A Renegade Guide for Healthy Grilling
TM
ALL GRILL BEAST PRODUCTS INCLUDE A LIFETIME WARRANTY
For Support, Please Visit: http://www.grillbeast.com/support
OMETER
TM
A Renegade Guide for Healthy Grilling
Copyright © 2014 Grill Beast All rights reserved.
By David C. Johnson
An entrepreneur and grill lover at heart, David Johnson is the founder and CEO of Grill Beast. He
knows what grill masters want, and he never manufactures a product he wouldn’t add to his own cart.
When he’s not concocting ways to improve the impractical or poorly designed cooking tools consumers currently find on the market, he’s experimenting at the grill surrounded by family and friends.
Based in the charming city of New Orleans, David regularly contributes his expertise to Grill Beast’s
blog in an effort to help others create tasty experiences no one will soon forget.
No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means whatsoever without
the express written consent of the publisher. The exception would be in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical
articles or reviews and pages where permission is specifically granted or a link to www.grillbeast.com is included.
Disclaimer. The publisher has put forth its best efforts in preparing and arranging this ebook. The information provided
herein by the author is provided “as is” and you read and use this information at your own risk. The publisher and author
disclaim any liabilities for any loss of profit or commercial or personal damages resulting from the use of the information
contained in this ebook.
WARNING - PLEASE READ CAREFULLY
DO NOT LEAVE THE BEASTOMETER IN A HOT OVEN OR GRILL FOR
EXTENDED PERIODS OF TIME. DO NOT PLACE IN A MICROWAVE. THE
BEASTOMETER IS NOT DISHWASHER SAFE.
The Beastometer is constructed with heat sensitive electronic components. Even though the stem can
handle high temperatures, the body and display was not designed for extended time in exterme heat.
Please use caution when caring for your Beastometer. Do not leave the Beastometer in the oven, or
place in the microwave. When cleaning your Beastometer be sure to handwash only. Do not use a
dishwasher to clean your Beastometer.
DO NOT LEAVE IN OVEN
FOR EXTENDED TIME.
DO NOT CLEAN IN
DISHWASHER.
DO NOT PLACE IN
MICROWAVE.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction
1
Chapter 1
2
6
Chapter 3
11
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
FAQs about Food Safety and Meat Thermometers
Chapter 2
A Guide to Minimal Internal Cooking Temperatures
Additional Meat Safety Tips You Should Know
16
Renegade Recipes to Die For
Care and Instructions for the Beastometer
Conclusion
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BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
INTRODUCTION
There’s nothing like appealing aromas and the promise of delicious dishes to make taste buds salivate and stomachs growl in anticipation, but lurking behind those tantalizing foods could be potentially
deadly pathogens ready to attack at first bite. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 48 million Americans are affected by food poisoning every year. About 128,000
of those individuals are hospitalized, and 3,000 die. That’s roughly one in six people who become sick
from tainted food in the United States alone.
These sobering statistics make food safety a priority, which is why Grill Beast has incorporated the
Beastometer into its line of chef-quality products. This precision instrument is designed to read the
internal temperature of foods in seconds, ensuring meals are safe to consume and perfectly cooked
to your preferred level of doneness every time.
Just as important as owning a meat thermometer is understanding how to apply it effectively. With
that in mind, it’s time to turn these digital pages so that you can find out how to probe your meat and
poultry like a pro while safeguarding against foodborne illness. Don’t forget to check out our renegade
recipes in chapter four—they’re to die for (figuratively speaking, of course).
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Introduction
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BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
CHAPTER 1
FAQS ABOUT FOOD SAFETY AND MEAT THERMOMETERS
If you like to live on the edge, the chances are you’re not afraid to try daring recipes, experiment
with unorthodox cooking techniques, and step outside of the box when it comes to trying weird food
combinations. That doesn’t mean you’d jump out of a plane without a parachute. The problem is that
you’re taking a similar risk every time you employ sight, gut instinct, or the press test to determine the
doneness of your food. It may sound dramatic, but you’ll likely think otherwise when you’re slung over
the porcelain bowl in your bathroom for days on end, or worse—admitted to your local ER, writhing in
pain and sweating with fever.
Since harmful contaminants like Salmonella, E. coli, Listeria, Shigella, Streptococcus, Norovirus, and
Campylobacter, cannot be detected by sight, smell, or taste, it’s crucial to heat meat and poultry to a
predetermined internal cooking temperature that’s guaranteed to kill bacteria. In this case, a simple
meat thermometer can act as your proverbial parachute, preventing potentially deadly food poisoning
from making you another statistic.
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BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
Do I really need to check the temperature of every meat I cook?
In short, yes.
Vegetables, fruits, cooked rice, and pasta are at high risk for contamination, but there’s a higher
risk of bacterial growth on meat, poultry, dairy products, eggs, seafood, and cured meats like ham
and salami. Although most products are perfectly safe, there are no guarantees. The only way to
decontaminate meat is to cook it properly.
Won’t probing my meat cause moisture loss?
Meat naturally loses moisture as muscle fibers tighten and squeeze out juices during the cooking
process. It’s for this reason that every grill master’s heart breaks a little when watching a fresh
puncture wound ooze deliciousness. The reality is this: there is no external seal keeping juices
securely locked inside your meat. The reason you might see juice pour out of a freshly pierced
chicken, turkey, or sausage is because the skin helped contain that moisture. If you’re roasting, the
moisture collects in the pan.
Probing your meat may rip apart a few fibers, but the loss of juice is minimal. You’ll lose far more
if you overcook your food—even by a few minutes. What you do want to do is limit the number of
readings you take. There’s no need to test the internal temperature multiple times when you’re
nowhere near the end of the recommended cooking time.
What if I have a good meat source?
Even after meat has gone through thorough cleaning and careful processing, there are far too many
opportunities for contamination. From your shopping cart to your countertop, bacteria are everywhere.
Again, the only way to ensure your food is free of harmful microbes is to incinerate those suckers with
sufficient heat.
Are there really dangers in overcooking meat?
Every food has a tipping point where its chemical configuration will change once it reaches a certain
temperature. In the case of meat, the heat binds the protein molecules closer together. This makes
overcooked meats hard to digest and metabolize since our bodies don’t have the necessary enzymes
to break down these materials easily. The food then sits in the gut and starts to become toxic. It
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BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
can also start to grow pathogens and cause the cells lining the gastrointestinal tract to become
enlarged. This then increases intestinal permeability, which means substances from the undigested
food leak into the bloodstream creating a host of health issues. It’s for this reason that using a meat
thermometer to avoid overcooking should form an essential part of your food safety habits.
When and where should I insert the thermometer?
Since the Beastometer is an instant-read thermometer, you should test temperatures near the end
of the cooking time after removing the food from its heat source. As a rule of thumb, you should
always insert the thermometer into the thickest part of your meat, poultry, or seafood, ensuring the tip
reaches the core. Be careful not to touch any bone as it conducts heat and produces an inaccurate
reading.
Poultry: For whole birds, insert the probe into the inner thigh just under the breast. If the bird is
stuffed, check the center of the stuffing separately. For poultry pieces, test the thickest part.
Ground Meat and Poultry: Measure the thickest area of dishes like meatloaf. If the meat is thin like
that of a hamburger patty, you should insert the thermometer horizontally and drive the tip to the
middle.
Meat, Game, Seafood: For whole animals or cuts with irregular shapes, you’ll need to take readings in
several places where the meat is thickest. For roasts, insert the thermometer into the fattest part and
push it to the center for an accurate reading. For thin items like steak and chops, go in horizontally.
Be sure to take temperatures away from any bone, cartilage, and fat.
Casseroles and Egg Dishes: Test the middle of the thickest section.
Additional Tips:
• Make sure the thermometer never touches the pan, pot, dish, or plate you’re using
when taking the readings.
• Let thin meats rest for 1–2 minutes before reading the temperature.
• Let large cuts and whole animals rest for 5–10 minutes before testing the internal
temperature.
• Always sanitize the stem of the thermometer between each reading to avoid crosscontamination.
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BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
• Whether you’re cooking one piece of meat or twenty, make sure you test every one of
them since heat can be uneven.
The bottom line: food poisoning is preventable. Observing the color of your meat, using your
intuition, and poking your protein are not effective methods of testing internal temperatures. A meat
thermometer allows you to see where your eyes can’t, protecting you and your family from the horrific
effects of foodborne illness. Besides removing the guesswork from cooking, using the Beastometer
lets you hold cooked foods at safe temperatures so that they don’t fall into the danger zone and
become perfect targets for microbe growth.
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BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
CHAPTER 2
A GUIDE TO MINIMAL INTERNAL COOKING TEMPERATURES
Item To Be Cooked
Target Temperature
Approximate Time
Final Internal Temperature
Beef
Brisket (Thin Sliced) 8 to 12 lbs.
225° F to 250° F
1.5 hours/lb
185° F
Brisket (Thick Sliced) 8 to 12 lbs.
225° F to 250° F
1.5 hours/lb
195° F
Brisket (Pulled) 8 to 12 lbs.
225° F to 250° F
1.5 hours/lb
205°F
Bottom Round
225° F to 250° F
1.5 hours/lb
Chuck Roast (Sliced Rare)
225° F to 250° F
1 hour/lb
125° F
Chuck Roast (Sliced Medium)
225° F to 250° F
1.25 hours/lb
155° F
Chuck Roast (Sliced Well Done)
225° F to 250° F
1.5 hours/lb
185° F
Chuck Roast (Pulled)
225° F to 250° F
1.5 hours/lb
195° F
Cold Smoke then 350° F
Until Done
Until Done
225° F to 250° F
30 to 40 Minutes
Until Done
Jerky (Sliced Meat)
140° F
3 to 4 hours
Until Done
Jerky (Hamburger)
140° F
3 to 4 hours
Until Done
Boneless Prime Rib
225° F to 250° F
12 minutes/lb
Until Done
Prime Rib Rare
225° F to 250° F
10 minutes/lb
125° F for Rare
Prime Rib Medium
225° F to 250° F
15 minutes/lb
135° F for Medium
Prime Rib Well Done
225° F to 250° F
20 minutes/lb
145° F for Well
Sirloin Tip Roasts
225° F to 250° F
8 hours
Until Done
190° F
12 to 14 hours
Medium to Rare
Whole Ribeye Loin Rare
225° F to 250° F
20 minutes/lb
125° F for Rare
Whole Ribeye Loin Medium
225° F to 250° F
25 minutes/lb
135° F for Medium
Whole Ribeye Loin Well Done
225° F to 250° F
30 minutes/lb
145° F for Well
Rump Roast
225° F to 250° F
30 minutes/lb
145° F for Well
Beef Short Ribs
225° F to 250° F
5 hours
Pulls back from bones
Beef Finger Ribs
225° F to 250° F
4 to 6 hours
185° - 200°
Beef Tenderloin 3 to 4 lbs. Rare
225° F to 250° F
1 to 2 hours
120° F to 125° F
Beef Tenderloin 3 to 4 lbs. Medium
Rare
225° F to 250° F
2.5 to 3 hours
130° F to 140° F
Beef Tenderloin 3 to 4 lbs. Medium
225° F to 250° F
3 to 3.5 hours
150° F
Beef Tenderloin 3 to 4 lbs. Well Done
225° F to 250° F
3.5 to 4 hours
160° F
Beef Tri-Tip. Rare
225° F to 250° F
1 to 2 hours
120° F to 125° F
Beef Tri-Tip. Medium Rare
225° F to 250° F
2 to 3 hours
130° F to 140° F
Beef Tri-Tip. Medium
225° F to 250° F
3 to 3.5 hours
150° F
Filet Mignon
Smoked Hamburgers
Steamship Round (40 Lbs.)
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BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
Item To Be Cooked
Target Temperature
Approximate Time
Final Internal Temperature
Beef
Beef Tri-Tip. Well Done
225° F to 250° F
3.5 to 4 hours
160° F
Meat Loaf
225° F to 300° F
3 hours
160° F
165° F
3.5 to 4 hours
150° F to 155° F
Target Temperature
Approximate Time
Final Internal Temperature
1 to 2 hours
170° F
Hot Dogs (Homemade)
Item To Be Cooked
Poultry
Chicken Breast 5 to 8 oz.
275° F to 350° F
Chicken Livers (Bacon Wrapped)
275° F to 350° F
1 to 2 hours
Crisp Bacon
Chicken (Quarters)
275° F to 350° F
1 to 2 hours
170° F
Chicken (Thighs)
275° F to 350° F
1.5 hours
170° F
Chicken (Whole ) 2.5 to 3 lbs.
275° F to 350° F
2 to 2.5 hours
170° F
Chicken (Whole ) 3.5 to 4.5 lbs.
275° F to 350° F
2 to 3 hours
170° F
Chicken (Wings)
275° F to 350° F
1.25 hours
170° F
Cornish Game Hens
275° F to 350° F
2 to 3 hours
170° F
Turkey (Legs)
275° F to 350° F
2 to 3 hours
170° F
Turkey (Whole ) 10-12 lbs.
275° F to 350° F
2.5 to 3 hours
170° F
Target Temperature
Approximate Time
Final Internal Temperature
Item To Be Cooked
Lamb
Lamb( Leg) 7-9 lbs. Rare
225° F to 250° F
4 to 8 hours
135° F
Lamb( Leg) 7-9 lbs. Medium Rare
225° F to 250° F
4 to 8 hours
140° F to 150° F
Lamb( Leg) 7-9 lbs. Medium
225° F to 250° F
4 to 8 hours
160° F
Lamb( Leg) 7-9 lbs. Well Done
225° F to 250° F
4 to 8 hours
165° F and above
Lamb Shanks
225° F to 250° F
4 hours
Until Tender
Target Temperature
Approximate Time
Final Internal Temperature
less than 100° F
6 hours
140° F
Item To Be Cooked
Pork
Belly Bacon
Buckboard Bacon
200° F
4 to 6 hours
140° F
Butt Bacon
less than 100° F
6 hours
140° F
Canadian Bacon (from small tenderloins)
225° F to 250° F
1.5 hours/lb
140° F
Canadian Bacon (from Large tenderloins)
225° F to 250° F
1.5 hours/lb
140° F
Pig Candy (Candied Bacon)
225° F to 250° F
30 to 45 minutes
Done
Pork Butt (Sliced) 6 to 8 lbs.
225° F to 250° F
1.5 hours/lb
170° F
Pork Butt (Pulled) 6 to 8 lbs.
225° F to 250° F
1.5 hours/lb
205° F
Pork Chops
225° F to 250° F
1.5 hours/lb
145° F
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BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
Item To Be Cooked
Target Temperature
Approximate Time
Final Internal Temperature
Pork
Ham (Bone In)
225° F to 250° F
1.5 hours/lb
160° F
Pork Crown Roast 8 to 10 lbs.
225° F to 250° F
1.5 hours/lb
155° F to 165° F
Fattys (Jimmy Dean Pork Sausage)
225° F to 250° F
2.5 to 3 hours
170° F
Pork Loin 8 to 10 lbs.
225° F to 250° F
4 to 6 hours
145 F
Pork Sausage 1.5 to 2.5 inch
225° F to 250° F
1 to 3 hours
160° F
Ribs (Baby Back ) 1.5 to 2.5 lbs.
225° F to 250° F
5 hours
Pulls back from bones
Ribs (Spare Ribs) 2.5 - 3 lbs.
225° F to 250° F
5 to 7 hours
Pulls back from bones
Pork Shoulder (Sliced) 6 to 10 lbs.
225° F to 250° F
5 to 8 hours
175° F
Pork Shoulder (Pulled) 6 to 10 lbs.
225° F to 250° F
8 to 12 hours
205° F
Pork Tenderloin 1.5 to 2 lbs.
225° F to 250° F
2.5 to 3 hours
145° F
Whole Hog to 85 lbs.
225° F to 250° F
16 to 18 hours
205° F
Target Temperature
Approximate Time
Final Internal Temperature
Item To Be Cooked
Other Meats
Duck (Whole) 4 to 5 lbs.
225° F to 250° F
3 to 4 hours
170° F
Frogs Legs
225° F to 250° F
3 to 4 hours
Pulls back from bones
Goat
185° F
8 hours
2 hours at 150° F
225° F to 250° F
30 minutes/lb
170° F
Pheasant
200° F
2.5 to 3 hours
170° F
Rabbit (3.5 lbs)
200° F
3.5 to 4 hours
160° F
Goose (Whole)
Veal Chops
200° F
1 to 1.5 hours/lb
160° F
Venison Roast
225° F to 250° F
1 to 1.5 hours/lb
160° F
Venison Tenderloin
225° F to 250° F
1 to 1.5 hours/lb
160° F
Item To Be Cooked
Target Temperature
Approximate Time
Final Internal Temperature
Fish and Seafood
Catfish
225° F to 250° F
2 to 3 hours
Until Done
Fish (Whole) 4 to 6 lbs.
225° F to 240° F
3.5 to 4 hours
Until Flaky
Fish (Fillets) 4 to 6 oz.
225° F to 240° F
1.5 to 2 hours
Until Flaky
Fish (Hot Smoking)
90°F for 2 hrs.
then 150°F
2 to 3 hours
Until Flaky
Fish (Cold Smoking)
80° F to 90° F
for 1-5 days
1 to 5 days
Until Flaky
140° F
3 to 4 hours
Until Flaky
Lox
70° F to 80° F
1 to 3 days
Until Flaky
Salmon (Cold Smoked)
70° F to 80° F
24 hours
Until Flaky
Salmon (Hot Smoked)
200° F to 225° F
3 to 4 hours
The oil turns dark
Crab (Steamed)
200° F to 225° F
15 minutes/lb
To Taste
Fish Jerky
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Item To Be Cooked
Target Temperature
Approximate Time
Final Internal Temperature
Fish and Seafood
Lobster (Steamed)
200° F to 225° F
15 minutes/lb
To Taste
190° F
1 to 1.5 hours/lb
To Taste
Shrimp (Steamed)
200° F to 225° F
15 minutes/lb
To Taste
Item To Be Cooked
Target Temperature
Approximate Time
Final Internal Temperature
Scallops
Vegtables
ABTs (Stuffed Jalapenos)
225° F to 250° F
1.5 to 2 hours
To Taste
Smoked Artichoke Hearts
225° F to 250° F
1 to 1.5 hours/lb
Until Tender
Smoked Baked Beans
225° F
2 to 2.5 hours
To Taste
Butternut Squash
225° F to 250° F
2 hours
Until Tender
Corn on the Cob
225° F
1.5 to 2 hours
Done
Corn Relish
225° F
30 to 45 minutes
To Taste
Cabbage (Whole)
225° F
2.5 to 3 hours
Done
Cabbage (Sliced)
225° F
2.25 to 2.5 hours
Done
Candied Carrots (Precooked)
225° F
30 to 45 minutes
Done
Candied Sweet Potatoes (Precooked)
225° F
30 to 45 minutes
Done
225° F to 250° F
1 to 1.5 hours/lb
Until Tender
Eggplant (Sliced)
Garlic Cloves
225° F
1.5 hours
Until Soft
225° F to 250° F
1 to 1.5 hours
Until Tender
Smoked Mushrooms
225° F
30 to 45 minutes
Until Tender
Smoked Portobello Mushrooms
225° F
1.5 to 2 hours
Until Tender
Smoked Stuffed Mushrooms
225° F
1 to 1.5 hours
Until Tender
225° F to 250° F
1 to 1.5 hours
Until Tender
225° F
2 to 2.5 hours
Done
Smoked Green Beans
Smoked Onions
Smoked Potatoes
Smoked Sweet Potatoes
225° F
2 to 2.5 hours
Done
Smoked Squash
225° F to 250° F
1 to 1.5 hours
Until Tender
Smoked Tomatoes
225° F to 240° F
1 hour
Until Tender
Smoked Vidalia Onions
225° F to 250° F
1 to 1.5 hours
Until Tender
Smoked Zucchini
225° F to 250° F
1 to 1.5 hours
Until Tender
Target Temperature
Approximate Time
Final Internal Temperature
Item To Be Cooked
Fruit and Nuts
Avocado (For Sauces and Dips)
225° F
30 to 60 minutes
Until Soft
Bananas
200° F
1 hour
Golden Brown
Fruit Flambe
200° F
35 to 40 minutes
To Taste
Pumpkin (Chunks for Pie)
Smoked Nuts
Smoked Pecans
9
200° F
60 to 90 minutes
Until Soft
225° F to 240° F
3 to 4 hours
To Taste
125° F
3 to 4 hours
To Taste
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BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
Item To Be Cooked
Target Temperature
Approximate Time
Final Internal Temperature
Less than 100° F
30 to 45 minutes
To Taste
Crisp-X Mix with Nuts (Chex Mix)
225° F
3 hours
Until Dry
Smoked Pasta (Cooked al dente)
160° F
30 to 45 minutes
To Taste
Smoked Fatty Stuffed Cresent Rolls
275° F
1.5 to 2 hours
Until crisp
Smoked Fruit Cobbler
350° F
30 to 45 minutes
Until crisp
Chocolate Ganache Frosting
185° F
30 to 60 minutes
To Taste
Other
Cheese
COOK BY TEMPERATURE NOT TIME: All cooking times are approximate and have many variables. Always
cook to the correct Temperature.
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BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
CHAPTER 3
ADDITIONAL MEAT SAFETY TIPS YOU SHOULD KNOW
Although governments establish and enforce a multitude of health regulations relating to food safety
and nutritional quality, contamination can happen at any time, anywhere, and no one would be any
the wiser. As a result, you should start good food safety habits long before—and carry them on long
after—your Beastometer perforates your meat. The following tips can help you prevent foodborne
illness, ensuring the health of your loved ones.
Tip 1: Start Good Food Safety Habits At the Store
Bacteria on raw meat will multiply rapidly at room temperature, which is why you want to plan your
shopping trip carefully.
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• If you’re running a number of errands, make the grocery store your last stop.
• Leave cold foods until the end so you’re not carting your eggs, dairy, and meat around
the store.
• Opt for packages at the back of butchery or fridge displays. The meat is likely to be
fresher.
• Be sure to pay attention to “best before” or “use by” dates on packaging so you know
the date by which the meat should be frozen or consumed.
• Avoid cross-contamination from leaking meat juices by putting your raw meats into
separate plastic bags. Place them in your cart away from other products.
• Use an insulated cooler to store perishables if the traveling distance between the
store and your home is more than 20 minutes.
Tip 2: Store Raw Meat Properly
Once you arrive home, it’s imperative that you take every precaution to keep your meat out of the
“Danger Zone,” which is in the 40ºF–140ºF range. According to the United States Department of
Agriculture, bacteria will grow rapidly in this zone, doubling in as little as 20 minutes.
• To ensure your meat remains safe, refrigerate or freeze it as soon as you arrive
home. Check your fridge and freezer regularly to ensure they’re cold enough.
• Before storing it, wrap the meat properly and then place it in a dish to avoid drippings.
• Always marinate meat in the refrigerator; never marinate at room temperature.
• When keeping meat in a cooler before grilling, place ice packs around it to keep it
cold.
• Don’t place the cooler in direct sunlight or open it too often.
• Foods in a cooler should be tightly sealed to ensure ice water or other items don’t
come into contact with them.
• Practice the “First In, First Out” method of organizing your meat storage and
consumption.
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• Keep the spices you use for your meat in a dark, dry area.
Tip 3: Thaw Your Meat Correctly
Thawing requires forethought. Many people defrost meat at room temperature to speed up the
process, but this can result in significant fluid loss. Although there are several acceptable methods,
refrigerator thawing is often best.
• When thawing in a cold or hot water bath, make sure the packaging is sealed tightly
so that no water can seep through to the meat.
• Only thaw thin cuts in a hot water bath, ensuring the water is sufficiently hot enough
to bring your protein through the danger zone quickly.
• If you’re using a microwave or hot water bath, plan to cook your food immediately
after thawing.
• Ensure even cooking by defrosting meats thoroughly. Allow for six hours of thawing
time per pound.
Tip 4: Pay Attention to Kitchen and Grill Hygiene
• Sanitize your work surfaces and cooking tools before and after you handle raw meat
and poultry.
• Always clean your Beastometer after each use.
• After rinsing meat in the sink, wipe down the area with a bleach solution.
• If you can, prevent the spread of bacteria by changing your dishcloths daily and
avoiding the use of sponges. If you need to use sponges, soak them in a bleach
solution regularly as they can harbor deadly bacteria.
• Before using a new smoker, grill, or utensil for the first time, take time to clean the
item thoroughly. It may contain grease, oil, or other contaminants from manufacturing
and shipping processes.
• Regularly inspect your grill brush to ensure bristles aren’t loose or meshed together.
Unclean, mangled wires can be a haven for microbes.
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• Check your refrigerator every few days for mold. The spores can contaminate your
meat and other items, especially if they’re uncovered.
Tip 5: Learn to Handle Raw Meat and Poultry the Right Way
• Avoid cross-contamination by using separate cutting boards, utensils, knives, dishes,
and cooking equipment for raw meats.
• Use latex or rubber gloves to handle your uncooked proteins.
• Don’t wash your poultry. If there are harmful microbes, they’re embedded in the
muscle so you’d only be making things worse and contaminating your sink while
you’re at it.
• Wash your hands in warm, soapy water for at least 20 seconds before and after
touching raw meats. Make sure you wash a few inches up your arm for ultimate
protection.
• Forget about the five-second rule—it simply doesn’t exist. Contamination is instant, so
you need to wash raw meat off and cook it properly. If you’ve dropped cooked meat,
discard it or wash it and heat it back up to a surface temperature of 165ºF.
Tip 6: Refer to a Temperature Chart
Use the temperature chart provided in chapter two to ensure your proteins are cooked to your
preferred level of doneness while being perfectly safe to consume.
Tip 7: Follow Safe Cooking Guidelines
• Never put cooked foods on a plate that contains juices from raw foods.
• Roasts will continue to cook for up to 90 minutes after removal from the oven. Let the
meat rest until the internal temperature stops rising—you’ll find it’s tastier.
• Don’t puncture meat with tenderizers and similar tools unless you’re cooking it beyond
165ºF. These devices will drive surface bacteria to the center of your cut, which isn’t
ideal if you like a medium rare steak.
• Use one set of tongs to work with raw meat, and another pair to move cooked meat.
Additional Meat Safety Tips You Should Know
14
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BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
• Rather than removing cooked foods, transfer them to the cooler side of the grill. This
allows you to keep them warm while you continue to cook other items.
• Unless you’re cooking sous-vide, always cook at 175ºF or higher.
• If you’ve heated ingredients to make a marinade, let the concoction cool before using
it. Always follow health and safety guidelines for marinades since there are numerous
opportunities for contamination. This is especially true when using brushes that touch
both raw meat and the marinade.
• Use silicone basting brushes, as they’re easier to clean and sterilize.
Tip 8: Keep Foods at the Right Temperatures
Hot foods should remain hot while cold foods should remain cold. Make sure you use the
Beastometer to maintain safe internal temperatures before serving, especially when setting out dishes
buffet-style and leaving them there for a while.
Tip 9: Handle Leftovers with Care
Even though your food is cooked, there will always be the potential for bacterial growth when meat,
poultry, and seafood hit the danger zone.
• Discard food that’s been left out at room temperature for more than two hours. On hot
days, you’ll want to throw it out sooner.
• When reheating food, make certain the internal temperature reaches 165ºF.
There are plenty of ways to limit the spread of bacteria, but cooking meat properly is your only
guarantee. Be a renegade grill master, but don’t be stupid by putting the health of your family at risk
with undercooked or overcooked proteins.
15
Additional Meat Safety Tips You Should Know
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BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
CHAPTER 4
RENEGADE RECIPES TO DIE FOR
TM
MAHI MAHI STEAKS WITH GREEN BEANS AND BACON
Yield: Makes 6 servings
Directions
Ingredients
1. Preheat the oven to 475ºF.
6 mahi mahi steaks (approximately 8oz each)
1 lb bacon, thinly sliced
1/3 cup pine nuts
2 1/2 pounds green beans, trimmed
1 1/2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
Olive oil
2 lemons, thickly sliced
Kosher salt to taste
Pepper to taste
2. Slice the green beans in half at an angle and
toss them together with the olive oil, garlic,
salt, and pepper until properly coated. Spread
them evenly in a roasting pan.
3. Nestle the mahi mahi steaks among the
beans, season with more salt and pepper,
and then place the bacon slices on top.
4. Add the lemon slices, scatter with pine nuts,
and drizzle with more olive oil.
5. Cook for approximately 15–20 minutes. The
green beans should be tender and the center
of the thickest part of each steak should reach
158°F before serving.
Renegade Recipes to Die For
16
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BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
SPICY DUCK WITH GINGER AND PLUM GLAZE
Yield: Makes 4 servings
Directions
Ingredients
1. Preheat the oven to 350ºF.
4 duck pieces, with skin
4 oz plum jam, reduced sugar
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 teaspoons chili sauce
2 teaspoons ground ginger
1 teaspoon garlic, finely chopped
Ground black pepper
Kosher salt
2. Pat excess moisture off the duck with a paper
towel. Poke multiple holes in the skin to allow
for fat drainage and then season with salt.
3. Place the duck skin-side up on a rack in a
roasting pan and cook for 75 minutes.
4. Remove from the oven and pour out juices.
5. Raise the oven temperature to 425ºF.
6. Add the remaining ingredients to a saucepan
and heat gently, stirring until the jam has completely melted.
7. Brush a thick coat of glaze over the skin of the
duck and then return it to the oven to roast for
another 10 minutes. The internal temperature
should reach 165ºF before serving.
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Renegade Recipes to Die For
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BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
CAJUN PORK AND BEEF BURGERS
Yield: Makes 6 servings
Directions
Ingredients
1. Mix the egg, Cajun seasoning, and mustard in
a bowl, and then stir in the breadcrumbs.
1 lb lean ground pork
1 lb lean ground beef
1 egg, beaten
4 tablespoons Italian breadcrumbs
1 1/2 tablespoons Cajun seasoning
1 1/2 tablespoons prepared mustard
2. Add the ground pork and ground beef. Mix
thoroughly and then divide the mixture into six
equal portions.
3. Shape each portion into a patty and then chill
in the refrigerator until ready to grill.
4. Oil the grill grate with oil before cooking the
burgers over medium to high heat for 5–8
minutes on each side.
5. Check the internal temperature has reached
160°F before serving on buttered buns with
garnish and condiments.
Renegade Recipes to Die For
18
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BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
INDIAN INSPIRED GRILLED CHICKEN
Yield: Makes 6 to 8 servings
Directions
Ingredients
1. Make three to four deep cuts in each piece of
chicken using a sharp knife.
6 1/2 lbs assorted chicken pieces, skin removed
2 cups natural yogurt
7 tablespoons white wine vinegar
2 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 3/4 teaspoons garam masala
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon kosher salt
3 garlic cloves, peeled
2 large onions, peeled and quartered
3 oz fresh ginger, peeled
1/2 lemon, sliced
2. Rub the salt and lemon juice over the chicken
pieces, ensuring they’re both rubbed into the
cuts.
3. In a food processor, purée the vinegar, garlic,
onion, ginger, sliced lemon, and half of the
yogurt.
4. Add the garam masala, chili powder, paprika,
and remaining yogurt. Blend thoroughly.
5. Place the chicken pieces into a dish and pour
the marinade over it. Cover the dish and refrigerate for 24 hours, turning each piece half
way through.
6. When ready to cook, heat the grill to about
375ºF.
7. Drain off excess marinade and cook for 15–20
minutes on each side. Make sure the internal
temperature reaches 165ºF before serving
with side dishes.
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Renegade Recipes to Die For
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BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
BARBECUED VENISON HAUNCH ON THE BONE
Yield: Makes 6 servings
Directions
Ingredients
1. In a nonreactive container, mix the red wine,
olive oil, garlic, ground bay leaf, salt, and pepper to make a marinade injection fluid.
4 lbs haunch of venison, on the bone
8 oz bacon slices
1 cup dry red wine
6 tablespoons olive oil
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon ground bay leaf
Kosher salt to taste
Ground black pepper to taste
2. Put the haunch of venison in a dish and use
a meat injector to inject an ounce of marinade
per pound of meat. Pour the remaining liquid
over the exterior of the joint and rub the marinade well into the flesh. Place the meat in the
refrigerator and let it rest for 2 hours.
3. When ready to cook, preheat the barbecue to
about 300ºF. Wrap the bacon slices around
the venison and then wrap it loosely in foil.
4. Place the parcel on the grill and let it cook for
approximately 30 minutes per pound. Be sure
to turn the haunch regularly.
5. Remove the venison and unwrap the foil.
Place the meat back on the barbecue over
high heat and cook for another 15 minutes to
brown the exterior.
6. Make sure the internal temperature reaches
at least 145ºF for medium rare, or higher for
your preferred level of doneness.
7. Allow to rest before serving.
Renegade Recipes to Die For
20
TM
BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
CHICKEN AND BEAN CASSEROLE WITH BACON BITS
Yield: Makes 6 to 8 servings
Directions
Ingredients
1. Preheat the oven to 350ºF and place the
chicken thighs in an oven dish.
8 skinless, boneless chicken thighs
16 oz baked beans in tomato sauce
1 cup chicken broth
1 green bell pepper, chopped
1 onion, finely chopped
2 1/2 teaspoons honey
1 teaspoon mixed herbs
1/2 teaspoon mustard powder
4 to 6 slices of bacon
3 tablespoons parsley, chopped
Ground pepper to taste
2. Mix the beans, chicken broth, green pepper,
onion, honey, mixed herbs, and pepper in a
bowl. Spoon the mixture over the chicken,
ensuring it’s spread out evenly.
3. Cover the dish and bake for 1 hour, turning
the chicken pieces every 25 minutes.
4. Remove the cover and bake for an additional
30 minutes. During this time, grill the bacon
until crispy and then cut it into bits.
5. Make sure the internal temperature of the
thickest part of each thigh has reached 165ºF.
Remove the dish from the oven when done.
*Serve with rice and vegetables
6. Sprinkle the parsley and bacon bits over the
casserole and serve with preferred side dishes.
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Renegade Recipes to Die For
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BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
SPICY LAMB CUTLETS WITH MANGO AND MINT PURÉE
Yield: Makes 4 servings
Directions
Ingredients
1. Preheat the grill to 400ºF.
2 lbs lamb cutlets
1 lb ripe mango, peeled and chopped
1 habanero/jalapeno chili, seeded and chopped
2 scallions, chopped
1 cup fresh mint
1 tablespoon lime juice
1/8 cup olive oil
1 garlic clove, finely chopped
2 1/4 teaspoons ground coriander
2 1/4 teaspoons cumin
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
A dash of ground cloves
2. Mix the olive oil and garlic in a bowl and then
coat the cutlets.
3. In a shallow dish, blend the coriander, cumin,
salt, cinnamon, turmeric, cardamom, cayenne
pepper, and cloves together. Press the cutlets
into the spices, once on each side.
4. In a food processor, purée the mangoes, chili,
scallions, mint, and lime juice. Place in a dish,
cover, and chill.
5. Cook the cutlets to your preferred doneness.
The minimum internal cooking temperature is
145ºF for medium rare.
6. Serve the lamb cutlets with the mango and
mint purée on a bed of wild rice.
Renegade Recipes to Die For
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BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
RICH HONEY PORK CHOPS
Yield: Makes 4 servings
Directions
Ingredients
1. Preheat the oven to 375ºF.
4 pork loin chops
1 cup dry white wine
1/3 cup orange juice
2 1/2 tablespoons honey
1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon five-spice powder
Kosher salt to taste
Pepper to taste
2. In a frying pan, heat the oil and fry the chops
until browned on both sides.
3. Add the wine and five-spice powder, and then
bring to a boil.
4. Place the chops in a roasting pan and pour
the liquid over it. Cover with foil and bake for
75 minutes. Be sure to turn the chops every
now and then.
5. Once the internal temperature reaches 165ºF,
remove the chops from the pan and cut off
the fat and rind. Put them on a serving dish,
cover them with foil, and place them back in
the oven, lowering the temperature to keep
them warm but not overcook them.
6. Pour the liquid from the roasting pan into a
saucepan. Stir in the honey, orange juice,
salt, and pepper. Bring to a boil and simmer
until the liquid becomes syrupy.
7. Spoon the glaze over the chops and serve
with egg noodles or rice.
23
Renegade Recipes to Die For
TM
BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
CHAPTER 5
CARE AND INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE BEASTOMETER
OMETER
Care and Instructions for the Beastometer
TM
24
TM
BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
The Beastometer is a high quality, durable product. However, you should use the following care instructions to ensure you obtain optimal use and accurate results.
1. Before using the Beastometer for the first time, wash the stem in warm, soapy water or
wipe it down with an alcohol-based disinfectant wipe.
2. Although the thermometer has an auto-shut off function to conserve battery life, make
sure you replace the battery whenever the LCD panel becomes dim. Optimum visibility
is essential when reading results accurately.
3. Depending on your oven and grill temperatures, switch between Fahrenheit and Celsius
as needed. Just make sure you reach the right minimum internal temperature for the
protein you’re cooking.
4. The Beastometer is not designed to remain in food while cooking. Remove it before
placing food back in the oven, on the stove, or on the grill.
5. When replacing the battery, make certain you keep the O-ring in place to ensure the
device remains waterproof.
6. Don’t remove the protective steel casing. If there’s a problem with your Beastometer,
contact Grill Beast.
How to Calibrate Your Beastometer
To be considered accurate, a meat thermometer must be calibrated to measure within 2ºF of the actual temperature. The Beastometer measures within 1ºF.
To calibrate the unit, press the calibration key on the face of the unit and “CAL” will be display on the
LCD screen. Place the probe into water at a known temperature (we suggest placing it in a ice water bath which is 0ºC). To increase the temperature, press the “C/F” button and the temperature will
increase in degrees. To decrease the temperature, press the “ON/OFF” button. When the temperature
is calibrated, press the calibration button to release the feature.
The unit is calibrated before it is shipped.
25
Care and Instructions for the Beastometer
TM
BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
CHANGES IN STANDARD TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE
Use the chart below in order to determine the boiling point of water in your region. This will help assist
you with ensuring that your Beastometer is calibrated.
Altitude ( ft. )
Pressure ( in. Hg )
Boiling pt. ( ° F )
-500
30.466
212.9
0
29.921
212.0
500
29.384
211.1
1000
27.855
210.2
2000
27.821
208.4
2500
27.315
207.5
3000
26.817
206.6
3500
26.326
205.7
4000
25.842
204.8
4500
25.365
203.9
5000
24.896
203.0
5500
24.434
202.0
6000
23.978
201.1
6500
23.530
200.2
7000
23.088
199.3
7500
22.653
198.3
8000
22.225
197.4
8500
21.803
196.4
9000
21.388
195.5
9500
20.979
194.6
10000
20.577
193.6
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Temperature Measurement
1. Press the ON/OFF button to turn the Beastometer on.
2. Clean the Beastometer stem and insert the tip a minimum of a 1/4 inch into the food or insert the
tip deep enough to reach the center of food item that you want to measure the internal temprature of.
In order to change the temperature scale between Fahrenheit ( Fo ) or Celsius ( Co ), press the oF/oC
button.
Care and Instructions for the Beastometer
26
TM
BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
Temperature Hold
In order to hold the temperature after a reading is taken, before withdrawing the Beastometer from
the food item, press the HOLD button. The reading will remain on the display and the letter “H” will
displayed in the upper right corner of the LCD. To resume normal operation, press the HOLD button
again.
Max Mode
1. Press the MAX button to show the maximum teperature that has been recorded. “MAX” will be
displayed on the LCD Screen.
2. Press the MAX button again to show the Minimum temperature that has been recorded. “MIN:
will be displayed on the LCD Screen.
3. Press the MAX button again to return to the current temprature reading.
4. In order to reset the MAX/MIN readings, press and hold the MAX button for 3 seconds.
Battery Installation/Replacement
The battery in the Beastometer should be replaced when the LCD screen becomes dim or hard to
read. Follow the steps below in order to replace the battery:
1. Remove the battery cover on the front of the Beastometer using a coin.
2. Install one LR44 battery with the positive side up.
3. Fasten the battery cover, again using a coin to tighten.
- WARNING -
DO NOT LEAVE THE BEASTOMETER IN A HOT OVEN OR GRILL FOR
EXTENDED PERIODS OF TIME. DO NOT PLACE IN A MICROWAVE. THE
BEASTOMETER IS NOT DISHWASHER SAFE.
27
Care and Instructions for the Beastometer
TM
BEASTOMETER: A RENEGADE GUIDE FOR HEALTHY GRILLING
CONCLUSION
TM
There is no escape from bacteria. While beneficial species keep your digestive organs in working
order, the harmful type can knock you down within hours of consumption. The Beastometer is all that
stands between you and unsafe food.
Heck, the Beastometer is all that stands between you and a dry, overcooked steak. Wash your hands,
douse your kitchen in bleach, but whatever you do, measure the internal cooking temperature of your
meat, poultry, game, and seafood. Now grab a beer and start grilling!
Conclusion
28
While the Beastometer ensures your food is safe, the Beast Injector ensures it
tastes great. Designed to pierce through any meat, the specially designed needles
let you reach where marinades simply can’t penetrate on their own. Within minutes,
you can start infusing your favorite flavors throughout your favorite cuts.
Visit www.grillbeast.com/products/beastinjector to order yours today!
We truly value our customers, which is why we want to
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offers that put dollars back in your pocket.
See vip.grillbeast.com for more info.
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