MacroSystem Digital Video SMART EDIT 5 User manual

MacroSystem Digital Video SMART EDIT 5 User manual
User manual
SMART EDIT 5
2nd edition
Legal notices
To avoid making mistakes during operation, we recommend that you carefully follow the instructions provided in this manual.
We have taken a great deal of care whilst programming and checking this software.
Nevertheless, since it is not possible to guarantee totally error-free software applications in all environments and at any time, we unfortunately
cannot rule out the possibility that some errors may have crept in.
MacroSystem Digital Video AG and its dealers therefore do not guarantee fault-free use of the product or complete flawlessness of the product.
We will remedy any errors in the program and supply the affected customers with the new software free of charge, if possible.
Warranty claims for defects shall expire in 24 months in the case of newly manufactured items. This shall not apply insofar as the law prescribes
otherwise and in cases involving injury to life, limb or health, in the case of intentional or grossly negligent violation of duty on the part of the supplier
and in the case of malicious silence with regard to a defect.
The customer shall report defects to the supplier immediately in writing. Claims for reimbursement of expenses for error tracing shall be honoured
only after prior consultation with MacroSystem Digital Video AG management staff.
Any other claims asserted by the customer for any expense(s) required for the purpose of subsequent performance, in particular transport, travelling,
work and material costs shall be excluded. However, this shall not apply to claims for reasons other than newly determined software defects.
Warranty claims shall not apply in the case of only insignificant deviation from the agreed quality, for only insignificant impairment of the usefulness,
in the case of natural wear or damage which may occur after passage of the risk due to improper or careless handling, excessive use, unsuitable
operating materials or which have occurred due to other special external influences not provided for in accordance with the terms of the agreement.
In the event that improper modifications or repair work is performed by the customer or any third party, then any warranty claims for defects shall
also be null and void for these and other consequences.
We do not, however, accept any liability for loss of data/time or any consequential damages that may occur as a result, particularly because we have
no influence over correct software installation and operation by the customer. MacroSystem Digital Video AG and its dealers therefore cannot be
held liable for any defects or unintentional damage in connection with the installation or use of the system.
Claims by the customer to compensation in damages and/or reimbursement of expenses shall thus be excluded, in particular because of violation
of contractual obligations and due to unlawful acts. However, this shall not apply insofar as peremptory liability is involved, e.g. in accordance with
product liability law, in cases of intention, gross negligence, because of injury to life, limb or health or because of violation of substantial contract
obligations. However, any claims to damages for violation of substantial contract obligations shall be limited to conventional foreseeable damage
insofar as intention or gross negligence is not involved or liability due to injury to life, limb or health. A shift of the burden of proof to the disadvantage
of the customer shall not be connected with the above regulations.
Neither MacroSystem Digital Video AG nor its dealers are responsible for any damages resulting either directly or indirectly through the use of the
software or the operating instructions. This is particularly the cause for profit loss and reimbursement of expense.
Any implied guarantee is totally out of the question, including guarantee of suitability of the software or operating instructions for a particular
purpose.
Please therefore ensure that you backup your video footage before using the device. We recommend that you do not delete the video footage and
that you create a backup on DV tape beforehand.
Since it is possible that changes have been made to the software after the manual was printed, the functions shown and described in this manual
might differ from the software.
Table of contents
Chapter 1: Introduction ........................................................................................................... 5
1.1 Congratulations!.............................................................................................. 5
1.2 What is SMART EDIT?..................................................................................... 6
1.3 HDV Video material......................................................................................... 6
1.4 Structure of this user manual......................................................................... 6
Chapter 2: Installation ............................................................................................................. 7
2.1 Registration/Update service ........................................................................... 7
2.2 Using the trackball .......................................................................................... 7
2.3 Installing SMART EDIT.................................................................................... 9
2.4 Unlocking software ......................................................................................... 12
2.5 Initial operation ............................................................................................... 12
Chapter 3: Basics ..................................................................................................................... 13
3.1 Editing philosophy .......................................................................................... 13
3.2 The user interface............................................................................................ 13
3.3 Working with graphics tablets ....................................................................... 20
3.4 The (integrated) Pro Pack software / available functions............................. 22
Chapter 4: Tutorials ................................................................................................................. 23
4.1 Tutorial 1: A small video project .................................................................... 23
4.2 Tutorial 2: Insert editing .................................................................................. 32
4.3 Tutorial 3: Audio mixing ................................................................................. 34
4.4 Tutorial 4: Titling 1........................................................................................... 37
4.5 Tutorial 5: Titling 2........................................................................................... 39
Chapter 5: Reference ............................................................................................................... 41
5.1 System settings ............................................................................................... 41
5.2 Project settings ................................................................................................ 43
5.3 Video settings .................................................................................................. 45
5.4 Recording......................................................................................................... 46
5.5 Editing .............................................................................................................. 47
5.6 Finish ................................................................................................................ 55
5.7 Transition effects ............................................................................................. 57
5.8 Image processing effects................................................................................ 61
5.9 Titling................................................................................................................ 66
5.10 Audio recording/editing................................................................................ 73
5.11 Audio mixing/Dubbing.................................................................................. 77
5.12 Shutdown (OFF) ............................................................................................ 84
Chapter 6: VGA Mode.............................................................................................................. 85
6.1 Dual-monitor use (VGA as an extra monitor to the video monitor) ........... 85
6.2 Single-monitor use (VGA as an alternative) ................................................. 86
Chapter 7: Tips & Error Handling .......................................................................................... 87
Chapter 8: HD Backup-System................................................................................................ 91
8.1 What is a backup used for? ............................................................................ 91
8.2 Starting the backup ......................................................................................... 91
Chapter 9: Ethernet-Transfer................................................................................................... 92
The operating system VxWorks ® is used in license from Wind River Systems, Inc.
For the IEEE 1394 interface (Firewire®, MiniDV®) a Firewire Stack from Intoto, Inc. is used.
The module for converting graphics data in PNG format is the PNG Reference Library.
The versions 0.97 - 1.0.5 are copyright © 1998, 1999 Glenn Randers-Pehrson.
For JPEG conversion the library of the Independent JPEG Group is used, copyright © 1991 - 1998,
Thomas G. Lane.
GLIBC and other supplemental programs are used according to the license conditions of the Free
Software Foundation. Detailed information can be found at the www.macrosystem.de web site.
The FreeType Engine is used to render Truetype character fonts.
Character fonts are used in license from enStep Incorporated.
5
Chapter 1: Introduction
E-Mail
[email protected]
[email protected]
(Germany)
(North America)
1.1 Congratulations!
Fax
0 +49 (0)2335/960-100
303-440-5322
(Germany)
(North America)
Congratulations on the purchase of the software
SMART EDIT! We thank you for the confidence
and trust you have shown us, and we hope that
it will meet your expectations.
SMART EDIT follows a philosophy completely
different from that of other video editing systems, opening up new and remarkable possibilities for working with video to you and those
who work with you.
If you are new to video editing, you will quickly
and easily become acquainted with SMART EDIT
and will soon enjoy the new creative realms it
will open up for you.
For those of you with prior experience with
other systems, (for example with linear (analog)
equipment or digital computer systems), it will
be easy to make and you will be rewarded with
the almost limitless possibilities that SMART
EDIT offers.
This manual will help you with installing and
operating SMART EDIT. Feel free to contact us to
ask further questions or to give us suggestions.
Whenever you contact us, please have your
customer number or the serial number of your
device at hand so that we can help you more
quickly.
Address :
MacroSystem Digital Video AG
Postfach 020240
58290 Wetter
Germany
MacroSystem US
5485 Conestoga Court
Boulder, Colorado
USA
80301
Phone
0 +49 (0)2335/960-0
303-440-5311
Up-to-date information on MacroSystem products and our sales department can be found on
the Internet.
Please visit our Website:
http://www.macrosystem.de (Germany)
http://www.macrosystem.us (North America)
Phone Support
If you have special technical questions, you can
call our technical support hotline:
(Germany)
Monday -Thursday from 10.00 to 17.00 hours
Friday 10.00 to 16.00 hours
+49 (0)2335/960-112
(North America)
Monday - Friday 9a.m. - 5p.m. (Mountain Standard Time)
303-801-1010
When calling, please have the serial number of
your device at hand.
Outside of these times you can email or fax us.
Messages received in this way are handled during business hours.
E-Mail Support
[email protected]
(Germany)
[email protected] (North America)
[email protected] (N.A.)
[email protected] (N .A.)
Fax Support
+49 (0)2335/960-110
303-801-1058
(Germany)
(North America)
(Germany)
(North America)
6
1.2 What is SMART EDIT?
The software is a non-linear editor. All video
and audio data is stored on the system hard
drive and can then be separated into individual
scenes. These scenes can be trimmed as desired
and added to a storyboard. It is possible to add
many different transitions between the scenes.
You can mix with six stereo tracks, mixing original sound, various pieces of music, and commentary. A large selection of fonts and effects
makes our Titler powerful, yet easy to use.
All of this is meant for the user who is not
familiar with computers. Its goal is simplicity of
use, even though the power and versatility of
the system makes for almost endless creative
possibilities. Also, SMART EDIT is not affected
by limitations in recording duration that typically
apply to computers.
1.3 HDV Video material
SMART EDIT 5 allows for editing of both, DV
projects (4:3 and 16:9) and HDV projects (16:9).
SMART EDIT 5 treats HDV projects as follows:
HDV is processed in the background, whilst
DV is processed directly on screen – this is the
quality you are seeing. It requires continuous
rendering to convert HDV material in DV
and to display it in 16:9 anamorph format.
In the background, `unseen´ by the user, the
HDV material is edited and cut in parallel. All
editing information is saved and stored. This
information is later taken up, bit by bit, when
outputting the finished video. The result is
HDV quality with precisely the same editing
decisions.
HDV stands for `High Definition Video´ and
represents the HDTV (`High Definition TV´)
standard for camcorders.
To create HDV films, you require a highresolution HDV camera – such cameras are
today available from most manufacturers. Such
a `switchable´ camcorder allows you to film not
just normal DV videos, but also HDV.
The high-definition format is stored in a more
effective compression form (MPEG-2) directly on
the DV tape.
SMART EDIT gives you two options to read your
HDV material, which can be set in the record
screen (see chapter 5.4, item (3)):
1. You load your video footage into the system,
and there it is converted from HDV into DV. Or…
2. You load your HDV video footage into the
system, then you switch your camera to DV
mode and load that DV stream into the system
again.
SMART EDIT 5 supports both currently popular
formats: HDV 1440 x 1080 i and HDV 1280 x 720
p.
HDV rendering occurs (e.g.) when creating
a new scene, importing using the clipboard,
finishing a project or when using special effects.
Note: We would like to point out the necessity
of using HDV tapes when recording footage to
the HDV Recorder and/or Smart Edit 5 editing
software (which allows HDV editing)!
The special surface coating of these tapes
considerably reduces the drop-out rate. Dropouts lead to evidently more problems in
MPEG method in HDV recordings than during
standard DV filming. Unlike the DV method,
HDV recordings may loose an entire Group of
Pictures (GOP) due to a drop-out.
This results clearly in more significant picture
faults and problems during transfer and editing
of such flawed footage.
1.4 Structure of this user manual
This manual explains the SMART EDIT functions
but refers to various hardware systems.
As the units running SMART EDIT may have different technical specifications, this may result in
differing software functionality. Such differences
are highlighted in the respective parts of this
manual.
This manual is divided into two main parts and
several appendices.
7
The first part of this manual guides the user
through Installation (Chapter 2), then through
the Basics of device use (Chapter 3) and then
through five Tutorials (Chapter 4). These sections are designed to help new owners to begin
editing right away.
In the second main part, all screens, buttons
and their functions are explained in a complete
Reference section (Chapter 5). There you will
find useful hints that will make your work easier.
If there is a function that you do not completely
understand, there you can read up on it to become more familiar.
The chapters VGA Mode (Chapter 6), Tips &
Error Handling (Chapter 7), HD Backup-System
(chapter 8), Ethernet-Transfer (chapter 9) and
Copyrights (Chapter 10) offer tips and tricks as
well as background information. The table of
contents completes this manual.
Enjoy exploring SMART EDIT!
We hope that you will be as satisfied as the
many thousands of MacroSystem customers
before you!
8
Chapter 2: Installation
2.1 Registration/Update service
2.1.1 Registration
Please take the time to register with us. There is
a registration card in the package.
When you register, your information will be put
into our database. Your info will not be given
to third parties, but it will allow us to give you
better customer service.
Please register, even if you are already registered as the owner of another MacroSystem
product!
This registration allows us to offer you a better
service.
2.2 Using the Trackball
A trackball is used to work within the screens.
Click on buttons to perform functions and access
functions by moving the on-screen pointer.
Because its handling is needed for the installation of the program, the trackball is explained in
this part of the manual.
Chapter 3 (3.2 The User interface) explains how
to handle the user interface.
Note: the trackball shown here is only an example. Another model may be supplied with your
machine, but it will function in a similar manner.
Depending on the system in use, the trackball
may utilise two or four buttons.
Your registration ensures that you are also
automatically informed about new products,
news, modifications, and updates to various
MacroSystem products. As a token of our
appreciation you will automatically receive free
codes to unlock the bonus effects available on
the included SmartMedia card. (see section 2.6
“Unlocking software“)
2.1.2 Update
(The following information does not apply to
North American Customers.)
On the registration card you can apply for the
automatic update service. This means that you
declare yourself willing to buy every new update at a price reduction of approximately 20%.
The automatic update service consists solely of
new developments in the software.
Update delivery, available earlier through this
subscription than regular ordering, is by invoice
with delivery free of charge.
You can cancel your automatic update subscription at any time. You don't have to worry about
being obligated by a long-term subscription.
The new versions are announced ahead of time
in well-known publications. You can also ask
our dealers about new developments or visit
our homepage on the Internet.
The trackball consists of three or alternatively
five components:
(1) Ball
This is used to move the screen cursor or, in
the Trim and Split screens, to scroll through the
video.
(2) Large left button (selection button)
This is used for selecting. You press a button on
the screen by positioning the cursor over the
on-screen button and pressing (clicking) the left
trackball button.
(3) The small left button
The Photo Studio 2 software is an example for a
product supporting this button. Please read the
separate manual of that product for information
on the function.
9
8
(4) Large right button (cancel button)
This button returns you to the previous state,
canceling or stopping the current operation.
Pressing this button without having selected
anything will return you to the previous screen.
Pressing the cancel button when you are making
settings cancels anything you have just set and
reinstates the prior settings. If you are playing or
recording video, then clicking the cancel button
will cause playback or recording to stop.
(5) The small right button
The Photo Studio 2 software is an example for a
product supporting this button. Please read the
separate manual of that product for information
on the function.
What is a click?
A click is simply when you press down and quikkly release one of the trackball's buttons. You
hear a quiet clicking sound. "Click on the ... button" means that you position the cursor on the
corresponding field on the screen with the ball
and then press and release the large left trackball button to select (click) the on-screen button.
Computer users will please note that our systems have neither a "double-click" nor a "drag"
operation. These operations are not needed for
our easy-to-use systems.
Why use a trackball and not a mouse?
Many users may ask this question. After all, a
trackball is usually more expensive than a simple mouse, and the mouse is better when using
a computer. The reason for our decision can be
found in the editing philosophy of SMART EDIT.
The trackball has the one big advantage that you
can use it in your hand or lap without having
to use a table. A mouse would also require too
much space, especially when "scrolling" through
the entire hour-long video for trimming or splitting purposes.
It is possible to use a mouse instead of a trackball. If you would rather use a mouse, please
contact your dealer. Not every mouse model is
compatible.
2.3 Installing SMART EDIT
The software is loaded from the hard-drive once
started.
It is possible that the supplied software version on the SmartMedia card or CD/DVD is more
recent than the version already installed by your
dealer (or at the factory). To check this, press the
button on the front side of the machine to turn it
on.
(Using this slider is explained in detail in the
hardware manual of your system.)
The Main menu appears after a greeting message and you can compare the version number on the SmartMedia card or CD/DVD with
the number displayed in the System Settings
screen.
If your system runs a current version, you can
start editing directly.
If the version number of the SmartMedia card
or CD/DVD is higher, then you should install the
more recent version.
You must carry out the installation procedure if
you do not see the Main Menu screen once your
system is turned on.
You will know an installation is necessary if
you see a SmartMedia symbol at the upper-left
corner displaying a flashing arrow indicating
that the SmartMedia card or CD/DVD should be
inserted.
If the symbols displayed above appear, no
system software will be found on your system
and the installation can only be carried out from
a SmartMedia card. Please continue reading
chapter 2.3.2.
If the version number on the SmartMedia card
or CD/DVD is higher, you should install this
version. There are two possible options now:
(Warning: It is not possible to update from
older system software versions without loosing
current project data! An update is only possible
if the full software version is the same, e.g. an
update from SMART EDIT 3.3 to SMART EDIT 3.4
You‘ll have to completely reinstall software 5.0,
so any project data stored on the system will be
lost!
Thus, we recommend that you finish your current project with your current system software
9
and (after recording out your film to another
device) install the new software afterwards.)
2.3.1 Installing from CD/DVD
(The installation from CD requires SMART EDIT
2.4 or higher and DVD-Arabesk 1.3 or higher)
If your system software is on a CD/DVD, insert
it into the drive (DVD burner), click on “Install
Product” in the “System Settings” menu and
select the relevant software (Smart Edit).
Since the CD/DVD also contains the complete
range of add-on software currently available,
you will also see a whole list of programs
displayed. Please note that it can take several
minutes before the list of programs is displayed.
After you select the system software, click on
“activate”. The data are then copied and the
system prepares to carry out the installation.
After the progress bar disappears, a message is
displayed informing you that the system is now
ready to restart. After you confirm this message
with “Ok”, the system might ask you to enter
the license code (only if a new version is being
installed, for instance, when upgrading from
SMART EDIT 4.1 to 5.0).
Please make sure you enter the correct code!
Once you have entered the correct license
code and closed the window by pressing “Ok”,
you should also confirm the “Install product”
window by clicking on “Ok”. The system will
then ask you to remove the CD/DVD. Once you
have removed it by pressing on the drive’s
button, the system restarts automatically and
the actual installation process begins:
Note for users with several hard drives: After
choosing the language, the system offers a hard
drive selection. Please choose the hard drive
from which you activated the installation of
“SMART EDIT V 4.0” in the “Install Product”
window before! Selecting the other hard drive
will not lead to an installation!
• If you want to install an update (e.g. SMART
EDIT 4.0 to 4.1), please proceed as follows:
first of all, select the installation language. A
message will then appear informing you that
your projects will remain intact during and after
the installation. You will be asked whether you
want to carry out the installation. If you click on
“Yes”, the software will be updated.
If you want to completely reinstall the software,
click on “No” (bear in mind that if you choose
this option all the project data stored on the
system will be lost) . You are then given the
option of canceling the operation (“No”) or
carrying out the completely new installation
(“Yes”).
• If you want to carry out a full installation of a
new version (e.g. upgrading from SMART EDIT
3.6 to 4.0), a message will inform you that it is
not possible to upgrade the current software
without losing projects and data.
If you click on “Yes”, the system will display
another query – if you confirm this query, a
complete installation will be carried out and
all the data that are already stored on the hard
drive will be deleted.
If you click on “No”, the installation process will
be cancelled.
Please note that you will have to reinstall your
additional software after installing the system
software SMART EDIT.
When reinstalling DVD-Arabesk, please make
sure that you select the correct version (1.x or
2.x) - it has to be the same base version, which
was istalled on your system before.
2.3.2 Installing from SmartMedia card
(Units without SmartMedia card drive or
without a multi-card reader only support
software installation from CD!)
If the software is installed from a SmartMedia
card, insert it into Smartcard Reader above the
front inputs of the machine, which must be
switched off. Viewing the machine, the gold contacts must be on the bottom side and the cut-off
corner on the top side and to the left.
The SmartMedia card is very sensitive so please
avoid bending it or touching the gold contacts
on the card.
Now you can turn on the machine by lightly
pressing the power switch on the front of the
unit.
If you insert an invalid SmartMedia card (a card
other than the installation SmartMedia card),
then the SmartMedia symbol appears (shown
below), indicating that the correct installation
SmartMedia card should be inserted.
EDIT 4.0), once you have selected a language,
a message appears informing you that your
projects will remain intact during and after the
installation. You will be asked whether you want
to carry out the installation. If you click on "Yes“,
the software will be updated.
If you want to completely reinstall the system
software, click on "No“ (bear in mind that if you
choose this option any project data stored on
the system will be lost) . You will then be given
the option to cancel the operation (by clicking on
"No“) or carry out the new installation ("Yes“).
In case you have inserted an invalid SmartMedia
card (not the installation SmartMedia card), but
a system has already been installed previously, then the system will start, but will display a
question mark over the SmartMedia symbol.
If the ambulance symbol appears, then an error
has occurred, perhaps because of defective
hardware e.g. due to defective hardware or because of a missing hard-drive. An error code is
usually also displayed. If this occurs, please contact your dealer, or MacroSystem Tech Support.
The following symbol appears when the correct
SmartMedia card has been inserted:
After installation has been carried out, remove
the SmartMedia card. Depending the system,
you may need to either pull the card out of the
slot or gently press it into the drive to unlock it
– it then automatically jumps a little out of the
slot and you may then pull it out. More information can be found in the hardware manual.
A window will now open in which you can specify the installation language.
Then, specify the installation language and
afterwards select a hard disk (if your system is
provided with several hard disks). „IDE 0“ always represents the top drawer and „IDE 1“ the
bottom one.
After that you‘ll be informed that it is not possible to update the software without a loss of
projects and data.
After having clicked on "Yes“, a new warning
appears. After confirming it, the software will be
completely reinstalled.
(Clicking on "No“ cancels the installation, so no
changes will be made in the software.)
To install the software, you have to enter the key
code. Remove the SmartMedia card after this.
The system will now automatically re-start and
you can continue. You should then see the following symbol:
If your system is already equipped with the
same base version (e.g. if you want to install
SMART EDIT 4.1 and already possess SMART
Note: Make sure to put the SmartMedia card
back into its protective sleeve after use to avoid
scratches.
Note: Should the system remain unused in the
Main Menu for more than 30 minutes, the unit
will switch off.
If you wish to continue work, simply start the
system again.
12
2.4 Unlocking software
You have the option of "unlocking" the bonus
effects contained on the installation SmartMedia
card or (if your system is provided with a DVDwriter) on the installation CD/DVD. To do this
you must register with MacroSystem. (Please
read the earlier section 2.1.1 Registration).
Additional software (more effects, fonts, supplemental software packages, etc.) is available from
your dealer.
If your system is equipped with a DVD writer,
you should have an installation CD, which contains additional software, which can be unlocked
or installed as a demo version, but the demo
versions are overlaid with identifying Demo text.
In order to use the effects (without the Demo
overlay) you can give your dealer the serial
number of your system machine (found in the
System Settings menu, in the lower-left field).
Your dealer can then charge you for the supplemental software and give you a key code for
unlocking the software.
Once you have received the code, switch on
either the system, insert the SmartMedia card
into the card drive or insert the DVD into the
DVD writer, after having opened the drawer and
click on "Install product" in the System Settings
menu.
If you have a SmartMedia card containing additional software, please insert it into the SmartMedia card reader as usual and click onto "Install
product".
The products contained on the medium are displayed in a list.
If you have inserted a DVD, you will have to wait
for a while, before the products are displayed.
During this time you'll hear a drive sound, which
indicates that the DVD is being read by the system.
The term after the product name indicates the
status for your installation:
– (hidden): This product and the corresponding
effects/fonts are not displayed in the SMART
EDIT list. This can be used to hide demos once
they have been previewed. Hidden demo effects
will not longer appear in the effects lists.
– (demo): The products, effects, or fonts are
displayed in the lists, but are labeled with a red
flag in the effect list and are identified as demo
effects when used in a scene.
– (active): The products, effects, or fonts are
unlocked and are available to the user without
restriction.
Now select the product or the desired bonus
effect and click on "Activate". If the effect is
not yet unlocked, a menu for entering the key
code appears. You again see the name of the
product you wish to unlock. After entering the
code remove the SmartMedia card or the DVD
and you can now use the new product without
restriction. If you do not enter the key code, and
instead cancel the procedure, then the software
will only be installed as a demo version.
If you are using more than one hard drive, then
you must install and unlock the software on
all of them. One key code will work for all hard
drives.
If you subsequently use one of the hard drives
in another MacroSystem machine, then the
unlocked software will run there only as a demo
version.
2.5 Initial operation
After you have turned on the machine by pressing the power switch, you are greeted with the
message (the logo of your machine) on the television monitor. If this message does not appear,
then check your cable connections and make
sure that the television is set to the proper input.
After the greeting the Main menu screen appears automatically. After being turned on, the
hard drive must first spin up before the OS program can be loaded. During this time you will be
able to hear the hard drive spinning.
The Main menu screen is the control center
for accessing the individual control screens
with which you will do your video editing. The
startup process is now over, and you can start
editing.
We recommend that you familiarize yourself
with the system Basics (Chapter 3) and then
work through the five Tutorials (Chapter 4) in
order to become acquainted with SMART EDIT.
In this way you will quickly learn the system
principles and you can experiment before you
begin working on your own video projects.
13
Chapter 3: Basics
of video without affecting the original audio).
3.1 Editing philosophy
5. Selection and use of Transition effects (e.g.
crossfade, double exposure, etc.), many in realtime (no rendering is required)
Your system operates in a non-linear fashion.
This means that every recorded scene can be
accessed instantly. The system does not have
to spool tape to access the desired scene. Direct
access is achieved by recording the video onto
a hard drive and not onto tape. On tape, scenes
can only be accessed by time-consuming spooling.
A hard drive is actually a storage device from
the field of computers and it is used for storing
programs (software) and data (video and audio).
Hard drives store data differently than tape,
because hard drives have a freely movable read/
write head, which can move directly to any area
of the drive similar to a record player needle, but
in a very short period of time (approx. 10 milliseconds).
This means that there is practically no waiting
times, even when jumping from the beginning
to the end of a video. This technique is called
"random access" (you are probably familiar with
the well-known abbreviation RAM – Random
Access Memory).
Random access (or direct access) is the fundamental characteristic of a non-linear editing
system. It makes possible direct and total control
over the recorded data.
Editing is therefore somewhat different than
with traditional analog devices. The following
principles apply to SMART EDIT video editing:
1. Recording of the desired material (video
and audio), either completely or in designated
sequences, which is stored in up to ten independent projects.
2. Splitting of the recorded material into individual scenes that can each be named as you
choose.
3. Trimming of the individual scenes (setting the
In/Out points to ignore unwanted footage).
4. Sequential ordering of the trimmed scenes on
the storyboard, in the order that you designate.
You can also add Insert Scenes, (the overlapping
6. Selection of Image Processing effects (e.g.
solarize, sharpen, etc.) to add to scenes or entire
sequences.
7. Titling of the storyboard (the addition of text
in different fonts, sizes, colors, and effects).
8. Audio mixing with up to six tracks for original sound, commentary, background music and
sound effects
9. Recording of the finished project out to video
tape or - if your system is provided with a DVD
writer and with the software "DVD-Arabesk" - to
DVD
And of course, you can record and edit more
footage at any time. There is no set sequence.
This list serves only to outline the basic concepts
involved.
3.2 The user interface
Your system makes use of the SMART EDIT
user-interface, which contains various elements.
These elements are explained here, although
they are fairly obvious.
Light gray buttons can be selected (clicked). Dark
gray buttons cannot be activated. Using certain
functions may cause some buttons to de-activate, meaning they cannot be used.
Some buttons may appear usable but at the moment have no corresponding function. If they are
clicked, a red, crossed-out circle appears indicating that no function is currently possible.
Buttons
Such buttons are simple gray fields containing
a text caption that describes the function they
perform. They cause something to happen when
they are clicked on, and they are usually clearly
labeled. (e.g. Clicking with the left trackball but-
14
ton on the "Delete" button causes the selected
scene to be deleted.)
Name field
Selection buttons
These buttons are indicated with three small,
white horizontal bars in the upper right corner.
Clicking with the left trackball button opens a list
of different options. You then scroll through the
options with the trackball, stopping on the desired option, which is highlighted in blue. Clicking
on the left trackball button then activates the
selected option. Clicking on the right trackball
button cancels the operation.
By clicking on this button you cause an onscreen keyboard to appear showing the name of
the currently selected scene. You can then use
this keyboard to enter a new name.
On-Screen keyboard
Sliders
Sliders can be either horizontal or vertical. After
a slider has been clicked, the ball of the trackball
is used to control movement of the slider. The
cursor disappears and the trackball now controls
the slider. Control of the slider is relinquished
by again pressing one of the trackball's buttons.
Clicking the left button accepts the current slider
setting. Clicking the right button cancels any
changes you have made and returns the slider
to its previous position.
You can use the arrow buttons (usually to the
right of a horizontal slider or below a vertical
slider) to step through footage one step at a
time(e.g. from one frame to the next). The symbols |< and >| are used in the Edit menu to jump
to the beginning or end of the storyboard.
There are also sliders, which allow you to select
numerical values such as effect options.
A special feature of SMART EDIT is that you can
click onto the value to the right of the slider to
revert to the to the preset value. For example, if
you have set the value for the effect `Bars´ to 20
and confirmed it, simply click onto the number
20 to revert back to the original, preset value of
10. The slider automatically jumps back to the
original position and becomes active.
At certain points, such as in the text input menu
for titling, SMART EDIT allows or requires
text input, (for example when naming scenes,
entering text for titles, and naming audio sequences).
Users who have installed the PowerKey option
or who have connected a USB keyboard can
enter the text with the external keyboard. (But
only when the on-screen keyboard is displayed). Otherwise the on-screen keyboard appears,
allowing text entry with the trackball. The text
is entered by using the trackball to click on each
individual letter key. Some of the keys are especially important:
(1) Delete key (delete text letter-by-letter).
(2) Newline key (start a new line).
(3) Shift key (toggle between uppercase and
lowercase).
(4) Single shift key (only the next key appears in
uppercase).
(5) ALT key (special characters, such as @ and
).
(6) The S key to the left, used to display the special characters menu. In this menu you find all
the available characters, including many letters
used in foreign languages, (e.g. "ç") or letters
with accents in French. If you want to enter the
characters "é", "á", or "ô", you can either select
them in the special characters menu or use the
normal keyboard. Click first on the accent and
then on the corresponding letter. The accent is
15
not displayed until you select the letter.
When the keyboard is displayed you will see that
the entire current name of the scene is highlighted. This allows you to immediately delete the
entire name. A new name can then be quickly
entered.
If you only want to change one letter within the
word, click on the letter just after the letter to
be changed or move the cursor (vertical bar) by
using the arrow buttons to the right of the scene
name. Press the delete key and then the key for
the new letter. You can insert new characters
into text in the same way. Simply click on the
character just after the desired insert position
and then type in the desired characters. Characters are inserted just before the cursor.
frame. This behavior is found at several points
in the program, for example when trimming,
splitting, or using sliders within the effect lists.
Symbols for recording, playback, pause, stop
Several menus have buttons for recording, playback, pause, and stop, with which you can play
your video and audio material. You are probably
familiar with these functions on other devices,
such as your VCR.
This is the symbol for Record and can be found
in the recording menu. Clicking on it causes your
system to start recording, at which time you can
start your video input device. (For best results,
be sure to start the input device first).
IN and OUT Points
This is the symbol for Play. Clicking it will play
the video scenes or audio samples. In the recording menu it starts the DV input device.
These points are set to mark certain segments of
a scene. This can be a Trim procedure, but also
the placement of an Image Processing effect
in the storyboard (using the Range function).
When you click with the left trackball button on
"IN" or "OUT", the trackball function changes.
Rolling the trackball then causes the video to
scroll forward or backward through the video
scene with a speed depending on the speed the
ball is rotated. An additional click with the left
button sets the new beginning (IN) or end (OUT)
point. A click with the right button reinstates the
original setting.
The length of the scene is indicated as a 7 digit
code. 001.15:03 means that the material will run
for another 1 minute, 15 seconds, and 3 frames.
Scene check
These two buttons (see above) serve to quickly
review the first and last few seconds of a scene
or audio segment. The "|>" button plays the first
3 seconds starting from the IN point. The ">|"
button plays the 3 seconds just prior to the OUT
point.
Arrow buttons
Stepping through individual frames (see slider)
works by clicking on the ">" and "<" symbols.
Clicking on ">" moves forward to the next frame.
Clicking on "<" moves backward to the previous
This button causes a Pause in the playback. Clicking on it again ends the pause and the video
material is played from the point at which the
pause was made.
The Stop symbol stops playback/recording. If
you initiate playback again, the video material
will be replayed from the beginning. Playback
can also be stopped by pressing the right trackball button. If you are using a DV input device,
then you can control it directly from the Record
screen. (But please be aware that most DV devices are compatible, but some are not. If this is
the case, the DV device can be started manually
and should then input correctly.) In the recording menu you will also find the three symbols
listed above: stop, playback, and pause, plus the
symbols rewind:
and forward:
16
Both of these buttons have a triple function.
Fast rewind and fast forward are achieved while
the DV source is in stop mode, viewable slow
rewind and slow forward in playback mode, and
frame-by-frame backward and forward in pause
mode.
The color box
The color box enables you to select a color.
Clicking on the palette arrow (1) enables you to
choose a specific color. Scroll through the color
palette (2) until your desired color is displayed
in the color window below (3). After confirming
this color by clicking the left trackball button you
can define the color more precisely. Click in the
large color window and use the upper arrow (4)
to scroll left or right in order to attain the desired
saturation. Use the left arrow (5) to scroll up or
down to set the color brightness. With a little
practice you can specify your desired color by simultaneous use of both arrows. The intersection
point of both arrows (if you imagine them extending until they touch within the box) indicates
the selected color, which is always displayed to
the right in the rectangle (6). Clicking on the left
trackball button confirms the setting. You can
also click directly on the color you wish without
having to use the arrow keys, by simply clicking
on the desired color within the color window (3).
The color that you selected is at the same time
displayed in the top left color button (9) for as
long as the button remains activated.
Beneath it you will see five other color buttons/
memory buttons (10), which allow you to select
frequently-used colors quickly and conveniently.
To assign your preferred colors to the memory
buttons, first activate a memory button and then
select a color in the big color window. Once
the required color is assigned to the memory
button, activate another memory button or the
upper color button (9).
In many cases (e.g. when titling) the color box
provides the Alpha option (7). Here you let the
desired color shine through your motif displayed
on the right (6), (the Eiffel tower is shown here
as an example). You can specify the alpha value
in percent by moving the scroll bar. The lower
the percent value the more transparent your
selected color and the more clearly your motif
shines through.
Clicking on the "Pick color” button (11) opens
the first frame of the scene that is selected in
the scene bin (in the case of the “New” menu)
or in the storyboard (in the case of the Effects
menus). There is a toolbar in the foreground
containing several buttons:
If you have opened the color box from an
effects menu, you can first of all use the top
left selection button to specify whether the
scene (“Effect”) that is currently selected in the
storyboard or another freely selectable scene
(“Choose") should be displayed.
Clicking on “Choose Scene” opens the scene
bin and you can specify a scene from which
you want to capture the color. If the upper
selection button was previously set to “Effect”
it will automatically switch to “Choose” after
you select another scene. You can then use the
selection button to jump easily back and forth
between the two scenes.
(By activating the color box in the transition effect menu, you can use the two „Left scene“ and
„Right scene“ buttons allowing you to switch
back and forth between the respective scenes.)
You can use the slider control or separate
buttons at the bottom to roll through the
selected scene frame-by-frame. (In the case of
image-processing effects, you also have the
option of rolling through the entire length of the
effect, i.e. through several scenes.)
The “Position” and “Size” buttons allow you
to adjust further settings for the color capture
function. The smaller the little selection box is,
the more precisely you can specify the color. In
the little “Color” box, you can view the color
over which the box is currently placed. If there
are several colors contained within the area
of the selection box, an average color value is
taken.
After you click on “Ok” you will see that your
selection is applied to the color window of the
color box. If you click on “Cancel”, you will
close the menu without applying any settings
changes.
17
You can use the Archive function (8) to save the
colors you specify for later use (see „Archive
function“).
When you have finished making all the settings
you want, click on "Ok" to confirm and to exit
the color box.
Note: If you are not using a professional video
system (e.g. Betacom SP), avoid using high saturation values. Otherwise "color drain" or "jaggedness" might occur that is only visible after
recording out to tape. A simultaneous reduction
of color saturation and brightness results in a
similar color with a better recording quality for
VHS, SVHS and DV.
Tip: If you would also like to use a color in titling
that has already been used for an effect (e.g. picture-in-picture), archive the effect color, change
to Titling and reload the color. You can access
archived colors from all projects!
The symbols for direct menu change
Most of the SMART EDIT screens are represented by symbols.
You will find these symbols on small buttons at
many places and they serve to directly switch
from one menu to another. It is always possible
to return to the Main menu and go from there to
the individual menus, but the experienced user
will save time by using the symbols to access
menus directly. You will become used to the
symbols while doing some editing. Instant memorization of their uses is not necessary.
Wave form and audio scrubbing
The menus Insert, Range, Split, and Trim (video
and audio) contain a loudspeaker symbol in
the operating panel. When this symbol is active
(blue) a small box containing the Audio Wave
Form is displayed at the other side of the operating panel. The wave form graphically displays
the volume over time. The height of the curve
represents loudness (the higher, the louder) and
the width is a measure of time.
In the wave form you see a vertical, black
position marker indicating your current picture
position. This position marker is also shown
when you scroll through the scene or the audio
segment.
The Audio Wave Form is automatically played
when one of the buttons "In", "Out", "Split Positi-
on", "/>", or ">/" is clicked and the trackball is
held motionless for approximately 0.5 seconds.
A movable, vertical white-hatch bar indicates the
actual playback position.
When trimming the beginning of a scene (In) the
black position marker can be seen to the left on
the curve. When trimming the end of a scene
(Out), it can be seen to the right.
As you scroll through the scene you hear the
corresponding audio. Depending on the scrolling speed you hear the audio faster or slower
(often referred to as "scrub audio”).
The wave form has two different display forms.
When scrolling through the scene you see a detailed wave form or a segment of the wave form.
As soon as you receive a preview of the last
second the wave form for the entire playback
time is shown.
If you don't need the wave form then you can
make it go away by clicking on the loudspeaker
symbol so that it becomes brown and the frame
disappears. To bring back the wave form simply
click on the symbol again.
i-buttons:
The Transition effects, Image Processing Effects,
and Titling screens all have an "i" button. This is
a button for obtaining information but it currently works only for some of the effects.
If you have selected supplementary or bonus effects and click on this button, a Product information menu opens and gives you an explanation
or summary instructions for the selected effect.
This button is inactive for those effects for which
no information is provided.
The "i” button is also present in the Install product menu in the System Settings screen.
There you can bring up information on the
products selected in the list (e.g. effect modules,
font packages, etc.). You will also find information and summary instructions for products that
are only installed as demo versions, if available.
The info button of the edit menu is available
both in the "Storyboard" part (displays information about the storyboard) as well as in the
"Scene Bin" (displays information about the
activated scene).
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Archive function
You will see the "Archive" button in various menus and screens (e.g. titling, color box).
Clicking on this button opens a screen in which
there are four buttons: "Load", "Save", "Delete",
and "Cancel".
Clicking on "Load" displays a list of the titles,
effects, or settings that have previously been
saved. You can then directly select or scroll to an
entry in this list and confirm.
A click on "Save" displays the same list. There
are now two possible courses of action:
1. You can click on the gray rectangle directly below the list so that the keyboard is called up and
you can type in a name, after which you click
on "Ok" in the keyboard and in the text archive
field. This creates a new archive entry.
2. You can select an entry from the list and then
click on the gray rectangle in which the name of
the selected entry is now visible. Now you can
use the keyboard field to overwrite this name
with another name of your choice. This differs
from the first option in that here you not only
change the name, but you also overwrite the
entry itself, so that the original entry is permanently deleted.
If you click on "Delete", a list of the saved entries
is displayed in which you can select an entry to
delete and confirm with "Ok".
Clicking on "Cancel" exits the window without
making any changes.
With the help of archiving you can save frequently used standard text and reuse the text at
any time in any of the projects.
Image Pool
An additional function is the Image Pool. This is
a ‘global’ area for storing graphics; this means
that the image can also be exchanged between
different program packages and projects or saved directly from your footage.
The main program and almost all supplemental
programs use the Image Pool. In this way, graphics brought into the system by one program
can automatically be used by all other programs.
The Image Pool is used in many areas of the
system, e.g. titling, when creating new scenes,
in the edit screen or in conjunction with DVDArabesk.
If you select the scene "Pattern" in the menu
"New", the option "Select Pattern" appears to
the right. You can click on that to open the Select
pattern screen which offers you a number of patterns to choose from.
In the area to the above-left you see the
selection button "Product" offering you a list
of the main program "SMART EDIT", "DVD
Arabesk" (if it is installed), different additional
programs and the option „Custom Images“.
The next selection button "Type" offers you up
to four different types of graphics:
- Masks
Masks are used principally by programs such as
Liquid Images and Video SpiceRack.
The masks are gray pictures whose form is used
by the programs to specify the course of effects.
But the masks can also be used for other purposes. For example, they can be colored and used
to achieve variety in backgrounds for titling.
- Monochrome
Monochrome (gray) patterns (also called "textures") are listed here. These can be colored
and used as background elsewhere. Because
the patterns are usually smaller than the screen,
they are automatically tiled on the screen, until
the desired surface is completely covered.
- Color
The multi-colored patterns are used in the same
way as the monochrome patterns. No further coloring is possible as the patterns already contain
color.
- Pictures
Complex pictures can be found in this category, (e.g. you see here the maps of the program
„Columbus“ (if it is installed) or the background
pictures for DVD Arabesk). Although they are in-
19
tended to be used as background for DVD titles,
the pictures can also be used elsewhere in the
system.
You'll find "SMART EDIT" under “Product“.
From here, you can also find logos of the single systems as well as the MacroSystem logo.
These can be used as background pictures when
creating your own text panel in the titling screen
and are therefore very useful for credits.
In addition, you will find many pictures
provided here (e.g. stars) – they have many uses
particularly when creating titles.
In the bottom left corner of the image pool
you will see the i-button described earlier. This
button allows you to access information on the
currently selected "Product”.
If you click on the "Save Image” button, the
“Product” selection will change to “Custom
Images” and the “Type” selection will change to
“Images”. The system will also ask you to select
an entry. Confirm this notification with “Ok”
and select a free (black) image from the list.
Then click on “Save Image” again to open the
scene bin so you can select the starting frame
of a scene that you want from the bin. After
you confirm with “Ok” it appears in the image
collection and in a large preview (right). You
can store a total of 18 of your own images here,
which you can later use anywhere in your video
editing work.
You can of course also readjust the “Product”
selection and “Type” selection manually before
saving a picture.
All patterns can also be used as texture for fonts
in the Titling menu.
In the list to the left you can select the desired
mask, which is then displayed to the right in
large format. You can also see the names of the
selected mask above and to the right.
Below this window you find several buttons:
The “Colorize“ button allows you to colorize all
patterns - even colored ones.
If you click onto the “Colorize” button, a menu
with several buttons will appear. Use “Mode” to
select how many colors are to be used. This will
then lead to the respective amount of palette
buttons appearing.
Your coloring will be displayed in the preview
window.
Original: There is no coloring and the pattern
remains in its original color or monochrome.
Additionally, you can use this function to return
to the original color of the pattern.
1 Color: The pattern brightness remains; yet one
color is added according to the color you choose
in “Color 1”. The brightness chosen in the color
box is ignored as this is controlled by the monochrome part of the pattern.
2 Colors: You can create a shift from one color
to another. "Color 1" is added in the parts used
by the monochrome image. "Color 3" replaces
white. Depending on the pattern, instead of the
black and white parts, the most bright and dark
parts of the pattern are used. Between the two
colors, all previously monochrome tones are
replaced by the respective color tones and a soft
color shift is created.
3 Colors: In comparison with the shift between
two colors, a third color is added: “Color 2”. This
color replaces the gray tone found in the middle
of the original monochrome shift. The result is a
shift from Color 1 to Color 2 and from there, to
Color 3.
Tint: This mode is only provided for color masks.
If you select this function, the "Color 1” button is
activated, which you should then click. Specify
a color and confirm with “Ok”. All the colors
of the mask are then replaced by the one you
selected. The entire picture is then filled with
one shade of color, though the saturation and
brightness are retained.
Hue: This option is likewise only provided for
color masks. If you click on this button, the
system first of all determines which is the
dominant color in the mask and then displays
it as “Color 1”. You cannot select this button.
Now click on “Color 2” and use the upper
palette arrow to select any color shade that you
want to replace the dominant color with. All the
colors in this mask are thus replaced with a new
one, whereby the distance in the color palette
between the original and replacement color is
equal to the distance between the dominant
color and Color 2.
Hue 2: This option functions in a similar way
to “Hue”, and is therefore only displayed for
colored masks. Though in this case you can
freely select the color that is to be replaced by
capturing it from the image (see Color box).
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You can customize the settings for your
mask still further by using the “Brightness”,
“Contrast” and “Color” buttons that are located
in the bottom area of the window.
For simple, soft shifts, it is recommended that
you use the “Linear H” (horizontal shift), “Linear
V” (vertical shift) and “Linear D” (diagonal shift).
The direction of the color shift can be altered
using the “Mode” button.
The little box next to the "Colorize” button can
be used to activate or deactivate the colorization
of the pattern displayed in the upper preview
window. If a dash appears in the little box,
you can see the original color. If a check mark
is shown, you can see the pattern with the
colorization that you set. You do not have to
activate the check mark in order to colorize
a pattern – all you need do is click on the
“Colorize” button!
With "Mode" you can choose from eight different positive and negative inverses.
To select a color, you can access the color box
directly using the little color box in the bottom
left corner of the right-hand image pool area (on
the left next to "Ok"). If, for example, you click
on the "Color/Pattern" button when selecting a
border for the titles, you will first of all see the
image pool in which you can either select (using
the button described here) a mask or a color as
desired.
The pattern chosen, with its chosen settings (e.g.
direction, color), can be saved and used again at
a later stage. For this purpose, use the “Archives” button. Included, you’ll find a number of
pre-set examples (“Granite dark”, “Wood”,…).
Below this window you find the buttons "Color" (the color box can be accessed from many
masks) and
Demo software
Most supplemental programs can be installed as
demo versions. This means that you can let your
dealer transfer these versions to your SmartMedia card or CD/DVD, so they can be previewed at
your leisure. To do this, insert the SmartMedia
card or CD/DVD and click on the button "Install
Product" in the System Settings screen. Select
as accustomed the program in the list and click
on "Display".
The selected software is then activated as demo
version, as you can tell by the caption "(Demo)”.
You can use this program without restriction, i.e.
you can insert effects, calculate them and view
them, but each effect is superimposed with the
red text "Demo". To purchase a code to unlock
the supplemental program, please contact your
Dealer.
3.3 Working with Graphics Tablets
You also have the option of connecting an
Intuos graphics tablet or, if your system has a
VGA port, a VGA tablet.
Further information on available and supported
tablets can be obtained from your dealer.
You can find out how to connect and calibrate
both tablets below. For further steps on
operating your tablet, please refer to the
instructions that came with it.
3.3.1 Intuos tablet
Connecting
Plug in the cable of the graphics tablet into an
available USB port on the back of your machine,
which can remain switched on when you plug in
the cable.
Calibration
In order to be able to control the SMART EDIT
user interface precisely, you must first calibrate
the graphics tablet before using it for the first
time.
To do this, enter the “System Settings” and click
onto the “Calibrate Graphics Tablet” button.
A menu appears, displaying the name of the
connected tablet.
You can now set the “Pressure Sensitivity” of
the tablet’s pen. A higher value means that you
have to press harder to reach an effect. Push the
slider to the entire right (“Off”) to deactivate the
pen point totally – instead you will have to press
the lower positioned button on the side of the
pen itself (see Intuos manual for more details).
The "max. Distance" button allows you to
21
specify how big the distance between the stylus
and the tablet can be for the system to still react.
A distance of 0 only allows for a very close
proximity to the tablet. A value of 100 allows for
a large distance. It is best if you simply try out
values to find the one that suits you.
another computer monitor so that you can “feed
through” the video picture and thus work on a
total of three monitors.
Press “Calibrate” and you will see a requester,
prompting you to “Please click the top left
corner of the tablet”. Having done this, you will
have to repeat it for the lower right corner of the
tablet. The coordinates of the tablet now correspond to the screen.
After you have made the cable connections,
switch on your system by operating the front
switch and switch on the VGA tablet by pressing
the button at the top right.
Once your system has started you will still see
the menu displayed on the TV monitor since you
first have to switch over to the VGA setting. To
do so, open the “System Settings” menu and
set the “Screen” button to the required “VGA”
option. A notification appears informing you that
a computer monitor is required for this. You are
then asked whether you want to continue – you
should answer by clicking on “Yes”. The system
is then restarted.
Afterwards you will see the main SMART EDIT
menu on the VGA tablet. Now, within the next
15 seconds, confirm the notification that informs
you that the screen display has been switched
over. To do so, click on “Yes” in the usual way
using the trackball.
Working with the pen
To work with the pen, you have to move it
across the tablet without actually touching the
surface – as if the pen is “floating” slightly. To
“click”; either press the pen point onto the tablet
surface or press the lower button on the pen’s
side. Doing this represents the standard “left
click”.
To simulate a click of the right Trackball button
(such as for cancelling), make sure that the pen
is floating slightly above the tablet and press the
top button on the pen’s side.
3.3.2 VGA tablet
Connecting
Unpack the VGA tablet and connect it to your
system. To do so, plug one end of the VGA cable
into the “VGA IN” input on the tablet and the
other end into the VGA port of your system.
Then connect up the USB cable by plugging one
end of the cable that is supplied with the tablet
into the USB port on the tablet and the other end
into a free USB port on your system.
You must now provide the tablet with electrical
power by connecting the power supply cable
to the adapter and plugging the cable into an
electrical socket. Now plug the adapter cable
into the 12 V connection of the tablet.
Note: Although the menus are subsequently
displayed on the VGA monitor, you will still of
course need a TV monitor for playing your video
footage.
You can connect an additional VGA cable to
the “VGA OUT” port on the VGA tablet. The
other end of this cable can be connected to
Switching on
Calibration
In order to now operate the VGA tablet with
the accompanying stylus, open the "System
Settings" menu and click (using the trackball)
on the “Calibrate Graphics Tablet" button in the
“Settings” section.
A menu appears, displaying the name of the
connected tablet.
You can now set the “Pressure Sensitivity” of
the tablet’s pen. A higher value means that you
have to press harder to reach an effect. Push the
slider to the entire right (“Off”) to deactivate the
pen point totally – instead you will have to press
the lower positioned button on the side of the
pen itself (see Intuos manual for more details).
We recommend a pressure sensitivity of 35-40.
You can place a check mark in the little box
next to the "Mousepointer" option to activate it
so that you always see a red arrow on-screen
wherever the tip of the stylus is positioned. If
you deactivate the function (dash), the arrow is
22
no longer displayed.
Press “Calibrate” and you will see a requester,
prompting you to “Please click into the center
of the cross in the top left corner”. Having done
this, you will have to repeat it for center of the
cross in the lower right corner of the tablet. The
coordinates of the tablet now correspond to the
screen.
mode off some camcorders (`Format´ button in
the record screen)
• Setting record time for loading footage into
the system and create stills during a recording
(`Mode´ button in the record screen)
• Graphical display of sound envelope to help
with editing music or original sounds (audioscrubbing with envelope display found in the
Split, Trim or Insert screens)
Working with the pen
• Selection of 6 audio tracks
To work with the pen, you have to move it
across the tablet without actually touching the
surface – as if the pen is “floating” slightly. To
“click”; either press the pen point onto the tablet
surface or press the lower button on the pen’s
side. Doing this represents the standard “left
click”.
To simulate a click of the right Trackball button
(such as for cancelling), make sure that the pen
is floating slightly above the tablet and press the
top button on the pen’s side.
3.4 The (integrated) Pro Pack software /
available functions
On some hardware variants, optional software
functions may already be available or may differ
slightly from the function described in this text.
On system variants, the software functions need
to be purchased separately.
The following functions are available if the Pro
Pack software has been installed or if it is part of
the included software:
• Up to 10 projects
• Scene function (`Scene´ button in the transition,
image processing and titling effect menus)
• Extended titling (`Line´ button)
• Single frame preview (`Single frame´ button
in the transition, image processing and titling
effect menus)
• Option for switching 4:3 format to 16:9 mode
to be able to use the anamorph 16:9 recording
• Copying video scenes or samples into other
projects (`Clipboard´ button in the `Special´
screen)
• Splitting a scene according to rhythm (`Index´
button in the `Split´ screen)
23
Chapter 4: Tutorials
We recommend working through the five tutorials in the order given here. This offers you an
introduction to video editing followed by the
more specialized techniques of SMART EDIT
(insert editing, audio mixing, titling, etc.).
For these tutorials we assume you are using
only one monitor (video mode). If you are
working in VGA mode, then you can read about
eventual changes to the user interface in
chapter 6: VGA Mode.
Please note that depending on the system
model, the functions explained in this text may
vary slightly or may be missing.
4.1 Tutorial 1: A small video project
This example introduces you to the basic concepts of editing with SMART EDIT. Special applications and procedures are not explained yet.
In this example you will create a simple video
project. A "project" is the creation of a complete
video starting with raw footage and ending with
a finished film.
Step 1: Selecting raw footage
For this example you will use your own raw
footage. Set aside a cassette with raw footage
(e.g. video from your last vacation), be it in DV
or HDV format. You will only need a few scenes that last a total of about 3 minutes. Try and
select interesting material so that the project will
be more fun!
Put the cassette in your video input device (e.g.
camcorder, VCR, etc.) and rewind it to the position where your selected footage begins.
Step 2: Orientation in the Main Menu screen
Turn on the machine and wait until the hard
drive is ready. The Main Menu now appears
offering several options for selection. There are
three main areas:
(1) Settings (above right)
Here you select settings such as trackball speed,
desired audio quality, or the current project.
(2) Video (center)
Here you will record your raw footage onto the
hard drive and then divide (split) it into editable scenes. You will then edit (trim) the scenes
and finally put them into a new sequence in the
storyboard. You will put transition effects between the individual scenes and apply an Image
Processing effect (or filter) to one of the scenes.
You will then create a title and then finish your
video project.
(3) Audio (below left)
Here you score your video with music, sound
effects or spoken commentary.
This division into logical steps makes for a
clearly structured work plan. If you should have
any questions during the course of work, then
simply check the Reference Section(Chapter 5)
of this manual – all buttons are explained there
in detail.
How do you access the individual work screens?
Position the screen cursor onto the corresponding field. Then click on it with the left trackball
button. The right trackball button cancels, or
returns you to the previous screen.
This operation requires a certain familiarity with
the user interface. If these instructions are unfamiliar to you, please read about the trackball in
section 2.2 and then the operating elements in
section 3.2.
24
Step 3: Settings
Before you begin editing, you should make your
own personal settings.
System settings
Click on the "System Settings" button to view
the System Settings screen. Here you can select
the "Trackball Speed" appropriate for you. There
is a choice of three different speeds.
Now exit this menu either by clicking the right
trackball button or by clicking on the Main menu
symbol (bottom right) with the left trackball
button:
Project settings
Now you can make the settings for your project.
A click on the Project Settings button leads you
to the corresponding menu.
At the upper edge you will see the the hard-drive
"Name" button. By clicking on the gray rectangle
the keyboard is displayed and you can enter the
name of the inserted hard drive. You can also
see which hard drive is currently in the machine
(the label on the hard drive itself is not visible
because the hard drive is contained within the
machine).
The field "Used Capacity" gives information on
how much of the hard drive has been filled (in
percentage) and how much space is left. Audio
and video are not distinguished.
Further below you see the "Select" button. After
clicking this button you see a list of several projects contained on the hard drive. Each project
can be worked on independently of the others.
But for now, click on project 1 ("P 1") and confirm with "OK".
Next to "Select" you see the field "P 1", which
you should now rename. Click on it to bring up
the keyboard (section 3.2: On-screen keyboard).
Delete the default name and enter instead "First
tutorial".
The button "Information" will bring up a menu
that gives information on the project name, storyboard length, scenes in the storyboard, chosen
effects, and number of scenes contained in the
scene bin.
Now, you must define the "Format" of the
project. Of you whish to playback DV footage,
you must opt for either a 4:3 or a 16:9 project. If
you video is recorded in HDV quality, you must
select the setting "HDV".
At this point we don‘t want to go into too much
detail on the functions and meanings of all the
settings. These will be explained in more detail
later! For now, set the Image size to "Normal".
The display, "Used Capacity" gives information
on the space used on the hard drive (dark blue),
and on the total remaining time (light blue). A
display for individual projects is not possible because this display refers to the entire hard drive.
Now exit this menu.
Video settings
Enter the Video settings (if supported) screen
and turn on your video input device. Here you
can select the appropriate input. If you using
a VCR as input device, then you will usually
use the SCART input (in Europe,) or you will
use CVBS (RCA) or YC (S-video). Of course, for
optimum quality you can use the DV input for
digital devices, if your system is provided with a
DV interface.
You will have the option to select between the
Front or Rear inputs: be sure to set this according to how you are physically cabled from your
input device. Your Prestige will automatically
detect which DV input you are using. We recommend that you only connect one DV device at a
time, or errors may occur.
Press Play on your input device, so the video
will start. If your video signal is now viewable
underneath the menu bar , you can continue by
adjusting the Brightness, Contrast, and Saturation if necessary. These settings are not accessible if the DV input is being used. If your DV signal
requires correction during input, use the YC
setting and cable in via S-Video and RCA audio.
Exit the menu when you are satisfied with the
picture quality.
25
Step 4: Recording and editing
ding because of the changing recording time.
Recording
Now select "Record" to enter the Record screen.
In the background you will see your video. An
operating panel in the foreground displays (after
the recording is stopped) the name of the scene,
the recording time, and the approximate remaining time available on the hard drive.
Now record a few minutes of video, preferably
containing 4 or 5 different scenes. Then press
the stop symbol. Your first recording is now
stored on the hard drive.
If you have connected a DV device for input
through the i-Link interface (if your system is
provided with this interface), then you can use
the five buttons in the lower part of the operating panel for DV control. Note that not every DV
device is compatible, but you will find that most
are.
Seen from left to right on the DV control panel,
you can: stop playing the DV tape, play the DV
tape, pause, rewind, and fast forward.
Rewind and fast forward each have three different modes. Fast rewind or fast forward results
if the button is pressed while the recorder is
stopped. Viewable slow rewind or slow forward
results if the button is pressed while DV unit is
playing. Clicking the button while the DV unit is
in pause mode moves a single frame backward
or forward.
The selection button "Mode" (if supported)
offers three options in a DV project, but for this
exercise leave it set to "Normal".
If you are editing an HDV project, set the "Mode"
accordingly so that only one recording is made.
Only one HDV recording button will be active.
With the button in the lower-left corner (arrows
facing each other) you have the option to move
the panel to the lower screen edge . With the
button on top of that you can reduce the panel
size to the functions for reinstating the larger
panel (the Record menu symbol) and for moving
the panel.
The four menu symbols in the lower right corner
take you to the Edit, Record/Edit, Video settings,
and to the Main menu screens.
Now wait until an scene you wish to load is
reached. Clicking the record symbol causes the
Prestige to begin recording.
As soon as recording begins, the current panel
is replaced with a smaller one that displays only
the elapsed recording time and a stop symbol.
You can see that your system is actually recor-
If you are recording an HDV project, the HDV
video footage will be loaded into your system
once you have clicked onto the record button. It
will be automatically converted from HDV to DV
format. Of course, in parallel, the HDV material
is saved and edited in the background. This
takes some time.
Now record a few more scenes. Do this as
described above. The recorded scenes are at
first automatically titled with "S 1", "S 2", etc. To
change the name (e.g. to "vacation") click on this
field immediately after recording to bring up the
keyboard where you can enter your text.
Stop the input device and then exit the "Record"
menu.
Editing
Now go to the Edit screen. Here you see the
Scene Bin in the lower half of the screen. The
Scene Bin contains a sequence of small pictures
("thumbnails") showing your recorded scenes.
To the right and above the scenes, you can see
the name of your project – if it has been named.
All created individual scenes that are ready for
editing are stored in this bin. You can see up
to eleven entire scenes at one glance in video
mode. For more you must scroll the horizontal
slider below the scene bin to access following
scenes.
You can also use the arrow buttons next to the
slider to step through the scenes forward or
backward one by one, or to jump to the beginning or end of the scene bin.
In case you have not already renamed the scenes in the "Record" menu, then you again have
the chance here to give the scenes your own
names. To do this, position the desired scene in
the center of the panel so that is displayed larger
than the rest and the length of the scene can be
seen displayed directly above it. (Scroll through
the scene bin or click directly on the desired
scene so that it is moved directly to the middle
"selected" position.)
26
Now click on the button below the scene to call
up the keyboard.
Each scene can now be viewed or edited from
this menu as soon as it has been brought to
the middle of the Scene bin. Once there it is the
selected scene, and it is slightly larger than the
other scenes in the Scene Bin.
Click on the play symbol (next to the slider) to
begin playing the video. Playback can be halted
at any time with the stop button, pause button,
or with the right trackball button.
Your video is now played from the hard drive.
(This lets you know that the footage has been
properly digitized.) If video and audio are successfully played, then you know that the installation was successful, the cables are correctly
connected and the hard drive is communicating
properly.
Your recorded scenes will probably consist of
several different camera perspectives. In order
to be able to separately edit and arrange them,
they must first be divided up into individual
scenes.
Click on the menu item "Split" in the bottom line
of the Scene Bin menu. The first frame of the
selected scene (in the center of the Scene Bin)
appears with the Split menu, which is displayed
in the lower third of the picture. The top line of
this menu displays the name of the scene (e.g.
"vacation"). Next to that you see a time indicating the length of the selected splitting position
(initially 000.00:01).
Here you must find the exact positions where
one shot ends and another begins – the socalled scene changes. Press the "Split position"
button to obtain a new, narrower control panel.
Now you can scroll through the scene. Look for
the first perspective change and scroll slowly to
the desired split position. Confirm this position
by clicking the left trackball button, which causes
the selection menu to be displayed again. There
you can adjust the split position by using the"<"
and ">" keys to move forward or backward one
frame at a time.
To check that you have correctly selected the
split position, set the Split position at the last
frame of the first take. Clicking on the ">" key
will display the first frame of the next take, clicking on "<" will display the previous one. After
you have done this, you can play the selected
portion (by clicking on the play button).
If you want to keep this scene, select "Use". If
you do not plan to use the selected portion of
video, click "Drop". If you have decided to use
part of the scene, the rest of the scene is given
a name with an additional suffix, (e.g. "vacation.1", "vacation.2", etc.).
After you have completed this step, you still
have the rest of the non-edited raw footage.
Continue as above until you have Used or Dropped the rest of the footage.
Now you can return to the Edit menu (click on
right button).
All takes marked as used are now displayed as
individual scenes ("vacation.1", "vacation.2" etc).
These split copies require no additional space
on the hard drive. The original scene ("vacation")
is still present.
You can now play the individual scenes. Simply click on the scene. The scene will move to
the center of the scene bin and then becomes
the selected scene. The duration of the selected scene is displayed above it. If you want to
play the selected scene simply click on the Play
button.
Tip: At this point, if you select the original scene
"vacation” in the scene bin and click "Delete”,
you will regain space on the hard drive – equivalent to the amount of footage that was dropped
when the scene was split up into pieces. This
footage cannot be recovered, so only do this if
you need additional drive space. However, if all
of the footage was used, then deleting the original scene "vacation” will have no benefit.
Trimming scenes
Now that the raw footage has been divided up
into scenes, we can begin to trim them. Trimming means that the beginning of the scene
can be advanced or the end of the scene can be
shortened. The result should be a scene with
proper In/Out points that make the scene start
and stop when you choose.
Clicking on "Trim" calls up the corresponding
27
Trim screen. In the background you see the first
frame of your video. The trim panel is in the
foreground and covers one third of the picture.
The name of the scene appears in the upper line,
and next to that its length is displayed. For this
tutorial a time between 3 and 10 seconds is suitable. (If the currently selected scene is shorter
than that, exit the Trim screen and select another scene. If it is longer, trim the scene down to
10 seconds)
Now trim the In point, (the point at which the
scene will begin playing). Clicking on "IN"
replaces the displayed panel with a narrower
one, in which you can scroll with the trackball
and adjust the In point. Rolling the ball to the
right causes the scene to be shortened from the
beginning. Rolling to the left increases it again.
Clicking the left trackball button confirms your
setting and you are returned to the Trim menu.
There you can make a frame-by-frame adjustment using the arrow keys "<" and ">" located
below the "IN" button.
You can adjust the Out point by clicking on
"OUT" and proceeding as explained above. Rolling to the left shortens the scene from the end
and rolling to the right increases it again. The
arrow keys located below the "OUT" button are
also available for frame-by-frame adjustment.
At the top of the Trim panel you see the new
scene length next to its name. The time information for the first frame is displayed next to
the "IN" button – 000.00:14 means, for example,
that the scene has been shortened by fourteen
frames. The time information for the last frame
appears next to the "OUT" button.
Click on the right button to leave the Trim menu.
Select the next scene and trim it as explained
above. Continue until all scenes have been trimmed.
You should now have a series of scenes in the
scene bin that are all free of bad properties (e.g.
blurred video, bad frames, scene breaks, etc.)
and each last from 3 to 10 seconds.
The Storyboard
Now the scenes are ready to be put into proper
sequence. SMART EDIT lets you sequentiallly
order the scenes in the storyboard. It doesn‘t
matter in what order they appear in the Scene
Bin.
Select the scene in the Scene Bin that you want
to be the first scene in your video project. Click
on "Add" (in the upper screen area, below the
storyboard itself). The scene then appears in the
horizontal panel (the storyboard) directly in the
center.
The storyboard contains the finished video project (which right now only consists of 1 scene).
Of course, changes can be made to the storyboard at any time.
Now select the second scene and click again on
"Add". You are asked whether the scene should
be added before or after the scene in the storyboard. This question appears only when the first
scene is the active scene in the storyboard (in
the center, with its length displayed above).
Normally, SMART EDIT will add a scene after the
active scene in the Storyboard. The query in this
case makes it possible to insert a scene in front
of the first scene. For now, select "behind".
Now you already have two scenes in the storyboard. Add the rest of the scenes in this manner.
When you are finished, all the scenes that make
up your video should be in the storyboard.
In the scene bin every scene that has been added to the storyboard is indicated with a white
point in the upper right corner.
Now you can view the finished video in its
"rough draft” version. First you must make the
first scene in the storyboard the active scene.
There are four ways to do this:
(1) Click with the left button on the arrow button
"|<" beneath the storyboard. The first scene of
the project is now the active scene in the center
of the storyboard.
(2) The slider under the storyboard is used to
scroll through the Storyboard scenes (using the
trackball). Move the slider all the way to the left.
(3) Using the "<" button you can move one scene
at a time toward the first scene.
(4) You can also click directly on the desired
scene, causing it to be put in the center.
Clicking on the Play symbol below the storyboard to the left causes the video to play from
the beginning of the active scene (in this case,
28
the first scene). All scenes are played in the order you have defined, from left to right through
the storyboard.
If your system does not support real-time effects, all effects must therefore be rendered. The
blue symbol will appear after rendering.
If you want to change the sequence, (for example move a scene from the end of the storyboard
to the beginning), select the scene in the Scene
bin. Now click in the storyboard on the scene
after which the selected scene is to appear. Click
on "Add". Finally, select the old scene in the storyboard and remove it by clicking on "Remove".
Now you can check the effect by clicking the
Play symbol. This plays one second of the video
before the effect, the effect itself, and one second after the effect.
Step 5: Effects
Transition effects
The basic footage of your video is finished. Now
some effects can be added. Return to the Main
menu. Select Transitions. Alternatively, you can
simply click the menu symbol at the bottom
right of the Edit menu:
In the Transitions screen you see the storyboard
above in its usual place, but in the center you
now find the active scene area now has room for
two scenes. Bring the two scenes that you would
like to connect with a transition into the center.
Click on the Play button below the storyboard
to play the last second of the first scene and the
first second of the second scene so that you can
observe the hard cut between the two scenes.
Now select a transition to be placed between the
scenes. SMART EDIT offers you many possibilities from a simple crossfade to complex 3D
effects.
Below left in the menu you find a list of the individual effects, where a maximum of 7 effects are
displayed at one time in the list; use the slider to
access the rest. Every effect is represented by a
name and a symbol. Simply click on the desired
effect to highlight it in gray.
For example, select the effect "Crossfade" (or
any other effect, if this effect is not available),
which causes the first scene in the center of the
storyboard to change gently into the second.
In this case the effect is a real-time effect, so its
symbol, outlined in blue, is displayed immediately between the two scenes in the storyboard
after you have clicked on "Add".
Now select the next transition point in the storyboard. To do this click on the ">" arrow button or
click directly on the next scene in the storyboard.
Now you can select another transition effect, (for
example the effect Bars). In the field to the right
you have three options to change how this transition performs: Type (Move or Over), Direction
(6 different directions, represented by arrows),
and Bars (2-200).
This time the effect symbol placed in the storyboard is outlined in red after a click on "Add".
This means that the effect has to be created
before it can be viewed.
We recommend that you activate the "Smart
Rendering" function, so that added effects
can be rendered in the background while you
continue to work.
However, you can preview the effect to decide if
you really want to use it. Click on the "Preview"
button below the storyboard. A screen will open
in which one second before the effect, the effect
itself, and one second after the effect is played.
For a few of the complex effects, the preview
may wobble a bit, because the number frames
per second is reduced. However, this will not
occur in the actual transition once created.
For some of the special effects (e.g. "Backward")
the preview may be slower than the final calculated effect. Of course, you can also choose the
other settings for type, direction, and number,
and observe these with the preview.
When you are satisfied with the effect, click on
the "Create" button below the storyboard to the
right. A screen opens so that you can follow the
creation (with a blue progress bar and actual
video preview).
You can activate the option „Smart Rendering“
in the „System Settings“. Now the inserted
effect will be rendered in the background, while
it is possible to insert more effects.
After a few seconds the effect has been created.
The outline of the effect symbol in the storyboard now appears blue instead of red. Now
29
the effect can be viewed by clicking on the Play
symbol. One second before the effect, the effect
itself, and one second after the effect is played.
If the effect appears to you to be too fast or too
slow, then you can change its speed by changing its duration. The default setting is 1 second,
but you can click to the left above on the button
displaying the effect duration. This opens a
screen in which you can set the effect duration
exactly with a slider. The effect must then be
recreated.
Image Processing effects
After all transition effects have been inserted
and created (all symbols are outlined in blue),
you can move on to Image Processing effects.
(Having activated "Smart Rendering", you can
switch between menus while your system
creates effects in the background.)These effects
change an individual scene partially or over its
entire duration. Exit the Transitions screen and
go to the Image Processing screen by clicking on
the following menu symbol:
At first glance everything looks just as it did in
the Transitions screen. But now you find only
one active scene in the center of the storyboard,
exactly as in the Edit screen. This scene represents, approximately, that portion of the storyboard to which you want to apply the Image
Processing effect. When initially added to the
scene, the effect will last the duration of the entire scene. You may make frame-accurate changes
to the range of the effect, if desired.
Image Processing effects modify a freely definable section of the storyboard. For example,
the entire scene may be to be brightened. In the
following tutorial you will transform a scene in
the storyboard into a moving charcoal drawing.
First, select a scene in the storyboard to which
you would like to add the effect. The scene
should not contain any transition effects.
Click on the effect list and scroll to the desired
effect (exactly as with transition effects). For
this tutorial select the effect Lineart. This effect
causes the video picture to appear as a blackand-white drawing. In the field to the right next
to the selection list you can specify the desired
Contrast with values between 1 and 8. (The
higher the contrast, the stronger the difference
between light and dark portions of the scene.)
Once you have done this, click on "Add".
Now you can observe the scene with the inserted effect by clicking on "Preview". It will now
look like a moving charcoal drawing!
Click on the duration display after the effect has
been added, and you will see a screen in which
you can specify the desired duration of the
effect. For more information see Reference 5.9
(Image Processing effects).
If you like the effect, you can create it. Clicking
on the Play button below the storyboard causes
the exact length of the effect to be played.
Now exit this menu by clicking on the right
trackball button.
Step 6: Audio mixing
You now can begin audio mixing. Call up the
"Audio Record, Edit" screen. Here you will add
commentary and a piece of music to your short
film. To do this you must - if your system sports
a CD/DVD drive, use a CD with suitable music.
If you do not have a CD drive, connect an audio
source (e.g. CD player or your camera with a
microphone).
Recording audio
In the Audio Record, Edit screen, the first thing
you see is the Input selection button.
If available, select the option "Microphone".
You should then already hear the microphone
and view the volume level in the above left
meter.
If your system does not feature this input, select
another available input.
In principle audio recording works just like video
recording. This means that you start with your
music source, (e.g. a tape deck), or you speak
your commentary into a microphone.
To record this material on the hard drive you
must first click on the red Record button at the
bottom right in the menu. The counter to the
left begins to count (just as when recording
video) and displays real time. Now speak a short
commentary into the microphone, (e.g. "My first
30
video with SMART EDIT").
Next, record some music of your choice into the
machine. This can come from any audio source
than can be connected via RCA cables.
Direct audio conversion from CD.
To quickly load in music from a cd, open the
DVD writer tray and put in a cd and close the
tray.
Go to the Audio Record, Edit screen and click
"CD Import" .
You will now see the CD Audio menu. Click on
the "CD Contents" button, and a list of the songs
on the CD will appear to the left. Select the song
you wish to convert and click "OK". After a
moment, the song will now appear in the list of
audio samples. It is a good idea to rename the
sample at this point.
(Detailed explanation of this screen can be found
in chapter 5.10, item (15).)
You can hear the result of your audio recording
by clicking the Play button. With the Trim function you can set precisely the beginning and end
of the audio sample. You may wish to split the
recording into individual parts by clicking on the
Split button.
seconds, clicking on the ">|" symbol plays the
last 3 seconds before the Out point. This makes
it much easier to find the exact end of the audio,
because it is not necessary to play the entire
piece in order to check the Out point. This is especially helpful when dealing with longer audio
samples.
Now give your music sample and your commentary sample a name. Simply click to the left
below on the gray rectangle with the default
name suggested by the system (A1, A2, CD
Audio, CD Audio2 etc.) to bring up the on-screen
keyboard with which you can change the name
of the sample.
To prevent confusion, we will wait until tutorial 3
before discussing the many special functions of
this screen.
Now exit the recording menu and switch to the
"Audio Mix" screen.
Audio mixing
Here you see the storyboard again.
Below it are several horizontal bands: these are the audio tracks.
Audio trimming works almost like video trimming. Click on "Trim" and the following menu
appears:
You can click either the "IN" or "OUT" button
(depending on whether you want to shorten
the audio from the beginning or from the end)
and then scroll through the recording to set the
position of the In or Out point. Alternatively, you
can use the arrow buttons for trimming frameby-frame.
Clicking on the "|>" symbol plays the first 3
The topmost track is reserved for the original
sound of the video whereas the Commentary
track (microphone symbol), the track(s) for background music (musical note symbol) and effect
track(s) are free for further use.
Of course, you can use the remaining 5 (or 2)
tracks according to your needs – the names of
the tracks /symbols to the right are merely intended as a guide.
If audio must be created, then you will see a
color control band (directly below the scenes,
but above the audio tracks). The band is either
red, yellow or blue (sized in sections correspon-
31
ding to the length of a scene in the storyboard).
A red band means over-modulation, a yellow
band means "must be created" and a blue band
means the audio has already been created, and
it is ready to play.
Activate the commentary audio track by clicking
either on the microphone symbol or on the track
itself. The track turns from gray to blue when
selected.
Then click on the "Add" button and select the
commentary that you have spoken and named
from the audio list now displayed. Confirm with
"OK" and the commentary is now placed as a
light/dark blue band below the scene you have
selected in the storyboard, on the track you designated, (in this case, the commentary track). The
audio sample will be placed at the beginning of
the scene currently selected in the middle of the
storyboard. It can be moved using the "Range”
function (see below).
The light/dark blue in the audio sample represents its volume level. Raising or lowering of the
volume will change the ratio of light blue to dark
blue. This will also show fade-ins and fade-outs,
once they are added. (When the sample is no
longer the highlighted sample, these bands will
appear light/dark gray.)
Remember that all of the functions in this screen
affect only the highlighted audio sample. Only
one sample can be highlighted at any time.
You can also change the audio volume in case
your commentary is too quiet and the music
too loud, (if you haven't already done so in the
recording menu).
Select the audio sample you placed in the commentary audio track so that it is highlighted in
blue. Scroll the volume slider to the right so that
the displayed dB value to the right is increased.
Increase about 5 dB.
Then click the audio sample on the background
music audio track so that it is highlighted. Scroll
the volume slider to decrease the dB by –5.
Click "Create" and the overall soundtrack will
be created. With the above changes finished,
the commentary becomes louder and the music
quieter so that the commentary can be heard
more clearly.
Clicking on the Play button plays the storyboard
from the active video scene with audio. The
audio level is displayed.
There are many more options in fine-tuning the
audio portion of your project but they will be covered in subsequent tutorials. You can also read
more on audio mixing in the reference (Chapter
5).
Now you can exit the Audio mix screen.
Step 7: Finishing your first video
In case you made a mistake and the commentary should begin in the next scene, delete the
audio sample by clicking on "Remove".
If the audio does not yet have the desired length,
then it can be corrected with the "Range" button.
You can read more on this in tutorial 4.3 (audio
mixing, step 3).
You also see that the color band under the
storyboard is now partially yellow, because the
audio has not yet been created. Click on "Create"
to mix the audio on the original track with the
commentary. After creation you can check your
results by clicking on the Play button.
Do the same with your music recording, which
you will put onto the third track (the background
music track).
So, now your first video project is almost finished. In the Main menu, click on "Finish".
If you have already created all the effects and
audio segments in the various submenus, then
only the function "Choose Range" and the button
"Record to VCR" can be clicked in a DV project.
Otherwise (also in already rendered effects of
an HDV project), the function "Create" is also
available, which we will discuss below.
Decide how you would like to output. If you
choose "Analog" and your effects have not been
completely created, then click on the button
"Create" and the system then takes care of all
the remaining necessary creation of effects/
audio. You can follow the progress in a preview
window that displays a blue progress bar and a
list of the effects as they are created.
32
After the calculation is finished you may click
on "Choose Range" so that the Range menu is
opened and – in case you don‘t want to record
out the entire storyboard – you can use the IN
and OUT buttons to specify the segment to be
recorded.
Finally, click on the Play button next to the
"Analog" button. You are requested to switch the
video recorder to recording mode. Clicking on
"Ok" activates recording out.
or a film created using DVD Arabesk. In that
case, you can therefore ignore the playback
functions described in Chapter 3.2 of the DVD
Arabesk manual.
So, this short tutorial is over. The examples that
follow, "Insert editing", "Audio mixing", and
"Titling 1 and 2", will explore some of the things
that we have only mentioned up to now.
If you want to record out to a DV device, choose
"DV" next to "Record to VCR”. After you have
created all effects (see above) – click on the button "DV Recorder Controls" causing the corresponding DV operating panel to appear.
4.2 Tutorial 2: Insert editing
The top row of buttons control the DV device,
the lower Play button makes the Prestige start
playing your video project and start the DV
device recording. Now select the desired position on the DV tape before starting recording
out with a click on the lower "Play" button. No
picture is displayed while recording out!
What is the essence of modern music videos?
You hear a complete musical composition from
beginning to end. The camera is sometimes
focussed on the artist, but at other times you see
completely different scenes.
The same situation occurs for lectures, interviews, speeches at wedding celebrations, etc.
If you select "HDV" output (only available if
you have created an HDV project), the footage
must be rendered again (see above), even if the
effects have already been rendered in for DV.
This may take some time.
In the end, you can output the material just like
with DV projects.
The exercises in this chapter assume that you
are somewhat familiar with the SMART EDIT
user interface. The instructions given are therefore not as detailed as before.
Of course, you can burn your finished video
directly to DVD if you are using a system with
DVD writer. Select the program "DVD Arabesk"
in the list in the lower-left screen and click to
the right on the option "Launch program". You
then enter the DVD menu whose operation you
can read about in the separate manual you
have obtained after buying the program "DVD
Arabesk".
Note: The DVD-Arabesk software may differ
slightly from the description below on some
systems.
In the “Image quality” section, you may see
the “Rendering” button, which provides you
with three options, namely, “fast”, “normal”
and “intensive”. These options allow you to
influence the picture quality of the computed
film.
In some cases you cannot play an inserted DVD
Now that you have become familiar with basic
editing with SMART EDIT, you can continue with
more specialized tutorials.
You will create a music video such as those
shown by various television music channels.
The main function you will be using is Insert-editing, which you will learn about here.
Step 1: Preparations
At first you require the raw footage. You need a
fairly long scene, preferably a continuous one,
where the music is always synchronized with
the artist‘s lips. A singer friend of yours filmed
with a camcorder will suffice. A television news
speaker or commentator will also do.
The complete raw footage (your "background")
should ideally be 30 seconds long or longer.
Now you need some scenes that you will overlay onto the background with Insert-editing.
Such scenes can contain much more than the
background video, (for example a sunset, a car
race, etc.).
33
Trim these Insert scenes so that each one is
about 5 seconds in length. For three inserts you
will need at least 30 seconds of original video.
Step 2: Edit
Now go to the "Edit" menu. Put the background
scene from the scene bin into the storyboard
with "Add".
Select the first short scene to insert from the
scene bin and click on the "Insert" button. You
are now in a time-setting menu in which you can
freely place the pictures (not the audio) of the insert scene onto the background (the background
video is displayed on the screen)
This menu is the same as the Range menu. At
the moment, the insert scene is positioned at the
very beginning of the background scene.
You will see that there are two functions here,
"Trim" and "Position".
"Trim" allows you to trim the scene being Inserted. (This can also be done in the main Edit
screen).
"Position" lets you designate the start point
where the Insert scene will appear in the overall
30-second background scene.
You will let 3 seconds of the background scene
run before the first insert scene appears. Set the
selection button in the panel above-left to "Position" so that the option "Start" appears below it,
which you should now click.
With Start you can specify which frame of the
background will be the first to be overlaid by the
Insert scene.
Scroll to 3 seconds (the time is displayed to
the right in the menu) and confirm with the left
trackball button. The "<” and ">” buttons below
Start allow frame-by-frame changes, if needed.
Click on the right trackball button in order to
return to the "Edit" menu.
Now look at the storyboard. There are now
three scenes in the storyboard – the one in the
center contains an Insert symbol. First the 2-3
seconds background, then the insert scene, then
the rest of the background. The insert scene has
been marked with the Insert symbol. The overall
length of the storyboard is still 30 seconds.
This division into two background scenes (which
would become one again if you were to remove
the insert scene from the storyboard) makes it
possible to overlay additional insert scenes onto
the same background.
Play the storyboard from the first scene. You will
see the background scene, then a hard cut to
the insert scene, and then the background scene
again. The audio from the background scene is
heard the entire time.
Now shift the Insert scene forward a little. Click
on the Insert scene in the storyboard and select
"Range" (to the right of the "Insert" button) so
that you are again in the time-setting menu and
the background scene is visible. Notice that you
once again have three modes to choose from:
"Position" to change its placement in the background scene, "Trim” to shorten the Insert scene
or "Trim E" to shorten the insert scene while
monitoring the insert scene itself.
Now click on Start and scroll forward (to about 4
seconds). You can now exit the menu.
Now you can begin with the second insert procedure. Click on the last scene in the storyboard
(last part of the background scene). Then click in
the scene bin on the second scene you wish to
insert and select "Insert" so that you are again in
the "Range" menu.
The default starting point is again the beginning
of the scene. If you do not Position it, the second
insert would then follow directly after the first.
But this is not what you want. There should be
several seconds of background between the two
inserts. So you now click on "Position" then on
"Start" and now you move the beginning of the
insert to the right; 3 to 4 seconds is enough time.
Now exit the menu.
Five scenes can now be recognized in the storyboard in the "Edit" screen. The two inserts have
divided the background scene into the following
five segments:
1. the background scene before the first insert
34
2. the first insert
3. the background scene between the first and
second insert
4. the second insert
5. and finally the rest of the background scene
after the second insert.
Now you can add the third insert to the remaining segment at the end of the storyboard. Use
the procedure described above. Click on the last
scene in the storyboard, select the third insert
scene in the scene bin, then click on "Insert", and
finally shift the starting point appropriately.
The music video is now practically finished. The
draft version can be played. The background and
the insert segments alternate, and the music is
played in its entirety.
– The duration of the effect is limited by the duration of the insert scene.
Now your music video should be finished! It
will probably not be a candidate for "MTV", but
you have learned the possibilities that the Insert
function offers you.
For example, you can show different camera
shots of a wedding ceremony without cutting off
the flow of the audio of the ceremony. You can
mask distorted segments, and you can achieve
picture-in-picture effects without affecting the
background audio. There are many possibilities
that you will certainly take advantage of in the
future.
4.3 Tutorial 3: Audio mixing
Step 3: Effects and finish
Now some transition effects will be added. This
is done the same as with the normal storyboard
created with "Add" (tutorial 1). Add some transition or image processing effects to your Insert
scenes. Lip synchronization is not affected.
Then go to the "Finish" screen from the Main
menu and click on "Create", but only after you
have selected the type of recording out (DV,
HDV or analog), if possible. This saves you from
being asked in every menu whether you have
already calculated everything. To the left of this
button you are informed whether effects and
audio in this menu have been created or not.
Tips:
We would like to call your attention now to some
specific issues regarding transitions placed on
Insert scenes:
– Transitions reveal a part of background material that was completely masked by the Insert.
This is used to prevent an immediate "hard" cut
to the next scene. You may want to use an insert
clip to "mask" a distorted (e.g. jittery) video
segment. But if so, consider that the insert clip
should have some extra length if you wish to
use transition effects.
– You have the possibility to fade two insert
scenes into each other by connecting them with
a transition effect.
This exercise will acquaint you in detail with the
possibilities of audio mixing. This exercise assumes that you are already familiar with exercises
1 and 2.
The goal of this exercise is the perfect audio
mixing of a video with corrections to the original
sound, and with the addition of commentary and
background music.
Step 1: Preparations
You have already successfully made the various
connections.
Now you need some video. This you can easily
create after having worked through the previous
exercises. The video should be 2 to 4 minutes
long. All effects should be calculated. One of the
most important principles of audio mixing is that
the video itself should be completely finished.
Any changes to the video material can destroy
all the work you put into audio mixing!
After completion of video and audio mixing, it
is still possible to add scenes to the beginning
and end of the storyboard, or to delete scenes.
Depending on what you do you are given an
appropriate warning and you can then decide if
you want to go ahead with the action.
Insert scenes can be added without danger after
audio mixing, because they don't make any
changes in timing or audio.
35
Step 2: Recording
In the audio section go to the Record, Edit
screen. At the above-right you can specify the
input for your audio source. You can choose
several options, depending on the audio source.
Note: If you connect a mono microphone keep in
mind to select the option Mono under Mode so
that you can still hear the sound in stereo.
You need some music to add to the video mentioned in step 1 (e.g. from a CD or from a music
TV channel), and you need several commentaries.
Important note: Important note: Do not set the
volume levels for your audio recordings too
high (the audio level meter should not hit the
red area!)
If you do very little audio work, use the yellow
area of the meter so that quality does not suffer
and so that audio is not too soft during playback.
If you are planning on doing a lot of audio mix
work, make sure to set the meter to a low level.
Over-modulation can occur even if two audio
tracks both use the yellow level of the meter.
The audio volume meter has a peak display. The
highest value is shown for a short time using a
little mark. This way, even short level peaks can
be seen and over-modulation can be prevented.
Although lowering the level can later reduce
over-modulation, it is far easier to monitor the
volume levels even before recording.
Now record the audio segments and the commentaries. Give the segments names, as you
have already done in earlier exercises.
You will want to trim the music recording at the
beginning and the end because the starting times of the music source (e.g. from radio) and of
recording will almost certainly not be exactly the
same. Do this as described in the first tutorial.
Step 3: Placement and mixing
Afterward call up the menu "Audio mixing". Here
you will arrange and digitally mix the recorded
audio segments.
Select the first scene in the storyboard so that it
appears in the center. Then select the (first) music track by clicking on either the musical-note
symbol or directly on the track itself. Now click
on "Add", select the music piece from the audio
sample list that appears, and confirm with "OK".
In case the music piece is too long in spite of
trimming and the end of the audio track lies
beyond the storyboard, simply shorten the end
of the audio scene: go back to the Record, Edit
screen and trim the music segment or trim it
using the Range function.
If you are not certain how long your storyboard
is altogether (including effects), then simply look
under "Storyboard length" in the Finish menu.
Shorten your music segment to the same length.
If the music piece is too short to fill the entire
storyboard, either select the scene in which the
music ends, or select the music directly, and
then click again on "Add". The audio recording
is now repeated starting exactly where the first
music segment ends.
(Of course, it is also possible to replace music scenes. Simply click on the inserted music
segment, select "Remove" and add, as above, a
different piece of music.)
Now we can insert the commentaries. Click on
the second track (commentary track) to make it
active.
Now look for the scene in the storyboard where
you want to insert your commentary and put it
in the center. Click on "Add" and then select the
first commentary sample in the audio list and
confirm with "OK". The commentary sample
then appears on the commentary track at the
beginning of the selected scene.
Now we come to the fine adjustments – to the
proper placing of the commentary sample.
At first, play the video from the commentary
position (click the Play symbol to the left of the
storyboard scroll bar). You should see the video
and hear the commentary. You can also observe the volume level displayed within the audio
sample graphic.
Then click on "Range", select "Position", and
shift the Start point, so that the commentary
begins earlier or later. Scroll to the ideal position and check again by replaying. When you are
satisfied with the commentary placement, return
to the menu Audio mix screen.
Now it is time for the first creation! Click on the
commentary in the commentary track and then
36
select "Create". The system computes the audio
tracks affected by the commentary. When the
calculation is finished, replay the storyboard
(Play symbol to the right of the scroll bar).
Pay close attention to the volumes of commentary, original sound, and background music in
relation to each other. It is highly likely that there
is a mismatch. Often the commentary is not loud
enough and is masked by the background music. You can now match the volumes to obtain
the proper audio relationship.
At the moment the audio in the commentary
track is selected. The "Volume" slider applies
to the entire length of the highlighted audio
sample. You can set the volume lower (negative
dB values) or higher (positive dB values). After
creation you can immediately check the result.
Within the audio track you also see the volume
displayed as a 2-tone-blue wave form.
It will often be necessary to lower the volume of
the background music and/or the original audio
in order to hear the commentary sample. Here
you want to correct the volume of the "neighboring tracks" for the duration of the highlighted
sample. Click on the commentary sample to
highlight it. Then click the "Correction" button
and select the camera symbol (representing the
original audio track) from the list. Now use the
dB slider to the right (NOT the Volume slider
above) to correct the original audio track's volume for the duration of the commentary sample.
Next select the musical-note symbol in the
"Correction" list and use the control to the right
to lower the volume by 10 dB. The music volume is lowered by 10 dB during the commentary
sample, and and when the sample ends--so does
its correction to the other tracks. They will then
return to their original volume levels.
Use these controls until you have found your
ideal audio mix.
If you would like the volume change not to be
abrupt, but gradual so that it sounds as if you
are controlling the change by hand with an audio mixer, click on the button "Fade" (while the
commentary is active). In the following menu
you see two possible settings, Fade-in and Fadeout.
Two sliders appear, i.e. for fade-in and fade-out,
together with several default values between 1/2
second and 10 seconds.
A fade-in value zero seconds means an abrupt
volume change. A value of one second means
that all volume changes take place gradually
over the course of one second. This applies to
the volume of the affected track (in this case the
commentary track) and also to its correction of
all neighboring tracks.
Set the values for both fade-in and fade-out to
one second. This achieves an smooth volume
transition. After the renewed creation you can
check the result.
The first commentary sample is now complete.
Find the position for the second commentary
and repeat the above procedure.
After all commentaries have been mixed, you
set the volume of the original audio and the
background music. Select the first piece of background music in the storyboard and play it. In
case the original audio cannot be heard and the
background music is too loud, you can adjust
the volumes using the volume control. You have
already learned earlier in this chapter how to do
this.
With audio mixing it is even possible to remove
disturbing sounds, for example coughing on the
original source audio.
The wave form is the suitable tool for this purpose.
Left-click on the desired audio sample to highlight it in blue, then select the "Wave Form"
menu item. In the "Wave Form" dialog, first
insert three anchor points by means of "Add"
in the volume display beneath the wave form.
Then activate the leftmost of the three new
points by clicking on it. The colour of the activated point changes from red to green. You can
now change its position, either by clicking on
it again and then dragging it with the trackball
to the desired position, or by clicking on the
"Range" button. If the "Range" function is used,
the associated video frame is displayed in the
background, and the position of the point can be
determined according to its location within the
video.
Place the first point horizontally ahead of the
unwanted noise to be eliminated, without however modifying its vertical position. Position
the second point horizontally in the middle of
37
the unwanted noise and drag it at the same time
vertically downwards to dampen the sound. The
third point marks the end of the unwanted noise:
it should therefore also be at the same level
horizontally as the first, but beyond the noise.
Click on "Create" to reduce the volume of the
unwanted noise substantially without changing
the remainder of the audio sample.
Audio mixing is now finished. Play the entire
film from the Finish screen. If necessary, you can
make further corrections.
4.4 Tutorial 4: Titling 1
SMART EDIT provides high-performance titling
with which you can insert opening titles, end
credits, subtitles, etc. into your video project.
Again, you need an edited video to do this. This
can be a complete video film project, but for this
exercise it is sufficient to have 3 or 4 scenes with
a length of about 10 seconds each.
Click on "Titling". This screen is very similar to
the "Image Processing" screen, because titling is
a similar task. A segment of the storyboard will
be modified, only in this case the modification is
an inserted text and not an effect.
As you have done when practicing image processing effects, select a scene in the storyboard
for your first title. You can simply take the first
scene.
Step 1: Adding an Opening title
You will now insert an opening title to your
video project. This title will display the name of
the video on three fixed text pages. From the
Main Menu, Click "Titling”. Once in the Titling
menu, select "Pages" and add this title effect
onto the storyboard.
Then click the "Enter/edit text" button in the
lower-right corner of the screen.
Now you are in the actual titling menu. The first
frame of the scene appears in the background
of an operation panel. This screen serves as
orientation for text placement, font style, color
selection, and type size. Here you can immediately check how your title looks over the selected
scene, because the title is automatically updated
after every adjustment.
You will see some pre-loaded text already displayed on the Titling display. Delete this text by
placing the vertical bar (called cursor) after the
last word and pressing the delete key of your
external keyboard as many times as necessary
until all of the text is deleted.
If you aren't working with an external keyoard,
click onto "Text" to call up the on-screen keyboard. Now you can delete the given text by
clicking on the "Delete" key several times. Alternatively, you can click onto "Boxes" and select
"Delete", so that the panel with the default text
is deleted. Another box will be available for text
entry.
If you have deleted the box with the help of the
"Delete" button or with the on-screen keyboard,
click onto the "TE" ("Text Editor") button in the
lower right corner or onto the right trackball
button, to call up the main menu bar.
First, select a font. Click onto "Text" in the main
operation panel and then select "Font" to bring
up a selection window. The text MacroSystem
appears in the previously selected font. Select
the font Floyd for which you can then set the
size. Set the size to 130 and confirm your settings by clicking on "OK".
The cursor over the display screen indicates the
current text position.
Use the keyboard to enter the text "Video title".
Remember, you can use the on-screen keyboard,
or the external Powerkey or USB keyboard.
Now you can go on to other settings using the
“Style” button. A screen appears, in which you
38
can see the video screen in the top right corner
– with an enlarged part of your title. In the top
left corner, you can first decide if the letters appear as “Color” (single color) or as a "Pattern". If
you choose “Color”, the color box opens so that
you can choose the color, for example yellow.
After you have confirmed your color box settings by clicking "OK", you can decide to add
an outline. You can define the strength of the
letters’ outline by moving the slider next to it (0
= no frame, 6 = strongest outline). Set it to 4 for
example. Now you can click onto the “Color/Pattern” button to call up the imagepool, in which
you can click onto the color button in the lower
right area (left to "Ok") to call up the color box.
Choose a color, for example red.
“Centered” and close the menu bar by pressing
the "TE" button.
Note: If the text box displays a background, then
click on the button "Graphics" in the main task
bar. Then click the checkmark next to "Choose
background", so that the checkmark turns into a
hyphen.
Now you can add another page by pressing
the “Pages” button. Another operation panel
appears. Here, you should press “Insert” and
answer the posed question “Insert where?” by
selecting “Behind”.
The top display of the operation panel should
now say “Page 2/2” meaning that the second of
two pages has been added.
Enter the word "with" on this page. The settings
you have made for color, frame, position, etc.
are still valid.
In the "Pages" menu click onto “Insert” again
and add another page (the third). On this page,
enter the word “SMART EDIT”.
Step 2: Archive titles
Now the text "Video title with SMART EDIT" is
contained on the three pages of the scene.
After you have closed the image pool you can
specify the intensity of the "Shadow" by using
the slider in the "Style" window.
Choose setting 6 for instance. Now use the
arrow directions to determine the "Direction" of
the shadow and its "Color", e.g. black.
The remaining buttons in the “Style” screen can
be ignored for this example
After you have closed the "Style" window
by clicking on "Ok", you can specify the
"Alignment" of the text under "Line".You have
the choice of left, centered, and right. For this
example it should be "centered".
You exit text entry by a final click on the "TE"
symbol and you can call up a new operations
panel with the button "Boxes". Here under "Text"
you can use "top", "centered" or "bottom" to
place your text accordingly on the page. Choose
You can save this text for future projects. In the
main operation panel, click on "Archive" and
then on "Save". A list appears containing only
the word "MacroSystem". This demo text is a
short, predefined text that we have provided
you. Click on the gray rectangular name field
(above the buttons "OK" and "Cancel"). The
keyboard appears and you can enter a name for
your title. Enter the name "exercise".
Using the archive you can save frequently used
standard text for future use in any project. Confirm the name change ("OK") and then the save
action ("OK"), after which the "Save text” menu
closes.
After you are finished, click "OK" in the main
operation panel. You are returned to the main
titling screen.
Here you can set the range, (the beginning and
end of text appearance). Click on the duration
value to the left of the Play button under the
storyboard. Currently, the title you have added
is visible during the entire scene with gradual
39
transitions between the pages. Using the duration value you can extend the text to other scenes
or shorten it (e.g. limit it to one second at the
beginning or at the end).
Now you can check your title by clicking on "Full
size", if your system is provided with this button.
In the window that appears you can use the control next to "Frame" to scroll through the entire
range of the title effect.
Finally, create the title so that you can view it in
the finished video.
Calculation occurs automatically if you have
activated the option "Smart Rendering" in
"System Settings".
Step 3: Adding credits
You can add an additional title later in the storyboard, e.g. as end credits or to explain a picture
scene.
Select in the storyboard a scene that does not
yet have a title symbol, and select the effect
"V-Scroll". This is a vertical scroll, (a text that
moves from bottom to top over the screen). You
have probably seen this frequently. Add this
effect to the scene in the storyboard.
Now click on "Enter/edit text" and you are again
in the main operation panel of the titler menu.
The doubly spaced text appears again in the
preview window.
Now call up the title you entered previously
by clicking on "Archives" and then on "Load",
after which you select the Text "Exercise" (see
"Archive titles").
After confirming with "OK" the text "Video title"
appears in the text window.
The words "with SMART EDIT" are not displayed
here, because they are not on the same page.
In order to see these entries, you can use the ">"
button in the "Pages" operating panel to display
the next pages.
A further page for the scroll title means that the
second page does not scroll into the screen until
the first page has completey disappeared at the
top of the screen.
The next page for a V-Scroll means that the next
page appears on the screen when the previous
page has scrolled off the screen at the top.
Change the text "Video title" to "End Credits VScroll". To do this, move the cursor to the end of
the text (after "title") and click on the left trackball button to position the cursor there. Now
press the button "Text" and then the delete key
of the on-screen keyboard (long arrow pointing
to the left, to be found above the new-line key)
as many times as necessary to delete the text.
Then enter the text "End Credits".
Confirm your entered text with "OK". Exit the
text entering menu with the "TE" button and
then the main operation panel with „Ok“. You
are now again in the main Titling menu. Now
you can use "Preview" to observe the effect.
If the text scrolls too slowly or too quickly, then
you can change the scroll speed accordingly. In
this case the text must travel the distance from
bottom to top – a longer running time means
more time for this and movement is slower.
To change the running time click again on the
duration value. Now create the title and play it.
Now that you have some experience in using
titling you can create additional titles using
the many available functions (e.g. several text
panels, different panel sizes, textured type). And
the following exercise will provide you with
even more help.
(All of the remaining titling functions are explained in the reference, section 5.10.)
4.5 Tutorial 5: Titling 2
In this exercise you will create a title that extends over five text pages and is faded in and
out.
You need a scene of about 15 seconds that has a
significant border between the upper and lower
screen halves. (This means that the bottom half
contains the events of interest and the top half
should be a light background, such as the sky).
Enter the Titling menu, select the title effect
"In/Out Fading pages" and add it. Then click on
"Enter/Edit Text" to enter the main operation
panel of the titler.
40
There you see your video. Delete the given text
(as explained in the previous exercise) and any
other available pages by clicking on the ">" button in the upper panel of the "Pages" operation
panel and then choosing "Delete". Repeat this
procedure until only one page is left.
Now enter the two words "You see" so that these
appear on top of the video. Then click on the
button "Font" in the "Text" menu to select the
typeface "Lynn" in size 90.
Now click onto “Style” and choose “Pattern”.
The window "Select pattern" appears and you
can select, for example, the pattern "confetti"
under Product: SMART EDIT and Type: polychromatic.
In addition, set an "Alpha" value of 80% and
close the window by clicking on "OK".
Under “Outline”, choose “0” as value, so that it
is deactivated.
Make the same setting for “Shadow”, because
you don‘t use it in this exercise.
Activate the empty box next to “Italic” by clicking onto it. Next, make the text appear in 3D
form by moving the “3D” option slider to “8”.
For “Direction”, choose the top arrow (pointing
to the top right). Under "Color/Pattern" call up
the image pool in order to set a light green. Confirm your settings by pressing "OK".
In the "Line" window under "Alignment" you
have left the setting "centered" as it was and
now you can click on the button "Boxes" in order
to call up the corresponding task bar.
And under "Text" select the option "top".
Now, add another page. (“Pages” operation
panel, “Insert”, “Behind”.)
On this new page, enter the words “the title
effect”, all previously made settings are automatically used.
Add another page and enter the words "In/out
fading pages" (with quote marks) as two lines.
The next inserted page contains only the word
"from", and the last (fifth) page contains the text
"SMART EDIT".
After you have created these five pages, click on
"Archive" and save this titling, as you learned to
do in the previous exercise.
Then exit the main operation panel of the titler
by clicking on "OK". You are returned to the
titling screen.
There you will see that there are further effect
options for the effect "In/Out Fading Pages".
For this title effect the options are Fade (indicates when the title should appear)and Pause,
(indicates the length of time between two pages.
Retain the default time of 1 second (000.01:00)
under Fade. For Pause, scroll all the way to the
left so that you see the time display 000.00:00.
Now create the new title.
Now you know how to use a professional titler
that you can vary in many ways and combine
with different backgrounds. The different effects
can serve you as opening titles, credits, or descriptive text during the film.
You can learn about additional titling functions
in the reference, section 5.10.
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Chapter 5: Reference
This part of the manual serves as a reference to
the individual menus. Look here for information
on individual functions or menu items you may
be unsure about, as well as additional features
not explained in earlier tutorials.
Please note that depending on the system
model, the functions explained in this text may
vary slightly or may be missing.
VIDEO
5.1 System settings
This menu is used to make general settings.
(1) Clicking on the "Install Product" button
displays a window that gives you three options.
You can use the "activate" function to activate
software contained on the SmartMedia card or
CD/DVD. You do this by first selecting the desired software, after which a window is displayed
in which you then enter (through the keyboard)
the code obtained from your dealer. The product is displayed in the corresponding selection
menu and can now be used. Software demo
versions are installed by activating the product
without entering a code (see section 3.2 "Demo
Software").
The "Hide" button prevents display of the product and thus also prevents its use.
You can activate the software by telling your
dealer the serial number of your system (below left in this menu, item 9) so that you can
purchase the code for the software.
By clicking on "delete", you can remove the
program which is activated in the list above.
After having clicked on "delete" a warning appears. If you confirm it by clicking on "yes", the
corresponding software will be removed. It is
certainly possible to install it anew afterwards.
As an example this function can be used in order
to delete demo software which is not required
any longer.
Another function in this window is the "i" button.
Clicking on this button displays additional information on the selected software (see section 3.2
"i buttons").
(2) The "Trackball Speed" can be set here. There
are three possible speeds.
(3) If your system is provided with the button
"video output", you can choose between "CVBS"
or "YC". If your video recorder supports a YC
signal, please choose this option.
(4) Click onto the button "Screen". Here, first set
the option "Screen". You can choose between
Video and different VGA screen resolutions.
The available modes depend on your system
model.
Video means that you can use your TV to access
the user interface.
The other possibilities are used to connect a
computer monitor to be used as a second screen
or as an alternative screen (depends again on
the system model used).
You can read more on this in the chapter 6 :
"VGA mode". The system is automatically restarted after being switched to another mode.
After this, you have 15 seconds time to confirm
the request with "Yes", otherwise the system
reverts to the previously used mode.
Once you have made a "Video" selection, the
buttons below will no longer be selectable. The
user interface and video footage are displayed
on the TV monitor.
If you have opted for one of the VGA modes,
you can (depending on the system) select
between "One monitor" and "Two monitor" use.
A one monitor set-up shows the user-interface
and video footage on the VGA screen, in two
monitor mode, the user interface and video footage are split: Interface in VGA, video on the TV
screen.
If you use the "One monitor" mode, the "VGA
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play" button beneath is activated and you can
use it to choose the format for playback: "Video" or "Field" are the two options. The "Field"“
option has an advantage in that unlike "Video",
there are no movement artefacts -- however, the
resolution is lower.
(5) The button "Set time" offers the possibility to
set date and time of your machine. This function
is required in order to let the system start
recording automatically (item (10)).
Clicking on the button opens a window in which
you can choose the "Year". Click onto the year,
so that a window is displayed in which you can
select the year by moving the slider. Afterwards
confirm it with "Ok".
(7) Here you can see the "Render Border"
function that can be activated by placing a mark
next to it. This creates a black border around
the edges of the screen, covering any unwanted
disturbances during playback.
Please note that the affected border is so thin
that is normally not visible on a normal video
monitor. Usually, it is only possible to see
it during a presentation on a video beamer/
projector for instance.
(8) Click the selection button "language" to open
a separate menu with items to select. Select the
desired language and the switch takes place
immediately.
(9) By clicking on the selection button "Keymap",
a list is called up in which you can choose
the language of the keyboard (also possible
for external keyboards). The selection "As
language" copies the settings chosen in the
"language" window. But it is also possible to
set an independent keymap from the system
language.
By clicking onto "Month", a menu is displayed
allowing you to choose the current month.
Afterwards, the dates which are displayed
underneath change, so that they correspond
to the weekdays of the selected month. Now
choose the current date. Then you can set the
time by moving the sliders and finally confirm
your settings by clicking on "Ok".
(6) After clicking on the button "Smart Rendering“ a window appears, in which you can activate the background rendering for the effects.
Just checkmark the box (next to "Smart Rendering") to do this.
Click on it again to deactivate the background
rendering function. Next, you can see the function "Cancel Rendering", which offers the possibility to cancel the current rendering process.
Underneath, you can see the number of effects
and their total time.
In addition, you can decide how the current
effect is to be rendered. For the "last inserted"
effect, you can choose between "first" and "last".
Confirm your settings and close the window
with "Ok".
(10) Clicking on "Record Times" opens a window
in which you can enter dates and times, so that
your system starts or stops recording at the
given time.
Thus your system acts as a harddisk video
recorder. You can start as many recordings as
you like via time control.
A click on the button "new" opens the window
"Record start". Enter the starting time of the
recording as described in item (5). After having
clicked on "Ok", the window "Record end" opens
which is used to set the time for stopping the
recording. After confirming it with "Ok", the set
time appears in the upper part of this window.
If you define several recording dates and times,
they will be displayed in a list. If the recording
43
time is too long, a warning will be displayed.
By clicking on "delete" you can remove the
recording time activated in the upper list. Be
careful, no warning appears!
If you want to correct the times, you can enter
the time setting anew by activating the buttons
"change start" or "Change end".
The button for "Input" in this menu allows you to
comfortably select the source for your system.
For example, you could have different sources
for different recordings.
load. Afterwards, the HDV material is converted
(rendered) into DV automatically.
If you select "DV + HDV", the record screen will
allow for two load passes.
Your footage is first loaded as HDV footage, then
in DV quality. More information about this can
be found in chapter 5.4, item (2).
After setting the time and having clicked on
"Ok", your system can be switched off. It will
start the recording at the time you have set.
Please make sure that your system is not
without power after setting the time.
Please choose the correct video input (menu
"Video settings") and connect a player, e.g. a TV
or receiver. Thus you can record TV scenes for
instance.
In this menu you make the settings for your current or next project. This affects, for example,
the project name, image size, and audio quality.
(11) Should your system feature the "Hard-drive
backup" button select it. This brings up a selection menu, where you can choose to do a "Backup" (Copying the video found on the system
drive to the backup drive) or a "Restore" (Sending the data saved on the backup disk to the
system disk).
After chosing one of these options the process
begins.
You can cancel it at anytime.
Note: The function "Backup" allows you to save
your video material regularly to avoid a possible loss of data (e.g. if the system hard drive is
damaged during transport).
The function "Restore" allows you to copy the
video material saved on the backup drive to a
system hard drive. For further information
please see Chapter 8 "HD Backup-System".
(12) This information field displays the OS version and the device serial number.
(13) Clicking on the menu symbol returns you
to the Main menu. Clicking the right trackball
button does the same.
(14) You can now see the "HDV-Recording"
button, giving you the choice between "Only
HDV" and "DV + HDV". This button is only of
importance if you need to load HDV footage into
your project. If you select the "Only HDV" option,
the record screen merely requires a one-pass
5.2 Project settings
(1) On the upper edge (the "Hard-drive" section)
you see the "Name" button. Clicking on the gray
name-field brings up the keyboard with which
you can enter the desired name for the hard drive. You can also see which hard drive is currently in the system. This is otherwise not possible
because the label on the hard drive is not visible
when the hard drive has been inserted into the
machine.
(2) The display, "Used Capacity" gives information on the space used on the hard drive (dark
blue), and on the total remaining time (light
blue). A display for individual projects is not
possible because this display refers to the entire
hard drive.
(3) Clicking on the "Select" button brings up the
Select Project menu, in which you can select
several different projects.
If some projects already contain scenes, the
corresponding projects are marked to the right
of the project name (with a little dot).
After you press "OK", the project you have selected is displayed next to the selection button (e.g.
"P 1"). If you want to rename the project, click
44
on "P 1" (or "P 2", etc.). The on-screen keyboard
appears so that you can enter another project
name. The chosen project name is also displayed in the edit screen above the scene bin.
Only the currently active project can be edited!
Exchanging video data between different projects is possible using the Clipboard feature in
the Edit screen. You always have access to archived titles and colors.
(4) Under "Image size" you have the choice
among Small, Normal, and Large. This setting
applies only when effects are applied.
We recommend using the default setting Normal. This will usually prevent black margins
from appearing when using effects.
The image size can be changed at anytime in the
current project. It takes effect only when applying effects and titles.
For technically interested users: A video signal
conforming to the studio standard CCIR 601
enables the use of 720 samples and 576 picture
lines. The real resolution is even higher, but a
video picture requires certain portions for synchronization signals, videotext, timecodes, etc.
The resolution of 720 x 576 pixels is the maximum allowed area for real video information.
But many video sources do not make use of
this resolution. This is true for camcorders,
laserdiscs, and even for studio devices. A much
smaller portion is often used in the assumption
that most televisions will not be able to render
the entire signal.
(5) The "Format" button provides different settings.
In addition to the normal “4:3” formats, the system also offers a “16:9 Anamorphic” mode.
The option means the 16:9 mode anamorphic
and contains 576 picture lines.
16:9 is set when starting the project.
This special mode works only if both camcorder
and TV conform to the 16:9 standard.
It might be necessary to manually switch the TV
monitor to 16:9. If the TV is not switched, then
SMART EDIT uses the standard display 4:3.
16:9 display is possible regardless of the format
in which the video source has been recorded.
Note: The 16:9 format is not available for NTSC
machines.
Further, note the formats "4:3 Progressive" and
"16:9 Progressive". Cameras which support the
"Progressive" function only work with 25 frames
(NTSC: 30) instead of 50 fields (NTSC: 60) per
second. If you activate one of the Progressive
formats, a warning is displayed saying that you
should only use this setting in combination with
a Progressive Scan camera. Otherwise you could
limit the effect use.
If you have chosen a progressive format for your
project, you can proceed to trim, split, etc., with
a progressive (full frame) display.
Furthermore, you can use the "HDV" format,
which is of course ideal for HDV video footage
recorded with such a camcorder.
If you choose to work on an HDV project, once
you have started editing, it is not possible to
revert back to another format for that project.
If you decide to work on a 4:3 or 16:9 project,
once started, it is not possible to select a the
HDV format any longer.
(6) The field "Audio settings" refers to the menu
“Mix” and consists of two parts:
In the upper area you can specify whether the
“Transitions” for the inserted transition effects
should be “constant” or “lowered”.
A continuous (linear) audio fade means that the
audio of both scenes is faded in and out without
reducing the volume. This function should be
used, for example, when both scenes have
similar volume.
A lowered (logarithmic) audio fade means that
for monotone background audio in both scenes
(e.g. sea shore, traffic) the impression is that the
first scene audio is quietly faded out before the
second scene audio is faded in with increasing
volume.
A continuous fade can sometimes have the
disadvantage that between different soundtracks
“acoustic confusion” can arise. Depending on
the audio of the scenes in question, it will be
advantageous to use either the constant or the
lowered method.
Note: If you have selected the audio fade after
the fact, transitions will not automatically be
newly calculated. But you can change each
individual transition afterward in the menu
“Mix”. There you activate the left scene and
the corresponding sound clip. Then click on the
button “Fade” and in the window then displayed
under “Transition” set the desired option
(“constant” or “lowered”).
In the lower area of the window you can specify
the behavior of the scene soundtracks.
45
If you set the button “Audio tracks” to
“normal”, then the buttons positioned below are
disabled. In the gray fields you can see whether
the corresponding soundtracks are free or fixed
to the scene.
If you select the option “Selection” under
“Audio tracks”, then the original audio is fixed
to the scene and the behavior of the other
soundtracks can be set at will.
Note: Some systems automatically select the
best audio sampling frequency (48 KHz). If your
system does not support this, there is a manual audio selection within the "Audio settings",
called "Audio quality". Use it to avoid compatibility issues with connected DV equipment.
(7) Clicking on "Delete" opens a window which
offers the possibility to determine which areas of
the selected project can be deleted.
You have three options: "Delete Storyboard",
"Delete scenes" and "Delete samples". It is
possible to select two or even all three options
at the same time. A click on the box next to the
option activates or deactivates that particular
function.
If you choose all options, all data (video and
audio, and all effects) within the currently active
project are deleted.
All project settings can now be reset. Project
settings are fixed only after video recording or
creation has begun.
The following are not deleted:
– other edited projects
– scenes in the clipboard
– archived colors and titles
– effect modules, including those that have been
installed later
– installed fonts
– other supplementary programs
If you choose only one function, merely this part
of the project will be deleted.
(8) The "Information" button gives information
on project name, storyboard length, scenes and
effects inserted into the storyboard, and on the
total number of existing scenes and samples.
(9) This menu symbol returns you to the Main
menu, the same as clicking the right trackball
button.
5.3 Video settings
This screen (only available on some system
models) allows you to correct the levels of the
incoming video signal (in terms of brightness,
contrast and saturation), and it is used for selecting the video input.
These are settings that you can change at any
time when recording analog footage – even
after the project has been edited.
(1) You can specify here the brightness, contrast,
and color of the video material before recording.
This allows you to see the footage as it will be
digitized.
It is possible, of course, to use Image Processing
effects to make corrections to recorded video
material after input, but this involves rendering
time.
Note: The better the material has been recorded,
the better the result will be. Corrections afterthe-fact have their limits – a picture that is too
dark can never be as radiant as a picture digitized with the correct lighting, even after using
brightening effects. Simply modify the settings
until you have attained the desired levels. When
your source material changes, e.g. when badweather pictures appear, then you can simply
readjust the settings.
Note: The settings "Brightness", "Contrast" and
"Saturation" cannot be changed, if you chose
the input "DV".
(2) You can use "Input" to switch the video input.
(Please note that DV input is only available if the
hardware you use actually features a DV port).
You can also add analog material, which is then
converted by SMART EDIT to DV data. Digital
and analog material can be combined in the
same project.
The DV input device is automatically recognized
and marked. After you have connected the DV
recorder, you see that the input, e.g. is titled with
"DV Sony". In this way you can determine quickly that the connection has been made.
(3) This button allows you to move the Input
menu bar from the bottom of the screen to the
top, if needed. Click again to return to the bottom.
46
(4) In case you want to check your video material
and don't intend to change settings at the same
time, then you can use the button to reduce the
menu to a much smaller panel. In this reduced
menu only the buttons described under item (3)
and the button ("video settings" menu symbol)
to redisplay the entire menu are visible.
(5) Clicking on these menu symbols takes you to
the Recording menu or to the Main menu.
5.4 Recording
This screen is used to record your video footage
from your camera or deck onto the system.
(1) By clicking on the volume display button you
can call up a volume display on the opposite
screen edge which serves to adjust the decibel
(dB) level before or during recording (not
available in HDV projects). Try to set the level
as high as possible in order to achieve the best
audio quality, but do not overdrive it (stay out
of the red area!). You can change the level by
clicking on the dB slider below it. The sound
becomes quieter (up to –30 dB) or louder (up
to 20 dB), depending on whether you move the
slider toward the left or right.
Flashing blue or yellow means there are no
problems and flashing red represents overmodulation. Clicking on the volume display button
again closes the volume display.
(2) Once you select the HDV format in the Project
Settings, there will be two, round record symbols (one for HDV and one for DV):
If you set the "HDV recording" slider to "Only
HDV" in the System Settings, only one pass is
necessary. This activates one record button.
Click on this button to begin loading your HDV
footage into your system and automatically convert the HDV stream into DV material. This takes
some time.
If you select "DV + HDV", two load passes are
required. You can see that this also activates the
DV record button.
Now you can output your video material via
HDV and record it using the HDV record button.
After that, switch the camera to DV and record
the DV video stream using the DV record button.
Please note that during the recording of source
HDV footage, neither picture nor sound can be
monitored. The screen displays a grey picture
with the running time.
Note that once the project settings are set to a
mode other than HDV, there will only be one
record button you can see.
During recording a click on the trackball right
button has the same effect as pressing the stop
button in the small display You can start and
stop recording to not waste drive space with
unwanted video. If you want to divide up your
recorded video material, after recording proceed
to the Edit screen. You can find more information in section "5.5 Editing" under splitting.
(3) The selection button "Mode" offers you three
possibilities:
"Normal": means a normal recording.
The setting "Time" activates the "Time" slider
(see item (4)), with which you can set the recording duration exactly. After this time, recording
is automatically stopped.
The setting "Photo" is appropriate for single
flicker-free pictures. Casablanca records about a
half second of material that is then extended as
a single image to the duration you have set (see
(4) "Time").
(4) The "Time" slider is activated by the modes
Time and Photo.
The Time mode allows setting the duration for
the still scene up to 100 minutes.
In Photo mode you can set the duration of the
still scene up to one minute.
You can always stop recording with the stop button, regardless of the time that has been set.
(5) When a new scene is recorded, the system
will automatically name it (S1, S2 etc.). Its name
is displayed under the record button. Clicking on
the name brings up the keyboard which allows
47
you to give scenes the name you choose.
5.5 Editing
(6) This fields shows you how long the recorded
scene is.
This screen is used for most of your editing
work, and for sequencing of trimmed scenes.
This is the most important menu.
(7) The field Rem. shows you how much time
remains, meaning how much video can still be
recorded. This is not displayed during recording;
it is switched to a smaller display. This amount
is an estimate. The system calculates the remaining time on the basis of the level of detail of the
material already recorded. The value is not recalculated until the current recording is finished.
If the quality settings change, the actual space
may be slightly more or less than this estimate.
(8) Just like the video settings, this menu is
superimposed over the video. You can see the
video during recording and thus always decide
whether you want to digitize a sequence or not.
The symbol at the lower left with the two triangles moves the panel to the upper edge. This
is useful if the panel happens to be covering
important parts of your material.
(9) If you don't need this menu during recording
(e.g. DV control) then you can minimize it with
this button to a much smaller panel. Then the
only buttons available are the buttons described
under (8) and the button to return the normal
size record menu.
(10) "DV control" is done with these five buttons.
You can directly control the connected DV device
through the i-Link interface. Please note, however, that not every DV device is compatible, but
you will find that most of them are.
Seen from left to right, the buttons are used to:
stop the recorder, play, pause, rewind, and fast
forward.
Rewind and fast forward have three different
effects. Fast rewind or fast forward results if the
button is pressed while the recorder is in stop
mode. Slow rewind or slow forward results if the
button is pressed while the recorder is playing.
Clicking the button while the recorder is in pause
mode causes movement of a single frame backward or forward.
(11) The four menu symbols bring you directly
to the Edit, Record/Edit, Video settings, and to
the Main menu screens.
(1) Here you see the storyboard. This is a tool
that has been used since movies were invented.
The idea is to clearly lay out all the scenes of a
production in order to more easily implement
editing principles. A single frame, (the first pictures of a scene), are used as symbols ("thumbnails") to represent the scene.
A glimpse at the storyboard allows you to grasp
the whole story without having to review all of
the material. Traditionally, the storyboard was a
large board composed of hand-drawn pictures.
Your system uses an electronic storyboard.
Scenes are selected from the scene bin (item
(7)) and put into order on the storyboard, located in the upper section of the screen. In the
storyboard the selected scene is in the center.
The selected scene length (duration) is displayed above the scene to highlight it. Clicking on a
scene in the storyboard causes it to be moved to
the center (often referred to as the "selected" or
"active" scene).
Seven scenes can appear in the visible portion
of the storyboard. But there is no limit to the
number of scenes that may actually be present on the storyboard. The storyboard can be
scrolled to the left or right. The starting point is
to the left, and scenes are played sequentially
from left to right.
(2) To scroll through the storyboard click on the
slider below the storyboard and roll the ball on
the trackball to the right or left.
48
(3) The buttons next to the slider can be used to
move from one scene to the next in the storyboard one scene at a time.
(4) The buttons "|<" and ">|" move you to the
beginning or end of the storyboard.
(5) You can use the Play button to the right of
the slider to play the storyboard beginning with
the selected scene until the end of the storyboard (or until you stop playing either by pressing the Stop button which is now visible, or by
clicking the right trackball button.)
You also have a Pause button which you can use
to stop the playback until you press the Pause
button again (or press the Play button). The last
frame appearing before the Pause button was
pressed remains as a single picture on the monitor until playback is resumed.
(6) Clicking on the "i" button, a window is called
up showing information about the storyboard.
You’ll see the project name, the current position
of the storyboard (the time is displayed), the
length of the whole storyboard and the remaining length (after the current position).
(7) Recorded scenes appear automatically in
the Scene bin in the lower section of the screen.
They are represented as small thumbnails (the
first frame of the video scene). In video mode
(not VGA) up to eleven scenes can be viewed
simultaneously in the Scene bin. For more than
eleven, the slider (item (8)) is then used to scroll
to the desired scene. Scenes from the scene bin
that have been inserted into the storyboard are
indicated by a small white point in the upper
right corner of the scene.
In the scene bin (right), you can see the project
name you chose.
(8) The slider below the scene bin is used to select the scenes to be displayed. The buttons next
to the slider can also be used to move through
the Scene bin one scene at a time.
The buttons "|<" and ">|" are used to jump to the
beginning or the end of the scene bin. The "<"
and ">" buttons will move through the scene bin
one scene at a time.
(9) The Playback button is to the right of the storyboard slider. This button is used to playback
the scene displayed in the center of the scene
bin.
Stop and Pause buttons are also available.
(10) Clicking on this "i" button displays a window
showing information about the activated scene
in the scene bin. In the upper part of this window you’ll see the timecode, the recording date,
the recording time and the format.
Further, you can call up the keyboard by clicking on "Enter/change comment" in order to
add your notes to this scene, which then will be
displayed in the lower box.
Clicking on "Ok" confirms the notes, so that it
will be displayed in this information window
when it is called up again.
(11) In case you have not yet renamed the scenes in the Record screen, you again have the
chance here to give the scenes your own names.
Simply select the desired scene in the scene
bin and then click on this button to bring up the
on-screen keyboard. If you have the PowerKey
option, then you can use this keyboard to clear
the old name and enter a new name.
(12) Many users require "overlapping" of certain video sequences with other scenes without
changing the original audio. Example: a music
video (see Chapter 4, Tutorial 2). A complete
recording of the singer is available. Certain portions of this recording are to be substituted with
other scenes, but the view of the artist singing
is to reappear several times. The movement of
the singer's lips should always be synchronized
with the music. This means that the original
audio does not change, even though scenes are
changed.
SMART EDIT offers an easy way to do this: With
an Insert-edit, the selected scene in the scene
bin is overlaid onto the storyboard. Only the
video, not the audio of the scene is overlaid.
Clicking on "Insert" overlays the selected scene
in the storyboard with the selected scene from
the scene bin. The scene in the storyboard (background) is then partially or completely covered
with the insert scene (foreground). The background scene must, of course, be longer than
the foreground scene.
The range (start position, length) can be set freely and changed at any time, even after the Insert
is placed. Every click on "Insert" leads automatically to a Range menu.
The starting point, which is by default set to the
first frame of the insert, can be moved towards
49
the end ("Start" button).
To do this, you have to select “Position”. Now
you can see the background scene. To trim the
insert-scene either from the front or from behind, switch the selection button to “Trim” so
that you can see the “IN” and “OUT” buttons.
During this setting, you can see the background
scene. Set the selection button to “Trim E” so
that you can see the insert-scene instead.
The so-called “background scene”, in other
words the story board, can be split in three
parts:
1. the background scene before the insert
2. the Insert scene
3. the rest of the background scene after the
insert
This division allows you to place any number
of insert sequences onto a single background
scene.
Inserts are indicated in the storyboard by a symbol (two overlapping rectangles) in the upper
part of the scene in the storyboard and can be
Removed at any time.
The button "Remove" offers the possibility to delete the first and the last part of the background
scene in front of or behind the insert scene.
Overlapped background sequences are automatically put back together.
Neighboured insert scenes can certainly be connected with a transition effect.
(13) After you have added an insert and the
scene is still selected in the storyboard, you
can use the "Range" button to modify inserted
scenes.
These scenes can either be shifted (Set the
mode to "Position”, and then click "Start”.) The
Insert scene can also be re-trimmed at the beginning or at the end (using the "IN/OUT" buttons
in Trim mode). The function “Trim E” allows you
to see the insert-scene while trimming.
For Insert scenes the user is brought to the usual
Range menu. Here also you can display and hide
the audio wave form with the loudspeaker symbols (section 3.2).
If you click on the "Range" button while no insert
scene is activated, you can reach every position
of the activated scene or of the entire storyboard. This function is helpful if you have added
a very long scene to the storyboard and want
to view its middle position. You can reach the
desired position by the help of the button "Position" or with the arrow buttons – the slider to the
right shows the current position in relation to
the complete storyboard. The position can also
be changed by clicking the play button; the stop
button stops playback. If you exit the "Range"
menu by clicking on "Ok", the new position is
confirmed.
(14) Scenes are added to the storyboard from
the scene bin. The selected scene in the scene
bin is added to the storyboard by clicking the
"Add" button.
The added scene always appears after the currently selected scene in the storyboard.
There is one exception. When the very first
scene is the current scene in the storyboard, the
user is asked by the system whether the scene
to add should be put In front or Behind the first
scene.
There also exists the possibility to cancel.
If you add the scene before the first scene then
you will be asked – if there is audio on a music
track – whether the music track should be shifted
backward. Answering Yes causes all audio tracks
to be shifted, No causes the music tracks 1 and
2 (thus the sound tracks 3 and 4) to stay at their
time position, and this causes them to slip under
another previous scene.
When the scene has been inserted, the original
in the scene bin can be deleted or trimmed without affecting the storyboard scene.
(15) The function "Remove" deletes the scene
located in the center of the storyboard from the
storyboard. An "Insert" scene can also deleted,
and this uncovers the background. If you have
already created audio and the scene to be deleted is affected, then you will receive a warning
message telling you that an audio sample will
be deleted.
(16) Clicking on "Replace" causes the selected
scene in the center of the storyboard to be replaced by the active scene in the scene bin.
This can be a completely different scene, or the
same scene with different In and Out points.
(17) The "Search" button makes it possible to
find the same scene in the scene bin that is
currently selected in the storyboard (assuming
it has not been deleted or renamed). After
clicking on "Search" the scene in the scene bin
is activated and can, for example, be trimmed
50
or split. (This cannot be done to a scene in the
storyboard). Finally, the scene in the storyboard
can be replaced with the newly trimmed scene.
If you have deleted the scene from the scene
bin, then after you click on "Search" the message "The scene was not found. Should it be
re-created?" appears. If you then click on "Yes"
and the scene will again appear in the scene bin.
This function can be activated at any time, even
after restart, after which a deleted scene cannot
normally be re-created.
(18) "New" creates a scene whose duration
("Length") can be set up to 1 minute and whose
contents can be set from a selection list.
This is very interesting for leaders and trailers
(black video), but also for certain crossfade
effects.
Clicking on this button causes a list of various
options to appear. The following new scenes are
available in the standard version:
Further effects are available on additional SmartMedia cards or CDs/DVDs that you can obtain
either as full or demo versions from your dealer.
You can select a new scene simply by clicking on
it or by activating the slider control.
a) Countdown
This new scene creates a countdown, the duration of which you can set. A countdown number
is shown each second. You can also specify the
numbers and background color with the help of
the color box.
b) Color bars
This scene creates a striped test image according to the standard IRE 100 (for PAL) or IRE 92.5
(for NTSC) with changeable duration. In professional usage, it is normal to have a colorbar
test image several seconds before each video
project.
c) Color
This option creates a one-color scene that is
mainly used as background for titling. Selecting
the option "Color" opens the color box so that
you may select the color.
d) Pattern
After you select this button, you see the "Select
pattern" button to the right. Click on this button to open a screen in which you can select a
pattern from the Image Pool. More information
on this image pool can be found in section 3.3 of
this manual.
The special effect called "Pattern" applies the
aspect ratio of the used pictures and patterns
to the 16:9 format (in PAL and HDV). Activate
the function "Enable distortion" to stop this
correction.
e) Black
This mode creates black video that can be used
as background for titles or combined with the
transition effect Crossfade for fading into and
out of a video.
Below the selection list you find the "Preview"
button. This allows you to view a moving video
preview.
Clicking on the button "Full size" (if your system
is provided with this button) brings up another
menu that again displays the effect options in
the area to the right.
In the left area you see the "Frame" slider under
the effect name. With this slider you can set the
point in time in the new scene you wish to see.
Below you see the button "Display" which you
use to select either "Original" (the representation
of the new scene you have just selected) and
"Compare". The last option divides the screen
into two parts. Part of your new scene is
displayed in the right half of the screen. In the
left half of the screen a scene is displayed that
you can freely choose from the scene bin with
the button "Choose scene" positioned below.
This comparison function lets you correct
images (adjust coloring).
With "OK" the settings for the effect options in
this menu are accepted and you are returned to
the "New scene" window. With "Cancel" you exit
the "Single image" menu without having made
any changes.
The arrow button serves to move the singleimage menu to the upper screen edge.
You also have the option to reduce the panel
51
with the button located above it.
To the right of the preview buttons is the scene
duration, which you can set for up to 1 minute.
Clicking on "OK" returns you to the Edit menu.
The new scene, (named after the effect chosen),
is now available in the Scene bin.
The selection button displayed underneath
the "Preview" button offers three settings. The
function "All" shows all possible "New scenes",
which can be found in the system. "Default"
shows the scenes, which are integrated in the
system and "Optional" shows only the scenes,
which have been installed afterwards.
(19) In the "Special" menu you find various special effects and all image processing effects.
Listing of all Image Processing effects under this
item has a special reason: multi-layering.
If you want to edit a scene with several Image
Processing effects then you must first activate the scene in the scene bin. Then select the
Image Processing effect from the list in the
"Special" menu, (not in the Image Processing
effects screen). The Image Processing effects
listed in the "Special” menu are not applied to a
scene in the storyboard, instead a copy is made
of the active scene in the scene bin. The copy
incorporates the effect, and its name is supplemented with SP, SP 2, etc. You can repeat this
procedure at will.
(see also section 5.8 Image Processing effects,
item (12))
Some of the special effects (the ones listed in
the upper part of the list—above the line) are
only available here. These include: Backwards,
Clipboard (availability depends on system used),
Copy, Ethernet-Transfer (availability depends on
system used), Jitter, Photo-Transfer (availability
depends on system used), Quick motion, Scene
--> audio Sample, Slow motion, and Still Scene.
These effects do not appear in the Image Processing screen.
Here, too, several effects have a "Preview" and
(if your system supports this function) a "Full
Size" preview option. To the right you find the
effect options, to the left you see the "Frame"
button under the effect name. You use this button to set the exact frame of the scene you want
to view.
The button "View" provides four options. With
"Original" you can view your original scene,
with "Effect" you can view your scene with the
special effect applied, and "Orig. + Effect" puts
the original scene on the left screen half and the
applied effect on the right half, so that you can
directly compare them.
The option "Compare" divides the screen into
two parts. To the right you see your new scene
(with effect) and to the left a scene that you
can freely choose from the scene bin using the
button "Choose scene" positioned below. This
enables, for example, an exact color adjustment.
The effect options can be set directly in this
window. You’ll even get a real-time preview
without having to confirm the selection with the
slider.
You accept the settings you have made for the
effect options by clicking "OK" and you are
returned to the Special screen. Clicking "Cancel"
returns you from the full-size menu, but without
accepting any new settings you may have made.
Further on you’ll see a selection button underneath the "Preview" button, which offers the
following three functions:
The function "All" shows all programs which are
to be found in the system. "Default" shows the
programs, which are integrated in the system
and "Optional" shows the programs, which have
been installed separately only, e.g. the additional
software. You also have the possibility to let just
one program be displayed in the effect list. This
function is helpful if you have installed several
effect packages, but only want to work with one
at a time.
The arrow buttons serve to move the singleimage menu to the upper screen edge.
– Backwards
Clicking on the button "Backwards" creates a
scene with the extension "RW" which has the
same length as the original, but runs backwards.
The audio is also run backward. You can mute
the audio in the "Audio Mix" screen if you don't
want to hear it.
52
– Clipboard (availability depends on system
used)
This is a function for temporary storage that
allows you to move scenes to tother projects.
If you click here, you see on the right of the
window the four buttons: "Clipboard -> Project", "Scene -> Clipboard", "Remove scene" and
"Scene from project --> Clipboard".
If you click on "Scene -> Clipboard", the scene
previously selected in the scene bin is automatically inserted onto the clipboard.
If there is no active scene in the scene bin, the
message "No active scene!" is displayed.
If you want to load a scene from the clipboard,
then first select the scene in the scene bin after
which the retrieved scene should be positioned.
Then click on "Special", then on "Clipboard" and
select "Clipboard -> Project". The "Get scene
from clipboard" menu is opened. There you can
select the desired scene, and exit the Special
menu (with "OK" or "Cancel"). You then see the
inserted Clipboard scene in the scene bin. The
scene might have a new number if the scene or
scene name is already present in the scene bin.
If you click (in the clipboard) on the function
"Remove scene", the "Remove scene from clipboard" menu is opened and you can select the
scene to be deleted from the clipboard. You only
have to click on "OK" and the scene is deleted.
Note: If you click on "Remove scene" you see
that in the window displayed the "OK" button is
disabled (appears in dark gray) and thus cannot
be clicked. This is a safety measure so that you
don't accidentally delete a scene. If you really
want to delete a scene, then click twice on the
scene to be deleted (even if it appears in gray)
and then click on the "OK" button that is now
enabled.
The function "Scene from project --> Clipboard"
is used to choose scenes in other projects without entering the project settings.
Clicking on the button "Scene from project -->
Clipboard" opens the screen "Select project", in
which you can choose one of your Projects, from
which you want to export a scene.
After marking a project and having clicked on
"Ok", the scene bin of the activated project
opens from which you can choose the desired
scene. After confirming with "Ok" the scene is
transported in the clipboard. Now you can click
on "Clipboard --> Project", so that a window appears in which you can mark the scene you just
exported. After confirming with "Ok", the scene
will be imported into the scene bin of your current project.
The clipboard serves principally to store video
scenes temporarily in order to use them in other
projects. The clipboard can be accessed from
any project.
Of course, it is also possible to copy DV
material into an HDV project with the aid of the
Clipboard.
If you switch projects and use new project settings, then the scenes already contained in the
clipboard are marked with an asterisk and may
not be usable. If you select one of these scenes
in order to insert it into the scene bin, the "These
scene properties do not conform to project settings!" message appears.
Note: The scenes contained in the clipboard are
deleted when you turn off your machine.
– Copy
A scene can be copied as often as desired within
the "Edit" menu without requiring additional
space on the hard drive. Copying also requires
no time.
You can simply select one of the scenes by clicking on it. The outline of this scene changes to
blue. Clicking on "Copy" creates a copy immediately.
The reason for copying is so that you can trim a
copy independently of the original.
For example, you can use several seconds of a
long take in the opening title and then insert the
complete scene later at a different point in the
storyboard.
SMART EDIT frequently creates copies automatically, (for example when splitting, inserting
into the storyboard, and when creating a special
effect (e.g. "slow motion").
The "Copy" button is therefore meant only for
the purpose described above.
The copy appears in the scene bin and receives
the name of the original scene extended with
".K", for example "vacation.K".
– Ethernet-Transfer (availability depends on
system used)
This is a program which is part of the SMART
EDIT system software. Further information can
be found in chapter 9 „Ethernet Transfer“.
53
– Jitter
Have no fear – SMART EDIT processes your best
and most detailed material without jitter. But sometimes a jitter or stroboscope effect is desired
to attain a change of pace or to give your video
an artistic note.
Simply pick a scene, select "Special", click on
"Jitter", then set the Still time (still time 000.00:
04 = one image remains as it is for a length
of time corresponding to four frames), and in
"Type" select between "Half frame" and "Full
frame". Now you have created a stroboscopic
scene that has an extension "RU". The option
"Full Frame" has an improved picture quality
and is recommended for scenes with little motion. For scenes with considerable motion the
option "Half Frame" is recommended.
Audio is not affected by Jitter and remains synchronized.
A preview of this effect is not possible. If you
click on the "Preview" button, a white, crossedout circle appears.
– Photo-Transfer (availability depends on system used, optionally available for other models)
This is a program used for importing and exporting images to and from photo storage cards (so
that they may be used in other software). Please
read the online help (i-button) or download the
respective pdf file from our website for more
information.
– Quick motion
"Quick motion" works principally the same way
as slow motion, but creates a new scene that
runs faster than the original. Here you can specify a speed-up factor between 2 and 10. Uneven
values are recommended in order to obtain full
resolution. The new scene has the suffix "ZR".
You calculate the length by dividing the time
of the original scene by the specified speed-up
factor.
Here, too, a preview of this effect is not possible. If you click on the "Preview" button a white,
crossed-out circle appears indicating that preview is not possible.
– Scene --> Sample
This function copies the original audio of the
active scene contained in the scene bin to the
audio sample list of the audio menu. The new
audio sample is named the same as the video
scene it was created from. In this way you can
use the audio of one scene for other scenes.
If you click on the "Preview" button a white,
crossed-out circle appears meaning that preview
is not possible.
– Slow motion
"Slow motion" creates a scene that is a copy of
the original but which runs more slowly. You can
specify the delay factor with a slider. The higher
the delay factor, the slower the scene. A value of
2 (the smallest possible value) creates a scene
that runs at only half the speed of the original. If
the original scene was, for example, 4 seconds
long, then the scene in slow motion is 8 seconds
long. To calculate the length of what the new
scene will be, multiply the scene length with the
delay factor).
The finished scene with the extension "ZL", can
be trimmed like any other scene and placed in
the storyboard. Effects can also be applied if
needed.
SMART EDIT plays the scene more slowly than
the normal frame rate. Movement can be jumpy.
The extreme slow motion known from sports
transmissions is only possible with the use of
expensive special cameras that can film at a
much higher frame rate per second.
A preview of this effect is not possible. If you
click on the "Preview" button a red, crossed-out
circle appears indicating that preview is not
possible.
– Still Scene
Frequently a still scene is required in a video.
For example, when introducing "actors". SMART
EDIT can quickly create such stills.
The selected scene in the Scene Bin is simply
frozen at its first frame for the Length of time
set (up to 1 minute), using the slider to the right.
Any remaining part of the scene after the first
frame is not used to create the still image.
If you want to have a specific still image that is
not the first frame in the scene, then simply copy
the scene and trim it down to where the first frame is the desired one, then apply the Still Scene
function. The created scene has the extension
"SC".
Under Type you have the choice between Half
Frame and Full Frame, whereby Full Frame has
a better quality and is recommended for scenes without too much motion. “Frame” means
that SMSRT EDIT tries to remove unwanted
“artifacts” which occur during fast movements
or also during quick camera pans. If the movements are not as dramatic, you will gain better
54
results and a very calm still by choosing “Frame”. In some rare cases, it may be better to
use the “field” option. There is no audio for still
images.
The remaining effects in the Special menu are
the same as the Image Processing effects (The
individual Image Processing effects are explained in chapter 5.8).
(20) In general, you will record scenes that have
more than one camera setting (take). These
scenes must usually be split up in order to make
the video you intend. You can skip this step only
if you want to keep the complete footage as is
without transition effects.
Clicking on the "Split" button brings you to the
Split menu:
Splitting can be compared to cutting a roll of
film.
The film is still on the roll. A segment of film,
(the first take in the scene selected in the scene
bin), is pulled out of the roll. This happens by
clicking on "Split position".
The trackball can be used to scroll through the
entire scene. Select the last frame of the first
take and click on the left trackball button. Check
(and correct if necessary) with the arrow buttons
("<,>") that you have hit the exact split points.
The audio wave form (section 3.2) can help you.
You can turn if on and off with the loudspeaker
symbol. Audio "scrubbing" can help you with
splitting by allowing you to make splits according to specific moments in the audio.
Now you have isolated the first take. The segment is highlighted in light blue. You can playback the segment (and rename it, if desired). You
must now decide whether the segment is valuable or can be deleted. Clicking on "Use" causes
the segment to be "cut" and placed into the
scene bin, where you can access it later. "Drop"
skips the segment and moves on to set the next
the split position in the scene.
SMART EDIT does not delete any video material
during this procedure. The individual scenes are
only copied ("Use") or not copied ("Drop"). The
original scene with all takes (the "film roll") re-
mains unchanged until it is intentionally deleted
in the Edit menu.
After clicking on "Use" or "Drop" you continue to
work with the rest of the roll. Another strip must
be taken out and judged either as good ("Use")
or bad ("Drop"). The last scene is automatically displayed as ".Rest" in the scene bin. This
enables you to easily interrupt your work and to
continue later with the ".Rest".
An additional function is splitting a scene in
series through the "Index" button. Click (in the
splitting menu) on the Play button so that you
see the "Index" button. While the video is running with audio, each time you click on the "Index" button a split position is set. Afterward the
split segments are positioned after the original
scene in the scene bin. This function serves to
roughly split up a scene before you begin with
final editing.
In addition, you can make use of the automatic
splitting function if the video material has been
recorded via DV.
Click on the "Auto" button to cause your footage
to be automatically split. The video scene that
you have filmed most recently is split up very
quickly according to shot changes. (If there are
no camera changes, no splits will be made.)
(21) Scenes must generally be trimmed before
they are suitable for production. Jittery and
blurred images can be removed down to the last
unsuitable frame.
Clicking on "Trim" brings up the trim menu.
Here you can do fine editing for each scene. You
can set the scene's In point (start, first image)
and Out point (end, last image) anywhere you
want. This is similar to an analog cutting board,
but without any waiting time.
Clicking on "IN" displays a much smaller strip
that enables you to scroll through the scene and
set the new In point. The blue area shows how
much of the scene is still active, the gray area to
the left shows the "trimmed away" part.
The time display to the right of the blue bar
shows the length of the scene. Once you have
found the correct starting image, confirm by
clicking on the left button and the "Trim" menu
55
appears again.
You proceed in the same manner with the Out
point. You can carry out fine editing by using the
arrow keys (below the "IN" and "OUT" buttons)
to step through the individual frames one at a
time. You can play the trimmed scene to check it
by clicking on the Play symbol (all the way to the
right).
You can display the audio wave form and use
audio scrubbing (section 3.2).
This procedure simplifies the creation of clean
splits.
Note: When trimming the IN-point, the system
always displays the first available even field.
When trimming the OUT-point, the system
shows the odd (later) field.
When splitting, the first field is even, when
positioning, it’s an odd field. This serves a more
clean way of cutting.
With the two buttons next to the time displays
for the start and end images you can play the
first and last 3 seconds of the scene.
Note that segments of a scene removed by trimming can be reinstated at any time by repeated
trimming.
To the right and below you can directly activate the Edit screen and the Main menu with the
menu symbols.
(22) You can delete a scene at any time. Clicking
on the "Delete" button deletes the currently selected scene in the scene bin.
(23) In case you want to retrieve deleted scenes,
you can use the UnDo button (curved arrow) to
be found to the right of the "Delete" button. With
the UnDo button you can retrieve the last ten
most recently deleted scenes. Deleted scenes
are lost permanently when the system is restarted, when switching between two projects,
and when there is no more space for recording
(video or audio).
This button can be used to reinstate scenes
that you deleted in the scene bin and now have
removed from the storyboard.
Tip: You can use the "Delete" and UnDo functions to easily sort scenes in the scene bin. Delete the active scene, activate another scene, and
then click on UnDo. The scene removed from the
scene bin is now reinserted just after the activated scene.
(24) As soon as you insert effects (which need
to be rendered) into the storyboard or activate
them in the "Special" menu, you'll see one dot
per effect in the upper right corner of the screen.
If the background rendering is activated, the
inserted effects will be rendered one after the
other. The dot of the currently rendered effect
flashes.
In the System Settings, you can determine if
rendering should start with the last placed effect
or if the effect is to be rendered at the end.
The rendering will be activated either with the
button "Smart Rendering" in the "System settings" (see chapter 5.1, item (6)) or by clicking
onto this display in the upper right corner (aswell as in other menus, which support inserting
effects), which also opens the window.
After rendering was started, you can continue
editing - the rendering will be done in the background.
The scene with the rendered special effect is
automatically placed right behind the original
scene in the scene bin.
Note: The display allows a maximum of 10 dots.
If there are more than 10 effects (which have to
be rendered) inserted, you'll see three little dots,
which means that further effects are waiting to
be rendered.
(25) To the right below you see six menu symbols for the following menus: Recording, Transition effects, Image Processing effects, Titling,
Audio mix, and Main menu.
5.6 Finish
In the Finish menu a completely finished project
is recorded out to a DV or video recorder. If your
system is provided with a DVD writer and the
software "DVD-Arabesk", you can record your
finished video to DVD (to read more, go to chapter 5.6 in the "Smart Edit - 2nd edition" manual
or in the separate manual that is included with
"DVD-Arabesk".)
You can finish creating all video and audio.
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(1) The counter at the upper right displays the
length of the storyboard, which is the total
length of your video project. The total length includes not only the scenes you have taken from
the scene bin but also all additions such as color
scenes, black intro scenes, etc. You now know
how much storage capacity you will need for
your output media (VHS, DV, etc.).
(2) This field indicates whether the effects and
audio samples are "Created" or still "Unrendered". Even if all effects except one have been
calculated, the display will show "Unrendered".
If all effects have been created, this button will
be inactive.
(3) It is often easier to let all effects and audio
mixing be created overnight or during work
breaks. You can use the "Create" button to carry
out pending calculations in order automatically.
(This is commonly referred to as Batch-Rendering.)
A display tells you which effect of the total
is currently being created and the light-blue
progress bar shows the progress of the entire
creation process. Please note that this is an
approximation because the calculation times for
different effects may be different. Some effects
(e.g. the 3D effects) need more calculation time
for every frame and this may lead to a certain
imprecision in the remaining time displayed.
Tip: If you turn off the machine while creation
of an effect is in progress, the calculation will
be finished before the machine actually powers
down.
(4) Clicking on the "Choose Range" button brings
up a menu in which you can specify a segment
of the storyboard (using the "IN" and "OUT" buttons and the arrow buttons) to be recorded out.
Here you can also use the wave form (section
3.2) to help you in deciding on the segment.
(5) The Record to VCR function serves to record
your video project out to another device.
If you want to record your material on a VCR,
then select Analog and then click on the Play
button next to it. Your video plays and is recorded out to the VCR.
If you want to record your material to DV, select
the option "DV" and use the DV Controls (6).
Of course you can record video material with the
aid of suitable capture programs to your PC’s
hard-drive and edit it there.
If you are editing an HDV project, you can
now also output your video in HDV. Before
outputting, the system must however first
render the effects (even if already rendered in
DV).
Depending on the system you are using, the
high resolution of the video and the sheer data
size can result in a longer rendering period.
(6) If you would like to control your DV device
(camera, deck, etc.) from your system, click on
the button "DV Recorder Controls". You can control your DV device using the control panel now
displayed.
When you are ready click the "Record to VCR"
button located below the control to start recording of your footage on DV tape. This process is
not shown on the monitor.
We recommend putting a few seconds of empty
scene at the beginning of the storyboard. The
recorder can then begin recording while the
empty scene is being played. This is also recommended for the end of the storyboard – this
avoids accidental recording the SMART EDIT
user interface.
The record-out function works only when all
effects and audio tracks have been completely
created (also read item (3): "Create").
(7) In the bottom area of the Finish screen you
see a window with a selection list in which the
program DVD Arabesk is listed, if you are using
a DVD writer.
(8) After you have created the complete video
project, you can click on the "Launch program"
button in the area to the right in order to run
DVD-Arabesk.
If you have installed SMART EDIT as an update,
you probably have version 1 of "DVD-Arabesk"
installed. Please see the "SMART EDIT – second
57
edition" manual, chapter 5.6 for the relevant
description. The programs "DVD-Arabesk 2" and
"DVD-Arabesk 3" come with a separate manual.
Note: The DVD-Arabesk software may differ
slightly from the description below on some
systems.
In the “Image quality” section, you may see
the “Rendering” button, which provides you
with three options, namely, “fast”, “normal”
and “intensive”. These options allow you to
influence the picture quality of the computed
film.
In some cases, you cannot play an inserted
DVD or a film created using DVD Arabesk. In
that case, you can therefore ignore the playback
functions described in Chapter 3.2 of the DVD
Arabesk manual.
(9) Clicking on the menu symbol brings you
directly to the Main menu screen.
5.7 Transition effects
When your project has been completely arranged in the Edit screen, and you are pleased with
the results (but with hard cuts between the
scenes), then you can apply transition effects.
Transition effects are transformations from one
scene to the next. In traditional film editing these transitions are known as A/B roll cuts.
You can carry out crossfades, wipe fades, and
color fades, but also trick transitions only possible in digital systems. The transition effects
are always inserted between two scenes in the
storyboard. Some complex transition effects
must be created. Creation can be time-consuming, depending on the effect desired. For this
reason it is possible to preview the effect in a
small window. You can then "batch-render" in
the Finish menu (see 5.6, item (3): "Create").
(1) The "Transitions" screen shown above displays the storyboard you are already familiar
with. But here, two scenes instead of one are
displayed in the center.
You thus see two time displays in the upper panel. You can now move the scenes meant for the
transition to the middle.
A further difference is the Play button which in
this menu only plays the effect with 1 second
before and after, and not the entire storyboard. If
you have not already inserted an effect, clicking
on this button plays the last second of the first
scene and the first second of the second scene.
This enables you to view hard cuts even between very long scenes.
The slider and the arrow buttons are used in the
same way as in the Edit menu.
(2) You can choose the desired transition effect
in the effect list by selecting directly or using the
slider. Some of the effect symbols are marked in the list with a blue flag in the upper-left
corner. This means that the effect is real-time
affected (availability depends on system used)
and normally does not have to be rendered in
DV projects. A red flag identifies a demo effect,
(real-time or not), that must be calculated and
is played with a superimposed "demo" text.
To purchase and unlock an effect, contact your
Dealer.
Note: In going to print, not all effects were
HDV capable and could therefore not be made
available in HDV projects. Additionally, in HDV
projects, no real-time effects are available.
(3) After you have selected an effect that has
further options, the effect options are displayed
in the field to the right of the effect list. There
you can, for example, define colors and effect
directions, and other parameters specific to the
individual effects.
(4) This button allows you to switch the effect
list to single points. The button offers the following three functions.
The function "All" shows all transition effects
which are to be found in the system. "Default"
shows the transition effects, which are integrated in the system and "Optional" only shows
the transition effects which have been installed
afterwards.
If you have installed additional transition effects,
they are also shown in this list (underneath the
three settings listed above). Thus it is possible
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just to see only one effect type in the list.
(5) Clicking on the "i" button, you’ll get information about the transition effect activated in the
effect list. If it is an additional effect, the window
"product information" appears, which offers a
description of the effect. Is the effect to be found
a standard effect, the product information refers
to the manual.
(6) You use the "Add" button to apply the selected and defined effect between the scenes in
the storyboard middle. The effect symbol then
appears between the two scenes with a blue
(real-time) or a red flag (must be created). The
effect duration corresponds to the duration that
was last used. This enables you to insert many
effects with the same duration between different
scenes.
If you select an new transition effect although
there already is one between the two scenes,
then the new effect replaces the old, without you
having to click again on "Add".
(7) A click on the "Remove" button removes the
added effect from the storyboard. If you would
like to replace the current effect with another,
then you can simply select the new effect and it
automatically replaces the current effect in the
storyboard. In this case you don't have to click
on the "Remove" button.
(8) With this button you can set the duration of
the effect.
This button is enabled after you have inserted
an effect between two scenes. The duration then
shown is 1 second (assuming that neither of the
two scenes lasts less than 1 second). Clicking on
this button displays a window in which you use
a slider to set the time exactly. Also provided
are the durations 1/2 sec, 1 sec and 2 sec, which
you can click directly, or use the slider to set the
duration to its maximum limit - the length of the
shorter of the 2 scenes used.
An effect between two normal scenes shortens
the total storyboard length by the running time
of the transition effect. An effect between a
normal scene (background) and an Insert scene
(foreground) does not shorten the length of the
storyboard.
Transition effects may not overlap. For example,
if a scene is 5 seconds long then the total duration of the two effects connecting this scene
with the previous scene and next scene cannot
be longer than 5 seconds. For effects where an
insert scene is present, the duration of the insert
scene is the maximum limit.
Audio is automatically cross-faded. This means
that the audio of the previous scene becomes
quieter and the audio of the next scene becomes louder. If a scene's audio is too quiet or too
loud, then you should correct the volume when
dubbing (audio mix).
If an insert scene is involved with the effect, the
audio is not changed because Inserts do not affect the original audio of the background scene.
(9) The "Preview" button can only be clicked
when the inserted effect is an effect that must
be created (indicated with red outline). A screen
opens in which the last second of the first scene,
the effect, and the first second of the following
scene are displayed, so that you can view the
transition and perhaps make further corrections
(concerning color, direction, time, etc.), before
you finally create the transition effect.
The duration of the preview is approximately
that of the final version. The preview may be a
little "jittery" because it does not work at the normal frame rate. This will not occur in the created
effect. For complex effects a certain wait time
even for preview may be necessary.
A preview does not require any hard-drive
space.
(10) After you have added a transition effect
and perhaps defined its duration, you can click
on the "Full Size" button and bring up a further
preview menu, if your system supports this
function. There you see the middle frame of the
transition effect. The video image is superimposed by an operating panel in which you can
see the effect options (if available) on the right
side.
On the left side you see the button "Frame" below the effect name. You can use this button to
specify the point in time of the transition effect
you want to see.
In this way you can observe the applied effect at
any point in time of the scene. The button does
not have to be confirmed – you can scroll slowly
through this part of the scene and view it at the
same time.
The button "Display" positioned below
offers you the choice between "Original"
(representation of the new scene you have just
chosen) and "Compare". The last option divides
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the screen into two parts. Your new scene is
displayed in the right half of the screen. In the
left half of the screen a scene is displayed that
you can freely choose from the scene bin with
the button "Choose scene" positioned below.
This comparison function lets you, for example,
adjust the color to correspond to an existing
scene.
You can also change the effect options to directly compare different colors or directions.
Here you’ll also get a real-time preview, too.
Therefore the selection of the sliders does not
have to be confirmed.
The settings made in this menu are confirmed
with "OK" and you are returned to the Edit
menu. With "Cancel" you leave the "Full Size"
menu without saving any changes.
The arrow button serves to move the menu bar
to the upper screen edge.
(11) If the inserted effect shows a symbol outlined in red, then it must be created. When you
click on the "Create" button a screen appears in
which the course of the effect can be seen as it
is created. After the creation is completed the
symbol's outline is blue.
(12) If your system supports the function "scene"
you can make use of the multi-layer technique.
If you want to overlap several transition effects,
you at first add one effect between two scenes
and create it. Then you create a single scene
from the two scenes and the inserted effect. To
do this you click on the "Scene" button so that
a window appears in which you can select the
range for the new scene. The name of the used
transition effect appears next to "Name" and is
given as default name for the new scene. If desired, you can enter another name by clicking and
using the keyboard that appears.
You also see the three options "Effect", "Effect
+ scene(s)", and "Range". If you only want to
convert the effect with the previously set range
into a new scene, then click on "Effect" and then
on "OK". This causes the effect to be converted
into a scene and to be put into the scene bin of
the Edit menu.
You can also let the length of the new scene
extend beyond the range of the two previous
scenes (with inserted effect). In this case click on
"Effect + scene(s)" and then on "OK".
Then you’ll be asked with the question, if the
scene should replace the effect. Clicking on
"yes" makes both scenes in the Storyboard be
replaced by a new one, containing the inserted
effect. This change can be seen directly in this
menu. (However, this function cannot be used if
the beginning of the first and the end of the last
scene features a transition effect).
Choosing "No" causes the scene to be created
and to appear in the scene bin of the "Edit"
menu.
Alternatively, you can create the scene from the
entire length of or from a portion of the storyboard. Click on "Range" and confirm with "OK".
Use the IN and OUT points (in the now familiar
Range menu) to select the range of the new
scene. The wave form can help you to do this
(section 3.3). The wave form can be displayed/
hidden with the loudspeaker symbol.
Then click on "OK" in the Range menu and the
scene is created and stored in the Edit menu.
Of course, you can also create a separate scene
from a portion of the storyboard in which there
is no effect. Simply select a point in the storyboard and click on "Scene". In the window that is
displayed only the function "Range" is enabled.
Specify a range and click on "OK". Then you can
view the new scene in the Edit menu.
(13) Clicking on the menu symbols brings you
directly to the Edit, Image Processing effects,
Titling, and to the Main menu screens.
Keep in mind: If you change a setting for an
effect that has already been created, change the
duration, or even replace the effect with another,
the effect must then be created again. Be careful!
The transition effects in detail
The following transition effects belong to the
basic package on the CD/DVD or SmartMedia
card.
1. 3D Mosaic: The first scene is divided into
small squares, the number of which you can set
in the effect options under "Number of Squares"
(between 1 and 15). The squares "fly" out of the
picture and reveal the second scene.
2. 3D Stripes: The second scene is pushed into
the picture in the "Direction" you choose (from
top to bottom, or from bottom to top) with from
2 to 30 stripes ("Number of stripes").
60
3. Bars: The new picture either pushes ("Type"
"Push") the old with from 2 to 200 "Bars" out
of view or superimposes itself ("Type" "Inset").
Under "Direction" you have a choice of six. Two
are interlocked (come from two sides). Recommended duration: 0.5 to 2 seconds.
4. Blue box: With this effect you can remove
undesirable elements from a foreground scene
and place the remaining motif on another background. (This is also commonly called a "chroma-key" effect) You are probably familiar with
this effect, it is used by weather forecasters on
television. The speaker actually stands in front
of a blue wall and is projected onto the weather
map.
The background scene can be any motif. The
foreground scene, located in the storyboard directly after the background scene, should show
an object (thing or person) in front of a single-colored (blue is very suitable) background.
You can choose any color, but avoid using pale
colors, black, or white.
With "Color Choice" you can set the largest
possible box that defines the color range of the
foreground scene to be masked.
In case the (blue) surface of the foreground
scene (because of illumination) is not completely
single-colored, then you can use "Color span" to
set the range in percent that the color may deviate from the selected box ("Color choice").
If you click "Include area", the foreground scene
appears, but with the help of a box you select
here the portion of the background scene to be
used for this effect. If you want to see your object in front of the entire background, set the box
to be as large as possible.
The "Exclude Area" button specifies the portion
of the background that should remain in a single
color. If you don't want to use this portion in
your video material, then make the box smaller
and move it out of the picture.
Keep in mind before calculating to adjust the
running time of the effect to the duration of both
scenes by using the button "x s". Ideally, both
scenes will be the same length.
5. Circle wipe: This effect changes from one
scene to another with a circle containing a scene
and which becomes steadily larger or smaller.
The direction can be chosen with "Mode". "In"
means that the second scene overlays the first
scene with a circle that begins in the center of
the screen and grows outward until only the
second scene is visible.
With "Out" the first scene is in a circle covering
the screen but which then becomes steadily
smaller until it disappears, having been replaced
by the second scene. The well-known end to cartoon films can be replicated by using the "Black"
effect from the "New scene" list and the mode
"Out".
6. Color fade: With this effect the first scene fades into a specifiable color and from there fades
into the second scene. Such a fade is popular,
for example, with edited interviews, where a
hard cut or other transition emphasizes the
participant's movement. The usual color box is
used here to set the "Color". For this effect black
or white is the usual choice.
7. Crossfade: This effect is the classical fade.
Next to the hard cut, this is certainly the most
frequently used type of scene transition. The
first scene is transformed gradually into the
second, whereby with increasing time the first
scene becomes less and less visible and the
second more and more. As with all transition
effects both scenes remain in movement. Simply
freezing a scene is not attractive and is no longer
supported by SMART EDIT.
8. Double exposure: This effect is the classical
double exposure as it has been used in film
for the last hundred years, and leads to a very
atmospheric picture transition. In essence, it is
an extended fade. With "Mode" you can choose
between "Crossfade" (normal usage) and "Fade
In/Out" (recommended for inserts). The "Fade
time" (sum of fade-in and fade-out) can be set
for up to 12 seconds. Under "Mix" you can set
the proportion of the scenes involved up to
100%. If the control for the mix proportion is set
to 0%, then the first scene is shown in full. For
100% you see only the second scene. With 50%
both scenes are shown with the same intensity.
This is suitable for normal transitions. Don't forget to specify the duration of the effect with the
corresponding buttons. You will usually use the
"x s" button to set the duration to the maximum
so that the transition takes effect throughout the
entire double scene. For this case you should
trim both scenes to the same length beforehand.
9. Field changer: The scenes in this effect are
alternated in half images with each other so that
a strobing effect ensues keeping both scenes in
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movement.
10. Gate: With this effect you can call up the
color box with the button "Color" in order to specify which color the gate should have. The gate
closes from opposite sides of the screen over
the first scene. Under "Direction" you specify
whether the opposite sides are top and bottom,
or left and right. After the bars have met at
screen center, they reverse direction, moving out
of the picture and revealing the second scene.
11. Pattern fade: This effect fades the second
scene by using the pattern you have selected
from the Image Pool. You can choose between
“Wipe” and “Split Screen” to achive the ffect
you want. In addition, select the color for the
border: “None“(no border), “Soft” or “Color”.
12. Picture in picture: This is not really a true
transition effect. But SMART EDIT handles it as
an effect because it affects two scenes simultaneously. The first of the two scenes fills the
entire screen in the background. The second
scene is inset on it as a reduced image. The
position of the small image can be set in the
effect options with the button "Location". The
buttons "Shadow" and "Frame" are used to set a
value from 0-50. The frame color can be set with
the color box through the button "Frame Color".
Avoid using very strong colors, because this
can lead to jaggedness in the upper-right and
lower-right corners. For the picture-in-picture
effect audio is not crossfaded, as is the case with
all other effects, but instead only the audio of
the first scene (background video) is used. You
can change this default setting by using audio
mixing.
13. Random lines: This effect transforms the first
scene to the second by continuously covering
the first scene with randomly positioned lines
from the second scene.
14. Rectangle wipe: This effect changes from
one scene to another with a rectangle containing a scene and which becomes steadily larger
or smaller. Under "Position" you can set the
"Location" and "Size" of a rectangle where the
sides increase or decrease in proportion to each
other. The direction can be chosen with "Mode".
"In" means that the second scene overlays the
first scene with a rectangle that begins in the
center of the screen and grows outward until
only the second scene is visible. With "Out" the
first scene is in a rectangle covering the screen
but which then becomes steadily smaller until it
disappears, having been replaced by the second
scene.
15. Scale: Under "Position" you can set the
"Location" and "Size" of a rectangle where the
sides always increase or decrease in proportion
to each other. If you choose the option "Grow"
under "Type", the second scene is zoomed into
the first scene. The scene is scaled to fit proportionately into the rectangle and increases or
decreases in size according to the sides of the
rectangle. If you choose the option "Shrink" the
opposite occurs. The first scene is in the rectangle covering the screen and gradually becomes
smaller until it disappears, having been replaced
by the second scene.
16. Stripe fade: This effect changes from one
scene to another by dividing the first scene
into stripes which are then faded out while the
second scene can already be seen in the background. You can specify the number of "Stripes"
from 2-32. Under "Mode" you can specify the
direction of the stripes (you have the choice
between "Horizontal" and "Vertical").
17. ZI Page turn: This effect lets the first scene
fold over like a book page, revealing the second
scene. You can specify the "Direction", the direction of the "Fixed corners", and the "Quality".
Note: Since this manual was printed, the software version may have been changed. The standard effects in your system may vary from the
ones listed here.
5.8 Image Processing effects
Apart from transition effects there are also the
Image Processing effects.
In contrast to transition effects, Image Processing effects are applied to entire scenes or segments of the storyboard. You can make a part
of your video brighter or invert it, or convert
it into a charcoal drawing or relief. These are
sometimes referred to as "filters" in old analog
editing systems. In the same way, for example,
as a yellow filter on a camera lens modifies the
color of pictures taken, an Image Processing
62
effect is applied to a particular segment of the
storyboard.
In the Image Processing effects screen only one
scene is selected. The selected scene represents
the approximate range for the intended effect.
You can process just one image, or an entire
scene, or in the extreme case the entire storyboard.
effects, which are to be found in the system.
"Default" shows the image processing effects,
which are integrated in the system, and "Optional" only shows the image processing effects,
which have been installed afterwards.
If you have installed additional image processing effects, they are also shown in this list (underneath the three settings listed above). Thus it
is possible just to see only one image processing effect type in the list.
(5) Clicking on the "i" button, you’ll get information about the image processing effect activated
in the effect list. If it is an additional effect, the
window "product information" opens, which offers a description of the effect. Is the effect to be
found a standard effect, the product information
refers to the manual.
(1) The long-term effects menu displays the
familiar storyboard. You now bring the scene
(to which you would like to add effect) into the
center of the storyboard.
A difference to the storyboard from the "Edit"
menu is the Play button. In the Image Processing effects screen the Play button does not play
the entire storyboard, only the selected scene in
the center. If an effect has been added, then the
length of the entire effect is played.
(2) You can select an effect in the effect list. Either click on the effect directly so that it is highlighted by the dark-gray bar, or use the slider
or arrow buttons in order to move the desired
effect to the correct position. If you do use the
slider, then after selecting the effect you must
press the left trackball button so that the lightblue bar again changes to dark-blue.
Note: In going to print, not all effects were HDV
capable and could therefore not be made available in HDV projects.
(3) After you have chosen an effect that is available with further options, the corresponding effect options are displayed in the field to the right
next to the effect list. There you can define, for
example, the colors and intensity of the effect.
(4) This button allows you to switch the effect
list to single points. The button offers the
following three functions.
The function "All" shows all image processing
(6) With the "Add" button you can apply the
selected and configured effect to the scene
located in the center. The effect symbol appears
in the scene outlined in red. If you select a new
long-term effect even though there is already
one in the scene, the new effect replaces the old,
without you having to click again on "Add". The
length of the newly inserted effect corresponds
at first to the length of the actual scene, but can
be changed with the button located to the above-left (item(8)).
(7) A click on the "Remove" button removes the
inserted effect from the storyboard. If you want
to replace the current effect with another, simply
select the new effect and it will replace the one
in the storyboard. In this case you don't have to
click on the "Remove" button.
(8) After you have inserted a scene the scene
length is displayed in this button (and thus the
maximum length of the effect). Click this button
so that the "Specify Range" menu opens and
you are given four selection options. You can
let the effect run "1 sec at beginning", "1 sec at
end", over the "complete scene", or over a specifiable "Range".
Choosing the function "Range" opens a Trim
menu, similar to "Trim" from the "Edit" menu,
in which you can set the applicable range for
the effect. The effect will begin at the In point
(first frame of the scene), and end at the Out
point (the last frame). Some segments of the
storyboard cannot be selected. The reason is
that other effects are already defined. Overlap-
63
ping between long-term effects and titling is not
possible. (However, you can do this by using the
Special function in the Edit screen to create new
scenes with included IP effects.)
You can also choose between the "Trim“ and
"Position“ functions here as well. For further
information, please refer to the notes regarding
"Insert“ (Chapter 5.5, Point (12))
When you have set the range of your choice,
return to the "Image Processing" screen (click on
the right button).
If you have extended the effect to other scenes,
then you will also see the effect symbol in these
scenes. (By choosing the option "complete
scene" you can remove the selected effect from
the other scenes.) The range that you just set is
displayed in this button.
(9) Clicking on the "Preview" button opens a
small screen in which the video plus the effect
runs. In this way you can judge and perhaps
make corrections (for color, intensity, time, etc.)
to the effect before creating it.
The running time of the preview will correspond
approximately to the time of the calculated effect. The preview may be a little "jittery", because it does not run at the normal frame rate. This
will not occur in the created effect. A preview
requires no space on the hard-drive.
(10) After you have inserted an Image Processing effect and perhaps specified its range, you
can click on "Full Size" (if your system is provided with this function) to bring up an additional
menu. In the background you see the middle frame of the entire segment for the inserted Image
Processing effect (if the effect is applied on the
entire scene, then you will see the middle frame
of the video scene).
An operating panel with effect options (to the
right, if there are any for the selected effect),
overlays the video.
To the left you see the button "Display" with
four available possibilities. With "Original" you
can view your original scene. With "Effect" you
can observe your scene with the applied effect.
"Orig. + Effect" displays the original scene in the
left screen half and the applied effect in the right
half. In this way you can easily compare the
original with the applied effect.
The option "Compare" divides the screen into
two parts. To the right you see your new scene
(with effect) and to the left a scene that you
can freely choose from the scene bin using the
button "Choose scene" positioned below. This
lets you, for example, exactly adjust the color to
correspond to another scene.
Above the function "Display" you see the "Frame" slider with which you can set the point in
time of the long-term effect that you want to
view.
In this way you can view the inserted effect at
any point in time of the scene. The button does
not have to be confirmed, so that you can scroll
slowly through the scene and view the effect at
the same time.
Of course, you can change the effect options as
you wish and thus have the possibility of directly
comparing various colors and directions.
The effect options can be set directly in this
window, while watching a real-time preview.
The selection of the sliders does not have to be
confirmed.
The effect options set in this menu are accepted with "OK" and you are returned to the Edit
menu. With "Cancel" you exit the "Full Size"
menu without changes.
The arrow button serves to move the Singleimage menu to the upper screen edge.
(11) When you click on the "Create" button a
window appears in which the effect can be viewed as it is created. After completed calculation
the outline of the effect symbol is blue.
When you calculate an effect SMART EDIT reads
all individual images from the scene in question
and applies the effect to it. The result is stored
on the hard drive. This procedure takes time and
consumes hard-drive capacity.
When recording data you should always leave a
small amount of hard drive capacity in reserve.
Depending on how often effects are used, this
should be between 2% and 10% of the video
playing time.
Although it is theoretically possible to apply
an effect to the entire video material, it is usually not meaningful to apply a general color or
brightness correction to all the footage. This
would require extensive hard-drive capacity
and would take a long time to be calculated. It is
better to make such corrections when recording
from the video input device using the sliders in
the "Video settings" screen.
(12) If the "Scene" button is available on your
system, you cam make use of the Multi-layer
technique.
If you would like to overlay several long-term ef-
64
fects, you at first insert an effect into a scene and
create it. Then you convert the scene with the
inserted effect into a separate scene. To do this
click on the button "Scene". A window appears
in which you can select the range for the new
scene. The name of the effect applied appears
under "Name" as default name for the new
scene. You can change this name by clicking on
it and calling up the keyboard.
You also have the three options "Effect", "Effect
+ Scene(s)", and "Range". In order to make a
new scene just from the effect with the previously set range, click on "Effect" and then on "OK".
The effect is turned into a scene and put into the
scene bin of the Edit menu.
You can also adjust the length of the new scene
to the range of the previous scene (with inserted
effect). In this case click on "Effect + Scene(s)"
and then on "OK". The new scene is created and
appears in the scene bin.
Alternatively, you can create the new scene from
the entire length or a segment of the storyboard.
Click on "Range", confirm with "OK", and use the
IN and OUT points in the familiar Range menu to
select the range containing the new scene. The
wave form can be of help (section 3.2) and can
be toggled on/off with the loudspeaker symbol.
Then click in the Range menu on "OK" and the
scene is created and put into the Edit menu in
the Scene Bin.
Of course, you can create a separate scene from
a storyboard segment in which there is no effect.
Simply select a scene in the storyboard and click
on "Scene". In the window displayed only the
function "Range" is active. Specify a new range
and click on "OK". Now you can view the new
scene in the Edit menu.
The multi-layering technique for Image Processing effects can also be applied by using the Edit
menu to activate a scene in the scene bin and
then clicking the "Special" button. All Image Processing effects are listed there. The effect you
select is not applied into the storyboard. Instead
a copy is made of the active scene in the scene
bin with the Image Processing effect added to
it. The copy is then identified with the extension
"SP", "SP 2", etc., as the case may be. You can
carry out this procedure any number of times.
(See section 5.5 Editing, item (19))
(13) Clicking on the menu symbols brings you
directly to the Edit, Transition effects, Titling,
and to the Main menu screens.
Keep in mind: If you change a setting for an effect that has already been calculated, or change
the duration, or even replace the effect with
another, the effect must then be re-created. Be
careful!
The Image Processing effects in detail
The following Image Processing effects are available in the standard package:
1. Binarizer: The scene is divided into two colors
according to brightness. With "Color 0" you
bring up the color box in which you select a
color that replaces the darker areas. "Color 1"
replaces the brighter areas. The "Threshold" of
the transition from light to dark can be set from
0-100%. And you can set "Transition" between
the two colors from 0-100% in order to prevent
"edge shimmer".
2. Color depth: A very frequently seen effect can
be achieved with this. The number of colors in
the picture is reduced. The "Depth" can be set
from 2-50. The "Transition" can be set from 0100% in order to prevent "edge shimmer".
Tip: Up to 16 million different shades of color
can appear in a video image. This allows fluid
transitions. For each color component (there
are a total of three color components) there are
about 256 possible levels.
3. Color to Grey: Usually the video material is in
color. This effect can convert the video to blackand-white. If you want to convert long segments, or perhaps even the entire video to blackand-white, then you can set the color saturation
in the Video settings menu to 0% when initially
recording the material. This might save you long
calculation times.
4. Control Color: With this effect you can correct the colors "Red", "Green", and "Blue" in the
scene (later adjustment). You can set the color
from 0-200%, where 100% corresponds to the
regular color.
5. Control Image: With this effect you can
change "Brightness", "Contrast", "Saturation",
and "Gamma".
6. CVBS filter: This effect can be used to reduce
65
edge shimmer which sometimes arises when
using an CVBS (RCA) connection. This shimmer
can appear at very fine, high-contrast edges
arises to a much lesser extent or not at all when
using a S-Video connection. Using the filter
causes a weak blurring of the image. The filter
should therefore only be used when absolutely
necessary.
You can set the "Strength" from 1-3.
Tip: With a CVBS connection the signals for
brightness and color, which are normally separate, are mixed. This causes considerable loss
in the video bandwidth, especially for color. The
"CVBS filter" reduces the video bandwidth and
thus reduces the extent of the undesired effect
described above.
7. Doubler: This effect blurs the scene by overlaying the image with itself so that a light colored shadow appears.
8. Dynamic range: This effect is used to limit the
extent of brightness and contrast. This makes
possible interesting estrangement effects.
Experiment a little with the settings! The preview offers a good approximation so that you
don't have to make time-intensive calculations.
All image information is retained under "Type".
"Clip". The controls "Min" and "Max" are used to
change brightness and contrast. Under "Compress", however, image information is lost for
areas brighter than maximum or darker than minimum, which are set to maximum or minimum,
respectively. You lose the details in the bright
and dark areas. Other areas are unaffected.
9. Fade in: This effect helps you to fade in the
scene, e.g. at the beginning of your film. Choose
the desired color with the effect options and see
how the color becomes less and less dominant
until the scene is completely revealed and the
color no longer visible. This effect fades in only
the picture material, not the audio!
10. Fade out: This effect helps you to fade out
the scene, e.g. at the end of your film. Use the
"Color" option to select the desired color to
which the scene is faded. At first, the effect overlays your scene very lightly with the color so
that the scene is still clearly visible. In the course
of the effect the color becomes more and more
dominant until the scene is completely overlaid
and no longer visible. This effect fades out only
the picture material, not the audio!
11. Flip: This effect flips the scene. If you set
the "Direction" to "Horizontal", then you see the
scene with the left and right halves exchanged. If
you set "Vertical", then the scene is seen upsidedown. The setting "Horizontal + Vertical" combines these two effects.
12. LineArt: With this effect the video is turned
into a sort of moving charcoal drawing. All
edges and sharp contours look like they have
been redrawn with a charcoal pencil on a piece
of white paper. The "Contrast" control is used
to set the blackness of the lines from 1-8 depending on the contrast of the original scene.
13. Mirror: A scene is mirrored. Under "Type"
the following directions can be given: "Horizontal Left-Left", "Horizontal Right-Right", "Vertical
Top-Top", and "Vertical Bottom-Bottom". You
also have the possibility to mirror the two upper
or the two lower image halves, whereby you
can also specify which image half (left or right)
should be mirrored.
14. Mosaic: With this effect you make a mosaic
out of your scene. The scene is divided up into
individual squares that become larger. You specify the "Size" of the squares from 2-200. You
specify the beginning and end points for the
effect within the scene with the "In" and "Out"
points. Time can be up to 10 seconds.
15. Negative: This is the negative effect known
from photography. It is often used for special
effects, but also has a practical application. With
the macro function of some video cameras it
is possible to film a slide or a negative in fullscreen format. The Negative effect can then be
used to create a positive image for use in the
video.
For this effect you also have (under "Type") the
choice between "Brightness" and "Brightness
+ Color". There is an interesting effect for example, if you invert the "Brightness". The video
seems like a negative, but the colors are correct.
16. NOP: You can ignore this effect. It is listed in
the regular effect list but doesn't do anything.
This function causes no change to your video
material but is used by MacroSystem technicians to help find software and hardware errors so
that we can help you with problems by telephone. NOP is an abbreviation for "No OPeration".
66
17. Out of focus: With this effect you can make
a scene appear blurred. You can set the blur
"Intensity" from 2-20. Under "In" and "Out" you
set the start and end points of the effect (up to
12 seconds).
18. Rectangle: A rectangle is inserted into your
video. You can set the "Position/Size" and the
"Color".
19. Relief: The video image is transformed into
a sort of 3-dimensional relief. It looks as if it has
been chiseled in stone – a single gray tone with
light and shadow at the edges. Edges appear
where the original has strongly contrasting
edges. The button "Direction" can be used to
change the illumination source in order to obtain
different effects. The arrow shows the direction
in which the light shines from.
20. Sharpen: Sometimes you may want to
improve a blurred segment of a scene (e.g. old
archive material). The degree of sharpness can
be set from 1-8 with the "Strength" control. The
preview does not do full justice to the result, so
you should experiment beforehand with a shortened version (Edit/Copy, Trim) of the scene you
would like to correct.
21. Solarize: The video is strongly altered with
this effect. The original colors are ignored and
new colors are created that are dependent on
the brightness. Black is replaced by blue, gray
values are converted to orange, yellow, green,
cyan, and even blue where the very brightest
image areas were. You can sometimes see similar images in TV science programs or in crime
movies as so-called "heat images". Hard transitions may lead to shimmering edges, especially
for VHS or when using the CVBS connection.
The effect "CVBS filter" can be used to alleviate
this (before or after.)
You can set the "Saturation" from 0-100%. The
higher the percent number, the more color the
image has. For 0% you have a black-and-white
picture.
Tip: False colors are frequently used in science
to highlight small differences in brightness for
the human eye. The human eye can distinguish
only about 100 different levels of brightness, but
about 100,000 different colors.
22. Spread: Here you create a "shimmering"
image. This is achieved by distributing the pixels
within a circle (which you set with "Step" 1-10)
containing the original pixel.
23. White balance: In case recording has led to
erroneous white matching resulting in white
and gray surfaces that look wrong but the color
is OK, you can specify the location and size of
a rectangle with the button "Reference Color".
Then the color fault within the rectangle is
averaged and the deviations in the entire image
are canceled out. Note that only light color faults
can be improved. You can turn a red surface
into a gray one, but the effects on the rest of the
image are extreme (color distortion).
In the case that there is no colorless surface in
the image, then a color correction can only be
done with the effect "Control Color".
24. Zoom: A defined image area can be zoomed
in. Under "Position" you give the location and
size of the rectangle area. Under "Zoom In" and
"Zoom Out" you specify the start and end time
of the effect (up to 12 seconds).
5.9 Titling
Titling functions much the same as if it were an
Image Processing effect. Titling is actually done
as a picture-editing effect. Instead of a "filter”,
digital text is added to your video.
Titling has two menus:
The settings in the "Titling" menu correspond
closely to those of the image processing effects
menu. You can read the corresponding description there for information about functions such
as Insert, Delete, Range, Preview, Single image,
Calculate, and Scene.
After you have selected a desired title effect, and
perhaps set further Options in the field to the
right of the effect list, you must first Add the effect into the storyboard. You can then enter the
Titler menu by clicking on the button "Enter/edit
Text" below the effect options.
67
(1) In the background you see the first frame of
your video scene.
This full frame display serves as orientation for
adding text. This lets you immediately see how
the text looks overlaid on the particular scene
you are editing.
At the vertical or horizontal edge of the window
you may see - according to effect - a scroll bar,
with which you can scroll through the text box.
If text boxes are already present in the video
image, then you can use this menu to enter text
with the help of an external keyboard.
(2) If you click on the button “Text”, you will
continue to see the first image of your scene.
There is a task bar in the foreground. This task
bar provides you with several components that
are described in the following:
• With the keyboard you can enter the text of
your choice. It is also possible to connect an
external keyboard (e.g. PowerKey option) to
enter the text. Any adjustments you make to the
settings will automatically be applied to the next
line of text entry.
If you want, you can enter the text later, but it is
recommended that you enter some letters now
in order to better judge the results later.
If you would like to format every line with its
own settings (e.g. font, size, color), then click
on the newline key after every line you enter
and then specify the desired format. Separate
formatting for individual words or letters in the
same line is not possible.
• A click on the button "Font" opens a window in
which you have a choice of fonts and many type
sizes (10-500 points). The font can be selected
by clicking on its name or with the slider, as you
already know from the effect list.
In the list you may also see various symbols
next to the fonts. Most of the supplied fonts are
marked with an "A" (this font contains all the
usual Western European characters).
A font marked with a happy face (there is one
supplied in the standard package) contains
pictures and/or symbols instead of letters and
punctuation. Fonts marked with an "A+" also
contain Eastern European characters. These
fonts can be purchased separately.
Fonts marked with an "A-" are not always complete or deviate from the norm. These fonts are
not sold, but can be obtained free of charge in
appropriate instances.
Note: The Carolann font supplied with the standard package has two different forms for "s", in
addition to "ß". The "s" key on the keyboard is
the more frequently used long "s", that is something like an "f" without the horizontal stroke.
The small, round "s" is mapped to the "#" key.
Font size is specified with the slider. The font
and size are displayed with the text "MacroSystem".
• A click onto the “Style” button opens another
screen. Here, you can see a preview to the right
displaying a smaller version of your video. The
text part and background are related to the position of the text cursor. If you have not yet entered text, the system displays some other letters.
In the top left corner, decide which pattern is to
be used for the text. Press “Color” for the color
68
box or “Pattern” to open the “Select pattern”
screen.
In this screen you can select a pattern of your
choice, just as described in section 3.2 under
"Image pool". The mode (positive/negative) and
alpha value can also be specified.
Clicking on "OK" in "Select pattern" confirms
your settings and you are returned to the "Style"
menu.
Now you can see the “Outline” button. With the
aid of the slider next to it, define the strength of
the outline with values between 0 (not active)
and 6 (strong). The “Color/Pattern” button leads
you to the image pool, in which you can decide
if the outline is to consist of a pattern or color.
In the box beneath, you should see the
“Shadow” button. Use it to determine a width
between even values of 0 to 20.
The “Direction” and “Color” of the shadow can
now also be determined.
In the right area of the screen, you can see the
function “Italic”. You can activate it by selecting
the empty box next to it.
Underneath, you can see the “3D” option. The
strength of the three-dimensional effect can be
set with even values between 0 and 20 by moving the slider. The effect makes the letter look
as if they had a certain depth. If you use higher
values, make sure to set a character space of
around 120% so that the 3D effect does not interfere with the letters themselves.
The “direction” can be set to four different possibilities. The arrow pointing towards the left top
direction is recommended.
The structure of the effect can be set using the
“Color/Pattern” button. It is recommended
to use a tone similar to the text color, yet with
brightness between this and the background
color’s.
Below left, in the "Style" screen, you can see the
“Archives” button. The Archives allow you to
save the styles you have created. You will also
find some examples of styles in the archives.
The Style screen can be closed by pressing the
“OK” button (meaning that you confirm the settings made) or by pressing “Cancel”.
• Clicking in the text entry operation panel on
the "Line” button opens a window in which the
functions "Character width", "Character space",
"Alignment", "Line space" and "Delete active
line" are listed.
You can see that the settings of the buttons with
percent values lie between 50% and 200%, whereby 100% corresponds to the default setting.
In the Enter/edit text screen, click anywhere
in the line of text to be edited. Then select the
button "Line” and under "Character width" enter
the desired percent. Click on "OK" to observe the
result. The letters have become wider (> 100%)
or narrower (< 100%), depending on the percent
given, and the entire line has become either
longer or shorter.
The individual words in a line cannot be formatted separately. The settings apply only to the
entire line.
The function "Character space" increases or
decreases the space between the letters. In the
Enter/edit text screen, click anywhere in the line
of text to be edited and select the button "Line”.
Use the "Character space" slider to enter the
desired percent of the distance.
The line is stretched (> 100%) or narrowed (<
100%), depending on the percent value given.
The individual words in a line cannot be formatted separately. The settings apply only to the
entire line.
Under the selection button "Alignment" you can
specify whether the line should be formatted
"left", "centered" or "right".
With the function "Line space" you can specify
the distance between the selected line and the
line below it. In the Enter/edit text screen, click
on the line that lies above the line to be changed. Now select "Line” and under "Line space"
change the default value (=100%) to another
value.
If your percent number is smaller, then the line
below moves closer to the selected line. If your
percent number is larger, then the line slides
farther away toward the bottom from the se-
69
lected line. The lines below the moved line are
moved along with it, but keep their respective
distances.
You can also make several settings together in
the "Line" window before clicking on "OK". Note
that the settings always apply to the line selected beforehand!
The percent values you have set are retained.
You can view the settings and changes for the
line you have selected by activating the "Line"
window. Here you can also modify the percent
values.
(If you have made changes but still see the
default values of 100% in the "Line" screen, then
you have selected the wrong line before clicking
on "Line".)
Clicking on "Delete active line" causes the line
containing the position marker to be deleted.
The window disappears.
With the buttons on the left in the menu "Text"
you can reduce the task bar to these buttons or
move it to the opposite screen edge.
With the "TE" button you return to the titler
menu.
(3) Clicking on the button "Boxes" calls up an
additional task bar, with which you can create
and edit text boxes.
• To the above left you at first see the label “Box
1/1”. You see the display “Box 1/2” after you
have added a text box. After adding still another
text box “Box 1/3” is displayed, and so on.
With the help of the right arrow key you can
move forward through the boxes. The left arrow
key is used to display the previous box.
Note: You can toggle between the text boxes by
clicking directly on the corresponding spot in the
preview screen. The box is then marked with a
broken line.
• Use the button “Add” to put an additional text
box onto the video image. When you click the
button a dashed box appears in the upper left
corner of the video image. You now use the
trackball to position the box. After the upper
left corner of the box has reached the desired
position, confirm by clicking the left trackball
button. Rolling the trackball now determines
the size of the box. Clicking on the left trackball
button again confirms the setting.
You can define any number of text boxes. The
last text box to be added is indicated with a
dashed frame.
When a text panel is hidden by others you can
make it visible either by resizing or moving the
overlying panel, or by clicking repeatedly the
TAB key on the keyboard (to the left of the letter
q) until the text panel you want appears.
Note: Please note that after calculation the text
boxes are ordered in the same sequence as they
were created. The sequence that you used to
place the boxes on top of each other is irrelevant
for the calculation!
• Clicking on "Delete" causes the active (outlined) panel to be deleted. The previously inserted
panel now becomes the active panel.
• Both the coordinates and the size of the
currently active text box are displayed at the
lower left edge of the task bar.
• With "Move" you can change the position of
the active text box. You drag it with the trackball and confirm the new position with the left
trackball button. Alternatively, you can position
the trackball cursor on the upper left corner of
the text box so that a symbol (four spearheads)
appears. Then click on the left trackball key so
that the task bar is hidden and you can move the
selected text box. After you have reached the
desired position, click again on the left trackball
key.
• After clicking "Size" you use the trackball to
resize the panel at the upper and right edges and
fix the new size by clicking on the left trackball
button. Alternatively, you can change the box
size by clicking directly. Point the screen cursor
to the upper or lower edge so that an arrow
symbol appears, click on the left trackball key
and drag the edge up or down by rolling the
trackball. Moving the left or right edge functions
in the same way.
If you point the cursor to the lower right edge,
70
a diagonal arrow symbol appears. Click on the
left trackball key and then roll the trackball to
change box height and width simultaneously.
• Clicking on the button “Extended” calls up a
display in which you have several options:
The "Grid" slider allows you to set the size of the
invisible grid. The box edges are aligned with
this grid so that positioning is easier.
With the "Border" slider you set the distance of
the text box to the screen edge.
It is also possible to move the text box using the
cursor keys of an external keyboard.
(4) After clicking on the button “Pages” a new
task bar appears in which you can create and
edit pages.
- The function "Copy style to all lines" offers
the possibility to copy the settings made in
the window "Style" from one single line to all
other lines on this page. Before you call up the
window "Extended" again, mark the line (place
the cursor in this line) which contains the style
you want to copy. After selecting "Style for all
lines", the settings will be copied.
Similarly to the function mentioned above, you
can copy the font of one line to the other lines
by clicking on "Copy font to all lines". Mark the
line which contains the desired font and choose
the function "Copy font to all lines".
Selecting the “min. Size” button reduces the
text panel to a minimum, meaning that a narrow
border encloses the text inside.
Clicking onto “Visible Size” sets the text panel
to a size visible on a television set.
If you click on the button "max. size" the active
box enlarges beyond the screen edge. This
function is helpful, for example, if you would
like to fill the box background with a transparent
color or pattern.
Clicking on the button "Settings" causes a
display to appear in which you can set "Grid"
and "Border".
• There you see at the above left (according to
the effect) the label “Page 1/1”. After you have
added a page (see below) you see the label
“Page 1/2”. After an additionally added page
“Page 1/3” appears, etc.
With the help of the right arrow you can move
forward through the pages. The left arrow
displays the previous page.
• By pressing the “Insert” button, you can insert
a new text page. Inserting a new page prompts
SMART EDIT to question if the page is to be inserted before or after the current (first) page. All
pages will automatically be added after the chosen page. A page can only be inserted (added) if
it contains text.
• Pressing “Delete” deletes the current page
and you will see the next available page on the
screen. If you have deleted the last available
page, the previous page will be seen.
• The selection button “All lines” offers three
possibilities: “Top”, “Centered” and “Bottom”.
With these options, you can select the vertical
position of the text lines of all text panels on the
current page.
• The button “Background to all boxes” copies
the background of the current box to all other
panels on this page. The button has no effect if
you are working with just one box.
(5) Clicking on the button "Graphics" causes an
additional task bar to appear.
71
trackball pointer will display a little cross when
trying to press “Preview”.
• At first you can decide whether your text box
should be provided with a background. Next
to the function “Choose background” there
is a checkbox. If you see a checkmark in the
checkbox then the background for the active text
box is transparent. If you activate the checkbox
so that a checkmark appears, then the active text
box is filled with a background.
• In order to specify the box background, click
on the button “Choose background“. This opens
the image pool.
There you can specify the desired pattern or
color - also with transparency percentage.
• A click on the button “Add graphics box”
opens the image pool, in which you can select
a graphic (Product: SMART EDIT, Type: Images).
After clicking on “Ok” you can position the box
in the desired size on the screen.
• The selection button “Mode” provides you
with several possibilities to render the box
background and the graphic in the text box.
The option “free scaled” means that the pattern/
graphic is adjusted to the size of the text box.
Under some conditions the proportions may be
distorted.
The option “fix scaled” uses the original
proportions of the pattern/graphic, meaning that
adjustment is made in reference to one edge of
the box. This may result in black streaks at the
edge of the text box. With the option “Original”
you use the pattern/graphic in original size. This
means that for a small text box only a part of the
pattern can be seen. A large text box is then not
completely filled with the pattern.
The option “tile” fills the entire text box with the
selected graphic. If you have selected a normal
large pattern, then you will see no difference to
the option “Original”. If the graphic is smaller
than the text box, then it it is set in original size
tiled behind each other, so that the entire box is
filled with one and the same graphic.
(6) The “Preview” button can be used to (if you
have already added a title effect to the storyboard) see a preview of the effect you have
selected. If you have not yet added an effect, the
(7) A click on "Archive" opens a field displaying
four buttons: "Load", "Save", "Delete", and "Cancel".
Clicking on "Load" displays a list of the previously saved titles. In this list you select a title, either
directly or with the slider, and confirm ("OK").
Clicking on "Save" displays the same list. Now
you have two possibilities:
1. You can click the gray rectangle below the list
so that the keyboard is displayed and you can
assign a name to the previously created title,
followed by clicking on "OK" within the keyboard
and in the text archive field.
2. You can select a title from the list and then
click on the gray line which now contains the
name of the selected effect. Within the keyboard
field you now overwrite this name with another
of your choice. The difference to the first possibility is that you overwrite not only the name,
but also the archived title, which is then irrevocably lost. Alternatively, you can select a title
without clicking on the yellow line. If you then
confirm with "OK", the selected title is replaced
by the previously created title, but retains its
name. With the help of archiving you can save
your frequently used standard text independently of projects and reuse them at any time.
If you click on "Delete", a list of saved titles is
displayed in which you can now select the title
to be deleted and confirm with "OK".
A click on "Cancel" closes the menu without
accepting any settings.
(8) A click on the „i” button displays information
on the selected title effect, the length of the
effect (in the case that you have already placed
it in the storyboard), and whether you have
applied the typefaces installed only in the demo
version to your text boxes.
(9) With the "OK" button you confirm again all
settings made and are returned to the "Titling"
menu.
(10) With "Cancel" you exit the Text-entry menu
without accepting any settings made for the
"Titling" menu.
In the "Titling" menu you can then insert the title
effect and calculate it, or set the range before-
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hand, as is done with the "Image processing”
effects screen.
The title effects in detail
the top through the picture. The scroll speed
depends on the scene length and the text length.
The text scrolls at a speed so that it scrolls entirely over the screen within the duration of the
scene. Several pages can be inserted.
The title effects can be selected in the effect
list. This list contains several effect options. For
many of them additional attributes can be modified, as will be shown in the following:
Audio
1. Fading V-Scroll: The text scrolls from the
bottom to the top through the picture. The scroll
speed depends on the scene length and the text
length (the text scrolls fast enough so that it
moves entirely over the screen within the duration of the scene). The title enters the screen in
a transparent state, becomes clear (solid) in the
center of the screen, and again more and more
transparent as it scrolls out of view. You can set
the height "Fading height" of this fade-in and
fade-out from 10-200 pixels.
2. Horizontal Scroller: The text moves across
the screen from right to left at the bottom of the
screen. In the Text-entry menu you can enter as
many letters as you wish for the text. There is a
slider below the video you can use to move the
text further.
3. In/out fading pages: All pages are faded in
and out in sequence. The "Fade" indicates when
the title should be faded in (up to 12 seconds)
and the "Pause" indicates the duration between
two pages.
4. Moving pages: The direction in which the
title is scrolled (over one or more pages) into
("into") or out of ("out of") the page is specified
here. Any one of eight directions can be given.
In addition, the "Movement" can be set up to 12
seconds.
5. Pages: All document pages are displayed in
sequence. Display is done without fading and
pauses. The display time is such so that the entire scene is affected.
6. Through fading pages: All document pages
are crossfaded one after another in sequence.
The speed can be set from 0-12 seconds in
"Fade".
7. V-Scroll: The text scrolls from the bottom to
You should not begin audio mixing until you
have finished editing the video. Effects and titling
should already be completed. Editing video or
adding effects after audio mixing has been completed can damage the careful editing work which
you have already done on the sound track.
When you edit video in SMART EDIT you also
change the audio. Transition effects in the video
are also applied to the audio. This section deals
with audio mixing, which involves adding additional audio tracks overlaying or supplementing
the original audio.
SmartEdit provides a number of interesting
features:
• The volume may be corrected during video
recording, i.e. with video recording running.
• Audio effects can be added directly to an audio
sample, in a similar way to image processing
effects. It is not necessary to create a new audio sample with the desired effect.
• Used in conjunction with suitable surround
systems, the surround audio effect creates interesting three-dimensional sound effects.
• An audio wave form enables the volume to be
influenced by means of the rubber band function. The volume of each audio sample can be
increased or reduced selectively at any desired
point.
• Within the extended timeline display, you can
toggle between individual audio samples of
an audio track and between the audio tracks
themselves.
• Practical default times have been added to the
fading function.
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• Video transition effects are also displayed in
the Storyboard display of the Audio-Mix menu
in the form of an intermediate scene.
• Audio splitting by the bar. Audio samples can
be split at the touch of a button during play.
Audio mixing employs the same principle as
video editing:
1. Recording of the raw (audio) data.
2. Splitting of the audio sample into a number of
discrete passages (if desired).
3. Trimming of these data, i.e. cutting out of undesired components such as coughing, residual
material from adjacent CD tracks, etc.
4. Special processing of the audio sample or of a
part of it (e.g. interchanging of stereo tracks).
5. Insertion of these audio samples into the
storyboard.
6. Adjustment of the volume of the original
audio and of any commentaries and the background music to each other, and adjustment of
any fading.
(1) Use the volume display to adjust the volume
level. Try to set the recording volume level as
high as possible so as to obtain optimum sound
quality, but do not over-modulate it. Click on the
scrollbar below the volume display to change
the volume level. Move the scrollbar to the left
or right to reduce (to a minimum of -30 dB) or
increase (to a maximum of 20 dB) the volume
respectively. Flashing blue indicates that everything is in order, flashing yellow indicates a risk
of over-modulation during audio mixing (only if
several over-modulated segments are mixed),
and flashing red indicates over-modulation.
8. Fine adjustment of the volume of individual
audio samples by means of wave form (if desired).
(2) If your system supports the "Sound" button,
it can be used if an analogue input has been selected, i.e. Microphone, Front and Rear. Before
recording audio material, click on the button. A
window is opened in which you can select the
Treble and Bass from -12 to 12 dB.
9. Creation (if necessary) of the complete sound
track (all stereo tracks are mixed on a single
stereo track).
(3) Here you can see the audio input. The options available differ of course according to your
particular model.
10. This just leaves recording to tape, and your
video is finished.
(4) Select between Mono and Stereo modes.
When using a mono microphone, check that
Mono is actually selected. If DV is selected as the
input, you can also select Stereo B. In this case,
the sound is recorded from a second stereo audio
track of the input device, provided the input is
in 12-bit, 32 kHz mode. Not all DV input devices
offer a facility for selecting this mode, however.
7. Addition of audio effects (if desired).
5.10 Audio Record, Edit.
Use this menu to record your audio material
by clicking on the round red Record button.
You can also use this function to split, trim and
name recordings.
(5) This field displays the remaining capacity of
the audio partition as a function of the selected
quality (the higher the quality, the shorter the
running time).
(6) The audio samples which you have recorded
are automatically assigned a label (A 1, A 2, etc)
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in the audio list, and their length displayed. If
you have added an audio sample to one of the
sound tracks of the Audio-Mix menu, it is marked with a small white point next to the length.
(7) The New Sample button opens a dialog in
which the Silence and Sine Wave Sound functions can be configured and launched by means
of the respective buttons.
• The Silence button creates a completely silent
audio sample with which, for example, you
can influence parts of another audio sample
indirectly for the duration of the silence (see
Audio-Mix - indirect volume control).
• Use Sine Wave Sound to create a tone the
frequency (440 Hz or 1 kHz) and volume (-20 to
0 dB) of which you can define. Soft crackling
may be audible at the beginning and/or end of
the sinusoidal tone. This cannot be eliminated
entirely during playback.
(8) Special can be used to apply a number of
special effects to the audio sample, many of
which are however only available or worthwhile
on stereo audio samples. With these functions,
SMART EDIT creates a copy which includes the
desired changes, i.e. the original audio sample
is preserved unchanged. The following special
functions are included as standard:
- Width
This function artificially increases the distance
between the loudspeakers. This increase is
achieved by negative channel crosstalk. You can
select a width of between 0 and 175%.
- Copy Channel
As can be seen under Mode, this function copies
the left-hand channel to the right-hand channel
or vice-versa, as desired.
- Swap Channels
This function interchanges the left-hand and
right-hand channels.
- Volume
Use this function to increase or reduce the volume for the audio sample in question from -20 to
6 dB.
- Volume LR
Use this function to adjust the two channels (left
and right) of an audio sample separately. Here
too, you can select within a range from -20 to 6
dB. Mono switches the stereo signal to mono.
- NOP
This function cannot be used to make any changes to your audio sample. As with the image
processing effects, it is used by MacroSystem
for internal debugging.
- Mute
This function mutes either the left-hand and/or
the right-hand channel as desired. In addition,
you can also deactivate the function using the `--´ button so that the audio track is only muted for
a specific period of time and so that you need
not remove the effect.
- Surround
The surround effect is used in conjunction with
a surround receiver or amplifier to assign the
sound of an audio sample to a certain channel,
i.e. to a certain loudspeaker. It can be used to
create interesting acoustic impressions, in particular during audio mixing with commentaries.
On a normal mono or stereo television set, surround audio is reproduced as „ordinary“ audio,
i.e. without surround effects, through a single or
two loudspeaker(s). A film containing surround
effects is thus suitable for playing over any set.
Once the surround effect has been selected, the
following options are available:
• front left
Sound is played through the front left-hand
loudspeaker only.
• front centre
Sound is played through the front centre
loudspeaker only.
• front right
Sound is played through the front right-hand
loudspeaker only.
• rear
The sound is played through both rear
loudspeakers.
• rear left
Sound is played over the rear left-hand channel
only. This is possible only with a receiver/amplifier which supports Pro Logic II (trademark of
Dolby Laboratories). Without Pro Logic II, sound
is played simultaneously over the two rear
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channels and the front left-hand channel, creating an effect which is similar but not as clear.
• rear right
Rear right functions in a similar manner to rear
left, but for the right-hand rear channel.
In all cases, a mono audio sample is first generated from the original stereo sample, as playback
is ultimately through a single loudspeaker only.
- Sample -> Scene
Clicking on the Sample -> Scene button creates a video sequence with black background
from your audio sample. You can use this video
sequence as a basis for further video operations
(e.g. insert editing). This function can greatly
simplify audio-based editing. Please read Chapter 4.3 for further details.
- Copy Sample
Clicking on the Copy Sample button creates
an identical copy of the the previously clicked
sample in the list of audio samples on the right.
This function is useful when you wish to use
both the original material and a modified version. The copy appears in the samples list with the
same name as the original, but is identified with
the suffix .K (e.g. A1.K).
- Clipboard
If your system supports this function, you can
place the audio sample onto a clipboard. Clicking
on Clipboard calls up four buttons: Clipboard ->
Project, Sample -> Clipboard, Remove sample
and Sample from project -> Clipboard. These
buttons have the same functions as in the video
menu.
Note: If you click on Delete Sample you will
observe that the OK button in the dialog which
appears is disabled (grayed out) and cannot be
activated. This is a safety measure to prevent
you from accidentally deleting an audio sample.
If you really wish to delete an audio sample, first
click on the audio sample to be deleted (even if it
is greyed out) and then on the OK button (which
is now enabled). The audio samples are stored
in the samples list and can be inserted into an
audio track in the Audio-Mix menu.
In the same way, first mark the audio samples in
the samples list which you wish to place on the
clipboard.
Should the samples list contain no samples, the
message No active audio sample available is
displayed.
The main purpose of the clipboard is temporary
storage of audio samples before they are used
in other menus. The clipboard is thus available
across projects.
Any audio samples placed on the clipboard are
deleted when the system is switched off.
Also in this menu you see the button "Pre-listen"
under the effect options.
Here, you have the option of either deactivating
the function ("off"), i.e. either hearing the effect
or the original. Once you select either Effect
or Original, this will loop-play several seconds
of the effect selected in the list (applied to the
music selected in the list of sound clips) or some
seconds of the original sound piece. This option
can save you a lot of time, because the audio
effects can be heard and compared with the
original without being rendered.
This function also displays signal amplitude as a
control.
Flashing blue indicates that everything is in
order, flashing yellow indicates a risk of overmodulation during audio mixing (only if several
over-modulated segments are mixed), and flashing red indicates over-modulation.
(9) Click on the Split button to access the Split
Sample menu. You can then split audio scenes
in the same way as video scenes. The name of
the audio sample is displayed at the top on the
right-hand side. The name is followed by .1 or
.2 etc. (e.g. A 1.1 or A 1.2). You can of course
click in this field to call up the keyboard again,
and rename the audio sample. Clicking on the
Split Position button now enables you to split
the audio sample. A graphical display of the part
to be split off is shown in the bar at the bottom.
In addition, the wave form and audio scrubbing
(Chapter 3.2), which cannot be disabled in this
menu, show the point of the audio sample at
which you are located.
The Use and Drop buttons and the arrow
buttons have the same function as in the Split
Sample menu of the image material.
Click on the Play button to start playback of the
audio sample currently being edited. During
playback you can split the sample for example at
a bar by clicking on Use at a suitable point. Your
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audio sample will be split at this point without
playback being stopped.
If you whish to copy the split audio pieces into
the Storyboard in the Edit screen, you need to
first activate the "Insert as scenes in storyboard"
by marking the little box.
After splitting the sample and confirming with
"Ok" or waiting until the end of the sound, the
video data will be created.
The sample parts are automatically copied in the
form of empty scenes, containing the respective
parts of the sound. These empty scenes are
placed into the Storyboard in the Edit screen
– they’ll be easy to spot: Black scenes with a
little music note symbol.
Additionally, you can now press the "Replace"
(or "Insert") button (see chapter 5.5, item (16)
/ (12)), so that the selected empty audio scene
takes the place of the selected scene in the
Storyboard. If the video scene is too long, it is
trimmed to the right length at the end.
This function is great for audio pre-editing as
you can comfortably make your cuts and then
implement the rhythmically cut up audio piece
to any video material.
Once you have split your audio sample, the
sample list shows that copies of it have been
made and that your original sample is still available.
(10) Use the Trim function to remove unwanted components at the beginning or end of the
recorded or split audio material. Coughing in
the commentaries and residual material from
adjacent CD tracks can thus be eliminated. The
Trim function is also familiar to you from video
editing, and functions in the same way with
audio. The wave form and audio scrubbing (see
Chapter 3.2) cannot however be disabled in this
menu.
(11) Click on the Delete button to delete the
selected audio sample.
(12) Click on the Undo button to undo deletion
of an audio sample. The last ten samples deleted can be recovered in this way. Deleted scenes
cannot be reactivated following a restart.
(13) The name of the audio sample clicked on
in the sample list is displayed automatically in
the name field. The name can be changed in the
manner familiar from video. Click in the name
field to call up the keyboard. The length of the
audio sample is displayed in the adjacent field.
(14) Use these buttons to control the Stop/
Record/Play functions for the audio sample
highlighted in colour in the audio list. You can
make corrections to the volume with the aid of
the scrollbar below the volume display (1) whilst
recording is running.
(15) Click on the CD Recording button (only on
models with integral DVD drive)
to the left of Record/Stop/Play to call up the CD
Import. Click on this open symbol,
to open the drive drawer in which you can put
an audio CD. then press the button on the drive
(or press against the drawer) in order to close it
again.
Now click on the Display CD contents button to
read all available tracks on the audio CD inserted
beforehand into the DVD-RW drive. To sample
your tracks, check the box next to Play track in
order to play the audio sample automatically for
approximately 5 seconds as soon as it is selected in the list. You can switch to a different track
or start import with OK at any time during play.
You have the following possibilities to enter
titles:
• To import only one track at this stage, mark it
in the list and confirm with OK.
After entry the window "CD Import" closes
automatically and you see the title displayed in
the list of sound clips.
• If you would like to read in several titles
present on the CD, then select the first desired
title and begin reading by clicking on “Import
track”. The window remains open so that you
can then select a further title, click on “Import
track”, etc.
When the audio track has been read in, click
onto "Ok" to enter the Audio Record, Edit menu.
The tracks read in beforehand are now displayed
in the list of audio samples.
• If you would like to read in all the titles on the
CD, then click the button “All”. It is unimportant
77
which title in the list has already been selected.
If you cancel the operation while the titles
are being read, then all titles that have been
successfully read are displayed in the list.
The window “CD Import” closes automatically
after the audio titles have been read and you
then see the titles displayed in the list of sound
clips.
of the Edit menu, transition effects are however
displayed as discrete scenes in the storyboard.
This display mode is advantageous, as it enables other audio samples to be situated exactly
within the duration of the effect.
(16) Here, you can see a CD symbol. Click on
this button and a screen called "CD compilation"
appears. This screen allows you to select
samples for your audio CD. You could burn your
audio comments or extracted original sounds to
CD or even load a music CD and re-burn it with a
different track order.
On the left you can see a list with sound samples
("All samples"). Select the desired sample and
press "Add". The sample should now appear
in the right list ("Selected samples"). This way,
you can continue adding sounds to your CD.
Any samples selected from the left list are
highlighted with a little dot.
Take care not to overstep the maximum length
of 72 minutes for the CD. The "Estimated usage"
of the CD can be monitored on the top of the
screen. Of course, you can remove any tracks
from the list again by simply pressing "Remove".
Once you have finished assembling the list
of tracks for your CD, press "Ok" and insert
an empty CD into the disc tray. A CD-RW, the
system can optionally delete the contents first,
before the tracks are burned. Please wait with
removing the CD until the system tells you the
CD was burned successfully.
If you have set the control “Audio tracks” to
“normal” in “Project settings” under “Audio
settings”, the specific differences between the
sound tracks are as follows:
(17) Click on one of the menu symbols to access
the menus Edit, Audio-Mix and the main menu
directly from this menu.
5.11 Audio-Mix
Use this function to arrange recorded commentaries and the background sound in the
storyboard, add audio effects, and fine-tune the
volume for the sound tracks.
Audio mixing is similar in principle to video
editing.
The storyboard with the scenes and video effects which you have added to it is visible at the
top of the screen. Unlike the storyboard view
Below the storyboard are several horizontal
bands, the sound tracks.
Audio samples from the original sound track,
the commentary track and the effect track(s) are
bound to the scene(s) above them. Where changes are subsequently made to scenes before
and after the audio samples, the sample remains
synchronized with its previous position. Where
changes are made to scenes which overlap the
audio sample in time, the latter must be deleted
(following a prompt). Audio samples in the music tracks are not bound to a scene; instead, they
retain their position in relation to the starting
point of the storyboard. Changes to the video
before or during the audio sample result in shifts
which are, however, generally uncritical in the
case of background music etc.
Owing to this difference in behaviour, the tracks
bound to the video material are particularly
suitable for commentaries or for sound effect
dubbing.
The music track is intended for background music and similar audio. Provided the differences
between tracks are observed, it can of course be
used for any other purpose.
If you set the control "Audio tracks" (in "Project
Setttings") to "Selection", then you can freely
specify the behavior of each soundtrack (except
the original soundtrack).
In the audio editing menu the symbols next
to the soundtracks change into numbers and
arrows, indicating to you the setting for each
soundtrack.
The following procedure must be followed for
audio mixing:
1. Add audio samples to a sound track
• Select the desired sound track by activating the
symbol to the right of the track or by clicking
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on the track itself (selected track turns blue).
• Select the scene in the storyboard approximately at which the audio sample is to begin.
• Click on the Add button and select an audio
sample from the list displayed.
• The sample now appears in the track provided
for it exactly at the beginning of the active
scene in the storyboard.
2. Moving and trimming audio samples
To define the starting point exactly, select Range.
The Range menu is called up, with which you can
• move the sample completely (Start ; select
Position) or
• shorten the sound at the beginning or end (In
and Out ; select Trim).
The corresponding image is also displayed, and
you can also hit the Play button to play the full
segment of video with the selected sound.
3. Creating and checking audio.
• Return to the Audio-Mix menu and select Create.
• From the colour of the horizontal colour control bar between the original sound track and
the storyboard, you can ascertain whether the
overall volume of all audio samples is faultless
(blue) or over-modulated (red). Correct any
over-modulated passages with the aid of the
volume control or the wave form as described
under Point 4.
• Click on the Play symbol. The sound is now
played in mixed form with the sound from the
other scenes. The video material concerned is
played at the same time, and a volume level
indicator is displayed.
4. Adjusting the volume.
SmartEdit offers a total of three methods of
volume control:
• Direct volume control. Should one of the
samples concerned be too loud or too soft,
click on it. It is highlighted in blue. Now move
the Volume control to adjust the volume. The
volume characteristic is displayed in light blue
in the background of the audio sample. Following recreation, you can play it back again and
correct it if necessary.
• Indirect volume control. To emphasize a particular audio sample by reducing the volume of adjacent tracks, use the Correction function. Click
on the sample to be emphasized, which is then
highlighted in blue. Now use the Correction
button and the slider adjacent to it to adjust the
volume of all six tracks. This procedure modifies
only the part of the adjacent sample selected
using Correction which is parallel to the selected
sample. The volume levels before and after the
selected sample remain unchanged.
• Volume control by means of wave form.The
wave form is the tool to use to increase or
reduce the volume of an audio segment within
an audio sample, for example in order to
eliminate a loud unwanted noise. Click on the
desired audio sample to highlight it in blue,
then select the Envelop menu item. First use
Add to insert three anchor points into the volume display beneath the wave form. In the area
above all soundtracks are displayed to give you
a better overview.
Then click on the leftmost of these three points
in order to activate it. The colour of the activated point changes from red to green. You can
now move it to the desired position either by
clicking on it again and dragging it with the
trackball, by means of the Position slider, or
by clicking on the Range button. Range causes
the associated video still to be displayed in the
background, enabling the position of the point
to be selected according to its position within
the video.
Place the first point horizontally ahead of the
noise to be eliminated, without however modifying the vertical position of the point. Position the second point horizontally in the middle
of the noise and drag it at the same time
vertically downwards to dampen the sound.
The third point marks the end of the noise: it
should therefore also be at the same horizontal
level as the first, but beyond the noise. Click
on Create to reduce the volume of the noise
substantially without changing the remainder
of the audio sample.
To reduce the volume of longer ranges, use
four points and drag the middle two points
down.
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The method of volume control employed in
each case is therefore determined primarily by
the task concerned:
• If the volume of a complete audio sample
is simply to be increased or reduced, direct
volume control is the solution. Using the wave
form for this purpose would be to use a sledgehammer to crack a nut.
• If an audio sample is to be dampened whilst
another audio sample is playing, for example the background music is to be softened for
the duration of a commentary, indirect volume
control is the most convenient solution. Modifying the audio samples by means of the wave
form or splitting the music manually would also
entail a disproportionate amount of work.
• If unwanted noises are to be eliminated from
a audio sample or over-modulated passages of
an audio sample adjusted to the general volume level, the wave form represents a powerful
tool, albeit one which is not particularly easy
to use. Once an audio sample has been edited
by means of the Wave Form function, indirect
volume control is however subject to certain
limitations.
5. Fading audio samples in and out.
To fade specific audio samples in and out gently,
click on the sample concerned to highlight it in
blue. Now click on Fade to call up a dialog in
which you can bind fading in and out to specific
images, either by selecting a predefined time
value, or by clicking on and moving the appropriate fader.
6. Adding audio effects.
Audio effects (standard effects, surround effect,
supplementary effects) can be added to individual audio samples in the same way as to complete sound tracks.
te sound track, i.e. to all audio samples of a
sound track, click on the fx symbol on the left
of the sound track concerned. Select an effect
from the list presented. Make any effect adjustments required, then confirm your selection
with Insert/Change. A white point on the lefthand button indicates the presence of one or
more effects in the sound track concerned.
• To delete an audio effect again from a sound
track or an audio sample, call up the audio effect menu again (as described above) and click
on Remove. Remove functions irrespective of
the effect selected, leaving an effect-free audio
sample or effect-free sound track.
7. Checking audio mixing.
• Add the remaining audio samples in turn and
adjust the volume, fading and effects as required.
• To check an individual audio sample in detail,
first select the desired audio sample, then
click on the Timeline menu item. The timeline
display shows all audio tracks in relation to the
selected audio sample. You can use the scrollbar beneath the timeline display to move the
displayed passage, click to move the sound
track to a different audio sample, and call up
the functions Fade and Envelop from within the
timeline display.
8. Creating audio.
Create the sound. The colour control bar immediately beneath the storyboard should no longer
contain any yellow components.
The Audio-Mix Menu
• To add an audio effect to an individual audio
sample, first select the desired sample, highlighting it in blue. Then click on Effects and select an effect from the list. If necessary, adjust
the effect. Then confirm your selection with
Insert/Change. A small fx at the right-hand end
of the audio sample concerned now indicates
the presence of an audio effect in the overview
of all sound tracks.
• To add an audio effect throughout a comple-
(1) The storyboard and its operation is familiar
to you from other menus. You can use the slider
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to move very quickly through the storyboard
scene by scene.
Use the arrow buttons to click either through
the video scene by scene, or from one audio
sample to another when there are several audio
samples below a single video scene. The audio
samples of the currently activated sound track
are selected in this case. This function is very
helpful when a large number of audio samples
are located below a single video scene, as the
samples are displayed only very briefly during
normal playback.
Select the desired sound track either directly or
by clicking on the corresponding symbol on the
right-hand side of the screen.
(2) This colour control bar directly beneath the
storyboard shows the range of the original video
scenes in which the audio has not been created
(yellow) or has already been completely created
(blue). Over-modulation is indicated in red.
(3) Select a button with the fx symbol to the
left of the sound tracks to add an effect for the
complete sound track. Effect selection in the
Audio-Mix menu is described under Point (13)
Effects. A further point in the associated button
indicates the presence of an effect in the sound
track concerned.
(4) Click on the Record button to play the storyboard (from the current scene onwards).
Simultaneous recording is possible through the
selected audio input. For instance, if you have
selected the microphone input, you can record
a commentary for your video. During audio
recording, a volume level indicator is overlaid
over your video material at the lower edge of
the screen. The recorded commentary is subsequently added automatically to the sample list.
If the commentary track is active and provides
sufficient capacity for the audio sample, it is automatically placed in the commentary track.
(5) Click on the Play button next to the scrollbar of the storyboard to play from the scene
currently located in the centre of the video. The
other simultaneous tracks are played provided
they have been created. Should the other tracks
not have been created, only the currently selected track is played back. This saves you from
having to repeatedly create tracks, for example
when you wish only to check the position of the
commentary. Video is generally played at the
same time. During play, a volume level indicator
is displayed, showing any over-modulation. The
volume level indicator has a peak-level indicator,
i.e. the maximum level is displayed continuously
until it is exceeded once again.
By contrast, the Play switch at the bottom of the
screen plays back the current active audio sample. Only audio is played back here, of course
there is no video here. Here too, a volume level
indicator is displayed, indicating any over-modulation.
The name of the sample to be played back
appears on the left of the Play symbol and the
counter. Click on Stop or the right-hand trackball
button to stop play.
(6) Click on the Add button to call up a dialog
showing the list of audio samples. Select the audio sample of your choice here, either directly or
with the aid of the slider with which you are already familiar. The audio samples already added
are marked with a point next to the length. Beneath the audio samples is a Play button which you
can use to listen to the selected audio sample
again in order to check it before adding it.
Confirm with OK to close the Add dialog. The
selected audio sample is added to the active
sound track.
The audio sample is placed by default in the storyboard at the very beginning of the active scene
(the scene in the frame). Use the Range button
to move it again (see Point (9)).
Should an audio sample already be present at
the current point in the selected sound track,
the Add function inserts the sample after the
material which is already present. Should there
be insufficient space, i.e. the audio sample be
longer than the gap, the sample is shortened at
the end such that it fills the gap exactly.
If an audio sample is inserted at the end of the
storyboard and is longer than the last scene, it
is automatically trimmed in to the length of the
scene. Click on the audio sample to read the new
length in the bottom left-hand corner.
If the storyboard is subsequently lengthened,
the audio sample is trimmed out again (up to a
maximum of its original length).
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(7) Hit the Remove button to delete the active
audio sample. This function has no effect upon
the original track, as only audio samples from
the supplementary tracks can be deleted. Remember that removing a audio sample may
necessitate recreation.
(8) Clicking on "Replace" opens the list of sound
clips and you can select a clip that now replaces
the previously active clip on the soundtrack.
(9) The Range function is used for adjusting the
position and the IN and OUT points of a audio
sample. The Range button can be selected when
an audio sample is clicked upon and thus activated. A Trim menu is called up similar to that
for the trimming of video scenes. Once you have
selected Position, you can move the entire audio
sample with the aid of the Start button. Should
the audio sample be too long, you can also
shorten it at the beginning and end. Select the
Trim function and then the IN and OUT buttons
in this case. The sound characteristic is displayed by the wave form (Chapter 3.3). Play back
again to check any changes. The new position is
also shown graphically when you return to the
Audio-Mix menu.
(10) SMART EDIT is able to play back several
audio tracks simultaneously only if they have
first been created (if necessary by clicking on
Create). Portions which have not been created
are displayed by yellow regions in the colour
control bar at the top. The entire audio visible in
the active image size is generally created together with the active audio sample (highlighted
in blue), even if it lies outside the window. If the
entire storyboard is to be created, launch creation from the Finish menu.
(11) Click on the Timeline button to call up a new
window in which the active audio sample is displayed in full and which shows the other samples
in relation to it. The active audio sample thus
serves as the dimension for the full width of the
new window. This permits a larger (full-screen)
display of very short audio samples (which would
otherwise appear only as a narrow line in the
storyboard), whereas the full length of very long
audio samples (which would otherwise run over
the limits of the visible region in the storyboard)
is displayed with all audio samples of adjacent
sound tracks. The timeline thus offers a scaled
view by which, for example, the volume characte-
ristic or any fades can be viewed more easily.
This window displaying the time data serves
mainly to provide a better overview. You can
however also use it to move the displayed part
below the timeline display with the aid of the
scrollbar, to change the sound track to a different audio sample by clicking on it, and to call
up the functions Fade and Envelop from the
timeline display.
The symbols >> and << indicate that the audio
sample does not end at the edge of the timeline,
but continues.
The original sound track is displayed twice, one
display above the other. The reason is as follows:
if for example you have inserted a transition
effect, two audio samples overlap. In the timeline
display, these two audio samples are then displayed in two lines (in both original sound tracks).
(12) Click on the Fade button to call up a dialog in
which you can adjust fade-in and fade-out of the
currently active audio sample. The audio volume is consequently reduced or increased for the
selected duration (which of course cannot exceed
the length of the audio sample), reaching the
selected baseline volume at the end of fading.
You also will find the control "Audio Settings" in
“Project Settings”, with which you can specify
whether the audio fade should be “constant” or
“lowered”.
Certain practical time values for fading in and
out are already provided as defaults. Should you
therefore wish to fade a commentary in softly,
you can for example select a fade-in time of 1
second (1 s), and thereby prevent the sound
from being clipped.
Should you wish to fade out an audio sample,
the volume is gently reduced towards the end of
the sample and is completely silent at the end of
fading.
The fade-in and fade-out times act upon all
selected changes, i.e. including any changes to
volume of the adjacent tracks. For example, as
the commentary volume is being increased, the
background music is gently reduced to the selected value.
The volume characteristic is displayed clearly in
the audio samples.
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If you then trim a sample or move it, the fade in
and fade out times remain.
(13) The Effects button calls up the Audio Effects
menu. Audio effects can be applied to either a
single audio sample or a complete sound track.
• To add an audio effect to an audio sample, first
select the desired audio sample, which is then
highlighted in blue. Then click on Effects.
• To add an audio effect to a sound track, call
up the Audio Effects menu as described under
Point (3) by means of the fx button to the left
of the sound tracks.
The audio effects are divided into several categories:
• All
All effects are displayed.
• Standard
Only the effects contained in the SmartEdit
software are displayed.
• Optional
Only the effects from any supplementary software packages are displayed.
• [Effect package]
Only the effects from the [effect package] concerned are displayed.
(a) The volume of the selected audio sample is
displayed as a wave form at the top of the Envelop window. Above you see a representation
of all soundtracks for a better overview.
(b) The volume of the selected audio sample
can be increased or reduced selectively in the
volume display directly beneath the wave form
display by means of the rubber-band function.
In this case, first specify the editing points within
the audio sample at which the volume is to be
increased or reduced. Insert these points either
by left-clicking in the volume display close to
the desired position, or by clicking on the Add
button beneath the volume display.
Now activate one of the new points either by
clicking on it directly, or by selecting it with the
aid of the scrollbar and the function for stepping
through individual frames on the right-hand side
beneath the volume display. The colour of the
active point changes from r
ed to green. The point can then be positioned
exactly as follows.
To combine several audio effects in a single
audio sample, use the Special item under Audio
Record, Edit.
• Positioning in the volume display
Click on the activated (green) point again. It
changes colour from green to blue. Drag the
point horizontally to the desired time position
in the volume display. To increase or reduce
the volume, move the point upwards (louder)
or downwards (softer). Note that the first and
last points in the volume display cannot be
moved horizontally, i.e. against time. Left-click
again to confirm the position of the point.
(14) The Envelop (audio wave form) of an audio
sample can be edited directly with the Rubber
Band function by means of the Envelop button.
First select the desired audio sample, after which
it is highlighted in blue. Then click on Envelop
• Positioning by means of the Level slider
After clicking on Position, the active point can
be moved horizontally to the desired time position. Next drag the Level slider to the right to
increase the volume or to the left to reduce it.
The Envelope (Wave Form) Menu
• Positioning against the video background
To determine the position of a point according
to its location within the video, click on Range
The start position can be determined either
by Position or by stepping through individual
frames. Click on the right-hand trackball button
to adopt the selected setting. Use the Level
slider to select the volume at the desired point
in time.
Follow the same procedure with the remaining
points in the volume display until the desired
result is achieved. Then create the result.
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(c) Using the Add button, insert an editing point
after the currently selected (green) point in the
volume display. Note that a point cannot be
inserted between two points located very close
to each other.
(d) Use the Remove button to delete the selected editing point from the volume display.
(e) The Range button can be used to group several adjacent editing points to form a range, i.e. a
common group:
• Mark the outer left-hand (first) point of the
desired range by left-clicking it or by stepping
through individual frames.
dividual point, the following menu is displayed
against the background of the current video:
Determine the position of the selected point either using the scrollbar following activation of
the Position switch, or by means of the arrow
buttons < and >.
• When determining the position for a range, the
following menu is displayed against the background of the current video:
• Click on Range.
• Mark the outer right-hand (last) point of the
desired range by left-clicking it.
All points within the marked range also change
to green and are thus marked as active. The following functions can now be used on this range:
• Increase or reduce the volume level for the entire range. Use the Level slider for this purpose.
• Move the position. Use either the Position slider, or select the position by means of Range.
• Delete all points in the selected range. Click on
Remove in this case.
Click in the scrollbar beneath the volume display
or on any point to terminate selection of the
range.
(f) The Level determines the volume of the active
(green) editing point or of the selected range.
The volume can be selected in steps of 1 dB
from -30 dB to +30 dB.
(g) Use Position to determine the position (in
time) of a point or a range in the volume display.
(h) Use the Create button to launch creation of
the complete audio sample shown in the volume
display.
(i) Use Range to determine the position of an
editing point or a range according to its location
within the video.
• During determination of the position of an in-
The position of a range is determined either
from the start point (Start) or the end point
(End), or by means of the arrow buttons < and >.
(j) Use the Play button to play the audio sample
currently shown in the wave form display, provided it has been calculated. The play position in
terms of time is shown next to the Play button
in minutes:seconds:frames. The instantaneous
play volume is shown on the volume display.
Play can be stopped at any time by means of the
Stop button.
Click on OK to terminate editing of the wave form
and to accept the settings. Note the following:
• The Volume and Correction controls are no
longer available for the edited audio sample
following editing of the wave forms. You can
therefore no longer modify the volume of the
wave form audio sample by means of the Volume control, nor the volume of a parallel audio
sample in relation to the wave form audio
sample by means of the Correction control.
• Insertion of a fade into a wave form audio
sample deletes the edited wave form (following
a prompt). All changes to the wave form audio
sample are then lost.
• Indirect volume control of a wave form audio
sample is still possible by Correction from
another audio sample. Creation must however
be repeated.
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•Audio effects may be inserted into wave form
audio samples.
• The sample envelope remains if you have
trimmed or moved the audio sample.
(15) Use the Volume button to adjust the volume
of the active video scene. You can reduce the
volume of the scene (negative dB value), mute
it (slider fully to the left), or increase the volume
(positive values up to 30 dB).
Use this control for example to prevent a soft
sound from being drowned by another sound
which is too loud (e.g. piece of music on the
background track).
A change in volume is shown in the light-blue
bar which forms the background to the audio
samples. If the volume is reduced, the bar at the
lower edge of the audio sample is also displaced. The longer the audio sample, the more
clearly of course the characteristic is displayed.
(16) The Correction button modifies the volume
of an audio sample for the complete duration of
another audio sample. The change is shown by
the blue bar in the audio sample.
Once you have selected an audio sample (e.g.
music) in one of its sound tracks (e.g. music
sound track), you can then click on the Correction
button. A list is displayed containing all six sound
tracks. From this list, select the sound track (e.g.
original sound track) in which you wish to modify
the volume of an audio sample (e.g. vocals). Then
slide the control located on the right of it to the
left or right (to reduce or increase the volume
respectively). This changes the sound in the track
which you previously selected (under Correction)
for the complete duration of the audio sample
activated in another track.
By way of explanation, consider the following
example. You have assigned audio to three
tracks. The first contains the original sound,
which extends throughout the storyboard. The
third track contains a piece of music which
begins whilst the original sound is running and
which ends during a further original sound.
Select this piece of music. Then click on the Correction button to call up a list of all sound tracks.
From this list, select the original sound track and
reduce the volume by means of the button adjacent to Correction until it is muted You now have
no original sound for the complete duration of
the piece of music. You can now hear the music
at this point of the video without being disturbed
by the original sound. The second track contains
a commentary which begins in the middle of the
piece of music and does not end until some time
after the music has ended. Select the commentary. You can then reduce the volume of the music
for the complete duration of the commentary by
clicking on Correction, selecting the music track,
and reducing the volume by means of the righthand control.
The original sound, which was muted for the
duration of the piece of music, must now also be
switched off for the remainder of the commentary.
For this purpose, create a new piece of music:
silence. Create a generous length. Insert it after
the piece of music, and trim it using the Range
button up to the point in the video at which the
commentary ends. If you cannot find the point in
the video easily from the material, calculate the
correct position if necessary.
The volume control for the track in which the
audio sample is activated is of course not selectable under Correction, as changes affecting the
volume must be made by means of the Volume
button.
(17) Click on one of these menu symbols to jump
from this menu directly to the Audio Record,
Edit menu and to the main menu.
5.12 Shutdown (OFF)
This button turns off the system. Clicking it does
exactly the same as pushing the manual switch
on the front.
The power-down procedure saves all settings,
so that after turning on the machine later you
can continue your project where you left off.
The project is saved and then the system is shut
down.
You can then turn on the machine only by using
the manual switch on the front of the unit.
We warn against shutting down the machine by
pulling the power plug or cutting power to the
machine!
You should always turn off your system with the
"Off” button or the front switch. Data loss may
otherwise occur!
85
Chapter 6: VGA Mode
It is possible to connect a VGA screen to your
system.
In the System Settings, you can use the "Screen"
button to select the required mode – there are
several modes available, depending on the
hardware you are using (single-monitor use or
dual-monitor use).
6.1 Dual-monitor use (VGA as extra monitor to the video monitor)
Please read this chapter carefully if you have
connected a VGA (computer) monitor to your
system in addition to your TV monitor.
Usually, the VGA option is included with your
system. If you are using an older hardware
variant, you may need to purchase this option
separately.
You can use the VGA monitor to work in twomonitor mode. This means that you see the user
interface on the computer monitor and your
video material on the TV monitor.
This setup is fixed. You cannot view your video
material on the computer monitor! Working with
just the VGA monitor without the TV monitor is
not possible in dual-monitor use!
You see differences between Video mode and
VGA 1-3 in the following menus:
Video settings: In this menu you see only the
operating panel for making settings on the computer monitor. Your video material is displayed
on the TV monitor.
Recording: The operating panel for recording is
shown on the VGA monitor. You see the recorded video on the TV monitor.
Editing: When you play the storyboard from this
menu, the playback duration is displayed on
the VGA monitor on top of the Edit menu. Your
video is shown on the TV monitor without any
menu overlays.
Splitting: If you click on this button, then the
Split menu appears on top of the Edit menu. On
the TV monitor you see the actual video. Now
you can use the Split menu to cut your video
scene while you observe the exact playback on
the TV monitor.
Trim: This menu is displayed on top of the Edit
menu, just like the Split menu. Here, too, you
observe your video on the TV monitor.
Transition effects: If you playback the storyboard
from this menu in order to view an inserted effect, then the Transition-effects menu is overlaid
by the play indicator on the VGA monitor. Your
video is displayed on the TV monitor without
any overlaid controls.
Image Processing effects: Just as with transition
effects, the playback display is shown in the
Long-term effects menu and the video shown
separately.
The button "Screen“ offers the following four
settings options:
Which mode you choose to select will depend
on your existing equipment, and your personal
editing style.
Video mode:
Both the user interface and your video material
are shown on the TV monitor. Eleven scenes are
shown in the scene bin. You see seven effects in
the effects list, and in the storyboard you see seven scenes at a glance (without having to scroll).
VGA 1 (800 x 600, 60 Hz):
The user interface is rendered on the computer
monitor at a resolution of 800 x 600. This means
that the entire rendering is smaller than in video
mode and that more scenes in the scene bin,
and more entries in the effects list can be displayed. The setting 60 Hz means that the screen
image is repeated 60 times per second. The
higher the Hertz frequency, the higher the image
repetition rate and the less the picture flickers.
The following two settings are not supported by
all hardware variants:
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VGA 2 (800 x 600, 75 Hz):
If your VGA monitor supports this setting then
you can also use it with SMART EDIT. The only
difference to the setting above is the frequency.
The picture flickers less.
VGA 3 (1024 x 768, 70 Hz):
This setting also enables rendering of more
scenes and entries. In addition, flicker is as little
as with VGA 2.
6.2 Single-monitor use (VGA as an alternative)
Instead of using a television you can use the
VGA port to connect a computer monitor (also a
flat screen). However, you cannot run the system
with both screens at the same time in singlemonitor-use.
A VGA monitor will provide a calmer picture of
the menus and video footage.
You must adjust the “Screen” setting
accordingly in the “System settings” menu to
the desired VGA mode. You can choose from
several VGA options. Some examples:
VGA 1 (800 x 600, 60 Hz)
VGA 2 (800 x 600, 75 Hz)
VGA 3 (1024 x 768, 60 Hz)
VGA 4 (1024 x 768, 75 Hz)
But take caution: If you want to use a VGA
monitor, you must connect both a television
and a VGA monitor to the system when you
start up the system for the first time! Once you
have started the system, you will see the menu
displayed on the television. After you set the
“Screen” button to the desired VGA mode, the
system restarts automatically and then displays
the user interface on the VGA monitor. You can
now disconnect the television from the system
– the television was only needed in order to start
up the system the first time.
A few limitations apply when running the
system with a VGA monitor but these are not
relevant to the final results of the film. In the
following we would like to give you a few tips on
how to work with VGA mode.
• Since the screen refresh rate of a VGA monitor
is not the same as a television’s refresh rate (50
Hz), the video footage will appear jerky when
played – though this of course has no effect on
the video output via the DV interface. If your
VGA monitor supports a frequency of 75 Hz, we
recommend you use a VGA resolution of 2 or
4 for PAL in order to minimize picture jerkiness
during playback. For NTSC, we recommend you
use the 60 Hz modes, VGA 1 or VGA 3.
• Compared to video mode, VGA mode handles
complete pictures (non-interlaced). This results
in a comb effect appearing on moving objects
(e.g. camera sweeps or cars driving by) so that
the edges no longer look sharp (fringed). This
limitation is of course only of relevance when
displaying footage on a VGA monitor and is not
included in the actual video itself.
To change this, go to the "System Settings",
press the "Screen" button and select the "Field"
option. This way, playback is exempt from
artefacts.
• The color saturation and contrast properties of
the picture displayed on a VGA monitor are very
weak but they are displayed correctly in “Video”
mode (television). Therefore, please avoid
increasing the saturation or contrast since this
could lead to color bleed or distortion that is not
visible on the VGA monitor.
The picture sharpness is also displayed
differently in VGA mode than it appears in the
final video. After you finish editing the video, we
recommend you check the saturation, contrast
and picture sharpness of the footage on a
television in video mode.
• The entire video picture including the overscan
area is displayed when working with various
menus in VGA mode (e.g. when playing,
trimming or splitting a video). This area
sometimes contains image distortion that is no
longer visible when the video is later exported
or viewed on the television. When you are
positioning titles, we therefore recommend you
do not place them too far into the area around
the edges of the picture or else the letters
will no longer be visible later on. In any case,
please make sure you carry out a final check by
watching the video footage on a television.
87
Chapter 7: Tips & Error Handling
CONNECTION OPTIONS
Problem: Can I connect other input devices?
This collection "Tips and Error Handling" will
continue to grow. We are always happy to receive your ideas and suggestions! In the following
pages you will find some of the most frequently
occurring problems and tips for handling them.
Please become familiar with the following tips
and help on errors. If you can't find the solution
to your problem here, then contact your dealer.
He or she will gladly answer your questions concerning operation of your machine. The MacroSystem hotline can only help you with technical
problems.
More support information can be found at:
www.macrosystem.de (Europe)
www.macrosystem.us (North America)
Solution: Yes. You can connect most types of
USB mice and trackballs that are available on
the market. You can also use USB keyboards
(PowerKey Option) or the Twister input device.
TRACKBALL
Problem: The trackball makes a grinding sound
and/or cursor movement is jumpy or works only
in one direction.
Solution: The trackball is probably dirty. Carefully remove the ball and clean it.
PICTURE AND SOUND
Tips:
If you have installed the Power-Key Option, you
have the possibility to arrange the scenes within
the storyboard. The key combination
SB, Ctrl, c
allows you to copy a scene and position it at
another place by clicking the key combination
SB, Ctrl, v.
If you wish that the scene won’t be shown at its
original position, copy it with the combination
SB, Ctrl, x
and place it at another position.
If you wish to trim a scene which is to be found
in the storyboard, call up the trim menu by pressing the combination
SB, t.
SWITCHING ON THE MACHINE
Problem: Every time the machine is turned on
the installation query appears.
Solution: After successful installation you must
remove the SmartMedia card or CD/DVD from
the machine (and store in a safe place). The
system then starts and displays the Main menu
of the user interface.
Problem: There is no video picture when I am
trying to input from my VCR or camera. When
I bring up the "Video settings" menu I see the
menu but the screen is otherwise black.
Solution: Check to be sure that:
– you have connected and activated the video
input device. Are all the cables connected properly?
– you have activated the correct input.
– the video input device is actually sending a
signal, meaning that it is playing a cassette with
recorded material.
Problem: During titling letters appear correctly
on the screen but after being recorded out or
even during transfer "jaggedness" and "bleeding" are seen.
Solution: This is a problem to colors being too
"hot", meaning that they are over-saturated.
SMART EDIT can create colors that can only be
processed by professional video machines and
that lead to distortions when using VHS, SVHS,
or even DV devices. In such a case simply reduce the color saturation and brightness (section
3.2, Color box). You will retain almost the same
color shade but can record it without distortion.
88
Problem: There is no picture when I record from
the video input device. The message "No video
signal" appears.
Solution: Read the corresponding information
in the hardware manual.
Problem: When recording the video material I
hear no sound.
Solution: Set the correct input in menu "Audio
recording/editing" so that the volume level is
visible. Read the information in section 4.3, step
2 (recording).
Problem: The audio is distorted.
Solution: Before recording, set the volume level
so that overdriving (red appears in level display)
does not occur.
Problem: The volume keeps changing when I
play my storyboard.
Solution: Take care when dubbing that the volume of a track is not affected unintentionally by
the settings for other tracks.
tain the additional effects. You can also use the
multi-layering technique through the "Scene"
button.
Problem: The television picture is unsteady and
flickers strongly.
Solution: Reduce the contrast on your TV, which
is usually set too high at the factory. You might
also want to use a 100 Hz monitor.
OPERATING THE SYSTEM
Problem: I want to exit the main operating panel
for titling and the DVD Arabesk menu but clicking on the right trackball button doesn't work.
Solution: If you want to exit the main operating
panel in order to enter the titling menu, you
must click on "OK" (to save your settings) or
"Cancel". If the right trackball button could be
used to cancel, then you might unintentionally
lose the text you entered.
For the DVD Arabesk menu you must click on
the symbol for the Finish menu.
Problem: The screen cursor won't move, or it
can be moved but not used to do anything.
Problem: My video is off to the side. I can't see
part of the menu.
Solution: The screen position depends on the
monitor used. Screen positioning is configured
according to the studio norm. It is possible that
the display area is different for some non-professional monitors. Unfortunately, a simple solution
to this is not possible. If you only use the monitor for your system, then it might make sense to
have the monitor configured specially for it. In
this case, contact your Dealer.
Problem: The camera supplies a picture that has
too much of a blue tone.
Solution: Use the long-term effect "White balance" or "Control Color". If you wish to use other
Image Processing effects in the same portion of
the video, then select these from the "Special"
menu so that new scenes are created which con-
Solution: Your machine has "crashed". This is
probably not a major problem. Press the switch
on the front side and hold it down for about 4-5
seconds until the greeting message appears.
Problem: Creating individual effects is taking too
long!
Solution: Create the effects in the "Finish" screen
(click "Create"). This will create all remaining
effects and audio.
If your system is equipped with 64 MB RAM,
you can activate the background rendering (by
clicking onto "Smart Rendering" in the "system
settings" menu or by clicking on the dots in the
upper right corner of the corresponding menus).
This way, you can continue to work on your
video project, while the rendering of the inserted
effects is done in the background.
Please read the corresponding sections in
89
chapter 5:
chapter 5.1, item (10)
chapter 5.5, item (24)
ERROR MESSAGES
Problem: I have a lot of scenes in the Scene bin
and am having trouble finding the scenes that I
am looking for.
Solution: This symbol means that you should
insert the installation SmartMedia card, because
the card currently in the drive is invalid.
Solution: Be sure to rename the scenes in chapters and sections when splitting or recording.
You can also sort the scenes in the scene bin. To
do this, delete a scene, select another, and then
click on the Undo button, causing the deleted
scene to be reinserted just after the selected
scene.
Problem: Sometimes I can't insert a transition
effect.
Solution: Transition effects cannot overlap! If
an effect has already been assigned to an entire
scene (can happen with very short scenes), then
it is not possible to insert another effect.
Problem: I have already recorded a lot of material and would like to know how many more
minutes I can record.
Problem: The crossed-out SmartMedia card
symbol appears on the screen.
Problem: The ambulance symbol and a number
code appear on the screen.
Solution: This symbol indicates a serious error
(e.g. defective hardware). In this case, contact
your dealer.
TURNING OFF
Problem: The machine won't turn all the way off
-- the red light always lit.
Solution: The machine is in stand-by mode meaning that the red light is always on. This mode of
operation saves electricity if you use the machine often. If you don't plan on using your system
for an extended period of time, then you should
pull the power plug (after having turned off the
machine).
Solution: The remaining time (available space
for video) is displayed in the "Recording" menu.
Problem: Is data lost if I pull the power plug for
an extended period of time?
Problem: I've finished a project and would like to
start another. How do I start?
Solution: If you want to keep your video material
on the system, then you can start a new project
in menu "Project settings". Otherwise you can
choose the option "Delete", which after a confirmation request will delete all the data of your
current project.
Problem: I can't find my project data!
Solution: Check the System settings screen.
Perhaps you have activated the wrong project
by accident.
Solution: No, your data is stored on the internal
hard drive. However, before pulling the plug
you should power-down the machine correctly
by pressing the power switch on the front of
the machine or by clicking on the "OFF" button
in the Main Menu screen. This also applies to
all other cables. Never disconnect a cable from
your system while the machine is operating!
Problem: The machine does not turn off right
away. It takes awhile.
Solution: This is normal behavior for your system. Before the machine is actually turned off
the current project is automatically saved, and
this can last several seconds. Only then does the
machine actually turn off. Even if the shutdown
90
program receives no message from the machine, it will turn the machine off, but only after
several seconds.
Problem: I have a problem not contained in this
list.
Solution: If you have access to the Internet,
check out the following Web site:
http://www.macrosystem.de (Germany)
http://www.macrosystem.us (North America)
Here ("Support", "FAQ") you will find an updated
list of FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions) that
may help you. You can also call your dealer, or
call our hotline if you have technical questions.
91
Chapter 8: HD Backup-System
8.1 What is a backup used for?
Some hardware variants support the backup
functionality:
In addition to the exchangeable system hard
drive, the system is supplied with an integrated
hard drive, found in the inside of the unit.
This backup hard drive allows you to save your
current project. It offers the same capacity as
your system hard drive.
You can also make use of the HD Backup-System
on other systems by upgrading your system.
Further information can be obtained from your
dealer or MacroSystem.
A backup can be helpful to save the edited material from time to time in order to avoid a possible loss of data, in case of a damaged system
hard drive (e.g. during transport).
The backup drive is also helpful if you wish to
do some “experiments“ with some effects and
would like to get back to the former version of
your project back afterwards.
Another way to use the backup system is to
save your data in order to exchange the full
(complete) system hard drive with a bigger one,
to copy the saved material onto it and continue
working with it again (exchanging a hard drive is
explained in the hardware manual).
You can make a copy of your footage in order to
create two variations of a film (e.g. with different
endings).
8.2 Starting the backup
If you want to do a backup of your video footage, please touch the “Backup“ button (if available) at the front of the unit softly. This issues a
warning from the user interface - confirm it.
(This warning may appear in any menu you are
working in.)
On other systems with a backup option, which
may however not feature the front button, enter
the “System settings” menu and click on the
“Hard-drive backup” button.
A selection dialog then appears. In this dialog,
click on the ”Backup” function. A dialog is then
displayed showing information on your source
and target (backup) drives. Click on ”Begin backup”. The application asks you whether the last
backup should be overwritten. Answer by clicking
on ”Yes”. The system then begins copying your
data from the system drive to the backup drive,
and displays a progress bar showing the estimated remaining time.
Important: Should you click on ”Cancel”, the
backup currently in progress will be aborted
and the video material on the backup drive will
remain incomplete. As soon as the backup has
been completed, the progress bar is cleared and
the information menu called up once again. Click
on ”Quick” to return to ”System settings”.
The saved material now remains on the backup
drive until you overwrite it again. You can now
replace the defective or full system drive with a
new drive.
You do not need to wipe or reinstall the system
drive in order to transfer data back to it. The
material present on the backup drive automatically
overwrites the data on the system drive.
Click once more on the ”Hard-drive backup”
button in the ”System settings” menu. After
confirming the ”Restore” prompt, you will be
presented with a dialog showing information on
your source (backup) and target drives. Click on
”Begin restore”. The system begins copying the
data you have saved on the backup drive to your
(new) system drive. A progress bar showing the
estimated remaining time is displayed.
Important: clicking on the ”Cancel” button causes
the active restore operation to be aborted. In this
case you must completely re-install your system
software. As soon as the restore operation
is complete, the progress bar closes and the
information menu is called up. Click on ”Quick”
to return to ”System settings”. Following a
successful restore operation, you can record and
edit further material. It goes without saying that
this also restores access to all scenes and effects.
Important: During backup and restoring of your
video material, only data actually occupying space
on the hard drive are copied. Unneeded copies
are not therefore made of empty drive space. This
reduces the time required for copying.
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Chapter 9: Ethernet-Transfer
9.1 General information
Since the installation of version 4 of SMART EDIT, Ethernet Transfer software is automatically
installed on many SMART EDIT compatible hardware systems. This program enables you to connect
your device to a TCP/IP network. You can then exchange video data (incl. original soundtrack) at high
speed with PCs on the network and use other programs installed on the PCs to edit your video data,
print images, send footage via email, etc.
The edited video footage can subsequently be transferred back to the system. (This is only possible
with a machine that is already equipped with an Ethernet port. Some Avio devices do not have this
kind of interface.)
Since it is not possible to transfer individual images (e.g. BMP, JPG, etc.) to the system, we
recommend you create a scene from the image and then transfer the scene as an AVI file.
Your PC must fulfill the following software requirements: Windows (XP, 95, 98, 2000 or ME), Internet
Explorer version 6.0 or higher and applications for editing the DV data (DV codec, Windows Media
Player version 9.0 or higher, programs such as Adobe Premiere, etc.) The DV data are transferred as
type-2 AVI files (see “Disk Transfer”).
Please note: The following instructions describe how to use Ethernet Transfer with a PC that is
installed with the Windows XP operating system. The various settings might be slightly different
for the other operating systems – if necessary, please refer to the instructions for your operating
system.
9.2 Cable connections
The easiest way to connect two devices (e.g. a PC and your system) is by plugging one end of an
Ethernet crossover cable into your PC’s Ethernet port and the other end into your system’s Ethernet
port (see hardware manual). You will need a Cat 5 type cable (or better) – you cannot use a Cat 3 or
Cat 4 cable.
If you want to connect several devices to one another (e.g. two PCs and your system) you should
connect the devices via a hub or switch. We recommend using 100 Mbit hubs or switches in order to
achieve an optimum speed.
9.3 Ethernet Transfer on your system
You can start the program by clicking on the “Special” button in the Edit menu. You will see the
Ethernet Transfer program listed there alphabetically in the upper effects section of the Window.
After you have selected it, click on the “Start Ethernet-Transfer” function in the effect options
section (right).
The following window then opens:
93
9.3.1 Manual configuration
In the “IP” field, specify a free (!) IP address on your network for your machine (e.g. 192.168.1.10).
The check mark for the DHCP setting must remain deactivated –the name, in this case, also remains
deactivated.
192.168.1.10
192.168.1.20
Direct connection between a PC and system (via a crossover Ethernet cable)
192.168.1.10
192.168.1.20
192.168.1.40
192.168.1.30
Star-shaped network (switch, hub)
94
9.3.2 Automatic configuration via DHCP
Via DHCP
Via DHCP
DHCP Server / DNS Server
Via DHCP
Via DHCP
In the “DHCP” section, you can first of all decide whether your system should be assigned a network
address automatically. This function can only be used if a DHCP server exists on the network. If this
is the case, activate the check box so that a check mark appears. You will then see a window appear
for a while that indicates that a network connection is being started. This might take a little time
depending on the size of the network.
Afterwards, a number will appear in the “IP” field below and you can begin transferring data using
Ethernet Transfer by starting “Internet Explorer” on your PC (see below).
If the automatic configuration (connection to the network) has failed or was not possible or if you
decide to assign an address to your system manually, you can specify a free (!) IP address within
your network for your system in the “IP” field.
Only applies to DHCP:
If you prefer to work with the name of the device instead of its IP address and if there is a Domain
Name Server (DNS) present on your network, a hostname will be configured automatically for your
device (default value: casablanca-“S/N”). The PC should then also have been configured with DHCP
or should be present in the same domain.
In any case, the PC that is supposed to communicate with the system over the network should have
an IP address from the same “address space”. The safest way of doing this when assigning an
address manually is to change only the last segment of the IP address.
Examples:
If you are using a domain server and it is configured in the “mynet.com” domain, your system could
then, for instance, be called “Solitaire.mynet.com”.
In this case, the “Name” field on the system is activated. (Capitalization is ignored when used in the
browser):
95
“Solitaire”= Solitaire.mynet.com
PC.mynet.com
The PC being used must also use the same domain server or be logged on to the same domain.
(Manual login via: Control Panel->System->Computer Name->Change)
Access via “http://solitaire”.
9.4 Ethernet Transfer on the PC
Now, on your PC, start the “Internet Explorer” browser (at least version 6.0 or higher). Once you
have entered the IP address of your system (e.g. 192.168.1.10) or the configured hostname (e.g.
“Solitaire.mynet.com”) in the “Address” field you will be given access to your system. You will now
see the following window of the “Ethernet Transfer” program:
96
1.) PC -> System
If you want to transfer your video data from the PC to the system, click on the “PC --> Casablanca”
button.
A window opens in which you can first of all specify the name that you want the scene to have in the
SMART EDIT scene bin after it is transferred. If you do not choose a name here, the system will call
the scene “New Scene”.
Beneath this is a little check box that you can activate if you want to overwrite an old scene that
already has the same scene name.
Afterwards, press the “Search” button to enter the path of the AVI file that you want to transfer. A
file browser will subsequently open in which you should select the AVI file that you want and then
click on “Open”. The path then appears in the window provided for this purpose and you can then
click on “Start Transfer”.
If a file transfer is unsuccessful, an error message will inform you of this. Please try again (or with
another file) by clicking on the “Further transfer PC --> Casablanca” button.
If the transfer was successful, a message will inform you that the file has been saved on the system
under its name.
If you want to transfer further files from the PC to the system, click on the “Further transfer PC -->
Casablanca” button.
Note: The file size is restricted to a maximum of 1 GB when transferring data from a PC --> system.
2.) System --> PC
Playing a scene
97
If you want to transfer video footage from the systemto the PC, click on the “Casablanca --> PC”
menu item. You will see a list of all the scenes that are available in the SMART EDIT scene bin.
Fifteen scenes are displayed per page. There is a bar at the bottom edge of the window that you can
use to display the subsequent pages (“Jump to...”). The scenes are displayed with their names and
the first frame of the scene.
Now click the left mouse button on the file that you want – this action directly opens the Windows
Media Player and plays the file. In order to be able to play the video, a DV codec must of course be
installed. Before you can play the video footage using Media Player, it must first be transferred to
the PC as a temporary AVI file. This process might take a few seconds to complete (depending on
the length of the scene). You will see a progress bar on the SMART EDIT screen during the transfer.
After your video has been played you have the option of saving the file on the PC by pressing the
“File” button and then “Save as”. (You might first have to press the “Show menu” button that is
located at the top left before you can access the “Save as” button in the “File” menu.
If you click on the “Save as” button, a file browser opens in which you can select the location that
you want to save the file as well as change the name if you wish. Finally, save the file by clicking on
“Save”.
Please note: If Media Player is not installed or you are prohibited from opening AVI files directly, the
left click will cause the file to be downloaded!
Saving a scene
If you do not want to play the scene but instead transfer the scene immediately to the PC and save it
there, you can avoid playing it by clicking the right mouse button on the file name or on the scene’s
thumbnail image so that a menu opens. In this menu, use the left mouse button to select the “Save
target as” option so that a file browser opens in which you can select the location that you want to
save the file to as well as change the name if you wish. Finally, save the file by clicking on “Save”.
You will see a file transfer window that informs you about the approximate length of time required,
the location where you are saving the file and the transfer rate.
Special case: If you want to transfer a scene from the system to the PC that exceeds a length of 4:43
minutes or has a file size greater than 1 Gbyte you must transfer the scene manually in sections of
1 Gbyte (+ the remaining portion of the scene). The scene sections are indicated accordingly in the
web browser with [2], [3], [4], etc. The first section can be opened via the scene’s name and via its
thumbnail image.
98
3.) Info
If you click on the “Info” button you will be provided with information on both transfer directions
(“PC --> Casablanca” and “Casablanca --> PC”).
9.5 Background knowledge
DHCP stands for “Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol”
-> Automatic connection to the network through a DHCP server (e.g. present in the local DSL router)
upon request by the DHCP client (system, PC)
Basic functioning: when a network connection is initialized and DHCP is activated, the client (i.e.
the PC or in our case the system) sends a query to the network asking whether a server exists that
can assign an IP address to the client. If this kind of server exists, additional data can then also be
assigned such as the hostname, the address of the relevant DNS server, etc.
DNS stands for “Domain Name System”
-> Management and resolution of “Names<->IP” allocations by the DNS server (e.g. present in the
local DSL router)
The DNS server is like a telephone directory on the network. Since it is easier to remember a name
(like “Solitaire.mynet.com”) rather than an address (like “123.456.7.890”) DNS servers are used on
networks to simplify our work.
IP network classes and subnet masks:
Version 4 IP addresses (IPv4) are made up of 32 bits that are generally written in decimal form in
four segments of 8 bits each. The classical subdivision of the address space that arises from the
32-bit addresses (a total of 4,294,967,296 computers can be addressed) provides for three network
99
classes that are differentiated by way of the first segment of the address.
For a “normal home network” all you need to know is that there are private address ranges
that are not and cannot be used on the internet and are therefore “free to use”). Under normal
circumstances, it is sufficient if you assign, for instance, the IP address 192.168.0.1 to the PC and the
IP address 192.168.0.2 to the system. Further PCs, devices, etc. can then be assigned addresses that
differ in the last segment of the address.
Then, in order to display the SMART EDIT user interface, all you need do is enter “http://192.168.0.2”
in the web browser on the PC.
Further notes:
•
•
•
•
•
•
The PC might only react very slowly whilst large files are being transferred from the system
to the PC or from the PC to the system. We therefore recommend you do not work with other
programs during a file transfer and that you close these programs beforehand.
When starting Ethernet Transfer, there might be a delay if the DHCP function was used
beforehand. The program should start immediately if the IP address has been assigned
manually.
File transfers via Ethernet are only possible if the Ethernet Transfer program has been
started on the system. It is not possible to work with the system during an active transfer/
connection.
Audio files cannot be transferred using Ethernet Transfer. If you want to transfer an audio file
from the system to the PC, you must first of all use the special “Sample->Scene” function to
create a black scene from the audio file that you can then transfer to the PC using Ethernet
Transfer.
If a file is transferred from the PC to the system, the progress bar is run through twice. The
scene is transferred during the first step and in the second step it is converted for the SMART
EDIT scene bin.
In order to maintain as high a level of compatibility as possible with the various PC video
editing programs, a type-2 DV-AVI is saved/created when transferring a scene from the
system to the PC. Alongside the original DV video (in which the audio and video components
are mixed), the audio component is saved separately as an additional component in the file
in accordance with the present AVI standard.
A DV-AVI codec must be installed on the PC before you can play and edit AVI files on the PC.
274-06/06
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