Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches

Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Release
15.1
Modified: 2015-06-28
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Juniper Networks, Inc.
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www.juniper.net
Juniper Networks, Junos, Steel-Belted Radius, NetScreen, and ScreenOS are registered trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. in the United
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Juniper Networks assumes no responsibility for any inaccuracies in this document. Juniper Networks reserves the right to change, modify,
transfer, or otherwise revise this publication without notice.
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
15.1
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
All rights reserved.
The information in this document is current as of the date on the title page.
YEAR 2000 NOTICE
Juniper Networks hardware and software products are Year 2000 compliant. Junos OS has no known time-related limitations through the
year 2038. However, the NTP application is known to have some difficulty in the year 2036.
END USER LICENSE AGREEMENT
The Juniper Networks product that is the subject of this technical documentation consists of (or is intended for use with) Juniper Networks
software. Use of such software is subject to the terms and conditions of the End User License Agreement (“EULA”) posted at
http://www.juniper.net/support/eula.html. By downloading, installing or using such software, you agree to the terms and conditions of
that EULA.
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Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Table of Contents
About the Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
Documentation and Release Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
Supported Platforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
Using the Examples in This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
Merging a Full Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xii
Merging a Snippet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xii
Documentation Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Documentation Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
Requesting Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
Self-Help Online Tools and Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
Opening a Case with JTAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvi
Part 1
Configuring Interfaces
Chapter 1
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces for Increased Throughput
and Link Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Platform Support for Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Configuration Guidelines for Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Load Balancing and Ethernet Link Aggregation Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Configuring an Aggregated Ethernet Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Deleting an Aggregated Ethernet Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Configuring Junos OS for Supporting Aggregated Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Configuring Virtual Links for Aggregated Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Configuring LACP Link Protection at the Chassis Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Enabling LACP Link Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Configuring System Priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Configuring the Maximum Links Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Configuring the Number of Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces on the Device
(Enhanced Layer 2 Software CLI Procedure) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Example: Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Configuring Tagged Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Configuring Untagged Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Minimum Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Configuring the LACP Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Configuring LACP Link Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Configuring LACP System Priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Configuring LACP System Identifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Configuring LACP administrative Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Configuring LACP Port Priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
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Tracing LACP Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
LACP Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Example: Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Monitor Statistics for a Fast Ethernet or Gigabit Ethernet Interface . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Chapter 2
Configuring Targeted Broadcast to Implement Remote Administration
Tasks and Support Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Understanding Targeted Broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Configuring Targeted Broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Configuring Targeted Broadcast and Its Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Display Targeted Broadcast Configuration Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Forward IP Packets On the Egress Interface and To the Routing
Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Forward IP Packets On the Egress Interface Only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Chapter 3
Configuring Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding (RPF) to Prevent IP
Spoofing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Understanding Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Configuring Unicast RPF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Unicast RPF and Default Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Unicast RPF Behavior with a Default Route . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Unicast RPF Behavior Without a Default Route . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Unicast RPF with Routing Asymmetry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Configuring Unicast RPF Strict Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Example: Configuring Unicast RPF Strict Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Configuring Unicast RPF Loose Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Example: Configuring Unicast RPF Loose Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Configuring Unicast RPF Loose Mode with Ability to Discard Packets . . . . . . 35
Example: Configuring Unicast RPF Loose Mode with Ability to Discard
Packets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Configuring Unicast RPF on a VPN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Example: Configuring Unicast RPF on a VPN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Example: Configuring Unicast RPF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Chapter 4
Configuring Multicast RPF to Optimize a Router or Switch’s Multicast
Forwarding State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Understanding Multicast Reverse Path Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
RPF Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Chapter 5
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Understanding Layer 2 Virtual Switches Instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch with a Layer 2 Trunk Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Configuring a Logical Interface for Access Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Configuring VLAN Encapsulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Example: Configuring VLAN Encapsulation on a Gigabit Ethernet
Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Example: Configuring VLAN Encapsulation on an Aggregated Ethernet
Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Rewriting the Inner and Outer VLAN Tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Rewriting the VLAN Tag on Tagged Frames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
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Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Table of Contents
Binding VLAN IDs to Logical Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Binding VLAN IDs to Logical Interfaces Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Binding a VLAN ID to a Logical Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Binding a VLAN ID to a Single-Tag Logical Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Binding a VLAN ID to a Dual-Tag Logical Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Binding a Range of VLAN IDs to a Logical Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Binding a Range of VLAN IDs to a Single-Tag Logical Interface . . . . . . . . 51
Binding a Range of VLAN IDs to a Dual-Tag Logical Interface . . . . . . . . . 51
Example: Binding Ranges VLAN IDs to Logical Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Binding a List of VLAN IDs to a Logical Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Binding a List of VLAN IDs to a Single-Tag Logical Interface . . . . . . . . . . 52
Binding a List of VLAN IDs to a Dual-Tag Logical Interface . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Example: Binding Lists of VLAN IDs to Logical Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Configuring Load Balancing on a LAG Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Example: Configuring Load Balancing on a LAG Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Part 2
Configuration Statements and Operational Commands
Chapter 6
Configuration Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
[edit chassis] Hierarchy Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
[edit dynamic-profiles] Hierarchy Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
[edit forwarding-options rpf-loose-mode-discard] Hierarchy Level . . . . . . . . . . . 69
[edit interfaces] Hierarchy Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
[edit protocols isis] Hierarchy Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Layer 2 Routing Instances Configuration Hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
bandwidth (Interfaces) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
flow-control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
forward-and-send-to-re . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
forward-only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
gratuitous-arp-reply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
group (RPF Selection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
interface (Multichassis Protection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
l2-domain-id-for-l3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
lacp (Aggregated Ethernet) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
layer3-domain-identifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
link-protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
mode (Interfaces) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
multicast-rpf-routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
next-hop (PIM RPF Selection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
no-gratuitous-arp-request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
no-local-switching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
policer (MAC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
prefix-list (PIM RPF Selection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
rpf-check (Dynamic Profiles) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
rpf-check (interfaces) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
rpf-check-policy (Routing Options RPF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
rpf-loose-mode-discard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
rpf-selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
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source (PIM RPF Selection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
targeted-broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
traceoptions (Individual Interfaces) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
unicast-reverse-path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
unidirectional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
vlan-tagging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
wildcard-source (PIM RPF Selection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Chapter 7
Operational Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Common Output Fields Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Damping Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Destination Class Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Enabled Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Filters Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Flags Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Addresses, Flags Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Device Flags Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Family Flags Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Interface Flags Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Link Flags Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Logical Interface Flags Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Label-Switched Interface Traffic Statistics Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Policer Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Protocol Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
RPF Failures Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Source Class Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
clear interfaces statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
show interfaces (10-Gigabit Ethernet) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
show interfaces (Discard) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
show interfaces (Serial) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
show interfaces extensive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
show interfaces queue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
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List of Figures
Part 1
Configuring Interfaces
Chapter 3
Configuring Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding (RPF) to Prevent IP
Spoofing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Figure 1: Unicast RPF with Routing Asymmetry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Chapter 4
Configuring Multicast RPF to Optimize a Router or Switch’s Multicast
Forwarding State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Figure 2: Multicast Routers and the RPF Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
viii
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
List of Tables
About the Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
Table 1: Notice Icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Part 1
Configuring Interfaces
Chapter 1
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces for Increased Throughput
and Link Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Table 3: Platform Support Matrix for Mixed Aggregated Ethernet Bundles . . . . . . . 5
Chapter 5
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Table 4: Configuration Statements Used to Bind VLAN IDs to Logical
Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Part 2
Configuration Statements and Operational Commands
Chapter 7
Operational Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Table 5: show interfaces Gigabit Ethernet Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Table 6: Gigabit Ethernet IQ PIC Traffic and MAC Statistics by Interface Type . . 140
Table 7: Discard show interfaces Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Table 8: show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Table 9: Gigabit Ethernet IQ PIC Traffic and MAC Statistics by Interface Type . . 170
Table 10: show interfaces (Serial) Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Table 11: Layer 2 Overhead and Transmitted Packets or Byte Counts . . . . . . . . . 223
Table 12: show interfaces queue Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Table 13: Byte Count by Interface Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
ix
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
x
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
About the Documentation
•
Documentation and Release Notes on page xi
•
Supported Platforms on page xi
•
Using the Examples in This Manual on page xi
•
Documentation Conventions on page xiii
•
Documentation Feedback on page xv
•
Requesting Technical Support on page xv
Documentation and Release Notes
®
To obtain the most current version of all Juniper Networks technical documentation,
see the product documentation page on the Juniper Networks website at
http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/.
If the information in the latest release notes differs from the information in the
documentation, follow the product Release Notes.
Juniper Networks Books publishes books by Juniper Networks engineers and subject
matter experts. These books go beyond the technical documentation to explore the
nuances of network architecture, deployment, and administration. The current list can
be viewed at http://www.juniper.net/books.
Supported Platforms
For the features described in this document, the following platforms are supported:
•
EX Series
Using the Examples in This Manual
If you want to use the examples in this manual, you can use the load merge or the load
merge relative command. These commands cause the software to merge the incoming
configuration into the current candidate configuration. The example does not become
active until you commit the candidate configuration.
If the example configuration contains the top level of the hierarchy (or multiple
hierarchies), the example is a full example. In this case, use the load merge command.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
xi
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
If the example configuration does not start at the top level of the hierarchy, the example
is a snippet. In this case, use the load merge relative command. These procedures are
described in the following sections.
Merging a Full Example
To merge a full example, follow these steps:
1.
From the HTML or PDF version of the manual, copy a configuration example into a
text file, save the file with a name, and copy the file to a directory on your routing
platform.
For example, copy the following configuration to a file and name the file ex-script.conf.
Copy the ex-script.conf file to the /var/tmp directory on your routing platform.
system {
scripts {
commit {
file ex-script.xsl;
}
}
}
interfaces {
fxp0 {
disable;
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 10.0.0.1/24;
}
}
}
}
2. Merge the contents of the file into your routing platform configuration by issuing the
load merge configuration mode command:
[edit]
user@host# load merge /var/tmp/ex-script.conf
load complete
Merging a Snippet
To merge a snippet, follow these steps:
1.
From the HTML or PDF version of the manual, copy a configuration snippet into a text
file, save the file with a name, and copy the file to a directory on your routing platform.
For example, copy the following snippet to a file and name the file
ex-script-snippet.conf. Copy the ex-script-snippet.conf file to the /var/tmp directory
on your routing platform.
commit {
file ex-script-snippet.xsl; }
2. Move to the hierarchy level that is relevant for this snippet by issuing the following
configuration mode command:
xii
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
About the Documentation
[edit]
user@host# edit system scripts
[edit system scripts]
3. Merge the contents of the file into your routing platform configuration by issuing the
load merge relative configuration mode command:
[edit system scripts]
user@host# load merge relative /var/tmp/ex-script-snippet.conf
load complete
For more information about the load command, see the CLI User Guide.
Documentation Conventions
Table 1 on page xiii defines notice icons used in this guide.
Table 1: Notice Icons
Icon
Meaning
Description
Informational note
Indicates important features or instructions.
Caution
Indicates a situation that might result in loss of data or hardware damage.
Warning
Alerts you to the risk of personal injury or death.
Laser warning
Alerts you to the risk of personal injury from a laser.
Tip
Indicates helpful information.
Best practice
Alerts you to a recommended use or implementation.
Table 2 on page xiii defines the text and syntax conventions used in this guide.
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions
Convention
Description
Examples
Bold text like this
Represents text that you type.
To enter configuration mode, type the
configure command:
user@host> configure
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
xiii
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions (continued)
Convention
Description
Examples
Fixed-width text like this
Represents output that appears on the
terminal screen.
user@host> show chassis alarms
•
Introduces or emphasizes important
new terms.
•
•
Identifies guide names.
A policy term is a named structure
that defines match conditions and
actions.
•
Identifies RFC and Internet draft titles.
•
Junos OS CLI User Guide
•
RFC 1997, BGP Communities Attribute
Italic text like this
Italic text like this
No alarms currently active
Represents variables (options for which
you substitute a value) in commands or
configuration statements.
Configure the machine’s domain name:
Represents names of configuration
statements, commands, files, and
directories; configuration hierarchy levels;
or labels on routing platform
components.
•
To configure a stub area, include the
stub statement at the [edit protocols
ospf area area-id] hierarchy level.
•
The console port is labeled CONSOLE.
< > (angle brackets)
Encloses optional keywords or variables.
stub <default-metric metric>;
| (pipe symbol)
Indicates a choice between the mutually
exclusive keywords or variables on either
side of the symbol. The set of choices is
often enclosed in parentheses for clarity.
broadcast | multicast
# (pound sign)
Indicates a comment specified on the
same line as the configuration statement
to which it applies.
rsvp { # Required for dynamic MPLS only
[ ] (square brackets)
Encloses a variable for which you can
substitute one or more values.
community name members [
community-ids ]
Indention and braces ( { } )
Identifies a level in the configuration
hierarchy.
; (semicolon)
Identifies a leaf statement at a
configuration hierarchy level.
Text like this
[edit]
root@# set system domain-name
domain-name
(string1 | string2 | string3)
[edit]
routing-options {
static {
route default {
nexthop address;
retain;
}
}
}
GUI Conventions
Bold text like this
xiv
Represents graphical user interface (GUI)
items you click or select.
•
In the Logical Interfaces box, select
All Interfaces.
•
To cancel the configuration, click
Cancel.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
About the Documentation
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions (continued)
Convention
Description
Examples
> (bold right angle bracket)
Separates levels in a hierarchy of menu
selections.
In the configuration editor hierarchy,
select Protocols>Ospf.
Documentation Feedback
We encourage you to provide feedback, comments, and suggestions so that we can
improve the documentation. You can provide feedback by using either of the following
methods:
•
Online feedback rating system—On any page at the Juniper Networks Technical
Documentation site at http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/index.html, simply click the
stars to rate the content, and use the pop-up form to provide us with information about
your experience. Alternately, you can use the online feedback form at
https://www.juniper.net/cgi-bin/docbugreport/.
•
E-mail—Send your comments to techpubs-comments@juniper.net. Include the document
or topic name, URL or page number, and software version (if applicable).
Requesting Technical Support
Technical product support is available through the Juniper Networks Technical Assistance
Center (JTAC). If you are a customer with an active J-Care or Partner Support Service
support contract, or are covered under warranty, and need post-sales technical support,
you can access our tools and resources online or open a case with JTAC.
•
JTAC policies—For a complete understanding of our JTAC procedures and policies,
review the JTAC User Guide located at
http://www.juniper.net/us/en/local/pdf/resource-guides/7100059-en.pdf.
•
Product warranties—For product warranty information, visit
http://www.juniper.net/support/warranty/.
•
JTAC hours of operation—The JTAC centers have resources available 24 hours a day,
7 days a week, 365 days a year.
Self-Help Online Tools and Resources
For quick and easy problem resolution, Juniper Networks has designed an online
self-service portal called the Customer Support Center (CSC) that provides you with the
following features:
•
Find CSC offerings: http://www.juniper.net/customers/support/
•
Search for known bugs: http://www2.juniper.net/kb/
•
Find product documentation: http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/
•
Find solutions and answer questions using our Knowledge Base: http://kb.juniper.net/
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
xv
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
•
Download the latest versions of software and review release notes:
http://www.juniper.net/customers/csc/software/
•
Search technical bulletins for relevant hardware and software notifications:
http://kb.juniper.net/InfoCenter/
•
Join and participate in the Juniper Networks Community Forum:
http://www.juniper.net/company/communities/
•
Open a case online in the CSC Case Management tool: http://www.juniper.net/cm/
To verify service entitlement by product serial number, use our Serial Number Entitlement
(SNE) Tool: https://tools.juniper.net/SerialNumberEntitlementSearch/
Opening a Case with JTAC
You can open a case with JTAC on the Web or by telephone.
•
Use the Case Management tool in the CSC at http://www.juniper.net/cm/.
•
Call 1-888-314-JTAC (1-888-314-5822 toll-free in the USA, Canada, and Mexico).
For international or direct-dial options in countries without toll-free numbers, see
http://www.juniper.net/support/requesting-support.html.
xvi
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 1
Configuring Interfaces
•
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces for Increased Throughput and Link
Redundancy on page 3
•
Configuring Targeted Broadcast to Implement Remote Administration Tasks and
Support Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF) on page 25
•
Configuring Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding (RPF) to Prevent IP Spoofing on page 29
•
Configuring Multicast RPF to Optimize a Router or Switch’s Multicast Forwarding
State on page 39
•
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch on page 43
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
1
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
2
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 1
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet
Interfaces for Increased Throughput and
Link Redundancy
•
Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces Overview on page 3
•
Load Balancing and Ethernet Link Aggregation Overview on page 8
•
Configuring an Aggregated Ethernet Interface on page 8
•
Deleting an Aggregated Ethernet Interface on page 9
•
Configuring Junos OS for Supporting Aggregated Devices on page 10
•
Configuring the Number of Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces on the Device (Enhanced
Layer 2 Software CLI Procedure) on page 12
•
Example: Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces on page 13
•
Configuring Tagged Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces on page 14
•
Configuring Untagged Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces on page 15
•
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Minimum Links on page 15
•
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP on page 16
•
Monitor Statistics for a Fast Ethernet or Gigabit Ethernet Interface on page 23
Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces Overview
Link aggregation of Ethernet interfaces is defined in the IEEE 802.3ad standard. The
Junos OS implementation of 802.3ad balances traffic across the member links within
an aggregated Ethernet bundle based on the Layer 3 information carried in the packet.
This implementation uses the same load-balancing algorithm used for per-flow load
balancing.
NOTE: For information about configuring circuit cross-connects over
aggregated Ethernet, see Circuit and Translational Cross-Connects Overview.
For information about mixed rates and mixed modes on an aggregated Ethernet bundle,
see Understanding Mixed Rates and Mixed Modes on Aggregated Ethernet Bundles.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
3
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Platform Support for Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces
You configure an aggregated Ethernet virtual link by specifying the link number as a
physical device and then associating a set of ports that have the same speed and are in
full-duplex mode. The physical interfaces can be Fast Ethernet, Tri-Rate Ethernet copper,
Gigabit Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet IQ, 10-Gigabit Ethernet IQ, Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 and
IQ2-E, or 10-Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 and IQ2-E. Generally, you cannot use a combination of
these interfaces within the same aggregated link; however, you can combine Gigabit
Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet IQ interfaces in a single aggregated Ethernet bundle.
Starting with Junos OS Release 13.2, aggregated Ethernet supports the following mixed
rates and mixed modes on T640, T1600, T4000, and TX Matrix Plus routers:
•
Member links of different modes (WAN and LAN) for 10-Gigabit Ethernet links.
•
Member links of different rates: 10-Gigabit Ethernet, 40-Gigabit Ethernet, 50-Gigabit
Ethernet, 100-Gigabit Ethernet, and OC192 (10-Gigabit Ethernet WAN mode)
NOTE:
•
Member links of 50-Gigabit Ethernet can only be configured using the
50-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces of 100-Gigabit Ethernet PIC with CFP
(PD-1CE-CFP-FPC4).
•
Starting with Junos OS Release 13.2, 100-Gigabit Ethernet member links
can be configured using the two 50-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces of
100-Gigabit Ethernet PIC with CFP. This 100-Gigabit Ethernet member link
can be included in an aggregated Ethernet link that includes member links
of other interfaces as well. In releases before Junos OS Release 13.2, the
100-Gigabit Ethernet member link configured using the two 50-Gigabit
Ethernet interfaces of 100-Gigabit Ethernet PIC with CFP cannot be included
in an aggregated Ethernet link that includes member links of other
interfaces.
TIP:
Going forward:
•
Aggregated Ethernet link with member links of different modes will be
referred as 10-Gigabit Ethernet mixed mode aggregated Ethernet link.
•
Aggregated Ethernet link with member links of different rates will be
referred as mixed rate aggregated Ethernet link.
•
These aggregated Ethernet links will generically be referred as mixed
aggregated Ethernet links.
Table 3 on page 5 lists the platforms and corresponding hardware components that
support mixed aggregated Ethernet bundles.
4
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces for Increased Throughput and Link Redundancy
Table 3: Platform Support Matrix for Mixed Aggregated Ethernet Bundles
Rate and
Mode
Supported
Platform
10-Gigabit
Ethernet LAN
and WAN
T640, T1600,
T4000, and TX
Matrix Plus routers
Supported FPCs
Supported PICs
•
•
10-Gigabit Ethernet LAN/WAN PIC with
Oversubscription and SFP+
(PF-24XGE-SFPP)
•
10-Gigabit Ethernet LAN/WAN PIC with
SFP+ (PF-12XGE-SFPP)
T4000 FPC5 (T4000-FPC5-3D)
(WAN rate:
OC192)
40-Gigabit
Ethernet,
100-Gigabit
Ethernet
•
Enhanced Scaling FPC3
(T640-FPC3-ES)
•
10-Gigabit Ethernet PIC with XENPAK
(PC-1XGE-XENPAK)
•
Enhanced Scaling FPC4
(T640-FPC4-ES)
•
10-Gigabit Ethernet LAN/WAN PIC with
SFP+ (PD-5-10XGE-SFPP)
•
Enhanced Scaling FPC4-1P
(T640-FPC4-1P-ES)
•
10-Gigabit Ethernet LAN/WAN PIC with XFP
(PD-4XGE-XFP)
•
T1600 Enhanced Scaling FPC4
(T1600-FPC4-ES)
T4000 and TX
Matrix Plus routers
•
T4000 FPC5 (T4000-FPC5-3D)
•
100-Gigabit Ethernet PIC with CFP
(PF-1CGE-CFP)
T640, T1600,
T4000, and TX
Matrix Plus routers
•
Enhanced Scaling FPC4
(T640-FPC4-ES)
•
100-Gigabit Ethernet PIC with CFP
(PD-1CE-CFP-FPC4)
•
Enhanced Scaling FPC4-1P
(T640-FPC4-1P-ES)
•
T1600 Enhanced Scaling FPC4
(T1600-FPC4-ES)
NOTE: This PIC is available packaged only
in an assembly with the T1600-FPC4-ES
FPC.
•
40-Gigabit Ethernet PIC with CFP
(PD-1XLE-CFP)
All Juniper routers support at least eight physical interfaces per aggregated Ethernet
bundle. See maximum-links configuration page for platform specific limits.
On M Series and T Series routers, you can create a maximum of 1024 logical interfaces
on an aggregated Ethernet interface.
Aggregated Ethernet interfaces can use interfaces from different FPCs, DPCs, PICs, or
MPCs.
Configuration Guidelines for Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces
•
Simple filters are not supported for interfaces in aggregated Ethernet bundles:
•
On M Series routers, simple filters are supported in Gigabit Ethernet Enhanced
Intelligent Queuing interfaces only, except when the interface is part of an aggregated
Ethernet bundle.
•
On MX Series routers, simple filters are supported in Enhanced Queuing Dense Port
Concentrator (EQ DPC) interfaces only, except when the interface is part of an
aggregated Ethernet bundle.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
5
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
For more information about simple filters, see the Class of Service Feature Guide for
Routing Devices.
•
On the aggregated Ethernet bundle, no IQ-specific capabilities such as MAC accounting,
VLAN rewrites, and VLAN queuing are available. For more information about IQ-specific
capabilities, see Capabilities of Gigabit Ethernet IQ PICs and Gigabit Ethernet PICs with
SFPs.
•
Aggregated Ethernet interfaces can be either tagged or untagged, with LACP enabled
or disabled. Aggregated Ethernet interfaces on MX Series routers support the
configuration of flexible-vlan-tagging and native-vlan-id on dual-tagged frames, which
consist of the following configuration statements:
•
inner-tag-protocol-id
•
inner-vlan-id
•
pop-pop
•
pop-swap
•
push-push
•
swap-push
•
swap-swap
In all cases, you must set the number of aggregated Ethernet interfaces on the chassis.
You can also set the link speed and the minimum links in a bundle.
•
6
When configuring mixed aggregated Ethernet bundles on T640, T1600, T4000, and
TX Matrix Plus routers, consider the following:
•
A maximum of 16 member links can be configured to form a mixed aggregated
Ethernet link.
•
Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP), aggregated Ethernet link protection, and
LACP link protection are supported only on mixed aggregated Ethernet link configured
on a 100-Gigabit Ethernet PIC with CFP (PD-1CE-CFP-FPC4).
•
Traffic distribution is based on the hash calculated on the egress packet header.
Hash range is fairly distributed according to member links’ speed. This guarantees
hash fairness but it does not guarantee fair traffic distribution depending on the rate
of the egress streams.
•
Packets are dropped when the total throughput of the hash flow exiting a member
link (or multiple hash flows exiting a single member link) exceeds the link speed of
the member link. This can happen when egress member link changes because of a
link failure and the hash flow switches to a member link of speed that is less than
the total throughput of the hash flow.
•
Rate-based CoS components such as scheduler, shaper, and policer are not
supported on mixed rate aggregated Ethernet links. However, the default CoS settings
are supported by default on the mixed rate aggregated Ethernet links.
•
Load balancing is performed at the ingress Packet Forwarding Engine. Therefore,
you must ensure that the egress traffic on the aggregated Ethernet link enters through
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces for Increased Throughput and Link Redundancy
the hardware platforms that support mixed aggregated Ethernet bundles.
Table 3 on page 5 lists the platforms and corresponding hardware components
that support mixed aggregated Ethernet bundles.
Related
Documentation
•
Mixed aggregated Ethernet links can interoperate with non-Juniper Networks
aggregated Ethernet member links provided that mixed aggregated Ethernet load
balancing is configured at egress.
•
Load balancing of the egress traffic across the member links of a mixed rate
aggregated Ethernet link is proportional to the rates of the member links.
•
Egress multicast load balancing is not supported on mixed aggregated Ethernet
interfaces.
•
Changing the edit interfaces aex aggregated-ether-options link-speed configuration
of a mixed aggregated Ethernet link, which is configured on the supported interfaces
of on T640, T1600, T4000, and TX Matrix Plus routers, leads to aggregated Ethernet
link flapping.
•
When configuring a mixed aggregated Ethernet link on a 100-Gigabit Ethernet PIC
with CFP (PD-1CE-CFP-FPC4), ensure that you add both the 50-Gigabit Ethernet
interfaces of the 100-Gigabit Ethernet PIC with CFP to the aggregated Ethernet
bundle. Moreover, both these 50-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces must be included in
the same aggregated Ethernet bundle.
•
When a mixed aggregated Ethernet link is configured on a 100-Gigabit Ethernet PIC
with CFP, changing aggregated Ethernet link protection or LACP link protection
configurations leads to aggregated Ethernet link flapping.
•
For a single physical link event of an aggregated Ethernet link configured on a
100-Gigabit Ethernet PIC with CFP, the packet loss performance value is twice the
original value because of the two 50-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces of the 100-Gigabit
Ethernet PIC with CFP.
•
The show interfaces aex command displays the link speed of the aggregated Ethernet
interface, which is the sum of the link speeds of all the active member links.
•
Use the show interfaces aggregate-interface extensive and show interfaces
aggregate.logical-interface commands to show the bandwidth of the aggregate. Also,
the SNMP object identifier ifSpeed/ifHighSpeed shows the corresponding bandwidth
on the aggregate logical interface if it is configured properly.
•
inner-tag-protocol-id
•
inner-vlan-id
•
pop-pop
•
pop-swap
•
push-push
•
swap-push
•
swap-swap
•
Configuring Mixed Rates and Mixed Modes on Aggregated Ethernet Bundles
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
7
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
•
Capabilities of Gigabit Ethernet IQ PICs and Gigabit Ethernet PICs with SFPs
•
Ethernet Interfaces Feature Guide for Routing Devices
•
Understanding Mixed Rates and Mixed Modes on Aggregated Ethernet Bundles
Load Balancing and Ethernet Link Aggregation Overview
You can create a link aggregation group (LAG) for a group of Ethernet ports. Layer 2
bridging traffic is load balanced across the member links of this group, making the
configuration attractive for congestion concerns as well as for redundancy. You can
configure up to 128 LAG bundles on M Series and T Series routers and 480 LAG bundles
on anMX Series router. Each LAG bundle contains up to 16 links.
By default, the hash key mechanism to load-balance frames across LAG interfaces is
based on Layer 2 fields (such as frame source and destination address) as well as the
input logical interface (unit). The default LAG algorithm is optimized for Layer 2 switching.
You can also configure the load balancing hash key for Layer 2 traffic to use fields in the
Layer 3 and Layer 4 headers using the payload statement, see “Configuring Load Balancing
on a LAG Link” on page 54.In a Layer 2 switch, one link is overutilized and other links are
underutilized.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Load Balancing on a LAG Link on page 54
•
Load Balancing on a LAG Link on page 55
•
payload
Configuring an Aggregated Ethernet Interface
You can associate a physical interface with an aggregated Ethernet interface.
To configure an aggregated Ethernet interface:
1.
Specify that you want to configure the link aggregation group interface.
user@host# edit interfaces interface-name
2. Configure the aggregated Ethernet interface.
[edit interfaces interface-name]
user@host# set ether-options 802.3ad aex
You specify the interface instance number x to complete the link association; x can be
from 0 through 480, for a total of 480 aggregated interfaces on MX Series routers or
EX9200 switches. You must also include a statement defining aex at the [edit interfaces]
hierarchy level. You can optionally specify other physical properties that apply specifically
to the aggregated Ethernet interfaces; for details, see Ethernet Interfaces Overview.
8
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces for Increased Throughput and Link Redundancy
NOTE: In general, aggregated Ethernet bundles support the features available
on all supported interfaces that can become a member link within the bundle.
As an exception, Gigabit Ethernet IQ features and some newer Gigabit
Ethernet features are not supported in aggregated Ethernet bundles.
Gigabit Ethernet IQ and SFP interfaces can be member links, but IQ- and
SFP-specific features are not supported on the aggregated Ethernet bundle
even if all the member links individually support those features.
You need to configure the correct link speed for the aggregated Ethernet
interface to eliminate any warning message.
NOTE: Before you commit an aggregated Ethernet configuration, ensure that
link mode is not configured on any member interface of the aggregated
Ethernet bundle; otherwise, the configuration commit check fails.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring the Number of Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces on the Device (Enhanced
Layer 2 Software CLI Procedure) on page 12
•
Deleting an Aggregated Ethernet Interface on page 9
•
Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces Overview on page 3
•
Ethernet Interfaces Feature Guide for Routing Devices
Deleting an Aggregated Ethernet Interface
There are two approaches to deleting an aggregated Ethernet interface:
•
You can delete an aggregated Ethernet interface from the interface configuration. The
Junos OS removes the configuration statements related to aex and sets this interface
to down state.
•
You can also permanently remove the aggregated Ethernet interface from the device
configuration by deleting it from the device-count on the routing device.
To delete an aggregated Ethernet interface:
1.
Delete the aggregated Ethernet configuration.
This step changes the interface state to down and removing the configuration
statements related to aex.
[edit]
user@host# delete interfaces aex
2. Delete the interface from the device count.
[edit]
user@host# delete chassis aggregated-devices ethernet device-count
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
9
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring an Aggregated Ethernet Interface
•
Configuring the Number of Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces on the Device
•
Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces Overview on page 3
•
Ethernet Interfaces Feature Guide for Routing Devices
Configuring Junos OS for Supporting Aggregated Devices
Junos OS supports the aggregation of physical devices into defined virtual links, such as
the link aggregation of Ethernet interfaces defined by the IEEE 802.3ad standard.
Tasks for configuring aggregated devices are:
•
Configuring Virtual Links for Aggregated Devices on page 10
•
Configuring LACP Link Protection at the Chassis Level on page 11
•
Enabling LACP Link Protection on page 11
•
Configuring System Priority on page 12
•
Configuring the Maximum Links Limit on page 12
Configuring Virtual Links for Aggregated Devices
To define virtual links, you need to specify the associations between physical and logical
devices within the [edit interfaces] hierarchy, and assign the correct number of logical
devices by including the device-count statement at the [edit chassis aggregated-devices
ethernet] and [edit chassis aggregated-devices sonet] hierarchy levels:
[edit chassis]
aggregated-devices {
ethernet {
device-count number;
}
sonet {
device-count number;
}
}
For M Series and T Series routers you can configure a maximum of 128 aggregated
interfaces (LAG bundles). On MX Series routers running Junos release 14.2R2 and earlier,
you can configure a maximum of 480 aggregated interfaces. For MX Series routers running
Junos release 14.2R3 and later you can configure a maximum of 1000 aggregated
interfaces. For MX2010 and MX2020 routers you can configure a maximum of 800
aggregated interfaces. In all cases the aggregated interfaces are numbered from ae0
through ae4092
For SONET/SDH, starting with Junos OS Release 13.2, the maximum number of logical
interfaces is 64, numbered from as0 through as63. In releases before Junos OS Release
13.2, the maximum was 16.
10
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces for Increased Throughput and Link Redundancy
Configuring LACP Link Protection at the Chassis Level
Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) is one method of bundling several physical
interfaces to form one logical interface. You can configure both VLAN-tagged and
untagged aggregated Ethernet with or without LACP enabled. LACP exchanges are made
between actors and partners. An actor is the local interface in an LACP exchange. A
partner is the remote interface in an LACP exchange.
LACP link protection enables you to force active and standby links within an aggregated
Ethernet. You configure LACP link protection by using the link-protection and
system-priority statements at either the chassis or interface level and by configuring port
priority at the interface level using the system-priority statement. Configuring LACP
parameters at the chassis level results in all aggregated Ethernet interfaces using the
defined values unless overridden by the LACP configuration on a specific interface.
[edit chassis]
aggregated-devices {
ethernet {
lacp {
link-protection {
non-revertive;
}
system-priority priority;
}
}
}
NOTE: LACP link protection also uses port priority. You can configure port
priority at the Ethernet interface [gigether-options] hierarchy level using the
port-priority statement. If you choose not to configure port priority, LACP link
protection uses the default value for port priority (127).
Enabling LACP Link Protection
To enable LACP link protection for aggregated Ethernet interfaces on the chassis, use
the link-protection statement at the [edit chassis aggregated-devices ethernet lacp]
hierarchy level:
[edit chassis aggregated-devices ethernet lacp]
link-protection {
non-revertive;
}
By default, LACP link protection reverts to a higher-priority (lower-numbered) link when
that higher-priority link becomes operational or a link is added to the aggregator that is
determined to be higher in priority. However, you can suppress link calculation by adding
the non-revertive statement to the LACP link protection configuration. In nonrevertive
mode, after a link is active and collecting and distributing packets, the subsequent addition
of a higher-priority (better) link does not result in a switch, and the current link remains
active.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
11
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
CAUTION: If both ends of an aggregator have LACP link protection enabled,
make sure to configure both ends of the aggregator to use the same mode.
Mismatching LACP link protection modes can result in lost traffic.
Configuring System Priority
To configure LACP system priority for aggregated Ethernet interfaces on the chassis, use
the system-priority statement at the [edit chassis aggregated-devices ethernet lacp]
hierarchy level:
[edit chassis aggregated-devices ethernet lacp]
system-priority priority;
The system priority is a 2-octet binary value that is part of the LACP system ID. The LACP
system ID consists of the system priority as the two most-significant octets and the
interface MAC address as the six least-significant octets. The system with the numerically
lower value for system priority has the higher priority. By default, system priority is 127,
with a range of 0 through 65,535.
Configuring the Maximum Links Limit
To configure the maximum links limit, use the maximum-links statement at the [edit
chassis aggregated-devices] hierarchy level:
[edit chassis aggregated-devices]
maximum-links maximum-links-limit;
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring an Aggregated Ethernet Interface
•
Ethernet Interfaces Feature Guide for Routing Devices
•
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces on PTX Series Packet Transport Routers
•
Configuring Aggregated SONET/SDH Interfaces
Configuring the Number of Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces on the Device (Enhanced
Layer 2 Software CLI Procedure)
By default, no aggregated Ethernet interfaces are created. You must set the number of
aggregated Ethernet interfaces on the routing device before you can configure them.
On MX Series routers and EX9200 switches, you can configure a maximum of 480
aggregated interfaces. The aggregated interfaces(LAG bundles) are numbered from ae0
through ae479 on MX Series routers and EX9200 switches.
1.
Specify that you want to access the aggregated Ethernet configuration on the device.
user@host# edit chassis aggregated-devices ethernet
2. Set the number of aggregated Ethernet interfaces.
[edit chassis aggregated-devices ethernet]
user@host# set device-count number
12
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces for Increased Throughput and Link Redundancy
You must also specify the constituent physical links by including the 802.3ad statement
at the [edit interfaces interface-name ether-options] or [edit interfaces interface-name
ether-options] hierarchy level.
Related
Documentation
•
For information about physical links, see Configuring an Aggregated Ethernet Interface
on page 8
•
Ethernet Interfaces Feature Guide for Routing Devices
•
For information about configuring aggregated devices, see the Junos OS Administration
Library for Routing Devices.
Example: Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces
Aggregated Ethernet interfaces can use interfaces from different FPCs, DPCs, or PICs.
The following configuration is sufficient to get an aggregated Gigabit Ethernet interface
up and running.
[edit chassis]
aggregated-devices {
ethernet {
device-count 15;
}
}
[edit interfaces]
ge-1/3/0 {
gigether-options {
802.3ad ae0;
}
}
ge-2/0/1 {
gigether-options {
802.3ad ae0;
}
}
ae0 {
aggregated-ether-options {
link-speed 1g;
minimum-links 1;
}
}
vlan-tagging;
unit 0 {
vlan-id 1;
family inet {
address 14.0.100.50/24;
}
}
unit 1 {
vlan-id 1024;
family inet {
address 14.0.101.50/24;
}
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
13
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
}
unit 2 {
vlan-id 1025;
family inet {
address 14.0.102.50/24;
}
}
unit 3 {
vlan-id 4094;
family inet {
address 14.0.103.50/24;
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
Ethernet Interfaces Feature Guide for Routing Devices
•
Configure 'link-speed' for Gigabit Ethernet based Aggregate Ethernet interface bundles
Configuring Tagged Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces
To specify aggregated Ethernet interfaces, include the vlan-tagging statement at the
[edit interfaces aex] hierarchy level:
[edit interfaces aex]
vlan-tagging;
You must also include the vlan-id statement:
vlan-id number;
You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit
logical-unit-number]
For more information about the vlan-tagging and vlan-id statements, see 802.1Q VLANs
Overview.
Related
Documentation
14
•
vlan-id
•
vlan-tagging on page 112
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces for Increased Throughput and Link Redundancy
Configuring Untagged Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces
When you configure an untagged Aggregated Ethernet interface, the existing rules for
untagged interfaces apply. These rules are as follows:
•
You can configure only one logical interface (unit 0) on the port. The logical unit 0 is
used to send and receive LACP or marker protocol data units (PDUs) to and from the
individual links.
•
You cannot include the vlan-id statement in the configuration of the logical interface.
Configure an untagged aggregated Ethernet interface by omitting the vlan-tagging and
vlan-id statements from the configuration:
[edit interfaces]
ge-1/1/1 {
ether-options {
802.3ad ae0;
}
}
ae0 {
# vlan-tagging; OMIT FOR UNTAGGED AE CONFIGURATIONS
unit 0 {
# vlan-id 100; OMIT FOR UNTAGGED AE CONFIGURATIONS
family inet {
address 13.1.1.2/24 {
vrrp-group 0 {
virtual-address 13.1.1.4;
priority 200;
}
}
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
For more information about configuring LACP, see Configuring Aggregated Ethernet
LACP on page 16.
•
Ethernet Interfaces Feature Guide for Routing Devices
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Minimum Links
On aggregated Ethernet interfaces, you can configure the minimum number of links that
must be up for the bundle as a whole to be labeled up. By default, only one link must be
up for the bundle to be labeled up.
To configure the minimum number of links:
1.
Specify that you want to configure the aggregated Ethernet options.
user@host# edit interfaces interface-name aggregated-ether-options
2. Configure the minimum number of links.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
15
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
[edit interfaces interface-name aggregated-ether-options]
user@host# set minimum-links number
On M120, M320, MX Series, T Series, and TX Matrix routers with Ethernet interfaces, and
EX 9200 switches, the valid range for minimum-links number is 1 through 16. When the
maximum value (16) is specified, all configured links of a bundle must be up for the bundle
to be labeled up.
On all other routers and on EX Series switches, other than EX8200 switches, the range
of valid values for minimum-links number is 1 through 8. When the maximum value (8) is
specified, all configured links of a bundle must be up for the bundle to be labeled up.
On EX8200 switches, the range of valid values for minimum-links number is 1 through 12.
When the maximum value (12) is specified, all configured links of a bundle must be up
for the bundle to be labeled up.
On MX Series routers, when Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) is enabled on a
link aggregation group (LAG) interface along with minimum links configuration, the bundle
is considered to be up when the following two conditions are met:
•
The specified minimum number of links are up.
•
The links are in collecting distributing state–that is, collecting and distributing states
are merged together to form a combined state (coupled control) for the aggregated
port. Because independent control is not possible, the coupled control state machine
does not wait for the partner to signal that collection has started before enabling both
collection and distribution.
If the number of links configured in an aggregated Ethernet interface is less than the
minimum link value configured under the aggregated-ether-options statement, the
configuration commit fails and an error message is displayed.
Related
Documentation
•
aggregated-ether-options
•
minimum-links
•
Ethernet Interfaces Feature Guide for Routing Devices
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP
For aggregated Ethernet interfaces, you can configure the Link Aggregation Control
Protocol (LACP). LACP is one method of bundling several physical interfaces to form
one logical interface. You can configure both VLAN-tagged and untagged aggregated
Ethernet with or without LACP enabled.
For Multichassis Link Aggregation (MC-LAG), you must specify the system-id and admin
key. MC-LAG peers use the same system-id while sending the LACP messages. The
system-id can be configured on the MC-LAG network device and synchronized between
peers for validation.
LACP exchanges are made between actors and partners. An actor is the local interface
in an LACP exchange. A partner is the remote interface in an LACP exchange.
16
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces for Increased Throughput and Link Redundancy
LACP is defined in IEEE 802.3ad, Aggregation of Multiple Link Segments.
LACP was designed to achieve the following:
•
Automatic addition and deletion of individual links to the aggregate bundle without
user intervention
•
Link monitoring to check whether both ends of the bundle are connected to the correct
group
The Junos OS implementation of LACP provides link monitoring but not automatic addition
and deletion of links.
The LACP mode can be active or passive. If the actor and partner are both in passive
mode, they do not exchange LACP packets, which results in the aggregated Ethernet
links not coming up. If either the actor or partner is active, they do exchange LACP packets.
By default, LACP is turned off on aggregated Ethernet interfaces. If LACP is configured,
it is in passive mode by default. To initiate transmission of LACP packets and response
to LACP packets, you must configure LACP in active mode.
To enable LACP active mode, include the lacp statement at the [edit interfaces
interface-name aggregated-ether-options] hierarchy level, and specify the active option:
[edit interfaces interface-name aggregated-ether-options]
lacp {
active;
}
NOTE: The LACP process exists in the system only if you configure the system
in either active or passive LACP mode.
To restore the default behavior, include the lacp statement at the [edit interfaces
interface-name aggregated-ether-options] hierarchy level, and specify the passive option:
[edit interfaces interface-name aggregated-ether-options]
lacp {
passive;
}
Starting with Junos OS release 12.2, you can also configure LACP to override the IEEE
802.3ad standard and to allow the standby link always to receive traffic. Overriding the
default behavior facilitates subsecond failover.
To override the IEEE 802.3ad standard and facilitate subsecond failover, include the
fast-failover statement at the [edit interfaces interface-name aggregated-ether-options
lacp] hierarchy level.
For more information, see the following sections:
•
Configuring the LACP Interval on page 18
•
Configuring LACP Link Protection on page 18
•
Configuring LACP System Priority on page 20
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
17
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
•
Configuring LACP System Identifier on page 20
•
Configuring LACP administrative Key on page 20
•
Configuring LACP Port Priority on page 20
•
Tracing LACP Operations on page 21
•
LACP Limitations on page 21
•
Example: Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP on page 22
Configuring the LACP Interval
By default, the actor and partner send LACP packets every second. You can configure
the interval at which the interfaces send LACP packets by including the periodic statement
at the [edit interfaces interface-name aggregated-ether-options lacp] hierarchy level:
[edit interfaces interface-name aggregated-ether-options lacp]
periodic interval;
The interval can be fast (every second) or slow (every 30 seconds). You can configure
different periodic rates on active and passive interfaces. When you configure the active
and passive interfaces at different rates, the transmitter honors the receiver’s rate.
NOTE: Source address filtering does not work when LACP is enabled.
Percentage policers are not supported on aggregated Ethernet interfaces
with the CCC protocol family configured. For more information about
percentage policers, see the Routing Policies, Firewall Filters, and Traffic
Policers Feature Guide for Routing Devices.
Generally, LACP is supported on all untagged aggregated Ethernet interfaces.
For more information, see Configuring Untagged Aggregated Ethernet
Interfaces.
Configuring LACP Link Protection
NOTE: When using LACP link protection, you can configure only two member
links to an aggregated Ethernet interface: one active and one standby.
To force active and standby links within an aggregated Ethernet, you can configure LACP
link protection and system priority at the aggregated Ethernet interface level using the
link-protection and system-priority statements. Configuring values at this level results in
only the configured interfaces using the defined configuration. LACP interface
configuration also enables you to override global (chassis) LACP settings.
LACP link protection also uses port priority. You can configure port priority at the Ethernet
interface [ether-options] hierarchy level using the port-priority statement. If you choose
not to configure port priority, LACP link protection uses the default value for port priority
(127).
18
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces for Increased Throughput and Link Redundancy
NOTE: LACP link protection supports per-unit scheduling configuration on
aggregated Ethernet interfaces.
To enable LACP link protection for an aggregated Ethernet interfaces, use the
link-protection statement at the [edit interfaces aeX aggregated-ether-options lacp]
hierarchy level:
[edit interfaces aeX aggregated-ether-options lacp]
link-protection;
disable;
revertive;
non-revertive;
}
By default, LACP link protection reverts to a higher-priority (lower-numbered) link when
that higher-priority link becomes operational or a link is added to the aggregator that is
determined to be higher in priority. However, you can suppress link calculation by adding
the non-revertive statement to the LACP link protection configuration. In nonrevertive
mode, once a link is active and collecting and distributing packets, the subsequent addition
of a higher-priority (better) link does not result in a switch and the current link remains
active.
If LACP link protection is configured to be nonrevertive at the global ([edit chassis]
hierarchy) level, you can add the revertive statement to the LACP link protection
configuration to override the nonrevertive setting for the interface. In revertive mode, the
addition of a higher-priority link to the aggregator results in LACP performing a priority
recalculation and switching from the current active link to the new active link.
CAUTION: If both ends of an aggregator have LACP link protection enabled,
make sure to configure both ends of the aggregator to use the same mode.
Mismatching LACP link protection modes can result in lost traffic.
We strongly recommend you to use LACP on both ends of the aggregator,
when you connect an aggregated Ethernet interface with two member
interfaces to any other vendor device. Otherwise, the vendor device (say a
Layer 2 switch, or a router), will not be able to manage the traffic coming
from the two link aggregated Ethernet bundle. As a result, you might observe
the vendor device sending back the traffic to the backup member link of the
aggregated Ethernet interface.
Currently, MX-MPC2-3D, MX-MPC2-3D-Q, MX-MPC2-3D-EQ, MX-MPC1-3D,
MX-MPC1-3D-Q, and MPC-3D-16XGE-SFPP do not drop traffic coming back
to the backup link, whereas DPCE-R-Q-20GE-2XGE, DPCE-R-Q-20GE-SFP,
DPCE-R-Q-40GE-SFP, DPCE-R-Q-4XGE-XFP, DPCE-X-Q-40GE-SFP, and
DPCE-X-Q-4XGE-XFP drop traffic coming to the backup link.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
19
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Configuring LACP System Priority
To configure LACP system priority for aggregated Ethernet interfaces on the interface,
use the system-priority statement at the [edit interfaces aeX aggregated-ether-options
lacp] hierarchy level:
[edit interfaces aeX aggregated-ether-options lacp]
system-priority;
The system priority is a 2-octet binary value that is part of the LACP system ID. The LACP
system ID consists of the system priority as the two most-significant octets and the
interface MAC address as the six least-significant octets. The system with the numerically
lower value for system priority has the higher priority. By default, system priority is 127,
with a range of 0 to 65,535.
Configuring LACP System Identifier
To configure the LACP system identifier for aggregated Ethernet interfaces, use the
system-id statement at the [edit interfaces aeX aggregated-ether-options lacp] hierarchy
level:
[edit interfaces aeX aggregated-ether-options lacp]
system-id system-id;
The user-defined system identifier in LACP enables two ports from two separate devices
to act as though they were part of the same aggregate group.
The system identifier is a 48-bit (6-byte) globally unique field. It is used in combination
with a 16-bit system-priority value, which results in a unique LACP system identifier.
Configuring LACP administrative Key
To configure an administrative key for LACP, include the admin-key number statement
at the edit interfaces aex aggregated-ether-options lacp] hierarchy level:
[edit interfaces ae x aggregated-ether-options-lacp]
admin-key number;
NOTE: You must configure MC-LAG to configure the admin-key statement.
For more information about MC-LAG, see Configuring Multichassis Link
Aggregation on MX Series Routers.
Configuring LACP Port Priority
To configure LACP port priority for aggregated Ethernet interfaces, use the port-priority
statement at the [edit interfaces interface-name ether-options 802.3ad aeX lacp] or [edit
interfaces interface-name ether-options 802.3ad aeX lacp] hierarchy levels:
[edit interfaces interface-name ether-options 802.3ad aeX lacp]
port-priority priority;
20
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces for Increased Throughput and Link Redundancy
The port priority is a 2-octet field that is part of the LACP port ID. The LACP port ID consists
of the port priority as the two most-significant octets and the port number as the two
least-significant octets. The system with the numerically lower value for port priority has
the higher priority. By default, port priority is 127, with a range of 0 to 65,535.
Port aggregation selection is made by each system based on the highest port priority
and are assigned by the system with the highest priority. Ports are selected and assigned
starting with the highest priority port of the highest priority system and working down in
priority from there.
NOTE: Port aggregation selection (discussed above) is performed for the
active link when LACP link protection is enabled. Without LACP link protection,
port priority is not used in port aggregation selection.
Tracing LACP Operations
To trace the operations of the LACP process, include the traceoptions statement at the
[edit protocols lacp] hierarchy level:
[edit protocols lacp]
traceoptions {
file <filename> <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag;
no-remote-trace;
}
You can specify the following flags in the protocols lacp traceoptions statement:
•
all—All LACP tracing operations
•
configuration—Configuration code
•
packet—Packets sent and received
•
process—LACP process events
•
protocol—LACP protocol state machine
•
routing-socket—Routing socket events
•
startup—Process startup events
For general information about tracing, see the tracing and logging information in the
Junos OS Administration Library for Routing Devices.
LACP Limitations
LACP can link together multiple different physical interfaces, but only features that are
supported across all of the linked devices will be supported in the resulting link aggregation
group (LAG) bundle. For example, different PICs can support a different number of
forwarding classes. If you use link aggregation to link together the ports of a PIC that
supports up to 16 forwarding classes with a PIC that supports up to 8 forwarding classes,
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
21
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
the resulting LAG bundle will only support up to 8 forwarding classes. Similarly, linking
together a PIC that supports WRED with a PIC that does not support it will result in a
LAG bundle that does not support WRED.
Example: Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP
Configure aggregated Ethernet LACP over a VLAN-tagged interface:
LACP with
VLAN-Tagged
Aggregated Ethernet
[edit interfaces]
ge--1/1/1 {
ether-options {
802.3ad ae0;
}
}
ae0 {
aggregated-ether-options {
lacp {
active;
}
}
vlan-tagging;
unit 0 {
vlan-id 100;
family inet {
address 10.1.1.2/24 {
vrrp-group 0 {
virtual-address 10.1.1.4;
priority 200;
}
}
}
}
}
Configure aggregated Ethernet LACP over an untagged interface:
LACP with Untagged
Aggregated Ethernet
22
[edit interfaces]
ge-1/1/1 {
ether-options-options {
802.3ad ae0;
}
}
ae0 {
aggregated-ether-options {
lacp {
active;
}
}
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 10.1.1.2/24 {
vrrp-group 0 {
virtual-address 10.1.1.4;
priority 200;
}
}
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces for Increased Throughput and Link Redundancy
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
lacp on page 93
•
link-protection on page 95
•
traceoptions
•
Ethernet Interfaces Feature Guide for Routing Devices
Monitor Statistics for a Fast Ethernet or Gigabit Ethernet Interface
Purpose
Action
To monitor statistics for a Fast Ethernet or Gigabit Ethernet interface, use the following
Junos OS CLI operational mode command:
user@host> monitor interface (fe-fpc/pic/port | ge-fpc/pic/port)
CAUTION: We recommend that you use the monitor interface fe-fpc/pic/port
or monitor interface ge-fpc/pic/port command only for diagnostic purposes.
Do not leave these commands on during normal router operations because
real-time monitoring of traffic consumes additional CPU and memory
resources.
Sample Output
The following sample output is for a Fast Ethernet interface:
user@host> monitor interface fe-2/1/0
Interface: fe-2/1/0, Enabled, Link is Up
Encapsulation: Ethernet, Speed: 100mbps
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes:
282556864218
Output bytes:
42320313078
Input packets:
739373897
Output packets:
124798688
Error statistics:
Input errors:
0
Input drops:
0
Input framing errors:
0
Policed discards:
6625892
L3 incompletes:
75
L2 channel errors:
0
L2 mismatch timeouts:
0
Carrier transitions:
1
Output errors:
0
Output drops:
0
Aged packets:
0
Active alarms : None
Active defects: None
Input MAC/Filter statistics:
Unicast packets
464751787
Packet error count
0
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
(14208 bps)
(384 bps)
(11 pps)
(1 pps)
Current Delta
[40815]
[890]
[145]
[14]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[6]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[154]
[0]
23
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Meaning
Use the information from this command to help narrow down possible causes of an
interface problem.
NOTE: If you are accessing the router from the console connection, make
sure you set the CLI terminal type using the set cli terminal command.
The statistics in the second column are the cumulative statistics since the last time they
were cleared using the clear interfaces statistics interface-name command. The statistics
in the third column are the cumulative statistics since the monitor interface interface-name
command was executed.
If the input errors are increasing, verify the following:
1.
Check the cabling to the router and have the carrier verify the integrity of the line. To
verify the integrity of the cabling, make sure that you have the correct cables for the
interface port. Make sure you have single-mode fiber cable for a single-mode interface
and multimode fiber cable for a multimode interface.
2. For a fiber-optic connection, measure the received light level at the receiver end and
make sure that it is within the receiver specification of the Ethernet interface. See
Fiber-Optic Ethernet Interface Specifications for the fiber-optic Ethernet interface
specifications.
3. Measure the transmit light level on the Tx port to verify that it is within specification.
See Fiber-Optic Ethernet Interface Specifications for the optical specifications.
24
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 2
Configuring Targeted Broadcast to
Implement Remote Administration Tasks
and Support Virtual Routing and
Forwarding (VRF)
•
Understanding Targeted Broadcast on page 25
•
Configuring Targeted Broadcast on page 26
Understanding Targeted Broadcast
Targeted broadcast is a process of flooding a target subnet with Layer 3 broadcast IP
packets originating from a different subnet. The intent of targeted broadcast is to flood
the target subnet with the broadcast packets on a LAN interface without broadcasting
to the entire network. Targeted broadcast is configured with various options on the egress
interface of the router or switch and the IP packets are broadcast only on the LAN (egress)
interface. Targeted broadcast helps you implement remote administration tasks such
as backups and wake-on LAN (WOL) on a LAN interface, and supports virtual routing
and forwarding (VRF) instances.
Regular Layer 3 broadcast IP packets originating from a subnet are broadcast within the
same subnet. When these IP packets reach a different subnet, they are forwarded to the
Routing Engine (to be forwarded to other applications). Because of this, remote
administration tasks such as backups cannot be performed on a particular subnet through
another subnet. As a workaround you can enable targeted broadcast, to forward broadcast
packets that originate from a different subnet.
Layer 3 broadcast IP packets have a destination IP address that is a valid broadcast
address for the target subnet. These IP packets traverse the network in the same way
as unicast IP packets until they reach the destination subnet. In the destination subnet,
if the receiving router has targeted broadcast enabled on the egress interface, the IP
packets are forwarded to an egress interface and the Routing Engine or to an egress
interface only. The IP packets are then translated into broadcast IP packets which flood
the target subnet only through the LAN interface (if there is no LAN interface, the packets
are discarded), and all hosts on the target subnet receive the IP packets. If targeted
broadcast is not enabled on the receiving router, the IP packets are treated as regular
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
25
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Layer 3 broadcast IP packets and are forwarded to the Routing Engine. If targeted
broadcast is enabled without any options, the IP packets are discarded.
Targeted broadcast can be configured to forward the IP packets only to an egress
interface, which is helpful when the router is flooded with packets to process, or to both
an egress interface and the Routing Engine.
NOTE: Targeted broadcast does not work when the targeted broadcast
option forward-and-send-to-re and the traffic sampling option sampling are
configured on the same egress interface of an M320 router, a T640 router,
or an MX960 router. To overcome this scenario, you must either disable one
of the these options or enable the sampling option with the targeted broadcast
option forward-only on the egress interface. For information about traffic
sampling, see Configuring Traffic Sampling.
NOTE: Any firewall filter that is configured on the Routing Engine loopback
interface (lo0) cannot be applied to IP packets that are forwarded to the
Routing Engine as a result of a targeted broadcast. This is because broadcast
packets are forwarded as flood next hop and not as local next hop traffic,
and you can only apply a firewall filter to local next hop routes for traffic
directed towards the Routing Engine.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Targeted Broadcast on page 26
•
targeted-broadcast on page 107
Configuring Targeted Broadcast
The following sections explain how to configure targeted broadcast on an egress interface
and its options:
•
Configuring Targeted Broadcast and Its Options on page 26
•
Display Targeted Broadcast Configuration Options on page 27
Configuring Targeted Broadcast and Its Options
You can configure targeted broadcast on an egress interface with different options. You
can either allow the IP packets destined for a Layer 3 broadcast address to be forwarded
on the egress interface and to send a copy of the IP packets to the Routing Engine or you
can allow the IP packets to be forwarded on the egress interface only. Note that the
packets are broadcast only if the egress interface is a LAN interface.
To configure targeted broadcast and its options:
1.
Configure the physical interface.
[edit]
user@host# set interfaces interface-name
26
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Configuring Targeted Broadcast to Implement Remote Administration Tasks and Support Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF)
2. Configure the logical unit number at the [edit interfaces interface-name hierarchy level.
[edit interfaces interface-name]
user@host# set unit logical-unit-number
3. Configure the protocol family as inet at the [edit interfaces interface-name unit
interface-unit-number hierarchy level.
[edit interfaces interface-name unit interface--unit-number]
user@host# set family inet
4. Configure targeted broadcast at the [edit interfaces interface-name unit
interface-unit-number family inet hierarchy level
[edit interfaces interface-name unit interface--unit-number family inet]
user@host# set targeted-broadcast
5. Specify one of the following options as per requirement:
•
To allow IP packets destined for a Layer 3 broadcast address to be forwarded on
the egress interface and to send a copy of the IP packets to the Routing Engine.
[edit interfaces interface-name unit interface-unit-number family inet
targeted-broadcast]
user@host# set forward-and-send-to-re
•
To allow IP packets to be forwarded on the egress interface only.
[edit interfaces interface-name unit interface-unit-number family inet
targeted-broadcast]
user@host# set forward-only
NOTE: Targeted broadcast does not work when the targeted broadcast
option forward-and-send-to-re and the traffic sampling option sampling are
configured on the same egress interface of an M320 router, a T640 router,
or an MX960 router. To overcome this scenario, you must either disable one
of the these options or enable the sampling option with the targeted broadcast
option forward-only on the egress interface. For information about traffic
sampling, see Configuring Traffic Sampling.
Display Targeted Broadcast Configuration Options
The following topics display targeted broadcast configuration with its various options:
•
Forward IP Packets On the Egress Interface and To the Routing Engine on page 27
•
Forward IP Packets On the Egress Interface Only on page 28
Forward IP Packets On the Egress Interface and To the Routing Engine
Purpose
Display the configuration when targeted broadcast is configured on the egress interface
to forward the IP packets on the egress interface and to send a copy of the IP packets
to the Routing Engine.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Action
To display the configuration run the show command at the [edit interfaces interface-name
unit interface-unit-number family inet] where the interface name is ge-2/0/0, the unit
value is set to 0, the protocol family is set to inet.
[edit interfaces interface-name unit interface-unit-number family inet]
user@host#show
targeted-broadcast {
forward-and-send-to-re;
}
Forward IP Packets On the Egress Interface Only
Purpose
Display the configuration when targeted broadcast is configured on the egress interface
to forward the IP packets on the egress interface only.
Action
To display the configuration run the show command at the [edit interfaces interface-name
unit interface-unit-number family inet] where the interface name is ge-2/0/0, the unit
value is set to 0, the protocol family is set to inet.
[edit interfaces interface-name unit interface-unit-number family inet]
user@host#show
targeted-broadcast {
forward-only;
}
Related
Documentation
28
•
targeted-broadcast on page 107
•
Understanding Targeted Broadcast on page 25
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 3
Configuring Unicast Reverse Path
Forwarding (RPF) to Prevent IP Spoofing
•
Understanding Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding on page 29
•
Configuring Unicast RPF on page 29
Understanding Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding
IP spoofing can occur during a denial-of-service (DoS) attack. IP spoofing allows an
intruder to pass IP packets to a destination as genuine traffic, when in fact the packets
are not actually meant for the destination. This type of spoofing is harmful because it
consumes the destination’s resources.
A unicast reverse-path-forwarding (RPF) check is a tool to reduce forwarding of IP packets
that might be spoofing an address. A unicast RPF check performs a route table lookup
on an IP packet’s source address, and checks the incoming interface. The router or switch
determines whether the packet is arriving from a path that the sender would use to reach
the destination. If the packet is from a valid path, the router or switch forwards the packet
to the destination address. If it is not from a valid path, the router or switch discards the
packet. Unicast RPF is supported for the IPv4 and IPv6 protocol families, as well as for
the virtual private network (VPN) address family.
NOTE: Reverse path forwarding is not supported on the interfaces you
configure as tunnel sources. This affects only the transit packets exiting the
tunnel.
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Configuring Unicast Reverse-Path-Forwarding Check
Configuring Unicast RPF
For interfaces that carry IPv4 or IPv6 traffic, you can reduce the impact of denial of service
(DoS) attacks by configuring unicast reverse path forwarding (RPF). Unicast RPF helps
determine the source of attacks and rejects packets from unexpected source addresses
on interfaces where unicast RPF is enabled.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
NOTE: If you want to configure unicast RPF, your router must be equipped
with the Internet Processor II application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC).
If you enable unicast RPF on live traffic, some packets are dropped while the
packet forwarding components are updating.
For transit packets exiting the router through the tunnel, forwarding path
features, such as RPF, forwarding table filtering, source class usage, and
destination class usage are not supported on the interfaces you configure as
the output interface for tunnel traffic. For firewall filtering, you must allow
the output tunnel packets through the firewall filter applied to input traffic
on the interface that is the next-hop interface towards the tunnel destination.
The following sections describe unicast RPF in detail:
•
Unicast RPF and Default Routes on page 30
•
Unicast RPF with Routing Asymmetry on page 32
•
Configuring Unicast RPF Strict Mode on page 32
•
Configuring Unicast RPF Loose Mode on page 34
•
Configuring Unicast RPF Loose Mode with Ability to Discard Packets on page 35
•
Configuring Unicast RPF on a VPN on page 37
•
Example: Configuring Unicast RPF on page 38
Unicast RPF and Default Routes
When the active route cannot be chosen from the routes in a routing table, the router
chooses a default route. A default route is equivalent to an IP address of 0.0.0.0/0. If
you configure a default route, and you configure unicast RPF on an interface that the
default route uses, unicast RPF behaves differently than it does otherwise. For information
about configuring default routes, see the Junos OS Routing Protocols Library for Routing
Devices.
To determine whether the default route uses an interface, enter the show route command:
user@host> show route address
address is the next-hop address of the configured default route. The default route uses
the interfaces shown in the output of the show route command.
The following sections describe how unicast RPF behaves when a default route uses an
interface and when a default route does not use an interface:
30
•
Unicast RPF Behavior with a Default Route on page 31
•
Unicast RPF Behavior Without a Default Route on page 31
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 3: Configuring Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding (RPF) to Prevent IP Spoofing
Unicast RPF Behavior with a Default Route
On all routers except those with MPCs and the MX80 router, unicast RPF behaves as
follows if you configure a default route that uses an interface configured with unicast
RPF:
•
Loose mode—All packets are automatically accepted. For this reason, we recommend
that you not configure unicast RPF loose mode on interfaces that the default route
uses.
•
Strict mode—The packet is accepted when the source address of the packet matches
any of the routes (either default or learned) that can be originated from the interface.
Note that routes can have multiple destinations associated with them; therefore, if
one of the destinations matches the incoming interface of the packet, the packet is
accepted.
On all routers with MPCs and the MX80 router, unicast RPF behaves as follows if you
configure a default route that uses an interface configured with unicast RPF:
•
Loose mode—All packets except the packets whose source is learned from the default
route are accepted. All packets whose source is learned from the default route are
dropped at the Packet Forwarding Engine. The default route is treated as if the route
does not exist.
•
Strict mode—The packet is accepted when the source address of the packet matches
any of the routes (either default or learned) that can be originated from the interface.
Note that routes can have multiple destinations associated with them; therefore, if
one of the destinations matches the incoming interface of the packet, the packet is
accepted.
On all routers, the packet is not accepted when either of the following is true:
•
The source address of the packet does not match a prefix in the routing table.
•
The interface does not expect to receive a packet with this source address prefix.
Unicast RPF Behavior Without a Default Route
If you do not configure a default route, or if the default route does not use an interface
configured with unicast RPF, unicast RPF behaves as described in “Configuring Unicast
RPF Strict Mode” on page 32 and “Configuring Unicast RPF Loose Mode” on page 34. To
summarize, unicast RPF without a default route behaves as follows:
•
•
Strict mode—The packet is not accepted when either of the following is true:
•
The packet has a source address that does not match a prefix in the routing table.
•
The interface does not expect to receive a packet with this source address prefix.
Loose mode—The packet is not accepted when the packet has a source address that
does not match a prefix in the routing table.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Unicast RPF with Routing Asymmetry
In general, we recommend that you not enable unicast RPF on interfaces that are internal
to the network because internal interfaces are likely to have routing asymmetry. Routing
asymmetry means that a packet’s outgoing and return paths are different. Routers in the
core of the network are more likely to have asymmetric reverse paths than routers at the
customer or provider edge. Figure 1 on page 32 shows unicast RPF in an environment with
routing asymmetry.
Figure 1: Unicast RPF with Routing Asymmetry
In Figure 1 on page 32, if you enable unicast RPF on interface so-0/0/0, traffic destined
for Router A is not rejected. If you enable unicast RPF on interface so-1/0/1, traffic from
Router A is rejected.
If you need to enable unicast RPF in an asymmetric routing environment, you can use fail
filters to allow the router to accept incoming packets that are known to be arriving by
specific paths. For an example of a fail filter that accepts packets with a specific source
and destination address, see “Example: Configuring Unicast RPF” on page 38.
Configuring Unicast RPF Strict Mode
In strict mode, unicast RPF checks whether the incoming packet has a source address
that matches a prefix in the routing table, and whether the interface expects to receive
a packet with this source address prefix.
If the incoming packet fails the unicast RPF check, the packet is not accepted on the
interface. When a packet is not accepted on an interface, unicast RPF counts the packet
and sends it to an optional fail filter. If the fail filter is not configured, the default action
is to silently discard the packet.
The optional fail filter allows you to apply a filter to packets that fail the unicast RPF
check. You can define the fail filter to perform any filter operation, including accepting,
rejecting, logging, sampling, or policing.
When unicast RPF is enabled on an interface, Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP) packets and
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) packets are not accepted on the interface.
To allow the interface to accept BOOTP packets and DHCP packets, you must apply a
fail filter that accepts all packets with a source address of 0.0.0.0 and a destination
address of 255.255.255.255. For a configuration example, see “Example: Configuring
Unicast RPF” on page 38.
For more information about unicast RPF, see the Junos OS Routing Protocols Library for
Routing Devices. For more information about defining fail filters, see the Routing Policies,
Firewall Filters, and Traffic Policers Feature Guide for Routing Devices.
32
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 3: Configuring Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding (RPF) to Prevent IP Spoofing
To configure unicast RPF, include the rpf-check statement:
rpf-check <fail-filter filter-name>;
You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family (inet | inet6)]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit
logical-unit-number family (inet | inet6)]
Using unicast RPF can have several consequences when implemented with traffic filters:
•
RPF fail filters are evaluated after input filters and before output filters.
•
If you configure a filter counter for packets dropped by an input filter, and you want to
know the total number of packets dropped, you must also configure a filter counter
for packets dropped by the RPF check.
•
To count packets that fail the RPF check and are accepted by the RPF fail filter, you
must configure a filter counter.
•
If an input filter forwards packets anywhere other than the inet.0 or inet6.0 routing
tables, the unicast RPF check is not performed.
•
If an input filter forwards packets anywhere other than the routing instance the input
interface is configured for, the unicast RPF check is not performed.
Example: Configuring Unicast RPF Strict Mode
Configure unicast RPF strict mode, and apply a fail filter that allows the interface to
accept BOOTP packets and DHCP packets. The filter accepts all packets with a source
address of 0.0.0.0 and a destination address of 255.255.255.255.
To configure unicast RPF in strict mode:
1.
Configure the fail filter:
[edit firewall]
filter rpf-special-case-dhcp-bootp {
term allow-dhcp-bootp {
from {
source-address {
0.0.0.0/32;
}
address {
255.255.255.255/32;
}
}
then {
count rpf-dhcp-bootp-traffic;
accept;
}
}
term default {
then {
log;
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33
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
reject;
}
}
}
2. Configure unicast RPF on interfaces:
[edit]
interfaces {
so-0/0/0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
rpf-check fail-filter rpf-special-case-dhcp-bootp;
}
}
}
}
3. Commit the configuration.
[edit]
commit;
Configuring Unicast RPF Loose Mode
By default, unicast RPF uses strict mode. Unicast RPF loose mode is similar to unicast
RPF strict mode and has the same configuration restrictions. The only check in loose
mode is whether the packet has a source address with a corresponding prefix in the
routing table; loose mode does not check whether the interface expects to receive a
packet with a specific source address prefix. If a corresponding prefix is not found, unicast
RPF loose mode does not accept the packet. As in strict mode, loose mode counts the
failed packet and optionally forwards it to a fail filter, which either accepts, rejects, logs,
samples, or polices the packet.
To configure unicast RPF loose mode, include the mode:
mode loose;
You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family (inet | inet6) rpf-check
<fail-filter filter-name>]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit
logical-unit-number family (inet | inet6) rpf-check <fail-filter filter-name>]
Example: Configuring Unicast RPF Loose Mode
In this example, no special configuration beyond device initialization is required.
Configure unicast RPF loose mode, and apply a fail filter that allows the interface to
accept BOOTP packets and DHCP packets. The filter accepts all packets with a source
address of 0.0.0.0 and a destination address of 255.255.255.255.
34
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 3: Configuring Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding (RPF) to Prevent IP Spoofing
To configure unicast RPF in strict mode:
1.
Configure the fail filter:
[edit firewall]
filter rpf-special-case-dhcp-bootp {
term allow-dhcp-bootp {
from {
source-address {
0.0.0.0/32;
}
address {
255.255.255.255/32;
}
}
then {
count rpf-dhcp-bootp-traffic;
accept;
}
}
term default {
then {
log;
reject;
}
}
}
2. Configure unicast RPF on interfaces:
[edit]
interfaces {
so-0/0/0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
rpf-check fail-filter rpf-special-case-dhcp-bootp;
mode loose;
}
}
}
}
3. Commit the configuration.
[edit]
commit;
Configuring Unicast RPF Loose Mode with Ability to Discard Packets
Starting with Junos OS Release 12.1, unicast RPF loose mode has the ability to discard
packets with the source address pointing to the discard interface. This feature is supported
on MX Series routers and on T Series routers with Type 1 FPCs, Type 2 FPCs, and Type 3
FPCs. Using unicast RPF loose mode, along with Remote Triggered Black Hole (RTBH)
filtering, provides an efficient way to discard packets coming from known attack sources.
BGP policies in edge routers ensure that packets with untrusted source addresses have
their next hop set to a discard route. When a packet arrives at the router with an untrusted
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
35
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
source address, unicast RPF performs a route lookup of the source address. Because the
source address route points to a discard next hop, the packet is dropped and a counter
is incremented. This feature is supported on both IPv4 (inet) and IPv6 (inet6) address
families.
To configure unicast RPF loose mode with the ability to discard packets, include the
rpf-loose-mode-discard family inet statement at the [edit forwarding-options] hierarchy
level:
rpf-loose-mode-discard {
family {
inet;
}
}
Example: Configuring Unicast RPF Loose Mode with Ability to Discard Packets
In this example, no special configuration beyond device initialization is required.
Configure unicast RPF loose mode, and apply a fail filter that allows the interface to
accept BOOTP packets and DHCP packets. The filter accepts all packets with a source
address of 0.0.0.0 and a destination address of 255.255.255.255.
To configure unicast RPF loose mode with the ability to discard packets:
1.
Configure the fail filter:
[edit firewall]
filter rpf-special-case-dhcp-bootp {
term allow-dhcp-bootp {
from {
source-address {
0.0.0.0/32;
}
address {
255.255.255.255/32;
}
}
then {
count rpf-dhcp-bootp-traffic;
accept;
}
}
term default {
then {
log;
reject;
}
}
}
2. Configure unicast RPF on interfaces:
[edit]
interfaces {
so-0/0/0 {
36
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 3: Configuring Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding (RPF) to Prevent IP Spoofing
unit 0 {
family inet {
rpf-check fail-filter rpf-special-case-dhcp-bootp;
mode loose;
}
}
}
}
3. Configure the ability to discard packets.
[edit]
forwarding-options{
rpf-loose-mode-discard {
family {
inet;
}
}
}
4. Commit the configuration.
[edit]
commit;
Configuring Unicast RPF on a VPN
You can configure unicast RPF on a VPN interface by enabling unicast RPF on the interface
and including the interface statement at the [edit routing-instances routing-instance-name]
hierarchy level.
You can configure unicast RPF only on the interfaces you specify in the routing instance.
This means the following:
•
For Layer 3 VPNs, unicast RPF is supported on the CE router interface.
•
Unicast RPF is not supported on core-facing interfaces.
•
For virtual-router routing instances, unicast RPF is supported on all interfaces you
specify in the routing instance.
•
If an input filter forwards packets anywhere other than the routing instance the input
interface is configured for, the unicast RPF check is not performed.
For more information about VPNs and virtual-router routing instances, see the Junos OS
VPNs Library for Routing Devices. For more information about FBF, see the Junos OS
Routing Protocols Library for Routing Devices.
Example: Configuring Unicast RPF on a VPN
Configure unicast RPF on a Layer 3 VPN interface:
[edit interfaces]
so-0/0/0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
rpf-check;
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Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
}
}
}
[edit routing-instance]
VPN-A {
interface so-0/0/0.0;
}
Example: Configuring Unicast RPF
Configure unicast RPF strict mode, and apply a fail filter that allows the interface to
accept BOOTP packets and DHCP packets. The filter accepts all packets with a source
address of 0.0.0.0 and a destination address of 255.255.255.255.
[edit firewall]
filter rpf-special-case-dhcp-bootp {
term allow-dhcp-bootp {
from {
source-address {
0.0.0.0/32;
}
address {
255.255.255.255/32;
}
}
then {
count rpf-dhcp-bootp-traffic;
accept;
}
}
term default {
then {
log;
reject;
}
}
}
[edit]
interfaces {
so-0/0/0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
rpf-check fail-filter rpf-special-case-dhcp-bootp;
}
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
38
•
unicast-reverse-path on page 110
•
Example: Configuring Unicast Reverse-Path-Forwarding Check
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 4
Configuring Multicast RPF to Optimize a
Router or Switch’s Multicast Forwarding
State
•
Understanding Multicast Reverse Path Forwarding on page 39
Understanding Multicast Reverse Path Forwarding
Unicast forwarding decisions are typically based on the destination address of the packet
arriving at a router. The unicast routing table is organized by destination subnet and
mainly set up to forward the packet toward the destination.
In multicast, the router or switch forwards the packet away from the source to make
progress along the distribution tree and prevent routing loops. The router's or switch’s
multicast forwarding state runs more logically by organizing tables based on the reverse
path, from the receiver back to the root of the distribution tree. This process is known as
reverse-path forwarding (RPF).
The router or switch adds a branch to a distribution tree depending on whether the request
for traffic from a multicast group passes the reverse-path-forwarding check (RPF check).
Every multicast packet received must pass an RPF check before it is eligible to be
replicated or forwarded on any interface.
The RPF check is essential for every router's multicast implementation. When a multicast
packet is received on an interface, the router or switch interprets the source address in
the multicast IP packet as the destination address for a unicast IP packet. The source
multicast address is found in the unicast routing table, and the outgoing interface is
determined. If the outgoing interface found in the unicast routing table is the same as
the interface that the multicast packet was received on, the packet passes the RPF check.
Multicast packets that fail the RPF check are dropped because the incoming interface
is not on the shortest path back to the source.
Figure 2 on page 40 shows how multicast routers can use the unicast routing table to
perform an RPF check and how the results obtained at each router determine where join
messages are sent.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
39
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Figure 2: Multicast Routers and the RPF Check
Routers and switches can build and maintain separate tables for RPF purposes. The
router must have some way to determine its RPF interface for the group, which is the
interface topologically closest to the root. For greatest efficiency, the distribution tree
follows the shortest-path tree topology. The RPF check helps to construct this tree.
RPF Table
The RPF table plays the key role in the multicast router or switch. The RPF table is
consulted for every RPF check, which is performed at intervals on multicast packets
entering the multicast router. Distribution trees of all types rely on the RPF table to form
properly, and the multicast forwarding state also depends on the RPF table.
RPF checks are performed only on unicast addresses to find the upstream interface for
the multicast source or RP.
The routing table used for RPF checks can be the same routing table used to forward
unicast IP packets, or it can be a separate routing table used only for multicast RPF
checks. In either case, the RPF table contains only unicast routes, because the RPF check
is performed on the source address of the multicast packet, not the multicast group
destination address, and a multicast address is forbidden from appearing in the source
address field of an IP packet header. The unicast address can be used for RPF checks
because there is only one source host for a particular stream of IP multicast content for
a multicast group address, although the same content could be available from multiple
sources.
If the same routing table used to forward unicast packets is also used for the RPF checks,
the routing table is populated and maintained by the traditional unicast routing protocols
such as BGP, IS-IS, OSPF, and the Routing Information Protocol (RIP). If a dedicated
multicast RPF table is used, this table must be populated by some other method. Some
multicast routing protocols (such as the Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol
[DVMRP]) essentially duplicate the operation of a unicast routing protocol and populate
a dedicated RPF table. Others, such as PIM, do not duplicate routing protocol functions
and must rely on some other routing protocol to set up this table, which is why PIM is
protocol independent.
40
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 4: Configuring Multicast RPF to Optimize a Router or Switch’s Multicast Forwarding State
Some traditional routing protocols such as BGP and IS-IS now have extensions to
differentiate between different sets of routing information sent between routers and
switches for unicast and multicast. For example, there is multiprotocol BGP (MBGP) and
multitopology routing in IS-IS (M-IS-IS). IS-IS routes can be added to the RPF table even
when special features such as traffic engineering and “shortcuts” are turned on. Multicast
Open Shortest Path First (MOSPF) also extends OSPF for multicast use, but goes further
than MBGP or M-IS-IS and makes MOSPF into a complete multicast routing protocol on
its own. When these routing protocols are used, routes can be tagged as multicast RPF
routers and used by the receiving router differently than the unicast routing information.
Using the main unicast routing table for RPF checks provides simplicity. A dedicated
routing table for RPF checks allows a network administrator to set up separate paths
and routing policies for unicast and multicast traffic, allowing the multicast network to
function more independently of the unicast network.
By default, PIM uses inet.0 as its reverse-path forwarding (RPF) routing table group. PIM
uses an RPF routing table group to resolve its RPF neighbor for a particular multicast
source address and for the RP address. PIM can optionally use inet.2 as its RPF routing
table group. The inet.2 routing table is organized more efficiently for RPF checks.
Once configured, the RPF routing table must be applied to a PIM as a routing table group.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
41
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
42
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 5
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch
•
Understanding Layer 2 Virtual Switches Instances on page 43
•
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch on page 44
•
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch with a Layer 2 Trunk Port on page 45
•
Configuring a Logical Interface for Access Mode on page 46
•
Configuring VLAN Encapsulation on page 46
•
Rewriting the Inner and Outer VLAN Tags on page 47
•
Rewriting the VLAN Tag on Tagged Frames on page 48
•
Binding VLAN IDs to Logical Interfaces on page 49
•
Configuring Load Balancing on a LAG Link on page 54
•
Example: Configuring Load Balancing on a LAG Link on page 55
Understanding Layer 2 Virtual Switches Instances
At Layer 2, you can group one or more VLANs into a single routing instance to form a
virtual switch instance. A virtual switch instance is composed of VLANs. The virtual switch
instance isolates a LAN segment and contains most Layer 2 functions, such as
spanning-tree protocol instances and VLAN ID spaces, into it’s own smaller, logical
network. Splitting Layer 2 traffic using virtual switch instances allows you to more logically
organize your Layer 2 traffic into multiple “virtual” Layer 2 networks.
A default virtual switch, called default-switch, is automatically created when a virtual
switch is configured. All Layer 2 traffic not assigned to a VLAN in a virtual switch
automatically becomes part of the default virtual switch.
You can configure a virtual switch to participate only in Layer 2 bridging and optionally
to perform Layer 3 routing. In addition, you can configure spanning-tree protocols (STPs)
within the virtual switch to prevent forwarding loops. For more information about how
to configure Layer 2 logical ports on an interface, see the Junos OS Network Interfaces
Library for Routing Devices.
You can associate one or more logical interfaces configured as trunk interfaces with a
virtual switch. A trunk interface, or Layer 2 trunk port, enables you to configure a logical
interface to represent multiple VLANs on the physical interface. For more information
about how to configure trunk interfaces, see the Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for
Routing Devices.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
43
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
You can also configure Layer 2 forwarding and learning properties for the virtual switch.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch on page 44
•
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch with a Layer 2 Trunk Port on page 45
•
Configuring a Layer 2 Control Protocol Routing Instance
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch
A Layer 2 virtual switch, which isolates a LAN segment with its spanning-tree protocol
instance and separates its VLAN ID space, filters and forwards traffic only at the data
link layer. Each VLAN consists of a set of logical ports that participate in Layer 2 learning
and forwarding. A virtual switch represents a Layer 2 network.
Two main types of interfaces are used in virtual switch hierarchies:
•
Layer 2 logical interface—This type of interface uses the VLAN-ID as a virtual circuit
identifier and the scope of the VLAN-ID is local to the interface port. This type of
interface is often used in service-provider-centric applications.
•
Access or trunk interface—This type of interface uses a VLAN-ID with global significance.
The access or trunk interface is implicitly associated with VLANs based on VLAN
membership. Access or trunk interfaces are typically used in enterprise-centric
applications.
NOTE: The difference between access interfaces and trunk interfaces is
that access interfaces can be part of one VLAN only and the interface is
normally attached to an end-user device (packets are implicitly associated
with the configured VLAN). In contrast, trunk interfaces multiplex traffic
from multiple VLANs and usually interconnect switches.
To configure a Layer 2 virtual switch, include the following statements:
[edit]
routing-instances {
routing-instance-name (
instance-type virtual-switch;
vlans vlan-name{
vlan-id (all | none | number);
[...configure optional VLAN parameters]
}
}
}
To enable a virtual switch, you must specify virtual-switch as the instance-type.
The VLANs that are specified with the vlan-id statement are included in the virtual switch.
You can configure other optional VLAN parameters in the virtual switch.
44
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch with a Layer 2 Trunk Port on page 45
•
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch for MX Series Routers
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch with a Layer 2 Trunk Port
You can associate one or more Layer 2 trunk interfaces with a virtual switch.
A virtual switch configured with a Layer 2 trunk port also supports IRB within a VLAN. IRB
provides simultaneous support for Layer 2 bridging and Layer 3 IP routing on the same
interface. Only an interface configured with the interface-mode (access | trunk) statement
can be associated with a virtual switch. An access interface enables you to accept packets
with no VLAN identifier.
In addition, you can configure Layer 2 learning and forwarding properties for the virtual
switch.
To configure a virtual switch with a Layer 2 trunk interface, include the following
statements:
[edit]
routing-instances {
routing-instance-name {
instance-type virtual-switch;
interface interface-name;
vlans name{
vlan-id (all | none | number);
[...configure optional VLAN parameters]
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch on page 44
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
45
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Configuring a Logical Interface for Access Mode
Enterprise network administrators can configure a single logical interface to accept
untagged packets and forward the packets within a specified VLAN. A logical interface
configured to accept untagged packets is called an access interface or access port.
interface-mode access;
You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family ethernet-switching]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit
logical-unit-number family ethernet-switching]
When an untagged or tagged packet is received on an access interface, the packet is
accepted, the VLAN ID is added to the packet, and the packet is forwarded within the
VLAN that is configured with the matching VLAN ID.
The following example configures a logical interface as an access port with a VLAN ID
of 20 on routers and switches that support the enhanced Layer 2 software:
[edit interfaces ge-1/2/0]
unit 1 {
family ethernet-switching {
interface-mode access;
vlan members 20;
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
802.1Q VLANs Overview
•
Ethernet Interfaces Feature Guide for Routing Devices
Configuring VLAN Encapsulation
To configure encapsulation on an interface, enter the encapsulation statement at the
[edit interfaces interface-name] hierarchy level:
[edit interfaces interface-name]
encapsulation type;
The following list contains important notes regarding encapsulation:
46
•
Ethernet interfaces in VLAN mode can have multiple logical interfaces. In CCC and
VPLS modes, VLAN IDs from 1 through 511 are reserved for normal VLANs, and VLAN
IDs 512 through 4094 are reserved for CCC or VPLS VLANs. For 4-port Fast Ethernet
interfaces, you can use VLAN IDs 512 through 1024 for CCC or VPLS VLANs.
•
For encapsulation type flexible-ethernet-services, all VLAN IDs are valid.
•
For some encapsulation types, including flexible Ethernet services, Ethernet VLAN CCC,
and VLAN VPLS, you can also configure the encapsulation type that is used inside the
VLAN circuit itself. To do this, include the encapsulation statement:
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch
encapsulation (vlan-ccc | vlan-tcc | vlan-vpls);
You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit
logical-unit-number]
•
You cannot configure a logical interface with VLAN CCC or VLAN VPLS encapsulation
unless you also configure the physical device with the same encapsulation or with
flexible Ethernet services encapsulation. In general, the logical interface must have a
VLAN ID of 512 or higher; if the VLAN ID is 511 or lower, it will be subject to the normal
destination filter lookups in addition to source address filtering. However if you configure
flexible Ethernet services encapsulation, this VLAN ID restriction is removed.
In general, you configure an interface’s encapsulation at the [edit interfaces
interface-name] hierarchy level.
Example: Configuring VLAN Encapsulation on a Gigabit Ethernet Interface
Configure VLAN CCC encapsulation on a Gigabit Ethernet interface:
interfaces ge-2/1/0 {
vlan-tagging;
encapsulation vlan-ccc;
unit 0 {
encapsulation vlan-ccc;
vlan-id 600;
}
}
Example: Configuring VLAN Encapsulation on an Aggregated Ethernet Interface
Configure VLAN CCC encapsulation on an aggregated Gigabit Ethernet interface:
interfaces ae0 {
vlan-tagging;
encapsulation vlan-vpls;
unit 0 {
vlan-id 100;
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
802.1Q VLANs Overview
•
Ethernet Interfaces Feature Guide for Routing Devices
Rewriting the Inner and Outer VLAN Tags
On Ethernet IQ, IQ2 and IQ2-E interfaces, on MX Series router Gigabit Ethernet, Tri-Rate
Ethernet copper, and 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, and on aggregated Ethernet
interfaces using Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 and IQ2-E or 10-Gigabit Ethernet PICs on MX Series
routers, to replace both the inner and the outer VLAN tags of the incoming frame with a
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
47
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
user-specified VLAN tag value, include the swap-swap statement in the input VLAN map
or output VLAN map:
swap-swap;
You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number input-vlan-map]
•
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number output-vlan-map]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit
logical-unit-number input-vlan-map]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit
logical-unit-number output-vlan-map]
See Configuring Inner and Outer TPIDs and VLAN IDs and Configuring Inner and Outer TPIDs
and VLAN IDs for information about configuring inner and outer VLAN ID values and inner
and outer TPID values required for VLAN maps.
Related
Documentation
•
input-vlan-map
•
output-vlan-map
•
swap-swap
•
unit
•
Ethernet Interfaces Feature Guide for Routing Devices
Rewriting the VLAN Tag on Tagged Frames
To rewrite the VLAN tag on all tagged frames entering the interface to a specified VLAN
ID and TPID, include the swap, tag-protocol-id, and vlan-id statements in the input VLAN
map:
input-vlan-map {
swap;
vlan-id number;
tag-protocol-id tpid;
}
To rewrite the VLAN tag on all tagged frames exiting the interface to a specified VLAN
ID and TPID, include the swap and tag-protocol-id statements in the output VLAN map:
output-vlan-map {
swap;
vlan-id number;
tag-protocol-id tpid;
}
You can include these statements at the following hierarchy levels:
•
48
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number input-vlan-map]
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit
logical-unit-number input-vlan-map]
You cannot include both the swap statement and the vlan-id statement in the output
VLAN map configuration. If you include the swap statement in the configuration, the
VLAN ID in outgoing frames is rewritten to the VLAN ID bound to the logical interface.
For more information about binding a VLAN ID to the logical interface, see 802.1Q VLANs
Overview.
The swap operation works on the outer tag only, whether or not you include the
stacked-vlan-tagging statement in the configuration. For more information, see Examples:
Stacking and Rewriting Gigabit Ethernet IQ VLAN Tags.
Related
Documentation
•
input-vlan-map
•
output-vlan-map
•
swap
•
vlan-id
•
tag-protocol-id
•
unit
•
For more information about binding a VLAN ID to the logical interface, see 802.1Q
VLANs Overview.
•
For more information about the swap operation, see Examples: Stacking and Rewriting
Gigabit Ethernet IQ VLAN Tags.
•
Ethernet Interfaces Feature Guide for Routing Devices
Binding VLAN IDs to Logical Interfaces
The following sections describe how to configure logical interfaces to receive and forward
VLAN-tagged frames:
•
Binding VLAN IDs to Logical Interfaces Overview on page 49
•
Binding a VLAN ID to a Logical Interface on page 50
•
Binding a Range of VLAN IDs to a Logical Interface on page 51
•
Binding a List of VLAN IDs to a Logical Interface on page 52
Binding VLAN IDs to Logical Interfaces Overview
To configure a logical interface to receive and forward VLAN-tagged frames, you must
bind a VLAN ID, a range of VLAN IDs, or a list of VLAN IDs to the logical interface.
Table 4 on page 50 lists the configuration statements you use to bind VLAN IDs to logical
interfaces, organized by scope of the VLAN IDs used to match incoming packets:
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
49
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Table 4: Configuration Statements Used to Bind VLAN IDs to Logical Interfaces
Scope of VLAN
ID Matching
Type of VLAN Framing Supported on the Logical Interface
Single-Tag Framing
Dual-Tag Framing
VLAN ID
vlan-id vlan-id;
vlan-tags outer tpid.<vlan-id> inner tpidvlan-id;
VLAN ID Range
vlan-id-range vlan-id–vlan-id;
vlan-tags outer tpid.vlan-id inner-range tpid.vlan-id–vlan-id;
VLAN ID List
vlan-id-list [vlan-id
vlan-id–vlan-id];
vlan-tags outer <tpid.>vlan-id inner-list [vlan-id vlan-id–vlan-id];
You can include all of the statements at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit
logical-unit-number]
NOTE: The inner-list option of the vlan-tags statement does not support Tag
Protocol ID (TPID) values.
Binding a VLAN ID to a Logical Interface
A logical interface that you have associated (bound) to a particular VLAN ID will receive
and forward incoming frames that contain a matching VLAN ID.
Binding a VLAN ID to a Single-Tag Logical Interface
To bind a VLAN ID to a single-tag logical interface, include the vlan-id statement:
vlan-id vlan-id;
You can include the statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit interfaces ethernet-interface-name unit logical-unit-number]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces ethernet-interface-name unit
logical-unit-number]
To configure an Ethernet interface to support single-tag logical interfaces, include the
vlan-tagging statement at the [edit interfaces ethernet-interface-name] hierarchy level.
To support mixed tagging, include the flexible-vlan-tagging statement instead.
Binding a VLAN ID to a Dual-Tag Logical Interface
To bind a VLAN ID to a dual-tag logical interface, include the vlan-tags statement:
vlan-tags inner <tpid.>vlan-id outer <tpid.>vlan-id;
You can include the statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
50
[edit interfaces ethernet-interface-name unit logical-unit-number]
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces ethernet-interface-name unit
logical-unit-number]
To configure an Ethernet interface to support dual-tag logical interfaces, include the
stacked-vlan-tagging statement at the [edit interfaces ethernet-interface-name] hierarchy
level. To support mixed tagging, include the flexible-vlan-tagging statement instead.
Binding a Range of VLAN IDs to a Logical Interface
A VLAN range can be used by service providers to interconnect multiple VLANs belonging
to a particular customer over multiple sites. Using a VLAN ID range conserves switch
resources and simplifies configuration.
Binding a Range of VLAN IDs to a Single-Tag Logical Interface
To bind a range of VLAN IDs to a single-tag logical interface, include the vlan-id-range
statement:
vlan-id-range vlan-id-vlan-id;
You can include the statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit interfaces ethernet-interface-name unit logical-unit-number]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces ethernet-interface-name unit
logical-unit-number]
To configure an Ethernet interface to support single-tag logical interfaces, include the
vlan-tagging statement at the [edit interfaces ethernet-interface-name] hierarchy level.
To support mixed tagging, include the flexible-vlan-tagging statement instead.
Binding a Range of VLAN IDs to a Dual-Tag Logical Interface
To bind a range of VLAN IDs to a dual-tag logical interface, include the vlan-tags
statement. Use the inner–list option to specify the VLAN IDs as an inclusive range by
separating the starting VLAN ID and ending VLAN ID with a hyphen.
vlan-tags inner–list [ vlan-id vlan-id–vlan-id ] outer <tpid.>vlan-id;
You can include the statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit interfaces ethernet-interface-name unit logical-unit-number]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces ethernet-interface-name unit
logical-unit-number]
To configure an Ethernet interface to support dual-tag logical interfaces, include the
stacked-vlan-tagging statement at the [edit interfaces ethernet-interface-name] hierarchy
level. To support mixed tagging, include the flexible-vlan-tagging statement instead.
Example: Binding Ranges VLAN IDs to Logical Interfaces
The following example configures two different ranges of VLAN IDs on two different
logical ports:
[edit interfaces]
ge-3/0/0 {
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Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
unit 0 {
encapsulation vlan-bridge;
vlan-id-range 500-600;
}
}
ge-3/0/1 {
flexible-vlan-tagging;
unit 0 {
encapsulation vlan-bridge;
vlan-id-range 200-300;
}
unit 1 {
encapsulation vlan-bridge;
vlan-tags outer 1000 inner-range 100-200;
}
}
Binding a List of VLAN IDs to a Logical Interface
In Junos OS Release 9.5 and later, on MX Series routers and in Junos OS Release 12.2R2
and later on EX Series switches, you can bind a list of VLAN IDs to a single logical interface,
eliminating the need to configure a separate logical interface for every VLAN or VLAN
range. A logical interface that accepts packets tagged with any VLAN ID specified in a
VLAN ID list is called a VLAN-bundled logical interface.
You can use VLAN-bundled logical interfaces to configure circuit cross-connects between
Layer 2 VPN routing instances or Layer 2 circuits. Using VLAN-bundled logical interfaces
simplifies configuration and reduces use of system resources such as logical interfaces,
next hops, and circuits.
As an alternative to configuring multiple logical interfaces (one for each VLAN ID and
one for each range of VLAN IDs), you can configure a single VLAN-bundled logical interface
based on a list of VLAN IDs.
NOTE: The vlan-id option is not supported to achieve VLAN normalization
on VPLS instances that are configured with vlan-id-list. However, you can
use the vlan-maps option to achieve VLAN normalization.
Binding a List of VLAN IDs to a Single-Tag Logical Interface
To bind a list of VLAN IDs to a single-tag logical interface, include the vlan-id-list
statement. Specify the VLAN IDs in the list individually by using a space to separate each
ID, as an inclusive list by separating the starting VLAN ID and ending VLAN ID with a
hyphen, or as a combination of both.
vlan-id-list [ vlan-id vlan-id–vlan-id ];
You can include the statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit interfaces ethernet-interface-name unit logical-unit-number]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces ethernet-interface-name unit
logical-unit-number]
52
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch
To configure an Ethernet interface to support single-tag logical interfaces, include the
vlan-tagging statement at the [edit interfaces ethernet-interface-name] hierarchy level.
To support mixed tagging, include the flexible-vlan-tagging statement instead.
Binding a List of VLAN IDs to a Dual-Tag Logical Interface
To bind a list of VLAN IDs to a dual-tag logical interface, include the vlan-tags statement.
Use the inner-list option to specify the VLAN IDs individually by using a space to separate
each ID, as an inclusive list by separating the starting VLAN ID and ending VLAN ID with
a hyphen, or as a combination of both:
vlan-tags inner-list [vlan-id vlan-id–vlan-id ] outer <tpid>vlan-id;
NOTE: The inner-list option of the vlan-tags statement does not support Tag
Protocol ID (TPID) values.
You can include the statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit interfaces ethernet-interface-name unit logical-unit-number]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces ethernet-interface-name unit
logical-unit-number]
To configure an Ethernet interface to support dual-tag logical interfaces, include the
stacked-vlan-tagging statement at the [edit interfaces ethernet-interface-name] hierarchy
level. To support mixed tagging, include the flexible-vlan-tagging statement instead.
Example: Binding Lists of VLAN IDs to Logical Interfaces
The following example configures two different lists of VLAN IDs on two different logical
ports:
[edit interfaces]
ge-1/1/0 {
vlan-tagging; # Only for single-tagging
encapsulation flexible-ethernet-services;
unit 10 {
encapsulation vlan-ccc;
vlan-id-list [20 30–40 45];
}
}
ge-1/1/1 {
flexible-vlan-tagging; # Only for mixed tagging
encapsulation flexible-ethernet-services;
unit 10 {
encapsulation vlan-ccc;
vlan-id-list [1 10 20 30–40];
}
unit 20 {
encapsulation vlan-ccc;
vlan-tags outer 200 inner-list [50–60 80 90–100];
}
}
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Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
In the example configuration above, ge-1/1/0 supports single-tag logical interfaces, and
ge-1/1/1 supports mixed tagging. The single-tag logical interfaces ge-1/1/0.10 and
ge-1/1/1.20 each bundle lists of VLAN IDs. The dual-tag logical interface ge-1/1/1.20
bundles lists of inner VLAN IDs.
TIP: You can group a range of identical interfaces into an interface range and
then apply a common configuration to that interface range. For example, in
the above example configuration, both interfaces ge-1/1/0 and ge-1/1/1 have
the same physical encapsulation type of flexible-ethernet-services. Thus you
can define an interface range with the interfaces ge-1/1/0 and ge-1/1/1 as its
members and apply the encapsulation type flexible-ethernet-services to that
defined interface range. For more information about interface ranges, see
Configuring Interface Ranges.
Related
Documentation
•
802.1Q VLANs Overview
•
Configuring Interface Ranges
•
Ethernet Interfaces Feature Guide for Routing Devices
Configuring Load Balancing on a LAG Link
You can configure the load balancing hash key for Layer 2 traffic to use fields in the Layer 3
and Layer 4 headers inside the frame payload for load-balancing purposes using the
payload statement. You can configure the statement to look at layer-3 (and source-ip-only
or destination-ip-only packet header fields) or layer-4 fields. You configure this statement
at the [edit forwarding-options hash-key family multiservice] hierarchy level.
You can configure Layer 3 or Layer 4 options, or both. The source-ip-only or
destination-ip-only options are mutually exclusive. The layer-3-only statement is not
available on MX Series routers.
By default, Junos implementation of 802.3ad balances traffic across the member links
within an aggregated Ethernet bundle based on the Layer 3 information carried in the
packet.
For more information about link aggregation group (LAG) configuration, see the Junos
OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices.
Related
Documentation
54
•
Load Balancing and Ethernet Link Aggregation on page 8
•
Load Balancing on a LAG Link on page 55
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch
Example: Configuring Load Balancing on a LAG Link
This example configures the load-balancing hash key to use the source Layer 3 IP address
option and Layer 4 header fields as well as the source and destination MAC addresses
for load balancing on a link aggregation group (LAG) link:
[edit]
forwarding-options {
hash-key {
family multiservice {
source-mac;
destination-mac;
payload {
ip {
layer-3 {
source-ip-only;
}
layer-4;
}
}
}
}
}
NOTE: Any change in the hash key configuration requires a reboot of the FPC
for the changes to take effect.
Related
Documentation
•
Load Balancing and Ethernet Link Aggregation on page 8
•
Configuring Load Balancing on a LAG Link on page 54
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
55
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
56
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 2
Configuration Statements and
Operational Commands
•
Configuration Statements on page 59
•
Operational Commands on page 115
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
58
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 6
Configuration Statements
•
[edit chassis] Hierarchy Level on page 60
•
[edit dynamic-profiles] Hierarchy Level on page 68
•
[edit forwarding-options rpf-loose-mode-discard] Hierarchy Level on page 69
•
[edit interfaces] Hierarchy Level on page 69
•
[edit protocols isis] Hierarchy Level on page 80
•
Layer 2 Routing Instances Configuration Hierarchy on page 83
•
bandwidth (Interfaces) on page 86
•
filter on page 87
•
flow-control on page 88
•
forward-and-send-to-re on page 89
•
forward-only on page 89
•
gratuitous-arp-reply on page 90
•
group (RPF Selection) on page 91
•
interface (Multichassis Protection) on page 91
•
l2-domain-id-for-l3 on page 92
•
lacp (Aggregated Ethernet) on page 93
•
layer3-domain-identifier on page 94
•
link-protection on page 95
•
mode (Interfaces) on page 96
•
multicast-rpf-routes on page 96
•
next-hop (PIM RPF Selection) on page 97
•
no-gratuitous-arp-request on page 97
•
no-local-switching on page 98
•
policer (MAC) on page 99
•
prefix-list (PIM RPF Selection) on page 100
•
rpf-check (Dynamic Profiles) on page 101
•
rpf-check (interfaces) on page 102
•
rpf-check-policy (Routing Options RPF) on page 103
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•
rpf-loose-mode-discard on page 104
•
rpf-selection on page 105
•
source (PIM RPF Selection) on page 106
•
targeted-broadcast on page 107
•
traceoptions (Individual Interfaces) on page 108
•
traps on page 109
•
unicast-reverse-path on page 110
•
unidirectional on page 111
•
vlan-tagging on page 112
•
wildcard-source (PIM RPF Selection) on page 113
[edit chassis] Hierarchy Level
chassis {
aggregated-devices {
ethernet {
device-count number;
lacp {
link-protection {
non-revertive;
}
system-priority;
}
}
sonet {
device-count number;
}
maximum-links maximum-links-limit;
}
alarm {
ds1 {
ais (ignore | red | yellow);
ylw (ignore | red | yellow);
}
ethernet {
link-down (ignore | red | yellow);
}
integrated-services {
failure (ignore | red | yellow);
}
management-ethernet {
link-down (ignore | red | yellow);
}
relay
input {
port port-number {
mode (close | open);
trigger (ignore | red | yellow;
}
}
output{
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port port-number {
input-relay input-relay;
mode (close | open);
temperature;
}
}
serial {
cts-absent (ignore | red | yellow);
dcd-absent (ignore | red | yellow);
dsr-absent (ignore | red | yellow);
loss-of-rx-clock (ignore | red | yellow);
loss-of-tx-clock (ignore | red | yellow);
tm-absent (ignore | red | yellow);
}
services {
hw-down (ignore | red | yellow);
linkdown (ignore | red | yellow);
pic-hold-reset (ignore | red | yellow);
pic-reset (ignore | red | yellow);
rx-errors (ignore | red | yellow);
sw-down (ignore | red | yellow);
tx-errors (ignore | red | yellow);
}
sonet {
(ais-l | ais-p | ber-sd | ber-sf | locd | lol | lop-p | los | pll | plm-p | rfi-l | rfl-p | uneq-p)
(ignore | red | yellow);
}
t3 {
(ais | exz | ferf | idle | lcv | lof | los | pll | ylw) (ignore | red | yellow);
}
}
cluster {
control-link-recovery;
control-ports {
fpc slot-number port port-number;
}
heartbeat-interval milliseconds;
heartbeat-threshold number;
redundancy-group {
... the redundancy-group subhierarchy appears at the end of the [edit chassis cluster]
hierarchy ...
}
reth-count number;
traceoptions {
file <filename > <files number> <match regular-expression> <size maximum-file-size>
<world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag;
level severity;
no-remote-trace;
}
redundancy-group group-number {
gratuitous-arp-count number;
hold-down-interval seconds;
interface-monitor {
interface-name weight number;
}
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ip-monitoring {
family {
inet {
ipv4-address {
interface rethindex.logical-unit-number secondary-ip-address ipv4-address;
weight number;
}
}
}
global-threshold number;
global-weight number;
retry-count count;
retry-interval interval;
}
node node-number priority priority-number;
preempt;
}
config-button {
no-clear;
no-rescue;
}
container-devices {
device-count number;
}
craft-lockout;
disable-power-management;
disk-partition partition-name (/config |/var) {
level (full | high) {
free-space threshold-value (mb | percent);
}
}
enhanced-policer;
extended-statistics;
fabric {
degraded {
action-fpc-restart-disable;
degraded-fabric-detection-enable
degraded-fpc-bad-plane-threshold number-bad-planes;
}
redundancy-mode (increased-bandwidth | redundant);
}
filter;
fpc slot-number {
... the fpc subhierarchy appears after the main [edit chassis] hierarchy ...
}
fpc-feb-connectivity {
fpc slot-number feb (slot-number | none);
}
fpc-resync;
fru-poweron-sequence sequence;
lcc index {
... the lcc subhierarchy appears after the main [edit chassis] hierarchy ...
}
maximum-ecmp value;
memory-enhanced {
filter;
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route;
vpn-label;
}
network-services (ethernet | enhanced-ethernet | ip | enhanced-ip);
(packet-scheduling | no-packet-scheduling);
pem {
minimum number;
}
policer-drop-probability-low;
ppp-subscriber-services (disable | enable);
redundancy {
cfeb slot (always | preferred);
failover {
on-disk-failure;
on-loss-of-keepalives;
}
feb {
redundancy-group group-name {
description description;
feb slot-number <backup | primary>;
no-auto-failover;
}
}
graceful-switchover;
keepalive-time seconds;
routing-engine slot-number (backup | disabled | master);
sfm slot-number (always | preferred);
ssb slot-number (always | preferred);
}
route-localization {
inet (chassis);
inet6;
}
routing-engine {
bios {
no-auto-upgrade;
}
on-disk-failure disk-failure-action (halt | reboot);
}
sfm slot-number {
power off;
}
sib {
minimum number;
}
(source-route | no-source-route);
state [
cb-upgrade [on | off];
}
synchronization { # for M Series and T Series routers
primary (external-a | external-b);
secondary (external-a | external-b);
signal-type (e1 | t1);
switching-mode (non-revertive | revertive);
transmitter-enable;
validation-interval seconds;
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y-cable-line-termination;
}
synchronization { # for MX80 and MX240 routers
clock-mode (auto-select | free-run);
esmc-transmit {
interfaces (all | interface-name);
}
hold-interval {
configuration-change seconds;
restart seconds;
switchover seconds;
}
network-option (option-1 | option-2);
quality-mode-enable;
selection-mode (configured-quality|received-quality);
source {
(external-a | external-b) {
priority number;
quality-level (prc | prs |sec | smc | ssu-a | ssu-b | st2 | st3 | st3e | st4 | stu | tnc);
request (force-switch | lockout);
}
interfaces interface-name {
priority number;
quality-level (prc | prs |sec | smc | ssu-a | ssu-b | st2 | st3 | st3e | st4 | stu | tnc);
request (force-switch | lockout);
wait-to-restore minutes;
}
}
switchover-mode (revertive | non-revertive);
}
synchronization { # for ACX Series routers
clock-mode (auto-select | free-run);
esmc-transmit {
interfaces (all | interface-name);
}
hold-interval {
configuration-change seconds;
restart seconds;
switchover seconds;
}
network-option (option-1 | option-2);
quality-mode-enable;
selection-mode (configured-quality | received-quality);
source {
(bits | gps) {
priority number;
quality-level (prc | prs |sec | smc | ssu-a | ssu-b | st2 | st3 | st3e | st4 | stu | tnc);
request (force-switch | lockout);
}
interfaces interface-name {
priority number;
quality-level (prc | prs |sec | smc | ssu-a | ssu-b | st2 | st3 | st3e | st4 | stu | tnc);
request (force-switch | lockout);
wait-to-restore minutes;
}
}
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switchover-mode(non-revertive | revertive);
}
system-domains {
protected-system-domains psdnumerical-index {
control-plane-bandwidth-percent percent;
control-slot-numbers [ slot-numbers ];
control-system-id control-system-id;
description description;
fpcs [ slot-numbers ];
}
root-domain-id root-domain-id;
}
vrf-mtu-check;
}
chassis {
fpc slot-number {
number-of-ports active-ports;
offline;
pic slot-number {
... the pic subhierarchy appears after the main [edit chassis fpc slot-number] hierarchy
...
}
port-mirror-instance port-mirror-instance-name;
power (off | on);
sampling-instance instance-name;
}
fpc slot-number {
pic slot-number {
adaptive-services {
service-package (layer-2 | layer-3 | ...the following extension-provider subhierarchy
...);
extension-provider {
control-cores number;
data-cores number;
data-flow-affinity {
hash-key (layer-3 | layer-4);
}
channelization;
forwarding-db-size megabytes;
object-cache-size megabytes;
package package-name;
policy-db-size megabytes;
syslog {
facility {
severity;
destination (pic-console | routing-engine);
}
}
wired-process-mem-size megabytes;
}
}
aggregated-devices {
ima {
device-count number;
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}
}
aggregate-ports;
atm-cell-relay-accumulation;
atm-l2circuit-mode (aal5 | cell | trunk trunk);
ce1 {
e1 port-number {
channel-group group-number timeslots slot-number;
}
}
ct3 {
port port-number {
t1 link-number {
channel-group group-number timeslots slot-number;
}
}
}
ethernet {
pic-mode (enhanced-switching | routing | switching);
}
fibre-channel {
port port-number;
port-range port-range-low port-range-high
}
egress-policer-overhead bytes;
forwarding-mode {
sa-multicast;
vlan-steering {
vlan-rule (high-low | odd-even);
}
}
framing (e1 | e3 | sdh | sonet | t1 | t3);
idle-cell-format {
itu-t;
payload-pattern payload-pattern-byte;
}
ingress-policer-overhead bytes;
inline-services {
bandwidth (1g | 10g);
}
linerate-mode;
max-queues-per-interface (4 | 8);
mlfr-uni-nni-bundles number;
no-concatenate;
no-multi-rate;
port port-number {
framing (e1 | e3 | sdh | sonet | t1 | t3);
forwarding-mode {
sa-multicast;
}
speed ( oc3-stm1 | oc12-stm4 | oc48-stm16);
}
port-mirror-instance port-mirror-instance-name;
q-pic-large-buffer {
(large-scale | small-scale);
}
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red-buffer-occupancy {
weighted-averaged <instant-usage-weight-exponent weight-value>;
}
shdsl {
pic-mode (1-port-atm | 2-port-atm);
}
sparse-dlcis;
traffic-manager {
egress-shaping-overhead number;
ingress-shaping-overhead number;
mode {
egress-only;
ingress-and-egress;
session-shaping;
}
}
tunnel-queuing;
tunnel-services {
bandwidth (1g | 10g | 20g | 40g);
tunnel-only;
}
vtmapping (itu-t | klm);
}
}
}
chassis {
lcc index {
fpc slot-number {
... the fpc subhierarchy appears after the main [edit chassis lcc index] hierarchy ...
}
offline;
online-expected;
}
}
lcc index {
fpc slot-number {
pic slot-number {
... the pic subhierarchy appears after the main [edit chassis lcc index fpc slot-number]
hierarchy ...
}
power (off | on);
sampling-instance instance-name;
}
fpc slot-number {
pic slot-number {
aggregate-ports;
atm-cell-relay-accumulation;
atm-l2circuit-mode (aal5 | cell | trunk trunk);
framing (e1 | e3 | sdh | sonet | t1 | t3);
idle-cell-format {
itu-t;
payload-pattern payload-pattern-byte;
}
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linerate-mode;
max-queues-per-interface (4 | 8);
no-concatenate;
no-mcast-replication;
no-pre-classifier;
port port-number {
framing (e1 | e3 | sdh | sonet | t1 | t3);
}
q-pic-large-buffer {
(large-scale | small-scale);
}
red-buffer-occupancy {
weighted-averaged <instant-usage-weight-exponent weight-value>;
}
shdsl {
pic-mode (1-port-atm | 2-port-atm);
}
traffic-manager {
egress-shaping-overhead bytes;
ingress-shaping-overhead bytes;
mode {
egress-only;
ingress-and-egress;
}
}
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
Notational Conventions Used in Junos OS Configuration Hierarchies
[edit dynamic-profiles] Hierarchy Level
dynamic-profiles {
profile-name {
class-of-service
... statements from those in [edit class-of-service] Hierarchy Level.
firewall
... statements from those in [edit firewall] Hierarchy Level.
interfaces
... statements from those in [edit interfaces] Hierarchy Level.
policy-options
... statements from those in [edit policy-options] Hierarchy Level.
predefined-variable-defaults variable-name default-value
profile-variable-set variable-set-name dynamic-variable-name substitute-variable-name
protocols
... statements from those in [edit protocols] Hierarchy Level.
routing-instances
... statements from those in [edit routing-instances] Hierarchy Level.
routing-options
... statements from those in [edit routing-options] Hierarchy Level.
services
... statements from those in [edit services] Hierarchy Level.
variables {
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variable-name {
default-value default-value;
equals expression;
mandatory;
}
uid;
uid-reference;
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
Notational Conventions Used in Junos OS Configuration Hierarchies
•
[edit dynamic-profiles routing-instances] Hierarchy Level
•
[edit dynamic-profiles routing-options] Hierarchy Level
•
[edit dynamic-profiles variables] Hierarchy Level
[edit forwarding-options rpf-loose-mode-discard] Hierarchy Level
rpf-loose-mode-discard {
family {
inet;
inet6;
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
Notational Conventions Used in Junos OS Configuration Hierarchies
•
[edit forwarding-options] Hierarchy Level
[edit interfaces] Hierarchy Level
The following statement hierarchy can also be included at the [edit logical-systems
logical-system-name] hierarchy level.
interfaces {
interface-name {
... the “interface-name” subhierarchy appears after the main [edit interfaces] hierarchy
level ...
}
interface-set interface-set-name {
interface interface-name {
(unit unit-number | vlan-tags-outer vlan-tag);
}
}
irb {
accounting-profile name;
description text;
(gratuitous-arp-reply | no-gratuitous-arp-reply);
hold-time up milliseconds down milliseconds;
mtu bytes;
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no-gratuitous-arp-request;
traceoptions {
flag flag;
}
(traps | no-traps);
unit logical-unit-number {
accounting-profile name;
bandwidth rate;
description text;
disable;
encapsulation type;
family inet {
accounting {
destination-class-usage;
source-class-usage {
input;
output;
}
}
address ipv4-address {
arp ip-address (mac | multicast-mac) mac-address <publish>;
broadcast address;
preferred;
primary;
vrrp-group group-id {
(accept-data | no-accept-data);
advertise-interval seconds;
advertisements-threshold number;
authentication-key key;
authentication-type authentication;
fast-interval milliseconds;
(preempt | no-preempt) {
hold-time seconds;
}
priority number;
track {
interface interface-name {
bandwidth-threshold bits-per-second priority-cost priority;
priority-cost priority;
}
priority-hold-time seconds;
route prefix/prefix-length routing-instance instance-name priority-cost priority;
}
virtual-address [ addresses ];
vrrp-inherit-from vrrp-group;
}
}
filter {
input filter-name;
output filter-name;
}
mtu bytes;
no-neighbor-learn;
no-redirects;
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primary;
rpf-check {
fail-filter filter-name;
mode {
loose;
}
}
targeted-broadcast {
forward-and-send-to-re;
forward-only;
}
}
family inet6 {
accounting {
destination-class-usage;
source-class-usage {
input;
output;
}
}
address address {
eui-64;
ndp ip-address (mac | multicast-mac) mac-address <publish>;
preferred;
primary;
vrrp-inet6-group group-id {
accept-data | no-accept-data;
advertisements-threshold number;
authentication-key key;
authentication-type authentication;
fast-interval milliseconds;
inet6-advertise-interval milliseconds;
preempt | no-preempt {
hold-time seconds;
}
priority number;
track {
interface interface-name {
bandwidth-threshold bandwidth priority-cost number;
priority-cost number;
}
priority-hold-time seconds;
route ip-address/mask routing-instance instance-name priority-cost cost;
}
virtual-inet6-address [addresses];
virtual-link-local-address ipv6–address;
vrrp-inherit-from {
active-group group-number;
active-interface interface-name;
}
}
}
(dad-disable | no-dad-disable);
filter {
input filter-name;
output filter-name;
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}
mtu bytes;
nd6-stale-time seconds;
no-neighbor-learn;
no-redirects;
policer {
input policer-name;
output policer-name;
}
rpf-check {
fail-filter filter-name;
mode {
loose;
}
}
}
family iso {
address interface-address;
mtu bytes;
}
family mpls {
filter {
input filter-name;
output filter-name;
}
mtu bytes;
policer {
input policer-name;
output policer-name;
}
}
native-inner-vlan-id vlan-id;
proxy-arp (restricted | unrestricted);
(traps | no-traps);
vlan-id-list [vlan-id’s];
vlan-id-range [vlan-id-range];
}
}
traceoptions {
file <filename> <files number> <match regular-expression> <size maximum-file-size>
<world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <disable>;
no-remote-trace;
}
}
interfaces {
interface-name {
disable;
accounting-profile name;
aggregated-ether-options {
ethernet-switch-profile {
tag-protocol-id [ hexadecimal-identifiers ];
}
(flow-control | no-flow-control);
lacp {
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(active | passive);
admin-key key;
fast-failover;
link-protection {
disable;
(revertive | non-revertive);
}
periodic (fast | slow);
system-id mac-address;
system-priority priority;
}
(link-protection | no-link-protection);
link-speed (100m | 1g | 8g | 10g | 40g | 50g | 80g | 100g | oc192);
logical-interface-fpc-redundancy;
(loopback | no-loopback);
mc-ae {
chassis-id chassis-id;
events {
iccp-peer-down {
force-icl-down;
prefer-status-control-active;
}
}
mc-ae-id mc-ae-id;
mode (active-active | active-standby);
redundancy-group group-id;
status-control (active | standby);
}
minimum-links number;
rebalance-periodic {
start-time time;
interval number;
}
source-address-filter {
mac-address;
}
(source-filtering | no-source-filtering);
}
auto-configure {
remove-when-no-subscribers;
stacked-vlan-ranges {
access-profile profile-name;
authentication {
password password-string;
username-include {
circuit-type;
delimiter delimiter-character;
domain-name domain-name-string;
interface-name;
mac-address;
option-82 ( circuit-id | remote-id);
radius-realm radius-realm-string;
user-prefix user-prefix-string;
}
}
dynamic-profile profile-name {
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accept (any | dhcp-v4 | dhcp-v6 | inet | inet6);
ranges (any | low-tag–high-tag),(any | low-tag–high-tag);
}
}
vlan-ranges {
access-profile profile-name;
authentication {
password password-string;
username-include {
circuit-type;
delimiter delimiter-character;
domain-name domain-name-string;
interface-name;
mac-address;
option-82;
radius-realm radius-realm-string;
user-prefix user-prefix-string;
}
}
dynamic-profile profile-name {
accept (any | dhcp-v4 | dhcp-v6 | inet | inet6);
ranges (any | low-tag)–(any | high-tag);
}
}
override tag vlan-tag dynamic-profile profile name;
}
encapsulation (ethernet-bridge | ethernet-vpls | extended-vlan-bridge |
extended-vlan-vpls | flexible-ethernet-services | vlan-vpls);
ether-options {
802.3ad {
aex;
(backup | primary);
lacp {
force-up;
port-priority
}
}
asynchronous-notification;
(auto-negotiation | no-auto-negotiation);
ethernet-switch-profile {
ethernet-policer-profile {
input-priority-map {
ieee802.1p premium [ values ];
}
output-priority-map {
classifier {
premium {
forwarding-class class-name {
loss-priority (high | low);
}
}
}
}
policer cos-policer-name {
aggregate {
bandwidth-limit bps;
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burst-size-limit bytes;
}
premium {
bandwidth-limit bps;
burst-size-limit bytes;
}
}
tag-protocol-id;
}
(mac-learn-enable | no-mac-learn-enable);
}
(flow-control | no-flow-control);
ignore-l3-incompletes;
link-mode (automatic | full-duplex | half-duplex);
(lloopback | no-loopback);
keepalives <interval seconds> <down-count number> <up-count number>;
speed (1g | 10m | 100m | 10m-100m | auto-negotiation);
source-address-filter {
mac-address;
}
source-filtering | no-source-filtering;
}
flexible-vlan-tagging;
(gratuitous-arp-reply | no-gratuitous-arp-reply);
hold-time (up milliseconds | down milliseconds);
interface-transmit-statistics;
(keepalives <down-count number> <interval seconds> <up-count number> |
no-keepalives);
layer2-policer {
apply-groups [ group-names ];
apply-groups-except [ group-names ];
}
link-mode (automatic | full-duplex);
mac mac-address;
mtu bytes;
multi-chassis-protection peer-ip-address {
interface interface-name;
}
native-vlan-id number;
no-gratuitous-arp-request;
optics-options {
alarm low–light–alarm {
(link-down | syslog);
}
warning low–light–warning {
(link-down | syslog);
}
wavelength nm;
}
passive-monitor-mode;
per-unit-scheduler;
speed (10m | 100m | 1g | auto | oc3 | oc12 | oc48);
stacked-vlan-tagging;
traceoptions {
flag flag;
}
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transmit-bucket {
overflow discard;
rate percentage;
threshold bytes;
}
(traps | no-traps);
unidirectional;
vlan-tagging;
}
interface-name {
unit logical-unit-number {
disable;
accept-source-mac {
mac-address mac-address {
policer {
input policer-name;
output policer-name;
}
}
}
accounting-profile name;
advisory-options {
downstream-rate rate;
upstream-rate rate;
}
arp-resp (restricted|unrestricted);
bandwidth rate;
clear-dont-fragment-bit;
copy-tos-to-outer-ip-header;
demux-destination family;
encapsulation (vlan-bridge | vlan-vpls);
epd-threshold cells plp1 cells;
filter filter-name;
inner-vlan-id-range start start-id end end-id;
input-vlan-map {
(pop | pop-pop | pop-swap | push | push-push | swap | swap-push | swap-swap);
inner-tag-protocol-id tpid;
inner-vlan-id number;
tag-protocol-id tpid;
vlan-id number;
}
interface-shared-with psdnumerical-index;
layer2-policer {
input-hierarchical-policer policer-name;
input-policer policer-name;
input-three-color policer-name;
output-policer policer-name;
output-three-color policer-name;
}
multi-chassis-protection peer-ip-address {
interface interface-name;
}
native-inner-vlan-id number;
output-vlan-map {
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(pop | pop-pop | pop-swap | push | push-push | swap | swap-push | swap-swap);
inner-tag-protocol-id tpid;
inner-vlan-id number;
tag-protocol-id tpid;
vlan-id number;
}
peer-interface interface-name;
peer-unit unit-number;
plp-to-clp;
proxy-arp <restricted | unrestricted>;
rpm {
(client | server);
twamp-server;
}
swap-by-poppush;
vlan-id number;
vlan-id-list [ vlan-id vlan-id-vlan-id ];
vlan-id-range number-number;
vlan-tags (inner <tpid.>vlan-id | inner-list [vlan-id vlan-id–vlan-id ] |
inner-range <tpid.>vlan-id–vlan-id) outer <tpid.>vlan-id;
}
unit logical-unit-number {
family ethernet-switching {
filter{
group filter-group-number;
(input filter-name | input-list [ filter-names ]);
(output filter-name | output-list [ filter-names ]);
(inner-vlan-id-list [ vlan-ids ] | vlan-id number | vlan-id-list [ number
number–number ]);
interface-mode (access | trunk);
policer {
input policer-name;
output policer-name;
}
vlan-rewrite {
translate old-vlan-id new-vlan-id;
}
vlan {
members [ all vlan-identifiers ];
}
}
family inet {
filter {
group filter-group-number;
(input filter-name | input-list [ filter-names ]);
(output filter-name | output-list [ filter-names ]);
}
input-hierarchical-policer policer-name;
mac-validate (loose | strict);
mtu bytes;
no-neighbor-learn;
no-redirects;
policer {
arp policer-template-name;
input policer-name;
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output policer-name;
}
primary;
receive-options-packets;
receive-ttl-exceeded;
rpf-check {
fail-filter filter-name;
mode loose;
}
sampling {
(input | output | input output);
}
simple-filter {
input filter-name;
}
targeted-broadcast {
forward-and-send-to-re;
forward-only;
}
unnumbered-address interface-name <destination address>
<destination-profile profile-name> <preferred-source-address address>;
}
family inet6 {
address ipv6-address {
destination destination-address;
eui-64;
ndp ipv6-address <l2-interface interface-name> <(mac mac-address |
multicast-mac multicast-mac-address) <publish>>;
preferred;
primary;
vrrp-inet6-group group-number {
(accept-data | no-accept-data);
fast-interval milliseconds;
inet6-advertise-interval seconds;
(no-preempt; | ... the following preempt statement ...)
preempt {
hold-time seconds;
}
priority number;
track {
interface interface-name {
bandwidth-threshold bits-per-second priority-cost priority;
priority-cost priority;
}
priority-hold-time seconds;
route ip-address-prefix/prefix-length routing-instance instance-name
priority-cost priority;
}
virtual-inet6-address [ addresses ];
virtual-link-local-address ipv6-address;
vrrp-inherit-from {
active-group group-number;
active-interface interface-name;
}
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}
}
(dad-disable | no-dad-disable);
filter {
group filter-group-number;
(input filter-name | input-list [ filter-names ]);
(output filter-name | output-list [ filter-names ]);
}
input-hierarchical-policer policer-name;
mtu bytes;
nd6-stale-time seconds;
no-neighbor-learn;
policer {
input policer-name;
output policer-name;
}
rpf-check {
fail-filter filter-name;
mode loose;
}
sampling {
(input | output | input output);
}
unnumbered-address interface-name preferred-source-address address;
}
family iso {
address iso-address;
mtu bytes;
}
family mlfr-end-to-end {
bundle logical-interface-name;
}
family mpls {
filter {
group filter-group-number;
(input filter-name | input-list [ filter-names ]);
(output filter-name | output-list [ filter-names ]);
}
input-hierarchical-policer policer-name;
maximum-labels maximum-labels;
mtu bytes;
policer {
input policer-name;
output policer-name;
}
}
family vpls {
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core-facing;
filter {
group filter-group-number;
(input filter-name | input-list [ filter-names ]);
(output filter-name | output-list [ filter-names ]);
}
policer {
input policer-name;
output policer-name;
}
}
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
Notational Conventions Used in Junos OS Configuration Hierarchies
[edit protocols isis] Hierarchy Level
The following statement hierarchy can also be included at the [edit protocols isis] hierarchy
level.
protocols {
isis {
disable;
clns-routing;
clns-updown-compatibility
context-identifier ip-address</prefix> {
level (1 | 2) <disable>;
}
export [ policy-names ];
graceful-restart {
disable;
helper-disable;
restart-duration seconds;
}
ignore-attached-bit;
interface interface-name {
... the interface subhierarchy appears after the main [edit protocols isis] hierarchy ...
}
label-switched-path name level level metric metric;
level (1 | 2) {
disable;
authentication-key key;
authentication-type authentication;
external-preference preference;
no-csnp-authentication;
no-hello-authentication;
no-psnp-authentication;
preference preference;
prefix-export-limit number;
wide-metrics-only;
}
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loose-authentication-check;
lsp-lifetime seconds;
max-areas number;
no-adjacency-holddown;
no-authentication-check;
no-ipv4-routing;
no-ipv6-routing;
overload {
advertise-high-metrics;
timeout seconds;
}
reference-bandwidth reference-bandwidth;
rib-group {
inet group-name;
inet6 group-name;
}
spf-options {
delay milliseconds;
holddown milliseconds;
rapid-runs number;
}
topologies {
ipv4-multicast;
ipv6-multicast;
ipv6-unicast;
}
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size maximum-file-size> <world-readable |
no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
traffic-engineering {
disable;
family inet {
shortcuts {
multicast-rpf-routes:
}
}
family inet6 {
shortcuts;
}
}
ignore-lsp-metrics;
}
isis {
interface interface-name {
disable;
bfd-liveness-detection {
authentication {
algorithm (keyed-md5 | keyed-sha-1 | meticulous-keyed-md5 |
meticulous-keyed-sha-1 | simple-password);
key-chain key-chain-name;
loose-check;
}
detection-time {
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threshold milliseconds;
}
minimum-interval milliseconds;
minimum-receive-interval milliseconds;
multiplier number;
no-adaptation;
transmit-interval {
minimum-interval milliseconds;
threshold milliseconds;
}
version (1 | automatic);
}
checksum;
csnp-interval (seconds | disable);
hello-padding (adaptive | loose | strict);
ldp-synchronization {
disable;
hold-time seconds;
}
level (1 | 2) {
disable;
hello-authentication-key key;
hello-authentication-type authentication;
hello-interval seconds;
hold-time seconds;
ipv4-multicast-metric number;
ipv6-multicast-metric number;
ipv6-unicast-metric number;
metric metric;
passive;
priority number;
te-metric metric;
}
link-protection;
lsp-interval milliseconds;
mesh-group (value | blocked);
no-adjacency-down-notification;
no-eligible-backup;
no-ipv4-multicast;
no-ipv6-multicast;
no-ipv6-unicast;
no-unicast-topology;
node-link-protection;
passive;
point-to-point;
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
82
•
Notational Conventions Used in Junos OS Configuration Hierarchies
•
[edit protocols] Hierarchy Level
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Statements
Layer 2 Routing Instances Configuration Hierarchy
Use the vpls routing instance type for point-to-multipoint LAN implementations between
a set of sites in a VPN.
To configure routing instances for Layer 2 networks, include the following statements:
routing-instances {
routing-instance-name {
access {
address-assignment {
... same statements as in the address-assignment subhierarchy in [edit access]
Hierarchy Level ...
}
address-protection;
description text;
egress-protection {
context-identifier context-id;
}
forwarding-options {
...forwarding-options...
}
instance-role role;
instance-type type;
interface interface-name;
l2-domain-id-for-l3 id;
l2vpn-id community;
layer3-domain-identifier identifier;
multicast-snooping-options {
... same statements as in [edit multicast-snooping-options] Hierarchy Level EXCEPT
FOR ...
traceoptions {...} # NOT valid at this level
}
no-irb-layer-2-copy;
no-local-switching;
no-vrf-advertise;
no-vrf-propagate-ttl;
pbb-options {
default-bvlan bvlan;
peer-instance instance;
vlan-id vlan-id isid-list [ isid-numbers ]
}
protocols {
... the protocols subhierarchy appears after the main [edit routing-instances
routing-instance-name] hierarchy ...
}
provider-tunnel {
... the provider-tunnel subhierarchy appears after the main [edit routing-instances
routing-instance-name] hierarchy ...
}
route-distinguisher (as-number:number | ip-address:number);
routing-interface interface;
routing-options {
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... the routing-options subhierarchy appears after the main [edit routing-instances
routing-instance-name] hierarchy ...
}
service-groups {
service-group-name {
pbb-service-options {
default-isid isid-number;
isid isid-number vlan-id-list [ vlan-ids ];
mac-address mac-address;
}
service-type type;
}
}
switch-options {
... same statements as in [edit switch-options] Hierarchy Level ...
}
vlan-id (id | all | none);
vlan-model one-to-one;
vlan-tags outer <tpid.>vlan-id inner <tpid.>vlan-id;
[edit vlans] Hierarchy Level {
... same statements as in [edit vlans] Hierarchy Level ...
}
vrf-advertise-selective {
family {
inet-mvpn;
inet6-mvpn;
}
}
vrf-export [ policy-names ];
vrf-import [ policy-names ];
vrf-propagate-ttl;
vrf-table-label;
vrf-target {
export community-name;
import community-name;
}
protocols {
... protocols-configuration ...
}
routing-options {
... routing-options-configuration ...
}
bridge-domains {
bridge-domain-name {
domain-type bridge;
interface interface-name;
routing-interface routing-interface-name;
vlan-id (Bridge Domain or VLAN) (none | all | number);
vlan-tags outer number inner number;
bridge-options {
interface-mac-limit limit {
packet-action drop;
}
interface interface-name {
interface-mac-limit limit {
packet-action drop;
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}
}
mac-statistics;
mac-table-size limit {
packet-action drop;
}
no-mac-learning;
static-mac mac-address;
}
}
}
}
}
With the exception of the instance-type virtual-switch statement (which configures a
virtual-switch routing instance), you can include the statements at the following hierarchy
levels:
•
[edit]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name]
The instance-type virtual-switch statement is not supported at the [edit logical-systems
logical-system-name] hierarchy level.
Related
Documentation
•
Routing Instances Overview
•
Layer 2 Routing Instance Types
•
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch on page 44
•
Configuring a Layer 2 Control Protocol Routing Instance
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bandwidth (Interfaces)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
bandwidth rate;
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Configure an informational-only bandwidth value for an interface. This statement is valid
for all logical interface types except multilink and aggregated interfaces.
NOTE: We recommend that you be careful when setting this value. Any
interface bandwidth value that you configure using the bandwidth statement
affects how the interface cost is calculated for a dynamic routing protocol,
such as OSPF. By default, the interface cost for a dynamic routing protocol
is calculated using the following formula:
cost = reference-bandwidth/bandwidth,
where bandwidth is the physical interface speed. However, if you specify a
value for bandwidth using the bandwidth statement, that value is used to
calculate the interface cost, rather than the actual physical interface
bandwidth.
Options
rate—Peak rate, in bits per second (bps) or cells per second (cps). You can specify a
value in bits per second either as a complete decimal number or as a decimal number
followed by the abbreviation k (1000), m (1,000,000), or g (1,000,000,000). You
can also specify a value in cells per second by entering a decimal number followed
by the abbreviation c; values expressed in cells per second are converted to bits per
second by means of the formula 1 cps = 384 bps.
Range: Not limited.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
86
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Interface Bandwidth
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Statements
filter
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
filter {
group filter-group-number;
input filter-name;
input-list [ filter-names ];
output filter-name;
output-list [ filter-names ];
}
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family family],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number
family family]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Apply a filter to an interface. You can also use filters for encrypted traffic. When you
configure filters, you can configure them under the family ethernet-switching, inet, inet6,
mpls, or vpls only.
NOTE: On QFX3500 and QFX3600 switches running Enhanced Layer 2
Software and on OCX Series switches, VPLS is not supported.
Options
group filter-group-number—Define an interface to be part of a filter group.
Range: 1 through 255
input filter-name—Name of one filter to evaluate when packets are received on the
interface.
output filter-name—Name of one filter to evaluate when packets are transmitted on the
interface.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Applying a Filter to an Interface
•
Junos OS Services Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
•
Routing Policies, Firewall Filters, and Traffic Policers Feature Guide for Routing Devices
•
Junos OS Administration Library for Routing Devices
•
Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces (CLI Procedure)
•
Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces (CLI Procedure)
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•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
•
Configuring Firewall Filters (CLI Procedure)
•
Configuring Firewall Filters and Policers for VPLS
•
family
•
family
flow-control
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
(flow-control | no-flow-control);
[edit interfaces interface-name aggregated-ether-options],
[edit interfaces interface-name ether-options],
[edit interfaces interface-name fastether-options],
[edit interfaces interface-name gigether-options],
[edit interfaces interface-name multiservice-options],
[edit interfaces interface-range name aggregated-ether-options],
[edit interfaces interface-range name ether-options]
Release Information
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 in EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2 for ACX Series Universal Access Routers.
Description
For aggregated Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, and Gigabit Ethernet interfaces only, explicitly
enable flow control, which regulates the flow of packets from the router or switch to the
remote side of the connection. Enabling flow control is useful when the remote device
is a Gigabit Ethernet switch. Flow control is not supported on the 4-port Fast Ethernet
PIC.
NOTE: On the Type 5 FPC, to prioritize control packets in case of ingress
oversubscription, you must ensure that the neighboring peers support MAC
flow control. If the peers do not support MAC flow control, then you must
disable flow control.
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
88
Flow control is enabled.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Flow Control
•
Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces (CLI Procedure)
•
Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces (CLI Procedure)
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Statements
forward-and-send-to-re
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
forward-and-send-to-re;
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet targeted-broadcast],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number
family inet targeted-broadcast]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 10.2.
Specify that IP packets destined for a Layer 3 broadcast address be forwarded to an
egress interface and the Routing Engine. The packets are broadcast only if the egress
interface is a LAN interface.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Targeted Broadcast on page 26
•
targeted-broadcast on page 107
•
Understanding Targeted Broadcast on page 25
forward-only
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
forward-only;
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet targeted-broadcast],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number
family inet targeted-broadcast]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 10.2.
Specify that IP packets destined for a Layer 3 broadcast address be forwarded to an
egress interface only. The packets are broadcast only if the egress interface is a LAN
interface.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Targeted Broadcast on page 26
•
targeted-broadcast on page 107
•
Understanding Targeted Broadcast on page 25
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gratuitous-arp-reply
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
(gratuitous-arp-reply | no-gratuitous-arp-reply);
[edit interfaces interface-name]
Release Information
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 in EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2 for ACX Series Universal Access Routers.
Description
For Ethernet interfaces, enable updating of the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) cache
for gratuitous ARPs.
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
90
Updating of the ARP cache is disabled on all Ethernet interfaces.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Gratuitous ARP
•
no-gratuitous-arp-request on page 97
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Statements
group (RPF Selection)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
group group-address{
sourcesource-address{
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
wildcard-source {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
}
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name edit protocols pim rpf-selection]
Statement introduced in JUNOS Release 10.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the PIM group address for which you configure RPF selectiongroup (RPF
Selection).
By default, PIM RPF selection is not configured.
group-address—PIM group address for which you configure RPF selection.
view-level—To view this statement in the configuration.
control-level—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring PIM RPF Selection
interface (Multichassis Protection)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
interface interface-name;
[edit multi-chassis multi-chassis-protection peer]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6 for MX Series routers.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3R2 for EX Series switches.
Specify the name of the interface that is being used as an interchassis link-protection
link (ICL-PL). The two switches hosting a multichassis link aggregation group (MC-LAG)
use this link to pass Inter-Chassis Control Protocol (ICCP) and data traffic.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
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l2-domain-id-for-l3
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
92
l2-domain-id-for-l3 id;
[edit routing-instances instance-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3R2.
Specify a Layer 2 domain ID within a routing instance.
id—Layer 2 identification number.
system—To view this statement in the configuration.
system-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch on page 44
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Statements
lacp (Aggregated Ethernet)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
lacp {
(active | passive);
admin-key key;
accept-data;
fast-failover;
link-protection {
disable;
(revertive |non-revertive);
}
periodic interval;
system-id mac-address;
system-priority priority;
}
[edit interfaces aex aggregated-ether-options]
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces aeX aggregated-ether-options]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
fast-failover option introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2.
Support for logical systems introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1.
Configure the Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) for aggregated Ethernet interfaces
only.
When you configure the accept-data statement at the [edit interfaces aeX
aggregated-ether-options lacp] hierarchy level, the router processes packets received on
a member link irrespective of the LACP state if the aggregated Ethernet bundle is up.
NOTE: When you configure the accept-data statement at the [edit interfaces
aeX aggregated-ether-options lacp] hierarchy level, this behavior occurs:
Default
Options
•
By default, the accept-data statement is not configured when LACP is
enabled.
•
You can configure the accept-data statement to improve convergence and
reduce the number of dropped packets when member links in the bundle
are enabled or disabled.
•
When LACP is down and a member link receives packets, the router or
switch does not process packets as defined in the IEEE 802.1ax standard.
According to this standard, the packets should be dropped, but they are
processed instead because the accept-data statement is configured.
If you do not specify LACP as either active or passive, LACP remains passive.
active—Initiate transmission of LACP packets.
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admin-key number—Specify an administrative key for the router or switch.
NOTE: You must also configure multichassis link aggregation (MC-LAG)
when you configure the admin-key.
fast-failover—Specify to override the IEEE 802.3ad standard and allow the standby link
to receive traffic. Overriding the default behavior facilitates subsecond failover.
passive—Respond to LACP packets.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring LACP for Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces
layer3-domain-identifier
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
94
layer3-domain-identifier identifier;
[edit routing-instances instance-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3R2.
Specify a Layer 3 domain ID within a routing instance.
id—Layer 3 identification number.
system—To view this statement in the configuration.
system-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch on page 44
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Statements
link-protection
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
link–protection {
disable;
(revertive |non-revertive);
}
[edit interfaces aex aggregated-ether-options]
[edit interfaces aex aggregated-ether-options lacp]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.3.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Support for disable, revertive, and non-revertive statements added in Junos OS Release
9.3.
On the router, for aggregated Ethernet interfaces only, configure link protection. In addition
to enabling link protection, a primary and a secondary (backup) link must be configured
to specify what links egress traffic should traverse. To configure primary and secondary
links on the router, include the primary and backup statements at the [edit interfaces
ge-fpc/pic/port gigether-options 802.3ad aex] hierarchy level or the [edit interfaces
fe-fpc/pic/port fastether-options 802.3ad aex] hierarchy level.
On the switch, you can configure either Junos OS link protection for aggregated Ethernet
interfaces or the LACP standards link protection for aggregated Ethernet interfaces.
For Junos OS link protection, specify link-protection at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit interfaces ge-fpc/pic/port ether-options 802.3ad aex]
•
[edit interfaces xe-fpc/pic/port ether-options 802.3ad aex]
For LACP standards link protection, specify link-protection at the following hierarchy
levels:
•
For global LACP link protection, specify at [edit chassis aggregated-devices ethernet
lacp]
•
For a specific aggregated Ethernet interface, specify at [edit interfaces aeX
aggregated-ether-options lacp]
To disable link protection, use the delete interface ae aggregate-ether-options
link-protection statement at the [edit interfaces aex aggregated-ether-options] hierarchy
level or the [edit interfaces aex aggregated-ether-options lacp]] hierarchy level.
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
The statements are explained separately.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Link Protection
•
Configuring LACP Link Protection of Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces (CLI Procedure)
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mode (Interfaces)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
mode loose;
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family (inet | inet6) rpf-check],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number
family (inet | inet6) rpf-check]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Check whether the packet has a source address with a corresponding prefix in the routing
table. If a corresponding prefix is not found, unicast reverse path forwarding (RPF) loose
mode does not accept the packet. Unlike strict mode, loose mode does not check whether
the interface expects to receive a packet with a specific source address prefix.
If you do not include this statement, unicast RPF is in strict mode.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Unicast RPF Strict Mode on page 32
multicast-rpf-routes
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
multicast-rpf-routes;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols isis traffic-engineering family inet
shortcuts],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances traffic-engineering family inet
shortcuts],
[edit protocols isis traffic-engineering family inet shortcuts],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols isis traffic-engineering family inet
shortcuts]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.3.
Install unicast IPv4 routes into the multicast routing table (inet.2) for multicast
reverse-path-forwarding (RPF) checks.
Traffic engineering shortcuts must be enabled. IPv4 multicast topology must not be
enabled. Label-switched paths (LSPs) must not be advertised into IS-IS.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
96
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Enabling IS-IS Traffic Engineering Support
•
Using Labeled-Switched Paths to Augment SPF to Compute IGP Shortcuts
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Statements
next-hop (PIM RPF Selection)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
next-hop next-hop-address;
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection group group-address
source source-address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection group group-address
wildcard-source],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection prefix-list
prefix-list-addresses source source-address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection prefix-list
prefix-list-addresses wildcard-source]
Statement introduced in JUNOS Release 10.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the specific next-hop address for the PIM group source.
next-hop-address—Specific next-hop address for the PIM group source.
view-level—To view this statement in the configuration.
control-level—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring PIM RPF Selection
no-gratuitous-arp-request
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
no-gratuitous-arp-request;
[edit interfaces interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2 for ACX Series Universal Access Routers.
For Ethernet interfaces and pseudowire logical interfaces, do not respond to gratuitous
ARP requests.
Gratuitous ARP responses are enabled on all Ethernet interfaces.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Gratuitous ARP
•
gratuitous-arp-reply on page 90
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no-local-switching
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
98
no-local-switching;
[edit routing-instances instance-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3R2.
Specify that access ports in this routing instance do not forward packets to each other.
system—To view this statement in the configuration.
system-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring a Layer 2 Virtual Switch on page 44
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Statements
policer (MAC)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
policer {
input cos-policer-name;
output cos-policer-name;
}
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number accept-source-mac
mac-address mac-address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number
accept-source-mac mac-address mac-address]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3R2 for EX Series switches.
For Gigabit Ethernet IQ and Gigabit Ethernet PICs with SFPs (except the 10-port Gigabit
Ethernet PIC and the built-in Gigabit Ethernet port on the M7i router), and 100-Gigabit
Ethernet Type 5 PIC with CFP, configure MAC policing.
NOTE:
On MX Series routers with Gigabit Ethernet or Fast Ethernet PICs, the following
considerations apply:
Options
•
Interface counters do not count the 7-byte preamble and 1-byte frame
delimiter in Ethernet frames.
•
In MAC statistics, the frame size includes MAC header and CRC before any
VLAN rewrite/imposition rules are applied.
•
In traffic statistics, the frame size encompasses the L2 header without CRC
after any VLAN rewrite/imposition rule.
input cos-policer-name—Name of one policer to specify the premium bandwidth and
aggregate bandwidth.
output cos-policer-name—Name of one policer to specify the premium bandwidth and
aggregate bandwidth.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring MAC Address Filtering
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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prefix-list (PIM RPF Selection)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
prefix-list prefix-list-addresses {
source source-address {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
wildcard-source {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
}
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection group group-address
source source-address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection group group-address
wildcard-source],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection prefix-list
prefix-list-addresses source source-address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection prefix-list
prefix-list-addresses wildcard-source]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 10.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
(Optional) Configure a list of prefixes (addresses) for multiple PIM groups.
prefix-list-addresses—List of prefixes (addresses) for multiple PIM groups.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
100
view-level—To view this statement in the configuration.
control-level—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring PIM RPF Selection
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Statements
rpf-check (Dynamic Profiles)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
rpf-check {
fail-filter filter-name;
mode loose;
}
[edit dynamic-profiles profile-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family
family]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Check whether traffic is arriving on an expected path. You can include this statement
with the inet protocol family only.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Unicast RPF Strict Mode on page 32
•
Configuring Unicast RPF and Fail Filters in Dynamic Profiles for Subscriber Interfaces
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rpf-check (interfaces)
Syntax
rpf-check {
fail-filter filter-name;
mode loose;
}
Hierarchy Level
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family family],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number
family family]
Release Information
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Support for interface ps0 (pseudowire subscriber logical interface device) added in Junos
OS Release 15.1.
Description
Check whether traffic is arriving on an expected path. You can include this statement
with the inet or inet6 protocol family only.
The mode statement is explained separately.
Options
fail-filter—A filter to evaluate when packets are received on the interface. If the RPF check
fails, this optional filter is evaluated. If the fail filter is not configured, the default
action is to silently discard the packet.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
102
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Unicast RPF Strict Mode on page 32
•
Configuring Unicast RPF Loose Mode on page 34
•
Example: Configuring Unicast Reverse-Path-Forwarding Check
•
Configuring a Pseudowire Subscriber Logical Interface Device
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Statements
rpf-check-policy (Routing Options RPF)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
rpf-check-policy [ policy-names ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name
routing-options multicast],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-options multicast],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name routing-options multicast],
[edit routing-options multicast]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.1.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3 for ACX Series routers.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Apply policies for disabling RPF checks on arriving multicast packets. The policies must
be correctly configured.
policy-names—Name of one or more multicast RPF check policies.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring RPF Policies
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rpf-loose-mode-discard
Syntax
rpf-loose-mode-discard {
family {
inet;
inet6;
}
}
Hierarchy Level
[edit forwarding-options]
Release Information
Description
Options
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3R2 for EX Series switches.
Configure unicast reverse path forwarding (unicast RPF) loose mode with the ability to
discard packets with the source address pointing to the discard next hop.
inet—IPv4 address family.
inet6—IPv6 address family.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
104
interface-control—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Unicast RPF on page 29
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Statements
rpf-selection
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
rpf-selection {
group group-address {
sourcesource-address {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
wildcard-source {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
}
prefix-list prefix-list-addresses {
source source-address {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
wildcard-source {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
}
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim]
Statement introduced in JUNOS Release 10.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the PIM RPF next-hop neighbor for a specific group and source for a VRF routing
instance.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Default
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
If you omit the rpf-selection statement, PIM RPF checks typically choose the best path
determined by the unicast protocol for all multicast flows.
source-address—Specific source address for the PIM group.
view-level—To view this statement in the configuration.
control-level—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring PIM RPF Selection
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source (PIM RPF Selection)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
source source-address {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection group
group-address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection prefix-list
prefix-list-addresses]
Statement introduced in JUNOS Release 10.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the source address for the PIM group.
source-address—Specific source address for the PIM group.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
106
view-level—To view this statement in the configuration.
control-level—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring PIM RPF Selection
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Statements
targeted-broadcast
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
targeted-broadcast {
forward-and-send-to-re;
forward-only;
}
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number
family inet]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 10.2.
Specify the IP packets destined for a Layer 3 broadcast address to be forwarded to both
an egress interface and the Routing Engine, or to an egress interface only. The packets
are broadcast only if the egress interface is a LAN interface.
The statements are explained separately.
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
When this statement is not included, broadcast packets are sent to the Routing Engine
only.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Targeted Broadcast on page 26
•
Understanding Targeted Broadcast on page 25
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traceoptions (Individual Interfaces)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
traceoptions {
file filename <files name> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag;
match;
}
[edit interfaces interface-name]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2 for ACX Series Universal Access Routers.
Define tracing operations for individual interfaces.
To specify more than one tracing operation, include multiple flag statements.
The interfaces traceoptions statement does not support a trace file. The logging is done
by the kernel, so the tracing information is placed in the system syslog file in the directory
/var/log/dcd.
Default
Options
If you do not include this statement, no interface-specific tracing operations are performed.
file name—Name of the file to receive the output of the tracing operation. Enclose the
name within quotation marks. All files are placed in the directory /var/log/dcd. By
default, interface process tracing output is placed in the file files number—(Optional)
Maximum number of trace files. When a trace file named trace-file reaches its
maximum size, it is renamed trace-file.0, then trace-file.1, and so on, until the
maximum number of trace files is reached. Then the oldest trace file is overwritten.
match—(Optional) Regular expression for lines to be traced.
no-world-readable—(Optional) Prevent any user from reading the log file.
world-readable—(Optional) Allow any user to read the log file.
size size—(Optional) Maximum size of each trace file, in kilobytes (KB), megabytes (MB),
or gigabytes (GB). When a trace file named trace-file reaches this size, it is renamed
trace-file.0. When the trace-file again reaches its maximum size, trace-file.0 is
renamed trace-file.1 and trace-file is renamed trace-file.0. This renaming scheme
continues until the maximum number of trace files is reached. Then, the oldest trace
file is overwritten.
flag—Tracing operation to perform. To specify more than one tracing operation, include
multiple flag statements. The following are the interface-specific tracing options.
108
•
all—All interface tracing operations
•
event—Interface events
•
ipc—Interface interprocess communication (IPC) messages
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Statements
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
•
media—Interface media changes
•
q921—Trace ISDN Q.921 frames
•
q931—Trace ISDN Q.931 frames
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Tracing Operations of an Individual Router Interface
traps
Syntax
(traps | no-traps);
Hierarchy Level
[edit dynamic-profiles profile-name interfaces interface-name],
[edit interfaces interface-name],
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number],
[edit interfaces interface-range name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number]
Release Information
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2 for ACX Series Universal Access Routers.
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
Enable or disable the sending of Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
notifications when the state of the connection changes.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Enabling or Disabling SNMP Notifications on Physical Interfaces
•
Enabling or Disabling SNMP Notifications on Logical Interfaces
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unicast-reverse-path
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
unicast-reverse-path (active-paths | feasible-paths);
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-options forwarding-table],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name instance-type name routing-options
forwarding-table],
[edit routing-options forwarding-table]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Support for routing instances added in Junos OS Release 8.3.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3 for ACX Series routers.
Control the operation of unicast reverse-path-forwarding check. This statement enables
the RPF check to be used when routing is asymmetrical.
active-paths—Consider only active paths during the unicast reverse-path check.
feasible-paths—Consider all feasible paths during the unicast reverse-path check.
Default: If you omit the unicast-reverse-path statement, only the active paths to a
particular destination are considered.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
110
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Unicast Reverse-Path-Forwarding Check
•
Enabling Unicast Reverse-Path Forwarding Check for VPNs
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Statements
unidirectional
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
unidirectional;
[edit interfaces interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.5.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3R2 for EX Series switches.
Create two new, unidirectional (transmit-only and receive-only) physical interfaces
subordinate to the original parent interface. Unidirectional links are currently supported
only on 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces on the following hardware:
NOTE: Which interfaces and pic for EX9200?
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
•
4-port 10-Gigabit Ethernet DPC on the MX960 router
•
10–Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PIC and 10–Gigabit Ethernet IQ2E PIC on the T Series router
Disabled.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Understanding Unidirectional Traffic Flow on Physical Interfaces
•
Enabling Unidirectional Traffic Flow on Physical Interfaces
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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vlan-tagging
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
112
vlan-tagging;
[edit interfaces interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2 for ACX Series Universal Access Routers.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2 for PTX Series Routers.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D10 for the QFX Series.
For Fast Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, aggregated Ethernet interfaces
configured for VPLS, and pseudowire subscriber interfaces, enable the reception and
transmission of 802.1Q VLAN-tagged frames on the interface.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring BGP Autodiscovery for LDP VPLS
•
Configuring Tagged Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces on page 14
•
Configuring Interfaces for VPLS Routing
•
Enabling VLAN Tagging
•
802.1Q VLANs Overview
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Statements
wildcard-source (PIM RPF Selection)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
wildcard-source {
next-hop next-hop-address;
}
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection group
group-address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols pim rpf-selection prefix-list
prefix-list-addresses]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 10.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Use a wildcard for the multicast source instead of (or in addition to) a specific multicast
source.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
view-level—To view this statement in the configuration.
control-level—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring PIM RPF Selection
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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114
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 7
Operational Commands
•
Common Output Fields Description on page 115
•
clear interfaces statistics
•
show interfaces (10-Gigabit Ethernet)
•
show interfaces (Discard)
•
show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet)
•
show interfaces (Serial)
•
show interfaces extensive
•
show interfaces queue
Common Output Fields Description
This chapter explains the content of the output fields, which appear in the output of most
show interfaces commands.
Damping Field
For the physical interface, the Damping field shows the setting of the following damping
parameters:
•
half-life—Decay half-life. The number of seconds after which the accumulated interface
penalty counter is reduced by half if the interface remains stable.
•
max-suppress—Maximum hold-down time. The maximum number of seconds that an
interface can be suppressed irrespective of how unstable the interface has been.
•
reuse—Reuse threshold. When the accumulated interface penalty counter falls below
this number, the interface is no longer suppressed.
•
suppress—Cutoff (suppression) threshold. When the accumulated interface penalty
counter exceeds this number, the interface is suppressed.
•
state—Interface damping state. If damping is enabled on an interface, it is suppressed
during interface flaps that match the configured damping parameters.
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Destination Class Field
For the logical interface, the Destination class field provides the names of destination
class usage (DCU) counters per family and per class for a particular interface. The counters
display packets and bytes arriving from designated user-selected prefixes. For example:
Destination class
Packets
(packet-per-second)
gold
(
bronze
(
silver
(
Bytes
(bits-per-second)
1928095
889)
0
0)
0
0)
161959980
(
597762)
0
(
0)
0
(
0)
Enabled Field
For the physical interface, the Enabled field provides information about the state of the
interface, displaying one or more of the following values:
•
Administratively down, Physical link is Down—The interface is turned off, and the physical
link is inoperable and cannot pass packets even when it is enabled.To change the
interface state to Enabled, use the following command:
user@host# set interfaces interface enable
Manually verify the connections to bring the physical link up.
•
Administratively down, Physical link is Up—The interface is turned off, but the physical
link is operational and can pass packets when it is enabled.To change the interface
state to Enabled, use the following command:
user@host# set interfaces interface enable
•
Enabled, Physical link is Down—The interface is turned on, but the physical link is
inoperable and cannot pass packets. Manually verify the connections to bring the
physical link up.
•
Enabled, Physical link is Up—The interface is turned on, and the physical link is
operational and can pass packets.
Filters Field
For the logical interface, the Filters field provides the name of the firewall filters to be
evaluated when packets are received or transmitted on the interface. The format is Filters:
Input: filter-name and Filters: Output: filter-name. For example:
Filters: Input: sample-all
Filters: Output: cp-ftp
116
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Flags Fields
The following sections provide information about flags that are specific to interfaces:
•
Addresses, Flags Field on page 117
•
Device Flags Field on page 117
•
Family Flags Field on page 118
•
Interface Flags Field on page 119
•
Link Flags Field on page 120
•
Logical Interface Flags Field on page 120
Addresses, Flags Field
The Addresses, Flags field provides information about the addresses configured for the
protocol family on the logical interface and displays one or more of the following values:
•
Dest-route-down—The routing process detected that the link was not operational and
changed the interface routes to nonforwarding status
•
Is-Default—The default address of the router used as the source address by SNMP,
ping, traceroute, and other network utilities.
•
Is-Preferred—The default local address for packets originating from the local router
and sent to destinations on the subnet.
•
Is-Primary—The default local address for broadcast and multicast packets originated
locally and sent out the interface.
•
Preferred—This address is a candidate to become the preferred address.
•
Primary—This address is a candidate to become the primary address.
•
Trunk—Interface is a trunk.
•
Trunk, Inter-Switch-Link—Interface is a trunk, and InterSwitch Link protocol (ISL) is
configured on the trunk port of the primary VLAN in order to connect the routers
composing the PVLAN to each other.
Device Flags Field
The Device flags field provides information about the physical device and displays one
or more of the following values:
•
Down—Device has been administratively disabled.
•
Hear-Own-Xmit—Device receives its own transmissions.
•
Link-Layer-Down—The link-layer protocol has failed to connect with the remote
endpoint.
•
Loopback—Device is in physical loopback.
•
Loop-Detected—The link layer has received frames that it sent, thereby detecting a
physical loopback.
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•
No-Carrier—On media that support carrier recognition, no carrier is currently detected.
•
No-Multicast—Device does not support multicast traffic.
•
Present—Device is physically present and recognized.
•
Promiscuous—Device is in promiscuous mode and recognizes frames addressed to all
physical addresses on the media.
•
Quench—Transmission on the device is quenched because the output buffer is
overflowing
•
Recv-All-Multicasts—Device is in multicast promiscuous mode and therefore provides
no multicast filtering.
•
Running—Device is active and enabled.
Family Flags Field
The Family flags field provides information about the protocol family on the logical
interface and displays one or more of the following values:
•
DCU—Destination class usage is enabled.
•
Dest-route-down—The software detected that the link is down and has stopped
forwarding the link's interface routes.
•
Down—Protocol is inactive.
•
Is-Primary—Interface is the primary one for the protocol.
•
Mac-Validate-Loose—Interface is enabled with loose MAC address validation.
•
Mac-Validate-Strict—Interface is enabled with strict MAC address validation.
•
Maximum labels—Maximum number of MPLS labels configured for the MPLS protocol
family on the logical interface.
•
MTU-Protocol-Adjusted—The effective MTU is not the configured value in the software.
•
No-Redirects—Protocol redirects are disabled.
•
Primary—Interface can be considered for selection as the primary family address.
•
Protocol-Down—Protocol failed to negotiate correctly.
•
SCU-in—Interface is configured for source class usage input.
•
SCU-out—Interface is configured for source class usage output.
•
send-bcast-packet-to-re—Interface is configured to forward IPv4 broadcast packets
to the Routing Engine.
•
targeted-broadcast—Interface is configured to forward IPv4 broadcast packets to the
LAN interface and the Routing Engine.
•
Unnumbered—Protocol family is configured for unnumbered Ethernet. An unnumbered
Ethernet interface borrows an IPv4 address from another interface, which is referred
to as the donor interface.
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•
Up–Protocol is configured and operational.
•
uRPF—Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding is enabled.
Interface Flags Field
The Interface flags field provides information about the physical interface and displays
one or more of the following values:
•
Admin-Test—Interface is in test mode and some sanity checking, such as loop detection,
is disabled.
•
Disabled—Interface is administratively disabled.
•
Down—A hardware failure has occurred.
•
Hardware-Down—Interface is nonfunctional or incorrectly connected.
•
Link-Layer-Down—Interface keepalives have indicated that the link is incomplete.
•
No-Multicast—Interface does not support multicast traffic.
•
No-receive No-transmit—Passive monitor mode is configured on the interface.
•
OAM-On-SVLAN—(MX Series routers with MPC/MIC interfaces only) Interface is
configured to propagate the Ethernet OAM state of a static, single-tagged service
VLAN (S-VLAN) on a Gigabit Ethernet, 10-Gigabit Ethernet, or aggregated Ethernet
interface to a dynamic or static double-tagged customer VLAN (C-VLAN) that has the
same S-VLAN (outer) tag as the S-VLAN.
•
Point-To-Point—Interface is point-to-point.
•
Pop all MPLS labels from packets of depth—MPLS labels are removed as packets arrive
on an interface that has the pop-all-labels statement configured. The depth value can
be one of the following:
•
•
1—Takes effect for incoming packets with one label only.
•
2—Takes effect for incoming packets with two labels only.
•
[ 1 2 ]—Takes effect for incoming packets with either one or two labels.
Promiscuous—Interface is in promiscuous mode and recognizes frames addressed to
all physical addresses.
•
Recv-All-Multicasts—Interface is in multicast promiscuous mode and provides no
multicast filtering.
•
SNMP-Traps—SNMP trap notifications are enabled.
•
Up—Interface is enabled and operational.
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Link Flags Field
The Link flags field provides information about the physical link and displays one or more
of the following values:
•
ACFC—Address control field compression is configured. The Point-to-Point Protocol
(PPP) session negotiates the ACFC option.
•
Give-Up—Link protocol does not continue connection attempts after repeated failures.
•
Loose-LCP—PPP does not use the Link Control Protocol (LCP) to indicate whether the
link protocol is operational.
•
Loose-LMI—Frame Relay does not use the Local Management Interface (LMI) to indicate
whether the link protocol is operational.
•
Loose-NCP—PPP does not use the Network Control Protocol (NCP) to indicate whether
the device is operational.
•
No-Keepalives—Link protocol keepalives are disabled.
•
PFC—Protocol field compression is configured. The PPP session negotiates the PFC
option.
Logical Interface Flags Field
The Logical interface flags field provides information about the logical interface and
displays one or more of the following values:
•
ACFC Encapsulation—Address control field Compression (ACFC) encapsulation is
enabled (negotiated successfully with a peer).
•
Device-down—Device has been administratively disabled.
•
Disabled—Interface is administratively disabled.
•
Down—A hardware failure has occurred.
•
Clear-DF-Bit—GRE tunnel or IPsec tunnel is configured to clear the Don't Fragment
(DF) bit.
•
Hardware-Down—Interface protocol initialization failed to complete successfully.
•
PFC—Protocol field compression is enabled for the PPP session.
•
Point-To-Point—Interface is point-to-point.
•
SNMP-Traps—SNMP trap notifications are enabled.
•
Up—Interface is enabled and operational.
Label-Switched Interface Traffic Statistics Field
When you use the vrf-table-label statement to configure a VRF routing table, a
label-switched interface (LSI) logical interface label is created and mapped to the VRF
routing table.
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Any routes present in a VRF routing table and configured with the vrf-table-label statement
are advertised with the LSI logical interface label allocated for the VRF routing table.
When packets for this VPN arrive on a core-facing interface, they are treated as if the
enclosed IP packet arrived on the LSI interface and are then forwarded and filtered based
on the correct table. For more information on the vrf-table-label statement, including a
list of supported interfaces, see the Junos VPNs Configuration Guide.
If you configure the family mpls statement at the [edit interfaces interface-name unit
logical-unit-number] hierarchy level and you also configure the vrf-table-label statement
at the [edit routing-instances routing-instance-name] hierarchy level, the output for the
show interface interface-name extensive command includes the following output fields
about the LSI traffic statistics:
•
Input bytes—Number of bytes entering the LSI and the current throughput rate in bits
per second (bps).
•
Input packets—Number of packets entering the LSI and the current throughput rate in
packets per second (pps).
NOTE: If LSI interfaces are used with VPLS when no-tunnel-services is
configured or L3VPN when vrf-table-label configuration is applied inside the
routing-instance, the Input packets field associated with the core-facing
interfaces may not display the correct value. Only the Input counter is affected
because the LSI is used to receive traffic from the remote PEs. Traffic that
arrives on an LSI interface might not be counted at both the Traffic Statistics
and the Label-switched interface (LSI) traffic statistics levels.
This note applies to the following platforms:
•
M Series routers with -E3 FPC model numbers or configured with an
Enhanced CFEB (CFEB-E), and M120 routers
•
MX Series routers with DPC or ADPC only
The following example shows the LSI traffic statistics that you might see as part of the
output of the show interface interface-name extensive command:
Label-switched interface (LSI) traffic statistics:
Input bytes:
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Policer Field
For the logical interface, the Policer field provides the policers that are to be evaluated
when packets are received or transmitted on the interface. The format is Policer: Input:
type-fpc/picport-in-policer, Output: type-fpc/pic/port-out-policer. For example:
Policer: Input: at-1/2/0-in-policer, Output: at-2/4/0-out-policer
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Protocol Field
For the logical interface, the Protocol field indicates the protocol family or families that
are configured on the interface, displaying one or more of the following values:
•
aenet—Aggregated Ethernet. Displayed on Fast Ethernet interfaces that are part of an
aggregated Ethernet bundle.
•
ccc—Circuit cross-connect (CCC). Configured on the logical interface of CCC physical
interfaces.
•
inet—IP version 4 (IPv4). Configured on the logical interface for IPv4 protocol traffic,
including Open Shortest Path First (OSPF), Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), Internet
Control Message Protocol (ICMP), and Internet Protocol Control Protocol (IPCP).
•
inet6—IP version 6 (IPv6). Configured on the logical interface for IPv6 protocol traffic,
including Routing Information Protocol for IPv6 (RIPng), Intermediate
System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS), and BGP.
•
iso—International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Configured on the logical
interface for IS-IS traffic.
•
mlfr-uni-nni—Multilink Frame Relay (MLFR) FRF.16 user-to-network network-to-network
(UNI NNI). Configured on the logical interface for link services bundling.
•
mlfr-end-to-end—Multilink Frame Relay end-to-end. Configured on the logical interface
for multilink bundling.
•
mlppp—Multilink Point-to-Point Protocol (MLPPP). Configured on the logical interface
for multilink bundling.
•
mpls—Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS). Configured on the logical interface for
participation in an MPLS path.
•
pppoe— Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE). Configured on Ethernet
interfaces enabled to support multiple protocol families.
•
tcc—Translational cross-connect (TCC). Configured on the logical interface of TCC
physical interfaces.
•
tnp—Trivial Network Protocol (TNP). Used to communicate between the Routing Engine
and the router’s packet forwarding components. The Junos OS automatically configures
this protocol family on the router’s internal interfaces only.
•
vpls—Virtual private LAN service (VPLS). Configured on the logical interface on which
you configure VPLS.
RPF Failures Field
For the logical interface, the RPF Failures field provides information about the amount
of incoming traffic (in packets and bytes) that failed a unicast reverse path forwarding
(RPF) check on a particular interface. The format is RPF Failures: Packets: xx,Bytes: yy.
For example:
RPF Failures: Packets: 0, Bytes:0
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Source Class Field
For the logical interface, the Source class field provides the names of source class usage
(SCU) counters per family and per class for a particular interface. The counters display
packets and bytes arriving from designated user-selected prefixes. For example:
Packets
(packet-per-second)
Source class
gold
(
bronze
(
silver
(
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
1928095
889)
0
0)
0
0)
(
(
(
Bytes
(bits-per-second)
161959980
597762)
0
0)
0
0)
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clear interfaces statistics
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
clear interfaces statistics (all | interface-name)
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Set interface statistics to zero. If you issue the clear interfaces statistics interface-name
command and then perform a graceful Routing Engine switchover, the interface statistics
are not cleared on the new master. Reissue the command to clear the interface statistics
again.
all—Set statistics on all interfaces to zero.
interface-name—Set statistics on a particular interface to zero.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
clear
clear interfaces statistics on page 124
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
clear interfaces statistics
user@host> clear interfaces statistics
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show interfaces (10-Gigabit Ethernet)
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show interfaces xe-fpc/pic/port
<brief | detail | extensive | terse>
<descriptions>
<media>
<snmp-index snmp-index>
<statistics>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 8.0.
Display status information about the specified 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface.
xe-fpc/pic/port—Display standard information about the specified 10-Gigabit Ethernet
interface.
brief | detail | extensive | terse—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
descriptions—(Optional) Display interface description strings.
media—(Optional) Display media-specific information about network interfaces.
snmp-index snmp-index—(Optional) Display information for the specified SNMP index
of the interface.
statistics—(Optional) Display static interface statistics.
Required Privilege
Level
view
List of Sample Output
show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, LAN PHY Mode, IQ2) on page 140
show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, WAN PHY Mode) on page 143
show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, DWDM OTN PIC) on page 145
show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, LAN PHY Mode, Unidirectional
Mode) on page 147
show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, LAN PHY Mode, Unidirectional Mode,
Transmit-Only) on page 147
show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, LAN PHY Mode, Unidirectional Mode,
Receive-Only) on page 148
Output Fields
See Table 5 on page 126 for the output fields for the show interfaces (10–Gigabit Ethernet)
command.
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Table 5: show interfaces Gigabit Ethernet Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Physical interface
Name of the physical interface.
All levels
Enabled
State of the interface. Possible values are described in the “Enabled Field”
section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
All levels
Interface index
Index number of the physical interface, which reflects its initialization sequence.
detail extensive none
SNMP ifIndex
SNMP index number for the physical interface.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Link-level type
Encapsulation being used on the physical interface.
All levels
MTU
Maximum transmission unit size on the physical interface.
All levels
Speed
Speed at which the interface is running.
All levels
Loopback
Loopback status: Enabled or Disabled. If loopback is enabled, type of loopback:
Local or Remote.
All levels
Source filtering
Source filtering status: Enabled or Disabled.
All levels
LAN-PHY mode
10-Gigabit Ethernet interface operating in Local Area Network Physical Layer
Device (LAN PHY) mode. LAN PHY allows 10-Gigabit Ethernet wide area links
to use existing Ethernet applications.
All levels
WAN-PHY mode
10-Gigabit Ethernet interface operating in Wide Area Network Physical Layer
Device (WAN PHY) mode. WAN PHY allows 10-Gigabit Ethernet wide area links
to use fiber-optic cables and other devices intended for SONET/SDH.
All levels
Unidirectional
Unidirectional link mode status for 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface: Enabled or
Disabled for parent interface; Rx-only or Tx-only for child interfaces.
All levels
Flow control
Flow control status: Enabled or Disabled.
All levels
Auto-negotiation
(Gigabit Ethernet interfaces) Autonegotiation status: Enabled or Disabled.
All levels
Remote-fault
(Gigabit Ethernet interfaces) Remote fault status:
All levels
Physical Interface
•
Online—Autonegotiation is manually configured as online.
•
Offline—Autonegotiation is manually configured as offline.
Device flags
Information about the physical device. Possible values are described in the
“Device Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
All levels
Interface flags
Information about the interface. Possible values are described in the “Interface
Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
All levels
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Table 5: show interfaces Gigabit Ethernet Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Link flags
Information about the link. Possible values are described in the “Links Flags”
section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
All levels
Wavelength
(10-Gigabit Ethernet dense wavelength-division multiplexing [DWDM]
interfaces) Displays the configured wavelength, in nanometers (nm).
All levels
Frequency
(10-Gigabit Ethernet DWDM interfaces only) Displays the frequency associated
with the configured wavelength, in terahertz (THz).
All levels
CoS queues
Number of CoS queues configured.
detail extensive none
Schedulers
(Gigabit Ethernet intelligent queuing 2 (IQ2) interfaces only) Number of CoS
schedulers configured.
extensive
Hold-times
Current interface hold-time up and hold-time down, in milliseconds.
detail extensive
Current address
Configured MAC address.
detail extensive none
Hardware address
Hardware MAC address.
detail extensive none
Last flapped
Date, time, and how long ago the interface went from down to up. The format
is Last flapped: year-month-day hour:minute:second:timezone (hour:minute:second
ago). For example, Last flapped: 2002-04-26 10:52:40 PDT (04:33:20 ago).
detail extensive none
Input Rate
Input rate in bits per second (bps) and packets per second (pps). The value in
this field also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes for ingress traffic on Ethernet
interfaces if you enable accounting of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or the
logical interface level.
None specified
Output Rate
Output rate in bps and pps. The value in this field also includes the Layer 2
overhead bytes for egress traffic on Ethernet interfaces if you enable accounting
of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or the logical interface level.
None specified
Statistics last
cleared
Time when the statistics for the interface were last set to zero.
detail extensive
Egress account
overhead
Layer 2 overhead in bytes that is accounted in the interface statistics for egress
traffic.
detail extensive
Ingress account
overhead
Layer 2 overhead in bytes that is accounted in the interface statistics for ingress
traffic.
detail extensive
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detail
extensive
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Table 5: show interfaces Gigabit Ethernet Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Traffic statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets received and transmitted on the physical
interface.
detail extensive
•
Input bytes—Number of bytes received on the interface. The value in this field
also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes for ingress traffic on Ethernet
interfaces if you enable accounting of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or
the logical interface level.
•
Output bytes—Number of bytes transmitted on the interface. The value in
this field also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes for egress traffic on Ethernet
interfaces if you enable accounting of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or
the logical interface level.
•
Input packets—Number of packets received on the interface.
•
Output packets—Number of packets transmitted on the interface.
Gigabit Ethernet and 10-Gigabit Ethernet IQ PICs count the overhead and CRC
bytes.
For Gigabit Ethernet IQ PICs, the input byte counts vary by interface type. For
more information, see Table 5 on page 126.
Input errors
Input errors on the interface. The following paragraphs explain the counters
whose meaning might not be obvious:
•
Errors—Sum of the incoming frame aborts and FCS errors.
•
Drops—Number of packets dropped by the input queue of the I/O Manager
extensive
ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every
packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
•
Framing errors—Number of packets received with an invalid frame checksum
(FCS).
•
Runts—Number of frames received that are smaller than the runt threshold.
•
Policed discards—Number of frames that the incoming packet match code
discarded because they were not recognized or not of interest. Usually, this
field reports protocols that the Junos OS does not handle.
•
L3 incompletes—Number of incoming packets discarded because they failed
Layer 3 (usually IPv4) sanity checks of the header. For example, a frame with
less than 20 bytes of available IP header is discarded. L3 incomplete errors
can be ignored by configuring the ignore-l3-incompletes statement.
•
L2 channel errors—Number of times the software did not find a valid logical
interface for an incoming frame.
•
L2 mismatch timeouts—Number of malformed or short packets that caused
the incoming packet handler to discard the frame as unreadable.
•
FIFO errors—Number of FIFO errors in the receive direction that are reported
by the ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC is probably
malfunctioning.
•
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Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.
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Table 5: show interfaces Gigabit Ethernet Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Output errors
Output errors on the interface. The following paragraphs explain the counters
whose meaning might not be obvious:
extensive
•
Carrier transitions—Number of times the interface has gone from down to up.
This number does not normally increment quickly, increasing only when the
cable is unplugged, the far-end system is powered down and then up, or
another problem occurs. If the number of carrier transitions increments quickly
(perhaps once every 10 seconds), the cable, the far-end system, or the PIC
or PIM is malfunctioning.
•
Errors—Sum of the outgoing frame aborts and FCS errors.
•
Drops—Number of packets dropped by the output queue of the I/O Manager
ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every
packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
•
Collisions—Number of Ethernet collisions. The Gigabit Ethernet PIC supports
only full-duplex operation, so for Gigabit Ethernet PICs, this number should
always remain 0. If it is nonzero, there is a software bug.
•
Aged packets—Number of packets that remained in shared packet SDRAM
so long that the system automatically purged them. The value in this field
should never increment. If it does, it is most likely a software bug or possibly
malfunctioning hardware.
•
FIFO errors—Number of FIFO errors in the send direction as reported by the
ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC is probably
malfunctioning.
•
HS link CRC errors—Number of errors on the high-speed links between the
ASICs responsible for handling the router interfaces.
Egress queues
•
MTU errors—Number of packets whose size exceeded the MTU of the interface.
•
Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.
Total number of egress queues supported on the specified interface.
detail extensive
NOTE: In DPCs that are not of the enhanced type, such as DPC 40x 1GE R, DPCE
20x 1GE + 2x 10GE R, or DPCE 40x 1GE R, you might notice a discrepancy in the
output of the show interfaces command because incoming packets might be
counted in the Egress queues section of the output. This problem occurs on
non-enhanced DPCs because the egress queue statistics are polled from IMQ
(Inbound Message Queuing) block of the I-chip. The IMQ block does not
differentiate between ingress and egress WAN traffic; as a result, the combined
statistics are displayed in the egress queue counters on the Routing Engine. In
a simple VPLS scenorio, if there is no MAC entry in DMAC table (by sending
unidirectional traffic), traffic is flooded and the input traffic is accounted in IMQ.
For bidirectional traffic (MAC entry in DMAC table), if the outgoing interface is
on the same I-chip then both ingress and egress statistics are counted in a
combined way. If the outgoing interface is on a different I-chip or FPC, then only
egress statistics are accounted in IMQ. This behavior is expected with
non-enhanced DPCs
Queue counters
(Egress)
CoS queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name.
•
Queued packets—Number of queued packets.
•
Transmitted packets—Number of transmitted packets.
•
Dropped packets—Number of packets dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
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Table 5: show interfaces Gigabit Ethernet Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Ingress queues
Total number of ingress queues supported on the specified interface. Displayed
on IQ2 interfaces.
extensive
Queue counters
(Ingress)
CoS queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name.
Displayed on IQ2 interfaces.
extensive
Active alarms and
Active defects
•
Queued packets—Number of queued packets.
•
Transmitted packets—Number of transmitted packets.
•
Dropped packets—Number of packets dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
Ethernet-specific defects that can prevent the interface from passing packets.
When a defect persists for a certain amount of time, it is promoted to an alarm.
Based on the routing device configuration, an alarm can ring the red or yellow
alarm bell on the routing device, or turn on the red or yellow alarm LED on the
craft interface. These fields can contain the value None or Link.
•
None—There are no active defects or alarms.
•
Link—Interface has lost its link state, which usually means that the cable is
detail extensive none
unplugged, the far-end system has been turned off, or the PIC is
malfunctioning.
OTN alarms
Active OTN alarms identified on the interface.
detail extensive
OTN defects
OTN defects received on the interface.
detail extensive
OTN FEC Mode
The FECmode configured on the interface.
detail extensive
•
efec—Enhanced forward error correction (EFEC) is configured to defect and
correct bit errors.
•
gfec—G.709 Forward error correction (GFEC) mode is configured to detect
and correct bit errors.
•
OTN Rate
none—FEC mode is not configured.
OTN mode.
•
fixed-stuff-bytes—Fixed stuff bytes 11.0957 Gbps.
•
no-fixed-stuff-bytes—No fixed stuff bytes 11.0491 Gbps.
•
pass-through—Enable OTN passthrough mode.
•
no-pass-through—Do not enable OTN passthrough mode.
detail extensive
OTN Line Loopback
Status of the line loopback, if configured for the DWDM OTN PIC. Its value can
be: enabled or disabled.
detail extensive
OTN FEC statistics
The forward error correction (FEC) counters for the DWDM OTN PIC.
detail extensive
•
Corrected Errors—The count of corrected errors in the last second.
•
Corrected Error Ratio—The corrected error ratio in the last 25 seconds. For
example, 1e-7 is 1 error per 10 million bits.
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Table 5: show interfaces Gigabit Ethernet Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
OTN FEC alarms
OTN FEC excessive or degraded error alarms triggered on the interface.
detail extensive
OTN OC
OTN OTU
•
FEC Degrade—OTU FEC Degrade defect.
•
FEC Excessive—OTU FEC Excessive Error defect.
OTN OC defects triggered on the interface.
•
LOS—OC Loss of Signal defect.
•
LOF—OC Loss of Frame defect.
•
LOM—OC Loss of Multiframe defect.
•
Wavelength Lock—OC Wavelength Lock defect.
OTN OTU defects detected on the interface
•
AIS—OTN AIS alarm.
•
BDI—OTN OTU BDI alarm.
•
IAE—OTN OTU IAE alarm.
•
TTIM—OTN OTU TTIM alarm.
•
SF—OTN ODU bit error rate fault alarm.
•
SD—OTN ODU bit error rate defect alarm.
•
TCA-ES—OTN ODU ES threshold alarm.
•
TCA-SES—OTN ODU SES threshold alarm.
•
TCA-UAS—OTN ODU UAS threshold alarm.
•
TCA-BBE—OTN ODU BBE threshold alarm.
•
BIP—OTN ODU BIP threshold alarm.
•
BBE—OTN OTU BBE threshold alarm.
•
ES—OTN OTU ES threshold alarm.
•
SES—OTN OTU SES threshold alarm.
•
UAS—OTN OTU UAS threshold alarm.
detail extensive
detail extensive
Received DAPI
Destination Access Port Interface (DAPI) from which the packets were received.
detail extensive
Received SAPI
Source Access Port Interface (SAPI) from which the packets were received.
detail extensive
Transmitted DAPI
Destination Access Port Interface (DAPI) to which the packets were transmitted.
detail extensive
Transmitted SAPI
Source Access Port Interface (SAPI) to which the packets were transmitted.
detail extensive
PCS statistics
(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces) Displays Physical Coding Sublayer (PCS) fault
conditions from the WAN PHY or the LAN PHY device.
detail extensive
•
Bit errors—The number of seconds during which at least one bit error rate
(BER) occurred while the PCS receiver is operating in normal mode.
•
Errored blocks—The number of seconds when at least one errored block
occurred while the PCS receiver is operating in normal mode.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Table 5: show interfaces Gigabit Ethernet Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
MAC statistics
Receive and Transmit statistics reported by the PIC's MAC subsystem, including
extensive
the following:
•
Total octets and total packets—Total number of octets and packets. For
Gigabit Ethernet IQ PICs, the received octets count varies by interface type.
For more information, see Table 6 on page 140
•
Unicast packets, Broadcast packets, and Multicast packets—Number of unicast,
broadcast, and multicast packets.
•
CRC/Align errors—Total number of packets received that had a length
(excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets) of between 64 and 1518
octets, inclusive, and had either a bad FCS with an integral number of octets
(FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment
Error).
•
FIFO error—Number of FIFO errors that are reported by the ASIC on the PIC.
If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC or a cable is probably malfunctioning.
•
MAC control frames—Number of MAC control frames.
•
MAC pause frames—Number of MAC control frames with pause operational
code.
•
Oversized frames—Number of frames that exceed 1518 octets.
•
Jabber frames—Number of frames that were longer than 1518 octets (excluding
framing bits, but including FCS octets), and had either an FCS error or an
alignment error. This definition of jabber is different from the definition in
IEEE-802.3 section 8.2.1.5 (10BASE5) and section 10.3.1.4 (10BASE2). These
documents define jabber as the condition in which any packet exceeds 20
ms. The allowed range to detect jabber is from 20 ms to 150 ms.
•
Fragment frames—Total number of packets that were less than 64 octets in
length (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets), and had either an
FCS error or an alignment error. Fragment frames normally increment because
both runts (which are normal occurrences caused by collisions) and noise
hits are counted.
•
VLAN tagged frames—Number of frames that are VLAN tagged. The system
uses the TPID of 0x8100 in the frame to determine whether a frame is tagged
or not.
•
Code violations—Number of times an event caused the PHY to indicate “Data
reception error” or “invalid data symbol error.”
OTN Received
Overhead Bytes
APS/PCC0: 0x02, APS/PCC1: 0x11, APS/PCC2: 0x47, APS/PCC3: 0x58 Payload
Type: 0x08
extensive
OTN Transmitted
Overhead Bytes
APS/PCC0: 0x00, APS/PCC1: 0x00, APS/PCC2: 0x00, APS/PCC3: 0x00
Payload Type: 0x08
extensive
132
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Table 5: show interfaces Gigabit Ethernet Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Filter statistics
Receive and Transmit statistics reported by the PIC's MAC address filter
extensive
subsystem. The filtering is done by the content-addressable memory (CAM)
on the PIC. The filter examines a packet's source and destination MAC addresses
to determine whether the packet should enter the system or be rejected.
•
Input packet count—Number of packets received from the MAC hardware
that the filter processed.
•
Input packet rejects—Number of packets that the filter rejected because of
either the source MAC address or the destination MAC address.
•
Input DA rejects—Number of packets that the filter rejected because the
destination MAC address of the packet is not on the accept list. It is normal
for this value to increment. When it increments very quickly and no traffic is
entering the routing device from the far-end system, either there is a bad ARP
entry on the far-end system, or multicast routing is not on and the far-end
system is sending many multicast packets to the local routing device (which
the routing device is rejecting).
•
Input SA rejects—Number of packets that the filter rejected because the
source MAC address of the packet is not on the accept list. The value in this
field should increment only if source MAC address filtering has been enabled.
If filtering is enabled, if the value increments quickly, and if the system is not
receiving traffic that it should from the far-end system, it means that the
user-configured source MAC addresses for this interface are incorrect.
•
Output packet count—Number of packets that the filter has given to the MAC
hardware.
•
Output packet pad count—Number of packets the filter padded to the
minimum Ethernet size (60 bytes) before giving the packet to the MAC
hardware. Usually, padding is done only on small ARP packets, but some very
small IP packets can also require padding. If this value increments rapidly,
either the system is trying to find an ARP entry for a far-end system that does
not exist or it is misconfigured.
•
Output packet error count—Number of packets with an indicated error that
the filter was given to transmit. These packets are usually aged packets or
are the result of a bandwidth problem on the FPC hardware. On a normal
system, the value of this field should not increment.
•
CAM destination filters, CAM source filters—Number of entries in the CAM
dedicated to destination and source MAC address filters. There can only be
up to 64 source entries. If source filtering is disabled, which is the default, the
values for these fields should be 0.
PMA PHY
(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) SONET error information:
•
Seconds—Number of seconds the defect has been active.
•
Count—Number of times that the defect has gone from inactive to active.
•
State—State of the error. Any state other than OK indicates a problem.
extensive
Subfields are:
•
PHY Lock—Phase-locked loop
•
PHY Light—Loss of optical signal
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Table 5: show interfaces Gigabit Ethernet Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
WIS section
(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) SONET error information:
extensive
•
Seconds—Number of seconds the defect has been active.
•
Count—Number of times that the defect has gone from inactive to active.
•
State—State of the error. Any state other than OK indicates a problem.
Subfields are:
WIS line
•
BIP-B1—Bit interleaved parity for SONET section overhead
•
SEF—Severely errored framing
•
LOL—Loss of light
•
LOF—Loss of frame
•
ES-S—Errored seconds (section)
•
SES-S—Severely errored seconds (section)
•
SEFS-S—Severely errored framing seconds (section)
(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) Active alarms and defects,
plus counts of specific SONET errors with detailed information.
•
Seconds—Number of seconds the defect has been active.
•
Count—Number of times that the defect has gone from inactive to active.
•
State—State of the error. State other than OK indicates a problem.
extensive
Subfields are:
134
•
BIP-B2—Bit interleaved parity for SONET line overhead
•
REI-L—Remote error indication (near-end line)
•
RDI-L—Remote defect indication (near-end line)
•
AIS-L—Alarm indication signal (near-end line)
•
BERR-SF—Bit error rate fault (signal failure)
•
BERR-SD—Bit error rate defect (signal degradation)
•
ES-L—Errored seconds (near-end line)
•
SES-L—Severely errored seconds (near-end line)
•
UAS-L—Unavailable seconds (near-end line)
•
ES-LFE—Errored seconds (far-end line)
•
SES-LFE—Severely errored seconds (far-end line)
•
UAS-LFE—Unavailable seconds (far-end line)
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Table 5: show interfaces Gigabit Ethernet Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
WIS path
(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) Active alarms and defects,
plus counts of specific SONET errors with detailed information.
extensive
•
Seconds—Number of seconds the defect has been active.
•
Count—Number of times that the defect has gone from inactive to active.
•
State—State of the error. Any state other than OK indicates a problem.
Subfields are:
•
BIP-B3—Bit interleaved parity for SONET section overhead
•
REI-P—Remote error indication
•
LOP-P—Loss of pointer (path)
•
AIS-P—Path alarm indication signal
•
RDI-P—Path remote defect indication
•
UNEQ-P—Path unequipped
•
PLM-P—Path payload label mismatch
•
ES-P—Errored seconds (near-end STS path)
•
SES-P—Severely errored seconds (near-end STS path)
•
UAS-P—Unavailable seconds (near-end STS path)
•
SES-PFE—Severely errored seconds (far-end STS path)
•
UAS-PFE—Unavailable seconds (far-end STS path)
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Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Table 5: show interfaces Gigabit Ethernet Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Autonegotiation
information
Information about link autonegotiation.
extensive
•
Negotiation status:
•
Incomplete—Ethernet interface has the speed or link mode configured.
•
No autonegotiation—Remote Ethernet interface has the speed or link mode
configured, or does not perform autonegotiation.
•
Complete—Ethernet interface is connected to a device that performs
autonegotiation and the autonegotiation process is successful.
•
Link partner status—OK when Ethernet interface is connected to a device that
performs autonegotiation and the autonegotiation process is successful.
•
Link partner:
•
Link mode—Depending on the capability of the attached Ethernet device,
either Full-duplex or Half-duplex.
•
Flow control—Types of flow control supported by the remote Ethernet
device. For Fast Ethernet interfaces, the type is None. For Gigabit Ethernet
interfaces, types are Symmetric (link partner supports PAUSE on receive
and transmit), Asymmetric (link partner supports PAUSE on transmit), and
Symmetric/Asymmetric (link partner supports both PAUSE on receive and
transmit or only PAUSE receive).
•
Remote fault—Remote fault information from the link partner—Failure
indicates a receive link error. OK indicates that the link partner is receiving.
Negotiation error indicates a negotiation error. Offline indicates that the
link partner is going offline.
•
Local resolution—Information from the link partner:
•
Flow control—Types of flow control supported by the remote Ethernet
device. For Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, types are Symmetric (link partner
supports PAUSE on receive and transmit), Asymmetric (link partner supports
PAUSE on transmit), and Symmetric/Asymmetric (link partner supports
both PAUSE on receive and transmit or only PAUSE receive).
•
Remote fault—Remote fault information. Link OK (no error detected on
receive), Offline (local interface is offline), and Link Failure (link error
detected on receive).
Received path
trace, Transmitted
path trace
(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) SONET/SDH interfaces allow
path trace bytes to be sent inband across the SONET/SDH link. Juniper Networks
and other router manufacturers use these bytes to help diagnose
misconfigurations and network errors by setting the transmitted path trace
message so that it contains the system hostname and name of the physical
interface. The received path trace value is the message received from the routing
device at the other end of the fiber. The transmitted path trace value is the
message that this routing device transmits.
extensive
Packet Forwarding
Engine
configuration
Information about the configuration of the Packet Forwarding Engine:
extensive
136
•
Destination slot—FPC slot number.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Table 5: show interfaces Gigabit Ethernet Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
CoS information
Information about the CoS queue for the physical interface.
extensive
•
CoS transmit queue—Queue number and its associated user-configured
forwarding class name.
•
Bandwidth %—Percentage of bandwidth allocated to the queue.
•
Bandwidth bps—Bandwidth allocated to the queue (in bps).
•
Buffer %—Percentage of buffer space allocated to the queue.
•
Buffer usec—Amount of buffer space allocated to the queue, in microseconds.
This value is nonzero only if the buffer size is configured in terms of time.
•
Priority—Queue priority: low or high.
•
Limit—Displayed if rate limiting is configured for the queue. Possible values
are none and exact. If exact is configured, the queue transmits only up to the
configured bandwidth, even if excess bandwidth is available. If none is
configured, the queue transmits beyond the configured bandwidth if
bandwidth is available.
Logical Interface
Logical interface
Name of the logical interface.
All levels
Index
Index number of the logical interface, which reflects its initialization sequence.
detail extensive none
SNMP ifIndex
SNMP interface index number for the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Flags
Information about the logical interface. Possible values are described in the
“Logical Interface Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description”
on page 115.
All levels
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Table 5: show interfaces Gigabit Ethernet Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
VLAN-Tag
Rewrite profile applied to incoming or outgoing frames on the outer (Out) VLAN
tag or for both the outer and inner (In) VLAN tags.
brief detail extensive
•
push—An outer VLAN tag is pushed in front of the existing VLAN tag.
•
pop—The outer VLAN tag of the incoming frame is removed.
•
swap—The outer VLAN tag of the incoming frame is overwritten with the user
none
specified VLAN tag information.
•
push—An outer VLAN tag is pushed in front of the existing VLAN tag.
•
push-push—Two VLAN tags are pushed in from the incoming frame.
•
swap-push—The outer VLAN tag of the incoming frame is replaced by a
user-specified VLAN tag value. A user-specified outer VLAN tag is pushed in
front. The outer tag becomes an inner tag in the final frame.
•
swap-swap—Both the inner and the outer VLAN tags of the incoming frame
are replaced by the user specified VLAN tag value.
•
pop-swap—The outer VLAN tag of the incoming frame is removed, and the
inner VLAN tag of the incoming frame is replaced by the user-specified VLAN
tag value. The inner tag becomes the outer tag in the final frame.
•
pop-pop—Both the outer and inner VLAN tags of the incoming frame are
removed.
Demux:
IP demultiplexing (demux) value that appears if this interface is used as the
demux underlying interface. The output is one of the following:
•
Source Family Inet
•
Destination Family Inet
detail extensive none
Encapsulation
Encapsulation on the logical interface.
All levels
Protocol
Protocol family. Possible values are described in the “Protocol Field” section
under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
detail extensive none
MTU
Maximum transmission unit size on the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Maximum labels
Maximum number of MPLS labels configured for the MPLS protocol family on
the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Traffic statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets received and transmitted on the specified
interface set.
detail extensive
•
Input bytes, Output bytes—Number of bytes received and transmitted on the
interface set. The value in this field also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes
for ingress or egress traffic on Ethernet interfaces if you enable accounting
of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or the logical interface level.
•
Input packets, Output packets—Number of packets received and transmitted
on the interface set.
IPv6 transit
statistics
Number of IPv6 transit bytes and packets received and transmitted on the
logical interface if IPv6 statistics tracking is enabled.
extensive
Local statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets destined to the routing device.
extensive
138
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Table 5: show interfaces Gigabit Ethernet Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Transit statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets transiting the switch.
extensive
NOTE: For Gigabit Ethernet intelligent queuing 2 (IQ2) interfaces, the logical
interface egress statistics might not accurately reflect the traffic on the wire
when output shaping is applied. Traffic management output shaping might
drop packets after they are tallied by the Output bytes and Output packets
interface counters. However, correct values display for both of these egress
statistics when per-unit scheduling is enabled for the Gigabit Ethernet IQ2
physical interface, or when a single logical interface is actively using a shared
scheduler.
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Route Table
Route table in which the logical interface address is located. For example, 0
refers to the routing table inet.0.
detail extensive none
Flags
Information about protocol family flags. Possible values are described in the
“Family Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
detail extensive
Donor interface
(Unnumbered Ethernet) Interface from which an unnumbered Ethernet interface
borrows an IPv4 address.
detail extensive none
Preferred source
address
(Unnumbered Ethernet) Secondary IPv4 address of the donor loopback interface
that acts as the preferred source address for the unnumbered Ethernet interface.
detail extensive none
Input Filters
Names of any input filters applied to this interface. If you specify a precedence
value for any filter in a dynamic profile, filter precedence values appear in
parenthesis next to all interfaces.
detail extensive
Output Filters
Names of any output filters applied to this interface. If you specify a precedence
value for any filter in a dynamic profile, filter precedence values appear in
parenthesis next to all interfaces.
detail extensive
Mac-Validate
Failures
Number of MAC address validation failures for packets and bytes. This field is
displayed when MAC address validation is enabled for the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Addresses, Flags
Information about the address flags. Possible values are described in the
“Addresses Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description” on
page 115.
detail extensive none
protocol-family
Protocol family configured on the logical interface. If the protocol is inet, the IP
address of the interface is also displayed.
brief
Flags
Information about address flag (possible values are described in the “Addresses
Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
detail extensive none
Destination
IP address of the remote side of the connection.
detail extensive none
Local
IP address of the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Broadcast
Broadcast address of the logical interlace.
detail extensive none
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Table 5: show interfaces Gigabit Ethernet Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
For Gigabit Ethernet IQ PICs, traffic and MAC statistics output varies. Table 6 on page 140
describes the traffic and MAC statistics for two sample interfaces, each of which is sending
traffic in packets of 500 bytes (including 478 bytes for the Layer 3 packet, 18 bytes for
the Layer 2 VLAN traffic header, and 4 bytes for cyclic redundancy check [CRC]
information). In Table 6 on page 140, the ge-0/3/0 interface is the inbound physical
interface, and the ge-0/0/0 interface is the outbound physical interface. On both
interfaces, traffic is carried on logical unit .50 (VLAN 50).
Table 6: Gigabit Ethernet IQ PIC Traffic and MAC Statistics by Interface Type
Interface Type
Sample Command
Byte and Octet Counts Include
Comments
Inbound physical
interface
show interfaces
ge-0/3/0 extensive
Traffic statistics:
The additional 4 bytes are
for the CRC.
Input bytes: 496 bytes per packet, representing
the Layer 2 packet
MAC statistics:
Received octets: 500 bytes per packet,
representing the Layer 2 packet + 4 bytes
Inbound logical
interface
show interfaces
ge-0/3/0.50 extensive
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes: 478 bytes per packet, representing
the Layer 3 packet
Outbound physical
interface
show interfaces
ge-0/0/0 extensive
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes: 490 bytes per packet, representing
the Layer 3 packet + 12 bytes
MAC statistics:
Received octets: 478 bytes per packet,
representing the Layer 3 packet
Outbound logical
interface
show interfaces
ge-0/0/0.50 extensive
For input bytes, the
additional 12 bytes
includes 6 bytes for the
destination MAC address
+ 4 bytes for VLAN + 2
bytes for the Ethernet
type.
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes: 478 bytes per packet, representing
the Layer 3 packet
Sample Output
show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, LAN PHY Mode, IQ2)
user@host> show interfaces xe-5/0/0 extensive
Physical interface: xe-5/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 177, SNMP ifIndex: 99, Generation: 178
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1518, LAN-PHY mode, Speed: 10Gbps, Loopback:
140
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
None, Source filtering: Enabled,
Flow control: Enabled
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 4 maximum usable queues
Schedulers
: 1024
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:14:f6:b9:f1:f6, Hardware address: 00:14:f6:b9:f1:f6
Last flapped
: Never
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
6970332384
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
81050506
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Ingress traffic statistics at Packet Forwarding Engine:
Input bytes :
6970299398
0 bps
Input packets:
81049992
0 pps
Drop
bytes :
0
0 bps
Drop
packets:
0
0 pps
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0, L3
incompletes: 0, L2 channel errors: 0,
L2 mismatch timeouts: 0, FIFO errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 0, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets: 0,
FIFO errors: 0, HS link CRC errors: 0,
MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Ingress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
81049992
81049992
0
1 expedited-fo
0
0
0
2 assured-forw
0
0
0
3 network-cont
0
0
0
Egress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets
Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
0
0
0
1 expedited-fo
0
0
0
2 assured-forw
0
0
0
3 network-cont
0
0
0
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
PCS statistics
Bit errors
Errored blocks
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Seconds
0
0
141
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
MAC statistics:
Receive
Total octets
6970332384
Total packets
81050506
Unicast packets
81050000
Broadcast packets
506
Multicast packets
0
CRC/Align errors
0
FIFO errors
0
MAC control frames
0
MAC pause frames
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
0
Fragment frames
0
VLAN tagged frames
0
Code violations
0
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
81050506
Input packet rejects
506
Input DA rejects
0
Input SA rejects
0
Output packet count
Output packet pad count
Output packet error count
CAM destination filters: 0, CAM source filters: 0
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 5
CoS information:
Direction : Output
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
%
bps
%
0 best-effort
95
950000000
95
3 network-control
5
50000000
5
Direction : Input
CoS transmit queue
0 best-effort
3 network-control
%
95
5
Bandwidth
bps
950000000
50000000
%
95
5
Transmit
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Buffer Priority
usec
0
low
0
low
Limit
Buffer Priority
usec
0
low
0
low
Limit
none
none
none
none
Logical interface xe-5/0/0.0 (Index 71) (SNMP ifIndex 95) (Generation 195)
Flags: SNMP-Traps 0x4000 VLAN-Tag [ 0x8100.100 ] Encapsulation: ENET2
Egress account overhead: 100
Ingress account overhead: 90
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
46
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
1
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
46
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
1
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
142
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Protocol inet, MTU: 1500, Generation: 253, Route table: 0
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 192.1.1/24, Local: 192.1.1.1, Broadcast: 192.1.1.255,
Generation: 265
Protocol multiservice, MTU: Unlimited, Generation: 254, Route table: 0
Flags: None
Policer: Input: __default_arp_policer__
show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, WAN PHY Mode)
user@host> show interfaces xe-1/0/0 extensive
Physical interface: xe-1/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 141, SNMP ifIndex: 34, Generation: 47
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 10Gbps, Loopback: Disabled
WAN-PHY mode
Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps 16384
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 4 supported
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:05:85:a2:10:9d, Hardware address: 00:05:85:a2:10:9d
Last flapped
: 2005-07-07 11:22:34 PDT (3d 12:28 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0,
L3 incompletes: 0, L2 channel errors: 0, L2 mismatch timeouts: 0,
HS Link CRC errors: 0, HS Link FIFO overflows: 0,
Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 1, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0,
Aged packets: 0, FIFO errors: 0, HS link CRC errors: 0, MTU errors: 0,
Resource errors: 0
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
0
0
0
1 expedited-fo
0
0
0
2 assured-forw
0
0
0
3 network-cont
0
0
0
Active alarms : LOL, LOS, LBL
Active defects: LOL, LOS, LBL, SEF, AIS-L, AIS-P
PCS statistics
Seconds
Count
Bit errors
0
0
Errored blocks
0
0
MAC statistics:
Receive
Transmit
Total octets
0
0
Total packets
0
0
Unicast packets
0
0
Broadcast packets
0
0
Multicast packets
0
0
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CRC/Align errors
0
0
FIFO errors
0
0
MAC control frames
0
0
MAC pause frames
0
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
0
Fragment frames
0
VLAN tagged frames
0
Code violations
0
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
0
Input packet rejects
0
Input DA rejects
0
Input SA rejects
0
Output packet count
0
Output packet pad count
0
Output packet error count
0
CAM destination filters: 0, CAM source filters: 0
PMA PHY:
Seconds
Count State
PLL lock
0
0 OK
PHY light
63159
1 Light Missing
WIS section:
BIP-B1
0
0
SEF
434430
434438 Defect Active
LOS
434430
1 Defect Active
LOF
434430
1 Defect Active
ES-S
434430
SES-S
434430
SEFS-S
434430
WIS line:
BIP-B2
0
0
REI-L
0
0
RDI-L
0
0 OK
AIS-L
434430
1 Defect Active
BERR-SF
0
0 OK
BERR-SD
0
0 OK
ES-L
434430
SES-L
434430
UAS-L
434420
ES-LFE
0
SES-LFE
0
UAS-LFE
0
WIS path:
BIP-B3
0
0
REI-P
0
0
LOP-P
0
0 OK
AIS-P
434430
1 Defect Active
RDI-P
0
0 OK
UNEQ-P
0
0 OK
PLM-P
0
0 OK
ES-P
434430
SES-P
434430
UAS-P
434420
ES-PFE
0
SES-PFE
0
UAS-PFE
0
Received path trace:
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ................
Transmitted path trace: orissa so-1/0/0
6f 72 69 73 73 61 20 73 6f 2d 31 2f 30 2f 30 00
orissa so-1/0/0.
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
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Destination slot: 1
CoS information:
CoS transmit queue
0 best-effort
3 network-control
%
95
5
Bandwidth
bps
950000000
50000000
%
95
5
Buffer
bytes
0
0
Priority
low
low
Limit
none
none
show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, DWDM OTN PIC)
user@host> show interfaces ge-7/0/0 extensive
Physical interface: ge-7/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Down
Interface index: 143, SNMP ifIndex: 508, Generation: 208
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 10Gbps, BPDU Error: None,
MAC-REWRITE Error: None, Loopback: Disabled, Source filtering: Disabled,
Flow control: Enabled
Device flags
: Present Running Down
Interface flags: Hardware-Down SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: None
Wavelength
: 1550.12 nm, Frequency: 193.40 THz
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:05:85:70:2b:72, Hardware address: 00:05:85:70:2b:72
Last flapped
: 2011-04-20 15:48:54 PDT (18:39:49 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0,
L3 incompletes: 0, L2 channel errors: 0, L2 mismatch timeouts: 0,
FIFO errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 2, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets: 0,
FIFO errors: 0, HS link CRC errors: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
0
0
0
1 expedited-fo
0
0
0
2 assured-forw
0
0
0
3 network-cont
Queue number:
0
1
2
3
Active alarms : LINK
Active defects : LINK
MAC statistics:
Total octets
Total packets
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Mapped forwarding classes
best-effort
expedited-forwarding
assured-forwarding
network-control
Receive
0
0
Transmit
0
0
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Unicast packets
0
0
Broadcast packets
0
0
Multicast packets
0
0
CRC/Align errors
0
0
FIFO errors
0
0
MAC control frames
0
0
MAC pause frames
0
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
0
Fragment frames
0
VLAN tagged frames
0
Code violations
0
Total octets
0
0
Total packets
0
0
Unicast packets
0
0
Broadcast packets
0
0
Multicast packets
0
0
CRC/Align errors
0
0
FIFO errors
0
0
MAC control frames
0
0
MAC pause frames
0
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
0
Fragment frames
0
VLAN tagged frames
0
Code violations
0
OTN alarms
:
None
OTN defects
:
None
OTN FEC Mode
: GFEC
OTN Rate
: Fixed Stuff Bytes 11.0957Gbps
OTN Line Loopback : Enabled
OTN FEC statistics :
Corrected Errors
0
Corrected Error Ratio (
0 sec average)
0e-0
OTN FEC alarms:
Seconds
Count State
FEC Degrade
0
0 OK
FEC Excessive
0
0 OK
OTN OC:
Seconds
Count State
LOS
2
1 OK
LOF
67164
2 Defect Active
LOM
67164
71 Defect Active
Wavelength Lock
0
0 OK
OTN OTU:
AIS
0
0 OK
BDI
65919
4814 Defect Active
IAE
67158
1 Defect Active
TTIM
7
1 OK
SF
67164
2 Defect Active
SD
67164
3 Defect Active
TCA-ES
0
0 OK
TCA-SES
0
0 OK
TCA-UAS
80
40 OK
TCA-BBE
0
0 OK
BIP
0
0 OK
BBE
0
0 OK
ES
0
0 OK
SES
0
0 OK
UAS
587
0 OK
Received DAPI:
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
................
Received SAPI:
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Chapter 7: Operational Commands
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
................
Transmitted DAPI:
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
................
Transmitted SAPI:
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
................
OTN Received Overhead Bytes:
APS/PCC0: 0x02, APS/PCC1: 0x42, APS/PCC2: 0xa2, APS/PCC3: 0x48
Payload Type: 0x03
OTN Transmitted Overhead Bytes:
APS/PCC0: 0x00, APS/PCC1: 0x00, APS/PCC2: 0x00, APS/PCC3: 0x00
Payload Type: 0x03
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
0
Input packet rejects
0
Input DA rejects
0
Input SA rejects
0
Output packet count
0
Output packet pad count
0
Output packet error count
0
CAM destination filters: 0, CAM source filters: 0
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 7
CoS information:
Direction : Output
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Buffer Priority
Limit
%
bps
%
usec
0 best-effort
95
9500000000
95
0
low
none
3 network-control
5
500000000
5
0
low
none
...
show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, LAN PHY Mode, Unidirectional Mode)
user@host> show interfaces xe-7/0/0 extensive
Physical interface: xe-7/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 173, SNMP ifIndex: 212, Generation: 174
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, LAN-PHY mode, Speed: 10Gbps,
Unidirectional: Enabled,
Loopback: None, Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled
Device flags
: Present Running
...
show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, LAN PHY Mode, Unidirectional Mode, Transmit-Only)
user@host> show interfaces xe-7/0/0–tx extensive
Physical interface: xe-7/0/0-tx, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 176, SNMP ifIndex: 137, Generation: 177
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, LAN-PHY mode, Speed: 10Gbps,
Unidirectional: Tx-Only
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:05:85:73:e4:83, Hardware address: 00:05:85:73:e4:83
Last flapped
: 2007-06-01 09:08:19 PDT (3d 02:31 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
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Output bytes :
Input packets:
Output packets:
322891152287160
0
328809727380
9627472888 bps
0 pps
1225492 pps
...
Filter statistics:
Output packet count
Output packet pad count
Output packet error count
...
328810554250
0
0
Logical interface xe-7/0/0-tx.0 (Index 73) (SNMP ifIndex 138) (Generation 139)
Flags: SNMP-Traps Encapsulation: ENET2
Egress account overhead: 100
Ingress account overhead: 90
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
322891152287160
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
328809727380
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
322891152287160
9627472888 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
328809727380
1225492 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Protocol inet, MTU: 1500, Generation: 147, Route table: 0
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 10.11.12/24, Local: 10.11.12.13, Broadcast: 10.11.12.255,
Generation: 141
Protocol multiservice, MTU: Unlimited, Generation: 148, Route table: 0
Flags: None
Policer: Input: __default_arp_policer__
show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet, LAN PHY Mode, Unidirectional Mode, Receive-Only)
user@host> show interfaces xe-7/0/0–rx extensive
Physical interface: xe-7/0/0-rx, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 174, SNMP ifIndex: 118, Generation: 175
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, LAN-PHY mode, Speed: 10Gbps,
Unidirectional: Rx-Only
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
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Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:05:85:73:e4:83, Hardware address: 00:05:85:73:e4:83
Last flapped
: 2007-06-01 09:08:22 PDT (3d 02:31 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
322857456303482
9627496104 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
328775413751
1225495 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
...
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
Input packet rejects
Input DA rejects
328775015056
1
0
...
Logical interface xe-7/0/0-rx.0 (Index 72) (SNMP ifIndex 120) (Generation 138)
Flags: SNMP-Traps Encapsulation: ENET2
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
322857456303482
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
328775413751
Output packets:
0
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
322857456303482
9627496104 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
328775413751
1225495 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Protocol inet, MTU: 1500, Generation: 145, Route table: 0
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 192.1.1/24, Local: 192.1.1.1, Broadcast: 192.1.1.255,
Generation: 139
Protocol multiservice, MTU: Unlimited, Generation: 146, Route table: 0
Flags: None
Policer: Input: __default_arp_policer__
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show interfaces (Discard)
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show interfaces dsc
<brief | detail | extensive | terse>
<descriptions>
<media>
<snmp-index snmp-index>
<statistics>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Display status information about the specified discard interface.
dsc—Display standard information about the specified discard interface.
brief | detail | extensive | terse—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
descriptions—(Optional) Display interface description strings.
media—This option is not relevant for the discard interface and always shows a value of
0.
snmp-index snmp-index—(Optional) Display information for the specified SNMP index
of the interface.
statistics—(Optional) This option is not relevant for the discard interface and always
shows a value of 0.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
show interfaces (ATM)
•
show interfaces routing
show interfaces dsc on page 153
show interfaces dsc brief on page 153
show interfaces dsc detail on page 153
show interfaces dsc extensive on page 154
Table 7 on page 150 lists the output fields for the show interfaces (discard) command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 7: Discard show interfaces Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Physical interface
Name of the physical interface, whether the interface is enabled, and the state
of the physical interface: Up or Down.
All levels
Interface index
Physical interface's index number, which reflects its initialization sequence.
detail extensive none
Physical Interface
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Table 7: Discard show interfaces Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
SNMP ifIndex
SNMP index number for the physical interface.
detail extensive none
Type
Type of interface. Software-Pseudo indicates a standard software interface
with no associated hardware device.
All levels
Link-level type
Encapsulation being used on the physical interface.
All levels
MTU
MTU size on the physical interface.
All levels
Clocking
Reference clock source. It can be Internal or External.
brief detail extensive
Speed
Speed at which the interface is running.
brief detail extensive
Device flags
Information about the physical device. Possible values are described in the
“Device Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
All levels
Interface flags
Information about the interface. Possible values are described in the “Interface
Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
All levels
Link type
Encapsulation being used on the physical interface.
detail extensive
Link flags
Information about the link. Possible values are described in the “Link Flags”
section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
detail extensive
Physical info
Information about the physical interface.
detail extensive
Hold-times
Current interface hold-time up and hold-time down. Value is in milliseconds.
detail extensive
Current address,
Hardware address
Configured MAC address and hardware MAC address.
detail extensive
Alternate link
address
Backup address of the link.
detail extensive
Last flapped
Date, time, and how long ago the interface went from down to up. The format
is Last flapped: year-month-day hour:minute:second timezone (hour:minute:second
ago). For example, Last flapped: 2002-04-26 10:52:40 PDT (04:33:20 ago).
detail extensive none
Statistics last
cleared
Time when the statistics for the interface were last set to zero.
detail extensive
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Table 7: Discard show interfaces Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Traffic statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets received and transmitted on the physical
interface.
detail extensive
•
Input bytes, Output bytes—Number of bytes received and transmitted on the
interface.
•
Input packets, Output packets—Number of packets received and transmitted
on the interface.
Input errors
Input errors on the interface:
detail extensive
•
Errors—Sum of incoming frame aborts and FCS errors.
•
Drops—Number of packets dropped by the input queue of the I/O Manager
ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every
packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
•
Framing errors—Number of packets received with an invalid frame checksum
(FCS).
•
Runts—Number of frames received that are smaller than the runt threshold.
•
Giants—Number of frames received that are larger than the giant threshold.
•
Policed discards—Number of frames that the incoming packet match code
discarded because they were not recognized or not of interest. Usually, this
field reports protocols that the Junos OS does not handle.
•
Output errors
Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.
(Extensive only) Output errors on the interface. The following paragraphs explain
the counters whose meaning might not be obvious:
•
detail extensive
Carrier transitions—Number of times the interface has gone from down to up.
This number does not normally increment quickly, increasing only when the
cable is unplugged, the far-end system is powered down and then up, or
another problem occurs. If the number of carrier transitions increments quickly
(perhaps once every 10 seconds), the cable, the far-end system, or the PIC
is malfunctioning.
•
Errors—Sum of the outgoing frame aborts and FCS errors.
•
Drops—Number of packets dropped by the output queue of the I/O Manager
ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every
packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
•
MTU errors—Number of packets whose size exceeded the MTU of the interface.
•
Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.
Logical Interface
Logical interface
Name of the logical interface.
All levels
Index
Logical interface index number, which reflects its initialization sequence.
detail extensive
SNMP ifIndex
Logical interface SNMP interface index number.
detail extensive
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
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Table 7: Discard show interfaces Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Flags
Information about the logical interface. Possible values are described in the
“Logical Interface Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description”
on page 115.
All levels
Encapsulation
Encapsulation on the logical interface.
All levels
Protocol
Protocol family configured on the logical interface, such as iso, inet6, or mpls.
All levels
MTU
MTU size on the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Route Table
Routing table in which the logical interface address is located. For example, 0
refers to the routing table inet.0.
detail extensive
Sample Output
show interfaces dsc
user@host> show interfaces dsc
Physical interface: dsc, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 5, SNMP ifIndex: 5
Type: Software-Pseudo, MTU: Unlimited
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps
Link flags
: None
Last flapped
: Never
Input packets : 0
Output packets: 0
Logical interface dsc.0 (Index 66) (SNMP ifIndex 235)
Flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps Encapsulation: Unspecified
Protocol inet, MTU: Unlimited
Flags: None
show interfaces dsc brief
user@host> show interfaces dsc brief
Physical interface: dsc, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Type: Software-Pseudo, Link-level type: Unspecified, MTU: Unlimited, Clocking:
Unspecified, Speed: Unspecified
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps
Logical interface dsc.0
Flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps Encapsulation: Unspecified
inet
show interfaces dsc detail
user@host> show interfaces dsc detail
Physical interface: dsc, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 5, SNMP ifIndex: 5, Generation: 9
Type: Software-Pseudo, Link-level type: Unspecified, MTU: Unlimited, Clocking:
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Unspecified, Speed: Unspecified
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps
Link type
: Unspecified
Link flags
: None
Physical info : Unspecified
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: Unspecified, Hardware address: Unspecified
Alternate link address: Unspecified
Last flapped
: Never
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Logical interface dsc.0 (Index 66) (SNMP ifIndex 235) (Generation 6)
Flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps Encapsulation: Unspecified
Protocol inet, MTU: Unlimited, Generation: 14, Route table: 0
Flags: None
show interfaces dsc extensive
user@host> show interfaces dsc extensive
Physical interface: dsc, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 5, SNMP ifIndex: 5, Generation: 9
Type: Software-Pseudo, Link-level type: Unspecified, MTU: Unlimited, Clocking:
Unspecified, Speed: Unspecified
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps
Link type
: Unspecified
Link flags
: None
Physical info : Unspecified
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: Unspecified, Hardware address: Unspecified
Alternate link address: Unspecified
Last flapped
: Never
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Giants: 0,
Policed discards: 0, Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 0, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, MTU errors: 0,
Resource errors: 0
Logical interface dsc.0 (Index 66) (SNMP ifIndex 235) (Generation 6)
Flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps Encapsulation: Unspecified
Protocol inet, MTU: Unlimited, Generation: 14, Route table: 0
154
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Chapter 7: Operational Commands
show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet)
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show interfaces ge-fpc/pic/port
<brief | detail | extensive | terse>
<descriptions>
<media>
<snmp-index snmp-index>
<statistics>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Display status information about the specified Gigabit Ethernet interface.
ge-fpc/pic/port—Display standard information about the specified Gigabit Ethernet
interface.
brief | detail | extensive | terse—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
descriptions—(Optional) Display interface description strings.
media—(Optional) Display media-specific information about network interfaces.
snmp-index snmp-index—(Optional) Display information for the specified SNMP index
of the interface.
statistics—(Optional) Display static interface statistics.
Additional Information
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
In a logical system, this command displays information only about the logical interfaces
and not about the physical interfaces.
view
•
Verifying and Managing Agent Circuit Identifier-Based Dynamic VLAN Configuration
show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) on page 171
show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet on MX Series Routers) on page 172
show interfaces extensive (Gigabit Ethernet on MX Series Routers showing interface
transmit statistics configuration) on page 172
show interfaces brief (Gigabit Ethernet) on page 172
show interfaces detail (Gigabit Ethernet) on page 173
show interfaces extensive (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2) on page 174
show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet Unnumbered Interface) on page 177
show interfaces (ACI Interface Set Configured) on page 178
Table 8 on page 156 describes the output fields for the show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet)
command. Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear. For
Gigabit Ethernet IQ and IQE PICs, the traffic and MAC statistics vary by interface type.
For more information, see Table 9 on page 170.
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Table 8: show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Physical interface
Name of the physical interface.
All levels
Enabled
State of the interface. Possible values are described in the “Enabled Field”
section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
All levels
Interface index
Index number of the physical interface, which reflects its initialization sequence.
detail extensive none
SNMP ifIndex
SNMP index number for the physical interface.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Link-level type
Encapsulation being used on the physical interface.
All levels
MTU
Maximum transmission unit size on the physical interface.
All levels
Speed
Speed at which the interface is running.
All levels
Loopback
Loopback status: Enabled or Disabled. If loopback is enabled, type of loopback:
Local or Remote.
All levels
Source filtering
Source filtering status: Enabled or Disabled.
All levels
LAN-PHY mode
10-Gigabit Ethernet interface operating in Local Area Network Physical Layer
Device (LAN PHY) mode. LAN PHY allows 10-Gigabit Ethernet wide area links
to use existing Ethernet applications.
All levels
WAN-PHY mode
10-Gigabit Ethernet interface operating in Wide Area Network Physical Layer
Device (WAN PHY) mode. WAN PHY allows 10-Gigabit Ethernet wide area links
to use fiber-optic cables and other devices intended for SONET/SDH.
All levels
Unidirectional
Unidirectional link mode status for 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface: Enabled or
Disabled for parent interface; Rx-only or Tx-only for child interfaces.
All levels
Flow control
Flow control status: Enabled or Disabled.
All levels
Auto-negotiation
(Gigabit Ethernet interfaces) Autonegotiation status: Enabled or Disabled.
All levels
Remote-fault
(Gigabit Ethernet interfaces) Remote fault status:
All levels
Physical Interface
•
Online—Autonegotiation is manually configured as online.
•
Offline—Autonegotiation is manually configured as offline.
Device flags
Information about the physical device. Possible values are described in the
“Device Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
All levels
Interface flags
Information about the interface. Possible values are described in the “Interface
Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
All levels
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Table 8: show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Link flags
Information about the link. Possible values are described in the “Links Flags”
section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
All levels
Wavelength
(10-Gigabit Ethernet dense wavelength-division multiplexing [DWDM]
interfaces) Displays the configured wavelength, in nanometers (nm).
All levels
Frequency
(10-Gigabit Ethernet DWDM interfaces only) Displays the frequency associated
with the configured wavelength, in terahertz (THz).
All levels
CoS queues
Number of CoS queues configured.
detail extensive none
Schedulers
(Gigabit Ethernet intelligent queuing 2 [IQ2] interfaces only) Number of CoS
schedulers configured.
extensive
Hold-times
Current interface hold-time up and hold-time down, in milliseconds (ms).
detail extensive
Current address
Configured MAC address.
detail extensive none
Hardware address
Hardware MAC address.
detail extensive none
Last flapped
Date, time, and how long ago the interface went from down to up. The format
is Last flapped: year-month-day hour:minute:second:timezone (hour:minute:second
ago). For example, Last flapped: 2002-04-26 10:52:40 PDT (04:33:20 ago).
detail extensive none
Input Rate
Input rate in bits per second (bps) and packets per second (pps). The value in
this field also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes for ingress traffic on Ethernet
interfaces if you enable accounting of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or the
logical interface level.
None
Output Rate
Output rate in bps and pps. The value in this field also includes the Layer 2
overhead bytes for egress traffic on Ethernet interfaces if you enable accounting
of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or the logical interface level.
None
Statistics last cleared
Time when the statistics for the interface were last set to zero.
detail extensive
Egress account
overhead
Layer 2 overhead in bytes that is accounted in the interface statistics for egress
traffic.
detail extensive
Ingress account
overhead
Layer 2 overhead in bytes that is accounted in the interface statistics for ingress
traffic.
detail extensive
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Table 8: show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Traffic statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets received and transmitted on the physical
interface.
detail extensive
•
Input bytes—Number of bytes received on the interface. The value in this field
also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes for ingress traffic on Ethernet
interfaces if you enable accounting of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or
the logical interface level.
•
Output bytes—Number of bytes transmitted on the interface. The value in
this field also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes for egress traffic on Ethernet
interfaces if you enable accounting of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or
the logical interface level.
•
Input packets—Number of packets received on the interface.
•
Output packets—Number of packets transmitted on the interface.
Gigabit Ethernet and 10-Gigabit Ethernet IQ PICs count the overhead and CRC
bytes.
For Gigabit Ethernet IQ PICs, the input byte counts vary by interface type. For
more information, see Table 31 under the show interfaces (10-Gigabit Ethernet)
command.
Input errors
Input errors on the interface. The following paragraphs explain the counters
whose meaning might not be obvious:
•
Errors—Sum of the incoming frame aborts and FCS errors.
•
Drops—Number of packets dropped by the input queue of the I/O Manager
extensive
ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every
packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
•
Framing errors—Number of packets received with an invalid frame checksum
(FCS).
•
Runts—Number of frames received that are smaller than the runt threshold.
•
Policed discards—Number of frames that the incoming packet match code
discarded because they were not recognized or not of interest. Usually, this
field reports protocols that Junos OS does not handle.
•
L3 incompletes—Number of incoming packets discarded because they failed
Layer 3 (usually IPv4) sanity checks of the header. For example, a frame with
less than 20 bytes of available IP header is discarded. L3 incomplete errors
can be ignored by configuring the ignore-l3-incompletes statement.
•
L2 channel errors—Number of times the software did not find a valid logical
interface for an incoming frame.
•
L2 mismatch timeouts—Number of malformed or short packets that caused
the incoming packet handler to discard the frame as unreadable.
•
FIFO errors—Number of FIFO errors in the receive direction that are reported
by the ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC is probably
malfunctioning.
•
158
Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.
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Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Table 8: show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Output errors
Output errors on the interface. The following paragraphs explain the counters
whose meaning might not be obvious:
extensive
•
Carrier transitions—Number of times the interface has gone from down to up.
This number does not normally increment quickly, increasing only when the
cable is unplugged, the far-end system is powered down and then up, or
another problem occurs. If the number of carrier transitions increments quickly
(perhaps once every 10 seconds), the cable, the far-end system, or the PIC
or PIM is malfunctioning.
•
Errors—Sum of the outgoing frame aborts and FCS errors.
•
Drops—Number of packets dropped by the output queue of the I/O Manager
ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every
packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
NOTE: Due to accounting space limitations on certain Type 3 FPCs (which
are supported in M320 and T640 routers), the Drops field does not always
use the correct value for queue 6 or queue 7 for interfaces on 10-port 1-Gigabit
Ethernet PICs.
•
Collisions—Number of Ethernet collisions. The Gigabit Ethernet PIC supports
only full-duplex operation, so for Gigabit Ethernet PICs, this number should
always remain 0. If it is nonzero, there is a software bug.
•
Aged packets—Number of packets that remained in shared packet SDRAM
so long that the system automatically purged them. The value in this field
should never increment. If it does, it is most likely a software bug or possibly
malfunctioning hardware.
•
FIFO errors—Number of FIFO errors in the send direction as reported by the
ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC is probably
malfunctioning.
•
HS link CRC errors—Number of errors on the high-speed links between the
ASICs responsible for handling the router interfaces.
Egress queues
•
MTU errors—Number of packets whose size exceeded the MTU of the interface.
•
Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.
Total number of egress queues supported on the specified interface.
detail extensive
NOTE: In DPCs that are not of the enhanced type, such as DPC 40x 1GE R, DPCE
20x 1GE + 2x 10GE R, or DPCE 40x 1GE R, you might notice a discrepancy in the
output of the show interfaces command because incoming packets might be
counted in the Egress queues section of the output. This problem occurs on
non-enhanced DPCs because the egress queue statistics are polled from IMQ
(Inbound Message Queuing) block of the I-chip. The IMQ block does not
differentiate between ingress and egress WAN traffic; as a result, the combined
statistics are displayed in the egress queue counters on the Routing Engine. In
a simple VPLS scenario, if there is no MAC entry in DMAC table (by sending
unidirectional traffic), traffic is flooded and the input traffic is accounted in IMQ.
For bidirectional traffic (MAC entry in DMAC table), if the outgoing interface is
on the same I-chip then both ingress and egress statistics are counted in a
combined way. If the outgoing interface is on a different I-chip or FPC, then only
egress statistics are accounted in IMQ. This behavior is expected with
non-enhanced DPCs
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Table 8: show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Queue counters
(Egress)
CoS queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name.
detail extensive
•
Queued packets—Number of queued packets.
•
Transmitted packets—Number of transmitted packets.
•
Dropped packets—Number of packets dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
NOTE: Due to accounting space limitations on certain Type 3 FPCs (which
are supported in M320 and T640 routers), the Dropped packets field does not
always display the correct value for queue 6 or queue 7 for interfaces on
10-port 1-Gigabit Ethernet PICs.
Ingress queues
Total number of ingress queues supported on the specified interface. Displayed
on IQ2 interfaces.
extensive
Queue counters
(Ingress)
CoS queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name.
Displayed on IQ2 interfaces.
extensive
Active alarms and
Active defects
•
Queued packets—Number of queued packets.
•
Transmitted packets—Number of transmitted packets.
•
Dropped packets—Number of packets dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
Ethernet-specific defects that can prevent the interface from passing packets.
When a defect persists for a certain amount of time, it is promoted to an alarm.
Based on the router configuration, an alarm can ring the red or yellow alarm
bell on the router, or turn on the red or yellow alarm LED on the craft interface.
These fields can contain the value None or Link.
•
None—There are no active defects or alarms.
•
Link—Interface has lost its link state, which usually means that the cable is
detail extensive none
unplugged, the far-end system has been turned off, or the PIC is
malfunctioning.
Interface transmit
statistics
(On MX Series devices) Status of the interface-transmit-statistics configuration:
Enabled or Disabled.
•
detail extensive
Enabled—When the interface-transmit-statistics statement is included in the
configuration. If this is configured, the interface statistics show the actual
transmitted load on the interface.
•
Disabled—When the interface-transmit-statistics statement is not included
in the configuration. If this is not configured, the interface statistics show the
offered load on the interface.
OTN FEC statistics
The forward error correction (FEC) counters provide the following statistics:
•
Corrected Errors—Count of corrected errors in the last second.
•
Corrected Error Ratio—Corrected error ratio in the last 25 seconds. For example,
detail extensive
1e-7 is 1 error per 10 million bits.
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Table 8: show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
PCS statistics
(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces) Displays Physical Coding Sublayer (PCS) fault
conditions from the WAN PHY or the LAN PHY device.
detail extensive
•
Bit errors—Number of seconds during which at least one bit error rate (BER)
occurred while the PCS receiver is operating in normal mode.
•
Errored blocks—Number of seconds when at least one errored block occurred
while the PCS receiver is operating in normal mode.
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Table 8: show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
MAC statistics
Receive and Transmit statistics reported by the PIC's MAC subsystem, including
extensive
the following:
•
Total octets and total packets—Total number of octets and packets. For
Gigabit Ethernet IQ PICs, the received octets count varies by interface type.
For more information, see Table 31 under the show interfaces (10-Gigabit
Ethernet) command.
•
Unicast packets, Broadcast packets, and Multicast packets—Number of unicast,
broadcast, and multicast packets.
•
CRC/Align errors—Total number of packets received that had a length
(excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets) of between 64 and 1518
octets, inclusive, and had either a bad FCS with an integral number of octets
(FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment
Error).
•
FIFO error—Number of FIFO errors that are reported by the ASIC on the PIC.
If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC or a cable is probably malfunctioning.
•
MAC control frames—Number of MAC control frames.
•
MAC pause frames—Number of MAC control frames with pause operational
code.
•
Oversized frames—There are two possible conditions regarding the number
of oversized frames:
•
•
Packet length exceeds 1518 octets, or
•
Packet length exceeds MRU
Jabber frames—Number of frames that were longer than 1518 octets (excluding
framing bits, but including FCS octets), and had either an FCS error or an
alignment error. This definition of jabber is different from the definition in
IEEE-802.3 section 8.2.1.5 (10BASE5) and section 10.3.1.4 (10BASE2). These
documents define jabber as the condition in which any packet exceeds 20
ms. The allowed range to detect jabber is from 20 ms to 150 ms.
•
Fragment frames—Total number of packets that were less than 64 octets in
length (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets) and had either an
FCS error or an alignment error. Fragment frames normally increment because
both runts (which are normal occurrences caused by collisions) and noise
hits are counted.
•
VLAN tagged frames—Number of frames that are VLAN tagged. The system
uses the TPID of 0x8100 in the frame to determine whether a frame is tagged
or not.
NOTE: The 20-port Gigabit Ethernet MIC (MIC-3D-20GE-SFP) does not have
hardware counters for VLAN frames. Therefore, the VLAN tagged frames field
displays 0 when the show interfaces command is executed on a 20-port
Gigabit Ethernet MIC. In other words, the number of VLAN tagged frames
cannot be determined for the 20-port Gigabit Ethernet MIC.
•
Code violations—Number of times an event caused the PHY to indicate “Data
reception error” or “invalid data symbol error.”
OTN Received
Overhead Bytes
APS/PCC0: 0x02, APS/PCC1: 0x11, APS/PCC2: 0x47, APS/PCC3: 0x58 Payload
Type: 0x08
extensive
OTN Transmitted
Overhead Bytes
APS/PCC0: 0x00, APS/PCC1: 0x00, APS/PCC2: 0x00, APS/PCC3: 0x00
Payload Type: 0x08
extensive
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Table 8: show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Filter statistics
Receive and Transmit statistics reported by the PIC's MAC address filter
extensive
subsystem. The filtering is done by the content-addressable memory (CAM)
on the PIC. The filter examines a packet's source and destination MAC addresses
to determine whether the packet should enter the system or be rejected.
•
Input packet count—Number of packets received from the MAC hardware
that the filter processed.
•
Input packet rejects—Number of packets that the filter rejected because of
either the source MAC address or the destination MAC address.
•
Input DA rejects—Number of packets that the filter rejected because the
destination MAC address of the packet is not on the accept list. It is normal
for this value to increment. When it increments very quickly and no traffic is
entering the router from the far-end system, either there is a bad ARP entry
on the far-end system, or multicast routing is not on and the far-end system
is sending many multicast packets to the local router (which the router is
rejecting).
•
Input SA rejects—Number of packets that the filter rejected because the
source MAC address of the packet is not on the accept list. The value in this
field should increment only if source MAC address filtering has been enabled.
If filtering is enabled, if the value increments quickly, and if the system is not
receiving traffic that it should from the far-end system, it means that the
user-configured source MAC addresses for this interface are incorrect.
•
Output packet count—Number of packets that the filter has given to the MAC
hardware.
•
Output packet pad count—Number of packets the filter padded to the
minimum Ethernet size (60 bytes) before giving the packet to the MAC
hardware. Usually, padding is done only on small ARP packets, but some very
small IP packets can also require padding. If this value increments rapidly,
either the system is trying to find an ARP entry for a far-end system that does
not exist or it is misconfigured.
•
Output packet error count—Number of packets with an indicated error that
the filter was given to transmit. These packets are usually aged packets or
are the result of a bandwidth problem on the FPC hardware. On a normal
system, the value of this field should not increment.
•
CAM destination filters, CAM source filters—Number of entries in the CAM
dedicated to destination and source MAC address filters. There can only be
up to 64 source entries. If source filtering is disabled, which is the default, the
values for these fields should be 0.
PMA PHY
(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) SONET error information:
•
Seconds—Number of seconds the defect has been active.
•
Count—Number of times that the defect has gone from inactive to active.
•
State—State of the error. Any state other than OK indicates a problem.
extensive
Subfields are:
•
PHY Lock—Phase-locked loop
•
PHY Light—Loss of optical signal
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Table 8: show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
WIS section
(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) SONET error information:
extensive
•
Seconds—Number of seconds the defect has been active.
•
Count—Number of times that the defect has gone from inactive to active.
•
State—State of the error. Any state other than OK indicates a problem.
Subfields are:
WIS line
•
BIP-B1—Bit interleaved parity for SONET section overhead
•
SEF—Severely errored framing
•
LOL—Loss of light
•
LOF—Loss of frame
•
ES-S—Errored seconds (section)
•
SES-S—Severely errored seconds (section)
•
SEFS-S—Severely errored framing seconds (section)
(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) Active alarms and defects,
plus counts of specific SONET errors with detailed information:
•
Seconds—Number of seconds the defect has been active.
•
Count—Number of times that the defect has gone from inactive to active.
•
State—State of the error. Any state other than OK indicates a problem.
extensive
Subfields are:
164
•
BIP-B2—Bit interleaved parity for SONET line overhead
•
REI-L—Remote error indication (near-end line)
•
RDI-L—Remote defect indication (near-end line)
•
AIS-L—Alarm indication signal (near-end line)
•
BERR-SF—Bit error rate fault (signal failure)
•
BERR-SD—Bit error rate defect (signal degradation)
•
ES-L—Errored seconds (near-end line)
•
SES-L—Severely errored seconds (near-end line)
•
UAS-L—Unavailable seconds (near-end line)
•
ES-LFE—Errored seconds (far-end line)
•
SES-LFE—Severely errored seconds (far-end line)
•
UAS-LFE—Unavailable seconds (far-end line)
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Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Table 8: show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
WIS path
(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) Active alarms and defects,
plus counts of specific SONET errors with detailed information:
extensive
•
Seconds—Number of seconds the defect has been active.
•
Count—Number of times that the defect has gone from inactive to active.
•
State—State of the error. Any state other than OK indicates a problem.
Subfields are:
•
BIP-B3—Bit interleaved parity for SONET section overhead
•
REI-P—Remote error indication
•
LOP-P—Loss of pointer (path)
•
AIS-P—Path alarm indication signal
•
RDI-P—Path remote defect indication
•
UNEQ-P—Path unequipped
•
PLM-P—Path payload (signal) label mismatch
•
ES-P—Errored seconds (near-end STS path)
•
SES-P—Severely errored seconds (near-end STS path)
•
UAS-P—Unavailable seconds (near-end STS path)
•
SES-PFE—Severely errored seconds (far-end STS path)
•
UAS-PFE—Unavailable seconds (far-end STS path)
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Table 8: show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Autonegotiation
information
Information about link autonegotiation.
extensive
•
Negotiation status:
•
Incomplete—Ethernet interface has the speed or link mode configured.
•
No autonegotiation—Remote Ethernet interface has the speed or link mode
configured, or does not perform autonegotiation.
•
Complete—Ethernet interface is connected to a device that performs
autonegotiation and the autonegotiation process is successful.
•
Link partner status—OK when Ethernet interface is connected to a device that
performs autonegotiation and the autonegotiation process is successful.
•
Link partner—Information from the remote Ethernet device:
•
Link mode—Depending on the capability of the link partner, either
Full-duplex or Half-duplex.
•
Flow control—Types of flow control supported by the link partner. For
Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, types are Symmetric (link partner supports
PAUSE on receive and transmit), Asymmetric (link partner supports PAUSE
on transmit), Symmetric/Asymmetric (link partner supports PAUSE on
receive and transmit or only PAUSE on transmit), and None (link partner
does not support flow control).
•
Remote fault—Remote fault information from the link partner—Failure
indicates a receive link error. OK indicates that the link partner is receiving.
Negotiation error indicates a negotiation error. Offline indicates that the
link partner is going offline.
•
Local resolution—Information from the local Ethernet device:
•
Flow control—Types of flow control supported by the local device. For
Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, advertised capabilities are
Symmetric/Asymmetric (local device supports PAUSE on receive and
transmit or only PAUSE on receive) and None (local device does not support
flow control). Depending on the result of the negotiation with the link
partner, local resolution flow control type will display Symmetric (local
device supports PAUSE on receive and transmit), Asymmetric (local device
supports PAUSE on receive), and None (local device does not support flow
control).
•
Remote fault—Remote fault information. Link OK (no error detected on
receive), Offline (local interface is offline), and Link Failure (link error
detected on receive).
Received path trace,
Transmitted path trace
(10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, WAN PHY mode) SONET/SDH interfaces allow
path trace bytes to be sent inband across the SONET/SDH link. Juniper Networks
and other router manufacturers use these bytes to help diagnose
misconfigurations and network errors by setting the transmitted path trace
message so that it contains the system hostname and name of the physical
interface. The received path trace value is the message received from the router
at the other end of the fiber. The transmitted path trace value is the message
that this router transmits.
extensive
Packet Forwarding
Engine configuration
Information about the configuration of the Packet Forwarding Engine:
extensive
•
166
Destination slot—FPC slot number.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Table 8: show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
CoS information
Information about the CoS queue for the physical interface.
extensive
•
CoS transmit queue—Queue number and its associated user-configured
forwarding class name.
•
Bandwidth %—Percentage of bandwidth allocated to the queue.
•
Bandwidth bps—Bandwidth allocated to the queue (in bps).
•
Buffer %—Percentage of buffer space allocated to the queue.
•
Buffer usec—Amount of buffer space allocated to the queue, in microseconds.
This value is nonzero only if the buffer size is configured in terms of time.
•
Priority—Queue priority: low or high.
•
Limit—Displayed if rate limiting is configured for the queue. Possible values
are none and exact. If exact is configured, the queue transmits only up to the
configured bandwidth, even if excess bandwidth is available. If none is
configured, the queue transmits beyond the configured bandwidth if
bandwidth is available.
Logical Interface
Logical interface
Name of the logical interface.
All levels
Index
Index number of the logical interface, which reflects its initialization sequence.
detail extensive none
SNMP ifIndex
SNMP interface index number for the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Flags
Information about the logical interface. Possible values are described in the
“Logical Interface Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description”
on page 115.
All levels
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Table 8: show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
VLAN-Tag
Rewrite profile applied to incoming or outgoing frames on the outer (Out) VLAN
tag or for both the outer and inner (In) VLAN tags.
brief detail extensive
•
push—An outer VLAN tag is pushed in front of the existing VLAN tag.
•
pop—The outer VLAN tag of the incoming frame is removed.
•
swap—The outer VLAN tag of the incoming frame is overwritten with the
none
user-specified VLAN tag information.
•
push—An outer VLAN tag is pushed in front of the existing VLAN tag.
•
push-push—Two VLAN tags are pushed in from the incoming frame.
•
swap-push—The outer VLAN tag of the incoming frame is replaced by a
user-specified VLAN tag value. A user-specified outer VLAN tag is pushed in
front. The outer tag becomes an inner tag in the final frame.
•
swap-swap—Both the inner and the outer VLAN tags of the incoming frame
are replaced by the user-specified VLAN tag value.
•
pop-swap—The outer VLAN tag of the incoming frame is removed, and the
inner VLAN tag of the incoming frame is replaced by the user-specified VLAN
tag value. The inner tag becomes the outer tag in the final frame.
•
pop-pop—Both the outer and inner VLAN tags of the incoming frame are
removed.
Demux
IP demultiplexing (demux) value that appears if this interface is used as the
demux underlying interface. The output is one of the following:
•
Source Family Inet
•
Destination Family Inet
detail extensive none
Encapsulation
Encapsulation on the logical interface.
All levels
ACI VLAN: Dynamic
Profile
Name of the dynamic profile that defines the agent circuit identifier (ACI)
interface set. If configured, the ACI interface set enables the underlying Ethernet
interface to create dynamic VLAN subscriber interfaces based on ACI
information.
brief detail extensive
Protocol
Protocol family. Possible values are described in the “Protocol Field” section
under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
detail extensive none
MTU
Maximum transmission unit size on the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Neighbor Discovery
Protocol (NDP)Queue
Statistics
NDP statistics for protocol inet6 under logical interface statistics.
All levels
•
Max nh cache—Maximum interface neighbor discovery nexthop cache size.
•
New hold nh limit—Maximum number of new unresolved nexthops.
•
Curr nh cnt—Current number of resolved nexthops in the NDP queue.
•
Curr new hold cnt—Current number of unresolved nexthops in the NDP queue.
•
NH drop cnt—Number of NDP requests not serviced.
none
Dynamic Profile
Name of the dynamic profile that was used to create this interface configured
with a Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE) family.
detail extensive none
Service Name Table
Name of the service name table for the interface configured with a PPPoE family.
detail extensive none
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Table 8: show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Max Sessions
Maximum number of PPPoE logical interfaces that can be activated on the
underlying interface.
detail extensive none
Duplicate Protection
State of PPPoE duplicate protection: On or Off. When duplicate protection is
configured for the underlying interface, a dynamic PPPoE logical interface cannot
be activated when an existing active logical interface is present for the same
PPPoE client.
detail extensive none
Direct Connect
State of the configuration to ignore DSL Forum VSAs: On or Off. When configured,
the router ignores any of these VSAs received from a directly connected CPE
device on the interface.
detail extensive none
AC Name
Name of the access concentrator.
detail extensive none
Maximum labels
Maximum number of MPLS labels configured for the MPLS protocol family on
the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Traffic statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets received and transmitted on the specified
interface set.
detail extensive
•
Input bytes, Output bytes—Number of bytes received and transmitted on the
interface set. The value in this field also includes the Layer 2 overhead bytes
for ingress or egress traffic on Ethernet interfaces if you enable accounting
of Layer 2 overhead at the PIC level or the logical interface level.
•
Input packets, Output packets—Number of packets received and transmitted
on the interface set.
IPv6 transit statistics
Number of IPv6 transit bytes and packets received and transmitted on the
logical interface if IPv6 statistics tracking is enabled.
extensive
Local statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets destined to the router.
extensive
Transit statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets transiting the switch.
extensive
NOTE: For Gigabit Ethernet intelligent queuing 2 (IQ2) interfaces, the logical
interface egress statistics might not accurately reflect the traffic on the wire
when output shaping is applied. Traffic management output shaping might
drop packets after they are tallied by the Output bytes and Output packets
interface counters. However, correct values display for both of these egress
statistics when per-unit scheduling is enabled for the Gigabit Ethernet IQ2
physical interface, or when a single logical interface is actively using a shared
scheduler.
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Route Table
Route table in which the logical interface address is located. For example, 0
refers to the routing table inet.0.
detail extensive none
Flags
Information about protocol family flags. Possible values are described in the
“Family Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
detail extensive
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Table 8: show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Donor interface
(Unnumbered Ethernet) Interface from which an unnumbered Ethernet interface
borrows an IPv4 address.
detail extensive none
Preferred source
address
(Unnumbered Ethernet) Secondary IPv4 address of the donor loopback interface
that acts as the preferred source address for the unnumbered Ethernet interface.
detail extensive none
Input Filters
Names of any input filters applied to this interface. If you specify a precedence
value for any filter in a dynamic profile, filter precedence values appear in
parentheses next to all interfaces.
detail extensive
Output Filters
Names of any output filters applied to this interface. If you specify a precedence
value for any filter in a dynamic profile, filter precedence values appear in
parentheses next to all interfaces.
detail extensive
Mac-Validate Failures
Number of MAC address validation failures for packets and bytes. This field is
displayed when MAC address validation is enabled for the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Addresses, Flags
Information about the address flags. Possible values are described in the
“Addresses Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description” on
page 115.
detail extensive none
protocol-family
Protocol family configured on the logical interface. If the protocol is inet, the IP
address of the interface is also displayed.
brief
Flags
Information about the address flag. Possible values are described in the
“Addresses Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description” on
page 115.
detail extensive none
Destination
IP address of the remote side of the connection.
detail extensive none
Local
IP address of the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Broadcast
Broadcast address of the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Table 9: Gigabit Ethernet IQ PIC Traffic and MAC Statistics by Interface Type
Interface Type
Sample Command
Byte and Octet Counts Include
Comments
Inbound physical
interface
show interfaces
ge-0/3/0 extensive
Traffic statistics:
The additional 4 bytes are
for the CRC.
Input bytes: 496 bytes per packet, representing
the Layer 2 packet
MAC statistics:
Received octets: 500 bytes per packet,
representing the Layer 2 packet + 4 bytes
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Table 9: Gigabit Ethernet IQ PIC Traffic and MAC Statistics by Interface Type (continued)
Interface Type
Sample Command
Byte and Octet Counts Include
Inbound logical
interface
show interfaces
ge-0/3/0.50 extensive
Traffic statistics:
Comments
Input bytes: 478 bytes per packet, representing
the Layer 3 packet
Outbound physical
interface
show interfaces
ge-0/0/0 extensive
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes: 490 bytes per packet, representing
the Layer 3 packet + 12 bytes
MAC statistics:
For input bytes, the
additional 12 bytes include
6 bytes for the destination
MAC address plus 4 bytes
for VLAN plus 2 bytes for
the Ethernet type.
Received octets: 478 bytes per packet,
representing the Layer 3 packet
Outbound logical
interface
show interfaces
ge-0/0/0.50 extensive
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes: 478 bytes per packet, representing
the Layer 3 packet
Sample Output
show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet)
user@host> show interfaces ge-3/0/2
Physical interface: ge-3/0/2, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 167, SNMP ifIndex: 35
Link-level type: 52, MTU: 1522, Speed: 1000mbps, Loopback: Disabled,
Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled, Auto-negotiation: Enabled
Remote fault: Online
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
CoS queues
: 4 supported, 4 maximum usable queues
Current address: 00:05:85:4a:e9:7c, Hardware address: 00:05:85:4a:e9:7c
Last flapped
: 2006-08-10 17:25:10 PDT (00:01:08 ago)
Input rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Output rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Ingress rate at Packet Forwarding Engine
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Ingress drop rate at Packet Forwarding Engine : 0 bps (0 pps)
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
Logical interface ge-3/0/2.0 (Index 72) (SNMP ifIndex 69)
Flags: SNMP-Traps 0x4000
VLAN-Tag [ 0x8100.512 0x8100.513 ] In(pop-swap 0x8100.530) Out(swap-push
0x8100.512 0x8100.513)
Encapsulation: VLAN-CCC
Egress account overhead: 100
Ingress account overhead: 90
Input packets : 0
Output packets: 0
Protocol ccc, MTU: 1522
Flags: Is-Primary
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show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet on MX Series Routers)
user@host> show interfaces ge-2/2/2
Physical interface: ge-2/2/2, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 156, SNMP ifIndex: 188
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 1000mbps, MAC-REWRITE Error: None,
Loopback: Disabled,
Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled, Auto-negotiation: Enabled,
Remote fault: Online
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 4 maximum usable queues
Schedulers
: 0
Current address: 00:1f:12:b7:d7:c0, Hardware address: 00:1f:12:b7:d6:76
Last flapped
: 2008-09-05 16:44:30 PDT (3d 01:04 ago)
Input rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Output rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
Logical interface ge-2/2/2.0 (Index 82) (SNMP ifIndex 219)
Flags: Up SNMP-Traps 0x4004000 Encapsulation: ENET2
Input packets : 10232
Output packets: 10294
Protocol inet, MTU: 1500
Flags: Sendbcast-pkt-to-re
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 10.10.10/24, Local: 10.10.10.1, Broadcast: 10.10.10.255
Protocol inet6, MTU: 1500
Max nh cache: 4, New hold nh limit: 100000, Curr nh cnt: 4, Curr new hold
cnt: 4, NH drop cnt: 0
Flags: Is-Primary
Addresses, Flags: Is-Default Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 2011::/64, Local: 2011::5
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred
Destination: fe80::/64, Local: fe80::223:9cff:fe9f:3e78
Protocol multiservice, MTU: Unlimited
Flags: Is-Primary
show interfaces extensive (Gigabit Ethernet on MX Series Routers showing interface transmit statistics
configuration)
user@host> show interfaces ge-2/1/2 extensive | match "output|interface"
Physical interface: ge-2/1/2, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 151, SNMP ifIndex: 530, Generation: 154
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Output bytes :
240614363944
772721536 bps
Output packets:
3538446506
1420444 pps
Direction : Output
Interface transmit statistics: Enabled
Logical interface ge-2/1/2.0 (Index 331) (SNMP ifIndex 955) (Generation 146)
Output bytes :
195560312716
522726272 bps
Output packets:
4251311146
1420451 pps
show interfaces brief (Gigabit Ethernet)
user@host> show interfaces ge-3/0/2 brief
Physical interface: ge-3/0/2, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Link-level type: 52, MTU: 1522, Speed: 1000mbps, Loopback: Disabled,
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Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled, Auto-negotiation: Enabled,
Remote fault: Online
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: None
Logical interface ge-3/0/2.0
Flags: SNMP-Traps 0x4000
VLAN-Tag [ 0x8100.512 0x8100.513 ] In(pop-swap 0x8100.530) Out(swap-push
0x8100.512 0x8100.513)
Encapsulation: VLAN-CCC
ccc
Logical interface ge-3/0/2.32767
Flags: SNMP-Traps 0x4000 VLAN-Tag [ 0x0000.0 ]
Encapsulation: ENET2
show interfaces detail (Gigabit Ethernet)
user@host> show interfaces ge-3/0/2 detail
Physical interface: ge-3/0/2, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 167, SNMP ifIndex: 35, Generation: 177
Link-level type: 52, MTU: 1522, Speed: 1000mbps, Loopback: Disabled,
Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled, Auto-negotiation: Enabled,
Remote fault: Online
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 4 supported, 4 maximum usable queues
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:05:85:4a:e9:7c, Hardware address: 00:05:85:4a:e9:7c
Last flapped
: 2006-08-09 17:17:00 PDT (01:31:33 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
Ingress traffic statistics at Packet Forwarding Engine:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Drop
bytes :
0
0 bps
Drop
packets:
0
0 pps
Ingress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
0
0
0
1 expedited-fo
0
0
0
2 assured-forw
0
0
0
3 network-cont
0
0
0
Egress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets
Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
0
0
0
1 expedited-fo
0
0
0
2 assured-forw
0
0
0
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3 network-cont
0
0
0
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
Logical interface ge-3/0/2.0 (Index 72) (SNMP ifIndex 69) (Generation 140)
Flags: SNMP-Traps 0x4000
VLAN-Tag [0x8100.512 0x8100.513 ] In(pop-swap 0x8100.530)
Out(swap-push 0x8100.512 0x8100.513)
Encapsulation: VLAN-CCC
Egress account overhead: 100
Ingress account overhead: 90
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
Protocol ccc, MTU: 1522, Generation: 149, Route table: 0
Flags: Is-Primary
Logical interface ge-3/0/2.32767 (Index 71) (SNMP ifIndex 70)
(Generation 139)
Flags: SNMP-Traps 0x4000 VLAN-Tag [ 0x0000.0 ] Encapsulation: ENET2
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
show interfaces extensive (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2)
user@host> show interfaces ge-7/1/3 extensive
Physical interface: ge-7/1/3, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 170, SNMP ifIndex: 70, Generation: 171
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 1000mbps, Loopback: Disabled,
Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled, Auto-negotiation: Enabled,
Remote fault: Online
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4004000
Link flags
: None
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CoS queues
: 8 supported, 4 maximum usable queues
Schedulers
: 256
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:14:f6:30:5e:74, Hardware address: 00:14:f6:30:5e:74
Last flapped
: 2007-11-07 21:31:41 PST (02:03:33 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
38910844056
7952 bps
Output bytes :
7174605
8464 bps
Input packets:
418398473
11 pps
Output packets:
78903
12 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Ingress traffic statistics at Packet Forwarding Engine:
Input bytes :
38910799145
7952 bps
Input packets:
418397956
11 pps
Drop
bytes :
0
0 bps
Drop
packets:
0
0 pps
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0,
L3 incompletes: 0, L2 channel errors: 0, L2 mismatch timeouts: 0,
FIFO errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 1, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets: 0,
FIFO errors: 0, HS link CRC errors: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Ingress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
418390823
418390823
0
1 expedited-fo
0
0
0
2 assured-forw
0
0
0
3 network-cont
7133
7133
0
Egress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets
Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
1031
1031
0
1 expedited-fo
0
0
0
2 assured-forw
0
0
0
3 network-cont
77872
77872
0
0 best-effort
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
MAC statistics:
Total octets
Total packets
Unicast packets
Broadcast packets
Multicast packets
CRC/Align errors
FIFO errors
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Receive
38910844056
418398473
408021893366
10
418398217
0
0
Transmit
7174605
78903
1026
12
77865
0
0
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MAC control frames
0
0
MAC pause frames
0
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
0
Fragment frames
0
VLAN tagged frames
0
Code violations
0 OTN Received Overhead Bytes:
APS/PCC0: 0x02, APS/PCC1: 0x11, APS/PCC2: 0x47, APS/PCC3: 0x58
Payload Type: 0x08
OTN Transmitted Overhead Bytes:
APS/PCC0: 0x00, APS/PCC1: 0x00, APS/PCC2: 0x00, APS/PCC3: 0x00
Payload Type: 0x08
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
418398473
Input packet rejects
479
Input DA rejects
479
Input SA rejects
0
Output packet count
78903
Output packet pad count
0
Output packet error count
0
CAM destination filters: 0, CAM source filters: 0
Autonegotiation information:
Negotiation status: Complete
Link partner:
Link mode: Full-duplex, Flow control: Symmetric/Asymmetric,
Remote fault: OK
Local resolution:
Flow control: Symmetric, Remote fault: Link OK
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 7
CoS information:
Direction : Output
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Buffer
Priority
Limit
%
bps
%
usec
0 best-effort
95
950000000
95
0
low
none
3 network-control
5
50000000
5
0
low
none
Direction : Input
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Buffer
Priority
Limit
%
bps
%
usec
0 best-effort
95
950000000
95
0
low
none
3 network-control
5
50000000
5
0
low
none
Logical interface ge-7/1/3.0 (Index 70) (SNMP ifIndex 85) (Generation 150)
Flags: SNMP-Traps Encapsulation: ENET2
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
812400
Output bytes :
1349206
Input packets:
9429
Output packets:
9449
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
812400
Output bytes :
1349206
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Input packets:
9429
Output packets:
9449
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
7440 bps
Output bytes :
0
7888 bps
Input packets:
0
10 pps
Output packets:
0
11 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Protocol inet, MTU: 1500, Generation: 169, Route table: 0
Flags: Is-Primary, Mac-Validate-Strict
Mac-Validate Failures: Packets: 0, Bytes: 0
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Input Filters: F1-ge-3/0/1.0-in, F3-ge-3/0/1.0-in
Output Filters: F2-ge-3/0/1.0-out (53)
Destination: 10.74.2/24, Local: 10.74.2.2, Broadcast: 10.74.2.255,
Generation: 196
Protocol multiservice, MTU: Unlimited, Generation: 170, Route table: 0
Flags: Is-Primary
Policer: Input: __default_arp_policer__
NOTE: For Gigabit Ethernet intelligent queuing 2 (IQ2) interfaces, the logical interface
egress statistics displayed in the show interfaces command output might not accurately
reflect the traffic on the wire when output shaping is applied. Traffic management output
shaping might drop packets after they are tallied by the interface counters. For detailed
information, see the description of the logical interface Transit statistics fields in
Table 8 on page 156.
show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet Unnumbered Interface)
user@host> show interfaces ge-3/2/0
Physical interface: ge-3/2/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 148, SNMP ifIndex: 50
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 1000mbps, Loopback: Disabled,
Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled, Auto-negotiation: Enabled,
Remote fault: Online
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 4 maximum usable queues
Current address: 00:14:f6:11:26:f8, Hardware address: 00:14:f6:11:26:f8
Last flapped
: 2006-10-27 04:42:23 PDT (08:01:52 ago)
Input rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Output rate
: 624 bps (1 pps)
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
Logical interface ge-3/2/0.0 (Index 67) (SNMP ifIndex 85)
Flags: SNMP-Traps Encapsulation: ENET2
Input packets : 0
Output packets: 6
Protocol inet, MTU: 1500
Flags: Unnumbered
Donor interface: lo0.0 (Index 64)
Preferred source address: 22.22.22.22
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show interfaces (ACI Interface Set Configured)
user@host> show interfaces ge-1/0/0.4001
Logical interface ge-1/0/0.4001 (Index 340) (SNMP ifIndex 548)
Flags: SNMP-Traps 0x4000 VLAN-Tag [ 0x8100.4001 ] Encapsulation: PPP-overEthernet
ACI VLAN:
Dynamic Profile: aci-vlan-set-profile
PPPoE:
Dynamic Profile: aci-vlan-pppoe-profile,
Service Name Table: None,
Max Sessions: 32000, Max Sessions VSA Ignore: Off,
Duplicate Protection: On, Short Cycle Protection: Off,
Direct Connect: Off,
AC Name: nbc
Input packets : 9
Output packets: 8
Protocol multiservice, MTU: Unlimited
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show interfaces (Serial)
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show interfaces interface-type
<brief | detail | extensive | terse>
<descriptions>
<media>
<snmp-index snmp-index>
<statistics>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Display status information about serial interfaces, including RS-232, RS-422/449, EIA-530,
X.21, and V.35.
interface-type—On M Series and T Series routers, the interface type is se-fpc/pic/port.
brief | detail | extensive | terse—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
descriptions—(Optional) Display interface description strings.
media—(Optional) Display media-specific information about network interfaces.
snmp-index snmp-index—(Optional) Display information for the specified SNMP index
of the interface.
statistics—(Optional) Display static interface statistics.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show interfaces (Serial, EIA-530) on page 185
show interfaces brief (Serial, EIA-530) on page 185
show interfaces detail (Serial, EIA-530) on page 186
show interfaces extensive (Serial, EIA-530) on page 186
show interfaces (Serial, V.35) on page 187
show interfaces brief (Serial, V.35) on page 188
show interfaces detail (Serial, V.35) on page 188
show interfaces extensive (Serial, V.35) on page 189
show interfaces statistics detail (RS 449) on page 190
Table 10 on page 179 lists the output fields for the show interfaces (Serial) command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 10: show interfaces (Serial) Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Physical interface
Name of the physical interface.
All levels
Enabled
State of the interface. Possible values are described in the “Enabled Field”
section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
All levels
Physical Interface
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Table 10: show interfaces (Serial) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Interface index
Physical interface's index number, which reflects its initialization sequence.
detail extensive none
SNMP ifIndex
SNMP index number for the physical interface.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Type
Type of interface.
All levels
Link-level type
Encapsulation being used on the physical interface.
All levels
MTU
Maximum transmission unit (MTU) size on the physical interface.
All levels
Maximum speed
Maximum speed. The nonconfigurable value is 16,384 kbps.
detail extensive none
Device flags
Information about the physical device. Possible values are described in the
“Device Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
All levels
Interface flags
Information about the interface. Possible values are described in the “Interface
Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
All levels
Link flags
Information about the link. Possible values are described in the “Link Flags”
section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
All levels
Hold-times
Current interface hold-time up and hold-time down, in milliseconds.
detail extensive
Keepalive settings
(PPP and HDLC) Configured settings for keepalive packets.
All levels
•
Interval seconds—Time between successive keepalive requests. The range of
values, in seconds, is 10 to 32,767. The default value is 10.
•
Up-count number—Number of keepalive packets a destination must receive
to change a link's status from down to up. The range of values is 1 to 255. The
default value is 1.
•
Down-count number—Number of keepalive packets a destination must fail
to receive before the network takes a link down. The range is 1 to 255. The
default value is 3.
Keepalive
(PPP and HDLC) Information about keepalive packets.
•
brief none
Input: number (hh:mm:ss ago)—Number of keepalive packets received by PPP
and the time since the last keepalive packet was received.
•
Output: number (hh:mm:ss ago)—Number of keepalive packets sent by PPP
and the time since the last keepalive packet was sent.
Keepalive statistics
(PPP and HDLC) Information about keepalive packets.
•
detail extensive
Input: number (last seen hh:mm:ssago)—Number of keepalive packets received
by PPP and the time since the last keepalive packet was received.
•
Output: number(last seen hh:mm:ss ago)—Number of keepalive packets sent
by PPP and the time since the last keepalive packet was sent.
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Table 10: show interfaces (Serial) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
LCP state
(PPP) Link Control Protocol state.
detail extensive none
NCP state
CHAP state
•
Conf-ack-received—Acknowledgement was received.
•
Conf-ack-sent—Acknowledgement was sent.
•
Conf-req-sent—Request was sent.
•
Down—LCP negotiation is incomplete (not yet completed or has failed).
•
Not-configured—LCP is not configured on the interface.
•
Opened—LCP negotiation is successful.
(PPP) Network Control Protocol state.
•
Conf-ack-received—Acknowledgement was received.
•
Conf-ack-sent—Acknowledgement was sent.
•
Conf-req-sent—Request was sent.
•
Down—NCP negotiation is incomplete (not yet completed or has failed).
•
Not-configured—NCP is not configured on the interface.
•
Opened—NCP negotiation is successful.
(PPP) Displays the state of the Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol
(CHAP) during its transaction.
•
Chap-Chal-received—Challenge was received but response not yet sent.
•
Chap-Chal-sent—Challenge was sent.
•
Chap-Resp-received—Response was received for the challenge sent, but
detail extensive none
detail extensive none
CHAP has not yet moved into the Success state. (Most likely with RADIUS
authentication.)
•
Chap-Resp-sent—Response was sent for the challenge received.
•
Closed—CHAP authentication is incomplete.
•
Failure—CHAP authentication failed.
•
Not-configured—CHAP is not configured on the interface.
•
Success—CHAP authentication was successful.
CoS queues
Number of CoS queues configured.
detail extensive none
Last flapped
Date, time, and how long ago the interface went from down to up. The format
is Last flapped: year-month-day hour:minute:second timezone (hour:minute:second
ago). For example, Last flapped: 2002-04-26 10:52:40 PDT (04:33:20 ago).
detail extensive none
Input Rate
Input rate in bits per second (bps) and packets per second (pps).
None specified
Output Rate
Output rate in bps and pps.
None specified
Statistics last
cleared
Time when the statistics for the interface were last set to zero.
detail extensive
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Table 10: show interfaces (Serial) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Traffic statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets received and transmitted on the physical
interface.
detail extensive
Input errors
•
Input bytes—Number of bytes received on the interface.
•
Output bytes—Number of bytes transmitted on the interface.
•
Input packets—Number of packets received on the interface.
•
Output packets—Number of packets transmitted on the interface.
Input errors on the interface. The following paragraphs explain the counters
whose meaning might not be obvious:
•
Errors—Sum of the incoming frame aborts and FCS errors.
•
Drops—Number of packets dropped by the input queue of the I/O Manager
extensive
ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every
packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
•
Framing errors—Number of packets received with an invalid frame checksum
(FCS).
•
Runts—Number of frames received that are smaller than the runt threshold.
•
Giants—Number of frames received that are larger than the giant threshold.
•
Policed discards—Number of frames that the incoming packet match code
discarded because they were not recognized or not of interest. Usually, this
field reports protocols that the Junos OS does not handle.
•
Output errors
Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.
Output errors on the interface. The following paragraphs explain the counters
whose meaning might not be obvious:
•
extensive
Carrier transitions—Number of times the interface has gone from down to up.
This number does not normally increment quickly, increasing only when the
cable is unplugged, the far-end system is powered down and up, or another
problem occurs. If the number of carrier transitions increments quickly
(perhaps once every 10 seconds), the cable, the far-end system, or the PIC
is malfunctioning.
•
Errors—Sum of the outgoing frame aborts and FCS errors.
•
Drops—Number of packets dropped by the output queue of the I/O Manager
ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every
packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
•
MTU errors—Number of packets whose size exceeds the MTU of the interface.
•
Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.
Egress queues
supported
Total number of egress queues supported on the specified interface. Displayed
with the statistics option.
detail extensive
Egress queues in
use
Total number of egress queues in use on the specified interface. Displayed with
the statistics option.
detail extensive
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Table 10: show interfaces (Serial) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Queue counters
CoS queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name.
Displayed with the statistics option.
detail extensive
Serial media
information
•
Queued packets—Number of queued packets.
•
Transmitted packets—Number of transmitted packets.
•
Dropped packets—Number of packets dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
Information about the physical media:
•
Line protocol—eia530, eia530a, rs232, rs449, v.35, or x.21..
•
Resync history—Information about resynchronization events:
•
•
detail extensive
Sync loss count—Number of times the synchronization was lost.
Data signal—(X.21 and V.35) Information about the data signal:
•
Rx Clock—Receive clock status: OK (DTE is receiving the receive clock
signal) or Not detected (receive clock signal is not being received).
•
Control signals—Information about modem control signals:
•
Local mode:DCE (data communication equipment) or DTE (data terminal
equipment)
•
•
To DCE—Control signals that the Serial PIC sent to the DCE: DTR (Data
Terminal Ready:up or down) or RTS (Request To Send: up or down.)
•
From DC—Control signals that the Serial PIC received from the DCE: CTS
(Clear To Send: up or down), DCD (Data Carrier Detect: up or down), DSR
(Data Set Ready: up or down), or TM (Test Mode: up or down).
Clocking mode—Clocking used for the transmit clock:
•
dte—Transmit clock is generated by DTE.
•
dce—Transmit clock is generated by the DCE and is looped back as the
transmit clock.
•
loop-timed—Receive clock from the DCE is looped back as the transmit
clock.
•
Clock rate—Rate, in megahertz (MHz), at which the clock is configured.
•
Loopback—Configured loopback mode for the interface: dce-remote, dce-local,
liu, local, or none.
•
Tx clock—Clocking phase of the transmit clock: invert (transmit clock polarity
is inverted) or non-invert (transmit clock polarity is not inverted).
•
Line encoding—Type of line encoding used: nrz (nonreturn to zero) or nrzi
(return to zero inverted).
Packet Forwarding
Engine
configuration
Information about the configuration of the Packet Forwarding Engine:
•
Destination slot—FPC slot number.
•
PLP byte—Packet Level Protocol byte.
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extensive
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Table 10: show interfaces (Serial) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
CoS information
Information about the CoS queue for the physical interface:
extensive
•
CoS transmit queue—Queue number and its associated user-configured
forwarding class name.
•
Bandwidth %—Percentage of bandwidth allocated to the queue.
•
Bandwidth bps—Bandwidth allocated to the queue (in bps).
•
Buffer %—Percentage of buffer space allocated to the queue.
•
Buffer usec—Amount of buffer space allocated to the queue, in microseconds.
This value is nonzero only if the buffer size is configured in terms of time.
•
Priority—Queue priority: low or high.
•
Limit—Displayed if rate limiting is configured for the queue. Possible values
are none and exact. If exact is configured, the queue transmits only up to the
configured bandwidth, even if excess bandwidth is available. If none is
configured, the queue transmits beyond the configured bandwidth if
bandwidth is available.
Logical Interface
Logical interface
Name of the logical interface.
All levels
Index
Logical interface index number, which reflects its initialization sequence.
detail extensive none
SNMP ifIndex
Logical interface SNMP interface index number.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Flags
Information about the logical interface. Possible values are described in the
“Logical Interface Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description”
on page 115.
All levels
Encapsulation
Encapsulation on the logical interface.
All levels
protocol-family
Protocol family configured on the logical interface. If the protocol is inet, the
source and destination address are also displayed.
brief
Protocol
Protocol family configured on the logical interface, such as iso, inet6, mpls.
detail extensive none
MTU
MTU size on the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Route Table
Routing table in which the logical interface address is located. For example, 0
refers to the routing table inet.0.
detail extensive
Flags
Information about protocol family flags. Possible values are described in the
“Family Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description” on page 115.
detail extensive
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Table 10: show interfaces (Serial) Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Addresses, Flags
Information about the address flags. Possible values are described in the
“Addresses Flags” section under “Common Output Fields Description” on
page 115.
detail extensive none
Destination
IP address of the remote side of the connection.
detail extensive none
Local
IP address of the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Broadcast
Broadcast address of the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Sample Output
show interfaces (Serial, EIA-530)
user@host> show interfaces se-5/0/1
Physical interface: se-5/0/1, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 144, SNMP ifIndex: 41
Type: Serial, Link-level type: PPP, MTU: 1504, Maximum speed: 16384kbps
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: Point-To-Point Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: Keepalives
Keepalive settings: Interval 10 seconds, Up-count 1, Down-count 3
Keepalive: Input: 32 (00:00:10 ago), Output: 31 (00:00:07 ago)
LCP state: Opened
NCP state: inet: Opened, inet6: Not-configured, iso: Not-configured, mpls:
Not-configured
CHAP state: Closed
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Last flapped
: 2006-04-26 15:10:18 PDT (00:05:22 ago)
Input rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Output rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Logical interface se-5/0/1.0 (Index 71) (SNMP ifIndex 45)
Flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps 0x4000 Encapsulation: PPP
Protocol inet, MTU: 1500
Flags: None
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 12.0.0.0/30, Local: 12.0.0.1, Broadcast: 12.0.0.3
show interfaces brief (Serial, EIA-530)
user@host> show interfaces se-5/0/1 brief
Physical interface: se-5/0/1, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Type: Serial, Link-level type: PPP, MTU: 1504
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: Point-To-Point Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: Keepalives
Keepalive settings: Interval 10 seconds, Up-count 1, Down-count 3
Keepalive: Input: 235 (00:00:10 ago), Output: 234 (00:00:00 ago)
Logical interface se-5/0/1.0
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Flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps 0x4000 Encapsulation: PPP
inet 12.0.0.1/30
show interfaces detail (Serial, EIA-530)
user@host> show interfaces se-5/0/1 detail
Physical interface: se-5/0/1, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 144, SNMP ifIndex: 41, Generation: 25
Type: Serial, Link-level type: PPP, MTU: 1504, Maximum speed: 16384kbps
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: Point-To-Point Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: Keepalives
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Keepalive settings: Interval 10 seconds, Up-count 1, Down-count 3
Keepalive statistics:
Input : 37 (last seen 00:00:06 ago)
Output: 35 (last sent 00:00:01 ago)
LCP state: Opened
NCP state: inet: Opened, inet6: Not-configured, iso: Not-configured, mpls:
Not-configured
CHAP state: Closed
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Last flapped
: 2006-04-26 15:10:18 PDT (00:06:02 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
928
40 bps
Output bytes :
1023
48 bps
Input packets:
76
0 pps
Output packets:
77
0 pps
Serial media information:
Line protocol: eia530
Resync history:
Sync loss count: 0
Data signal:
Rx Clock: OK
Control signals:
Local mode: DTE
To DCE: DTR: up, RTS: up
From DCE: CTS: up, DCD: up, DSR: up
Clocking mode: loop-timed
Clock rate: 8.0 MHz
Loopback: none
Tx clock: non-invert
Line encoding: nrz
Logical interface se-5/0/1.0 (Index 71) (SNMP ifIndex 45) (Generation 9)
Flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps 0x4000 Encapsulation: PPP
Protocol inet, MTU: 1500, Generation: 15, Route table: 0
Flags: None
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 12.0.0.0/30, Local: 12.0.0.1, Broadcast: 12.0.0.3,
Generation: 23
show interfaces extensive (Serial, EIA-530)
user@host> show interfaces se-5/0/1 extensive
Physical interface: se-5/0/1, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 144, SNMP ifIndex: 41, Generation: 25
Type: Serial, Link-level type: PPP, MTU: 1504, Maximum speed: 16384kbps
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: Point-To-Point Internal: 0x4000
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Link flags
: Keepalives
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Keepalive settings: Interval 10 seconds, Up-count 1, Down-count 3
Keepalive statistics:
Input : 40 (last seen 00:00:00 ago)
Output: 37 (last sent 00:00:09 ago)
LCP state: Opened
NCP state: inet: Opened, inet6: Not-configured, iso: Not-configured, mpls:
Not-configured
CHAP state: Closed
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Last flapped
: 2006-04-26 15:10:18 PDT (00:06:28 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
988
40 bps
Output bytes :
1088
48 bps
Input packets:
81
0 pps
Output packets:
82
0 pps
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 2, Runts: 0, Giants: 0,
Policed discards: 0, Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 1, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, MTU errors: 0,
Resource errors: 0
Serial media information:
Line protocol: eia530
Resync history:
Sync loss count: 0
Data signal:
Rx Clock: OK
Control signals:
Local mode: DTE
To DCE: DTR: up, RTS: up
From DCE: CTS: up, DCD: up, DSR: up
Clocking mode: loop-timed
Clock rate: 8.0 MHz
Loopback: none
Tx clock: non-invert
Line encoding: nrz
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 5, PLP byte: 1 (0x00)
CoS information:
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Buffer
Priority
Limit
%
bps
%
usec
0 best-effort
95
15564800
95
0
low
none
3 network-control
5
819200
5
0
low
none
Logical interface se-5/0/1.0 (Index 71) (SNMP ifIndex 45) (Generation 9)
Flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps 0x4000 Encapsulation: PPP
Protocol inet, MTU: 1500, Generation: 15, Route table: 0
Flags: None
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 12.0.0.0/30, Local: 12.0.0.1, Broadcast: 12.0.0.3,
Generation: 23
show interfaces (Serial, V.35)
user@host> show interfaces se-5/0/0
Physical interface: se-5/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Down
Interface index: 150, SNMP ifIndex: 39
Type: Serial, Link-level type: PPP, MTU: 1504, Maximum speed: 16384kbps
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Device flags
: Present Running Down
Interface flags: Hardware-Down Point-To-Point Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: Loose-NCP
Keepalive settings: Interval 10 seconds, Up-count 1, Down-count 3
Keepalive: Input: 0 (never), Output: 0 (never)
LCP state: Down
NCP state: inet: Not-configured, inet6: Not-configured, iso: Not-configured,
mpls: Not-configured
CHAP state: Closed
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Last flapped
: 2006-04-26 14:51:27 PDT (01:02:23 ago)
Input rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Output rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Logical interface se-5/0/0.0 (Index 73) (SNMP ifIndex 27)
Flags: Hardware-Down Device-Down Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps
Encapsulation: PPP
Protocol inet, MTU: 1500
Flags: Protocol-Down
Addresses, Flags: Dest-route-down Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 13.0.0.0/30, Local: 13.0.0.2, Broadcast: 13.0.0.3
show interfaces brief (Serial, V.35)
user@host> show interfaces se-5/0/0 brief
Physical interface: se-5/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Down
Type: Serial, Link-level type: PPP, MTU: 1504
Device flags
: Present Running Down
Interface flags: Hardware-Down Point-To-Point Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: Loose-NCP
Keepalive settings: Interval 10 seconds, Up-count 1, Down-count 3
Keepalive: Input: 0 (never), Output: 0 (never)
Logical interface se-5/0/0.0
Flags: Hardware-Down Device-Down Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps
Encapsulation: PPP
inet 13.0.0.2/30
show interfaces detail (Serial, V.35)
user@host> show interfaces se-5/0/0 detail
Physical interface: se-5/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Down
Interface index: 150, SNMP ifIndex: 39, Generation: 31
Type: Serial, Link-level type: PPP, MTU: 1504, Maximum speed: 16384kbps
Device flags
: Present Running Down
Interface flags: Hardware-Down Point-To-Point Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: Loose-NCP
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Keepalive settings: Interval 10 seconds, Up-count 1, Down-count 3
Keepalive statistics:
Input : 0 (last seen: never)
Output: 0 (last sent: never)
LCP state: Down
NCP state: inet: Not-configured, inet6: Not-configured, iso: Not-configured,
mpls: Not-configured
CHAP state: Closed
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Last flapped
: 2006-04-26 14:51:27 PDT (01:03:15 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
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Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Serial media information:
Line protocol: v.35
Resync history:
Sync loss count: 0
Data signal:
Rx Clock: Not Detected
Control signals:
Local mode: DCE
To DTE: CTS: down, DCD: down, DSR: up
From DTE: DTR: down, RTS: down
DCE loopback override: Off
Clocking mode: internal
Clock rate: 38.4 KHz
Loopback: none
Tx clock: non-invert
Line encoding: nrz
0 bps
0 pps
0 pps
Logical interface se-5/0/0.0 (Index 73) (SNMP ifIndex 27) (Generation 12)
Flags: Hardware-Down Device-Down Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps
Encapsulation: PPP
Protocol inet, MTU: 1500, Generation: 17, Route table: 0
Flags: Protocol-Down
Addresses, Flags: Dest-route-down Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 13.0.0.0/30, Local: 13.0.0.2, Broadcast: 13.0.0.3,
Generation: 23
show interfaces extensive (Serial, V.35)
user@host> show interfaces se-5/0/0 extensive
Physical interface: se-5/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Down
Interface index: 150, SNMP ifIndex: 39, Generation: 31
Type: Serial, Link-level type: PPP, MTU: 1504, Maximum speed: 16384kbps
Device flags
: Present Running Down
Interface flags: Hardware-Down Point-To-Point Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: Loose-NCP
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Keepalive settings: Interval 10 seconds, Up-count 1, Down-count 3
Keepalive statistics:
Input : 0 (last seen: never)
Output: 0 (last sent: never)
LCP state: Down
NCP state: inet: Not-configured, inet6: Not-configured, iso: Not-configured,
mpls: Not-configured
CHAP state: Closed
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Last flapped
: 2006-04-26 14:51:27 PDT (01:04:17 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Giants: 0,
Policed discards: 0, Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 0, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, MTU errors: 0,
Resource errors: 0
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Serial media information:
Line protocol: v.35
Resync history:
Sync loss count: 0
Data signal:
Rx Clock: Not Detected
Control signals:
Local mode: DCE
To DTE: CTS: down, DCD: down, DSR: up
From DTE: DTR: down, RTS: down
DCE loopback override: Off
Clocking mode: internal
Clock rate: 38.4 KHz
Loopback: none
Tx clock: non-invert
Line encoding: nrz
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 5, PLP byte: 1 (0x00)
CoS information:
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
%
bps
0 best-effort
95
15564800
3 network-control
5
819200
%
95
5
Buffer
usec
0
0
Priority
Limit
low
low
none
none
Logical interface se-5/0/0.0 (Index 73) (SNMP ifIndex 27) (Generation 12)
Flags: Hardware-Down Device-Down Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps
Encapsulation: PPP
Protocol inet, MTU: 1500, Generation: 17, Route table: 0
Flags: Protocol-Down
Addresses, Flags: Dest-route-down Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 13.0.0.0/30, Local: 13.0.0.2, Broadcast: 13.0.0.3,
Generation: 23
show interfaces statistics detail (RS 449)
user@host> show interfaces se-6/0/0 statistics detail
Interface index: 149, SNMP ifIndex: 59, Generation: 150
Type: Serial, Link-level type: PPP, MTU: 1504, Maximum speed: 8mbps
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: Point-To-Point Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: No-Keepalives Loose-NCP
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
LCP state: Opened
NCP state: inet: Opened, inet6: Not-configured, iso: Not-configured, mpls:
Not-configured
CHAP state: Closed
PAP state: Closed
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Last flapped
: 2007-11-28 19:38:36 PST (00:14:06 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
744
0 bps
Output bytes :
5978
0 bps
Input packets:
33
0 pps
Output packets:
129
0 pps
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Giants: 0, Policed discards:
0,
Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 13, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors:
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Chapter 7: Operational Commands
0
Egress queues: 8 supported, 5 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets
Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
24
24
0
1 expedited-fo
0
0
0
2 bulk
0
0
0
105
105
0
0
0
0
0 best-effort
3 assured-forw
4 voip
Serial media information:
Line protocol: rs449
Resync history:
Sync loss count: 0
Data signal:
Rx Clock: OK
Control signals:
Local mode: DTE
To DCE: DTR: up, RTS: up
From DCE: CTS: up, DCD: up, DSR: up
Clocking mode: internal
Loopback: none
Tx clock: non-invert
Line encoding: nrz
Logical interface se-6/0/0.0 (Index 75) (SNMP ifIndex 69) (Generation 141)
Flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps 0x4000 Encapsulation: PPP
Protocol inet, MTU: 256, Generation: 145, Route table: 0
Flags: None
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 11.11.11/24, Local: 11.11.11.2, Broadcast: 11.11.11.255,
Generation: 157
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show interfaces extensive
Syntax
Release Information
Description
192
show interfaces extensive
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1x48 for PTX Series Packet Transport
Routers.
Display extensive information about all interfaces configured on the router.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
NOTE:
•
At some times, the cumulative byte counters displayed with the show
interfaces extensive command on the 10-Gigabit Ethernet MPC with SFP+
is not always increasing and cumulative and does not give the correct
results. There is a time lag in collecting these statistics, during which the
display might decrease or go from a nonzero number to zero. Eventually,
the counter will display the correct result.
•
When the show interfaces extensive command is executed on a router with
an MPC or a T4000 Type 5 FPC, the Input packet rejects counter of the Filter
statistics field also displays statistics related to the following packet errors:
•
Options
Required Privilege
Level
•
Invalid VLAN range
•
Tagged packet received on an untagged interface
When the show interfaces extensive command is executed on an interface
that is configured on a T4000 Type 5 FPC, the IPv6 transit statistics field
displays:
•
Total statistics (sum of transit and local statistics) at the physical
interface level
•
Transit statistics at the logical interface level
•
When the show interfaces extensive command is executed on an aggregate
interface in a T1600 Core Router, the IPv6 Input bytes is displayed for an
aggregate interface. However, the IPv6 Input bytes is always zero on a
member link of an aggregated bundle even when there is IPv6 transit traffic
on the member link. This is because the logical interface index of the
aggregate logical interface is updated but not the logical interface of the
member links in the channel lookup table.
•
The Output packets field under the Traffic statistics section in the output
of the show interfaces extensive command includes both IPv4 and IPv6
packets. For example, in a scenario in which both IPv4 and IPv6 packets
are being mirrored on the same interface and when you deactivate an IPv4
port-mirroring instance on the chassis, the output of the show interfaces
extensive command shows a value in the Output packets field of the Traffic
statistics section, which is the value of IPv6 packets that are mirrored and
not of the IPv4 packets. This behavior is expected.
•
For IQ2 PIC interfaces, the output of the show interfaces extensive command
displays byte statistics that includes Layer 2 headers.
This command has no options.
view
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List of Sample Output
show interfaces extensive (Circuit Emulation) on page 194
show interfaces extensive (Fast Ethernet) on page 195
show interfaces extensive (Gigabit Ethernet) on page 197
show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet) on page 197
show interfaces extensive (IQ2 and IQ2E) on page 199
show interfaces extensive (100-Gigabit Ethernet Type 4 PIC with CFP) on page 202
show interfaces extensive (PTX5000 Packet Transport Router) on page 204
show interfaces extensive (MX Series Routers) on page 206
show interfaces extensive (MX480 Router with MPC5E and 10-Gigabit Ethernet OTN
Interface) on page 208
show interfaces extensive (MX480 Router with MPC5E and 100-Gigabit Ethernet OTN
Interface) on page 209
show interfaces extensive (MX2020 Router with MPC6E and OTN MIC) on page 212
show interfaces extensive (MX2010 Router with MPC6E and 100-Gigabit Ethernet
OTN Interface) on page 215
show interfaces extensive (MX2010 Router with MPC6E and 10-Gigabit Ethernet
Interface) on page 216
show interfaces extensive (T4000 Routers with Type 5 FPCs) on page 218
show interfaces extensive (Aggregated Ethernet) on page 219
Output Fields
For more information, see the output fields table for the particular interface type in which
you are interested. For information about destination class and source class statistics,
see the “Destination Class Field” section and the “Source Class Field” section under
“Common Output Fields Description” on page 115. For sample output for specific interfaces,
see the other topics in this collection.
Sample Output
show interfaces extensive (Circuit Emulation)
If a Circuit Emulation (CE) PIC is configured for SAToP pseudowire, then pseudowire
statistics are displayed in the CE information section of the show interface extensive
output. If SAToP pseudowire is not configured on the CE PIC, then all CE information
counters display 0 (zero).
user@host> show interface t1-0/0/0 extensive
Physical interface :t1-0/0/0, Enabled, Physical Link : Up
Interface index:61441
Speed : 1.54 Mbps, Loopback: Disabled
Operational state : Enabled,
Encapsulation : Trans
Encoding : b8zs,
Framing
: unframe,
Build-out : 0-30
Inversion
: enable, Clock source : master
Description :
Traffic statistics:
T1 media:
Seconds
ES
1643
SES
1643
CE
CE
CE
CE
CE
194
Info
Rx
:
Tx
:
Rx Drop:
Tx Drop:
Packets
2395529
2396259
0
0
Bytes
306627712
306721152
0
0
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
CE Overrun Events: 0
CE Underrun Events: 0
Sample Output
show interfaces extensive (Fast Ethernet)
user@host> show interfaces fe-0/2/1 extensive
Physical interface: fe-0/2/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 129, SNMP ifIndex: 23, Generation: 130
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 100mbps, Loopback: Disabled,
Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
CoS queues
: 4 supported, 4 maximum usable queues
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:90:69:91:c4:3e, Hardware address: 00:90:69:91:c4:3e
Last flapped
: 2006-04-16 23:00:41 PDT (02:08:05 ago)
Statistics last cleared: 2006-04-16 21:42:00 PDT (03:26:46 ago)
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
17539
152 bps
Output bytes :
92968
224 bps
Input packets:
348
0 pps
Output packets:
1349
0 pps
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0,
L3 incompletes: 0, L2 channel errors: 0, L2 mismatch timeouts: 0,
FIFO errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 3, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets: 0,
FIFO errors: 0, HS link CRC errors: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Egress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
66
66
0
1 expedited-fo
0
0
0
2 assured-forw
0
0
0
3 network-cont
1283
1283
0
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
MAC statistics:
Total octets
Total packets
Unicast packets
Broadcast packets
Multicast packets
CRC/Align errors
FIFO errors
MAC control frames
MAC pause frames
Oversized frames
Jabber frames
Fragment frames
VLAN tagged frames
Code violations
Filter statistics:
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Receive
24721
348
347
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Transmit
105982
1349
430
37
882
0
0
0
0
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Input packet count
348
Input packet rejects
0
Input DA rejects
0
Input SA rejects
0
Output packet count
1349
Output packet pad count
0
Output packet error count
0
CAM destination filters: 3, CAM source filters: 0
Autonegotiation information:
Negotiation status: Complete
Link partner:
Link mode: Full-duplex, Flow control: None, Remote fault: OK
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 0
CoS information:
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Buffer
Priority
Limit
%
bps
%
usec
0 best-effort
95
95000000 95
0
low
none
3 network-control
5
5000000
5
0
low
none
Logical interface fe-0/2/0.0 (Index 66) (SNMP ifIndex 46) (Generation 133)
Flags: SNMP-Traps Encapsulation: ENET2
Protocol inet, MTU: 1500, Generation: 142, Route table: 0
Flags: DCU, SCU-out
Packets
Bytes
Destination class
(packet-per-second)
(bits-per-second)
silv1_new
0
0
(
0) (
0)
silv2_new
0
0
(
0) (
0)
silv_misc
0
0
(
0) (
0)
silver0
0
0
(
0) (
0)
silver2
0
0
(
0) (
0)
silver3
0
0
(
0) (
0)
silver4
0
0
(
0) (
0)
silver5
0
0
(
0) (
0)
silver6
0
0
(
0) (
0)
silver7
0
0
(
0) (
0)
silver9
0
0
(
0) (
0)
Packets
Bytes
Source class
(packet-per-second)
(bits-per-second)
gold1
0
0
(
0) (
0)
gold2
16600
1062400
(
0) (
0)
gold3
0
0
(
0) (
0)
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 12.1.1/24, Local: 12.1.1.1, Broadcast: 12.1.1.255,
Generation: 150
196
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
show interfaces extensive (Gigabit Ethernet)
user@host> show interfaces ge-5/0/0.0 extensive
Logical interface ge-5/0/0.0 (Index 71) (SNMP ifIndex 1930) (Generation 139)
Flags: SNMP-Traps 0x4000 Encapsulation: ENET2
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
42
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
1
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
42
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
1
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
Output Filters: f-any
Protocol inet, MTU: 1500, Generation: 155, Route table: 0
Output Filters: f-inet,
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 10.11.1/24, Local: 10.11.1.1, Broadcast: 10.11.1.255,
Generation: 170
Protocol multiservice, MTU: Unlimited, Generation: 156, Route table: 0
Flags: Is-Primary
Policer: Input: __default_arp_policer__
show interfaces extensive (10-Gigabit Ethernet)
user@host> show interfaces xe-2/1/0 extensive
Physical interface: xe-2/1/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 258, SNMP ifIndex: 762, Generation: 2046
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, LAN-PHY mode, Speed: 10Gbps, BPDU Error:
None, Loopback: None, Source filtering: Disabled,
Flow control: Enabled
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:1d:b5:f8:6d:eb, Hardware address: 00:1d:b5:f8:6d:eb
Last flapped
: 2011-12-17 00:19:02 PST (07:36:37 ago)
Statistics last cleared: 2011-12-17 07:55:24 PST (00:00:15 ago)
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
110000
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
1000
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
110000
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
1000
Output packets:
0
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0, L3
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incompletes: 0, L2 channel errors: 0,
L2 mismatch timeouts: 0, FIFO errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 0, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets: 0,
FIFO errors: 0, HS link CRC errors: 0,
MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
0
0
0
1 expedited-fo
0
0
0
2 assured-forw
0
0
0
3 network-cont
0
0
0
Queue number:
Mapped forwarding classes
0
best-effort
1
expedited-forwarding
2
assured-forwarding
3
network-control
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
PCS statistics
Seconds
Bit errors
0
Errored blocks
0
MAC statistics:
Receive
Total octets
128000
Total packets
1000
Unicast packets
1000
Broadcast packets
0
Multicast packets
0
CRC/Align errors
0
FIFO errors
0
MAC control frames
0
MAC pause frames
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
0
Fragment frames
0
VLAN tagged frames
0
Code violations
0
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
1000
Input packet rejects
0
Input DA rejects
0
Input SA rejects
0
Output packet count
Output packet pad count
Output packet error count
CAM destination filters: 0, CAM source filters: 0
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 2
CoS information:
Direction : Output
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Limit
%
bps
%
0 best-effort
95
9500000000
95
none
3 network-control
5
500000000
5
198
Transmit
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Buffer Priority
usec
0
low
0
low
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
none
Interface transmit statistics: Disabled
Logical interface xe-2/1/0.0 (Index 83) (SNMP ifIndex 1677) (Generation 10082)
Flags: SNMP-Traps 0x4004000 Encapsulation: ENET2
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
110000
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
1000
Output packets:
0
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
55000
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
500
Output packets:
0
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
55000
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
500
Output packets:
0
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
55000
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
500
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
55000
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
500
Output packets:
0
Protocol inet6, MTU: 1500, Generation: 23739, Route table: 0
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 2001:1000:abcd:2312:1432:abcd:1234:0/112, Local:
2001:1000:abcd:2312:1432:abcd:1234:1234
Generation: 506
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred
Destination: fe80::/64, Local: fe80::21d:b5ff:fef8:6deb
Protocol multiservice, MTU: Unlimited, Generation: 508
Generation: 23740, Route table: 0
Policer: Input: __default_arp_policer__
show interfaces extensive (IQ2 and IQ2E)
user@host> show interfaces ge-3/2/2 extensive
Physical interface: ge-3/2/2, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 156, SNMP ifIndex: 548, Generation: 159
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1518, Speed: 1000mbps, BPDU Error: None,
MAC-REWRITE Error: None, Loopback: Disabled, Source filtering: Disabled,
Flow control: Enabled, Auto-negotiation: Enabled, Remote fault: Online
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Schedulers
: 128
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:14:f6:12:86:fa, Hardware address: 00:14:f6:12:86:fa
Last flapped
: 2010-03-17 04:03:11 PDT (00:45:30 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
1716096
0 bps
Output bytes :
1716448
0 bps
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Input packets:
13407
0 pps
Output packets:
13411
0 pps
IPv6 total statistics:
Input bytes :
1716096
Output bytes :
1716096
Input packets:
13407
Output packets:
13407
Ingress traffic statistics at Packet Forwarding Engine:
Input bytes :
1716096
0 bps
Input packets:
13407
0 pps
Drop
bytes :
0
0 bps
Drop
packets:
0
0 pps
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0,
L3 incompletes: 0, L2 channel errors: 1, L2 mismatch timeouts: 0, FIFO errors:
0,
Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 1, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets:
0, FIFO errors: 0, HS link CRC errors: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Ingress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped
packets
0 best-effort
13407
13407
0
1 expedited-fo
0
0
0
2 assured-forw
0
0
0
3 network-cont
0
0
0
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped
packets
0 best-effort
13407
13407
0
1 expedited-fo
0
0
0
2 assured-forw
0
0
0
3 network-cont
4
4
0
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
MAC statistics:
Receive
Transmit
Total octets
1716096
1716448
Total packets
13407
13411
Unicast packets
13407
13407
Broadcast packets
0
0
Multicast packets
0
4
CRC/Align errors
0
0
FIFO errors
0
0
MAC control frames
0
0
MAC pause frames
0
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
0
Fragment frames
0
VLAN tagged frames
0
Code violations
0
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
13407
200
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Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Input packet rejects
0
Input DA rejects
0
Input SA rejects
0
Output packet count
13411
Output packet pad count
0
Output packet error count
0
CAM destination filters: 0, CAM source filters: 0
Autonegotiation information:
Negotiation status: Complete
Link partner:
Link mode: Full-duplex, Flow control: None, Remote fault: OK
Local resolution:
Flow control: Symmetric, Remote fault: Link OK
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 3
CoS information:
Direction : Output
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Buffer Priority
Limit
%
bps
%
usec
0 best-effort
95
950000000
95
0
low
none
3 network-control
5
50000000
5
0
low
none
Direction : Input
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Buffer Priority
Limit
%
bps
%
usec
0 best-effort
95
950000000
95
0
low
none
3 network-control
5
50000000
5
0
low
none
Logical interface ge-3/2/2.0 (Index 83) (SNMP ifIndex 6080) (Generation
148)
Flags: SNMP-Traps 0x4000 VLAN-Tag [ 0x8100.100 ]
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
336
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
4
IPv6 total statistics:
Input bytes :
1716096
Output bytes :
1716096
Input packets:
13407
Output packets:
13407
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
336
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
4
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
IPv6 total statistics:
Input bytes :
1716096
Output bytes :
1716096
Input packets:
13407
Output packets:
13407
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Encapsulation: ENET2
0
0
0
0
bps
bps
pps
pps
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Protocol inet6, MTU: 1500, Generation: 159, Route table: 0
Flags: Is-Primary
Addresses, Flags: Is-Default Is-Primary
Destination: Unspecified, Local: 2000::2
Generation: 146
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred
Destination: fe80::/64, Local: fe80::214:f600:6412:86fa
Protocol multiservice, MTU: Unlimited, Generation: 148
Generation: 160, Route table: 0
Policer: Input: __default_arp_policer__
Logical interface ge-3/2/2.32767 (Index 84) (SNMP ifIndex 6081) (Generation
149)
Flags: SNMP-Traps 0x4000 VLAN-Tag [ 0x0000.0 ] Encapsulation: ENET2
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
Protocol multiservice, MTU: Unlimited, Generation: 161, Route table: 0
Flags: None
Policer: Input: __default_arp_policer__
show interfaces extensive (100-Gigabit Ethernet Type 4 PIC with CFP)
user@host> show interfaces et-0/0/0:0 extensive
Physical interface: et-0/0/0:0, Enabled, Physical link is Down
Interface index: 156, SNMP ifIndex: 516, Generation: 163
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 9192, Speed: 50000mbps, BPDU Error: None,
MAC-REWRITE Error: None,
Loopback: Disabled, Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled
Device flags
: Present Running Down
Interface flags: Hardware-Down SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Damping
: half-life: 5 sec, max-suppress: 20 sec, reuse 1000, suppress:
2000, state: enabled
Current address: 00:aa:aa:aa:aa:00, Hardware address: 00:21:59:5c:48:00
Last flapped
: 2010-01-07 16:36:49 PST (18:02:35 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
202
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Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0, L3
incompletes: 0,
L2 channel errors: 0, L2 mismatch timeouts: 0, FIFO errors: 0, Resource errors:
0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 0, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets: 0,
FIFO errors: 0,
HS link CRC errors: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Egress queues: 8 supported, 8 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 DEFAULT, NC-
0
0
0
1 REALTIME
0
0
0
2 PRIVATE, NC-
0
0
0
1253
1253
0
4 BC-H, CLASS_
0
0
0
5 BC-M, CLASS_
0
0
0
6 IA, CLASS_V_
0
0
0
7 CLASS_S_OUTP
0
0
0
3 CONTROL
Queue
Mapped Forwarding Class
0
DEFAULT, NC-Q0
1
REALTIME
2
PRIVATE, NC-Q1
3
CONTROL
4
BC-H, CLASS-Q4
5
BC-M, CLASS-Q5
6
IA, CLASS_V_OUTPUT
7
CLASS_S_OUTPUT
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
MAC statistics:
Receive
Total octets
0
Total packets
0
Unicast packets
0
Broadcast packets
0
Multicast packets
0
CRC/Align errors
0
FIFO errors
0
MAC control frames
0
MAC pause frames
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
0
Fragment frames
0
VLAN tagged frames
0
Code violations
0
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 0
CoS information:
Direction : Output
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
%
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
bps
Transmit
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Buffer Priority Limit
%
usec
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0 best-effort
3 network-control
95
47500000000
95
0
low none
5
2500000000
5
0
low none
Logical interface et-0/0/0:0.0 (Index 68) (SNMP ifIndex 546) (Generation 161)
Flags: Deviet-Down SNMP-Traps Encapsulation: ENET2
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
Protocol inet, MTU: 9178, Generation: 220, Route table: 0
Addresses, Flags: Dest-route-down Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 210.160.0/24, Local: 210.160.0.1, Broadcast: 210.160.0.255,
Generation: 192
Protocol mpls, MTU: 9166, Maximum labels: 3, Generation: 221, Route table: 0
Protocol multiservice, MTU: Unlimited, Generation: 222, Route table: 0
Policer: Input: __default_arp_policer
show interfaces extensive (PTX5000 Packet Transport Router)
user@host> show interfaces et-7/0/0 extensive
Physical interface: et-7/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 168, SNMP ifIndex: 501, Generation: 171
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 10Gbps, BPDU Error: None,
MAC-REWRITE Error: None,
Loopback: Disabled, Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Damping
: half-life: 5 sec, max-suppress: 20 sec, reuse 1000, suppress:
2000, state: enabled
Current address: 88:e0:f3:3b:de:43, Hardware address: 88:e0:f3:3b:de:43
Last flapped
: 2012-01-18 11:48:24 PST (01:47:08 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
3583014
0 bps
Output bytes :
758050
0 bps
Input packets:
17740
0 pps
Output packets:
3418
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0, L3
204
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
incompletes: 0,
L2 channel errors: 0, L2 mismatch timeouts: 0, FIFO errors: 0, Resource errors:
0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 1, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets: 0,
FIFO errors: 0,
HS link CRC errors: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
252
252
0
1 expedited-fo
0
0
0
2 assured-forw
0
0
0
3 network-cont
6196
6196
0
Queue number:
Mapped forwarding classes
0
best-effort
1
expedited-forwarding
2
assured-forwarding
3
network-control
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
MAC statistics:
Receive
Total octets
4108825
Total packets
21166
Unicast packets
14824
Broadcast packets
3
Multicast packets
6339
CRC/Align errors
0
FIFO errors
0
MAC control frames
0
MAC pause frames
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
0
Fragment frames
0
VLAN tagged frames
16091
Code violations
0
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
9
Input packet rejects
9
Input DA rejects
9
Input SA rejects
0
Output packet count
Output packet pad count
Output packet error count
CAM destination filters: 0, CAM source filters: 0
Autonegotiation information:
Negotiation status: Incomplete
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 7
CoS information:
Direction : Output
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Limit
%
bps
%
0 best-effort
95
9500000000
95
none
3 network-control
5
500000000
5
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Transmit
1159686
6448
3255
0
3193
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Buffer Priority
usec
0
low
0
low
205
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
none
Interface transmit statistics: Disabled
show interfaces extensive (MX Series Routers)
user@host> show interfaces xe-0/0/0 extensive
Physical interface: xe-0/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 145, SNMP ifIndex: 592, Generation: 148
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, LAN-PHY mode, Speed: 10Gbps, BPDU Error:
None,
Loopback: None, Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled
Pad to minimum frame size: Enabled
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x0
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 08:81:f4:82:a3:f0, Hardware address: 08:81:f4:82:a3:f0
Last flapped
: 2013-10-26 03:20:40 test (2w3d 03:15 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Dropped traffic statistics due to STP State:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0,
L3 incompletes: 0, L2 channel errors: 0, L2 mismatch timeouts: 0, FIFO errors:
0,
Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 0, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets: 0,
FIFO errors: 0, HS link CRC errors: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
Queue number:
0
1
2
3
Active alarms
206
Mapped forwarding classes
best-effort
expedited-forwarding
assured-forwarding
network-control
: LINK
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Active defects : LINK
PCS statistics
Bit errors
Errored blocks
MAC statistics:
1
Seconds
109
109
Receive
0
Transmit
0
0
2
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
Queue number:
Mapped forwarding classes
0
best-effort
1
expedited-forwarding
2
assured-forwarding
3
network-control
Active alarms : LINK
Active defects : LINK
PCS statistics
Seconds
Bit errors
109
Errored blocks
109
MAC statistics:
Receive
Total octets
0
Total packets
0
Unicast packets
0
Broadcast packets
0
Multicast packets
0
CRC/Align errors
0
FIFO errors
0
MAC control frames
0
MAC pause frames
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
0
Fragment frames
0
VLAN tagged frames
0
Code violations
0
Total errors
0
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
0
Input packet rejects
0
Input DA rejects
0
Input SA rejects
0
Output packet count
Output packet pad count
Output packet error count
CAM destination filters: 0, CAM source filters: 0
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 0
CoS information:
Direction : Output
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Limit
%
bps
%
0 best-effort
95
9500000000
95
none
3 network-control
5
500000000
5
none
Interface transmit statistics: Disabled
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Transmit
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Buffer Priority
usec
0
low
0
low
207
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
show interfaces extensive (MX480 Router with MPC5E and 10-Gigabit Ethernet OTN Interface)
user@host> show interfaces xe-0/0/3 extensive
Physical interface: xe-0/0/3, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 200, SNMP ifIndex: 577, Generation: 203
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, MRU: 1522, LAN-PHY mode, Speed: 10Gbps,
BPDU Error: None, MAC-REWRITE Error: None, Loopback: None, Source filtering:
Disabled, Flow control: Enabled
Pad to minimum frame size: Disabled
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Schedulers
: 0
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:23:9c:fc:98:03, Hardware address: 00:23:9c:fc:98:03
Last flapped
: 2014-06-26 18:16:50 PDT (04:58:35 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Dropped traffic statistics due to STP State:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0, L3
incompletes: 0, L2 channel errors: 0, L2 mismatch timeouts: 0, FIFO errors: 0,
Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 5, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets: 0,
FIFO errors: 0, HS link CRC errors: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
Queue number:
0
1
2
3
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
PCS statistics
Bit errors
Errored blocks
208
Mapped forwarding classes
best-effort
expedited-forwarding
assured-forwarding
network-control
Seconds
0
4
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
MAC statistics:
Receive
Total octets
0
Total packets
0
Unicast packets
0
Broadcast packets
0
Multicast packets
0
CRC/Align errors
0
FIFO errors
0
MAC control frames
0
MAC pause frames
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
0
Fragment frames
0
VLAN tagged frames
0
Code violations
0
Total errors
0
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
0
Input packet rejects
0
Input DA rejects
0
Input SA rejects
0
Output packet count
Output packet pad count
Output packet error count
CAM destination filters: 0, CAM source filters: 0
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 0 (0x00)
CoS information:
Direction : Output
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Limit
%
bps
%
0 best-effort
95
9500000000
95
none
3 network-control
5
500000000
5
none
Interface transmit statistics: Disabled
Transmit
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Buffer Priority
usec
0
low
0
low
show interfaces extensive (MX480 Router with MPC5E and 100-Gigabit Ethernet OTN Interface)
user@host> show interfaces et-2/1/0 extensive
Physical interface: et-2/1/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 215, SNMP ifIndex: 872, Generation: 218
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, MRU: 1522, Speed: 100Gbps, BPDU Error:
None, Loopback: Disabled, Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled
Pad to minimum frame size: Disabled
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Schedulers
: 0
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:23:9c:fc:9a:e6, Hardware address: 00:23:9c:fc:9a:e6
Last flapped
: 2014-06-26 18:42:04 PDT (04:36:58 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
209
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Dropped traffic statistics due to STP State:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0, L3
incompletes: 0, L2 channel errors: 0, L2 mismatch timeouts: 0, FIFO errors: 0,
Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 263, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets:
0, FIFO errors: 0, HS link CRC errors: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
Queue number:
Mapped forwarding classes
0
best-effort
1
expedited-forwarding
2
assured-forwarding
3
network-control
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
PCS statistics
Seconds
Bit errors
0
Errored blocks
754
MAC statistics:
Receive
Total octets
14960
Total packets
104
Unicast packets
0
Broadcast packets
0
Multicast packets
0
CRC/Align errors
0
FIFO errors
0
MAC control frames
0
MAC pause frames
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
2
Fragment frames
6
VLAN tagged frames
0
Code violations
0
Total errors
98
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
104
Input packet rejects
0
Input DA rejects
0
Input SA rejects
0
Output packet count
Output packet pad count
Output packet error count
210
Transmit
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
CAM destination filters: 0, CAM source filters: 0
OTN alarms
: None
OTN defects
: None
OTN FEC Mode
: GFEC
OTN Rate
:
OTU4 100Gbps
OTN Line Loopback : None
OTN Local Loopback: None
OTN Payload PRBS
: None
OTN FEC statistics:
Corrected Errors
169828399453
Uncorrected Words
28939961456
Corrected Error Ratio (
17963 sec average) 8.46e-05
OTN FEC alarms:
Seconds
Count State
FEC Degrade
1180
3 OK
FEC Excessive
1160
5 OK
OTN OC:
Seconds
Count State
LOS
129
1 OK
LOF
2
1 OK
LOM
0
0 OK
Wavelength Lock
0
0 OK
OTN OTU:
AIS
0
0 OK
BDI
7
1 OK
IAE
0
0 OK
TTIM
168
45 OK
BIAE
0
0 OK
TSF
0
0 OK
SSF
0
0 OK
Received DAPI:
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
................
Received SAPI:
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
................
Transmitted DAPI:
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
................
Transmitted SAPI:
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
................
OTN ODU:
AIS
130
1 OK
OCI
0
0 OK
LCK
0
0 OK
BDI
7
1 OK
TTIM
133
1 OK
IAE
0
0 OK
LTC
0
0 OK
CSF
8
4 OK
TSF
0
0 OK
SSF
0
0 OK
PTIM
130
1 OK
Received DAPI:
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
................
Received SAPI:
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
................
Transmitted DAPI:
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
................
Transmitted SAPI:
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
................
OTN Received Overhead Bytes:
APS/PCC0: 0x00, APS/PCC1: 0x00, APS/PCC2: 0x00, APS/PCC3: 0x00
Payload Type: 0x00
ODU Delay Management :
Result : 0x00
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
211
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
PRBS:
Result: Test not enabled
OTN Transmitted Overhead Bytes:
APS/PCC0: 0x00, APS/PCC1: 0x00, APS/PCC2: 0x00, APS/PCC3: 0x00
Payload Type: 0x00
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 0 (0x00)
CoS information:
Direction : Output
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Buffer Priority
Limit
%
bps
%
usec
0 best-effort
95
95000000000
95
0
low
none
3 network-control
5
5000000000
5
0
low
none
Interface transmit statistics: Disabled
show interfaces extensive (MX2020 Router with MPC6E and OTN MIC)
user@host> show interfaces xe-3/0/0 extensive
Physical interface: xe-3/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 166, SNMP ifIndex: 516, Generation: 169
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, MRU: 1522, LAN-PHY mode, Speed: 10Gbps,
BPDU Error:
None, MAC-REWRITE Error: None, Loopback: None, Source filtering: Disabled, Flow
control:
Enabled
Pad to minimum frame size: Disabled
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 4c:96:14:72:22:63, Hardware address: 4c:96:14:72:22:63
Last flapped
: 2014-05-28 17:53:12 PDT (05:56:24 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Dropped traffic statistics due to STP State:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0, L3
incompletes:
0, L2 channel errors: 0, L2 mismatch timeouts: 0, FIFO errors: 0, Resource errors:
0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 3, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets: 0,
FIFO
errors: 0, HS link CRC errors: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
212
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets
0 best-effort
1 expedited-forwarding
0
2 assured-forwarding
0
3 network-control
Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Queue number:
Mapped forwarding classes
0
best-effort
1
expedited-forwarding
2
assured-forwarding
3
network-control
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
PCS statistics
Seconds
Bit errors
2
Errored blocks
2
MAC statistics:
Receive
Transmit
Total octets
0
0
Total packets
0
0
Unicast packets
0
0
Broadcast packets
0
0
Multicast packets
0
0
CRC/Align errors
0
0
FIFO errors
0
0
MAC control frames
0
0
MAC pause frames
0
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
0
Fragment frames
0
VLAN tagged frames
0
Code violations
0
Total errors
0
0
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
0
Input packet rejects
0
Input DA rejects
0
Input SA rejects
0
Output packet count
0
Output packet pad count
0
Output packet error count
0
CAM destination filters: 0, CAM source filters: 0
OTN alarms
: None
OTN defects
: None
OTN FEC Mode
: GFEC
OTN Rate
: Fixed Stuff Bytes 11.0957Gbps
OTN Line Loopback : None
OTN Local Loopback: None
OTN Payload PRBS
: None
OTN FEC statistics:
Corrected Errors
0
Uncorrected Words
0
Corrected Error Ratio (
21387 sec average) 0.00e+00
OTN FEC alarms:
Seconds
Count State
FEC Degrade
0
0 OK
FEC Excessive
0
0 OK
OTN OC:
Seconds
Count State
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
213
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
LOS
0
0 OK
LOF
0
0 OK
LOM
0
0 OK
Wavelength Lock
0
0 OK
OTN OTU:
AIS
0
0 OK
BDI
0
0 OK
IAE
0
0 OK
TTIM
0
0 OK
BIAE
0
0 OK
TSF
0
0 OK
SSF
0
0 OK
Received DAPI:
00 53 4d 2d 54 52 43 20 44 41 50 49 2d 53 45 43
.SM-TRC DAPI-SEC
Received SAPI:
00 53 4d 2d 54 52 43 20 53 41 50 49 2d 53 45 43
.SM-TRC SAPI-SEC
Transmitted DAPI:
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
................
Transmitted SAPI:
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
................
OTN ODU:
AIS
0
0 OK
OCI
0
0 OK
LCK
0
0 OK
BDI
0
0 OK
TTIM
0
0 OK
IAE
0
0 OK
LTC
0
0 OK
CSF
0
0 OK
TSF
0
0 OK
SSF
0
0 OK
PTIM
0
0 OK
Received DAPI:
00 50 4d 2d 54 52 43 20 44 41 50 49 2d 53 45 43
.PM-TRC DAPI-SEC
Received SAPI:
00 50 4d 2d 54 52 43 20 53 41 50 49 2d 53 45 43
.PM-TRC SAPI-SEC
Transmitted DAPI:
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
................
Transmitted SAPI:
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
................
OTN Received Overhead Bytes:
APS/PCC0: 0x00, APS/PCC1: 0x00, APS/PCC2: 0x00, APS/PCC3: 0x00
Payload Type: 0x00
ODU Delay Management :
Result : 0x00
PRBS:
Result: Test not enabled
OTN Transmitted Overhead Bytes:
APS/PCC0: 0x00, APS/PCC1: 0x00, APS/PCC2: 0x00, APS/PCC3: 0x00
Payload Type: 0x00
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 0 (0x00)
CoS information:
Direction : Output
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Buffer Priority
Limit
%
bps
%
usec
0 best-effort
95
9500000000
95
0
low
none
3 network-control
5
500000000
5
0
low
none
214
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Interface transmit statistics: Disabled
show interfaces extensive (MX2010 Router with MPC6E and 100-Gigabit Ethernet OTN Interface)
user@host> show interfaces et-9/0/0 extensive
Physical interface: et-9/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 196, SNMP ifIndex: 623, Generation: 199
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, MRU: 1522, Speed: 100Gbps, BPDU Error:
None, Loopback: Disabled, Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled
Pad to minimum frame size: Disabled
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 3c:8a:b0:38:6e:f6, Hardware address: 3c:8a:b0:38:6e:f6
Last flapped
: 2014-06-26 18:18:34 PDT (04:17:07 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Dropped traffic statistics due to STP State:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0, L3
incompletes: 0, L2 channel errors: 0, L2 mismatch timeouts: 0, FIFO errors: 0,
Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 1, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets: 0,
FIFO errors: 0, HS link CRC errors: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
Queue number:
0
1
2
3
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
PCS statistics
Bit errors
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Mapped forwarding classes
best-effort
expedited-forwarding
assured-forwarding
network-control
Seconds
0
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Errored blocks
0
MAC statistics:
Receive
Total octets
0
Total packets
0
Unicast packets
0
Broadcast packets
0
Multicast packets
0
CRC/Align errors
0
FIFO errors
0
MAC control frames
0
MAC pause frames
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
0
Fragment frames
0
VLAN tagged frames
0
Code violations
0
Total errors
0
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
0
Input packet rejects
0
Input DA rejects
0
Input SA rejects
0
Output packet count
Output packet pad count
Output packet error count
CAM destination filters: 0, CAM source filters: 0
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 0 (0x00)
CoS information:
Direction : Output
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Limit
%
bps
%
0 best-effort
95
95000000000
95
none
3 network-control
5
5000000000
5
none
Interface transmit statistics: Disabled
Transmit
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Buffer Priority
usec
0
low
0
low
show interfaces extensive (MX2010 Router with MPC6E and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interface)
user@host> show interfaces xe-6/1/0 extensive
Physical interface: xe-6/1/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 159, SNMP ifIndex: 603, Generation: 162
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, MRU: 1522, LAN-PHY mode, Speed: 10Gbps,
BPDU Error: None, MAC-REWRITE Error: None, Loopback: None, Source filtering:
Disabled, Flow control: Enabled
Pad to minimum frame size: Disabled
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Schedulers
: 0
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 3c:8a:b0:38:6c:d5, Hardware address: 3c:8a:b0:38:6c:d5
Last flapped
: 2014-06-26 18:16:50 PDT (04:21:04 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
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Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Dropped traffic statistics due to STP State:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0, L3
incompletes: 0, L2 channel errors: 0, L2 mismatch timeouts: 0, FIFO errors: 0,
Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 1, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets: 0,
FIFO errors: 0, HS link CRC errors: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
Queue number:
Mapped forwarding classes
0
best-effort
1
expedited-forwarding
2
assured-forwarding
3
network-control
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
PCS statistics
Seconds
Bit errors
0
Errored blocks
1
MAC statistics:
Receive
Total octets
0
Total packets
0
Unicast packets
0
Broadcast packets
0
Multicast packets
0
CRC/Align errors
0
FIFO errors
0
MAC control frames
0
MAC pause frames
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
0
Fragment frames
0
VLAN tagged frames
0
Code violations
0
Total errors
0
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
0
Input packet rejects
0
Input DA rejects
0
Input SA rejects
0
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Transmit
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
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Output packet count
Output packet pad count
Output packet error count
CAM destination filters: 0, CAM source filters: 0
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 0 (0x00)
CoS information:
Direction : Output
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Limit
%
bps
%
0 best-effort
95
9500000000
95
none
3 network-control
5
500000000
5
none
Interface transmit statistics: Disabled
0
0
0
Buffer Priority
usec
0
low
0
low
show interfaces extensive (T4000 Routers with Type 5 FPCs)
The output fields for the show interfaces interface extensive command remains the same
for 12-port 10-Gigabit Ethernet LAN/WAN PIC with SFP+ (PF-12XGE-SFPP), 24-port
10-Gigabit Ethernet LAN/WAN PIC with SFP+ (PF-24XGE-SFPP), and 100-Gigabit
Ethernet Type 5 PIC with CFP (PF-1CGE-CFP).
user@host> show interfaces xe-4/0/0 extensive
Physical interface: xe-4/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 200, SNMP ifIndex: 592, Generation: 203
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, LAN-PHY mode, Speed: 10Gbps, BPDU Error:
None, Loopback: None, Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Damping
: half-life: 5 sec, max-suppress: 20 sec, reuse 1000, suppress:
2000, state: enabled
Current address: 00:12:1e:37:53:f8, Hardware address: 00:12:1e:37:53:f8
Last flapped
: 2013-06-03 16:01:56 PDT (06:04:07 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0, L3
incompletes: 0, L2 channel errors: 0, L2 mismatch timeouts: 0, FIFO errors: 0,
Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 1, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets: 0,
FIFO errors: 0, HS link CRC errors: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
218
0
0
0
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Chapter 7: Operational Commands
1 expedited-fo
0
0
0
2 assured-forw
0
0
0
3 network-cont
0
0
0
Queue number:
Mapped forwarding classes
0
best-effort
1
expedited-forwarding
2
assured-forwarding
3
network-control
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
PCS statistics
Seconds
Bit errors
0
Errored blocks
0
MAC statistics:
Receive
Transmit
Total octets
0
0
Total packets
0
0
Unicast packets
0
0
Broadcast packets
0
0
Multicast packets
0
0
CRC/Align errors
0
0
FIFO errors
0
0
MAC control frames
0
0
MAC pause frames
0
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
0
Fragment frames
0
VLAN tagged frames
0
Code violations
0
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
0
Input packet rejects
0
Input DA rejects
0
Input SA rejects
0
Output packet count
0
Output packet pad count
0
Output packet error count
0
CAM destination filters: 0, CAM source filters: 0
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 0 (0x00)
CoS information:
Direction : Output
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Buffer Priority Limit
%
bps
%
usec
0 best-effort
95
9500000000
95
0
low
none
3 network-control
5
500000000
5
0
low
none
Preclassifier statistics:
Traffic Class
Received Packets
Transmitted Packets
Dropped Packets
real-time
0
network-control
0
best-effort
0
Interface transmit statistics: Disabled
0
0
0
0
0
0
show interfaces extensive (Aggregated Ethernet)
user@host> show interfaces ae0 extensive
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Physical interface: ae0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 199, SNMP ifIndex: 570, Generation: 202
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 2Gbps, BPDU Error: None,
MAC-REWRITE Error: None, Loopback: Disabled, Source filtering: Disabled,
Flow control: Disabled, Minimum links needed: 1, Minimum bandwidth needed: 0
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Current address: 2c:6b:f5:d1:0f:c0, Hardware address: 2c:6b:f5:d1:0f:c0
Last flapped
: 2012-06-06 23:33:03 PDT (00:00:58 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
18532
1984 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
158
2 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Dropped traffic statistics due to STP State:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Giants: 0, Policed discards:
0,
Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 0, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors:
0
Ingress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
0
0
0
1 expedited-fo
0
0
0
2 assured-forw
0
0
0
3 network-cont
0
0
0
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets
Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
57
57
0
1 expedited-fo
0
0
0
2 assured-forw
0
0
0
3 network-cont
63605
63605
0
0 best-effort
Queue number:
0
1
2
3
Mapped forwarding classes
best-effort
expedited-forwarding
assured-forwarding
network-control
Logical interface ae0.0 (Index 331) (SNMP ifIndex 583) (Generation 142)
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Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Flags: SNMP-Traps 0x4004000 Encapsulation: ENET2
Statistics
Packets
pps
Bytes
bps
Bundle:
Input :
149
2
17416
1984
Output:
0
0
0
0
Link:
ge-3/2/5.0
Input :
90
1
10100
992
Output:
0
0
0
0
ge-3/3/9.0
Input :
59
1
7316
992
Output:
0
0
0
0
LACP info:
Role
System
System
Port Port
priority
identifier priority
key
ge-3/2/5.0
Actor
100
00:00:00:00:00:01
127
1
ge-3/2/5.0
Partner
127 00:24:dc:98:67:c0
127
ge-3/3/9.0
Actor
ge-3/3/9.0
Partner
100
00:00:00:00:00:01
Port
number
1
1
127
1
2
1
127
00:24:dc:98:67:c0
127
2
1
LACP Statistics:
LACP Rx
LACP Tx
Unknown Rx
Illegal Rx
ge-3/2/5.0
38
137
0
0
ge-3/3/9.0
36
139
0
0
Marker Statistics:
Marker Rx
Resp Tx
Unknown Rx
Illegal Rx
ge-3/2/5.0
0
0
0
0
ge-3/3/9.0
0
0
0
0
Protocol inet, MTU: 1500, Generation: 169, Route table: 0
Flags: Sendbcast-pkt-to-re
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 1.1.1/24, Local: 1.1.1.2, Broadcast: 1.1.1.255, Generation:
153
Protocol multiservice, MTU: Unlimited, Generation: 170, Route table: 0
Flags: Is-Primary
Policer: Input: __default_arp_policer__
Sample Output
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show interfaces queue
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show interfaces queue
<aggregate | remaining-traffic>
<both-ingress-egress>
<egress>
<forwarding-class forwarding-class>
<ingress>
<interface-name interface-name>
<l2-statistics>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
both-ingress-egress, egress, and ingress options introduced in Junos OS Release 7.6.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
l2-statistics option introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Display class-of-service (CoS) queue information for physical interfaces.
none—Show detailed CoS queue statistics for all physical interfaces.
aggregate—(Optional) Display the aggregated queuing statistics of all logical interfaces
that have traffic-control profiles configured. (Not on the QFX Series.)
both-ingress-egress—(Optional) On Gigabit Ethernet Intelligent Queuing 2 (IQ2) PICs,
display both ingress and egress queue statistics. (Not on the QFX Series.)
egress—(Optional) Display egress queue statistics.
forwarding-class forwarding-class—(Optional) Forwarding class name for this queue.
Shows detailed CoS statistics for the queue associated with the specified forwarding
class.
ingress—(Optional) On Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PICs, display ingress queue statistics. (Not
on the QFX Series.)
interface-name interface-name—(Optional) Show detailed CoS queue statistics for the
specified interface.
l2-statistics—(Optional) Display Layer 2 statistics for MLPPP, FRF.15, and FRF.16 bundles
remaining-traffic—(Optional) Display the remaining-traffic queue statistics of all logical
interfaces that have traffic-control profiles configured.
Overhead for Layer 2
Statistics
Transmitted packets and transmitted byte counts are displayed for the Layer 2 level
with the addition of encapsulation overheads applied for fragmentation, as shown
in Table 11 on page 223. Others counters, such as packets and bytes queued (input)
and drop counters, are displayed at the Layer 3 level. In the case of link fragmentation
and interleaving (LFI) for which fragmentation is not applied, corresponding Layer
2 overheads are added, as shown in Table 11 on page 223.
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Table 11: Layer 2 Overhead and Transmitted Packets or Byte Counts
Protocol
Fragmentation
LFI
First fragmentation
Second to n fragmentations
Bytes
Bytes
MLPPP (Long)
13
12
8
MLPPP (short)
11
10
8
MLFR (FRF15)
12
10
8
MFR (FRF16)
10
8
-
MCMLPPP(Long)
13
12
-
MCMLPPP(Short)
11
10
-
Layer 2 Statistics—Fragmentation Overhead Calculation
MLPPP/MC-MLPPP Overhead details:
===============================
Fragment 1:
Outer PPP header
Long or short sequence MLPPP header
Inner PPP header
HDLC flag and FCS bytes
:
:
:
:
4
4
1
4
bytes
bytes or 2 bytes
byte
bytes
Fragments 2 .. n :
Outer PPP header
Long or short sequence MLPPP header
HDLC flag and FCS bytes
MLFR (FRF15) Overhead details:
=============================
Fragment 1:
Framerelay header
: 2
Control,NLPID
: 2
Fragmentaion header
: 2
Inner proto
: 2
HDLC flag and FCS
: 4
: 4 bytes
: 4 bytes or 2 bytes
: 4 bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
Fragments 2 ...n :
Framerelay header
Control,NLPID
Fragmentaion header
HDLC flag and FCS
:
:
:
:
2
2
2
4
bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
MFR (FRF16) Overhead details:
==============================
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Fragment 1:
Fragmentaion header
Framerelay header
Inner proto
HDLC flag and FCS
:
:
:
:
2
2
2
4
Fragments 2 ...n :
Fragmentaion header
Framerelay header
HDLC flag and FCS
:
:
:
2 bytes
2 bytes
4 bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
Overhead with LFI
MLPPP(Long & short sequence):
============================
Outer PPP header
: 4 bytes
HDLC flag and FCS
: 4 bytes
MLFR (FRF15):
=============
Framerelay header
Control,NLPID
HDLC flag and FCS
:
:
:
2 bytes
2 bytes
4 bytes
The following examples show overhead for different cases:
•
A 1000-byte packet is sent to a mlppp bundle without any fragmentation. At the
Layer 2 level, bytes transmitted is 1013 in 1 packet. This overhead is for MLPPP long
sequence encap.
•
A 1000-byte packet is sent to a mlppp bundle with a fragment threshold of
250byte. At the Layer 2 level, bytes transmitted is 1061 bytes in 5 packets.
•
A 1000-byte LFI packet is sent to an mlppp bundle. At the Layer 2 level, bytes
transmitted is 1008 in 1 packet.
remaining-traffic—(Optional) Display the queuing statistics of all logical interfaces that
do not have traffic-control profiles configured. (Not on the QFX Series.)
Additional Information
For rate-limited interfaces hosted on Modular Interface Cards (MICs), Modular Port
Concentrators (MPCs), or Enhanced Queuing DPCs, rate-limit packet-drop operations
occur before packets are queued for transmission scheduling. For such interfaces, the
statistics for queued traffic do not include the packets that have already been dropped
due to rate limiting, and consequently the displayed statistics for queued traffic are the
same as the displayed statistics for transmitted traffic.
NOTE: For rate-limited interfaces hosted on other types of hardware,
rate-limit packet-drop operations occur after packets are queued for
transmission scheduling. For these other interface types, the statistics for
queued traffic include the packets that are later dropped due to rate limiting,
and consequently the displayed statistics for queued traffic equals the sum
of the statistics for transmitted and rate-limited traffic.
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Chapter 7: Operational Commands
On M Series routers (except for the M320 and M120 routers), this command is valid only
for a PIC installed on an enhanced Flexible PIC Concentrator (FPC).
Queue statistics for aggregated interfaces are supported on the M Series and T Series
routers only. Statistics for an aggregated interface are the summation of the queue
statistics of the child links of that aggregated interface. You can view the statistics for a
child interface by using the show interfaces statistics command for that child interface.
When you configure tricolor marking on a 10-port 1-Gigabit Ethernet PIC, for queues 6
and 7 only, the output does not display the number of queued bytes and packets, or the
number of bytes and packets dropped because of RED. If you do not configure tricolor
marking on the interface, these statistics are available for all queues.
For the 4-port Channelized OC12 IQE PIC and 1-port Channelized OC48 IQE PIC, the
Packet Forwarding Engine Chassis Queues field represents traffic bound for a particular
physical interface on the PIC. For all other PICs, the Packet Forwarding Engine Chassis
Queues field represents the total traffic bound for the PIC.
For Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PICs, the show interfaces queue command output does not
display the number of tail-dropped packets. This limitation does not apply to Packet
Forwarding Engine chassis queues.
When fragmentation occurs on the egress interface, the first set of packet counters shows
the postfragmentation values. The second set of packet counters (under the Packet
Forwarding Engine Chassis Queues field) shows the prefragmentation values.
The behavior of the egress queues for the Routing Engine-Generated Traffic is not same
as the configured queue for MLPPP and MFR configurations.
For information about how to configure CoS, see the Junos OS Network Interfaces Library
for Routing Devices. For related CoS operational mode commands, see the CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
view
List of Sample Output
show interfaces queue (Rate-Limited Interface on a Gigabit Ethernet MIC in an
MPC) on page 230
show interfaces queue (Aggregated Ethernet on a T320 Router) on page 231
show interfaces queue (Gigabit Ethernet on a T640 Router) on page 233
show interfaces queue aggregate (Gigabit Ethernet Enhanced DPC) on page 233
show interfaces queue (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PIC) on page 237
show interfaces queue both-ingress-egress (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PIC) on page 240
show interfaces queue ingress (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PIC) on page 242
show interfaces queue egress (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PIC) on page 243
show interfaces queue remaining-traffic (Gigabit Ethernet Enhanced DPC) on page 245
show interfaces queue (Channelized OC12 IQE Type 3 PIC in SONET Mode) on page 247
show interfaces queue (QFX Series) on page 257
show interfaces queue l2-statistics (lsq interface) on page 258
show interfaces queue lsq (lsq-ifd) on page 259
Output Fields
Table 12 on page 226 lists the output fields for the show interfaces queue command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
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Table 12: show interfaces queue Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Physical interface
Name of the physical interface.
Enabled
State of the interface. Possible values are described in the “Enabled Field” section under “Common
Output Fields Description” on page 115.
Interface index
Physical interface's index number, which reflects its initialization sequence.
SNMP ifIndex
SNMP index number for the interface.
Forwarding classes
supported
Total number of forwarding classes supported on the specified interface.
Forwarding classes in
use
Total number of forwarding classes in use on the specified interface.
Ingress queues
supported
On Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PICs only, total number of ingress queues supported on the specified interface.
Ingress queues in use
On Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PICs only, total number of ingress queues in use on the specified interface.
Output queues
supported
Total number of output queues supported on the specified interface.
Output queues in use
Total number of output queues in use on the specified interface.
Egress queues
supported
Total number of egress queues supported on the specified interface.
Egress queues in use
Total number of egress queues in use on the specified interface.
Queue counters
(Ingress)
CoS queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name. Displayed on IQ2
interfaces.
Burst size
•
Queued packets—Number of queued packets.
•
Transmitted packets—Number of transmitted packets.
•
Dropped packets—Number of packets dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
(Logical interfaces on IQ PICs only) Maximum number of bytes up to which the logical interface can
burst. The burst size is based on the shaping rate applied to the interface.
The following output fields are applicable to both interface component and Packet Forwarding component in the show interfaces
queue command:
Queue
Queue number.
Forwarding classes
Forwarding class name.
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Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Table 12: show interfaces queue Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Queued Packets
Number of packets queued to this queue.
NOTE: For Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 interfaces, the Queued Packets count is calculated by the Junos OS
interpreting one frame buffer as one packet. If the queued packets are very large or very small, the
calculation might not be completely accurate for transit traffic. The count is completely accurate for
traffic terminated on the router.
For rate-limited interfaces hosted on MICs or MPCs only, this statistic does not include traffic dropped
due to rate limiting. For more information, see “Additional Information” on page 224.
Queued Bytes
Number of bytes queued to this queue. The byte counts vary by interface hardware. For more
information, see Table 13 on page 229.
For rate-limited interfaces hosted on MICs or MPCs only, this statistic does not include traffic dropped
due to rate limiting. For more information, see “Additional Information” on page 224.
Transmitted Packets
Number of packets transmitted by this queue. When fragmentation occurs on the egress interface,
the first set of packet counters shows the postfragmentation values. The second set of packet counters
(displayed under the Packet Forwarding Engine Chassis Queues field) shows the prefragmentation
values.
NOTE: For Layer 2 statistics, see “Overhead for Layer 2 Statistics” on page 222
Transmitted Bytes
Number of bytes transmitted by this queue. The byte counts vary by interface hardware. For more
information, see Table 13 on page 229.
NOTE: On MX Series routers, this number can be inaccurate when you issue the command for a
physical interface repeatedly and in quick succession, because the statistics for the child nodes are
collected infrequently. Wait ten seconds between successive iterations to avoid this situation.
NOTE: For Layer 2 statistics, see “Overhead for Layer 2 Statistics” on page 222
Tail-dropped packets
Number of packets dropped because of tail drop.
RL-dropped packets
Number of packets dropped due to rate limiting.
For rate-limited interfaces hosted on MICs, MPCs, and Enhanced Queuing DPCs only, this statistic
is not included in the queued traffic statistics. For more information, see “Additional Information” on
page 224.
NOTE: The RL-dropped packets counter is not supported on the PTX Series Packet Transport Routers,
and is omitted from the output.
RL-dropped bytes
Number of bytes dropped due to rate limiting.
For rate-limited interfaces hosted on MICs, MPCs, and Enhanced Queuing DPCs only, this statistic
is not included in the queued traffic statistics. For more information, see “Additional Information” on
page 224.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Table 12: show interfaces queue Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
RED-dropped packets
Number of packets dropped because of random early detection (RED).
•
•
(M Series and T Series routers only) On M320 and M120 routers and the T Series routers, the total
number of dropped packets is displayed. On all other M Series routers, the output classifies dropped
packets into the following categories:
•
Low, non-TCP—Number of low-loss priority non-TCP packets dropped because of RED.
•
Low, TCP—Number of low-loss priority TCP packets dropped because of RED.
•
High, non-TCP—Number of high-loss priority non-TCP packets dropped because of RED.
•
High, TCP—Number of high-loss priority TCP packets dropped because of RED.
(MX Series routers with enhanced DPCs, and T Series routers with enhanced FPCs only) The output
classifies dropped packets into the following categories:
•
Low—Number of low-loss priority packets dropped because of RED.
•
Medium-low—Number of medium-low loss priority packets dropped because of RED.
•
Medium-high—Number of medium-high loss priority packets dropped because of RED.
•
High—Number of high-loss priority packets dropped because of RED.
NOTE: Due to accounting space limitations on certain Type 3 FPCs (which are supported in M320
and T640 routers), this field does not always display the correct value for queue 6 or queue 7 for
interfaces on 10-port 1-Gigabit Ethernet PICs.
RED-dropped bytes
Number of bytes dropped because of RED. The byte counts vary by interface hardware. For more
information, see Table 13 on page 229.
•
(M Series and T Series routers only) On M320 and M120 routers and the T Series routers, only the
total number of dropped bytes is displayed. On all other M Series routers, the output classifies
dropped bytes into the following categories:
•
Low, non-TCP—Number of low-loss priority non-TCP bytes dropped because of RED.
•
Low, TCP—Number of low-loss priority TCP bytes dropped because of RED.
•
High, non-TCP—Number of high-loss priority non-TCP bytes dropped because of RED.
•
High, TCP—Number of high-loss priority TCP bytes dropped because of RED.
NOTE: Due to accounting space limitations on certain Type 3 FPCs (which are supported in M320
and T640 routers), this field does not always display the correct value for queue 6 or queue 7 for
interfaces on 10-port 1-Gigabit Ethernet PICs.
Byte counts vary by interface hardware. Table 13 on page 229 shows how the byte counts
on the outbound interfaces vary depending on the interface hardware. Table 13 on page 229
is based on the assumption that outbound interfaces are sending IP traffic with 478 bytes
per packet.
228
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Table 13: Byte Count by Interface Hardware
Interface
Hardware
Output
Level
Gigabit
Ethernet IQ
and IQE PICs
Interface
Byte Count Includes
Comments
Queued: 490 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes of
Layer 3 packet + 12 bytes
The 12 additional bytes
include 6 bytes for the
destination MAC address +
4 bytes for the VLAN +
2 bytes for the Ethernet type.
Transmitted: 490 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes
of Layer 3 packet + 12 bytes
Packet
forwarding
component
RED dropped: 496 bytes per packet representing 478 bytes
of Layer 3 packet + 18 bytes
For RED dropped, 6 bytes are
added for the source MAC
address.
Queued: 478 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes of Layer
3 packet
–
Transmitted: 478 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes
of Layer 3 packet
Non-IQ PIC
Interface
T Series, TX Series, T1600, and MX Series routers:
•
Queued: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet.
•
Transmitted: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet.
The Layer 2 overhead is 14
bytes for non-VLAN traffic
and 18 bytes for VLAN traffic.
T4000 routers with Type 5 FPCs :
•
Queued: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet + the full Layer 2
overhead including 4 bytes CRC + the full Layer 1 overhead
8 bytes preamble + 12 bytes Inter frame Gap.
•
Transmitted: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet + the full Layer
2 overhead including 4 bytes CRC + the full Layer 1 overhead
8 bytes preamble + 12 bytes Interframe Gap.
M Series routers:
•
Queued: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet.
•
Transmitted: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet + the full Layer
2 overhead.
PTX Series Packet Transport Routers:
•
Queued: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet + the full Layer 2
overhead including 4 bytes FCS + the full Layer 1 overhead
of the MAC header DA + SA + EtherType (non-VLAN).
•
Transmitted: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet + the full Layer
2 overhead including 4 bytes CRC + the full Layer 1 overhead
of the MAC header DA + SA + EtherType (non-VLAN).
•
RED dropped: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet + 22 bytes
special header. To the TQ, this packet has 4 bytes more
than queued or transmitted.
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Table 13: Byte Count by Interface Hardware (continued)
Interface
Hardware
Output
Level
IQ and IQE
PICs with a
SONET/SDH
interface
Interface
Byte Count Includes
Comments
Queued: 482 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes of Layer
3 packet + 4 bytes
The additional 4 bytes are for
the Layer 2 Point-to-Point
Protocol (PPP) header.
Transmitted: 482 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes
of Layer 3 packet + 4 bytes
RED dropped: 482 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes
of Layer 3 packet + 4 bytes
Packet
forwarding
component
Queued: 478 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes of Layer
3 packet
Transmitted: 486 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes
of Layer 3 packet + 8 bytes
Non-IQ PIC
with a
SONET/SDH
interface
Interface
T Series, TX Series, T1600, and MX Series routers:
•
Queued: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet.
•
Transmitted: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet.
For transmitted packets, the
additional 8 bytes includes 4
bytes for the PPP header and
4 bytes for a cookie.
For transmitted packets, the
additional 5 bytes includes 4
bytes for the PPP header and
1 byte for the packet loss
priority (PLP).
M Series routers:
•
Queued: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet.
•
Transmitted: 483 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes
of Layer 3 packet + 5 bytes
•
RED dropped: 478 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes
of Layer 3 packet
Interfaces
configured with
Frame Relay
Encapsulation
Interface
The default Frame Relay overhead is 7 bytes. If you configure
the Frame Check Sequence (FCS) to 4 bytes, then the
overhead increases to 10 bytes.
1-port
10-Gigabit
Ethernet IQ2
and IQ2–E PICs
Interface
Queued: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet + the full Layer 2
overhead including CRC.
4-port 1G IQ2
and IQ2-E PICs
8-port 1G IQ2
and IQ2-E PICs
The Layer 2 overhead is 18
bytes for non-VLAN traffic
and 22 bytes for VLAN traffic.
Transmitted: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet + the full Layer 2
overhead including CRC.
Packet
forwarding
component
Queued: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet.
–
Transmitted: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet.
Sample Output
show interfaces queue (Rate-Limited Interface on a Gigabit Ethernet MIC in an MPC)
The following example shows queue information for the rate-limited interface ge-4/2/0
on a Gigabit Ethernet MIC in an MPC. For rate-limited queues for interfaces hosted on
MICs or MPCs, rate-limit packet drops occur prior to packet output queuing. In the
230
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
command output, the nonzero statistics displayed in the RL-dropped packets and
RL-dropped bytes fields quantify the traffic dropped to rate-limit queue 0 output to
10 percent of 1 gigabyte (100 megabits) per second. Because the RL-dropped traffic
is not included in the Queued statistics, the statistics displayed for queued traffic are the
same as the statistics for transmitted traffic.
user@host> show interfaces queue ge-4/2/0
Physical interface: ge-4/2/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 203, SNMP ifIndex: 1054
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in use
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
131300649
Bytes
:
11287964840
Transmitted:
Packets
:
131300649
Bytes
:
11287964840
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RL-dropped packets
:
205050862
RL-dropped bytes
:
13595326612
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
141751 pps
99793248 bps
141751
99793248
0
602295
327648832
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
show interfaces queue (Aggregated Ethernet on a T320 Router)
The following example shows that the aggregated Ethernet interface, ae1, has traffic on
queues af1 and af12:
user@host> show interfaces queue ae1
Physical interface: ae1, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 158, SNMP ifIndex: 33 Forwarding classes: 8 supported, 8 in use
Output queues: 8 supported, 8 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: be
Queued:
Packets
:
5
0 pps
Bytes
:
242
0 bps
Transmitted:
Packets
:
5
0 pps
Bytes
:
242
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: af1
Queued:
Packets
:
42603765
595484 pps
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231
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets :
RED-dropped packets :
RED-dropped bytes
:
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes:
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets :
RED-dropped packets :
RED-dropped bytes
:
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes:
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets :
RED-dropped packets :
RED-dropped bytes
:
Queue: 4, Forwarding classes:
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets :
RED-dropped packets :
RED-dropped bytes
:
Queue: 5, Forwarding classes:
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets :
RED-dropped packets :
RED-dropped bytes
:
Queue: 6, Forwarding classes:
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets :
RED-dropped packets :
RED-dropped bytes
:
Queue: 7, Forwarding classes:
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
232
5453281920
609776496 bps
42603765
5453281920
0
0
0
595484
609776496
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
ef1
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
nc
45
3930
0 pps
0 bps
45
3930
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
af11
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
ef11
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
af12
31296413
4005940864
437436 pps
447935200 bps
31296413
4005940864
0
0
0
437436
447935200
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
nc2
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Transmitted:
Packets
Bytes
Tail-dropped packets
RED-dropped packets
RED-dropped bytes
:
:
:
:
:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
show interfaces queue (Gigabit Ethernet on a T640 Router)
user@host> show interfaces queue
Physical interface: ge-7/0/1, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 150, SNMP ifIndex: 42
Forwarding classes: 8 supported, 8 in use
Output queues: 8 supported, 8 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: be
Queued:
Packets
:
13
Bytes
:
622
Transmitted:
Packets
:
13
Bytes
:
622
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: af1
Queued:
Packets
:
1725947945
Bytes
:
220921336960
Transmitted:
Packets
:
1725947945
Bytes
:
220921336960
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: ef1
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: nc
Queued:
Packets
:
571
Bytes
:
49318
Transmitted:
Packets
:
571
Bytes
:
49318
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
372178 pps
381110432 bps
372178
381110432
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0 pps
336 bps
0
336
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
show interfaces queue aggregate (Gigabit Ethernet Enhanced DPC)
user@host> show interfaces queue ge-2/2/9 aggregate
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
233
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Physical interface: ge-2/2/9, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 238, SNMP ifIndex: 71
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in use
Ingress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
148450735
Bytes
:
8016344944
Transmitted:
Packets
:
76397439
Bytes
:
4125461868
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
72053285
Low
:
72053285
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
3890877444
Low
:
3890877444
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
410278257
Bytes
:
22156199518
Transmitted:
Packets
:
4850003
Bytes
:
261900162
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
405425693
Low
:
405425693
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
21892988124
Low
:
21892988124
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
0
234
947295 pps
409228848 bps
487512 pps
210602376 bps
459783
459783
0
0
0
198626472
198626472
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
473940 pps
204742296 bps
4033 pps
1742256 bps
469907
469907
0
0
0
203000040
203000040
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in use
Egress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
76605230
Bytes
:
5209211400
Transmitted:
Packets
:
76444631
Bytes
:
5198235612
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
160475
Low
:
160475
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
10912300
Low
:
10912300
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
4836136
Bytes
:
333402032
Transmitted:
Packets
:
3600866
Bytes
:
244858888
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
485376 pps
264044560 bps
484336 pps
263478800 bps
1040
1040
0
0
0
565760
565760
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
3912 pps
2139056 bps
1459 pps
793696 bps
235
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
RED-dropped packets :
1225034
Low
:
1225034
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
83302312
Low
:
83302312
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
2450
2450
0
0
0
1333072
1333072
0
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Packet Forwarding Engine Chassis Queues:
Queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
77059796
Bytes
:
3544750624
Transmitted:
Packets
:
77059797
Bytes
:
3544750670
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
236
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
486384 pps
178989576 bps
486381
178988248
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
4846580
Bytes
:
222942680
Transmitted:
Packets
:
4846580
Bytes
:
222942680
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
3934 pps
1447768 bps
3934
1447768
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
show interfaces queue (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PIC)
user@host> show interfaces queue ge-7/1/3
Physical interface: ge-7/1/3, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 170, SNMP ifIndex: 70 Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in
use Ingress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
418390039
10 pps
Bytes
:
38910269752
7440 bps
Transmitted:
Packets
:
418390039
10 pps
Bytes
:
38910269752
7440 bps
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
237
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
7055
1 pps
Bytes
:
451552
512 bps
Transmitted:
Packets
:
7055
1 pps
Bytes
:
451552
512 bps
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in use Egress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
1031
0 pps
Bytes
:
143292
0 bps
Transmitted:
Packets
:
1031
0 pps
Bytes
:
143292
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RL-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
RL-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
RED-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RL-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
RL-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
RED-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
238
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RL-dropped packets
:
0
RL-dropped bytes
:
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
77009
Bytes
:
6894286
Transmitted:
Packets
:
77009
Bytes
:
6894286
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RL-dropped packets
:
0
RL-dropped bytes
:
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Packet Forwarding Engine Chassis Queues:
Queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
1031
Bytes
:
147328
Transmitted:
Packets
:
1031
Bytes
:
147328
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low, non-TCP
:
0
Low, TCP
:
0
High, non-TCP
:
0
High, TCP
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low, non-TCP
:
0
Low, TCP
:
0
High, non-TCP
:
0
High, TCP
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low, non-TCP
:
0
Low, TCP
:
0
High, non-TCP
:
0
High, TCP
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low, non-TCP
:
0
Low, TCP
:
0
High, non-TCP
:
0
High, TCP
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
bps
11 pps
7888 bps
11 pps
7888 bps
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
239
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low, non-TCP
:
0
Low, TCP
:
0
High, non-TCP
:
0
High, TCP
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low, non-TCP
:
0
Low, TCP
:
0
High, non-TCP
:
0
High, TCP
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
94386
Bytes
:
13756799
Transmitted:
Packets
:
94386
Bytes
:
13756799
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low, non-TCP
:
0
Low, TCP
:
0
High, non-TCP
:
0
High, TCP
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low, non-TCP
:
0
Low, TCP
:
0
High, non-TCP
:
0
High, TCP
:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
12 pps
9568 bps
12
9568
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
show interfaces queue both-ingress-egress (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PIC)
user@host> show interfaces queue ge-6/2/0 both-ingress-egress
Physical interface: ge-6/2/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 175, SNMP ifIndex: 121
Forwarding classes: 8 supported, 4 in use
Ingress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
254
Bytes
:
16274
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
240
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Forwarding classes: 8 supported, 4 in use
Egress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
3
Bytes
:
126
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
241
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Packet Forwarding Engine Chassis Queues:
Queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
80564692
Bytes
:
3383717100
Transmitted:
Packets
:
80564692
Bytes
:
3383717100
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
80564685
Bytes
:
3383716770
Transmitted:
Packets
:
80564685
Bytes
:
3383716770
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
9397
Bytes
:
3809052
Transmitted:
Packets
:
9397
Bytes
:
3809052
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0 pps
232 bps
0
232
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
show interfaces queue ingress (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PIC)
user@host> show interfaces queue ge-6/2/0 ingress
Physical interface: ge-6/2/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 175, SNMP ifIndex: 121
Forwarding classes: 8 supported, 4 in use
Ingress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
288
Bytes
:
18450
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
242
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
show interfaces queue egress (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PIC)
user@host> show interfaces queue ge-6/2/0 egress
Physical interface: ge-6/2/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 175, SNMP ifIndex: 121
Forwarding classes: 8 supported, 4 in use
Egress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
3
Bytes
:
126
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
243
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Packet Forwarding Engine Chassis Queues:
Queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
80564692
Bytes
:
3383717100
Transmitted:
Packets
:
80564692
Bytes
:
3383717100
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
80564685
Bytes
:
3383716770
Transmitted:
Packets
:
80564685
Bytes
:
3383716770
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
9538
Bytes
:
3819840
Transmitted:
Packets
:
9538
Bytes
:
3819840
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
244
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
show interfaces queue remaining-traffic (Gigabit Ethernet Enhanced DPC)
user@host> show interfaces queue ge-2/2/9 remaining-traffic
Physical interface: ge-2/2/9, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 238, SNMP ifIndex: 71
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in use
Ingress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
110208969
Bytes
:
5951284434
Transmitted:
Packets
:
110208969
Bytes
:
5951284434
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
472875 pps
204282000 bps
472875 pps
204282000 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
245
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
High
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in use
Egress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
109355853
Bytes
:
7436199152
Transmitted:
Packets
:
109355852
Bytes
:
7436198640
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
246
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
471736 pps
256627968 bps
471736 pps
256627968 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
Low
:
Medium-low
:
Medium-high
:
High
:
RED-dropped bytes
:
Low
:
Medium-low
:
Medium-high
:
High
:
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
Low
:
Medium-low
:
Medium-high
:
High
:
RED-dropped bytes
:
Low
:
Medium-low
:
Medium-high
:
High
:
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
show interfaces queue (Channelized OC12 IQE Type 3 PIC in SONET Mode)
user@host> show interfaces queue t3-1/1/0:7
Physical interface: t3-1/1/0:7, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 192, SNMP ifIndex: 1948
Description: full T3 interface connect to 6ce13 t3-3/1/0:7 for FR testing Lam
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 9 in use
Egress queues: 8 supported, 8 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: DEFAULT
Queued:
Packets
:
214886
13449 pps
Bytes
:
9884756
5164536 bps
Packets
:
214886
13449 pps
Bytes
:
9884756
5164536 bps
Transmitted:
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
247
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: REALTIME
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: PRIVATE
248
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: CONTROL
Queued:
Packets
:
60
0 pps
Bytes
:
4560
0 bps
Packets
:
60
0 pps
Bytes
:
4560
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
249
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Queue: 4, Forwarding classes: CLASS_B_OUTPUT
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 5, Forwarding classes: CLASS_C_OUTPUT
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
Transmitted:
250
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 6, Forwarding classes: CLASS_V_OUTPUT
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 7, Forwarding classes: CLASS_S_OUTPUT, GETS
Queued:
Packets
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
:
0
0 pps
251
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Packet Forwarding Engine Chassis Queues:
Queues: 8 supported, 8 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: DEFAULT
Queued:
Packets
:
371365
23620 pps
Bytes
:
15597330
7936368 bps
Packets
:
371365
23620 pps
Bytes
:
15597330
7936368 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
Transmitted:
252
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: REALTIME
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: PRIVATE
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
253
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: CONTROL
Queued:
Packets
:
32843
0 pps
Bytes
:
2641754
56 bps
Packets
:
32843
0 pps
Bytes
:
2641754
56 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 4, Forwarding classes: CLASS_B_OUTPUT
254
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 5, Forwarding classes: CLASS_C_OUTPUT
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
255
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Queue: 6, Forwarding classes: CLASS_V_OUTPUT
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 7, Forwarding classes: CLASS_S_OUTPUT, GETS
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
Transmitted:
256
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
RED-dropped bytes
show interfaces queue (QFX Series)
user@switch> show interfaces queue xe-0/0/15
Physical interface: xe-0/0/15, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 49165, SNMP ifIndex: 539
Forwarding classes: 12 supported, 8 in use
Egress queues: 12 supported, 8 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
Total-dropped packets:
0
Total-dropped bytes :
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: fcoe
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
Total-dropped packets:
0
Total-dropped bytes :
0
0 bps
Queue: 4, Forwarding classes: no-loss
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
Total-dropped packets:
0
Total-dropped bytes :
0
Queue: 7, Forwarding classes: network-control
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
257
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
Total-dropped packets:
Total-dropped bytes :
Queue: 8, Forwarding classes: mcast
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
Total-dropped packets:
Total-dropped bytes :
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
show interfaces queue l2-statistics (lsq interface)
user@switch> show interfaces queue lsq-2/2/0.2 l2-statistics
Logical interface lsq-2/2/0.2 (Index 69) (SNMP ifIndex 1598)
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in use
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Burst size: 0
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: be
Queued:
Packets
:
1
Bytes
:
1001
Transmitted:
Packets
:
5
Bytes
:
1062
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: ef
Queued:
Packets
:
1
Bytes
:
1500
Transmitted:
Packets
:
6
Bytes
:
1573
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: af
Queued:
Packets
:
1
Bytes
:
512
Transmitted:
Packets
:
3
Bytes
:
549
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: nc
Queued:
Packets
:
0
258
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0
0
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0
0
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0
0
0
0
0 pps
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Operational Commands
Bytes
Transmitted:
Packets
Bytes
Tail-dropped packets
RED-dropped packets
RED-dropped bytes
=========
:
0
0 bps
:
:
:
:
:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
show interfaces queue lsq (lsq-ifd)
user@switch> show interfaces queue lsq-1/0/0
Logical interface lsq-1/0/0 (Index 348) (SNMP ifIndex 660)
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in use
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Burst size: 0
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: be
Queued:
Packets
:
55576
Bytes
:
29622008
Transmitted:
Packets
:
55576
Bytes
:
29622008
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RL-dropped packets
:
0
RL-dropped bytes
:
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: ef
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RL-dropped packets
:
0
RL-dropped bytes
:
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: af
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
1206 pps
5145472 bps
1206
5145472
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
259
Interfaces Feature Guide for EX9200 Switches
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets :
RL-dropped packets
:
RL-dropped bytes
:
RED-dropped packets :
Low
:
Medium-low
:
Medium-high
:
High
:
RED-dropped bytes
:
Low
:
Medium-low
:
Medium-high
:
High
:
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: nc
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets :
RL-dropped packets
:
RL-dropped bytes
:
RED-dropped packets :
Low
:
Medium-low
:
Medium-high
:
High
:
RED-dropped bytes
:
Low
:
Medium-low
:
Medium-high
:
High
:
260
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
22231
11849123
482 pps
2057600 bps
22231
11849123
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
482
2057600
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
Copyright © 2015, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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