Home Washing Guide - Mrs. Stewarts Bluing

Home Washing Guide - Mrs. Stewarts Bluing
Mrs. Stewart’s®
Home
Washing
Guide
Brought to you by the makers of
Mrs. Stewart’s® Bluing
“Whitening White Clothes Safely Since 1883”
Mrs. Stewart’s®
Home
Washing
Guide
A little common sense and effort in caring and
laundering can extend the life and appearance of a
garment, and as a result, save time and money. Most
people are very careful to use exact measurements
when they cook or bake. This guide is written to help
you be just as exact when doing laundry. The most
common reason for unsatisfactory laundering results
is not following the directions. Throughout this guide,
you will notice that we emphasize these points:
Follow instructions on the garment Care Label
Follow machine Manufacturer’s Instructions
Follow instructions on the Product Label
Problems? – Call the Manufacturer
We hope this Home Washing Guide will be of
practical and educational help to you. If you have
friends or relatives who would benefit from this guide,
please send us their names and addresses and we will
mail a copy free of charge. If you are unable to obtain
Mrs. Stewart’s Bluing from your local grocery, please
contact us, or visit us at www.mrsstewart.com on the
internet, and we will be glad to help you.
Index
Quick Laundry Guide.................................2
Protecting Earth / Laundry Safety................3
Laundry Room............................................3
Laundry Equipment / Water Hardness.........4
Pre-Laundry............................................ 5-6
Laundry Products................................... 6-8
Washing / Drying / Ironing................... 8-10
Fabric Care / Special Problems........... 10-11
Laundry and Children...............................12
Stain Removal Guide.......................... 13-16
Care Label Guide............................... 17-18
Machine Manufacturers............................19
Customer Raving Reviews.......... Back Cover
Page 2
Quick Laundry Guide
If you are in a hurry – or desire a simplified summary
of what’s printed in detail in this Home Washing
Guide, well, here it is – the quick do’s, don’ts and
tips of laundering. Understanding and applying these
basic laundry guidelines will extend the life of your
clothes and reduce the stress of laundry mishaps.
Washing Do’s:
◆◆Presort correctly.
◆◆Check clothing and machine for foreign objects.
◆◆Zip zippers, empty pockets, etc.
◆◆Use appropriate cycle, temperature & water level.
◆◆If needed, use pre-treatment products.
◆◆Use an appropriate amount of detergent.
◆◆Put detergent in first – let liquids dilute and
powders dissolve before adding clothing.
◆◆Always dilute bleach before adding. Add to wash
water before adding clothes.
◆◆Add fabric softener with final rinse. If available,
use fabric softener dispenser.
◆◆For the whitest whites, use Mrs. Stewart’s Bluing
in the final rinse, as directed on the bottle.
Washing Don’ts:
◆◆Avoid overloading the washer.
◆◆Avoid using too much detergent.
◆◆Do not use fabric softener in wash cycle as it is
incompatible with most detergents.
Drying Tips:
◆◆Avoid overloading the dryer.
◆◆Keep like garments together to prevent shrinkage,
lint, pill development, etc.
◆◆Dry garments just long enough to remove wrinkles
and moisture.
◆◆Use proper heat and cycle settings.
◆◆Hang or fold clothes soon after they are dry to
avoid wrinkling.
◆◆Keep the dryer lint filter clean and vent clear.
We encourage you to take notice of the Stain
Removal Guide on page 13 and the Care Label Guide
on page 17 – helpful resources for successful laundry
© 2014 Jefco, Inc. dba Mrs. Stewart’s Bluing
Mrs. Stewart’s ® is a Registered Trademark of
Jefco, Inc. dba Mrs. Stewart’s Bluing
Protecting Earth
◆◆ Purchase laundry
products packaged in recycled
and recyclable materials. When
empty – recycle.
◆◆ Purchase refill products in
cardboard cartons rather than
plastic bottles.
◆◆Use products free of phosphates or builders.
◆◆For whitening, choose Mrs. Stewart’s Bluing rather
than bleach. It’s environmentally friendly.
◆◆To save water, set your washing machine level for
the size load you’re washing or wait until you have a
full load.
◆◆To save electricity & gas, wash with warm or cool
water. Always rinse in cold water.
◆◆Use an adequate amount of detergent, but not
more than necessary. Too many suds hamper effective
washing and require more energy for extra rinsing.
◆◆Keep in mind that a 10 minute cycle is usually
enough for even very soiled clothes.
◆◆Use the soak cycle to save time and money.
◆◆Wait for a full load to use your dryer. However,
remember that over-loading makes your machine less
efficient and more costly to operate.
◆◆Use warm to cool settings on your dryer,
especially for permanent press clothes.
◆◆Keep the lint filter on your dryer clean.
◆◆Your dryer will run most efficiently if you dry
clothes that are of the same thickness.
Laundry Safety
– many of which make excellent pre-laundry aids,
stain removers, etc. However, when heated, these
substances can present possible explosion hazards.
◆◆Items containing foam rubber or like materials
should never be heat dried. These materials, when
heated, under certain circumstances, can produce fire
by spontaneous combustion. Consult the care label
before laundering such items.
◆◆Be careful about where an iron is plugged in and
how it is supervised. Be sure the cord is not strung
across a hallway inviting a family member to trip over
it. Be sure your ironing board is easy to set up and
provides a sturdy and smooth surface for ironing.
Laundry Room
You can make the task of doing laundry more
pleasant by arranging your laundry area in an efficient
and pleasant manner. If you are planning a new
laundry room, plan plenty of space and adequate
lighting. Consider where machines and tubs will be
placed to create the most efficient workflow. Plan
electricity, gas and water appropriate to your layout.
Consider the need for shelving and hanger space.
If you are working with a pre-existing laundry area,
add lighting or shelving and re-plan a sorting area
with labeled laundry baskets. A bulletin board for
stain-removal information or for pinning up care
labels from certain garments is invaluable. Are your
iron and ironing board handy and near a safe outlet?
Keeping the laundry room clean, wiping surfaces
frequently, helps keep laundry clean.
◆◆Supervise young children near laundry machines.
◆◆Wait until the washing machine has stopped
spinning before reaching into the wash basket.
◆◆Protect lives and save clothing by checking
Product Labels for chemical interaction before
combining different products.
◆◆To avoid electric shock, do not use an extension
cord to connect your washer. Instead, move the outlet
or have a longer power cord installed.
◆◆To avoid possibility of explosion, remove all traces
of flammable cleaners from fabric, cleaning cloth
and dust mops before machine washing and drying.
These include acetone, denatured alcohol, gasoline,
kerosene, some liquid household cleaners, some
spot removers, turpentines, waxes, and wax removers
Page 3
Laundry Equipment
Any machine will clean or dry adequately
provided you use the right cycle, correct amount
of detergent, proper water level and follow the
machine Manufacturer’s Instructions. Here are some
maintenance tips to help extend the life of your
machines and achieve cleaner laundry:
◆◆Keep your loads balanced evenly.
◆◆Clean the lint filters on both the washer and the
dryer – after every cycle.
◆◆Clean dryer exhaust ducts one each year.
◆◆Wipe the machines out regularly to remove
detergent, bleach & fabric softener residue.
◆◆Avoid overloading your machines.
◆◆Follow yearly maintenance checklists provided in
machine manuals.
◆◆An occasional “overhaul” by a professional is
recommended to replace cracked seals, check hoses,
re-balance, etc.
◆◆Drain a washer before storing in an unheated area
for an extended time. Service before using.
◆◆To avoid electric shock, don’t use an extension
cord to connect your washer. Instead, move the outlet
or have a longer power cord installed.
High Efficiency and Front Loading Washers
The newer washers in this category use less water
and lower energy than the standard top-loading
washing machine. Follow Manufacturer’s Instructions
frequently as you “get to know” your new washer,
keeping in mind how less water and lower energy
may affect your laundry routine and how to use your
favorite laundry products.
To determine whether you have hard water, call your
city water department. Hard water contains 7.1-10.5
gpg and 121-180 ppm; very hard water contains
more than 10.5 gpg and more than 180 ppm.
Hard water can be dealt with in a number of ways:
◆◆Use adequate amounts of detergent and water. It
may be necessary to use slightly more detergent than
directed when washing with hard water.
◆◆Hard water can be eliminated or softened by
mechanical home water softeners. However, some
only soften hot water and therefore don’t solve the
problem when laundering with cold water. If your
water hardness is higher than 15-16 grains, a home
water conditioner system should be considered.
◆◆Packaged water conditioners can be used in the
wash to help prevent minerals from inhibiting the
detergent. Add to both the wash water and the rinse
water. Follow instructions on the product label. In
general, you can control up to about 15-16 grains of
water hardness with packaged water conditioners.
If you are having a problem with curds produced by
your powdered detergent reacting with your hard
water, try switching to a liquid detergent. To remove
curding stains, soak in a solution of 1 cup vinegar to
1 gallon of water for 20 minutes. Rinse thoroughly,
then launder.
If you do not have a machine manual, contact the
manufacturer of your machine to obtain one. There is
a list of manufacturers on page 19.
Iron Mineral
Laundry problems caused by high concentrates of
iron (more than .2 or .3 parts per million) in water
include yellow, orange or brown stains or spots or
overall discoloration. Oxygen-type bleaches may be
substituted for chlorine bleach as they do not react
with dissolved iron to form stain-causing precipitates.
Their bleaching action is milder and stain removal
ability may be more limited, however if used
consistently can help prevent iron staining.
Water Hardness
In the event that you need to remove iron stains (rust),
consult our Stain Removal Guide on page 17.
Hard water does not clean as effectively as soft water.
It is caused by minerals like manganese, calcium and
iron and easily recognized by bathtub rings or scaling
teapots. These minerals prevent laundry detergents
from working and form a detergent curd that sticks to
fabrics causing gray and dingy looking clothing and
giving soft fabrics a stiff and harsh texture.
Monday - Soak Day
Tuesday - Wash, Blue & Hang to Dry Day
Wednesday - Iron, Fold, & Put Away Day
Thursday - Mend Day
Friday - Sew Day
Saturday - Bath Day (dirty clothes come off)
Sunday - Rest Day
Page 4
Preparing Laundry
Presorting
Pre-sorting may be the most important step of the
laundry process. By presorting your laundry in loads
of like color, fabric weight, texture, construction and
soil level, you can avoid many problems. For the
best washing action in all loads, include articles of
different sizes to allow free circulation in the washer.
To begin, separate out “dry clean only” garments.
Then, sort by the following categories:
Sort by Color
Separate whites from colors
and light fabrics from dark
fabrics. Different wash
temperatures are needed for
maximum cleaning and to
keep colors from fading and
bleeding. If you have a new
garment and wonder if it’s
colorfast, wash separately.
Add ½ to ¾ cup white vinegar when washing the
item the first time. The vinegar neutralizes the color
and minimizes future fading. Continue to wash
separately until no color bleeds in wash water.
Sort by Fabric
Separate man-made fabrics like polyester from natural
fibers such as cotton. Man-made fibers can attract
the oils that are released from natural fibers during
washing. These oils can make spots more noticeable.
Some fabrics (white cottons, linens, and underwear)
require hot water and vigorous washing; others
(washable woolens and dark colors) require cold
water and short wash times to prevent shrinkage or
fading; still others (permanent press fabrics) require
special treatment to prevent wrinkling. Follow
garment care label instructions. Fabrics that generate
lint, such as fleece and terry cloth, should be washed
separately. Wash like-fabrics and like-colors together.
Sort by Weight, Texture and Construction
Loosely knit garments, articles with lace trim, or
“hand washable” articles require a “delicate” laundry
procedure. Lingerie should be washed separately
from jeans. Mixing fabric weights can play havoc on
your washer’s balance and it will be unable to clean
your clothes as efficiently.
Sort by Soil Level
Heavily soiled work or play clothes should be washed
separately from lightly soiled clothes, as soils can
travel from one garment to another. Wash grubbies in
a separate load from good clothes.
Other Sorting Tips
◆◆Always consult and follow garment care label
instructions. For help, see the Care Label Guide on
page 17. Put a bulletin board on the wall in the
laundry area for attaching care labels of particular
garments and for posting the Care Label Guide.
◆◆Loads of permanent press, delicate, knit, and
woolen pieces should be smaller than regular loads.
◆◆Wash white items separately or with white-only
loads to avoid picking up color from other fabrics.
◆◆Do not wash silk, wool, spandex or other chlorine
sensitive products in a load you plan to bleach.
◆◆Blankets, bedspreads or large rugs should be
washed alone because of their size.
◆◆Diapers should be washed separately so you can
use a gentler detergent.
◆◆Place nylon hosiery in a mesh bag or zippered
pillowcase for washing and drying.
Preparing
As you are sorting your laundry into appropriate wash
loads, follow these simple preparation tips:
◆◆Complete necessary mending, as the washing
process could make rips and tears larger.
◆◆Shake out loose dirt, brush lint out of cuffs.
◆◆Close zippers and hooks. They may catch and
snag other clothes in the load.
◆◆Empty pockets. Remove belts, pins and bows.
Overlooked tissue, crayon, lipstick, cigarettes,
ballpoint pens, gum or any metal object can create
real problems when they get into the washer or dryer,
both for your clothes and for your machines.
◆◆Check for loose change or dollar bills.
Pretreating
Follow these tips and consult our Stain Removal
Guide on page 13 for pre-treating stains:
◆◆Treat spots and stains as soon as possible and
thoroughly before putting into the dryer.
◆◆Check the garment care label before attempting
stain removal.
Page 5
Loading the Washer
As there are several types of washers, it is
recommended that you obtain and become familiar
with the Manufacturer’s Instructions for machine use.
Each washer offers different cycles and some offer
various kinds of dispensers and filters – all of which
affect the result of your laundry. If you are in need of
a machine manual, a list of machine manufacturers is
provided on page 19.
General Instructions for loading the washer:
◆◆Put detergent in first – let liquids dilute and
powders dissolve before adding clothing.
◆◆Load the washer loosely with dry, unfolded
clothes. Be careful not to over-load.
◆◆Load larger items first, smallest items next and
medium-sized items on top.
◆◆Do not overload your washer by packing clothes
in, as they must circulate freely in the wash basket
for thorough cleaning and rinsing. Overloading can
result in poor cleaning, excessive lint, extra wear on
fabrics and extra work for your machine.
Presoaking
Presoaking works wonders on heavily soiled and
greasy garments as well as on delicate pieces that
require only a minimum of agitation. Pre-soak
with water alone (use the warmest water safe for
the fabric), or aid the soak by adding detergent
or a commercial enzyme pre-soak product. Most
machines have a presoak cycle that lasts for only a
few minutes. For heavily soiled clothes, a presoak
of 15 minutes or longer is recommended. To do so,
fill washer, put in desired additives and clothing.
Turn machine off for desired soaking time. Then turn
machine on to finish the wash cycle. It is best not to
soak overnight as this can cause fabric graying.
Laundry Products
As water doesn’t clean laundry on its own, our
society has managed to come up with a variety of
laundry “aids”. Some work and some don’t. Some
are harmful to fabric and to the environment. Most,
however, are very helpful in producing clean laundry.
It is important to choose the right product for the
job. Pay attention to garment care labels, and follow
product label instructions for use.
Page 6
Detergent
Detergent is needed
in every wash load.
There are several
types and brands of
laundry detergent
available. Keep in
mind that package
recommendations
are for an “average”
load with “average”
soil in 16 gallons of water of “average” hardness.
Adjustment may be necessary.
◆◆More detergent may be needed for large loads,
extremely dirty clothes, or in hard water.
◆◆Less detergent may be needed for small loads,
lightly soiled clothes, or in soft water.
Detergents may have two major ingredients:
◆◆Surfactants (surface active agents) make water
wetter by reducing surface tension and letting fabrics
absorb it more quickly. They are biodegradable and
easily broken down in the ecosystem.
◆◆Builders or phosphates are rarely used anymore
as they have been found to be harmful to the
environment and have been government banned
under “Clean Detergent Acts” in many states.
More detergent tips:
◆◆Add your detergent, whether liquid or powder,
to your washer as it is filling up and before adding
your clothes. Dissolved, diluted detergent has a better
opportunity to spread evenly throughout your wash.
This will also lessen the chance for detergent curding,
lint or pill development.
◆◆Do not be concerned with “suds levels”.
◆◆Cold water detergents are generally as effective
as warm/hot water detergents for commonly soiled
clothing and they save energy.
Bleach
Bleach is an excellent stain and heavy soil remover.
It also provides a disinfectant action. When used
correctly, it can serve as a whitener as well. Of
course, we recommend the use of Mrs. Stewart’s
Bluing for whitening, as it is more effective and less
damaging to fabric. As always – follow the product
label instructions and pay attention to garment care
labels. Be familiar with the various types of bleach
listed below and their affects on fabric.
Chlorine Bleach
Chlorine Bleach can be identified by the word
“chlorine”, “sodium chloride” or “hypochlorite” on
the package. It comes in both liquid and powdered
form. It can be used for laundering all fabrics except
silk, wool, spandex, non-colorfast fabrics, and certain
flame retardant finishes. If the garment care label says
“No Bleach” or “No Chlorine Bleach”, do not use it.
Liquid chlorine bleach is a powerful chemical and
must be used according to product label instructions.
Powdered chlorine bleach is not as caustic as liquid,
but must be diluted and handled with care. When
used incorrectly, chlorine bleach can permanently
discolor and damage fabric fibers. Applied directly,
it can burn holes in your fabric. Safety should be
observed when using chlorine bleach, as it is highly
toxic. Never mix chlorine bleach with ammonia, rust
removers, vinegar, cleaning fluids, or acids. These
chemicals can product toxic gases when combined.
Oxygen Bleach
Oxygen bleach is “safe for all fabrics” or “all fabric
bleach”. However if garment care label says “No
Bleach”, oxygen bleach should not be used. This type
of bleach is most effective when used consistently.
It is not strong enough to restore whiteness to
garments that have become gray and dingy or to be
considered a “stain remover”. It may be added in the
recommended amount along with the detergent when
loading the washer. Follow product label instructions.
Bleach Dispensers
Many washing machines provide a bleach dispenser.
When used per the Manufacturer’s Instructions, they
work well at dispensing the bleach when the washer
is at its fullest and the clothes have already been
saturated, thus reducing bleach damage, which can
occur when undiluted bleach comes in contact with
fabric – particularly dry fabric. Do not add powdered
bleach to a bleach dispenser unless otherwise
recommended by the machine manufacturer.
Bluing
Bluing is a fabric whitener. While bleach “removes”
something from fabric, bluing “adds” something to
fabric. Bluing is not a detergent, stain-remover, colorremover or dye, but an optical whitener.
When fabric is manufactured, it begins as an
untreated product – correctly called “greige goods”.
“Greige goods” meant to be white go through a
vigorous process of chemical bleaching, cleaning
and finally bluing to make it appear sparkling
white in color. As the fabric experiences repeated
washings and age, the bluing escapes and the gray or
dinginess returns. Mrs. Stewart’s Bluing provides an
opportunity for the consumer to add bluing back in
to the fabric restoring the just-new white appearance.
Mrs. Stewart’s Bluing is biodegradable, non-toxic and
environmentally friendly.
Instructions – Mrs. Stewart’s Bluing:
◆◆Always dilute bluing in cold water before adding
to the wash or rinse load.
◆◆Mix a few drops or up to ¼ teaspoon of bluing,
depending on wash load size, in a quart or more of
cold water.
◆◆Add diluted bluing to wash water or final rinse.
Water should appear light sky blue.
Notes – Mrs. Stewart’s Bluing:
◆◆While bluing can be used in wash or rinse cycles,
it is more effective when used in the rinse cycle.
◆◆How much bluing? Generally, when using Mrs.
Stewart’s Bluing in the wash water, use no more than
¼ teaspoonful and if used in the rinse water, less than
1/8 teaspoon – for full loads of laundry. In any case,
bluing should always be diluted.
◆◆Avoid pouring bluing from the bottle into the
machine when clothes are present as any fiber can
absorb undiluted bluing causing spotting.
◆◆Bluing may be used in the same cycle as
detergent. However, we do not recommend that
bluing be used in the same cycle with other laundry
products. There is no worry of hazardous
chemical reaction. Bleach encourages
adherence of bluing to fabric and
most fabric softener manufacturers
recommend that fabric softener not
be used in along with other laundry
products. If you wish to use these
other products, use them in separate
machine cycles.
◆◆
We do not recommend
dispensing bluing from your
automatic fabric softener dispenser
as most dispensers are not large
enough to allow for enough dilution
and spotting can occur.
Page 7
◆◆We do not recommend soaking of any garment
in bluing water as prolonged exposure to bluing can
produce a blue tint to the fabric.
◆◆For re-bluing fabric, such as faded denim jeans,
use more bluing than directed.
Bluing and Colors
Mrs. Stewart’s Bluing has been tested and is endorsed
as a whitener for white fabrics. However, many
loyal customers use it in every load claiming that
it brightens colors as well. Since bluing does not
“remove” color, it is safe to use as directed with white
and color fabric alike. Some have reported that
“using more bluing than directed” aids in keeping
blue jeans very blue and black fabrics fade free.
Fabric Softener
Fabric softener eliminates “static cling” from
permanent press garments and from those made
of nylon, polyester, and acrylic. It also minimizes
wrinkling and makes clothes soft and fluffy. There are
several types of fabric softener on the market:
◆◆Detergents with fabric softeners.
◆◆Rinse-added fabric softeners.
◆◆Dryer-added fabric softener sheets.
◆◆Fabric softeners used in the final rinse are the
most effective over-all. Be sure to follow Product
Label instructions for use. Here are some general tips
about using final rinse fabric softeners:
◆◆Dilute and then add to the rinse water when the
rinse indicator light comes on.
◆◆If you have a fabric softener dispenser – follow
machine Manufacturer’s Instructions for use.
◆◆Do not use any other additive in the rinse cycle
with your fabric softener or pour fabric softener
directly onto clothes as grease-like stains may occur.
◆◆Too much fabric softener can cause build-up that
will “waterproof” items such as towels and diapers
causing them to be less absorbent and causing
dinginess. If this should happen, discontinue use of
fabric softener for a few washes to allow build-up to
dissolve and rinse away.
Starch
Modern fibers and fabric finishes have reduced the
need for starch. For that occasional need, however,
there are starch products available. Follow product
label instructions for use.
Page 8
About Washing
Most washing machines offer a choice of water
level, water temperature, and cycle (which sets
intensity and length of agitation, number of rinses,
length of soak, etc.). Follow machine Manufacturer’s
Instructions for the best results. The guides below
will also give you an idea of appropriate cycles for
specific loads.
Water Level
Vary the water level in your washer to fit the size of
your wash load. Be sure there will be enough water
to let items move freely. Avoid overloading.
Water Temperature
Proper choice of water temperature can also
minimize dye transfer from unstable colors. Check
your garment care label for recommended wash
temperature. If care label advice isn’t available, use
the following as a guide.
◆◆Hot Water provides the quickest and best
cleaning. Use it for sturdy whites, colorfast pastels
and light prints, cloth diapers and similarly soiled
baby items, heavily-soiled work and play clothes.
◆◆Warm Water cleans while minimizing dye loss,
removes wrinkles and helps reduce wrinkling in the
washer. Use it for permanent press, colorfast dark or
bright colors, synthetics made of nylon, polyester,
acrylic and washable woolens.
◆◆Cold Water may help protect sensitive dyes,
minimize washer wrinkling and save hot water.
However it doesn’t clean as well as warmer water.
Use it for bright red and orange dyes that release
color without losing intensity; lightly-soiled fabrics,
removal of some protein stains such as blood.
◆◆Cold water is excellent for rinsing ALL loads,
regardless of wash water temperature. Rinsing in cold
water helps reset dye-fastness, set in fresh smelling
scents of detergent fragrances, and save energy.
In the past, laundry detergents were formulated to
clean well at temperatures above 60°F. In water
colder than 60°F, detergents did not dissolve well
and soils were more difficult to remove. However,
now that we are more environmentally and energy
conscious, machines and detergents are both
manufactured to clean well in cold water.
Washer Cycle
◆◆Regular Cycles usually provide a wash time of 1014 minutes with a normal agitation and spin intensity.
This is a good cycle for most cottons, linens, work
and play clothes. If you are energy conscious, many
resources report that a 10 minute cycle is usually
sufficient for commonly soiled garments.
◆◆Soak Cycles are provided to help loosen
embedded soils and stains. Most last only a couple
of minutes. If you desire a longer soak – fill the
machine, add clothes and soaking aids (such as a presoak enzyme product) and then turn the machine off.
When ready to resume the laundry, turn the machine
back on, selecting the appropriate wash cycle.
◆◆Synthetic Cycles (Permanent Press, Knits) are
for loads of shirts, blouses, dresses, knits and similar
wearing apparel with normal soil levels. These
cycles provide a wash time of 5-10 minutes with
an extended cool-down spray rinse which helps to
minimize wrinkling.
◆◆Delicate Cycles are provided for laundering
delicate lingerie, stockings, nylon undergarments,
etc. These cycles have a minimal washing time of 3-5
minutes with a gentle agitation and spin intensity.
◆◆Extra Rinse Cycles are provided for use with
modern fabrics with heavy or oily soil, to help
remove additional detergent that may be required for
these soils.
Washing with Front-Loading and
High-Efficiency Washers
The newer washers in this category use less water and
energy than standard top-loading washing machines.
Follow Manufacturer’s Instructions as you “get to
know” these washers, keeping in mind how less water
and lower energy may affect your laundry routine and
how to use your favorite laundry products.
While the general guidelines in this guide can
be applied, you may want to purchase products
specifically made for these machines. For example,
detergents specifically marked for high-efficiency
washers are formulated to create fewer suds.
It will be important to know HOW your machine
works because you will not be able to OPEN it during
a cycle to add product or to remove an item as you
might be able to do with a top-loading machine. The
product dispensing drawers and the doors often lock
preventing entry until the process is complete.
About Drying
To begin, check the garment care label for specific
drying instructions or warnings. As drying can set
some stains into fabric more permanently, make a
practice of checking freshly washed clothing for stains
before throwing them into the dryer. Finding one
gives you the opportunity to treat it before the dryer
cycle makes it impossible.
Without the Automatic Dryer
Drying via clothesline in the sunshine remains a
favorite. Unfortunately, in our society, it has become
inconvenient. While it is more energy efficient than
the automatic dryer, it takes a much longer time.
Flat air-drying is preferred for sweaters and some
cotton knit garments. Squeeze out extra water without
wrinkling. Then roll the garment in a towel to absorb
more water. Shape and lay out flat on a clean dry
towel or on a drying rack.
With the Automatic Dryer
Since many clothes are permanent press or “no
iron” garments, the chore of ironing can be virtually
eliminated by using an automatic dryer properly.
Items such as towels, jeans, or underwear are much
softer and more comfortable to wear when tumbledried. Get to know your dryer and its cycles by
consulting the machine Manufacturer’s Instructions
for use. If you are in need of a machine manual,
see page 19.
◆◆Prepare clothes for drying by lightly shaking out
items taken from the washer before placing them in
the dryer. Tightly balled up fabric dries slower and
will likely come out wrinkled.
◆◆Be careful not to overload the dryer. A stuffed
dryer will not allow the items to tumble, causing
wrinkling and slower drying.
◆◆Keep like garments together. A washer load is
usually a dryer load – both in size and likeness.
Permanent press items should not be dried with
towels, and delicate items, such as lingerie, should be
dried separately. All clothes should be left in the dryer
just long enough to remove wrinkles and moisture.
◆◆Be careful not to over dry. This can cause lint,
wrinkling and shrinkage of fabrics. It is normal for
elastic bands in shorts, socks, or bras to feel slightly
Page 9
damp when first removed from the dryer. Use the
proper heat setting and cycle.
◆◆Hang and fold garments as soon as possible after
drying is complete to avoid wrinkling.
◆◆Do not dry woolens, fiberglass fabrics, rubber
or plastic coated articles as these present a fire or
explosion hazard.
◆◆Keeping the lint filter clean and clear will prevent
fire-related accidents as well as maintain good air
circulation for better drying results.
Dryer Cycle & Temperature
◆◆Regular (Warm/Hot) cycles are for drying nonpermanent press items such as towels, underwear,
jeans, and diapers.
◆◆Permanent Press (Warm) cycles are for
permanent press and outerwear garments of nylon,
acrylic, polyester, and blends of these with other
fibers. Care labels may say “tumble dry” or “tumble
dry-medium.” It is essential to remove these garments
from the dryer immediately when tumbling stops
since they will become wrinkled if left in the
dryer basket. If your dryer has a cool-down cycle,
take advantage of it to help eliminate shrinkage &
wrinkling.
◆◆Delicate (Cool) cycles are for lingerie, “hand
washable” items, machine wash/dry woolens, and
those heat sensitive items labeled “tumble dry-low”.
Other Drying Tips
◆◆Items containing foam rubber or vinyl, like bath
mats with rubber backing, must not be dryer dried,
unless the care label instructions suggest otherwise.
◆◆Draperies should be dried according to the care
label instructions.
◆◆“Machine wash and dry” woolens may be dried
on the delicate setting. “Hand washable” woolens
should be blocked (laid flat and adjusted to
correct shape without stretching) and air-dried.
◆◆Nylon hosiery can be dryer dried in a mesh
bag.
◆◆Cotton knits should be blocked into shape and
air-dried flat unless care label states otherwise.
◆◆Drying a small load reduces the tumbling
effect and prolongs the drying period. Add
3-4 already clean and dry like-color towels to speed
up drying of small loads.
Page 10
About Ironing
In the modern days of permanent press and other noiron fabrics, many families do not even own an iron.
In the event that you need to iron or if you simply
prefer or enjoy it, here are some guidelines to follow:
◆◆Use the washing/drying tips to reduce wrinkling.
◆◆Be careful about where an iron is plugged in and
how it is supervised. Be sure the cord is not strung
across a hallway inviting a safety hazard. Be sure
your ironing board is easy to set up and provides a
sturdy and smooth surface for ironing.
◆◆Read the garment care label for the ironing
procedure and temperature setting to use.
◆◆Do not iron items that are dirt or stained. The heat
from the iron could set the stain in more permanently.
Likewise, keep iron and ironing board cover clean to
avoid staining a freshly laundered garment.
◆◆When ironing pile fabrics (velvet, corduroy,
materials with raised patterns,) or when ironing dark
fabrics, silk, rayon, linens and acetates – iron on the
wrong side of the fabrics to prevent de-texturizing
and shining of the fabric.
◆◆When ironing double fabrics such as shirt collars,
cuffs, pockets and hems, iron the inside first and then
the outside. These areas may require steam or prewetting when ironing.
◆◆Iron clothes while they are still damp.
◆◆Iron lengthwise on fabric to prevent stretching.
◆◆Hang clothes immediately after ironing to help
them keep that “just-pressed” look.
Fabric Care
Understanding fabrics can be
valuable when, in the absence of a
garment care label, a laundry
decision needs to be made. If
a garment care label is
provided, pay attention
to it. If a garment care
label is not provided,
the following
information may be
of help to you. When
washing fiber blends (i.e., 70% polyester, 30% cotton
wool), wash as if they were 100% of the predominant
fiber. You may also find it helpful to consult the Care
Label Guide on page 17.
Natural Fibers
◆◆Cotton is a commonly used fiber because of its
strength and breathability. It absorbs water well but
wrinkles easily. It may be washed in hot water and
dried easily at high temperatures.
◆◆Linen is cellulose fiber like cotton but it wrinkles
easily. It may be washed and ironed as a cotton is, but
do not press sharp creases as its fibers break easily.
◆◆Silk is a protein fiber. It may be machine washed
in warm temperature unless the care label says it is
“delicate”. Do not use Chlorine Bleach. Do not dry in
direct sunlight.
◆◆Wool is a natural protein fiber that is almost
wrinkle free. Most woolens are “dry clean only”.
If the care label says “washable”, follow garment
care label instructions. Be gentle, as it will shrink if
agitated when hot and wet. Use cold or lukewarm
water and a short washing time. Use a “delicate”
cycle and provide an 8-minute soak with 2-minute
agitation. Chlorine bleach will damage wool. Drying
in warm and hot temperatures will cause extreme
shrinkage. Do not dry in direct sunlight.
Man-Made Fibers
◆◆Acetates and tri-acetates are heat-sensitive and
brittle. Most acetates are “dry clean only”. If the care
label says “washable”, handle with care and follow
care label instructions. Wash in cool or warm water.
Never twist or wring wet acetates. Iron on warm
setting or with steam.
◆◆Acrylics are wrinkle resistant and retain their
shape well. They are heat sensitive, so air dry or
tumble dry low and use a steam iron on warm setting.
◆◆Glass fibers are often used in bedspreads and
draperies. If possible, hand wash fabrics with glass
fibers. Never dry clean glass. Do not twist or wring as
this will break the fibers. Do not iron.
◆◆Nylon is the strongest fiber available. White nylon
products must be washed separately because they
pick up color easily. Rinse in cool water and tumble
dry-low. Gray or yellowed nylon can be treated with
Mrs. Stewart’s Bluing to restore whiteness.
◆◆Polyesters are very wrinkle resistant and strong.
However, they take on oily soil easily. Wash in warm
water. Turn polyester knits inside out to prevent
snagging and pill development. If ironing is necessary,
use steam iron on warm setting.
◆◆Rayon is absorbent and versatile. It has little
strength when it is wet. If the garment label specifies
“washable”, it may be washed in warm water – on
the delicate cycle – and ironed only if necessary.
◆◆Spandex is used for its elasticity. It will yellow
if exposed to chlorine. It is machine washable and
can be tumble dried or line dried – but not in direct
sunlight. It is heat sensitive.
Special Items
◆◆Stockings and panty hose should be hand washed
in lukewarm water. They can be washed in the
washing machine if first placed in a mesh bag or a
zippered pillowcase. If hand washing, squeeze water
out gently without wringing or twisting. Line dry or
dry in automatic dryer on the “delicate” cycle in
mesh bag.
◆◆Diapers should be rinsed immediately and
soaked in a solution of lukewarm water and a gentle
detergent until washing. Run diapers through a spin
cycle to release excess contaminated water before
washing. Wash in hot water with an adequate
amount of gentle detergent on a regular cycle (10+
minutes). As bleach can be harsh on a baby’s skin, we
recommend using gentle Mrs. Stewart’s Bluing in the
final rinse to keep diapers their whitest.
◆◆When washing and drying draperies, curtains,
quilts, bedspreads, rugs and similar items, we
recommend following the instructions on the care
label or consulting the manufacturer.
Special Problems
Color Loss
Causes of color loss include bad quality dyes,
incorrect bleaching, and an over-hot dryer. Most
color loss is permanent and non-reversible. For
prevention of color loss, sort clothes properly, follow
care label instructions on clothing, and product label
instructions on products used. If you have a garment
that you suspect is not “colorfast”, wash it separately.
To the first washing, add ½ to ¾ cup of vinegar to
the wash load. This will help neutralize the dyes,
eliminating some bleeding and fading.
Color Transfer
Also known as “Bleeding”, color transfer occurs when
a non-colorfast fabric comes in contact with a lighter
color fabric (for instance, red on white) and the dye
transfers. This usually happens when both fabrics are
wet. This is caused by bad quality dyes.
Page 11
For prevention of color transfer, sort clothes properly,
follow care label and product label instructions. If
noticed before drying, rinse in cool water. If color
remains, rub with detergent and re-wash. Use bleach
if safe for fabric. Use color remover if safe for fabric.
loads, shake and brush them free of lint.
◆◆Incorporate the use of fabric softener sheets.
◆◆Set the dryer at a cooler temperature.
◆◆Turn clothes that create or collect lint inside out
for drying.
◆◆Remove clothing when slightly damp.
Dinginess
Pills
Dinginess or graying is caused by loss of whitener in
fabric, color transfer, over-bleaching, age, insufficient
amount of detergent, pre-soaking for too long,
overloading of washing machine, hard water and/or a
number of other factors.
For prevention of dingy looking clothing:
◆◆Use an adequate amount of detergent (but not too
much) and proper water temperature.
◆◆Be sure clothing is sorted correctly.
◆◆Do not overload your washer.
◆◆Limit bleach use. While it is a good stain remover,
continuous use will damage fabric fibers irreversibly.
◆◆To prevent graying caused by hard water, consider
the purchase of a home water softener or look into
packaged water conditioners.
To prevent and reverse graying caused by bleaching,
age or insufficient cleaning, use Mrs. Stewart’s Bluing
to restore whiteness to white laundry and to brighten
colors in colored laundry.
Lint
Lint is the small particles or balls of loose unwanted
fiber that collect on clothing. Lint gently attaches
itself to the surface of clothing. Some lint will always
be created by wear and laundering.
To prevent washing-related lint:
◆◆Unclog or clean out the washing machine lint
filter. Follow the machine Manufacturer’s Instructions
for care and maintenance of the machine.
◆◆Sort fabrics that tend to create lint into their own
loads (towels, flannel material, blankets, etc.).
◆◆Before laundering these loads, shake and brush
the fabric with a clothes or lint brush, or use the
sticky side of masking tape to remove lint.
To prevent drying-related lint:
◆◆Unclog or clean out the dryer lint filter and follow
Manufacturer’s Instructions for proper maintenance.
◆◆Sort fabrics that tend to create lint into their own
Page 12
Pills develop when groups of short or broken fibers
on the surface of the fabric become entangled
together in a tiny ball – a pill. Pill development
results from rubbing or abrasion of the fabric during
normal wear and use. Pill development is particularly
prevalent with polyester and polyester blends.
To prevent pill development:
◆◆Before laundering, turn the garment inside out.
◆◆Use a slower agitation and a shorter wash cycle.
◆◆Use liquid detergent or allow powdered detergent
to dissolve completely before adding garments.
◆◆Remove from the dryer as soon as it is dry.
To remove pills, use a battery operated pill remover,
which shaves the pills from the surface of the
garment. Or, pull the fabric taut over a curved surface
and carefully cut off the pill with scissors or shave the
fabric surface with a safety razor.
Laundry & Children
Young children should be supervised when near the
washer or dryer. With good teaching and patience,
older children can learn to do laundry. Here are some
tips for making laundry easier for kids:
◆◆Since most light and dark fabrics can be washed
together in cold water these days, a lot of the sorting
we used to think was necessary isn’t always, and
sorting by color is relatively simple for most children.
◆◆Teach children to check their check pockets and
zip zippers before laundering their clothes.
◆◆Post a safe stain removal chart near the laundry
area and encourage children to treat stains while they
are fresh. If safety is a concern, some stains could say
“See Mom” or “See Dad”.
◆◆Teach children to be responsible for folding and
putting away their laundry as soon as it is finished to
keep items from wrinkling.
The Basics
Mrs. Stewart’s Stain Removal Guide
◆◆Treat spots and stains as soon as possible and thoroughly before putting into the dryer (drying may make the
stain more difficult to remove).
◆◆Check the garment care label before attempting stain removal or using any stain removal products or remedies.
◆◆Begin by lifting or gently scraping off any excess material from the fabric using a dull table knife – being careful
not to damage the fabric. Use a cloth or towel to gently lift and soak up any liquid. DO NOT RUB! Rubbing can
spread the stain and cause it to penetrate deeper into the fabric.
◆◆For immediate treatment of common spots and stains, follow these guidelines: For grease, oil and fruit stains,
use hottest water safe for fabric. For protein stains (blood, tomato sauce, egg, human fluids), use cold water. In any
case, soak for 30 minutes, if possible. Otherwise, thoroughly sponge spot until outline disappears.
◆◆Identify the agent or substance that caused the stain. For most common stains, use a pre-wash stain removal
product. For fruit stains, pour excessive amounts of hot water through the stain. For vegetable, animal and human fluid stains – use an enzyme pre-soak product. For oil, grease, and some glues – sponge with cleaning fluid,
rinse thoroughly, then launder using bleach safe for fabric in hottest water safe for fabric. For specific stains, follow
instructions provided in Mrs. Stewart’s Stain Removal Guide below. For stains caused by laundry products, call the
manufacturer even before consulting a professional dry cleaner and especially before trying to remove the product
stains with other products.
◆◆If, after laundering, the stain is not removed, proceed with a new removal procedure before heat drying.
Stain
Removal Solution
Acne Medication
Must be cleaned professionally. Do not use water as this may make the stain more permanent.
Adhesive Tape
Remove excess matter with dull table knife, being careful not to damage fabric. Sponge with cleaning
fluid, blotting with clean paper towels until removed. Let air dry, then brush away remaining adhesive
residue. Rinse thoroughly, then launder.
Alcoholic Beverages
Sponge with or soak in cold water. For beer, rinse with equal parts of vinegar and water. For wine,
gently rub salt into stain or blot with club soda and then rinse with equal parts of vinegar and water.
In addition, red wine can often be treated with white wine to remove the red coloring and then salt or
club soda to remove remaining stain. Press detergent into stain while still wet. Launder using bleach
safe for fabric. Older stains may respond to an enzyme pre-soak product.
Baby Formula
For fresh stains on white fabric, moisten cloth with water, dip in baking soda and blot the stained area.
If stain persists, apply detergent to stain or use an enzyme pre-soak product. Rinse thoroughly, then
launder using bleach safe for fabric (and baby) in hottest water safe for fabric.
Blood
For fresh stain, soak in cold water (soak for extended period of time for dried stain). Use enzyme presoak product, following label directions. If stain persists, apply equal parts of ammonia and water (for
colorfast fabrics), or hydrogen peroxide and water (for non-colorfast fabrics). Rinse thoroughly. If stain
still persists, soak in equal parts vinegar and water. Rinse. Launder using bleach safe for fabric.
Bluing
If accidentally spilled full strength or if too much bluing was used, soak fabric overnight in a solution
of ½ cup ammonia to 1 quart of cold water in a tightly covered container. Do not use bleach. If bluing
removal was previously attempted with bleach, soak 2-3 days in solution of 1 cup ammonia to 1 quart
of cold water in a tightly covered container.
Chalk
Remove chalk dust by shaking or using sticky tape. Apply pre-wash stain remover. Launder using bleach
safe for fabric in hottest water safe for fabric. If stain persists, apply an oxygen bleach paste and relaunder. Or, try rinsing with equal parts of vinegar and water. Rinse, then re-launder.
Charcoal
Press with detergent and a few drops of household ammonia (for colorfast fabric) or with detergent only
(for non-colorfast fabric). Rinse, then launder.
Chewing Gum
Harden gum using an ice cube. Scrape gummy matter from fabric with dull table knife, being careful
not to damage fabric. Sponge with cleaning fluid. Let air dry. Rinse thoroughly, then launder.
Page 13
Chocolate / Cocoa
Soak in cold water. Press detergent into stain while wet. Use pre-wash stain remover and launder in
hottest water safe for fabric. To remove remaining grease stain, sponge with cleaning fluid, let air dry.
Rinse thoroughly. If stain persists, sponge with hydrogen peroxide. Rinse thoroughly. Launder using
bleach safe for fabric.
Coffee / Tea
Sponge stain immediately and, if possible, soak in cold water for 30 minutes. Press detergent into stain
while wet. If safe for fabric, stretch cloth over bowl and pour boiling water through stain. To remove
remaining grease stain (from cream), sponge with cleaning fluid. Let air dry. Rinse thoroughly. If stain
persists, sponge with hydrogen peroxide. Rinse thoroughly. Launder using bleach safe for fabric.
Cosmetics
Sponge with cleaning fluid. Press with detergent. Rinse. Launder using bleach safe for fabric.
Crayon
Harden using an ice cube. Scrape off excess wax with dull table knife, being careful not to damage
fabric. For hardy fabrics, stretch over bowl and pour boiling water through fabric from height. For more
delicate fabrics, place between several layers of facial tissue or paper towels and press with warm iron
(no steam). To remove remaining stain, sponge with cleaning fluid or, if stain persists, with diluted
household chlorine bleach (if safe for fabric) or an oxygen bleach paste (if safe for fabric). Instead of
bleach, try vinegar or lemon juice for a natural remedy. Rinse thoroughly, then launder. Or, wash in hot
water using laundry detergent and 1 cup baking soda.
Dairy Products
Scrape off excess with dull table knife, being careful not to damage fabric. Sponge or soak in cold
water using agitation if possible. Press detergent into stain and launder. To treat remaining grease spots,
sponge with cleaning fluid. Let air dry. Rinse thoroughly, then launder using bleach safe for fabric in
hottest water safe for fabric.
Deodorants /
Antiperspirants
Press detergent into dampened stain. Launder using bleach safe for fabric in hottest water
safe for fabric. Antiperspirants that contain such substances as aluminum chloride are acidic and may
change the color of some dyes. Color may or may not be restored by sponging with ammonia (for
colorfast fabric). If ammonia treatment is required, dilute with an equal amount of water for use on
wool, mohair, or silk. Rinse thoroughly, then launder.
Dye (from non-
colorfast article) Bleach immediately using bleach safe for fabric, repeating process as often as necessary. Or
use a commercial color remover (if bleach is unsuccessful or if bleach is not safe for fabric).
Egg or Meat
If dried, scrape excess matter from fabric with dull table knife, being careful not to damage fabric.
Sponge with cold water. Press detergent into dampened stain and launder using bleach safe for fabric.
On wool and resin treated cottons, sponge with cold water, then with cleaning fluid. Rinse, then
launder.
Fabric Softener
Dampen stain, press with bar soap. Rinse thoroughly, then launder in hottest water safe for fabric.
Fruit / Fruit Juice
Press dampened stain with detergent. If safe for fabric, stretch over a bowl, then pour boiling water
through stain from 12-18” height. If stain persists, make oxygen bleach paste and press into stain. Add
a few drops of ammonia (for colorfast fabrics). Wait 15-30 minutes. Rinse thoroughly. Apply enzyme
pre-soak product, then launder using bleach safe for fabric in hottest water safe for fabric.
Furniture Polish
Lay flat down on top of several clean paper towels. Sponge with cleaning fluid from back side. Let air
dry, then brush away remaining polish residue. Rinse thoroughly, then launder using hottest water safe
for fabric.
Gasoline
Lay flat face down on top of several clean paper towels. Sponge with cleaning fluid from back side. Let
air dry. Rinse thoroughly. If stain persists, press detergent into stain. Launder using hottest water safe for
fabric.
Glue
For all types, begin by soaking in warm water. For animal based glue, pre-treat with an enzyme presoak product (if fabric is washable) or pre-treat with pre-wash stain remover (if non-washable). For
paste or white glue, remove excess matter with dull table knife, being careful not to damage fabric.
Press detergent into stain. Wait 5 minutes. Launder with hottest water safe for fabric. For synthetic
glue, attempt to remove the stain and remaining gummy matter with pure acetone (unless the fabric is
acetate or triacetate based). Rinse thoroughly, then launder.
Page 14
Grass
After using an enzyme pre-soak product or a stick style pre-wash stain remover, press detergent into
stain. Launder using bleach safe for fabric in hottest water safe for fabric. On wool, sponge stain with
full strength rubbing alcohol. For acetate and non-colorfast fabrics, use 1 part alcohol to 2 parts water.
Rinse thoroughly, then launder.
Grease / Oil
Pretreat with a degreasing hand cleaner, an absorbent (chalk or corn meal product), or press with
detergent to bring oil to the surface of the fabric. Pre-wash aerosol detergent booster products work
well on grease and oil. Rinse in hottest water safe for fabric. If stain persists, lay flat face down on top of
several clean paper towels. Sponge with cleaning fluid from back side. Let air dry. Rinse, then launder.
Ink
For ball-point pen ink, sponge stain with rubbing alcohol (hair spray may work in a pinch – but may
leave a gummy residue to be dealt with). Or, apply glycerin. Rinse thoroughly, press with detergent,
then launder. For drawing ink stain, press absorbents into stain. Apply hydrogen peroxide full strength
if stain is unaffected, then steam over teakettle. Rinse thoroughly, then launder. Or, soak in ammonia,
press household cleaner into stain. Rinse thoroughly, launder.
Ketchup
Remove excess with a dull table knife, being careful not to damage fabric. Soak in cold water for 30
minutes. Pretreat with detergent and/or enzyme presoak product. Launder using bleach safe for fabric
in hottest water safe for fabric.
Lipstick / Rouge
Lay flat face down on top of several clean paper towels. Sponge with cleaning fluid from back side. Let
air dry. Rinse thoroughly. Or, use a pre-wash stain remover. Press detergent into stain until outline is
removed. Rinse thoroughly, then launder using bleach safe for fabric.
Mayonnaise
Lay flat face down on top of several clean paper towels. Sponge with cleaning fluid from back side.
Let air dry. Rinse thoroughly, then launder. If stain persists, press with detergent. Launder. If stain still
persists, treat with meat tenderizer (test for colorfastness first) and launder.
Mildew
First, use a disinfectant to kill the mildew. Then remove excess with dull table knife, being careful not to
damage fabric. Pretreat with detergent and launder using bleach safe for fabric. If stain persists, sponge
with hydrogen peroxide and launder using bleach safe for fabric.
Mud
Let dry. Remove excess with dull table knife or with a household brush, being careful not to damage
fabric. Sponge with cold water. Launder in hottest water safe for fabric. If stain remains, sponge with
rubbing alcohol. If acetate or non-colorfast fabric, dilute alcohol using 1 part alcohol to 2 parts water.
Mustard
Work glycerin into stain. Scrub, being careful not to damage fabric. Pretreat with detergent, then
launder using bleach safe for fabric. If stain persists, sponge with rubbing alcohol, then launder. It has
been suggested that drying in sunlight may help fade mustard stains.
Nail Polish
Do not use acetone nail polish remover on colored fabrics. Sponge with chemically pure amyl acetate.
Launder. If stain persists, sponge with rubbing alcohol to which a few drops of ammonia have
been added.
Paint / Varnish
If possible, treat stains quickly before paint dries. If stain or paint container has stain removal
instructions, follow them. Otherwise: For wet latex paint stains, rub with detergent, then launder, using
extra water. Dry latex paint stains are impossible to remove, although sand paper has been suggested,
as has methanol (found in hardware stores). For wet or dry oil paint stains, sponge with mineral spirits,
blot with clean, white paper towels. Rinse thoroughly, then launder.
Pencil Lead Marks
First, try a clean eraser. Then, sponge with equal parts of ammonia and water. Rinse thoroughly,
then launder.
Perfume
Sponge with equal parts of alcohol and water. Rinse thoroughly. If stain persists, sponge with equal
parts of vinegar and water. Rinse thoroughly, then launder using bleach safe for fabric.
Perspiration
Sponge with equal parts of ammonia and water and then equal parts of vinegar and water. Apply
detergent, then launder using bleach safe for fabric in hottest water safe for fabric. If color is affected
by perspiration, sponge fresh stain with ammonia, old stain with vinegar. Wash in hot suds. Soak in
diluted chlorine bleach (if safe for fabric) or press with oxygen bleach paste (if safe for fabric). Or, dip in
a sodium hydrosulphite solution (1 tsp. crystals to 1 cup water). Rinse thoroughly, then launder.
Page 15
Ring Around
the Collar
Apply liquid detergent or a paste of granular detergent and water. Wait for 30 minutes. An
enzyme pre-soak product especially designed for this purpose may be used, follow manufacturer’s
directions. Rinse thoroughly, then launder.
Rust
Launder in hottest water safe for fabric using detergent and rust removal product. If a rust removal
product is unavailable, use a solution of 1 tablespoon oxalic acid crystals in 1 cup of warm water.
Sponge this solution into the stain. Rinse thoroughly as oxalic acid is poisonous, then launder. A natural
remedy is to rub the stain with salt and lemon juice, dry in the sun, then launder.
Sap (Wood Resin)
Sponge stain with cleaning fluid, turpentine or pre-wash stain remover. Let air dry. Rinse thoroughly.
Press with detergent paste and launder as usual. If stain persists, apply a few drops of household
ammonia. Air dry. Rinse thoroughly. Launder using bleach safe for fabric in hottest water safe for fabric.
Scorch
Severe scorching cannot be removed, as fabric may have been permanently damaged. For light
scorching, launder in hottest water safe for fabric using bleach safe for fabric. For heavier scorching
or for non-bleachable fabric, cover stains with cloth dampened with hydrogen peroxide. Cover with a
dry cloth and press with hottest iron safe for fabric. Rinse thoroughly. Press detergent into stained area
while still wet. Launder. Repeat if necessary. Another suggested method is to rub scorch lightly with fine
sand paper, then sponge with equal parts of vinegar and water. Rinse thoroughly, then launder.
Shoe Polish
Scrape off excess with dull table knife, being careful not to damage fabric. Press detergent into
dampened stain. Launder using bleach safe for fabric in hottest water safe for fabric. If stain persists,
sponge with full strength rubbing alcohol (for colorfast fabrics) or a solution of 1 part alcohol to 2 parts
water (for non-colorfast fabrics). Rinse thoroughly, then launder.
Smoke / Soot
Shake off excess soot outdoors. For small spots, take up excess ash with sticky tape. Use a pre-wash
stain remover. Launder using heavy duty detergent and bleach safe for fabric. To remove odor, use
baking soda.
Soft Drinks
Sponge stain immediately with cold water. Apply pre-wash stain remover and glycerin. Launder using
bleach safe for fabric in hottest water safe for fabric. Some soft drink stains are invisible after they are
dry, but turn yellow after aging or heating. This yellow stain may be impossible to remove.
Syrup
Soak in warmest water safe for fabric. Or, if safe for fabric, stretch over bowl and pour boiling water
through fabric from 12-18” height. If stain persists, use pre-wash stain remover. Launder using bleach
safe for fabric in hottest water safe for fabric.
Tar / Asphalt
Act quickly before stain is dry. Tar removal products are available at auto supply stores (test first). Or,
pour cleaning fluid or turpentine through stain. Repeat. Rinse thoroughly, apply detergent, then launder.
This stain is often impossible to remove.
Urine
Treat with equal parts of vinegar and water. Rinse thoroughly, then launder. Or, treat with equal parts of
ammonia and water. Rinse thoroughly, then launder.
Vegetables
For green vegetables, use an enzyme presoak, then press in detergent. Launder using bleach safe for
fabric in hottest water safe for fabric. On wool, sponge stain with full strength rubbing alcohol. For
acetate and non-colorfast fabrics, use 1 part alcohol to 2 parts water. Rinse thoroughly, then launder.
Vegetable
Cooking Oil
Treat light stains with pre-wash stain remover or liquid laundry detergent. For heavy stains,
lay flat face down on top of several clean paper towels. Sponge with cleaning fluid from back side.
Let air dry. Rinse thoroughly, then launder in hottest water safe for fabric. Before drying, check stain.
Repeat process if necessary.
Wax
Harden using an ice cube. Scrape off excess with dull table knife, being careful not to damage fabric.
For washable fabric, stretch over bowl and pour boiling water through stain from 12-18” height. For
non-washable fabric, place between several layers of facial tissue or paper towels and press with warm
Page 16
Mrs. Stewart’s Care Label Guide
Caring for fabric in the proper way is important enough that federal regulations have been enacted requiring
garment manufacturers to provide information about how to care for the garment. This information must be
attached to the garment and must be readable upon purchase. The following guide will aid you in understanding
the instructions on the care label of your garment. We encourage you to check the care labels on your garments
and other fabric products and follow the instructions given for washing, drying and ironing. Doing so will prolong
the life and quality for your garment.
Care Label
Definition / Instruction
Block to Dry
Maintain original size and shape while drying.
Cold Water
Water with a temperature up to 85 degrees F.
Cold Wash / Rinse
Use cold water or set washing machine for cold water.
Damp Wipe
Clean surface with damp cloth or sponge. Do not machine wash or dry.
Delicate Cycle /
Gentle Cycle
Use appropriate machine setting with slow agitation and spin and reduced washing time. Or,
wash by hand.
Do Not Bleach
Do not use bleach of any type.
Do Not Dry Clean
Use recommended care instructions. Dry cleaning chemicals should not be used.
Do Not Iron
Do not iron or press with heat.
Do Not Spin
Remove garment before spin cycle begins.
Do Not Use
Chlorine Bleach
Do not use chlorine bleach. Oxygen bleaches may be used.
Do Not Wring
Hang dry, drip dry, or flat dry only. Handle to prevent wrinkling and damage or distortion of fabric.
Drip Dry
Hang wet and allow to dry with hand shaping only.
Dry Clean Only
Garment should be dry cleaned only, including self-service dry cleaning.
Dry Flat
Lay garment horizontally flat, on breathable surface to dry.
Hand Wash
Launder only by hand in lukewarm (hand-comfortable) water. May be dry cleaned.
Hand Wash Separately
Hand wash alone or with like colors.
Home Launder Only
Wash, bleach, dry, press by any customary method. Dry cleaning chemicals should not be used.
Hot Wash
Use hot water or set washing machine settings for use of hot water.
Iron Cool
Set iron at lowest setting.
Iron Damp
Dampen garment before ironing.
Iron Hot
Set iron at hot or hottest setting.
Iron Wrong Side Only
Turn garment inside out to iron.
Line Dry
Hang damp and allow to air dry.
Machine Wash
Wash, bleach, dry and press by any customary method, including commercial laundering and dry
cleaning. If no temperature is specified, water up to 150 degrees F can be used.
No Heat
When drying, choose the “no heat” or “air dry” setting. Or, air dry without a machine.
Permanent Press
Use appropriate machine setting with warm wash, cool rinse and reduced spin cycle.
Professionally
Dry Clean Only
Use the services of a licensed, professional dry cleaner only. Do not use self-service dry cleaning.
Page 17
Remove Promptly
Tumble dry. In absence of cool down cycle, remove at once when tumbling stops.
Steam Iron
Iron or press with steam.
Tumble Dry
Dry in tumble dryer at specified setting. If no temperature is specified, a hot setting may be used.
Warm Iron
Set iron at medium setting.
Warm Wash / Rinse
Use warm water or warm washing machine setting.
Warm Water
Water with temperature between 90 and 110 degrees F. “Hand-comfortable”.
Wash Inside Out
Turn garment inside out before washing to protect fabric.
Wash Separately
Wash alone or with like colors.
Page 18
Washing Machine and Dryer Manufacturers
To obtain manuals for your washer or dryer, contact the manufacturer of your machine.
Bosch
800-944-2904
www.bosch-home.com/us
Bosch Customer Care
1901 Main Str, Ste 600, Irvine, CA 92614
Frigidaire
800-374-4432 (main)
706-860-4110 (customer service)
www.frigidaire.com
Frigidaire Customer Service
P.O. Box 212378, Augusta, GA 30907
General Electric
Maytag
866-616-2601 (Customer Service)
800-688-2002 (Canada)
www.maytag.com
Maytag Customer Service
553 Benson Rd, Benton Harbor, MI 49022
Whirlpool
866-698-2538 (Customer Service)
800-688-2002 (Canada)
www.whirlpool.com
Whirlpool Customer Service
553 Benson Rd, Benton Harbor, MI 49022
502-452-4311 (main)
800-626-2000 (answer center)
www.geappliances.com
GE Appliances
3135 Easton Turnpike, Fairfield, CT 06828
Samsung
Kenmore
Electrolux
888-KENMORE (main)
800-549-4505 (customer service)
www.kenmore.com
Sears (Kenmore) Customer Service
3333 Beverly Road, Hoffman Estates, IL 60179
800-SAMSUNG (Product Support)
www.samsung.com/us
Consumer Electronics Support
85 Challenger Rd, Ridgefield Park, NJ 07660
877-435-3287 (Customer Service)
www.electroluxappliances.com
Electrolux Major Appliances
P.O. Box 212237, Augusta, GA 30907
LG
800-243-0000 (Customer Service)
www.lg.com
LG Electronics Customer Service
201 James Record Rd, Huntsville, AL 35824
Page 19
Look what some NEW and LOYAL customers have to say about Mrs. Stewart’s® Bluing!
See more comments at our web site, www.mrsstewart.com.
“I am stopping in the midst of doing my laundry to write to you to tell you that I use your Mrs. Stewart’s®
Bluing every time I wash – EVERY load. Growing up, my mother couldn’t rinse without bluing. That was
when she used the wringer type washer and two stove tubs – one to soak and one to rinse. I learned and
was taught by her how to ‘hang out’ a white, clean wash! My lingerie and kitchen cloths, for years, looked
like (are you old enough for this???) ‘tattletale gray’, and I knew the missing bluing had something to do
with it. Now, every time I put in a load of wash, in goes the MSB, too, and believe me, there is a difference.
Even my husband commented on the change. I’ve been meaning for a long time to write to tell you so – and
today is the day. The other loads will wait – I have a “Thank You”, most belated, to write.”
— H.P. – Roswell, GA
“I have just recently discovered your Mrs. Stewart’s® Bluing, and to say the least, I’m ecstatic. We live in a
rural area and have well-water. Our well is fed by a natural underground spring, which makes for sparkling
clear water. However, when we experience a very heavy rainfall, the water will appear dingy and the result,
of course, is dingy whites. I’ve tried presoaks, bleach, and nothing made a really noticeable difference until I
tried your product. I’m telling everybody about my new discovery!”
— D. Turney – Hulbert, OK
“Can you possibly stand yet another glowing testimony regarding Mrs. Stewart’s® Bluing? Prepare yourselves
because this consumer couldn’t be happier with your product! Environmentally safe, fabric-friendly and
multipurpose – all for such a reasonable price? I thought products like this were extinct! You guys are great!”
— C. Spriher – St. Paris, OH
Share a Home Washing Guide with Your Friends!
You may have friends or relatives who would like a copy of the Home Washing Guide.
Please send us their names and addresses and we will mail a copy free of charge.
If you or your friends cannot obtain Mrs. Stewart’s® Bluing from local grocers and
would like to try it, please call us and we will be glad to help you.
Comments on our Home Washing Guide?
Jefco, Inc.
Mrs. Stewart’s® Bluing
1700 West 94th Street
Bloomington, MN 55431-2300
800-325-7785, fax: 952-881-1873
email: “Contact Us” at our web site.
Visit our Web Site!
www.mrsstewart.com
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