Qlogic SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Installation guide

Qlogic SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Installation guide
D
Simplify
SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch
Installation Guide
59021-04 C
Page i
Q
SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch
Installation Guide
Information furnished in this manual is believed to be accurate and reliable. However, QLogic Corporation assumes no
responsibility for its use, nor for any infringements of patents or other rights of third parties which may result from its
use. QLogic Corporation reserves the right to change product specifications at any time without notice. Applications
described in this document for any of these products are for illustrative purposes only. QLogic Corporation makes no
representation nor warranty that such applications are suitable for the specified use without further testing or
modification. QLogic Corporation assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document.
QLogic, SANbox, SANbox2, SANblade, and SANsurfer are trademarks or registered trademarks of QLogic
Corporation.
Solaris is a registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc.
Pentium is a registered trademark of Intel Corporation.
Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.
Microsoft, Windows NT, and Windows 2000, and Internet Explorer are registered trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation.
Netscape Navigator is a registered trademark of Netscape Communications Corporation.
All other brand and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
Document Revision History
Revision A, Release, August 2002
Revision B, Update, November 2002
Revision C, Update, February 2003
Changes
Sections Affected
Corrected omissions to the table of contents
iii
Reorganized Logged-In LED Indications to include
Excessive Port Errors
5.1.2, 5.1.2.1, 5.1.2.2
ThresholdMonitoringEnabled default changed to
False
page B-20
© 2000–2003 QLogic Corporation
First Printed: March 2002
All Rights Reserved Worldwide.
Printed in U.S.A.
QLogic Corporation, 6321 Bury Drive, Eden Prairie, MN 55346
(800) 342-7379 or (952) 932-4000
Page ii
59021-04 C
Table of Contents
Section 1
Introduction
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.6.1
1.6.2
1.6.4
1.6.5
1.6.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
1.10
1.11
1.12
1.12.1
1.12.2
1.12.3
Intended Audience ............................................................................................. 1-1
Related Materials ............................................................................................... 1-2
Safety Notices .................................................................................................... 1-3
Sicherheitshinweise............................................................................................ 1-3
Notes informatives relatives à la sécurité........................................................... 1-3
Communications Statements.............................................................................. 1-4
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Class A Statement ............ 1-4
Canadian Department of Communications Class A
Compliance Statement .............................................................................. 1-4
Avis de conformité aux normes du ministère des
Communications du Canada ..................................................................... 1-5
CE Statement ............................................................................................ 1-5
VCCI Class A Statement ........................................................................... 1-6
BSMI Class A Statement ........................................................................... 1-6
Laser Safety Information .................................................................................... 1-7
Electrostatic Discharge Sensitivity (ESDS) Precautions .................................... 1-7
Accessible Parts................................................................................................. 1-8
Pièces Accessibles............................................................................................. 1-8
Zugängliche Teile ............................................................................................... 1-8
Technical Support............................................................................................... 1-9
Availability.................................................................................................. 1-9
Training...................................................................................................... 1-9
Contact Information ................................................................................... 1-9
Section 2
General Description
2.1
2.1.1
2.1.2
2.1.3
2.1.3.1
2.1.3.2
2.1.3.3
2.1.3.4
2.2
2.2.1
Chassis Controls and LEDs ............................................................................... 2-2
Power Switches ......................................................................................... 2-2
Force PROM Button .................................................................................. 2-2
Chassis LEDs ............................................................................................ 2-3
Over Temperature LED (Yellow) ....................................................... 2-3
Fan Fail LED (Yellow) ....................................................................... 2-3
Heartbeat LED (Yellow) .................................................................... 2-3
Input Power LED (Green) ................................................................. 2-4
Fibre Channel Ports ........................................................................................... 2-4
Small Form-Factor Pluggable (SFP) Transceivers .................................... 2-4
1.6.3
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2.2.2
2.2.2.1
2.2.2.2
2.2.3
2.2.3.1
2.2.3.2
2.2.3.3
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
Port LEDs .................................................................................................. 2-5
Logged-In LED ................................................................................. 2-5
Activity LED ...................................................................................... 2-6
Port Modes ................................................................................................ 2-6
Fabric Ports ...................................................................................... 2-6
Translated Loop Port ........................................................................ 2-7
Expansion Port ................................................................................. 2-7
Ethernet Port ...................................................................................................... 2-8
Serial Port........................................................................................................... 2-8
Power Supplies .................................................................................................. 2-9
Fans ................................................................................................................. 2-10
Switch Management......................................................................................... 2-11
Section 3
Planning
3.1
3.2
3.2.1
3.2.2
3.2.2.1
3.2.2.2
3.2.2.3
3.3
3.3.1
3.3.2
3.3.3
3.4
3.4.1
3.4.2
3.4.3
3.5
3.6
Devices............................................................................................................... 3-1
Multiple Chassis Fabrics .................................................................................... 3-2
Domain ID, Principal Priority, and Domain ID Lock ................................... 3-2
Common Topologies.................................................................................. 3-3
Cascade Topology ............................................................................ 3-3
Mesh Topology ................................................................................. 3-4
Multistage Topology .......................................................................... 3-5
Performance....................................................................................................... 3-6
Distance..................................................................................................... 3-6
Bandwidth.................................................................................................. 3-7
Latency ...................................................................................................... 3-7
Device Access.................................................................................................... 3-8
Soft Zones ................................................................................................. 3-9
Access Control List Hard Zones ................................................................ 3-9
Virtual Private Fabric Hard Zones ........................................................... 3-10
Fabric Management ......................................................................................... 3-10
Fabric Security ................................................................................................. 3-11
Section 4
Installation
4.1
4.1.1
4.1.2
4.1.3
4.2
4.2.1
4.2.2
Site Requirements.............................................................................................. 4-1
Fabric Management Workstation............................................................... 4-1
Switch Power Requirements ..................................................................... 4-1
Environmental Conditions.......................................................................... 4-2
Installing a Switch............................................................................................... 4-2
Mount the Switch ....................................................................................... 4-3
Install SFP Transceivers............................................................................ 4-4
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SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch
Installation Guide
4.2.3
4.2.4
4.2.4.1
4.2.4.2
4.2.5
4.2.5.1
4.2.5.2
4.2.5.3
4.2.6
4.2.7
4.2.8
4.3
4.3.1
4.3.2
4.3.3
4.4
Connect the Switch to AC Power .............................................................. 4-5
Connect the Management Workstation to the Switch................................ 4-8
Ethernet Connection ......................................................................... 4-9
Serial Connection ............................................................................. 4-9
Install SANbox Manager.......................................................................... 4-10
SANbox Manager Installation for Windows .................................... 4-11
SANbox Manager Installation for Linux .......................................... 4-11
SANbox Manager Installation for Solaris ........................................ 4-12
Configure the Switch ............................................................................... 4-13
Configure the Ports.................................................................................. 4-14
Cable Devices to the Switch.................................................................... 4-14
Installing Firmware ........................................................................................... 4-15
Using SANbox Manager to Install Firmware............................................ 4-15
Using the CLI to Install Firmware ............................................................ 4-16
Using FTP and the CLI to Install Firmware.............................................. 4-17
Powering Down a Switch.................................................................................. 4-18
Section 5
Diagnostics/Troubleshooting
5.1
5.1.1
5.1.1.1
5.1.1.2
5.1.1.3
5.1.1.4
5.1.1.5
5.1.2
5.1.2.1
5.1.2.2
5.2
5.2.1
5.2.2
5.2.3
5.2.4
5.2.5
5.3
5.3.1
5.3.2
5.3.3
5.3.4
5.3.5
POST Diagnostics .............................................................................................. 5-1
Heartbeat LED Blink Patterns.................................................................... 5-1
Normal (all pass)............................................................................... 5-1
Force PROM Mode Pattern .............................................................. 5-2
Internal Firmware Failure Blink Pattern ............................................ 5-2
Fatal Error Blink Pattern ................................................................... 5-2
Configuration File System Error Blink Pattern .................................. 5-2
Logged-In LED Indications ........................................................................ 5-5
E_Port Isolation ................................................................................ 5-6
Excessive Port Errors ....................................................................... 5-7
Chassis Diagnostics ........................................................................................... 5-9
Chassis Over Temperature LED is Illuminated........................................ 5-10
Input Power LED Is Extinguished ............................................................ 5-10
Fan Fail LED is Illuminated...................................................................... 5-10
Output Power LED Is Extinguished ......................................................... 5-11
Power Supply Over Temperature LED is Illuminated .............................. 5-11
Recovering a Switch......................................................................................... 5-12
Force PROM – Exit.................................................................................. 5-13
Force PROM – Image Unpack ................................................................ 5-13
Force PROM – Reset Network Config..................................................... 5-14
Force PROM – Reset Password File....................................................... 5-14
Force PROM – Copy Log Files................................................................ 5-14
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5.3.6
5.3.7
5.3.8
Q
Force PROM – Remove Switch Config ................................................... 5-14
Force PROM – Remake Filesystem ........................................................ 5-14
Force PROM – Reset Switch................................................................... 5-14
Section 6
Removal/Replacement
6.1
6.2
6.3
SFP Transceivers ............................................................................................... 6-2
Power Supplies .................................................................................................. 6-3
Fans ................................................................................................................... 6-4
Appendix A Specifications
A.1
A.2
A.3
A.4
A.5
A.6
A.7
A.8
A.9
Switch Specifications..........................................................................................A-1
Switch Maintainability .........................................................................................A-2
Fabric Management ...........................................................................................A-3
Switch Dimensions .............................................................................................A-3
Switch Electrical .................................................................................................A-3
Switch Environmental.........................................................................................A-4
Switch Regulatory Certifications.........................................................................A-4
Shortwave Laser SFP 1G/2G (multi-mode)........................................................A-5
Longwave Laser SFP 1G/2G (single-mode) ......................................................A-6
Appendix B Command Line Interface
B.1
B.2
B.3
Page viii
Logging On to a Switch ......................................................................................B-1
Command Syntax...............................................................................................B-2
Commands .........................................................................................................B-3
Admin Command.......................................................................................B-4
Alias Command .........................................................................................B-5
Config Command.......................................................................................B-7
Date Command .........................................................................................B-9
Fallback Command..................................................................................B-10
Help Command........................................................................................ B-11
History Command....................................................................................B-12
Image Command .....................................................................................B-13
Lip Command ..........................................................................................B-14
Passwd Command ..................................................................................B-15
Ps Command...........................................................................................B-16
Quit Command ........................................................................................B-17
Reset Command......................................................................................B-18
Set Command..........................................................................................B-23
Set Config Command ..............................................................................B-25
Set Log Command...................................................................................B-33
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SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch
Installation Guide
Set Port Command ..................................................................................B-36
Set Setup Command ...............................................................................B-37
Show Command ......................................................................................B-41
Show Config Command...........................................................................B-54
Show Log Command ...............................................................................B-57
Show Perf Command ..............................................................................B-59
Show Setup Command............................................................................B-61
Shutdown Command ...............................................................................B-64
Test Command ........................................................................................B-65
Uptime Command....................................................................................B-68
User Command .......................................................................................B-69
Whoami Command..................................................................................B-71
Zone Command.......................................................................................B-72
Zoneset Command ..................................................................................B-76
Zoning Command ....................................................................................B-79
Glossary
Index
Figures
Figure
Page
2-1
SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch................................................................................ 2-1
2-2
Chassis Controls and LEDS........................................................................................... 2-2
2-3
Chassis LEDs................................................................................................................. 2-3
2-4
Fibre Channel Ports ....................................................................................................... 2-4
2-5
SFP Transceiver ............................................................................................................ 2-5
2-6
Port LEDs....................................................................................................................... 2-5
2-7
Ethernet Port .................................................................................................................. 2-8
2-8
Serial Port ...................................................................................................................... 2-8
2-9
Power Supply Components............................................................................................ 2-9
2-10 Fans ............................................................................................................................. 2-10
3-1
Cascade-with-a-Loop Topology ..................................................................................... 3-3
3-2
Mesh Topology............................................................................................................... 3-4
3-3
Multistage Topology ....................................................................................................... 3-5
4-1
SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch................................................................................ 4-2
4-2
Installing Rack Mount Brackets...................................................................................... 4-4
4-3
Ethernet and Serial Cable Connections ......................................................................... 4-8
5-1
Port Logged-In LED ....................................................................................................... 5-5
5-2
Logged-In LED Indications............................................................................................. 5-5
5-3
Chassis and Power Supply LEDs .................................................................................. 5-9
6-1
SFP Transceiver Installation .......................................................................................... 6-2
6-2
Power Supply Removal.................................................................................................. 6-3
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SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch
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6-3
6-4
Fan Removal.................................................................................................................. 6-4
Fan Installation for Switch Model SB2A-16B ................................................................. 6-5
Tables
Table
2-1
3-1
3-2
4-1
B-1
B-2
B-3
B-4
B-5
B-6
B-7
B-8
B-9
B-10
B-11
B-12
B-13
Page x
Page
Serial Port Pin Identification ........................................................................................... 2-9
Port-to-Port Transmission Combinations ....................................................................... 3-7
Port-to-Port Latency ....................................................................................................... 3-7
Management Workstation Requirements....................................................................... 4-1
Commands Listed by Authority Level.............................................................................B-3
Switch Configuration Defaults ......................................................................................B-19
Port Configuration Defaults ..........................................................................................B-19
Alarm Threshold Configuration Defaults ......................................................................B-20
SNMP Configuration Defaults ......................................................................................B-21
System Configuration Defaults.....................................................................................B-22
Set Config Port Parameters .........................................................................................B-25
Set Config Switch Parameters .....................................................................................B-27
Set Config Threshold Parameters................................................................................B-28
Set Config Zoning Parameters.....................................................................................B-29
SNMP Configuration Settings ......................................................................................B-37
System Configuration Settings.....................................................................................B-38
Show Port Parameters .................................................................................................B-43
59021-04 C
Section 1
Introduction
This manual describes the features and installation of the SANbox2-16 Fibre
Channel switch, firmware version 1.4. This manual is organized as follows:
■
Section 1 describes the intended audience, related materials, safety notices,
communications statements, laser safety information, electrostatic discharge
sensitivity precautions, accessible parts, and technical support.
■
Section 2 is an overview of the switch. It describes indicator LEDs and all
user controls and connections.
■
Section 3 describes the factors to consider when planning a fabric.
■
Section 4 explains how to install and configure the switch.
■
Section 5 describes the diagnostic methods and troubleshooting
procedures.
■
Section 6 describes the removal/replacement procedures for all field
replaceable units (FRUs).
■
Appendix A lists the switch specifications.
■
Appendix B describes the Command Line Interface.
Please read the communications statements and laser safety information later in
this section. Use this manual in conjunction with the SANbox2-8c/16 Switch
Management User’s Guide.
1.1
Intended Audience
This manual introduces users to the switch and explains its installation and
service. It is intended for users who are responsible for the installation and
servicing of network equipment.
59021-04 C
1-1
Q
1 – Introduction
Related Materials
1.2
Related Materials
The following manuals and materials are referenced in the text and/or provide
additional information.
■
SANbox2-8c/16 Switch Management User’s Guide, Publication Number
59022-04.
■
Fibre Channel-Arbitrated Loop (FC-AL-2) Rev. 6.8.
■
Fibre Channel-Private Loop SCSI Direct Attach (FC-PLDA) NCITS
TR-19:1998
■
Fibre Channel-10-bit Interface Rev. 2.3.
■
Definitions of Managed Objects for the Fabric Element in Fibre Channel
Standard (draft-ietf-ipfc-fabric-element-mib-04.txt).
The Fibre Channel Standards are available from:
Global Engineering Documents, 15 Inverness Way East, Englewood, CO
80112-5776 Phone: (800) 854-7179 or (303) 397-7956 Fax: (303)
397-2740.
1-2
59021-04 C
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1 – Introduction
Safety Notices
1.3
Safety Notices
A Warning notice indicates the presence of a hazard that has the potential of
causing personal injury.
4-3, 4-5, 6-1
A Caution notice indicates the presence of a hazard that has the potential of
causing damage to the equipment.
4-3, 6-4
1.4
Sicherheitshinweise
Ein Warnhinweis weist auf das Vorhandensein einer Gefahr hin, die
möglicherweise Verletzungen zur Folge hat.
4-3, 4-6, 6-1
Ein Vorsichtshinweis weist auf das Vorhandensein einer Gefahr hin, die
möglicherweise Geräteschäden zur Folge hat.
4-3, 6-4
1.5
Notes informatives relatives à la sécurité
Une note informative Avertissement indique la présence d’un risque pouvant
entraîner des blessures.
4-3, 4-5, 6-1
Une note informative Attention indique la présence d’un risque pouvant entraîner
des dégâts matériels.
4-3, 6-4
59021-04 C
1-3
1 – Introduction
Communications Statements
Q
1.6
Communications Statements
The following statements apply to this product. The statements for other products
intended for use with this product appear in their accompanying manuals.
1.6.1
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Class A Statement
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A
digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to
provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is
operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can
radiate radio frequency energy, and, if not installed and used in accordance with
the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.
Operation of this equipment in a residential area may cause unacceptable
interference, in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at
their own expense
Neither the provider nor the manufacturer is responsible for any radio or television
interference caused by unauthorized changes or modifications to this equipment.
Unauthorized changes or modifications could void the user's authority to operate
the equipment.
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the
following two conditions:
■
This device may not cause harmful interference, and
■
This device must accept any interference received, including interference
that may cause undesired operation.
1.6.2
Canadian Department of Communications Class A Compliance
Statement
This equipment does not exceed Class A limits for radio emissions for digital
apparatus, set out in Radio Interference Regulation of the Canadian Department
of Communications. Operation in a residential area may cause unacceptable
interference to radio and TV reception requiring the owner or operator to take
whatever steps necessary to correct the interference.
1-4
59021-04 C
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1 – Introduction
Communications Statements
1.6.3
Avis de conformité aux normes du ministère des Communications du
Canada
Cet équipement ne dépasse pas les limites de Classe A d'émission de bruits
radioélectriques por les appareils numériques, telles que prescrites par le
Réglement sur le brouillage radioélectrique établi par le ministère des
Communications du Canada. L'exploitation faite en milieu résidentiel peut
entraîner le brouillage des réceptions radio et télé, ce qui obligerait le propriétaire
ou l'opérateur à prendre les dispositions nécwssaires pour en éliminer les causes.
1.6.4
CE Statement
The CE symbol on the equipment indicates that this system complies with the
EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility) directive of the European Community
(89/336/EEC) and to the Low Voltage (Safety) Directive (73/23/EEC). Such
marking indicates that this system meets or exceeds the following technical
standards:
59021-04 C
■
EN60950/A11:1997 – “Safety of Information Technology Equipment,
Including Electrical Business Equipment”.
■
EN60825-1/A11:1996 –“Safety of Laser Products, Part 1.
■
EN55022:1998 – “Limits and Methods of Measurement of Radio
Interference Characteristics of Information Technology Equipment”.
■
EN 55024-1:1998 – “Electromagnetic compatibility - Generic immunity
standard Part 1: Residential commercial, and light industry.”
■
IEC1000-4-2:1995 – “Electrostatic Discharge Immunity Test”
■
IEC1000-4-3:1995 – “Radiated, Radio-Frequency, Electromagnetic
Field Immunity Test”
■
IEC1000-4-4:1995 – “Electrical Fast Transient/Burst Immunity Test”
■
IEC1000-4-5:1995 – “Surge Immunity Test”
■
IEC1000-4-6:1996 – “Immunity To Conducted Disturbances, Induced
By Radio-Frequency Fields”
■
IEC1000-4-8:1993 – Power Frequency Magnetic Field Immunity Test”
■
IEC1000-4-11:1994 – “Voltage Dips, Short Interruptions And Voltage
Variations Immunity Tests”
■
EN61000-3-2:1995 – “Limits For Harmonic Current Emissions (Equipment
Input Current Less Than/Equal To 16 A Per Phase)” Class A
■
EN61000-3-3:1995 – “Limitation Of Voltage Fluctuations And Flicker In
Low-Voltage Supply Systems For Equipment With Rated Current Less Than
Or Equal To 16 A”
1-5
1 – Introduction
Communications Statements
Q
1.6.5
VCCI Class A Statement
Translation:
This is a Class A product based on the standard of the Voluntary Control Council
For Interference by Information Technology Equipment (VCCI). If this equipment
is used in a domestic environment, radio disturbance may arise. When such
trouble occurs, the user may be required to take corrective actions.
1.6.6
BSMI Class A Statement
Translation:
Warning:
This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment, this product may cause
radio interference in which case the user will be required to take adequate
measures.
1-6
59021-04 C
Q
1 – Introduction
Laser Safety Information
1.7
Laser Safety Information
This product may use Class 1 laser optical transceivers to communicate over the
fiber optic conductors. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
(DHHS) does not consider Class 1 lasers to be hazardous. The International
Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 825 Laser Safety Standard requires labeling in
English, German, Finnish, and French stating that the product uses Class 1
lasers. Because it is impractical to label the transceivers, the following label is
provided in this manual.
1.8
Electrostatic Discharge Sensitivity (ESDS) Precautions
The assemblies used in the switch chassis are ESD sensitive. Observe ESD
handling procedures when handling any assembly used in the switch chassis.
59021-04 C
1-7
Q
1 – Introduction
Accessible Parts
1.9
Accessible Parts
The only Field Replaceable Units (FRUs) in the SANbox2-16 switch are:
■
Small Form-Factor Pluggable (SFP) optical transceivers
■
Power supplies
■
Fans
Refer to Section 6 Removal/Replacement for more information.
1.10
Pièces Accessibles
Les pièces remplaçables, Field Replaceable Units (FRU), du commutateur
SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch sont les suivantes:
■
Interfaces aux media d’interconnexion appelés SFP transceivers.
■
Alimentation(s) de courant
■
Ventilateurs
Se reporter à la Section 6 (Procédures de retrait et remplacement) pour plus de
renseignements.
1.11
Zugängliche Teile
Nur die folgenden Teile im SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch können
kundenseitig ersetzt werden:
■
Schnittstellen für die Zwischenverbindungsträger, SFP transceivers
genannt.
■
Netzteil(e)
■
Gehäuselüfte
Weitere Informationen finden Sie im Abshcnitt 6 (Ausbauen der ersetzbaren
Teile).
1-8
59021-04 C
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1 – Introduction
Technical Support
1.12
Technical Support
Customers should contact their authorized maintenance provider for technical
support of their QLogic switch products. QLogic-direct customers may contact
QLogic Technical Support; others will be redirected to their authorized
maintenance provider.
Visit the QLogic switch support Web site listed in Contact Information for the latest
firmware and software updates.
1.12.1
Availability
QLogic Technical Support is available from 7:00 AM to 7:00 PM Central Standard
Time, Monday through Friday, excluding QLogic-observed holidays.
1.12.2
Training
QLogic offers the following technical training courses:
■
Switch Certification
■
HBA Certification
Each course is available at the training facility in Eden Prairie, MN or at your local
facility. All courses include a Fibre Channel overview and sections on installation,
maintenance, and topology solutions. Each student receives a set of manuals and
a CD-ROM containing course training materials. Upon successful completion of
the training, Qlogic awards a certificate identifying the student as a Certified
SANbox® or SANblade® Professional.
1.12.3
Contact Information
59021-04 C
Address:
QLogic Switch Products Inc.
6321 Bury Drive
Eden Prairie, Minnesota 55346
USA
Telephone:
+1 952-932-4040
Fax:
+1 952-932-4018
Email:
Technical Service
Technical Training
[email protected]
[email protected]
Switch Support Web Site:
www.qlogic.com/support/home_support.asp
1-9
1 – Introduction
Technical Support
Q
Notes
1-10
59021-04 C
Section 2
General Description
This section describes the features and capabilities of the SANbox2-16 Fibre
Channel switch. The following topics are described:
■
Chassis controls and LEDs
■
Fibre channel ports
■
Ethernet port
■
Serial port
■
Power supplies
■
Fans
■
Fabric management
Fabrics are managed with the SANbox Manager switch management application
and the Command Line Interface (CLI). Refer to Appendix B Command Line
Interface for more information. Refer to the SANbox2-8c/16 Switch Management
User’s Guide for information about using the SANbox Manager application.
Figure 2-1. SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch
59021-04 C
2-1
Q
2 – General Description
Chassis Controls and LEDs
2.1
Chassis Controls and LEDs
Chassis controls include the power supply On/Off switches and the force PROM
button as shown in Figure 2-2. The chassis LEDs include the Over Temperature
LED, Fan Fail LED, Heartbeat LED, and the Input Power LED.
Force PROM
Button
Chassis LEDs
Left Power
Switch
Right Power
Switch
Figure 2-2. Chassis Controls and LEDS
2.1.1
Power Switches
Each power supply has an On/Off switch that controls power to the switch logic
circuitry. To apply power to the switch, place both switches in the On position.
2.1.2
Force PROM Button
The force PROM button is a momentary switch on the front panel. It is used to
recover a disabled switch. Force PROM mode causes the switch to access PROM
when flash memory or the resident configuration file is corrupted. Placing the
switch in force PROM mode forces the default IP address of 10.0.0.1. Refer to
”Recovering a Switch” on page 5-12 for information about force PROM mode.
To place the switch in force PROM mode, do the following:
1.
Isolate the switch from the fabric. Open a Telnet session, and enter the
Shutdown command. Refer to ”Shutdown Command” on page B-64.
2.
Place both power supply switches in the Off position.
3.
Press and hold the force PROM button with a pointed tool for a few seconds,
then place one of the power supply switches in the On position. You can
release the force PROM button after the Input Power LED illuminates. When
the switch is in force PROM mode, the Heartbeat LED illuminates
continuously. Refer to ”Chassis LEDs” on page 2-3 for information about the
Input Power LED and the Heartbeat LED.
To return to normal operation, turn both power supplies off, and then back on.
2-2
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2 – General Description
Chassis Controls and LEDs
2.1.3
Chassis LEDs
The chassis LEDs shown in Figure 2-3 provide status information about switch
operation. Refer to ”Power Supplies” on page 2-9 for information about power
supply LEDs and to ”Port LEDs” on page 2-5 for information about port LEDs.
Over Temperature LED
(Yellow)
Fan Fail LED
(Yellow)
Heartbeat LED
(Yellow)
Input Power LED
(Green)
Figure 2-3. Chassis LEDs
2.1.3.1
Over Temperature LED (Yellow)
The Over Temperature LED provides status information about the air temperature
inside the switch. This LED illuminates to indicate that the switch logic circuitry is
overheating. Refer to Section 5 Diagnostics/Troubleshooting for information about
troubleshooting over temperature conditions.
2.1.3.2
Fan Fail LED (Yellow)
The Fan Fail LED indicates operational status of both fans. This LED illuminates if
the speed of either fan falls below the normal range. Refer to
Section 5 Diagnostics/Troubleshooting for information about troubleshooting fan
failure conditions.
2.1.3.3
Heartbeat LED (Yellow)
The Heartbeat LED indicates the status of the internal switch processor and the
results of Power On Self Tests (POSTs). Following a normal power-up, the
Heartbeat LED blinks about once per second to indicate that the switch passed
the POST and that the internal switch processor is running. In force PROM mode,
the Heartbeat LED illuminates continuously. Refer to ”Heartbeat LED Blink
Patterns” on page 5-1 for more information about Heartbeat LED blink patterns.
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Fibre Channel Ports
2.1.3.4
Input Power LED (Green)
The Input Power LED indicates the voltage status at the switch logic circuitry. This
LED illuminates when the switch logic circuitry is receiving the proper DC
voltages.
2.2
Fibre Channel Ports
Each SANbox2-16 switch has 16 Fibre Channel ports numbered 0 - 15 as shown
in Figure 2-4. Each of these ports is served by a Small Form-Factor Pluggable
(SFP) transceiver. The port LEDs are located to the right of their respective ports
and provide port login and activity status information. Port modes configure the
ports to communicate with public devices, private devices, and inter-switch
connections.
Port
Port LEDs
Figure 2-4. Fibre Channel Ports
2.2.1
Small Form-Factor Pluggable (SFP) Transceivers
An SFP transceiver, like the one shown in Figure 2-5, converts electrical signals to
and from optical laser signals to transmit and receive data. SFP transceivers plug
into the ports; duplex fiber optic cables plug into the transceivers which then
connect to the devices. A port is capable of transmitting at 1 Gbps or 2 Gbps;
however, the transceiver must be capable of 2 Gbps for the port to deliver at that
rate.
The SFP transceivers are hot swappable. This means that you can remove or
install an SFP transceiver while the switch is operating without harming the switch
or the transceiver. However, communication with the connected device will be
interrupted. Refer to Section 6 Removal/Replacement for information about
installing and removing SFP optical transceivers.
2-4
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Fibre Channel Ports
Figure 2-5. SFP Transceiver
2.2.2
Port LEDs
Each data port has its own Logged-In LED and Activity LED as shown in
Figure 2-6. The Logged-In LED indicates whether the port and its connected
device are logged into the fabric, or if it is connected to another switch and they
are segmented. The Activity LED indicates the frequency at which the port
receives or transmits frames.
Logged-In LED
(Green)
Activity LED
(Yellow)
Figure 2-6. Port LEDs
2.2.2.1
Logged-In LED
The Logged-in LED indicates the logged-in or initialization status of the connected
devices. After successful completion of the POST, the switch extinguishes all
Logged-In LEDs. Following a successful loop initialization or port login, the switch
illuminates the corresponding logged-in LED. This shows that the port is properly
connected and able to communicate with its attached devices. The Logged-In
LED remains illuminated as long as the port is initialized or logged in. If the port
connection is broken or an error occurs that disables the port, the Logged-In LED
will flash. Refer to ”Logged-In LED Indications” on page 5-5 for more information
about the Logged-In LED.
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2 – General Description
Fibre Channel Ports
Q
2.2.2.2
Activity LED
The Activity LED indicates that data is passing through the port. Each frame that
enters or leaves the port causes this LED to illuminate for 50 milliseconds. This
makes it possible to observe the transmission of a single frame. When extending
credits, an Activity LED for a donor port will reflect the traffic of the recipient port.
Refer to ”Distance” on page 3-6 for more information about extended credits and
donor ports.
2.2.3
Port Modes
SANbox2-16 switches support the following port modes:
■
Generic ports (GL_Port and G_Port)
■
Fabric ports (FL_Port and F_Port)
■
Translated loop ports (TL_Port)
■
Expansion ports (E_Port)
Switches come from the factory with all ports configured as GL_Ports. GL_Ports
self-configure in the following ways:
■
FL_Port when connected to a loop of public devices
■
F_Port when connected to a single public device. If the device is a single
device on a loop, the GL_Port will attempt to configure first as an F_Port,
then if that fails, as an FL_Port.
■
E_Port when connected to another FC-SW-2 compliant switch
G_Ports self-configure in the following ways:
■
F_Port when connected to a public device
■
E_Port when connected to another FC-SW-2 compliant switch
A TL_Port supports private loop devices and must be configured explicitly. Refer
to the SANbox2-8c/16 Switch Management User’s Guide for more information
about defining port modes.
2.2.3.1
Fabric Ports
An FL_Port can support a loop of up to 126 public devices. An FL_Port can also
configure itself during the fabric login process as an F_Port when connected to a
single public device (N_Port).
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2 – General Description
Fibre Channel Ports
2.2.3.2
Translated Loop Port
A TL_Port supports a loop of up to 125 private initiator devices or up to 124
private target devices with the ability to communicate with “off-loop” devices. This
includes public fabric devices and private devices on other TL_Ports. TL_Ports
connect to devices that conform to the Fibre Channel-Private Loop SCSI Direct
Attach (FC-PLDA) standard. Devices connected to TL_Ports are registered with
the Name Server.
A TL_Port acts as a proxy for the off-loop device translating private frames into
and from public frames. Each TL_Port can proxy up to 63 off-loop initiator devices
or up to 64 off-loop target and initiator devices. The set of off-loop devices are
maintained in the TL_Port’s translation entries list.
■
For a TL_Port connected to private target devices, the switch firmware
automatically creates an entry in the translation entries list for each off-loop
initiator device that attempts to establish communication. Soft or ACL zoning
can be used to limit the number of potential initiators to 63. Zone
membership must be done by worldwide name, or domain ID and port ID.
■
For a TL_Port connected to private initiator devices, the switch firmware
automatically creates an entry in the translation entries list for up to 64 target
and initiator devices that are members of the same soft or ACL zone. Zone
membership must be done by worldwide name, or domain ID and port ID.
2.2.3.3
Expansion Port
E_Ports enable you to expand the fabric by connecting SANbox2-16 switches with
other FC-SW-2 compliant switches. SANbox2-16 switches self-discover all
inter-switch connections. Refer to ”Multiple Chassis Fabrics” on page 3-2 for more
information about multiple chassis fabrics.
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2 – General Description
Ethernet Port
2.3
Ethernet Port
The Ethernet port shown in Figure 2-7 is an RJ-45 Ethernet connector that
provides a connection to a management workstation. A management workstation
can be a PC, a Solaris™ workstation, or a Linux® workstation that is used to
configure and manage the switch fabric. You can manage the switch over an
Ethernet connection using SANbox Manager, the Command Line Interface (CLI),
or SNMP. The switch through which the fabric is managed is called the fabric
management switch.
RJ-45 Ethernet Port
Figure 2-7. Ethernet Port
2.4
Serial Port
The SANbox2-16 switch is equipped with an RS-232 serial port for maintenance
purposes. The serial port is located on the back of the switch under a small cover
as shown in Figure 2-8.
5
1
6
9
Serial Port
Figure 2-8. Serial Port
The serial port connector requires a null-modem F/F DB9 cable. The pins on the
switch RS-232 connector are shown in Figure 2-8 and identified in Table 2-1.
Refer to ”Connect the Management Workstation to the Switch” on page 4-8 for
information about connecting the management workstation through the serial port.
2-8
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2 – General Description
Power Supplies
Table 2-1. Serial Port Pin Identification
Pin Number
Description
1
Carrier Detect (DCD)
2
Receive Data (RxD)
3
Transmit Data (TxD)
4
Data Terminal Ready (DTR)
5
Signal Ground (GND)
6
Data Set Ready (DSR)
7
Request to Send (RTS)
8
Clear to Send (CTS)
9
Ring Indicator (RI)
2.5
Power Supplies
The power supplies convert standard 110 or 230 VAC to DC voltages for the
various switch circuits. Each power supply has an AC power receptacle, an On/Off
switch, and two status LEDs as shown in Figure 2-9. After connecting a power
supply to an AC voltage source and placing the power switch in the On position,
the power supply is energized and DC voltage is delivered to the switch logic
circuitry. Refer to Section 6 Removal/Replacement for information about replacing
a power supply.
Over Temperature LED
(Amber)
AC Power
Receptacle
Output Power LED
(Green)
On/Off Switch
Figure 2-9. Power Supply Components
Each power supply is capable of providing all of the switch’s power needs. During
normal operation, each power supply provides half of the demand. If one power
supply goes offline, the second power supply steps up and provides the
difference.
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2 – General Description
Fans
The power supplies are hot swappable and interchangeable. Hot swappable
means that you can remove and replace one power supply while the switch is in
operation without disrupting service.
Each power supply has two status LEDs: an Output Power LED (green) and an
Over Temperature LED (amber):
■
The Output Power LED illuminates to indicate that the power supply is
producing DC voltage at the proper levels.
■
The Over Temperature LED illuminates to indicate that the power supply is
overheating. When a power supply overheats, the switch extinguishes the
Output Power LED and shuts down the power supply. Refer to
Section 5 Diagnostics/Troubleshooting for information about troubleshooting
over temperature conditions.
2.6
Fans
The switch is equipped with two fans as shown in Figure 2-10. If one fan should
fail, replace the failed fan immediately. The fans are hot swappable and
interchangeable. Refer to ”Fans” on page 6-4 for information about removing and
replacing the fans. Air flow can be front-to-back or back-to-front depending on the
switch model.
Fans
Figure 2-10. Fans
2-10
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2 – General Description
Switch Management
2.7
Switch Management
The SANbox Manager application provides a graphical user interface for fabric
management. This application runs on a Windows®, Solaris, or Linux workstation.
The management workstation connects to the fabric directly through one switch’s
Ethernet port and provides in-band management for all other switches in the
fabric. Refer to the SANbox2-8c/16 Switch Management User’s Guide for
information about the SANbox Manager application and its use.
In addition to SANbox Manager, the switch supports the following management
tools:
■
Command Line Interface
■
File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
■
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
The Command Line Interface provides monitoring and configuration functions by
which the administrator can manage the fabric and its switches. Refer to
Appendix B Command Line Interface for more information.
FTP provides the Command Line Interface for loading and retrieving firmware and
log files.
SNMP provides monitoring and trap functions for the fabric. SANbox2 firmware
supports SNMP Versions 1, 2, and 3, the Fibre Alliance Management Information
Base (FA-MIB) version 4.0, and the Fabric Element Management Information
Base (FE-MIB) RFC 2837. Traps are formatted using SNMP version 2.
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2 – General Description
Switch Management
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Notes
2-12
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Section 3
Planning
Consider the following when planning a fabric:
■
Devices
■
Multiple chassis fabrics
■
Performance
■
Device access
■
Fabric management
■
Fabric security
3.1
Devices
When planning a fabric, consider the number of devices and the anticipated
demand. This will determine the number of ports that are needed and in turn the
number of switches. Consider how many and what types of switches are needed.
Consider the distribution of public and private devices as well as targets and
initiators. Public devices have full Fibre Channel addressing capability, and
therefore can communicate with any other public device on the fabric. An F_Port
supports a single public device. An FL_Port can support up to 126 public devices
in an arbitrated loop.
Private devices do not have full Fibre Channel addressing capability, only the
Arbitrated Loop Physical Address (ALPA) portion. A TL_Port provides a proxy for
a loop of private initiator or target devices allowing communication with off-loop
public and private devices. Consider the number of private devices in the fabric
and the number of off-loop devices with which the private devices must
communicate.
■
A TL_Port can support up to 125 private initiator devices and maintain
communications with up to 64 off-loop target devices.
■
A TL_Port can support up to 124 private target devices and maintain
communications with up to 63 off-loop initiator devices.
The SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel switch uses SFP optical transceivers, but the
device host bus adapters you are using may not. Consider whether the device
adapters use SFP transceivers or Gigabit Interface Converters (GBIC), and
choose fiber optic cable accordingly. Use LC-type cable connectors for SFP
transceivers and SC-type cable connectors for GBIC transceivers.
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Multiple Chassis Fabrics
3.2
Multiple Chassis Fabrics
By connecting switches together you can expand the number of available ports for
devices. Each switch in the fabric is identified by a unique domain ID, and the
fabric will automatically resolve domain ID conflicts. Because the ports are
self-configuring, you can connect SANbox2-16 and other FC-SW-2 compliant
switches together in a wide variety of topologies.
3.2.1
Domain ID, Principal Priority, and Domain ID Lock
The following switch configuration settings affect multiple chassis fabrics:
■
Domain ID
■
Principal priority
■
Domain ID lock
The domain ID is a unique number from 1– 239 that identifies each switch in a
fabric. The principal priority is a number (1 – 255) that determines the principal
switch which manages domain ID assignments for the fabric. The switch with the
highest principal priority (1 is high, 255 is low) becomes the principal switch. If the
principal priority is the same for all switches in a fabric, the switch with the lowest
WWN becomes the principal switch.
The domain ID lock allows (FALSE) or prevents (TRUE) the reassignment of the
domain ID on that switch. Switches come from the factory with the domain ID set
to 1, the domain ID lock set to FALSE, and the principal priority set to 254. Refer
to the SANbox2-8c/16 Switch Management User’s Guide for information about
changing the domain ID using SANbox Manager. Refer to ”Set Config Command”
on page B-25 for information about changing the default domain ID, domain ID
lock, and principal priority parameters.
An unresolved domain ID conflict means that the switch with the higher WWN will
isolate as a separate fabric, and the Logged-In LEDs on both switches will flash to
show the affected ports. If you connect a new switch to an existing fabric with its
domain ID unlocked, and a domain ID conflict occurs, the new switch will isolate
as a separate fabric. However, you can remedy this by resetting the new switch or
taking it offline then back online. The principal switch will reassign the domain ID
and the switch will join the fabric.
Note:
3-2
Domain ID reassignment is not reflected in zoning that is defined by
domain ID/port number pair or Fibre Channel address. You must
reconfigure zones that are affected by domain ID reassignment. To
prevent zoning definitions from becoming invalid when the membership
is defined by domain ID/port number or Fibre Channel address, lock
the domain IDs.
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Multiple Chassis Fabrics
3.2.2
Common Topologies
This section describes three commonly used topologies:
■
Cascade
■
Mesh
■
Multistage®
3.2.2.1
Cascade Topology
A cascade topology describes a fabric in which the switches are connected in a
linear fashion. If you connect the last switch back to the first switch, you create a
cascade-with-a-loop topology as shown in Figure 3-1. The loop reduces latency
because any switch can route traffic in the shortest direction to any switch in the
loop. The loop also provides failover should a switch fail.
The cascade fabric shown in Figure 3-1 has the following characteristics:
■
Each chassis link contributes up to 200 MB/s of bandwidth between chassis,
400 MB/s in full duplex. However, because of the structure of the cascade
topology, the bandwidth will be shared between devices on other chassis.
■
Latency between any two ports is no more than three hops.
■
48 Fibre Channel ports are available for devices.
Figure 3-1. Cascade-with-a-Loop Topology
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3 – Planning
Multiple Chassis Fabrics
3.2.2.2
Mesh Topology
A mesh topology describes a fabric in which each chassis has at least one port
directly connected to every chassis in the fabric. The mesh fabric shown in
Figure 3-2 has the following characteristics:
■
Each link contributes up to 200 MB/s of bandwidth between switches, 400
MB/s in full duplex. Because of multiple parallel paths, there is less
competition for this bandwidth than with a cascade or a Multistage topology.
■
Latency between any two device ports is no more than two hops.
■
40 Fibre Channel ports are available for devices
Figure 3-2. Mesh Topology
3-4
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Multiple Chassis Fabrics
3.2.2.3
Multistage Topology
A Multistage topology describes a fabric in which two or more edge switches
connect to one or more core switches. Each additional core switch increases the
bandwidth to each edge switch by 200 MB/s. The Multistage fabric shown in
Figure 3-3 has the following characteristics:
■
Each link contributes up to 200 MB/s of bandwidth between chassis.
Competition for this bandwidth is less than that of a Cascade topology, but
greater than that of the Mesh topology.
■
Latency between any two device ports is three hops.
■
52 Fibre Channel ports are available for devices
Core Switch
Edge Switch
Edge Switch
Edge Switch
Figure 3-3. Multistage Topology
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3 – Planning
Performance
3.3
Performance
The SANbox2-16 switch supports class 2 and class 3 Fibre Channel service at
transmission rates of 1 Gbps or 2 Gbps with a maximum frame size of 2148 bytes.
A port can transmit or receive at 1 Gbps or 2 Gbps depending on the device to
which it is connected. The port discovers the transmission speed prior to login
when the connected device powers up. Related performance characteristics
include the following:
■
Distance
■
Bandwidth
■
Latency
3.3.1
Distance
Consider the physical distribution of devices and switches in the fabric. Choose
SFP transceivers that are compatible with the cable type, distance, Fibre Channel
revision level, and the device host bus adapter. Refer to
Appendix A Specifications for more information about cable types and SFP
transceivers.
Each port is supported by a data buffer with a 12 credit capacity; that is, 12
maximum sized frames. For fibre optic cables, this enables full bandwidth over a
distance of 20 kilometers at 1 Gbps (0.6 credits/Km), or 10 kilometers at 2 Gbps
Gbps (1.2 credits/Km). Beyond this distance, however, there is some loss of
efficiency because the transmitting port must wait for an acknowledgement before
sending the next frame.
Longer distances can be spanned at full bandwidth by extending credits on
G_Ports and F_Ports. Each port can donate up to 11 credits to a pool from which
a recipient port can borrow. For example, you can configure a recipient port to
borrow up to 66 credits from 6 ports for a total of 78 credits. This will support
communication over approximately 130 Km at 1 Gbps (78÷0.6) or 65 Km at 2
Gbps (78÷1.2).
You configure recipient and donor ports using SANbox Manager or the Set Config
command. Refer to ”Set Config Command” on page B-25 for more information.
3-6
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Performance
3.3.2
Bandwidth
Bandwidth is a measure of the volume of data that can be transmitted at a given
transmission rate. A port can transmit or receive at 1 Gbps or 2 Gbps depending
on the device to which it is connected. The switch supports all transmission rate
combinations as shown in Table 3-1.
Table 3-1. Port-to-Port Transmission Combinations
1
Source Port Rate
Destination Port Rate
Maximum Bandwdith
1 Gbps
1 Gbps
100 MB
1 Gbps
2 Gbps
100 MB
1 Gbps x 2 ports
2 Gbps
200 MB
2 Gbps
1 Gbps x 2 ports
100 MB each port1
2 Gbps
2 Gbps
200 MB
Bandwidth will be less for larger sequence sizes.
In multiple chassis fabrics, each link between chassis contributes 100 or 200
megabytes of bandwidth between those chassis. When additional bandwidth is
needed between devices, increase the number of links between the connecting
switches. The switch guarantees in-order-delivery with any number of links
between chassis.
3.3.3
Latency
Latency is a measure of how fast a frame travels from one port to another. The
factors that affect latency include transmission rate and the source/destination
port relationship as shown in Table 3-2.
Table 3-2. Port-to-Port Latency
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Source/Destination Rates
Same Switch
1 Gbps - 1 Gbps
< 1 µsec
2 Gbps - 2 Gbps
< 0.5 µsec
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3 – Planning
Device Access
3.4
Device Access
Consider device access needs within the fabric. Access is controlled by the use of
zones and zone sets. Some zoning strategies include the following:
■
Separate devices that use different operating systems.
■
Separate devices that have no need to communicate with other devices in
the fabric or have classified data.
■
Separate devices into department, administrative, or other functional
grouping.
■
Group TL_Port devices with targets and initiators to allow automatic
discovery.
■
Reserve a path and its bandwidth from one port to another.
A zone is a named group of devices that can communicate with each other.
Membership in a zone can be defined by switch port number, port Fibre Channel
address, or by device worldwide name (WWN). Devices can communicate only
with devices that are members of the same zone. A zone can be a member of
more than one zone set. Several zone sets can be defined for a fabric, but only
one zone set can be active at one time. The active zone set determines the
current fabric zoning.
A zoning database is maintained on each switch consisting of all inactive zone
sets, the active zone set, all zones, aliases, and their membership. The
SANbox2-16 switch supports the following maximum limits:
■
256 zone sets
■
256 zones
■
1000 total zone set members
■
2000 members per zone
■
256 aliases
■
2000 members per alias
■
2000 total number of alias and zone members
Three types of zones are supported:
3-8
■
Soft zone
■
Access Control List (ACL) - hard zone
■
Virtual Private Fabric (VPF) - hard zone
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3 – Planning
Device Access
3.4.1
Soft Zones
Soft zoning divides the fabric for purposes of controlling discovery. Members of
the same soft zone automatically discover and communicate freely with all other
members of the same zone. The soft zone boundary is not secure; traffic across
soft zones can occur if addressed correctly. The following rules apply to soft
zones:
■
Soft zones that include members from multiple switches need not include
the ports of the inter-switch links.
■
Soft zone boundaries yield to ACL and VPF zone boundaries.
■
Soft zones can overlap; that is, a port can be a member of more than one
soft zone.
■
Membership can be defined by Fibre Channel address, port ID and domain
ID, or worldwide name.
■
Soft zoning supports all port modes.
3.4.2
Access Control List Hard Zones
Access Control List (ACL) zoning divides the fabric for purposes of controlling
discovery and inbound traffic. ACL zoning is a type of hard zoning that is
hardware enforced. This type of zoning is useful for controlling access to certain
devices without totally isolating them from the fabric. Members can communicate
with each other and transmit outside the ACL zone, but cannot receive inbound
traffic from outside the zone. The following rules apply to ACL zones:
59021-04 C
■
The ACL zone boundary is secure against inbound traffic.
■
ACL zones can overlap; that is, a port can be a member of more than one
ACL zone.
■
ACL zones that include members from multiple switches need not include
the ports of the inter-switch links.
■
ACL zone boundaries supersede soft zone boundaries, but yield to VPF
zone boundaries.
■
Membership can be defined only by domain ID and port ID.
■
ACL zoning supports all port modes except TL_Port.
3-9
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3 – Planning
Fabric Management
3.4.3
Virtual Private Fabric Hard Zones
Virtual Private Fabric (VPF) zoning divides the fabric for purposes of controlling
discovery and both inbound and outbound traffic. This type of zoning is useful for
providing security and reserving paths between devices to guarantee bandwidth.
VPF zoning is a type of hard zoning that is hardware enforced. Members can only
transmit to and receive from members of the same VPF zone. The VPF zone
boundary is secure against both inbound and outbound traffic. The following rules
apply to VPF zones:
■
VPF zones that include members from multiple switches must include the
ports of the inter-switch links.
■
VPF zones cannot overlap; that is, a port can be a member of only one VPF
zone.
■
VPF zone boundaries supersede both soft and ACL zone boundaries.
■
Membership can be defined only by domain ID and port ID.
■
VPF zoning supports all port modes.
3.5
Fabric Management
The SANbox Manager application and CLI execute on a management workstation
that provides for the configuration, control, maintenance of the fabric. Supported
platforms include Windows, Windows NT, Solaris, and Linux. The SANbox
Manager application can manage multiple fabrics. Consider how many fabrics will
be managed, how many management workstations are needed, and whether the
fabrics will be managed with the CLI or SANbox Manager.
The switch supports a maximum of 15 user logins. This includes SANbox
Manager inband and out-of-band logins, Telnet out-of-band logins, and SNMP
out-of-band logins. Of this 15, a maximum of 10 SANbox Manager logins are
allowed.
3-10
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3 – Planning
Fabric Security
3.6
Fabric Security
You manage fabric security on a switch basis through the creation of user
accounts. Each account consists of an account name, a password, and an
authority level. There are two authority levels: User and Admin. These authority
levels apply to SANbox Manager and to the CLI. User authority permits only
monitoring and display tasks. Admin authority permits all management tasks
including user administration. Consider your fabric security needs, who the
system administrators will be, and authority levels they should have.
59021-04 C
■
Refer to ”Commands” on page B-3 for more information about authority
levels.
■
Refer to the ”User Command” on page B-69 for information about creating
user accounts.
■
Refer to the ”Set Setup Command” on page B-37 and the System keyword
for information about fabric security and the enforcement of user accounts.
3-11
3 – Planning
Fabric Security
Q
Notes
3-12
59021-04 C
Section 4
Installation
This section describes how to install and configure the SANbox2-16 switch. It also
describes how to load new firmware and how to recover a disabled switch.
4.1
Site Requirements
The following items are required for the installation of a SANbox2-16 switch:
■
Fabric management workstation
■
Power requirements
■
Environmental conditions
4.1.1
Fabric Management Workstation
The requirements for fabric management workstations running SANbox Manager
are described in Table 4-1:
Table 4-1. Management Workstation Requirements
Operating System
■ Windows® NT, 2000, 95/98
■ Linux® 6.2 Red Hat®
■ Solaris™
Memory
128 MB or more
Disk Space
150 MB per installation
Processor
300 MHz or faster
Hardware
CD-ROM drive, RS-232 serial port, RJ-45 Ethernet port
Internet Browser
Microsoft® Internet Explorer® or Netscape Navigator®
Telnet workstations require an RJ-45 Ethernet port and an operating system with
a Telnet client.
4.1.2
Switch Power Requirements
Operating voltage requirements are as follows:
90 to 137 Vac; 47 to 63 Hz
180 to 265 Vac; 47 to 63 Hz
59021-04 C
4-1
Q
4 – Installation
Installing a Switch
4.1.3
Environmental Conditions
Consider the factors that affect the climate in your facility such as equipment heat
dissipation and ventilation. The switch requires the following operating conditions:
■
Operating temperature range: 10° to 40° C (50°- 104°F)
■
Relative humidity: 25 - 80%, non-condensing
4.2
Installing a Switch
Unpack the switch and accessories. The SANbox2-16 product is shipped with the
components shown in Figure 4-1:
■
SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch (1) with firmware installed
■
Power cords (2)
■
Rubber feet (4)
■
Rack mount brackets (2)
■
CD containing the SANbox Manager switch management application,
release notes, and documentation
Figure 4-1. SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch
4-2
59021-04 C
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4 – Installation
Installing a Switch
Installing a SANbox2-16 switch involves the following steps:
1.
Mount the switch.
2.
Install SFP transceivers.
3.
Connect the switch to the AC power source.
4.
Connect the management workstation to the switch.
5.
Install the SANbox Manager application.
6.
Configure the switch.
7.
Configure the ports.
8.
Cable devices to the switch.
4.2.1
Mount the Switch
The switch can be placed on a flat surface and stacked or mounted in a 19” EIA
rack. The top of each chassis has dimples to receive the rubber feet of a second
chassis stacked on top. Without the rubber feet, the switch occupies 1U of space
in an EIA rack. Mounting rails are required and available through QLogic
Corporation.
59021-04 C
WARNING!!
Mount switches in the rack so that the weight is distributed
evenly. An unevenly loaded rack can become unstable possibly
resulting in equipment damage or personal injury.
CAUTION!
If the switch is mounted in a closed or multi-unit rack assembly,
make sure that the operating temperature inside the rack
enclosure does not exceed the maximum rated ambient
temperature. Refer to ”Switch Environmental” on page A-4.
The switch must rest on rails or a shelf in the rack or cabinet.
Allow 16 cm (6.5 in) minimum clearance at the front and rear of
the rack for service access and ventilation.
Do not restrict chassis air flow. Allow 16 cm (6.5 in) minimum
clearance at the front and rear of the rack for service access and
ventilation.
Multiple rack-mounted units connected to the AC supply circuit
may overload that circuit or overload the AC supply wiring.
Consider the power source capacity and the total power usage
of all switches on the circuit. Refer to ”Switch Electrical” on
page A-3.
Reliable grounding in the rack must be maintained from the
switch chassis to the AC power source.
4-3
Q
4 – Installation
Installing a Switch
To mount the switch in a rack, do the following:
1.
Ensure that the19-inch rack meets the following standard specifications:
■
ANSI/EIA RS-230 Standard, entitled Cabinets, Racks, Panels, and
Associated Equipment
■
MIL-STD- 189, entitled Racks, Electrical Equipment, 19-Inch and
Associated Panels
2.
Mount the brackets on the front or rear corners of the chassis as shown in
Figure 4-2.
3.
Place the switch in the rack and secure it with four 10-32 x .625” machine
screws (not supplied).
Figure 4-2. Installing Rack Mount Brackets
4.2.2
Install SFP Transceivers
The switch will support a variety of interconnection media. Refer to ”SFP
Transceivers” on page 6-2 for information about removing and installing SFP
transceivers.
4-4
59021-04 C
Q
4 – Installation
Installing a Switch
4.2.3
Connect the Switch to AC Power
WARNING!!
This product is supplied with a 3-wire power cable and plug for
the user’s safety. Use this power cable in conjunction with a
properly grounded outlet to avoid electrical shock. An electrical
outlet that is not correctly wired could place hazardous voltage
on metal parts of the switch chassis. It is the responsibility of the
customer to ensure that the outlet is correctly wired and
grounded to prevent electrical shock.
You may require a different power cable in some countries
because the plug on the cable supplied with the equipment will
not fit your electrical outlet. In this case, you must supply your
own power cable. The cable you use must meet the following
requirements:
■ For 125 Volt electrical service, the cable must be rated at 10
Amps and be approved by UL and CSA.
■ For 250 Volt electrical service: The cable must be rated at 10
Amps, meet the requirements of H05VV-F, and be approved by
VDE, SEMKO, and DEMKO.
AVERTISSEMENT!!
Pour la sécurité de l’utilisateur, l’appareil est livré avec un câble
d’alimentation trifilaire et une fiche. Pour éviter toute secousse
électrique, enficher ce câble à une prise correctement mise à la
terre.Une prise électrique dont les fils sont mal branchés peut
créer une tension dangereuse dans les pièces métalliques du
châssis switch. Pour éviter toute secousse électrique, s’assurer
que les fils sont correctement branchés et que la prise est bien
mise à la terre.
Dans certains pays les prises électriques sont de modèle
différent; on ne peut y enficher le câble de l’appareil. On doit
donc en utiliser un autre ayant les caractéristiques suivantes:
■ Alimentation 125 V: Câble pour courant nominal de 10 A, agréé
LAC et CSA.
■ Alimentation 250 V: Câble pour courant nominal de 10 A,
conforme au H05VV-F, et agréé VDE, SEMKO et DEMKO.
59021-04 C
4-5
Q
4 – Installation
Installing a Switch
WARNUNG!!
Dieses Produkt wird mit einem 3-adrigen Netzkabel mit Stecker
geliefert. Dieses Kabel erfüllt die Sicherheitsanforderungen und
sollte an einer vorschriftsmäßigen Schukosteckdose
angeschlossen werden, um die Gefahr eines elektrischen
Schlages zu vermeiden.Elektrosteckdosen, die nicht richtig
verdrahtet sind, können gefährliche Hochspannung an den
Metallteilen des switch-Gehäuses verursachen. Der Kunde trägt
die Verantwortung für eine vorschriftsmäßige Verdrahtung und
Erdung der Steckdose zur Vermeidung eines elektrischen
Schlages.
In manchen Ländern ist eventuell die Verwendung eines
anderen Kabels erforderlich, da der Stecker des mitgelieferten
Kabels nicht in die landesüblichen Steckdosen paßt. In diesem
Fall müssen Sie sich ein Kabel besorgen, daß die folgenden
Anforderungen erfüllt:
■ Für 125 Volt-Netze: 10 Ampere Kabel mit UL- und
CSA-Zulassung.
■ Für 250 Volt-Netze: 10 Ampere Kabel gemäß den
Anforderungen der H05VV-F und VDE-, SEMKO- und
DEMKO-Zulassung.
To connect the switch to an AC power source and energize the switch, do the
following:
1.
Connect the power cords to the AC power receptacles on the front of the
switch chassis.
2.
Connect each power cord to a 3-wire, grounded, AC outlet that delivers
power in accordance with the power requirements in
Appendix A Specifications.
Note:
3.
4-6
To provide redundancy in the event of an AC power circuit failure,
connect the switch power supplies to separate AC circuits.
Place both power On/Off switches in the On position to energize the switch
logic circuitry. Confirm that the Input Power LED on the switch chassis is
illuminated indicating that the switch logic circuitry is receiving DC voltage. If
not, contact your authorized maintenance provider.
59021-04 C
Q
4 – Installation
Installing a Switch
4.
5.
59021-04 C
Confirm that the Output Power LEDs on both power supplies are illuminated.
If not, do the following:
a.
Check voltage at the AC power source.
b.
Inspect the power cord.
c.
Replace the power supply.
Observe the Heartbeat LED to determine the results of the Power On Self
Test (POST). The POST tests the condition of firmware, memories,
data-paths, and switch logic circuitry and passes a blink code to the
Heartbeat LED. If the Heartbeat LED blinks steadily about once per second,
the POST was successful, and you can continue with the installation
process. Any other blink pattern appears indicates that an error has
occurred. Refer to ”Heartbeat LED Blink Patterns” on page 5-1 for more
information about the error blink pattern.
4-7
Q
4 – Installation
Installing a Switch
4.2.4
Connect the Management Workstation to the Switch
Connect the management workstation to the switch in one of three ways:
■
Indirect Ethernet connection from the management workstation to the switch
RJ-45 Ethernet connector through an Ethernet switch or a hub. This requires
a 10/100 Base-T straight cable as shown in Figure 4-3. With this method,
you can manage the switch with the SANbox Manager application or
Command Line Interface.
■
Direct Ethernet connection from the management workstation to the switch
RJ-45 Ethernet connector. This requires a 10/100 Base-T cross-over cable
as shown in Figure 4-3. With this method, you can manage the switch with
the SANbox Manager application or Command Line Interface.
■
Serial port connection from the management workstation to the switch
RS-232 serial port connector. This requires a null modem F/F DB9 cable as
shown in Figure 4-3. With this method, you can manage the switch with
Command Line Interface.
Indirect Ethernet
RJ-45 Connection
8
Direct Ethernet
RJ-45 Connection
1
8
Serial RS-232
Connection
1
5
9
1
6
8
8
8
8
9
9
7
7
7
7
8
8
6
6
6
6
7
7
5
5
5
5
6
6
4
4
4
4
5
5
3
3
3
3
4
4
2
2
2
2
3
3
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
Figure 4-3. Ethernet and Serial Cable Connections
4-8
59021-04 C
Q
4 – Installation
Installing a Switch
4.2.4.1
Ethernet Connection
To establish an Ethernet connection, do the following:
1.
Connect a 10/100 Base-T cross-over cable from a COM port on the
management workstation directly to the RJ-45 Ethernet port; or a 10/100
Base-T straight cable indirectly over an Ethernet network.
2.
Open a command line window.
3.
Open a Telnet session by entering the following command with the switch IP
address. The default IP address is 10.0.0.1
telnet 10.0.0.1
4.
Log in to the switch. If fabric security is disabled, account names and
passwords are not enforced. Refer to the ”Set Setup Command” on
page B-37 for information about setting fabric security. The default account
name and password are (admin, password).
SANbox2 Login: admin
Password: ********
4.2.4.2
Serial Connection
To establish a serial port connection, do the following:
1.
Connect a null modem F/F DB9 cable from a COM port on the management
workstation to the RS-232 serial port on the switch.
2.
Configure the connection according to your platform:
■
59021-04 C
For Windows:
a.
Open the HyperTerminal application on a Windows platform.
Choose the Start button, select Programs, Accessories,
HyperTerminal, and HyperTerminal.
b.
Enter a name for the switch connection and choose an icon in the
Connection Description window. Choose the OK button.
c.
Select the COM port in the Connect To window and choose the
OK button.
d.
Enter the following COM Port settings in the COM Properties
window and choose the OK button.
❑
Bits per second: 9600
❑
Data Bits: 8
❑
Parity: None
❑
Stop Bits: 1
❑
Flow Control: None
4-9
Q
4 – Installation
Installing a Switch
■
For Linux:
a.
Set up minicom to use the serial port. Create or modify the
/etc/minirc.dfl file with the following content:
pr
pu
pu
pu
portdev/ttyS0
minit
mreset
mhangup
b.
Verify that all users have permission to run minicom. Review the
/etc/minicom/users file and confirm that the line "ALL" exists or
that there are specific user entries.
c.
Enter the following command at the Linux prompt:
minicom
■
For Solaris:
a.
Set up Solaris to use the serial port. Modify the /etc/remote file to
include the following lines:
sanbox2:\
:dv=/dev/term/a:br#9600:el=C^S^Q^U^D:ie%$:oe=^D:
b.
Enter the following command at the Solaris prompt:
# tip sanbox2
3.
Log in to the switch. If fabric security is disabled, account names and
passwords are not enforced. Refer to the ”Set Setup Command” on
page B-37 for information about setting fabric security. The default account
name and password are (admin, password).
SANbox2 Login: admin
Password: ********
4.2.5
Install SANbox Manager
You can install SANbox Manager on the Windows, Linux, and Solaris platforms.
Refer to the subsection that corresponds to your workstation:
4-10
■
4.2.5.1 SANbox Manager Installation for Windows
■
4.2.5.2 SANbox Manager Installation for Linux
■
4.2.5.3 SANbox Manager Installation for Solaris
59021-04 C
Q
4 – Installation
Installing a Switch
4.2.5.1
SANbox Manager Installation for Windows
To install the SANbox Manager application on Windows from the CD-ROM and do
the following:
1.
Close all programs currently running, and insert the CD into the
management workstation CD-ROM drive. If the start page does not open in
your default browser, do the following:
a.
Using Windows Explorer, double-click the drive letter which contains
the CD.
b.
Locate and double-click the Start_Here.htm file to open the start page
in your default browser.
2.
On the start page, choose the SANbox Switch Software button.
3.
On the SANbox Switch Software page, scroll to the SANbox2-16 (2Gb)
Series area.
4.
In the Windows column, choose the SANbox Manager link to open the File
Download window.
5.
You have a choice of running the installation file from the CD-ROM or
downloading the installation file to your hard drive. Choose one of the
following:
■
Open the installation file from the CD-ROM and follow the SANbox
Manager installation instructions.
■
Specify a location in which to save the
sansurfer_windows_install.exe file, and choose the Save button.
Double-click the saved sansurfer_windows_install.exe file and
follow the SANbox Manager installation instructions.
4.2.5.2
SANbox Manager Installation for Linux
To install the SANbox Manager application on Linux from the CD-ROM, do the
following:
1.
Close all programs currently running, and insert the CD into the
management workstation CD-ROM drive. If a file browser window opens
showing icons for the contents of the CD-ROM, double-click the
Start_Here.htm file to open the start page. If a file browser does not open,
double-click the CD-ROM icon on the to open the browser. If there is no
CD-ROM icon on the, do the following:
a.
Open an xterm or other terminal window.
b.
Mount the CD-ROM. From a shell prompt, enter the following
command:
mount /mnt/cdrom
59021-04 C
4-11
Q
4 – Installation
Installing a Switch
c.
Execute your web browser to view the Start_Here.htm document
using one of the following commands:
$mozilla file:/mnt/cdrom/Start_Here.htm
or
$netscape file:/mnt/cdrom/Start_Here.htm
d.
The start page opens in your default browser.
2.
On the start page, choose the SANbox Switch Software button.
3.
On the SANbox Switch Software page, scroll to the SANbox2-16 (2Gb)
Series area.
4.
In the Linux column, choose the SANbox Manager link to open the Save As
window.
5.
Enter a path name to save the sansurfer_linux_install.bin file, and choose
the Save button.
6.
Open a terminal window for the directory in which the
sansurfer_linux_install.bin file was saved, and enter the following
command:
chmod +x sansurfer_linux_install.bin
7.
Press the Enter key.
8.
Enter the following command:
./sansurfer_linux_install.bin
9.
Press the Enter key, and follow the SANbox Manager installation
instructions.
4.2.5.3
SANbox Manager Installation for Solaris
To install the SANbox Manager application on Solaris from the CD-ROM, do the
following:
1.
2.
4-12
Close all programs currently running, and insert the CD into the
management workstation CD-ROM drive. If the start page does not open in
your default browser, do the following:
a.
Right-click the to open the Workspace Menu.
b.
Point to and select Files, then select File Manager.
c.
In File Manager, double-click the CD-ROM icon, and then double-click
the Sansurfer folder.
d.
In the Sansurfer folder, double-click the Start_Here.htm file to open
the start page in your default browser.
On the start page, choose the SANbox Switch Software button.
59021-04 C
Q
4 – Installation
Installing a Switch
3.
On the SANbox Switch Software page, scroll to the SANbox2-16 (2Gb)
Series area.
4.
In the Solaris column, choose the SANbox Manager link to open the Save
As window.
5.
Enter a path name to save the sansurfer_solaris_install.bin file and
choose the Save button.
6.
Open a terminal window for the directory in which the
sansurfer_solaris_install.bin file was saved, and enter the following
command:
chmod +x sansurfer_solaris_install.bin
7.
Press the Enter key.
8.
Enter the following command and follow the SANbox Manager installation
instructions:
./sansurfer_solaris_install.bin
Note:
If you download SANbox Manager from a server, be sure the
downloaded file has execute permission before installing.
4.2.6
Configure the Switch
Do the following to configure a switch using the SANbox Manager application.
Refer to the SANbox2-8c/16 Switch Management User’s Guide for more
information about configuring a switch. You can also configure the switch using
the Command Line Interface. Refer to Appendix B Command Line Interface for
more information.
59021-04 C
1.
Connect to the switch using an Ethernet connection and run SANbox
Manager.
2.
Open the Fabric menu and select Add Fabric to open the Add a New Fabric
window.
3.
Enter a fabric name and the IP address of the switch through which to
manage the fabric. The default IP address is 10.0.0.1. If this is a new switch,
leave the login name and password fields empty, and choose the Add
Fabric button. By default, fabric security is disabled, and therefore account
names and passwords are not enforced. Refer to the ”Set Setup Command”
on page B-37 for information about setting fabric security.
4.
Open the Switch menu and select Switch Properties. In the Switch
Properties window, enter a chassis name. Accept the default domain ID, and
choose the OK button.
4-13
Q
4 – Installation
Installing a Switch
5.
Open the Switch menu and select Network Properties. In the Network
Properties window, enter values for the IP address, subnet mask, and
gateway address. Accept the default boot method. If you know the SNMP
configuration settings, enter those as well. Choose the OK button.
6.
Set the date and time. Double click on the switch in the topology display. In
the faceplate display, open the Switch menu and select Set Date/Time.
Enter the date and time in the Switch Date and Time window and choose the
OK button. Reset the switch when prompted to implement the new and date
and time.
Repeat this process for each switch in the fabric, then connect the switches.
4.2.7
Configure the Ports
Configuring a port involves defining the port mode and setting the frame
sequencing if necessary. For public devices and other switches, a switch
automatically sets the port mode as each port discovers the type of device to
which it is connected.
A GL_Port will self configure as an FL_Port when connected to a loop of public
devices or an F_Port when connected to a single device. A G_Port will self
configure as an F_Port when connected to a single public device. Both GL_Ports
and G_Ports self configure as E_Ports when connected to another switch. The
default port mode is GL_Port. Refer to the SANbox2-8c/16 Switch Management
User’s Guide for more information about configuring ports. You can also configure
ports using the CLI. Refer to Appendix B Command Line Interface for more
information.
4.2.8
Cable Devices to the Switch
Connect cables to the SFP transceivers and their corresponding devices, and
then energize the devices. Device host bus adapters can have SFP (or SFF)
transceivers or GigaBit Interface Converters (GBIC). LC-type duplex fiber optic
cable connectors are designed for SFP transceivers, while SC-type connectors
are designed for GBICs. Duplex cable connectors are keyed to ensure proper
orientation. Choose the fiber optic cable with the connector combination that
matches the device host bus adapter.
4-14
59021-04 C
Q
4 – Installation
Installing Firmware
4.3
Installing Firmware
The switch comes with current firmware installed. You can upgrade the firmware
from the management workstation as new firmware becomes available. Firmware
installation involves loading the firmware image file onto the switch, unpacking the
image file, and then resetting the switch to activate the new firmware. New
firmware can be loaded on the switch while the switch is operating without
disrupting service. However, you must reset the switch to activate the new
firmware, which does disrupt service.
You can use the SANbox Manager application or the CLI to install new firmware:
■
The SANbox Manager application loads and unpacks the firmware image
file in one operation. Refer to ”Using SANbox Manager to Install Firmware”
on page 4-15.
■
When using the CLI on a workstation that has an FTP server, you can open
a Telnet session and load and unpack the firmware image file using the CLI
Image command. Refer to ”Using the CLI to Install Firmware” on page 4-16.
■
When using the CLI on a workstation without an FTP server, you must open
an FTP session through the switch to load the image file, then open a Telnet
session to unpack it with the CLI Image command. Refer to ”Using FTP and
the CLI to Install Firmware” on page 4-17.
4.3.1
Using SANbox Manager to Install Firmware
To install firmware using SANbox Manager, do the following:
59021-04 C
1.
From the Faceplate display, open the Switch menu and select Load
Firmware.
2.
In the Firmware Upload window, browse and select the firmware file you
want to load.
3.
In the Firmware Upload window, choose the Start button to begin the
loading process. When the firmware is finished loading, the Bytes
Transferred field displays the number of bytes transferred during the loading
process.
4.
Choose the Close button to close the Firmware Upload window.
5.
Open the Switch menu and select Reset Switch to activate the new
firmware.
4-15
Q
4 – Installation
Installing Firmware
4.3.2
Using the CLI to Install Firmware
To install firmware using the CLI when an FTP server is present on the
management workstation, do the following:
1.
Connect to the switch through the Ethernet or the serial port and open a
Telnet session.
2.
Enter the following account name and password:
SANbox2 Login:admin
Password: password
3.
To start an admin session, enter the following:
cli $> admin start
4.
Retrieve the firmware file. The device on which the firmware file is stored
must be running an FTP server. Enter the following command to retrieve the
firmware file from the specified IP address:
cli (admin) #> image fetch username 10.0.0.254
firmwarefilenametoload firmwarefilenameonswitch
Connected to 10.0.0.254.
Note:
If prompted for your password, enter your password (for that IP
Address) and press the Enter key.
331 Password required for username.
Password:
230 User username logged in.
bin
200 Type set to I.
verbose
Verbose mode off.
5.
Enter the following command to display the list of firmware files:
cli (admin) #> image listfirmwarefilenameonswitch
6.
Enter the following command to install the new firmware:
cli (admin) #>image unpack firmwarefilenameonswitch
7.
Reset the switch to activate the new firmware.
cli (admin) $>reset
4-16
59021-04 C
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4 – Installation
Installing Firmware
4.3.3
Using FTP and the CLI to Install Firmware
To install firmware using the CLI when the management workstation does not
have an FTP server, do the following:
1.
Connect to the switch through the Ethernet or the serial port.
2.
Move to the folder or directory that contains the new firmware image file.
3.
Establish communications with the switch using the File Transfer Protocol
(FTP). Enter one of the following on the command line:
>ftp xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
or
>ftp switchname
where xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is the switch IP address, and switchname is the
switch name associated with the IP address.
4.
Enter the following account name and password:
user:images
password: images
5.
Activate binary mode and copy the firmware image file on the switch:
ftp>bin
ftp>put filename
6.
Close the FTP session.
ftp>quit
7.
Establish communications with the switch using the CLI. Enter one of the
following on the command line:
telnet xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
or
telnet switchname
where xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is the switch IP address, and switchname is the
switch name associated with the IP address.
8.
A Telnet window opens prompting you for a login. Enter an account name
and password. The default account name and password are (admin,
password).
9.
Open an Admin session to acquire the necessary authority.
cli $>admin start
59021-04 C
4-17
Q
4 – Installation
Powering Down a Switch
10.
Display the list of firmware image files on the switch to confirm that the file
was loaded. Refer to the ”Image Command” on page B-13 for more
information .
cli (admin) $>image list
11.
Unpack the firmware image file to install the new firmware in flash memory.
cli (admin) $>image unpack filename
12.
Reset the switch to activate the new firmware. This will close the Telnet
session by default.
cli (admin) $>reset
4.4
Powering Down a Switch
Simply unplugging the switch from the power source does not allow the switch to
complete executing tasks and could lead to flash memory corruption. For this
reason, open a Telnet session and use the Shutdown command to initiate an
orderly shut down, then power down the switch. Refer to the ”Shutdown
Command” on page B-64.
4-18
59021-04 C
Section 5
Diagnostics/Troubleshooting
Diagnostic information about the switch is available through the chassis LEDs, the
power supply LEDs, and the port LEDs. Diagnostic information is also available
through the SANbox Manager and CLI event logs and error displays. This section
describes two types of diagnostics: Power On Self Test (POST) and chassis.
POST diagnostics describe the Heartbeat LED and the port Logged-In LED
indications. Chassis diagnostics cover power supply and fan diagnostics as well
as over temperature conditions. This section also describes how to use force
PROM mode to recover a disabled switch.
5.1
POST Diagnostics
The switch performs a series of Power On Self Tests (POST) as part of its
power-up procedure. The POST diagnostic program performs the following tests:
■
Checksum tests on the boot firmware in PROM and the switch firmware in
flash memory
■
Internal data loopback test on all ports
■
Access and integrity test on the ASIC
During the POST, the switch logs any errors encountered. Some POST errors are
fatal, others are non-fatal. The switch uses the Heartbeat LED and the Logged-In
LED to indicate switch and port status. A fatal error disables the switch so that it
will not operate. A non-fatal error allows the switch to operate, but disables the
ports that have errors. Whether the problem is fatal or non-fatal, contact your
authorized maintenance provider.
If there are no errors, the Heartbeat LED blinks at a steady rate of once per
second. If a fatal error occurs, the Heartbeat LED will show an error blink pattern.
If there are non-fatal errors, the switch disables the failed ports and flashes the
associated Logged-In LEDs. Refer to ”Heartbeat LED Blink Patterns” on page 5-1
for more information about Heartbeat LED blink patterns.
5.1.1
Heartbeat LED Blink Patterns
5.1.1.1
Normal (all pass)
If all POST diagnostics pass, the switch will go to normal operation and the
Heartbeat LED will blink at a steady rate of one (1) blink per second.
59021-04 C
5-1
Q
5 – Diagnostics/Troubleshooting
POST Diagnostics
5.1.1.2
Force PROM Mode Pattern
Steady illumination indicates that the switch is in force PROM mode, which returns
the switch IP address to 10.0.0.1. From force PROM mode, you may reload
firmware, reset the password to the factory default, and remove a corrupt
configuration.
5.1.1.3
Internal Firmware Failure Blink Pattern
An internal firmware failure blink pattern is 2 blinks per second followed by a two
second pause. The 2-blink error pattern indicates that the firmware has failed, and
that the switch must be reset. Power cycle the switch to reset it.
1 second
2 seconds
5.1.1.4
Fatal Error Blink Pattern
A fatal error blink pattern is 3 blinks per second followed by a two second pause.
The 3-blink error pattern indicates that a fatal error has left the switch inoperable.
If a fatal error occurs, contact your authorized maintenance provider.
1 second
2 seconds
5.1.1.5
Configuration File System Error Blink Pattern
A configuration file system error blink pattern is 4 blinks per second followed by a
two second pause. The 4-blink error pattern indicates that a configuration file
system error has occurred, and that the configuration file must be recreated. Refer
to ”Recovering a Switch” on page 5-12 for more information.
1 second
2 seconds
To recreate the configuration file, do the following:
5-2
1.
Use the Shutdown command to close activity on the switch, then power
down the switch. Refer to the ”Shutdown Command” on page B-64.
2.
Place the switch in force PROM mode. Refer to ”Recovering a Switch” on
page 5-12.
59021-04 C
Q
5 – Diagnostics/Troubleshooting
POST Diagnostics
3.
Establish a Telnet session with the switch using the default IP address
10.0.0.1.
telnet 10.0.0.1
4.
Enter the account name (prom) and password (prom), and press the Enter
key.
Sanbox2 login: prom
Password:xxxx
[[email protected]:Itasca]% telnet 10.0.0.1
Trying 10.0.0.1...
Connected to 10.0.0.1.
Escape character is '^]'.
5.
The following menu is displayed. Enter "6" (Remake Filesystem) and press
the Enter key to recreate the configuration file.
0) Exit
1) Image Unpack
2) Reset Network Config
3) Reset Password File
4) Copy Log Files
5) Remove Switch Config
6) Remake Filesystem
7) Reset Switch
Option: 6
6.
When the recreate process is complete, select option 7 to reset the switch
and exit force PROM mode.
7.
If a previously saved configuration file is available for the switch, do the
following to restore the configuration file.
a.
Establish communications with the switch using the File Transfer
Protocol (FTP). Enter one of the following on the command line:
>ftp xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
or
>ftp switchname
where xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is the switch IP address and switchname is the
switch name associated with the IP address.
b.
Enter the following account name and password:
user:images
password:images
59021-04 C
5-3
5 – Diagnostics/Troubleshooting
POST Diagnostics
c.
Q
Activate binary mode and copy the configuration file from the
workstation to the switch. The configuration file must be named
"configdata".
ftp>bin
ftp>put configdata
d.
Close the FTP session.
ftp>quit
e.
Establish communications with the switch using Telnet. Enter one of
the following on the command line:
telnet xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
or
telnet switchname
where xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is the switch IP address and switchname is the
switch name associated with the IP address.
f.
A Telnet window opens prompting you for a login. Enter an account
name and password. The default account name and password are
(admin, password).
g.
Open an admin session to acquire the necessary authority.
cli $>admin start
h.
Restore the configuration file.
cli (admin) $>config restore
i.
Reset the switch and close the Telnet session.
cli (admin) $>reset
5-4
59021-04 C
Q
5 – Diagnostics/Troubleshooting
POST Diagnostics
5.1.2
Logged-In LED Indications
Port diagnostics are indicated by the Logged-In LED for each port as shown in
Figure 5-1.
Logged-In LED
Figure 5-1. Port Logged-In LED
The Logged-In LED has three indications:
■
Logged in - Continuous illumination.
■
Logging in - Flashes at roughly once per second as shown in Figure 5-2.
■
Error - Flashes at roughly twice per second as shown in Figure 5-2.
1 second
Logging In
Error
Figure 5-2. Logged-In LED Indications
If a Logged-In LED shows an error indication, review the alarm log for messages
regarding the affected port. You can inspect the alarm log using the Alarm data
tab in SANbox Manager faceplate display or the Show Alarm command. Pertinent
alarm log messages will point to one or more of the following conditions:
59021-04 C
■
E_Port isolation
■
Excessive port errors
5-5
Q
5 – Diagnostics/Troubleshooting
POST Diagnostics
5.1.2.1
E_Port Isolation
A Logged-In LED error indication is often the result of E_Port isolation. An isolated
E_Port is indicated by a red link in the SANbox Manager topology display. E_Port
isolation can be caused by conflicting domain IDs, conflicting timeout values, or
conflicting zone membership between active zone sets. Refer to the
SANbox2-8c/16 Switch Management User’s Guide for information about how to
change domain IDs, timeout values, and edit zoning.
Review the alarm log and do the following to diagnose and correct an isolated
E_Port:
1.
2.
3.
Display the fabric domain IDs using the Show Domains command or the
Switch data tab in the SANbox Manager topology display. Are all domain IDs
in the fabric unique?
■
Yes - Continue.
■
No - Correct the domain IDs on the offending switches using the Set
Config Switch command or the SANbox Manager Switch Properties
window.
Compare the RA_TOV, ED_TOV, RT_TOV timeout values for all switches in
the fabric using the Show Config Switch command or the Switch data tab of
the SANbox Manager topology display. Is each timeout value the same on
every switch?
■
Yes - Continue.
■
No - Correct the timeout values on the offending switches using the
Set Config Switch command or the SANbox Manager Switch
Properties window. Reset the port. If the condition remains, continue.
Display the active zone set on each switch using the Zoning Active
command or the Active Zoneset tab of the SANbox Manager topology
display. Compare the zone membership between the two active zone sets.
Are they the same?
■
Yes - Contact your authorized maintenance provider.
■
No - Deactivate one of the active zone sets or edit the conflicting zones
so that their membership is the same. Reset the port. If the condition
remains, contact your authorized maintenance provider.
Note:
5-6
This can be caused by merging two fabrics whose active
zone sets have two zones with the same name, but
different membership.
59021-04 C
Q
5 – Diagnostics/Troubleshooting
POST Diagnostics
5.1.2.2
Excessive Port Errors
The switch monitors a set of port errors and generates alarms based on
user-defined sample intervals and thresholds. Refer to the SANbox2-8c/16 Switch
Management User’s Guide for information about managing alarms. These port
errors include the following:
■
CRC errors
■
Decode errors
■
ISL connection count
■
Login errors
■
Logout errors
■
Loss-of-signal errors
If the count for any of these errors remains above the rising threshold for three
consecutive sample intervals, the switch generates an alarm and disables the
affected port, changing its operational state to “down”. Port errors can be caused
by the following:
■
Thresholds are too low or the sample interval is too small
■
Faulty Fibre Channel port cable
■
Faulty SFP
■
Faulty port
■
Faulty device or HBA
Review the alarm log to determine if excessive port errors are responsible for
disabling the port. Look for a message that mentions one of the monitored error
types indicating that the port has been disabled, then do the following:
1.
59021-04 C
Examine the alarm configuration for the associated error using the Show
Config Threshold command or the SANbox Manager application. Refer to
the ”Show Config Command” on page B-54. Refer to Table B-4 for a list of
the alarm configuration defaults. Are the thresholds and sample interval
correct?
■
Yes - Continue
■
No - Correct the alarm configuration. If the condition remains, continue.
5-7
Q
5 – Diagnostics/Troubleshooting
POST Diagnostics
2.
3.
4.
5-8
Reset the port, then perform an external port loopback test to validate the
port and the SFP. Refer to the ”Test Command” on page B-65 or the
SANbox2-8c/16 Switch Management User’s Guide for information about
testing ports. Does the port pass the test?
■
Yes - Continue
■
No - Replace the SFP and repeat the test. If the port does not pass the
test, contact your authorized maintenance provider. Otherwise
continue.
Replace the Fibre Channel port cable. Is the problem corrected?
■
Yes - Complete.
■
No - Continue.
Inspect the device to which the affected port is connected and confirm that
the device and its HBA are working properly. Make repairs and corrections
as needed. If the condition remains, contact your authorized maintenance
provider.
59021-04 C
Q
5 – Diagnostics/Troubleshooting
Chassis Diagnostics
5.2
Chassis Diagnostics
Chassis diagnostics are indicated by the chassis and power supply LEDs as
shown in Figure 5-3.
Chassis Over
Temperature LED
Output Power LED
Fan Fail LED
Power Supply Over
Temperature LED
Input Power LED
Figure 5-3. Chassis and Power Supply LEDs
The following conditions are described:
■
Chassis Over Temperature LED is illuminated
■
Input Power LED is extinguished
■
Fan Fail LED is illuminated
■
Output Power LED is extinguished
■
Power supply Over Temperature LED is illuminated
Note:
59021-04 C
The chassis and power supply Over Temperature LEDs are different.
The chassis LED indicates an over temperature condition in the switch
logic circuitry; the power supply LED indicates an over temperature
condition in the power supply.
5-9
5 – Diagnostics/Troubleshooting
Chassis Diagnostics
Q
5.2.1
Chassis Over Temperature LED is Illuminated
The chassis Over Temperature LED illuminates to indicate that the switch logic
circuitry is overheating. If the chassis Over Temperature LED illuminates, do the
following:
1.
2.
Inspect the chassis fans. Are the intake openings clear? Are both fans
operating and producing air flow?
■
Yes - Continue.
■
No - Remove any debris from fan intakes and exhausts if necessary.
Replace any fan that is not operating. Refer to
Section 6 Removal/Replacement. If the condition remains, continue.
Consider the ambient air temperature near the switch. Make necessary
corrections. If the condition remains, shut down the switch immediately and
contact your authorized maintenance provider.
5.2.2
Input Power LED Is Extinguished
The Input Power LED illuminates to indicate that the switch logic circuitry is
receiving proper voltages. If the Input Power LED is extinguished, inspect the
Output Power LED. Is the Output Power LED illuminated?
■
Yes - Contact your authorized maintenance provider.
■
No - Refer to ”Output Power LED Is Extinguished” on page 5-11.
5.2.3
Fan Fail LED is Illuminated
The Fan Fail LED illuminates to indicate a malfunction with one or both of the
chassis fans. If the Fan Fail LED illuminates, do the following:
1.
Inspect the chassis fan connections. Remove and reinstall the chassis fan.
Refer to Section 6 Removal/Replacement. If the condition remains,
continue.
2.
Are both fans operating and producing equal air flow?
■
Yes - Contact your authorized maintenance provider.
■
No - Replace the weaker chassis fan. Refer to
Section 6 Removal/Replacement. If the condition remains, contact
your authorized maintenance provider.
Note:
5-10
Removing a fan will not illuminate the Fan Fail LED.
59021-04 C
Q
5 – Diagnostics/Troubleshooting
Chassis Diagnostics
5.2.4
Output Power LED Is Extinguished
The Output Power LED illuminates to indicate that the power supply is producing
the proper voltages. If the Output Power LED is extinguished, do the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Inspect the power supply Over Temperature LED. Is the power supply Over
Temperature LED illuminated?
■
Yes - Refer to ”Power Supply Over Temperature LED is Illuminated” on
page 5-11.
■
No - Continue.
Inspect the power cables and connectors. Are the cables unplugged? Are
the cables or connectors damaged?
■
Yes - Make necessary corrections or repairs. If the condition remains,
continue.
■
No - Continue.
Inspect the power source. Is the power source delivering the proper voltage?
■
Yes - Continue
■
No - Make necessary repairs. If the condition remains, continue.
Replace the power supply. Refer to Section 6 Removal/Replacement. If the
condition remains, contact your authorized maintenance provider.
5.2.5
Power Supply Over Temperature LED is Illuminated
The power supply Over Temperature LED illuminates to indicate that the power
supply is overheating. If the power supply Over Temperature LED illuminates, do
the following:
1.
59021-04 C
Inspect the chassis fans. Are the intake openings clear? Are both fans
operating and producing air flow?
■
Yes - Continue.
■
No - Remove any debris from fan intakes if necessary. Replace any
fan that is not operating. Refer to Section 6 Removal/Replacement. If
the condition remains, continue.
2.
Consider the ambient air temperature near the switch and clearance around
the switch. Make necessary corrections. If the condition remains, continue.
3.
Replace the power supply. Refer to Section 6 Removal/Replacement. If the
condition remains, contact your authorized maintenance provider.
5-11
5 – Diagnostics/Troubleshooting
Recovering a Switch
Q
5.3
Recovering a Switch
A switch can become inoperable or unavailable for the following reasons:
■
Firmware becomes corrupt
■
IP address is lost
■
Switch configuration becomes corrupt
■
Forgotten password
In these specific cases, you can recover the switch using force PROM mode.
Force PROM mode temporarily returns the switch IP address to 10.0.0.1 and
provides opportunities to do the following:
■
Unpack a firmware image file
■
Restore the network configuration parameters to the default values
■
Remove all user accounts and restore the Admin account name password to
the default.
■
Copy the log file
■
Restore factory defaults for all but user accounts and zoning
■
Restore all switch configuration parameters to the factory default values
■
Reset the switch
To recover a switch, do the following:
1.
Place the switch in force PROM mode. Do the following:
a.
Power down the switch.
b.
Press and hold the Force PROM button with a pointed tool, then power
up the switch. All chassis LEDs will illuminate, then extinguish leaving
only the Input Power LED illuminated. Release the button.
2.
Allow one minute for the switch to complete its tests. When the switch is in
force PROM mode, the Input LED will be illuminated and the Heartbeat LED
will illuminate continuously. All other chassis LEDs will be extinguished.
3.
Establish a Telnet session with the switch using the force PROM mode IP
address 10.0.0.1.
4.
Enter the force PROM mode account name and password (prom, prom),
and press the Enter key.
Sanbox login: prom
Password:xxxx
[[email protected]:Itasca]% telnet 10.0.0.1
Trying 10.0.0.1...
Connected to 10.0.0.1.
Escape character is '^]'.
5-12
59021-04 C
Q
5 – Diagnostics/Troubleshooting
Recovering a Switch
5.
The force PROM menu displays several recovery options. To select a switch
recovery option, press the corresponding number (displayed in option: field)
on the keyboard and press the Enter key.
0) Exit
1) Image Unpack
2) Reset Network Config
3) Reset Password File
4) Copy Log Files
5) Remove Switch Config
6) Remake Filesystem
7) Reset Switch
Option:
These options and their use are described in the following sections.
5.3.1
Force PROM – Exit
This option closes the current login session. To log in again, enter the force PROM
mode account name and password (prom, prom).
5.3.2
Force PROM – Image Unpack
This option unpacks and installs new firmware when the current firmware has
become corrupt. Before using this option, you must load the new firmware image
file onto the switch. The steps to install new firmware using this option are as
follows:
1.
Place the switch in force PROM mode. Refer to the procedure for force
PROM mode in ”Recovering a Switch” on page 5-12.
2.
Use FTP to load a new firmware image file onto the switch. Refer to ”Using
FTP and the CLI to Install Firmware” on page 4-17. Do not unpack the
firmware image file with the Image command.
3.
Select option 1 from the force PROM menu. When prompted for a file name
prompt, enter the firmware image file name.
Image filename: filename
Unpacking ’filename’, please wait...
Unpackage successful.
4.
59021-04 C
Select option 7 to reset the switch and exit force PROM mode.
5-13
Q
5 – Diagnostics/Troubleshooting
Recovering a Switch
5.3.3
Force PROM – Reset Network Config
This option resets the network properties to the factory default values and saves
them on the switch. Refer to Table B-6 for the default network configuration
values.
5.3.4
Force PROM – Reset Password File
This option restores the password for the Admin account name to the default
(password) and removes all other user accounts from the switch.
5.3.5
Force PROM – Copy Log Files
This option copies all log file buffers to a file.
5.3.6
Force PROM – Remove Switch Config
This option deletes all configurations from the switch except for the default
configuration. This restores switch configuration parameters to the factory defaults
except for user accounts and zoning. Refer to Table B-2 though Table B-6 for the
factory default values.
5.3.7
Force PROM – Remake Filesystem
In the event of sudden loss of power, it is possible that the switch configuration
may become corrupt. The file system on which the configuration is stored must be
re-created. This option resets the switch to the factory default values including
user accounts and zoning. Refer to Table B-2 though Table B-6 for the factory
default values.
CAUTION!
If you choose the Remake Filesystem option, you will lose all
changes made to the fabric configuration that involve that switch,
such as password and zoning changes. You must then
reconfigure the portions of the fabric that involve the switch.
5.3.8
Force PROM – Reset Switch
This option closes the Telnet session, exits force PROM mode and reboots the
switch using the current switch configuration. All unpacked firmware image files
that reside on the switch are deleted.
5-14
59021-04 C
Section 6
Removal/Replacement
This section describes the removal and replacement procedures for the following
field replaceable units (FRU):
■
SFP transceivers
■
Power supplies
■
Fans
The switch is equipped with a battery that powers the non-volatile memory. This
memory stores the switch configuration. The battery is not a field replaceable unit.
WARNING!!
Danger of explosion if battery is incorrectly replaced. Replace
only with the same or equivalent type recommended by the
manufacturer. Dispose of the used battery according to the
manufacturer’s instructions.
WARNUNG!!
Bei unsachgemäß ausgetauschter Batterie besteht
Explosionsgefahr. Die Batterie nur mit der gleichen Batterie oder
mit einem äquivalenten, vom Hersteller empfohlenen Batterietyp
ersetzen. Die gebrauchte Batterie gemäß den
Herstelleranweisungen entsorgen.
AVERTISSEMENT!!
Danger d’explosion si le remplacement de la pile est incorrect.
Ne remplacer que par une pile de type identique ou équivalent
recommandé par le fabricant. Jeter la pile usagée en observant
les instructions du fabricant.
59021-04 C
6-1
Q
6 – Removal/Replacement
SFP Transceivers
6.1
SFP Transceivers
The SFP transceivers can be removed and replaced while the switch is operating
without damaging the switch or the transceiver. However, transmission on the
affected port will be interrupted until the transceiver installed.
To remove a transceiver, gently press the transceiver into the port to release the
tension, then pull on the release tab or lever and remove the transceiver. Different
transceiver manufacturers have different release mechanisms. Consult the
documentation for your transceiver. To install, insert the transceiver into the port
and gently press until it snaps in place as shown in Figure 6-1.
Note:
The SFP transceiver will fit only one way. If the SFP does not install
under gentle pressure, flip it over and try again.
Figure 6-1. SFP Transceiver Installation
6-2
59021-04 C
Q
6 – Removal/Replacement
Power Supplies
6.2
Power Supplies
The power supplies are hot pluggable. This means you can remove or install one
of the power supplies while the switch is operating without disrupting service. The
power supplies are also interchangeable; that is, the left and right power supplies
are the same unit.
To remove the power supply, grasp the power supply latch handle and pull firmly
to release the latches and disengage the modular connector. Slide the power
supply out of its bay as shown in Figure 6-2.
To install a power supply, slide the power supply into the bay with the latch handle
on top. Press the power supply firmly into place until it is fully seated, then push
the latch handle in against the power supply to engage the latches.
Latch Handle
Figure 6-2. Power Supply Removal
59021-04 C
6-3
Q
6 – Removal/Replacement
Fans
6.3
Fans
The fans are hot pluggable. This means you can remove or install one of the fans
while the switch is operating without disrupting service. The fan is completely
enclosed, so there is no risk of injury from the fan blades. The fans are also
interchangeable; that is, the left and right fans are the same unit.
To remove a fan, loosen the two retaining screws, then grasp the fan housing and
pull firmly to disengage the modular connector. Slide the fan out of its bay as
shown in Figure 6-2.
Figure 6-3. Fan Removal
When replacing a fan, consider the following:
■
The left and right fans are interchangeable. However, you must orient the
fan so that the modular connector aligns with the mating connector in the
switch as shown in Figure 6-4.
■
Replacement fans must be compatible with the switch air flow direction. Air
flow direction for switch model SB2A-16A is front-to-back; air flow direction
for switch model SB2A-16B is back-to-front.
■
A label on the fan indicates the switch model number and fan air flow
direction as shown in Figure 6-4.
CAUTION!
6-4
Both fans must have the same air flow direction to prevent the
switch from overheating.
59021-04 C
Q
6 – Removal/Replacement
Fans
To install a fan, do the following:
1.
Confirm that the new fan is compatible with the switch air flow direction.
2.
Align the modular connector toward the inside of the switch as shown in
Figure 6-4.
3.
Slide the fan into the bay until it is firmly seated and confirm that the air flow
is correct. Fasten the screws.
Modular
Connector
Part Number
Label
Figure 6-4. Fan Installation for Switch Model SB2A-16B
59021-04 C
6-5
6 – Removal/Replacement
Fans
Q
Notes
6-6
59021-04 C
Appendix A
Specifications
Appendix A contains the specifications for the SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel switch.
Refer to Section 2 General Description for the location of all connections,
switches, controls, and components.
A.1
Switch Specifications
Fibre Channel Protocols ................. FC-PH Rev. 4.3
FC-PH-2
FC-PH-3
FC-AL Rev 4.5
FC-AL-2 Rev 7.0
FC-FLA
FC-GS-3
FC-FG
FC-PLDA
FC-Tape
FC-VI
FC-SW-2
Fibre Channel Element MIB RFC 2837
Fibre Alliance MIB Version 3.0
Fibre Channel Classes of Service .. Classes 2 and 3
Modes of Operation ........................ Fibre Channel Classes 2 and 3,
connectionless
Port Types....................................... F_Port
FL_Port
TL_Port
E_Port
G_Port
GL_Port
Port Characteristics ........................ All ports are auto-discovering and
self-configuring.
Number of Fibre Channel Ports ...... 16 ports per chassis
Scalability........................................ Maximum 239 switches depending on
configuration
59021-04 C
A-1
A – Specifications
Switch Maintainability
Q
Maximum User Ports ...................... > 475,000 ports depending on
configuration
Buffer Credits.................................. 12 buffer credits per port
Media Type ..................................... Small Form Pluggable (SFP) optical
transceivers. Hot swappable. 3.3 Volts.
Fabric Port Speed ........................... 1.0625 or 2.125 Gigabits/second
Maximum Frame Size..................... 2148 bytes (2112 byte payload)
System Processor........................... 266 MHz Pentium® processor
Fabric Latency (best case) ............. <0.5 µsec.
Fabric Point-to-Point Bandwidth ..... 212 or 424 MB/s full duplex
Fabric Aggregate Bandwidth .......... 64 Gb/s for a single switch
A.2
Switch Maintainability
Maintenance Strategy ..................... Field Replaceable Units
SFP transceivers
Power supplies
Fans
Diagnostics ..................................... Power On Self Test (POST) tests all
functional components except SFP
transceivers.
User Interface ................................. LED indicators
A-2
59021-04 C
Q
A – Specifications
Fabric Management
A.3
Fabric Management
Management Methods .................... SANbox Manager application
Command Line Interface
GS-3 Management Server
SNMP
FTP
Maintenance Connection ................ RS-232 connector; null modem F/F DB9
cable
Ethernet Connection ....................... RJ-45 connector; 10/100BASE T cable
Switch Agent................................... Allows a network management station to
obtain configuration values, traffic
information, and failure data pertaining to
the Fibre Channels via SNMP through the
Ethernet interface.
A.4
Switch Dimensions
Width............................................... 17.0” (19 inch rack mount)
Height ............................................. 1.75”
Depth .............................................. 18.0”
Weight............................................. 18 lbs
A.5
Switch Electrical
Power source loading ..................... 1.9 Amps maximum at 90 to 137 Vac
0.95 Amps maximum at 180 to 265 Vac
Heat Output (maximum) ................. 170 watts
Operating voltage ........................... 90 to 137 Vac; 47 to 63 Hz
180 to 265 Vac; 47 to 63 Hz
Circuit Protection ............................ Internally fused
59021-04 C
A-3
A – Specifications
Switch Environmental
Q
A.6
Switch Environmental
Temperature
■ Operating .................................. 10 to 40°C (50 to 104°F)
■ Non-operating ........................... -40 to 65°C (-40 to 149°F)
Humidity
■ Operating .................................. 25% to 80%, non-condensing
■ Non-operating ........................... 25% to 90%, non-condensing
Altitude
■ Operating .................................. 0 to 3048m (0 to 10,000 feet)
■ Non-operating ........................... 0 to 15,240m (0 to 50,000 feet)
Vibration
Magnitude during/after along any axis
■ Operating .................................. 2.54 mm (.1); 5 - 14 Hz
0.1G; 14-300 Hz
■ Non-operating ........................... 5 - 500 Hz, random
2.09 G rms, 10 minutes
Shock
Magnitude during/after along any axis
■ Operating .................................. 1 g for 15 msec
■ Non-operating ........................... 8 g for 15 msec
Air flow ............................................ Two fans; front-to-back or back-to-front
depending on the switch model
A.7
Switch Regulatory Certifications
Safety Standards ............................ UL1950,CSA 22.2 No. 950,EN60950
Emissions Standards ...................... FCC Part 15B Class A
VCCI Class A ITE
BSMI Class A
CISPR 22, Class A
EN 55022, Class A
Voltage Fluctuations ....................... EN 61000-3-3
Harmonics....................................... EN 61000-3-2
Immunity ......................................... EN 55024:1998
Marking ........................................... FCC Part 15,UL (United States), cUL
(Canada), TUV, VCCI, BSMI, CE
A-4
59021-04 C
Q
A – Specifications
Shortwave Laser SFP 1G/2G (multi-mode)
A.8
Shortwave Laser SFP 1G/2G (multi-mode)
Connector ....................................... Duplex LC
Color coding.................................... Beige or black exposed connector
surfaces
Cable .............................................. Fibre Channel 100-M6-SN-I (50 µm
multimode)
Fibre Channel 200-M5-SN-I or
200-M6-SN-I (62.5 µm multimode)
Wavelength..................................... 830 - 860 nm
Transmit Power............................... -10 dBm minimum
Receiver Sensitivity ........................ -16 dBm average
Distance.......................................... 500 meters maximum using 50 micron
fiber
300 meters maximum using 62.5 micron
fiber
Safety.............................................. DHHS 21 CFR(J), IEC 825-1
CENELEC EN 60825-1, VDE
Standard ......................................... Small Form-Factor Pluggable Multisource
Agreement
59021-04 C
A-5
A – Specifications
Longwave Laser SFP 1G/2G (single-mode)
Q
A.9
Longwave Laser SFP 1G/2G (single-mode)
Connector ....................................... Duplex LC
Color coding.................................... Blue exposed connector surfaces
Cable .............................................. Fibre Channel 100SM-LC-L (9 µm single
mode)
Wavelength..................................... 1270 - 13.5 nm
Transmit Power............................... -10 dBm minimum
Receiver Sensitivity ........................ -20 dBm average
Distance.......................................... 2 meters to 10 kilometers
Safety.............................................. DHHS 21 CFR(J), IEC 825-1
CENELEC EN 60825-1, VDE
Standard ......................................... Small Form-Factor Pluggable Multisource
Agreement
A-6
59021-04 C
Appendix B
Command Line Interface
Each switch contains a Telnet server. This server allows a Telnet client to establish
a Telnet session with the switch to retrieve information or to configure parameters
using the Command Line Interface (CLI). The CLI enables you to perform a
variety of fabric and switch management tasks through an Ethernet or a serial port
connection.
B.1
Logging On to a Switch
To log on to a switch using Telnet, open a command line window on the
management workstation and enter the Telnet command followed by the switch IP
address:
/> telnet 123.45.67.890
A Telnet window opens prompting you for a login. Enter an account name and
password. Switches come from the factory with the following user account already
defined:
Account name: admin
Password: password
Authority: Admin
This user account provides full access to the switch and its configuration. After
planning your fabric management needs and creating your own user accounts,
consider changing the password for this account. Refer to ”Commands” on
page B-3 for more information about authority levels. Refer to the ”User
Command” on page B-69 for information about creating user accounts.
Note:
59021-04 C
A switch supports a combined maximum of 15 logins. This includes
SANbox Manager inband and out-of-band logins, Telnet out-of-band
logins, and SNMP out-of-band logins. Of this 15, there can be a
maximum of 10 SANbox Manager logins. Additional logins will be
refused.
B-1
B – Command Line Interface
Command Syntax
Q
B.2
Command Syntax
The command syntax is as follows:
command
keyword
keyword [value]
keyword [value1] [value2]
The Command is followed by one or more keywords. Consider the following rules
and conventions:
B-2
■
Commands and keywords are lowercase and case sensitive.
■
Commands with keywords require one of those keywords.
■
Required keyword values appear in standard font: [value]. Optional values
are shown in italics: [value].
■
Underlined portions of the keyword in the command format indicate the
abbreviated form that can be used. For example the Delete keyword can be
abbreviated Del.
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Commands
B.3
Commands
The command set provides for User and Admin authority levels.
■
User authority grants viewing access to the fabric and switches using the
Show command and other read-only commands.
■
Admin authority includes the User authority and grants permission to use the
Admin command. The Admin Start command opens an admin session which
provides access to the commands that change switch and fabric
configurations. Refer to the ”Admin Command” on page B-4.
Note:
Admin authority is enforced only if fabric security is enabled. By
default, fabric security is disabled. Refer to ”Set Setup Command” on
page B-37 (System keyword) for more about setting fabric security.
The commands and their page numbers are listed by authority level in Table B-1.
Table B-1 Commands Listed by Authority Level
User Authority Commands
Help
History
Ps
Quit
Show
Show Config
Show Log
Show Perf
Show Setup
Uptime
Whoami
1
59021-04 C
(B-11)
(B-12)
(B-16)
(B-17)
(B-41)
(B-54)
(B-57)
(B-59)
(B-61)
(B-68)
(B-71)
Admin Authority Command
Admin
(B-4)
Admin Session Commands
Alias1
Config1
Date1
Fallback
Image
Lip
Passwd
Reset
Set1
Set Config
Set Log
Set Port
Set Setup
Shutdown
Test
User1
Zone1
Zoneset1
Zoning1
(B-5)
(B-7)
(B-9)
(B-10)
(B-13)
(B-14)
(B-15)
(B-18)
(B-23)
(B-25)
(B-33)
(B-36)
(B-37)
(B-64)
(B-65)
(B-69)
(B-72)
(B-76)
(B-79)
Some keywords are available with User authority.
B-3
B – Command Line Interface
Admin Command
Q
Admin Command
Opens and closes an Admin session. The Admin session provides commands
that change the fabric and switch configurations. Only one Admin session can be
open on the switch at any time. An inactive Admin session will time out after a
period of time which can be changed using the Set Setup System command.
Refer to the Set Setup Command on page B-37.
Authority
Admin
Syntax
admin
start
end
cancel
Keywords
start
Opens the admin session.
end
Closes the admin session. The Logout, Shutdown, and Reset Switch commands
will also end an admin session.
cancel
Terminates an Admin session opened by another user. Use this keyword with care
because it terminates the Admin session without warning the other user and
without saving pending changes.
Notes
Closing a Telnet window during an admin session does not release the session. In
this case, you must either wait for the admin session to time out, or use the Admin
Cancel command.
Examples
The following example shows how to open and close an Admin session:
SANbox2 #> admin start
SANbox2
(admin) #>
.
.
.
B-4
SANbox2
(admin) #> admin end
SANbox2
#>
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Alias Command
Alias Command
Creates a named set of ports. Aliases make it easier to assign a set of ports to
many zones. An alias can not have a zone or another alias as a member.
Authority
Admin
Syntax
alias
add [alias] [members]
copy [alias_source] [alias_destination]
create [alias]
delete [alias]
list
members [alias]
remove [alias] [members]
rename [alias_old] [alias_new]
Keywords
add [alias] [members]
Specifies one or more ports given by [members] to add to the alias named [alias].
An alias can have a maximum of 2000 members. [members] can have one of the
following formats:
■
Domain ID and port number pair (Domain ID, Port Number). Domain IDs and
port numbers are in decimal. Ports are numbered beginning with 0.
■
6-character hexadecimal device Fibre Channel address (hex)
■
16-character hexadecimal worldwide port name (WWPN) with the format
xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx.
The application verifies that the [alias] format is correct, but does not validate that
such a port exists.
copy [alias_source] [alias_destination]
Creates a new alias named [alias_destination] and copies the membership into it
from the alias given by [alias_source].
create [alias]
Creates an alias with the name given by [alias]. An alias name must begin with a
letter and be no longer than 64 characters. Valid characters are 0-9, A-Z, a-z, &, _,
and -. The zoning database supports a maximum of 256 aliases.
delete [alias]
Deletes the specified alias given by [alias] from the zoning database. If the alias is
a member of the active zone set, the alias will not be removed from the active
zone set until the active zone set is deactivated.
list
Displays a list of all aliases. This keyword is valid for User authority and does not
require a zoning edit session or an admin session.
59021-04 C
B-5
B – Command Line Interface
Alias Command
Q
members [alias]
Displays all members of the alias given by [alias]. This keyword is available with
User authority and does not require a zoning edit session or an admin session.
remove [alias] [members]
Removes the ports given by [members] from the alias given by [alias]. [members]
can have one of the following formats:
■
Domain ID and port number pair (Domain ID, Port Number). Domain IDs and
port numbers are in decimal. Ports are numbered beginning with 0.
■
6-character hexadecimal device Fibre Channel address (hex)
■
16-character hexadecimal worldwide port name (WWPN) for the device with
the format xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx.
rename [alias_old] [alias_new]
Renames the alias given by [alias_old] to the alias given by [alias_new].
B-6
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Config Command
Config Command
Manages the Fibre Channel configurations on a switch. For information about
setting the port and switch configurations, refer to the Set Config Command on
page B-25.
Authority
Admin for all keywords except List
Syntax
config
activate [config]
backup
cancel
copy [config_source] [config_destination]
delete [config]
edit [config]
list
restore
save [config]
Keywords
activate [config]
Activates the configuration given by [config]. If you omit the configuration, the
currently active configuration is used. Only one configuration can be active at a
time.
backup
Creates a file named configdata, which contains the system configuration
information. To download this file, open an FTP session, log in with account
name/password of “images” for both, and type “get configdata”.
cancel
Terminates the current configuration edit session without saving changes that
were made.
copy [config_source] [config_destination]
Copies the configuration given by [config_source] to the configuration given by
[config_destination]. The switch supports up to 10 configurations including the
default configuration.
delete [config]
Deletes the specified configuration file where [config] is a file name.
edit [config]
Opens an edit session for the configuration given by [config]. If you omit the
configuration name, the currently active configuration is used.
list
Displays a list of all available configurations. This keyword is available with User
authority.
59021-04 C
B-7
B – Command Line Interface
Config Command
Q
restore
Restores configuration settings to an out-of-band switch from a backup file named
configdata, which must be first uploaded on the switch using FTP. You create the
backup file using the Config Backup command. Use FTP to load the backup file
on a switch, then enter the Config Restore command.
save [config]
Saves changes made during a configuration edit session in the configuration
given by [config]. If you omit the configuration name value, the configuration you
chose for the Config Edit command is used. The switch supports up to 10
configurations including the default configuration.
Notes
If you edit the active configuration, changes will be held in suspense until you
reactivate the configuration or activate another configuration.
Examples
The following shows an example of how to open and close a Config Edit session:
SANbox2 #> admin start
SANbox2 (admin) #> config edit
.
.
.
SANbox2 (admin-config) #> config cancel
Configuration mode will be canceled.Please confirm (y/n): [n] y
SANbox2 (admin) #> admin end
B-8
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Date Command
Date Command
This command displays or sets the system date and time. To set the date and time
the information string must be provided in this format: MMDDhhmmCCYY. You
must reset the switch for the new date to take effect.
Authority
Admin to change the date; User to display the date.
Syntax
date
[MMDDhhmmCCYY]
Keywords
[MMDDhhmmCCYY]
Specifies the date – this requires an admin session. If you omit
[MMDDhhmmCCYY], the current date is displayed – this is available with User
authority.
Examples
The following is an example of the Date command:
SANbox2 #> date
Tue Nov 12 07:51:24 2002
59021-04 C
B-9
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Fallback Command
Fallback Command
Loads the fallback version of the firmware from switch memory. The switch stores
two versions of the firmware. This command alternately activates the two
versions.
Authority
Admin
Syntax
Notes
fallback
Examples
■
The Show Switch command displays the available firmware versions and
the currently active version.
■
After executing the Fallback command, reset the switch for the firmware to
be placed in effect.
The following is an example of the Fallback command:
SANbox2 #> admin start
SANbox2 (admin) #> fallback
Reverting to previous software image.
Please confirm (y/n): [n] y
SANbox2 #> admin end
B-10
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Help Command
Help Command
Displays a brief description of the specified command and its keywords.
Authority
User
Syntax
Keywords
help [command] [keyword]
[command]
A command name. If you omit this value, the system displays all available
commands from which to choose.
[keyword]
A keyword associated with the command named by [command]. If you omit this
value, the system displays the available keywords for the specified command.
all
Displays a list of all available commands (including command variations).
Examples
The following is an example of the Help Set command:
SANbox2 #> help set
set SET_OPTIONS
There are many attributes that can be set.
Type help with one of the following to get more information:
set alarm
set beacon
set blade
set config blade
set config port
set config ports
set config switch
set config threshold
set config zoning
set log
set pagebreak
set port
set setup snmp
set setup system
set switch
The following is an example of the Help Set Beacon command:
SANbox2 #> help set beacon
set beacon On | Off
This command allows the lights on the front of the switch to flash.
The On option will start and the Off option will stop the flashing.
59021-04 C
B-11
B – Command Line Interface
History Command
Q
History Command
Displays a numbered list of the previously entered commands from which you can
re-execute selected commands.
Authority
User
Syntax
Notes
history
Examples
Use the History command to provide context for the ! command:
■
Enter ![command] to re-enter the most recent execution of that command.
■
Enter ![line number] to re-execute the corresponding command from the
History display
■
Enter ![partial command string] to re-execute a command that matches the
command string.
■
Enter !! to re-execute the most recent command.
The following is an example of the History command:
SANbox2 #> history
1 show switch
2 date
3 help set
4 history
SANbox2 #> !3
help set
set SET_OPTIONS
There are many attributes that can be set.
Type help with one of the following to get more information:
set alarm
set beacon
set blade
set config blade
set config port
set config ports
set config switch
set config threshold
set config zoning
set log
set pagebreak
set port
set setup snmp
set setup system
set switch
B-12
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Image Command
Image Command
Manages and installs switch firmware.
Authority
Admin
Syntax
image
cleanup
fetch [account_name] [ip_address] [file_source] [file_destination]
list
unpack [file]
Keywords
cleanup
Removes all firmware image files from the switch. All firmware image files are
removed automatically each time the switch is reset.
fetch [account_name] [ip_address] [file_source] [file_destination]
Retrieves image file given by [file_source] and stores it on the switch with the file
name given by [file_destination]. The image file is retrieved from the device with
the IP address given by [ip_address] and an account name given by
[account_name]. If an account name needs a password to access the device, the
system will prompt you for it.
list
Displays the list of image files that reside on the switch.
unpack [file]
Installs the firmware file given by [file]. After unpacking the file, a message
appears confirming successful unpacking. The switch must be reset for the new
firmware to take effect.
59021-04 C
B-13
B – Command Line Interface
Lip Command
Q
Lip Command
Reinitializes the specified loop port.
Authority
Admin
Syntax
Keywords
lip [port_number]
Examples
The following is an example of the Lip command:
[port_number]
The number of the port to be reinitialized.
SANbox2
B-14
(admin) #> lip 2
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Passwd Command
Passwd Command
Changes a user account’s password.
Authority
Admin to change another account’s password; User to change your own.
Syntax
Keywords
passwd [account_name]
Examples
The following is an example of the Passwd command:
[account_name]
The user account name. You must open an admin session to change the
password for an account name other than your own. If you omit [account_name],
you will be prompted to change the password for the current account name.
SANbox2
(admin) #> passwd user2
Press 'q' and the ENTER key to abort this command.
account OLD password
:
account NEW password (4-20 chars)
:
please confirm account NEW password:
password has been changed.
59021-04 C
B-15
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Ps Command
Ps Command
Displays current system process information.
Authority
User
Syntax
Examples
ps
The following is an example of the Ps command:
SANbox2 #> ps
PID
B-16
PPID %CPU
TIME
ELAPSED COMMAND
298
292
0.0 00:00:00 59:42
cns
299
292
0.0 00:00:00 59:42
ens
300
292
0.0 00:00:00 59:42
dlog
301
292
0.3 00:00:53 59:42
ds
302
292
0.2 00:00:29 59:42
mgmtApp
303
292
0.0 00:00:02 59:42
nserver
304
292
0.0 00:00:00 59:42
mserver
305
292
0.1 00:00:15 59:42
util
306
292
0.0 00:00:04 59:42
eport
307
292
1.2 00:02:53 59:41
PortApp
308
292
0.0 00:00:01 59:41
zoning
309
292
0.0 00:00:00 59:41
diagApp
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Quit Command
Quit Command
Closes the Telnet session.
Authority
User
Syntax
quit, exit, or logout
59021-04 C
B-17
B – Command Line Interface
Reset Command
Q
Reset Command
Resets the switch and port configuration parameters.
Authority
Admin
Syntax
reset
config [config_name]
factory
port [port_number]
snmp
switch (default)
system
zoning
Keywords
config [config_name]
Resets the configuration given by [config_name] to the factory default values for
switch, port, alarm threshold, and zoning configuration. This keyword clears all
zoning definitions. If [config_name] does not exist on the switch, a configuration
with that name will be created. If you omit [config_name], the active configuration
is reset. You must activate the configuration or reset the switch for the changes to
take effect. Refer to Table B-2 through Table B-4 for switch, port, and alarm
threshold configuration default values.
factory
Resets switch, alarm threshold, zoning, SNMP, zoning configuration, and system
configuration settings to the factory default values. The switch configuration is
activated automatically. Refer to Table B-2 through Table B-6.
port [port_number]
Reinitializes the port given by [port_number]. Ports are numbered beginning
with 0.
snmp
Resets the SNMP configuration settings to the factory default values. Refer to
Table B-5 for SNMP configuration default values.
switch
Reinitializes the switch. This is the default. This command also closes the Telnet
session.
system
Resets the system configuration settings to the factory default values. Refer to
Table B-6 for system configuration default values.
zoning
Clears the zoning database and deactivates the active zone set. The zoning
configuration values (autosave, default visibility) remain unchanged.
Notes
B-18
The following tables specify the various factory default settings:
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Reset Command
Table B-2. Switch Configuration Defaults
Parameter
Default
Admin State
Online
Broadcast Enable
True
InbandEnable
True
Domain ID
1
Domain ID Lock
False
Symbolic Name
SANbox2
R_T_TOV
100
R_A_TOV
10000
E_D_TOV
2000
FS_TOV
5000
DS_TOV
5000
Principal Priority
254
System Description
Undefined
Configuration Last Saved By
Initial
Configuration Last Saved On
Initial
Table B-3. Port Configuration Defaults
Parameter
59021-04 C
Default
Admin State
Online
Link Speed
Auto
Port Type
GL
TL_Port Mode
TLTargetMode
ISL Security
Any
Symbolic Name
Port
ALFairness
False
ARB_FF
False
InteropCredit
0
B-19
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Reset Command
Table B-3. Port Configuration Defaults (Continued)
Parameter
Default
ExtCredit
0
FanEnable
True
LCFEnable
False
MFSEnable
True
MFS_TOV
10
MSEnable
True
NoClose
False
IOStreamGuard
False
VIEnable
False
CheckAlps
False
Table B-4. Alarm Threshold Configuration Defaults
Parameter
B-20
Default
ThresholdMonitoringEnabled
False
CRCErrorsMonitoringEnabled
RisingTrigger
FallingTrigger
SampleWindow
True
25
1
10
DecodeErrorsMonitoringEnabled
RisingTrigger
FallingTrigger
SampleWindow
True
200
0
10
ISLMonitoringEnabled
RisingTrigger
FallingTrigger
SampleWindow
True
2
0
10
LoginMonitoringEnabled
RisingTrigger
FallingTrigger
SampleWindow
True
5
1
10
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Reset Command
Table B-4. Alarm Threshold Configuration Defaults (Continued)
Parameter
Default
LogoutMonitoringEnabled
RisingTrigger
FallingTrigger
SampleWindow
True
5
1
10
LOSMonitoringEnabled
RisingTrigger
FallingTrigger
SampleWindow
True
100
5
10
Table B-5. SNMP Configuration Defaults
Parameter
59021-04 C
Default
Contact
Undefined
Location
Undefined
Description
Undefined
Trap [1-5] Address
Trap 1: 10.0.0.254; Traps 2–5: 0.0.0.0
Trap [1-5] Port
Undefined
Trap [1-5] Severity
Warning
Trap [1-5] Enabled
False
ObjectID
1.3.6.1.4.1.1663.1.1.1.1.11
AuthFailureTrap
False
B-21
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Reset Command
Table B-6. System Configuration Defaults
Parameter
B-22
Default
Ethernet Network IP Address
10.0.0.1
Ethernet Network IP Mask
255.0.0.0
Ethernet Gateway Address
10.0.0.254
Ethernet Network Discovery
Static
Admin Timeout
30 minutes
Security Enabled
False
LocalLog Enabled
True
Remotelog Enabled
False
Remote Log Host IP Address
Undefined
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Set Command
Set Command
Sets a variety of switch and port parameters.
Authority
Admin for all keywords except Alarm Clear, Beacon, and Pagebreak which are
available with User authority.
Syntax
set
alarm clear
beacon [state]
config [option]
log [option]
pagebreak [state]
port [option]
setup [option]
switch [state]
Keywords
alarm clear
Clears the alarm log. This keyword is available with User authority.
beacon [state]
Enables or disables the flashing of the Port Status LEDs according to [state]. This
keyword is available with User authority. [state] can be one of the following:
on
Enables the flashing beacon.
off
Disables the flashing beacon.
config [option]
Sets port, switch, alarm threshold, and zoning configuration parameters. Refer to
the ”Set Config Command” on page B-25.
log [option]
Specifies the type of entries to be entered in the event log. Refer to the ”Set Log
Command” on page B-33.
pagebreak [state]
Specifies how much information is displayed on the screen at a time according to
the value given by [state]. This keyword is available with User authority. [state] can
be one of the following:
on
Limits the display of information to 20 lines at a time. The page break
functions affects the following commands: Alias (List, Members), Show
(Alarm, Log), Zone (List, Members), Zoneset (List, Zones), Zoning (Active,
List).
off
Allows continuous display of information without a break.
59021-04 C
B-23
B – Command Line Interface
Set Command
Q
port [option]
Sets port state and speed for the specified port temporarily until the next switch
reset or new configuration activation. Refer to the ”Set Port Command” on
page B-36.
setup [option]
Changes SNMP and system configuration settings. Refer to the ”Set Setup
Command” on page B-37.
switch [state]
Temporarily changes the administrative state for all ports on the switch to the state
given by [state]. The previous Set Config Switch settings are restored after a
switch reset or a reactivation of a switch configuration. [state] can be one of the
following:
online
Places all ports online
offline
Places all ports offline.
diagnostics
Prepares all ports for testing.
B-24
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Set Config Command
Set Config Command
Sets switch, port, alarm threshold, and zoning configuration parameters.
Authority
Admin authority and a Config Edit session
Syntax
set config
port [port_number]
ports [port_number]
switch
threshold
zoning
Keywords
port [port_number]
Initiates an edit session in which to change configuration parameters for the port
number given by [port_number]. If you omit [port_number], the system begins with
port 0 and proceeds in order through port 63. For each parameter, enter a new
value or press the Enter key to accept the current value shown in brackets. Enter
“q” to cancel the configuration for one port, or “qq” to cancel the configuration for
all ports. Table B-7 describes the port parameters.
ports [port_number]
Initiates an editing session in which to change configuration parameters for all
ports based on the configuration for the port given by [port_number]. If you omit
[port_number], port 0 is used. For each parameter, enter a new value or press the
Enter key to accept the current value shown in brackets. Enter “q” to cancel the
configuration. Table B-7 describes the port parameters.
Table B-7. Set Config Port Parameters
Parameter
59021-04 C
Description
AdminState
Port administrative state: online, offline,
diagnostics, or down.
LinkSpeed
1Gb/sec or 2 Gb/sec
PortType
Type of port
TLPortMode
Initiates the configuration of ports
attributes. Indicates whether using
initiator or target devices on the loop. If
you specify [port_number], the display
will present attributes for that port only;
otherwise, all attributes for all ports will
be available for configuration.
B-25
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Set Config Command
Table B-7. Set Config Port Parameters (Continued)
Parameter
B-26
Description
ISLSecurity
E_Port security. Determines which
switches a port will establish a link with.
■ Any - we will link with any switch.
■ Ours - we will only link to another
QLogic switch.
■ None - the port will not establish an
ISL link.
SymbolicPortName
Descriptive name
ALFairness
Default is switch that has priority
ARB_FF
Use ARB_FF instead of idles on loop
FCAL option
InteropCredit
Number of buffer-to-buffer credits per
port. 0 means the default (12) is
unchanged.
ExtCredit
Extended credit port
FANEnable
Fabric Address Notification. If enabled,
notifies logged-in NL_Ports of the
FL_Port address, port name, and node
name.
LCFEnable
Link control frame preference, R_CTL =
0xC
MFSEnable
Multi-Frame Sequence bundling
MFS_TOV
MFS limit for camp on
MSEnable
Management Server enable on this port
NoClose
Don't close unless another device
arbitrates
I/O Stream Guard
Enables or disables the suppression of
RSCN messages
VIEnable
Enable VI preference routing
CheckAlps
Close before sending frames to new
target
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Set Config Command
switch
Initiates an editing session in which to change switch configuration settings. The
system displays each parameter one line at a time and prompts you for a value.
For each parameter, enter a new value or press the Enter key to accept the
current value shown in brackets.
Table B-8. Set Config Switch Parameters
Parameter
59021-04 C
Description
AdminState
Switch administrative state: online,
offline, or diagnostics
Broadcast Enable
Enables (True) or disables (False)
forwarding of broadcast frames.
InbandEnabled
Enables (True) or disables (False) the
ability to manage the switch over an
ISL.
DefaultDomainID
Default domain ID setting
DomainIDLock
Prevents (True) or allows (False)
dynamic reassignment of the
domain ID.
SymbolicName
Descriptive name
R_T_TOV
Receiver Transmitter Timeout Value.
Specifies the number of milliseconds a
port is to wait to receive a response
from another port. The default is 100.
R_A_TOV
Resource Allocation Timeout Value.
The number of milliseconds the switch
waits to allow two ports to allocate
enough resources to establish a link.
The default is 10000.
E_D_TOV
Error Detect Timeout Value. The
number of milliseconds a port is to wait
for errors to clear. The default is 2000.
FS_TOV
Fabric Stability Timeout Value. The
default is 5000 msec.
DS_TOV
Distributed Services Timeout Value
(Management Server, Name Server).
The default is 5000 msec.
B-27
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Set Config Command
Table B-8. Set Config Switch Parameters
Parameter
Description
PrincipalPriority
The priority used in the FC-SW-2
principal switch selection algorithm. 1 is
high, 255 is low.
ConfigDescription
The name for the configuration. The
default is undefined.
threshold
Initiates a configuration session by which to generate and log alarms for selected
events. The system displays each event, its thresholds, and sampling interval one
line at a time and prompts you for a value. For each parameter, enter a new value
or press the Enter key to accept the current value shown in brackets. These
parameters must be saved in a configuration and activated before they will take
effect. Refer to the ”Config Command” on page B-7 for information about saving
and activating a configuration. Table B-9 describes the Set Config Threshold
parameters.
Table B-9. Set Config Threshold Parameters
Parameter
B-28
Description
Threshold Monitoring Enabled
Master enable/disable parameter for all
events. Enables (True) or disables (False)
the generation of all enabled event alarms.
CRCErrorsMonitoringEnabled
DecodeErrorsMonitoringEnabled
ISLMonitoringEnabled
LoginMonitoringEnabled
LogoutMonitoringEnabled
LOSMonitoringEnabled
The event type enable/disable parameter.
Enables (True) or disables (False) the
generation of alarms for each of the
following events:
■ CRC errors
■ Decode errors
■ ISL connection count
■ Login errors
■ Logout errors
■ Loss-of-signal errors
Rising Trigger
The event count above which an event is
logged. Once the count exceeds the rising
threshold, one alarm is logged. The switch
will not generate another alarm for that
event until the count falls below the falling
threshold and rises again above the rising
threshold.
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Set Config Command
Table B-9. Set Config Threshold Parameters
Parameter
Description
Falling Trigger
The event count above which an event
becomes eligible for logging in the alarm
log.
Sample Window
The period of time in seconds in which to
count events.
zoning
Initiates an editing session in which to change switch zoning attributes. The
system displays each parameter one line at a time and prompts you for a value.
For each parameter, enter a new value or press the Enter key to accept the
current value shown in brackets.
Table B-10. Set Config Zoning Parameters
Parameter
Examples
Description
AutoSave
Determines whether zoning changes
will be saved to flash (non-volatile)
memory or to RAM (volatile) in each
switch. The default is On.
Default
Determines communication among
ports/devices in the absence of an
active zone set. “All” enables all
ports/devices to communicate with one
another. “None” prohibits
communication among ports/devices.
The following is an example of the Set Config Port command:
SANbox2 #> admin start
SANbox2
(admin) #> config edit
SANbox2
(admin-config) #> set config port 1
A list of attributes with formatting and current values will follow.
Enter a new value or simply press the ENTER key to accept the current value.
If you wish to terminate this process before reaching the end of the list
press 'q' or 'Q' and the ENTER key to do so.
Configuring Port Number:
1
------------------------
59021-04 C
B-29
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Set Config Command
AdminState
(1=Online, 2=Offline, 3=Diagnostics, 4=Down) [Online]
LinkSpeed
(1=1Gb/s, 2=2Gb/s, 3=Auto)
[Auto
]
PortType
(TL / GL / G / F / FL / Donor)
[GL
]
TLPortMode
(1=TLTargetMode, 2=TLInitiatorMode)
[TLInitiatorMode]
ISLSecurity
(Any /
[Any
SymPortName
(string, max=32 chars)
[Port2 ]
ALFairness
(True / False)
[False ]
ARB_FF
(True / False)
[False ]
Ours / None)
]
InteropCredit (decimal value, 0-255)
[0
]
ExtCredit
(decimal value, 0-65535)
[0
]
FANEnable
(True / False)
[True
]
LCFEnable
(True / False)
[False ]
MFSEnable
(True / False)
[False ]
MFS_TOV
(decimal value, 10-20480 msec)
[640
]
MSEnable
(True / False)
[True
]
NoClose
(True / False)
[False ]
I/O Stream Guard (Suppress RSCN)(Enable / Disable)
[Disable]
VIEnable
(True / False)
[False ]
CheckAlps
(True / False)
[False ]
Finished configuring attributes.
This configuration must be saved (see config save command) and
activated (see config activate command) before it can take effect.
To discard this configuration use the config cancel command.
The following is an example of the Set Config Switch command:
SANbox2 #> admin start
SANbox2
(admin) #> config edit
SANbox2
(admin-config) #> set config switch
A list of attributes with formatting and default values will follow.
Enter a new value or simply press the ENTER key to accept the current value.
If you wish to terminate this process before reaching the end of the list
press 'q' or 'Q' and the ENTER key to do so.
B-30
AdminState
(1=Online, 2=Offline, 3=Diagnostics) [Online
]
InbandEnabled
(True / False)
[False
]
BroadcastEnable
(True / False)
[False
]
DefaultDomainID
(decimal value, 1-239)
[11
]
DomainIDLock
(True / False)
[True
]
SymbolicName
(string, max=32 chars)
[SANbox2 switch]
R_T_TOV
(decimal value, 1-1000 msec)
[100
]
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Set Config Command
R_A_TOV
(decimal value, 100-100000 msec)
[10000
]
E_D_TOV
(decimal value, 10-20000 msec)
[2000
]
FS_TOV
(decimal value, 100-100000 msec)
[5000
]
DS_TOV
(decimal value, 100-100000 msec)
[5000
]
PrincipalPriority
(decimal value, 1-255)
[254
]
ConfigDescription
(string, max=32 chars)
[
]
The following is an example of the Set Config Threshold command:
SANbox2 #> admin start
SANbox2
(admin) #> config edit
SANbox2 (admin-config) #> set config threshold
A list of attributes with formatting and current values will follow.
Enter a new value or simply press the ENTER key to accept the current value.
If you wish to terminate this process before reaching the end of the list
press 'q' or 'Q' and the ENTER key to do so.
ThresholdMonitoringEnabled
(True / False)
[True]
CRCErrorsMonitoringEnabled
(True / False)
[True]
RisingTrigger
(decimal value, 1-1000)
[25 ]
FallingTrigger
(decimal value, 0-1000)
[1 ]
SampleWindow
(decimal value, 1-1000 sec) [10 ]
DecodeErrorsMonitoringEnabled
(True / False)
[True]
RisingTrigger
(decimal value, 1-1000)
[200 ]
FallingTrigger
(decimal value, 0-1000)
[0 ]
SampleWindow
(decimal value, 1-1000 sec) [10 ]
ISLMonitoringEnabled
(True / False)
[True]
RisingTrigger
(decimal value, 1-1000)
[2 ]
FallingTrigger
(decimal value, 0-1000)
[0 ]
SampleWindow
(decimal value, 1-1000 sec) [10 ]
LoginMonitoringEnabled
(True / False)
[True]
RisingTrigger
(decimal value, 1-1000)
[5 ]
FallingTrigger
(decimal value, 0-1000)
[1 ]
SampleWindow
(decimal value, 1-1000 sec) [10 ]
LogoutMonitoringEnabled
59021-04 C
(True / False)
[True]
RisingTrigger
(decimal value, 1-1000)
[5 ]
FallingTrigger
(decimal value, 0-1000)
[1 ]
SampleWindow
(decimal value, 1-1000 sec) [10 ]
B-31
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Set Config Command
LOSMonitoringEnabled
(True / False)
[True]
RisingTrigger
(decimal value, 1-1000)
[100 ]
FallingTrigger
(decimal value, 0-1000)
[5 ]
SampleWindow
(decimal value, 1-1000 sec)
[10 ]
Finished configuring attributes.
This configuration must be saved (see config save command) and activated (see
config activate command) before it can take effect. To discard this configuration
use the config cancel command.config.
The following is an example of the Set Config Zoning command.
SANbox2 #> admin start
SANbox2
(admin) #> config edit
SANbox2
(admin-config) #> set config zoning
A list of attributes with formatting and current values will follow.
Enter a new value or simply press the ENTER key to accept the current value.
If you wish to terminate this process before reaching the end of the list press 'q'
or 'Q' and the ENTER key to do so.
AutoSave
(True / False)
[True]
Default
(All / None)
[All ]
Finished configuring attributes.
This configuration must be saved (see config save command) and
activated (see config activate command) before it can take effect.
To discard this configuration use the config cancel command.
B-32
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Set Log Command
Set Log Command
Specifies the type of entries to be entered in the event log. The log is a storage file
contained on the switch. The log can hold a maximum of 200 entries. When the
log becomes full, the entries are replaced, starting with the oldest entry, to
produce a list of the last 200 events which occurred. Log entries are created for
ports, components, and event severity levels.
Authority
Admin
Syntax
set log
archive
clear
component [list]
level [level]
port [port_list]
restore
save
start (default)
stop
Keywords
archive
Archives the log entries to a file on the switch named logfile that can be
downloaded from the switch using FTP. To download the log file, open an FTP
session, log in with account name/password of “images” for both, and type “get
logfile”.
clear
Clears all log entries.
component [list]
Specifies one or more components to monitor for events. Use spaces to delimit
values in the list. Choose one or more of the following values:
All
Monitors all components. To maintain optimal switch performance, do not
use this setting with the Level keyword set to Info.
Chassis
Monitors chassis hardware components such as fans and power supplies.
Eport
Monitors all E_Ports.
Mgmtserver
Monitors management server status.
Nameserver
Monitors name server status.
None
Monitor none of the component events.
59021-04 C
B-33
B – Command Line Interface
Set Log Command
Q
Other
Monitors other miscellaneous events.
Port
Monitors all port events
Switch
Monitors switch management events.
Zoning
Monitors zoning conflict events.
level [level]
Specifies the severity level given by [level] to use in monitoring events for the
specified components or ports. [level] can be one of the following values:
Critical
Monitors critical events.
Warn
Monitors warning events.
Info
Monitors informational events. To maintain optimal switch performance, do
not use this setting with the Component keyword set to All.
None
Monitors none of the severity levels.
port [port_list]
Specifies one or more ports to monitor for events. Choose one of the following
values:
[port_list]
Specifies port or ports to monitor. Use spaces to delimit values in the list.
Ports are numbered beginning with 0.
All
Specifies all ports.
None
Disables monitoring on all ports.
restore
Returns the port, component, and level settings to the default values.
save
Saves the log settings for the component, level, and port. These settings remain
in effect after a switch reset. The log settings can be viewed using the Show Log
Settings command. To export log entries to a file, use the Set Log Archive
command.
B-34
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Set Log Command
start
Starts the logging of events based on the Port, Component, and Level keywords
assigned to the current configuration. The logging continues until you enter the
Set Log Stop command.
stop
Stops logging of events.
Notes
59021-04 C
To maintain optimal switch performance, do not set the Component keyword to All
and the Level keyword to Info at the same time.
B-35
B – Command Line Interface
Set Port Command
Q
Set Port Command
Sets port state and speed for the specified port temporarily until the next switch
reset or new configuration activation. This command also clears port counters.
Authority
Admin
Syntax
set port [port_number]
bypass [alpa]
clear
enable [alpa]
speed [transmission_speed]
state [state]
Keywords
[port_number]
Specifies the port. Ports are numbered beginning with 0.
bypass [alpa]
Sends a Loop Port Bypass (LPB) to a specific ALPA or to all ALPAs on the loop.
[alpa] can be a specific ALPA or the keyword ALL to choose all ALPAs.
clear
Clears the counters on the specified port.
enable [alpa]
Sends a Loop Port Enable (LPE) to all ALPAs on the arbitrated loop. [alpa] can be
a specific ALPA or the keyword ALL to choose all ALPAs.
speed [transmission_speed]
Specifies the speed for the specified port. Choose one of the following values:
1Gb/s
One gigabit per second.
2Gb/s
Two gigabits per second.
Auto
The port speed is automatically detected.
state [state]
Specifies the administrative state for the specified port. Choose one of the
following port state values:
Online
Places the port online.
Offline
Places the port offline.
Diagnostics
Prepares the port for testing.
Down
Disables the port.
B-36
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Set Setup Command
Set Setup Command
Changes SNMP and system configuration settings. The switch maintains one
SNMP configuration and one system configuration.
Authority
Admin
Syntax
set setup
snmp
system
Keywords
snmp
Prompts you in a line-by-line fashion to change SNMP configuration settings.
Table B-11 describes the SNMP fields. For each parameter, enter a new value or
press the Enter key to accept the current value shown in brackets.
Table B-11. SNMP Configuration Settings
Entry
59021-04 C
Description
Contact
Specifies the name of the person to be contacted to respond
to trap events. The default is undefined.
Location
Specifies the name of the switch location. The default is
undefined.
Trap [1-5] Address
Specifies the IP address to which SNMP traps are sent. The
default address for trap 1 is 10.0.0.254. The default address
for traps 2–5 is 0.0.0.0.
Trap [1-5] Port
Specifies the port for which SNMP traps are sent.
Trap [1-5] Severity
Specifies the severity level to use when monitoring trap
events. The default is Warning
Trap [1-5] Enabled
Specifies whether traps (event information) are enabled or
disabled (default).
ReadCommunity
Read Community Authentication. A write-only field; the
value on the switch and the SNMP management server
must be the same.
WriteCommunity
Write Community Authentication. A write-only field; the
value on the switch and the SNMP management server
must be the same.
TrapCommunity
Trap Community Authentication. A write-only field; the value
on the switch and the SNMP management server must be
the same.
AuthFailureTrap
Specifies the IP address where a notification is sent in the
event of an authentication failure.
B-37
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Set Setup Command
system
Prompts you in a line-by-line fashion to change system configuration settings.
Table B-12 describes the system configuration fields. For each parameter, enter a
new value or press the Enter key to accept the current value shown in brackets.
Table B-12. System Configuration Settings
Entry
Notes
B-38
Description
Eth0NetworkAddress
Internet Protocol (IP) address for the Ethernet port.
Eth0NetworkMask
Subnet mask address for the Ethernet port.
Eth0GatewayAddress
IP address gateway.
Eth0NetworkDiscovery
Boot Method (1 - Static, 2 - Bootp, 3 - DHCP, 4 - RARP)
AdminTimeout
Specifies the amount of time in minutes the switch waits
before terminating an idle Admin session. Zero (0)
disables the time out threshold. The default is 30, the
maximum is 1440.
Security Enabled
Enables or disables the enforcement of account names
and passwords.
Local Log Enabled
Enables or disables the saving of log information on the
switch.
Remote Log Enabled
Whether remote logging of is enabled or disabled. If
enabled, log information is saved to a remote host that
supports the syslog protocol.
Remote LogHost IP
Address
The IP address of the host that will receive the remote
log information if remote logging is enabled.
The two components of security are user authentication and fabric security. The
user must be authenticated before gaining access to a switch. If an invalid
account name/password combination is entered, that user can not access the
switch, and thus can not gain access to the fabric. If security is enabled (True) and
a valid account name/password combination is entered, that user can access the
switch but can not execute any command that exceeds their authority (privileges)
level. If security is disabled (False) and a valid account name/password
combination is entered, that user has access to all switches in the fabric and can
execute all commands (both user and admin), regardless of their authority
(privileges) level.
59021-04 C
Q
Examples
B – Command Line Interface
Set Setup Command
The following is an example of the Set Setup SNMP command:
SANbox2 #> admin start
SANbox2 (admin) #> set setup snmp
A list of attributes with formatting and current values will follow.
Enter a new value or simply press the ENTER key to accept the current value.
If you wish to terminate this process before reaching the end of the list
press 'q' or 'Q' and the ENTER key to do so.
Trap Severity Options
--------------------unknown, emergency, alert, critical, error, warning, notify, info, debug, mark
Contact
(string, max=32 chars)
[Technical Support]
Location
(string, max=32 chars)
[TSLab
]
Trap1Address
(dot-notated IP Address)
[10.20.71.15
]
Trap1Port
(decimal value)
[162
]
Trap1Severity
(see allowed options above)
[warning
]
Trap1Enabled
(True / False)
[False
]
Trap2Address
(dot-notated IP Address)
[0.0.0.0
]
Trap2Port
(decimal value)
[162
]
Trap2Severity
(see allowed options above)
[warning
]
Trap2Enabled
(True / False)
[False
]
Trap3Address
(dot-notated IP Address)
[0.0.0.0
]
Trap3Port
(decimal value)
[162
]
Trap3Severity
(see allowed options above)
[warning
]
Trap3Enabled
(True / False)
[False
]
Trap4Address
(dot-notated IP Address)
[0.0.0.0
]
Trap4Port
(decimal value)
[162
]
Trap4Severity
(see allowed options above)
[warning
]
Trap4Enabled
(True / False)
[False
]
Trap5Address
(dot-notated IP Address)
[0.0.0.0
]
Trap5Port
(decimal value)
[162
]
Trap5Severity
(see allowed options above)
[warning
]
Trap5Enabled
(True / False)
[False
]
ReadCommunity
(string, max=32 chars)
[public
]
WriteCommunity
(string, max=32 chars)
[private
]
TrapCommunity
(string, max=32 chars)
[public
]
AuthFailureTrap
(True / False)
[False
]
Do you want to save and activate this snmp setup? (y/n) [n]
59021-04 C
B-39
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Set Setup Command
The following is an example of the Set Setup System command:
SANbox2 (admin) #> set setup system
A list of attributes with formatting and current values will follow.
Enter a new value or simply press the ENTER key to accept the current value.
If you wish to terminate this process before reaching the end of the list
press 'q' or 'Q' and the ENTER key to do so.
Eth0NetworkAddress
(dot-notated IP Address)
[10.0.0.1
]
Eth0NetworkMask
(dot-notated IP Address)
[255.255.255.0 ]
Eth0GatewayAddress
(dot-notated IP Address)
[10.0.0.254
]
Eth0NetworkDiscovery
(1=Static, 2=Bootp, 3=Dhcp, 4=Rarp)
[Static
]
AdminTimeout
(dec value 0-1440 minutes, 0=never)
[30
]
SecurityEnabled
(True / False)
[False
]
LocalLogEnabled
(True / False)
[True
]
RemoteLogEnabled
(True / False)
[False
]
RemoteLogHostAddress
(dot-notated IP Address)
[10.0.0.254
]
Do you want to save and activate this system setup? (y/n): [n]
B-40
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Command
Show Command
Displays fabric, switch, and port operational information.
Authority
User
Syntax
show
about
alarm
broadcast
chassis
config [option]
domains
donor
fabric
interface
log [option]
lsdb
mem [count]
ns [option]
pagebreak
perf [option]
port [port_number]
post log
setup [option]
steering [domain_id]
support
switch
topology
users
version
Keywords
about
Displays an introductory set of information about operational attributes of the
switch. This keyword is equivalent to the Version keyword.
alarm
Displays the last 200 alarm entries.
broadcast
Displays the broadcast tree information and all ports that are currently transmitting
and receiving broadcast frames.
chassis
Displays chassis component status and temperature.
config [option]
Displays switch and port configuration attributes. Refer to the Show Config
Command on page B-54.
59021-04 C
B-41
B – Command Line Interface
Show Command
Q
domains
Displays list of each domain and its worldwide name in the fabric.
donor
Displays list of current donor configuration for all ports.
fabric
Displays list of each domain, fabric ID, worldwide name, node IP address, port IP
address, and symbolic name in the fabric.
interface
Displays the status of the active network interfaces.
log [option]
Displays log entries. Refer to the Show Log Command on page B-57.
lsdb
Displays Link State database information.
mem [count]
Displays information about memory activity for the number of seconds given by
[count]. If you omit [count], the value 1 is used. Displayed memory values are in
1K block units.
Note:
This keyword will display memory activity updates until [count] is
reached – it cannot be interrupted. Therefore, avoid using large values
for [count].
ns [option]
Displays name server information for the specified [option]. If you omit [option],
name server information for the local domain ID is displayed. [option] can have the
following values:
all
Displays name server information for all switches and ports.
[domain_id]
Displays name server information for the switch given by [domain_id].
[domain_id] is a switch domain ID.
[port_id]
Displays name server information for the port given by [port_id]. [port_id] is a
port Fibre Channel address.
pagebreak
Displays the current pagebreak setting. The pagebreak setting limits the display of
information to 20 lines (On) or allows the continuous display of information without
a break (Off).
B-42
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Command
perf [option]
Displays performance information for all ports. Refer to the Show Perf Command
on page B-59.
port [port_number]
Displays operational information for the port given by [port_number]. Ports are
numbered beginning with 0. If the port number is omitted, information is displayed
for all ports. Table B-13 describes the port parameters.
Table B-13. Show Port Parameters
Entry
59021-04 C
Description
AIinit
Incremented each time the port begins AL initialization.
AIinitError
Number of times the port entered initialization and the
initialization failed.
ClassXFramesIn
Number of class x frames received by this port.
ClassXFramesOut
Number of class x frames sent by this port.
ClassXWordsIn
Number of class x words received by this port.
ClassXWordsOut
Number of class x words sent by this port.
DecodeError
Decoding error detected.
FBusy
Number of times the switch sent a F_BSY because Class 2
frame could not be delivered within ED_TOV time. Number
of class 2 and class 3 fabric busy (F_BSY) frames
generated by this port in response to incoming frames.
This usually indicates a busy condition on the fabric or
N_port that is preventing delivery of this frame.
Flowerrors
Received a frame when there were no available credits.
FReject
Number of frames from devices that were rejected.
InvalidCRC
Invalid CRC detected.
InvalidDestAddr
Invalid destination address detected.
LIP ALPD ALPS
Number of F7, AL_PS LIPs, or AL_PD (vendor specific)
resets, performed.
LIPF7ALPS
This LIP is used to reinitialize the loop. An L_port, identified
by AL_PS, may have noticed a performance degradation
and is trying to restore the loop.
LIPF8ALPS
This LIP denotes a loop failure detected by the L_port
identified by AL_PS.
B-43
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Command
Table B-13. Show Port Parameters (Continued)
Entry
B-44
Description
LIPF7F7
A loop initialization primitive frame used to acquire a valid
AL_PA.
LIPF8F7
A loop initialization primitive frame used to indicate that a
loop failure has been detected at the receiver.
Link Failures
Number of optical link failures detected by this port. A link
failure is a loss of synchronization for a period of time
greater than the value of R_T_TOV or by loss of signal
while not in the offline state. A loss of signal causes the
switch to attempt to re-establish the link. If the link is not
re-established by the time specified by R_T_TOV, a link
failure is counted. A link reset is performed after a link
failure.
Login
Time when user logged in.
Logout
Time when user logged out.
LoopTimeouts
A two (2) second timeout as specified by FC-AL-2.
LossOfSync
Number of synchronization losses (>100 ms) detected by
this port. A loss of synchronization is detected by receipt of
an invalid transmission word.
PrimSeqErrors
Primitive sequence errors detected.
EportConnects
Shows the count of the number of times an E_Port
connected through ISL negotiation.
RxLinkResets
Number of link reset primitives received from an attached
device.
RxOfflineSeq
Number of offline sequences received. An OLS is issued
for link initialization, a Receive & Recognize
Not_Operational (NOS) state, or to enter the offline state.
TotalErrors
Total number of errors detected.
TotalLIPsRecvd
Number of loop initialization primitive frames received by
this port.
TotalLinkResets
Total number of link reset primatives.
TotalOfflineSeq
Total number of Offline Sequences issued by this port.
TotalRxFrames
Total number of frames received by this port.
TotalRxWords
Total number of words received by this port.
TotalTxFrames
Total number of frames issued by this port.
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Command
Table B-13. Show Port Parameters (Continued)
Entry
Description
TotalTxWords
Total number of words issued by this port.
TxLinkResets
Number of Link Resets issued by this port.
TxOfflineSeq
Total number of Offline Sequences issued by this port.
TxWait
Time waiting to transmit when blocked with no credit.
Measured in FC Word times.
post log
Displays the Power On Self Test (POST) log which contains results from the
POST.
setup [option]
Displays setup attributes for the system, SNMP, and the switch manufacturer.
Refer to the Show Setup Command on page B-61.
steering [domain_id]
Displays the routes that data takes to the switch given by [domain_id]. If you omit
[domain_id], the system displays routes for all switches in the fabric.
support
Executes a series of commands that display a complete description of the switch,
its configuration, and operation. The display can be captured from the screen and
used for diagnosing problems. This keyword is intended for use at the request of
your authorized maintenance provider. The commands that are executed include
the following:
59021-04 C
■
Date
■
Alias List
■
Config List
■
Date
■
History
■
Ps
■
Show (About, Alarm, Backtrace, Chassis, Config Port, Config Switch, Dev,
Dev Settings, Domains, Donor, Fabric, Log, Log Settings, Lsdb, Mem, Ns,
Perf, Port, Setup Mfg, Setup Snmp, Setup System, Steering, Switch,
Topology, Users)
■
Uptime
■
User Accounts
■
Whoami
B-45
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Command
■
Zoneset (Active, List)
■
Zoning (History, Limits, List)
switch
Displays switch operational information.
topology
Displays all connected devices.
users
Displays a list of logged-in users. This is equivalent to the User List command.
version
Displays an introductory set of information about operational attributes of the
switch. This keyword is equivalent to the About keyword.
Examples
The following is an example of the Show Broadcast command:
SANbox2 #> show broadcast
Group Member Ports ISL Ports
----- ------------ --------0
13
The following is an example of the Show Chassis command:
SANbox2 #> show chassis
Chassis Information
------------------BoardTemp (1) - Degrees Celsius
32
BoardTemp (2) - Degrees Celsius
36
FanStatus (1)
Good
FanStatus (2)
Good
PowerSupplyStatus (1)
Good
PowerSupplyStatus (2)
Good
The following is an example of the Show Domains command:
SANbox2 #> show domains
Principal switch is (local): 10:00:00:c0:dd:00:90:6b
Domain ID List:
Domain 22 (0x16)
B-46
WWN = 10:00:00:c0:dd:00:90:6b
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Command
The following is an example of the Show Fabric command:
SANbox2 #> show fabric
Switch
ID
WWN
Eth0IPAddress
SymbolicName
------
--
---
-------------
------------
1 (0x1)
fffc01 10:00:00:c0:dd:00:bd:ec
10.20.68.107
4 (0x4)
fffc04 10:00:00:c0:dd:00:80:21
10.20.68.14
The following is an example of the Show NS (local domain) command:
SANbox2 #> show ns
Seq Domain
Port
Port
No
ID
Type
COS
PortWWN
NodeWWN
--- ------
ID
------
----
---
-------
-------
1
99 (0x63)
630425
NL
3
21:00:00:20:37:d9:4b:2a
20:00:00:20:37:d9:4b:2a
2
99 (0x63)
6304e8
NL
3
21:00:00:20:37:d9:4b:2f
20:00:00:20:37:d9:4b:2f
3
99 (0x63)
6304ef
NL
3
21:00:00:20:37:d9:4f:46
20:00:00:20:37:d9:4f:46
The following is an example of the Show NS Domain_ID command:
SANbox2 #> show ns domain_ID
Port ID: 630425
-------PortType
NL
PortWWN
21:00:00:20:37:d9:4b:2a
SymbolicPortName
NodeWWN
20:00:00:20:37:d9:4b:2a
SymbolicNodeName
59021-04 C
NodeIPAddress
0.0.0.0
ClassOfService
3
PortIPAddress
0.0.0.0
FabricPortName
20:04:00:c0:dd:00:b7:ea
FC4Type
FCP
FC4Desc
SEAGATE
ST318304FC (Rev. 0005)
B-47
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Command
The following is an example of the Show Interface command:
SANbox2 #> show interface
eth0
Link encap:Ethernet
HWaddr 00:C0:DD:00:BD:ED
inet addr:10.20.68.107
Bcast:10.20.68.255
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST
MTU:1500
Mask:255.255.255.0
Metric:1
RX packets:4712 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:3000 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:100
RX bytes:415313 (405.5 Kb)
TX bytes:716751 (699.9 Kb)
Interrupt:11 Base address:0xfcc0
lo
Link encap:Local Loopback
inet addr:127.0.0.1
Mask:255.0.0.0
UP LOOPBACK RUNNING
MTU:16436
Metric:1
RX packets:304 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:304 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
RX bytes:20116 (19.6 Kb)
TX bytes:20116 (19.6 Kb)
The following is an example of the Show Port command:
SANbox2 #> show port 1
Port Number: 1
-----------AdminState
Online
PortID
AsicNumber
0
PortWWN
640100
AsicPort
1
RunningType
Donor
ConfigType
Donor
SFPPartNumber
PL-XPL-00-S23-00
DiagStatus
Passed
SFPRevision
EpConnState
None
SFPType
100-M5-SN-I
EpIsoReason
NotApplicable
SFPVendor
PICOLIGHT
LinkSpeed
2Gb/s
SFPVendorID
00850400
LinkState
Active
SymbolicName
Port1
LoginStatus
LoggedIn
SyncStatus
SyncLost
MaxCredit
0
XmitterEnabled
False
OperationalState Online
B-48
ALInit
0
FlowErrors
0
PrimSeqErrors
0
ALInitError
0
FReject
0
RxLinkResets
0
Class2FramesIn
0
InvalidCRC
0
RxOfflineSeq
0
Class2FramesOut 0
InvalidDestAddr 0
TotalErrors
0
Class2WordsIn
0
LIP_AL_PD_AL_PS 0
TotalLIPsRecvd
0
Class2WordsOut
0
LIP_F7_AL_PS
0
TotalLinkResets 0
Class3FramesIn
0
LIP_F7_F7
0
TotalOfflineSeq 0
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Command
Class3FramesOut 0
LIP_F8_AL_PS
0
TotalRxFrames
0
Class3Toss
0
LIP_F8_F7
0
TotalRxWords
0
Class3WordsIn
0
LinkFailures
0
TotalTxFrames
0
Class3WordsOut
0
Login
0
TotalTxWords
0
DecodeErrors
0
Logout
0
TxLinkResets
0
EpConnects
0
LoopTimeouts
0
TxOfflineSeq
0
FBusy
0
LossOfSync
0
TxWaits
0
The following is an example of the Show Setup SNMP command:
SANbox2 #> show setup snmp
SNMP Information
----------------
59021-04 C
Contact
Technical Support
Location
TSLab
Description
QLogic SANbox2 FC Switch
Trap1Address
10.20.71.15
Trap1Port
162
Trap1Severity
warning
Trap1Enabled
True
Trap2Address
0.0.0.0
Trap2Port
162
Trap2Severity
warning
Trap2Enabled
False
Trap3Address
0.0.0.0
Trap3Port
162
Trap3Severity
warning
Trap3Enabled
False
Trap4Address
0.0.0.0
Trap4Port
162
Trap4Severity
warning
Trap4Enabled
False
Trap5Address
0.0.0.0
Trap5Port
162
Trap5Severity
warning
Trap5Enabled
False
ObjectID
1.3.6.1.4.1.1663.1.1.1.1.11
AuthFailureTrap
False
B-49
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Command
The following is an example of the Show Setup System command:
SANbox2 (admin) #> show setup system
System Information
------------------
B-50
Eth0NetworkAddress
10.20.11.112
Eth0NetworkMask
255.255.252.0
Eth0GatewayAddress
10.20.8.254
Eth0NetworkDiscovery
Static
AdminTimeout
30
SecurityEnabled
True
LocalLogEnabled
True
RemoteLogEnabled
True
RemoteLogHostAddress
10.20.11.106
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Command
The following is an example of the Show Switch command:
SANbox2 #> show switch
Switch Information
-----------------SymbolicName
SANbox2-203
SwitchWWN
10:00:00:c0:dd:00:b8:b5
SwitchType
SANbox2-16
PromVersion
V0.1-5-18
CreditPool
0
DomainID
3
LogLevel
Info
MaxPorts
16
NumberOfAsics
1
NumberOfPortsPerAsic
16
NumberOfResets
127
ReasonForLastReset
NormalReset
SWImageVersion (1) - build date
V0.4-6-16
(Thu Jun 14 04:06:42 2001)
SWImageVersion (2) - build date
V0.4-6-18
(Fri Jun 15 10:22:09 2001)
ActiveConfiguration
default
ActiveSWImage
2
AdminState
Online
AdminModeActive
False
BeaconOnStatus
False
OperationalState
Online
PrincipalSwitchRole
False
BoardTemp (1) - Degrees Celsius
32
BoardTemp (2) - Degrees Celsius
36
SwitchDiagnosticsStatus
Passed
SwitchTemperatureStatus
Normal
(Fri Jun 15 10:22:09 2001)
The following is an example of the Show Topology command:
SANbox2 #> show topology
Unique ID Key
------------A = ALPA,
Port
D = Domain ID,
P = Port ID
Local Local
Number Type
PortWWN
------ ----- -------
59021-04 C
Remote
Remote
Unique
Type
NodeWWN
ID
------
-------
------
5
F
20:05:00:c0:dd:00:bd:ec
N
20:00:00:00:c9:22:1e:93
010500 P
10
E
20:0a:00:c0:dd:00:bd:ec
E
10:00:00:c0:dd:00:80:21
4(0x4) D
B-51
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Command
The following is an example of the Show Topology command for port 1:
SANbox2
#> show topology 1
Local Link Information
---------------------PortNumber 1
PortID
650100
PortWWN
20:01:00:c0:dd:00:91:11
PortType
F
Remote Link Information
----------------------Device 0
NodeWWN 50:80:02:00:00:06:d5:38
PortType NL
Description (NULL)
IPAddress 0.0.0.0
Device 1
NodeWWN 20:00:00:20:37:2b:08:c9
PortType NL
Description (NULL)
IPAddress 0.0.0.0
Device 2
Description (NULL)
IPAddress 0.0.0.0
Device 3
NodeWWN 20:00:00:20:37:2b:05:c9
PortType NL
Description (NULL)
IPAddress 0.0.0.0
B-52
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Command
The following is an example of the Show Version command:
SANbox2 #> show version
SystemDescription
QLogic SANbox2 FC Switch
Eth0NetworkAddress 10.0.0.1 (use 'set setup system' to update)
59021-04 C
FCNetworkAddress
0.0.0.0 (use 'set setup system' to update)
MACAddress
12:34:56:78:ab:cd
WorldWideName
10:00:00:c0:dd:00:90:a4
SymbolicName
SANbox2
SWImageVersion
V255.4-1-121
SWImageBuiltDate
Mon Jul 29 19:42:47 2002
DiagnosticsStatus
Passed
SecurityEnabled
False
B-53
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Config Command
Show Config Command
Displays switch, port, alarm threshold, and zoning attributes for the current
configuration.
Authority
User
Syntax
show config
port [port_number]
switch
threshold
zoning
Keywords
port [port_number]
Displays configuration parameters for the port number given by [port_number].
Ports are numbered beginning with 0. If the port value is omitted, all ports are
specified.
switch
Displays configuration parameters for the switch.
threshold
Displays alarm threshold parameters for the switch.
zoning
Displays zoning configuration parameters for the switch.
Examples
The following is an example of the Show Config Port command:
SANbox2 #> show config port 3
Configuration Name: default
------------------Port Number: 3
------------
B-54
AdminState
Online
LinkSpeed
Auto
PortType
GL
TLPortMode
TLInitiatorMode
ISLSecurity
Any
SymbolicName
Port4
ALFairness
False
ARB_FF
False
InteropCredit
0
FanEnable
True
ExtCredit
0
FanEnable
False
LCFEnable
False
MFSEnable
False
MFS_TOV
640
MSEnable
False
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Config Command
NoClose
False
IOStreamGuard
False
VIEnable
False
CheckAlps
False
The following is an example of the Show Config Switch command:
SANbox2 #> show config switch
Configuration Name: default
-------------------
Switch Configuration Information
-------------------------------AdminState
Online
BroadcastEnabled
True
InbandEnabled
True
DomainID
100 (0x64)
DomainIDLock
False
SymbolicName
SANbox2-16 N_11.107
R_T_TOV
100
R_A_TOV
10000
E_D_TOV
2000
FS_TOV
5000
DS_TOV
5000
PrincipalPriority
254
ConfigDescription
QLogic SANbox2 FC Switch
ConfigLastSavedBy
[email protected]
ConfigLastSavedOn
Mon Nov 18 15:10:03 2002
The following is an example of the Show Config Threshold command:
SANbox2 #> show config threshold
Configuration Name: default
------------
Threshold Configuration Information
----------------------------------ThresholdMonitoringEnabled
True
CRCErrorsMonitoringEnabled
True
RisingTrigger
25
FallingTrigger
1
SampleWindow
10
DecodeErrorsMonitoringEnabled True
RisingTrigger
59021-04 C
200
B-55
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Config Command
FallingTrigger
0
SampleWindow
10
ISLMonitoringEnabled
True
RisingTrigger
2
FallingTrigger
0
SampleWindow
10
LoginMonitoringEnabled
True
RisingTrigger
5
FallingTrigger
1
SampleWindow
10
LogoutMonitoringEnabled
True
RisingTrigger
5
FallingTrigger
1
SampleWindow
10
LOSMonitoringEnabled
True
RisingTrigger
100
FallingTrigger
5
SampleWindow
10
The following is an example of the Show Config Zoning command:
SANbox2 #> show config zoning
Configuration Name: default
-------------------
Zoning Configuration Information
--------------------------------
B-56
AutoSave
True
Default
All
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Log Command
Show Log Command
Displays the contents of the log or the parameters used to create entries in the
log. The log contains a maximum of 200 entries. When the log reaches its entry
capacity, subsequent entries overwrite the existing entries, beginning with the
oldest.
Authority
User
Syntax
show log
component
level
options
port
settings
Keywords
component
Displays the components currently being monitored for events.
level
Displays the event severity level needed to create an entry in the log. If the
severity level occurs on a port or on a component which is not defined, no entry is
made in the log.
options
Displays the options used to set the component and log level attributes.
port
Displays the ports being monitored for events. If an event occurs which is of the
defined level and on a defined component, but not on a defined port, no entry is
made in the log.
settings
Displays the current settings for component, level and port. This command is
equivalent to executing the following commands separately: Show Log
Component, Show Log Level, and Show Log Port.
Examples
The following is an example of the Show Log Component command:
SANbox2 #> show log component
Current setting(s) for log component: NameServer
The following is an example of the Show Log Level command:
SANbox2 #> show log level
Current setting(s) for log level: Info
59021-04 C
B-57
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Log Command
The following is an example of the Show Log Options command:
SANbox2 #> show log options
Allowed options for '
level': Critical,Warn,Info,None
Allowed options for 'component': All,None,NameServer,MgmtServer,Zoning,Switch,
Chassis,Blade,Port,Eport,Snmp,Other
The following is an example of the Show Log Port command:
SANbox2 #> show log port
Current setting(s) for log port: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
The following is an example of the Show Log command:
[327][Wed Jan 25 09:36:54.860 1989][I][Eport:0xdd00b8b6.304.4 Port: 0/8][Eport
State = E_A0_GET_DOMAIN_ID]
[328][Wed Jan 25 09:36:54.860 1989][I][Eport:0xdd00b8b6.304.4 Port: 0/8][FSPF
PortUp state=0]
[329][Wed Jan 25 09:36:54.861 1989][I][Eport:0xdd00b8b6.304.4 Port: 0/8][Send
ing init hello]
[330][Wed Jan 25 09:36:54.861 1989][I][Eport:0xdd00b8b6.304.4 Port: 0/8][Proc
essing EFP, oxid= 0x8]
[331][Wed Jan 25 09:36:54.861 1989][I][Eport:0xdd00b8b6.304.4 Port: 0/8][Epor
t State = E_A2_IDLE]
[332][Wed Jan 25 09:36:54.861 1989][I][Eport:0xdd00b8b6.304.4 Port: 0/8][EFP,
WWN= 0x100000c0dd00b845, len= 0x30]
[333][Wed Jan 25 09:36:54.864 1989][I][Eport:0xdd00b8b6.304.4 Port: 0/8][Send
ing LSU oxid= 0xc: type= 1]
[334][Wed Jan 25 09:36:54.864 1989][I][Eport:0xdd00b8b6.304.4 Port: 0/8][Send
Zone Merge Request]
[335][Wed Jan 25 09:36:54.865 1989][I][Eport:0xdd00b8b6.304.4 Port: 0/8][LSDB
Xchg timer set]
[336][Wed Jan 25 09:36:54.865 1989][I][Eport:0xdd00b8b6.304.4 Port: 0/8][Sett
ing attribute Oper.UserPort.0.8.EpConnState Connected]
B-58
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Perf Command
Show Perf Command
Displays port performance in frames/second and bytes/second. If you omit the
keyword, the command displays data transmitted (out), data received (in), and
total data transmitted and received in frames/second and bytes per second.
Authority
User
Syntax
show perf
byte
inbyte
outbyte
frame
inframe
outframe
errors
Keywords
byte
Displays continuous performance data in total bytes/second transmitted and
received for all ports. Type “q” and press the Enter key to stop the display.
inbyte
Displays continuous performance data in bytes/second received for all ports. Type
“q” and press the Enter key to stop the display.
outbyte [port_number]
Displays continuous performance data in bytes/second transmitted for the set of
16 ports that include [port_number]. Type “q” and press the Enter key to stop the
display.
frame [port_number]
Displays continuous performance data in total frames/second transmitted and
received for the set of 16 ports that include [port_number]. Type “q” and press the
Enter key to stop the display.
inframe [port_number]
Displays continuous performance data in frames/second received for the set of 16
ports that include [port_number]. Type “q” and press the Enter key to stop the
display.
outframe [port_number]
Displays continuous performance data in frames/second transmitted for the set of
16 ports that include [port_number]. Type “q” and press the Enter key to stop the
display.
errors [port_number]
Displays continuous error counts for the set of 16 ports that include [port_number].
Type “q” and press the Enter key to stop the display.
59021-04 C
B-59
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Perf Command
Examples
The following is an example of the Show Perf command:
SANbox2 #> show perf
Port
Bytes/s
Number
Bytes/s
(in)
Bytes/s
Frames/s
Frames/s
Frames/s
(out)
(total)
(in)
(out)
(total)
------ -------
-------
-------
--------
--------
--------
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
0
0
0
0
0
0
7
0
0
0
0
0
0
8
7K
136M
136M
245
68K
68K
9
58K
0
58K
1K
0
1K
10
0
0
0
0
0
0
11
0
0
0
0
0
0
12
0
0
0
0
0
0
13
0
0
0
0
0
0
14
0
7K
7K
0
245
245
15
136M
58K
136M
68K
1K
70K
The following is an example of the Show Perf Byte command:
SANbox2 #> show perf byte
Displaying bytes/sec (total)...
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
(Press 'q' and the ENTER key to stop display)
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
B-60
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
137M 58K
0
0
0
0
8K
137M
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
136M 58K
0
0
0
0
8K
136M
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
135M 58K
0
0
0
0
7K
135M
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
137M 58K
0
0
0
0
8K
137M
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
136M 58K
0
0
0
0
7K
136M
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
137M 58K
0
0
0
0
8K
137M
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
136M 58K
0
0
0
0
8K
136M
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
136M 58K
0
0
0
0
7K
136M
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Setup Command
Show Setup Command
Displays the current SNMP and system settings.
Authority
User
Syntax
show setup
mfg
snmp
system
Keywords
mfg
Displays manufacturing information about the switch.
snmp
Displays the current SNMP settings.
system
Displays the current system settings.
Examples
The following is an example of the Show Setup Mfg command:
SANbox2 #> show setup mfg
Manufacturing Information
-------------------------
59021-04 C
BoardSerialNumber
000781428
BrandName
QLogic
BuildDate
Unknown
ChassisPartNumber
Unknown
ChassisSerialNumber
S01450034
MACAddress
00:c0:dd:00:bc:09
PlanarPartNumber
Unknown
SwitchSymbolicName
SANbox2
SwitchWWN
10:00:00:c0:dd:00:bc:08
SystemDescription
QLogic SANbox2 FC Switch
SystemObjectID
1.3.6.1.4.1.1663.1.1.1.1.11
B-61
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Setup Command
The following is an example of the Show Setup Snmp command:
SANbox2 #> show setup snmp
SNMP Information
----------------
B-62
Contact
<sysContact undefined>
Location
N_107 System Test Lab
Description
QLogic SANbox2 FC Switch
Trap1Address
10.0.0.254
Trap1Port
162
Trap1Severity
warning
Trap1Enabled
False
Trap2Address
0.0.0.0
Trap2Port
162
Trap2Severity
warning
Trap2Enabled
False
Trap3Address
0.0.0.0
Trap3Port
162
Trap3Severity
warning
Trap3Enabled
False
Trap4Address
0.0.0.0
Trap4Port
162
Trap4Severity
warning
Trap4Enabled
False
Trap5Address
0.0.0.0
Trap5Port
162
Trap5Severity
warning
Trap5Enabled
False
ObjectID
1.3.6.1.4.1.1663.1.1.1.1.11
AuthFailureTrap
True
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Show Setup Command
The following is an example of the Show Setup System command:
SANbox2 #> show setup system
System Information
------------------
59021-04 C
Eth0NetworkAddress
10.0.0.1
Eth0NetworkMask
255.255.255.0
Eth0GatewayAddress
10.0.0.254
Eth0NetworkDiscovery
Static
AdminTimeout
30
SecurityEnabled
False
LocalLogEnabled
True
RemoteLogEnabled
False
RemoteLogHostAddress
10.0.0.254
B-63
B – Command Line Interface
Shutdown Command
Q
Shutdown Command
Terminates all data transfers on the switch at convenient points and closes the
Telnet session. Always power cycle the switch after entering this command.
Authority
Admin
Syntax
Notes
shutdown
B-64
Always use this command to effect an orderly shut down before removing power
from the switch. Failure to do so could corrupt the flash memory and the switch
configuration.
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Test Command
Test Command
Tests ports using internal (SerDes level), external (SFP), and online loopback
tests. Internal and external tests require that the port be placed in diagnostic
mode. Refer to the ”Set Command” on page B-23 for information about changing
the port administrative state. While the test is running, the remaining ports on the
switch remain fully operational.
Authority
Admin
Syntax
test
port [port_number] [test_type]
cancel
status
Keywords
port [port_number] [test_type]
Tests the port given by [port_number] using the test given by [test_type]. If you
omit [test_type], Internal is used. [test_type] can have the following values:
internal
Tests the SerDes. This is the default. The port must be in diagnostics mode
to perform this test.
external
Tests both the SerDes and SFP. The port must be in diagnostics mode to
perform this test, and a loopback plug must be installed in the SFP.
online
Tests one online port.
cancel
Cancels the online test in progress.
status
Displays the status of a test in progress, or if there is no test in progress, the
status of the test that was executed last.
Examples
To run an internal (SerDes) or external (SFP) port tests, do the following:
1.
To start an admin session, enter the following command and press the Enter
key.
admin start
2.
Place the port in Diagnostics mode, enter the following command (x = port
number) and press the Enter key.
set port x state diagnostics
3.
Insert the loopback plug into the SFP on the selected port.
4.
Choose type of port loopback test to run:
■
To run an internal loopback test, enter the following:
test x internal
59021-04 C
B-65
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Test Command
■
To run an external loopback test, enter the following:
test x external
5.
A series of test parameters are displayed on the screen. Press the Enter key
to accept each default parameter value, or type a new value for each
parameter and press the Enter key. The TestLength parameter is the
number of frames sent, the FrameSize (256 byte maximum in some cases)
parameter is the number of bytes in each frame, and the DataPattern
parameter is the pattern in the payload.
6.
After the test type has been chosen and the command executed, a message
on the screen will appear detailing the test results.
7.
After the test is run, put the port back into online state by entering the
following command (x = port number) and pressing the Enter key.
set port x state online
8.
To verify port is back online, enter the following command and press the
Enter key. The contents of the AdminState field should display be “Online”.
show port x
The online loopback (node-to-node) test can test only one port at a time, and that
port must be online and connected to a remote device. To run the online loopback
test, do the following:
1.
To start an admin session, enter the following command and press the Enter
key.
admin start
2.
To run the online loopback test, enter the following command and press the
Enter key.
test x online
3.
A series of test parameters are displayed on the screen. Press the Enter key
to accept each default parameter value, or type a new value for each
parameter and press the Enter key. The TestLength parameter is the
number of frames sent, the FrameSize (256 byte maximum in some cases)
parameter is the number of bytes in each frame, and the DataPattern
parameter is the pattern in the payload. Before running the test, make sure
that the device attached to the port can handle the test parameters.
SANbox2N107 (admin) #> test x online
A list of attributes with formatting and current values will
follow. Enter a new value or simply press the ENTER key to
accept the default value. If you wish to terminate this
B-66
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Test Command
process before reaching the end of the list press 'q' or 'Q'
and the ENTER key to do so.
TestLength
(decimal value, 1-4294967295)
[100
]
FrameSize
(decimal value, 36-2148)
[256
]
DataPattern
(32-bit hex value or 'Default') [Default]
StopOnError
(True/False)
[False
]
Do you want to start the test? (y/n) [n]
4.
59021-04 C
After all parameter values are defined, press the Y key to start the test.
B-67
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Uptime Command
Uptime Command
Displays the elapsed time since the switch was last reset and reset method.
Authority
User
Syntax
Examples
uptime
The following is an example of the Uptime command:
SANbox2 #> uptime
Elapsed up time
: 0 day(s), 2 hour(s), 28 min(s), 44 sec(s)
Reason last reset: NormalReset
B-68
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
User Command
User Command
Administers or displays user accounts.
Authority
Admin. The List keyword is available with User authority.
Syntax
user
accounts
add
delete [account_name]
list
Keywords
accounts
Displays all user accounts that exist on the switch.
add
Add a user account to the switch. After this command is executed, the
administrator will be prompted for the information needed to establish the user
account. A switch can have a maximum of 15 user accounts. Account names are
limited to 15 characters; passwords are limited to 31 characters.
delete [account_name]
Deletes the account name given by [account_name] from the switch.
list
Displays the list of users currently logged in and their session numbers. Provides
the same function as the Show Users command. This keyword is valid for User
authority and does not require an admin session.
Examples
The following is an example of the User Accounts command:
SANbox2
(admin) #> user accounts
Current list of user accounts
-----------------------------
59021-04 C
admin
(admin authority = True)
user1
(admin authority = False)
user2
(admin authority = False)
user3
(admin authority = True)
B-69
Q
B – Command Line Interface
User Command
The following is an example of the User Add command:
SANbox2
(admin) #> user add
Press 'q' and the ENTER key to abort this command.
account name (1-15 chars)
: user3
account password (4-20 chars)
:
please confirm account password:
should this account have admin authority? (y/n) [n] : y
OK to add user account 'user3' with admin authority?
Please confirm (y/n): [n] y
The following is an example of the User Delete command:
SANbox2
(admin) #> user del user3
The user account will be deleted.
Please confirm (y/n): [n] y
The following is an example of the User List command:
SANbox2
(admin) #> user list
Current list of users logged in
[email protected] - in admin mode
[email protected]
[email protected]
B-70
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Whoami Command
Whoami Command
Displays the account name, session number, and switch domain ID for the Telnet
session.
Authority
User
Syntax
Examples
whoami
The following is an example of the Whoami command:
SANbox2 #> whoami
User name:[email protected]
Switch name:SANbox2
Switch domain ID:1
59021-04 C
B-71
B – Command Line Interface
Zone Command
Q
Zone Command
Manages zones and zone membership on a switch. The Zone command defines
members (ports and devices) for a single switch. Zones are members of zone
sets.
Authority
Admin authority and a Zoning Edit session. Refer to the Zoning Command on
page B-79 for information about starting a Zoning Edit session. The List,
Members, and Zonesets keywords are available with User authority and do not
require a Zoning Edit session.
Syntax
zone
add [zone] [members]
copy [zone_source] [zone_destination]
create [zone]
delete [zone]
list
members [zone]
remove [zone] [members]
rename [zone_old [zone_new]
type [zone] [zone_type]
zonesets [zone]
Keywords
add [zone] [members]
Specifies one or more ports given by [members] to add to the zone named [zone].
A zone can have a maximum of 256 members. [members] can have one of the
following formats:
■
Domain ID and port number pair (Domain ID, Port Number). Domain IDs and
port numbers are in decimal. Ports are numbered beginning with 0.
■
6-character hexadecimal device Fibre Channel address (hex)
■
16-character hexadecimal worldwide port name (WWPN) with the format
xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx.
■
Alias name
The application verifies that the [zone] format is correct, but does not validate that
such a port exists.
copy [zone_source] [zone_destination]
Creates a new zone named [zone_destination] and copies the membership into it
from the zone given by [zone_source].
create [zone]
Creates a zone with the name given by [zone]. An zone name must begin with a
letter and be no longer than 64 characters. Valid characters are 0-9, A-Z, a-z, &, _,
and -. The zoning database supports a maximum of 256 zones.
B-72
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Zone Command
delete [zone]
Deletes the specified zone given by [zone] from the zoning database. If the zone
is a member of the active zone set, the zone will not be removed from the active
zone set until the active zone set is deactivated.
list
Displays a list of all zones and the zone sets of which they are members. This
keyword is valid for User authority and does not require a zoning edit session.
members [zone]
Displays all members of the zone given by [zone]. This keyword is available with
User authority and does not require a Zoning Edit session.
remove [zone] [members]
Removes the ports given by [members] from the zone given by [zone]. [members]
can have one of the following formats:
■
Domain ID and port number pair (Domain ID, Port Number). Domain IDs and
port numbers are in decimal. Ports are numbered beginning with 0.
■
6-character hexadecimal device Fibre Channel address (hex)
■
16-character hexadecimal worldwide port name (WWPN) with the format
xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx.
■
Alias name
rename [zone_old] [zone_new]
Renames the zone given by [zone_old] to the zone given by [zone_new].
type [zone] [zone_type]
Specifies the zone type given by [zone_type] to be assigned to the zone name
given by [zone]. If you omit the [zone_type], the system displays the zone type for
the zone given by [zone]. [zone_type] can be one of the following:
soft
Name server zone
hardacl
Access control list hard zone
hardvpf
Virtual private fabric hard zone
zonesets [zone]
Displays all zone sets of which the zone given by [zone] is a member. This
keyword is available with User authority and does not require a Zoning Edit
session.
59021-04 C
B-73
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Zone Command
Examples
The following is an example of the Zone List command:
SANbox2 #> zone list
Zone
ZoneSet
------------------wwn_b0241f
zone_set_1
wwn_23bd31
zone_set_1
wwn_221416
zone_set_1
wwn_2215c3
zone_set_1
wwn_0160ed
zone_set_1
wwn_c001b0
zone_set_1
wwn_401248
zone_set_1
wwn_02402f
zone_set_1
wwn_22412f
zone_set_1
The following is an example of the Zone Members command:
SANbox2 #> zone members wwn_b0241f
Current List of Members for Zone: wwn_b0241f
--------------------------------50:06:04:82:bf:d2:18:c2
50:06:04:82:bf:d2:18:d2
21:00:00:e0:8b:02:41:2f
B-74
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Zone Command
The following is an example of the Zone Zonesets command:
SANbox2 #> zone zonesets zone1
Current List of ZoneSets for Zone: wwn_b0241f
---------------------------------zone_set_1
59021-04 C
B-75
B – Command Line Interface
Zoneset Command
Q
Zoneset Command
Manages zone sets and zone set membership across the fabric.
Authority
Admin authority and a Zoning Edit session. Refer to the Zoning Command on
page B-79 for information about starting a Zoning Edit session. The Active, List,
and Zones keywords are available with User authority. You must close the Zoning
Edit session before using the Activate and Deactivate keywords.
Syntax
zoneset
activate [zone_set]
active
add [zone_set] [zone_list]
copy [zone_set_source] [zone_set_destination]
create [zone_set]
deactivate
delete [zone_set]
list
remove [zone_set] [zone_list]
rename [zone_set_old] [zone_set_new]
zones [zone_set]
Keywords
activate [zone_set]
Activates the zone set given by [zone_set]. This keyword deactivates the active
zone set. Close the Zoning Edit session before using this keyword.
active
Displays the name of the active zone set. This keyword is available with User
authority and does not require a Zoning Edit session.
add [zone_set] [zone_list]
Adds a list of zones and aliases given by [zone_list] to the zone set given by
[zone_set]. Zone and alias names are delimited by spaces in [zone_list]. This
keyword requires a Zoning Edit session.
copy [zone_set_source] [zone_set_destination]
Creates a new zone set named [zone_set_destination] and copies into it the
membership from the zone set given by [zone_set_source]. This keyword requires
a Zoning Edit session.
create [zone_set]
Creates the zone set with the name given by [zone_set]. A zone set name must
begin with a letter and be no longer than 64 characters. Valid characters are 0-9,
A-Z, a-z, &, _, and -. This keyword requires a Zoning Edit session. The zoning
database supports a maximum of 256 zone sets.
deactivate
Deactivates the active zone set. Close the Zoning Edit session before using this
keyword.
B-76
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Zoneset Command
delete [zone_set]
Deletes the zone set given by [zone_set]. If the specified zone set is active, the
command is suspended until the zone set is deactivated. This keyword requires a
Zoning Edit session.
list
Displays a list of all zone sets. This keyword is available with User authority and
does not require a Zoning Edit session.
remove [zone_set] [zone_list]
Removes a list of zones and aliases given by [zone_list] from the zone set given
by [zone_set]. Zone and alias names are delimited by spaces in [zone_list]. If
[zone_set] is the active zone set, the zone will not be removed until the zone set
has been deactivated. This keyword requires a Zoning Edit session.
rename [zone_set_old] [zone_set_new]
Renames the zone set given by [zone_set_old] to the name given by
[zone_set_new]. You can rename the active zone set. This keyword requires a
Zoning Edit session.
zones [zone_set]
Displays all zones that are members of the zone set given by [zone_set]. This
keyword is available with User authority and does not need a Zoning Edit session.
Notes
Examples
■
A zone set must be active for its definitions to be applied to the fabric.
■
Only one zone set can be active at one time.
■
A zone can be a member of more than one zone set.
The following is an example of the Zoneset Active command:
SANbox2 #> zoneset active
The active ZoneSet is:
Beta
The following is an example of the Zoneset List command:
SANbox2 #> zoneset list
Current List of ZoneSets
-----------------------alpha
beta
59021-04 C
B-77
B – Command Line Interface
Zoneset Command
Q
The following is an example of the Zoneset Zones command:
SANbox2 #> zoneset zones ssss
Current List of Zones for ZoneSet: ssss
---------------------------------zone1
zone2
zone3
B-78
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Zoning Command
Zoning Command
Opens a Zoning Edit session in which to create and manage zone sets and zones.
Refer to the Zone Command on page B-72 and the Zoneset Command on
page B-76.
Authority
Admin. The List keyword is available with User authority.
Syntax
zoning
active
cancel
clear
edit
history
limits
list
restore
save
Keywords
active
Displays membership information for the active zone set including member zones
and zone members.
cancel
Closes the current Zoning Edit session. Any unsaved changes are lost.
clear
Clears all inactive zone sets from the volatile edit copy of the zoning database.
This keyword does not affect the non-volatile zoning database. However, if you
enter the Zoning Clear command followed by the Zoning Save command, the
non-volatile zoning database will be cleared from the switch. The preferred
method for clearing the zoning database from the switch is the Reset
Zoning command.
edit
Opens a Zoning Edit session.
history
Displays a history of zoning modifications including the following:
■
Time of the most recent zone set activation or deactivation and the user who
performed it
■
Time of the most recent modifications to the zoning database and the user
who made them.
■
Checksum for the zoning database
limits
Displays the maximum limits imposed on the zoning database for the number of
zone sets, zones, aliases, members per zone, members per alias, and total
members.
59021-04 C
B-79
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Zoning Command
list
Lists all fabric zoning definitions. This keyword is available with User authority.
restore
Reverts the changes to the zoning database that have been made during the
current Zoning Edit session since the last Zoning Save command was entered.
save
Saves changes made during the current Zoning Edit session. The system will
inform you that the zone set must be activated to implement any changes. This
does not apply if you entered the Zoning Clear command during the Zoning Edit
session.
Examples
The following is an example of the Zoning Edit command:
SANbox2 #> admin start
SANbox2
(admin) #> zoning edit
SANbox2
(admin-zoning) #>
.
.
SANbox2
(admin-zoning) #> zoning cancel
Zoning edit mode will be canceled.
SANbox2
Please confirm (y/n): [n]
y
(admin) #> admin end
The following is an example of the Zoning List command:
SANbox2 #> zoning list
Active ZoneSet Information
ZoneSet
Zone
ZoneMember
-------------------------------wwn
wwn_b0241f
50:06:04:82:bf:d2:18:c2
50:06:04:82:bf:d2:18:d2
21:00:00:e0:8b:02:41:2f
wwn_23bd31
50:06:04:82:bf:d2:18:c2
50:06:04:82:bf:d2:18:d2
10:00:00:00:c9:23:bd:31
wwn_221416
B-80
59021-04 C
Q
B – Command Line Interface
Zoning Command
50:06:04:82:bf:d2:18:c2
50:06:04:82:bf:d2:18:d2
10:00:00:00:c9:22:14:16
wwn_2215c3
50:06:04:82:bf:d2:18:c2
50:06:04:82:bf:d2:18:d2
10:00:00:00:c9:22:15:c3
Configured Zoning Information
ZoneSet
Zone
ZoneMember
-------------------------------wwn
wwn_b0241f
50:06:04:82:bf:d2:18:c2
50:06:04:82:bf:d2:18:d2
21:00:00:e0:8b:02:41:2f
wwn_23bd31
50:06:04:82:bf:d2:18:c2
50:06:04:82:bf:d2:18:d2
10:00:00:00:c9:23:bd:31
wwn_221416
50:06:04:82:bf:d2:18:c2
50:06:04:82:bf:d2:18:d2
10:00:00:00:c9:22:14:16
wwn_2215c3
50:06:04:82:bf:d2:18:c2
50:06:04:82:bf:d2:18:d2
10:00:00:00:c9:22:15:c3
59021-04 C
B-81
B – Command Line Interface
Zoning Command
Q
Notes
B-82
59021-04 C
Glossary
Activity LED
A port LED that indicates when frames are
entering or leaving the port.
Alias
A collection of objects that can be zoned
together. An alias is not a zone, and can
not have a zone or another alias as a
member.
ALFairness
On an arbitrated loop, the switch is always
highest priority when arbitrating for the
right to transfer. To prevent other devices
from being locked out, the standard
provides for a fairness mode, which if
enabled requires an arbitrater to let all
other devices win arbitration before arb-ing
a second time. (True / False).
AL_PA
Arbitrated Loop Physical Address
Arbitrated Loop
A Fibre Channel topology where ports use
arbitration to establish a point-to-point
circuit.
Arbitrated Loop Physical Address (AL_PA)
A unique one-byte valid value assigned
during loop initialization to each NL_Port
on a Loop.
ARB_FF
When ARB_FF is enabled, it causes the
switch to send the ARB_FF primitive when
it is in monitoring mode, rather than idles.
The only reason to do this is since the
ARB_FF has less bit transitions than does
an idle, it produces less EMI. It has no
other effect. (True / False)
ASIC
Application Specific Integrated Circuit
BootP
A type of network server.
Buffer Credit
A measure of port buffer capacity equal to
one frame.
Class 2 Service
A service which multiplexes frames at
frame boundaries to or from one or more
N_Ports wit h acknowledgment provided.
Class 3 Service
A service which multiplexes frames at
frame boundaries to or from one or more
N_Ports without acknowledgment.
Domain ID
User defined name that identifies the
switch in the fabric.
E_Port
Expansion port. A switch port that
connects to another FC-SW-2 compliant
switch.
59021-04 C
Glossary-1
Q
Expansion Port
See E_Port.
ExtCredit
Allows full speed operation over distances
greater than 10 kilometers. Additional
credit buffers are borrowed from other
ports (which must be set to donor state).
Decimal value 0-65535
Fabric Management Switch
The switch through which the fabric is
managed.
Fabric Name
User defined name associated with the file
that contains user list data for the fabric.
Fan Fail LED
An LED that indicates that a cooling fan in
the switch is operating below standard.
FC-PLDA
Fibre Channel Private Loop Direct Attach
Flash Memory
Memory on the switch that contains the
chassis control firmware.
Frame
Data unit consisting of a start-of-frame
(SOF) delimiter, header, data payload,
CRC, and an end-of-frame (EOF)
delimiter.
FRU
Field Replaceable Unit
Heartbeat LED
A chassis LED that indicates the status of
the internal switch processor and the
results of the Power-On Self-Test.
Glossary-2
SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch
Installation Guide
Initiator
The device that initiates a data exchange
with a target device.
In-Order-Delivery
A feature that requires that frames be
received in the same order in which they
were sent.
Input Power LED
A chassis LED that indicates that the
switch logic circuitry is receiving proper DC
voltages.
InteropCredit
This variable determines the number of
credits we will advertise on an ISL. Older
versions of software required that we
match their offering. (decimal value,
0-255)
IP
Internet Protocol
ISLSecurity
ISLSecurity determines which switches a
port will establish a link with. ANY - we will
link with any switch. Ours - we will only link
to another QLogic switch. None - the port
will not establish an ISL link.
LCFEnable
LCFEable gives preference to Link control
frames (such as class 2 ACK frames) over
other frames, when queued for
transmission in the switch. This may
provide better performance when running
Class 2 traffic. LCFEable is incompatible
with MFSEnable, and both cannot be
selected. (True / False)
LIP
Loop Initialization Primitive sequence
59021-04 C
Q
SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch
Installation Guide
Logged-In LED
A port LED that indicates device login or
loop initialization status.
Over Temperature LED
A chassis LED or a power supply LED that
indicates that the switch or power supply is
overheating.
Management Information Base
A set of guidelines and definitions for the
Fibre Channel functions.
POST
Power On Self Test
Management Workstation
PC workstation that manages the fabric
through the fabric management switch.
Power On Self Test (POST)
Diagnostics that the switch chassis
performs at start up.
MIB
Management Information Base
Private Device
A device that can communicate only with
other devices on the same loop.
MSEnable
Determines whether GS-3 management
server commands will be accepted on the
port. It can be used to prevent in-band
management of the switch on any or all
ports. (True / False)
NL_Port
Node Loop Port. A Fibre Channel device
port that supports arbitrated loop protocol.
N_Port
Node Port. A Fibre Channel device port in
a point-to-point or fabric connection.
NoClose
Causes the switch to keep the loop open,
if no other device is arbitrating. It is
intended to improve performance when
there is a single L_Port device connected
to the switch. (True / False)
Output Power LED
A power supply LED that indicates that the
power supply is providing DC voltage to
the switch.
59021-04 C
Private Loop
A loop of private devices connected to a
single switch port.
SANbox Manager
Switch management application.
SFF
Small Form-Factor transceiver.
SFP
Small Form-Factor Pluggable. A
transceiver device, smaller than a GigaBit
Interface Converter, that plugs into the
Fibre Channel port.
Small Form Factor
A transceiver device, smaller than a
GigaBit Interface Converter, that is
permanently attached to the circuit board.
Small Form-Factor Pluggable
A transceiver device, smaller than a
GigaBit Interface Converter, that plugs into
the Fibre Channel port.
Glossary-3
Q
SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch
Installation Guide
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol
Target
A storage device that responds to an
initiator device.
VCCI
Voluntary Control Council for Interference
VIEnable
FC-VI. When enabled, VI preference
frames will be transmitted ahead of other
frames. (True / False)
Worldwide Name (WWN)
A unique 64-bit address assigned to a
device by the device manufacturer.
WWN
Worldwide Name
Zone
A set of ports or devices grouped together
to control the exchange of information.
Zone Set
A set of zones grouped together. The
active zone set defines the zoning for a
fabric.
Glossary-4
59021-04 C
Index
Numerics
10/100 Base-T straight cable 4-8
A
access 3-8
Access Control List zone 3-9
access control list zone B-73
account name 3-11, B-71
force PROM 5-12
Activity LED 2-6
Admin authority 3-11, B-3
Admin command B-4
administrative state
port B-36
switch B-24
air flow 2-10, A-4
alarm
configuration B-28, B-54
alarm log B-41
clear B-23
alias
add member port B-5
copy B-5
create B-5
delete B-5
delete member B-6
display list B-5
display members B-6
rename B-6
Alias command B-5
altitude A-4
authority 3-11
B
bandwidth 3-7
beacon B-23
brackets 4-2, 4-4
broadcast B-41
buffer credits A-2
59021-04 C
C
cable
10/100 Base-T 4-8
10/100 Base-T crossover cable 4-8
fibre optic 3-1
null modem F/F DB9 4-8
cascade topology 3-3
chassis
air flow A-4
diagnostics 5-9
LEDs 2-3
marking A-4
shock A-4
status B-41
vibration A-4
classes of service A-1
Command Line Interface B-1
command syntax B-2
Config command B-7
configuration
activate B-7
backup B-7
copy B-7
delete B-7
edit B-7
file 2-2, 5-3, 5-14
list B-7
reset B-7, B-18
restore B-8
save B-8
configuration file system error 5-2
controls 2-2
CRC error 5-7
credits 3-6, A-2
D
Date command B-9
decode error 5-7
device
cabling 4-14
Index-1
Q
SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch
Installation Guide
description 3-1
diagnostics 5-1, 5-9, A-2
dimensions A-3
distance 3-6
domain ID 3-2, 5-6
domain ID lock 3-2
domains B-42
donor port 3-6, B-42
E
E_Port 5-6
emissions standards A-4
environmental
conditions 4-2
specifications A-4
Ethernet
connection 4-9
port 2-8
event logging
by component B-33, B-57
by port B-34, B-57
by severity level B-34, B-57
restore B-34
settings B-34, B-57
start B-35
stop B-35
expansion port 2-7
external test B-65
F
F_Port 2-6
fabric
aggregate bandwidth A-2
latency A-2
management 3-10, A-3
management workstation 4-1
point-to-point bandwidth A-2
security 3-11, 4-10
factory default settings B-18
Fallback command B-10
Fan Fail LED 2-3, 5-10
fans 2-10, 6-4
fatal error 5-1, 5-2
Index-2
fiber optic cable 3-1
Fibre Channel
ports 2-4
protocols A-1
field replaceable unit 6-1
File Transfer Protocol 4-17, 5-3
firmware
failure 5-2
fallback version B-10
install with CLI 4-16
install with FTP and CLI 4-17
install with SANbox Manager 4-15
list image files B-13
remove image files B-13
retrieve image file B-13
unpack image file B-13
version B-46
FL_Port 2-6
flash memory 2-2, 4-18
force PROM
blink pattern 5-2
copy log files 5-14
exit 5-13
image unpack 5-13
menu 5-13
mode 5-12
remake file system 5-14
remove switch config 5-14
reset network config 5-14
reset password file 5-14
reset switch 5-14
Force PROM button 2-2, 5-12
frame size A-2
FRU - See Field Replaceable Unit
FTP - See File Transfer Protocol
G
G_Port 2-6
GBIC - See GigaBit Interface Converter
generic ports 2-6
Gigabit Interface Converter 3-1
GL_Port 2-6
59021-04 C
Q
SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch
Installation Guide
H
harmonics A-4
HBA - See Host Bus Adapter
Heartbeat LED 2-3, 5-1
Help command B-11
History command B-12
host bus adapter 3-1
humidity 4-2, A-4
HyperTerminal application 4-9
I
Image command B-13
immunity A-4
initiator device 2-7
Input Power LED 2-4, 5-10
installation 4-2
internal firmware failure 5-2
internal test B-65
IP address 2-2
ISL connection 5-7
L
laser specifications A-6
latency 3-7, A-2
LED
Activity 2-6
Fan Fail 2-3, 5-10
Heartbeat 2-3, 5-1
Input Power 2-4, 5-10
Logged-In 2-5, 5-5
Output Power 2-10, 5-11
Over Temperature (chassis) 2-3, 5-10
Over Temperature (power supply) 2-10, 5-11
link state database B-42
Lip command B-14
log
archive B-33
clear B-33
file B-33
power-on self test B-45
logged in users B-46
Logged-In LED 2-5, 5-5
login error 5-7
59021-04 C
login limit B-1
logout error 5-7
loop port B-14
Loop Port Bypass B-36
Loop Port Enable B-36
loss-of-signal error 5-7
M
maintainability A-2
maintenance
interface A-3
strategy A-2
management workstation 4-8
manufacturer information B-61
marking A-4
media type A-2
memory
activity B-42
flash 2-2
mesh topology 3-4
minicom 4-10
Multistage topology 3-5
N
name server
information B-42
zone 3-9, B-73
network interface B-42
non-fatal error 5-1
null modem F/F DB9 cable 4-8
O
online test B-65
Output Power LED 2-10, 5-11
Over Temperature LED
chassis 2-3, 5-10
power supply 2-10, 5-11
P
pagebreak B-23, B-42
Passwd command B-15
password
force PROM 5-12
Index-3
Q
switch 3-11, B-1, B-15
performance 3-6
planning 3-1
port
administrative state B-36
buffer credits 3-6
configuration 4-14, B-25, B-54
counters B-36
diagnostics 5-5
Ethernet 2-8
excessive errors 5-7
external test B-65
Fibre Channel 2-4
generic 2-6
initialize B-18
internal test B-65
LEDs 2-5
maximum number of ports/users A-2
modes 2-6
online test B-65
operational information B-43
performance B-59
serial 2-8
speed A-2, B-36
POST - See Power On Self Test
power
cords 4-2
requirements 4-1
source loading A-3
supply 2-9, 6-3
switch 2-2
power down 4-18
power-on self test
description 5-1
log B-45
results 4-7
principal
priority 3-2
switch 3-2
PROM 2-2
Ps command B-16
Index-4
SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch
Installation Guide
Q
Quit command B-17
R
rack mount 4-3
recovering a switch 5-12
regulatory certifications A-4
removal/replacement 6-1
Reset command B-18
RS-232 port 2-8
rubber feet 4-2
S
safety standards A-4
SANbox Manager
description 2-11
Linux installation 4-11
Solaris installation 4-12
Windows installation 4-11
scalability A-1
security 3-11, 4-10
serial
connection 4-9
port 2-8
Set command B-23
Set Config command B-25
Set Log command B-33
Set Port command B-36
Set Setup command B-37
SFP - See Small Form-Factor Pluggable
Show command B-41
Show Config command B-54
Show Log command B-57
Show Perf command B-59
Show Setup command B-61
Shutdown command 4-18, B-64
Simple Network Management Protocol 2-11
configuration B-18, B-37, B-61
reset B-18
site requirements 4-1
small form-factor pluggable 2-4, 4-4, 6-2
SNMP See - Simple Network Management
Protocol
59021-04 C
Q
SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch
Installation Guide
soft zone 3-9, B-73
steering B-45
switch
administrative state B-24
configuration 4-13, B-27, B-54
initialize B-18
management 2-11
manufacturer information B-61
operational information B-46
power down 4-18
recovery 5-12
reset 5-14, B-18, B-68
specifications A-1
system
configuration B-38, B-61
process B-16
processor A-2
reset B-18
settings B-61
T
table mount 4-3
target device 2-7
Telnet session B-71
temperature 4-2, A-4
Test command B-65
timeout value 5-6
TL_Port
devices 2-7
name server registration 2-7
number of off-loop devices 2-7
private initiators 2-7
private targets 2-7
topology
cascade 3-3
mesh 3-4
Multistage 3-5
transceiver 2-4, 4-4, 6-2
translation entries list 2-7
transmission rate 3-6, 3-7
U
Uptime command B-68
59021-04 C
user
account 3-11, B-1
interface A-2
logged in B-46
User authority 3-11, B-3
V
ventilation 2-10
vibration A-4
Virtual Private Fabric zone 3-10
virtual private fabric zone B-73
voltage
fluctuations A-4
operating A-3
W
Whoami command B-71
workstation 4-1, 4-8
worldwide name 2-7, 3-8
WWN - See Worldwide Name
Z
zone
access control list 3-9, B-73
add member port B-72
conflict 5-6
copy B-72
create B-72
definition 3-8
delete B-73
delete member port B-73
list B-73
list members B-73
name server 3-9
rename B-73
type B-73
virtual private fabric 3-10, B-73
Zone command B-72
zone set 3-8
activate B-76
active B-79
add member zone B-76
copy B-76
Index-5
Q
SANbox2-16 Fibre Channel Switch
Installation Guide
create B-76
deactivate B-76
delete B-77
delete member zone B-77
display B-77
display active B-76
display members B-77
display zones B-73
rename B-77
Zoneset command B-76
zoning
configuration B-29, B-54
database 3-8
edit B-79
history B-79
limits 3-8, B-79
list definitions B-80
reset B-18
revert changes B-80
save edits B-80
Zoning command B-79
Index-6
59021-04 C
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