Uniwide Technologies UniServer 1522 User`s guide

Uniwide Technologies UniServer 1522 User`s guide
Part I. User’s Guide
1. Introduction............................................................................................. 2
1.1
System Feature ................................................................................................................................3
1.1.1 Front View............................................................................................................................3
1.2.2 Front Panel Controls and Indicators........................................................................................3
1.1.3 Rear View.............................................................................................................................4
1.1.4 Inner View............................................................................................................................5
1.1.5 Power LED Indication ............................................................................................................5
1.2 System Specifications .......................................................................................................................6
1.3 Mainboard Layout ............................................................................................................................9
1.3.1 Block Diagram ......................................................................................................................9
1.3.2 Mainboard Layout ............................................................................................................... 10
2. Important Safety ................................................................................... 11
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
Intended Application Uses .............................................................................................................. 11
Checking the Power Cord................................................................................................................ 11
Earth-Grounded Socket Outlets ....................................................................................................... 12
Before Removing the Access Covers ................................................................................................ 12
Fans .............................................................................................................................................. 12
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD).......................................................................................................... 12
Cooling and Airflow ........................................................................................................................ 13
Battery .......................................................................................................................................... 13
3. System Installation................................................................................ 14
3.1
Preparing for Setup ........................................................................................................................ 14
3.1.1 Unpacking .......................................................................................................................... 14
3.1.2 Packing List ........................................................................................................................ 15
3.1.3 Environmental Specifications ............................................................................................... 16
3.1.4 Install Rail for Mounting the System on the Rack .................................................................. 17
3.1.5 Install System at the Rack Cabinet ....................................................................................... 19
3.2 Installing User Serviceable Component ............................................................................................ 20
3.2.1 CPU ................................................................................................................................... 20
3.2.2 Memory.............................................................................................................................. 21
3.2.3 Hard Disk Drive................................................................................................................... 24
3.2.4 PCI Add-on Card ................................................................................................................. 25
4. BIOS and Jumper Setting ...................................................................... 26
4.1 BIOS ............................................................................................................................................. 26
4.1.1 Starting BIOS Setup............................................................................................................. 26
4.1.2 Updating BIOS Setup ........................................................................................................... 27
4.1.3 Using Setup......................................................................................................................... 28
4.1.4 Main Menu .......................................................................................................................... 29
4.1.5 Advanced Menu ................................................................................................................... 29
4.1.6 PCI PnP Menu ..................................................................................................................... 39
4.1.7 Boot Menu .......................................................................................................................... 41
4.1.8 Security Menu ..................................................................................................................... 42
4.1.9 Chipset Configuration Menu ................................................................................................. 44
4.1.10 Power Menu ...................................................................................................................... 48
4.1.11 Exit Menu.......................................................................................................................... 49
4.2 Jumper Setting .............................................................................................................................. 50
4.2.1 PCI-X Speed Setting(J22, J26) .............................................................................................. 51
4.2.2 VGA Enable / Disable(J18) ................................................................................................... 52
4.2.3 Clear CMOS Header ............................................................................................................. 52
4.2.4 External SAS Port Enable/Disable(JP2) .................................................................................. 53
4.2.5 Geographical ID Setting ....................................................................................................... 53
4.2.6 Cable Connection on the SAS BP........................................................................................... 55
4.2.7 Jumper Setting on the SAS BP .............................................................................................. 55
4.2.8 Jumper Setting on the SATA BP ............................................................................................ 55
5.
Software & Utilities ............................................................................. 56
5.1
NVRAID......................................................................................................................................... 56
5.1.1 Basic Configuration Instruction ............................................................................................. 56
5.1.2 Setting up the BIOS............................................................................................................. 57
5.1.3 Entering the RAID BIOS Setup Basic Configuration Instruction ............................................... 58
5.1.4 NVIDIA RAID Utility installation ............................................................................................ 62
5.2 LSILogic SAS RAID(Optional) .......................................................................................................... 65
5.2.1 Introduction to Integrated RAID ........................................................................................... 65
5.2.2 Integrated Mirroring Overview.............................................................................................. 66
5.2.3 Creating Integrated Mirroring Volumes.................................................................................. 72
5.2.4 Integrated Striping Overview................................................................................................ 79
5.2.5 Creating Integrated Striping Volumes....................................................................................82
5.3 ServerDome Overview .................................................................................................................... 87
Part II.
Technical Guide
1. Removing & Installing System Components.......................................... 88
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
Installing the CD-ROM Drive ........................................................................................................... 88
Installing the Floppy Disk Drive....................................................................................................... 89
Installing the Hard Disk Drive ......................................................................................................... 90
Removing the Power Supply Unit .................................................................................................... 91
Replacing the Cooling Fan Unit........................................................................................................ 91
Replacing the Interface Unit ........................................................................................................... 92
1.6.1 Interface Board(IFB) Unit and Backplane Unit....................................................................... 92
1.6.2 Installing the Cable (SATA, SAS) .......................................................................................... 93
1.7 Installing the AC Cable Unit ............................................................................................................ 94
1.8 Installing the Motherboard.............................................................................................................. 95
1.9 Installing the CPU Heatsink............................................................................................................. 96
1.10 Installing the Front Bezel .............................................................................................................. 96
Appendix.................................................................................................... 97
A. BIOS Post Code ................................................................................................................................. 97
Preface
The information in this User's Guide has been carefully reviewed and is believed to be accurate.
The vendor assumes no responsibility for any inaccuracies that may be contained in this document, makes no
commitment to update or to keep current the information in this Guide, or to notify any person or organization of
the updates.
NOTE: For any up-to-date version of this document, please see our web site at www.uniwide.com.
UNIWIDE Technologies, Inc. reserves the right to make changes to the product described in this manual at any
time and without notice.
This product, including software, if any, and documentation may not, in whole or in
part, be copied, photocopied, reproduced, translated or reduced to any medium or machine without written
consent.
Copyright Notice
The material in this document is the intellectual property of UNIWIDE Technologies, Inc. We take every care in
the preparation of this document, but no guarantee is given as to the correctness of its contents. Our products
are under continual improvement and we reserve the right to make changes without notice.
Technical Support
If a problem arises with your system and no solution can be obtained from the user's manual, please contact your
place of purchase or local distributor. Alternatively, please try the following help resources for further guidance.
Visit the UNIWIDE website for FAQ, technical guide, BIOS updates, driver updates, and other information:
http://www.uniwide.com/
Contact our technical staff at: [email protected]
Revision History
Revision
Revision History
V1.0
Date
First release
September 2006
1
1. Introduction
The key objective for UniServer is to overcome the major challenges faced by developers, and system integrators
alike, in deploying ideal server solutions to the market. Although many, key challenges are identified as reliability,
performance, value, scalability and manageability. UniServer offers the best in class for each of these challenges
by employing the latest technology designed by a specialized sever team.
The UniServer S1522 1U Rackmount Server is a high-performance barebone system powered by dual AMD® Opteron TM
processors, nVIDIA® nForce Professional 2200 & 2050, AMD 8132 PCI-X Tunnel chipset, ADM 1026 Hardware
Monitoring Chip.
In addition, 8 DIMM sockets are supported per CPU. This first-in-industry feature increases the performance/value
mix by reducing the cost of system memory by up to 100% over competition. In line with extreme processing and
data buffering capability, UniServer is equipped with both PCI-Express and PCI-X slots and SATA II with RAID 0, 1,
0+1 support. For those preferring SAS devices, 2-slot SAS with RAID option is available. Data transfer is optimized with
on-board dual PCI-Express Gigabit Ethernet ports.
Server management feature is unrivaled by utilizing its dedicated BMC with IPMI 2.0 based ServerDome.
A remote management suit handles all aspects of deployment, management and monitoring of UniServer at an
individual or aggregate level. Last but not least, UniServer is cable-less and tool-less integration. This well thought out
packaging keeps all variations of UniServer ultra cool and easy to maintain, thus, optimizing on reliability and TCO.
2
1.1
System Feature
1.1.1 Front View
a. Slim CD-ROM Drive
d. Hard Disk Drive
b. Front Panel Controls and Indicators
e. Front Bezel
c. FDD Ejector button
f. Mounting Bracket
1.2.2 Front Panel Controls and Indicators
a. USB 2,0 Ports
e. System Fault LED
b. Power LED
f. System ID Switch
c. LAN Activity LED
g. Reset Switch
d. System ID LED
h. Power ON/OFF Switch
Front Panel LEDs
LED
System Power
LAN1/LAN2 Activity
System ID
System Fault
HDD Status
HDD Activity
Color
State
Description
Blue
On
System is turned on
Off
Off
Power is off
Green
Blink
Green
Off
No LAN access
White
On
Identification is active by management software or
ID LED button
Off
Off
Identification is not active
Network is linked and accessed
Off
Off
Running/normal operation
Red
On
Critical or non-recoverable condition
Green
On
HDD exists and is powered
Off
Off
Green
Blink
Disk is accessed
No HDD
Off
Off
No disk activity
3
1.1.3 Rear View
a. AC Power Inlet
h. USB Port
b. PCI-Express x16 Slot
i.
c. PCI-X Slot
j. IEEE 1394 Port
d. System Geographical ID Switch
k. GbE LAN Port(IPMI)
e. VGA Port
l.
f. Serial Port
m. External SAS Port
KVM over IP
GbE LAN Port
g. PS/2 Keyboard / Mouse Port
LAN Port Function
The LAN port uses a CAT 6 LAN cable for connecting the motherboard to a local area
network by means of a network hub. The port has 2 indicator LEDs.
LED
Link and Activity
Speed
Color
State
Green
Blink
Description
LAN is linked and accessed
Off
Off
LAN is not linked
Orange
On
Gigabit mode access
Green
On
100M mode access
Off
Off
10M mode access
Link and Activity LED
Speed LED
NOTICE
If you use ethernet card with RJ-45 connector in the PCI-X riser card, you may need some kit when
you remove the LAN cable.
4
1.1.4 Inner View
a. Power Supply
e. Memory DIMM Slots
b. Silm FDD
f. Heatsink
c. Silm CD-ROM
g. PCI-Express Add-on Card
d. CPU Air Duct
h. PCI-X Add-on Card
1.1.5 Power LED Indication
AC : Green – Normal / Yellow - Fail
DC : Green – Normal / Yellow - Fail
NOTICE
You can check the power status LED after the front bezel is removed.
5
1.2
System Specifications
Processor
Two socket F(1207pin) AMD OpteronTM Processors
Supports up to 2P/4C Dual-Core AMD OpteronTM 2000 Series processors
Integrated 128bit DDR-2 memory controller
Chipset
NVIDIA® nForceTM Professional 2200
AMD-8132TM PCI-X 2.0 Tunnel
NVIDIA® nForceTM Professional 2050 (1522VA-02)
Winbond Super I/O chip
Analog Devices® hardware monitoring chip
Memory
128-bit dual channel memory bus
8 DIMMs per CPU, up to 64GB memory capacity
Registered ECC DDR2 400/533/667 SDRAM DIMM
SATA Controller (1522VA)
Integrated nForceTM Professional 2200
2 ports supporting RAID 0, 1
SAS Controller (1522ES)
LSILogic LSI1068X 8-ch SAS controller
4-CH shared with External SAS port
LSILogic Integrated RAID & ZCR support
IDE Controller
Integrated nForceTM Professional 2200
One port for CD-ROM Drive
2.5" HDD (Optional)
6
Drive Bays
Supports 2 hot-swap SATA HDDs (1522VA-01, 1522VA-02)
Supports 2 hot-swap SAS HDDs (1522ES-01)
Supports Slim CD-ROM and Slim FDD Drive
Expansion Slots
One x16 PCI-Express slot supporting half-length add-on card
One 64bit 133/100/66MHz PCI-X slot supporting half-length add-on card (1522VA-02)
One 64bit 100/66MHz PCI-X slot supporting half-length add-on card (1522ES-01)
Integrated I/O
Rear I/O
One VGA port
One serial port
One PS/2 keyboard & mouse port
Two USB 2.0 ports
Two RJ45 GbE ports
One IEEE-1394a (Firewire) port
One external SAS connector (1522ES-01)
Front LED Panel
Two USB 2.0 ports
LEDs: Power / GbE LAN1 / GbE LAN2 / ID / System Fault
Switches: System ID / Reset / Power
System Management
FAN connectors
For CPU / System - Two step speed control
Port 80h 7 segment display
BMC
Supports IPMI 2.0 specification
Auto fan speed control
Voltage and fan speed monitoring
7
LAN Controller
Two Broadcom® BCM5721 PCI-Express gigabit ethernet controllers
Support PXE function
Video Controller
XGI Volari Z9 /16MB
BIOS
AMI BIOS
Support ACPI 2.0 with S0/S1/S3/S4 and S5
Support AMD PowerNow!
48-bit LBA support
Support USB K/B & Mouse
Serial Console Redirection
Support USB boot and PXE boot in boot sequence
Support serial over LAN function
Power Supply
500W cold-swap single power supply with PFC function
AC Input: 100-240V~, 50/60Hz, 9.0-4.5A
Form Factor
1U (H x W x D): 43.5 x 430 x 698 mm (1.7 x 16.9 x 27.5 inch)
Regulatory
CE(EMC) : EN55022(EMI), EN55024(EMS), EN61000-3-2(Harmonic), EN61000-3-3(Flicker)
CE(LVD) : EN60950
CB : IEC 60950
FCC : FCC 15 Subpart A
UL : UL 60950
MIC: KN22(EMI), KN24(EMS)
ROHS
WEEE
8
1.3
Mainboard Layout
1.3.1 Block Diagram
9
1.3.2 Mainboard Layout
① AMD® OpteronTM Socket 1207 - CPU0
®
② AMD Opteron
TM
Socket 1207 - CPU1
⑨ PCI Express x16 Slot
⑩ Two Broadcom® PCI Express GbE ports
③ Registered ECC DDR memory Slots
⑪ LSILogic LSI1068X 8-ch SAS controller
④ NVIDIA nForceTM Professional 2200
⑫ 32pin SAS Connector
⑤ NVIDIA nForceTM Professional 2050
⑬ External SAS Connector
⑥ AMD® 8132 PCI-X 2.0 Tunnel
⑭ Winbond 83627THF LPC Super I/O
⑦ HT Connector
⑧ PCI-X slot (supports ZCR)
⑮ XGI Volari Z9
16 Interface Connector
○
10
2. Important Safety
Only a technically qualified person shall access, integrate, configure, and service this product.
To avoid personal injury or property damage, read, observe, and adhere to all of the following safety instructions
and information before you begin installing the product.
2.1
Intended Application Uses
This product was evaluated as information technology equipment (ITE), which may be installed in offices, schools,
computer rooms, and similar commercial type locations. The suitability of this product for other product categories
and environment (such as medial, industrial, alarm systems, and test equipment), other than an ITE application,
may require further evaluation.
2.2
Checking the Power Cord
CAUTION
To avoid electrical shock, check the power cord(s) that will be used with the product:
Do not attempt to modify or use the AC power cord(s) if they are not the exact type required.
If a power cord is not compatible with the AC wall outlet in your region, get one that meets the following
criteria:
z
The power cord must be properly rated for the AC voltage in your region.
z
The power cord plug cap must have an electrical current rating that is at least 125% of the
electrical current rating of the product.
z
The power cord plug cap that plugs into the wall socket-outlet must have a grounding type male
plug designed for use in your region.
z
The power cord must have safety certifications for your region, and shall be marked with the
certification markings.
z
The power cord plug cap that plugs into the AC receptacle on the power supply must be an IEC
320, sheet C13, type female connector.
z
In Europe, the power cord must be less than 4.5 meters (14.76 feet) long, and it must be flexible
<HAR> (harmonized) or VDE certified cordage to comply with the chassis' safety certification
The power supply cord(s) is the main disconnect device to AC power.
The socket outlet(s) shall be near the equipment and shall be readily accessible for disconnection.
11
2.3
Earth-Grounded Socket Outlets
CAUTION
To avoid electrical shock, the system power cord(s) must be plugged into socket-outlet(s) that is
provided with a suitable earth ground. The system will be provided with the following marking:
z
2.4
Connect only to properly earthed socket outlet.
Before Removing the Access Covers
CAUTION
To avoid personal injury or property damage, the following safety instructions apply whenever
accessing inside the product:
2.5
z
Turn off all peripheral devices connected to this product.
z
Turn off the system by pressing the power button on the front of the product.
z
Disconnect the AC power by unplugging all AC power cords from the system or wall outlet.
z
Disconnect all cables and telecommunication lines that are connected to the system.
z
Retain all screws or other fasteners when removing access cover(s). Upon completion of accessing
inside the product, refasten access cover with original screws or fasteners.
z
Do not access inside power supply. There are no serviceable parts in the power supply.
z
Return to manufacturer for servicing.
Fans
CAUTION
To avoid injury, do not contact moving fan blades.
2.6
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD)
CAUTION
Perform the procedures in this product guide only at an electrostatic discharge (ESD) workstation, because the
server components can be extremely sensitive to ESD. If no such station is available, you can reduce the risk
of electrostatic discharge ESD damage by doing the following.
z
Wear an antistatic wrist strap and attach it to a metal part of the server.
z
Touch the metal on the server chassis before touching the server components.
z
Keep part of your body in contact with the metal server chassis to dissipate the static charge while
handling the components.
12
2.7
z
Avoid moving around unnecessarily.
z
Hold the server components (especially boards) only by the edges.
z
Place the server components on a grounded, static-free surface.
z
Use a conductive foam pad if available but not the component wrapper.
z
Do not slide the components over any surface.
Cooling and Airflow
CAUTION
For proper cooling and airflow, always install all access covers before turning on the system.
Operating the system for longer than five minutes without the covers in place can cause overheating and
damage to system components.
2.8
Battery
CAUTION
Risk of explosion if battery is replaced by an incorrect type.
Dispose of used batteries according to the instructions.
13
3. System Installation
3.1
Preparing for Setup
3.1.1 Unpacking
① Main Box
② Slide Rail Box
③ Heatsink Pad
④ Accessory Box
⑤ Heatsink Box
⑥ System Bottom Cushion
⑦ UniServer 1522 System
⑧ System Top Cushion
CAUTION
In setting the product out of the box, hold it in the middle and not the cushion.
Depending on the weight of the product, two people together should lift it.
14
3.1.2 Packing List
Unpack the package and check if all items listed below are present.
If any item contained in the package is damaged or missing, please contact your local dealer for
replacement. In addition, keep the box and packing materials for possible future use.
1522 Series Barebone
Slide Rail
CPU Heatsink
Accessory Box
① PS/2 Y-Cable
② Power Cord (Optional)
③ Manual and Driver CD
④ ServerDome (Optional)
15
3.1.3 Environmental Specifications
Place
In front of the system, minimum 25" of the space is needed for using and managing the system.
In rear of the system, minimum 30" of the space is needed for managing the system and airflow.
Power supply
Before installing the system, check the power capacity of the place where the system is installed.
Grounding
The system should be grounded.
Temperature
The system should be installed where the airflow and temperature is proper.
If the system is installed in the rack, the temperature in rack should be less than 35 degree Celsius.
In most case, the temperature of the rack is higher than that of the out of the rack.
Airflow
Since the airflow of the system is front-to-rear, please do not cover of the system
16
3.1.4 Install Rail for Mounting the System on the Rack
This section provides information on installing the system into a rack unit with the slide rails provided.
Slide Rail
Slide rails consist of two sections: an inner fixed chassis rail that secures directly to the server chassis
and an outer fixed slide rail that secures directly to the rack itself.
You should have received outer slide rails in the rack mounting kit.
(See packing list) And, both the left and right side inner rails have been pre-attached to the chassis.
Inner Fixed Chassis Rail
17
Installing the Outer Rails
As shown in picture below, put the rear of outer rail on right place of the rear-mounting frame, and fit
it on the front-mounting frame.
You can fit the outer rails on the rack very easily and then eventually you can reduce the assembly
time.
Finally, secure it with M6 screws, just rear side only.
18
3.1.5 Install System at the Rack Cabinet
CAUTION
Remove all the cables from system before installing.
CAUTION
System can be heavy. To reduce the risk of personal injury or damage to the equipment,
get help to lift and stabilize the system during installation or removal, especially when the
system is not fastened to the rails.
① Lift the system to slide of rack
② Set the system on the slide rail of rack
③ Slide the system into the rack
④ Pull it out, pressing both levers on the inner slide rails simultaneously
⑤ Secure the system with thumbscrew on the rack.
19
3.2
Installing User Serviceable Component
3.2.1 CPU
System mainboard accommodates Socket-F(1207 pin) AMD Opteron TM Processors at 2000 MT (Mega
Transfer per second). You must insert a CPU into CPU socket 0 (CPU0) first before installing one in
CPU socket 1 (CPU1). The correct CPU installation sequence is CPU0, CPU1.
CAUTION
If you are using 1522VA-01, 1522ES-01 model, you must surely use two for appropriate operation.
Follow these instructions to install the CPU.
① Lift up the socket-locking lever slightly.
② Locate the pin 1 of the CPU socket and pin 1 of the CPU. (Marked by a triangular hole in the Pin 1
corner) Lower the locking lever and latching it into the fully locked position
Gold Triangle
20
3.2.2 Memory
The system mainboard uses Dual Inline Memory Modules (DIMM). Two pair's banks are available;
each bank supports one CPU with Hyper Transport Technology. The memory DIMMs accommodates Registered
ECC (400/533/667) SDRAM DIMM and Double Data Rate Memory (DDR2) memory modules in 128MB,
256MB, 512MB, 1GB, and 2GB, 4GB combinations. Total memory size for one CPU is up to 32GB.
CAUTION
The system mainboard has strict memory type and timing requirements.
Before you purchase DDR (Double Data Rate) memory for using in the system mainboard, you should
contact your local reseller for a recommend list of system memory that has been validated on this
system. It only supports registered memory, not supports unbuffered type memory.
CAUTION
To take advantage of the 128-bit interface, you must install DIMMs in pairs of two. DIMM0 and DIMM1
are paired; DIMM2 and DIMM3 are paired; DIMM4 and DIMM5 are paired; and slots DIMM6 and DIMM7
are paired. If you are only installing two DIMMs into a Memory Bank, it is recommended that you install
them in slots DIMM6 and DIMM7 to get the full bandwidth.
NOTE
For optimal dual-channel DDR operation, installing DIMMs in pair is highly recommended. For two DIMMs
per CPU, install them far from the CPU. For four or more DIMMs per CPU, install them same method to
the CPU.
Memory Configuration Chart
(Note: X indicates a populated DIMM Slot, The chart below does not included all the configuration)
CPU 0
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
DIMM7
x
DIMM6
x
x
DIMM5
x
x
DIMM4
x
x
DIMM3
x
x
DIMM2
x
DIMM1
DIMM7
x
DIMM0
DIMM6
DIMM5
DIMM4
x
DIMM3
x
DIMM2
x
DIMM1
DIMM0
128bit memory support
x
CPU 1
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
21
Memory Installation Procedure
① Locate the DIMM modules.
② Make sure the DIMM’s pins are facing down, and check that the pin arrangement on the memory
module resembles the one pictured below.
CAUTION
Always populate H0 DIMM socket before installing memory modules in the H1 DIMM sockets.
③ Insert the module into the DIMM socket and press down evenly on both ends firmly until the
DIMM module is securely in place. (The tabs of the DIMM socket will close-up to hold the DIMM in
place when the DIMM is properly installed into the socket.)
22
23
3.2.3 Hard Disk Drive
NOTICE
When you install hard disk drive into the system, we recommend using slot #0 first.
HDD ID Configuration
HDD Type
Slot #1
Slot #0
SATA
ID 4
ID 1
SAS
ID 1
ID 0
24
3.2.4 PCI Add-on Card
WARNING
Power off power supply completely when adding or removing any expansion card and other
system components. Failure to do so may cause severe damage to both your motherboard and
expansion card.
WARNING
Check add-on card type for sure when adding expansion card to slot. PCI-X slot can not support
exclusive 5V add-on card.
3.2.4.1
Memory Installation Procedure
Pull out the latch toward the direction as shown in picture below and rotate the latch clockwise.
Install the PCI card in the PCI riser card module and put the latch back in the original position.
Align the hooks of the PCI riser card module to the hole of the rear panel.
Put the assembled PCI module down into the slot of the chassis.
25
4. BIOS and Jumper Setting
4.1
BIOS
This chapter discusses the AMI BIOS Setup program built into the ROM BIOS. The Setup program allows users
modifying the basic system configurations according to their requirements. This special information is then stored
in battery-backed RAM so that it retains the Setup information when the power is turned off.
The AMI BIOS installed in your computer system's ROM (Read Only Memory) is a custom version of an industry
standard BIOS. The BIOS provides critical low-level support for standard devices such as disk drives and serial
ports. The AMI BIOS has been customized by adding important, but non-standard, features such as password
protection as well as special support for detailed fine-tuning of the chipset controlling the entire system.
The rest of this chapter is intended to guide you through the process of configuring your system using Setup.
4.1.1 Starting BIOS Setup
The AMI BIOS is immediately activated when you power on the computer every time.
The BIOS reads the system information contained in the CMOS and begins the process of checking out the
system and configuring it. After finishing configuring the whole system, then BIOS will continue to seek an
operating system on one of the disks, launch then turn control over to the operating system.
While the AMI BIOS is in control, the Setup program can be activated in the way:
By pressing the <DEL> key when the following message appears briefly at the bottom of the screen during
the POST (Power On Self-Test).
26
4.1.2 Updating BIOS Setup
Creating a bootable floppy disk
A. DOS environment
Insert a 1.44 MB floppy disk into the drive.
At the DOS prompt, type:
format A : /S then press <Enter>.
B. Microsoft® Windows® environment(Microsoft® Windows® 95/98 only)
Insert a 1.44 MB floppy disk into the floppy disk drive.
From your Windows desktop, click on Start, then select My Computer.
Select the 3 1/2 Floppy Drive icon.
Click File from the menu, and then select Format. A Format 3 1/2 Floppy
Disk window appears.
If you are using WindowsTM, select "Create an MS-DOS startup disk" from the format
options field, then click Start.
Move the latest BIOS file to the bootable floppy disk.
Using "NVFLSHSC.EXE" to update the BIOS
Update the BIOS using the NVFLSHSC.EXE utility in DOS environment.
At the DOS prompt, type the command line:
NVFLSHSC <filename>
where "filename" means the latest (or original) BIOS file that you copied to the bootable
floppy disk.
The screen displays the status of the update process.
NOTICE
The BIOS information on the screen is for reference only.
What you see on your screen may not be exactly the same as shown.
CAUTION
DO NOT shutdown or reset the system while updating the BIOS! Doing
so may cause system boot failure!
When the BIOS update process is complete, the utility returns to the DOS prompt.
The AMI BIOS is immediately activated when you power on the computer every time.
The BIOS reads the system information contained in the CMOS and begins the process of
checking
out the system and configuring it. After finishing configuring the whole system, then BIOS
will continue to seek an operating system on one of the disks, launch then turn control
over to the operating system.
While the AMI BIOS is in control, the Setup program can be activated in the way:
By pressing the <DEL> key when the following message appears briefly at the bottom of
the screen during the POST (Power On Self-Test).
Press <DEL> to enter SETUP
27
4.1.3 Using Setup
In general, you use the arrow keys to highlight items, press <Enter> to select, press <Esc> to quit. The following table
provides more details about how to navigate in the Setup program using the keyboard.
Key
Function
Up Arrow(↑) Key
Move to the previous item
Down Arrow(↓) Key
Move to the next item
Left Arrow(→) Key
Move to the previous item
Right Arrow(←) Key
Move to the next item
Esc key
In the Submenu: Exit the submenu.
In the BIOS main category: Quit Without saving changes.
Enter Key
Select the item. A pop-up selection will display
on the screen to set the item value.
PgUp Key
Previous page on Scrollable menus or jump to the first
interactive item listed.
PgDn Key
Next page on Scrollable menus or jump to the last
interactive item listed
F1 Key
General Help on Setup navigation keys. Press <F1> key to pop up a small help
window that describes the appropriate keys to use and the possible selections for
the highlighted item. To exit the Help Window, press<ESC> key or <F1> key
again.
F2/F3 Key
Change colors
F7 Key
Discard changes
F8 Key
Load failsafe defaults
F9 Key
Load optimal defaults
F10 Key
Save and Exit
Home
Go to top of screen
End
Go to bottom of screen
Esc
Exit
NOTICE
The BIOS does NOT automatically save values that you have modified. If you do not save your values
before you exit the BIOS Setup Utility, all your changes will be lost.
If after making and saving system changes with the BIOS Setup Utility, you discover that your computer
is no longer able to boot, the AMI BIOS supports an override, which will reset your system to the
Failsafe defaults. If that fails, it is possible to manually clear the present CMOS information through
the "Clear CMOS Header" on the motherboard (Refer to Jumper Settings for more information).
The best advice is to ONLY alter settings which you thoroughly understand. The default settings have
been carefully chosen by AMIBIOS to provide the maximum system performance and reliability.
Even a slight change to the chipset setup may cause potential and unpredictable failure to the system.
28
4.1.4 Main Menu
This is the first screen that is displayed when you enter the BIOS Setup Utility.
Each tab lined on the top of the screen represents each different menu. The following picture shows the main menu.
Main menu shows the information of BIOS version, date and ID; processor type, speed and count; system size.
In addition, system time and date is adjustable using + / - key or number keys.
NOTICE
You can check the BMC F/W version on the post and in the BIOS setup utility
4.1.5 Advanced Menu
You can make these modifications on the advanced menu.
29
4.1.5.1
CPU Configuration Submenu
In CPU configuration, you can set up CPU frequency and enable/disable the Error Reporting. GART
error reporting should remain disabled for the normal operation.
Feature
Options
Description
GART Error Reporting
Disable
Enable
This option should remain disabled for the normal operation.
This driver developer may enable it for testing
purpose.
30
4.1.5.2
IDE Configuration Submenu
You can make the selections on IDE Configuration menu.
Feature
Options
Description
OnBoard PCI
IDE Controller
Disable
Primary
Secondary
Both
Disable: disable the integrated IDE controller
Primary: enable only the Primary IDE controller
Secondary: enable only the Secondary IDE controller
Both: enable both IDE controllers
IDE Detect
Time out (sec)
0, 5, 10, 15,
20, 25, 30,35
Select the time out value for detecting ATA/ATAPI device
ATA (PI) 80Pin
Cable Detection
Host & Device
Host
Device
Select the mechanism for detecting 80 pin cable
Configuration
nVidia RAID ROM
Disabled
Enabled
Disable/enable nVidia ROM.
31
4.1.5.3
Floppy Configuration Submenu
Feature
Options
Description
Floppy
Configuration
Disabled
5 1/2” 360 KB
5 1/2” 1.2 MB
3 1/2” 720 KB
3 1/2” 1.44 MB
3 1/2” 2.88 MB
Select Floppy A or Floppy B and then selects
floppy-diskette type installed in your system.
32
4.1.5.4
Super IO Submenu
Feature
Options
Description
OnBoard Floppy
Controller
Disabled
Enabled
Allows BIOS to Enable or Disable Floppy Controller
Serial Port1
Address
Disabled
3F8/IRQ4
3E8/IRQ4
2E8/IRQ3
Allows BIOS to Select Serial Port1 Base Addresses.
Serial Port2
Address
Disabled
2F8/IRQ3
3E8/IRQ4
2E8/IRQ3
Allows BIOS to Select Serial Port1 Base Addresses.
33
4.1.5.5
ACPI Configuration Submenu
Feature
ACPI Configuration
4.1.5.6
Options
ACPI Aware O/S
Yes/No
Description
Enable: O/S supports ACPI
Disable: O/S doesn’t support ACPI
Hyper Transport Configuration Submenu
To set up the hyper transport speed and bandwidth, you can adjust over this menu.
The incorrect manipulation will impede the system running.
34
4.1.5.7
IPMI Configuration
To set up the BMC LAN Configuration, you can adjust over this menu.
4.1.5.8
MPS Configuration Submenu
35
4.1.5.9
PCI Express Configuration Submenu
Enable/Disable PCI Express L0 and L1 link power states.
4.1.5.10
Remote Access Configuration Submenu
36
4.1.5.11
USB Configuration Submenu
Feature
Options
Description
USB Controller
Support
Disabled
USB 1.1 Only
USB 1.1+ USB 2.0
Enables USB controller
Legacy USB Support
Disabled/Enabled/
Auto
Enables support for legacy USB
Auto option disables legacy support if no
USB device connected
USB 2.0
Controller Mode
HiSpeed
FullSpeed
Configures the USB 2.0 controller in
HiSpeed(480Mbps) or FullSpeed(12Mbps).
USB Mass Storage
Device Configuration
Number of seconds POST waits for the USB
mass storage device after start unit command.
37
4.1.5.12
Onboard Device Configuration Submenu
Feature
Options
Description
SAS
Enabled
Disabled
On-board SAS controller Enabled/Disabled
IEEE 1394
Enabled
Disabled
On-board IEEE 1394 Enabled/Disabled
NIC0 PXE Setting
Enabled
Disabled
On-board NIC0 PXE Boot Enabled/Disabled
NIC1 PXE Setting
Enabled
Disabled
On-board NIC1 PXE Boot Enabled/Disabled
Audio CODEC Interface
Enabled
Disabled
On-board Audio CODEC Enabled/Disabled
38
4.1.6 PCI PnP Menu
PCI PnP Menu 1
PCI PnP Menu 2
39
Feature
Plug & Play O/S
Options
Yes
No
Description
Yes: lets the O/S configure PnP devices not
required for boot if your system has a Plug
and Play O/S
PCI Latency Timer
32, 64, 96, 128,
160, 192, 224, 248
Value in units of PCI clocks for PCI device latency
timer register
Allocate IRQ to PCI
VGA
Yes
No
Yes: Assign IRQ to PCI VGA card if card requests
IRQ
No: Doesn’t assign IRQ To PCI VGA card even if
card requests IRQ
Palette Snooping
Enabled
Disabled
Enabled: informs the PCI devices that an ISA
graphics device is installed in the system
so the card will function correctly
PCI IDE BusMaster
Enabled
Disabled
Enabled: BIOS uses PCI busmastering for
reading/writing to IDE drives
Offboard PCI/ISA IDE
card
Auto
PCI Slot1
PCI Slot2
PCI Slot3
PCI Slot4
PCI Slot5
PCI Slot6
Some PCI IDE cards may require this to be set to
the PCI slot number that is holding the card
IRQ3~IRQ15
Available
Reserved
Available: specified IRQ is available to be used by
PCI/PnP devices
Reserve: specified IRQ is reserved for use by
legacy ISA devices
DMA Channel 0, 1, 3,
5, 6, 7
Available
Reserved
Available: specified DMA is available to be used
by PCI/PnP devices
Reserve: specified DMA is reserved for use by
legacy ISA devices
Reserved Memory Size
Disabled
16K
32K
64K
Size of memory block to reserve for legacy ISA
devices
40
4.1.7 Boot Menu
Feature
Options
Description
Quick Boot
Disabled
Enabled
Allow BIOS to skip tests while booting
Quiet Boot
Disabled
Enabled
Disabled: Display normal POST messages
Enabled: Display OEM logo
Bootup Num-Lock
Off
On
Select power on state for Num-Lock
PS/2 Mouse Support
Disabled
Enabled
Select support for PS/2 mouse
Wait for “ F1 “ if error
Disabled
Enabled
Wait for F1 key to be pressed if error occurs
Interrupt 19 Capture
Disabled
Enabled
Enabled: allows option ROMs to trap interrupt 19
Boot Endless Loop
Disabled
Enabled
41
4.1.8 Security Menu
Security Menu 1: Change Supervisor
Security Menu 2: Change User
42
Security Menu 3: Boot Sector
Feature
Options
Description
Change Supervisor Password
Install or change the password
Change User Password
Install or change the password
Boot Sector Virus Protection
Disabled
Enabled
Enable/Disable boot sector virus protection
43
4.1.9 Chipset Configuration Menu
4.1.9.1
NorthBridge Chipset Configuration Submenu
44
4.1.9.2
Memory Configuration Submenu
Feature
Options
Description
Memclock Mode
Auto Limit
It can be set by the code using AUTO, or if you use
LIMIT, you can set one of the standards.
Bank Interleaving
Auto
Disabled
Interleaving allows memory accesses to be spread out
over BANKS on the same node, or across NODES,
decreasing access contention
Memory Hole
Remapping
Disabled
Enabled
Enable Software Memory Remapping Around Memory
Hole
45
4.1.9.3
ECC Configuration Submenu
Feature
Options
Description
Master
ECC Enable
Disabled
Enabled
Master ECC Enables support on all nodes for ECC
error detect and correction.
DRAM
ECC Enable
Disabled
Enabled
DRAM ECC allows hardware to report and correct
memory errors automatically maintaining system
integrity.
L2 Cache
BG Scrub
Disable
40ns
80ns
160ns
320ns
640ns
1.28us
2.56us
5.12us
10.2us
20.5us
41.0us
81.9us
163.8us
327.7us
655.4us
Allows the L2 date cache ram to be corrected
while idle.
Date Cache
BG Scrub
See above
Allows the L1 date cache ram to be corrected
while idle.
46
4.1.9.4
IOMMU Mode Submenu
Feature
Options
IOMMU Mode
AGP Present
Disabled
32MB
64MB
128MB
256MB
512MB
1GB
Description
Set GART size in systems without AGP, or disable
altogether. Some OSes require valid GART for
proper operation. If AGP is present, select
appropriate option to ensure proper AGP operation.
47
4.1.10 Power Menu
The Power menu items allow you to change the power management settings.
Select an item then press Enter to display the configuration options.
Feature
Options
Description
Power Management/APM
Disabled
Enabled
Enable or disable APM
LAN & PME Resume
Disabled
Enabled
RTC Resume
Disabled
Enabled
Restore on AC/Power
Loss
Power Off
Power On
Last State
Enabled or disabled Internal 802.3 MAC to
generate P.M.E in SoftOFF.
Disabled/Enabled RTC event to wake after a
power failure
Power Off
Power On
Last State
48
4.1.11 Exit Menu
Feature
Description
Save Changes and Exit
Exit system setup after saving the changes
F10 key can be used for this operation
Discard Changes and Exit
Exit system setup without saving the changes
ESC key can be used for this operation
Discard Changes
Discard changes done so far to any of the setup question
F7 key can be used for this operation
Load Optimal Defaults
Load optimal default values for all the setup questions
F9 key can be used for this operation
Load Failsafe Defaults
Load Failsafe default values for all the setup questions
F8 key can be used for this operation
49
4.2
Jumper Setting
This section covers the jumper setting. Refer to the following illustration for the location of the jumpers.
① PCI-X Speed CHB(J22)
② PCI-X Speed CHA(J26)
③ VGA Enable / Disable(J18)
④ Clear CMOS(JP1)
⑤ External SAS Enable / Disable(JP2)
50
4.2.1 PCI-X Speed Setting(J22, J26)
PCI-X speed can be selected by the switch. Please follow the below instruction.
133
100
66
1
OFF
ON
OFF
2
OFF
OFF
ON
1 Off: 2 Off - 133MHz
1 On: 2 Off - 100MHz
1 Off: 2 On - 66MHz
51
4.2.2 VGA Enable / Disable(J18)
This header lets you set your VGA port function. You can choose enable or disable this function or not.
Onboard
VGA can be disabled by setting this jumper on.
4.2.3
ON
OFF
Disable
Enable(default)
Clear CMOS Header
The onboard button cell battery powers the CMOS RAM. It contains all the BIOS setup information.
Normally, it
is necessary to keep the jumper connected to pin1 and pin2 (Default) to retain the RTC data as shown below.
1-2
2-3
Clear CMOS
Normal(default)
Follow these instructions to clear the CMOS RTC data:
①
AC off.
②
Short pin2 and pin3 with a jumper for a few seconds.
③
Replace the jumper on pin1 and pin2.
④
Turn on your computer by pressing the power-on button.
⑤
Hold down <Delete> during boot and select either the <Load Optimal Defaults> or <Load Failsafe
Defaults> option in the selection "Exit".
Then re-enter BIOS setup to re-enter user preferences.
52
4.2.4 External SAS Port Enable/Disable(JP2)
This header lets you set your External SAS port Enable/Disable function. You can choose enable or disable this
function or not.
ON
OFF
Disable
Enable
4.2.5 Geographical ID Setting
ID switch is used to decide identification, CPU number and type of server.
ServerDome is monitoring on the basis of identification, CPU number and type of server.
CAUTION
You have to install the ID switch before BMC F/W update.
ID Assignment
This sets up identification information of server.
ID
Binary
0
Switches(B)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
00000000
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
10
00001010
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
124
01111100
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
53
CPU Assignment
This sets up CPU number of server.
ID
Description
Binary
1
1-way
2
Switches(A)
1
2
00
OFF
OFF
2-way
01
ON
OFF
3
3-way
10
OFF
ON
4
4-way
11
ON
ON
Server Type Assignment
This sets up server type.
Type
Description
Binary
1U
2way passive
3U
3U
Switches(A)
3
4
00
OFF
OFF
2way Active/4way
01
ON
OFF
Only 2way Passive
10
OFF
ON
54
4.2.6 Cable Connection on the SAS BP
Connector J4, J5 are used to connect SAS cable to each SAS HDD.
Connector J8 is used to connect SAS Controller and Enclosure monitoring chip.
Connector
Description
J4
SAS Port 0
J5
SAS Port 1
J8
Enclosure monitoring connection
4.2.7 Jumper Setting on the SAS BP
Jumper J10, J11 are used to decide which enclosure monitoring controller will use in system.
Default setting is “1-2” for J10 and “1-3, 2-4” for J11 on-board SATA controller. If you want to use add-on another
SATA controller supporting SES(I2C) interface, you have to set the jumper to “2-3” for J10 and “3-5, 4-6” for J11.
Jumper
SGPIO
SES(I2C)
J10
1-2
2-3
1-3
3-5
2-4
4-6
J11
4.2.8 Jumper Setting on the SATA BP
Jumper is used to decide which controller we will use in system.
Default setting is "ON" for on-board SATA controller. If you want to use add-on SATA controller, you also have to
set the switch to "ON" like below picture.
Default Setting is "ON"
55
5.
5.1
Software & Utilities
NVRAID
5.1.1 Basic Configuration Instruction
The following are the basic steps for configuring NVRAID
5.1.1.1
Non-Bootable RAID Array
① Choose the hard disks that are to be RAID enabled in the system BIOS.
② Specify the RAID level, either Mirroring (RAID 1), Striping (RAID 0), Striping and
Mirroring (RAID 0+1), or Spanning (JBOD) and create the desired RAID array.
③ Install the operating system on one hard disk, then reboot the system.
④ Run the Windows nForce Setup application and install the RAID driver.
⑤ Initialize the NVRAID Array.
5.1.1.2
Bootable RAID Array
① Choose the hard disks that are to be RAID enabled in the system BIOS.
② Specify the RAID level, either Mirroring (RAID 1), Striping (RAID 0), Striping and
Mirroring (RAID 0+1), or Spanning (JBOD) and create the desired RAID array.
③ Boot from the Windows CD, then press F6 when the Windows Setup appears.
④ Initialize the NVRAID Array.
⑤ Initialize the NVRAID Array.
56
5.1.2 Setting up the BIOS
①
Start your computer, then press Delete to enter the BIOS setup.
Use the arrow keys to select Integrated Peripherals, then press Enter.
②
Use the arrow keys to select the RAID Config(see the picture), then press Enter.
③
From the RAID Config window, "enable" the RAID Enable, the other items would be light, then
you can enable the disk that you want to use as RAID disks.
④ Press F10 to save the configuration and exit.
57
5.1.3 Entering the RAID BIOS Setup Basic Configuration Instruction
① After rebooting your system, wait until you see the RAID software prompting you to press F10.
The RAID prompt appears as part of the system POST and boot process prior to loading the OS.
② Press <N>, and the NVIDIA RAID Utility-Define a New Array window will appears(See the picture).
The default RAID Mode is set to Mirroring and Striping Block is set to Optimal.
5.1.3.1
Understanding the Define a New Array Window
Use the Define a New Array window to
z
Select the RAID Mode
z
Set up the Striping Block
z
Specify which disks to use for the RAID Array
Depending on the platform used, the system can have one or more channels.
In a typical system there is usually one controller and multiple channels, and each channel
has a slave and a master.
The channel/controller/master/slave status of each hard disk is given in the Loc(location)
columns of the Free Disks and Array Disks lists.
1.0.M
M : Master
S : Slave
0 : Channel
Adapter - adapter 0 is used for PATA drives
1 and above is used for SATA drives.
58
In upper picture 1.0.M means the hard drive is attached to Adapter 1, Channel 0, and the drive is set
to Master. The following is a list of all possible combinations:
Serial ATA
1.0.M
Adapter 1, Channel 0, Master
1.1.M
Adapter 1, Channel 1, Master
1.2.M
Adapter 1, Channel 2, Master
1.3.M
Adapter 1, Channel 3, Master
2.1.M
Adapter 2, Channel 1, Master
2.2.M
Adapter 2, Channel 2, Master
NOTICE
There is no such thing as Slave drive in Serial ATA. All drives are considered to be Master since
there is a one to one connection between the drive and the controller.
5.1.3.2
Using the Define a New Array Window
If necessary, press the tab key to move from field to field until the appropriate field is highlighted.
Selecting the RAID Mode
By default, this is set to mirroring. To change to a different RAID mode, press the down arrow key
until the mode that you want appears in the RAID mode box-either mirroring, striping, spanning, or
stripe mirroring.
Selecting the Striping Block Size
Striping block size is given in kilobytes, and affects how data is arranged on the disk. It is
recommended to leave this value at the default Optimal, which is 32KB, but the values can be between 4
KB and 128 KB.
Assigning the Disks
The disks that you enabled from the RAID Config BIOS setup page appear in the Free Disks block.
These are the drives that are available for use as RAID array disks.
To designate a free disk to be used as a RAID array disk,
① Tab to the Free Disks section. The first disk in the list is selected
② Move it from the Free Disks block to the Array Disks block by pressing the right arrow key(→).
The first disk in the list is moved, and the next disk in the list is selected and ready to be moved.
③ Continue pressing the right-arrow key (→) until all the disks that you want to use as RAID array
disks appear in the Array Disks block.
59
The below picture illustrates the Define a New Array window after two disks have been assigned as
RAID1 array disks.
NVIDIA RAID Utility – Array Disks
5.1.3.3
Completing the RAID BIOS Setup
① After assigning your RAID array disks, press F7.
The Clear disk data prompt appears.
60
② Press Y to clear all drive data.
The Array List screen appears, where you can review the RAID arrays that you have set up.
③ Use the arrow keys to select the array that you want to set up, and then press Enter.
The Array Detail screen appears.
The Array Detail screen shows information about the array that you selected, such as Striping Block
used, RAID Mode, Striping Width, Disk Model Name, and disk capacity.
④ If you want to mark this disk as empty and wipe out all its contents then press C.
⑤ At the prompt, press Y to wipe out all the data, otherwise press N.
⑥ Press Enter again to go back to the previous window and then press F10 to exit the RAID setup.
61
5.1.4 NVIDIA RAID Utility installation
5.1.4.1
Installing the NVIDIA RAID Software Under Windows (For Non-bootable
RAID Array)
This section describes how to setup the application and install the RAID software which will upgrade
the Windows IDE driver and install the RAID driver.
① Start the nForce Setup program to open the NVIDIA Windows nForce Drivers page.
② Select the modules that you want to install. Select the relative options that you have configured.
③ Click Next and then follow the instructions.
④ After the installation is completed, be sure to reboot the system.
⑤ After the reboot. Initialize the newly created array.
62
5.1.4.2
①
Installing the RAID Driver (For bootable RAID Array)
After you complete the RAID BIOS setup, boot from the Windows CD, and the Windows Setup
program starts.
②
Press F6 and wait for the Windows Setup screen to appear.
③ Specify the NVIDIA drivers:
a.
Insert the floppy that has the RAID driver, press S, then press Enter.
The Windows Setup screen appears as below:
b.
Select "NVIDIA RAID CLASS DIRVER" and then press Enter
c.
Press S again at the Specify Devices screen, then press Enter.
d.
Select " NVIDIA nForce Storage Controller" and then press Enter.
e.
The following Windows Setup screen appears listing both drivers:
63
④ Press Enter to continue with operating system Installation, Be sure to copy the files from the floppy
is complete, then take out the floppy.
⑤ Following the instructions on how to install operating system, During the GUI portion of the
installation you might be prompted to click Yes to install the RAID driver. Click Yes as many times
as needed in order to finish the installation.
This will not be an issue with a signed driver.
NOTICE
Each time you add a new hard drive to a RAID array, the RAID driver will have to be installed under
Windows once for that hard drive. After that, the driver will not have to be installed.
64
5.2
LSILogic SAS RAID(Optional)
This chapter provides information how to configure and use the components of the LSI Logic Integrated RAID
(IR) software with LSI SAS 1068/1068E controllers.
z
You may need to run the SAS BIOS setup utility when:
z
You want to change the default SAS controller settings for customized features.
z
You intend to manage any of the attached SAS devices.
5.2.1 Introduction to Integrated RAID
This section provides an overview of the LSI Logic Integrated RAID solution for LSI Logic SAS controllers, its
features, and its benefits.
The LSI Logic Integrated RAID solution provides cost benefits for the server or workstation market where the
extra performance, storage capacity, and/or redundancy of a RAID configuration are required.
z
Integrated Mirroring (IM), which provides features of RAID 1 and RAID 1E (RAID 1 Enhanced).
RAID 1E is also called Integrated Mirroring Enhanced (IME).
z
Integrated Striping (IS), which provides features of RAID 0.
By simplifying the IM and IS configuration options and by providing firmware support in its host adapters, LSI
Logic can offer the Integrated RAID solution at a lower cost than a hardware RAID implementation.
Fusion-MPT™ firmware supports IM and IS volumes. You can configure IM and IS volumes together on the same
LSI Logic SAS controller.
Integrated RAID Benefits and Features
z
Low cost RAID volume creation meets the needs of most internal RAID installations
z
Easy to use - installation and configuration are not complex
z
System can boot from an IM, IME, or IS volume
z
No special OS-specific software required
z
High reliability and data integrity
- Non-volatile write journaling
- Physical disks not visible to OS or to application software
z
Low host CPU and PCI bus utilization
z
Fusion-MPT architecture provides processing power
- Shared memory architecture minimizes external memory requests
- Functionality is contained in device hardware and firmware
65
5.2.2 Integrated Mirroring Overview
This section provides an overview of the LSI Logic Integrated Mirroring (IM) feature.
5.2.2.1
Introduction
As a result of the shift towards Network Attached Storage (NAS), ISPs need a cost effective, faulttolerant solution to protect the operating systems on small form factor, high-density, rack-mountable
servers. The LSI Logic Integrated Mirroring (IM) feature—which includes Integrated Mirroring Enhanced
(IME)— provide data protection for the system boot volume to safeguard critical information such as the
operating system on servers and high performance workstations. The Integrated Mirroring feature gives
customers a robust, high-performance, fault-tolerant solution to their storage needs, at a lower cost than
a dedicated RAID controller.
The Integrated Mirroring feature supports simultaneous mirrored volumes with two disks (IM) or three to
eight disks (IME), to provide fault-tolerant protection for critical data. (If a hot spare disk is used, the
maximum volume size is seven mirrored disks, plus the hot spare disk.) Up to two IM volumes are
supported per SAS controller, with up to ten drives total per controller.
If a disk in an Integrated Mirroring volume fails, the hot swap capability allows the volume to be easily
restored by simply swapping disks. The firmware then automatically re-mirrors the swapped disk.
Additionally, each SAS controller can have one global hot spare disk available to automatically replace a
failed disk in the one or two IM or IME volumes configured on the controller. The hot spare makes the
Integrated Mirroring volume even more fault-tolerant.
Note
You can configure an Integrated Mirroring volume and an Integrated Striping volume on
the same LSI Logic SAS controller
The IM feature uses the same device drivers as the standard LSI Logic Fusion-MPT based controllers,
providing seamless and transparent fault tolerance. This eliminates the need for complex backup software
or expensive RAID hardware. The IM feature operates independently from the operating system, in order
to conserve system resources. The BIOS based configuration utility makes it easy to configure IM and
IME volumes.
The Integrated Mirroring feature is currently available as an optional component of the Fusion-MPT
architecture on LSI Logic controller products.
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5.2.2.2
IM Features
LSI Logic Integrated Mirroring and Integrated Mirroring Enhanced support the following features:
z
Configurations of one or two IM or IME volumes on the same LSI Logic SAS controller. Each volume
can consist of two mirrored disks (IM) or three to eight mirrored disks (IME).
z
(Optional) One global hot spare disk per controller. If a global hot spare disk is defined, the upper
limit for an IME volume is seven mirrored disks.
z
Mirrored volumes run in optimal mode or in degraded mode (if one mirrored disk fails).
z
Hot swap capability.
z
Presents a single virtual drive to the OS for each IM/IME volume.
z
Supports both SAS and SATA disks, although the two types of disks cannot be combined on the
same LSI Logic SAS controller.
z
Fusion-MPT architecture.
z
Easy-to-use BIOS-based configuration utility (and DOS-based configuration utility for manufacturing
use only).
z
Error notification: OS-specific event log updated by drivers and errors displayed inside the FusionMPT BIOS.
z
SES status LED support for Integrated Mirroring disks.
z
Write journaling, which allows automatic synchronization of potentially inconsistent data after
unexpected power-down situations.
z
Metadata used to store volume configuration on mirrored disks.
z
Automatic background resynchronization while host I/Os continue.
z
Background media verification ensures that data on the IM volume is accessible.
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5.2.2.3
IM/IME Description
The LSI Logic Integrated Mirroring (IM) feature supports one or two mirrored volumes on each LSI Logic
SAS controller (or one mirrored volume and one Integrated Striping volume). Typically, one of these volumes
is the boot volume, as shown in Figure. This is accomplished through the firmware of the LSI Logic SAS
controller that supports the standard Fusion-MPT interface. The runtime mirroring of the boot disk is transparent
to the BIOS, drivers, and operating system.
Host-based status software monitors the state of the mirrored disks and reports any error conditions.
In Figure, the system is configured with a second disk as a mirror of the first (primary) disk.
The advantage of Integrated Mirroring (RAID 1) is that there is always a mirrored copy of the data. The
disadvantage is that writes take longer because data must be written twice. On the other hand,
performance is actually improved during reads. Figure shows the logical view and physical view of an
Integrated Mirroring configuration with two disks in the mirrored volume.
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An IME volume can be configured with up to eight mirrored disks, or seven mirrored disks and a global hot
spare. Figure shows the logical view and physical view of an Integrated Mirroring Enhanced (IME) volume
with three mirrored disks. Each mirrored stripe is written to a disk and mirrored to an adjacent disk. This
type of configuration is also called RAID 1E.
LSI Logic provides the BIOS-based configuration utility to enable the user to create IM and IME volumes
during initial setup and to reconfigure them in response to hardware failures or changes in the environment.
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5.2.2.4
Integrated Mirroring Firmware
This section describes features of the LSI Logic Integrated Mirroring (IM) firmware, which supports up to
two IM volumes per LSI Logic SAS controller.
5.2.2.4.1
Host Interface
The IM host interface uses the Message Passing Interface, as described in the Fusion-MPT Message
Passing Interface Specification. Through the Fusion-MPT interface, the host OS has access to the IM
volume as well as the physical disks.
5.2.2.4.2
Resynchronization with Concurrent Host I/O Operation
The IM firmware allows Host I/Os to continue on the IM/IME volume while the volume is being resynchronized in the background. Resynchronization is attempted after a hot spare is activated due to a
physical device failure, or after a hot swap has occurred to a physical disk in the IM or IME volume.
5.2.2.4.3
Metadata Support
The firmware supports metadata, which describes the IM/IME logical drive configuration stored on each
member disk. When the firmware is initialized, each member disk is queried to read the stored metadata in
order to verify the configuration. The usable disk space for each member disk is adjusted down to leave
room for this data.
5.2.2.4.4
Hot Swapping
The IM firmware supports hot swapping. The hot-swapped disk is automatically resynchronized in the
background, without any host or user intervention. The firmware detects hot swap removal and disk
insertion.
Following a hot swap event, the firmware readies the new physical disk by spinning it up and verifying that
it has enough capacity for the mirrored volume. The IM firmware resynchronizes all hot-swapped disks that
have been removed, even if the same disk is re-inserted. In a two-disk mirrored volume, the IM firmware
marks the hot-swapped disk as the secondary disk and marks the other mirrored disk as the primary disk.
The firmware resynchronizes all data from the primary disk onto the new secondary disk.
5.2.2.4.5
SMART Support
The IM firmware enables Mode 6 SMART on the member disks in the mirrored volume. Mode 6 SMART
requires each physical disk to be polled at regular intervals. If a SMART ASC/ASCQ code is detected on a
physical disk in the volume, the firmware processes the SMART data, and the last received SMART
ASC/ASCQ is stored in non-volatile memory. The IM/IME volume does not support SMART directly, since it
is just a logical representation of the physical disks in the volume.
5.2.2.4.6
Hot Spare Disk
One disk can be configured as a global hot spare disk, which protects data on the one or two volumes
configured on the controller. If the IM firmware fails one of the mirrored disks, the firmware automatically
replaces it with the hot spare disk. The IM firmware then resynchronizes the mirrored data. The IM
firmware is automatically notified when the failed disk has been replaced, and the firmware then
designates that disk as the new hot spare.
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5.2.2.4.7
Media Verification
The IM firmware supports a background media verification feature that runs at regular intervals when the
IM/IME volume is in optimal mode. If the verification command fails for any reason, the other disk’s data
for this segment is read and written to the failing disk in an attempt to refresh the data. The current Media
Verification Logical Block Address is written to non-volatile memory occasionally to allow Media Verification
to continue approximately where it left off prior to a power-cycle.
5.2.2.4.8
Disk Write Caching
The IM firmware disables disk write caching by default. This is done to increase data integrity, so that the
disk write log stored in NVSRAM is always valid. If disk write caching were enabled (not recommended),
the disk write log could be invalid.
5.2.2.4.9
NVSRAM Usage
For the LSISAS1064/1064E and LSISAS1068/1068E controllers, the IM firmware requires at least a 32K
NVSRAM in order to perform write journaling. Write journaling is used to verify that the mirrored disks in
the IM/IME volume are synchronized with each other.
5.2.2.5
Fusion-MPT Support
The BIOS uses the LSI Logic Fusion-MPT interface to communicate to the SAS controller and firmware to
enable Integrated Mirroring. This includes reading the Fusion-MPT configuration to gain access to the
parameters that are used to define behavior between the SAS controller and the devices connected to it.
The Fusion-MPT drivers for all supported operating systems implement the Fusion-MPT interface to
communicate with the controller and firmware.
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5.2.3 Creating Integrated Mirroring Volumes
This section describes how to create Integrated Mirroring (IM) and Integrated Mirroring Enhanced (IME)
volumes using the LSI Logic SAS BIOS Configuration Utility (SAS BIOS CU).
5.2.3.1
IM Configuration Overview
You can use the SAS BIOS CU to create one or two IM or IME volumes on each LSI Logic SAS controller,
with an optional global hot spare disk. All disks in an IM or IME volume must be connected to the same
LSI Logic SAS controller.
Although you can use disks of different size in IM and IME volumes, the smallest disk determines the
“logical” size of each disk in the volume. In other words, the excess space of the larger member disk is not
used.
Refer to Section 2.2, “IM Features,” for more information about Integrated Mirroring volumes.
5.2.3.2
Creating IM and IME Volumes
The SAS BIOS CU is part of the Fusion-MPT BIOS. When the BIOS loads during boot and you see the
message about the LSI Logic Configuration Utility, press Ctrl-C to start the CU. After you do this, the
message changes to:
Please wait, invoking SAS Configuration Utility...
After a brief pause, the main menu of the SAS BIOS CU appears. On some systems, however, the following
message appears next:
LSI Logic Configuration Utility will load following initialization!
In this case, the SAS BIOS CU will load after the system has completed its power-on self test.
You can configure one or two IM or IME volumes per Fusion-MPT controller. You can also combine IM, IME,
and Integrated Striping volumes on the same controller, up to a maximum of 10 physical disk drives.
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The following guidelines also apply when creating an IM or IME volume:
z
All physical disks in the volumes must be either SATA (with extended command set support) or
SAS (with SMART support). SAS and SATA disks cannot be combined in the same volume.
z
Disks must have 512-byte blocks and must not have removable media.
z
An IM volume must have two drives, plus an optional global hot spare. An IME volume. An IME
volume can have three to eight drives, or three to seven drives if you also create a global hot
spare.
Note
If a disk in an IM or IME volume fails, it is rebuilt on the global hot spare if one is available.
So adding a global hot spare greatly increases the level of data protection. (One global hot spare
is allowed for the one or two volumes configured on a controller.)
5.2.3.2.1
Creating a Second IM and IME Volume
Follow these steps to create an IM volume with the SAS BIOS CU:
① On the Adapter screen, use the arrow keys to select an LSI Logic SAS adapter.
② Press Enter to go to the Adapter Properties screen, shown in below Figure.
③ On the Adapter Properties screen, use the arrow keys to select RAID Properties on the screen and
press Enter.
④ When you are prompted to select a volume type, select Create IM Volume. The Create New Array
screen shows a list of disks that can be added to a volume.
⑤ Move the cursor to the “RAID Disk” column and select a disk. To add the disk to the volume, change
the “No” to “Yes” by pressing the + key, . key, or space bar. When the first disk is added, the SAS
BIOS CU prompts you to either keep existing data or overwrite existing data.
⑥ Press M to keep the existing data on the first disk or press D to overwrite it. If you keep the existing
data, this is called a migration. The first disk will be mirrored onto the second disk, so the data you
want to keep must be on the first disk added to the volume. Any data on the second disk is
overwritten. As disks are added the Array Size field changes to reflect the size of the new volume.
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⑦ (Optional) Add a global hot spare by moving the cursor to the hot spare column and pressing the +
key, . key, or space bar.
⑧ When the volume has been fully configured, press C and then select Save changes then exit this
menu to commit the changes. The SAS BIOS CU pauses while the array is being created.
5.2.3.2.2
Managing Hot Spares
Follow these steps to create an IME volume with the SAS BIOS CU:
① On the Adapter List screen, use the arrow keys to select an LSI Logic SAS adapter.
② Press Enter to go to the Adapter Properties screen, shown in Figure.
③ On the Adapter Properties screen, use the arrow keys to select RAID Properties on the screen and press Enter.
④ When you are prompted to select a volume type, select Create IME Volume. The Create New Array
screen shows a list of disks that can be added to a volume.
⑤ Move the cursor to the “RAID Disk” column and select a disk. To add the disk to the volume, change
the “No” to “Yes” by pressing the + key, . key, or space bar.
⑥ Repeat this step to select a total of three to eight disks for the volume (or three to seven disks if you
will create a global hot spare). All existing data on all the disks you select will be overwritten. As you
add disks, the Array Size field changes to reflect the size of the new volume.
⑦ (Optional) Add a global hot spare to the volume by moving the cursor to the hot spare column and
pressing the + key, . key, or space bar.
⑧ When the volume has been fully configured, press C and then select Save changes then exit this menu
to commit the changes. The SAS BIOS CU pauses while the array is being created.
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5.2.3.2.3
Creating s Second IM or IME Volume
The LSI Logic SAS controllers allow you to configure two IM or IME volumes. If one volume is already
configured, and if there are available disk drives, there are two ways to add a second volume.
The first is as follows:
① In the configuration utility, select an adapter from the Adapter List. Select the RAID Properties
option. This will display the current volume
② Press C to create a new volume.
③ Continue with step 4 of the IM or IME creation procedure in the previous section to create a
second volume.
The other way in which to add a second volume is as follows:
① On the Adapter List screen, use the arrow keys to select an LSI Logic SAS adapter.
② Press Enter to go to the Adapter Properties screen, shown in Figure.
③ On the Adapter Properties screen, use the arrow keys to select RAID Properties and press Enter.
④ with step 4 of the IM or IME creation procedure in the previous section to create a second volume.
5.2.3.2.4
Managing Hot Spares
You can create one global hot spare disk to protect the one or two IM/IME volumes defined on a SAS controller.
Usually, you create the global hot spare at the same time you create the IM/IME volume.
Follow these steps to add a global hot spare disk later for the existing IM/IME volumes on the controller:
① On the View Array screen, select Manage Array.
② Select Manage Hot Spare on the Manage Array screen, shown in below Figure.
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③ Select a disk from the list by pressing the + key, . key, or space bar.
④ After you select the global hot spare disk, press C. An error message appears if the selected disk is not
at least as large as the smallest disk used in the IM/IME volume(s). The global hot spare disk must have
512-byte blocks, it cannot have removable media, and the disk type must be either SATA with extended
command set support or SAS with SMART support. If SATA disks are used for the IM/IME volume(s),
the hot spare disk must also be a SATA disk. If SAS disks are used, the hot spare disk must also be a
SAS disk. An error message appears if the selected disk is not the same type as the disks used in the
IM/IME volumes.
⑤ Select Save changes then exit this menu to commit the changes. The configuration utility will pause
while the global hot spare is being added.
Follow these steps to delete a global hot spare:
① Select Manage Hot Spare on the Manage Array screen.
② Select Delete Hot Spare and then press C.
③ Select Save changes then exit this menu to commit the changes. The configuration utility will pause
while the global hot spare is being removed.
5.2.3.5
Other Configuration Tasks
This section explains how to do other tasks related to configuring and maintaining IM and IME volumes.
5.2.3.5.1
Viewing Volume Properties
Follow these steps to view the properties of volumes:
① In the SAS BIOS CU, select an adapter from the Adapter List. Select the RAID Properties option.
The properties of the current volume are displayed. If a global hot spare is defined, it is also listed.
Note
If you create one volume using SAS disks, another volume using SATA disks, and a global hot spare disk,
the hot spare disk will only appear when you view the volume that has the same type of disks as the hot
spare disk.
② If two volumes are configured, press Alt+N to view the other array.
③ To manage the current array, select the Manage Array item and press Enter.
5.2.3.5.2
Synchronizing an Array
The Synchronize Array command forces the firmware to resynchronize the data on the mirrored disks is
the array. It is seldom necessary to use this command, because the firmware automatically keeps the
mirrored data synchronized during normal system operation. When you use this command, one disk of the
array is placed in the Degraded state until the data on the mirrored disks has been resynchronized.
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Follow these steps to force the synchronization of a selected array:
① Select Synchronize Array on the Manage Array screen.
② Press Y to start the synchronization, or N to cancel it.
5.2.3.5.3
Activating an Array
An array can become inactive if, for example, it is removed from one controller or computer and moved to
another one. The “Activate Array” option allows you to reactivate an inactive array that has been added to
a system. This option is only available when the selected array is currently inactive.
Follow these steps to activate a selected array
① Select Activate Array on the Manage Array screen.
② Press Y to proceed with the activation, or press N to abandon it. After a pause, the array will become active.
Note
If there is a global hot spare disk on the controller to which you have moved the array, the firmware
checks when you activate the array to determine if the hot spare is compatible with the new array. An
error message appears if the disks in the activated array are larger than the hot spare disk or if the
disks in the activated array are not the same type as the hot spare disk (SATA versus SAS).
5.2.3.5.4
Deleting an Array
CAUTION
Before deleting an array, be sure to back up all data on the array that you want to keep.
Follow these steps to delete a selected array:
① Select Delete Array on the Manage Array screen.
② Press Y to delete the array.
After a pause, the firmware deletes the array. If there is another remaining array and a global hot
spare disk, the firmware checks the hot spare disk to determine if it is compatible with the remaining
array. If the hot spare disk is not compatible (too small or wrong disk type) the firmware deletes it also.
Note
After a volume has been deleted, it cannot be recovered. When a RAID 1 volume is deleted, the data
is preserved on the primary disk. The master boot records (MBR) of other disks in the array are
deleted. For other RAID types, the master boot records of all disks are deleted.
5.2.3.5.5
Locating a Disk Drive, or Multiple Disk Drives in a Volume
You can use the SAS BIOS CU to locate and identify a specific physical disk drive by flashing the drive’s
LED. You can also use the SAS BIOS CU to flash the LEDs of all the disk drives in a RAID volume. There
are several ways to do this:
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z
When you are creating an IM or IME volume, and a disk drive is set to Yes as part of the volume, the
LED on the disk drive is flashing. The LED is turned off when you have finished creating the volume.
z
You can locate individual disk drives from the SAS Topology screen. To do this, move the cursor to the
name of the disk in the Device Identifier column and press Enter. The LED on the disk flashes until the
next key is pressed.
z
You can locate all the disk drives in a volume by selecting the volume on the RAID Properties screen.
The LEDs flash on all disk drives in the volume.
Note
The LEDs on the disk drives will flash as described above if the firmware is correctly configured and
the drives or the disk enclosure supports disk location.
5.2.3.5.6
Selecting a Boot Disk
You can select a boot disk in the SAS Topology screen. This disk is then moved to scan ID 0 on the next
boot, and remains at this position. This makes it easier to set BIOS boot device options and to keep the
boot device constant during device additions and removals. There can be only one boot disk.
Follow these steps to select a boot disk:
① In the SAS BIOS CU, select an adapter from the Adapter List.
② Select the SAS Topology option.
The current topology is displayed. If the selection of a boot device is supported, the bottom of the
screen lists the Alt+B option. This is the key for toggling the boot device. If a device is currently
configured as the boot device, the Device Info column on the SAS Topology screen will show the word
“Boot.”
③ To select a boot disk, move the cursor to the disk and press Alt+B.
④ To remove the boot designator, move the cursor down to the current boot disk and press Alt+B. This
controller will no longer have a disk designated as boot.
⑤ To change the boot disk, move the cursor to the new boot disk and press Alt+B. The boot designator
will move to this disk.
Note
The firmware must be configured correctly in order for the Alt+B feature to work.
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5.2.4 Integrated Striping Overview
This section provides an overview of the LSI Logic Integrated Striping (IS) feature.
5.2.4.1
Introduction
The LSI Logic Integrated Striping (IS) feature is useful for applications that require the faster performance
and increased storage capacity of striping. The low-cost IS feature has many of the advantages of a more
expensive RAID striping solution. A single IS logical drive may be configured as the boot disk or as a data
disk.
The IS feature is implemented with controller firmware that supports the Fusion-MPT Interface. IS
provides better performance and more capacity than individual disks, without burdening the host CPU. The
firmware splits host I/Os over multiple disks and presents the disks as a single logical drive. In general,
striping is transparent to the BIOS, the drivers, and the operating system.
The SAS BIOS CU is used to configure IS volumes, which can consist of two to eight disks.
Note
Integrated Mirroring and Integrated Striping volumes can be configured on the same LSI logic SAS
controller.
5.2.4.2
IS Features
Integrated Striping supports the following features:
z
Support for volumes with two to eight drives
z
Support for two IS volumes, with up to 10 drives total, on a controller. An IS volume can also be
combined with an IM or IME volume.
Note
Currently available LSI Logic SAS controllers support a maximum of eight drives.
All drives in a volume must be connected to the same SAS controller.
z
Presents a single virtual drive to the OS for each configured volume
z
Support for both SAS and SATA drives, although the two types of drives cannot be combined in
one volume
z
Fusion-MPT architecture
z
Easy-to-use SAS BIOS configuration utility
z
Error notification
z
Use of metadata to store volume configuration on disks
z
OS-specific event log
z
Error display inside the Fusion-MPT BIOS
z
SES status LED support for drives used in IS volumes
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5.2.4.3
IS Description
The IS feature writes data across multiple disks instead of onto one disk. This is accomplished by
partitioning each disk’s storage space into 64 Kbyte stripes. These stripes are interleaved round-robin, so
that the combined storage space is composed alternately of stripes from each disk.
For example, as shown in Figure, segment 1 is written to disk 1, segment 2 is written to disk 2, segment 3
is written to disk 3, and so on. When the system reaches the end of the disk list, it continues writing data
at the next available segment of disk
Below Figure shows a logical view and a physical view of Integrated Striping configuration.
The primary advantage of IS is speed, because it transfers data to or from multiple disks at once. However,
there is no data redundancy; therefore, if one disk fails, that data is lost.
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5.2.4.4
Integrated Striping Firmware
This section describes features of the LSI Logic Integrated Striping (IS) firmware.
5.2.4.4.1
Host Interface
The IS host interface uses the Message Passing Interface, as described in the Fusion-MPT Message Passing
Interface Specification, including Integrated Striping. Through the Fusion-MPT interface, the host operating
system has access to the logical IS drive as well as the physical disks.
5.2.4.4.2
Metadata Support
The firmware supports metadata, which describes the IS logical drive configuration stored on each
member disk. When the firmware is initialized, each member disk is queried to read the stored metadata
to verify the configuration. The usable disk space for each IS member disk is adjusted down to leave room
for this data.
5.2.4.4.3
SMART Support
The IS firmware enables Mode 6 SMART on the IS member disks. Mode 6 SMART requires each physical
disk to be polled at regular intervals. If a SMART ASC/ASCQ code is detected on a physical IS disk, the
firmware processes the SMART data, and the last received SMART ASC/ASCQ is stored in non-volatile
memory. The IS volume does not support SMART directly, since it is just a logical representation of the
physical disks in the volume.
5.2.4.4.4
Disk Write Caching
Disk write caching is disabled by default on all IS volumes.
5.2.4.5
Fusion-MPT Support
The BIOS uses the LSI Logic Fusion-MPT interface to communicate to the SAS controller and firmware to
enable Integrated Striping. This includes reading the Fusion-MPT configuration to gain access to the
parameters that are used to define behavior between the SAS controller and the devices connected to it.
The Fusion-MPT drivers for all supported operating systems implement the Fusion-MPT interface to
communicate with the controller and firmware.
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5.2.5 Creating Integrated Striping Volumes
This section describes how to create Integrated Striping (IS) volumes using the LSI Logic SAS BIOS
Configuration Utility (SAS BIOS CU).
5.2.5.1
Configuration Overview
You can use the SAS BIOS CU to create multiple IS volumes, with up to 10 drives total on an LSI Logic SAS
controller. Each volume can have from 2 to 8 drives. Disks in an IS volume must be connected to the same
LSI Logic SAS controller, and the controller must be in the BIOS boot order.
Although you can use disks of different size in IS volumes, the smallest disk determines the “logical” size of
each disk in the volume. In other words, the excess space of the larger member disk is not used. Usable
disk space for each disk in an IS volume is adjusted down to leave room for metadata. Usable disk space
may be further reduced to maximize the ability to interchange disks in the same size classification. The
supported stripe size is 64 Kbytes.
Refer to Section 4.2, “IS Features,” for more information about Integrated Striping volumes.
5.2.5.2
Creating IS Volumes
The SAS BIOS CU is part of the Fusion-MPT BIOS. When the BIOS loads during boot and you see the
message about the Setup Utility, press Ctrl-C to start it. After you do this, the message changes to:
Please wait, invoking SAS Configuration Utility...
After a brief pause, the main menu of the SAS BIOS CU appears. On some systems, however, the following
message appears next:
LSI Logic Configuration Utility will load following initialization!
In this case, the SAS BIOS CU will load after the system has completed its power-on self test.
Follow the steps below to configure an Integrated Striping (IS) volume with the SAS BIOS CU. The
procedure assumes that the required controller(s) and disks are already installed in the computer system.
You can configure both IM and IS volumes on the same SAS controller.
① On the Adapter List screen of the SAS BIOS CU, use the arrow keys to select a SAS adapter.
② Press Enter to go to the Adapter Properties screen, shown in Figure.
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③ On the Adapter Properties screen, use the arrow keys to select RAID Properties on the screen and
press Enter.
④ When you are prompted to select a volume type, select Create IS Volume. The Create New Array
screen shows a list of disks that can be added to a volume.
⑤ Move the cursor to the “RAID Disk” column. To add a disk to the volume, change the “No” to “Yes” by
pressing the + key, . key, or space bar. As disks are added, the Array Size field changes to reflect the
size of the new volume.
There are several limitations when creating an IS (RAID 0) volume:
z
All disks must be either SATA (with extended command set support) or SAS (with SMART support).
z
Disks must have 512-byte blocks and must not have removable media.
z
There must be at least 2 and no more than 8 drives in a valid IS volume. Hot spare drives are not
allowed.
⑥ When the volume has been fully configured, press C and then select Save changes then exit this menu
to commit the changes. The configuration utility will pause while the array is being created.
Note
Integrated Striping does not provide any data protection in the event of disk failure. It is primarily
used to increase speed.
5.2.5.3
Creating a Second IS Volume
The LSI Logic SAS controllers allow you to configure two IS volumes, or an IS volume and an IM or IME
volume. If one volume is already configured, and if there are available disk drives, there are two ways to
add a second volume.
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The first is as follows:
①
In the configuration utility, select an adapter from the Adapter List. Select the RAID
Properties option. This will display the current volume.
②
Press C to create a new volume.
③
Continue with step 4 of Section 5.2, “Creating IS Volumes,” to create a second IS volume.
The other way in which to add a second volume is as follows:
① On the Adapter List screen, use the arrow keys to select an LSI Logic SAS adapter.
② Press Enter to go to the Adapter Properties screen, shown in upper Figure.
③ On the Adapter Properties screen, use the arrow keys to select RAID Properties and
press Enter.
④ Continue with step 4 of the IS creation procedure in the previous section to create a
second volume.
5.2.5.4
Other Configuration Tasks
This section explains how to do other tasks related to configuring and maintaining IS volumes.
5.2.5.4.1
Viewing IS Volume Properties
Follow these steps to view the properties of IS volumes:
① In the configuration utility, select an adapter from the Adapter List. Select the RAID Properties
option. The properties of the current volume are displayed.
② If more than one volume is configured, press Alt+N to view the next array.
③ To manage the current array, press Enter when the Manage Array item is selected.
5.2.5.4.2 Activating an Array
An array can become inactive if, for example, it is removed from one controller or computer and moved to
another one. The “Activate Array” option allows you to reactivate an inactive array that has been added to
a system. This option is only available when the selected array is currently inactive.
Follow these steps to activate a selected array.
① Select Activate Array on the Manage Array screen.
② Press Y to proceed with the activation, or press N to abandon it. After a pause, the array will become
active.
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5.2.5.4.3
Deleting an Array
CAUTION
Before deleting an array, be sure to back up all data on the array that you want to keep.
Follow these steps to delete a selected array:
① Select Delete Array on the Manage Array screen.
② Press Y to delete the array, or press N to abandon the deletion. After a pause, the firmware deletes
the array.
Note
Once a volume has been deleted, it cannot be recovered. The master boot records of all disks are
deleted.
5.2.5.4.4 Locating a Disk Drive, or Multiple Disk Drives in a Volume
You can use the SAS BIOS CU to locate and identify a specific physical disk drive by flashing the drive’s
LED. You can also use the SAS BIOS CU to flash the LEDs of all the disk drives in a RAID volume. There
are several ways to do this:
z
When you are creating an IS volume, and a disk drive is set to Yes as part of the volume, the
LED on the disk drive is flashing. The LED is turned off when you have finished creating the
volume.
z
You can locate individual disk drives from the SAS Topology screen. To do this, move the cursor
to the name of the disk in the Device Identifier column and press Enter. The LED on the disk
flashes until the next key is pressed.
z
You can locate all the disk drives in a volume by selecting the volume on the RAID Properties
screen. The LEDs flash on all disk drives in the volume.
Note
The LEDs on the disk drives will flash as described above if the firmware is correctly configured
and the drives or the disk enclosure supports disk location.
5.2.5.4.5 Selecting a Boot Disk
You can select a boot disk in the SAS Topology screen. This disk is then moved to scan ID 0 on the next
boot, and remains at this position. This makes it easier to set BIOS boot device options and to keep the
boot device constant during device additions and removals. There can be only one boot disk.
Follow these steps to select a boot disk:
① In the SAS BIOS CU, select an adapter from the Adapter List.
② Select the SAS Topology option.
The current topology is displayed. If the selection of a boot device is supported, the bottom of the
screen lists the Alt+B option. This is the key for toggling the boot device. If a device is currently
configured as the boot device, the Device Info column on the SAS Topology screen will show the word
“Boot.”
③ To select a boot disk, move the cursor to the disk and press Alt+B.
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④ To remove the boot designator, move the cursor down to the current boot disk and press Alt+B.
This controller will no longer have a disk designated as boot.
⑤ To change the boot disk, move the cursor to the new boot disk and press Alt+B. The boot designator
will move to this disk.
Note
The firmware must be configured correctly in order for the Alt+B feature to work.
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5.3
ServerDome Overview
The ServerDome provides remote server management for the UniServer 1U and 3U UniServer.
With comprehensive management capabilities from a single graphical console, ServerDome remote management
software automates and simplifies IT and networking tasks, letting the system administrator deploy, configure,
manage and maintain X number of servers. The ServerDome remote management capabilities are IPMI 2.0
compliant and work with either Windows or Linux.
SNMP
Internet
IPMI
Remote Management Host
(ServerDomePro)
IPMI
UniServer
(ServerDome Agent)
SNMP
Local Management Host
(ServerDomePro)
Key Features
z
Easy to set up and manage
z
Provides graphic user interface
z
Failure notifications with customized e-mail and popup message.
z
Provides remote management capabilities through SNMP and IPMI.
z
System HW resource real-time monitoring
z
System OS resource real-time monitoring
NOTICE
For details, please refer to the ServerDome manual which included ServerDome CD.
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1. Removing & Installing
System Components
1.1
Installing the CD-ROM Drive
① Screw two brackets and the interface board to the CD-ROM.
② Locate the CD-ROM kit right into the place on the chassis and then slide it forward.
③ Push the lock tension down to secure the CD-ROM kit.
④ Install the FFC(Flexible Flat Cable) of CD-ROM drive.
CAUTION
Face the conduct side down and lock
the connector to secure the cable.
Do not treat the connector by force.
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1.2
Installing the Floppy Disk Drive
① Install the FDD with two mounting brackets.
② Install the FDD with two mounting brackets in the plastic housing as shown below.
③ Install the FDD cable to backplane.
CAUTION
Face the conduct side down and lock the connector to secure the cable. Do not treat the
connector by force.
④ Push the button and slide the front LED panel back into the system. To use the FDD, push the blue
button and it will come up to the front.
Close the FDD
Use the FDD
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1.3
Installing the Hard Disk Drive
① Remove the blank disk from the disk carrier and secure HDD to the carrier with four screws.
② Insert the disk carrier into the bay and then close the handle to lock.
③ In removing the HDD carrier: push the release button of the carrier and gently pull the drive carrier
outward.
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1.4
Removing the Power Supply Unit
CAUTION
In removing the power supply, handle the unit with care because it is heavy
① Remove Raise the lever up to its full extent.
② Lift up and remove the power supply unit.
1.5
Replacing the Cooling Fan Unit
WARNING
Do not remove the fan module while operating the system. In installing the fan module, carefully set
the unit on the fan connector.
① Push both latches of the fan duct.
② Lift the fan module upward and set it away from the system.
③ Locate the fan duct unit on the locking guide of the chassis.
④ Push the fan module down carefully.
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1.6
Replacing the Interface Unit
1.6.1 Interface Board(IFB) Unit and Backplane Unit
CAUTION
Before installing IFB, remove HDD carrier and locate FDD forward.
① Secure the backplane board on the backplane bracket with two screws and the interface board on
the interface bracket with three screws.
② Assemble the interface board unit into the backplane board unit.
③ Install the interface unit into the chassis.
④ Install the cable for FDD, front LED panel and CD-ROM drive.
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1.6.2 Installing the Cable (SATA, SAS)
1.6.2.1
Installing the SATA Cable
Install the interface unit into the chassis and connect the SATA cable to the backplane.
1.6.2.2
Installing the SAS Cable
Install the interface unit into the chassis and connect the SAS cable to the backplane.
SAS Cable
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1.7
Installing the AC Cable Unit
① Remove the power supply unit first.
② Push the lever and lift up the AC strip.
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1.8
Installing the Motherboard
CAUTION
In order to remove or install the motherboard, remove the power module, AC strip unit, Interface unit,
PCI riser card unit and Cooling FAN unit beforehand.
① Remove the power supply unit first.
CAUTION
Routing SCSI cable should be prior to installing Interface unit.
② Place the motherboard on the chassis standoffs so that each of the six mounting holes fit over a
standoff.
CAUTION
Check the insulator of motherboard on the chassis and then insert the front side of motherboard
into the chassis first. In placing the motherboard, check the ID LED's hole.
Alignment for the ID LED
③ Secure the motherboard on the chassis with the screws.
95
1.9
Installing the CPU Heatsink
CAUTION
Make sure that thermal interface material
should be on the bottom side of the heatsink.
1.10
Installing the Front Bezel
①
Locate the front bezel on the chassis as shown below.
②
Slide the bezel toward the left until it makes the click sound.
③
In removing the bezel, pull up the lever of the rear side bezel and slide the bezel to the right
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Appendix
A. BIOS Post Code
AMIBIOS8 Check Point and Beep Code List
The POST code checkpoints are the largest set of checkpoints during the BIOS pre-boot process. The
following table describes the type of checkpoints that may occur during the POST portion of the BIOS.
Checkpoint
Description
Before D0
If boot block debugger is enabled, CPU cache-as-RAM functionality is enabled at this point.
Stack will be enabled from this point.
D1
Early super I/O initialization is done including RTC and keyboard controller.
Serial port is enabled at this point if needed for debugging. NMI is disabled.
Perform keyboard controller BAT test. Save power-on CPUID value in scratch CMOS. Go to flat
mode with 4GB limit and GA20 enabled.
D2
Verify the boot block checksum. System will hang here if checksum is bad.
D3
Disable CACHE before memory detection. Execute full memory sizing module.
If memory sizing module not executed, start memory refresh and do memory sizing
in Boot block code. Do additional chipset initialization.
Re-enable CACHE. Verify that flat mode is enabled.
D4
Test base 512KB memory. Adjust policies and cache first 8MB. Set stack.
D5
Bootblock code is copied from ROM to lower system memory and control is given to it. BIOS
now executes out of RAM. Copies compressed boot block code to memory in right segments.
Copies BIOS from ROM to RAM for faster access. Performs main BIOS checksum and updates
recovery status accordingly.
D6
Both key sequence and OEM specific method is checked to determine if BIOS
recovery is forced. If BIOS recovery is necessary, control flows to checkpoint E0. See
Bootblock Recovery Code Checkpoints section of document for more information.
D7
Restore CPUID value back into register. The Bootblock-Runtime interface module is moved to
system memory and control is given to it. Determine whether to execute serial flash.
D8
The Runtime module is uncompressed into memory. CPUID information is stored in memory.
D9
Store the Uncompressed pointer for future use in PMM. Copying Main BIOS into
memory. Leaves all RAM below 1MB Read-Write including E000 and F000 shadow
areas but closing SMRAM.
DA
Restore CPUID value back into register. Give control to BIOS POST (ExecutePOSTKernel). See
POST Code Checkpoints section of document for more information.
DC
System is waking from ACPI S3 state.
03
Disable NMI, Parity, video for EGA, and DMA controllers. Initialize BIOS, POST, Runtime data
area. Also initialize BIOS modules on POST entry and GPNV area. Initialized CMOS as
mentioned in the Kernel Variable "wCMOSFlags."
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04
Check CMOS diagnostic byte to determine if battery power is OK and CMOS checksum is
OK. Verify CMOS checksum manually by reading storage area. If the CMOS checksum is
bad, update CMOS with power-on default values and clear passwords. Initialize status
register A. Initializes data variables that are based on CMOS setup questions. Initializes both
the 8259 compatible PICs in the system.
05
Initializes the interrupt controlling hardware(generally PIC) and interrupt vector table.
06
Do R/W test to CH-2 count reg. Initialize CH-0 as system timer. Install the POSTINT1Ch
handler. Enable IRQ-0 in PIC for system timer interrupt.
Traps INT1Ch vector to "POSTINT1ChHandlerBlock."
08
Initializes the CPU. The BAT test is being done on KBC. Program the keyboard controller
command byte is being done after Auto detection of KB/MS using AMI KB-5.
C0
Early CPU Init Start -- Disable Cache - Init Local APIC
C1
Set up boot strap processor Information
C2
Set up boot strap processor for POST
C5
Enumerate and set up application processors
C6
Re-enable cache for boot strap processor
C7
Early CPU Init Exit
0A
Initializes the 8042 compatible Key Board Controller.
0B
Detects the presence of PS/2 mouse.
0C
Detects the presence of Keyboard in KBC port.
0E
Testing and initialization of different Input Devices. Also, update the Kernel Variables. Traps
the INT09h vector, so that the POST INT09h handler gets control for IRQ1. Uncompress all
available language, BIOS logo, and Silent logo modules.
13
Early POST initialization of chipset registers.
24
Uncompress and initialize any platform specific BIOS modules.
30
Initialize System Management Interrupt.
2A
Initializes different devices through DIM.
See DIM Code Checkpoints section of document for more information.
2C
Initializes different devices. Detects and initializes the video adapter installed in the system
that have optional ROMs.
2E
Initializes all the output devices.
31
Allocate memory for ADM module and uncompress it. Give control to ADM module for
initialization. Initialize language and font modules for ADM. Activate ADM module.
33
Initializes the silent boot module. Set the window for displaying text information.
37
Displaying sign-on message, CPU information, setup key message, and any OEM specific
information.
38
Initializes different devices through DIM. See DIM Code Checkpoints section of document
for more information.
39
Initializes DMAC-1 & DMAC-2.
3A
Initialize RTC date/time.
3B
Test for total memory installed in the system. Also, Check for DEL or ESC keys to limit
memory test. Display total memory in the system.
3C
Mid POST initialization of chipset registers.
40
Detect different devices (Parallel ports, serial ports, and coprocessor in CPU, … etc.)
successfully installed in the system and update the BDA, EBDA…etc.
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50
Programming the memory hole or any kind of implementation that needs an adjustment in
system RAM size if needed.
52
Updates CMOS memory size from memory found in memory test. Allocates memory for
Extended BIOS Data Area from base memory.
60
Initializes NUM-LOCK status and programs the KBD type matic rate.
75
Initialize Int-13 and prepare for IPL detection.
78
Initializes IPL devices controlled by BIOS and option ROMs.
7A
Initializes remaining option ROMs.
7C
Generate and write contents of ESCD in NVRam.
84
Log errors encountered during POST.
85
Display errors to the user and gets the user response for error.
87
Execute BIOS setup if needed / requested.
8C
Late POST initialization of chipset registers.
8D
Build ACPI tables (if ACPI is supported)
8E
Program the peripheral parameters. Enable/Disable NMI as selected
90
Late POST initialize of system management interrupt.
A0
Check boot password if installed.
A1
Clean-up work needed before booting to OS.
A2
Takes care of runtime image preparation for different BIOS modules. Fill the free area in
F000h segment with 0FFh. Initializes the Microsoft IRQ Routing Table. Prepares the runtime
language module. Disables the system configuration display if needed.
A4
Initialize runtime language module.
A7
Displays the system configuration screen if enabled. Initialize the CPU’s before boot, which
includes the programming of the MTRR’s.
A8
Prepare CPU for OS boot including final MTRR values.
A9
Wait for user input at configuration display if needed.
AA
Uninstall POST INT1Ch vector and INT09h vector. De-initializes the ADM module.
AB
Prepare BBS for Int 19 boot.
AC
End of POST initialization of chipset registers.
B1
Save system context for ACPI.
00
Passes control to OS Loader (typically INT19h).
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