the PDF - The PCLinuxOS Magazine

the PDF - The PCLinuxOS Magazine
Volume 107
December, 2015
Happy Holidays
2015 Holiday Gift Guide:
Meemaw's Picks
What Programming
Language?
2015 Holiday Gift Guide:
YouCanToo's Picks
The Chimpbox:
A Review
2015 Holiday Gift Guide:
parnote's Picks
Game Zone: Stick 'Em
Up 2: Paper Adventures
PCLinuxOS Family Member
Spotlight: bkstan
Inkscape Tutorial: Another
Fun Text Effect
Inkscape Tutorial: Creating
A Jigsaw Puzzle Using The
Lasercut Extension
Tip Top Tips: Running
Multiple Logitech Devices
From One USB Receiver
PCLinuxOS Magazine
And more inside ...
Page 1
Table Of Contents
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
13
15
16
19
20
22
23
26
27
28
29
30
31
34
Welcome From The Chief Editor
Inkscape Tutorial: Another Fun Text Effect
Screenshot Showcase
The ChimpBox: A Review
Screenshot Showcase
ms_meme's Nook: No Place Like The Forum
PCLinuxOS Recipe Corner: Tofu Parmigiana
2015 Holiday Gift Guide: parnote's Picks
2015 Holiday Gift Guide: Meemaw's Picks
Screenshot Showcase
2015 Holiday Gift Guide: YouCanToo's Picks
PCLinuxOS Friends & Family Member Spotlight: bkstan
ms_meme's Holiday Poems
Which Programming Language?
Screenshot Showcase
Inkscape Tutorial: Creating A Jigsaw Puzzle
Using The Lasercut Extension
Screenshot Showcase
Tip Top Tips:
Running Multiple Logitech Devices From One USB Receiver
Game Zone: Stick 'Em Up 2: Paper Adventures
Screenshot Showcase
PCLinuxOS Puzzled Partitions
More Screenshot Showcase
PCLinuxOS Magazine
The PCLinuxOS name, logo and colors are the trademark of
Texstar.
The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a monthly online publication
containing PCLinuxOS-related materials. It is published
primarily for members of the PCLinuxOS community. The
magazine staff is comprised of volunteers from the
PCLinuxOS community.
Visit us online at http://www.pclosmag.com
This release was made possible by the following volunteers:
Chief Editor: Paul Arnote (parnote)
Assistant Editor: Meemaw
Artwork: Sproggy, Timeth, ms_meme, Meemaw
Magazine Layout: Paul Arnote, Meemaw, ms_meme
HTML Layout: YouCanToo
Staff:
ms_meme
Meemaw
Gary L. Ratliff, Sr.
Daniel Meiß-Wilhelm
daiashi
Smileeb
loudog
YouCanToo
Pete Kelly
Antonis Komis
Patrick Horneker
Contributors:
tuxlink
The PCLinuxOS Magazine is released under the Creative
Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0
Unported license. Some rights are reserved.
Copyright © 2014.
Page 2
Welcome From The Chief Editor
I recently went deer hunting. As I was sitting in the
tree stand, it was hard to not notice the deafening
silence. In that silent realm, you can hear everything.
Until it’s that quiet, you have no idea how much
noise a single, dried leaf makes as it falls from its
supporting
branch
and
flutters to the ground. A
squirrel that weighs maybe a
pound, sounds as if he’s 40
pounds as it scampers
through the leaves. The
periodic
tapping
of
a
woodpecker echos through
the woods as it looks for
another insect to eat. Geese
honk in the distance. Gravel
crunches under the tires of a
car traveling down a distant
road.
That’s one thing I really like
about being in the outdoors,
whether
it’s
fishing
or
hunting. The peace and
solitude envelopes you. Little
else seems to matter as
you’re able to escape the
hustle and bustle of everyday
life. The theme songs from
my son’s favorite kiddie
shows blare loudly in my
head.
that dominates the computer landscape. Many
thanks to Texstar and his small group of packagers
that keep PCLinuxOS running like a well oiled
machine.
We don’t have to deal with
viruses, malware, spyware
and crapware. We don’t
have to worry about
spending
obscene
amounts of money for the
programs we rely on to get
our daily tasks done. We
have choices not only in
the software we use, but
we also have choices in
desktop environments and
how to set up how our
computer works. We have
the choice to use lots of
eye candy, or hardly any at
all.
We are free from all that
background noise that
those problems and issues
bring with them. I guess
you could say that we
have freed ourselves from
the
Matrix. And,
as
computer
users,
our
computer
lives
are
enrichened
by
that
freedom.
In a way, it all also reminds
me of what it’s like to use
PCLinuxOS. With it, we’re
able to free ourselves from
the everyday hassles that go
along with using that “other”
commercial operating system
During
this
holiday
season, I wish for each of
you happiness, peace,
serenity and prosperity.
Disclaimer
1.
All the contents of The PCLinuxOS Magazine are only for general
information and/or use. Such contents do not constitute advice
and should not be relied upon in making (or refraining from
making) any decision. Any specific advice or replies to queries in
any part of the magazine is/are the person opinion of such
experts/consultants/persons and are not subscribed to by The
PCLinuxOS Magazine.
2.
The information in The PCLinuxOS Magazine is provided on an
"AS IS" basis, and all warranties, expressed or implied of any
kind, regarding any matter pertaining to any information, advice
or replies are disclaimed and excluded.
3.
The PCLinuxOS Magazine and its associates shall not be liable,
at any time, for damages (including, but not limited to, without
limitation, damages of any kind) arising in contract, rot or
otherwise, from the use of or inability to use the magazine, or any
of its contents, or from any action taken (or refrained from being
taken) as a result of using the magazine or any such contents or
for any failure of performance, error, omission, interruption,
deletion, defect, delay in operation or transmission, computer
virus, communications line failure, theft or destruction or
unauthorized access to, alteration of, or use of information
contained on the magazine.
4.
No representations, warranties or guarantees whatsoever are
made as to the accuracy, adequacy, reliability, completeness,
suitability, or applicability of the information to a particular
situation. All trademarks are the property of their respective
owners.
5.
Certain links on the magazine lead to resources located on
servers maintained by third parties over whom The PCLinuxOS
Magazine has no control or connection, business or otherwise.
These sites are external to The PCLinuxOS Magazine and by
visiting these, you are doing so of your own accord and assume
all responsibility and liability for such action.
Material Submitted by Users
A majority of sections in the magazine contain materials submitted by
users. The PCLinuxOS Magazine accepts no responsibility for the
content, accuracy, conformity to applicable laws of such material.
Entire Agreement
These terms constitute the entire agreement between the parties with
respect to the subject matter hereof and supersedes and replaces all
prior or contemporaneous understandings or agreements, written or
oral, regarding such subject matter.
Me, sitting in the tree stand.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 3
Inkscape Tutorial: Another Fun Text Effect
By Meemaw
I was talking to ms_meme the other day about ways
to manipulate text in Inkscape, and one of the
extensions we discussed was the Envelope
extension. Envelope is an extension that will “mold”
text to a rectangular shape. Let’s do one!
Start with the bezier tool and draw a rectangle. You
have to make it a rectangle for the extension to
work. If you want a triangle, you can draw a 4-sided
figure that looks kind of like a triangle with one point
cut off, as shown below.
Some of these extensions are picky about how you
draw them. Envelope requires the figure to be drawn
in this order: top left, top right, bottom right, bottom
left, and close. Change your rectangle to a path by
clicking Path > Object to path.
Once you change it to a path, you can always go in
and move the nodes around to get the shape you
want. It has to be four-sided, but the four sides can
be any way you want. If you want a banner shape
(or any other four-sided shape), just move the nodes
until you are satisfied with the result. The text will
align with the rectangle along the first and fourth
lines, with the top of the word being against the first
line and the left side of the first letter being against
the fourth line. When you move your nodes, keep
this in mind.
Now for the text. Type and configure it, changing the
font, size, etc., however you want. With your text
selected, click on Path > Object to path. At this
point, your text is a group of paths, with each letter
being its own path. Ungroup your text, which will
then look like this:
then click on Path > Combine and combine the text
into one path.
Envelope works with only two paths. If you don’t
perform the above step, you will get an error
message that says you have to have only two paths.
Choose the word, (hold down <Shift>) and choose
the shape, and then go to Extensions > Modify
Path > Envelope (top, right).
PCLinuxOS Magazine
After your text is changed, you can use or delete the
shape, whatever you need to do for your drawing.
It’s a fun process! With a little experimentation, you
can get all sorts of effects.
Page 4
Inkscape Tutorial: Another Fun Text Effect
ms_meme got this (which looks kind of like a tree):
DOWNLOAD
Mate Desktop
linuxfordummies.org
There Are No Stupid Questions
Screenshot
Screenshot Showcase
Showcase
This one’s fun! I hope you have fun with it as well.
It's easier than E=mc2
It's elemental
It's light years ahead
It's a wise choice
It's Radically Simple
It's ...
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Posted by Agent Smith, November 6, 2015, running Trinity.
Page 5
The ChimpBox: A Review
by Michael Duffy (tuxlink)
Like a child on Christmas morning, I was almost
shaking with excitement the day the box arrived at
my front door. This box held the contents of which I
had been talking, thinking and dreaming about for
the previous few months since it first became an
idea in a chat room with some of my fellow
PCLinuxOS buddies. Now, it was here, and
December was nowhere in sight. Truly, an early
Christmas gift!
The need for a box like this has been increasing in
popularity for some time now. After reading about
and becoming curios of The Mintbox Mini, a product
offered in the familiar green of the Linux Mint distro, I
started to wish for a box that would fit that need,
niche and price point also. Up to this, I had built full
sized desktop machines without much difficulty. The
biggest hurdle for me seemed to be the battle
against heat here in Southern California. A room that
is already hot, sucking air into a computer that has a
great need to remain cooler can be a troublesome
task. In the average home, A/C cannot be run all day
long, (some of us work for a living!) and if extra fans
are used in the case, noise becomes a factor. My
current desktop machine, an AMD Athlon 3500+, has
four fans in it. A CPU fan, a fan on the power supply,
and two case fans. At first boot up you notice it run,
after an hour or so, I find myself turning my speakers
up a little! Not the end of the world by any means,
but it's there.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Upon opening the box it arrived in, I am shocked at
how small the ChimpBox enclosure is! It is 8 ¼” X 7
1/2” wide, and 2” tall. In anticipation of connecting it
to my 22” Envision monitor, I went searching for a
VGA cable, only to find I already had one plugged
into the rear of the monitor waiting to go! I connected
and then turned my attention to the power
connector, the audio and USB keyboard and mouse.
With all hooked up, I nervously leaned my thumb on
the power switch located on the left of the front
panel. It instantly glowed blue, and my screen came
alive!
“Oh crap, what's wrong!” There was the boot
process happening before my eyes, and rather
quickly I might add, but I was missing something.
Something primal was missing. “What the...?” There
was no sound. Nothing! No fans, no whirring, no
buzzing, no creaking,... nothing. It was glorious
silence. The one huge factor about the ChimpBox is
that it is silent. In the following hours of use, I must
have leaned over to check to see if it was still on.
And yes, there it was, running silently, with it's
calming blue glow.
I wondered how it would fare with heat dispersion.
Both sides, the front and the top have plenty of holes
for venting any heat that builds up. After a number of
hours using it, it had barely even become warm to
my hand.
The sight of an activity LED flashing on and off gives
you a small clue whether a machine is alive, but
there is nothing but the constant blue power light to
calm your curiosity. One thing I am impressed with is
the boot up time. I have a password entry at the
login screen and including typing that in, this baby
boots up in thirty one seconds! I could set it up to
bypass the login, but either way, it's the fastest
booting machine I have ever owned. I could go
through the specs of the machine line by line, but
then if you're interested in buying a ChimpBox, you
can read through all of them at the website. One
thing I will say about the wireless adapter that sits
behind the front panel, is that it has very easily found
and kept a strong 82% wifi signal from my router
located about 25-30 feet away in another room on
the same floor. The ChimpBox does come with an
RJ-45 Ethernet port, so if you happen to be located
close to your router, a wired connection is always a
nicer (and faster) option.
I have been using the box for a few weeks now, and
I can say it is easily able to run everything that
PCLinuxOS KDE can throw at it. I have burned three
DVD's through an external burner via USB and it
tore through that in no time flat. I have used Gimp to
make wallpapers for the ChimpBox, and it is
impressive to see the tools zip through the tasks so
easily.
Some folks might not like the size of the AC/DC
adapter, commonly known as 'the brick'. It is 6 1/2”
long by 2” wide. I have seen 17” laptops with bricks
that were half the size of this. Tucking it away
though, like under a desk or behind the monitor,
helps the 'out of sight, out of mind' thing to work for
you.
Page 6
The ChimpBox: A Review
One thing I wanted to do on the new ChimpBox was
export some video and see how it handled it. I
created a short video that runs for just 3 minutes,
including still images and a soundtrack. I set the
export for a high def and high quality, hit the 'Export'
button, and started my stopwatch. It took exactly 8
minutes and 12 seconds to render the video into an
.mp4 file. I was quite impressed with that, and if I
had selected a lower quality (like for the web etc...),
it may have been even quicker.
All ChimpBoxes come with a recovery USB thumb
drive. It holds the OS and works just like a Live
CD/DVD. If you happen to really mess things up on
the desktop, or anywhere else, this drive restores
you to day one, in no time at all. The OS that comes
as default on the ChimpBox is PCLinuxOS KDE. If
new users to Linux find it unfamiliar to get around at
first, there is a wealth of knowledge available at the
PCLinuxOS website, with a friendly helpful
community waiting at the ready to help with any
issue that may arise. The ChimpBox offers a great
deal of value to new and experienced users alike, at
an affordable price and in a neatly sized package.
Screenshot
Screenshot Showcase
Showcase
The only question left is, have you been good
enough to get one this Christmas?
The PCLinuxOS Magazine
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Looking for an old article?
Can't find what you want? Try the
PCLinuxOS Magazine's
searchable index!
Posted by OnlyHuman, November 14, 2015, running e19.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 7
ms_meme's Nook: No Place Like The Forum
Oh there's no place like the forum for the holidays
From this OS we will never roam
You will find it friendly in so many ways
For the holidays make PCLOS your home
Come and meet the man from Texas
He's a first-class Linux whiz
Always working he really knows his biz
Folks from here and there all around the world
Loudly sing his praise
Texstar's code is scientific
The downloading is terrific
Oh there's no place like the forum for the holidays
From this OS we will never roam
You will find it friendly in so many ways
For the holidays make PCLOS your home
MP3
PCLinuxOS Magazine
OGG
Page 8
PCLinuxOS Recipe Corner
Want To Help?
Tofu Parmigiana
INGREDIENTS:
1/2 cup seasoned bread crumbs
4 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
2 teaspoons dried oregano, divided
1 (14 ounce) package extra firm tofu
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 (18 ounce) can/jar marinara sauce
1/2 teaspoon dried basil
13 clove garlic, minced
4 ounces shredded mozzarella cheese
1 egg, beaten
pepper, to taste
Combine tomato sauce, basil, garlic, and remaining
oregano. Place a thin layer of sauce in an 8 inch
square baking pan. Arrange tofu slices in the pan.
Spoon remaining sauce over tofu. Top with shredded
mozzarella and remaining 2 tablespoons Parmesan.
Would you like to help with the PCLinuxOS
Magazine? Opportunities abound. So get
involved!
You can write articles, help edit articles, serve
as a "technical advisor" to insure articles are
correct, create artwork, or help with the
magazine's layout.
Join us on our Google Group mailing list.
Bake at 400° F for 20 minutes. Serves 5.
DIRECTIONS:
In a small bowl, combine bread crumbs, 2
tablespoons Parmesan cheese, 1 teaspoon
oregano, salt, and black pepper.
Slice tofu into 1/4 inch thick slices and press water
out of tofu using paper towels. Coat tofu in egg and
one at a time, press tofu slices into crumb mixture,
turning to coat all sides.
Heat oil in a medium skillet over medium heat. Cook
tofu slices until crisp on one side; turn, and brown on
the other side.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
The
PCLinuxOS
Magazine
Created with
Scribus
Page 9
2015 Holiday Gift Guide: parnote's Picks
by Paul Arnote (parnote)
It’s that time of year. The holidays are upon us, once
again. With that in mind, it’s also time for The
PCLinuxOS Magazine’s annual gift guide. Between
me, Meemaw and YouCanToo, we’re going to
present 30 gift ideas that might help you buy gifts for
that “hard-to-buy-for techie” on your holiday
shopping list. You can also help PCLinuxOS by
purchasing gifts from the official PCLinuxOS store
on CafePress, and I’ve featured some of those items
below. PCLinuxOS receives a portion of the profits
from the sale of each item in the official PCLinuxOS
store. Also, all prices are expressed in U.S. dollars.
3.0 ports, along with two IQ Smart charging ports.
Sure, there are hubs that are less expensive, but
this one is externally powered – so you’ll need to
plug it into the wall, as well. Once connected to an
open USB 3.0 port on your computer, you’ll have not
only seven additional USB 3.0 ports to power all of
you peripherals, you’ll also have two intelligent
charging ports to charge your smartphone, tablet
and other devices.
around town. This shirt is only available in white, and
in adult men’s sizes small to 4XL.
Silicon Power S60 3K P/E Cycle Toggle MLC 2.5"
120GB 7mm SATA III 6Gb/s Internal Solid State
Drive (SSD) Newegg … $41.99
PCLinuxOS Value T-Shirt
Official PCLinuxOS Store … $13.99
KINGWIN KW-HUB-9U3 9 Port SuperSpeed USB
3.0 Hub ( 7 x USB3.0 Port + 2Port IQ smart
Charging) Newegg … $31.99
It doesn’t seem to matter how many USB ports you
have on your computer, you can always use more.
This USB hub features seven (7) high speed USB
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Look great in this value priced t-shirt, emblazoned
with the PCLinuxOS logo. Made of midweight 100%
cotton, this shirt is perfect for warm summer days or
just lounging around the house. Let the world know
about the best operating system ever by wearing it
Want to breathe new life into an older computer?
Replace the existing SATA III magnetic hard drive
with a SATA III SSD (solid state drive). Not only will
your computer boot in record time, but you won’t
believe how responsive and fast your older
computer becomes. Like a lot of SSDs, this fits into a
2.5” form factor, and it can be used in a notebook,
netbook, or desktop computer (the latter will most
likely require a mounting adapter, though). If digging
around inside your computer isn’t your cup of tea,
you can also use this in an external drive enclosure
and create a blazing fast external storage solution
that can be moved between all of your computers.
Just in case 120 GB isn’t big enough for your liking,
there is also a 240 GB version available on the
same page for $67.99.
Page 10
2015 Holiday Gift Guide: parnote's Picks
PCLinuxOS Clock
PCLinuxOS Official Store … $13.99
Have your morning cup of joe in a PCLinuxOS
coffee mug! This mug comes in three sizes: small,
medium and large. The small mug, at 11 ounces
capacity, also changes color. When filled with a hot
beverage, it changes colors from black to white,
revealing the logo. The medium mug holds 15
ounces, costs $15.99, and does not change colors.
The large mug holds 20 ounces – over three times
the size of a traditional coffee cup (a traditional
serving size of coffee is six ounces). The 20 ounce
mug costs $19.99, but does not change colors.
Star Wars #1 ThinkGeek Exclusive Variant
ThinkGeek … $7.99
Keep track of how much time you’ve been on the
computer with your own wall clock adorned with the
PCLinuxOS logo. The 10 inch analog wall clock
features precision quartz movements to guarantee
accurate time, and is housed in a black plastic case
with a clear plastic lens. It runs off of one AA battery,
which is included.
So, if you like to lie in bed and cruise the internet, or
sit in a chair with the computer in your lap, this item
is for you. Not only does it provide a fairly stable
platform for your computer, it keeps the computer off
of soft, fluffy surfaces (like your bed), and off of your
lap. In doing so, it improves air circulation around
the computer, thus helping to keep your computer
running cooler, and thereby helping extend the life of
your computer and its components.
PCLinuxOS Coffee Mug
PCLinuxOS Official Store … $14.99
Folding Adjustable Vented Laptop/iPad/Book
Desk Stand, Portable Bed Tray - Black
Newegg … $26.99
One of the worst things you could do to your laptop
(notebook) computer is to use it on your lap or other
soft surfaces. Frequently, you block the ventilation
holes, causing your laptop to run hot. In fact, it can
run so hot that it causes burns to the skin. Plus, we
all know (or should know) that heat is a mortal
enemy of computers, and can shorten the lives of
various computer components, especially CPUs,
RAM and video chips.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
With the release of Star Wars: The Force Awakens
movie scheduled later this month on December
18th, Star Wars merchandise will be finding a new
audience as millions discover the saga for the first
time – and as many millions more rediscover and
revisit their longtime favorite serial about good vs
evil. Star Wars “lore” is broken down into two
categories: legend and canon. The former is
Page 11
2015 Holiday Gift Guide: parnote's Picks
unofficial, while the latter is the “official” history.
Since the first release of the first movie (Episode IV:
A New Hope) in 1977, there has been a steady
stream of Star Wars lore released to fans hungry for
more. As you can imagine, both categories of lore
have filled up with tomes of information.
with a hook and loop strap in the back, allowing for
proper sizing for virtually any head size. It also
features a sweatband on the inside.
MTM Arrow Plus Case, Black
Sportsman’s Guide … $31.99 ($28.79)
BB-8 Desktop Lamp ThinkGeek … $39.99
Now, there will be an official Star Wars comic book
line coming out. And I do mean OFFICIAL. The
comic books will be canonical. Here’s your chance to
get a special edition copy of the first issue, with a
cover especially designed for ThinkGeek. The issues
come bagged and boarded (you comic book
collectors will know what that means), but
ThinkGeek will not guarantee that you receive a mint
condition graded copy. The storyline in these comic
books pick up where the first movie (Episode IV) left
off.
PCLinuxOS Baseball Cap
PCLinuxOS Official Store … $18.99
In the new Star Wars movie, The Force Awakens, he
doubles as a projector, a fire extinguisher, a
navigator, and a power coupler. We know all the
things that R2-D2 does, but we don't yet know all the
things BB-8 has up its... well, up its metaphorical
sleeves. Maybe it also doubles as a lamp in a sticky
situation. We just don't know.
Available in white (pictured above) or tan, this 100%
brushed cotton baseball cap has the PCLinuxOS
logo printed on the front. The hat size is adjustable
PCLinuxOS Magazine
But it definitely can double as a lamp for you. This
BB-8 Desktop Lamp stands 8 1/2" tall and casts light
on your subject of choice, whether that's
astronavigation or algebra. It has LED light inside
the head, which shines downward through a diffuser.
A gentle tap on BB-8's head switches between three
different lighting modes: natural white, amber, and
warm white. And off. Also a good mode when you
need to go to sleep.
I keep it no secret that I like to hunt and fish, and
enjoy all sorts of outdoor activities. In the last year, I
took up learning archery. What I didn’t anticipate was
how quickly you accumulate arrows and all the
accessories that go along with them. Broadheads
and field tips, nocks, fletching material, threaded
inserts … the list goes on and on. So, it would be
nice to have a single case where I could store all
those arrows and assorted accessories. This case
will store 36 – three dozen – arrows up to 35 inches
(88.9 cm) in length (even though I cut my arrows to a
length of 28 inches (71.1 cm) to accommodate my
draw length).
We here at The PCLinuxOS Magazine would like to
wish you and your families a wonderful, safe and
happy holiday season.
Page 12
2015 Holiday Gift Guide: Meemaw's Picks
by Meemaw
Melting Dali Clock
$14.99
It’s almost time to find those gifts that you hope are
just right for each person on your gift list. Some of
my picks are fun and some are strange, so if you
need a fun or strange gift, one of the following might
just be the one.
While we are talking about clocks and home decor,
this would be a cute design for one’s kitchen (center
bottom).
Fiber-Optic Christmas Tree
18”, 31”, 4’ and 6’
$39.99 to $149.99
One of my favorite sites, as I have said before, is
BITS & PIECES. They have toys and jigsaw puzzles
(one of my faves), plus many gifts that other sites
don’t have.
Laser Scissors
$9.99
The painting "The Persistence of Memory” by
Salvador Dali is really different, and if your home
decor is this style, or you have a copy of the
painting, this makes a wonderful addition. It is
designed to hang on a shelf.
Kitchen Utensil Clock
$19.99
This might be a good alternative to a live evergreen
tree (some people are allergic). It has two light disks,
one white and one colors, and it comes in four
different sizes.
When I first saw this, I thought, “Really?” However, I
started thinking about it, and decided that this is a
good idea. There are many places that I would want
a straight line to follow. So, yes: laser scissors.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
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Page 13
2015 Holiday Gift Guide: Meemaw's Picks
Nail Art Pen Set
sets
$14.99 for each of 4 different
Sky Full of Balloons Jigsaw
$16.99
Most everyone travels, and most people I know use
some sort of bag to keep their personal items from
moving around in the suitcase. L L Bean has an
assortment of these bags in four different sizes, and
in several different designs and colors. The one in
the image is a medium size bag.
Lambswool Scarf
My granddaughters are older now, and many young
girls (and their mothers!) are into the current nail
design trend. This is one of four sets that will give
you the supplies to do it yourself. Some are plain
colors and some have glitter. Each set comes with
four pens with brushes and fine tip pens to do the
whole design.
Glow in the Dark Jigsaw Puzzle
$18.99
$39.95
I guess my gift guide wouldn’t be mine without at
least one jigsaw puzzle. These are two that would be
fun to assemble.
While not inexpensive by any means, L L BEAN has
a wonderful assortment, and if you can afford them,
the clothes don’t wear out in the first year of wear.
My husband has some of their flannel shirts, and
they have lasted up to 10 years. In addition, they
have other items that are very interesting.
Personal Travel Bag
$24.95 (small) $29.95
(medium) $39.95 (large) $49.95 (family size)
This might be a wonderful present for just one
special person! Lambswool is sure to be really soft
and warm.
First Watch Weather Station
PCLinuxOS Magazine
$39.95
Page 14
2015 Holiday Gift Guide: Meemaw's Picks
This is a handy gadget for displaying indoor and
outdoor temperature, plus time and date. It is easy
to configure.
Snowman Family Kit
$34.95
DOWNLOAD
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BitTorrent and copyright collide
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Twenty-six pieces in a handy bag will be all your
family needs to build a snowman family, including a
snow-dog. All you have to do is add the snow.
Have a great holiday season! I hope that you find
that some of these suggestions are just the right
selection for someone special.
Looking for an old article?
Can't find what you want? Try the
PCLinuxOS Magazine's
searchable index!
Posted by trytip, November 21, 2015, running KDE.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 15
2015 Holiday Gift Guide: YouCanToo's Picks
by YouCanToo
The Hey Joe Coffee Mug can brew your coffee
inside of your mug at the push of a button, anytime,
anywhere. It's the world’s first smart coffee mug that
you can take with you anywhere and brew coffee
anytime. Add your coffee pod, add water and hit
power — it's that simple. In just a few minutes, you
can enjoy a freshly-brewed cup of coffee wherever
you are. On top of that, this kit includes a unique
blend of coffee that will delight your taste buds in
light, medium, or bold roast. This high quality,
arabica coffee is specially formulated to taste better
than any other coffee brewed in a Hey Joe Coffee
Mug, guaranteed.
He’s making a list and checking it twice. Going to
check who’s been naughty or nice.
The Chimpbox Quad Core Starting at $299.99
TrackR StickR
Good things comes in small packages this year.
Measuring only 7.5 X 8.5 X 2 inches, The Chimpbox
packs a punch. Zero noise, small footprint and low
power usage. Comes preloaded with PCLinuxOS
KDE.
$24.95
tracks and switch between audio and phone
functions with a touch of a button—unlocking your
mobile device’s true potential.
Hey Joe Coffee + Mug $99.99
Smartbean Bluetooth Receiver $23.99
The Smartbean Bluetooth Receiver is the latest in
the line of Antec Mobile Products designed to free
you from wires and tangled cables. Thanks to the
Smartbean's use of Bluetooth High-Definition
technology, you can go wireless with your favorite
headphones and still retain CD quality sound and
crystal-clear audio while listening to music, watching
movies or playing games. But don’t surrender
control.tthe Smartbean's integrated microphone and
audio controls let you adjust volume, pause and skip
PCLinuxOS Magazine
You likely lose your wallet, smartphone, keys and/or
remote control frequently. Losing things is normal.
But instead of dealing with the frustrations of losing
these items, there’s a better way to cope: the TrackR
StickR. Where are the keys? Where did you put your
Page 16
2015 Holiday Gift Guide: YouCanToo's Picks
wallet? Where is your phone? Trackr solves that
problem. It is a quarter-sized device that can be
fastened to any item, and then users are able to use
the companion app to find whatever the device is
attached to. When you lose your wallet, you simply
pull up the app on your smartphone and you can
make the StickR beep. You can also set up the app
to alert you when you venture too far from it, and
can use the TrackR StickR to also find your phone,
even if it is on silent. It works with both iOS and
Android. I have one attached to my remote control
so I never have to worry about losing it.
Tablet Wall Mount Mount Dock
There are no screws or holes required, as it simply
uses damage-free 3M Command adhesive strips for
mounting, allowing you to mount it virtually
anywhere in your home. Whether you need your
tablet in the bedroom, garage, bathroom or kitchen,
the Koala Tablet Wall Mount Dock can be placed
anywhere. And, it’s cheap enough so that it makes a
great gift for her on a budget.
Google Chromecast
$35.00
$ 15.49
out dry-to-touch. You won't even need to shake
them.
Smartphone Spy Lens
$20.00
Wireless streaming sticks don't get any cheaper or
easier to use than the Google Chromecast. This little
HDMI dongle attaches to a TV, and using it is a
snap. Simply open a supported app — such as
Netflix or Pandora — on your laptop, tablet or
smartphone, and hit the Cast button. Your content
will show up instantly on your TV in full 1080p
resolution, without any lag. You can even broadcast
from a Google Chrome browser.
Ever lay in bed at night with your tablet bingewatching your backlog of shows and movies on
Netflix and realize just how uncomfortable it is to
have to hold the tablet while you watch? You need a
tablet wall mount, and the easiest one to set up is
the Koala Tablet Wall Mount Dock by Dockem. It
works with virtually all tablets — both iOS and
Android devices — and is easily set up in seconds.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Polaroid Zip $130.00
The Zip is a super-simple photo printer. Turn it on,
connect it to your iPhone or Android via Bluetooth,
and hit the print button on a free app. The result: 2 x
3-inch instant prints. Don't worry about expensive ink
cartridges, either. The Zip uses special photo paper
(a 30-pack costs $14.99) that's ink-free and comes
Sneak snapshots on the sly with this low profile lens
that magnetically attaches to your phone. Designed
to capture photos at a 90 degree angle, this device
simply attaches to your phone's lens to act as a
periscope for furtive shooting. With the ability to
swivel the lens 365 degrees, you can lay your phone
Page 17
2015 Holiday Gift Guide: YouCanToo's Picks
down flat in "texting position" and still shoot straight
ahead, turning any surface into an impromptu tripod.
Perfect for candids of your camera-shy friends, or
when you need a little photographic evidence to
back up an unbelievable story. Made in China.
Wireless Smart LED Soft White Bulb
$134.00 for a 6 pack
Magic Cube Laser Virtual Projection Keyboard
$96.95
Today’s powerful man wants the control of
everything. Let’s get it started from your home. Keep
the control of your bulbs and lights in the house with
this LED soft white bulb, you can dim or highlight the
bulbs through the setting in the mobile application.
Manage it like you want.
Want To Help?
Would you like to help with the PCLinuxOS
Magazine? Opportunities abound. So get
involved!
It is a magical cube that is totally virtual. With this
tiny portable gadget, now you can have the virtual
keyboard wherever you are. What more a geek
would want other than this?
You can write articles, help edit articles, serve
as a "technical advisor" to insure articles are
correct, create artwork, or help with the
magazine's layout.
Join us on our Google Group mailing list.
Support PCLinuxOS! Get Your Official
PCLinuxOS
Merchandise Today!
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 18
PCLinuxOS Friends & Family Member Spotlight: bkstan
As told to YouCanToo.
in 1992-1997 as a mathematician
theoretical science, physics).
(near
to
What is your name/username?
My name is Stas, surname is Starodubtsev.
How old are you?
40
Are you married, single?
What kind of things you like doing? hobbies,
travel, fishing, camping?
I'm fond of serving to people - in an altruistic
manner. I love reading religious articles, as well, and
I love my family and children. I love spending time in
a our little forest wooden house in the summertime,
and I am also interested in computer science and
technology a lot.
Married.
Why and when did you start using Linux?
How about Kids, Grandkids?
A boy and a girl, very young ones.
Do you have pets, what is your favorite?
No.
Are you retired, still working and what do you
do?
Working as an IT developer in a Moscow bank.
Doing DB development, and front-end dev too.
(Generally using C# and C++ on Windows,
sometimes Python).
Where do you call home? What is it like? IE:
weather, scenery
Well I live in a Moscow suburb.
Where did you go to school and what is your
education level?
Well, I got pretty nice education, in a Moscow school
in 1982-1992. and then at a Moscow state university
PCLinuxOS Magazine
I love Linux because it is powerful, secure, smart,
pretty stable, quick, extendable, ... I have so many
good words for Linux in general, and for PCLinuxOS
in particular!
Using this chance I ask you to convey a lot of thanks
and good wishes to all PCLinuxOS crew in the USA
and all over the world!
I tried many times Fedora, SLAX, Mandriva/Mageia,
ASPLinux, what not ... still using this distro, I think
since 2009.
PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight is an exclusive,
monthly column by youcantoo, featuring PCLinuxOS
forum members. This column will allow "the rest of us" to
get to know our forum family members better, and will
give those featured an opportunity to share their
PCLinuxOS story with the rest of the world.
It's easier than E=mc2
It's elemental
It's light years ahead
It's a wise choice
It's Radically Simple
It's ...
If you would like to be featured in PCLinuxOS Family
Member Spotlight, please send a private message to
youcantoo, parnote or Meemaw in the PCLinuxOS forum
expressing your interest.
Page 19
ms_meme's Holiday Poems
With holiday parties upon us
The drinks will start to flow
But if you don't intend to sip
Why should you even go
I love the feast in the Forum
There's only one thing wrong
When Texstar says the thankful prayer
He makes it too darn long
Just a small glass of red wine
Will give you a merry glow
The mods are paying for all of it
So you won't spend any dough
And then there's those fruit cakes
That YouCanToo always sends
Heavenly and delicious
It's what the Forum pretends
After a double martini
You'll be the star of the show
Doing a Silly Santa routine
And shouting Ho Ho Ho
The life of the party you'll be
After a whiskey or two of Old Crow
You ask me why I'm sure of this
I've done it and I know
We're going to the Forum for holidays
We go there every year
I've packed all the music
Texstar's packed all the beer
MeeMaw baked a pumpkin pie
Another of wild plum
In a bag out of sight
Texstar stashed a bottle of rum
So excited to greet old friends
Already a tear in my eye
Texstar nods and shakes his head
In his pocket goes a bottle of rye
PCLOS sisters will be there
We'll be the kissing kin
Texstar will take the geeks outside
To share a bottle of gin
PCLinuxOS Magazine
We've studied well his masterpiece
Every bit of all the crumbs
Just the very thought of it
Makes us reach for the Tums
Never found the fruit or nuts
Cross our hearts that is so
It's all just a sticky mess
A bunch of sugary dough
This year we will play it smart
Not taking it out of the tins
Sending it on to someone else
Lord forgive us for our sins
Page 20
is for celebration
Gee give me a break
Did plenty last year
Just got a headache
is for impossible
Too many gifts to give
No paper no ribbon
Don't feel fes-tive
is for merriment
Each year always more
Trying to figure
Just what it is for
is for hectic
The days soon will be
Nobody helps
It's all left to me
is for sauces
And salads to make
Pies and cookies
And turkeys to bake
is for abracadabra
I need a magic wand
To accomplish it all
Before I despond
is for rushing
To stores in the mall
Must remember
To buy alcohol
is for tired
My work's just begun
Someone please tell me
Why holidays are fun
is for season
Let it soon cease
I plead and I pray
Send me some peace
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 21
Which Programming Language?
by Peter Kelly (critter)
some effort. The more effort you put in, the more you
get out of the endeavor.
Most of my previous submissions to the PCLinuxOS
magazine have been in the form of tutorials or howto's. This time, however, I thought that I would share
my experiences with trying out a new programming
language, the difficulties that I experienced, the
relative advantages and disadvantages of the
different languages, and the benefits of being able to
use one, or more, computer languages to achieve
the results you require from today's powerful
computer systems.
Simple, 'that's useful' routines can require very little
expertise, while the all-encompassing, mega-app will
take much, much more.
Most of us will use what is available already, and
supplement it with a few little scripts to help take
away the drudgery of day-to-day requirements.
About programming and scripting
For the lowdown on a whole bunch of computer
languages, take a look at the “Computer Languages
from A to Z” series published in the PCLinuxOS
Magazine from July 2008 to February 2011, written
by Gary L. Ratliff, Sr.
New computer users usually fall into one of two
categories: those who see themselves as potential
programming gurus, and those who would rather just
not know about such evil practices. Both are usually
misinformed and, whichever direction they
eventually
follow,
disappointed
with
their
experiences.
You may not realize just how powerful your
computer actually is when using pre-packaged
applications supplied with your distribution. They will,
usually, make tasks easier but at the expense of
compromising your requirements and providing a
'close fit' result.
It is not necessary to be able to write computer code
to achieve a satisfactory relationship with the
capabilities (and complexities) of a computer.
However, those who do learn to use some of this
additional ability tend to get so much more from their
computing time.
After a while, it becomes apparent that there are
some things that take a lot of effort to accomplish,
more effort than they will save, and some that
require a little bit of 'heavy lifting' code to
accomplish.
Thankfully, some other people have realized this and
produced their own versions of programming
environments in order to: 'make the easy things
easy, and the hard things possible' (Larry Wall,
inventor of the perl scripting language).
The first consideration I had was whether to use a
compiled or interpreted language. There are some
languages that support both interpretation and
compilation, but ultimately the user usually decides
on the way to go.
Compiled languages
You can write your own routines - not full blown
applications such as word processors and
spreadsheets, but little applications or scripts that
get you the results that want, how you want them, in
the format that suits your requirements. Writing your
own routines can be achieved in a variety of ways,
and there are many programming and scripting
languages available to enable you to write them.
Writing a utility application to achieve your end result
need not be difficult but, like learning to play a
musical instrument or to excel at a sport, it requires
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Choosing a language or script
Under Linux operating systems, the most used
scripting language is almost certainly the shell
scripting language, usually, but not always - bash.
Most Linux users tend to start using the bash
scripting language when beginning to write their own
little routines to supplement, or to replace, the
utilities that are built into the system. Also, most of
these users remain loyal to this strategy.
C is a compiled language, which means that you
have to write the code and then run it through a
program called (unsurprisingly) a compiler. This
converts your code, written in text, into the
mysterious instructions understood by by the
computer’s processor. If this succeeds, which it
almost never does on the first few attempts, then
another program called a linker is called up to join
up your bits to the system’s own bits in order that the
two can cooperate.
The compile-link process can be done seamlessly
using an application known as an integrated
development environment or IDE. (These IDE’s are
available for most computer languages, not just
compiled languages, and they really do help speed
up the development process). Even so, you have to
complete the process before you know if you have
produced something usable.
Page 22
Which Programming Language?
Another compiled language is C++, which is a
different flavour of C. C++ uses Object Oriented
Programming (OOP), where C is a procedural
language. See here for an explanation. Which one to
use is mostly down to personal preference, as both
are extremely powerful languages. So should I use a
compiled language? No, not for writing quick fixes
and small helper utilities. C is good. Unix was written
in C, as were most of the GNU utilities, and of
course, the Linux kernel. If you want to write device
drivers or low-level systems utilities, use C. If you
intend to start out from scratch and write '2nix' then
choose C. If you want to do that and annoy the hell
out of Linus Torvalds, then choose C++. For my
purpose I wanted something lighter.
any platform, Linux, BSD, Windows, Mac and others.
Most Linux distributions install it by default.
The documentation is as near complete as the
documentation for a project of this size can be.
Online tutorials are plentiful, and books on perl
abound. Perl is also easy to use. Well, at least the
beginnings of perl are easy, but adventurous folk can
get as deeply involved as they like. One of perl’s
maxims is 'there is more than one way to do it' and
this is certainly true. If you have a perl problem and
try to Google the answer, you are likely to get five
people come up with eight different solutions, all of
which work.
Screenshot
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Interpreted languages
Interpreted languages tend to be lighter and easier
for newcomers to grasp. This is why, when home
computers first appeared on the scene, most came
with a BASIC (Beginners All-purpose Symbolic
Instruction Code) language interpreter installed.
BASIC is not, however, a 'good' language, and can
lead to some very poor programming habits. An
interpreted language is written in text which is
passed to an interpreter. This reads an instruction
and executes it and then waits for the next
instruction. This way you get to see the results
immediately as each instruction is executed.
Actually, most interpreters these days do two passes
over the code. The first pass optimizes the code for
interpretation, and the second pass performs the
execution although this is invisible to the user.
Perl is an interpreted language, and many of the
PCLinuxOS configuration utilities are written in perl.
Therefore, I looked at perl. I was impressed. Perl is
vast and has been around since at least 1987 (Larry
won't say exactly). In that time, almost anything that
can be done in perl has been done by someone, and
that code is available for re-use in a central
repository named CPAN - The Comprehensive Perl
Archive Network. Perl is available for free on almost
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Posted by chilly, November 18, 2015, running KDE.
Page 23
Which Programming Language?
So, is perl the language that I should choose? No.
The problem with perl is its completeness. There is
just so much of it and so many ways to do things
that I felt lost, I was drowning in a sea of
possibilities. For some this is a plus, but I felt
overwhelmed so I could not concentrate on the
problem at hand. I agree with Forrest Gump –
'Simple is as simple does.'
A friend suggested I try Java. I did. Again no. Why
not? I didn't like it, simple as that. It may be the
perfect solution for some folks, but not for me.
Next up came Python, a language that has been
around as long as perl (1987) but has in recent
years become the darling of coders in the open
source world. A wonder language – I wonder…
There are currently two versions of Python, similar
but incompatible with each other: Python 2 and
Python 3, with current releases at 2.7.10 and 3.5.0
respectively. Python 3 is stable but still in
development, while Python 2 is also stable but
unlikely to receive new features. Python 2 is not
going to disappear any time soon, as there is too
much existing code dependent upon it, but Python 3
is the way forward. I decided to try Python 3.
Python is an interpreted, object-oriented language
that can also be used as a procedural language.
Object-oriented because everything in Python is an
object, but if you don't like that way of working, don't
want to have to use classes and methods, use
functions. Python will take care of the details, but
then you will miss out on some of the power of
Python.
OOP is not difficult, but it is different if you are used
to the traditional way of coding. Python allows you to
transition at your own pace. Once you begin to
grasp the concepts of OOP, you can appreciate the
simplicity and power available. Like perl, Python has
a wealth of ready written code available in the form
of importable modules, has excellent documentation,
is free to use, is available on most platforms, and is
PCLinuxOS Magazine
installed by default in most Linux distributions.
So, once again, should I choose Python as my
development platform? Yes, because unlike perl, I
didn't get that feeling of being overwhelmed. Like
perl, there is more than one way to do it, but unlike
perl there is only one correct way to do it and the
structure of Python tends to lead you towards that
level of correctness. However, Python is tolerant if
you do wander from the straight and narrow.
Often, compiled programs are used in speed critical
situations. An interpreted language may call a
compiled module to optimize the execution, as
interpreted languages tend to run more slowly.
Python has some useful features that help to speed
things up. Here's an example:
One way of benchmarking programs is to perform
many iterations of a repetitive task and to record the
time taken. A Fibonacci sequence is a series of
numbers such that the next number in the series is
the sum of the previous two numbers – 0, 1, 1, 2, 3,
5, 8, 13…
To find the largest Fibonacci number in the range 0
to n in python:
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Page 24
Which Programming Language?
#!/usr/bin/env python3
# fibo_test.py
import sys, getopt
International Community
PCLinuxOS Sites
def fib(n):
a, b = 0, 1
while b < n:
a, b = b, a+b
return a
result = fib(float(sys.argv[1]))
digits = len(str(result))
print()
print('Result:', result)
print()
print('Digits in result:', digits)
To time the run of this routine this is called with:
time fibo_test.py n
Where n is the number to stop at.
Netherlands
Turkey
Donate To PCLinuxOS
Denmark
Czechoslovakia
I did this for two maximums, 1e3 which is 1000 and
1e308 which is 1 followed by 308 zeros, a
ridiculously large number that should seriously test
the routine. The screenshot shows the results.
Click here to make a one-time donation
through Google Checkout.
Or, click one of the amounts down below
to make a monthly, recurring donation.
Quick enough for me.
So, Python it is then. I've only been using it for a
couple of weeks, but I like it. From the few examples
that I've tried, OOP seems to make integrating GUI
components much easier, so I think I'll stick with it a
while.
I know that Linus thinks that C++ and OOP are an
abomination, but then he's biased. He's a genius.
For me, all things are difficult, and hard things are
very difficult. But perhaps, with python, they are all
achievable.
Community Supported.
No Billionaires/Millionaires.
No Corporate Backing Or Funding.
Italy
Poland
Brazil
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 25
Inkscape Tutorial: Creating A Jigsaw Puzzle
Using The Lasercut Extension
by Khadis
Click Apply and your puzzle pieces will appear in
the center of your working canvas. By default, they
are fairly hard to see because the stroke is very thin.
So, open up the Fill and Stroke (Shift + Ctrl + F)
panel and increase the stroke width from the Stroke
Style tab.
A couple of months ago I wrote a tutorial about
making jigsaw puzzle pieces manually. I realized that
it took a long time to create it, although it still good to
sharpen your designing skill. But, thanks to the
Inkscape community, working in Inkscape is now
getting easier each day — including creating puzzle
pieces instantly.
In this issue, I will show you how to create a jigsaw
puzzle instantly using the Lasercut extension. OK,
let’s go!
To get started, download the Lasercut extension
(Lasercut-jigsaw.inx)
from
https://github.com/Neon22/inkscape-jigsaw. If you
cannot download it directly, just copy the script into
your favorite text editor, then save it in the <.inx>
format with name “Lasercut-jigsaw.inx”.
Also, download the python script (Lasercutjigsaw.py) from the same address above. Simply
copy the script into your favorite text editor and save
it with a <.py> format.
Put
those
2
files
in
the
usr/share/inkscape/extensions/ folder and start
your Inkscape. If it doesn’t work, put those files in
~/.config/inkscape/extensions/ folder. You’ll find
this new extension under the Extensions – Render
– Lasercut Jigsaw menu. If it still doesn’t work, try
to run Inkscape using root mode.
Go to the Extensions – Render – Lasercut Jigsaw
menu entry. A Lasercut window will appear in your
screen. Set the width and height the same as your
image dimension. Also, set the number of pieces
across and down (see the illustration below). You
can experiment with the number of pieces to gain a
better result.
After that, put the puzzle above the image (click the
puzzle and press the PageUp button to ensure).
Then, select all (puzzle and the image) and center
them through the Align and Distribute (Shift + Ctrl
+ A) panel.
Now, import an image to your Inkscape. I used a
random free image from http://www.123rf.com/.
Look at its dimension. Mine is 562.5 x 435 px (center
top).
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 26
Inkscape Tutorial: Creating A Jigsaw Puzzle Using The Lasercut Extension
Done. You can later cut the puzzle into pieces by
following the pattern. Good luck.
Linux Docs
Linux Man Pages
Screenshot
Screenshot Showcase
Showcase
Defending Your Rights
Posted by R76, November 17, 2015, running MATE.
In The Digital World
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 27
Tip Top Tips: Running Multiple
Logitech Devices From One USB Receiver
Editor’s Note: Tip Top Tips is a new monthly column in
The PCLinuxOS Magazine. Each month, we will feature –
and possibly even expand upon – one tip from the
PCLinuxOS forum. The magazine will not accept
independent tip submissions specifically intended for
inclusion in the Tip Top Tips column. Rather, if you have a
tip, share it in the PCLinuxOS forum’s “Tips & Tricks”
section. Your tip just may be selected for publication in
The PCLinuxOS Magazine.
From the description in Synaptic:
It comes in two flavors, command-line and GUI. Both
are able to list the devices paired to a Unifying
Receiver, show detailed info for each device, and
also pair/unpair supported devices with the receiver.
solaar
Device manager for Logitech's Unifying Receiver
Solaar is a Linux device manager for Logitech’s
Unifying Receiver peripherals. It is able to
pair/unpair devices to the receiver, and for most
devices read battery status.
Most of you may already know of solaar. I didn't,
and I am sure others don't either. I hope this helps
someone.
This month’s tip comes from PCLinuxOS forum
member Ramchu.
I just purchased a new Logitech wireless keyboard.
In the instructions, I noticed paragraph for running
up to six (6) compatible devices from a single USB
receiver. I went to http://logitech.com/support/. There
I discovered that, once again, Linux isn't (officially)
supported. I searched with Google and discovered
that there was a workaround.
I then searched in Synaptic for unifying and
discovered Solaar, installed the package, then
opened solaar from a terminal.
I now have my Logitech wireless mouse and
wireless keyboard both working from a single USB
receiver .
For your Logitech product to be compatible, this logo
should be located somewhere on the equipment.
Full Monty ...
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Everything you might want or need –
plus the kitchen sink!
Page 28
Game Zone: Stick ’Em Up 2: Paper Adventures
by daiashi
System requirements:
Fully updated PCLinuxOS and Steam
Hardware:
Minimum:
Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo or equivalent
Memory: 1 GB RAM
Graphics: OpenGL 2.0 or later
About The Game
Hard Drive: 150 MB available space
Stick 'Em Up 2: Paper Adventures is a
run'n'gun/platform game of stick figure characters
fighting through paper and card levels.
Additional Notes: Supports mouse and
keyboard, Xbox 360 controllers, Xbox One
controllers, and other Steam-configured
controllers
Fly across city rooftops firing rockets from a
helicopter, leap between pirate ships with a sword,
race buggies on the moon, and more!
About The Company
Play with between 1 and 4 players with extra
controllers or by connecting over your local network.
Never Don't Play is the company behind this game.
However, not much could be found about those
responsible.
Game mode include playing together in campaign
mode, or fight against each other in VS and Team
VS modes
Some Gameplay Screenshots
First let me say the game is short, but for the price,
definitely worth it. The levels that you fight through
were, in my opinion, well thought out for what they
are and enjoyable to play through. If you like South
Park's construction paper type back drop, then you
will surely like this. As a side note, if everyone does
not have the full version to join a game, the starter
edition can be used. What an ingenious addition to a
game to get everyone involved. I hope you enjoy the
game. I know I did.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 29
Game Zone: Stick ’Em Up 2: Paper Adventures
Connect
All your
PCLinuxOS
connections in one
convenient location!
Screenshot
Screenshot Showcase
Showcase
Getting It To Run
Install Steam (if you don’t have it installed already),
then start it. You will need to create a new account, if
you do not already have one. Once you have Steam
up and running, go to the store tab. Click on the
Linux tab and search for Stick ‘Em Up 2. Click on
and download the demo. If you have updated your
system, including graphics drivers, you should be
good to go.
Stick 'Em Up 2
Posted by weirdwolf, November 22, 2015, running LXDE.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 30
SUDOKU RULES: There is only one valid solution to each
Sudoku puzzle. The only way the puzzle can be considered
solved correctly is when all 81 boxes contain numbers and the
other Sudoku rules have been followed.
When you start a game of Sudoku, some blocks will be prefilled
for you. You cannot change these numbers in the course of the
game.
Each column must contain all of the numbers 1 through 9 and
no two numbers in the same column of a Sudoku puzzle can
be the same. Each row must contain all of the numbers 1
through 9 and no two numbers in the same row of a Sudoku
puzzle can be the same.
Each block must contain all of the numbers 1 through 9 and no
two numbers in the same block of a Sudoku puzzle can be the
same.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
SCRAPPLER RULES:
1. Follow the rules of Scrabble®. You can
view them here. You have seven (7) letter
tiles with which to make as long of a word
as you possibly can. Words are based on
the
English
language.
Non-English
language words are NOT allowed.
2. Red letters are scored double points.
Green letters are scored triple points.
3. Add up the score of all the letters that
you used. Unused letters are not scored.
For red or green letters, apply the
multiplier when tallying up your score.
Next, apply any additional scoring
multipliers, such as double or triple word
score.
4. An additional 50 points is added for
using all seven (7) of your tiles in a set to
make your word. You will not necessarily
be able to use all seven (7) of the letters in
your set to form a “legal” word.
5. In case you are having difficulty seeing
the point value on the letter tiles, here is a
list of how they are scored:
0 points: 2 blank tiles
1 point: E, A, I, O, N, R, T, L, S, U
2 points: D, G
3 points: B, C, M, P
4 points: F, H, V, W, Y
5 points: K
8 points: J, X
10 points: Q, Z
6. Optionally, a time limit of 60 minutes
should apply to the game, averaging to 12
minutes per letter tile set.
7. Have fun! It's only a game!
Download Puzzle Solutions Here
PCLinuxOS Puzzled Partitions
Possible score 232, average score 162.
Page 31
PCLinuxOS Puzzled Partitions
PCLinuxOS Crossword Puzzle: December 2015
Holiday Gifts
1 . XBox or Nintendo
2. Smaller computer I use to read books
3. Great for cooking steak!
4. If he has a barbecue grill, get him one
of these
5. For my favorite deer hunter!
6. The family can watch the football game
7. Nice healthy food gift for friends
8. Some things are much better when
cooked slowly
9. Goes well with wine
10. Red or white, whatever you like
11. Pick your favorite brand of alcohol
12. A machine with PCLinuxOS on it
13. More reading material
14. Keep your feet dry
15. You can chop, slice or mince with this
16. Great to use for picking out your own
present
17. Archery supplies
Download Puzzle Solutions Here
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 32
PCLinuxOS Puzzled Partitions
Holiday Gifts Word Find
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Barbecue Grill
Blouse
Book
Boots
Bow and Arrows
Camping Gear
Cell Phone
Cheese
Coat
Computer
Crock Pot
Dryer
Food Processor
Fruit
Game Console
Gift Card
Gloves
Handgun
Hat
Liquor
Refrigerator
Rifle
Scarf
Shirt
Shoes
Shotgun
Smoker
Stove
Sweater
Tablet
Television
Tie
Towels
Washer
Wine
Download Puzzle Solutions Here
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 33
More Screenshot Showcase
Posted by Crow, November 24, 2015, running KDE.
Posted by Mr. Minion~Kevin-Hertz, November 20, 2015, running KDE.
Posted by Meemaw, November 9, 2015, running Xfce.
Posted by Orion, November 20, 2015, running Xfce.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 34
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