Bluetooth - Texas Instruments

Bluetooth - Texas Instruments
Understanding Wireless Connectivity
in the Industrial IoT
www.ti.com/wirelessconnectivity
Understanding Wireless Connectivity
in the Industrial IoT
Contents Page
White Paper
Wireless connectivity design considerations for the industrial IoT.........................................................3
Blog Posts
The Internet of industrial Things.........................................................................................................12
Building the industrial Internet of Things............................................................................................13
Taking Power to a New Low with the SimpleLink™ ULP Wireless MCU Platform..............................15
Bluetooth® Smart in Industrial............................................................................................................18
The Shocking Impact of Poor RF Selectivity and Blocking.................................................................20
TI Design Reference Designs
Humidity & Temp Sensor Node for Star Networks Enabling 10+ Year ...............................................22
Coin Cell Battery Life Ref Design
Wireless Motor Monitor Reference Design.........................................................................................23
SimpleLink Multi-Standard CC2650 SensorTag Reference Design.....................................................25
ETSI Cat. 1 Receiver-Capable wM-Bus 169-MHz RF Subsystem for ................................................26
Smart Gas and Water Meters
Implementing SimpleLink Wi-Fi® Connectivity in a Smart Electric Meter.............................................27
Smart Plug with Remote Disconnect and Wi-Fi Connectivity.............................................................28
Bluetooth Low Energy (Bluetooth Smart) to RS-485 Gateway...........................................................29
CC2540 Bluetooth Low Energy USB Dongle Reference Design........................................................30
Gas Sensor Platform with Bluetooth Low Energy..............................................................................31
Smart Home and Energy Gateway Reference Design........................................................................32
Product Overviews
SimpleLink ultra-low power wireless MCU platform ..........................................................................35
SimpleLink Wi-Fi Family CC3100/CC3200 wireless MCU platform....................................................37
WiLink™ 8 Wi-Fi+ Bluetooth/BLE Modules.......................................................................................39
Dual-mode Bluetooth CC2564 smart RF transceiver.........................................................................41
Bluetooth Smart high-temperature CC2540T wireless MCU..............................................................43
White Paper
Wireless connectivity
design considerations
for the industrial IoT
Olivier Monnier
marketing director,
wireless connectivity solutions
Eran Zigman
business line manager,
wireless connectivity solutions
Amit Hammer
business line manager,
wireless connectivity solutions
Texas Instruments
3
Introduction
Wireless communications, dominant in consumer electronics for some time now,
is quickly making its way into the industrial Internet of Things (IoT). Developers of
industrial systems, once freed from the restrictions of cables, are discovering new ways
to increase efficiencies and productivity, cut costs and better control processes and
equipment. In fact, the only limit on industrial wireless applications appears to be the
imagination of developers.
Enabled by ultra-low power sensors and wireless communications devices, as well as
highly integrated microcontrollers (MCUs), the IoT is quickly spreading throughout
traditional industrial markets like factory and building automation, the energy infrastructure,
smart lighting, as well as non-industrial markets such as automotive, retail, health care
and others. In many cases, new wireless applications interoperate and enhance the
established wired systems, providing value-added capabilities that ride the air waves
instead of the wires. For instance, what had been a complex human/machine interface
(HMI) can now run as a convenient app on a smartphone or tablet in the wireless
industrial IoT. Moreover, tapping into powerful cloud-based analytics in real time adds
another dimension to the sophistication of industrial applications.
Of course, system designers should consider a number of factors with regards to
wireless connectivity. These include choosing the particular wireless technology that
best fits the requirements and use cases of the application, the power consumption
and the compatibility of the technology with other devices such as sensors, MCUs,
gateways, servers and others, the ease of integrating wireless technology into industrial
equipment, cloud connectivity and security.
Going wireless –
it needs to be easy
systems by integrating wireless connectivity with the
processing capabilities of an MCU. This significantly
reduces the need for the industrial system developer
to be an expert in radio frequency (RF) design
Integrating wireless connectivity into industrial
techniques and gives developers a powerful MCU
systems has become vastly easier in recent years
for running an application or subsystem. Some of
as new end-to-end building blocks – low-power
these wireless MCUs include the entire wireless
sensors, wireless connectivity devices, MCUs,
protocol stack as well as security measures. Other
gateways and servers – have been introduced.
more integrated alternatives include as much as
Industrial system developers now have access to
possible in one device, such as cloud connectivity,
a wide variety of wireless technology with diverse
local wireless protocols, security protections
capabilities and varying degrees of integration. For
and other capabilities in an attempt to make the
example, some technology suppliers have simplified
inclusion of wireless connectivity a plug-in module
the inclusion of wireless connectivity into industrial
Wireless connectivity design considerations for the industrial IoT
exercise.
4
July 2015
Motor drive and
remote control
Building
automation
Smart
grid
Figure 1: Examples of industrial applications where wireless connectivity may be implemented
In addition to the devices and capabilities needed,
The more comprehensive suppliers of wireless
industrial system designers can now access the
technology are able to ensure end-to-end inter­
extensive support ecosystems that some wireless
operability among sensors, intermediary devices,
technology suppliers provide. The more complete
industrial protocols like RS-485, RS-232 and
ecosystems feature an array of developer kits,
the various real-time Ethernet networks, and the
community support, reference designs, already
cloud. Such suppliers have simplified designing-in
integrated wireless protocol stacks, app developer
wireless connectivity and at the same time ensure
tools, integrated development environments
interoperability with the cloud and a variety of IoT
(IDE) for software programmers and many of the
end nodes.
software and hardware modules that are typically
Industrial wireless:
One size won’t fit all
implemented in industrial settings.
MCU
RF
Transceiver
Sensor
Gateway (Opt.)
Discrete
Fortunately, a variety of local area wireless
connectivity standards with a wide range of
• Application
• RF stacks
capabilities and unique characteristics is available.
MCU + Wireless Network Processor
Wireless Network
Processor
Sensor
• Application
This is especially beneficial to the developers of
Gateway (Opt.)
MCU
industrial systems because industrial applications
cover a broad spectrum of use cases and each
• RF stacks +
• RF transceiver
one has its own set of challenges. Developers are
able to select the wireless connectivity technology
Wireless Microcontroller
that best meets the requirements of the application.
Gateway (Opt.)
Wireless MCU
Sensor
For example, the developers of a smart metering
system for a utility grid might decide that the longer
signaling range of a Sub-1 GHz wireless protocol
• RF stacks +
• RF transceiver +
• MCU +
• Optional cloud agent
is best suited to this application. Another design
team working on a home automation system could
Figure 2: Integration variations for cloud connectivity
Wireless connectivity design considerations for the industrial IoT
5
July 2015
White Paper
Factory
automation
Remote display / Wireless HMI
Before the emergence of the industrial wireless IoT, an
HMI for a new monitoring application would have required
extensive development and integration of the new
subsystem and display hardware. Now, with low-power
wireless technologies like Bluetooth® Smart, batteryoperated sensors can transmit monitoring data to IoT user
devices such as a smartphone or tablet PC. Technicians
are familiar and comfortable with this sort of device so the
learning curve is short.
opt for Wi-Fi® because of its compatibility with
communication (NFC) and Bluetooth® Smart or a
controlling appliances remotely. Lighting networks
proprietary 2.4-GHz protocol might suffice.
®
The point is that each wireless technology
consumption, mesh topology and extensive support
has its own set of strengths. An industrial IoT
ecosystem. 6LoWPAN could be the choice of
application is best served when the strengths of
developers of a factory automation system who see
a particular wireless technology is matched with
real benefit in implementing a network of nodes with
the requirements of the application. For example,
Internet Protocol (IP) addresses. For some systems,
Bluetooth has been deployed in a host of user
the very low power and limited range of near field
devices, including smartphones and tablets. So an
Range
Network type
might be better suited to ZigBee for its low power
NFC
RFID
Bluetooth®
Bluetooth low
energy
Proprietary
2.4 GHz
ZigBee®
Wi-Fi®
6LowPAN
Proprietary
Sub-1 GHz
Identification
Personal
connection
Customizable
Mesh
Existing
infrastructure
IP Mesh
Customizable
Industrial applications
Key
differences
Proximity
Personal area networks
Data
• Up to 848 Kbps
• No battery to
coin cell
Data or voice
• Up to 3 Mbps
• Coin cell to AAA
Data
• Up to 1 Mbps
• Coin cell
Data
• Up to 256 Kbps
• Energy
harvesting to
AAA
Voice or video
• Up to 100 Mbps
• AA battery
Data
• Up to 256 Kbps
• Energy
harvesting to
AAA
Data
• Up to 1 Mbps
• Coin cell
• Device
configuration /
Firmware
upgrade
• Lighting
• Wire
replacement
• Beaconing
• Asset tracking
• Factory
automation
• Building
and factory
automation
• Beaconing
• Smart energy
• Building
automation
• Lighting
networks
• Industrial
Internet
• Assets tracking
• Remote control
of machinery
• Sensors
• Building
automation
• Smart energy
• Building
automation
• Lighting
networks
• Low-power
Industrial
Internetgateways
• Metering
• Smart grid
• Alarm and
security
• Environmental
monitoring
Figure 3: Selection table of wireless connectivity technologies for industrial
Neighborhood area
networks
Local area networks
Wireless connectivity design considerations for the industrial IoT
6
July 2015
devices. 6LoWPAN consumes very little power to
Preventive maintenance was
never so easy
the point where it could be supported by small coin
Preventive maintenance – heading off a problem
cell batteries, energy harvesting or both. In addition,
before it happens – is highly valued in many
since 6LoWPAN nodes are assigned an IP address,
industrial environments. Wireless connectivity
they can be accessed directly from the cloud. If
makes possible a new generation of preventive
the wireless signal must travel a long distance and
maintenance applications. In a power generation
penetrate through objects like walls, a Sub-1 GHz
plant, for example, wireless sensors could
would have immediate compatibility with many user
communicate with a technician’s smartphone when
protocol could be most appropriate.
vibration in a machine exceeds a certain limit. Then,
preventive maintenance could return the machine
Power consumption
to its proper working order before a catastrophic
problem occurs.
The power consumption of an industrial wireless
application must be examined at the macro level
of the entire system and not just its individual
elements.
To start with, an industrial IoT network would
certainly call for low-power sensors to monitor
factory processes, building equipment, residential
systems, the electrical power grid or whatever the
setting. Today’s most advanced wireless sensors
have brought new meaning to low power. When
teamed with a low-power MCU with wireless
a machine on the roof of a building, atop a tower
connectivity, some sensor-based IoT end nodes
or in a satellite. In these sorts of applications, the
can operate for up to 10 years on a coin cell battery
power management subsystem could lengthen the
while others will operate on energy harvested from
life of the batteries by keeping most of the system
the light, vibration, thermal or RF energy in their
in a low-power sleep mode except for the sensor
surroundings. Sophisticated power management
that is monitoring the inaccessible machine. When
as well as precision analog capabilities like analog-
the condition being monitored by the sensor, such
to-digital (ADC) converters and comparators are
as vibration or temperature, exceeds a certain
also critical to low-power IoT networks. Power
threshold, the rest of the system could be powered
management routines that are able to automatically
up so that it could communicate an alarm or take an
place portions of the system into a power-saving
action on its own.
sleep mode can extend the operational life of a
Sensors
battery considerably and reduce the need for
regular maintenance to change batteries. This could
be critical in applications where an IoT node is
Sensors deployed in a wireless industrial IoT will
installed in a particularly inaccessible location, like
Wireless connectivity design considerations for the industrial IoT
monitor a complex and widely diverse environment
7
July 2015
White Paper
industrial application supporting Bluetooth Smart
IP investments as well as a loss of control over the
system to rogue processes. In low-power, often
remote wireless nodes, this security protection is
usually best provided through hardware-based
accelerators or co-processors executing security
algorithms because this will consume less power
and not diminish the throughput of the node.
Conformance and certification to wireless standards,
like Wi-Fi, Bluetooth Smart and others, also affect
Figure 4: SimpleLink™ SensorTag quickly connects
sensors to the cloud
security since standards either incorporate built-in
security measures or are compatible with security
standards. Wi-Fi, for example, has a number of
where slight changes in conditions can be critical.
security standards associated with it, such as
High-resolution measurements and the monitoring
Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA), SSL, TLS, X.509
of chemical composition, access control, vibrations,
and others. Cryptographic and authentication
asset tracking information, motion, pressure,
temperature, UV radiation, gas and fluid flow and
many other variables could be required.
Building security
Some easy-to-implement devices integrate
Wireless connectivity can ensure the security of
several of these capabilities, combining low-
buildings in a convenient way. For example, locks,
power wireless connectivity over Bluetooth
motion sensors, cameras, exterior and interior
Smart, ZigBee, 6LoWPAN, Sub-1 GHz, Wi-Fi or
lighting, keypads and other security devices could
a proprietary protocol, with an MCU that’s able to
connect through ZigBee or Sub-1 GHz to a Wi-Fi-
control a sensor and run an application. This also
based gateway with access to the Internet. With
includes several interfaces to I/O peripherals. By
this sort of system, a business owner/operator who
bundling many of the basic capabilities into an
may not currently be at the property, could grant
integrated platform, such devices reduce the power
temporary access to a trusted employee through
consumption of the node even further than that of a
their smartphone and a cloud-based security
discrete implementation.
application.
Security
Security is an issue of concern in practically every
aspect of the economy, including industrial wireless
IoT networks. Security can be implemented in a
number of ways, but the goal is always to prevent,
detect and respond to malicious behavior when it
occurs. On a physical level, IoT nodes should be
as tamper resistant as possible. But with electronic
systems, security must also be provided to protect
Wireless connectivity design considerations for the industrial IoT
8
July 2015
wider industrial IoT and the cloud. Some industrial
hardware security measures can be taken, such
Wi-Fi solutions have been bundled with out-of-the-
as secure boot loading mechanisms and logical
box connectivity capabilities, including single or dual
memory locks.
wireless technologies, certified wireless protocols
and security algorithms, sample code libraries and
Connectivity to the
cloud and wired
networks
development tools and kits.
In addition to cloud connectivity, wireless industrial
applications will likely interact with traditional
wired equipment networks. For example, factory
automation or building automation systems could
At some point, most industrial wireless IoT networks
very well feature both wired and local area wireless
usually interface with the cloud and/or traditional
networks in the same environment. In such cases,
industrial wired networks.
the ability to interface wireless connectivity devices
Cloud connectivity has many advantages, but the
with wired connectivity protocols like RS-485,
first issue to address is where in the local IoT will this
RS-232 and others will be quite beneficial. A
connectivity be implemented. Most likely, the IoT will
technician might then monitor processes on the
connect to the cloud through one of its upper levels,
factory floor through a wireless connection to
such as a server or gateway. The gateway or server
an HMI which is monitoring a wired equipment
would aggregate cloud communications from other
network running one of the industrial real-time
nodes and transmit over the cloud. Some industrial
Ethernet protocols like EtherCAT®, EtherNet/IP™,
IoT implementations will access the cloud in order
PROFINET® or POWERLINK.
to connect with cloud-based strategic partners,
like IBM, PTC or other third-party firms that offer
Conclusions
application-specific analytics, specialized processing
and other services that are sometimes required.
Texas Instruments has long had the industry’s
Probably the most critical issue relative to cloud
most extensive portfolio of enabling wireless
connectivity will be how easy or difficult it will be
technologies for industrial IoT networks. A pioneer
to accomplish. Historically, developers of industrial
in low-power innovation, TI’s technologies include
systems have not needed experience in radio
both integrated and discrete solutions, such as
frequency (RF) engineering. In many cases, wireless
ultra-low power MCUs and sensors, analog devices
cloud connectivity will be provided by Wi-Fi in a
like ADCs and comparators, as well as WiLink™
gateway or server, since Wi-Fi is already ubiquitous
Wi-Fi and Bluetooth combo connectivity devices
in many industrial settings and it features the
and SimpleLink™ wireless MCUs which have been
requisite bandwidth and capacity for effective cloud
integrated with local area wireless connectivity for all
connectivity. Some IoT end nodes might require
of the popular standards in addition to being easily
dual wireless connectivity; Bluetooth Smart, ZigBee
customizable to proprietary protocols. Moreover, the
or 6LoWPAN for local interaction with sensors and
SimpleLink wireless MCUs include the most popular
operators, and Wi-Fi connectivity for linking into the
peripheral interfaces as well as on-chip memory and
Wireless connectivity design considerations for the industrial IoT
9
July 2015
White Paper
algorithms can also protect stored data. In addition,
a sensor controller engine that quickly and easily
and other resources that allow industrial system
interfaces to a wide range of TI’s sensors.
developers to not only customize and differentiate
All solutions are capable of operating over the
their products, but also deliver their new system to
40–85°C industrial temperature range. Highly
the market quickly and efficiently.
programmable, TI’s wireless solutions are supported
For more information go to
by an extensive ecosystem of tools, libraries of
www.ti.com/wirelessconnectivity
ready-to-use software modules, reference designs
BG1
RF_ANT2
WRF2
®
ZigBee
COEX I/F
Aband
BT: UART
MAC/PHY
WLAN : SDIO
BT EN
MAC/PHY
32 KHz
26M TCXO
D
WRFA
BG2
RF_ANT1
2.4-GHz
SPDT
WRF1
WLAN EN
5-GHz
DPDT
BT
D
BTRF
F
VIO
VBAT
PM
Note: Dashed lines indicate optional configurations and are not applied by default.
Figure 5: WiLink 8 dual-band industrial module (WL1837MOD variant shown)
Important Notice: The products and services of Texas Instruments Incorporated and its subsidiaries described herein are sold subject to TI’s standard
terms and conditions of sale. Customers are advised to obtain the most current and complete information about TI products and services before placing
orders. TI assumes no l­iability for applications assistance, customer’s applications or product designs, software performance, or infringement of patents.
The publication of information regarding any other company’s products or services does not constitute TI’s approval, warranty or endorsement thereof.
SimpleLink and WiLink are trademarks of Texas Instruments. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
© 2015 Texas Instruments Incorporated
10
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11
Blog Posts
Wireless connectivity
blog posts
Blog Posts
The Internet of industrial Things
The Internet of Things or IoT is not just for consumer applications. It has a strong potential in the industrial sector
because of the services that will be provided as more sensors
and equipment are connected to the cloud. It is important
that IoT not be confused with machine-to-machine or M2M
connectivity since they are not the same. M2M is traditionally
based on proprietary technology that is a closed environment
vs. IoT which offers an open environment and leverages standard Internet accessibility and services – just like the ones we
humans use. This level of openness enables a gas sensor to
tweet or text an operator when there is a problem, which is
not straightforward with an M2M system.
With cloud connectivity there is a lot of potential for IoTenabled applications within the industrial market.
• Smart manufacturing: Manufacturers are adding wireless
connectivity to their products or production line to improve the
manufacturing process. With integrated wireless connectivity, manufacturers are better able to get information from the
factory floor to their cloud systems to quickly uncover and
address any issues long before the product leaves the factory.
Manufacturers also want to use connectivity to gather information about equipment in the field. This information helps them
find bugs, monitor equipment and also allows for software and
firmware updates over-the-air – something that was not possible before.
• Building automation: Much like factory automation, building
automation can connect to sensors to turn lights on and off
depending on occupancy and allow dynamic control of HVAC
systems, which allows for energy optimization. Predicative
maintenance is also a benefit to ensure that service is done in
a timely fashion, which reduces costs.
• Smart cities: Connecting elements within a smart city to the
IoT can provide enhancements to improve electricity and
water usage with e-meters to improve conservation efforts.
Connected smart street lights as well as cloud-connected surveillance and traffic-control monitors help provide a smoothrunning city. Last, sensors throughout the city detect gas and
water-pipe leak keep citizens safe and ensure operation.
• Other markets: There are additional opportunities to improve
employee health and safety through the IoT outside of the
workplace. Connected wearables and healthcare monitoring
improves overall health and wellness. And IoT within automobiles provides infotainment but also lighter and more fuel efficient cars with wire replacement and predictive maintenance
to save on costly repairs.
Many of the examples above play out in the consumer
market as well. However, the industrial IoT is different than
consumer applications. Industrial requires different interfaces
and protocols that are robust against noise, environmental
changes, controlled latency and are highly secure because of
the conditions and applications they are used in.
Additionally, the industrial market moves much slower than
the consumer market so its move to connected IoT enhancements will take some time. The benefits of predicative
maintenance, monitoring and data analysis to improve output
or working conditions, combined with the availability of the
right hardware and software solutions, will provide a financial
reason to migrate to IoT-connected systems in the future – its
just a question of when.
• Learn more about TI’s role in the IoT and its broad portfolio of
IoT-ready solutions
• Watch this video and see how TI is innovating for industrial
automation
• Read more blogs on TI’s IoT solutions
12
Blog Posts
Building the industrial
Internet of Things
The Internet of Things or IoT is an enabling technology that is
delivering new use cases and services across a wide variety of markets and applications. When people think of the
IoT, they often think of home or personal applications, but in
reality, IoT-connected products will play a role in smart manufacturing, smart cities, automotive, building automation and
health care as well.
The Industrial IoT has strong potential because of the services that will be provided as more sensors and equipment
are connected to the cloud. It is important that IoT not be
confused with machine-to-machine (M2M) connectivity since
they are not the same. M2M is traditionally based on proprietary technology that is a closed environment vs. IoT which
offers an open environment and leverages standard Internet
accessibility and services – just like the ones we humans use.
This level of openness enables a gas sensor to tweet or text
an operator when there is a problem or for an industrial endequipment to leverage a generic public data base to see how
it is performing compared to industry benchmarks, things
which are not straightforward with proprietary M2M systems.
At a high-level, IoT is about improving efficiency (e.g., energy,
manufacturing, maintenance, etc.), and delivering increased
safety and security, better experiences, new business services and more to a variety of industries including:
• Smart manufacturing: Manufacturers are adding wireless
connectivity to their products or production line to improve the
manufacturing process. With integrated connectivity, manufacturers are better able to get information from the factory
floor to their cloud systems to quickly uncover and address
any issues long before the product leaves the factory. Manufacturers also want to use connectivity to gather information
about equipment in the field. This information helps them
find bugs, monitor equipment and also allows for software
and firmware updates over-the-air – something that was not­
possible before.
• Building automation: Much like factory automation, building
automation can connect to sensors to turn lights on and off
depending on occupancy and allow dynamic control of HVAC
systems, which allows for energy optimization. Predicative
maintenance is also a benefit to ensure that service is done in
a timely fashion, which reduces costs.
• Smart cities: Connecting elements within a smart city to the
IoT can provide enhancements to improve electricity and
water usage with e-meters to improve conservation efforts.
Connected, smart street lights as well as cloud-connected surveillance and traffic-control monitors help provide a smoothrunning city. Last, sensors throughout the city detect gas and
water-pipe leak keep citizens safe and ensure operation.
• Automotive: Connected cars provide infotainment services
to stream entertainment and provide navigation and other
connected services. Replacing wires with wireless connectivity is leading to lighter and more fuel-efficient automobiles
13
with sensor-driven predictive maintenance to save on costly
repairs.
• Retail stores: A connected retail environment can better track
inventory and dynamically change digital shelf labels. Combined with customer loyalty programs, IoT-connected beacons
within a store can serve up coupons and offer sales based on
customer preferences directly to their smartphones while they
are shopping.
• Healthcare: There are additional opportunities to improve
employee health and safety through the IoT outside of the
workplace. Connected wearables and health care monitoring
improve overall health and wellness.
Many of the examples above play out in the consumer
market as well. However, the industrial IoT is different than
consumer applications. Industrial requires different interfaces
and communication protocols that are robust against noise,
environmental changes, controlled latency and are highly
secure because of the conditions and applications they are
used in.
Additionally, the industrial market moves much slower than
the consumer market so its move to connected IoT will take
some time. The benefits of predicative maintenance, monitoring and big data analysis to improve output or working
conditions, combined with the availability of the right hardware and software solutions, will provide a financial reason
to migrate to IoT-connected systems in the future – it’s just a
question of how quickly it happens.
• Learn more about TI’s role in the IoT and its broad portfolio of
IoT-ready solutions
• Watch this video and see how TI is innovating for industrial
automation
• Read more blogs on TI’s IoT solutions
14
The new SimpleLink™ CC26xx/CC13xx ultra-low power platform for Bluetooth® Smart, 6LoWPAN, ZigBee®, Sub-1 GHz
and ZigBee RF4CE™ is built and designed with low power in
mind. We’ve looked at all aspects important to making sure
the energy footprint of our solution is as small as possible
enabling longer battery lifetimes, smaller batteries or even
energy harvesting for battery-less applications.
Application
Contrary to popular belief, that radio transceiver itself is rarely
the main contributor to the overall power consumption of a
wireless microcontroller (MCU). As various technologies progress, there is more and more need for computing power, even
as relatively small sensors and the wireless protocol stacks
come with more overhead as the standards evolve.
In the SimpleLink CC26xx family, there are two very energy
efficient MCUs available for the application.
The scores in Table 1 allow for very low average power consumption during active use. Running the ARM Cortex-M3 at
maximum speed (48 MHz), the CPU operation consumes less
than 3 mA and outperforms any wireless MCU running at less
efficient cores or at lower CPU clocks. The CC26xx CoreMark power efficiency (CoreMark / mA) is the best compared
to any competitor with a comparable MCU, making it the
most energy efficient microcontroller available today.
Sensor controller
The unique ultra-low power sensor controller is a 16-bit CPU
coupled with peripherals like analog-to-digital converters
(ADC), analog comparators, SPI/I2C and capacitive touch. It is
designed to run autonomously when the rest of the system is
in standby. The Sensor Controller allows interface with external analog or digital sensors in a very low power manner.
ARM® Cortex®-M3
The ARM Cortex-M3 is the main system CPU inside the
CC26xx device. One way of measuring the performance of
MCUs is by using benchmark tools. One of the more popular
benchmarks is CoreMark from the Embedded Microprocessor Benchmark Consortium (EEMBC). CoreMark is a simple,
yet sophisticated, benchmark that is designed to test the
efficiency of a processor core used in embedded devices.
It is not system dependent, therefore it functions the same
regardless of the platform (e.g., big/little endian, high-end
or low-end processors, etc.). This benchmark also demonstrates the energy efficiency of the MCU core.
Table 1: Various CoreMark scores for the CC26xx, measured on CC2650-7ID @ 3.0V
and 48 MHz
Figure 1: The ultra-low power sensor controller engine can run autonomously while the rest
of the system is in standby.
Waking up the entire system to perform minor tasks is very
often not energy efficient as it introduces a lot of overhead.
In many use cases there are tasks that need to run at certain
intervals that are at a higher duty-cycle than the actual RF or
main activity.
One example could be a heart-rate monitor that needs to
run the ADC 10 times per second to capture the heart rate
accurately. Waking the entire system up to perform a wireless transmission 10 times per second will, in this case, be
very energy inefficient. With the SimpleLink ultra-low power
CC26xx platform, one can let the Sensor Controller perform
15
Blog Posts
Taking power to a new low with
the SimpleLink™ ULP wireless
MCU platform
the battery for the active use. The
CC26xx uses an ultra-low leakage
SRAM that can be fully retained
(20 KB) and in addition have the
real-time clock (RTC) running, and
registers and CPU state retained
while in standby consuming as little
as 1 µA. In shutdown, the CC26xx
can wake up on external I/O events
while drawing as little as 150 nA.
The shelf lives for CR2032s are
increasing and some vendors now
state up to 10 years of battery life.
The average system current drawn
from a 220 mAh CR2032 has to
be below 2.5 µA to reach 10 years
lifetime[2]. If the base current of a
system is above this, one cannot
reach the maximum potential of the
battery, no matter how low active duty cycle one implements.
Figure 2: The sensor controller can significantly reduce average power consumption.
all the ADC measurements and wake up the ARM Cortex-M3
every 10th ADC sample for optional further processing and
group RF transmission of this data.
How average current affects battery lifetime
In this example, the sensor controller can do 10 ADC reads
per second at less than 3 µA average consumption. Performing the same task using the ARM Cortex-M3 will require 10×
the power consumption.
Battery life time is mostly about the average power consumption. This will be very use-case dependent, but there is a
benchmark now available from EEMBC called ULPBench™
that standardizes on datasheet parameters and provides a
methodology to reliably and equitably measure MCU energy efficiency. ULPBench uses a common set of workloads
that are portable across 8-, 16- and 32-bit microcontrollers,
enables the use of MCU low-power modes while focusing on
real-world applications utilizing integrated hardware functions.
In the end it analyzes the effects of active and low-power
conditions[3].
Table 2: Energy efficiency of the sensor controller while running at the main clock.
The sensor controller can run directly off a pre-scaled
24-MHz clock, making it capable of collecting data and performing simple processing of the data.
Radio
Traditionally the peak drain caused by high transmit and
receive currents of wireless solutions puts constraints on
the batteries that could be used or significantly reduced
the battery lifetime. With the very low peak currents of the
CC26xx at around 6 mA (0 dBm output), this no longer poses
any limitations on the traditional CR2032 batteries and can
even allow for smaller batteries to be used. From an average
power consumption perspective, the radio is no longer the
main contributor and is of less concern and there is no longer
a need to back down on the output power to reduce the peak
consumption.
Sleep and shutdown
Figure 3: CC26xx ULPBench scores vs. competition.
In any battery-operated application, the RF (receive/transmit)
duty cycle and its parameters decide the battery lifetime.
Between transmissions, it is important to keep the standby
currents as low as possible so that there is enough juice in
Another common way of looking at average current is to look
at a specific use-case for a given technology. For Bluetooth
16
Smart, one way is to point out the average while keeping a
connection between two devices at a given interval.
Further details on how to calculate average currents and battery lifetime for a Bluetooth Smart application can be found in
[4].
Table 3: Average scores for the CC26xx, measured on CC2650-7ID @ 3.0 V
Reference
Cortex-M0+ Processor
[2]
arketing Malarkey and Some Truths About Ultra-Low
M
Power Design, Jack Ganssle 2014
[3]
EEMBC ULPBench
[4]
Measuring Bluetooth® Smart Power Consumption
Blog Posts
All of what has been discussed comes into play when looking at the power profile of a wireless event. Figure 4 shows a
connection event for Bluetooth Smart with wake-up, preprocessing of the software stack, radio events (both receive
and transmit) and a post-processing / going back to sleep
period.
[1]
Figure 4: Power profile of a Bluetooth Smart connection event
17
®
Blog Posts
Bluetooth Smart in industrial
Have you ever heard of Bluetooth® Smart? It’s the latest
addition to the Bluetooth specification and it uses Bluetooth
low-energy technology to enable the Internet of Things (IoT)
for products that operate on small coin cells for years. How
is that possible you may ask? Bluetooth low energy was
designed to be low power, only waking up from time to time
to transmit small amounts of data with rather high latency in
a range that covers up to a couple of meters. Perfect for sensors! That’s how it began in 2010.
It took a year or two until the first products showed up on
the market in the form of heart-rate belts and smart watches.
Then a smartphone came into the picture, Apple® iPhone®
4S. It was the first phone on the market to support Bluetooth
low energy and the market took off. The fact that everyone
carrying a smartphone, could connect to all kinds of products
in a low-power manner was something new. Suddenly, everyone wanted their product to be connected to a smartphone.
As a natural progression came the talk about Internet of
Things and cloud connectivity so your smartphone can connect to any-thing and so allowing any-thing to connect to the
Internet (read cloud). With this dramatic change, firmware
updates could be pushed to products out in the field, smartphones could control helicopter toys and wireless add-ons
can replace wires in weird places.
There are already deployed solutions for use cases including
both wired and wireless technologies that can be replaced by
Bluetooth Smart. As Bluetooth Smart is evolving and adapting to these new use cases, one might be afraid that there
might be a “war” between standards coming. I like to think
about it more of an evolution, where the survival of the fittest
applies. The future will behold which technology is suitable
for what.
We are at this point closing in on 2015 and all of a sudden,
manufacturers are now using Bluetooth Smart (which is becoming the more common name for Bluetooth low energy)
for longer-range communication, high-throughput transfers
and tough ISM applications as well. This is not at all what
Bluetooth low energy was designed for. However, Bluetooth
low energy is now advancing into high-quality industrial applications; replacing whatever has been used for ages, or at
least a very long time.
However, we can already elaborate on some applications
that might be impacted. Take lighting as an example, where
ZigBee is dominating the market with smart bulbs connected
in a network to a Wi-Fi® gateway. Bluetooth Smart can do
star topologies as of now, with a central or smartphone
controlling multiple light bulbs. However, ZigBee operates in a
mesh network topology which means that information can be
routed through nodes and range can be extended beyond the
gateway limitation. Bluetooth Mesh is something that could
address this in the future as well, if it’s designed in an energyefficient way (i.e., not using flooding, etc.) and the security
It’s time for a revolution, time for Bluetooth Smart to show
its worth in new places. Bluetooth Smart is emerging into
unexplored new market segments from hardcore industrial
applications and fancy home appliances to trendy beaconsystems [sic].
18
is robust including the complete solution for that matter. But
what about the already-deployed ZigBee solutions, will those
be redundant? Well, not necessarily. What if one node in
the ZigBee network adds Bluetooth Smart? Or the gateway
includes a Bluetooth Smart interface?
Why is Bluetooth Smart a good fit for industrial applications?
Read the six-part blog series on ECN Magazine that covers
the industrial applications mentioned above and allow me to
enlighten you.
Reference
There are other use cases; i.e., Machine to Machine (M2M),
cable replacements, asset tracking and automation control
that can benefit from Bluetooth Smart in the industrial setting.
There are already multiple connectivity technologies with a
foothold in the industrial space including Ethernet, ZigBee,
Wi-Fi, Sub-1 GHz, etc. and Bluetooth Smart can easily
complement these technologies. What is needed is a focus
on streamlining a set of technologies to define a wireless
super-set similar to the useful Swiss army knife.
19
[1]
Why Bluetooth Smart is perfect for M2M
[2]
Connecting machinery to the IoT
[3]
How to use Bluetooth Smart in industrial lighting
[4]
How you can replace wires with Bluetooth Smart
[5]
Why Beacon is the next big thing in wireless
[6]
The key to using Bluetooth Smart in asset tracking
Blog Posts
The shocking impact of
poor RF selectivity and blocking
At TI we have more than 15 years of experience with lowpower RF solutions. Over time, working hands-on with
customers, we have learned what it takes to design RF ICs
that work well in industrial environments. The wireless communication needs to be robust and just plain work. To learn
more about our 169-MHz, 315-MHz, 433-MHz, 470-MHz,
868-MHz, 915-MHz and 920-MHz solutions, check out our
Sub-1 GHz page.
Recently we wanted to test our newest long-range RF solution against a well-known competitor in the market. Both
solutions have really great RF transmission range when
tested in a quiet open space, such as in the countryside
environment found in this video from our 25-km range test
video in South Africa. However, many industrial RF solutions
are not deployed in the countryside but rather in urban areas,
which is why we shot our latest range test video in downtown
Oslo, Norway.
what happens to the RF link when we introduce an interferer,
i.e., an e-meter, into the equation. We were really surprised
by the results. The wideband solution basically ceased to
function if the interferer was within ~200 meter range. This
basically means that an e-meter in a neighboring building can
block your wide-band RF link completely.
So why is the wideband solution prevented from receiving
data while the narrowband solution is just fine?
There are two main benefits with a narrowband solution. First,
there are more RF channels available which enable more
systems to coexist peacefully. Secondly, wideband solutions
have wider RF receive filters which pick up more RF noise
and interference than a narrowband solution. Hence, narrowband is the best choice for robust RF solutions in urban
and industrial areas. For an in-depth discussion on this topic,
please check out our Long-range RF communication: Why
narrowband is the de facto standard whitepaper.
In the video we set up 2 RF links (one with TI’s CC1120
long-range, narrowband, high-performance RF transceiver
and one with a long-range wideband competitor) to compare
20
Return to ToC
TI Designs
Wireless connectivity
TI Design reference designs
21
Humidity & Temp Sensor Node for
Star Networks Enabling 10+ Year
Coin Cell Battery Life Ref Design
Description
TI Designs
This TI Design uses Texas Instruments nano-power system
timer, SimpleLink™ ultra-low power wireless microcontroller
(MCU) platform, and humidity-sensing technologies to demonstrate an ultra-low power method to duty-cycle sensor end
nodes. These technologies lead to an extremely long battery
life: over 10 years with a standard CR2032 lithium ion coin cell
battery. The TI Design includes techniques for system design,
detailed test results and information to get the design up and
running quickly.
Features
• Use of nano-power system timer to duty-cycle the system
results in 10+ year battery life from CR2032 coin cell
• Configurable system wakeup interval
• Extremely low off-state current (183 nA for 59.97 seconds)
• Ultra-low on-state current due to low active processor and
radio transmit currents (4.04 mA for 30 ms)
• ±3% Relative humidity accuracy
• ±0.2°C Temperature accuracy
Part number
Name
Product family
Design kits and Evaluation modules
CC2650
SimpleLink™ multi-standard 2.4-GHz ultra-low power wireless MCU
Wireless MCUs
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
CC2640
SimpleLink ultra-low power wireless MCU for Bluetooth Smart
Wireless connectivity
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
CC2630
SimpleLink ultra-low power wireless MCU for 2.4-GHz IEEE 802.15.4-based RF
protocols
Wireless connectivity
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
HDC1000
Low power, high accuracy digital humidity sensor with integrated temperature sensor
Sensor products
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
TPD1E10B06
Single-channel ESD in 0402 package with 10pF capacitance and 6V breakdown
ESD protection diodes
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
TPL5110
Ultra-low-power timer with MOS driver and MOSFET power ON
Clock and timing
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
To download the full TI Design Reference Design visit: http://www.ti.com/tool/TIDA-00374
© 2015 Texas Instruments Incorporated
Printed in U.S.A.
22
Wireless Motor Monitor
Reference Design
This TI Design is inspired by the need to monitor the health
of motors and machines to accurately predict and schedule
maintenance (or replacement) while minimizing cost and
down time during industrial production. Millions of industrial
motors are monitored today with handheld or wired Piezo accelerometer sensing devices. The annual cost of monitoring
these motors is approximately $300 per motor.
Recent advancements in ultra-low-power processing technologies, radios and piezo sensor miniaturization have
enabled the development and deployment of low-cost, small
motor monitors with wireless capabilities. These wireless
motor monitors are powered by coin cells that have a battery
life of more than 10 years. These systems provide the same
broadband sensitivity as existing handheld systems, collect
vibrational data and perform spectral analyses on that data.
This integrated intelligence lets you deploy and monitor these
systems in difficult-to-reach locations. The money these capabilities save can pay for the systems within a few months.
The wireless motor-monitoring TI Design uses two different,
yet electrically equivalent, form factors for development and
testing.
These form factors include:
• The modular form factor
• The compact form factor
The standard sensor board supports a PCB Piezotronic vibration sensor.
The 30-pin expansion connector on the small form factor
board enables the base-board to be operated with the MCU,
the CC2650 radio, or both. The system software assumes
you are using both devices. This TI Design focuses on the
compact form factor system.
Features
• 100-µA MSP MCU analyze/write
• 6-mA Bluetooth® Low Energy radio
• 40-nA system sleep
• 10-KHz/16-bit vibration sensor
• iPad®/Android™ visualization
• This circuit design is tested and includes firmware, GUI, demo,
and Getting Started Guide
In the modular form factor, TI LaunchPad™ Development Kits
and EM connectors allow you to incorporate multiple radios
and processors with energy-management and sensor subsystems. The compact form factor uses the MSP430FR5969
ultra-low-power microcontroller unit (MCU) with a CC2650
BLE radio, but can be connected to multiple sensor boards.
(continued)
23
TI Designs
Description
TI devices
Order samples, get tools and find more information on the TI products in this reference design.
Part number
Name
Product family
Design kits and Evaluation modules
ADS8320
16-bit, high-speed, 2.7-V to 5-V micro power sampling analog-to-digital
converter
Analog-to-digital converter
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
BQ25570
Ultra-low-power harvester power management IC with boost charger and
nanopower buck converter
Battery management products
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
CC2650
SimpleLink™ multi-standard 2.4-GHz ultra-low power wireless MCU
Wireless MCUs
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
LMP7716
Dual-precision, 17-MHz, low-noise, CMOS input amplifier
Operational amplifier (Op Amp)
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
MSP430FR5969
16-MHz ultra-low-power microcontroller featuring 64 KB FRAM, 2 KB SRAM,
40 I/O
Ultra-low power MCU
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
TPL5100
Nano power programmable timer with power gating functionality
Clock and timing
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
TPS22969
1-Ohm SPDT analog switch 5-V/3.3-V single-channel 2:1 multiplexer/
demultiplexer
Signal switches
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
TPS7A7002
Very-low input, very-low dropout 3-A regulator with enable
Linear regulator (LDO)
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
To download the full TI Design Reference Design visit: http://www.ti.com/tool/tidm-wlmotormonitor
© 2015 Texas Instruments Incorporated
Printed in U.S.A.
24
SimpleLink™ Multi-Standard CC2650
SensorTag Reference Design
The new SimpleLink Multi-Standard SensorTag IoT kit invites
you to realize your cloud-connected product idea. Including 10 low-power MEMS sensors in a tiny package, the kit is
expandable with DevPacks to make it easy to add your own
sensors or actuators.
Connect to the cloud with Bluetooth® Smart and get your
sensor data online in three minutes. The SensorTag is ready
to use out of the box with an iOS™ and Android™ app, with
no programming experience required to get started.
The new SensorTag is based on the CC2650 wireless MCU,
offering 75% lower power consumption than previous
Bluetooth Smart products. This allows the SensorTag to be
battery powered and offer years of battery lifetime from a
single coin-cell battery.
The Bluetooth Smart SensorTag includes iBeacon technology. This allows your phone to launch applications and
customize content based on SensorTag data and physical
location.
Additionally, the SensorTag can be enabled with ZigBee® and
6LoWPAN technology.
Features
• Support for 10 low-power sensors, including ambient light,
digital microphone, magnetic sensor, humidity, pressure,
accelerometer, gyroscope, magnetometer, object temperature
and ambient temperature
• Ultra-low power, with years of battery life from a single coincell battery and enabling battery-less applications through the
high-performance ARM® Cortex®-M3 CC2650 wireless MCU.
• Cloud connectivity lets you access and control your SensorTag
from anywhere
• Multi-standard support enables ZigBee or 6LoWPAN through
a simple firmware upgrade
• DevPacks allow you to expand the SensorTag to fit your designs
Visit www.ti.com/sensortag for more information.
TI devices
Order samples, get tools and find more information on the TI products in this reference design.
Part number
Name
Product family
Design kits and Evaluation modules
CC2620
SimpleLink ultra-low power wireless MCU for RF4CE
Wireless connectivity
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
CC2630
SimpleLink ultra-low power wireless MCU for 2.4-GHz IEEE 802.15.4-based RF protocols
Wireless connectivity
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
CC2640
SimpleLink ultra-low power wireless MCU for Bluetooth Smart
Wireless connectivity
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
CC2650
SimpleLink multi-standard 2.4-GHz ultra-low power wireless MCU
Wireless MCUs
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
HDC1000
Low power, high-accuracy digital humidity sensor with integrated temperature sensor
Sensor products
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
OPT3001
Digital ambient light sensor (ALS) with high-precision human eye response
Optical sensing
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
TMP007
Infrared thermopile contactless temperature sensor with integrated math engine in
WCSP package
Temperature sensors
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
TS5A3159A
1-Ohm SPDT analog switch 5-V/3.3-V single-channel 2:1 multiplexer/demultiplexer
Signal switches
To download the full TI Design Reference Design visit: http://www.ti.com/tool/TIDC-CC2650STK-SENSORTAG
25
TI Designs
Description
ETSI Cat. 1 Receiver-Capable
wM-Bus 169-MHz RF Subsystem
for Smart Gas and Water Meters
Description
Features
• ETSI Cat. 1 receiver capable RF subsystem
• Market-leading blocking, selectivity and RX sensitivity subsystem for wM-Bus at 169 MHz
• Fully compliant with the wM-Bus requirements for Italy and
France (with an external PA device) at 169 MHz
• Highly efficient, RF friendly DC/DC converter
• No costly SAW filter and TCXO required
TI devices
Order samples, get tools and find more information on the TI products in this reference design.
Part number
Name
Product family
Design kits and Evaluation modules
CC1120
High-performance RF transceiver for narrowband systems
Wireless connectivity
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
TPS62730
Step-down converter with bypass mode for ultra-low-power wireless
applications
Converter (integrated switch)
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
To download the full TI Design Reference Design visit: http://www.ti.com/tool/TIDC-WMBUS-169MHZ
© 2015 Texas Instruments Incorporated
Printed in U.S.A.
26
TI Designs
This reference design is a very-low power, ETSI Cat. 1
receiver capable RF subsystem for wM-Bus-enabled smart
gas and water meters at 169 MHz. It provides market-leading
blocking, selectivity and RX sensitivity numbers for all
wM-Bus N-modes as per EN13757-4:2013 and their respective variants, which were defined in Italy and France. This
cost-optimized design, without SAW filter and without TCXO,
uses the RF friendly DC/DC to reduce the average power
consumption while keeping the highest RF performance.
™
Implementing SimpleLink
®
Wi-Fi Connectivity in a
Smart Electric Meter
Description
This design implements a three-phase energy meter with
Wi-Fi connectivity. The e-meter SoC is used to perform all
metrology functions and control the SimpleLink™ Wi-Fi transceiver. The smart meter data can then be displayed on any
Wi-Fi connected device via a standard web browser.
Features
TI Designs
• Three-phase e-meter implementation that calculates metrology parameters such as RMS current, RMS voltage, active
and reactive power and energies, power factor and frequency
• Wi-Fi connectivity over IEEE 802.11 b/g/n networks from any
smart phone, tablet or computer through a standard web
browser
• 160-segment LCD display for Wi-Fi status and metrology
parameter display
• Expandable to support other Internet applications
• PC-based GUI for calibration
TI devices
Order samples, get tools and find more information on the TI products in this reference design.
Part number
Name
Product family
CC3100
CC3100 SimpleLink™ Wi-Fi and Internet-of-Things solution for MCU applications
SimpleLink solutions
CC3100MOD
SimpleLink Wi-Fi CC3100 Internet-on-a-chip wireless network processor module
Wireless connectivity
MSP430F67791
MSP430F67791 mixed-signal microcontroller
Low power + performance
To download the full TI Design Reference Design visit: http://www.ti.com/tool/TIDC-3PHMTR-WIFIXR
© 2015 Texas Instruments Incorporated
Printed in U.S.A.
27
Smart Plug with Remote
®
­Disconnect and Wi-Fi Connectivity
Description
This design implements single-outlet energy measurement with remote connect/disconnect capability and Wi-Fi®
connectivity. Designers can quickly create networked load
control devices for industrial building and home automation
­applications.
• SimpleLink™ Wi-Fi connectivity over IEEE-802.11 b/g/n networks from any smart phone, tablet or computer through a
standard web browser
• Single-phase energy measurement that calculates RMS current, RMS voltage, active and reactive power and energies,
power factor and frequency
• Solid-state relay provides remote connect/disconnect
capability
• Compact physical design with minimal BOM components
• Low-power components plus efficient power supply provide
low system power consumption
• The system design is tested and includes firmware for energy
measurement, Wi-Fi connectivity and relay control along with
Android™-based demo application and user’s guide
TI devices
Order samples, get tools and find more information on the TI products in this reference design.
Part number
Name
Product family
Design kits and Evaluation modules
®
CC3200
CC3200 SimpleLink™ Wi-Fi and Internet-of-Things solution, a
single-chip wireless MCU
Wireless MCUs
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
CC3200MOD
SimpleLink Wi-Fi CC3200 Internet-on-a-chip wireless MCU module
Wireless connectivity
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
MSP430I2040
16-bit mixed-signal microcontroller
Ultra-low power
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
UCC28910
700-V flyback switcher with constant-voltage constant-current and
primary-side control
AC/DC and isolated DC/DC power supply
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
UCC28911
700-V flyback switcher with constant-boltage constant-current and
primary-side regulation
AC/DC and isolated DC/DC power supply
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
To download the full TI Design Reference Design visit: http://www.ti.com/tool/TIDC-SMARTPLUG-WIFI
© 2015 Texas Instruments Incorporated
Printed in U.S.A.
28
TI Designs
Features
Bluetooth® Low Energy (Bluetooth
Smart) to RS-485 Gateway
Description
Modbus is an application protocol for serial data transmission
that often uses RS-485 for serial data transfer. This reference
design implements a gateway between Modbus and the
Bluetooth® Smart CC2540 wireless MCU. It serves as a
replacement for wires in an RS-485 network, and it allows another Bluetooth Smart-compatible device like a computer or
smartphone to easily connect to an existing RS-485 network.
• Implements wireless connection to industrial electronic
devices with the CC2540T Bluetooth Smart Gateway solution
graded up to 125°C
• Simple and “ready-to-go” design shortens time to market
• Android™ app (ModbusController) provided to enable control
and communication with Modbus peripheral software
• This design is tested and includes firmware, GUI, demo and
user guide
TI devices
Order samples, get tools and find more information on the TI products in this reference design.
Part number
Name
Product family
®
CC2540T
SimpleLink high-temperature Bluetooth Smart wireless MCU
Wireless connectivity
SN65HVD485E
Half-duplex RS-485 transceiver
Interface
TPS769
10-V, 100-mA, low Iq, low-dropout linear regulator
Linear regulator (LDO)
To download the full TI Design Reference Design visit:
http://www.ti.com/tool/TIDC-BLUETOOTH-SMART-TO-RS-485-GATEWAY
© 2015 Texas Instruments Incorporated
Printed in U.S.A.
29
TI Designs
Features
CC2540 Bluetooth® Low Energy
USB Dongle Reference Design
Description
The CC2540 USB Dongle is a complete example of how to
use the USB-enabled Bluetooth® Low Energy (BLE) Wireless
MCU. The reference design can be used to enable Bluetooth
Smart and Internet of Things applications on any system that
contains a USB host.
Features
TI Designs
• Simple BLE-to-USB connection – Adds BLE to an existing
product with USB
• Debug header, LEDs and buttons included – Enables faster
development
• It can also be used as a packet sniffer for analyzing the BLE
protocol and for software and system-level debugging (use the
free tool SmartRF Packet Sniffer)
TI devices
Order samples, get tools and find more information on the TI products in this reference design.
Part number
Name
Product family
®
CC2540
SimpleLink Bluetooth Smart wireless MCU with USB
Wireless connectivity
TPS769
10-V, 100-mA, low Iq, low-dropout linear regulator
Linear regulator (LDO)
To download the full TI Design Reference Design visit: http://www.ti.com/tool/TIDC-CC2540-BLE-USB
© 2015 Texas Instruments Incorporated
Printed in U.S.A.
30
Gas Sensor Platform with
Bluetooth® Low Energy
Description
This reference design is a low-power wireless gas sensor
solution that supports a wide array of electrochemical gas
sensors. With the versatility of a configurable interface for
­either Bluetooth® Low Energy, ZigBee® RF4CE, 6LoWPAN
or ANT this flexible and certified sensor solution is ideal for
various building safety, industrial process control, mining and
health care applications.
Features
TI Designs
• Monitors wide range of gases
• Carbon monoxide, oxygen, ammonia, fluorine, chlorine
dioxide … and more
• Supports 2- and 3-lead electrochemical gas sensors
• Complies with FCC and IC regulatory standards
• Coin-cell battery operation
• Easily monitor gas concentrations via TI’s gas sensor iOS
mobile app
TI devices
Order samples, get tools and find more information on the TI products in this reference design.
Part number
Name
Product family
®
CC2541
SimpleLink™ Bluetooth Smart and proprietary wireless MCU
Wireless connectivity
LM4120
Precision micropower low dropout voltage reference
Voltage reference
LMP91000
Configurable AFE potentiostat for low-power chemical-sensing applications
Sensor products
TPS61220
Low input voltage, 0.7-V boost converter with 5.5-μA quiescent current
Converter (integrated switch)
To download the full TI Design Reference Design visit: http://www.ti.com/tool/TIDA-00056
© 2015 Texas Instruments Incorporated
Printed in U.S.A.
31
Smart Home and Energy Gateway
Reference Design
The Smart Home and Energy Gateway Reference Design
provides example implementation for measurement, management and communication of energy systems for smart homes
and buildings. This example design is a bridge between
different communication interfaces, such as Wi-Fi®, Ethernet,
ZigBee® or Bluetooth®, that are commonly found in residential and commercial buildings. Since objects in the house
and buildings are becoming more and more connected, the
gateway design needs to be flexible to accommodate different RF standards, since no single RF standard is dominating
the market. This example gateway addresses this problem
by supporting existing legacy RF standards (Wi-Fi, Bluetooth)
and newer RF standards (ZigBee, BLE).
• Showcase seamless profile integration for smart energy, lighting and building automation
• Showcase bridge between HAN (Home Area Network) and
LAN (Local Area Network)/WAN (Wide Area Network)
• Enables development of real-world smart home and energy
gateway applications, with the use of example schematics, bill
of materials, design files and links to free software package
downloads
Features
• Showcase co-existence of ZigBee, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and NFC
(Near Field Communication) allows for simultaneous operation
of the different communication profiles
(continued)
32
TI Designs
Description
TI devices
Order samples, get tools and find more information on the TI products in this reference design.
Part number
Name
Product family
®
®
Design kits and Evaluation modules
AM3352
Sitara™ processor
ARM Cortex -A8 core
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
CC2530
Second-generation System-on-Chip solution for 2.4-GHz IEEE 802.15.4 / RF4CE
/ ZigBee
SimpleLink™ solutions
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
WL1835MOD
WiLink™ 8 single-band combo 2×2 MIMO Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and Bluetooth Low
Energy module
Wireless Connectivity
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
DP83848J
PHYTER mini LS commercial temperature single-port 10/100 Mb/s Ethernet
transceiver
Ethernet
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
SN74AVC4T774
4-bit dual-supply bus transceiver with configurable voltage translation and
3-state outputs
Voltage level translation
SN74LVC04
Hex inverter
Buffer/Driver/Transceiver
SN74LVC07A
Hex buffer/driver with open-drain outputs
Buffer/Driver/Transceiver
TLV702
300-mA, low IQ, low-dropout regulator for portables
Linear regulator (LDO)
TLVH431
Low-voltage adjustable precision shunt regulator
Voltage reference
TPD4S012
4-channel USB ESD solution with power clamp
ESD protection diodes
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
TPS2051B
Single, current-limited, power-distribution switch
USB power and charging port
controllers
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
TPS51200
3-A sink/source DDR termination regulator w/ VTTREF buffered reference for
DDR2, DDR3, DDR3L and DDR4
Power management
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
TPS650250
Power management IC (PMIC) for Li-ion powered systems
Power management
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
View Design Kits & Evaluation Modules
To download the full TI Design Reference Design visit: http://www.ti.com/tool/TIEP-SMART-ENERGY-GATEWAY
© 2015 Texas Instruments Incorporated
Printed in U.S.A.
Return to ToC
Product Overviews
Wireless connectivity
product overviews
34
SimpleLink™ Ultra-Low Power
Wireless Microcontroller Platform
Overview
The SimpleLink™ ultra-low power wireless microcontroller (MCU) platform is
the broadest, lowest power and easiest
to use wireless connectivity offering
in the industry for Internet of Things
(IoT) connected devices. With
the capability to leverage
multiple standards, customers have flexibility in
design and TI makes it easy
by providing tools and software, reference designs, community support and more.
What standard fits your design?
Key benefits
• The lowest power:
• Go battery-less with energy
harvesting
• Use a coin cell battery
for multi-year, always-on
operation
• Integrated ultra-low power
sensor controller
• Industry’s only multi-standard
platform:
• Code- and pin-compatibility
across Bluetooth Smart,
6LoWPAN, ZigBee, Sub-1 GHz
and RF4CE
• Easiest to design with:
•ARM® Cortex®-M3 based MCU
•TI-RTOS
• Simplest RF and antenna
design
• Built-in robust security
• Ready-to-use protocol stacks
• Tools and reference designs
• Bluetooth Smart: Control ultralow power wireless solutions with a
smartphone or tablet
• 6LoWPAN: Complete solution to the
cloud in a wide-area mesh network
using open IP standards
• Sub-1 GHz: Provides long range and
reliable communication at ultra-low
power
• ZigBee: Standardized stacks, protocols and application profiles for
robust, low-power mesh networks
• RF4CE: Two-way communication
standard designed for ultra-low
power input devices such as remote
controls
Available products
• SimpleLink 2.4-GHz multi-standard
C2650 wireless MCU: The CC2650
supports multiple 2.4 GHz standards
allowing customers to leverage
code compatibility across 2.4 GHz
standards by downloading the corresponding protocol stack.
35
• SimpleLink Bluetooth Smart
CC2640 wireless MCU: The CC2640
is the lowest power Flash-based
Bluetooth 4.1 solution with multi-year
operation on smaller coin cells.
• SimpleLink 6LoWPAN/ZigBee
CC2630 wireless MCU: The CC2630
supports large networks connecting
1,000s of nodes in homes, buildings
and cities. Take advantage of easy
IP and cloud connectivity through
6LowPAN operation where each
device has an IPv6 address.
• TI is also launching the SimpleLink
Sub-1 GHz CC1310 wireless MCU
and the SimpleLink ZigBee RF4CE
CC2620 wireless MCU in 2015.
Getting started
To simplify development, TI provides
a broad range of tools and software
that offer flexibility between technologies. All kits for 2.4-GHz operation are
based on the multi-standard CC2650
wireless MCU. The CC2650DK includes
two SmartRF06 evaluation boards, two
CC2650 evaluation modules and can
be customized with the appropriate
software stacks for Bluetooth Smart,
6LoWPAN or ZigBee operation. The
CC2650STK SimpleLink SensorTag is a
rapid prototyping and development tool
designed to shorten the design time for
CC26xx development from months to
hours.
Product Overviews
The industry’s only multi-standard
family with code- and pin-compatibility
across:
• Bluetooth® low energy (Bluetooth
Smart)
•6LoWPAN
• Sub-1 GHz
•ZigBee®
•RF4CE™ and
•Proprietary
modes
Application areas
Block diagram
The SimpleLink ultra-low power wireless MCU platform is
designed for use in multiple applications including:
SimpleLink™ ULP wireless MCU platform
Health and Fitness
RF core
2.4 GHz
Sub-1GHz
cJTAG
Main CPU
ROM
ADC
®
ADC
Up to
128 KB
Flash
ARM
®
Cortex -M3
Digital PLL
Home and Building Automation
DSP modem
8 KB
cache
Radio
controller
20 KB
SRAM
General peripherals / modules
Industrial
IC
2
4× 32-bit timers
UART
2× SSI (SPI, µW, TI)
I2S
Watchdog timer
10 / 15 / 31 GPIOs
TRNG
AES
Temp. / batt. monitor
32 ch. µDMA
RTC
4 KB
SRAM
ROM
Sensor controller
Sensor controller
engine
12-bit ADC, 200 ks/s
2× Analog comparators
2
SPI / I C digital sensor IF
Constant current source
Time-to-digital converter
2 KB SRAM
DC / DC converter
Hardware
CC2650DK
$299
CC2650EMK
$99
CC2650STK
$29
Complete 2.4-GHz hardware, software and RF development
platform for Bluetooth Smart, ZigBee and 6LoWPAN
Two optimized plug-in boards to easily test RF performance
with more nodes in a CC2650DK network
Low-power development kit for IoT applications
Start sensor development in the cloud in three minutes.
Expandable with debugger and DevPacks to customized
your IoT application. Powered by the CC2650 wireless MCU
and 10 low-power sensors
The EMK comes in 4×4-mm, 5×5-mm and 7×7-mm
options
Software
SmartRF Studio 7
Sensor Controller Studio
PC application that helps designers of radio
systems easily evaluate the RF-IC at an
early stage in the design process
Development environment to implement
sensor controller task algorithms and rapid
development
SmartRF Flash Programmer 2
PC application for programming CC26xx
devices
CCS Uniflash
Flash programmer with Windows® and
Linux™ support
For more information on the SimpleLink ultra-low power wireless MCU platform, please visit www.ti.com/simplelinkulp
The platform bar and SimpleLink are trademarks of Texas Instruments. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
© 2015 Texas Instruments Incorporated
Printed in U.S.A.
36
SimpleLink Wi-Fi Family
™
®
CC3100 / CC3200 Internet-on-a-chip™ Solutions
Save time and resources developing with CC3100 and CC3200 Wi-Fi® CERTIFIED™ chips and modules
TI makes connectivity even easier with the
next-generation SimpleLink Wi-Fi solutions. The
product family features Internet-on-a-chip™,
Wi-Fi CERTIFIED™ solutions solving industry
challenges for broad embedded applications.
With SimpleLink CC3100 and CC3200 pin-topin-compatible solutions you can:
• Program applications on the industry’s first
Internet-on-a-chip solution with userdedicated MCU
• Power Wi-Fi battery-operated designs for
more than a year on two AA batteries
• Start quickly, no Wi-Fi experience needed
CC3100 Wireless Network Processor
The CC3100 device is a Wi-Fi, self-contained
network processor with on-chip web server
and embedded TCP/IP stack that connects
VCC
Serial
Flash
32-KHz
XTAL
32 KHz
MCU
Enable
I2S audio, SDMMC, ADC, SPI, UART, I2C, PWM,
I/Os, built-in power management and RTC
enabling connection to the cloud.
CC3200 certified modules, coming soon,
provide easier Wi-Fi integration by lowering
manufacturing costs, reducing development
time and simplifying procurement and certification. The modules have complete antenna
reference designs for streamlined integration.
CC3200 Wireless MCU
Both CC3100 and CC3200 solutions are supported by a software development kit (SDK)
including software drivers, sample applications, API guide, user documentation and a
world-class support E2E™ community. On the
integrated Cortex-M4, all sample applications
in the SDK are supported with Code Composer
Studio™ Integrated Development Environment
and no RTOS. A few of the applications support
IAR, GCC, Free RTOS, TI-RTOS.
Example applications:
The SimpleLink Wi-Fi CC3200 solution
capitalizes on the CC3100 benefits and
integrates an 80-MHz ARM® Cortex®-M4 MCU
and peripherals enabling application development with a Wi-Fi CERTIFIED device or module.
Developers can fully access the MCU portion
with more than 200kB of application code
fully independent from the Wi-Fi processing.
The peripheral set includes parallel camera,
40-MHz
XTAL
CC3100
Network
Processor
ROM
JTAG
Fast Parallel
SYSTEM
SPI or
UART
UART
SPI
Timers
UART
GPIOs
IC
Oscillators
SD/MMC
2
POWER
MANAGEMENT
2
I S/PCM
DC2DC
BAT Monitor
ADC
Hibernate RTC
PWM
®
Wi-Fi Network Processor
37
ANALOG
easily to any low-cost and low-power microcontroller (MCU) such as the MSP430F5529 or
MSP430FR5969, due to a simple UART or SPI
driver and host memory footprint as low as 7kB
of code to reside on the MCU. Hardware design
flexibility includes a 64-pin 9×9 mm QFN
package or upcoming certified CC3100 module.
Flexible connection methods (provisioning)
RAM
ARM®
Cortex®-M4
80 MHz
PERIPHERAL INTERFACES
IRQ
include Access Point Mode, WPS, SmartConfig™
Technology and others. On the security side,
an embedded hardware cryptography engine
allows establishing TLS secure Link in 200 ms.
Interfacing to any MCU, designed with lowpower radio and advanced low-power modes,
the SimpleLink Wi-Fi family makes sensor-to-thecloud connectivity possible. Moreover, the solution
contains several Internet protocols in ROM including mDNS, DNS, SSL/TLS and HTTP server.
Software and Support
• Internet-on-a-chip sample applications
• Email from SimpleLink Wi-Fi solution
• Information Center – get time and weather
from Internet
• http server – host a web page on
SimpleLink Wi-Fi solution
• XMPP – Instant Message chat client
• Serial interface
• Wi-Fi sample apps
• Easy Wi-Fi configuration
• Station, AP modes
• TCP/UDP
• Security – Enterprise/Personal, TLS/SSL
• MCU peripheral samples apps
Product Overviews
Overview
Getting started: SimpleLink™ CC3100 and CC3200 hardware development kits
Kit name
Description
When to buy this?
SimpleLink Wi-Fi C3200 Internet-on-a-chip wireless microcontroller (MCU)
CC3200-LAUNCHXL
$29.99 USD
• CC3200 Launchpad
• Single-chip Internet of Things solution with
integrated MCU
Want to use Wi-Fi® wireless MCU – single-chip Interneton-a-chip™
SimpleLink Wi-Fi CC3100 Internet-on-a-chip wireless network processor
CC3100BOOST-CC31XXEMUBOOSTEXP430F5529LP
• CC3100 BoosterPack + Advanced emulation board +
MSP430F5529 Launchpad
Want to evaluate all CC3100 sample apps, using TI’s ultralow-power MSP430™ MCU family
• CC3100 BoosterPack + flashing and advanced
debug capability
• Compatible LaunchPads (sold separately)
Want to use CC3100 with any other MCU. Need one
EMUBOOST board for flashing, using radio tool, using
SimpleLink Studio (MCU development on PC) or
advanced debug
• CC3100 BoosterPack
If buying additional CC3100BOOST boards – assuming you
already have CC31XXEMUBOOST for flashing, radio tool
and possible advanced debug
• CC3100 BoosterPack + MSP430FR5969 LaunchPad
Want to evaluate CC3100 with TI's low power FRAM
device MSP430FR5969
$49.99 USD
CC3100BOOST-CC31XXEMUBOOST
$36.99 USD
CC3100BOOST
$19.99 USD
CC3100BOOST-MSP-EXP430FR5969
$34.00 USD
Growing cloud of ecosystem partners
The TI IoT cloud ecosystem helps manufacturers using TI technology to easily and rapidly connect more to the IoT. Open to cloud service providers
with a differentiated service offering and value-added services running on one of TI’s IoT solutions, the TI cloud ecosystem provides options to meet
individual manufacturer needs. www.ti.com/simplelinkwificloud
TI Design Library: Wi-Fi and IoT development with SimpleLink Wi-Fi reference designs
Jump start system design and speed time to market with our comprehensive Wi-Fi reference designs. Each design
includes schematic or block diagram, BOM and design files. Created by experts with deep system and product knowledge, the
designs span across TI’s portfolio of analog, embedded processor and connectivity products.
• SimpleLink Wi-Fi Antenna Selection enables evaluation and development of end applications requiring antenna diversity
• Smart Plug with Remote Disconnect and Wi-Fi Connectivity quickly creates networked load control devices for industrial building and home
automation applications
• Wi-Fi Audio Streaming Application enables the capture, streaming and playback of audio from a digital microphone or a stereo/mono audio jack
to another Wi-Fi-enabled device
• SimpleLink Wi-Fi Connectivity in a Smart Electric Meter implements a three-phase energy meter with Wi-Fi connectivity
Important Notice: The products and services of Texas Instruments Incorporated and its subsidiaries described herein are sold subject to TI’s standard terms and conditions of sale.
Customers are advised to obtain the most current and complete information about TI products and services before placing orders. TI assumes no liability for applications assistance,
customer’s applications or product designs, software performance, or infringement of patents. The publication of information regarding any other company’s products or services does not
constitute TI’s approval, warranty or endorsement thereof.
The platform bar, Code Composer Studio, E2E, Internet-on-a-chip, MSP430, SimpleLink and SmartConfig are trademarks of Texas Instruments. All other trademarks are the property of their
respective owners.
© 2014 Texas Instruments Incorporated
Printed in U.S.A.
SWRB034B
38
WiLink 8 Wi-Fi +
Bluetooth /BLE Modules
™
®
®
Certified high-performance combo modules
from TI for fast and easy time-to-market
•High-performance Wi-Fi
•802.11 a/b/g/n 2.4- and 5-GHz
Radio/Baseband/MAC
• 20- and 40-MHz channels
•2×2 MIMO
•Up to 100 Mbps (UDP) of
throughput
•MRC for 1.4× extended range
•Station and access point
•Wi-Fi direct, multi-channel
multi-role
•Personal and enterprise security
•Linux™, Android™ and RTOS
drivers
•Dual-mode Bluetooth
•Bluetooth and BLE (BT 4.0
compliant)
•On-chip SBC encode and decode
•Royalty-free certified TI Bluetooth
Stack™ based on Bluetopia®
•Wi-Fi/Bluetooth single antenna
co-existence
• Built-in power management
•Direct connection to battery
(integrated DC2DC)
• Advanced low-power modes
• Host interfaces
•SDIO for Wi-Fi and UART for BT
• Temperature ranges:
• 20°C to +70°C
•–40°C to +85°C
•Small form factor:
13.4 × 13.3 × 2 mm
Overview
The TI WiLink 8 module family enables
manufacturers to easily add fully
integrated 2.4- and 5-GHz versions of
Wi-Fi and dual-mode Bluetooth 4.0
solutions to embedded applications.
The new highly integrated module
family offers high throughput and
extended industrial temperature
range with robust Wi-Fi and Bluetooth
coexistence. WiLink 8 modules are
perfect for power-optimized designs
for home and building automation,
smart energy, gateways, wireless
audio, enterprise, wearables and
many more industrial and Internet
of Things (IoT) applications. The
WiLink 8 modules and software
are compatible and pre-integrated
with many processors including TI’s
Sitara™ processors. As a module, less
hardware and RF design is needed,
making development easier and faster.
Wi-Fi and Bluetooth software stacks
and sample applications are provided,
and the modules are FCC/IC/ETSI/
Telec certified. WiLink 8 solutions also
provide sample applications, API guide,
user documentation and a world-class
support community.
The modules are pin-to-pin compatible enabling new use cases and better
user experiences including:
•Extended temperature range of –40°C
to 85°C for industrial applications
WiLink 8 block diagram
32-KHz
XTAL
VBAT
Antenna 1
Wi-Fi/BT
Host processor running
™
™
Linux , Android or RTOS
VIO
®
WPA supplicant
®
and Wi-Fi driver
Bluetooth
stack and profiles
32 KHz
Enable
Wi-Fi
SDIO
UART driver
SDIO driver
39
BT
UART
WL18XXMOD
Antenna 2
Wi-Fi
(optional)
Product Overviews
Key Features and Benefits
•5-GHz module for high-performance
solutions in a less noisy frequency
band
(maximal ratio combining) and MIMO
(multiple-input and multiple-output)
technology
•Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and ZigBee® coexistence for Smart energy and home
gateways
•Low-power applications with low idle
connect current consumption
•1.4× the range and up to 100 Mbps
throughput with WiLink 8 MRC
•Audio streaming with both Wi-Fi
and dual-mode Bluetooth/Bluetooth
low energy
Applications
• Internet of Things
• Industrial and home automation
• Home electronics
• Home appliances and white goods
•Gateways
• Wireless audio
• Video camera and security
•Wearables
WiLink™ 8 Wi-Fi®+ Bluetooth®/BLE Modules
TI Modules
Product Number
WL1801MOD
WL1805MOD
WL1807MOD
WL1831MOD
WL1835MOD
WL1837MOD
2.4 GHz
•
•
•
•
•
•
Wi-Fi®
5 GHz
•
•
MIMO
Bluetooth v4.0
Bluetooth low
energy
•
•
•
•
Other tools
Industrial
temperature
•
•
•
•
•
Development Tools
Product Number
Description
Availability
WL1835MODCOM8
The 2.4-GHz WL1835-based evaluation board is compatible
with the Sitara™ AM335x and AM437x EVMs as well as several
other TI EVMs and reference designs
TI eStore and
­authorized
­distributors
WL1835MOD Cape
WiLink 8 module-based cape offered by CircuitCo for fast
development with ­BeagleBone Black and BeagleBone open
source computer
BoardZoo.com and
CircuitCo distributors
WL1837MODCOM8
The 5-GHz WL1837-based evaluation board is compatible with
Sitara AM335x and AM437xEVMs as well as several other TI
EVMs and reference designs
TI eStore and
­authorized
­distributors
•TI provides a fully integrated and
validated WiLink 8 add-on software
for Sitara AM335x Linux™ ezSDK –
www.ti.com/wilink8
•TI’s unique SmartConfig™ technology is a one-step Wi-Fi setup
process that allows multiple in-home
devices to connect to Wi-Fi networks
quickly and efficiently –
www.ti.com/tool/smartconfig
WiLink resources
• Learn more:
www.ti.com/wilink8
• E2E Forum:
www.ti.com/wiconforum
• WiLink 8 Wiki:
www.ti.com/wilink8wiki
Important Notice: The products and services of Texas Instruments Incorporated and its subsidiaries described herein are sold subject to TI’s standard terms and conditions of sale.
Customers are advised to obtain the most current and complete information about TI products and services before placing orders. TI assumes no liability for applications assistance,
customer’s applications or product designs, software performance, or infringement of patents. The publication of information regarding any other company’s products or services does not
constitute TI’s approval, warranty or endorsement thereof.
The platform bar, Sitara, SmartConfig and WiLink are trademarks of Texas Instruments. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
© 2014 Texas Instruments Incorporated
Printed in U.S.A.
40
TI Bluetooth
CC256x Solutions
®
Dual-mode Bluetooth 4.1 controller available in
certified modules with integrated audio capabilities
Overview
•Single-chip Bluetooth solution integrating Bluetooth
Basic Rate (BR)/Enhanced Data Rate (EDR)/
Low Energy (LE) features fully compliant with the
Bluetooth 4.1 specification up to the HCI layer
• BR/EDR features include:
•
CC2560 provides an assisted mode for HFP1.6
wideband speech (WBS) profile or A2DP profile
to reduce host processing and power
•LE supports up to 10 CC2564 simultaneous
connections
•Flexibility for easy stack integration and validation
into various microcontrollers, such as MSP430 and
ARM Cortex-M4 MCUs
• Highly optimized for low-cost designs:
•
Package footprint: 76 pins, 0.6-mm pitch,
8.10-mm × 8.10-mm mrQFN
•Best-in-class Bluetooth (RF) performance
(TX power, RX sensitivity, blocking)
• Class 1.5 TX power up to +12 dBm
•
Provides longer range, including 2× range over
ther Bluetooth low energy-only solutions
•Advanced power management for extended battery
life and ease of design
• Physical interfaces:
•
Standard HCI over H4 UART (4 wire)
•
Standard HCI over H5 UART (2 wire)
•
Fully programmable digital PCM-I2S codec
interface
A royalty-free software Bluetooth stack available from
TI is pre-integrated with TI’s MSP430™ and ARM®
Cortex®-M4 MCUs. The stack is also available for MFi
solutions and on other MCUs. Examples of profiles supported today include: serial port profile (SPP), human
interface device (HID), A2DP (Advanced Audio Distribution
Profile), AVRCP (Audio/Video Remote Control Profile) and
several BLE profiles (profiles can vary based on the supported MCU).
In addition to software, reference designs are available
with a low BOM cost. For example, TI’s Audio Sink solution uses the Bluetooth® device for audio processing,
an MSP430™, audio DAC and USB charger. TI’s Audio
Source solution is also available. For more information,
visit TI Designs.
26-MHz
Clock
32-KHz
MSP430™
or
Other MCU
Clock
UART
CC256x
Filter
Benefits
CC256x block diagram
• Best-in-class link budget extends application range
• Simplified hardware and software development
• Reduced development time and costs
•Enables simultaneous operations of Bluetooth
with Bluetooth low energy
www.ti.com/bluetooth
41
Product Overviews
Key Features
TI single- and dual-mode CC256x solutions are complete
Bluetooth® BR/EDR/LE HCI or Bluetooth + Bluetooth Low
Energy solutions that reduce design effort and enable fast
time to market.
CC256x Products
Technology supported
Devices/
Modules
Description
BR/EDR
CC2560
Bluetooth® 4.1 (with EDR)
•
•
•
CC2564*
Bluetooth 4.1 + BLE
Bluetooth 4.1 + ANT
LE
Assisted modes
Ant™
HFP 1.6 (WBS)
A2DP
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
* The device does not support simultaneous operation of LE, ANT or assisted modes. Any of these modes can run simultaneous to Bluetooth BR/EDR.
Applications
Bluetooth® CC256x Resources
• Cable replacement
•Smart watches, activity trackers
•Mobile device accessories
• Industrial control
•Audio streaming solutions
• Point of sale
• Learn more at: www.ti.com/bluetooth
• E2E™ Forum: www.ti.com/wiconforum
• CC256x Wiki: www.ti.com/cc2564wiki
Development Tools and Software
Product Number
Description
Availability
CC256x modules from TI
TI-certified modules based on the CC2564 devices
Available through TI and TI
authorized distributors
CC2564MODEM
CC2564 Module Evaluation board
Intended for evaluation purposes of the CC2564 module. Works with processor platforms
such as TI’s ultra-low-power MSP430 and the performance TM4C ARM® Cortex®-MF
microcontrollers.
TI Store and ­authorized
­distributors
Bluetooth and MSP430™
Audio Sink Reference Design
Enables Bluetooth audio (SBC encode/decode) with CC2560 and the ultra-low power
MSP430F5229 and digital input speaker amplifier (TAS2505) and USB charge management device (BQ24055). Reference design is a cost-effective audio implementation, with
full design files provided for application and end product development. Software supported
includes TI Bluetooth stack (certified and royalty free) based on Bluetopia.
Download at TI Designs
Boards are orderable through
TI Store
Bluetooth and MSP430 Audio
Source Reference Design
Enables Bluetooth audio (SBC encode/decode) with CC2560 and the ultra-low power
Download at TI Designs
MSP430F5229 and digital DAC plus USB charge management device (BQ24055). Reference
design is a cost-effective audio implementation, with full design files provided for applicaBoards are orderable through
tion and end product development. Software supported includes TI Bluetooth stack (certified TI Store
and royalty free) based on Bluetopia.
CC256x BoosterPack
Bluetooth BoosterPack evaluation kit has flexibility to work with ultra-low power
­microcontrollers such as the TI MSP430 and TM4C Series LaunchPad evaluation kits
Coming soon: Boards will be
orderable through TI Store
CC256xQFNEM
CC256x Bluetooth® / dual-mode QFN device evaluation module
TI Store and ­authorized
­distributors
The platform bar, E2E and MSP430 are trademarks of Texas Instruments. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
© 2015 Texas Instruments Incorporated
42
Product
Folder
Sample &
Buy
Technical
Documents
Tools &
Software
Support &
Community
CC2540T
SWRS172 – JULY 2014
SimpleLink™ CC2540T 2.4-GHz Bluetooth® Low Energy Wireless MCU
1 Device Overview
1
Features
• True Single-Chip BLE Solution: CC2540T Can Run
Both Application and BLE Protocol Stack, Includes
Peripherals to Interface with Wide Range of
Sensors, and so forth.
• Operating Temperature up to 125°C
• 6-mm × 6-mm Package
• RF
– Bluetooth Low Energy Technology Compatible
– Excellent Link Budget (up to 97 dB), Enabling
Long-Range Applications Without External Front
End
– Accurate Digital Received Signal-Strength
Indicator (RSSI)
– Suitable for Systems Targeting Compliance with
Worldwide Radio Frequency Regulations: ETSI
EN 300 328 and EN 300 440 Class 2 (Europe),
FCC CFR47 Part 15 (US), and ARIB STD-T66
(Japan)
• Layout
– Few External Components
– Reference Design Provided
– 6-mm × 6-mm QFN40 Package
• Low Power
– Active Mode RX Down to 19.6 mA
– Active Mode TX (–6 dBm): 24 mA
– Power Mode 1 (3-μs Wake-Up): 235 μA
– Power Mode 2 (Sleep Timer On): 0.9 μA
– Power Mode 3 (External Interrupts): 0.4 μA
– Wide Supply Voltage Range (2 V–3.6 V)
– Full RAM and Register Retention in All Power
Modes
• TPS62730 Compatible
Low Power in Active Mode
– RX Down to 15.8 mA (3-V Supply)
– TX (–6 dBm): 18.6 mA (3-V Supply)
• Microcontroller
– High-Performance and Low-Power 8051
Microcontroller Core
– 256-KB In-System-Programmable Flash
– 8-KB SRAM
• Peripherals
– 12-Bit ADC with Eight Channels and
Configurable Resolution
– Integrated Ultralow-Power Comparator
– General-Purpose Timers (One 16-Bit, Two 8-Bit)
– 21 General-Purpose I/O (GPIO) Pins (19×4 mA,
2×20 mA)
– 32-kHz Sleep Timer with Capture
– Two Powerful USARTs with Support for Several
Serial Protocols
– Full-Speed USB Interface
– IR Generation Circuitry
– Powerful Five-Channel DMA
– AES Security Coprocessor
– Battery Monitor and Temperature Sensor
– Each CC2540T Contains a Unique 48-Bit IEEE
Address
• Bluetooth v4.0 Compliant Protocol Stack for
Single-Mode BLE Solution
– Complete Power-Optimized Stack, Including
Controller and Host
• GAP – Central, Peripheral, Observer, or
Broadcaster (Including Combination Roles)
• ATT / GATT – Client and Server
• SMP – AES-128 Encryption and Decryption
• L2CAP
– Sample Applications and Profiles
• Generic Applications for GAP Central and
Peripheral Roles
• Proximity, Accelerometer, Simple Keys, and
Battery GATT Services
– Multiple Configuration Options
• Single-Chip Configuration, Allowing
Application to Run on CC2540T
• Network Processor Interface for Applications
Running on an External Microcontroller
– BTool – Windows PC Application for Evaluation,
Development, and Test
• Development Tools
– CC2540T Mini Development Kit
– SmartRF™ Software
– Supported by IAR Embedded Workbench™
Software for 8051
1
An IMPORTANT NOTICE at the end of this data sheet addresses availability, warranty, changes, use in safety-critical applications,
intellectual property matters and other important disclaimers. PRODUCTION DATA.
43
Product Overviews
1.1
CC2540T
www.ti.com
SWRS172 – JULY 2014
1.2
•
•
•
•
•
Applications
2.4-GHz Bluetooth Low Energy Systems
Lighting
Motor Monitoring
Proximity Sensing
Cable Replacement
1.3
•
•
•
•
•
Power Tools
Maintenance
Wireless HMI and Remote Display
USB Dongles
Smart Phone Connectivity
Description
The CC2540T is a cost-effective, low-power, true wireless MCU for Bluetooth low energy applications. It
enables robust BLE master or slave nodes to be built with very low total bill-of-material costs, and can
operate up to 125°C. The CC2540T combines an excellent RF transceiver with an industry-standard
enhanced 8051 MCU, in-system programmable flash memory, 8-KB RAM, and many other powerful
supporting features and peripherals. The CC2540T is suitable for systems where very low power
consumption is required. Very low-power sleep modes are available. Short transition times between
operating modes further enable low power consumption.
Combined with the Bluetooth low energy protocol stack from Texas Instruments, the CC2540TF256 forms
the market’s most flexible and cost-effective single-mode Bluetooth low energy solution.
Table 1-1. Device Information (1)
PART NUMBER
PACKAGE
BODY SIZE
CC2540TF256RHAR
RHA (40)
6.00 mm × 6.00 mm
CC2540TF256RHAT
RHA (40)
6.00 mm × 6.00 mm
(1)
2
For more information, see Section 8, Mechanical Packaging and Orderable Information.
Device Overview
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44
CC2540T
www.ti.com
1.4
SWRS172 – JULY 2014
Functional Block Diagram
Figure 1-1 shows the functional block diagram of the device.
XOSC_Q2
32-MHz
CRYSTAL OSC
XOSC_Q1
P2_4
32.768-kHz
CRYSTAL OSC
P2_3
P2_2
HIGHSPEED
RC-OSC
DEBUG
INTERFACE
P2_1
DCOUPL
POWER-ON RESET
BROWN OUT
CLOCK MUX
and
CALIBRATION
SFR Bus
RESET
VDD (2 V–3.6 V)
ON-CHIP VOLTAGE
REGULATOR
WATCHDOG
TIMER
RESET_N
SLEEP TIMER
32-kHz
RC-OSC
POWER MANAGEMENT CONTROLLER
P2_0
PDATA
P1_7
P1_6
XRAM
8051 CPU
CORE
P1_5
IRAM
P1_4
MEMORY
ARBITRATOR
SFR
FLASH
FLASH
P1_3
P1_2
DMA
P1_1
UNIFIED
P1_0
IRQ CTRL
FLASH CTRL
P0_7
P0_6
ANALOG COMPARATOR
P0_5
FIFOCTRL
1 KB SRAM
Radio Arbiter
P0_4
OP-AMP
P0_2
AES
ENCRYPTION
AND
DECRYPTION
ADC
AUDIO/DC
RADIO REGISTERS
Link Layer Engine
SFR Bus
DEMODULATOR
MODULATOR
Product Overviews
P0_0
I/O CONTROLLER
P0_1
SYNTH
P0_3
USB_N
USB_P
USB
RECEIVE
USART 1
FREQUENCY
SYNTHESIZER
USART 0
TRANSMIT
TIMER 1 (16-Bit)
TIMER 2
(BLE LL TIMER)
RF_P
RF_N
TIMER 3 (8-Bit)
DIGITAL
ANALOG
TIMER 4 (8-Bit)
MIXED
B0301-05
Figure 1-1. Functional Block Diagram
SWRY016
Device Overview
Copyright © 2014, Texas Instruments Incorporated
3
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Product Folder Links: CC2540T
45
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