Teacher Resource: Character Attributes in Action

Teacher Resource: Character Attributes in Action
VALUES ILY
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TAUGHT
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A RESOU
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ARTEN
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KIND RG DE 9
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Character
Attributes
in Action
An educator’s guide to promoting
student wellness with physical activity,
focused on character development
Climate for
Learning and
Working
EQUITY
Safe, Nurturing,
Engaging,
Relationships &
Environments
RESPECT
INCLUSION
Character
Attributes
in Action
Conflict/
Bullying/
Violence
Prevention &
Intervention
Character
Attributes in
Action
At the Peel District School Board, we
value the development of the whole
child, which is why we commit to the
teaching and learning of our six core
character attributes:
CARING
COOPERATIVE
HONEST
INCLUSIVE
RESPECTFUL
RESPONSIBLE
The character development of the
people who work and learn inside our
buildings matters. A key phrase we ask
our Peel board community is:
What will you learn INSIDE these
doors that will help you be your best
OUTSIDE these doors?
Restorative
Practices
Healthy
Relationships
Safe,
Nurturing &
Engaging
Repair
Character
Attributes
in Action
Working with
Challenging
Emotions/
Behaviours
An effective way to teach the
character attributes and learn about
them is to have fun while being
physically active. While developing
character attributes in an active way,
students will also develop better social
skills, improve their learning skills,
and have better physical and mental
wellness — all while meeting
curriculum objectives. Being active in a
purposeful and playful way gives us
energy, reduces stress and anxiety, and
increases our feelings of well-being.
This document has been developed
by teachers for teachers. This resource
provides 10 fun physical activities
for each of the 6 character attributes
to be used during Physical Education
classes, outdoor activities, Daily
Physical Activity (DPA), team building
events or for a physical release in
the classroom.
We hope you will have as much
fun using this document as we had
in creating it!
2
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
Lesson
Plans
Each lesson plan includes:
Character Attribute:
The character attribute that will be
the focus of the lesson and follow-up
conversations are identified.
Learning Goal:
Specific learning outcomes for the
activity are described.
Movement Skills:
Connections to the Health and
Physical Education Curriculum
are provided.
Equipment:
Materials needed for the activity
are listed.
Set-Up:
All pre-work that is required to
prepare for the activity is explained.
Instructions:
Step-by-step instructions for completing
the activity are described.
Questions for Consolidation:
Post-questions are suggested in order
to assess student learning and to
engage students in dialogue about
the identified character attribute.
How students can demonstrate this
character attribute outside of class
can also be discussed at this time.
Photo and Video:
A photograph and a YouTube link of
the activity in action are provided in
order to deepen the understanding
of the activity for the educator.
Acknowledgements
This document would not have been
possible without the dedication,
creativity and persistence of these
dedicated teacher professionals:
Thanks to the Peel District School
Board Climate for Learning and
Working Team who helped compile
this resource:
Jennifer Cuthbertson
Steven Killeen
Alisa McClure
Aviva Rosenberg
Lisa Tutty
Kelly Krug
CLIMATE FOR LEARNING AND WORKING COORDINATOR
Sayema Chowdhury
CLIMATE FOR LEARNING AND WORKING RESOURCE TEACHER
Rubi Pourawal
CLIMATE FOR LEARNING AND WORKING RESOURCE TEACHER
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
3
Grouping Strategies to
Ensure Inclusion
Many activities in this document
require students to work in groups.
Well-designed groups support positive
student interactions and have the
power to help students become part
of an environment in which they feel
respected, included and connected to
one another. As these are the
environments where students flourish
and maximum learning occurs, it is
essential that educators be thoughtful
in their grouping practices and give
careful and intentional attention to
how students will be grouped for
these activities.
4
Purposeful organization of student
groupings ensures that vulnerable
students are not marginalized or
excluded. When students are asked to
form their own groups, this encourages
students who are alike to come
together and those who are viewed as
different to be excluded. When
teachers intentionally group students,
this can prevent embarrassment of not
being chosen for a group and thus
being forced into a pre-established
group.
For the purpose of the activities in this
document, classes can be divided into
groups using random grouping
methods (rather than intentional
grouping strategies). The following are
a list of fun and quick ways to group
students. Each of these methods
encourages students to work with new
people often, gives students an
opportunity to still work with their
friends, and helps promote an
environment of inclusion.
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY
INSTRUCTIONS
Socks
Using a bag of clean socks, have students pick one then find its pair. For larger groups, pairs join other
pairs by size or colour to form larger sub-groups.
Ask a Question
Ask a question to the class. Those who say ‘yes’ move to one end of the room, those who say ‘no’, move
to the other. For example, ask the class, “When you put your socks on, do you put the right one on first?”
Instead of yes or no questions, you could ask questions giving the number of options that you need
groups. For example, “What flavour ice cream do you like better; chocolate, strawberry or vanilla?”
Chocolate moves to one side, strawberry to another, and vanilla to another.
Playing Cards
Pass out playing cards and group students based on having similar or different suits, black or red cards,
cards in a specific order, the same numbers, or any other values you assign to the deck.
Odds and Evens
Ask students to count up the letters in their first name and determine if they have an odd number of
letters or an even number of letters. Odds could move to one end of the playing space and evens could
move to the other. If you need bigger groups, you can ask students to find three or four others who also
have an even or odd number of letters in their name and form a group.
Birthday Buddies
Ask students to group together based on who has the same birthday month as them. You could also ask
students to group together based on the season they were born.
Burger Buddies
Have students choose the fast food establishment they like the best. Have choices for the number of
groups that you would like. Example, “Which do you prefer? McDonald’s, Burger King, Subway, etc.”
Colour Pencils
Have students pick coloured pencils out of a can. Have four or five of the same color and have as many
colors as you need groups.
Famous Pairs
Make index cards ahead of time. On each pair of cards, write a famous pair that serves as a way for students
to form pairs. For example, write “peanut butter” on one card and “jelly” on the other. Other ideas:
“spaghetti and meatballs” or “Romeo and Juliet” or “October and Halloween” or “Tom and Jerry”.
Pick a Word, Any Word
rite a word on an index card and then on the next two, three or four cards, write synonyms for the
W
original word. For example, you could have cards containing the words large, gigantic, huge, enormous,
and so forth. Do the same with additional sets of cards using different sets of synonyms for however
many number of groups you want. Ask each student to pick a word, any word. Once everyone has a
card, explain to them that they will be working in synonym groups, and if necessary, remind them what
synonyms are. Students then form themselves into groups based on matching synonyms. This approach
could also be used for homonyms, antonyms, figures of speech, or pretty much anything else that can be
categorized.
Team Shake App
Use the Team Shake app to randomly select names to create teams.
Picture Puzzles
Cut pictures from a magazine so that there are half as many pictures as members of the group. If you
have a theme, try to find pictures related to the theme. Cut each picture in half, thirds or quarters
(dependent on the number you want in each group) and mix them up in a bin. Each student takes one
piece and groups are those whose pieces form a complete picture.
There are many benefits of teachers taking the responsibility for
creating student groups. When students work with peers who
they normally would not work with in an environment where the
demonstration of the Character Attributes are expected, it has the
power to enhance peer dynamics, promote optimal peer interactions, develop students’ social skills, increase empathy, build
relationships across the classroom, and increase feelings of safety,
inclusion, respect and belonging. In these kinds of environments,
students are motivated and engaged; they are excited to learn
from one another and feel supported by their peers. Ensuring
inclusion through the use of grouping strategies has the power to
transform a class into a community!
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
5
Table of Contents
2Character Attributes in Action
3Lesson Plans
3Acknowledgements
4Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion
7CARING
9Up, Over and Down
10Fill Your Bucket
11Help! Help! Help!
12Reducing Litter
13Plant a Tree with TLC
14Be My Valentine
15Squished Ants Tag
16Parachute Care
17Chuck the Chicken
18Alphabet Tag and Super Hero Tag
19 COOPERATIVE
21 Human Knot
22 Building the CN Tower
23 Traffic Jam
24 Mystery Maze
25 Caterpillar on Course
26 Magic Carpet Walk
27 Back to Back
28Tent
29Mushroom
30Cloud
31 HONEST
6
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
Chicken Relay Race
Whistle Locomotion Freeze
Rock-Paper-Scissors Ha Ha Ohhh
Pokemon Math Dodgeball
Pokemon Tag
Hockey Stick Handling Continuous Relay
Hot Dog Tag
Auto Wreckers
‘Everybody It’ Tag and Survivor Series
Cat and Mouse
43 INCLUSIVE
45 Get Together
46 Save Your Planet
47 Martian From Mars
48 Stuck in the Middle
49 Stinky Cheese Touch
50 Discriminating Doctor Dodgeball
51 Rock-Paper-Scissors Cheer
52 Everybody In!
53Switch!
54 Stop Picking on Me!
55 RESPECTFUL
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
Olympic Rock-Paper-Scissors
R-E-S-P-E-C-T Relay
Toilet Tag
Oh Deer!
Circle of Respect
Trash Balls
Partner Move
Object Move
Back Me Up Tag
Helping Hands
67 RESPONSIBLE
69Yoga
70 Warm Up Leader
71 Tag, You’re It
72 Sinking Ship
73 Rock-Paper-Scissors: Beat the Leader
74 Let’s Get to 100
75 Equipment Manager Relay
76 Circuit Time
77 Responsibility Gallery Walk
78 Alphabet Tag
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
CARING
“Never believe that a few
caring people can’t change
the world. For, indeed,
that’s all who ever have.”
– Margaret Mead
CARING
Showing compassion and kindness toward others
You show CARE when you:
• Show kindness towards people and other living things.
• Listen to and respond appropriately to the concerns of others.
• Help others who are in need.
•Demonstrate empathy by recognizing and identifying with the
feelings of others.
• Protect and respect the environment.
http://bit.ly/CARINGplaylist
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
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ACTIVITY #1
UP, OVER AND DOWN
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate
caring for others
through working as
a team and learning
to care for one
another’s safety.
Running, leaping,
planking
Large space
Set-Up
Instructions
•Set up as a relay with students
in 4-6 lines with 5-8 students in
each line.*
•Students should stand one behind
the other.
•
The first person is to run a few metres then get into plank position.
•The second person runs, leaps over the legs of the first person, and gets
into a plank position a few metres past the first person. Then the third
person goes, and so on.
•If there is room, the first person gets up and continues the activity until there
is no room left at the end of the gym.
•Remind students to be careful when leaping over students’ legs while they are in
a plank position and to wait patiently for the person ahead of them to be in
a safe position before continuing.
•Start again in the opposite direction once the team has gotten to the end
of the gym.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Questions for Consolidation
1.How did it feel when someone was leaping over you? How did you feel when
you were leaping over someone else?
2.How does this game demonstrate caring and empathy for how other
people feel?
3.What did you do to make sure you cared for your fellow teammates and
kept them safe?
4.What do you say and what do you do to demonstrate caring at home,
in the school, and in your community?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/caring1
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
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ACTIVITY #2
FILL YOUR BUCKET
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate caring
for others through
working as a team.
Underhand and
overhand throwing,
catching, running
Large space, large
bucket (or basket/
container that can hold
lots of balls), a large
number of balls (foam
balls, tennis balls, etc.),
pylons
Set-Up
Instructions
•The goal is for the ‘caring
students’ to fill the bucket with
balls more quickly than the
‘mean student’ can empty it.
•Select one student to be the
‘mean student’ and stand in the
middle of the gym next to the
bucket full with balls.
•The rest of the players stand
scattered around the space.
•Place pylons around the bucket
(radius of about 2m) to show
where students cannot cross.
•
On the teacher’s signal, the ‘mean student’ tries to empty the container by
throwing out balls one by one.
•The ‘caring students’ try to put all of the tennis balls back inside the container
before it is emptied.
•Players are allowed to pass the ball to other players who could be standing
close to the container.
• The ‘mean student’ cannot block other players from placing balls in the bucket.
•Select a new ‘mean student’ every new round or after a certain amount of
time has elapsed.
Questions for Consolidation
1.As the ‘mean student’, was it difficult to get the bucket empty with so many
students keeping it filled?
2.Why did working together allow you to keep the bucket full?
3.What parallels can you make to experiences you have had or witnessed in class,
in school, at home (in society)?
4.How can a large group of caring students help a student who is not making
good choices?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/caring2
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Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #3
HELP! HELP! HELP!
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate
caring for others
through working as
a team and learning
to care for one
another’s safety.
Running, crossovers,
hopping
Open space,
agility ladders
Set-Up
Instructions
•Divide the students into groups
of 4 or 5, depending on how
many agility ladders you have.*
•One student is alone on one
side of the agility ladder – he/she
is safe.
•Explain to the students that there
has been a fire in the building and
that they need to be caring for
others’ safety and help rescue
the people.
•
The student who is alone on the safe side runs through the agility ladder
to the other side.
• The other students do jumping jacks while yelling, “HELP HELP!!!”
• The student helper runs one friend back to the safe side.
• Then the two students go back together to save the next person.
• This pattern continues until all of the students are saved.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Variations: Change the movement skill through the ladder — emphasizing
proper form and safety rather than rushing. You may choose to explain what
agility means at this time.
Questions for Consolidation
1.How does it feel when someone tries to help you out of difficult situations?
2.How does this game demonstrate caring and empathy for other people’s safety?
3.What occupations require you to be caring?
4.Does caring for someone sometimes mean you have to give up something?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/caring3
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
11
ACTIVITY #4
REDUCING LITTER
(Adapted from 50 Games for Going Green by Carol Scaini and Carolyn Evans)
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate caring
for our environment by
sorting recyclables to
keep waste from ending
up in landfills.
Running
Open space, various
recyclable materials
(e.g., water bottles,
newspapers, plastic
containers, aluminum
cans) or a variety of
physical education
equipment (e.g.,
skipping ropes, scoops,
beanbags, balls) –
minimum of two
materials per student,
5 or 6 recycling bins.
All recyclable items
must be safe and clean.
Set-Up
Instructions
•The goal is for the ‘caring
students’ to sort recyclables to
keep waste from ending up in
the landfills.
•Students line up behind their
team’s recycling bin facing a
pile of recyclable items on the
other side of the gymnasium or
playing field. Physical education
equipment will be considered
trash/garbage and should also be
placed in this pile.
•
Divide students into five or six teams.*
• The first player runs to the recyclable/trash pile, picks up one item and runs back.
•Recyclable materials are to be dropped into the recycling bin or beside the
recycling bin if it is physical education equipment.
• The next student in line is then tagged.
•The second player runs to the recyclable pile, picks up one item, and runs back
and drops it into the recycling bin or beside the recycling bin for waste and tags
the next student in line.
• Continue until all the items have been picked up and sorted.
• If a student drops an item, they must pick it up before continuing.
•Teams must sit quietly in line, one behind the other, and with their hands on
their heads when finished.
Variations: Teachers may choose to change the method of locomotion,
change the relay distance, or designate each team to sort a specific item
(e.g., trash vs. physical education items).
* See ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’ on page 4.
Questions for Consolidation
1.Why is caring about the environment important? What are some ways in which
we demonstrate this?
2.Why is it important to sort our waste? What are some things you can say
to a friend who does not seem to care about sorting waste and its impact on
the environment?
3.How can we show caring as a group at school, home and in the community?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/caring4
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Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #5
PLANT A TREE WITH TLC
(TENDER LOVING CARE)
(Adapted from 50 Games for Going Green by Carol Scaini and Carolyn Evans)
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate caring
for our environment
and all living things
through TLC.
Running
Open space,
1 pylon per team
Set-Up
Instructions
•The goal is for the ‘caring
students’ to replicate the planting
of a tree. For a tree to flourish
and grow, it needs clean air, clean
water, healthy soil, and sunlight.
•Divide students into groups
of five.*
•Each team represents one of the
following: clean air, clean water,
healthy soil, healthy sunlight, and
a little TLC.
•If a team does not have five
players, have the team take
more than one turn to complete
five runs.
•Place a pylon 10-20 metres away
from their team on one end of the
gymnasium or playing field.
•Line up in groups of five, standing
single file opposite their pylon.
•
On the teacher’s signal, the first person on each team (clean air) runs around
the pylon and back to their team to pick up the second player (clean water) by
holding hands. All team members must remain attached by holding hands.
•Together, clean air and clean water run to the pylon and back to their team to
pick up ‘healthy soil’.
•The same movement pattern is continued until everyone has been picked up
and has completed the relay.
•The first team to finish will have successfully planted a tree by having all the
players standing together with their arms outstretched over their hands,
resembling a forest of trees.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Variations: Teachers may choose to ask students to link in different ways
(e.g., linking elbows).
Questions for Consolidation
1.Why is caring about the environment important? What are some ways in which
we demonstrate this?
2.Why must we care for the environment together?
3.What are some ways that human activities impact the cleanliness of the air, the
cleanliness of water, the health of the soil, and the amount of sunlight plants
need to flourish?
4.What are some benefits to humans in caring for our environment?
5.How can we show caring as a group at school, home, and in the community?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/caring5
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
13
ACTIVITY #6
BE MY VALENTINE
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate caring
for others.
Running, dodging
Large space, 4 red
pinnies for the ‘cupids’
and 4 red beanbags
to represent hearts or
valentines
Set-Up
Instructions
•Choose 4 students to be ‘cupids’
(have them wear the red pinnies)
- they are the taggers.
•Give 4 students a red beanbag
(hearts or valentines). These
students cannot be tagged – they
must display the beanbag and not
hide it from the other players.
•Have the ‘cupids’ start in the centre of the playing area and count to ten.
Then they can tag people.
•Everyone else spreads out inside the playing area, including the students with
the hearts – be sure to indicate the playing area with either gym lines or pylons.
•When a student is tagged, they go outside of the playing area and kneel down
and make a heart with their arms.
•Students with the red beanbags will hand the beanbag to someone who has
been tagged and is kneeling outside the playing area making a heart with
their hands.
•The ‘freed’ person joins back in the game carrying the beanbag and can
now free other students who have been tagged and are kneeling outside
the playing area.
Questions for Consolidation
1.In what ways was caring demonstrated in this activity?
2.How can we show caring as a group at school, home, and in the community?
3.Why were ‘cupids’ and ‘hearts’ used for this activity? What is their connection
to caring?
4.Name someone who has a ‘caring heart’ who you admire. Why do you admire
him/her?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/caring6
14
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #7
SQUISHED ANTS TAG
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate caring
for others by working as
a team.
Running, skipping,
dodging
Large space,
pool noodles
Set-Up
Instructions
•Select 1-2 students to be
the tagger(s).
•Students are in a scatter
formation within the boundaries
of the designated area.
•Teacher selects the movement
skill that the students will use
(e.g., running, skipping).
•
When a student is tagged by the student(s) holding the ‘bug swatter’
(pool noodle), they must lay on their back with hands and feet in the air.
•In order to get back in the game, 4 students must carry the ‘squished ant’ to
the ‘Ant Hospital’ by holding onto one limb each. The ‘Ant Hospital’ can be a
designated area marked off with pylons or a specific part of the area.
• Ants cannot be tagged while carrying out their caring act of kindness.
• Switch taggers every 1-2 minutes and change the movement skill frequently.
Questions for Consolidation
1.In this activity, you needed to rely on your teammates to get back into the
game. What are some examples of a time when you had help from others
to achieve a goal?
2.What impact does having a caring person in your life have on you (your success,
achievement of goals, your mood, etc.)?
3.How does teamwork demonstrate our care for others?
4.How can we show caring as a group at school, home and in the community?
5.Why might it be hard to be caring at times?
6.What do you do or say during this activity to show you care?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/caring7
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
15
ACTIVITY #8
PARACHUTE CARE
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate caring
for others through
written responses.
Start and stop on
a signal
Large space, parachute,
paper hearts or prewritten hearts with
examples of what
caring is
Set-Up
Instructions
•Each student fills out a heart
with an example of caring prior
to the activity.
•
Each student will grab a handle of the parachute and place their heart on
the parachute.
•On the teacher’s signal, students will begin to shake the parachute and try to
have a heart fall off the parachute.
• When a heart falls off the parachute, students stop shaking the parachute.
• The student that is closest to the heart will open and read the heart to the class.
Variations: The teacher may choose to use a blanket or tarp if a parachute is
not available.
Questions for Consolidation
1.What are some common themes that have emerged from the messages written
on the hearts?
2.Why is caring about your classmates important?
3.What does a caring environment look like, sound like, and feel like in a classroom,
in the school, and at home?
4.If you could write another heart thanking someone for caring about you,
what would it say and for whom would it be?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/caring8a http://bit.ly/caring8b
16
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #9
CHUCK THE CHICKEN
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate
awareness of other
people’s feelings.
Running, over and under
hand passing, throwing,
retrieving objects from
the ground
Large space (preferably
outside with the idea of
endless space to throw
and run), 1 or 2 Chickens
(2 different colours)
Set-Up
Instructions
•Divide class into 2 or 4 teams.*
•If you have 4 teams, 2 teams
work with one chicken and the
other 2 teams work with the
other chicken.
•Predetermine which teams will
work with which chicken.
•If you have 2 teams, use only
one chicken.
•
Begin the game with 2 teams in a tight huddle position and the other 2 teams in
a straight line.
• Give the student in the beginning of the line a chicken.
•The teacher will signal the beginning of the game by yelling the word, “GO”.
On this signal, the huddle group and line group will do two different things.
Line Group: Student at the beginning of the line must pass the chicken over their
head and the next person must pass the chicken under and through their legs.
Continue this pattern until the last person in line has the chicken. This last person
must then yell, “CHUCK THE CHICKEN!” and throw the chicken as far as possible.
Huddle Group: Must choose a runner to run around their huddle as many times as
possible. The group counts the number of times the selected student runs around
the entire huddle. The teacher may suggest a strategy of counting every time the
runner runs past a particular student. For instance, Sam is the runner chosen for
this huddle and Marvin is the chosen person in the huddle. Each time Sam passes
Marvin the huddle yells, “1, 2” and so on until they hear, “CHUCK THE CHICKEN”.
•Once the chicken is thrown and “CHUCK THE CHICKEN” is yelled, the groups
change roles in the game – the huddle group becomes the line group and the
line group becomes the huddle group.
•Now the huddle group must run to the chicken that was thrown and make a line
there following the Step 1 instructions without the ‘GO’ signal.
•Now the line group must form a huddle quickly, choose a runner and huddle
person for the count and begin to count the number of runs around the huddle
as fast as possible.
•The number of runs that each group gains while the chicken is passed over and
under the group in the line is the amount of points the group achieves. The
group continues to add points together to gain the total points for the end of
the game. Remembering that the points stop when the words “CHUCK THE
CHICKEN” is shouted.
• Teacher signals the end of the game with a whistle.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Variations: Teachers may choose to have teams sit while students run around
their group of students instead of a huddle. Students could also gallop around
the huddle instead of running. Students could kneel and pass the chicken over
and under their body to the next team member.
Questions for Consolidation
1.Why is it important to share the different roles in this game?
2.Why is it important to identify with the feelings of others in your group/team
during the activity?
3.What other character attributes are important to demonstrate in this activity?
4.What challenges did your group face in completing this activity?
5.Give examples of how your group demonstrated caring in this activity and how
this may have helped your group be successful.
Video Link: http://bit.ly/caring9
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
17
ACTIVITY #10
ALPHABET TAG AND
SUPER HERO TAG
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To show kindness
towards people by
recognizing and
identifying with the
feelings of others and
helping those who are
in need.
Running, skipping,
dodging (change the
locomotion to other
forms - slow motion,
jogging, hopping,
jumping, galloping,
marching, etc. to build
their physical literacy)
Large open space
(inside or outside),
pool noodles or small
pieces of material for
scarves (silk is best)
Set-Up
Instructions
•Select 3-4 students to be the
taggers – if you have 2 classes in
the gym together choose
6-8 taggers.
•Remind students about safe
and fair tagging. They are only
allowed to tag on the arms, back,
and shoulders of others.
•Taggers and non-taggers should
also be reminded of fair play
and caring of others’ feelings;
everyone must use the same
locomotion to be fair. Also, the
taggers are not allowed to wait
around the students (monkey
guard) as they may only tag
those who are moving in the
locomotion given.
•Ask students to scatter
within the boundaries of the
designated area.
•Teacher selects the movement
skill that the students will use
(e.g., running, skipping etc.).
• Taggers carry a scarf or a noodle.
Alphabet Tag:
•When the person tags a player, the student must make a letter of the alphabet
with their body. Students must remain standing.
•Students who do not have a noodle (students who are not taggers) have a
choice to save their friend and be a ‘hero’ by guessing the letter he/she is
making. The friend may guess as many letters as possible to free their friend or
stop and continue to escape the taggers.
•When another student or the teacher guesses their letter, they may rejoin
the game.
Super Hero Tag:
•When the person tags a player, the student must make an X with their body
staying on their feet.
•Students who do not have a noodle (students who are not taggers) have a
choice to save their friend and be a ‘hero’ by crawling through the person’s legs
and then getting up and giving the person a DOUBLE HIGH FIVE (High 10).
•The tagged person can now rejoin the game.
Questions for Consolidation
1.How did it feel to have your teammates help you get back in the game?
How does it feel to help a teammate?
2.Why was it important to show you cared about the students who were caught
in the frozen X?
3.How do taggers show they care about others in a tag game?
4.Why is it important to accept a role as a tagger and accept a role as a
non-tagger? How is this related to caring within a gym class and within
the tag game?
5.How do non-taggers show they care about others in a tag game?
6.What is a hero? Who is a hero you know and why is he/she a hero to you?
Are they caring? How?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/caring10
18
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
COOPERATIVE
“Alone we can
do so little;
together we can
do so much.”
– Helen Keller
COOPERATIVE
Working together with others for one goal
You show COOPERATION when you:
• Participate with your best effort.
• Assume positive intentions in others.
• Follow the rules made by the group.
• Respect the ideas and feelings of others.
• Value the contributions of others.
http://bit.ly/COOPERATIVEplaylist
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
19
ACTIVITY #1
HUMAN KNOT
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate
collaboration through
working as a team and
by learning how to
cooperate, communicate,
and problem-solve.
Ducking, dodging,
leaping
Open space
Set-Up
Instructions
•The goal is for students to work
together through problem-solving
and in close proximity to figure
out how to untangle the human
knot without letting go of hands.
Students can let go of hands if
they feel that they are not safe.
•Divide class into groups of
approximately 5-10 students.*
•
Groups need to stand in a circle shoulder to shoulder and face the centre.
•Students put their right hand up in the air and then grab the hand of another
student across the circle from them.
•Students then put their left hand up in the air and grab the hand of a
different student.
•Double check to make sure that everyone is holding the hands of two different
students and that they are not holding hands with another student directly
next to them.
•Tell students to untangle themselves to make a circle without breaking the
chain of hands.
• If students break the chain, they need to start over.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Variations: Teachers can ask students to untangle without talking during the
challenge or to complete the activity while blindfolded.
Questions for Consolidation
1.
Did the team cooperate to reach a consensus on a plan of action?
What process did the team go through to reach consensus?
2.How does this challenge demonstrate cooperation and collaboration?
How well do you feel your team communicated during this activity?
3.How are cooperation and communication related?
4.Why is it hard to be cooperative at times – either during the game or
in your life at school?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/cooperative1
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
21
ACTIVITY #2
BUILDING THE CN TOWER
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate
collaboration through
working as a team and
by learning how to
cooperate, communicate,
and problem-solve.
Running, balancing
10 beanbags for each
group, one pool noodle
for each group
Set-Up
Instructions
•
The goal is to build as high of
a tower as possible with the 10
beanbags given.
•Divide class into teams of 4-6
and give one person on each
team a beanbag.*
•All teams line up on one end of
the playing area.
•Place the team’s 10 beanbags
on the opposite end of the
playing area.
•
On the teacher’s signal, all students run to the opposite end of the gym to
where their beanbags are.
•Students will bring a single beanbag at a time back to the starting line by
balancing it on the pool noodle (in whichever way the team decides).
ALL students on the team must hold the noodle but NOT touch the beanbag.
•If the beanbag falls off, students can pick it up and put it back on the noodle
and continue.
•Once back at the starting line, the team must attempt to build the tallest tower
using the beanbags without them tumbling over (students can use their hands
at this point).
• Contine the game until all the beanbags are used.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Variations: Teacher can ask students to use different locomotion patterns to
complete the challenge.
Questions for Consolidation
1.
Were you able to provide possible solutions to the problem and did you
cooperate to implement your possible solutions?
2.How does this challenge demonstrate cooperation and collaboration?
3.How does cooperation on a team help to achieve success?
4.What might you do next time, to improve your team’s performance?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/cooperative2
22
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #3
TRAFFIC JAM
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate
collaboration through
working as a team and
by learning how to
cooperate, communicate,
and problem-solve.
Jumping, leaping,
walking
7 hula hoops ,
or 7 poly spots,
or 7 carpet squares
Set-Up
Instructions
•Set up 7 hula hoops in a row for a
group of 6 students.
•Divide the group of 6 into two
teams of three students.*
•The teams face each other in
single file with each student
standing in a hula hoop.
•Place one empty hula hoop in the
middle between the two teams.
•
There can only ever be one person in a hoop at a time.
• After each move, a student must be standing in a hoop.
• Students cannot move backwards.
•If students start on the left, they may only move to the right; if they start on the
right, they may only move to the left.
• Students can only move into an open hoop.
•Students may ‘jump’ another person only if there is an empty hoop on the other
side. Students may not ‘jump’ more than one person at a time. Remind students
to be careful when leaping to open hoops.
• Only one student can move at a time.
x
x
x
x
x
x
•The goal is to have the teams
pass each other and trade places.
Everyone must move so that
whoever was originally standing
on the right side of the empty
hoop is now on the left side.
This would mean that at the end,
the centre hoop is unoccupied
again, as it was at the start of
the activity.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Variations: This game can be played with 8 students using 9 hula hoops
or students can try to complete the challenge with the least number of
moves possible.
Questions for Consolidation
1.
How well did your team cooperate to come up with strategies to get out of the
traffic jam?
2.What are some reasons that people may not want to cooperate? How might
this impact relationships?
3.How does this challenge demonstrate cooperation and collaboration?
4.How does cooperation help achieve success on teams, at home, and in school?
5.What are some words or phrases you might use to show you are being
cooperative?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/cooperative3
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
23
ACTIVITY #4
MYSTERY MAZE
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate
collaboration through
working as a team and
by learning how to
cooperate, communicate,
and problem-solve.
Leaping, walking
30 pieces of recycled
paper with different
letters of the alphabet
or numbers written
on them
Set-Up
Instructions
•
Place pieces of paper into grid
formation on the ground. With 30
pieces of paper, make a 6x5 grid.
•Teacher needs to predetermine
a route for students to complete
the maze.
•The goal is for students to work
together by problem solving
to figure out the mystery path
that will move them successfully
through the maze. Through
trial and error, students must
work together to discover the
correct path.
•Divide class into two groups if
you are using one grid or set up
several grids and divide students
into smaller groups – 2 groups
per grid.*
•The facilitator has a map of
the maze on grid paper in
which he/she has drawn the
successful path.
•
Give students time to strategize. Students can only talk during the
strategizing phase of this activity. Once a team member steps onto the maze,
verbal communication is NOT allowed.
•Everyone in the group must move through the maze pattern without making
any noise.
•Students do not know the mystery pattern and must discover it through trial
and error.
•One student steps on a piece of paper. The teacher will nod or give a thumbs up
if he/she stepped on the proper piece of paper. The teacher will shake his/her
head or give a thumbs down if it is not the correct piece of paper.
•When students are correct, they continue until they step on an incorrect piece
of paper.
• If a student is incorrect, they must step off of the grid.
•A member of the other team now gets a turn. They must follow the same
pattern to be able to continue.
• Only one person at a time can be on the grid.
• A student cannot jump pieces of paper.
• A student must move to a square that is next to the one he/she leaves.
• A student can move to the side or forward but not diagonally or backwards.
• The game ends when one person successfully reaches the other side.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Variations: Teachers may choose to use smaller or larger grids or to use
different sized groups.
Questions for Consolidation
1.
How well did your team cooperate to come up with strategies for this activity?
2.Did the team reach consensus on a plan of action? What process did the team
go through to reach consensus?
3.How well do you feel your team communicated during this activity?
4.How did you feel about the no talking rule?
5.How does this challenge demonstrate the power of cooperation and
communication?
6.What actions might you use to show cooperation?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/cooperative4
24
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #5
CATERPILLAR ON COURSE
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate
collaboration through
working as a team and
by learning how to
cooperate, communicate,
and problem-solve.
Walking, balancing,
jumping
10 pylons,
10 hula hoops,
and 4 skipping ropes
for each group
(objects to create an
obstacle course)
Set-Up
Instructions
•The goal of this activity is for
students to problem solve and
work together in order to
maneouver through an obstacle
course like a ‘caterpillar’.
•The teacher will decide upon
and set up the obstacle course.
(e.g., pylons to weave through,
hula hoops to jump in and out of,
skipping ropes to balance on, etc.)
•Divide class into groups of
approximately 8 students and
have them line up at the
beginning of each obstacle
course.*
•All teams must move through the obstacle course with all heels touching the
toes of the person behind them at all times.
• If a mistake happens, students can simply re-group and continue.
•Have students re-group at the end of the obstacle course and discuss a strategy
in order to improve their performance for the next run-through.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
Questions for Consolidation
1.How difficult was it to work so closely together? Did you feel comfortable
with someone in your personal space?
2.Is it easier to be cooperative with people when you have positive relationships
with them?
3.How does positive communication support and help build relationships?
4.In your second run-through, did cooperating on a strategy help to improve
your time? Why?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/cooperative5
25
ACTIVITY #6
MAGIC CARPET WALK
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate
collaboration through
working as a team and
by learning how to
cooperate, communicate,
and problem-solve.
Leaping
Large space,
2 gymnastic mats or
2 large carpet squares
per group
Set-Up
Instructions
•
The goal is for students to
problem solve and work together
to transport themselves and their
mats across a large open space
(gymnasium floor).
•Divide class into groups of
approximately 5-6 students.*
•The teacher will decided the
distance between the start and
finish line.
•Each group receives 2 mats at the
start line.
•
All members of the team and the gymnastic mats must make it from one end of
the playing field to the other.
•Each group will transfer themselves from one area to the other without touching
the ground (gym floor).
•If a group member touches the ground with any part of his/her body, the entire
group must go back to the starting position and begin again.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Variations: The teacher may impose a time limit to complete the challenge, insist
on no talking, use smaller sized equipment for the magic carpet walk, ask students
to complete the challenge moving a certain way (e.g., hopping or crawling), or
increase the number of students in a group.
Questions for Consolidation
1.
What strategy did your team use to complete the task?
2.How did you cooperate to decide what made one strategy better than another
strategy that was suggested?
3.How well do you feel your team communicated during this activity?
4.How are cooperation and communication connected?
5.How are the different character attributes demonstrated in this activity?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/cooperative6
26
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #7
BACK TO BACK
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate
collaboration through
working as a team and
by learning how to
cooperate, communicate,
and problem-solve.
Flexibility, core strength
Large open space
Set-Up
Instructions
•The goal is for pairs of linked
students to work together
through problem solving to stand
up together without letting go.
Eventually, the goal will be for
the entire class to stand up all
at once.
•Students form pairs and sit down
back to back with their bottoms
on the floor.*
•Students link arms at the elbows and bend knees with feet flat on the floor.
• Each pair tries to stand up without using their hands.
• If someone lets go, students are to start the activity again.
• If a pair succeeds, make a group of four, six, eight… until the entire class is linked!
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Variations: Teacher can impose a time limit to complete the challenge,
insist on no talking, or blind fold students.
Questions for Consolidation
1.Did the team cooperate to reach consensus on a plan of action?
What process did the team go through to reach consensus?
2.What strategy did your team use to complete the task?
3.What did you find challenging?
4.How does this challenge demonstrate the connection between cooperation
and communication?
5.In what ways do you demonstrate cooperation at home, in school, and
in the community?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/cooperative7
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
27
ACTIVITY #8
TENT
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate
collaboration through
working as a team and
by learning how to
cooperate, communicate,
and problem-solve.
Agility, upper and
lower body strength
Large space,
parachute
Set-Up
Instructions
•
The goal is to work together
through problem solving to make
a tent with a parachute.
•Students spread out evenly
around the chute.
•
Students will inflate and deflate the chute three times.
- Inflate: stand with straight arms over head
- Deflate: squat like a frog (feet flat on the floor shoulder width apart in a
squat position – bring arms close to body)
•On the third count, while inflating the chute, students will take 3 steps forward
towards the centre while letting go of the chute with one hand and pulling
the parachute behind their backs with the other so that the parachute is
over their bodies.
• Students will sit on the edges of the parachute to prevent air from escaping.
Variations: Teacher may choose to ask students to perform the challenge on
only one count.
Questions for Consolidation
1.
What did you find challenging about this task?
2.How did this challenge demonstrate cooperation and collaboration?
3.Cooperation was necessary in order to create the tent. What does cooperation
look like, sound like, and feel like in the classroom, in the school, and at home?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/cooperative8
28
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #9
MUSHROOM
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate
collaboration through
working as a team and
by learning how to
cooperate, communicate,
and problem-solve.
Upper and lower body
strength
Large open space,
parachute
Set-Up
Instructions
•The goal is to work together
through problem solving to make
a mushroom with a parachute.
If an aeriel picure were to be
taken, the students standing
close together would represent
the mushroom stem, and the
air bubble created by the
parachute would represent the
mushroom cap.
•Students spread out evenly
around the chute.
•Students will inflate and deflate the chute three times.
- Inflate: stand with straight arms over head
- Deflate: squat like a frog (feet flat on the floor shoulder width apart in a squat
position – bring arms close to body)
•On the third count, while inflating the chute, students will walk forward towards
the centre, with their arms in front until the edges of the parachute are touching
creating the mushroom cap. Students are now positioned under the cap and are
therefore symbolic of the mushroom stem.
•On a given signal, students will walk backwards while still holding the end of the
chute to go back to the starting position.
Variations: Teacher may choose to ask students to perform the challenge on only
one count.
Questions for Consolidation
1.What did you find challenging about this task?
2.How does this challenge demonstrate cooperation and collaboration?
3.How well do you feel your team communicated during this activity?
4.Can you think of another activity we might try with the parachute
that requires cooperation?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/cooperative9
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
29
ACTIVITY #10
CLOUD
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate
collaboration through
working as a team and
by learning how to
cooperate, communicate,
and problem-solve.
Upper and lower body
strength
Large open space,
parachute
Set-Up
Instructions
•
The goal is to work together
through problem solving to make
a cloud with a parachute.
•Students spread out evenly
around the chute.
•
Students will inflate and deflate the chute three times.
- Inflat: stand with straight arms over head
- Deflate: squat like a frog (feet flat on the floor shoulder width apart in a squat
position – bring arms close to body)
•On the third count, while inflating the chute, students will let go of the chute on
a given signal.
• Students are to stay in place and watch the cloud.
• On a given signal, students can retrieve the chute.
Questions for Consolidation
1.
In what ways does cooperation play a role in this activity?
2.If someone does not cooperate during this parachute game, what impact would
this have on the success of this activity?
3.In circle formation, ask students to share examples of how they cooperate with
others in different aspects of their lives.
4.What might you do in the future to better cooperate with others?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/cooperative10
30
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
“When you tell a lie,
you steal someone’s
right to the truth.”
– Khaled Hosseini
HONEST
HONEST
Being truthful, trustworthy and sincere in what you say and do
You show HONESTY when you:
• Tell the truth - be sincere, genuine and trustworthy.
• Take responsibility for your actions and words.
• Admit to your mistakes.
• Play by the rules.
• Do what is right, even when no one is watching.
http://bit.ly/HONESTplaylist
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
31
ACTIVITY #1
CHICKEN RELAY RACE
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate the
importance of taking
responsibility for one’s
actions by owning
mistakes, playing by the
rules, and doing what is
right – even when no one
is watching.
Overhand and
underhand passing,
locomotion movements
on the spot
Large space, 2 to 4
rubber chickens
minimum (substitute
with another object
if needed)
Set-Up
Instructions
•Divide class into the number of
teams that you have chickens.*
•Each team lines up parallel to
other teams.
• Each team has its own chicken.
•
Put one chicken at the foot of the first person in each line.
•Inform students that the chicken must be squeezed and passed by each student
in a pattern of over their head and the next person passing through their legs.
•All students in the team sit down when the chicken is passed to the final person
in the line.
•Explain to students that the first team to sit down and complete the task
correctly and honestly is the winner!
•During the game, the teacher watches to ensure the game is being completed
honestly. He/she may need to remind students that even if the teacher is not
watching, they are to follow the pattern of over and under and work as a team
to achieve the goal of getting the chicken from one end of the line to the other.
•The teacher may want to remind students that speed is not always the best
strategy; if all members of a team do their best, work honestly, and follow the
instructions, then everyone wins.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Variations: Teachers may have students change their height by being on their
tippy toes or on their knees the entire time. The passing pattern or movement skill
can also be changed (i.e., students can run, march, jump, or hop on the spot while
passing the chicken).
Questions for Consolidation
1.Why is the height of students or body positions important to the success
of the race?
2.How do honesty and teamwork go hand-in-hand in this activity?
3.What happens when someone wins but he/she was not honest?
How might he/she feel?
4.What would you say to someone who you know was not being honest?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/honestone
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
33
ACTIVITY #2
WHISTLE LOCOMOTION FREEZE
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate the
importance of taking
responsibility for one’s
actions by owning
mistakes, playing by the
rules, and doing what
is right – even when no
one is watching.
Running, jumping,
hopping, walking,
crawling, slithering,
marching, slow motion
moving, galloping,
skipping
Large space
(indoor or outdoor),
whistle
Set-Up
Instructions
•
Students find their own space and
are reminded about the whistle:
-1 whistle means STOP AND
LISTEN
-2 whistles means STOP, LISTEN,
AND SIT
•Students find their spots in the
playing area.
•Students are reminded of the
importance of travelling safely
when close to other students to
ensure no one is bumped or hurt.
•
Students are given a movement skill (i.e., running, jumping, hopping) and then
the teacher says, “GO!”
•Students travel all over the playing area using the given movement skill.
Students are reminded to keep eyes up and to watch for teachers, students,
and/or benches.
•Students are stopped by either 1 or 2 whistles. The teacher watches and asks
students to be honest and reminds them of the importance of following the
rules of a game. The teacher may need to remind students that even if the
teacher is not watching, they should follow the rules.
•Teacher calls out a change to the movement skill and says, “GO!” to start the
new task.
• This continues until several movements have been attempted.
Variations: The teacher may use music or have students make animal sounds
in order to have students really listen for the whistle and STOP even if the
music continues.
Questions for Consolidation
1.Why are rules like stopping when you hear a whistle, important in gym class and
to the safety of others?
2.Could people’s safety be in jeopardy when people do not stop on the whistle?
3.Is it important for everyone to be honest with their reactions to the whistle
when playing competitive sports? (e.g., track and field activities, soccer, etc.)
4.How does being honest help in other activities and in the gym?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/honest2
34
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #3
ROCK-PAPER-SCISSORS
HA HA OHHH
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate the
importance of taking
responsibility for one’s
actions by owning
mistakes, playing by the
rules, and doing what is
right – even when no one
is watching.
Jumping, balancing,
squatting, safe
locomotion to another
partner, etc.
Open Space
Set-Up
Instructions
•Teacher reminds students of
the rules to the game of RockPaper-Scissors:
-Rock beats scissors
-Scissors beats paper
-Paper beats rock
•Students pair up and find a space
together within the designated
playing area.*
•
On the teacher’s signal, students jump 4 times while saying, “ROCK, PAPER,
SCISSORS, GO”.
• After GO, students make the rock, paper, or scissors symbol with their body.
-Rock: Squat position
-Paper: Open X position
-Scissors: Legs wide open with crossed arms
• Whoever wins says, “HA HA” and finds another partner to challenge.
•Opponent says, “OHHH” while doing a little Country Hoe Down Jig in a circle
and then finds another partner to challenge.
•If both challengers get the same symbol, they both say, “HA HA” and move on
to find another challenger.
•The key is for the whole class to play every single person in their class before
the whistle. Teachers are encouraged to play too!
•Play the game again, this time asking students to change “HA HA” to
“THANK YOU for PLAYING” and “OHHH” to “YOU’RE WELCOME”.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Variations: Teachers can ask students who lost the challenge to find another
person doing the jig, link arms with them, continue the jig, and then challenge
them next. Teachers may also choose to change the word reactions of winning
or losing to physical reactions (e.g., plank if you win, jumping jacks if you lose).
Questions for Consolidation
1.How does it make you feel to be forced to use “HA HA” and “OHHH” during
this game?
2.How does it feel when you lose? How does it feel when you win?
3.Asking students to speak honestly, have them reflect on whether or not they
have ever made others feel badly/inferior for having lost a game.
4.What is sportsmanship and how do you demonstrate it?
5.Why is it important to experience both losing and winning in a class,
game, or life?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/honestthree
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
35
ACTIVITY #4
POKEMON MATH DODGEBALL
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate the
importance of taking
responsibility for one’s
actions by owning
mistakes, playing by the
rules, and doing what
is right – even when no
one is watching.
Underhand and
overhand throwing,
catching, running,
dodging
Open space, gator skin
balls (soft foam balls),
4 wipe boards,
4 wipe board markers,
4 pylons, pinnies
Set-Up
Instructions
•4 students create addition,
subtraction, multiplication or
division questions on the wipe
boards (these students must
know the answers to their
questions).
•Students can write three to five
questions based on the grade
and level of math achievement
within the class.
•Place one wipe board in each
corner of the playing area by a
pylon. The student who created
the questions should also stay
in that corner.
•Place 7 pinnies in a box/bucket in
each corner beside the pylon.
•Place balls in the centre of the
gym in 2 even lines (10 balls and
10 balls, etc.).
•Divide students into 2 teams.*
•Ask teams to stand on opposite
ends of the playing area facing
each other.
•Each student is reminded to be
HONEST while playing.
•Each student is reminded of the
rules – all underhand and overhand balls need to be thrown
below the waist of the students
on the opposite team at all times,
students need to remain on their
feet at all times, and sliding is
not allowed.
•On the teacher’s signal, students rush to the centre to get a ball and throw it
or hang back to dodge a ball thrown at them.
•In the beginning of the game, everyone is a POKEMON and may only have one
ball in their hands.
•Students who get hit anywhere below the waist, on the arm, or on the hand before
the ball hits the ground, need to go to any corner and answer a math question
correctly in order to get back into the game. Students who answer a question
incorrectly can continue trying to answer a question until they get a correct answer.
•If students get hit anywhere else on their body, it does not count and they
continue their game.
•If students get hit by a ball after it bounces off the floor, it does not count as
the ball is dead.
•If students try to catch a ball before it hits the ground, and they succeed, they
go to one of the corners and tell the student that they caught a ball. They then
answer a math problem; if they answer the question correctly, they become a
super powered POKEMON. These students may now wear a pinnie and carry
two balls in their hands at all times. If they do not answer the math problem
correctly, they may continue until they succeed and get a pinnie.
•If students attempt to catch a ball and they miss, they need to go to a corner
and answer a math question correctly to get back into the game. Students may
continue to answer questions until they succeed.
•If students who are wearing a pinnie get hit by a ball, they must return the
pinnie to any corner and answer a math question correctly to get back into the
game. These students can no longer carry two balls; they can only carry one.
•Students are encouraged to visit a different corner each time they get hit or when
visiting a corner for the second time, they should answer a different question.
This will require honesty on the part of the students and promote self-regulation.
•Students should think of others who are using the wipe boards and ask to
switch with them so that everyone may play a role in the game.
•Wipe board decision makers are encouraged to change their questions
intermittently.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Variations: Teacher may choose to use flash cards instead of wipe boards.
Questions for Consolidation
1.Why is it important that the wipe board decision maker be honest?
2.Why does the game of Dodgeball or Pokemon Dodgeball only work with
honest players?
3.Why is honesty important to all aspects of life?
4.What does honesty sound like, look like, and feel like at home, school,
and in the community?
5.Can you think of a time that you were not honest? How did it make you feel?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/honest4
36
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #5
POKEMON TAG
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate the
importance of taking
responsibility for one’s
actions by owning
mistakes, playing by the
rules, and doing what is
right – even when no one
is watching.
Running and other
movement skills like
dodging, transferring
of weight
4 coloured pylons
(Orange, Blue, Purple,
Yellow), 4 coloured
scarves to match pylon
colours, plus a red
and green scarf for
Pokemon Tag #2
Set-Up
Instructions
•
Choose 4 students to be the
taggers. They need to stand in
the centre of the playing area.
•Other students scatter in the
designated play area.
•Taggers start when the teacher
says, “POKEMON”. Other students
start when the teacher says, “Go.”
•All students move in the
game using the movement skill
identified by the teacher.
•4 pylons are placed outside of the
designated play area.
•
Each tagger needs a different coloured scarf in his/her hand. The colour of the
scarf corresponds to the different Pokemon characters. Orange = Charmander,
Blue = Squirtle, Purple = Bulbasaur, Yellow = Pikachu
•Teacher identifies the movement skill that is to be used by all players for the
duration of the activity and signals the start of the game.
•When a student gets tagged, he/she needs to see which colour tagged them.
He/she then moves to the coloured pylon that matches the colour of the tagger.
(i.e., if a student got tagged by the blue scarf (Squirtle), he/she will go to the
blue pylon). Students must remember to move using the movement skill
identified in the beginning of the game.
•Students sit behind the pylon in a line with crossed legs once they have
been tagged.
•If students get touched and are on their way to that colour and get tagged
again, they need to go to the first colour.
•This game can be played until everyone gets tagged and is seated
behind a pylon.
•The teacher can also call out and free captives in the middle of the game
(colour by colour or all of them at once).
•When the game finishes, the tagger thanks the students he/she captured by
giving the scarf to one of the students at his/her pylon.
• Students may need reminders throughout the game to be HONEST and fair.
Variations: Teacher may choose more than one tagger per colour so students are
not judged based on the number of people they tag or the teacher may choose to
add more POKEMON characters, pylons and scarves to the game.
Questions for Consolidation
1.Is it important to be honest when you play this game? Explain.
2.Why is it important to acknowledge you have been tagged and to sit at the
appropriate pylon?
3.How does it feel to have more students be on the same team as you when you
are a tagger instead of being the only one?
4.Why might someone choose to be dishonest in this game or in real life?
How might it make him/her or others feel if the truth were to eventually come out?
5.Name someone in your life who is honest. How do you know? What other
character attributes does he/she demonstrate?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/honest5
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
37
ACTIVITY #6
HOCKEY STICK HANDLING
CONTINUOUS RELAY
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate the
importance of taking
responsibility for one’s
actions by owning
mistakes, playing by the
rules, and doing what
is right – even when no
one is watching.
Stick handling, hand
eye coordination,
walking, fast walking
20 hockey sticks,
20 tennis balls,
8 pylons
Set-Up
Instructions
•Line up 4 pylons on one end of
the designated play area and the
other 4 pylons directly opposite
on the other side of the play area.
•Place 5 sticks at each pylon on
one side of the gym.
•Divide class into 4 groups.*
• Assign each group to a pylon.
•Each group member gets a stick
and a ball (if there are more
group members than there are
sticks, teammates will share the
stick and ball once they have
completed the activity).
•Teacher shows students how to
properly grip the hockey stick
(knuckles show when holding
the top of the stick with their
non-dominant hand and their
fingers show and thumb points
downward on the dominant hand
down the shaft of the stick closer
to the bottom of the hockey stick.
The dominant hand near the
bottom of the stick allows more
control of the puck as the
wrist on the dominant hand
is stronger).
•Ask students to hold the ball until
it is their turn to do the activity.
•Students start by dribbling the ball down to the opposite side of the gym to
their other pylon.
•Students are reminded that speed is not important but control is (no running,
no balls being pushed with only one side of the blade, and lifting the blade and
placing it on each side of the ball as it is dribbled).
•When the first student gets to the centre of the playing field, the next person
starts as the first person continues down to their pylon.
•Once players reach their pylon, they exit and make their way around the
perimeter of the playing area and return back to their line carrying the ball
and stick.
•This continues and students share balls and sticks at each line and work on their
skills at their own pace.
•This activity is not a race but a relay of teamwork to have each student in their
group get as many turns as possible before the whistle or class ends.
Variations: Teachers may choose to use gator skin balls as a bigger option,
rubber pucks, or scooters with broom balls and shorter sticks.
Questions for Consolidation
1.What is it like to have students waiting for their turn behind you when
you start your turn?
2.What could teammates do to encourage and support their teammate when
doing their skills?
3.Honesty is important in this activity because…
4.What kinds of pressures exist that tempt people to be dishonest?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/honest6
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
38
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #7
HOT DOG TAG
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate the
importance of taking
responsibility for one’s
actions by owning
mistakes, playing by the
rules, and doing what is
right – even when no one
is watching.
Running, jumping,
hopping, walking,
crawling, slithering,
marching, slow motion
moving, galloping,
skipping, dodging
Open space,
6 foam frisbees,
2-3 pool noodles
Set-Up
Instructions
•
Everyone finds his/her own spot
in the designated play area.
•Teacher chooses 6 students
to have the frisbees and 2-3
students to have the noodles.
•Teacher explains that the people
holding the frisbees are ‘buns’
and the people holding the
noodles are the ‘hot dog makers’.
•Teacher may choose to tell
students to use a specific
movement skill.
•
The ‘hot dog makers’ are to work together to tag as many students as they
can in the time given. Noodles cannot touch frisbees (hot dog makers can
not touch buns).
•Students with no equipment need to dodge the ‘hot dog makers’. If they get
tagged, they must lie down on the gym floor in the log roll position (body
straight, back to the floor, hands crossed on stomach). These students have
been made into ‘hot dogs’.
• While on the floor, ‘hot dogs’ shout, “I need some buns! I need some buns!”
•The foam frisbee holders (the ‘buns’) work together as a team to free the
‘hot dogs’. It takes 2 buns to free one hot dog.
•‘Buns’ need to seek out ‘hotdogs’ on the gym floor. One ‘bun’ lies beside the hot
dog on one side and the other ‘bun’ lays on the other. Together the buns and the
hot dog say, “Hot digity dog, I am a hot dog!”
• The ‘buns’ then use their frisbees to high 5 one another over the ‘hot dog’.
• The ‘hot dog’ goes back into the game trying not to get tagged again.
• The game continues until the whistle is blown.
Questions for Consolidation
1.How do you become a successful ‘bun’ in the game?
2.How do you become a successful ‘hot dog maker’ in the game?
3.How does being honest enhance the fun in this game?
4.Without naming, blaming, or shaming, describe a time when dishonesty spoiled
the fun of a game. How did this incident impact relationships?
5.What does honesty sound like, look like, and feel like at home, school,
and in the community?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/honest7
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
39
ACTIVITY #8
AUTO WRECKERS
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate the
importance of taking
responsibility for one’s
actions by owning
mistakes, playing by the
rules, and doing what
is right – even when no
one is watching.
Running, jumping,
hopping, walking,
crawling, slithering,
marching, slow motion
moving, galloping,
skipping, dodging
Open space,
2-4 scarves,
2-4 rubber chickens
(substitute with
another object if
needed)
Set-Up
Instructions
•Select 2-4 students to be the
‘auto wreckers’. Give these
students the scarves. Their job is
to wreck the cars on the road.
•Select 2-4 students to be the
‘mechanics’. Give these students
the chickens. Their job is to fix
the cars.
•Students are in scatter formation
within the boundaries of the
designated area.
•Teacher selects the movement
skill that the students will use
(e.g., running, skipping).
•Students who do not have chickens or scarves are the ‘cars’.
•Remind students with scarves to tuck them into their hands so that no one slips
on them. These students are the taggers.
•When students get tagged, they stop and carefully sit on the ground, place their
back on the ground, and put their feet and arms in the air.
•The ‘mechanics’ fix the ‘cars’ by touching the students’ shoes that are in
the air, two times. This student can now go back into the game while doing
the movement skill that the teacher had chosen.
•Every time the game is stopped with the whistle, the movement skill, the ‘auto
wreckers’ and ‘mechanics’ can also be changed.
Questions for Consolidation
1.Does playing ‘fair’ mean you have to be honest?
2.How does being honest during activities increase fun and help to
build relationships?
3.Can you ‘fix’ someone who is not being honest? How?
4.What careers or jobs do you know where people need to be very honest? Why?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/honest8
40
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #9
‘EVERYBODY IT’ TAG AND
SURVIVOR SERIES
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate the
importance of taking
responsibility for one’s
actions by owning
mistakes, playing by the
rules, and doing what is
right – even when no one
is watching.
Running, jumping,
hopping, walking,
crawling, slithering,
marching, slow motion
moving, galloping,
skipping, dodging
Large space
Set-Up
Instructions
•
Students need to scatter in the
designated playing area.
•
In this game, everybody is it!
•On the teacher’s signal, all the students try to tag as many people as they
can before the whistle. Tagging must be done on backs, arms or shoulders
of participants.
• When students are tagged they stop and sit down.
• If two people tag each other at the same time, then they both sit down.
•Teachers can free students during the game. For example, they may choose
to free all the girls, people with an A in their name, or anyone wearing blue.
The teacher may also choose to free everyone!
Everybody It Survivor Series
• When students get tagged they must make note of who tagged them.
•When their tagger gets tagged by someone else and sits down, then the first
student can rejoin the game.
• Teachers can also set students free in this game.
Questions for Consolidation
1.What do you do if you did not see the person who tagged you?
Do you still sit down?
2.What if you tag someone at the same time, who wins? How do you figure this
out fairly and honestly?
3.Why do tag games rely on students being honest? How does society rely on
people being honest?
4.Why is honesty an important character attribute?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/honest9
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
41
ACTIVITY #10
CAT AND MOUSE
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate the
importance of taking
responsibility for one’s
actions by owning
mistakes, playing by the
rules, and doing what
is right – even when no
one is watching.
Running, jumping,
hopping, walking,
crawling, slithering,
marching, slow motion
moving, galloping,
skipping, dodging
Open space,
4-6 noodles (optional)
Set-Up
Instructions
•Students scatter in the
designated playing area.
•Teacher chooses 4-6 students
to be the taggers (give them
noodles if you have them); these
students are ‘cats’.
•The teacher also chooses students
to make bridges. Students make
bridges by pairing up with some
else, holding hands, and holding
their hands high over their heads.
•Make at least ¼ of the class
into bridges.
•
Students with noodles are ‘cats’. Their job is to catch the ‘mice’ (students who
have no equipment).
•Mice can hide under a bridge for up to 3 seconds. After 3 seconds, mice must
continue to move.
•If a mouse is caught by a cat, the two students switch roles. The cat is now the
mouse and the mouse is now the cat. If using noodles, students will pass them
to the new cat.
•Cats cannot touch mice in the bridge or stand near bridges and wait for
the mouse.
• All players must use the same movement skill.
Questions for Consolidation
1.Given the variety of roles in this game, who needs to be the most honest?
2.The bridges in this game require partners to communicate honestly, how does
honest communication foster healthy relationships in schools, at home, and
within the community?
3.What might you do or say to someone who is not being honest? Is this a
strategy that demonstrates caring for that person?
4.What is the difference between tattling and telling? Would you always tell an
adult when someone is not being honest? Why? Why not?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/honest10
42
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
“Tell me, I’ll forget. Show me,
I may remember. But involve me,
and I’ll understand.”
– Chinese Proverb
INCLUSIVE
INCLUSIVE
Treating everyone fairly and equitably
You show INCLUSIVENESS when you:
• Welcome and engage others.
• Treat everyone with respect and dignity.
• Approach situations free of prejudice.
• Reach out to others in a fair and equitable manner.
• Respect differences.
http://bit.ly/INCLUSIVEplaylist
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
43
ACTIVITY #1
GET TOGETHER
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To understand that
everyone belongs in our
community.
Running, leaping,
skipping, etc.
Large space,
music (optional)
Set-Up
Instructions
•
Ensure students know how
to plank.
•
Give a locomotor movement (e.g., skipping).
• Turn on the music.
•Students move around the area using the movement skill that was given
(e.g., skipping).
• Stop music - students are to freeze and listen for a number.
• Shout out a number.
•Students get into groups with the same number of members as the number
called out.
• Students create a circle while planking.
•While in a plank position, students give each other high fives; this increases the
difficulty of the plank.
•If there is a student without a group, encourage students to be inclusive and ask
him/her to join their group regardless of the fact that they already have enough
group members.
• Repeat – changing the movement and number.
Questions for Consolidation
1.How did you feel when someone told you they already have the correct number
in their group and that you needed to find another one?
2.How does it make you feel when you’re asked to join a group?
3.How does it make you feel when you cannot join a group?
4.How can you take what you learned today onto the field at recess?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/inclusive1
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
45
ACTIVITY #2
SAVE YOUR PLANET
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To understand that
everyone belongs in our
community.
Running, dodging,
acceleration/
deceleration, etc.
Large space,
1 hula hoop for
each student,
music (optional)
Set-Up
Instructions
•
Scatter hula hoops around
the gym.
•Each student finds a hula hoop
and starts inside of it in a squat
position.
•
Count down from 10 to ‘TAKEOFF’.
•At ‘take off’, students jump high into the air and run around the gym while
jumping around or over the hula hoops.
• Teacher shouts, “SAVE YOUR PLANET” and the students run to find a hula hoop.
• After every turn, the teacher takes away a hula hoop – he/she is a BLACK HOLE!
• Repeat the activity.
•Encourage students to be inclusive and ask students without a hula hoop to join
them in their hoop. All students remain in the game.
• Repeat until there are about 4 students in each hoop.
Questions for Consolidation
1.Did your classmates help make you feel included while playing this game? How?
2.How can you take what you learned today and apply it to another activity that
we might play?
3.How might we do a better job of including everyone in this class at all times?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/inclusive2
46
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #3
MARTIAN FROM MARS
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To be inclusive in order
to make sure everyone
at school feels like they
belong.
Running, dodging,
acceleration/
deceleration, etc.
Large space
Set-Up
Instructions
•
Students line up at the end of
the gym.
•Choose one person to be
it – have him/her stationed in the
middle of the gym.
•
The student who is it says, “Martian from Mars, Martian from Mars, I will
take you to the stars ONLY if you have – BLUE eyes.” (Substitute any physical
characteristic - e.g., eye colour, hair colour, etc.)
• The students with BLUE eyes skip to the other end of the gym – they are safe.
•Once the safe students reach the end of the gym, the teacher says, “GO” and
the students that don’t have BLUE eyes run to the other end of the gym and try
not to get tagged.
• If a student is tagged, he/she is it as well.
•Repeat the activity by continuing to call out BLUE eyes. This is to help make a
point that these BLUE eyed students are a part of an inclusive group while the
rest are excluded.
• Ask the ‘Questions for Consolidation’ written below.
•Play again but change up the characteristic (not a visual characteristic) each
time so that one group is not always excluded, e.g., “in grade 2,” “lives in
Mississauga,” “has a pet.”
Questions for Consolidation
1.How does it make you feel when you’re excluded from the group because of
a certain physical characteristic?
2.How does it make you feel when you’re part of the ‘special’ group?
3.How does this concept of privilege/discrimination, extend to our society?
4.Why is it important to appreciate our differences?
5.What makes you different? How might you use that difference to make this
a better class or school?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/inclusive3
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
47
ACTIVITY #4
STUCK IN THE MIDDLE
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To be inclusive in order
to make sure everyone at
school feels good about
themselves.
Sending and receiving
objects
Large space,
small dodgeballs
Set-Up
Instructions
•
Divide students into groups of 3.*
•Groups choose one student to be
in the middle.
•
Two students throw and catch the ball not allowing the third student to touch
the ball.
•If the middle player touches or catches the ball, the person who last threw it
goes into the middle.
•After a few minutes of playing, ask the ‘Questions for Consolidation #1 and
#2’ written below.
•Change the groupings to 4 students per group – 2 in the middle and 2 on
the outside.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Questions for Consolidation
1.How does it feel when the other two players never let you have the ball?
2.What strategies did you use to try and be a part of the group?
3.What effect did the change in groupings have on how you felt or played?
4.When somebody is going through a difficult time, what impact might it have on
that person if you were to try to find a way to support him/her?
5.How can you take what you learned today into another activity that we
might play?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/inclusive4
48
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #5
STINKY CHEESE TOUCH
(From Diary of a Wimpy Kid)
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To identify how rumours,
stereotypes, and name
calling effect people.
Running, dodging,
acceleration/
deceleration, etc.
Large space,
beanbags, or
pool noodles
Set-Up
Instructions
•
Choose one student in the class
to be it.
•This person is considered to have
the ‘STINKY CHEESE TOUCH!’
•
The student who is it has a beanbag or a pool noodle and tries to tag the other
students with it without throwing it.
•The students try and avoid the student who is it and yells, “HE/SHE HAS THE
STINKY CHEESE TOUCH! STAY AWAY FROM ME!”.
•If a student gets tagged, he/she now has the ‘Stinky Cheese Touch’ as well.
He/she gets a beanbag or a pool noodle and joins the it group.
Questions for Consolidation
1.To the first student who was it, ask, “How did it feel when the other students
said you had the ‘Stinky Cheese Touch’?”
2.To the other students that were tagged ask, “How did it feel when you went
from the ‘accepted group’ to part of the ‘Stinky Cheese Touch group’”?
3.How can you take what you learned today into another activity that we
might play?
4.What are some things that you can say to people to help them feel included and
good about themselves?
5.What do you think about the phrase, “Sticks and stones may break your bones
but words will never hurt you?”
Video Link: http://bit.ly/inclusive5
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
49
ACTIVITY #6
DISCRIMINATING DOCTOR
DODGEBALL
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To develop awareness
and empathy for
students who are not
included in a group.
Running, dodging,
acceleration/
deceleration, etc.
Large space
Set-Up
Instructions
•
Students are divided into 2 teams
and are lined up at opposite ends
of the gym.*
•This is a traditional dodgeball
game where the 2 teams stay on
their respective sides.
•
Choose one student from each team to be the ‘Doctor’. The Doctor’s job is to
‘save’ students who have been hit with the ball.
•The Doctor can only save some people… Teachers choose a characteristic of the
people who he/she can save. (e.g., wearing a pink shirt, a boy, wearing shorts,
with a pony tail), and tell the class.
• Students throw the ball at any of the players on the other team.
• If a student gets hit and:
-has the pre-identified characteristic, he/she sits down on the floor in that spot
and yells, “DOCTOR DOCTOR!” The Doctor touches the ‘injured’ player and he/
she rejoins the game.
-does not have the pre-identified characteristic, he/she leaves the game and
sits on the bench until the game is finished. Be sure to not allow the game to
go on too long.
• Ask the ‘Questions for Consolidation’ written below.
• Play Doctor Dodgeball again – this time the Doctor can ‘save’ everyone!
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Variations: It is up to the teacher to decide if the Doctor is ‘immune’ from getting
hit. If the Doctor is immune, he/she does not get out when hit by the ball. If the
doctor is not ‘immune,’ the game is over once the doctor gets hit. Note: It is better
to make the Doctor ‘immune’ in order to get students back into the game quickly
and to keep everyone active.
Questions for Consolidation
1.To the students without the pre-identified characteristic (e.g., NOT wearing
pink) ask, “How did it feel to be excluded from the group just because of the
colour you were wearing?”
2.To the students with the pre-identified characteristic (e.g., wearing pink) ask,
“How did it feel to be included?”
3.How does this concept of privilege/discrimination, extend to our society?
4.Name someone who is different from you who you admire? What do you
admire about them?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/inclusivesix
50
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #7
ROCK-PAPER-SCISSORS CHEER
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To identify how cheering
for others fosters
inclusivity in groups.
Reaction time
Large space
Set-Up
Instructions
•Ensure all students understand
the rules of the game of RockPaper-Scissors.
•
Students will challenge another student to a game of Rock-Paper-Scissors.
• Students who win will challenge another student.
•Students who do not win, become their challenger’s cheerleader; they get
behind the person who ‘won’ and cheer for him/her while he/she challenges
the new student.
•The cheering sections will merge and the leader of the group will change based
on who wins the challenges. The losing team will always become the cheering
squad for the winner.
•This continues until half the class is cheering for one player and the other half
is cheering another. At this point, a final challenge takes place to determine the
overall winner.
Questions for Consolidation
1.How did it make you feel when you had people cheering for you?
2.How did you feel cheering for the leader of your group?
3.What is the impact of being included in a group? Reflect on what lengths
people might go to in order to feel included?
4.Where and how could we apply what we have learned to other aspects
of our life?
5.How might we make our classroom more inclusive of others? How might I,
as your teacher, be more inclusive of you?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/inclusive7
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
51
ACTIVITY #8
EVERYBODY IN!
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
Develop empathy for
students who are not
included in a group.
Running, dodging,
jumping, acceleration/
deceleration, agility, etc.
Large space,
hula hoops,
music (optional)
Set-Up
Instructions
•
Spread the same number of
hula hoops as students around
the gym.
•Give a reminder of safety and
self-control.
•
With the music on, ask the students to move around the gym in a certain
movement pattern (skipping, hopping, backwards) avoiding the hoops.
•The students freeze when the music stops and listen for questions from the
teacher. Teachers ask a different question each time the music stops.
-How many friends can you fit in a hoop when the hoop is at waist level?
-How many friends can you fit in a hoop when the hoop is on the floor?
-How many friends can you fit in a hoop when the hoop is at knee level?
-How many friends can you fit in a hoop with just one foot in?
-How many friends can you fit in a hoop with just one hand in?
-How many friends can you fit in a hoop when everyone is sitting cross-legged?
-How many friends can you fit in a hoop with just your baby finger?
Questions for Consolidation
1.How does it feel when people make an effort to invite you into their group?
What could you do today or tomorrow to help people in our school feel
more included?
2.What were some of the strategies you used to make sure everyone was included?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/inclusive8
52
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #9
SWITCH!
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
Develop awareness and
empathy for students
who are not included in
a group.
Running, pivoting,
acceleration/
deceleration, agility, etc.
Large space,
6 sets of 4 cones
Set-Up
Instructions
•Create as many squares with 4
cones around the gym as
needed in order for all students
to be divided into groups of 5.*
•Groups of 4 or 6 people are fine
to accommodate the remainder –
just make sure there is one less
pylon than there are people in
the group.
•
There is one student at each cone with one student in the middle of the square.
•The students communicate with one another to switch from corner to corner
(not diagonally).
•The student in the middle tries to get to one of the empty cones before the new
player gets there.
• If he/she is successful the player without a cone is in the middle.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Questions for Consolidation
1.How did it feel when the other players covertly strategized in order to prevent
you from getting to one of the corners?
2.When you were at one of the corners did you make the person in the
middle feel left out?
3.If the person in the middle was not successful at getting a cone, what did you
do? What could you do to help him/her feel like a part of the group?
4.In what ways might we support someone who is not feeling like a part of
the group?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/inclusivenine
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
53
ACTIVITY #10
STOP PICKING ON ME!
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To understand that
everyone belongs in
our community and
to develop awareness
and empathy for other
students who are not
included in the group.
Running, deking,
dodging, etc.
Clothes pins or
several flags on a
flag football belt,
cones for boundaries
Set-Up
Instructions
•
Create small circles on the floor
with the cones or use existing
floor patterns.
• Create groups of 4 or 5.*
•
Put all the pins/flags on one student in each group. This student goes into the
middle of the circle.
• The other three or four students stay outside the circle.
•The students outside the circle try and take the pins/flags off the student
in the middle.
• Once all of the pins/flags are gone, choose another player to be in the middle.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Questions for Consolidation
1.How did it make you feel when the other players kept trying to take your pins?
2.How did it feel to be in the middle and be targeted by the others?
3.How did you feel being a part of the outside group who was told to take the pins?
4.What did you learn from this activity?
5.How can you take what you learned and apply it to a social situation inside or
outside of school?
6.Share an example of a time you or someone else was targeted unfairly
by others.
7.Lead a discussion based on the questions written below. Be sure to modify the
questions as needed to suit the developmental needs of your students.
-What characteristics do some people use as a basis to target others in our
school or in society? What are some characteristics that people in our society
value? (Primary/Junior/Intermediate)
-What are some social constructs that we have in society that creates avenues
by which certain people tend to be targeted? (Secondary)
Video Link: http://bit.ly/inclusive10
54
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
“Treat people exactly
as you would like to be
treated by them.”
– Golden Rule
RESPECTFUL
Treating others, yourself, and the environment with high regard and value
RESPECTFUL
You show RESPECT when you:
• Are polite to everyone.
• Treat yourself and others with care and value.
• Honour the rules of your home, school, workplace and community.
• Demonstrate value for yourself, your body and your rights.
• Take care of other people’s property and belongings.
http://bit.ly/RESPECTFULplaylist
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
55
ACTIVITY #1
OLYMPIC ROCK-PAPER-SCISSORS
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To develop an
understanding of respect
within sports and
to build character
education vocabulary.
Running, skipping,
squatting, jumping
Open space,
chart paper, markers
Set-Up
Instructions
•Talk to students about the
Olympic Games and explain the
Olympic Values and how they
relate to your School Values.
•Co-create with your class a chart
giving each Olympic Value an
agreed upon action.
• For example:
•
For this game, students need to refer to the Values and Actions list they created
earlier during the Set-Up section (see left).
•The goal of the game is to move up the Olympic Values list that you created
(during the Set-Up section) by winning games of Rock-Paper-Scissors.
•Students start in pairs - ready to play Rock-Paper-Scissors.*
•All students start off at the last Olympic Value (i.e. Balance of Body, Will,
and Mind).
•Every time a student wins a Rock-Paper-Scissors match, they move up to
the next level; each time they lose, they move down a level and challenge a
new student.
•After the challenge, students perform the action that describes what level
they are on.
•Students can only challenge another player at Rock-Paper-Scissors if they are
performing the same Olympic Value ‘action’ as them.
•Students try to keep winning at Rock-Paper-Scissors until they work their way
up to ‘Respect For Others’ – the top Olympic Value that was co-created.
Olympic Value
Symbolic Action
Respect for Others
Balance of Body,
Will, and Mind
Pursuit of
Excellence
Running on
the spot
Joy of Effort
Waving hands in
the air and jumping
Fair Play
Skipping and
shaking hands
Balance of Body,
Will, and Mind
Meditating
* See ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’ on page 4.
Questions for Consolidation
1.Why is it important to have respect for others when playing games and sports?
2.How do you show respect when participating in activities?
3.Can you use these strategies when playing at recess?
4.What are some respectful words we use to show that we value others?
5.Name an athlete you respect. Why do you respect him/her?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/respectful1
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
57
ACTIVITY #2
R-E-S-P-E-C-T RELAY
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To develop an
understanding of respect
and to build character
education vocabulary.
Running, walking,
skipping
Open space,
chart paper and
markers, 4 hula hoops,
lots of beanbags with
alphabet letters written
on them (if no bean
bags - make on paper)
Set-Up
Instructions
•As a whole class, brainstorm on
chart paper, different words
that are related to ‘respect’ and
character education and post up
in a visible place in the play area.
•Divide students into 4 equal
groups.*
•Send the groups to the four
corners of the playing area.
•In the centre of the playing area,
pile up the alphabet beanbags.
•
Explain that each team has to create as many different respect related words in
the time allotted.
•In a relay-style race (one student at a time), the students move to the centre and
collect a beanbag and bring it back to the group and place it in the hula hoop.
•The teams attempt to collect the letters they need to spell out their words
within the time limit.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Variations: Teacher can create a points system for the amount of words, size of
words, etc. that a team makes. A teacher can also insist that this game be done in
silence to create more of a challenge.
Questions for Consolidation
1. Define respect.
2.Can you give some examples of being respectful at school (in class or at recess),
at home, or on a team?
3.How can we show respect at school, at home, and in the community?
4.Which respectful word might you try to say more often? What word do you
value most? Why?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/respectful2
58
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #3
TOILET TAG
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To develop an
understanding of
respecting your
personal hygiene.
Running, walking,
skipping, squatting
Large space,
pool noodles for
taggers (optional)
Set-Up
Instructions
•Students start in a scattered
formation within the playing area.
•Choose 2-3 students to be the
taggers.
•Decide what movement skill the
students will use (e.g., running,
skipping, etc.).
•
On the teacher’s signal, the taggers attempt to chase and tag the
other students.
• If a student is tagged, he/she must kneel on one knee with one hand up with
wrist bent (to create a toilet and flusher).
•The other students can free tagged students and help them re-join the game
by ‘flushing the toilet’ - this is done by sitting on their lap and pushing their
arm down. Once flushed, the student who is the toilet must spin around 3 times
(symbolizing the water going down) while the other student acts out washing
his/her hands.
• Change taggers and movement skills frequently.
Questions for Consolidation
1.How do we respect our bodies when we are active?
2.Why is it important to have good personal hygiene?
3.What does the phrase ‘respect for self’ mean to you? Why is it important?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/respectful3
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
59
ACTIVITY #4
OH DEER!
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To develop an
understanding and
respect for animals
and their habitats.
Running, walking
Chart paper, markers
Set-Up
Instructions
•Explain to students the 4
essential components of an
animal’s habitat - food, water,
shelter, and space.
•Ask the students to count off in
fours. Have all the 1s go to one
end of the playing area and stand
shoulder-width apart. Have all
the 2s, 3s, and 4s line up together
opposite the 1s, on the other side
of the playing area.
•Tell students that the smaller
group is the Deer and the larger
group is the Habitat.
•
When a deer is looking for food, they should hold their stomach. When a
deer is looking for water, they should hold their mouth. When a deer is looking
for shelter, they should hold the top of their head.
•In each round, the deer chooses what it is looking for, but cannot change that
until the next round.
• Each student in the habitat decides what habitat component he/she will be.
•Count the number of deer and make a note of the number at the end of
each round.
•Have the two groups turn their backs to each other and make their sign. On the
teacher’s signal the students turn around and the deer have to run towards the
habitat and find a student who has the same sign. When a deer finds the corresponding habitat component that it needs, it takes it back to the starting place
(the person who was representing a Habitat component, now becomes a deer).
Deer that do not find what they need die, and become a component of the habitat (ashes to ashes).
•Play at least 8-10 rounds and keep track of the deer population at the start
of each round so that you can discuss the changes in deer each round
(year to year).
Questions for Consolidation
1. How did it feel to be the deer that was not able to find what was needed?
2.Why should we, as humans, be respectful of an animal’s habitat?
3.What things can we do to show respect to our environment and earth?
4.How can we, as humans, acknowledge and respect the reciprocal relationship
that we have with our environment?
5.What are things we do to our environment that shows a lack of respect?
How might we change that?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/respectful4
60
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #5
CIRCLE OF RESPECT
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To develop an
understanding of
respect when working
with others.
Bending, squatting
Large space,
hula hoops
Set-Up
Instructions
•Choose one student to have
a hula hoop on each of his/
her arms.
•Ask all students to stand in a
circle with everyone holding
hands (including the student
with the hula hoops).
•
On the teacher’s signal, start the stopwatch and send the hula hoops around
the circle in opposite directions. Students pass the hoops around the circle
by cooperating with the people beside them, crawling through the hoop,
and passing it on to the next person without disconnecting hands.
•The game ends and the timer stops, when the different coloured hoops are on
the opposite arms of the starting student.
•Give students some time to discuss what they might do to work together more
effectively to increase the speed of passing the hoops around. Teachers should
focus on encouraging respectful dialogue.
Variations: Teachers may choose to allow students to try the activity in two
smaller subgroups with only one hoop to increase their comfort level before
trying it in the whole class setting.
Questions for Consolidation
1. In what ways can we show respect for each other during a team challenge?
2.Do we work more effectively when we have respectful communication
for each other?
3.How can fostering respectful dialogue in the classroom, playground, and at
home improve relationships?
4.Name someone in your life who you respect. Why do you respect him/her?
5.What did you do in this game that showed respect?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/respectful5
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
61
ACTIVITY #6
TRASH BALLS
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To develop an
understanding of what
respect sounds like,
looks like, and feels like.
Running, walking,
skipping
Large space,
trash balls
Set-Up
Instructions
•Make trash balls (Instructions:
Wrap a number of plastic bags
into a tight ball to the size you
want then wrap them completely
with masking tape until the ball
feels sturdy and secure. Colour
and add designs for extra style!)
• Divide the class into two teams.*
•Create a ‘fence’, by splitting the
playing area in half with pylons
or a bench.
•
Students try to get all of the trash balls out of their yard and into their
neighbour’s yard.
•Students may only hold one trash ball at a time and may not take trash balls
from other students.
• Students should not aim at other students’ heads.
•Students may use balls to block and are encouraged to catch any balls
coming at them.
• At the “freeze” command, students must drop balls and put hands on knees.
•The team that has the least amount of balls in their yard wins that round
(if you want to make it competitive).
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Questions for Consolidation
1. Why is it not respectful to the environment to throw trash on the ground?
2.Have you ever thrown trash on someone’s lawn or on public property?
Who does this impact? How?
3.How can we show respect to our environment when out in the community?
4.Why is it important that we recycle, reuse, and reduce?
5.For older grades, teachers may want to consider investigating the concept of
NIMBY (Not In My Back Yard).
Video Link: http://bit.ly/respectful6
62
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #7
PARTNER MOVE
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To develop an
understanding of
respect for different
abilities and bodies.
Running, walking,
skipping
A variety of
equipment that you
have available
Set-Up
Instructions
•Divide class into teams of 4-5.*
•Each team is given a random
assortment of equipment (e.g.,
ropes, mats, scooters, etc.)
•
Each team has one player who must remain completely immobile throughout
the activity.
•Other team members have to take on some form of disability (e.g. blind, mute,
can only use one arm, etc.)
•The team must work together to create a sort of transport device to move
the immobile partner from one end of the playing area to the other without
dropping or injuring the immobile partner.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Questions for Consolidation
1. How did it feel to have a disability in this challenge?
2.What was the most challenging part of this task?
3.Why should we respect others’ abilities and needs?
4.What are some visible disabilities? Invisible disabilities?
5.How often do you consider what challenges people with different kinds of
abilities might face? What are you considering?
6.What might we do to be more inclusive and respectful of others who are
different from us?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/respectful7
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
63
ACTIVITY #8
OBJECT MOVE
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To learn the importance
of accepting each
other’s ideas.
Running, walking,
balancing
A variety of different
shaped objects
(e.g., pool noodles,
beanbags, balls,
hula hoops, etc.)
Set-Up
Instructions
•Divide the class into pairs.*
•Within the playing area create a
start and end point for each pair,
ideally with hula hoops.
•Provide each pair with a variety of
objects at the start point.
•
The challenge is for each pair to carry one object at a time from the start to
the end point, using a variety of body parts for each object (e.g., ball only with
head, noodle only with knees).
• If the object falls, the pair must go back to the start and try again.
• As each pair finishes, their job is to cheer on the other teams as they try to finish.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Questions for Consolidation
1.Was it frustrating when objects fell down? How did you and your partner
deal with that?
2.Why was it important to respect your partner’s ideas for carrying the objects?
3.What is the value of respectful dialogue in different aspects of your life?
4.How can you use those strategies when working in the classroom?
5.What might we do or say in this school to better demonstrate respect?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/respectful8
64
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #9
BACK ME UP TAG
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To develop an
understanding of
respect and helping
others.
Running, walking,
skipping, partner
balancing, squatting
Pool noodles for
taggers (optional)
Set-Up
Instructions
•Students start in a scattered
formation around the playing
area.
•Choose 2-3 students to be
the taggers.
•Choose a movement skill for
the students to perform during
that round (i.e., speed walking,
running, skipping etc.).
•
When tagged, students must sit down.
•The challenge is for the other students to work together to get all students back
into the game. To do this, another student sits down behind the student who is
seated. They sit back to back, pushing against each other to stand up together.
Students cannot be tagged when helping someone.
•Give all students the chance to practice this a few times with a partner before
starting the game. Discuss strategies like counting to three before beginning to
help coordinate the timing of their movements.
• Switch the taggers frequently.
Variations: If the back to back tag challenge is too difficult, modify the activity so
students sit face to face, touching the tips of their toes and holding hands as they
work to stand up at the same time.
Questions for Consolidation
1. How did it feel to have a partner help you get back into the game?
2.Why does supporting another student show that you respect them?
3.Can you give other examples of how you can support each other in the
school day?
4.Name a time when you helped someone at school.
5.When should you help others and not be a bystander?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/respectful9
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
65
ACTIVITY #10
HELPING HANDS
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To develop an
understanding of
respect when
working together.
Running, walking,
balancing, carrying
Open space, rings,
skipping ropes, balls
Set-Up
Instructions
•Divide class into teams of 4.*
•Each team is given a ring with
four skipping ropes attached to it.
•Identify a start point and end
point for each team.
•
Each student holds one end of a skipping rope.
•On the teacher’s signal, students must balance a basketball on their ring and
raise it off the ground.
•The students carry the ball to the end position. Students may not, at any time,
touch the ground with the ring or the ball.
•If the ball falls off of their ring, students must return to the beginning
and restart.
• For extra motivation you can make it into a race or have a points system.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Questions for Consolidation
1.To accomplish a common goal, why is it important to be aware of and respect
others’ needs and feelings?
2.What words and phrases did you use to communicate in a respectful way
with your team?
3.How can you use those skills in different class projects?
4.What does it feel like when someone does not respect you? What does
disrespect look like and sound like?
5.How might we stand up for others who are not being respected?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/respectful10
66
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
“With great rights come
great responsibilities.
To those whom much has
been given, much will
be asked (time, talent,
and treasure).”
– David C. Hill
RESPONSIBLE
Being accountable for and reliable in your actions and commitments
You show RESPONSIBILITY when you:
• Set goals, stay focused and stick with the task until completed.
• Do your share of the work.
RESPONSIBLE
• Recognize and learn from your mistakes.
• Follow through with your commitments.
• Demonstrate initiative and perseverance in overcoming difficulties.
http://bit.ly/RESPONSIBLEplaylist
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
67
ACTIVITY #1
YOGA
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To take responsibility for
our actions and respect
others.
Various poses
Open space, a mat
for each student,
pictures of yoga poses
(optional)
Set-Up
Instructions
•When participating in yoga,
each student is responsible for
following the teacher and
respecting other students.
•Select ten poses to perform
with your students or create a
schedule and have your students
teach a yoga pose to the class.
If students are choosing the
poses, they are responsible for
explaining the pose to the class
and helping their classmates
perform the yoga pose properly.
•Students are spread out within
the gym area on their mats.
•
Demonstrate ten poses with the students.
•Include name of pose (e.g. happy baby, downward dog) for students to
learn as well.
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
Questions for Consolidation
1.In what ways can you demonstrate responsibility during a yoga class?
2.How is this the same or different from your responsibilities at home or school?
3.Do you like being responsible for other people? Why or why not?
4.What things do you do to show responsibility at school, at home, in the
community, or to take care of yourself?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/responsible1
69
ACTIVITY #2
WARM UP LEADER
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To take ownership of the
class by leading them
through a warm up and
ensuring that students
are performing the warm
up properly.
Open space, various
warm up activities
Music
Set-Up
Instructions
•Each student is responsible for
leading the class in a short warm
up activity.
•Teach students a warm up and
explain why it is important.
•Create a schedule for students
to take responsibility to lead the
class through a warm up.
•
Have each student lead the class through a 5 minute warm up.
Questions for Consolidation
1.Did you find it difficult to correct your classmates in a positive manner/tone?
2.What are some of the ways you encouraged your classmates to participate in
your warm up?
3.How does the attitude of a leader impact the group he/she is leading?
4.How can you be a responsible participant when you are not the leader?
5.How can you demonstrate responsibility outside of class?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/responsible2
70
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #3
TAG, YOU’RE IT
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate
ownership of your
thoughts, words
and actions.
Running, skipping,
dodging
Open space, noodles
for tagging
Set-Up
Instructions
•Select 1-2 students to be the
tagger(s).
•Students are in a scatter
formation within the boundaries
of the designated area.
•Teacher selects the movement
skill that the students will use
(e.g., running, skipping).
•
When a student is tagged, they become frozen and stand with their arms in the
shape of a heart.
•In order to get back in the game, another player must give the frozen
person a compliment. For example, “You are a great friend” or “You are an
excellent runner.”
• Switch taggers every 1-2 minute(s) and change the movement skill frequently.
Questions for Consolidation
1.Who do you trust more – someone who owns up to mistakes or someone
who covers them up? Why?
2.How do you think responsibility can help you during physical education classes?
3.How can you be responsible while at school or in the community? What do you
do? What do you say?
4.Is there something you might change about your behaviour to show more
responsibility?
5.Name someone in your life who you consider to be responsible. How does
he/she demonstrate responsibility?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/responsible3
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
71
ACTIVITY #4
SINKING SHIP
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate
responsibility by taking
care of others.
Walking
Open space,
3 hula hoops
per group,
2 pylons (for start and
finish) per group
Set-Up
Instructions
•Have a conversation with students
about what responsibility
entails; speak to the fact that
responsibility includes helping,
making good choices, completing
tasks, being a good citizen and
doing the right thing at the right
time. It is important for students
to understand that if you are
responsible, then others can trust
you and depend on you.
•Divide class into groups of
4-5 people.*
• Select 1 captain per group.
•Have a start and finish line
identified with pylons.
•Students line up behind their
pylon in their groups.
•Explain to students that captains need to bring their mates to shore before
the ship sinks. The first pylon represents the boat; the second pylon represents
the shore.
•Captains move their mates by having them step into a hoop. The captain needs
to move the hula hoops forward in order to move the team forward. When
captains move their mates to shore, the last hula hoop must be placed on the
ground and the entire team (including the captain), must step inside.
•During transport, if someone steps out of the hula hoop, that person must go
back to the start. The leader can continue to take the rest of the mates to shore
and go back for the rest of his/her team later.
•The first team to rescue everyone and bring them to land, wins. The team then
shares compliments to one another explaining what went well and led them to
make it to land.
•Explain to students that a compliment is a positive statement given to
someone. If someone gives you a compliment, you should accept it by saying,
“Thank you.”
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
1.What happens when leaders do not take charge? What responsibilities
do leaders have?
2.How do you think responsibility can help you during physical education classes
or in other aspects of school life?
3.What might our next steps be to demonstrate more responsibility in our school
and community?
4.What are the benefits of being responsible?
Questions for Consolidation
Video Link: http://bit.ly/responsible4
72
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #5
ROCK-PAPER-SCISSORS:
BEAT THE LEADER
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To take ownership
of your actions and
behaviours.
Hand-eye coordination,
quick response time,
balance, strength
Open space, chart with
rock-paper-scissors
instructions
Set-Up
Instructions
•Have a conversation with students
about what responsibility
entails; speak to the fact that
responsibility Includes helping,
making good choices, completing
tasks, being a good citizen and
doing the right thing at the right
time. It is important for students
to understand that if you are
responsible, then others can trust
you and depend on you.
•Teacher stands in front of the
students.
•Students face the teacher and at
a safe distance away from others.
•Teacher discusses and
demonstrates what the body
positions are for Rock, Paper,
and Scissors.
-Rock: squat position
-Paper: arms straight up in the
air and feet together
-Scissors: your body forms an x
•
Everyone yells, “Rock,” “Paper,” “Scissors” while jumping into the corresponding
body positions.
• Then they choose one of the movements for Rock, Paper, or Scissors and freeze.
•If they beat the teacher or a selected leader, they show responsibility by
telling someone, “good job” or giving someone a positive statement or gesture
(shake their hand; high five).
•If they do the same as the teacher – they must perform half of an exercise that
the teacher chooses (instead of ten jumping jacks , they will do 5).
• If they lose against the teacher or leader, they must perform the exercise.
-Rock beats scissors
-Paper beats rock
-Scissors beats paper
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
Questions for Consolidation
1.Who do you trust more – someone who owns up to mistakes or someone who
covers them up? Why?
2.In what ways did you show responsibility in this activity?
3.How do you think responsibility can help you during physical education classes?
4.How do we, as a school, demonstrate responsibility in the community?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/responsiblefive
73
ACTIVITY #6
LET’S GET TO 100
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate
responsibility when
counting cards to
reach 100.
Open space, running,
skipping, hopping
Grades 1-2 use cards
numbered 1, 2, 5, 10
(easier to add), other
grade levels can use
playing cards
(e.g. Ace = 1, King =13).
Teacher may need to
post a chart showing
the value of each card.
Set-Up
Instructions
•Have a conversation with students
about what responsibility
entails; speak to the fact that
responsibility Includes helping,
making good choices, completing
tasks, being a good citizen and
doing the right thing at the right
time. It is important for students
to understand that if you are
responsible, then others can trust
you and depend on you.
•Divide the class into 5 equal
groups.*
•Select 1 student to be the leader
for each group.
•Scatter the cards (face down)
in the middle of the gym (blue
circle) or along the line at
opposite end.
•Teacher selects the movement
skill that the students will use
(i.e., running, skipping)
•On the teacher’s signal, the first student in every group uses the movement
skill (running, skipping, hopping) to get to the middle of the gym and chooses
one card.
•The student brings the card back to his/her leader. This continues until
the team has reached a sum of 100.
•The leader will add up all of the cards and signal the group to sit quietly
when they have reached 100.
•It may be necessary to return a card and retrieve a new card in order to
reach 100.
•Switch leaders after a team reaches 100 and change the movement skill
frequently.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
74
Questions for Consolidation
1.Why is it important to be kind and supportive with your teammates in
this game?
2.Why is it hard to take responsibility when things don’t go well?
3.How do you think responsibility can help you during physical education classes
and other aspects of life?
4.What is the impact on the team when one person chooses to not be
responsible?
5.How can we encourage others to be responsible?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/responsible6
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #7
EQUIPMENT MANAGER RELAY
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate the
need of taking care of
the physical education
equipment.
Running, hopping,
skipping
Open space, various
pieces of equipment
for relays (beanbags,
puzzle pieces),
buckets
Set-Up
Instructions
•Select an equipment manager
who will ensure students are using
the equipment appropriately
and are only taking one piece of
equipment at a time.
•Divide students into teams of
5 or 6.*
•Select equipment for the relay
and place at one end of playing
area. On the other end of the
playing area, place buckets.
•Teams are to sit, one behind the
other, with their equipment in the
front of their group line.
•Teacher selects the movement
skill that the students will use
(e.g., running, skipping).
•
Explain to the students that they will pick up a piece of equipment from the
front of their line and run, hop, or skip to the other end of the playing area and
place the equipment in their team’s bucket.
•If the equipment is thrown into the bucket or is not placed properly into
the bucket, the equipment manager will remove it and place it back at the
beginning of the line.
• Students will then, run, hop, or skip back to their team.
•If students take more than one piece of equipment, it will be removed
and returned.
• To end the game, all the equipment must be placed into the bucket.
*S
ee ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’
on page 4.
Questions for Consolidation
1.What responsibilities do you have when you enter the gym?
2.If you are being irresponsible by not following the established norms,
how might this impact the classroom environment?
3.Why is it important to demonstrate responsibility even when no one is watching?
4.Name someone in your life who is responsible. What does he/she do and say to
demonstrate responsibility? Why does he/she behave responsibly? How does it
benefit you, them and others?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/responsible7
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
75
ACTIVITY #8
CIRCUIT TIME
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate the
importance of
taking ownership
of your thoughts,
words, and actions
and taking care of
the physical education
equipment.
Running, skipping, etc.
Open space,
Functional Fitness
Charts from
Thompson Educational
(or other premade
activity cards)
Set-Up
Instructions
•Set up 10-12 stations with 2-3
fitness choices at a station.
Having choice at the stations,
allows students to complete
an activity in which they feel
comfortable.
•Play music for the length of time
you would like the students to
perform the activity.
•Introduce and/or demonstrate each activity card you have chosen or use cards/
exercises that the students are familiar with.
•Ask students to find a partner and move to a station.*
• Play a song for the designated amount of time (30 seconds).
•One partner performs the activity, while the other partner counts repetitions,
observes, and provides feedback on his/her technique. After the designated
amount of time, switch roles. Rotate to the next station.
* See ‘Grouping Strategies to Ensure Inclusion’ on page 4.
Questions for Consolidation
1.What impact does having a partner have during this activity?
2.What did you to do to demonstrate responsibility towards your partner
during this activity?
3.How does having choice increase the responsibility to complete a task?
4.How do you think responsibility can help you during physical education classes?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/responsible8
76
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
ACTIVITY #9
RESPONSIBILITY GALLERY WALK
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
To demonstrate the
importance of
taking ownership of
your thoughts, words,
and actions and taking
care of the physical
education equipment.
Equipment
Open space,
chart paper,
markers and pencils
Set-Up
Instructions
•Ask students about what their
responsibilities are during physical
education classes.
•Label and post chart paper
with the headings: Attitude,
Equipment, Actions, Respect,
Participation and Effort
•
Students walk around to the different chart papers posted around the gym and
add their thoughts about responsibility in a Physical Education class.
• Develop success criteria for “Responsibility” in a Physical Education class.
Questions for Consolidation
1.How do you think responsibility can help you during physical education classes
and life outside of the gym?
2.What impact does it have when you have responsible classmates/teammates?
3.If you saw someone not being responsible in the gym, what is a respectful way
that you could address the issue?
4.If you see someone making a bad choice, what responsibility do you have to
remedy the situation? What might you say or do?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/responsible9
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
77
ACTIVITY #10
ALPHABET TAG
Learning Goal
Movement Skills
Equipment
To demonstrate the
importance of having a
good attitude and being
accountable for your
choices and actions.
Running, dodging
Bag or bucket, cards
with the letters A-Z
written on them, chart
paper with the letters
of the alphabet and a
corresponding fitness
activity. (See ‘Exercises
for Alphabet Tag’ below)
Set-Up
Instructions
•Select 2 students to be the
taggers – have them wear
a pinnie.
•Students are in scatter formation
within the boundaries of the
designated area.
•When a student is tagged he/she must go to the outside of the designated
playing area and choose a letter from the bucket.
•In order to get back in the game the student must perform the exercise that
corresponds to the letter they chose. (See ‘Exercises for Alphabet Tag’ below).
• Switch taggers every 1-2 minutes.
Exercises for Alphabet Tag
Letter
Exercise
Letter
Exercise
A
Alternate Knee Lifts - 10
N
Needle Jumps – 10 times
B
Burpees – 10
O
Open – Free Choice
C
Crab Walk for 10 seconds
P
Push Ups – 10
D
Dips - 10
Q
Squats – for ten seconds
E
Energizer Bunny Hops - 10
R
Run on the spot for 10 seconds
F
Front Support for 10 seconds
S
Stork Stand for 10 seconds
G
Gluteal Kicks - 10
T
Tuck Jumps - 10
H
Hop on two feet – 10 times
U
You stretch it out – 10 seconds
I
Intense Marching on the Spot – 10 seconds
V
V-Sit for 10 seconds
J
Jumping Jacks – 10 times
W
Walk on the spot for 10 seconds
K
Air Kicks – 10 times
X
Make an x jumping
L
Lunges - 10
Y
Yodel for 10 seconds
M
Mountain Climbers – 10 times
Z
Zig Zag Jumps - 10
Questions for Consolidation
1.How did you demonstrate responsibility in this activity?
2.Why is it hard to take responsibility when things don’t go well?
3.Was it difficult to be responsible with some of the exercise tasks that you were
asked to complete? Explain.
4.What are the benefits of being responsible in school, at home, and in
the community?
Video Link: http://bit.ly/responsible10
78
Peel District School Board Values Taught Daily
We inspire success,
confidence and hope
in each student.
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