Marking Period 1 Reading Guide - Washington Township Public

Marking Period 1 Reading Guide - Washington Township Public
Washington Township Public Schools
Grade 3
Reading
Crosswalk, Essential Standards, Pacing Guides, and Unit Plans
Marking Period 1
Language Arts/ Reading and Writing Crosswalk/ 2014-2015/ Grade 3
Reading
3
Writing
1st Marking Period
2nd Marking Period
3rd Marking Period
4th Marking Period
Traditional Literature/
Fiction
Nonfiction Unit
Historical Fiction
Mysteries
ES: RL 3.3, 3.4,3.6
ES: RL 3.3, 3.5, 3.9
Opinion
Supplemental
Persuasive Unit
Fiction/
Functional
BAW Units 4 & 6
ES: RL 3.2, 3.3, 3.7
Writing
Community/Narrative
BAW Units 1-3
ES: W 3.3, 3.4, 3.5,
3.10
ES: RI 3.1 – 3.10
Informative/
Explanatory
BAW Unit 5
ES: W 3.2, 3.4, 3.5,
3.7, 3.8, 3.10
ES: W.3.1, 3.4,
3.5, 3.6, 3.10
ES: W 3.2, 3.3,
3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.8,
3.10
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Reading Pacing Guide
Month
Units
Week #
Fiction Unit
SEPTEMBER
1
2
3
Revised 2014
Reading Focus (Essential Standard)










Introduction to Fiction
Elements of Fiction
Genre Characteristics
Introduction to Story Mapping
Essential Standards – RL 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
Introduce Realistic Fiction and Personal Narratives
Reader Response Prompts for Character Analysis
Character Traits
Essential Standards – RL 3.1, 3.3
Introduce Fantasy
Using text illustrations to make meaning
Character Analysis / Character Web
Essential Standards – RL 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.7
Additional Resources
Elements of Fiction
Genre Characteristics
Elements of Fiction Study Guide
Assorted Story Maps
Mentor Texts
Fountas & Pinnell First 20 Days
Character Trait List
Reader Response Prompts
Cool Character Organizer
Additional Character Organizers
Mentor Texts
Fountas & Pinnell First 20 Days
Making Meaning Volume 1
Mentor Texts
Fountas & Pinnell First 20 Days
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Reading Pacing Guide
Month
Units
Units
Reading Focus
Reading
(Essential
Focus (Essential
Standard)Standard)
Fiction Unit – Traditional Literature Focus
OCTOBER



4
5
6
7
Revised 2014
Introduction to traditional literature
Elements of traditional literature
Assign groups and introduce small group texts
Essential Standards RL – 3.1, 3.2



Common themes in traditional literature
Small group meetings/independent practice
Character analysis
Essential Standards RL – 3.1, 3.2, 3.3



Character Analysis
Small group meetings/independent practice
Indentifying and using context clues
Essential Standards RL – 3.1, 3.2, 3.3




Small group meetings/independent practice
Open ended questions for small groups
Finish up all small groups
Genre unit assessment
Essential Standards RL 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
Additional
AdditionalResources
Resources
Elements of traditional literature
Traditional literature story openers
Genre group books and reading packets
Mentor texts
Arrow to the Sun
Common Themes
Making Meaning Teacher’s Manual
Paper Bag Princess
Genre group books and reading packets
Mentor texts
Making Meaning Teacher’s Manual
Paper Bag Princess
Genre group books and reading packets
Mentor texts
Arrow to the Sun
Genre group books and reading packets
Mentor text
Assessment
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Reading Pacing Guide
Revised 2014
Fiction Unit ~ Traditional Literature Focus
Units
NOVEMBER
Month
Reading Focus (Essential Standard)
Open Week – NJEA Convention/In Service
8


9
Additional Resources
Genre Unit Assessment
Teaching summarization through fiction mentor texts and/or teaching
summarization through IDR books *use this to strengthen daily reading
logs so that students are summarizing their 20 minutes of reading
Essential Standards – RL 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
Open Week / American Education / Thanksgiving
Fiction Unit Assessment
Story Maps
Sample Reading Logs
Mentor texts
IDR books
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS
THIRD GRADE
FICTION UNIT
TEACHER RESOURCE GUIDE
Grade 3 – Fiction Unit – STANDARDS OVERVIEW
RL.3.1
Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring
explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers
VOCABULARY (words that are helpful in the instruction of this standard)
o
questioning/question
o
text evidence
o
ask
o
explicitly stated
o
answer
o
right there
o
text
o
thin question*
o
summarize
o
thick question
*this term is used in the last example under lesson plans; it refers to a factual “right there”
question that has an answer that can be found right in the text and answered with a few
words or a short sentence. The opposite term “thick question” refers to inferential questions
that require reasoning from the reader.
UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Students who can ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of text
and can refer to specific text to support their answers and to craft their question, should
have acquired an extensive academic vocabulary related to text including terms such as
text evidence, proof, thin questions, summarize, contract and compare, key details and
main idea, visualize, infer, thick and thin questions and answers, connections,
illustrations, digital and print text, and perceptions
When asking and answering questions about text, students demonstrate that they
can explicitly locate evidence in the text to support answers and to craft questions of a
factual nature (thin questions).
Students at this grade level are able to answer and ask both factual (thin) questions
and inferential (thick) questions that require reasoning from the reader.
When asking and answering questions during class or small group discussions of
text, students can connect responses to, and build on, what others have said.
When asking and answering questions during class or small group discussions of
text, students demonstrate the ability to draw from personal experience and/or from
other texts to provide further support to the evidence for answers found in the text.
Asking and answering questions about text prompts students to examine what
information they lack or what parts of the text are confusing.
Students who are able to explicitly draw evidence from text to support answers and
to formulate questions, can begin to develop and manage basic research projects.
Students who are able to explicitly draw evidence from text to support answers can
use that skill in writing in response to reading as well as developing oral presentations.
Students who can quickly and confidently locate explicit information in text to support
answers and questions demonstrate that they understand what they are reading and
can describe setting, plot (conflict and resolution), characters as well as identify key
details and the main idea or message.
Grade 3 – Fiction Unit – STANDARDS OVERVIEW
o
As students answer questions using explicit evidence found in text, they learn to
summarize, rather than read text evidence word-for-word.
QUESTIONS TO FOCUS INSTRUCTION
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
How does the ability to question and locate answers in the text help readers
understand and analyze text?
What strategies can be used to help students focus on the central message and key
details?
How does this standard support students utilizing questioning as a strategy during
their independent reading and writing?
How does the ability to locate information in text to support questions and answers
prepare students for writing projects, including research?
What strategies are useful in teaching question asking and answering (i.e. reciprocal
teaching; questioning the author; question and answer relationship)?
What cues can students learn to use to note relevant information (key details) in text
for future reference?
What academic vocabulary must students have developed in order to ask and
answer “who, what, where, when, why, and how” questions to demonstrate
understanding about text, including being able to refer to text (print or illustrations) to
support answers?
RL.3.2
Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures;
determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed
through key details in the text
VOCABULARY
o
o
o
o
recount/retell
fable
folktale
myth/mythology
o
o
o
o
diverse/diversity
cultures
message
lesson
o
o
o
o
o
moral
important
summary
key details
author’s purpose
INTEGRATION IDEA
o
o
o
Organizing and verbally describing events supports oral language development,
vocabulary acquisition, and speaking and listening standards across grade levels.
Retelling stories and summarizing are active reading comprehension strategies that
can be applied to a variety of texts across content areas.
Being able to retell and summarize is a prerequisite to and will support higher levels
of comprehension, such as synthesizing information, making inferences, and forming
opinions.
Grade 3 – Fiction Unit – STANDARDS OVERVIEW
o
o
o
Examining plot features of fables, folktales, and mythology will lead to discussion
and understanding of cultures and their history and traditions.
Focusing on key ideas and details to use in their retelling helps readers begin to
discern what is most important and relevant. This can be linked to written and oral
summaries in science, social studies, math, and other content areas.
Participating in retelling improves student understanding of narratives and their
structure, which helps students learn how to write their own stories.
QUESTIONS TO FOCUS INSTRUCTION
o
o
o
o
How does understanding plot features of fables, folktales, and myths support
comprehension
and recounting of these types of text?
What strategies can be used to help students focus on the central message and key
details?
How does the author use key details to convey the central message of the text?
RL.3.3
Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and
explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.
VOCABULARY
o
describe/description
o
characters
o
character traits
o
o
o
character
motivations
character feelings
actions
o
o
o
sequence
events
plot
INTEGRATION IDEAS
o
Verbally describing characters and related actions supports oral language
development,
o
vocabulary acquisition, and speaking and listening standards across grade levels.
o
Organizing information, describing relationships (i.e., how traits influence behaviors
and
o
actions), and summarizing are active reading comprehension strategies that can be
o
applied to a variety of texts and experiences across content areas. For example,
those same strategies can be utilized during scientific observations and discussions of
historical figures.
o
Being able to visualize and summarize character traits and actions are prerequisites
to and
o
will support higher levels of comprehension, such as synthesizing information,
making inferences, and forming opinions.
Grade 3 – Fiction Unit – STANDARDS OVERVIEW
o
o
o
o
o
o
Examining how the author directly describes characters and indirectly reveals traits
through
the characters’ actions will help students understand author’s purpose and to
distinguish between relevant vs. unimportant information in a variety of texts.
Comparing and contrasting character traits revealed by the author’s words versus
character
traits apparent in illustrations or visual representations would help students integrate
and analyze literature and arts.
Participating in character description and analysis improves student understanding
of
narratives and their structure, which helps students learn how to write their own
stories.
QUESTIONS TO FOCUS INSTRUCTION
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
How does understanding story elements, such as characters, actions, and
sequential events,
support comprehension of narrative texts?
What additional instructional support can be provided for students who struggle to
attend to the
important elements of text?
What strategies can be used to help students describe the characters and related
actions and events?
How does character description and analysis contribute to the overall
comprehension of
narrative stories?
RL.3.7
Explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is
conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a
character or setting).
VOCABULARY
o
illustrations
o
setting
o
perspective
o
o
o
mood
message
visual clues
o
o
o
character
interpretation
information
UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD
o
Students who are able to explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations
contribute to what is conveyed by words about characters, setting, or mood demonstrate
an understanding of the roles of the illustrator and author and how the illustrator and
author work together to help the reader “make meaning”.
Grade 3 – Fiction Unit – STANDARDS OVERVIEW
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Explaining how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is
conveyed by words in the story requires students to read text or hear text read and
visualize what is conveyed by the words read and heard. This visualization supports
student’s analysis of text illustrations and helps students connect illustrations to words in
text.
Students who are able to explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations
contribute to what is conveyed by words about mood demonstrate an understanding of
what the term mood means and can identify a variety of moods. They are able to infer
mood when the mood is not stated using key details and illustrations.
Students who are able to explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations
contribute to what is conveyed by words about mood, characters, or setting use an
extensive academic vocabulary related to reading literature acquired over several years.
They have a deep understanding of terms such as characters, mood, setting,
illustrations, analyze, connect, support, text, making inferences and use these terms
correctly and with ease.
Explaining how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is
conveyed by words in the story regarding characters and setting requires students to
have a deep understanding of key details of the characters and setting and be able to
connect those details as described by words in the text to specific aspects of
illustrations.
Explaining how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is
conveyed by words in the story requires that students analyze illustrations for clues that
support or enhance their understanding of characters or setting.
Understanding the meaning of visuals within a text is an essential skill for students in
grades K-12 and crosses all content areas.
The ability to analyze the relationship between visual information and written
information is crucial to grasping both specific points and broader meanings of a text.
Learning how to integrate information from multiple sources assists students in
developing such higher order thinking skills as synthesizing, analyzing and evaluating,
which are necessary for all content areas.
Considering the choices authors and illustrators make in telling a story can help
students in making such choices in their own writing.
QUESTIONS TO FOCUS INSTRUCTION
o
In what ways do illustrations support the comprehension of a text?
o
What strategies or activities help students analyze illustrations, analyze text about
characters, setting and mood, and, then, connect the two.
o
What skills, knowledge, and academic vocabulary must students have mastered in
order to connect specific aspects of illustrations to specific words in text about
character, setting, and mood that the illustrations support?
o
How does each illustration provide clues about the story’s mood, characters, and
setting?
o
Do the illustrations convey a particular character’s point of view?
FICTION GENRE UNIT – PACING GUIDE
Essential Standards: 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.7, 3.10
Whole Class
Week 1
Intro To
Genre and
to Story
Mapping
Whole Class
Whole Class
Introduce the Introduce
genre:
the genre:
Fiction
Fiction
Elements of
Characteristic Fiction
s and different *suggested
types of
mentor text
fiction
read aloud
Officer
Buckle and
Gloria
Introduce
Story Maps
Reread
yesterday’s
story and
complete a
story map
*suggested
mentor text
read aloud
Officer
Buckle and
Gloria
Whole Class
Review
realistic
fiction and
read an
example
mentor text
*suggested
Whole Class
&
Independent
(repeat
yesterday’s
lesson with a
different
text)
Students will
complete
reader
response
prompt(s) for
today’s read
*suggested
mentor texts
Grandma’s
Records,
Aunt
Flossie’s
Hats
Whole Class
Review
personal
narrative
(may note it is
also our process
writing piece)
Read aloud
Week 2
from mentor
texts Boundless
Realistic
text and
Grace , A
Fiction & Day’s Work
continue
focusing on
Personal Focusing on
characters
Narratives the
Reader
and actions
character(s)
Response and their
Introduce
Prompts for actions
and practice
Characters and give
reader
character trait response
prompts
examples
Independent
Practice:
Story
Mapping
Review Story
Mapping
Choose a
short/easy
mentor text
*suggested text
Miss Nelson is
Missing
Students will
complete a
story map
Whole Class
Whole Class
Review
characteristics
of a personal
Narrative and
review
character
traits
Read aloud a
personal
narrative
*suggested
mentor texts
Alexander
Who is Not
Going to
Move, Mailing
May
Model how to
complete a
character trait
graphic
organizer
Whole Class
&
Independent
(repeat
yesterday’s
lesson with a
different text)
Students will
complete their
own
Character
Trait Graphic
Organizer
Review
Realistic
Fiction and
read aloud
from a
selected
mentor text
*suggested
texts
Boundless
Grace , A
Day’s Work
Whole Class
Review
Fantasy
Read aloud
The Spooky
Tail of Prewitt
Week 3
Peacock and
Fantasy
follow the
& Text
corresponding
Illustrations
Making
& Main
Meaning
Character
lesson
Whole Class
(continue
yesterday’s
lesson from
Making
Meaning)
Focus on
how the text
illustrations
help convey
the meaning
Whole Class
Review the
elements of
fantasy
Read aloud
Julius Baby
of the World
and follow
the
correspondin
g Making
Meaning
lesson:
Making
Meaning
Unit 3, week
2, day 1
Whole Class
Review the
elements of
fantasy
Julius Baby of
the World
follow the
corresponding
Making
Meaning
lesson:
Making
Meaning Unit
3, week 2,
day 2
Whole Class
Review the
elements of
fantasy
Julius Baby of
the World
follow the
corresponding
Making
Meaning
lesson:
Making
Meaning Unit
3, week 2,
day 3
Whole Class Lesson # 1
What is Fiction?
Essential Standard Common Core 3.1, 3.2
Overview:
This lesson introduces the genre of fiction and explores the main subgenres
Classroom Resources:
Elements of Fiction
Genre Characteristics
Various examples of fictional texts
Instruction and Activities:
1. Introduce the term “Fiction” and have students give examples of fictional texts
that they have read
2. Explain that there are many different types of fiction and share the 6 subgenres
(fantasy, personal narrative, historical, mystery, realistic, and science)
3. After reviewing some characteristics of each subgenre have students share
examples of books that they are familiar with that may fit under one of the
subgenres
Student Assessment/Reflections:
Informally assess student participation. While students are participating, reflect on their
answers, giving feedback to help them expand and develop ideas.
** Follow Fountas & Pinnell “First 20 Days” to structure IDR time
Elements of Fiction
Theme
A theme is the main idea of the story. When writers have a story idea, they develop their
story around a theme. They have a specific message they want to reveal to readers.
Settings
A setting reveals the location as well as the time period of a story. A setting can take
place in a house, school, castle, outer space, forest, hospital, or anywhere writers want to
develop their scenes. A setting can also take place in the past, present or future.
Characters
The characters in a story can be people or animals. There is one main character in the
story. This character has some kind of problem he/she experiences throughout the story.
There are other characters in the story who can either help the main character with
his/her problem or hinder the main character from overcoming his/her goal.
Plots
Plots are the structure of the story. A plot of a story is simply the sequence of events in a
story. They reveal the characters and what the main character experiences throughout
the story. The structure occurs in order of the events that happen to the main character.
Point of View
Point of view is the viewpoint of the story. Writers use first person point of view or third
person point of view. In first person point of view, the main character tells the story. In
third person point of view, the narrator tells the story.
Genre Characteristics
Fantasy :





contains elements that are not realistic
talking animals
magical
often set in a medieval universe
possibly involves mythical beings
Personal Narrative:




told in a first person point of view
describes something that happened to the narrator and is usually true
includes the author’s feelings about the experience and the lesson learned
uses sensory and emotional details
Historical Fiction:


stories centered around the basis of a partially historical situation
a novel set in a historical period
Mystery:






strangeness
solving a puzzling event or situation
something unknown
solving a crime
centered around a person who is investigating a wrongdoing
centered around finding out secret information
Realistic Fiction:


stories take place in modern times
characters are involved in events that could happen
Science Fiction:


stories that tell about science and technology of the future
settings are usually: in the future, in space, on a different planet, in a different
universe or dimension
Whole Class Lesson # 2
Elements of Fiction
Essential Standard Common Core 3.1, 3.2
Overview:
This lesson introduces the specific elements of fiction
Classroom Resources:
Elements of Fiction
Genre Characteristics
Officer Buckle and Gloria – MM Unit 1 *or other mentor text
Instruction and Activities:
1. Introduce the class to the “Elements of Fiction”
2. Explain each element in detail (there are two different guides depending on how
in depth you want to go)
3. Read Officer Buckle and Gloria aloud and discuss with the class
4. Have students determine the type of fiction the story is and have students identify
some of the elements in the story that they heard
Student Assessment/Reflections:
Informally assess student participation. You may also choose to repeat this lesson with
other texts and add in a more formal means of assessment on the “Elements of Fiction.”
Use class discussion to monitor general comprehension. While students are participating,
reflect on their answers, giving feedback to help them expand and develop ideas.
** Follow Fountas & Pinnell “First 20 Days” to structure IDR time
Whole Class Lesson # 3
Introducing a Story Map
Essential Standard Common Core 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
Overview:
This lesson uses the elements of fiction to introduce summarizing techniques through use
of story mapping
Classroom Resources:
Elements of Fiction
Any of the included samples of story maps
Officer Buckle and Gloria MM Unit 1 *or other mentor text that you read for yesterday’s
lesson
Instruction and Activities:
1. Review the elements of fiction paying close attention to the plot and how the
events are sequenced in the story that was read yesterday
2. Recap yesterday’s story and orally discuss the sequence of events in the story
3. Reread yesterday’s mentor text aloud and have students add any important events
they may have missed
4. Introduce students to the concept of a story map and why it is important for
comprehension as well as a great way to build up summarization skills for future
reading log assignments
5. Choose any sample map you’d like and either pass out individual copies or place
one on the document camera. Guide the students in completing the story map
together as a whole class
Student Assessment/Reflections:
Informally assess student participation. While students are participating, reflect on their
answers, giving feedback to help them expand and develop ideas. In addition, if students
completed maps on their own through guided instructions, they may be collected to check
for understanding.
** Follow Fountas & Pinnell “First 20 Days” to structure IDR time
Title ______________________________________________________________
Beginning
Middle
End
Plot / Story Sequence
Whole Class Lesson # 4
Independent Practice: Story Mapping
Essential Standard Common Core 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
Overview:
This lesson gives the students an opportunity to complete a story map individually. It is
important that students get familiar with this task as it will be required throughout the
unit. Story mapping is also a great preface to summarizing and will aid students as they
begin their independent reading logs.
Classroom Resources:
Any of the included samples of story maps
Miss Nelson is Missing – MM Unit 1 *or other mentor text
Instruction and Activities:
1. Review the elements of fiction paying close attention to the plot and how the
events are sequenced a story
2. Review whichever story map organizer you’ll be using with the class before
reading the text
3. Read aloud from mentor text of your choice
4. Lead the class in beginning a story map for the mentor text
5. Have the students finish the map individually
Student Assessment/Reflections:
Collect the story map assignment to check for understanding.
Whole Class Lesson # 5
Introducing Realistic Fiction
Essential Standard Common Core 3.1, 3.3
Overview:
This lesson defines realistic fiction and exposes the students to a realistic fiction text. It
also focuses on main character and character traits
Classroom Resources:
Suggested Mentor texts (but may choose any example of realistic fiction):
Boundless Grace – MM Unit 3
A Day’s Work – MM Unit4
Keepers – MM Unit 8
Instruction and Activities:
1. Introduce and define “Realistic Fiction”
2. Discuss ways it may be different from the types of fiction that students read for
the last two lessons
3. Read aloud from a realistic fiction mentor text. Before reading, ask students to
pay close attention to the main character and how the main character may be
feeling
4. Discuss the story and have students talk about how the character was feeling and
or what they may have been thinking. Use their answers to begin a discussion on
how the main character’s behavior led to the sequence of events
5. Briefly introduce the concept of “character trait”
Student Assessment/Reflections:
Informally assess student participation. While students are participating, reflect on their
answers, giving feedback to help them expand and develop ideas.
** Follow Fountas & Pinnell “First 20 Days” to structure IDR time
Whole Class Lesson # 6
Exploring Characterization Through Realistic Fiction
Essential Standard Common Core 3.1, 3.3
Overview:
This lesson uses a realistic fiction text to explore character traits and how a character’s
traits lead to the events in a story
Classroom Resources:
Character Trait List
Boundless Grace MM Unit 3
A Day’s Work MM Unit 4 *or other realistic fiction mentor text
Instruction and Activities:
1. Review realistic fiction and discuss the character from yesterday’s story
2. Define “Character Trait” and pass out a list of character traits for students to read
through. Help them to understand any unknown traits.
3. Have students volunteer some traits from their list that best fit the character from
yesterday’s story.
4. Read aloud from a different realistic fiction mentor text. Have students pay close
attention to the character’s traits.
5. Discuss the story and have students volunteer some character traits that they feel
the main character displayed. Further the discussion by having students share
how that particular trait led to the characters actions and plot sequence
Student Assessment/Reflections:
Informally assess student participation. While students are participating, reflect on their
answers, giving feedback to help them expand and develop ideas.
** Follow Fountas & Pinnell “First 20 Days” to structure IDR time
humble
brave
courageous
serious
funny
humorous
sad
resourceful
stubborn
loyal
gullible
handsome
caring
carefree
selfish
unselfish
generous
self-confident
respectful
considerate
imaginative
inventive
creative
independent
studious
intelligent
honest
mischievous
friendly
adventurous
hard-working
timid
shy
bold
daring
dainty
busy
lazy
patriotic
fun-loving
successful
responsible
helpful
dreamer
happy
disagreeable
conceited
leader
demanding
bossy
gentle
loving
proud
wild
messy
neat
joyful
cooperative
lovable
ambitious
quiet
curious
witty
fighter
determined
energetic
cheerful
thoughtful
calm
mannerly
rude
mean
Whole Class Lesson # 7
Responding to Personal Narratives/Character Analysis
Essential Standard Common Core 3.1, 3.3
Overview:
This lesson uses a personal narrative mentor text and reader response prompts to further
reflect on characterization
Classroom Resources:
Character Trait List
Reader Response Prompts
Grandma’s Records BAW
Aunt Flossie’s Hats MM Unit 2 *or other personal narrative mentor text
Instruction and Activities:
1. Review yesterday’s lesson and read aloud from a personal narrative mentor text
2. Ask students to pay close attention to the characters thoughts and feelings as they
listen to a sample narrative.
3. Read the reader response prompts to the class and use them as a springboard for
discussion.
Student Assessment/Reflections:
Informally assess student participation. While students are participating, reflect on their
answers, giving feedback to help them expand and develop ideas.
** Follow Fountas & Pinnell “First 20 Days” to structure IDR time
Reader Response Prompts (RL 3.3)
*suggested prompts for Fiction Unit week two
1. Explain a character’s problem and then offer your character advice on
how to solve his/her problem.
2. Explain how a character is acting and why you think the character is
acting that way.
3. Pick one character and explain why you would/would not like to have
him/her as a friend.
4. What real-life people or events are you reminded of by characters or
events in the story? Explain why.
5. Write about what would happen if you brought one of your characters to
school or home for a day.
6. Pick a scene in which you disagreed with how a character handled a
situation and rewrite it in the way you think it should have happened.
7. How does the character’s actions affect other people in the story?
Whole Class Lesson # 8
Personal Narratives/Character Analysis
Essential Standard Common Core 3.1, 3.3
Overview:
This lesson uses a personal narrative mentor text and reader response prompts to further
reflect on characterization
Classroom Resources:
Character Trait List
Reader Response Prompts
Grandma’s Records – BAW
Aunt Flossie’s Hats MM Unit 2 *or other personal narrative mentor text
Instruction and Activities:
1. Review yesterday’s lesson and read aloud from a personal narrative mentor text
2. Ask students to pay close attention to the characters thoughts and feelings as they
listen to a sample narrative
3. Have students choose 2 reader response prompts to complete for the story. It may
be suggested to review and/or directly teach answering open ended questions
prior to this lesson.
Student Assessment/Reflections:
Collect and assess the reader response prompts
** Follow Fountas & Pinnell “First 20 Days” to structure IDR time
Whole Class Lesson # 9
Personal Narratives/Character Analysis
Essential Standard Common Core 3.1, 3.3
Overview:
This lesson uses a personal narrative mentor text and a graphic organizer to further reflect
on characterization
Classroom Resources:
Character Trait List
Cool Character organizer
Alexander Who is Not Going to Move MM Unit 3
Mailing May MM Unit 4 *or other personal narrative mentor text
Instruction and Activities:
1. Read aloud from a personal narrative mentor text
2. Ask students to pay close attention to the characters thoughts and feelings as they
listen to a sample narrative.
3. Share the Cool Character graphic organizer (or other character analysis activity of
your choice) on the document camera
4. Complete the activity as a whole class for the character from today’s mentor text
Student Assessment/Reflections:
Informally assess student participation. While students are participating, reflect on their
answers, giving feedback to help them expand and develop ideas.
** Follow Fountas & Pinnell “First 20 Days” to structure IDR time
Name: _____________________
Date:________
Character traits are
adjectives that
describe what a
character is like. They are
identified or inferred by
what a character says, how
a character acts, and by
what people say
about them.
Character
Trait
Support for Trait
Whole Class Lesson # 10
Personal Narrative / Character Analysis
Essential Standard Common Core 3.1, 3.3
Overview:
This lesson uses a personal narrative mentor text to have students independently complete
a character analysis assignment
Classroom Resources:
Character Trait List
Cool Character organizer
Alexander Who is Not Going to Move MM Unit 3
Mailing May MM Unit 4 *or other personal narrative mentor text
Instruction and Activities:
1. Read aloud from a personal narrative mentor text
2. Ask students to pay close attention to the characters thoughts and feelings as they
listen to a sample narrative.
3. Have students complete the Cool Character graphic organizer (or other character
analysis activity of your choice) individually based on today’s text
Student Assessment/Reflections:
Collect and assess assignment
** Follow Fountas & Pinnell “First 20 Days” to structure IDR time
Name ___________________________
Date ____________________
Character Analysis
Pyramid
Name/Title
Physical Appearance
Character’s Role
Problems / Challenges
Character Accomplishments
Whole Class Lessons # 11 & 12
Fantasy / Text Illustrations
Essential Standard Common Core 3.1, 3.7
Overview:
This lesson introduces students to a fantasy text and has students pay close attention to
how the illustrations help with understanding. This lesson uses the making meaning
series to cover essential standard 3.7.
Classroom Resources:
The Spooky Tale of Prewitt Peacock
Making Meaning Teacher’s Manual, Volume 1
Instruction and Activities:
1. Follow the Meaning Teacher’s Manual pages 56 -62 (days 1 & 2) The
visualization lesson on Prewitt Peacock is a great way to have students reflect on
how illustrations help convey the words in a story
Student Assessment/Reflections:
Informally assess student participation. While students are participating, reflect on their
answers, giving feedback to help them expand and develop ideas.
** Follow Fountas & Pinnell “First 20 Days” to structure IDR time
Whole Class Lessons # 13 - 15
Fantasy / Characterization
Essential Standard Common Core 3.1, 3.3
Overview:
This lesson exposes students to another fantasy text and has students revisit character
analysis specifically through inferencing. These lessons use the making meaning series.
Classroom Resources:
Julius, the Baby of the World
Making Meaning Teacher’s Manual, Volume 1
Instruction and Activities:
1. Follow the Meaning Teacher’s Manual pages 102 – 116 (days 1 - 3). The story
Julius was a good example of fantasy and the corresponding lesson further
develops essential standard 3.3
Student Assessment/Reflections:
Informally assess student participation. While students are participating, reflect on their
answers, giving feedback to help them expand and develop ideas. Another option is
using the Reader Response Prompts, Cool Character Chart, or Story Map.
** Follow Fountas & Pinnell “First 20 Days” to structure IDR time
Fiction Unit Appendix
Grade 3
Weeks 1-3
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS
THIRD GRADE
GENRE UNIT : TRADITIONAL LITERATURE
TEACHER RESOURCE GUIDE
Written by:
Third Grade Genre Unit Committee
Under the Direction of :
Jessica Rose, Elementary Education Supervisor
Christine Gehringer, Elementary Education Supervisor
Beth Niederman, Elementary Education Supervisor
Linda Thomas, Elementary Eudcation Supervisor
Gretchen Gerber, Director of Elementary Education
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Genre Overview / Title Selections……………………………………………………
1
Common Core Content Standards – Unit Focus…….......................…..……………
3
Reading Calendar / Weekly Pacing Guide….………………………………………..
6
Whole Class Lesson Plans ……………………………………………………………
9
Section/Weekly Materials ………………………………………………….............
28
Section 1 ……………………………………………………………………….
29
Advanced Level
 Overview
 Instruction Resources (worksheets, graphic organizers, etc.)
Average Level
 Overview
 Instruction Resources (worksheets, graphic organizers, etc.)
Basic Level
 Overview
 Instruction Resources (worksheets, graphic organizers, etc.)
Special Education Option
 Overview
 Instruction Resources (worksheets, graphic organizers, etc.)
Section 2……………………………………………………………………….
Advanced Level
 Overview
 Instruction Resources (worksheets, graphic organizers, etc.)
Average Level
 Overview
 Instruction Resources (worksheets, graphic organizers, etc.)
Basic Level
 Overview
 Instruction Resources (worksheets, graphic organizers, etc.)
35
Special Education Option
 Overview
 Instruction Resources (worksheets, graphic organizers, etc.)
Section 3……………………………………………………………………….
41
Advanced Level
 Overview
 Instruction Resources (worksheets, graphic organizers, etc.)
Average Level
 Overview
 Instruction Resources (worksheets, graphic organizers, etc.)
Basic Level
 Overview
 Instruction Resources (worksheets, graphic organizers, etc.)
Special Education Option
 Overview
 Instruction Resources (worksheets, graphic organizers, etc.)
Section 4……………………………………………………………………….
54
Advanced Level
 Overview
 Instruction Resources (worksheets, graphic organizers, etc.)
Average Level
 Overview
 Instruction Resources (worksheets, graphic organizers, etc.)
Basic Level
 Overview
 Instruction Resources (worksheets, graphic organizers, etc.)
Special Education Option
 Overview
 Instruction Resources (worksheets, graphic organizers, etc.)
Assessments /Appendix………………………………………………………………
59
TRADITIONAL LITERATURE UNIT / TITLE SELECTIONS
Traditional Literature: Stories that are passed down orally or in writing from one
generation to the next. It is described as being “a window through which children in
today’s world may view cultures from long ago”. This includes, but is not limited to
folktales, legends, fables, fairy tales, tall tales, and myths from different cultures.
Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters An African Tale by John Steptoe
Title # 1
Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters is an African tale that has been compared to the story
of Cinderella. Mufaro has two daughters who must pass a series of tests in order
for one of them to be considered a wife for the great king. As Manyara and Nyasha
journey to meet the great king, they are each tested by Nyoka, a little garden snake,
in his various disguises. In a surprise ending, Nyoka is revealed to be the great king
himself.
(High Book)
Paul Bunyan A Tall Tale Retold and Illustrated by Steven Kellogg
Title # 2
Paul Bunyan tells the famous tale of Paul Bunyan and his pal Babe, the blue ox.
For those who have never heard the tale, it tells of Paul’s extraordinary size and
strength, even as a baby. His adventures include digging the Great Lakes and
gouging out the Grand Canyon. The illustrations throughout this book depict the
many adventures of the pair of loveable giants, Paul and Babe.
(Average Book)
1
TRADITIONAL LITERATURE / TITLE SELECTIONS
Rumplestiltskin retold and illustrated by Paul O. Zelinksky
Title # 3
One of the Grimm’s most famous tales, Rumplestiltskin begins with the miller’s
daughter being locked in a room and forced to spin straw into gold for the king. If
she is unable to do this, her life will be at stake. The events that unfold in this room
include a little man by the name of Rumplestiltskin who comes to the woman’s aid.
However, he chooses to help her under certain conditions, one being that she gives
him her first unborn child. Will she be able to fulfill the king’s orders?
(Low Book)
Seven Blind Mice by Ed Young
When seven blind mice go out one by one to investigate the strange “Something”
by the pond, each comes back with a different idea of what it is. Argue as they
might, they can not agree.
Title # 4
Only when the last mouse ventures out and investigates, do they finally learn for
certain what the strange “Something” is, and what the whole truth is as well. This
tale based on the ancient fable of “The Blind Men and the Elephant” concludes with
a “mouse moral”.
(Spec. Ed.)
2
COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS FOR ENGLISH AND LITERACY
TRADITIONAL LITERATURE UNIT FOCUS
GRADE 3
Reading Standards for Literature K-5
Key Ideas and Details
RL 1
Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to
the text as the basis for the answers.
RL 2
Recount stories including fables, folktales and myths from diverse cultures. Determine
the central message, lesson or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details
in the text.
RL 3
Describe characters in a story (e.g. their traits, motivations or feelings) and explain how
their actions contribute to the sequence of events.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
RL 7
Explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by
the words in a story (e.g. create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting).
RL By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry
at the high end of the grades 2–3 text complexity band independently and proficiently
3
5HODWHG6WDQGDUGV
Speaking and Listening Standards K-5
Comprehension and Collaboration
SL 1
Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussion (one-on-one, in groups, and
teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade three topics and text, building on others’ ideas
and expressing their own clearly.
SL 1.b
Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g. gaining the floor in respectful ways,
listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under
discussion).
SL 1.c
Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on topic, and link
their comments to the remarks of others.
SL 1.d
Explain their own ideas and understanding in the light of discussion.
SL 3
Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate
elaboration and detail.
Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
SL 4
Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount and experience with appropriate facts and
relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.
SL 6
Speak in complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to provide
requested detail or clarification (See grade 3 language standards 1 and 3 for specific
expectations).
4
Language Standards K-5
Conventions of Standard English
L1
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English, grammar and usage when
writing or speaking.
L2
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English, capitalization,
punctuation and spelling when writing.
L3
Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading or
listening.
Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
L4
Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases
based on grade three reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
L 4.a
Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
L5
Demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
5
TRADITIONAL LITERATURE UNIT – PACING GUIDE
Essential Standards: 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.7, 3.10
Week 4
Intro. to
Traditional
Literature
Week 5
Traditional
Literature
Whole Class
Lesson 16
Day 1
Introduce the
Elements of
Traditional
Literature
and have
students give
examples of
different types
of traditional
literature
*suggested
mentor text
titles included
Whole Class
Lesson 18
Day 3
Present the
definition of
theme and list
common
themes in
traditional
literature
Whole Class
Lesson 17
Day 2
Review
yesterday’s
lesson
Read aloud
from a
mentor text
Have
students pick
out elements
of traditional
literature
from the read
aloud
Whole Class
(repeat
yesterday’s
lesson with a
different
mentor text
for extra
practice)
Whole Class
Lesson 19
Day 4
Read Aloud
Arrow to the
Sun
Class
discussion of
themes
Open ended
question
Independent/
Genre
Reading
Groups
Book 1: read
pgs 8-13
Book 2: read
pgs 11-17
Book 3: read
pgs 8-13
Book 4: read
pgs 11-20
Introduce
vocabulary for
section 2 and
use “Think,
Draw, Write”
*Assign
books and
guided
reading
packets
Independent/
Genre Reading
Groups
Book 1: read
pgs 1 – 7
Book 2: read
pgs 1 -10
Book 3: read
pgs 1 – 7
Book 4: read
pgs 1 – 10
Introduce
vocabulary for
section 1 and
use “Think,
Draw, Write”
Independent/
Genre
Reading
Groups
Book 1: read
pgs 8-13
Book 2: read
pgs 11-17
Book 3: read
pgs 8-13
Book 4: read
pgs 11-20
Introduce
vocabulary for
section 2 and
use “Think,
Draw, Write”
Independent/
Genre
Reading
Groups
Book 1: read
pgs 1 – 7
Book 2: read
pgs 1 -10
Book 3: read
pgs 1 – 7
Book 4: read
pgs 1 – 10
Relate to
genre
overview:
Ingredients
for
Traditional
Literature
wksht
Whole
Class
Lesson 20
Day 5
Identifying
and
Utilizing
Context
Clues
6
Independent/
Genre
Reading
Groups
Making
Making
Book 1: read
Inferences
Inferences
Use The Paper Use The Paper pgs 14-23
Bag Princess
Bag Princess
Book 2: read
and the
and the
pgs 14-19
Making
Making
Book 3: read
Week 6
Meaning
Meaning
pgs 18-26
Traditional
Lesson Unit 3, Lesson Unit 3, Book 4: read
Literature
Week 1, Days Week 1, Days pgs 21-28
1&2
1&2
Meet in small
group
Whole Class
Lesson 21
Whole Class
Lesson 22
Independent/
Genre
Reading
Groups
Book 1: read
pgs 14-23
Book 2: read
pgs 14-19
Book 3: read
pgs 18-26
Book 4: read
pgs 21-28
Independent/
Genre
Reading
Groups
Book 1: read
pgs 24-30
Book 2:
read pgs 2027
Book 3: read
pgs 27-35
Book 4: read
pgs 29-36
Meet in small
group
Introduce
vocabulary
for section
3.
Independent/
Genre
Reading
Groups
Book 1: read
pgs 24-30
Book 2: read
pgs 20-27
Week 7
Book 3: read
Traditional pgs 27-35
Literature Book 4: read
pgs 29-36
Independent/
Genre
Reading
Groups
Independent/
Genre
Reading
Groups
All groups
will finish
their books
All groups
will finish
their books
Independent/
Genre
Reading
Groups
Genre Unit
Assessment
Open ended
questions for
individual
Genre
Reading
Introduce
Introduce
vocabulary for vocabulary for Groups
section 4
section 4
Introduce
vocabulary for
section 3.
7
Week 8
(end of
mp)
Teaching
summarization
through
fiction mentor
texts and/or
teaching
summarization
through IDR
books
*use this to
strengthen
daily reading
logs so that
students are
summarizing
what they read
for the 20 min.
Teaching
summarization
through
fiction mentor
texts and/or
teaching
summarization
through IDR
books
*use this to
strengthen
daily reading
logs so that
students are
summarizing
what they read
for the 20 min
Teaching
summarization
through
fiction mentor
texts and/or
teaching
summarization
through IDR
books
*use this to
strengthen
daily reading
logs so that
students are
summarizing
what they read
for the 20 min
Teaching
summarization
through
fiction mentor
texts and/or
teaching
summarization
through IDR
books
*use this to
strengthen
daily reading
logs so that
students are
summarizing
what they read
for the 20 min
Administer
Marking
Period BM
Assessment
8
Whole Class Lesson # 16
(Traditional Lit. Day 1)
What is Traditional Literature?
Exploring and Identifying Elements of Traditional Literature
Essential Standard Common Core 3.2
Overview:
This lesson teaches students about the plot structure, characters, style, setting and theme
of traditional literature.
Students identify the characteristics of traditional literature through class discussions.
Classroom Resources:
Elements of Traditional Literature List
Traditional Story Language List
Chart paper
Overhead Projector/Document Camera
Elements of Traditional Literature Wordsearch (Found in Assessment Section)
Instructional Plan:
Familiarize yourself with the components and language of Traditional Literature. This
includes, but is not limited to folktales, fairytales, legends, fables, tall tales and myths.
Since most students are familiar with some form of Traditional Literature, begin by
asking them to share the names of various genres that they know. As they share titles, list
them on the board or on chart paper. You may chose to make copies of “Elements of
Traditional Literature” and/or “Traditional Story Language” as visual aids.
Instruction and Activities:
1.
Ask students if they have ever read any traditional literature stories, and if so, what their
favorites are. Record their responses on chart paper.
2.
Show students the Elements of Traditional Literature list and review any aspects you have
not already discussed. Leave the sheet up where students can see it.
3.
Ask students to think about the kind of words they might find in traditional literature.
Record their responses on chart paper.
4.
Show students the Traditional Story Language list and review any ideas you have not
already discussed. Leave the sheet up where students can see it.
5.
Talk with students about the different elements found in Traditional Literature. Inform the
students that they will be working in groups reading a specific book in this genre.
9
Student Assessment/Reflections:
Informally assess students' comprehension of the elements of Traditional Literature
during group discussions. While students are participating, reflect on their answers,
giving feedback to help them expand and develop ideas.
10
Elements of Traditional Literature List
1. Theme (usually deals with conflict or contrast)
 good vs. evil
 weak vs. strong
 innocence vs. wise
 clever vs. foolish
2. Plot (the storyline or events)
 fast-paced development of events
 problem or conflict that needs to be solved
 usually has a happy ending
3. Characters
 human/superhuman (exaggerated)
 hero/heroine
 magical people, animals or objects
4. Setting
 any time
 any place
5. Style
 events sometimes occur in patterns of 3 or 7
 stories end with a lesson or moral
 sometimes relate to a specific culture
11
Traditional Story Language List
Story Openers:
Once upon a time…
Long, long ago…
Once there was…
In a faraway kingdom…
Repeating Phrases:
Little pig, little pig, let me come in.
Mirror, mirror on the wall, who is the fairest of them
all?
Grandma, what big _______ you have!
Traditional Endings:
They lived happily ever after!
…and nothing was heard of the _______ ever again.
The moral of the story is _____________.
12
Whole Class Lesson # 17
(Traditional Lit. Day 2)
Exploring and Identifying Elements of Traditional Literature
Essential Standard Common Core 3.2
Overview:
This lesson will give students the opportunity to identify the elements of Traditional
Literature through a read aloud.
.
Classroom Resources:
Elements of Traditional Literature List
Elements Found in Traditional Literature Table
Traditional Story Language List
List of Traditional Literature Books
Chart paper
Overhead Projector/Document Camera
Elements Found in Traditional Lit. List
Arrow to the Sun, Paper Bag Princess, Knots on a Counting Rope or any other example
of traditional literature to use as a mentor text
Instructional Plan:
Briefly review the elements of Traditional Literature from the previous lesson. Read
aloud one of the Traditional Literature mentor texts and ask students to use their prior
knowledge to identify elements of Traditional Literature.
Instruction and Activities:
1. Show the class the front cover and opening pages of the mentor text selected.
2. Read aloud the first few pages of the mentor text. Ask the students to identify any elements
of Traditional Literature that they have heard. Allow the students to record these ideas on
post-it notes or in a Reader’s Notebook.
3. Continue reading aloud to midway through the story. Once again ask the students to identify
any elements; specifically a problem, magical elements or repetition. Allow students time to
record.
4. Continue reading aloud to the end of the story. One final time, have the students identify any
new elements that they have noticed. Again, have the students record their ideas.
5. Come together and share their findings as a group.
13
Student Assessment/Reflections:
Informally assess students' comprehension of the elements of Traditional Literature
during group discussions. While students are participating, reflect on their answers,
giving feedback to help them expand and develop ideas.
14
Elements of Traditional Literature List
1. Theme (usually deals with conflict or contrast)
 good vs. evil
 weak vs. strong
 innocence vs. wise
 clever vs. foolish
2. Plot (the storyline or events)
 fast-paced development of events
 problem or conflict that needs to be solved
 usually has a happy ending
3. Characters
 human/superhuman (exaggerated)
 hero/heroine
 magical people, animals or objects
4. Setting
 any time
 any place
5. Style
 events sometimes occur in patterns of 3 or 7
 stories end with a lesson or moral
 sometimes relate to a specific culture
15
Sample List of Traditional Literature Books
This list includes books that fall under the category of sub-genres
that make up Traditional Literature.
Pecos Bill
Johnny Appleseed
Jack and the Beanstalk
Cinderella
Little Red Riding Hood
Anansi the Spider
Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears
The Rough Faced Girl
The True Story of the Three Little Pigs
The Tortoise and the Hare
Aesop’s Fables
Three Billy Goats Gruff
Sleeping Beauty
Hansel and Gretel
The Emperor’s New Clothes
The Gingerbread Man
The Frog Prince
The Princess and the Pea
The Ugly Duckling
American Tall Tales
16
Lon Po Po
Coyote
The Spider Weaver
The Seven Chinese Brothers
The Talking Eggs
The Nightingale
Borreguita and the Coyote
The Legend of the Indian Paintbrush
The Tale of Tricky Fox
The Rooster Who Went to His Uncle’s Wedding
The Little Brown Jay
Pandora’s Box
The Twelve Tasks of Heracles
King Midas
The Odyssey
The Old Hermit and the Boy Who Couldn’t Stop Laughing
There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly
Juan Bobo
The Banza
…and many more.
17
Elements Found in Traditional Literature








Title
Opening - Once upon a time...and they lived happily ever after.
Good character
Evil character
Royalty and/or a castle usually present
Magic happens
Animals talk and come to the rescue
Use this chart when being
Moral lesson of the story
with books from the genre
Problem and a Solution
"element detectives"
Opening
Evil
Character
Royalty
Animals
or
Magic
castle
Moral
Good
character
of Traditional Literature
Problem/Solution
18
Whole Class Lesson # 18
(Traditional Lit Day 3)
What is a theme?
Essential Standard Common Core 3.2
Overview:
This lesson teaches students to identify “theme” as it applies to traditional literature.
Classroom Resources:
Definition of Theme & List of Common Themes (Teacher Resource)
Teacher Selected Book from List of Traditional Literature Books
Instructional Plan:
Familiarize yourself with the definition of theme as it applies to traditional literature.
Explain the concept of “theme” to the students. Teacher will read aloud selected book
and class will identify and discuss various themes that may appear within the text.
Instruction and Activities:
1.
Present the definition of “theme” as it applies to traditional literature with students.
2.
You may want to share with the students the list of common themes found within
traditional literature.
3.
Read aloud a text of your choice from the “List of Traditional Literature Books” from the
Whole Class Lesson Day 1.
4.
Have students use the “think, pair, share” strategy to discuss their ideas for theme within
the read aloud.
5.
Share findings and reflect together.
Student Assessment/Reflections:
Informally assess students' comprehension of the definition of theme during group
discussions. While students are participating, reflect on their answers, giving feedback to
help them expand and develop ideas.
19
THEME
What exactly is this elusive thing called theme?
The theme of a piece of fiction is its view about life and how
people behave. The theme of a fable is its moral.
In fiction, the theme is not intended to teach or preach. In fact, it is
not presented directly at all. You gather it from the characters,
action and setting that make up the story. In other words, you must
figure out the theme yourself.
The writer’s task is to communicate with and relate to the reader.
Although your schema may be different from the details of the
story, the general ideas behind the story may be just the connection
that you and the writer are seeking.
COMMON THEMES IN
TRADITIONAL LITERATURE










Hero/heroine
Freedom
Individuality
Relationships
Challenge and success
Innocence
Choices
Friendship
Family
Love
20
Whole Class Lesson # 19
(Tradition Lit Day 4)
Identifying Underlying Themes in Arrow to the Sun
Essential Standards Common Core 3.2
Overview:
This lesson allows the students to revisit the text in order to identify various themes such
as hero, relationships, challenges and successes, choices, family and love.
Classroom Resources:
Arrow to the Sun by Gerald McDermott
Teacher Resource page (Common Themes)
Open-ended questions handout (choose one)
Rubric for grading open-ended (Assessment Section)
Instructional Plan:
Review List of Common Themes in Traditional Literature. Read Arrow to the Sun aloud
to the class having the students focus on the idea of “theme”. After reading, students will
respond to an open-ended question to demonstrate their understanding of “theme”.
Instruction and Activities:
1.
Review the List of Common Themes in Traditional Literature with students.
2.
Read Arrow to the Sun aloud to the class.
3.
Have students independently respond to the text through completion of an open-ended
question.
Student Assessment/Reflections:
Students will be completing an open-ended question to assess their knowledge of theme.
21
Name:
Date:
Open Ended Question (Theme)
In the text, Arrow to the Sun, Boy is determined to find his
father. Throughout the story, many themes are presented.
 Identify two themes within the text.
 Give examples from the story to explain your choices.
*Be sure to support your answer with details from the text.
________________________________________________
________________________________________________
________________________________________________
________________________________________________
________________________________________________
________________________________________________
________________________________________________
________________________________________________
________________________________________________
22
OPEN-ENDED THEME ASSESSMENT
“Arrow to the Sun”
One of the themes throughout the story, “Arrow to
the Sun”, was bravery. An example of this was when
the boy had to pass through the four chambers of
ceremony to find his father.
 Write about a time in your life when you were
brave.
 Tell when and where this happened.
 Be sure to include details to explain why you
think you were brave.
___________________________________________
___________________________________________
___________________________________________
___________________________________________
___________________________________________
___________________________________________
___________________________________________
___________________________________________
23
Whole Class Lesson # 20
(Traditional Lit Day 5)
Identifying and Utilizing Context Clues
Essential Standard Common Core 3.1, 3.2
Overview:
This lesson teaches students how to use context clues to understand the story as it
develops. Students will determine word meanings using context clues, differentiate
shades of word meanings, evaluate word meanings in context and communicate as a team
using reason and logic.
Classroom Resources:
Context Clues Poem
Context clues Challenge
Index Cards
Document Camera
Instructional Plan:
In groups of four, students write down definitions, but there’s a catch! They’re not
allowed to use dictionaries, glossaries, or any other reference. They’re only allowed to
use each other and Arrow to the Sun. They must use context clues. Each team compares
definitions. The team with the highest point total at the end wins the game.
Instruction and Activities:
1.
Display the context clues teacher resource using the document camera.
2.
Assign in groups of four and assign 2 words from the context clues teacher resource to
each group.
3.
Explain the following rules: Each group must determine the meaning of each word based
on how it is used in context. Students may not use any source other than the context clues
resource and their teammates.
4.
As students define the words, make a grid on the board: words listed on the side, team
names listed across the top.
5.
Begin the contests when sufficien time has passed. This is the challenge part of the
context clue challenge. Ask group 1 for their difiniteion on word 1. Write it in the
corresponding grid space. Ask group 2 if they agree or disagree with group 1’s definition.
If they agree, write ‘A’. If they disagree, write ‘D’. Continue until all groups have either
agreed or disagreed.
24
6. Go over the definition. If group 1's definition is correct, they get 2 points and everybody
who agreed with them gets 1 point. If group 1's definition is incorrect, everybody who
disagreed with them gets 1 point.
7. Continue the game with group 2 going first, then group 3, then group 4, etc.
Suggestions:





Have groups that disagree provide their own definition.
Have students copy down the correct definition and create sentences using the
word correctly.
Base the grade on what place in which group finished.
Have students write their answers on individual group white boards.
Adapt it to your classroom strengths.
Student Assessment/Reflections:
Informally assess students' comprehension of context clues as they work with their teams
to create definitions. While students are participating, reflect on their answers, giving
feedback to help them expand and develop ideas.
25
Context Clues Challenge
1. maiden: There it entered the house of a young
maiden.
2. mocked: They mocked him and chased him away.
3. tend: Corn Planter said nothing, but continued to
tend his crops.
4. chambers/serpents: You must pass through the
four chambers of ceremony – the Kiva of Lions, the
Kiva of Serpents, the Kiva of Bees, and the Kiva of
Lightning.
5. endure/trials: “I will endure these trials”.
6. transformed: When the boy came from the Kiva of
Lightning, he was transformed.
7. rejoiced: The father and his son rejoiced.
8. emerged: When the arrow reached the Earth, the
boy emerged and went to the pueblo.
26
CONTEXT CLUES POEM
You be the detective,
Look for context clues as you read.
When you can’t understand a word
Find the context clues that you need.
Reread the sentence carefully,
The one before and after, too.
Still having trouble?
Reread the whole paragraph through
You be the detective,
Look for context clues as you read.
When you can’t understand a word
Find the context clues that you need.
Antonyms or synonyms
Are very helpful clues
Still having trouble?
Re-read that whole paragraph through.
A prefix or a suffix
May be just what you need
Take your time, be careful
Think about what you read
You be the detective,
Look for context clues as you read.
When you can’t understand a word
Find the context clues that you need.
It’s just like a sandwich,
The meat and the bread
You put it all together,
Visualize in your head
You be the detective,
Look for context clues as you read.
When you can’t understand a word
Find the context clues that you need.
27
SECTION 1
28
Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughter’s
Weekly Overview
Title: Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughter’s
Section #1
Pages: 1-7
Summary of Important Events
In a small village in Africa, a man named Mufaro lived with his two
beautiful daughters, Manyara and Nyasha. Manyara was mean, always
teasing her sister. Nyasha was the kind one. Manyara swore to be queen
one day.
Instructional Strategies/Objectives
 Read assigned pages
 Introduce vocabulary & use “Think, Draw, Write” chart
 Using assigned pages, students will complete “Elements Found in
Traditional Literature” wkst.
Vocabulary to be Addressed in Small Groups
 servant
 bountiful
 tended
29
Rumpelstiltskin
Weekly Overview
Title: Rumpelstiltskin
Section #1
Pages: 1-7
Summary of Important Events
The story begins with a poor miller who encounters a king on his way into
town. He explains to the king that his daughter has the ability to spin straw
into gold. The daughter is brought before the king and told that she must
spin spools of straw into gold by using a spinning wheel before morning or
she will be put to death. At night, the girl is met by a tiny man named
Rumpelstiltskin. She gives him her necklace and in return he magically
spins the straw into gold.
Instructional Strategies/Objectives
 Read assigned pages
 Introduce vocabulary & use “Think, Draw, Write” chart
 Using assigned pages, students will complete “Elements Found in
Traditional Literature” worksheet.
Vocabulary to be Addressed in Small Groups
 miller
 passion
 weep
30
Paul Bunyan
Weekly Overview
Title: Paul Bunyan
Section #1
Pages: 1-10
Summary of Important Events
In the state of Maine, a baby is born whose size and strength surpass any
child every born there. Paul’s size and strength cause his family some
problems which causes them to relocate to the wilderness.
Instructional Strategies/Objectives
 Read assigned pages
 Introduce vocabulary & use “Think, Draw, Write” chart
 Using assigned pages, students will complete “Elements Found in
Traditional Literature” wkst.
Vocabulary to be Addressed in Small Groups
 wandered
 anchored
 shivering
31
Seven Blind Mice
Weekly Overview
Title: Seven Blind Mice
Section #1
Pages: 1-10
Summary of Important Events
The story begins as seven blind mice go to the pond and encounter a strange
Something there. Two of the mice give their ideas of what the strange
Something might be.
Instructional Strategies/Objectives
 Read assigned pages
 Introduce vocabulary & use “Think, Draw, Write” chart
 Using assigned pages, students will complete “Elements Found in
Traditional Literature” wkst.
Vocabulary to be Addressed in Small Groups
 blind
 pillar
 pond
32
“Think, Draw, Write Chart”
Vocab Word
Definition
Picture
Sentence
Vocab Word
Definition
Picture
Sentence
33
Page 51
Elements Found in Traditional Literature








Title
Opening - Once upon a time...and they lived happily ever after.
Good character
Evil character
Royalty and/or a castle usually present
Magic happens
Animals talk and come to the rescue
Use this chart when being
Moral lesson of the story
with books from the genre
Problem and a Solution
"element detectives"
Opening
Evil
Character
Royalty
Animals
or
Magic
castle
Moral
Good
character
of Traditional Literature
Problem/Solution
34
SECTION 2
35
Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughter’s
Weekly Overview
Title: Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughter’s
Section #2
Pages: 8 - 13
Summary of Important Events
While tending to the garden, Nyasha befriends a little garden snake, Nyoka.
Nyoka replaces the traditional fairy godmother. Manyara and Nyasha
journey to the city to meet with the great king, who is looking for a wife.
Manyara sneaks out of the village at night and travels ahead. She is met and
tested by Nyoka in various disguises. Her responses are selfish and cruel.
Instructional Strategies/Objectives
 Read assigned pages
 Introduce vocabulary & use “Think, Draw, Write” chart
Vocabulary to be Addressed in Small Groups




considerate
messenger
greed
journey
36
Paul Bunyan
Weekly Overview
Title: Paul Bunyan
Section #2
Pages: 11-17
Summary of Important Events
Now in his teens, Paul decides he needs to move west. Paul and his blue ox,
Babe, forged a path across the Appalachians. A wild tussle with a group of
ogres proves historic.
Instructional Strategies/Objectives
 Read assigned pages
 Introduce vocabulary & use “Think, Draw, Write” chart
Vocabulary to be Addressed in Small Groups



settlers
pioneers
determined
37
Rumpelstiltskin
Weekly Overview
Title: Rumpelstiltskin
Section #2
Pages: 8-13
Summary of Important Events
The king was so delighted with the gold that was spun that he becomes
greedier. He leads the daughter into a larger room with even more straw and
requests that she spin it all into gold. Once again, Rumpelstiltskin returns
and spins all of the straw into gold with the daughter agreeing to give him
her ring in exchange. When the king returns he is happy, but still not
satisfied. He leads the daughter into an even larger room with more straw.
The daughter is ordered to spin all of the straw into gold. If she is
successful, she will become the king’s wife.
Instructional Strategies/Objectives
 Read assigned pages
 Introduce vocabulary & use “Think, Draw, Write” chart
Vocabulary to be Addressed in Small Groups




delighted
whirring
gleaming
spools
38
Seven Blind Mice
Weekly Overview
Title: Seven Blind Mice
Section #2
Pages: 11-20
Summary of Important Events
Two of the blind mice each give different ideas of what they think the
strange Something might be.
Instructional Strategies/Objectives
 Read assigned pages
 Introduce vocabulary & use “Think, Draw, Write” chart
Vocabulary to be Addressed in Small Groups
 spear
 cliff
 great
39
“Think, Draw, Write Chart”
Vocab Word
Definition
Picture
Sentence
Vocab Word
Definition
Picture
Sentence
40
SECTION 3
41
Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughter’s
Weekly Overview
Title: Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughter’s
Section #3
Pages: 14-19, 20-27
Summary of Important Events
Nyasha travels to the city, and is also met by Nyoka in his various disguises.
She responds with kindness and thoughtfulness. When arriving at the city
gate, she was met by a hysterical Manyara complaining of a great
monster…a snake with five heads.
Instructional Strategies/Objectives
 Read assigned pages
 Use KWL chart to assess comprehension of the story thus far.
 Introduce vocabulary for section 3
42
Paul Bunyan
Weekly Overview
Title: Paul Bunyan
Section #3
Pages: 18-26, 27-35
Summary of Important Events
A desire for flapjacks and maple syrup forced Paul to dig what became the
St. Lawrence River and The Great Lakes.
Instructional Strategies/Objectives
 Read assigned pages
 Use KWL chart to assess comprehension of the story thus far
 Introduce vocabulary for section 3
Vocabulary to be Addressed in Small Groups
 enormous
 delicious
 burrowed
43
Rumpelstiltskin
Weekly Overview
Title: Rumpelstiltskin
Section #3
Pages: 14-23, 24-30
Summary of Important Events
Rumpelstiltskin appears to the daughter for a third time and requests her first
born child in exchange for spinning the straw into gold. The daughter feels
there is no other way to be saved, so she makes this promise to
Rumpelstiltskin. When the king returns and sees that everything is as he
wished, the daughter becomes his queen. A year later, the queen gives birth
to a baby boy. Rumpelstiltskin returns demanding what he was promised.
He decides to give her three days to try and guess his name. If she can
figure it out, she will be permitted to keep her child. The first & second
nights arrive and although the daughter makes great guesses, she does not
guess correctly.
Instructional Strategies/Objectives
 Read assigned pages
 Use KWL chart to assess comprehension of the story thus far
 Introduce vocabulary for section 3
44
Seven Blind Mice
Weekly Overview
Title: Seven Blind Mice
Section #3
Pages: 21-28, 29-36
Summary of Important Events
Two more of the seven mice share their thoughts about what the strange
Something could be. Their opinions are also very different from the other
four.
Instructional Strategies/Objectives
 Read assigned pages
 Use KWL chart to assess comprehension of the story thus far
 Introduce vocabulary for section 3
45
KWL Chart for book:_______________________________________________
Name:_____________________________________________________
What I KNOW
What I WANT to Know
What I LEARNED
46
Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters
SECTIONS 3 & 4 VOCABULARY ACTIVITY
Directions: Carefully, read the sentences from the story.
Then use the context clues to respond to the tasks for
each vocabulary word. Answer in complete sentences.
Section 3: (pgs. 14 – 19)
1. garments: Nyasha woke at the first light of
dawn. As she put on her finest garments, she
thought how her life might be changed forever
beyond this day. Tell about a time when you
might have worn your finest garments. Describe
what you wore.
2. beneath: As the wedding party moved through
the forest, brightly plumed birds darted about in
the cool green shadows beneath the trees. Name
something you could do while sitting beneath the
trees.
3. yam: “You must be hungry,” she said, and
handed him a yam she had brought for her lunch.
Tell what you think a yam might be. Name the
holiday where yams are normally served.
47
4. faults: “There’s a great monster there, a snake
with five heads! He said that he knew all my
faults and that I displeased him. What faults do
you have that may have made someone
unhappy?
Section 4: (pgs. 20 – 27)
5. weavers: The best weavers in the land laid out their
finest cloth for her wedding garments. Tell what you
think a weaver does. Name something you would like
a weaver to make for you.
6. celebration: Villagers from all around were invited to
the celebration, and a great feast was held. Tell about
a celebration that you attended.
7. feast: Nyasha prepared the bread for the wedding
feast from millet that had been brought from her
village. Have you ever helped to prepare a feast at
your home? Tell what you did.
48
Paul Bunyan
VOCABULARY ACTIVITY FOR SECTIONS 3-4
Directions: Carefully, read the sentences from the story. Then
use the context clues to respond to the tasks for each
vocabulary word. Answer in complete sentences.
Section 3: (pgs. 18-26)
1. colossal: To solve the muddle, Paul built a colossal
flapjack griddle. Would you like to have a colossal
ice cream cone? Tell why or why not.
2. blizzard: They probably would have sawed the peaks
themselves into logs if a blizzard hadn’t suddenly
buried the entire mountain range. Name a time when
a blizzard stopped you from doing something.
3. hibernate / burrowed: The crew burrowed into their
bunkhouses and hibernated. Can you think of animals
that burrow and hibernate during the winter?
Section 4: (pgs. 27-35)
1. jagged / trench: Paul’s great ax fell from his
shoulder, gouging a jagged trench, which today is
known as the Grand Canyon. Where could you dig a
jagged trench and what tools could you use?
2. lumberjack: After the festival, the lumberjacks
continued their journey. What objects would a
lumberjack see on his journey?
49
3. Grand Canyon: Paul’s great ax fell from his shoulder
gouging a jagged trench, which today is known as the
Grand Canyon. What is the Grand Canyon and where
is it located?
50
RUMPELSTILTSKIN
SECTIONS 3 & 4 VOCABULARY ACTIVITY
Directions: Carefully, read the sentences from the story.
Then use the context clues to respond to the tasks for
each vocabulary word. Answer in complete sentences.
Section 3 (pages 14-23)
1. royal: He could take all the royal treasure if he
would only let her keep her child. Do you think
your family could have royal treasure?
2. vain: But her pleading was in vain. Then she
began to weep so piteously that at last the little
man was moved. Have you ever asked your
parents for something and your begging was in
vain? Explain what happened.
3. inquiries: The second day the queen had
inquiries made in town, searching for new
names. Have you ever made an inquiry in
Science class? Explain.
4. posed: And when the little man came that
evening, she posed the strangest and most
unusual ones to him. She tried Beastyribs and
Leg O’Ram and Stringbones-but he would only
51
reply, “That is not my name.” What question
did you ever pose to your teacher during a
lesson?
Section 4 (pages 24-30)
1. thickets: The servant searched through
thickets and over clearings, deep into the
forest. Explain why thickets may make it
difficult for you to walk through the forest.
2. faithful: Now the queen grew truly
frightened, and she sent her most faithful
servant into the woods to look for the little
man. Describe your most faithful friend.
3. fury: And in a fury he jumped on his cooking
spoon and flew out the window. If you were
grounded by your parents would you be in a
fury? Explain why or why not.
52
SEVEN BLIND MICE
VOCABULARY ACTIVITY FOR SECTIONS 3-4
Directions: Carefully, read the sentences from the story.
Then use the context clues to respond to the tasks for
each vocabulary word. Answer in complete sentences.
Section 3 (pages 21-28)
1. agree:-The mice did not agree on what the
Something was. Explain about a time when you
didn’t agree with someone.
2. argue:-The mice begin to argue about what the
Something was. Do you think that friends who
argue could be on the same team?
Section 4 (pages 29-36)
1. sturdy:- The Something turned out to be as
sturdy as a pillar. Explain why a house needs to
be sturdy.
2. supple: The Something turned out to be as
supple as a snake. Why does dough need to be
supple?
53
SECTION 4
54
Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughter’s
Weekly Overview
Title: Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughter’s
Section #4
Pages: 20 - 27
Summary of Important Events
Bravely, Nyasha enters a room in the city where Manyara observed the
hideous snake. She sees her friend, Nyoka, who has helped her from time to
time in her garden. He confesses that he was in all the various disguises. He
transforms before her very eyes and says he knows of her kindness and is
pleased with her. Nyasha agreed to become his queen. Mufaro proclaims that
he had two worthy daughters…Nyasha, the queen; and Manyara, a servant in
the queen’s household.
Instructional Strategies/Objectives
 Read assigned pages
 Introduce vocabulary for sections 4
 Students will read sentences from the text, and use context clues
to respond to the tasks for each word
 Students will complete a prefix/suffix cube using words from the
Teacher Resource List.
Vocabulary to be addressed in small groups
 Garments
 beneath
 yam
 faults
 weavers
 celebration
55
Paul Bunyan
Weekly Overview
Title: Paul Bunyan
Section #4
Pages: 27-35
Summary of Important Events
With the evaporation of the flapjack batter, the lumbermen became
disenchanted. Even Paul let the great ax fall to the ground. As the ax was
dragged along, it created the Grand Canyon. Paul comes up with an
explosive plan to rejuvenate the lumbermen.
Instructional Strategies/Objectives
 Read assigned pages
 Introduce vocabulary for section 4
 Students will read sentences from the text, and use context clues
to respond to the tasks for each word
 Students will complete a prefix/suffix cube using words from the text
Vocabulary to be Addressed in Small Groups
 blistering
 gouging
 desperate
56
Rumpelstiltskin
Weekly Overview
Title: Rumpelstiltskin
Section #4
Pages: 24-30
Summary of Important Events
The queen sends a servant into the forest to spy on Rumpelstiltskin. She
returns to the queen with the correct name. When the little man arrives that
evening, he is furious with the fact that she guesses correctly and flies out of
the window on his cooking spoon. He was never heard from again.
Instructional Strategies/Objectives
 Read assigned pages
 Introduce vocabulary for section 4
 Students will read sentences from the text, and use context clues to
respond to the tasks for each word
 Students will complete a prefix/suffix cube
Vocabulary to be Addressed in Small Groups







royal
vain
inquiries
posed
thickets
faithful
fury
57
Seven Blind Mice
Weekly Overview
Title: Seven Blind Mice
Section #4
Pages: 29-36
Summary of Important Events
The last mouse, being the wisest of all, puts together all of the ideas of the
other mice. Combining all of their thoughts into a whole, he finally figures
out what the strange Something is.
Instructional Strategies/Objectives
 Students will read assigned pages
 Introduce vocabulary for section 4
 Students will read sentences from the text, and use context clues to
respond to the tasks for each word
 Students will complete a prefix/suffix cube using words from the
Teacher Resource List.
Vocabulary to be Introduced in Small Groups





sturdy
pillar
supple
cliff
moral
58
ASSESSMENT
&
APPENDIX
59
Open-Ended Questions
Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters
1. In the story, Mufaro has two daughters, Manyara and
Nyasha.
 Explain how the daughters are alike (compare).
 Explain how they are different (contrast).
Be sure to use details from the story to support your
answer.
2. Whose personality would you choose for being a good
queen?
 Choose either Manyara or Nyasha.
 Tell why you feel this way using examples from the
text.
Be sure to use details from the story to support your
answer.
60
Open-Ended Questions
Paul Bunyan
1. In the story, “Paul Bunyan”, Paul cared very much for
the people he grew to know.
 Pick two examples of how Paul showed that he cared.
 Explain these examples and describe how they showed
Paul’s caring nature.
Be sure to use details from the story to support your
answer.
2. In the story, “Paul Bunyan”, there were times when Paul
and even his men became very sad and depressed.
 Choose an example of a time when either Paul or his
men became sad or depressed.
 Explain how he/they overcame these feelings.
Be sure to use details from the story to support your
answer.
61
Open-Ended Questions
Rumpelstiltskin
1. In the story, “Rumpelstiltskin”, the poor miller’s
daughter makes three promises to Rumpelstiltskin of gifts
she will give him if he helps her spin straw into gold for the
king.
 Tell what three gifts she promises to give him.
 Explain whether or not she sticks to her promises
throughout the entire story.
Be sure to use details from the story to support your
answer.
2. At the end of the story “Rumpelstilskin”, the poor
miller’s daughter acts in a clever way in order to keep her
first born child.
 Explain what she does that makes her so clever.
 Explain how her clever behavior helps to save her first
born child.
Be sure to use details from the story to support your
answer.
62
Open-Ended Questions
Seven Blind Mice
1. In the fable, “Seven Blind Mice”, seven blind mice find
something mysterious by a pond. One by one, they
investigate the “thing” and make their own guesses as to
what “it” is.
 Explain why the first six mice think the mysterious
“thing” is something different.
 What clues do the first six mice use to help them
guess?
 What does the seventh mouse do differently?
 How does this help him figure out the mysterious
“thing”?
Use details from the story to support your response.
2. In the fable, “Seven Blind Mice”, seven blind mice find
something mysterious by a pond. One by one, they
investigate the “thing” and make their own guesses as to
what “it” is.
 Explain why the first six mice think the mysterious
“thing” is something different.
 What clues do the first six mice use to help them
guess?
 What does the seventh mouse do differently?
 How does this help him figure out the mysterious
“thing”?
Use details from the story to support your response.
63
64
65
Open-Ended Questions
Grading Rubric
4-point response
Clearly demonstrates understanding of the task, completes all
requirements, and provides an insightful explanation/ opinion that
links to or extends aspects of the text.
3-point response
Demonstrates an understanding of the task, completes all
requirements, and provides some explanation/ opinion using
situations or ideas from the text as support.
2-point response
May address all of the requirements, but demonstrates a partial
understanding of the task, and uses text incorrectly or with limited
success resulting in an inconsistent or flawed explanation.
1-point response
Demonstrates minimal understanding of the task, does not
complete the requirements, and provides only a vague reference to
or no use of the text.
0-point response
Irrelevant or off-topic
66
The Kid-Friendly 4 point Rubric for Students
4 points: My writing is clear and does what the prompt
asked me. My errors in spelling and punctuation are so few
they wouldn’t bother you.
3 points: My writing is pretty good. I did what the prompt
asked of me, but I did not give enough information or
details with my answer. I need to add more. I made very
few errors in spelling and punctuation.
2 points: My writing is not clear enough, and I drifted
away from the prompt. I need to use more details and be
sure they area accurate. I did not notice the errors I made
in spelling and mechanics.
1 point: My writing needs to be focused and organized. I
need to write more to the prompt and include a lot more
details and information. I have too many mistakes in
spelling and mechanics.
67
Traditional Literature Crossword Puzzle
8
1
9
2
7
10
3
11
12
4
5
6
Across
1. The main idea or meaning
of a story.
2. In traditional literature,
the _________ may be human/
superhuman, animals, magical people,
or even talking objects.
7.
8.
A message or lesson to be
learned from a story.
9.
A mythological or legendary
man having great courage and
admired for his deeds and
noble qualities.
10.
A type of traditional
literature that is similar to
a folktale but includes
magical elements(e.g.,
Cinderella).
11.
A type of traditional
literature in which the story
tries to explain how the
natural world works
(e.g., Demeter and Persephone)
3. A type of traditional literature
in which a story has been passed
down by storytellers (e.g., Johnny
Appleseed).
4. The time and/or place of a story.
5. The storyline or sequence
of events.
6. A type of traditional literature
told to teach a lesson or share
a moral (e.g., The Hare and
the Tortoise)
Down
A mythological or legendary
woman having the qualities of
a hero.
12. A type of traditional
literature in which the
story talks about people and
based on facts but is not
entirely true (e.g., King
Arthur and the Knights of the
Round Table).
68
Traditional Literature Crossword Puzzle- Answer Key
8
T H E M E
9
O
R
H
7
2
C H A R A C T E R S
10
E
L
R
F
3
R
F O L K T A
O
I
11
12
I
M
L
R
N
Y
E
Y
5
4
S E T T I N G
P L O T
H
E
A
6
N
F A B L
D
E
1
Across
1. The main idea or meaning
of a story.
2. In traditional literature,
the _________ may be human/
superhuman, animals, magical people,
or even talking objects.
7.
E
Down
A mythological or legendary
woman having the qualities of
a hero.
8.
A message or lesson to be
learned from a story.
9.
A mythological or legendary
man having great courage and
admired for his deeds and
noble qualities.
10.
A type of traditional
literature that is similar to
a folktale but includes
magical elements(e.g.,
Cinderella).
11.
A type of traditional
literature in which the story
tries to explain how the
natural world works
(e.g., Demeter and Persephone)
3. A type of traditional literature
in which a story has been passed
down by storytellers (e.g., Johnny
Appleseed).
4. The time and/or place of a story.
5. The storyline or sequence
of events.
6. A type of traditional literature
told to teach a lesson or share
a moral (e.g., The Hare and
the Tortoise)
L E
12. A type of traditional
literature in which the
story talks about people and
based on facts but is not
entirely true (e.g., King
Arthur and the Knights of the
Round Table).
69
Quick Summarizing Strategies to Use in the Classroom
Written Summaries
Brief Description of the Strategy
3-2-1
List: 3 main points (or 3 “somethings”), 2 controversial ideas (or two things I
disagree with), and 1 question related to the key concept or learning
This can be the answer to any question about the day’s work that you pose
One “clever” way to pose the question is to ask them to answer “So What?”
Other generic questions could be “What do I want to remember?,” “What was I
supposed to learn from this lesson/reading/topic?,” “How could I communicate
what I’ve learned to someone else?,” etc.
Three important ideas/things from the lesson today are ---, ---, and ---, but the
most important thing I learned today is ---.
List 3 (or any number) of questions you would still like clarified
List 4 things that “square with my thinking”; 3 “angles” I disagree with (or 3
details to support --, or 3 things for which I need more information, 3 “different
ways to look at the idea,” etc.); and 1 question “circling” in my head
Give students a key word/concept from the lesson. They must then write a
detail or descriptor that starts with each of the letters of the key word/concept
On chart paper around the room (or on paper that is passed around groups), ask
small groups of students (3-4) to respond to a question or statement posed at the
top of the paper. After a short period of time, student groups move on to
another piece of chart paper/topic, and read what has been written about that
topic and add to or respond to it. Key reminder: Ahead of time prepare the
chart paper and the different topics, insuring that you have enough “stations” so
that every group is at one station during each rotation. These charts and
responses can be used as a lesson activator or review the next day.
With each word worth 10 cents, write a $2 summary of the learning from the
lesson.
This can be scaffolded by giving students specific words related to the learning
that they must include in their summaries. This can be increased to any amount
of money.
Students are given a grid of blanks (any number, depending on the age/level of
the student and the level of complexity of the topic). They must fill each blank
with a word or phrase helps capture the “gist” of the learning.
Similar to $2 summaries, have students write a newspaper headline that gives
the main points of the lesson.
If students keep journals for the course, have the summarizing activity be an
entry in the journal. You might include a prompt to get them started.
A writing “situation” where students choose Role (from whose point of view),
Audience (the specific reader to whom the piece is being written), Form or
Format (a letter, memo, list, email, etc.), Topic (specific subject of the writing)
If you started the lesson with a K-W-L (what I Know, what I Want to know,
what I Learned), then complete the L(learned) section as the summary.
Ask students to go back to the anticipation guide from the beginning of the
lesson and revise their answers. You can also ask them to justify the changes.
Write a vanity tag for a car or a bumper sticker that describes the key ideas from
the lesson.
Similar to Think-Pair-Share, students are given a topic/question, they brainstorm
it with a partner, but then each student writes his/her own response.
Similar to above but the sharing is oral. Students think about a question, write a
response, then share with their partners.
Students are given a “splash” of the key words from the lesson. They must
write a few meaningful sentences (summarize the learning) using these words.
Students make a list of bulleted key points of the learning from the lesson.
Ticket Out The Door/Exit Ticket
The Important Thing
Questions to the Teacher
Squares, Triangles, Circles
Acrostics
Carousel Brainstorming
$2 Summaries
Gist
Headline Summaries
Journals
RAFT
K-W-L
Revisit Anticipation Guide
Vanity Tag/Bumper Sticker
Think-Pair-Write
Think-Write-Share
Word Splash
Key Points Summary
70
Quick Summarizing Strategies to Use in the Classroom
Written Conversations
SQ3R
Changing Points of View
Sample Test Questions
One-Sentence Summary
Paragraph Summary
Dear Student Letter
Aha! and Huh?
6-Word Memoirs
Framed Paragraph
Sentence Starters
Inference Frame
Inference Venn Diagram
Sequence or Timeline
Learning Logs
Foldables
Text Transformation
Each student begins the answer to a question or prompt posed by the teacher.
Then after 1 or 2 minutes of writing, they exchange their papers (or pass them
around). Then they spend 1-2 minutes responding to the writing/thinking on the
paper they receive. Then they pass the paper the paper back (or on) and
continue the process. Limit the time, using a timer or other signal, so that
students are always left thinking they have more to say.
Survey, Question, Read, Recite, Review. While this is a teaching/reading
strategy, the last part of it could constitute a summary at the end of the
reading/lesson.
See: http://www.studygs.net/texred2.htm
Ask students to do a quick-write about a topic related to the learning from
lesson from a very specific point of view. (i.e., What would X say about --?)
Ask students to write one or several possible test questions related to the
learning of the lesson. These questions should not be yes/no or one-word
answer questions. An easy way to do this is to use index cards or half-pieces of
paper, and ask the student to write the question on one side and an acceptable,
detailed answer on the other.
These questions can be collected and then redistributed the next day and used as
a “warm up” or “lesson activator.”
Summarize in one sentence the key point of the lesson (be specific about what
to summarize—i.e., the importance of ---)
Instead of writing a sentence, students expand. You can ask them to describe at
least 3 reasons or support or details
Write a letter to an absent student telling him/her --- (the point of the lesson, the
steps in a process, the details learned through the lesson, etc.)
A variation could be “Dear Teacher” or “Dear Citizen/Voter,” (depending on
the purpose of the learning or the topic and the content area)
Write down 1 or 2 “ahas” (something you learned) and 1 or 2 “huhs” (things
you still have questions about)
In 6 words, what did you learn? (This is a variation of the Smith Magazine
writing contest)
For samples, see: http://sixwordmemoirs.aarpmagazine.org/ or
http://www.smithmag.net/sixwords/
Do a paragraph skeleton or frame which students have to complete (for
example: XX happened because of 3 important factors. The first is – and it
caused ---. The second is – and it caused ---. Etc.)
Similar to framed paragraphs, start the sentence and have students finish it (for
example: One thing I learned about X today is ---, or One important reason why
--- is ---)
Similar to a framed paragraph, this frame helps students draw inferences from
what they’ve been reading/viewing/discussing by connecting that new
information to their background knowledge to make inferences.
“The part where . . . may mean that . . . because . . . .”
A variation on the above, one side of the Venn has the TEXT information, the
other side BACKGROUND INFORMATION, and the “combined,” middle
section of the Venn is INFERENCES or conclusions drawn
List in order of importance or in chronological order (or steps) the concepts
discussed in the lesson
If students keep learning logs for the course, let the summarizing activity be an
entry in the learning log (similar to journals)
Have each student create a foldable that captures the key concepts of the lesson.
Students transform a text into a different genre. Say they read a section in a
science or social studies text. Then they could transform the information in the
text to any of the following: 1) newspaper article, 2) flyer or advertisement, 3)
letter from a specific viewpoint (see RAFT), 4) diary entry, 5) comic strip, etc.
71
Quick Summarizing Strategies to Use in the Classroom
Frayer Model
What would X do?
Graphic Organizers
Plus/Minus/Intriguing
Alphabet Game
Concept of definition/word map
5-3-1 (alone, pair, group)
Sticky Notes
Give One-Get One
Quick Writes
Cloze Activity
Cause-Effect timeline or chart/
WHAT and WHY
Paragraph essay outline
5 W’s Summary
Analogies
Alphabet Sequential Round Table
Text Messages
Instead of using this “concept definer” graphic organizer at the beginning of a
lesson, use it at the end
See: http://toolsfordifferentiation.pbworks.com/Frayer-Model
Give students a situation related to the topic of or learning from the lesson.
Then ask them to respond to the question, using a specific person (i.e.,
government official, historical figure, character, scientist, etc.). This is similar
to “changing points of view” above.
After a lesson, activity, discussion, etc., give students a graphic organizer and
ask them to fill it out.
List things you agree with (plus), things you disagree with or question (minus),
and something you have found intriguing.
Divide the alphabet among the class (or groups). Each student must think of
one descriptor about the topic, lesson, etc. that begins with the letter she/she is
assigned.
A great way to teach and reinforce a complicated topic. Focuses on 1) what the
term is (definition), 2) what it’s like (properties, qualities), 3) examples
See: http://www.readingquest.org/strat/cdmap.html
Pose a question/topic. Students brainstorm 5 answers. Then they work in a pair
to come up with the 3 best. Then the pair joins with another pair to come up
with the 1 most important.
Give students sticky notes and a question or topic with which to respond. They
post their notes on the board, door, wall, a chart (that can have
divisions/pros/cons, etc.).
Pose a question/topic, etc. Students number paper to 5. They write 3
ideas/answers. Then they must talk to at least 2 more students to get 2
additional answers and to give 2 of theirs “away.”
Pose a question or specific topic. Students are to “quick write” (write whatever
comes to mind about the topic, without regards to written conventions—a
brainstorming on paper) for a limited amount of time. Begin with short time
periods 1-2 minutes, because students must write the entire time.
This can be a highly scaffolded writing, where students are given key
terms/words from the lesson and a paragraph about the topic with blanks which
they must fill in from the given list of terms.
Students make (or are given) a timeline, where above the line either has listed
(or they must list) WHAT Happened. Underneath the events, they must
describe WHY it happened.
Have student create just the outline of a essay. They must write the introduction
and the topic sentences of the supporting paragraphs only.
Students list information that answers Who, What, When, Where, Why related
to the learning from the lesson.
Take a key idea from the lesson and turn it into an analogy: something is to
something else as – is to -Give students a grid with each letter of the alphabet in a square. In a small
group, students are given a defined time to begin filling in the grid with a word
or phrase that starts with the letter in the grid and which relates to the key
learning of the lesson. At the signal, the student passes the grid on (and receives
another). With each successive pass, students must read the concepts/ideas on
the grid they receive, and then continue the grid, adding (not repeating) new
information to each grid.
Similar to a sentence summary, ask students to write a summary of the key
learning in txt msg form. LOL. BTW
72
Quick Summarizing Strategies to Use in the Classroom
Snowball Fights
Error Analysis
“How Do You . . .”
Put a problem on the board or post a question. Ask students to answer it, but not
to put their names on their papers. Then they wad up the paper and toss the
“snowball” (either in a box or a to designated center spot). Then each student in
the class gets one of the tossed snowballs. The teacher explains the
problem/answers the question, etc., and asks students to look at the snowball
they received. If their paper has a correct response, they should sit down. Then,
while the teacher doesn’t know “who” doesn’t get it, he/she does know quickly
“how many” don’t.
Post a problem or a process on the board—with an error in the
computation/writing/process, etc. Then with a partner or alone, students try to
find out where the error or mistake is. If done individually, then students can
pair up to compare their findings.
With any skill that is a process, as a review ask students individually or in pairs
to write down the steps or process.
Non-written Summaries
Brief Description of the Strategy
Read and Say Something
Have students read a portion of text and then “say something” to their partners
in response to their reading.
In response to a summary prompt or question, direct students to “turn and
talk” to a shoulder partner (very similar to Read and Say Something).
Pose a question to the group. Allow time for students to individually process
their thinking in response to the question. Then ask them to discuss with their
collaborative partners (pairs) and then share with the group or with another
pair.
Have Collaborative Pairs “square” to form groups of 4. In each group, tell
them to number themselves 1, 2, 3, and 4. Meanwhile, you assign the groups
letters (A, B, C, etc.). Tell them to pull their group’s chairs close so they can
“put their heads together.” Pose the 1st question out loud. Then give them 2-3
minutes to quietly discuss the answer. When you signal time is up, everyone
should be silent. Then randomly call a group letter and one number (e.g., A3
or C2 or D1, etc.) Whoever happens to be that number in the particular group
– Person 3 in Group A, for example – must answer the question. If the
question can be answered in more than one way, then you can call another
letter and number to get additional responses.
Establish a specified time frame (1-2 min., perhaps using a timer to signal
when time is up). Then, tell students to engage in “quick talk” to summarize
their thinking/learning at various intervals in the lesson. (Could also use the
A talk for __ time, B talks for __ time.)
Form expert groups for each “chunk” of a segment of reading/learning.
Allow time for each expert group to discuss and summarize its “chunk.”
Then jigsaw the groups so that each new group has one member of each
expert group. Direct each expert in the newly formed groups to summarize
their “chunk” for their new group members. This is similar to Numbered
Heads Together above.
Have students engage in dramatic creations that summarize the learning.
Similar to an improvisation, a small group of students create a tableau related
to the reading/discussion/topic. Then the rest of the class must guess the
topic/situation of the freeze frame or tableau.
Turn and Talk
Think-Pair-Share
Numbered Heads Together
Quick Talk
Expert Groups/Jigsaw
Charades/ Improvisation/Role Play
Freeze Frame
73
Quick Summarizing Strategies to Use in the Classroom
Bloom’s Taxonomy Summary
Cubes
Stand the Line (1 step in, 1 step back)
Red Light, Green Light
25,000 Pyramid
Meet and Greet (or “going to a
‘Math’—or other content-- party” or
“Speed Dating”)
Kinesthetic Tic Tac Toe
Illustration/Drawing/Cartoon/Tattoo
Story Board
Provide for students “cubes” with one of Bloom’s levels of learning on each
side. Ask each Collaborative Pair to roll the cube; one student in the pair then
asks a question based on the level of learning rolled (analyze, evaluate,
synthesize, etc.) of his/her partner about the learning. The other student gives
a response.
Put a piece of masking tape down the center of the classroom. Have students
stand on either side of the tape, about two steps away. Pose a series of
prompts for which students must take a stand. Direct students to take one
step in/toward the line if they agree, or one step back from the line if they
disagree. Randomly ask given students to share their thinking verbally.
In an open area of the classroom or hallway, engage students in the childhood
game of Red Light, Green Light. When you turn as they freeze, ask one of
the participants to respond to a summary question/prompt. If they are unable
to do so, they must return to the starting line. The first student to reach you
must summarize the overall specified learning or forfeit his “win” and start all
over.
In Collaborative Pairs, have students try to get their partners to guess key
words and concepts on a pyramid projected the screen or distributed on
handouts (Rounds I and II). Members of each pair sit back-to-back or side-toside, with one facing the screen and the other’s back to the screen.
As a review of important content vocabulary, each student is given a different
vocabulary word (if there aren’t enough to go around, there can be
duplicates). Have students do a Frayer or Concept of Definition Map for their
words. The teacher reviews how a person would introduce him or herself to a
stranger in professional, polite conversation. The introductions in this “meet
and greet” are actually the vocabulary terms being introduced and discussed.
As in interpersonal conversation, the parties ask each other questions about
themselves, etc.
Then the students are to “go” to a Math party, or Computer party, or Econ
party (whatever the content area/course is). At the party, they must “Meet and
Greet” (which should be modeled ahead of time) others in the class,
introducing themselves as their individual concepts/terms, and talking about
themselves and asking each other questions.
Draw or outline with masking tape a large tic tac toe grid on the floor (you
will need to have each square about 3 X 3 or 4 X 4). Create a paper version
of the grid with different summary prompts for the given content in each
square. Distribute the paper Tic Tac Toe grids to students and tell them that
when you give the signal (clapping hands, flicking lights, etc.), they are to
step into a square with 1-2 other people and converse with each other in
response to the prompt in that square on their paper. Each time they hear/see
the signal, they should move to different blocks, with different people and
respond to the prompts for those blocks. Repeat the process until students
have had multiple opportunities to summarize their thinking/learning about
the different aspects of the content. (Note: Be sure to establish where the top
of the grid on the floor is in relation to the top of the paper version.)
Have students create an illustration, drawing, or cartoon to summarize their
reading/learning.
Give students a blank “story board” and ask them to create a non-linguistic
summary of their learning, filling the blocks of the story board with stick
figures, drawings, etc. in an appropriate sequence.
74
Quick Summarizing Strategies to Use in the Classroom
Graffiti Wall/Gallery Walk
Smiley Faces, Sad Faces or
Red or Green Cards
Thumbs Up, Thumps Down
Following Directions
Think Alouds
Key Concept Clothesline
Divide the class into groups of 3 or 4, and give each group a sheet of poster
paper and markers. Assign each group a different chunk of the learning to
summarize in graffiti from (pictures, symbols, graphics). When groups have
finished, display all the posters side by side along a wall of the classroom.
Then have the groups do a “gallery walk” to view and discuss what they see
on the “graffiti wall.”
As a really quick assessment of understanding, have the students make index
cards with smiley faces on one side and sad faces on the other, or one side red
and one side green. The teacher then can pose a question and have students
quickly indicate by holding up or flashing the appropriate side of the card
their understanding or their questions.
Similar to the objective of the Smiley Faces above, student just give a thumbs
up or down sign, close to their chests, to indicate understanding or questions.
Have students guide their partners through specific steps or processes by
giving detailed directions that the partner must follow explicitly. This might
be modeled in a fun way using the old “making a peanut butter sandwich”
game, where one person gives directions for making a peanut butter sandwich
and the partner has to just the steps dictated.
Utilizing a well-established, research-based instructional practice, model for
students a think aloud yourself. Then, with a given problem, question, or
passage, have students do think alouds in pairs, taking turns thinking aloud
while the silent partner listens.
Give each student of Collaborative Pair a piece of construction paper. Ask
them to choose a key concept from their reading/learning and represent that
visually with drawings, symbols, etc. Hang all of them with clothespins on a
line in an area of the classroom. Encourage them use the “clothesline” as an
interactive concept/word wall whenever they are asked to summarize.
Sources:
Buehl, Doug. (2001). Classroom strategies for interactive learning. Newark, DE: International Reading
Association.
Beers, Kylene. (2003). When kids can’t read-what teachers can do. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
Kagan, Spencer. (1994). Cooperative learning. San Clemente, CA: Kagan.
Marzano. R., Pickering, D., Pollock, J. (2004). Classroom instruction that works: Research-based strategies for
increasing student achievement. ASCD.
Santa, C., et al. (2004). Creating independence through student-owned strategies. 3rd Ed. Dubuque, Iowa:
Kendall/Hunt.
Thompson, M. (2009). Learning focused solutions. Boone, NC. Learning Focused.
Zwiers, Jeff. (2004). Building reading comprehension habits in grades 6-12. Newark, DE.: IRA.
Zwiers, Jeff. (2004). Developing academic thinking skills in grades 6-12. Newark, DE.: IRA.
75
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