safety manual - Ryson Construction

safety manual - Ryson Construction
SAFETY MANUAL
Safety Manual
Table of Contents
1.
Company Safety Policy & Assignment of Responsibility
2.
Hazard Assessment
3.
a. Safe Work Practices
b. Job Procedures
4.
Rules
5.
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
6.
Maintenance Program
7.
Training & Safety Measures
8.
Inspections
9.
Investigations
10.
Environmental
11.
Emergency Preparedness
12.
Harassment Policy
13.
Legislation & References
Company Safety Policy
This company is committed to a strong program that protects its workers,
property, and the public from accidental loss.
The management at Ryson Interior Construction Ltd. is committed to the
leadership of this safety program and the development of proper
attitudes towards health and safety at the work place by all personnel. All
employees and subcontractors are expected to participate in all aspects
of this safety program, including compliance with all rules and regulations
and performing their duties in accordance with established job
procedures and safe work practices.
All employees and sub-contractors shall attend and participate in biweekly toolbox meetings. JOHS meetings shall take place when legislated
numbers on site are met & attended by all Sub reps on a monthly basis.
Every individual shall be held accountable and directly responsible for
safety at the work place. Promoting safety awareness and setting a good
example shall be everyone’s responsibility.
Through a cooperative effort, this safety program can be maintained and
preserved in everyone’s best interest. The objective is an injury and
accident free work place.
Management at Ryson Interior Construction Ltd. will work in consultation
and in cooperation with our employees in all aspect of our Safety
Program.
Signed:
________________________
Mark Stevenson, President
Dated:______________
RETURN TO WORK POLICY
Ryson Interior Construction Limited will work toward facilitating injured
workers who have been injured while performing duties for the company,
to an appropriate and timely return to work in pre-injury positions. If this is
not possible, Ryson Interior Construction Ltd. will make every effort to
place workers in a suitable, alternate position. In the event that an
alternate position is not available within the original position / job
description, every reasonable attempt will be made to find an
appropriate position within the company. All attempts to place the
worker a position will be made, in an appropriate manner, in cooperation
with site superintendents, health care providers, Workers’ Compensation
Board representatives and the worker.
Ryson Interior Construction Limited will provide an injured worker, if
required, a modified duty until such time that the worker is able to return
regular pre-injury work and or position.
Any personal information received from or about a worker will be held in
the strictest confidence. Information of a personal nature will be released
only if required by law or with the approval of the worker who will specify
the nature of any information that may be released and to whom it can
be released.
Signed: _________________________________Date:______________
Assignment of Responsibilities
and
Accountability for Safety
Managers
1. To provide information, instruction, and assistance to all supervisory staff in
order to protect the health and safety of all of our employees.
2. To understand and enforce our accident prevention policy as well as the
Occupational Health & Safety Act.
3. To provide all supervisory staff with an understanding of our accident
prevention program as well as relevant sections of the Occupational
Health & Safety Act.
4. To provide all supervisory staff with proper, well maintained, tools and
equipment plus any other special personal protective devices which may
be required.
5. To provide on going safety education programs and approved first aid
training as required.
6. To monitor departments and projects and hold them accountable for
their individual safety performances.
Site Supervisors
1. To know and apply the company’s safety policy and relevant sections of
the Occupational Health & Safety Act.
2. To ensure that all employees are educated to work in a safe manner and
that they use all protective devices and procedures required by this
company and by legislation to protect their health and safety.
3. To advise all employees of any potential or actual dangers and how to
isolate, prevent, or remove them.
4. To arrange for medical treatment as required, in case of injury or illness,
including transportation to a doctor or hospital as necessary.
5. To report all accidents immediately, to investigate all accidents fully, and
to advise management on how to prevent similar accidents in the future.
6. To carry out regular inspections of the workplace to ensure a safe and
healthy environment.
Employees
1. To know and apply the company’s safety policy and relevant sections of
the Occupational Health & Safety Act.
2. To ensure that all coworkers are educated to work in a safe manner and
that they use all protective devices and procedures required by this
company and by legislation to protect their health and safety.
3. To advise all coworkers of any potential or actual dangers and how to
isolate, prevent, or remove them.
4. To arrange for medical treatment as required, in case of injury or illness,
including transportation to a doctor or hospital as necessary.
5. To report all accidents immediately, to investigate all accidents fully, and
to advise management on how to prevent similar accidents in the future.
6. To carry out regular inspections of the workplace to ensure a safe and
healthy environment.
Joint Occupational Health & Safety Committee
Ryson Construction’s JOHSC is a collaborative employer – employee body established to jointly
address the issues in the workplace and is responsible to:
1. Perform duties of a JOHSC as defined in the OH&S Act
2. Hold regular meetings in accordance with the terms of reference and
operating, and maintain minutes and records of committee activities
3. Work cooperatively with employees and management to identify hazards
to health and safety and develop, limit and evaluate health and safety
programs designed to respond to hazards
4. Receive, investigate and make recommendations for prompt disposition
of the safety complaints and concerns for work refusal
5. Participate in inspections, inquiries, investigations and audits concerning
health and safety and implement action plans when needed
6. Advise on the development, implementation, evaluation and safety
policy and programs designed to improve workplace health and safety or
to meet the objectives
7. Participate in the education and training programs for employees and
advise on the use of PPE
8. Make written recommendations as is considered appropriate.
9. Participate in a co – operate auditing of the workplace to determine
compliance with health and safety requirements
Safety Representative
The occupational health and safety representative acts on behalf of the employees together
with the employer and is responsible to:
1. Perform the function of safety representative as defined in the OH&S Act
2. Work co-operatively with the employees and management in identifying
hazards to health and safety and to develop and implement programs to
respond to hazards
3. Receive and co-operate with the employer in the investigation and
prompt disposition complains or concerns of employees
4. Participate in inspections and investigations concerning the safety of
employees
5. Participate in development, implementation of health and safety
programs within the workplace
6. Participate in health and safety educational and training programs for
employees including the use of PPE
7. Advise and make recommendations regarding the occupational health
and safety policy and program and for the improvement of health and
safety in the workplace
8. Participate in the co-operative auditing of compliance with the
occupational health and safety requirements in the workplace
9. Make written recommendations as it is considered appropriate
Hazard Assessment Policy
In order for Ryson Interior Construction Ltd. to maintain its Safety Program
and meet its requirements for due diligence, it is crucial for our success
that this policy be properly and consistently adhered to.
It is the policy of Ryson Interior Construction Ltd., as part of the Safety
Program, to follow the requirements of the Nova Scotia Occupational
Health & Safety Act in regards to hazard identification and control.
A formal Safety Plan will be considered for all projects undertaken by
Ryson Interior Construction Ltd.
The decision for formulating and
implementing a Safety plan will be based on the scope of the work,
complexity of the work, size of the job, and requirements made upon
Ryson Interior Construction Ltd.
All major jobs (contract), will have a
Hazard Assessment and an emergency plan, and all required/pertinent
contacts/legislation posted. Smaller jobs and maintenance work is
covered by the company’s comprehensive Hazard Assessment.
A Job Site Hazard Assessment will be done by the sub-contractors and
submitted to the site supervisor prior to work commencing. Site supervisors
must, from this hazard assessment, be able to:
1. Clearly understand the work to be performed.
2. Recognize that all hazards related to the sub-contractors work and
how their work relates with other contractors has been identified.
3. Identify that suitable controls have been put in place, which meet or
exceed legislative requirements or expected industry standards will be
properly applied.
The Site Supervisor will be responsible to enforce this policy with subcontractors. If there are any questions/difficulties with sub-contractors
meeting their obligations they shall be referred to the “Subcontractor
Statement of Responsibility.”
Signed:
__________________________
Mark Stevenson, President
Dated:___________________
Subcontract Statement of Responsibility
As a subcontractor performing work for Ryson Interior Construction Ltd., your
company shall:
1. Provide documentation, if requested, that a safety program be in place.
(Certificate of Recognition
2. Read and understand all of Ryson Interior Construction Ltd.’s rules and safety
policies. These rules and policies have been explained to all my employees
and will be enforced by my company.
3. Provide to Ryson Interior Construction Ltd. a hazard assessment prior to
conduction site activities and follow up with monthly formal inspections
4. Understand your responsibility to thoroughly investigate and report all
incidents, accidents, and near misses, which occur at the job site, to Ryson
Interior Construction Ltd.’s Job Superintendents, both verbally and in writing.
5. Prior to site activities, will have written documentation of sage work practices
and job procedures that will be performed at the job site. All of your
employees must be trained and must use these practices and procedures
and be provided an on-site safety orientation.
6. Shall provide employees who are trained to perform the required tasks of the
job and ensure that their certification does not expire to the end of the
contract
7. Shall submit documentation of MSDS sheets for all hazardous products to be
used on the job site prior to commencing site activities. All employees have
been WHMIS trained and are educated in the use of these hazardous
products and know how to read a MSDS sheet.
8. Shall provide appropriate first aid supplies and trained first aid personnel as
required by the Nova Scotia First Aid Regulations. All incidents requiring
medical attention shall be documented and reported to Ryson Interior
construction Ltd. immediately.
9. A company safety representative shall attend safety meetings as required by
site superintendent.
10. Provide only those tools and equipment that are in good condition with all
safety devices properly attached at all times.
I agree to the above terms and acknowledge my responsibility to follow these
terms as part of the contract requirements.
Signed:
________________________
Dated: ______________________
Company:
__________________________
Contact:_____________________
Signed:
________________________
Dated: ______________________
Mark Stevenson, President
Work Site
Hazard Assessment
Project:
Location:
Performed By:
Job #:
Inspection Date:
Position:
Safety Requirements
Safety Manual Up-To-Date (not
observed)
Safety Policy’s Posted
First Aid Personnel / Facilities (training
current)
First Aid Kit (complete / proper type)
Fire Extinguisher (charged / inspected)
Emergency Exits (visible / obscured)
PPE (acceptable / worn)
Warning Signs
Emergency Numbers Posted
General Housekeeping
Y
N
Particles in the Air
Lighting Adequate
Temperature OK
Falling Objects (risk of)
Stacking of Material(safe / unsafe)
Trip / Fall Hazard
Machinery
Sanitation facilities
Temporary Overhead Power lines
Underground Service
Electrical Lockout Required
Temporary Installation
Site Rules
Access Restricted
PPE (special requirements)
Security
Smoking
Confined Space Required
Entry Permit Fill Out
PPE Required
Site Equipment
Ladders / Scaffolding / Inspections
Hoses / Cords / Ropes
Hoisting Equipment
Hazard Assessment Carried Out
WHMIS
Proof of Training
Proper Labeling
MSDS’s Current ( not observed)
Asbestos a Concern
Flammable / Explosive Products
Reactive / Corrosive Products
Power Tools
Double Insulated or Grounded
Specific Training
Safety Guards
Inspected (Visually / Form Completed)
Other
√ = Acceptable
On Site Conditions
Noise Level Acceptable
Other
N/A
Y
N
Work Site
Hazard Assessment
Details of Required Action
Priority
Hazard
Corrective Action
Completed
Priority: 01 = Immediate Action required - 05 = Needs Attention
Supervisor:
Crew:
Comments / Observations
Safety Officer’s Signature:
Manager’s Signature:
Date Reviewed:
By Who
Critical Task Inventory List
Job/ Task/ Equip/ Tool
Hazards
Working Near Forklift use
Server Injury, Damage, Death.
Operating Forklift
Server Injury, Damage, Death.
Drilling, Grinding, Cutting
Injury, Shock, Server Cuts Bruising.
Working from Ladders
Injury from falls.
Working from Man-Lift
Server Injury from Falling, Death.
Use of Power Saws
Server Cuts, Shocks
Use of Power Activated tools
Server Injury from Flying Objects.
Working from Scaffolding
Server Injury From Falling, Dropping
objects onto Persons Below, Death.
Working nearby Powered Cranes
Server Injury From Falling Objects, Death.
Spray Painting
Fire Explosion, chronic, Health Problems,
and unconscious reaction to Fumes.
Excessive Noise
Unable to hear Warning signals, or call for
help, temporary and permanent loss of
hearing.
Controls
Wear PPE (vests), Barricade/Tape off work
area.
Certified OPER training, Machine Insp.
Insp. Tool, do not use in wet area, wear
PPE
Insp. Ladder, follow SWP
Competent Training, Inspection use
Harness
Insp. Tool, wear PPE, secure Work Piece.
Certified use Training, wear PPE, insolate
use.
Erection by competent persons, follow
regs, proper guard rails, barricades.
Certified Operator, Inspection of crane and
Rigging, use of PPE competent signaler.
Read MSDS, use Specific PPE, proper
ventilating, No smoking, No Static
electricity on open flames.
Isolate noise, damper noise, use hearing
protection.
TOOLS FOR COMPREHENSIVE HAZARD ASSESSMENT
FORM #1 - WORK DETAIL
Area of Activity:
Renovation and Construciton of Interior
layout of Retail Stores & Office Spaces
Supervisor (Ryson Int. Const. Ltd.):
Trades/Occupations (within area of activity)
1
2
3
4
5
Tasks/hazardous conditions
(within area of activity)
Accident History Yes
or No
Regulatory
Compliance Issue
1. Working at heights
2. Using Sissor Lift
3. Using a table saw
4. Working in public areas
5. Damage to food & merchandise
6. Portable power tools
7. Hazardous material
8. Spraying liquid adhesive
9. Work in conjested areas
10. Lifting heavy loads
11. Falling objects
Assessment Team:
Date:
Manager Signature:
Safety Co-ordinator Signature:
Priority Ranking
TOOLS FOR COMPREHENSIVE HAZARD ASSESSMENT FORM - 2 - CONTROLS
HAZARD
Working at heights
TASKS/ISSUES
Pwr elevated
platforms
PRIORITY RANKING
CONTROLS
2
In Place
In Place
3
Specfic Training
Job procedure
PPEHarness/Lanyard
Daily Inspection
SWP
3
Job procedure
In Place
SWP
PPEHarness/Lanyard
In Place
3
SWP
In Place
Dust Contamination
Lifting & handling
heavy loads
Pwr Hand Tools
3
Job procedure
In Place
3
3
Table Saw
3
Paint Spraying
3
In Place
In Place
In Place
In Place
In Place
In Place
Defective Tools
Adhesives
Paints
Waste
Work Area
Storage
3
3
3
3
3
3
SWP
SWP
PPE
Job procedure
PPE- Safety Glasses
SWP
PPE - face mask or
respirator
JP - Red Tag
SWP
SWP
SWP
SWP
SWP
Step Ladders
Falling Objects
Customer Traffic
Merchandise
Damage
Physical
Mechanical
Hazardous Mat.
Housekeeping
Remove/install O/H
signage
Working among
pedestrians
ASSESSMENT COMPLETED BY: Trevor MacDonald,
RESPONSIBLE
DATE: 11 January 2015
TARGET DATE
COMPLETION DATE
In Place
In Place
In Place
In Place
In Place
In Place
In Place
In Place
In Place
In Place
In Place
Comprehensive Hazard Assessment
Annual Review
Hazards and controls have not changed:
no
Hazards and controls have changed:
yes
Workig at Heights
Pwr Elevated platform
Priority
Ranking
2
Step ladders
falling objects
remove/install signage
3
3
Hazard Category
Tasks / Issues
customer traffic
working among pedestrians
merchandise damage
dust
physical
lifting and handling
mechanical
Pwr hand tools
Hazardous materials
housekeeping
Assessment Team:
3
3
3
3
table saw
3
defective tools
adhesives
paints
waste
work area/storage
3
3
3
3
3
Signed:
Dated:
Signed:
Dated:
Controls
Specific Training
Job Procedure
PPE
Daily Inspections
SWP
Job Procedure
PPE
SWP
Job Procedure
SWP
SWP
PPE
Job Procedure
PPE
Job Procedure
SWP
SWP
SWP
SWP
Responsible to
complete
Target Completion
Date
Completion Date
In place
In place
In place
In place
In place
In place
In place
In place
In place
In place
In place
In place
In place
In place
In place
In place
In place
In place
In place
Annual Review
Safe Work Practices
Safe Work Practices
Development
Date
1
Attaching Cable Clamps
& Clamping Wire Rope
2
Backing Vehicles
2004
3
Belt Sander
2004
4
Care of Hand Tools
2004
5
Cell Phone Usage
2004
6
Cleaning Solvents &
Flammables
2004
7
Company Truck
2004
8
Computer Use Habits
2004
9
Defective Tools – Tools
on Site
2004
10 Defective Tools
11
Drills & Associated
Equipment
2004
2004
2004
12 Electric Shock
2004
Explosive Powder
13 Actuated Fastening
Tools
2004
14 Extension Cords
2004
15 Fire & Fire Extinguishers
2004
16 Floor Openings
2004
17 Forklifts
2004
Review
Date
Decision
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM
2014
Review
Date Decision
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
MAY
2014
MAY
2014
MAY
2014
MAY
2014
JAN
2015
JAN
2015
JAN
2015
JAN
2015
TM
TM
TM
TM
VS
VS
VS
VS
File Name: 2e47e94c-0ff6-438a-a8c0-a72d33e63b79
Modified: Jul-2015
Safe Work Practices
Development
18 Garbage Removal
2004
19 Grinders – Portable
2004
20 Grinding
2004
21
Hammer Drills – Rotary
& Chippers
2004
22 Hand Tools
2004
23 Housekeeping
2004
24 Ladder – Step
2004
25 Ladder – Portable
2004
26 Lifting & Carrying
2004
27 Lifting & Hoisting
2004
28 Man lifts – Operating
2004
29 Material Handling
2004
Moving Heavy
Equipment
2004
30
31 Office Safety – 01
2004
32 Office Safety – 02
2004
33
Packing Tools –
UNIBAND & Cutter
2004
34 Personal Hygiene
2004
35 Power Drills
2004
36 Power Tools
2004
37 Propane
2004
Review
MAY
TM
2014
MAY
TM
2014
MAY
TM
2014
MAY
TM
2014
MAY
TM
2014
MAY
TM
2014
MAY
TM
2014
MAY
TM
2014
MAY
TM
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
Review
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
File Name: 2e47e94c-0ff6-438a-a8c0-a72d33e63b79
Modified: Jul-2015
Safe Work Practices
Proper Work
38
Environment
Respirators – Series
39
5500 & 7700
Development
2004
2004
40 Repetitive Motion
2004
41 Safety Do’s & Don’ts
2004
42 Saw – Chop
2004
43 Saw – Floor
2004
44
Saw – Hand Held
Circular
2004
45 Saw – Hole
2004
46 Scaffold – Frame
2004
47 Scaffold – Metal
2004
48 Scaffold – Rolling
2004
49
Storage of Material on
Site
2004
50 Storing & Piling Material
2004
51 Transportation Safety
2004
52 Turbo Dryer
2004
53
Unfamiliar Tools &
Equipment
2004
54 Vehicle Safety
2004
55 Waste Removal
2004
56 Working Alone
2004
57
Working in Congested
Areas
2004
Review
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
Review
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
File Name: 2e47e94c-0ff6-438a-a8c0-a72d33e63b79
Modified: Jul-2015
Safe Work Practices
Working in Dust or Paint
58
Laden Areas
Development
2004
59 Concrete Saw
2007
60 Soldering and Brazing
2009
61 Rolling Safety Ladder
2009
62 Router/Trimmer
2014
63 Band Saw
2014
64 Drill Press
2014
65 Pinner/Stapler
2014
66 Brad Nailer
2014
67
Cordless Brad Nailer
(Fuel Cell)
2014
68 Utility Knife
2014
69 Silica Exposure
2014
70 Edge Bander
2014
71
72
Review
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
MAY
TM/RB
2014
DEC
RF/VS
2014
DEC
RF/VS
2014
DEC
RF/VS
2014
Approved By OH&S Rep: RICK BAKER
Date:
Approved By OH&S Rep: VICTOR SAWLOR
Date:
DEC
2014
DEC
2014
Review
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
JAN
VS
2015
Date:
Date:
JAN
2015
File Name: 2e47e94c-0ff6-438a-a8c0-a72d33e63b79
Modified: Jul-2015
01
Safe Work Practices
Attaching Cable Clips & Clamping Wire Rope
General
1. Wire the thimble to the rope at the desired point, then bend the rope
around the thimble and secure temporarily by wiring the rope
members together.
2. First attach the clip farthest from the thimble and tighten (be sure the
base of the saddle rests upon the live end of the rope and the “U”
bolts on the shortest end.) All clips must be attached in this manner.
3. The clip nearest the thimble goes on next. Do not tighten yet. If one or
more additional clips are to be attached, place them at an equal
distance apart between the clips already attached.
4. Before tightening, place some stress on the rope to take up the slack
and equalize the tension on both sides of the clip. (Do not apply too
much stress or the clip attached in step 1 will not hold). Tighten all
clips.
Diameter of Rope
(millimeters)
Number of Clips
6
8
10
11
12
16
19
22
25
29
32
38
44
50
2
2
2
2
3
3
4
4
4
5
5
6
7
8
Spacing Between
Clips Center to
Center
(millimeters)
38
51
57
64
76
102
114
133
152
178
203
229
267
305
Torque
(Newton - Meters)
20
40
65
90
90
135
176
305
305
305
488
488
628
881
02
Safe Work Practices
Backing Vehicles
An unacceptable number of vehicle accidents occur when backing into
an area. The implementation of these safe-backing procedures will
significantly increase safe driving practices.
1.
2.
3.
4.
The driver will use a ground guide when backing the vehicle.
The ground guide will remain visible at all times, to the driver.
The driver will obey the ground guide’s directions.
In the event a ground guide is unavailable, the driver will exit the
vehicle and do a complete walk around to ensure the route is
unobstructed.
03
Safe Work Practices
Belt Sander
General
1. Never use the sander if it is defective in any way.
2. When using the belt sander, ensure that you are wearing the proper
PPE (safety glasses, filtered mask, etc).
3. Use the proper sanding belt for the material being sanded.
4. Ensure that the electrical cord is without any cuts, frays, or any other
damage.
5. When sanding material, make sure that the work piece is secured by
means of clamps. Never hold the material with one hand and sand
with the other.
6. When changing sanding belts, ensure that the plug or power source
has been disconnected.
7. If you are unfamiliar with this piece of equipment, check with your
supervisor for safe operating practices and / or refer to the equipment
manual.
04
Safe Work Practices
Care of Hand Tools
Hand tools are used every day on a construction site. They are used so
much and so often that the proper care is many times forgotten. As we
list some important points on proper care of hand tools, please refresh you
memory concerning these points.
Proper Care of Tools
 Take good care of tools. Use tools carefully and you will have less
need for first-aid.
 Keep tools clean. Protect them against damage from corrosion. Dip
tool occasionally in cleaning fluids or solvents and wipe them clean.
Lubricate adjustable and moving parts to prevent wear and
misalignment.
 Keep cutting edges sharp. Sharp tools are much safer than dull ones.
 When sharpening, redressing or repairing tools, sharpen, grind, hone,
file, fix and set them properly, using other tools suited to each purpose.
 For sharpening tools, either on oil stone or a grind stone is preferable.
 Tools which are struck by hammers, such as chisels or punches, should
have the head ground periodically to prevent mushrooming.
 When tools are not in use keep them in suitable boxes, racks or trays.
Put them down carefully and in an orderly manner on work benches,
with cutting edge turned away from you.
 Place tools so they cannot fall and where no one can strike against or
trip over them. Tools shall not be placed on elevated benches, tables,
or platforms so they cannot roll or be kicked or knocked off.
 When carrying tools, protect the cutting edges and carry the tools in
such a way that you will not endanger yourself or others.
 Carry pointed or sharp-edged tools in pouches or holsters.
 Refit or replace loose or split handles. Do not rely on friction tape to
secure split handles.
 Keep handles wedged tightly in the heads of all tools. Keep them
smooth and free of rough or jagged surfaces.
05
Safe Work Practices
Cell Phone Usage
General
Protecting workers from injuries associated with the IMPROPER use of cell
phones while operating a motor vehicle.
Using a cell phone improperly while operating a motor vehicle may be
hazardous to the worker and general public.
Make driving your first priority.
Whenever possible, let your Voice Mail take your incoming calls.
Utilize a hands-free device at all times while driving
Do not engage in stressful or emotional conversations.
Ensure you know your wireless phone and its features such as speed
dial and redial.

Do not taking notes or looking up phone numbers while driving.

Do not email or text while driving.

Ensure cellular phones are turned off when refueling.





05
Safe Work Practices
Cell Phone Usage
For purpose of this policy, the term “cell phone” is defined as any handheld
electronic device with the ability to receive and/or transmit voice, text, or
data messages without a cable connection (including, but not limited to ,
cellular telephones, digital wireless phones, radio-phones/walkie talkies,
telephone pagers, PDA’s(personal digital assistants with wireless
communications capabilities), or RIM(research in motion) wireless
devices). Ryson Interior Construction reserves the right to modify or
update these policies at any time.
1. Use of Cell Phones or Similar Devices.
a. General use at work – while at work, employees are expected to
exercise the same discretion in using personal cell phones as they
use with company phones. Excessive personal calls during the
workday, regardless of the phone used, can interfere with employee
productivity and be distracting to others. Employees should restrict
personal calls during work time and should use personal cell phones
only during scheduled breaks or lunch periods in non-working areas.
Other personal calls should be made during non-working time
whenever possible, and employees should ensure that their friends
and family members are instructed of this policy. Ryson Interior
Construction is not liable for the loss of personal cell phones brought
into the workplace.
b. Unsafe Work Situations – Ryson Interior Construction prohibits the
use of cell phones or similar devices while at any work site at which
the operation of such device would be a distraction to the user
and/or could create an unsafe work environment. Such work sites
must be secured or the device only used by an employee who is out
of harm’s way at such a work environment.
c. Use While Driving – Ryson Interior Construction prohibits employee
use of cell phones or similar devices for company related-purposes
while driving. This prohibition includes receiving or placing calls, text
messaging or surfing the internet, receiving or responding to email,
checking for phone messages or any other purpose related to Ryson
employment, its customers, vendors, meetings or any other
company-related activities not names herein. Employees must stop
their vehicles in safe locations in order to use cell phones or similar
devices, employ the use of hands free devices whenever possible or
allow calls to go to voicemail.
05
Safe Work Practices
2. Personal Use of Company-Owned Cell Phones.
Ryson Interior Construction may issue business cell phones to select
employees for work related communications. To protect the employee from
incurring tax liabilities for the personal use of such equipment, these
company issued phones are to be used for business purpose only.
Employees in possession of company equipment (including cell phones)
are to be expected to protect the equipment from loss, damage, or theft.
On resignation or termination of employment, or at any time on request,
the employee maybe asked to produce the phone for return or inspection.
06
Safe Work Practices
Use of Cleaning Solvent & Flammables
General
Cleaning solvents are used in the day-to-day construction work to clean
tools and equipment. Special care must be taken to protect the worker
from hazard which may be created from the use of these liquids.
Wherever possible, solvents should be non-flammable and non-toxic.
The Manager must be aware of all solvents / flammables that are used on
the premises, and be sure that all employees who use these materials
have been instructed in their proper use and any hazards they may pose.
The following instructions or rules apply when solvents / flammables are
used:
1. Use non-flammable solvents for general cleaning.
2. When flammable liquids are used, make sure that no hot work is
permitted in the area.
3. Store flammables and solvents in special storage areas.
4. Check toxic hazard of all solvents before use. (MSDS)
5. Provide adequate ventilation where all solvents and flammables are
being used.
6. Use goggles or face shields to protect the face and eyes from splashes
or sprays.
7. Use rubber gloves to protect the hands.
8. Wear protective clothing to prevent contamination of employees’
clothes.
9. When breathing hazards exist, use the appropriate respiratory
protection.
10. Never leave solvents in open tubs or vats - return them to storage
drums or tanks.
11. Ensure that proper containers are used for transportation, storage and
field use of solvents / flammables.
12. Where solvents are controlled products, ensure all employees using or
in the vicinity of the use or storage are trained and certified in WHMIS.
Ensure all WHMIS requirements are met.
07
Safe Work Practices
Company Truck
General
Like every vehicle, certain care must be given to the company trucks to
keep them operating at their best. Some general maintenance can
prevent accidents and costly repairs.
1. Make sure the vehicle is properly registered and annually inspected.
Also, make sure that there is a valid permit, insurance card, and an
accident report form in the vehicle.
2. Ensure that all the lights on the vehicle work properly.
3. Make sure all gauges work.
4. Maintain all fluid levels.
5. Inspect tires for excessive ware.
6. Periodically test the brakes and inspect the brake lines. If there is a
problem, have it repaired immediately.
7. All trucks have a regular maintenance schedule. Following this
schedule will be the responsibility of management.
8. Before operating, do a walk around inspection. Check tires, lights,
leaking fluids, check for loose nuts / bolts. Check all fluid levels.
08
Safe Work Practices
Computer Use Habits
Adjusting Your Computer Monitor For Better Comfort
Use the proper lighting and adjust your computer screen and paperwork
appropriately to help reduce eyestrain and fatigue.
Tips
 Place monitor at eye level; lower if you wear bifocals.
 Place screen 18 to 30 inches from your eyes.
 Place your notes next to the screen at monitor height.
 Tip the monitor down to avoid reflecting ceiling lights.
screen clean.
 Use high-contrast, natural screen colours.
Keep your
Computers and Body Fatigue
Some people who use computers experience discomfort such as back
pain, stiff neck and shoulders, sore hands, or tired legs. Much of this
discomfort can be avoided, since these symptoms often arise from
pushing the body beyond its natural limits.
Tips
 Change Your Posture
Changing position reduces muscle fatigue. Maintain good back
support and keep your wrists straight. Avoid awkward or twisting
positions and frequent reaching. Use a gentle touch when typing or
using the mouse.
 Use Foot and Leg Support
Be sure your feet are well supported, either on the floor or on a
footrest. You may need a footrest if you raise your chair to keep your
wrists in a straight position. Don’t let the edge of your chair press into
the backs of your knees.
 Alternate Tasks
Do a variety of tasks throughout the day, alternating among several
different types of tasks. This gives the body a chance to recover while
you remain productive.
 Pause Regularly Throughout The Day
To minimize fatigue, take short rest breaks (30 seconds to 2 minutes)
between tasks throughout the day. During your breaks, perform simple
exercises and deep breathing to help your body eliminate the effects
of fatigue.
09
Safe Work Practices
Use of Tools On-Site
General
1. All tools on-site are to be secured at all times.
2. All tools on-site to be stored in:
a. job trailer
b. job box or storage box
c. vehicle from which it was removed
3. All tools to be returned to storage area or vehicle when finished
with.
4. Damaged or defective tools to be returned to the shop for
action, fill out maintenance form.
5. All tools returned to shop for maintenance must be tagged out.
Defective Tools
General
Defective tools can cause serious and painful injuries. If a tool is defective
in some way, DON’T USE IT.
Be aware of problems like:
 chisels and wedges with mushroomed heads
 split or cracked handles
 chipped or broken drill bits
 wrenches with worn out jaws
 tools which are not complete, such as files without handles
To ensure safe use of hand tools, remember:
 never use a defective tool
 double check all tools prior to use, and
 ensure defective tools are repaired
Air, gasoline or electric power tools require skill and complete attention on
the part of the user, even when they are in good condition. Don’t use
power tools when they are defective in any way.
Watch for problems like:
 broken or inoperative guards
09
Safe Work Practices
 insufficient or improper grounding due to damage on double insulated
tools
 no ground wire (on plug) of cords of standard tools
 the on / off switch not in good working order
 tool blade is cracked
 the wrong grinder is being used, or
 the guard has been wedged back on a power saw
Tagging and Removal of Defective Tools / Equipment
All defective tools or equipment are to be brought to the attention of the
Divisional Foreman.
The tool or equipment is then taken out of service, tagged with company
tags and placed in the designated and clearly marked areas within each
company shop location. The Divisional Foreman is responsible for the
repair and /or replacement of the defective tool or equipment.
10
Safe Work Practices
Defective Tools
Defective tools can cause serious and painful injuries.
defective, in any way, DO NOT USE IT.
If a tool is
Be aware of problems like:
 chisels and wedges with mushroom heads
 split or cracked handles
 chipped or broken drill bits
 wrenches with worn out jaws
 tools which are not complete, such as files without handles
To ensure safe use of hand tools, remember:
 Never use a defective tool
 Double check all tools prior to use
 Ensure defective tools are repaired and or reported
Air, gasoline, or electric power tools all require skill and complete attention
on the part of the user, even when they are in good condition. Never use
power tools when they are defective in any way.
Watch for problem like:
 broken, missing or inoperative guards
 insufficient or improper grounding due to damage on double insulated
tools
 no grounding wire (on plug) or cards of standard tools
 the on/off switch is not in good working order
 tool blade is dull or cracked
 the wrong grinder wheel is being used
 the guard has been wedged back on a power saw
11
Safe Work Practices
Use of Drills & Associated Equipment
General
1. Visually inspect drills and cords to check for frays and damaged
equipment.
2. Select proper bits for the application.
3. Install bit into chuck, tighten all three chuck key sets to ensure bit will
not fall out.
4. Check before drilling through walls or floors to prevent property
damage or injury to others
5. Drill all holes through wood members in center or as close as practical,
to allow for proper installation of cables.
6. When finished, return drills and equipment to job box or vehicle from
which it came.
12
Safe Work Practices
Electrical Shock
1. Before treating, ensure that the hazard of electrical shock has been
removed.
2. If the casualty is unconscious check for breathing. If there is breathing,
position the person on their side. If there is no breathing, administer
mouth to mouth resuscitation, then, check for heart beat by taking the
pulse. If the casualty does not have a pulse, administer CPR.
3. Check for further injuries that may result from a fall, such as fractures. If
you suspect a spinal injury DO NOT move the person.
4. Check for entry and exit wounds of the electrical charge. Treat as
open wounds by covering with clean dressing.
5. Seek medical assistance.
13
Safe Work Practices
Explosive / Powder Actuated Fastening Tools
General
There are a number of tools utilizing an explosive charge in use throughout
the construction industry to drive fastenings. The manufacturers of these
devices provide detailed instructions regarding their use and
maintenance. These instructions, along with the legislation specifically set
out for their use, shall be closely adhered to at all times.
The following general recommendations apply to all explosive / powder
actuated tools.
1. Only properly trained and qualified operators are to use this type
of tool. The user shall possess proof of this training issued by the
manufacturer, authorized dealer / distributor, or other
competent source.
2. The tool must be CSA approved for Explosive Powder Actuated
Fastening Tools.
3. The tool should be loaded just prior to use with the correct load
for the job anticipated. Tools should never be loaded and left to
sit or be moved to a alternate work site after being loaded.
4. The tool should never be pointed at anyone, whether loaded or
unloaded. Hands should be kept clear of the muzzle end at all
times.
5. Explosive / powder actuated tools should always be stored in
their proper lock-able boxes.
6. Explosive / powder actuated tools must never be used in an
explosive atmosphere.
7. When used, the tool must be held firmly and at right angles to
the surface being driven into.
8. Eye protection must be worn by the operator. Where there is a
danger of spalling, full face protection must be worn. Hearing
protection is also to be worn in confined areas.
9. To prevent free-flying studs, ensure that the material being driven
into will not allow the stud to completely pass through it.
10. Manufacturers’ recommendations should be consulted and
followed whenever there is a doubt about the material being
driven into, maintenance procedures, or load strength to be
used.
11. Always be aware of other workers. Where a hazard to other
workers is created by this operation, signs and barricades
identifying the hazard area are mandatory.
14
Safe Work Practices
Extension Cords
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Inspect the cords before using.
Use only wire designed for extension cord use (not building wire).
Use only cords of proper wire size to do a specific job.
Only use a receptacle or plug hooked up to proper fuse or breaker.
Do not lay your cords on floors. If possible, suspend them in the air so
they will not be a trip hazard.
6. When working in wet locations, always use a GFI plug.
7. If possible, when working outside, plug cords in a GFI outlet.
8. Never use cords that have broken grounding prongs.
9. Discard extension cords which have badly cracked insulation.
10. Keep cords from excessive heat, oil, and sharp edges.
15
Safe Work Practices
Fire and Use of Fire Extinguishers
Good housekeeping is essential in the prevention of fires. Fires can start
anywhere and at any time. This is why it is important to know which fire
extinguisher to use and how to use it.
Always keep fire extinguishers visible and easily accessible. Fire
extinguishers have to be properly maintained to do the job. Where
temperature is a factor, ensure that care is taken in selecting the right
extinguisher.
Types of fires
Class A:
These fires consist of wood, paper, rags, rubbish and other
ordinary combustible materials.
Recommended Extinguishers
 Water from a hose, pump-type water can, or pressurized extinguisher
and soda acid extinguishers.
Fighting the Fire
 Soak the fire completely - even the smoking embers.
Class B:
Flammable liquids, oil and grease
Recommended Extinguishers
 ABC unite, dry chemical, foam and carbon dioxide extinguishers.
Fighting the Fire
 Start at the base of the fire and use a swinging motion from left to right,
always keeping the fire in front of you.
Class C:
Electrical Equipment
Recommended Extinguishers
 Carbon dioxide and dry chemical (ABC units) extinguishers.
Fighting the Fire
 Use short bursts on the fire. When the electrical current is shut off on a
Class C fire, it can become a Class A fire if the materials around the
electrical fire are ignited.
NOTE: It is the responsibility of each firm/company to ensure that its safe
work practices are in compliance with all provincial and/or federal
legislation.
16
Safe Work Practices
Floor Openings
1. Guardrails are the preferred method for protecting workers near floor
openings but may not always be practical. Narrow access routes, for
example, may rule them out. In such cases, securely fasten covers –
planks, plywood, or steel plates – may be the best alternative.
2. Use 48 mm full-sized # 1 spruce planks. In some cases, pallet like
designs can make covers stronger and less likely to be removed.
3. Make opening covers stand out with bright paint. Include a warning
sign “DANGER – DO NOT REMOVE – DO NOT LOAD”.
4. Fasten the cover securely to the floor to prevent workers from
removing it and falling through the opening.
5. The following table indicated the load limits for two different spans and
grades of planks for opening covers.
Uniformly Distributed
Load per sq. ft
Up to 5’ span
Up to 7’ span
150 lbs
No. 1 Grade
Not allowed – load
exceeds plank capacity
100 lbs
No. 1 Grade
Select structural grade
75 lbs
No. 1 Grade
No. 1 Grade
Notes
1. Planks are spruce-pine-fur species group (SPF).
2. Planks are at least 17/8” thick and 9¾” wide.
3. Allowable stresses conform with CSA Standard CAN3-086-1984 “Engineering
Design in
…wood”.
4. No stress increases are included for load sharing or load duration.
5. Width of opening shall be no greater than the span.
6. Loads indicated are maximum for grade and loading conditions, with cover
completely
….“decked in” with planks
17
Safe Work Practices
Forklift
Starting
CAUTION:
Start this forklift from the operator’s seat only !!!!!!
1. Make sure all controls are in the neutral position and parking brake is
on.
2. Make sure engine stop control is pushed fully in.
3. Turn the key on and check the battery charge light is on.
4. Turn the key to the start position for 20 seconds or until the engine
starts. If the engine fails to start, wait 60 seconds and repeat.
5. For cold weather starting, turn the key to preheat for 15 to 20 seconds,
then to start for 60 seconds, or until engine starts. If the engine fails to
start, preheat for 10 seconds and repeat.
CAUTION:
CAUTION:
Do not use ETHER or any high energy starting fluids or sprays
as they can cause serious personal injury and engine
damage.
This engine has a pre-heater in the intake system. Starting
fluids can explode if they are used. The pre-heater MUST be
removed before using any such fluids.
6. The key must be in the on position while the engine is running.
7. Always let the engine idle for a few minutes before working the forklift.
CAUTION:
Stopping
1.
2.
3.
4.
High engine speeds when cold, could cause serious
damage to the engine, transmission and hydraulics.
Lower the forks to the ground.
Apply the parking brake.
Pull the engine stop until the engine stops.
Turn the key to the OFF position.
CAUTION: Never stop the engine after heavy use without letting it idle
for a few minutes to cool both the engine and the transmission down.
5. Clean the forklift and inspect for any damage that may have
occurred while operating it.
17A
Safe Work Practices
Changing a Propane Tank on a Forklift/Boomlift
PPE – use gloves to protect form possible skin burns from accidental
escape of propane and preventing fingers from pinches and sharp
edges.
Steps
1. Turn off motor
2. Make sure there is no source of ignition or open flame and no one is
smoking nearby
3. Close the fuel valve on the tank before disconnecting the fuel hose
coupler
4. Unhook the straps that secure the tank to the machine
5. Lift off the ‘empty’ tank and check its date of manufacture or last valid
inspection date (must be 10 years or less to be refilled)
6. Make sure the ‘full’ tank is the same size and type of fitting as the
‘empty’ tank
7. Inspect the fuel hose fitting to make sure the o ring is in good condition
and the tank valve threads are clear of any dirt
8. Lift the ‘full’ tank into the saddle and hook on the hold drum straps
9. Screw on the fuel hose fitting taking care that the threads screw in
properly and are properly seated
10. Slowly open the tanks supply fuel valve and check for leaks around
fittings by applying a small amount of soapy water – look for bubbles
escaping at the fitting joint which is due to a leak. Also a hissing sound
is another indication of a leak and the smell of ‘rotten eggs’ is another
indication of leaking propane
- If you suspect a leak check the tightness of the screw in hose fitting
and recheck. If the leak stops, you may start the machine. If the leak
does not stop turn off the tank supply valve. Contact the machines
authorized service representative for assistance
18
Safe Work Practices
Garbage Removal
1. Waste removal to be done on a daily or job basis (service calls
only).
2. Site is to be kept as clean as possible and mainlined in a
workmanlike manner.
3. Waste metals and cardboard waste are to be taken to a recycling
shop (if in the area), all other garbage is to be disposed of prior to
returning to the shop.
4. Toxic materials and hazardous waste to be stored properly and
taken to the appropriate facility for disposal.
19
Safe Work Practices
Use of Portable Grinders
General
Abrasive wheels can cause severe injury. Proper storage of wheels,
proper use of wheels and proper maintenance of wheels must be
observed.
1. Familiarize yourself with the grinder operation before commencing
work.
2. Ensure proper guards are in place and that safety glasses, face shields,
gloves and safety boots are worn when using portable grinders.
3. Never exceed the maximum wheel speed. Check the speed marked
on the wheel and compare it to the speed on the grinder.
4. When mounting the wheels, check them for cracks and defects,
ensure that the mounting flanges are clean and the mounting blotters
are used. Do not over tighten the mounting nut.
5. Before grinding, run newly mounted wheels at operating speed to
check for vibrations.
6. Do not use grinders near flammable materials.
7. Never use the grinder for jobs for which it is not designed, such as
cutting.
8. Watch out for finished surfaces - sparks can damage them.
20
Safe Work Practices
Grinding
General
Severe injury may occur if proper protective equipment is not used and
properly maintained.
1. Check the tool for the correct distance from the abrasive wheel,
maximum 1/8” or 3mm clearance.
2. Replace the grindstone when adjustment of the rest cannot provide
1/8” or 3mm clearance.
3. If the wheel has been abused and ground to an angle or grooved,
reface the wheel with the appropriate surfacing tool.
4. Protect your eyes with goggles or a face shield at all times when
grinding.
5. Each time a grinding wheel is mounted, the maximum approved
speed stamped on the wheel bladder should be checked against the
shaft rotation speed of the machine to ensure the safe peripheral
speed is not exceeded. A grinding wheel must not be operated at
peripheral speed exceeding the manufacturer’s recommendation.
6. The flanges supporting the grinding wheel should be a maximum of 1/3
the diameter of the wheel, and must fit the shaft rotating speed
according to the manufacturer’s recommendations.
7. Bench grinders are designed for peripheral grinding. Do not grind on
the side of the wheel.
8. Do not stand directly in front of the grinding wheel when it is first
started.
21
Safe Work Practices
Rotary Hammer Drills + Chippers
General
There are operating instructions by all manufacturers. This version of the
Safe Work Procedure is not meant to omit any of those instructions.
 Hearing protection is required while in use.
 Safety glasses or a face shield shall be worn when operating a drill or
chipper.
 Always operate a drill with both hands.
 Never lower a drill by its cord.
 Never attempt to use bits that are broken, chipped or bent.
 Always operate a drill 90 degrees to the drilling surface.
 Be sure to have stable footing.
 Keep the drill clean and lubricated with an approved product.
 Check the electrical cord before each use.
 Avoid standing in water or having the cord in water while drilling.
 Store in the container provided.
22
Safe Work Practices
Hand Tools
General
Hand tools shall be treated with respect and used correctly to avoid
incidents. All hand tools shall be inspected prior to each use to ensure
that they are in good condition.
Some rules for hand tool use are:
1. Always use the correct tool for the job.
2. Don’t use a screwdriver as a chisel or pry bar.
3. Don’t use worn tools; keep blades sharp, handles in good condition,
clean and firmly attached.
4. Don’t leave tools on scaffolds, ladders, or overhead when not in use.
5. Always use containers to hold tools to prevent them from falling when
you are working on scaffolds or ladders.
6. Don’t throw tools from one location to another, or drop them to a
lower level.
7. Don’t carry sharp edged tools in your pockets or clothing.
23
Safe Work Practices
Housekeeping
Housekeeping is a very important part of your job. Not only does it
improve the overall appearance of your shop or work area, it shows that
you take pride in your where you work. The best way that you can help
keep your work place clean is to pick up after yourself. Don’t leave it for
the next person or another company to worry about.
Here are some reasons to keep your work area clean:
1. You reduce trip and fall hazards.
2. Increase production. You won’t have to waste time looking for a
misplaced tool. You will always know where your tools are when you
put them where they belong after you use them.
3. If someone falls because of materials you left on the floor, you will feel
guilty because you were the cause factor in the incident. Also, the
injured worker may want to remind you of that.
4. You reduce a potential fire hazard by removing unneeded
combustibles from the work area.
Here are some tips to maintain a clean work area:
1. Plan the job. Make a list of the needed tools / materials. This will help
to minimize unnecessary clutter around your work area.
2. Develop a routine for cleaning up at the end of the day or periodically
during the day.
3. Do not allow employees to eat, drink, or smoke in the work area, not
only because of littler problems, but also because of hygienic
concerns.
This is not, by any means, all inclusive. The point is, take responsibility for
yourself and your work area. Remember, a clean work area is a
productive work area and also enhances safety.
24
Safe Work Practices
Use of Step Ladders
As with all ladders, make sure that the step ladder is in good condition
and the right ladder for the job.
 Step ladders are to be used only on clean and even surfaces.
 No work is to be done from the top two steps of a step ladder counting the top platform as a rung.
 When in the open position ready for use, the incline of the front step
section is to be one foot horizontal for every six feet vertical.
 The step ladder is only to be used in the fully opened position with the
spreader bars locked.
 Tops of step ladders are not to be used as a support for scaffolds.
 Don't overreach while on the ladder. Climb down and move the
ladder over to a new position.
 If a step ladder is used to access a working surface – it must extend 3
feet above the working surface and be held by another worker while
the other worker climbs up or down.
 Only CSA Standard ladders will be used.
 No aluminum ladders will be used for electrical work.
 Use only approved ladders shall be used,
 DO NOT use any other companies ladders.
NOTE: It is the responsibility of each firm/company to ensure that its safe
work practices are in compliance with all provincial and/or federal
legislation.
25
Safe Work Practices
Use of Portable Ladders
General
Ladders can be used safely if they are given the respect they deserve.
Before using any ladder, make sure that it is in good condition and is the
right ladder for the job to be done.
1. When setting up a ladder, secure the base and “walk” the ladder up
into place.
2. The ladder should be set at the proper angle of one horizontal to every
four vertical.
3. Before using a ladder, make sure it is secured against movement.
4. When in position, the ladder should protrude one metre above the
intended landing point.
5. Workers shall not work from the top two rungs of a ladder.
6. Don’t overreach while on a ladder. It is easier and safer to climb down
and move the ladder over a few feet to a new position.
7. Always face the ladder when using it. Grip it firmly and use the threepoint contact method when moving up or down.
8. The minimum overlap on an extension ladder should be one metre
unless the manufacturer specifies the overlap.
9. Keep both metal and wood ladders away from electrical sources.
10. No metal ladders.
26
Safe Work Practices
How to Lift
Steps
1. Plan your move. Size up your load and make sure the path is clear.
2. Look over the object to be lifted. Make sure that it is not too heavy or
clumsy for good balance.
3. Stand close to the load with your feet spread apart for good balance.
Make sure your footing is sound and that there is no tripping or slipping
hazards.
4. Bend your knees, straddle the load somewhat (that is, put one foot
along the side of the object and one foot behind it). Keep your back
as straight as possible, straight does not mean vertical.
5. Get a good grip to ensure that the load is secure in your hands.
6. Lift gradually. Straighten out your knees and stand. Use your leg
muscles. Avoid quick, jerky motions.
7. Some objects may require a variation of the techniques listed above.
NOTE:
If the object is too heavy, large, hard to handle, or must be
placed higher than the waist, try teaming – two or more people
working together. These people should be approximately the
same size with one person giving clear signals so that the effort is
made together.
27
Safe Work Practices
Proper Lifting Practices - Hoisting
General
Determine the weight of the object or load prior to a lift to make sure that
the lifting equipment can operate within its capabilities.
Balance Loads
Estimate the centre of gravity or point of balance. The lifting device
should be positioned immediately above the estimated centre of gravity.
Landing the Load
Prepare a place to land the load, lower the load gently and make sure it
is stable before slackening the sling or chain.
1. Select only alloy chain slings and NEVER exceed the working load
limits.
2. Make sure the hoist or crane is directly over the load.
3. Use slings of proper reach. Never shorten a line by twisting or knotting.
With chain slings, never use bolts or nuts.
4. Never permit anyone to ride the lifting hook or the load.
5. Make sure all personnel stand clear from the load being lifted.
6. Never work under a suspended load, unless the load is properly
supported.
7. Never leave a load suspended when hoist or crane is unattended.
8. Inspect all slings thoroughly at specific intervals and maintain them in
good condition.
9. Inspect each chain or sling for cuts, bent links, hooks, etc., before each
use. If in doubt, don’t use it.
10. Ensure that safety latches on hooks are in good working condition.
11. Ensure that the signaler is properly identified and understands
techniques of proper signaling.
12. Make sure a tag-line is used to control the load.
28
Safe Work Practices
Operation of Motorized Lift Equipment (Man lifts)
General
Inspect before each use to insure all fittings are in place, tires are inflated
properly, and there are no fuel leaks.
Use only operators trained in the use of the lift by the supplier and refer to
the safe job procedure for the operation of that piece of equipment.
Never set up on unstable ground.
Use signage or tape off the area below the lift to ensure workers below
are not injured from objects that may fall from the lift.
Workers are to wear an approved body harness and lanyards.
Know the load limits of the lift (posted on the machine) and never exceed
the safe working limits.
Never use the lift for anything other than it’s designed purpose. Refer to
the manufacturer’s operating manual or to a safe job procedure for
guidelines or limitations.
29
Safe Work Practices
Material Handling
General
With material handling the approach is relatively simple.....we can ask a
series of questions:
1. Must the load be moved?
 With proper planning and organization many manual handling
tasks can be eliminated.
2. Must a load be lifted?
 Some loads can be slid, pushed, pulled, rolled, poured or pumped,
removing the need to lift.
3. Can the load be moved mechanically?
 If possible use a crane, forklift, winch or hand truck to handle the
load.
4. Can the load be reduced?
 Break a load into two or more components if possible.
5. Can assistance be gained?
 Some loads require a team to lift to handle the size, bulk or weight.
Finally, whether assistance is available or not, there is one last
question which must be asked.
6. Is the load too heavy to lift safely?
 Do not lift a load that is too bulky, too awkward, or is not within your
comfortable lifting capacity.
30
Safe Work Practices
Moving Heavy Equipment
Equipment Required
 back up alarm
PPE
 hard hat, safety boots
Job Sequence
1. Prior to entering the vehicle, walk around and ensure that there is no
equipment or people that may get damaged or injured.
2. Check vision and adjust mirrors as required to ensure that a good line
of sight is maintained while moving, it is also required to get the
assistance of another employee behind the vehicle making sure that
eye contact is maintained.
3. Check air brakes to ensure that adequate pressure is reached, and
activate the brakes to see if they are functioning properly.
4. Make sure the back-up alarm is working, to do this shift into reverse
and check for back-up alarm. If not functioning, sound the horn and
proceed, report the defect to your supervisor immediately.
Hazards to look for
1. Equipment in hidden areas
2. Employees around or working under the vehicle
31
Safe Work Practices
Office Safety
General
Protecting workers from injuries associated with office environment
 Ensure you are conversant with emergency evacuation.
 Ensure that all electrical cords are in good condition and are not
overloaded.
 Ensure that computer monitors are adjusted to correct height and
kept clean.
 Ensure fans/space heaters are used to manufacturer specifications.
 Ensure floors and aisles are kept clear and not cluttered.
 Ensure that only one drawer of filling is open at one time and that
drawers are closed when not in use.
 Ensure proper type of fire extinguisher is available.
 When transporting materials of a heavy nature ensure that handcarts
and trolleys are used properly.
 Operate microwave according to manufacturers specifications.
 Ensure coffee makers are used according to manufacturer
specifications.
 Ensure photocopier is maintained according to manufacturers
specifications.
 Ensure chairs are in good repair.
 Ensure rugs are kept clean and in good repair – free of tripping hazard.
 Ensure paper cutter blade is placed in closed lock position.
 Ensure all loose clothing is tied back when using paper shredder.
32
Safe Work Practices
Office Safety
General
 Employees shall report all injuries, regardless of severity, to their
immediate supervisor.
 Employees should walk cautiously up and down stairs; the handrail
should be used whenever possible.
 All employees associated with an office environment, must be trained
in all aspects of the office workplace. This includes a number of
closely associated SWP such as WHMIS, First Aid and Fire Safety.
Lifting & Carrying
 An employee shall obtain assistance in lifting heavy objects.
 Bulky objects shall not be carried in such a way as to obstruct the view
ahead or interfere with free use of
handrails or stairways.
 Large boxes or bundles of supplies shall be moved by a hand truck or
unpacked and delivered in smaller parcels.
Doors
 Doors shall be opened slowly to avoid striking anyone on the other side
of it.
 When opening solid doors without windows, care must be taken when
approaching from the push side. Open this type of door carefully to
avoid injuring persons approaching from the opposite direction. When
approaching and opening this type of door from the pull side, stand to
the door jam side of the pull handle when opening the door. This will
allow the door to be opened safely by a person approaching from the
opposite direction without injury to yourself. Doors that open into aisles
and corridors should be highlighted with warning signs. All doors
should be opened slowly and cautiously. Hold doors open for anyone
walking close behind you.
Furniture & Office Equipment
32
Safe Work Practices
Chairs
 The standard for office chairs is to have 5 legs with castors and the
ability to rotate 360°. Chairs that do not meet this standard shall be
replaced on an as needed basis.
 When sitting down, position yourself in front of the chair and move
slightly backwards until you feel the front edge of the seat pan with
the back of your legs. At this point bend your knees slightly until you
can touch and control the location of the chair with your hand or
hands. Stabilize the chair with your hands by grasping the seat or arms
and place yourself fully into the seat portion of the chair.
 When raising: place your feet flat on the floor and with your back
straight, grasp the seat or arms of the chair and lift your body weight
with your legs.
 There are two types of castors used on office chairs; carpet and
linoleum castors. Carpet castors are very large and designed to allow
the chair to move safely and easily on a carpet surface. The castors
being used on tile or linoleum flooring are ½ the size of carpet castors.
Use of the proper linoleum or tile castor does not allow an office chair
to roll unduly when an occupant rises and leaves the sitting position.
 Do not roll across the floor while sitting in a chair. Rolling of the chair,
while seated must be limited to the immediate workstation.
Workstations
 Workstations should be placed in the office space so as not to impede
access or egress from any part of the office.
 Workstations should be placed in the office space so as not to infringe
on the aisle space or corridor space which is critical to local and
national safety codes.
 Desks and desk tops must be maintained and relatively hazard free.
 All sharp objects are to be stored with the sharp point or edge safely
away from human contact.
 Drawers and doors must be closed when not in use. These create
hazards for any person walking by or working in the area.
Furniture
 Furniture should be considered in the same category as a tool. This
means it must be maintained in good working condition. Any parts
32
Safe Work Practices





such as drawers and / or moveable wings or attachments must be
maintained.
If any part or parts are found to be in a state of disrepair, it must be
identified and reported to your supervisor.
All book shelves, file drawers, credenzas and shelved cabinets must be
loaded with the majority of the weight on the bottom shelves. Under
no circumstances should the top shelves be left empty. When loading
a file cabinet, the bottom shelves must be loaded first.
All multi-drawer file shelves must have a functioning drawer locking
system which allows only one drawer to be opened at any given time.
When opening any desk or cabinet drawer, stand to one side of the
drawer and open it carefully. The drawer must have a safety stop to
prevent it from opening too far out of the track. If this safety stop is
missing or malfunctioning, a warning sign must be placed on the
drawer and the malfunction must be reported and repaired.
When closing a desk or cabinet drawer, apply steady pressure on the
center portion of the drawer. Ensure that your free hand is not in
jeopardy of being injured by the closing drawer.
Storage of Office Supplies
 Office supplies such as writing paper, computer paper, boxes and
other combustible items should be stored in an appropriate storage
area.
 When storing items on shelving units, the heavier items must be stored
on the lower shelves. This maintains stability in the shelving units and
places the heavy objects closer to the floor where they are easier to
retrieve.
 Sharp objects must be stored with their sharp edges directed away
from possible contact with body parts.
 Stored objects must not protrude beyond the edge of the shelf.
 Stick pins and thumb-tacks should be stored in a separate closed
container.
 Photocopier toner and other chemicals should be stored in metal
cabinets away from combustible material and heat sources.
 You must not store items on the top of cabinets, storage shelves or in
locations that would require excessive reaching.
Wearing Apparel & Personal Affects
 All wearing apparel must be stored when not in use; on a hanger,
stand, or hung in a closet which is designed for that use.
 All miscellaneous personal effects such as shoes, boots, purses,
briefcases, etc., must be stored in a location, which does not create a
hazard near or around the work space.
32
Safe Work Practices
Ladders
 Employees shall use a set of steps or a ladder when required to place
or obtain objects in elevated locations.
 Materials shall not be piled too high for stability or in a haphazard way.
 Ladders and platforms shall be examined before use: treads and feet
of ladders shall be provided with non-slip material.
 Boxes, chairs, etc., shall not be used in place of ladder.
Sharp Instruments
 Knives, scissors, letter openers, pens, pencils, etc., should be kept in
front of the desk drawer where they can be seen when the drawer is
opened.
 Care shall be exercised when using staples, punches, or paper cutters.
 Immediate first aid treatment is essential for all cuts and puncture
wounds, no matter how slight.
Filing Cabinets
 Drawers of desk and file cabinets shall be kept closed when not in use.
 Only one drawer of a file cabinet shall be pulled out at a time in order
to avoid overbalancing, unless the cabinet is securely fastened to the
wall or to other cabinets.
Fire Protection
 No employee shall smoke in areas designated by “No Smoking” signs.
 No employee shall hinder access to fire extinguishers or exits.
 Each employee shall note the location of fire extinguishers, exits, and
fire alarms and shall be knowledgeable in the use of each.
 It is the responsibility of each fire warden to ensure that all employees
are knowledgeable in fire protection and evacuation procedures.
 Employees discovering fires shall sound the alarm and, provided that it
is of a small nature, attempt to extinguish the fire. However, if there is a
danger from this procedure, these employees shall evacuate the
building immediately.
 All employees shall exercise good housekeeping habits, not allowing
waste, paper, rags, or other combustible material to accumulate.
Office Equipment
32
Safe Work Practices
 Unsafe electrical cords, faulty electrical or other equipment, or any
other hazardous conditions shall be reported.
 Employees shall not attempt to clean, oil, or adjust any machine that is
running. If the machine is not equipped with a starting switch that can
be locked in the “OFF” position, it shall be disconnected from the
power source.
 Chemicals used in office copiers and the like shall be stored in proper
containers, in proper storage areas, and handled with due care.
Appropriate PPE shall be worn when handling chemicals for office
functions.
 Safety shall be considered in what you wear on the job. Loose fitting
clothing, dangling bracelets, rings, and ties may cause serious injury to
employees operating or working around power driven machines and
shall not be worn.
Working in Outside Areas
 Office workers called upon to work in the operating areas of the
company shall observe the rules of that particular area.
Tips
 Deep Breathing - relieves muscle tension.
 Hand and Finger Massage - reduces cramping or stiffness and warms
your hands.
 Executive Stretch - exercises the entire upper body. Clasp your hands
behind your head and gently stretch your elbows back, taking in a
deep breath as you stretch back.
 Shoulder Shrugs - reduces tension or stiffness in the upper back and
neck. Gently raise your shoulders up toward your ears and then relax
your shoulders downward.
 Foot Rotation - improves circulation to your legs and feet. While
seated, rotate each ankle three times clockwise, then counterclockwise.
Lighting and Eyestrain
Like other parts of the body, the eyes need to be relaxed from time to
time.
Tips
 Lighting - when you work on a computer, the light level should be
dimmer than when you work with paper. If you work with both,
32
Safe Work Practices
choose relatively dim room lighting plus an adjustable reading lamp
that you can use for paperwork.
 Glare - angle the reading lamp away from your eyes and away from
the monitor so that you can’t see the un-shaded bulb and so there is
no glare on the monitor screen.
 Reflections - remove any reflective materials - such as glass desk pads
and picture frames - from around your monitor to avoid distracting
reflections. Also, try tilting your monitor downward, or reposition it on
your desk, to eliminate reflections.
Eye Exercises
Take brief (30 seconds to 2 minutes) but frequent pauses while working at
your computer to rest your eyes. This pause gives your eyes a chance to
recover from fatigue and help you feel refreshed.
Tips
 Yawning & Blinking - keeps the eyes lubricated.
 Changing Focus - relaxes the muscles of your eyes. With your arm
stretched in front of you, look at your fingertips, then at a point far
away from you then back to your fingertips.
 Palming - helps to overcome eyestrain. Support your head in your
hands, with your eyes covered, while you breathe deeply.
33
Safe Work Practices
Packing Tools & Cutters
Uniband Tensioning Tool Instruction Sheet
1. To eliminate waste, pull band from carton as needed. With ears
of buckle away from operator, slide the buckle on the banding.
Lace banding around the object being clamped and again
through the buckle.
2. Follow same steps to double wrap for added radial compression.
Bend end of band under buckle.
3. Slide band in tool the slot. Press down on gripper with thumb
and tension clamp by turning the handle. Maximum tension has
been reached when the band stops moving through the buckle.
4. When maximum tension has been reached, roll tool over buckle.
At same time reversing handle carefully approximately ¾ turn to
avoid breakage. The band that is released will be used in the
bend and therefore there is no loss of tension.
5. Lift cutter lever and band will be cut to correct length. On
smaller size ¼” and ” buckle, a stub remains after band is cut.
6. While holding the stub of the band with your thumb, hammer flat
over bridge of buckle. Complete application by hammering the
buckle ears over the stub.
Safety Instructions For Packing Tools + Cutters
1. This tool (or cutter) was designed and manufactured for safe
handling during the operation, for effective service, please read
and follow all safety, maintenance and operating instructions.
2. Always wear eye, face, and hand protection when operating
this tool.
3. Do not put hands or other parts of the body between the strap
and the package.
4. When cutting the strap, hold the upper portion and stand at a
safe distance away from the strap, as the lower strap will snap
forward.
5. Do not stand in line with the strap while it is being tensioned, the
strap could break if over tensioned.
6. Use the original packing products replacement parts.
Maintenance Instructions
1. Clean this tool with brush or periodically blowing dust or dirt off,
with clean, dry compressed air.
2. Apply light machine oil to all moving parts.
34
Safe Work Practices
Personal Hygiene
General
For safety and health reasons, and because of the products used in the
painting industry, common sense dictates that you must pay close
attention to your personal hygiene.
Basic hygienic guidelines for normal painting job-sites are as follows:
 wash hands thoroughly before eating or drinking
 avoid sticking objects into your mouth while working
 do not rub your eyes with dirty hands. Hands are know to be notorious
carriers of diseases
 long hair must be neat and secured to avoid a vision or safety hazard
 mustaches and beards should be trimmed neatly, however, to get a
proper fit with a respirator you must be clean shaven.
Basic hygienic guidelines for lead paint removed from job sites:
 face, hands, arms must be thoroughly washed prior to eating, drinking
or smoking
 hands shall be thoroughly washed prior to and after using the
washroom
 disposable coveralls, shoe covers, gloves, etc., must be placed in a
hazardous waste disposal container. Hazardous waste disposal shall
be in accordance with all local, provincial, and / or federal regulations
 after you have washed and changed back into normal work or street
cloths, re-entry into the lead paint removal site shall not be allowed.
35
Safe Work Practices
Power Drills
Review safe work practice for power tools.
Steps:
1. Always be sure that the tool is switched off and unplugged before
installing or removing the bit.
2. Before plugging in the tool, always check to see that the trigger switch
actuates properly and returns to the “OFF” position when released.
3. Change the direction of rotation only when the tool comes to a
complete stop. Changing it before the tool stops may ruin the drill.
4. Always be sure you have a firm footing, be sure that no one is below
when using this tool in high locations.
5. Hold the tool firmly.
6. Keep hands away from rotating parts.
7. Pressing excessively on the tool will not speed up the drilling. In fact,
this excessive pressure will only serve to damage the tip of your bit,
decrease the tool performance and shorten the service life of the tool.
8. There is tremendous force exerted on the tool / bit at the time of hole
breakthrough. Hold the tool firmly and exert care when the bit begins
to break through the work-piece.
9. A stuck bit can be removed simply by setting the reversing switch to
reverse rotation in order to back it out. However, the tool may back
out abruptly if you do not hold it firmly.
10. Always secure small work pieces in a vise or similar hold-down device.
11. When drilling into walls, floors or whatever “Live” electrical wires may
be encountered, DO NOT TOUCH ANY METAL PARTS OF THE TOOL.
12. Hold the tool by the insulated grasping surfaces to prevent electric
shock if you are drilling into a “live” wire.
13. Do not leave the tool running. Operate the tool only when hand-held.
14. Do not touch the drill bit or the work-piece immediately after
operation – they may be extremely hot and could burn your skin.
Reference: Operator’s Manual – Makita, Instruction Manual (Pages: 6, 8,
9, & 10)
Prepared by: Thomas Spanik, 05 June 2002
36
Safe Work Practices
Power Tools
WARNING: When using electric tools, basic safety precautions should
always be followed to reduce the risk of fire, electric shock, and personal
injury, including the following:
1. Keep work area clean – cluttered areas and benches invite injuries.
2. Consider the work environment – do not use power tools in damp
locations. Keep your work area well lit. Don’t expose power tools to
rain. Do not use tool in the presence of flammable liquids or gases.
3. Keep bystanders away – all visitors should be kept away from the work
area. Do not let visitors contact the tool or extension cord.
4. Store idle tools – when not in use, tools should be stored in dry, and
high or locked-up place.
5. Don’t force tools – it will do the job better and safer at the rate for
which it was intended.
6. Use the right tools – don’t force small tools or attachments to do the
job of a heavy-duty tool. Don’t use the tool for purposes it was not
intended.
7. Dress properly – don’t wear loose clothing or jewelry. They can be
caught in moving parts. Rubber gloves and non-skid footwear is
recommended when working outdoors. Wear protective hair covering
to contain long hair.
8. Use safety glasses – also use face or dust mask if cutting operation is
dusty.
9. Do not abuse cords – never carry the tool by the cord or yank it to
disconnect from receptacles. Keep cord from heat, oil, and sharp
edges.
10. Secure work – use work clamps or a vise to hold work. It’s safer than
using your hand and it frees both hands to operate the tool.
11. Don’t overreach – keep proper footing and balance at all times.
12. Maintain tools with care – keep tools sharp and clean for better and
safer performance.
Follow the instructions for lubricating and
changing accessories.
Inspect tool cords periodically and if
damaged, have repaired by an authorized service facility. Inspect
extension cords periodically and replace if damaged. Keep handles
dry, clean, and free of oil and grease.
13. Disconnect tools – when not in use, before servicing, and when
changing accessories, such as blades, bits, cutters.
14. Remove adjusting keys and wrenches – form habit of checking to see
that keys and adjusting wrenches are removed from tool before
turning it on.
36
Safe Work Practices
15. Avoid unintentional starting – don’t carry plugged in tools with finger
on the switch. Be sure that the switch is OFF when plugging the tool in.
16. Outdoor use extension cords – when tool is used outdoors, use only
extension cords intended for use outdoors and so marked.
17. Stay alert – watch what you’re doing, use common sense. Don’t
operate tool when you are tired.
18. Check damaged parts – before further use of the tool, a guard or
other part that is damaged should be carefully checked to determine
that it will operate properly and perform its intended function. Check
for alignment of moving parts, binding of moving parts, breakage of
parts, mounting, and any other conditions that may affect its
operation. A guard or other part that is damaged should be properly
repaired or replaced by an authorized service centre unless otherwise
indicated elsewhere in the instruction manual.
Have defective
switches replaced by an authorized service centre. Don’t’ use tool if
switch does not turn on and off.
19. Guard against electric shock – prevent body contact with grounded
surfaces.
For example; pipes, radiators, ranges, refrigerators
enclosures.
20. Replacement parts – when servicing use only identical replacement
parts.
VOLTAGE WARNING Before connecting the tool to a power source
(receptacle, outlet, etc) be sure the voltage supplied is the same as that
specified on the nameplate of the tool. A power source with voltage
greater than that specified for the tool can result in SERIOUS INJURY to the
user – as well as damage the tool. If in doubt, DO NOT PLUG IN THE TOOL.
Using a power source with voltage less than the nameplate rating is
harmful to the motor.
37
Safe Work Practices
Propane, Use of
General
1. Since propane is heavier than air and invisible, it is a special concern
when it is used on the job-site.
2. All installations and use of this product on the job-site must comply with
the Government Legislation set out for its safe use.
3. Suppliers delivering the product or setting up the equipment at the site
must be part of the safe work practice.
4. Nylon slings must be used in a “choker” fashion when loading, offloading or lifting propane tanks.
5. “Lifting lugs” provided on tanks are not to be used. Slings are to be
wrapped around the shell of the tank.
6. Tank valves and regulators are to be removed from the tank prior to
any movement of the tank.
7. Crane hooks shall be equipped with a “safety latch”.
8. All trucks, cranes or equipment used to handle propane tanks must be
equipped with a fire extinguisher appropriate for the size and type of
tank being handled.
9. Except in an emergency, any movement or repositioning of tanks shall
be performed by a competent worker.
10. Tanks are not to be heated to increase flow.
11. When in use, propane bottles are to be securely held in an upright
position.
12. Tanks are not to be hooked up and used without proper regulators.
38
Safe Work Practices
Proper Work Environment
Setting Up Your Work-space
Organize your work area so it is quiet and comfortable, with ample
lighting and furniture suited to your body shape and size.
Tips
 Locate your desk away from high-traffic areas.
 Avoid a noisy setting.
 Keep the area under your desk clear of cables and other items so you
can sit comfortably without twisting.
 Don’t place your monitor in front of a window; rather, put it at a right
angle to the window and use window shades to reduce glare.
Organizing Your Desk & Shelves
Organize your desk space and nearby shelves to help you work more
comfortably. Place books and other materials between knee and
shoulder height on shelves. Avoid reaching and twisting as you lift items
from shelves.
Divide Your Desk Into Three Zones:
 Primary Work Zone
- the distance from elbow to hand.
- Use this zone to place the items you use most often within easy
reach.
 Secondary Work Zone
- within arm’s reach.
- Use this zone to position those items that you use frequently, but
don’t need all the time.
 Reference Zone
- outside arm’s reach.
- Use this zone for your least-often used items.
39
Safe Work Practices
Use of 5500 & 7700 Series Air Purifying Respirators
Dusts:
Having PEL (permissible exposure limit) not less than 0.05 milligrams per
cubic meter of air including but not limited to coal, cotton, chromium,
and manganese or dusts having a PEL not less than 2 million particles per
cubic foot of air, including but not limited to aluminum, flour, iron ore, and
free silica (excluding sandblasting) resulting principally from the
disintegration of a solid, i.e. dust clouds produced in mining, quarrying,
and tunneling, and from dust produced during industrial operations, such
as grinding, crushing, and the general processing of minerals and other
materials.
Mists:
Mists of materials having a PEL not less than 0.05 milligrams per cubic
meter or 2 million particles per cubic foot, i.e. mist produced by spray
coating with vitreous enamels, chromic acid mist produced during
chromium plating, and other mists of materials whose liquid vehicle does
not produce harmful gases or vapors.
Instructions:
 Failure to follow all instructions and limitations on the use of this
respirator and/or failure to wear this respirator during all times of
exposure can reduce respirator effectiveness and result in sickness or
death.
 The dusts and mists which can be dangerous to your health include
the ones that are so small you can not see them.
 Before use, the wearer must first be trained by the employer in proper
respirator use in accordance with OH&S Act & Regulations. The 3M
saccharin qualitative fit test is recommended for this respirator.
 Leave the contaminated area immediately if dizziness or other distress
occurs.
 If the respirator becomes damaged or breathing becomes difficult,
leave the contaminated area and discard and replace the respirator.
Limitations:
 Do not use for protection against gases, vapors, in sandblasting, or
paint spray operations, or in atmospheres containing less than 19.5 %
oxygen.
 Do not use when concentrations of contaminants are immediately
dangerous to life and health, are unknown, or when concentrations
exceed applicable OH&S standards, or 10 times the PEL, whichever is
lower.
 Never alter or modify this respirator.
 Do not use with beards or other facial hair that can prevent direct
contact between the face and the edge of the respirator.
40
Safe Work Practices
Repetitive Motion
Some studies suggest that long periods of repetitive motion coupled with
an improper work environment and incorrect work habits may be liked to
certain type of physical discomfort of injury. These include carpal tunnel
syndrome (CTS), tendinitis, and tenosynovitis.
It is important to follow all instructions contained in this section. Failure to
do so may result in CTS, tendinitis, and tenosynovitis. These instruction may
not only help minimize your chances of experiencing one of these
conditions, but will also help you to work more comfortably and
effectively. Ensuring that your chair, work surface, and placement of the
mouse are in the correct positions is important. In addition, you should
take frequent breaks to avoid sitting in the same position for extended
periods of time.
Using Input Devices Comfortably
There are things you can do while using the keyboard, mouse, or other
input device to achieve greater comfort.
Tips
 Use shortcuts - learn as much as you can about your software
programs to help you minimize keystrokes and become more efficient
at using your computer. Using a mouse or other input device can
provide a needed break from using the keyboard.
 Use a light touch - press keys and hold the input device gently.
 Avoid unnecessary reaching - keep the mouse or other input device
close to the keyboard to minimize reaching from the shoulder. If you
use a mouse or other input device more than the key, place it in front
of you, with the keyboard a bit to the side.
 Use palm rest when not typing - try to rest your palms and wrists only
when you aren’t typing, but don’t rest them on the edge of the desk.
Move your keyboard forward enough so that you can rest your palms
on the palm rest.
41
Safe Work Practices
Safety Do’s & Don’ts
General
Common sense and awareness of your surroundings must be used at all
times. Some general examples are given below:
Do’s
 follow all safety rules, procedures, and practices
 report all unsafe conditions and practices to your supervisor
immediately
 ask your supervisor for instructions, if you are unfamiliar with a specific
job
 point out any hazards you see on the job site to new employees
 obey warning tags and signs. They are posted to point out existing
hazards
 keep your work area clean and orderly at all times
 report all injuries, no matter how small to your supervisor immediately
 report any prescription medication that you are using to our supervisor.
Don’ts
 jump from scaffolds, truck beds, platforms or any type of machinery
 consume alcohol, drugs, or prescription drugs prior to operating any
type of machinery or equipment – this is grounds for immediate
dismissal
 participate in any type of horseplay on company property or sites
 smoke on the job site, except in designated areas.
42
Safe Work Practices
Chop Saw
General
The chop saw is to be used for CUTTING ONLY. Do not attempt to use the
side of the cutting wheel as a grinding surface to remove burrs on pipes
on to smooth out the threads on threaded rods.
1. Always wear the proper PPE. For this tool, safety glasses must be used.
Depending on the stock being cut, it may be necessary to wear a fullface shield. If in doubt, check with your supervisor. If your supervisor is
in doubt, wear the face shield. Ear protection and leather gloves shall
also be worn while operating this piece of equipment.
2. Check cutting blade for nicks or chips before using.
3. Check electrical cord for damage and the end of cord end to make
sure that it has not been tampered with.
4. Always use on a level surface and away from combustible surfaces.
(i.e.: wood, carpet)
5. Make sure that the cutting wheel is properly mounted.
6. Insert the stock in the vice and clamp before cutting.
7. Make sure that your stock is ninety degrees to the cutting blade.
43
Safe Work Practices
Saw – Floor
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Install diamond blade with arrow pointing clockwise
Check for water leaks
Wear rubber boots
Wear safety glasses
When using a vacuum with the saw, do not let the cord lay in the
water
44
Safe Work Practices
Use of Hand-Held Power Saws
General
This type of power hand tool is one of the most commonly used in
construction. Because of this common use there are numerous accidents
due to thoughtless acts.
The following are the minimum accepted practices to e used with this
saw:
1. Approved safety equipment such as safety glasses or a face-shield is
to be worn.
2. Where harmful vapors or dusts are created, approved breathing
protection is to be used.
3. The proper sharp blade designed for the work to be done must be
selected and used.
4. The power supply must be disconnected before making any
adjustments to the saw or changing the blade.
5. Before the saw is set down be sure the retracting guard has fully
returned to its down position.
6. Both hands must be used to hold the saw while ripping.
7. Maintenance is to be done according to the manufacturer’s
specifications.
8. Ensure all cords are clear of the cutting area before starting to cut.
9. Before cutting, check the stock for foreign objects or any other
obstruction, which could cause the saw to “kick back”.
10. When ripping, make sure the stock is held securely in place. Use a
wedge to keep the stock from closing and causing the saw to bind.
45
Safe Work Practices
Hole Saw
Hole Saws













Always wear proper eye protection.
Select the proper mandrill and bit for the job.
Use cutting oil when the metal surface is over 24 gauge.
If there is a part missing or you break a part, report this to your
supervisor.
Always hold the drill perpendicular to the cutting surface.
Secure the surface to be drilled.
Only use a drill with a motor large enough for the task at hand.
Tighten chuck on mandrill with proper key.
Always remove chuck key before using.
Check the underside of the surface to be cut to prevent any
unnecessary damage.
Have a stable footing and be aware of where the chips or dust from
the saw will fall. This is especially true when working on a ladder.
Hold the drill with a firm grip and be prepared for the saw to bite the
surface after the pilot hole is drilled. Keep a firm grip for the entire time
and be prepared when the saw penetrates the surface.
After the saw is used, the teeth are very hot. Handle with care.
46
Safe Work Practices
Scaffold - Frame
The following are some common sense rules designed to promote safety
in the use of suspended stages. These rules do not purport to be allinclusive or to supplant or replace other additional safety and
precautionary measures. They are not intended to conflict with or
supersede the requirements of law or of governmental regulations, codes
and ordinances; reference to such specific provisions should be made by
the user.
1. Workers should be properly trained or instructed before they use
equipment.
2. Inspect all equipment before using. Never use any equipment
that is damaged.
3. Inspect erected scaffolds regularly to ensure they are
maintained in safe condition.
4. Consult the supplier when in doubt. Never take chances.
5. Provide adequate sills for scaffold posts and use base plates.
6. Use adjusting screw jacks instead of blocking to adjust to uneven
grade conditions.
7. Plumb and level all scaffolds as the erection proceeds. Do not
force braces to fit - level the scaffold until proper fit can be
made easily.
8. Fasten all braces securely.
9. Do not climb cross braces. An access ladder, access steps,
frame designed to be climbed or equivalent safe access to the
scaffold shall be used.
10. On wall scaffolds, place and maintain anchors or push pull ties,
securely between structure and scaffold at vertical intervals not
exceeding three times the minimum width of the structure and
every third bay longitudinally to prevent tipping. Horizontal
bracing is required at the level of tie-in.
11. When scaffolds are to be partially or fully enclosed, specific
precautions must be taken to assure frequency and adequacy
of ties attaching the scaffold to the building due to increased
load conditions resulting from effects of wind and weather. The
scaffolding components to which the ties are attached must
also be checked for additional loads.
12. Free standing scaffold towers must be restrained from tipping by
guying or other means. Additional horizontal bracing should be
placed at guying level.
46
Safe Work Practices
13. Equip all planked or working levels with proper guard rails, midrails and toe boards along all open sides and ends of scaffold
platforms.
14. Power lines near scaffolds are dangerous - use caution and
consult the power company for advice.
15. Do not use ladders or makeshift devices on top of scaffolds to
increase the height.
16. Do not overload scaffolds.
17. Planking:
 use a minimum of 50 mm x 250 mm spruce construction grade
lumber that is properly inspected.
 wood planking shall overlap or extend no less than 150 mm and no
more than 300 mm and be cleated at each end beyond centre of
support when extending.
 fabricated scaffold planks and platforms, unless cleated or
restrained by hooks, shall extend on their end supports not less than
150 mm no more than 300 mm.
 -steel or aluminum planking should be used in accordance with
manufacturer’s instructions.
18. For putlogs and trusses, the following additional rules apply:
 Do not cantilever or extend putlogs / trusses as side brackets
without thorough consideration for loads to be applied.
 Putlogs / trusses should extend at least 150 mm beyond point of
support unless a fixed connection is provided.
 Place proper bracing between putlogs / trusses when the span of
putlog / trusses is more than 3.7 meters.
19. All brackets shall be seated correctly with side brackets parallel
to the frames and end brackets at 90 degrees to the frames.
Brackets shall not be twisted from normal position. Brackets are
to be used for work platforms only and shall not be used for
storage of material or equipment.
20. All scaffolding accessories shall be used and installed in
accordance with the manufacturer’s recommended procedure.
Accessories should not be altered in the field. Scaffolds, frames
and their components, manufactured by different companies
should not be intermixed.
47
Safe Work Practices
Scaffold - Metal
General
There are various types of metal scaffolds and they all have a right and
wrong way to be erected.
The misuse of scaffolding is the cause of numerous serious injuries. Every
worker who designs or constructs a scaffold should be competent and
know what the manufacturer’s specifications are for that type of scaffold.
The scaffolding which will be best suited for the job and capable of
withstanding the loads to be imposed on it must be determined before
the job begins.
Ensure that:
1. The scaffold you intend to use is the correct one for the job.
2. The location in which the scaffold is to be constructed is level or is
capable of presenting secure footing by use of mud-sills or some other
device.
3. The scaffold will be erected by a competent person.
4. Legislative and manufacturer’s requirements have been complied
with.
5. Safe access and egress to both the scaffold and the general work
area has been provided.
6. Leveling adjustment screws have not been over extended.
7. Tower scaffolds have outriggers or are guyed and have all component
parts secured in place.
8. Scaffold work platforms have perimeter guardrail:
 horizontal rail - 0.92 meters to 1.07 meters above the platform.
 intermediate rail - horizontal rail midway between scaffold platform
and top rail.
 toe board - horizontal member at platform level no less than
140mm in height above the platform level.
9. Scaffold planks are of number one grade materials with maximum
spans of 3.1 meters on light duty and 2.3 meters on heavy duty with a
maximum projection beyond the ledger of no more than 300mm.
10. The Scaffold Inspection Checklist shall be completed, signed and
dated. This will be placed on a clip board and tied to the scaffolding.
11. The Subsequent Inspection shall be filled in daily by the user(s); this
includes anyone from other companies using this company’s scaffolds.
48
Safe Work Practices
Scaffold - Rolling
These guidelines are not intended to conflict or supersede the Nova
Scotia Occupational Health + Safety Act or the Fall Protection Regulations
made pursuant to the Act. Reference to such specific provisions should
be made by the user.
Note: These safe work practices are to be used in addition to Halifax
Glass & Mirror’s safe work practices for Metal & Frame Scaffold.
1. Do not ride on rolling scaffold.
2. Secure or remove all material and equipment from platform before
moving the scaffold.
3. All scaffolds on wheels or wagons must have locking devices on all
wheels.
4. Caster brakes must be engaged at all times when scaffold is not being
moved.
5. Casters with plain stems shall be attached to the panel or adjustment
screw by pins or other suitable means.
6. Before moving, check for holes in the floor, overhead obstructions,
slopes and debris.
7. Do not extend adjusting screw on rolling scaffold more than is
recommended by your supplier.
8. The working platform height of a rolling scaffold must not exceed three
times the smallest base dimension unless guyed or otherwise stabilized.
9. All rolling scaffolds must be horizontally braced.
10. Do not use brackets on rolling scaffolds without consideration of
overturning effect.
11. The working platform height of a rolling scaffold must not exceed three
times the smallest base dimension unless guyed or otherwise stabilized.
Note: In conversation with Darrell Goreman of Steeplejacks, on 23 April
2001, a body harness is not required if there is a proper top rail, midrail, toe board, and a full platform. Also stated was that there shall
be a fall protection system in place for the people climbing up and
down the scaffold, such as a rope, if the ladder is not 900 to the
platform.
49
Safe Work Practices
Storage of Material on Site
General
1. All material on site to be secured at all times.
2. All materials to be stored in:
 job trailer
 job box or storage box
 designated secure area
3. All material to be returned to storage area when finished with.
4. Damaged or defective materials to be returned to appropriate
wholesaler for credit, or returned to shop for action.
50
Safe Work Practices
Storing and Piling Material
1. Material stored in quantity shall be arranged so that the weight is
evenly distributed and not top heavy.
2. All stacks and piles shall be protected against overturning or other
movement.
3. Pipe and similar material shall be stored on suitable racks and safety
blocked to prevent movement.
4. All barrels, drums, and kegs located inside shall be stored on end or, if
stored on their side, securely blocked to prevent rolling.
5. All drums located outside shall be stored on their side and blocked to
prevent rolling. The pressure of the liquid inside against the plugs of the
drum will help keep water from entering the container and
contaminating the contents.
6. Store materials safety away from all electrical and fire hazards.
7. Wear proper PPE when handling and moving pipe and other materials.
When handling chemicals, use proper PPE to protect yourself from
hazardous chemicals.
8. No building material shall be stored, stacked, or piled within six feet of:
 A floor or roof opening
 The open edge of a floor or roof
 An excavation
9. Other materials to be stored must be kept in an orderly manner so as
to not endanger the safety of personnel.
51
Safe Work Practices
Transportation Safety
1. All loading and unloading of heavy equipment upon a low-bed or
flatbed shall be done using all safety precautions. If necessary, have
signalman assist. Always use required chains and binds, flags, lights,
signs.
2. When towing vehicles, trailers, etc., always consider the following:
 Stability of unit being towed.
 Power and stability of towing vehicle.
 Lights, signals, and required signs (TDG)
 Safety chains.
3. Operate your vehicle with running lights on at all times when in motion.
4. Maintain all lights in good working order. This includes brake lights,
signals, etc.
5. Keep vehicle clean inside with no debris, tool chains, etc.
6. All drivers are to conduct an inspection prior to vehicle start up, to
include:
 Coolants, lubricants
 Belts and hoses
 Brakes
 Lights
7. Drive in a DEFENSIVE manner. Expect the unexpected from other
drivers, pedestrians, bicycles, children, etc.
8. Drive in a COURTEOUS manner.
9. Before backing a vehicle, the following procedure is to be followed:
 Use a ground guide person who is outside the vehicle.
 If ground guide person is not available, the driver is to get out of
the vehicle and do a walk around to ensure the route is
unobstructed.
10. Wheel caulks / blocks will be placed at the rear tandem wheels when
a concrete mixer is parked / operating on an incline.
52
Safe Work Practices
Turbo-Dryer
General
Like other electrical devices, Turbodryers can become dangerous if
abused, damaged or misused. Failure to observe the following warnings
can result in injury to persons, fire damage, or damage to the this unit.
To reduce the risk of electrical shock, fire, or personal injury, the following
warnings shall be observed:
Keep this unit grounded
 Always operate this unit with a three pronged grounding plug and a
grounded electrical outlet
Extension cords
 Extension cords for this unit must be grounded
Protect the power cord from damage
 Never operate this unit with cut, nicked, abraded, frayed or otherwise
damaged power cords or extension cords
Storage
 Store this unit in a clean, dry environment - do not store outdoors
Keep the motor dry
 Never allow water inside this units motor. If this unit becomes wet for
any reason, thoroughly dry it before use
Handle with care
 Do not drop or throw this unit for any reason, rough treatment can
damage the motor, wiring or motor mount and safety screens and
create a hazardous condition
52
Safe Work Practices
Run this unit on a stable surface
 Always operate on a stable flat surface such as the floor. Do not
operate this unit from places where it can fall or be pulled down
causing injury.
 Beware - this unit may vibrate or be pulled from smooth surfaces such
as counter tops and cause an injury, fire or electrical hazard
Ensure that the air intake is clear
 Operate this unit away from draperies or other material that may
come in contact with the air intakes. Do not allow any material to
clog or block air intakes, do not operate close to sources of exhaust or
other contaminates that would hamper a persons breathing
Keep foreign matter out
 Do not allow oil, grease, solvents or other matter (including sawdust,
drywall dust) to be drawn into the air intake - never direct fogged or
liquid chemicals of any kind into the air intakes.
Do not operate without safety screens
 Never operate this unit without the factory installed safety screens on
the air inlets and air exhaust - the rapidly revolving wheel can cause
serious injury
Keep away from heaters
 Do not use this unit for circulating hot air by placing the intakes close
to a heater - the housing could melt or the motor could overheat and
cause a fire or electrical fire
Keep away from combustible gas
Do not modify this unit in any way
53
Safe Work Practices
Use of Unfamiliar Tools & Equipment
1. If you are unfamiliar with a piece of equipment or a particular tool, ask
your supervisor and / or consult the manufacturer’s operation
instructions from the pertaining manual.
2. Contact the manufacturer or supplier for written instructions for the
proper safe use, safety equipment (if required), and proper
maintenance required.
3. Ensure that the proper PPE is available prior to use.
4. If possible, contact the manufacturer’s / supplier’s representative and
ask for a demonstration.
5. Select an area or material to use as a practice run to familiarize
yourself with this tool or piece of equipment.
6. Supervisors shall ensure that personnel using any tool or piece of
equipment has the necessary skills and knowledge to safely use them.
54
Safe Work Practices
Vehicle Safety
1. Follow the common sense rules of good driving:
 do not tailgate
 observe the speed limit
 stay alert, expect the unexpected
 use vehicle mirrors
 drive defensively
In addition, there are special rules that apply to trucks
2. Before driving, check the load:
 for even distribution of weight
 to ensure that it is secured in place
3. Before towing equipment, check to ensure that:
 the hitch and ball are properly connected
 the safety chain is secured in place
 all brakes and running lights are working
4. Other vehicle checks include:
 horn, front lights, and windshield wipers
 oil and water levels
 tire pressure (including equipment in tow)
5. Allow for safe stopping distances. A heavy loaded truck or a vehicle
with equipment in tow will not stop quickly.
6. Company vehicles shall be equipped with a first aid kit and dry
chemical extinguisher.
7. When backing up, the operator shall sound the horn. In addition, if
backing into confined or blind areas, a signalman should be used if
available.
55
Safe Work Practices
Waste Disposal
General
RYSON, on its daily work-site generates two (2) classifications of waste:
 Non-Hazardous
 Hazardous
In both cases certain procedures shall be followed to keep in
accordance with the Nova Scotia OH&S Act – Transportation of
Dangerous Goods.
Non-Hazardous
Defined as any particle or substrate, which does not contain organic
compounds or toxic materials. (i.e.: boxes, drywall, plastic, used but
cleaned roller sleeves / paint brushes, and dried paint cans)
All non-hazardous waste shall be bagged on-site and carried back to the
warehouse by the production manager responsible for that particular site.
Once at the warehouse, it shall be stored in the regular trash area and a
regular garbage pick-up will be arranged by management responsible.
This garbage shall be brought to the regular landfill site at Otter Lake.
Hazardous
Defines as any particle, controlled product, or liquid that contains an
organic compound or is considered as a dangerous good, and falls under
the regulations by the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act (i.e.: paint
thinner, lead paint chips, toxic debris)
RYSON deems it necessary for these items to be contained and labeled
onsite in accordance with the regulations provided by the Provincial
Government. All handling of these materials shall only be done by
properly trained personnel equipped with the necessary PPE according to
regulations. If any material is questionable as to its hazardous content, it
shall be treated as a hazardous material. Any material that causes
concern or is known to be hazardous must be analyzed by PSC Analytical
Services Inc., located on Bluewater Road in Bedford, Nova Scotia. Then
Atlantic Industrial Services Inc must be contacted for proper removal if
required.
56
Safe Work Practices
Working Alone
Any employee required to work alone must make every reasonable effort
to advise their supervisors, switchboard, or dispatcher of the area they are
working and when the work they are performing is complete. Also, report
any problems encountered. “Buddy system should be used in high risk
area.”
57
Safe Work Practices
Working in Congested Areas
Note:
As Contractors, we are responsible for the safety of all people
on our sites. All trades working in congested areas must follow
the safe work practices. It is the responsibility of all employees
to ensure compliance.
1. If known hazards are created, inform those working near you of these
dangers.
2. Screen off area around the welding site when welding to prevent
“flash burns” to the eyes of fellow workers.
3. Clean up the area after each job (more frequently if needed) to
prevent slips, trips, falls, or fire hazards.
4. Plan work schedules to reflect the number of workers (trades) that are
required in an area at any time.
5. Wear all necessary PPE to protect yourself from the hazards of the
task(s) you are performing, and the hazards of the workers working in
the immediate area.
58
Safe Work Practices
Working in Dust or Paint Laden Atmospheres
General
1. Refer to the WHMIS label on the paint container and to the MSDS for
the allowable concentration or hazards for the particular product.
2. Wear the appropriate dust-filtering respirators to remove the dust from
the air.
3. Avoid dust from contacting the skin or open wounds as this may allow
toxins to enter the blood stream by wearing the appropriate PPE
(gloves, clothing) to protect yourself from the hazard(s).
4. Warn other workers in the area of the dangers of the paint being used
and how to protect themselves from the hazards. Look into scheduling
the painting to be done when other workers are not there.
59
Safe Work Practices
Concrete Saw
Model MK-20 series
This machine can cause serious injury and damage when not used
properly
 Before using this machine be fully aware of its’ controls and operating
characteristics, it’s capabilities and limitations and the associated
hazards.
 Read the Instruction Manual supplied and have an experienced
person provide a familiarization of this machine and demonstrate it in
actual use.
 Prior to cutting any floor the operator must determine the existence
and location of any wires, pipes, cables that are in the floor to be cut
and determine if they are hazardous.
 The operator must be aware that operating this machine inside an
enclosed area will generate exhaust gases that may be hazardous; if
so, there must be adequate ventilation of the work area while in use.
 Confirm the diameter of the cutting that is mounted in the saw. Blades
of different diameter require the engine to be operated at specific
engine rpm’s to enable the blades to cut concrete effectively. A 14
inch dia. blade requires the engine speed to be set at 3500 rpm (full
throttle). A 20 inch dia. blade requires the engine speed to be set
2550-3000 rpm
DO NOT EXCEED THESE ENGINE RPM SETTINGS!
 The cutting blade will begin spinning as soon as the engine is started.
Therefore, the blade must be raised as much as possible to avoid
damage.
 When engaging the hydrostatic drive transmission be sure the speed
control lever is in the neutral position to avoid any sudden movement
of the machine.
 While running a continuous supply of water is sprayed onto both faces
of the blade to provide coolant and flush concrete from the cut while
at the same time preventing a dust problem. If the water flow is
interrupted stop any further cutting and immediately raise the blade
out of the cut then turn the machine off.
 Never re-start the machine with the blade inside the cut. Whenever
inspecting the blade always turn the kill switch to off. Never operate
the machine with any guard removed. This engine uses propane fuel
stored in pressurized portable cylinders which must be removed for
refilling. Follow the SWP for replacing such propane cylinders.
60
Safe Work Practices
Soldering & Brazing
 Only qualified employees will be authorized to perform;
 Be familiar with the proper use of the specific equipment you are
using;
 Ensure soldering equipment has a properly insulated holder before
using;
 Store soldering equipment in a fireproof holder when not in use;
 Never leave soldering equipment unattended;
 Ensure work area is adequately ventilated;
 Ensure fire detection systems have been shut down is applicable;
 Isolate soldering areas with shields or screens or separate work from
other employees if possible;
 Keep fire extinguisher nearby;
 Use proper PPE
PPE
 Use the correct protective glasses, goggles or shields for all soldering
and brazing;
 Wear Protective gauntlet gloves for brazing;
 Provide adequate ventilation. If not possible, wear respirators if there is
inadequate ventilation or extremely toxic metal fumes; check with
your supervisor for instructions.
Hazards
 Damage to eyes, face and neck from sparks and spattering of
molten metal;
 Health effects from breathing fumes and gases;
 Burns to hands or other body parts from hot soldering irons;
 Electrical shock;
 Fire
61
Safe Work Practices
Rolling Safety Ladders
General
As with all ladders, make sure it is in good condition and it is the right
ladder for the job to be done.
1. When setting up the ladder, secure the rolling base as required
2. Always face the ladder when climbing or descending
3. Grip the railing firmly when climbing or descending
4. Keep rolling ladder away from electrical sources
5. Do not climb on or over railing
6. Use ladder on a level firm surface
7. Check the ladder ratings and manufactures manual prior to each
use
62
Safe Work Practices
Use of Router/Trimmer
General
This type of power tool is one of the most commonly used in construction.
Because of this common use there are numerous accidents due to
thoughtless acts.
The following are the minimum accepted practices to be used with this
tool:
1. Approved safety equipment such as safety glasses or a face-shield is
to be worn.
2. Where harmful vapors or dusts are created, approved breathing
protection is to be used.
3. The proper router bit designed for the work to be done must be
selected and used.
4. The power supply must be disconnected before making any
adjustments to the router or trimmer before changing the bit.
5. Before the router/trimmer is set down be sure the retracting guard has
fully returned to its down position.
6. Both hands must be used to hold the router/trimmer while operating.
7. Maintenance is to be done according to the manufacturer’s
specifications.
8. Ensure all cords are clear of the cutting area before starting to cut.
9. Before cutting, check the stock for foreign objects or any other
obstruction, which could cause the router/trimmer to “kick back”.
10. When routering/trimming, make sure the stock is held securely in place.
11. Use clamps or other practical way to secure and support work piece
to a stable platform
File Name: d41c87e4-3583-4fdf-8982-4443ff3578c6
Created: May-2014
63
Safe Work Practices
Use of Band Saw
General
This type of power tool is one of the most commonly used in construction.
Because of this common use there are numerous accidents due to
thoughtless acts.
The following are the minimum accepted practices to be used with this
tool:
1. Know your power tool. Read the owner’s manual carefully. Learn the
tools applications and limitations, as well as the specific potential
hazards peculiar to it.
2. Keep guards in place and in working order.
3. Ground all tools. If tool is equipped with three prong plug, it should be
plugged into a three-hole electrical receptacle. Never remove the
third prong.
4. Remove adjusting keys and wrenches. Form a habit of checking to see
that keys and adjusting wrenches are removed from tool before
turning it on.
5. Keep work area clean. Cluttered area and benches invite accidents.
6. Avoid dangerous environment. Don’t use power tools in damp or wet
locations. Keep your work area well illuminated.
7. Keep children and visitors away. All children and visitors should be kept
a safe distance from the work area.
8. Make workshop childproof, with padlocks, master switches, or by
removing starter keys.
9. Don’t force the tool. It will do the job better and be safer at the rate for
which it is designed.
10. Use the right tool. Don’t force tool or attachment to do a job it was not
designed for.
11. Wear proper apparel. No loose clothing, gloves, neck-ties, rings,
bracelets, or other jewelry to get caught in moving parts. Nonslip foot
wear is recommended. Wear protective hair covering to contain long
hair.
12. Use safety glasses. Also use face of dust mask if cutting operation is
dusty. Everyday eyeglasses only have impact resistant lenses; they are
not safety glasses.
13. Secure work. Using clamps or a vise to hold work, when practical. It’s
safer than using your hand and frees both hands to operate tool.
File Name: 8c30a61d-ad28-4bfa-881e-a7551786ec44
Created: May-2014
63
Safe Work Practices
14. Do not overreach. Keep your proper footing and balance at all times.
15. Maintain tools in top condition. Keep tools sharp and clean for best
and safest performance. Follow instructions for lubricating and
changing accessories.
16. Disconnect tools before service and when changing accessories such
as blades, bits and cutters.
17. Use recommended accessories. Consult owner’s manual, use of
improper accessories may be hazardous.
18. Avoid accidental starting. Make sure switch is in “OFF” position before
plugging in cord.
19. Never stand on tool. Serious injury could occur if the tool is tipped or if
the cutting tool is accidentally contacted.
File Name: 8c30a61d-ad28-4bfa-881e-a7551786ec44
Created: May-2014
64
Safe Work Practices
Use of Drill Press
General
This type of power tool is one of the most commonly used in construction.
Because of this common use there are numerous accidents due to
thoughtless acts.
The following are the minimum accepted practices to be used with this
tool:
1. Do not operate the drill press when tired, distracted, or under the
effects of drugs, alcohol or any medication that impairs reflexes or
alertness.
2. The working area should be well lit, clean and free of debris.
3. Keep children and visitors at a safe distance when the drill press is in
operation; do not permit them to operate the drill press.
4. Childproof and tamper proof your shop and all machinery with locks,
master electrical switches and switch keys, to prevent unauthorized or
unsupervised use.
5. Stay alert! Give your work your undivided attention. Even a momentary
distraction can lead to serious injury.
6. Fine particulate dust is a carcinogen that can be hazardous to health.
Work in a well-ventilated area and whenever possible use a dust
collector and wear eye, ear and respiratory protection services.
7. Do not wear loose clothing, gloves, bracelets, neck-laces or other
jewelry while the drill press is in operation.
8. Be sure that adjusting wrenches, tools, drinks, and other clutter are
removed from the machine and/or the table surface before
operating.
9. Keep hands well away from the drill bit and all moving parts. Use a
hold-down or clamp to secure the stock, and use a brush, not hands to
clear away chips and dust.
10. Be sure that the drill is securely installed in the chuck before beginning
to drill.
11. Be sure the drill bit has gained full operating speed before beginning
to drill.
12. Always use a clean, properly sharpened bit. Dirty or dull bits are unsafe
and can lead to accidents.
13. Use suitable work piece support if the work piece does not have a flat
surface.
File Name: 68cf3c87-d24c-4462-b64b-92d7140b93b2
Created: May-2014
64
Safe Work Practices
14. Do not push or force the drill bit into the stock. The drill will perform
better and more safely when working at the rate feed for which it was
designed.
15. Avoid working from awkward or off balance positions. Do not
overreach and keep both feet on floor.
16. Keep guards in place and in working order. If a guard must be
removed for maintenance or cleaning be sure it is properly reattached before using the tool again.
17. Never leave the machine unattended while it is running or with the
power on.
18. Use of parts and accessories NOT recommended by manufacturer
may result in equipment malfunction or risk of injury.
19. Never stand on machinery. Serious injury could result if the tool is
tipped over or if the drill bit is unintentionally contacted.
20. Always disconnect the tool from the power source before servicing or
changing accessories such as bits, or before preforming any
maintenance, cleaning, or if the machine will be left unattended.
21. Make sure the switch is in the off position before plugging in the power
cord.
22. Make sure the tool is properly grounded. If equipped with a 3-prong
plug, it should be used with a three pole receptacle. Never remove
the third prong.
23. Do not use the drill press for other than its intended use. If used for
other purposes, manufacturer disclaims any real implied warranty and
holds itself harmless for any injury, which may result from that use.
File Name: 68cf3c87-d24c-4462-b64b-92d7140b93b2
Created: May-2014
65
Safe Work Practices
Use of Pinner / Stapler
General
This type of power tool is one of the most commonly used in construction.
Because of this common use there are numerous accidents due to
thoughtless acts.
The following are the minimum accepted practices to be used with this
tool:
1. Read and understand these warnings to prevent injuries to yourself
and bystanders. Refer to tool use, maintenance and troubleshooting
sections in the Operating Instruction Manual for additional information.
2. To prevent eye injuries, always wear safety glasses with permanently
attached rigid, hard plastic side shields.
3. Always wear other personal protective equipment such as hearing
protection and hard hat.
4. Stay alert, watch what you are doing, and use common sense when
operating a power tool. Do not use tool while tired or under the
influence of drugs, alcohol or medication. A moment of inattention
while operating power tools may result in serious personal injury.
5. Never use oxygen, carbon dioxide or any other bottled gas as a
power source for this tool; the tool will explode and cause serious
injury.
6. Always remove finger from trigger when not driving fasteners. Never
carry the tool with finger on or under the trigger. Tool will eject a
fastener if the safety element is bumped.
7. Always assume the tool contains fasteners. Keep the tool pointed
away from yourself and others. No horseplay. Respect the tool as a
working implement.
8. Drive fasteners into work surface only, never into materials too hard to
penetrate.
9. Always place yourself in a firmly balanced position when using or
handling the tool.
10. Do not force the tool. Let the tool do the work. Use the correct tool for
your application. The correct tool will do the job better and safer at
the rate for which it is designed.
11. Do not drive fasteners on top of other fasteners or with the tool at too
steep of an angle; the fasteners can ricochet and hurt someone.
File Name: 77dba8c6-8827-483f-be5d-bf80cb2adc4f
Created: May-2014
65
Safe Work Practices
12. When using tool, care should be taken due to possibility of tool recoil
after a fastener is driven. If safety element is unintentionally allowed to
re-contact work surface following a recoil, an unwanted fastener will
be driven. Therefore, allow tool to recoil completely off work surface
after a fastener is driven to avoid this condition. Do not push safety
element on work surface unit a second fastener is desired.
13. Do not drive fasteners close to edge of the work surface. The work
piece is likely to split and the fastener could fly free or ricochet and hit
someone.
14. Never use any part of the tool as a hammer. The tool may activate or
become damaged and result in an unsafe condition.
15. Keep hands and other body parts away from the firing area to avoid
possibly injury during operation.
16. Disconnect tool from air before doing tool maintenance, cleaning a
jammed fastener, leaving work area, moving tool to another location,
or handing the tool to another person.
17. Tool may eject a fastener when connected to an air supply; therefore
remove all fasteners from tool before connecting air.
18. Never use tool if safety element, trigger or springs have become
inoperable, missing or damaged. Do not tamper with or remove safety
element, trigger or springs.
19. Make sure all screws and caps are securely tightened at all times.
Make daily inspections for free movement of trigger and safety
element. Never use the tool if parts are missing or damaged.
20. Store idle tools out of reach of minors and other untrained persons.
Tools are dangerous in the hands of untrained users.
21. Use only parts, fasteners, accessories recommended or sold by
manufacturer. Do not modify tool without authorization from
manufacturer.
22. Use only clean, dry, regulated, compressed air at recommend
pressure.
23. Tools shall not be connected to air pressure which potentially exceeds
200 psig or 13.7 bar
24. Air compressors used to supply compressed air to this tool must comply
with applicable ANSI standards.
25. Air hoses must have a minimum working pressure rating of 150 psig or
150% of the maximum pressure produced in the system, whichever is
higher.
26. The tool and air supply hose must have a hose coupling such that all
pressure is removed from the tool when the coupling joint is
disconnected.
File Name: 77dba8c6-8827-483f-be5d-bf80cb2adc4f
Created: May-2014
65
Safe Work Practices
27. Do not load fasteners with the trigger or safety element depressed.
28. Do not use tool without DANGER label on tool. If label is missing,
damaged or unreadable, contact manufacturer representative to
obtain a new label.
29. Never use a tool that leaks air or needs repair.
File Name: 77dba8c6-8827-483f-be5d-bf80cb2adc4f
Created: May-2014
66
Safe Work Practices
Use of Brad Nailer
General
This type of power tool is one of the most commonly used in construction.
Because of this common use there are numerous accidents due to
thoughtless acts.
The following are the minimum accepted practices to be used with this
tool:
1. Use safety glasses. To prevent eye injuries, the tool operator and all
persons in the work area must wear safety glasses with permanently
attached, rigid, plastic side shields.
2. Wear ear protection to safe guard against possible hearing loss.
3. Use clean, dry, regulated compressed air at 70 to 120 PSI
4. Do not connect tool to pressure which potentially exceeds 200 PSI
5. Only use air hose that is rated for a maximum working pressure of 150
PSI or 150% of the maximum system pressure, whichever is greater.
6. Never use oxygen, carbon dioxide, combustible gases or any other
bottled gas as a power source for this tool, explosion and serious
personal injury could result.
7. Connect tool to air supply hose with a coupling that removes all
pressure from the tool when the coupling is disconnect.
8. Disconnect tool from air supply hose before doing tool maintenance,
cleaning a jammed fastener, leaving work area, moving tool to
another location, or handing tool to another person.
9. Never use a tool that is leaking air, has missing or damaged parts, or
requires repair. Make sure all screws and caps are securely tightened.
10. Never use tool if safety, trigger or springs are inoperable, missing or
damaged. Do not alter or remove safety, trigger or springs. Make daily
inspections for free movement of trigger and safety mechanism.
11. Do not use tool without safety warning label. If label is missing,
damaged or unreadable, contact your manufacturer service
representative for replacement.
12. Only use parts, fasteners, and accessories recommended by
manufacturer.
13. Connect tool to air supply before loading fasteners, to prevent a
fastener from being fired during connection. The tool driving
mechanism may cycle when tool is connected to the air supply.
File Name: 084c5fe5-6ffd-496e-be7e-ab5600d2b458
Created: May-2014
66
Safe Work Practices
14. Always assume the tool contains fasteners. Keep the tool pointed
away from yourself and others at all times. No horseplay. Respect the
tool as a working implement.
15. Do not load fasteners with trigger or safety depressed, to prevent
unintentionally firing of the fastener.
16. Remove finger from trigger when not driving fasteners. Never
carry tool with finger; tool may fire a fastener if safety is bumped
while trigger is depressed.
17. Don’t overreach. Keep proper footing and balance at all times
when using or handling the tool.
18. Fire fasteners into work surface only; never into materials that are
too hard to penetrate.
19. Grip tool firmly to maintain control while allowing tool to recoil
away from work surface as fastener is driven. If safety element is
allowed to re-contact work surface before trigger is released, an
unwanted fastener may be fired.
20. Do not drive fasteners on top of other fasteners, or with the tool
at too steep of an angle; the fastener can ricochet causing
personal injury.
21. Do not drive fasteners close to the edge of the work piece. The
work piece is likely to split allowing the fastener to fly free or
ricochet causing personal injury.
22. Keep hands and body parts away from firing area to prevent
personal injury.
23. Do not use on scaffolding or ladders or for tasks in which
changing location involves the use of scaffoldings, stairs, ladders,
and the like. Do not use for specific tasks such as closing boxes or
crates or fitting transportation systems on vehicles and wagons.
File Name: 084c5fe5-6ffd-496e-be7e-ab5600d2b458
Created: May-2014
67
Safe Work Practices
Use of Brad Nailer (Fuel Cell)
General
This type of power tool is one of the most commonly used in construction.
Because of this common use there are numerous accidents due to
thoughtless acts.
The following are the minimum accepted practices to be used with this
tool:
1. Eye protection must meet the requirements of ANSI Standard Z87.1
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
and should have side shields for increased protection.
Never assume the tool is empty. Never point the tool at yourself or
anyone else.
Never engage in horseplay with the tool. The cordless brad nailer is not
a toy, it is a tool. Careless and improper use may result in a serious
accident.
Never carry the tool with your finger on, or squeezing, the trigger. This
practice may result in the accidental discharge of a fastener.
Never operate a malfunctioning tool. Refer to the servicing or
troubleshooting section of this manual to correct the problem. If the
problem cannot be corrected, stop using the tool and report it to your
supervisor or manufacturer representative.
Do not load fasteners with the trigger and or work contacting element
pressed in. A fastener may be accidentally discharged,
Never remove or disable the work contacting element. This device
helps reduce the possibility of accidental fastener discharge by
preventing the tool from operating until it is completely against the
work surface. Never operate the tool if the work contacting
element is not working properly.
8. Always point the tool away from yourself and others when
clearing jams or removing fasteners. Pull the follower slightly back
and push the release lever. Tip the tool nose up slightly and
fasteners should slide out of the rear of the magazine. If fasteners
are jammed, refer to the appropriate servicing section of the
manual.
9. Never operate the cordless brad nailer if parts are loose,
damaged or missing.
File Name: 4e896117-f1b0-40da-8cb2-8887a480a5a7
Created: May-2014
67
Safe Work Practices
10. Do not drive fasteners into knots or on top of other fasteners. A
fastener may ricochet and cause serious injury.
11. Operate the tool only on the work piece. The cordless brad
nailer should be operated only when it is in contact with the
work surface. When fastening thin materials such as plywood, be
sure to position the tool so that the fastener is driven into the
underlying piece.
12. Never drive fasteners into areas with concealed hazards. Always
check the area behind the work surface for electrical wiring, gas
pipes, water pipes, sewer drains or other potential hazards.
13. Always maintain secure and unobstructed footing when on
ladders, platforms, or other high locations. Never over-reach
since tool recoil may cause a loss of balance. Always be aware
of edges and drop-offs when nailing on rooftops and other high
locations. Keep them in full view.
14. Allow only qualified personnel to operate the cordless brad
nailer. Only persons who have read and fully understand all tool
operation safety and maintenance instructions should be
allowed to operate the tool.
15. Properly store fuel cell. Always store fuel cells where they will not
be exposed to an open flame, sparks, or temperatures above
120°F.
16. Always store the tool with the fuel cell and battery removed.
Store the fuel cell in the case with the cordless brad nailer.
17. Keep the tool clean. A clean tool is less likely to jam or
malfunction.
18. Keep your hands clear of the work area surface. A fastener may
exit at an angle unexpectedly and cause injury.
File Name: 4e896117-f1b0-40da-8cb2-8887a480a5a7
Created: May-2014
68
Safe Work Practices
Safe Knife Use
General
This type of cutting tool is one of the most commonly used in construction.
Because of this common use there are numerous accidents due to
improper/unsafe use.
The following are the minimum accepted practices to be used with this
tool:
1. CSA approved eye protection should be worn when using this tool.
2. Use a cut resistant glove on the holding hand or use a mechanical
device to hold the object
3. Place the object being cut on a stable surface (secure the object with
a protected hand or holding device i.e. edge)
4. Never engage in horseplay with the tool. Careless and improper use
may result in a serious accident.
5. Do not cut toward yourself
6. Assess where the blade will go if it comes off or goes through the
material being cut
7. Open blade knifes must be stored in sheaths; utility knives must be
stored with the blade retracted
8. Keep blades sharp (replace or sharpen blades when they become
dull)
9. Do not pass or toss a utility knife to another worker. Set the knife down
and let the other person pick it up.
10. Never try to catch a falling utility knife.
11. Do not use a knife in place of another tool such as a scrapper,
screwdriver, chisel, etc.
12. Do not extend more blade than is necessary for the cutting job.
13. Do not leave a utility knife unattended, especially with the blade
exposed.
14. Do not hammer on a blade to achieve a greater cutting force.
File Name: 446e50f9-d7ec-43bf-afe1-59ba59d92f61
Created: Dec-2014
69
Safe Work Practices
Silica Exposure Control Plan
Cutting concrete without proper dust controls can generate high levels of
silica-containing dust. Breathing in this dust can cause a serious lung
disease called silicosis.
Purpose and responsibilities
Ryson has a duty to protect our workers from silica exposure during
concrete cutting, grinding and drilling. The work procedures Ryson
establishes for cutting, drilling, grinding, chipping or jackhammering of
concrete will protect our workers and any other workers on the site not
involved in these operations.
Supervisors are responsible for the following:
•
•
•
•
•
Provide adequate instruction to workers on the hazards associated
with the cutting, drilling, grinding, chipping or jackhammering of
concrete, and cutting fibre cement board
Select and implement the appropriate control measures.
Ensure that workers using respirators have been properly fit-tested and
that the results are recorded and maintained
Ensure that work is conducted in a manner that ensures the risk to
workers and others is minimized and adequately controlled. This
includes ensuring that workers use the necessary PPE.
Work locations where workers or other persons are exposed to the
hazards of silica will be identified with signs, placards, or barrier tape
Workers are responsible for the following:
•
•
•
Use the assigned protective equipment in an effective and safe
manner within the scope of their training
Follow established work procedures as directed by the supervisor
Report any unsafe conditions or acts to the supervisor
File Name: 90a75cfc-ba38-4be2-a819-d73355ecb4b1
Created: Dec-2014
69
Safe Work Practices
Silica Dust Control:
•
The Regulation requires employers to select silica dust controls based
on the following hierarchy: ‹ Engineering ‹ Administrative controls ‹
Personal protective equipment (PPE)
•
Use of respirators as a primary control is not acceptable when other
methods are available and practical
Respirators will be used in conjunction with other controls such as wet
cutting, grinding, and drilling to reduce worker exposure to silica, unless
air monitoring information suggests otherwise
Wet cutting, grinding, and drilling or the use of local exhaust ventilation
(LEV) are the preferred engineering methods and will be used when
practicable
Dry cutting or grinding methods might be required for certain
applications or locations. If this is the case, dry work will be isolated
from other work areas, Effective LEV will be used in order to control the
dust, and a HEPA vacuum will be used for cleanup and
decontamination.
•
•
•
Acceptable control methods for: Cutting Concrete
• The work methods in the following table are acceptable, provided
that the respirator selection is adhered to.
• The following control options will be used to eliminate or reduce the risk
to workers from the hazards of silica dust exposure, unless air
monitoring information suggests otherwise:
Work activity
Small and
large cuts or
multiple cuts
in one area
Dust suppression
HEPA vacuum
extraction near
tool or continuous
water spray
Using a saw
in a small
unventilated
area
HEPA vacuum
extraction near
tool or continuous
water spray
Other Controls
Barriers to restrict
access to the work
area
Respirator type
Full face respirator
with 100 series
filters
Full enclosure
systems (with
negative air) are
required to restrict
access to and
contain the work
area
Full face powered
air purifying
respirator (PAPR)
with 100 series
filters
File Name: 90a75cfc-ba38-4be2-a819-d73355ecb4b1
Created: Dec-2014
69
Safe Work Practices
Acceptable control methods for: concrete drilling
•
•
The work methods in the following table are acceptable, provided
that the respirator selection, dust suppression and other controls are
adhered to.
The following control options will be used to eliminate or reduce the risk
to workers from the hazards of silica dust exposure, unless air
monitoring information suggests otherwise:
Work activity
Drilling holes in a
wall, ceiling, or
floor
Drilling holes in a
small
unventilated
work area where
standard
engineering
controls are not
practicable
Dust suppression
Drill connected
to HEPA vacuum
extraction, or
HEPA vacuum
extraction
Other Controls
Barriers to restrict
access to the work
area or full
enclosure system
with negative air
(depending on the
size of the work
area and amount
of work)
Respirator type
Full face
respirator with 100
series (P or R)
filters
Floor:
Continuous
water spray
Barriers to restrict
access to the work
area
Half face
respirator with 100
series (N, P or R)
filters
None
Full enclosure
system (with
negative air) to
restrict access and
contain the work
area.
Full face powered
air purifying
respirator (PAPR)
with 100 series (P
or R) filters
File Name: 90a75cfc-ba38-4be2-a819-d73355ecb4b1
Created: Dec-2014
69
Safe Work Practices
Acceptable control methods for: chipping or jack hammering concrete
•
•
The work methods in the following table are acceptable, provided
that the respirator selection, dust suppression and other controls are
adhered to.
The following control options will be used to eliminate or reduce the risk
to workers from the hazards of silica dust exposure, unless air
monitoring information suggests otherwise.
Dust
Suppression
Other Controls
Chipping of walls,
ceilings or floors.
LEV or
continuous
water spray
Barriers to restrict
access to the work
area
Jack hammering
or using more
than one tool in
an area.
LEV or
continuous
water spray
Barriers to restrict
access to the work
area
Work Activity
Respirator Type
Full face respirator
with 100 series
filters. (Half face for
small areas)
Full face respirator
with 100 series
filters. (Half face for
small areas)
Acceptable control methods for: cutting fibre cement board
•
The following control options will be used to eliminate or reduce the risk
to workers from the hazards of silica dust exposure.
Fibre cement shears
Fibre cement shears
Score and snap knife
Dust reducing circular
saw connected to HEPA
vacuum extraction
Work Location
Outdoors
Indoors
Outdoors or indoors
Respirator Type
None required
N95 respirator
None required
Outdoors or indoors
Half face or full face
respirator with N100 filters
File Name: 90a75cfc-ba38-4be2-a819-d73355ecb4b1
Created: Dec-2014
69
Safe Work Practices
Safe Work Planning
1. Select one or more of the methods described in the table above
2. Establish a barrier around the work zone to restrict access
3. Inspect dust control equipment and tools to make sure they are in
good working order
4. Use and maintain all tools as specified by the manufacturer
5. Ensure that workers inspect their respirators before start-up
Respiratory protective equipment
•
Each worker who has occupational exposure to respirable silica, will
be fit-tested and trained on the proper selection, use, care and
maintenance of respirators
Other personal protective equipment and hygiene
•
•
Workers must remove dust covered coveralls or protective
clothing before eating lunch.
Workers who launder clothing contaminated with silica should be
informed of the hazards of silica and the precautions required for
handling the clothing.
Housekeeping procedures
•
•
•
•
•
Dry sweeping and the use of compressed air are prohibited for
removing dust and debris containing silica.
Work areas and equipment covered by dust will be cleaned at the
end of every shift using a HEPA filter vacuum.
Wet cleanup may also be used to remove dust.
Waste material and/or slurry will be placed in a dumpster and will be
removed at least weekly. The location and method used to store
waste will not allow silica-containing dust to re-enter the workplace.
Supervisors are responsible for ensuring that work areas are free from
dust at the end of each shift.
File Name: 90a75cfc-ba38-4be2-a819-d73355ecb4b1
Created: Dec-2014
70
Safe Work Practices
Edgebander
When using this unit, basic precautions shall be followed, including the following:
1. Read the owner’s manual carefully before starting machine.
2. The machine must be used only by persons familiar with woodworking
machinery and who are of at least the minimum age required by law.
Authorized personnel only.
3. Never leave the machine unattended during operation.
4. No jewelry (including watches), long hair, neckties and other loose article of
clothing is to be worn while operating equipment.
5. Personal Protective Equipment such as gloves, ear plugs, dust mask and safety
shoes are to be worn while machine is in operation.
6. Check that all safety, protection and emergency devices are correctly installed
before starting the machine. These devices MUST NOT be removed for any
reason.
7. Where special processing operations are required, make sure that the
appropriate guards are constructed.
8. Never perform machining trials or test runs without protective equipment in
place.
9. Never attempt to process work pieces that are too small or too big for the
machines capacity. All pieces of wood going through the machine must be flat
panels.
10. Use the support devices provided on the machine. Do not attempt to support
the panels with your hands during processing.
11. Equipment is to be serviced and maintained regularly by trained personnel only.
File Name: b7177d8e-389d-48f5-b4ba-83f36e48b745
Created: Dec-2014
71
Pg. 1 OF 1
Safe Work Practices
Table Saw
General
Table saws are designed to push material into the blade of the saw. The
rate of blade spread and material pushed into the saw must always be
adjusted to keep the saw from binding, overhearing, and/or tripping the
breaker.
PPE Required: Safety boots, hard hat, secured vest, eye protection,
hearing protection
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Do a hazard assessment.
Ensure the table saw is resting on all four legs or all four wheels and
that all wheels are locked prior to use.
Check for damage in the cord and ensure the guard is in place.
For long sheet material or boards, an additional person is needed to
receive the material on the back side of the saw.
When finished, clean up area.
File Name: C:\Users\octopus\AppData\Roaming\LocalLow\Tentakel-1-264210071964999512.octo\e380bc52-699e-4b1c89a1-4925326aad25.doc
Created: Mar-2015
72
Pg. 1 OF 1
Safe Work Practices
Sliding Table Saw
General
PPE Required: Safety boots, eye protection, hearing protection
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Do a hazard assessment.
Turn dust collection unit on.
Be aware scoring blade runs toward main blade and will push small
material forward.
Remove cross-cut fence when ripping material.
When cross-cutting material, ensure cross-cut fence is fully secure and
in its proper place (at 90° and not in the line of blades).
Slide rip fence back as far as possible to use as a stop block when
cross cutting.
Never use both fences in a way where stock will jam and kick back.
Use a push stick for narrow pieces.
When finished, turn off dust collection unit and clean up area.
File Name: C:\Users\octopus\AppData\Roaming\LocalLow\Tentakel-1-8342228914749839657.octo\65bc597f-78d04bdb-ab8f-ae4afadc98d8.doc
Created: Mar-2015
73
Pg. 1 OF 1
Safe Work Practices
Drill Press
General
PPE Required: Safety boots, eye protection, hearing protection
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Do a hazard assessment.
Install the proper bit required for drilling.
Adjust drill press fence to desired position.
Adjust drill press plunge to the desired height.
Drill slowly into the material.
If drilling metal, drill at a slower RPM and apply oil to the worked area.
When finished, turn the machine off and clean up area.
File Name: C:\Users\octopus\AppData\Roaming\LocalLow\Tentakel-1-9032422114461030022.octo\e3dd20f7-158c4960-b8df-f9f510e2bada.doc
Created: Mar-2015
74
Pg. 1 OF 1
Safe Work Practices
Automated External Defibrillator (AED)
General
An AED is a portable electronic device that automatically diagnoses the
life-threatening cardiac emergencies that can strike without warning in
people of all ages.
If you see someone collapse and they are
unresponsive, the first thing to do is call 911 and begin CPR.
PPE Required: none
1.
2.
3.
Remove front cover of device case.
Press the orange “ON” button located on the front of the device. The
lid will open and automated instructions will begin.
Follow audio and visual instructions.
Note: In the Ryson office at 100 Illsley Rd, Dartmouth, the AED is in a wall
mounted box in the office hallway, to the left of the door to shop.
1. Open door to the box. An alarm will sound.
2. Remove case from box.
3. Follow instructions above.
File Name: C:\Users\octopus\AppData\Roaming\LocalLow\Tentakel-1-1052435347688443766.octo\5f9ca5ff-3cc9-45c2b9fd-18bbabf99c07.doc
Created: Mar-2015
Annual Review
Job Procedures
Job Procedures
Development
Date
2004
Review
Date Decision
MAY
TM/RB
2014
Review
Date Decision
JAN
VS
2015
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
1
Adjusting Office Chairs
2
Areas Where Forklifts &
Pallet Jacks are in Use
2004
MAY
2014
3
Chemical Grout Injection
– Plug & T Port Type
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
4
Drill – Electric
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
5
Drilling / Grinding /
Cutting
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
6
Extension Ladders
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
7
Fire Extinguishers
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
8
Fitting of a Full Body
Harness
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
9
Fitting the 3M Dust
Mask – Series 8710
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
11 Generator – Portable
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
12 Grinding
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
10 Forklift
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
2004
MAY
2014
16 How to Lift
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
17 Ladders
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
18 Mobile Equipment
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
19 Air Compressor
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
20 Powder Actuated Tools
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
21 Power Drill
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
22 Power Washing
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
23 Product Ordering
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
24 Saw – Chop
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
25 Saw – Cut-off
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
26 Saw – Mitre
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
13 Hammer Drill – Electric
14 Hand Tools
Heavy Equipment –
15
Lifting
VS
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
29 Saw – Skill
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
30 Saw – Table
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
32 Working at Heights
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
Working From Heights,
33 Boom, Buckets, or
Scissor Lifts
2004
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
27 Saw – Reciprocating
Saw – Skill – Changing
28
Blades
31 Scaffolding – Work On
Install Interior Overhead
34
Signs
35
Refueling Trucks and
Mobile Equipment
2007
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
36
Replacing Liquid
Propane
2007
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
2007
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
Fall Arrest Rescue
37
Procedure
38
Self Service Refueling
Vehicles
2007
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
39
Red Tag Defective
Tools/Equip.
2007
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
2008
MAY
2014
TM/RB
JAN
2015
VS
Spraying Two Part Paint
40
Systems
41
Rolling Safety Ladder
2009
42 Router/Trimmer
2014
43 Band Saw
2014
44 Drill Press
2014
45 Gas/Air Fasteners
2014
46 Edgebander
2014
MAY
2014
May
2014
Aug
2014
Aug
2014
Aug
2014
Aug
2014
Approved By OH&S Rep: RICK BAKER
Date:
Approved By OH&S Rep: VICTOR SAWLOR
Date:
TM/RB
TM/RB
TM/RB
TM/RB
TM/RB
TM/RB
MAY
2014
JAN
2015
VS
JAN
2015
JAN
2015
JAN
2015
JAN
2015
JAN
2015
VS
VS
VS
VS
VS
Date:
Date:
JAN
2015
01
Job Procedure
Adjusting an Office Chair
The office workstation should let the worker sit and carry out their duties in
comfort while allowing for voluntary changes in the working position.
There are three contact areas in the work space that affect the worker's
posture: the seat, the work surface (commonly it is a desk top or
keyboard) and the floor. To ensure the most comfortable posture possible,
two of these factors have to be adjustable.
If you can afford to do nothing else, a fully adjustable chair is the
undisputable "must". The other, and perhaps the most preferable option,
would be a fully adjustable desk. However the price of such a desk may
not make this option practical. Another effective (and cheaper) option is
to use an adjustable chair and footrest to secure postural comfort.
How do I adjust a chair for my height?
Steps
1. Stand in front of the chair. Adjust the height so the highest point of the
seat, (when in the horizontal position), is just below the knee cap.
2. Sit on the chair and keep your feet flat on the floor.
3. Check that the clearance between the front edge of the seat and the
lower part of the legs (your calves) fits a clenched fist (about 2 inches).
4. Adjust the back rest forwards and backwards as well as up and down
so that it fits the hollow in your lower back.
5. Sit upright with your arms hanging loosely by your sides. Bend your
elbows at about a right angle (90 degrees) and adjust the armrest(s)
height until they barely touch the undersides of the elbows.
6. Remove the armrests from the chair if this level can not be achieved or
if armrests, in their lowest adjustment, elevate your elbows even slightly.
7. Tilt the seat itself forwards or backwards if you prefer.
Different office tasks require different equipment, accessories and layouts.
Nonetheless, the chair and its adjustment remain constant for the majority
of setups in a typical office environment.
What adjustments should I make if the workstation (desk) is at a fixed
height?
01
Job Procedure
Once your chair is properly adjusted for your height, check if you can sit
at the workstation comfortably with your legs crossed underneath.
If you cannot fit your legs under the workstation or there is not enough
space to move them freely, your workstation is too low for you and you
should not use such a workstation on a regular basis!
If you can sit comfortably but need to elevate your arms in order to place
them over the work surface, your workstation is too high. Adjust the chair
height so your elbows are about the same height as the work surface. Use
a footrest if you cannot place your feet flat on the floor.
The footrest should be adjustable and support both feet. Keep feet flat
and firm on the footrest.
What should I consider when selecting a chair?
A basic rule of ergonomics is that there is no such thing as an "average"
person. However, providing a chair specifically designed for each
individual is not practical. The only solution is to provide workers with fully
adjustable chairs that can accommodate a maximum range of people
(typically around 90 percent of the population; workers falling in the
ranges of 5% of the shortest and the tallest will need custom-made chairs).
Choose a chair with:
controls that are easy to operate from sitting position
a seat that adjusts for both height and tilt
a seat that does not put pressure the back of thighs or knees
a seat with a front edge that curves towards the floor
breathable, non-slippery fabric on the seat
a backrest shaped to support the lower back
a stable five-point base
wheels or casters suitable for the type of flooring
a swivel mechanism
armrests that can be adjusted to the elbow height when your upper
arms are hanging down and your forearms are at about a 90 degree
angle to the upper arms
 armrests that do not interfere with free movements within the
workstation










You may also wish to check the OSH Answers document The "Ergonomic"
Chair for more details on how to purchase a chair.
02
Job Procedure
Working in Warehouses & Storage Areas
Where Forklifts & Pallet Jacks Are In Use
Special Tools / PPE
 hard hat, safety boots, safety glasses
Materials Required
 caution tape or pylons
Steps
1. Inform supervisor to make drivers aware that you are working in a
specific area.
2. Use pylons around any ladders or staging.
3. Keep drivers informed as your location changes.
4. Clean up all debris as soon as you are finished and before leaving the
area.
5. When possible, use caution tape to identify your work area.
6. Even if your area is identified with pylons or caution tape, be aware of
lift trucks and pallet jacks operating in the immediate area.
7. Be aware of the storage methods used by others. If pallets or other
material are stacked or stored in an unsafe manner, bring this to the
attention of your supervisor.
03
Job Procedure
Chemical Grout Injection – Plug & “T” Port Type
Special Tools
 Electric chipper, twin cartridge gun, trowel, gloves, water sprayer,
extension cord, rags
Materials Required
 Chemical grout, fast set cement, “T” Ports + Plug Ports
Steps
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Always wear safety glasses and gloves while handling epoxy
Clean crack with electric chipper
Brush area clean
Mix cement and set ports as required
Inject resin after cement is hard
Clean excess with water
Cut off ports after resin cures
Refer to PPE Policy for PPE
04
Job Procedure
Electric Drill
PPE Required
 safety boots, hard hat, safety glasses
Equipment / Tools
 Drill , drill bits, chuck wrench
Steps
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Do a hazard assessment
Mark the spot to be drilled
Determine the proper drill bit to be used
Insert the bit and tighten with the chuck wrench
Check the cord for breaks and signs of stress
Plug in the drill
Drill the required hole(s)
When finished, remove the drill bit and put the tool away
Clean up your work area
05
Job Procedure
Drilling, Grinding, Cutting
Tools / Equipment
 Grinder, drill, power saw, clamps
PPE
 Hard hat, safety boots, eye protection, rubber footwear and rubber
gloves (for outdoor work)
Sequence
 Define job
 Select equipment to be used (if electric power tool, ensure it is double
insulated)
 Select proper accessories for equipment (drill bits, saw blades, etc.)
 Ensure accessories are sharp and properly installed
 Check extension cords for ground and cord condition
 As applicable, clamp work to bench or other solid base
 Use safety glasses and / or dust mask a required
 Commence job
 Do not force the tool or equipment
 Keep guards in place
 Do not overreach, keep proper footing
 Finish job
 Disconnect cords
 Clean up
Possible Hazard








Electrical shock
Personal injury due to abrasion or cuts
Clothing caught in rotating components
Accidental starting
Burr’s
Infection, broken fingers
Tripping, falling
Fire
05
Job Procedure
Precautions
 Be knowledgeable in regard to equipment being used
 If three prong plug and receptacle not available, an adapter wire
must be grounded
 Do not use power tools in wet locations
 Inspect grinding wheels for cracks
 When stringing temporary extension cords ensure they are protected
and do not present a tripping hazard
 Portable saws must have proper guard and shoes
 Stop chain saw when walking
 Do not operate saw at height higher than shoulder level
 Hold chain saw firmly with both hands when operating it
 Do not perform any grinding on the sides of an abrasive wheel unless it
is designed for such use
 Before drilling in a wall, floor or ceiling, make certain dri will not strike
electrical wires, gas lines or high pressure lines
 Ensure no loose clothing, long hair or jewellery – to eliminate possibility
of getting caught in moving parts
 When drilling into walls or sawing used lumber, check for spikes or nails
prior to starting
 Keep workmen away from the plane of rotation
Isolations
 Usually none
Disposal
 Normal clean up
Outside Authorities
 None
.
06
Job Procedure
Extension Ladders
Special Tools / PPE
 safety harness, hard hat, safety boots, safety glasses
Steps
1. Carry extension ladders taking care not to hit anyone / anything.
Maybe two people could help.
2. Make sure the base of the ladder is out from building approximately
25% of the distance it is in the vertical.
3. The ladder is to maintain an adequate overlap between the sections
of the ladder and be tied off to at or near the top.
4. When working above 3 meters, the 3 point contact rule must be
observed.
5. When using an extension ladder for accessing a work platform, ensure
it is extended 3 feet above the working surface.
6. Take care not to damage the sides of buildings when extending and
retracting ladders.
7. Make sure ladder is securely locked on the vehicle.
07
Job Procedure
Using a Fire Extinguisher
Equipment / Tools
 Fire extinguisher
Steps
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Do a hazard assessment
Keep your back to an unobstructed exit
Stand six to eight feet away from the fire
Follow the “PASS” procedure
Pull the pin to unlock the operating lever
Aim low and point the extinguisher nozzle at the base of the fire
Squeeze the lever to discharge the extinguishing agent – release the
lever to stop
8. Sweep from side to side slowing approaching the fire while aiming at
the base
9. Continue to sweep back and forth until the fire is out
10. DON’T LEAVE YET – watch the fire area for flash ups, if possible overhaul
the fire area with water.
11. If there is a flash up, repeat the “PASS” steps above
12. Ensure that you return the extinguisher to the office and complete an
incident report
13. Make sure that the office manager or the safety officer is aware of the
incident so that the extinguisher can be recharged
08
Job Procedure
Fitting of an “Miller” Full Body Harness
To put on this harness:
1. Hold the harness by the back “dee” ring. Shake the harness to allow
all straps to fall in place.
2. If waist and / or leg straps are buckled, release the straps and
unbuckle at this time.
3. Slip the straps over your shoulders so that the “dee” ring is located in
the middle of your back between your shoulder blades.
4. Connect the waist strap. The waist strap should be tight, but not
binding.
5. Pull the buckle portion of the leg strap between your legs and connect
to opposite end of the leg strap. Repeat this step for the other leg
strap.
6. After all straps have been buckled, tighten all friction buckles so that
the harness fits snug, but allows full range of movement. Tongue
buckle leg straps should be adjusted for the same number of
grommets on each leg.
7. If the harness contains a shoulder restrainer strap, fasten it in the chest
area approximately 8” below your chin. Tighten to keep shoulder
straps taut.
8. To remove the harness, reverse the above procedures.
9. Miller recommends reconnecting the waist strap after removing the
harness. This gives the worker a starting point when next attempting to
put the harness on.
10. Miller also recommends hanging the harness by the back “dee” ring to
help it keep shape when not in use.
09
Job Procedure
Fitting & Testing of 3M Dust Mask 8710 Series
Fitting instructions to be followed each time this respirator is worn.
1. Pre-stretch top and bottom straps before placing the respirator on the
face.
2. Cup the respirator in your hand, with the nosepiece at your fingertips,
allowing the headbands to hang freely below your hand.
3. Position the respirator under your chin with the nosepiece up. Pull the
top strap over your head resting it high at the top back of your head.
Pull the bottom strap over your head and position it around you’re the
neck below the ears.
4. Place your fingertips from both hands at the top of the metal
nosepiece. Using both hands, mold the nose area to the shape of
your nose by pushing inward while moving your fingertips down both
sides of the nosepiece. Pinching the nosepiece using one hand may
cause a bad fit and result in less effective respirator performance. Use
both hands.
5. The seal of the respirator on the face should be fit checked prior to
each wearing. To check fit, place both hands completely over the
respirator and exhale. Be careful not to change the position of the
respirator. If it leaks around the nose, readjust the straps and
nosepiece as described in the steps. If air leaks at the respirator
edges, work the straps back along the sides of your head.
NOTE: If you cannot achieve a proper fit, DO NOT ENTER the
contaminated area. See your supervisor.
10
Job Procedure
Forklift
Special Tools / PPE
 Safety boots, Hard hat, Safety glasses, refer to PPE Policy for other PPE
requirements
Materials Required
Forklift
Steps
Visual Inspection
1. Propane Tank: check: Relief valve, Fuel level, Leaks, Safety straps
2. Rear tire
3. Engine compartment: Oil, Radiator, Air filter, Fan belt
4. Overhead guard
5. Front left tire, Front right tire
6. Tilt cylinder
7. Carriage
8. Fork locking pin – left
9. Fork locking pin – right
10. Left fork (attachment if applicable)
11. Right fork (attachment if applicable)
12. Mast
13. Lift cylinder
14. Lift chains
15. Hydraulic oil
16. Seat + belt
17. Overhead guard
Operational Instructions
1. Listen for unusual noise
2. Check service and Parking Brake
3. Lifting Control
4. Tilt Control
5. Forward Driving : Accelerators, Steering, Braking
6. Reverse Driving: Accelerators, Steering, Braking, Backup Alarm
7. Lights
8. Horn
9. Gauges
10. Oil spots on floor
11
Job Procedure
Generator Operations
PPE Required
 Hard hat, safety boots, safety glasses
Equipment / Tools
 Generator
Materials Required
 Fuel
Before Operation
Grounding the Generator
Make sure that the generator is grounded to help prevent accidental
shock. A ground lug has been provided for this purpose. Connect a
length of heavy gauge wire between the generator lug and an external
ground source, such as a water pipe or copper rod driven into the
ground.
WARNING – Do not use a pipe carrying combustible materials as the
ground source.
Lubrication
DO NOT attempt to start this engine without filling the crankcase with the
proper amount and type of oil. Your generator has been shipped from
the factory without oil in the crankcase. Operating the unit without oil
can ruin the engine.
Fuel
Fill the tank with clean, fresh unleaded automotive gasoline.
CAUTION – Do not overfill the tank. Keep maximum fuel level ¼ inch
below the top of the fuel tank. This will allow expansion in hot
weather and prevent overflow.
11
Job Procedure
WARNING – Gasoline is very dangerous. Serious injury may result from fire
caused by gasoline contacting hot surfaces.
Pre-Start Preparation
Before starting the generator, check for loose or missing parts and for any
damage which may have occurred during shipment or transportation.
WARNING – This generator must not be operated without the special
cap for the fuel tank which includes a one inch thick circle
of foam. This is for one gallon tanks only. Failure to comply
may allow leakage around the cap and result in injury from
fire.
Starting the Engine
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Check oil level and fuel.
Disconnect all electrical loads from the unit.
Open fuel shut off valve (if equipped).
Be sure kill tab is not against spark plug on the top of the engine.
Adjust choke as necessary.
Set the engine switch to the “ON / RUN” position.
Pull on the starter rope with fast steady pull. As the engine warms up,
readjust the choke.
WARNING – Provide adequate ventilation for toxic exhaust gases and
cooling air flow.
Break-In Procedure
Controlled break-in helps insure proper engine and generator operation.
Follow engine procedure outlined in engine manual.
CAUTION –
Do not apply heavy electrical load during break-in period
(the first two to three hours of operation.
CAUTION – Allow generator to run at no load for five minutes upon each
initial start-up to permit engine and generator to stabilize.
11
Job Procedure
Shutting the Generator Off
1. Remove entire electrical load.
2. Let the engine run for a few minutes without load.
3. Hold engine kill tab against spark plug to stop engine or move the
engine switch to the “OFF / STOP” position.
4. Do not leave the generator until it has completely stopped.
5. Close the fuel shut off valve if the engine is to be put in storage or
transported.
6. If cover is used, do not install until unit has cooled.
Applying Load
This unit has been pre-tested and adjusted to handle its full capacity.
When starting the generator, disconnect the load. Apply load only after
generator is running. Voltage is related via the engine speed adjusted at
the factory for correct output. Re-adjusting is not recommended.
CAUTION –
When applying the load, do not exceed the maximum
wattage rating of the generator when using one or more
receptacles. Also, do not exceed the amperage rating of
any one receptacle.
Reference: Coleman Operator’s Manual (Page 05)
12
Job Procedure
Grinding
PPE Required
 safety boots, hard hat, safety glasses, dust mask
Equipment / Tools
 Grinder, grinder stone
Steps
1. Do a hazard assessment
2. Prior to start up check the electrical cord for breaks and signs of stress
3. Ensure that the guard is in place
4. Check the stone for any signs of damage
5. Check the area for any signs of flammable material
6. Inform people around you that you are about to start grinding
7. Adjust the guard to properly deflect the sparks
8. Use two hands when grinding
9. Squeeze the trigger to start the grinder
10. Slowly make contact with the surface to be ground, moving back and
forth until finished
11. Release the trigger when finished
12. Wait until the grinding wheel has stopped
13. Unplug the grinder, put it away
14. Clean up your work area
13
Job Procedure
Electric Hammer Drill
PPE Required
 Safety glasses, hearing protection, safety boots, gloves, hard hat, dust
mask
Equipment / Tools
 Hammer drill, bits
Materials Required
 Cement, stone
Steps
1. Complete a hazard assessment
2. Prior to start up, check cord and determine the proper bit
3. Insert bit into the drill and lock it in
4. Plug drill in
5. Check the trigger operation
6. Start hammer drilling
7. Shut down when finished
8. Unplug drill
9. Take out bit wearing gloves – the bit will be hot
10. Put the drill away and clean up your work area
14
Job Procedure
Hand Tools
1. Use the right tool for the right job.
The mistakes in matching a tool to a job are not always obvious.
For instance, if a job calls for an 8” box wrench, we get one, put it on a
nut and start to tug. If the nut does not come loose right away, the
mistake is to use a hammer to bang on the wrench instead of getting
a wrench with a longer handle or using more leverage.
Trying to make do with a smaller wrench can have nasty
consequences. If hammered, the wrench may chip or splinter,
sending metal pieces into your eyes. If you use an extension on the
handle, say a piece of pipe, it may slip and cause you to loose your
balance.
Don’t take chances. If you find you have chosen the wrong tool for
the job, take the time to get the proper one. If you do not know which
tool is the proper tool, ask your supervisor.
2. Use only tools in good condition.
No one would use a hammer with a head, which came off every time
it was swung. But we may use one with a head that wiggles a little.
Using a hammer with a loose head is a hazard – you never know when
it will twist enough to glance off the work, or chip the nail head, or fly
off of the handle.
When tools are in first class condition, the head and handle are sound
and securely fastened, cutting edges are sharp and true, and the tool
is free of dirt and grease.
When a tool is defective in any way, do not use it.
3. Use the tools properly.
If you do not know how to use a tool, ask your supervisor.
An improperly used tool is probably more dangerous than the wrong
one.
14
Job Procedure
The following are a few pointers on the safe use of tools:
 pull on a wrench – do not push
 use the full handle of a hammer. The tools is built and balanced
to be used that way. When the handle is choked, control
becomes difficult.
When you are using a sharp edged tool, cut away from yourself.
Always wear proper eye protection whenever using hand tools.
4. Carry and store tools safely.
If you carry tools in your hands, cover sharp or cutting edges and hold
them away from you. If you have to carry more tools than you can
comfortably or safely in your hands, put them in a tool belt, bag, or
box – do not stuff them into your pockets.
Keep the toolboxes neat. Store cutting tools so that their edges are
protected.
Simply following these four (4) rules will give us effective protection against
hand tool injuries.
15
Job Procedure
Heavy Equipment - Lifting
Tools / Equipment
 Mobile crane, rigging, safety vests, barricades, blocks or pads
PPE
 Hard hat, safety boots, safety vest, gloves
Sequence
1.
2.
3.
4.
Define job
Review site plan
Clear and inspect area
Establish load lifting area, load placement area and crane placement
area
5. Determine maximum radius for load manipulation and height
clearance requirements
6. Select crane to meet specific job requirements and / or space
limitations
7. Inspect crane when it arrives on site (also to be inspected before start
of each shift, whenever repairs are made and at regular intervals as
recommended by the manufacturer
8. Place barricades
9. Complete job
10. Clean site
Possible Hazards






Mechanical failure of crane
Rigging slippage or failure
Unstable pick up
Overheating
Worker injury
Failure of support base allowing crane to tip
15
Job Procedure
Precautions
 Ensure crane is certified and that it has a durable and clearly legible
load-rating chart fixed in a location easily visible to the operator while
seated at controls. If not available move crane off site
 Mobile crane with rope suspended boom to have positive boom
stops, limit device and jib stop device(if equipped with jib)
 Ensure crane is placed on firm, level footing. Utilize blocks and pads as
required
 Outriggers or stabilizing devices available with crane are to be used
 Area around stabilizing devices and crane to be kept clear
 A permanent load gauge is to be used to determine the weight of any
load being lifted
 Operator must be certified and thoroughly instructed
 Rigging to be placed in a manner which ensures hoisting line is in a
vertical position and over the centre of gravity of the load
 Load on rigging not to exceed 20% of he breaking strength of the
weakest part of the rigging or the maximum recommended by
manufacturer
 Rigging to be inspected at the beginning of each shift
 Tag line of adequate length to be utilized as required
 Ensure sufficient electronic operating aids are available to meet the
job requirements
 Designated signaler to wear safety vest and use standard signals
which have been reviewed with the operator
 Crane to be equipped with an effective warning device(other than
back up alarm) with a distinct sound distinguishable from other sounds
at the site
 Address impact of high winds, cold temperatures and crane leveling,
a they affect the load rating of the crane
 Ensure barricades are properly placed to protect other workers on site
 Check crane log to verify inspections and / or operating deficiencies
Isolations
 Barricades
Outside Authorities
 As required
16
Job Procedure
How to Lift
PPE Required
 safety boots, hard hat, safety glasses
Steps
1. Plan your move. Size up your load and make sure the path is clear.
2. Look over the object to be lifted. Make sure that it is not too heavy or
clumsy for good balance.
3. Stand close to the load with your feet spread apart for good balance.
Make sure your footing is sound and that there are no tripping or
slipping hazards.
4. Bend your knees, straddle the load somewhat (that is, put one foot
along the side of the object and one foot behind it). Keep your back
as straight as possible, straight does not mean vertical.
5. Get a good grip to ensure that the load is secure in your hands.
6. Lift gradually. Straighten out your knees and stand. Use your leg
muscles. Avoid quick, jerky motions.
7. Some objects may require a variation of the techniques listed above.
NOTE:
If the object is too heavy, large, hard to handle, or must be
placed higher than the waist, try teaming – two or more people
working together. These people should be approximately the
same size with one person giving clear signals so that the effort
is made together.
17
Job Procedure
Using a Ladder
PPE Required
 safety boots, hard hat, safety harness (if over 10’)
Equipment / Tools
 Ladder
Materials Required
 Rope
Steps
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Do a hazard assessment
Check the ladder ratings prior to each use
Thoroughly check the ladder before using
Set the ladder on a level firm surface
Ensure ladders extend 3 feet above working surface
Anchor or tie off the top of the ladder or have someone hold it at its
base
7. Never put a ladder in front of an building entrance or exit, unless it is
locked or guarded
8. Use three point contact while on, climbing or descending the ladder
9. Never try to adjust the ladder while you or someone else is on the
ladder
10. Never leave placed ladders unattended
11. Always put the ladder away after you are finished with it
18
Job Procedure
Mobile Equipment
Tools / Equipment
 Crawler tractors, industrial tractors; motor graders; wheel scrapers and
loaders; backhoe; skidder; self-propelled roller or compactor;
barricades, signs, fencing
PPE
 Hard hat, safety boots, gloves, ear / eye / dust protection, safety vest
Sequence
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Define job
Review site plan
Select equipment for job
Barricade or fence as appropriate
Install signs as required
Co-ordinate with other jobs on site
Visually inspect machine and surrounding area
Complete job
Clear site
Possible Hazards





Impact with other machinery or structures
Rollover
Fire
Worker injury
Property damage
Precautions
 Ensure equipment is provided with a device to quickly stop any
auxiliary equipment from the powered mobile equipment (power take
off, auger, digging, lifting, equipment)
 Horn or other audible warning device is available
 Operator is trained and familiar with unit being available
 Headlights and back up lights to be available for operations in hours of
darkness
 Ensure windshield wiper washers are available and functioning for units
with windshields
18
Job Procedure
 Windshields and / or other transparent material used as part of
enclosure for cab or canopy is made of safety glass or other material
providing protection against shattering
 Ensure unit is fitted with rollover protective structure and approved seat
belts for operator. If seat belts are impracticable, shoulder belts, bars,
gates, screens or other restraining device are to be available
 Ensure unit has automatic back up warning system
 Ensure rollover protective structure is designed and installed to meet
approved standards
 Rollover structure to be suitably labelled and identified
 Fuel tank located in any enclosed cab in any powered mobile
equipment must have filler spout and vent extending outside the cab
 Ensure no servicing or maintenance is undertaken while flammable
liquid or gas is being loaded or unloaded from the vehicle or present in
the vehicle in any place other than the fuel tank
 No fuelling of powered mobile equipment permitted with gasoline or
flammable liquid while engine is running, anyone smoking in the area
or if there is a known source of ignition in the immediate vicinity
 No worker to ride on equipment unless seated with seat belts fastened
 Vehicle compartment must not contain equipment or material unless it
is properly secured
 Powered mobile equipment transporting materials must have an
appropriate bulkhead to protect the operator
 Equipment must have a stopping device, within easy reach of the
operator and designed to cut power or shut down the power unit
 Ensure underground services and structures have been identified,
located and marked
Isolations
 Fencing or barricades
 Signs
Disposal
 Normal clean up
Outside Authorities
 Utilities
19
Job Procedure
Portable Air Compressor
PPE Required
 safety boots, hard hat, safety glasses, extinguisher
Material
 Compressor, fuel, oil
Set Up
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Bring machine on site.
Ensure that the compressor is sitting n level ground.
Check oil, fuel, and radiator coolant.
Ensure that all air valves are turned off.
If there is a choke, turn it on. (if it is diesel, warm glo-plug)
Now start the compressor and let it run for a minute or so, then shut it
down.
7. Check visually for any fluid leaks.
8. With the machine turned off, proceed to hook the hose to the
compressor. These hoses will have “chicago fittings”. Check to ensure
that both ends have washers in them and that they are not cut or
broken.
9. When the two fittings are put together (one clockwise and the other
counterclockwise), then insert a piece of wire through the two safety
clips.
10. Repeat this all the way to the tool.
11. Making sure that the tool is turned off, restart the compressor
12. Ensure that all PPE is being worn.
13. The compressor is now ready to be turned on.
20
Job Procedure
Powder Actuated Tools
Special Tools / PPE
 powder actuated tool, ear protection, safety boots, hard hat, safety
glasses
Materials Required
 anchoring devices, cartridges
Special Certification
 Powder Actuated Tool Certificate
Steps
1. Remove tool from case.
2. Examine tool to see if it has been maintained and cleaned properly.
3. Make sure work area is clear and people around you are aware you
will be using a powder actuated tool.
4. Insert fastener, point out, into guide until it is held in place by the
plastic washer.
5. In one movement, pull out base-plate and position sleeve to the stop
position, the push back again to the step.
6. Insert magazine in the base of the handgrip, slide it in until end is flush
with the grip (always insert magazine from bottom and remove from
the top).
7. Press tool firmly and squarely against the work surface and squeeze
the trigger.
8. Clean tool thoroughly after a each use and make sure the parts are
working properly.
9. Never point a powder actuated tool at anyone or put your hand over
the end.
NOTE:
The above procedures are closely related to Hilti tools because
those are most available.
Hilti pins are to be used in Hilti tools, and Ramset pins are to be used in
Ramset tools only. Due to differences in pin head configuration.
21
Job Procedure
Power Drill
Operating Applications
Selecting Bits
When selecting a bit, use the right type for your job.
performance, always use sharp bits.
For best
Drilling
1. Before drilling, be sure the work piece is clamped securely. Use
backing material to prevent damage to the work piece during
breakthrough.
2. When starting a hole, place the drill bit on the work surface and apply
firm pressure. Begin drilling at a slow speed, gradually increasing the
speed as you drill.
3. Always apply pressure in line with the bit. Use enough pressure to keep
the drill biting, but do not push hard enough to stall the motor.
4. Reduce pressure and ease the bit through the last part of the hole.
While the tool is still running, pull the bit out of the hole to prevent
jamming.
Drilling in Wood, Composition Materials and Plastic
When drilling in wood, composition materials and plastic, use a wood bit
with a guide screw, start the drill slowly, gradually increasing speed as you
drill. When using twist drill bits, pull the bit out of the hole frequently to
clear chip from the bit flutes. Use low speeds for plastics with a low
melting point.
Drilling in Masonry
When drilling masonry, use high-speed carbide-tipped bits at low speeds.
Drilling soft masonry materials such as cinder block requires little pressure.
Hard materials like concrete require more pressure. A smooth, even flow
of dust indicates the proper drilling rate. Do not let the bit spin in the hole
without cutting, since this will damage the bit. Do not use water to settle
dust or cool bit. This will damage the carbide and create a shock hazard.
21
Job Procedure
Drilling in Metal
When drilling in metal, to prevent the bit from slipping use a centre punch
and create an indentation and use high-speed steel twist drills or hole
saws. Use slow speeds for hard metals and high speeds for softer metals.
Lubricate drill bits with cutting oil when drilling in iron or steel. Use a
coolant when drilling in non-ferrous metals such as copper, brass or
aluminium. Back the material to prevent binding and distortion on
breakthrough.
Driving Screws
When driving screws, use the proper screwdriver bit for your job. After
drilling pilot and shank holes, start the screw slowly and increase the
speed as driving progresses. Set the screw by slowing to a stop. Do not
run screws down at excessive speeds. To remove screws, reverse the
motor.
Reference: Milwaulkee, Makita Operators Manual / Instruction Manual
Prepared by: Thomas Spanik, 5 June, 2002
22
Job Procedure
Power Washing
General
Power washing can be at times very dangerous and safety comes first. In
addition to the job procedures below, always use in conjunction with the
pertaining safe work practices.
1. Put on the necessary PPE, rain suit, goggles, gloves, hearing protection,
and steel toed rubber boots.
2. Survey the site for potential hazards and possible damage to
surrounding property, and plan the job (begin with the end in mind)
3. Put necessary controls in place to do this job safely.
4. Unload, assemble and inspect the equipment according to the
manufacturer’s operators manual
5. Open the intake water source valve.
6. Pull the trigger on the gun to release any built up pressure and keep it
pen while starting the machine (according to the operators manual).
7. Insert the chemical tip, start from the top to the bottom, left to right,
apply the chemical (whenever possible use only environmentally
friendly products) evenly to only sections that will be worked on within
a two (2) hour period. While working with these chemicals, please
keep in mind to follow all WHMIS guidelines and standards.
8. If for any reason, the machine is not in use for three (3) minutes or
more, shut it off.
9. Insert the high pressure tip. Wait ten (10) minutes and begin to apply
water pressure to surface, starting with low pressure and increasing the
pressure to do the job correctly without damaging the substrate (keep
in mind to hold the tip back from the surface at least eight (8) inches
at all times), again going from top to bottom, left to right.
10. Once the surface has been power washed and visually inspected,
rinse thoroughly with clean water to make sure that the chemical has
been diluted properly and no remaining particles or debris are left
behind on the substrate. Once this is achieved, move onto a new
section and proceed until the job is completed.
11. Once the power washing has been completed and inspected, check
the equipment for signs of wear or damage, and follow necessary tag
out procedures (for damage).
12. If the equipment is in good condition, return it to it’s proper storage
place for transportation.
13. Immediately after completing the power-washing job, a thorough
clean up is required to be done. All paint chips and debris must be
contained and disposed of in the appropriate manner as provided by
law.
14. We must leave the property in as good of shape or better than we
found it.
23
Job Procedure
Ordering Product
General
This job is an important task within our company. It will allow us to provide
accurate information and feedback on our jobs. If done properly, clear
and concise job information will be returned and be able to be used as a
management tool, and an effectiveness measuring device. Also, if done
properly, down time will b reduced.
1. Plan tomorrows work today. This will allow the foreman to know what
products they will need for the following day and be able to order
them.
2. Only the foreman on the job can order materials.
3. This is done by the foreman calling the production manager in the
evening prior to 9 p.m.
4. This message shall include everything needed the following day,
including the name of the job and its location.
5. Materials will be delivered to the job-sites, no later than 11 a.m. the
next day, so plan your work accordingly.
6. Job-site material delivery will be prioritized.
7. No deliveries will be made after 1 p.m., and / or orders placed on the
same day.
8. Any employee authorized to pick up materials must make sue the
correct job name is on the supplier’s invoice, and signed legibly by the
person making the purchase.
9. Any personal tools and material, other than the normally applied to
the job, should be marked on the invoice as the employees’ name,
and signed legibly by the person picking them up.
10. All supplier invoices should be placed in the Job Jacket immediately.
Again, those invoices must be clearly tagged to the appropriate job
and legibly signed. (i.e.: Kent’s, Piercey’s, Benjamin Moore, and any
other invoices, where there is no account set up.
11. If any material is to be picked up at a supplier that RYSON Personnel
does not have a regular account, the receipt shall be submitted with
an expense statement and the invoice to go into the Job Jacket. (see
# 10 above)
24
Job Procedure
Use of the Chop Saw
Special Tools / PPE
 hard hat, safety boots, safety glasses, gloves
Material Required
 chop saw, spare blades
Steps
1. Make sure you have proper PPE.
2. Make sure that the chop saw you are using is in good working
condition before you use it.
3. Make sure the chop saw has the right size and type of blade in it for
the material that you would like to cut.
4. Before you start cutting, make sure there is no wires or anything else in
the way that you do not want to cut off.
5. Cut your material that you want to cut. After you make the cut, clean
the toll and put it away.
25
Job Procedure
Cut Off Saw
Pre-Starting Instructions
Filling Tank
 Check operator’s manual for proper fuel mixture. Running the saw on
straight gas will cause a major engine breakdown.
 Fill tank outdoors in a well ventilated area on a bare surface at 10’
away from the cutting area.
 Wipe up any spilled fuel and check for leakage. (Do not run saw with
fuel leaks.)
Check Area
 Place saw in an open area, cleared of all objects, on a firm, level
surface at least 10’ away from where it was fuelled.
 Your cut off saw is strictly a one-person saw. Make sure no one else is
near the saw but make sure there is someone in the area in case of an
accident.
Check Guard
 Check that the guard is set so that rear section will be close to the
work piece and will direct particles away from the operator. (Never
use saw without guard and always make sure guard is undamaged,
unmodified and is adjusted for the work piece.)
Starting Instructions
Starting
 (Never drop start; you may lose control of saw.)
 (Never start saw with wheel in cut. This could cause kickback and
serious injury.)
 (On cold starts, wheel will turn as soon as engine is started.)
 Ensure proper PPE is worn (safety boots, safety glasses, hearing and
head protection, and appropriate filter mask)
 Hold saw so that wheel does not touch anything including the ground.
 Make sure you have a good balanced stance with good footing.
 Use starter grip after pulling, let starter rewind fully. Do not wrap starter
rope around hand or let starter rope snap back, which could cause
injury to yourself or damage to the starter.
25
Job Procedure
Check Controls
 Check that when you release the throttle control, engine rpm drops
and returns to idle “by itself”. Check that the wheel does not move
when the engine is idling.
Check Wheel
 Before cutting, run saw at no load under full throttle for 30 seconds to
check that wheel runs evenly. (Do not use a wheel that wobbles or
pounds.)
Cutting
The following techniques are general in nature. Check instructions for
each type of wheel for individual cutting characteristics. (Diamond
blades, for example, need less feed pressure than abrasive wheels.)
 Support the work piece so that you know what to expect while cutting
and so that it will not bind.
 Always cut at open throttle.
 Start cut gently, do not bump or jam wheel.
 Use high wheel speed.
 Move the wheel slowly back and forth.
 Use small portion of wheel’s cutting edge.
 Use only the cutting edge of the wheel for cutting
 (Never cut with the side of the wheel: it almost certainly will be
damaged, break, and is likely to cause severe injury.)
 (Use cutting edge only.)
 Cut with blade straight up and down – at right angle to work piece.
(Do not bend saw to one side or wheel may bind or break causing
human damage or injury.)
Water Cooling
 (Never use water with an electric cut-off saw because of the danger of
electrocution.)
 Water cooling, used only on gasoline saws and when cutting masonry
type material, helps cool and lengthen the life of the wheel and to
hold down the dust.
Reference: Partner – Safety Manual – Gasoline & Electric Cut Off Saws –
Section 4
26
Job Procedure
Power Miter Saw
General Cutting Operations
Cutting Aluminum
Aluminum extrusions such as used for making aluminum screens and storm
windows can easily be cut with the mitre saw. When cutting aluminum
extrusions, or other sections that can be cut with a saw blade and are
within the capacity of the machine, position material so the blade is
cutting through the smallest cross-section.
The wrong way to cut
aluminum is face down; the angled piece should be pointing up. Be sure
to apply a stick wax to the blade before cutting any aluminum stock. The
stick wax provides proper lubrication and keeps chips from adhering to
the blade. (NEVER apply a lubricant to the blade while running.)
Cutting Bowed Material
When cutting flat pieces, first check to see if the material bowed. If it is,
make sure that the material is positioned on the table with the inside bow
facing down, if not the work-piece will pinch the blade.
Cutting Crown Moulding
1. There are several methods that can be used to cut crown moulding on
the mitre saw. Hold the surface (that makes contact with the wall and
ceiling) firmly against the fence and table of the mitre saw. This
method is acceptable when making a small number of cuts but would
not be practical for a production application as it may be difficult to
firmly hold the work in this position. Also, this method means that the
crown moulding must be positioned on the table in the upside down
position.
2. When a large number of repetitive cuts of crown moulding are
required the manufacturer suggests the use of filler blocks. The
majority of crown moulding have contact surfaces at 52 and 38
degrees to rear surface of the moulding and these angles must be
utilized when joining the face of the filler block. For crown moulding
with different angles, appropriate filler blocks can be produced.
3. Fasten the filler blocks to the mitre saw fence with the face of the filler
block extending outward from the top of the fence and down to the
surface of the table. When the filler block is positioned in this manner,
the crown moulding must be positioned on the table in the upside
26
Job Procedure
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
down position. This means that the surface of the moulding that
contacts the ceiling is against the table.
Fasten the filler block to the mitre saw fence with the face of the filler
block extending inward toward the fence from the top to the bottom.
When the filler block is positioned in this manner, the crown moulding is
placed on the table in he same position as it would be when nailed
between the ceiling and wall.
Fasten the filler blocks to the fence using wood screws through the
holes provided on each fence half. This enables you to easily remove
the filer blocks when not in use and quickly reassemble them to the
fence when needed.
When the mitre saw arm is in the 45 degree right mitre position and the
filler blocks fastened to the fence so that the moulding will be in the
same position as it would be when nailed between the ceiling and
wall.
When making this cut the moulding on the left of the saw blade will be
for an outside corner and the moulding on the right of the saw blade
will be for an inside corner.
To cut the mating pieces for moulding, simply rotate the mitre saw arm
to the 45-degree left mitre position and make the cut. In this case the
moulding on the left of the saw blade will be for an inside corner and
the moulding on the right of the saw blade will be for an outside
corner.
Reference:
Delta Instruction Manual, Pages 14, 15, & 16.
27
Job Procedure
Reciprocating Saw - Operation
PPE
 Safety boots, safety glasses, rubber gloves, dust / filter mask, hearing
protection
General Cutting
Hold your saw firmly in front of and clearly away from you. Make sure saw
blade is clear of any foreign material and that power cord and extension
cords are out of the blade's path. Be sure material to be cut is held firmly.
Small work pieces should be securely clamped in a vise or with clamps to
the workbench or table. Mark the line of cut clearly. Depress the trigger
switch starting the cutting action; set the base assembly against the work,
then move the blade into the work. DO NOT FORCE. Use only enough
pressure to keep the saw cutting. Let the blade and saw do the work.
Plunge Cutting
Mark the line of cut clearly. Choose a convenient starting point inside the
area to be cut out and place the tip of the blade over that point. Rest
front edge of base assembly on work and hold firmly in position. NOTE:
Make sure blade does not touch work until motor reaches full speed, since
this could cause loss of control resulting in serious injury. With saw blade at
full cutting speed, slowly tilt saw downward until tip of blade starts cutting
work. After blade penetrates work, tilt saw until blade is perpendicular to
the work.
Flush Cutting
This saw has been designed with a flush cutting feature which permits
cutting close to floors or walls. To fit your cutting requirements, cuts may
be made in either direction by reversing the position of the blade in the
blade clamp.
Metal Cutting
Metals such as sheet metal, pipe, steel rods, aluminium, brass, and copper
may be cut with this saw. Be careful not to twist or bend the saw blade.
DO NOT FORCE. It is recommend that cutting oil is used when cutting
most soft metals and steel. Cutting oil will also keep blades cool, increase
cutting action, and prolong blade life.
27
Job Procedure
NEVER use gasoline since normal sparking of motor could ignite fumes.
Clamp the work firmly and cut close to the clamping point to eliminate
any vibration of the work being cut. When cutting conduit pipe or angle
iron, clamp work in a vise if possible and cut close to the vise. To cut thin
sheet material, “sandwich” the material between hardboard or plywood
and clamp the layers to eliminate vibration and material tearing.
Reference:
8, and 9)
Owner’s Operating Manual – Ryobi, Operation (Pages
28
Job Procedure
Skill Saw – Changing Blades
PPE Required
 safety boots, hard hat, safety glasses, hearing protection
Equipment / Tools
 Skill saw, blades, wrench
Steps
1. Do a hazard assessment
2. Prior to start up check the electrical cord for breaks and signs of stress
3. Check the blade and equipment for any signs of obvious damage
4. Check the start and stop trigger
5. Plug in the saw, keep a firm grip on the saw
6. Use the proper blade for the job
7. Ensure that the saw is completely stopped by making any adjustments
8. Complete the cut(s)
9. Unplug the saw and put it away
10. Clean up your work area
Changing Saw Blades
1.
2.
3.
4.
Disconnect the power source to the saw.
Set the saw on a non-slip surface, preferably a piece of wood.
Pull back the safety guard.
Push in lock button to lock the blade. If the saw does not have a lock
button, apply hand pressure to saw to ensure that the blade does not
spin when you are loosening the blade bolt.
5. Use the wrench and turn the blade bolt nut counterclockwise to
loosen.
6. Remove the bolt and the blade.
7. Install the new blade, making sure that the teeth on the bottom of the
blade point towards the front of the saw.
8. Make sure, if the blade has a diamond infill, that it is in place and
secure.
9. Engage the lock button or apply hand pressure to saw, and tighten
the blade bolt.
10. Check the guard to ensure that it works properly, if so, the saw is ready
for use.
29
Job Procedure
Skill Saw - Operating Instructions
Depth Adjustment
Disconnect plug from power source. Loosen the depth adjustment lever
located between the guard and handle of saw. Hold the foot down with
one hand and raise or lower saw by the handle. Tighten lever at the
depth setting desired. Check desired depth, not more than one tooth
length of the blade should extend below the material to be cut, for
minimum splintering.
90º Cutting Angle Check
Disconnect plug from power source. Set foot to maximum depth of cut
setting. Loosen bevel adjustment lever, set 0º on quadrant, retighten lever
and check for 0º angle between the blade and bottom plane of foot with
a square. Make adjustments by turning the small alignment screw if
necessary.
Bevel Adjustment
Disconnect plug from power source. The foot can be adjusted up to 45º
by loosening the bevel adjustment lever at the front of the saw. Align to
desired angle on calibrated quadrant. Then tighten bevel adjustment
lever. Because of the increased amount of blade engagement in the
work and decreased stability of the foot, blade binding may occur. Keep
the saw steady and the foot firmly on the work-piece.
Line Guide
For a straight 90º cut, use right side of notch in the foot. For 45º bevel cuts,
use the left side. The cutting guide notch will give an approximate line of
cut. Make sample cuts in scrap lumber to verify actual line of cut. This will
be helpful because of the number of different blade types and thickness’
available. To ensure minimum splintering on the good side of the material
to be cut, face the good side down.
29
Job Procedure
Switch
WARNING: When starting the tool, hold it with both hands. The torque
from the motor can cause the tool to twist.
To turn tool “ON”, squeeze the trigger switch. To turn the tool “OFF”,
release the trigger switch, which is spring loaded and will return to the off
position automatically.
Your saw should be running at full speed BEFORE starting the cut, and
turned off only AFTER completing the cut. To increase switch life, do not
turn switch on and off while cutting.
General Cuts
Always hold the saw handle with one hand and the auxiliary handle or
motor housing with the other. Maintain a firm grip and operate the switch
with a decisive action. Never force the saw. Use light and continuous
pressure.
WARNING: After completing a cut, be aware of the necessary time it
takes for the blade to come to a complete stop. Do not allow the saw to
brush against your leg or side, since the lower guard is retractable, it could
catch on your clothing and expose the blade. Be aware of the necessary
blade exposures that exist in both the upper and lower guard areas.
When cutting is interrupted, to resume cutting: squeeze the trigger and
allow the blade to reach full speed, re-enter the cut slowly and resume
cutting.
When cutting against the grain, the fibres of the wood have a tendency
to tear and lift. Advancing the saw slowly minimizes this effect. For a
finished cut, a cross blade or miter blade is recommended.
Cutting Masonry / Metal
This tool is not recommended for continuous and general usage with
metal or masonry cut-off wheels. If you use your saw for cutting these
materials, use the appropriate wheel for the material being cut.
When cutting masonry, do not cut a depth of more than ¼ inch. Make
successive passes to achieve desired depth. Apply a light forward
pressure. Do not overload motor. Disconnect plug from power source
29
Job Procedure
and clean dust from air vents frequently. Metal cutting is done at full
depth.
WARNING – When cutting masonry materials, the lower guard may
become sluggish. Clean guards frequently to assure a rapid return. Wear
safety glasses and a dust mask.
WARNING – The safe rating of the wheels must be greater than the
nameplate RPM rating of the saw. Because of sparks from wheels, do not
use near flammable materials or liquids.
WARNING – Do not use water feed attachments with this saw.
Pocket Cuts
Disconnect the plug from the power source before making adjustments.
Set depth adjustment according to material to be cut. Tilt saw forward
with cutting guide notch lined up with the line you’ve drawn. Raise the
lower guard, using lift lever and hold the saw by the front and rear
handles.
With the blade just clearing the material to be cut, start the motor.
Gradually lower the back end of the saw using the front end of the foot as
the hinge point.
WARNING: As blade starts cutting the material, release the lower guard
immediately. When the foot rests flat on the surface being cut, proceed
cutting in forward direction to end of cut.
WARNING: Allow blade to come to a complete stop before lifting the saw
from cut. Also, never pull the saw backward since the blade will climb out
of the material and KICKBACK will occur. Turn saw around and finish the
cut in the normal manner, sawing forward. If corners of your pocket cut
are not completely cut through, use a jigsaw or hand saw to finish the
corners.
Cutting Large Sheets
Large sheets and long boards sag or bend, depending on support. If you
attempt to cut without levelling and properly supporting the piece, the
blade will tend to bind, causing KICKBACK and extra load on the motor.
Support the panel or board close to the cut. Be sure to set the depth of
the cut so that you cut through the sheet or board only and not the table
29
Job Procedure
or work bench. The 2 x 4’s used to raise and support the work should be
positioned so that the broadest sides support the work and rest on the
table or bench. Do not support the work with the narrow sides as this is an
unsteady arrangement. If the sheet or board to be cut is too large for a
table or work bench, use the supporting 2 x 4’s on the floor and secure.
Rip Cuts
The combination blade provided with your saw is for both cross cuts and
rip cuts. Ripping is cutting length-wise with the grain of the wood. Rip cuts
are easy to do with a rip fence.
Rip Board Guide
When rip cutting large sheets, the rip fence may not allow the desired
width of cut. Clamp or nail a straight piece of 1” lumber to the sheet as a
guide. Use the right side of the foot against the board guide.
Reference: Owner’s Operating Guide – S-B Power Tool Company
Chicago, Il 60646, Operating Instructions, pages 5,6,7
30
Job Procedure
Table Saw
PPE Required
 Hard hat, safety boots, hearing protection, safety glasses, dust mask
Equipment / Tools
 Table saw, blade, wrench, push block
Materials Required
 Wood, plastic
Steps
1. Do a hazard assessment
2. Prior to start up, check the electrical cords for any sign of damage
3. Check the blade and guard for damage
4. Ensure Guard is lowered manually prior to cutting
5. Raise the blade to the desired height for cutting or ripping
6. Start the saw up and check the stop switch
7. Use proper push block – never use your hands
8. Always shut down the saw prior to making any adjustments
9. Keep your mind on your work
10. When finished the cut(s), turn off the saw and wait for the blade to
stop rotating
11. Lower the blade back down below the table surface
12. Clean up your work area
31
Job Procedure
Work on Scaffolding
Tools / Equipment
 Ladders, guard-rails, scaffolds, elevating work platforms, tool apron
PPE
 Hard hat, safety boots, safety harness, eye protection as required
Sequence
1.
2.
3.
4.
Define job
Examine area
Select appropriate equipment for the job
For use of fixed scaffold, ensure equipment is placed on a firm and
level base
5. For use of mobile scaffold, ensure equipment is suspended with cables
of appropriate capacity and in good condition. Suspension and
counterweight installation must be in compliance with the OH+S
regulations
6. Visually verify the condition of suspension cables, winches, safety
cables, and harnesses before every use
7. Provide clearance space suited to equipment selected
8. Material and debris to be cleared from base and top of equipment
9. Utilize the safety harness
10. Use both hands when climbing up to working level or to hold when the
mobile scaffold is moving
11. Tools and equipment required to do the job to be raised by hand lines
12. Execute the job
13. Lower tools and equipment using the hand line
14. Descend to ground level using both hands
15. Clean area and remove equipment
Possible Hazards
 Fixed or mobile scaffold to fall due to an overload of suspension
system. Due to a fall of a heavy object on the catwalk, to a wrong
installation, to a break of suspension or related element, to an
excessive inclination of catwalk, to a mechanical or electrical break of
wrench, to a nacelle collision during climbing or descending, to a
maintenance problem, or to a non levelled base.
31
Job Procedure
 Worker to fall during installation of harness or from the catwalk due to
absence or inadequacy of guard-rails, to unplanned movement of
catwalk, to the unbalance of the person working in a high windy area
or a catwalk in poor condition
 Material or objects to fall on the catwalk or from the catwalk to the
workers under
 Electrical shock due to collision with electrical lines under pressure or
absence of grounding
Precautions
 All equipment to meet and to be inspected as per applicable
regulations
 Equipment installed if operated by qualified personnel
 Equipment checked on site
 Equipment utilized as per OH+S regulations
 Modification or changes to equipment must be rechecked
 Personnel working at height to be knowledgeable of job to be done
and take precautions to ensure good footing and hand grip
 Keep walking surfaces clear
 Adequately fasten ladders and catwalks
Isolations
 Determined by job being performed
Disposal
 Normal clean up
Outside Authorities
 None
Additional Information
 Ensure that the scaffold checklist is completed before each use
08
Job Procedure
Fitting of an “Miller” Full Body Harness
To put on this harness:
1. Hold the harness by the back “dee” ring. Shake the harness to allow
all straps to fall in place.
2. If waist and / or leg straps are buckled, release the straps and
unbuckle at this time.
3. Slip the straps over your shoulders so that the “dee” ring is located in
the middle of your back between your shoulder blades.
4. Connect the waist strap. The waist strap should be tight, but not
binding.
5. Pull the buckle portion of the leg strap between your legs and connect
to opposite end of the leg strap. Repeat this step for the other leg
strap.
6. After all straps have been buckled, tighten all friction buckles so that
the harness fits snug, but allows full range of movement. Tongue
buckle leg straps should be adjusted for the same number of
grommets on each leg.
7. If the harness contains a shoulder restrainer strap, fasten it in the chest
area approximately 8” below your chin. Tighten to keep shoulder
straps taut.
8. To remove the harness, reverse the above procedures.
9. Miller recommends reconnecting the waist strap after removing the
harness. This gives the worker a starting point when next attempting to
put the harness on.
10. Miller also recommends hanging the harness by the back “dee” ring to
help it keep shape when not in use.
09
Job Procedure
Fitting & Testing of 3M Dust Mask 8710 Series
Fitting instructions to be followed each time this respirator is worn.
1. Pre-stretch top and bottom straps before placing the respirator on the
face.
2. Cup the respirator in your hand, with the nosepiece at your fingertips,
allowing the headbands to hang freely below your hand.
3. Position the respirator under your chin with the nosepiece up. Pull the
top strap over your head resting it high at the top back of your head.
Pull the bottom strap over your head and position it around you’re the
neck below the ears.
4. Place your fingertips from both hands at the top of the metal
nosepiece. Using both hands, mold the nose area to the shape of
your nose by pushing inward while moving your fingertips down both
sides of the nosepiece. Pinching the nosepiece using one hand may
cause a bad fit and result in less effective respirator performance. Use
both hands.
5. The seal of the respirator on the face should be fit checked prior to
each wearing. To check fit, place both hands completely over the
respirator and exhale. Be careful not to change the position of the
respirator. If it leaks around the nose, readjust the straps and
nosepiece as described in the steps. If air leaks at the respirator
edges, work the straps back along the sides of your head.
NOTE: If you cannot achieve a proper fit, DO NOT ENTER the
contaminated area. See your supervisor.
10
Job Procedure
Forklift
Special Tools / PPE
 Safety boots, Hard hat, Safety glasses, refer to PPE Policy for other PPE
requirements
Materials Required
Forklift
Steps
Visual Inspection
1. Propane Tank: check: Relief valve, Fuel level, Leaks, Safety straps
2. Rear tire
3. Engine compartment: Oil, Radiator, Air filter, Fan belt
4. Overhead guard
5. Front left tire, Front right tire
6. Tilt cylinder
7. Carriage
8. Fork locking pin – left
9. Fork locking pin – right
10. Left fork (attachment if applicable)
11. Right fork (attachment if applicable)
12. Mast
13. Lift cylinder
14. Lift chains
15. Hydraulic oil
16. Seat + belt
17. Overhead guard
Operational Instructions
1. Listen for unusual noise
2. Check service and Parking Brake
3. Lifting Control
4. Tilt Control
5. Forward Driving : Accelerators, Steering, Braking
6. Reverse Driving: Accelerators, Steering, Braking, Backup Alarm
7. Lights
8. Horn
9. Gauges
10. Oil spots on floor
11
Job Procedure
Generator Operations
PPE Required
 Hard hat, safety boots, safety glasses
Equipment / Tools
 Generator
Materials Required
 Fuel
Before Operation
Grounding the Generator
Make sure that the generator is grounded to help prevent accidental
shock. A ground lug has been provided for this purpose. Connect a
length of heavy gauge wire between the generator lug and an external
ground source, such as a water pipe or copper rod driven into the
ground.
WARNING – Do not use a pipe carrying combustible materials as the
ground source.
Lubrication
DO NOT attempt to start this engine without filling the crankcase with the
proper amount and type of oil. Your generator has been shipped from
the factory without oil in the crankcase. Operating the unit without oil
can ruin the engine.
Fuel
Fill the tank with clean, fresh unleaded automotive gasoline.
CAUTION – Do not overfill the tank. Keep maximum fuel level ¼ inch
below the top of the fuel tank. This will allow expansion in hot
weather and prevent overflow.
11
Job Procedure
WARNING – Gasoline is very dangerous. Serious injury may result from fire
caused by gasoline contacting hot surfaces.
Pre-Start Preparation
Before starting the generator, check for loose or missing parts and for any
damage which may have occurred during shipment or transportation.
WARNING – This generator must not be operated without the special
cap for the fuel tank which includes a one inch thick circle
of foam. This is for one gallon tanks only. Failure to comply
may allow leakage around the cap and result in injury from
fire.
Starting the Engine
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Check oil level and fuel.
Disconnect all electrical loads from the unit.
Open fuel shut off valve (if equipped).
Be sure kill tab is not against spark plug on the top of the engine.
Adjust choke as necessary.
Set the engine switch to the “ON / RUN” position.
Pull on the starter rope with fast steady pull. As the engine warms up,
readjust the choke.
WARNING – Provide adequate ventilation for toxic exhaust gases and
cooling air flow.
Break-In Procedure
Controlled break-in helps insure proper engine and generator operation.
Follow engine procedure outlined in engine manual.
CAUTION –
Do not apply heavy electrical load during break-in period
(the first two to three hours of operation.
CAUTION – Allow generator to run at no load for five minutes upon each
initial start-up to permit engine and generator to stabilize.
11
Job Procedure
Shutting the Generator Off
1. Remove entire electrical load.
2. Let the engine run for a few minutes without load.
3. Hold engine kill tab against spark plug to stop engine or move the
engine switch to the “OFF / STOP” position.
4. Do not leave the generator until it has completely stopped.
5. Close the fuel shut off valve if the engine is to be put in storage or
transported.
6. If cover is used, do not install until unit has cooled.
Applying Load
This unit has been pre-tested and adjusted to handle its full capacity.
When starting the generator, disconnect the load. Apply load only after
generator is running. Voltage is related via the engine speed adjusted at
the factory for correct output. Re-adjusting is not recommended.
CAUTION –
When applying the load, do not exceed the maximum
wattage rating of the generator when using one or more
receptacles. Also, do not exceed the amperage rating of
any one receptacle.
Reference: Coleman Operator’s Manual (Page 05)
12
Job Procedure
Grinding
PPE Required
 safety boots, hard hat, safety glasses, dust mask
Equipment / Tools
 Grinder, grinder stone
Steps
1. Do a hazard assessment
2. Prior to start up check the electrical cord for breaks and signs of stress
3. Ensure that the guard is in place
4. Check the stone for any signs of damage
5. Check the area for any signs of flammable material
6. Inform people around you that you are about to start grinding
7. Adjust the guard to properly deflect the sparks
8. Use two hands when grinding
9. Squeeze the trigger to start the grinder
10. Slowly make contact with the surface to be ground, moving back and
forth until finished
11. Release the trigger when finished
12. Wait until the grinding wheel has stopped
13. Unplug the grinder, put it away
14. Clean up your work area
13
Job Procedure
Electric Hammer Drill
PPE Required
 Safety glasses, hearing protection, safety boots, gloves, hard hat, dust
mask
Equipment / Tools
 Hammer drill, bits
Materials Required
 Cement, stone
Steps
1. Complete a hazard assessment
2. Prior to start up, check cord and determine the proper bit
3. Insert bit into the drill and lock it in
4. Plug drill in
5. Check the trigger operation
6. Start hammer drilling
7. Shut down when finished
8. Unplug drill
9. Take out bit wearing gloves – the bit will be hot
10. Put the drill away and clean up your work area
14
Job Procedure
Hand Tools
1. Use the right tool for the right job.
The mistakes in matching a tool to a job are not always obvious.
For instance, if a job calls for an 8” box wrench, we get one, put it on a
nut and start to tug. If the nut does not come loose right away, the
mistake is to use a hammer to bang on the wrench instead of getting
a wrench with a longer handle or using more leverage.
Trying to make do with a smaller wrench can have nasty
consequences. If hammered, the wrench may chip or splinter,
sending metal pieces into your eyes. If you use an extension on the
handle, say a piece of pipe, it may slip and cause you to loose your
balance.
Don’t take chances. If you find you have chosen the wrong tool for
the job, take the time to get the proper one. If you do not know which
tool is the proper tool, ask your supervisor.
2. Use only tools in good condition.
No one would use a hammer with a head, which came off every time
it was swung. But we may use one with a head that wiggles a little.
Using a hammer with a loose head is a hazard – you never know when
it will twist enough to glance off the work, or chip the nail head, or fly
off of the handle.
When tools are in first class condition, the head and handle are sound
and securely fastened, cutting edges are sharp and true, and the tool
is free of dirt and grease.
When a tool is defective in any way, do not use it.
3. Use the tools properly.
If you do not know how to use a tool, ask your supervisor.
An improperly used tool is probably more dangerous than the wrong
one.
14
Job Procedure
The following are a few pointers on the safe use of tools:
 pull on a wrench – do not push
 use the full handle of a hammer. The tools is built and balanced
to be used that way. When the handle is choked, control
becomes difficult.
When you are using a sharp edged tool, cut away from yourself.
Always wear proper eye protection whenever using hand tools.
4. Carry and store tools safely.
If you carry tools in your hands, cover sharp or cutting edges and hold
them away from you. If you have to carry more tools than you can
comfortably or safely in your hands, put them in a tool belt, bag, or
box – do not stuff them into your pockets.
Keep the toolboxes neat. Store cutting tools so that their edges are
protected.
Simply following these four (4) rules will give us effective protection against
hand tool injuries.
15
Job Procedure
Heavy Equipment - Lifting
Tools / Equipment
 Mobile crane, rigging, safety vests, barricades, blocks or pads
PPE
 Hard hat, safety boots, safety vest, gloves
Sequence
1.
2.
3.
4.
Define job
Review site plan
Clear and inspect area
Establish load lifting area, load placement area and crane placement
area
5. Determine maximum radius for load manipulation and height
clearance requirements
6. Select crane to meet specific job requirements and / or space
limitations
7. Inspect crane when it arrives on site (also to be inspected before start
of each shift, whenever repairs are made and at regular intervals as
recommended by the manufacturer
8. Place barricades
9. Complete job
10. Clean site
Possible Hazards






Mechanical failure of crane
Rigging slippage or failure
Unstable pick up
Overheating
Worker injury
Failure of support base allowing crane to tip
15
Job Procedure
Precautions
 Ensure crane is certified and that it has a durable and clearly legible
load-rating chart fixed in a location easily visible to the operator while
seated at controls. If not available move crane off site
 Mobile crane with rope suspended boom to have positive boom
stops, limit device and jib stop device(if equipped with jib)
 Ensure crane is placed on firm, level footing. Utilize blocks and pads as
required
 Outriggers or stabilizing devices available with crane are to be used
 Area around stabilizing devices and crane to be kept clear
 A permanent load gauge is to be used to determine the weight of any
load being lifted
 Operator must be certified and thoroughly instructed
 Rigging to be placed in a manner which ensures hoisting line is in a
vertical position and over the centre of gravity of the load
 Load on rigging not to exceed 20% of he breaking strength of the
weakest part of the rigging or the maximum recommended by
manufacturer
 Rigging to be inspected at the beginning of each shift
 Tag line of adequate length to be utilized as required
 Ensure sufficient electronic operating aids are available to meet the
job requirements
 Designated signaler to wear safety vest and use standard signals
which have been reviewed with the operator
 Crane to be equipped with an effective warning device(other than
back up alarm) with a distinct sound distinguishable from other sounds
at the site
 Address impact of high winds, cold temperatures and crane leveling,
a they affect the load rating of the crane
 Ensure barricades are properly placed to protect other workers on site
 Check crane log to verify inspections and / or operating deficiencies
Isolations
 Barricades
Outside Authorities
 As required
16
Job Procedure
How to Lift
PPE Required
 safety boots, hard hat, safety glasses
Steps
1. Plan your move. Size up your load and make sure the path is clear.
2. Look over the object to be lifted. Make sure that it is not too heavy or
clumsy for good balance.
3. Stand close to the load with your feet spread apart for good balance.
Make sure your footing is sound and that there are no tripping or
slipping hazards.
4. Bend your knees, straddle the load somewhat (that is, put one foot
along the side of the object and one foot behind it). Keep your back
as straight as possible, straight does not mean vertical.
5. Get a good grip to ensure that the load is secure in your hands.
6. Lift gradually. Straighten out your knees and stand. Use your leg
muscles. Avoid quick, jerky motions.
7. Some objects may require a variation of the techniques listed above.
NOTE:
If the object is too heavy, large, hard to handle, or must be
placed higher than the waist, try teaming – two or more people
working together. These people should be approximately the
same size with one person giving clear signals so that the effort
is made together.
17
Job Procedure
Using a Ladder
PPE Required
 safety boots, hard hat, safety harness (if over 10’)
Equipment / Tools
 Ladder
Materials Required
 Rope
Steps
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Do a hazard assessment
Check the ladder ratings prior to each use
Thoroughly check the ladder before using
Set the ladder on a level firm surface
Ensure ladders extend 3 feet above working surface
Anchor or tie off the top of the ladder or have someone hold it at its
base
7. Never put a ladder in front of an building entrance or exit, unless it is
locked or guarded
8. Use three point contact while on, climbing or descending the ladder
9. Never try to adjust the ladder while you or someone else is on the
ladder
10. Never leave placed ladders unattended
11. Always put the ladder away after you are finished with it
18
Job Procedure
Mobile Equipment
Tools / Equipment
 Crawler tractors, industrial tractors; motor graders; wheel scrapers and
loaders; backhoe; skidder; self-propelled roller or compactor;
barricades, signs, fencing
PPE
 Hard hat, safety boots, gloves, ear / eye / dust protection, safety vest
Sequence
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Define job
Review site plan
Select equipment for job
Barricade or fence as appropriate
Install signs as required
Co-ordinate with other jobs on site
Visually inspect machine and surrounding area
Complete job
Clear site
Possible Hazards





Impact with other machinery or structures
Rollover
Fire
Worker injury
Property damage
Precautions
 Ensure equipment is provided with a device to quickly stop any
auxiliary equipment from the powered mobile equipment (power take
off, auger, digging, lifting, equipment)
 Horn or other audible warning device is available
 Operator is trained and familiar with unit being available
 Headlights and back up lights to be available for operations in hours of
darkness
 Ensure windshield wiper washers are available and functioning for units
with windshields
18
Job Procedure
 Windshields and / or other transparent material used as part of
enclosure for cab or canopy is made of safety glass or other material
providing protection against shattering
 Ensure unit is fitted with rollover protective structure and approved seat
belts for operator. If seat belts are impracticable, shoulder belts, bars,
gates, screens or other restraining device are to be available
 Ensure unit has automatic back up warning system
 Ensure rollover protective structure is designed and installed to meet
approved standards
 Rollover structure to be suitably labelled and identified
 Fuel tank located in any enclosed cab in any powered mobile
equipment must have filler spout and vent extending outside the cab
 Ensure no servicing or maintenance is undertaken while flammable
liquid or gas is being loaded or unloaded from the vehicle or present in
the vehicle in any place other than the fuel tank
 No fuelling of powered mobile equipment permitted with gasoline or
flammable liquid while engine is running, anyone smoking in the area
or if there is a known source of ignition in the immediate vicinity
 No worker to ride on equipment unless seated with seat belts fastened
 Vehicle compartment must not contain equipment or material unless it
is properly secured
 Powered mobile equipment transporting materials must have an
appropriate bulkhead to protect the operator
 Equipment must have a stopping device, within easy reach of the
operator and designed to cut power or shut down the power unit
 Ensure underground services and structures have been identified,
located and marked
Isolations
 Fencing or barricades
 Signs
Disposal
 Normal clean up
Outside Authorities
 Utilities
19
Job Procedure
Portable Air Compressor
PPE Required
 safety boots, hard hat, safety glasses, extinguisher
Material
 Compressor, fuel, oil
Set Up
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Bring machine on site.
Ensure that the compressor is sitting n level ground.
Check oil, fuel, and radiator coolant.
Ensure that all air valves are turned off.
If there is a choke, turn it on. (if it is diesel, warm glo-plug)
Now start the compressor and let it run for a minute or so, then shut it
down.
7. Check visually for any fluid leaks.
8. With the machine turned off, proceed to hook the hose to the
compressor. These hoses will have “chicago fittings”. Check to ensure
that both ends have washers in them and that they are not cut or
broken.
9. When the two fittings are put together (one clockwise and the other
counterclockwise), then insert a piece of wire through the two safety
clips.
10. Repeat this all the way to the tool.
11. Making sure that the tool is turned off, restart the compressor
12. Ensure that all PPE is being worn.
13. The compressor is now ready to be turned on.
20
Job Procedure
Powder Actuated Tools
Special Tools / PPE
 powder actuated tool, ear protection, safety boots, hard hat, safety
glasses
Materials Required
 anchoring devices, cartridges
Special Certification
 Powder Actuated Tool Certificate
Steps
1. Remove tool from case.
2. Examine tool to see if it has been maintained and cleaned properly.
3. Make sure work area is clear and people around you are aware you
will be using a powder actuated tool.
4. Insert fastener, point out, into guide until it is held in place by the
plastic washer.
5. In one movement, pull out base-plate and position sleeve to the stop
position, the push back again to the step.
6. Insert magazine in the base of the handgrip, slide it in until end is flush
with the grip (always insert magazine from bottom and remove from
the top).
7. Press tool firmly and squarely against the work surface and squeeze
the trigger.
8. Clean tool thoroughly after a each use and make sure the parts are
working properly.
9. Never point a powder actuated tool at anyone or put your hand over
the end.
NOTE:
The above procedures are closely related to Hilti tools because
those are most available.
Hilti pins are to be used in Hilti tools, and Ramset pins are to be used in
Ramset tools only. Due to differences in pin head configuration.
21
Job Procedure
Power Drill
Operating Applications
Selecting Bits
When selecting a bit, use the right type for your job.
performance, always use sharp bits.
For best
Drilling
1. Before drilling, be sure the work piece is clamped securely. Use
backing material to prevent damage to the work piece during
breakthrough.
2. When starting a hole, place the drill bit on the work surface and apply
firm pressure. Begin drilling at a slow speed, gradually increasing the
speed as you drill.
3. Always apply pressure in line with the bit. Use enough pressure to keep
the drill biting, but do not push hard enough to stall the motor.
4. Reduce pressure and ease the bit through the last part of the hole.
While the tool is still running, pull the bit out of the hole to prevent
jamming.
Drilling in Wood, Composition Materials and Plastic
When drilling in wood, composition materials and plastic, use a wood bit
with a guide screw, start the drill slowly, gradually increasing speed as you
drill. When using twist drill bits, pull the bit out of the hole frequently to
clear chip from the bit flutes. Use low speeds for plastics with a low
melting point.
Drilling in Masonry
When drilling masonry, use high-speed carbide-tipped bits at low speeds.
Drilling soft masonry materials such as cinder block requires little pressure.
Hard materials like concrete require more pressure. A smooth, even flow
of dust indicates the proper drilling rate. Do not let the bit spin in the hole
without cutting, since this will damage the bit. Do not use water to settle
dust or cool bit. This will damage the carbide and create a shock hazard.
21
Job Procedure
Drilling in Metal
When drilling in metal, to prevent the bit from slipping use a centre punch
and create an indentation and use high-speed steel twist drills or hole
saws. Use slow speeds for hard metals and high speeds for softer metals.
Lubricate drill bits with cutting oil when drilling in iron or steel. Use a
coolant when drilling in non-ferrous metals such as copper, brass or
aluminium. Back the material to prevent binding and distortion on
breakthrough.
Driving Screws
When driving screws, use the proper screwdriver bit for your job. After
drilling pilot and shank holes, start the screw slowly and increase the
speed as driving progresses. Set the screw by slowing to a stop. Do not
run screws down at excessive speeds. To remove screws, reverse the
motor.
Reference: Milwaulkee, Makita Operators Manual / Instruction Manual
Prepared by: Thomas Spanik, 5 June, 2002
22
Job Procedure
Power Washing
General
Power washing can be at times very dangerous and safety comes first. In
addition to the job procedures below, always use in conjunction with the
pertaining safe work practices.
1. Put on the necessary PPE, rain suit, goggles, gloves, hearing protection,
and steel toed rubber boots.
2. Survey the site for potential hazards and possible damage to
surrounding property, and plan the job (begin with the end in mind)
3. Put necessary controls in place to do this job safely.
4. Unload, assemble and inspect the equipment according to the
manufacturer’s operators manual
5. Open the intake water source valve.
6. Pull the trigger on the gun to release any built up pressure and keep it
pen while starting the machine (according to the operators manual).
7. Insert the chemical tip, start from the top to the bottom, left to right,
apply the chemical (whenever possible use only environmentally
friendly products) evenly to only sections that will be worked on within
a two (2) hour period. While working with these chemicals, please
keep in mind to follow all WHMIS guidelines and standards.
8. If for any reason, the machine is not in use for three (3) minutes or
more, shut it off.
9. Insert the high pressure tip. Wait ten (10) minutes and begin to apply
water pressure to surface, starting with low pressure and increasing the
pressure to do the job correctly without damaging the substrate (keep
in mind to hold the tip back from the surface at least eight (8) inches
at all times), again going from top to bottom, left to right.
10. Once the surface has been power washed and visually inspected,
rinse thoroughly with clean water to make sure that the chemical has
been diluted properly and no remaining particles or debris are left
behind on the substrate. Once this is achieved, move onto a new
section and proceed until the job is completed.
11. Once the power washing has been completed and inspected, check
the equipment for signs of wear or damage, and follow necessary tag
out procedures (for damage).
12. If the equipment is in good condition, return it to it’s proper storage
place for transportation.
13. Immediately after completing the power-washing job, a thorough
clean up is required to be done. All paint chips and debris must be
contained and disposed of in the appropriate manner as provided by
law.
14. We must leave the property in as good of shape or better than we
found it.
23
Job Procedure
Ordering Product
General
This job is an important task within our company. It will allow us to provide
accurate information and feedback on our jobs. If done properly, clear
and concise job information will be returned and be able to be used as a
management tool, and an effectiveness measuring device. Also, if done
properly, down time will b reduced.
1. Plan tomorrows work today. This will allow the foreman to know what
products they will need for the following day and be able to order
them.
2. Only the foreman on the job can order materials.
3. This is done by the foreman calling the production manager in the
evening prior to 9 p.m.
4. This message shall include everything needed the following day,
including the name of the job and its location.
5. Materials will be delivered to the job-sites, no later than 11 a.m. the
next day, so plan your work accordingly.
6. Job-site material delivery will be prioritized.
7. No deliveries will be made after 1 p.m., and / or orders placed on the
same day.
8. Any employee authorized to pick up materials must make sue the
correct job name is on the supplier’s invoice, and signed legibly by the
person making the purchase.
9. Any personal tools and material, other than the normally applied to
the job, should be marked on the invoice as the employees’ name,
and signed legibly by the person picking them up.
10. All supplier invoices should be placed in the Job Jacket immediately.
Again, those invoices must be clearly tagged to the appropriate job
and legibly signed. (i.e.: Kent’s, Piercey’s, Benjamin Moore, and any
other invoices, where there is no account set up.
11. If any material is to be picked up at a supplier that RYSON Personnel
does not have a regular account, the receipt shall be submitted with
an expense statement and the invoice to go into the Job Jacket. (see
# 10 above)
24
Job Procedure
Use of the Chop Saw
Special Tools / PPE
 hard hat, safety boots, safety glasses, gloves
Material Required
 chop saw, spare blades
Steps
1. Make sure you have proper PPE.
2. Make sure that the chop saw you are using is in good working
condition before you use it.
3. Make sure the chop saw has the right size and type of blade in it for
the material that you would like to cut.
4. Before you start cutting, make sure there is no wires or anything else in
the way that you do not want to cut off.
5. Cut your material that you want to cut. After you make the cut, clean
the toll and put it away.
25
Job Procedure
Cut Off Saw
Pre-Starting Instructions
Filling Tank
 Check operator’s manual for proper fuel mixture. Running the saw on
straight gas will cause a major engine breakdown.
 Fill tank outdoors in a well ventilated area on a bare surface at 10’
away from the cutting area.
 Wipe up any spilled fuel and check for leakage. (Do not run saw with
fuel leaks.)
Check Area
 Place saw in an open area, cleared of all objects, on a firm, level
surface at least 10’ away from where it was fuelled.
 Your cut off saw is strictly a one-person saw. Make sure no one else is
near the saw but make sure there is someone in the area in case of an
accident.
Check Guard
 Check that the guard is set so that rear section will be close to the
work piece and will direct particles away from the operator. (Never
use saw without guard and always make sure guard is undamaged,
unmodified and is adjusted for the work piece.)
Starting Instructions
Starting
 (Never drop start; you may lose control of saw.)
 (Never start saw with wheel in cut. This could cause kickback and
serious injury.)
 (On cold starts, wheel will turn as soon as engine is started.)
 Ensure proper PPE is worn (safety boots, safety glasses, hearing and
head protection, and appropriate filter mask)
 Hold saw so that wheel does not touch anything including the ground.
 Make sure you have a good balanced stance with good footing.
 Use starter grip after pulling, let starter rewind fully. Do not wrap starter
rope around hand or let starter rope snap back, which could cause
injury to yourself or damage to the starter.
25
Job Procedure
Check Controls
 Check that when you release the throttle control, engine rpm drops
and returns to idle “by itself”. Check that the wheel does not move
when the engine is idling.
Check Wheel
 Before cutting, run saw at no load under full throttle for 30 seconds to
check that wheel runs evenly. (Do not use a wheel that wobbles or
pounds.)
Cutting
The following techniques are general in nature. Check instructions for
each type of wheel for individual cutting characteristics. (Diamond
blades, for example, need less feed pressure than abrasive wheels.)
 Support the work piece so that you know what to expect while cutting
and so that it will not bind.
 Always cut at open throttle.
 Start cut gently, do not bump or jam wheel.
 Use high wheel speed.
 Move the wheel slowly back and forth.
 Use small portion of wheel’s cutting edge.
 Use only the cutting edge of the wheel for cutting
 (Never cut with the side of the wheel: it almost certainly will be
damaged, break, and is likely to cause severe injury.)
 (Use cutting edge only.)
 Cut with blade straight up and down – at right angle to work piece.
(Do not bend saw to one side or wheel may bind or break causing
human damage or injury.)
Water Cooling
 (Never use water with an electric cut-off saw because of the danger of
electrocution.)
 Water cooling, used only on gasoline saws and when cutting masonry
type material, helps cool and lengthen the life of the wheel and to
hold down the dust.
Reference: Partner – Safety Manual – Gasoline & Electric Cut Off Saws –
Section 4
26
Job Procedure
Power Miter Saw
General Cutting Operations
Cutting Aluminum
Aluminum extrusions such as used for making aluminum screens and storm
windows can easily be cut with the mitre saw. When cutting aluminum
extrusions, or other sections that can be cut with a saw blade and are
within the capacity of the machine, position material so the blade is
cutting through the smallest cross-section.
The wrong way to cut
aluminum is face down; the angled piece should be pointing up. Be sure
to apply a stick wax to the blade before cutting any aluminum stock. The
stick wax provides proper lubrication and keeps chips from adhering to
the blade. (NEVER apply a lubricant to the blade while running.)
Cutting Bowed Material
When cutting flat pieces, first check to see if the material bowed. If it is,
make sure that the material is positioned on the table with the inside bow
facing down, if not the work-piece will pinch the blade.
Cutting Crown Moulding
1. There are several methods that can be used to cut crown moulding on
the mitre saw. Hold the surface (that makes contact with the wall and
ceiling) firmly against the fence and table of the mitre saw. This
method is acceptable when making a small number of cuts but would
not be practical for a production application as it may be difficult to
firmly hold the work in this position. Also, this method means that the
crown moulding must be positioned on the table in the upside down
position.
2. When a large number of repetitive cuts of crown moulding are
required the manufacturer suggests the use of filler blocks. The
majority of crown moulding have contact surfaces at 52 and 38
degrees to rear surface of the moulding and these angles must be
utilized when joining the face of the filler block. For crown moulding
with different angles, appropriate filler blocks can be produced.
3. Fasten the filler blocks to the mitre saw fence with the face of the filler
block extending outward from the top of the fence and down to the
surface of the table. When the filler block is positioned in this manner,
the crown moulding must be positioned on the table in the upside
26
Job Procedure
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
down position. This means that the surface of the moulding that
contacts the ceiling is against the table.
Fasten the filler block to the mitre saw fence with the face of the filler
block extending inward toward the fence from the top to the bottom.
When the filler block is positioned in this manner, the crown moulding is
placed on the table in he same position as it would be when nailed
between the ceiling and wall.
Fasten the filler blocks to the fence using wood screws through the
holes provided on each fence half. This enables you to easily remove
the filer blocks when not in use and quickly reassemble them to the
fence when needed.
When the mitre saw arm is in the 45 degree right mitre position and the
filler blocks fastened to the fence so that the moulding will be in the
same position as it would be when nailed between the ceiling and
wall.
When making this cut the moulding on the left of the saw blade will be
for an outside corner and the moulding on the right of the saw blade
will be for an inside corner.
To cut the mating pieces for moulding, simply rotate the mitre saw arm
to the 45-degree left mitre position and make the cut. In this case the
moulding on the left of the saw blade will be for an inside corner and
the moulding on the right of the saw blade will be for an outside
corner.
Reference:
Delta Instruction Manual, Pages 14, 15, & 16.
27
Job Procedure
Reciprocating Saw - Operation
PPE
 Safety boots, safety glasses, rubber gloves, dust / filter mask, hearing
protection
General Cutting
Hold your saw firmly in front of and clearly away from you. Make sure saw
blade is clear of any foreign material and that power cord and extension
cords are out of the blade's path. Be sure material to be cut is held firmly.
Small work pieces should be securely clamped in a vise or with clamps to
the workbench or table. Mark the line of cut clearly. Depress the trigger
switch starting the cutting action; set the base assembly against the work,
then move the blade into the work. DO NOT FORCE. Use only enough
pressure to keep the saw cutting. Let the blade and saw do the work.
Plunge Cutting
Mark the line of cut clearly. Choose a convenient starting point inside the
area to be cut out and place the tip of the blade over that point. Rest
front edge of base assembly on work and hold firmly in position. NOTE:
Make sure blade does not touch work until motor reaches full speed, since
this could cause loss of control resulting in serious injury. With saw blade at
full cutting speed, slowly tilt saw downward until tip of blade starts cutting
work. After blade penetrates work, tilt saw until blade is perpendicular to
the work.
Flush Cutting
This saw has been designed with a flush cutting feature which permits
cutting close to floors or walls. To fit your cutting requirements, cuts may
be made in either direction by reversing the position of the blade in the
blade clamp.
Metal Cutting
Metals such as sheet metal, pipe, steel rods, aluminium, brass, and copper
may be cut with this saw. Be careful not to twist or bend the saw blade.
DO NOT FORCE. It is recommend that cutting oil is used when cutting
most soft metals and steel. Cutting oil will also keep blades cool, increase
cutting action, and prolong blade life.
27
Job Procedure
NEVER use gasoline since normal sparking of motor could ignite fumes.
Clamp the work firmly and cut close to the clamping point to eliminate
any vibration of the work being cut. When cutting conduit pipe or angle
iron, clamp work in a vise if possible and cut close to the vise. To cut thin
sheet material, “sandwich” the material between hardboard or plywood
and clamp the layers to eliminate vibration and material tearing.
Reference:
8, and 9)
Owner’s Operating Manual – Ryobi, Operation (Pages
28
Job Procedure
Skill Saw – Changing Blades
PPE Required
 safety boots, hard hat, safety glasses, hearing protection
Equipment / Tools
 Skill saw, blades, wrench
Steps
1. Do a hazard assessment
2. Prior to start up check the electrical cord for breaks and signs of stress
3. Check the blade and equipment for any signs of obvious damage
4. Check the start and stop trigger
5. Plug in the saw, keep a firm grip on the saw
6. Use the proper blade for the job
7. Ensure that the saw is completely stopped by making any adjustments
8. Complete the cut(s)
9. Unplug the saw and put it away
10. Clean up your work area
Changing Saw Blades
1.
2.
3.
4.
Disconnect the power source to the saw.
Set the saw on a non-slip surface, preferably a piece of wood.
Pull back the safety guard.
Push in lock button to lock the blade. If the saw does not have a lock
button, apply hand pressure to saw to ensure that the blade does not
spin when you are loosening the blade bolt.
5. Use the wrench and turn the blade bolt nut counterclockwise to
loosen.
6. Remove the bolt and the blade.
7. Install the new blade, making sure that the teeth on the bottom of the
blade point towards the front of the saw.
8. Make sure, if the blade has a diamond infill, that it is in place and
secure.
9. Engage the lock button or apply hand pressure to saw, and tighten
the blade bolt.
10. Check the guard to ensure that it works properly, if so, the saw is ready
for use.
29
Job Procedure
Skill Saw - Operating Instructions
Depth Adjustment
Disconnect plug from power source. Loosen the depth adjustment lever
located between the guard and handle of saw. Hold the foot down with
one hand and raise or lower saw by the handle. Tighten lever at the
depth setting desired. Check desired depth, not more than one tooth
length of the blade should extend below the material to be cut, for
minimum splintering.
90º Cutting Angle Check
Disconnect plug from power source. Set foot to maximum depth of cut
setting. Loosen bevel adjustment lever, set 0º on quadrant, retighten lever
and check for 0º angle between the blade and bottom plane of foot with
a square. Make adjustments by turning the small alignment screw if
necessary.
Bevel Adjustment
Disconnect plug from power source. The foot can be adjusted up to 45º
by loosening the bevel adjustment lever at the front of the saw. Align to
desired angle on calibrated quadrant. Then tighten bevel adjustment
lever. Because of the increased amount of blade engagement in the
work and decreased stability of the foot, blade binding may occur. Keep
the saw steady and the foot firmly on the work-piece.
Line Guide
For a straight 90º cut, use right side of notch in the foot. For 45º bevel cuts,
use the left side. The cutting guide notch will give an approximate line of
cut. Make sample cuts in scrap lumber to verify actual line of cut. This will
be helpful because of the number of different blade types and thickness’
available. To ensure minimum splintering on the good side of the material
to be cut, face the good side down.
29
Job Procedure
Switch
WARNING: When starting the tool, hold it with both hands. The torque
from the motor can cause the tool to twist.
To turn tool “ON”, squeeze the trigger switch. To turn the tool “OFF”,
release the trigger switch, which is spring loaded and will return to the off
position automatically.
Your saw should be running at full speed BEFORE starting the cut, and
turned off only AFTER completing the cut. To increase switch life, do not
turn switch on and off while cutting.
General Cuts
Always hold the saw handle with one hand and the auxiliary handle or
motor housing with the other. Maintain a firm grip and operate the switch
with a decisive action. Never force the saw. Use light and continuous
pressure.
WARNING: After completing a cut, be aware of the necessary time it
takes for the blade to come to a complete stop. Do not allow the saw to
brush against your leg or side, since the lower guard is retractable, it could
catch on your clothing and expose the blade. Be aware of the necessary
blade exposures that exist in both the upper and lower guard areas.
When cutting is interrupted, to resume cutting: squeeze the trigger and
allow the blade to reach full speed, re-enter the cut slowly and resume
cutting.
When cutting against the grain, the fibres of the wood have a tendency
to tear and lift. Advancing the saw slowly minimizes this effect. For a
finished cut, a cross blade or miter blade is recommended.
Cutting Masonry / Metal
This tool is not recommended for continuous and general usage with
metal or masonry cut-off wheels. If you use your saw for cutting these
materials, use the appropriate wheel for the material being cut.
When cutting masonry, do not cut a depth of more than ¼ inch. Make
successive passes to achieve desired depth. Apply a light forward
pressure. Do not overload motor. Disconnect plug from power source
29
Job Procedure
and clean dust from air vents frequently. Metal cutting is done at full
depth.
WARNING – When cutting masonry materials, the lower guard may
become sluggish. Clean guards frequently to assure a rapid return. Wear
safety glasses and a dust mask.
WARNING – The safe rating of the wheels must be greater than the
nameplate RPM rating of the saw. Because of sparks from wheels, do not
use near flammable materials or liquids.
WARNING – Do not use water feed attachments with this saw.
Pocket Cuts
Disconnect the plug from the power source before making adjustments.
Set depth adjustment according to material to be cut. Tilt saw forward
with cutting guide notch lined up with the line you’ve drawn. Raise the
lower guard, using lift lever and hold the saw by the front and rear
handles.
With the blade just clearing the material to be cut, start the motor.
Gradually lower the back end of the saw using the front end of the foot as
the hinge point.
WARNING: As blade starts cutting the material, release the lower guard
immediately. When the foot rests flat on the surface being cut, proceed
cutting in forward direction to end of cut.
WARNING: Allow blade to come to a complete stop before lifting the saw
from cut. Also, never pull the saw backward since the blade will climb out
of the material and KICKBACK will occur. Turn saw around and finish the
cut in the normal manner, sawing forward. If corners of your pocket cut
are not completely cut through, use a jigsaw or hand saw to finish the
corners.
Cutting Large Sheets
Large sheets and long boards sag or bend, depending on support. If you
attempt to cut without levelling and properly supporting the piece, the
blade will tend to bind, causing KICKBACK and extra load on the motor.
Support the panel or board close to the cut. Be sure to set the depth of
the cut so that you cut through the sheet or board only and not the table
29
Job Procedure
or work bench. The 2 x 4’s used to raise and support the work should be
positioned so that the broadest sides support the work and rest on the
table or bench. Do not support the work with the narrow sides as this is an
unsteady arrangement. If the sheet or board to be cut is too large for a
table or work bench, use the supporting 2 x 4’s on the floor and secure.
Rip Cuts
The combination blade provided with your saw is for both cross cuts and
rip cuts. Ripping is cutting length-wise with the grain of the wood. Rip cuts
are easy to do with a rip fence.
Rip Board Guide
When rip cutting large sheets, the rip fence may not allow the desired
width of cut. Clamp or nail a straight piece of 1” lumber to the sheet as a
guide. Use the right side of the foot against the board guide.
Reference: Owner’s Operating Guide – S-B Power Tool Company
Chicago, Il 60646, Operating Instructions, pages 5,6,7
30
Job Procedure
Table Saw
PPE Required
 Hard hat, safety boots, hearing protection, safety glasses, dust mask
Equipment / Tools
 Table saw, blade, wrench, push block
Materials Required
 Wood, plastic
Steps
1. Do a hazard assessment
2. Prior to start up, check the electrical cords for any sign of damage
3. Check the blade and guard for damage
4. Ensure Guard is lowered manually prior to cutting
5. Raise the blade to the desired height for cutting or ripping
6. Start the saw up and check the stop switch
7. Use proper push block – never use your hands
8. Always shut down the saw prior to making any adjustments
9. Keep your mind on your work
10. When finished the cut(s), turn off the saw and wait for the blade to
stop rotating
11. Lower the blade back down below the table surface
12. Clean up your work area
31
Job Procedure
Work on Scaffolding
Tools / Equipment
 Ladders, guard-rails, scaffolds, elevating work platforms, tool apron
PPE
 Hard hat, safety boots, safety harness, eye protection as required
Sequence
1.
2.
3.
4.
Define job
Examine area
Select appropriate equipment for the job
For use of fixed scaffold, ensure equipment is placed on a firm and
level base
5. For use of mobile scaffold, ensure equipment is suspended with cables
of appropriate capacity and in good condition. Suspension and
counterweight installation must be in compliance with the OH+S
regulations
6. Visually verify the condition of suspension cables, winches, safety
cables, and harnesses before every use
7. Provide clearance space suited to equipment selected
8. Material and debris to be cleared from base and top of equipment
9. Utilize the safety harness
10. Use both hands when climbing up to working level or to hold when the
mobile scaffold is moving
11. Tools and equipment required to do the job to be raised by hand lines
12. Execute the job
13. Lower tools and equipment using the hand line
14. Descend to ground level using both hands
15. Clean area and remove equipment
Possible Hazards
 Fixed or mobile scaffold to fall due to an overload of suspension
system. Due to a fall of a heavy object on the catwalk, to a wrong
installation, to a break of suspension or related element, to an
excessive inclination of catwalk, to a mechanical or electrical break of
wrench, to a nacelle collision during climbing or descending, to a
maintenance problem, or to a non levelled base.
31
Job Procedure
 Worker to fall during installation of harness or from the catwalk due to
absence or inadequacy of guard-rails, to unplanned movement of
catwalk, to the unbalance of the person working in a high windy area
or a catwalk in poor condition
 Material or objects to fall on the catwalk or from the catwalk to the
workers under
 Electrical shock due to collision with electrical lines under pressure or
absence of grounding
Precautions
 All equipment to meet and to be inspected as per applicable
regulations
 Equipment installed if operated by qualified personnel
 Equipment checked on site
 Equipment utilized as per OH+S regulations
 Modification or changes to equipment must be rechecked
 Personnel working at height to be knowledgeable of job to be done
and take precautions to ensure good footing and hand grip
 Keep walking surfaces clear
 Adequately fasten ladders and catwalks
Isolations
 Determined by job being performed
Disposal
 Normal clean up
Outside Authorities
 None
Additional Information
 Ensure that the scaffold checklist is completed before each use
PPE Information Sheet
Respirators
Combination Respirators
This type of APR combines separate chemical and mechanical filters. This
allows for the change of the different filters when one of them becomes
plugged or exhausted before the other filter (usually the dust filter plugs
up before the chemical filter). This type of respirator is suitable for most
spray painting and welding. For more information, check the:
 MSDS
 Department of Labour
 Supplier of the safety equipment.
For more information, see:
 OH+S Act, Regulations, and Code of Practices
 CSA Standards “Compressed Breathing Air” CAN3 - Z180.1 – M85
 “Selection, Care, and Use of Respirators” Z94.4 - M1982
DO:
 Train workers very carefully in the APR’s use, care, and limitations.
 Ensure that respirators are properly cleaned and disinfected after
each use, according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
 Dispose of exhausted cartridges and masks in sealed bags or
containers.
 Keep new, unused filters separate from old, used filters.
 Monitor APR use, they are useless just hung around the neck.
 Replace filters when breathing becomes difficult.
DON’T:
Use for protection against material which are toxic in small amounts.
Use materials that are highly irritating to the eyes.
Use with gases that can’t be detected by odour or throat irritation.
Use with gases not effectively halted by chemical cartridges,
regardless of concentration.
 Use respirators or masks if the serviceability is in doubt.
 Use APR’s where oxygen content in the air is less than 18% or 18 kiloPascal’s (partial pressure or greater)




PPE Information Sheet
Fall Protection + Body Harness
General
Advanced planning is essential to identifying locations where fall
prevention will be required and to determine what procedures and
arrangements will be most suitable for the location(s).
On construction sites, fall prevention / protection can be accomplished
by using one or more of the following methods:




installing guardrails in accordance with General Regulations
installing safety nets
providing workers with a fall arrest system
providing workers with a travel restraint system
It should be noted that the fall arrest system should only be used as the
last line of defense for worker protection.
Body Harness
 All personnel required to wear a body harness must be trained in fitting
and it’s use.
 The body harness must fit snugly and not pinch or chafe the wearer.
 The body harness must be properly fitted to allow for ease of
movement while working.
 Carefully follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
 Before each use, inspect the harness you are using. Look for loose
stitching, fraying, bad rivets, bent or broken buckles.
 Do not fasten or attach any tool to your harness while working.
 A body harness must be worn while working above 3 meters, in
situations as outlined in the OH+S Act’s Fall Arrest Regulation.
 When working with a body harness, try to maintain a minimum of slack
in the lanyard and life line.
 If a harness is used to arrest a fall, it must be discarded.
Fall Protection Equipment Inspection Checklist
Instructions:
1. All parts of the fall protection system and components are to be checked for
excessive wear and damage.
2. Use the symbol “Y” for yes or OK.
3. Use the symbol “N” for no or replace.
4. All equipment must be inspected visually before each use and documented on this
form.
5. Any equipment taken out of service due to damage or excessive wear must be
tagged.
Harness Number / ID
Harness Webbing
Dee Ring
Buckles
Buckle tongs
Wear, rivets, stitching, etc.
Corrosion, cracks, rough edges
Corrosion, cracks
Missing, worn
Sign:
Dated:
Lanyard Description
Lanyard
Snap Hook
Rope Grab
Life Line
Cuts, frays
Corrosion, cracks, damage, locks
Corrosion, spring tension
Cuts, frays
Sign:
Dated:
Site Location:
________________________________________________________________
PPE Information Sheet
Hearing Protection
Permissible Exposures
The threshold limit values (TLV) are levels of sound that have been
established to prevent hearing loss. The values should be used as guides
in the control of noise exposure and, due to individual susceptibility,
should not be regarded as fine lines between safe and dangerous levels.
The following are the TLV’s
Duration / Day Hours
Sound Level dB A
16
80
8
85
4
90
2
95
1
100
½
105
¼
110
Hearing Loss
Hearing loss varies with the intensity of noise and the length of daily
exposure a person is subjected to. Everyday noises like vehicle engines,
music, lawn mowers have to be considered. All of these, added together
with the exposure noise at work, could cause hearing loss.
Exposure to very high noise levels for a short period of time can cause
temporary hearing loss. Recovery depends on the noise level and on the
length of exposure (complete recovery usually occurs 16 hours after the
noise ends).
A permanent loss of hearing from damage to the vibration-detecting cells
in the ears can develop from long term exposure to noise.
The
impairment first affects high frequencies above the range of human
speech, so it might not even be noticed. Continued exposure will further
the deterioration until the point where it’s obvious to the affected
individual. Some of the symptoms of hearing loss caused by exposure to
noise are, difficulty understanding speech in a noisy environment, being
unable to tune out unwanted sounds, and a ringing, buzzing or humming
in the ears when there is little or no external sound.
Exposure to high noise levels can cause hearing loss or impairment.
Because there is no cure for noise-induced hearing loss, the prevention of
excessive noise is the only way to avoid hearing damage.
Hearing Protection
There are two type of hearing protection available:
1. Plug Type
 molded of soft polymer foam
 designed to fit snugly in the ear canal
 instruction for the insertion are printed on each package they may
-be of the disposable or the reusable type
2. Muff Type
 two ear cups mounted on an adjustable steel headband
 the ear muff type protector may be worn with the head in a
number of positions to suit particular work requirements; over the
head, behind the head or under the chin. This allows the wearer to
adjust them to any comfortable position to conform to the head.
The only maintenance required for hearing protectors is occasional
cleaning with mild soap and water.
Note: Always ensure hearing protectors are tightly sealed within the ear
canal or against the side of the head.
Maintenance Program Policy
An effective maintenance program will reduce the risk of injury, damage,
and lost production. To this extent, all tools, machinery, vehicles, and
facilities are included in this program.
Each individual operating any tool or equipment shall:
1. Be familiar with the proper use and maintenance of each
tool/equipment as instructed by the manufacturer specifications,
standards, regulations, and your supervisor.
2. Regularly check all tools/equipment for damage and ensure regular
service maintenance of the tool as required.
3. Do not use any tool/equipment for any purpose other than what it was
designed to do.
4. Remove from use, any tool/equipment that is damaged or is not
functioning properly. The tool/equipment must be labeled “DO NOT
USE” and indicated what is wrong with the tool/equipment.
5. Do not temporarily fix or “jerry-rig” any tool for short-term use until
proper repair is performed.
6. Only operate tools/equipment that they have been trained to use.
(i.e.: explosive/powder actuated tools require specific training).
7. Not remove any safety guards attached to any tool/equipment.
All maintenance and repair work must be performed by a qualified
person.
Each repaired tool/equipment must be tested for proper
performance before being returned to regular service. A record shall be
kept of all maintenance performed on all tools/equipment.
All equipment and tools will be informally inspected prior to every use of
the equipment/tool and formally inspected once per year. Ongoing
maintenance will be performed on defective or broken equipment/tools.
Broken or defective tools shall be immediately removed from site until
either repaired or disposed of.
The safety information in this policy does not take precedence over the
Nova Scotia Occupational Health and Safety Act and Regulations or
Codes of Practice.
Signed:
__________________________
Mark Stevenson, President
Dated: __________________
Maintenance Program
It is the policy of Ryson Interior Construction Ltd. to ensure that all individuals
who perform maintenance work have the appropriate skills, accreditation
and/or certification. This applies to both company employees and to
contract maintenance personnel.
Rental Equipment
This company will from time to time be required to rent equipment such as
compressors, generators, and scissors lifts. Any equipment required on job
sites that may be rented will only be repaired by the company that it has
been rented from. Training on all equipment will be conducted before
employees use this equipment and the employees using this equipment will
carry out the manufacturer’s recommended daily checks.
Fall Arrest Equipment
Fall arrest equipment will be formally inspected on a regular basis. In
addition to formal inspections it is the responsibility of each employee to do
a physical check of his or her fall arrest equipment each day before using.
Should a harness be involved in a fall arrest it is to be discarded.
Scaffolding
Any scaffolding delivered to a job site will be inspected for damage or
missing parts prior to using the scaffolding. Only trained and competent
employees will be allowed to assemble scaffolding. This scaffolding will be
erected following the Scaffold and Fall Arrest regulations. Daily inspection
of the erected scaffolding will be carried out prior to use with attention
being paid to the base and also to any pieces, which may have been
removed by unauthorized persons while the scaffold was unattended.
Ladders
All company ladders will be maintained in good condition at all times. Any
ladders found to be damaged will be taken out of service and replaced
immediately. The Safe Work Practice on portable ladders and stepladders
will be followed by all personnel.
Extension Cords
After extension cords are used on a job site they are to be coiled, and
inspected for cuts and abrasions. The plugs are to be checked to see if
they are properly grounded. Any hazards found will result in the extension
cord being tagged and taken out of service.
Signed: __________________________
Mark Stevenson, President
Dated: ________________
RYSON INTERIOR CONSTRUCTIION LTD.
DAILY MANLIFT INSPECTION
SITE:
LOCATION:
SUPERVISOR:
MODEL/SERIAL#:
RENTED FROM:
WEEK OF:
MON
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
11A
11B
11C
11D
12
13
14
15
16
17
Operator trained, qualified and authorized
Proper decals legible, manual on machine
Inspect all safety deviced emergency stop, alarms, etc.
Check for missing, broked, damaged or loose parts
Check pivot pins, and retainers
Check for cracked welds, or other structural damage
Check hydarulic system for leaks, damage, and oil level
Check outriggers, stabilizers, extended axles
Check upper/lower controls, including auxiliary/emergency controls
Check guardrails and gates, deck and anchor points
Perform all maintenance procedures outlined by the manufacturer
Batteries (levels), electrical connections
Engine Oil
Fuel: liquid or propane, check lines and connections
Coolant levels, radiator and hoses
Cleanliness:keep debris from exhaust, electrical connections, deck
Inspect tires, rims, wheel nuts
After starting recheck all guages, lights, alarms
Be sure you can contraol all functions before moving
Ensure you know the rated capacity of your machine. Never exceed it
Fall arrest inuse vefore moving verticall or horizontally
Initial Daily
Name of person(s) who did the inspections:
TUE
WED
TO
THU
FRI
SAT
SUN
Safety Training Policy
This company is devoted to safety at the work place. Ensuring proper safety
training for each individual at the work place is the first step to achieving this
objective.
Safety training must be provided by the subcontractor to newly and presently
employed individuals of the subcontracting company for site-specific functions.
Ryson Interior Construction Ltd. is responsible to provide safety training to all its
employees, new or presently employed, for all aspects of the company’s duties.
Safety training will include, but not be limited to, the following.
Each individual shall:
1. Have a company safety orientation which shall include this safety manual
and be familiar with its contents including safe work practices and job
procedures.
2. Be aware of and attend regular safety meetings and inspections.
3. Understand their responsibilities for the safety of other workers as well as
themselves and to report any unsafe acts, conditions and incidents that
occur at the job site.
4. Locate and be able to use all safety devices (i.e.: tool guards, personal
protective equipment, fire extinguishers, first aid kits, first aid
personnel/facilities, etc.)
5. Be trained in the proper use, care, and maintenance of all tools and
equipment to be used by the individual.
6. Have appropriate job-specific training as required (i.e.: WHMIS, Confined
Spaces, First Aid, Explosive/Powder Actuated Tools, etc.)
7. Be aware of the contents and responsibilities of the Nova Scotia
Occupational Health and Safety Act and Regulations.
8. Attend annual safety meeting, date and time to be decided.
For subcontracting companies, it is the direct responsibility of the subcontractor in
charge to ensure that each employee is trained to perform their job safely while
at our work place and be orientated to by Ryson site Supervisors.
The safety information in this policy does not take precedence over the Nova
Scotia Occupational Health and Safety Act and Regulations.
Signed:__________________________
Mark Stevenson, President
Dated: __________________
Project Name:________________________________ Civic Address:______________________________________
New Employee
Name:
Safety Orientation
Annual
1
2
3
4
Date:
Sub - Contractor
Safety Policy
Emergency Requirements
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Training :
First Aid
WHMIS
Safety Orientation
Fall Protection
Other (Specify)
Proof of Training is Required for our records
Class “E” Hard Hat
Requirement for Employment CSA Work Boots (Green Triangle)
5
Safe Work Practices
6
Harassment / Violence in the Workplace Policy
7
Accident Investigation Procedures
8
Work Site Safety Inspection
9
Safety Legislation – Occupational Health & Safety Act
10 OH&S: Rights
11 Location of First Aid Equipment + Fire Extinguishers
12 Worker Conduct – Policy Regarding: Fighting, Alcohol & Drugs
13 Hazard Assessment & Policies Reviewed
14 First Aid Providers Names Posted at Ryson Job Box
15 Emergency Numbers & Hospital Route Posted at Ryson Job
Box
16 Evacuation Plan for Building Posted around the Facility
17 Muster Station Point Posted at Ryson Job Box








Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y








N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N










Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y










N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
 Y
 Y
 N
 N
 Y
 Y
 N
 N
This will certify that I have been given Ryson Interior Construction Ltd. safety
orientation Briefing on the above noted subjects as indicated by me with an “”
and that I have fully reviewed and understand its contents.
Signature:
Company:
Date:
Signature Person Conducting Orientation:
Date:
TOOL BOX TALK MEETING MINUTES
DATE:
LOCATION:
SPEC. LOCATION:
NUMBER IN CREW:
MEETING NO.:
DIVISION:
TIME:
SUPERVISOR:
NUMBER OF ATTENDEES:
REVIEW LAST MEETING:
TOPIC(S) DISCUSSED:
SUGGESTIONS OFFERED:
ACTION TO BE TAKEN:
ACCIDENTS / INCIDENTS:
NEAR MISSES:
FIRST AID TREATMENTS:
SITE SUPERVISOR SIGNATURE:
SITE SUPERVISOR COMMENTS:
MANAGER'S COMMENTS:
SIGNATURE:
DATE:
Monthly Safety Summary
Date: ___________________
1
Number of Workers Hired:
Number of Completed Orientations:
2
Number of Tool Box Meetings Scheduled:
Number Conducted:
Percentage of Attendance:
3
Number of inspections Scheduled:
Number Completed:
Total Unsafe Acts/Conditions Identified:
Number Corrected:
Number Outstanding
Number of Incidents:
%
Damage Only
Injury Only:
Injury + Damage:
Near Miss:
4
5
Number of Investigations Completed:
Outstanding:
6
Number of Recommendations Made:
Completed:
Outstanding:
7
Notes
Manager’s Signature:
Date:
Annual Safety Summary
Year:
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC TOTAL
Number of New Hires
Number of Oreintations
Number of Toolbox Meetings Scheduled
Number of Toolbox Meetings Held
Percentage of Attendance
Number of Inspections Scheduled
Number of Inspections Conducted
Number of Unsafe Acts/Conditions
Number Corrected
Number Outstanding
Number of Incidents
Damage Only
Injury Only
Damage & Injury
Near Miss
Number of Investigations Conducted
Number of Investigations Outstanding
Number of Recommendations
Completed
Outstanding
Managers Signature:
Date:
Inspection Policy
It is the policy of Ryson Interior Construction Ltd. to maintain a program of
safety inspections. The objective of this program is to control or eliminate
hazards in the workplace.
Company facilities and various job sites shall be included in the inspection
program.
Formal inspections shall be conducted at least once per month by the
Site Super, manager and/or designate at job sites depending on type,
size, repetitiveness, and how the job is similar or varies from the norm for
our company.
Ryson Interior Construction Ltd.’s Site supervisors shall conduct regular
informal work site inspections throughout the duration of the job. During
this inspection, special attention shall be paid to subcontractors and their
compliance with our company polices and with the Occupational Health
and Safety Act and the applicable Regulations.
Ryson Interior Construction Ltd. encourages employee participation in the
inspection process.
Fire extinguishers shall be inspected monthly and signed on inspection
card.
All ladders shall be inspected and signed off monthly.
All inspection reports shall be signed & dated as reviewed by senior
management.
Signed:
__________________________
Mark Stevenson, President
Dated: __________________
Work Site
Safety Inspection
Project:
Location:
Performed By:
Inspection Date:
Position:
Safety Requirements
Safety Manual Up-To-Date
Safety Policy’s Posted
(available)
First Aid Personnel / Facilities (training
current)
First Aid Kit (complete / proper type)
Fire Extinguisher (charged / inspected)
Emergency Exits (visible / obscured)
Y
N
PPE (acceptable / worn)
Warning Signs
Emergency Numbers Posted (available)
General Housekeeping
Site Rules
Access Restricted
PPE (special requirements)
Security
Smoking
Site Equipment
Ladders / Scaffolding / Inspections
Hoses / Cords / Ropes
Hoisting Equipment
Power Tools
Double Insulated or Grounded
Specific Training
Safety Guards
Inspected
Other – Specify
4 = Acceptable
On Site Conditions
Noise Level Acceptable
Particles in the Air
Lighting Adequate
Temperature OK
Falling Objects (risk of)
Stacking of Material
(safe / unsafe)
Trip / Fall Hazard
Machinery
Sanitation facilities
Overhead Power lines
Underground Service
Electrical Lockout Required
Temporary Installation
Confined Space Required
Proof of Training
PPE
Hazard Assessment Carried Out
Entry Permit Fill Out
WHMIS
Proof of Training
Proper Labeling
MSDS’s Current ( not observed)
Asbestos a Concern
Flammable / Explosive Products
Reactive / Corrosive
Products
Other – Specify
X = Action Required
N/A = Not Applicable
Y
N
Work Site
Safety Inspection
Details of Required Action
Priority
Hazard
Corrective Action
Completed
Supervisor:
Crew:
Comments / Observations
Priority: 01 = Immediate Action required - 05 = Needs Attention
Safety Officer’s Signature:
Manager’s Signature:
Date Reviewed:
By Who
Investigation Policy
It is the policy of this company to have all incidents and accidents that result
in injury or significant property damage, or near misses that could have
resulted in serious injury or property damage, thoroughly investigated.
The purpose of such investigations shall be to determine the causes of the
incident so that appropriate action can be taken to prevent recurrence.
Supervisors and/or the safety coordinator shall be responsible for conducting
these investigations and submitting reports to the manager and shall
determine and implement appropriate measures to prevent recurrence,
improve work process, or work conditions.
Employees and/or their safety representative are encouraged to actively
participate in these investigations.
All incidents/accidents that fall under the reporting guidelines for the
Department of Labour shall be reported to the Department of Labour and the
Workers’ Compensation Board in the time frame allocated.
All reports shall be reviewed, signed & dated by senior management.
Signed:
__________________________
Mark Stevenson, President
Dated:
_________________
Investigation
Report
Incident
Accident
Date:
Near Miss
Job #:
Location of incident:
Who was involved?
What happened?
When did the incident / accident
take place?
Date:
Time:
AM
Was any time missed from duties?
Did worker require medical attention?
What was the immediate cause?
What was the root cause?
What training, cautions, instructions were given prior to the incident / accident?
How can similar situations be prevented in the future?
Recommendations for further action:
Supervisor:
Safety Coordinator
Management:
Signature:
Signature:
Signature:
REV.01
PM
Environmental Policy
Ryson Interior Construction Ltd. will ensure that the proper safeguards are
taken to protect our environment.
All individuals will have responsibilities and will take the necessary action
to protect the environment. Our company will ensure that land and
vegetation, water and fisheries, air, wildlife, and wildlife habitat will be
protected.
Ryson Interior Construction Ltd. will train and educate our employees on
environmental issues that may affect their work. Employees will also have
a good understanding of environmental practices and what measures
are needed to control them.
We shall use, store, and dispose of products in such a manner that will
provide appropriate protection to the environment through our waste
management program.
Management will develop and enforce good environmental standards in
accordance with relevant legislation.
All environmental incidents will be reported ensuring compliance to
statutory obligations.
Signed:
__________________________
Mark Stevenson, President
Dated: __________________
Emergency Preparedness Policy
The risk of an incident or injury cannot be totally eliminated, therefore
Ryson Interior Construction Ltd. will take every precaution and the
following steps to help ensure the safety of its workers:
1. Provide initial emergency first aid training and refresher training,
ensuring the appropriate number of first aid trained personnel at
each work site at all times
2. To ensure first aid trained personnel are known or that their names
are posted
3. Provide transportation to a medical facility for injured workers
4. Provide training on fire extinguishers and initial fire safety
5. Provide communications means in the form of cell phones and/or
radios
6. Provide appropriate first aid kits and ensure that records are kept
7. Provide current MSDS and ensure they are available to all
employees
Signed: __________________________
Mark Stevenson, President
Dated: ______________________
Emergency Procedures
1. Fire
 Without endangering yourself or others, attempt to extinguish the
fire with apparatus on hand.
 If the fire cannot be controlled or extinguished safely by existing
personnel, dial 911 and ask for assistance.
 Provide clear and accurate information regarding the site location
and type of emergency.
 Notify any on-site personnel or customers of the emergency
situation.
 Notify Ryson Interior Construction As indicated below.
2. Injury
 Take immediate steps to protect the injured worker.
 Administer First Aid.
 Call for an ambulance to transport injured worker to hospital.
 All injuries are to be logged as per WCB regulations.
 Notify Ryson Interior Construction As indicated below.
3. Electric Shock
 Before treating, ensure that the hazard of electric shock has been
removed.
 If the casualty is unconscious check for breathing. If there is
breathing, position the person on their side. If there is no breathing,
administer mouth to mouth resuscitation, then check for heart beat
by taking the pulse. If the casualty does not have a pulse,
administer CPR.
 Check for further injuries that may result from a fall, such as
fractures. If you suspect a spinal injury do not move the person.
 Check for entry and exit wounds of the electric charge. Treat as
open wounds by covering with clean dressing.
 Seek medical assistance.
Ryson Interior Construction must be contacted by one of the following
methods:
Job Site Injury
Emergency first aid on the job site can often prevent further injury and
even save a life. It is critical that all the company job sites have an
emergency plan to aid in immediate, effective response.
1. Ensure you identify those personnel qualified first aid to all your site
personnel.
2. Everyone must / have access to emergency phone numbers as
outlined in the “Safety Manual”.
3. Training to be provided to ensure everyone knows the location of
emergency numbers and on-site radio / cell phones.
4. Additional emergency equipment such as fire extinguishers and
respirators must be accessible and training conducted.
5. In the event of an injury, it must be reported to the Site Supervisor or
Safety Rep verbally immediately, and Ryson Interior Construction’s
office within 24 hours.
Office Emergency Contact Numbers
NAME
Mark Stevenson
Sean Skinner
Trevor MacDonald
Larry Young
FIRE, POLICE, AMBULANCE, POISON CONTROL:
HEALTH INFORMATION
NOVA SCOTIA
HOSPITALS
QUEEN ELIZABETH II
DARTMOUTH GENERAL
EMERGENCY MEASURES ORGANIZATION
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT
POWER
WATER COMMISSION
NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADOR
HOSPITALS
ST JOHNS HEALTH SCIENCES CTR
CENTRAL NL REGIONAL HEALTH
EMERGENCY MEASURES ORGANIZATION
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT
POWER
WATER COMMISSION
NEW BRUNSWICK
HOSPITALS
SAINT JOHN REGIONAL HOSPITAL
MONCTON HOSPITAL
EMERGENCY MEASURES ORGANIZATION
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT
POWER
WATER COMMISSION
PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND
HOSPITALS
KING’S COUNTY MEMORIAL
PHONE NUMBER
902-483-8880, 902-883-4898
902-818-6642
902-483-5755
902-430-8776
911
811
902-473-2043
902-465-8333
902-424-5620
902-424-4125, 1-800-952-2687
1-800-565-1633
902-428-6230
902-421-6940, 902-421-6432
709-777-6300
709-292-2500
866-424-5620
877-563-1063
709-737-2802
709-737-2802
709-834-6500
506-648-6000
506-857-5111
1-800-561-4034
506-453-2881
1-800-565-1633
1-888-544-2333
506-658-4455
902-838-0777
EMERGENCY MEASURES ORGANIZATION
866-424-5620
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
902-368-5680
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT
902-368-5028
POWER
800-670-1012
WATER COMMISSION
902-838-0639
Ryson First Aiders: Mark Stevenson, Sean Skinner, Trevor MacDonald, Larry Young, Nick
Young, Robyn Fennell, Silver Gauvin, Annie Morton, Chuck Richer, Victor Sawlor, Curtis
McConnell
Job Site Emergency Contact Numbers
SITE SAFETY REP: _______________________________________________________________
OFFICE SAFETY REP:____________________________________________________________
SITE FIRST AIDERS: ______________________________________________________________
NAME
PHONE NUMBER
Mark Stevenson
902-483-8880, 902-883-4898
Sean Skinner
902-818-6642
Trevor MacDonald
902-483-5755
Larry Young
902-430-8776
FIRE, POLICE, AMBULANCE, POISON CONTROL:
911
HEALTH INFORMATION
811
NOVA SCOTIA
HOSPITALS
QUEEN ELIZABETH II
902-473-2043
DARTMOUTH GENERAL
902-465-8333
EMERGENCY MEASURES ORGANIZATION
902-424-5620
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
902-424-4125, 1-800-952-2687
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT
1-800-565-1633
POWER
902-428-6230
WATER COMMISSION
902-421-6940, 902-421-6432
NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADOR
HOSPITALS
ST JOHNS HEALTH SCIENCES CTR
709-777-6300
CENTRAL NL REGIONAL HEALTH
709-292-2500
EMERGENCY MEASURES ORGANIZATION
866-424-5620
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
877-563-1063
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT
709-737-2802
POWER
709-737-2802
WATER COMMISSION
709-834-6500
NEW BRUNSWICK
HOSPITALS
SAINT JOHN REGIONAL HOSPITAL 506-648-6000
MONCTON HOSPITAL
506-857-5111
EMERGENCY MEASURES ORGANIZATION
1-800-561-4034
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
506-453-2881
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT
1-800-565-1633
POWER
1-888-544-2333
WATER COMISSION
506-658-4455
PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND
HOSPITALS
KING’S COUNTY MEMORIAL
902-838-0777
EMERGENCY MEASURES ORGANIZATION
866-424-5620
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
902-368-5680
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT
902-368-5028
POWER
800-670-1012
WATER COMMISSION
902-838-0639
Ryson First Aiders: Mark Stevenson, Sean Skinner, Trevor MacDonald, Larry Young, Rick
Baker, Jim Foss, Sheldon Hayward, Morris Baker, Robert Pitre, Roger Elliott, Josh Clory,
Jacob Clory, Dave Pepperdene, Fred Clory
Project Emergency Response Orientation
Goal: To ensure workers at this site are aware of emergency response
precautions and applicable portions of Ryson Interior Constructions Safety
program.
Job Site Location: __________________________________________
At a minimum everyone will be aware of:
Civic Address: ____________________________________________
First Aid Kits(s) located at: _________________________________
First Aid Providers. Names Posted at: _______________________
Emergency Contact #’s posted at: ________________________
Fire Extinguisher(s) located at: _____________________________
Evacuation Plan for Building: ______________________________
Muster Station Point: ______________________________________
Other Emergency (as applicable)
Confined Space Rescue (reference) _______________________
Fall Arrest Rescue Site: _____________________________________
Individuals involved in any of these areas will be familiar with
applicable policies and/or procedures
Orientation Provided by: ___________________________________
Date: ___________________________
Person(s) Receiving Orientation and Company Name:
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
Emergency Evacuation
1. Initial observation of an incident shall be reported immediately to your
supervisor.
2. The individual automatically becomes the “On Scene Commander”
and calls in the alarm, as per emergency numbers list.
3. Alarm is sounded and employees evacuate the building as per fire drill
procedures and awareness of emergency exits is essential.
4. There should be a point where employees will muster or gather to
ensure accountability of all personnel.
5. “On Scene Commander” will keep Ryson Interior Construction aware
of all that is being done to prevent unnecessary loss and what action
has been taken to this point.
6. “On Scene Commander” or persons they are reporting to shall inform
the emergency response people of particulars concerning the
incident of the fire:
 type of fire;
 type of material or chemicals to be prepared for;
 requirements for support (i.e., ambulance, hospital alert, police
assistance, type of injuries, and the Department of Labour notified if
required.
7. “On Scene Commander” remains on scene until the “All Clear” is
given.
8. It is important to have a debriefing session to verify cause and proper
corrective action to be taken.
JOB SITE SIGN IN SHEET
NAME
COMPANY
TIME IN
TIME OUT
SIGNATURE
First Aid Remote Location Plan
Remote Location:
This is defined by the First Aid Regulations as
meaning a place requiring more than 30 minutes of
surface travel time in one direction from an
emergency care facility that is open during the
working hours at a work site.
Surface Travel Time:
This is defined by the First Aid Regulations as
meaning the time required to safely transport an
injured worker on a stretcher to an emergency care
facility by land or water, having consideration for
the weather, road conditions, traffic patterns and
other factors which may affect travel and are likely
to prevail during working hours.
Where a work site is in a remote location, the following considerations shall
be taken:
 A written first aid remote location plan - to be compiled by person(s)
at the remote location;
 This plan shall reflect the nature of work being performed;
 A method of transporting an injured worker from the remote location;
 A means of communications to and from the remote location;
 The required number of first aid attendants and their qualifications, at
least one (1) person shall hold a current standard first aid certificate;
 The proper (fully stocked) Number Two (2) first aid kit;
 A fire extinguisher;
 A map locating the nearest emergency care facility.
This safety information is compiled from the Nova Scotia First Aid
Regulations
First Aid Remote Location Plan Form
Date:
Job#:
Location:
Person Completing This Form:
Position:
Nature of Work Being Performed:
Method of
Communications
Specify
Cell
PRC
Other
Name
Standard First Aider
Emergency First Aiders
Method of Transporting
Injured
Phone # or
Channel #
1.
2.
Phone # or
Channel #
Expiry Date
First Aid Remote
Location Plan Form
Date:
Job#:
Location:
Person Completing This Form:
Position:
Nature of Work Being Preformed:
Method of Communication
Cell
PRC
Specify
Other
Phone # or Channel #
Name
Standard First Aider
Emergency First Aiders
Method of Transporting Injured
1.
2.
Phone # or Channel #
Expiry Date
First Aid #02
First Aid Supply List
First Aid Guide
First Aid Record Book
Pencil
Safety Pin
Splinter Tweezers
Scissor (100mm)
Latex Gloves (disposable
Bandage Compress – Sterile (100mm x 100mm)
Adhesive Dressing – Sterile (25mm wide)
Pads – Sterile (75mm x 75mm)
Triangular Bandage
Roller Bandage (50mm wide)
Adhesive Tape (25mm x 2.5m)
Antiseptic Towelettes
Hand Cleaner
Bio-Hazardous Disposable Bag
Airway Breathing Device for Rescue Breathing
Verified by:
Required
01
01
01
12
01
01
02
02
25
16
06
02
01
12
24
01
01
Date:
Acutal
Harassment Policy
Ryson Interior Construction Ltd., in co-operation with our employees (or
unions), is committed to a healthy, harassment-free work environment for
all employees. This company has developed a company-wide policy
intended to prevent harassment of its employees and to deal quickly and
effectively with any incident that might occur.
Harassment is any unwelcome physical, visual, or verbal conduct. It is
against the law. Harassment may include but not be limited to verbal or
practical jokes, insults, threats, or personal comments. It may take the
form of posters, pictures, or graffiti. It may involve touching, striking,
pinching, or any unwelcome physical contact. Any behavior that insults
or intimidates is harassment if a reasonable person should have known
that the behavior was unwelcome.
The Human Rights Code protects everyone within provincial jurisdiction
from harassment and other forms of discrimination on the basis of race,
religion, sex (including pregnancy and sexual orientation), marital status,
physical disability, political opinion, color or ethnicity, national or social
origin, and age.
Ryson Interior Construction Ltd. will not tolerate harassment on the basis of
any of those protected grounds.
All reported incidents of this type will be held in the strictest confidence
and shall be investigated on an individual basis. Any action deemed
necessary to prevent reoccurrences shall be at the discretion of
management.
Signed:
__________________________
Mark Stevenson, President
Dated: __________________
Labour and
Workforce Development
Occupational Health and Safety
A How-to Guide for an
Occupational Health and
Safety Policy and
Program
Introduction
This brochure explains two major parts of the Nova Scotia Occupational Health
and Safety Act that are important for employers with five or more employees.
Employers, contractors, and constructors who regularly employ five or more
people must develop an occupational health and safety policy. The first part of
this brochure describes policies.
An organization regularly employing 20 or more employees must also develop
an occupational health and safety program. The second part of this brochure
describes occupational health and safety programs.
What is an occupational health and safety policy?
An occupational health and safety policy is the statement of an employer’s
commitment to preventing accidents and illness in the workplace. It describes
how the employer and employees can work together to prevent workplace
accidents and illness.
The Occupational Health and Safety Act requires that employers with five or more
regular employees have an occupational health and safety policy.
Why is a policy needed?
An Occupational Health and Safety Policy should:
• state clearly that the employer is committed to and plans to support accident
and illness prevention at work
• declare what the employer intends to do to eliminate the causes of accidents
and illness
• state how the employer will integrate at all levels, the organization’s internal
responsibility system in accident and illness prevention
• direct human and financial resources to the issues
• help achieve the organization’s health and safety objectives.
How to write a health and safety policy
A policy is a statement of the employer’s commitment to employees’health and
safety. Some important points to consider when writing the policy are:
• promoting health and safety at work
• protecting employees from hazards, such as fire, noise, slips and falls, violence,
and hazardous products
• complying with health and safety laws.
Policy statements should include:
• the employer’s clear commitment to providing a healthy and safe work
environment and to integrating health and safety in everyday work activities
• the employer’s responsibility to take reasonable precautions to prevent illness
and injury. An example is training employees in safe work procedures and
supervising and re-enforcing safe work procedures
• the responsibility of a senior management person to sign the document and
ensure that the policy is carried out
• the employer’s commitment to co-operate and consult with all levels of the
organization to implement the occupational health and safety policy effectively
• everyone’s responsibility in maintaining a healthy and safe workplace
• the need to review the policy at least once a year to update it, so that it is
current with workplace changes and legislation
• the requirement that all employees be held accountable for their health and
safety responsibilities.
These references are just suggestions. Your organization may need a broader
version. Each organization is unique and local conditions will dictate the specifics
of your policy.
How should you communicate the policy?
The policy should be written in clear language that is easily understood by all
employees. The policy must be posted in a prominent area of the workplace and
made available on request to an employee or to the Department of Labour and
Workforce Development.
What does a policy look like?
Here is a sample of an occupational health and safety policy.
Scope
This policy applies to Company/Organization and all of its locations.
Policy
Company/Organization is committed to providing a healthy and safe work
environment for our employees and to integrating that commitment into our
everyday activities. This occupational health and safety policy will help us fulfill
our commitment.
Company/Organization is responsible for the health and safety of its employees
while they are at work. Company/Organization will make every effort to provide a
healthy and safe work environment.
Managers and supervisors will be trained and held responsible for ensuring that
• the employees under their supervision follow this policy
• employees use safe work practices and receive adequate training to protect their
health and safety
• equipment and facilities are safe.
Company/Organization, through all levels of management, will cooperate with
the Joint Occupational Health and Safety Committee, the Health and Safety
Representatives and employees to create a healthy and safe work environment.
Cooperation will also be extended to others such as contractors, owners,
inspectors, etc.
The employees of Company/Organization must support the health and safety
policy and must cooperate with the Joint Occupational Health and Safety
Committee, the Health and Safety Representatives and others exercising authority
under the applicable laws.
It is the duty of each employee to report to the supervisor or manager, as soon as
possible, any hazardous conditions, injury, accident, or illness related to the
workplace. Also, employees must protect their own health and safety by complying
with applicable laws and by following policies, procedures, rules and instructions
as prescribed by Company/Organization.
Company/Organization will, where possible, eliminate hazards and the need for
personal protective equipment. If that is not possible, and where there is a need,
employees must use personal protective clothing, equipment, devices, and materials.
Company/Organization recognizes the employees’duty to identify hazards and
supports and encourages employees to play an active role in identifying hazards
and to offer suggestions or ideas to improve health and safety.
To ensure that this policy continues to meet our needs, Company/Organization
will ensure that our Joint Occupational Health and Safety Committee, Health and
Safety Representatives, and employees review it each year.
Signed:
President/ CEO/ Owner/ Operator
Date
What will make the policy work?
A key element in making sure your occupational health and safety policy works in
your organization is to involve everyone in the process. That means your policy is
drafted with input from all levels of the company. Also, your policy should be
flexible enough to adapt to the needs of diverse company applications.
To make implementation of your policy easier, make sure that:
• everyone in the workplace knows about your policy
• everyone understands their roles and responsibilities
• accountability is clearly established
• adequate human and financial resources are provided
• a process for setting up and reviewing procedures and programs is established.
What is a program?
An organization’s occupational health and safety program contains the elements
that make it possible to realize its policy objectives. Each program will be unique
to the company that develops it, but some elements are needed to make them
comply with the laws and to meet general health and safety standards.
What must a program contain?
An occupational health and safety program must have:
• a method to ensure that employees are trained on how to protect themselves
when dealing with hazardous materials or situations and that the employees
are supervised
• a method to establish and write safe work procedures and to make sure that
employees use them
• a description of how a Joint Occupational Health and Safety Committee and
the Health and Safety Representatives fit within the program. The program
must outline how the committee and the representatives gain access to a
manager with adequate authority to address health and safety issues
• a system for identifying hazards, including:
• evaluating/ inspecting the work areas regularly
• a reporting method, with someone given the job of ensuring that the
issues are addressed
• a clear idea of what, when, and how the employer will report to the
committee or representative about workplace hazards
• a monitoring, follow-up, and control system for hazards that may be identified
in the workplace
• a system to keep all records concerning health and safety and any reports of
inspections or orders written by the Department of Labour and Workforce
Development, or tests performed on the workplace.
• a method for monitoring the implementation and effectiveness of the program.
Workplace Safety and Insurance System
In Nova Scotia the partners in the Workplace Safety and Insurance System include
workers, employers, the Workers’Advisers Program, the Workers’ Compensation
Appeals Tribunal, the Occupational Health and Safety Division and the Workers’
Compensation Board, and others who provide service in the System.
For information on the System, the government partners and the services we
provide visit our website at <www.wsis.ns.ca>.
This information has been prepared by the Occupational Health and Safety
Division. For clarification on the material or any other parts of the Occupational
Health and Safety Act or Regulations, please contact us at:
Occupational Health and Safety Division
Nova Scotia Department of Labour and Workforce Development
P.O. Box 697
Halifax, NS B3J 2T8
Telephone: (902) 424-5400 (Halifax area only)
Toll-free: (800) 952-2687 (NS only)
Fax:
(902) 424-5640
Website: www.gov.ns.ca/lwd/healthandsafety
Additional information on the preparation of a policy and program is available
from the Workers’ Compensation Board of Nova Scotia and can be accessed at:
Workers’ Compensation Board of Nova Scotia
5668 South Street
Halifax, NS B3J 2Y2
Main Office (Halifax)
Telephone: (902) 491-8999 (Halifax area)
Toll free: (800) 870-3331 (NS only)
Website:
www.wcb.ns.ca/
Labour and Workforce Development
Occupational Health and Safety
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement