A guide for converting your physical desktops to virtual machines

A guide for converting your physical desktops to virtual machines
Project Success Plan
A guide for converting your physical desktops to virtual machines
(VMs).
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
Calculating ROI
Expert tips and advice
Getting more PRO+ essential
content
Page 1 of 50
In this e-guide:
Ever increasing demands for anytime, anywhere access to
desktops and applications from various endpoints has
disrupted the traditional PC refresh cycle and IT pros have
been scrambling to find strategies that enable them to
minimize time consuming maintenance tasks, upgrade
application performance and data availability, and improve
end-user experience.
But what are your options? What tools are available? What
challenges will you run into? Where do you begin? This
comprehensive guide walks readers through the entire
process of a migration to virtual desktops, from the initial
phases of a VDI project through to the monitoring and
management of fully deployed VMs.
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
Calculating ROI
Expert tips and advice
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Page 2 of 50
http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/definition/desktop-virtualization
Desktop virtualization is the concept of isolating a logical operating system
(OS) instance from the client that is used to access it.
There are several different conceptual models of desktop virtualization,
which can broadly be divided into two categories based on whether or not
the operating system instance is executed locally or remotely. It is important
to note that not all forms of desktop virtualization involve the use of virtual
machines (VMs).
Host-based forms of desktop virtualization require that users view and
interact with their desktops over a network by using a remote display
protocol. Because processing takes place in a data center, client devices
can be thin clients, zero clients, smartphones, and tablets. Included in this
category are:
Host-based virtual machines: Each user connects to an individual virtual
machine that is hosted in a data center. The user may connect to the same
VM every time, allowing personalization, (known as a persistent desktop) or
be given a random VM from a pool (a non-persistent desktop). See also:
virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI)
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
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Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
Calculating ROI
Shared hosted: Users connect to either a shared desktop or simply
individual applications that run on a server. Shared hosted is also known as
remote desktop services or terminal services. See also: remote desktop
services and terminal services.
Host-based physical machines or blades: The operating system runs directly
on physical hardware located in a data center.
Client-based types of desktop virtualization require processing to occur on
local hardware; the use of thin clients, zero clients, and mobile devices is not
possible. These types of desktop virtualization include:
OS streaming: The operating system runs on local hardware, but boots to a
remote disk image across the network. This is useful for groups of desktops
that use the same disk image. OS streaming requires a constant network
connection in order to function; local hardware consists of a fat-client with
all of the features of a full desktop computer except for a hard drive.
Client-based virtual machines: A virtual machine runs on a fully-functional
PC, with a hypervisor in place. Client-based virtual machines can be
managed by regularly syncing the disk image with a server, but a constant
network connection is not necessary in order for them to function.
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Next article
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
Calculating ROI
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Page 4 of 50
http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/tip/Four-desktop-virtualizationuse-cases
Knowing why you're deploying virtual desktops is the first step to success -whether it's for better security, simplified management or BYOD support.
Desktop virtualization isn't right for every environment or every desktop, so
let's review some of the places where it makes the most sense to virtualize.
As business owners demand a lower total cost of ownership, better security,
greater mobility and a more agile IT infrastructure, the traditional desktop
model is showing its age. The No. 1 reason that desktop virtualization
projects fail is because IT professionals often launch these projects without
identifying a clear business problem for which the technology is a solution.
Fresh off the heels of success with server virtualization, systems
administrators may believe that desktop virtualization is the next logical step
in the enterprise IT lifecycle.
Virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) hasn't replaced traditional desktops and
laptops in the way that server virtualization has replaced physical servers,
but most industry observers acknowledge that desktop virtualization use
cases will remain complementary to traditional desktop and laptop delivery
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
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Page 5 of 50
and management technologies. Rarely does it make sense for an
organization to virtualize 100% of its desktops in the data center. Instead,
you should view desktop virtualization as just part of a larger IT strategy to
provide the highest value to the business.
To help you deploy virtual desktops for the right reasons, here are some
examples of common desktop virtualization use cases.
Disaster recovery
As business continuity and disaster recovery plans develop, companies
increasingly rely on desktop virtualization to provide on-demand access at a
failover site. Traditionally, businesses interested in disaster recovery would
warehouse PC inventory at an alternate facility where users could come and
work in the event that the primary location was unavailable
With virtualization, IT can provision thousands of desktops in a virtual
environment, quickly providing access to applications in the event that
worker access to primary endpoints is not possible.
In addition, virtual desktops and modern remote display protocols enable
users to gain access to their desktops and applications remotely. Now that
mobile devices provide nearly ubiquitous Internet access, workers expect to
be able to connect to corporate systems anywhere, anytime via multiple
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
consumer devices. This use case provides redundancy but raises other
concerns.
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
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Security
The increasing mobility of users and their devices makes it harder for IT
departments to manage company desktops and laptops. Viruses and
spyware have become more complex and difficult to detect.
Both physical and virtual machines still have the same Windows operating
system, applications and network vulnerabilities. However, desktop
virtualization can improve the security of data at rest. Company data on
laptops or desktops is no longer stored in unsecured environments; it is now
stored within the walls of the data center.
In addition, applications can be isolated by using multiple operating system
instances or application virtualization isolation technologies. Separate virtual
desktop environments can be used to access sensitive data, providing an
additional layer of separation and security.
Nonpersistent desktops can revert the desktop operating system and
applications back to a known-good state. IT-controlled virtual desktops in
the data center can be more reliably updated with antivirus signature files,
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
patches and updates. Data from desktops can be backed up or collected
with electronic discovery systems.
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Bring your own device
With bring your own device (BYOD), worker-owned devices are being
brought into the enterprise, and some users prefer personal devices over
corporate-provided ones. Desktop virtualization can provide an alternative
path to accessing applications while relieving IT staffers from having to
support the endpoints themselves. Subsidizing partial costs for users who
choose to bring their own devices could reduce the capital expense of user
laptops and desktops.
Budgeting
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Management
Reducing the total cost of ownership of desktops and laptops is a key
objective for IT departments. Traditional desktop and laptop management
systems can add significant complexity and increase the cost of supporting
users. Plus, managing those desktops and laptops can require numerous
applications, including those for application deployment, inventory, OS
management and antivirus protection. Virtualization makes it easier to
centrally manage and support users' desktops. Plus, you have more control
over app deployment, user access and other management tasks.
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
Calculating ROI
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Page 8 of 50
Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI)
http://searchservervirtualization.techtarget.com/definition/virtual-desktop-infrastructureVDI
Virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) is the practice of hosting a desktop
operating system within a virtual machine (VM) running on a centralized
server. VDI is a variation on the client/server computing model, sometimes
referred to as server-based computing. The term was coined by VMware
Inc. Many organizations are turning to VDI as an alternative to the serverbased computing model used by Citrix and Microsoft Terminal Services.
Thin client (lean client)
http://searchnetworking.techtarget.com/definition/thin-client
A thin client, sometimes called a lean client, is a low-cost, centrally-managed
computer devoid of CD-ROM players, diskette drives, and expansion slots.
The term derives from the fact that small computers in networks tend to be
clients and not servers. Since the idea is to limit the capabilities of these
computers to only essential applications, they tend to be purchased and
remain "thin" in terms of the client applications they include. As software as
a service (SaaS) gains popularity, it is expected that thin clients and blade
PCs will replace desktop PCs in many work and educational environments.
In general, they are not as vulnerable to malware attacks, have a longer life
cycle, use less power and are less expensive to purchase.
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
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Thin client is also used to describe software applications that use the clientserver model where the server performs all the processing.
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
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Fat client (thick client)
http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/fat-client-thick-client
A fat client (sometimes called a thick client) is a networked computer with
most resources installed locally, rather than distributed over a network as is
the case with a thin client. Most PCs (personal computers), for example, are
fat clients because they have their own hard drive, DVD drives, software
applications and so on.
Fat clients are almost unanimously preferred by network users because they
are very customizable and the user has more control over what programs
are installed and specific system configuration. On the other hand, thin
clients are more easily managed, are easier to protect from security risks,
and offer lower maintenance and licensing costs.
A system that has some components and software installed but also uses
resources distributed over a network is sometimes known as a rich client.
Remote Desktop Services (RDS)
http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/definition/Remote-Desktop-Services-RDS
Remote Desktop Services (RDS) is an umbrella term for features of
Microsoft Windows Server that allow users to remotely access graphical
desktops and Windows applications.
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
RDS components include:


Key terms to understand
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



Remote Desktop Connection Broker: The connection broker
connects users with remote desktops. If a user loses connectivity to a
remote desktop, the connection broker allows the user to reestablish
the connection without losing the virtual desktop's state.
Remote Desktop Gateway: This component allows for connectivity
to virtual desktops and RemoteApp programs over the Internet.
Remote Desktop Licensing: This component tracks license usage for
your RDS deployment.
Remote Desktop Session Host: The Session Host allows a server to
host session-based desktops or RemoteApp programs.
Remote Desktop Virtualization Host: This is the component that
hosts virtual desktops.
Remote Desktop Web Access: This component lets users access
remote desktops or RemoteApp programs either through a Web
browser or the Start menu.
Remote Desktop Services applications and desktops can be accessed from a variety of
client devices, operating systems, and form factors, as well as HTML 5 browsers and
Java clients. Users view and interact with Remote Desktop Services resources through
a remote display protocol. Microsoft provides the Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) with
Windows, and third-party companies can also create their own protocols, examples of
which are Citrix HDX and VMware PC-over-IP.
The richness of the user experience with Remote Desktop Services may be limited by
network bandwidth or remote display protocol capabilities. However, there many
benefits, including the centralized management of many operating system images, the
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
Calculating ROI
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Page 11 of 50
ability to use inexpensive thin clients to access server-class hardware and increased
security within the data center.
Next article
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
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http://pro.techtarget.com/expert-vdi-buyers-guide_lb-ma-content
Citrix XenDesktop 7
Citrix XenDesktop 7 is an enterprise-class, secure VDI platform that delivers
virtual desktops and apps. XenDesktop with FlexCast technology supports
many different types of desktop-related services virtually, such as Windows
apps for tablets and mobile devices, high-end graphics and centralized
security for corporate laptops.
One capability that sets XenDesktop apart from others is that the platform
supports a variety of hypervisors: Citrix XenServer, VMware ESXi and
Microsoft Hyper-V, among others. The platform also supports 16-, 32- and
64-bit apps on Windows Server 2008 and 2012 R2, Windows XP, Vista, 7
and 8, as well as apps on Mac OS X, iOS and Android.
To support a mobile workforce, XenDesktop lets organizations roll out
virtual desktops and apps to nearly any type of device, optimizing them for
large and small screens, as well as touch. Users may select authorized apps
from an enterprise app store, and WAN networking is optimized to limit
latency and provide highly reliable connections.
XenDesktop 7 is available in Enterprise and Platinum editions. Customers
can purchase XenDesktop 7 concurrent or perpetual licenses, or opt for a
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
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Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
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hosted desktop option that has a monthly subscription fee. A concurrent
license for the Enterprise edition costs $397; the user/device perpetual
license with support costs $4.
VMware Horizon 6 Enterprise edition (with View)
VMware Horizon 6 Enterprise edition, including the View desktop
virtualization product, offers secure delivery of desktops, apps and online
services through a unified workspace. The platform supports central image
management for physical and virtual machines (VMs) running Windows XP
through Windows 8.1, as well as devices operating on Windows, Mac OS or
Linux. View is designed only to work on VMware's own hypervisor, ESXi.
The workspace enables administrators to deliver many different kinds of
applications and services, including XenApp 5.0, apps hosted by Microsoft
Remote Desktop Services (RDS), desktops hosted by Windows Server 2008
and 2012, software as a service applications and VMware ThinApp 5.0.
One of the most enticing features for enterprises is the platform's Blast
technology, which provides optimized access over WAN and LAN
connections. It also supports virtualized graphics, multimedia streaming and
unified communications. With Blast, users get a consistent experience
regardless of which device they're using.
With its suite of products for the mobile, cloud-enabled workplace,
VMware's VDI platform takes things a step further than some other
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
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Key terms to understand
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platforms. Horizon 6 Enterprise is designed to support software-defined
data center operations, allocating resources dynamically to support user
workloads on demand, providing self-service options, and securing user
computer resources.
Horizon 6 editions include Horizon View Standard, Horizon Advanced and
Horizon Enterprise. Sold in 10-packs, Horizon Enterprise costs $3,630 for a
one-year Named User license (dedicated to specific users), or $6,050 for a
one-year Concurrent User license (virtual machines shared among users).
Microsoft VDI/Remote Desktop Services
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Microsoft VDI is an enterprise-level virtual desktop and application delivery
platform, based on Hyper-V, which requires the Windows Server Remote
Desktop Services server role in Windows Server 2012. The platform
supports user PCs (through the Remote Desktop Gateway component),
personal and pooled virtual desktops, session-based desktops and
RemoteApp programs.
Microsoft VDI provides a consistent, personalized user experience on a
variety of devices running Windows or Windows RT, iOS, Mac OS X and
Android.
The Deployment Wizard enables administrators to configure server roles
and automate a Microsoft VDI rollout. To store and access VMs,
administrators may use their choice of direct-attached, network-attached,
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
clustered or storage area network (SAN) storage. A unified management
console enables central management of server roles, users, VMs and much
more.
Hardware
Typically, there are two licenses involved with a Microsoft VDI
implementation: one for connecting to the virtual desktop infrastructure and
another for accessing a virtual installation of the Windows client OS. If you
use RDS to access the infrastructure, you must purchase an RDS client
access license, either per device or per user. For accessing the Windows
client OS, customers covered under Windows Client Software Assurance
(SA) do not pay an additional charge for VDI. Without SA, however,
customers must license each device through Windows Virtual Desktop
Access (VDA) for $100 per year, per device.
Budgeting
Dell vWorkspace 8.0
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Virtualization project?
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Originally created by Quest Software, vWorkspace is Dell's VDI platform
aimed at the small to medium-size business but is also used by enterprise
organizations.. Integrated with Microsoft Hyper-V, vWorkspace 8.0 enables
organizations to virtualize applications, provide hosted VDI and deliver local
VDI and Remote Desktop Services.
Dell vWorkspace provides fast provisioning, scalability, load balancing,
diagnostics and integrated user-experience monitoring and reporting. The
platform supports every major hypervisor and many different virtualization
platforms, such as Microsoft Hyper-V, Parallels, VMware ESXi and Virtual
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Iron, as well as Windows desktop and server operating systems through
Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012, respectively. VWorkspace supports
devices running iOS, Android, Mac, Linux and Java.
The platform provides high-quality audio and video using Microsoft Lync
2013 with the Lync VDI plug-in, and enables organizations to use directattached storage rather than a SAN.
Dell vWorkspace comes in two editions: Desktop and Premier. Desktop
Edition supports hosted VDI and App-V, and costs about $150 per
concurrent user. Premier Edition supports hosted VDI, Remote Desktop
Session Host (RDSH) and App-V, and costs about $200 per concurrent
user.
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Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/tip/Choosing-among-VDI-vendors-Knowyour-needs
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Choosing a VDI product is no small task because you must take into account
features, setup and maintenance, as well as licensing and ongoing support.
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
You must also determine which technologies your organization needs. Do
you plan to provide stateless desktops? Deliver applications through a
virtualization tool? Perhaps you're considering desktop as a service (DaaS).
Clearly, there are plenty of options, and gaining an understanding of the
various virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) vendors and tools will help you
make the best possible choice.
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
The world of VDI
Outsourcing
VDI provides a framework for hosting a desktop operating system within a
virtual machine (VM) on a server. A user at an endpoint workstation
accesses the VM over the network via a remote display protocol that allows
the virtualized desktop to be rendered locally.
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IT decision makers often turn to VDI because it promises to cut
management and support costs by centralizing and simplifying
administrative tasks while reducing the resources necessary to maintain
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
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Hardware
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Page 18 of 50
individual PCs. User workstations require only a thin client to access their
desktops.
But don't confuse VDI with Microsoft's Remote Desktop Services (Terminal
Services prior to Windows Server 2008 R2). That provides only sessionbased access to a server, usually for multiple users.
With a VDI product, users connect to their own desktops and applications,
similar to how they would at their local workstations.
Selecting a VDI product
When choosing a VDI vendor or tool, you should consider a number of
factors. For starters, the system you choose must support the necessary
operating systems. On the VM side, most services can host Windows but
often not Linux. Even within the Windows camp, some VDI products can
handle XP and Vista, but others cannot. On the endpoint side, VDI tools
generally support a larger range of OSes, including Windows, Mac OS, Linux
and Unix. Many VDI products now support mobile endpoints, particularly iOS
and Android devices.
There are also other factors you'll need to consider. For instance, your
clients might require a display protocol other than Microsoft Remote
Desktop Protocol. Or you might want to support Web-based access to the
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
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Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
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Page 19 of 50
virtual desktops. How about support for Microsoft Hyper-V, bidirectional
audio WAN or graphics processing unit virtualization?
The key, of course, is to determine exactly which features you must have.
Setup and maintenance are the most important considerations, not only to
ensure that implementation and ongoing administration are manageable, but
also so you get exactly the environment you need. For example, you might
plan to implement stateless desktops in which user settings do not persist.
Or you might want to go with stateful desktops that save those settings. You
might even decide to support both options.
Availability and reliability are also part of the equation. Unlike the traditional
desktop model, if a server running multiple virtual desktops is sluggish or
goes down, many users can feel the effects. To avoid slow performance or
significant downtime, you might need to support capabilities such as load
balancing or automatic backups. In addition, your change management
strategies should account for how you'll be delivering your applications. For
example, if you plan to use a desktop provisioning tool such as Unidesk,
you'll have to verify that it will work with your VDI setup.
You should also determine the necessary infrastructure to support desktop
virtualization. For instance, do you need both TCP/IP v4 and v6? What level
of Active Directory integration do you require? Can you leave your existing
infrastructure alone, or will VDI require a substantial investment in
resources? And speaking of resources, look carefully at how licensing
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Key terms to understand
works. Offerings such as Microsoft VDI are notorious for their complex
licensing structures. Be cognizant of the total potential cost, not just for the
VDI deployment itself, but also for the OS, business apps and ongoing
support.
Above all, understand the provider's financial well-being or lack thereof.
When Pano Logic shut its doors in 2012, customers were left standing out in
the cold.
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An abundance of VDI options
There is no shortage of options to choose from. Citrix XenDesktop and
VMware Horizon View have emerged as the industry's top players, and both
have a wide range of features. Microsoft VDI remains in the running,
especially since the release of Windows Server 2012. But other products are
worth considering, too. Dell vWorkspace, Virtual Bridges VERDE and Red
Hat Enterprise Virtualization for Desktops are all credible alternatives and
may be more affordable than VDI software from the top vendors.
The VDI market is dynamic, and new approaches to virtualizing desktops
come online every day. For example, Citrix now offers VDI-in-a-Box, a
pared-down tool for smaller businesses. Other providers are also
responding to the changing industry. NComputing vSpace uses OS
partitioning and virtualization to create virtual environments. Ericom
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
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AccessNow implements HTML5 streaming to deliver a browser-based
desktop. And LISTEQ BoxedVDI applies a plug-and-play approach to its
virtual desktops. Then there is DaaS, a cloud-based service that lets you
offload many VDI headaches, such as provisioning, networking and load
balancing. Desktone is perhaps the best-known of the current wave of DaaS
providers, which also includes Nivio and dinCloud.
Again, change is the one constant in the industry. VMware bought Desktone,
Dell acquired vWorkspace as part of Quest Software, and Oracle purchased
its VDI technology from Sun but has since discontinued further
development. Consolidation doesn't necessarily translate to success, nor
does the inverse approach; just look at Pano Logic.
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This all means that a wide range of virtualization options is available, but you
need to be aware of the constantly shifting nature of VDI. So if you don't find
what you want today, wait a few months and ask around. Before you do
anything, however, make sure you know what you need. Implementing VDI
software is a significant undertaking. Tread lightly, plan ahead and then
proceed with caution.
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Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/feature/VDI-hardware-comparison-Thin-vsthick-vs-zero-clients
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
When you deploy VDI, you need to figure out what hardware your virtual
desktops will run on.
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
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To host virtual desktops, you have a lot of choices: thin clients, zero clients
and smart clients -- not to mention tablets and mobile devices. Thin clients
and other slimmed-down devices rely on a network connection to a central
server for full computing and don't do much processing on the hardware
itself. Those differ from thick clients -- basically traditional PCs -- that handle
all the functionality of a server on the desktop itself.
Understanding the benefits, challenges and cost implications of all these VDI
hardware options will help you make the right choice. Let's get this straight:
Thick clients
It's possible to use thick clients for desktop virtualization, but many
organizations don't because it doesn't cut down on overall hardware and
requires all local software. If you use traditional PCs to connect to virtual
desktops, you don't get many of the benefits of VDI, such as reduced power
consumption, central management and increased security.
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What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
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How thick clients compare to thin
Since a thick client is basically a PC running thin client software, it is usually
more costly than a thin client device. Plus, thick clients have hard drives and
media ports, making them less secure than thin clients. Finally, thin clients
tend to require less maintenance than thick ones, although thin client
hardware problems can sometimes lead to having to replace the entire
device.
Thin clients
With thin client hardware, virtual desktops are hosted in the data center and
the thin client simply serves as a terminal to the back-end server. Thin
clients are generally easy to install, make application access simpler,
improve security and reduce hardware needs by allowing admins to
repurpose old PCs.
What to look for in thin client devices
Thin clients are meant to be small and simple, so the more advanced
features you add, the more expensive they get. As you choose thin client
devices, consider whether you need capabilities such as 3-D, video
conferencing and multi-monitor support. You should also take into account
your remote display protocol and how much display processing your back
end can supply.
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Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Aside from being cheap and uncomplicated, thin clients should also offer
centralized management. For instance, you can automatically apply profile
policies to groups of thin clients with similar configurations. That tends to be
easier than individual manual management. Plus, you want your VDI
hardware to be simple enough for nonveteran IT staff or those at remote
branch offices to be able to deploy.
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
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Zero clients
Zero clients are gaining ground in the VDI market because they're even
slimmer and more cost-effective than thin clients. These are client devices
that require no configuration and have nothing stored on them. Vendors
including Dell Wyse, Fujitsu, Hewlett-Packard and Pano Logic offer zero
client hardware.
Pros and cons of zero clients
So what are the benefits of this kind of VDI hardware? First off, zero clients
can be less expensive than thick and thin clients. Plus, they use less power
and can simplify client device licensing.
Still, there's a catch: Vendors often market zero clients as requiring no
management or maintenance, which isn't always true. Some products do
require software or memory and other resources. In addition, zero clients
tend to be proprietary, so organizations could run into vendor lock-in.
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In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
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Hardware
Other VDI hardware routes
But wait -- there are even more VDI hardware options. In today's mobile era,
some people are starting to use tablets or smartphones to run virtual
desktops.
Using the iPad as a VDI client
With faster network speeds and improved screen resolution over the past
few years, tablets are now up to the task of presenting a virtual desktop.
Highly mobile workers and executives are good candidates for connecting
to VDI via an iPad, for example. Still, remember that tablets don't offer a
mouse and many Windows applications aren't conducive to a touch
interface.
Budgeting
Repurposing old PCs as VDI hardware
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
Calculating ROI
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If you're thinking about deploying VDI -- and tablets are too high-tech for you
at this point -- you might consider recycling old PCs to use as thin clients.
That saves money, plus it's green. Just make sure your PC candidates aren't
too old, or else they won't provide solid graphics performance and may be
prone to failure.
Next article
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
Calculating ROI
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http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/tip/How-to-analyze-the-costs-of-a-virtualdesktop-deployment
Although saving money isn't the best rationale for desktop virtualization, at
some point, someone's going to ask you how much this whole thing is going
to cost. So before you say that it doesn't matter, let's try to figure out what
exactly this person is asking.
As you probably know, business costs are usually divided into two
classifications: capital expenditures (Capex) and operating expenditures
(Opex). Broadly defined, Capex includes onetime costs, and Opex covers
ongoing costs. Capex includes buying software and hardware and the time
and money it costs to implement and migrate from other technologies. Opex
is usually just support and maintenance costs.
The first step to doing a cost analysis is to figure out whether you're going
to look at Capex, Opex or both.
Entire books have been written about modeling the expenses of IT systems,
and there are companies dedicated to analyzing expenses. Because there
are so many different kinds of desktop virtualization, we can't do a proper
expense analysis here. But we can look at some quick "back of the napkin"style numbers to compare virtual and physical desktops.
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Most people believe that the Capex of implementing virtual desktops is
about the same as that for physical desktops. In other words, if you spend
about $800 per desktop to buy and roll out traditional desktops, you can
probably build a virtual desktop for about $800 each.
These models assume that you'll reuse existing computers, maybe as thin
clients or simpler terminals for accessing your newly built virtual desktop
environment. So if you have 100 users who would otherwise get new
desktops at $800 each but you reuse existing machines instead, that frees
up about $80,000 to buy some nice VDI servers, software and consulting.
Opex is not nearly as simple to quantify as Capex for two reasons:

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
There's no clear-cut way to figure out what's included in your Opex
calculation.
Before a project has been implemented, actual Opex is just a bestguess estimate anyway.
For example, will Opex calculations include soft costs such as "employee
productivity gained by less downtime" or "user satisfaction?" Are your
operating expenses based on dollar amounts you actually pay? Have you
used the power savings of thin-client devices as part of your justification,
even though the thin clients plug into users' cubicles whose power is not
billed back to the IT department?
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
Calculating ROI
Have you included everything in your cost models? For data center servers,
have you based your power costs on their rated wattage, or have you
included your data center's power usage effectiveness?
Of course, you can use any of these methods to nudge the cost analysis in
the direction you want to prove that desktop virtualization is cheaper or that
it is more expensive than traditional PCs. The mere fact that cost analysis is
complex doesn't mean it should be ignored. It just means that you need to
be more aware of what a cost analysis can and cannot be used for.
Unless your cost analysis can fit on the back of a napkin, it's probably crap.
So go ahead and work out the basic numbers. Figure out your high-level
stuff, and create a budget for the hardware and software you'll need for
desktop virtualization. But beyond that, don't waste your time building a
complex Excel model. There's a good chance that if you show it to someone,
he won't believe it.
Just keep in mind why you're virtualizing desktops in the first place. If it's to
save money, make sure you're really going to save money. And if it's for
another reason, such as more redundancy or increased security, don't waste
your time going nuts with return on investment (ROI) models.
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Next article
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
What are the options for VDI training, and who
needs it?
Key terms to understand
http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/answer/Why-you-need-VDI-training-andhow-to-go-about-it
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
If your company is planning a transition to virtual desktop infrastructure, it's
essential to provide proper VDI training to all IT staff in your organization
who will design, deploy and maintain your environment.
Evaluating products
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If you are a systems administrator, start by educating upper management
about the importance of proper VDI training for everyone involved. Virtual
desktop infrastructure (VDI) requires a number of back-end hardware and
software components to provide end users with the performance and
computing experiences they expect.
Vendors have offered VDI training for some time, but the majority of that
training (and related certifications) remains vendor-specific.
Microsoft, for instance, offers a VDI certification for technical specialists
called the Microsoft IT Professional (MSITP)-Virtualization Administrator.
The underlying training courses for the MSITP Virtualization Administrator
certification include server virtualization, desktop virtualization and
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
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virtualization administrator. All three of these classes and certification
exams could be helpful for fledgling VDI administrators who expect to
support Microsoft VDI software.
Citrix offers a bundled 30-hour online training course and certification
focusing on its Xen product line. Citrix VDI training courses and
certifications include the Certified Citrix Administrator (CCA) for
XenDesktop 5, CCA for XenServer 5, CCA for XenApp 6 and NetScaler
training.
These are just two examples of VDI training and certifications available.
Other vendors offer similar training and certification opportunities. There is
no vendor-agnostic VDI certification available, however, and there may never
be. That's because of the tight linkage between VDI environments and the
underlying proprietary infrastructures and technologies they use, which are
not only tied to specific hypervisors (such as Microsoft's Hyper-V, VMware's
vSphere or Citrix XenServer) but also to equally specific management,
monitoring, deployment and configuration tools.
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Taking the Microsoft certification path to VDI
http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/tip/Taking-the-Microsoftcertification-path-to-VDI
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
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It's one thing for an organization to decide to deploy VDI, but it is quite
another to effectively support it. One way to ensure that staff has the skills
necessary to deploy, manage and support VDI is getting everyone certified.
The most appropriate certifications vary depending on which vendor's VDI
offering you deploy. If you're implementing VDI on Windows Server, it's a
good idea to get familiar with the Microsoft certification path. Even if you are
using a different vendor's products, you'll learn what may be involved in the
certification process.
When you choose a certification path, you must not only consider the
vendor, but also the version. Microsoft, for example, made some major
changes to its certifications following the release of Windows Server 2012.
Windows Server 2008 R2
For a Windows Server 2008 R2 platform, Microsoft actually offers a VDIspecific certification track. There are two primary exams that will be the
most helpful to virtualization administrators. These include:


Exam 70-669: TS: Windows Server 2008 R2, Desktop Virtualization
Exam 70-693: Pro: Windows Server 2008 R2, Virtualization
Administrator
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
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If you are looking for formalized VDI training, Microsoft offers a five-day
training course that is specific to VDI. The course is 10324A: Implementing
and Managing Microsoft Desktop Virtualization.
Windows Server 2012
Microsoft certifications do not include a virtualization-specific track for
Windows Server 2012. Instead, virtualization is considered to be one of the
operating system's core functions, and the certification path reflects this
new philosophy. In fact, Microsoft's MCSE Desktop Infrastructure track
seems ideally suited toward VDI deployments.
There are five exams required for those seeking the MCSE: Desktop
Infrastructure certification:





70-410: Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2012
70-411: Administering Windows Server 2012
70-412: Configuring Advanced Windows Server 2012 Services
70-415: Implementing a Desktop Infrastructure
70-416 Implementing Desktop Application Environments
The first three exams are only loosely related to VDI, but there are a couple
of benefits to taking them anyway. First, these exams cover the
infrastructure components on which the VDI deployment will be based.
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
Topics such as failover clustering and Hyper-V management are covered on
the first three exams. Plus, passing these three exams means that you earn
an MCSA certification for Windows Server 2012.
The last two exams in the series focus heavily on VDI. The fourth exam is all
about the desktop infrastructure, and the fifth focuses on desktop
applications.
The desktop operating system
Regardless of whether you are using a Microsoft VDI platform or something
from a third party, it is a good idea for IT staff to take a desktop operating
system-specific exam. This ensures that you will learn the various OSspecific nuances that you can tune to help it function efficiently in a VDI
environment.
The primary exams that are available for Windows 7 include:


70-680: Windows 7, Configuring
70-685: Windows 7, Enterprise Desktop Support Technician
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Those who wish to deploy Windows 8 in their VDI environments should
consider these exams:

70-687: Configuring Windows 8
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?

70-688: Managing and Maintaining Windows 8
Earning advanced IT certifications takes a lot of work, but it can be
extremely beneficial for administrators to get certified before deploying VDI.
Doing so ensures that you are adequately prepared to deploy, manage and
maintain both the virtual desktops and the underlying infrastructure.
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
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Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
Calculating ROI
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Next article
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
Calculating ROI
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Page 35 of 50
http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/feature/XaaS-products-at-your-service
Desktop as a service (DaaS) is a cloud service where the back-end
infrastructure of VDI is hosted by a cloud service provider. It has a multitenancy architecture. The DaaS provider takes care of the responsibilities of
data storage, backup, security and upgrades, and user data is copied to and
from the virtual desktops when they log on and off.
Pros: Users can access hosted desktops from any device, location or
network. Customers usually manage their own images, apps and security,
but the provider manages the infrastructure. DaaS is a good alternative to
VDI for small and midsize businesses that want to deliver virtual desktops to
users, but can't afford the upfront and ongoing costs associated with doing
VDI on-premises.
Cons: Licensing virtual desktops comes with headaches, but licensing them
in the cloud is often even more complicated. Microsoft does not have a
Service Provider License Agreement for Windows client OSes, so many
organizations host Windows Server -based desktops in the cloud instead.
This is a good way to get around the licensing concerns, but Server
desktops can have application-compatibility problems.
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
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Market leaders: Amazon WorkSpaces, VMware Horizon Air Desktops
(formerly Horizon DaaS, formerly Desktone) and Microsoft Azure
RemoteApp.
Next article
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/essentialguide/Best-practices-guide-MakingVDI-deployment-magic
Best practices for VDI production deployment
So, you've assessed your organization's needs, planned a strategy to meet
management and end-user requirements, and selected the right tools to suit
your existing infrastructure. Now you're ready to deploy VDI, but how do you
start?
How to stagger a VDI rollout
Before you jump into a VDI production environment, begin with a proof of
concept and make a plan to stagger your rollout -- starting with areas of the
business that will benefit from virtual desktops the most.
Transitioning from VDI pilot to production
Once your VDI pilot is ready for production, do some IOPS calculations to
ensure that your storage can handle the full VDI load. To keep things in
check throughout the deployment, get some monitoring software and keep
tabs on user satisfaction.
Calculating ROI
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Ten steps to deployment success
Servers are the building blocks of your deployment, so make sure those are
up to date and ready for the VDI workload. Plus, determine which remote
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
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Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
display protocol is compatible with your environment and lock down the user
endpoints.
Don't forget to consider VDI applications
As you deploy VDI, you need to take the applications into account. How
often will you need to update and patch apps once your VDI deployment is in
place? How will the licensing of those apps work in the new environment?
Overcoming VDI deployment challenges
Of course, a VDI deployment is never without its hang-ups. You might run
into bandwidth restrictions, low storage capacity or an inability to scale.
Learn some ways to break down these VDI deployment challenges and set
your strategy straight.
Top reasons a VDI deployment fails
Some of the biggest reasons VDI fails is when administrators underestimate
virtual desktop requirements, don't work as a team with networking and
storage admins, or don't know why they're virtualizing in the first place.
Planning for deployment
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Why scaling up can break your deployment
When you implement a VDI pilot project, you probably deploy a few virtual
desktops and simplify the underlying infrastructure. But when you move to
production, you can hit the ceiling of supported users pretty quickly. The
problem is that buying hardware for future growth can be expensive.
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Consider using converged infrastructure for VDI
Using a pre-bundled stack to host your virtual desktops can make it easier
to scale the deployment when you need to. Plus, it provides simplicity for
organizations that don't have the manpower to build a VDI environment from
scratch.
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Watch out for VDI stall
Your desktop virtualization deployment can stall mid-step if you try to do too
much at once. For instance, don't try to do an OS update or hypervisor
switch at the same time you're implementing the new desktops.
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
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Next article
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
Calculating ROI
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http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/guides/Guide-to-calculating-ROI-from-VDICost-analysis-budgeting-and-more
Virtual desktop infrastructure can decrease hardware costs, increase end
user productivity and mobility, and provide more flexibility for applications
and operating systems. But to decide whether implementing virtual desktop
infrastructure (VDI) will be worth the price tag, you need to determine the
potential return on investment (ROI).
Numerous factors go into calculating VDI ROI, including the cost of
virtualizing workloads, purchasing or repurposing hardware, adding storage
or network resources, and training IT employees and end users.
Implementing virtual desktops isn't necessarily a money-saving opportunity,
but figuring out the possible ROI -- and when you might achieve it -- will help
you plan your deployment.
There are many important questions to ask yourself before moving to VDI.
You need to establish what types of users you have, what applications and
OSes you'll use, whether you'll need remote and/or mobile access, and
more. Start adding up your VDI costs and calculating return on investment
from VDI with these seven questions.
http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/feature/Calculating-the-returnon-investment-from-VDI
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
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Planning for deployment
Calculating ROI
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1. Will the use case have local or remote users?
This affects hardware requirements. Will hardware need to be purchased or
maintained at the local site, or will users use their home PCs?
2. Will the end devices (desktops, laptops, thin clients, etc.) be
purchased or reused?
This also affects the purchase requirements for end devices.
3. Which operating system (OS) will be used?
The OS affects application compatibility. ROI can significantly be affected if
applications can be virtualized and run on a newer OS without being
recoded.
4. Does the organization have Microsoft Software Assurance or a
Microsoft Enterprise Agreement?
This affects software licensing from Microsoft.
5. Are the users power users, typical users or light users?
This is affected by the number of backend servers, which in turn drives the
hardware and software costs of the solution: The better the consolidation,
the better the ROI.
6. Which applications will be used? Are they all licensed?
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
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This is where application virtualization can have a significant impact. If apps
are found to be under-used, application virtualization can improve license
management.
7. How large is the current desktop and application support staff? Are
they looking to make changes?
The answers to these seven questions often times determine if a customer
will achieve any type of ROI.
ROI has different meanings for each organization and it can be developed
based on the following criteria:





Software licensing
Hardware purchase
Hardware/Software maintenance
Operations staffing (administrators and build teams)
Support staffing
By taking the different ROI criteria and matching them with the answers to
the above questions, you can determine where a customer might be able to
get a decent return.
1. Will the use case have local or remote users?
a. Operating staffing
b. Support staffing
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
2.
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
3.
Comparing leading VDI
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Evaluating products
Hardware
4.
Budgeting
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5.
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6.
c. Hardware purchase
d. Maintenance
Will the end devices (desktops, laptops, thin clients, etc.) be
purchased or re-used?
a. Hardware purchase
b. Maintenance
c. Support Staffing
Which OS will be used?
a. Software licensing
b. Maintenance
c. Operational staffing
d. Support staffing
Does the organization have Microsoft Software Assurance or a
Microsoft Enterprise Agreement?
a. Software licensing
b. Maintenance
Are the users power users, typical users or light users?
a. Hardware purchase
b. Software licensing
c. Maintenance
Which applications will be used? Are they all licensed?
a. Software licensing
b. Maintenance
c. Operational staffing
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
Calculating ROI
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d. Support staffing
7. How large is the current desktop and application support staff? Are
they looking to make changes?
a. Operational staffing
b. Support staffing
A return on investment from VDI can be obtained -- but it takes work to
realize these benefits. VDI implementation is not as simple as server
virtualization: There are many more moving parts in VDI and it impacts the
end-user community. Therefore, a great design, architecture and
deployment plan are vital to obtaining a ROI.
Other costs to consider
Control VDI storage costs with
configuration planning
http://searchvirtualstorage.techtarget.com/feature/Control-VDI-costs-forstorage-by-careful-configuration-planning
To strike a balance between VDI costs and storage performance, you have
to plan ahead. Virtual desktops come with different I/O and read/write
requirements, so you have to decide whether your storage area network will
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
perform as expected. To determine whether desktop virtualization will be
worth the cost of storage, figure out your performance needs, how many
IOPS you'll need and whether your VDI costs will be similar to physical
desktop costs.
Understanding VDI storage costs
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/tip/Virtual-Desktop-StorageBasics-The-hidden-costs-of-VDI-storage
Evaluating products
Before you virtualize all your desktops, consider reducing the extent of your
deployment to lessen storage requirements and cut VDI costs. Thin
provisioning, tiered storage and data deduplication can also help mitigate
storage costs. Finally, take into account the hidden costs of VDI storage,
such as manual desktop provisioning.
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
Calculating ROI
Expert tips and advice
Getting more PRO+ essential
content
Page 45 of 50
Building the business case
This document should help you explore the feasibility of Desktop
Virtualization. To help you organize your thoughts and compose a proper
business case consider this outline,
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/How-to-write-a-business-casedocument
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
Calculating ROI
Expert tips and advice
Getting more PRO+ essential
content
Page 46 of 50
Next article
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
Calculating ROI
Expert tips and advice
Getting more PRO+ essential
content
Page 47 of 50
Best practices guide: Making VDI deployment magic
It takes more than sleight of hand to make a VDI deployment go smoothly.
Fortunately, there are lots of ways to ensure success: Pay attention to your
applications, stagger your rollout and right-size your storage system, to
name a few.
You may not be able to pull a rabbit out of a VDI server, but you can get on
the right track with the resources in this guide. Plus, learn some tips from
shops that have overcome some of the most common VDI deployment
challenges.
http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/essentialguide/Best-practicesguide-Making-VDI-deployment-magic
Demystifying desktop virtualization technology
When it comes to virtual desktop infrastructure, administrators have a lot of
choices. You may have wondered about the differences between desktop
virtualization technology and product options, remote display protocols or all
the licenses out there. In this series, we tackle some of the biggest headscratchers facing VDI admins to help you get things straight.
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
What is Desktop Virtualization
Check back each month for the latest installment of the "Let's get this
straight" series below. If you encounter something in your desktop
virtualization travels that you want cleared up, write to us at
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/essentialguide/Demystifyingdesktop-virtualization-technology
Key terms to understand
Troubleshooting tips for VDI deployments
In this guide
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
With so many moving parts in VDI deployments, it's easy for things to go
wrong. Problems with remote connections, storage, management and
latency can keep your to-do list full.
Fortunately, there are some easy ways to avoid common issues in virtual
desktop infrastructure (VDI) environments in the first place. And if you made
some missteps setting up your deployment that resulted in problems staring
you in the face right now, never fear. We've got troubleshooting tips for
some of the most common VDI woes.
http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/essentialguide/Troubleshooting
-tips-for-VDI-deployments
Calculating ROI
Desktop virtualization market guide
Expert tips and advice
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content
Page 48 of 50
The desktop virtualization market has changed a lot over the years, so IT
professionals who looked at doing VDI in the past may be surprised by
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
what's available now -- DaaS, hyperconverged infrastructure and perpetual
product improvements have all helped change the virtualization landscape.
Because virtualization technology evolves so quickly, it can be difficult to
keep up with trends and how they can affect your users: Will VDI adoption
ever take off? Is desktop as a service (DaaS) right for you? Should you try to
sell higher-ups on the value of hyperconverged infrastructure?
Instead of getting bogged down in all the marketing babble, check out this
guide for the straight facts so you can get out of the weeds and into
desktop virtualization.
http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/essentialguide/Desktopvirtualization-market-guide
Budgeting
Staffing Skills
Outsourcing
Planning for deployment
Calculating ROI
Expert tips and advice
Getting more PRO+ essential
content
Page 49 of 50
Next article
Project Success Plan: Desktop Virtualization
In this guide
What is Desktop Virtualization
Why consider a Desktop
Virtualization project?
This e-guide is made available to you, our member, through PRO+ Offers a
collection of free publications, training and special opportunities specifically
gathered from our partners and across our network of sites.
Key terms to understand
Comparing leading VDI
vendors
Evaluating products
Hardware
PRO+ Offers is a free benefit only available to members of the TechTarget
network of sites.
Take full advantage of your membership by visiting
http://pro.techtarget.com/ProLP/
Budgeting
Images; Fotalia
Staffing Skills
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content
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