DLV11-J user`s guide
DLV11-J
user's guide
DLV11-J
user's guide
E K-DLV1 J-UG-001
digital equipment corporation • marlboro, massachusetts
1st Edition, October 1978
Copyright
©
1978 by Digital Equipment Corporation
The material in this manual is for informational purposes and is
subject to change without notice.
Digital Equipment Corporation assumes no responsibility for any
errors which may appear in this manual.
Printed in U.S.A.
The following are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation,
Maynard, Massachusetts:
DIGITAL
DEC
PDP
DECUS
UNIBUS
DECsystem-1O
DECSYSTEM-20
DIBOL
EDUSYSTEM
VAX
VMS
MASSBUS
OMNIBUS
OS/8
RSTS
RSX
lAS
CONTENTS
Page
CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION
1.1
1.2
1.2.1
1.2.2
1.2.3
1.2.4
1.2.5
1.3
1.3.1
1.3.2
INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................. 1-1
SPECIFICATIONS ............................................................................................. 1-2
Electrical ...................................................................................................... 1-2
Environmental ............................................................................................. 1-3
Physical ........................................................................................................ 1-3
Module Contact Finger Identification .......................................................... 1-3
Backplane Pinning Utilization ...................................................................... 1-3
OPTIONS ........................................................................................................... .1-3
Cables .......................................................................................................... 1-3
DLVII-KA 20 rnA Current Loop Option .................................................... .1-5
CHAPTER 2
INSTALLATION
2.1
2.2
2.2.1
2.2.2
2.2.2.1
2.2.2.2
2.2.2.3
2.2.3
2.2.3.1
2.2.3.2
2.2.3.3
2.2.3.4
2.2.4
2.2.5
2.2.6
2.2.6.1
2.2.6.2
2.2.6.3
2.2.6.4
2.2.6.5
2.3
2.3.1
2.3.1.1
2.3.1.2
2.3.2
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................. .2-1
CONFIGURING MODULE JUMPERS ........................................................... .2-4
General ....................................................................................................... .2-4
Addressing .................................................................................................. .2-4
Device Register Addresses ................................................................... .2-4
Interrupt Vectors ..................................................................................2-8
Console Device Jumpers ..................................................................... 2-11
Configuring Channel Word Formats .......................................................... 2-12
General .............................................................................................. 2-12
Number of Data Bits .......................................................................... 2-12
Number of STOP Bits ......................................................................... 2-12
Parity Inhibit ...................................................................................... 2-12
Baud Rate .................................................................................................. 2-14
Channel 3 BREAK Response ..................................................................... 2-15
Serial Line Signal Level Compatibility ........................................................ 2-16
General .............................................................................................. 2-16
EIA RS-422 ........................................................................................ 2-17
EIA RS-423 and RS-232C ................................................................... 2-17
Slew Rates .......................................................................................... 2-17
20 rnA Current Loop .......................................................................... 2-18
INSTALLATION .............................................................................................. 2-18
Module Installation .................................................................................... 2-18
Module Contact Finger (Pin) Identification ........................................ 2-18
Module Priority .................................................................................. 2-19
Cabling Considerations .............................................................................. 2-21
iii
CONTENTS (Coot)
Page
2.3.3
2.3 .3.1
2.3.3.2
2.3.3.3
2.3.3.4
2.4
Cable Installation ....................................................................................... 2-22
Modem Operating Cabling ................................................................. 2-22
Local Terminal Operation Cable ......................................................... 2-22
DLVI1-J to DLVI1-J Operation Cabling ............................................ 2-22
DLVII-J to SLU Module Cabling ...................................................... 2-22
CHECKOUT/ACCEPTANCE TESTS ............................................................. 2-22
CHAPTER 3
PROGRAMMING
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
GENERAL .......................................................................................................... 3-1
DEVICE REGISTER ADDRESSING ............................................................... .3-1
INTERRUPT VECTORS ............ :...................................................................... .3-2
WORD FORMATS ............................................................................................ .3-2
INTERRUPTS ....................................................................................................3-2
CONSOLE DEVICE .......................................................................................... .3-5
CHAPTER 4
TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION
4.1
4.2
4.2.1
4.3
4.3.1
4.3.2
4.3.3
4.3.4
4.4
4.4.1
4.4.2
4.4.3
4.4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.7.1
4.7.2
4.7.3
4.8
4.8.1
4.9
GENERAL ..........................................................................................................4-1
MODULE FUNCTIONS .................................................................................... 4-1
Operational Overview ...................................................................................4-1
BUS INTERFACE ..............................................................................................4-4
Bus Interfacing ............................................................................................ .4-4
Address Comparison .....................................................................................4-5
Channel 3 Console Device Addressing ..........................................................4-6
Vector Transmission .....................................................................................4-6
INTERRUPT AND VECTOR GENERATION LOGIC .................................... 4-6
Interrupt Request Generation ...................................................................... .4-6
Interrupt Acknowledge Detection ................................................................ .4-6
Vector Genera tion ........................................................................................4-6
Board Initialization ...................................................................................... 4-7
ADDRESS COMPARE ......................................................................................4-7
ADDRESS LATCH ............................................................................................ 4-8
I/O CONTROL LOGiC ......................................................................................4-8
Interrupt Operations ....................................................................................4-9
Input Operation ......................................... ~, ................................................4-9
Output Operations ....................................................................................... 4-9
REGISTER LOGIC ........................................................................................... ;4-9
CSR Data Flow .......................................................................................... 4-10
UNIVERSAL ASYNCHRONOUS RECEIVE TRANSMITTER
(UART) OPERATION ...................................................................................... 4-14
General ...................................................................................................... 4-14
Receiver Operation ..................................................................................... 4-15
Error Detection .................................................................................. 4-15
Framing Errors (FE) ........................................................................... 4-16
4.9.1
4.9.2
4.9.2.1
4.9.2.2
iv
CONTENTS (Cont)
Page
4.9.2.3
4.9.2.4
4.9.2.5
4.9.3
4.9.4
4.10
4.11
4.12
4.13
Overrun Error (OE) ............................................................................4-16
Parity Error (PE) ............................................................................... .4-16
Error Flag .......................................................................................... 4-16
Character Formatting ................................................................................ .4-16
Transmit Operation .................................................................................... 4-16
BREAK LOGIC ................................................................................................ 4-17
BAUD RATE CONTROL ................................................................................. 4-18
PERIPHERAL INTERFACE ........................................................................... 4-18
DC-TO-DC POWER CONVERTER................................................................ .4-18
APPENDIX A
DL Vll-KA USER'S GUIDE
FIGURES
Figure No.
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-4
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-7
2-8
2-9
2-10
2-11
2-12
2-13
2-14
2-15
2-16
2-17
2-18
2-19
3-1
4-1
4-2
Title
Page
DLV II-J Connector Pinning ............................................................................... .1-2
Module Contact Finger Identification ................................................................. .1-4
DLVII-J Cabling Summary ................................................................................. 1-5
DLVII-J 20 rnA Cabling Summary ...................................................................... 1-6
DLVII-J Component and Jumper Factory Configuration Summary .................... 2-2
Device Register Address Format ......................................................................... .2-4
Device Register Address Jumper Locations ......................................................... .2-5
Interrupt Vector Format ..................................................................................... .2-8
Interrupt Vector Address and Console Select Jumper Locations .......................... .2-9
Serial Character Format for Transmitted and Received Data .............................. 2-13
Character Format, Baud Rate and BREAK Response Jumper Locations ........... 2-13
Serial Channel Signal Level Jumpers and Pads .................................................... 2-16
Module Contact Finger Identification ................................................................ 2-19
Quad Module Contact Finger Identification ....................................................... 2-20
LSI-II, PDP-I 1/03 Backplane Module Pin Identification ................................... 2-20
Baud Rate vs Cable Length ................................................................................. 2-21
DLVII-J Cabling Summary ............................................................................... 2-24
BC21 B-05 Peripheral Device Cable ..................................................................... 2-25
DLVII-J to Modem or Acoustic Coupler ........................................................... 2-26
Local Terminal Cabling ...................................................................................... 2-27
BC20M-50 DLVII-J to DLVII-J Cable ............................................................. 2-28
Cable Construction for DL VII-J to DLVII-J Operation .................................... 2-29
DLVII-J to SLU Module Cabling ...................................................................... 2-30
DLVII-J Device Register Word Format.. ............................................................ .3-3
DLVII-J Block Diagram ..................................................................................... .4-2
DLV11-J Data Flow, Simplified Block Diagram .................................................. .4-4
v
FIGURES (Cont)
Figure No.
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-9
4-10
4-11
4-12
4-13
Title
Page
Bus Interface Signal Flow .....................................................................................4-5
Address Compare Circuit Block Diagram ............................................................ .4-7
Summary of Board Address Decoding ................................................................. .4-8
Control/Status Register During DATI ...... ........................................................ .4-10
Control/Status Register During DATO or DATOB .......................................... .4-11
DLVI1-J RCSR Data Flow ................................................................................ 4-12
DLVII-J XCSR Data Flow ................................................................................ 4-13
UART Signal Flow (Typical for All Channels) ................................................ .4-14
UART Receiver Block Diagram ........................................................................ .4-15
UART Transmitter Block Diagram .................................................................... 4-17
Typical Peripheral Interface ............................................................................... .4-19
TABLES
Table No.
I-I
1-2
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-7
2-8
2-9
2-10
2-11
2-12
2-13
2-14
2-15
2-16
2-17
3-1
Title
Page
DLVI1-J Connector Pinning Description ............................................................ 1-2
Backplane Pin Utilization ..................................................................................... 1-4
DLVI1-J Component and Jumper Factory Configuration Summary .................... 2-3
General Device Register Address Assignments (Without console selected) ............2-6
Specific Device Register Address Assignments (DLVII-J configured
with BA = 176500 and BV = 300 without console selected) ................................... 2-6
General Device Register Address Assignments (General configuration
with console selected) ...........................................................................................2-7
Specific Device Register Address Assignments (Factory configuration
with BA = 176500, BV = 300 and console enabled) ..............................................2-7
General Vector Assignments (Without console selected) .......................................2-9
Specific Vector Assignments (DLVll-J configured with BV = 300 without
console selected) ................................................................................................. 2-1 0
General Vector Assignments (With console selected) .......................................... 2-10
Specific Vector Assignments (Factory-configured with BV = 300 with
console selected) ................................................................................................. 2-1 0
Summary of Vector Jumper Configurations ........................................................ 2-11
Summary of Console Selection Jumper Configurations ....................................2-12
Summary of Character Format Jumper Configurations ...................................... 2-14
Baud "Rate Generator Outputs ............................................................................ 2-15
Channel 3 BREAK Operation Jumper Summary ................................................ 2-15
Summary of Serial Channel Signal Level Compatibility Configurations .............. 2-17
EIA RS-423 and RS-232C Wave-Shaping Resistor Values .................................. 2-18
Definition of Cables ........................................................................................... 2-23
DLVI1-J Word Formats ..... :... '..................'.......................................................... .3-4
vi
CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION
1.1 INTRODUCTION
This manual contains all user information required for installing, interfacing, and programming the
DLVll-J 4-Channel Asynchronous Serial Line Unit (SLU) Interface.
The DLVII-J is an LSI-II bus-compatible interface module (M8043) that contains four asynchronous
serial line channels. Serial line channels can be independently configured for Electronics Industry
Association (EIA) RS-422, RS-423, or RS-232C signal compatibility. Provisions are also made for configuring the channels for 20 rnA current loop (and "reader run") via the DLVll-KA 20 rnA option
(described in Appendix A). Each DLVII-J module has the following features:
•
Four independent serial line interfaces exist with consecutive bus device address and vector
assignments that can be user-configured for system requirements.
•
Each channel can be independently configured for any of the following selections.
Crystal-Controlled Baud Rates - 150, 300, 600, 1200, 2400,4800, 9600, 19200, or 38400 bits
per second (bits/s) - 110 bits/s is available when the DLVll-KA option is installed.
Number of Data Bits -7 or 8.
Number of Stop Bits - 1 or 2.
Parity Bit - No parity or parity; and even or odd parity.
•
One channel (channel 3) can be designated the console device. In most configurations, each
LSI-ll system requires one keyboard/display terminal that will function as the console
device.
•
All data buffers (one transmit and one receive) in each channel are double-buffered.
•
Channel 3 can be configured to respond to a receive line BREAK condition by causing the
processor to either halt (console emulator mode), bootstrap the system, or have no
response.
•
The module has on-board overload protection (fuse) for 20 rnA (current loop power source
to DLVII-KA option).
•
The DLVll-J is completely LSI-II bus-compatible, and will function in all present LSI-ll
systems.
1-1
1.2 SPECIFICATIONS
1.2.1 Electrical
M8043 Module Power Requirements
+ 5 V ± 5%, 1 A typical (1.25 A max.)
+ 12 V ± 3%,0.15 A typical (0.2 A max.)
Note: Add 0.225 A for each DLVII-KA option installed.
Bus Loading
ac loading = I unit load
dc loading = 1 unit load
Interface Connector Pinning
Four lO-pin connectors (one for each channel) are provided on the DLVII-J module. Connector pins
and signal functions are described in Figure I-I and Table I-I.
TYPICAL INTERFACE
CONNECTOR
(1 OF 41
9
o
0
7
000
5
3
1
o
0
0
0
TOP OF
t;==~~~8~6~4~2~~==~""'---DLV11"J
;
MODULE
NO PIN
(FOR CABLING
INDEXINGI
MR-0892
Figure 1-1
Table 1-1
Pin
DLV Il-J Connector Pinning
DLVll-J Connector Pinning Description
Signal/Function
UART CLK (16
X
baud rate, CMOS Levels)
2
Signal Ground
3
Transmitted Data (EIA RS-232C, RS-423 and 20 rnA);
Transmitted Data ( + ) (EIA RS-422)
4
Signal Ground (EIA RS-232C and RS-423);
Transmitted Data (-) (EIA RS-422),
RDR Run Pulse (20 rnA)
5
Signal Ground
6
Indexing Key (no pin)
7
Received Data (-)
8
Received Data ( + )
9
Signal Ground
10
Fused
+ 12 V
1-2
Interface Signal Level
Factory Configuration: All channels are configured to meet both EIA RS-423 and RS-232C signal
compatibility simultaneously.
Optional Configurations: Channels can be user-configured for EIA RS-422 or 20 rnA current loop (20
rnA current loop operation requires the use of the DLV11-KA 20 rnA current loop option).
Environmental
1.2.2
Operating: 5° to 60° C (41 ° to 140° F) with a relative humidity of 5% to 95% (noncondensing), with
adequate airflow across the module. When operating at the maximum temperature (60° Cor 140° F),
air flow must maintain the inlet-to-outlet air temperature rise across the module at not more than 5° C
(9° F).
Storage: -40° to 80° C (-40° to 176° F) with a relative humidity of 5% to 95% (noncondensing).
NOTE
Before operating a module that has been stored in
an environment outside the specified operating
environment, the module must be allowed to stabilize at the operating temperature for 5 minutes
(minimum).
1.2.3
Physical
Height
Width
Length
13.2 cm (5.2 in) typical
1.27 cm (0.5 in) typical
22.8 cm (8.9 in) typical
NOTE
Length as stated is approximate and includes plastic handles. Actual module length is 21.6 cm (8.5
in).
Weight
0.23 kg (8 oz) typical
1.2.4 Module Contact Finger Identification
The DIGITAL finger (pin) identification for dual-height boards is shown in Figure 1-2.
1.2.5 Backplane Pinning Utilization
DLV11-J backplane pin utilization is shown in Table 1-2. Blank spaces indicate pins not used.
1.3
OPTIONS
1.3.1 Cables
The DLVll-J may work in conjunction with several peripheral device cables and options, thus providing great flexibility when configuring systems. Figure 1-3 shows the possible cables and options
used with the DLV11-J as well as the primary application of each.
1-3
ROW A
ROW B
SIDE'
COMPONEN T S I DE
PIN BY'
PIN BY2
CP-i403
Figure 1-2
Module Contact Finger Identification
Table 1-2
Backplane Pin Utilization
A Connector
Side 1
B Connector
Pm
~ide
A
B
C
D
+5V
E
F
GND
GND
BHALTL
GND
H
J
K
L
M
N
P
R
S
T
U
V
Z
GND
+ 12 V
BDOUTL
BRPLY L
BDINL
BSYNC L
BIRQ L
BIAKI L
BIAKO L
BBS7 L
BDMGI L
BDMGOL
BINIT L
BDALO L
BDALl L
~icte
I
BDCOKH
Pin
Side 2
A
B
C
D
+5V
E
F
GND
GND
GND
+5V
1-4
H
J
K
L
M
N
P
R
S
T
U
V
GND
BDAL2L
BDAL3 L
BDAL4L
BDAL5 L
BDAL6 L
BDAL7L
BDAL8L
BDAL9 L
BDALlOL
BDALll L
BDALI2 L
BDAL13 L
BDALl4 L
BDALl5 L
DLV11-J TO MODEM OR ACOUSTIC COUPLER
DLV11-J TO LOCAL TERMINAL
NOTES:
1_ MODEM USED IS A "MANUAL TYPE"
SUCH AS BELL 103A WITH 804B.
2. DEC EIA RS-232C TERMINALS
(VT52. LA36. LS120. ETC.) COME
EQUIPPED WITH A 9 FT CABLE. NONDEC EIA RS-232C TERMINALS ARE
CONNECTED SIMILARLY EXCEPT
9 FT OF LENGTH MUST BE DEDUCTED
FROM THE TOTAL CABLE LENGTH.
MR·1326
Figure 1-3
DLVII-J Cabling Summary
1.3.2 DLVll-KA 20 rnA Current Loop Option
The DLVll-J module has the ability to interface with 20 rnA current loop devices including those
with "reader-run" capabilities_ This is accomplished with the use of the DLVll-KA option. The
option consists of a DLVll-KB (EIA to 20 rnA current loop converter) and a BC21A-03 interface
cable_ The DLVll-KA is placed between the DLVll-J module output and the 20 rnA current loop
peripheral device. Figure 1-4 illustrates the cables and devices which may be used with the DLVllKA option_ For detailed information on the DLV11-KA option see Appendix A.
1-5
DLVll-J TO SLU CHANNEL INTERFACE
,
DLVll-KA
It.
DLVll-J
j-.::;B=C2:.;I~A:..:-O::::3~_-1.--1 DLVll-KB
BC05F-XX
DLVll-KB
y
DLVll-KA
DLVll-KA
"
BC21A-03
DLVll-KB
BC05F-XX
BC05M-05
NOTE
1. PRISOI IS A SERIAL LINE PAPERTAPE
LOADER.
MR-1326
Figure 1-4 DLVII-J 20 rnA CablingSurnrnary
1-6
CHAPTER 2
INSTALLATION
2.1 INTRODUCTION
The DLVll-J can be installed in any system that uses an LSI-ll bus structure. This includes LSI-ll
and LSI-I 112 component systems, PDP-IU03, PDP-IIV03, and PDP-IIT03 systems.
Installation involves the following steps.
1.
Jumpers on the DLVII-J module are configured for the specific mode of operation required
by the user.
2.
The module is installed in the LSI-II system backplane.
3.
Up to four peripherals (terminals, printers, etc.) can be connected to the DLVII-J module.
The DLVII-J is factory-configured for the following operation.
•
Base Device Register Address
•
Base Vector = 300
•
Channel 3 enabled as the console device (device register addresses 177560-177566 and vectors = 60 and 64)
•
Channel 3 Halt on BREAK enabled
•
Baud rates (transmit and receive are identical):
=
176500
Channels 0, I and 2 = 9.6K bits/s
Channel 3 = 300 bits/s
•
Data/parity/stop bit format (all channels):
Number of data bits = 8
Number of stop bits = I
Parity = parity disabled
•
Serial line signal interface levels (all channels) meet both Electronics Industry Association
(EIA) RS-232C and RS-423 signal levels, simultaneously (slew rate = 2 JLS)
2-1
Figure 2-1 gives the location of components and jumpers used to configure the DLVll-J module to
meet user requirements. Table 2-1 gives a summary of the factory configuration of these components
.
and jumpers with a brief explanation of their purpose.
The remainder of this chapter contains specific instructions for configuring and installing the DLVII-J.
J3
CHOAND {
CHI EIA
SELECTION
MO _
_
2X3R
NO _ _ _
Ml _ _
Nl-_ -
R3X2
--M2
Jl
~_ ~£} BA~~
2
RIO
CHO e-c=J-e
D __
Ef"i'l
CHO{
S l"'i"l
P-CHI
D__
E ......
CHI{
S ......
P_CH2
D
__
E ......
CH2{
S l"'i"l
P-CH3
D
__
E l"'i"l
CH3{
S l"'i"l
P--
COMMUNICATION
LINE
PARAMETERS
--cA5'"
--
_v
-_-__M3
-N2
_ _
N3
CH2 AND
} CH3EIA
SELECTION
SELECTION
RATE
3:-i:: N
LUT
CHI
CHO
CH2
CH3
TERM
TERM
TERM
TERM
M
RESISTOR
RESISTOR
RESISTOR
RESISTOR
I
ADDRESS AND
VECTOR JUMPERS
A9 .....
AI2
__
AIO _ _
All _ _
A6_
{ A7 - V6-
--
V7-
AB-C2-_
Cl--
BXH
'--y-J
BREAK SELECTION
(CHANNEL 3)
---V5'"
o1
e-c=J-e
J2
X
MA·1323
Figure 2-1 DLVII-J Component and Jumper
Factory Configuration Summary
2-2
Table 2-1
DLVll-J Component and Jumper Factory
Configuration Summary
Label
Configuration
Function Implemented
AI2
All
AIO
A9
A8
A7
A6
AS
X to I
X to I
X to I
X toO
X to I
R*
1*
X toO
This arrangement of jumpers AS-Al2 implements the octal base device address 176SXX,
which is the assigned address for channel 0 RCSR. The least significant digit is decoded on
the module during operation to address one of four SLU device registers as follows.
LSD = 0 = RCSR
LSD = 2 = RBUF
LSD = 4 = XCSR
LSD = 6 = XBUF
CI
C2
X to I
X to I
These jumpers are used to enable channel 3 for console operation. Base address must be
176S00 (factory-configured), 176S40 or 177S00.
BREAK
Response
XtoH
This jumper determines channel 3 BREAK response. The board is configured for halt (console emulator mode) upon receiving a BREAK condition).
V7
V6
VS
1*
1*
X to 0
This arrangement of jumpers VS-V7 implements the octal base vector of 300 with channel 3
at 60 and 64.
E
D
S
X to 0
X to I
X to 0
X to I
Odd parity enabled
8 data bits
I stop bit
No parity
p
These jumpers determine the word format used by the channel. All channels are configured
the same at the factory.
o
Oto N
I to N
2 to N
3 to T
I
2
3
9.6K baud
9.6K baud
9.6K baud
300 baud
These jumpers determine the baud rate (bits/s) of the serial line channel. If more than one
channel requires the same baud rate, daisy-chain the wirewrap pins.
M
1*
Always installed, removed only during production test.
NO-N3
MO-M3
X to 3
X to 3
These jumpers determine the EIA standard compatibility of the channels. All channels are
set at the factory to be compatible to both EIA RS-423 and RS-232C simultaneously.
RIO
22K ohms
Channels 0 and 1 slew rate of2p.s (used when configured for EIA RS-423/RS-232C)
R23
22K ohms
Channels 2 and 3, slew rate of 2p.s (used when configured for EIA RS-423/RS-232C)
*R
= jumper removed; I = jumper installed
2-3
2.2 CONFIGURING MODULE JUMPERS
2.2.1 General
The DLVll-J device register addresses, interrupt vectors, serial word formats, baud rates, etc., are
selected by installing and/or removing jumpers. Wirewrap posts are provided on the module for this
purpose. The module is factory-configured and ready for use in many user applications. However, as
your system applications require different DLVll-J device register addresses and interrupt vectors
and/or operations, refer to appropriate paragraphs for configuration instructions.
2.2.2 Addressing
2.2.2.1 Device Register Addresses - The DLVll-J module contains 16 device registers that can be
individually addressed by the computer program. Four device registers (RCSR, RBUF, XCSR and
XBUF) are provided for each of the four serial line channels (channels 0-3). Jumpers are configured
to establish a base device register address (BA) for the module. This base device address is the address
of the channel 0 received control/status register (RCSR). The format of a device address is shown in
Figure 2-2. The location of the jumpered wirewrap posts used to configure the base device address
can be seen in Figure 2-3. Note that address bits 13-17 are neither configured on nor decoded by the
DLVll-J module. These bits are decoded by the processor module as the bank 7 select (BBS7 L) bus
signal. This signal becomes active only when the upper 4K address space is accessed. Bits 3-4 are not
user-configured; they select the serial line channel to be used within the module. Similarly, address
bits 1-2 select one of the four device registers within the addressed channel.
17
16
15
14
13
1
12
11
10
: A 121 All : A 10: A9
.,
BANK 7
SELECTED (1)
~~~:~~~:~ss -~
=176500
09
___ 1
r
I
08
07
AB:
A7
06
05
: A6 1 A5
04
03
0:2
01
00
:
lll~~'
1-J1~~
---.,,--_0_ _
!
3 WIRE WRAP POSTS
(X, 1,0) ARE
PROVIDED FOR
EACH BIT.
2WIRE WRAP
POSTS ARE
PROVIDED FOR
EACH BIT.
JUMPER X TO 1 = 1
JUMPER X TO 0= 0
JUMPER IN = 1
JUMPER OUT = 0
I
g~: ~~~~
10=XCSR
.,.----A----.. 11 = XBU F
OO=CHANNELO
01 = CHANNEL 1
10 = CHANNEL 2
11 = CHANNEL 3
NOTE:
RANGE 1600008-1777708 NONEXTENDED ADDRESS
7600008-7777708 EXTENDED ADDRESS
MR-0893
Figure 2-2
Device Register Address Format
2-4
o
o
ADDRESS
BITS A5, A8-A 12
JUMPERS.
ONE JUMPER IS REQUIRED
FOR EACH BIT. TO
CONFIGURE A LOGICAL ''1'',
CONNECT FROM X TO 1.
TO CONFIGURE A LOGICAL "0",
CONNECT FROM X TO O.
A5
A9
A12
A10
A11
A8
••
••
• }
•
•••
•••
•••
•••
o1
A6 • • }
A7..
BIT A6& A7
JUMPERS
IN = 1
OUT = 0
X
MR··0994
Figure 2-3
Device Register Address Jumper Locations
The device addresses of the module follow the configured base device address (BA) consecutively
through 16 (total) contiguous word addresses. Each device address is an offset of the base device
address as shown in Table 2-2. Table 2-3 gives a numerical example of the device addresses of the
DLVll-J when a base device register address of 176500 and base interrupt vector of 300 are configured. (Base interrupt vectors are described in Paragraph 2.2.2.2.)
It is possible to independently configure the last four addresses (channel 3) to the LSI-ll console
device (addresses 177560-177566) when certain base addresses and console select jumpers are
installed. In this configuration, the preceding addresses (channels 0, 1 and 2) are not affected; they are
normal offsets of the configured base device address as shown in Table 2-4.
2-5
Table 2-2 General Device Register Address Assignments
(Without console selected)
Address
Device Register
Module Base Address (BA)
BA+2
BA+4
BA+6
BA+1O
BA+ 12
BA+14
BA+16
BA+20
BA+22
BA+24
BA+26
BA+30
BA+32
BA+34
BA+36
Channel 0 RCSR
Channel 0 RBUF
Channel 0 XCSR
Channel 0 XBUF
Channel I RCSR
Channel I RBUF
Channel I XCSR
Channell XBUF
Channel 2 RCSR
Channel 2 RBUF
Channel 2 XCSR
Channel 2 XBUF
Channel 3 RCSR
Channel 3 RBUF
Channel 3 XCSR
Channel 3 XBUF
Table 2-3 Specific. Device Register Address Assignments
(DLVll.J configured with BA = 176500 and BV = 300
without console selected)
Address
Register
176500
176502
176504
176506
RCSR
RBUF
XCSR
XBUF
176510
176512
176514
176516
RCSR
RBUF
XCSR
XBUF
176520
176522
176524
176526
RCSR
RBUF
XCSR
XBUF
176530
176532
176534
176536
RCSR
RBUP
XCSR
XBUF
Vector
Channel
300
Channel 0
304
310
Channell
314
320
Channel 2
324
330
Channel 3
334
NOTE
All addresses are in octal notation.
2-6
Table 2-4 General Device Register Address Assignments
(General configuration with console selected)
Address
Device Register
Module Base Address (BA)
BA+2
BA+4
BA+6
BA+1O
BA+12
BA+ 14
BA+16
BA+20
BA+22
BA+24
BA+26
177560
177562
177564
177566
Channel 0 RCSR
Channel 0 RBUF
Channel 0 XCSR
Channel 0 XBUF
Channel 1 RCSR
Channell RBUF
Channel 1 XCSR
Channell XBUF
Channel 2 RCSR
Channel 2 RBUF
Channel 2 XCSR
Channel 2 XBUF
Channel 3· RCSR
Channel 3 RBUF
Channel 3 XCSR
Channel 3 XBUF
*Channel 3 is enabled as a console device.
NOTE
All addresses in octal notation.
The factory-assigned base device register address is 176500 and base vector is 300, producing the individual device register addresses shown in Table 2-5; in addition, channel 3 is enabled as the console
device. Configure any base address desired for specific system requirements by installing or removing
appropriate wirewrap jumpers. However, if channel 3 is to function as the console device, the base
address must be configured for one of three addresses: 176500 (factory configuration), 176540 or
177500.
Table 2-5 Specific Device Register Address Assignments
(Factory configuration with BA = 176500,
BV 300 and console enabled)
=
Address
Register
176500
176502
176504
176506
RCSR
RBUF
XCSR
XBUF
176510
176512
176514
176516
RCSR
RBUF
XCSR
XBUF
176520
176522
176524
176526
RCSR
RBUF
XCSR
XBUF
177560
177562
177564
177566
RCSR
RBUF
XCSR
XBUF
Vector
Channel
300
Channel 0
304
310
Channel 1
314
320
Channel 2
324
60
Channel 3
64
NOTE
All addresses are in octal notation.
2-7
Three wirewrap posts each are provided for address bits A8-A 12 and AS. One jumper must be
installed for each of these bits. Connect the jumper from wirewrap post X (for a particular bit) to a
corresponding post labeled 1 or 0 to select the desired address configuration. Address bits A7 and A6
use only two wirewrap posts each; configure each of these bits to logical I by installing a jumper, or to
logical 0 by removing ajumper.
2.2.2.2 Interrupt Vectors - Two interrupt vectors (one for receive and one for transmit) are provided
for each of the four SLU channels (8 vectors total). The interrupt vector format is shown in Figure 24. Figure 2-5 illustrates the jumper wirewrap post locations used when configuring the base interrupt
vector. The procedure for configuring the vectors is similar to that used for the device register
addresses; a base vector is configured on the module with all other vectors being standard offsets from
the base vector as shown in Table 2-6. The base vector (BV) is the channel 0 receive interrupt vector
of the module. Each interrupt vector references two word locations in memory. Hence, sequential vectors follow the base vector in octal increments of 4 as shown in Table 2-7.
14
13
12
08
07
06
05
o
o
o
o
V7
V6
V5
04
03
'---y----J \
FACTORY·CONFIGURED
8ASE INTERRUPT VECTOR
ADDRESS=300
TWOWIREWRAP
POSTS ARE PROVIDED
FOR EACH 81T.
JUMPER IN = 1
JUMPE ROUT = 0
r
}J
1
1
'---y--J
Y
CHANNEL
0 = RECEIVER
REQUESTING
INTERRUPT
INTERRUPT 4 = TRANSMITTER
(0-3)
INTERRUPT
o
THREE WI RE WRAP
POSTS ARE PROVIDED
FOR BIT V5.
JUMPER X TO 1 = 1
JUMPER X TO 0 = 0 WITH CONSOLE
NO JUMPER = 0 WITHOUT CONSOLE
NOTE:
RANGE 0-3778 (040 8 NOT ALLOWED IN CONSOLE MODE)
MR 0895
Figure 2-4 Interrupt Vector Format
2-8
o
o
CONSOLE SEL!ECT VECTOR BIT V5-V7
JUMPERS
JUMPERS
{
V6 • •
V7· •
C2
• • • "\..
Cl • • • L
V5 • • •
o1X
MR ...0896
Figure 2-5
Interrupt Vector Address and Console
Select Jumper Locations
Table 2-6 General Vector Assignments
(Without console selected)
Vector Offsets
Interrupt Vector
Module Base Vector (BV)
BV+"4
BV+lO
BV+l4
BV+20
BV+24
BV+30
BV+34
Channel 0 Receiver
Channel 0 Transmitter
Channel 1 Receiver
Channel 1 Transmitter
Channel 2 Receiver
Channel 2 Transmitter
Channel 3 Receiver
Channel 3 Transmitter
2-9
Table 2-7 Specific Vector Assignments
(DLVll-J configured with BV = 300
without console selected)
Octal Vector
Interrupt Vector
300
304
310
314
320
324
330
334
Channel 0 Receiver
Channel 0 Transmitter
Channel 1 Receiver
Channel 1 Transmitter
Channel 2 Receiver
Channel 2 Transmitter
Channel 3 Receiver
Channel 3 Transmitter
NOTE
All vectors are in octal notation.
When channel 3 is configured as the console device interface (using console select jumpers discussed
in Paragraph 2.2.2.3) the interrupt vectors of the channel become 60 and 64. This is true regardless of
the configured base vector of the module. It should be noted that the preceding channels (0, I and 2)
are not affected and their vectors are normal offsets of the base vector configured, as shown in Table
2-8.
Table 2-8 General Vector Assignments
(With console selected)
Vector Offsets
Interrupt Vector
Module Base Vector (BV)
BV+4
BV+ 10
BV+ 14
BV+20
BV+24
Channel 0 Receiver
Channel 0 Transmitter
Channel I Receiver
Channel I Transmitter
Channel 2 Receiver
Channel 2 Transmitter
Channel 3 Receiver*
Channel 3 Transmitter*
60
64
*Console selected
NOTE
All vectors are in octal notation.
The module is factory-configured with a base interrupt vector of 300 and channel 3 is configured as
the console device. Therefore, channel 3's interrupt vectors will automatically be 60 and 64, as shown
on Table 2-9. When channel 3 is not configured as the console device, channel 3 receiver and transmitter interrupt vectors are equal to the base vector address plus 30 and 34, respectively.
Table 2-9 Specific Vector Assignments
(Factory-configured with BV = 300 with console selected)
Octal Vector
Interrupt Vector
300
304
310
314
320
324
Channel 0 Receiver
Channel 0 Transmitter
Channel I Receiver
Channell Transmitter
Channel 2 Receiver
Channel 2 Transmitter
Channel 3 Receiver*
Channel 3 Transmitter*
60
64
*Console selected
NOTE
All vectors are in octal notation.
2-10
Three wirewrap posts are provided for configuring vector bit V5. To obtain a logical I a jumper is
installed between wire wrap posts X and 1. Configure a logical 0 with channel 3 not configured as a
console device by connecting no jumpers; and to configure a logical zero with channel 3 used as a
console device, connect a jumper between the X and 0 wirewrap posts. Two wirewrap posts each are
provided for configuring vector bits V6 and V7. To configure a logical I for these bits, install
jumper(s); to configure a logical 0, remove jumper(s).
A summary of possible vector jumper configurations is given in Table 2-10.
Table 2-10 Summary of Vector Jumper Configurations
Label
Logical 1
Logical 0
V7
Jumper installed
Jumper removed
V6
Jumper installed
Jumper removed
V5
Jumper installed
from wirewrap post
X to I
Console not selected jumper removed
Console selected jumper installed from
wirewrap post X to 0
2.2.2.3 Console Device Jumpers - When the D LV 11-1 is used as the LSI-II console device interface,
the module's base device register address must be configured to one of three addresses (176500,
176540 or 177500). In addition, both console device jumpers C 1 and C2 whose locations are shown in
Figure 2-5 must be connected from their respective X to 1 wirewrap posts. This enables console
device address and interrupt vector assignments of the SLU channel 3 as follows.
Device
Register
Address
Console
Device
Register
Function
177560
177562
177564
177566
RCSR
RBUF
XCSR
XBUF
Receiver control/status register
Receiver data buffer register
Transmitter control/status register
Transmitter data buffer register
Interrupt
Vector
60
64
When channel 3 is used as a console device interface, the remaining channels (0, 1 and 2) are not
affected. The device register addresses and interrupt vectors associated with these channels are normal consecutive offsets from the module's base configurations.
If console operation is not desired, both console device jumpers C1 and C2 must be connected from
their respective X to 0 wirewrap posts. Channel 3's interrupt vectors will then be normal offsets from
the module's base vector.
A summary of possible console select jumper configurations is shown in Table 2-11.
2-11
Table 2·11
Summary of Console Selection Jumper Configurations
Label
Console Selected
Console Not Selected
Cl
Install jumper from
wirewrap pins
X to 1.
Install jumper from
wirewrap pins
XtoO.
C2
Install jumper from
wirewrap pins
X to 1.
Install jum per from
wirewrap pins
X to O.
2.2.3 Configuring Channel Word Formats
2.2.3.1 General - Each DLVII-J SLU channel can be individually configured for number of data
bits (7 or 8); even, odd, or no parity; 1 or 2 STOP bits, and baud rate (described in Paragraph 2.2.4).
The serial character format is shown in Figure 2-6; jumper locations are shown in Figure 2-7; and a
summary of possible character format jumper configurations is shown in Table 2-12.
2.2.3.2 Number of Data Bits - The serial character format for each channel can be configured for
either seven or eight data bits. Three D (data) wire wrap posts are provided for the purpose of selecting the number of data bits per character for each channel. If seven data bits per character are
desired, connect a jumper from wirewrap D pin X to pin O. To configure eight data bits, connect the
jumper from wirewrap D pin X to pin 1.
2.2.3.3 Number of STOP Bits - The serial character format for each channel can be configured for
either one or two STOP bits. Configure one STOP bit operation by connecting a jumper between S
(stop) wirewrap pin X and pin O. To configure two STOP bits connect a jumper from wirewrap Spin
X to pin 1.
NOTE
Two STOP bits are generally only required for use
with Teletype® terminals.
2.2.3.4 Parity Inhibit - Even, odd, or no parity bit generation and detection can be configured for
each channel. If no parity bit generation or detection is desired, delete the bit by connecting a jumper
between P (parity) wirewrap pins X and 1. If a parity bit is desired connect P pins X and O. Select even
parity by connecting ajumper between E (even parity) wirewrap pin X and pin 1. Select odd parity by
connecting a jumper between E pin X and pin O.
NOTE
To prevent hardware damage within the channel,
the E jumper must ALWAYS be installed. This is
true regardless of the configuration of the P
(parity) jumper.
®Teletype is a registered trademark of Teletype Corporation.
2·12
START BIT OF
NEW CHARACTER
IDLE
STATE OF
"SPACE"
+
7 OR B
DATA________________
BITS
______________
-
.,.
LSB
I
~
00
"MARK" _ _--I~-~
-r
01
_.J..
I
..1
~A
~
-r--r-T-T-T-402 I 03
I
I
04
_..1~
05
.J. -
I
I ~;B I
06
.J. -
.L.. -
..1
ONE 81T
TIME =
ONE/
BAUD RATE
f
OPTIONAL
PARITY
BIT
RETURN TO IDLE
STATE OF LINE
Figure 2-6 Serial Character Format
for Transmitted and Received Data
o
o
CHANNEL
BAUD CLOCK
INPUTS
CHANNELO{
CHO
E •••
D •••
S •••
P • • •
{O.z • •
3..
•••
1.
2.
Y
BAUD RATE
GENERATOR
OUTPUTS
.W}
•K
.V
N
L UT
~
EVEN/ODD PARITY
NUMBER OF DATA BITS
ADDITIONAL STOP BIT
PARITY INHIBIT
CH1
E •••
CHANNEL 1 {
D· ••
S· ••
p •••
CH2
E •••
CHANNEL2{
CHANNEL
3{
D· • •
S· ••
P •••
CH3
E •••
D •••
S •••
P •••
o1X
~
WIRE
WRAP
POSTS
BOOT\
rHALT
•••
BXH
'-y--J
CHANNEL 3
BREAK
OPERATION
MR-oS98
Figure 2-7
Character Format, Baud Rate and BREAK
Response Jumper Locations
2-13
Table 2-12
Summary of Character Format Jumper Configurations
Wirewrap Connection
UART
Label
Parameter
XtoO
Xto 1
Comments
D
Number of
data bits
7 bits
8 bits
LSB is
transmitted
first
S
Number of
stop bits
1 bit
2 bits
P
Parity
inhibit
Parity generation
and detection
enabled
Parity generation
and detection
disabled
E
Even parity
enabled
Odd parity
enabled
Even parity
enabled
Requires
Pjumper
connected
from X to 0
NOTE
E jumper must be connected to either 0 or 1, even if the parity
bit is disabled.
2.2.4 Baud Rate
Each channel can be configured for baud rates ranging from 150 to 38400 bits/so Baud rate jumpers
are shown in Figure 2-7. One baud rate clock input wirewrap pin is provided for each channel (pins
0-3 and channels 0-3 respectively). Both transmitter and receiver functions for a given channel operate at the same baud rate; split baud rate operation is not provided.
NOTE
A 110 baud rate clock generator circuit is contained on the optional DLV11-KA 20 mA option.
When 110 baud operation is desired, do not connect the baud rate jumper on the DLVII-J module
for that particular channel. The 110 baud clock will
be supplied by the DLV11-KA option through the
interface connector.
Configure baud rates (except 110 baud) by connecting a jumper from an appropriate baud rate generator output wirewrap pin to the baud rate clock input pin (labeled 0-3); one jumper is required for
each channel. Baud rate generator outputs are identified in Table 2-13.
NOTE
If more than. one channel requires the same baud
rate, wirewrap jumpers may be daisy-chained.
2-14
Table 2-13
Baud Rate Generator Outputs
Wirewrap
Pin Label
U
T
V
W
Y
L
N
Baud Rate
(bitsts)
150
300
600
1200
2400
4800
9600
K
19200
Z
38400
2.2.5 Channel 3 BREAK Response
Channel 3 (normally used as the console device) can respond to a BREAK condition on the receive
line such as when an operator presses the BREAK key on the associated terminal. The BREAK key
transmits a continuous space signal which is detected by the D LV Il-J circuits as a framing error. If no
operation is desired, do not connect jumpers to the B, X, and H wirewrap pins. Boot and Halt
response are described as follows.
Boot - This function causes the processor to restart operation by executing a bootstrap program. The
bootstrap program starts at memory location 173000 whenever a BREAK condition occurs on the
receive data line; this will occur only if processor power-up mode 2 is configured on the processor
module. Otherwise, the processor will respond to its configured power-up mode.
Configure the bootstrap response by connecting a jumper from wirewrap pin X to B.
Halt - This function causes the processor to halt whenever a BREAK condition occurs on the receive
data line. This operation will occur regardless of the processor power-up mode configured on the
processor module. Whenever the processor halts, console octal debugging technique (ODT) microcode is invoked.
Configure the BREAK response by connecting a jumper from wirewrap pins X to H.
The location of the BREAK response jumpers is shown in Figure 2-7 and a summary of possible configurations is shown in Table 2-14.
Table 2-14
Channel 3 BREAK Operation Jumper Summary
BREAK
Response
Operation
Jumper Connection
Boot
Install jumper between wirewrap pins X and B.
Halt
Install jumper between wirewrap pins X and H.
No response
No jumper installed
2-15
2.2.6 Serial Line Signal Level Compatibility
2.2.6.1 General - Each SLU channel can be independently configured for signal line compatibility
with EIA RS-422, RS-423, RS-232C, or 20 rnA current loop devices. Configure each channel as
directed in the following paragraphs. Jumper and pad locations are shown in Figure 2-8. Table 2-15
gives a summary of serial channel signal level compatibility configurations available on the module.
o
CHANNELO {
CHANNEL 1{
JO
2X3 R
MO • • •
NO • • • •
M1 • • •
N1 • • • •
<>--=-<l CHANNEL 3
{ <>--=-<l CHANNEL 2
~
0=0
R1\O
J2
J1
o...=-o CHANNEL 0
~CHANNEL1
EIA RS·422
TERMINATION
RESISTOR
MOUNTING
PADS
J3
o
R3X2
'---_---J
• • • M2 }
0=0
• • • • N2
CHANNEL 2
• • • M3 }
3
R23
• • • • N3
CHANNEL
1
EIA RS·423
AND RS·232C
WAVE SHAPING
RESISTOR PADS
(CHANNELS 2 AND 3)
EIA RS·423
AND RS·232C
WAVE SHAPING
RESISTOR PADS
(CHANNELS 0 AND 1)
MA-0899
Figure 2-8
Serial Channel Signal Level Jumpers and Pads
2-16
Table 2-15 Sununary of Serial Channel Signal Level
Compatibility Configurations
Serial Channel Signal Level
Serial Channel
Signal Level
Modifiers
20 mA Current Loop
(Required DLVll-KA
Option)
EIA~S-422
EIA RS-232C and
RS-423
MO-3 Jumpers
Connect wirewrap pins X
and 2.
Connect wirewrap pins X
and 3.
Connect wirewrap
pins X and 3.
NO-3 Jumpers
Connect wirewrap pins X
and 2.
Connect wirewrap pins X
and 3.
Connect wirewrap
pins X and R for
program-controlled
paper tape reader
functionality.
Termination
resistor
(one per
channel)
Install a
100 ohm, 'A
W, non-wirewound, fusible
resistor.
No resistor
installed.
No resistor
installed.
Wave shaping
resistor,
one per channel
pair (channel
pairs 0 and I;
2 and 3).
Not required.
Install resistor from Table
2-16,1;4 W
non-wirewound.
Install 22 kG
non-wirewound
resistor.
2.2.6.2 EIA RS-422 - To configure an SLU channel for EIA RS-422 signal levels, connect the
M(MO-M3) and N(NO-N3) jumper wire wrap pin X of the desired channel to the respective wirewrap
pin 2. Install (solder) a 100 ohm, 1;4 W fusible resistor (non-wirewound) into the termination resistor
mounting pads for the channel being configured. The resistor must be removed for any configuration
other than EIA RS-422.
2.2.6.3 EIA RS-423 and RS-232C - To configure an SLU channel to be compatible with both the
EIA RS-423 and RS-232C (which on the DLVII-J are met simultaneously), connect each M(MO-M3)
and N(NO-N3) jumper X wirewrap pin of the desired channel to the respective wirewrap pin 3.
2.2.6.4 Slew Rates - The signal rise and fall time may be controlled on EIA RS-423 and RS-232C
SLU channel configurations by installing (soldering) an appropriate value of non-wirewound, 1;4 W
resistor into the wave-shaping resistor pads provided (RIO and/or R23). An appropriate resistor value
can be selected by referring to Table 2-16. The value of resistor RIO determines the slew rate of both
channels 0 and 1 which are simultaneously set to the same value. Similarly, R23 controls the slew rate
of both channels 2 and 3.
2-17
Table 2-16
EIA RS-423 and RS-232C WaveShaping Resistor Values
Baud Rate
Wave-Shaping Resistor
38.4K
19.2K
9.6K
4.8K
2.4K
I.2K
600
300
150
110
22 kO
51 kO
120 kO
200 kO
430 kO
820 kO
1 MO
1 MO
1 MO
See Note
NOTE
Determined by other channel of the
2-channel pair.
2.2.6.5 20 rnA Current Loop - To configure an SLU channel for 20 rnA current loop operation, connect the M(MO-M3) jumper pin X to pin 3 for the desired channel. If the 20 rnA terminal contains a
paper tape reader that can be program-controlled (such as a DEC-modified LT-33 Teletype or Teletype ASR-33 with LT33-MD modification kit), connect wire wrap jumper N(NO-N3) pin X to the
respective pin R.
When the DLVll-KA 20 rnA current loop option is connected to the channel interface connector,
operating power for the option circuits is supplied by the DLVII-J. To configure a channel for 110
baud operation, enable the 110 baud rate clock on the DLVll-KA option and remove the baud rate
selector jumper for the channel on the DLVII-J module. The clock needed by the DLVll-J is automatically supplied through the serial line connector cable.
2.3 INSTALLATION
2.3.1 Module Installation
CAUTION
DC power MUST be removed from the backplane
during module insertion or removal.
2.3.1.1 Module Contact Finger (Pin) Identification - Digital plug-in modules all use the same contact finger (pin) identification system. The LSI-II I/O bus is based on the use of double-height modules which plug into a 2-s10t bus connector, each slot containing 36 lines (18 lines each on component
and solder sides of the circuit board).
Slots, shown as Row A and Row B in Figure 2-9, include a numeric identifier for the side of the module. The component side is designated as side 1 and the solder side is designated as side 2. Letters
ranging from A to V (excluding G, I, 0, and Q) identify a particular pin on a side of a slot. Hence, a
typical pin is designated as:
/B
Slot (Row)
Identifier
E
2~
Module Side Identifier Solder Side
Pin Identifier
PinE
Note that the positioning notch between the two rows of pins mates with a protrusion on the connector block for correct module orientation.
2-18
ROWA
ROW B
SIDE'
COMPONENT SIDE
PIN BV'
PIN BV2
CP-1403
Figure 2-9
Module Contact Finger Identification
CAUTION
The module and/or backplane connector blocks
can be damaged if the module is installed backwards. Ensure that the component side of the module faces in the same direction as other LSI-U
system modules.
Quad-height modules are similarly pin-numbered. They are identified in Figure 2-10.
Individual connector pins, viewed from the underside (wiring side) of a backplane, are identified as
shown in Figure 2-11. Only the pins for one bus l()cation (two slots) are shown in detail. This pattern
of pins is repeated eight times on the H9270 backplane.
2.3.1.2 Module Priority - DLVll-J module interrupt priority is dependent on module electrical
position in the LSI-II backplane. Refer to the Microcomputer Handbook, Section 1, Chapter 3 for
device priority considerations.
2-19
PIN
PIN
AA1
AA2
ROW A
AV2
BAl
ROW B
BV2
ROW C
CVl
SIDE I
COMPONENT SIDE
SIDE 2
SOLDER SIDE
ROW D
CP-1416
DV1
Figure 2-10 Quad Module Contact Finger Identification
H9270 POWER AN D
SIGNAL CONNECTIONS
0
00001
o..R2.0....2.2J.
-
-
ROW IDENTIFIER
-0-1-0- -
rOO' _____
I
0 0
I
0
0o_+-~
0 0
TYPICAL MODULE
LOCATION
(SLOTS Al-BI)
C
-
-
WIRE-WRAP PINS
PASS THROUGH
H9270 PC BOARD
MODULE SIDE IDENTIFIER
1 = COMPONENT SIDE
2 = SOLDER SIDE
B
A
'0
_
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
L'~,--;..::~_:~::..~....:~,--~..:.;:'~_o::::..;....:~,--~..:.g~--,~,--~_+I",:...:~,--;..::~_,:;::..~:....:~,--~..:.~_~~::..o;....:~'--~..:.~_~~:..~-I.
0 0
_ _ _ _ _o_ro
000
0
0
0
0
0
:0
I
- - , - - - - - - - T - - - - - --1- - - - - - Lo; __ -- ---i------~-------i------I 00
I
1
10'- - - - -
1
1
1
1
u _______ ~-------~------~------I ·
1
2
3
4
CP-1773
Figure 2-11 LSI-II, PDP-II /03 Backplane
Module Pin Identification
2-20
2.3.2 Cabling Considerations
When interconnecting equipment that meets compatible, but different EIA standards, the performance of the channel is limited by the least efficient EIA specification. Specifically EIA RS-232C/RS423 mixed connections are limited to EIA RS-232C performance capabilities and EIA RS-423/RS422 mixed connections are limited to EIA RS-423 performance capabilities. This consideration is critical when choosing baud rates and cabling lengths for the computer system. Figure 2-12 gives the relationship between baud rate and cable length for both EIA RS-423 and RS-422 specifications.
Remember, when connecting equipment that adheres to EIA RS-232C specifications, the baud rate is
limited to 20K bits per second with a maximum cable length of 50 feet.
EIA RS-423
f-
lK
w
w
LL
I
:c
f-
<.:;J
Z
w
~ 100
-'
al
«
u 40
10
lOOK
DATA MODULATION RATE - BAUDS
EIA RS-422
4K
f-
lK
w
W
LL
:c
f-
<.:;J
Z
w
-' 100
w
-'
al
«
u
40
10
lK
100
10K
40K
lOOK
DATA MODULATION RATE - BAUDS
MR·1324
Figure 2-12
Baud Rate vs Cable Length
2-21
When configuring the slew rate for the channels (for EIA RS-423/RS-232C), the value of RIO (channels 0 and 1) and R23 (channels 2 and 3) may be changed to meet specifications shown in Table 2-16.
Because the channels are configured in pairs, the highest baud rate of the channel pair limits the cable
length of both channels. This fact must be taken into consideration when using high baud rates over
long cable lengths. The DLVII-J is factory-configured with a 22K ohm slew rate resistor which allows
operation at all baud rates, but limits cable length to 100 ft.
2.3.3 Cable Installation
Table 2-17 and Figure 2-13 give the part numbers, applications and lengths of the cabling and options
available for the DLVI1-J module.
Modem Operation Cabling - The DLVll-J module operates in the Data Leads Only mode; it
does not monitor EIA control lines. It will supply the modem with a continuous true logic level on
both the request-to-send (RTS) and data terminal ready (DTR) control lines, allowing the DLVII-J to
operate with modems equipped with manual operation provisions (such as the Bell 103A data set with
804B auxiliary set). Figure 2-14 shows the BC2IB-05 cable. The cable is used to connect the DLV1I-J
module to a modem or acoustic coupler as shown in Figure 2-15. The DLVll-J device connector is an
AMP 87133-5 receptacle which is configured in a 2-pin by 5-pin configuration. The modem connector
is a standard EIA RS-232C 25-pin connector.
2.3.3.1
Local Terminal Operation Cable - When connecting the DLVII-J to local terminals, two
methods may be used as shown in Figure 2-16. When using 20 rnA terminals see Figure 1-4.
2.3.3.2
DLVll-J to DLVll-J Operation Cabling - Digital offers the BC20M-50 cable (50 ft) for
D LV II-J to D LV II-J operation as shown in Figure 2-17. Because longer cables usually require routing without connectors attached, it is encouraged that the user make cables for lengths greater than
fifty feet. Cable material must adhere to EIA RS-422/423 specifications. Recommended cable material is as follows.
2.3.3.3
2 twisted-pair, individually shielded 22 to 24 gauge wire
mutual capacitance 20 pF 1ft
stray capacitance 40 pF 1ft
resistance < 30 ohms I 1000 ft
The connectors on the DLVll-J module are AMP 87272-8 (2-pin by 5-pin on 0.1 inch centers). These
connectors can mate with a wide variety of low cost cables including lO-conductor flat cable. Cable
retention in the module connector is provided by use oflocking clip contacts (AMP PN 87124-1; DEC
PIN 12-14267-00). The cable receptacle (AMP PN 87133-5, DEC PN 12-14268-02) will not pull out of
the module connector if the cable is pulled; however, it is easily removed if the receptacle is pulled
back. Note that keying (AMP PN 87179-1, DEC PN 12-15418-00) is provided (pin 6 removed) to
allow "active" cable indexing.
Cable wiring instructions can be seen in Figure 2-18.
2.3.3.4 DLVll-J to SLU Module Cabling - The DLVII-J module may be linked to serial line units
that are EIA-compatible (such as the DLll-D, DLVll, DLVll-F, etc., when configured for EIA operation). The two cabling configurations possible are shown in Figure 2-19.
CHECKOUT I ACCEPTANCE TESTS
A diagnostic program is available to verify proper operation of the DLVll-J module. The program
will run on any LSI-ll-based system containing a minimum of 4K of memory. For data loop back
tests to be performed, the diagnostic requires the H3270-A option (four diagnostic loopback plugs) to
be inserted into the module's four peripheral device connectors. To configure the DLVll-J module
for testing, remove dc power and insert the H3270-A diagnostic loop back plugs. The computer may
then be powered up, and the program loaded and started.
2.4
2-22
Table 1-17 Definition of Cables
Cable
Application
Length
BC21B-OS
Modem or acoustic coupler operation
I.S m (S ft)
NOTE
"Strapped" logic levels are provided on
data terminal ready (DTR) and request to
send (RTS) to allow operation of modems
with manual provisions (such as Bell lO3A
data set with 804B auxiliary set).
BCOSD-IO
Extension cable used in conjunction with
BC21B-OS
3 m (10 ft)
BCOSD-2S
Extension cable used in conjunction with
BC21B-OS
7.6m (2S ft)
BC03M-2S
"Null Modem" extension cable used in
conjunction with BC2IB-OS
7.6 m (2S ft)
BC20N-OS
"Null Modem" cable for local terminal
connection
I.S m (S ft)
BC20M-SO
DLVII-J to DLVIl-J Operation
IS m (SO ft)
H3270-A
Four DLVII-J diagnostic loopback plugsOne plug required for each channel; four
required per DLVIl-J module to run
diagnostic.
2-23
DLV11·JTO MODEM OR ACOUSTIC COUPLER
i
DLV11·J TO LOCAL TERMINAL
----!9 F T - - - '
(NOTE 2)
NOTES;
1. MODEM USED ISA "MANUAL TYPE"
SUCH AS BELL 103A WITH B04B.
2. DEC EIA R5-232C TERMINALS
(VT52. LA36. LS120. ETC.) COME
EQUIPPED WITH A 9 FT CABLE. NON·
DEC EIA R5-232C TERMINALS ARE
CONNECTED SIMILARLY EXCEPT
9 FT OF LENGTH MUST BE DEDUCTED
FROM THE TOTAL CABLE LENGTH.
IotR.laz.
Figure 2-13 DLVII-J Cabling Summary
2 X 5 PIN AMP NO 87133-5
RECEPTACLE
~------------5FT------------~
211
4
6
3
5
1~
~
STANDARD EIA RS-232C
25 PIN CONNECTOR
PULL HERE
GROUND SHIELD (ATTACH TO CHASSIS)
'------INDEX KEY
-
r-
<
'"
/
I
'"
RCVDATA-)7 /
+12 VDC
I
~10
I
I
, 4(--.J REQUEST TO SEND (CA)
6(--, DATA SET READY (CC)
I
750n
1/2W
.l\.
5(--, CLEAR TO SEND (CB)
I
O(-_.J DATA TERMINAL READY (CD)
2
F1 1A FUSE
'"
3 < RECEIVED DATA (BB)
RCV DATA + )8 /
XMITDATA+)3
2< TRANSMITTED DATA (BA)
"
/
-
0
CABLE
DLV11-J MODULE
CONNECTOR
NOTE
CA8LE RETENTION IN DLV11-J CONNECTOR
IS PROVIDED BY "LOCKING PINS". PULL
BACK ON THE RECEPTACLE TO SLIDE OUT
OF DLV11·J CONNECTOR. HOWEVER, IF THE
CABLE IS PULLED, THE "LOCKING PINS"
HOLD THE RECEPTACLE FIRMLY IN THE
DLV11-J CONNECTOR,.
Figure 2-14
--
7< SIGNAL GROUND (AB)
1<
EIA
RS-232C
CONNECTOR
PROTECTIVE GROUND (AA)
MODEM
BC21 B-05 Peripheral Device Cable
2-25
DLV11-J
BC21B-05
ElM ElF
••- - - - - - - - - - - 5 F T - - - - - - - - - - - . t -______~
......-------'''''
r -__________~)4.------------15FT----------~~
BC21B-05
ElM ElF
BC05D-10
ElM ElF
BC21 B-05
ElM ElF
BC05D-25
ElM ElF
<D
L-----------~1·•._-----------30FT----------~~
NOTES:
<D MODEM OR ACOUSTIC COUPLER.
MODEMS SHOWN ARE "MANUAL" MODEMS
SUCH AS BELL 103A DATA SETS WITH 804B
AUXILIARY SET.
I]] =2 X 5 PIN AMP NO 87133-5 CON~
NECTORS
=EIA RS-232C 25 PIN MALE CONNECTORS
RS-232C 25 PIN FEMALE CONNECTORS
~ = EIA
MR·1281
Figure 2-15
DLVII-J to Modem or Acoustic Coupler
2-26
TERMINAL
r-------~~~·•.-----------------14FT-----------------.1
DLVll·.I
BC20N·05
"NULL MODEM"
CABLE
ElF
ElM
~.~------9FT------~~
TERMINAL
~.~----------------39FT-------------------'1
DLV11-J
BC21 B·05
ElM ElF
BC03M·25
"NULL MODEM"
CABLE
ElF
NOTES
TERMI NALS SHOWN ARE DEC EIA RS·232C
TERMINALS (SUCH AS VT52, LA36, LS120,
ETC.)
DEC TERMINALS ARE CONSTRUCTED WITH 9
FOOT CABLES, WHEN USING NON-DEC EIA
RS-232C TERMINALS DEDUCT 9 FEET FROM
THE TOTAL CABLE LENGTH.
[6J
= 2 X 5 PIN AMP NO 87133·5 CONNEC·
TORS
1E/MI= EIA RS·232C 25 PIN MALE CONNECTORS
1ElF 1= EIA RS-232C 25 PIN FEMALE CONNECTORS
MR-1282
Figure 2-16
Local Terminal Cabling
2-27
CONNECT TO CHASSIS
GROUND
CONNECT TO CHASSIS
GROUND
~------------50FT------------~
2 X 5 PIN AMP NO 87133·5 RECEPTACLE
INDEX KEY
INDEX KEY
NOTE
BOTH CONNECTORS HAVE THE SAME CABLE
RETENTION MECHANISM. CABLE RETEN·
TION IS PROVIDED BY "LOCKING PINS".
PULL ON RECEPTACLE TO RELEASE.
MA·1283
Figure 2-17 BC20M-50 DLVII.J to DLVII-J Cable
EIA RS-423 TO R5-423
I
EIA RS-423 XMTR
EIA RS-422/423 RCVR
I
~+-+-~~~8 ~~RCVDATA
XMT DATA
____
...,..._ _ _----",...
.-
I
- I
~
:
-~
EIARS-423XMTR
~XMTDATA
EIA RS-422/423 RCVR
--<::df---:-< ~---J---J..j
RCV DATA
7
~-I-+-~~
i~
I-=--=-
EIA RS-423 TO RS-422
I
EIA RS-423:
XMTR
-=-
EIA RS-422
EIA RS-422/423 RCVR
-~
I
I
-
I
EIA RS-422/423 RCVR
8
RCVDATA-<j
~100n
7
~
V
~
~>-:___~XMTDATA
I
I
3~~~~~~
______
CA8LE:
41
.~I
1
RCV DATA-<j
EIA RS-422/423 RCVR
~ 1~ ~~
EIA RS-422/423 RCVR
I
8
I
7
,--r-tl--~t· 100 n ~
-
1
Non
EIA RS-422 XMTR
EIA R5-422 TO RS-422
EIA RS-422 XMTR
XMTDATA
8
~RCVDATA
~I>-7--~V
XMT DATA
1
~RCVDATA
__
:~
~+-+-~~~_:
~XMTDATA
___
I
I
I
I
EIA RS-422 XMTR
- IT IS MANDATORY THAT CA8LE SHIELD BE ELECTRICALLY CONNECTED TO THE CHASSIS AT THE ENTRY POINT.
_. THIS CONNECTION IS ALSO MANDATORY. NL T 18 GAUGE
OR MT5 FT.
--- RISE TIME CONTROL MUST BE IMPLEMENTED ON EIA
RS-423 DRIVERS.
MR·1327
Figure 2-18 Cable Construction for DLVII-J to DLVII-J Operation
2-29
BC20N-05
ElF ElM
DLV11-J
BC01V-25
OR
BC05C-25
OR
BC01V-25
. OR
BC05C-25
IKI
= 2 x 5 PIN AMP NO 87133-5 CONNECTORS
IE/MI
= EIA RS-232C 25 PIN MALE CONNECTORS
~
= EIA RS-232C 25 PIN FEMALE CONNECTORS
FO/MI = 40 PIN BERG MALE CONNECTORS,
140/FI
= 40 PIN BERG FEMALE CONNECTORS
MR·1328
Figure 2-19
DLVII-J to SLU Module Cabling
The diagnostic program specifics are listed below_
Program Title: CVDLAA DLVI1-J Test
Document Listing Number: AC-E188A-MC
Microfiche Listing Number: AH-EI89A-MC
Paper Tape: AK-EI90A-MC
The program has been constructed in two distinct phases:
Phase 1 - Tests the channels individually
Phase 2 - Tests channel interaction_
In phase 1, the individual channels are run through register bit tests_ Also, data transfer tests are executed if the data loopback plug is connected and specified in $USWR (loc 1220). These tests are run
in the Flag and Interrupt modes.
In phase 2, the four channels are tested for interaction; i.e., correct interrupt contention and correct
buffer loading. The buffers are checked to ensure that no channel interaction takes place when data is
transferred.
CHAPTER 3
PROGRAMMING
3.1 GENERAL
All programmed operations involving the DLVll-J are via 16 device registers contained on the module. Four device registers are provided for each of the four channels. Each device register is assigned a
unique device address, as described in Chapter 2. Device register formats for each channel are identical; therefore, similar routines can be used for all four channels.
This chapter describes register addressing, register formats, interrupts, and console device operational
req uirements.
3.2 DEVICE REGISTER ADDRESSING
DLVll-J device registers generally occupy 16 contiguous word locations; however, the module can be
configured with channel 3 as the console device. When this is done, channel 3 device register
addresses will always be assigned four contiguous word addresses starting at 177560; channels 0
through 2 device register addresses will then occupy 12 contiguous word addresses starting at a base
address (the factory or user-configured address for channel 0 RCSR device register).
NOTE
Channel 3 can be used as the console device only
when certain base addresses are used. These
addresses are 176500 (factory-configured), 176540
or 177500.
Within anyone of four DLVll-J channels, the least significant octal digit of the address designates a
specific register, as follows.
Octal
Address
Device
Register
Function
RCSR
RBUF
XCSR
XBUF
Receiver control/status register
Receiver data buffer
Transmitter control/status register
Transmitter data buffer
MSDLSD
XXXXXO
XXXXX2
XXXXX4
XXXXX6
3-1
Channel addresses are sequential in increments of lOs. The user can configure a module to a specific
base address in increments of 40s ; this procedure is described in Chapter 2. The base address is the
channel 0 RCSR address. All addresses follow sequentially starting at the base address. When channel 3 is configured for console device operation, the following device addresses are assigned for LSI11 system compatibility.
Console Device
Register Address
DLVll-J
Register
177560
177562
177564
177566
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
3 RCSR
3 RBUF
3 XCSR
3 XBUF
3.3 INTERRUPT VECTORS
Eight interrupt vectors are assigned to each DLV11-J module. Two interrupt vectors (receiver and
transmitter) per channel are used for each of the four channels. The vectors are in sequence, starting
at a base vector assigned as the channel 0 receiver interrupt vector and progressing upward in
increments of 4s. However, when channel 3 is configured for use as the console device, the following
vectors are enabled.
Console Device
Interrupt Vector
DLVll-J
Interrupt Vector
60
64
Channel 3 Receiver
Channel 3 Transmitter
3.4 WORD FORMATS
Four word formats, one for each device register, are applicable for each DLVII-J channel. Word formats are shown in Figure 3-1 and are described in Table 3-l.
3.5 INTERRUPTS
Each DLVII-J channel can generate both receiver and transmitter interrupts. Interrupt priority of the
DLVll-J is established by the module's electrical position along the LSI-ll bus with respect to other
devices that are capable of requesting interrupts. The module electrically closest to the processor
receives highest interrupt priority; the module farthest from the processor receives lowest interrupt
priority.
Interrupt priority within the DLV11-J module is also structured. Interrupt priority is as follows.
Interrupt Priority
Requesting Function
1 (highest)
2
3
4
Channel 0 Receiver
Channel 1 Receiver
Channel 2 Receiver
Channel 3 Receiver
Channel 0 Transmitter
Channel I Transmitter
Channel 2 Transmitter
Channel 3 Transmitter
5
6
7
8 (lowest)
3-2
RCSR
14
13
12
11
10
09
05
04
03
02
01
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
READER
ENABLE
(WRITE ONLY)
ON READ = 0
RECEIVER
DONE
(READ ONLY)
RECEIVER
INTERRUPT
ENABLE
(READ/WRITE)
RBUF
11
10
09
0
0
0
03
04
Il
FRAMING
ERROR
(READ
ONLY)
OVERRUN
PARITY
ERROR
ERROR
(READ
(READ
ONLY)
ONLY)
ERROR
(READ
ONLY)
XCSR
05
02
01
Y
Y
NOT USED
RECEIVE DATA
(7, B BIT DATA IS RIGHT JUSTIFIED.)
IF BIT UNUSED = 0
(READ ONLY)
14
13
12
11
10
09
05
04
03
02
01
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
00
TRANSMIT BREAK
(READ/WRITE)
TRANSMIT
READY
(READ ONLY)
TRANSMIT
INTERRUPT
ENABLE
(READ/WRITE)
XBUFI
15
14
13
12
11
10
09
OB
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
07
06
05
03
04
02
01
00
It
T
Y
(NOT USED)
TRANSMIT DATA
(7, B BIT DATA IS RIGHT JUSTIFIED.)
(WRITE ONLY) ON READ = 0
NOTE
ONE OF FOUR CHANNELS SHOWN.
FORMAT THE SAME FOR ALL CHANNELS.
MR-0901
Figure 3-1
DLV11-J Device Register Word Format
3-3
Table 3-1
DLVU-J Word Formats
Word
Bit(s)
Function
RCSR
8-15
Not used. On read =
7
Receiver Done - Read only bit - Set when an entire character has been received and is
ready for input to the processor. This bit is automatically cleared when RBUF is read, when
INIT is asserted (on power-up or reset instruction), or when reader enable bit is set.
o.
If receiver interrupt enable (bit 6) is set, the setting of receiver done starts an interrupt
sequence.
6
Receive Interrupt Enable - Read/write bit - Set under program control when it is desired to
allow a receiver interrupt sequence to occur when a character is ready for input to the processor (signified by receiver done being set). Cleared under program control or by INIT.
1-5
Not used. On read =
o
Reader Enable - Write only bit - Setting this bit advances the paper tape reader on an LT-33
terminal one character at a time and the setting of this bit clears receiver done (bit 7).
o.
The DLVl1-KA 20 rnA current loop option is required for operation of this bit.
RBUF
15
Channel Error Status - Read only bit - Logical OR of bits 14, 13 and 12.
14
Overrun Error - Read only bit - When set, indicates that the reading of the previously
received character was not completed (RCVR done not cleared) prior to receiving a new
character. The first character is "lost."
Cleared by INIT being asserted.
NOTE
When back-to-back characters are received, one full character time is allowed from the
instant when receiver done (bit 7) is set to the occurrence of an overrun error.
13
Framing Error - Read only bit - When set, indicates that the character read had no valid
STOP bit. This indicates that the currently received character and the next character are
invalid.
Cleared by INIT being asserted.
12
Parity Error - Read only bit - When set, indicates that the parity received does not agree
with the expected parity. This bit is always 0 if no-parity operation is configured for the
channel.
NOTE
Error bits remain valid until the next character is received at which time the error bits are
updated.
XCSR
= O.
8-11
Not used. On read
0-7
Data bits - Read only - Contains seven or eight data bits in a right-justified format. Bit 7 = 0
when seven data bits are enabled.
8-15
Not used. On read
7
Transmit Ready - Read only bit - Set when XBUF is empty and can accept another character for transmission. It is also set by INIT during the power-up sequence or during a reset
instruction.
= O.
If transmitter interrupt enable (bit 6) is set, the setting of transmit ready will start an interrupt sequence.
3-4
Table 3-1 DLVll-J Word Formats (cont)
Word
Bit(s)
Function
6
Transmit Interrupt Enable - Read/write bit - Set under program control when it is desired to
generate a transmitter interrupt request (when transmitter is ready to accept a character for
transmission).
The bit is cleared under program control, during power-up sequence, or reset instruction.
= o.
1-5
Not used. On read
o
Transmit Break - Read/write bit - Set or reset under program control. When set, a continuous space level is transmitted. However, transmit done and transmit interrupt enable can
still operate allowing software timing of the Break signal. When not set, normal character
transmission can occur.
Cleared by INIT being asserted.
XBUF
o.
8-15
Not used. On read =
0-7
Data bits - Write only - Contains seven or eight right-justified data bits. Loaded under program control for serial transmission. On read = o.
An interrupt can be generated by a device function only when its interrupt enable bit is set (described
in Table 3-1 for RCSR and XCSR bit 6). If the interrupt enable bit is set, an interrupt request will be
issued by a DLVIl-J channel when its DONE (receiver) or READY (transmitter) bit becomes set
(described in Table 3-1 for RCSR and XCSR bit 7). Setting the DONE or READY bit indicates that
the function (for a specific SLU channel transmitter or receiver) is ready for service - a data transfer.
When the processor acknowledges the DLV 11-J's interrupt request (according to bus protocol), the
DLVll-J places the appropriate interrupt vector onto the bus. The processor then inputs the vector
and obtains the appropriate service routine PC (program counter, or starting address) and PS (processor status word) from the memory locations addressed by the vector and vector plus 2, respectively.
Thus, two memory locations are referenced by the interrupt vector for gaining access to the service
routine of the interrupting device.
3.6 CONSOLE DEVICE
For a device to function as the console device it must be able to transmit and receive ASCII characters
and to use the standard console device register and interrupt vectors as follows.
Address
Dedicated Console Device Function
000060
000064
177560
177562
177564
177566
Receiver interrupt vector
Transmitter interrupt vector
RCSR
RBUF
XCSR
XBUF
3-5
When the boot response is selected, the BREAK key causes the system to respond as though a powerup sequence were being executed. This feature is most useful when the processor module is configured for power-up mode 2. This power-up mode causes the processor to start program execution at
memory location 173000 (typically PROM-resident). Thus, pressing the BREAK key will cause the
processor to execute a resident program starting at 173000.
When the halt response is selected, the BREAK key causes the processor to print the halt (PC + 2)
address and the "@" octal debugging technique (ODT) prompt character on the console terminal, and
halt. The operator can then communicate with the processor using console ODT commands.
If the console device terminal is equipped with a BREAK key, it can be used to boot the system, cause
the processor to halt (console emulator mode) or have no response; one of these BREAK functions
can be selected when configuring the DLV11-J module prior to installation in the system backplane,
as directed in Chapter 2. Pressing the BREAK key generates a continuous space condition which is
detected by the DLVI1-J as a framing error. Note that only channel 3 can respond to the BREAK key
by booting or halting the system.
3-6
CHAPTER 4
TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION
4.1 GENERAL
The DLVll-J is designed to interface equipment that transmits and receives data over EIA-compatible data lines or 20 rnA current loop data lines to an LSI-II bus. When configured for EIA signal
level compatibility, the DLVll-J transmits and receives EIA signal levels over the peripheral device
interface cable. When configured for 20 rnA current loop operation, the DLVII-J can support current
loop devices including those which contain paper tape readers which are program controlled (such as
DEC LT-33 terminals or Teletype ASR33 with LT33-MD modification kit installed). A general block
diagram of the DLVll-J module is shown in Figure 4-1.
NOTE
Detailed schematics may be obtained by ordering
field maintenance print set no. MPOO586.
4.2 MODULE FUNCTIONS
The DLVll-J 4-channel asynchronous serial line interface module takes data from the LSI-ll bus
and converts it to the timing, character format, and signal level required by the user's peripheral
device. Conversely, it assembles inputs from the peripheral device and converts them to the format
required by the processor. The computer program can address any of the four device registers within
each channel to transfer data and status information. It also can enable the interface module to generate interrupts. When_a peripheral device requires service, the interface module will, if enabled, interrupt the program and provide a vector to the necessary service routine.
4.2.1 Operational Overview
Data passes through three main circuits when moving to and from a peripheral device (see Figure 42). During computer output operations, parallel data is taken off the LSI-II bus by the bus interface
circuit and placed on the module's internal tri-state bus. The data on the tri-state bus enters a data
buffer, where it is serialized and formatted for the peripheral device. The data enters the peripheral
interface which changes the data from TTL (transistor-to-transistor logic) to EIA-compatible bipolar
levels. The data leaves the module on an interface cable and enters the user's peripheral device.
When using 20 rnA current loop signals an external option (DLVll-KA) is placed between the
DLVII-J peripheral interface output and the 20 rnA device. Data coming into the computer from the
peripheral device goes through the main circuits of the module in the reverse order.
4-1
(AE2)
IAH2'
(AJ2)
(AF2)
BDOUT
BDIN
BSYNC
BRPlY
DATA ROUTE GATING BD DINIBD DOUT
_ _ VECTOR 1
I SYNC
BDMGI
BDMGO
BDAlll
BDAll0
BDAl9
BDAl8
•
IAR2)_IIA8,Al0,All,A12
IAS2)
MODULE BASE
ADDRESS JUMPERS
(BR2)
(BP2)
(BN2)
(BM2)
~
REGISTER
lOGIC
I-
L ./
DA12
-n-
~
Cl, C2
CONSOLE
SELECT
JUMPERS
~-=4
.--
ADDRESS
f----J
LATCH
A
f CON SEL 1
r-
(-
'r-
--
DA 12-15TRI-STATE ERROR BUS
=>
ii-
DA 0-7 TRI-STATE DATA BUS
~
~
.....
A6, A7
MODULE BASE
ADDRESS
JUMPERS
r-
..->
I
>
A
/)
I
VECTOR 1
.f"
XMT DATA
UART
CHANNELO
C
Figure 4-1
XMIT
~
~
CLK 0
-....J
D
GND ___ r-- Jl
+12F--RCV DATA
-
-
UART
CHANNELl
D
XMIT
XMT DATA
CLK 1
0
DLVII-J Block Diagram (Sheet 10f2)
F
~ R31
=JM1~
~
==l.0L-J
I-
E
REC
...----.
TO 1/0 CONTROL
B
_JMOI--
Rl0
r-
V5-V7
MODULE BASE
VECTOR
JUMPERS
N
~ R30
...----.
CHARACTER
FORMAT
JUMPERS
D, E, P,S
0
0
REC
CHARACTER
FORMAT
JUMPERS
0, E, P,S
r-
"
K=
=J
=J
IV'
"I
BUS
INTERFACE
RCV DATA
~
~
I ADDRESS
0-4
-
r-
+12F---
r---
r-\
GND_r-- JO
READ RUN CONTROL AND BREAK SIGNAL
L:
MATCH H
ADDRESS COMPARE
LOGIC
{r
BDAl15
BDAl14
BDAl13
BDAl12
BDAl7
BDAl6
BDAl5
BDAl4
BDAl3
BDAl2
BDAll
BDAlO
BBS 7
I
~
A5, A9
MODULE
BASE
ADDRESS
JUMPERS
(BV2)
(BU2)
(BT2)
(BS2)
(Bl2)
(BK2)
(BJ2)
IBH2)
(BF2)
(BE2)
(AV2)
(AU2)
(AP2)
~
BD SEl
1/0 CONTROL LOGIC
G
IAI
(AM2)
BIAKI
BIAKO
BIRO
BINIT
(AN2)
(Al2)
(AT2)
INTERRUPT
lOGIC
r
II
F
E
D
C
B
G
tf)
...J
«
z
VECTOR
GENERATION
lOGIC
c.:J
in
u
c.:J
0
...J
I-
GND---oor- J2
t-
~
+12F---OO
~
w
'"«
'"
REC
c.:J
~~
L....
,....
BDCOK
BHAlT
(AP1)
HALT/BOOT
JUMPER
~
FE3
Ia/
1-1UART
CHANNEl2
rV
M
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
+5 V
+5V
+5 V
+12 V
<D
(AC2)
(AJlI
(AMlI
(AT1)
(BJlI
(BM1)
(BTlI
(BC2)
(Al2)
(AA2)
(BV1)
(BA2)
(AD2)
CHARGE
PUMP
f---f----
GND
r - - - + 5V
-12 V
~e",
!
BAUD
RATE
GENERATOR
-vi
"'-
Fl
NOT ES
D ETAllED SCHEMATICS MAY BE ORDERED
USING PRINT SET ORDER NUMBER MPOO586.
BAUD RATE OUTPUTS
Figure 4-1
"'-
V
E3--
N2J--
ClK 2
+12F--+
RCV DATA
~ R33
REC
....---.
UART
CHANNEl3
--
:=JM3\-
-
XMIT
XMT DATA
'----'
E3
N3r----
'----'
ClK 3
f.--
'--
{'r
ClK 0
ALWAYS I NSTAlI.ED.
<D JUMPER
REMOVED DURING FACTORY TEST.
r----
GND_r- J3
CHARACTER
FORMAT
JUMPERS
D,E,P,S
+12 F
M2
~
i''r
-=:>
~
*
XMIT
L-
CHARACTER
FORMAT
JUMPERS
D,E,P,S
MASTER ClK
]
R23
XMT DATA
....
~
OSCillATOR
R32
....---.
f--o/
(BA1)
1
RCV DATA
Itf)
BAUD RATE
JUMPERS
DLV II-J Block Diagram (Sheet 2 of 2)
II-
ClK 1
ClK 2
I-- ClK 3
r~~~~~~~~~---------l
I
~
~
A
K
I
TTL
PARALLEL
LINES
THREE-STATE
PARALLEL
LINES
...
..
ADDRESS AND DATA)
"
CJ)
::>
m
,
H
I
I
I
I
I
CJ)
..J
CONTROL
I
BUS
INTERFACE
~
TTL D~~:IAL
LINES
DATA
LINESI
I
DATA
BUFFERS
PERIPHERAL
INTERFACE
I I
~
OPTIONAL
DLV11-KA
(20mA
CURRENT
LOOP)
PERIPHERAL
DEVICE
L- _ _ ...J
CONTROL FUNCTIONS
I
IL _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
~
r--..,
I
I
I
I
I
I
~
;,
Figure 4-2 DLVII-J Data Flow, Simplified Block Diagram
4.3 BUS INTERFACE
The bus interface circuit performs four basic functions on the DLVII-J module.
1.
Converts signal levels of data moving between the LSI-ll bus and the module's internal tristate bus.
2.
Decodes a portion of the device address and produces a component of the MATCH H
signal.
3.
When channel 3 is used as a console device the bus interface forces console address
recognition. "
4.
Receives interrupt vectors and places them onto the LSI-II bus.
4.3.1 Bus Interfacing
The bus interface circuit is used to place the DLVll-J module directly onto the LSI-ll bus structure.
This allows data movement between the LSI-II bus structure and the internal tri-state bus of the
module. The LSI-II bus uses standard TTL logic levels; however, the module's internal tri-state bus
has three signal conditions:
TTL high
TTL low
Disabled.
When the bus driver outputs are disabled, they go to a high impedance condition that will not affect
other devices connected to the bus. This permits the bus to be used in both directions by high-speed,
low-power devices.
4-4
4.3.2 Address Comparison
The bus interface circuit monitors the LSI-ll data/address bus lines (BDAL) 0-15 during module
operation (see Figure 4-3). It inverts these signals and places them on the appropriate internal tri-state
buses DA 0-7 (data bus) and DA 12-15 (error bus) of the module. If the information on the BDAL
lines is the address of a location in the upper 4K of addressing space; i.e., in the 110 page, the processor asserts the BBS7 L (Bank 7 Select) signal line. The signal enables the device address match function within the interface to compare the LSI-ll bus lines (BDAL 6-7) and the user-configured module
base device resister address (wirewrap jumpers A6-7). If the addresses agree, the bus interface produces a component of the MATCH H signal required by the address latch (the remaining portion of
MATCH H is discussed in Paragraph 4.5).
rsU~N~~E-
A6
~~=l
I
MATCH H
TO
ADDRESS
LATCH
.".
BBS7
ENABLE
ADDRESS
MATCH
CIRCUIT
IC1/LvA
I ADDRESS/
DATA
BDAL3-5 L
BDALO-15L
I
I
CONSOLE
ADDRESS
MATCH
CIRCUIT
I
CON
SEL 1 H
ADDRESS
COMPARE
BUS
DRIVERS
I
ERROR BUS
TRI-STATE
BUS
I
I
I
I
~
w
a:
o
o
<I:
BDALO-7 L ) t - - - - - K
DAO-7 H
DATA BUS
I
a:
L
- - - - -
~
w
>
I
J
VECTOR
GENERATION
LOGIC
MR-1287
Figure 4-3
Bus Interface Signal Flow
4-5
4.3.3 Channel 3 Console Device Addressing
If channel 3 has been selected as a console device interface (jumpers CI and C2 installed between
wirewrap posts X and 1), the bus interface performs a match operation between the LSI-ll bus lines
(BDAL 3-5) and an internal address. The internal address is enabled by the console select jumper CI.
If these addresses agree, a CON SEL 1 H signal is produced for the address-compare circuit, causing
console address recognition.
4.3.4 Vector Transmission
When the interrupt request function is enabled by the program, the bus interface circuit can place one
of two vectors associated with each channel onto the BDAL bus lines. This vector is determined by
the vector generation logic under control of the interrupt logic.
4.4 INTERRUPT AND VECTOR GENERATION LOGIC
The interrupt and vector generation logic performs four basic functions as follows.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Generation of interrupt requests
Detection of interrupt acknowledges from the computer
Generation of modified vectors used during interrupt operations
Initialization ofDLVll-J module circuits
4.4.1 Interrupt Request Generation
When a peripheral device interfaced to a DLVll-J needs service, the module can, if enabled, interrupt the computer program and vector to a service routine. The interrupt logic can initiate two types
of interrupts: a receiver interrupt and a transmitter interrupt. These interrupts are handled through
separate receiver and transmitter channels.
A receiver interrupt request is initiated when the receive buffer (RBUF) has received and assembled a
character of data for transfer to the processor. A transmitter interrupt is initiated when the transmitter
buffer's holding register (XBUF) is empty and is ready for another data input from the processor.
For an interrupt transaction to occur, the program must set the interrupt enable bit (bit 6) in the control/status register (CSR). Next, the interrupt logic must recognize a condition requiring service
(indicated by the setting of bit 7 within the CSR) and then assert the interrupt request line (BIRQ L)
on the LSI-II bus. When the interrupt is acknowledged by the processor, the interrupt logic enables
the vector generation logic to provide the bus interface circuit with a vector to be placed on the LSI-II
bus.
4.4.2 Interrupt Acknowledge Detection
The priority of a device is established by its position on the interrupt acknowledge signal
(BIAKIIBIAKO) daisy-chain. The signal is transmitted by the processor module to the modules held
on the system backplane. When the daisy-chained signal enters the DLVll-J module it travels
through the receiver and transmitter sections of all four channels.
4.4.3 Vector Generation
When the interrupt logic receives a request for service from a peripheral device it asserts the interrupt
request line (BIRQ L). The processor acknowledges this request through the interrupt acknowledge
(BIAKIIBAIKO) daisy-chain. Upon receiving this acknowledgement, the DLVll-J interrupt logic
creates an input to the module's vector generation logic which reflects the channel needing service (0,
1,2 or 3) and the type of service needed (receive or transmit). The vector generation logic creates a
vector function address which may be modified by the user-configured base vector jumpers V5-7. This
modified address is output to the LSI-II bus by the bus interface circuit, thus causing the processor to
jump to the proper peripheral device service routine.
4-6
4.4.4 Board Initialization
The interrupt logic is used to initialize the DLVll-J module. During a system power-up sequence a
BINIT L signal is asserted on the LSI-II bus and is converted by the DLVII-J's interrupt logic to the
INITO H signal. This signal is distributed on the module to initialize the four UARTs and the interrupt status registers (held within the interrupt logic).
4.5 ADDRESS COMPARE
The address compare circuit tests the user-configured wire wrap board address (AS, A8-12) against the
LSI-ll bus input (BDAL S, BDAL 8-12) to create a component of the MATCH H signal. The
MATCH H signal is required by the address latch during module operation. (The address latch
receives the remaining component of MATCH H from the bus interface circuit discussed in Paragraph 4.3.2.)
Bus lines BDAL 8-11 are received directly by the address compare circuit to be tested against the predetermined conditions created on base address wirewraps A8-11 (as shown in Figure 4-4). In addition, the address compare logic receives the bus input BDAL Sand 12 indirectly through the bus
interface circuit (which merely inverts the signals and places them on the internal tri-state bus). The
BDAL Sand 12 inputs are tested by the address compare circuit against the conditions created by the
base device register address jumpers AS and A 12. If all the address compare inputs match, the
MATCH H signal is asserted. (A summary of the board address decoding is shown in Figure 4-S.)
~BDAL 8 L
4
BDAL 9 L
ADDRESS
COMPARE
CIRCUIT
BDAL 10 L
BDAL11L
(J)
co
DA 12 H
BDAL 12 L
~
Vi
...l
U.J
u
BDAL 5 L
«
ADDRESS
LATCH
"
L~
,..--
:::J
MATCH H
DA 5 H
u..
a:
U.J
....
BDAL 4 L
~
(J)
:::J
co
BDAL 3 L
.t
{~
j
-oC2
(CONSOLE
DISABLE)
CON SEL 1 H
ADDRESS
JUMPERS
A5, A8-A12
C1,[
~
~
il
MATCH H
+VA
NOTE
JUMPERS C1 AND C2 ARE USED TO
SELECT CHANNEL 3 AS A CONSOLE DEVICE.
MA·1288
Figure 4-4
Address Compare Circuit Block Diagram
4-7
BBS7
14
13
A
A
y
15
CHANNEL
ADDRESS
0-3
BOARD ADDRESS
(SE LECTED BY WI REWRAP JUMPERS)
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
.,
03
DEVICE
REGISTER BYTE
ADDRESS POINTER
~
A
02
01
00
I
1
NOT DECODED BY
DLV11-J MODULE
I
DECODED 01 RECTL Y BY THE
ADDRESS COMPARE LOGIC
DECODED BY ADDRESS COMPARE
LOGIC VIA THE BUS INTERFACE
CIRCUIT
Figure 4-5
y
T
.J
I
DECODED BY
ADDRESS COMPARE
LOGIC VIA THE BUS
INTERFACE CIRCUIT
DECODED BY BUS INTERFACE
TO PRODUCE COMPONENT OF
MATCH H
DECODED BY MODULE
OPERATIONAL LOGIC
Summary of Board Address Decoding
When channel 3 is configured as a console device, the bus interface circuit supplies the address compare logic with two additional signals: CON SEL I Hand channel 3 address disable. CON SEL I His
created by the bus interface when comparing an internally held address with bus lines BDAL 3-5.
When a match is achieved, the CON SEL I H signal is transmitted to the address compare logic to
force an address match. The channel 3 address disable (provided by console select jumper C2) is used
to prevent channel 3 from responding to an address other than that of a console device. This ensures
that channel 3 will only respond to the correct console device address.
4.6 ADDRESS LATCH
The address latch is used to hold the channel address (0-3), device register address (RCSR, RBUF,
XCSR or XBUF), high-low byte indicator and the board select signal of the pending operation. When
the program addresses the DLVII-J module, the address bits 0-4 are presented to the address latch by
the bus interface circuit over the internal tri-state data bus. Simultaneously, the address compare circuit and the bus interface circuit supply the address latch with the MATCH H signal (if the board
address is correct). The address and the MATCH H signal are gated into the latch under control of the
I/O control logic circuit (SYNC H signal). The address latch now holds the address and a board select
signal (BD SEL H) to be used by the I/O control and register logic during completion of the desired
operation.
4.7 I/O CONTROL LOGIC
The I/O control logic directs data transactions between the processor and the DLVll-J module. A
data transaction can be word-byte, input-output, or status-character information. The I/O control
logic monitors the LSI-II bus lines to recognize what type of transaction is to be accomplished. The
control logic interacts with the following LSI-II bus control lines.
BSYNC L - Bus Sync signal - Address present on bus
BDIN L - Bus Data In - Ready to accept data or interrupt operation occurring
BDOUT L - Bus Data Out - Data output valid
BRPLY L - Reply from Module - Data output or input complete
4-8
The control logic uses this information to operate the four device registers of each channel by creating
BD DIN IBD DOUT module gating signals. The register names and functions held within each channel are as follows.
RCSR
XCSR
RBUF
XBUF
Receiver Control/Status Register
Transmitter Control/Status Register
Receiver Buffer
Transmitter Buffer
The I/O control logic operates during three types of data transfers:
Interrupt operations
Input operations
Output operations.
Interrupt operations occur when the interrupt logic of the DLVll-J creates an interrupt request
(BIRQ L) signal. The processor acknowledges the interrupt request via the BIAKIIBIAKO daisychain, thus causing the module's interrupt logic to initiate a vector generation. Upon assertion of
BIAKI L, the DLVll-J interface places the vector onto the LSI-ll bus where it is read by the computer. The 110 control logic senses that the vector has been produced by the activation of the VECTOR I H signal and in turn produces the BRPLY L signal. BRPLY assertion indicates the end of the
interrupt vector transfer, thereby causing the negation of the LSI-II bus control signals.
4.7.2 Input Operation
When the computer program reads data from the DLVll-J module (DATI bus cycle), the module's
address is placed onto the LSI-ll bus lines BDAL 0-15 and the BBS7 L signal line is asserted. The
BSYNC L signal line of the computer latches this address into the module where it is decoded to produce a BD SEL H signal. The BD SEL H signal is presented to the I/O control logic, indicating a
proper address was received. Subsequently the address is removed from the bus, BBS7 L is negated
and the processor asserts the BDIN L signal. The I/O control logic on the reception of the BDIN L
signal gates the contents of the desired register to the LSI-II bus (via the bus interface circuit) and
asserts BRPLY L. The computer reads the data and negates the BDIN L signal, indicating the end of
the data transfer. The BRPLY Land BSYNC L signals are deactivated to end the bus cycle.
4.7.3 Output Operations
When the computer writes a word or byte out to the interface module (DATO or DATOB bus cycle),
the module's address is placed onto the BDAL 0-15 LSI-ll bus lines and BBS7 L is asserted. The
BSYNC L signal of the bus latches the address into the module where it is decoded to produce a BD
SEL H signal for the I/O control logic. The BD SEL H signal indicates the proper board address was
received and module operation may continue. The address is removed from the LSI-II bus, BBS7 L
is negated and the data to be transferred is placed onto the bus. The computer asserts BDOUT L,
causing the I/O control logic to gate the data to the proper device register. BRPLY L is issued by the
I/O control logic, indicating that the data transfer has been completed. The computer removes the
data from the bus and negates BDOUT L. The module negates BRPLY L, and the computer negates
BSYNC L, terminating the bus cycle.
4.8 REGISTER LOGIC
The DLVll-J has two control/status registers (CSR) for each of its four channels - the receiver control/status register (RCSR) and the transmitter control/status register (XCSR). The registers consist of
latches, data selectors and gating circuitry which operate under the direction of the I/O control logic
on the module. Input I/O control logic enables the registers to either latch in control bits or gate out
status bits during operation.
.
4-9
Each of the registers can be individually addressed by the processor when using the proper unique
device register address. The register's address is an offset of the base device address configured on the
module. However, when channel 3 is selected as a console device, standard console addresses are used
by the channel.
When status bits are to be read by the computer, the input data transfer (DATI) operation places the
device register address onto the LSI-II bus. The module decodes the address and the content of the
register is gated through the module's bus interface circuit to the LSI-II bus. (See Figure 4-6.)
TRANSMITTER
STATUS
BITS
RECEIVER
STATUS
BITS
I/O
CONTROL
LOGIC
REGISTER
LOGIC
l
J
""
r/
I
I
I
I
I
1
J TRI-STATE BUt>
BUS
INTERFACE
CIRCUIT
DATA ROUTE GATING
SIGNALS
MR-1290
Figure 4-6 Control/Status Register During DATI
Control information may be written out of the computer with the use of an output data transfer
(DATO or DATOB) operation. The address of the device register to be loaded is placed onto the LSI11 bus where it is read by the DLVll-J. The address is decoded and the proper device register
enabled to accept the control information. When the information is placed onto the LSI-II bus, the
I/O control logic of the module gates it through the bus interface circuit to the enabled CSR. (See
Figure 4-7.)
4.8.1 CSR Data Flow
The receiver control/status register (RCSR) uses three bits during operation: the receiver done bit (bit
7), receiver interrupt enable bit (bit 6) and reader enable bit (bit 0). The receiver done bit is set by the
receiver buffer when a character has been assembled and is ready for input to the processor. This bit
works in conjunction with the receiver interrupt enable bit to initiate interrupt requests. The receiver
interrupt enable bit is set by the program to allow interrupt requests to occur. Interrupt requests are
generated whenever both the interrupt enable bit (bit 6) and the receiver done bit (bit 7) are set.
The reader enable bit (bit 0) is used to advance a paper tape reader one character, thus allowing data
to be input into the system. This bit is functional only when the DLVll-KA option is used with the
DLVll-J module. The reader enable bit is program-controlled and is the only bit of the RCSR which
cannot be read; it is a write only bit. The RCSR operational data flow is pictured in Figure 4-8.
4-10
UART
BUS
-f\.
/
"
~
TRANSMITTER
CONTROL
LATCHES
i
THREE - STATE BUS
RECEIVER
CONTROL
LATCHES
'\
,/
1
I/O
CONTROL
LOGIC
TO
TRANSMITTER
CIRCUITS
REGISTER
AND BYTE
SELECT
LINES
r-
Figure 4-7 Control/Status Register During DATa or DATOB
4-11
TO
RECEIVER
CIRCUITS
SOURCE
I
RBUF
RCSR
J--DATOS H---
DESTINATION
RECEIVER
DONE
(READ ONlY)
RECEIVER
INTERRUPT
ENABLE (R/W)
DAT07 H
~
J
INTERRUPT
LOGIC
DATOO H _
READER RUN
ENABLE
(WRITE ONLY)
Figure 4-8
DLVII-J RCSR Data Flow
4-12
I
DLVIt-KA
I
I
The transmit control/status register (XCSR) only uses three bits during operation: the transmit ready
bit (bit 7), transmit interrupt enable bit (bit 6) and transmit break bit (bit 0). The transmit ready bit is
set by the transmit buffer when it is empty and can accept another character for transmission. The
transmit ready bit works with the transmit interrupt enable bit to generate transmitter interrupts.
Transmit interrupt enable (bit 6) is set by the program to allow interrupt requests to be generated.
Transmitter interrupts may occur when both the transmit ready bit and transmit interrupt enable bit
are set.
Transmit break bit (bit 0) is set or reset under program control. When set, the module will transmit a
constant space level; however, both the receiver done and transmit interrupt enable remain fully operational. The XCSR data flow is shown in Figure 4-9.
XCSR
SOURCE
I
I
XBUF
I
DA6
DAD
TRANSMITTER
READY
(READ ONLY)
TRANSMITTER
INTERRUPT
ENABLE (R/W)
DESTINATION
~
BREAK
(RIW)
J
I
DA 7
INTERRUPT
LOGIC
BREAK
LOGIC
I
I
MA·1293
Figure 4-9 DLVII-J XCSR Data Flow
4-13
4.9
UNIVERSAL ASYNCHRONOUS RECEIVE TRANSMITTER (UART) OPERATION
4.9.1 General
The DLVII-J module is equipped with four universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter (UART)
chips, one per channel. These chips are capable of serial data transfers with the peripheral device
interface and parallel data transfers with the module's internal bus (and thus, with the processor).
Both the receive and transmit data buffers of a channel are held within a single UART chip. The
receiver section performs the receiver buffer (RBUF) function, accepting asynchronous serial binary
data characters, converting them to a parallel format, and placing them onto the module's internal tristate bus. The transmitter section performs the transmit buffer (XBUF) function, accepting parallel
data from the module's internal bus and converting it to a serial data format for the peripheral device
interface. The baud rate and character format used during these data transfers is user-selectable when
configuring the module (see Chapter 2 for details on board configuration) prior to installation. A simplified block diagram of the UART is shown in Figure 4-10.
UART
CHANNEL
ClK
TRANSMITTER
RECEIVER
. . . . - - - - - - , SERI A l
INPUT
THREE-STATE BUS
Figure 4-10
UART Signal Flow (Typical for All Channels)
4-14
4.9.2 Receiver Operation
The UART receiver consists of two data buffers (one serial, one parallel) and their controlling logic
which provide the channel with all receive buffer functions. The receiver section accepts asynchronous serial binary characters, converts them to parallel format and places them onto the internal tristate bus of the module.
Serial data entering the module from the peripheral device is converted to TTL signal levels by the
peripheral interface circuit and applied to the UART's receiver section. The UART samples the serial
input data line at 16 times the data bit rate and will sense a continuous marking state when idle.
When a START bit arrives, the UART detects a mark-to-space transition and begins loading the character into the receiver shift register. The character is shifted to place the least significant bit in the lowest bit position of the register.
When the UART receives the first STOP bit, it transfers the data in parallel from the receiver shift
register to the parallel holding register (see Figure 4-11), removing all START, STOP or parity bits
from the transmission. At this time, the data and error bits become valid for gating onto the module's
tri-state bus and the receiver asserts receiver done (bit 7 of the RCSR). If the receiver interrupt enable
bit (bit 6) is set, an interrupt request is initiated. The computer then has one full character period to
service the interrupt before the next character is moved into the holding register. During this time the
next character (if available) is being assembled in the receiver shift register. After the DATI (data
input) sequence has taken the data, the I/O control logic resets the receiver done bit (bit 7) of the
RCSR. If the computer program does not take the data within the character time allotted the RCVR
done does not get reset, thus causing an error condition.
BUFFER
DATA BITS
--,
I
I
I
READ RCV
BUFFER
(RRBF)
--.J
SHOWN AS
SINGLE BUFFERING
SERIAL
DATA
INPUT
RCV
CLOCK
INPUT
EVEN
PARITY
SELECT
PARITY
INHIBIT
NUMBER
OF
DATA
BITS
NUMBER
OF
STOP
BITS
Figure 4-11
UART Receiver Block Diagram
4.9.2.1 Error Detection
The DLVII-J uses the UART to sense three types of communication errors:
FE Framing errors
OE Overrun errors
PE Parity errors.
4-15
4.9.2.2 Framing Errors (FE) - A framing error is produced when the UART does not receive a valid
STOP bit(s). A valid STOP bit is received when the line is found marking at the correct bit time. If the
line is spacing when the UART tests for a STOP bites) the framing error flag will be set.
4.9.2.3 Overrun Error (OE) - When the receiver done bit (bit 7) is set, the computer is given one full
character time to read the receive buffer. If the program does not read the data before the next character is completely assembled within the holding register, the UART will set the data overrun flag. The
setting of the flag indicates the first character was lost.
4.9.2.4 Parity Error (PE) - If the channel is jumpered for parity checking (P jumper set between
wirewraps X and 0), the UART will check the MARKs received in the data and parity bits of each
character. If the UART finds an even count and even parity has been selected (E jumper installed
between wirewraps X and 1) or if an odd count is found and odd parity has been selected (E jumper
installed between wirewraps X and 0), the flag is left cleared. If any other condition occurs the UART
will set the parity bit indicating a data transmission error.
4.9.2.5 Error Flag - Any error condition (OE, PE, or FE) found by the UART will set the ERR flag
bit 15. This flag indicates that some type of transmission error has occurred.
These error bits do not initiate interrupt requests, but they are available for the programmer in the
receive buffer.
4.9.3 Character Formatting
The UART, through user-configured wirewrap jumpers, determines the character format of the transmission. When operating, the UART selects the number of STOP bits (one or two), the number of
data bits (7 or 8), if parity is to be checked and what type of parity is expected (odd or even). For configuration instructions see Chapter 2.
4.9.4 Transmit Operation
The UART chip supplies the channel with all transmit buffer (XBUF) functions. The XBUF consists
of two registers (one serial, one parallel) and their controlling logic, all of which are contained within
the UART chip (as shown in Figure 4-12). A holding register stores the parallel data taken off the tristate bus, and then transfers it in parallel to the transmitter shift register. Next, the data is shifted out
serially to the peripheral device interface. The format of the character being transmitted is controlled
by the data format jumpers of the channel.
During idle time the UART transmits a continuous marking signal and holds the transmitter ready
status bit (XMIT ROY bit 7) asserted in the XCSR; XMIT RDY initiates a transmitter interrupt
request if the transmitter interrupt enable bit (bit 6) is set in the XCSR. If the interrupt function is not
enabled, the UART transmitter remains idle until the program requires it.
When the program has data to transmit to a peripheral device, it uses a DATa (data output) or
DATOB (data output byte) sequence to load the XBUF register. The bus interface receives the data to
be transmitted from the LSI-ll bus lines (BDAL 0-7 L) and transfers it to the (DA 0-7 H) tri-state
bus of the module. The 110 control logic gates this data into the holding register of the XBUF (held
within the UART). When the data enters the holding register, the UART negates XMIT ROY. The
character is then transferred to the transmitter shift register to be shifted serially out of the XBUF and
into the peripheral interface circuitry.
4-16
NO. STOP BITS
EVEN PAR. SEL.
PARITY INHIBIT
CONTROL
LOGIC
NO. DATA BITS
SERIAL
OUTPUT
OUTPUT
LOGIC
DA7
XMIT
BUFFER
EMPTY
DA6
DAe
DATA
BITS
DA4
DA:5
HOLDING
REGISTER
(DATA
BUFFER)
XMTR
SHIFT
REGISTER
DA2
DAI
LOAD
DAO
SHIFT
I--_ _-I-_+-'-'TR.::::AN""S""M!.!..ITT!.!::E:.:..R"",BU"""F!.!:FE::.:.R-=EM""P--'-TY-'----_-+-.k~~~~MITTER
(XRDYl
TBMT
F/F
CLOCK INPUT
Figure 4-12
UART Transmitter Block Diagram
XMIT RDY is asserted as soon as a character is transferred from the holding register to the transmitter shift register, thereby indicating that the holding register is empty. The next character may be
loaded immediately, even while the first character is still being serially shifted out of the transmitter
shift register. Hence, if the holding register and transmitter shift register are both empty, the computer
can parallel-transfer a 2-character pair into the XBUF in less time than it takes for a single character
to be serially transmitted to the peripheral device. This advantage of double-buffering applies only to
the first two characters; that is, if a series of characters is being transmitted, each character after the
second must wait a serial character period for the XBUF to become ready again. The actual time
depends on the baud rate of the channel.
4.10 BREAK LOGIC
During normal operation, the UART checks each received character for the proper number of STOP
bits. It does this by testing for a marking condition at the appropriate bit time. If the UART finds a
spacing condition instead, it sets the framing error flag (FE). The BREAK signal is a continuous spacing condition, and is interpreted by the UART as a data character that is missing its STOP bit(s). The
UART, therefore, responds to the BREAK signal by asserting FE H. If the channel 3 BREAK
response jumper is installed from X to B, FE H will negate control line BDCOK H; BDCOK H
indicates to the processor that dc power is "OK." When FE H negates this signal, it causes the computer to jump to location 173000 (normally ROM boot).
CAUTION
If the LSI-II is using MOS memory with processor
refresh, data may be lost when BDCOK H is
negated during memory refresh because this action
interrupts the memory refresh cycle. If the channel
3 break response jumper is not installed, the module will not take action.
4-17
If the channel 3 BREAK response jumper is installed from X to H, the computer will not "boot" on a
framing error, but FE H will negate control line BHALT L. This causes the computer to halt when a
framing error is received.
4.11 BAUD RATE CONTROL
The baud rate control circuit generates clock signals that control the speed at which the RBUF and
XBUF move serial data. The circuit provides a common clock to both buffer circuits (common speed
operation).
In common speed operation each channel is configured by the selection of wirewrap jumpers for the
desired baud rate. The clock is developed by a crystal-controlled oscillator and a frequency division
chip (counter). The outputs of the frequency division chip are connected to wirewraps which may be
selected when configuring the channel(s). If more than one channel is used for a particular baud rate,
the clock may be daisy-chained between channels.
When 110 baud, 20 rnA operation is desired the DLVII-KA option must be used. This option provides the 110 clock to the channel via the peripheral device cable; therefore, no baud rate jumper may
be configured on the module for the 110 baud channel.
4.12 PERIPHERAL INTERFACE
Each SLU channel of the DLVll-J module can be independently configured for line signal compatibility with EIA RS-232C, RS-423, RS-422 and 20 rnA current loop operation (see Figure 4-13).
Each of the four interfaces may be configured to support 20 rnA current loop devices with the addition of the DLVII-KA option. When installed, the peripheral interface supplies all power supply voltages needed by this option. If the 20 rnA device contains a paper tape reader that can be programcontrolled (such as a DEC-modified LT-33 Teletype) the interface can be configured to supply the
needed reader enable pulses. For specific instructions on peripheral interface configurations see
Chapter 2.
4.13 DC-TO-DC POWER CONVERTER
The power converter produces -12 Vdc from the LSI-II power supply voltage of + 12 Vdc and + 5
Vdc. The power converter circuit consists of a crystal-controlled oscillator which drives a charge
pump. The charge pump during operation supplies -12 Vdc to the EIA driver chips.
4-18
I
I
RECEIVER INTERFACE
8
RCV
DATA
7
tI
cr:
0
TRANSMITTER INTERFACE
lt)
w
x
Z
Z
2
0
t)
w
®
t)
«
LL
Ry
cr:
w
PERIPHERAL
DEVICE
I-
~
XMIT-
I
4
READER RUN PULSE
---'
«
cr:
w
:I:
D-
cr:
w
D-
CLK
CLK
1
+12 VDC
+12 F
F1
10
L-_
NOTES
<D RX IS INSTALLED WHEN CHANNEL IS
®
CONFIGURED FOR EIA RS-422 OPERATION
(100 fl., 1/4 W NON-WI RE WOUND)
R3a - CHANNEL a
R31 - CHANNEL 1
R32 - CHANNEL 2
R33 - CHANNEL 3
Ry IS CHOSEN FOR PROPER SLEW RATE
WHEN CHANNEL IS, CONFIGURED FOR
EIA R5-232C/R5-423 OPERATION
R1a SETS SLEW RATE FOR CHANNELS a
AND 1
R23 SETS SLEW RATE FOR CHANNELS 2
AND 3
MR·1297
Figure 4-13 Typical Peripheral Interface
4-19
APPENDIX A
DLVII-KA USER'S GUIDE
NOTE
The DLVll-KA 20 rnA option is not available at
this time. Option information will be contained in
the next revision of this manual.
A-I
DLVll-J USER'S GUIDE
EK-DL VlJ-UG-OO1
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