TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design

TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
TIBCO iProcess® Modeler
Basic Design
Software Release 11.5
April 2015
Two-Second Advantage®
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| iii
Contents
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .vii
Related Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Documentation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Other TIBCO Product Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Typographical Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x
Connecting with TIBCO Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
How to Join TIBCOmmunity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
How to Access TIBCO Documentation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
How to Contact TIBCO Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Chapter 1 Defining a Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Placing Procedure Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Selecting Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Editing Objects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Linking Procedure Objects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
A Normal Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
A Withdraw Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
A Deadline Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
A Deadline Withdraw Link. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Routing the Business Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Assigning Addressees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Single-User Addressees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Multiple User or Group Addressees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Defining Step Status Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Enabling Steps to be Forwarded. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Enabling the Contents of a Form to be Copied. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Stop Work Items Being Deleted on Withdraw. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Preventing a Case from Being Suspended. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Chapter 2 Creating Fields and Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
About iProcess Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
What are Single Instance Fields? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
What are Array Fields? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
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Defining Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Creating a Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inserting Fields into Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Marked Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining Field Help. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Embedded and Ampersanded Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Marking Application Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing Fields From Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Conditional Text to Dynamically Change a Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inserting a Use File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Form Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Your Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Form Type of a Step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21
21
23
23
24
27
31
31
33
34
35
35
Chapter 3 Controlling Data Input On Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Using Field Validations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Copying Field Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Using Field Calculations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Conditional Calculations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calculating Text Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calculating the Case Description. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
41
43
44
44
Using Delimiters and Key Words. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Using iProcess Tables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Defining a Table Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Marking Table Fields in your Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Chapter 4 Using Deadlines in Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Defining a Deadline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Drawing the Deadline Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Using Deadlines on a Sub-Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Dynamically Recalculating Deadlines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Chapter 5 Using Conditional Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Defining a Conditional Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Chapter 6 Withdrawing Steps From the Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Example of Using a Withdraw Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Defining a Withdraw Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Defining a Deadline Withdraw Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Defining a Withdraw Action on a Sub-Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
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Chapter 7 Defining Waits in the Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
Example of Using a Wait . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Defining a Wait Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
How the iProcess Engine Processes Waits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Viewing Step Status on the TIBCO iProcess Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Using Waits in Loops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Using Waits with Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Using Waits with Withdraw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Chapter 8 Making Procedures Easier to Follow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
Setting TIBCO iProcess Modeler Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Using Swim Lanes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Enabling Swim Lanes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Swapping Between Swim Lane Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Configuring Swim Lanes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Changing Step Icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Annotating Procedures for Clarity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Changing the Object Label Position. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Working with Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Setting Link Labels and Icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Changing Link Styles and Animation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Using Routers to Simplify Visual Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Using Complex Routers to Simplify Procedure Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Using GOTOSTEP to Simplify the Procedure Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Zooming In and Out of a Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Changing Procedure Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Using the Snap-To Grid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Saving a Procedure as an Image. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Chapter 9 Customizing the Process Step Definer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Colors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Select Font. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Dynamic Scroll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Show Field Names. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Line Length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Tabs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Nesting Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
vi
| Contents
Appendix A Troubleshooting Procedure Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
An Under Construction Symbol Appears on a Step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Changing the Currency Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
| vii
Preface
This guide explains and demonstrates the basic principles of procedure design
using a combination of the following products:
•
TIBCO iProcess® Workspace (Windows)
•
TIBCO iProcess Modeler
•
Related Documentation, page viii
•
Typographical Conventions, page x
•
Connecting with TIBCO Resources, page xiii
Topics
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
viii
| Related Documentation
Related Documentation
This section lists documentation resources you may find useful.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Documentation
The following documents form the TIBCO TIBCO iProcess Modeler and TIBCO
iProcess Workspace (Windows) documentation set, which are supplied with the
TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows) software:
•
TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows) Installation Read this manual for
instructions on site preparation and installation.
•
TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows) Release Notes Read the release notes for a
list of new and changed features. This document also contains lists of known
issues and closed issues for this release.
•
TIBCO iProcess Suite Documentation This documentation set contains all the
manuals for TIBCO TIBCO iProcess Modeler, TIBCO iProcess® Workspace
(Windows), and other TIBCO products in TIBCO iProcess® Suite. The
manuals for TIBCO TIBCO iProcess Modeler and TIBCO iProcess Workspace
(Windows) are as follows:
— TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows) User’s Guide
— TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
— TIBCO iProcess Modeler Procedure Management
— TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
— TIBCO iProcess Modeler Advanced Design
— TIBCO iProcess Modeler Integration Techniques
— TIBCO iProcess Expressions and Functions Reference Guide
— TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows) Manager’s Guide
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
Preface ix
|
If you are new to iProcess procedure development, you are advised to follow the
reading path shown next. The documentation road map shows the relationships
between the books and online references in this product’s documentation set.
Getting
Started
Procedure
Management
Advanced
Design
Legend
PDF
Basic Design
Integration
Techniques
HTML
Eclipse help
Eclipse cheat sheet
Other TIBCO Product Documentation
You may find it useful to read the documentation for the following TIBCO
products:
•
TIBCO ActiveMatrix BusinessWorks™
•
TIBCO Business Studio™
•
TIBCO Enterprise Message Service™
•
TIBCO Hawk®
•
TIBCO Rendezvous®
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
x
| Typographical Conventions
Typographical Conventions
The following typographical conventions are used in this manual.
Table 1 General Typographical Conventions
Convention
Use
SWDIR
TIBCO iProcess Engine installs into a directory. This directory is referenced in
documentation as SWDIR. The value of SWDIR depends on the operating system.
For example,
•
on a Windows server (on the C: drive)
if SWDIR is set to the C:\swserver\staffw_nod1 directory, then the full path
to the swutil command is in the C:\swserver\staffw_nod1\bin\swutil
directory.
•
on a UNIX or Linux server
if SWDIR is set to the /swserver/staffw_nod1 directory, then the full path to
the swutil command is in the /swserver/staffw_nod1/bin/swutil
directory or the $SWDIR/bin/swutil directory.
Note: On a UNIX or Linux system, the environment variable $SWDIR should
be set to point to the iProcess system directory for the root and swadmin users.
code font
Code font identifies commands, code examples, filenames, pathnames, and
output displayed in a command window. For example:
Use MyCommand to start the foo process.
bold code
font
Bold code font is used in the following ways:
•
In procedures, to indicate what a user types. For example: Type admin.
•
In large code samples, to indicate the parts of the sample that are of
particular interest.
•
In command syntax, to indicate the default parameter for a command. For
example, if no parameter is specified, MyCommand is enabled:
MyCommand [enable | disable]
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
Preface xi
|
Table 1 General Typographical Conventions (Cont?)
Convention
Use
italic font
Italic font is used in the following ways:
Key
combinations
•
To indicate a document title. For example: See TIBCO ActiveMatrix
BusinessWorks Concepts.
•
To introduce new terms. For example: A portal page may contain several
portlets. Portlets are mini-applications that run in a portal.
•
To indicate a variable in a command or code syntax that you must replace.
For example: MyCommand PathName
Key name separated by a plus sign indicate keys pressed simultaneously. For
example: Ctrl+C.
Key names separated by a comma and space indicate keys pressed one after the
other. For example: Esc, Ctrl+Q.
The note icon indicates information that is of special interest or importance, for
example, an additional action required only in certain circumstances.
The tip icon indicates an idea that could be useful, for example, a way to apply
the information provided in the current section to achieve a specific result.
The warning icon indicates the potential for a damaging situation, for example,
data loss or corruption if certain steps are taken or not taken.
Table 2 Syntax Typographical Conventions
Convention
Use
[ ]
An optional item in a command or code syntax.
For example:
MyCommand [optional_parameter] required_parameter
|
A logical OR that separates multiple items of which only one may be chosen.
For example, you can select only one of the following parameters:
MyCommand param1 | param2 | param3
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
xii
| Typographical Conventions
Table 2 Syntax Typographical Conventions (Cont?)
Convention
Use
{ }
A logical group of items in a command. Other syntax notations may appear
within each logical group.
For example, the following command requires two parameters, which can be
either the pair param1 and param2, or the pair param3 and param4.
MyCommand {param1 param2} | {param3 param4}
In the next example, the command requires two parameters. The first parameter
can be either param1 or param2 and the second can be either param3 or param4:
MyCommand {param1 | param2} {param3 | param4}
In the next example, the command can accept either two or three parameters.
The first parameter must be param1. You can optionally include param2 as the
second parameter. And the last parameter is either param3 or param4.
MyCommand param1 [param2] {param3 | param4}
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
Preface xiii
|
Connecting with TIBCO Resources
How to Join TIBCOmmunity
TIBCOmmunity is an online destination for TIBCO customers, partners, and
resident experts. It is a place to share and access the collective experience of the
TIBCO community. TIBCOmmunity offers forums, blogs, and access to a variety
of resources. To register, go to http://www.tibcommunity.com.
How to Access TIBCO Documentation
You can access TIBCO documentation here:
http://docs.tibco.com
How to Contact TIBCO Support
For comments or problems with this manual or the software it addresses, contact
TIBCO Support as follows:
•
For an overview of TIBCO Support, and information about getting started
with TIBCO Support, visit this site:
http://www.tibco.com/services/support
•
If you already have a valid maintenance or support contract, visit this site:
https://support.tibco.com
Entry to this site requires a user name and password. If you do not have a user
name, you can request one.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
xiv
| Connecting with TIBCO Resources
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
|1
Chapter 1
Defining a Procedure
This chapter describes the different types of procedure objects you can use to
define your procedure and how to link them together. Each procedure object
performs a specific task such as displaying a form for a user to fill out or updating
information on an external system.
Topics
•
Placing Procedure Objects, page 2
•
Selecting Objects, page 5
•
Editing Objects, page 6
•
Linking Procedure Objects, page 7
•
Routing the Business Process, page 9
•
Defining Step Status Options, page 13
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
2
| Chapter 1
Defining a Procedure
Placing Procedure Objects
The TIBCO iProcess Modeler Tool Bar shows the different objects that are
available to the procedure definer. These are:
Object
Description
Pointer
This is the default tool. It is used to select
objects that have been added to a procedure.
After selecting, they can be moved or deleted.
Double-clicking an object in a procedure with
the pointer tool displays the Step Definition
dialog.
Router
The router is used when you want a line to
follow a particular route between two objects
to improve clarity. When drawing a line
between two objects, right-click to place a
router at the cursor position. There is no
toolbar icon for the router.
Complex
Router
The complex router is a modeling object used
to simplify complicated procedures. There are
several ways of using the complex router. For
more information see Using Complex Routers
to Simplify Procedure Logic on page 107.
Step
The Step is the most frequently used object. It
allows you to define a step to display, specify
an addressee to whom the step should be sent,
and optionally a deadline by which the step
(work item) must be completed.
Script
Scripts can be created and run from the
business process definition. See “Using
Scripts” in TIBCO iProcess Modeler- Advanced
Design guide for more information about
creating scripts.
Event
Events enable the flow of a case to be
controlled and the data associated with it to be
changed, externally to iProcess. For more
information, see “Using Events” in the TIBCO
iProcess Modeler - Integration Techniques guide.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
Placing Procedure Objects 3
|
Object
Description
Condition
A condition is a decision point in the business
process. For example, in a form where
approval has to be given or refused, the
approval field can be interrogated and the
business process will branch depending on
the value of the field. For more information,
see Defining a Conditional Action on page 60.
Wait
A wait is a synchronization point in a business
process where parallel paths join together
again. For more information, see Defining a
Wait Action on page 71.
Stop
A stop indicates the end of that branch of the
procedure, or the end of a branch of the
procedure. It is optional but does help to
clarify the business process definition in the
iProcess Modeler.
Annotation
Selecting this object enables you to enter text
to document your procedure.
Subprocedure
The sub-procedure tool allows you to specify
a call to a new or existing sub-procedure. For
more information, see “Defining a Call to a
Static Sub-Procedure” in the TIBCO iProcess
Modeler - Advanced Design guide.
Dynamic
Sub-procedure
The dynamic sub-procedure tool is used to
specify a call to one or more sub-procedures.
The sub-procedures that are run are only
determined when a case of the procedure is
run.
For more information, see “Defining a
Dynamic Call to Multiple Sub-Procedures” in
the TIBCO iProcess Modeler - Advanced Design
guide.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
4
| Chapter 1
Defining a Procedure
Object
Description
Graft
The graft tool is used when you want to start
sub-procedures from an external application
and attach them to the main procedure.
For more information, see the TIBCO iProcess
Modeler - Integration Techniques guide.
EIS Report
The EIS Report allows you to define a report
based on the field values held in the cases of
your procedure. See TIBCO iProcess Workspace
(Windows) Manager’s Guide for more
information.
Start
The Start object is not on the tool bar but is
always present when you open the TIBCO
iProcess Modeler. It indicates the start of the
procedure.
EAI Step
The Enterprise Application Integration (EAI)
step enables you to interact with third party
software systems such as relational databases
or legacy systems. Different types of EAI step
are used to interact with specific applications,
for example, the SQL EAI step is used to
interact with a SQL Server. Refer to “Using
EAI Steps” in the TIBCO iProcess Modeler Integration Techniques guide for more
information.
Align
The Align horizontal tool horizontally aligns
all selected objects with the currently focused
object.
Horizontal
Align
Vertical
Layout
Procedure
Snap
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
The Align vertical tool vertically aligns all
selected objects with the currently focused
object.
The Layout Procedure tool changes the chart
orientation from left-to-right to top-down.
The Snap tool snaps the selected objects to the
nearest grid square.
Selecting Objects 5
|
Selecting Objects
You can click an object with the pointer tool to select a single object. To select
multiple objects, lasso the objects by clicking and dragging the cursor over the
objects. You can also select multiple objects using the CTRL key. Click an object,
then hold the CTRL key while you click the next object. Both objects are selected.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
6
| Chapter 1
Defining a Procedure
Editing Objects
The following table contains a list of edit commands and descriptions.
Command
Description
Copy
Select one or more objects in the procedure and click
or
Edit > Copy. The selected items are copied to the clipboard.
Cut
Select one or more objects in the procedure and click
Edit > Cut. The selected items are removed from the
procedure and placed on the clipboard.
Paste
After selecting the items and clicking
or
, click
,
then click the target location in a procedure and the selected
items are pasted. To cancel the Paste operation, press Escape.
Depending on the number of steps being pasted and the type
of conflicts that occur, a Wizard might be displayed to guide
you through the Paste operation.
Move
Select one or more objects in the procedure and drag the
selected objects to the new location within the procedure. To
cancel the Move operation, press Escape.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
or
Linking Procedure Objects 7
|
Linking Procedure Objects
The link tool is automatically selected when you move the cursor near an object
that supports links. To cancel a link operation, press Escape.
The way in which you link procedure objects dictates the action that is carried out
in a procedure flow. In some circumstances, you might want a procedure map to
flow from right-to-left or top-to-bottom instead of the default flow of left-to-right.
In a horizontal (left-to-right) procedure flow (unless the object side is already
used for a different purpose):
•
A release action link can be started from the right or left side of an object.
•
A deadline action link can be started from the bottom or top of an object.
•
A process step link can be ended on the left or right side of an object.
•
A withdraw step link can be ended on the top or bottom of an object.
In a vertical (top-to-bottom) procedure flow (unless the object side is already used
for a different purpose):
•
A release action link can be started from the bottom or top of an object.
•
A deadline action link can be started from the right or left of an object.
•
A process step link can be ended on the top or bottom of an object.
•
A withdraw step link can be ended on the left or top of an object.
When you move the cursor to the side of an object, the default link action appears
as a tool tip (after a short delay). To override the default, press the ALT key. When
ending a link, you can override the default end-of-link type by pressing the
SHIFT key.
Each type of link is described fully in the following sections. See Working with
Links on page 101 for more information.
A Normal Link
In a normal link, the second step is an action that is carried out when the first step
is released.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
8
| Chapter 1
Defining a Procedure
A Withdraw Link
A withdraw link means that the step being connected to will be withdrawn from
the work queue. For example, you might have two steps that are sent out in
parallel but only one needs to be actioned and released. In that instance you can
use a withdraw link to withdraw the second, now superfluous, step. See Defining
a Withdraw Action on page 65 for more information.
A Deadline Link
When you have a step that a user must release by a certain date and time or
within a specific time period, you can put a deadline on the step so that another
action (step) is carried out if the deadline expires. See Defining a Deadline on
page 52.
A Deadline Withdraw Link
Combining a deadline and a withdraw link allows you to withdraw a step when a
deadline expires.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
Routing the Business Process 9
|
Routing the Business Process
Routing the business process tasks is achieved by the use of addressees. There are
different types of addressees that you can use to route the business process.
Every step that is to be delivered to a work queue must have an addressee. The
addressee is the user who is responsible for completing the work item.
Assigning Addressees
For a detailed explanation of how to assign an addressee to a step, see the TIBCO
iProcess Modeler - Getting Started guide.
Single-User Addressees
A step can have a single addressee.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
10
| Chapter 1
Defining a Procedure
If you want a step to go to one specific user, enter a user name in the Users
column. To see a list of all users on your iProcess installation, click List Users.
Highlight the user(s) you want to add to the list of addressees and click Add to
List. An alternative is to use the special assignment of sw_starter. This will route a
work item to the user who started that particular case.
Users must have been previously added to the iProcess installation. You can do
this using the User Manager in the TIBCO iProcess Administrator. For more
information, see “Managing iProcess Users” in TIBCO iProcess Workspace
(Windows) Manager’s Guide.
Multiple User or Group Addressees
If you have a step that you want to send to more than one user, you can either use
groups or multiple users.
Like users, groups must have been previously added to the iProcess installation.
For multiple users, enter all the user names in the Users column. A copy of the
step will be sent to each user listed. This can be a useful way of sending the same
information to a number of people. Each user is responsible for releasing their
copy of the work item and the procedure will only progress when all users have
released the work item.
Alternatively, a group can be entered in the Users column and the work item will
be sent to that group queue. For details on how to set up a group, see “Managing
Groups” in TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows) Manager’s Guide. When a work
item goes to a group queue, any member of the group may open the work item,
complete any input fields and release it. When the work item is open, it appears
as a grayed out entry in the group queue of the other group members who are
prevented from opening the item. Once the work item is released, it disappears
from the other members’ group queues.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
Routing the Business Process 11
|
Roles
A role is a job title or function and is unique to a particular user or group. A step
can be addressed to a role as shown in the following example. Multiple roles can
be entered in the Roles column.
It is often better to specify a role rather than a particular user name so that if a
user leaves the company or is promoted, it is not necessary to amend the
procedure as the work items will automatically be sent to the new user who holds
that role. For information on how to assign roles to users, see “Managing Roles”
in TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows) Manager’s Guide.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
12
| Chapter 1
Defining a Procedure
Fields
You can incorporate a field into your procedure so that the name of a user, group
or role can be entered into the field at run time. That field can then be used as an
addressee in subsequent steps to decide the routing of the business process. As for
users and roles, multiple fields can be entered in the Fields column.
This is called dynamic routing, or variable addressees, as it gives you the
flexibility to route a step based on case data instead of using hard-coded
addressees.
A field can contain a comma-separated list of addressees.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
Defining Step Status Options 13
|
Defining Step Status Options
The following sections describe the step status options you can configure for each
step in your procedure:
•
Enabling Steps to be Forwarded on page 13
•
Enabling the Contents of a Form to be Copied on page 13
•
Stop Work Items Being Deleted on Withdraw on page 14
•
Preventing a Case from Being Suspended on page 14.
•
Using Form Commands on page 34.
Information about setting the step priority is described in “Setting Priority at Step
Level” in the TIBCO iProcess Modeler - Advanced Design guide.
Enabling Steps to be Forwarded
If you want to enable users to forward a step to other users, you need to enable
the Forward permission for that step:
1. Right-click the Step and click Status.
2. In the Permissions group box, click Forward. Click OK.
When the Forward permission is checked, the user who receives this work item in
their queue may forward it to another user. See “Forwarding Work Items from a
Queue” in TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows) User’s Guide and TIBCO iProcess
Workspace (Windows) Manager’s Guide for more information on forwarding work
items, and the QSUPERVISOR and USERFLAG attributes that need to be used to
define the correct user permissions.
Enabling the Contents of a Form to be Copied
If you want to enable users to copy the entire contents of a form for a work item
they receive, you need to enable the Edit permission for the step:
1. Right-click the Step and click Status.
2. In the Permissions group box, click Edit. Click OK.
Users can then copy the form contents (including field data) by choosing Copy
All from the Form Edit menu.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
14
| Chapter 1
Defining a Procedure
Stop Work Items Being Deleted on Withdraw
Select the Don’t delete work items on withdraw option. If this option is selected,
and the deadline on an outstanding step expires or it is withdrawn as an action
(release or deadline expire) of another step:
•
the deadline actions are processed.
•
the step remains outstanding (the step remains in the work queue or the
sub-procedure case is not purged).
•
when the step is released (or the sub-procedure case completes) the normal
release actions are not processed but the case field data associated with the
release step (e.g. the field values set in a normal step whilst in a work queue or
the output parameters of a sub-case) is applied to the main case data.
Preventing a Case from Being Suspended
The Ignore Case Suspend check box determines whether or not the step is still
processed when a case is suspended by an iProcess Objects or SAL application:
•
If Ignore Case Suspend is not checked (the default option), the step is not
processed while the case is suspended. This means that:
— work items generated by the step are marked as unavailable and cannot be
opened (until the case is re-activated).
— deadlines on work items generated by the step are not processed. The date
and time at which deadlines are due is not affected, and deadlines continue
to expire. However, no actions are processed when a deadline expires.
When the case is re-activated, any expired deadlines are immediately
processed.
•
If Ignore Case Suspend is checked, the step is still processed as normal while
the case is suspended. This means that:
— work items generated by the step can still be opened.
— deadlines on work items generated by the step are still processed.
Cases can only be suspended and re-activated from an iProcess Objects or SAL
application. Audit trail messages indicate whether a case is active or suspended. Refer to
the iProcess Objects documentation for more information about suspending cases.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
| 15
Chapter 2
Creating Fields and Forms
This chapter describes how to use and create fields in iProcess and then use the
Process Step Definer to create forms.
Topics
•
About iProcess Fields, page 16
•
Defining Fields, page 18
•
Creating a Form, page 21
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
16
| Chapter 2
Creating Fields and Forms
About iProcess Fields
Fields are used in iProcess to store business data related to a case of a procedure
such as customer names, order values and stock items. The data can be
manipulated by iProcess as the case progresses - for example, adding fields
together to get a total price of an order or concatenating the contents of a surname
field and a forename field.
There are a number of iProcess system fields already defined (such as
SW_STARTER and SW_CASEDESC) but you need to create fields that are
relevant to the information you need to capture in your process. For example, if
you are capturing order details, you will need to create fields for the customer’s
name, account number, delivery address, order value, and so on.
These fields can be added to a form which the user completes when they receive
the work item in their work queue. After releasing the work item, the data stored
in the field is saved.
There are two types of field you can use: single instance or array. A single instance
field is a field that contains just one element of data - for example, a name. An
array field can contain multiple elements of data - for example, 10 names.
What are Single Instance Fields?
For the majority of fields you create, you will use single instance fields. This
means that just one data element will be stored in the field. For example, in a field
that you have defined called CUSTNAME, a name of Jane Doe could be stored in
one case. You can use expressions and functions to manipulate field data, for
example, concatenating data or summing totals.
What are Array Fields?
Array fields are defined in the same way as single instance fields but they enable
you to store more than one piece of data in them. For example, an array field
called CUSTNAME could store the names of several customers instead of just
one.
When using dynamic sub-procedure calls and graft steps, you need to use array
fields to provide the multiple data elements required for each sub-case that will be
started. For example, you might have a procedure in which a separate
sub-procedure needs to be run for each type of account the customer has. During
a case of the procedure, the customer indicates that they have three accounts so
the ACCOUNT array field will be populated with the names of the three
accounts.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
About iProcess Fields 17
|
If a dynamic sub-procedure call has been defined so that one sub-procedure is run
for each account that a user holds, three sub-cases will be started. Each sub-case is
passed a unique account number from the ACCOUNT array field.
Refer to “Using Array Fields” in the TIBCO iProcess Modeler - Advanced Design
guide for more detailed information about array fields.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
18
| Chapter 2
Creating Fields and Forms
Defining Fields
A field must be defined before you can use it in forms, scripts, EAI steps, etc. You
can either define your fields from the TIBCO iProcess Modeler before creating
individual steps in your procedure, or you can create fields as you need them
when creating forms. To define a field:
1. Click Field > Definition in the TIBCO iProcess Modeler (or Field > Define
from the Process Step Definer).
The Field Definition dialog is displayed showing the Single Instance tab.
To define single instance fields, continue to step 2. To define array fields, click
the Array tab before continuing to step 2.
2. In the Field Name box, enter a name for the field. Please note the following:
— Field names can be up to 15 characters long and can contain letters, digits
and underscore characters but they must start with a letter. Field names are
converted to uppercase irrespective of how they are originally entered.
— Array field names can be up to 8 characters. When you set the length value
this determines the length for each array element. Refer to “Using Array
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Defining Fields 19
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Fields” in the TIBCO iProcess Modeler - Advanced Design guide for more
information about using arrays.
— Do not create a field with the same name as a system field (e.g.
SW_CASEREF). iProcess does not allow you to select the new field or use
it in your form as it will always default to the original system field.
It is not possible to change an existing field between single instance and array.
3. Select a Field Type. The available options are:
Field Type
Description
Text
Any characters can be entered up to the
length you select (maximum 255
characters).
Numeric
Any number, positive or negative, up to
the length and number of decimals you
select (maximum length 18 including
decimals, decimal point and sign, with no
more than 8 decimals).
Comma
Separated
Numeric
As numeric but iProcess automatically
displays commas to separate the
thousands, for example 1,234,567.89.
Date
A date, defaulting to the format
dd/mm/yyyy although this can be
changed by your iProcess Administrator.
CAUTION - You must make changes to
the date format before cases are started.
Doing so while the system has live case
data will corrupt the data.
Time
A time (24 hour clock) in the format
hh:mm
Memo
Large amounts of text (stored in a
separate file).
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Field Type
Description
Composite
The field refers to an iProcess Table, which
is selected in the Tables box. (Creating a
composite field creates an instance of that
table’s record definition within the
procedure, from which table sub-fields
can be accessed.)
4. If you want to change the field length, click in the Length box at the bottom of
the window.
5. Click Add. The field details you entered are saved and you can define another
field.
The length of a numeric field includes the decimal point and decimal places,
for example, a length of 8 with 2 decimal places gives us 00000.00.
6. Click OK when you have finished adding fields.
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Creating a Form
You can find detailed information on how to create a basic form in the TIBCO
iProcess Modeler - Getting Started guide.
This section looks in more detail at the functionality available to you as the form
designer, including:
•
inserting fields into forms
•
editing marked fields
•
defining field help
•
using embedded and ampersanded fields
•
application fields
•
removing fields from forms
•
using conditional text
•
inserting use files
•
using form commands
•
editing forms
Inserting Fields into Forms
To insert a field in a form:
1. In the Step Definer, place the cursor where you want the field to appear.
2. Click Field > Insert.
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The Mark Field dialog is displayed.
3. Select the field type you want to use from the Field list.
4. Select the Origin of the field. The origin defines how the field is going to be
used in the form. The origins are:
Origin
Meaning
Required
The user must fill in this field. If a
Required field is not completed the form
cannot be released. In TIBCO iProcess
Workspace (Windows) required fields
appear on the form in red.
Optional
The user can enter information into this
field but does not have to. The form can
be released without an optional field
being filled in. Optional fields appear in
blue (white at run time).
Display
The current value for the field is displayed
in the form but it cannot be changed.
Calculated
A value for the field is calculated and
displayed based on a specified
calculation.
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Origin
Meaning
Hidden
A value is calculated but not displayed in
the form.
Embedded
Displays the value of the field (but not
any remaining spaces up to the length of
the field). This origin is often used in
letters as at run time it appears as part of
the form body rather than a field. See
Using Embedded and Ampersanded
Fields on page 24.
5. Depending on the field origin you have selected, click the following buttons:
— Validations, which allows you to limit the data the user can input for
Required or Optional fields. See Using Field Validations on page 38.
— Calculations, which allows you to define the calculation used to calculate
the value of a Calculated or Hidden field. See Using Field Calculations on
page 41.
— Field Help, which allows you to define help text that the user can display
to help them fill in the field. See Defining Field Help on page 23.
6. If you want to define a command that will run when the field is opened, enter
it in the Command section.
If you also click the Auto Open check box, the command is run automatically
when the user presses ENTER or moves off the field after changing its value.
7. Click OK when you have finished. The field is displayed at the cursor
position.
Editing Marked Fields
To edit a marked field from the Step Definer, do the following:
1. Click Field > Modify or double-click the field box.
The Mark Field dialog is displayed.
2. Make any changes required and click OK.
Defining Field Help
When you add a field that is either Required or Optional you can enter help text
that the user can display for assistance when they are filling in the field.
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1. From the Process Step Definer, click Field > Insert (or Field > Modify if you
have already inserted your field).
2. In the Mark Field dialog, click Field Help.
The Mark Field - Field Help dialog is displayed.
3. Enter your Help text and click OK.
The field is displayed on the form with a Help button
at the end of it. At run
time, the user can click this button to display the Help text.
Using Embedded and Ampersanded Fields
Within your procedure you might want to include a memo to a colleague, or a
letter to a customer or supplier. You might want to include some of the
information that is held in the fields of your procedure, but you don’t want it to
appear as a form. In this circumstance you can use embedded fields.
To use embedded fields in your form:
1. In the Step Definer, click Field > Insert.
2. Select the field and choose an origin of Embedded.
On selecting Embedded, an additional pop-up allows you to select the style
option.
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The options available to you will depend on the field type:
Field Type
Description
Standard
All types: appears like Display but without
padding or justification.
Long
Textual: /L
The following types are available:
Padded: /P
Monetary
Numeric: /M
•
Numeric: 120 is shown as one hundred
and twenty
•
Date: 31/03/2000 is shown as 31st March,
2000
•
Time: 23:30 is shown as 11:30 pm
The following types are available:
•
Text: Left justified
•
Numeric: Right justified
Numeric only: 12.34 is shown as twelve
pounds and thirty four pence (or with
different currency units according to your
system configuration)
See Changing the Currency Unit on page 127
for more information.
Simple
Numeric: /N
Numeric only: 120 is shown as one two zero
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Creating Fields and Forms
As an alternative to marking an embedded field you can type the field name
within ampersands (&). You can use the style options by typing / and the style
abbreviation, for example /P for padded.
In the example above we have three ampersanded fields, customer, date and
item1.
When you re-open the form after saving it you will see that iProcess has
converted any field names you typed in to red field names in square brackets.This
is how embedded fields appear.
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At run time, the form will appear as follows:
In this example, the fields Customer, Date and Item1 contain the values of Mrs
Millard, 3rd June 2001 and Filing Cabinet, which all appear as if they have been
typed directly into the letter.
Marking Application Fields
You use Application Fields when you want the user to be able to launch a
program from within a form. When you mark an Application Field, you specify
the program to be run and the text that will appear on the button. When the user
clicks the button, the program is run.
1. On your form, place the cursor where you want the Application Field to be
displayed.
2. Click Field > Insert Application Field.
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The Mark Application Field dialog is displayed.
3. In the Type of command to run section, choose:
— Application Command Line, if you want to run a program.
— iProcess Expression, if you want to run an iProcess expression or script.
4. In the Command to run dialog, enter the name of the program, iProcess
expression or iProcess script that you want to run.
If you are entering the name of a program, you can:
— Enter a full pathname. The icon that will appear on the button is displayed
to the right of the pathname.
— Enter a simple filename. The program must exist on the Windows search
path.
— Insert an iProcess field value in the command, by entering the field name
in ampersand (&) characters. For example, the command Notepad.exe
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
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&myfile& would, at run time, open the file defined by the value of the
MYFILE field.
— Click
to select a program by browsing through your folders.
This will open the Application Field Command window that enables you
to browse through your computer’s file structure to locate the program you
want to run.
When you have located the program you want to run, click Open and you
are returned to the Mark Application Field dialog.
The path to the program you want to run is displayed in the Command to
run dialog.
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5. You can now enter any Description Text you want displayed on the
application field button so that the user knows which program will be run.
6. Click OK. The Application Field button now appears on your form.
Application Field Button
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Removing Fields From Forms
To remove a field from a form, click on the field and press Delete.
This does not delete the field from the list of defined fields. It only deletes this
particular field marking. If you want to remove a field from the field definition
list, you need to open the Field Definition dialog and delete it from there - see
Inserting Fields into Forms on page 21 for information about the field definition
dialog.
Using Conditional Text to Dynamically Change a Form
You can change how the form appears to the user dynamically, based on the
information that is entered into the fields. For example, on a loan application
form, if the salary of the first applicant is not sufficient for the mortgage
requested, then a second applicant’s details must be entered. At run time, the
section asking for the second applicant details will only be visible if the condition
equates to true.
To enter a text condition on your form:
1. Click Conditions > Insert menu, then click IF.
2. Enter the condition and the label in the dialog box and click OK.
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Any valid expression can be entered. For more information about expressions,
please see “Using Expressions” in TIBCO iProcess Expressions and Functions
Reference Guide.
3. Enter into the form all of the text and fields that you want the user to see if the
expression evaluates to true.
4. You can also enter an ELSE from the Conditions menu if you want to show
alternative text and fields to the user if the condition evaluates to false. The
construct would then look like this:
5. Finally, you must close the condition by choosing ENDIF from the Conditions
menu.
You can nest IF.....ENDIF or IF.....ELSE.....ENDIF conditions one inside the other
up to a maximum of 20 deep.
As nested conditions can become quite complex to follow, you can display the
nesting levels at the side of the Step Definer form. See Nesting Level on page 122
for instructions on how to do this.
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Inserting a Use File
Use files are text files that reside in a specific area on the TIBCO iProcess Engine
and can be read into a form of a procedure whenever and wherever they are
required. This means that the text can be created once in a word processor and
read into as many forms as you like. It also means that the text only needs to be
updated once and the latest version will always be used in the forms which makes
the maintenance of procedures much easier and more cost effective.
To insert a Use File, do the following:
1. From the Step Definer, click Use File > Insert.
2. Choose the file you want from the dialog and click OK.
To add another file to the list displayed, you need to Import it. Click Import and
you can browse through your directory structure for the file you want.
If you want to look at the contents of a file before inserting it into your form,
highlight the file in the list box and click View.
When you have inserted your Use file, it will appear in your form as follows:
At run time the contents of the file are displayed.
Use Files must be ASCII (plain text), can be up to 250 lines in length, and you can
only show fields in the text by using Ampersanded Fields. See Using Embedded
and Ampersanded Fields on page 24.
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Using Form Commands
Form Commands are instructions to iProcess to execute a specific command at a
given point in the procedure. As indicated by their name, Form Commands are
attached to the form and there are three kinds.
Command
Type
Description
Initial
This command is run when the work item
form is opened from the user’s Work Queue.
Keep
This command is run when the form is
returned to the user’s Work Queue.
Release
This command is run when the form is
released.
You define a Form Command in the Step Status dialog.
Select the Step that you want to put a form command on and choose Status from
the Step Definition dialog.
This example has a Release Command specified that calls a third-party
application. An iProcess Command can be any iProcess expression, but will
usually be one of the following:
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
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•
A function call to run an external program (as above), such as SERVERRUN to
run a program on the Server, or WINRUN to run a program on the iProcess
Workspace. See “Functions to Call External Programs” in TIBCO iProcess
Expressions and Functions Reference Guide for more information.
•
A call to an iProcess script in the format CALL (script1). See “Calling Scripts”
in the TIBCO iProcess Modeler - Advanced Design guide and “CALL” in TIBCO
iProcess Expressions and Functions Reference Guide for more information.
•
An assignment expression to give a new value to a field, for example:
FIELD2 := SUBSTR (FIELD1, 1, 2)
This would assign part of FIELD1 to FIELD2 when the command is run. See
“Using Expressions” in TIBCO iProcess Expressions and Functions Reference
Guide for further information on assignment expressions.
Editing Your Form
You can edit text in a form by using the standard Cut, Copy and Paste features.
The selected text can include fields and can be copied either within a form or to
another form window. If you copy the selected text to another application such as
a word processor, any fields will be converted to fieldnames.
Using the Copy All option from the Edit menu enables you to copy the entire
form so that you can paste it into another form either as part of the existing
procedure or a different procedure.
You can copy and paste forms between different procedures. If fields marked in
the source form do not already exist in the destination procedure they are
automatically created. If fields already exist but have conflicting types, a warning
dialog is displayed and the field will not be marked in the copy.
Changing the Form Type of a Step
If you change the form type of an existing step from iProcess Form to Formflow
form (FORMFLOW) or vice versa, then the existing form definition is lost.
To change the form type of a step:
1. Right-click on the step and click Properties. The Step Definition dialog is
displayed.
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2. From the Form Type drop-down list, select a new form type and click OK or
Edit, depending on your requirements. The following warning is displayed:
Click Yes to save the step with a new form type or No to return to the Step
Definition dialog.
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Chapter 3
Controlling Data Input On Forms
This chapter explains how to control data input on your forms.
Topics
•
Using Field Validations, page 38
•
Using Field Calculations, page 41
•
Using Delimiters and Key Words, page 46
•
Using iProcess Tables, page 48
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Using Field Validations
When you define a field that is either Required or Optional, you can enter
validations so that the information the user enters is limited to certain options that
are selected from a drop-down list.
From the Mark Field dialog, choose Validations.
In the example above, two possible values have been entered, “Approved” and
“Declined”.
When a user receives this step in their queue, the form will look like this:
The button next to the field enables you to open and close the drop-down list. Use
the arrow keys to move up and down the list and when the choice you want is
highlighted, press Return to select it.
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Using Field Validations 39
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As well as entering text values (which must be entered in double quotes) in the
Values and Fields column, you can also enter iProcess Expressions or Field
names. Each must equate to the same type as the field, for example, Text or
Numeric. VLDFILE and VLDQUERY functions can be used to add items from an
external database to the list. Special values such as SW_ANYTHING or
SW_BLANK can also be used. See TIBCO iProcess Expressions and Functions
Reference Guide for more information.
In the Lists column you can enter the name of an iProcess list. If you have
imported the sample procedures supplied with iProcess, the list YESNO will have
been defined. Entering this in the Lists column will give you a drop-down list at
run time with the values of YES and NO. Other lists may be defined through the
List Manager in the iProcess Administrator.
Note that the list YESNO will not be present unless you have imported a
procedure that uses it.
If you add a new list or make any changes to existing lists in the TIBCO iProcess
Administrator, you need to log out of iProcess and log back in again before the
changes you have made will be visible in the TIBCO iProcess Modeler.
Each column can contain up to 10 items. If there are entries in both columns, they
will all be displayed in the drop-down list.
If the field that has the validation on it is a composite key field then by entering
the word TABLE in the lists section, a drop-down list of the tables key field values
is displayed at run time. See Using iProcess Tables on page 48 for more
information.
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Copying Field Values
You can copy the value of one field to another by entering the name of a field in
the Values and Fields column of the Validations dialog. The value of the field
appears in a drop-down list at run time. If you enter more than one field, you can
see the values of all of them in the drop-down list and can select from them.
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Using Field Calculations 41
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Using Field Calculations
You can use calculations to determine the value of a field. For example, in an
ordering procedure you might want to calculate the value of all the items ordered.
Or, you might need to calculate the delivery date of an item based on the order
date and the known lead time for that item.
Field calculations are carried out on opening the form and every time a
dependent field is changed.
Self-referential calculated or hidden fields (for example, field1=field1+1) can
be evaluated multiple times. This is because forms are rebuilt several times as a
work item is processed and the calculation is evaluated every time the form is
rebuilt. Therefore, using the example above, this means that 2 could be added to
field1. To overcome this, use self-referential calculated fields in an initial or
release command. This way the calculation is only executed on an initial or
release of the form.
A calculated or hidden field has the option of Calculations instead of Validations.
The calculation is entered in the left column and you can optionally enter a
condition so that the calculation is only carried out if the condition is met, see
Conditional Calculations on page 43.
The following table shows you the operations that can be carried out by iProcess
calculations.
Operation
Definition
+
add (when adding two text fields, the values are
concatenated).
-
subtract
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Operation
Definition
*
multiply
/
divide
^ or **
to the power of
date
To calculate the number of days between two
dates:
DATE1 - DATE2
The following formula can be used in date
calculations:
@days/weeks/months/years@
For example, to add one year to the DATE1 field:
DATE1 + @0/0/0/1@
time
To calculate the number of minutes between two
times:
TIME1 - TIME2
For example, to add 15 minutes to the TIME1
field:
TIME1 + 15
Comparison
operators
Compare the value of one field to another
=
equals
<>
does not equal. For example: DATE1 <> DATE2
<
less than. For example: FIELD1 < FIELD2
>
greater than
<=
less than or equal to
>=
greater than or equal to
()
parentheses
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
Using Field Calculations 43
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Operation
Definition
AND
or
OR
logical operators. For example:
(FIELD1 < FIELD2) AND (DATE1 <> DATE2)
Conditional Calculations
Conditional calculations are ones that are only carried out if a particular condition
is met. The conditions are entered in the right side of the Mark Field Calculations dialog. In the following example, the first calculation is only
performed if the value of the field Quantity is less than 10; if it is greater than or
equal to 10, then the second calculation is performed.
The operators that you can use are:
Operator
Description
=
equal to
<>
not equal to
<
less than
>
greater than
<=
less than or equal to
>=
greater than or equal
to
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Up to five calculations with conditions may be entered. iProcess looks at each in
turn and acts upon the first condition that is met. Any remaining calculations and
conditions are disregarded. The final calculation can be left without a condition so
that if the first 4 conditions fail, the final calculation will be carried out.
If there are no conditions, then only one calculation should be entered.
Calculating Text Fields
It is not just numeric fields that can be calculated: text fields can also be
calculated.
The example below shows how a field calculation can be the sum of two other
fields.
In the form at run time this gives the customer name followed by the customer
reference. For example:
Calculating the Case Description
This method of calculation can also be used to calculate fields such as
sw_casedesc, the case description.
To calculate the case description rather than entering it when you start a case, do
the following:
1. Click Procedure > Status.
2. Click Hidden for Case Description at Start.
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Using Field Calculations 45
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iProcess does not allow a case description to be entered at case start when
Hidden is selected.
3. In the first form of the procedure use Field > Insert to place the sw_casedesc
field on the form (probably as a hidden field) and then add a calculation as
described above.
The calculated case description is displayed for each subsequent work item in the
work queues. It will not initially be available to the first step as the iProcess
Engine will not be updated with the case description until the form is either kept
or released.
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Using Delimiters and Key Words
If you want to compare a field value with a real value, you must enclose the real
value within delimiters appropriate to the field type as shown below:
Field
Type
Delimiters
Example
Numeric
None
NUM = 2
Text
“ “ Quotes
Name = “Fred”
Date
! ! Exclamation marks
Effective_Date>!07/10/99!
Time
# # Hashes
Time = #08:00#
Key words, or system values, are special iProcess words that have particular
values and meanings. These words can be used as fields and are always present in
the Field Definition dialog. The following table details each of the key words.
Key Word
Meaning
SW_CASEDESC
The case description of the current case as entered by
the user starting the procedure or can be calculated,
see Calculating Text Fields on page 44.
SW_CASENUM
The case number of the current case, allocated
sequentially by iProcess.
SW_CASEREF
The case reference number of the current case in the
format x-yy, where x is the number of the procedure
and yy is the number of the case.
SW_DATE
The system date.
SW_HOSTNAME
The name of the host node for the procedure.
SW_NODENAME
The name of the iProcess Engine.
SW_PRODESC
The description of the procedure (up to 24
characters).
SW_PRONAME
The name of the procedure (up to 8 characters).
SW_STEPDESC
The description of the step (up to 24 characters).
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
Using Delimiters and Key Words 47
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Key Word
Meaning
SW_STEPDESC2
An extra value for adding further description about
the current step.
SW_STEPNAME
The name of the step (up to 8 characters).
SW_TIME
The system time on the iProcess Engine.
There are also certain key words that apply just to sub-procedures. These are:
Key Word
Meaning
SW_MAINCASE
The top level procedure’s case number.
SW_MAINPROC
The top level procedure’s name.
SW_MAINHOST
The host where the top level procedure resides.
SW_PARENTCASE
The parent procedure’s case number.
SW_PARENTPROC
The parent procedure’s name.
SW_PARENTHOST
The host where the parent procedure resides.
SW_PARENTREF
Internal information on the parent given in a text
string as follows:
pname^pnum count^ccrnum^step name^step
description^call depth
These fields are read-only and are added to all new sub-procedures. If a main
procedure is changed to a sub-procedure, these fields will be added to the
procedure by the TIBCO iProcess Modeler.
Any of these special iProcess words can be used in your forms by selecting them
in the Mark Field dialog. Alternatively, they can be used to calculate the value of
a field.
In addition, SW_GROUP, SW_USER and SW_STARTER can be used in
conjunction with any of their attributes, for example,
SW_STARTER:DESCRIPTION will give the description of the user who started
the case of the procedure. See “Expressions” in TIBCO iProcess Expressions and
Functions Reference Guide for more information.
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Using iProcess Tables
iProcess tables can be accessed from all procedures and are easily referenced from
the form. iProcess tables should only be used for static information that does not
need to be updated very often. As iProcess tables are not automatically updated
when new data is entered into a form, they are not suitable for uses such as a
customer database.
Structually, iProcess tables are similar to database tables. Table records are
associated with fields, and one key field value serves as a unique identifier for
each record. For example, a user enters a value in the key field. If this value
corresponds to a record in the table, the values of the other fields in the table will
automatically display.
Tables are created and stored on the iProcess Engine. For information on how to
create tables, see “Managing iProcess Tables” in TIBCO iProcess Workspace
(Windows) Manager’s Guide.
To use a table in a form, you must first define it and then mark it.
Defining a Table Field
To define a table field in your form, do the following:
1. Click Field > Define and enter the name you want to call your field.
2. Click Composite for the field type.
3. From the drop-down list of tables, choose the table you require.
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4. Click Add.
Marking Table Fields in your Form
To mark a table field in your form, do the following:
1. Click Field > Insert and choose the table field you want to insert.
The table field you defined will be shown in the list of fields several times,
once for each field in the table, as shown below.
2. Select the field you want, choose the origin and click OK.
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3. In your form, mark the key field in the table and then mark the remaining
table fields as required.
At run time, when the key field is entered, the remaining table fields will
automatically be completed with the values from the table.
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Chapter 4
Using Deadlines in Procedures
Deadlines can be placed on a step to ensure that a work item is completed within
a specified time period. If the deadline expires, the deadline actions will be
processed. Deadlines can, if required, be reset on outstanding work items.
Topics
•
Defining a Deadline, page 52
•
Using Deadlines on a Sub-Procedure, page 55
•
Dynamically Recalculating Deadlines, page 56
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Defining a Deadline
1. From the Step Definition dialog, click Deadlines. You can select a step and
right-click to access the Deadlines tab.
The Deadline tab is displayed.
Choose deadline period or expression
Enter the deadline period here.
2. Select whether your deadline is to be based on a Period, such as 2 weeks, or on
an Expression, then enter the deadline period or expression.
When considering how to define a deadline, you should bear in mind whether
or not the deadline may need to change after the step has been sent out. See
Dynamically Recalculating Deadlines on page 56 for more information.
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If you select Expression, this section will automatically change to allow the
input of the expression, as shown below.
Enter the deadline expression here.
In this example, a date expression has been defined as the date of application
plus two weeks using the formula of @days/weeks/months/years@. The
expression is evaluated at the time the step is sent out. For more information
on expressions, see TIBCO iProcess Expressions and Functions Reference Guide.
If working days are set, and you want the deadline to use them you need to be
aware of the following:
— If you set a time expression or specify a date such as SW_DATE, the
deadline does not take into account working days. For example, if working
days are set to Monday to Friday and you are testing the procedure on a
Sunday, the deadline will be set for Sunday rather than the first working
day (Monday).
— If you specify a Date calculation such as SW_DATE + @0/0/0/0@, the
deadline uses working days and therefore the deadline will be set to
Monday.
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3. (Optional) Select the Withdraw form from queue on expiry check box if you
require the work item with the deadline to be withdrawn from the work
queue when the deadline expires (unless the work item is open at the time of
expiry). The deadline actions will be processed. This feature is often used in
situations where an escalation process is used.
4. (Optional) Enter any deadline conditions required. You can set a deadline to
only take effect if a certain condition is true. For example, a deadline could be
set if the anticipated completion date for the property purchase is less than 4
weeks after the application date. This condition is evaluated when the step is
sent out.
Drawing the Deadline Link
When you have created the step(s) that are to be actioned on expiry of the
deadline you can draw the deadline link(s). The link must be drawn from the
bottom of the first step (S1 in the example below) to the left of the second (S3 in
the example below).
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Using Deadlines on a Sub-Procedure
A deadline can be set on a sub-procedure object in the same way as any other
step. Once the deadline expires, the deadline actions are performed and if
Withdraw form from queue on expiry is selected, then the sub-case (and any
child sub-cases it has initiated) will be closed. In this instance, the output data is
not copied back into the parent procedure’s case data.
CONFIRM
CHECKSTATUS
DISPATCH
REMIND
A deadline set on a call to a sub-procedure will not be seen as a deadline in the
Work Queue Manager for the sub-procedure, as the steps within a sub-procedure
can have their own deadlines.
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Dynamically Recalculating Deadlines
A deadline (with or without a condition) is evaluated and/or calculated when a
work item is sent out. It then remains in force until either the work item is
released or the deadline expires.
In some situations, however, you may want to reset a deadline on a work item
while it is still outstanding. For example, you may have used a deadline to set a
review date for a customer’s case in 6 months’ time, but then for some reason
want to bring that review date forward to 3 months’ time.
You can force the iProcess Engine to re-calculate its deadlines on all outstanding
work items for a case by triggering an event on a particular step of the case. The
event must:
1. update one or more field values used in setting the deadline - either in the
expression that is used to calculate the deadline, or in an expression that is
used to determine whether a deadline is set.
2. set a flag that informs the iProcess Engine that it should recalculate deadlines
for the case.
To trigger such an event, you can use any of the following methods:
•
the SWDIR\bin\swutil EVENT or SWDIR\util\swbatch EVENT
commands. See "Issue an Event" in TIBCO iProcess swutil and swbatch Reference
Guide for more information about these commands.
•
the TRIGGEREVENT function. See TIBCO iProcess Expressions and Functions
Reference Guide for a detailed description of this function.
•
iProcess Objects. See the relevant iProcess Objects Programmer’s Guide and
help system for more information.
When the iProcess Engine detects the event, it recalculates the deadlines on all
outstanding work items, as shown in the following table.
Condition Type
Expression deadline is...
Period deadline is...
No condition
Re-evaluated and set to
the new value.
Not recalculated.
Condition now
evaluates as true
Re-evaluated and set to
the new value.
Calculated as a period from
the original date that the
work item was sent out.
Condition now
evaluates as false
Removed.
Removed.
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You cannot use an event in this way to recalculate a Period deadline that is not
triggered by a condition, because no field values are involved in the deadline’s
calculation. The only way to force a re-calculation of such a deadline is to build
logic into your procedure allowing you to withdraw the step and then resend it
with the new deadline. However, if you do this any changes made to the work
item while it has been in the user’s queue will be lost.
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Chapter 5
Using Conditional Actions
Within most business processes there is a point at which a decision has to be made
and different paths followed depending on the outcome of the decision. For
example, an application for a mortgage is approved or rejected, an item is in stock
or out of stock. A conditional action is the point in the process where the decision
is automatically made by iProcess according to the rules you specify.
Topics
•
Defining a Conditional Action, page 60
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Defining a Conditional Action
To define a conditional action:
1. Click the condition object
from the Toolbar, place it on the TIBCO
iProcess Modeler chart and click.
The Condition Definition dialog appears.
If case prediction is enabled on your procedure, you can use the Predicted
Condition settings. See “Using Case Prediction to Forecast Outstanding Work
Items” in the TIBCO iProcess Modeler - Advanced Design guide for more
information.
2. Enter the condition and click OK.
See TIBCO iProcess Expressions and Functions Reference Guide for more
information on how to enter a valid condition expression.
Any fields that you use in this expression must already be defined.
You will also need to define the step(s) to be actioned if the condition proves
true and those to be actioned if the condition proves false.
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3. Draw a link from the right side of the preceding step to the left side of the
condition object. Then:
— For when the condition evaluates to True, draw a line from the right side of
the condition to the left side of the next step(s) as indicated by the check
mark on the object.
— For actions to be taken when the condition evaluates to False, draw a line
from the bottom of the condition to the left side of the next step(s).
REVIEW
APPROVE
DECLINE
A condition can have more than one action following each of its true and false
branches. A condition can also be directly followed by another condition.
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Chapter 6
Withdrawing Steps From the Procedure
If you have steps that become redundant during the running of a case, you can
define the procedure so that they are withdrawn from the work queues. You do
this by defining a withdraw action on the step. An example of where this can be
used is when you have two steps sent out in parallel, but if one is released, the
other becomes unnecessary and can be withdrawn from the work queue.
Topics
•
Example of Using a Withdraw Action, page 64
•
Defining a Withdraw Action, page 65
•
Defining a Deadline Withdraw Action, page 66
•
Defining a Withdraw Action on a Sub-Procedure, page 67
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Example of Using a Withdraw Action
In the following example, if step S2 is released before S3, then S3 will
automatically be withdrawn from the work queue.
S2
S1
S4
S3
Here there are 2 withdraw actions. If S2 is released first then S3 will be
withdrawn but if S3 is released first then S2 will be withdrawn.
S1
S2
S4
S3
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Defining a Withdraw Action
Draw a link from the right side of the step to the top of the step to be withdrawn.
A message box appears asking you to confirm that you want to define a withdraw
action. Click Yes.
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Defining a Deadline Withdraw Action
Draw a link from the bottom of the step with a deadline to the top of the step to be
withdrawn. A message box appears asking you to confirm that you want to
define a withdraw action. Click Yes.
In the following example, S1 actions S2 and S3. S2 has a deadline on it, which if it
expires, will withdraw S3 and action S4.
S1
S2
S4
S3
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Defining a Withdraw Action on a Sub-Procedure
If a sub-procedure case is withdrawn by the parent procedure case it will be
closed immediately. In the diagram below, if step S2 is released before the
sub-procedure called by SUB1 is completed, then S2 will withdraw SUB1 causing
the sub-procedure case to be terminated prematurely.
S1
S2
S3
SUB1
When a sub-procedure case is terminated prematurely, no data is transferred back
to the parent procedure and if the sub-procedure calls any further
sub-procedures, these will also be closed.
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Chapter 7
Defining Waits in the Procedure
You can insert a wait into your procedure to pause the flow of a case until a
number of steps have finished. You do this by inserting a Wait object on your
procedure. You can use Waits to synchronize multiple concurrent paths within the
procedure. A Wait:
•
begins when the step which precedes it is released. (This is the step which has
a line drawn from its right edge to the Wait object’s left edge.)
•
finishes when the steps which it is waiting for are released or withdrawn.
(These are the steps which have lines drawn from their right edges to the top
or bottom of the Wait object.)
•
must be the only action following a step.
•
Example of Using a Wait, page 70
•
Defining a Wait Action, page 71
Topics
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Example of Using a Wait
In the following example, the Wait begins when step S3 is released, and finishes
when S2 and S4 are also released:
1. When S3 is released, the Wait is processed.
2. The procedure waits until S2 and S4 have also been released.
3. This means that E2 will not be processed until S2, S3 and S4 have been
released.
S4
S1
S2
S3
E2
It is important to realize that the Wait is not processed until S3 is released. If S2 or
S4 are released before S3, E2 is not processed, because the Wait has not yet been
processed.
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Defining a Wait Action
To add a wait to your procedure, do the following:
1. Click the Wait icon
from the SPD Toolbar.
2. Place the Wait object at the appropriate place on your procedure. This
depends on how you require the wait action to work - see:
— Using Waits in Loops on page 72
— Using Waits with Conditions on page 79
— Using Waits with Withdraw on page 80.
How the iProcess Engine Processes Waits
The iProcess Engine maintains its own record of the current status of each step in
an active case. A step can be:
•
Withdrawn. The step has been withdrawn.
•
Outstanding. The step has been sent out to a queue (or external system).
•
Released. The step has been released by a user (or external system).
•
Not Processed. The step has not yet been processed by the server.
The server uses this step status value to control when Waits begin and finish.
Viewing Step Status on the TIBCO iProcess Engine
You can use the following command (on the TIBCO iProcess Engine) to view the
current status of each step in each active case for a procedure:
SWDIR\util\plist -D [nodename] procname
where
•
SWDIR is the iProcess system directory, where the TIBCO iProcess Engine is
installed.
•
nodename is the name of the iProcess Engine node (optional).
•
procname is the name of the procedure (main procedure or sub-procedure) you
want to view.
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The status of each step in each active case for procedure procname is shown. Status
is shown by one of the following characters:
Character
Status
W
Withdrawn
O
Outstanding
R
Released
. (Period)
Not Processed
The following example shows the output of this plist command for the procedure
shown on page 70:
•
Step names are shown vertically.
•
The case number is shown at the beginning of the final line.
•
The status of each step (R for released or O for outstanding) is shown on the
final line under the step name.
A single case (case number 1) is active. S1 and S3 have been released, but S2 and
S4 are Outstanding (in a work queue). Note that E2 has not been processed yet.
C:\swserver\staffw_nod1\util>plist -D waituse3
Diractive Status Listing for procedure: WAITUSE3
Case : $$SSSES
PP12344
AA
NN
II
CC
12
==============
1
: ..ROR.O
Using Waits in Loops
There are many ways of using Waits to control the flow of your procedure. For
example, you can use them in loops,
Consider the example procedure shown below.
•
When step S1 is released, two parallel flows are triggered (step S2 and EAI
step E1, step S3 and EAI step E2).
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
Defining a Wait Action 73
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S1
•
Each flow displays a form and, when the form is released, runs an EAI step.
•
A Wait is triggered when E2 is released. The procedure waits until E1 has also
been released.
•
S4 is then sent out, and asks the user if they want to stop or continue.
•
If the user opts to continue, S1 is sent out again. (The loop can continue in this
way until the user opts to stop.)
S2
S3
E1
E2
S4
Prompt-stop
or continue?
1. Suppose that a case is started and processed through. The user, on S4, chooses
to continue. When the condition is processed, the procedure loops back to S1,
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which has status Outstanding. All other steps still have status Released from
the first pass through.
S1
S2
E1
S3
E2
S4
Prompt-stop
or continue?
Step names are color coded as follows:
•
Released
•
Outstanding
2. The case now runs through the procedure again. When S1 is released, S2 and
S3 are sent out and their status is changed to Outstanding. Note that E1 and E2
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still have status Released, because they have not yet been processed on this second
pass through the procedure.
S1
S2
S3
E1
E2
S4
Prompt-stop
or continue?
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3. If S2 and E1 are processed and released, but S3 is still Outstanding, the
procedure waits. This is because the Wait is not processed until E2 has been
processed and released.
S1
S2
E1
S3
E2
S4
Prompt-stop
or continue?
However, the situation is different if S3 and E2 are processed and released
while S2 is still Outstanding. In this case the Wait is processed when E2 is
released and, although the procedure should wait because E1 has not yet been
processed, E1 still has status Released from the first pass through. Because
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both E1 and E2 have status Released, the Wait is released and S4 is sent out which is not the desired result.
S1
S2
S3
E1
E2
S4
Prompt-stop
or continue?
Using SETSTEPSTATUS to Control the Loop
If you want to use Waits in a loop in this way you should use the
SETSTEPSTATUS function. You do this by inserting an extra, parallel condition
after S4 which uses the following condition expression:
SETSTEPSTATUS(“E1,E2”,0)
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When S4 is released, the condition is processed and the server resets the status of
steps E1 and E2 to Outstanding. This ensures that when S3 is released, the Wait
will process in the desired fashion, and S4 will only be sent out when E1 and E2
have been released.
SETSTEPSTATUS("E1,E2",0)
S1
S2
S3
E1
E2
Step names are color coded as follows:
•
Released
•
Outstanding
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
S4
Prompt-stop
or continue?
Defining a Wait Action 79
|
Using Waits with Conditions
In the following example the intention is that when step S3 is released, the
procedure should wait until either S2 or S4 have been released. However, the Wait
can never be triggered because one of the steps will never be sent out by the
server. Its status will always be Not Processed.
S1
S4
S2
S3
E1
Step names are color coded as follows:
•
Released
Using SETSTEPSTATUS to Control the Wait
You can use the SETSTEPSTATUS function to control the Wait and ensure that it
gets triggered, as follows:
•
Insert a condition after S4, which uses the following condition expression:
SETSTEPSTATUS (“S2”,1)
If S4 is released, this condition is evaluated and the status of S2 is set to
Released. The Wait is therefore triggered and E1 is processed.
•
Insert another condition after S2, which uses the following condition
expression:
SETSTEPSTATUS (“S4”,1)
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If S2 is released, this condition is evaluated and the status of S4 is set to
Released. The Wait is therefore triggered and E1 is processed.
SETSTEPSTATUS (“S2”,1)
S4
S1
S2
SETSTEPSTATUS (“S4”,1)
E1
S3
Using Waits with Withdraw
In the following example it is intended that S4 will be withdrawn after S3 is
released but this doesn’t happen and the step is never withdrawn. This is because
iProcess expects a Wait to be the only action on a step.
S2
S1
S3
S5
S4
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Defining a Wait Action 81
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The solution is to add a complex router R1 between S3 and the Wait. This allows
the Wait to be the only action after the Complex Router and the Withdraw is
actioned correctly.
S2
S1
S3
R1
S5
S4
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Chapter 8
Making Procedures Easier to Follow
A small procedure can be very simple to follow but larger and more complex
procedures are more difficult to read and edit in the TIBCO iProcess Modeler.
This chapter describes some tools and techniques that you can use to make
procedures easier to follow and understand:
Topics
•
Setting TIBCO iProcess Modeler Options, page 84
•
Using Swim Lanes, page 85
•
Changing Step Icons, page 97
•
Annotating Procedures for Clarity, page 98
•
Changing the Object Label Position, page 100
•
Working with Links, page 101
•
Setting Link Labels and Icons, page 102
•
Changing Link Styles and Animation, page 104
•
Using Routers to Simplify Visual Layout, page 106
•
Using Complex Routers to Simplify Procedure Logic, page 107
•
Using GOTOSTEP to Simplify the Procedure Routing, page 110
•
Zooming In and Out of a Procedure, page 111
•
Changing Procedure Orientation, page 112
•
Using the Snap-To Grid, page 113
•
Saving a Procedure as an Image, page 114
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Setting TIBCO iProcess Modeler Options
To view the TIBCO iProcess Modeler options, click Options on the Menu Bar.
In addition to the Printing options described in “Printing a Procedure” in TIBCO
iProcess Modeler - Procedure Management, there are the following options:
•
Display Text. You can choose to display the name, description, extended
description, and/or link labels with objects and links.
•
Link Styles. You can choose the type of link, the line width, and the type of
start and end cap for the link. For more information on links see Working with
Links on page 101, Setting Link Labels and Icons on page 102, and Changing
Link Styles and Animation on page 104.
•
Link Animation. You can choose to animate the links and the speed of the
animation. You can also select the link points (round, arrow, and multiple).
For more information on link animation, see Changing Link Styles and
Animation on page 104.
•
Show Default Icons. iProcess has standard icons it uses for each type of step,
but you can change these icons to something more representative. Selecting
this option will display the default icons and de-selecting the option will
return the display to the changed icons. Showing default icons is not
maintained between TIBCO iProcess Modeler sessions.
•
Confirm Withdraw Connections. Selecting this option displays a
confirmation screen when you draw a withdraw link connection. De-selecting
the option allows you to draw a withdraw link without displaying the
confirmation screen.
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Using Swim Lanes
Swim lanes are a visual tool that enable you to organize how you display your
iProcess Engine procedure objects. Swim lanes can be vertical or horizontal. By
specifying category labels when you create your swim lanes, you can group
procedure objects into categories of your choice.
You can choose whether to use swim lanes or not, depending on your
requirements. This section describes:
•
Enabling Swim Lanes on page 85
•
Swapping Between Swim Lane Types on page 89
•
Configuring Swim Lanes on page 90
Enabling Swim Lanes
To enable swim lanes:
1. From the iProcess Modeler, click Swim Lanes.
2. Select one of the following from the drop-down list:
— None. If you have swim lanes already enabled, you can select None if you
want to disable them.
If you disable swim lanes then the procedure objects are de-categorized.
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— Horizontal. Select Horizontal if you want horizontal swim lanes.
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— Vertical. Select Vertical if you want vertical swim lanes.
3. The Swim-Lane Properties: dialog is displayed.
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The following table describes the properties that you can set for a swim lane.
Property
Description
Label
The name of the category to be used for this swim
lane. The name can be up to 128 characters.
Lane Color
The color to be used for the swim lane.
Text Color
The color to be used for the label text.
Once you have configured the properties of your swim lane, click OK. If you
selected a swim lane type, a single swim lane is created. All the procedure
objects are moved below the new swim lane.
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4. Depending on your requirements, drag and drop your procedure objects to
the swim lane you have just created.
5. To add more swim lanes, see Adding Swim Lanes on page 90.
6. See Configuring How Swim Lanes are Displayed on page 96 for information
on how to configure how your swim lanes are displayed.
Swapping Between Swim Lane Types
Depending on your requirements, you can swap between swim lane types. For
example, you can swap from horizontal to vertical and vice versa.
If you swap between horizontal and vertical swim lane types, the top-down
layout mode is swapped.
If you swap from a swim lane type to no swim lanes:
•
the procedure objects are de-categorized.
•
any extra space around the objects is automatically compressed.
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Configuring Swim Lanes
The following section describes how to edit the swim lanes. It describes:
•
Adding Swim Lanes
•
Creating Child Swim Lanes
•
Selecting Swim Lanes
•
Resizing Swim Lanes
•
Deleting Swim Lanes
•
Editing Swim Lane Properties
•
Configuring How Swim Lanes are Displayed
Adding Swim Lanes
To add a new swim lane:
1. Right-click the header of the chosen swim lane.
Depending on your requirements, select either:
— Insert Swim-Lane Above...
— Insert Swim-Lane Below...
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The Swim-Lane Properties dialog is displayed.
2. See step 3 in Enabling Swim Lanes for information on how to configure the
swim lane properties. Click OK. A new swim lane is inserted.
3. Depending on your requirements, drag and drop your procedure objects to
the swim lane you have just created.
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Creating Child Swim Lanes
You can nest swim lanes within other swim lanes, depending on your
requirements. To do this, create a child swim lane in the swim lane where you
want to nest other swim lanes. To create a child swim lane:
1. Right click the header of the swim lane you want to create a child swim lane
from and select Add Child Swim-Lane.... The Swim-Lane Properties dialog
is displayed.
2. See step 3 in Enabling Swim Lanes for information on how to configure the
swim lane properties.
3. Click OK. The child swim lane is created.
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4. Repeat steps 1 -2 for each child swim lane that you want to create.
5. Depending on your requirements, drag and drop your procedure objects to
the child swim lane(s) you have just created.
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Selecting Swim Lanes
You can select a swim lane or multiple swim lanes, depending on your
requirements, using CTRL + Click. This is useful, for example, if you want to
delete more than one swim lane or you want to highlight particular procedure
objects, as shown below.
You can also select all the procedure objects within a swim lane by right clicking
the header of the swim lane whose procedure objects you want to select and
clicking Select all objects.
To deselect a swim lane(s), press Escape or click on another swim lane.
Resizing Swim Lanes
You can resize a swim lane by dragging the separating lines between the swim
lanes.
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Deleting Swim Lanes
You can only delete a swim lane if it is empty, unless it is the last child swim lane.
If it is the last child swim lane, the parent swim lane inherits the procedure
objects.
To delete a swim lane:
1. Move the procedure objects from the swim lane you want to delete to another
swim lane. This is because you cannot delete a swim lane if it contains
procedure objects.
2. Right click the tab header of the swim lane you want to delete and select
Delete. The swim lane is deleted.
If you are deleting multiple swim lanes, use the Delete key.
Editing Swim Lane Properties
To edit the properties of a swim lane:
1. Right-click the header of the swim lane whose properties you want to change
and select Properties. The Swim-Lane Properties: dialog is displayed.
2. See step 3 in Enabling Swim Lanes for information on how to configure the
swim lane properties.
Configuring How Swim Lanes are Displayed
To configure how your swim lanes are displayed, click Options > Swim Lanes.
You can select one of the following:
•
Plain Style. This is the default option when you enable swim lanes. Select this
if you want to display your swim lanes as squares.
•
Tablet Style. Select this if you want to display your swim lanes as tablets.
•
Border. Select this if you want to display your swim lanes with a border.
•
Color Header Only. Select this if you only want the swim lane header to be
displayed with a color rather than the whole swim lane.
•
Shadow. Select this if you want to display your swim lanes with shadows.
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Changing Step Icons
iProcess has default icons that are used to represent the different types of steps,
but you can change these to other icons. For example, you might want to use a
word processing icon to represent a letter or a database icon where an external
database is being interrogated by iProcess.
To change an icon:
1. Right click on the step you want to change, then click Change Icon.
The Select Object Icon dialog is displayed.
2. Enter the file name containing the icons or click Browse. Choose an icon from
those displayed and click OK.
If you have already changed an icon and want to revert to the original icon, click
Use Default and the default iProcess icon will be displayed.
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Annotating Procedures for Clarity
Annotating your procedures is an easy way to ensure clarity of your procedures.
To add an annotation:
1. Click the annotation tool
your procedure.
and place it in the appropriate position on
2. Enter the text that you want displayed and click OK.
The annotation text appears with the
symbol on your procedure. You can
re-position the annotation text by clicking and dragging the symbol.
Annotation is frequently used alongside Conditional Actions to show the decision
being taken. A Conditional Action can also have an annotation that displays in
the hover pop-up.
Annotation can also be associated with a particular step.
1. Select the required step in your procedure and right click.
2. Click Annotations and enter the information.
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Annotation that is specific to a step is not displayed on the TIBCO iProcess
Modeler procedure layout but can be accessed at any time by right-clicking on the
object.
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Changing the Object Label Position
Text labels for objects display in the following default positions:
Object
Text Label Position
Annotation
Right side. (You cannot reposition annotation text.)
Condition
Since conditions have at least one side that is not
linked, the text label appears on the free side.
Start
No text label.
Elbow
No text label.
Wait
No text label.
All other
objects
Bottom side for left > right layout mode.
Right side for top > down layout mode.
You can override the default text position (except for annotation) by right-clicking
on an object (or selected objects) and selecting Object Label Position, then
selecting the text position. Selecting Automatic uses the text label default
position. To choose which text displays (the object name, description, extended
description, and link labels), select Option > Display Text.
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Working with Links 101
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Working with Links
Links between objects are selectable in their own right, just as objects are
selectable. To select a link, you can click the link or label. To select multiple links,
hold the CTRL key and click the additional links. This leaves the original links
selected while selecting the additional links. Also, if you select a group of objects,
any links between those objects are selected.
To move a link, click the link and drag it to the new position. (Note that moving a
link adds a router to the link.) Press ESC to cancel the move.
To delete a link, select the link and press Delete.
You can right-click a link to access the following popup menu options:
Menu
Option
Description
Link Label
Allows you to edit the link label parameters.
Add Router
Inserts a router at the point the mouse was clicked.
Go To
Source
Selects the source object for the link and brings it into
view (if not currently visible on screen).
Go To
Target
Selects the target object for the link and brings it into
view (if not currently visible on screen).
Reset Link
Styles
Resets the link styles and color to those options
currently selected on the link style toolbar.
Delete Link
Deletes the link without deleting the selected objects.
If you select multiple links (with no objects selected) and right-click a selected
link, a popup menu containing the following menu options appears:
Menu
Option
Description
Link Label
Allows you to edit the link label parameters.
Reset Link
Styles
Resets the link styles and color to those options
currently selected on the link style toolbar.
Delete
Link(s)
Deletes the link without deleting the selected objects.
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Setting Link Labels and Icons
You can assign a label to a link. The link label can consist of text and icons that
identify the link type. The link type icons are:
Icon
Type
Deadline
Condition True
Condition False
Withdraw
The link icon displays on the link line close to the link start point (or end point in
the case of the withdraw link icon). If the object text label is positioned on the
same side as the link, the link icon appears further along the link line to avoid
overlaying the text. You can elect to hide the start and end link type icons using an
option on the Link Label dialog.
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Setting Link Labels and Icons 103
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To access the Link Label dialog, double-click a link or right-click a link and select
the Link Label menu option. The Link Label dialog appears.
The link label description text can be up to 128 characters. The text is truncated (or
not displayed at all) if display space is limited. However, you can hover the cursor
over the link and the full label text displays in a pop-up window.
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Changing Link Styles and Animation
You can select a variety of link styles by using the Link Styles toolbar (or by
selecting Options > Link Styles).
Style
Icon
Description
Convert
Converts the selected links to the styles and
colors currently selected on the toolbar.
Flowchart
Allows horizontal and vertical lines.
Straight
Allows diagonal lines.
Curved
Allows best-fit curved lines through routers.
Line Width
Allows you to select the thickness of the lines
by pixel.
Start-cap
Style
Allows you to select a line start-cap style
from a drop-down list. Your choices are
None, Round, Square, and two arrow styles.
End-cap
Style
Allows you to select a line end-cap style from
a drop-down list. Your choices are None,
Round, Square, and two arrow styles.
Normal
Allows you to set the Normal link color.
Deadline
Allows you to set the Deadline link color.
Condition
Allows you to set the Condition True link
color.
True
Condition
False
Animation
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
Allows you to set the Condition False link
color.
Allows you to turn on/off link animation,
select the type of points (dots or arrows), and
select the animation speed.
Changing Link Styles and Animation 105
|
Changing a link style makes the change only for the selected link. To make the
same changes to all links in a procedure, click
or select Edit > Reset All
Link Styles.
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Using Routers to Simplify Visual Layout
Routers are used to simplify the visual layout of a procedure. Using them allows
you to define the route of the connecting line between two steps. Any number of
routers can be placed anywhere on any type of link to give greater control over
the layout.
When drawing a line between two steps, right-click to place a router at the cursor
position. To add a router to an existing link, right-click the link and select Add
Router or simply click and drag the link.
The following simple example shows first how the line would be automatically
drawn by iProcess and then how it can be displayed when using a router.
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Using Complex Routers to Simplify Procedure Logic 107
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Using Complex Routers to Simplify Procedure Logic
A Complex Router is a step that is hidden to the user at run time and never
appears in a work queue. The iProcess background process releases the Complex
Router and processes its actions without any input from the user.
Complex Routers can be useful in the following situations:
•
To simplify procedure layout. The following is an example:
A conditional action can only have one step leading to it, but it may be that
two or more steps need to use the same condition to decide an action. In the
example below, S1 processes either S2 or S3. Both of these steps process either
S4 or S5. When this happens, the resulting process is difficult to follow.
S1
S2
S4
S5
S3
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Using a Complex Router R1 in this situation makes the process visually
simpler, as you can see below.
S1
S2
R1
S3
•
S4
S5
To make the case number available to the first step.
On the TIBCO iProcess Workspace, when the addressee (or one of the
addressees) of the first step of a procedure is the same as the user starting the
case, the form appears immediately. In this instance, the case number is not
available to the first step as it is assigned by the iProcess background when the
case start is processed and returned to the work queue.
By placing a complex router between the Start object and the first step you can
overcome this problem. iProcess takes the Complex Router as being the first
step, assigns the case number, then processes the next step which is the first
step to be displayed to the user.
•
To provide conditional start steps.
Placing a Complex Router immediately after the Case Start object allows you
to conditionally set the start step, depending on the value of case data. (A
Condition cannot be placed directly after the Case Start object.)
In the following example, as shown by the annotation, STEP1 is actioned if the
case is started by the Manager user. If it is started by another user, STEP2 is
actioned. (Note that STEP1 or STEP2 will be sent to the appropriate queue in
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|
the normal way - the case starter will not receive the form for either when
starting the case.)
SW_STARTER:Name = “Manager”?
S1
S2
Complex Routers cannot have withdraw or deadline actions and do not have
entries in the Audit Trail.
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Using GOTOSTEP to Simplify the Procedure Routing
You can alter the normal flow of your procedure using the GOTOSTEP
expression. For example, if you want to jump to a specific step (perhaps for
exception handling), you can jump directly to an exception handling step rather
than trying to define the necessary workflow layout to do it (which can often get
difficult to interpret).
On release of the current step, you can use GOTOSTEP to jump to another step.
You can choose to process the current step or not. The GOTOSTEP expression has
a flag that can be used to specify if the current workflow processing is continued
or stopped when the workflow jumps to the new step.
For example, if you have a step where a script is run and an exception is raised,
you can use the GOTOSTEP to jump to an exception handling step rather than
trying to define a complicated workflow to handle the various workflow routes.
Using this expression can cut down the amount of workflow “spaghetti” which
can be created when defining a complicated procedure.
For more information and a detailed example about using the GOTOSTEP syntax,
refer to “GOTOSTEP” in TIBCO iProcess Expressions and Functions Reference Guide.
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Zooming In and Out of a Procedure 111
|
Zooming In and Out of a Procedure
For ease of use when viewing a procedure you can zoom in and out or choose a
particular part of a procedure to view.
Task
Menu Option
Toolbar Button
Enlarge the size of the
procedure.
View > Zoom In
Reduce the size of a
procedure.
View > Zoom Out
Set zoom level.
View > Zoom Level
Enlarge a particular section
of a procedure.
View > Map
Use on large procedures to
give you a rectangular box
which you can drag across
your TIBCO iProcess
Modeler window. If you
place it over a particular
section of your procedure
and click, that section is
enlarged.
Display the default size.
View > Normal
Spinning the mouse wheel while pressing CTRL will zoom the view in and out.
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Changing Procedure Orientation
The default orientation for procedures is left-to-right (horizontal). However, for
some procedures, a top-down (vertical) flow makes more sense. The
button
allows you to change the procedure orientation. Changing the orientation swaps
the X and Y coordinates of each object and changes the link sides from right to
bottom and from left to top. It also switches the default object side link types. See
Linking Procedure Objects on page 7 for more information.
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Using the Snap-To Grid 113
|
Using the Snap-To Grid
The snap-to grid function allows you to align objects using a grid. When you
move or place an object, the object is automatically snapped to the center of the
nearest grid square. The following table contains the toolbar icons and a
description of the toolbar functions:
Icon
Description
Displays the snap-to grid.
Allows you to select the size of the
grid.
Snaps the selected object to the
center of the nearest grid square.
If a snap-to grid operation would cause objects to overlap, no objects are moved
and you receive an error message.
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Saving a Procedure as an Image
You can save a procedure map as an image file by clicking Procedure > Save As >
Image. The Save File dialog appears. Specify the location, name, and type (JPEG,
BMP, or PNG) of the output image. Click Save to view the image in the specified
file and format at the current zoom level.
There is a limitation on the size of in-memory bitmaps. If the procedure is very
large in the current zoom level a warning message is displayed. You can decrease
the zoom level to make the view smaller until the size is under the limitation.
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Chapter 9
Customizing the Process Step Definer
The Process Step Definer has a number of setup options that can be changed to
suit your way of working.
Open the Step Definer, click Form > Setup and you have several options, which
are described in this chapter.
Topics
•
Colors, page 116
•
Select Font, page 117
•
Dynamic Scroll, page 118
•
Show Field Names, page 119
•
Line Length, page 120
•
Tabs, page 121
•
Nesting Level, page 122
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Colors
The colors that are used for the text and background in different parts of the form
can be changed through the standard Windows Colors dialog.
Click Change to display the color palette, make your selection and click OK.
Changes are implemented across all procedures and are saved between TIBCO
iProcess Modeler sessions.
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Select Font 117
|
Select Font
Selecting this option takes you to the Font dialog allowing you to select the font
you want and its style and size.
Changes made are per form and are saved between TIBCO iProcess Modeler
sessions.
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Dynamic Scroll
When Dynamic Scroll is on, the contents of the window move as you drag the
scroll bar up or down. When it is off, the contents of the window will not move
until you release the scroll bar.
Click on Dynamic Scroll to select it and a check mark appears to the left of the
list. Click again to de-select it.
This option is per form and is not saved between editing sessions.
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Show Field Names 119
|
Show Field Names
When Show Field names is selected the names of fields appear in the input fields
in the Step Definer as shown below.
Click on Show Field names to select it and a check mark appears to the left of the
list. Click again to de-select it.
This option is set across all procedures and is saved between TIBCO iProcess
Modeler sessions.
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Line Length
Line length allows you to choose how long the lines in your form should be before
they are wrapped.
Enter the line length you want (to a maximum of 128 characters) and click OK.
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Tabs 121
|
Tabs
To change the distance in characters between tabs, select Setup > Tabs. Enter the
distance you want and click OK.
The maximum tab length is 16 characters and the change is implemented across
all procedures and is maintained between TIBCO iProcess Modeler sessions.
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Nesting Level
When you use Conditional Text in your form (see Using Conditional Text to
Dynamically Change a Form on page 31), you can nest up to 20 levels. To make it
easier to follow when working on your form, you can choose to show the nesting
levels either numerically or graphically.
This option is per form and is not saved between TIBCO iProcess Modeler
sessions.
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Nesting Level 123
|
Select Nesting Level from the Setup menu on the form and choose Numeric or
Graphical (or both).
Show the nesting level either graphically, numerically, or both.
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Appendix A
Troubleshooting Procedure Definitions
This appendix describes some typical problems you can encounter when defining
and working with procedures.
Topics
•
An Under Construction Symbol Appears on a Step, page 126
•
Changing the Currency Unit, page 127
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Troubleshooting Procedure Definitions
An Under Construction Symbol Appears on a Step
Problem
One or more steps in your procedure definition show an Under Construction sign
over the step icon.
Description
When defining procedures, you need to be aware that steps need to have a certain
amount of basic information. If this information is not defined, iProcess warns
you by placing an Under Construction sign on the step.
Solution
The following list describes the possible solutions you can try for each step type
where you see a red question mark.
•
For a normal step, select the step and right-click to select Addressees. Make
sure an addressee has been entered for this step.
•
For a Sub-procedure call step, select the step and right-click to select
Sub-Procedure. Make sure a sub-procedure is chosen in the Sub-Procedure
Name field.
•
For a Dynamic Sub-procedure call step, select the step and right-click to
select Dynamic Sub-Procedure. Make sure the Sub-Procedure Name Array
field contains an array field and that all the required input fields are mapped.
•
For an EAI step, select the step and right-click Description. Make sure a valid
script definition has been entered and check that an EAI type has been
selected.
•
For a Wait step, make sure it is connected to 2 or more steps.
•
For a Condition step, select the step and right-click Condition. Enter a valid
condition.
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Changing the Currency Unit 127
|
Changing the Currency Unit
Problem
Description
You need to change the currency unit.
The default currency unit for iProcess is pounds and pence. For different currency
units, you must change the system configuration. The currency unit information
is stored in the SWDIR/etc/ENGLISH.LNG/LONGNUM.FMT file. To change
the currency units, you must change all the references to pounds and pence in the
LONGNUM.FMT file to the currency unit you require. You can, either:
•
Solution 1: Amend the original SWDIR/etc/LONGNUM.FMT file, or
•
Solution 2: Create a copy of the SWDIR/etc/ENGLISH.LNG directory,
rename it to the language whose currency unit you require and amend the
LONGNUM.FMT file in the new SWDIR/etc/language.LNG directory.
The sections below describe the steps to perform for each solution:
Solution 1
Complete the following steps:
1. Create a back up copy of the SWDIR/etc/ENGLISH.LNG directory.
2. Open the SWDIR/etc/ENGLISH.LNG/LONGNUM.FMT file in a text
editor, for example, Textpad.
3. Change all references to pounds and pence in the
SWDIR/etc/ENGLISH.LNG/LONGNUM.FMT file to the currency units
you require.
Solution 2
Complete the following steps:
1. In SWDIR/etc, create a directory named language.LNG where language is the
name of the language whose currency unit you want to use. For example, if
you wanted to change the currency unit to dollars, you could create a
directory called USA.LNG.
2. Copy all the files from the SWDIR/etc/ENGLISH.LNG directory to the
language.LNG directory you have just created.
3. Open the SWDIR/etc/language.LNG/LONGNUM.FMT file in a text editor,
for example, Textpad.
4. Change all references to pounds and pence in the LONGNUM.FMT file to the
currency units you require.
5. Open User Manager in the iProcess Administrator.
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Troubleshooting Procedure Definitions
6. For each user whose currency unit needs to change, change the user
LANGUAGE attribute to the value of the language.lng directory that you
created in step 1. For example, if you created a directory called usa.lng, then
change the LANGUAGE attribute from english to usa.
7. Open Move SysInfo in the iProcess Administrator.
8. Click Move SysInfo to apply the changes.
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Index
A
Action
conditional
defining 60
deadline withdraw, drawing 66
wait, defining 71
withdraw
drawing 65
using on sub-procedure 67
Addressee
group 10
multiple user 10
single user 9
Ampersanded field 24
Annotation 98
Application field, marking 27
Array fields
about 16
defining 18
Assigning addressee 9
C
Calculating
case description 44
deadlines dynamically 56
text field 44
Calculation
conditional 43
field 41
Case
description
calculating 44
ignore suspend flag 14
suspend 14
Changing
colors
in Step Definer 116
dynamic scroll setting, in Step Definer 118
font, in Step Definer 117
step
icons 97
tabs
in Step Definer 121
Colors, changing
in Step Definer 116
Command, form 34
Complex router 107
Condition
using waits with 79
Conditional
action
defining 60
calculations 43
text 31
Conditional actions
using 59
Configuring
Process Step Definer 115
Copy objects 6
Copying field values 40
Copying form contents 13
Creating
form 21
procedure 1
customer support xiii
Cut objects 6
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| Index
D
F
Deadline
defining 52
dynamic recalculation 56
link 8
drawing 54
on sub-procedure 55
withdraw
action, drawing 66
link 8
Defining
conditional action 60
deadline 52
field help 24
fields 18
roles 11
step status options 13
table field 48
wait action 71
waits 69
Deleting
field 31
swim lanes 96
Delimiters 46
Drawing
deadline
link 54
withdraw action 66
withdraw action 65
Dynamic
deadline recalculation 56
scroll setting 118
Field
ampersanded 24
application 27
array 16
calculations 41
defining 18
deleting 31
embedded 24
names, showing in Step Definer 119
table 49
defining 48
text 44
using for dynamic routing 12
validations 38
values, copying 40
Field Definition dialog
Field Length 18
Field Name 18
Field type 18
Tables 18
Font, changing in Step Definer 117
Form
commands 34
creating 21
editing 35
using conditional text to change dynamically 31
Forwarding steps 13
G
GOTOSTEP expression 110
Group addressee 10
E
Editing
form 35
marked fields 23
Editing form
edit permission 13
Embedded field 24
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
H
Horizontal swim lanes 85
Index 131
|
I
N
Icons, step, changing 97
Ignore suspend flag 14
iProcess
iProcess Engine, viewing step status on 71
tables, using 48
Nesting
levels 122
Normal link 7
O
L
Line length 120
Link
deadline 8
withdraw 8, 54
normal 7
withdraw 8
Link icons, setting 102
Link labels, setting 102
Linking
objects 7
Loops
using waits in 72
M
Mark Field - Field Help dialog
Field Help 24
Mark Field dialog
Command 22
Field 22
Origin 22
Marked field
editing 23
Marking 49
application fields 27
table fields 49
Multiple user addressee 10
Object label position, changing 100
Objects
linking 7
types of 2
Options, Process Definer 84
P
Paste objects 6
Placing procedure objects 2
Preventing deletion on withdraw 14
Procedure
creating 1
logic, simplifying with complex routers 107
zooming in and out of 111
Process Definer
options 84
Process routing 9
Process Step Definer
configuring 115
R
Recalculating deadlines dynamically 56
Roles 11
Router
using 106
Routing, process 9
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| Index
S
T
Showing field names in the Step Definer 119
Single instance fields
about 16
Single user addressee 9
Status
step 71
Step
icons 97
status 71
Step Definer 119
colors 116
dynamic scroll setting 118
font 117
tabs 121
using 15, 37
Steps
forwarding 13
withdrawing 63
Sub-procedure
using
deadlines on 55
withdraw action on 67
support, contacting xiii
Suspend case 14, 14
Swim lanes
adding 90
configuring 90
deleting 96
displaying 96
editing properties of 96
enabling 85
nesting 93
resizing 95
selecting 95
swapping between types 89
types of 85
using 85
Table
field
defining 48
marking 49
iProcess 48
Tabs
changing in Step Definer 121
technical support xiii
Text
condition, entering 31
field, calculating 44
Troubleshooting procedures 125
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
U
Under Construction symbol
troubleshooting 126
Use files, inserting 33
Using
ampersanded fields 24
complex routers
to simplify procedure logic 107
conditional actions 59
conditional text 31
deadlines
on a sub-procedure 55
deadlines in a procedure 51
embedded fields 24
field
calculations 41
validations 38
form commands 34
iProcess tables 48
routers 106
Step Definer 15, 37
swim lanes 85
waits
in loops 72
with conditions 79
with withdraws 80
withdraw action on a sub-procedure 67
Index 133
|
Using GOTOSTEP 110
V
Validation, field 38
Vertical swim lanes 85
Viewing
step status
on the TIBCO iProcess Engine 71
W
Wait
action 71
how iProcess processes 71
using
in loop 72
with conditions 79
with withdraws 80
Waits
defining 69
Withdraw
action
drawing 65
using on sub-procedure 67
link 8
using waits with 80
Withdrawing steps 63
Work items 14
Z
Zooming in and out of a procedure 111
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
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