TIBCO Silver?? Fabric Concepts

TIBCO Silver?? Fabric Concepts
TIBCO Silver® Fabric
TIBCO Silver® Fabric Concepts
Software Release 5.7.1
October 2015
Two-Second Advantage®
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|v
Contents
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .vii
Related Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
TIBCO Silver Fabric Documentation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Other Documentation and Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Typographical Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x
Connecting with TIBCO Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
How to Join TIBCOmmunity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
How to Access All TIBCO Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
How to Contact TIBCO Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Chapter 1 Silver Fabric Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Dynamic Application Elasticity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Uses and Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Automated Application Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Skyway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
The Operations Management Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Resource and Privilege Segmentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
High-Level Silver Fabric Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
For More Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Chapter 2 Enablers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Enabler Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Enablers and Component Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
J2EE Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Command Line Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Other Component Types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
For More Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Chapter 3 Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Creating and Deploying Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Allocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Deployment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
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Chapter 4 Stacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Stacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Policies and Schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
For More Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Chapter 5 Inside the Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
The Engine Daemon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Installation and Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
For More Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Chapter 6 Inside the Broker. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Broker Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connection Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Statistics Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Allocation Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stack Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Component and Enabler Repository . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Management Dashboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Web Services SDK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asset Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resource Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30
30
30
31
31
31
32
32
32
32
32
VirtualRouter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Skyway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
For More Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Chapter 7 Statistics and Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Statistics Collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Viewing Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
The Dashboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
The Reports Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
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Preface
TIBCO Silver® Fabric combines the flexibility and scalability of the public cloud
with the security and control of your own data center. It brings the elasticity of
cloud computing to your organization – supporting existing solutions within
your current infrastructure while automatically scaling resources to meet
demand.
Topics
•
Related Documentation, page viii
•
Typographical Conventions, page x
•
Connecting with TIBCO Resources, page xiii
TIBCO Silver® Fabric Concepts
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Related Documentation
This section lists documentation resources you may find useful.
For the latest version of documentation, including any changes or additions made
since the last product release, please visit http://docs.tibco.com.
TIBCO Silver Fabric Documentation
The following documentation is included with Silver Fabric in Adobe Acrobat
(PDF) format. To view the guides, log in to the Administration Tool and go to
Admin > Documentation. The PDF files are also on the Broker at
SF_HOME/webapps/livecluster/admin/docs. The following documents form
the Silver Fabric documentation set:
•
Silver Fabric Concepts Contains an introduction to Silver Fabric, including
definitions of key concepts and terms, such as Enablers, Stacks, Components,
Engines, and Brokers. Read this first if you are new to Silver Fabric.
•
Silver Fabric Installation Guide Covers installation of Silver Fabric for Windows
and Unix, including Brokers, Engines, and pre-installation planning.
•
Silver Fabric Cloud Administration Guide Covers Silver Fabric cloud
administration, configuration of Engines, Enablers, and Components, and
configuration and use of Skyway. Also covers security, general maintenance,
performance tuning, and database administration.
•
Silver Fabric Developer’s Guide Developer-related topics such as logging and
debugging, using the Admin API, and the Enabler SDK.
•
Silver Fabric Developer’s Tutorial Tutorials for developers, such as how to write
Enablers and Asset Managers.
•
Silver Fabric User’s Guide Covers Silver Fabric use and operation, including
management of Engines, Enablers, Components, and Stacks.
•
Silver Fabric Skyway User’s Guide Covers usage of Skyway, which enables
users to quickly and easily provision and manage their Silver Fabric Stacks.
•
Silver Fabric Tomcat Enabler Guide Covers installation and configuration of
applications run on the Tomcat Enabler.
•
Silver Fabric Command Line Enabler Guide Covers installation and
configuration of applications run on the Command Line Enabler.
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Other Documentation and Help
Additional help and information is available from the following sources:
•
Silver Fabric Administration Tool Help Context-sensitive help is provided
throughout the Silver Fabric Administration Tool by clicking the Page Help
button located on any page.
•
API Reference Silver Fabric API reference information is available in the Silver
Fabric SDK in the api directory in JavaDoc format. You can also view and
search them from the Silver Fabric Administration Tool; log in to the
Administration Tool and go to Admin > Documentation.
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Typographical Conventions
The following typographical conventions are used in this manual.
Table 1 General Typographical Conventions
Convention
Use
TIBCO_HOME
Many TIBCO products must be installed within the same home directory. This
directory is referenced in documentation as TIBCO_HOME. The default value of
TIBCO_HOME depends on the operating system. For example, on Windows
systems, the default value is C:\tibco.
SF_HOME
TIBCO Silver® Fabric installs into a directory within TIBCO_HOME. This
directory is referenced in documentation as SF_HOME. The default value of
SF_HOME depends on the operating system. For example on Windows systems,
the default value is C:\tibco\fabric.
code font
Code font identifies commands, code examples, filenames, pathnames, and
output displayed in a command window. For example:
Use MyCommand to start the foo process.
bold code
font
Bold code font is used in the following ways:
•
In procedures, to indicate what a user types. For example: Type admin.
•
In large code samples, to indicate the parts of the sample that are of
particular interest.
•
In command syntax, to indicate the default parameter for a command. For
example, if no parameter is specified, MyCommand is enabled:
MyCommand [enable | disable]
italic font
Italic font is used in the following ways:
•
To indicate a document title. For example: See TIBCO ActiveMatrix
BusinessWorks Concepts.
•
To introduce new terms. For example: A portal page may contain several
portlets. Portlets are mini-applications that run in a portal.
•
To indicate a variable in a command or code syntax that you must replace.
For example: MyCommand PathName
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Table 1 General Typographical Conventions (Continued)
Convention
Use
Key
combinations
Key names separated by a plus sign indicates keys pressed simultaneously. For
example: Ctrl+C.
Key names separated by a comma and space indicate keys pressed one after the
other. For example: Esc, Ctrl+Q.
The note icon indicates information that is of special interest or importance, for
example, an additional action required only in certain circumstances.
The tip icon indicates an idea that could be useful, for example, a way to apply
the information provided in the current section to achieve a specific result.
The warning icon indicates the potential for a damaging situation, for example,
data loss or corruption if certain steps are taken or not taken.
Table 2 Syntax Typographical Conventions
Convention
Use
[ ]
An optional item in a command or code syntax.
For example:
MyCommand [optional_parameter] required_parameter
|
A logical OR that separates multiple items of which only one may be chosen.
For example, you can select only one of the following parameters:
MyCommand param1 | param2 | param3
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Table 2 Syntax Typographical Conventions (Continued)
Convention
Use
{ }
A logical group of items in a command. Other syntax notations may appear
within each logical group.
For example, the following command requires two parameters, which can be
either the pair param1 and param2, or the pair param3 and param4.
MyCommand {param1 param2} | {param3 param4}
In the next example, the command requires two parameters. The first parameter
can be either param1 or param2 and the second can be either param3 or param4:
MyCommand {param1 | param2} {param3 | param4}
In the next example, the command can accept either two or three parameters.
The first parameter must be param1. You can optionally include param2 as the
second parameter. And the last parameter is either param3 or param4.
MyCommand param1 [param2] {param3 | param4}
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Connecting with TIBCO Resources
How to Join TIBCOmmunity
TIBCOmmunity is an online destination for TIBCO customers, partners, and
resident experts, a place to share and access the collective experience of the
TIBCO community. TIBCOmmunity offers forums, blogs, and access to a variety
of resources. To register, go to http://www.tibcommunity.com.
How to Access All TIBCO Documentation
After you join TIBCOmmunity, you can access the documentation for all
supported product versions here:
http://docs.tibco.com
How to Contact TIBCO Support
For comments or problems with this manual or the software it addresses, please
contact TIBCO Support as follows.
•
For an overview of TIBCO Support, and information about getting started
with TIBCO Support, visit this site:
http://www.tibco.com/services/support
•
If you already have a valid maintenance or support contract, visit this site:
https://support.tibco.com
Entry to this site requires a user name and password. If you do not have a user
name, you can request one.
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TIBCO Silver® Fabric Concepts
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Chapter 1
Silver Fabric Overview
TIBCO Silver® Fabric enables creation, configuration, provisioning, management,
and monitoring of private clouds for the enterprise.
To meet the highly cyclical demands of large-scale business applications,
enterprises traditionally take one of two approaches: deliver high performance by
provisioning for peak load or forego service level agreements to a lower cost.
Silver Fabric enables IT operations to have the best of both worlds: deliver high
performance while optimizing costs.
Silver Fabric is hosted securely within your on-premise data center and
seamlessly works with your existing hardware and software — quickly enabling
you to create shared pools of computing resources within which your
applications’ footprints can dynamically expand and contract based on real-time
metrics.
Topics
•
Dynamic Application Elasticity, page 2
•
Automated Application Management, page 4
•
The Operations Management Environment, page 6
•
High-Level Silver Fabric Architecture, page 8
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For More Information, page 9
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Dynamic Application Elasticity
Dynamic Application Elasticity involves transforming static enterprise
applications to dynamically deploy them to hosts within the private cloud. within
which your applications' footprints can dynamically expand and contract
leverage existing applications and configure them for automated deployment to
cloud resources is a minimal amount of reconfiguration.
You can then use an automated system to configure, publish, start, monitor, and
manage applications based on policy. Since this eliminates the need to install and
configure Stacks on individual machines, this also implies controlling a resource
pool in a highly scalable manner.
This type of virtualization involves dynamic expansion or contraction of
application capacity, based on schedule or demand. This closed-loop provisioning
capability means the environment can automatically respond to changing
business needs. The figure below illustrates the three fundamental aspects of
application virtualization.
Figure 1 Application Virtualization Concepts.
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Uses and Benefits
Application virtualization is a transforming technology for several use cases
beyond incremental automation improvement. Silver Fabric automates manual
tasks in a new paradigm transforming how application services are delivered to
the business. The list below outlines the new capability benefits of application
virtualization:
•
Self-Service — Developers can provision their own platforms and deploy their
own applications without IT involvement - reducing workload on your IT
resources and speeding up the time it takes to deploy applications.
•
Elasticity - Application capacity can grow or shrink based on demand.
Thresholds for activating new application instances are based on system or
application statistics monitoring. Unused applications automatically shrink to
their minimum required level of capacity.
•
Shared Pool of Resources — By pooling resources and automatically
allocating resources based on demand or schedule, enterprises can
dramatically reduce the amount of over-provisioning that is seen in data
center. Silver Fabric increases infrastructure utilization and reduces the total
number of servers required — ultimately reducing the management and
overhead associated with application stacks.
•
Leverage Existing Resources — Silver Fabric does not rely on virtualization
technology and can leverage your existing infrastructure resources. Silver
Fabric can have resources that can be a mix of virtual machines, native OS
hosts and public cloud resources allowing you to gain maximum value from
your existing investments.
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Automated Application Management
Silver Fabric creates a utility computing operation by centralizing and automating
all aspects of application provisioning, activation, monitoring, and
administration. Different people within an organization are tasked with different
activities. A utility operating model must provide the different roles and
entitlements, but it must also provide transparency and reporting for creating
diagnostic methodologies and charge back models.
Figure 2 Multiple users and roles require different entitlements.
Configuration managers create and standardize distributions for runtimes,
platforms, and application artifacts. Architects must understand the resource
requirements and constraints for a given application, and create appropriate
runtime policies. Administrators must monitor applications with transparency
into the operations on remote machines. Therefore, uniform logging, auditing,
and exception tracking are critical. Scheduling and coordination becomes an
important capability to address with a utility computing model. Lastly, thorough
reporting on usage is important for internal charge back and IT visibility.
Skyway
Skyway is a web-based interface that enables a developer to obtain a desired
complex development platform to build franchise applications. Skyway users are
provided Templates, each of which defines a Stack that can be easily provisioned
to run an application. You can configure Templates before provisioning, and also
capture changes made in the Stack’s Components.
Skyway runs on each Broker. It uses the Broker’s definitions of Stacks, Templates,
and users.
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Skyway can also be used as a templating system to enable operators to easily
deploy applications to a private cloud. An application running in the cloud can be
captured as a template which can then be modified and later provisioned. This
enables operators to repeatedly instantiate templates to environments after
making minor changes.
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The Operations Management Environment
In addition to providing a virtualization model and runtime environment for
applications, Silver Fabric also includes a highly manageable operating
environment featuring a web-based console, the Silver Fabric Administration
Tool. This lets you define, deploy and register Stacks and Components, manage
the workloads running in the cloud, and configure the Silver Fabric environment.
Uploading binaries and controlling versions is also straightforward.
The Administration Tool provides graphical runtime monitors to quantify cloud
usage and current operations. Diagnostic tools also provide logging and error
information for remote debugging purposes.
Figure 3 The Silver Fabric Administration Tool Dashboard.
TIBCO Silver® Fabric provides monitoring and management facilities for key
metrics such as throughput, latency, resource usage, and exceptions. Simple user
interfaces and subscription services provide access to current and historical
information as well as Service Level Agreement (SLA) warnings and breaches.
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Resource and Privilege Segmentation
Silver Fabric provides the ability to segment user privileges and resource access in
two different ways: by account and by role.
Assets such as applications and compute nodes can be segmented vertically, by
groups of users called accounts.
Accounts are a collection of users, with access limited to a subset of assets on the
cloud. Accounts are typically used to “silo” users in different business units to
their own set of objects in an enterprise-wide cloud. Users in an account can only
access objects that belong to their account, which prevents them from interfering
with other applications or data in the cloud.
A special account, simply named “cloud”, exists by default and contains
admin-level users that have access to all objects.
You can also segment user privileges horizontally by the use of roles. A role is a
set of permissions assigned to a user that governs the ability to use, see, or access
a Silver Fabric resource. An Administer role allows administrators access to any
part of the cloud. Four other predefined roles allow more limited access, or you
can create custom roles, and add or remove what permissions are be available to
user accounts assigned that role.
Users, accounts, and roles can all be defined and administered in Silver Fabric’s
built-in authentication database. You can also map users and groups in your
existing LDAP server to integrate with your current enterprise authentication
system.
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High-Level Silver Fabric Architecture
Silver Fabric virtualizes applications across a shared computing infrastructure.
You can dynamically change the amount of resources dedicated to an application
based on policy. This lets you utilize and share your excess capacity and grant
priority access to the most important applications.
At the highest level, Silver Fabric consists of the following components:
•
Component — one of the executable pieces, such as a utility service or J2EE
web application, that makes up a Stack.
•
Engine — the process that provisions and runs Components.
•
Enabler — a controlling “wrapper” around an application, application server,
or application platform that enables you to run it on Silver Fabric.
•
Stack — a Component or a bundle of Components that is activated as a unit,
plus one or more policies specifying the resource needs, priorities and
constraints of those Components.
•
Broker — the central component that deploys and activates applications on
the remote machines of the utility infrastructure. The Broker also manages the
policies you create to specify how and when the applications are activated on
the utility resources.
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For More Information
Management of the Silver Fabric platform is described in more detail in the Silver
Fabric Cloud Administration Guide. Monitoring is described in more detail in
Statistics and Monitoring on page 37.
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Chapter 2
Enablers
An Enabler is a wrapper around an executable, typically an application server, and
is responsible for life-cycle management of deployed applications. Enablers host
Components, and configure, start, monitor, and stop Component processes. They
also collect performance statistics pertaining to those Component processes.
A typical Enabler is a wrapper around a J2EE application server, such as Tomcat,
JBoss, or WebLogic. However, Enablers are not J2EE-specific. Enablers have been
developed to wrap Apache Web Server, Microsoft IIS, and TIBCO BusinessWorks,
among many others.
The Silver Fabric installation includes the Tomcat Enabler by default. Additional
Enablers can be obtained from TIBCO. Contact TIBCO for information about
available Enablers.
You can also use the Enabler SDK to develop additional, custom Enablers and add
them to existing Silver Fabric installations.
Topics
•
Enabler Contents, page 12
•
Enablers and Component Types, page 13
•
For More Information, page 14
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Enabler Contents
A Silver Fabric Enabler consists of an Enabler runtime and, optionally, one or
more additional Enabler distribution archives.
The Enabler runtime is a package containing Silver Fabric-specific configuration
and implementation. It contains a configuration file that defines changes to occur
when an Enabler is activated on an Engine. For example, at run-time, the Enabler
runtime may dynamically change URLs, port numbers, or other information in an
application server’s startup scripts, in order to virtualize the server to any
machine.
The Enabler distribution is one or more packages containing the application
server or other application that’s run to host Components. Some Enablers, such as
the Command Line Enabler, only require an Enabler runtime. In other Enablers,
such as the included Tomcat Enabler, the Enabler distribution consists of the
installation directory used to run the application server in a standalone
configuration on a single machine, with minor changes, such as the removal of
redundant files or changes to statically configured items.
Components, Enablers, and Distributions are packaged as grid libraries and
uploaded to a Silver Fabric Broker and deployed to Engines. Grid libraries are
compressed files and distributions that may be published by the Silver Fabric
Broker to Silver Fabric Engines with specific configurations and policies defined
by an Enabler and a Stack. Grid libraries, also known as gridlibs or archives, are
stored in a central repository for reuse when a Component is published to a new
Engine.
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Enablers and Component Types
Enablers host Components on an Engine. Each Enabler supports one or more
Component Types. A given Component can be launched by any Enabler that
supports its type.
J2EE Components
A J2EE Component is a web application or web service that may require multiple
running instances and is deployed as an EAR or WAR application archive into a
J2EE application server Enabler.
For example, an existing J2EE application server cluster could be represented as a
J2EE Component, with the size of the cluster varying between two to five nodes,
based on policy. The physical locations of the Component instances are
determined by the infrastructure at runtime and the resources are provided
dynamically. Silver Fabric then instantiates this user-defined Component on these
resources and centrally monitors its performance. Stack policies dictate how
many instances to create, the kinds of resources to use for them, and when to add
or remove instances.
Silver Fabric includes by default a Tomcat Enabler that can be used to run J2EE
Components. Enablers that wrap certain versions of other J2EE application
servers (including WebLogic, WebSphere, and JBoss) can be obtained from
TIBCO. If you have multiple J2EE Enablers, you can separately associate each
J2EE Component with one of the available J2EE Enablers as part of configuring
the J2EE Component.
Command Line Components
Any executable that can be run from a command line can be virtualized as a
Component by way of the Command Line Enabler, which ships as part of Silver
Fabric. This provides a quick way to obtain many of the advantages of application
virtualization with a minimum of effort.
Other Component Types
Specialized Enablers can sometimes prove useful. Silver Fabric’s Enabler SDK is a
toolkit that allows you to develop custom Enablers.
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For More Information
For more information on developing Enablers, see the Silver Fabric Developer’s
Guide.
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Chapter 3
Components
TIBCO Silver Fabric Components are configured executables that have been
virtualized with Enabler configurations. Components can then be published as
parts of a Stack for running on Silver Fabric Engines. Many TIBCO products,
utility services, and J2EE web applications have been productized as distinct
components for publishing multiple scalable instances on Engines as parts of the
TIBCO Silver Fabric Cloud.
A policy specifies the minimum and maximum number of processes to run at a
given time. If a Component has two running instances, it means that two physical
processes are running (automatically activated on different machines if possible),
which are load balanced by an external or internal load balancer. Silver Fabric
automatically reconfigures each instance of a Component to reflect aspects of the
environment (such as host names, port numbers, or work directories) that are
unique to that instance.
Topics
•
Creating and Deploying Components, page 16
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Creating and Deploying Components
Silver Fabric simplifies application management by storing all information
pertaining to application servers, versions, customizations, and application code
in one logical place, the Broker. Multiple configuration files for different
computers or cluster members are not required as Silver Fabric supports a
one-to-many paradigm. All Component customizing is done in the Silver Fabric
Administration Tool, using the Component Wizard.
Features
Each Enabler defines set of behaviors it supports; each supported item is called a
feature. For example, the Tomcat Enabler supports HTTP routing as a feature by
default.
When you create a Component, you can then specify which Enabler features you
will use. For example, if your Enabler supports clustering as a feature, you can
add clustering support and configure which cluster your Component will use.
Variables
Enablers and Components feature runtime context variables, which can be used to
help you virtualize an application. Enablers define a set of string and
environment variables, which are inherited by each Component. If a Component
has a dependency on another Component, it will also inherit that Component’s
exported variables. These variables can then be used by the Enabler or
Component to ensure the application can be easily virtualized.
For example, the Tomcat Enabler provides variables for the Tomcat instance
name, HTTP port, JDK name and version, and more. If you create a Component
for your J2EE application running in the Tomcat Enabler, it will inherit all of the
Enabler’s variables. If you add a dependency on a database defined in another
Component which contains the database’s JDBC URL in an exported variable,
you can then use that variable in the application’s Component to point it to the
database.
You can also create an encrypted context variable instead of hard-coding
passwords in Enabler or Component configuration files; it is stored encrypted on
the Broker and decrypted when used on the Engine. There is also an
auto-increment variable type. This enables you to define a variable that has the
Engine instance number added or appended to the value. For example, you could
define a port number as being 8080 plus the Engine instance number, so running
instances of an Enabler would listen on ports 8080, 8081, and so on.
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You can easily add, edit, or remove variables in the Silver Fabric Administration
Tool, either at the Enabler level, where they are inherited by all Components
running in that Enabler, or at the Component level.
Allocation
Allocation is the number of CPUs or Engine instances given to running published
Components. Allocation constraints may be set to limit the number of Engines or
CPUs dedicated to running a particular Component on a schedule or based on
metrics.
Configure the default allocation for Components and Components within Stacks
to specify how many instances and the relative priority that the Component can
have. You can set allocation constraints on dependencies (on other Components
or resource types in the runtime environment) and you can also specify
conditions or schedules that can change the allocation to increase or reduce the
availability of resources.
Deployment
Once you create and configure a Component, you can publish it with a single
click. It’s also easy to modify and re-publish Components on demand, making for
highly scalable application management.
For more information on Components, see the Silver Fabric Cloud Administrator’s
Guide.
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Chapter 4
Stacks
In some contexts, an executable standing alone is useful in its own right. More
often, however, what’s really useful is something that’s built up out of several
tiers of executables running simultaneously and in cooperation. A classic example
of this might be a Code-Cache-Data web-based application, with a J2EE web
application as its front-end, a database as its back-end and an in-memory cache
between them. While there are tasks you might perform that focus on just one or
another of these pieces, in most contexts you’d like to work with them as a unit.
Topics
•
Stacks, page 20
•
Policies and Schedules, page 21
•
For More Information, page 23
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Stacks
In Silver Fabric, each piece of an application, such as a database or J2EE web
application, is defined with a Component. The unit tying these Components
together is called a Stack.
At its simplest, a Silver Fabric Stack is just a bundle of Components. The value in
this initial kind of bundling is that it provides joint activation. When Silver Fabric
runs a Stack, it provisions default numbers of the various Components to Engines
and activates those Components. When Silver Fabric stops a Stack, it deactivates
those Components and makes the Engines on which they were running available
to other Stacks. When you define Components, you specify default allocation
rules, such as the number of Engines to allocate for the Component, and those will
be copied into and used by each Stack including that Component.
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Policies and Schedules
A Stack isn’t limited to using Components’ default allocation settings. You can
change those settings at the Stack level by defining a policy. Policies are rules that
can define component allocation settings within a stack. Policies can also set a
dependency, enablement condition, resource preference, threshold activation,
engine group minimum or maximum.
For instance, each Component has a default allocation priority, but when you add
a Component to a Stack, you might want it to have a different priority in that
Stack. You can do that by creating a policy that gives it a different priority within
that Stack, while leaving its default priority intact for all other Stacks.
Figure 4 Defining policies for a Stack.
Policies can also contain rules that define advanced Engine activation behavior.
For example, you can add an allocation rule stating that a Component cannot be
activated until another Component in the Stack is already running. Or you can
specify that a Component needs or prefers to run on Engines of a specific OS or
hardware type.
If you need for your Stack to run differently at different times of day or different
parts of the week or month, you can create Schedules that describe those different
periods of interest. Schedules are periods of time that you define based on hourly,
daily, weekly, or monthly periods.You should define distinct Schedules for each
period of time for which you want different Stack behavior so that different
policies will apply to each specifically defined Schedule. Once you define the
intervals and recurrence within a Schedule, you can also share the definitions
across any Stacks.
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For example, you can define a Schedule to specify the intervals of 9:00 AM to 5:00
PM Monday through Friday, and another Schedule that indicates the weekend,
such as all day Saturday and Sunday. One Stack can then add policies to the
weekday Schedule to allocate more Engines during the business day, while
another Stack can take more Engines during the weekend off-hours.
Figure 5 Scheduling changes in resource allocation policy.
Some components also support archive scaling and policies may be set to manage
and scale component archives based on statistics gathered on the project archive
level. Archive scaling is an elasticity framework for scaling archives or services
within an Enabler. It enables you to deploy, start, stop, and undeploy application
archives to Components without restarting the Components and disrupting the
running applications. Archive Scaling is also known as micro-scaling.
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For More Information
For more information on Stacks, see the Silver Fabric Cloud Administrator’s Guide.
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Chapter 5
Inside the Engine
The TIBCO Silver® Fabric Engine is a lightweight
application that deploys, monitors and manages Stacks.
Any given host can be used to run one or more Engine
instances (and so, potentially, Component instances).
Engine instances are started and managed by an agent
that runs on the host called the Engine Daemon. The
Engine Daemon starts Engine instances, monitors them,
and restarts them if there are failures or reconfigurations.
Figure 6 The TIBCO
Silver® Fabric Engine.
Topics
•
The Engine Daemon, page 26
•
Installation and Configuration, page 27
•
For More Information, page 28
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The Engine Daemon
The Engine Daemon manages Engine instances on resource computers. It is the
program you install on a computer to maintain Engine instances on that machine.
It runs as a separate process from the Engine instances. One Engine Daemon runs
per machine. It starts and stops one or more Engine instances based on
configuration and machine state.
Aside from starting Engine instances, the Engine Daemon also performs
configuration for Engine instances. The Engine Configuration is centrally
managed on the Broker. When an administrator changes the Engine
Configuration, the changes automatically propagate to Engine Daemon, which
then apply the changes to Engine instances.
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Installation and Configuration
Engine instances are only installed on a machine once. Engine configuration is
centrally managed, and Engine instances can be automatically upgraded.
A 1-click installation is available from the Silver Fabric Administration Tool for
32-bit Windows machines. For 64-bit Windows machines, or as an alternative to
the 1-click installation on a 32-bit Windows machine, you can download a
Windows installation executable, or use SMS to run an automated installation. For
Unix, an archive file is available for download to a target machine.
Once Engine instances are installed, you can manage Engine configuration from
anywhere on the network with the Silver Fabric Administration Tool. You can also
create configuration profiles for use by multiple machines to synchronize
configurations.
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For More Information
For more information on installing Engines, see “Windows Engine Installation”
and “Unix Engine Installation” in the Silver Fabric Installation Guide.
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Chapter 6
Inside the Broker
The Silver Fabric Broker provides policy-driven resource allocation and
monitoring. The focal point of Silver Fabric, the Broker manages Stacks and
Engines to ensure service and manage load.
The Silver Fabric administration service that manages and provides policy-driven
resource allocation and monitoring. The Silver Fabric Administrator provides an
HTTP accessible GUI for management and configuration of the Broker.
Topics
•
Broker Roles, page 30
•
VirtualRouter, page 34
•
Skyway, page 35
•
For More Information, page 36
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Broker Roles
A Broker’s roles include routing and authentication, Engine allocation, Engine
provisioning, and resource management. It can also serve as a virtual endpoint
for J2EE Components.
Figure 7 Roles of the Silver Fabric Broker.
Connection Management
Connection managers establish connections with Engines and other Brokers (for
failover). The remote control of applications and statistics collection is made
through the connection managers. The HTTP/HTTPS communication protocol
provides a highly scalable, secure, firewall-friendly management plane.
Heartbeats flow between components through the connections to provide robust
operation with failover/failback capabilities.
Statistics Management
The Broker gathers statistics from Engines, Enablers, and Components. Statistics
are tracked metrics from Engines, Components, or Archives that are reported and
aggregated for historical reporting and for dynamic provisioning of incremental
application resources. System statistics such as CPU usage and memory footprint
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can be used with application statistics such as threads, sessions, throughput, and
latency. External statistics can be implemented to provide information about
conditions outside Silver Fabric’s scope. You can also use scripts to provide
statistics about a running Enabler or Component.
A limited amount of history is stored in memory for allocation decisions; an
optional external relational database can be used for long-term history storage of
system and application statistics, alerts, user events, and other tracked data. Silver
Fabric supports standard RDBMS vendors. The Silver Fabric Administration Tool
enables you to get simple reports or create and store custom queries.
Allocation Management
The Broker determines how many instances of each Component to run, and on
which machines. The allocation algorithm, derived from Stack policies and
captured statistics, provides priority-based optimization of Component allocation
across machines. Policy rules govern constraints (such as OS or memory
requirements), dependencies and the addition and subtraction of resources in
response to runtime conditions. Blacklisting ensures that Components that
repeatedly fail to start on certain machines are not continually activated on those
machines.
Stack Management
The Stack manager enables you to create, modify, deploy, and activate Stacks.
Silver Fabric Stacks are clusters of Components, combined with one or more
policies (sets of settings and rules that dictate Engine allocation for each
Component in the Stack). Where a Component corresponds to a virtualized
executable, a Stack corresponds to the kind of Component bundle you’d naturally
think of as a unit. For example, a typical Code-Cache-Data web-based application
might be deployed in Silver Fabric as a Stack combining a Component for each
tier (one for the J2EE web application “Code” front-end, a second for the
in-memory cache and a third for the database back-end).
Component and Enabler Repository
The Component and Enabler repository is the central location that stores the
libraries and distributions used by Engines to run Components. You can use the
Silver Fabric Administration Tool to stage and deploy these archives in controlled
and roles-based fashion.
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Management Dashboard
The Silver Fabric Administration Tool Dashboard provides dynamic updates of
quick view operational data, applications, resources, and statistics. Event
notifications appear on the Dashboard and are available for capture by external
tools and systems through SNMP.
Web Services SDK
Most of the tasks you perform through the Silver Fabric Administration Tool are
also achievable through web services (REST/JMX), thus enabling other
applications or management systems to control Silver Fabric. In addition, a
command line tool and a set of ant tasks allow common activities to be easily
integrated into existing operational frameworks.
Asset Management
Provisioning applications dynamically sometimes involves more than just
instantiating Components on existing Engines. Depending on the structure of
your data center, it could involve spinning up new machine images, powering on
hardware or reconfiguring the network. In Silver Fabric’s Asset Management
framework, an Asset Manager is something you’d add to a Broker that would be
responsible for managing external services to perform tasks like these. For
instance, the VMware Asset Manager that ships with Silver Fabric enables Silver
Fabric to use VMware APIs to start, stop and monitor VMware virtual machines.
The Asset Manager framework provides an API that enables an Asset Manager to
react to events on the Broker and to post events to the Broker (allowing other
components to react in turn). It also includes an Asset Manager management
interface in the Silver Fabric Administration Tool.
Configuration Management
The Broker stores and configures many Silver Fabric settings, including users and
passwords, Component information, routing properties, and Engine
configuration. You configure these settings with the Silver Fabric Administration
Tool.
Resource Management
Enabler and Component resources are staged on the Broker and published to
Engines.
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Publishing resources like Stacks, Enablers, Components, Component Archives,
and Schedules moves those selected resources as staged changes to the running
installation.
You can use the Silver Fabric Administration Tool to upload files to Components
and publish/unpublish the Components as needed.
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VirtualRouter
Silver Fabric VirtualRouter is a web application that routes requests between
Components and HTTP clients such as Web browsers. The Broker continually
sends Engine routing information to the VirtualRouter. In the case of J2EE
Components, HTTP clients connect to VirtualRouter and are forwarded to the
Component hosting the J2EE web application.
Figure 8 Silver Fabric VirtualRouter.
By default, an embedded instance of VirtualRouter runs on the Broker. The
number of simultaneous requests it can handle is controlled by the number of
threads available in the application server running Silver Fabric. You can run
additional instances of VirtualRouter externally, on other application servers. This
provides greater overall performance, as VirtualRouter can handle greater loads
without affecting general Broker performance. It also provides greater system
stability in the event of a Broker failure, as VirtualRouter continues to function
with its last known state. Multiple VirtualRouters may be run for redundancy and
load sharing. They can also be partitioned such that some VirtualRouters only
forward to a certain set of Components and other VirtualRouters to other
Components.
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Skyway
Skyway is a web-based interface that enables a developer to obtain a desired
complex development platform to build franchise applications. Skyway users are
provided Templates, each of which defines a Stack that can be easily provisioned
to run an application. You can configure Templates before provisioning, and also
capture changes made in the Stack’s Components.
Skyway runs on each Broker. It uses the Broker’s definitions of Stacks, Templates,
and users.
Skyway can also be used as a templating system to enable operators to easily
deploy applications to a private cloud. An application running in the cloud can be
captured as a template which can then be modified and later provisioned. This
enables operators to repeatedly instantiate templates to environments after
making minor changes.
For more information on Skyway, see the Silver Fabric Cloud Administration Guide.
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For More Information
For more information, see “Broker Installation” in the Silver Fabric Installation
Guide.
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Chapter 7
Statistics and Monitoring
TIBCO Silver® Fabric provides robust, built-in support for monitoring and
statistics collection. Monitoring is a primary tool for system health tracking,
optimization and automated error-prevention. The Broker monitors the cloud as
it communicates directly with each Engine. Baseline performance statistics such
as free memory and CPU utilization as well as allocation statistics—number of
Engines expected or allocated—are collected and tracked for each Component.
Components can be configured to have additional statistics, such as throughput
or request frequency, tracked as desired.
Topics
•
Statistics Collection, page 38
•
Viewing Statistics, page 40
TIBCO Silver® Fabric Concepts
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Statistics Collection
Silver Fabric monitors key statistics for IT intelligence as well as for dynamically
adjusting allocation resources to applications. Engines contain statistics collection
mechanisms. The Broker collects the latest average statistics at regular time
intervals. The data collected includes the invoking user, Component, service and
method signature. Additionally, the record contains the average values of the
collected statistics.
In the figure below, the Engine collects statistics and reports them to the Broker.
The Broker uses these statistics as a metric to determine whether to allocate or
deallocate Engines. This creates a continuous feedback loop.
Figure 9 Statistics gathering.
Silver Fabric uses Java Management Extensions (JMX) to provide statistics and
monitor enabled applications. Measuring the right JMX statistics to determine
load and system performance is critical for enforcing and meeting SLAs. For
example, the load on a Java application server and the commensurate user
response time is not best assessed through CPU utilization. JMX attributes such as
queue depth, service throughput, or thread count are better alternatives.
TIBCO Silver® Fabric Concepts
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Silver Fabric collects Engine statistics on a regular basis. Since the collection
occurs frequently for every Engine in the cloud, the resulting amount of data
requires consolidation through an averaging strategy. For every Engine process,
data accumulates in the Broker’s in-memory statistics queue. Each interval, the
Broker averages the data for each Engine, calculates the statistics for the entire
cloud, and saves the resulting records into the database.
TIBCO Silver® Fabric Concepts
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Viewing Statistics
You can view statistics in a variety of ways to monitor the effectiveness and
general health of your Silver Fabric system.
The Dashboard
The Silver Fabric dashboard is the initial page of the Silver Fabric Administration
Tool. The dashboard displays updated information on the system, including
Engine allocation, alerts, cloud information, and more.
Figure 10 The Silver Fabric Dashboard.
TIBCO Silver® Fabric Concepts
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The Reports Tab
The Silver Fabric Administration Tool provides several methods to view collected
data on the Reports tab. These include an Alerts page and an Allocation Stats
page, both of which are summarized on the dashboard. The Reports tab also
contains pages for Component and Engine Charts. The charts pages enable you to
graph a variety of statistics.
If you make available an enterprise-grade JDBC-enabled database, Silver Fabric
can use it to store data including allocation events and Component, Enabler, and
Engine statistics.
TIBCO Silver® Fabric Concepts
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TIBCO Silver® Fabric Concepts
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Glossary
A
reuse when a Component is published to a new
Engine. See also Grid Library.
Accounts
A collection of users, with access limited to a
subset of the cloud and its objects. Accounts are
typically used to “silo” users in different
business units to their own set of objects in an
enterprise-wide cloud. A special account, simply
named “cloud”, exists by default and contains
admin-level users that have access to all objects.
Administration Tool
A web application used to monitor and manage
a Silver Fabric installation. The interface can be
used to administer the Broker, its Engines and
Clients, and the associated Stacks, Components,
Enablers, and Schedules.
Allocation
The number of CPUs or Engine instances given
to running published Components. Allocation
constraints may be set to limit the number of
Engines or CPUs dedicated to running a
particular Component.
Applications
Applications are now called Stacks. See Stacks.
Archive Scaling
An elasticity framework for scaling archives or
services within an Enabler. It enables you to
deploy, start, stop, and undeploy application
archives to Components without restarting the
Components and disrupting the running
applications. Archive Scaling is also known as
micro-scaling.
Assets
Applications and compute nodes are assets that
can be segmented vertically by groups of users
called accounts.
B
Broker
The Silver Fabric administration service that
manages and provides policy-driven resource
allocation and monitoring. The Silver Fabric
Administrator provides an HTTP accessible GUI
for management and configuration of the Broker.
Application Components
Application Components are now called
Components. See Components.
Archives
Compressed libraries and distributions that may
be published by the Silver Fabric Broker to Silver
Fabric Engines with specific configurations.
Archives are stored in a central repository for
C
Cloud
A collection of TIBCO Silver Fabric Engines,
Brokers, and Components. Your Silver Fabric
Broker, Engines, and Components running on
your network is your private cloud hosted
on-premise.
TIBCO Silver® Fabric Concepts
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Component
Engine Configuration
An executable, virtualized by an Enabler, that
can be published as part of a Stack . Many TIBCO
products, utility services, and J2EE web
applications have been productized as distinct
components for publishing as part of the TIBCO
Silver Fabric Cloud.
A centralized profile that controls Engine
Daemon behavior. Engine instances use the
configuration of their Engine Daemon. Changes
made to an Engine Configuration on a Broker
will propagate to all Engine Daemons using that
configuration.
Component Type
Engine Daemon
Components with a similar set of characteristics.
Components belonging to the same Component
Type will have the same Component
configuration wizard.
Engine Daemon - the agent that starts, manages,
and stops Engine instances on the Engine host.
Containers
G
Containers are now called Enablers. See
Enablers.
Grid Library
D
Compressed files and distributions that may be
published by the Silver Fabric Broker to Silver
Fabric Engines with specific configurations and
policies defined y an Enabler and a Stack. Grid
libraries, also known as gridlibs or archives, are
stored in a central repository for reuse when a
Component is published to a new Engine.
Deployment
Deployment is now called publishing. See
Publish
Distribution
The Distribution contains the application server
or program used for the Enabler.
P
Policy
E
Enabler
A wrapper around an external application or
application platform, such as a J2EE application
server.
Engine
The process that provisions and runs a
Component instance.
TIBCO Silver® Fabric Concepts
Rules can define component allocation settings
within a stack. Policies can also set a
dependency, enablement condition, resource
preference, threshold activation, engine group
minimum or maximum.
Publishing
To move staged changes made to Enablers,
Components, Component Archives, Stacks, and
Schedules to the running installation.
| 45
R
Role
A set of permissions assigned to a user, each of
which approves them to use, see, or access a
Silver Fabric resource. Roles can be used to
segment permissions horizontally, and limit
actions available to a given class of user. There
are five default roles, or you can also create
custom roles.
Statistic
Tracked metrics of an Engine, Component, or
Archive that are reported and aggregated for
historical reporting and dynamic provisioning of
incremental application resources.
T
Template
Runtime
Refers to published components and stacks
running on Engines.
A Silver Fabric Stack which can be configured
and provisioned from Skyway.
Any Stack can be designated as a template in the
Silver Fabric Administration Tool.
Runtime Context Variables
Enabler settings and values that help to
virtualize a component. Enablers define a set of
string and environment variables, which are
inherited by each Component at runtime.
S
V
VirtualRouter
A web application that routes requests between
Components and HTTP clients such as Web
browsers.
Schedule
Defined periods of time based on hourly, daily,
weekly, or monthly periods.
Skyway
A web-based application used by cloud
consumers to run platforms for franchise
applications. Skyway users are provided
Templates, which are Stacks that can be easily
provisioned to run an application.
Skyway runs on each Broker. It uses the Broker’s
definitions of Stacks, Templates, and users.
Stack
A bundle of Components that is activated as a
unit, plus one or more policies specifying the
resource needs, priorities and constraints of
those Components.
TIBCO Silver® Fabric Concepts
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TIBCO Silver® Fabric Concepts
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Index
A
F
Allocation 17
Allocation Management 31
Asset Management 32
Automated Application Management 4
Features 16
H
High-Level Silver Fabric Architecture 8
B
Broker Roles 30
I
Installation and Configuration 27
C
Command Line Components 13
Component and Enabler Repository 31
Configuration Management 32
Connection Management 30
Creating and Deploying Components 16
customer support xiii
J
J2EE Components 13
L
D
Leverage Existing Resources 3
Dynamic Application Elasticity 2
M
E
Management Dashboard 32
Elasticity 3
Enabler Contents 12
Enablers and Component Types 13
Engine
installation 27
P
Policies and Schedules 21
TIBCO Silver® Fabric User’s Guide
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R
W
Resource and Privilege Segmentation 7
Resource Management 32
Web Services SDK 32
S
Self-Service 3
Shared Pool of Resources 3
Skyway 4, 35
Stack Management 31
Stacks 20
Statistics Collection 38
Statistics Management 30
support, contacting xiii
T
technical support xiii
The Dashboard 40
The Engine Daemon 26
The Operations Management Environment 6
The Reports Tab 41
TIBCO_HOME x
U
Uses and Benefits 3
V
Variables 16
Viewing Statistics 40
VirtualRouter 34
TIBCO Silver® Fabric User’s Guide
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