M-Audio | 37-Key Audio/MIDI Interface and Controller Ozonic | Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M

Hardware options for Pro
Tools LE and M-Powered
systems
Pro Tools LE software requires you to connect a suitable Digidesign hardware
interface to your computer before it will run. Digidesign hardware for LE
systems includes the Digi 001, the Mbox, the Mbox 2, the Digi 002, and the
Digi 002R. The Command|8 hardware controller also works with LE systems.
The Mboxes are very affordable and ideal for use with laptops – but only offer
two channels of analogue and two channels of digital input and output. The
Digi 002R is more expensive but supports multi-channel operation. The Digi
002 incorporates a hardware control surface along with the same interfacing
features as the Digi 002R. The Command|8 is similar to the Digi 002R,
incorporating a MIDI interface and basic audio monitoring, but without the
multi-channel audio input and output interface capabilities.
Let’s take a look at the discontinued Digi 001 first, as this was the first serious
multi-port interface for Pro Tools LE systems, and there may still be some of
these in use today.
Figure A4.1
Digi 001 (no longer
manufactured).
APPENDIX 4
Digi 001
The Digi 001 system includes a PCI card that you install in your computer; an
I/O interface with a range of input and output connectors; and the Pro Tools
LE software. The PCI card has a connector to link to the Digi 001 interface and
also has a pair of ADAT optical connectors for multi-channel digital input and
output (I/O). Each optical connector can carry eight channels of 24-bit digital
audio or can be switched using the software for use as an additional twochannel S/PDIF interface.
The I/O interface provides eight analogue audio inputs and outputs with
24-bit converters, S/PDIF digital audio input and output, a stereo headphone
jack socket, a footswitch jack socket and a pair of MIDI In and Out sockets. The
total number of audio inputs and outputs is 18 – counting the eight ADAT digital
channels, the two S/PDIF digital channels, and the eight analogue channels.
The MIDI in and out connectors let you use the Digi 001 as a basic 16-channel
MIDI interface for Mac or PC. The headphone jack socket lets you connect a
pair of stereo headphones to monitor whatever audio you have routed to
analogue outputs 1 and 2 using the PT LE software. The footswitch jack lets
you connect a footswitch to control the QuickPunch and MIDI punch-in and
punch-out recording features.
The 001’s microphone pre-amps will accept a wide range of microphone
types, including high-quality ‘condenser’ models that require ‘phantom’ power.
Dynamic microphones (such as the popular Shure SM58) don’t need power,
but professional studio models (such as the AKG C414) need 48 volts that the
pre-amplifier can send via the microphone cables into the microphone, rather
than via separate power cables – hence the name ‘phantom’ power.
Figure A4.2
Digi 001 front panel.
The pair of analogue audio inputs provided on the front panel of the interface
can accept either Mic-level or Line-level signals. The input sockets are
combined XLR and 1/4” jack types, so you can plug either of these commonly
used connectors into the Digi 001. The ‘pad’ switches provided for each input
reduce the input sensitivity by 26 dB when you want to use line-level signals
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
instead of microphones. The phantom power switches are labeled ‘48V’,
which is the voltage supplied to power the microphones. A pair of Input Gain
controls is also provided. Gain controls for the line inputs, 3–8 on the back
of the Digi 001 interface, are provided in software so you can use these with
mixers, preamps, keyboards, or other line-level sources.
Figure A4.3
Digi 001 rear panel.
A pair of Monitor Outputs is provided on the back panel. These carry the same
audio signals that are routed to analogue outputs 1 and 2. The difference is that
they are intended to let you listen to your main mix by hooking up a pair of
powered speakers or a stereo power amplifier and speakers. A Monitor Volume
control is provided on the front panel of the Digi 001 interface to control the
listening level.
The Main Analogue outputs, 1 and 2, can be used to connect to a tape recorder
when you are mixing down, although they may be connected to an external
mixer. These outputs are balanced, +4 dBu line level. Analog Outputs 3–8 are
unbalanced, –10 dBu line level, and can be used as sends to outboard gear or
as outputs to an external mixer.
Another option for mixdown is to connect the S/PDIF outputs to a DAT or other
digital recorder. By default, whatever is routed to outputs 1 and 2 is also sent
to the S/PDIF outputs. You can disable this S/PDIF ‘mirroring’ (as it is referred
to in the manual) so that you can use the S/PDIF connections to hook up an
external digital effects unit, for example.
Low Latency Monitoring on the Digi 001
The Digi 001 supports Pro Tools LE’s special Low Latency Monitoring feature.
This lets you record and monitor the eight analogue and eight ADAT digital
inputs directly via outputs 1 and 2 with very low latency. When you select Low
Latency Monitoring from Pro Tools LE’s Operations menu, the audio entering
the hardware interface is not passed through the host computer’s processor –
it is routed directly to the main outputs instead.
There is a slight amount of latency involved here due to the A/D and D/A
conversions and the internal routing within the hardware. From the information
I was able to gather, the total delay is roughly 164 samples. This may not sound
APPENDIX 4
that low, but it’s a lot better than the 1024 samples that would have been in
there had the Low Latency feature not been implemented.
There are some limitations with this method – any plug-ins and sends assigned
to record-enabled tracks will be bypassed, for example – but at least you can
get around the problem reasonably well.
One particular situation always requires a workaround. If you are using a
plug-in to create a metronome click, you are going to lose your click in Low
Latency mode.
One solution is to use an external MIDI device such as a drum machine to play
the click. Another, partial, solution is to bus the output of the track containing
the plug-in to an Audio track and record this to your hard disk first. Then you
can dispense with the plug-in track and simply replay the audio click track.
The problem with this, of course, is that you lose the ability to hear the click
during count-off bars. If your session starts at Bar 1, Beat 1, for example, this
can make it practically impossible to cue a musician to overdub starting at
Bar 1, Beat 1.
A solution here is to make sure that you leave one or more bars empty at the
start of your session so that you can record the click as audio into these ‘startup’
bars and use this to cue the musicians.
Monitoring Latency and MIDI
To monitor a MIDI device through the audio inputs on the Digi 001, you need
to route each input to a track and record-enable that track before you will hear
any output. This is another reason why it is useful to use a separate external
mixer with the Digi 001 – so you can always hear your synths, drum-machines,
and samplers without setting up routings in the Pro Tools software.
Also, when you are monitoring the audio coming into the Digi 001 from an
external synthesizer, what you hear will have an audio delay equivalent to the
number of samples specified in your Hardware Buffer settings – the latency
delay. This delay will be very apparent if you have existing audio tracks, as
these will be heard first and the MIDI devices will be heard a little later. If
you don’t have an external mixer you will have to accept this latency while
recording MIDI.
But there is a way around this for playback – use the Global MIDI Playback
Offset feature in Pro Tools LE’ s MIDI Preferences to trigger your MIDI data
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
early to compensate for the latency. This offset is made in such a way that it
just affects the playback – not the way the MIDI data is displayed in the Edit
window. You are given the choice of offsetting the MIDI tracks either globally
(all by the same amount) or individually. To compensate for audio monitoring
latency you will need to enter a negative offset that causes the MIDI data to
be played back earlier by a number of samples equivalent to the latency in
samples. The best way to work out which latency value to use is to record
the audio from your MIDI device into Pro Tools then simply look at the exact
position in samples where the audio starts compared to where the MIDI note is
placed. This way you can read off the delay between these exactly in samples.
TIP
You can also set up Individual MIDI Track Offsets in Pro Tools LE. This
can be useful when you want to compensate for the time it takes for a
particular synth or sampler to respond to an incoming MIDI message.
This can amount to several milliseconds, and this can be enough to make
supposedly simultaneous percussive instruments sound like they are
‘flamming’. This is typically the case with a snare drum sample played from
Pro Tools as audio that you want to combine with another snare sample
played from an external MIDI sampler. The solution here is to offset the
individual MIDI track in Pro Tools to compensate for the delay in the MIDI
sampler.
The Digi 002
Resembling a typical small digital mixer, the Digi 002 actually combines the
features of a high-quality audio interface, a MIDI interface, a touch-sensitive
control surface, and a stand-alone digital mixer, all in one unit. Connecting
to your computer through a single FireWire connection, Digi 002 pairs Pro
Tools LE software with a dedicated control surface for hands-on control of the
software.
Audio and MIDI data are passed back and forth between your computer and
the Digi 002 via the FireWire cable along with control information generated
by or returned to the Digi 002 control surface. Any moves you make using the
Pro Tools software on the computer screen will be reflected on the control
surface – and vice versa.
At the push of a button, the Digi 002 unit can be switched into Standalone
mode to become an 8 × 2 digital mixer, complete with two internal and two
external effects sends, EQ, dynamics, effects, reverb, and automation snapshots.
APPENDIX 4
So you can use Pro Tools LE with the Digi 002 to record, edit, process, mix, and
master your projects in your home studio, then put the Digi 002 under your
arm, take it to a gig, and use it as a digital mixer on-stage. Whoopee! It’s your
flexible friend!
The Digi 002 lies somewhere in that grey area between an entry-level product
and a professional product that is sometimes referred to as ‘prosumer’. It is
definitely going to give you better audio quality than an Mbox, for example,
but it is not quite in the same league as Digidesign’s TDM systems that offer
much higher quality converters and analogue electronics and much more
choice when it comes to building systems with many inputs and outputs.
Nevertheless, the Digi 002’s analogue inputs and outputs support all the
most important sample rates that you are likely to encounter, with A/D and
D/A converters allowing sample rates of 44.1, 48, 88.2, or 96 kHz. The co-axial
S/PDIF connectors support up to 24-bit, 96 kHz audio. If you use the optical
connectors in ADAT mode then these can only support the original 44.1
and 48 kHz sample rates that they were designed for. But if you use these in
Optical S/PDIF mode, they will also support the higher sample rates of 88.2
and 96 kHz.
TIP
Don’t forget to select the appropriate I/O format as the Clock Source in
the Hardware Setup dialog when transferring material digitally into Pro
Tools using ADAT or S/PDIF formats.
Rear Panel
The Digi 002 has similar connectors on its rear panel to those on the Digi 002R
(see Figure A4.10).
At the lower right-hand side, there are four Microphone Inputs via balanced,
three-conductor XLR connectors. If you are using condenser microphones that
need to take their power from the microphone cables, you can switch on the
48-volt so-called ‘phantom’ power for inputs 1 & 2 or for inputs 3 & 4 using two
small push-button switches located above. This 48-volt power is then supplied
to the microphone via its own cable.
Also located above the microphone inputs, there are four Line/Instrument
Inputs that use balanced, 1/4-inch TRS jacks for line-level or instrument-level
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
inputs. These Line inputs have operating levels fixed at +4 dBu, which means
that they are suitable for connection to professional audio equipment. To
the left of these there are four more analogue inputs that also use balanced,
1/4-inch TRS jacks for line-level inputs. The operating levels of each of
these inputs can be set to either +4 dBu or–10 dBV to suit consumer audio
equipment, using switches immediately to the right of the input jacks.
NOTE
A –10 dBV input pair marked ‘Alternative Source’ is provided using RCA
connectors so that you can hook up a tape, cassette, or CD player for
playback.
The Digi 002 also has eight analogue audio outputs. The Main (1–2) Output pair
can be connected to a professional tape or DAT machine or other equipment
at +4 dBu operating level using balanced, 1/4-inch TRS jacks.
Analog Outputs 3–8 also use balanced, 1/4-inch TRS jacks at a fixed +4 dBu
operating level – so these are intended for connection to professional audio
equipment such as analogue signal processors (compressors, EQs, reverbs,
and other effects) or to headphone distribution amplifiers for musicians to use.
The Monitor Output pair mirrors the Main (1–2) Output pair and works together
with its front-panel volume control to provide direct connection to a monitor
amplifier or to professional powered speakers at a fixed +4 dBu operating level.
NOTE
A –10 dBV ‘Alternative Main’ unbalanced output pair that mirrors the Main
(1–2) Outputs can be used to provide a direct connection to –10 dBV
devices such as consumer-quality cassette players or to a consumer hi-fi
amplifier or powered speakers if you don’t have professional monitoring
equipment.
At the lower left-hand side you will find a pair of optical connectors for eight
channels of ADAT I/O or two channels of Optical S/PDIF I/O; a pair of RCA
connectors for two channels of S/PDIF digital I/O; and two FireWire ports –
one to connect to your computer and one to let you daisy-chain other FireWire
devices such as digital cameras or camcorders.
APPENDIX 4
To the left of these, there is a footswitch jack that you can use to punch-in
and -out of record and to the right there are three 5-pin DIN MIDI sockets:
one MIDI In, and two MIDI Outs allowing for 16 channels of MIDI input and
32 channels of MIDI output.
Finally, the power connector will accept AC supplies between 100 and 240 volts
running at either 50 or 60 Hz – so you can connect the Digi 002 to the main
electricity supplies in most countries around the world without problems.
The Control Surface
The Digi 002 control surface is divided into two main sections with the input
gain and output level controls at the top and the other controls below.
The main section is further sub-divided to group the control knobs, more
switches, and the ‘scribble strip’ displays in the middle section with the moving
faders below these in the lowest section and the transport controls to the right
of these.
Figure A4.4
Digi 002 control
surface (no longer
manufactured).
Top Section
Let’s look at the top section first. At the top left there are four rotary gain
controls for the four microphone preamplifiers. Above these there are four
pairs of buttons. The first of each pair switches the input between microphone
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
and line level. The second button switches in a high-pass filter (HPF). This filter
removes the lower frequencies that may contain rumble or other unwanted
sounds.
Figure A4.5
Digi 002 top section.
To the right of these there are two small button switches. The first of these
routes the Alternative Source to input pair 7–8. The second routes the
Alternative Source to the monitor outputs. An associated rotary control knob
lets you adjust the output level to the monitors, and adjacent to this a button
switch is provided to let you mute the monitors. There is also a Mono button
that can be very useful when checking audio that will be broadcast (which
may be in mono).
Finally, at the far right of the panel, there is a 1/4” jack socket for headphone
output with an associated volume control knob.
Middle Section
Figure A4.6
Digi 002 middle
section.
Home View
The Digi 002’s default view is called the Home View. The idea here is that you
should always go back to this ‘home’ view after going outside the ‘home’ view
to other views.
Home view is the Console View with the Pan controls displayed on the Rotary
Encoders and the mixer channel names shown in the Channel Scribble Strips.
This makes sense as the default view because the faders control volume and
the rotary encoders control pan and both of these are positioned on the
control surface just where you would expect volume faders and pan controls
to be on a mixer.
APPENDIX 4
Console View Selectors
In the middle section, there is a row of three buttons at the far left to let you
select the Console View. You can use these to choose whether to view the
pans, sends, or inserts in the ‘scribble strips’ located to the right of these.
The default setting is the Pan View in which, when you first launch a Pro Tools
session, the faders control track volume and the rotary encoders control
channel pan positions.
When you switch to Send View, the Channel Scribble Strips show the names of
any currently assigned sends, and the rotary encoders are assigned to control
the send levels.
When you switch to Insert View, the names of any plug-ins currently assigned as
inserts (whether hardware inserts or plug-ins) will appear in the corresponding
Channel Scribble Strips. If you select any of these inserts in the Pro Tools Mix
or Edit windows, its name will flash on and off in the Scribble Strip so that
you know where it is. Select the one you are interested in by pressing the
corresponding Channel Select button on the Digi 002 and the controls will
be shown in the Channel Scribble Strips and assigned to the rotary encoders
ready for you to adjust.
Insert/Send Position Selectors
Pro Tools has five sends and five inserts available for each channel so the Digi
002 needs a way to switch its displays between these. At the far left of the
middle section, underneath the Console View Selectors, you will find a vertical
column of buttons labeled A to F. These are the Insert/Send Position Selectors,
and they are there to let you choose which of the five available send or insert
positions are displayed in Console View.
Channel Scribble Strips
The eight Channel Scribble Strips display channel information such as track
name, or pan, send, or plug-in values. They can also display the fader values in
Decibels (dB).
When you move a fader or a rotary encoder, the scribble strip will temporarily
display the value for that control before returning to the default display. So
with the pan values showing in the scribble strips, if you move a fader, it will
show the fader value while you are moving the fader and for a fraction of
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
a second after you let go of the fader – then it will revert to showing the pan
value.
Display Scribble Strips and Display Mode Switch
To the right of the Channel Scribble Strips, two more ‘scribble strips’ show
additional information – the Display Scribble Strips.
For example, if you have any stereo tracks in your Pro Tools Session, the
Channel Scribble strips will default to displaying the pan values for the left
channels. To view and be able to modify the right channel pan settings, you
have to press the button marked ‘L R Meter’ located to the right of the encoder
displays. Three associated LEDs indicate whether you have selected the left or
right channels for panning, or the left or right Meter. This information is also
shown in the Display Scribble Strips.
By default, the Display Scribble Strips always show the current status of the
Channel Scribble Strips. So, for example, if you hit the Insert View button, it will
say which insert you are viewing, such as Insert A.
If you press the Command switch at the same time as the Display Mode switch,
the channels will display numerical parameter values rather than control
names. For example, in Pan view, when you press Command + Display, fader
volume levels in dB are shown as the default display.
You can also show the Pro Tools main Counter in the Display Scribble Strips by
pressing the Display Mode switch, which is located right between the Display
Scribble Strips and the Channel Scribble Strips. So you can see the Bar:Beat
location or the SMPTE location or whatever the main Counter is set to.
More Buttons and Status Indicators
There are various LEDs and buttons located below the Display Scribble Strips.
Four LEDs indicate the sampling rate: 44.1, 48, 88.2, or 96 kHz.
Three buttons underneath these let you select Enter, Undo, and the Standalone
mode.
Three more LEDs to the right of these indicate MIDI input and output activity.
To the left you will find the Record Enable button. When this is pressed you can
arm any track for record by pressing its Channel Select button on the Digi 002.
APPENDIX 4
Rotary Encoders
Underneath the Channel Scribble Strips you will find eight rotary encoders
that you can use to adjust the pan, send, meter, and plug-in channel settings.
Each rotary encoder has a circle of 15 LEDs above it to indicate data values
controlled by the encoder.
The style of display depends on the type of data. For example, discrete or
stepped information such as pan position or frequency value is shown by
a single LED, while an expanding series of LEDs shows values such as send
levels, gain, or filter bandwidth. The LED rings can also be set to show track
levels by pressing the Encoder/Meter Mode switch to the right of the encoder
area (the button marked ‘L R Meter’). When you set this to Meter mode, the
LED rings show increasing levels in a clockwise manner. When the last red LED
lights, this indicates clipping.
Channel Select
Underneath the rotary encoders you will find a row of eight Channel Select
button switches.
In Pan view, pressing a Channel Select switch selects the corresponding track
in Pro Tools – which is what you would expect it to do.
In Send view, the Channel Select switch toggles the selected send on that
track between pre- and post-fader operation – which is a useful function in
this view.
In Insert View, pressing a Channel Select switch directly under a plug-in name
does something much more radical: it puts Digi 002 into Channel View and
displays the plug-in controls across all the channel strips.
Channel View
Above the Channel Scribble Strips there is a row of eight buttons. The first four
of these are the Channel View Selectors that let you choose between viewing
the EQ, Dynamics, Insert, or Pan/Send settings.
There are two Page buttons to let you page forward or backward when you are
using plug-ins with more controls than will fit on the eight scribble strips. There
is also a Master Bypass button that works with the currently selected plug-in or
with all plug-ins on a channel, depending on the current view. Finally, there is
an Escape button that lets you cancel certain operations, such as the Channel
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
View selections. It also functions as a ‘Cancel’ button for on-screen dialogs in
Pro Tools.
Channel View lets you zoom in on a single track and display all the plug-in
assignments, insert names, or send assignments horizontally, across all the
Channel Scribble Strips. From this view, you can recall and edit parameters for
all the sends on a single track, or all the parameters of a single plug-in.
In Channel View, the LED rings above the rotary encoders indicate values for
the selected control showing plug-in parameters, send levels, insert levels, or
pan values depending on which Channel View switch is lit.
Don’t forget that, just as in Console View, the Digi 002’s faders mirror the Pro
Tools software’s volume faders when in Channel View.
NOTE
Dedicated buttons for EQ and Dynamics are provided because these
are used so often. Any plug-ins can be accessed using the Insert button
(including EQ and Dynamics) but it is more efficient to use the dedicated
buttons for EQ and Dynamics if these are what you want to get to.
TIP
To cycle through all the plug-ins or inserts on a channel, hold the EQ,
Dynamics, or Insert button and repeatedly press the track’s Channel
Select switch.
NOTE
On Digi 002 (and Command|8), when you use Channel View to display the
sends on a single Pro Tools channel, you can only view Sends A-E. To view
Sends F-J, use Console view. Press the Send switch to put Digi 002 (or
Command|8) into Sends view, then hold the Shift/Add switch and press
the corresponding Send Position switch (A=F, B=G, C=H, D=I, E=J).
EQ
When you press the EQ switch, the Channel Select buttons will light up on
any channels that have an EQ plug-in inserted so that you can identify these.
Choose the one you want to work with by pressing its Channel Select button.
APPENDIX 4
Controls for the first EQ plug-in on that track are then assigned to the rotary
encoders and displayed in the Channel Scribble Strips and switched controls,
such as Master Bypass or Phase Invert functions, can be controlled using the
Channel Select switches.
If you have more than one EQ plug-in inserted on a track, you can get to the
second by holding the EQ button and pressing the track’s Channel Select
button. The controls will then be displayed on the Channel Scribble Strips, and
if the first EQ plug-in’s window is open in Pro Tools, the window will switch to
the second EQ plug-in.
Dynamics
When you press the Dynamics switch, the Channel Select buttons will light up
on any channels that have dynamics plug-ins (such as compressors or limiters)
inserted so that you can identify these.
Choose the one you want to work with by pressing its Channel Select button.
Controls for the first Dynamics plug-in on that track are assigned to the rotary
encoders and displayed in the Channel Scribble Strips. Switched controls, such
as Phase Invert or In/Out for EQ bands, can be controlled using the Channel
Select switches below the corresponding Scribble Strips. Again, if you have
more than one Dynamics plug-in inserted on a track, you can get to the
second by holding the Dynamics button and pressing the track’s Channel
Select button.
Inserts
When you press the Inserts switch, the Channel Scribble Strips will show
abbreviated names for any inserts on the track, and the Channel Select buttons
will light up on any channels that have a plug-in (or any hardware I/O) inserted
so that you can identify these.
You should check the Display Scribble Strips at this point to see which of
the five insert slots you are viewing in the Channel Scribble Strips. These are
labeled A to F and you can select which to view using the Insert/Send Position
Selectors at the middle left of the control surface.
You can choose which insert to edit by viewing each of the five insert
slots in turn until you find the insert you are looking for, then pressing the
corresponding illuminated Channel Select button.
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
When you press the Pan/Send switch, Digi 002 identifies channels with sends
assigned to them by illuminating their Channel Select switches. If no sends are
present, no Channel Select switches will be lit. If you do have any sends in your
Pro Tools Session, you can access the controls for any of these by pressing the
corresponding illuminated Channel Select switch.
Channel Scribble Strip 1 and the first rotary encoder show track pan position
for that track. (If the track is a stereo track, you can toggle between left and
right pan by pressing the Encoder Mode switch immediately to the right of the
encoders. This switch is marked ‘L R Meter’ on the Digi 002.)
Channel Scribble Strips 3–7 show the names and their rotary encoders control
the levels for all five sends on that track. (Channel Scribble Strip 2 is inactive.)
In this mode, the Channel Select switches on channels 3–7 toggle pre- and
post-fader metering for the corresponding send.
Multi-mono Plug-ins
When working with a multi-mono plug-in, you can toggle the view between
the left and right sides of the plug-in by holding down the Display switch
when you press the Channel Select switch to select a plug-in from Channel
view. The resulting display shows ‘left’ and ‘right’ in the Scribble Strips, allowing
you to choose between the two sides of the multi-mono plug-in by pressing
the corresponding Channel Select switch.
Lower Section
The lower section contains the faders along with the transport and navigation
controls.
Figure A4.7
Digi 002 lower section.
APPENDIX 4
Faders
The fader section consists of eight identical channel strips, each with a
touch-sensitive motorized fader, solo, and mute switches.
Transport Controls
Located to the right of the fader section there is a group of transport control
buttons: Play, Record, Stop, Fast Forward, Rewind, and Return to Zero.
Navigation and Zoom
Above the transport controls there is a raised circular controller containing
left/right and up/down navigation keys.
Above this controller there are three button switches that you can use to
define the function of the left/right arrow.
Use the Bank switch to swap the Pro Tools tracks that are displayed on the Digi
002 for the next bank of eight or the previous bank of eight. If you want to
move the tracks one at a time, use the Nudge switch instead.
If you press the Zoom button, you can also use the controller to control the
zoom function in the Pro Tools Edit window. When this button is lit, the Left
and Right arrow keys zoom the display horizontally, and the up and down
arrow keys zoom the display vertically in and out.
The Left and Right arrow keys can also be used to navigate between editable
fields when you are editing numerical values such as Selection Start, End, and
Length or Pre-and Post-Roll in the Edit or Transport windows. The Up and
Down keys can be used to increment or decrement the selected value.
In Bank and Nudge modes, the Navigation keys perform the same functions
the Up or Down keys on the computer keyboard. So you can use these keys
to mark in and out points during playback to make selections in Pro Tools Edit
window. If you have already made a selection, in the Edit window, the Up and
Down keys will move the selection up and down your track list.
Window Show/Hide and Playback Mode Switches
In between the navigation controller and the transport controls there are six
more control buttons. The first, marked ‘Plug-in’, opens or closes the window of
the currently selected plug-in. The second, marked ‘Mix’, opens, brings forward,
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
or closes the Mix window in Pro Tools and the third, marked ‘Edit’ does the
same for the Edit window. The next three buttons let you switch the various
Play/Record modes on or off : Loop Playback, Loop Record, and QuickPunch.
Fader Flip and Master Faders
To the left of the navigation controller there are two buttons, marked ‘Flip’ and
‘Master Faders’.
The Fader Flip switch transfers control assignments from the rotary encoders
to the corresponding channel faders, allowing you to use the touch-sensitive
faders to edit and automate these control values. So, for example, if you hit the
Flip button in Console View, it will move the send level controls to the channel
faders and the send pan controls to the rotary encoders. Or in Channel View,
if you are working with a plug-in insert, pressing the Flip button will move the
plug-in’s controls from the rotary encoders to the faders.
Pressing the Master Fader switch arranges any and all of the Master Fader
tracks in the current session on the right-hand side of the control surface so
that you can focus on making adjustments to these. Pressing this switch a
second time returns the control surface to the previous view.
Function/Utility Keys
To the right of the navigation controller, there are five function keys labeled
F1 to F5. F1 takes you into Utility Mode when the Digi 002 is in stand-alone
mode so that you can set the control surface and input preferences and run
diagnostic tests. Also for use in stand-alone mode, F2 lets you name channels
and F3 lets you store and recall up to 24 mixer configurations.
F4 temporarily prevents the faders from moving while you are working with
Pro Tools so that you can listen to your audio playback without hearing the
noise of the faders moving on the Digi 002. When you want the faders to
move again, just press F4 a second time. Don’t worry about this affecting the
sound in Pro Tools though: this feature stops the DIGI 002 faders from moving,
but it doesn’t affect the virtual faders in the Pro Tools Mix window (these will
continue to move).
F5 is a shortcut that lets you display the currently active plug-in’s controls in
the Digi 002 Channel Scribble Strips. Using this is much faster than pressing the
Insert button to enter Channel View then pressing the channel select button
for the plug-in you want to make active and again to display its controls in the
APPENDIX 4
Scribble Strips. And when you have adjusted the controls, another press on
the F5 button takes you back to the view that you were in previously.
Keyboard Modifier Switches
To the left of the fader section there are four modifier keys corresponding to
the modifier keys on your computer keyboard. These are labeled the same way
as the modifier keys on Apple computers, so you have Shift, Option, Control,
and Command. You can use these in the same way as those on the computer
keyboard in combination with other key presses on the computer keyboard or
with mouse clicks.
The Shift/Add Switch allows you to extend a track selection or add to a group
of selected items. The Option/All Switch applies an action or command to all
the tracks in a Pro Tools session. So, for example, this is very useful if you want
to insert an EQ plug-in onto every track: just hold the Option key while you are
inserting the plug-in onto the first track and it will insert it onto every track
of the same type. The Control/Clutch Switch temporarily stops a control from
acting as part of a group of controls. If you need finer adjustment of any Pro
Tools controls or automation breakpoints, simply hold down the Command
Switch while you adjust these and small increments will become possible.
Digi 002 Modes
The Digi 002 goes into Standby mode when you power it up and it waits in this
mode until you either launch Pro Tools LE or switch to Standalone mode. When
the Digi 002 is connected to a computer with Pro Tools LE software running, it
goes into Pro Tools mode.
The Digi 002 can also be used as a standalone eight-channel digital audio
mixer – with or without being connected to the computer. You can switch to
Standalone mode either from Standby mode or from Pro Tools mode when
your computer is no longer needed for Digi 002 to operate.
Standalone Mode
To put the Digi 002 into Standalone mode, just press the Standalone switch
on the right-hand side of the Digi 002 top panel and confirm that you want to
enter Standalone mode by pressing the Channel Select switch that is flashing
under the word ‘Yes’. To exit Standalone mode, simply press the Standalone
switch a second time. Digi 002 goes into Standby mode, or re-enters Pro Tools
mode automatically if Pro Tools software is still running.
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
In Standalone mode, the Digi 002 has dedicated, in-line three-band EQ on input
channels 1–8 and dedicated, in-line compressors on input channels 1–4. There
are four sends available on each channel for adding internal Delay or Reverb
effects, or for hooking up external effects processors. Sends 1–2 are dedicated
to the internal Delay and Reverb effects. Sends 3–4 route the input signals out
via outputs 7–8 on the back panel so you can send to external effects.
The ten ‘Scribble Strips’ display the pan, volume and effects controls, send
levels, and track names. The LED Encoder rings on each channel strip show
the pan positions in Pan view and Master Fader view but show send levels or
other information in other views. If you press the button marked ‘L R Meter’
this puts the Digi 002 into Meter mode so that the LED rings act as post-fader
meters unless you are viewing the compressor controls, in which case they act
as input, output, and gain reduction meters for the displayed compressor.
Hooking up External Sources to the Digi 002 in Standalone Mode
Inputs 1–4 accept microphone-, line-, or instrument-level signals, and you can
adjust the input gains for these using the controls located at the left of the Digi
002’s top panel. Inputs 5–8 only accept line-level signals and are switchable
between –10 dBV and +4 dBu using the operating level switches on the Digi
002 back panel.
The Alt Src Inputs can be used to hook up alternative audio sources such as
CD players or tape decks. These can either be routed directly to the Monitor
and Headphone outputs by pressing the Alt Src to Mon switch or they can be
routed to Input channels 7–8 by pressing the Alt Src to 7–8 switch (in which
case inputs 7–8 on the back panel of the Digi 002 are disabled).
TIP
Some digital audio equipment and even some personal computers such
as the Mac G5 models feature optical S/PDIF inputs and outputs that you
can connect directly to the Digi 002. This can be useful when you want to
play iTunes back through your main monitors, or to set up iChat on your
Mac for video conferencing over the Internet using your main monitors
instead of the Mac’s internal speakers. Don’t forget to set the sync mode to
wordclock, set the S/PDIF inputs to Optical, and set up the routing for the
S/PDIF inputs to Digi 002 inputs 5–6 first. You can access these settings in
Standalone mode by pressing the F1 Utility button, choosing Preferences
by pressing the corresponding Channel Select button, and pressing the
appropriate Channel Select buttons to access the desired settings.
APPENDIX 4
If you have a DAT or CD player with S/PDIF digital outputs, you can route these
via the Digi 002’s S/PDIF digital connector to inputs 5–6, allowing you to bring
a stereo digital signal into the Digi 002. When playing audio into the Digi 002
digitally, you will need to change the sync mode settings to S/PDIF.
In Standalone mode, all eight Input channels, the Delay return, and the Reverb
return are summed to outputs 1–2, which are routed to the Main Outputs, to
the Alt Main Outputs, and to the S/PDIF outputs on the back panel of the Digi
002. Outputs 1–2 are also mirrored on the Monitor Outputs and Headphone
Output.
NOTE
If Optical is chosen in the S/PDIF preferences, only Main Outputs 1–2
are mirrored in the Optical Output port. If RCA is chosen in the S/PDIF
preferences, all eight Input channels are passed directly to the eight ADAT
Optical Outputs, pre-fader, pre-effects, except for the HPF on channels
1–4. This allows you to route input signals directly to an ADAT device
without repatching cables.
Digi 002 Rack
The Digi 002R is, essentially, the Digi 002 without the control surface. What you
get is a 2U 19” rackmountable unit that connects to the computer via Firewire.
It is just about light enough in weight to carry with you in a bag, and it is
perfect for small studio setups – supporting a wide range of analogue and
digital audio and MIDI inputs and outputs. It also has dedicated monitor and
headphone outputs.
Figure A4.8
The Digi 002 rack:
the successor to the
Digi 001 (no longer
manufactured).
Songwriters and musicians can use the Digi 002R to record high-quality
demos; DJs can make endless mixes; and broadcasters can prepare and edit
their radio spots – all with 24-bit clarity and up to 96 kHz sample rate support.
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
Front Panel
Figure A4.9
Digi 002 front panel.
At the left of the front panel there are rotary gain controls for each of the
four microphone preamplifiers. Above these there are four pairs of buttons.
The first of each pair switches the input between microphone and line level.
The second button switches in a HPF to remove lower frequencies that may
contain rumble or other unwanted sounds. Four LEDs to the right of the gain
controls indicate the sampling rate: 44.1, 48, 88.2, or 96 kHz. Three more LEDs
to the right of these indicate MIDI input and output activity. Above these
there are two small button switches. The first routes the Alternative Source to
input pair 7-8 while the second routes the Alternative Source to the monitor
outputs. An associated rotary control knob lets you adjust the output level
to the monitors and, adjacent to this, a button switch is provided to let you
mute the monitors. Finally, at the right of the panel, there is a 1/4” jack socket,
providing a headphone output, with an associated volume control knob.
Rear Panel
Figure A4.10
Digi 002 rear panel.
Looking at the rear panel you will find the inputs at the right and the outputs
at the left. The first four inputs accept either microphones via XLR connectors
or line- or instrument-level inputs via 1/4” jack connectors. Two switches are
provided for 48-volt phantom power – the first switches this on for inputs
1 and 2, while the second switches it on for inputs 3 and four.
This is something of a limitation if you only have one microphone that
needs phantom power. Fortunately most dynamic microphones are not
usually harmed if phantom power is applied, even they do not need this.
Unfortunately, ribbon microphones can be damaged if you apply phantom
power – so take care!
APPENDIX 4
NOTE
So-called phantom power is used to supply the 48-volts typically used to
power capacitor microphones directly via the microphone audio cables.
Examples include the large-diaphragm studio types like the AKG C414 or
Neumann U87 models.
Inputs 5, 6, 7, and 8 just have 1/4” jack connectors, but individual switches are
provided for +4 dBu or –10 dBV operation. An Alternate Source Input for direct
monitoring of –10 dBV audio equipment, such as tape players or CD players, is
provided via a pair of RCA/phono sockets for left and right channels.
To the left of these, a pair of 1/4” jack sockets carry the left and right Monitor
outputs. You connect these to your monitor amplifier and speakers, or directly
to powered monitors, and you can control the level of this output using the
dedicated volume control on the front panel. This monitor output carries
whatever signals are being routed to Main output pair 1-2.
The main left and right outputs, output pair 1-2, may be connected to a tape
or DAT or CD recorder when recording final mixes to stereo, or may be used
along with the other three output pairs, 3-4, 5-6, and 7-8, to connect to any
other equipment.
The Monitor outputs and the individual outputs are fixed at +4 dBu to suit
connection to professional equipment. Signals routed to output pair 1-2 are
also mirrored on a pair of RCA/phono sockets that provides an alternative –10
dBV output to, say, a cassette, or Mini-disc recorder.
So, in total, the Digi 002R has eight analogue input channels and eight
analogue outputs, and the A/D and D/A converters offer 24-bit/96 kHz
operation – which provides significantly higher audio quality than the Digi 001
or Mbox, for example.
One MIDI input socket and two MIDI output sockets are provided to support
16 channels of input and 32 channels of output. To the left of these there is
a pair of optical connectors that can provide either eight channels of ADAT
optical I/O (up to 48 kHz) or two channels of S/PDIF I/O (up to 96 kHz).
There are also two RCA/phono sockets for standard S/PDIF I/O and a pair of
IEEE 1394 ‘FireWire’ ports – one to connect to your computer and one to act as
a ‘thru’ port to another FireWire device such as an external hard drive.
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
A 1/4” jack socket to the left of the FireWire ports, labeled Footswitch, is
provided for QuickPunch control – use this to punch in and out while recording.
Finally, the power connector will accept AC supplies between 100 and 240 volts
running at either 50 or 60 Hz – so you can connect the Digi 002R to the main
electricity supplies in most countries around the world without problems.
Digidesign Command|8 Control Surface
It can be very useful to have a hardware control surface to use with Pro Tools –
especially if you do not have an audio mixer. The Command|8 is similar to the
Digi 002 – but without the audio interface features. It is primarily a control
surface – although it does have basic monitoring and routing facilities.
NOTE
You can use the Command|8 to provide extra faders with a Digi 002, and
it can also be used for remote control of play and record functions with
Digidesign’s ProControl and Control|24 professional control surfaces.
Figure A4.11
Digidesign
command|8 control
surface with 002R
interface and laptop.
Designed specifically for use with Pro Tools, the Command|8 Control Surface
has a big, bright 110-character backlit LCD display that is at least twice as nice
as the Digi 002’s display and connects to your computer using a standard USB
cable. It has eight sets of touch-sensitive moving faders and rotary encoders
that you can easily shift in banks to control all of the tracks in your Pro Tools
session.
APPENDIX 4
The Command|8 gives you full control of all the channel strip functions in Pro
Tools, allowing you to view and edit plug-in parameters and automate all the
sends, pans, track volume, and mutes. Transport controls are also included,
along with a footswitch jack that can be used to punch into record.
Figure A4.12
Command 8 top
showing details of
controls.
The Command|8 also has one MIDI In and two MIDI Out sockets and can work
as a MIDI controller with any third-party MIDI software and devices that will
allow you to map MIDI control change messages for level, panning, solo, mute,
MIDI Machine Control, and other parameters to Command|8 controls.
Figure A4.13
Command|8 back.
You can connect the analogue audio stereo mix outputs from an Mbox, Digi
002 Rack, or any of the M-Powered interfaces to the Command|8’s Main
Monitor inputs and route this audio via the Command|8’s Speaker Outputs to
a pair of powered monitors for control room monitoring.
A pair of External Source inputs lets you hook up another stereo source such
as a CD-player. The inputs and outputs all use balanced 1/4” TRS jacks and are
individually switchable between –10 dBV or +4 dBu operating levels. A switch
is provided to let you choose between Main and External input sources, along
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
with control room Level, Mono, and Mute switches. A Headphone output is
also provided with its own separate level control.
Digi 003 Family
There are three 003 family interfaces including the Digi 003 Integrated Control
Surface that replaced the Digi 002, the Digi 003R that replaced the Digi 002R,
and the Digi 003 +.
Each 003 family interface has unique features. However, all 003 family units
can handle up to 18 simultaneous channels of audio I/O at up to 24-bit/96 kHz
resolution and use FireWire to communicate with the host computer.
Each has eight individual analogue audio inputs and eight individual analogue
audio outputs, plus Main and Alternate Monitor Output pairs (+4 dBU)
controlled by a single level control. These two pairs of monitor outputs mirror
individual outputs 1–2 to allow connection to a monitoring system (such as a
stereo power amp, powered speakers, or another stereo destination).
An Aux Input pair (+4 dBu) is provided for direct monitoring of tape or CD
input sources.
The Monitor section has a Mute switch and additional switches for routing
input and output signals.
There are two 1/4-inch stereo headphone outputs with level controls.
Headphone 1 monitors Main Outputs 1–2. Headphone 2 can also monitor
Main Outputs 1–2 or can be switched to monitor Outputs 3–4 to provide a
separate cue mix.
Optical I/O connectors can be used for eight channels of Optical (ADAT) I/O
(supporting up to 48 kHz) or for two channels of Optical S/PDIF I/O. RCA
connectors are also provided for two channels of S/PDIF digital I/O supporting
up to 24-bit, 96 kHz audio. Word Clock In and Out ports can receive or send
1× Word clock.
There is also a Footswitch jack for starting and stopping playback or punching
in/out while recording.
Digi 003 – Integrated Control Surface
The Digi 003 is an integrated control surface for Pro Tools LE (or Pro Tools 9)
that is rugged enough to take out ‘on the road’ or use in the studio.
APPENDIX 4
Like its forerunner, the Digi 002, it can be used as a stand-alone mixer and also
has stand-alone MIDI Mode functionality.
Control Surface
Figure A4.14
Digi 003 control
surface.
The 003 top panel is arranged in sections of controls with related functions.
The Fader section includes standard channel strip controls, similar to any
small-format mixer. The Console/Channel View section provides powerful
multi-state controls for viewing and controlling inserts, plug-ins and sends in
Pro Tools. The Transport and Navigation controls provide access to many of the
on-screen navigation features of Pro Tools.
The 003 control surface has eight touch-sensitive motorized faders with eight
multifunction motion-sensitive rotary encoders for operating pan, send, and
plug-in controls.
There are dedicated mute, solo, and select/record arm switches above each
fader and each channel has a six-character, two-line LCD display that displays
track name, pan, send, fader, and plug-in values, and the timeline position.
A separate five-segment LED display is provided for viewing metering and
automation mode status.
There are dedicated Automation Mode switches for selecting and displaying
Automation modes, Navigation and Zoom controls, and dedicated transport
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
controls, together with Transport mode switches for loop playback, loop
record, and QuickPunch – and there is a Jog/Shuttle wheel.
You can disable the faders during playback of automated mixes if you wish –
as it can sometimes be distracting to see and hear the faders moving around
when you want to concentrate on other things.
Switches are also provided for Save, Undo, and Enter, along with MIDI mode
switches for MIDI mapping, a Utility mode switch for testing the 003, and a
dedicated Memory Location switch for recalling Memory Locations or opening
the Memory Location window.
Conveniently, the 003 also has dual headphone outputs with individual source
and level controls.
Standby Mode
003 is in this mode when you first power on the unit, waiting for you to launch
Pro Tools (or another supported application).
In Standby mode, the unit displays “003 Offline” in the top row of the 003
display and the Monitor Mute switch is enabled (lit).
In Standby mode, the Monitor section I/O ports are available, without having
to power on the computer.
While in Standby mode, you can also switch to MIDI mode to control external
MIDI devices (without having to power on the computer). However, you cannot
use 003 as a standalone MIDI router; you must route MIDI through software.
Pro Tools Mode
003 is in this mode when the 003 unit is connected to a computer and Pro
Tools LE software is running.
If Pro Tools is running and no session is open, the unit normally displays ‘Open
or create a new session’. When a session is being launched, the display changes
to ‘Loading a session’. When a Pro Tools session is open, the unit mirrors the
on-screen controls. 003 faders, transport switches, rotary knobs, and switches
control the corresponding elements in Pro Tools. You can also use 003 MIDI
ports as you would those on a standard MIDI interface.
In Pro Tools mode, the Monitor section and MIDI I/O ports are available with a
session open or closed.
APPENDIX 4
To put 003 in Pro Tools mode:
1. Make sure the 003 unit is properly connected to the computer and
powered on.
2. If Mute is disabled (unlit), enable Mute by pressing the Monitor Mute
switch so that it is lit.
3. Launch Pro Tools LE and open or create a Pro Tools session.
MIDI Mode
003 is in this mode when either the MIDI Map A or B switch is enabled (lit). In
this mode, 003 functions as a MIDI control surface for external devices and
applications other than Pro Tools. MIDI mode can be enabled in Pro Tools
mode, Third-Party Software mode, or Standby Mode.
Third-Party Software Mode
003 is in this mode when the 003 unit is connected to a computer and you
launch a third-party audio application (such as iTunes or Ableton Live), and
then use 003 as your playback or recording device. You can also use 003 MIDI
ports as you would those on a standard MIDI interface. In this mode, the unit
displays ‘Working’ in the top row of the LCD.
On Windows, ASIO- and WaveDriver-compatible applications are supported.
WaveDriver supports playback only. On Mac, CoreAudio Driver applications
are supported.
Utility Mode
003 is in this mode when the Utility switch is enabled (flashing). In Utility
mode, you can run pre-programmed diagnostic tests of the 003 unit (such as
fader movement and LEDs). The Utility switch is unavailable in Pro Tools mode.
Rear Panel
Figure A4.15
Digi 003 rear panel.
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
The first four input channels located on the rear panel each have an XLR
connector for a microphone together with a 1/4” jack for use as a line level
input. Each of these channels has a 75 Hz HPF, switchable per channel, and 48V
phantom power is provided for the mic inputs, switchable in channel pairs.
There is an Alternate Source input for external device monitoring, and two
stereo outputs – a studio monitor output and an alternate control room output.
Line inputs 5–8 have 1/4” TRS jacks switchable between +4 dBu (for pro-level
gear) and –10 dBV (for consumer-level gear). Eight analogue line level outputs
are also provided using 1/4” TRS jacks.
A pair of optical I/O connectors is provided that can be used for eight channels
of ADAT optical I/O or two channels of S/PDIF optical I/O. The two channels of
digital S/PDIF I/O can also be accessed via a pair of phono jack connectors and
separate Word Clock I/O is provided via a pair of BNC connectors.
There is one MIDI In port and two MIDI Out ports, providing up to 16 channels
of MIDI input and up to 32 channels of MIDI output.
The Host Connection to the computer uses two IEEE-1394a (FireWire) ports to
allow flexibility when connecting this into a chain of Firewire devices.
NOTE
The FireWire ports on 003 and 003 Rack do not pass data when they are
powered off. If you daisy-chain FireWire devices from your computer, it is
best to connect FireWire hard drives directly to your computer and not to
the 003 family device.
The second FireWire port on 003 or 003 Rack is available for daisy-chaining
FireWire devices such as digital cameras or digital video recorders.
Even when it is powered off, 003 and 003 Rack supply power from the
computer through their FireWire ports, letting you re-charge batteries in
other FireWire devices.
003 Rack
This 2U rackmountable unit provides up to 18 simultaneous channels of audio
I/O at up to 24-bit/96 kHz resolution.
APPENDIX 4
Front Panel
Figure A4.16
Digi 003R front panel.
At the far left of the 003 Rack front panel, there is a Power on/off button. To the
right of this these are the controls for Inputs 1–4, options for routing outputs
and monitoring alternate input sources, and indicators for connections status,
sync source, and MIDI data.
The 003 Rack has four high-quality microphone preamplifiers with adjustable
input gain controls on the front panel and phantom power (switchable in
pairs, for Inputs 1–2 and Inputs 3–4) on the back panel.
To the right of the input gain controls there are three rotary control knobs for
the two Headphone Outputs and for the Monitor Level.
Below these controls, a row of switches includes Aux In to 7/8, 3/4-HP2, Aux In,
Alt Control Room, Mono, and Mute.
Headphone 1 and 2 Level knobs control the volume of the independent
Headphone Outputs. The Headphone Outputs normally mirror outputs 1–2 in
Pro Tools and are independent of the Monitor Outputs. Headphone 2 mirrors
output pair 3-4 when the 3/4-HP2 switch is enabled (lit). Both headphones
include Aux In signal when Aux In (to monitor) is enabled. Headphone output
is not affected by the status of the Monitor Mute switch, but does follow status
of the Mono switch.
The Monitor Level control knobs control the volume of the Main and Alt
Monitor Outputs. These outputs mirror Analog Outputs 1–2, which correspond
to outputs 1–2 in Pro Tools.
The Aux In to 7/8 switch routes the Aux In input pair directly to Inputs 7–8 of
Pro Tools, and does not send it to the Main and Alt Monitor Outputs. This lets
you route an alternate input signal (such as a CD player) directly into Pro Tools
without the need to repatch any cables. When Aux In to 7/8 is enabled (lit),
Analog Inputs 7–8 are disabled.
At the far right of the front panel, there are two 1/4” jacks for Headphone
Outputs 1 and 2.
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
Rear Panel
The 003 and 003 Rack have identical connectors, although the 003’s Power
switch is on its back panel, whereas the 003 Rack’s Power switch is on its front
panel.
Figure A4.17
Digi 003R rear panel.
At the top left of the rear panel can be found four XLR microphone inputs
paired with four balanced 1/4” jacks for line input. The mic preamps have 48V
phantom power enabled on channel pairs.
To the right of the Mic Input 4, there are eight balanced 1/4” jacks
providing eight channels of analogue line level output, followed by two
balanced 1/4” jacks carrying the main L-R studio monitor outputs and a
second pair of balanced 1/4” jacks carrying an alternate pair of control
room monitor outputs. To the right of these can be found a further pair
of balanced 1/4” jacks to provide an Alternate Source input for external
device monitoring. At the far right there is one MIDI In port and two
MIDI Out ports, providing up to 16 channels of MIDI input and up to
32 channels of MIDI output.
At the bottom left of the rear panel there are four additional balanced 1/4”
jacks for line input. To the right of these there is a Footswitch jack for starting
and stopping playback or punching in/out while recording; a pair of IEEE1394a (FireWire) ports; a pair of optical I/O ports for eight channels of ADAT
optical I/O or two channels of S/PDIF optical I/O; an RCA jack pair providing
alternative access to two channels of S/PDIF digital I/O; and two BNC jacks
providing Word Clock I/O.
Digi 003 Rack+
The 003 Rack+ has eight microphone preamplifiers and eight Line/DI inputs.
Each input channel features a 75 Hz HPF, switchable per channel, a –20 dB
pad, switchable per channel, and 48V phantom power on all the mic inputs,
switchable per channel.
APPENDIX 4
Front Panel
Figure A4.18
Digi 003 rack+ front
panel.
At the far left of the front panel, there is a DI input jack at the top with a Power
on/off switch located underneath this.
Eight rotary control knobs on the front panel control the input gain for each
input channel.
Underneath these, a row of multi-function switches can be used to control the
functions selected by a column of selector switches for Line/DI, 48V, Pad and
HPF, located at the centre of the front panel.
At the right of the front panel there are three rotary control knobs for the two
Headphone Outputs and for the Monitor Level.
Below these controls, a row of switches includes Aux In to 7/8, 3/4-HP2, Aux In,
Alt Control Room, Mono, and Mute.
At the far right of the front panel, there are two 1/4” jacks for Headphone
Outputs 1 and 2.
Rear Panel
Figure A4.19
Digi 003 rack+ rear
panel.
At the top left of the rear panel there are eight XLR microphone inputs. To
the right of these there are eight balanced 1/4” jacks providing eight channels
of analogue line level output, followed by two balanced 1/4” jacks carrying
the main L-R studio monitor outputs and a second pair of balanced 1/4” jacks
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
carrying an alternate pair of control room monitor outputs. To the right of
these can be found a further pair of balanced 1/4” jacks to provide an Alternate
Source input for external device monitoring. At the far right there is one MIDI
In port and two MIDI Out ports, providing up to 16 channels of MIDI input and
up to 32 channels of MIDI output.
At the bottom left of the rear panel there are eight balanced 1/4” jacks for
line/DI input. To the right of these there is a Footswitch jack for starting and
stopping playback or punching in/out while recording; a pair of IEEE-1394a
(FireWire) ports; a pair of optical I/O ports for eight channels of ADAT optical
I/O or two channels of S/PDIF optical I/O; an RCA jack pair providing alternative
access to two channels of S/PDIF digital I/O; and two BNC jacks providing Word
Clock I/O.
The Mbox
Mbox is a low-cost system for recording, editing and mixing up to 32 tracks of
audio that includes an audio interface along with Pro Tools LE software. The
interface connects to your computer via USB – ideal for use with laptops.
The Mbox requires a free USB port on the computer to connect to – it will not
work with a USB hub – which could make things awkward with some setups.
However, the Mbox takes its power from the USB port, so no power adapter is
required – a distinct advantage for portable setups.
Compact in size, Mbox measures just over 6 inches high, 3.5 inches wide, and
7 inches deep It has two analogue audio inputs into which you can feed a
microphone, a line level signal or a direct instrument signal via the XLR/1/4”
jack combination connector. The high-impedance line input has a low-noise
setting for use with electric instruments such as guitar, bass, or keyboard.
MBox also has two channels of S/PDIF digital I/O.
The A/D and D/A converters and the S/PDIF I/O are all 24-bit, working at
either 44.1 or 48 kHz sampling rates, and the microphone pre-amplifiers were
designed by Focusrite to provide the best quality possible at this price.
The Front Panel
Looking at the front panel, there are two knobs with associated switches and
LED indicators to let you select between the mic, line, and instrument inputs
APPENDIX 4
Figure A4.20
The original mbox (no
longer manufactured).
and control the input levels of these. Below these, third from the top, you will
find a knob labeled ‘Mix’ that lets you monitor whatever is plugged into the
Mbox’s inputs, or the playback of any audio tracks in Pro Tools, or a blend or
mix of these, as described later. Finally, at the bottom of the front panel there
is a 1/8” ‘mini’ headphone jack with an associated volume knob and mono
button.
The Back Panel
At the top-left of the back panel there is a standard 1/4” headphone jack.
To the right of this there is a USB port with a 48-volt phantom power switch
above it. Underneath the USB port there is a pair of RCA/phono connectors
for S/PDIF input and output. The line outputs are underneath again, in the
form of a pair of 1/4” TRS jacks that can provide either balanced or unbalanced
analogue output. A pair of analogue inserts is also provided via 1/4” TRS jacks
to allow you to hook up outboard processors while recording to disk. The final
two connectors are dual-purpose XLR/1/4” jack combinations that will accept
either a typical balanced microphone cable XLR connector or a typical musical
instrument cable 1/4” jack connector.
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
Figure A4.21
Mbox back panel.
Zero-latency Monitoring
One of the neatest features is the Mix control. This lets you blend the sound of
anything plugged into the Mbox with the playback from Pro Tools LE. This is
ideal, especially when overdubbing, to avoid the latency delay that normally
appears when you monitor inputs through the software (via A/D, the computer
CPU, then D/A) and back out to the speakers – rather than monitoring straight
from the source to the speakers.
Just mute the track to which you are recording in the Pro Tools LE software
mixer so that you don’t hear its delayed sound being monitored through the
system. Then adjust the Mix control to feed the incoming signal from the
instrument you are recording directly into the stereo mix. Et voila! There you
have it – zero-latency monitoring.
APPENDIX 4
NOTE
When you are using the Mbox hardware with Pro Tools LE software, there
is no Low Latency Monitoring option in the Operations menu. This is not
needed, as the Mix control effectively does the same thing.
Exploring the Mbox Mix Control
Try this:
Step 1. Plug a microphone into one of the Mbox inputs.
Step 2. Route this to an audio track in the Pro Tools LE mixer.
Step 3. Record-enable the audio track so that the audio coming in from the
Mbox will be routed via the Pro Tools mixer back out to the Mbox.
Step 4. Now hit the Record and then the Play buttons (or hit CommandSpacebar) to start recording and count out loud to ten (or just say
anything for 10 seconds or so) into the microphone.
Step 5. Then hit the Spacebar to stop recording and de-select the track’s
Record-Enable button.
Now let’s explore how the Mix control works:
Step 6. Turn the Mix control to Input (all the way anti-clockwise, to the left).
Step 7. Speak into the microphone. You will hear the microphone directly
through the speakers.
Step 8. Now turn the Mix control to Playback (all the way clockwise, to the
right).
Step 9. Speak into the microphone and you will discover that you cannot
hear the sound directly through the speakers any more.
Step 10. Now hit the Spacebar to playback your recording. You will hear this
directly through the speakers.
Step 11. Now put the Mix control back to Input and the playback from Pro
Tools will not be heard any more.
This is because putting the Mix control in the Input position only lets you hear
what is plugged into the Mbox’s inputs (with no latency delay as it is not being
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
monitored via the computer) and putting it in the Playback position only lets
you hear what is being played back from Pro Tools.
NOTE
Beware the trap of forgetting to turn the Mix control to either Input
or Playback as necessary or you may end up ‘scratching your head’
wondering why you are hearing no sound through the speakers at all.
TIP
The clever trick is to balance the Mix control somewhere in-between
these two extremes so that you hear enough of the Input directly via the
Mbox so that you can play or sing into the microphone without being put
off by the latency delay while hearing enough of the Playback to keep you
happy as well.
Summary
Ideal for laptop users, the Mbox interface is very compact, light, and easy to
carry around in a bag with a laptop, a pair of small self-powered monitors,
and maybe an M-Audio Oxygen keyboard and a Shure SM58 microphone. This
setup is basically a ‘studio in a bag’ that you can set up just about anywhere
you like.
Figure A4.22
Laptop with mbox.
APPENDIX 4
Reasons to buy an Mbox? If you want a portable recording studio for your
laptop, get an Mbox. If you want to learn Pro Tools before investing in an
expensive professional system, get an MBox. If you are on a budget, but want
to make a start working with the industry-standard digital audio workstation,
get an Mbox. If you already have a Pro Tools system at the studio and want to
take work home to review and edit, get an Mbox.
Mbox 2
Digidesign brings out new products each year and retires older models from
time to time. The original Mbox was discontinued in the summer of 2005 and
immediately replaced in Digidesign’s product range by the Mbox 2 – allowing
Digidesign to continue offering a USB-powered studio-in-a-box for under
$500.
The Mbox 2 is slightly larger than the original Mbox and features MIDI in and
out ports in addition to similar audio features to the original Mbox. It also
has microphone, line and DI inputs. So you can hook up a MIDI module or
controller, then plug a guitar or bass directly into the DI jack (without the need
for an extra preamp), plug a keyboard or mixer into the line jack, or plug a pair
of microphones into the XLR jacks.
Although Mbox 2 looks like a two-channel unit, it actually supports four
channels of input and output if you use both the analogue and digital I/O at
the same time. As with the original Mbox, the A/D and D/A converters, and the
S/PDIF I/O are all 24-bit, working at either 44.1 or 48 kHz sampling rates.
The maximum analogue input level is +21 dBu and maximum analogue output
level is an impressive +4 dBV – so Mbox 2 should interface with just about any
type of mixer or other audio equipment that you are likely to be using.
The Mbox 2 hardware unit can be positioned horizontally or vertically to fit into
any workspace. It comes with two faceplates that can easily be swapped using
the included hex wrench. One faceplate features a large handle that makes
the unit easily portable. The second faceplate, which offers a rubberized grip,
allows Mbox 2 to sit flat on a desktop and reduces the space required when
the unit is packed for traveling.
Weighing in at just 1.23 kg, Mbox 2 is compact and easily portable. The
dimensions measured with the unit in horizontal (handle-down) configuration
are as follows: Height: 4.9 cm; with handle: 7.7 cm; with handle cover: 5.6 cm.
Width: 22.4 cm. Depth: 18.4 cm (including the knobs).
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
Figure A4.23
Mbox 2.
Front Panel
At the far left there is a 1/4” headphone jack with an associated knob to control
the volume. To the right of this you will see the main Monitor volume control
and the Mix control that lets you balance between incoming source audio
being routed direct to the monitor outputs and audio from the computer
being routed to the monitor outputs.
TIP
Use the Mix control for zero latency monitoring of your source audio while
recording. With it somewhere in the middle you can hear both source
audio and audio from the computer.
Looking at the right-hand side of the front panel you will see the Input gain
controls along with associated indicator LEDs, source selection, and Pad buttons.
In the middle there is a very useful Mono button and a button to switch on the
48-volt ‘phantom’ power, which is needed if you want to connect condenser
microphones directly to Mbox 2’s microphone preamplifiers.
Figure A4.24
Mbox 2 front panel.
APPENDIX 4
Rear Panel
Toward the left-hand side, the rear panel has two groups of analogue inputs,
each with an XLR microphone input, a balanced Line input (via ‘stereo’ 1/4” Tip/
Ring/Sleeve jack) and an unbalanced DI input (via ‘mono’ 1/4” jack) to let you
connect musical instruments.
In the middle of the panel there is a pair of 1/4” jacks carrying the left and
right unbalanced analogue outputs. Next to these, a pair of RCA/phono jacks
provides stereo 24-bit S/PDIF digital input and output. To the right of the
panel there is a pair of sockets for MIDI input and output and at the far right
you will find the USB connection that carries data between Mbox 2 and the
computer.
NOTE
The USB socket also carries power from the computer for Mbox 2 so it
needs to be connected directly to the computer or via a powered USB hub.
Figure A4.25
Mbox 2 rear panel.
Mbox 2 Pro
If you need a more advanced interface, the Mbox 2 Pro is worthy of strong
consideration. This provides a total of six simultaneous inputs and eight
simultaneous outputs, including the stereo digital I/O.
Mbox 2 Pro also provides up to 24-bit/96 kHz sound quality (with appropriate
software) and can be powered either by FireWire or using its (included) power
supply.
As with all Mbox series interfaces, the Mbox 2 Pro communicates with a
Windows XP– or Mac OS X–based computer via a high-speed FireWire (IEEE1394) connection – so when you want to use your Mbox 2 Pro away from
home or studio, it can be powered from a laptop’s FireWire port.
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
Front Panel
The front panel has all the usual level controls, peak indicators, pads, phantom
power for condenser mics, and two front-panel DI inputs so you can directly
plug in guitars, keyboards or other instruments – all the stuff you need for
recording just about any kind of instrument!
And if you still use vinyl records (like me) you will truly appreciate the built-in
phono pre-amp that lets you record directly from a turntable! This is great for
sampling stuff off vinyl straight into Pro Tools, for transferring your old vinyl
collection to WAV or MP3 files, or whatever.
Mbox 2 Pro also has dual stereo headphone jacks on the front panel. So, for
example, two people can record at the same time (with separate mixes) while
monitoring via headphones - and Mbox 2 Pro features low-latency monitoring.
An Alt 3/4 switch on the unit’s front panel enables you to quickly and easily
switch between monitoring output pair 1 and 2 and output pair 3 and 4.
There is even a dedicated monitor control knob on the front panel to provide
convenient control of listening levels.
Figure A4.26
Mbox 2 pro front
panel.
Rear Panel
The rear panel is packed with good stuff as well. There are four analogue inputs
(two XLR/1/4” TRS combo jacks for mic or line-level inputs, and two 1/4” TRS
jacks that accept line-level inputs) along with six analogue line-level outputs
(1/4” jacks).
APPENDIX 4
There is a pair of MIDI in and out ports that support MIDI Time Stamping
(MTS) to make sure that your MIDI performances are captured with the utmost
precision and accuracy.
To enable digital transfers, there are two channels of S/PDIF digital I/O that
allow you to route digital audio signals to and from other devices such as
signal processors, digital mixers, or other digital audio recording and playback
devices directly into Pro Tools. A pair of BNC connectors allow the Mbox 2 Pro
to be professionally synchronized with external devices via Word Clock.
Other useful features? Well, yes there are! Turntable inputs are available via
RCA phono jacks and a pair of Firewire jacks allows you to chain FireWire
devices through the unit which can sometimes be necessary. And a dedicated
Stereo monitor output on the rear panel allows you to have reference monitors
permanently connected – without using up the individual output ports that
you may wish to use for other purposes.
Figure A4.27
Mbox 2 pro rear panel.
Mbox 2 Micro
Mbox 2 Micro is the smallest member of the Mbox 2 family, enabling Pro Tools
users to edit, sequence, and mix sessions created on Pro Tools|HD, Pro Tools LE,
and Pro Tools M-Powered systems on the go as well as compose with virtual
instruments and loops.
Mbox 2 Micro is about the size of a typical USB flash drive (it’s just 3-1/2” ×
1-1/4” and weighs a mere 1.2 ounces). Mbox 2 Micro offers high-quality sound,
a 3.5 mm stereo minijack output for headphone or speaker monitoring (no
audio inputs), and a convenient volume wheel for quick adjustments.
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
Figure A4.28
Mbox 2 Micro.
Mbox 2 Micro gives Pro Tools users the freedom to leave their Pro Tools systems
in the studio and edit and mix sessions in high-quality audio anywhere.
The Mbox 2 doesn’t feature any audio inputs, although you can create loopbased and virtual instrument-driven music with it.
Mbox 2 Micro can record MIDI into Pro Tools (with Mbox 2 Micro connected)
by using either a compatible USB MIDI keyboard connected to a computer
(such as the M-Audio Axiom series), a MIDI device connected to a compatible
MIDI interface that’s connected to your computer, or by just using the step
sequencing features of Pro Tools software to create MIDI parts.
Mbox 2 Micro offers up to 24-bit/48 kHz audio and comes with Pro Tools LE
software, Digidesign Xpand! sample-playback/synthesis workstation, and
Bomb Factory and DigiRack plug-ins. For higher sample rates, Pro Tools users
need to down-convert sessions using their studio setup before using Mbox 2
Micro.
M-Audio M-Powered Interfaces for Pro Tools
M-Audio offers a range of PCI, USB and FireWire hardware interfaces that work
with Pro Tools M-Powered software – providing many more options for users
to put together suitable, affordable Pro Tools systems.
APPENDIX 4
FireWire vs USB
There are two types of connectors used to hook up popular Audio and MIDI
interfaces to your computer – USB and FireWire (IEEE 1394). FireWire supports
much greater bandwidth than USB 1.1 so you can use more channels of digital
audio at higher sampling rates and bit depths with your application. USB is
OK for less demanding applications with just a couple of channels of input
and output. FireWire is better able to handle multi-track operation with lower
latency and higher fidelity.
FireWire Interfaces
M-Audio offers five FireWire multi-channel audio/MIDI interfaces that work
with Pro Tools M-Powered – the Ozonic keyboard and interface, the FireWire
410 and FireWire 1814, FireWire Audiophile, and FireWire Solo.
Ozonic
Ozonic is a 37-note velocity- and pressure-sensitive MIDI keyboard, with plenty
of MIDI-assignable knobs, sliders, buttons, joystick, and other controllers. It
also incorporates an audio interface with four inputs and four outputs, a MIDI
interface, a microphone preamplifier, instrument inputs, and a headphone
output.
Ozonic has 40 MIDI-assignable controllers that you can use to program
and perform with RTAS virtual instruments and effects – bringing back
tactile control. So, for example, you could assign the mod wheel to the cutoff frequency of your virtual MiniMoog or map Ozonic’s slider bank to the
drawbars of your virtual tone wheel organ.
Figure A4.29
Ozonic 37-key firewire
Audio/MIDI interface
and controller.
Ozonic connects to your computer via FireWire and also incorporates both
MIDI and audio interfaces. So, if you already have a laptop or desktop, a pair
of powered monitor speakers, and maybe a microphone or guitar, Ozonic
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
completes your MIDI and audio recording system. M-Audio also offers a range
of accessories including sustain and expression pedals, an affordable studio
microphone, and Ableton Live software.
The MIDI keyboard has pitchbend and modulation wheels at the left and an
octave selector button that you can press to play lower notes or higher notes
than the default range. Above these there are several controls for output level,
headphone level, input gain, and so forth. Directly above the keys, you will
see two columns of buttons that let you select the preset, group or zone, with
an assignable joystick positioned between these. A row of 14 MIDI assignable
buttons runs above the rest of the keys. Above the buttons there is a small LCD
screen, eight assignable knobs and nine MIDI assignable faders. You can use all
these controls to give you hands-on control of any MIDI-controllable hardware
devices, mixers, sound modules or effects, or ‘virtual’ instruments, effects, and
other software.
The audio and MIDI interfaces are accessed via the back panel. Ozonic has just
one FireWire socket, which can be a limitation if you want to use it with other
FireWire peripherals. Normally, Ozonic takes its power from your computer
via the FireWire bus, but a low-voltage power input is provided that you can
use with any suitable mains adapter as necessary. MIDI in and out sockets are
provided along with a pair of jack sockets for sustain and expression pedals.
There are four 1/4” audio output jacks, three 1/4” audio input jacks, an XLR
socket with associated phantom power switch that you can use to hook up
any stage or studio microphone – and a headphone socket.
You get a cut-down version of Reason free with Ozonic to get you started.
You also get a software control panel that provides basic audio mixing and
metering facilities. And now that Avid/Digidesign owns M-Audio, you can buy
Pro Tools M-Powered software to use as the software front-end for Ozonic. This
means that the files you record using Ozonic at a gig, in the field or on the road
can be session-compatible with full Pro Tools systems at professional studios
around the world.
FireWire 410 and FireWire 1814
The FireWire 410 has two balanced analogue inputs and eight balanced
analogue outputs plus two channels of S/PDIF I/O. You might choose this
interface when you need to run discrete output channels to independent mixer
channels and other outboard gear, or to provide separate outputs for surround
monitoring. It has MIDI in and out sockets, direct hardware monitoring, and is
bus-powered with an optional low-voltage power input.
APPENDIX 4
Figure A4.30
FireWire 410 4-in/
10-out FireWire
mobile recording
interface.
If you’re recording a full band, the FireWire 1814’s with its eight balanced
analogue inputs and four balanced analogue outputs, makes a better choice
(especially if you get the optional eight-channel Octane preamp). It also has
eight channels of digital input and output via optical ‘Lightpipe’ connectors,
along with word clock synchronization for seamless communication with
devices such as ADATs, DA-88s, and digital mixers.
Figure A4.31
FireWire 1814
18-in/14-out FireWire
Audio/MIDI interface
with ADAT lightpipe.
Figure A4.32
FireWire 1814 rear
panel.
The FireWire 1814 and FireWire 410 both support up to 24-bit/96 kHz with
Pro Tools M-Powered. (When used with software supporting even higher data
rates, the FireWire 410 can output two channels at 192 kHz, and the FireWire
1814 goes so far as 2 × 4 analog at 192 kHz.) Both units have great dual mic/
instrument preamps, as well as dual simultaneously active headphone amps
with convenient individual front-panel controls and 1/4” outputs.
These compact studios literally fit in a backpack (M-Audio even make the
backpack) and are amazingly powerful and convenient for remote recording.
Again, the files you record at a gig, in the field or on the road are sessioncompatible with full Pro Tools systems at professional studios around the world.
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
Firewire Audiophile
Created with the laptop-based DJ or live performer in mind, the FireWire
Audiophile is a compact, FireWire-compatible audio/MIDI interface in a mobile
package that’s perfect for live performance, home recording, and digital DJ
work.
Stereo headphone output with A/B switching between assignable sources
allows precuing for DJs and mobile musicians – and the assignable aux bus
is perfect for creating dedicated headphone mixes and effect sends. You also
get zero-latency hardware direct monitoring, ultra-low latency ASIO software
direct monitoring, and MIDI I/O. The FireWire Audiophile even has AC-3 and
DTS pass-through for surround sound playback.
The front panel has a 1/4” jack headphone output with associated volume
control and an A/B source switch, a pair of LEDs to indicate S/PDIF I/O activity,
an assignable level control, and a power on/off button.
Figure A4.33
FireWire audiophile
4-in/6-out FireWire
audio/MIDI interface.
The rear panel has a 12-volt low-power input, a pair of FireWire sockets, a
pair of coaxial connectors providing two channels of S/P DIF digital input
and output, a pair of MIDI in and out sockets. It also has two pairs of RCA
connectors providing analogue line outputs and one pair of RCA connectors
providing analogue output.
Figure A4.34
FireWire Audiophile
rear panel.
APPENDIX 4
That makes the FireWire Audiophile a four-input, six output audio interface
capable of high-quality analog and digital I/O with full 24-bit resolution at
sampling rates up to 96 kHz for recording and playback.
FireWire Solo
FireWire Solo is a mobile audio interface designed for songwriters and
guitarists.
Figure A4.35
FireWire solo.
The front panel has an XLR microphone input with associated gain control, a
1/4” jack guitar input with associated gain control, a front/rear input selector,
a phantom power on/off switch for the microphone preamplifier, and a
headphone output 1/4” jack with associated volume control.
Figure A4.36
FireWire solo rear
panel.
The rear panel has two FireWire sockets, a 12-volt power input, stereo S/PDIF
I/O, two unbalanced analogue line inputs, and two balanced analogue line
outputs via 1/4” jack sockets.
PCI Cards and Interfaces
Pro Tools M-Powered works with various M-Audio Delta PCI 2.2 interface cards,
including the best-selling Audiophile 2496 and the next-generation Audiophile
192. Other systems available at the time of writing include the Delta 1010, the
Delta 1010 LT, the Delta 44, and the Delta 66.
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
Audiophile 2496 and Audiophile 192
Pro Tools M-Powered works with various M-Audio Delta PCI 2.2 interface
cards, including the best-selling Audiophile 2496 and the next-generation
Audiophile 192.
Both of these feature two-channel analogue balanced 1/4” I/O, two-channel
S/PDIF coaxial digital I/O and up to 24-bit/96 kHz operation with Pro Tools.
(The Audiophile 192 also features balanced 1/4” I/O and provides up to
192kHz sampling rate with applications that support it.) Both devices let
you use analogue and digital I/O simultaneously, providing the flexibility of
configuring four-channel I/O, monitoring analogue while outputting digital or
running a digital effects loop.
Direct monitoring on both devices allows you to hear the input without
latency while recording. The Audiophile 192 provides the extra benefit of a
second pair of outputs, allowing routing to a separate headphone mix or two
different speaker systems.
Figure A4.37
Audiophile 192 highdefinition 4-in/4-out
audio card with digital
I/O and MIDI.
These PCI 2.2 interfaces come with control panels that give you full digital
mixing control of all inputs and outputs. Another benefit is that all M-Audio
products that feature digital I/O provide pass-through of surround-soundencoded AC-3 and DTS content, allowing you to stream surround content
directly to a compatible surround receiver or similar device.
APPENDIX 4
Figure A4.38
Audiophile 2496
4-in/4-out audio
card with MIDI and
digital I/O.
Both the Audiophile 2496 and Audiophile 192 have built-in 16-channel MIDI
I/O, so there’s no need for a separate MIDI interface. You’ll also find built in
support for ASIO, WDM, GSIF2, and Core Audio for compatibility with most
other applications such as Cubase SX, Sonar, Digital Performer, and so forth.
Delta 1010
The Delta 1010 10-In/10-Out PCI/Rack Digital Recording System with MIDI and
Digital I/O consists of a PCI card that connects to a 19” rackmountable box that
contains the various input and output sockets.
Figure A4.39
Delta 1010 10-in/
10-out PCI/rack digital
recording system with
MIDI and digital I/O.
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
Delta 1010 LT
The Delta 1010 LT version does not have the rackmountable audio interface.
Instead, the input and output sockets attach to the PCI card via multi-way
connectors and ‘float’ around loose at the back of your computer – which is
not as robust a solution, but is even more affordable.
Figure A4.40
Delta 1010 LT.
Delta 44
The Delta 44 Professional 4-In/4-Out Audio Card is a PCI card that connects
to a small breakout box that houses the four audio input jacks and four audio
output jacks.
APPENDIX 4
Figure A4.41
Delta 44 professional
4-in/4-out audio card.
Delta 66
The Delta 66 Professional 6-In/6-Out Audio Card with Digital I/O is virtually
identical to the Delta 44 but has the additional benefit of a pair of digital stereo
input/output S/PDIF sockets on the back of the PCI card.
Hardware options for Pro Tools LE and M-Powered systems
Figure A4.42
Delta 66 professional
6-in/6-out audio card
with digital I/O.
Latest Additions
Coinciding with the launch of Pro Tools 7, Digidesign announced that several
more M-Audio devices had been qualified for use with Pro Tools M-Powered
7 software, including Black Box, Ozone, Mobile Pre USB, Fast Track USB, and
Transit.
You won’t be needing a crystal ball to figure out that this will be an ongoing
process, so keep your eyes out for future announcements on the Avid,
Digidesign, and M-Audio websites and in the various music technology
magazines.
© 2010 Mike Collins
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