Six Bricks Booklet
Introduction | Six Bricks Booklet
Six Bricks Booklet
1
Icons in this booklet:
Recommended number of children
5-10
10-20
Estimated activity duration in minutes
30-40
Index | Six Bricks Booklet
Index
Discover Six Bricks • 6
Brick Breaks • 8
Games • 20
Team Challenges • 25
Introduction • 4
Discover Six Bricks I • 6
Discover Six Bricks II • 7
Tricky Tower • 8
Can You Remember • 9
Back To Back • 10
What Can You Build? • 11
Build A Cube • 12
Sorting • 13
Patterns • 14
Can You Copy? • 15
Kim’s Game • 16
Sammy’s Snake • 17
Cover It • 20
Double or Half • 21
Skip Count • 22
What Is It? • 23
Play Now • 24
Tall Tower • 25
Two-Stud-Trick • 26
Blind Build • 27
Build The Picture • 28
More Cube Fun • 29
Build A Bridge • 30
Hanging Around • 31
Communication House • 32
Tips n’ Tricks • 33
Activity Template • 34
3
Introduction | Six Bricks Booklet
What is Six Bricks?
Six Bricks is a hands-on tool for learning. Through fun
and short activities with sets of LEGO® DUPLO® bricks
in six bright colours, children can practice their memory,
movement, creativity and more. You can adapt activities
and of course make your own activities to match the
children’s skills and interests.
What skills do children practice?
How do I get started?
When they are engaged and challenged in playful
ways, children practice skills for learning:
Every child and adult needs a set of six DUPLO
bricks. At any time of the day, choose an activity
or let the children pick one. This booklet has 25
activity ideas for getting started with a group of
up to fifty children.
•
•
•
4 Language such as describing in rich detail,
giving clear instructions, explaining your
reasons, and telling stories, which helps you
to communicate with others and express your
ideas.
Problem solving including to stay focused,
and remember a task or a challenge, set goals
and make plans, come up with creative ideas,
and reflect on what you do and how you do it.
Collaboration as in working together in pairs
or teams, share turns and the materials
you work with, learn from your peers and
their ideas, and give each other roles and
responsibilities.
First, allow the children to become familiar with
the bricks by doing simple, short activities like
the ones you find in the beginning of this booklet,
Discover Six Bricks and Brick Breaks.
Once they get the hang of it, try more challenging
group activities, like the later Games and Team
Challenges.
Introduction | Six Bricks Booklet
What is the role of the adult?
Where can I learn more?
Children learn by your example. What you do
inspires the language they use, how they try to
solve problems and how they work together with
others.
Share your experiences, get inspired and find
tips and tricks from others working with Six
Bricks. Join our Facebook group or visit the LEGO
Foundation’s website for more activities, videos,
background information about children’s learning
and development and the story of how it all
started:
Here are a few good ways to support them:
• Guide the children to try on their own; help
them if they get frustrated or ask for help.
•
Encourage them as they try, give useful hints
and ideas, and use an encouraging tone.
•
Sit next to the children, notice what they do,
and use this as a cue when you help them.
•
Be curious and ask open questions like ‘what
are you making?’ and ‘how did you solve it?’
•
Give them choices and make sure they play
an active role in completing a challenge.
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5
Discover Six Bricks | Six Bricks Booklet
5-10
Discover Six Bricks I
Children learn to:
Play and become familiar with the bricks
Listen and respond to questions
Use descriptive language
Base Activity
1. Each child separates his or her bricks and
spread them out.
2. With closed eyes, they shuffle their bricks
around.
3. Keeping their eyes closed, each child picks
any brick and holds it up high.
5-10
Comparing heights and numbers
Complete steps 1 – 4 of the base activity
5. Children look around the room and see
who has the same colour.
6. They quickly go and stand together in
colour groups.
Guiding questions
• Which colour group has the most, least or
the same number of bricks? How can we
check?
(Try to let the children think of solutions –
like building colour towers for each group)
4. Now they open their eyes and see what
colour they hold.
5-10
Guiding questions
•
What colour brick do you have?
•
Can you name all the different colours?
•
Can you sort the bricks into warm and cold
colours?
•
Can you create a rainbow with your bricks?
5. Let them pick any brick, look at it carefully
and turn it around and over in their hands.
Guiding questions
•
What colour is your brick? How does it feel
(rough, smooth, hard, soft, shiny, dull, etc.)?
•
What spaces and shapes can you see on your
brick? How many studs does each brick have?
6. Children restack their six bricks.
6 Find matching colours
Complete steps 1 – 4 of the base activity
5. Children find something in the room (or
outside) of the same colour, and match it
to their brick.
Guiding questions
• How can you check if the colour the exact
same, lighter or darker?
• What in nature is the same colour as your
brick?
Discover Six Bricks | Six Bricks Booklet
5-10
Discover Six Bricks II
Children learn to:
Use spatial skills to orientate themselves
Keep attention and resist distraction
Initiate activities
Base Activity
1. Children lay out their bricks in any order (see
the picture).
2. Then they put a finger on the red brick and
move it left.
3. They turn the dark blue brick upside down (or
on its side).
4. Children click the green brick on the red and
cover all studs.
(Vary the instructions you give such as colours,
moving bricks left/right, and positions).
Guiding questions
•
How did you keep attention (encourage some
of the children to explain in turn)?
•
How can we make this activity harder?
(Give more instructions, say them faster…?)
5-10
Try with two hands
Complete step 1 of the base activity
2. Children pick up the first and last brick
and swap their places (have fun doing
this a few times).
3. Then they pick up the red and green
brick and swap places (vary colours).
4. Using their left hand, children pick up
the blue brick and place it in their lap.
(Vary colours, hand and places you use in the
instructions).
Guiding questions
• What other instructions can you think of?
(Let the children suggest and try their
instructions)
5-10
‘Think’ with your hands
Complete step 1 of the base activity
2. Children pick up two bricks and see how
many different ways they can click the
two together.
3. Using all their bricks each child tries to
discover what shapes you can make with
six bricks.
Guiding questions
• In what different ways that did you click
the bricks together?
• What shapes or objects did you make with
your bricks? (e.g. staircase, tower…)
• What was fun about building with the
bricks?
7
Brick Breaks | Six Bricks Booklet
5-10
Tricky Tower
Children learn to:
Move fingers and hands with precision
Persist in the face of difficulty
Develop own ways of carrying out tasks
Base Activity
1. Children separate their bricks and lay them
out in any order.
2. Then they balance all their six bricks, short
end to short end, building a tower.
3. Children try changing the hand they use when
building.
5-10
Experiment with building towers
Complete step 1 of the base activity
2. Try different ways to balance the bricks
to create a tower without clicking the
studs together.
3. Try using left or right hand, only one or
two fingers, and a clothes peg to pick up
bricks.
Guiding questions
• How did you build your tower? (Let the
children explain and demonstrate with
their bricks)
• What makes a tower stable? How do you
make the highest or shortest towers?
Guiding questions
•
How did you balance your bricks? (in turn, let
some of the children explain what they did)
•
If you have to try a new way of balancing the
bricks, what will you do?
4. Finish the activity by letting them restack
their six bricks.
5-10
Build towers in pairs
1. In pairs, children combine all their bricks
to build a tower by balancing bricks.
(Give different instructions for building the
tower)
Guiding questions
• What is different about building with 12
bricks?
• What is helpful or hard about working in
pairs
8 Brick Breaks | Six Bricks Booklet
5-10
Can You Remember?
Children learn to:
Hold information in their memory
Keep attention and resist distraction
Speak about how they have done something
Base Activity
1. The adult takes any two bricks and clicks
them together, one on top of the other and
covering all the studs.
2. Hold them up for the children to see.
(Do not hide the bricks away)
3. The children copy the brick sequence.
5-10
Hide the brick sequence
1. The adult takes any two bricks and
secretly builds one on top of the other,
covering all the studs.
2. Hold them up for the children to see for
five seconds and then hide them way.
3. The children copy the brick sequence.
Guiding questions
• Who remembered the sequence by
repeating the colours over and over?
• Did anyone use a different way to
remember the sequence?
• What other ways to remember the
sequence can you think of?
Guiding questions
•
Match your sequence to mine. Are they the
same?
•
If it is different, can you explain the difference?
5-10
•
If it is different, how can you make it the same?
Build in more directions
4. Repeat this activity with 2 bricks of any
colours until you feel the children are ready
to move on to copying 3 and then 4, 5 and 6
bricks.
1. The adult takes any two bricks and
secretly clicks them together, covering
only some studs.
2. Hold the bricks up for five seconds, hide
them, and then ask the children to copy
the model.
(Try to distract with questions before they
build like ‘what’s your favourite food’ or
‘3 x 4 is..?’)
Guiding questions
• How did you remember the model? How
can you learn to remember in other ways?
9
Brick Breaks | Six Bricks Booklet
10-20
Back to Back
Children learn to:
Use descriptive language
Think from another person’s perspective
Speak about own and others’ behaviour and consequences
Base Activity
1. Children sit or stand in pairs with the same
three bricks.
2. One child builds a model, and then explains to
the partner how to build the same model.
3. The partner builds without looking or asking
questions.
4. The pairs compare their models and discuss
how it went.
Guiding questions
•
How did you explain how to build the model?
•
What instructions are clear and helpful?
5. Children swap roles and repeat the activity.
10-20
Ask three questions
Complete step 1-2 of this activity.
3. The partner builds without looking, but
can ask three questions underway.
4. The pairs compare their models and
discuss how it went.
5. Swap over and repeat the activity.
Guiding questions
• What questions did you ask?
• Which questions worked well? Why is
that?
10-20
Play with ‘yes’ and ‘no’
Complete step 1 of this activity
2. One child builds a model, but can now
only say ‘yes’ and ‘no’.
3. The partner builds the same model by
asking questions, such as ‘Is the bottom
brick red?’
4. The pairs compare their models and
discuss how it went.
5. Swap over and repeat the activity.
Guiding questions
• What questions help you to get the
position of bricks right?
• What is the hardest part of this activity
and why?
• What can you do to overcome that hard
part?
10 Brick Breaks | Six Bricks Booklet
5-10
What Can You Build?
Children learn to:
Invent and describe characters (for stories)
Come up with stories in groups
Ask questions and suggest answers
Base Activity
1. Children use their six bricks to build any
creature.
2. Then they take turns to describe their
creature.
This activity can also be linked to a theme, story
or book, and could be done in pairs.
10-20
Build to remember a story
Link this activity to a story you read with
the children the previous day
1. Working in pairs or small groups, ask the
children to think back to the story and to
talk about it.
2. Let the children build something (not
only creatures) from the story that they
heard yesterday.
Guiding questions
• What have you built (children explain their
story and model)?
• What questions can you ask your friends
about their model?
Guiding questions
•
Does it have a name?
•
What sound does it make?
10-20
•
How does it move?
Walk and sort by creature
•
Does it have a magic power?
•
Do you have any questions to ask your friends
about their model?
Complete steps 1-2 of the base activity.
Ask the children to stand up so they can
walk around.
3. Let the children figure out ways to sort
into groups by creature, like features
(wings, feet etc.)
4. Each child then walks to a different part
of the room according to the sorting
rule.
Guiding questions
• How did you figure out where to go?
Is this the only place you could go?
If not, where else?
• How else could we choose to walk and
sort with your creatures?
11
Brick Breaks | Six Bricks Booklet
10-20
Build a Cube
Children learn to:
Coordinate and balance using their whole body
Enjoy solving problems
Engage in collaborative tasks with peers
Base Activity
1. Children build a cube with six bricks so it does
not fall apart (See picture for an example).
Guiding questions
‘Simon says’ with cubes
Complete step 1 of this activity.
2. In pairs or small groups of 3-4, children
take turns to show moves which the
others copy. (Let the children come up
with rules, like ‘if you drop the cube,
then…’ or ‘you have 3 turns’)
Guiding questions
• How can a friend help you if you have
problems getting it right?
•
Which two colours are on top, at the bottom
and middle?
•
In pairs, how can one of you give, and the other
follow, instructions to build a cube?
10-20
•
What instructions are easier and harder to use?
Measure with cubes
2. Children rotate their cube while holding it
behind their back (or above the head)
3. They throw the cube up in the air and catch it.
4. Toss it from one hand to the other.
5. Hold it under their chin.
Guiding questions
12 10-20
•
What else can you do? In how many different
ways can you hold your cube?
•
How long can you balance the cube on your
head? Can you walk around with it?
Complete step 1 of this activity.
2. Two children stand so everyone can see
them. The rest use their cubes to build a
measuring tower with the same height
as these two children.
Guiding questions
• How can we use the cubes to measure the
children? How many cubes do we need?
• What else can you measure?
Brick Breaks | Six Bricks Booklet
5-10
Sorting
Children learn to:
Filter information to spot specific details
Use descriptive language
Negotiate when and how to carry out tasks
Base Activity
1. In pairs or groups of 3-4, children mix their
bricks together.
2. Then they sort all the bricks into piles by
colour.
Guiding questions
•
How quickly can you make a pile of each colour?
•
What was it like to do this activity?
5-10
Sort by position
Start by introducing positions: Standing,
and lying, on the side, studs down and
studs facing up.
• Scoop your six bricks in both hands,
raise them up and let them fall in front of
you.
• Ask some of the children to sort them
according to position.
Guiding questions
• What other rules can you think of for this
sorting game?
• How can you work together to sort
quickly?
Let the children play this sorting game in
pairs.
3. Each child chooses a pile and builds a Colour
Creature.
Guiding questions
5-10
•
Shift the sorting rule
Can you make up a group story about your
Colour Creatures?
1. In pairs, children scoop their bricks, raise
them up and let them fall.
2. Then they roll a red brick. If it is lying
studs down, sort by colour. If the red
brick is lying studs up, sort by position.
If the red brick is on its side, decide
together.
Guiding questions
• What other rules can you think of for this
sorting game?
13
Brick Breaks | Six Bricks Booklet
10-20
Patterns
Children learn to:
Notice and follow patterns
Experiment with own creative ideas
Share and take turns independently
10-20
Make patterns in pairs
1. Children work together to create their
own repetitive pattern.
2. One of them starts a pattern with six
bricks and the other continues this.
Base Activity
1. Children copy your pattern and see if they
can continue. (The adult builds the start of a
repeating pattern for the children to follow).
Guiding questions
• What is your pattern – can you explain it?
• How is your pattern different from others
in this room?
2. Do this 4-5 times with different patterns.
3. Add spaces to the patterns (like space
between letters and words on a page). Help
the children notice the spaces.
Guiding questions
•
Can you explain this pattern?
10-20
Rhythms and moves
1. Children work together to create their
own repetitive pattern.
2. This time add a sound, tap, clap or a
move to each brick.
3. They have fun playing the pattern and
experimenting with different rhythms.
Guiding questions
• What is your pattern – can you play it?
• How is your pattern different from others
in this room?
14 Brick Breaks | Six Bricks Booklet
10-20
Can You Copy?
Children learn to:
Notice depth and perspective
Keep attention and resist distraction
Develop own ways of carrying out tasks
Base Activity
1. Prepare this activity by building a model in 3D.
(See the picture for inspiration).
2. The children copy your model.
Guiding questions
•
Which colours are behind / in front /on top etc.?
•
What shapes do you see? What angles?
•
How is it different?
10-20
Build a reflection
1. Working in pairs, one child builds a 3D
model.
2. The partner then builds a reflection of
that model (if possible, use a mirror for
help).
Guiding questions
• How is your model a reflection of the
original?
• How can you make this activity easier or
more challenging?
5-10
3. Repeat the activity, but this time children
copy from a distance.
Guiding questions
•
How is different when the model is further
away?
Use a 2D picture
1. The adult shows a 2D picture of a model.
2. The children try to build a 3D model by
looking at the picture.
Guiding questions
• How does your model fit with the picture?
• From what angle is it easier and harder to
figure out how to build the model?
15
Brick Breaks | Six Bricks Booklet
10-20
Kim’s Game
Children learn to:
Tackle new tasks confidently
Keep attention and resist distraction
Develop own ways of carrying out tasks
Base Activity
1. Prepare by arranging three bricks on an A4
piece of paper. (See the picture below for an
example).
2. The children study this brick arrangement for
10 seconds.
10-20
Walk and remember
1. The adult arranges 3 bricks and hides
them outside or behind a cupboard /
chair.
2. Children come to look, 4 or 5 at a time,
and go back to their bricks and build from
memory.
3. Children are allowed 3 turns to go back
and check if they have remembered it.
Guiding questions
• How do you remember the bricks?
• Can you learn from what others do?
3. Then you cover the bricks with a cloth.
Guiding questions
•
How many bricks do you think you can
remember?
•
How can you remember and build the same
arrangement that is under the cloth?
•
How can you also remember the bricks’
positions?
4. Child try to build the brick arrangement using
their own six bricks.
Use 4 or more bricks once the children are
confidently remembering the position of 3 bricks.
16 10-20
Play with tricky changes
1. In pairs, one child shows the partner an
arrangement of bricks for a few seconds.
2. The partner must remember what he/
she has seen and then build it.
3. Swap over and repeat the activity.
4. Children can try to secretly change 1, 2
or 3 bricks and then ask the partner to
look again.
Guiding questions
• Can you spot the changes? How can you
do that?
• How can you make this game tricky for
each other? Or really easy?
• Can you think of ways to help each other
remember more bricks?
Brick Breaks | Six Bricks Booklet
10-20
Sammy Snake
Children learn to:
Use strategies learned earlier (patterns)
Negotiate when and how to carry out a task
Imagine and tell stories
10-20
Snakes in pairs
1. Let each child build his or her own snake
using six bricks.
2. Go together in pairs and share how your
snake moves, how you built it etc.
Base Activity
1. In pairs, children mix their bricks to build a
snake.
Guiding questions
•
How can you show movement, colours,
patterns or camouflage in your snake?
•
How can you present your snake to the others?
Guiding questions
• What questions can you ask to learn more
about each other’s’ snakes?
• Can you make a short story about your
snakes meeting?
10-20
2. Allow the pairs time to prepare what to
present.
3. The pairs take turns presenting their snakes.
Guiding questions
•
What does it mean to be a good listener?
One-minute-snake
1. In groups of six, children mix their bricks
together.
Guiding questions
• How long a snake do you think you can
build in one minute?
• How can you work together to build fast?
2. The groups get one minute to build, and
then stop when the adult calls ‘hands-off’.
Guiding questions
• Was this close to the length you
estimated?
• Which snake is longer? How many bricks
did you use?
17
Games | Six Bricks Booklet
10-20
Cover It
Children learn to:
Move fingers and hands with precision
Share and take turns independently
Use strategies learned earlier (memory)
10-20
Even and uneven numbers
1. Play the game, but this time add bricks
when the roll shows 2-4-6, and remove
them on 1-3-5.
Base Activity
Guiding questions
• How else can you play this game?
1. The children go into small groups and get a
dice.
2. Start the game by having one brick on the
table.
3. First child rolls the dice. If it shows two, choose
a brick and cover two studs on the brick on the
table (and so on).
4. The number five is tricky; you cannot cover
five studs:
Guiding question
•
What action can you take if you roll a five (skip a
turn, remove a brick etc.)?
5. Keep building upwards; try to find ways of
keeping the model balanced.
Guiding question
18 •
Which group can build the tallest structure
without it tumbling over?
•
How do you keep the model balanced?
10-20
Remember the numbers
1. Play the game, and keep a running
total of the number of studs you have
covered.
2. Two or three times, the adult pauses the
games to ask for the running total:
Guiding questions
• Without looking at your model, what is the
sequence of studs you have covered?
• How do you remember? Can you
remember as a group?
Games | Six Bricks Booklet
10-20
Double or Half
Children learn to:
Make reasoned choices and decisions
Tackle new tasks with confidence
Enjoy solving problems
10-20
Play in groups
1. Play this game in groups of 3-4.
Guiding questions
• What other rules can you think of for this
game?
Base Activity
1. In pairs, children get a dice. First child rolls and
finds the number on the dice. For example
‘two’.
2. If first child calls ‘double’, the partner adds
two bricks, making the total four bricks.
3. If first child calls ‘half’, the partner removes
one brick, making the total one brick.
4. The partner should explain what he does and
call out the new number.
5. Swap over and repeat the activity.
Guiding questions
•
How did it go in your pairs? How can you be a
helpful partner?
•
What happens if you call ‘half’ to an uneven
number like ‘3’?
19
Games | Six Bricks Booklet
10-20
Skip Count
Children learn to:
Keep attention and resist distraction
Persist in the face of difficulty
Trace with their eyes while counting
Base Activity
This is a counting activity. Each child will count his
own bricks, and the next child will count on.
1. In small groups, children sit in a circle and lay
out all their bricks, one after the other, inside
the circle.
10-20
Try with weekdays
1. Repeat the activity but instead of
counting, name the days of the week
from Monday to Sunday.
2. The same rules apply – select a colour to
skip.
Guiding questions
• Can you remember the correct sequence
of the days of the week?
• What happened when you reached the
skip colour?
2. First child counts his own bricks, 1-6, and the
next child continues, 7-12, and so on.
3. Now agree on a colour, like green.
10-20
4. Count all the bricks again, but this time all
green bricks are silent counts.
Months of the year
Children must count in their heads and not aloud
when they reach a green brick.
Guiding questions
•
What is hard or easy about this activity?
•
How do you stay focused on where you are in
the count?
•
What other rules can you think of for this game?
1. Repeat the activity, naming months of
the year from January to December,
instead of counting.
2. The same rules apply – select a colour to
skip.
Guiding questions
• Can you remember the correct sequence
of the months of the year?
• What happened when you reached the
skip colour?
Games | Six Bricks Booklet
10-20
What Is It?
Children learn to:
Share and take turns independently
Use imagination and creative thinking
Notice words that connect or describe in sentences
30-40
Two models meet
Complete steps 1-4 of this activity.
5. Two groups go together and their
models ‘meet’.
Base Activity
1. In small groups, children get a dice.
2. First child rolls the dice, and builds a model
with the same number of bricks as the dice
shows.
Guiding questions
• What happens? Can you make a story with
both of your models
3. Pass on the model and dice to the next child,
who rolls the dice, and adds the number of
bricks shown by the dice.
10-20
4. Continue until each child in the group has had
a turn.
Complete steps 1-4 of this activity.
Practice listening to and finishing each
other’s sentences:
Guiding questions
•
At the end of the round, what does your model
look like?
•
How can you decide together?
•
What reasons made you decide on this idea?
Say three words in turn
5. Take turns to say three words – like this:
This is a… Cat and it… Has a hat… and a
funny…
You must make your own sentences in the
groups.
Guiding questions
• What words help your sentences to
continue and grow longer (e.g. ‘and’, ‘but’,
‘then’ etc.)?
• What words describe your model (e.g.
‘funny’, ‘cat’, ‘hat’ etc.)?
21
Games | Six Bricks Booklet
10-20
Play Now
Children learn to:
Develop own ways of carrying out tasks
Keep attention and resist distraction
Remember and coordinate movements
10-20
Colour moves
Complete steps 1-4 of this activity, but
clap every time you must hand over a red
brick.
Base Activity
1. In small groups, children sit at a table with
their own bricks lying loose in their laps
(hidden from view for the others).
2. When first child says ‘Play Now!’ all children
show a brick.
3. If the brick has the same colour as that of first
child, you must hand over this brick to him or
her.
4. Play two rounds for each child in the group.
Guiding questions
•
22 What other ways can you play this game?
Repeat the activity with different moves and
colours.
Guiding questions
• How do you remember the right colour
and moves?
• What happens if you have to remember
two moves and colours?
Team Challenges | Six Bricks Booklet
30-40
Tall Tower
Children learn to:
Tackle new tasks confidently
Engage in collaborative tasks with others
Stretch and balance their whole body
10-20
Tower relay race
Complete steps 1-3, but this time each
child adds one brick at a time to build the
tower.
Base Activity
Start this activity by discussing towers and tall
buildings. (You can use the picture shown here).
1. In two large groups, the children work to see
who can make the tallest tower.
The first group to finish wins.
Guiding questions
• What ideas for building worked well in your
group?
• How can you learn from what others do?
2. Give the groups a few minutes to discuss
ideas before they start building.
3. Compare towers when both groups have
finished.
10-20
Guiding questions
Complete steps 1-3, but vary how you
build, instead of stacking bricks directly on
each other.
•
Which group has the tallest tower?
•
Which tower is the strongest (find ways to test
this by lifting the towers)?
•
Does the tower break? Why or why not?
Twisting towers
Guiding questions
• What shapes or patterns can you make?
• How can you build a twisting tower? What
makes it stable or instable?
23
Team Challenges | Six Bricks Booklet
10-20
Two-Stud-Trick
Children learn to:
Explain what they did and what they have learned
Speak about future planned activities
Use spatial skills to guide how they build
10-20
Cover more studs
Complete steps 1-4, but change the
number of studs to cover to three or four
instead.
Base Activity
1. In smaller groups, children take turns building
onto a brick placed in the middle of their
group.
2. Each time they add a brick, they must cover
two studs only.
See how high you can build before the model
topples over.
Guiding questions
•
How did it go in your group?
•
What have you learned about keeping balance?
•
What will you do next time?
3. Give the children time to discuss ideas for
keeping balance.
4. Repeat the activity.
Guiding questions
•
24 How did your plan work?
Guiding questions
• How is this different from covering only
two studs?
• What other ideas do you have for playing
this game?
Team Challenges | Six Bricks Booklet
10-20
Blind Build
Children learn to:
Keep attention and resist distraction
Persist in the face of difficulty
Use sense of touch to solve a challenge
10-20
Keep your eyes closed
Complete steps 1-3, but stay ‘blind’ while
building the model as well.
4. Compare the two models when finished.
5. Swap roles and repeat the activity.
Base Activity
1. In pairs, one child closes his eyes (or covers
them with a scarf) and the partner builds a
model with six bricks.
Guiding questions
• What is it like to build without seeing?
• What is harder, easier or different?
2. The ‘blind’ child feels the model to notice how
it is built.
3. Hand the model back to the partner, who then
hides it.
4. Open your eyes (or remove the scarf) and
build the model.
Colours are not important, only the shape.
5. The partner can give clues to help you
remember.
6. Children compare their models when finished.
Guiding questions
•
What was it like doing this activity?
•
How did you remember the model?
•
What clues proved most helpful as you were
building?
7. Swap roles and repeat the activity.
25
Team Challenges | Six Bricks Booklet
10-20
Build The Picture
Children learn to:
Engage in creative problem-solving
Speak about future planned activities
Use strategies learned earlier (representing)
Base Activity
1. In groups of 3-4, children mix their bricks
together and choose a leader.
2. The adult whispers a word, like ‘tree’, to the
leader.
3. Back with his or her group, the leader quickly
builds that word for the others to guess.
4. The group may not ask questions, but can call
out words. The leader can say when they get
it right.
Guiding questions
•
How did the first group figure out the word?
•
What can you do to help the next leader of the
group?
5. Choose a new leader and repeat the activity
with a new word.
Continue until all children in the group have been
a leader.
26 10-20
Guess a sentence
Complete steps 1-4, but use sentences of
3-4 words (the leaders may spell with the
bricks).
5. Once the group guesses the word, a new
leader goes to get the next word right
away.
Guiding questions
• How did the first group figure out the
sentence?
• What tricks or strategies work well for
building words?
Team Challenges | Six Bricks Booklet
10-20
More Cube Fun
Children learn to:
Tackle new tasks confidently
Engage in physical movement
Develop own ways of carrying tasks
Base Activity
1. In groups of 4-6, children stand in a row.
2. Each row has a leader in front holding one
cube.
3. The leader passes the cube under her legs to
the person behind, who passes over his head
to the next.
10-20
Moves with cubes
1. The children stand in a circle, holding
their own cube.
2. Each child gets to step into the circle
and show a movement or trick to do
with the cube (e.g. hold it under the chin,
balance on a foot or arm, throw it high,
keep it on the head etc.)
Guiding questions
• What is easy or hard to do with the cube?
• What other ideas do you have for games
with cubes?
4. Continue with this under / over movement.
5. The last child in the row passes the cube back
to the leader.
Guiding questions
•
What other ways can you pass the cube (e.g.
rotating, one or two arms etc.)?
6. Change a movement and repeat the activity
with a new leader.
27
Team Challenges | Six Bricks Booklet
10-20
Build A Bridge
Children learn to:
Engage in creative problem-solving
Negotiate when and how to carry out tasks
Make reasoned choices and decisions
Base Activity
Start this activity by discussing bridges and their
functions. (You can use the picture shown here).
1. In groups of four, children combine their bricks
and think of ways to build a bridge over a ‘river’.
(Use a piece of blue material or paper on the
floor for the children to imagine as the river).
10-20
Build across a gap
Complete steps 1-4, but this time children
build a bridge across a 10 cm gap between
two chairs.
5. Let children re-evaluate their bridge and
discuss what to change to improve their
build.
Guiding questions
• How can you use spaces in build your
bridge to make the structure longer and
lighter?
2. Give the children time to discuss and plan
how they will span the river.
30-40
Guiding questions
•
How can you measure the length you need to
span with bricks?
•
What would make the bridge stable? What will
happen if it is heavy?
•
How will you organize the different tasks in your
group?
3. Allow the children time to build their bridge.
Warn them when time is almost up.
4. Test the strength of each bridge (ask the
children for ideas, e.g. using a toy or books).
Guiding questions
28 •
How did your plan work? What ideas did you
change underway and why?
•
How did you work together in the group?
Link the bridge to story telling
Complete steps 1-4 of this activity.
5. Link the bridge to a story you have read
with the children, or let the children
come up with their own.
Guiding questions
• What happens near or on the bridge in the
story? What props can you use to act it
out?
Team Challenges | Six Bricks Booklet
5-10
Hanging Around
Children learn to:
Tackle new tasks confidently
Keep attention and resist distraction
Develop own ways of carrying tasks
10-20
Work in pairs
Complete step 1 in this activity, with
children working in pairs and combining
their bricks.
Base Activity
1. Each child places one brick close to the edge
of a table.
Guiding questions
• How far can you go with your 12 bricks?
• How are you deciding what to do and who
does what?
The task is to see how many bricks can hang off
the table.
Guiding questions
•
How many bricks can you get to hang off the
edge of your table? You need to counterbalance as you build.
•
What solution seems to work best?
10-20
Work in groups (or all children)
Complete step 1 of this activity, with
children working in groups or 4-6 or more.
2. Let the children experiment with
building from higher surfaces.
Guiding questions
• Can you find a higher surface to build
from?
• What does it take to reach the floor?
29
Team Challenges | Six Bricks Booklet
10-20
Communication House
Children learn to:
Describe and explain using appropriate language
Think from another person’s perspective
Use strategies learned earlier (memory)
10-20
Check only 3 times
Complete steps 1-6 of this activity in pairs
or groups, but this time the children may
only check 3 times.
Base Activity
1. In pairs, children combine their bricks.
Guiding questions
• How close did you get to building the
original model?
2. The adult builds a simple model and hides it
from view somewhere in the room.
3. One child from each pair goes to see how the
model is built and returns to explain it to the
partner.
4. The partner builds the model (the first child
may not build).
The first child can go back and forth several times
to check and remember details.
5. After five minutes, the pair goes to compare
their model to the original.
Guiding questions
•
What was easy or difficult about remembering
the model?
•
What ‘tricks’ did you use to remember?
•
What was it like trying to follow the
instructions?
•
How can you help each other in the next round?
6. The adult can change the model and the
children swap roles.
30 10-20
Build without talking
Complete steps 1-2 of this activity in pairs
or groups. This time, both children can
look and build. However, once they start
building, they may not speak together or
go to check the original model.
3. After five minutes, the pairs go to
compare their model to the original.
Guiding questions
• How close did you get to building the
original model?
Tips n’ Tricks | Six Bricks Booklet
Tips n’ Tricks
Storing the bricks
Clean the LEGO® DUPLO® bricks
Store the stacks of Six Bricks in a box or on a tray
for easy transport. Older children can learn to
keep them on their desks; after around 2-3 weeks,
with you kindly reminding them, they can learn to
let the bricks alone.
You can use mild soap or washing liquid in warm
water (no hotter than 40°C) and wash the bricks
using a soft cloth, sponge or soft brush. Just rinse
the bricks with water, and leave out them to dry
(not in direct sunlight!).
Hands-on and off
Make stable structures
A good rule to learn for activities with Six Bricks
is ‘hands-off’ during instructions. Then start an
activity by calling ‘hands-on’. Try to discuss how
to remember the rule and make it like a game with
the children.
If you build by stacking bricks directly on top of
each other, the tower or structure you make is less
stable. Try instead to interlock the bricks, much
like a mason building a house with concrete or clay
bricks.
Scooping up the bricks
Build on hard and stable surfaces
When you do group activities like Discover Six
Bricks I or Tall Tower, try to spread out a thin
blanket or bed sheet on the floor, and build on this.
Once the activity is finished, you can scoop up all
the bricks in one go.
It is much easier to build on a surface, which is
hard, smooth and stable, like a table or tiled floor.
31
Activity Template | Six Bricks Booklet
Activity Template
Children learn to:
Base Activity
Guiding questions
1.
•
2.
•
3.
•
4.
5.
32 •
Activity Template | Six Bricks Booklet
Activity Template
Children learn to:
Base Activity
Guiding questions
1.
•
2.
•
3.
•
4.
5.
•
33
Introduction | Six Bricks Booklet
Only together, we can champion
learning through play.
The LEGO Foundation
Only together, we can champion
learning through play.
Get to know us better at LEGOFoundation.com
Follow us on Twitter @LEGOFoundation
E-mail us at [email protected]
Get to know us better at LEGOFoundation.com
Follow
us onFoundation
Twitter @LEGOFoundation
The LEGO
E-mail us at [email protected]
Koldingvej 2
7190 Billund, Denmark
The LEGO Foundation
Koldingvej 2
34 7190 Billund, Denmark
24
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