Display - Siemens Industry Online Support Portals

Display - Siemens Industry Online Support Portals
Preface, Contents
SIMATIC HMI
Communication for
Windows-based Systems
User’s Guide
Part 2
Part I
Introduction
1
Part II
Connection via OPC
2
Part III Connection to
Allen-Bradley
4
Part IV Connection to
GE Fanuc Automation
7
Part V
9
Connection to LG
Industrial Systems/IMO
Part VI Connection to
Mitsubishi Electric
11
Part VII Connection to
OMRON
14
Part VIII Connection to
Modicon
16
Part IX Connection to
Telemecanique
18
Part X
A
Appendix
Abbreviations,
Index
This documentation is a component part
of the Communication for Windows-based Systems
User’s Guide,
Order No.: 6AV6596-1MA06-0AB0.
Release 12/01
A5E00136862
Safety Guidelines
This manual contains notices which you should observe to ensure your own personal
safety, as well as to protect the product and connected equipment. These notices are
marked as follows according to the level of danger:
!
!
!
Danger
indicates an imminently hazardous situation which, if not avoided, will result in death or
serious injury.
Warning
indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in death
or serious injury.
Caution
used with the safety alert symbol indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if
not avoided, may result in minor or moderate injury.
Caution
used without the safety alert symbol indicates a potentially hazardous situation which,
if not avoided, may result in property damage.
Notice
indicates that unwanted events or status can occur if the relevant information is not
observed.
Note
draws your attention to particularly important information on the product, handling the
product, or to a particular part of the documentation.
Qualified Personnel
Equipment may be commissioned and operated only by qualified personnel. Qualified personnel within the meaning of the safety notices in this manual are persons who
are authorized to commission, ground and identify equipment, systems and circuits in
accordance with safety engeneering standards.
Correct Usage
Please note the following:
!
Warning
The device may only be used for the application cases specified in the catalog and the
technical description and may only be used in combination with third-party equipment
and components recommended or approved by Siemens.
Appropriate transport, and appropriate storage, installation and assembly, as well as
careful operation and maintenance, are required to ensure that the product operates
perfectly and safely.
Trademarks
The registered trademarks of the Siemens AG can be found in the preface.
Impressum
Editor and Publisher: A&D PT1 D1
Copyright Siemens AG 2001 Allrights reserved
Exclusion of Liability
The transmission and reproduction of this documentation and the exploitation
and communication of its contents are not permitted without express
authority. Offenders will be liable for compensation for damage. All rights
reserved, especially in the case of the granting of a patent or registration of a
utility model or design
We have checked the content of this publication for compliance with the
described hardware and software. However, discrepancies cannot be excluded, with the result that we cannot guarantee total compliance. The information in this publication is, however, checked regularly, and any necessary
corrections are included in the following editions. We welcome any suggestions for improvement.
Siemens AG
Bereich Automation & Drives
Geschäftsgebiet SIMATIC HMI
Postfach 4848, D-90327 Nürnberg
E Siemens AG 2001
Technical data subject to change.
Siemens Aktiengesellschaft
Order No.: 6AV6596-1MA06-0AB0
Preface
The Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide applies for
SIEMENS operating units which are configured with the ProTool configuration
software.
The user’s guide is divided into Parts 1 and 2. This guide, Part 2, provides
descriptions on:
S
connection via OPC,
S
connection to Allen-Bradley PLCs,
S
connection to GE Fanuc Automation PLCs,
S
connection to LG Industrial Systems/IMO PLCs,
S
connection to Mitsubishi Electric and Melsec PLCs,
S
connection to OMRON PLCs,
S
connection to Schneider Automation PLCs (Modicon and Telemecanique),
Part 1 contains descriptions of the connections to SIMATIC PLCs.
Purpose
The purpose of the “Communication for Windows-based Systems” User’s Guide is
to explain:
S
which communication protocols can be used for the communication between a
SIEMENS operating unit and a PLC,
S
which SIEMENS operating units can be used for the communication,
S
which PLCs can be connected to selected SIEMENS operating units,
S
which settings are necessary in the PLC program for the connection, and
S
which user data areas can be set for the communication.
To do this, certain chapters describe the scope, structure and function of the
user data areas and explain the area pointers assigned.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
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v
Preface
History
Refer to the following table for information on the various editions of the
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide.
Edition
Comments
07/98
First edition of the guide
01/99
Addition of PROFIBUS-DP connection for the SIMATIC S5 and
SIMATIC 505 PLCs.
Addition of the driver for WinAC.
SIMATIC 505 with NITP and Allen-Bradley DF1 have new configuration
parameters and support different data types than previously.
Inclusion of the MP 270 operating unit.
01/00
Addition of the drivers for the Telemecanique, MitsubishiFX and
Allen Bradley PLCs.
Addition of the TP 170A, FI 25/45 and Panel PC operating units.
09/00
Addition of the drivers for the Lucky Goldstar and Modicon PLCs.
Inclusion of the TP 170B and OP 170B operating units.
12/01
Addition of the integration of a configuration in SIMATIC iMap.
Addition of the SIMOTION PLC.
Addition of the PLCs from OMRON and GE Fanuc Automation.
Addition of the Allen-Bradley and Mitsubishi PLCs for the DH485 and
Protocol 4 protocols.
Inclusion of the MP 370, MP 270B, TP 270 and OP 270 operating units.
This edition of the “Communication for Windows-based Systems” User’s
Guide is divided into Part 1 and Part 2.
Trademarks
The following names are registered trademarks of the Siemens AG:
S
SIMATICR, SIMATIC HMIR, HMIR
S
SIMATIC Multi PanelR
S
SIMATIC Multifunctional PlatformR
S
SIMATIC Panel PCR
S
MP 270R, MP 370R
S
ProToolR, ProTool/LiteR, ProTool/ProR, ProAgentR
Some of the other designations used in these documents are also registered
trademarks; the owner’s rights may be violated if they are used by third parties for
their own purposes.
vi
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Preface
Customer and Technical Support
Available round the clock, worldwide:
Nuremberg
Johnson City
Singapore
SIMATIC Hotline
Worldwide (Nuremberg)
Worldwide (Nuremberg)
Technical Support
Technical Support
(FreeContact)
(fee-based, only with SIMATIC
Card)
Local time: Mon.-Fri. 8:00 to 17:00
Local time: Mon.-Fri. 0:00 to 24:00
Telephone: +49 (180) 5050-222
Telephone: +49 (911) 895-7777
Fax:
+49 (180) 5050-223
Fax:
+49 (911) 895-7001
E-Mail:
[email protected]
ad.siemens.de
+1:00
GMT:
+01:00
GMT:
Europe / Africa (Nuremberg)
America (Johnson City)
Asia / Australia (Singapore)
Authorization
Technical Support and
Authorization
Technical Support and
Authorization
Local time: Mon.-Fri. 8:00 to 17:00
Local time: Mon.-Fri. 8:00 to 19:00
Local time: Mon.-Fri. 8:30 to 17:30
Telephone: +49 (911) 895-7200
Telephone: +1 423 461-2522
Telephone: +65 740-7000
Fax:
+49 (911) 895-7201
Fax:
+1 423 461-2289
Fax:
+65 740-7001
E-Mail:
[email protected]
nbgm.siemens.de
+1:00
E-Mail:
[email protected]
sea.siemens.com
–5:00
E-Mail:
[email protected]
sae.siemens.com.sg
+8:00
GMT:
GMT:
GMT:
The languages spoken by the SIMATIC Hotlines are generally German and
English, the Authorization Hotline is also provided in French, Italian and Spanish.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
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Preface
Other support
In case of technical queries, please contact the Siemens representatives in the
subsidiaries and branches responsible for your area.
SIMATIC Customer Support Online Services
The SIMATIC Customer Support provides you with additional information about
SIMATIC products through online services:
S
General current information can be obtained
– in the Internet under http://www.ad.siemens.de/simatic
S
Current product information and downloads which you may find useful are
available:
– in the Internet under http://www.ad.siemens.de/simatic–cs and
– via the Bulletin Board System (BBS) in Nürnberg (SIMATIC Customer
Support Mailbox) under the number +49 (911) 895–7100
To dial the mailbox, use a modem with a capacity up to V.34 (28.8 kBaud)
whose parameters are set as follows:
– 8, N, 1, ANSI, or
– dial via ISDN (x.75, 64 kBit).
S
Your contact partner for Automation & Drives can be found in the contact
partner database
– in the Internet under
http://www3.ad.siemens.de/partner/search.asp
Notation
The following notation is used throughout this manual:
viii
VAR_23
Screen texts, such as commands, file names, entries in
dialog boxes and system messages, are displayed in this
font.
Tag
Dialog box names and the fields and buttons contained in
them appear in this font.
File → Edit
Menu items are linked by arrows and are displayed in this
font.
The full path from the initial menu to the menu item
required is always shown.
F1
The names of keys are displayed in this font.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Contents
Part I
1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1
1.1
Connections and Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1
1.2
Operating Unit and Possible Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-4
1.3
Conversion on Changing PLCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-6
Part II
2
3
5
Connection via OPC
Network Connection with OPC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
2.1
Possible Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2
2.2
Starting Up the OPC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-5
2.3
OPC Client Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-6
2.4
OPC Client Tag Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-7
2.5
Server Parameters – OPC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-9
Settings for DCOM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
Part III
4
Introduction
Connection to Allen-Bradley via DF1 and DH485
Communication Management for Allen-Bradley PLCs via DF1 . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-1
4.1
Basic Methods of Functioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-4
4.2
Configuration in ProTool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-5
4.3
Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-7
4.4
Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-8
Communication Management for Allen-Bradley PLCs via DH485 . . . . . . . . . . .
5-1
5.1
Basic Methods of Functioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-3
5.2
Configuration in ProTool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-4
5.3
Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-5
5.4
Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-7
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6
User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley PLCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-1
6.1
User Data Areas Available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-1
6.2
User Data Area, User Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-4
6.3
User Data Area, Job Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-4
6.4
User Data Areas, Event and Alarm Messages and Acknowledgement . .
6-5
6.5
User Data Area, Screen Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-10
6.6
User Data Area, Date/Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-11
6.7
User Data Area, Date/Time PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-12
6.8
User Data Area, Coordination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-13
6.9
User Data Areas, Trend Request and Trend Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-14
6.10
User Data Area, LED Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-16
6.11
6.11.1
6.11.2
6.11.3
6.11.4
6.11.5
Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asynchronous data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronous data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data mailbox for synchronized data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronization process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PLC jobs with recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-18
6-19
6-20
6-20
6-21
6-25
Part IV
7
8
x
Connection to GE Fanuc Automation PLCs
Communication Management for GE Fanuc PLCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-1
7.1
Basic Methods of Functioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-3
7.2
Configuration in ProTool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-4
7.3
Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-5
7.4
Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-6
User Data Areas for GE Fanuc PLCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-1
8.1
User Data Areas Available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-1
8.2
User Data Area, User Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-4
8.3
User Data Area, Job Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-4
8.4
User Data Areas, Event and Alarm Messages and Acknowledgement . .
8-5
8.5
User Data Areas, Screen Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-10
8.6
User Data Area, Date/Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-11
8.7
User Data Area, Date/Time PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-12
8.8
User Data Area, Coordination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-13
8.9
User Data Areas, Trend Request and Trend Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-14
8.10
User Data Area, LED Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-16
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Contents
8.11
8.11.1
8.11.2
8.11.3
8.11.4
8.11.5
Teil V
9
10
8-18
8-19
8-20
8-20
8-21
8-25
Connection to LG Industrial Systems/IMO PLCs
Communication Management for LG Industrial Systems/IMO PLCs . . . . . . . .
9-1
9.1
Basic Methods of Functioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-3
9.2
Configuration in ProTool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-4
9.3
Data types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-5
9.4
Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-6
User Data Areas for LG Industrial Systems/IMO PLCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10-1
10.1
User Data Areas Available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10-1
10.2
User Data Area, User Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10-4
10.3
User Data Area, Job Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10-4
10.4
User Data Area, Event and Alarm Messages and Acknowledgement . . .
10-5
10.5
User Data Area, Screen Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-10
10.6
User Data Area, Date/Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-11
10.7
User Data Area, Date/Time PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-12
10.8
User Data Area, Coordination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-13
10.9
User Data Areas, Trend Request and Trend Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-14
10.10
User Data Area, LED Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-16
10.11
10.11.1
10.11.2
10.11.3
10.11.4
10.11.5
Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asynchronous data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronous data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data mailbox for synchronous data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronization process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PLC jobs with recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Part VI
11
Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asynchronous data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronous data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data mailbox for synchronized data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronization process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PLC jobs with recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10-18
10-19
10-20
10-20
10-21
10-25
Connection to Mitsubishi Electric PLCs
Communication Management for Mitsubishi PLCs via PU Protocol . . . . . . . . .
11-1
11.1
Basic Methods of Functioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11-3
11.2
Configuration in ProTool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11-4
11.3
Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11-5
11.4
Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11-6
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13
Communication Management for Mitsubishi PLCs via Protocol 4 . . . . . . . . . .
12-1
12.1
Basic Methods of Functioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12-3
12.2
Configuration in ProTool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12-4
12.3
Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12-6
12.4
Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12-7
User Data Areas for Mitsubishi PLCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-1
13.1
User Data Areas Available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-1
13.2
User Data Area, User Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-4
13.3
User Data Area, Job Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-4
13.4
User Data Areas, Event and Alarm Messages and Acknowledgement . .
13-5
13.5
User Data Areas, Screen Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-10
13.6
User Data Area, Date/Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-11
13.7
User Data Area, Date/Time PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-12
13.8
User Data Area, Coordination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-13
13.9
User Data Areas, Trend Request and Trend Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-14
13.10
User Data Area, LED Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-16
13.11
13.11.1
13.11.2
13.11.3
13.11.4
13.11.5
Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asynchronous data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronous data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data mailbox for synchronized data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronization process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PLC jobs with recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Part VII
14
15
xii
13-18
13-19
13-20
13-20
13-21
13-25
Connection to OMRON PLCs
Communication Management for OMRON PLCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14-1
14.1
Basic Methods of Functioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14-3
14.2
Configuration in ProTool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14-4
14.3
Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14-5
14.4
Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14-6
User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-1
15.1
User Data Areas Available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-1
15.2
User Data Area, User Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-4
15.3
User Data Area, Job Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-4
15.4
User Data Areas, Event and Alarm Messages and Acknowledgement . .
15-5
15.5
User Data Areas, Screen Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-10
15.6
User Data Area, Date/Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-11
15.7
User Data Area, Date/Time PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-12
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Contents
15.8
User Data Area, Coordination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-13
15.9
User Data Areas, Trend Request and Trend Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-14
15.10
User Data Area, LED Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-16
15.11
15.11.1
15.11.2
15.11.3
15.11.4
15.11.5
Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asynchronous data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronous data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data mailbox for synchronized data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronization process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PLC jobs with recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-18
15-19
15-20
15-20
15-21
15-25
Part VIII Connection to Schneider Automation PLCs (Modicon)
16
17
Communication Management for Modicon PLCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16-1
16.1
Basic Methods of Functioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16-3
16.2
Configuration in ProTool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16-4
16.3
Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16-5
16.4
Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16-6
User Data Areas for Modicon PLCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17-1
17.1
User Data Areas Available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17-1
17.2
User Data Area, User Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17-4
17.3
User Data Area, Job Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17-4
17.4
User Data Areas, Event and Alarm Messages and Acknowledgement . .
17-5
17.5
User Data Areas, Screen Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-10
17.6
User Data Area, Date/Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-11
17.7
User Data Area, Date/Time PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-12
17.8
User Data Area, Coordination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-13
17.9
User Data Areas, Trend Request and Trend Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-14
17.10
User Data Area, LED Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-16
17.11
17.11.1
17.11.2
17.11.3
17.11.4
17.11.5
Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asynchronous data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronous data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data mailbox for synchronized data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronization process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PLC jobs with recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
17-18
17-19
17-20
17-20
17-21
17-25
xiii
Contents
Part IX
18
19
Connection to Schneider Automation PLCs (Telemecanique)
Communication Management for Telemecanique PLCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18-1
18.1
Basic Methods of Functioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18-4
18.2
Configuration in ProTool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18-5
18.3
Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18-6
18.4
Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18-7
User Data Areas for Telemecanique PLCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19-1
19.1
User Data Areas Available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19-1
19.2
User Data Area, User Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19-4
19.3
User Data Area, Job Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19-4
19.4
User Data Areas, Event and Alarm Messages and Acknowledgement . .
19-5
19.5
User Data Area, Screen Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-10
19.6
User Data Area, Date/Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-11
19.7
User Data Area, Date/Time PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-12
19.8
User Data Area, Coordination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-13
19.9
User Data Areas, Trend Request and Trend Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-14
19.10
User Data Area, LED Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-16
19.11
19.11.1
19.11.2
19.11.3
19.11.4
19.11.5
Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asynchronous data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronous data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data mailbox for synchronized data transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronization process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PLC jobs with recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Part X
19-18
19-19
19-20
19-20
19-21
19-25
Appendix
20
System Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-1
21
PLC Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B-1
22
Interface Area Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-1
23
SIMATIC HMI Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-1
xiv
Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Abbrev-1
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Index-1
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Part I
Introduction
Introduction
1
AChapter
2-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Introduction
1
This chapter contains an overview of the communication protocols (subsequently
referred to as protocols) which can be used following connection of a SIEMENS
operating unit to a PLC.
Connection here relates to the connection required for data exchange between the
operating unit and PLC.
Detailed information on the main features of the connection and the PLCs with
which they can be used, as well as connection-specific configuration notes, are
provided in the chapters titled “Communication with …” in this user’s guide.
Note
The operating units belonging to the Panel PC range as well as the FI 25, FI 45
and OP 37/Pro, are subsequently referred to under the general term ’Panel PC’.
This general definition of terms is only deviated from when absolutely necessary.
In such cases, the operating units are referred to individually.
1.1
Connections and Protocols
Function of the operating unit
Messages and tags are read in, displayed, stored and recorded on the operating
units. The operating units can also be used to intervene in the process.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
1-1
Introduction
The term operating unit is used throughout this guide when settings are described
which apply to all the following units:
S
Panel PC
S
Standard PC
S
MP 370
S
MP 270, MP 270B
S
TP 270, OP 270
S
TP 170B, OP 170B
S
TP 170A
Data Exchange
A condition for the operating and monitoring functions is the connection of the
operating unit to a PLC. The exchange of data between the operating unit and the
PLC is controlled by a connection-specific protocol. Each connection requires its
own protocol.
Criteria for selecting the type of connection
Criteria for selecting the type of connection between operating unit and PLC
include:
S
the type of PLC
S
the CPU in the PLC
S
the type of operating unit
S
the number of operating units per PLC
S
the structure and, if applicable, the bus system used, by an existing installation,
S
the work and expense involved in any additional components required.
Protocols
Protocols are available for the following PLCs:
S
SIMATIC S5
– AS 511
– PROFIBUS-DP
S
SIMATIC S7
– MPI
– PPI
– PROFIBUS-DP
1-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Introduction
S
SIMATIC500/505
– NITP
– PROFIBUS-DP
S
SIMATIC WinAC
– SIMATIC S7-300/400
S
SIMOTION
– PROFIBUS-DP
S
OPC
– DCOM
S
Allen-Bradley PLC series SLC500, SLC501, SLC502, SLC503, SLC504,
SLC505, PLC5/20 and MicroLogix
– DF1
– DH+ via DF1
– DH485 via DF1
– DH485
S
GE Fanuc Automation PLC series 70 and 90-Micro
– SNP/SNPX
S
LG Industrial Systems (Lucky Goldstar)/IMO –
PLC series GLOFA-GM or G4, G6 and G7M
– Dedicated communication
S
Mitsubishi Electric PLC series MELSEC FX and MELSEC FX0
– FX
Mitsubishi Melsec PLC series FX, A, AnS, Q and QnAS
– Protocol 4
S
OMRON PLC series SYSMAC C, SYSMAC CV, SYSMAC CS1,
SYSMAC alpha and CP
– HostLink/MultiLink
S
Schneider Automation (Modicon) –
PLC series Modicon 984, TSX Quantum and TSX Compact
– Modicon Modbus
S
Schneider Automation (Telemecanique) –
PLC series Micro, Premium and TSX 7 and TSX 17
– Uni-Telway
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
1-3
Introduction
1.2
Operating Unit and Possible Protocols
Selection criteria
Table 1-1 provides an overview of the operating units which can be used. The
decisive factors in making the correct choice of connection are the type of PLC
used and the network configuration which exists.
Table 1-1
Operating unit and possible protocols
Siemens PLC or
manufacturer
Protocol
SIMATIC S5
AS511
SIMATIC S7
SIMATIC 500/505
SIMATIC WinAC
Panel PC 670
Panel PC 870
Panel PC IL
Standard
PC
FI 25
FI 45
OP37/Pro
x
x
x
x
PROFIBUS-DP
x
x
x
x
MPI
1
1
1
1
PPI
x
x
x
x
PROFIBUS-DP
x
x
x
x
NITP
x
x
x
x
PROFIBUS-DP
x
x
x
x
SIMATIC S7 300/400
x
x
x
x
SIMATIC S7 WinAC
x
x
x
–
SIMOTION
PROFIBUS-DP
x
x
x
x
OPC
DCOM3
x
x
x
–
Allen-Bradley
DF15,
DH+4
x
x
x
x
DH4856
2
2
2
x
GE-Fanuc Automation
SNP/SNPX
x
x
x
x
LG Industrial
Systems/IMO
Dedicated
communication
x
x
x
x
Mitsubishi Electric
FX
x
x
x
x
Mitsubishi Melsec
Protocol 4
x
x
x
x
Omron
HostLink/MultiLink
x
x
x
x
Schneider Automation
(Modicon)
Modicon Modbus
x
x
x
x
Schneider Automation
(Telemecanique)
Uni-Telway
x
x
x
x
x
–
Possible
Not possible
1
2
3
4
5
6
Not possible with connection to S7-212
DH485 restricted by Windows NT ad Windows 2000 operating systems on PC
Valid for Windows NT with SP 5 and Windows 2000
Valid for SLC500, PLC5/20, MicroLogix PLCs
Valid for SLC500, PLC5/20 PLCs via DF1
Valid for SLC500, MicroLogix PLCs
1-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Introduction
Table 1-2
Operating unit and possible protocols
Siemens PLC or manufacturer
Protocol
SIMATIC S5
AS511
MP 370
MP 270
MP 270B
TP 270
OP 270
TP 170B
OP 170B
TP 170A
x
x
x
x
x
PROFIBUS-DP
x
x
x
x
–
MPI
1
1
1
1
1
PPI
x
x
x
x
x
PROFIBUS-DP
x
x
x
x
x
NITP
x
x
x
x
x
PROFIBUS-DP
x
x
x
x
–
SIMATIC S7 300/400
x
x
x
x
x
SIMATIC S7 WinAC
–
–
–
–
–
SIMOTION
PROFIBUS-DP
x
x
x
x
–
OPC
DCOM2
–
–
–
–
–
Allen-Bradley
DF13,
SIMATIC S7
SIMATIC 500/505
SIMATIC WinAC
DH+4
x
x
x
x
x
DH4855
x
x
x
x
x
GE-Fanuc Automation
SNP/SNPX
x
x
x
x
x
LG Industrial
Systems/IMO
Dedicated
communication
x
x
x
x
x
Mitsubishi Electric
FX
x
x
x
x
x
Mitsubishi Melsec
Protocol 4
x
x
x
x
x
Omron
HostLink/MultiLink
x
x
x
x
x
Schneider Automation
(Modicon)
Modicon Modbus
x
x
x
x
x
Schneider Automation
(Telemecanique)
Uni-Telway
x
x
x
x
x
x
–
Possible
Not possible
1
2
3
4
5
Not possible with connection to S7-212
Valid for Windows NT with SP 5 and Windows 2000
Valid for SLC500, PLC5/20, MicroLogix PLCs
Valid for SLC500, PLC5/20 PLCs via DF1
Valid for SLC500, MicroLogix PLCs
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
1-5
Introduction
1.3
Conversion on Changing PLCs
Changing the PLC
If the PLC is changed in a configuration, ProTool cannot convert the data formats
used by the old PLC for the new one. For this reason, the connection of the tags to
the PLC are disconnected following a warning. If a tag is then called, the symbolic
name – No PLC – is specified in the field PLC . This does not happen using
ProTool when implementing a newer version of the PLC driver or when changing to
a PLC within the same PLC family.
Changing within the same PLC range
ProTool retains connection of the tags to the PLC when changing to a PLC in the
same unit family. If data types are used for the change which are not relevant for
the new PLC, they are identified as invalid data formats. The invalid data types can
be modified. This concerns the following PLCs:
S
Changing the CPU using the SIMATIC S5 when different data formats are
supported,
S
Changing from Allen-Bradley SLC500 to PLC5/20 and vice versa,
The Allen-Bradley SLC500 and Allen-Bradley PLC5/20 PLCs have various
drivers for the connection of an operating unit with ProTool installed. During the
conversion between the two PLCs, all the tags are identified as invalid or the
connection is disconnected.
S
Changing from SIMATIC S7-300/400 to WinAC and vice versa.
Modifying data formats
Call in the dialog box for the tag with a double click. The old, invalid data format is
displayed. Change the data format to a valid one.
1-6
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Part II
Connection via OPC
Network Connection with OPC
2
Settings for DCOM
3
1-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Network Connection with OPC
2
This chapter describes the connection of the server and client with the OPC to
form a network.
General Information
Windows-based systems, such as Panel PCs, are used for realistic machine and
process representations and can communicate with office applications via Ethernet
with TCP/IP and OPC.
This means that visualization and data processing on site are possible as is the
calling in of system-wide data and the archiving of process data. Universal
information flows ensure a clear view of the status of all processes.
What is OPC?
OPC stands for OLE for Process Control and is a standard open systems
interface. It is based on OLE/COM and DCOM technology and enables simple,
standardized data exchange between automation/PLC applications, field devices
and office applications.
Data can be exchanged between devices and applications from different providers
via a common interface:
S
OPC simplifies the connection of automation components from different
manufacturers to PC applications such as visualization systems and office
applications.
S
OPC standardizes communication to the extent that any OPC server and
applications can work together without problems occurring.
Note
Leading industrial automation companies have joined together to form the OPC
Foundation.
Further information on the OPC Foundation is provided in the Internet under the
following address: http://www.opcfoundation.org.
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Network Connection with OPC
Conditions
Since data exchange with OPC is performed using the DCOM (Distributed
Component Object Model), only operating units with one of the following
operating systems can be implemented:
S
Windows 2000 Service Pack 2
S
Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 6
OPC must be installed on the runtime system and selected from the
communication components.
The OPC server must be located on the same network as the OPC client or be
accessible via RAS (Remote Access Service).
For the OPC client channel to be able to start the OPC server automatically and
successfully establish the process communication connection, the startup and
access permissions of the OPC server must be set accordingly.
Data exchange
To display or evaluate data on the operating unit, it can be retrieved via the OPC
interface from any OPC server in the network operating as a client.
The data which is exchanged is in the form of tags. They are addressed by their
symbolic names assigned in the Tag dialog.
Tags can be processed within the entire network, in the following way for example:
2.1
S
Trend tags can be represented in a trend curve display.
S
Tags are stored in a tag archive and then evaluated.
Possible Configurations
To enable communication via the OPC channel, ProTool/Pro RT is equipped with
an applicable COM interface to establish the exchange of data between PLCs or
automation systems.
An operating unit can be used as either an OPC server or OPC client. When used
as an OPC Client, the operating unit can be connected to a maximum of 8 OPC
servers.
Operating system
2-2
OPC server
OPC client
Windows NT 4.0
Service Pack 6
x
x
Windows 2000
Service Pack 2
x
x
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Network Connection with OPC
Configuration with an operating unit as the OPC client
The following diagram illustrates an example of a configuration with an operating
unit as the OPC client:
ProTool/Pro RT
(Client)
WinCC (Server 1)
Figure 2-1
WinCC (Server 2)
ProTool/Pro RT
(Server)
Configuration with the operating unit as OPC client
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Network Connection with OPC
Configuration with an operating unit as the OPC server
The following diagram illustrates an example of a configuration with an operating
unit as the OPC server:
WinCC (Client)
ProTool/Pro RT
(Server)
ProTool/Pro RT
(Server)
SIMATIC S7-300
SIMATIC S5
SIMATIC S7-400
Figure 2-2
Configuration with the operating unit as an OPC server
The software for the OPC server and OPC client is supplied with the configuration
software and automatically installed.
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Network Connection with OPC
Select PLC protocol
When creating a new project, select the driver required from the Project Assistant
– PLC Selection dialog box.
Set the OPC driver.
Define the driver parameters after clicking on the Parameter... button.
For subsequent changes to the parameters, select PLC in the project window and
then Properties → Parameters....
Tasks of the tags
The general data exchange between the operating units is performed via process
values. To do this, tags must be created in the project of the one operating unit
which point to addresses in the project on the other operating unit. The first
operating unit reads the value from the specified address and displays it. In the
same way, the operator can enter a value on the operating unit which is then
written to the address in the other operating unit.
2.2
Starting Up the OPC
Connection
The OPC server(s) must be installed in the same Windows-supported network as
the OPC client.
Connecting the operating unit to the PLC
The connection of the OPC client and OPC server involves selecting the OPC PLC
with the corresponding parameters and setting the start and access permissions of
the OPC server DCOM.
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Network Connection with OPC
2.3
OPC Client Parameters
To establish a connection via the OPC, the following parameters must be defined
for the PLC under Parameters...:
Figure 2-3
OPC Connection
The lower field lists the OPC servers which are available for selection.
In the case of SIMATIC HMI, the current tag value is read in. The current value is
not explicitly read from the PLC.
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Network Connection with OPC
2.4
OPC Client Tag Parameters
For the connection via OPC, set the parameters specified below for the tags of the
OPC client in General, except for the known parameters Name, Acquisition Cycle
(s), etc.:
Figure 2-4
Tag
PLC
Define the symbolic name of the OPC servers to be connected via OPC.
Type
Define the tag type to be read from the OPC server.
The tag type defined on the OPC client must be identical to the tag type used on
the OPC server.
Browse
After selecting the Browse button, a window opens up containing selectable items.
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Network Connection with OPC
Note
Length (words) is specified in ProTool for Area Pointers. This concerns the
SHORT type and not the WORD type.
Item Name
Define the tag name used on the OPC server.
With the SIMATIC HMI (ProTool/Pro, WinCC), the tag name is the symbolic name
of the tag.
With SIMATIC NET, the Item Name can be
S7:[CPU416–2DP|S7–OPC–Server|CP_L2_1:]DB100,REAL0,1
or
S7:[CPU416–2DP|S7–OPC–Server|CP_L2_1:]MB0
Access path
The access path remains empty
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Network Connection with OPC
2.5
Server Parameters – OPC
For connection via OPC, select System → Settings and set the OPC server
parameter.
Figure 2-5
OPC Connection
Server
Activate the OPC Server check box to connect the OPC server.
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Network Connection with OPC
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Settings for DCOM
3
This chapter describes the DCOM configuration required for networking with OPC.
Since the DCOM configuration depends on how the network is configured, such as
the security aspect, etc., this chapter only provides a basic description. Security
aspects are not taken into consideration in this chapter.
The following settings are recommended. They enable a connection via OPC.
However, it is not possible to guarantee that the function of other modules remains
unaffected.
Configuring DCOM
The settings for the DCOM configuration are defined using the DCOM
Configuration Properties program. This can be started via Start → Run and
entering the program name dcomcnfg.exe.
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Settings for DCOM
The Distributed COM Configuration Properties program appears (refer to
Figure 3-1). Select the OPC servers entry on the Applications tab control:
OPC.SimaticHMI.PTPro. The Properties dialog box is opened after clicking on
the Properties button.
Figure 3-1
3-2
DCOM Configuration Properties – Applications
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Settings for DCOM
The OPC.SimaticHMI.PTPro Properties dialog box appears (refer to Figure 3-2).
On the General tab control, set Authentication Level: (none).
Figure 3-2
OPC.SimaticHMI.PTPro Properties – General
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Settings for DCOM
Set Run application on this computer in the Location tab control (refer to
Figure 3-3).
Figure 3-3
3-4
OPC.SimaticHMI.PTPro Properties – Standard
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Settings for DCOM
On the Security tab control (refer to Figure 3-4), define the settings Use default
access permissions, Use custom custom access permissions and
Use custom configuration permissions.
Figure 3-4
OPC.SimaticHMI.PTPro Properties – Security
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Settings for DCOM
Set The interactive user in the Identity tab control (refer to Figure 3-5).
Figure 3-5
3-6
OPC.SimaticHMI.PTPro Properties – Identity
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Settings for DCOM
Nothing should be changed on the Endpoints tab control (refer to Figure 3-6).
Figure 3-6
OPC.SimaticHMI.PTPro Properties – Endpoints
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Settings for DCOM
Use the OK button to return to the DCOM Configuration Properties dialog box. Use
the Default Properties tab control (refer to Figure 3-7) to select the Enable DCOM
(Distributed COM) on this computer and Enable COM Internet
Services on this computer. Continue to use Default Authentication Level:
(none) and Default Impersonation Level: Anonymous.
Figure 3-7
3-8
DCOM Configuration Properties – Default Properties
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
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Settings for DCOM
Use the Default Security tab control (refer to Figure 3-8), to define who should be
assigned permissions to access, start or configure the OPC server. To do this,
select the Edit Default in each case. One further dialog box appears in which to
select the type of access for the user and another in which to add more users and
groups.
Figure 3-8
DCOM Configuration Properties – Default Security
If this concerns the same user with the same password on all the individual
computers, no special rights need to be assigned.
If, however, different users are involved, e.g.
User X and User Y, or
User X + Domain 1 and User X + Domain 2,
the corresponding rights must be defined in Default Security.
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Settings for DCOM
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Part III
Connection to AllenBradley via DF1 and
DH485
Communication Management for
Allen-Bradley via DF1
4
Communication Management for
Allen-Bradley via DH485
5
User Data Areas for
Allen-Bradley PLCs
6
3-2
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Communication Management for
Allen-Bradley PLCs via DF1
4
This chapter describes the communication between operating unit and
Allen-Bradley PLCs from the SLC500, PLC5/20 and MicroLogix series using the
DF1 protocol.
General Information
The connection, in the case of these PLCs, is established by the following internal
PLC protocols:
S
DF1 – point-to-point connection
S
DH+ via KF2 module and DF1 – multi-point connection
S
DH485 via KF3 module and DF1 – multi-point connection
Operating units
The following operating units can be connected to SLC500, PLC5/20 and
MicroLogix PLCs:
S
Panel PC
S
Standard PC
S
MP 370
S
MP 270, MP 270B
S
TP 270, OP 270
S
TP 170B, OP 170B
S
TP 170A
Installation
The driver necessary for the connection to the SLC500, PLC5/20 and MicroLogix
PLCs is contained in the configuration software and is installed automatically.
The connection between the operating unit and the PLC is basically restricted to
defining the interface parameters. Special function blocks for connection to the
PLC are not required.
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Communication Management for Allen-Bradley PLCs via DF1
Connection
The operating unit must be connected to the DF1 interface of the CPU (RS 232 or
RS 422) or to a KF2 or KF3 module (refer to the documentation of the unit to be
connected).
Note
The Allen-Bradley company also offers a wide range of communication adapters to
integrate “DF1 participants” in DH485, DH and DH+ networks. Connections via the
KF2 and KF3 modules are approved for Windows-based systems. Other
connections have not been tested by Siemens AG and, therefore, not been
approved for release.
S
DF1 protocol
The operating unit must be connected to the DF1 interface on the CPU (RS232)
(refer to Figure 4-1). Please refer to Table 4-1 for information concerning the
connection cables to be used.
Operating
Unit
Figure 4-1
S
DF1
PLC
RS 232/RS 422
Connecting the operating unit to the PLC
DH+ protocol
The operating unit must be connected to the RS232 interface of the KF2
module, and the KF2 module to the DH+ interface of the CPU (refer to
Figure 4-2). Please refer to Table 4-1 for information concerning the connection
cables to be used.
Operating
Unit
DF1
PLC
PLC
RS 232
KF2
DH+
Figure 4-2
4-2
Connecting the operating unit to the PLC
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Communication Management for Allen-Bradley PLCs via DF1
S
DH485 protocol
Only valid for Allen-Bradley SLC 50x.
The operating unit must be connected to the RS232 interface of the KF3
module and the KF3 module connected via an AIC or NET-AIC to the DH485
interface of the CPU (refer to Figure 2324-3). Please refer to Table 4-1 for
information concerning the connection cables to be used.
Operating
Unit
DF1
RS 232
PLC
PLC
AIC
AIC
KF3
DH485
Figure 4-3
Connecting the operating unit to the PLC
Note
When using a PC or OP37/Pro the FIFO of the interface via which communication
should take place must be switched off.
Windows 95:
Select the COM ports required using Control Panel → System →
Device Manager → Connections (COM and LPT) and then select Properties →
Connection Settings → More... to deactivate the option Use FIFO Buffer.
Windows NT:
Select the COM ports required using Control Panel → Connections (COM and
LPT) Connections (COM and LPT) Settings → More... to deactivate the option
FIFO activated.
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The following connection cables are available for connection of the operating unit
to the PLC:
Table 4-1
Applicable connection cables (refer to Appendix, Part C Interface Assignment)
Interface
SLC500/
MicroLogix
MicroLogix
RS 232, 9-pin
Mini-DIN
PLC5/20
RS 232, 25-pin
RS 422, 25-pin
RS 232, 9-pin
Allen-Bradley
standard cable
1747 CP3
Allen-Bradley
standard cable
1761-CBL PM02
Allen-Bradley
standard cable
1784 CP10
–
RS 232, 15-pin
6XV1440-2K _ _ _
Point-to-point
cable 1
6XV1440-2L _ _ _
–
RS 422, 9-pin
–
–
–
6XV1440-2V _ _ _
’_’ Length code (refer to Catalog ST 80)
Details of which interface to use on the operating unit are provided in the relevant
equipment manual.
4.1
Basic Methods of Functioning
PLC
Tags
Process values
User data
areas
Application
program
Display/Operation
Communication
Messages
Operating unit
User
guidance
Coordination
area
Figure 4-4
4-4
Communication structure
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Communication Management for Allen-Bradley PLCs via DF1
Task of the tags
The general exchange of data between the PLC and operating unit is performed by
means of the process values. To do this, tags must be specified in the
configuration which point to an address in the PLC. The operating unit reads the
value from the specified address and displays it. In the same way, the operator can
enter a value on the operating unit, which is then written to the address in the PLC.
User data areas
User data areas are used for the exchange of special data and must only be set up
when the data concerned is used.
User data area are required, for example, for:
S
Trends
S
PLC jobs
S
Controlling LEDs
S
Life bit monitoring
A detailed description of the user data areas is provided in Chapter 6.
4.2
Configuration in ProTool
When creating a new project, select the protocol required from the Project
Wizard " PLC Selection dialog box.
Define one of the following protocols:
S
Allen-Bradley DF1 SLC500 for the SLC500 and MicroLogix PLCs,
S
Allen-Bradley DF1 PLC5/20 for the PLC5/20 PLC,
Select the Parameter ... button to define the protocol parameters.
Note
The settings on the operating unit must match with those on the PLC.
When starting up, ProTool must not be integrated in STEP 7; deactivate the menu
item Integration in STEP 7.
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Define the following parameters for the PLC:
Table 4-2
PLC parameters
Parameters
Explanation
Interface
The operating unit interface to which the PLC is connected must be set
here.
–
Panel PC:
COM 1 or COM 2
–
Standard PC:
COM 1 to COM 4
–
MP 370:
IF1A, IF2 or IF1B
–
MP 270, MP 270B:
IF1A, IF2 or IF1B
–
TP 270, OP 270:
IF1A, IF2 or IF1B
–
TP 170B, OP 170B: IF1A, IF2 or IF1B
–
TP 170A:
IF1A or IF1B
Target address
Select the PLC address or, in the case of a point-to-point DF1
connection of the PLC, the address 0.
CPU type
Only valid for Allen-Bradley DF1 SLC500:
Set the CPU type of that used in the PLC: SLC500, SLC501, SLC502,
SLC503, SLC504, SLC505 or MicroLogix
Error code
Set BCC or CRC.
Interface type
Set RS232 or RS422 according to the interface.
Data bits
Set 7 or 8.
Parity
Set NONE, EVEN or UNEVEN.
Stop bits
Set 1 or 2.
Baud rate
Define the transmission rate between the operating unit and PLC here.
System setting: 9600 bit/s.
Note
Configure the driver DF1 FULL-DUPLEX as follows: NO HANDSHAKING for
Control Line and AUTO-DETECT for Embedded Responses.
For subsequent changes to the parameters, select PLC in the project window and
then Properties " Parameter ....
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4.3
Data Types
When configuring tags and area pointers, the data types listed in Table 4-3 are
available for use.
Table 4-3
Data types
Data type
Addressed by
Format
ASCII1
A
ASCII
Binary
B
BIT,
UNSIGNED INT
Counter
C
BIT, SIGNED INT,
UNSIGNED INT
BCD (PLC5 only)
D
BIT, SIGNED INT,
UNSIGNED INT,
BCD4, BCD8
Float1
F
REAL
Digital Input
I
BIT,
UNSIGNED INT
Data Register (Integer)
N
BIT, SIGNED INT,
UNSIGNED INT,
SIGNED LONG,
UNSIGNED LONG,
REAL
Digital Output
O
BIT,
UNSIGNED INT
Control
R
BIT,
UNSIGNED INT
Status
S
BIT,
UNSIGNED INT
Timer
T
BIT, SIGNED INT,
UNSIGNED INT
1
Valid for PLCs in the SLC503, SLC504, SLC505 and PLC5/20 series.
Representation in ProTool
In ProTool the data format UNSIGNED INT is abbreviated as UIN, UNSIGNED
LONG as ULONG, SIGNED INT as INT and SIGNED LONG as LONG.
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Note
Input/output modules with 8 or 16 ports occupy a complete word in the PLC. An
input/output module with 24 or 32 ports occupies two words. If non-available bits
are assigned in the operating unit, the unit issues an error message.
For this reason, ensure that only those bits are assigned which are assigned to a
port when configuring input/output modules with 8 or 24 ports.
4.4
Optimization
Acquisition cycle and update time
The acquisition cycles defined in the configuration software for thearea pointers
and the acquisition cycles for the tags are major factors in respect of the real
update times which are achieved. The update time is the acquisition cycle plus
transmission time plus processing time.
In order to achieve optimum update times, the following points should be observed
during configuration:
S
When setting up the individual data areas, make them as large as necessary
but as small as possible.
S
Define data areas that belong together as contiguous areas. The effective
update time is improved by setting one single large area rather than several
smaller areas.
S
Setting acquisition cycles which are too short unnecessarily impairs overall
performance. Set the acquisition cycle to correspond to the modification time of
the process values. The rate of change of temperature of a furnace, for
example, is considerably slower than the acceleration curve of an electric
motor.
Guideline value for the acquisition cycle: Approx. 1 second.
4-8
S
If necessary, dispense with cyclic transmission of user data areas (acquisition
cycle = 0) in order to improve the update time. Instead, use PLC jobs to transfer
the user data areas at random times.
S
Store the tags for a message or a screen in a contiguous data area.
S
In order that changes on the PLC are reliably detected by the operating unit,
they must occur during the actual acquisition cycle at least.
S
Set the baud rate to the highest possible value.
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Screens
The real screen updating rate which can be achieved is dependent on the type and
quantity of data to be displayed.
In order to achieve short updating times, ensure that short acquisition cycles are
only defined in the configuration for those objects which actually need to be
updated quickly.
Trends
If, in the case of bit-triggered trends, the communication bit is set in the trend
transfer area, the operating unit always updates all the trends whose bit is set in
that area. It resets the bits afterwards.
The communication bit in the PLC program can only be set again after all the bits
have been reset by the operating unit.
PLC jobs
If large numbers of PLC jobs are sent to the operating unit in quick succession,
communication between the operating unit and PLC may become overloaded.
If the operating unit enters the value 0 in the first data word of the job mailbox, it
signifies that the operating unit has accepted the job. It then processes the job, for
which it requires a certain amount of time. If a new PLC job is then immediately
entered in the job mailbox, it may take some time before the operating unit
executes the next PLC job. The next PLC job is only accepted when sufficient
computer performance is available.
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Communication Management for
Allen-Bradley PLCs via DH485
5
This chapter describes the communication between the operating unit and
Allen-Bradley PLC types SLC500, SLC501, SLC502, SLC503, SLC504 and
SLC505 (subsequently referred to as SLCs) and MicroLogix using the DH485
protocol.
General Information
The connection, in the case of these PLCs, is established by the following internal
PLC protocols:
S
DH485 – multi-point connection
Operating units
The following operating units can be connected to SLC PLCs and MicroLogix:
S
Panel PC
S
Standard PC
S
MP 370
S
MP 270, MP 270B
S
TP 270, OP 270
S
TP 170B, OP 170B
S
TP 170A
Installation
The driver necessary for the connection to the SLC and MicroLogix PLCs is
contained in the configuration software and is installed automatically.
The connection between the operating unit and the PLC is basically restricted to
defining the interface parameters. Special function blocks for connection to the
PLC are not required.
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Communication Management for Allen-Bradley PLCs via DH485
Connection
Note
The Allen-Bradley company also offers a wide range of communication adapters to
integrate “DF1 participants” in DH485, DH and DH+ networks. Other connections
have not been tested by Siemens AG and, therefore, not been approved for
release.
The CPU must be connected directly to the operating unit or the AIC or AIC+
module, and the module connected to the RS 485 interface of the operating unit
(multi-point connection).
The SLC PLCs are equipped with an RS 232 or RS 485 interface and are
connected to the bus via the AIC or AIC+ accordingly. The MicroLogix PLCs only
have an RS 232 interface and can only be connected via the AIC+.
S
Point-to-point connection via RS 232
DH485
Operating unit
PLC
RS 232
Figure 5-1
S
Connecting the operating unit via a point-to-point connection
Multi-point connection via RS 485
Operating unit
PLC
PLC
DH485
DH485
RS 485
RS 232
AIC
AIC+
DH485
RS 485
Figure 5-2
5-2
Connecting the operating unit via a multi-point connection
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Communication Management for Allen-Bradley PLCs via DH485
The following connection cables are available for connection of the operating unit
to the PLC:
Table 5-1
Applicable connection cables (refer to Appendix, Part C Interface Assignment)
Interface
SLC, MicroLogix
MicroLogix
Bus connection
RS 232, 9-pin
RS 232, Mini-DIN
RS 485, 6-pin
RS 232, 9-pin
Allen-Bradley
standard cable
1747 CP3
Allen-Bradley
standard cable
1761-CBL PM02
–
RS 232, 15-pin
6XV1440-2K _ _ _
Point-to-point cable 1
–
RS 485, 9-pin
–
–
Multi-point cable
’_’ Length code (refer to Catalog ST 80)
Details of which interface to use on the operating unit are provided in the relevant
equipment manual.
5.1
Basic Methods of Functioning
PLC
Tags
Process values
User data
areas
Application
program
Display/Operation
Communication
Messages
Operating unit
User
guidance
Coordination
area
Figure 5-3
Communication structure
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Communication Management for Allen-Bradley PLCs via DH485
Task of the tags
The general exchange of data between the PLC and operating unit is performed by
means of the process values. To do this, tags must be specified in the
configuration which point to an address in the PLC. The operating unit reads the
value from the specified address and displays it. In the same way, the operator can
enter a value on the operating unit, which is then written to the address in the PLC.
User data areas
User data areas are used for the exchange of special data and must only be set up
when the data concerned is used.
User data area are required, for example, for:
S
Trends
S
PLC jobs
S
Controlling LEDs
S
Life bit monitoring
A detailed description of the user data areas is provided in Chapter 6.
5.2
Configuration in ProTool
When creating a new project, select the protocol required from the Project
Wizard " PLC Selection dialog box.
Set the protocol:
S
Allen-Bradley DH485 for the SLC and MicroLogix PLCs
Note
The settings on the operating unit must match with those on the PLC.
When starting up, ProTool must not be integrated in STEP 7; deactivate the menu
item Integration in STEP 7.
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Select the Parameter ... button to define the protocol parameters. Define the
following parameters for the PLC:
Table 5-2
PLC parameters
Parameters
Explanation
OP address
Set the OP address here. The addresses 1-31 are available for
selection.
Target address
Set the address of the PLC to be communicated with. The addresses
1-31 are available for selection.
Max. bus
address
et the maximum bus address to be taken into account for token transfer.
The addresses 2-31 are available for selection.
Interface
The operating unit interface to which the PLC is connected must be set
here.
–
Panel PC:
COM 1 or COM 2
–
Standard PC:
COM 1 to COM 4
–
MP 370:
IF1A, IF2 or IF1B
–
MP 270, MP 270B:
IF1A, IF2 or IF1B
–
TP 270, OP 270:
IF1A, IF2 or IF1B
–
TP 170B, OP 170B: IF1A, IF2 or IF1B
–
TP 170A:
IF1A or IF1B
CPU type
Define a controller type.Select SLC50x for SLC503, SLC504 or SLC505.
Interface type
Set RS232 or RS422 according to the PLC.
Data bits
Set 8 or 7 – default: 8
Parity
Set NONE , EVEN or UNEVEN – default: even
Stop bits
Set 1 or 2.
Baud rate
Define the transmission rate between the operating unit and PLC here.
System setting: 9600 bit/s.
For subsequent changes to the parameters, select PLC in the project window and
then Properties " Parameter ....
5.3
Data Types
When configuring tags and area pointers, the data types listed in Table 5-3 are
available for use.
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Table 5-3
Data types
Data type
Addressed by
Format
ASCII1
A
ASCII
Binary
B
BIT,
UNSIGNED INT
Counter
C
BIT, SIGNED INT,
UNSIGNED INT
Float1
F
REAL
Digital Input
I
BIT,
UNSIGNED INT
Data Register (Integer)
N
BIT, SIGNED INT,
UNSIGNED INT,
SIGNED LONG,
UNSIGNED LONG,
REAL
Digital Output
O
BIT,
UNSIGNED INT
Control
R
BIT,
UNSIGNED INT
Status
S
BIT,
UNSIGNED INT
Timer
T
BIT, SIGNED INT,
UNSIGNED INT
1
Valid for SLC 503, SLC 504 and SLC 505
Representation in ProTool
In ProTool the data format UNSIGNED INT is abbreviated as UIN, UNSIGNED
LONG as ULONG, SIGNED INT as INT and SIGNED LONG as LONG.
Note
Input/output modules with 8 or 16 ports occupy a complete word in the PLC. An
input/output module with 24 or 32 ports occupies two words. If non-available bits
are assigned in the operating unit, the unit issues an error message.
For this reason, ensure that only those bits are assigned which are assigned to a
port when configuring input/output modules with 8 or 24 ports.
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5.4
Optimization
Acquisition cycle and update time
The acquisition cycles defined in the configuration software for thearea pointers
and the acquisition cycles for the tags are major factors in respect of the real
update times which are achieved. The update time is the acquisition cycle plus
transmission time plus processing time.
In order to achieve optimum update times, the following points should be observed
during configuration:
S
When setting up the individual data areas, make them as large as necessary
but as small as possible.
S
Define data areas that belong together as contiguous areas. The effective
update time is improved by setting one single large area rather than several
smaller areas.
S
Setting acquisition cycles which are too short unnecessarily impairs overall
performance. Set the acquisition cycle to correspond to the modification time of
the process values. The rate of change of temperature of a furnace, for
example, is considerably slower than the acceleration curve of an electric
motor.
Guideline value for the acquisition cycle: Approx. 1 second.
S
If necessary, dispense with cyclic transmission of user data areas (acquisition
cycle = 0) in order to improve the update time. Instead, use PLC jobs to transfer
the user data areas at random times.
S
Store the tags for a message or a screen in a contiguous data area.
S
In order that changes on the PLC are reliably detected by the operating unit,
they must occur during the actual acquisition cycle at least.
S
Set the baud rate to the highest possible value.
Screens
The real screen updating rate which can be achieved is dependent on the type and
quantity of data to be displayed.
In order to achieve short updating times, ensure that short acquisition cycles are
only defined in the configuration for those objects which actually need to be
updated quickly.
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Trends
If, in the case of bit-triggered trends, the communication bit is set in the trend
transfer area, the operating unit always updates all the trends whose bit is set in
that area. It resets the bits afterwards.
The communication bit in the PLC program can only be set again after all the bits
have been reset by the operating unit.
PLC jobs
If large numbers of PLC jobs are sent to the operating unit in quick succession,
communication between the operating unit and PLC may become overloaded.
If the operating unit enters the value 0 in the first data word of the job mailbox, it
signifies that the operating unit has accepted the job. It then processes the job, for
which it requires a certain amount of time. If a new PLC job is then immediately
entered in the job mailbox, it may take some time before the operating unit
executes the next PLC job. The next PLC job is only accepted when sufficient
computer performance is available.
Network configuration
The network participants (operating unit and PLC) are basically considered equal
in the case of the DH485 protocol. The owner of a so called “token” has the current
bus control until the token is transferred to the participant with the node one
number higher. For optimum bus configuration, ensure the following:
5-8
S
The bus participants should be assigned consecutive numbers starting with
one, without any gaps where possible, so that there are no interruptions in the
token transfer.
S
The “Max. bus address” parameter should be exactly 1 higher than the highest
bus node address used.
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User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley PLCs
6
Overview
User data areas are used for data exchange between the PLC and operating unit.
The user data areas are written to and read by the operating unit and the
application program alternately during the process of communication. By analyzing
the data stored there, the PLC and operating unit reciprocally initiate predefined
actions.
This chapter describes the function, layout and special features of the various user
data areas.
6.1
User Data Areas Available
Definition
The user data areas can be set up in the PLC as output, input, status, binary and
N files.
Set up the user data areas both in the ProTool project and in the PLC.
The user data areas can be set up and modified in the ProTool project using the
menu items Insert → Area Pointers.
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Function range
The user data areas available are dependent on the operating unit used. The
tables 6-1 and 6-2 provide an overview of the functional range of the individual
operating units.
Table 6-1
User data areas available, Part 1
User data area
Panel PC
Standard PC
MP 370
User version
x
x
x
Job mailbox
x
x
x
Event messages
x
x
x
Screen number
x
x
x
Data mailbox
x
x
x
Date/Time
x
x
x
Date/Time PLC
x
x
x
Coordination
x
x
x
Trend request
x
x
x
Trend transfer 1, 2
x
x
x
1
x
–
x
OP/PLC acknowledgement
x
x
x
Alarm messages
x
x
x
LED assignment
1
Only possible using operating units with keyboard.
Table 6-2
User data areas available, Part 2
User data area
MP 270
MP 270B
TP 270
OP 270
TP 170B
OP 170B
TP 170A
User version
x
x
x
–
Job mailbox
x
x
x
–
Event messages
x
x
x
x
Screen number
x
x
x
–
Data mailbox
x
x
x
–
Date/Time
x
x
x
–
Date/Time PLC
x
x
x
x
Coordination
x
x
x
–
Trend request
x
x
–
–
Trend transfer 1, 2
x
x
–
–
LED assignment 1
x
x
x
–
OP/PLC acknowledgement
x
x
x
–
Alarm messages
x
x
x
–
1
6-2
Only possible using operating units with keyboard.
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Table 6-3 illustrates the way in which the PLC and operating unit access the
individual user data areas – Read (R) or Write (W).
Table 6-3
Application of the user data areas
User data area
Necessary for
Operating
unit
PLC
User version
ProTool Runtime checks whether the
ProTool project version and the
project in the PLC are consistent.
R
W
Job mailbox
Triggering of functions on the operating unit by PLC program
R/W
R/W
Event messages
Bit reporting process
arrival and departure of event messages
R
W
Screen number
Evaluation by the PLC as to which
screen is currently open
W
R
Data mailbox
Downloading of data records with
synchronization
R/W
R/W
Date/Time
Transfer of date and time from the
operating unit to the PLC
W
R
Date/Time PLC
Transfer of date and time from the
PLC to the operating unit.
R
W
Coordination
Operating unit status polled by the
PLC program
W
R
Trend request
Configured trends with “Triggering
via bit” or configured history trends
W
R
Trend transfer 1
Configured trends with “Triggering
via bit” or configured history trends
R/W
R/W
Trend transfer area 2
Configured history trend with “switch
buffer”
R/W
R/W
LED assignment
LED triggered by the PLC
R
W
Operating unit
acknowledgement
Message from the operating unit to
the PLC indicating an alarm message has been acknowledged
W
R
PLC
acknowledgement
Alarm message acknowledgement
from the PLC
R
W
Alarm messages
Bit reporting process
arrival and departure of alarm messages
R
W
The user data areas and their associated area pointers are explained in the
following chapters.
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6.2
User Data Area, User Version
Usage
When starting up the operating unit, it is possible to check whether the operating
unit is connected to the correct PLC. This is important when several operating
units are used.
To do this, the operating unit compares a value stored in the PLC with the value
defined in the configuration. In this way, the compatibility of the configuration data
with the PLC program is ensured. If there is a mismatch, a system message
appears on the operating unit and the runtime configuration is terminated.
In order to use this user data area, set up the following during the configuration:
S
Specify the configuration version – value between 1 and 255.
ProTool: System → Settings
S
Data address of the value for the version stored in the PLC:
ProTool: Insert → Area Pointers, available types: User version
6.3
User Data Area, Job Mailbox
Description
The job mailbox can be used to send PLC jobs to the operating unit, thus initiating
actions on the operating unit. These functions include:
S
displaying screens
S
setting date and time
The job mailbox is set up under Area Pointer and has a length of four data words.
The first word of the job mailbox contains the job number. Depending on the PLC
job in question, up to three parameters can then be specified.
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Word
n+0
0
Job no.
n+1
Parameter 1
n+2
Parameter 2
n+3
Parameter 3
Figure 6-1
Structure of the user data area, job mailbox
If the first word of the job mailbox is not equal to zero, the operating unit analyzes
the PLC job. The operating unit then sets this data word to zero again. For this
reason, the parameters must be entered in the job mailbox first and then the job
number.
The possible PLC jobs, including job number and parameters, are provided in the
“ProTool Online Help” and the Appendix, Part B.
6.4
User Data Areas, Event and Alarm Messages and
Acknowledgement
Definition
Messages consist of a static text and/or tags. The text and tags can be defined by
the user.
Messages are subdivided into event messages and alarm messages. The
programmer defines the event message and alarm message.
Event Messages
An event message indicates a status, e.g.
S
Motor switched on
S
PLC in manual mode
Alarm messages
An alarm message indicates an operational fault, e.g.
S
Valve not opening
S
Motor temperature too high
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Acknowledgement
Since alarm messages indicate an abnormal operational status, they must be
acknowledged. They can be acknowledged either by
S
operator input on the operating unit
S
setting a bit in the PLC acknowledgement area.
Triggering messages
A message is triggered by setting a bit in one of the message areas on the PLC.
The location of the message areas is defined by means of the configuration
software. The corresponding area must also be set up in the PLC.
As soon as the bit in the PLC event/alarm message area has been set and that
area has been transferred to the operating unit, the operating unit detects that the
relevant message has “arrived”.
Conversely, when the same bit is reset on the PLC by the operating unit, the
message is registered as having “departed”.
Message areas
Table 6-4 indicates the number of message areas for event and alarm messages,
for alarm acknowledgement OP (operating unit → PLC) and for alarm
acknowledgement PLC (PLC → operating unit) and the number of words for the
various operating units.
Table 6-4
Division of message areas
Operating unit
Event message area, Alarm message area
OP acknowledgement area, PLC acknowledgement area
Number of
Words in data
Words,
data areas, ma- area, maximum total
ximum
Panel PC
8
125
250
4000
Standard PC
8
125
250
4000
MP 370
8
125
250
4000
MP 270, MP 270B
8
125
250
4000
TP 270, OP 270
8
125
250
4000
TP 170B, OP 170B
8
125
125
2000
TP 170A1
8
63
63
1000
1
6-6
Messages,
total
Only event messages possible.
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Assignment of message bit and message number
A message can be assigned to each bit in the configured message area. The bits
are assigned to the message numbers in ascending order.
Example:
The following event message area has been configured in the PLC:
N 7
Element 8
Length 5 (in words)
Figure 6-2 illustrates the assignment of all 80 (5 x 16) message numbers to the
individual bit numbers in the PLC event message area. The assignment is
performed automatically on the operating unit.
N 7:8
15
16
0
1
N 7:12
80
65
Message number
Figure 6-2
Assignment of message bit and message number
User Data Area, Acknowledgement
If the PLC should be informed of an alarm message acknowledgement on the
operating unit or the acknowledgement should be initiated on the PLC itself, the
relevant acknowledgement areas must also be set up in the PLC. These
acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the ProTool project under Area
Pointers.
S
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC:
This area is used to inform the PLC when an alarm message has been
acknowledged by means of operator input on the operating unit. The “Alarm
Ack. OP” area pointer must be created or configured for this.
S
Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit:
This area is used when an alarm message is acknowledged by the PLC. In this
case, the area pointer “PLC acknowledgement” must be set.
These acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the configuration under
Area Pointers.
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Figure 6-3 illustrates a schematic diagram of the of the individual alarm message
and acknowledgement areas. The acknowledgement sequences are shown in
Figures 6-5 and 6-6.
Operating unit
PLC
Alarm messages area
ACK
Internal processing /
link
Acknowledgement area
PLC → Operating unit
Acknowledgement area
Operating unit → PLC
Figure 6-3
Alarm message and acknowledgement areas
Assignment of acknowledgement bit to message number
Each alarm message is assigned a message number. The message number is
assigned the same bit number in the alarm messages area as that assigned in the
acknowledgement area. Under normal circumstances, the acknowledgement area
is the same length as the associated alarm messages area.
If the length of an acknowledgement area is not equal to the overall length of the
associated alarm messages area, and there are succeeding alarm messages and
acknowledgement areas, the following assignment applies:
Alarm messages area 1
Alarm message no. 1
Bit 15
0
16
1
.............
.............
32
17
.............
48
33
Alarm messages area 2
Bit 15
64
80
Alarm message no. 49
0
.............
49
.............
65
Figure 6-4
6-8
Acknowledgement area 1
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 1
Bit 15
0
16
1
.............
.............
32
17
Acknowledgement area 2
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 49
0
Bit 15
.............
64
49
.............
80
65
Assignment of acknowledgement bit and message number
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Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
A bit set in this area by the PLC initiates the acknowledgement of the
corresponding alarm message in the operating unit, thus fulfilling the same function
as pressing the ACK button. Reset the bit before setting the bit in the alarm
message area again. Figure 6-5 illustrates the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
S
must follow on immediately from the associated alarm messages area,
S
must have precisely the same polling time and
S
may not be any longer than the associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages area
Acknowledgement area
PLC → Operating Unit
Acknowledgement
via PLC
Figure 6-5
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
When a bit is set in the alarm message area, the operating unit resets the
associated bit in the acknowledgement area. As a result of processing by the
operating unit, the two processes indicate a slight difference with regard to time. If
the alarm message is acknowledged on the operating unit, the bit in the
acknowledgement area is set. In this way, the PLC can detect that the alarm
message has been acknowledged. Figure 6-6 illustrates the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC must be no longer than the
associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages area
Acknowledgement area
Operating Unit → PLC
Acknowledgement
via operating unit
Figure 6-6
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
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Acknowledgement area size
The acknowledgement areas PLC → Operating Unit and Operating Unit → PLC
must not be any longer than the associated alarm message areas. The
acknowledgement area, however, be smaller if acknowledgement by the PLC is
not required for all alarm messages. This is also valid when the acknowledgement
need not be detected in the PLC for all alarm messages. Figure 6-7 illustrates such
a case.
Alarm messages area
Alarm messages
that can be
Bit 0
acknowledged
Bit n
Alarm messages
that cannot be
acknowledged
Figure 6-7
Reduced-size
alarm messages acknowledgement area
Bit 0
Bit n
Bit m
Reduced-size acknowledgement area
Note
Place important alarm messages in the alarm messages area starting at Bit 0 in
ascending order.
6.5
User Data Area, Screen Number
Application
The operating units store information concerning the screen currently open on the
unit in the screen number user data area.
This enables the transfer of data regarding the current operating unit display
content to the PLC which, in turn, can trigger certain reactions; e.g. call in a
different screen.
Requirements
If the screen number area should be used, it must be specified in the ProTool
project as an Area Pointer. It can only be stored in one PLC and only once.
The screen number area is downloaded to the PLC spontaneously, i.e. the transfer
is always initiated when a change is selected on the operating unit. Therefore, it is
not necessary to configure an acquisition cycle.
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Structure
The screen number area is a data area with a fixed length of 5 data words.
The structure of the screen number area in the PLC memory is illustrated below.
1st Word
15
8 7
Current screen type
2nd Word
Current screen number
3rd Word
Reserved
4th Word
Current field number
5th Word
Reserved
0
Entry
6.6
Assignment
Current screen type
1 for basic screen or
4 for fixed window
Current screen number
1 to 65535
Current field number
1 to 65535
User Data Area, Date/Time
Transferring date and time
Transfer of date and time from the operating unit to the PLC can be triggered by
PLC job 41. PLC job 41 writes the date and time to the data area Date/Time where
they can be analyzed by the PLC program. Figure 6-8 illustrates the structure of
the data area. All data is in BCD format.
DL
Minute (0–59)
Second (0–59)
n+2
n+3
0
Hour (0–23)
Reserved
Reserved
Weekday (1–7, 1=Sun)
n+4
Day (1–31)
Month (1–12)
n+5
Year (80–99/0–29)
Reserved
Figure 6-8
Time
n+1
8 7
Reserved
Date
DW 15
n+0
DR
Structure of data area Time and Date
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Note
When entering data in the year data area, please note that the values 80–99
represent 1980 to 1999 and 0–29 the years 2000 to 2029.
6.7
User Data Area, Date/Time PLC
Transfer of date and time to the operating unit
The downloading of date and time to the operating unit is generally useful when the
PLC is master for time.
The TP 170A operating unit represents a special case here:
Synchronization with the PLC system time is necessary when a Single message
display screen object is to be inserted in a ProTool screen. The Single
message display screen object is the only TP 170A screen object which has
access to the unit’s system time. This restriction only applies to the TP 170A.
DATE_AND_TIME format (BCD coded)
DL
DW
15
DR
8 7
0
n+0
Year (80–99/0–29)
Month (1–12)
n+1
Day (1–31)
Hour (0–23)
n+2
Minute (0–59)
n+3
Reserved
Figure 6-9
Second (0–59)
Reserved
Weekday (1–7, 1=Sun)
Structure of data area Date/Time in DATE_AND_TIME format
Note
When entering data in the year data area, please note that the values 80–99
represent 1980 to 1999 and 0–29 the years 2000 to 2029.
The PLC writes cyclically to the data area, whereby the operating unit reads and
synchronizes (refer to the ProTool User’s Guide).
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Note
In the configuration, do not select too small an acquisition cycle for the Date/Time
area pointer because this affects the operating unit performance.
Recommendation: Acquisition cycle of 1 minute, if permitted by the process.
6.8
User Data Area, Coordination
The coordination user data area is two data words long. It serves to realize the
following functions:
S
Detection of operating unit startup by the PLC program,
S
Detection of the current operating unit operating mode by the PLC program,
S
Detection by the PLC program that the operating unit is ready to communicate.
Note
Each time the coordination area is updated by the operating unit, the entire
coordination area is written.
Therefore, the PLC program must not execute any modifications in the
coordination area.
Bit assignment in coordination area
1. Word
High Byte
15
– – – – – –
8
– –
Low Byte
7
2 1 0
– – – – – X X X
Startup bit
– = Reserved
X = Assigned
Figure 6-10
Operating mode
Life bit
Significance of the bits in the coordination area
Startup bit
The startup bit is set to 0 for a short time during the start-up routine by the
operating unit. After the startup routine has been completed, the bit is set
permanently to 1.
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Operating mode
As soon as the operating unit has been switched offline by the operator, the
operating mode bit is set to 1. When the operating unit is working in normal
operation, the operating mode bit is set to 0. The PLC program can be used to poll
this bit and thus establish the current operating mode of the operating unit.
Life bit
The life bit is inverted by the operating unit at intervals of approx. one second. The
PLC program can be used to poll this bit to check whether connection to the
operating unit still exists.
6.9
User Data Areas, Trend Request and Trend Transfer
Trends
A trend is the graphical representation of a value from the PLC. Reading of the
value can be time-triggered or bit-triggered, depending on the configuration.
Time-triggered trends
The operating unit reads the trend values cyclically according to the cycle interval
defined in the configuration. Time-triggered trends are suitable for continuous
progressions such as the operating temperature of a motor.
Bit-triggered trends
By setting a trigger bit in the trend transfer area pointer, the operating unit reads in
either a trend value or the entire trend buffer. This is specified in the configuration.
Bit-triggered trends are normally used to display values of an area subject to rapid
variation. An example of this is the injection pressure for plastic moldings.
In order to be able to activate bit-triggered trends, corresponding data areas have
to be specified in the ProTool project (under Area Pointers) and set up on the PLC.
The operating unit and the PLC communicate with one another via those areas.
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The following areas are available for trends:
S
Trend request area
S
Trend transfer area 1
S
Trend transfer area 2 (required with switch buffer only)
Assign a trend to a bit in the configuration. This ensures the bit assignment is
unique for all areas.
Switch buffer
The switch buffer is a second buffer for the same trend and can be set up during
the configuration.
While the operating unit reads the value from Buffer 1, the PLC writes it in Buffer 2.
If the operating unit reads from Buffer 2, the PLC writes to Buffer 1. This prevents
the trend value being overwritten by the PLC when being read by the operating
unit.
Partitioning of the area pointers
The trend request and trend transfer 1 and 2 area pointers can be divided into
separate data areas with a predefined maximum number and length (refer to
Table 6-5).
Table 6-5
Partitioning of the area pointer
Data area
Trend request
Trend transfer
1
2
Number of data areas, maximum
8
8
8
Words in data area, total
8
8
8
Trend request area
If a screen with one or more trends is opened on the operating unit, the unit sets
the corresponding bits in the trend request area. After deselection of the screen,
the operating unit resets the corresponding bits in the trend request area.
The trend request area can be used by the PLC to ascertain which trend is
currently being displayed on the operating unit. Trends can also be triggered
without analysis of the trend request area.
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Trend transfer area 1
This area serves for triggering trends. In the PLC program, set the bit assigned to
the trend in the trend transfer area and the trend communication bit. The operating
unit detects triggering and reads in either a trend value or the entire buffer. It then
resets resets the trend bit and the trend communication bit.
Trend transfer area(s)
Bit number
15 14 13 12 11 10 9
8 7
6
5 4
3
2
1
0
1st Word
2nd Word
Trend communication bit
The trend transfer area must not be altered by the PLC program until the trend
communication bit has been reset.
Trend transfer area 2
Trend transfer area 2 is necessary for trends that are configured with a switch
buffer. Its layout is precisely the same as that of trend transfer area 1.
6.10
User Data Area, LED Assignment
Application
The Operator Panel (OP), Multi Panel (MP) and Panel PC have function keys with
Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) integrated in them. These LEDs can be controlled
from the PLC. This means, for example, that in specific situations, it is possible to
indicate to the operator which key should be pressed by switching on an LED.
Requirements
In order to control LEDs, corresponding data areas, so-called LED assignments,
must be set up in the PLC and defined in the configuration as Area Pointers.
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Partitioning of the area pointer
The LED assignment area pointer can be divided into separate data areas, as
illustrated in the following table.
Table 6-6
Partitioning of the LED assignment area pointer
Operating unit
Number of data areas,
maximum
Words in data area,
total
Panel PC
8
16
MP 370
8
16
MP 270, MP 270B
8
16
OP 270
8
16
OP 170B
8
16
Note
The area pointer in question can no longer be selected in the Insert new area
pointer window when the maximum number has been reached. Area pointers of
the same type appear gray.
LED assignment
The assignment of the individual LEDs to the bits in the data areas is defined when
the function keys are configured. This involves specifying a bit number within the
assignment area for each LED.
The bit number (n) identifies the first of two successive bits which control the
following LED states:
Table 6-7
LED states
Bit n + 1
Bit n
0
0
Off
0
1
Flashes
1
0
Flashes
1
1
Permanently on
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LED function
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User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley PLCs
6.11
Recipes
Description
During the transfer of data records between the operating unit and PLC, both
communication peers alternately access common communication areas in the
PLC. The function and structure of the recipe-specific communication area (“data
mailbox”) and the mechanisms involved in synchronized transfer of data records
are the subject of this chapter.
Information on setting up the data mailbox in ProTool is provided in the online help.
Downloading methods
There are two methods of downloading data records between operating unit and
PLC:
S
Asynchronous transfer (Page 6-19)
S
Synchronized transfer using the data mailbox (Page 6-20)
Data records are always transferred directly, i.e. the tag values are read or written
directly from or to the address configured for the tag without being stored
intermediately.
Trigger downloading of data records
There are three methods of triggering the transfer of data:
S
By operator input on the recipe display (Page 6-21)
S
By PLC jobs (Page 6-22)
S
By activating configured functions (Page 6-23)
If transfer of data records is initiated by a configured function or a PLC job, the
recipe display on the operating unit remains fully functional as the data records are
transferred in the background.
Simultaneous processing of multiple transfer jobs is not possible, however. In such
cases, the operating unit returns a system message refusing additional transfer
requests.
A list of the most important system messages together with notes on the possible
causes of the associated errors and remedies for them is provided in Appendix,
Part A.
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User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley PLCs
6.11.1
Asynchronous data transfer
Purpose
In the case of asynchronous transfer of data records between operating unit and
PLC, there is no coordination of the communication areas commonly used. For
this reason, there is no need to set up a data mailbox during the configuration
process.
Application
The asynchronous transfer of data records is applicable, for example, when the
S
uncontrolled overwriting of data by the communication peers can be reliably
prevented by the system,
S
the PLC does not require any details of the recipe and data record numbers, or
S
transfer of data records is initiated by operator input on the operating unit.
Read values
On triggering a read transfer, the values are read from the PLC addresses and
downloaded to the operating unit.
S
Transfer initiated by operator input on recipe display:
Data is uploaded to the operating unit. There it can be processed, e.g. values
can be modified and the changes saved.
S
Transfer initiated by function or PLC job:
The data is saved directly to the storage medium.
Write values
On triggering a write transfer, the values are written to the PLC addresses.
S
Transfer initiated by operator input on recipe display:
The current values are written to the PLC.
S
Transfer initiated by function or PLC job:
The values on the storage medium are written to the PLC.
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User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley PLCs
6.11.2
Synchronous data transfer
Purpose
In the case of synchronous data transfer, both the communication peers set status
bits in the commonly used data mailbox. In this way, the PLC program can prevent
uncontrolled overwriting of each other’s data by the two units.
Application
The synchronous transfer of data records is applicable, for example, when
S
the PLC is the “active partner” for transfer of data records,
S
details of the recipe and data record numbers are to be analyzed on the PLC,
or
S
transfer of data records is initiated by PLC job.
Requirements
In order to synchronize the transfer of data records between the operating unit and
PLC, the following conditions must be fulfilled in the configuration:
S
the data mailbox must have been set up in System → Area Pointer;
S
the recipe properties must specify the PLC with which the operating unit has to
synchronize transfer of data records.
The PLC is specified in the recipe editor in Properties → Transfer.
Detailed information on this is provided in ProTool Configuring Windows-based
Systems User Guide.
6.11.3
Data mailbox for synchronized data transfer
Structure
The data mailbox has a defined length of 5 words. Its structure is as follows:
15
Current recipe number (1 – 999)
2nd Word
Current data record number (0 – 65,535)
3rd Word
4th Word
5th Word
6-20
0
1st Word
Reserved
Status (0, 2, 4, 12)
Reserved
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User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley PLCs
Status word
The status word (Word 4) can assume the following values:
Value
6.11.4
Explanation
Decimal
Binary
0
0000 0000
Transfer permitted, data mailbox is accessible
2
0000 0010
Transfer in progress
4
0000 0100
Transfer completed without errors
12
0000 1100
Errors occurred during transfer
Synchronization process
Read from the PLC by operating the recipe view
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe number to be read
and the status “Transfer in progress” in the data mailbox
and sets the data record number to zero.
3
The operating unit reads the values from the PLC and
displays them on the recipe display.
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In the case of recipes with synchronous tags, the values
from the are also written in the tags.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
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User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley PLCs
Write in the PLC by operating the recipe view
Step
1
Action
Check status word = 0?
Yes
No
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number to be written and the status “Transfer in progress”
in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit writes the current values to the PLC.
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In the case of recipes with synchronized tags, the
modified values between the recipe views and tags are
compared and then written to the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Read from the PLC by PLC job “PLC → DAT” (no. 69)
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the job and the status “Transfer in
progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit reads the value from the PLC and
saves the value in the data record specified by the job.
4
S If the option “Overwrite” has been specified for the job,
No
Operation
cancelled and no
message returned
existing data records are overwritten without prior
warning.
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer
completed”.
S If “Do not overwrite” was specified in the job and the
data record already exists, the operating unit
terminates the process and enters 0000 1100 in the
status word of the data mailbox.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Details of the structure of the PLC job are provided on Page 6-25.
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User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley PLCs
Write in the PLC by PLC job “DAT → PLC” (no. 70)
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
No
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the job and the status “Transfer in
progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit retrieves the value from the data
record specified in the job from the data medium and
writes that value in the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
Operation
cancelled and no
message returned
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Details of the structure of the PLC job are provided on Page 6-25.
Read from the PLC by configured function
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the function and the status “Transfer
in progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit reads the data from the PLC and
saves it to the data record specified by the function.
4
S If the option “Overwrite” has been specified for the
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
function, existing data records are overwritten without
prior warning.
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer
completed”.
S If “Do not overwrite” was specified in the job and the
data record already exists, the operating unit
terminates the process and enters 0000 1100 in the
status word of the data mailbox.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
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User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley PLCs
Write in the PLC by configured function
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the function and the status “Transfer
in progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit retrieves the value from the data
record specified in the function from the data medium and
writes that value in the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Note
For reasons of data consistency, analysis of the recipe and data record number on
the PLC cannot be performed until the status in the data mailbox is set to
“Transfer completed” or “Errors occurred during transfer”.
Possible causes of errors
If the downloading of data records is terminated due to errors, it may be due to one
of the following reasons:
S
Tag address not set up on PLC
S
Overwriting of data records not possible
S
Recipe number not available
S
Data record number not available
A list of the most important system messages together with notes on the possible
causes of the associated errors and remedies for them is provided in Appendix,
Part A.
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User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley PLCs
Response to error-based termination
The operating unit responds as follows when the downloading of data records is
terminated due to an error:
S
Transfer initiated by operator input in recipe view
Indication on the status bar on the recipe display and issue of system
messages.
S
Transfer initiated by function
System messages issued.
S
Transfer initiated by PLC job
No feedback of information on operating unit
Regardless of the response of the operating unit, the status of the transfer can be
checked by reading the status word in the data mailbox.
6.11.5
PLC jobs with recipes
Purpose
The transfer of data records between operating unit and PLC can be triggered by
the PLC program. This requires no operator input on the operating unit.
The two PLC jobs No. 69 and No. 70 can be used for this.
No. 69: Read data record from PLC (“PLC → DAT”)
PLC Job No. 69 downloads data records from the PLC to the operating unit. The
structure of this PLC job is as follows:
Word 1
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
69
Word 2
Recipe number (1 – 999)
Word 3
Data record number (1 – 65,535)
Word 4
Do not overwrite existing data record: 0
Overwrite existing data record: 1
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User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley PLCs
No. 70: Write data record to PLC (“DAT → PLC”)
PLC Job No. 70 downloads data records from the operating unit to the PLC. The
structure of this PLC job is as follows:
Word 1
6-26
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
70
Word 2
Recipe number (1 – 999)
Word 3
Data record number (1 – 65,535)
Word 4
—
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
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Part IV
Connection to
GE Fanuc
Automation PLCs
Communication Management for
GE Fanuc PLCs
7
User Data Areas for
GE Fanuc PLCs
8
OChapter
Chapter
AChapter
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Communication Management for
GE Fanuc PLCs
7
This chapter describes the communication between operating unit and GE Fanuc
Automation PLCs from the 90-30, 90-70 and 90-Micro series.
General information
The GE Fanuc Automation PLCs consist of the 90-70, 90-30 and 90 Micro series.
In the subsequent section, these series are referred to under the general term GE
Fanuc PLC 90.
The connection, in the case of these PLCs, is established by the following internal
PLC protocol:
S
SNP/SNPX – multi-point connection
Operating units
The following operating units can be connected to a GE Fanuc PLC 90 controller:
S
Panel PC
S
Standard PC
S
MP 370
S
MP 270, MP 270B
S
TP 270, OP 270
S
TP 170B, OP 170B
S
TP 170A
Installation
The driver necessary for the connection to the GE Fanuc PLC 90 controllers is
contained in the configuration software and is installed automatically.
The connection between the operating unit and the PLC is basically restricted to
defining the interface parameters. Special function blocks for connection to the
PLC are not required.
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Communication Management for GE Fanuc PLCs
Connection
The connection between the operating unit and GE Fanuc PLC 90 controllers is
basically restricted to defining the interface parameters and bus address. Special
function blocks for connection to the PLC are not required.
The operating unit must be connected to the appropriate PLC interface (refer to the
documentation supplied with the PLC).
Master
Slave
Slave
Operating unit
PLC
PLC
SNP/X
Figure 7-1
Connection between the operating unit and PLC
The following connection cables are available for connection of the operating unit
to the PLC:
Table 7-1
Applicable connection cables (refer to Appendix, Part C Interface Assignment)
Interface
9-pin
6-pin
15-pin
8-pin
RS 232, 9-pin
For Adapter 2
Western connector 2
–
RJ 45_2
RS 232, 15-pin
For Adapter 1
Western connector 1
–
RJ 45_1
RS 232, with cable –
to adapter
–
Multi-point
cable 2
–
RS 422, 9-pin
–
Multi-point
cable 1
–
–
’_’ Length code (refer to Catalog ST 80)
Caution
Only valid for MP 270.
After disconnecting and then reconnecting a plug, it is possible that no connection
is re-established to the operating unit. The connection is only established after the
operating unit has been restarted. This condition only occurs in the case of the
MP 270 and a direct connection via the RS 422 (IF1B).
Details of which interface to use on the operating unit are provided in the relevant
equipment manual.
7-2
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7.1
Basic Methods of Functioning
PLC
Tags
Process values
User data
areas
Application
program
Display/Operation
Communication
Messages
Operating unit
User
guidance
Coordination
area
Figure 7-2
Communication structure
Task of the tags
The general exchange of data between the PLC and operating unit is performed by
means of the process values. To do this, tags must be specified in the
configuration which point to an address in the PLC. The operating unit reads the
value from the specified address and displays it. In the same way, the operator can
enter a value on the operating unit, which is then written to the address in the PLC.
User data areas
User data areas are used for the exchange of special data and must only be set up
when the data concerned is used.
User data area are required, for example, for:
S
Trends
S
PLC jobs
S
Controlling LEDs
S
Life bit monitoring
A detailed description of the user data areas is provided in Chapter 8.
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Communication Management for GE Fanuc PLCs
7.2
Configuration in ProTool
When creating a new project, select the protocol required from the Project
Wizard " PLC Selection dialog box.
Set the protocol:
S
SNP/SNPX
Note
The settings on the operating unit must match with those on the PLC.
When starting up, ProTool must not be integrated in STEP 7; deactivate the menu
item Integration in STEP 7.
Select the Parameter ... button to define the protocol parameters. Define the
following parameters for the PLC:
Table 7-2
PLC parameters
Parameters
Explanation
Bus address
Set the PLC bus address here. 7 ASCII characters are permitted: 0–9, _
(underscore) and A–Z (capital letters).
CPU type
Set the CPU type of that used in the PLC. If the CPU type cannot be
selected, select the CPU type Free.
Interface
The operating unit interface to which the PLC is connected must be set
here.
–
PanelPC
COM 1 or COM 2
–
Standard PC
COM 1 to COM 4
–
MP 370
IF1A, IF2 or IF1B
–
MP 270, MP 270B
IF1A, IF2 or IF1B
–
TP 270, OP 270
IF1A, IF2 or IF1B
–
TP 170B, OP170B
IF1A, IF2 or IF1B
–
TP 170A
IF1A or IF1B
LongBreak
Set the time (in ms) to establish the connection to the individual PLCs.
Interface type
Set RS232 or RS422 according to the PLC.
Data bits
Set 8 here.
Parity
Set NONE , EVEN or UNEVEN.
Stop bits
Set 1 or 2 here.
Baud rate
Define the transmission rate between the operating unit and PLC here.
System setting: 9600 bit/s.
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LongBreak
It is recommended to retain the default setting of 50 ms. If connection problems should
occur despite identical interface parameters in the PLC and operating unit, increase this
value step by step.
Note
An increase in the LongBreak automatically causes an increase in the update time.
For subsequent changes to the parameters, select PLC in the project window and
then Properties " Parameter ....
7.3
Data Types
When configuring tags and area pointers, the data types listed in Table 7-3 are
available for use.
Table 7-3
Data types
Data type
Addressed by
Format
Analog IN
AI
Word, UInt, Int, DWord, DInt, Real
BCD-4, BCD-8
Analog OUT
AQ
Word, UInt, Int, DWord, DInt
BCD-4, BCD-8
Binary
M, T or G
Bit, Byte,
Word, UInt, Int, DWord, DInt
BCD-4, BCD-8
Digital Input
I
Bit, Word
Digital Output
Q
Bit, Word
Data Register (Integer)
R
Word, UInt, Int, DWord, DInt
BCD-4, BCD-8
Status
S, SA, SB, SC
Bit, Word
Program Registers
(90-70 CPU only)
P
Word, UInt, Int, DWord, DInt
BCD-4, BCD-8
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Communication Management for GE Fanuc PLCs
Note
Valid for the Program Register data type:
The password for access to Program Register (addressing: P) is ”P_TASK”.
This password cannot be changed by the user because it is defined in the driver.
The password is contained in the protocol for access to Program Register.
Therefore, the LM-90 project, to which access is required, must have the name
P_TASK.
Representation in ProTool
In ProTool the data format UNSIGNED INT is abbreviated as UIN, UNSIGNED
LONG as ULONG, SIGNED INT as INT and SIGNED LONG as LONG.
7.4
Optimization
Acquisition cycle and update time
The acquisition cycles defined in the configuration software for the area pointers
and the acquisition cycles for the tags are major factors in respect of the real
update times which are achieved. The update time is the acquisition cycle plus
transmission time plus processing time.
In order to achieve optimum update times, the following points should be observed
during configuration:
S
When setting up the individual data areas, make them as large as necessary
but as small as possible.
S
Define data areas that belong together as contiguous areas. The effective
update time is improved by setting one single large area rather than several
smaller areas.
S
Setting acquisition cycles which are too short unnecessarily impairs overall
performance. Set the acquisition cycle to correspond to the modification time of
the process values. The rate of change of temperature of a furnace, for
example, is considerably slower than the acceleration curve of an electric
motor.
Guideline value for the acquisition cycle: Approx. 1 second.
S
7-6
If necessary, dispense with cyclic transmission of user data areas (acquisition
cycle = 0) in order to improve the update time. Instead, use PLC jobs to transfer
the user data areas at random times.
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Communication Management for GE Fanuc PLCs
S
Store the tags for a message or a screen in a contiguous data area.
S
In order that changes on the PLC are reliably detected by the operating unit,
they must occur during the actual acquisition cycle at least.
S
Set the baud rate to the highest possible value.
Screens
The real screen updating rate which can be achieved is dependent on the type and
quantity of data to be displayed.
In order to achieve short updating times, ensure that short acquisition cycles are
only defined in the configuration for those objects which actually need to be
updated quickly.
Trends
If, in the case of bit-triggered trends, the communication bit is set in the trend
transfer area, the operating unit always updates all the trends whose bit is set in
that area. It resets the bits afterwards.
The communication bit in the PLC program can only be set again after all the bits
have been reset by the operating unit.
PLC jobs
If large numbers of PLC jobs are sent to the operating unit in quick succession,
communication between the operating unit and PLC may become overloaded.
If the operating unit enters the value 0 in the first data word of the job mailbox, it
signifies that the operating unit has accepted the job. It then processes the job, for
which it requires a certain amount of time. If a new PLC job is then immediately
entered in the job mailbox, it may take some time before the operating unit
executes the next PLC job. The next PLC job is only accepted when sufficient
computer performance is available.
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User Data Areas for GE Fanuc PLCs
8
Overview
User data areas are used for data exchange between the PLC and operating unit.
The user data areas are written to and read by the operating unit and the
application program alternately during the process of communication. By analyzing
the data stored there, the PLC and operating unit reciprocally initiate predefined
actions.
This chapter describes the function, layout and special features of the various user
data areas.
8.1
User Data Areas Available
Definition
The user data areas can be set up in various data areas in the PLC (Data Register
(R), Binary (M)).
Set up the user data areas both in the ProTool project and in the PLC.
The user data areas can be set up and modified in the ProTool project using the
menu items Insert → Area Pointers.
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User Data Areas for GE Fanuc PLCs
Function range
The user data areas available are dependent on the operating unit used. The
tables 8-1 and 8-2 provide an overview of the functional range of the individual
operating units.
Table 8-1
User data areas available, Part 1
User data area
Panel PC
Standard PC
MP 370
User version
x
x
x
Job mailbox
x
x
x
Event messages
x
x
x
Screen number
x
x
x
Data mailbox
x
x
x
Date/Time
x
x
x
Date/Time PLC
x
x
x
Coordination
x
x
x
Trend request
x
x
x
Trend transfer 1, 2
x
x
x
1
x
–
x
OP/PLC acknowledgement
x
x
x
Alarm messages
x
x
x
LED assignment
1
Only possible using operating units with keyboard.
Table 8-2
User data areas available, Part 2
User data area
MP 270
MP 270B
TP 270
OP 270
TP 170B
OP 170B
TP 170A
User version
x
x
x
–
Job mailbox
x
x
x
–
Event messages
x
x
x
x
Screen number
x
x
x
–
Data mailbox
x
x
x
–
Date/Time
x
x
x
–
Date/Time PLC
x
x
x
x
Coordination
x
x
x
–
Trend request
x
x
–
–
Trend transfer 1, 2
x
x
–
–
LED assignment 1
x
x
x
–
OP/PLC acknowledgement
x
x
x
–
Alarm messages
x
x
x
–
1
8-2
Only possible using operating units with keyboard.
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User Data Areas for GE Fanuc PLCs
Table 8-3 illustrates the way in which the PLC and operating unit access the
individual user data areas – Read (R) or Write (W).
Table 8-3
Application of the user data areas
User data area
Necessary for
Operating
unit
PLC
User version
ProTool Runtime checks whether the
ProTool project version and the
project in the PLC are consistent.
R
W
Job mailbox
Triggering of functions on the operating unit by PLC program
R/W
R/W
Event messages
Bit reporting process
arrival and departure of event messages
R
W
Screen number
Evaluation by the PLC as to which
screen is currently open
W
R
Data mailbox
Downloading of data records with
synchronization
R/W
R/W
Date/Time
Transfer of date and time from the
operating unit to the PLC
W
R
Date/Time PLC
Transfer of date and time from the
PLC to the operating unit.
R
W
Coordination
Operating unit status polled by the
PLC program
W
R
Trend request
Configured trends with “Triggering
via bit” or configured history trends
W
R
Trend transfer 1
Configured trends with “Triggering
via bit” or configured history trends
R/W
R/W
Trend transfer area 2
Configured history trend with “switch
buffer”
R/W
R/W
LED assignment
LED triggered by the PLC
R
W
Operating unit
acknowledgement
Message from the operating unit to
the PLC indicating an alarm message has been acknowledged
W
R
PLC
acknowledgement
Alarm message acknowledgement
from the PLC
R
W
Alarm messages
Bit reporting process
arrival and departure of alarm messages
R
W
The user data areas and their associated area pointers are explained in the
following chapters.
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User Data Areas for GE Fanuc PLCs
8.2
User Data Area, User Version
Usage
When starting up the operating unit, it is possible to check whether the operating
unit is connected to the correct PLC. This is important when several operating
units are used.
To do this, the operating unit compares a value stored in the PLC with the value
defined in the configuration. In this way, the compatibility of the configuration data
with the PLC program is ensured. If there is a mismatch, a system message
appears on the operating unit and the runtime configuration is terminated.
In order to use this user data area, set up the following during the configuration:
S
Specify the configuration version – value between 1 and 255.
ProTool: System → Settings
S
Data address of the value for the version stored in the PLC:
ProTool: Insert → Area Pointers, available types: User version
8.3
User Data Area, Job Mailbox
Description
The job mailbox can be used to send PLC jobs to the operating unit, thus initiating
actions on the operating unit. These functions include:
S
displaying screens
S
setting date and time
The job mailbox is set up under Area Pointer and has a length of four data words.
The first word of the job mailbox contains the job number. Depending on the PLC
job in question, up to three parameters can then be specified.
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Word
n+0
Left byte
Right byte
0
Job no.
n+1
Parameter 1
n+2
Parameter 2
n+3
Parameter 3
Figure 8-1
Structure of the user data area, job mailbox
If the first word of the job mailbox is not equal to zero, the operating unit analyzes
the PLC job. Afterwards, the unit sets this data word to zero again. For this reason,
the parameters must be entered in the job mailbox first and then the job number.
The possible PLC jobs, including job number and parameters, are provided in the
“ProTool Online Help” and the Appendix, Part B.
8.4
User Data Areas, Event and Alarm Messages and
Acknowledgement
Definition
Messages consist of a static text and/or tags. The text and tags can be defined by
the user.
Messages are subdivided into event messages and alarm messages. The
programmer defines the event message and alarm message.
Event Messages
An event message indicates a status, e.g.
S
Motor switched on
S
PLC in manual mode
Alarm messages
An alarm message indicates an operational fault, e.g.
S
Valve not opening
S
Motor temperature too high
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Acknowledgement
Since alarm messages indicate an abnormal operational status, they must be
acknowledged. They can be acknowledged either by
S
operator input on the operating unit
S
setting a bit in the PLC acknowledgement area.
Triggering messages
A message is triggered by setting a bit in one of the message areas on the PLC.
The location of the message areas is defined by means of the configuration
software. The corresponding area must also be set up in the PLC.
As soon as the bit in the PLC event/alarm message area has been set and that
area has been transferred to the operating unit, the operating unit detects that the
relevant message has “arrived”.
Conversely, when the same bit is reset on the PLC by the operating unit, the
message is registered as having “departed”.
Message areas
Table 8-4 indicates the number of message areas for event and alarm messages,
for alarm acknowledgement OP (operating unit → PLC) and for alarm
acknowledgement PLC (PLC → operating unit) and the number of words for the
various operating units.
Table 8-4
Division of message areas
Operating unit
Event message area, Alarm message area
Acknowledgement area OP, Acknowledgement area PLC
Number of
Words in data
data areas, ma- area,
ximum
maximum
Messages,
total
Panel PC
8
125
250
4000
Standard PC
8
125
250
4000
MP 370
8
125
250
4000
MP 270, MP 270B
8
125
250
4000
TP 270, OP 270
8
125
250
4000
TP 170B, OP 170B
8
125
125
2000
TP 170A1
8
63
63
1000
1
8-6
Words,
total
Only event messages possible.
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Assignment of message bit to message number
A message can be assigned to each bit in the configured message area. The bits
are assigned to the message numbers in ascending order.
Example:
The following event message area has been configured in the PLC:
R43
Address 43
Length 5 (in words)
Figure 8-2 illustrates the assignment of all 80 (5 x 16) message numbers to the
individual bit numbers in the PLC event message area. The assignment is
performed automatically on the operating unit.
16
Word 43 16
1
1
Word 47 80
65
Message number
Figure 8-2
Assignment of message bit and message number
User data areas, acknowledgement
If the PLC should be informed of an alarm message acknowledgement on the
operating unit or the acknowledgement should be initiated on the PLC itself, the
relevant acknowledgement areas must also be set up in the PLC. These
acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the ProTool project under Area
Pointers.
S
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC:
This area is used to inform the PLC when an alarm message has been
acknowledged by means of operator input on the operating unit. The “Alarm
Ack. OP” area pointer must be created or configured for this.
S
Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit:
This area is used when an alarm message is acknowledged by the PLC. In this
case, the area pointer “PLC acknowledgement” must be set.
These acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the configuration under
Area Pointers.
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Figure 8-3 illustrates a schematic diagram of the of the individual alarm message
and acknowledgement areas. The acknowledgement sequences are shown in
Figures 8-5 and 8-6.
Operating unit
PLC
Alarm messages area
ACK
Internal processing /
link
Acknowledgement area
PLC → Operating unit
Acknowledgement area
Operating unit → PLC
Figure 8-3
Alarm message and acknowledgement areas
Assignment of acknowledgement bit to message number
Each alarm message is assigned a message number. The message number is
assigned the same bit number in the alarm messages area as that assigned in the
acknowledgement area. Under normal circumstances, the acknowledgement area
is the same length as the associated alarm messages area.
If the length of an acknowledgement area is not equal to the overall length of the
associated alarm messages area, and there are succeeding alarm messages and
acknowledgement areas, the following assignment applies:
Alarm messages area 1
Alarm message no. 1
Bit 16
1
16
1
.............
.............
32
17
.............
48
33
Alarm messages area 2
Alarm message no. 49
1
Bit 16
.............
64
49
.............
80
65
Figure 8-4
8-8
Acknowledgement area 1
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 1
Bit 16
1
16
1
.............
.............
32
17
Acknowledgement area 2
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 49
1
Bit 16
.............
64
49
.............
80
65
Assignment of acknowledgement bit and message number
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Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
A bit set in this area by the PLC initiates the acknowledgement of the
corresponding alarm message in the operating unit, thus fulfilling the same function
as pressing the ACK button. Reset the bit before setting the bit in the alarm
message area again. Figure 8-5 illustrates the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area PLC→ Operating Unit
S
must follow on immediately from the associated alarm messages area,
S
must have precisely the same polling time and
S
may not be any longer than the associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages
area
Acknowledgement
area PLC →
Operating Unit
Figure 8-5
Acknowledgement
via PLC
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
When a bit is set in the alarm message area, the operating unit resets the
associated bit in the acknowledgement area. As a result of processing by the
operating unit, the two processes indicate a slight difference with regard to time. If
the alarm message is acknowledged on the operating unit, the bit in the
acknowledgement area is set. In this way, the PLC can detect that the alarm
message has been acknowledged. Figure 8-6 illustrates the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC must be no longer than the
associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages
area
Acknowledgement
area Operating
Unit → PLC
Figure 8-6
Acknowledgement
via operating unit
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
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Acknowledgement area size
The acknowledgement areas PLC → Operating Unit and Operating Unit → PLC
must not be any longer than the associated alarm message areas. The
acknowledgement area, however, be smaller if acknowledgement by the PLC is
not required for all alarm messages. This is also valid when the acknowledgement
need not be detected in the PLC for all alarm messages. Figure 8-7 illustrates such
a case.
Alarm messages area
Alarm messages
that can be
acknowledged
Figure 8-7
Bit 1
Bit 1
Bit n
Bit n
Alarm messages
that cannot be
acknowledged
Reduced-size
alarm messages acknowledgement area
Bit m
Reduced-size acknowledgement area
Note
Place important alarm messages in the alarm messages area starting at Bit 1 in
ascending order.
8.5
User Data Areas, Screen Numbers
Application
The operating units store information concerning the screen currently open on the
unit in the screen number user data area.
This enables the transfer of data regarding the current operating unit display
content to the PLC which, in turn, can trigger certain reactions; e.g. call in a
different screen.
Requirements
If the screen number area should be used, it must be specified in the ProTool
project as an Area Pointer. It can only be stored in one PLC and only once.
The screen number area is downloaded to the PLC spontaneously, i.e. the transfer
is always initiated when a change is selected on the operating unit. Therefore, it is
not necessary to configure an acquisition cycle.
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Structure
The screen number area is a data area with a fixed length of 5 words.
The structure of the screen number area in the PLC memory is illustrated below.
1st Word
16
9 8
Current screen type
2nd Word
Current screen number
3rd Word
Reserved
4th Word
Current field number
5th Word
Reserved
1
Entry
8.6
Assignment
Current screen type
1 for basic screen or
4 for fixed window
Current screen number
1 to 65535
Current field number
1 to 65535
User Data Area, Date/Time
Transferring date and time
Transfer of date and time from the operating unit to the PLC can be triggered by
PLC job 41. PLC job 41 writes the date and time to the data area Date/Time where
they can be analyzed by the PLC program. Figure 8-8 illustrates the structure of
the data area. All data is in BCD format.
Left byte
Minute (0–59)
Second (0–59)
n+2
n+3
1
Hour (0–23)
Reserved
Reserved
Weekday (1–7, 1=Sun)
n+4
Day (1–31)
Month (1–12)
n+5
Year (80–99/0–29)
Reserved
Figure 8-8
Time
n+1
9 8
Reserved
Date
DW 16
n+0
Right byte
Structure of data area Time and Date
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Note
When entering data in the year data area, please note that the values 80–99
represent 1980 to 1999 and 0–29 the years 2000 to 2029.
8.7
User Data Area, Date/Time PLC
Transfer of date and time to the operating unit
The downloading of date and time to the operating unit is generally useful when the
PLC is master for time.
The TP 170A operating unit represents a special case here:
Synchronization with the PLC system time is necessary when a Single message
display screen object is to be inserted in a ProTool screen. The Single
message display screen object is the only TP 170A screen object which has
access to the unit’s system time. This restriction only applies to the TP 170A.
DATE_AND_TIME format (BCD coded)
Left byte
DW
16
Right byte
9 8
1
n+0
Year (80–99/0–29)
Month (1–12)
n+1
Day (1–31)
Hour (0–23)
n+2
Minute (0–59)
n+3
Reserved
Figure 8-9
Second (0–59)
Reserved
Weekday (1–7, 1=Sun)
Structure of data area Date/Time in DATE_AND_TIME format
Note
When entering data in the year data area, please note that the values 80–99
represent 1980 to 1999 and 0–29 the years 2000 to 2029.
The PLC writes cyclically to the data area, whereby the operating unit reads and
synchronizes (refer to the ProTool User’s Guide).
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Note
In the configuration, do not select too small an acquisition cycle for the Date/Time
area pointer because this affects the operating unit performance.
Recommendation: Acquisition cycle of 1 minute, if permitted by the process.
8.8
User Data Area, Coordination
The coordination user data area is two words long. It serves to realize the following
functions:
S
Detection of operating unit startup by the PLC program,
S
Detection of the current operating unit operating mode by the PLC program,
S
Detection by the PLC program that the operating unit is ready to communicate.
Note
Each time the coordination area is updated by the operating unit, the entire
coordination area is written.
Therefore, the PLC program must not execute any modifications in the
coordination area.
Bit assignment in coordination area
Left byte
1st Word
16
– – –
–
– –
9
– –
8
– – –
Right byte
3 2 1
– – X X X
Startup bit
– = Reserved
X = Assigned
Figure 8-10
Operating mode
Life bit
Significance of the bits in the coordination area
Startup bit
The startup bit is set to 0 for a short time during the start-up routine by the
operating unit. After the startup routine has been completed, the bit is set
permanently to 1.
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Operating mode
As soon as the operating unit has been switched offline by the operator, the
operating mode bit is set to 1. When the operating unit is working in normal
operation, the operating mode bit is set to 0. The PLC program can be used to poll
this bit and thus establish the current operating mode of the operating unit.
Life bit
The life bit is inverted by the operating unit at intervals of approx. one second. The
PLC program can be used to poll this bit to check whether connection to the
operating unit still exists.
8.9
User Data Areas, Trend Request and Trend Transfer
Trends
A trend is the graphical representation of a value from the PLC. Reading of the
value can be time-triggered or bit-triggered, depending on the configuration.
Time-triggered trends
The operating unit reads the trend values cyclically according to the cycle interval
defined in the configuration. Time-triggered trends are suitable for continuous
progressions such as the operating temperature of a motor.
Bit-triggered trends
By setting a trigger bit in the trend transfer area pointer, the operating unit reads in
either a trend value or the entire trend buffer. This is specified in the configuration.
Bit-triggered trends are normally used to display values of an area subject to rapid
variation. An example of this is the injection pressure for plastic moldings.
In order to be able to activate bit-triggered trends, corresponding data areas have
to be specified in the ProTool project (under Area Pointers) and set up on the PLC.
The operating unit and the PLC communicate with one another via those areas.
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The following areas are available for trends:
S
Trend request area
S
Trend transfer area 1
S
Trend transfer area 2 (required with switch buffer only)
Assign a trend to a bit in the configuration. This ensures the bit assignment is
unique for all areas.
Switch buffer
The switch buffer is a second buffer for the same trend and can be set up during
the configuration.
While the operating unit reads the value from Buffer 1, the PLC writes it in Buffer 2.
If the operating unit reads from Buffer 2, the PLC writes to Buffer 1. This prevents
the trend value being overwritten by the PLC when being read by the operating
unit.
Partitioning of the area pointers
The trend request and trend transfer 1 and 2 area pointers can be divided into
separate data areas with a predefined maximum number and length (refer to
Table 8-5).
Table 8-5
Partitioning of the area pointer
Data area
Trend request
Trend transfer
1
2
Number of data areas, maximum
8
8
8
Words in data area, total
8
8
8
Trend request area
If a screen with one or more trends is opened on the operating unit, the unit sets
the corresponding bits in the trend request area. After deselection of the screen,
the operating unit resets the corresponding bits in the trend request area.
The trend request area can be used by the PLC to ascertain which trend is
currently being displayed on the operating unit. Trends can also be triggered
without analysis of the trend request area.
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Trend transfer area 1
This area serves for triggering trends. In the PLC program, set the bit assigned to
the trend in the trend transfer area and the trend communication bit. The operating
unit detects triggering and reads in either a trend value or the entire buffer. It then
resets resets the trend bit and the trend communication bit.
Trend transfer area(s)
Bit number
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8
7
6 5
4
3
2
1
1st Word
2nd Word
Trend communication bit
The trend transfer area must not be altered by the PLC program until the trend
communication bit has been reset.
Trend transfer area 2
Trend transfer area 2 is necessary for trends that are configured with a switch
buffer. Its layout is precisely the same as that of trend transfer area 1.
8.10
User Data Area, LED Assignment
Application
The Operator Panel (OP), Multi Panel (MP) and Panel PC have function keys with
Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) integrated in them. These LEDs can be controlled
from the PLC. This means, for example, that in specific situations, it is possible to
indicate to the operator which key should be pressed by switching on an LED.
Requirements
In order to control LEDs, corresponding data areas, so-called LED assignments,
must be set up in the PLC and defined in the configuration as Area Pointers.
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Partitioning of the area pointer
The LED assignment area pointer can be divided into separate data areas, as
illustrated in the following table.
Table 8-6
Partitioning of the LED assignment area pointer
Operating unit
Number of data areas,
maximum
Words in data area,
total
Panel PC
8
16
MP 370
8
16
MP 270, MP 270B
8
16
OP 270
8
16
OP 170B
8
16
Note
The area pointer in question can no longer be selected in the Insert new area
pointer window when the maximum number has been reached. Area pointers of
the same type appear gray.
LED assignment
The assignment of the individual LEDs to the bits in the data areas is defined when
the function keys are configured. This involves specifying a bit number within the
assignment area for each LED.
The bit number (n) identifies the first of two successive bits which control the
following LED states:
Table 8-7
LED states
Bit n + 1
Bit n
0
0
Off
0
1
Flashes
1
0
Flashes
1
1
Permanently on
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8.11
Recipes
Description
During the transfer of data records between the operating unit and PLC, both
communication peers alternately access common communication areas in the
PLC. The function and structure of the recipe-specific communication area (“data
mailbox”) and the mechanisms involved in synchronized transfer of data records
are the subject of this chapter.
Information on setting up the data mailbox in ProTool is provided in the online help.
Downloading methods
There are two methods of downloading data records between operating unit and
PLC:
S
Asynchronous transfer (Page 8-19)
S
Synchronized transfer using the data mailbox (Page 8-20)
Data records are always transferred directly, i.e. the tag values are read or written
directly from or to the address configured for the tag without being stored
intermediately.
Trigger downloading of data records
There are three methods of triggering the transfer of data:
S
By operator input on the recipe display (Page 8-21)
S
By PLC jobs (Page 8-22)
S
By activating configured functions (Page 8-23)
If transfer of data records is initiated by a configured function or a PLC job, the
recipe display on the operating unit remains fully functional as the data records are
transferred in the background.
Simultaneous processing of multiple transfer jobs is not possible, however. In such
cases, the operating unit returns a system message refusing additional transfer
requests.
A list of the most important system messages together with notes on the possible
causes of the associated errors and remedies for them is provided in Appendix,
Part A.
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8.11.1
Asynchronous data transfer
Purpose
In the case of asynchronous transfer of data records between operating unit and
PLC, there is no coordination of the communication areas commonly used. For
this reason, there is no need to set up a data mailbox during the configuration
process.
Application
The asynchronous transfer of data records is applicable, for example, when the
S
uncontrolled overwriting of data by the communication peers can be reliably
prevented by the system,
S
the PLC does not require any details of the recipe and data record numbers, or
S
transfer of data records is initiated by operator input on the operating unit.
Read values
On triggering a read transfer, the values are read from the PLC addresses and
downloaded to the operating unit.
S
Transfer initiated by operator input on recipe display:
Data is uploaded to the operating unit. There it can be processed, e.g. values
can be modified and the changes saved.
S
Transfer initiated by function or PLC job:
The data is saved directly to the storage medium.
Write values
On triggering a write transfer, the values are written to the PLC addresses.
S
Transfer initiated by operator input on recipe display:
The current values are written to the PLC.
S
Transfer initiated by function or PLC job:
The values on the storage medium are written to the PLC.
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8.11.2
Synchronous data transfer
Purpose
In the case of synchronous data transfer, both the communication peers set status
bits in the commonly used data mailbox. In this way, the PLC program can prevent
uncontrolled overwriting of each other’s data by the two units.
Application
The synchronous transfer of data records is applicable, for example, when
S
the PLC is the “active partner” for transfer of data records,
S
details of the recipe and data record numbers are to be analyzed on the PLC,
or
S
transfer of data records is initiated by PLC job.
Requirements
In order to synchronize the transfer of data records between the operating unit and
PLC, the following conditions must be fulfilled in the configuration:
S
the data mailbox must have been set up in System → Area Pointer;
S
the recipe properties must specify the PLC with which the operating unit has to
synchronize transfer of data records.
The PLC is specified in the recipe editor in Properties → Transfer.
Detailed information on this is provided in ProTool Configuring Windows-based
Systems User Guide.
8.11.3
Data mailbox for synchronized data transfer
Structure
The data mailbox has a defined length of 5 words. Its structure is as follows:
16
8-20
1
1st Word
Current recipe number (1 – 999)
2nd Word
Current data record number (0 – 65,535)
3rd Word
Reserved
4th Word
Status (0, 2, 4, 12)
5th Word
Reserved
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Status word
The status word (Word 4) can assume the following values:
Value
8.11.4
Explanation
Decimal
Binary
0
0000 0000
Transfer permitted, data mailbox is accessible
2
0000 0010
Transfer in progress
4
0000 0100
Transfer completed without errors
12
0000 1100
Errors occurred during transfer
Synchronization process
Read from the PLC by operating the recipe view
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe number to be read
and the status “Transfer in progress” in the data mailbox
and sets the data record number to zero.
3
The operating unit reads the values from the PLC and
displays them on the recipe display.
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In the case of recipes with synchronous tags, the values
from the are also written in the tags.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
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Write in the PLC by operating the recipe view
Step
1
Action
Check status word = 0?
Yes
No
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number to be written and the status “Transfer in progress”
in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit writes the current values to the PLC.
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In the case of recipes with synchronized tags, the
modified values between the recipe views and tags are
compared and then written to the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Read from the PLC by PLC job “PLC → DAT” (no. 69)
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the job and the status “Transfer in
progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit reads the value from the PLC and
saves the value in the data record specified by the job.
4
S If the option “Overwrite” has been specified for the job,
No
Operation
cancelled and no
message returned
existing data records are overwritten without prior
warning.
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer
completed”.
S If “Do not overwrite” was specified in the job and the
data record already exists, the operating unit
terminates the process and enters 0000 1100 in the
status word of the data mailbox.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Details of the structure of the PLC job are provided on Page 8-25.
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Write in the PLC by PLC job “DAT → PLC” (no. 70)
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
No
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the job and the status “Transfer in
progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit retrieves the value from the data
record specified in the job from the data medium and
writes that value in the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
Operation
cancelled and no
message returned
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Details of the structure of the PLC job are provided on Page 8-25.
Read from the PLC by configured function
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the function and the status “Transfer
in progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit reads the data from the PLC and
saves it to the data record specified by the function.
4
S If the option “Overwrite” has been specified for the
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
function, existing data records are overwritten without
prior warning.
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer
completed”.
S If “Do not overwrite” was specified in the job and the
data record already exists, the operating unit
terminates the process and enters 0000 1100 in the
status word of the data mailbox.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
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Write in the PLC by configured function
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the function and the status “Transfer
in progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit retrieves the value from the data
record specified in the function from the data medium and
writes that value in the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Note
For reasons of data consistency, analysis of the recipe and data record number on
the PLC cannot be performed until the status in the data mailbox is set to
“Transfer completed” or “Errors occurred during transfer”.
Possible causes of errors
If the downloading of data records is terminated due to errors, it may be due to one
of the following reasons:
S
Tag address not set up on PLC,
S
Overwriting of data records not possible,
S
Recipe number not available
S
Data record number not available
A list of the most important system messages together with notes on the possible
causes of the associated errors and remedies for them is provided in Appendix,
Part A.
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Response to error–based termination
The operating unit responds as follows when the downloading of data records is
terminated due to an error:
S
Transfer initiated by operator input in recipe view
Indication on the status bar on the recipe display and issue of system
messages.
S
Transfer initiated by function
System messages issued.
S
Transfer initiated by PLC job
No feedback of information on operating unit
Regardless of the response of the operating unit, the status of the transfer can be
checked by reading the status word in the data mailbox.
8.11.5
PLC jobs with recipes
Purpose
The transfer of data records between operating unit and PLC can be triggered by
the PLC program. This requires no operator input on the operating unit.
The two PLC jobs No. 69 and No. 70 can be used for this.
No. 69: Read data record from PLC (“PLC → DAT”)
PLC Job No. 69 downloads data records from the PLC to the operating unit. The
structure of this PLC job is as follows:
Word 1
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
69
Word 2
Recipe number (1 – 999)
Word 3
Data record number (1 – 65,535)
Word 4
Do not overwrite existing data record: 0
Overwrite existing data record: 1
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User Data Areas for GE Fanuc PLCs
No. 70: Write data record to PLC (“DAT → PLC”)
PLC Job No. 70 downloads data records from the operating unit to the PLC. The
structure of this PLC job is as follows:
Word 1
8-26
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
70
Word 2
Recipe number (1 – 999)
Word 3
Data record number (1 – 65,535)
Word 4
—
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Teil V
Connection to
LG Industrial Systems/
IMO PLCs
Communication Management
for LG Industrial Systems/IMO
User Data Areas for LG Industrial
Systems/IMO
9
10
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Communication Management for
LG Industrial Systems/IMO PLCs
9
This chapter describes the communication between operating unit and
LG Industrial Systems (Lucky Goldstar) PLCs from the GLOFA-GM (GM4, GM6
and GM7) series and IMO PLCs from the G4, G6 and G7M series.
General Information
Communication from one or more LG Industrial Systems/IMO PLCs is realized via
a Cnet communication module with RS 232/RS 485/RS 422 physics to the
operating unit.
The connection, in the case of these PLCs, is established by the following internal
PLC protocol:
S
Dedicated communication
Operating units
The following operating units can be connected to one of the PLCs mentioned
above:
S
Panel PC
S
Standard PC
S
MP 370
S
MP 270, MP 270B
S
TP 270, OP 270
S
TP 170B, OP 170B
S
TP 170A
Note
The operating unit can only be implemented as a master.
A licensed runtime version must be installed on the Panel PC and standard PC.
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Communication Management for LG Industrial Systems/IMO PLCs
Installation
The driver necessary for the connection to the PLCs mentioned is contained in the
configuration software and is installed automatically.
The connection between the operating unit and the PLC is basically restricted to
defining the interface parameters. Special function blocks for connection to the
PLC are not required.
Connection
The operating unit must be connected to the Cnet module, e.g. G4L-CUEA or
G6L-CUEC, via the RS 232, RS 422 or RS 485 interface. In the case of the
RS 232 interface, only zero modem mode is supported.
The ”Dedicated Protocol” available also provides a direct connection possibility to
the GM6 CPU-B without ComputerLinkModule (Cnet) G6L, but this GM6-CPU
communication, however, does not support any symbolic tags Named.
The following connection cables are available for connection of the operating unit
to the PLC:
Table 9-1
Applicable connection cables ( refer to Appendix, Part C Interface Assignment)
Interface
Point-to-point cable
Multi-point cable
RS 232, 9-pin
Point-to-point cable 1
–
RS 232, 15-pin
Point-to-point cable 4
–
RS 422, 9-pin
Point-to-point cable 2
Multi-point cable 2
RS 485, 9-pin
Point-to-point cable 3
Multi-point cable 1
Details of which interface to use on the operating unit are provided in the relevant
equipment manual.
Setting the operating mode switch on the Cnet module
The Operating Mode Switch must be set to Dedicated
(e.g. in the case of G4L-CUEA, to Position ”3”).
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9.1
Basic Methods of Functioning
PLC
Tags
Process values
User data
areas
Application
program
Display/Operation
Communication
Messages
Operating unit
User
guidance
Coordination
area
Figure 9-1
Communication structure
Task of the tags
The general exchange of data between the PLC and operating unit is performed by
means of the process values. To do this, tags must be specified in the
configuration which point to an address in the PLC. The operating unit reads the
value from the specified address and displays it. In the same way, the operator can
enter a value on the operating unit, which is then written to the address in the PLC.
User data areas
User data areas are used for the exchange of special data and must only be set up
when the data concerned is used.
User data area are required, for example, for:
S
Trends
S
PLC jobs
S
Controlling LEDs
S
Life bit monitoring
A detailed description of the user data areas is provided in Chapter 10.
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9.2
Configuration in ProTool
When creating a new project, select the protocol required from the Project
Wizard" PLC Selection dialog box.
Note
The settings on the operating unit must comply with those on the PLC.
By using the Cnet Frame Editor (CnetEdit.exe) program, it is possible to check
and define the control parameters for the Cnet module. These settings only take
effect on the Cnet module when power is switched on again. The parameters for
GM6 CPU-B and GM7 are set using GMWIN.
Note
The settings on the operating unit must match with those on the PLC.
When starting up, ProTool must not be integrated in STEP 7; deactivate the menu
item Integration in STEP 7.
Select the Parameter ... button in order to set the protocol parameters and
station address of the Cnet module. Define the following parameters for the PLC:
Table 9-2
PLC parameters
Parameters
Explanation
Interface
The operating unit interface to which the PLC is connected must be set
here.
Note for Panels and Multi Panels
If the IF1B interface is used, the RS 422 receive data signal and the
RTS signal must be switched by using the 4 DIL switches on the rear
side of the Multi Panels.
Further information is available in the operating unit equipment manual.
Station
This is used to set the Cnet module station address of the PLC.
Values between 0 and 31 are permissible.
Interface type
Set RS232, RS422 or RS485 here.
Data bits
Set 7 or 8.
Parity
Set NONE , EVEN and or UNEVEN.
Stop bits
Set 1 or 2.
Baud rate
Define the transmission rate between the operating unit and PLC here.
System setting: 38400 bit/s.
For subsequent changes to the parameters, select PLC in the project window and
then Properties" Parameters....
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9.3
Data types
When configuring tags and area pointers, the data types listed in Table 9-3 are
available for use.
Table 9-3
Data types
Data type
Name
Addressed by
Format
Internal
Memory
%M
0 to max. 64 kbyte
BOOL, BYTE, WORD,
DOUBLE WORD
Output
%Q
Base (0–63)
Slot (0–7)
Card (0–63)
BOOL, BYTE, WORD,
DOUBLE WORD
Input
%I
Base (0–63)
Slot (0–7)
Card (0–63)
BOOL, BYTE, WORD,
DOUBLE WORD
Symbolic tag
Named
Max. 16 byte longer string
consisting of A–Z, 0––9, “_”
BOOL, BYTE, WORD,
DOUBLE WORD, SINT,
INT, DINT, USINT, UINT,
UDINT, TIME, STRING
Representation in ProTool
The condition for this is that these data areas have also been set up with GMWIN
for the CPU.
In the case of symbolic tags, the name entered must be exactly the same as
that used in the PLC. In order to have write access to a symbolic tag it must be
registered as READ_WRITE in the ”access variable area” of the PLC under
GMWIN; READ_ONLY is only sufficient for output fields.
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Communication Management for LG Industrial Systems/IMO PLCs
Note
The symbolic tags Named cannot be used for communication with GM7 (via the
Cnet module) and direct to GM6 CPU-B.
Note
Only MW% can be used for area pointers.
The following options are available for entering the address for internal memory
%M in BOOL format:
– MX
Bit
– MB
Bit-in-byte
– MW
– fD
Bit-in-word
Bit-in-Dword
STRINGS of up to 4 ASCII characters can be read by the Lucky Goldstar
communication software and not written.
9.4
Optimization
Acquisition cycle and update time
The acquisition cycles defined in the configuration software for the area pointers
and the acquisition cycles for the tags are major factors in respect of the real
update times which are achieved. The update time is the acquisition cycle plus
transmission time plus processing time.
In order to achieve optimum update times, the following points should be observed
during configuration:
S
When setting up the individual data areas, make them as large as necessary
but as small as possible.
S
Define data areas that belong together as contiguous areas. The effective
update time is improved by setting one single large area rather than several
smaller areas.
S
Setting acquisition cycles which are too short unnecessarily impairs overall
performance. Set the acquisition cycle to correspond to the modification time of
the process values. The rate of change of temperature of a furnace, for
example, is considerably slower than the acceleration curve of an electric
motor.
Guideline value for the acquisition cycle: Approx. 1 second.
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S
If necessary, dispense with cyclic transmission of user data areas (acquisition
cycle = 0) in order to improve the update time. Instead, use PLC jobs to transfer
the user data areas at random times.
S
Store the tags for a message or a screen in a contiguous data area.
S
In order that changes on the PLC are reliably detected by the operating unit,
they must occur during the actual acquisition cycle at least.
S
Set the baud rate to the highest possible value.
Screens
The real screen updating rate which can be achieved is dependent on the type and
quantity of data to be displayed.
In order to achieve short updating times, ensure that short acquisition cycles are
only defined in the configuration for those objects which actually need to be
updated quickly.
Trends
If, in the case of bit-triggered trends, the communication bit is set in the trend
transfer area, the operating unit always updates all the trends whose bit is set in
that area. It resets the bits afterwards.
The communication bit in the PLC program can only be set again after all the bits
have been reset by the operating unit.
PLC jobs
If large numbers of PLC jobs are sent to the operating unit in quick succession,
communication between the operating unit and PLC may become overloaded.
If the operating unit enters the value 0 in the first data word of the job mailbox, it
signifies that the operating unit has accepted the job. It then processes the job, for
which it requires a certain amount of time. If a new PLC job is then immediately
entered in the job mailbox, it may take some time before the operating unit
executes the next PLC job. The next PLC job is only accepted when sufficient
computer performance is available.
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User Data Areas for
LG Industrial Systems/IMO PLCs
10
Overview
User data areas are used for data exchange between the PLC and operating unit.
The user data areas are written to and read by the operating unit and the
application program alternately during the process of communication. By analyzing
the data stored there, the PLC and operating unit reciprocally initiate predefined
actions.
This chapter describes the function, layout and special features of the various user
data areas.
10.1
User Data Areas Available
Definition
The user data areas can be set up in various data areas in the PLC (Internal
Memory (M)).
Set up the user data areas both in the ProTool project and in the PLC.
The user data areas can be set up and modified in the ProTool project using the
menu items Insert → Area Pointers.
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Functional range
The user data areas available are dependent on the operating unit used. The
tables 10-1 and 10-2 provide an overview of the functional range of the individual
operating units.
Table 10-1 User data areas available, Part 1
User data area
Panel PC
Standard PC
MP 370
User version
x
x
x
Job mailbox
x
x
x
Event messages
x
x
x
Screen number
x
x
x
Data mailbox
x
x
x
Date/Time
x
x
x
Date/Time PLC
x
x
x
Coordination
x
x
x
Trend request
x
x
x
Trend transfer 1, 2
x
x
x
1
x
–
x
OP/PLC acknowledgement
x
x
x
Alarm messages
x
x
x
LED assignment
1
Only possible using operating units with keyboard.
Table 10-2 User data areas available, Part 2
User data area
MP 270
MP 270B
TP 270
OP 270
TP 170B
OP 170B
TP 170A
User version
x
x
x
–
Job mailbox
x
x
x
–
Event messages
x
x
x
x
Screen number
x
x
x
–
Data mailbox
x
x
x
–
Date/Time
x
x
x
–
Date/Time PLC
x
x
x
x
Coordination
x
x
x
–
Trend request
x
x
–
–
Trend transfer 1, 2
x
x
–
–
LED assignment 1
x
x
x
–
OP/PLC acknowledgement
x
x
x
–
Alarm messages
x
x
x
–
1
10-2
Only possible using operating units with keyboard.
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Table 10-3 illustrates the way in which the PLC and operating unit access the
individual user data areas – Read (R) or Write (W).
Table 10-3 Application of the user data areas
User data area
Necessary for
Operating
unit
PLC
User version
ProTool Runtime checks whether the
ProTool project version and the
project in the PLC are consistent.
R
W
Job mailbox
Triggering of functions on the operating unit by PLC program
R/W
R/W
Event messages
Bit reporting process
arrival and departure of event messages
R
W
Screen number
Evaluation by the PLC as to which
screen is currently open
W
R
Data mailbox
Downloading of data records with
synchronization
R/W
R/W
Date/Time
Transfer of date and time from the
operating unit to the PLC
W
R
Date/Time PLC
Transfer of date and time from the
PLC to the operating unit.
R
W
Coordination
Operating unit status polled by the
PLC program
W
R
Trend request
Configured trends with “Triggering
via bit” or configured history trends
W
R
Trend transfer 1
Configured trends with “Triggering
via bit” or configured history trends
R/W
R/W
Trend transfer area 2
Configured history trend with “switch
buffer”
R/W
R/W
LED assignment
LED triggered by the PLC
R
W
OP acknowledgement
Message from the operating unit to
the PLC indicating an alarm message has been acknowledged
W
R
PLC
acknowledgement
Alarm message acknowledgement
from the PLC
R
W
Alarm messages
Bit reporting process
arrival and departure of alarm messages
R
W
The user data areas and their associated area pointers are explained in the
following chapters.
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User Data Areas for LG Industrial Systems/IMO PLCs
10.2
User Data Area, User Version
Usage
When starting up the operating unit, it is possible to check whether the operating
unit is connected to the correct PLC. This is important when several operating
units are used.
To do this, the operating unit compares a value stored in the PLC with the value
defined in the configuration. In this way, the compatibility of the configuration data
with the PLC program is ensured. If there is a mismatch, a system message
appears on the operating unit and the runtime configuration is terminated.
In order to use this user data area, set up the following during the configuration:
S
Specify the configuration version – value between 1 and 255.
ProTool: System → Settings
S
Data address of the value for the version stored in the PLC:
ProTool: Insert → Area Pointers, available types: User version
10.3
User Data Area, Job Mailbox
Description
The job mailbox can be used to send PLC jobs to the operating unit, thus initiating
actions on the operating unit. These functions include:
S
displaying screens
S
setting date and time
The job mailbox is set up under Area Pointer and has a length of four data words.
The first word of the job mailbox contains the job number. Depending on the PLC
job in question, up to three parameters can then be specified.
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Word
n+0
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
Job no.
n+1
Parameter 1
n+2
Parameter 2
n+3
Parameter 3
Figure 10-1
Structure of the user data area, job mailbox
If the first word of the job mailbox is not equal to zero, the operating unit analyzes
the PLC job. Afterwards, the unit sets this data word to zero again. For this reason,
the parameters must be entered in the job mailbox first and then the job number.
The possible PLC jobs, including job number and parameters, are provided in the
“ProTool Online Help” and the Appendix, Part B.
10.4
User Data Area, Event and Alarm Messages and
Acknowledgement
Definition
Messages consist of a static text and/or tags. The text and tags can be defined by
the user.
Messages are subdivided into event messages and alarm messages. The
programmer defines the event message and alarm message.
Event Messages
An event message indicates a status, e.g.
S
Motor switched on
S
PLC in manual mode
Alarm messages
An alarm message indicates an operational fault, e.g.
S
Valve not opening
S
Motor temperature too high
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Acknowledgement
Since alarm messages indicate an abnormal operational status, they must be
acknowledged. They can be acknowledged either by
S
operator input on the operating unit
S
setting a bit in the PLC acknowledgement area.
Triggering messages
A message is triggered by setting a bit in one of the message areas on the PLC.
The location of the message areas is defined by means of the configuration
software. The corresponding area must also be set up in the PLC.
As soon as the bit in the PLC event/alarm message area has been set and that
area has been transferred to the operating unit, the operating unit detects that the
relevant message has “arrived”.
Conversely, when the same bit is reset on the PLC by the operating unit, the
message is registered as having “departed”.
Message areas
Table 10-4 indicates the number of message areas for event and alarm messages,
for alarm acknowledgement OP (operating unit → PLC) and for alarm
acknowledgement PLC (PLC → operating unit) and the number of words for the
various operating units.
Table 10-4 Division of message areas
Operating unit
Event message area, Alarm message area
OP acknowledgement area, PLC acknowledgement area
Number of
Words in data
Words,
data areas, ma- area, maximum total
ximum
Panel PC
8
125
250
4000
Standard PC
8
125
250
4000
MP 370
8
125
250
4000
MP 270, MP 270B
8
125
250
4000
TP 270, OP 270
8
125
250
4000
TP 170B, OP 170B
8
125
125
2000
TP 170A1
8
63
63
1000
1
10-6
Messages,
total
Only event messages possible.
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Assignment of message bit and message number
A message can be assigned to each bit in the configured message area. The bits
are assigned to the message numbers in ascending order.
Example:
The following event message area has been configured in the PLC:
Length 5 (in words)
M43
Figure 10-2 illustrates the assignment of all 80 (5 x16) message numbers to the
individual bit numbers in the PLC event message area. The assignment is
performed automatically on the operating unit.
M43
15
16
0
1
M47
80
65
Message number
Figure 10-2
Assignment of message bit and message number
User Data Area, Acknowledgement
If the PLC should be informed of an alarm message acknowledgement on the
operating unit or the acknowledgement should be initiated on the PLC itself, the
relevant acknowledgement areas must also be set up in the PLC. These
acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the ProTool project under Area
Pointers.
S
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC:
This area is used to inform the PLC when an alarm message has been
acknowledged by means of operator input on the operating unit. The “Alarm
Ack. OP” area pointer must be created or configured for this.
S
Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit:
This area is used when an alarm message is acknowledged by the PLC. In this
case, the area pointer “PLC acknowledgement” must be set.
These acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the configuration under
Area Pointers.
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Figure 10-3 illustrates a schematic diagram of the of the individual alarm message
and acknowledgement areas. The acknowledgement sequences are shown in
Figures 10-5 and 10-6.
Operating unit
PLC
Alarm messages area
ACK
Internal processing /
link
Acknowledgement area
PLC → Operating unit
Acknowledgement area
Operating unit → PLC
Figure 10-3
Alarm message and acknowledgement areas
Assignment of acknowledgement bit to message number
Each alarm message is assigned a message number. The message number is
assigned the same bit number in the alarm messages area as that assigned in the
acknowledgement area. Under normal circumstances, the acknowledgement area
is the same length as the associated alarm messages area.
If the length of an acknowledgement area is not equal to the overall length of the
associated alarm messages area, and there are succeeding alarm messages and
acknowledgement areas, the following assignment applies:
Alarm messages area 1
Alarm message no. 1
Bit 15
0
16
1
.............
.............
32
17
.............
48
33
Alarm messages area 2
Bit 15
64
80
Alarm message no. 49
0
.............
49
.............
65
Figure 10-4
10-8
Acknowledgement area 1
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 1
Bit 15
0
16
1
.............
.............
32
17
Acknowledgement area 2
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 49
0
Bit 15
.............
64
49
.............
80
65
Assignment of acknowledgement bit and message number
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Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating unit
A bit set in this area by the PLC initiates the acknowledgement of the
corresponding alarm message in the operating unit, thus fulfilling the same function
as pressing the ACK button. Reset the bit before setting the bit in the alarm
message area again. Figure 10-5 illustrates the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area PLC→ Operating Unit
S
must follow on immediately from the associated alarm messages area,
S
must have precisely the same polling time and
S
may not be any longer than the associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages
area
Acknowledgement
area PLC →
Operating Unit
Figure 10-5
Acknowledgement
via PLC
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
When a bit is set in the alarm message area, the operating unit resets the
associated bit in the acknowledgement area. As a result of processing by the
operating unit, the two processes indicate a slight difference with regard to time. If
the alarm message is acknowledged on the operating unit, the bit in the
acknowledgement area is set. In this way, the PLC can detect that the alarm
message has been acknowledged. Figure 10-6 illustrates the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC must be no longer than the
associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages
area
Acknowledgement
area Operating Unit →
PLC
Figure 10-6
Acknowledgement
via operating unit
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
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Acknowledgement area size
The acknowledgement areas PLC → Operating Unit and Operating Unit → PLC
must not be any longer than the associated alarm message areas. The
acknowledgement area, however, be smaller if acknowledgement by the PLC is
not required for all alarm messages. This is also valid when the acknowledgement
need not be detected in the PLC for all alarm messages. Figure 10-7 illustrates
such a case.
Alarm messages area
Alarm messages
that can be
acknowledged
Figure 10-7
Bit 0
Bit 0
Bit n
Bit n
Alarm messages
that cannot be
acknowledged
Reduced-size
alarm messages acknowledgement area
Bit m
Reduced-size acknowledgement area
Note
Place important alarm messages in the alarm messages area starting at Bit 0 in
ascending order.
10.5
User Data Area, Screen Number
Application
The operating units store information concerning the screen currently open on the
unit in the screen number user data area.
This enables the transfer of data regarding the current operating unit display
content to the PLC which, in turn, can trigger certain reactions; e.g. call in a
different screen.
Requirements
If the screen number area should be used, it must be specified in the ProTool
project as an Area Pointer. It can only be stored in one PLC and only once.
The screen number area is downloaded to the PLC spontaneously, i.e. the transfer
is always initiated when a change is selected on the operating unit. Therefore, it is
not necessary to configure an acquisition cycle.
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Structure
The screen number area is a data area with a fixed length of 5 words.
The structure of the screen number area in the PLC memory is illustrated below.
1st Word
15
8 7
Current screen type
2nd Word
Current screen number
3rd Word
Reserved
4th Word
Current field number
5th Word
Reserved
0
Entry
10.6
Assignment
Current screen type
1 for basic screen or
4 for fixed window
Current screen number
1 to 65535
Current field number
1 to 65535
User Data Area, Date/Time
Transferring date and time
Transfer of date and time from the operating unit to the PLC can be triggered by
PLC job 41. PLC job 41 writes the date and time to the data area Date/Time where
they can be analyzed by the PLC program. Figure 10-8 illustrates the structure of
the data area. All data is in BCD format.
Left byte
Minute (0–59)
Second (0–59)
n+2
n+3
0
Hour (0–23)
Reserved
Reserved
Weekday (1–7, 1=Sun)
n+4
Day (1–31)
Month (1–12)
n+5
Year (80–99/0–29)
Reserved
Figure 10-8
Time
n+1
8 7
Reserved
Date
DW 15
n+0
Right byte
Structure of data area Time and Date
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User Data Areas for LG Industrial Systems/IMO PLCs
Note
When entering data in the year data area, please note that the values 80–99
represent 1980 to 1999 and 0–29 the years 2000 to 2029.
10.7
User Data Area, Date/Time PLC
Transfer of date and time to the operating unit
The downloading of date and time to the operating unit is generally useful when the
PLC is master for time.
The TP 170A operating unit represents a special case here:
Synchronization with the PLC system time is necessary when a Single message
display screen object is to be inserted in a ProTool screen. The Single
message display screen object is the only TP 170A screen object which has
access to the unit’s system time. This restriction only applies to the TP 170A.
DATE_AND_TIME format (BCD coded)
Left byte
DW
15
Right byte
8 7
0
n+0
Year (80–99/0–29)
Month (1–12)
n+1
Day (1–31)
Hour (0–23)
n+2
Minute (0–59)
n+3
Reserved
Figure 10-9
Second (0–59)
Reserved
Weekday (1–7, 1=Sun)
Structure of data area Date/Time in DATE_AND_TIME format
Note
When entering data in the year data area, please note that the values 80–99
represent 1980 to 1999 and 0–29 the years 2000 to 2029.
The PLC writes cyclically to the data area, whereby the operating unit reads and
synchronizes (refer to the ProTool User’s Guide).
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Note
In the configuration, do not select too small an acquisition cycle for the Date/Time
area pointer because this affects the operating unit performance.
Recommendation: Acquisition cycle of 1 minute, if permitted by the process.
10.8
User Data Area, Coordination
The coordination user data area is two words long. It serves to realize the following
functions:
S
Detection of operating unit startup by the PLC program,
S
Detection of the current operating unit operating mode by the PLC program,
S
Detection by the PLC program that the operating unit is ready to communicate.
Note
Each time the coordination area is updated by the operating unit, the entire
coordination area is written.
Therefore, the PLC program must not execute any modifications in the
coordination area.
Bit assignment in coordination area
1st Word
High Byte
15
– – – – – –
8
– –
Low Byte
7
2 1 0
– – – – – X X X
Startup bit
– = Reserved
X = Assigned
Operating mode
Life bit
Figure 10-10 Significance of the bits in the coordination area
Startup bit
The startup bit is set to 0 for a short time during the start-up routine by the
operating unit. After the startup routine has been completed, the bit is set
permanently to 1.
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User Data Areas for LG Industrial Systems/IMO PLCs
Operating mode
As soon as the operating unit has been switched offline by the operator, the
operating mode bit is set to 1. When the operating unit is working in normal
operation, the operating mode bit is set to 0. The PLC program can be used to poll
this bit and thus establish the current operating mode of the operating unit.
Life bit
The life bit is inverted by the operating unit at intervals of approx. one second. The
PLC program can be used to poll this bit to check whether connection to the
operating unit still exists.
10.9
User Data Areas, Trend Request and Trend Transfer
Trends
A trend is the graphical representation of a value from the PLC. Reading of the
value can be time-triggered or bit-triggered, depending on the configuration.
Time-triggered trends
The operating unit reads the trend values cyclically according to the cycle interval
defined in the configuration. Time-triggered trends are suitable for continuous
progressions such as the operating temperature of a motor.
Bit-triggered trends
By setting a trigger bit in the trend transfer area pointer, the operating unit reads in
either a trend value or the entire trend buffer. This is specified in the configuration.
Bit-triggered trends are normally used to display values of an area subject to rapid
variation. An example of this is the injection pressure for plastic moldings.
In order to be able to activate bit-triggered trends, corresponding data areas have
to be specified in the ProTool project (under Area Pointers) and set up on the PLC.
The operating unit and the PLC communicate with one another via those areas.
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The following areas are available for trends:
S
Trend request area
S
Trend transfer area 1
S
Trend transfer area 2 (required with switch buffer only)
Assign a trend to a bit in the configuration. This ensures the bit assignment is
unique for all areas.
Switch buffer
The switch buffer is a second buffer for the same trend and can be set up during
the configuration.
While the operating unit reads the value from Buffer 1, the PLC writes it in Buffer 2.
If the operating unit reads from Buffer 2, the PLC writes to Buffer 1. This prevents
the trend value being overwritten by the PLC when being read by the operating
unit.
Partitioning the area pointer
The trend request and trend transfer 1 and 2 area pointers can be divided into
separate data areas with a predefined maximum number and length (refer to
Table 10-5).
Table 10-5 Partitioning of the area pointer
Data area
Trend request
Trend transfer
1
2
Number of data areas, maximum
8
8
8
Words in data area, total
8
8
8
Trend request area
If a screen with one or more trends is opened on the operating unit, the unit sets
the corresponding bits in the trend request area. After deselection of the screen,
the operating unit resets the corresponding bits in the trend request area.
The trend request area can be used by the PLC to ascertain which trend is
currently being displayed on the operating unit. Trends can also be triggered
without analysis of the trend request area.
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User Data Areas for LG Industrial Systems/IMO PLCs
Trend transfer area 1
This area serves for triggering trends. In the PLC program, set the bit assigned to
the trend in the trend transfer area and the trend communication bit. The operating
unit detects triggering and reads in either a trend value or the entire buffer. It then
resets the trend bit and the trend communication bit.
Trend transfer area(s)
Bit number
15 14 13 12 11 10 9
8 7
6
5 4
3
2
1
0
1st Word
2nd Word
Trend communication bit
The trend transfer area must not be altered by the PLC program until the trend
communication bit has been reset.
Trend transfer area 2
Trend transfer area 2 is necessary for trends that are configured with a switch
buffer. Its layout is precisely the same as that of trend transfer area 1.
10.10
User Data Area, LED Assignment
Application
The Operator Panel (OP), Multi Panel (MP) and Panel PC have function keys with
Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) integrated in them. These LEDs can be controlled
from the PLC. This means, for example, that in specific situations, it is possible to
indicate to the operator which key should be pressed by switching on an LED.
Requirements
In order to control LEDs, corresponding data areas, so-called LED assignments,
must be set up in the PLC and defined in the configuration as Area Pointers.
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Partitioning of the area pointer
The LED assignment area pointer can be divided into separate data areas, as
illustrated in the following table.
Table 10-6 Partitioning the LED assignment area pointer
Operating unit
Number of data areas,
maximum
Words in data area,
total
Panel PC
8
16
MP 370
8
16
MP 270, MP 270B
8
16
OP 270
8
16
OP 170B
8
16
Note
The area pointer in question can no longer be selected in the Insert new area
pointer window when the maximum number has been reached. Area pointers of
the same type appear gray.
LED assignment
The assignment of the individual LEDs to the bits in the data areas is defined when
the function keys are configured. This involves specifying a bit number within the
assignment area for each LED.
The bit number (n) identifies the first of two successive bits which control the
following LED states:
Table 10-7 LED states
Bit n + 1
Bit n
0
0
Off
0
1
Flashes
1
0
Flashes
1
1
Permanently on
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LED function
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User Data Areas for LG Industrial Systems/IMO PLCs
10.11
Recipes
Description
During the transfer of data records between the operating unit and PLC, both
communication peers alternately access common communication areas in the
PLC. The function and structure of the recipe-specific communication area (“data
mailbox”) and the mechanisms involved in synchronized transfer of data records
are the subject of this chapter.
Information on setting up the data mailbox in ProTool is provided in the online help.
Operating modes
There are two methods of downloading data records between operating unit and
PLC:
S
Asynchronous transfer (Page 10-19)
S
Synchronized transfer using the data mailbox (Page 10-20)
Data records are always transferred directly, i.e. the tag values are read or written
directly from or to the address configured for the tag without being stored
intermediately.
Trigger downloading of data records
There are three methods of triggering the transfer of data:
S
By operator input on the recipe display (Page 10-21)
S
By PLC jobs (Page 10-22)
S
By activating configured functions (Page 10-23)
If transfer of data records is initiated by a configured function or a PLC job, the
recipe display on the operating unit remains fully functional as the data records are
transferred in the background.
Simultaneous processing of multiple transfer jobs is not possible, however. In such
cases, the operating unit returns a system message refusing additional transfer
requests.
A list of the most important system messages together with notes on the possible
causes of the associated errors and remedies for them is provided in Appendix,
Part A.
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10.11.1
Asynchronous data transfer
Purpose
In the case of asynchronous transfer of data records between operating unit and
PLC, there is no coordination of the communication areas commonly used. For
this reason, there is no need to set up a data mailbox during the configuration
process.
Application
The asynchronous transfer of data records is applicable, for example, when the
S
uncontrolled overwriting of data by the communication peers can be reliably
prevented by the system,
S
the PLC does not require any details of the recipe and data record numbers, or
S
transfer of data records is initiated by operator input on the operating unit.
Read values
On triggering a read transfer, the values are read from the PLC addresses and
downloaded to the operating unit.
S
Transfer initiated by operator input on recipe display:
Data is uploaded to the operating unit. There it can be processed, e.g. values
can be modified and the changes saved.
S
Transfer initiated by function or PLC job:
The data is saved directly to the storage medium.
Write values
On triggering a write transfer, the values are written to the PLC addresses.
S
Transfer initiated by operator input on recipe display:
The current values are written to the PLC.
S
Transfer initiated by function or PLC job:
The values on the storage medium are written to the PLC.
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10.11.2
Synchronous data transfer
Purpose
In the case of synchronous data transfer, both the communication peers set status
bits in the commonly used data mailbox. In this way, the PLC program can prevent
uncontrolled overwriting of each other’s data by the two units.
Application
The synchronous transfer of data records is applicable, for example, when
S
the PLC is the “active partner” for transfer of data records,
S
details of the recipe and data record numbers are to be analyzed on the PLC,
or
S
transfer of data records is initiated by PLC job.
Requirements
In order to synchronize the transfer of data records between the operating unit and
PLC, the following conditions must be fulfilled in the configuration:
S
the data mailbox must have been set up in System → Area Pointer;
S
the recipe properties must specify the PLC with which the operating unit has to
synchronize transfer of data records.
The PLC is specified in the recipe editor in Properties → Transfer.
Detailed information on this is provided in ProTool Configuring Windows-based
Systems User Guide.
10.11.3
Data mailbox for synchronous data transfer
Structure
The data mailbox has a defined length of 5 words. Its structure is as follows:
15
Current recipe number (1 – 999)
2nd Word
Current data record number (0 – 65,535)
3rd Word
4th Word
5th Word
10-20
0
1st Word
Reserved
Status (0, 2, 4, 12)
Reserved
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Status word
The status word (Word 4) can assume the following values:
Value
10.11.4
Explanation
Decimal
Binary
0
0000 0000
Transfer permitted, data mailbox is accessible
2
0000 0010
Transfer in progress
4
0000 0100
Transfer completed without errors
12
0000 1100
Errors occurred during transfer
Synchronization process
Read from the PLC by operating the recipe view
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe number to be read
and the status “Transfer in progress” in the data mailbox
and sets the data record number to zero.
3
The operating unit reads the values from the PLC and
displays them on the recipe display.
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In the case of recipes with synchronous tags, the values
from the are also written in the tags.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
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Write in the PLC by operating the recipe view
Step
1
Action
Check status word = 0?
Yes
No
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number to be written and the status “Transfer in progress”
in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit writes the current values to the PLC.
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In the case of recipes with synchronized tags, the
modified values between the recipe views and tags are
compared and then written to the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Read from the PLC by PLC job “PLC → DAT” (no. 69)
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the job and the status “Transfer in
progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit reads the value from the PLC and
saves the value in the data record specified by the job.
4
S If the option “Overwrite” has been specified for the job,
No
Operation
cancelled and no
message returned
existing data records are overwritten without prior
warning.
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer
completed”.
S If “Do not overwrite” was specified in the job and the
data record already exists, the operating unit
terminates the process and enters 0000 1100 in the
status word of the data mailbox.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Details of the structure of the PLC job are provided on Page 10-25.
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Write in the PLC by PLC job “DAT → PLC” (no. 70)
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
No
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the job and the status “Transfer in
progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit retrieves the value from the data
record specified in the job from the data medium and
writes that value in the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
Operation
cancelled and no
message returned
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Details of the structure of the PLC job are provided on Page 10-25.
Read from the PLC by configured function
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the function and the status “Transfer
in progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit reads the data from the PLC and
saves it to the data record specified by the function.
4
S If the option “Overwrite” has been specified for the
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
function, existing data records are overwritten without
prior warning.
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer
completed”.
S If “Do not overwrite” was specified in the job and the
data record already exists, the operating unit
terminates the process and enters 0000 1100 in the
status word of the data mailbox.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
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Write in the PLC by configured function
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the function and the status “Transfer
in progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit retrieves the value from the data
record specified in the function from the data medium and
writes that value in the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Note
For reasons of data consistency, analysis of the recipe and data record number on
the PLC cannot be performed until the status in the data mailbox is set to
“Transfer completed” or “Errors occurred during transfer”.
Possible causes of errors
If the downloading of data records is terminated due to errors, it may be due to one
of the following reasons:
S
Tag address not set up on PLC,
S
Overwriting of data records not possible,
S
Recipe number not available
S
Data record number not available
A list of the most important system messages together with notes on the possible
causes of the associated errors and remedies for them is provided in Appendix,
Part A.
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Response to error-related termination
The operating unit responds as follows when the downloading of data records is
terminated due to an error:
S
Transfer initiated by operator input in recipe view
Indication on the status bar on the recipe display and issue of system
messages.
S
Transfer initiated by function
System messages issued.
S
Transfer initiated by PLC job
No feedback of information on operating unit
Regardless of the response of the operating unit, the status of the transfer can be
checked by reading the status word in the data mailbox.
10.11.5
PLC jobs with recipes
Purpose
The transfer of data records between operating unit and PLC can be triggered by
the PLC program. This requires no operator input on the operating unit.
The two PLC jobs No. 69 and No. 70 can be used for this.
No. 69: Read data record from PLC (“PLC → DAT”)
PLC Job No. 69 downloads data records from the PLC to the operating unit. The
structure of this PLC job is as follows:
Word 1
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
69
Word 2
Recipe number (1 – 999)
Word 3
Data record number (1 – 65,535)
Word 4
Do not overwrite existing data record: 0
Overwrite existing data record: 1
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User Data Areas for LG Industrial Systems/IMO PLCs
No. 70: Write data record to PLC (“DAT → PLC”)
PLC Job No. 70 downloads data records from the operating unit to the PLC. The
structure of this PLC job is as follows:
Word 1
10-26
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
70
Word 2
Recipe number (1 – 999)
Word 3
Data record number (1 – 65,535)
Word 4
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Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
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Part VI
Connection to
Mitsubishi Electric
PLCs
Communication Management for
Mitsubishi Electric via PU
11
Communication Management for
Mitsubishi Electric via Protocol 4
12
User Data Area for
Mitsubishi Electric PLCs
13
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Communication Management for
Mitsubishi PLCs via PU Protocol
This chapter describes the communication between operating unit and Mitsubishi
Electric PLCs from the MELSEC FX and MELSEC FX0 series.
General Information
The connection, in the case of these PLCs, is established by the following protocol:
S
Programming unit protocol (PU protocol) – point-to-point connection
The driver necessary for the connection to the MELSEC FX and MELSEC FX0
PLCs is contained in the configuration software and is installed automatically.
Operating units
The following operating units can be connected to a Mitsubishi PLC:
S
Panel PC
S
Standard PC
S
MP 370
S
MP 270, MP 270B
S
TP 270, OP 270
S
TP 170B, OP 170B
S
TP 170A
Connection
The operating unit must be connected to the programming interface of the CPU
(RS 422) (refer to PLC documentation).
The connection between the operating unit and Mitsubishi Electric PLC is basically
restricted to defining the interface parameters and bus address. Special function
blocks for connection to the PLC are not required.
The following connection cables are available for connection of the operating unit
to the PLC:
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Communication Management for Mitsubishi PLCs via PU Protocol
Table 11-1 Applicable connection cables (refer to Appendix, Part C Interface Assignment)
Interface
FX series, Sub-D, 25-pin
FX0, Mini DIN, 8-pin
RS 232, 9-pin
Mitsubishi SC-081
Mitsubishi SC-071
RS 232, 15-pin
Adapter
Adapter
6XV1440-2UE32
6XV1440-2UE32
Mitsubishi SC-0811
Mitsubishi SC-0711
RS 422, 9-pin
6XV1440-2R_ _ _
6XV1440-2P_ _ _
RS 422, 25-pin
–
6XV1440-2Q_ _ _
’_’
1
Length code (refer to Catalog ST 80)
Since Mitsubishi PLCs normally communicate via RS 422, the Mitsubishi programming cable SC-07
or SC-08 with integrated RS 422/RS 232 adaptation is required for the OP address.
Note
Only valid for RS 232:
Limited cable length of approx. 3 m.
Details of which interface to use on the operating unit are provided in the relevant
equipment manual.
Connection type
The point-to-point connection from an operating unit to a Mitsubishi FX CPU via
the PU protocol (protocol for access to the program and memory elements of the
FX series PC CPU, Version V121 and later) has undergone system tests by
Siemens AG and been approved.
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11.1
Basic Methods of Functioning
PLC
Tags
Process values
User data
areas
Application
program
Display/Operation
Communication
Messages
Operating unit
User
guidance
Coordination
area
Figure 11-1
Communication structure
Task of the tags
The general exchange of data between the PLC and operating unit is performed by
means of the process values. To do this, tags must be specified in the
configuration which point to an address in the PLC. The operating unit reads the
value from the specified address and displays it. In the same way, the operator can
enter a value on the operating unit, which is then written to the address in the PLC.
User data areas
User data areas are used for the exchange of special data and must only be set up
when the data concerned is used.
User data area are required, for example, for:
S
Trends
S
PLC jobs
S
Controlling LEDs
S
Life bit monitoring
A detailed description of the user data areas is provided in Chapter 13.
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Communication Management for Mitsubishi PLCs via PU Protocol
11.2
Configuration in ProTool
When creating a new project, select the protocol required from the Project
Wizard " PLC Selection dialog box.
Select the Parameter ... button to define the protocol parameters. Set the
protocol:
S
MITSUBISHI FX for the Mitsubishi PLC
Then define the following parameters after clicking on the Parameter button.
Note
The settings on the operating unit must match with those on the PLC.
When starting up, ProTool must not be integrated in STEP 7; deactivate the menu
item Integration in STEP 7.
Define the following parameters for the PLC:
Table 11-2 PLC parameters
Parameters
Explanation
Interface
The operating unit interface to which the Mitsubish PLC is connected
must be set here.
CPU type
Define the PLC to which the operating unit is connected. Use the
FX Series setting.
Interface type
Set RS232 or RS422.
If the operating unit is a PC, only RS232 can be used.
Data bits
Set 7 or 8.
Parity
Set NONE, EVEN or UNEVEN.
Stop bits
Set 1 or 2.
Baud rate
Define the transmission rate between the operating unit and PLC here.
The communication can be set to a baud rate of 19200, 9600, 4800,
2400, 1200, 600 or 300 baud.
For subsequent changes to the parameters, select PLC in the project window and
then Properties " Parameter ....
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11.3
Data Types
When configuring tags and area pointers, the data types listed in Table 11-3 are
available for use.
Table 11-3 Data types
Data type
Addressed by
Format
Input
X
Bit
4-bit block
8-bit block
12-bit block
16-bit block
20-bit block
24-bit block
28-bit block
32-bit block
Output
Y
Bit
4-bit block
8-bit block
12-bit block
16-bit block
20-bit block
24-bit block
28-bit block
32-bit block
Flag
F
Bit
4-bit block
8-bit block
12-bit block
16-bit block
20-bit block
24-bit block
28-bit block
32-bit block
Time element, actual value
T
Word
16-bit counter, actual value
C – 16-bit
Word
32-bit counter, actual value
C – 32-bit
DOUBLE
Data register
D
Bit
Word,
Double,
String,
IEEE float
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11.4
Optimization
Acquisition cycle and update time
The acquisition cycles defined in the configuration software for the area pointers
and the acquisition cycles for the tags are major factors in respect of the real
update times which are achieved. The update time is the acquisition cycle plus
transmission time plus processing time.
In order to achieve optimum update times, the following points should be observed
during configuration:
S
When setting up the individual data areas, make them as large as necessary
but as small as possible.
S
Define data areas that belong together as contiguous areas. The effective
update time is improved by setting one single large area rather than several
smaller areas.
S
Setting acquisition cycles which are too short unnecessarily impairs overall
performance. Set the acquisition cycle to correspond to the modification time of
the process values. The rate of change of temperature of a furnace, for
example, is considerably slower than the acceleration curve of an electric
motor.
Guideline value for the acquisition cycle: Approx. 1 second.
S
If necessary, dispense with cyclic transmission of user data areas (acquisition
cycle = 0) in order to improve the update time. Instead, use PLC jobs to transfer
the user data areas at random times.
S
Store the tags for a message or a screen in a contiguous data area.
S
In order that changes on the PLC are reliably detected by the operating unit,
they must occur during the actual acquisition cycle at least.
S
Set the baud rate to the highest possible value.
Screens
The real screen updating rate which can be achieved is dependent on the type and
quantity of data to be displayed.
In order to achieve short updating times, ensure that short acquisition cycles are
only defined in the configuration for those objects which actually need to be
updated quickly.
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Trends
If, in the case of bit-triggered trends, the communication bit is set in the trend
transfer area, the operating unit always updates all the trends whose bit is set in
that area. It resets the bits afterwards.
The communication bit in the PLC program can only be set again after all the bits
have been reset by the operating unit.
PLC jobs
If large numbers of PLC jobs are sent to the operating unit in quick succession,
communication between the operating unit and PLC may become overloaded.
If the operating unit enters the value 0 in the first data word of the job mailbox, it
signifies that the operating unit has accepted the job. It then processes the job, for
which it requires a certain amount of time. If a new PLC job is then immediately
entered in the job mailbox, it may take some time before the operating unit
executes the next PLC job. The next PLC job is only accepted when sufficient
computer performance is available.
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Mitsubishi PLCs via Protocol 4
12
This chapter describes the communication between operating unit and Mitsubishi
Melsec PLCs from the FX, A, AnS, Q and QnAS series.
General Information
The communication of Mitsubishi Melsec PLCs from the FX, A, AnS, Q and QnAS
series is realized by the interface modules via an operating unit interface with
RS 232 or RS 422 physics via Protocol 4.
Only those physical connections are enabled on operating units which are available
as standard equipment for the units – this particularly applies to a standard PC on
which only the RS 232 interface is enabled. A multi-point connection with up to
4 PLCs is possible via an RS 422 interface (Panel PCs and Multipanels) or an
RS 232/RS 422 converter.
The connection, in the case of these PLCs, is established by the following protocol:
S
Protocol 4 – point-to-point/multi-point connection
Operating units
The following operating units can be connected to a Mitsubishi PLC:
S
Panel PC
S
Standard PC
S
MP 370
S
MP 270, MP 270B
S
TP 270, OP 270
S
TP 170B, OP 170B
S
TP 170A
Note
The operating unit can only be implemented as a master.
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Installation
The driver necessary for the connection to the FX, A, AnS, Q and QnAS PLCs is
contained in the configuration software and is installed automatically.
The connection between the operating unit and the PLC is basically restricted to
defining the interface parameters. Special function blocks for connection to the
PLC are not required.
Connection
The operating unit can be connected to one or more PLCs from the Melsec-FX
series via the multifunctional serial interface with an RS 232 or RS 422
communication module (e.g. FX2N-232-BD) or to PLCs from the A (AnN, AnA,
AnU, AnS) Q and QnA (QnAS) series via interface modules, e.g.
A1SJ71UC24-R2/R4 (AnS(H)), A1SJ71QC24 (QnAS), AJ71UC24 (A/AnU) or
AJ71QC24N (Q/QnA) via RS 232 or RS 422.
The following connection cables are available for connection of the operating unit
to the PLC:
Table 12-1 Applicable connection cables (refer to Appendix, Part C Interface Assignment)
Interface
Point-to-point cable
Multi-point cable
RS 232, 9/9-pin
Point-to-point cable 1
Multi-point cable 1 via converter
RS 232, 9/25-pin
Point-to-point cable 2
–
RS 232, 15/9-pin
Point-to-point cable 3
–
RS 232, 15/25-pin
Point-to-point cable 4
–
RS 422, 9-pin
Point-to-point cable 5
Multi-point cable 2
Details of which interface to use on the operating unit are provided in the relevant
equipment manual.
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12.1
Basic Methods of Functioning
PLC
Tags
Process values
User data
areas
Application
program
Display/Operation
Communication
Messages
Operating unit
User
guidance
Coordination
area
Figure 12-1
Communication structure
Task of the tags
The general exchange of data between the PLC and operating unit is performed by
means of the process values. To do this, tags must be specified in the
configuration which point to an address in the PLC. The operating unit reads the
value from the specified address and displays it. In the same way, the operator can
enter a value on the operating unit, which is then written to the address in the PLC.
User data areas
User data areas are used for the exchange of special data and must only be set up
when the data concerned is used.
User data area are required, for example, for:
S
Trends
S
PLC jobs
S
Controlling LEDs
S
Life bit monitoring
A detailed description of the user data areas is provided in Chapter 13.
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Note
Area pointers can only be configured in user data area D.
If, a PLC from another series is included when configuring a PLC, not all tags can
be transferred.
The inputs and outputs (X/Y) are converted from hexadecimal to octal for the FX
series, and vice versa, in the case of the A/Q series. If the address is greater than
the permissible address range of the target PLC (X/Y > 777, Timer/Counter > 999
or D > 9999), the address is allocated to 0. Non-existent operands, such as W, B,
F are assigned to D0.
Protected areas (Write Disable During RUN) can only be read and not written to,
according to the CPU type. Special relays/registers may be write protected or only
for system use. Writing data in these special address areas (> 8191) may lead to
malfunction of the CPU.
The data types STRING and REAL do not recognize all CPUs.
The CPUs in the various series have differing limits with regard to their address
range, so refer to the Mitsubishi documentation for the relevant information.
12.2
Configuration in ProTool
When creating a new project, select the protocol required from the Project
Wizard " PLC Selection dialog box.
Set the protocol:
S
Mitsubishi Protocol 4
Note
The settings on the operating unit must match with those on the PLC.
When starting up, ProTool must not be integrated in STEP 7; deactivate the menu
item Integration in STEP 7.
Select the Parameter ... button to define the protocol parameters.
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The parameters must be set via D8120 and D8121 in the FX series PLCs.
The parameters are set via switches on the interface modules of the A, Q, AnS,
QnAS PLCs. In the case of module A1SJ71UC24-R2, the station number is always
0. The computer link, dedicated protocol, Protocol format 4 must be selected.
Define the following parameters for the PLC:
Table 12-2 PLC parameters
Parameters
Explanation
Interface
The operating unit interface to which the Mitsubish PLC is connected
must be set here.
CPU type
Define the PLC type to which the operating unit is connected. The
following entries are possible:
S
S
S
S
FX0N/FX1S
FX/FX2C/FX1N/FX2N/FX2NC
A/AnS/AnN
AnA/AnU/Q/QnA/QnAS
The PLC type must be selected in order that:
S the maximum telegram length of the PLC is not exceeded during
runtime,
S protocol differences between FX/A/AnS/AnN CPUs (5-character
addressing) and larger CPUs (7-character addressing) are realized
and
S the addressing for X and Y (hexadecimal or octal) can be adapted.
Instead of checking the address range of the operands according to the
PLC, they are selected in the largest size possible for the protocol. The
user is therefore not restricted when the memory areas of the PLCs
supported are triggered.
Station
Define the station number 0–15 of the PLC here.
Checksum
Select between yes and no here.
Interfaces type
Set RS232 or RS422.
If the operating unit is a PC, only RS232 can be used.
Data bits
Set 7 or 8.
Parity
Set NONE, EVEN or UNEVEN.
Stop bits
Set 1 or 2.
Baud rate
Define the transmission rate between the operating unit and PLC here.
The communication can be set to a baud rate of 19200 or 9600 baud.
For subsequent changes to the parameters, select the PLC in the project window
and then Properties" Parameters....
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12.3
Data Types
When configuring tags and area pointers, the data types listed in Table 12-3 are
available for use.
Table 12-3 Data types
Data type
12-6
Addressed by
Format
Output
Y
BOOL,
4-bit block
8-bit block
12-bit block
16-bit block
20-bit block
24-bit block
28-bit block
32-bit block
Input
X
BOOL,
4-bit block
8-bit block
12-bit block
16-bit block
20-bit block
24-bit block
28-bit block
32-bit block
Flag
F
BOOL,
4-bit block
8-bit block
12-bit block
16-bit block
20-bit block
24-bit block
28-bit block
32-bit block
Link marker
B
BOOL,
4-bit block
8-bit block
12-bit block
16-bit block
20-bit block
24-bit block
28-bit block
32-bit block
Timer
T
Word
Counter
C
Word, DWord
Data register
D
BOOL, Word, DWord, Int,
DInt, Real, String
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Table 12-3 Data types, continued
Data type
12.4
Addressed by
Format
Link register
W
Word, DWord, Int, DInt, Real
Fault marker
F
BOOL,
4-bit block
8-bit block
12-bit block
16-bit block
20-bit block
24-bit block
28-bit block
32-bit block
Optimization
Acquisition cycle and update time
The acquisition cycles defined in the configuration software for thearea pointers
and the acquisition cycles for the tags are major factors in respect of the real
update times which are achieved. The update time is the acquisition cycle plus
transmission time plus processing time.
In order to achieve optimum update times, the following points should be observed
during configuration:
S
When setting up the individual data areas, make them as large as necessary
but as small as possible.
S
Define data areas that belong together as contiguous areas. The effective
update time is improved by setting one single large area rather than several
smaller areas.
S
Setting acquisition cycles which are too short unnecessarily impairs overall
performance. Set the acquisition cycle to correspond to the modification time of
the process values. The rate of change of temperature of a furnace, for
example, is considerably slower than the acceleration curve of an electric
motor.
Guideline value for the acquisition cycle: Approx. 1 second.
S
If necessary, dispense with cyclic transmission of user data areas (acquisition
cycle = 0) in order to improve the update time. Instead, use PLC jobs to transfer
the user data areas at random times.
S
Store the tags for a message or a screen in a contiguous data area.
S
In order that changes on the PLC are reliably detected by the operating unit,
they must occur during the actual acquisition cycle at least.
S
Set the baud rate to the highest possible value.
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Screens
The real screen updating rate which can be achieved is dependent on the type and
quantity of data to be displayed.
In order to achieve short updating times, ensure that short acquisition cycles are
only defined in the configuration for those objects which actually need to be
updated quickly.
Trends
If, in the case of bit-triggered trends, the communication bit is set in the trend
transfer area, the operating unit always updates all the trends whose bit is set in
that area. It resets the bits afterwards.
The communication bit in the PLC program can only be set again after all the bits
have been reset by the operating unit.
PLC jobs
If large numbers of PLC jobs are sent to the operating unit in quick succession,
communication between the operating unit and PLC may become overloaded.
If the operating unit enters the value 0 in the first data word of the job mailbox, it
signifies that the operating unit has accepted the job. It then processes the job, for
which it requires a certain amount of time. If a new PLC job is then immediately
entered in the job mailbox, it may take some time before the operating unit
executes the next PLC job. The next PLC job is only accepted when sufficient
computer performance is available.
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13
Overview
User data areas are used for data exchange between the PLC and operating unit.
The user data areas are written to and read by the operating unit and the
application program alternately during the process of communication. By analyzing
the data stored there, the PLC and operating unit reciprocally initiate predefined
actions.
This chapter describes the function, layout and special features of the various user
data areas.
13.1
User Data Areas Available
Definition
The user data areas can be set up in various data areas in the PLC (data
register (D)).
Set up the user data areas both in the ProTool project and in the PLC.
The user data areas can be set up and modified in the ProTool project using the
menu items Insert → Area Pointers.
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Function range
The user data areas available are dependent on the operating unit used. The
tables 13-1 and 13-2 provide an overview of the functional range of the individual
operating units.
Table 13-1 User data areas available, Part 1
User data area
Panel PC
Standard PC
MP 370
User version
x
x
x
Job mailbox
x
x
x
Event messages
x
x
x
Screen number
x
x
x
Data mailbox
x
x
x
Date/Time
x
x
x
Date/Time PLC
x
x
x
Coordination
x
x
x
Trend request
x
x
x
Trend transfer 1, 2
x
x
x
1
x
–
x
OP/PLC acknowledgement
x
x
x
Alarm messages
x
x
x
LED assignment
1
Only possible using operating units with keyboard.
Table 13-2 User data areas available, Part 2
User data area
MP 270
MP 270B
TP 270
OP 270
TP 170B
OP 170B
TP 170A
User version
x
x
x
–
Job mailbox
x
x
x
–
Event messages
x
x
x
x
Screen number
x
x
x
–
Data mailbox
x
x
x
–
Date/Time
x
x
x
–
Date/Time PLC
x
x
x
x
Coordination
x
x
x
–
Trend request
x
x
–
–
Trend transfer 1, 2
x
x
–
–
LED assignment 1
x
x
x
–
OP/PLC acknowledgement
x
x
x
–
Alarm messages
x
x
x
–
1
13-2
Only possible using operating units with keyboard.
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Table 13-3 illustrates the way in which the PLC and operating unit access the
individual user data areas – Read (R) or Write (W).
Table 13-3 Application of the user data areas
User data area
Necessary for
Operating
unit
PLC
User version
ProTool Runtime checks whether the
ProTool project version and the
project in the PLC are consistent.
R
W
Job mailbox
Triggering of functions on the operating unit by PLC program
R/W
R/W
Event messages
Bit reporting process
arrival and departure of event messages
R
W
Screen number
Evaluation by the PLC as to which
screen is currently open
W
R
Data mailbox
Downloading of data records with
synchronization
R/W
R/W
Date/Time
Transfer of date and time from the
operating unit to the PLC
W
R
PLC date/time
Transfer of date and time from the
PLC to the operating unit.
R
W
Coordination
Operating unit status polled by the
PLC program
W
R
Trend request
Configured trends with “Triggering
via bit” or configured history trends
W
R
Trend transfer area 1
Configured trends with “Triggering
via bit” or configured history trends
R/W
R/W
Trend transfer area 2
Configured history trend with “switch
buffer”
R/W
R/W
LED assignment area
LED triggered by the PLC
R
W
OP acknowledgement
Message from the operating unit to
the PLC indicating an alarm message has been acknowledged
W
R
PLC
acknowledgement
Alarm message acknowledgement
from the PLC
R
W
Alarm messages
Bit reporting process
arrival and departure of alarm messages
R
W
The user data areas and their associated area pointers are explained in the
following chapters.
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User Data Areas for Mitsubishi PLCs
13.2
User Data Area, User Version
Usage
When starting up the operating unit, it is possible to check whether the operating
unit is connected to the correct PLC. This is important when several operating
units are used.
To do this, the operating unit compares a value stored in the PLC with the value
defined in the configuration. In this way, the compatibility of the configuration data
with the PLC program is ensured. If there is a mismatch, a system message
appears on the operating unit and the runtime configuration is terminated.
In order to use this user data area, set up the following during the configuration:
S
Specify the configuration version – value between 1 and 255.
ProTool: System → Settings
S
Data address of the value for the version stored in the PLC:
ProTool: Insert → Area Pointers, available types: User version
13.3
User Data Area, Job Mailbox
Description
The job mailbox can be used to send PLC jobs to the operating unit, thus initiating
actions on the operating unit. These functions include:
S
displaying screens
S
setting date and time
The job mailbox is set up under Area Pointer and has a length of four data words.
The first word of the job mailbox contains the job number. Depending on the PLC
job in question, up to three parameters can then be specified.
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Data Word
n+0
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
Job no.
n+1
Parameter 1
n+2
Parameter 2
n+3
Parameter 3
Figure 13-1
Structure of the user data area, job mailbox
If the first word of the job mailbox is not equal to zero, the operating unit analyzes
the PLC job. Afterwards, the unit sets this data word to zero again. For this reason,
the parameters must be entered in the job mailbox first and then the job number.
The possible PLC jobs, including job number and parameters, are provided in the
“ProTool Online Help” and the Appendix, Part B.
13.4
User Data Areas, Event and Alarm Messages and
Acknowledgement
Definition
Messages consist of a static text and/or tags. The text and tags can be defined by
the user.
Messages are subdivided into event messages and alarm messages. The
programmer defines the event message and alarm message.
Event Messages
An event message indicates a status, e.g.
S
Motor switched on
S
PLC in manual mode
Alarm messages
An alarm message indicates an operational fault, e.g.
S
Valve not opening
S
Motor temperature too high
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Acknowledgement
Since alarm messages indicate an abnormal operational status, they must be
acknowledged. They can be acknowledged either by
S
operator input on the operating unit
S
setting a bit in the PLC acknowledgement area.
Triggering messages
A message is triggered by setting a bit in one of the message areas on the PLC.
The location of the message areas is defined by means of the configuration
software. The corresponding area must also be set up in the PLC.
As soon as the bit in the PLC event/alarm message area has been set and that
area has been transferred to the operating unit, the operating unit detects that the
relevant message has “arrived”.
Conversely, when the same bit is reset on the PLC by the operating unit, the
message is registered as having “departed”.
Message areas
Table 13-4 indicates the number of message areas for event and alarm messages,
for alarm acknowledgement OP (operating unit → PLC) and for alarm
acknowledgement PLC (PLC → operating unit) and the number of words for the
various operating units.
Table 13-4 Division of message areas
Operating unit
Event message area, Alarm message area
Acknowledgement area OP, Acknowledgement area PLC
Number of
Words in data
Words,
data areas, ma- area, maximum total
ximum
Panel PC
8
125
250
4000
Standard PC
8
125
250
4000
MP 370
8
125
250
4000
MP 270, MP 270B
8
125
250
4000
TP 270, OP 270
8
125
250
4000
TP 170B, OP 170B
8
125
125
2000
TP 170A1
8
63
63
1000
1
13-6
Messages,
total
Only event messages possible.
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Assignment of message bit and message number
A message can be assigned to each bit in the configured message area. The bits
are assigned to the message numbers in ascending order.
Example:
The following event message area has been configured in the PLC:
Length 5 (in words)
D 43
Figure 13-2 illustrates the assignment of all 80 (5 x 16) message numbers to the
individual bit numbers in the PLC event message area. The assignment is
performed automatically on the operating unit.
D 43
15
16
0
1
D 47
80
65
Message number
Figure 13-2
Assignment of message bit and message number
User data areas, acknowledgement
If the PLC should be informed of an alarm message acknowledgement on the
operating unit or the acknowledgement should be initiated on the PLC itself, the
relevant acknowledgement areas must also be set up in the PLC. These
acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the ProTool project under Area
Pointers.
S
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC:
This area is used to inform the PLC when an alarm message has been
acknowledged by means of operator input on the operating unit. The “Alarm
Ack. OP” area pointer must be created or configured for this.
S
Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit:
This area is used when an alarm message is acknowledged by the PLC. In this
case, the area pointer “PLC acknowledgement” must be set.
These acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the configuration under
Area Pointers.
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Figure 13-3 illustrates a schematic diagram of the of the individual alarm message
and acknowledgement areas. The acknowledgement sequences are shown in
Figures 13-5 and 13-6.
Operating unit
PLC
Alarm messages area
ACK
Internal processing /
link
Acknowledgement area
PLC → Operating unit
Acknowledgement area
Operating unit → PLC
Figure 13-3
Alarm message and acknowledgement areas
Assignment of acknowledgement bit to message number
Each alarm message is assigned a message number. The message number is
assigned the same bit number in the alarm messages area as that assigned in the
acknowledgement area. Under normal circumstances, the acknowledgement area
is the same length as the associated alarm messages area.
If the length of an acknowledgement area is not equal to the overall length of the
associated alarm messages area, and there are succeeding alarm messages and
acknowledgement areas, the following assignment applies:
Alarm messages area 1
Alarm message no. 1
Bit 15
0
16
1
.............
.............
32
17
.............
48
33
Alarm messages area 2
Bit 15
64
80
Alarm message no. 49
0
.............
49
.............
65
Figure 13-4
13-8
Acknowledgement area 1
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 1
Bit 15
0
16
1
.............
.............
32
17
Acknowledgement area 2
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 49
0
Bit 15
.............
64
49
.............
80
65
Assignment of acknowledgement bit and message number
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Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
A bit set in this area by the PLC initiates the acknowledgement of the
corresponding alarm message in the operating unit, thus fulfilling the same function
as pressing the ACK button. Reset the bit before setting the bit in the alarm
message area again. Figure 13-5 illustrates the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area PLC→ Operating Unit
S
must follow on immediately from the associated alarm messages area,
S
must have precisely the same polling time and
S
may not be any longer than the associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages
area
Acknowledgement
area PLC →
Operating Unit
Figure 13-5
Acknowledgement
via PLC
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
When a bit is set in the alarm message area, the operating unit resets the
associated bit in the acknowledgement area. As a result of processing by the
operating unit, the two processes indicate a slight difference with regard to time. If
the alarm message is acknowledged on the operating unit, the bit in the
acknowledgement area is set. In this way, the PLC can detect that the alarm
message has been acknowledged. Figure 13-6 illustrates the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC must be no longer than the
associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages
area
Acknowledgement
area Operating Unit →
PLC
Figure 13-6
Acknowledgement
via operating unit
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
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Acknowledgement area size
The acknowledgement areas PLC → Operating Unit and Operating Unit → PLC
must not be any longer than the associated alarm message areas. The
acknowledgement area, however, be smaller if acknowledgement by the PLC is
not required for all alarm messages. This is also valid when the acknowledgement
need not be detected in the PLC for all alarm messages. Figure 13-7 illustrates
such a case.
Alarm messages
area
Alarm messages
that can be
acknowledged
Bit 0
Bit n
Bit n
Alarm messages
that cannot be
acknowledged
Figure 13-7
Reduced-size
alarm messages
acknowledgement area
Bit 0
Bit m
Reduced-size acknowledgement area
Note
Place important alarm messages in the alarm messages area starting at Bit 0 in
ascending order.
13.5
User Data Areas, Screen Numbers
Application
The operating units store information concerning the screen currently open on the
unit in the screen number user data area.
This enables the transfer of data regarding the current operating unit display
content to the PLC which, in turn, can trigger certain reactions; e.g. call in a
different screen.
Requirements
If the screen number area should be used, it must be specified in the ProTool
project as an Area Pointer. It can only be stored in one PLC and only once.
The screen number area is downloaded to the PLC spontaneously, i.e. the transfer
is always initiated when a change is selected on the operating unit. Therefore, it is
not necessary to configure an acquisition cycle.
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Structure
The screen number area is a data area with a fixed length of 5 words.
The structure of the screen number area in the PLC memory is illustrated below.
1st Word
15
8 7
Current screen type
2nd Word
Current screen number
3rd Word
Reserved
4th Word
Current field number
5th Word
Reserved
0
Entry
13.6
Assignment
Current screen type
1 for basic screen or
4 for fixed window
Current screen number
1 to 65535
Current field number
1 to 65535
User Data Area, Date/Time
Transferring date and time
Transfer of date and time from the operating unit to the PLC can be triggered by
PLC job 41. PLC job 41 writes the date and time to the data area Date/Time where
they can be analyzed by the PLC program. Figure 13-8 illustrates the structure of
the data area. All data is in BCD format.
Left byte
Minute (0–59)
Second (0–59)
n+2
n+3
0
Hour (0–23)
Reserved
Reserved
Weekday (1–7, 1=Sun)
n+4
Day (1–31)
Month (1–12)
n+5
Year (80–99/0–29)
Reserved
Figure 13-8
Time
n+1
8 7
Reserved
Date
DW 15
n+0
Right byte
Structure of data area Time and Date
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User Data Areas for Mitsubishi PLCs
Note
When entering data in the year data area, please note that the values 80–99
represent 1980 to 1999 and 0–29 the years 2000 to 2029.
13.7
User Data Area, Date/Time PLC
Transfer of date and time to the operating unit
The downloading of date and time to the operating unit is generally useful when the
PLC is master for time.
DATE_AND_TIME format (BCD coded)
Left byte
DW
15
n+0
Right byte
8 7
0
Year (80–99/0–29)
Month (1–12)
n+1
Day (1–31)
Hour (0–23)
n+2
Minute (0–59)
Second (0–59)
n+3
Reserved
Figure 13-9
Reserved
Weekday (1–7, 1=Sun)
Structure of data area Date/Time in DATE_AND_TIME format
Note
When entering data in the year data area, please note that the values 80–99
represent 1980 to 1999 and 0–29 the years 2000 to 2029.
The PLC writes cyclically to the data area, whereby the operating unit reads and
synchronizes (refer to the ProTool User’s Guide).
Note
In the configuration, do not select too small an acquisition cycle for the Date/Time
area pointer because this affects the operating unit performance.
Recommendation: Acquisition cycle of 1 minute, if permitted by the process.
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User Data Areas for Mitsubishi PLCs
13.8
User Data Area, Coordination
The coordination user data area is two words long. It serves to realize the following
functions:
S
Detection of operating unit startup by the PLC program,
S
Detection of the current operating unit operating mode by the PLC program,
S
Detection by the PLC program that the operating unit is ready to communicate.
Note
Each time the coordination area is updated by the operating unit, the entire
coordination area is written.
Therefore, the PLC program must not execute any modifications in the
coordination area.
Bit assignment in coordination area
High Byte
1st Word
15
– – –
–
– –
8
– –
Low Byte
7
2 1 0
– – – – – X X X
Startup bit
– = Reserved
X = Assigned
Operating mode
Life bit
Figure 13-10 Significance of the bits in the coordination area
Startup bit
The startup bit is set to 0 for a short time during the start-up routine by the
operating unit. After the startup routine has been completed, the bit is set
permanently to 1.
Operating mode
As soon as the operating unit has been switched offline by the operator, the
operating mode bit is set to 1. When the operating unit is working in normal
operation, the operating mode bit is set to 0. The PLC program can be used to poll
this bit and thus establish the current operating mode of the operating unit.
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User Data Areas for Mitsubishi PLCs
Life bit
The life bit is inverted by the operating unit at intervals of approx. one second. The
PLC program can be used to poll this bit to check whether connection to the
operating unit still exists.
13.9
User Data Areas, Trend Request and Trend Transfer
Trends
A trend is the graphical representation of a value from the PLC. Reading of the
value can be time-triggered or bit-triggered, depending on the configuration.
Time-triggered trends
The operating unit reads the trend values cyclically according to the cycle interval
defined in the configuration. Time-triggered trends are suitable for continuous
progressions such as the operating temperature of a motor.
Bit-triggered trends
By setting a trigger bit in the trend transfer area pointer, the operating unit reads in
either a trend value or the entire trend buffer. This is specified in the configuration.
Bit-triggered trends are normally used to display values of an area subject to rapid
variation. An example of this is the injection pressure for plastic moldings.
In order to be able to activate bit-triggered trends, corresponding data areas have
to be specified in the ProTool project (under Area Pointers) and set up on the PLC.
The operating unit and the PLC communicate with one another via those areas.
The following areas are available for trends:
S
Trend request area
S
Trend transfer area 1
S
Trend transfer area 2 (required with switch buffer only)
Assign a trend to a bit in the configuration. This ensures the bit assignment is
unique for all areas.
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User Data Areas for Mitsubishi PLCs
Switch buffer
The switch buffer is a second buffer for the same trend and can be set up during
the configuration.
While the operating unit reads the value from Buffer 1, the PLC writes it in Buffer 2.
If the operating unit reads from Buffer 2, the PLC writes to Buffer 1. This prevents
the trend value being overwritten by the PLC when being read by the operating
unit.
Partitioning of the area pointers
The trend request and trend transfer 1 and 2 area pointers can be divided into
separate data areas with a predefined maximum number and length (refer to
Table 13-5).
Table 13-5 Partitioning of the area pointer
Data area
Trend request
Trend transfer
1
2
Number of data areas, maximum
8
8
8
Words in data area, total
8
8
8
Trend request area
If a screen with one or more trends is opened on the operating unit, the unit sets
the corresponding bits in the trend request area. After deselection of the screen,
the operating unit resets the corresponding bits in the trend request area.
The trend request area can be used by the PLC to ascertain which trend is
currently being displayed on the operating unit. Trends can also be triggered
without analysis of the trend request area.
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User Data Areas for Mitsubishi PLCs
Trend transfer area 1
This area serves for triggering trends. In the PLC program, set the bit assigned to
the trend in the trend transfer area and the trend communication bit. The operating
unit detects triggering and reads in either a trend value or the entire buffer. It then
resets resets the trend bit and the trend communication bit.
Trend transfer area(s)
Bit number
15 14 13 12 11 10 9
8 7
6
5 4
3
2
1
0
1st Word
2nd Word
Trend communication bit
The trend transfer area must not be altered by the PLC program until the trend
communication bit has been reset.
Trend transfer area 2
Trend transfer area 2 is necessary for trends that are configured with a switch
buffer. Its layout is precisely the same as that of trend transfer area 1.
13.10
User Data Area, LED Assignment
Application
The Operator Panel (OP), Multi Panel (MP) and Panel PC have function keys with
Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) integrated in them. These LEDs can be controlled
from the PLC. This means, for example, that in specific situations, it is possible to
indicate to the operator which key should be pressed by switching on an LED.
Requirements
In order to control LEDs, corresponding data areas, so-called LED assignments,
must be set up in the PLC and defined in the configuration as Area Pointers.
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User Data Areas for Mitsubishi PLCs
Partitioning of the area pointer
The LED assignment area pointer can be divided into separate data areas, as
illustrated in the following table.
Table 13-6 Partitioning of the LED assignment area pointer
Operating unit
Number of data areas,
maximum
Words in data area,
total
Panel PC
8
16
MP 370
8
16
MP 270, MP 270B
8
16
OP 270
8
16
OP 170B
8
16
Note
The area pointer in question can no longer be selected in the Insert new area
pointer window when the maximum number has been reached. Area pointers of
the same type appear gray.
LED assignment
The assignment of the individual LEDs to the bits in the data areas is defined when
the function keys are configured. This involves specifying a bit number within the
assignment area for each LED.
The bit number (n) identifies the first of two successive bits which control the
following LED states:
Table 13-7 LED states
Bit n + 1
Bit n
0
0
Off
0
1
Flashes
1
0
Flashes
1
1
Permanently on
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LED function
13-17
User Data Areas for Mitsubishi PLCs
13.11
Recipes
Description
During the transfer of data records between the operating unit and PLC, both
communication peers alternately access common communication areas in the
PLC. The function and structure of the recipe-specific communication area (“data
mailbox”) and the mechanisms involved in synchronized transfer of data records
are the subject of this chapter.
Information on setting up the data mailbox in ProTool is provided in the online help.
Downloading methods
There are two methods of downloading data records between operating unit and
PLC:
S
Asynchronous transfer (Page 13-19)
S
Synchronized transfer using the data mailbox (Page 13-20)
Data records are always transferred directly, i.e. the tag values are read or written
directly from or to the address configured for the tag without being stored
intermediately.
Trigger downloading of data records
There are three methods of triggering the transfer of data:
S
By operator input on the recipe display (Page 13-21)
S
By PLC jobs (Page 13-22)
S
By activating configured functions (Page 13-23)
If transfer of data records is initiated by a configured function or a PLC job, the
recipe display on the operating unit remains fully functional as the data records are
transferred in the background.
Simultaneous processing of multiple transfer jobs is not possible, however. In such
cases, the operating unit returns a system message refusing additional transfer
requests.
A list of the most important system messages together with notes on the possible
causes of the associated errors and remedies for them is provided in Appendix,
Part A.
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User Data Areas for Mitsubishi PLCs
13.11.1
Asynchronous data transfer
Purpose
In the case of asynchronous transfer of data records between operating unit and
PLC, there is no coordination of the communication areas commonly used. For
this reason, there is no need to set up a data mailbox during the configuration
process.
Application
The asynchronous transfer of data records is applicable, for example, when the
S
uncontrolled overwriting of data by the communication peers can be reliably
prevented by the system,
S
the PLC does not require any details of the recipe and data record numbers, or
S
transfer of data records is initiated by operator input on the operating unit.
Read values
On triggering a read transfer, the values are read from the PLC addresses and
downloaded to the operating unit.
S
Transfer initiated by operator input on recipe display:
Data is uploaded to the operating unit. There it can be processed, e.g. values
can be modified and the changes saved.
S
Transfer initiated by function or PLC job:
The data is saved directly to the storage medium.
Write values
On triggering a write transfer, the values are written to the PLC addresses.
S
Transfer initiated by operator input on recipe display:
The current values are written to the PLC.
S
Transfer initiated by function or PLC job:
The values on the storage medium are written to the PLC.
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User Data Areas for Mitsubishi PLCs
13.11.2
Synchronous data transfer
Purpose
In the case of synchronous data transfer, both the communication peers set status
bits in the commonly used data mailbox. In this way, the PLC program can prevent
uncontrolled overwriting of each other’s data by the two units.
Application
The synchronous transfer of data records is applicable, for example, when
S
the PLC is the “active partner” for transfer of data records,
S
details of the recipe and data record numbers are to be analyzed on the PLC,
or
S
transfer of data records is initiated by PLC job.
Requirements
In order to synchronize the transfer of data records between the operating unit and
PLC, the following conditions must be fulfilled in the configuration:
S
the data mailbox must have been set up in System → Area Pointer;
S
the recipe properties must specify the PLC with which the operating unit has to
synchronize transfer of data records.
The PLC is specified in the recipe editor in Properties → Transfer.
Detailed information on this is provided in ProTool Configuring Windows-based
Systems User Guide.
13.11.3
Data mailbox for synchronized data transfer
Structure
The data mailbox has a defined length of 5 words. Its structure is as follows:
15
Current recipe number (1 – 999)
2nd Word
Current data record number (0 – 65,535)
3rd Word
4th Word
5th Word
13-20
0
1st Word
Reserved
Status (0, 2, 4, 12)
Reserved
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Status word
The status word (Word 4) can assume the following values:
Value
13.11.4
Explanation
Decimal
Binary
0
0000 0000
Transfer permitted, data mailbox is accessible
2
0000 0010
Transfer in progress
4
0000 0100
Transfer completed without errors
12
0000 1100
Errors occurred during transfer
Synchronization process
Read from the PLC by operating the recipe view
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe number to be read
and the status “Transfer in progress” in the data mailbox
and sets the data record number to zero.
3
The operating unit reads the values from the PLC and
displays them on the recipe display.
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In the case of recipes with synchronous tags, the values
from the are also written in the tags.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
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User Data Areas for Mitsubishi PLCs
Write in the PLC by operating the recipe view
Step
1
Action
Check status word = 0?
Yes
No
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number to be written and the status “Transfer in progress”
in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit writes the current values to the PLC.
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In the case of recipes with synchronized tags, the
modified values between the recipe views and tags are
compared and then written to the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Read from the PLC by PLC job “PLC → DAT” (no. 69)
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the job and the status “Transfer in
progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit reads the value from the PLC and
saves the value in the data record specified by the job.
4
S If the option “Overwrite” has been specified for the job,
No
Operation
cancelled and no
message returned
existing data records are overwritten without prior
warning.
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer
completed”.
S If “Do not overwrite” was specified in the job and the
data record already exists, the operating unit
terminates the process and enters 0000 1100 in the
status word of the data mailbox.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Details of the structure of the PLC job are provided on Page 13-25.
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User Data Areas for Mitsubishi PLCs
Write in the PLC by PLC job “DAT → PLC” (no. 70)
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
No
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the job and the status “Transfer in
progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit retrieves the value from the data
record specified in the job from the data medium and
writes that value in the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
Operation
cancelled and no
message returned
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Details of the structure of the PLC job are provided on Page 13-25.
Read from the PLC by configured function
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the function and the status “Transfer
in progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit reads the data from the PLC and
saves it to the data record specified by the function.
4
S If the option “Overwrite” has been specified for the
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
function, existing data records are overwritten without
prior warning.
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer
completed”.
S If “Do not overwrite” was specified in the job and the
data record already exists, the operating unit
terminates the process and enters 0000 1100 in the
status word of the data mailbox.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
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User Data Areas for Mitsubishi PLCs
Write in the PLC by configured function
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the function and the status “Transfer
in progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit retrieves the value from the data
record specified in the function from the data medium and
writes that value in the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Note
For reasons of data consistency, analysis of the recipe and data record number on
the PLC cannot be performed until the status in the data mailbox is set to
“Transfer completed” or “Errors occurred during transfer”.
Possible causes of errors
If the downloading of data records is terminated due to errors, it may be due to one
of the following reasons:
S
Tag address not set up on PLC,
S
Overwriting of data records not possible,
S
Recipe number not available
S
Data record number not available
A list of the most important system messages together with notes on the possible
causes of the associated errors and remedies for them is provided in Appendix,
Part A.
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User Data Areas for Mitsubishi PLCs
Response to error–based termination
The operating unit responds as follows when the downloading of data records is
terminated due to an error:
S
Transfer initiated by operator input in recipe view
Indication on the status bar on the recipe display and issue of system
messages.
S
Transfer initiated by function
System messages issued.
S
Transfer initiated by PLC job
No feedback of information on operating unit
Regardless of the response of the operating unit, the status of the transfer can be
checked by reading the status word in the data mailbox.
13.11.5
PLC jobs with recipes
Purpose
The transfer of data records between operating unit and PLC can be triggered by
the PLC program. This requires no operator input on the operating unit.
The two PLC jobs No. 69 and No. 70 can be used for this.
No. 69: Read data record from PLC (“PLC → DAT”)
PLC Job No. 69 downloads data records from the PLC to the operating unit. The
structure of this PLC job is as follows:
Word 1
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
69
Word 2
Recipe number (1 – 999)
Word 3
Data record number (1 – 65,535)
Word 4
Do not overwrite existing data record: 0
Overwrite existing data record: 1
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User Data Areas for Mitsubishi PLCs
No. 70: Write data record to PLC (“DAT → PLC”)
PLC Job No. 70 downloads data records from the operating unit to the PLC. The
structure of this PLC job is as follows:
Word 1
13-26
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
70
Word 2
Recipe number (1 – 999)
Word 3
Data record number (1 – 65,535)
Word 4
—
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Part VII
Connection to
OMRON PLCs
Communication Management for
OMRON PLCs
14
User Data Areas for
OMRON PLCs
15
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Communication Management for
OMRON PLCs
14
This chapter describes the communication between operating unit and OMRON
PLCs from the SYSMAC C, SYSMAC CV, SYSMAC CS1, SYSMAC alpha and CP
series.
General Information
The connection, in the case of these PLCs, is established by the following internal
PLC protocol:
S
SYSMAC Way (Hostlink/Multilink protocol)
Only those connections are enabled which are present on the operating unit as
standard equipment. In the case of standard PCs in particular, only the RS 232
interface is enabled. A multi-point connection to up to 4 PLCs is possible using a
RS 232/RS 422 converter.
Operating units
The following operating units can be connected to SYSMAC and CP PLCs:
S
Panel PC
S
Standard PC
S
MP 370
S
MP 270, MP 270B
S
TP 270, OP 270
S
TP 170B, OP 170B
S
TP 170A
Note
The operating unit can only be implemented as a master.
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Communication Management for OMRON PLCs
Installation
The connection between the operating unit and the PLC is basically restricted to
defining the interface parameters. Special function blocks for connection to the
PLC are not required.
The driver necessary for the connection to the SYSMAC and CP PLCs is
contained in the configuration software and is installed automatically.
Connection
The connection of the operating unit is dependent on the protocol selected.
The following connection cables are available for connection of the operating unit
to the PLC:
Table 14-1 Applicable connection cables (for interface assignment, refer to Appendix, Part C)
Interface
RS 232
9-pin
RS 232
Periphery port
RS 422
9-pin
RS 422
Terminals
RS 232, 9-pin
–
Manufacturer’s
programming
cable
–
–
RS 232, 15-pin
6XC1440-2X _ _
–
–
–
RS 232 via
converter
–
–
–
Multi-point cable 1
RS 422, 9-pin
–
–
RS 422, 9-pin
Multi-point cable 2
’_’ Length code (refer to Catalog ST 80)
Details of which interface to use on the operating unit are provided in the relevant
equipment manual.
Connection type
The connection of an operating unit (Panel PC, standard PC) to an OMRON PLC
from the OMRON SYSMAC C series (not CQM-CPU11/21), SYSMAC CV,
SYSMAC CS1 and SYSMAC alpha via the Hostlink/Mulitlink protocol and RS 232
has been tested by Siemens AG and approved.
A multi-point connection to up to 4 OMRON LCs in an RS 422 four-wire multidrop
combination can be realized via a communication adapter.
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14.1
Basic Methods of Functioning
PLC
Tags
Process values
User data
areas
Application
program
Display/Operation
Communication
Messages
Operating unit
User
guidance
Coordination
area
Figure 14-1
Communication structure
Task of the tags
The general exchange of data between the PLC and operating unit is performed by
means of the process values. To do this, tags must be specified in the
configuration which point to an address in the PLC. The operating unit reads the
value from the specified address and displays it. In the same way, the operator can
enter a value on the operating unit, which is then written to the address in the PLC.
User data areas
User data areas are used for the exchange of special data and must only be set up
when the data concerned is used.
User data area are required, for example, for:
S
Trends
S
PLC jobs
S
Controlling LEDs
S
Life bit monitoring
A detailed description of the user data areas is provided in Chapter 15.
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Communication Management for OMRON PLCs
14.2
Configuration in ProTool
When creating a new project, select the protocol required from the Project
Wizard" PLC Selection dialog box.
Set the protocol:
S
SYSMAC Way
Note
The settings on the operating unit must match with those on the PLC.
When starting up, ProTool must not be integrated in STEP 7; deactivate the menu
item Integration in STEP 7.
Select the Parameter ... button to define the protocol parameters. Define the
following parameters for the PLC:
Table 14-2 PLC parameters
Parameters
Explanation
Interface
The operating unit interface to which the PLC is connected must be set
here.
–
PanelPC
COM 1 or COM 2
–
Standard PC
COM 1 to COM 4
–
MP 370
IF1A, IF2 or IF1B
–
MP 270, MP 270B
IF1A, IF2 or IF1B
–
TP 270, OP 270
IF1A, IF2 or IF1B
–
TP 170B, OP170B
IF1A, IF2 or IF1B
–
TP 170A
IF1A or IF1B
Station
Define the station number of the PLC connected.
Interface type
Set RS232 or RS422.
Data bits
Set 7 or 8.
Parity
Set NONE, EVEN or UNEVEN.
Stop bits
Set 1 or 2.
Baud rate
Define the transmission rate between the operating unit and PLC here.
The communication can be set to a baud rate of 19200, 9600, 2400,
4800 or 1200 baud.
For subsequent changes to the parameters, select PLC in the project window and
then Properties" Parameters....
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14.3
Data Types
When configuring tags and area pointers, the data types listed in Table 14-3 are
available for use.
Table 14-3 Data types
Data type
Addressed by
Format
Status
CPU status
BIN
Input/Output words
I/O
BIN,
DEC,
+/–DEC
ID marker word
HR
BIN,
DEC,
+/–DEC,
LDC,
+/–LDC,
IEEE,
ASCII
Auxiliary marker word
AR
BIN,
DEC,
+/–DEC,
LDC,
+/–LDC,
ASCII
Interface marker word
LR
BIN,
DEC,
+/–DEC,
LDC,
+/–LDC,
ASCII
Data marker word
DM
BIN,
DEC,
+/–DEC,
LDC,
+/–LDC,
IEEE,
ASCII
Tmer/Counter status
T/C BIN
BIN
Timer/Counter actual values
T/C VAL
DEC,
+/–DEC
the type of PLC
CPU type
Byte
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Communication Management for OMRON PLCs
Note
Reliable reading from and writing to all data areas the OMRON PLCs is only
possible in operating modes STOP or MONITOR.
Either the IR/SR or CIO area is named with the I/O according to the PLC series.
The data types LR, HR and AR are not recognized by all PLC series.
Adressing from the CV and CS PLC series
In the case of PLCs from the CV and CS series, the timers 0–2047 are addressed
with T/C 0-2047. The counters 0-2047 must be addressed with an offset of 2048 in
ProTool (T/C 2048-4095 corresponds to the counters 0–2047).
Counters and timers with addresses > 2047 cannot be addressed via Hostlink.
Example:
In order to address the counter C20, T/C 20 + 2048 = T/C 2068 must be
addressed muss in ProTool.
14.4
Optimization
Acquisition cycle and update time
The acquisition cycles defined in the configuration software for the area pointers
and the acquisition cycles for the tags are major factors in respect of the real
update times which are achieved. The update time is the acquisition cycle plus
transmission time plus processing time.
In order to achieve optimum update times, the following points should be observed
during configuration:
S
When setting up the individual data areas, make them as large as necessary
but as small as possible.
S
Define data areas that belong together as contiguous areas. The effective
update time is improved by setting one single large area rather than several
smaller areas.
S
Setting acquisition cycles which are too short unnecessarily impairs overall
performance. Set the acquisition cycle to correspond to the modification time of
the process values. The rate of change of temperature of a furnace, for
example, is considerably slower than the acceleration curve of an electric
motor.
Guideline value for the acquisition cycle: Approx. 1 second.
14-6
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Communication Management for OMRON PLCs
S
If necessary, dispense with cyclic transmission of user data areas (acquisition
cycle = 0) in order to improve the update time. Instead, use PLC jobs to transfer
the user data areas at random times.
S
Store the tags for a message or a screen in a contiguous data area.
S
In order that changes on the PLC are reliably detected by the operating unit,
they must occur during the actual acquisition cycle at least.
S
Set the baud rate to the highest possible value.
Screens
The real screen updating rate which can be achieved is dependent on the type and
quantity of data to be displayed.
In order to achieve short updating times, ensure that short acquisition cycles are
only defined in the configuration for those objects which actually need to be
updated quickly.
Trends
If, in the case of bit-triggered trends, the communication bit is set in the trend
transfer area, the operating unit always updates all the trends whose bit is set in
that area. It resets the bits afterwards.
The communication bit in the PLC program can only be set again after all the bits
have been reset by the operating unit.
PLC jobs
If large numbers of PLC jobs are sent to the operating unit in quick succession,
communication between the operating unit and PLC may become overloaded.
If the operating unit enters the value 0 in the first data word of the job mailbox, it
signifies that the operating unit has accepted the job. It then processes the job, for
which it requires a certain amount of time. If a new PLC job is then immediately
entered in the job mailbox, it may take some time before the operating unit
executes the next PLC job. The next PLC job is only accepted when sufficient
computer performance is available.
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User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs
15
Overview
User data areas are used for data exchange between the PLC and operating unit.
The user data areas are written to and read by the operating unit and the
application program alternately during the process of communication. By analyzing
the data stored there, the PLC and operating unit reciprocally initiate predefined
actions.
This chapter describes the function, layout and special features of the various user
data areas.
15.1
User Data Areas Available
Definition
The user data areas can be set up in the data area D of the PLC.
Set up the user data areas both in the ProTool project and in the PLC.
The user data areas can be set up and modified in the ProTool project using the
menu items Insert → Area Pointers.
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User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs
Function range
The user data areas available are dependent on the operating unit used. The
tables 15-1 and 15-2 provide an overview of the functional range of the individual
operating units.
Table 15-1 User data areas available, Part 1
User data area
Panel PC
Standard PC
User version
x
x
Job mailbox
x
x
Event messages
x
x
Screen number
x
x
Data mailbox
x
x
Date/Time
x
x
Date/Time PLC
x
x
Coordination
x
x
Trend request
x
x
Trend transfer 1, 2
x
x
1
x
–
OP/PLC acknowledgement
x
x
Alarm messages
x
x
LED assignment
1
Only possible using operating units with keyboard.
Table 15-2 User data areas available, Part 2
User data area
MP 270
MP 270B
TP 270
OP 270
TP 170B
OP 170B
TP 170A
User version
x
x
x
–
Job mailbox
x
x
x
–
Event messages
x
x
x
x
Screen number
x
x
x
–
Data mailbox
x
x
x
–
Date/Time
x
x
x
–
Date/Time PLC
x
x
x
x
Coordination
x
x
x
–
Trend request
x
x
–
–
Trend transfer 1, 2
x
x
–
–
LED assignment 1
x
x
x
–
OP/PLC acknowledgement
x
x
x
–
Alarm messages
x
x
x
–
1
15-2
Only possible using operating units with keyboard.
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User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs
Table 15-3 illustrates the way in which the PLC and operating unit access the
individual user data areas – Read (R) or Write (W).
Table 15-3 Application of the user data areas
User data area
Necessary for
Operating
unit
PLC
User version
ProTool Runtime checks whether the
ProTool project version and the
project in the PLC are consistent.
R
W
Job mailbox
Triggering of functions on the operating unit by PLC program
R/W
R/W
Event messages
Bit reporting process
arrival and departure of event messages
R
W
Screen number
Evaluation by the PLC as to which
screen is currently open
W
R
Data mailbox
Downloading of data records with
synchronization
R/W
R/W
Date/Time
Transfer of date and time from the
operating unit to the PLC
W
R
Date/Time PLC
Transfer of date and time from the
PLC to the operating unit.
R
W
Coordination
Operating unit status polled by the
PLC program
W
R
Trend request
Configured trends with “Triggering
via bit” or configured history trends
W
R
Trend transfer 1
Configured trends with “Triggering
via bit” or configured history trends
R/W
R/W
Trend transfer area 2
Configured history trend with “switch
buffer”
R/W
R/W
LED assignment area
LED triggered by the PLC
R
W
OP acknowledgement
Message from the operating unit to
the PLC indicating an alarm message has been acknowledged
W
R
PLC
acknowledgement
Alarm message acknowledgement
from the PLC
R
W
Alarm messages
Bit reporting process
arrival and departure of alarm messages
R
W
The user data areas and their associated area pointers are explained in the
following chapters.
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User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs
15.2
User Data Area, User Version
Usage
When starting up the operating unit, it is possible to check whether the operating
unit is connected to the correct PLC. This is important when several operating
units are used.
To do this, the operating unit compares a value stored in the PLC with the value
defined in the configuration. In this way, the compatibility of the configuration data
with the PLC program is ensured. If there is a mismatch, a system message
appears on the operating unit and the runtime configuration is terminated.
In order to use this user data area, set up the following during the configuration:
S
Specify the configuration version – value between 1 and 255.
ProTool: System → Settings
S
Data address of the value for the version stored in the PLC:
ProTool: Insert → Area Pointers, available types: User version
15.3
User Data Area, Job Mailbox
Description
The job mailbox can be used to send PLC jobs to the operating unit, thus initiating
actions on the operating unit. These functions include:
S
displaying screens
S
setting date and time
The job mailbox is set up under Area Pointer and has a length of four data words.
The first word of the job mailbox contains the job number. Depending on the PLC
job in question, up to three parameters can then be specified.
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User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs
Word
n+0
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
Job no.
n+1
Parameter 1
n+2
Parameter 2
n+3
Parameter 3
Figure 15-1
Structure of the user data area, job mailbox
If the first word of the job mailbox is not equal to zero, the operating unit analyzes
the PLC job. The operating unit then sets this data word to zero again. For this
reason, the parameters must be entered in the job mailbox first and then the job
number.
The possible PLC jobs, including job number and parameters, are provided in the
“ProTool Online Help” and the Appendix, Part B.
15.4
User Data Areas, Event and Alarm Messages and
Acknowledgement
Definition
Messages consist of a static text and/or tags. The text and tags can be defined by
the user.
Messages are subdivided into event messages and alarm messages. The
programmer defines the event message and alarm message.
Event Messages
An event message indicates a status, e.g.
S
Motor switched on
S
PLC in manual mode
Alarm messages
An alarm message indicates an operational fault, e.g.
S
Valve not opening
S
Motor temperature too high
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User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs
Acknowledgement
Since alarm messages indicate an abnormal operational status, they must be
acknowledged. They can be acknowledged either by
S
operator input on the operating unit
S
setting a bit in the PLC acknowledgement area.
Triggering messages
A message is triggered by setting a bit in one of the message areas on the PLC.
The location of the message areas is defined by means of the configuration
software. The corresponding area must also be set up in the PLC.
As soon as the bit in the PLC event/alarm message area has been set and that
area has been transferred to the operating unit, the operating unit detects that the
relevant message has “arrived”.
Conversely, when the same bit is reset on the PLC by the operating unit, the
message is registered as having “departed”.
Message areas
Table 15-4 indicates the number of message areas for event and alarm messages,
for alarm acknowledgement OP (operating unit → PLC) and for alarm
acknowledgement PLC (PLC → operating unit) and the number of words for the
various operating units.
Table 15-4 Division of message areas
Operating unit
Event message area, Alarm message area
Acknowledgement area OP, Acknowledgement area PLC
Number of
Words in data
data areas, ma- area,
ximum
maximum
Messages,
total
Panel PC
8
125
250
4000
Standard PC
8
125
250
4000
MP 370
8
125
250
4000
MP 270, MP 270B
8
125
250
4000
TP 270, OP 270
8
125
250
4000
TP 170B, OP 170B
8
125
125
2000
TP 170A1
8
63
63
1000
1
15-6
Words,
total
Only event messages possible.
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User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs
Assignment of message bit to message number
A message can be assigned to each bit in the configured message area. The bits
are assigned to the message numbers in ascending order.
Example:
The following event message area has been configured in the PLC:
Data register D 60
Length 5 (in words)
Figure 15-2 illustrates the assignment of all 80 (5 x 16) message numbers to the
individual bit numbers in the PLC event message area. The assignment is
performed automatically on the operating unit.
Data register D 60
16
16
1
1
Data register D 64
80
65
Message number
Figure 15-2
Assignment of message bit and message number
User data areas, acknowledgement
If the PLC should be informed of an alarm message acknowledgement on the
operating unit or the acknowledgement should be initiated on the PLC itself, the
relevant acknowledgement areas must also be set up in the PLC. These
acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the ProTool project under Area
Pointers.
S
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC:
This area is used to inform the PLC when an alarm message has been
acknowledged by means of operator input on the operating unit. The “Alarm
Ack. OP” area pointer must be created or configured for this.
S
Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit:
This area is used when an alarm message is acknowledged by the PLC. In this
case, the area pointer “PLC acknowledgement” must be set.
These acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the configuration under
Area Pointers.
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User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs
Figure 15-3 illustrates a schematic diagram of the of the individual alarm message
and acknowledgement areas. The acknowledgement sequences are shown in
Figures 15-5 and 15-6.
Operating unit
PLC
Alarm messages area
ACK
Internal processing /
link
Acknowledgement area
PLC → Operating unit
Acknowledgement area
Operating unit → PLC
Figure 15-3
Alarm message and acknowledgement areas
Assignment of acknowledgement bit to message number
Each alarm message is assigned a message number. The message number is
assigned the same bit number in the alarm messages area as that assigned in the
acknowledgement area. Under normal circumstances, the acknowledgement area
is the same length as the associated alarm messages area.
If the length of an acknowledgement area is not equal to the overall length of the
associated alarm messages area, and there are succeeding alarm messages and
acknowledgement areas, the following assignment applies:
Alarm messages area 1
Alarm message no. 1
Bit 16
1
16
1
.............
.............
32
17
.............
48
33
Alarm messages area 2
Alarm message no. 49
1
Bit 16
.............
64
49
.............
80
65
Figure 15-4
15-8
Acknowledgement area 1
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 1
Bit 16
1
16
1
.............
.............
32
17
Acknowledgement area 2
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 49
1
Bit 16
.............
64
49
.............
80
65
Assignment of acknowledgement bit and message number
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User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs
Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
A bit set in this area by the PLC initiates the acknowledgement of the
corresponding alarm message in the operating unit, thus fulfilling the same function
as pressing the ACK button. Reset the bit before setting the bit in the alarm
message area again. Figure 15-5 illustrates the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
S
must follow on immediately from the associated alarm messages area,
S
must have precisely the same polling time and
S
may not be any longer than the associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages
area
Acknowledgement
area PLC →
Operating Unit
Figure 15-5
Acknowledgement
via PLC
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
When a bit is set in the alarm message area, the operating unit resets the
associated bit in the acknowledgement area. As a result of processing by the
operating unit, the two processes indicate a slight difference with regard to time. If
the alarm message is acknowledged on the operating unit, the bit in the
acknowledgement area is set. In this way, the PLC can detect that the alarm
message has been acknowledged. Figure 15-6 illustrates the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC must be no longer than the
associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages
area
Acknowledgement
area Operating
Unit → PLC
Figure 15-6
Acknowledgement
via operating unit
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
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User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs
Acknowledgement area size
The acknowledgement areas PLC → Operating Unit and Operating Unit → PLC
must not be any longer than the associated alarm message areas. The
acknowledgement area, however, be smaller if acknowledgement by the PLC is
not required for all alarm messages. This is also valid when the acknowledgement
need not be detected in the PLC for all alarm messages. Figure 15-7 illustrates
such a case.
Alarm messages area
Alarm messages
that can be
Bit 1
acknowledged
Bit n
Alarm messages
that cannot be
acknowledged
Figure 15-7
Reduced-size
alarm messages acknowledgement area
Bit 1
Bit n
Bit m
Reduced-size acknowledgement area
Note
Place important alarm messages in the alarm messages area starting at Bit 0 in
ascending order.
15.5
User Data Areas, Screen Numbers
Application
The operating units store information concerning the screen currently open on the
unit in the screen number user data area.
This enables the transfer of data regarding the current operating unit display
content to the PLC which, in turn, can trigger certain reactions; e.g. call in a
different screen.
Requirements
If the screen number area should be used, it must be specified in the ProTool
project as an Area Pointer. It can only be stored in one PLC and only once.
The screen number area is downloaded to the PLC spontaneously, i.e. the transfer
is always initiated when a change is selected on the operating unit. Therefore, it is
not necessary to configure an acquisition cycle.
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User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs
Structure
The screen number area is a data area with a fixed length of 5 data words.
The structure of the screen number area in the PLC memory is illustrated below.
1st Word
16
9 8
Current screen type
2nd Word
Current screen number
3rd Word
Reserved
4th Word
Current field number
5th Word
Reserved
1
Entry
15.6
Assignment
Current screen type
1 for basic screen or
4 for fixed window
Current screen number
1 to 65535
Current field number
1 to 65535
User Data Area, Date/Time
Transferring date and time
Transfer of date and time from the operating unit to the PLC can be triggered by
PLC job 41. PLC job 41 writes the date and time to the data area Date/Time where
they can be analyzed by the PLC program. Figure 15-8 illustrates the structure of
the data area. All data is in BCD format.
DL
Minute (0–59)
Second (0–59)
n+2
n+3
1
Hour (0–23)
Reserved
Reserved
Weekday (1–7, 1=Sun)
n+4
Day (1–31)
Month (1–12)
n+5
Year (80–99/0–29)
Reserved
Figure 15-8
Time
n+1
9 8
Reserved
Date
DW 16
n+0
DR
Structure of data area Time and Date
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User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs
Note
When entering data in the year data area, please note that the values 80–99
represent 1980 to 1999 and 0–29 the years 2000 to 2029.
15.7
User Data Area, Date/Time PLC
Transfer of date and time to the operating unit
The downloading of date and time to the operating unit is generally useful when the
PLC is master for time.
The TP 170A operating unit represents a special case here:
Synchronization with the PLC system time is necessary when a Single message
display screen object is to be inserted in a ProTool screen. The Single
message display screen object is the only TP 170A screen object which has
access to the unit’s system time. This restriction only applies to the TP 170A.
DATE_AND_TIME format (BCD coded)
DL
DW
16
DR
9 8
1
n+0
Year (80–99/0–29)
Month (1–12)
n+1
Day (1–31)
Hour (0–23)
n+2
Minute (0–59)
n+3
Reserved
Figure 15-9
Second (0–59)
Reserved
Weekday (1–7, 1=Sun)
Structure of data area Date/Time in DATE_AND_TIME format
Note
When entering data in the year data area, please note that the values 80–99
represent 1980 to 1999 and 0–29 the years 2000 to 2029.
The PLC writes cyclically to the data area, whereby the operating unit reads and
synchronizes (refer to the ProTool User’s Guide).
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User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs
Note
In the configuration, do not select too small an acquisition cycle for the Date/Time
area pointer because this affects the operating unit performance.
Recommendation: Acquisition cycle of 1 minute, if permitted by the process.
15.8
User Data Area, Coordination
The coordination user data area is two data words long. It serves to realize the
following functions:
S
Detection of operating unit startup by the PLC program,
S
Detection of the current operating unit operating mode by the PLC program,
S
Detection by the PLC program that the operating unit is ready to communicate.
Note
Each time the coordination area is updated by the operating unit, the entire
coordination area is written.
Therefore, the PLC program must not execute any modifications in the
coordination area.
Bit assignment in coordination area
1st Word
DL n+0
16
– – – – – –
9
– –
DR n+0
8
3 2 1
– – – – – X X X
Startup bit
– = Reserved
X = Assigned
Operating mode
Life bit
Figure 15-10 Significance of the bits in the coordination area
Startup bit
The startup bit is set to 0 for a short time during the start-up routine by the
operating unit. After the startup routine has been completed, the bit is set
permanently to 1.
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User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs
Operating mode
As soon as the operating unit has been switched offline by the operator, the
operating mode bit is set to 1. When the operating unit is working in normal
operation, the operating mode bit is set to 0. The PLC program can be used to poll
this bit and thus establish the current operating mode of the operating unit.
Life bit
The life bit is inverted by the operating unit at intervals of approx. one second. The
PLC program can be used to poll this bit to check whether connection to the
operating unit still exists.
15.9
User Data Areas, Trend Request and Trend Transfer
Trends
A trend is the graphical representation of a value from the PLC. Reading of the
value can be time-triggered or bit-triggered, depending on the configuration.
Time-triggered trends
The operating unit reads the trend values cyclically according to the cycle interval
defined in the configuration. Time-triggered trends are suitable for continuous
progressions such as the operating temperature of a motor.
Bit-triggered trends
By setting a trigger bit in the trend transfer area pointer, the operating unit reads in
either a trend value or the entire trend buffer. This is specified in the configuration.
Bit-triggered trends are normally used to display values of an area subject to rapid
variation. An example of this is the injection pressure for plastic moldings.
In order to be able to activate bit-triggered trends, corresponding data areas have
to be specified in the ProTool project (under Area Pointers) and set up on the PLC.
The operating unit and the PLC communicate with one another via those areas.
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The following areas are available for trends:
S
Trend request area
S
Trend transfer area 1
S
Trend transfer area 2 (required with switch buffer only)
Assign a trend to a bit in the configuration. This ensures the bit assignment is
unique for all areas.
Switch buffer
The switch buffer is a second buffer for the same trend and can be set up during
the configuration.
While the operating unit reads the value from Buffer 1, the PLC writes it in Buffer 2.
If the operating unit reads from Buffer 2, the PLC writes to Buffer 1. This prevents
the trend value being overwritten by the PLC when being read by the operating
unit.
Partitioning of the area pointers
The trend request and trend transfer 1 and 2 area pointers can be divided into
separate data areas with a predefined maximum number and length (refer to
Table 15-5).
Table 15-5 Partitioning of the area pointer
Data area
Trend request
Trend transfer
1
2
Number of data areas, maximum
8
8
8
Words in data area, total
8
8
8
Trend request area
If a screen with one or more trends is opened on the operating unit, the unit sets
the corresponding bits in the trend request area. After deselection of the screen,
the operating unit resets the corresponding bits in the trend request area.
The trend request area can be used by the PLC to ascertain which trend is
currently being displayed on the operating unit. Trends can also be triggered
without analysis of the trend request area.
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User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs
Trend transfer area 1
This area serves for triggering trends. In the PLC program, set the bit assigned to
the trend in the trend transfer area and the trend communication bit. The operating
unit detects triggering and reads in either a trend value or the entire buffer. It then
resets resets the trend bit and the trend communication bit.
Trend transfer area(s)
Bit number
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8
7
6 5
4
3
2
1
1st Word
2nd Word
Trend communication bit
The trend transfer area must not be altered by the PLC program until the trend
communication bit has been reset.
Trend transfer area 2
Trend transfer area 2 is necessary for trends that are configured with a switch
buffer. Its layout is precisely the same as that of trend transfer area 1.
15.10
User Data Area, LED Assignment
Application
The Operator Panel (OP), Multi Panel (MP) and Panel PC have function keys with
Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) integrated in them. These LEDs can be controlled
from the PLC. This means, for example, that in specific situations, it is possible to
indicate to the operator which key should be pressed by switching on an LED.
Requirements
In order to control LEDs, corresponding data areas, so-called LED assignments,
must be set up in the PLC and defined in the configuration as Area Pointers.
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Partitioning of the area pointer
The LED assignment area pointer can be divided into separate data areas, as
illustrated in the following table.
Table 15-6 Partitioning of the LED assignment area pointer
Operating unit
Number of data areas,
maximum
Words in data area,
total
Panel PC
8
16
MP 370
8
16
MP 270, MP 270B
8
16
OP 270
8
16
OP 170B
8
16
Note
The area pointer in question can no longer be selected in the Insert new area
pointer window when the maximum number has been reached. Area pointers of
the same type appear gray.
LED assignment
The assignment of the individual LEDs to the bits in the data areas is defined when
the function keys are configured. This involves specifying a bit number within the
assignment area for each LED.
The bit number (n) identifies the first of two successive bits which control the
following LED states:
Table 15-7 LED states
Bit n + 1
Bit n
0
0
Off
0
1
Flashes
1
0
Flashes
1
1
Permanently on
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LED function
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User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs
15.11
Recipes
Description
During the transfer of data records between the operating unit and PLC, both
communication peers alternately access common communication areas in the
PLC. The function and structure of the recipe-specific communication area (“data
mailbox”) and the mechanisms involved in synchronized transfer of data records
are the subject of this chapter.
Information on setting up the data mailbox in ProTool is provided in the online help.
Downloading methods
There are two methods of downloading data records between operating unit and
PLC:
S
Asynchronous transfer (Page 15-19)
S
Synchronized transfer using the data mailbox (Page 15-20)
Data records are always transferred directly, i.e. the tag values are read or written
directly from or to the address configured for the tag without being stored
intermediately.
Trigger downloading of data records
There are three methods of triggering the transfer of data:
S
By operator input on the recipe display (Page 15-21)
S
By PLC jobs (Page 15-22)
S
By activating configured functions (Page 15-23)
If transfer of data records is initiated by a configured function or a PLC job, the
recipe display on the operating unit remains fully functional as the data records are
transferred in the background.
Simultaneous processing of multiple transfer jobs is not possible, however. In such
cases, the operating unit returns a system message refusing additional transfer
requests.
A list of the most important system messages together with notes on the possible
causes of the associated errors and remedies for them is provided in Appendix,
Part A.
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15.11.1
Asynchronous data transfer
Purpose
In the case of asynchronous transfer of data records between operating unit and
PLC, there is no coordination of the communication areas commonly used. For
this reason, there is no need to set up a data mailbox during the configuration
process.
Application
The asynchronous transfer of data records is applicable, for example, when the
S
uncontrolled overwriting of data by the communication peers can be reliably
prevented by the system,
S
the PLC does not require any details of the recipe and data record numbers, or
S
transfer of data records is initiated by operator input on the operating unit.
Read values
On triggering a read transfer, the values are read from the PLC addresses and
downloaded to the operating unit.
S
Transfer initiated by operator input on recipe display:
Data is uploaded to the operating unit. There it can be processed, e.g. values
can be modified and the changes saved.
S
Transfer initiated by function or PLC job:
The data is saved directly to the storage medium.
Write values
On triggering a write transfer, the values are written to the PLC addresses.
S
Transfer initiated by operator input on recipe display:
The current values are written to the PLC.
S
Transfer initiated by function or PLC job:
The values on the storage medium are written to the PLC.
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User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs
15.11.2
Synchronous data transfer
Purpose
In the case of synchronous data transfer, both the communication peers set status
bits in the commonly used data mailbox. In this way, the PLC program can prevent
uncontrolled overwriting of each other’s data by the two units.
Application
The synchronous transfer of data records is applicable, for example, when
S
the PLC is the “active partner” for transfer of data records,
S
details of the recipe and data record numbers are to be analyzed on the PLC,
or
S
transfer of data records is initiated by PLC job.
Requirements
In order to synchronize the transfer of data records between the operating unit and
PLC, the following conditions must be fulfilled in the configuration:
S
the data mailbox must have been set up in System → Area Pointer;
S
the recipe properties must specify the PLC with which the operating unit has to
synchronize transfer of data records.
The PLC is specified in the recipe editor in Properties → Transfer.
Detailed information on this is provided in ProTool Configuring Windows-based
Systems User Guide.
15.11.3
Data mailbox for synchronized data transfer
Structure
The data mailbox has a defined length of 5 words. Its structure is as follows:
16
Current recipe number (1 – 999)
2nd Word
Current data record number (0 – 65,535)
3rd Word
15-20
1
1st Word
Reserved
4th Word
Status (0, 2, 4, 12)
5th Word
Reserved
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Status word
The status word (Word 4) can assume the following values:
Value
15.11.4
Explanation
Decimal
Binary
0
0000 0000
Transfer permitted, data mailbox is accessible
2
0000 0010
Transfer in progress
4
0000 0100
Transfer completed without errors
12
0000 1100
Errors occurred during transfer
Synchronization process
Read from the PLC by operating the recipe view
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe number to be read
and the status “Transfer in progress” in the data mailbox
and sets the data record number to zero.
3
The operating unit reads the values from the PLC and
displays them on the recipe display.
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In the case of recipes with synchronous tags, the values
from the are also written in the tags.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
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User Data Areas for OMRON PLCs
Write in the PLC by operating the recipe view
Step
1
Action
Check status word = 0?
Yes
No
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number to be written and the status “Transfer in progress”
in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit writes the current values to the PLC.
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In the case of recipes with synchronized tags, the
modified values between the recipe views and tags are
compared and then written to the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Read from the PLC by PLC job “PLC → DAT” (no. 69)
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the job and the status “Transfer in
progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit reads the value from the PLC and
saves the value in the data record specified by the job.
4
S If the option “Overwrite” has been specified for the job,
No
Operation
cancelled and no
message returned
existing data records are overwritten without prior
warning.
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer
completed”.
S If “Do not overwrite” was specified in the job and the
data record already exists, the operating unit
terminates the process and enters 0000 1100 in the
status word of the data mailbox.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Details of the structure of the PLC job are provided on Page 15-25.
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Write in the PLC by PLC job “DAT → PLC” (no. 70)
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
No
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the job and the status “Transfer in
progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit retrieves the value from the data
record specified in the job from the data medium and
writes that value in the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
Operation
cancelled and no
message returned
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Details of the structure of the PLC job are provided on Page 15-25.
Read from the PLC by configured function
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the function and the status “Transfer
in progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit reads the data from the PLC and
saves it to the data record specified by the function.
4
S If the option “Overwrite” has been specified for the
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
function, existing data records are overwritten without
prior warning.
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer
completed”.
S If “Do not overwrite” was specified in the job and the
data record already exists, the operating unit
terminates the process and enters 0000 1100 in the
status word of the data mailbox.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
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Write in the PLC by configured function
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the function and the status “Transfer
in progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit retrieves the value from the data
record specified in the function from the data medium and
writes that value in the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Note
For reasons of data consistency, analysis of the recipe and data record number on
the PLC cannot be performed until the status in the data mailbox is set to
“Transfer completed” or “Errors occurred during transfer”.
Possible causes of errors
If the downloading of data records is terminated due to errors, it may be due to one
of the following reasons:
S
Tag address not set up on PLC,
S
Overwriting of data records not possible,
S
Recipe number not available
S
Data record number not available
A list of the most important system messages together with notes on the possible
causes of the associated errors and remedies for them is provided in Appendix,
Part A.
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Response to error-based termination
The operating unit responds as follows when the downloading of data records is
terminated due to an error:
S
Transfer initiated by operator input in recipe view
Indication on the status bar on the recipe display and issue of system
messages.
S
Transfer initiated by function
System messages issued.
S
Transfer initiated by PLC job
No feedback of information on operating unit
Regardless of the response of the operating unit, the status of the transfer can be
checked by reading the status word in the data mailbox.
15.11.5
PLC jobs with recipes
Purpose
The transfer of data records between operating unit and PLC can be triggered by
the PLC program. This requires no operator input on the operating unit.
The two PLC jobs No. 69 and No. 70 can be used for this.
No. 69: Read data record from PLC (“PLC → DAT”)
PLC Job No. 69 downloads data records from the PLC to the operating unit. The
structure of this PLC job is as follows:
Word 1
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
69
Word 2
Recipe number (1 – 999)
Word 3
Data record number (1 – 65,535)
Word 4
Do not overwrite existing data record: 0
Overwrite existing data record: 1
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No. 70: Write data record to PLC (“DAT → PLC”)
PLC Job No. 70 downloads data records from the operating unit to the PLC. The
structure of this PLC job is as follows:
Word 1
15-26
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
70
Word 2
Recipe number (1 – 999)
Word 3
Data record number (1 – 65,535)
Word 4
—
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Part VIII
Connection to
Schneider
Automation PLCs
(Modicon)
Communication Management for
Modicon PLCs
16
User Data Areas for
Modicon PLCs
17
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Modicon PLCs
16
This chapter describes the communication between operating unit and Schneider
Automation (Modicon) PLCs from the Modicon 984, TSX Quantum and TSX
Compact series.
General Information
The connection, in the case of these PLCs, is established by the following internal
PLC protocol:
S
MODBUS – point-to-point connection
Operating units
The following operating unit can be connected to a Modicon 984, TSX Quantum
and TSX Compact PLC:
S
Panel PC
S
Standard PC
S
MP 370
S
MP 270, MP 270B
S
TP 270, OP 270
S
TP 170B, OP 170B
S
TP 170A
Installation
The driver necessary for the connection to the Modicon 984, TSX Quantum and
TSX Compact PLCs is contained in the configuration software and is installed
automatically.
The connection between the operating unit and PLC is basically restricted to
defining the interface parameters and bus address. Special function blocks for
connection to the PLC are not required.
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Communication Management for Modicon PLCs
Connection
The operating unit must be connected to the programming interface of the CPU
(RS 232) (refer to PLC documentation).
The following connection cables are available for connection of the operating unit
to the PLC:
Table 16-1 Applicable connection cables (for interface assignment, refer to Appendix, Part C)
Interface
Direct via
Modbus-SS
(RS 232)
Via MB Bridge
(RS 232)
Via Modem
J878 (RS 232)
TXS Compact
point-to-point
connection
RS 232, 9-pin
Point-to-point
cable 1
Point-to-point
cable 2
–
Point-to-point
cable 2
RS 232, 15-pin
6XV1440-1K _ _ _
6XV1440-1K _ _ _
6XV1440-1L _ _ _
–
RS 232, 15-pin
6XV1440-1K _ _ _
6XV1440-1K _ _ _
–
Point-to-point
cable 3
’_’ Length code (refer to Catalog ST 80)
Details of which interface to use on the operating unit are provided in the relevant
equipment manual.
Connection type
The standard connection from the operating unit to the PLC is the ”direct”
connection to the Modbus interface with RS 232 physics, available on all CPUs
(max. cable length 15 m).
In addition, the following has been is tested with the system and approved:
S
Multipoint connection from one operating unit (Modbus/Master) with up to 4
PLCs.
The operating unit must be connected to a Modbus Plus Bridge or a Modicon
984 CPU or Modicon TSX Quantum CPU which has been configured as a
Modbus Plus Bridge.
S
16-2
The other PLCs must be connected to the first PLC via the MODBUSPlus
connection of the first PLC and can be accessed under their address via the
bridge functionality of the first PLC.
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Note
It is not possible to integrate the operating unit in a Modbus network because the
operating unit is the Modbus/Master.
S
The integration of the operating unit in a MODBUS Plus network via
Modicon MODBUS Plus Bridge type BM85-000 (logical point-to-point
communication of the operating unit with a Modicon 984 or TSX Quantum).
S
The integration of the operating unit in a MODBUS Plus Netzwerk network via
the bridge function of the Modicon 984 or TSX Quantum (logical point-to-point
communication of the operating unit with a PLC).
Note
The connection of the operating unit to PLCs from other manufacturers which
provide a MODBUS interface has not been system tested by Siemens AG and is,
thus, not approved.
16.1
Basic Methods of Functioning
PLC
Tags
Process values
User data
areas
Application
program
Display/Operation
Communication
Messages
Operating unit
User
guidance
Coordination
area
Figure 16-1
Communication structure
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Task of the tags
The general exchange of data between the PLC and operating unit is performed by
means of the process values. To do this, tags must be specified in the
configuration which point to an address in the PLC. The operating unit reads the
value from the specified address and displays it. In the same way, the operator can
enter a value on the operating unit, which is then written to the address in the PLC.
User data areas
User data areas are used for the exchange of special data and must only be set up
when the data concerned is used.
User data area are required, for example, for:
S
Trends
S
PLC jobs
S
Controlling LEDs
S
Life bit monitoring
A detailed description of the user data areas is provided in Chapter 17.
16.2
Configuration in ProTool
When creating a new project, select the protocol required from the Project
Wizard " PLC Selection dialog box.
Set the protocol:
S
Modicon Modbus for Modicon PLC
Note
The settings on the operating unit must match with those on the PLC.
When starting up, ProTool must not be integrated in STEP 7; deactivate the menu
item Integration in STEP 7.
Select the Parameter ... button to define the protocol parameters. Define the
following parameters for the PLC:
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Table 16-2 PLC parameters
Parameters
Explanation
CPU type
Define the PLC to which the operating unit is connected.
Select between the following CPUs:
–
CPU 984 (except CPU 984A, 984B and 984X),
–
CPU 984-785 and
–
CPU TSX Quantum.
Slave address
Set the slave address of the PLC here.
Framing
Define the framing used here.
Select between the following settings (Remote Terminal Unit):
–
RTU (standard)
–
RTU (modem)
–
RTU (compatible)
Interface
The operating unit interface to which the PLC is connected must be set
here.
Interface type
Set RS232 here.
Free parameters
Define whether further settings options are required for the interface
parameters.
Note
This setting has not been subjected to a system test. ”Free Parameters”
is excluded from the terms of guarantee if activated.
Data bits
Set 8 here.
Parity
Select one of the settings NONE, EVEN and ODD.
Stop bits
Set 1 or 2.
Baud rate
Define the transmission rate between the operating unit and PLC here.
System setting: 9600 bit/s.
For subsequent changes to the parameters, select PLC in the project window and
then Properties " Parameter ....
16.3
Data Types
When configuring tags and area pointers, the data types listed in Table 16-3 are
available for use.
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Table 16-3 Data types
Data type
Addressed by
Format
Coil
(Discrete Output)
0x
Bit,
16 Bit Group
Discrete Input
1x
Bit,
16 Bit Group
Input Register
3x
Bit,
+/– INT, INT
Holding Register
(Output)
4x
Bit,
+/– INT, INT
+/– DOUBLE, DOUBLE
FLOAT, ASCII
Extended Memory1
6x
Bit,
+/– INT, INT
+/– DOUBLE, DOUBLE
FLOAT, ASCII
1
Only available with the TSX-Quantum PLC.
Representation in ProTool
In the case of data formats signed Int and signed Double, the placeholders
+/– INT and +/– DOUBLE are used.
16.4
Optimization
Acquisition cycle and update time
The acquisition cycles defined in the configuration software for the area pointers
and the acquisition cycles for the tags are major factors in respect of the real
update times which are achieved. The update time is the acquisition cycle plus
transmission time plus processing time.
In order to achieve optimum update times, the following points should be observed
during configuration:
S
When setting up the individual data areas, make them as large as necessary
but as small as possible.
S
Define data areas that belong together as contiguous areas. The effective
update time is improved by setting one single large area rather than several
smaller areas.
S
Setting acquisition cycles which are too short unnecessarily impairs overall
performance. Set the acquisition cycle to correspond to the modification time of
the process values. The temperature progress of an oven, for example, is much
slower than the speed progress of an electric motor.
Guideline value for the acquisition cycle: Approx. 1 second.
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S
If necessary, dispense with cyclic transmission of user data areas (acquisition
cycle = 0) in order to improve the update time. Instead, use PLC jobs to transfer
the user data areas at random times.
S
Store the tags for a message or a screen in a contiguous data area.
S
In order that changes on the PLC are reliably detected by the operating unit,
they must occur during the actual acquisition cycle at least.
S
Set the baud rate to the highest possible value.
Screens
The real screen updating rate which can be achieved is dependent on the type and
quantity of data to be displayed.
In order to achieve short updating times, ensure that short acquisition cycles are
only defined in the configuration for those objects which actually need to be
updated quickly.
Trends
If, in the case of bit-triggered trends, the communication bit is set in the trend
transfer area, the operating unit always updates all the trends whose bit is set in
that area. It resets the bits afterwards.
The communication bit in the PLC program can only be set again after all the bits
have been reset by the operating unit.
PLC jobs
If large numbers of PLC jobs are sent to the operating unit in quick succession,
communication between the operating unit and PLC may become overloaded.
If the operating unit enters the value 0 in the first data word of the job mailbox, it
signifies that the operating unit has accepted the job. It then processes the job, for
which it requires a certain amount of time. If a new PLC job is then immediately
entered in the job mailbox, it may take some time before the operating unit
executes the next PLC job. The next PLC job is only accepted when sufficient
computer performance is available.
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17
Overview
User data areas are used for data exchange between the PLC and operating unit.
The user data areas are written to and read by the operating unit and the
application program alternately during the process of communication. By analyzing
the data stored there, the PLC and operating unit reciprocally initiate predefined
actions.
This chapter describes the function, layout and special features of the various user
data areas.
17.1
User Data Areas Available
Definition
The user data areas can be set up in various data areas in the PLC (Holding
Register (4x)).
Set up the user data areas both in the ProTool project and in the PLC.
The user data areas can be set up and modified in the ProTool project using the
menu items Insert → Area Pointers.
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User Data Areas for Modicon PLCs
Function range
The user data areas available are dependent on the operating unit used. The
tables 17-1 and 17-2 provide an overview of the functional range of the individual
operating units.
Table 17-1 User data areas available, Part 1
User data area
Panel PC
Standard PC
MP 370
User version
x
x
x
Job mailbox
x
x
x
Event messages
x
x
x
Screen number
x
x
x
Data mailbox
x
x
x
Date/Time
x
x
x
Date/Time PLC
x
x
x
Coordination
x
x
x
Trend request
x
x
x
Trend transfer 1, 2
x
x
x
1
x
–
x
OP/PLC acknowledgement
x
x
x
Alarm messages
x
x
x
LED assignment
1
Only possible using operating units with keyboard.
Table 17-2 User data areas available, Part 2
User data area
MP 270
MP 270B
TP 270
OP 270
TP 170B
OP 170B
TP 170A
User version
x
x
x
–
Job mailbox
x
x
x
–
Event messages
x
x
x
x
Screen number
x
x
x
–
Data mailbox
x
x
x
–
Date/Time
x
x
x
–
Date/Time PLC
x
x
x
x
Coordination
x
x
x
–
Trend request
x
x
–
–
Trend transfer 1, 2
x
x
–
–
LED assignment 1
x
x
x
–
OP/PLC acknowledgement
x
x
x
–
Alarm messages
x
x
x
–
1
17-2
Only possible using operating units with keyboard.
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Table 17-3 illustrates the way in which the PLC and operating unit access the
individual user data areas – Read (R) or Write (W).
Table 17-3 Application of the user data areas
User data area
Necessary for
Operating
unit
PLC
User version
ProTool Runtime checks whether the
ProTool project version and the
project in the PLC are consistent.
R
W
Job mailbox
Triggering of functions on the operating unit by PLC program
R/W
R/W
Event messages
Bit reporting process
arrival and departure of event messages
R
W
Screen number
Evaluation by the PLC as to which
screen is currently open
W
R
Data mailbox
Downloading of data records with
synchronization
R/W
R/W
Date/Time
Transfer of date and time from the
operating unit to the PLC
W
R
Date/Time PLC
Transfer of date and time from the
PLC to the operating unit.
R
W
Coordination
Operating unit status polled by the
PLC program
W
R
Trend request
Configured trends with “Triggering
via bit” or configured history trends
W
R
Trend transfer 1
Configured trends with “Triggering
via bit” or configured history trends
R/W
R/W
Trend transfer area 2
Configured history trend with “switch
buffer”
R/W
R/W
LED assignment
LED triggered by the PLC
R
W
OP acknowledgement
Message from the operating unit to
the PLC indicating an alarm message has been acknowledged
W
R
PLC
acknowledgement
Alarm message acknowledgement
from the PLC
R
W
Alarm messages
Bit reporting process
arrival and departure of alarm messages
R
W
The user data areas and their associated area pointers are explained in the
following chapters.
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17.2
User Data Area, User Version
Usage
When starting up the operating unit, it is possible to check whether the operating
unit is connected to the correct PLC. This is important when several operating
units are used.
To do this, the operating unit compares a value stored in the PLC with the value
defined in the configuration. In this way, the compatibility of the configuration data
with the PLC program is ensured. If there is a mismatch, a system message
appears on the operating unit and the runtime configuration is terminated.
In order to use this user data area, set up the following during the configuration:
S
Specify the configuration version – value between 1 and 255.
ProTool: System → Settings
S
Data address of the value for the version stored in the PLC:
ProTool: Insert → Area Pointers, available types: User version
17.3
User Data Area, Job Mailbox
Description
The job mailbox can be used to send PLC jobs to the operating unit, thus initiating
actions on the operating unit. These functions include:
S
displaying screens
S
setting date and time
The job mailbox is set up under Area Pointer and has a length of four data words.
The first word of the job mailbox contains the job number. Depending on the PLC
job in question, up to three parameters can then be specified.
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Word
n+0
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
Job no.
n+1
Parameter 1
n+2
Parameter 2
n+3
Parameter 3
Figure 17-1
Structure of the user data area, job mailbox
If the first word of the job mailbox is not equal to zero, the operating unit analyzes
the PLC job. Afterwards, the unit sets this data word to zero again. For this reason,
the parameters must be entered in the job mailbox first and then the job number.
The possible PLC jobs, including job number and parameters, are provided in the
“ProTool Online Help” and the Appendix, Part B.
17.4
User Data Areas, Event and Alarm Messages and
Acknowledgement
Definition
Messages consist of a static text and/or tags. The text and tags can be defined by
the user.
Messages are subdivided into event messages and alarm messages. The
programmer defines the event message and alarm message.
Event Messages
An event message indicates a status, e.g.
S
Motor switched on
S
PLC in manual mode
Alarm messages
An alarm message indicates an operational fault, e.g.
S
Valve not opening
S
Motor temperature too high
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Acknowledgement
Since alarm messages indicate an abnormal operational status, they must be
acknowledged. They can be acknowledged either by
S
operator input on the operating unit
S
setting a bit in the PLC acknowledgement area.
Triggering messages
A message is triggered by setting a bit in one of the message areas on the PLC.
The location of the message areas is defined by means of the configuration
software. The corresponding area must also be set up in the PLC.
As soon as the bit in the PLC event/alarm message area has been set and that
area has been transferred to the operating unit, the operating unit detects that the
relevant message has “arrived”.
Conversely, when the same bit is reset on the PLC by the operating unit, the
message is registered as having “departed”.
Message areas
Table 17-4 indicates the number of message areas for event and alarm messages,
for alarm acknowledgement OP (operating unit → PLC) and for alarm
acknowledgement PLC (PLC → operating unit) and the number of words for the
various operating units.
Table 17-4 Division of message areas
Operating unit
Event message area, Alarm message area
Acknowledgement area OP, Acknowledgement area PLC
Number of
Words in data
data areas, ma- area,
ximum
maximum
Messages,
total
Panel PC
8
125
250
4000
Standard PC
8
125
250
4000
MP 370
8
125
250
4000
MP 270, MP 270B
8
125
250
4000
TP 270, OP 270
8
125
250
4000
TP 170B, OP 170B
8
125
125
2000
TP 170A1
8
63
63
1000
1
17-6
Words,
total
Only event messages possible.
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User Data Areas for Modicon PLCs
Assignment of message bit to message number
A message can be assigned to each bit in the configured message area. The bits
are assigned to the message numbers in ascending order.
Example:
The following event message area has been configured in the PLC:
Length 5 (in words)
40043
Figure 17-2 illustrates the assignment of all 80 (5 x 16) message numbers to the
individual bit numbers in the PLC event message area. The assignment is
performed automatically on the operating unit.
40043
Bit
40047
1
1
16
16
65
80
Message number
Figure 17-2
Assignment of message bit and message number
User data areas, acknowledgement
If the PLC should be informed of an alarm message acknowledgement on the
operating unit or the acknowledgement should be initiated on the PLC itself, the
relevant acknowledgement areas must also be set up in the PLC. These
acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the ProTool project under Area
Pointers.
S
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC:
This area is used to inform the PLC when an alarm message has been
acknowledged by means of operator input on the operating unit. The “Alarm
Ack. OP” area pointer must be created or configured for this.
S
Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit:
This area is used when an alarm message is acknowledged by the PLC. In this
case, the area pointer “PLC acknowledgement” must be set.
These acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the configuration under
Area Pointers.
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User Data Areas for Modicon PLCs
Figure 17-3 illustrates a schematic diagram of the of the individual alarm message
and acknowledgement areas. The acknowledgement sequences are shown in
Figures 17-5 and 17-6.
Operating unit
PLC
Alarm messages area
ACK
Internal processing /
link
Acknowledgement area
PLC → Operating unit
Acknowledgement area
Operating unit → PLC
Figure 17-3
Alarm message and acknowledgement areas
Assignment of acknowledgement bit to message number
Each alarm message is assigned a message number. The message number is
assigned the same bit number in the alarm messages area as that assigned in the
acknowledgement area. Under normal circumstances, the acknowledgement area
is the same length as the associated alarm messages area.
If the length of an acknowledgement area is not equal to the overall length of the
associated alarm messages area, and there are succeeding alarm messages and
acknowledgement areas, the following assignment applies:
Alarm messages area 1
Alarm message no. 1
Bit 1
16
1
16
.............
.............
17
32
.............
33
48
Alarm messages area 2
Bit
Alarm message no. 49
1
16
.............
49
64
.............
65
80
Figure 17-4
17-8
Acknowledgement area 1
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 1
Bit 1
16
1
16
.............
.............
17
32
Acknowledgement area 2
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 49
16
Bit 1
.............
49
64
.............
65
80
Assignment of acknowledgement bit and message number
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User Data Areas for Modicon PLCs
Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
A bit set in this area by the PLC initiates the acknowledgement of the
corresponding alarm message in the operating unit, thus fulfilling the same function
as pressing the ACK button. Reset the bit before setting the bit in the alarm
message area again. Figure 17-5 illustrates the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
S
must follow on immediately from the associated alarm messages area,
S
must have precisely the same polling time and
S
may not be any longer than the associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages
area
Acknowledgement
area PLC →
Operating Unit
Figure 17-5
Acknowledgement
via PLC
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
When a bit is set in the alarm message area, the operating unit resets the
associated bit in the acknowledgement area. As a result of processing by the
operating unit, the two processes indicate a slight difference with regard to time. If
the alarm message is acknowledged on the operating unit, the bit in the
acknowledgement area is set. In this way, the PLC can detect that the alarm
message has been acknowledged. Figure 17-6 illustrates the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC must be no longer than the
associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages
area
Acknowledgement
area Operating Unit →
PLC
Figure 17-6
Acknowledgement
via operating unit
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
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User Data Areas for Modicon PLCs
Acknowledgement area size
The acknowledgement areas PLC → Operating Unit and Operating Unit → PLC
must not be any longer than the associated alarm message areas. The
acknowledgement area, however, be smaller if acknowledgement by the PLC is
not required for all alarm messages. This is also valid when the acknowledgement
need not be detected in the PLC for all alarm messages. Figure 17-7 illustrates
such a case.
Alarm messages area
Alarm messages
that can be
acknowledged
Bit 1
Reduced-size
alarm messages acknowledgement area
Bit 1
Bit n
Alarm messages
that cannot be
acknowledged
Figure 17-7
Bit n
Bit m
Reduced-size acknowledgement area
Note
Place important alarm messages in the alarm messages area starting at Bit 1 in
ascending order.
17.5
User Data Areas, Screen Numbers
Application
The operating units store information concerning the screen currently open on the
unit in the screen number user data area.
This enables the transfer of data regarding the current operating unit display
content to the PLC which, in turn, can trigger certain reactions; e.g. call in a
different screen.
Requirements
If the screen number area should be used, it must be specified in the ProTool
project as an Area Pointer. It can only be stored in one PLC and only once.
The screen number area is downloaded to the PLC spontaneously, i.e. the transfer
is always initiated when a change is selected on the operating unit. Therefore, it is
not necessary to configure an acquisition cycle.
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Structure
The screen number area is a data area with a fixed length of 5 words.
The structure of the screen number area in the PLC memory is illustrated below.
1
16
1st Word
Current screen type
2nd Word
Current screen number
3rd Word
Reserved
4th Word
Current field number
5th Word
Reserved
Entry
17.6
Assignment
Current screen type
1 for basic screen or
4 for fixed window
Current screen number
1 to 65535
Current field number
1 to 65535
User Data Area, Date/Time
Transferring date and time
Transfer of date and time from the operating unit to the PLC can be triggered by
PLC job 41. PLC job 41 writes the date and time to the data area Date/Time where
they can be analyzed by the PLC program. Figure 17-8 illustrates the structure of
the data area. All data is in BCD format.
Left byte
n+1
8 9
Hour (0–23)
Minute (0–59)
Second (0–59)
n+2
n+3
16
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Weekday (1–7, 1=Sun)
n+4
Day (1–31)
Month (1–12)
n+5
Year (80–99/0–29)
Reserved
Figure 17-8
Time
1
Date
DW
n+0
Right byte
Structure of data area Time and Date
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User Data Areas for Modicon PLCs
Note
When entering data in the year data area, please note that the values 80–99
represent 1980 to 1999 and 0–29 the years 2000 to 2029.
17.7
User Data Area, Date/Time PLC
Transfer of date and time to the operating unit
The downloading of date and time to the operating unit is generally useful when the
PLC is master for time.
DATE_AND_TIME format (BCD coded)
Left byte
DW
1
n+0
Right byte
8 9
16
Year (80–99/0–29)
Month (1–12)
n+1
Day (1–31)
Hour (0–23)
n+2
Minute (0–59)
Second (0–59)
n+3
Reserved
Figure 17-9
Reserved
Weekday (1–7, 1=Sun)
Structure of data area Date/Time in DATE_AND_TIME format
Note
When entering data in the year data area, please note that the values 80–99
represent 1980 to 1999 and 0–29 the years 2000 to 2029.
The PLC writes cyclically to the data area, whereby the operating unit reads and
synchronizes (refer to the ProTool User’s Guide).
Note
In the configuration, do not select too small an acquisition cycle for the Date/Time
area pointer because this affects the operating unit performance.
Recommendation: Acquisition cycle of 1 minute, if permitted by the process.
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User Data Areas for Modicon PLCs
17.8
User Data Area, Coordination
The coordination user data area is two words long. It serves to realize the following
functions:
S
Detection of operating unit startup by the PLC program,
S
Detection of the current operating unit operating mode by the PLC program,
S
Detection by the PLC program that the operating unit is ready to communicate.
Note
Each time the coordination area is updated by the operating unit, the entire
coordination area is written.
Therefore, the PLC program must not execute any modifications in the
coordination area.
Bit assignment in coordination area
1st Word
DL n+0
1
– – – – – –
8
– –
DR n+0
9
14 15 16
– – – – – X X X
Startup bit
– = Reserved
X = Assigned
Operating mode
Life bit
Figure 17-10 Significance of the bits in the coordination area
Startup bit
The startup bit is set to 0 for a short time during the start-up routine by the
operating unit. After the startup routine has been completed, the bit is set
permanently to 1.
Operating mode
As soon as the operating unit has been switched offline by the operator, the
operating mode bit is set to 1. When the operating unit is working in normal
operation, the operating mode bit is set to 0. The PLC program can be used to poll
this bit and thus establish the current operating mode of the operating unit.
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User Data Areas for Modicon PLCs
Life bit
The life bit is inverted by the operating unit at intervals of approx. one second. The
PLC program can be used to poll this bit to check whether connection to the
operating unit still exists.
17.9
User Data Areas, Trend Request and Trend Transfer
Trends
A trend is the graphical representation of a value from the PLC. Reading of the
value can be time-triggered or bit-triggered, depending on the configuration.
Time-triggered trends
The operating unit reads the trend values cyclically according to the cycle interval
defined in the configuration. Time-triggered trends are suitable for continuous
progressions such as the operating temperature of a motor.
Bit-triggered trends
By setting a trigger bit in the trend transfer area pointer, the operating unit reads in
either a trend value or the entire trend buffer. This is specified in the configuration.
Bit-triggered trends are normally used to display values of an area subject to rapid
variation. An example of this is the injection pressure for plastic moldings.
In order to be able to activate bit-triggered trends, corresponding data areas have
to be specified in the ProTool project (under Area Pointers) and set up on the PLC.
The operating unit and the PLC communicate with one another via those areas.
The following areas are available for trends:
S
Trend request area
S
Trend transfer area 1
S
Trend transfer area 2 (required with switch buffer only)
Assign a trend to a bit in the configuration. This ensures the bit assignment is
unique for all areas.
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Switch buffer
The switch buffer is a second buffer for the same trend and can be set up during
the configuration.
While the operating unit reads the value from Buffer 1, the PLC writes it in Buffer 2.
If the operating unit reads from Buffer 2, the PLC writes to Buffer 1. This prevents
the trend value being overwritten by the PLC when being read by the operating
unit.
Partitioning of the area pointers
The trend request and trend transfer 1 and 2 area pointers can be divided into
separate data areas with a predefined maximum number and length (refer to
Table 17-5).
Table 17-5 Partitioning of the area pointer
Data area
Trend request
Trend transfer
1
2
Number of data areas, maximum
8
8
8
Words in data area, total
8
8
8
Trend request area
If a screen with one or more trends is opened on the operating unit, the unit sets
the corresponding bits in the trend request area. After deselection of the screen,
the operating unit resets the corresponding bits in the trend request area.
The trend request area can be used by the PLC to ascertain which trend is
currently being displayed on the operating unit. Trends can also be triggered
without analysis of the trend request area.
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User Data Areas for Modicon PLCs
Trend transfer area 1
This area serves for triggering trends. In the PLC program, set the bit assigned to
the trend in the trend transfer area and the trend communication bit. The operating
unit detects triggering and reads in either a trend value or the entire buffer. It then
resets resets the trend bit and the trend communication bit.
Trend transfer area(s)
Bit number
1 2 3 4
5
6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
1st Word
2nd Word
Trend communication bit
The trend transfer area must not be altered by the PLC program until the trend
communication bit has been reset.
Trend transfer area 2
Trend transfer area 2 is necessary for trends that are configured with a switch
buffer. Its layout is precisely the same as that of trend transfer area 1.
17.10
User Data Area, LED Assignment
Application
The Operator Panel (OP), Multi Panel (MP) and Panel PC have function keys with
Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) integrated in them. These LEDs can be controlled
from the PLC. This means, for example, that in specific situations, it is possible to
indicate to the operator which key should be pressed by switching on an LED.
Requirements
In order to control LEDs, corresponding data areas, so-called LED assignments,
must be set up in the PLC and defined in the configuration as Area Pointers.
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Partitioning of the area pointer
The LED assignment area pointer can be divided into separate data areas, as
illustrated in the following table.
Table 17-6 Partitioning of the LED assignment area pointer
Operating unit
Number of data areas,
maximum
Words in data area,
total
Panel PC
8
16
MP 370
8
16
MP 270, MP 270B
8
16
OP 270
8
16
OP 170B
8
16
Note
The area pointer in question can no longer be selected in the Insert new area
pointer window when the maximum number has been reached. Area pointers of
the same type appear gray.
LED assignment
The assignment of the individual LEDs to the bits in the data areas is defined when
the function keys are configured. This involves specifying a bit number within the
assignment area for each LED.
The bit number (n) identifies the first of two successive bits which control the
following LED states:
Table 17-7 LED states
Bit n + 1
Bit n
0
0
Off
0
1
Flashes
1
0
Flashes
1
1
Permanently on
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LED function
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User Data Areas for Modicon PLCs
17.11
Recipes
Description
During the transfer of data records between the operating unit and PLC, both
communication peers alternately access common communication areas in the
PLC. The function and structure of the recipe-specific communication area (“data
mailbox”) and the mechanisms involved in synchronized transfer of data records
are the subject of this chapter.
Information on setting up the data mailbox in ProTool is provided in the online help.
Downloading methods
There are two methods of downloading data records between operating unit and
PLC:
S
Asynchronous transfer (Page 17-19)
S
Synchronized transfer using the data mailbox (Page 17-20)
Data records are always transferred directly, i.e. the tag values are read or written
directly from or to the address configured for the tag without being stored
intermediately.
Trigger downloading of data records
There are three methods of triggering the transfer of data:
S
By operator input on the recipe display (Page 17-21)
S
By PLC jobs (Page 17-22)
S
By activating configured functions (Page 17-23)
If transfer of data records is initiated by a configured function or a PLC job, the
recipe display on the operating unit remains fully functional as the data records are
transferred in the background.
Simultaneous processing of multiple transfer jobs is not possible, however. In such
cases, the operating unit returns a system message refusing additional transfer
requests.
A list of the most important system messages together with notes on the possible
causes of the associated errors and remedies for them is provided in Appendix,
Part A.
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17.11.1
Asynchronous data transfer
Purpose
In the case of asynchronous transfer of data records between operating unit and
PLC, there is no coordination of the communication areas commonly used. For
this reason, there is no need to set up a data mailbox during the configuration
process.
Application
The asynchronous transfer of data records is applicable, for example, when the
S
uncontrolled overwriting of data by the communication peers can be reliably
prevented by the system,
S
the PLC does not require any details of the recipe and data record numbers, or
S
transfer of data records is initiated by operator input on the operating unit.
Read values
On triggering a read transfer, the values are read from the PLC addresses and
downloaded to the operating unit.
S
Transfer initiated by operator input on recipe display:
Data is uploaded to the operating unit. There it can be processed, e.g. values
can be modified and the changes saved.
S
Transfer initiated by function or PLC job:
The data is saved directly to the storage medium.
Write values
On triggering a write transfer, the values are written to the PLC addresses.
S
Transfer initiated by operator input on recipe display:
The current values are written to the PLC.
S
Transfer initiated by function or PLC job:
The values on the storage medium are written to the PLC.
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17.11.2
Synchronous data transfer
Purpose
In the case of synchronous data transfer, both the communication peers set status
bits in the commonly used data mailbox. In this way, the PLC program can prevent
uncontrolled overwriting of each other’s data by the two units.
Application
The synchronous transfer of data records is applicable, for example, when
S
the PLC is the “active partner” for transfer of data records,
S
details of the recipe and data record numbers are to be analyzed on the PLC,
or
S
transfer of data records is initiated by PLC job.
Requirements
In order to synchronize the transfer of data records between the operating unit and
PLC, the following conditions must be fulfilled in the configuration:
S
the data mailbox must have been set up in System → Area Pointer;
S
the recipe properties must specify the PLC with which the operating unit has to
synchronize transfer of data records.
The PLC is specified in the recipe editor in Properties → Transfer.
Detailed information on this is provided in ProTool Configuring Windows-based
Systems User Guide.
17.11.3
Data mailbox for synchronized data transfer
Structure
The data mailbox has a defined length of 5 words. Its structure is as follows:
1
17-20
16
1st Word
Current recipe number (1 – 999)
2nd Word
Current data record number (0 – 65,535)
3rd Word
Reserved
4th Word
Status (0, 2, 4, 12)
5th Word
Reserved
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Status word
The status word (Word 4) can assume the following values:
Value
17.11.4
Explanation
Decimal
Binary
0
0000 0000
Transfer permitted, data mailbox is accessible
2
0000 0010
Transfer in progress
4
0000 0100
Transfer completed without errors
12
0000 1100
Errors occurred during transfer
Synchronization process
Read from the PLC by operating the recipe view
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe number to be read
and the status “Transfer in progress” in the data mailbox
and sets the data record number to zero.
3
The operating unit reads the values from the PLC and
displays them on the recipe display.
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In the case of recipes with synchronous tags, the values
from the are also written in the tags.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
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Write in the PLC by operating the recipe view
Step
1
Action
Check status word = 0?
Yes
No
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number to be written and the status “Transfer in progress”
in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit writes the current values to the PLC.
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In the case of recipes with synchronized tags, the
modified values between the recipe views and tags are
compared and then written to the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Read from the PLC by PLC job “PLC → DAT” (no. 69)
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the job and the status “Transfer in
progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit reads the value from the PLC and
saves the value in the data record specified by the job.
4
S If the option “Overwrite” has been specified for the job,
No
Operation
cancelled and no
message returned
existing data records are overwritten without prior
warning.
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer
completed”.
S If “Do not overwrite” was specified in the job and the
data record already exists, the operating unit
terminates the process and enters 0000 1100 in the
status word of the data mailbox.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Details of the structure of the PLC job are provided on Page 17-25.
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Write in the PLC by PLC job “DAT → PLC” (no. 70)
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
No
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the job and the status “Transfer in
progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit retrieves the value from the data
record specified in the job from the data medium and
writes that value in the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
Operation
cancelled and no
message returned
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Details of the structure of the PLC job are provided on Page 17-25.
Read from the PLC by configured function
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the function and the status “Transfer
in progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit reads the data from the PLC and
saves it to the data record specified by the function.
4
S If the option “Overwrite” has been specified for the
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
function, existing data records are overwritten without
prior warning.
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer
completed”.
S If “Do not overwrite” was specified in the job and the
data record already exists, the operating unit
terminates the process and enters 0000 1100 in the
status word of the data mailbox.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
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Write in the PLC by configured function
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the function and the status “Transfer
in progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit retrieves the value from the data
record specified in the function from the data medium and
writes that value in the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Note
For reasons of data consistency, analysis of the recipe and data record number on
the PLC cannot be performed until the status in the data mailbox is set to
“Transfer completed” or “Errors occurred during transfer”.
Possible causes of errors
If the downloading of data records is terminated due to errors, it may be due to one
of the following reasons:
S
Tag address not set up on PLC,
S
Overwriting of data records not possible,
S
Recipe number not available
S
Data record number not available
A list of the most important system messages together with notes on the possible
causes of the associated errors and remedies for them is provided in Appendix,
Part A.
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Response to error-based termination
The operating unit responds as follows when the downloading of data records is
terminated due to an error:
S
Transfer initiated by operator input in recipe view
Indication on the status bar on the recipe display and issue of system
messages.
S
Transfer initiated by function
System messages issued.
S
Transfer initiated by PLC job
No feedback of information on operating unit
Regardless of the response of the operating unit, the status of the transfer can be
checked by reading the status word in the data mailbox.
17.11.5
PLC jobs with recipes
Purpose
The transfer of data records between operating unit and PLC can be triggered by
the PLC program. This requires no operator input on the operating unit.
The two PLC jobs No. 69 and No. 70 can be used for this.
No. 69: Read data record from PLC (“PLC → DAT”)
PLC Job No. 69 downloads data records from the PLC to the operating unit. The
structure of this PLC job is as follows:
Word 1
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
69
Word 2
Recipe number (1 – 999)
Word 3
Data record number (1 – 65,535)
Word 4
Do not overwrite existing data record: 0
Overwrite existing data record: 1
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No. 70: Write data record to PLC (“DAT → PLC”)
PLC Job No. 70 downloads data records from the operating unit to the PLC. The
structure of this PLC job is as follows:
Word 1
17-26
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
70
Word 2
Recipe number (1 – 999)
Word 3
Data record number (1 – 65,535)
Word 4
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Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
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Part IX
Connection to
Schneider
Automation PLCs
(Telemecanique)
Communication Management for
Telemecanique PLCs
18
User Data Areas for
Telemecanique PLCs
19
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18
This chapter describes the communication between operating unit and
Telemecanique PLCs from the TSX 7, TSX 17, TSX 47, Micro and Premium
series.
General Information
In the case of the Telemecanique TSX series, the connection is made via the
following internal PLC protocols:
S
Uni-Telway protocol
Multi-point connection
Operating units
The following operating unit can be connected to the Micro, Premium, TSX 7 and
TSX 17 PLCs:
S
Panel PC
S
Standard PC
S
MP 370
S
MP 270, MP 270B
S
TP 270, OP 270
S
TP 170B, OP 170B
S
TP 170A
Note
The operating unit can only be implemented as a slave.
Installation
The driver necessary for the connection to the Micro, Premium, TSX 7 and TSX 17
PLCs is contained in the configuration software and is installed automatically.
The connection between the operating unit and the PLC is basically restricted to
defining the interface parameters. Special function blocks for connection to the
PLC are not required.
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Communication Management for Telemecanique PLCs
Connection
Communication between the operating unit (Uni-Telway/Slave) and PLC
(Uni-Telway/Master) is performed by using the Telemecanique TSX SCA 62
connection socket.
For connection of the operating unit, an RS 485 interface card configured as
follows must be used:
S
Rx: always on
S
Tx: controlled via RTS
Tests performed by Siemens AG involved the use of interface cards of the type
C102, CI 132, CI 132I or Ci 132IS from Moxa Data Communication Solutions.
The operating unit must be connected to the CPU interface via the corresponding
TSX SCA.
Operating unit
PLC
RS 485
RS 485
TSX SCA62
TSX SCA62
TSX SCA62
TSX SCA62
RS 485
Operating unit
Figure 18-1
18-2
RS 485
PLC
Connection of the operating unit to the PLC via the Unit-Telway protocol
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Note
When using a Panel PC or standard PC the FIFO of the interface via which
communication should take place must be deactivated.
Windows 98 and Windows ME:
Select the COM ports required using Start → Settings→ Control Panel → System
→ Device Manager → Connections (COM and LPT) and then select Properties →
Connection Settings → More... to deactivate the option Use FIFO Buffer.
Windows NT:
Select the COM ports required using Start → Settings → Control Panel →
Connections (COM and LPT) Connections (COM and LPT) select Settings →
More... to deactivate the option FIFO activated.
Windows 2000:
Select the COM ports required using Start → Settings → Control Panel → System
→ Administration → Computer Management→ System → Device Manager →
Connections (COM and LPT) and then select Connection Settings → More... to
deactivate the option Use FIFO Buffer.
The following connection cables are available for connection of the operating unit
to the PLC:
Table 18-1 Applicable connection cables (refer to Appendix, Part C Interface Assignment)
Interface
TTY, 9-pin
RS 485, 15-pin
TTY, 15-pin
6XV1440-1F_ _ _
–
RS 485, 9-pin
–
6XV1440-1E_ _ _
Panel PC, standard PC
–
RS 485 interface card
cable
’_’ Length code (refer to Catalog ST 80)
Details of which interface to use on the operating unit are provided in the relevant
equipment manual.
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Communication Management for Telemecanique PLCs
18.1
Basic Methods of Functioning
PLC
Tags
Process values
User data
areas
Application
program
Display/Operation
Communication
Operating unit
Messages
User
guidance
Coordination
area
Figure 18-2
Communication structure
Task of the tags
The general exchange of data between the PLC and operating unit is performed by
means of the process values. To do this, tags must be specified in the
configuration which point to an address in the PLC. The operating unit reads the
value from the specified address and displays it. In the same way, the operator can
enter a value on the operating unit, which is then written to the address in the PLC.
User data areas
User data areas are used for the exchange of special data and must only be set up
when the data concerned is used.
User data area are required, for example, for:
S
Trends
S
PLC jobs
S
Controlling LEDs
S
Life bit monitoring
A detailed description of the user data areas is provided in Chapter 6.
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18.2
Configuration in ProTool
When creating a new project, select the protocol required from the Project
Wizard" PLC Selection dialog box.
Set the protocol:
S
”Telemecanique Uni-Telway”
Note
The settings on the operating unit must match with those on the PLC.
When starting up, ProTool must not be integrated in STEP 7; deactivate the menu
item Integration in STEP 7.
Select the Parameter ... button to define the protocol parameters. Define the
following parameters for the PLC:
Table 18-2 PLC parameters
Parameters
Explanation
Bus module /
CPU type
Set the processor type, and in the case of Uni-Telway the
Telemecanique TSX bus module type too, with which the
communication should be performed.
Telway 7
Define whether the PLC is integrated in a superordinated Telway 7
network. In addition, it may be necessary to specify the Telway 7
network or station number.
Gate
Select between System and Intelligent Module.
In addition, it may be necessary to define the Uni-Telway station number
of the PLC for the Intelligent Module.
Operating unit
Uni-Telway
station
Specify the station number of the operating unit.
Interface
The operating unit interface to which the Telemecanique PLC is
connected must be set here.
Interface type
RS 485 is set in for the Telemecanique Uni-Telway protocol.
Data bits
Set 8 here.
Parity
Set ODD here.
Stop bits
Set 1 here.
Baud rate
Define the transmission rate between the operating unit and PLC here.
Communication is possible with a baud rate of 9600 Baud.
For subsequent changes to the parameters, select PLC in the project window and
then Properties" Parameters....
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18.3
Data Types
When configuring tags and area pointers, the data types listed in Table 18-3 are
available for use.
A condition for this is that these data areas have also been set up with PL 7-2,
PL 7-3 or PL 7 Junior software for the CPU.
Table 18-3 Data types
Data type
Addressed by
Addressed by
(TSX37/57 only)
Format
Input bit
I
%I
BOOL
Output bit
O
%Q
BOOL
Bit
B
%U
BOOL
Word
W
%MW
BOOL,
+/– INT, INT,
STRING
Double word
DW
%MD
BOOL,
+/–LONG, LONG
Float
n. a.
%MF
Float
Constant word
CW
%KW
BOOL,
+/– INT, INT,
STRING
Constant double
word
CDW
%KD
BOOL,
+/–LONG, LONG
Constant float
n. a.
%KF
Float
System bit
SY
%S
BOOL
System word
S
%SW
BOOL,
+/– INT, INT
Time function
T
%T
+/–INT, INT
Counter
C
%C
+/–INT, INT
Representation in ProTool
In the case of data formats signed Int and signed Long, the placeholder +/–
is used.
Note
No write access is possible from the operating unit to the data types Constant
word, Constant float and Constant double word.
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Note
Only valid for TSX 37 and TSX 57:
The data types Input bit and Output bit are not supported by these PLCs at
present.
18.4
Optimization
Acquisition cycle and update time
The acquisition cycles defined in the configuration software for the area pointers
and the acquisition cycles for the tags are major factors in respect of the real
update times which are achieved. The update time is the acquisition cycle plus
transmission time plus processing time.
In order to achieve optimum update times, the following points should be observed
during configuration:
S
When setting up the individual data areas, make them as large as necessary
but as small as possible.
S
Define data areas that belong together as contiguous areas. The effective
update time is improved by setting one single large area rather than several
smaller areas.
S
Setting acquisition cycles which are too short unnecessarily impairs overall
performance. Set the acquisition cycle to correspond to the modification time of
the process values. The rate of change of temperature of a furnace, for
example, is considerably slower than the acceleration curve of an electric
motor.
Guideline value for the acquisition cycle: Approx. 1 second.
S
If necessary, dispense with cyclic transmission of user data areas (acquisition
cycle = 0) in order to improve the update time. Instead, use PLC jobs to transfer
the user data areas at random times.
S
Store the tags for a message or a screen in a contiguous data area.
S
In order that changes on the PLC are reliably detected by the operating unit,
they must occur during the actual acquisition cycle at least.
S
Set the baud rate to the highest possible value.
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Screens
The real screen updating rate which can be achieved is dependent on the type and
quantity of data to be displayed.
In order to achieve short updating times, ensure that short acquisition cycles are
only defined in the configuration for those objects which actually need to be
updated quickly.
Trends
If, in the case of bit-triggered trends, the communication bit is set in the trend
transfer area, the operating unit always updates all the trends whose bit is set in
that area. It resets the bits afterwards.
The communication bit in the PLC program can only be set again after all the bits
have been reset by the operating unit.
PLC jobs
If large numbers of PLC jobs are sent to the operating unit in quick succession,
communication between the operating unit and PLC may become overloaded.
If the operating unit enters the value 0 in the first data word of the job mailbox, it
signifies that the operating unit has accepted the job. It then processes the job, for
which it requires a certain amount of time. If a new PLC job is then immediately
entered in the job mailbox, it may take some time before the operating unit
executes the next PLC job. The next PLC job is only accepted when sufficient
computer performance is available.
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Overview
User data areas are used for data exchange between the PLC and operating unit.
The user data areas are written to and read by the operating unit and the
application program alternately during the process of communication. By analyzing
the data stored there, the PLC and operating unit reciprocally initiate predefined
actions.
This chapter describes the function, layout and special features of the various user
data areas.
19.1
User Data Areas Available
Definition
The user data areas can be set up in various data areas in the PLC (words
(W, %MW)).
Set up the user data areas both in the ProTool project and in the PLC.
The user data areas can be set up and modified in the ProTool project using the
menu items Insert → Area Pointers.
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User Data Areas for Telemecanique PLCs
Function range
The user data areas available are dependent on the operating unit used. The
tables 19-1 and 19-2 provide an overview of the functional range of the individual
operating units.
Table 19-1 User data areas available, Part 1
User data area
Standard PC
MP 370
MP 270
MP 270B
User version
x
x
x
Job mailbox
x
x
x
Event messages
x
x
x
Screen number
x
x
x
Data mailbox
x
x
x
Date/Time
x
x
x
Date/Time PLC
x
x
x
Coordination
x
x
x
Trend request
x
x
x
Trend transfer 1, 2
x
x
x
1
–
x
x
OP/PLC acknowledgement
x
x
x
Alarm messages
x
x
x
TP 270
OP 270
TP 170B
OP 170B
TP 170A
User version
x
x
–
Job mailbox
x
x
–
Event messages
x
x
x
Screen number
x
x
–
Data mailbox
x
x
–
Date/Time
x
x
–
Date/Time PLC
x
x
–
Coordination
x
x
x
Trend request
x
–
–
Trend transfer 1, 2
x
–
–
1
x
x
–
OP/PLC acknowledgement
x
x
–
Alarm messages
x
x
–
LED assignment
1
Only possible using operating units with keyboard.
Table 19-2 User data areas available, Part 2
User data area
LED assignment
1
19-2
Only possible using operating units with keyboard.
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Table 19-3 illustrates the way in which the PLC and operating unit access the
individual user data areas – Read (R) or Write (W).
Table 19-3 Application of the user data areas
User data area
Necessary for
Operating
unit
PLC
User version
ProTool Runtime checks whether the
ProTool project version and the
project in the PLC are consistent.
R
W
Job mailbox
Triggering of functions on the operating unit by PLC program
R/W
R/W
Event messages
Bit reporting process
arrival and departure of event messages
R
W
Screen number
Evaluation by the PLC as to which
screen is currently open
W
R
Data mailbox
Downloading of data records with
synchronization
R/W
R/W
Date/Time
Transfer of date and time from the
operating unit to the PLC
W
R
Date/Time PLC
Transfer of date and time from the
PLC to the operating unit.
R
W
Coordination
Operating unit status polled by the
PLC program
W
R
Trend request
Configured trends with “Triggering
via bit” or configured history trends
W
R
Trend transfer area 1
Configured trends with “Triggering
via bit” or configured history trends
R/W
R/W
Trend transfer area 2
Configured history trend with “switch
buffer”
R/W
R/W
LED assignment
LED triggered by the PLC
R
W
OP acknowledgement
Message from the operating unit to
the PLC indicating an alarm message has been acknowledged
W
R
PLC
acknowledgement
Alarm message acknowledgement
from the PLC
R
W
Alarm messages
Bit reporting process
arrival and departure of alarm messages
R
W
The user data areas and their associated area pointers are explained in the
following chapters.
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19.2
User Data Area, User Version
Usage
When starting up the operating unit, it is possible to check whether the operating
unit is connected to the correct PLC. This is important when several operating
units are used.
To do this, the operating unit compares a value stored in the PLC with the value
defined in the configuration. In this way, the compatibility of the configuration data
with the PLC program is ensured. If there is a mismatch, a system message
appears on the operating unit and the runtime configuration is terminated.
In order to use this user data area, set up the following during the configuration:
S
Specify the configuration version – value between 1 and 255.
ProTool: System → Settings
S
Data address of the value for the version stored in the PLC:
ProTool: Insert → Area Pointers, available types: User version
19.3
User Data Area, Job Mailbox
Description
The job mailbox can be used to send PLC jobs to the operating unit, thus initiating
actions on the operating unit. These functions include:
S
displaying screens
S
setting date and time
The job mailbox is set up under Area Pointer and has a length of four data words.
The first word of the job mailbox contains the job number. Depending on the PLC
job in question, up to three parameters can then be specified.
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Word
n+0
Left byte
Right byte
0
Job no.
n+1
Parameter 1
n+2
Parameter 2
n+3
Parameter 3
Figure 19-1
Structure of the user data area, job mailbox
If the first word of the job mailbox is not equal to zero, the operating unit analyzes
the PLC job. Afterwards, the unit sets this data word to zero again. For this reason,
the parameters must be entered in the job mailbox first and then the job number.
The possible PLC jobs, including job number and parameters, are provided in the
“ProTool Online Help” and the Appendix, Part B.
19.4
User Data Areas, Event and Alarm Messages and
Acknowledgement
Definition
Messages consist of a static text and/or tags. The text and tags can be defined by
the user.
Messages are subdivided into event messages and alarm messages. The
programmer defines the event message and alarm message.
Event Messages
An event message indicates a status, e.g.
S
Motor switched on
S
PLC in manual mode
Alarm messages
An alarm message indicates an operational fault, e.g.
S
Valve not opening
S
Motor temperature too high
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Acknowledgement
Since alarm messages indicate an abnormal operational status, they must be
acknowledged. They can be acknowledged either by
S
operator input on the operating unit
S
setting a bit in the PLC acknowledgement area.
Triggering messages
A message is triggered by setting a bit in one of the message areas on the PLC.
The location of the message areas is defined by means of the configuration
software. The corresponding area must also be set up in the PLC.
As soon as the bit in the PLC event/alarm message area has been set and that
area has been transferred to the operating unit, the operating unit detects that the
relevant message has “arrived”.
Conversely, when the same bit is reset on the PLC by the operating unit, the
message is registered as having “departed”.
Message areas
Table 19-4 indicates the number of message areas for event and alarm messages,
for alarm acknowledgement OP (operating unit → PLC) and for alarm
acknowledgement PLC (PLC → operating unit) and the number of words for the
various operating units.
Table 19-4 Division of message areas
Operating unit
Event message area, Alarm message area
Acknowledgement area OP, Acknowledgement area PLC
Number of
Words in data
data areas, ma- area,
ximum
maximum
Messages,
total
Standard PC
8
125
250
4000
MP 370
8
125
250
4000
MP 270, MP 270B
8
125
250
4000
TP 270, OP 270
8
125
250
4000
TP 170B, OP 170B
8
125
125
2000
TP 170A1
8
63
63
1000
1
19-6
Words,
total
Only event messages possible.
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Assignment of message bit and message number
A message can be assigned to each bit in the configured message area. The bits
are assigned to the message numbers in ascending order.
Example:
The following event message area has been configured in the PLC:
Length 5 (in words)
W 43
Figure 19-2 illustrates the assignment of all 80 (5 x 16) message numbers to the
individual bit numbers in the PLC event message area. The assignment is
performed automatically on the operating unit.
W 43
15
16
0
1
W 47
80
65
Message number
Figure 19-2
Assignment of message bit and message number
User Data Area, Acknowledgement
If the PLC should be informed of an alarm message acknowledgement on the
operating unit or the acknowledgement should be initiated on the PLC itself, the
relevant acknowledgement areas must also be set up in the PLC. These
acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the ProTool project under Area
Pointers.
S
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC:
This area is used to inform the PLC when an alarm message has been
acknowledged by means of operator input on the operating unit. The “Alarm
Ack. OP” area pointer must be created or configured for this.
S
Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit:
This area is used when an alarm message is acknowledged by the PLC. In this
case, the area pointer “PLC acknowledgement” must be set.
These acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the configuration under
Area Pointers.
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Figure 19-3 illustrates a schematic diagram of the of the individual alarm message
and acknowledgement areas. The acknowledgement sequences are shown in
Figures 19-5 and 19-6.
Operating unit
PLC
Alarm messages area
ACK
Internal processing /
link
Acknowledgement area
PLC → Operating unit
Acknowledgement area
Operating unit → PLC
Figure 19-3
Alarm message and acknowledgement areas
Assignment of acknowledgement bit to message number
Each alarm message is assigned a message number. The message number is
assigned the same bit number in the alarm messages area as that assigned in the
acknowledgement area. Under normal circumstances, the acknowledgement area
is the same length as the associated alarm messages area.
If the length of an acknowledgement area is not equal to the overall length of the
associated alarm messages area, and there are succeeding alarm messages and
acknowledgement areas, the following assignment applies:
Alarm messages area 1
Alarm message no. 1
Bit 15
0
16
1
.............
.............
32
17
.............
48
33
Alarm messages area 2
Alarm message no. 49
0
Bit 15
.............
64
49
.............
80
65
Figure 19-4
19-8
Acknowledgement area 1
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 1
Bit 15
0
16
1
.............
.............
32
17
Acknowledgement area 2
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 49
0
Bit 15
.............
64
49
.............
80
65
Assignment of acknowledgement bit and message number
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Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
A bit set in this area by the PLC initiates the acknowledgement of the
corresponding alarm message in the operating unit, thus fulfilling the same function
as pressing the ACK button. Reset the bit before setting the bit in the alarm
message area again. Figure 19-5 illustrates the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
S
must follow on immediately from the associated alarm messages area,
S
must have precisely the same polling time and
S
may not be any longer than the associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages
area
Acknowledgement
area PLC →
Operating Unit
Figure 19-5
Acknowledgement
via PLC
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
When a bit is set in the alarm message area, the operating unit resets the
associated bit in the acknowledgement area. As a result of processing by the
operating unit, the two processes indicate a slight difference with regard to time. If
the alarm message is acknowledged on the operating unit, the bit in the
acknowledgement area is set. In this way, the PLC can detect that the alarm
message has been acknowledged. Figure 19-6 illustrates the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC must be no longer than the
associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages
area
Acknowledgement
area Operating
Unit → PLC
Figure 19-6
Acknowledgement
via operating unit
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
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Acknowledgement area size
The acknowledgement areas PLC → Operating Unit and Operating Unit → PLC
must not be any longer than the associated alarm message areas. The
acknowledgement area, however, be smaller if acknowledgement by the PLC is
not required for all alarm messages. This is also valid when the acknowledgement
need not be detected in the PLC for all alarm messages. Figure 19-7 illustrates
such a case.
Alarm messages area
Alarm messages
that can be
Bit 0
acknowledged
Bit n
Alarm messages
that cannot be
acknowledged
Figure 19-7
Reduced-size
alarm messages acknowledgement area
Bit 0
Bit n
Bit m
Reduced-size acknowledgement area
Note
Place important alarm messages in the alarm messages area starting at Bit 0 in
ascending order.
19.5
User Data Area, Screen Number
Application
The operating units store information concerning the screen currently open on the
unit in the screen number user data area.
This enables the transfer of data regarding the current operating unit display
content to the PLC which, in turn, can trigger certain reactions; e.g. call in a
different screen.
Requirements
If the screen number area should be used, it must be specified in the ProTool
project as an Area Pointer. It can only be stored in one PLC and only once.
The screen number area is downloaded to the PLC spontaneously, i.e. the transfer
is always initiated when a change is selected on the operating unit. Therefore, it is
not necessary to configure an acquisition cycle.
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Structure
The screen number area is a data area with a fixed length of 5 words.
The structure of the screen number area in the PLC memory is illustrated below.
15
0
1st Word
Current screen type
2nd Word
Current screen number
3rd Word
Reserved
4th Word
Current field number
5th Word
Reserved
Entry
19.6
Assignment
Current screen type
1 for basic screen or
4 for fixed window
Current screen number
1 to 65535
Current field number
1 to 65535
User Data Area, Date/Time
Transferring date and time
Transfer of date and time from the operating unit to the PLC can be triggered by
PLC job 41. PLC job 41 writes the date and time to the data area Date/Time where
they can be analyzed by the PLC program. Figure 19-8 illustrates the structure of
the data area. All data is in BCD format.
Left byte
Minute (0–59)
Second (0–59)
n+2
n+3
0
Hour (0–23)
Reserved
Reserved
Weekday (1–7, 1=Sun)
n+4
Day (1–31)
Month (1–12)
n+5
Year (80–99/0–29)
Reserved
Figure 19-8
Time
n+1
8 7
Reserved
Date
DW 15
n+0
Right byte
Structure of data area Time and Date
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Note
When entering data in the year data area, please note that the values 80–99
represent 1980 to 1999 and 0–29 the years 2000 to 2029.
19.7
User Data Area, Date/Time PLC
Transfer of date and time to the operating unit
The downloading of date and time to the operating unit is generally useful when the
PLC is master for time.
DATE_AND_TIME format (BCD coded)
Left byte
DW
15
n+0
Right byte
8 7
0
Year (80–99/0–29)
Month (1–12)
n+1
Day (1–31)
Hour (0–23)
n+2
Minute (0–59)
Second (0–59)
n+3
Reserved
Figure 19-9
Reserved
Weekday (1–7, 1=Sun)
Structure of data area Date/Time in DATE_AND_TIME format
Note
When entering data in the year data area, please note that the values 80–99
represent 1980 to 1999 and 0–29 the years 2000 to 2029.
The PLC writes cyclically to the data area, whereby the operating unit reads and
synchronizes (refer to the ProTool User’s Guide).
Note
In the configuration, do not select too small an acquisition cycle for the Date/Time
area pointer because this affects the operating unit performance.
Recommendation: Acquisition cycle of 1 minute, if permitted by the process.
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19.8
User Data Area, Coordination
The coordination user data area is two words long. It serves to realize the following
functions:
S
Detection of operating unit startup by the PLC program,
S
Detection of the current operating unit operating mode by the PLC program,
S
Detection by the PLC program that the operating unit is ready to communicate.
Note
Each time the coordination area is updated by the operating unit, the entire
coordination area is written.
Therefore, the PLC program must not execute any modifications in the
coordination area.
Bit assignment in coordination area
1st Word
High Byte
15
– – – – – –
8
– –
Low Byte
7
2 1 0
– – – – – X X X
Startup bit
– = Reserved
X = Assigned
Operating mode
Life bit
Figure 19-10 Significance of the bits in the coordination area
Startup bit
The startup bit is set to 0 for a short time during the start-up routine by the
operating unit. After the startup routine has been completed, the bit is set
permanently to 1.
Operating mode
As soon as the operating unit has been switched offline by the operator, the
operating mode bit is set to 1. When the operating unit is working in normal
operation, the operating mode bit is set to 0. The PLC program can be used to poll
this bit and thus establish the current operating mode of the operating unit.
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User Data Areas for Telemecanique PLCs
Life bit
The life bit is inverted by the operating unit at intervals of approx. one second. The
PLC program can be used to poll this bit to check whether connection to the
operating unit still exists.
19.9
User Data Areas, Trend Request and Trend Transfer
Trends
A trend is the graphical representation of a value from the PLC. Reading of the
value can be time-triggered or bit-triggered, depending on the configuration.
Time-triggered trends
The operating unit reads the trend values cyclically according to the cycle interval
defined in the configuration. Time-triggered trends are suitable for continuous
progressions such as the operating temperature of a motor.
Bit-triggered trends
By setting a trigger bit in the trend transfer area pointer, the operating unit reads in
either a trend value or the entire trend buffer. This is specified in the configuration.
Bit-triggered trends are normally used to display values of an area subject to rapid
variation. An example of this is the injection pressure for plastic moldings.
In order to be able to activate bit-triggered trends, corresponding data areas have
to be specified in the ProTool project (under Area Pointers) and set up on the PLC.
The operating unit and the PLC communicate with one another via those areas.
The following areas are available for trends:
S
Trend request area
S
Trend transfer area 1
S
Trend transfer area 2 (required with switch buffer only)
Assign a trend to a bit in the configuration. This ensures the bit assignment is
unique for all areas.
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Switch buffer
The switch buffer is a second buffer for the same trend and can be set up during
the configuration.
While the operating unit reads the value from Buffer 1, the PLC writes it in Buffer 2.
If the operating unit reads from Buffer 2, the PLC writes to Buffer 1. This prevents
the trend value being overwritten by the PLC when being read by the operating
unit.
Partitioning of the area pointers
The trend request and trend transfer 1 and 2 area pointers can be divided into
separate data areas with a predefined maximum number and length (refer to
Table 19-5).
Table 19-5 Partitioning of the area pointer
Data area
Trend request
Trend transfer
1
2
Number of data areas, maximum
8
8
8
Words in data area, total
8
8
8
Trend request area
If a screen with one or more trends is opened on the operating unit, the unit sets
the corresponding bits in the trend request area. After deselection of the screen,
the operating unit resets the corresponding bits in the trend request area.
The trend request area can be used by the PLC to ascertain which trend is
currently being displayed on the operating unit. Trends can also be triggered
without analysis of the trend request area.
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User Data Areas for Telemecanique PLCs
Trend transfer area 1
This area serves for triggering trends. In the PLC program, set the bit assigned to
the trend in the trend transfer area and the trend communication bit. The operating
unit detects triggering and reads in either a trend value or the entire buffer. It then
resets the trend bit and the trend communication bit.
Trend transfer area(s)
Bit number
15 14 13 12 11 10 9
8 7
6
5 4
3
2
1
0
1st Word
2nd Word
Trend communication bit
The trend transfer area must not be altered by the PLC program until the trend
communication bit has been reset.
Trend transfer area 2
Trend transfer area 2 is necessary for trends that are configured with a switch
buffer. Its layout is precisely the same as that of trend transfer area 1.
19.10
User Data Area, LED Assignment
Application
The Operator Panel (OP), Multi Panel (MP) and Panel PC have function keys with
Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) integrated in them. These LEDs can be controlled
from the PLC. This means, for example, that in specific situations, it is possible to
indicate to the operator which key should be pressed by switching on an LED.
Requirements
In order to control LEDs, corresponding data areas, so-called LED assignments,
must be set up in the PLC and defined in the configuration as Area Pointers.
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User Data Areas for Telemecanique PLCs
Partitioning of the area pointer
The LED assignment area pointer can be divided into separate data areas, as
illustrated in the following table.
Table 19-6 Partitioning of the LED assignment area pointer
Operating unit
Number of data areas,
maximum
Words in data area,
total
Panel PC
8
16
MP 370
8
16
MP 270, MP 270B
8
16
OP 270
8
16
OP 170B
8
16
Note
The area pointer in question can no longer be selected in the Insert new area
pointer window when the maximum number has been reached. Area pointers of
the same type appear gray.
LED assignment
The assignment of the individual LEDs to the bits in the data areas is defined when
the function keys are configured. This involves specifying a bit number within the
assignment area for each LED.
The bit number (n) identifies the first of two successive bits which control the
following LED states:
Table 19-7 LED states
Bit n + 1
Bit n
0
0
Off
0
1
Flashes
1
0
Flashes
1
1
Permanently on
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LED function
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User Data Areas for Telemecanique PLCs
19.11
Recipes
Description
During the transfer of data records between the operating unit and PLC, both
communication peers alternately access common communication areas in the
PLC. The function and structure of the recipe-specific communication area (“data
mailbox”) and the mechanisms involved in synchronized transfer of data records
are the subject of this chapter.
Information on setting up the data mailbox in ProTool is provided in the online help.
Downloading methods
There are two methods of downloading data records between operating unit and
PLC:
S
Asynchronous transfer (Page 19-19)
S
Synchronized transfer using the data mailbox (Page 19-20)
Data records are always transferred directly, i.e. the tag values are read or written
directly from or to the address configured for the tag without being stored
intermediately.
Trigger downloading of data records
There are three methods of triggering the transfer of data:
S
By operator input on the recipe display (Page 19-21)
S
By PLC jobs (Page 19-22)
S
By activating configured functions (Page 19-23)
If transfer of data records is initiated by a configured function or a PLC job, the
recipe display on the operating unit remains fully functional as the data records are
transferred in the background.
Simultaneous processing of multiple transfer jobs is not possible, however. In such
cases, the operating unit returns a system message refusing additional transfer
requests.
A list of the most important system messages together with notes on the possible
causes of the associated errors and remedies for them is provided in Appendix,
Part A.
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User Data Areas for Telemecanique PLCs
19.11.1
Asynchronous data transfer
Purpose
In the case of asynchronous transfer of data records between operating unit and
PLC, there is no coordination of the communication areas commonly used. For
this reason, there is no need to set up a data mailbox during the configuration
process.
Application
The asynchronous transfer of data records is applicable, for example, when the
S
uncontrolled overwriting of data by the communication peers can be reliably
prevented by the system,
S
the PLC does not require any details of the recipe and data record numbers, or
S
transfer of data records is initiated by operator input on the operating unit.
Read values
On triggering a read transfer, the values are read from the PLC addresses and
downloaded to the operating unit.
S
Transfer initiated by operator input on recipe display:
Data is uploaded to the operating unit. There it can be processed, e.g. values
can be modified and the changes saved.
S
Transfer initiated by function or PLC job:
The data is saved directly to the storage medium.
Write values
On triggering a write transfer, the values are written to the PLC addresses.
S
Transfer initiated by operator input on recipe display:
The current values are written to the PLC.
S
Transfer initiated by function or PLC job:
The values on the storage medium are written to the PLC.
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User Data Areas for Telemecanique PLCs
19.11.2
Synchronous data transfer
Purpose
In the case of synchronous data transfer, both the communication peers set status
bits in the commonly used data mailbox. In this way, the PLC program can prevent
uncontrolled overwriting of each other’s data by the two units.
Application
The synchronous transfer of data records is applicable, for example, when
S
the PLC is the “active partner” for transfer of data records,
S
details of the recipe and data record numbers are to be analyzed on the PLC,
or
S
transfer of data records is initiated by PLC job.
Requirements
In order to synchronize the transfer of data records between the operating unit and
PLC, the following conditions must be fulfilled in the configuration:
S
the data mailbox must have been set up in System → Area Pointer;
S
the recipe properties must specify the PLC with which the operating unit has to
synchronize transfer of data records.
The PLC is specified in the recipe editor in Properties → Transfer.
Detailed information on this is provided in ProTool Configuring Windows-based
Systems User Guide.
19.11.3
Data mailbox for synchronized data transfer
Structure
The data mailbox has a defined length of 5 words. Its structure is as follows:
15
19-20
0
1st Word
Current recipe number (1 – 999)
2nd Word
Current data record number (0 – 65,535)
3rd Word
Reserved
4th Word
Status (0, 2, 4, 12)
5th Word
Reserved
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Status word
The status word (Word 4) can assume the following values:
Value
19.11.4
Explanation
Decimal
Binary
0
0000 0000
Transfer permitted, data mailbox is accessible
2
0000 0010
Transfer in progress
4
0000 0100
Transfer completed without errors
12
0000 1100
Errors occurred during transfer
Synchronization process
Read from the PLC by operating the recipe view
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe number to be read
and the status “Transfer in progress” in the data mailbox
and sets the data record number to zero.
3
The operating unit reads the values from the PLC and
displays them on the recipe display.
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In the case of recipes with synchronous tags, the values
from the are also written in the tags.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
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User Data Areas for Telemecanique PLCs
Write in the PLC by operating the recipe view
Step
1
Action
Check status word = 0?
Yes
No
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number to be written and the status “Transfer in progress”
in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit writes the current values to the PLC.
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In the case of recipes with synchronized tags, the
modified values between the recipe views and tags are
compared and then written to the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Read from the PLC by PLC job “PLC → DAT” (no. 69)
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the job and the status “Transfer in
progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit reads the value from the PLC and
saves the value in the data record specified by the job.
4
S If the option “Overwrite” has been specified for the job,
No
Operation
cancelled and no
message returned
existing data records are overwritten without prior
warning.
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer
completed”.
S If “Do not overwrite” was specified in the job and the
data record already exists, the operating unit
terminates the process and enters 0000 1100 in the
status word of the data mailbox.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Details of the structure of the PLC job are provided on Page 19-25.
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User Data Areas for Telemecanique PLCs
Write in the PLC by PLC job “DAT → PLC” (no. 70)
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
No
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the job and the status “Transfer in
progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit retrieves the value from the data
record specified in the job from the data medium and
writes that value in the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
Operation
cancelled and no
message returned
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Details of the structure of the PLC job are provided on Page 19-25.
Read from the PLC by configured function
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the function and the status “Transfer
in progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit reads the data from the PLC and
saves it to the data record specified by the function.
4
S If the option “Overwrite” has been specified for the
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
function, existing data records are overwritten without
prior warning.
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer
completed”.
S If “Do not overwrite” was specified in the job and the
data record already exists, the operating unit
terminates the process and enters 0000 1100 in the
status word of the data mailbox.
5
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
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Write in the PLC by configured function
Step
Action
1
Check status word = 0?
Yes
2
The operating unit enters the recipe and data record
number specified by the function and the status “Transfer
in progress” in the data mailbox.
3
The operating unit retrieves the value from the data
record specified in the function from the data medium and
writes that value in the PLC.
4
The operating unit sets the status to “Transfer completed”.
5
The PLC program can now analyze the data transferred
as required.
No
Operation
cancelled and
system message
returned
In order to enable another transfer operation, the PLC
program has to reset the status word to zero.
Note
For reasons of data consistency, analysis of the recipe and data record number on
the PLC cannot be performed until the status in the data mailbox is set to
“Transfer completed” or “Errors occurred during transfer”.
Possible causes of errors
If the downloading of data records is terminated due to errors, it may be due to one
of the following reasons:
S
Tag address not set up on PLC,
S
Overwriting of data records not possible,
S
Recipe number not available
S
Data record number not available
A list of the most important system messages together with notes on the possible
causes of the associated errors and remedies for them is provided in Appendix,
Part A.
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User Data Areas for Telemecanique PLCs
Response to error-based termination
The operating unit responds as follows when the downloading of data records is
terminated due to an error:
S
Transfer initiated by operator input in recipe view
Indication on the status bar on the recipe display and issue of system
messages.
S
Transfer initiated by function
System messages issued.
S
Transfer initiated by PLC job
No feedback of information on operating unit
Regardless of the response of the operating unit, the status of the transfer can be
checked by reading the status word in the data mailbox.
19.11.5
PLC jobs with recipes
Purpose
The transfer of data records between operating unit and PLC can be triggered by
the PLC program. This requires no operator input on the operating unit.
The two PLC jobs No. 69 and No. 70 can be used for this.
No. 69: Read data record from PLC (“PLC → DAT”)
PLC Job No. 69 downloads data records from the PLC to the operating unit. The
structure of this PLC job is as follows:
Word 1
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
69
Word 2
Recipe number (1 – 999)
Word 3
Data record number (1 – 65,535)
Word 4
Do not overwrite existing data record: 0
Overwrite existing data record: 1
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User Data Areas for Telemecanique PLCs
No. 70: Write data record to PLC (“DAT → PLC”)
PLC Job No. 70 downloads data records from the operating unit to the PLC. The
structure of this PLC job is as follows:
Word 1
19-26
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
70
Word 2
Recipe number (1 – 999)
Word 3
Data record number (1 – 65,535)
Word 4
—
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
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Part X
System messages
A
PLC Jobs
B
Interface Area Assignment
C
SIMATIC HMI Documentation
D
Appendix
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System Messages
A
In this chapter
This section of the Appendix contains a selection of important system messages
for Windows-based systems. The table indicates when the messages occur and
how they, or their cause, can be cleared. Not every message is relevant for each
operating unit.
System message parameters
The system messages may contain parameters which are not decoded for the user
but which are relevant in respect of the cause of an error since they provide a
reference to the source code of the runtime software. These parameters are
issued according to the text Error code:.
Note
System messages are issued in the language currently set on the operating unit.
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A-1
System Messages
Number
10000
Effect/Cause
Remedy
The print job could not be started or was
terminated for an unknown reason.
Check the printer settings and cable
connections.
The printer is incorrectly configured.
Or: There are no rights for a network printer
available.
If a fault occurs repeatedly, contact the
hotline.
10001
No printer has been installed or no standard
printer configured.
Install a printer and/or mark one as standard
printer.
10002
The intermediate buffer for printing graphics
is full. Up to two graphics can be buffered.
Do not issue print jobs so quickly in
succession.
10003
Graphics can be buffered again.
–
10004
The intermediate buffer for printing lines in
text mode (e.g. messages) is full. Up to 1000
lines can be buffered.
Do not issue print jobs so quickly in
succession.
10005
Lines of text can be buffered again.
–
10006
The Windows print system reports an error.
Repeat the action, if necessary.
For information on the cause, refer to the text
printed and, if available, the error number.
Printing is not performed or it is incorrect.
20010
A fault has occurred in the script line called in Select the specified script line in the
from the specified script. Execution of the
configuration.
script function was, therefore, terminated.
Check tags, whether the types used are
In this case, it is advisable to check any
permissible.
previous system messages too.
Check Functions, whether the number and
20011
An error has occurred in a script called in by
the script specified. Execution of the script
function has, therefore, been terminated in
the subscript.
types of parameter are correct.
In this case, it is advisable to check any
previous system messages too.
Select the scripts from the configuration
which are called in directly or indirectly via
the specified script.
Check tags, whether the types used are
permissible.
Check Functions, whether the number and
types of parameter are correct.
20012
Inconsistent configuration data is present.
Therefore, the script could not be created.
Compile the configuration again.
20013
VBScript.dll is not correctly installed.
Therefore, no scripts can be executed.
Re-install ProTool/Pro RT.
20014
A value is returned by the script function
which is not written in any configured return
tag.
Select the specified script in the
configuration.
Too many scripts have been triggered in
quick succession.
If more than 20 scripts are queued to be
processed, any subsequent scripts are
rejected.
In this case, the script indicated in the
message is not executed.
Check where the scripts are being triggered
from.
The tag could not accept the function result,
e.g. in the case of exceeding the value
range.
Check the tag type of the function parameter.
20015
30010
A-2
Check whether the script name has been
assigned a value.
Extend the times, e.g. the polling time of the
tags, which trigger the scripts.
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System Messages
Number
Effect/Cause
Remedy
30011
A function could not be executed because
Check the parameter value and tag type of
the function was assigned an invalid value or the invalid parameter.
type in the parameter.
If a tag is used as a parameter, check its
value.
40010
The function could not be executed since the Check the parameter types in the
parameters could not be converted to a
configuration.
common tag type.
40011
The function could not be executed since the Check the parameter types in the
parameters could not be converted to a
configuration.
common tag type.
50000
The operating unit receives data faster than it –
is capable of processing. Therefore, no
further data is received until the data
currently available has been processed.
Data exchange then resumes.
50001
Data exchange has been resumed.
–
60000
This message is generated by the function
“Display system messages”. The text to be
displayed is transferred to the function as a
parameter.
–
60010
The file could not be copied in the direction
defined because one of the two files is
currently open or the source/target path is
not available.
Restart the function or check the paths of the
source/target files.
It is possible that the Windows NT user has
no access rights to one of the two files.
60011
Using Windows NT with NTFS: The user
executing ProTool/Pro RT must be granted
access rights for the files.
An attempt was made to copy a file to itself.
Check the path of the source/target file.
It is possible that the Windows NT user has
no access rights to one of the two files.
Using Windows NT with NTFS: The user
executing ProTool/Pro RT must be granted
access rights for the files.
70010
The application could not be started because Check whether the application exists in the
it could not be found in the path specified or
specified path or close other applications.
insufficient memory space was available.
70011
The system time could not be modified. The
error message only appears in connection
with area pointer Date/Time PLC. Possible
causes:
S an impermissible time was transferred in
Check the time which is to be set.
Under Windows NT: The user executing
ProTool/Pro RT must be assigned the rights
to modify the system time from Windows NT
(administration/user manager, guidelines).
the PLC job,
S the Windows NT user has no user rights
to modify the system time.
If the first parameter in the system message
is displayed with the value 13, the second
parameter indicates the byte containing the
incorrect value.
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System Messages
Number
70012
Effect/Cause
Remedy
An error occurred when executing the
function ”Exit Runtime” with the option ”Exit
also Windows”.
Terminate all applications currently running.
Then terminate Windows.
Windows and ProTool/Pro RT are not
terminated.
A possible cause is that other applications
cannot be terminated.
70013
The system time could not be modified
because an invalid value was entered.
Incorrect separators may have been used.
Check the time which is to be set.
70014
The system time could not be modified.
Possible causes:
Check the time which is to be set.
S an impermissible time was transferred
S the Windows NT user has no user rights
to modify the system time,
Under Windows NT: The user executing
ProTool/Pro RT must be assigned the rights
to modify the system time from Windows NT
(administration/user manager, guidelines).
S Windows rejects the setting request.
70015
The system time could not be read because
Windows rejects the reading function.
–
70016
An attempt was made to select a screen by
means of a function or job. This is not
possible because the screen number
specified does not exist.
Check the screen number in the function or
job with the screen numbers configured.
Refer the number to a screen, if necessary.
Or: a screen could not be generated due to
insufficient system memory.
70017
Date/Time is not read from the area pointer
because the address set in the PLC is either
not available or has not been set up.
Change the address or set up the address in
the PLC.
70018
Acknowledgement that the password list has
been successfully imported.
–
70019
Acknowledgement that the password list has
been successfully exported.
–
70020
Acknowledgement for activation of message
recording.
–
70021
Acknowledgement for deactivation of
message recording.
–
70022
Acknowledgement to starting the Import
Password List action.
–
70023
Acknowledgement to starting the Export
Password List action.
–
70027
Backing up the RAM file system has been
started.
–
70028
Backing up of the RAM file system has been
completed successfully.
–
The files from the RAM have been copied in
the Flash memory. Following a restart, these
saved files will be copied back in the RAM
file system.
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System Messages
Number
70029
Effect/Cause
Backup of the RAM file system has failed.
No backup copy of the RAM file system has
been made.
70030
The parameters configured for the function
are faulty.
The connection to the new PLC was not
established.
70031
The PLC configured in the function is not an
S7 PLC.
The connection to the new PLC was not
established.
Remedy
Check the settings in the OP Properties
dialog and save the RAM file system using
the Save Files button in the Persistent
Storage tab control.
Compare the parameters configured for the
function with the parameters configured for
the PLC and correct them as necessary.
Compare the S7 PLC name parameter
configured for the function with the
parameters configured for the PLC and
correct them as necessary.
80001
The archive specified is filled to the size
defined (in percent) and must be stored
elsewhere.
Store the file or table by executing a ‘move’
or ‘copy’ function.
80002
A line is missing in the specified archive.
–
80003
The copying process for archiving was not
successful.
–
In this case, it is advisable to check any
subsequent system messages, too.
80006
Since archiving is not possible, this causes a
permanent loss of the functionality.
In the case of databases, check whether the
corresponding data source exists and start
up the system again.
80009
A copying action has been completed
successfully.
–
80010
Since the path was incorrectly entered in
ProTool, this causes a permanent loss of the
functionality.
Configure the path for the respective archive
again and restart the system when the full
functionality is required.
80012
Archive values are stored in a buffer. If the
values are read to the buffer faster than they
can be physically written (e.g. using a hard
disk), overloading may occur and recording
is then stopped.
Archive less values.
80013
The overload status no longer applies.
Archiving resumes the recording of all
values.
–
80014
The same action was triggered twice in quick –
succession. Since the process is already in
operation, the action is only carried out once.
80016
The archives are separated by the function
Close archive and the incoming entries
exceed the defined buffer size.
Or increase the recording interval.
Reconnect the archives.
All the jobs in the buffer are deleted.
80017
The incoming entries cause the defined
buffer size to be exceeded. This can be
caused, e.g. by several copying actions
being activated at the same time.
Terminate the copy process.
All the copy jobs in the buffer are deleted.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
A-5
System Messages
Number
80018
Effect/Cause
Remedy
All the archives are reconnected by means of –
the DB layer, e.g. after executing the function
Open_archive.
Values are then written back into the tables.
80019
All the archives are separated from the DB
layer and all connections terminated, e.g.
after executing the function Close_archive.
–
Values are temporarily buffered and written in
the tables when the connection is
re-established.
There is no connection to the storage
medium and a change can take place.
80020
80021
The max. number of simultaneously
activated copy actions has been exceeded.
Copying is not executed.
Wait until the current copying actions have
been completed and restart the last copy
action.
An attempt was made to delete an archive
which is still involved with a copy action.
Wait until the current copying action has
been completed and restart the last action.
Deletion has not been executed.
80022
An attempt was made to start a sequence
archive, which is not a sequence archive,
from an archive using the function
Start_sequence_archive.
Check the project for the following:
S the function Start_sequence_archive is
correctly configured.
S the variable parameters are being
No sequence archive is created.
80023
correctly provided at the operating unit.
An attempt was made to copy an archive to
itself.
Check the project for the following:
S the function Copy_archive is correctly
configured.
The archive is not copied.
S the variable parameters are being
correctly provided at the operating unit.
80024
The function Copy_archive is configured not
to permit copying when the target archive
already contains data (Parameter: Write
mode).
Modify the function Copy_archive in the
project, if necessary.
Before initiating the function, delete the target
archive.
The archive is not copied.
80025
The copy action is interrupted.
–
Data written up to this point is retained.
Deletion of the target table (if configured) is
not executed.
The cancellation is documented by an error
entry $RT_ERR$ at the end of the target
table.
80026
A-6
The message is issued after all the archives –
have been successfully initialized. Values are
written in the archives from this moment on.
Prior to this, no values are archived even
though the runtime software is operating.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
System Messages
Number
80027
Effect/Cause
The internal Flash memory has been
specified as the memory location for an
archive. This is not permissible.
Remedy
Configure ”Storage Card” as the memory
location or a network path.
No values will be archived for this archive
and the archive will not be created.
80028
The message serves as a status
acknowledgment that initialization of the
archives is currently running. No values are
archived until system message 80026 is
issued.
–
80029
The number of archives specified in the
Evaluate the additional system message,
message could not be initialized. Initialization related to this message, which is also issued.
of the archives has been completed.
Check the configuration, the ODBC (Open
The faulty archives are not available for
Database Connectivity) and the specified
archiving jobs.
drive.
80030
The structure of the table(s) available does
not match the archiving structure expected.
Delete the existing tables manually, in
advance.
The archiving process is stopped for this
archive.
80032
Archives can be configured with a function
trigger. This is triggered as son as the
archive is full. If runtime is started and the
archive is already full, the trigger function will
not be initiated.
The archive specified no longer archives
data since it is full.
Stop the runtime, delete the archive and
restart the runtime again.
Or:
Configure a button in the runtime which
contains the same actions as the function
trigger and press it.
110000
The operating mode status has been
changed. The operating mode is now offline.
–
110001
The operating mode status has been
changed. The operating mode is now online.
–
110002
The operating mode status has not been
changed.
Check the connection to the PLCs.
110003
Check whether the address area for the area
pointer “Coordination” in the PLC is
available.
The operating status of the PLC specified is
–
changed by the function Connect/Disconnect
PLC.
The operating mode is now offline.
110004
The operating status of the PLC specified is
–
changed by the function Connect/Disconnect
PLC.
The operating mode is now online.
110005
An attempt was made to use the function
Connect/Disconnect PLC to switch the
specified PLC to operating mode online
although the entire system is in operating
mode Offline. This switch-over is not
permissible.
Switch the complete system to operating
mode online and execute the function again.
The PLC remains in operating mode offline.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
A-7
System Messages
Number
Effect/Cause
Remedy
110006
system has been extended by the addition of Check the user versions.
the User Version area pointer.
Either the wrong version was entered in the
If the user version is not correct, the runtime PLC or configuration or the wrong
is stopped.
configuration was started for the PLC user
version.
120000
The trend is not displayed because an
incorrect axis to the trend, or incorrect trend,
has been configured.
Change the configuration.
120001
The trend is not displayed because an
incorrect axis to the trend, or incorrect trend,
has been configured.
Change the configuration.
120002
The trend is not displayed because the tag
assigned tries to access an invalid PLC
address.
Check whether the data area for the tag
exists in the PLC, the configured address is
correct or the value range for the tag is
correct.
130000
The action was not executed.
Close other applications.
Delete files no longer required from the hard
disk.
130001
The action was not executed.
Delete files no longer required from the hard
disk.
130002
The action was not executed.
Close other applications.
Delete files no longer required from the hard
disk.
130003
No target data carrier is inserted. The
process is stopped.
Check, for example, whether:
S access has been made to the correct
data carrier
S the data carrier has been inserted
130004
The target data carrier is write-protected. The Check whether access has been made to
process is stopped.
the correct data carrier. Remove the write
protection.
130005
The file is write-protected. The process is
stopped.
Check whether access has been made to
the correct file. Modify the file attributes, if
necessary.
130006
No access to file is possible. The process is
stopped.
Check, for example, whether:
S access has been made to the correct file
S the file exists
S a different action prevents simultaneous
access to the file
140000
Online connection to the PLC has been
successfully established.
–
140001
Online connection to the PLC has been
disconnected.
–
140003
No tag updating or writing is executed.
Check the connection and whether the PLC
is switched on.
Check the parameter definitions in the
Control Panel using “Set PU/PC interface”.
Restart the system.
A-8
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
System Messages
Number
140004
Effect/Cause
No tag updating or writing is executed
because the access point or the subrack
configuration is incorrect.
Remedy
Check the connection and whether the PLC
is switched on.
Check the access point or the subrack
configuration (MPI, PPI, PROFIBUS) in the
Control Panel with “Set PU/PC interface”.
Restart the system.
140005
No tag updating or writing is executed
because the address of the operating unit is
incorrect (possibly too high).
Use a different operating unit address.
Check the connection and whether the PLC
is switched on.
Check the parameter definitions in the
Control Panel using “Set PU/PC interface”.
Restart the system.
140006
No tag updating or writing is executed
because the baud rate is incorrect.
Select a different baud rate in ProTool/Pro
(according to subrack, profile,
communication peer, etc.).
140007
No tag updating or writing is executed
because the bus profile is incorrect
(see %1).
Check the user defined bus profile.
The following parameters could not be
entered in the registry:
Check the parameter definitions in the
Control Panel using “Set PU/PC interface”.
1:
2:
3:
4:
5:
6:
7:
8:
9:
10:
Restart the system.
140008
No tag updating or writing is executed
because the configuration data is incorrect:
Check the connection and whether the PLC
is switched on.
The following parameters could not be
entered in the registry:
Check the parameter definitions in the
Control Panel using “Set PU/PC interface”.
0:
1:
2:
3:
Restart the system.
4:
5:
140009
Tslot
Tqui
Tset
MinTsdr
MaxTsdr
Trdy
Tid1
Tid2
Gap Factor
Retry Limit
Check the connection and whether the PLC
is switched on.
General errors
Incorrect version
Profile cannot be entered in the registry.
Sub-network type cannot be entered in
the registry.
Target rotation time cannot be entered
in the registry.
Highest address (HSA) incorrect.
No tag updating or writing is executed
because the module for the S7
communication was not found.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Re-install the module in the Control Panel
using “Set PU/PC interface”.
A-9
System Messages
Number
140010
Effect/Cause
Remedy
No S7 communication peer could be found
because the PLC is switched off.
DP/T:
The option “PU/PC is the only master on
bus” has not been set in the Control Panel
under Set PU/PC Interface”.
Switch the PLC on.
DP/T:
If only one master is connected to the
network, select “Set PU/PC Interface” and
activate the option “PU/PC is only master on
bus”.
If the network has more than one master,
switch this master on. Do not modify any
settings here, otherwise a bus fault may
occur.
140011
No tag updating or writing is executed
because communication is interrupted.
Check the connection and that the
communication peer is switched on.
140012
There is an initialization problem (e.g. when
ProTool/Pro RT has been terminated in the
Task Manager).
Restart the operating unit.
Or start ProTool/Pro RT first and then the
other applications.
Or: another application (e.g. STEP7, WINCC)
is active with different bus parameters and
the driver cannot be started with the new bus
parameters (e.g. baud rate).
140013
The MPI cable is not plugged in and, thus,
there is no power supply.
Check the connections.
140014
–
Modify the operating unit address in the
configuration in PLC.
140015
Incorrect baud rate
Correct the incorrect parameters.
Or: incorrect bus parameter (e.g. HSA)
Or: OP address HSA
Or: incorrect interrupt vector (interrupt does
not arrive at the driver)
140016
–
Change the interrupt number.
140017
–
Change the interrupt number.
140018
The consistency check was deactivated by
Simotion Scout.
Activate the consistency check with Simotion
Scout again and load the configuration in the
project once more.
Only one appropriate note appears.
140019
Simotion Scout loads a new project in the
PLC.
Wait until the end of the reconfiguration.
Connection to the PLC is interrupted.
140020
The version in the PLC and that in the
configuration (FWD file) do not match.
Connection to the PLC is interrupted.
The following options are available:
S Load the current version in the PLC using
Simotion Scout.
S Generate the project anew using ProTool
CS, end ProTool RT and start with the
new configuration.
A-10
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
System Messages
Number
150000
Effect/Cause
No more data is read or written.
Possible causes:
S The cable is defective.
S The PLC does not respond, is defective,
Remedy
Check that the cable is plugged in, the PLC
is operational, the correct interface is used.
Reboot the system if the system message is
displayed continuously.
etc.
S Connection is established via the wrong
interface.
S The system is overloaded.
150001
Connection is re-established because the
cause of the interruption has been
eliminated.
–
160000
No more data is read or written.
Check that the cable is plugged in, the PLC
is operational, the correct interface is used.
Possible causes:
S The cable is defective.
S The PLC does not respond, is defective,
Reboot the system if the system message is
displayed continuously.
etc.
S Connection is established via the wrong
interface.
S The system is overloaded.
160001
Connection is re-established because the
cause of the interruption has been
eliminated.
–
160010
There is no connection to the server
because the server identification (CLS-ID)
cannot be established.
Check the access rights.
Values cannot be read or written.
160011
There is no connection to the server
because the server identification (CLS-ID)
cannot be established.
Values cannot be read or written.
160012
There is no connection to the server
because the server identification (CLS-ID)
cannot be established.
Values cannot be read or written.
Check, for example, whether:
S the server name is correct
S the computer name is correct
S the server is registered
Check, for example, whether:
S the server name is correct
S the computer name is correct
S the server is registered
Information for experienced users:
Interpret the value from HRESULT.
160013
The specified server was started as InProc
Configure the server as OutProc Server or
Server. This has not been released and may Local Server.
possibly lead to incorrect behavior because
the server is running in the same process
area as the ProTool/Pro RT runtime software.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
A-11
System Messages
Number
160014
Effect/Cause
Remedy
Only one OPC server project can be started
on a PC/MP. An error message appears
when an attempt is made to start a second
project.
Do not start a second project with OPC
server functionality on the computer.
The second project has no OPC server
functionality and cannot be located as an
OPC server from external sources.
170000 1)
S7 diagnostics messages are not displayed
because it is not possible to logon to the S7
diagnostics with this unit. The service
program is not supported.
–
170001 1)
The S7 diagnostics buffer cannot be
displayed because communication with the
PLC has been switched off.
Switch the PLC online
170002 1)
The S7 diagnostics buffer cannot be
–
displayed because reading in the diagnostics
buffer (SZL) was terminated due to an error.
170003 1)
The display of an S7 diagnostics message is
not possible. An internal error %2 has been
reported.
170004 1)
The display of an S7 diagnostics message is –
not possible. An internal error with error class
%2, error number %3 has been reported.
170007 1)
It is not possible to read in the S7 diagnostics –
buffer (SZL) because it was terminated with
an internal error with error class %2 and error
code %3.
180000
A component/OCX receives configuration
data with a version identification which is not
supported.
180001
The system is overloaded because too many There are several options available:
actions have been activated simultaneously. S Increase the configured cycle times or
basic clock.
Not all the actions can be executed, some
are rejected.
S Generate the messages slower (polling).
–
Install a newer component.
S Trigger the scripts and functions at
greater intervals.
S If the message appears more frequently:
Restart the operating unit.
180002
The screen keyboard could not be activated.
Possible causes:
If Windows 95 is not available:
Install the runtime software again.
S The screen keyboard is not generally
supported under Windows 95.
S The file “TouchInputPC.exe” was not
registered due to an incorrectly executed
Setup.
190000
It is possible that the tag will not be updated.
–
190001
The tag is updated following an error status
after the cause of the last error state has
been eliminated (return to normal operation).
–
A-12
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
System Messages
Number
Effect/Cause
Remedy
190002
The tag is not updated because
communication to the PLC has been
switched off.
Switch on communication via the function
“Set Online”.
190004
The tag is not updated because the
configured address is not available for this
tag.
Check the configuration.
190005
The tag is not updated because the
configured PLC type does not exist for this
tag.
Check the configuration.
190006
The tag is not updated because it is not
Check the configuration.
possible to map the PLC type in the tag type.
190007
The tag values are not modified because the
connection to the PLC has been terminated
or the tag is offline.
Switch Online or re-establish connection to
the PLC.
190008
The threshold values configured for the tag
have been violated, e.g. by
Observe the configured or current threshold
value of the tag.
S an entered value,
S a function,
S a script.
190009
An attempt has been made to assign a value
to a tag which is outside the value range
permitted for this type.
Observe the value range for the tag type.
E.g. a value of 260 entered for a byte tag or
a value of -3 for a signless word tag.
190010
The tag is described with values too often
(e.g. in a loop triggered by a script).
Increase the time interval between the
multi-writing tasks.
Values are lost because the maximum of 100
event have been stored in the buffer.
190011
Possible cause 1
S The value entered could not be written to Ensure that the value entered is within the
the configured PLC tag because it was
either above or below the value range.
value range of the PLC tags.
S The input is rejected and the original
value is reset.
Possible cause 2:
S Connection to the PLC has been
Check the connection to the PLC.
interrupted.
190012
It is not possible to convert a value from a
source format to a target format, e.g.:
Check the value range or type of the
variable.
S A value should be assigned to a counter
which is outside the valid,
PLC-dependent value range.
S A tag of the type Integer should be
assigned a value of the type String.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
A-13
System Messages
Number
190100
Effect/Cause
Remedy
The area pointer is not updated because the Check the configuration.
configured address for this area pointer is not
available.
Type:
1
Event messages
2
Alarm messages
3
PLC acknowledgment
4
Operating unit acknowledgment
5
LED assignment
6
Trend request
7
Trend transfer 1
8
Trend transfer area 2
No.:
is the consecutive number displayed in
ProTool/Pro.
190101
The area pointer is not updated because it is
not possible to map the PLC type in the area
pointer type.
–
Parameter type and no.:
See message 190100
190102
The area pointer is updated following an
error status after the cause of the last error
state has been eliminated (return to normal
operation).
–
Parameter type and no.:
See message 190100
200000
Coordination is not executed because the
address configured in the PLC does not
exist/has not been set up.
Change the address or set up the address in
the PLC.
200001
Coordination is not executed because the
address configured in the PLC cannot be
written.
Change the address or set up the address in
the PLC in an area which can be written.
200002
Coordination is not carried out at the moment Internal error
because the address format of the area
pointer does not match the internal storage
format.
200003
Coordination can be executed again
because the last error status has been
eliminated (return to normal operation).
–
200004
It is possible that coordination is not
executed.
–
200005
No more data is read or written.
Check that the cable is connected and the
PLC is in order.
Possible causes:
S The cable is defective.
S The PLC does not respond, is defective,
Reboot the system if the system message is
displayed continuously.
etc.
S The system is overloaded.
210000
A-14
Jobs are not processed because the
address configured in the PLC does not
exist/has not been set up.
Change the address or set up the address in
the PLC.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
System Messages
Number
Effect/Cause
Remedy
210001
Jobs are not processed because the
address configured in the PLC cannot be
written to/read from.
Change the address or set up the address in
the PLC in an area which can be written
to/read from.
210002
Commands are not executed because the
address format of the area pointer does not
match the internal storage format.
Internal error
210003
The job mailbox is processed again because
the last error status has been eliminated
(return to normal operation).
–
210004
It is possible that the job mailbox is not
processed.
–
210005
A PLC job was triggered by an impermissible Check the PLC program.
number.
210006
A fault occurred while attempting to execute
the PLC job. The PLC job is, therefore, not
executed.
Check the parameter types in the PLC job.
Compile the configuration again.
Observe the subsequent/previous system
message, if appropriate.
220000 2)
–
220001
The tag is not downloaded because the
Change the configuration.
associated channel/the unit does not support
downloading the data type bool/bit.
220002
The tag is not downloaded because the
Change the configuration.
associated channel/the unit does not support
downloading the data type byte.
220003
The associated driver could not be uploaded. Install the driver by re-installing
It is possible that the driver is not installed.
ProTool/Pro RT.
220004
Communication is terminated and no update
is executed because the cable is not
connected or is defect etc.
Check the connection.
220005
Communication is running.
–
220006
The connection is established to the
specified PLC at the specified interface.
–
220007
The connection to the specified PLC at the
specified interface is disconnected.
Check that:
–
S
S
S
S
the cable is plugged in
the PLC is OK
the correct interface is used
the configuration is OK (interface
parameters, protocol settings, PLC
address).
Reboot the system if the system message is
displayed continuously.
220008
The PLC driver cannot access the specified
interface or open it. It is possible that another
application is using this interface or an
interface is used which is not available on
the target device.
Terminate all the programs which access the
interface and reboot the computer.
Use another interface which is available in
the system.
There is no communication with the PLC.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
A-15
System Messages
Number
230000
Effect/Cause
Remedy
The value entered could not be accepted.
The entered value is rejected and the
previous value is specified again.
Enter a permissible value.
Either the value range has been exceeded or
impermissible characters were entered.
230002
Since the current password level is
inadequate or the password dialog box was
closed with ESC, the entry is rejected and
the previous value is specified again.
Activate an adequate password level using
Login.
230003
Changeover to the specified screen is not
executed because the screen is not
available/configured. The current screen
remains selected.
Configure the screen.
Runtime is operating in Demo mode.
Load the license.
240000 3)
Check the selection function.
There is either no Stopcopy license or it is
defect.
240001 3)
Runtime is operating in Demo mode.
Load an adequate license / powerpack.
Too many tags are configured for the
installed version.
240002 3)
Runtime is operating with a time-limited
standby authorization.
Restore the full authorization.
240003
Authorization cannot be executed.
Restart ProTool/Pro RT or reinstall it.
ProTool/Pro RT is running in Demo mode.
240004
Error during reading the standby
authorization.
ProTool/Pro RT is running in Demo mode.
Restart ProTool/Pro RT, install the
authorization or repair the authorization (see
Commissioning Instructions Software
Protection).
250000
The tag in the specified line in Status/Control
is not updated because the address
configured for this tag is not available.
Check the set address and then check that
the address has been set up in the PLC.
250001
The tag in the specified line in Status/Control
is not updated because the PLC type
configured for this tag is not available.
Check the set address.
250002
The tag in the specified line in Status/Control
is not updated because it is not possible to
map the PLC type in the tag type.
Check the set address.
250003
No connection could be established to the
PLC. The tags will not be updated.
Check the connection to the PLC. Check that
the PLC is switched on and online is
activated.
260000
A password has been entered which is
unknown to the system. Therefore, the
lowest password level has been set. This
corresponds to the status following Logout.
Enter a known password in the password
input field (with corresponding level).
260001
A password has been entered whose
assigned level does not permit execution of
the function.
Modify the password level in the password
input field enter a password with a sufficiently
high level.
The password level currently set is displayed
for information purposes.
A-16
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
System Messages
Number
Effect/Cause
Remedy
260003
The user has logged off from the system. If
–
the password level is 0, no user is logged on.
270000
A tag is not displayed in the message
because it attempts to access an invalid
address in the PLC.
Check whether the data area for the tag
exists in the PLC, the configured address is
correct or the value range for the tag is
correct.
270001
There is a unit-dependent limit as to how
many messages may be queued
simultaneously in order to be displayed (see
Equipment Manual). This limit has been
exceeded.
–
The display no longer contains all the
messages.
However, all the messages are recorded in
the message buffer.
270002
Messages are displayed from an archive are
displayed for which there is no data in the
current project.
Delete older archive files, if necessary.
Placeholders are issued for the messages.
270003
The service cannot be set up because too
many devices was to set up this service.
Connect fewer operating units which want to
use the service.
A maximum of four devices can execute this
action.
280000
Connection is re-established because the
cause of the interruption has been
eliminated.
–
280001
No more data is read or written.
Check that the cable is plugged in, the PLC
is operational, the correct interface is used.
Possible causes:
S The cable is defective.
S The PLC does not respond, is defective,
Reboot the system if the system message is
displayed continuously.
etc.
S Connection is established via the wrong
interface.
S The system is overloaded.
280002
A connection is used which requires a
function module in the PLC.
–
The function block has replied.
Communication can now proceed.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
A-17
System Messages
Number
280003
Effect/Cause
Remedy
A connection is used which requires a
function module in the PLC.
Check that the cable is plugged in, the PLC
is operational, the correct interface is used.
The function block does not reply.
Reboot the system if the system message is
displayed continuously.
The remedy is dependent on the error code:
1: The function block must set the COM bit
in the response container.
280004
The online connection to the PLC has been
interrupted. There is no data exchange at
present.
2:
The function block may not set the
ERROR bit in the response container
3:
The function block must respond within
the specified time (timeout)
4:
Establish an online connection to the
PLC
Check the PLC parameters in ProTool Pro:
baud rate, block length, station address.
Check that the cable is plugged in, the PLC
is operational, the correct interface is used.
Reboot the system if the system message is
displayed continuously.
290000
The tag could not be read or written. It is
assigned the start value.
Check in the configuration that the address
has been set up in the PLC.
The message can be entered in the
message buffer for up to four more failed
tags, if necessary. After that, the message
number 290003 is issued.
290001
An attempt has been made to assign a value
to a tag which is outside the value range
permitted for this type.
Observe the value range for the tag type.
The message can be entered in the
message buffer for up to four more failed
tags, if necessary. After that, the message
number 290004 is issued.
290002
It is not possible to convert a value from a
source format to a target format.
Check the value range or type of the
variable.
The message can be entered in the
message buffer for up to four more failed
tags, if necessary. After that, the message
number 290005 is issued.
290003
This message is issued when message
number 290000 is triggered more than five
times.
Check in the configuration that the tag
addresses have been set up in the PLC.
In this case, no further individual messages
are generated.
290004
This message is issued when message
number 290001 is triggered more than five
times.
Observe the value range for the tag type.
In this case, no further individual messages
are generated.
A-18
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
System Messages
Number
290005
Effect/Cause
This message is issued when message
number 290002 is triggered more than five
times.
Remedy
Check the value range or type of the
variable.
In this case, no further individual messages
are generated.
290006
The threshold values configured for the tag
have been violated by values entered.
Observe the configured or current threshold
value of the tag.
290007
There is a difference between the source
and target structure of the recipe currently
being processed. The target structure
contains an additional data record tag which
is not available in the source structure.
Insert the specified data record tag in the
source structure.
The data record tag specified is assigned its
start value.
290008
There is a difference between the source
and target structure of the recipe currently
being processed. The source structure
contains an additional data record tag which
is not available in the target structure and
therefore cannot be assigned.
Remove the specified data record tag in the
specified recipe from the project.
The value is rejected.
290010
The storage location configured for the
recipe is not permitted.
Check the path specification configured.
Possible causes:
Impermissible characters, write protected,
data medium full or does not exist.
290011
The data record specified by the number
does not exist.
Check the source for the number (constant
or variable value).
290012
The recipe specified by the number does not
exist.
Check the source for the number (constant
or variable value).
290013
An attempt was made to save a data record
under a data record number which already
exists.
The following options are available:
The process is not executed.
S Delete the data record beforehand.
S Change the function parameter
S Check the source for the number
(constant or variable value).
“Overwrite”.
290014
The file specified to be imported could not be Check the following:
found.
S Check the file name.
S Ensure that the file is in the specified
directory.
290020
Acknowledgement that downloading of data
records from operating unit to PLC has
started.
–
290021
Acknowledgement that downloading of data
records from operating unit to PLC has been
completed without any errors.
–
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
A-19
System Messages
Number
290022
Effect/Cause
Remedy
Acknowledgement that downloading of data
records from operating unit to PLC has been
terminated due to an error.
Check the configuration:
S have the tag addresses been set up in
the PLC?
S does the recipe number exist?
S does the data record number exist?
S has the function parameters ”Overwrite”?
290023
Acknowledgement that downloading of data
records from the PLC to the operating unit
has started.
–
290024
Acknowledgement that downloading data
records from the PLC to the operating unit
has been completed without any errors.
–
290025
Acknowledgement that downloading of data
records from the PLC to the operating unit
has been terminated due to an error.
Check the configuration:
S have the tag addresses been set up in
the PLC?
S does the recipe number exist?
S does the data record number exist?
S has the function parameters ”Overwrite”?
290026
An attempt has been made to read/write a
data record although the data mailbox is not
free at present.
Set the data mailbox status to zero.
This error may occur in the case of recipes
for which downloading with synchronization
has been configured.
290027
No connection to the PLC can be
established at present. Therefore, the data
record can neither be read nor written.
Check the connection to the PLC.
Possible causes:
No physical connection to the PLC (no cable
plugged in, cable is defect) or the PLC is
switched off.
290030
This message is issued after reselecting a
screen that contains a recipe display in
which a data record has already been
selected.
Reload the data record from the data
medium or retain the current values.
290031
While saving, it was detected that a data
record with the specified number already
exists.
Overwrite the data record or cancel the
process.
290032
While exporting data records, it was detected Overwrite the file cancel the process.
that a file with the specified name already
exists.
290033
Confirmation request before deleting data
records.
A-20
–
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
System Messages
Number
290040
Effect/Cause
Remedy
A data record error with error code %1 has
occurred which cannot be described in more
detail.
Check that the data carrier, the data record,
the data mailbox and, if necessary, the
connection to the PLC.
The action was canceled.
Trigger the action again after waiting a short
period.
It might be that the data mailbox has not
been installed correctly on the PLC.
If the error occurs again, please contact the
Customer Support. Specify the error code
displayed.
290041
A data record or file cannot be saved
because the data medium is full.
Delete files no longer required.
290042
An attempt was made to execute several
recipe actions simultaneously.
Trigger the action again after waiting a short
period.
The last action was not executed.
290043
Confirmation request before storing data
records.
–
290044
The data store for the recipe has been
destroyed and will be deleted.
–
290050
Acknowledgement that the exportation of
data records has started.
–
290051
Acknowledgement that the exportation of
data records has been completed
successfully.
–
290052
Acknowledgement that the exportation of
data records has been terminated due to
errors.
Ensure that the structure of the data records
on the data medium and the current recipe
structure on the operating unit are identical.
290053
Acknowledgement that the importation of
data records has been started.
–
290054
Acknowledgement that the importation of
data records has been completed
successfully.
–
290055
Acknowledgement that the importation of
data records has been terminated due to
errors.
Ensure that the structure of the data records
on the data medium and the current recipe
structure on the operating unit are identical.
290056
The value in the specified line/column could
not be read/written without errors.
Check the specified line/column.
The action was canceled.
290057
The tags of the recipe specified have been
switched from operating mode “offline” to
“online”.
–
Each modification of a tag in this recipe is
now immediately transferred to the PLC.
290058
The tags of the recipe specified were
switched from operating mode “online” to
“offline”.
–
Modifications to tags in this recipe are no
longer immediately transferred to the PLC
but must be transferred there explicitly by
means of downloading a data record, if
necessary.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
A-21
System Messages
Number
Effect/Cause
Remedy
290059
Acknowledgement that the specified data
record has been stored successfully.
–
290060
Check-back message that the data record
memory has been successfully erased.
–
290061
Check-back message, that erasing the data
record memory was aborted with errors.
–
290068
Request to confirm whether all data records
in the recipe should be deleted.
–
290069
Request to confirm whether all data records
of all recipes should be deleted.
–
290070
The data record specified is not contained in
the import file.
Check the source of the data record number
or data record name(constant or tag value).
300000
Process monitoring (e.g. using PDiag or
S7-Graph) has been incorrectly
programmed: More messages are queued
than specified in the technical data of the
CPU. No further ALARM_S messages can
be managed by the CPU and reported to
operating systems.
Change the CPU configuration.
310000
An attempt is being made to print too many
protocols simultaneously.
Wait until printout of the last active protocol
has been concluded.
Since only one protocol can be printed at a
time, the print job is rejected.
Repeat the print job, if necessary.
An error occurred on triggering the printer.
The protocol is either not printed or printed
with errors.
Evaluate the additional system message,
related to this message, which is also issued.
310001
Repeat the print job, if necessary.
320000
The movements have already been indicated Select the movements on the other display
by another device.
units and select the movement screen on the
required display unit.
The movements can no longer be served.
320001
The network is too complex.
Display the network in AWL.
The defective operands cannot be displayed.
320002
No diagnostics-capable alarm messages
have been selected.
Select a diagnostics-capable alarm message
in the message screen ZP_ALARM.
The units related to the alarm messages
could not be selected.
320003
No alarm messages exist in respect of the
selected unit.
Select the defective unit in the general view
screen.
No network can be displayed in the detail
display.
320004
The required signal statuses could not be
read by the PLC.
Check the consistency between the
configuration on the display unit and the PLC
program loaded.
The defective operands cannot be
established.
320005
The project contains ProAgent partitions
which are not installed.
In order to run the project, install the
ProAgent option packet.
No ProAgent diagnostics can be performed.
A-22
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
System Messages
Number
320014
Effect/Cause
The selected PLC cannot be evaluated for
ProAgent.
Remedy
Check the parameters of the
Evaluate_message_display_fault function.
The message display configured with the
Evaluate_message_display_fault function
could not be found.
1)
The optional parameter %1 at the start of the message may contain an identification for the S7 connection
when several S7s are in parallel operation and are connected to diagnostics equipment.
2) A WinCC channel provides the message texts via an interface. This text is issued via this message.
ProTool/Pro RT has no influence on this texts.
3) The specified text comes from the component resources.
Procedure in the case of “internal errors”
Please proceed as follows in the case of all system messages related to “internal
errors”:
1. Start up the operating unit again.
2. Download the configuration again.
3. Switch the operating unit off, stop the PLC and then restart both.
4. If the error occurs again, please contact the SIMATIC Customer Support (refer
to Preface). Make reference to the specified error number and message tags.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
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A-23
System Messages
A-24
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
B
PLC Jobs
This section of the Appendix contains a list of all PLC jobs and their relevant
parameters.
Description
PLC jobs can be used to initiate functions on the operating unit from the PLC, such
as:
S
displaying screens
S
setting date and time
A PLC job consists of 4 data words. The first data word contains the job number.
Data words 2 to 4 are used to transfer up to three parameters depending on the
function in question. The basic structure of a PLC job is shown in Figure B-1.
Address
1. Data Word
DL
DR
0
Job number
2. Data Word
Parameter 1
3. Data Word
Parameter 2
4. Data Word
Parameter 3
Figure B-1
Structure of a PLC job
List
All PLC jobs that are possible on the various operating units are listed below
together with their parameters. The No. column indicates the PLC job number. In
general, PLC jobs can only be initiated by the PLC when the operating unit is in
online mode.
Note
There are no PLC jobs for the TP 170A operating unit.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
B-1
PLC Jobs
No. Function
14
Set Time (BCD format)
Parameter 1
Parameter 2
Parameter 3
15
–
Hours
(0–23)
DL:
Minutes
(0–59)
DR:
Seconds
(0–59)
Parameter 2
Parameter 3
DL:
–
DR:
Weekday
(1–7: Sunday–Saturday)
DL:
Day of month (1–31)
DR:
Month
Panel2
D
D
D
D
D
D
DL:
Year
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
–
D
D
D
D
D
(1–12)
Set password level
Parameter 1
OP37/Pro
–
Set Date (BCD format)
Parameter 1
23
DL:
DR:
PC1
0–9
0 = lowest password level
9 = highest password level
Parameter 2, 3
24
Passwort Logout
Parameter 1, 2, 3
40
–
–
Transfer date/time to PLC
(Format: S7 DATE_AND_TIME)
There should be at least 5 seconds between two jobs or
else the operating unit will become overloaded.
Parameter 1, 2, 3
41
–
Date/Time for PLC download (in OP/MP format )
There should be at least 5 seconds between two jobs or
else the operating unit will become overloaded.
Parameter 1, 2, 3
42
43
–
Get LED area from PLC3
Parameter 1
Area pointer no.: 1–8
Parameter 2, 3
–
Get event message area from PLC
Parameter 1
Area pointer no.:
1–8
Parameter 2, 3
1
2
3
B-2
–
Includes the operating units Panel PC, standard PC and FI 25/45.
Includes the operating units MP 370, MP 270, MP 270B, TP 270, OP 270, TP 170B, OP 170B.
Not possible with touch panels.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
PLC Jobs
No. Function
44
Retrieve alarm message area and acknowledgement
area from the PLC
PC1
OP37/Pro
Panel2
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
This PLC job is used to retrieve both the alarm message
area and the acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
from the PLC. If no acknowledgement area has been set up,
only the alarm message area is retrieved.
Parameter 1
Area pointer no.:
1–8
Parameter 2, 3
49
Clear event buffer
Parameter 1, 2, 3
50
69
–
Clear alarm buffer
Parameter 1, 2, 3
51
–
–
Select screen
Parameter 1
Screen number
Parameter 2
–
Parameter 3
Field number
Read data record from PLC
Parameter 1
Recipe number (1 to 999)
Parameter 2
Data record number (1–65535)
Parameter 3
0: Do not overwrite existing data
records
1: Overwrite existing data records
70
1
2
Write data record in PLC
Parameter 1
Recipe number (1 to 999)
Parameter 2
Data record number (1–65535)
Parameter 3
–
Includes the operating units Panel PC, standard PC and FI 25/45.
Includes the operating units MP 370, MP 270, MP 270B, TP 270, OP 270, TP 170B, OP 170B.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
B-3
PLC Jobs
B-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C
Interface Area Assignment
This section of the Appendix explains the interface assignment of the connection
cables related to Part 2 of the “Communication for Windows-based Systems”
User’s Guide.
The connection cables described on the following pages can be ordered from
Siemens AG.
Note
The Siemens AG assumes no liability for damage resulting fro the use of
self-made connection cables.
The cables on the following pages are arranged according to PLCs. It defines the
interface assignment associated with the respective PLCs:
S
Allen Bradley via DF1 and DH 485
S
GE Fanuc Automation
see Pages C-10 to C-17
S
LG Industrial Systems/IMO (Lucky Goldstar)
see Pages C-18 to C-23
S
Mitsubishi Electric (PU protocol)
see Pages C-24 to C-27
S
Mitsubishi Melsec (Protocol 4)
see Pages C-28 to C-34
S
Omron
see Pages C-35 to C-38
S
Schneider Automation (Modicon)
see Pages C-39 to C-43
S
Schneider Automation (Telemecanique)
see Pages C-44 to C-46
see Pages C-2 to C-9
When selecting the connection cable, please take the “Connection Cables
Available” into account, set out in Chapter “Communication with …” of the
respective PLC.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-1
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Allen Bradley SLC500
RS 232 Interface
6XV1440-2K _ _ _
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
15-pin Sub D plug
Secured by slide
Cable outlet at Pin 1
Solid metal cover V.24
9-pin Sub D socket connector
Secured by screws
Solid metal cover V.24
PE
1
1
DCD
PE
8
6
DSR
CTS
5
4
DTR
RxD
3
3
TxD
TxD
4
2
RxD
GND
12
5
GND
RTS
10
7
RTS
8
CTS
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
C-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Allen-Bradley PLC5/20
RS 232 Interface
6XV1440-2L _ _ _
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
15-pin Sub D plug
Secured by slide
Cable outlet at Pin 1
Solid metal cover V.24
25-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Casing shield
1
Solid metal cover V.24
25
Casing shield
PE
PE
PE
PE
8
RxD
3
2
TxD
TxD
4
3
RxD
RTS
10
4
RTS
CTS
5
5
CTS
GND
12
7
GND
6
DSR
20
DTR
8
DCD
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-3
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Allen-Bradley PLC5/20
RS 422 Interface
6XV1440-2V _ _ _
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to rear
25-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to rear
+TxD
3
16
– TxD
8
3
+RxD
+RxD
4
14
+TxD
– RxD
9
2
– TxD
GND
5
7
GND
– RxD
S Cable: 3 x 2 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max. length: max. 60 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area, screen contacts connected
C-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Allen-Bradley SLC500
RS 232 Interface
Standard cable 1747 CP3
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to rear
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to bottom
DCD
1
1
DCD
RxD
2
2
RxD
TxD
3
3
TxD
DTR
4
4
DTR
COM
5
5
COM
DSR
6
6
DSR
RTS
7
7
RTS
CTS
8
8
CTS
I
9
9
NC
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-5
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Allen-Bradley PLC5/20
RS 232 Interface
Standard cable 1784 CP10
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin IBM AT socket connector
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to rear
25-pin PLC processor plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to rear
RxD
2
2
GND
5
7
TxD
3
3
DTR
4
4
RTS
DSR
6
5
CTS
RTS
7
6
DSR
CTS
8
8
DCD
20
DTR
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
C-6
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Allen-Bradley PLC5/20
RS 232 Interface
Standard cable 1761-CBL-PM02 (point-to-point cable)
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D socket connector
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to rear
8-pin Mini-DIN plug
Cable feed-out to rear
DCD
1
5
DCD
RxD
2
7
TxD
TxD
3
4
RxD
DTR
4
GND
5
2
GND
DSR
6
RTS
7
6
CTS
CTS
8
3
RTS
RI
9
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-7
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Allen-Bradley MicroLogix
RS 232 Interface
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
15-pin Sub D plug
Secured by slide
8-pin Mini-DIN plug
TxD
4
4
RxD
RxD
3
7
TxD
GND
12
8
SG
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
C-8
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Allen-Bradley MicroLogix
RS 485 Interface
Multi-point cable 1
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
V.24
6-pin connector strip
Data B
3
GND
Data A
5
8
Adapter AIC
2
Shield
4
3
Data B
GND 6–pin
5
Data A
2
Shield
4
3
Data B
5
Data A
GND 6–pin
Network connection RS 485: Installation as intermediate link
S
Both bus ends must be terminated (refer to the documents on installation of the
RS 485 network, e.g. Allen-Bradley 1761-6.4).
S
If the operating unit is at one end, a 120-Ohm- resistance is necessary between
the data lines Data A and Data B.
S
Cable length of the entire DH485 network: max. 1220 m.
Note
The cable connection shield must not be connected to the operating unit housing.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-9
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – GE Fanuc PLC
RS 232 Interface
Adapter 1 via converter
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
15-pin Sub D plug
Secured by slide
9-pin Sub D socket connector
Secured by screws
V.24
V.24
RxD
3
2
TxD
TxD
4
3
RxD
GND
12
5
GND
7
RTS
8
CTS
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
C-10
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – GE Fanuc PLC
RS 232 Interface
Adapter 2 via converter
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D socket connector
Secured by screws
V.24
9-pin Sub D socket connector
Secured by screws
V.24
RxD
2
2
TxD
TxD
3
3
RxD
GND
5
5
GND
7
RTS
8
CTS
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-11
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – GE Fanuc PLC
RS 232 Interface
Western plug 1
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
15-pin Sub D plug
Secured by slide
Cable outlet at Pin 1
Solid metal cover V.24
6-pin Western plug
RxD
3
2
TxD
TxD
4
5
RxD
GND
12
3
GND
4
GND
1
CTS
6
RTS
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
S Pin 1 is at the bottom when viewing the PLC (Western plug)
C-12
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – GE Fanuc PLC
RS 232 Interface
Western plug 2
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D socket connector
Secured by screws
6-pin Western plug
V.24
RxD
2
2
TxD
TxD
3
5
RxD
GND
5
3
GND
4
GND
1
CTS
6
RTS
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
S Pin 1 is at the bottom when viewing the PLC (Western plug)
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-13
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – GE Fanuc PLC
RS 422 Interface
Multi-point cable 1
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to rear
15-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to rear
+TxD
3
– TxD
+RxD
8
11
R = 120 Ω
10
+RxD
4
13
+TxD
– RxD
9
12
– TxD
+5V
6
GND
5
7
R = 4.7 k Ω
R = 120 Ω
R = 4.7 kΩ
S
S
S
S
– RxD
GND
14
+RTS
6
–RTS
15
+CTS
8
–CTS
Cable: 3 x 2 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max. length: 1200 m
Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area, screen contacts connected
R is terminal resistance
Insert terminal resistance of 120 Ohm (e.g. construction 0207)
C-14
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – GE Fanuc PLC
RS 232 Interface
Cable with RJ45 plug
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
15-pin Sub D plug
Secured by slide
8-pin RJ45 plug
V.24
V.24
RxD
3
4
TxD
TxD
4
3
RxD
GND
12
8
GND
1
RTS
2
CTS
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
S Pin 1 is at the bottom when viewing the PLC (RJ45)
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-15
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – GE Fanuc PLC
RS 232 Interface
Cable with RJ45 plug
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D socket connector
Secured by screws
8-pin RJ45 plug
V.24
V.24
RxD
2
4
TxD
TxD
3
3
RxD
GND
5
8
GND
1
RTS
2
CTS
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
S Pin 1 is at the bottom when viewing the PLC (RJ45)
C-16
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – GE Fanuc PLC
RS 422 Interface
Multi-point cable 2 with RS 232-RS 422 adapter
Adapter
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D socket connector
Secured by screws
8-pin RJ45 plug
V.24
V +5
+RxD
– RxD
+TxD
– TxD
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
5
11
10
13
12
7
14
6
15
8
5
11
10
13
12
7
14
6
15
8
V +5
+RxD
– RxD
+TxD
– TxD
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
5
11
10
13
12
7
14
6
15
8
+RxD
– RxD
+TxD
– TxD
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
5
11
10
13
12
7
14
6
15
8
+RxD
– RxD
+TxD
– TxD
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
5
11
10
13
12
7
14
6
15
8
+RxD
– RxD
+TxD
– TxD
GND
+RTS
–RTS
+CTS
–CTS
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 300 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
!
Caution
The power supply for the adapter may only be connected to a PLC, otherwise the
PLCs will be damaged.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-17
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – LG Industrial Systems/IMO
RS 232 Interface
Point-to-point cable 1
PLC
Operating Unit
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-poliger Sub D plug
Secured by screws
9-pin Sub D socket connector
Secured by screws
CD
1
RxD
2
3
TxD
TxD
3
2
RxD
DTR
4
SG
5
5
GND
DSR
6
RTS
7
CTS
8
RI
9
S Cable: 3 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
C-18
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – LG Industrial Systems/IMO
RS 422 Interface
Point-to-point cable 2
PLC
Operating Unit
Connector 1
Connector 2
Terminal strip
9-pin Sub D connector strip
Secured by screws
RDA
1
3
TxD (B)
RDB
2
8
TxD (A)
SDA
3
4
RxD (B)
SDB
4
9
RxD (A)
S.G.
5
5
GND
(potential-free)
F.G.
6
S Cable: 3 x 2 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max. length: 500 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-19
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – LG Industrial Systems/IMO
RS 485 Interface
Point-to-point cable 3
PLC
Operating Unit
Connector 1
Connector 2
Terminal strip
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
RDA
1
3
Data B
RDB
2
8
Data A
SDA
3
SDB
4
S.G.
5
5
GND
(potential-free)
F.G.
6
S Cable: 2 x 2 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max. length: 500 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
C-20
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – LG Industrial Systems/IMO
RS 232 Interface
Point-to-point cable 4
PLC
Operating Unit
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by slide
15-pin Sub D plug
Secured by slide
CD
1
RxD
2
4
TxD
TxD
3
3
RxD
DTR
4
SG
5
12
GND
DSR
6
RTS
7
CTS
8
9
S Cable: 3 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-21
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – LG Industrial Systems/IMO
RS 485 Interface
Multi-point cable 1
P in PLC
PLC
Operating Unit
Connector 1
Connector 2
Terminal strip
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
P in PLC
P in PLC
P in PLC
RDA
1
RDA
1
RDA
1
RDA
1
3 Data B
RDB
2
RDB
2
RDB
2
RDB
2
8 Data A
SDA
3
SDA
3
SDA
3
SDA
3
SDB
4
SDB
4
SDB
4
SDB
4
S.G.
5
S.G.
5
S.G.
5
S.G.
5
5 GND–
F.G.
6
F.G.
6
F.G.
6
F.G.
6
(pot. free)
S Cable: 2 x 2 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max. length: 500 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
C-22
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – LG Industrial Systems/IMO
RS 422 Interface
Multi-point cable 2
P in PLC
PLC
Operating Unit
Connector 1
Connector 2
Terminal strip
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
P in PLC
P in PLC
P in PLC
RDA
1
RDA
1
RDA
1
RDA
1
3 TxD (B)
RDB
2
RDB
2
RDB
2
RDB
2
8 TxD (A)
SDA
3
SDA
3
SDA
3
SDA
3
4 RxD (B)
SDB
4
SDB
4
SDB
4
SDB
4
9 RxD (A)
S.G.
5
S.G.
5
S.G.
5
S.G.
5
5 GND–
F.G.
6
F.G.
6
F.G.
6
F.G.
6
(pot. free)
S Cable: 3 x 2 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max. length: 500 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-23
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Mitsubishi-Electric PLC
RS 422 Interface
6XV1440-2P _ _ _
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to rear
8-pin Mini-DIN plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to rear
TxD+
3
2
RxD+
TxD–
8
1
RxD–
GND
5
3
GND
RxD+
4
7
TxD+
RxD–
9
4
TxD–
S Cable: 3 x 2 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max. length: 500 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
C-24
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Mitsubishi-Electric PLC
RS 422 Interface
6XV1440-2Q _ _ _
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
25-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to rear
8-pin Mini-DIN plug
Cable feed-out to rear
TxD+
16
1
RxD+
TxD–
17
2
RxD–
GND
7
3
GND
RxD+
14
7
TxD+
RxD–
15
4
TxD–
S Cable: 3 x 2 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max. length: 500 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-25
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Mitsubishi-Electric PLC
RS 422 Interface
6XV1440-2R _ _ _
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to rear
25-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to rear
Casing shield
PE
1
TxD+
3
2
RxD+
TxD–
8
15
RxD–
GND
5
20
GND
12
+5V
RxD+
4
3
TxD+
RxD–
9
16
TxD–
4
DSR+
17
DSR–
5
DTR+
18
DTR–
21
PWE
S Cable: 3 x 2 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max. length: 500 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
C-26
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Mitsubishi-Electric PLC
RS 232 Interface
6XV1440-2UE32
Operating Unit
Standard PC
Connector 1
Connector 2
15-pin Sub D socket plug
Secured by slide
Cable outlet at Pin 1
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to rear
RTS
10
7
RTS
RxD
3
2
RxD
TxD
4
3
TxD
CTS
5
8
CTS
GND
15
5
GND
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: max. 32 cm
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-27
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Mitsubishi-Melsec PLC
Point-to-point cable 1
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D socket connector
Secured by screws
9-pin Sub D plug
1
CD
TxD
3
2
RxD
RxD
2
3
TxD
4
DTR
5
SG
6
DSR
7
RTS
8
CTS
GND
5
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
C-28
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Mitsubishi-Melsec PLC
Point-to-point cable 2
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D socket connector
Secured by screws
25-pin Sub D plug
TxD
3
3
RxD
RxD
2
2
TxD
20
DTR
GND
5
7
SG
6
DSR
8
CD
4
RTS
5
CTS
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-29
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Mitsubishi-Melsec PLC
Point-to-point cable 3
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
15-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
9-pin Sub D plug
1
CD
TxD
4
2
RxD
RxD
3
3
TxD
4
DTR
5
SG
6
DSR
7
RTS
8
CTS
GND
12
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
C-30
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Mitsubishi-Melsec PLC
Point-to-point cable 4
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
15-pin Sub D plug
Secured by slide
25-pin Sub D plug
TxD
4
3
RxD
RxD
3
2
TxD
20
DTR
GND
12
7
SG
6
DSR
8
CD
4
RTS
5
CTS
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-31
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Mitsubishi-Melsec PLC
Point-to-point cable 5
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-poliger Sub D plug
Secured by screws
6-pin screw connection
FG
+TxD
3
RDA
R
– TxD
8
+RxD
4
RDB
TDA
R
– RxD
9
TDB
SG
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 500 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
S 330 Ohm is valid for R
C-32
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Mitsubishi-Melsec PLC
Multi-point cable 1
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
6-pin screw connection
PC
Multi Panel
FG
RDB
RDA
TDA
TDB
SG
TDB
TDA
RDA
RDB
SG
Converter FX–485C–IF
FG
RDB
RDA
TDA
TDB
SG
FG
RDB
RDA
TDA
TDB
SG
R
R
FG
RDB
RDA
TDA
TDB
SG
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 500 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
S For the connection PC – Converter, use the point-to-point cable 2 and
for the connection Multi Panel – Converter use the point-to-point cable 4.
S 330 Ohm is valid for R
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-33
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Mitsubishi-Melsec PLC
Multi-point cable 2
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D plug
6-pin screw connection
+TxD
– TxD
+RxD
– RxD
FG
RDB
RDA
TDA
TDB
SG
3
8
4
9
FG
RDB
RDA
TDA
TDB
SG
FG
RDB
RDA
TDA
TDB
SG
R
R
FG
RDB
RDA
TDA
TDB
SG
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 500 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
S 330 Ohm is valid for R
C-34
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – OMRON
RS 232 Interface
6XV1440-2X _ _ _
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
15-pin Sub D plug
Secured by slide
Cable outlet at Pin 1
Solid metal coverV.24
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out, straight
Solid metal cover V.24
RxD
3
2
TxD
TxD
4
3
RxD
GND
12
7
GND
9
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-35
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – OMRON
RS 422 Interface
Cable cannot be ordered
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to rear
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to rear
+TxD
8
– RxD
8
6
+RxD
+RxD
4
2
– TxD
– RxD
9
1
+TxD
GND
5
5
GND
3
R
– TxD
S Cable: 3 x 2 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max. length: 500 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area, screen contacts connected
S Insert resistance R = 220 Ohm/> 150mW (e.g. construction 0207)
C-36
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – OMRON
RS 232-RS 422 Converter
Multi-point cable 1
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D socket connector
Secured by slide
9-pin Sub D plug
9-pin Sub D plug
6-pin screw connection
TxD
RxD
GND
3
2
5
3
2
9
RxD
TxD
SG
6
V +5
R = 0n
R = 0ff
TDB
RDA
RDB
RDA
8
6
2
1
Converter NT–AL001
RS 232/RS 422
DC 5 V, 200 mA
Power–on current max. 0.8 A
RDB
RDA
TDB
TDA
R = 0ff
8
6
2
1
RDB
RDA
TDB
TDA
R = 0ff
8
6
2
1
RDB
RDA
TDB
TDA
R = 0n
RDB
RDA
TDB
TDA
CIF–11
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 500 m
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-37
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – OMRON
Multi-point cable 2
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
6-pin screw connection
R = 0n
+TxD
– TxD
+RxD
– RxD
3
8
4
9
8
6
2
1
RDB
RDA
TDB
TDA
8
6
2
1
RDB
RDA
TDB
TDA
8
6
2
1
RDB
RDA
TDB
TDA
R = 0n
8
6
2
1
RDB
RDA
TDB
TDA
CIF–11
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 500 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
C-38
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Modicon PLC
RS 232 Interface
6XV1440-1K _ _ _
Operating Unit
Modicon 984
Connector 1
Connector 2
15-pin Sub D plug
Secured by slide
Cable outlet at Pin 1
Solid metal coverV.24
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable outlet at Pin 1
Solid metal cover V.24
6
DSR
4
DTR
RxD
3
3
TxD
TxD
4
2
RxD
GND
12
5
GND
7
RTS
8
CTS
S Cable: 2 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: max. 3.7 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-39
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Modicon PLC
RS 232 Interface
6XV1440-1L _ _ _
Operating Unit
Modem
Connector 1
Connector 2
15-pin Sub D plug
Secured by slide
25-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Solid metal cover V.24
Solid metal cover V.24
6
DSR
20
DCD
RxD
3
3
RxD
TxD
4
2
TxD
GND
15
7
GND
CTS
5
5
CTS
RTS
10
4
RTS
S Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length:
max. 3.7 m for Modicon, max. 15 m for non-Modicon applications
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
C-40
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Modicon PLC
RS 232 Interface
Point-to-point cable 1
PLC
Operating Unit
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
9-pin Sub D socket connector
Secured by screws
Shield
1
RxD
2
3
TxD
TxD
3
2
RxD
DTR
4
GND
5
5
GND
DSR
6
RTS
7
CTS
8
N/C
9
S Cable: 3 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
S N/C = No Connection
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-41
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Modicon PLC
RS 232 Interface
Point-to-point cable 2
PLC
Operating Unit
Connector 1
Connector 2
8-pin RJ45 plug
(Type: Phone Jack)
9-pin Sub D socket connector
Secured by screws
–
1
1
–
TxD
3
2
RxD
RxD
4
3
TxD
DSR
2
4
–
GND
5
5
GND
CTS
7
6
–
RTS
6
7
RTS
Ground
8
8
CTS
9
–
S Cable: 3 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
S Pin 1 is at the top when viewing the PLC (RJ45)
C-42
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Modicon PLC
RS 232 Interface
Point-to-point cable 3
PLC
Operating Unit
Connector 1
Connector 2
8-pin RJ45 plug
(Type: Phone Jack)
15-pin Sub D socket plug
Secured by slide
Cable outlet at Pin 1
–
1
1
–
TxD
3
3
RxD
RxD
4
4
TxD
DSR
2
GND
5
CTS
7
RTS
6
Ground
8
12
GND
S Cable: 3 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max length: 15 m
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
S Pin 1 is at the top when viewing the PLC (RJ45)
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
C-43
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Telemecanique
RS 485 Interface
6XV1440-1E _ _ _
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to rear
Solid metal cover
15-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed-out to rear
Solid metal cover
+TxD
3
14
Data B
– TxD
8
7
Data A
+RxD
4
– RxD
9
GND
5
15
GND
8
GND
S Cable: 3 x 2 x 0.14 mm2, shielded; max. length: max. 15 m to branch socket
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
C-44
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Interface Area Assignment
Plug-in Connecting Cable
Operating Unit – Telemecanique
RS 485 Interface
RS 485 interface cable
Operating Unit
PLC
Connector 1
Connector 2
Assignment according to interface card
9-pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
TxD (B)
7
RxD (B)
TxD (A)
14
RxD (A)
8
GND
15
S Cable: 4 x 0.14 mm2, shielded
S Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
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C-45
Interface Area Assignment
C-46
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
SIMATIC HMI Documentation
D
Target groups
This section of the Appendix ciontains the SIMATIC HMI documentation. The
documentation is aimed at the following target groups:
S
Newcomers
S
Users
S
Configurers
S
Programmers
S
Commissioning engineers
How the documentation is organized
The SIMATIC HMI documentation consists of the following components:
S
User’s Guides for:
– Configuration software
– Runtime software
– Communication between PLCs and operating unit
S
Equipment Manuals for the following operating units:
– SIMATIC Panel PC
– SIMATIC Multi Panel
– Operator Panel
– Touch Panel
– Text Display
– Push Button Panel
S
Online Help on the configuration software
S
Start-up Guides
S
Product Brief
Overview of complete documentation
The following table provides an overview of the SIMATIC HMI documentation and
shows you when you require the different documents.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
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D-1
SIMATIC HMI Documentation
Documentation
Target Group
Content
First Steps with ProTool
Newcomers
This documentation guides you step by step through
the configuration of
Product Brief
S a screen with various objects
S a screen change and
S a message.
This documentation is available for:
S Text-based Displays
S Graphics Displays
S Windows-based Systems
ProTool
Configuring
Windows-based Systems
Configurers
Contains information on the configuration software with
regard to:
S installation,
S basic principles of configuration, and
S a detailed description of configurable objects and
User’s Guide
functions.
This documentation is valid for Windows-based
systems.
ProTool
Configuring
Graphics Displays
Configurers
Contains information on the configuration software with
regard to:
S installation,
S basic principles of configuration, and
S a detailed description of configurable objects and
User’s Guide
functions.
This documentation is valid for graphic display
operating units.
ProTool
Configuring
Text-based Displays
Configurers
Contains information on the configuration software with
regard to:
S installation,
S basic principles of configuration, and
S a detailed description of configurable objects and
User’s Guide
functions.
This documentation is valid for text-based display
operating units.
ProTool
Configurers
Online Help
ProTool/Pro Runtime
User’s Guide
D-2
Provides information on the configuration computer
while working with ProTool. The online help contains:
S
S
S
S
Commissioning
engineers,
Users
What’s this? (direct help)
detailed instructions and examples
detailed information
all the information from the user guide
Describes the installation of the ProTool/Pro RT
visualization software and startup and operation of the
software on Windows–based systems.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
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SIMATIC HMI Documentation
Documentation
Target Group
Content
Copy Protection
Start-up Guide
Commissioning
engineers,
Users
The ProTool/Pro Runtime visualization software is a
copyright product. This manual contains information on
the installation, repair and uninstallation of
authorizations.
Application Example
Newcomers
ProTool is supplied with example configurations and
the corresponding PLC programs. This documentation
describes how you
Start-up Guide
S load the examples onto the operating unit and PLC
S operating the examples, and
S upgrade the connection to the PLC to suit your own
specific application.
SIMATIC Panel PC 670
Equipment Manual
SIMATIC Panel PC870
Commissioning
engineers,
Users
Contains descriptions of computers and operating units
for the SIMATIC Panel PC 670 and SIMATIC Panel PC
870 as well as a description of the SIMATIC Panel PC
IL.
Commissioning
engineers,
Users
Describes the hardware and the general operation of
Windows-based units:
Equipment Manual
SIMATIC Panel PC IL
Equipment Manual
Equipment Manuals
MP 370
MP270
MP 270B, OP 270, TP 270
TP 170B, OP 170B
TP 170A
TP070
S
S
S
S
installation and startup guides
a description of the equipment
Operation
instructions for connecting the PLC, printer and
programming computer,
S maintenance instructions
OP37/Pro
Equipment Manual
Commissioning
engineers,
Users
Describes the hardware, installation and inclusion of
upgrades and options for the OP 37/Pro.
TP 27, TP 37
Equipment Manual
Commissioning
engineers,
Users
Describes the hardware and general operation. It
contains
OP 27, OP 37
Equipment Manual
OP 25, OP 35, OP 45
Equipment Manual
programming computer,
S operating modes
S operating instructions
S description of the standard screens supplied with
OP 7, OP 17
Equipment Manual
OP 5, OP 15
Equipment Manual
the operating unit and how to use them
TD 17
Equipment Manual
OP 3
Equipment Manual
PP 7, PP 17
Equipment Manual
S installation and commissioning instructions
S a description of the equipment
S instructions for connecting the PLC, printer and
S fitting options
S maintenance and fitting of spare parts.
Commissioning
engineers,
Users,
Programmers
Describes the hardware of the OP3, its general
operation and the connection to the SIMATIC S7.
Commissioning
engineers,
Users
Describes the hardware, installation and
commissioning of push-button panels PP7 and PP17
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
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D-3
SIMATIC HMI Documentation
Documentation
Target Group
Content
Communication
Programmers
Provides information on connecting text-based and
graphics displays to the following PLCs:
User’s Guide
S
S
S
S
SIMATIC S5
SIMATIC S7
SIMATIC 500/505
drivers for other PLCs
This documentation describes the
S configuration and parameters required for
connecting the devices to the PLC and the network
S user data areas used for exchanging data between
operating unit and PLC.
Communication for
Windows-based Systems
Programmers
Provides information on connecting Windows-based
systems to the following PLCs:
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
User’s Guide
SIMATIC S5
SIMATIC S7
SIMATIC WinAC
SIMATIC 505
Integration in SIMATIC iMap
SIMOTION
drivers for other PLCs
This documentation describes the
S configuration and parameters required for
connecting the devices to the PLC and the network
S user data areas used for exchanging data between
operating unit and PLC.
Other PLCs
Programmers
Online Help
Provides information on connecting the operating units
to the OPC and PLCs from:
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
Allen Bradley
GE Fanuc
Lucky Goldstar GM
Mitsubishi
Modicon
Omron
Telemecanique
When the drives are installed, the relevant Online Help
is installed at the same time.
ProAgent for OP
User’s Guide
ProAgent/PC and
ProAgent/MP
User’s Guide
Configurers
Provides the following information about the ProAgent
optional package (process diagnosis):
S configuring system-specific process diagnosis
S detecting process faults, locating the cause of
faults and eliminating them,
S customizing standard diagnostic screens supplied
with the software
D-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
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Abbreviations
The abbreviations used in this guide have the following meaning:
PLC
Programmable Logic Control
AS 511
Protocol of the PU interface to the SIMATIC S5
ANSI
American National Standards Institute
ASCII
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
EM
Event Messages
CP
Communication Processor
CPU
Central Processing Unit
CS
Configuration
DB
Data block
DL
Data byte, left
DR
Data byte, right
DW
Data Word
DP
Decentralized Periphery
DX
Extended data block
EPROM
Erazable Programmable Read-only Memory
FB
Function Block
FM
Funktionsmodul
FW
Firmware
HMI
Human Machine Interface
HSA
Highest Station Address
IF
Interface
I/O
Input/Output
ISA
Integrated System Architecture
LED
Light Emitting Diode
MP
Multi Panel
MPI
Multipoint Interface (SIMATIC S7)
MW
Flag word
OB
Organization Block
OP
Operator Panel
PC
Personal Computer
PLC
Programmable Logic Control
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Abbrev-1
Abbreviations
Abbrev-2
PP
Push Button Panel
PPI
Point to Point Interface (SIMATIC S7)
PU
Random Access Memory
RT
Runtime
RTU
Remote Terminal Unit
RAM
Alarm messages
PLC
Programmable Logic Control
SRAM
Static Read Only Memory (buffered)
STW
Status word
TD
Text Display
TP
Touch Panel
WinAC
Windows Automation Center
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Index
A
Abbreviations, Abbrev-1
Acknowledgement
Allen-Bradley, 6-5, 6-7
GE Fanuc, 8-5, 8-7
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-5, 10-7
Mitsubishi, 13-5, 13-7
Modicon, 17-5, 17-7
OMRON, 15-5, 15-7
Telemecanique, 19-5, 19-7
Acknowledgement - OP, Allen-Bradley, 6-3
Acknowledgement area, Allen-Bradley, 6-9
Acknowledgement area OP
GE Fanuc, 8-6
Mitsubishi, 13-6
Modicon, 17-6
OMRON, 15-6
Telemecanique, 19-6
Acknowledgement area PLC
GE Fanuc, 8-6
Mitsubishi, 13-6
Modicon, 17-6
OMRON, 15-6
Telemecanique, 19-6
Acknowledgement areas
GE Fanuc, 8-9
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-9
Mitsubishi, 13-9
Modicon, 17-9
OMRON, 15-9
Telemecanique, 19-9
Acquisition cycle
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-8
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-7
GE Fanuc, 7-6
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-6
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-6
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-7
Modicon, 16-6
OMRON, 14-6
Telemecanique, 18-7
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
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Alarm message area
Allen-Bradley, 6-6
GE Fanuc, 8-6
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-6
Mitsubishi, 13-6
Modicon, 17-6
OMRON, 15-6
Telemecanique, 19-6
Alarm Messages
GE Fanuc, 8-5
Mitsubishi, 13-5
Modicon, 17-5
OMRON, 15-5
Telemecanique, 19-5
Alarm messages
Allen-Bradley, 6-3, 6-5
GE Fanuc, 8-3
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-3, 10-5
Mitsubishi, 13-3
Modicon, 17-3
OMRON, 15-3
Telemecanique, 19-3
Allen-Bradley via DF1, communication management, 4-1
Allen-Bradley via DH485, communication management, 5-1
B
Baud rate
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-6
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-5
GE Fanuc, 7-4
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-4
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-4
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-5
Modicon, 16-5
OMRON, 14-4
Telemecanique, 18-5
Bus address, GE Fanuc, 7-4
Bus module / CPU type, Telemecanique, 18-5
Index-1
Index
C
Changing PLC, conversion, 1-6
Checksum, Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-5
Clear alarm buffer, B-3
Clear event buffer, B-3
Communication driver, 1-2
Communication management
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-1
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-1
GE Fanuc, 7-1
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-1
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-1
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-1
Modicon, 16-1
OMRON, 14-1
Telemecanique, 18-1
Communication structure
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-4
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-3
GE Fanuc, 7-3
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-3
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-3
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-3
Modicon, 16-3
OMRON, 14-3
Telemecanique, 18-4
Communication via tags
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-5
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-4
GE Fanuc, 7-3
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-3
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-3
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-3
Modicon, 16-4
OMRON, 14-3
Telemecanique, 18-4
Connection
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-2
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-2
GE Fanuc, 7-2
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-2
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-1
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-2
Modicon, 16-2
OMRON, 14-2
OPC, 2-5
Telemecanique, 18-2
Connection types, selection criteria, 1-2
Connections
overview, 1-1
protocols, 1-4
Index-2
Conversion, changing PLCs, 1-6
Coordination
Allen-Bradley, 6-3, 6-13–6-15
GE Fanuc, 8-3, 8-13
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-3, 10-13
Mitsubishi, 13-3, 13-13
Modicon, 17-13
Modicon , 17-3
OMRON, 15-3, 15-13–15-15
Telemecanique, 19-13
Coordination , Telemecanique, 19-3
CPU type
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-6
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-5
GE Fanuc, 7-4
CPU- type
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-4
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-5
Modicon, 16-5
D
Data bits
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-6
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-5
GE Fanuc, 7-4
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-4
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-4
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-5
Modicon, 16-5
OMRON, 14-4
Telemecanique, 18-5
Data exchange, 1-2
OPC, 2-2
Data mailbox
Allen-Bradley, 6-3
GE Fanuc, 8-3
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-3
Mitsubishi, 13-3
Modicon, 17-3
OMRON, 15-3
Telemecanique, 19-3
Data Type, Mitsubishi via FX, 11-5
Data Types, OMRON, 14-5
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Index
Data types
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-7
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-5
GE Fanuc, 7-5
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-5
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-6
Modicon, 16-5
Telemecanique, 18-6
Date/Time
Allen-Bradley, 6-3, 6-11–6-13
GE Fanuc, 8-3, 8-11
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-3
Mitsubishi, 13-3, 13-11
Modicon, 17-3, 17-11
OMRON, 15-3, 15-11
Telemecanique, 19-3, 19-11
Date/Time , LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-11
Date/Time PLC
Allen-Bradley, 6-3
GE Fanuc, 8-3, 8-12–8-14
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-3,
10-12–10-14
Mitsubishi, 13-12–13-14
Modicon, 17-3, 17-12–17-14
OMRON, 15-3, 15-12–15-14
Telemecanique, 19-3, 19-12–19-14
DCOM
configuration, 3-1
settings, 3-1
Documentation, D-1
Download date/time, B-2
Downloading , termination, Allen-Bradley, 6-25
Downloading data records
Allen-Bradley, 6-18
asynchronous
Allen-Bradley, 6-19
GE Fanuc, 8-19
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-19
Mitsubishi, 13-19
Modicon, 17-19
OMRON, 15-19
Telemecanique, 19-19
GE Fanuc, 8-18
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-18
Mitsubishi, 13-18
Modicon, 17-18
OMRON, 15-18
synchronous
Allen-Bradley, 6-20
GE Fanuc, 8-20
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-20
Mitsubishi, 13-20
Modicon, 17-20
OMRON, 15-20
Telemecanique, 19-20
Telemecanique, 19-18
E
Event message area
Allen-Bradley, 6-6, 6-17
GE Fanuc, 8-6, 8-17
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-6, 10-17
Mitsubishi, 13-6, 13-17
Modicon, 17-6, 17-17
OMRON, 15-6, 15-17
Telemecanique, 19-6, 19-17
Event messages
Allen-Bradley, 6-3, 6-5
GE Fanuc, 8-3, 8-5
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-3, 10-5
Mitsubishi, 13-3, 13-5
Modicon, 17-3, 17-5
OMRON, 15-3, 15-5
Telemecanique, 19-3, 19-5
F
Framing, Modicon, 16-5
Free parameters, Modicon, 16-5
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Index-3
Index
Function, operating unit, 1-1
Function range
Allen-Bradley, 6-2–6-26
GE Fanuc, 8-2–8-26
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-2–10-26
Mitsubishi, 13-2–13-26
Modicon, 17-2–17-26
OMRON, 15-2–15-26
Telemecanique, 19-2–19-26
Job mailbox
Allen-Bradley, 6-3, 6-4–6-6
GE Fanuc, 8-3, 8-4–8-6
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-3,
10-4–10-6
Mitsubishi, 13-3, 13-4–13-6
Modicon, 17-3, 17-4–17-6
OMRON, 15-3, 15-4–15-6
Telemecanique, 19-3
G
L
Gate, Telemecanique, 18-5
GE Fanuc, Kommunikationsmanagement, 7-1
Get event message area, B-2
Get LED area, B-2
Language, System messages, A-1
LED assignment
Allen-Bradley, 6-3, 6-16–6-18
GE Fanuc, 8-3, 8-16, 8-17
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-3,
10-16–10-18
Mitsubishi, 13-3, 13-16–13-18
Modicon, 17-3, 17-16, 17-17
OMRON, 15-3, 15-16, 15-17
Telemecanique, 19-3, 19-16–19-18
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, communication
management, 9-1
Life bit
Allen-Bradley, 6-14
GE Fanuc, 8-14
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-14
Mitsubishi, 13-14
Modicon, 17-14
OMRON, 15-14
Telemecanique, 19-14
Literature, D-1
LongBreak, GE Fanuc, 7-4
I
Interface
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-6
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-5
GE Fanuc, 7-4
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-4
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-4
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-5
Modicon, 16-5
OMRON, 14-4
Telemecanique, 18-5
Interface Area Assignment, C-1
Interface type
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-6
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-5
GE Fanuc, 7-4
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-4
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-4
Modicon, 16-5
OMRON, 14-4
Telemecanique, 18-5
Interfaces type, Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-5
M
Max. bus address, Allen-Bradley via DH485,
5-5
J
Job Mailbox, Telemecanique, 19-4–19-6
Index-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Index
Message areas
Allen-Bradley, 6-6
GE Fanuc, 8-6
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-6
Mitsubishi, 13-6
Modicon, 17-6
OMRON, 15-6
Telemecanique, 19-6
Message bit
Allen-Bradley, 6-7
GE Fanuc, 8-7
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-7
Mitsubishi, 13-7
Modicon, 17-7
OMRON, 15-7
Telemecanique, 19-7
Message number
Allen-Bradley, 6-7
GE Fanuc, 8-7
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-7
Mitsubishi, 13-7
Modicon, 17-7
OMRON, 15-7
Telemecanique, 19-7
Messages, System messages, A-1
Mitsubishi via FX, communication management, 11-1
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, communication management, 12-1
Modicon, communication management, 16-1
O
OMRON, communication management, 14-1
OP acknowledgement area
Allen-Bradley, 6-6
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-6
OP acknowledgementLG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-3
Mitsubishi, 13-3
Modicon, 17-3
OMRON, 15-3
Telemecanique, 19-3
OP address, Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-5
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
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OPC
conditions, 2-2
configuration
as OPC-client, 2-3
as OPC-server, 2-4
configurations, 2-2
connection, 2-5
data exchange, 2-2
Networking, 2-1
OPC parameters - client, 2-6
OPC-server parameters, tags, 2-9
PLC protocol, 2-5
settings for DCOM, 3-1
starting up, 2-5
tag parameters - client, tags, 2-7
tags, 2-5
OPC parameters - client, OPC, 2-6
OPC-client tag parameters, tags, 2-7
OPC-server parameters, OPC, 2-9
Operating mode
Allen-Bradley, 6-14
GE Fanuc, 8-14
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-14
Mitsubishi, 13-13
Modicon, 17-13
OMRON, 15-14
Telemecanique, 19-13
Operating mode switch, LG Industrial Systems/
IMO, 9-2
Operating unit
function, 1-1
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-1
possible protocols, 1-4
selection criteria, 1-4
Operating unit acknowledgement, GE Fanuc,
8-3
Operating unit- Un-iTelwa-y station, Telemecanique, 18-5
Index-5
Index
Operating units
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-1
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-1
GE Fanuc, 7-1
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-1
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-1
Modicon, 16-1
OMRON, 14-1
Telemecanique, 18-1
Optimization
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-8
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-7
GE Fanuc, 7-6
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-6
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-6
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-7
Modicon, 16-6
OMRON, 14-6
Telemecanique, 18-7
Optimizing PLC jobs
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-9
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-8
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-7
Optimizing screens
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-9
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-7
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-6
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-8
Optimizing trends
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-9
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-8
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-7
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-8
Overview
connections, 1-1
protocols, 1-1
P
Parameters, system message, A-1
Parity
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-6
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-5
GE Fanuc, 7-4
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-4
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-4
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-5
Modicon, 16-5
OMRON, 14-4
Telemecanique, 18-5
Password logout, B-2
Index-6
Performance
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-8
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-7
GE Fanuc, 7-6
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-6
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-6
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-7
Modicon, 16-6
OMRON, 14-6
Telemecanique, 18-7
PLC, changing the PLC, 1-6
PLC acknowledgement
Allen-Bradley, 6-3–6-27
GE Fanuc, 8-3
PLC acknowledgement area
Allen-Bradley, 6-6
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-6
PLC acknowledgementLG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-3
Mitsubishi, 13-3
Modicon, 17-3
OMRON, 15-3
Telemecanique, 19-3
PLC date/time
Allen-Bradley, 6-12–6-14
Mitsubishi, 13-3
PLC job
Clear alarm buffer, B-3
Clear event buffer, B-3
Get event message area, B-2
Get LED area, B-2
Password logout, B-2
Read data record from PLC, B-3
Retrieve alarm message area and acknowledgement area, B-3
Select screen, B-3
Set Date, B-2
Set password level, B-2
Set Time, B-2
Transfer date/time, B-2
Write data record in PLC, B-3
PLC job optimization
GE Fanuc, 7-7
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-7
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-8
Modicon, 16-7
OMRON, 14-7
Telemecanique, 18-8
PLC jobs, B-1
Download date/time, B-2
Protocol, possible for use, 1-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Index
Protocols
available, 1-2
overview, 1-1
R
Recipes
Allen-Bradley, 6-18–6-20
causes of errors
Allen-Bradley, 6-24
GE Fanuc, 8-24
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-24
Modicon, 17-24
GE Fanuc, 8-18–8-20
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-18–10-20
Mitsubishi, 13-18–13-20
Modicon, 17-18–17-20
OMRON, 15-18–15-20
PLC jobs
Allen-Bradley, 6-25
GE Fanuc, 8-25
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-25
Mitsubishi, 13-25
Modicon, 17-25
OMRON, 15-25
Telemecanique, 19-25
possible causes of errors
Mitsubishi, 13-24
OMRON, 15-24
Telemecanique, 19-24
Telemecanique, 19-18–19-20
termination
GE Fanuc, 8-25
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-25
Mitsubishi, 13-25
Modicon, 17-25
OMRON, 15-25
Telemecanique, 19-25
Retrieve alarm message area and acknowledgement area, B-3
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
S
Screen number
Allen-Bradley, 6-3, 6-10–6-12
GE Fanuc, 8-3, 8-10
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-3, 10-10
Mitsubishi, 13-3, 13-10
Modicon, 17-3, 17-10
OMRON, 15-3, 15-10
Telemecanique, 19-3, 19-10
Screen optimization
GE Fanuc, 7-7
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-7
Modicon, 16-7
OMRON, 14-7
Telemecanique, 18-8
Select, connection, 1-2
Select screen, B-3
Set Date, B-2
Set password level, B-2
Set Time, B-2
SIMATIC HMI documentation, D-1
Slave address, Modicon, 16-5
Startup bit
Allen-Bradley, 6-13
GE Fanuc, 8-13
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-13
Mitsubishi, 13-13
Modicon, 17-13
OMRON, 15-13
Telemecanique, 19-13
Station, LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-4
Index-7
Index
Stop bits
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-6
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-5
GE Fanuc, 7-4
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-4
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-4
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-5
Modicon, 16-5
OMRON, 14-4
Telemecanique, 18-5
Structure of the documentation, D-1
Switch buffer
Allen-Bradley, 6-15
GE Fanuc, 8-15
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-15
Mitsubishi, 13-15
Modicon, 17-15
OMRON, 15-15
Telemecanique, 19-15
Synchronization
data mailbox
Allen-Bradley, 6-20
GE Fanuc, 8-20
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-20
Mitsubishi, 13-20
Modicon, 17-20
OMRON, 15-20
Telemecanique, 19-20
process
Allen-Bradley, 6-21
GE Fanuc, 8-21
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-21
Mitsubishi, 13-21
Modicon, 17-21
OMRON, 15-21
Telemecanique, 19-21
System messages, A-1
Language, A-1
Index-8
T
Tags
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-5
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-4
GE Fanuc, 7-3
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-3
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-3
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-3
Modicon, 16-4
OMRON, 14-3
OPC, 2-5
Telemecanique, 18-4
Target address
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-6
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-5
Target groups, D-1
Telemecanique, communication management,
18-1
Telway 7, Telemecanique, 18-5
Transfer date/time, B-2
Trend optimization
GE Fanuc, 7-7
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-7
Modicon, 16-7
OMRON, 14-7
Telemecanique, 18-8
Trend Request, LG Industrial Systems/IMO,
10-3
Trend request
Allen-Bradley, 6-3, 6-14–6-16
GE Fanuc, 8-3, 8-14
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-14
Mitsubishi, 13-3, 13-14
Modicon, 17-3, 17-14–17-16
OMRON, 15-3, 15-14–15-16
Telemecanique, 19-3, 19-14
Trend transfer
Allen-Bradley, 6-3, 6-14–6-16
GE Fanuc, 8-3, 8-14
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-3, 10-14
Mitsubishi, 13-3, 13-14
Modicon, 17-3, 17-14–17-16
OMRON, 15-3, 15-14–15-16
Telemecanique, 19-3, 19-14
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
Index
Trends
Allen-Bradley, 6-14
GE Fanuc, 8-14
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-14
Mitsubishi, 13-14
Modicon, 17-14
OMRON, 15-14
Telemecanique, 19-14
Triggering messages
Allen-Bradley, 6-6
GE Fanuc, 8-6
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-6
Mitsubishi, 13-6
Modicon, 17-6
OMRON, 15-6
Telemecanique, 19-6
U
Update time
Allen-Bradley via DF1, 4-8
Allen-Bradley via DH485, 5-7
GE Fanuc, 7-6
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 9-6
Mitsubishi via FX, 11-6
Mitsubishi via Protocol 4, 12-7
Modicon, 16-6
OMRON, 14-6
Telemecanique, 18-7
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
User data area, partitioning
Allen-Bradley, 6-15
GE Fanuc, 8-15
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-15
Mitsubishi, 13-15
Modicon, 17-15
OMRON, 15-15
User data areas
Allen-Bradley, 6-1
GE Fanuc, 8-1
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-1
Mitsubishi, 13-1
Modicon, 17-1
OMRON, 15-1
partitioning, Telemecanique, 19-15
Telemecanique, 19-1
User version
Allen-Bradley, 6-3, 6-4–6-6
GE Fanuc, 8-3, 8-4–8-6
LG Industrial Systems/IMO, 10-3,
10-4–10-6
Mitsubishi, 13-3, 13-4–13-6
Modicon, 17-3, 17-4–17-6
OMRON, 15-3, 15-4–15-6
Telemecanique, 19-3
Telemecanique-, 19-4–19-6
Index-9
Index
Index-10
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide
Release 12/01
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