Simulation Flows

Simulation Flows

Quartus Prime Standard Edition Handbook Volume 3: Verification

Subscribe

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

101 Innovation Drive

San Jose, CA 95134 www.altera.com

Simulating Altera Designs

2015.11.02

QPS5V3

Subscribe

Send Feedback

This document describes simulating designs that target Altera devices. Simulation verifies design behavior before device programming. The Quartus

®

Prime software supports RTL- and gate-level design simulation in supported EDA simulators. Simulation involves setting up your simulator working environ‐ ment, compiling simulation model libraries, and running your simulation.

1

Simulator Support

The Quartus Prime software supports specific EDA simulator versions for RTL and gate-level simulation.

Table 1-1: Supported Simulators

Vendor

Aldec

Aldec

Cadence

Mentor

Graphics

Mentor

Graphics

Mentor

Graphics

Mentor

Graphics

Synopsys

Simulator Version Platform

Active-HDL

Riviera-PRO

Incisive Enterprise

10.2 Update 2 Windows

2015.06

14.2

ModelSim-Altera (provided) 10.4b

Windows, Linux

Linux

Windows, Linux

ModelSim PE

ModelSim SE

QuestaSim

VCS/VCS MX

10.4b

10.4b

10.4b

Windows

Windows, Linux

Windows, Linux

2014,12-SP1 Linux

Simulation Levels

The Quartus Prime software supports RTL and gate-level simulation of IP cores in supported EDA simulators.

©

2015 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, ENPIRION, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX words and logos are trademarks of Altera Corporation and registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. All other words and logos identified as trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html

. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.

www.altera.com

101 Innovation Drive, San Jose, CA 95134

ISO

9001:2008

Registered

1-2

Simulation Levels

Table 1-2: Supported Simulation Levels

Simulation Level

RTL

Gate-level functional

Gate-level timing

Description

Cycle-accurate simulation using

Verilog HDL, SystemVerilog, and VHDL design source code with simulation models provided by Altera and other IP providers.

Simulation Input

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

• Design source/testbench

• Altera simulation libraries

• Altera IP plain text or IEEE encrypted

RTL models

• IP simulation models

• Altera IP functional simulation models

• Altera IP bus functional models

• Qsys-generated models

• Verification IP

Simulation using a post-synthesis or post-fit functional netlist testing the post-synthesis functional netlist, or post-fit functional netlist.

• Testbench

• Altera simulation libraries

• Post-synthesis or post-fit functional netlist

• Altera IP bus functional models

Simulation using a post-fit timing netlist, testing functional and timing performance.

Supported only for the Stratix IV, Cyclone

IV, and MAX 10 device families.

• Testbench

• Altera simulation libraries

• Post-fit timing netlist

• Post-fit Standard Delay Output File

(

.sdo

). Not supported for MAX 10 devices.

Note: Gate-level timing simulation of an entire design can be slow and should be avoided. Gate-level timing simulation is supported only for the Stratix IV and Cyclone IV device families. Use

TimeQuest static timing analysis rather than gate-level timing simulation.

Altera Corporation

Simulating Altera Designs

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

HDL Support

1-3

HDL Support

The Quartus

®

Prime software provides the following HDL support for EDA simulators.

Table 1-3: HDL Support

Language

VHDL

Verilog HDL

SystemVerilog

Mixed HDL

Schematic

Description

• For VHDL RTL simulation, compile design files directly in your simulator. To use NativeLink automation, analyze and elaborate your design in the Quartus

Prime software, and then use the NativeLink simulator scripts to compile the design files in your simulator. You must also compile simulation models from the

Altera simulation libraries and simulation models for the IP cores in your design.

Use the Simulation Library Compiler or NativeLink to compile simulation models.

• For gate-level simulation, the EDA Netlist Writer generates a synthesized design netlist VHDL Output File (

.vho

). Compile the .vho in your simulator. You may also need to compile models from the Altera simulation libraries.

• IEEE 1364-2005 encrypted Verilog HDL simulation models are encrypted separately for each Altera-supported simulation vendor. If you want to simulate the model in a VHDL design, you need either a simulator that is capable of

VHDL/Verilog HDL co-simulation, or any Mentor Graphics single language

VHDL simulator.

• For RTL simulation in Verilog HDL or SystemVerilog, compile your design files in your simulator. To use NativeLink automation, analyze and elaborate your design in the Quartus Prime software, and then use the NativeLink simulator scripts to compile your design files in your simulator. You must also compile simulation models from the Altera simulation libraries and simulation models for the IP cores in your design. Use the Simulation Library Compiler or NativeLink to compile simulation models.

• For gate-level simulation, the EDA Netlist Writer generates a synthesized design netlist Verilog Output File (

.vo

). Compile the

.vo

in your simulator.

• If your design is a mix of VHDL, Verilog HDL, and SystemVerilog files, you must use a mixed language simulator. Choose the most convenient supported language for generation of Altera IP cores in your design.

• Altera provides the entry-level ModelSim-Altera software, along with precompiled Altera simulation libraries, to simplify simulation of Altera designs.

Starting in version 15.0, the ModelSim-Altera software supports native, mixedlanguage (VHDL/Verilog HDL/SystemVerilog) co-simulation of plain text HDL.

If you have a VHDL-only simulator and need to simulate Verilog HDL modules and IP cores, you can either acquire a mixed-language simulator license from the simulator vendor, or use the ModelSim-Altera software.

You must convert schematics to HDL format before simulation. You can use the converted VHDL or Verilog HDL files for RTL simulation.

Simulating Altera Designs

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

1-4

Simulation Flows

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Simulation Flows

The Quartus

® design flow.

Prime software supports various method for integrating your supported simulator into the

Table 1-4: Simulation Flows

Simulation Flow

NativeLink flow

Description

The NativeLink automated flow supports a variety of design flows. Do not use

NativeLink if you require direct control over every aspect of simulation.

• Use NativeLink to generate simulation scripts to compile your design and simulation libraries, and to automatically launch your simulator.

• Specify your own compilation, elaboration, and simulation scripts for testbench and simulation model files that have not been analyzed by the Quartus Prime software.

• Use NativeLink to supplement your scripts by automatically compiling design files, IP simulation model files, and Altera simulation library models.

• To use NativeLink for Arria 10 devices and later, you must add to your project the

.qsys

file generated for IP or Qsys system. To use NativeLink for all other device families, you must add to your project the

.qip

and

.sip

files generated for

IP or Qsys systems.

• The Quartus Prime Pro Edition software does not support NativeLink RTL simulation

Custom flows Custom flows support manual control of all aspects of simulation, including the following:

• Manually compile and simulate testbench, design, IP, and simulation model libraries, or write scripts to automate compilation and simulation in your simulator.

• Use the Simulation Library Compiler to compile simulation libraries for all Altera devices and supported third-party simulators and languages.

Use the custom flow if you require any of the following:

• Custom compilation commands for design, IP, or simulation library model files (for example, macros, debugging or optimization options, or other simulator-specific options).

• Multi-pass simulation flows.

• Flows that use dynamically generated simulation scripts.

Specialized flows Altera supports specialized flows for various design variations, including the following:

• For simulation of Altera example designs, refer to the documentation for the example design or to the IP core user guide.

• For simulation of Qsys designs, refer to Creating a System with Qsys.

• For simulation of designs that include the Nios II embedded processor, refer to

Simulating a Nios II Embedded Processor.

Altera Corporation

Simulating Altera Designs

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Preparing for Simulation

1-5

Related Information

IP User Guide Documentation

Creating a System with Qsys

Simulating a Nios II Embedded Processor

Preparing for Simulation

Preparing for RTL or gate-level simulation involves compiling the RTL or gate-level representation of your design and testbench. You must also compile IP simulation models, models from the Altera simulation libraries, and any other model libraries required for your design.

Generating Simulation Scripts

You can use the NativeLink feature to automatically generate top-level simulation scripts to set up supported simulators. These scripts compile the required device libraries and system design files in the correct order, and then elaborate or load the top-level design for simulation. You can use Altera-provided utilities to generate a combined simulation script for Altera IP cores in your design. You can source these

IP simulation scripts in your top-level project script. You can modify and reuse these simulation scripts to fit your simulation requirements.

1. Click Assignments > Settings.

2. Under EDA Tool Settings, click Simulation.

3. Select the Tool name of your simulator.

4. Click More NativeLink Settings.

5. Turn on Generate third-party EDA tool command scripts without running the EDA tool.

Table 1-5: NativeLink Generated Scripts for RTL Simulation

Simulator(s) Simulation File

Mentor Graphics

ModelSim

QuestaSim

/simulation/modelsim/<my_ip>.do

Aldec Riviera Pro

/simulation/modelsim/<my_ip>.do

Synopsys VCS

/simulation/modelsim/<revision name>

_<rtl or gate>.vcs

Synopsys

VCS MX

/simulation/scsim/<revision name>_ vcsmx_<rtl or gate>_<verilog or vhdl>

.tcl

Use

Source directly with your simulator.

Source directly with your simulator.

Add your testbench file name to this options file to pass the file to VCS using the

-file

option.

If you specify a testbench file to NativeLink,

NativeLink generates an

.sh

script that runs

VCS.

Run this script at the command line using the command: quartus_sh -t

<script>

Any testbench you specify with NativeLink is included in this script.

Simulating Altera Designs

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

1-6

Generating Version-Independent IP and Qsys Simulation Scripts

Simulator(s)

Cadence Incisive

(NC SIM)

Simulation File

/simulation/ncsim/<revision name>_ ncsim_<rtl or gate>_<verilog or vhdl>

.tcl

Use

Run this script at the command line using the command: quartus_sh -t

<script>.

Any testbench you specify with NativeLink is included in this script.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

You can use the following script variables:

TOP_LEVEL_NAME

—The top-level entity of your simulation is often a testbench that instantiates your design, and then your design instantiates IP cores and/or Qsys systems. Set the value of

TOP_LEVEL_NAME

to the top-level entity.

QSYS_SIMDIR

—Specifies the top-level directory containing the simulation files.

• Other variables control the compilation, elaboration, and simulation process.

Generating Version-Independent IP and Qsys Simulation Scripts

The Quartus Prime software includes useful utilities that generate simulation scripts for each IP core or

Qsys system in your design. You can use these utilities to produce a single simulation script that does not require manual update for upgrades to Quartus Prime software or IP versions.

This scripted method generates simulation scripts that support ModelSim-Altera, all supported versions of Questa-SIM, VCS, VCSMX, NCSim, and Aldec simulators. These generated scripts are not suitable for entire design simulation because they lack top-level design information. However, you can easily source the generated scripts from your top-level simulation script. You can incorporate templates from the generated scripts into a top-level script.

Use the ip-setup-simulation

utility to find all Altera IP cores and Qsys systems in your project. Next, run the ip-make-simscript

utility to generate a combined IP simulation script. The ip-setupsimulation

utility also automates regeneration of a combined simulation script following upgrade of the software. If you use simulation scripts, run the ip-setup-simulation

utility after upgrading software or

IP core version.

Set appropriate variables in the script, or edit the variable assignment directly in the script. If the simulation script is a Tcl file that is sourced in the simulator, set the variables before sourcing the script. If the simulation script is a shell script, pass in the variables as command-line arguments to the shell script.

Table 1-6: IP Simulation Script Utilities

Utility

ip-setupsimulation

Description

Finds all Altera IP cores in your project and automates regeneration of a combined simulation script after upgrading software or IP versions.

Syntax

ip-setup-simulation --quartusproject=<project>.qpf -output-directory=<directory>

N/A

Generated Files

Altera Corporation

Simulating Altera Designs

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Utility

ip-makesimscript

Incorporating IP Simulation Scripts in Top-Level Scripts

Description

Generates a single, combined simulation script for all of the IP cores specified on the command line. To use ip-makesimscript

, specify one or more .spd files and an output directory in the command. Running the script compiles IP simulation models into various simulation libraries. Use the compileto- work

option to compile all simulation files into a single work library. Use the

--userelative-paths option to use relative paths whenever possible

Syntax

ip-make-simscript -spd=<ipA.spd,ipB.spd> -output-directory=<directory>

Generated Files

1-7

• Aldec—

aldec/ rivierapro_setup.tcl

• Cadence—

cadence/ ncsim_setup.sh

• Mentor Graphics—

mentor/msim_ setup.tcl

• Synopsys—

synopsys/ vcs/vcs_setup.sh

Incorporating IP Simulation Scripts in Top-Level Scripts

You can incorporate generated IP core simulation scripts into a top-level simulation script that controls simulation of your entire design. After generating a combined IP simulation script, you can copy the template sections and modify them for use in a new top-level script file.

Figure 1-1: Incorporating IP Simulation Scripts into Top-Level Script

Top-Level Simulation Script

Specify:

TOP_LEVEL_NAME

Additional compile and elaboration options

Source the Generated Combined IP Simulation Script

(e.g., source msim_setup.tcl)

Compile design files

Elaborate

Simulate

Individual IP

Simulation Scripts

Run ip_setup_simulation

For Quartus Prime Project

Simulation Script with Combined IP

Includes Guidelines for

Use and Templates

1. Run ip-setup-simulation

on the project: ip-setup-simulation --quartus-project=<project>.qpf

--output-directory=<directory>

2. Copy the template sections from the simulator-specific generated scripts and paste them into a new top-level file. The examples in this document assume that the top-level simulation script file is in the

Simulating Altera Designs

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

1-8

Incorporating Aldec IP Simulation Scripts

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

project directory, and that the generated simulation scripts are located in a directory one level below the project directory.

3. After pasting the template sections, remove the comments at the beginning of each line from the copied template sections.

4. Make any other modification to match your design simulation requirements, for example:

a. Specify the

TOP_LEVEL_NAME

variable to the design’s simulation top-level file.

b. Compile the top-level HDL file (e.g. a test program) and all other files in the design.

c. Specify any other changes, such as using the grep

command-line utility to search a transcript file for error signatures, or e-mail a report.

Incorporating Aldec IP Simulation Scripts

To incorporate generated Aldec simulation scripts into a top-level project simulation script, follow these steps:

1. The generated simulation script contains the following template lines. Cut and paste these lines into a new file. For example,

sim_top.tcl

.

# # Start of template

# # If the copied and modified template file is "aldec.do", run it as:

# # vsim -c -do aldec.do

# #

# # Source the generated sim script

# source rivierapro_setup.tcl

# # Compile eda/sim_lib contents first

# dev_com

# # Override the top-level name (so that elab is useful)

# set TOP_LEVEL_NAME top

# # Compile the standalone IP.

# com

# # Compile the user top-level

# vlog -sv2k5 ../../top.sv

# # Elaborate the design.

# elab

# # Run the simulation

# run

# # Report success to the shell

# exit -code 0

# # End of template

2. Delete the first two characters of each line (comment and space):

# Start of template

# If the copied and modified template file is "aldec.do", run it as:

# vsim -c -do aldec.do

#

# Source the generated sim script source rivierapro_setup.tcl

# Compile eda/sim_lib contents first dev_com

# Override the top-level name (so that elab is useful) set TOP_LEVEL_NAME top

# Compile the standalone IP. com

# Compile the user top-level vlog -sv2k5 ../../top.sv

# Elaborate the design. elab

# Run the simulation run

# Report success to the shell

Altera Corporation

Simulating Altera Designs

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Incorporating Cadence IP Simulation Scripts

1-9

exit -code 0

# End of template

3. Modify the

TOP_LEVEL_NAME

and compilation step appropriately, depending on the simulation’s toplevel file. For example: set TOP_LEVEL_NAME sim_top vlog –sv2k5 ../../sim_top.sv

4. Specify any other changes required to match your design simulation requirements.

5. Run the new top-level script from the generated simulation directory: vsim –c –do <path to sim_top>.tcl

Incorporating Cadence IP Simulation Scripts

To incorporate generated Cadence IP simulation scripts into a top-level project simulation script, follow these steps:

1. The generated simulation script contains the following template lines. Cut and paste these lines into a new file. For example,

ncsim.sh

.

# # Start of template

# # If the copied and modified template file is "ncsim.sh", run it as:

# # ./ncsim.sh

# #

# # Do the file copy, dev_com and com steps

# source ncsim_setup.sh \

# SKIP_ELAB=1 \

# SKIP_SIM=1

#

# # Compile the top level module

# ncvlog -sv "$QSYS_SIMDIR/../top.sv"

#

# # Do the elaboration and sim steps

# # Override the top-level name

# # Override the user-defined sim options, so the simulation

# # runs forever (until $finish()).

# source ncsim_setup.sh \

# SKIP_FILE_COPY=1 \

# SKIP_DEV_COM=1 \

# SKIP_COM=1 \

# TOP_LEVEL_NAME=top \

# USER_DEFINED_SIM_OPTIONS=""

# # End of template

2. Delete the first two characters of each line (comment and space):

# Start of template

# If the copied and modified template file is "ncsim.sh", run it as:

# ./ncsim.sh

#

# Do the file copy, dev_com and com steps source ncsim_setup.sh \

SKIP_ELAB=1 \

SKIP_SIM=1

# Compile the top level module ncvlog -sv "$QSYS_SIMDIR/../top.sv"

# Do the elaboration and sim steps

# Override the top-level name

# Override the user-defined sim options, so the simulation

# runs forever (until $finish()). source ncsim_setup.sh \

SKIP_FILE_COPY=1 \

SKIP_DEV_COM=1 \

Simulating Altera Designs

Altera Corporation

Send Feedback

1-10

Incorporating ModelSim IP Simulation Scripts

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

SKIP_COM=1 \

TOP_LEVEL_NAME=top \

USER_DEFINED_SIM_OPTIONS=""

# End of template

3. Modify the

TOP_LEVEL_NAME

and compilation step appropriately, depending on the simulation’s toplevel file. For example:

TOP_LEVEL_NAME=sim_top \

4. Make the appropriate changes to the compilation of the your top-level file, for example: ncvlog -sv "$QSYS_SIMDIR/../top.sv"

5. Specify any other changes required to match your design simulation requirements.

6. Run the resulting top-level script from the generated simulation directory by specifying the path to

ncsim.sh

.

Incorporating ModelSim IP Simulation Scripts

To incorporate generated ModelSim IP simulation scripts into a top-level project simulation script, follow these steps:

1. The generated simulation script contains the following template lines. Cut and paste these lines into a new file. For example,

sim_top.tcl

.

# # Start of template

# # If the copied and modified template file is "mentor.do", run it

# # as: vsim -c -do mentor.do

# #

# # Source the generated sim script

# source msim_setup.tcl

# # Compile eda/sim_lib contents first

# dev_com

# # Override the top-level name (so that elab is useful)

# set TOP_LEVEL_NAME top

# # Compile the standalone IP.

# com

# # Compile the user top-level

# vlog -sv ../../top.sv

# # Elaborate the design.

# elab

# # Run the simulation

# run -a

# # Report success to the shell

# exit -code 0

# # End of template

2. Delete the first two characters of each line (comment and space):

# Start of template

# If the copied and modified template file is "mentor.do", run it

# as: vsim -c -do mentor.do

#

# Source the generated sim script source msim_setup.tcl

# Compile eda/sim_lib contents first dev_com

# Override the top-level name (so that elab is useful) set TOP_LEVEL_NAME top

# Compile the standalone IP. com

# Compile the user top-level vlog -sv ../../top.sv

# Elaborate the design. elab

Altera Corporation

Simulating Altera Designs

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Incorporating VCS IP Simulation Scripts

1-11

# Run the simulation run -a

# Report success to the shell exit -code 0

# End of template

3. Modify the

TOP_LEVEL_NAME

and compilation step appropriately, depending on the simulation’s toplevel file. For example: set TOP_LEVEL_NAME sim_top vlog -sv ../../sim_top.sv

4. Specify any other changes required to match your design simulation requirements.

5. Run the resulting top-level script from the generated simulation directory: vsim –c –do <path to sim_top>.tcl

Incorporating VCS IP Simulation Scripts

To incorporate generated Synopsys VCS simulation scripts into a top-level project simulation script, follow these steps:

1. The generated simulation script contains these template lines. Cut and paste the lines preceding the

“helper file” into a new executable file. For example,

synopsys_vcs.f

.

# # Start of template

# # If the copied and modified template file is "vcs_sim.sh", run it

# # as: ./vcs_sim.sh

# #

# # Override the top-level name

# # specify a command file containing elaboration options

# # (system verilog extension, and compile the top-level).

# # Override the user-defined sim options, so the simulation

# # runs forever (until $finish()).

# source vcs_setup.sh \

# TOP_LEVEL_NAME=top \

# USER_DEFINED_ELAB_OPTIONS="'-f ../../../synopsys_vcs.f'" \

# USER_DEFINED_SIM_OPTIONS=""

#

# # helper file: synopsys_vcs.f

# +systemverilogext+.sv

# ../../../top.sv

# # End of template

2. Delete the first two characters of each line (comment and space) for the

vcs.sh

file, as shown below:

# Start of template

# If the copied and modified template file is "vcs_sim.sh", run it

# as: ./vcs_sim.sh

#

# Override the top-level name

# specify a command file containing elaboration options

# (system verilog extension, and compile the top-level).

# Override the user-defined sim options, so the simulation

# runs forever (until $finish()). source vcs_setup.sh \

TOP_LEVEL_NAME=top \

Simulating Altera Designs

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

1-12

Incorporating VCS MX IP Simulation Scripts

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

USER_DEFINED_ELAB_OPTIONS="'-f ../../../synopsys_vcs.f'" \

USER_DEFINED_SIM_OPTIONS=""

3. Delete the first two characters of each line (comment and space) for the

synopsys_vcs.f

file, as shown below:

# helper file: synopsys_vcs.f

+systemverilogext+.sv

../../../top.sv

# End of template

4. Modify the

TOP_LEVEL_NAME

and compilation step appropriately, depending on the simulation’s toplevel file. For example:

TOP_LEVEL_NAME=sim_top \

5. Specify any other changes required to match your design simulation requirements.

6. Run the resulting top-level script from the generated simulation directory by specifying the path to

vcs_sim.sh

.

Incorporating VCS MX IP Simulation Scripts

To incorporate generated Synopsys VCS MX simulation scripts for use in top-level project simulation scripts, follow these steps:

1. The generated simulation script contains these template lines. Cut and paste the lines preceding the

“helper file” into a new executable file. For example,

vcsmx.sh

.

# # Start of template

# # If the copied and modified template file is "vcsmx_sim.sh", run

# # it as: ./vcsmx_sim.sh

# #

# # Do the file copy, dev_com and com steps

# source vcsmx_setup.sh \

# SKIP_ELAB=1 \

# SKIP_SIM=1

#

# # Compile the top level module vlogan +v2k

+systemverilogext+.sv "$QSYS_SIMDIR/../top.sv"

# # Do the elaboration and sim steps

# # Override the top-level name

# # Override the user-defined sim options, so the simulation runs

# # forever (until $finish()).

# source vcsmx_setup.sh \

# SKIP_FILE_COPY=1 \

# SKIP_DEV_COM=1 \

# SKIP_COM=1 \

# TOP_LEVEL_NAME="'-top top'" \

# USER_DEFINED_SIM_OPTIONS=""

# # End of template

2. Delete the first two characters of each line (comment and space), as shown below:

# Start of template

# If the copied and modified template file is "vcsmx_sim.sh", run

# it as: ./vcsmx_sim.sh

#

# Do the file copy, dev_com and com steps source vcsmx_setup.sh \

SKIP_ELAB=1 \

SKIP_SIM=1

Altera Corporation

Simulating Altera Designs

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Compiling Simulation Models

1-13

# Compile the top level module vlogan +v2k +systemverilogext+.sv "$QSYS_SIMDIR/../top.sv"

# Do the elaboration and sim steps

# Override the top-level name

# Override the user-defined sim options, so the simulation runs

# forever (until $finish()). source vcsmx_setup.sh \

SKIP_FILE_COPY=1 \

SKIP_DEV_COM=1 \

SKIP_COM=1 \

TOP_LEVEL_NAME="'-top top'" \

USER_DEFINED_SIM_OPTIONS=""

# End of template

3. Modify the

TOP_LEVEL_NAME

and compilation step appropriately, depending on the simulation’s toplevel file. For example:

TOP_LEVEL_NAME=”-top sim_top’” \

4. Make the appropriate changes to the compilation of the your top-level file, for example: vlogan +v2k +systemverilogext+.sv "$QSYS_SIMDIR/../sim_top.sv"

5. Specify any other changes required to match your design simulation requirements.

6. Run the resulting top-level script from the generated simulation directory by specifying the path to

vcsmx_sim.sh

.

Compiling Simulation Models

The Quartus Prime software includes simulation models for all Altera IP cores. These models include IP functional simulation models, and device family-specific models in the

Quartus Prime< installation path>/ eda/sim_lib

directory. These models include IEEE encrypted Verilog HDL models for both Verilog HDL and VHDL simulation.

Before running simulation, you must compile the appropriate simulation models from the Altera simulation libraries using any of the following methods:

• Use the NativeLink feature to automatically compile your design, Altera IP, simulation model libraries, and testbench.

• Run the Simulation Library Compiler to compile all RTL and gate-level simulation model libraries for your device, simulator, and design language.

• Compile Altera simulation models manually with your simulator.

After you compile the simulation model libraries, you can reuse these libraries in subsequent simulations.

Note: The specified timescale precision must be within 1ps when using Altera simulation models.

Related Information

Altera Simulation Models

Generating IP Simulation Files for RTL Simulation

The Quartus Prime software supports both Verilog HDL and VHDL simulation of encrypted and unencrypted Altera IP cores. If your design includes Altera IP cores, you must compile any corresponding

IP simulation models in your simulator with the rest of your design and testbench. The Quartus Prime software generates and copies the simulation models for IP cores to your project directory.

Simulating Altera Designs

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

1-14

Generating IP Functional Simulation Models for RTL Simulation

You can use the following files to simulate your Altera IP variation.

Table 1-7: Altera IP Simulation Files

File Type

Simulator setup script

Description

Simulator-specific script to compile, elaborate, and simulate Altera IP models and simulation model library files. Copy the commands into your simulation script, or edit these files to compile, elaborate, and simulate your design and testbench.

File Name

Cadence

cds.lib

ncsim_setup.sh

hdl.var

Mentor Graphics

msim_setup.tcl

Synopsys

synopsys_sim.setup

vcs_setup.sh

vcsmx_setup.sh

Aldec

rivierapro_setup.tcl

Simulation IP

File (

.sip

) or

Qsys System

File (

.qsys

)

IP functional simulation models

IEEE encrypted models

The

.sip

and

.qsys

files contain IP core simulation library mapping information. To use NativeLink for

Arria 10 devices and later, you must add the

.qsys

file generated for IP or Qsys system to your project. To use

NativeLink for all other device families, you must add the

.qip

and

.sip

files generated for IP or Qsys systems to your project.

IP functional simulation models are cycle-accurate

VHDL or Verilog HDL models generated by the

Quartus Prime software for some Altera IP cores. IP functional simulation models support fast functional simulation of IP using industry-standard VHDL and

Verilog HDL simulators.

Arria V, Cyclone V, Stratix V, and newer simulation model libraries and IP simulation models are provided in Verilog HDL and IEEE encrypted Verilog HDL.

VHDL simulation of these models is supported using your simulator's co-simulation capabilities. IEEE encrypted Verilog HDL models are significantly faster than IP functional simulation models.

<design name>.sip

<my_ip>.vho

<my_ip>.vo

<my_ip>.v

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Generating IP Functional Simulation Models for RTL Simulation

Altera provides IP functional simulation models for some Altera IP cores. To generate IP functional simulation models, follow these steps:

• Turn on the Generate Simulation Model option when parameterizing the IP core.

• When you simulate your design, compile only the

.vo

or

.vho

for these IP cores in your simulator. In this case you should not compile the corresponding HDL file. The encrypted HDL file supports synthesis by only the Quartus Prime software.

Altera Corporation

Simulating Altera Designs

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Running a Simulation (NativeLink Flow)

1-15

Note: Altera IP cores that do not require IP functional simulation models for simulation, do not provide the Generate Simulation Model option in the IP core parameter editor.

Note: Many recently released Altera IP cores support RTL simulation using IEEE Verilog HDL encryption. IEEE encrypted models are significantly faster than IP functional simulation models.

You can simulate the models in both Verilog HDL and VHDL designs.

Related Information

AN 343: OpenCore Evaluation of AMPP Megafunctions

Running a Simulation (NativeLink Flow)

The NativeLink feature integrates your EDA simulator with the Quartus Prime software and automates the following simulation steps:

• Set and reuse simulation settings

• Generate simulator-specific files and simulation scripts

• Compile Altera simulation libraries

• Launch your simulator automatically following Quartus Prime Analysis & Elaboration, Analysis &

Synthesis, or after a full compilation.

Note: To use NativeLink for Arria 10 devices and later, you must add to your project the

.qsys

file generated for IP or Qsys system. To use NativeLink for all other device families, you must add to your project the

.qip

and

.sip

files generated for IP or Qsys systems.

Setting Up Simulation (NativeLink Flow)

Before running simulation using the NativeLink flow, you must specify settings for your simulator in the

Quartus Prime software. To specify simulation settings in the Quartus Prime software, follow these steps:

1. Open a Quartus Prime project.

2. Click Tools > Options and specify the location of your simulator executable file .

Table 1-8: Execution Paths for EDA Simulators

Simulator

Mentor Graphics

ModelSim-Altera

Path

<drive letter>:\<simulator install path>\

win32aloem (Windows)

/<simulator install path>/bin (Linux)

Mentor Graphics

ModelSim

Mentor Graphics

QuestaSim

<drive letter>:\<simulator install path>\win32

(Windows)

<simulator install path>/bin (Linux)

Synopsys VCS/VCS MX <simulator install path>/bin (Linux)

Cadence Incisive

Enterprise

<simulator install path>/tools/bin (Linux)

Simulating Altera Designs

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

1-16

Running RTL Simulation (NativeLink Flow)

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Simulator Path

Aldec Active-HDL

Aldec Riviera-PRO

<drive letter>:\<simlulator install path>\bin

(Windows)

<simulator install path>/bin (Linux)

3. Click Assignments > Settings and specify options on the Simulation page and More NativeLink

Settings dialog box. Specify default options for simulation library compilation, netlist and tool command script generation, and for launching RTL or gate-level simulation automatically following

Quartus Prime processing.

4. If your design includes a testbench, turn on Compile test bench and then click Test Benches to specify options for each testbench. Alternatively, turn on Use script to compile testbench and specify the script file.

5. If you want to use a script to setup simulation, turn on Use script to setup simulation.

Running RTL Simulation (NativeLink Flow)

To run RTL simulation using the NativeLink flow, follow these steps:

1. Set up the simulation environment.

2. Click Processing > Start > Analysis and Elaboration.

3. Click Tools > Run Simulation Tool > RTL Simulation.

NativeLink compiles simulation libraries and launches and runs your RTL simulator automatically according to the NativeLink settings.

4. Review and analyze the simulation results in your simulator. Correct any functional errors in your design. If necessary, re-simulate the design to verify correct behavior.

Running Gate-Level Simulation (NativeLink Flow)

To run gate-level simulation with the NativeLink flow, follow these steps:

1. Prepare for simulation.

2. Set up the simulation environment. To generate only a functional (rather than timing) gate-level netlist, click More EDA Netlist Writer Settings, and turn on Generate netlist for functional

simulation only.

3. To synthesize the design, follow one of these steps:

• To generate a post-fit functional or post-fit timing netlist and then automatically simulate your design according to your NativeLink settings, Click Processing > Start Compilation. Skip to step

6

.

• To synthesize the design for post-synthesis functional simulation only, click Processing > Start >

Start Analysis and Synthesis.

4. To generate the simulation netlist, click Start EDA Netlist Writer.

5. Click Tools > Run Simulation Tool > Gate Level Simulation.

6. Review and analyze the simulation results in your simulator. Correct any unexpected or incorrect conditions found in your design. Simulate the design again until you verify correct behavior.

Altera Corporation

Simulating Altera Designs

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Running a Simulation (Custom Flow)

1-17

Running a Simulation (Custom Flow)

Use a custom simulation flow to support any of the following more complex simulation scenarios:

• Custom compilation, elaboration, or run commands for your design, IP, or simulation library model files (for example, macros, debugging/optimization options, simulator-specific elaboration or run-time options)

• Multi-pass simulation flows

• Flows that use dynamically generated simulation scripts

Use these to compile libraries and generate simulation scripts for custom simulation flows:

• NativeLink-generated scripts—use NativeLink only to generate simulation script templates to develop your own custom scripts.

• Simulation Library Compiler—compile Altera simulation libraries for your device, HDL, and simulator. Generate scripts to compile simulation libraries as part of your custom simulation flow.

This tool does not compile your design, IP, or testbench files.

• IP and Qsys simulation scripts—use the scripts generated for Altera IP cores and Qsys systems as templates to create simulation scripts. If your design includes multiple IP cores or Qsys systems, you can combine the simulation scripts into a single script, manually or by using the ip-make-simscript

utility.

Use the following steps in a custom simulation flow:

1. Compile the design and testbench files in your simulator.

2. Run the simulation in your simulator.

Post-synthesis and post-fit gate-level simulations run significantly slower than RTL simulation. Altera recommends that you verify your design using RTL simulation for functionality and use the TimeQuest timing analyzer for timing. Timing simulation is not supported for Arria V, Cyclone V, Stratix V, and newer families.

Related Information

Running EDA Simulators

Document Revision History

This document has the following revision history.

Simulating Altera Designs

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

1-18

Document Revision History

Date

2015.11.02

15.1.0

Version

2015.05.04

2014.06.30

May 2013

November 2012

June 2012

15.0.0

14.0.0

13.0.0

12.1.0

12.0.0

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Changes

• Added new Generating

Version-Independent IP

Simulation Scripts topic.

• Added example IP simulation script templates for all supported simulators.

• Added new Incorporating IP

Simulation Scripts in Top-

Level Scripts topic.

• Updated simulator support table with latest version information.

• Changed instances of

Quartus II to Quartus Prime.

• Updated simulator support table with latest.

• Gate-level timing simulation limited to Stratix IV and

Cyclone IV devices.

• Added mixed language simulation support in the

ModelSim-Altera software.

• Replaced MegaWizard Plug-

In Manager information with

IP Catalog.

• Updated introductory section and system and IP file locations.

• Revised chapter to reflect latest changes to other simulation documentation.

• Reorganization of chapter to reflect various simulation flows.

• Added NativeLink support for newer IP cores.

Altera Corporation

Simulating Altera Designs

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Date

November 2011 11.1.0

Version

Document Revision History

Changes

• Added information about encrypted Altera simulation model files.

• Added information about IP simulation and NativeLink.

1-19

Related Information

Quartus Handbook Archive

For previous versions of the Quartus Prime Handbook, refer to the Quartus Handbook Archive.

Simulating Altera Designs

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

Mentor Graphics ModelSim and QuestaSim

Support

2015.11.02

QPS5V3

Subscribe

Send Feedback

You can integrate a supported EDA simulator into the Quartus Prime design flow. This document provides guidelines for simulation of designs with Mentor Graphics

®

ModelSim-Altera

®

, ModelSim, or

QuestaSim software. Altera provides the entry-level ModelSim-Altera software, along with precompiled

Altera simulation libraries, to simplify simulation of Altera designs.

Note: The latest version of the ModelSim-Altera software supports native, mixed-language (VHDL/

Verilog HDL/SystemVerilog) co-simulation of plain text HDL. If you have a VHDL-only simulator, you can use the ModelSim-Altera software to simulate Verilog HDL modules and IP cores. Alternatively, you can purchase separate co-simulation software.

Related Information

Simulating Altera Designs

on page 1-1

Managing Quartus Prime Projects

2

Quick Start Example (ModelSim with Verilog)

You can adapt the following RTL simulation example to get started quickly with ModelSim:

1. Type the following to specify your EDA simulator and executable path in the Quartus Prime software: set_user_option -name EDA_TOOL_PATH_MODELSIM

<modelsim executable path> set_global_assignment -name EDA_SIMULATION_TOOL "MODELSIM (verilog)"

2. Compile simulation model libraries using one of the following methods:

©

2015 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, ENPIRION, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX words and logos are trademarks of Altera Corporation and registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. All other words and logos identified as trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html

. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.

www.altera.com

101 Innovation Drive, San Jose, CA 95134

ISO

9001:2008

Registered

2-2

ModelSim, ModelSim-Altera, and QuestaSim Guidelines

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

• Run NativeLink RTL simulation to compile required design files, simulation models, and run your simulator. Verify results in your simulator. If you complete this step you can ignore the remaining steps.

• Use Quartus Prime Simulation Library Compiler to automatically compile all required simulation models for your design.

• Type the following commands to create and map Altera simulation libraries manually, and then compile the models manually: vlib <lib1>_ver vmap <lib1>_ver <lib1>_ver vlog -work <lib1> <lib1>

3. Compile your design and testbench files: vlog -work work <design or testbench name>

.v

4. Load the design: sim -L work -L <lib1>_ver -L <lib2>_ver work.<testbench name>

ModelSim, ModelSim-Altera, and QuestaSim Guidelines

The following guidelines apply to simulation of Altera designs in the ModelSim, ModelSim-Altera, or

QuestaSim software.

Using ModelSim-Altera Precompiled Libraries

Precompiled libraries for both functional and gate-level simulations are provided for the ModelSim-

Altera software. You should not compile these library files before running a simulation. No precompiled libraries are provided for ModelSim or QuestaSim. You must compile the necessary libraries to perform functional or gate-level simulation with these tools.

The precompiled libraries provided in <ModelSim-Altera path>

/altera/

must be compatible with the version of the Quartus Prime software that creates the simulation netlist. To verify compatibility of precompiled libraries with your version of the Quartus Prime software, refer to the <ModelSim-Altera

path>

/altera/version.txt

file. This file indicates the Quartus Prime software version and build of the precompiled libraries.

Note: Encrypted Altera simulation model files shipped with the Quartus Prime software version 10.1 and later can only be read by ModelSim-Altera Edition Software version 6.6c and later. These encrypted simulation model files are located at the <Quartus Prime System directory>

/quartus/eda/sim_lib/

<mentor> directory.

Disabling Timing Violation on Registers

In certain situations, you may want to ignore timing violations on registers and disable the “X” propagation that occurs. For example, this technique may be helpful to eliminate timing violations in internal synchronization registers in asynchronous clock-domain crossing.

Before you begin

By default, the x_on_violation_option logic option is enabled for all design registers, resulting in an output of “X” at timing violation. To disable “X” propagation at timing violations on a specific register,

Altera Corporation

Mentor Graphics ModelSim and QuestaSim Support

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Passing Parameter Information from Verilog HDL to VHDL

disable the x_on_violation_option logic option for the specific register, as shown in the following example from the Quartus Prime Settings File (

.qsf

).

set_instance_assignment -name X_ON_VIOLATION_OPTION OFF -to \ <register_name>

2-3

Passing Parameter Information from Verilog HDL to VHDL

You must use in-line parameters to pass values from Verilog HDL to VHDL.

Before you begin

By default, the x_on_violation_option logic option is enabled for all design registers, resulting in an output of “X” at timing violation. To disable “X” propagation at timing violations on a specific register, disable the x_on_violation_option logic option for the specific register, as shown in the following example from the Quartus Prime Settings File (

.qsf

).

set_instance_assignment -name X_ON_VIOLATION_OPTION OFF -to \ <register_name>

Example 2-1: In-line Parameter Passing Example

lpm_add_sub#(.lpm_width(12), .lpm_direction("Add"),

.lpm_type("LPM_ADD_SUB"),

.lpm_hint("ONE_INPUT_IS_CONSTANT=NO,CIN_USED=NO" )) lpm_add_sub_component (

.dataa (dataa),

.datab (datab),

.result (sub_wire0)

);

Note: The sequence of the parameters depends on the sequence of the GENERIC in the

VHDL component declaration.

Increasing Simulation Speed

By default, the ModelSim and QuestaSim software runs in a debug-optimized mode.

Before you begin

To run the ModelSim and QuestaSim software in speed-optimized mode, add the following two vlog command-line switches. In this mode, module boundaries are flattened and loops are optimized, which eliminates levels of debugging hierarchy and may result in faster simulation. This switch is not supported in the ModelSim-Altera simulator.

vlog -fast -05

Simulating Transport Delays

By default, the ModelSim and QuestaSim software filter out all pulses that are shorter than the propagation delay between primitives.

Turning on the transport delay options in the ModelSim and QuestaSim software prevents the simulator from filtering out these pulses.

Mentor Graphics ModelSim and QuestaSim Support

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

2-4

Viewing Error Messages

Table 2-1: Transport Delay Simulation Options (ModelSim and QuestaSim)

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Option

+transport_path_delays

+transport_int_delays

Description

Use when simulation pulses are shorter than the delay in a gate-level primitive. You must include the

+pulse_e/number

and

+pulse_r/number

options.

Use when simulation pulses are shorter than the interconnect delay between gate-level primitives.

You must include the

+pulse_int_e/number

and

+pulse_int_r/number

options.

Note: The

+transport_path_delays

and

+transport_path_delays

options apply automatically during

NativeLink gate-level timing simulation. For more information about either of these options, refer to the ModelSim-Altera Command Reference installed with the ModelSim and QuestaSim software.

The following ModelSim and QuestaSim software command shows the command line syntax to perform a gate-level timing simulation with the device family library: vsim -t 1ps -L stratixii -sdftyp /i1=filtref_vhd.sdo work.filtref_vhd_vec_tst \

+transport_int_delays +transport_path_delays

Viewing Error Messages

ModelSim and QuestaSim error and warning messages are tagged with a vsim or vcom code. To determine the cause and resolution for a vsim or vcom error or warning, use the verror command.

For example, ModelSim may return the following error:

# ** Error: C:/altera_trn/DUALPORT_TRY/simulation/modelsim/DUALPORT_TRY.vho(31):

(vcom-1136) Unknown identifier "stratixiv"

In this case, type the following command: verror 1136

The following description appears:

# vcom Message # 1136:

# The specified name was referenced but was not found. This indicates

# that either the name specified does not exist or is not visible at

# this point in the code.

Generating Power Analysis Files

To generate a timing Value Change Dump File (

.vcd

) for power analysis, you must first generate a

<filename>

_dump_all_vcd_nodes.tcl

script file in the Quartus Prime software. You can then run the script from the ModelSim, QuestaSim, or ModelSim-Altera software to generate a timing <filename>.vcd. for use in the Quartus Prime PowerPlay power analyzer.

Altera Corporation

Mentor Graphics ModelSim and QuestaSim Support

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Viewing Simulation Waveforms

2-5

Before you begin

To generate and use a .vcd for power analysis, follow these steps:

1. In the Quartus Prime software, click Assignments > Settings.

2. Under EDA Tool Settings, click Simulation.

3. Turn on Generate Value Change Dump file script, specify the type of output signals to include, and specify the top-level design instance name in your testbench.

4. Click Processing > Start Compilation.

5. Click Tools > Run EDA Simulation > EDA Gate Level Simulation. The Compiler creates the

<filename>

_dump_all_vcd_nodes.tcl

file, the ModelSim simulation <filename>

_run_msim_gate_vhdl/ verilog.do

file (including the .vcd and .tcl execution lines), and all other files for simulation. ModelSim then automatically runs the generated .do to start the simulation.

6. Stop the simulation if your testbench does not have a break point. ModelSim generates the .vcd only after simulation ends with the End Simulation function.

Viewing Simulation Waveforms

ModelSim-Altera, ModelSim, and QuestaSim automatically generate a Wave Log Format File (.wlf) following simulation. You can use the .wlf to generate a waveform view.

Before you begin

To view a waveform from a .wlf through ModelSim-Altera, ModelSim, or QuestaSim, perform the following steps:

1. Type

vsim

at the command line. The ModelSim/QuestaSim or ModelSim-Altera dialog box appears.

2. Click File > Datasets. The Datasets Browser dialog box appears.

3. Click Open and select your .wlf.

4. Click Done.

5. In the Object browser, select the signals that you want to observe.

6. Click Add > Wave, and then click Selected Signals.

You must first convert the .vcd to a .wlf before you can view a waveform in ModelSim-Altera,

ModelSim, or QuestaSim.

7. To convert the the .vcd to a .wlf, type the following at the command-line: vcd2wlf <example>.vcd <example>.wlf

8. After conversion, view the

.wlf

waveform in ModelSim or QuestaSim.

You can convert your .wlf to a .vcd by using the wlf2vcd

command

Simulating with ModelSim-Altera Waveform Editor

You can use the ModelSim-Altera Waveform Editor as a simple method to create stimulus vectors for simulation. You can create this design stimulus via interactive manipulation of waveforms from the wave window in ModelSim-Altera. With the ModelSim-Altera waveform editor, you can create and edit waveforms, drive simulation directly from created waveforms, and save created waveforms into a stimulus file.

Related Information

ModelSim Web Page

Mentor Graphics ModelSim and QuestaSim Support

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

2-6

ModelSim Simulation Setup Script Example

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

ModelSim Simulation Setup Script Example

The Quartus Prime software can generate a msim_setup.tcl simulation setup script for IP cores in your design. The script compiles the required device library models, compiles the design files, and elaborates the design with or without simulator optimization. To run the script, type source msim_setup.tcl in the simulator Transcript window.

Alternatively, if you are using the simulator at the command line, you can type the following command: vsim -c -do msim_setup.tcl

In this example the top-level-simulate.do custom top-level simulation script sets the hierarchy variable

TOP_LEVEL_NAME

to top_testbench

for the design, and sets the variable

QSYS_SIMDIR

to the location of the generated simulation files.

# Set hierarchy variables used in the IP-generated files set TOP_LEVEL_NAME "top_testbench" set QSYS_SIMDIR "./ip_top_sim"

# Source generated simulation script which defines aliases used below source $QSYS_SIMDIR/mentor/msim_setup.tcl

# dev_com alias compiles simulation libraries for device library files dev_com

# com alias compiles IP simulation or Qsys model files and/or Qsys model files in the correct order com

# Compile top level testbench that instantiates your IP vlog -sv ./top_testbench.sv

# elab alias elaborates the top-level design and testbench elab

# Run the full simulation run - all

In this example, the top-level simulation files are stored in the same directory as the original IP core, so this variable is set to the IP-generated directory structure. The

QSYS_SIMDIR

variable provides the relative hierarchy path for the generated IP simulation files. The script calls the generated msim_setup.tcl script and uses the alias commands from the script to compile and elaborate the IP files required for simulation along with the top-level simulation testbench. You can specify additional simulator elaboration command options when you run the elab

command, for example, elab +nowarnTFMPC

. The last command run in the example starts the simulation.

Unsupported Features

The Quartus Prime software does not support the following ModelSim simulation features:

• Altera does not support companion licensing for ModelSim AE.

• The USB software guard is not supported by versions earlier than Mentor Graphics ModelSim software version 5.8d.

• For ModelSim-Altera software versions prior to 5.5b, use the PCLS utility included with the software to set up the license.

• Some versions of ModelSim and QuestaSim support SystemVerilog, PSL assertions, SystemC, and more. For more information about specific feature support, refer to Mentor Graphics literature

Related Information

ModelSim-Altera Software Web Page

Altera Corporation

Mentor Graphics ModelSim and QuestaSim Support

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Document Revision History

Document Revision History

Table 2-2: Document Revision History

2015.11.02

Date

2015.05.04

2014.06.30

November 2012

June 2012

November 2011

15.1.0

15.0.0

14.0.0

12.1.0

12.0.0

11.0.1

Version Changes

Changed instances of Quartus II to Quartus

Prime.

• Added mixed language simulation support in the ModelSim-Altera software.

• Replaced MegaWizard Plug-In Manager information with IP Catalog.

• Relocated general simulation information to

Simulating Altera Designs.

• Removed survey link.

• Changed to new document template.

Related Information

Quartus Handbook Archive

For previous versions of the Quartus Prime Handbook, refer to the Quartus Handbook Archive.

2-7

Mentor Graphics ModelSim and QuestaSim Support

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

Synopsys VCS and VCS MX Support

2015.11.02

QPS5V3

Subscribe

Send Feedback

You can integrate your supported EDA simulator into the Quartus Prime design flow. This document provides guidelines for simulation of Quartus Prime designs with the Synopsys VCS or VCS MX software.

3

Quick Start Example (VCS with Verilog)

You can adapt the following RTL simulation example to get started quickly with VCS:

1. Type the following to specify your EDA simulator and executable path in the Quartus Prime software: set_user_option -name EDA_TOOL_PATH_VCS

<VCS executable path> set_global_assignment -name EDA_SIMULATION_TOOL "VCS"

2. Compile simulation model libraries using one of the following methods:

• Run NativeLink RTL simulation to compile required design files, simulation models, and run your simulator. Verify results in your simulator. If you complete this step you can ignore the remaining steps.

• Use Quartus Prime Simulation Library Compiler to automatically compile all required simulation models for your design.

3. Modify the

simlib_comp.vcs

file to specify your design and testbench files.

4. Type the following to run the VCS simulator: vcs -R -file simlib_comp.vcs

VCS and QuestaSim Guidelines

The following guidelines apply to simulation of Altera designs in the VCS or VCS MX software:

• Do not specify the -v option for

altera_lnsim.sv

because it defines a systemverilog package.

• Add

-verilog

and

+verilog2001ext+.v

options to make sure all .v files are compiled as verilog 2001 files, and all other files are compiled as systemverilog files.

• Add the

-lca

option for Stratix V and later families because they include IEEE-encrypted simulation files for VCS and VCS MX.

• Add

-timescale=1ps/1ps

to ensure picosecond resolution.

©

2015 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, ENPIRION, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX words and logos are trademarks of Altera Corporation and registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. All other words and logos identified as trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html

. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.

www.altera.com

101 Innovation Drive, San Jose, CA 95134

ISO

9001:2008

Registered

3-2

Simulating Transport Delays

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Simulating Transport Delays

By default, the VCS and VCS MX software filter out all pulses that are shorter than the propagation delay between primitives. Turning on the transport delay options in the VCS and VCS MX software prevents the simulator from filtering out these pulses.

Table 3-1: Transport Delay Simulation Options (VCS and VCS MX)

Option

+transport_path_delays

+transport_int_delays

Description

Use when simulation pulses are shorter than the delay in a gate-level primitive. You must include the

+pulse_e/number

and

+pulse_r/number

options.

Use when simulation pulses are shorter than the interconnect delay between gate-level primitives.

You must include the

+pulse_int_e/number

and

+pulse_int_r/number

options.

Note: The

+transport_path_delays

and

+transport_path_delays

options apply automatically during

NativeLink gate-level timing simulation.

The following VCS and VCS MX software command runs a post-synthesis simulation: vcs -R <testbench>.v <gate-level netlist>.v -v <Altera device family \ library>.v +transport_int_delays +pulse_int_e/0 +pulse_int_r/0 \

+transport_path_delays +pulse_e/0 +pulse_r/0

Disabling Timing Violation on Registers

In certain situations, you may want to ignore timing violations on registers and disable the “X” propagation that occurs. For example, this technique may be helpful to eliminate timing violations in internal synchronization registers in asynchronous clock-domain crossing.

Before you begin

By default, the x_on_violation_option logic option is enabled for all design registers, resulting in an output of “X” at timing violation. To disable “X” propagation at timing violations on a specific register, disable the x_on_violation_option logic option for the specific register, as shown in the following example from the Quartus Prime Settings File (

.qsf

).

set_instance_assignment -name X_ON_VIOLATION_OPTION OFF -to \ <register_name>

Generating Power Analysis Files

You can generate a Verilog Value Change Dump File (.vcd) for power analysis in the Quartus Prime software, and then run the .vcd from the VCS software. Use this .vcd for power analysis in the Quartus

Prime PowerPlay power analyzer.

Altera Corporation

Synopsys VCS and VCS MX Support

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

VCS Simulation Setup Script Example

3-3

Before you begin

To generate and use a .vcd for power analysis, follow these steps:

1. In the Quartus Prime software, click Assignments > Settings.

2. Under EDA Tool Settings, click Simulation.

3. Turn on Generate Value Change Dump file script, specify the type of output signals to include, and specify the top-level design instance name in your testbench.

4. Click Processing > Start Compilation.

5. Use the following command to include the script in your testbench where the design under test (DUT) is instantiated: include <revision_name>_dump_all_vcd_nodes.v

Note: Include the script within the testbench module block. If you include the script outside of the testbench module block, syntax errors occur during compilation.

6. Run the simulation with the VCS command. Exit the VCS software when the simulation is finished and the <revision_name>.vcd file is generated in the simulation directory.

VCS Simulation Setup Script Example

The Quartus Prime software can generate a simulation setup script for IP cores in your design. The scripts contain shell commands that compile the required simulation models in the correct order, elaborate the top-level design, and run the simulation for 100 time units by default. You can run these scripts from a

Linux command shell.

The scripts for VCS and VCS MX are vcs_setup.sh (for Verilog HDL or SystemVerilog) and

vcsmx_setup.sh (combined Verilog HDL and SystemVerilog with VHDL). Read the generated .sh script to see the variables that are available for override when sourcing the script or redefining directly if you edit the script. To set up the simulation for a design, use the command-line to pass variable values to the shell script.

Example 3-1: Using Command-line to Pass Simulation Variables

sh vcsmx_setup.sh\

USER_DEFINED_ELAB_OPTIONS=+rad\

USER_DEFINED_SIM_OPTIONS=+vcs+lic+wait

Example 3-2: Example Top-Level Simulation Shell Script for VCS-MX

# Run generated script to compile libraries and IP simulation files

# Skip elaboration and simulation of the IP variation sh ./ip_top_sim/synopsys/vcsmx/vcsmx_setup.sh SKIP_ELAB=1 SKIP_SIM=1

QSYS_SIMDIR="./ip_top_sim"

#Compile top-level testbench that instantiates IP vlogan -sverilog ./top_testbench.sv

#Elaborate and simulate the top-level design vcs –lca –t ps <elaboration control options> top_testbench simv <simulation control options>

Synopsys VCS and VCS MX Support

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

3-4

Document Revision History

Example 3-3: Example Top-Level Simulation Shell Script for VCS

# Run script to compile libraries and IP simulation files sh ./ip_top_sim/synopsys/vcs/vcs_setup.sh TOP_LEVEL_NAME=”top_testbench”\

# Pass VCS elaboration options to compile files and elaborate top-level

passed to the script as the TOP_LEVEL_NAME

USER_DEFINED_ELAB_OPTIONS="top_testbench.sv"\

# Pass in simulation options and run the simulation for specified amount of time.

USER_DEFINED_SIM_OPTIONS=”<simulation control options>

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Document Revision History

Table 3-2: Document Revision History

2015.11.02

Date

2014.06.30

November 2012

June 2012

November 2011

15.1.0

14.0.0

12.1.0

12.0.0

11.0.1

Version Changes

Changed instances of Quartus II to Quartus

Prime.

• Replaced MegaWizard Plug-In Manager information with IP Catalog.

• Relocated general simulation information to

Simulating Altera Designs.

• Removed survey link.

• Changed to new document template.

Related Information

Quartus Handbook Archive

For previous versions of the Quartus Prime Handbook, refer to the Quartus Handbook Archive.

Altera Corporation

Synopsys VCS and VCS MX Support

Send Feedback

Cadence Incisive Enterprise (IES) Support

2015.11.02

QPS5V3

Subscribe

Send Feedback

You can integrate your supported EDA simulator into the Quartus Primedesign flow. This chapter provides specific guidelines for simulation of Quartus Prime designs with the Cadence Incisive Enterprise

(IES) software.

4

Quick Start Example (NC-Verilog)

You can adapt the following RTL simulation example to get started quickly with IES:

1. Type the following to specify your EDA simulator and executable path in the Quartus Prime software: set_user_option -name EDA_TOOL_PATH_NCSIM

<ncsim executable path> set_global_assignment -name EDA_SIMULATION_TOOL "NC-Verilog (Verilog)"

2. Compile simulation model libraries using one of the following methods:

• Run NativeLink RTL simulation to compile required design files, simulation models, and run your simulator. Verify results in your simulator. If you complete this step you can ignore the remaining steps.

• Use Quartus Prime Simulation Library Compiler to automatically compile all required simulation models for your design.

• Map Altera simulation libraries by adding the following commands to a cds.lib file: include ${CDS_INST_DIR}/tools/inca/files/cds.lib

DEFINE <lib1>_ver <lib1_ver>

Then, compile Altera simulation models manually:

vlog -work <lib1_ver>

3. Elaborate your design and testbench with IES: ncelab <work library>.<top-level entity name>

4. Run the simulation: ncsim <work library>.<top-level entity name>

©

2015 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, ENPIRION, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX words and logos are trademarks of Altera Corporation and registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. All other words and logos identified as trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html

. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.

www.altera.com

101 Innovation Drive, San Jose, CA 95134

ISO

9001:2008

Registered

4-2

Cadence Incisive Enterprise (IES) Guidelines

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Cadence Incisive Enterprise (IES) Guidelines

The following guidelines apply to simulation of Altera designs in the IES software:

• Do not specify the -v option for

altera_lnsim.sv

because it defines a systemverilog package.

• Add

-verilog

and

+verilog2001ext+.v

options to make sure all .v files are compiled as verilog 2001 files, and all other files are compiled as systemverilog files.

• Add the

-lca

option for Stratix V and later families because they include IEEE-encrypted simulation files for IES.

• Add

-timescale=1ps/1ps

to ensure picosecond resolution.

Using GUI or Command-Line Interfaces

Altera supports both the IES GUI and command-line simulator interfaces.

To start the IES GUI, type nclaunch

at a command prompt.

Table 4-1: Simulation Executables

ncvlog ncvhdl ncelab ncsdfc ncsim

Program Function

ncvlog

compiles your Verilog HDL code and performs syntax and static semantics checks.

ncvhdl

compiles your VHDL code and performs syntax and static semantics checks.

Elaborates the design hierarchy and determines signal connectivity.

Performs back-annotation for simulation with VHDL simulators.

Runs mixed-language simulation. This program is the simulation kernel that performs event scheduling and executes the simulation code.

Elaborating Your Design

The simulator automatically reads the .sdo file during elaboration of the Quartus Prime-generated

Verilog HDL or SystemVerilog HDL netlist file. The ncelab command recognizes the embedded system task

$sdf_annotate

and automatically compiles and annotates the .sdo file by running ncsdfc automatically.

VHDL netlist files do not contain system task calls to locate your .sdf file; therefore, you must compile the standard .sdo file manually. Locate the .sdo file in the same directory where you run elaboration or simulation. Otherwise, the

$sdf_annotate

task cannot reference the .sdo file correctly. If you are starting an elaboration or simulation from a different directory, you can either comment out the

$sdf_annotate and annotate the .sdo file with the GUI, or add the full path of the .sdo file.

Note: If you use NC-Sim for post-fit VHDL functional simulation of a Stratix V design that includes

RAM, an elaboration error might occur if the component declaration parameters are not in the same order as the architecture parameters. Use the

-namemap_mixgen

option with the ncelab command to match the component declaration parameter and architecture parameter names.

Altera Corporation

Cadence Incisive Enterprise (IES) Support

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Back-Annotating Simulation Timing Data (VHDL Only)

4-3

Back-Annotating Simulation Timing Data (VHDL Only)

You can back annotate timing information in a Standard Delay Output File (.sdo) for VHDL simulators.

To back annotate the .sdo timing data at the command line, follow these steps:

1. To compile the .sdo with the ncsdfc

program, type the following command at the command prompt.

The ncsdfc program generates an <output name>.sdf.X compiled .sdo file ncsdfc <project name>_vhd.sdo –output <output name>

Note: If you do not specify an output name, ncsdfc uses <project name>.sdo.X

2. Specify the compiled .sdf file for the project by adding the following command to an ASCII SDF command file for the project:

COMPILED_SDF_FILE = "<project name>.sdf.X" SCOPE = <instance path>

3. After compiling the .sdf file, type the following command to elaborate the design: ncelab worklib.<project name>:entity –SDF_CMD_FILE <SDF Command File>

Example 4-1: Example SDF Command File

// SDF command file sdf_file

COMPILED_SDF_FILE = "lpm_ram_dp_test_vhd.sdo.X",

SCOPE = :tb,

MTM_CONTROL = "TYPICAL",

SCALE_FACTORS = "1.0:1.0:1.0",

SCALE_TYPE = "FROM_MTM";

Disabling Timing Violation on Registers

In certain situations, you may want to ignore timing violations on registers and disable the “X” propagation that occurs. For example, this technique may be helpful to eliminate timing violations in internal synchronization registers in asynchronous clock-domain crossing.

Before you begin

By default, the x_on_violation_option logic option is enabled for all design registers, resulting in an output of “X” at timing violation. To disable “X” propagation at timing violations on a specific register, disable the x_on_violation_option logic option for the specific register, as shown in the following example from the Quartus Prime Settings File (

.qsf

).

set_instance_assignment -name X_ON_VIOLATION_OPTION OFF -to \ <register_name>

Simulating Pulse Reject Delays

By default, the IES software filters out all pulses that are shorter than the propagation delay between primitives.

Setting the pulse reject delays options in the IES software prevents the simulation tool from filtering out these pulses. Use the following options to ensure that all signal pulses are seen in the simulation results.

Cadence Incisive Enterprise (IES) Support

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

4-4

Viewing Simulation Waveforms

Table 4-2: Pulse Reject Delay Options

-PULSE_R

Program

-PULSE_INT_R

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Function

Use when simulation pulses are shorter than the delay in a gate-level primitive. The argument is the percentage of delay for pulse reject limit for the path

Use when simulation pulses are shorter than the interconnect delay between gate-level primitives. The argument is the percentage of delay for pulse reject limit for the path

Viewing Simulation Waveforms

IES generates a .trn file automatically following simulation. You can use the .trn for generating the

SimVision waveform view.

Before you begin

To view a waveform from a .trn file through SimVision, follow these steps:

1. Type simvision

at the command line. The Design Browser dialog box appears.

2. Click File > Open Database and click the .trn file.

3. In the Design Browser dialog box, select the signals that you want to observe from the Hierarchy.

4. Right-click the selected signals and click Send to Waveform Window.

You cannot view a waveform from a .vcd file in SimVision, and the .vcd file cannot be converted to a .trn file.

IES Simulation Setup Script Example

The Quartus Prime software can generate a ncsim_setup.sh simulation setup script for IP cores in your design. The script contains shell commands that compile the required device libraries, IP, or Qsys simulation models in the correct order. The script then elaborates the top-level design and runs the simulation for 100 time units by default. You can run these scripts from a Linux command shell. To set up the simulation script for a design, you can use the command-line to pass variable values to the shell script.

Read the generated .sh script to see the variables that are available for you to override when you source the script or that you can redefine directly in the generated .sh script. For example, you can specify additional elaboration and simulation options with the variables

USER_DEFINED_ELAB_OPTIONS

and

USER_DEFINED_SIM_OPTIONS

.

Example 4-2: Example Top-Level Simulation Shell Script for Incisive (NCSIM)

# Run script to compile libraries and IP simulation files

# Skip elaboration and simulation of the IP variation sh ./ip_top_sim/cadence/ncsim_setup.sh SKIP_ELAB=1 SKIP_SIM=1 QSYS_SIMDIR="./ ip_top_sim"

#Compile the top-level testbench that instantiates your IP ncvlog -sv ./top_testbench.sv

#Elaborate and simulate the top-level design

Altera Corporation

Cadence Incisive Enterprise (IES) Support

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

ncelab <elaboration control options> top_testbench ncsim <simulation control options> top_testbench

Document Revision History

4-5

Document Revision History

Table 4-3: Document Revision History

2015.11.02

Date

2014.08.18

2014.06.30

November 2012

June 2012

November 2011

Version

15.1.0

14.0.a10.0

14.0.0

12.1.0

12.0.0

11.0.1

Changes

Changed instances of Quartus II to Quartus

Prime.

• Corrected incorrect references to VCS and

VCS MX.

• Replaced MegaWizard Plug-In Manager information with IP Catalog.

• Relocated general simulation information to

Simulating Altera Designs.

• Removed survey link.

• Changed to new document template.

Related Information

Quartus Handbook Archive

For previous versions of the Quartus Prime Handbook, refer to the Quartus Handbook Archive.

Cadence Incisive Enterprise (IES) Support

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

Aldec Active-HDL and Riviera-PRO Support

2015.11.02

QPS5V3

Subscribe

Send Feedback

You can integrate your supported EDA simulator into the Quartus Prime design flow. This chapter provides specific guidelines for simulation of Quartus Prime designs with the Aldec Active-HDL or

Riviera-PRO software.

5

Quick Start Example (Active-HDL VHDL)

You can adapt the following RTL simulation example to get started quickly with Active-HDL:

1. Type the following to specify your EDA simulator and executable path in the Quartus Prime software: set_user_option -name EDA_TOOL_PATH_ACTIVEHDL

<Active HDL executable path> set_global_assignment -name EDA_SIMULATION_TOOL "Active-HDL (VHDL)"

2. Compile simulation model libraries using one of the following methods:

• Run NativeLink RTL simulation to compile required design files, simulation models, and run your simulator. Verify results in your simulator. If you complete this step you can ignore the remaining steps.

• Use Quartus Prime Simulation Library Compiler to automatically compile all required simulation models for your design.

• Compile Altera simulation models manually: vlib <library1> <altera_library1> vcom -strict93 -dbg -work <library1> <lib1_component/pack.vhd> <lib1.vhd>

3. Create and open the workspace: createdesign <workspace name> <workspace path> opendesign -a <workspace name>.adf

4. Create the work library and compile the netlist and testbench files: vlib work vcom -strict93 -dbg -work work <output netlist> <testbench file>

5. Load the design: vsim +access+r -t 1ps +transport_int_delays +transport_path_delays \

-L work -L <lib1> -L <lib2> work.<testbench module name>

6. Run the simulation in the Active-HDL simulator.

©

2015 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, ENPIRION, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX words and logos are trademarks of Altera Corporation and registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. All other words and logos identified as trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html

. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.

www.altera.com

101 Innovation Drive, San Jose, CA 95134

ISO

9001:2008

Registered

5-2

Aldec Active-HDL and Riviera-PRO Guidelines

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Aldec Active-HDL and Riviera-PRO Guidelines

The following guidelines apply to simulating Altera designs in the Active-HDL or Riviera-PRO software.

Compiling SystemVerilog Files

If your design includes multiple SystemVerilog files, you must compile the System Verilog files together with a single alog command. If you have Verilog files and SystemVerilog files in your design, you must first compile the Verilog files, and then compile only the SystemVerilog files in the single alog

command.

Simulating Transport Delays

By default, the Active-HDL or Riviera-PRO software filters out all pulses that are shorter than the propagation delay between primitives. Turning on the transport delay options in the in the Active-HDL or Riviera-PRO software prevents the simulator from filtering out these pulses.

Table 5-1: Transport Delay Simulation Options

Option

+transport_path_delays

+transport_int_delays

Description

Use when simulation pulses are shorter than the delay in a gate-level primitive. You must include the

+pulse_e/number

and

+pulse_r/number

options.

Use when simulation pulses are shorter than the interconnect delay between gate-level primitives.

You must include the

+pulse_int_e/number

and

+pulse_int_r/number

options.

Note: The

+transport_path_delays

and

+transport_path_delays

options apply automatically during

NativeLink gate-level timing simulation.

To perform a gate-level timing simulation with the device family library, type the Active-HDL command: vsim -t 1ps -L stratixii -sdftyp /i1=filtref_vhd.sdo \ work.filtref_vhd_vec_tst +transport_int_delays +transport_path_delays

Disabling Timing Violation on Registers

In certain situations, you may want to ignore timing violations on registers and disable the “X” propagation that occurs. For example, this technique may be helpful to eliminate timing violations in internal synchronization registers in asynchronous clock-domain crossing.

Before you begin

By default, the x_on_violation_option logic option is enabled for all design registers, resulting in an output of “X” at timing violation. To disable “X” propagation at timing violations on a specific register, disable the x_on_violation_option logic option for the specific register, as shown in the following example from the Quartus Prime Settings File (

.qsf

).

set_instance_assignment -name X_ON_VIOLATION_OPTION OFF -to \ <register_name>

Altera Corporation

Aldec Active-HDL and Riviera-PRO Support

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Using Simulation Setup Scripts

Using Simulation Setup Scripts

The Quartus Prime software can generate a rivierapro_setup.tcl simulation setup script for IP cores in your design. The use and content of the script file is similar to the msim_setup.tcl file used by the

ModelSim simulator.

5-3

Document Revision History

Table 5-2: Document Revision History

2015.11.02

Date

2014.06.30

November 2012

June 2012

November 2011

15.1.0

14.0.0

12.1.0

12.0.0

11.0.1

Version Changes

Changed instances of Quartus II to Quartus

Prime.

• Replaced MegaWizard Plug-In Manager information with IP Catalog.

• Relocated general simulation information to

Simulating Altera Designs.

• Removed survey link.

• Changed to new document template.

Related Information

Quartus Handbook Archive

For previous versions of the Quartus Prime Handbook, refer to the Quartus Handbook Archive.

Aldec Active-HDL and Riviera-PRO Support

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

Timing Analysis Overview

2015.11.02

QPS5V3

Subscribe

Send Feedback

Timing Analysis Overview

Comprehensive static timing analysis involves analysis of register-to-register, I/O, and asynchronous reset paths. Timing analysis with the TimeQuest Timing Analyzer uses data required times, data arrival times, and clock arrival times to verify circuit performance and detect possible timing violations.

The TimeQuest analyzer determines the timing relationships that must be met for the design to correctly function, and checks arrival times against required times to verify timing. This chapter is an overview of the concepts you need to know to analyze your designs with the TimeQuest analyzer.

Related Information

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

on page 7-1

For more information about the TimeQuest analyzer flow and TimeQuest examples.

TimeQuest Terminology and Concepts

Table 6-1: TimeQuest Analyzer Terminology

Term

nodes cells pins nets ports clocks

Definition

Most basic timing netlist unit. Used to represent ports, pins, and registers.

Look-up tables (LUT), registers, digital signal processing (DSP) blocks, memory blocks, input/output elements, and so on.

(1)

Inputs or outputs of cells.

Connections between pins.

Top-level module inputs or outputs; for example, device pins.

Abstract objects representing clock domains inside or outside of your design.

6

©

2015 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, ENPIRION, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX words and logos are trademarks of Altera Corporation and registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. All other words and logos identified as trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html

. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.

www.altera.com

101 Innovation Drive, San Jose, CA 95134

ISO

9001:2008

Registered

6-2

Timing Netlists and Timing Paths

Term Definition

Notes:

1. For Stratix

®

devices, the LUTs and registers are contained in logic elements (LE) and modeled as cells.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Timing Netlists and Timing Paths

The TimeQuest analyzer requires a timing netlist to perform timing analysis on any design. After you generate a timing netlist, the TimeQuest analyzer uses the data to help determine the different design elements in your design and how to analyze timing.

The Timing Netlist

A sample design for which the TimeQuest analyzer generates a timing netlist equivalent.

Figure 6-1: Sample Design

data1 reg1 and_inst reg3 reg2 data2 clk

The timing netlist for the sample design shows how different design elements are divided into cells, pins, nets, and ports.

Altera Corporation

Timing Analysis Overview

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 6-2: The TimeQuest Analyzer Timing Netlist

data1

Cells

Cell combout datain clk reg1 data2

Port

Pin reg2

Pin

Net regout datac datad

Cell and_inst combout reg3 regout

Net

Net clk inclk0 clk~clkctrl outclk

Timing Paths

6-3

datain data_out

Port

Timing Paths

Timing paths connect two design nodes, such as the output of a register to the input of another register.

Understanding the types of timing paths is important to timing closure and optimization. The TimeQuest analyzer uses the following commonly analyzed paths:

Edge paths—connections from ports-to-pins, from pins-to-pins, and from pins-to-ports.

Clock paths—connections from device ports or internally generated clock pins to the clock pin of a register.

Data paths—connections from a port or the data output pin of a sequential element to a port or the data input pin of another sequential element.

Asynchronous paths—connections from a port or asynchronous pins of another sequential element such as an asynchronous reset or asynchronous clear.

Figure 6-3: Path Types Commonly Analyzed by the TimeQuest Analyzer

data clk

Clock Path

D Q

Data Path

D Q

CLRN CLRN

Asynchronous Clear Path rst

In addition to identifying various paths in a design, the TimeQuest analyzer analyzes clock characteristics to compute the worst-case requirement between any two registers in a single register-to-register path. You must constrain all clocks in your design before analyzing clock characteristics.

Timing Analysis Overview

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

6-4

Data and Clock Arrival Times

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Data and Clock Arrival Times

After the TimeQuest analyzer identifies the path type, it can report data and clock arrival times at register pins.

The TimeQuest analyzer calculates data arrival time by adding the launch edge time to the delay from the clock source to the clock pin of the source register, the micro clock-to-output delay ( µt

CO

) of the source register, and the delay from the source register’s data output (Q) to the destination register’s data input

(D).

The TimeQuest analyzer calculates data required time by adding the latch edge time to the sum of all delays between the clock port and the clock pin of the destination register, including any clock port buffer delays, and subtracts the micro setup time ( µt setup time of an internal register in the FPGA.

SU

) of the destination register, where the µt

SU

is the intrinsic

Figure 6-4: Data Arrival and Data Required Times

D Q

Data Arrival Time

D Q

Data Required Time

The basic calculations for data arrival and data required times including the launch and latch edges.

Figure 6-5: Data Arrival and Data Required Time Equations

Data Arrival Time = Launch Edge + Source Clock Delay + µt

CO

+ Register-to-Register Delay

Data Required Time = Latch Edge + Destination Clock Delay – µt

SU

Launch and Latch Edges

All timing relies on one or more clocks. In addition to analyzing paths, the TimeQuest analyzer determines clock relationships for all register-to-register transfers in your design.

The following figure shows the launch edge, which is the clock edge that sends data out of a register or other sequential element, and acts as a source for the data transfer. A latch edge is the active clock edge that captures data at the data port of a register or other sequential element, acting as a destination for the data transfer. In this example, the launch edge sends the data from register reg1

at 0 ns, and the register reg2

captures the data when triggered by the latch edge at 10 ns. The data arrives at the destination register before the next latch edge.

Altera Corporation

Timing Analysis Overview

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Clock Setup Check

Figure 6-6: Setup and Hold Relationship for Launch and Latch Edges 10ns Apart

0ns 10ns 20ns

Launch Clock

Hold relationship

Setup relationship

6-5

Latch Clock

In timing analysis, and with the TimeQuest analyzer specifically, you create clock constraints and assign those constraints to nodes in your design. These clock constraints provide the structure required for repeatable data relationships. The primary relationships between clocks, in the same or different domains, are the setup relationship and the hold relationship.

Note: If you do not constrain the clocks in your design, the Quartus Prime software analyzes in terms of a

1 GHz clock to maximize timing based Fitter effort. To ensure realistic slack values, you must constrain all clocks in your design with real values.

Clock Setup Check

To perform a clock setup check, the TimeQuest analyzer determines a setup relationship by analyzing each launch and latch edge for each register-to-register path.

For each latch edge at the destination register, the TimeQuest analyzer uses the closest previous clock edge at the source register as the launch edge. The following figure shows two setup relationships, setup A and setup B. For the latch edge at 10 ns, the closest clock that acts as a launch edge is at 3 ns and is labeled setup A. For the latch edge at 20 ns, the closest clock that acts as a launch edge is 19 ns and is labeled setup

B. TimQuest analyzes the most restrictive setup relationship, in this case setup B; if that relationship meets the design requirement, then setup A meets it by default.

Figure 6-7: Setup Check

Source Clock

Setup A Setup B

Destination Clock

0 ns 8 ns 16 ns 24 ns 32 ns

The TimeQuest analyzer reports the result of clock setup checks as slack values. Slack is the margin by which a timing requirement is met or not met. Positive slack indicates the margin by which a requirement is met; negative slack indicates the margin by which a requirement is not met.

Figure 6-8: Clock Setup Slack for Internal Register-to-Register Paths

Clock Setup Slack = Data Required Time – Data Arrival Time

Data Arrival Time = Launch Edge + Clock Network Delay to Source Register + µt

CO

+ Register-to-Register Delay

Data Required Time = Latch Edge + Clock Network Delay to Destination Register – µt

SU

– Setup Uncertainty

Timing Analysis Overview

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

6-6

Clock Hold Check

The TimeQuest analyzer performs setup checks using the maximum delay when calculating data arrival time, and minimum delay when calculating data required time.

Figure 6-9: Clock Setup Slack from Input Port to Internal Register

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Clock Setup Slack = Data Required Time – Data Arrival Time

Data Arrival Time = Launch Edge + Clock Network Delay + Input Maximum Delay + Port-to-Register Delay

Data Required Time = Latch Edge + Clock Network Delay to Destination Register – µt

SU

– Setup Uncertainty

Figure 6-10: Clock Setup Slack from Internal Register to Output Port

Clock Setup Slack = Data Required Time – Data Arrival Time

Data Required Time = Latch Edge + Clock Network Delay to Output Port – Output Maximum Delay

Data Arrival Time = Launch Edge + Clock Network Delay to Source Register +µt

CO

+ Register-to-Port Delay

Clock Hold Check

To perform a clock hold check, the TimeQuest analyzer determines a hold relationship for each possible setup relationship that exists for all source and destination register pairs. The TimeQuest analyzer checks all adjacent clock edges from all setup relationships to determine the hold relationships.

The TimeQuest analyzer performs two hold checks for each setup relationship. The first hold check determines that the data launched by the current launch edge is not captured by the previous latch edge.

The second hold check determines that the data launched by the next launch edge is not captured by the current latch edge. From the possible hold relationships, the TimeQuest analyzer selects the hold relation‐ ship that is the most restrictive. The most restrictive hold relationship is the hold relationship with the smallest difference between the latch and launch edges and determines the minimum allowable delay for the register-to-register path. In the following example, the TimeQuest analyzer selects hold check A2 as the most restrictive hold relationship of two setup relationships, setup A and setup B, and their respective hold checks.

Figure 6-11: Setup and Hold Check Relationships

Source Clock

Hold

Check A1

Setup A

Hold

Check A2

Hold

Check B1

Setup B

Destination Clock

Hold

Check B2

0 ns 8 ns 16 ns 24 ns 32 ns

Figure 6-12: Clock Hold Slack for Internal Register-to-Register Paths

Clock Hold Slack = Data Arrival Time – Data Required Time

Data Arrival Time = Launch Edge + Clock Network Delay to Source Register + µt

CO

+ Register-to-Register Delay

Data Required Time = Latch Edge + Clock Network Delay to Destination Register + µt

H

+ Hold Uncertainty

Altera Corporation

Timing Analysis Overview

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Recovery and Removal Time

6-7

The TimeQuest analyzer performs hold checks using the minimum delay when calculating data arrival time, and maximum delay when calculating data required time.

Figure 6-13: Clock Hold Slack Calculation from Input Port to Internal Register

Clock Hold Slack = Data Arrival Time – Data Required Time

Data Arrival Time = Launch Edge + Clock Network Delay + Input Minimum Delay + Pin-to-Register Delay

Data Required Time = Latch Edge + Clock Network Delay to Destination Register + µt

H

Figure 6-14: Clock Hold Slack Calculation from Internal Register to Output Port

Clock Hold Slack = Data Arrival Time – Data Required Time

Data Arrival Time = Latch Edge + Clock Network Delay to Source Register + µt

CO

Data Required Time = Latch Edge + Clock Network Delay – Output Minimum Delay

+ Register-to-Pin Delay

Recovery and Removal Time

Recovery time is the minimum length of time for the deassertion of an asynchronous control signal relative to the next clock edge.

For example, signals such as clear

and preset

must be stable before the next active clock edge. The recovery slack calculation is similar to the clock setup slack calculation, but it applies to asynchronous control signals.

Figure 6-15: Recovery Slack Calculation if the Asynchronous Control Signal is Registered

Recovery Slack Time = Data Required Time – Data Arrival Time

Data Required Time = Latch Edge + Clock Network Delay to Destination Register – µt

SU

Data Arrival Time = Launch Edge + Clock Network Delay to Source Register + µt

CO

+ Register-to-Register Delay

Figure 6-16: Recovery Slack Calculation if the Asynchronous Control Signal is not Registered

Recovery Slack Time = Data Required Time – Data Arrival Time

Data Required Time = Latch Edge + Clock Network Delay to Destination Register – µt

SU

Data Arrival Time = Launch Edge + Clock Network Delay + Input Maximum Delay + Port-to-Register Delay

Note: If the asynchronous reset signal is from a device I/O port, you must create an input delay constraint for the asynchronous reset port for the TimeQuest analyzer to perform recovery analysis on the path.

Removal time is the minimum length of time the deassertion of an asynchronous control signal must be stable after the active clock edge. The TimeQuest analyzer removal slack calculation is similar to the clock hold slack calculation, but it applies asynchronous control signals.

Timing Analysis Overview

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

6-8

Multicycle Paths

Figure 6-17: Removal Slack Calcuation if the Asynchronous Control Signal is Registered

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Removal Slack Time = Data Arrival Time – Data Required Time

Data Arrival Time = Launch Edge + Clock Network Delay to Source Register + µt

CO

of Source Register + Register-to-Register Delay

Data Required Time = Latch Edge + Clock Network Delay to Destination Register + µt

H

Figure 6-18: Removal Slack Calculation if the Asynchronous Control Signal is not Registered

Removal Slack Time = Data Arrival Time – Data Required Time

Data Arrival Time = Launch Edge + Clock Network Delay + Input Minimum Delay of Pin + Minimum Pin-to-Register Delay

Data Required Time = Latch Edge + Clock Network Delay to Destination Register + µt

H

If the asynchronous reset signal is from a device pin, you must assign the Input Minimum Delay timing assignment to the asynchronous reset pin for the TimeQuest analyzer to perform removal analysis on the path.

Multicycle Paths

Multicycle paths are data paths that require a non-default setup and/or hold relationship for proper analysis.

For example, a register may be required to capture data on every second or third rising clock edge. An example of a multicycle path between the input registers of a multiplier and an output register where the destination latches data on every other clock edge.

Figure 6-19: Multicycle Path

D Q

ENA

D Q

ENA

D Q

ENA

2 Cycles

A register-to-register path used for the default setup and hold relationship, the respective timing diagrams for the source and destination clocks, and the default setup and hold relationships, when the source clock, src_clk

, has a period of 10 ns and the destination clock, dst_clk

, has a period of 5 ns. The default setup relationship is 5 ns; the default hold relationship is 0 ns.

Altera Corporation

Timing Analysis Overview

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Metastability

Figure 6-20: Register-to-Register Path and Default Setup and Hold Timing Diagram

D reg

Q D reg

Q data_in src_clk dst_clk data_out setup hold

6-9

0 10 20 30

To accommodate the system requirements you can modify the default setup and hold relationships with a multicycle timing exception.

The actual setup relationship after you apply a multicycle timing exception. The exception has a multicycle setup assignment of two to use the second occurring latch edge; in this example, to 10 ns from the default value of 5 ns.

Figure 6-21: Modified Setup Diagram

new setup default setup

0 10 20 30

Related Information

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

on page 7-1

For more information about creating exceptions with multicycle paths.

Metastability

Metastability problems can occur when a signal is transferred between circuitry in unrelated or asynchronous clock domains because the designer cannot guarantee that the signal will meet setup and hold time requirements.

To minimize the failures due to metastability, circuit designers typically use a sequence of registers, also known as a synchronization register chain, or synchronizer, in the destination clock domain to resynchronize the data signals to the new clock domain.

The mean time between failures (MTBF) is an estimate of the average time between instances of failure due to metastability.

Timing Analysis Overview

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

6-10

Common Clock Path Pessimism Removal

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

The TimeQuest analyzer analyzes the potential for metastability in your design and can calculate the

MTBF for synchronization register chains. The MTBF of the entire design is then estimated based on the synchronization chains it contains.

In addition to reporting synchronization register chains found in the design, the Quartus Prime software also protects these registers from optimizations that might negatively impact MTBF, such as register duplication and logic retiming. The Quartus Prime software can also optimize the MTBF of your design if the MTBF is too low.

Related Information

Understanding Metastability in FPGAs

For more information about metastability, its effects in FPGAs, and how MTBF is calculated.

Managing Metastability with the Quartus Prime Software

For more information about metastability analysis, reporting, and optimization features in the Quartus

Prime software.

Common Clock Path Pessimism Removal

Common clock path pessimism removal accounts for the minimum and maximum delay variation associated with common clock paths during static timing analysis by adding the difference between the maximum and minimum delay value of the common clock path to the appropriate slack equation.

Minimum and maximum delay variation can occur when two different delay values are used for the same clock path. For example, in a simple setup analysis, the maximum clock path delay to the source register is used to determine the data arrival time. The minimum clock path delay to the destination register is used to determine the data required time. However, if the clock path to the source register and to the destina‐ tion register share a common clock path, both the maximum delay and the minimum delay are used to model the common clock path during timing analysis. The use of both the minimum delay and maximum delay results in an overly pessimistic analysis since two different delay values, the maximum and minimum delays, cannot be used to model the same clock path.

Figure 6-22: Typical Register to Register Path

B

2.2 ns

2.0 ns

D Q reg1 clk

A

5.5 ns

5.0 ns

C

2.2 ns

2.0 ns

D Q reg2

3.2 ns

3.0 ns

Segment A is the common clock path between reg1

and reg2

. The minimum delay is 5.0 ns; the maximum delay is 5.5 ns. The difference between the maximum and minimum delay value equals the common clock path pessimism removal value; in this case, the common clock path pessimism is 0.5 ns.

The TimeQuest analyzer adds the common clock path pessimism removal value to the appropriate slack equation to determine overall slack. Therefore, if the setup slack for the register-to-register path in the example equals 0.7 ns without common clock path pessimism removal, the slack would be 1.2 ns with common clock path pessimism removal.

You can also use common clock path pessimism removal to determine the minimum pulse width of a register. A clock signal must meet a register’s minimum pulse width requirement to be recognized by the register. A minimum high time defines the minimum pulse width for a positive-edge triggered register. A minimum low time defines the minimum pulse width for a negative-edge triggered register.

Altera Corporation

Timing Analysis Overview

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Clock-As-Data Analysis

6-11

Clock pulses that violate the minimum pulse width of a register prevent data from being latched at the data pin of the register. To calculate the slack of the minimum pulse width, the TimeQuest analyzer subtracts the required minimum pulse width time from the actual minimum pulse width time. The

TimeQuest analyzer determines the actual minimum pulse width time by the clock requirement you specified for the clock that feeds the clock port of the register. The TimeQuest analyzer determines the required minimum pulse width time by the maximum rise, minimum rise, maximum fall, and minimum fall times.

Figure 6-23: Required Minimum Pulse Width time for the High and Low Pulse

Minimum and

Maximum Rise

Rise Arrival Times High Pulse

Width

Minimum and

Maximum

Fall Arrival Times

0.8

0.5

0.9

0.7

Low Pulse

Width

0.8

0.5

With common clock path pessimism, the minimum pulse width slack can be increased by the smallest value of either the maximum rise time minus the minimum rise time, or the maximum fall time minus the minimum fall time. In the example, the slack value can be increased by 0.2 ns, which is the smallest value between 0.3 ns (0.8 ns – 0.5 ns) and 0.2 ns (0.9 ns – 0.7 ns).

Related Information

TimeQuest Timing Analyzer Page (Settings Dialog Box)

For more information, refer to the Quartus Prime Help.

Clock-As-Data Analysis

The majority of FPGA designs contain simple connections between any two nodes known as either a data path or a clock path.

A data path is a connection between the output of a synchronous element to the input of another synchro‐ nous element.

A clock is a connection to the clock pin of a synchronous element. However, for more complex FPGA designs, such as designs that use source-synchronous interfaces, this simplified view is no longer sufficient. Clock-as-data analysis is performed in circuits with elements such as clock dividers and DDR source-synchronous outputs.

The connection between the input clock port and output clock port can be treated either as a clock path or a data path. A design where the path from port clk_in

to port clk_out

is both a clock and a data path.

The clock path is from the port clk_in

to the register reg_data

clock pin. The data path is from port clk_in

to the port clk_out

.

Timing Analysis Overview

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

6-12

Multicycle Clock Setup Check and Hold Check Analysis

Figure 6-24: Simplified Source Synchronous Output

D reg_data

Q clk_in

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

clk_out

With clock-as-data analysis, the TimeQuest analyzer provides a more accurate analysis of the path based on user constraints. For the clock path analysis, any phase shift associated with the phase-locked loop

(PLL) is taken into consideration. For the data path analysis, any phase shift associated with the PLL is taken into consideration rather than ignored.

The clock-as-data analysis also applies to internally generated clock dividers. An internally generated clock divider. In this figure, waveforms are for the inverter feedback path, analyzed during timing analysis. The output of the divider register is used to determine the launch time and the clock port of the register is used to determine the latch time.

Figure 6-25: Clock Divider

D Q

D Q

Launch Clock (2 T)

Data Arrival Time

Latch Clock (T)

Multicycle Clock Setup Check and Hold Check Analysis

You can modify the setup and hold relationship when you apply a multicycle exception to a register-toregister path.

Altera Corporation

Timing Analysis Overview

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 6-26: Register-to-Register Path

T clk1

D

REG1

SET

Q

CLR

T

CO

CLK

Combinational

Logic

T data

D

REG2

SET

T clk2

CLR

T

SU

/ T

H

Q

Multicycle Clock Setup

6-13

Multicycle Clock Setup

The setup relationship is defined as the number of clock periods between the latch edge and the launch edge. By default, the TimeQuest analyzer performs a single-cycle path analysis, which results in the setup relationship being equal to one clock period (latch edge – launch edge). Applying a multicycle setup assignment, adjusts the setup relationship by the multicycle setup value. The adjustment value may be negative.

An end multicycle setup assignment modifies the latch edge of the destination clock by moving the latch edge the specified number of clock periods to the right of the determined default latch edge. The following figure shows various values of the end multicycle setup (EMS) assignment and the resulting latch edge.

Figure 6-27: End Multicycle Setup Values

-10 0 10 20

REG1.CLK

EMS = 1

(default)

EMS = 2

EMS = 3

REG2.CLK

A start multicycle setup assignment modifies the launch edge of the source clock by moving the launch edge the specified number of clock periods to the left of the determined default launch edge. A start multicycle setup (SMS) assignment with various values can result in a specific launch edge.

Timing Analysis Overview

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

6-14

Multicycle Clock Hold

Figure 6-28: Start Multicycle Setup Values

0 10

Source Clock

SMS = 2

SMS = 3

Destination Clock

20

SMS = 1

(Default)

30

40

The setup relationship reported by the TimeQuest analyzer for the negative setup relationship.

Figure 6-29: Start Multicycle Setup Values Reported by the TimeQuest Analyzer

-10 0 10 20

Source Clock

SMS = 1

(default)

SMS = 3

SMS = 2

Destination Clock

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Multicycle Clock Hold

The setup relationship is defined as the number of clock periods between the launch edge and the latch edge.

By default, the TimeQuest analyzer performs a single-cycle path analysis, which results in the hold relationship being equal to one clock period (launch edge – latch edge).When analyzing a path, the

TimeQuest analyzer performs two hold checks. The first hold check determines that the data launched by the current launch edge is not captured by the previous latch edge. The second hold check determines that the data launched by the next launch edge is not captured by the current latch edge. The TimeQuest analyzer reports only the most restrictive hold check. The TimeQuest analyzer calculates the hold check by comparing launch and latch edges.

The calculation the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the hold check.

Figure 6-30: Hold Check

hold check 1 = current launch edge – previous latch edge hold check 2 = next launch edge – current latch edge

Tip: If a hold check overlaps a setup check, the hold check is ignored.

Altera Corporation

Timing Analysis Overview

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Multicycle Clock Hold

6-15

A start multicycle hold assignment modifies the launch edge of the destination clock by moving the latch edge the specified number of clock periods to the right of the determined default launch edge. he following figure shows various values of the start multicycle hold (SMH) assignment and the resulting launch edge.

Figure 6-31: Start Multicycle Hold Values

-10 0 10 20

Source Clock

SMH = 0

(default)

SMH = 1

SMH = 2

Destination Clock

An end multicycle hold assignment modifies the latch edge of the destination clock by moving the latch edge the specific ed number of clock periods to the left of the determined default latch edge. he following figure shows various values of the end multicycle hold (EMH) assignment and the resulting latch edge.

Figure 6-32: End Multicycle Hold Values

-20 -10

EMH = 2

0 10

20

Source Clock

EMH = 1

EMH = 0

(Default)

Destination Clock

Timing Analysis Overview

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

6-16

Multicorner Analysis

The hold relationship reported by the TimeQuest analyzer for the negative hold relationship shown in the figure above would look like this:

Figure 6-33: End Multicycle Hold Values Reported by the TimeQuest Analyzer

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

-10 0 10 20

Source Clock

EMH = 0

(Default)

EMH = 2

EMH = 1

Destination Clock

Multicorner Analysis

The TimeQuest analyzer performs multicorner timing analysis to verify your design under a variety of operating conditions—such as voltage, process, and temperature—while performing static timing analysis.

To change the operating conditions or speed grade of the device used for timing analysis, use the set_operating_conditions

command.

If you specify an operating condition Tcl object, the

-model

, speed

,

-temperature

, and

-voltage

options are optional. If you do not specify an operating condition Tcl object, the

-model

option is required; the

speed

,

-temperature

, and

-voltage

options are optional.

Tip: To obtain a list of available operating conditions for the target device, use the get_available_operating_conditions -all

command.

To ensure that no violations occur under various conditions during the device operation, perform static timing analysis under all available operating conditions.

Table 6-2: Operating Conditions for Slow and Fast Models

Model Speed Grade Voltage Temperature

Slow

Fast

Slowest speed grade in device density

V cc

minimum supply

(1)

Fastest speed grade in device density V cc

maximum supply

(1)

Maximum T

J

(1)

Minimum T

J

(1)

Note :

1. Refer to the DC & Switching Characteristics chapter of the applicable device Handbook for

V cc

and T

J

. values

In your design, you can set the operating conditions for to the slow timing model, with a voltage of

1100 mV, and temperature of 85° C with the following code: set_operating_conditions -model slow -temperature 85 -voltage 1100

Altera Corporation

Timing Analysis Overview

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Document Revision History

6-17

You can set the same operating conditions with a Tcl object: set_operating_conditions 3_slow_1100mv_85c

The following block of code shows how to use the set_operating_conditions

command to generate different reports for various operating conditions.

Example 6-1: Script Excerpt for Analysis of Various Operating Conditions

#Specify initial operating conditions set_operating_conditions -model slow -speed 3 -grade c -temperature 85 voltage 1100

#Update the timing netlist with the initial conditions update_timing_netlist

#Perform reporting

#Change initial operating conditions. Use a temperature of 0C set_operating_conditions -model slow -speed 3 -grade c -temperature 0 voltage 1100

#Update the timing netlist with the new operating condition update_timing_netlist

#Perform reporting

#Change initial operating conditions. Use a temperature of 0C and a model of fast set_operating_conditions -model fast -speed 3 -grade c -temperature 0 voltage 1100

#Update the timing netlist with the new operating condition update_timing_netlist

#Perform reporting

Related Information set_operating_conditions get_available_operating_conditions

For more information about the get_available_operating_conditions

command

Document Revision History

Table 6-3: Document Revision History

Date Versio n

Changes

2015.11.02

15.1.0 Changed instances of Quartus II to Quartus Prime.

2014.12.15

14.1.0 Moved Multicycle Clock Setup Check and Hold Check Analysis section from the TimeQuest Timing Analyzer chapter.

June 2014 14.0.0 Updated format

June 2012 12.0.0 Added social networking icons, minor text updates

November

2011

11.1.0 Initial release.

Timing Analysis Overview

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

6-18

Document Revision History

Related Information

Quartus Handbook Archive

For previous versions of the Quartus Prime Handbook, refer to the Quartus Handbook Archive.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Timing Analysis Overview

Send Feedback

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

2015.11.02

QPS5V3

Subscribe

Send Feedback

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer is a powerful ASIC-style timing analysis tool that validates the timing performance of all logic in your design using an industry-standard constraint, analysis, and reporting methodology. Use the TimeQuest analyzer GUI or command-line interface to constrain, analyze, and report results for all timing paths in your design.

This document is organized to allow you to refer to specific subjects relating to the TimeQuest analyzer and timing analysis. The sections cover the following topics:

Enhanced Timing Analysis for Arria 10

on page 7-2

The TimeQuest Timing Analyzer supports new timing algorithms for the Arria significantly improve the speed of the analysis.

®

10 device family which

Recommended Flow

on page 7-2

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest analyzer performs constraint validation to timing verification as part of the compilation flow.

Timing Constraints

on page 7-6

Timing analysis in the Quartus Prime software with the TimeQuest Timing Analyzer relies on constraining your design to make it meet your timing requirements.

Running the TimeQuest Analyzer

on page 7-54

When you compile a design, the TimeQuest timing analyzer automatically performs multi-corner signoff timing analysis after the Fitter has finished.

Understanding Results

on page 7-57

Knowing how your constraints are displayed when analyzing a path is one of the most important skills of timing analysis.

Constraining and Analyzing with Tcl Commands

on page 7-65

You can use Tcl commands from the Quartus Prime software Tcl Application Programming Interface

(API) to constrain, analyze, and collect information for your design.

Generating Timing Reports

on page 7-70

The TimeQuest analyzer provides real-time static timing analysis result reports.

Document Revision History

on page 7-71

7

©

2015 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, ENPIRION, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX words and logos are trademarks of Altera Corporation and registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. All other words and logos identified as trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html

. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.

www.altera.com

101 Innovation Drive, San Jose, CA 95134

ISO

9001:2008

Registered

7-2

Enhanced Timing Analysis for Arria 10

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Related Information

Timing Analysis Overview

on page 6-1

For more information about basic timing analysis concepts and how they pertain to the TimeQuest analyzer.

TimeQuest Timing Analyzer Resource Center

For more information about Altera resources available for the TimeQuest analyzer.

Altera Training

For more information about the TimeQuest analyzer.

Enhanced Timing Analysis for Arria 10

The TimeQuest Timing Analyzer supports new timing algorithms for the Arria

® significantly improve the speed of the analysis.

10 device family which

These algorithms are enabled by default for Arria 10 devices, and can be enabled for earlier families with an assignment. The new analysis engine analyzes the timing graph a fixed number of times. Previous

TimeQuest analysis analyzed the timing graph as many times as there were constraints in your Synopsys

Design Constraint (SDC) file.

The new algorithms also support incremental timing analysis, which allows you to modify a single block and re-analyze while maintaining a fully analyzed design.

You can turn on the new timing algorithms for use with Arria V, Cyclone V, and Stratix V devices with the following QSF assignment: set_global_assignment -name TIMEQUEST2 ON

Recommended Flow for First Time Users

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest analyzer performs constraint validation to timing verification as part of the compilation flow. Both the TimeQuest analyzer and the Fitter use of constraints contained in a

Synopsys Design Constraints (

.sdc

) file. The following flow is recommended if you have not created a project and do not have a SDC file with timing constraints for your design.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 7-1: Design Flow with the TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Creating and Setting Up your Design

Create Quartus Prime Project and Specify Design Files

7-3

Perform Analysis & Synthesis

Specify Timing Requirements

Compile Design and Verify Timing

Creating and Setting Up your Design

You must first create your project in the Quartus Prime software. Include all the necessary design files, including any existing Synopsys Design Constraints (

.sdc

) files, also referred to as SDC files, that contain timing constraints for your design. Some reference designs, or Altera or partner IP cores may already include one or more SDC files.

All SDC files must be added to your project so that your constraints are processed when the Quartus

Prime software performs Fitting and Timing Analysis. Typically you must create an SDC file to constrain your design.

Related Information

SDC File Precedence

on page 7-56

Specifying Timing Requirements

Before running timing analysis with the TimeQuest analyzer, you must specify timing constraints, describe the clock frequency requirements and other characteristics, timing exceptions, and I/O timing requirements of your design. You can use the TimeQuest Timing Analyzer Wizard to enter initial constraints for your design, and then refine timing constraints with the TimeQuest analyzer GUI.

Both the TimeQuest analyzer and the Fitter use of constraints contained in a Synopsis Design Constraints

(

.sdc

) file.

The constraints in the SDC file are read in sequence. You must first make a constraint before making any references to that constraint. For example, if a generated clock references a base clock, the base clock constraint must be made before the generated clock constraint.

If you are new to timing analysis with the TimeQuest analyzer, you can use template files included with the Quartus Prime software and the interactive dialog boxes to create your initial SDC file. To use this method, refer to Performing an Initial Analysis and Synthesis.

If you are familiar with timing analysis, you can also create an SDC file in you preferred text editor. Don't forget to include the SDC file in the project when you are finished.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-4

Performing an Initial Analysis and Synthesis

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Related Information

Creating a Constraint File from Quartus Prime Templates with the Quartus Prime Text Editor

on

page 7-4

For more information on using the <keyword keyref="qts-all" /> Text Editor templates for SDC constraints.

Identifying the Quartus Prime Software Executable from the SDC File

on page 7-69

Performing an Initial Analysis and Synthesis

Perform Analysis and Synthesis on your design so that you can find design entry names in the Node

Finder to simplify creating constraints.

The Quartus Prime software populates an internal database with design element names. You must synthesize your design in order for the Quartus Prime software to assign names to your design elements, for example, pins, nodes, hierarchies, and timing paths.

If you have already compiled your design, you do not need need to perform the synthesis step again, because compiling the design automatically performs synthesis.You can either perform Analysis and

Synthesis to create a post-map database, or perform a full compilation to create a post-fit database.

Creating a post-map database is faster than a post-fit database, and is sufficient for creating initial timing constraints.

Note: If you are using incremental compilation, you must merge your design partitions after performing

Analysis and Synthesis to create a post-map database.

Note: When compiling for the Arria 10 device family, the following commands are required to perform initial synthesis and enable you to use the Node Finder to find names in your design: quartus_map <design> quartus_fit <design> --floorplan quartus_sta <design> --post_map

When compiling for other devices, you can exclude the quartus_fit <design> --floorplan step: quartus_map <design> quartus_sta <design> --post_map

Creating a Constraint File from Quartus Prime Templates with the Quartus Prime Text Editor

You can create an SDC file from constraint templates in the Quartus Prime software with the Quartus

Prime Text Editor, or with your preferred text editor.

1. On the File menu, click New.

2. In the New dialog box, select the Synopsys Design Constraints File type from the Other Files group.

Click OK.

3. Right-click in the blank SDC file in the Quartus Prime Text Editor, then click Insert Constraint.

Choose Clock Constraint followed by Set Clock Groups since they are the most widely used constraints.

The Quartus Prime Text Editor displays a dialog box with interactive fields for creating constraints.

For example, the Create Clock dialog box shows you the waveform for your create_clock

constraint while you adjust the Period and Rising and Falling waveform edge settings. The actual constraint is displayed in the SDC command field. Click Insert to use the constraint in your SDC.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Performing a Full Compilation

7-5

or

4. Click the Insert Template button on the text editor menu, or, right-click in the blank SDC file in the

Quartus Prime Text Editor, then click Insert TemplateTimeQuest.

a. In the Insert Template dialog box, expand the TimeQuest section, then expand the SDC

Commands section.

b. Expand a command category, for example, Clocks.

c. Select a command. The SDC constraint appears in the Preview pane.

d. Click Insert to paste the SDC constraint into the blank SDC file you created in step 2.

This creates a generic constraint for you to edit manually, replacing variables such as clock names, period, rising and falling edges, ports, etc.

5. Repeat as needed with other constraints, or click Close to close the Insert Template dialog box.

You can now use any of the standard features of the Quartus Prime Text Editor to modify the SDC file, or save the SDC file to edit in a text editor. Your SDC can be saved with the same name as the project, and generally should be stored in the project directory.

Related Information

Create Clocks Dialog Box

Set Clock Groups Dialog Box

For more information on Create Clocks and Set Clock Groups, refer to the

Quartus Prime

Help.

Performing a Full Compilation

After creating initial timing constraints, compile your design.

During a full compilation, the Fitter uses the TimeQuest analyzer repeatedly to perform timing analysis with your timing constraints. By default, the Fitter can stop early if it meets your timing requirements, instead of attempting to achieve the maximum performance. You can modify this by changing the Fitter effort settings in the Quartus Prime software.

Related Information

Analyzing Timing in Designs Compiled in Previous Versions

on page 7-6

For more information about importing databases compiled in previous versions of the software.

Fitter Settings Page (Settings Dialog Box)

For more information about changing Fitter effort, refer to the Quartus Prime Help.

Verifying Timing

The TimeQuest analyzer examines the timing paths in the design, calculates the propagation delay along each path, checks for timing constraint violations, and reports timing results as positive slack or negative slack. Negative slack indicates a timing violation. If you encounter violations along timing paths, use the timing reports to analyze your design and determine how best to optimize your design. If you modify, remove, or add constraints, you should perform a full compilation again. This iterative process helps resolve timing violations in your design.

There is a recommended flow for constraining and analyzing your design within the TimeQuest analyzer, and each part of the flow has a corresponding Tcl command.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-6

Analyzing Timing in Designs Compiled in Previous Versions

Figure 7-2: The TimeQuest Timing Analyzer Flow

Open Project project_open

Create Timing Netlist create_timing_netlist

Apply Timing Constraints read_sdc

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Update Timing Netlist update_timing_netlist

Verify Static Timing Analysis

Results report_clock_transfers report_min_pulse_width report_timing report_clocks report_net_timing report_sdc report_ucp

Analyzing Timing in Designs Compiled in Previous Versions

Performing a full compilation can be a lengthy process, however, once your design meets timing you can export the design database for later use. This can include operations such as verification of subsequent timing models, or use in a later version of the Quartus Prime software.

When you re-open the project, the Quartus Prime software opens the exported database from the export directory. You can then run TimeQuest on the design without having to recompile the project.

To export the database in the previous version of the Quartus Prime software, click Project > Export

Database and select the export directory to contain the exported database.

To import a database in a later version of the Quartus Prime software, click File > Open and select the

Quartus Prime Project file (

.qpf

) for the project.

Once you import the database, you can perform any TimeQuest analyzer functions on the design without recompiling.

Timing Constraints

Timing analysis in the Quartus Prime software with the TimeQuest Timing Analyzer relies on constraining your design to make it meet your timing requirements. When discussing these constraints, they can be referred to as timing constraints, SDC constraints, or SDC commands interchangeably.

Recommended Starting SDC Constraints

Almost every beginning SDC file should contain the following four commands:

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

create_clock

create_clock

on page 7-7

derive_pll_clocks

on page 7-8

derive_clock_uncertainty

on page 7-8

SDC Constraint Creation Summary

on page 7-8

Those are the first three steps, which can usually be done very quickly. For a sample design with two clocks coming into it, your SDC file might look like this example:

set_clock_groups

on page 7-9

7-7

Related Information

Creating a Constraint File from Quartus Prime Templates with the Quartus Prime Text Editor

on page 7-4

create_clock

The first statements in a SDC file should be constraints for clocks, for example, constrain the external clocks coming into the FPGA with create_clock

. An example of the basic syntax is: create_clock -name sys_clk -period 8.0 [get_ports fpga_clk]

This command creates a clock called sys_clk

with an 8ns period and applies it to the port called fpga_clk

.

Note: Both Tcl files and SDC files are case-sensitive, so make sure references to pins, ports, or nodes, such as fpga_clk

match the case used in your design.

By default, the clock has a rising edge at time 0ns, and a 50% duty cycle, hence a falling edge at time 4ns. If you require a different duty cycle or to represent an offset, use the

-waveform

option, however, this is seldom necessary.

It is common to create a clock with the same name as the port it is applied to. In the example above, this would be accomplished by: create_clock -name fpga_clk -period 8.0 [get_ports fpga_clk]

There are now two unique objects called fpga_clk

, a port in your design and a clock applied to that port.

Note: In Tcl syntax, square brackets execute the command inside them, so

[get_ports fpga_clk] executes a command that finds all ports in the design that match fpga_clk

and returns a collection of them. You can enter the command without using the get_ports

collection command, as shown in the following example. There are benefits to using collection commands, which are described in

"Collection Commands".

create_clock -name sys_clk -period 8.0 fpga_clk

Repeat this process, using one create_clock command for each known clock coming into your design.

Later on you can use Report Unconstrained Paths to identify any unconstrained clocks.

Note: Rather than typing constraints, users can enter constraints through the GUI. After launching

TimeQuest, open the SDC file from TimeQuest or Quartus Prime, place the cursor where the new constraint will go, and go to Edit > Insert Constraint, and choose the constraint.

Warning:

Using the Constraints menu option in the TimeQuest GUI applies constraints directly to the timing database, but makes no entry in the SDC file. An advanced user may find reasons to do this, but if you are new to TimeQuest, Altera recommends entering your constraints directly into your SDC with the Edit > Insert Constraint command.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-8 derive_pll_clocks

Related Information

Creating Base Clocks

on page 7-11

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

derive_pll_clocks

After the create_clock

commands add the following command into your SDC file: derive_pll_clocks

This command automatically creates a generated clock constraint on each output of the PLLs in your design..

When PLLs are created, you define how each PLL output is configured. Because of this, the TimeQuest analyzer can automatically constrain them, wit thet derive_pll_clocks

command.

This command also creates other constraints. It constrains transceiver clocks. It adds multicycles between

LVDS SERDES and user logic.

The derive_pll_clocks command prints an Info message to show each generated clock it creates.

If you are new to the TimeQuest analyzer, you may decide not to use derive_pll_clocks

, and instead cut-and-paste each create_generated_clock

assignment into the SDC file. There is nothing wrong with this, since the two are identical. The problem is that when you modifiy a PLL setting, you must remember to change its generated clock in the SDC file. Examples of this type of change include modifying an existing output clock, adding a new PLL output, or making a change to the PLL's hierarchy. Too many designers forget to modify the SDC file and spend time debugging something that derive_pll_clocks would have updated automatically.

Related Information

Creating Base Clocks

on page 7-11

Deriving PLL Clocks

on page 7-18

derive_clock_uncertainty

Add the following command to your SDC file: derive_clock_uncertainty

This command calculates clock-to-clock uncertainties within the FPGA, due to characteristics like PLL jitter, clock tree jitter, etc. This should be in all SDC files and the TimeQuest analyzer generates a warning if this command is not found in your SDC files.

Related Information

Accounting for Clock Effect Characteristics

on page 7-21

SDC Constraint Creation Summary

Those are the first three steps, which can usually be done very quickly. For a sample design with two clocks coming into it, your SDC file might look like this example: create_clock -period 20.00 -name adc_clk [get_ports adc_clk] create_clock -period 8.00 -name sys_clk [get_ports sys_clk] derive_pll_clocks derive_clock_uncertainty

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

set_clock_groups

7-9

set_clock_groups

With the constraintsdiscusssed previously, most, if not all, of the clocks in the design are now constrained.

In the TimeQuest analyzer, all clocks are related by default, and you must indicate which clocks are not related. For example, if there are paths between an 8ns clock and 10ns clock, even if the clocks are completely asynchronous, the TimeQuest analyzer attempts to meet a 2ns setup relationship between these clocks unless you indicate that they are not related. The TimeQuest analyzer analyzes everything known, rather than assuming that all clocks are unrelated and requiring that you relate them. The SDC language has a powerful constraint for setting unrelated clocks called set_clock_groups

. A template for the the typical use of the set_clock_groups

command is: set_clock_groups -asynchronous -group {<clock1>...<clockn>} ... \

-group {<clocka>...<clockn>}

The set_clock_groups

command does not actually group clocks. Since the TimeQuest analyzer assumes all clocks are related by default, all clocks are effectively in one big group. Instead, the set_clock_groups command cuts timing between clocks in different groups.

There is no limit to the number of times you can specify a group option with

-group {<group of

clocks>}

. When entering constraints through the GUI with Edit > Insert Constraint, the Set Clock

Groups dialog box only permits two clock groups, but this is only a limitation of that dialog box. You can always manually add more into the SDC file.

Any clock not listed in the assignment is related to all clocks. If you forget a clock, the TimeQuest analyzer acts conservatively and analyzes that clock in context with all other domains to which it connects.

The set_clock_groups

command requires either the

-asynchronous

or

-exclusive

option. The

asynchronous

flag means the clocks are both toggling, but not in a way that can synchronously pass data.

The

-exclusive

flag means the clocks do not toggle at the same time, and hence are mutually exclusive.

An example of this might be a clock multiplexor that has two generated clock assignments on its output.

Since only one can toggle at a time, these clocks are

-exclusive

. TimeQuest does not currently analyze crosstalk explicitly. Instead, the timing models use extra guard bands to account for any potential crosstalk-induced delays. TimeQuest treats the

-asynchronous

and

-exclusive

options the same.

A clock cannot be within multiple

-group

groupings in a single assignment, however, you can have multiple set_clock_groups

assignments.

Another way to cut timing between clocks is to use set_false_path

. To cut timing between sys_clk

and dsp_clk

, a user might enter: set_false_path -from [get_clocks sys_clk] -to [get_clocks dsp_clk] set_false_path -from [get_clocks dsp_clk] -to [sys_clk]

This works fine when there are only a few clocks, but quickly grows to a huge number of assignments that are completely unreadable. In a simple design with three PLLs that have multiple outputs, the set_clock_groups

command can clearly show which clocks are related in less than ten lines, while set_false_path

may be over 50 lines and be very non-intuitive on what is being cut.

Related Information

Creating Generated Clocks

on page 7-15

Relaxing Setup with set_multicyle_path

on page 7-31

Accounting for a Phase Shift

on page 7-32

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-10

Tips for Writing a set_clock_groups Constraint

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Tips for Writing a set_clock_groups Constraint

Since derive_pll_clocks creates many of the clock names, you may not know all of the clock names to use in the clock groups.

A quick way to make this constraint is to use the SDC file you have created so far, with the three basic constraints described in previous topics. Make sure you have added it to your project, then open the

TimeQuest timing analyzer GUI.

In the Task panel of the TimeQuestanalyzer, double-click on Report Clocks. This reads your existing

SDC and applies it to your design, then reports all the clocks. From that report, highlight all of the clock names in the first column, and copy the names.

You have just copied all the clock names in your design in the exact format the TimeQuest analyzer recognizes. Paste them into your SDC file to make a list of all clock names, one per line..

Format that list into the set_clock_groups

command by cutting and pasting clock names into appropriate groups. Then enter the following empty template in your SDC file:: set_clock_groups -asynchronous -group { \

} \

-group { \

} \

-group { \

} \

-group { \

}

Cut and paste clocks into groups to define how they’re related, adding or removing groups as necessary.

Format to make the code readable.

Note: This command can be difficult to read on a single line. Instead, you should make use of the Tcl line continuation character "\". By putting a space after your last character and then "\", the end-of-line character is escaped. (And be careful not to have any whitespace after the escape character, or else it will escape the whitespace, not the end-of-line character).

set_clock_groups -asynchronous \

-group {adc_clk \

the_adc_pll|altpll_component_autogenerated|pll|clk[0] \

the_adc_pll|altpll_component_autogenerated|pll|clk[1] \

the_adc_pll|altpll_component_autogenerated|pll|clk[2] \

} \

-group {sys_clk \

the_system_pll|altpll_component_autogenerated|pll|clk[0] \

the_system_pll|altpll_component_autogenerated|pll|clk[1] \

} \

-group {the_system_pll|altpll_component_autogenerated|pll|clk[2] \

}

Note: The last group has a PLL output system_pll|..|clk[2]

while the input clock and other PLL outputs are in different groups. If PLLs are used, and the input clock frequency is not related to the frequency of the PLL's outputs, they must be treated asynchronously. Usually most outputs of a

PLL are related and hence in the same group, but this is not a requirement, and depends on the requirements of your design.

For designs with complex clocking, writing this constraint can be an iterative process. For example, a design with two DDR3 cores and high-speed transceivers could easily have thirty or more clocks. In those cases, you can just add the clocks you’ve created. Since clocks not in the command are still related to every clock, you are conservatively grouping what is known. If there are still failing paths in the design between unrelated clock domains, you can start adding in the new clock domains as necessary. In this case, a large number of the clocks won't actually be in the set_clock_groups

command, since they are either cut in

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Creating Clocks and Clock Constraints

7-11

the SDC file for the IP core (such as the SDC files generated by the DDR3 cores), or they only connect to clock domains to which they are related.

For many designs, that is all that's necessary to constrain the core. Some common core constraints that will not be covered in this quick start section that user's do are:

• Add multicycles between registers which can be analyzed at a slower rate than the default analysis, in other words, increasing the time when data can be read, or 'opening the window'. For example, a 10ns clock period will have a 10ns setup relationship. If the data changes at a slower rate, or perhaps the registers toggle at a slower rate due to a clock enable, then you should apply a multicycle that relaxes the setup relationship (opens the the window so that valid data can pass). This is a multiple of the clock period, making the setup relationship 20ns, 40ns, etc., while keeping the hold relationship at 0ns.

These types of multicycles are generally applied to paths.

• The second common form of multicycle is when the user wants to advance the cycle in which data is read, or 'shift the window'. This generally occurs when your design performs a small phase-shift on a clock. For example, if your design has two 10ns clocks exiting a PLL, but the second clock has a 0.5ns

phase-shift, the default setup relationship from the main clock to the phase-shifted clock is 0.5ns and the hold relationship is -9.5ns. It is almost impossible to meet a 0.5ns setup relationship, and most likely you intend the data to transfer in the next window. By adding a multicycle from the main clock to the phase-shifted clock, the setup relationship becomes 10.5ns and the hold relationship becomes

0.5ns. This multicycle is generally applied between clocks and is something the user should think about as soon as they do a small phase-shift on a clock. This type of multicycle is called shifting the window.

• Add a create_generated_clock

to ripple clocks. When a register's output drives the clk

port of another register, that is a ripple clock. Clocks do not propagate through registers, so all ripple clocks must have a create_generated_clock

constraint applied to them for correct analysis. Unconstrained ripple clocks appear in the Report Unconstrained Paths report, so they are easily recognized. In general, ripple clocks should be avoided for many reasons, and if possible, a clock enable should be used instead.

• Add a create_generated_clock

to clock mux outputs. Without this, all clocks propagate through the mux and are related. TimeQuest analyze paths downstream from the mux where one clock input feeds the source register and the other clock input feeds the destination, and vice-versa. Although it could be valid, this is usually not preferred behavior. By putting create_generated_clock

constraints on the mux output, which relates them to the clocks coming into the mux, you can correctly group these clocks with other clocks.

Creating Clocks and Clock Constraints

Clocks specify timing requirements for synchronous transfers and guide the Fitter optimization algorithms to achieve the best possible placement for your design. You must define all clocks and any associated clock characteristics, such as uncertainty or latency. The TimeQuest analyzer supports SDC commands that accommodate various clocking schemes such as:

• Base clocks

• Virtual clocks

• Multifrequency clocks

• Generated clocks

Creating Base Clocks

Base clocks are the primary input clocks to the device. Unlike clocks that are generated in the device (such as an on-chip PLL), base clocks are generated by off-chip oscillators or forwarded from an external device.

Define base clocks at the top of your SDC file, because generated clocks and other constraints often reference base clocks. The TimeQuest timing analyzer ignores any constraints that reference a clock that has not been defined.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-12

Creating Base Clocks

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Use the create_clock

command to create a base clock. Use other constraints, such as those described in

Accounting for Clock Effect Characteristics, to specify clock characteristics such as uncertainty and latency.

The following examples show the most common uses of the create_clock

constraint:

create_clock Command

To specify a 100 MHz requirement on a clk_sys

input clock port you would enter the following in your

SDC file: create_clock -period 10 -name clk_sys [get_ports clk_sys]

100 MHz Shifted by 90 Degrees Clock Creation

This example creates a 10 ns clock with a 50% duty cycle that is phase shifted by 90 degrees applied to port clk_sys

. This type of clock definition is most commonly used when the FPGA receives source synchro‐ nous, double-rate data that is center-aligned with respect to the clock.

create_clock -period 10 -waveform { 2.5 7.5 } [get_ports clk_sys]

Two Oscillators Driving the Same Clock Port

You can apply multiple clocks to the same target with the

-add

option. For example, to specify that the same clock input can be driven at two different frequencies, enter the following commands in your SDC file: create_clock -period 10 -name clk_100 [get_ports clk_sys] create_clock -period 5 -name clk_200 [get_ports clk_sys] -add

Although it is not common to have more than two base clocks defined on a port, you can define as many as are appropriate for your design, making sure you specify

-add

for all clocks after the first.

Creating Multifrequency Clocks

You must create a multifrequency clock if your design has more than one clock source feeding a single clock node in your design. The additional clock may act as a low-power clock, with a lower frequency than the primary clock. If your design uses multifrequency clocks, use the set_clock_groups

command to define clocks that are exclusive.

To create multifrequency clocks, use the create_clock

command with the

-add

option to create multiple clocks on a clock node. You can create a 10 ns clock applied to clock port clk

, and then add an additional

15 ns clock to the same clock port. The TimeQuest analyzer uses both clocks when it performs timing analysis.

create_clock –period 10 –name clock_primary –waveform { 0 5 } \

[get_ports clk] create_clock –period 15 –name clock_secondary –waveform { 0 7.5 } \

[get_ports clk] -add

Related Information

Accounting for Clock Effect Characteristics

on page 7-21

create_clock

get_ports

For more information about these commands, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Automatically Detecting Clocks and Creating Default Clock Constraints

7-13

Automatically Detecting Clocks and Creating Default Clock Constraints

To automatically create base clocks in your design, use the derive_clocks

command. The derive_clocks

command is equivalent to using the create_clock

command for each register or port feeding the clock pin of a register. The derive_clocks

command creates clock constraints on ports or registers to ensure every register in your design has a clock constraints, and it applies one period to all base clocks in your design.

You can have the TimeQuest analyzer create a base clock with a 100 Mhz requirement for unconstrained base clock nodes.

derive_clocks -period 10

Warning:

Do not use the derive_clocks

command for final timing sign-off; instead, you should create clocks for all clock sources with the create_clock

and create_generated_clock

commands.

If your design has more than a single clock, the derive_clocks

command constrains all the clocks to the same specified frequency. To achieve a thorough and realistic analysis of your design’s timing requirements, you should make individual clock constraints for all clocks in your design.

If you want to have some base clocks created automatically, you can use the

-create_base_clocks option to derive_pll_clocks

. With this option, the derive_pll_clocks

command automatically creates base clocks for each PLL, based on the input frequency information specified when the PLL was instantiated. The base clocks are named matching the port names. This feature works for simple port-to-

PLL connections. Base clocks are not automatically generated for complex PLL connectivity, such as cascaded PLLs. You can also use the command derive_pll_clocks -create_base_clocks

to create the input clocks for all PLL inputs automatically.

Related Information derive_clocks

For more information about this command, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

Creating Virtual Clocks

A virtual clock is a clock that does not have a real source in the design or that does not interact directly with the design.

To create virtual clocks, use the create_clock

command with no value specified for the <targets> option.

This example defines a 100Mhz virtual clock because no target is specified.

create_clock -period 10 -name my_virt_clk

I/O Constraints with Virtual Clocks

Virtual clocks are most commonly used in I/O constraints; they represent the clock at the external device connected to the FPGA.

For the output circuit shown in the following figure, you should use a base clock to constrain the circuit in the FPGA, and a virtual clock to represent the clock driving the external device. Examples of the base clock, virtual clock, and output delay constraints for such a circuit are shown below.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-14

Example of Specifying an I/O Interface Clock

Figure 7-3: Virtual Clock Board Topology

Altera FPGA reg_a dataout datain

External Device reg_b

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

system_clk virt_clk

You can create a 10 ns virtual clock named virt_clk

with a 50% duty cycle where the first rising edge occurs at 0 ns by adding the following code to your SDC file. The virtual clock is then used as the clock source for an output delay constraint.

Example 7-1: Virtual Clock

#create base clock for the design create_clock -period 5 [get_ports system_clk]

#create the virtual clock for the external register create_clock -period 10 -name virt_clk

#set the output delay referencing the virtual clock set_output_delay -clock virt_clk -max 1.5 [get_ports dataout] set_output_delay -clock virt_clk -min 0.0 [get_ports dataout]

Related Information

set_input_delay

set_output_delay

For more information about these commands, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

Example of Specifying an I/O Interface Clock

To specify I/O interface uncertainty, you must create a virtual clock and constrain the input and output ports with the set_input_delay

and set_output_delay

commands that reference the virtual clock.

When the set_input_delay

or set_output_delay

commands reference a clock port or PLL output, the virtual clock allows the derive_clock_uncertainty

command to apply separate clock uncertainties for internal clock transfers and I/O interface clock transfers

Create the virtual clock with the same properties as the original clock that is driving the I/O port.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 7-4: I/O Interface Clock Specifications

External Device

D reg1

Q

I/O Interface Uncertainty

7-15

data_in

Altera FPGA

D reg2

Q clk_in

100 MHz

Example 7-2: SDC Commands to Constrain the I/O Interface

# Create the base clock for the clock port create_clock -period 10 -name clk_in [get_ports clk_in]

# Create a virtual clock with the same properties of the base clock

# driving the source register create_clock -period 10 -name virt_clk_in

# Create the input delay referencing the virtual clock and not the base

# clock

# DO NOT use set_input_delay -clock clk_in <delay value>

# [get_ports data_in] set_input_delay -clock virt_clk_in <delay value> [get_ports data_in]

I/O Interface Uncertainty

Virtual clocks are recommended for I/O constraints because they most accurately represent the clocking topology of the design. An additional benefit is that you can specify different uncertainty values on clocks that interface with external I/O ports and clocks that feed register-to-register paths inside the FPGA.

Related Information

Clock Uncertainty

on page 7-21

For more information about clock uncertainty and clock transfers.

Creating Generated Clocks

Define generated clocks on any nodes in your design which modify the properties of a clock signal, including phase, frequency, offset, and duty cycle. Generated clocks are most commonly used on the outputs of PLLs, on register clock dividers, clock muxes, and clocks forwarded to other devices from an

FPGA output port, such as source synchronous and memory interfaces. In the SDC file, create generated clocks after the base clocks have been defined. Generated clocks automatically account for all clock delays and clock latency to the generated clock target.

Use the create_generated_clock

command to constrain generated clocks in your design.

The

-source

option specifies the name of a node in the clock path which is used as reference for your generated clock. The source of the generated clock must be a node in your design netlist and not the name of a previously defined clock. You can use any node name on the clock path between the input clock pin of the target of the generated clock and the target node of its reference clock as the source node. A good practice is to specify the input clock pin of the target node as the source of your new generated clock. That

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-16

Creating Generated Clocks

way, the source of the generated clock is decoupled from the naming and hierarchy of its clock source. If you change its clock source, you don't have to edit the generated clock constraint.

If you have multiple base clocks feeding a node that is the source for a generated clock, you must define multiple generated clocks. Each generated clock is associated to one base clock using the

-master_clock option in each generated clock statement. In some cases, generated clocks are generated with combina‐ tional logic. Depending on how your clock-modifying logic is synthesized, the name can change from compile to compile. If the name changes after you write the generated clock constraint, the generated clock is ignored because its target name no longer exists in the design. To avoid this problem, use a synthesis attribute or synthesis assignment to keep the final combinational node of the clock-modifying logic. Then use the kept name in your generated clock constraint. For details on keeping combinational nodes or wires, refer to the Implement as Output of Logic Cell logic option topic in Quartus Prime Help.

When a generated clock is created on a node that ultimately feeds the data input of a register, this creates a special case referred to as “clock-as-data”. Instances of clock-as-data are treated differently by TimeQuest.

For example, when clock-as-data is used with DDR, both the rise and the fall of this clock need to be considered since it is a clock, and TimeQuest reports both rise and fall. With clock-as-data, the From

Node is treated as the target of the generated clock, and the Launch Clock is treated as the generated clock. In the figure below, the first path is from toggle_clk (INVERTED) to clk, whereas the second path is from toggle_clk to clk. The slack in both cases is slightly different due to the difference in rise and fall times along the path; the ~5 ps difference can be seen in the Data Delay column. Only the path with the lowest slack value need be considered. This would also be true if this were not a clock-as-data case, but normally TimeQuest only reports the worst-case path between the two (rise and fall). In this example, if the generated clock were not defined on the register output, then only one path would be reported and it would be the one with the lowest slack value. If your design targets an Arria 10 device, the enhanced timing algorithms remove all common clock pessimism on paths treated as clock-as-data.

Figure 7-5: Example of clock-as-data

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

The TimeQuest analyzer provides the derive_pll_clocks

command to automatically generate clocks for all PLL clock outputs. The properties of the generated clocks on the PLL outputs match the properties defined for the PLL.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Clock Divider Example

Related Information

Deriving PLL Clocks

on page 7-18

For more information about deriving PLL clock outputs.

Implement as Output of Logic Cell logic option

For more information on keeping combinational nodes or wires, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

create_generate_clock

derive_pll_clocks

create_generated_clocks

For information about these commands, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

7-17

Clock Divider Example

A common form of generated clock is a divide-by-two register clock divider. The following constraint creates a half-rate clock on the divide-by-two register.

Figure 7-6: Clock Divider

reg clk_sys

Figure 7-7: Clock Divider Waveform

Edges 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 clk_sys clk_div_2

Time

0 10 20 30 create_clock -period 10 -name clk_sys [get_ports clk_sys] create_generated_clock -name clk_div_2 -divide_by 2 -source \

[get_ports clk_sys] [get_pins reg|q]

Or in order to have the clock source be the clock pin of the register you can use: create_clock -period 10 -name clk_sys [get_ports clk_sys] create_generated_clock -name clk_div_2 -divide_by 2 -source \

[get_pins reg|clk] [get_pins reg|q]

Clock Multiplexor Example

Another common form of generated clock is on the output of a clock mux. One generated clock on the output is requred for each input clock. The SDC example also includes the set_clock_groups

command

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-18

Deriving PLL Clocks

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

to indicate that the two generated clocks can never be active simultaneously in the design, so the

TimeQuest analyzer does not analyze cross-domain paths between the generated clocks on the output of the clock mux.

Figure 7-8: Clock Mux

clk_a clk_b mux_out create_clock -name clock_a -period 10 [get_ports clk_a] create_clock -name clock_b -period 10 [get_ports clk_b] create_generated_clock -name clock_a_mux -source [get_ports clk_a] \

[get_pins clk_mux|mux_out] create_generated_clock -name clock_b_mux -source [get_ports clk_b] \

[get_pins clk_mux|mux_out] -add set_clock_groups -exclusive -group clock_a_mux -group clock_b_mux

Deriving PLL Clocks

Use the derive_pll_clocks

command to direct the TimeQuest analyzer to automatically search the timing netlist for all unconstrained PLL output clocks. The derive_pll_clocks

command detects your current PLL settings and automatically creates generated clocks on the outputs of every PLL by calling the create_generated_clock

command.

Create Base Clock for PLL input Clock Ports

create_clock -period 10.0 -name fpga_sys_clk [get_ports fpga_sys_clk] \

derive_pll_clocks

If your design contains transceivers, LVDS transmitters, or LVDS receivers, you must use the derive_pll_clocks

command. The command automatically constrains this logic in your design and creates timing exceptions for those blocks.

Include the derive_pll_clocks

command in your SDC file after any create_clock

command Each time the TimeQuest analyzer reads your SDC file, the appropriate generate clock is created for each PLL output clock pin. If a clock exists on a PLL output before running derive_pll_clocks

, the pre-existing clock has precedence, and an auto-generated clock is not created for that PLL output.

A simple PLL design with a register-to-register path.

Figure 7-9: Simple PLL Design

dataout reg_1 reg_2 pll_inclk pll_inst

The TimeQuest analyzer generates messages when you use the derive_pll_clocks

command to automatically constrain the PLL for a design similar to the previous image.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Creating Clock Groups

Example 7-3: derive_pll_clocks Command Messages

Info:

Info: Deriving PLL Clocks:

Info: create_generated_clock -source pll_inst|altpll_component|pll|inclk[0] divide_by 2 -name pll_inst|altpll_component|pll|clk[0] pll_inst|altpll_component|pll|clk[0]

Info:

7-19

The input clock pin of the PLL is the node pll_inst|altpll_component|pll|inclk[0]

which is used for the

-source

option. The name of the output clock of the PLL is the PLL output clock node, pll_inst| altpll_component|pll|clk[0]

.

If the PLL is in clock switchover mode, multiple clocks are created for the output clock of the PLL; one for the primary input clock (for example, inclk[0]

), and one for the secondary input clock (for example, inclk[1]

). You should create exclusive clock groups for the primary and secondary output clocks since they are not active simultaneously.

Related Information

Creating Clock Groups

on page 7-19

For more information about creating exclusive clock groups.

derive_pll_clocks

Derive PLL Clocks

For more information about the derive_pll_clocks command.

Creating Clock Groups

The TimeQuest analyzer assumes all clocks are related unless constrained otherwise.

To specify clocks in your design that are exclusive or asynchronous, use the set_clock_groups command. The set_clock_groups

command cuts timing between clocks in different groups, and performs the same analysis regardless of whether you specify

-exclusive

or

-asynchronous

. A group is defined with the

-group

option. The TimeQuest analyzer excludes the timing paths between clocks for each of the separate groups.

The following tables show examples of various group options for the set_clock_groups

command.

Table 7-1: set_clock_groups -group A

B

C

D

Dest\Source

A

A

Analyzed

Cut

Cut

Cut

B

Cut

Analyzed

Analyzed

Analyzed

C

Cut

Analyzed

Analyzed

Analyzed

D

Cut

Analyzed

Analyzed

Analyzed

Table 7-2: set_clock_groups -group {A B}

Dest\Source

A

A

Analyzed

B

Analyzed

C

Cut

D

Cut

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-20

B

C

D

Exclusive Clock Groups

Analyzed

Cut

Cut

Analyzed

Cut

Cut

Cut

Analyzed

Analyzed

Cut

Analyzed

Analyzed

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Table 7-3: set_clock_groups -group A -group B

B

C

D

Dest\Source

A

A

Analyzed

Cut

Cut

Cut

B

Cut

Analyzed

Cut

Cut

Table 7-4: set_clock_groups -group {A C} -group {B D}

C

D

Dest\Source

A

B

A

Analyzed

Cut

Analyzed

Cut

B

Cut

Analyzed

Cut

Analyzed

C

Cut

Cut

Analyzed

Analyzed

C

Analyzed

Cut

Analyzed

Cut

D

Cut

Cut

Analyzed

Analyzed

D

Cut

Analyzed

Cut

Analyzed

Table 7-5: set_clock_groups -group {A C D}

B

C

Dest\Source

A

D

A

Analyzed

Cut

Analyzed

Analyzed

B

Cut

Analyzed

Cut

Cut

C

Analyzed

Cut

Analyzed

Analyzed

D

Analyzed

Cut

Analyzed

Analyzed

Related Information set_clock_groups

For more information about this command, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

Exclusive Clock Groups

Use the

-exclusive

option to declare that two clocks are mutually exclusive. You may want to declare clocks as mutually exclusive when multiple clocks are created on the same node. This case occurs for multiplexed clocks.

For example, an input port may be clocked by either a 25-MHz or a 50-MHz clock. To constrain this port, create two clocks on the port, and then create clock groups to declare that they do not coexist in the design at the same time. Declaring the clocks as mutually exclusive eliminates clock transfers that are derived between the 25-MHz clock and the 50-MHz clock.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 7-10: Clock Mux with Synchronous Path Across the Mux

Asynchronous Clock Groups

7-21

clk_a clk_b mux_out create_clock -period 40 -name clk_a [get_ports {port_a}] create_clock -add -period 20 -name clk_b [get_ports {port_a}] set_clock_groups -exclusive -group {clk_a} -group {clk_b}

Asynchronous Clock Groups

Use the

-asynchronous

option to create asynchronous clock groups. Asynchronous clock groups are commonly used to break the timing relationship where data is transfered through a FIFO between clocks running at different rates.

Related Information set_clock_groups

For more information about this command, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

Accounting for Clock Effect Characteristics

The clocks you create with the TimeQuest analyzer are ideal clocks that do not account for any board effects. You can account for clock effect characteristics with clock latency and clock uncertainty.

Clock Latency

There are two forms of clock latency, clock source latency and clock network latency. Source latency is the propagation delay from the origin of the clock to the clock definition point (for example, a clock port).

Network latency is the propagation delay from a clock definition point to a register’s clock pin. The total latency at a register’s clock pin is the sum of the source and network latencies in the clock path.

To specify source latency to any clock ports in your design, use the set_clock_latency

command.

Note: The TimeQuest analyzer automatically computes network latencies; therefore, you only can characterize source latency with the set_clock_latency

command. You must use the

-source option.

Related Information set_clock_latency

For more information about this command, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

Clock Uncertainty

When clocks are created, they are ideal and have perfect edges. It is important to add uncertainty to those perfect edges, to mimic clock-level effects like jitter. You should include the derive_clock_uncertainty command in your SDC file so that appropriate setup and hold uncertainties are automatically calculated and applied to all clock transfers in your design. If you don't include the command, the TimeQuest analyzer performs it anyway; it is a critical part of constraining your design correctly.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Altera Corporation

Send Feedback

7-22

Clock Uncertainty

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

The TimeQuest analyzer subtracts setup uncertainty from the data required time for each applicable path and adds the hold uncertainty to the data required time for each applicable path. This slightly reduces the setup and hold slack on each path.

The TimeQuest analyzer accounts for uncertainty clock effects for three types of clock-to-clock transfers; intraclock transfers, interclock transfers, and I/O interface clock transfers.

• Intraclock transfers occur when the register-to-register transfer takes place in the device and the source and destination clocks come from the same PLL output pin or clock port.

• Interclock transfers occur when a register-to-register transfer takes place in the core of the device and the source and destination clocks come from a different PLL output pin or clock port.

• I/O interface clock transfers occur when data transfers from an I/O port to the core of the device or from the core of the device to the I/O port.

To manually specify clock uncertainty, use the set_clock_uncertainty

command. You can specify the uncertainty separately for setup and hold. You can also specify separate values for rising and falling clock transitions, although this is not commonly used. You can override the value that was automatically applied by the derive_clock_uncertainty

command, or you can add to it.

The derive_clock_uncertainty

command accounts for PLL clock jitter if the clock jitter on the input to a PLL is within the input jitter specification for PLL's in the specified device. If the input clock jitter for the PLL exceeds the specification, you should add additional uncertainty to your PLL output clocks to account for excess jitter with the set_clock_uncertainty -add

command. Refer to the device handbook for your device for jitter specifications.

Another example is to use set_clock_uncertainty -add

to add uncertainty to account for peak-to-peak jitter from a board when the jitter exceeds the jitter specification for that device. In this case you would add uncertainty to both setup and hold equal to 1/2 the jitter value: set_clock_uncertainty –setup –to <clock name> \

-setup –add <p2p jitter/2> set_clock_uncertainty –hold –enable_same_physical_edge –to <clock name> \

–add <p2p jitter/2>

There is a complex set of precedence rules for how the TimeQuest analyzer applies values from derive_clock_uncertainty

and

set_clock_uncertainty

, which depend on the order the commands appear in your SDC files, and various options used with the commands. The Help topics referred to below contain complete descriptions of these rules. These precedence rules are much simpler to understand and implement if you follow these recommendations:

• If you want to assign your own clock uncertainty values to any clock transfers, the best practice is to put your set_clock_uncertainty

exceptions after the derive_clock_uncertainty

command in your SDC file.

• When you use the

-add

option for set_clock_uncertainty

, the value you specify is added to the value from derive_clock_uncertainty

. If you don't specify

-add

, the value you specify replaces the value from derive_clock_uncertainty

.

Related Information

set_clock_uncertainty

derive_clock_uncertainty

remove_clock_uncertainty

For more information about these commands, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Creating I/O Requirements

7-23

Creating I/O Requirements

The TimeQuest analyzer reviews setup and hold relationships for designs in which an external source interacts with a register internal to the design. The TimeQuest analyzer supports input and output external delay modeling with the set_input_delay

and set_output_delay

commands. You can specify the clock and minimum and maximum arrival times relative to the clock.

You must specify timing requirements, including internal and external timing requirements, before you fully analyze a design. With external timing requirements specified, the TimeQuest analyzer verifies the

I/O interface, or periphery of the device, against any system specification.

Input Constraints

Input constraints allow you to specify all the external delays feeding into the device. Specify input requirements for all input ports in your design.

You can use the set_input_delay

command to specify external input delay requirements. Use the

clock

option to reference a virtual clock. Using a virtual clock allows the TimeQuest analyzer to correctly derive clock uncertainties for interclock and intraclock transfers. The virtual clock defines the launching clock for the input port. The TimeQuest analyzer automatically determines the latching clock inside the device that captures the input data, because all clocks in the device are defined.

Figure 7-11: Input Delay

External Device tco_ext cd_ext

Oscillator dd cd_altr

Altera Device

The calculation the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the typical input delay.

Figure 7-12: Input Delay Calculation

input delay

MAX

input delay

MIN

= (cd_ext

MAX

= (cd_ext

MIN

– cd_altr

MIN

) + tco_ext

– cd_altr

MAX

) + tco_ext

MIN

MAX

+ dd

+ dd

MAX

MIN

Output Constraints

Output constraints allow you to specify all external delays from the device for all output ports in your design.

You can use the set_output_delay

command to specify external output delay requirements. Use the

clock

option to reference a virtual clock. The virtual clock defines the latching clock for the output port.

The TimeQuest analyzer automatically determines the launching clock inside the device that launches the output data, because all clocks in the device are defined. The following figure is an example of an output delay referencing a virtual clock.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-24

Creating Delay and Skew Constraints

Figure 7-13: Output Delay

Altera Device cd_altr

Oscillator dd cd_ext

External Device tsu_ext/th_ext

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

The calculation the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the typical out delay.

Figure 7-14: Output Delay Calculation

output delay

MAX

output delay

MIN

= dd

MAX

+ tsu_ext + (cd_altr

MAX

= (dd

MIN

– th_ext +(cd_altr

MIN

– cd_ext

MIN

)

– cd_ext

MAX

))

Related Information

set_intput_delay

set_output_delay

For more information about these commands, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

Creating Delay and Skew Constraints

The TimeQuest analyzer supports the Synopsys Design Constraint format for constraining timing for the ports in your design. These constraints allow the TimeQuest analyzer to perform a system static timing analysis that includes not only the device internal timing, but also any external device timing and board timing parameters.

Advanced I/O Timing and Board Trace Model Delay

The TimeQuest analyzer can use advanced I/O timing and board trace model assignments to model I/O buffer delays in your design.

If you change any advanced I/O timing settings or board trace model assignments, recompile your design before you analyze timing, or use the

-force_dat

option to force delay annotation when you create a timing netlist.

Example 7-4: Forcing Delay Annotation

create_timing_netlist -force_dat

Related Information

Using Advanced I/O Timing

I/O Management

For more information about advanced I/O timing.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Maximum Skew

7-25

Maximum Skew

To specify the maximum path-based skew requirements for registers and ports in the design and report the results of maximum skew analysis, use the set_max_skew

command in conjunction with the report_max_skew command.

Use the set_max_skew

constraint to perform maximum allowable skew analysis between sets of registers or ports. In order to constrain skew across multiple paths, all such paths must be defined within a single set_max_skew

constraint. set_max_skew

timing constraint is not affected by set_max_delay, set_min_delay

, and set_multicycle_path

but it does obey set_false_path

and set_clock_groups

. If your design targets an Arria 10 device, skew constraints are not affected by set_clock_groups

.

Table 7-6: set_max_skew Options

-h | -help

-long_help

Arguments

-exclude <Tcl list>

-fall_from_clock <names>

-fall_to_clock <names>

-from <names>

(1)

-from_clock <names>

-get_skew_value_from_clock_period

<src_clock_period|dst_clock_

period|min_clock_period>

Description

Short help

Long help with examples and possible return values

A Tcl list of parameters to exclude during skew analysis. This list can include one or more of the following: utsu

, uth

, utco

, from_clock

, to_clock

, clock_uncertainty

, ccpp

, input_ delay

, output_delay

, odv

.

Note: Not supported for Arria 10 devices.

Valid source clocks (string patterns are matched using Tcl string matching)

Valid destination clocks (string patterns are matched using Tcl string matching)

Valid sources (string patterns are matched using Tcl string matching

Valid source clocks (string patterns are matched using Tcl string matching)

Option to interpret skew constraint as a multiple of the clock period

-include <Tcl list>

-rise_from_clock <names>

-rise_to_clock <names>

Tcl list of parameters to include during skew analysis. This list can include one or more of the following: utsu

, uth

, utco

, from_clock

, to_clock

, clock_uncertainty

, ccpp

, input_ delay

, output_delay

, odv

.

Note: Not supported for Arria 10 devices.

Valid source clocks (string patterns are matched using Tcl string matching)

Valid destination clocks (string patterns are matched using Tcl string matching)

(1) Legal values for the -from and -to options are collections of clocks, registers, ports, pins, cells or partitions in a design.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Altera Corporation

Send Feedback

7-26

Net Delay

Arguments

-skew_value_multiplier

<multiplier>

-to <names>

(1)

-to_clock <names>

<skew>

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Description

Value by which the clock period should be multiplied to compute skew requirement.

Valid destinations (string patterns are matched using Tcl string matching)

Valid destination clocks (string patterns are matched using Tcl string matching)

Required skew

Applying maximum skew constraints between clocks applies the constraint from all register or ports driven by the clock specified with the

-from

option to all registers or ports driven by the clock specified with the

-to

option.

Use the

-include

and

-exclude

options to include or exclude one or more of the following: register micro parameters ( utsu

, uth

, utco

), clock arrival times ( from_clock

, to_clock

), clock uncertainty

( clock_uncertainty

), common clock path pessimism removal ( ccpp

), input and output delays

( input_delay

, output_delay

) and on-die variation ( odv

). Max skew analysis can include data arrival times, clock arrival times, register micro parameters, clock uncertainty, on-die variation and ccpp removal. Among these, only ccpp removal is disabled during the Fitter by default. When

-include

is used, those in the inclusion list are added to the default analysis. Similarly, when

-exclude

is used, those in the exclusion list are excluded from the default analysis. When both the

-include

and

-exclude options specify the same parameter, that parameter is excluded.

Note: If your design targets an Arria 10 device,

-exclude

and

-include

are not supported.

Use

-get_skew_value_from_clock_period

to set the skew as a multiple of the launching or latching clock period, or whichever of the two has a smaller period. If this option is used, then

skew_value_multiplier

must also be set, and the positional skew option may not be set. If the set of skew paths is clocked by more than one clock, TimeQuest uses the one with smallest period to compute the skew constraint.

When this constraint is used, results of max skew analysis are displayed in the Report Max Skew

(report_max_skew) report from the TimeQuest Timing Analyzer. Since skew is defined between two or more paths, no results are displayed if the

-from

/

-from_clock

and

-to

/

-to_clock

filters satisfy less than two paths.

Related Information

set_max_skew

report_max_skew

For more information about these commands, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

Net Delay

Use the set_net_delay

command to set the net delays and perform minimum or maximum timing analysis across nets. The

-from

and

-to

options can be string patterns or pin, port, register, or net collections. When pin or net collection is used, the collection should include output pins or nets.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Table 7-7: set_net_delay Options

Using create_timing_netlist

7-27

Arguments

-h | -help

-long_help

-from <names>

Description

Short help

Long help with examples and possible return values

Valid source pins, ports, registers or nets(string patterns are matched using Tcl string matching)

Option to interpret net delay constraint as a multiple of the clock period.

-get_value_from_clock_period

<src_clock_period|dst_clock_

period|min_clock_period|max_

clock_period>

-max

-min

-to <names>

(2)

-value_multiplier <multiplier>

<delay>

Specifies maximum delay

Specifies minimum delay

Valid destination pins, ports, registers or nets (string patterns are matched using Tcl string matching)

Value by which the clock period should be multiplied to compute net delay requirement.

Required delay

When you use the -min option, slack is calculated by looking at the minimum delay on the edge. If you use -max option, slack is calculated with the maximum edge delay.

Use

-get_skew_value_from_clock_period

to set the net delay requirement as a multiple of the launching or latching clock period, or whichever of the two has a smaller or larger period. If this option is used, then

-value_multiplier

must also be set, and the positional delay option may not be set. If the set of nets is clocked by more than one clock, TimeQuest uses the net with smallest period to compute the constraint for a

-max

constraint, and the largest period for a

-min

constraint. If there are no clocks clocking the endpoints of the net (e.g. if the endpoints of the nets are not registers or constraint ports), then the net delay constraint will be ignored.

Related Information

set_net_delay

report_net_delay

For more information about these commands, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

Using create_timing_netlist

You can onfigure or load the timing netlist that the TimeQuest analyzer uses to calculate path delay data.

Your design should have a timing netlist before running the TimeQuest analyzer. You can use the Create

Timing Netlist dialog box or the Create Timing Netlist command in the Tasks pane. The command also generates Advanced I/O Timing reports if you turned on Enable Advanced I/O Timing in the

TimeQuest Timing Analyzer page of the Settings dialog box.

Note: The timing netlist created is based on the initial configuration of the design. Any configuration changes done by the design after the device enters user mode, for example, dynamic transceiver

(2) If the -to option is unused or if the

-to

filter is a wildcard ( "*") character, all the output pins and registers on timing netlist became valid destination points.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Altera Corporation

Send Feedback

7-28

Creating Timing Exceptions

reconfiguration, are not reflected in the timing netlist. This applies to all device families except transceivers on Arria 10 devices with the Multiple Reconfiguration Profiles feature.

The following diagram shows how the TimeQuest analyzer interprets and classifies timing netlist data for a sample design.

Figure 7-15: How TimeQuest Interprets the Timing Netlist

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Creating Timing Exceptions

Timing exceptions in the TimeQuest analyzer provide a way to modify the default timing analysis behavior to match the analysis required by your design. Specify timing exceptions after clocks and input and output delay constraints because timing exceptions can modify the default analysis.

Precedence

If a conflict of node names occurs between timing exceptions, the following order of precedence applies:

1. False path

2. Minimum delays and maximum delays

3. Multicycle path

The false path timing exception has the highest precedence. Within each category, assignments to individual nodes have precedence over assignments to clocks. Finally, the remaining precedence for additional conflicts is order-dependent, such that the assignments most recently created overwrite, or partially overwrite, earlier assignments.

False Paths

Specifying a false path in your design removes the path from timing analysis.

Use the set_false_path

command to specify false paths in your design. You can specify either a pointto-point or clock-to-clock path as a false path. For example, a path you should specify as false path is a static configuration register that is written once during power-up initialization, but does not change state again. Although signals from static configuration registers often cross clock domains, you may not want to make false path exceptions to a clock-to-clock path, because some data may transfer across clock domains. However, you can selectively make false path exceptions from the static configuration register to all endpoints.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Minimum and Maximum Delays

7-29

To make false path exceptions from all registers beginning with A to all registers beginning with B, use the following code in your SDC file.

set_false_path -from [get_pins A*] -to [get_pins B*]

The TimeQuest analyzer assumes all clocks are related unless you specify otherwise. Clock groups are a more efficient way to make false path exceptions between clocks, compared to writing multiple set_false_path

exceptions between every clock transfer you want to eliminate.

Related Information

Creating Clock Groups

on page 7-19

For more information about creating exclusive clock groups.

set_false_path

For more information about this command, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

Minimum and Maximum Delays

To specify an absolute minimum or maximum delay for a path, use the set_min_delay

command or the set_max_delay

commands, respectively. Specifying minimum and maximum delay directly overwrites existing setup and hold relationships with the minimum and maximum values.

Use the set_max_delay

and set_min_delay

commands to create constraints for asynchronous signals that do not have a specific clock relationship in your design, but require a minimum and maximum path delay. You can create minimum and maximum delay exceptions for port-to-port paths through the device without a register stage in the path. If you use minimum and maximum delay exceptions to constrain the path delay, specify both the minimum and maximum delay of the path; do not constrain only the minimum or maximum value.

If the source or destination node is clocked, the TimeQuest analyzer takes into account the clock paths, allowing more or less delay on the data path. If the source or destination node has an input or output delay, that delay is also included in the minimum or maximum delay check.

If you specify a minimum or maximum delay between timing nodes, the delay applies only to the path between the two nodes. If you specify a minimum or maximum delay for a clock, the delay applies to all paths where the source node or destination node is clocked by the clock.

You can create a minimum or maximum delay exception for an output port that does not have an output delay constraint. You cannot report timing for the paths associated with the output port; however, the

TimeQuest analyzer reports any slack for the path in the setup summary and hold summary reports.

Because there is no clock associated with the output port, no clock is reported for timing paths associated with the output port.

Note: To report timing with clock filters for output paths with minimum and maximum delay constraints, you can set the output delay for the output port with a value of zero. You can use an existing clock from the design or a virtual clock as the clock reference.

Related Information

set_max_delay

set_min_delay

For more information about these commands, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

Delay Annotation

To modify the default delay values used during timing analysis, use the set_annotated_delay

and set_timing_derate

commands. You must update the timing netlist to see the results of these commands

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-30

Multicycle Paths

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

To specify different operating conditions in a single SDC file, rather than having multiple SDC files that specify different operating conditions, use the set_annotated_delay -operating_conditions command.

Related Information

set_timing_derate

set_annotated_delay

For more information about these commands, refer to the Quartus Prime Help.

Multicycle Paths

By default, the TimeQuest analyzer performs a single-cycle analysis, which is the most restrictive type of analysis. When analyzing a path, the setup launch and latch edge times are determined by finding the closest two active edges in the respective waveforms.

For a hold analysis, the timing analyzer analyzes the path against two timing conditions for every possible setup relationship, not just the worst-case setup relationship. Therefore, the hold launch and latch times may be completely unrelated to the setup launch and latch edges. The TimeQuest analyzer does not report negative setup or hold relationships. When either a negative setup or a negative hold relationship is calculated, the TimeQuest analyzer moves both the launch and latch edges such that the setup and hold relationship becomes positive.

A multicycle constraint adjusts setup or hold relationships by the specified number of clock cycles based on the source (

-start

) or destination (

-end

) clock. An end setup multicycle constraint of 2 extends the worst-case setup latch edge by one destination clock period. If

-start

and

-end

values are not specified, the default constraint is

-end

.

Hold multicycle constraints are based on the default hold position (the default value is 0). An end hold multicycle constraint of 1 effectively subtracts one destination clock period from the default hold latch edge.

When the objects are timing nodes, the multicycle constraint only applies to the path between the two nodes. When an object is a clock, the multicycle constraint applies to all paths where the source node (

from

) or destination node (

-to

) is clocked by the clock. When you adjust a setup relationship with a multicycle constraint, the hold relationship is adjusted automatically.

You can use TimeQuest analyzer commands to modify either the launch or latch edge times that the uses to determine a setup relationship or hold relationship.

Table 7-8: Commands to Modify Edge Times

Command

set_multicycle_path -setup -end <value> set_multicycle_path -setup -start<value> set_multicycle_path -hold -end <value> set_multicycle_path -hold -start <value>

Description of Modification

Latch edge time of the setup relationship

Launch edge time of the setup relationship

Latch edge time of the hold relationship

Launch edge time of the hold relationship

Common Multicycle Variations

Multicycle exceptions adjust the timing requirements for a register-to-register path, allowing the Fitter to optimally place and route a design in a device. Multicycle exceptions also can reduce compilation time and improve the quality of results, and can be used to change timing requirements. Two common

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Relaxing Setup with set_multicyle_path

multicycle variations are relaxing setup to allow a slower data transfer rate, and altering the setup to account for a phase shift.

7-31

Relaxing Setup with set_multicyle_path

A common type of multicycle exception occurs when the data transfer rate is slower than the clock cycle.

Relaxing the setup relationship opens the window when data is accepted as valid.

In this example, the source clock has a period of 10 ns, but a group of registers are enabled by a toggling clock, so they only toggle every other cycle. Since they are fed by a 10 ns clock, the TimeQuest analyzer reports a set up of 10 ns and a hold of 0 ns, However, since the data is transferring every other cycle, the relationships should be analyzed as if the clock were operating at 20 ns, which would result in a setup of

20 ns, while the hold remains 0 ns, in essence, extending the window of time when the data can be recognized.

The following pair of multicycle assignments relax the setup relationship by specifying the

-setup

value of N and the

-hold

value as N-1. You must specify the hold relationship with a

-hold

assignment to prevent a positive hold requirement.

Relaxing Setup while Maintaining Hold

set_multicycle_path -setup -from src_reg* -to dst_reg* 2 set_multicycle_path -hold -from src_reg* -to dst_reg* 1

Figure 7-16: Relaxing Setup by Multiple Cycles

0 ns 10 ns 20 ns 30 ns No Multicycles

(Default Relationship)

Setup = 10 ns

Hold = 0 ns

0 ns 10 ns 20 ns 30 ns

Setup = 2

Hold = 1

Setup = 20 ns

Hold = 0 ns

0 ns 10 ns 20 ns 30 ns

Setup = 3

Hold = 2

Setup = 30 ns

Hold = 0 ns

This pattern can be extended to create larger setup relationships in order to ease timing closure require‐ ments. A common use for this exception is when writing to asynchronous RAM across an I/O interface.

The delay between address, data, and a write enable may be several cycles. A multicycle exception to I/O ports can allow extra time for the address and data to resolve before the enable occurs.

You can relax the setup by three cycles with the following code in your SDC file.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-32

Accounting for a Phase Shift

Three Cycle I/O Interface Exception

set_multicycle_path -setup -to [get_ports {SRAM_ADD[*] SRAM_DATA[*]} 3 set_multicycle_path -hold -to [get_ports {SRAM_ADD[*] SRAM_DATA[*]} 2

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Accounting for a Phase Shift

In this example, the design contains a PLL that performs a phase-shift on a clock whose domain exchanges data with domains that do not experience the phase shift. A common example is when the destination clock is phase-shifted forward and the source clock is not, the default setup relationship becomes that phase-shift, thus shifting the window when data is accepted as valid.

For example, the following code is a circumstance where a PLL phase-shifts one output forward by a small amount, in this case 0.2 ns.

Cross Domain Phase-Shift

create_generated_clock -source pll|inclk[0] -name pll|clk[0] pll|clk[0] create_generated_clock -source pll|inclk[0] -name pll|clk[1] -phase 30 pll|clk[1]

The default setup relationship for this phase-shift is 0.2 ns, shown in Figure A, creating a scenario where the hold relationship is negative, which makes achieving timing closure nearly impossible.

Figure 7-17: Phase-Shifted Setup and Hold

-10 ns 0 ns 10 ns 20 ns No Multicycles

(Default Relationship)

Setup = 0.2 ns

Hold = -9.8 ns

-10 ns 0 ns 10 ns 20 ns

Setup = 2

Setup = 10.2 ns

Hold = 0.2 ns

Adding the following constraint in your SDC allows the data to transfer to the following edge.

set_multicycle_path -setup -from [get_clocks clk_a] -to [get_clocks clk_b] 2

The hold relationship is derived from the setup relationship, making a multicyle hold constraint unneces‐ sary.

Related Information

Same Frequency Clocks with Destination Clock Offset

on page 7-41

Refer to this topic for a more complete example.

Same Frequency Clocks with Destination Clock Offset

on page 7-41

Refer to this topic for a more complete example.

set_multicycle_path

For more information about this command, refer to the Quartus Prime Help.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Examples of Basic Multicycle Exceptions

7-33

Examples of Basic Multicycle Exceptions

Each example explains how the multicycle exceptions affect the default setup and hold analysis in the

TimeQuest analyzer. The multicycle exceptions are applied to a simple register-to-register circuit. Both the source and destination clocks are set to 10 ns.

Default Settings

By default, the TimeQuest analyzer performs a single-cycle analysis to determine the setup and hold checks. Also, by default, the TimeQuest analyzer sets the end multicycle setup assignment value to one and the end multicycle hold assignment value to zero.

The source and the destination timing waveform for the source register and destination register, respectively where HC1 and HC2 are hold checks one and two and SC is the setup check.

Figure 7-18: Default Timing Diagram

-10 0

Current Launch

10 20

REG1.CLK

REG2.CLK

HC1

0

SC HC2

1

Current Latch

2

The calculation that the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the setup check.

Figure 7-19: Setup Check

setup check = current latch edge – closest previous launch edge

= 10 ns – 0 ns

= 10 ns

The most restrictive setup relationship with the default single-cycle analysis, that is, a setup relationship with an end multicycle setup assignment of one, is 10 ns.

The setup report for the default setup in the TimeQuest analyzer with the launch and latch edges highlighted.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-34

Default Settings

Figure 7-20: Setup Report

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

The calculation that the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the hold check. Both hold checks are equivalent.

Figure 7-21: Hold Check

hold check 1 = current launch edge – previous latch edge

= 0 ns – 0 ns

= 0 ns hold check 2 = next launch edge – current latch edge

= 10 ns – 10 ns

= 0 ns

The most restrictive hold relationship with the default single-cycle analysis, that a hold relationship with an end multicycle hold assignment of zero, is 0 ns.

The hold report for the default setup in the TimeQuest analyzer with the launch and latch edges highlighted.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 7-22: Hold Report

End Multicycle Setup = 2 and End Multicycle Hold = 0

7-35

End Multicycle Setup = 2 and End Multicycle Hold = 0

In this example, the end multicycle setup assignment value is two, and the end multicycle hold assignment value is zero.

Multicycle Exceptions

set_multicycle_path -from [get_clocks clk_src] -to [get_clocks clk_dst] \

-setup -end 2

Note: An end multicycle hold value is not required because the default end multicycle hold value is zero.

In this example, the setup relationship is relaxed by a full clock period by moving the latch edge to the next latch edge. The hold analysis is unchanged from the default settings.

The setup timing diagram for the analysis that the TimeQuest analyzer performs. The latch edge is a clock cycle later than in the default single-cycle analysis.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-36

End Multicycle Setup = 2 and End Multicycle Hold = 0

Figure 7-23: Setup Timing Diagram

-10

Current

Launch

REG1.CLK

10 20

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

SC

REG2.CLK

0

1 2

Current

Latch

The calculation that the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the setup check.

Figure 7-24: Setup Check

setup check = current latch edge – closest previous launch edge

= 20 ns – 0 ns

= 20 ns

The most restrictive setup relationship with an end multicycle setup assignment of two is 20 ns.

The setup report in the TimeQuest analyzer with the launch and latch edges highlighted.

Figure 7-25: Setup Report

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

End Multicycle Setup = 2 and End Multicycle Hold = 0

7-37

Because the multicycle hold latch and launch edges are the same as the results of hold analysis with the default settings, the multicycle hold analysis in this example is equivalent to the single-cycle hold analysis. The hold checks are relative to the setup check. Usually, the TimeQuest analyzer performs hold checks on every possible setup check, not only on the most restrictive setup check edges.

Figure 7-26: Hold Timing DIagram

-10 0

Current Launch

10 20

REG1.CLK

Data

REG2.CLK

HC1 SC HC2

Current Latch

The calculation that the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the hold check. Both hold checks are equivalent.

Figure 7-27:

hold check 1 = current launch edge – previous latch edge

= 0 ns – 10 ns

= –10 ns hold check 2 = next launch edge – current latch edge

= 10 ns – 20 ns

= –10 ns

The most restrictive hold relationship with an end multicycle setup assignment value of two and an end multicycle hold assignment value of zero is 10 ns.

The hold report for this example in the TimeQuest analyzer with the launch and latch edges highlighted.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-38

End Multicycle Setup = 2 and End Multicycle Hold = 1

Figure 7-28: Hold Report

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

End Multicycle Setup = 2 and End Multicycle Hold = 1

In this example, the end multicycle setup assignment value is two, and the end multicycle hold assignment value is one.

Multicycle Exceptions

set_multicycle_path -from [get_clocks clk_src] -to [get_clocks clk_dst] \

-setup -end 2 set_multicycle_path -from [get_clocks clk_src] -to [get_clocks clk_dst] -hold -end 1

In this example, the setup relationship is relaxed by two clock periods by moving the latch edge to the left two clock periods. The hold relationship is relaxed by a full period by moving the latch edge to the previous latch edge.

The setup timing diagram for the analysis that the TimeQuest analyzer performs.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 7-29: Setup Timing Diagram

-10

SRC.CLK

Current

Launch

End Multicycle Setup = 2 and End Multicycle Hold = 1

7-39

10 20

SC

DST.CLK

0

1 2

Current

Latch

The calculation that the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the setup check.

Figure 7-30: Setup Check

setup check = current latch edge – closest previous launch edge

= 20 ns – 0 ns

= 20 ns

The most restrictive hold relationship with an end multicycle setup assignment value of two is 20 ns.

The setup report for this example in the TimeQuest analyzer with the launch and latch edges highlighted.

Figure 7-31: Setup Report

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-40

End Multicycle Setup = 2 and End Multicycle Hold = 1

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

The timing diagram for the hold checks for this example. The hold checks are relative to the setup check.

Figure 7-32: Hold Timing Diagram

-10 10 20

Current

Launch

SRC.CLK

SC

HC1

HC2

DST.CLK

Current

Latch

The calculation that the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the hold check. Both hold checks are equivalent.

Figure 7-33: Hold Check

hold check 1 = current launch edge – previous latch edge

= 0 ns – 0 ns

= 0 ns hold check 2 = next launch edge – current latch edge

= 10 ns – 10 ns

= 0 ns

The most restrictive hold relationship with an end multicycle setup assignment value of two and an end multicycle hold assignment value of one is 0 ns.

The hold report for this example in the TimeQuest analyzer with the launch and latch edges highlighted.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 7-34: Hold Report

Application of Multicycle Exceptions

7-41

Application of Multicycle Exceptions

This section shows the following examples of applications of multicycle exceptions. Each example explains how the multicycle exceptions affect the default setup and hold analysis in the TimeQuest analyzer. All of the examples are between related clock domains. If your design contains related clocks, such as PLL clocks, and paths between related clock domains, you can apply multicycle constraints.

Same Frequency Clocks with Destination Clock Offset

In this example, the source and destination clocks have the same frequency, but the destination clock is offset with a positive phase shift. Both the source and destination clocks have a period of 10 ns. The destination clock has a positive phase shift of 2 ns with respect to the source clock.

An example of a design with same frequency clocks and a destination clock offset.

Figure 7-35: Same Frequency Clocks with Destination Clock Offset

D

REG1

SET

Q

Combinational

Logic

D

REG2

SET

Q

Out In clk0 clk1

CLR CLR

The timing diagram for default setup check analysis that the TimeQuest analyzer performs.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-42

Same Frequency Clocks with Destination Clock Offset

Figure 7-36: Setup Timing Diagram

-10 0

Launch

REG1.CLK

10 20

REG2.CLK

SC

1 2

Latch

The calculation that the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the setup check.

Figure 7-37: Setup Check

setup check = current latch edge – closest previous launch edge

= 2 ns – 0 ns

= 2 ns

The setup relationship shown is too pessimistic and is not the setup relationship required for typical designs. To correct the default analysis, you must use an end multicycle setup exception of two. A multicycle exception used to correct the default analysis in this example in your SDC file.

Multicycle Exceptions

set_multicycle_path -from [get_clocks clk_src] -to [get_clocks clk_dst] \

-setup -end 2

.

The timing diagram for the preferred setup relationship for this example.

Figure 7-38: Preferred Setup Relationship

-10 0

Launch

10 20

REG1.CLK

SC

REG2.CLK

1 2

Latch

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Same Frequency Clocks with Destination Clock Offset

7-43

The timing diagram for default hold check analysis that the TimeQuest analyzer performs with an end multicycle setup value of two.

Figure 7-39: Default Hold Check

-10 0

Current

Launch

10 20

REG1.CLK

HC1 SC

HC2

REG2.CLK

Current

Latch

The calculation that the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the hold check.

Figure 7-40: Hold Check

hold check 1 = current launch edge – previous latch edge

= 0 ns – 2 ns

= –2 ns hold check 2 = next launch edge – current latch edge

= 10 ns – 12 ns

= –2 ns

In this example, the default hold analysis returns the preferred hold requirements and no multicycle hold exceptions are required.

The associated setup and hold analysis if the phase shift is –2 ns. In this example, the default hold analysis is correct for the negative phase shift of 2 ns, and no multicycle exceptions are required.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-44

Destination Clock Frequency is a Multiple of the Source Clock Frequency

Figure 7-41: Negative Phase Shift

-10 0

Current

Launch

10

REG1.CLK

20

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

HC1

SC

HC2

REG2.CLK

Current

Latch

Destination Clock Frequency is a Multiple of the Source Clock Frequency

In this example, the destination clock frequency value of 5 ns is an integer multiple of the source clock frequency of 10 ns. The destination clock frequency can be an integer multiple of the source clock frequency when a PLL is used to generate both clocks with a phase shift applied to the destination clock.

An example of a design where the destination clock frequency is a multiple of the source clock frequency.

Figure 7-42: Destination Clock is Multiple of Source Clock

In

D

REG1

SET

Q

Combinational

Logic

D

REG2

SET

Q

Out clk clk0 clk1

CLR CLR

The timing diagram for default setup check analysis that the TimeQuest analyzer performs.

Figure 7-43: Setup Timing Diagram

-10 0

Launch

10 20

REG1.CLK

REG2.CLK

SC

1 2

Latch

The calculation that the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the setup check.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 7-44: Setup Check

Destination Clock Frequency is a Multiple of the Source Clock Frequency

setup check = current latch edge – closest previous launch edge

= 5 ns – 0 ns

= 5 ns

7-45

The setup relationship demonstrates that the data does not need to be captured at edge one, but can be captured at edge two; therefore, you can relax the setup requirement. To correct the default analysis, you must shift the latch edge by one clock period with an end multicycle setup exception of two. The multicycle exception assignment used to correct the default analysis in this example.

Multicycle Exceptions

set_multicycle_path -from [get_clocks clk_src] -to [get_clocks clk_dst] \

-setup -end 2

The timing diagram for the preferred setup relationship for this example.

Figure 7-45: Preferred Setup Analysis

-10 0

Launch

10 20

REG1.CLK

REG2.CLK

SC

1 2

Latch

The timing diagram for default hold check analysis performed by the TimeQuest analyzer with an end multicycle setup value of two.

Figure 7-46: Default Hold Check

-10 0

Current

Launch

10 20

REG1.CLK

HC1

SC

HC2

REG2.CLK

Current

Latch

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-46

Destination Clock Frequency is a Multiple of the Source Clock Frequency...

The calculation that the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the hold check.

Figure 7-47: Hold Check

hold check 1 = current launch edge – previous latch edge

= 0 ns – 5 ns

= –5 ns hold check 2 = next launch edge – current latch edge

= 10 ns – 10 ns

= 0 ns

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

In this example, hold check one is too restrictive. The data is launched by the edge at 0 ns and should check against the data captured by the previous latch edge at 0 ns, which does not occur in hold check one. To correct the default analysis, you must use an end multicycle hold exception of one.

Destination Clock Frequency is a Multiple of the Source Clock Frequency with an Offset

This example is a combination of the previous two examples. The destination clock frequency is an integer multiple of the source clock frequency and the destination clock has a positive phase shift. The destination clock frequency is 5 ns and the source clock frequency is 10 ns. The destination clock also has a positive offset of 2 ns with respect to the source clock. The destination clock frequency can be an integer multiple of the source clock frequency with an offset when a PLL is used to generate both clocks with a phase shift applied to the destination clock. The following example shows a design in which the destina‐ tion clock frequency is a multiple of the source clock frequency with an offset.

Figure 7-48: Destination Clock is Multiple of Source Clock with Offset

In

D

REG1

SET

Q

Combinational

Logic

D

REG2

SET

Q

Out clk clk0 clk1

CLR CLR

The timing diagram for the default setup check analysis the TimeQuest analyzer performs.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Destination Clock Frequency is a Multiple of the Source Clock Frequency...

Figure 7-49: Setup Timing Diagram

-10 0

Launch

10 20

REG1.CLK

7-47

REG2.CLK

SC

1

Latch

2 3

The calculation that the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the setup check.

Figure 7-50: Hold Check

setup check = current latch edge – closest previous launch edge

= 2 ns – 0 ns

= 2 ns

The setup relationship in this example demonstrates that the data does not need to be captured at edge one, but can be captured at edge two; therefore, you can relax the setup requirement. To correct the default analysis, you must shift the latch edge by one clock period with an end multicycle setup exception of three.

The multicycle exception code you can use to correct the default analysis in this example.

Multicycle Exceptions

set_multicycle_path -from [get_clocks clk_src] -to [get_clocks clk_dst] \

-setup -end 3

The timing diagram for the preferred setup relationship for this example.

Figure 7-51: Preferred Setup Analysis

-10 0

Launch

10 20

REG1.CLK

REG2.CLK

1

SC

2 3

Latch

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-48

Source Clock Frequency is a Multiple of the Destination Clock Frequency

The timing diagram for default hold check analysis the TimeQuest analyzer performs with an end multicycle setup value of three.

Figure 7-52: Default Hold Check

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

-10 0

Current

Launch

10 20

REG1.CLK

SC

HC2

HC1

REG2.CLK

Current

Latch

The calculation that the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the hold check.

Figure 7-53: Hold Check

hold check 1 = current launch edge – previous latch edge

= 0 ns – 5 ns

= –5 ns hold check 2 = next launch edge – current latch edge

= 10 ns – 10 ns

= 0 ns

In this example, hold check one is too restrictive. The data is launched by the edge at 0 ns and should check against the data captured by the previous latch edge at 2 ns, which does not occur in hold check one. To correct the default analysis, you must use an end multicycle hold exception of one.

Source Clock Frequency is a Multiple of the Destination Clock Frequency

In this example, the source clock frequency value of 5 ns is an integer multiple of the destination clock frequency of 10 ns. The source clock frequency can be an integer multiple of the destination clock frequency when a PLL is used to generate both clocks and different multiplication and division factors are used.

An example of a design where the source clock frequency is a multiple of the destination clock frequency.

Figure 7-54: Source Clock Frequency is Multiple of Destination Clock Frequency

In

D

REG1

SET

Q

Combinational

Logic

D

REG2

SET

Q

Out clk clk0 clk1

CLR CLR

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Source Clock Frequency is a Multiple of the Destination Clock Frequency

The timing diagram for default setup check analysis performed by the TimeQuest analyzer.

Figure 7-55: Default Setup Check Analysis

-10 0 10 20

REG1.CLK

2

Launch

1

7-49

SC

REG2.CLK

Latch

The calculation that the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the setup check.

Figure 7-56: Setup Check

setup check = current latch edge – closest previous launch edge

= 10 ns – 5 ns

= 5 ns

The setup relationship shown demonstrates that the data launched at edge one does not need to be captured, and the data launched at edge two must be captured; therefore, you can relax the setup require‐ ment. To correct the default analysis, you must shift the launch edge by one clock period with a start multicycle setup exception of two.

The multicycle exception code you can use to correct the default analysis in this example.

Multicycle Exceptions

set_multicycle_path -from [get_clocks clk_src] -to [get_clocks clk_dst] \

-setup -start 2

The timing diagram for the preferred setup relationship for this example.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-50

Source Clock Frequency is a Multiple of the Destination Clock Frequency

Figure 7-57: Preferred Setup Check Analysis

REG1.CLK

-10 0

Launch

2 1

10 20

SC

REG2.CLK

Latch

The timing diagram for default hold check analysis the TimeQuest analyzer performs for a start multicycle setup value of two.

Figure 7-58: Default Hold Check

-10 0

Current

Launch

10 20

REG1.CLK

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

HC1 SC HC2

REG2.CLK

Current

Latch

The calculation that the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the hold check.

Figure 7-59: Hold Check

hold check 1 = current launch edge – previous latch edge

= 0 ns – 0 ns

= 0 ns hold check 2 = next launch edge – current latch edge

= 5 ns – 10 ns

= –5 ns

In this example, hold check two is too restrictive. The data is launched next by the edge at 10 ns and should check against the data captured by the current latch edge at 10 ns, which does not occur in hold check two. To correct the default analysis, you must use a start multicycle hold exception of one.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Source Clock Frequency is a Multiple of the Destination Clock Frequency...

7-51

Source Clock Frequency is a Multiple of the Destination Clock Frequency with an Offset

In this example, the source clock frequency is an integer multiple of the destination clock frequency and the destination clock has a positive phase offset. The source clock frequency is 5 ns and destination clock frequency is 10 ns. The destination clock also has a positive offset of 2 ns with respect to the source clock.

The source clock frequency can be an integer multiple of the destination clock frequency with an offset when a PLL is used to generate both clocks, different multiplication.

Figure 7-60: Source Clock Frequency is Multiple of Destination Clock Frequency with Offset

In

D

REG1

SET

Q

Combinational

Logic

D

REG2

SET

Q

Out clk clk0 clk1

CLR CLR

Timing diagram for default setup check analysis the TimeQuest analyzer performs.

Figure 7-61: Setup Timing Diagram

-10 0 20

REG1.CLK

3 2

10

Launch

1

SC

REG2.CLK

Latch

The calculation that the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the setup check.

Figure 7-62: Setup Check

setup check = current latch edge – closest previous launch edge

= 12 ns – 10 ns

= 2 ns

The setup relationship in this example demonstrates that the data is not launched at edge one, and the data that is launched at edge three must be captured; therefore, you can relax the setup requirement. To correct the default analysis, you must shift the launch edge by two clock periods with a start multicycle setup exception of three.

The multicycle exception used to correct the default analysis in this example.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-52

Source Clock Frequency is a Multiple of the Destination Clock Frequency...

Multicycle Exceptions

set_multicycle_path -from [get_clocks clk_src] -to [get_clocks clk_dst] \

-setup -start 3

The timing diagram for the preferred setup relationship for this example.

Figure 7-63: Preferred Setup Check Analysis

REG1.CLK

-10 0

Launch

3 2

10

1

20

SC

REG2.CLK

Latch

The timing diagram for default hold check analysis the TimeQuest analyzer performs for a start multicycle setup value of three.

Figure 7-64: Default Hold Check Analysis

-10 10 20

Current

Launch

REG1.CLK

HC1

SC

HC2

REG2.CLK

Current

Latch

The calculation that the TimeQuest analyzer performs to determine the hold check.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 7-65: Hold Check

A Sample Design with SDC File

7-53

hold check 1 = current launch edge – previous latch edge

=

= –2 ns

0 ns – 2 ns hold check 2 = next launch edge – current latch edge

= 5 ns – 12 ns

= –7 ns

In this example, hold check two is too restrictive. The data is launched next by the edge at 10 ns and should check against the data captured by the current latch edge at 12 ns, which does not occur in hold check two. To correct the default analysis, you must use a start multicycle hold exception of one.

A Sample Design with SDC File

An example circuit that includes two clocks, a phase-locked loop (PLL), and other common synchronous design elements helps demonstrate how to constrain your design with an SDC file.

Figure 7-66: TimeQuest Constraint Example

data1 inst lpm_add_sub0 myfifo inst2 dataout data2 inst1 clk1 clk2 altpll0

The following SDC file contains basic constraints for the example circuit.

Example 7-5: Basic SDC Constraints

# Create clock constraints create_clock -name clockone -period 10.000 [get_ports {clk1}] create_clock -name clocktwo -period 10.000 [get_ports {clk2}]

# Create virtual clocks for input and output delay constraints create clock -name clockone_ext -period 10.000

create clock -name clockone_ext -period 10.000

derive_pll_clocks

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-54

Running the TimeQuest Analyzer

# derive clock uncertainty derive_clock_uncertainty

# Specify that clockone and clocktwo are unrelated by assinging

# them to seperate asynchronus groups set_clock_groups \

-asynchronous \

-group {clockone} \

-group {clocktwo altpll0|altpll_component|auto_generated|pll1|clk[0]}

# set input and output delays set_input_delay -clock { clockone_ext } -max 4 [get_ports

{data1}]set_input_delay -clock { clockone_ext } -min -1 [get_ports {data1}] set_input_delay -clock { clockone_ext } -max 4 [get_ports

{data2}]set_input_delay -clock { clockone_ext } -min -1 [get_ports {data2}] set_output_delay -clock { clocktwo_ext } -max 6 [get_ports {dataout}] set_output_delay -clock { clocktwo_ext } -min -3 [get_ports {dataout}]

The SDC file contains the following basic constraints you should include for most designs:

• Definitions of clockone

and clocktwo

as base clocks, and assignment of those settings to nodes in the design.

• Definitions of clockone_ext

and clocktwo_ext

as virtual clocks, which represent clocks driving external devices interfacing with the FPGA.

• Automated derivation of generated clocks on PLL outputs.

• Derivation of clock uncertainty.

• Specification of two clock groups, the first containing clockone

and its related clocks, the second containing clocktwo

and its related clocks, and the third group containing the output of the PLL. This specification overrides the default analysis of all clocks in the design as related to each other.

• Specification of input and output delays for the design.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Related Information

Asynchronous Clock Groups

on page 7-21

For more information about asynchronous clock groups.

Running the TimeQuest Analyzer

When you compile a design, the TimeQuest timing analyzer automatically performs multi-corner signoff timing analysis after the Fitter has finished.

• To open the TimeQuest analyzer GUI directly from the Quartus Prime software GUI, click TimeQuest

Timing Analyzer on the Tools menu.

• To peform or repeat multi-corner timing analysis from the Quartus Prime GUI, click Processing >

Start > Start TimeQuest Timing Analyzer.

• To perform multi-corner timing analysis from a system command prompt, type

quartus_sta

<options><project_name>

.

• To run the TimeQuest analyzer as a stand-alone GUI application, type the following command at the command prompt: quartus_staw

.

• To run the TimeQuest analyzer in interactive command-shell mode, type the following command at a system command prompt: quartus_sta -s <options><project_name>

.

The following table lists the command-line options available for the quartus_sta

executable.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Table 7-9: Summary of Command-Line Options

Command-Line Option

-h | --help

-t

<

script file

>

|

--script=

<script file>

-s | --shell

--tcl_eval

<

tcl command

>

--do_report_timing

--force_dat

--lower_priority

--post_map

--sdc=

<SDC file>

--report_script=

<

script

>

--speed=<value>

--tq2pt

-f <argument file>

-c <revision name> |

--rev=<revision_name>

--multicorner

--multicorner[=on|off]

--voltage

=

<value_in_mV>

--temperature

=

<value_in_C>

--parallel

[=

<num_processors>

]

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Running the TimeQuest Analyzer

7-55

Description

Provides help information on quartus_sta.

Sources the <script file>.

Enters shell mode.

Evaluates the Tcl command <tcl command>.

For all clocks in the design, run the following commands: report_timing -npaths 1 -to_clock $clock report_timing -setup -npaths 1 -to_ clock $clock report_timing -hold -npaths 1 -to_clock

$clock report_timing -recovery -npaths 1 -to_ clock $clock report_timing -removal -npaths 1 -to_ clock $clock

Forces an update of the project database with new delay information.

Lowers the computing priority of the quartus_sta process.

Uses the post-map database results.

Specifies the SDC file to use.

Specifies a custom report script to call.

Specifies the device speed grade used for timing analysis.

Generates temporary files to convert the TimeQuest analyzer SDC file(s) to a PrimeTime SDC file.

Specifies a file containing additional command-line arguments.

Specifies which revision and its associated Quartus

Prime Settings File(

.qsf

) to use.

Specifies that all slack summary reports be generated for both slow- and fast-corners.

Turns off multicorner timing analysis.

Specifies the device voltage, in mV used for timing analysis.

Specifies the device temperature in degrees Celsius, used for timing analysis.

Specifies the number of computer processors to use on a multiprocessor system.

Altera Corporation

7-56

Quartus Prime Settings

Command-Line Option

--64bit

Description

Enables 64-bit version of the executable.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Related Information

Constraining and Analyzing with Tcl Commands

on page 7-65

For more information about using Tcl commands to constrain and analyze your design

Recommended Flow for First Time Users

on page 7-2

For more information about steps to perform before opening the TimeQuest analyzer.

Quartus Prime Settings

Within the Quartus Prime software, there are a number of quick steps for setting up your design with

TimeQuest. You can modify the appropriate settings in Assignments > Settings.

In the Settings dialog box, select TimeQuest Timing Analyzer in the Category list.

The TimeQuest Timing Analyzer settings page is where you specify the title and location for a Synopsis

Design Constraint (SDC) file. The SDC file is an inudstry standard format for specifying timing constraints. If no SDC file exists, you can create one based on the instructions in this document. The

Quartus Prime software provides an SDC template you can use to create your own.

The following TimeQuest options should be on by default:

• Enable multicorner timing analysis—Directs the TimeQuest analyzer to analyze all the timing models of your FPGA against your constraints. This is required for final timing sign-off. Unchecked, only the slow timing model is be analyzed.

• Enable common clock path pessimism removal— Prevents timing analysis from over-calculating the effects of On-Die Variation. This makes timing better, and there really is no reason for this to be disabled.

• Report worst-case paths during compilation—This optional setting displays summary of the worst paths in your timing report. This type of path analysis is covered in more detail later in this document.

While useful, this summary can increase the size of the

<project>.sta.rpt

with all of these paths.

• Tcl script file for custom reports—This optional setting should prove useful later, allowing you to add custom reports to create a custom analysis. For example, if you are only working on a portion of the full FPGA, you may want additional timing reports that cover that hierarchy.

Note: In addition, certain values are set by default. The default duty-cycle is 50% and the default clock frequency is 1Ghz.

SDC File Precedence

The Fitter and the TimeQuest analyzer process SDC files in the order you specify in the Quartus Prime

Settings File (

.qsf

). You can add and remove SDC files to process and specify the order they are processed from the Assignments menu.

Click Settings, then TimeQuest Timing Analyzer and add or remove SDC files, or specify a processing order in the SDC files to include in the project box. When you create a new SDC file for a project, you must add it to the project for it to be read during fitting and timing analysis. If you use the Quartus Prime

Text Editor to create an SDC file, the option to add it to the project is enabled by default when you save the file. If you use any other editor to create an SDC file, you must remember to add it to the project. If no

SDC files are listed in the

.qsf

, the Quartus Prime software looks for an SDC named

<current revision>.sdc

in the project directory. When you use IP from Altera, and some third-parties, the SDC files are often included in a project through an intermediate file called a Quartus Prime IP File (

.qip

). A

.qip

file points to all source files and constraints for a particular IP. If SDC files for IP blocks in your design are included

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Understanding Results

7-57

through with a

.qip

, do not re-add them manually. An SDC file can also be added from a Quartus Prime

IP File (

.qip

) included in the

.qsf

.

Figure 7-67: .sdc File Order of Precedence

Is one or more .sdc file specified in the .qsf?

No

Does an .sdc named

<current revision>.sdc

exist in the project directory?

No

Analyze the design

Yes

Yes

Note: If you type the read_sdc

command at the command line without any arguments, the TimeQuest analyzer reads constraints embedded in HDL files, then follows the SDC file precedence order.

The SDC file must contain only SDC commands that specify timing constraints. There are some techniques to control which constraints are applied during different parts of the compilation flow. Tcl commands to manipulate the timing netlist or control the compilation must be in a separate Tcl script.

Understanding Results

Knowing how your constraints are displayed when analyzing a path is one of the most important skills of timing analysis. This information completes your understanding of timing analysis and lets you correlate the SDC input to the back-end analysis, and determine how the delays in the FPGA affect timing.

Iterative Constraint Modification

Sometimes it is useful to change an SDC constraint and reanalyze the timing results. This flow is particularly common when you are creating timing constraints and want to ensure that they will be applied appropriately during compilation and timing analysis.

Use the following steps when you iteratvely modify constraints:

1. Open the TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

2. Generate the appropriate reports.

3. Analyze your results

4. Edit your SDC file and save

5. Double-click Reset Design

6. Generate the appropriate reports.

7. Analyze your results

8. Repeat steps 4-7 as necessary.

Open the TimeQuest Timing Analyzer—It is most common to use this interactive approach in the

TimeQuest GUI. You can also use the command-line shell mode, but it does not include some of the time-saving automatic features in the GUI.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Altera Corporation

Send Feedback

7-58

Set Operating Conditions Dialog Box

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Generate the appropriate reports —Use the Report All Summaries task under Macros to generate setup, hold, recovery, and removal summaries, as well as minimum pulse width checks, and a list of all the defined clocks. These summaries cover all constrained paths in your design. Especially when you are modifying or correcting constraints, you should also perform the Diagnostic task to create reports to identify unconstrained parts of your design, or ignored constraints. Double-click on any of the report tasks to automatically run the three tasks under Netlist Setup if they haven't already run. One of those tasks reads all SDC files.

Analyze your results—When you are modifying or correcting constraints, review the reports to find any unexpected results. For example, a cross-domain path might indicate that you forgot to cut a transfer by including a clock in a clock group.

Edit your SDC file and save it—Create or edit the appropriate constraints in your SDC files. If you edit your SDC file in the Quartus Prime Tex Editor, you can benefit from tooltips showing constraint options, and dialog boxes that guide you when creating constraints.

Reset the design—Double click Reset Design task to remove all constraints from your design. Removing all constraints from your design prepares it to reread the SDC files, including your changes.

Be aware that this method just performs timing analysis using new constraints, but the fit being analyzed has not changed. The place-and-route was performed with the old constraints, but you are analyzing with new constraints, so if something is failing timing against these new constraints,you may need to run place-and-route again.

For example, the Fitter may concentrate on a very long path in your design, trying to close timing. For example, you may realize that a path runs at a lower rate, and so have added set_multicycle_path assignments to relax the relationship (open the window when data is valid). When you perform

TimeQuest analysis iteratively with these new multicycles, new paths replace the old. The new paths may have sub-optimal placement since the Fitter was concentrating on the previous paths when it ran, because they were more critical. The iterative method is recommend for getting your SDC files correct, but you should perform a full compilation to see what the Quartus Prime software can do with those constraints.

Related Information

Relaxing Setup with set_multicyle_path

on page 7-31

Set Operating Conditions Dialog Box

You can select different operating conditions to analyze from those used to create the existing timing netlist.

Operating conditions consist of voltage and temperature options that are used together. You can run timing analysis for different delay models without having to delete the existing timing netlist. The

TimeQuest analyzer supports multi-corner timing analysis which you can turn on in the dialog box of the command you are performing. A control has been added to the TimeQuest UI where you can select operating conditions and analyze timing for combinations of corners.

Select a voltage/temperature combination and double-click Report Timing under Custom Reports in the

Tasks pane.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Set Operating Conditions Dialog Box

7-59

Reports that fail timing appear in red type, reports that pass appear in black type. Reports that have not yet been run are in gold with a question mark (?). Selecting another voltage/temperature combination creates a new report, but any reports previously run persist.

You can use the following context menu options to generate or regenerate reports in the Report window:

Regenerate—Regenerate the selected report.

Generate in All Corners—Generate a timing report using all corners.

Regenerate All Out of Date—Regenerate all reports.

Delete All Out of Date—Flush all the reports that have been run to clear the way for new reports with modifications to timing.

Each operating condition generates its own set of reports which appear in their own folders under the

Reports list. Reports that have not yet been generated display a '?' icon in gold. As each report is generated, the folder is updated with the appropriate output.

Note: Reports for a corner not being generated persist until that particular operating condition is modifyed and a new report is created.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-60

Report Timing (Dialog Box)

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Report Timing (Dialog Box)

Once you are comfortable with the Report All Summaries command, the next tool in the TimeQuest analyzer toolbox is Report Timing....

The TimeQuest analyzer displays reports in the Report pane, and is similar to a table of contents for all the reports created. Selecting any name in the Report panel displays that report in the main viewing pane.

Below is a design with the Summary (Setup) report highlighted:

The main viewing pane shows the Slack for every clock domain. Positive slack is good, saying these paths meet timing by that much. The End Point TNS stands for Total Negative Slack, and is the sum of all slacks for each destination and can be used as a relative assessment of how much a domain is failing.

However, this is just a summary. To get details on any domain, you can right-click that row and select

Report Timing….

The Report Timing dialog box appears, auto-filled with the Setup radio button selected and the To Clock box filled with the selected clock. This occurs because you were viewing the Setup Summary report, and right-clicked on that particular clock. As such, the worst 10 paths where that is the destination clock were reported.You can modify the settingsin various ways, such as increasing the number of paths to report, adding a Target filter, adding a From Clock, writing the report to a text file, etc.

Note that any report_timing

command can be copied from the Console at the bottom into a usercreated Tcl file, so that you can analyze specific paths again in the future without having to negotiate the

TimeQuest analyzer UI. This is often done as users become more comfortable with TimeQuest and find themselves analyzing the same problematic parts of their design over and over, but is not required. Many complex designs successfully use TimeQuest as a diving tool, i.e. just starting with summaries and diving down into the failing paths after each compile.

Analyzing Results with Report Timing

Report Timing is one of the most useful analysis tools in TimeQuest. Many designs require nothing but this command. In the TimeQuest analyzer, this command can be accessed from the Tasks menu , from the Reports > Custom Reports menu, or by right-clicking on nodes or assignments in TimeQuest.

You can review all of the options for Report Timing by typing report_timing -long_help

in the

TimeQuest console.

Clocks

The From Clock and To Clock in the Clocks box are used to filter paths where the selected clock is used as the launch or latch. The pull-down menu allows you to choose from existing clocks(although admittedly has a "limited view" for long clock names).

Targets

The boxes in the Targets box are targets for the From Clock and To Clocksettings, and allow you to report paths with only particular endpoints. These are usually filled with register names or I/O ports, and can be wildcarded. For example, you might use the following to only report paths within a hierarchy of interest: report_timing -from *|egress:egress_inst|* -to *|egress:egress_inst|* -(other options)

If the From, To, or Through boxes are empty, then the TimeQuest analyzer assumes you are refering to all possible targets in the device, which can also be represented with a wildcard (*). The From and To options cover the majority of situations. TheThrough option is used to limit the report for paths that pass through combinatorial logic, or a particular pin on a cell. This is seldom used, and may not be very reliable due to combinatorial node name changes during synthesis. Clicking the browse Browse box after

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Analyzing Results with Report Timing

7-61

each target opens the Name Finder dialog box to search for specific names. This is especially useful to make sure the name being entered matches nodes in the design, since the Name Finder can immediately show what matches a user's wildcard.

Analysis type

The Analysis type options are Setup, Hold, Recovery, or Removal. These will be explained in more detail later, as understanding them is the underpinning of timing analysis.

Output

The Detail level, is an option often glanced over that should be understood. It has four options, but I will only discuss three.

The first level is called Summary, and produces a report which only displays Summary information such as

Slack

From Node

To Node

Launch Clock

Latch Clock

Relationship

Clock Skew

Data Delay

The Summary report is always reported with more detailed reports, so the user would choose this if they want less info. A good use for summary detail is when writing the report to a text file, where Summary can be quite brief.

The next level is Path only. This report displays all the detailed information, except the Data Path tab displays the clock tree as one line item. This is useful when you know the clock tree is correct, details are not relevant. This is common for most paths within the FPGA. A useful data point is to look at the Clock

Skew column in the Summary report, and if it's a small number, say less than +/-150ps, then the clock tree is well balanced between source and destination.

If there is clock skew, you should select the Full path option.. This breaks the clock tree out into explicit detail, showing every cell it goes through, including such things as the input buffer, PLL, global buffer

(called

CLKCTRL_

), and any logic. If there is clock skew, this is where you can determine what is causing the clock skew in your design. The Full path option is also recommended for I/O analysis, since only the source clock or destination clock is inside the FPGA, and therefore its delay plays a critical role in meeting timing.

The Data Path tab of a detailed report gives the delay break-downs, but there is also useful information in the Path Summary and Statistics tabs, while the Waveform tab is useful to help visualize the Data Path analysis. I would suggest taking a few minutes to look at these in the user's design. The whole analysis takes some time to get comfortable with, but hopefully is clear in what it's doing.

Enable multi corner reports allows you to enable or disable multi-corner timing analysis. This option is on by default.

Report Timing also has the Report panel name, which displays the name used in TimeQuest's Report section. There is also an optional File name switch, which allows you to write the information to a file. If you append .htm as a suffix, the TimeQuest analyzer produces the report as HTML. The File options radio buttons allow you to choose between Overwrite and Append when saving the file.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-62

Correlating Constraints to the Timing Report

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Paths

The default value for Report number of paths is 10. Two endpoints may have a lot of combinatorial logic between them and might have many different paths. Likewise, a single destination may have hundreds of paths leading to it. Because of this, you might list hundreds of paths, many of which have the same destination and might have the same source. By turning on Pairs only you can list only one path for each pair of source and destination. An even more powerful way to filter the report is limit the Maximum number of paths per endpoints. You can also filter paths by entering a value in the Maximum slack limit field.

Tcl command

Finally, at the bottom is the Tcl commandfield, which displays the Tcl syntax of what is run in

TimeQuest. You can edit this directly before running the Report Timing command.

Note:

A useful addition is to addis the

-false_path

option to the command line string. With this option, only false paths are listed. A false path is any path where the launch and latch clock have been defined, but the path was cut with either a

set_false_path

assignment or

set_clock_groups_assignment

. Paths where the launch or latch clock was never constrained are not considered false paths. This option is useful to see if a false path assignment worked and what paths it covers, or to look for paths between clock domains that should not exist. The Task window's Report False Path custom report is nothing more than Report

Timing with the

-false_path

flag enabled.

Correlating Constraints to the Timing Report

A critical part of timing analysis is how timing constraints appear in the Report Timing analysis. Most constraints only affect the launch and latch edges. Specifically, create_clock

and create_generated_clock

create clocks with default relationships. The command set_multicycle_path will modify those default relationships, while set_max_delay

and set_min_delay

are low-level overrides that explicitly tell TimeQuest what the launch and latch edges should be.

The folowing figures are from an example of the output of Report Timing on a particular path.

Initially, the design features a clock driving the source and destination registers with a period of 10ns. This results in a setup relationship of 10ns (launch edge = 0ns, latch edge = 10ns) and hold relationship of 0ns

(launch edge = 0ns, latch edge = 0ns) from the command: create_clock -name clocktwo -period 10.000 [get_ports {clk2}]

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Correlating Constraints to the Timing Report

Figure 7-68: Setup Relationship 10ns, Hold Relationship 0ns

7-63

In the next figure, using set_multicycle_path

adds multicycles to relax the setup relationship, or open the window, making the setup relationship 20ns while the hold relationship is still 0ns: set_multicycle_path -from clocktwo -to clocktwo -setup -end 2 set_multicycle_path -from clocktwo -to clocktwo -hold -end 1

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-64

Correlating Constraints to the Timing Report

Figure 7-69: Setup Relationship 20ns

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

In the last figure, using the set_max_delay

and set_min_delay

constraints lets you explicitly override the relationships. Note that the only thing changing for these different constraints is the Launch Edge

Time and Latch Edge Times for setup and hold analysis. Every other line item comes from delays inside the FPGA and are static for a given fit. Whenever analyzing how your constraints affect the timing requirements, this is the place to look.

Figure 7-70: Using set_max_delay and set_min_delay

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Constraining and Analyzing with Tcl Commands

7-65

For I/O, this all holds true except we must add in the

-max

and

-min

values. They are displayed as iExt or

oExt in the Type column. An example would be an output port with a set_output_delay -max 1.0

and set_output_delay -min -0.5

:

Once again, the launch and latch edge times are determined by the clock relationships, multicycles and possibly set_max_delay

or set_min_delay

constraints. The value of set_output_delay

is also added in as an oExt value. For outputs this value is part of the Data Required Path, since this is the external part of the analysis. The setup report on the left will subtract the

-max

value, making the setup relationship harder to meet, since we want the Data Arrival Path to be shorter than the Data Required Path. The

-min

value is also subtracted, which is why a negative number makes hold timing more restrictive, since we want the

Data Arrival Path to be longer than the Data Required Path.

Related Information

Relaxing Setup with set_multicyle_path

on page 7-31

Constraining and Analyzing with Tcl Commands

You can use Tcl commands from the Quartus Prime software Tcl Application Programming Interface

(API) to constrain, analyze, and collect information for your design. This section focuses on executing timing analysis tasks with Tcl commands; however, you can perform many of the same functions in the

TimeQuest analyzer GUI. SDC commands are Tcl commands for constraining a design. SDC extension commands provide additional constraint methods and are specific to the TimeQuest analyzer. Additional

TimeQuest analyzer commands are available for controlling timing analysis and reporting. These commands are contained in the following Tcl packages available in the Quartus Prime software:

::quartus::sta

::quartus::sdc

::quartus::sdc_ext

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-66

Collection Commands

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Related Information

::quartus::sta

For more information about TimeQuest analyzer Tcl commands and a complete list of commands, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

::quartus::sdc

For more information about standard SDC commands and a complete list of commands, refer to

Quartus Prime Help.

::quartus::sdc_ext

For more information about Altera extensions of SDC commands and a complete list of commands, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

Collection Commands

The TimeQuest analyzer Tcl commands often return data in an object called a collection. In your Tcl scripts you can iterate over the values in collections to access data contained in them. The software returns collections instead of Tcl lists because collections are more efficient than lists for large sets of data.

The TimeQuest analyzer supports collection commands that provide easy access to ports, pins, cells, or nodes in the design. Use collection commands with any constraints or Tcl commands specified in the

TimeQuest analyzer.

Table 7-10: SDC Collection Commands

all_clocks all_inputs all_outputs all_registers get_cells get_clocks get_nets get_pins get_ports

Command Description of the collection returned

All clocks in the design.

All input ports in the design.

All output ports in the design.

All registers in the design.

Cells in the design. All cell names in the collection match the specified pattern. Wildcards can be used to select multiple cells at the same time.

Lists clocks in the design. When used as an argument to another command, such as the

-from or

-to

of set_multicycle_path

, each node in the clock represents all nodes clocked by the clocks in the collection. The default uses the specific node

(even if it is a clock) as the target of a command.

Nets in the design. All net names in the collection match the specified pattern. You can use wildcards to select multiple nets at the same time.

Pins in the design. All pin names in the collection match the specified pattern. You can use wildcards to select multiple pins at the same time.

Ports (design inputs and outputs) in the design.

You can also examine collections and experiment with collections using wildcards in the TimeQuest analyzer by clicking Name Finder from the View menu.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Wildcard Characters

7-67

Wildcard Characters

To apply constraints to many nodes in a design, use the “

*

” and “

?

” wildcard characters. The “

*

” wildcard character matches any string; the “

?

” wildcard character matches any single character.

If you make an assignment to node reg*

, the TimeQuest analyzer searches for and applies the assignment to all design nodes that match the prefix reg

with any number of following characters, such as reg

, reg1

, reg[2]

, regbank

, and reg12bank

.

If you make an assignment to a node specified as reg?

, the TimeQuest analyzer searches and applies the assignment to all design nodes that match the prefix reg

and any single character following; for example, reg1

, rega

, and reg4

.

Adding and Removing Collection Items

Wildcards used with collection commands define collection items identified by the command. For example, if a design contains registers named src0

, src1

, src2

, and dst0

, the collection command

[get_registers src*]

identifies registers src0

, src1

, and src2

, but not register dst0

. To identify register dst0

, you must use an additional command,

[get_registers dst*]

. To include dst0

, you could also specify a collection command

[get_registers {src* dst*}]

.

To modify collections, use the add_to_collection

and remove_from_collection

commands. The add_to_collection

command allows you to add additional items to an existing collection.

add_to_collection Command

add_to_collection <first collection> <second collection>

Note: The add_to_collection

command creates a new collection that is the union of the two specified collections.

The remove_from_collection

command allows you to remove items from an existing collection.

remove_from_collection Command

remove_from_collection <first collection> <second collection>

You can use the following code as an example for using add_to_collection

for adding items to a collection.

Adding Items to a Collection

#Setting up initial collection of registers set regs1 [get_registers a*]

#Setting up initial collection of keepers set kprs1 [get_keepers b*]

#Creating a new set of registers of $regs1 and $kprs1 set regs_union [add_to_collection $kprs1 $regs1]

#OR

#Creating a new set of registers of $regs1 and b*

#Note that the new collection appends only registers with name b*

# not all keepers set regs_union [add_to_collection $regs1 b*]

In the Quartus Prime software, keepers are I/O ports or registers. A SDC file that includes get_keepers can only be processed as part of the TimeQuest analyzer flow and is not compatible with third-party timing analysis flows.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-68

Getting Other Information about Collections

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Related Information

add_to_collection

remove_from_collection

For more information about the add_to_collection

and remove_from_collection

commands, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

Getting Other Information about Collections

You can display the contents of a collection with the query_collection

command. Use the

report_format

option to return the contents in a format of one element per line. The

-list_format option returns the contents in a Tcl list.

query_collection -report_format -all $regs_union

Use the get_collection_size

command to return the size of a collection; the number of items it contains. If your collection is in a variable named col

, it is more efficient to use set num_items

[get_collection_size $col]

than set num_items [llength [query_collection -list_format

$col]]

Using the get_pins Command

The get_pins

command supports options that control the matching behavior of the wildcard character

(*). Depending on the combination of options you use, you can make the wildcard character (*) respect or ignore individual levels of hierarchy, which are indicated by the pipe character (|). By default, the wildcard character (*) matches only a single level of hierarchy.

These examples filter the following node and pin names to illustrate function:

• foo (a hierarchy level named foo)

• foo|dataa (an input pin in the instance foo)

• foo|datab (an input pin in the instance foo)

• foo|bar (a combinational node named bar in the foo instance)

• foo|bar|datac (an input pin to the combinational node named bar)

• foo|bar|datad (an input pin to the combinational node bar)

Table 7-11: Sample Search Strings and Search Results

Search String

get_pins *|dataa get_pins *|datac get_pins *|*|datac get_pins foo*|* get_pins -hierarchical *|*|datac get_pins -hierarchical foo|* get_pins -hierarchical *|datac

Search Result

foo|dataa

<empty>

(3) foo|bar|datac foo|dataa, foo|datab

<empty>

(3) foo|dataa, foo|datab foo|bar|datac

(3) The search result is <empty> because the wildcard character (*) does not match more than one hierarchy level, indicated by a pipe character (|), by default. This command would match any pin named datac

in instances at the top level of the design.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Identifying the Quartus Prime Software Executable from the SDC File

Search String

get_pins -hierarchical foo|*|datac get_pins -compatibility_mode *|datac

<empty>

(3) foo|bar|datac

(4) get_pins -compatibility_mode *|*|datac foo|bar|datac

Search Result

7-69

The default method separates hierarchy levels of instances from nodes and pins with the pipe character

(|). A match occurs when the levels of hierarchy match, and the string values including wildcards match the instance and/or pin names. For example, the command get_pins <instance_name>|*|datac returns all the datac

pins for registers in a given instance. However, the command get_pins *|datac returns and empty collection because the levels of hierarchy do not match.

Use the

-hierarchical

matching scheme to return a collection of cells or pins in all hierarchies of your design.

For example, the command get_pins -hierarchical *|datac

returns all the datac

pins for all registers in your design. However, the command get_pins -hierarchical *|*|datac

returns an empty collection because more than one pipe character (|) is not supported.

The

-compatibility_mode

option returns collections matching wildcard strings through any number of hierarchy levels. For example, an asterisk can match a pipe character when using

-compatibility_mode.

Identifying the Quartus Prime Software Executable from the SDC File

To identify which Quartus Prime software executable is currently running you can use the

$::TimeQuestInfo(nameofexecutable)

variable from within an SDC file. This technique is most commonly used when you want to use an overconstraint to cause the Fitter to work harder on a particular path or set of paths in the design.

Identifying the Quartus Prime Executable

#Identify which executable is running: set current_exe $::TimeQuestInfo(nameofexecutable) if { [string equal $current_exe "quartus_fit"] } {

#Apply .sdc assignments for Fitter executable here

} else {

#Apply .sdc assignments for non-Fitter executables here

} if { ! [string equal "quartus_sta" $::TimeQuestInfo(nameofexecutable)] } {

#Apply .sdc assignments for non-TimeQuest executables here

} else {

#Apply .sdc assignments for TimeQuest executable here

}

Examples of different executable names are quartus_map

for Analysis & Synthesis, quartus_fit

for

Fitter, and quartus_sta

for the TimeQuest analyzer.

Locating Timing Paths in Other Tools

You can locate paths and elements from the TimeQuest analyzer to other tools in the Quartus Prime software.

(4) When you use

-compatibility_mode

, pipe characters (|) are not treated as special characters when used with wildcards.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Altera Corporation

Send Feedback

7-70

Generating Timing Reports

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Use the Locate or

Locate Path

command in the TimeQuest analyzer GUI or the locate

command in the

Tcl console in the TimeQuest analyzer GUI. Right-click on most paths or node names in the TimeQuest analyzer GUI to access the Locate or Locate Path options.

The following commands are examples of how to locate the ten paths with the worst timing slack from

TimeQuest analyzer to the Technology Map Veiwer and locate all ports matching data* in the Chip

Planner.

Example 7-6: Locating from the TimeQuest Analyzer

# Locate in the Technology Map Viewer the ten paths with the worst slack locate [get_timing_paths -npaths 10] -tmv

# locate all ports that begin with data in the Chip Planner locate [get_ports data*] -chip

Related Information

Viewing Timing Analysis Results

For more information about locating paths from the TimeQuest analyzer, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

locate

For more information on this command, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

Generating Timing Reports

The TimeQuest analyzer provides real-time static timing analysis result reports. The TimeQuest analyzer does not automatically generate most reports; you must create each report individually in the TimeQuest analyzer GUI or with command-line commands. You can customize in which report to display specific timing information, excluding fields that are not required.

Some of the different command-line commands you can use to generate reports in the TimeQuest analyzer and the equivalent reports shown in the TimeQuest analyzer GUI.

Table 7-12: TimeQuest Analyzer Reports

Command-Line Command

report_timing report_exceptions report_clock_transfers report_min_pulse_width report_ucp

Report

Timing report

Exceptions report

Clock Transfers report

Minimum Pulse Width report

Unconstrained Paths report

During compilation, the Quartus Prime software generates timing reports on different timing areas in the design. You can configure various options for the TimeQuest analyzer reports generated during compila‐ tion.

You can also use the

TIMEQUEST_REPORT_WORST_CASE_TIMING_PATHS

assignment to generate a report of the worst-case timing paths for each clock domain. This report contains worst-case timing data for setup, hold, recovery, removal, and minimum pulse width checks.

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Document Revision History

7-71

Use the

TIMEQUEST_REPORT_NUM_WORST_CASE_TIMING_PATHS

assignment to specify the number of paths to report for each clock domain.

An example of how to use the

TIMEQUEST_REPORT_WORST_CASE_TIMING_PATHS

and

TIMEQUEST_REPORT_NUM_WORST_CASE_TIMING_PATHS

assignments in the

.qsf

to generate reports.

Generating Worst-Case Timing Reports

#Enable Worst-Case Timing Report set_global_assignment -name TIMEQUEST_REPORT_WORST_CASE_TIMING_PATHS ON

#Report 10 paths per clock domain set_global_assignment -name TIMEQUEST_REPORT_NUM_WORST_CASE_TIMING_PATHS 10

Fmax Summary Report panel

Fmax Summary Report panel lists the maximum frequency of each clock in your design. In some designs you may see a note indicating "Limit due to hold check. Typically, Fmax is not limited by hold checks, because they are often same-edge relationships, and therefore independent of clock frequency, for example, launch = 0, latch = 0. However, if you have an inverted clock transfer, or a multicycle transfer such as setup=2, hold=0, then the hold relationship is no longer a same-edge transfer and changes as the clock frequency changes. The value in the Restricted Fmax column incorporates limits due to hold time checks in the situations described previously, as well as minimum period and pulse width checks. If hold checks limit the Fmax more than setup checks, that is indicated in the Note: column as "Limit due to hold check".

Related Information

::quartus::sta

For more information on this command, refer to Quartus Prime Help.

TimeQuest Timing Analyzer Page

For more information about the options you can set to customize TimeQuest analyzer reports.

Area and Timing Optimization

For more information about timing closure recommendations.

Document Revision History

Table 7-13: Document Revision History

Date Version

2015.11.02 15.1.0

Changes

• Changed instances of Quartus II to Quartus Prime.

• Updated information on using Arria 10 devices with enhanced timing algorithms.

2015.05.04 15.0.0

Added and updated contents in support of new timing algorithms for

Arria 10:

• Enhanced Timing Analysis for Arria 10

• Maximum Skew ( set_max_skew

command)

• Net Delay ( set_net_delay

command)

• Create Generated Clocks (clock-as-data example)

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

7-72

Document Revision History

Date Version Changes

2014.12.15 14.1.0

Major reorganization. Revised and added content to the following topic areas:

• Timing Constraints

• Create Clocks and Clock Constraints

• Creating Generated Clocks

• Creating Clock Groups

• Clock Uncertainty

• Running the TimeQuest Analyzer

• Generating Timing Reports

• Understanding Results

• Constraining and Analyzing with Tcl Commands

August

2014

14.0a10.

0

June 2014 14.0.0

Added command line compliation requirements for Arria 10 devices.

• Minor updates.

• Updated format.

November

2013

13.1.0

June 2012 12.0.0

• Removed HardCopy device information.

• Reorganized chapter.

• Added “Creating a Constraint File from Quartus Prime Templates with the Quartus Prime Text Editor” section on creating an SDC constraints file with the Insert Template dialog box.

• Added “Identifying the Quartus Prime Software Executable from the

SDC File” section.

• Revised multicycle exceptions section.

November

2011

11.1.0

• Consolidated content from the Best Practices for the Quartus Prime

TimeQuest Timing Analyzer chapter.

• Changed to new document template.

May 2011 11.0.0

• Updated to improve flow. Minor editorial updates.

December

2010

10.1.0

• Changed to new document template.

• Revised and reorganized entire chapter.

• Linked to Quartus Prime Help.

July 2010 10.0.0

Updated to link to content on SDC commands and the TimeQuest analyzer GUI in Quartus Prime Help.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Document Revision History

Date

November

2009

Version

9.1.0

November

2008

8.1.0

Changes

Updated for the Quartus Prime software version 9.1, including:

• Added information about commands for adding and removing items from collections

• Added information about the set_timing_derate and report_skew commands

• Added information about worst-case timing reporting

• Minor editorial updates

Updated for the Quartus Prime software version 8.1, including:

• Added the following sections:

“set_net_delay” on page 7–42

“Annotated Delay” on page 7–49

“report_net_delay” on page 7–66

• Updated the descriptions of the

-append

and

-file

<name> options in tables throughout the chapter

• Updated entire chapter using 8½” × 11” chapter template

• Minor editorial updates

7-73

Related Information

Quartus Handbook Archive

For previous versions of the Quartus Prime Handbook, refer to the Quartus Handbook Archive.

The Quartus Prime TimeQuest Timing Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

PowerPlay Power Analysis

2015.11.02

QPS5V3

Subscribe

Send Feedback

The PowerPlay Power Analysis tools allow you to estimate device power consumption accurately.

As designs grow larger and process technology continues to shrink, power becomes an increasingly important design consideration. When designing a PCB, you must estimate the power consumption of a device accurately to develop an appropriate power budget, and to design the power supplies, voltage regulators, heat sink, and cooling system.

The following figure shows the PowerPlay Power Analysis tools ability to estimate power consumption from early design concept through design implementation.

Figure 8-1: PowerPlay Power Analysis From Design Concept Through Design Implementation

8

PowerPlay Early Power Estimator Quartus Prime PowerPlay Power Analyzer

Placement and

Routing

Results

Simulation

Results

User Input

Quartus Prime

Design Profile

Design Concept

Design Implementation

PowerPlay Power Analysis Input

For the majority of the designs, the PowerPlay Power Analyzer and the PowerPlay EPE spreadsheet have the following accuracy after the power models are final:

• PowerPlay Power Analyzer—±20% from silicon, assuming that the PowerPlay Power Analyzer uses the Value Change Dump File (.vcd) generated toggle rates.

• PowerPlay EPE spreadsheet— ±20% from the PowerPlay Power Analyzer results using .vcd generated toggle rates. 90% of EPE designs (using .vcd generated toggle rates exported from PPPA) are within

±30% silicon.

©

2015 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, ENPIRION, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX words and logos are trademarks of Altera Corporation and registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. All other words and logos identified as trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html

. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.

www.altera.com

101 Innovation Drive, San Jose, CA 95134

ISO

9001:2008

Registered

8-2

Types of Power Analyses

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

The toggle rates are derived using the PowerPlay Power Analyzer with a .vcd file generated from a gate level simulation representative of the system operation.

Related Information

PowerPlay Early Power Estimators (EPE) and Power Analyzer

Types of Power Analyses

Understanding the uses of power analysis and the factors affecting power consumption helps you to use the PowerPlay Power Analyzer effectively. Power analysis meets the following significant planning requirements:

Thermal planning—Thermal power is the power that dissipates as heat from the FPGA. You must use a heatsink or fan to act as a cooling solution for your device. The cooling solution must be sufficient to dissipate the heat that the device generates. The computed junction temperature must fall within normal device specifications.

Power supply planning—Power supply is the power needed to run your device. Power supplies must provide adequate current to support device operation.

Note: For power supply planning, use the PowerPlay EPE at the early stages of your design cycle. Use the PowerPlay Power Analyzer reports when your design is complete to get an estimate of your design power requirement.

The two types of analyses are closely related because much of the power supplied to the device dissipates as heat from the device; however, in some situations, the two types of analyses are not identical. For example, if you use terminated I/O standards, some of the power drawn from the power supply of the device dissipates in termination resistors rather than in the device.

Power analysis also addresses the activity of your design over time as a factor that impacts the power consumption of the device. The static power (P independent of user clocks. P

STATIC for I/O DC bias power and transceiver DC bias power, which are accounted for in the I/O and transceiver sections. Dynamic power is the additional power consumption of the device due to signal activity or toggling.

STATIC

) is the thermal power dissipated on chip,

includes the leakage power from all FPGA functional blocks, except

Related Information

PowerPlay Early Power Estimator (EPE) User Guide

Differences between the PowerPlay EPE and the

Analyzer

Quartus Prime

PowerPlay Power

The following table lists the differences between the PowerPlay EPE and the Quartus Prime PowerPlay

Power Analyzer.

Altera Corporation

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Differences between the PowerPlay EPE and the Quartus Prime PowerPlay...

Table 8-1: Comparison of the PowerPlay EPE and Quartus Prime PowerPlay Power Analyzer

8-3

Characteristic PowerPlay EPE

Phase in the design cycle Any time, but it is recommended to use

Quartus Prime PowerPlay Power Analyzer for post-fit power analysis.

Tool requirements Spreadsheet program

Accuracy

Data inputs

Medium

• Resource usage estimates

• Clock requirements

• Environmental conditions

• Toggle rate

Quartus Prime PowerPlay Power

Analyzer

Post-fit

The Quartus Prime software

Medium to very high

• Post-fit design

• Clock requirements

• Signal activity defaults

• Environmental conditions

• Register transfer level

(RTL) simulation results

(optional)

• Post-fit simulation results

(optional)

• Signal activities per node or entity (optional)

Data outputs (1)

• Total thermal power dissipation

• Thermal static power

• Thermal dynamic power

• Off-chip power dissipation

• Current drawn from voltage supplies

• Total thermal power

• Thermal static power

• Thermal dynamic power

• Thermal I/O power

• Thermal power by design hierarchy

• Thermal power by block type

• Thermal power dissipation by clock domain

• Off-chip (non-thermal) power dissipation

• Device supply currents

The result of the PowerPlay Power Analyzer is only an estimation of power. Altera does not recommend using the result as a specification. The purpose of the estimation is to help you establish guidelines for the power budget of your design. It is important that you verify the actual power during device operation as the information is sensitive to the actual device design and the environmental operating conditions.

(5) PowerPlay EPE and PowerPlay Power Analyzer outputs vary by device family. For more information, refer to the device-specific PowerPlay Early Power Estimators (EPE) and Power Analyzer Page and PowerPlay

Power Analyzer Reports in the Quartus Prime Help.

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Altera Corporation

Send Feedback

8-4

Factors Affecting Power Consumption

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Note: The PowerPlay Power Analyzer does not include the transceiver power for features that can only be enabled through dynamic reconfiguration (DFE, ADCE/AEQ, EyeQ). Use the EPE to estimate the incremental power consumption by these features.

Related Information

PowerPlay Early Power Estimators (EPE) and Power Analyzer Page

For more information, refer to the device-specific PowerPlay Early Power Estimators (EPE) page on the Altera website.

PowerPlay Power Analyzer Reports

For more information, refer to this page for device-specific information about the PowerPlay Early

Power Estimator.

Factors Affecting Power Consumption

Understanding the following factors that affect power consumption allows you to use the PowerPlay

Power Analyzer and interpret its results effectively:

Device Selection

Environmental Conditions

Device Resource Usage

Signal Activities

Device Selection

Device families have different power characteristics. Many parameters affect the device family power consumption, including choice of process technology, supply voltage, electrical design, and device architecture.

Power consumption also varies in a single device family. A larger device consumes more static power than a smaller device in the same family because of its larger transistor count. Dynamic power can also increase with device size in devices that employ global routing architectures.

The choice of device package also affects the ability of the device to dissipate heat. This choice can impact your required cooling solution choice to comply to junction temperature constraints.

Process variation can affect power consumption. Process variation primarily impacts static power because sub-threshold leakage current varies exponentially with changes in transistor threshold voltage. Therefore, you must consult device specifications for static power and not rely on empirical observation. Process variation has a weak effect on dynamic power.

Environmental Conditions

Operating temperature primarily affects device static power consumption. Higher junction temperatures result in higher static power consumption. The device thermal power and cooling solution that you use must result in the device junction temperature remaining within the maximum operating range for the device. The main environmental parameters affecting junction temperature are the cooling solution and ambient temperature.

The following table lists the environmental conditions that could affect power consumption.

Altera Corporation

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Table 8-2: Environmental Conditions that Could Affect Power Consumption

Device Resource Usage

Environmental Conditions

Airflow

Heat Sink and Thermal

Compound

Junction Temperature

Board Thermal Model

Description

8-5

A measure of how quickly the device removes heated air from the vicinity of the device and replaces it with air at ambient temperature.

You can either specify airflow as “still air” when you are not using a fan, or as the linear feet per minute rating of the fan in the system. Higher airflow decreases thermal resistance.

A heat sink allows more efficient heat transfer from the device to the surrounding area because of its large surface area exposed to the air. The thermal compound that interfaces the heat sink to the device also influences the rate of heat dissipation. The case-to-ambient thermal resistance (θ

CA

) parameter describes the cooling capacity of the heat sink and thermal compound employed at a given airflow. Larger heat sinks and more effective thermal compounds reduce θ

CA

.

The junction temperature of a device is equal to:

T

Junction

= T

Ambient

+ P

Thermal

· θ

JA in which θ

JA

is the total thermal resistance from the device transistors to the environment, having units of degrees Celsius per watt. The value θ

JA

is equal to the sum of the junction-to-case (package) thermal resistance (θ

JC

, and the case-to-ambient thermal resistance (θ

CA solution.

) of your cooling

)

The junction-to-board thermal resistance (θ

JB

) is the thermal resistance of the path through the board, having units of degrees Celsius per watt. To compute junction temperature, you can use this board thermal model along with the board temperature, the top-of-chip θ temperatures.

JA

and ambient

Device Resource Usage

The number and types of device resources used greatly affects power consumption.

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

8-6

Signal Activities

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Number, Type, and Loading of I/O Pins—Output pins drive off-chip components, resulting in highload capacitance that leads to a high-dynamic power per transition. Terminated I/O standards require external resistors that draw constant (static) power from the output pin.

Number and Type of Hard Logic Blocks—A design with more logic elements (LEs), multiplier elements, memory blocks, transceiver blocks or HPS system tends to consume more power than a design with fewer circuit elements. The operating mode of each circuit element also affects its power consumption. For example, a DSP block performing 18 × 18 multiplications and a DSP block performing multiply-accumulate operations consume different amounts of dynamic power because of different amounts of charging internal capacitance on each transition. The operating mode of a circuit element also affects static power.

Number and Type of Global Signals—Global signal networks span large portions of the device and have high capacitance, resulting in significant dynamic power consumption. The type of global signal is important as well. For example, Stratix V devices support global clocks and quadrant (regional) clocks. Global clocks cover the entire device, whereas quadrant clocks only span one-fourth of the device. Clock networks that span smaller regions have lower capacitance and tend to consume less power. The location of the logic array blocks (LABs) driven by the clock network can also have an impact because the Quartus Prime software automatically disables unused branches of a clock.

Signal Activities

The behavior of each signal in your design is an important factor in estimating power consumption. The following table lists the two vital behaviors of a signal, which are toggle rate and static probability:

Table 8-3: Signal Behavior

Signal Behavior

Toggle rate

Static probability

Description

• The toggle rate of a signal is the average number of times that the signal changes value per unit of time. The units for toggle rate are transitions per second and a transition is a change from

1

to

0

, or

0

to

1

.

• Dynamic power increases linearly with the toggle rate as you charge the board trace model more frequently for logic and routing. The Quartus

Prime software models full rail-to-rail switching. For high toggle rates, especially on circuit output I/O pins, the circuit can transition before fully charging the downstream capacitance. The result is a slightly conservative prediction of power by the PowerPlay Power Analyzer.

• The static probability of a signal is the fraction of time that the signal is logic

1

during the period of device operation that is being analyzed. Static probability ranges from

0

(always at ground) to

1

(always at logic-high).

• Static probabilities of their input signals can sometimes affect the static power that routing and logic consume. This effect is due to statedependent leakage and has a larger effect on smaller process geometries.

The Quartus Prime software models this effect on devices at 90 nm or smaller if it is important to the power estimate. The static power also varies with the static probability of a logic

1

or

0

on the I/O pin when output I/O standards drive termination resistors.

Altera Corporation

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

PowerPlay Power Analyzer Flow

8-7

Note: To get accurate results from the power analysis, the signal activities for analysis must represent the actual operating behavior of your design. Inaccurate signal toggle rate data is the largest source of power estimation error.

PowerPlay Power Analyzer Flow

The PowerPlay Power Analyzer supports accurate power estimations by allowing you to specify the important design factors affecting power consumption. The following figure shows the high-level

PowerPlay Power Analyzer flow.

Figure 8-2: PowerPlay Power Analyzer High-Level Flow

User Design

(Post-Fit)

Operating

Conditions

PowerPlay

Power Analyzer

Signal

Activities

Operating condition specifications are available for only some device families. For more information, refer to “Performing Power Analysis with the

PowerPlay Power Analyzer” in Quartus Prime Help.

Power Analysis

Report

To obtain accurate I/O power estimates, the PowerPlay Power Analyzer requires you to synthesize your design and then fit your design to the target device. You must specify the electrical standard on each I/O cell and the board trace model on each I/O standard in your design.

Operating Settings and Conditions

You can specify device power characteristics, operating voltage conditions, and operating temperature conditions for power analysis in the Quartus Prime software.

On the Operating Settings and Conditions page of the Settings dialog box, you can specify whether the device has typical power consumption characteristics or maximum power consumption characteristics.

On the Voltage page of the Settings dialog box, you can view the operating voltage conditions for each power rail in the device, and specify supply voltages for power rails with selectable supply voltages.

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

8-8

Signal Activities Data Sources

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Note: The Quartus Prime Fitter may override some of the supply voltages settings specified in this chapter. For example, supply voltages for several Stratix V transceiver power supplies depend on the data rate used. If the Fitter detects that voltage required is different from the one specified in the Voltage page, it will automatically set the correct voltage for relevant rails. The Quartus Prime

PowerPlay Power Analyzer uses voltages selected by the Fitter if they conflict with the settings specified in the Voltage page.

On the Temperature page of the Settings dialog box, you can specify the thermal operating conditions of the device.

Related Information

Operating Settings and Conditions Page (Settings Dialog Box)

Voltage Page (Settings Dialog Box)

Temperature Page (Settings Dialog Box)

Signal Activities Data Sources

The PowerPlay Power Analyzer provides a flexible framework for specifying signal activities. The framework reflects the importance of using representative signal-activity data during power analysis. Use the following sources to provide information about signal activity:

• Simulation results

• User-entered node, entity, and clock assignments

• User-entered default toggle rate assignment

• Vectorless estimation

The PowerPlay Power Analyzer allows you to mix and match the signal-activity data sources on a signalby-signal basis. The following figure shows the priority scheme applied to each signal.

Figure 8-3: Signal-Activity Data Source Priority Scheme

Start

Node or entity assignment?

No

Yes

Use node or entity assignment

Simulation data?

No

Yes

Use simulation data

Is primary input?

No

Yes

Use default assignment

Vectorless supported and enabled?

Yes

Use vectorless estimation

No

Altera Corporation

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Simulation Results

Simulation Results

8-9

The PowerPlay Power Analyzer directly reads the waveforms generated by a design simulation. Static probability and toggle rate can be calculated for each signal from the simulation waveform. Power analysis is most accurate when you use representative input stimuli to generate simulations.

The PowerPlay Power Analyzer reads results generated by the following simulators:

• ModelSim

®

• ModelSim-Altera

• QuestaSim

• Active-HDL

• NCSim

• VCS

• VCS MX

• Riviera-PRO

Signal activity and static probability information are derived from a Verilog Value Change Dump File

(.vcd). For more information, refer to

Signal Activities

on page 8-6.

For third-party simulators, use the EDA Tool Settings to specify the Generate Value Change Dump

(VCD) file script option in the Simulation page of the Settings dialog box. These scripts instruct the thirdparty simulators to generate a .vcd that encodes the simulated waveforms. The Quartus Prime PowerPlay

Power Analyzer reads this file directly to derive the toggle rate and static probability data for each signal.

Third-party EDA simulators, other than those listed, can generate a .vcd that you can use with the

PowerPlay Power Analyzer. For those simulators, you must manually create a simulation script to generate the appropriate .vcd.

Note: You can use a .vcd created for power analysis to optimize your design for power during fitting by utilizing the appropriate settings in the PowerPlay power optimization list, available from

Assignments > Settings > Compiler Settings > Advanced Settings (Fitter).

Using Simulation Files in Modular Design Flows

A common design practice is to create modular or hierarchical designs in which you develop each design entity separately, and then instantiate these modules in a higher-level entity to form a complete design.

You can perform simulation on a complete design or on each module for verification. The PowerPlay

Power Analyzer supports modular design flows when reading the signal activities from simulation files.

The following figure shows an example of a modular design flow.

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

8-10

Using Simulation Files in Modular Design Flows

Figure 8-4: Modular Simulation Flow

Parameter

Input

Video

Processing

Memory

Interface

Video

Source

Interface

Column

Driver

Timing

Control system.vcd

video_gizmo.vcd

output_driver.vcd

video_input.vcd

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

When specifying a simulation file (a .vcd), the software provides support to specify an associated design entity name, such that the PowerPlay Power Analyzer imports the signal activities derived from that file for the specified design entity. The PowerPlay Power Analyzer also supports the specification of multiple .vcd files for power analysis, with each having an associated design entity name to enable the integration of partial design simulations into a complete design power analysis. When specifying multiple .vcd files for your design, more than one simulation file can contain signal-activity information for the same signal.

Note: When you apply multiple .vcd files to the same design entity, the signal activity used in the power analysis is the equal-weight arithmetic average of each .vcd.

Note: When you apply multiple simulation files to design entities at different levels in your design hierarchy, the signal activity in the power analysis derives from the simulation file that applies to the most specific design entity.

The following figure shows an example of a hierarchical design. The top-level module of your design, called Top, consists of three 8b/10b decoders, followed by a mux

. The software then encodes the output of the mux

to produce the final output of the top-level module. An error-handling module handles any

8b/10b decoding errors. The Top module contains the top-level entity of your design and any logic not defined as part of another module. The design file for the top-level module might be a wrapper for the hierarchical entities below it, or it might contain its own logic. The following usage scenarios show common ways that you can simulate your design and import the .vcd into the PowerPlay Power Analyzer.

Altera Corporation

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 8-5: Example Hierarchical Design

Top

8b10b_dec:decode1

8b10b_dec:decode2

8b10b_dec:decode3

8b10b_rxerr:err1 mux:mux1

Complete Design Simulation

8-11

8b10b_enc:encode1

Complete Design Simulation

You can simulate the entire design and generate a .vcd from a third-party simulator. The PowerPlay

Power Analyzer can then import the .vcd (specifying the top-level design). The resulting power analysis uses the signal activities information from the generated .vcd, including those that apply to submodules, such as decode [1-3]

, err1

, mux1

, and encode1

.

Modular Design Simulation

You can independently simulate of the top-level design, and then import all the resulting .vcd files into the PowerPlay Power Analyzer. For example, you can simulate the

8b10b_dec

independent of the entire design and mux

,

8b10b_rxerr

, and

8b10b_enc

. You can then import the .vcd files generated from each simulation by specifying the appropriate instance name. For example, if the files produced by the simulations are 8b10b_dec.vcd, 8b10b_enc.vcd, 8b10b_rxerr.vcd, and mux.vcd, you can use the import specifications in the following table:

Table 8-4: Import Specifications

8b10b_dec.vcd

8b10b_dec.vcd

8b10b_dec.vcd

8b10b_rxerr.vcd

8b10b_enc.vcd

mux.vcd

File Name

Top|8b10b_dec:decode1

Entity

Top|8b10b_dec:decode2

Top|8b10b_dec:decode3

Top|8b10b_rxerr:err1

Top|8b10b_enc:encode1

Top|mux:mux1

The resulting power analysis applies the simulation vectors in each file to the assigned entity. Simulation provides signal activities for the pins and for the outputs of functional blocks. If the inputs to an entity instance are input pins for the entire design, the simulation file associated with that instance does not

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

8-12

Multiple Simulations on the Same Entity

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

provide signal activities for the inputs of that instance. For example, an input to an entity such as mux1

has its signal activity specified at the output of one of the decode entities.

Multiple Simulations on the Same Entity

You can perform multiple simulations of an entire design or specific modules of a design. For example, in the process of verifying the top-level design, you can have three different simulation testbenches: one for normal operation, and two for corner cases. Each of these simulations produces a separate .vcd. In this case, apply the different .vcd file names to the same top-level entity, as shown in the following table.

Table 8-5: Multiple Simulation File Names and Entities

File Name Entity normal.vcd

corner1.vcd

corner2.vcd

Top

Top

Top

The resulting power analysis uses an arithmetic average of the signal activities calculated from each simulation file to obtain the final signal activities used. If a signal err_out has a toggle rate of zero transition per second in normal.vcd, 50 transitions per second in corner1.vcd, and 70 transitions per second in corner2.vcd, the final toggle rate in the power analysis is 40 transitions per second.

If you do not want the PowerPlay Power Analyzer to read information from multiple instances and take an arithmetic average of the signal activities, use a .vcd that includes only signals from the instance that you care about.

Overlapping Simulations

You can perform a simulation on the entire design, and more exhaustive simulations on a submodule, such as

8b10b_rxerr

. The following table lists the import specification for overlapping simulations.

Table 8-6: Overlapping Simulation Import Specifications

File Name Entity full_design.vcd

error_cases.vcd

Top

Top|8b10b_rxerr:err1

In this case, the software uses signal activities from

error_cases.vcd for all the nodes in the generated .vcd and uses signal activities from full_design.vcd for only those nodes that do not overlap with nodes in

error_cases.vcd. In general, the more specific hierarchy (the most bottom-level module) derives signal activities for overlapping nodes.

Partial Simulations

You can perform a simulation in which the entire simulation time is not applicable to signal-activity calculation. For example, if you run a simulation for 10,000 clock cycles and reset the chip for the first

2,000 clock cycles. If the PowerPlay Power Analyzer performs the signal-activity calculation over all

10,000 cycles, the toggle rates are only 80% of their steady state value (because the chip is in reset for the

Altera Corporation

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Specifying Start and End Time when Performing Signal-Activity...

8-13

first 20% of the simulation). In this case, you must specify the useful parts of the .vcd for power analysis.

The Limit VCD Period option enables you to specify a start and end time when performing signalactivity calculations.

Specifying Start and End Time when Performing Signal-Activity Calculations using the Limit VCD

Period Option

To specify a start and end time when performing signal-activity calculations using the Limit VCD period option, follow these steps:

1. In the Quartus Prime software, on the Assignments menu, click Settings.

2. Under the Category list, click PowerPlay Power Analyzer Settings.

3. Turn on the Use input file(s) to initialize toggle rates and static probabilities during power analysis option.

4. Click Add.

5. In the File name and Entity fields, browse to the necessary files.

6. Under Simulation period, turn on VCD file and Limit VCD period options.

7. In the Start time and End time fields, specify the desired start and end time.

8. Click OK.

You can also use the following tcl or qsf assignment to specify .vcd files: set_global_assignment -name POWER_INPUT_FILE_NAME "test.vcd" -section_id test.vcd

set_global_assignment -name POWER_INPUT_FILE_TYPE VCD -section_id test.vcd

set_global_assignment -name POWER_VCD_FILE_START_TIME "10 ns" -section_id test.vcd

set_global_assignment -name POWER_VCD_FILE_END_TIME "1000 ns" -section_id test.vcd

set_instance_assignment -name POWER_READ_INPUT_FILE test.vcd -to test_design

Related Information

set_power_file_assignment

Add/Edit Power Input File Dialog Box

Node Name Matching Considerations

Node name mismatches happen when you have .vcd applied to entities other than the top-level entity. In a modular design flow, the gate-level simulation files created in different Quartus Prime projects might not match their node names with the current Quartus Prime project.

For example, you may have a file named 8b10b_enc.vcd, which the Quartus Prime software generates in a separate project called 8b10b_enc while simulating the

8b10b

encoder. If you import the .vcd into another project called Top, you might encounter name mismatches when applying the .vcd to the

8b10b_enc

module in the Top project. This mismatch happens because the Quartus Prime software might name all the combinational nodes in the 8b10b_enc.vcd differently than in the Top project.

You can avoid name mismatching with only RTL simulation data, in which register names do not change, or with an incremental compilation flow that preserves node names along with a gate-level simulation.

Note: To ensure accuracy, Altera recommends that you use an incremental compilation flow to preserve the node names of your design.

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Altera Corporation

Send Feedback

8-14

Glitch Filtering

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Glitch Filtering

The PowerPlay Power Analyzer defines a glitch as two signal transitions so closely spaced in time that the pulse, or glitch, occurs faster than the logic and routing circuitry can respond. The output of a transport delay model simulator contains glitches for some signals. The logic and routing structures of the device form a low-pass filter that filters out glitches that are tens to hundreds of picoseconds long, depending on the device family.

Some third-party simulators use different models than the transport delay model as the default model.

Different models cause differences in signal activity and power estimation. The inertial delay model, which is the ModelSim default model, filters out more glitches than the transport delay model and usually yields a lower power estimate.

Note: Altera recommends that you use the transport simulation model when using the Quartus Prime software glitch filtering support with third-party simulators. Simulation glitch filtering has little effect if you use the inertial simulation model.

Glitch filtering in a simulator can also filter a glitch on one logic element (LE) (or other circuit element) output from propagating to downstream circuit elements to ensure that the glitch does not affect simulated results. Glitch filtering prevents a glitch on one signal from producing non-physical glitches on all downstream logic, which can result in a signal toggle rate and a power estimate that are too high.

Circuit elements in which every input transition produces an output transition, including multipliers and logic cells configured to implement XOR functions, are especially prone to glitches. Therefore, circuits with such functions can have power estimates that are too high when glitch filtering is not used.

Note: Altera recommends that you use the glitch filtering feature to obtain the most accurate power estimates. For .vcd files, the PowerPlay Power Analyzer flows support two levels of glitch filtering.

Enabling First Level of Glitch Filtering

To enable the first level of glitch filtering in the Quartus Prime software for supported third-party simulators, follow these steps:

1. On the Assignments menu, click Settings.

2. In the Category list, select Simulation under EDA Tool Settings.

3. Select the Tool name to use for the simulation.

4. Turn on Enable glitch filtering.

Enabling Second Level of Glitch Filtering

The second level of glitch filtering occurs while the PowerPlay Power Analyzer is reading the .vcd

generated by a third-party simulator. To enable the second level of glitch filtering, follow these steps:

1. On the Assignments menu, click Settings.

2. In the Category list, select PowerPlay Power Analyzer Settings.

3. Under Input File(s), turn on Perform glitch filtering on VCD files.

The .vcd file reader performs filtering complementary to the filtering performed during simulation and is often not as effective. While the .vcd file reader can remove glitches on logic blocks, the file reader cannot determine how a given glitch affects downstream logic and routing, and may eliminate the impact of the glitch completely. Filtering the glitches during simulation avoids switching downstream routing and logic automatically.

Altera Corporation

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Node and Entity Assignments

8-15

Note: When running simulation for design verification (rather than to produce input to the PowerPlay

Power Analyzer), Altera recommends that you turn off the glitch filtering option to produce the most rigorous and conservative simulation from a functionality viewpoint. When performing simulation to produce input for the PowerPlay Power Analyzer, Altera recommends that you turn on the glitch filtering to produce the most accurate power estimates.

Node and Entity Assignments

You can assign toggle rates and static probabilities to individual nodes and entities in the design. These assignments have the highest priority, overriding data from all other signal-activity sources.

You must use the Assignment Editor or Tcl commands to create the Power Toggle Rate and Power Static

Probability assignments. You can specify the power toggle rate as an absolute toggle rate in transitions per second using the Power Toggle Rate assignment, or you can use the Power Toggle Rate Percentage assignment to specify a toggle rate relative to the clock domain of the assigned node for a more specific assignment made in terms of hierarchy level.

Note: If you use the Power Toggle Rate Percentage assignment, and the node does not have a clock domain, the Quartus Prime software issues a warning and ignores the assignment.

Assigning toggle rates and static probabilities to individual nodes and entities is appropriate for signals in which you have knowledge of the signal or entity being analyzed. For example, if you know that a 100

MHz data bus or memory output produces data that is essentially random (uncorrelated in time), you can directly enter a 0.5 static probability and a toggle rate of 50 million transitions per second.

The PowerPlay Power Analyzer treats bidirectional I/O pins differently. The combinational input port and the output pad for a pin share the same name. However, those ports might not share the same signal activities. For reading signal-activity assignments, the PowerPlay Power Analyzer creates a distinct name

<node_name~output> when configuring the bidirectional signal as an output and <node_name~result> when configuring the signal as an input. For example, if a design has a bidirectional pin named

MYPIN

, assignments for the combinational input use the name

MYPIN~result

, and the assignments for the output pad use the name

MYPIN~output

.

Note: When you create the logic assignment in the Assignment Editor, you cannot find the

MYPIN~result

and

MYPIN~output

node names in the Node Finder. Therefore, to create the logic assignment, you must manually enter the two differentiating node names to create the assignment for the input and output port of the bidirectional pin.

Related Information

Constraining Designs

For more information about how to use the Assignment Editor in the Quartus Prime software, refer to this document.

Timing Assignments to Clock Nodes

For clock nodes, the PowerPlay Power Analyzer uses timing requirements to derive the toggle rate when neither simulation data nor user-entered signal-activity data is available. f

MAX

requirements specify full cycles per second, but each cycle represents a rising transition and a falling transition. For example, a clock f

MAX

requirement of 100 MHz corresponds to 200 million transitions per second for the clock node.

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

8-16

Default Toggle Rate Assignment

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Default Toggle Rate Assignment

You can specify a default toggle rate for primary inputs and other nodes in your design. The PowerPlay

Power Analyzer uses the default toggle rate when no other method specifies the signal-activity data.

The PowerPlay Power Analyzer specifies the toggle rate in absolute terms (transitions per second), or as a fraction of the clock rate in effect for each node. The toggle rate for a clock derives from the timing settings for the clock. For example, if the PowerPlay Power Analyzer specifies a clock with an f

MAX constraint of 100 MHz and a default relative toggle rate of 20%, nodes in this clock domain transition in

20% of the clock periods, or 20 million transitions occur per second. In some cases, the PowerPlay Power

Analyzer cannot determine the clock domain for a node because either the PowerPlay Power Analyzer cannot determine a clock domain for the node, or the clock domain is ambiguous. For example, the

PowerPlay Power Analyzer may not be able to determine a clock domain for a node if the user did not specify sufficient timing assignments. In these cases, the PowerPlay Power Analyzer substitutes and reports a toggle rate of zero.

Vectorless Estimation

For some device families, the PowerPlay Power Analyzer automatically derives estimates for signal activity on nodes with no simulation or user-entered signal-activity data. Vectorless estimation statistically estimates the signal activity of a node based on the signal activities of nodes feeding that node, and on the actual logic function that the node implements. Vectorless estimation cannot derive signal activities for primary inputs. Vectorless estimation is accurate for combinational nodes, but not for registered nodes.

Therefore, the PowerPlay Power Analyzer requires simulation data for at least the registered nodes and

I/O nodes for accuracy.

The PowerPlay Power Analyzer Settings dialog box allows you to disable vectorless estimation. When turned on, vectorless estimation takes precedence over default toggle rates. Vectorless estimation does not override clock assignments.

To disable vectorless estimation, perform the following steps:

1. In the Quartus Prime software, on the Assignments menu, click Settings.

2. In the Category list, select PowerPlay Power Analyzer Settings.

3. Turn off the Use vectorless estimation option.

Using the PowerPlay Power Analyzer

For flows that use the PowerPlay Power Analyzer, you must first synthesize your design, and then fit it to the target device. You must either provide timing assignments for all the clocks in your design, or use a simulation-based flow to generate activity data. You must specify the I/O standard on each device input and output and the board trace model on each output in your design.

Common Analysis Flows

You can use the analysis flows in this section with the PowerPlay Power Analyzer. However, vectorless activity estimation is only available for some device families.

Altera Corporation

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Signal Activities from RTL (Functional) Simulation, Supplemented by...

Signal Activities from RTL (Functional) Simulation, Supplemented by Vectorless Estimation

8-17

In the functional simulation flow, simulation provides toggle rates and static probabilities for all pins and registers in your design. Vectorless estimation fills in the values for all the combinational nodes between pins and registers, giving good results. This flow usually provides a compilation time benefit when you use the third-party RTL simulator.

RTL Simulation Limitation

RTL simulation may not provide signal activities for all registers in the post-fitting netlist because synthesis loses some register names. For example, synthesis might automatically transform state machines and counters, thus changing the names of registers in those structures.

Signal Activities from Vectorless Estimation and User-Supplied Input Pin Activities

The vectorless estimation flow provides a low level of accuracy, because vectorless estimation for registers is not entirely accurate.

Signal Activities from User Defaults Only

The user defaults only flow provides the lowest degree of accuracy.

Importance of .vcd

Altera recommends that you use a .vcd or a .saf generated by gate-level timing simulation for an accurate power estimation because gate-level timing simulation takes all the routing resources and the exact logic array resource usage into account.

Generating a .vcd

In previous versions of the Quartus Prime software, you could use either the Quartus Prime simulator or an EDA simulator to perform your simulation. The Quartus Prime software no longer supports a built-in simulator, and you must use an EDA simulator to perform simulation. Use the .vcd as the input to the

PowerPlay Power Analyzer to estimate power for your design.

To create a .vcd for your design, follow these steps:

1. On the Assignments menu, click Settings.

2. In the Category list, under EDA Tool Settings, click Simulation.

3. In the Tool name list, select your preferred EDA simulator.

4. In the Format for output netlist list, select Verilog HDL, or SystemVerilog HDL, or VHDL.

5. Turn on Generate Value Change Dump (VCD) file script.

This option turns on the Map illegal HDL characters and Enable glitch filtering options. The Map

illegal HDL characters option ensures that all signals have legal names and that signal toggle rates are available later in the PowerPlay Power Analyzer. The Enable glitch filtering option directs the EDA

Netlist Writer to perform glitch filtering when generating VHDL Output Files, Verilog Output Files, and the corresponding Standard Delay Format Output Files for use with other EDA simulation tools.

This option is available regardless of whether or not you want to generate .vcd scripts.

Note: When performing simulation using ModelSim, the +nospecify option for the vsim

command disables the specify path delays and timing checks option in ModelSim. By enabling glitch filtering on the Simulation page, the simulation models include specified path delays. Thus,

ModelSim might fail to simulate a design if you enabled glitch filtering and specified the

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

8-18

Generating a .vcd from ModelSim Software

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

+nospecify option. Altera recommends that you remove the +nospecify option from the

ModelSim vsim

command to ensure accurate simulation for power estimation.

6. Click Script Settings. Select the signals that you want to output to the .vcd.

With All signals selected, the generated script instructs the third-party simulator to write all connected output signals to the .vcd. With All signals except combinational lcell outputs selected, the generated script tells the third-party simulator to write all connected output signals to the .vcd, except logic cell combinational outputs.

Note: The file can become extremely large if you write all output signals to the file because the file size depends on the number of output signals being monitored and the number of transitions that occur.

7. Click OK.

8. In the Design instance name box, type a name for your testbench.

9. Compile your design with the Quartus Prime software and generate the necessary EDA netlist and script that instructs the third-party simulator to generate a .vcd.

10.Perform a simulation with the third-party EDA simulation tool. Call the generated script in the simulation tool before running the simulation. The simulation tool generates the .vcd and places it in the project directory.

Generating a .vcd from ModelSim Software

To generate a .vcd with the ModelSim software, follow these steps:

1. In the Quartus Prime software, on the Assignments menu, click Settings.

2. In the Category list, under EDA Tool Settings, click Simulation.

3. In the Tool name list, select your preferred EDA simulator.

4. In the Format for output netlist list, select Verilog HDL, or SystemVerilog HDL, or VHDL.

5. Turn on Generate Value Change Dump (VCD) file script.

6. To generate the .vcd, perform a full compilation.

7. In the ModelSim software, compile the files necessary for simulation.

8. Load your design by clicking Start Simulation on the Tools menu, or use the vsim

command.

9. Use the .vcd script created in

step 6

using the following command: source <design>_dump_all_vcd_nodes.tcl

10.Run the simulation (for example, run 2000ns or run -all).

11.Quit the simulation using the quit -sim

command, if required.

12.Exit the ModelSim software.

If you do not exit the software, the ModelSim software might end the writing process of the .vcd improperly, resulting in a corrupt .vcd.

Generating a .vcd from Full Post-Fit Netlist (Zero Delay) Simulation

To successfully generate a .vcd from the full post-fit Netlist (zero delay) simulation, follow these steps:

1. Compile your design in the Quartus Prime software to generate the Netlist

<project_name>

.vo.

2. In

<project_name>

.vo, search for the include statement for

<project_name>

.sdo, comment the statement out, and save the file.

Altera Corporation

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

PowerPlay Power Analyzer Compilation Report

8-19

Altera recommends that you use the Standard Delay Format Output File (.sdo) for gate-level timing simulation. The .sdo contains the delay information of each architecture primitive and routing element in your design; however, you must exclude the .sdo for zero delay simulation.

3. Generate a .vcd for power estimation by performing the steps in

Generating a .vcd

on page 8-17.

PowerPlay Power Analyzer Compilation Report

The following table list the items in the Compilation Report of the PowerPlay Power Analyzer section.

Section Description

Summary

Settings The Settings section of the report shows the PowerPlay Power Analyzer settings information of your design, including the default input toggle rates, operating conditions, and other relevant setting information.

Simulation Files Read The Simulation Files Read section of the report lists the simulation output file that the .vcd used for power estimation. This section also includes the file ID, file type, entity, VCD start time, VCD end time, the unknown percentage, and the toggle percentage. The unknown percentage indicates the portion of the design module unused by the simulation vectors.

Operating Conditions

Used

The Operating Conditions Used section of the report shows device characteris‐ tics, voltages, temperature, and cooling solution, if any, during the power estimation. This section also shows the entered junction temperature or autocomputed junction temperature during the power analysis.

Thermal Power

Dissipated by Block

The Summary section of the report shows the estimated total thermal power consumption of your design. This includes dynamic, static, and I/O thermal power consumption. The I/O thermal power includes the total I/O power drawn from the V

CCIO

and V

CCPD

power supplies and the power drawn from V

CCINT

in the I/O subsystem including I/O buffers and I/O registers. The report also includes a confidence metric that reflects the overall quality of the data sources for the signal activities. For example, a Low power estimation confidence value reflects that you have provided insufficient toggle rate data, or most of the signalactivity information used for power estimation is from default or vectorless estimation settings. For more information about the input data, refer to the

PowerPlay Power Analyzer Confidence Metric report.

The Thermal Power Dissipated by Block section of the report shows estimated thermal dynamic power and thermal static power consumption categorized by atoms. This information provides you with estimated power consumption for each atom in your design.

By default, this section does not contain any data, but you can turn on the report with the Write power dissipation by block to report file option on the

PowerPlay Power Analyzer Settings page.

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

8-20

PowerPlay Power Analyzer Compilation Report

Section

Thermal Power

Dissipation by Block

Type (Device Resource

Type)

Thermal Power

Dissipation by

Hierarchy

Core Dynamic

Thermal Power

Dissipation by Clock

Domain

Current Drawn from

Voltage Supplies

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Description

This Thermal Power Dissipation by Block Type (Device Resource Type) section of the report shows the estimated thermal dynamic power and thermal static power consumption categorized by block types. This information is further categorized by estimated dynamic and static power and provides an average toggle rate by block type. Thermal power is the power dissipated as heat from the

FPGA device.

This Thermal Power Dissipation by Hierarchy section of the report shows estimated thermal dynamic power and thermal static power consumption categorized by design hierarchy. This information is further categorized by the dynamic and static power that was used by the blocks and routing in that hierarchy. This information is useful when locating modules with high power consumption in your design.

The Core Dynamic Thermal Power Dissipation by Clock Domain section of the report shows the estimated total core dynamic power dissipation by each clock domain, which provides designs with estimated power consumption for each clock domain in the design. If the clock frequency for a domain is unspecified by a constraint, the clock frequency is listed as “unspecified.” For all the combina‐ tional logic, the clock domain is listed as no clock with zero MHz.

The Current Drawn from Voltage Supplies section of the report lists the current drawn from each voltage supply. The V

CCIO

and V

CCPD

voltage supplies are further categorized by I/O bank and by voltage. This section also lists the minimum safe power supply size (current supply ability) for each supply voltage.

Minimum current requirement can be higher than user mode current require‐ ment in cases in which the supply has a specific power up current requirement that goes beyond user mode requirement, such as the V

III and Stratix IV devices, and the V

CCIO

CCPD

power rail in Stratix

power rail in Stratix IV devices.

The I/O thermal power dissipation on the summary page does not correlate directly to the power drawn from the V this report. This is because the I/O thermal power dissipation value also includes portions of the V

CCINT

CCIO

and V

CCPD

voltage supplies listed in

power, such as the I/O element (IOE) registers, which are modeled as I/O power, but do not draw from the V

CCIO

and V

CCPD

supplies.

The reported current drawn from the I/O Voltage Supplies (ICCIO and ICCPD) as reported in the PowerPlay Power Analyzer report includes any current drawn through the I/O into off-chip termination resistors. This can result in ICCIO and

ICCPD values that are higher than the reported I/O thermal power, because this off-chip current dissipates as heat elsewhere and does not factor in the calcula‐ tion of device temperature. Therefore, total I/O thermal power does not equal the sum of current drawn from each V

V

CCIO

and V

CCPD

voltage.

CCIO

and V

CCPD

supply multiplied by

For SoC devices or for Arria V SoC and Cyclone V SoC devices, there is no standalone ICC_AUX_SHARED current drawn information. The ICC_AUX_

SHARED is reported together with ICC_AUX.

Altera Corporation

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Section

Confidence Metric

Details

Signal Activities

Messages

Scripting Support

8-21

Description

The Confidence Metric is defined in terms of the total weight of signal activity data sources for both combinational and registered signals. Each signal has two data sources allocated to it; a toggle rate source and a static probability source.

The Confidence Metric Details section also indicates the quality of the signal toggle rate data to compute a power estimate. The confidence metric is low if the signal toggle rate data comes from poor predictors of real signal toggle rates in the device during an operation. Toggle rate data that comes from simulation, user-entered assignments on specific signals or entities are reliable. Toggle rate data from default toggle rates (for example, 12.5% of the clock period) or vectorless estimation are relatively inaccurate. This section gives an overall confidence rating in the toggle rate data, from low to high. This section also summarizes how many pins, registers, and combinational nodes obtained their toggle rates from each of simulation, user entry, vectorless estimation, or default toggle rate estimations. This detailed information helps you understand how to increase the confidence metric, letting you determine your own confidence in the toggle rate data.

The Signal Activities section lists toggle rates and static probabilities assumed by power analysis for all signals with fan-out and pins. This section also lists the signal type (pin, registered, or combinational) and the data source for the toggle rate and static probability. By default, this section does not contain any data, but you can turn on the report with the Write signal activities to report file option on the PowerPlay Power Analyzer Settings page.

Altera recommends that you keep the Write signal activities to report file option turned off for a large design because of the large number of signals present. You can use the Assignment Editor to specify that activities for individual nodes or entities are reported by assigning an on value to those nodes for the Power Report Signal Activities assignment.

The Messages section lists the messages that the Quartus Prime software generates during the analysis.

Scripting Support

You can run procedures and create settings described in this chapter in a Tcl script. You can also run some procedures at a command prompt. For more information about scripting command options, refer to the Quartus Prime Command-Line and Tcl API Help browser. To run the Help browser, type the following command at the command prompt: quartus_sh --qhelp

Related Information

Tcl Scripting

API Functions for Tcl

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

8-22

Running the PowerPlay Power Analyzer from the Command–Line

Quartus Prime Settings File Reference Manual

Command-Line Scripting

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Running the PowerPlay Power Analyzer from the Command–Line

The executable to run the PowerPlay Power Analyzer is quartus_pow

. For a complete listing of all command–line options supported by quartus_pow

, type the following command at a system command prompt: quartus_pow --help

or-

quartus_sh --qhelp

The following lists the examples of using the quartus_pow

executable. Type the command listed in the following section at a system command prompt. These examples assume that operations are performed on Quartus Prime project called sample.

To instruct the PowerPlay Power Analyzer to generate a PowerPlay EPE File:

quartus_pow sample --output_epe=sample.csv

To instruct the PowerPlay Power Analyzer to generate a PowerPlay EPE File without performing the power estimate:

quartus_pow sample --output_epe=sample.csv --estimate_power=off

To instruct the PowerPlay Power Analyzer to use a .vcd as input (sample.vcd):

quartus_pow sample --input_vcd=sample.vcd

To instruct the PowerPlay Power Analyzer to use two .vcd files as input files (sample1.vcd and sample2.vcd), perform glitch filtering on the .vcd and use a default input I/O toggle rate of 10,000 transitions per second:

quartus_pow sample --input_vcd=sample1.vcd --input_vcd=sample2.vcd \

--vcd_filter_glitches=on --\ default_input_io_toggle_rate=10000transitions/s

To instruct the PowerPlay Power Analyzer to not use an input file, a default input I/O toggle rate of

60%, no vectorless estimation, and a default toggle rate of 20% on all remaining signals:

quartus_pow sample --no_input_file --default_input_io_toggle_rate=60% \

--use_vectorless_estimation=off --default_toggle_rate=20%

Note: No command–line options are available to specify the information found on the PowerPlay Power

Analyzer Settings Operating Conditions page. Use the Quartus Prime GUI to specify these options.

The quartus_pow

executable creates a report file, <revision name>.pow.rpt. You can locate the report file

in the main project directory. The report file contains the same information in

PowerPlay Power

Analyzer Compilation Report

on page 8-19.

Altera Corporation

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Document Revision History

8-23

Document Revision History

The following table lists the revision history for this chapter.

Date

2015.11.02

2014.12.15

2014.08.18

November 2012

June 2012

November 2011

December 2010

July 2010

Version

15.1.0

14.1.0

Changes

Changed instances of Quartus II to Quartus Prime.

• Removed Signal Activities from Full Post-Fit Netlist (Timing)

Simulation and Signal Activities from Full Post-Fit Netlist (Zero

Delay) Simulation sections as these are no longer supported.

• Updated location of Fitter Settings, Analysis & Synthesis Settings, and

Physical Synthesis Optimizations to Compiler Settings.

14.0a10.0 Updated "Current Drawn from Voltage Supplies" to clarify that for SoC devices or for Arria V SoC and Cyclone V SoC devices, there is no standalone ICC_AUX_SHARED current drawn information. The ICC_

AUX_SHARED is reported together with ICC_AUX.

12.1.0

• Updated “Types of Power Analyses” on page 8–2, and “Confidence

Metric Details” on page 8–23.

• Added “Importance of .vcd” on page 8–20, and “Avoiding Power

Estimation and Hardware Measurement Mismatch” on page 8–24

12.0.0

• Updated “Current Drawn from Voltage Supplies” on page 8–22.

• Added “Using the HPS Power Calculator” on page 8–7.

10.1.1

• Template update.

• Minor editorial updates.

10.1.0

• Added links to Quartus Prime Help, removed redundant material.

• Moved “Creating PowerPlay EPE Spreadsheets” to page 8–6.

• Minor edits.

10.0.0

• Removed references to the Quartus Prime Simulator.

• Updated Table 8–1 on page 8–6, Table 8–2 on page 8–13, and Table

8–3 on page 8–14.

• Updated Figure 8–3 on page 8–9, Figure 8–4 on page 8–10, and

Figure 8–5 on page 8–12.

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

8-24

Document Revision History

Date

November 2009

Version

9.1.0

March 2009

November 2008

May 2008

9.0.0

8.1.0

8.0.0

Changes

• Updated “Creating PowerPlay EPE Spreadsheets” on page 8–6 and

“Simulation Results” on page 8–10.

• Added “Signal Activities from Full Post-Fit Netlist (Zero Delay)

Simulation” on page 8–19 and “Generating a .vcd from Full Post-Fit

Netlist (Zero Delay) Simulation” on page 8–21.

• Minor changes to “Generating a .vcd from ModelSim Software” on page 8–21.

• Updated Figure 11–8 on page 11–24.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

• This chapter was chapter 11 in version 8.1.

• Removed Figures 11-10, 11-11, 11-13, 11-14, and 11-17 from 8.1

version.

• Updated for the Quartus Prime software version 8.1.

• Replaced Figure 11-3.

• Replaced Figure 11-14.

• Updated Figure 11–5.

• Updated “Types of Power Analyses” on page 11–5.

• Updated “Operating Conditions” on page 11–9.

• Updated “PowerPlay Power Analyzer Compilation Report” on page

11–31.

• Updated “Current Drawn from Voltage Supplies” on page 11–32.

Altera Corporation

PowerPlay Power Analysis

Send Feedback

System Debugging Tools Overview

2015.11.02

QPS5V3

Subscribe

Send Feedback

About Altera System Debugging Tools

The Altera

®

system debugging tools help you verify your FPGA designs. As your product requirements continue to increase in complexity, the time you spend on design verification continues to rise. This manual provides a quick overview of the tools available in the system debugging suite and discusses the criteria for selecting the best tool for your design.

System Debugging Tools Portfolio

The Quartus Prime software provides a portfolio of system design debugging tools for real-time verification of your design. Each tool in the system debugging portfolio uses a combination of available memory, logic, and routing resources to assist in the debugging process. The tools provide visibility by routing (or “tapping”) signals in your design to debugging logic. The debugging logic is then compiled with your design and downloaded into the FPGA or CPLD for analysis. Because different designs can have different constraints and requirements, such as the number of spare pins available or the amount of logic or memory resources remaining in the physical device, you can choose a tool from the available debugging tools that matches the specific requirements for your design.

9

©

2015 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, ENPIRION, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX words and logos are trademarks of Altera Corporation and registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. All other words and logos identified as trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html

. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.

www.altera.com

101 Innovation Drive, San Jose, CA 95134

ISO

9001:2008

Registered

9-2

System Debugging Tools Comparison

System Debugging Tools Comparison

Table 9-1: Debugging Tools Portfolio

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Tool Description Typical Usage

System Console

Uses a Tcl interpreter to communi‐ cate with hardware modules instantiated in your design. You can use it with the Transceiver Toolkit to monitor or debug your design.

System Console provides real-time in-system debugging capabilities.

Using System Console, you can read from and write to Memory Mapped components in our system without the help of a processor or additional software.

System Console uses Tcl as the fundamental infrastructure which means you can source scripts, set variables, write procedures, and take advantage of all the features of the

Tcl scripting language.

You need to perform systemlevel debugging. For example, if you have an Avalon-MM slave or Avalon-ST interfaces, you can debug your design at a transac‐ tion level. The tool supports

JTAG connectivity and TCP/IP connectivity to the target FPGA you wish to debug.

Transceiver Toolkit

The Transceiver Toolkit allows you to test and tune transceiver link signal quality. You can use a combination of bit error rate (BER), bathtub curve, and eye contour graphs as quality metrics. Auto

Sweeping of physical medium attachment (PMA) settings allows you to quickly find an optimal solution.

You need to debug or optimize signal integrity of your board layout even before the actual design to be run on the FPGA is ready.

SignalTap

®

II Logic Analyzer This logic analyzer uses FPGA resources to sample test nodes and outputs the information to the

Quartus Prime software for display and analysis.

You have spare on-chip memory and you want functional verifica‐ tion of your design running in hardware.

Altera Corporation

System Debugging Tools Overview

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera JTAG Interface (AJI)

9-3

Tool Description Typical Usage

SignalProbe

This tool incrementally routes internal signals to I/O pins while preserving results from your last place-and-routed design.

You have spare I/O pins and you would like to check the operation of a small set of control pins using either an external logic analyzer or an oscilloscope.

Logic Analyzer Interface (LAI) This tool multiplexes a larger set of signals to a smaller number of spare

I/O pins. LAI allows you to select which signals are switched onto the

I/O pins over a JTAG connection.

You have limited on-chip memory, and have a large set of internal data buses that you would like to verify using an external logic analyzer. Logic analyzer vendors, such as

Tektronics and Agilent, provide integration with the tool to improve the usability of the tool.

In-System Sources and Probes This tool provides an easy way to drive and sample logic values to and from internal nodes using the JTAG interface.

You want to prototype a front panel with virtual buttons for your FPGA design.

In-System Memory Content

Editor

This tool displays and allows you to edit on-chip memory.

You would like to view and edit the contents of on-chip memory that is not connected to a Nios II processor. You can also use the tool when you do not want to have a Nios II debug core in your system.

Virtual JTAG Interface

This megafunction allows you to communicate with the JTAG interface so that you can develop your own custom applications.

You have custom signals in your design that you want to be able to communicate with.

Altera JTAG Interface (AJI)

With the exception of SignalProbe, each of the on-chip debugging tools uses the JTAG port to control and read back data from debugging logic and signals under test. System Console uses JTAG and other interfaces as well. The JTAG resource is shared among all of the on-chip debugging tools.

Required Arbitration Logic

For all system debugging tools except System Console, the Quartus Prime software compiles logic into your design automatically to distinguish between data and control information and each of the debugging logic blocks, when the JTAG resource is required. This arbitration logic, also known as the System-Level

Debugging (SLD) infrastructure, is shown in the design hierarchy of your compiled project as

System Debugging Tools Overview

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

9-4

Debugging Ecosystem

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

sld_hub:sld_hub_inst. The SLD logic allows you to instantiate multiple debugging blocks into your design and run them simultaneously. For System Console, you must explicitly insert debug IP cores into your design to enable debugging.

Debugging Ecosystem

To maximize debugging closure, the Quartus Prime software allows you to use a combination of the debugging tools in tandem to fully exercise and analyze the logic under test. All of the tools have basic analysis features built in; that is, all of the tools enable you to read back information collected from the design nodes that are connected to the debugging logic. Out of the set of debugging tools, the SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer, the LAI, and the SignalProbe feature are general purpose debugging tools optimized for probing signals in your register transfer level (RTL) netlist. In-System Sources and Probes, the Virtual

JTAG Interface, System Console, Transceiver Toolkit, and In-System Memory Content Editor, allow you to read back data from the debugging breakpoints, and to input values into your design during runtime.

Taken together, the set of on-chip debugging tools form a debugging ecosystem. The set of tools can generate a stimulus to and solicit a response from the logic under test, providing a complete debugging solution.

Figure 9-1: Debugging Ecosystem

Quartus Prime Software

FPGA

JTAG

In-System Sources and Probes

In-System Memory Content Editor

VJI

SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

In-System Memory Content Editor

Transceiver Toolkit - System Console

LAI

Design

Under Test

About Analysis Tools for RTL Nodes

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, SignalProbe, and LAI are designed specifically for probing and debugging RTL signals at system speed. They are general-purpose analysis tools that enable you to tap and analyze any routable node from the FPGA or CPLD. If you have spare logic and memory resources, the

Altera Corporation

System Debugging Tools Overview

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Resource Usage

9-5

SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is useful for providing fast functional verification of your design running on actual hardware.

Conversely, if logic and memory resources are tight and you require the large sample depths associated with external logic analyzers, both the LAI and the SignalProbe make it easy to view internal design signals using external equipment.

Note: The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is not supported on CPLDs, because there are no memory resources available on these devices.

Resource Usage

The most important selection criteria for these three tools are the available resources remaining on your device after implementing your design and the number of spare pins available. You should evaluate your preferred debugging option early on in the design planning process to ensure that your board, your

Quartus Prime project, and your design are all set up to support the appropriate options. Planning early can reduce time spent during debugging and eliminate the necessary late changes to accommodate your preferred debugging methodologies.

Figure 9-2: Resource Usage per Debugging Tool

SignalTap II

Signal

Probe

Memory

Overhead Logic

Any debugging tool that requires the use of a JTAG connection requires the SLD infrastructure logic, for communication with the JTAG interface and arbitration between any instantiated debugging modules.

This overhead logic uses around 200 logic elements (LEs), a small fraction of the resources available in any of the supported devices. The overhead logic is shared between all available debugging modules in your design. Both the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer and the LAI use a JTAG connection.

For SignalProbe

SignalProbe requires very few on-chip resources. Because it requires no JTAG connection, SignalProbe uses no logic or memory resources. SignalProbe uses only routing resources to route an internal signal to a debugging test point.

For Logic Analyzer Interface

The LAI requires a small amount of logic to implement the multiplexing function between the signals under test, in addition to the SLD infrastructure logic. Because no data samples are stored on the chip, the

LAI uses no memory resources.

System Debugging Tools Overview

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

9-6

For SignalTap II

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

For SignalTap II

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer requires both logic and memory resources. The number of logic resources used depends on the number of signals tapped and the complexity of the trigger logic. However, the amount of logic resources that the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer uses is typically a small percentage of most designs. A baseline configuration consisting of the SLD arbitration logic and a single node with basic triggering logic contains approximately 300 to 400 Logic Elements (LEs). Each additional node you add to the baseline configuration adds about 11 LEs. Compared with logic resources, memory resources are a more important factor to consider for your design. Memory usage can be significant and depends on how you configure your SignalTap II Logic Analyzer instance to capture data and the sample depth that your design requires for debugging. For the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, there is the added benefit of requiring no external equipment, as all of the triggering logic and storage is on the chip.

Resource Estimation

The resource estimation feature for the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer and the LAI allows you to quickly judge if enough on-chip resources are available before compiling the tool with your design.

Figure 9-3: Resource Estimator

Pin Usage

For SignalProbe

The ratio of the number of pins used to the number of signals tapped for the SignalProbe feature is oneto-one. Because this feature can consume free pins quickly, a typical application for this feature is routing control signals to spare pins for debugging.

For Logic Analyzer Interface

The ratio of the number of pins used to the number of signals tapped for the LAI is many-to-one. It can map up to 256 signals to each debugging pin, depending on available routing resources. The control of the active signals that are mapped to the spare I/O pins is performed via the JTAG port. The LAI is ideal for routing data buses to a set of test pins for analysis.

For SignalTap II

Other than the JTAG test pins, the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer uses no additional pins. All data is buffered using on-chip memory and communicated to the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer GUI via the JTAG test port.

Usability Enhancements

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, SignalProbe, and LAI tools can be added to your existing design with minimal effects. With the node finder, you can find signals to route to a debugging module without making any changes to your HDL files. SignalProbe inserts signals directly from your post-fit database.

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer and LAI support inserting signals from both pre-synthesis and post-fit netlists.

Altera Corporation

System Debugging Tools Overview

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Incremental Compilation

9-7

Incremental Compilation

All three tools allow you to find and configure your debugging setup quickly. In addition, the Quartus

Prime incremental compilation feature and the Quartus Prime incremental routing feature allow for a fast turnaround time for your programming file, increasing productivity and enabling fast debugging closure.

Both the LAI and SignalTap II Logic Analyzer support incremental compilation. With incremental compilation, you can add a SignalTap II Logic Analyzer instance or an LAI instance incrementally into your placed-and-routed design. This has the benefit of both preserving your timing and area optimiza‐ tions from your existing design, and decreasing the overall compilation time when any changes are necessary during the debugging process. With incremental compilation, you can save up to 70% compile time of a full compilation.

Incremental Routing

SignalProbe uses the incremental routing feature. The incremental routing feature runs only the Fitter stage of the compilation. This leaves your compiled design untouched, except for the newly routed node or nodes. With SignalProbe, you can save as much as 90% compile time of a full compilation.

Automation Via Scripting

As another productivity enhancement, all tools in the on-chip debugging tool set support scripting via the quartus_stp

Tcl package. For the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer and the LAI, scripting enables userdefined automation for data collection while debugging in the lab. The System Console includes a full Tcl interpreter for scripting.

Remote Debugging

You can perform remote debugging of your system with the Quartus Prime software via the System

Console. This feature allows you to debug equipment deployed in the field through an existing TCP/IP connection.

There are two Application Notes available to assist you.

• Application Note 624 describes how to set up your NIOS II system to use the System Console to perform remote debugging.

• Application Note 693 describes how to set up your Altera SoC to use the SLD tools to perform remote debugging.

Related Information

Application Note 624: Debugging with System Console over TCP/IP

Application Note 693: Remote Debugging over TCP/IP for Altera SoC

System Debugging Tools Overview

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

9-8

Suggested On-Chip Debugging Tools for Common Debugging Features

Suggested On-Chip Debugging Tools for Common Debugging Features

Table 9-2: Tools for Common Debugging Features

(1)

Feature SignalProbe

Large Sample

Depth

Ease in

Debugging

Timing Issue

N/A

X

Logic Analyzer

Interface (LAI)

X

X

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer

Description

An external logic analyzer used with the LAI has a bigger buffer to store more captured data than the

SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer.

No data is captured or stored with

SignalProbe.

External equipment, such as oscilloscopes and mixed signal oscilloscopes

(MSOs), can be used with either

LAI or SignalP‐ robe. When used with the LAI, external equipment provides you with access to timing mode, which allows you to debug combined streams of data.

Altera Corporation

System Debugging Tools Overview

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Feature

Minimal Effect on Logic Design

Short Compile and Recompile

Time

Triggering

Capability

System Debugging Tools Overview

Send Feedback

SignalProbe

X

Suggested On-Chip Debugging Tools for Common Debugging Features

Logic Analyzer

Interface (LAI)

X

(2)

SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer

X

(2)

Description

9-9

X

N/A

X

(2)

N/A

X

(2)

X

The LAI adds minimal logic to a design, requiring fewer device resources.

The SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer has little effect on the design, because it is set as a separate design partition.

SignalProbe incrementally routes nodes to pins, not affecting the design at all.

SignalProbe attaches incrementally routed signals to previously reserved pins, requiring very little recompila‐ tion time to make changes to source signal selections.

The SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer and the LAI can refit their own design partitions to decrease recompilation time.

The SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer offers triggering capabilities that are comparable to commercial logic analyzers.

Altera Corporation

9-10

Suggested On-Chip Debugging Tools for Common Debugging Features

Feature

I/O Usage

SignalProbe

Logic Analyzer

Interface (LAI)

SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer

X

Acquisition

Speed

No JTAG

Connection

Required

N/A

X

X

X

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Description

No additional output pins are required with the

SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer.

Both the LAI and

SignalProbe require I/O pin assignments.

The SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer can acquire data at speeds of over

200 MHz. The same acquisition speeds are obtainable with an external logic analyzer used with the LAI, but might be limited by signal integrity issues.

A FPGA design with the LAI requires an active

JTAG connection to a host running the Quartus

Prime software.

SignalProbe and

SignalTap II do not require a host for debugging purposes.

Altera Corporation

System Debugging Tools Overview

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

About Stimulus‑Capable Tools

9-11

Feature SignalProbe Logic Analyzer

Interface (LAI)

SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer

Description

No External

Equipment

Required

— — X The SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer logic is completely internal to the programmed

FPGA device. No extra equipment is required other than a JTAG connection from a host running the Quartus

Prime software or the stand-alone

SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer software. SignalP‐ robe and the LAI require the use of external debugging equipment, such as multimeters, oscilloscopes, or logic analyzers.

Notes to Table:

1. • X indicates the recommended tools for the feature.

• — indicates that while the tool is available for that feature, that tool might not give the best results.

• N/A indicates that the feature is not applicable for the selected tool.

2. When used with incremental compilation.

About Stimulus‑Capable Tools

The In-System Memory Content Editor, In-System Sources and Probes, and Virtual JTAG interface enable you to use the JTAG interface as a general-purpose communication port. Though all three tools can be used to achieve the same results, there are some considerations that make one tool easier to use in certain applications than others. In-System Sources and Probes is ideal for toggling control signals. The

In-System Memory Content Editor is useful for inputting large sets of test data. Finally, the Virtual JTAG interface is well suited for more advanced users who want to develop their own customized JTAG solution.

System Console provides system-level debugging at a transaction level, such as with Avalon-MM slave or

Avalon-ST interfaces. You can communicate to a chip through JTAG, and TCP/IP protocols. System

System Debugging Tools Overview

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

9-12

In-System Sources and Probes

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Console uses a Tcl interpreter to communicate with hardware modules that you have instantiated into your design.

In-System Sources and Probes

In-System Sources and Probes is an easy way to access JTAG resources to both read and write to your design. You can start by instantiating a megafunction into your HDL code. The megafunction contains source ports and probe ports for driving values into and sampling values from the signals that are connected to the ports, respectively. Transaction details of the JTAG interface are abstracted away by the megafunction. During runtime, a GUI displays each source and probe port by instance and allows you to read from each probe port and drive to each source port. The GUI makes this tool ideal for toggling a set of control signals during the debugging process.

Push Button Functionality

A good application of In-System Sources and Probes is to use the GUI as a replacement for the push buttons and LEDs used during the development phase of a project. Furthermore, In-System Sources and

Probes supports a set of scripting commands for reading and writing using quartus_stp

. When used with the Tk toolkit, you can build your own graphical interfaces. This feature is ideal for building a virtual front panel during the prototyping phase of the design.

In-System Memory Content Editor

The In-System Memory Content Editor allows you to quickly view and modify memory content either through a GUI interface or through Tcl scripting commands. The In-System Memory Content Editor works by turning single-port RAM blocks into dual-port RAM blocks. One port is connected to your clock domain and data signals, and the other port is connected to the JTAG clock and data signals for editing or viewing.

Generate Test Vectors

Because you can modify a large set of data easily, a useful application for the In-System Memory Content

Editor is to generate test vectors for your design. For example, you can instantiate a free memory block, connect the output ports to the logic under test (using the same clock as your logic under test on the system side), and create the glue logic for the address generation and control of the memory. At runtime, you can modify the contents of the memory using either a script or the In-System Memory Content

Editor GUI and perform a burst transaction of the data contents in the modified RAM block synchronous to the logic being tested.

Virtual JTAG Interface Megafunction

The Virtual JTAG Interface megafunction provides the finest level of granularity for manipulating the

JTAG resource. This megafunction allows you to build your own JTAG scan chain by exposing all of the

JTAG control signals and configuring your JTAG Instruction Registers (IRs) and JTAG Data Registers

(DRs). During runtime, you control the IR/DR chain through a Tcl API, or with System Console. This feature is meant for users who have a thorough understanding of the JTAG interface and want precise control over the number and type of resources used.

System Console

System Console is a framework that you can launch from the Quartus Prime software to start services for performing various debugging tasks. System Console provides you with Tcl scripts and a GUI to access the Qsys system integration tool to perform low-level hardware debugging of your design, as well as identify a module by its path, and open and close a connection to a Qsys module. You can access your

Altera Corporation

System Debugging Tools Overview

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Test Signal Integrity

9-13

design at a system level for purposes of loading, unloading, and transferring designs to multiple devices.

Also, System Console supports the Tk toolkit for building graphical interfaces.

Test Signal Integrity

System Console also allows you to access commands that allow you to control how you generate test patterns, as well as verify the accuracy of data generated by test patterns. You can use JTAG debug commands in System Console to verify the functionality and signal integrity of your JTAG chain. You can test clock and reset signals.

Board Bring-Up and Verification

You can use System Console to access programmable logic devices on your development board, perform board bring-up, and perform verification. You can also access software running on a Nios II or Altera SoC processor, as well as access modules that produce or consume a stream of bytes.

Test Link Signal Integrity with Transceiver Toolkit

Transceiver Toolkit runs from the System Console framework, and allows you to run automatic tests of your transceiver links for debugging and optimizing your transceiver designs. You can use the Transceiver

Toolkit GUI to set up channel links in your transceiver devices, and then automatically run EyeQ and

Auto Sweep testing to view a graphical representation of your test data.

Document Revision History

Table 9-3: Document Revision History

Date

2015.11.02

June 2014

November 2013

June 2012

November 2011

December 2010

15.1.0

14.0.0

13.1.0

12.0.0

10.0.2

10.0.1

Version Changes

Changed instances of Quartus II to

Quartus Prime.

Added information that System Console supports the Tk toolkit.

Dita conversion. Added link to Remote

Debugging over TCP/IP for Altera SoC

Application Note.

Maintenance release.

Maintenance release. Changed to new document template.

Maintenance release. Changed to new document template.

Initial release July 2010 10.0.0

Related Information

Quartus Handbook Archive

For previous versions of the Quartus Prime Handbook, refer to the Quartus Handbook Archive.

System Debugging Tools Overview

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

2015.11.02

QPS5V3

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System

Console

10

Send Feedback

Subscribe

Introduction to System Console

System Console provides visibility into your design and allows you to perform low-level debugging on an

FPGA running in real-time. System Console performs tests on debug-enabled Qsys instantiated IP cores.

A variety of debug services provide read and write access to elements in you design to facilitate debugging.

You can perform the following tasks with System Console and the tools built on top of System Console:

• Bring up boards with both finalized and partially complete designs.

• Perform remote debug with internet access.

• Automate run-time verification through scripting across multiple devices in your system.

• Test serial links with point-and-click configuration tuning in the Transceiver Toolkit.

• Debug memory interfaces with the External Memory Interface Toolkit.

• Integrate your debug IP into the debug platform.

• Test the performance of your ADC and analog chain on a MAX

• Perform system verification with MATLABS/Simulink.

®

10 device with the ADC Toolkit.

©

2015 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, ENPIRION, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX words and logos are trademarks of Altera Corporation and registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. All other words and logos identified as trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html

. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.

www.altera.com

101 Innovation Drive, San Jose, CA 95134

ISO

9001:2008

Registered

10-2

Introduction to System Console

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

In the diagram below, tools are graphical interface, such as Bus Analyzer, that you use in conjunction with the System Console GUI interface.

Tcl Console is a command-line interface that provides you access to the System Console core. API supports services and enables communication with hardware, such as, Ethernet, processor, master, and bytestream services.

Some service have hardware requirements, for example the master service requires a JTAG Master or Nios

II with JTAG Debug, or simular. The Bytestream service requires a JTAG UART.

Note: You use debug links to connect the host to the target that you are debugging.

Related Information

External Memory Interface Documentation

Debugging Transceiver Links Documentation

on page 11-1

Application Note 693: Remote Hardware Debugging over TCP/IP for Altera SoC

Application Note 624: Debugging with System Console over TCP/IP

White Paper 01208: Hardware in the Loop from the MATLAB/Simulink Environment

System Console Online Training

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Hardware Requirements for System Console

10-3

Hardware Requirements for System Console

System Console runs on your host computer and communicates with your running design through debug agents. Debug agents are soft-logic embedded in some IP cores that enable debug communication with the host computer.

You instantiate debug IP cores using the Qsys IP Catalog. Some IP cores are enabled for debug by default, while others are enabled for debug with options in the parameter editor. You can use some debug agents, such as the Nios II processor with debug enabled, for multiple purposes. For example, debugging the hardware in your design, as well as debugging the code running on the Nios II processor.

When you use IP cores with embedded debug in your design, you can make large portions of the design accessible. Debug agents allow you to read and write to memory and alter peripheral registers from the host computer. For example, when you add a JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge instance to a Qsys system, you can read and write to memory-mapped slaves connected to the bridge.

Services associated with debug agents in the running design can be directly opened and closed as needed for debugging. System Console is responsible for determining and using the communication protocol with the debug agent. The communication protocol determines the best board connection to use for command and data transmission.

The Programmable SRAM Object File (

.sof

) provides System Console with channel communication information. When System Console opens in the Quartus Prime software or Qsys while your design is open, any existing

.sof

is automatically found and linked to the detected running device. You can may need to link the design and device manuallly in a complex system.

Note: The following IP cores in the IP Catalog do not support VHDL simulation generation in the current version of the Quartus Prime software:

• JTAG Debug Link

• SLD Hub Controller System

• USB Debug Link

Related Information

WP-01170 System-Level Debugging and Monitoring of FPGA Designs

IP Cores that Interact with System Console

To facilitate debugging your design with the System Console, you can include IP cores with debug interfaces that the System Console can use to send commands and receive data. By adding the appropriate debug agent to your design, System Console services can use the associated capabilities of the debug agent.

Table 10-1: Common Services for System Console

Service

master

Function

Access memory-mapped (Avalon-MM or

AXI) slaves connected to the master interface.

Debug Agent Providing Service

• Nios II with debug

• JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge

• USB Debug Master

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-4

slave

System Console Flow

Service

processor

JTAG UART

Function Debug Agent Providing Service

Allows the host to access a single slave without needing to know the location of the slave in the host's memory map. Any slave that is accessible to a System Console master can provide this service.

• NiosII with debug

• JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge

• USB Debug Master

If an SRAM Object File (

.sof

) is loaded, then slaves controlled by a debug master provide the slave service.

Nios II with debug

• Start, stop, or step the processor.

• Read and write processor registers.

The JTAG UART is an Avalon-MM slave device that you can use in conjunction with

System Console to send and receive byte streams.

JTAG UART

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Related Information

System Console Examples and Tutorials

on page 10-77

System Console Commands

on page 10-8

System Console Flow

1. Add an IP Core to your Qsys system.

2. Generate your Qsys system.

3. Compile your design in the Quartus Prime software.

4. Connect a board and program the FPGA.

5. Start System Console.

6. Locate and open a System Console service.

7. Perform debug operation(s) with the service.

8. Close the service.

Starting System Console

In the System Console, you use Tcl scripting commands to interact with your design in both graphical and command-line interface modes. The System Console GUI panes provide design information for debugging your design.

Related Information

System Console Commands

on page 10-8

Scripting Reference Manual

Information about Tcl scripting support

Introduction to Tcl Online Training

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Customizing Startup

You can customize your System Console environment, as follows:

• Adding commands to the

system_console_rc

configuration file located at:

Customizing Startup

10-5

<$HOME>

/system_console/system_console_rc.tcl

The file in this location is the user configuration file, which only affects the owner of the home directory.

• Specifying your own design startup configuration file with the command-line argument

-rc_script=<path_to_script>

, when you launch System Console from the Nios II command shell.

• Using the

system_console_rc.tcl

file in combination with your custom

rc_script.tcl

file. In this case, the

system_console_rc.tcl

file performs System Console actions, and the

rc_script.tcl

file performs your debugging actions.

On startup, System Console automatically runs the Tcl commands in these files. The commands in the

system_console_rc.tcl

file run first, followed by the commands in the

rc_script.tcl

file.

Starting System Console from Nios II Command Shell

1. On the Windows Start menu, click All Programs > Altera > Nios II EDS <version> > Nios

II<version> > Command Shell..

2. Type system-console

.

3. Type

-- help

for System Console help.

4. Type system-console --project_dir=<project directory>

to point to a directory that contains

.qsf

or

.sof

files.

Starting System Console Stand-Alone

You can get the stand-alone version of System Console as part of the Quartus Prime software

Programmer and Tools installer on the Altera website.

1. Navigate to the Altera Download Center page and click the Additional Software tab.

2. On the Windows Start menu, click All Programs > Altera <version> > Programmer and Tools >

System Console

Related Information

Altera Download Center

Starting System Console from Qsys

• Click Tools > System Console.

Starting System Console from

• Click Tools > System Debugging Tools > System Console.

System Console GUI

The System Console GUI consists of a main window with multiple panes, and allows you to interact with the design currently running on the host computer.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-6

System Console GUI

System Explorer—Displays the hierarchy of the System Console virtual file system in your design, including board connections, devices, designs, and scripts.

Toolkits—Displays available toolkits including the ADC Toolkit, Transceiver Toolkit, Toolkits, GDB

Server Control Panel, and Bus Analyzer. Click the Tools menu to launch applications.

Tcl Console—A window that allows you to interact with your design using Tcl scripts, for example, sourcing scripts, writing procedures, and using System Console API.

Messages—Displays status, warning, and error messages related to connections and debug actions.

Figure 10-1: System Console GUI

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

System Explorer Pane

System Explorer Pane

The System Explorer pane displays the virtual file system for all connected debugging IP cores, and contains the following information:

10-7

Devices folder—Contains information about each device connected to System Console.

Scripts folder—Stores scripts for easy execution.

Connections folder—Displays information about the board connections which are visible to System

Console, such as USB Blaster. Multiple connections are possible.

Designs folder—Displays information about project designs connected to System Console. Each design represents a .

sof

file that is loaded.

The Devices contains a sub-folder for each device currently connected to System Console. Each device sub-folder contains a (link) folder and sometimes contains a (files) folder. The (link) folder shows debug agents (and other hardware) that System Console can access. The (files) folder contains information about the design files loaded from the project for the device.

Figure 10-2: System Explorer Pane

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-8

System Console Commands

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

• The figure above shows the EP4SGX230 folder under the Device folder, which contains a (link) folder.

The (link) folder contains a JTAG folder, which describes the active debug connections to this device, for example, JTAG, USB, Ethernet, and agents connected to the EP4SGX230 device via a JTAG connection.

• Folders with a context menu display a context menu icon. Right-click these folders to view the context menu. For example, the Connections folder above shows a context menu icon.

• Folders that have messages display a message icon. Mouse-over these folders to view the messages. For example, the Scripts folder above a message icon.

• Debug agents that sense the clock and reset state of the target show an information or error message with a clock status icon. The icon indicates whether the clock is running (information, green), stopped

(error, red), or running but in reset (error, red). For example, the trace_system_jtag_link.h2t folder above has a running clock.

System Console Commands

The console commands enable testing. Use console commands to identify a service by its path, and to open and close the connection. The path

that identifies a service is the first argument to most System

Console commands.

To initiate a service connection, do the following:

1. Identify a service by specifying its path with the get_service_paths

command.

2. Open a connection to the service with the claim_service

command.

3. Use Tcl and System Console commands to test the connected device.

4. Close a connection to the service with the close_service

command

Note: For all Tcl commands, the <format> argument must come first.

Table 10-2: System Console Commands

Command

get_service_types

N/A

Arguments Function

Returns a list of service types that System Console manages. Examples of service types include master, bytestream, processor, sld, jtag_debug, device, and design.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Command

get_service_paths claim_service close_service is_service_open get_services_to_add

System Console Commands

10-9

Arguments Function

• <service-type>

• <device>—Returns services in the same specified device.

The argument can be a device or another service in the device.

• <hpath>—Returns services whose hpath

starts with the specified prefix.

• <type>—Returns services whose debug type matches this value. Particu‐ larly useful when opening slave services.

• <type>—Returns services on the same development boards as the argument. Specify a board service, or any other service on the same board.

Allows you to filter the services which are returned.

• <service-type>

• <service-path>

• <claim-group>

• <claims>

Provides finer control of the portion of a service you want to use.

claim_service

returns a new path which represents a use of that service. Each use is independent. Calling claim_service multiple times returns different values each time, but each allows access to the service until closed.

Closes the specified service type at the specified path.

• <service-type>

• <service-path>

• <service-type>

• <service-type>

N/A

Returns 1 if the service type provided by the path is open, 0 if the service type is closed.

Returns a list of all services that are instantiable with the add_service

command.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-10

System Console Commands

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Command Arguments Function

add_service add_service transceiver_channel_ tx

• <service-type>

• <instance-name>

optional-parameters

Adds a service of the specified service type with the given instance name. Run get_services_to_add

to retrieve a list of instantiable services. This command returns the path where the service was added.

Run help add_service

<service-type> to get specific help about that service type, including any parameters that might be required for that service.

add_service gdbserver

• <Processor Service>

• <port number>

Instantiates a gdbserver.

add_service tcp add_service transceiver_channel_ rx

• <instance name>

• <ip_addr>

• <port_number>

• <data_pattern_

checker>

• <path>

• <transceiver path>

• <transceiver

channel address>

• <reconfig path>

• <reconfig channel

address>

Allows you to connect to a TCP/IP port that provides a debug link over ethernet. See AN693 (Remote

Hardware Debugging over TCP/IP for Altera SoC) for more information.

Instantiates a Transceiver Toolkit receiver channel.

• <data_pattern_

generator>

• <path>

• <transceiver path>

• <transceiver

channel address>

• <reconfig path>

• <reconfig channel

address>

Instantiates a Transceiver Toolkit transmitter channel.

add_service transceiver_debug_ link get_version

• <transceiver_

channel_tx path>

• <transceiver_

channel_rx path>

N/A

Instantiates a Transceiver Toolkit debug link.

Returns the current System Console version and build number.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Command

get_claimed_services refresh_connections send_message

Arguments

• <claim>

N/A

• <level>

• <message>

Running System Console in Command-Line Mode

10-11

Function

For the given claim group, returns a list of services claimed. The returned list consists of pairs of paths and service types. Each pair is one claimed service.

Scans for available hardware and updates the available service paths if there have been any changes.

Sends a message of the given level to the message window. Available levels are info, warning, error, and debug.

Related Information

Starting System Console

on page 10-4

Remote Hardware Debugging over TCP/IP for Altera SoC

Running System Console in Command-Line Mode

You can run System Console in command line mode and work interactively or run a Tcl script. The

System Console prints responses to your commands in the console window.

--cli

—Runs System Console in command-line mode.

--project_dir=<project dir>

—Directs System Console to the location of your hardware project.

Also works in GUI mode.

--script=<your script>.tcl

—Directs System Console to run your Tcl script.

--help

— Lists all available commands. Typing

--help

<command name> provides the syntax and arguments of the command. System Console provides command completion if you type the beginning letters of a command and then press the Tab key.

Locating, Opening, and Closing System Console Services

System Console services allow you to access different parts of your running design. For example, the services you can access to memory-mapped slave interfaces. With processor services, you can access embedded processor controls. Services do not inter-mix, but a single IP core can provide multiple services. For example, the Nios II processor contains a debug core and has a memory-mapped master interface that can connect to slaves. The master service can access the memory-mapped slaves that connect to the Nios II processor. You can also use the processor service to debug your design.

Locating Available Services

System Console uses a virtual file system to organize the available services, which is similar to the

/dev location

on Linux systems. Board connection, device type, and IP names are all part of a service path.

Instances of services are referred to by their unique service path in the file system. You can retrieve service paths for a particular service with the command get_service_paths

<service-type>.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-12

Opening and Closing Services

Example 10-1: Locating a Service Path

#We are interested in master services.

set service_type "master"

#Get all the paths as a list.

set master_service_paths [get_service_paths $service_type]

#We are interested in the first service in the list.

set master_index 0

#The path of the first master.

set master_path [lindex $master_service_paths $master_index]

#Or condense the above statements into one statement: set master_path [lindex [get_service_paths master] 0]

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

System Console commands require service paths to identify the service instance you want to access. The paths for different components can change between runs of System Console and between versions. Use get_service_paths

to obtain service paths rather than hard coding them into your Tcl scripts.

The string values of service paths change with different releases of the tool, so you should not infer meaning from the actual strings within the service path. Use marker_node_info

to get information from the path.

System Console automatically discovers most services at startup. System Console automatically scans for all JTAG and USB-based service instances and retrieves their service paths. System Console does not automatically discover some services, such as TCP/IP. Use add_service

to inform System Console about those services.

Example 10-2: Marker_node_info

You can also use the marker_node_info

command to get information about the discovered services so you can choose the right one.

set slave_path [get_service_paths -type altera_avalon_uart.slave slave] array set uart_info [marker_node_info $slave_path] echo $uart_info(full_hpath)

Opening and Closing Services

After you have a service path to a particular service instance, you can access the service for use.

The claim_service

command directs System Console to start using a particular service instance, and with no additional arguments, claims a service instance for exclusive use.

Example 10-3: Opening a Service

set service_type "master" set claim_path [claim_service $service_type $master_path mylib];#Claims service.

You can pass additional arguments to the claim_service

command to direct System Console to start accessing a particular portion of a service instance. For example, if you use the master service to access

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

System Console Services

10-13

memory, then use claim_service

to only access the address space between

0x0

and

0x1000

. System

Console then allows other users to access other memory ranges, and denies access to the claimed memory range. The claim_service

command returns a newly created service path that you can use to access your claimed resources.

You can access a service after you open it. When you finish accessing a service instance, use the close_service

command to direct System Console to make this resource available to other users.

Example 10-4: Closing a Service

close_service master $claim_path; #Closes the service.

System Console Services

Altera's System Console services provide access to hardware modules instantiated in your FPGA. Services vary in the type of debug access they provide.

SLD Service

The SLD Service shifts values into the instruction and data registers of SLD nodes and captures the previous value. When interacting with a SLD node, start by acquiring exclusive access to the node on an opened service.

Example 10-5: SLD Service

set timeout_in_ms 1000 set lock_failed [sld_lock $sld_service_path $timeout_in_ms]

This code attempts to lock the selected SLD node. If it is already locked, sld_lock

waits for the specified timeout. Confirm the procedure returns non-zero before proceeding. Set the instruction register and capture the previous one: if {$lock_failed} {

return

} set instr 7 set delay_us 1000 set capture [sld_access_ir $sld_service_path $instr $delay_us]

The 1000 microsecond delay guarantees that the following SLD command executes least 1000 microseconds later. Data register access works the same way.

set data_bit_length 32 set delay_us 1000 set data_bytes [list 0xEF 0xBE 0xAD 0xDE] set capture [sld_access_dr $sld_service_path $data_bit_length $delay_us \

$data_bytes]

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-14

SLD Commands

Shift count is specified in bits, but the data content is specified as a list of bytes. The capture return value is also a list of bytes. Always unlock the SLD node once finished with the SLD service.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

sld_unlock $sld_service_path

Related Information

SLD Commands

on page 10-14

Virtual JTAG Megafunction documentation

SLD Commands

Table 10-3: SLD Commands

Command

sld_access_ir

Arguments

<claim-path>

<ir-value>

<delay> (in µs) sld_access_dr sld_lock sld_unlock

<service-path>

<size_in_bits>

<delay-in-µs>,

<list_of_byte_values>

<service-path>

<timeout-in-milliseconds>

<service-path>

Function

Shifts the instruction value into the instruction register of the specified node. Returns the previous value of the instruction.

If the <delay> parameter is nonzero, then the JTAG clock is paused for this length of time after the access.

Shifts the byte values into the data register of the SLD node up to the size in bits specified.

If the <delay> parameter is nonzero, then the JTAG clock is paused for at least this length of time after the access.

Returns the previous contents of the data register.

Locks the SLD chain to guarantee exclusive access.

Returns 0 if successful. If the

SLD chain is already locked by another user, tries for <timeout> ms before throwing a Tcl error.

You can use the catch command if you want to handle the error.

Unlocks the SLD chain.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

In-System Sources and Probes Service

10-15

Related Information

SLD Service

on page 10-13

In-System Sources and Probes Service

The In-System Sources and Probes (ISSP) service provides scriptable access to the altsource_probe

IP core in a similar manner to using the In-System Sources and Probes Editor in the Quartus Prime software.

Example 10-6: ISSP Service

Before you use the ISSP service, ensure your design works in the In-System Sources and Probes

Editor. In System Console, open the service for an ISSP instance.

set issp_index 0 set issp [lindex [get_service_paths issp] 0] set claimed_issp [claim_service issp $issp mylib]

View information about this particular ISSP instance.

array set instance_info [issp_get_instance_info $claimed_issp] set source_width $instance_info(source_width) set probe_width $instance_info(probe_width)

The Quartus Prime software reads probe data as a single bitstring of length equal to the probe width.

set all_probe_data [issp_read_probe_data $claimed_issp]

As an example, you can define the following procedure to extract an individual probe line's data.

proc get_probe_line_data {all_probe_data index} {

set line_data [expr { ($all_probe_data >> $index) & 1 }]

return $line_data

} set initial_all_probe_data [issp_read_probe_data $claim_issp] set initial_line_0 [get_probe_line_data $initial_all_probe_data 0] set initial_line_5 [get_probe_line_data $initial_all_probe_data 5]

# ...

set final_all_probe_data [issp_read_probe_data $claimed_issp] set final_line_0 [get_probe_line_data $final_all_probe_data 0]

Similarly, the Quartus Prime software writes source data as a single bitstring of length equal to the source width.

set source_data 0xDEADBEEF issp_write_source_data $claimed_issp $source_data

The currently set source data can also be retrieved.

set current_source_data [issp_read_source_data $claimed_issp]

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-16

In-System Sources and Probes Commands

As an example, you can invert the data for a 32-bit wide source by doing the following: set current_source_data [issp_read_source_data $claimed_issp] set inverted_source_data [expr { $current_source_data ^ 0xFFFFFFFF }] issp_write_source_data $claimed_issp $inverted_source_data

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Related Information

In-System Sources and Probes Commands

on page 10-16

In-System Sources and Probes Commands

Note: The valid values for ISSP claims include read_only

, normal

, and exclusive

.

Table 10-4: In-System Sources and Probes Commands

Command

issp_get_instance_info issp_read_probe_data issp_read_source_data issp_write_source_data

Arguments

<service-path>

<service-path>

<service-path>

<service-path>

<source-value>

Function

Returns a list of the configura‐ tions of the In-System Sources and Probes instance, including: instance_index instance_name source_width probe_width

Retrieves the current value of the probe input. A hex string is returned representing the probe port value.

Retrieves the current value of the source output port. A hex string is returned representing the source port value.

Sets values for the source output port. The value can be either a hex string or a decimal value supported by the System

Console Tcl interpreter.

Related Information

In-System Sources and Probes Service

on page 10-15

Monitor Service

The monitor service builds on top of the master service to allow reads of Avalon-MM slaves at a regular interval. The service is fully software-based. The monitor service requires no extra soft-logic. This service

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Monitor Service

10-17

streamlines the logic to do interval reads, and it offers better performance than exercising the master service manually for the reads.

Example 10-7: Monitor Service

Start by determining a master and a memory address range that you are interested in polling continuously.

set master_index 0 set master [lindex [get_service_paths master] $master_index] set address 0x2000 set bytes_to_read 100 set read_interval_ms 100

You can use the first master to read 100 bytes starting at address 0x2000 every 100 milliseconds.

Open the monitor service: set monitor [lindex [get_service_paths monitor] 0] set claimed_monitor [claim_service monitor $monitor mylib]

Notice that the master service was not opened. The monitor service opens the master service automatically. Register the previously-defined address range and time interval with the monitor service: monitor_add_range $claimed_monitor $master $address $bytes_to_read monitor_set_interval $claimed_monitor $read_interval_ms

You can add more ranges. You must define the result at each interval: global monitor_data_buffer set monitor_data_buffer [list] proc store_data {monitor master address bytes_to_read} {

global monitor_data_buffer

set data [monitor_read_data $claimed_monitor $master $address $bytes_to_read]

lappend monitor_data_buffer $data

}

The code example above, gathers the data and appends it with a global variable. monitor_read_data returns the range of data polled from the running design as a list. In this example, data will be a 100element list. This list is then appended as a single element in the monitor_data_buffer

global list. If this procedure takes longer than the interval period, the monitor service may have to skip the next one or more calls to the procedure. In this case, monitor_read_data

will return the latest data polled. Register this callback with the opened monitor service: set callback [list store_data $claimed_monitor $master $address $bytes_to_read] monitor_set_callback $claimed_monitor $callback

Use the callback variable to call when the monitor finishes an interval. Start monitoring: monitor_set_enabled $claimed_monitor 1

Immediately, the monitor reads the specified ranges from the device and invokes the callback at the specified interval. Check the contents of monitor_data_buffer

to verify this. To turn off the monitor, use

0 instead of 1 in the above command.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-18

Monitor Commands

Related Information

Monitor Commands

on page 10-18

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Monitor Commands

You can use the Monitor commands to read many Avalon-MM slave memory locations at a regular interval.

Under normal load, the monitor service reads the data after each interval and then calls the callback. If the value you read is timing sensitive, you can use the monitor_get_read_interval

command to read the exact time between the intervals at which the data was read.

Under heavy load, or with a callback that takes a long time to execute, the monitor service skips some callbacks. If the registers you read do not have side effects (for example, they read the total number of events since reset), skipping callbacks has no effect on your code. The monitor_read_data

command and monitor_get_read_interval

command are adequate for this scenario.

If the registers you read have side effects (for example, they return the number of events since the last read), you must have access to the data that was read, but for which the callback was skipped. The monitor_read_all_data

and monitor_get_all_read_intervals

commands provide access to this data.

Table 10-5: Main Monitoring Commands

Command

monitor_add_range monitor_set_callback

Arguments

<service-path>

<target-path>

<address>

<size>

<service-path>

<Tcl-expression>

Function

Adds a contiguous memory address into the monitored memory list.

<service path> is the value returned when you opened the service.

<target-path> argument is the name of a master service to read.

The address is within the address space of this service. <target-

path> is returned from

[lindex

[get_service_paths master]

n]

where n is the number of the master service.

<address> and <size> are relative to the master service.

Defines a Tcl expression in a single string that will be evaluated after all the memories monitored by this service are read. Typically, this expression should be specified as a Tcl procedure call with necessary argument passed in.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Command

monitor_set_interval

Arguments

<service-path>

<interval>

Monitor Commands

Function

Enables and disables monitoring.

Memory read starts after this is enabled, and Tcl callback is evaluated after data is read.

10-19

Specifies the frequency of the polling action by specifying the interval between two memory reads. The actual polling frequency varies depending on the system activity. The monitor service will try to keep it as close to this specification as possible.

Returns the current interval set which specifies the frequency of the polling action.

monitor_get_interval

<service-path>

monitor_set_enabled

<service-path>

<enable(1)/disable(0)>

Table 10-6: Monitor Callback Commands

Command

monitor_add_range

Arguments

<service-path> <target-path>

<address> <size> monitor_set_callback monitor_read_data

<service-path>

<Tcl-expression>

<service-path> <target-path>

<address> <size>

Function

Adds contiguous memory addresses into the monitored memory list.

The <target-path> argument is the name of a master service to read. The address is within the address space of this service.

Defines a Tcl expression in a single string that will be evaluated after all the memories monitored by this service are read. Typically, this expression should be specified as a Tcl procedure call with necessary argument passed in.

Returns a list of 8-bit values read from the most recent values read from device. The memory range specified must be the same as the monitored memory range as defined by monitor_add_range

.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-20

Device Service

Command

monitor_read_all_data monitor_get_read_interval monitor_get_all_read_ intervals

Arguments

<service-path> <target-path>

<address> <size>

<service-path> <target-path>

<address> <size>

<service-path> <target-path>

<address> <size> monitor_get_missing_event_ count

<service-path>

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Function

Returns a list of 8-bit values read from all recent values read from device since last Tcl callback.

The memory range specified must be within the monitored memory range as defined by monitor_add_range

.

Returns the number of millisec‐ onds between last two data reads returned by monitor_read_ data

.

Returns a list of intervals in milliseconds between two reads within the data returned by monitor_read_all_data

.

Returns the number of callback events missed during the evaluation of last Tcl callback expression.

Related Information

Monitor Service

on page 10-16

Device Service

The device service supports device-level actions.

Example 10-8: Programming

You can use the device service with Tcl scripting to perform device programming.

set device_index 0 ; #Device index for target set device [lindex [get_service_paths device] $device_index] set sof_path [file join project_path output_files project_name.sof] device_download_sof $device $sof_path

To program, all you need are the device service path and the file system path to a

.sof

. Ensure that no other service (e.g. master service) is open on the target device or else the command fails.

Afterwards, you may do the following to check that the design linked to the device is the same one programmed: device_get_design $device

Related Information

Device Commands

on page 10-21

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Device Commands

10-21

Device Commands

The device commands provide access to programmable logic devices on your board. Before you use these commands, identify the path to the programmable logic device on your board using the get_service_paths

.

Table 10-7: Device Commands

Command

device_download_sof device_get_connections device_get_design

Arguments

<service_path>

<sof-file-path>

<service_path>

<device_path>

Function

Loads the specified

.sof

to the device specified by the path.

Returns all connections which go to the device at the specified path.

Returns the design this device is currently linked to.

Related Information

Device Service

on page 10-20

Design Service

You can use design service commands to work with design information.

Example 10-9: Load

When you open System Console from the software or Qsys, the current project's debug informa‐ tion is sourced automatically if the

.sof

has been built. In other situations, you can load manually.

set sof_path [file join project_dir output_files project_name.sof] set design [design_load $sof_path]

System Console is now aware that this particular

.sof

has been loaded.

Example 10-10: Linking

Once a

.sof

is loaded, System Console automatically links design information to the connected device. The resultant link persists and you can choose to unlink or reuse the link on an equivalent device with the same

.sof

.

You can perform manual linking.

set device_index 0; # Device index for our target set device [lindex [get_service_paths device] $device_index] design_link $design $device

Manually linking fails if the target device does not match the design service.

Linking fails even if the

.sof

programmed to the target is not the same as the design

.sof

.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-22

Design Service Commands

Related Information

Design Service Commands

on page 10-22

Design Service Commands

Design service commands load and work with your design at a system level.

Table 10-8: Design Service Commands

Command

design_load design_link design_extract_debug_files

<design-path>

<zip-file-name>

design_get_warnings

Arguments

<quartus-project-path>,

<sof-file-path>,

or <qpf-file-path>

<design-path>

<device-service-path>

<design-path>

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Function

Loads a model of a design into

System Console. Returns the design path.

For example, if your Project File

(

.qpf

) is in

c:/projects/loopback

, type the following command: design_load {c:\projects\ loopback\}

Links a logical design with a physical device.

For example, you can link a design called 2c35_quartus_

design to a 2c35 device. After you create this link, System

Console creates the appropriate correspondences between the logical and physical submodules of the project.

Extracts debug files from a

.sof

to a zip file which can be emailed to

Altera Support for analysis.

You can specify a design path of

{}

to unlink a device and to disable auto linking for that device.

Gets the list of warnings for this design. If the design loads correctly, then an empty list returns.

Related Information

Design Service

on page 10-21

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Bytestream Service

10-23

Bytestream Service

The bytestream service provides access to modules that produce or consume a stream of bytes. You can use the bytestream service to communicate directly to the IP core that provides bytestream interfaces, such as the Altera JTAG UART or the Avalon-ST JTAG interface.

Example 10-11: Bytestream Service

The following code finds the bytestream service for your interface and opens it.

set bytestream_index 0 set bytestream [lindex [get_service_paths bytestream] $bytestream_index] set claimed_bytestream [claim_service bytestream $bytestream mylib]

To specify the outgoing data as a list of bytes and send it through the opened service: set payload [list 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8] bytestream_send $claimed_bytestream $payload

Incoming data also comes as a list of bytes.

set incoming_data [list] while {[llength $incoming_data] ==0} {

set incoming_data [bytestream_receive $claimed_bytestream 8]

}

Close the service when done.

close_service bytestream $claimed_bytestream

Related Information

Bytestream Commands

on page 10-23

Bytestream Commands

Table 10-9: Bytestream Commands

Command

bytestream_send

Arguments

<service-path>

<values>

bytestream_receive

<service-path>

<length>

Function

Sends the list of bytes to the specified bytestream service.

Values argument is the list of bytes to send.

Returns a list of bytes currently available in the specified services receive queue, up to the specified limit. Length argument is the maximum number of bytes to receive.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-24

JTAG Debug Service

Related Information

Bytestream Service

on page 10-23

JTAG Debug Service

The JTAG Debug service allows you to check the state of clocks and resets within your design.

The following is a JTAG Debug design flow example.

1. To identify available JTAG Debug paths: get_service_paths jtag_debug

2. To select a JTAG Debug path: set jtag_debug_path [lindex [get_service_paths jtag_debug] 0]

3. To claim a JTAG Debug service path:

set claim_jtag_path [claim_service jtag_debug$jtag_debug_path mylib]

4. Running the JTAG Debug service: jtag_debug_reset_system $claim_jtag_path jtag_debug_loop $claim_jtag_path [list 1 2 3 4 5]

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

JTAG Debug Commands

JTAG Debug commands help debug the JTAG Chain connected to a device.

Table 10-10: JTAG Debug Commands

Command

jtag_debug_loop jtag_debug_sample_clock

Argument

<service-path>

<list_of_byte_values>

<service-path>

Function

Loops the specified list of bytes through a loopback of tdi

and tdo

of a system-level debug

(SLD) node. Returns the list of byte values in the order that they were received. Blocks until all bytes are received. Byte values have the

0x

(hexadecimal) prefix and are delineated by spaces.

Returns the value of the clock signal of the system clock that drives the module's system interface. The clock value is sampled asynchronously; consequently, you may need to sample the clock several times to guarantee that it is toggling.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Command

jtag_debug_sample_reset jtag_debug_sense_clock jtag_debug_reset_system

Argument

<service-path>

<service-path>

<service-path>

Working with Toolkits

10-25

Function

Returns the value of the reset_n signal of the Avalon-ST JTAG

Interface core. If reset_n

is low

(asserted), the value is 0 and if reset_n

is high (deasserted), the value is 1.

Returns the result of a sticky bit that monitors for system clock activity. If the clock has toggled since the last execution of this command, the bit is 1. Returns true

if the bit has ever toggled and otherwise returns false

.

The sticky bit is reset to 0 on read.

Issues a reset request to the specified service. Connectivity within your device determines which part of the system is reset.

Related Information

Verifying Clock and Reset Signals

on page 10-79

Working with Toolkits

You can use Toolkit API to create tools to visualize and interact with design debug data.

Graphical widgets in the form of buttons and text fields can leverage user input to interact with debug logic. Toolkit API is the successor to the Dashboard service. Use Toolkit API with the Quartus Prime software versions 14.1 and later.

Toolkits require the following files:

• XML file that describes the plugin (

.toolkit

file)

• Tcl file that implements the toolkit GUI

Registering a Toolkit

Use the toolkit_register

command to register a System Console toolkit. You must also specify the path to the

.toolkit

file when you use the toolkit_register

command.

When you open System Console, toolkits that appear with the

.toolkit

extention in the

$HOME/system_ console/toolkits/

directory appear in the Tools > Toolkits menu.

Opening a Toolkit

You can use the Toolkits tab in System Console to launch available toolkits. Each toolkit has a description, detected hardware list, and a launch button.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-26

Creating a Toolkit Description File

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

To launch a toolkit from the Quartus Prime software:

1. Click Tools > System Debugging Tools > System Console.

2. In System Console, to view available toolkits, click Tools > Toolkits.

You can also use following command-line command to open a System Console toolkit: toolkit_open

<toolkit_name>, where <toolkit_name> is the name in the

.toolkit

file.

Note: You can launch a toolkit in the context of a hardware resource associated with a toolkit type. If you use the command toolkit_open <toolkit_name> <context>

, the toolkit Tcl can retrieve the

<context>

with the set context [toolkit_get_context] command.

Creating a Toolkit Description File

The Toolkit Description File (

.toolkit

) provides the registration data for a toolkit. It does not create an instance of the toolkit GUI.

The toolkit file includes the following attributes:

• Unique

<toolkit name>.toolkit

name that describes the toolkit type.

• Internal toolkit file name.

• Toolkit display name that appears in the GUI.

• Whether the System Console Tools > Toolkits Tools menu displays the toolkit.

• Path to the

.tcl

file that implements the toolkit.

• Description of the purpose of the toolkit (optional).

• Path to an icon to display as the toolkit launcher button in System Console (optional).

Note: The

.png

format 64x64 is preferred. If the icon does not take up the whole space, then be sure that the background is transparent.

• Requirement is a toolkit that displays as associated hardware for the toolkit (optional).

Note: If this toolkit works with a particular type of hardware, specify the debug type name of the hardware with the requirement

property. This enables automatic discovery of the toolkit. The debug type name of a toolkit is the name of the hw.tcl

component, a dot, and the name of the interface within that component which the toolkit will use, for example,

<hw.tcl name><interface name>

.

Related Information

Toolkit API GUI Example .toolkit File

on page 10-32

Toolkit API GUI Example .tcl File

on page 10-32

Matching Toolkits with IP Cores

You can match any toolkit with any IP core.

• When the toolkit searches for IP, it looks for debug markers and matches IP cores to the toolkit requirements. In the toolkit file, use the requirement attribute to specify a debug type, as follows:

<requirement><type>debug.type-name</type></requirement

• You can create debug assignments in the

hw.tcl

for an IP core.

hw.tcl

files are available when you load the design in System Console.

• System Console discovers debug markers from identifiers in the hardware and associates with IP without direct knowledge of the design.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Toolkit API

10-27

Toolkit API

The Toolkit API service enables you to construct GUIs for visualizing and interacting with debug data.

Toolkit API is a graphical pane for the layout of your graphical widgets, which can include buttons and text fields. Widgets can pull data from other System Console services. Similarly, widgets can leverage user input to act on debug logic in your design through services.

Properties

Widget properties can push and pull information to the user interface. Widgets have properties specific to their type. For example, the button property onClick

performs an action when the button is clicked. A label widget does not have the same property because it does not perform an action when clicked.

However, both the button and label widgets have the text

property to display text strings.

Layout

The Toolkit API service creates a widget hierarchy where the toolkit is at the top-level. The service can implement group-type widgets that contain child widgets. Layout properties dictate layout actions performed by a parent on its children.

The expandableX

property when set as

True

, expands the widget horizontally to encompass all of the available space. The visible

property when set as

True

allows a widget to display in the GUI.

User Input

Some widgets allow user interaction. For example, the textField

widget is a text box that allows user entries. You access the contents of the box with the text

property. A Tcl script can either get or set the contents of the textField

widget with the text

property.

Callbacks

Some widgets can perform user-specified actions, referred to as callbacks. The textField

widget has the onChange

property, which is called when text contents change. The button

widget has the onClick property, which is called when a button is clicked. Callbacks may update widgets or interact with services based on the contents of a text field, or the state of any other widget.

Customizing Toolkit API Widgets

Use toolkit_set_property

command to interact with the widgets that you instantiate. The toolkit_set_property

command is most useful when you change part of the execution of a callback.

Toolkit API Script Examples

Note: To convert your Dashboard scripts to Toolkit API, do the following:

1. Add a

.toolkit

file.

2. Remove the add_service dashboard <name of service>

command.

3. Change

dashboard_<command>

to toolkit_<command>

.

4. Change open_service

to claim_service

, for example:

Before: open_service slave $path master_read_memory $path address count

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-28

Toolkit API Script Examples

After: set c [claim_service slave $path lib {}] master_read_memory $c address count

Example 10-12: Registering the Service

Toolkit API is not initialized by default. You must register the service before you can use it.

toolkit_register <toolkit_file>

Example 10-13: Making the Toolkit Visible in System Console

Once you register a toolkit, you must explicitly make the toolkit visible. Use the toolkit_set_property

command to modify the visible

property of the root toolkit.

toolkit_set_property $toolkit root_widget visible true

In this command,

$toolkit

represents the Toolkit API service. root_widget

is the name of the root toolkit widget. visible

is the property that allows the toolkit to be visible in System Console.

Example 10-14: Adding Widgets

Use the toolkit_add

command to add widgets.

toolkit_add my_button button "parentGroup"

Use the following commands to add a label widget "my_label" to the root toolkit. In the GUI, it appears as "Widget Label." set content "Text to display goes here" toolkit_set_property $dash $name text $content

This command sets the text

property to that string. In the GUI, the displayed text changes to the new value. Add one more label: toolkit_add $dash my_label_2 label self toolkit_set_property $dash my_label_2 text "Another label"

Notice the new label appears to the right of the first label. Cause the layout to put the label below instead: toolkit_set_property $dash self itemsPerRow 1

Example 10-15: Gathering Input

Incorporate user input into your Toolkit API: set name "my_text_field" set widget_type "textField"

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Toolkit API Script Examples

set parent "self" toolkit_add $dash $name $widget_type $parent

The widget appears, but it is very small. Make the widget fill the horizontal space: toolkit_set_property $dash my_text_field expandableX true

Now the text field is fully visible. Text can be typed into it once clicked. Type a sentence. Now, retrieve the contents of the field: set content [toolkit_get_property $dash my_text_field text] puts $content

This prints the contents into the console.

10-29

Example 10-16: Updating Widgets Upon User Events

You can make Toolkit API perform actions without interactive typing. Use callbacks to accomplish this. Start by defining a procedure that updates the first label with the text field contents: proc update_my_label_with_my_text_field {dash} {

set content [toolkit_get_property $dash my_text_field text]

toolkit_set_property $dash my_label text $content

}

Run the update_my_label_with_my_text_field $dash

command in the Tcl Console. Notice that the first label now matches the text field contents. Have the update_my_label_with_my_text_field $dash

command called whenever the text field changes: toolkit_set_property $dash my_text_field onChange \

"update_my_label_with_my_text_field $dash"

The onChange

property is executed each time the text field changes. The effect is the first field changes to match what is typed.

Example 10-17: Buttons

You can use buttons to trigger actions. Create a button that changes the second label: proc append_to_my_label_2 {dash suffix} {

set old_text [toolkit_get_property $dash my_label_2 text]

set new_text "${old_text}${suffix}"

toolkit_set_property $dash my_label_2 text $new_text

} set text_to_append ", and more" toolkit_add $dash my_button button self toolkit_set_property $dash my_button onClick [list append_to_my_label_2 \

$dash $text_to_append]

Click the button and the second label gets some text appended to it.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-30

Toolkit API GUI Example

Example 10-18: Groups

The property itemsPerRow

dictates how widgets are laid out in a group. For more complicated layouts where the number of widgets per row is different per row, use nested groups. Add a new group with more widgets per row: toolkit_add $dash my_inner_group group self toolkit_set_property $dash my_inner_group itemsPerRow 2 toolkit_add $dash inner_button_1 button my_inner_group toolkit_add $dash inner_button_2 button my_inner_group

There is now a row with a group of two buttons. You can remove the border with the group name to make the nested group more seamless.

toolkit_set_property $dash inner_group title ""

The title

property can be set to any other string to have the border and title text show up.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Example 10-19: Tabs

GUIs do not require all the widgets to be visible at the same time. Tabs accomplish this.

toolkit_add $dash my_tabs tabbedGroup self toolkit_set_property $dash my_tabs expandableX true toolkit_add $dash my_tab_1 group my_tabs toolkit_add $dash my_tab_2 group my_tabs toolkit_add $dash tabbed_label_1 label my_tab_1 toolkit_add $dash tabbed_label_2 label my_tab_2 toolkit_set_property $dash tabbed_label_1 text "in the first tab" toolkit_set_property $dash tabbed_label_2 text "in the second tab"

This adds a set of two tabs, each with a group containing a label. Clicking on the tabs changes the displayed group/label.

Toolkit API GUI Example

The Toolkit API GUI example creates a button in the Toolkits pane in the System Console window, which registers the toolkit. Clicking the Launch button under Toolkit Example opens a GUI window that provides debug interaction with your design.

The Toolkit Example includes the

.toolkit

and

.tcl

files so that you can reconstruct the example on your local system.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Register Toolkit API in System Console

Toolkit API GUI Example

10-31

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-32

Toolkit API GUI Example .toolkit File

Toolkit API GUI Example

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Toolkit API GUI Example .toolkit File

The .toolkit files registers the Toolkit API to appear in the System Console.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

<toolkit name="toolkit_example" displayName="Toolkit Example" addMenuItem="true">

<file> toolkit_example.tcl </file>

</toolkit>

Related Information

Creating a Toolkit Description File

on page 10-26

Toolkit API GUI Example .tcl File

The Toolkit API .tcl file creates the GUI window that provides debug interaction with your design.

namespace eval Test {

variable ledValue 0

variable dashboardActive 0

variable Switch_off 1

proc toggle { position } {

set ::Test::ledValue ${position}

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Toolkit API GUI Example .tcl File

::Test::updateDashboard

}

proc sendText {} {

set sendText [toolkit_get_property sendTextText text]

toolkit_set_property receiveTextText text $sendText

}

proc dashBoard {} {

if { ${::Test::dashboardActive} == 1 } {

return -code ok "dashboard already active"

}

set ::Test::dashboardActive 1

#

# top group widget

#

toolkit_add topGroup group self

toolkit_set_property topGroup expandableX false

toolkit_set_property topGroup expandableY false

toolkit_set_property topGroup itemsPerRow 1

toolkit_set_property topGroup title ""

#

# leds group widget

#

toolkit_add ledsGroup group topGroup

toolkit_set_property ledsGroup expandableX false

toolkit_set_property ledsGroup expandableY false

toolkit_set_property ledsGroup itemsPerRow 2

toolkit_set_property ledsGroup title "LED State"

#

# leds widgets

#

toolkit_add led0Button button ledsGroup

toolkit_set_property led0Button enabled true

toolkit_set_property led0Button expandableY false

toolkit_set_property led0Button expandableY false

toolkit_set_property led0Button text "Toggle"

toolkit_set_property led0Button onClick {::Test::toggle 1}

toolkit_add led0LED led ledsGroup

toolkit_set_property led0LED expandableX false

toolkit_set_property led0LED expandableY false

toolkit_set_property led0LED text "LED 0"

toolkit_set_property led0LED color "green_off"

toolkit_add led1Button button ledsGroup

toolkit_set_property led1Button enabled true

toolkit_set_property led1Button expandableY false

toolkit_set_property led1Button expandableY false

toolkit_set_property led1Button text "Turn ON"

toolkit_set_property led1Button onClick {::Test::toggle 2}

toolkit_add led1LED led ledsGroup

toolkit_set_property led1LED expandableX false

toolkit_set_property led1LED expandableY false

toolkit_set_property led1LED text "LED 1"

toolkit_set_property led1LED color "green_off"

#

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

10-33

Altera Corporation

10-34

Toolkit API GUI Example .tcl File

# sendText widgets

#

toolkit_add sendTextGroup group topGroup

toolkit_set_property sendTextGroup expandableX false

toolkit_set_property sendTextGroup expandableY false

toolkit_set_property sendTextGroup itemsPerRow 1

toolkit_set_property sendTextGroup title "Send Data"

toolkit_add sendTextText text sendTextGroup

toolkit_set_property sendTextText expandableX false

toolkit_set_property sendTextText expandableY false

toolkit_set_property sendTextText preferredWidth 200

toolkit_set_property sendTextText preferredHeight 200

toolkit_set_property sendTextText editable true

toolkit_set_property sendTextText htmlCapable false

toolkit_set_property sendTextText text ""

toolkit_add sendTextButton button sendTextGroup

toolkit_set_property sendTextButton enabled true

toolkit_set_property sendTextButton expandableY false

toolkit_set_property sendTextButton expandableY false

toolkit_set_property sendTextButton text "Send Now"

toolkit_set_property sendTextButton onClick {::Test::sendText}

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

#

# receiveText widgets

#

toolkit_add receiveTextGroup group topGroup

toolkit_set_property receiveTextGroup expandableX false

toolkit_set_property receiveTextGroup expandableY false

toolkit_set_property receiveTextGroup itemsPerRow 1

toolkit_set_property receiveTextGroup title "Receive Data"

toolkit_add receiveTextText text receiveTextGroup

toolkit_set_property receiveTextText expandableX false

toolkit_set_property receiveTextText expandableY false

toolkit_set_property receiveTextText preferredWidth 200

toolkit_set_property receiveTextText preferredHeight 200

toolkit_set_property receiveTextText editable false

toolkit_set_property receiveTextText htmlCapable false

toolkit_set_property receiveTextText text ""

return -code ok

}

proc updateDashboard {} {

if { ${::Test::dashboardActive} > 0 } {

toolkit_set_property ledsGroup title "LED State"

if { [ expr ${::Test::ledValue} & 0x01 & ${::Test::Switch_off} ] } {

toolkit_set_property led0LED color "green"

set ::Test::Switch_off 0

} else {

toolkit_set_property led0LED color "green_off"

set ::Test::Switch_off 1

}

if { [ expr ${::Test::ledValue} & 0x02 ] } {

toolkit_set_property led1LED color "green"

} else {

toolkit_set_property led1LED color "green_off"

}

}

}

}

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

::Test::dashBoard

Related Information

Creating a Toolkit Description File

on page 10-26

Toolkit API Commands

Toolkit API commands run in the context of a unique toolkit instance.

toolkit_register

on page 10-36

toolkit_open

on page 10-37

get_quartus_ini

on page 10-38

toolkit_get_context

on page 10-39

toolkit_get_types

on page 10-40

toolkit_get_properties

on page 10-41

toolkit_add

on page 10-42

toolkit_get_property

on page 10-43

toolkit_set_property

on page 10-44

toolkit_remove

on page 10-45

toolkit_get_widget_dimensions

on page 10-46

Toolkit API Commands

10-35

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-36 toolkit_register

toolkit_register

Description

Point to the XML file that describes the plugin (

.toolkit

file) .

Usage

toolkit_register

<toolkit_file>

Returns

No return value.

Arguments

<toolkit_file>

Path to the toolkit definition file.

Example

toolkit_register /data/trogdor/toolkits/burninator.xml

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

toolkit_open

toolkit_open

Description

Opens an instance of a toolkit in System Console.

Usage

toolkit_open

<toolkit_id> [<context>]

Returns

No return value.

Arguments

<toolkit_id>

Name of the toolkit type to open.

<context>

An optional context, such as a service path for a hardware resource that is associated with the toolkit that opens.

Example

toolkit_open my_toolkit_id

10-37

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-38 get_quartus_ini

get_quartus_ini

Description

Returns a value from the software

.ini

file.

Usage

get_quartus_ini

<ini> <type>

Returns

No return value.

Arguments

<ini>

Name of the software

.ini

setting.

<type>

(Optional) Type of

.ini

setting. The known types are string

and enabled

. If the type is enabled

, the value of the

.ini

setting returns

1

, or

0

if not enabled.

Example

set my_ini_enabled [get_quartus_ini my_ini enabled] set my_ini_raw_value [get_quartus_ini my_ini]

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

toolkit_get_context

toolkit_get_context

10-39

Description

Returns the context that was specified when the toolkit was opened. If no context was specified, returns an empty string.

Usage

toolkit_get_context

Returns

Returns the context.

Arguments

None

N/A

Example

set context [toolkit_get_context]

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-40 toolkit_get_types

toolkit_get_types

Description

Returns a list of widget types.

Usage

toolkit_get_types

Returns

No return value.

Arguments

None

N/A

Example

set widget_names [toolkit_get_types]

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

toolkit_get_properties

Description

Returns a list of toolkit properties for a type of widget.

Usage

toolkit_get_properties

<widgetType>

Returns

No return value.

Arguments

<widgetType>

Name of a type of widget.

Example

set widget_properties [toolkit_get_properties xyChart]

toolkit_get_properties

10-41

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-42 toolkit_add

toolkit_add

Description

Adds a widget to the current toolkit.

Usage

toolkit_add

<id> <type><groupid>

Returns

No return value.

Arguments

<id>

A unique ID for the widget being added.

<type>

The type of widget that is being added.

<groupid>

The ID for the parent group that will contain the new widget.

Example

toolkit_add my_button button "parentGroup"

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

toolkit_get_property

Description

Returns the value of a property for a specific widget.

Usage

toolkit_get_property

<id> <propertyName>

Returns

No return value.

Arguments

<id>

A unique ID for the widget being queried.

<tpropertyName>

The name of the widget property being queried.

Example

set enabled [toolkit_get_property my_button enabled]

toolkit_get_property

10-43

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-44 toolkit_set_property

toolkit_set_property

Description

Sets the value of a property for a specific widget.

Usage

toolkit_set_property

<id><propertyName> <value>

Returns

No return value.

Arguments id>

A unique ID for the widget being modified.

<propertyName>

The name of the widget property being set.

<value>

The new value for the widget property.

Example

toolkit_set_property my_button enabled false

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

toolkit_remove

Description

Removes a widget from the specified toolkit.

Usage

toolkit_remove

<id>

Returns

No return value.

Arguments

<id>

A unique ID for the widget being removed.

Example

toolkit_remove my_button

toolkit_remove

10-45

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-46 toolkit_get_widget_dimensions

toolkit_get_widget_dimensions

Description

Returns the width and height of the specified widget.

Usage

toolkit_get_widget_dimensions

<id>

Returns

No return value.

Arguments

<id>

A unique ID for the widget being added.

Example

set dimensions [toolkit_get_widget_dimensions my_button]

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Toolkit API Properties

Widget Types and Properties

on page 10-48

barChart Properties

on page 10-49

button Properties

on page 10-50

checkBox Properties

on page 10-51

comboBox Properties

on page 10-52

dial Properties

on page 10-53

fileChooserButton Properties

on page 10-54

group Properties

on page 10-55

label Properties

on page 10-56

led Properties

on page 10-57

lineChart Properties

on page 10-58

list Properties

on page 10-59

pieChart Properties

on page 10-60

tableProperties

on page 10-61

text Properties

on page 10-62

textField Properties

on page 10-63

timeChart Properties

on page 10-64

xyChart Properties

on page 10-65

Toolkit API Properties

10-47

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-48

Widget Types and Properties

Widget Types and Properties

Table 10-11: Toolkit API Widget Types and Properties

enabled expandable expandableX expandableY

Name

foregroundColor maxHeight minHeight maxWidth minWidth preferredHeight preferredWidth toolTip visible

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Description

Enables or disables the widget.

Allows the widget to be expanded.

Allows the widget to be resized horizontally if there is space available in the cell where it resides.

Allows the widget to be resized vertically if there is space available in the cell where it resides.

Sets the foreground color.

If the widget's expandableY is set, this is the maximum height in pixels that the widget can take.

If the widget's expandableY is set, this is the minimum height in pixels that the widget can take.

If the widget's expandableX is set, this is the maximum width in pixels that the widget can take.

If the widget's expandableX is set, this is the minimum width in pixels that the widget can take.

The height of the widget if expandableY is not set.

The width of the widget if expandableX is not set.

Implements a mouse-over tooltip.

Displays the widget.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

barChart Properties

Table 10-12: Toolkit API barChart Properties

title labelX label range itemValue

Name barChart Properties

Description

Chart title.

X-axis label text.

X-axis label text.

Y-axis value range. By default, it is auto range. Range is specified in a Tcl list, for example:

[ list lower_numerical_value upper_numerical_value

]

Value is specified in a Tcl list, for example:

[list bar_category_str numerical_value]

10-49

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-50 button Properties

button Properties

Table 10-13: Toolkit API button Properties

Name

onClick text

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Description

A Tcl command to run, usually a proc

, every time the button is clicked.

The text on the button.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

checkBox Properties

Table 10-14: Toolkit API checkBox Properties

checked onClick text

Name checkBox Properties

10-51

Description

If true, the checkbox is checked. If false, the checkbox is not checked.

A Tcl command to run, usually a proc, every time the checkbox is clicked.

The text on the checkbox.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-52 comboBox Properties

comboBox Properties

Table 10-15: Toolkit API comboBox Properties

onChange options selected

Name

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Description

A Tcl callback to run when the value of the combo box changes.

A list of options to display in the combo box.

The index of the selected item in the combo box.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

dial Properties

Table 10-16: Toolkit API dial Properties

Name

max min ticksize title value

dial Properties

Description

The maximum value that the dial can show.

The minimum value that the dial can show. .

The space between the different tick marks of the dial.

The title of the dial.

The value that the dial's needle should mark. It must be between min and max.

10-53

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-54 fileChooserButton Properties

fileChooserButton Properties

Table 10-17: Toolkit API fileChooserButton Properties

text onChoose title chooserButtonText filter mode multiSelectionEnabled paths

Name

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Description

The text on the button.

A Tcl command to run, usually a proc

, every time the button is clicked.

The dialog box title.

chooserButtonText

The file filter based on extension. Only one extension is supported. By default, all file names are allowed. The filter is specified as

[list filter_description file_extension]

, for example:

[ list "Text Document (.txt)" "txt"

]

Specifies what kind of files or directories can be selected. The default is files_only

. Possible options are files_only

and directories_only

.

Controls whether multiple files can be selected. False, by default.

Returns a list of file paths selected in the file chooser dialog box.

This property is read-only. It is most useful when used within the onClick

script or a procedure when the result is freshly updated after the dialog box closes.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

group Properties

Table 10-18: Toolkit API group Properties

Name

itemsPerRow title

group Properties

Description

The number of widgets the group can position in one row, from left to right, before moving to the next row.

The number of widgets the group can position in one row, from left to right, before moving to the next row.

10-55

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-56 label Properties

label Properties

Table 10-19: Toolkit API label Properties

Name

text

The text to show in the label.

Description

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

led Properties

Table 10-20: Toolkit API led Properties

Name

color text

led Properties

10-57

Description

The color of the LED. The options are: red_off

, red

, yellow_ off

, yellow

, green_off

, green

, blue_off

, blue

, and black

.

The color of the LED. The options are: red_off

, red

, yellow_ off

, yellow

, green_off

, green

, blue_off

, blue

, and black

.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-58 lineChart Properties

lineChart Properties

Table 10-21: Toolkit API lineChart Properties

title labelX labelY range

Name

Y-axis value range. By default, it is auto range. Range is specified in a Tcl list, for example [list lower_numerical_ value upper_numerical_value].

Description

Chart title.

X-axis label text.

Y-axis label text.

Y-axis value range. By default, it is auto range. You specify range in a Tcl list, for example:

[list lower_numerical_value upper_numerical_value]

Y-axis value range. By default, it is auto range. You specify range in a Tcl list, for example:

[list lower_numerical_value upper_numerical_value]

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

list Properties

Table 10-22: Toolkit API list Properties

Name

selected options onChange

list Properties

10-59

Description

Index of the selected item in the combo box.

List of options to display.

A Tcl callback to run when the selected item in the list changes.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-60 pieChart Properties

pieChart Properties

Table 10-23: Toolkit API pieChart Properties

title itemValue

Name Description

Chart title.

Item value. Value is specified in a Tcl list, for example:

[list bar_category_str numerical_value]

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

tableProperties

Table 10-24: Toolkit API tableProperties

Name

columnCount rowCount headerReorderingAllowed headerResizingAllowed rowSorterEnabled showGrid showHorizontalLines rowIndex columnIndex cellText selectedRows columnHeader columnHeaders columnHorizontalAlignment columnRowSorterType columnWidth columnWidthResizable contents

tableProperties

10-61

Description

The number of columns (Mandatory) (

0

, by default).

The number of rows (Mandatory) (

0

, by default).

.

Controls whether you can drag the columns ( false

, by default)

Controls whether you can resize all column widths. ( false

, by default).

Note: You can resize each column individually with the columnWidthResizable

property.

Controls whether you can sort the cell values in a column

( false

, by default).

Controls whether to draw both horizontal and vertical lines

( true

, by default).

Controls whether to draw horizontal line ( true

, by default).

Current row index. Zero-based. This value affects some properties below (

0

, by default).

Current column index. Zero-based. This value affects all column specific properties below (

0

, by default).

Specifies the text to be filled in the cell specified in the current rowIndex

and columnIndex

(Empty, by default).

Control or retrieve row selection.

The text to be filled in the column header.

A list of names to define the columns for the table.

The cell text alignment in the specified column. Supported types are leading

(default), left

, center

, right

, trailing

.

The type of sorting method used. This is applicable only if rowSorterEnabled

is true

. Each column has its own sorting type. Supported types are string

(default), int

, and float

.

The number of pixels used for the column width.

Controls whether the column width is resizable by you ( false

, by default).

The contents of the table as a list. For a table with columns A,

B, and C, the format of the list will be

{A1 B1 C1 A2 B2

C2 ...}.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-62 text Properties

text Properties

Table 10-25: Toolkit API text Properties

Name

editable htmlCapable text

Description

Controls whether the text box is editable.

Controls whether the text box can format HTML.

The text to show in the text box.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

textField Properties

Table 10-26: Toolkit API textField Properties

editable onChange text

Name textField Properties

Description

Controls whether the text box is editable.

A Tcl callback to run when the contents of the text box is changed.

The text to show in the text box.

10-63

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-64 timeChart Properties

timeChart Properties

Table 10-27: Toolkit API timeChart Properties

Name

labelX labelY latest maximumItemCount title range showLegend

Description

The label for the X-axis.

The label for the Y-axis.

The latest value in the series.

The number of sample points to display in the historic record.

The title of the chart.

Sets the range for the chart. The range is of the form

{low, high}

. The low/high values are interpreted as doubles.

Sets whether a legend for the series should be shown in the graph.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

xyChart Properties

Table 10-28: Toolkit API xyChart Properties

Name

title labelX labelY range maximumItemCount series showLegend

xyChart Properties

10-65

Properties

Chart title

X-Axis label text.

Y-Axis label text.

Sets the range for the chart. The range is of the form

{low, high}

. The low/high values are interpreted as doubles.

Sets the maximum number of data values to keep in a series of data. Setting this does not affect the current data, only new data added to the chart. If a series is added that has more values than the maximum count, the last-maximumItemCount number of entries will be kept.

Adds a series of data to the chart. The first value in the spec is the identifier for the series. If the same identifier is set twice, the most-recently used series data wins. If the identifier does not come with series data, that series is removed from the chart.

The series is in a format such as the following:

{identifier, x-1 y-1, x-2 y-2}

.

Sets whether a legend for the series should be shown in the graph.

ADC Toolkit

The ADC Toolkit is designed to work with MAX 10 devices and helps you understand the performance of the analog signal chain as seen by the on-board ADC hardware. The GUI displays the performance of the

ADC using industry standard metrics. You can export the collected data to a

.csv

file and process this raw data yourself. The ADC Toolkit is built on the System Console framework and can only be operated using the GUI. There is no Tcl support for the tool.

Prerequisites for Using the ADC Toolkit

• Altera Modular ADC IP core

External Reference Voltage if you select External in the Altera Modular ADC IP parameters

• Reference signal

The ADC Toolkit needs a sine wave signal to be fed to the analog inputs. You need the capability to precisely set the level and frequency of the reference signal. A high-precision sine wave is needed for accurate test results; however, there are useful things that can be read in Scope mode with any input signal.

To achieve the best testing results, the reference signal should have less distortions than the device ADC is able to resolve. If this is not the case, then you will be adding distortions from the source into the resulting

ADC distortion measurements. The limiting factor is based on hardware precision.

Note: When applying a sine wave, the ADC should sample at 2x the fundamental sine wave frequency.

There should be a low-pass filter, 3dB point set to the fundamental frequency.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Altera Corporation

Send Feedback

10-66

ADC Toolkit

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Configuring the Altera Modular ADC IP Core

The Altera Modular ADC IP core needs to be included in your design. You can instantiate this IP core from the IP Catalog. When you configure this IP core in the Parameter Editor, you need to enable the

Debug Path option located under Core Configuration.

There are two limitations in the software v14.1 for the Altera Modular ADC IP core. The ADC Toolkit does not support the ADC control core only option under Core Configuration. You must select a core variant that uses the standard sequencer in order for the Altera Modular ADC IP core to work with ADC

Toolkit. Also, if an Avalon Master is not connected to the sequencer, you must manually start the sequencer before the ADC Toolkit will work.

Figure 10-3: Altera Modular ADC Core

Starting the ADC Toolkit

You can launch the ADC Toolkit from System Console. Before starting the ADC toolkit, you need to verify that your board is programmed. You can then load your

.sof

by clicking File > Load Design. If

System Console was started with an active project, your design is auto-loaded when you start System

Console.

There are two methods to start the ADC Toolkit. Both methods require you to have a MAX 10 device connected, programmed with a project, and linked to this project. However, the Launch command only shows up if these requirements are met. You can always start the ADC Toolkit from the Tools menu, but if the above requirements are not met, no connection will be made.

• Click Tools > ADC Toolkit

• Alternatively, click Launch from the Toolkits tab. The path for the device is displayed above the

Launch button.

Note: Only one ADC Toolkit enabled device can be connected at a time.

Upon starting the ADC Toolkit, an identifier path on the ADC Toolkit tab shows you which ADC on the device is being used for this instance of the ADC Toolkit.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 10-4: Launching ADC Toolkit

ADC Toolkit

10-67

ADC Toolkit Flow

The ADC Toolkit GUI consists of four panels: Frequency Selection, Scope, Signal Quality, and

Linearity.

1. Use the Frequency Selection panel to calculate the required sine wave frequency for proper signal quality testing. The ADC Toolkit will give you the nearest ideal frequency based on your desired reference signal frequency.

2. Use the Scope panel to tune your signal generator or inspect input signal characteristics.

3. Use the Signal Quality panel to test the performance of your ADC using industry standard metrics.

4. Use the Linearity panel to test the linearity performance of your ADC and display differential and integral non-linearity results.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-68

ADC Toolkit Terms

Figure 10-5: ADC Toolkit GUI

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Related Information

Using the ADC Toolkit in MAX 10 Devices online training

MAX 10 FPGA Device Overview

MAX 10 FPGA Device Datasheet

MAX 10 FPGA Design Guidelines

MAX 10 Analog to Digital Converter User Guide

Additional information about sampling frequency

Nyquist sampling theorem and how it relates to the nominal sampling interval required to avoid aliasing.

ADC Toolkit Terms

Table 10-29: ADC Toolkit Terms

SNR

THD

SFDR

Term Description

The ratio of the output signal voltage level to the output noise level.

The ratio of the sum of powers of the harmonic frequency components to the power of the fundamental/original frequency component.

Characterizes the ratio between the fundamental signal and the highest spurious in the spectrum.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

SINAD

ENOB

DNL

INL

Term

Setting the Frequency of the Reference Signal

10-69

Description

The ratio of the RMS value of the signal amplitude to the RMS value of all other spectral components, including harmonics, but excluding DC.

The number of bits with which the ADC behaves.

The maximum and minimum difference in the step width between actual transfer function and the perfect transfer function

The maximum vertical difference between the actual and the ideal curve. It indicates the amount of deviation of the actual curve from the ideal transfer curve.

Setting the Frequency of the Reference Signal

You use the Frequency Selection panel to compute the required reference signal frequency to run the

ADC performance tests. The sine wave frequency is critical and affects the validity of your test results.

Figure 10-6: Frequency Selection Panel

To set the frequency of the reference signal:

1. On ADC Channel, select the ADC channel that you plan to test.

The tool populates the Sample Size and Sample Frequency fields.

2. Enter the Desired Frequency. This is your desired frequency for testing. You need to complete this procedure to calculate the frequency that you set your signal generator to, which will differ depending on the type of test you want to do with the ADC Toolkit.

3. Click Calculate.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-70

Tuning the Signal Generator

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

• The closest frequency for valid testing near your desired frequency displays under both Signal

Quality Test and Linearity Test.

• The nearest required sine wave frequencies are different for the signal quality test and linearity test.

4. Set your signal generator to the precise frequency given by the tool based on the type of test you want to run.

Tuning the Signal Generator

You use the Scope panel to tune your signal generator in order to achieve the best possible performance from the ADC.

Figure 10-7: Scope Mode Panel

To tune your signal generator:

1. On ADC Channel, select the ADC channel that you plan to test.

2. Enter your reference Sample Frequency (unless the tool can extract this value from your IP).

3. Enter your Ref Voltage (unless the tool can extract this value from your IP).

4. Click Run.

The tool will repeatedly capture a buffer worth of data and display the data as a waveform and display additional information under Signal Information.

5. Tune your signal generator to use the maximum dynamic range of the ADC without clipping. Avoid hitting 0 or 4095 because your signal will likely be clipping. Look at the displayed sine wave under

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Running a Signal Quality Test

10-71

Oscilloscope to see that the top and bottom peaks are evenly balanced to ensure you have selected the optimum value.

• For MAX 10 devices, you want to get as close to Min Code = 0 and Max Code = 4095 without actually hitting those values.

• The frequency should be set precisely to the value needed for testing such that coherent sampling is observed in the test window. Before moving forward, follow the suggested value for signal quality testing or linearity testing, which is displayed next to the actual frequency that is detected.

• From the Raw Data tab, you can export your data as a

.csv

file.

Related Information

Additional information about coherent sampling vs window sampling

Running a Signal Quality Test

The available performance metrics in signal quality test mode are the following: signal to noise ratio

(SNR), total harmonic distortion (THD), spurious free dynamic range (SFDR), signal to noise and distortion ratio (SINAD), effective number of bits (ENOB), and a frequency response graph.

The frequency response graph shows the signal, noise floor, and any spurs or harmonics.

The signal quality parameters are measurements relative to the carrier signal and not the full scale of the

ADC.

Before you begin

Before running a signal quality test, ensure that you have set up the frequency of the reference signal using

Scope mode.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-72

Running a Linearity Test

Figure 10-8: Signal Quality Panel

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

To run a signal quality test:

1. On ADC Channel, select the ADC channel that you plan to test.

2. Click Run.

From the Raw Data tab, you can export your data as a

.csv

file.

For signal quality tests, the signal must be coherently sampled. Based on the sampling rate and number of samples to test, specific input frequencies are required for coherent sampling.

The sample frequency for each channel is calculated based on the ADC sequencer configuration.

Related Information

Additional information about dynamic parameters such as SNR, THD, etc

Running a Linearity Test

The linearity test determines the linearity of the step sizes of each ADC code. It uses a histogram testing method which requires sinusoidal inputs which are easier to source from signal generators and DACs than other test methods.

When using Linearity test mode, your reference signal must meet specific requirements.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

ADC Toolkit Data Views

10-73

• The signal source covers the full code range of the ADC. Results improve if the time spent at code end is equivalent, by tuning the reference signal in Scope mode.

• You have to make sure if using code ends that you are not clipping the signal. Look at the signal in

Scope mode to see that it does not look flat at the top or bottom. It may be desirable to back away from code ends and test a smaller range within the desired operating range of the ADC input signal.

• Choosing a frequency that is not an integer multiple of the sample rate and buffer size helps to ensure all code bins are filled relatively evenly to the probability density function of a sine wave. If an integer multiple is selected, some bins may be skipped entirely while others are over populated. This makes the tests results invalid. Use the frequency calculator feature to determine a good signal frequency near your desired frequency.

To run a linearity test:

1. On ADC Channel, select the ADC channel that you plan to test.

2. Enter the test sample size in Burst Size. Larger samples increase the confidence in the test results.

3. Click Run.

• You can stop the test at anytime, as well as click Run again to continue adding to the aggregate data. To start fresh, click Reset after you stop a test. Anytime you change the input signal or channel, you should click Reset so your results are correct for a particular input.

• There are three graphical views of the data: Histogram view, DNL view, and INL view.

• From the Raw Data tab, you can export your data as a

.csv

file.

ADC Toolkit Data Views

Histogram View

The Histogram view shows how often each code appears. The graph updates every few seconds as it collects data. You can use the Histogram view to quickly check if your test signal is set up appropriately.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-74

ADC Toolkit Data Views

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 10-9: Example of Pure Sine Wave Histogram

The figure below shows the shape of a pure sine wave signal. Your reference signal should look similar.

If your reference signal is not a relatively smooth line, but has jagged edges with some bins having a value of 0, and adjacent bins with a much higher value, then the test signal frequency is not adequate. Use Scope mode to help choose a good frequency for linearity testing.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

ADC Toolkit Data Views

Figure 10-10: Examples of (Left) Poor Frequency Choice vs (Right) Good Frequency Choice

10-75

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-76

ADC Toolkit Data Views

Differential Non-linearity View

Figure 10-11: Example of Good Differential Non-linearity

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

The DNL view shows the currently collected data. Ideally, you want your data to look like a straight line through the 0 on the x-axis. When there are not enough samples of data, the line appears rough. The line improves as more data is collected and averaged.

Each point in the graph represents how many LSB values a particular code differs from the ideal step size of 1 LSB. The Results box shows the highest positive and negative DNL values.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

System Console Examples and Tutorials

10-77

Integral Non-linearity View

Figure 10-12: Example of Good Integral Non-linearity

The INL view shows currently collected data. Ideally, with a perfect ADC and enough samples, the graph appears as a straight line through 0 on the x-axis.

Each point in the graph represents how many LSB values a particular code differs from its expected point in the voltage slope. The Results box shows the highest positive and negative INL values.

System Console Examples and Tutorials

Altera provides examples for performing board bring-up, creating a simple dashboard, and programming a Nios II processor. The

System_Console.zip

file contains design files for the board bring-up example. The

Nios II Ethernet Standard

.zip

files contain the design files for the Nios II processor example.

Note: The instructions for these examples assume that you are familiar with the software, Tcl commands, and Qsys.

Related Information

On-Chip Debugging Design Examples Website

Contains the design files for the example designs that you can download.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-78

Board Bring-Up with System Console Tutorial

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Board Bring-Up with System Console Tutorial

You can perform low-level hardware debugging of Qsys systems with System Console. You can debug systems that include IP cores instantiated in your Qsys system or perform initial bring-up of your PCB.

This board bring-up tutorial uses a Nios II Embedded Evaluation Kit (NEEK) board and USB cable. If you have a different development kit, you need to change the device and pin assignments to match your board and then recompile the design.

1.

Setting Up the Board Bring-Up Design Example

on page 10-78

To load the design example into the software and program your device, follow these steps:

2.

Verifying Clock and Reset Signals

on page 10-79

You can use the System Explorer pane to verify clock and reset signals.

3.

Verifying Memory and Other Peripheral Interfaces

on page 10-79

The Avalon-MM service accesses memory-mapped slaves via a suitable Avalon-MM master, which can be controlled by the host.

4.

Qsys Modules for Board Bring-up Example

on page 10-85

Related Information

Use Cases for System Console

Faster Board Bring-Up with System Console Demo Video

Setting Up the Board Bring-Up Design Example

To load the design example into the software and program your device, follow these steps:

1. Unzip the

System_Console.zip

file to your local hard drive.

2. Click File > Open Project and select

Systemconsole_design_example.qpf

with the software.

3. Change the device and pin assignments (LED, clock, and reset pins) in the

Systemconsole_design_ example.qsf

file to match your board.

4. Click Processing > Start Compilation

5. To Program your device, follow these steps:

a. Click Tools >Programmer.

b. Click Hardware Setup.

c. Click the Hardware Settings tab.

d. Under Currently selected hardware, click USB-Blaster, and click Close.

Note: If you do not see the USB-Blaster option, then your device was not detected. Verify that the

USB-Blaster driver is installed, your board is powered on, and the USB cable is intact.

This design example uses a USB-Blaster cable. If you do not have a USB-Blaster cable and you are using a different cable type, then select your cable from the Currently selected hardware options.

e. Click Auto Detect, and then select your device.

f. Double-click your device under File.

g. Browse to your project folder and click

Systemconsole_design_example.sof

in the subdirectory

output_files.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Verifying Clock and Reset Signals

10-79

h. Turn on the Program/Configure option.

i. Click Start.

j. Close the Programmer.

6. Click Tools > System Debugging Tools > System Console.

Related Information

System_Console.zip file

Contains the design files for this tutorial.

Verifying Clock and Reset Signals

You can use the System Explorer pane to verify clock and reset signals.

Open the appropriate node and check for either a green clock icon or a red clock icon. You can use JTAG

Debug command to verify clock and reset signals.

Related Information

System Explorer Pane

on page 10-7

JTAG Debug Commands

on page 10-24

Verifying Memory and Other Peripheral Interfaces

The Avalon-MM service accesses memory-mapped slaves via a suitable Avalon-MM master, which can be controlled by the host. You can use Tcl commands to read and write to memory with a master service.

Locating and Opening the Master Service

#Select the master service type and check for available service paths.

set service_paths [get_service_paths master]

#Set the master service path.

set master_service_path [lindex $service_paths 0]

#Open the master service.

set claim_path [claim_service master $master_service_path mylib]

Avalon-MM Slaves

The Address Map tab shows the address range for every Qsys component. The Avalon-MM master communicates with slaves using these addresses.

The register maps for all Altera components are in their respective Data Sheets.

Figure 10-13: Address Map

Related Information

Data Sheets Website

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-80

Avalon-MM Commands

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Avalon-MM Commands

Using the 8, 16, or 32 versions of the master_read

or master_write

commands is less efficient than using the master_write_memory

or master_read_memory

commands. Master commands can also be used on slave services. If you are working on a slave service, the address field can be a register (if the slave defines register names). (6)

Table 10-30: Avalon-MM Commands

Command

master_write_memory

Arguments

<service-path>

<address>

<list_of_byte_values>

<format>

Function

Writes the list of byte values.

Starts at the specified base address using the most efficient accesses possible with the selected master.

The <format> argument makes this command accept data as 16 or 32-bit, instead of as bytes.

For example: master_read_memory format 16 <service_ path> <addr> <count> master_write_8 master_write_16 master_write_from_file master_write_32

<service-path>

<address>

<list_of_byte_values>

<service-path>

<address>

<list_of_16_bit_words>

<service-path>

<file-name>

<address>

<service-path>

<address>

<list_of_32_bit_words>

Writes the list of byte values, starting at the specified base address, using 8-bit accesses.

Writes the list of 16-bit values, starting at the specified base address, using 16-bit accesses.

Writes the entire contents of the file through the master, starting at the specified address. The file is treated as a binary file containing a stream of bytes.

Writes the list of 32-bit values, starting at the specified base address, using 32-bit accesses.

(6) Transfers performed in 16- and 32-bit sizes are packed in little-endian format.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Command

master_read_memory master_read_8 master_read_16 master_read_32 master_read_to_file master_get_register_names

Arguments

<service-path>

<address>

<size_in_bytes>

<format>

<service-path>

<address>

<size_in_bytes>

<service-path>

<address>

<size_in_multiples_of_16_bits>

<service-path>

<address>

<size_in_multiples_of_32_bits>

<service-path>

<file-name>

<address>

<count>

<service-path>

Testing the PIO component

10-81

Function

Returns a list of <size> bytes.

Read from memory starts at the specified base address.

The <format> argument makes this command accept data as 16 or 32-bit, instead of as bytes.

Returns a list of <size> bytes.

Read from memory starts at the specified base address, using 8bit accesses.

Returns a list of <size> 16-bit values. Read from memory starts at the specified base address, using 16-bit accesses.

Returns a list of <size> 32-bit values. Read from memory starts at the specified base address, using 32-bit accesses.

Reads the number of bytes specified by <count> from the memory address specified and creates (or overwrites) a file containing the values read. The file is written as a binary file.

When a register map is defined, returns a list of register names in the slave.

Testing the PIO component

In this example design, the PIO connects to the LEDs of the board. Test if this component is operating properly and the LEDs are connected, by driving the outputs with the Avalon-MM master.

Table 10-31: Register Map for the PIO Core

Offset

0

1

Fields

Register Name R/W

(n-1) ...

2 1 0

data read access R write access W direction

Data value currently on PIO inputs.

New value to drive on PIO outputs.

R/W Individual direction control for each I/O port. A value of 0 sets the direction to input; 1 sets the direction to output.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-82

Testing On-chip Memory

Offset

2

3

Register Name

interruptmask edgecapture

Fields

R/W

(n-1) ...

2 1 0

R/W IRQ enable/disable for each input port. Setting a bit to 1 enables interrupts for the corresponding port.

R/W Edge detection for each input port.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

#Write the driver output values for the Parallel I/O component.

set offset 0x0; #Register address offset.

set value 0x7; #Only set bits 0, 1, and 2.

master_write_8 $claim_path $offset $value

#Read back the register value.

set offset 0x0 set count 0x1 master_read_8 $claim_path $offset $count master_write_8 $claim_path 0x0 0x2; #Only set bit 1.

master_write_8 $claim_path 0x0 0xe; #Only set bits 1, 2, 3.

master_write_8 $claim_path 0x0 0x7; #Only set bits 0, 1, 2.

#Observe the LEDs turn on and off as you execute these Tcl commands.

#The LED is on if the register value is zero and off if the register value is one.

#LED 0, LED 1, and LED 2 connect to the PIO.

#LED 3 connects to the interrupt signal of the CheckSum Accelerator.

Testing On-chip Memory

Test the memory with a recursive function that writes to incrementing memory addresses.

#Load the design example utility procedures for writing to memory.

source set_memory_values.tcl

#Write to the on-chip memory.

set base_address 0x80 set write_length 0x80 set value 0x5a5a5a5a fill_memory $claim_path $base_address $write_length $value

#Verify the memory was written correctly.

#This utility proc returns 0 if the memory range is not uniform with this value.

verify_memory $claim_path $base_address $write_length $value

#Check that the memory is re-initialized when reset.

#Trigger reset then observe verify_memory returns 0.

set jtag_debug_path [lindex [get_service_paths jtag_debug] 0] set claim_jtag_debug_path [claim_service jtag_debug $jtag_debug_path mylib] jtag_debug_reset_system $claim_jtag_debug_path; #Reset the connected on-chip memory

#peripheral.

close_service jtag_debug $claim_jtag_debug_path verify_memory $claim_path $base_address $write_length $value

#The on-chip memory component was parameterized to re-initialized to 0 on reset.

#Check the actual value.

master_read_8 $claim_path 0x0 0x1

Testing the Checksum Accelerator

The Checksum Accelerator calculates the checksum of a data buffer in memory. It calculates the value for a specified memory buffer, sets the DONE bit in the status register, and asserts the interrupt signal. You

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Testing the Checksum Accelerator

10-83

should only read the result from the controller when both the DONE bit and the interrupt signal are asserted. The host should assert the interrupt enable control bit in order to check the interrupt signal.

Table 10-32: Register Map for Checksum Component

Offset

(Bytes)

Hexadecimal value (after adding offset)

0x20

Register Access

31-9 8 7-5

Bits (32 bits)

4 3 2 1

BUSY DON

E

0

0

4

12

0x24

0x2C

Status Read/

Write to clear

Address Read/

Write

Length Read/

Write

Control Read/

Write

Read Address

Length in bytes

24 0x38 Fixed

Read

Address

Bit

Interrup t Enable

G

O

Checksum result (upper 16 bits are zero)

INV Clear

28 0x3C

1.

Result Read

#Pass the base address of the memory buffer Checksum Accelerator.

set base_address 0x20 set offset 4 set address_reg [expr {$base_address + $offset}] set memory_address 0x80 master_write_32 $claim_path $address_reg $memory_address

#Pass the memory buffer to the Checksum Accelerator.

set length_reg [expr {$base_address + 12}] set length 0x20 master_write_32 $claim_path $length_reg $length

#Write clear to status and control registers.

#Status register: set status_reg $base_address master_write_32 $claim_path $status_reg 0x0

#Control register: set clear 0x1 set control_reg [expr {$base_address + 24}] master_write_32 $claim_path $control_reg $clear

#Write GO to the control register.

set go 0x8 master_write_32 $claim_path $control_reg $go

#Cross check if the checksum DONE bit is set.

master_read_32 $claim_path $status_reg 0x1

#Is the DONE bit set?

#If yes, check the result and you are finished with the board bring-up design example.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-84

Testing the Checksum Accelerator

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

set result_reg [expr {$base_address + 28}] master_read_16 $claim_path $result_reg 0x1

2. If the result is zero and the JTAG chain works properly, the clock and reset signals work properly, and the memory works properly, then the problem is the Checksum Accelerator component.

#Confirm if the DONE bit in the status register (bit 0)

#and interrupt signal are asserted.

#Status register: master_read_32 $claim_path $status_reg 0x1

#Check DONE bit should return a one.

#Enable interrupt and go: set interrupt_and_go 0x18 master_write_32 $claim_path $control_reg $interrupt_and_go

3. Check the control enable to see the interrupt signal. LED 3 (MSB) should be off. This indicates the interrupt signal is asserted.

4. You have narrowed down the problem to the data path. View the RTL to check the data path.

5. Open the

Checksum_transform.v

file from your project folder.

<unzip dir>

/System_Console/ip/checksum_accelerator/checksum_accelerator.v

6. Notice that the data_out

signal is grounded in

Figure 10-14

(uncommented line 87 and comment line

88). Fix the problem.

7. Save the file and regenerate the Qsys system.

8. Re-compile the design and reprogram your device.

9. Redo the above steps, starting with

Verifying Memory and Other Peripheral Interfaces

on page 10-

79 or run the Tcl script included with this design example.

source set_memory_and_run_checksum.tcl

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 10-14: Checksum.v File

Qsys Modules for Board Bring-up Example

Figure 10-15: Qsys Modules for Board Bring-up Example

Qsys Modules for Board Bring-up Example

10-85

The Qsys design for this example includes the following modules:

• JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge—Provides System Console host access to the memory-mapped IP in the design via the JTAG interface.

• On-chip memory—Simplest type of memory for use in an FPGA-based embedded system. The memory is implemented on the FPGA; consequently, external connections on the circuit board are not necessary.

• Parallel I/O (PIO) module—Provides a memory-mapped interface for sampling and driving general

I/O ports.

• Checksum Accelerator—Calculates the checksum of a data buffer in memory. The Checksum Acceler‐ ator consists of the following:

• Checksum Calculator (

checksum_transform.v

)

• Read Master (

slave.v

)

• Checksum Controller (

latency_aware_read_master.v

)

Checksum Accelerator Functionality

The base address of the memory buffer and data length passes to the Checksum Controller from a memory-mapped master. The Read Master continuously reads data from memory and passes the data to the Checksum Calculator. When the checksum calculations finish, the Checksum Calculator issues a valid signal along with the checksum result to the Checksum Controller. The Checksum Controller sets the

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-86

Nios II Processor Example

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

DONE bit in the status register and also asserts the interrupt signal. You should only read the result from the Checksum Controller when the DONE bit and interrupt signal are asserted.

Nios II Processor Example

This example programs the Nios II processor on your board to run the count binary software example included in the Nios II installation. This is a simple program that uses an 8-bit variable to repeatedly count from 0x00 to 0xFF. The output of this variable is displayed on the LEDs on your board. After programming the Nios II processor, you use System Console processor commands to start and stop the processor.

To run this example, perform the following steps:

1. Download the Nios II Ethernet Standard Design Example for your board from the Altera website.

2. Create a folder to extract the design. For this example, use

C:\Count_binary

.

3. Unzip the Nios II Ethernet Standard Design Example into

C:\Count_binary

.

4. In a Nios II command shell, change to the directory of your new project.

5. Program your board. In a Nios II command shell, type the following: nios2-configure-sof niosii_ethernet_standard_<board_version>.sof

6. Using Nios II Software Build Tools for Eclipse, create a new Nios II Application and BSP from

Template using the Count Binary template and targeting the Nios II Ethernet Standard Design

Example.

7. To build the executable and linkable format (ELF) file (

.elf

) for this application, right-click the Count

Binary project and select Build Project.

8. Download the

.elf

file to your board by right-clicking Count Binary project and selecting Run As,

Nios II Hardware.

• The LEDs on your board provide a new light show.

9. Type the following: system-console; #Start System Console.

#Set the processor service path to the Nios II processor.

set niosii_proc [lindex [get_service_paths processor] 0] set claimed_proc [claim_service processor $niosii_proc mylib]; #Open the service.

processor_stop $claimed_proc; #Stop the processor.

#The LEDs on your board freeze.

processor_run $claimed_proc; #Start the processor.

#The LEDs on your board resume their previous activity.

processor_stop $claimed_proc; #Stop the processor.

close_service processor $claimed_proc; #Close the service.

• The processor_step

, processor_set_register

, and processor_get_register

commands provide additional control over the Nios II processor.

Related Information

Processor Commands

on page 10-87

Nios II Ethernet Standard Design Example

Nios II Software Build Tools User Guide

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Processor Commands

Table 10-33: Processor Commands

Command (7)

processor_download_elf

Arguments

<service-path>

<elf-file-path>

processor_in_debug_mode processor_reset processor_run processor_stop processor_step

<service-path>

<service-path>

<service-path>

<service-path>

<service-path>

<service-path>

processor_get_register_ names processor_get_register processor_set_register

<service-path>

<register_name>

<service-path>

<register_name>

<value>

Related Information

Nios II Processor Example

on page 10-86

Processor Commands

10-87

Function

Downloads the given Executable and Linking Format File (

.elf

) to memory using the master service associated with the processor.

Sets the processor's program counter to the

.elf

entry point.

Returns a non-zero value if the processor is in debug mode.

Resets the processor and places it in debug mode.

Puts the processor into run mode.

Puts the processor into debug mode.

Executes one assembly instruc‐ tion.

Returns a list with the names of all of the processor's accessible registers.

Returns the value of the specified register.

Sets the value of the specified register.

(7)

If your system includes a Nios II/f core with a data cache, it may complicate the debugging process. If you suspect the Nios II/f core writes to memory from the data cache at nondeterministic intervals; thereby, overwriting data written by the System Console, you can disable the cache of the Nios II/f core while debugging.

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Altera Corporation

Send Feedback

10-88

On-Board USB Blaster II Support

On-Board USB Blaster II Support

System Console supports an On-Board USB-Blaster

TM component. This IP core supports the master service.

II circuit via the USB Debug Master IP

Not all Stratix V boards support the On-Board USB-Blaster II. For example, the transceiver signal integrity board does not support the On-Board USB-Blaster II.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

About Using MATLAB and Simulink in a System Verification Flow

System Console can be used with MATLAB and Simulink to perform system development testing. You can use the Altera Hardware in the Loop (HIL) tools to set up a system verification flow. In this approach, the design is deployed to hardware and runs in real time. The surrounding components in your system are simulated in a software environment. The HIL approach allows you to use the flexibility of software tools with the real-world accuracy and speed of hardware. You can gradually introduce more hardware components to your system verification testbench. This gives you more control over the integration process as you tune and validate your system. When your full system is integrated, the HIL approach allows you to provide stimuli via software to test your system under a variety of scenarios.

Advantages of HIL Approach

• Avoid long computational delays for algorithms with high processing rates

• API helps to control, debug, visualize, and verify FPGA designs all within the MATLAB environment

• FPGA results are read back by the MATLAB software for further analysis and display

Required Tools and Components

• MATLAB software

• DSP Builder software

• software

• Altera FPGA

Note: The System Console MATLAB API is included in the DSP Builder installation bundle.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

About Using MATLAB and Simulink in a System Verification Flow

Figure 10-16: Hardware in the Loop Host-Target Setup

10-89

Supported MATLAB API Commands

You can perform your work from the MATLAB environment and leverage the capability of System

Console to read and write to masters and slaves. By using the supported MATLAB API commands, you do not have to launch the System Console software. The supported commands are the following:

SystemConsole.refreshMasters;

M = SystemConsole.openMaster(1);

M.write (type, byte address, data);

M.read (type, byte address, number of words);

M.close

Example 10-20: MATLAB API Script Example

SystemConsole.refreshMasters; %Investigate available targets

M = SystemConsole.openMaster(1); %Creates connection with FPGA target

%%%%%%%% User Application %%%%%%%%%%%%

....

M.write('uint32',write_address,data); %Send data to FPGA target

....

data = M.read('uint32',read_address,size); %Read data from FPGA target

....

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

M.close; %Terminates connection to FPGA target

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-90

Deprecated Commands

High-Level Flow

1. Install the DSP Builder software so you have the necessary libraries to enable this flow

2. Build your design using Simulink and the DSP Builder libraries (DSP Builder helps to convert the

Simulink design to HDL)

3. Include Avalon-MM components in your design (DSP Builder can port non-Avalon-MM components)

4. Include Signals and Control blocks in your design

5. Use boundary blocks to separate synthesizable and non-synthesizable logic

6. Integrate your DSP system in Qsys

7. Program your Altera FPGA

8. Use the supported MATLAB API commands to interact with your Altera FPGA

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Related Information

Hardware in the Loop from the MATLAB/Simulink Environment white paper

System in the Loop - Enabling Real-Time FPGA Verification within MATLAB website

DSP Builder website

Deprecated Commands

The table lists commands that have been deprecated. These commands are currently supported, but are targeted for removal from System Console.

Note: All dashboard_<name>

commands are deprecated and replaced with toolkit_<name>

commands for Quartus Prime software15.1, and later.

Table 10-34: Deprecated Commands

Command

open_service

Arguments

<service_type>

<service_path>

Function

Opens the specified service type at the specified path.

Calls to open_service

may be replaced with calls to claim_ service

providing that the return value from claim_ service

is stored and used to access and close the service.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Document Revision History

Document Revision History

Table 10-35: Document Revision History

Date

2015.11.02

2015.11.02

May 2015

December

2014

Version

15.1.0

15.1.0

October 2015 15.1.0

June 2014

November

2013

June 2013

15.0.0

14.1.0

14.0.0

13.1.0

13.0.0

November

2012

12.1.0

August 2012 12.0.1

June 2012 12.0.0

Changes

• Edits to Toolkit API content and command format.

• Added Tookkit API design example.

• Added graphic to Introduction to System Console.

• Deprecated Dashboard.

• Changed instances of Quartus II to Quartus Prime.

• Edits to Toolkit API content and command format.

• Added Tookkit API design example.

• Added graphic to Introduction to System Console.

• Deprecated Dashboard.

• Changed instances of Quartus II to Quartus Prime.

• Added content for Toolkit API

• Required .toolkit and Tcl files

• Registering and launching the toolkit

• Toolkit discovery and matching toolkits to IP

• Toolkit API commands table

Added information about how to download and start System Console stand-alone.

• Added overview and procedures for using ADC Toolkit on MAX 10 devices.

• Added overview for using MATLABS/Simulink Environment with

System Console for system verification.

Updated design examples for the following: board bring-up, dashboard service, Nios II processor, design service, device service, monitor service, bytestream service, SLD service, and ISSP service.

Re-organization of sections. Added high-level information with block diagram, workflow, SLD overview, use cases, and example Tcl scripts.

Updated Tcl command tables. Added board bring-up design example.

Removed SOPC Builder content.

Re-organization of content.

Moved Transceiver Toolkit commands to Transceiver Toolkit chapter.

Maintenance release. This chapter adds new System Console features.

10-91

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

10-92

Document Revision History

Date

November

2011

May 2011

December

2010

July 2010

Version

11.1.0

11.0.0

10.1.0

10.0.0

Changes

Maintenance release. This chapter adds new System Console features.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Maintenance release. This chapter adds new System Console features.

Maintenance release. This chapter adds new commands and references for

Qsys.

Initial release. Previously released as the System Console User Guide, which is being obsoleted. This new chapter adds new commands.

Related Information

Quartus Handbook Archive

For previous versions of the Handbook, refer to the Quartus Handbook Archive.

Altera Corporation

Analyzing and Debugging Designs with System Console

Send Feedback

Debugging Transceiver Links

11

2015.11.02

QPS5V3

Subscribe

Send Feedback

The Transceiver Toolkit helps you to optimize high-speed serial links in your board design. The

Transceiver Toolkit provides real-time control, monitoring, and debugging of the transceiver links running on your board.

Once you correctly configure a debugging system, you can control the transmitter or receiver channels to optimize transceiver settings and hardware features. The toolkit tests bit-error rate (BER) while running multiple links at target data rate. Run auto sweep tests to identify the best physical media attachment

(PMA) settings for each link. EyeQ graphs display the receiver horizontal and vertical eye margin during testing. The toolkit supports testing of multiple devices across multiple boards simultaneously.

Figure 11-1: Transceiver Toolkit Channel Manager

©

2015 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, ENPIRION, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX words and logos are trademarks of Altera Corporation and registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. All other words and logos identified as trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html

. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.

www.altera.com

101 Innovation Drive, San Jose, CA 95134

ISO

9001:2008

Registered

11-2

Transceiver Debugging Flow

Transceiver Toolkit User Interface

System Explorer—displays design components and hardware connections.

Channel Manager—control multiple channels simultaneously.

Tcl Console—script control of the Transceiver Toolkit.

Messages—displays information, warning, and error messages.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Quick Start

The Transceiver Toolkit user interface helps you to visualize and debug transceiver links in your design.

To launch the toolkit, click Tools > System Debugging Tools > Transceiver Toolkit. Alternatively, you can run Tcl scripts from the command-line: system-console --script=<name of script>

Get started quickly by downloading Transceiver Toolkit design examples from the

On-Chip Debugging

Design Examples

website. For an online demonstration of how to use the Transceiver Toolkit to run a high-speed link test with one of the design examples, refer to the

Transceiver Toolkit Online Demo

on the Altera website.

Transceiver Debugging Flow

Testing transceiver links involves configuring your system for debug, and then running various link tests.

Table 11-1: Transceiver Link Debugging Flow

System

Configuration

Steps

Flow Description

1. Use one of the following methods to define a system that includes necessary transceiver debugging components:

• Download Transceiver Toolkit design examples from the

On-Chip Debugging

Design Examples

website. Modify Altera design examples to fit your design.

• Integrate debugging components into your own design. Click Tools > IP Catalog to select IP cores and define them in the parameter editor.

2. Click Assignments > Pin Planner to assign device I/O pins to match your device and board.

3. Click Processing > Start Compilation to compile your design.

4. Connect your target device to Altera programming hardware.

5. Click Tools > Programmer and then program the target device with the debugging system.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Link

Debugging

Steps

Configuring Systems for Transceiver Debug

11-3

Flow Description

1. Click File > Load Design, and select the SRAM Object File (

.sof

) generated for your transceiver design. If you start the toolkit while a project is open, the project loads in the toolkit automatically.

2. (Optional) Create additional links between transmitter and receiver channels.

3. Run any of the following tests:

• Run BER with various combinations of PMA settings.

• Run PRBS Signal eye tests.

• Run custom traffic tests.

• Run link optimization tests.

• Directly control PMA analog settings to experiment with settings while the link is running.

Configuring Systems for Transceiver Debug

To debug transceivers, you must first configure a system that includes the appropriate Altera IP core(s) that support each debugging operation. You can either modify an Altera design example, or configure your own system with required debugging IP components.The debugging system configuration varies by device family. Refer to the appropriate setup information to correctly configure or adapt a system for your target device.

Related Information

Configuring Your Own Debugging System

on page 11-6

Configuring an Altera Design Example

Altera provides design examples to help you quickly test your own design. You can experiment with

Altera design examples and modify them for your own application. Refer to the

readme.txt

of each design example for more information. Download the Transceiver Toolkit design examples from the On-Chip

Debugging Design Examples page of the Altera website.

Use the design examples as a starting point to work with a particular signal integrity development board.

The design examples provide the components to quickly test the functionality of the receiver and transmitter channels in your design. Change the transceiver settings in the design examples and observe the effects on transceiver link performance. Isolate and verify the high-speed serial links without debugging other logic in your design. You can modify and customize the design examples to match your intended transceiver design.

Once you download the design examples, open the Quartus Prime and click Project > Restore Archived

Project to restore the design example project archive. If you have access to the same development board with the same device as mentioned in the

readme.txt

file of the example, you can directly program the device with the provided programming file in that example. If you want to recompile the design, you must make your modifications to the system configuration in Qsys, regenerate in Qsys, and recompile the design in the Quartus Prime software to generate a new programming file.

If you have the same board as mentioned in the

readme.txt

file, but a different device on your board, you must choose the appropriate device and recompile the design. For example, some early development boards are shipped with engineering sample devices.

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-4

Modifying Stratix V Design Examples

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

You can make changes to the design examples so that you can use a different development board or a different device. If you have a different board, you must edit the necessary pin assignments and recompile the design examples.

Related Information

On-Chip Debugging Design Examples

Modifying Stratix V Design Examples

You can adapt Altera design examples to experiment with various configurations that match your own design. For example, you can change data rate, number of lanes, PCS-PMA width, FPGA-fabric interface width, or input reference clock frequency. To modify the design examples, modify the IP core parameters and regenerate the system in Qsys. Next, you modify the top-level design file, and re-assign device I/O pins as necessary.

To modify a Stratix V design example PHY block to match your design, follow these steps:

1. Determine the number of channels required by your design.

2. Open the <project name>

.qpf

for the design example in the Quartus Prime software.

3. Click Tools > Qsys.

4. On the System Contents tab, right-click the PHY block and click Edit. Specify options for the PHY block to match your design requirement for number of lanes, data rate, PCS-PMA width, FPGA-fabric interface width, and input reference clock frequency.

5. Specify a multiple of the FPGA-fabric interface data width for Avalon Data Symbol Size. The available values are 8 or 10. Click Finish.

6. Delete any timing adapter from the design. The timing adaptors are not required.

7. From the IP Catalog, add one Data Pattern Generator and Data Pattern Checker for each transmitter and receiver lane.

8. Right-click Data Pattern Generator and click Edit. Specify a value for ST_DATA_W that matches the

FPGA-fabric interface width.

9. Right-click Data Pattern Checker and click Edit. Specify a value for ST_DATA_W that matches the

FPGA-fabric interface width.

10.From the IP Catalog, add a Transceiver Reconfiguration Controller.

11.Right-click Transceiver Reconfiguration Controller and click Edit. Specify 2* number of lanes for the number of reconfigurations interfaces. Click finish.

12.Create connections for the data pattern generator and data pattern checker components. Right-click the net name in the System Contents tab and specify the following connections.

From To

Block Name Net Name Block Name Net Name

clk_100 clk data_pattern_generator csr_clk clk_100 master_0 xcvr_*_phy_0 xcvr_*_phy_0 clk_100 clk_reset master tx_clk_out0 tx_parallel_data0 clk data_pattern_generator csr_clk_reset data_pattern_generator csr_slave data_pattern_generator pattern_out_clk data_pattern_generator pattern_out data_pattern_checker csr_clk

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

clk_100 master_0 xcvr_*_phy_0

From

clk_reset master rx_clk_out0

Generating reconfig_clk from an Internal PLL

To

data_pattern_checker csr_clk_reset data_pattern_checker data_pattern_checker csr_slave pattern_in_clk

11-5

xcvr_*_phy_0 rx_parallel_data0 data_pattern_checker pattern_in

13.Click System > Assign Base Addresses.

14.Connect the reset port of timing adapters to clk_reset

of clk_100

.

15.To implement the changes to the system, click Generate > Generate HDL.

16.If you modify the number of lanes in the PHY, you must update the top-level file accordingly. The following example shows Verilog HDL code for a two-channel design that declares input and output ports in the top-level design. The example design includes the low latency PHY IP core. If you modify the PHY parameters, you must modify the top-level design with the correct port names. Qsys displays an example of the PHY, click Generate > HDL Example.

module low_latency_10g_1ch DUT (

input wire GXB_RXL11,

input wire GXB_RXL12,

output wire GXB_TXL11,

output wire GXB_TX12

);

.....

low_latency_10g_1ch DUT (

.....

.xcvr_low_latency_phy_0_tx_serial_data_export ({GXB_TXL11,

GXB_TXL12}),

.xcvr_low_latency_phy_0_rx_serial_data_export ({GXB_RXL11,

GXB_TXL12}),

.....

);

17.From the Quartus Prime software, click Assignments > Pin Planner and update pin assignments to match your board.

18.Edit the design’s Synopsys Design Constraints (

.sdc

) to reflect the reference clock change. Ignore the reset warning messages.

19.Click Start > Start Compilation to recompile the design.

Generating reconfig_clk from an Internal PLL

You can use an internal PLL to generate the reconfig_clk

. You implement this by changing the Qsys connections to delay offset cancellation until the generated clock is stable.

• If there is no free running clock within the required frequency range of the reconfiguration clock, you can add a PLL to the top-level of the design example. The frequency range varies depending on the device family. Refer to the device family data sheet for your device.

• When using an internal PLL, hold off offset cancellation until the generated clock is stable. You do this by connecting the pll_locked

signal of the internal PLL to the

.clk_clk_in_reset_n

port of the

Qsys system, instead of the system_reset

signal.

• Implement the filter logic, inverter, and synchronization to the reconfig_clk

outside of the Qsys system with your own logic.

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-6

Configuring Your Own Debugging System

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

You can find the

support solution

in the Altera Knowledge Base. The solution applies to only Arria V,

Cyclone V, Stratix IV GX/GT, and Stratix V devices.

Configuring Your Own Debugging System

Rather than modifying the Altera Debugging Design Examples, you can integrate debugging IP components into your own design. Refer to the appropriate system configuration steps for your target device.

Related Information

Arria 10 Debug System Configuration

on page 11-6

Stratix V Debug System Configuration

on page 11-12

Arria 10 Debug System Configuration

For Arria 10 designs, the Transceiver Toolkit configuration requires instantiation of the Arria 10

Transceiver Native PHY IP core, and use of the built-in Altera Debug Master Endpoint (ADME). Qsys system generation automatically instantiates the JTAG debug link. You enable the ADME features by enabling specific parameters in the Transceiver Native PHY IP core.

Click Tools > IP Catalog to parameterize, generate, and instantiate the following debugging components.

Table 11-2: Arria 10 / 20nm Transceiver Toolkit IP Core Configuration

Component

Transceiver Native

PHY

Debugging Functions

Supports all debugging functions

Transceiver ATX PLL Required for Arria 10

Transceiver PHY

Reset Controller

N/A

Parameterization Notes

On the Dynamic Reconfiguration tab:

• Turn on Enable dynamic reconfiguration.

• Turn on Enable odi acceleration logic.

• Turn on Enable Altera Debug Master Endpoint.

• Turn on Enable capability registers.

• Turn on Enable control and status registers.

• Turn on Enable prbs soft accumulators (enables hard PRBS Generator and Checker).

On the Dynamic Reconfiguration tab:

• Turn on Enable dynamic reconfiguration

(required for System Console read/write access).

• Turn on Enable Altera Debug Master Endpoint

(required for System Console read/write access).

N/A

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Component

Altera Debug Master

Endpoint (ADME)

JTAG Debug Link

Enabling Altera Master Debug Endpoint (Arria 10)

11-7

Debugging Functions Parameterization Notes

• Supports control of

PMA analog settings,

ADCE settings, DFE settings, and EyeQ.

• discovers PHY and use toolkit on designs not using Qsys.

• Optionally, turn off to save resource count. (only an option if you instantiate the JTAG to Avalon Master

Bridge. Otherwise,

Transceiver Toolkit cannot function).

• Enabled from the Arria 10 Transceiver Native PHY

Parameter Editor, Dynamic Reconfiguration tab.

Required for Arria 10.

For Qsys projects, the JTAG Debug Link is autoinstantiated.

Enabling Altera Master Debug Endpoint (Arria 10)

The Altera Debug Master Endpoint (ADME) connects to the host link via the system level debug fabric for debugging Arria 10 designs. The ADME provides Avalon-MM Master capability, and is discoverable by System Console. To enable ADME for Arria 10 designs, you must set specific parameters when defining the Arria 10 Transceiver Native PHY and Arria 10 Transceiver ATX PLL IP cores. Click Tools >

IP Catalog to select and define the following IP core parameters. Once properly configured, project synthesis inserts the ADME, debug fabric, and embedded logic.

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-8

Enabling Altera Master Debug Endpoint (Arria 10)

Figure 11-2: Altera Debug Master Endpoint Block Diagram

Arria 10 Native PHY

Arria 10 Transceiver

PreSICE

(Nios II)

Channel

DPRIO

JTAG

Master 0

JTAG

Master 1

User

Avalon-MM

User Logic

ADME

Arbitration

Debug Fabric

Altera IP

Host Link

Table 11-3: Enabling ADME IP Core Parameters for Arria 10 Designs

IP Core Parameter Setting

Location

Dynamic Reconfiguration tab

Arria 10

Transceiver

Native PHY

• Turn on Enable dynamic

reconfiguration

• Turn on Enable Altera

Debug Master Endpoint

• Turn on Enable prbs soft

accumulators

Arria 10

Transceiver ATX

PLL

• Turn on Enable capability

registers

• Turn on Enable control and

status registers

Dynamic Reconfiguration tab

Hard PRBS Generator

Hard PRBS Checker

Optional Soft Logic

User Logic

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Link Testing Configuration (Arria 10)

Figure 11-3: Enabling ADME in A10 Transceiver Native PHY IP Core

11-9

Figure 11-4: Enabling ADME in ATX PLL IP Core

Link Testing Configuration (Arria 10)

Use the following system configuration for BER, PRBS, and link optimization testing in Arria 10 devices.

To perform BER or PRBS testing of Arria 10 designs, use the PRBS Generator and PRBS Checker functions of the Transceiver Native PHY IP core. You enable the built-in hard PRBS Generator and

Checker by turning on Enable prbs soft accumulators when configuring the IP core. The Transceiver

Toolkit performs required read-write-modify operations on the tested channel(s).

Debugging Transceiver Links

Altera Corporation

Send Feedback

11-10

Link Testing Configuration (Arria 10)

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Note: For more information, refer to the Arria 10 Transceiver Native PHY User Guide, Enabling the PRBS

and Square Wave Data Generator and Enabling the PRBS Data Checker sections in the Reconfigura‐

tion Interface and Dynamic Configuration chapter.

The built-in hard PRBS Data Pattern Generator and Checker requires no separate IP instantiation. The hard PRBS Data Pattern Generator and Checker does not support error injection. To use error injection for Arria 10 designs, use the Data Pattern Generator and Checker IP cores in your Arria 10 system design configuration.

Figure 11-5: BER, PRBS, and Link Optimization Test Configuration (Arria 10)

Transceiver Native PHY IP

Your Design

Logic

Hard PRBS Generator

Hard PRBS Checker

Altera Debug Master

Endpoint (ADME)

Table 11-4: System Connections: BER and PRBS Testing (Arria 10)

From

Your design logic

To

• Transceiver Native PHY Hard PRBS Generator

• Transceiver Native PHY Hard PRBS Checker

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Custom Traffic Signal Eye Test Configuration (Arria 10)

Custom Traffic Signal Eye Test Configuration (Arria 10)

Use the following configuration for custom traffic signal eye tests in Arria 10 devices.

Figure 11-6: Custom Traffic Signal Eye Test Configuration for Arria 10 / Generation 10 / 20nm

11-11

Transceiver Native PHY IP

Your Design Logic

(Custom Traffic)

Hard PRBS Generator

Hard PRBS Checker

Altera Debug Master

Endpoint (ADME)

Table 11-5: System Connections: Custom Traffic Signal Eye Test (Arria 10)

From

Your design logic custom traffic

• Transceiver Native PHY

To

PMA Analog Setting Control Configuration (Arria 10)

Use the following configuration to control PMA analog settings in Arria 10 devices.

Figure 11-7: System Configuration: PMA Analog Setting Control (Arria 10)

Transceiver Native PHY IP

Hard PRBS Generator

Hard PRBS Checker

Altera Debug Master

Endpoint (ADME)

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-12

Stratix V Debug System Configuration

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Stratix V Debug System Configuration

For Stratix V designs, the Transceiver Toolkit configuration requires instantiation of the JTAG to Avalon

Bridge and Reconfiguration Controller IP cores. Click Tools > IP Catalog to parameterize, generate, and instantiate the following debugging components for Stratix V designs.

Table 11-6: Stratix V / 28nm Transceiver Toolkit IP Core Configuration

Component

Transceiver

Native PHY

Custom PHY

Low Latency

PHY

Altera-Avalon

Data Pattern

Generator

Debugging

Functions

Supports all debugging functions

Test all possible transceiver parallel data widths

Parameterization Notes Connect To

• If Enable 10G PCS is enabled, 10G

PCS protocol mode must be set to

basic on the 10G PCS tab.

• Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Checker

• Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Generator

• JTAG to Avalon

Master Bridge

• Reconfiguration controller

• Set lanes, group size, serialization factor, data rate, and input clock frequency to match your application.

• Turn on Avalon data interfaces.

• Disable 8B/10B.

• Set Word alignment mode to manual.

• Disable rate match FIFO.

• Disable byte ordering block.

• Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Checker

• Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Generator

• JTAG to Avalon

Master Bridge

• Reconfiguration controller

Test at more than

8.5 Gbps in GT devices or use of

PMA direct mode

(such as when using six channels in one quad)

• Set Phase compensation FIFO mode to EMBEDDED above certain data rates and set to NONE for PMA direct mode (Stratix IV designs only).

• Turn on Avalon data interfaces.

• Set serial loopback mode to enable serial loopback controls in the toolkit.

• Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Checker

• Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Generator

• JTAG to Avalon

Master Bridge

• Reconfiguration controller

Generates standard data test patterns at

Avalon-ST source ports

• Select PRBS7, PRBS15, PRBS23,

PRBS31, high frequency, or low

frequency patterns.

• Turn on Enable Bypass interface for connection to design logic.

• PHY input port

• JTAG to Avalon

Master Bridge

• Your design logic

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Component

Altera-Avalon

Data Pattern

Checker

Debugging

Functions

Stratix V Debug System Configuration

Parameterization Notes

Validates incoming data stream against test patterns accepted on

Avalon streaming sink ports

• Specify a value for

ST_DATA_W

that matches the FPGA-fabric interface width.

Connect To

• PHY output port

• JTAG to Avalon

Master Bridge

11-13

Reconfigura‐ tion Controller

Supports PMA control and other transceiver settings

• Connect the reconfiguration controller to

• Connect reconfig_from_xcvr

to reconfig_to_xcvr

.

• Enable Analog controls.

• Turn on Enable EyeQ block to enable signal eye analysis

• Turn on Enable Bit Error Rate Block for BER testing

• Turn on Enable decision feedback

equalizer (DFE) block for link optimization

• Enable DFE block

• PHY input port

• JTAG to Avalon

Master Bridge

JTAG to

Avalon Master

Bridge

Accepts encoded streams of bytes with transaction data and initiates

Avalon-MM transactions

N/A • PHY input port

• Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Checker

• Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Generator

• Reconfiguration

Controller

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-14

Bit Error Rate Test Configuration (Stratix V)

Bit Error Rate Test Configuration (Stratix V)

Use the following configuration to perform bit rate error testing in Stratix V designs.

Figure 11-8: Bit Error Rate Test Configuration (Stratix V)

JTAG-to-Avalon

Master Bridge

Custom PHY

IP Core or

Low-Latency

PHY IP Core

Your Design Logic

Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Generator

Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Checker

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Table 11-7: System Connections: Bit Error Rate Tests

From

Your Design Logic

Data Pattern Generator

JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge

To

Data Pattern Generator bypass port

PHY input port

Altera Avalon Data Pattern Generator

JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge

JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge

Data Pattern Checker

Transceiver Reconfiguration Controller

Altera Avalon Data Pattern Checker

PHY input port

PHY output port

PHY input port

Related Information

Running BER Tests

on page 11-27

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

PRBS Signal Eye Test Configuration (Stratix V)

PRBS Signal Eye Test Configuration (Stratix V)

Use the following configuration to perform PRBS signal eye testing in Stratix V designs.

Figure 11-9: PRBS Signal Eye Test Configuration (Stratix V)

11-15

JTAG-to-Avalon

Master Bridge

Your Design Logic

XCVR

Reconfiguration

Controller

Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Generator

Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Checker

Custom PHY

IP Core or

Low-Latency

PHY IP Core

Table 11-8: System Connections: PRBS Signal Eye Tests (Stratix V)

From

Your Design Logic

Data Pattern Generator

JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge

To

Data Pattern Generator bypass port

PHY input port

Altera Avalon Data Pattern Generator

JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge

Data Pattern Checker

JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge

JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge

Transceiver Reconfiguration Controller

Altera Avalon Data Pattern Checker

PHY output port

Transceiver Reconfiguration Controller

PHY input port

PHY input port

Related Information

Running PRBS Signal Eye Tests

on page 11-28

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-16

Enabling Serial Bit Comparator Mode (Stratix V)

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Enabling Serial Bit Comparator Mode (Stratix V)

Serial bit comparator mode allows you to run EyeQ diagnostic features with any PRBS patterns or userdesign data, without disrupting the data path. For Stratix V devices, you must enable Serial bit

comparator mode. For Arria 10 design, Serial bit comparator automatically enables through the standard Arria 10 system configuration.

To enable this mode for Stratix V devices, you must enable the following debugging component options when configuring the debugging system:

Table 11-9: Component Settings for Serial Bit Comparator Mode

Debugging Component

Transceiver Reconfiguration

Controller

Data Pattern Generator

(9)

Setting for Serial Bit Mode

(8)

Turn on Enable EyeQ block and Enable Bit Error Rate Block

Turn on Enable Bypass interface

Serial bit comparator mode is less accurate than Data pattern checker mode for single bit error checking. Do not use Serial bit comparator mode if you require an exact error rate. Use the Serial bit

comparator mode for checking a large window of error. The toolkit does not read the bit error counter in real-time because it reads through the memory-mapped interface. Serial bit comparator mode has the following hardware limitations for Stratix V devices:

• Toolkit uses serial bit checker only on a single channel per reconfiguration controller at a time.

• When the serial bit checker is running on channel n, you can change only the V

OD

, pre-emphasis, DC gain, and EyeQ settings on that channel. Changing or enabling DFE or CTLE can cause corruption of the serial bit checker results.

• When the serial bit checker is running on a channel, you cannot change settings on any other channel on the same reconfiguration controller.

• When the serial bit checker is running on a channel, you cannot open any other channel in the

Transceiver Toolkit.

• When the serial bit checker is running on a channel, you cannot copy PMA settings from any channel on the same reconfiguration controller.

(8)

(9)

Settings in

Table 11-9

are supported in Stratix V devices only.

Limited support for Data Pattern Generator or data pattern in Serial Bit Mode.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Custom Traffic Signal Eye Test Configuration (Stratix V)

Custom Traffic Signal Eye Test Configuration (Stratix V)

Use the following configuration to perform custom traffic signal eye testing in Stratix V designs.

Figure 11-10: System Configuration: Custom Traffic Signal Eye Tests (Stratix V)

11-17

JTAG-to-Avalon

Master Bridge

Custom PHY

IP Core or

Low-Latency

PHY IP Core

Your Design Logic

(Custom Traffic)

XCVR

Reconfiguration

Controller

Table 11-10: System Connections: Custom Traffic Signal Eye Tests (Stratix V)

From

Your design logic with custom traffic

JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge

JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge

Transceiver Reconfiguration Controller

To

PHY input port

Transceiver Reconfiguration Controller

PHY input port

PHY input port

Related Information

Running Custom Traffic Tests

on page 11-29

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-18

Link Optimization Test Configuration (Stratix V)

Link Optimization Test Configuration (Stratix V)

Use the following configuration for link optimization tests in Stratix V devices.

Figure 11-11: System Configuration: Link Optimization Tests (Stratix V)

JTAG-to-Avalon

Master Bridge

Your Design Logic

XCVR

Reconfiguration

Controller

Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Generator

Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Checker

Custom PHY

IP Core or

Low-Latency

PHY IP Core

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Your Design Logic

From

Data Pattern Generator

JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge

JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge

Data Pattern Checker

JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge

JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge

Transceiver Reconfiguration Controller

Related Information

Running Link Optimization Tests

on page 11-30

To

Data Pattern Generator bypass port

PHY input port

Altera Avalon Data Pattern Generator

Altera Avalon Data Pattern Checker

PHY output port

Transceiver Reconfiguration Controller

PHY input port

PHY input port

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

PMA Analog Setting Control Configuration (Stratix V)

PMA Analog Setting Control Configuration (Stratix V)

Use the following configuration to control PMA Analog settings in Stratix V designs.

Figure 11-12: System Configuration: PMA Analog Setting Control (Stratix V)

11-19

JTAG-to-Avalon

Master Bridge

XCVR

Reconfiguration

Controller

Custom PHY

IP Core or

Low-Latency

PHY IP Core

Table 11-11: System Connections: PMA Analog Setting Control (Stratix V)

From

JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge

JTAG to Avalon Master Bridge

Transceiver Reconfiguration Controller

To

Transceiver Reconfiguration Controller

PHY input port

PHY input port

Related Information

Controlling PMA Analog Settings

on page 11-30

Managing Transceiver Channels

The Channel Manager allows you to configure and control large numbers of channels in a spreadsheet view. You can view all the PMA and sweep settings for all channels. You can copy, paste, import, and export settings to and from channels. You can also start and stop sweeps for any or all channels. Rightclick in the Channel Manager to view additional channel commands. The columns in the Channel

Manager are movable, resizable, and sortable.

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-20

Channel Display Modes

Figure 11-13: Channel Manager GUI

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Copying and Pasting Settings

You can copy PMA and/or sweep settings from a selected row. You can paste PMA and/or sweep settings to one or more rows.

Importing and Exporting Settings

You can select a row in the Channel Manager to export your PMA settings to a text file. You can then select one or more rows in the Channel Manager to apply the PMA settings from a text file. The PMA settings in the text file apply to a single channel. When you import the PMA settings from a text file, you are duplicating one set of PMA settings for all selected channels.

Starting and Stopping Tests

The Channel Manager allows you to start and stop tests by right-clicking the channels. You can select several rows in the Channel Manager to start or stop test for multiple channels.

Channel Display Modes

The three display modes are Current, Min/Max, and Best. The default display mode is Current.

Current—shows the current values from the device. The blue color text indicates that the settings are live.

Min/Max—shows the minimum and maximum values to be used in the auto sweep.

Best—shows the best tested values from the last completed auto sweep run.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Creating Links

11-21

Note: The Transmitter Channels tab only shows the Current display mode. Auto sweep cannot be performed on only a transmitter channel; a receiver channel is required to perform an auto sweep test.

Creating Links

The toolkit automatically creates links when a receiver and transmitter share a transceiver channel. You can also manually create and delete links between transmitter and receiver channels. You create links in the Setup dialog.

Setup Dialog

Click Setup from the Channel Manager to open the Setup dialog box.

Table 11-12: Setup Dialog Popup Menu

Command Name Action When Clicked

Edit Transmitter Alias Starts the inline edit of the alias of the selected row.

Edit Receiver Alias

Starts the inline edit of the alias of the selected row.

Edit Transceiver Link

Alias

Copy

Starts the inline edit of the alias of the selected row.

Copies the text of the selected row(s) to the clipboard. The text copied depends on the column clicked on. The text copied to the clipboard is newline delimited.

Enabled If

Only enabled if one row is selected.

Only enabled if one row is selected.

Only enabled if one row is selected.

Enabled if one or more rows are selected.

Controlling Transceiver Channels

You can directly control and monitor transmitters, receivers, and links running on the board in real time.

You can transmit a data pattern across the transceiver link, and then report the signal quality of the received data in terms of bit error rate or eye margin with EyeQ.

Click Control Transmitter Channel (Transmitter Channels tab), Control Receiver Channel (Receiver

Channels tab), or Control Transceiver Link (Transceiver Links tab) to adjust transmitter or receiver settings while the channels are running.

Debugging Transceiver Links

The Transceiver Toolkit allows you to control and monitor the performance of high-speed serial links running on your board in real-time. You can identify the transceiver links in your design, transmit a data pattern across the transceiver link, and report the signal quality of the received data in terms of bit error rate, bathtub curve, heat map, or EyeQ graph (for supported families).

The toolkit automatically identifies the transceiver links in your design, or you can manually create transceiver links. You can then run auto sweep to help you quickly identify the best PMA settings for each link. You can directly control the transmitter/receiver channels to experiment with various settings suggested by auto sweep. The EyeQ graph allows you to visualize the estimated horizontal and vertical eye opening at the receiver.

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-22

Step 1: Load Your Design

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

The Transceiver Toolkit supports various transceiver link testing configurations. You can identify and test the transceiver link between two Altera devices, or you can transmit a test pattern with a third-party device and monitor the data on an Altera device receiver channel. If a third-party chip includes self-test capability, then you can send the test pattern from the Altera device and monitor the signal integrity at the third-party device receiver channel. If the third-party device supports reverse serial loopback, you can run the test entirely within the Transceiver Toolkit.

Before you can monitor transceiver channels, you must configure a system with debugging components, and program the design into an FPGA. Once those steps are complete, use the following flow to test the channels:

1. Load the design in Transceiver Toolkit

2. Link hardware resources

3. Verify hardware connections

4. Identify transceiver channels

5. Run link tests or control PMA analog settings

6. View results

Step 1: Load Your Design

The Transceiver Toolkit automatically loads the last compiled design upon opening. To load any design into the toolkit, click File > Load Design and select the

.sof

programming file generated for your transceiver design. Loading the

.sof

automatically links the design to the target hardware in the toolkit.

The toolkit automatically discovers links between transmitter and receiver of the same channel. The

System Explorer displays information about the loaded design.

Step 2: Link Hardware Resources

The toolkit automatically discovers connected hardware and designs. You can also manually link a design to connected hardware resources in the System Explorer.

If you are using more than one Altera board, you can set up a test with multiple devices linked to the same design. This setup is useful when you want to perform a link test between a transmitter and receiver on two separate devices. You can also load multiple Quartus Prime projects and make links between different systems. You can perform tests on completely separate and unrelated systems in a single tool instance.

Note: Prior to the Transceiver Toolkit version 11.1, you must manually load and link your design to hardware. In version 11.1 and later, the Transceiver Toolkit automatically links any device programmed with a project.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 11-14: One Channel Loopback Mode for Stratix V / 28nm

Step 2: Link Hardware Resources

11-23

Transceiver Toolkit host computer

Top-Level Design (FPGA)

JTAG-to-Avalon

Master Bridge

XCVR

Reconfiguration

Controller

Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Generator

Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Checker

Custom PHY

IP Core or

Low-Latency

PHY IP Core

Loopback on board

Figure 11-15: One Channel Loopback Mode for Arria 10 / 20nm

Top-Level Design (FPGA)

Transceiver Toolkit

Host Computer

Transceiver Native PHY IP

Hard PRBS Generator

Hard PRBS Checker

Altera Debug Master

Endpoint (ADME)

Loopback

On Board

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-24

Step 2: Link Hardware Resources

Figure 11-16: Four Channel Loopback Mode for Stratix V / 28nm

Top-Level Design (FPGA)

Transceiver Toolkit host computer

JTAG-to-Avalon

Master Bridge

XCVR

Reconfiguration

Controller

Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Generator

Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Checker

Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Generator

Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Checker

Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Generator

Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Checker

Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Generator

Avalon-ST Data

Pattern Checker

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Loopback on board

Custom PHY

IP Core or

Low-Latency

PHY IP Core

Loopback on board

Loopback on board

Loopback on board

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Linking One Design to One Device

Figure 11-17: Four Channel Loopback Mode for Arria 10 / Generation 10 / 20nm

11-25

Top-Level Design (FPGA)

Transceiver Toolkit

Host Computer

Transceiver Native PHY IP

Altera Debug Master

Endpoint (ADME)

Hard PRBS Generator

Hard PRBS Checker

Hard PRBS Generator

Hard PRBS Checker

Hard PRBS Generator

Hard PRBS Checker

Hard PRBS Generator

Hard PRBS Checker

Loopback

On Board

Loopback

On Board

Loopback

On Board

Loopback

On Board

Linking One Design to One Device

To link one design to one device by one USB-Blaster download cable, follow these steps:

1. Load the design for your Quartus Prime project.

2. Link each device to an appropriate design if the design has not auto-linked.

3. Create the link between channels on the device to test.

Linking Two Designs to Two Devices

To link two designs to two separate devices on the same board, connected by one USB-Blaster download cable, follow these steps:

1. Load the design for all the Quartus Prime project files you might need.

2. Link each device to an appropriate design if the design has not auto-linked.

3. Open the project for the second device.

4. Link the second device on the JTAG chain to the second design (unless the design auto-links).

5. Create a link between the channels on the devices you want to test.

Linking Designs and Devices on Separate Boards

To link two designs to two separate devices on separate boards, connected to separate USB-Blaster download cables, follow these steps:

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-26

Linking One Design on Two Devices

1. Load the design for all the Quartus Prime project files you might need.

2. Link each device to an appropriate design if the design has not auto-linked.

3. Create the link between channels on the device to test.

4. Link the device you connected to the second USB-Blaster download cable to the second design.

5. Create a link between the channels on the devices you want to test.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Linking One Design on Two Devices

To link the same design on two separate devices, follow these steps:

1. In the Transceiver Toolkit, open the

.sof

you are using on both devices.

2. Link the first device to this design instance.

3. Link the second device to the design.

4. Create a link between the channels on the devices you want to test.

Step 3: Verify Hardware Connections

After you load your design and link your hardware, verify that the channels are connected correctly and looped back properly on the hardware. Use the toolkit to send data patterns and receive them correctly.

Verifying your link and correct channel before you perform Auto Sweep or EyeQ tests can save time in the work flow.

After you have verified that the transmitter and receiver are communicating with each other, you can create a link between the two transceivers so that you can perform Auto Sweep and EyeQ tests with this pair.

Step 4: Identify Transceiver Channels

The Transceiver Toolkit automatically displays recognized transmitter and receiver channels. The toolkit identifies a channel automatically whenever a receiver and transmitter share a transceiver channel. You can also manually identify the transmitter and receiver in a transceiver channel and create a link between the two for testing.

When you run link tests, channel color highlights indicate the test status:

Table 11-13: Channel Color Highlights

Red

Color

Green

Neutral

Yellow

Transmitter Channel Receiver Channel

Channel is closed or generator clock is not running

Channel is closed or checker clock is not running

Generator is sending a pattern

Channel is open, generator clock is running, and generator is not sending a pattern

N/A

Checker is checking and data pattern is locked

Channel is open, checker clock is running, and checker is not checking

Checker is checking and data pattern is not locked

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Step 5: Run Link Tests

11-27

Step 5: Run Link Tests

Once you identify the transceiver channels for debugging, you can run various link tests in the toolkit.

Use the Transceiver Links tab to control link tests. For example, use the Auto Sweep feature to sweep transceiver settings to determine the parameters that support the best BER value. Click Link Auto Sweep,

Link EyeQ or Link Auto Sweep & EyeQ to adjust the PMA settings and run tests.

Running BER Tests

You can run BER tests across your transceiver link. After programming the FPGA with your debugging design, loading the design in the toolkit, and linking hardware, follow these steps to run BER tests:

1. Click Setup.

a. Select the generator and checker you want to control.

b. Select the transmitter and receiver pair you want to control.

c. Click Create Transceiver Link and click Close

2. Click Control Transceiver Link, and specify a PRBS Test pattern and Data pattern checker for

Checker mode. The checker mode option is only available after you turn on Enable EyeQ block and

Enable Bit Error Rate Block in the Reconfiguration Controller component.

If you select Bypass for the Test pattern, the toolkit bypasses the PRBS generator and runs your design through the link. The bypass option is only available after you turn on Enable Bypass interface in the

Reconfiguration Controller component.

3. Experiment with Reconfiguration, Generator, or Checker settings.

4. Click Start to run the pattern with your settings. You can then click Inject Error to inject error bits,

Reset the counter, or Stop the test.

Note: Arria 10 devices do not support Inject Error if you use the hard PRBS Pattern Generator and

Checker in the system configuration.

Related Information

Bit Error Rate Test Configuration (Stratix V)

on page 11-14

Link Testing Configuration (Arria 10)

on page 11-9

Signal Eye Margin Testing

Some Altera devices include EyeQ circuitry that allows visualization of the horizontal and vertical eye margin at the receiver. For supported devices, use signal eye tests to tune the PMA settings of your transceiver. This results in the best eye margin and BER at high data rates. The toolkit disables signal eye testing for unsupported devices.

The EyeQ graph can display a bathtub curve, eye diagram representing eye margin, or heat map display.

The run list displays the statistics of each EyeQ test. When PMA settings are suitable, the bathtub curve is wide, with sharp slopes near the edges. The curve is up to 30 units wide. If the bathtub is narrow, then the signal quality is poor. The wider the bathtub curve, the wider the eye. The smaller the bathtub curve, the smaller the eye. The eye contour shows the estimated horizontal and vertical eye opening at the receiver.

You can right-click any of the test runs in the list, and then click Apply Settings to Device to quickly apply those PMA setting to your device. You can also click Export, Import, or Create Report.

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-28

Running PRBS Signal Eye Tests

Figure 11-18: EyeQ Settings and Status Showing Results of Two Test Runs

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 11-19: Heat Map Display and Bathtub Curve Through Eye

Running PRBS Signal Eye Tests

You can run PRBS signal eye tests to visualize the estimated horizontal and vertical eye opening at the receiver.After programming the FPGA with your debugging design, loading the design in the toolkit, and linking hardware, follow these steps to run PRBS signal eye tests:

1. Click Setup.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Running Custom Traffic Tests

11-29

a. Select the generator and checker you want to control.

b. Select the transmitter and receiver pair you want to control.

c. Click Create Transceiver Link and click Close.

2. Click Link EyeQ, and select EyeQ as the Test mode. The EyeQ mode displays test results as a bathtub curve, heat map, or eye contour representing bit error and phase offset data.

3. Specify the PRBS Test pattern and the Checker mode. Use Serial bit comparator checker mode only for checking a large window of error with custom traffic.

The checker mode option is only available after you turn on Enable EyeQ block and Enable Bit Error

Rate Block in the Reconfiguration Controller component. (Stratix V designs only)

4. Specify Run length and EyeQ settings to control the test coverage and type of EyeQ results displayed, respectively.

5. Click Start to run the pattern with your settings. EyeQ uses the current channel settings to start a phase sweep of the channel. The phase sweep runs 32 iterations. As the run progresses, view the status under EyeQ status. Use this diagram to compare PMA settings for the same channel and to choose the best combination of PMA settings for a particular channel.

6. When the run completes, the chart displays the characteristics of each run. Click Stop to halt the test, change the PMA settings, and re-start the test. Click Create Report to export data to a table format for further viewing.

Related Information

PRBS Signal Eye Test Configuration (Stratix V)

on page 11-15

Link Testing Configuration (Arria 10)

on page 11-9

Running Custom Traffic Tests

After programming the FPGA with your debugging design, loading the design in the toolkit, and linking hardware, follow these steps to run custom traffic tests:

1. Click Setup and specify the following:

a. Select the associated reconfiguration controller.

b. Click Create Transceiver Link and click Close.

2. Click the Receiver EyeQ, and select EyeQ as the Test mode. The EyeQ mode displays test results as a bathtub curve, heat map, or eye contour representing bit error and phase offset data.

3. Specify the PRBS Test pattern.

4. For Checker mode, select Serial bit comparator.

The checker mode option is only available after you turn on Enable EyeQ block and Enable Bit Error

Rate Block for the Reconfiguration Controller component.

5. Specify Run length and EyeQ settings to control the test coverage and type of EyeQ results displayed, respectively.

6. Click Start to run the pattern with your settings. EyeQ uses the current channel settings to start a phase sweep of the channel. The phase sweep runs 32 iterations. As the run progresses, view the status under EyeQ status.

7. When the run completes, the chart displays the characteristics of each run. Click Stop to halt the test, change the PMA settings, and re-start the test. Click Create Report to export data to a table format for further viewing.

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-30

Auto Sweep Testing

Related Information

Custom Traffic Signal Eye Test Configuration (Stratix V)

on page 11-17

Custom Traffic Signal Eye Test Configuration (Arria 10)

on page 11-11

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Auto Sweep Testing

Use the auto sweep feature to automatically sweep ranges for the best transceiver PMA settings. Store a history of the test runs and keep a record of the best PMA settings. Use the best settings the toolkit determines in your final design for improved signal integrity.

Running Link Optimization Tests

After programming the FPGA with your debugging design, loading the design in the toolkit, and linking hardware, follow these steps to run link optimization tests:

1. Click the Transceiver Links tab, and select the channel you want to control.

2. Click Link Auto Sweep. The Advanced tab appears with Auto sweep as Test mode.

3. Specify the PRBS Test pattern.

4. Specify Run length, experiment with the Transmitter settings, and Receiver settings to control the test coverage and PMA settings, respectively.

5. Click Start to run all combinations of tests meeting the PMA parameter limits.

6. When the run completes the chart is displayed and the characteristics of each run are listed in the run list. You can click Stop to halt the test, change the PMA settings, and re-start the test. Click Create

Report to export data to a table format for further viewing.

7. To use decision feedback equalization (DFE) to determine the best tap settings, follow these steps:

a. Use Auto Sweep to find optimal PMA settings while leaving the DFE mode set to Off.

b. If BER = 0, use the best PMA settings achieved.

c. If BER > 0, use this PMA setting, and set the minimum and maximum values obtained from Auto

Sweep to match this setting. Set the maximum DFE range to limits for each of the three DFE settings.

d. Run Create Report to view the results and determine which DFE setting has the best BER. Use these settings in conjunction with the PMA settings for the best results.

Related Information

Link Optimization Test Configuration (Stratix V)

on page 11-18

Link Testing Configuration (Arria 10)

on page 11-9

Controlling PMA Analog Settings

You can directly control PMA analog settings to experiment with settings while the link is running. To control PMA analog settings, follow these steps:

1. Click Setup.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Controlling PMA Analog Settings

11-31

a. Click the Transmitter Channels tab, define a transmitter without a generator, and click Create

Transmitter Channel.

b. Click the Receiver Channels tab, define a receiver without a generator, and click Create Receiver

Channel.

c. Click the Transceiver Links tab, select the transmitter and receivers you want to control, and click

Create Transceiver Link.

d. Click Close.

2. Click Control Receiver Channel, Control Transmitter Channel, or Control Transceiver Link to directly control the PMA settings while running.

Figure 11-20: Controlling Transmitter Channel

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-32

Controlling PMA Analog Settings

Figure 11-21: Controlling Receiver Channel

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 11-22: Controlling Transceiver Link

Controlling PMA Analog Settings

11-33

Related Information

PMA Analog Setting Control Configuration (Stratix V)

on page 11-19

PMA Analog Setting Control Configuration (Arria 10)

on page 11-11

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-34

Troubleshooting Common Errors

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Troubleshooting Common Errors

• Missing high-speed link pin connections

The pin connections to identify high-speed links (tx_p/n and rx_p/n) could be missing. When porting an older design to the latest version of the Quartus Prime software, please make sure your connections were preserved.

• Reset Issues

Ensure that the reset input to the Transceiver Native PHY, Transceiver Reset Controller, and ATX PLL

IP cores is not held active (1'b1). The Transceiver Toolkit highlights in red, all the Transceiver Native

PHY channels which you are trying to set up.

• Unconnected reconfig_clk

The reconfig_clk

input to the Transceiver Native PHY and ATX PLL IP cores need to be connected and driven. Otherwise, the transceiver link channel will not be displayed.

User Interface Settings Reference

The following settings are available for interaction with the transmitter channels or receiver channels or transceiver links in the Transceiver Toolkit user interface.

Table 11-14: Transceiver Toolkit Control Panel Settings

Setting

1-D EyeQ mode

Alias

Description

Use when DFE is on and the EyeQ mode is set to

Bathtub curve. Ignores the vertical step settings for

EyeQ (Stratix V only).

Name you choose for the channel.

Control Panel

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Auto sweep status Reports the current and best tested bits, errors, bit error rate, and case count for the current auto sweep test.

Bit error rate (BER) Specifies errors divided by bits tested since the last reset of the checker.

Transmitter

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Channel address Logical address number of the transceiver channel.

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Transmitter

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Setting

Checker mode

Data rate

DC gain

User Interface Settings Reference

Description Control Panel

Specify Data pattern checker or Serial bit

comparator for BER tests.

If you enable Serial bit comparator the Data Pattern

Generator sends the PRBS pattern, but the pattern is checked by the serial bit comparator.

In Bypass mode, clicking Start begins counting on the

Serial bit comparator.

For BER testing:

• Arria 10 devices supports the Data Pattern Checker and the Hard PRBS.

• Stratix V supports the Data Pattern Checker and the Serial Bit Checker.

For EyeQ testing:

• Arria 10 devices Arria 10 support the Serial Bit

Checker.

• Stratix V devices support the Data Pattern Checker and the Serial Bit Checker.

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Data rate of the channel as read from the project file or data rate as measured by the frequency detector.

To use the frequency detector, turn on Enable

Frequency Counter in the Data Pattern Checker IP core and/or Data Pattern Generator IP core, regenerate the IP cores, and recompile the design.

The measured data rate depends on the Avalon management clock frequency as read from the project file.

Click the refresh button next to the measured Data

rate if you make changes to your settings and want to sample the data rate again.

Transmitter

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Circuitry that provides an equal boost to the incoming signal across the frequency spectrum.

Receiver

Transceiver Link

11-35

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-36

User Interface Settings Reference

Setting

DFE mode

• Values 1-5

(Stratix V devices)

• Values 1-11

(Arria 10 devices)

Enable word aligner

Description

Decision feedback equalization (DFE) for improving signal quality. DFE modes are Off, Manual and

Continuous Adaptation in Arria 10 devices.

Continuous mode DFE automatically tries to find the best tap values.

Stratix V devices also support One-time adaptive

mode DFE.

Forces the transceiver channel to align to the word you specify (Stratix V only feature).

Control Panel

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Equalization control

Boosts the high-frequency gain of the incoming signal, thereby compensating for the low-pass filter effects of the physical medium. When used with DFE, use DFE in Manual or Continuous mode.

In Stratix V devices, AEQ one-time adaptation is supported in Auto Sweep.

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Receiver

Transceiver Link

In Stratix V devices, Adaptive equalization (AEQ) automatically evaluates and selects the best combina‐ tion of equalizer settings. When turned on, it automatically turns off Equalization Control. The one-time selection determines the best setting and stops searching. You can use AEQ for multiple, independently controlled receiver channels.

Error rate limit

EyeQ mode

Turns on or off error rate limits. Start checking after waits until the set number of bits are satisfied until it starts looking at the bit error rate (BER) for the next two checks.

Bit error rate achieves below sets upper bit error rate limits. If the error rate is better than the set error rate, the test ends.

Bit error rate exceeds Sets lower bit error rate limits.

If the error rate is worse than the set error rate, the test ends.

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Allows you to specify Eye contour or Bathtub curve as the type of EyeQ graph generated by the test.

Transmitter

Receiver

Transceiver Link

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Setting

EyeQ phase step

User Interface Settings Reference

Description

Sets the phase step for sampling the data from an offset of the CDR (clock data recovery) data path; set to Off to use the regular clock data recovery (CDR) data path.

Control Panel

Receiver

Transceiver Link

EyeQ status Displays a graphical representation of signal integrity as an eye contour, bathtub curve plot, or heat map.

Transmitter

Receiver

Transceiver Link

EyeQ vertical step Sets the voltage threshold of the sampler to report the height of the eye. Negative numbers are allowed for vertical steps to capture asymmetric eye.

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Horizontal phase step interval

Specify the number of horizontal steps to increment when performing a sweep. Increasing the value increases the speed of the test but at a lower resolution. This option only applies to eye contour.

Transmitter

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Increase test range Right-click in the Advanced panel to use the span capabilities of Auto Sweep to automatically increase the span of tests by one unit down for the minimum and one unit up for the maximum, for the selected set of controls. You can span either PMA Analog controls

(non-DFE controls), or the DFE controls. You can quickly set up a test to check if any PMA setting combinations near your current best could yield better results.

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Inject Error

Maximum tested bits

Number of bits tested

Flips one bit to the output of the data pattern generator to introduce an artificial error (Stratix V only feature).

Sets the maximum number of tested bits for each test iteration.

Specifies the number of bits tested since the last reset of the checker.

Transmitter

Transceiver Link

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Number of error bits

Specifies the number of error bits encountered since the last reset of the checker.

Receiver

Transceiver Link

11-37

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-38

User Interface Settings Reference

Setting

Number of preamble beats

Description

The number of clock cycles to which the preamble word is sent before the test pattern begins (Stratix V only feature).

PLL refclk freq

Populate with

Control Panel

Transmitter

Transceiver Link

Channel reference clock frequency as read from the project file or measured reference clock frequency as calculated from the measured data rate.

Transmitter

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Right-click in the Advanced panel to load current values on the device as a starting point, or initially load the best settings determined through auto sweep.

The Quartus Prime software automatically applies the values you specify in the drop-down lists for the

Transmitter settings and Receiver settings.

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Preamble word Word to send out if you use the preamble mode (only if you use soft PRBS Data Pattern Generator and

Checker).

Transmitter

Transceiver Link

Pre-emphasis The programmable pre-emphasis module in each transmit buffer boosts high frequencies in the transmit data signal, which may be attenuated in the transmission media. Using pre-emphasis can maximize the data eye opening at the far-end receiver.

Transmitter

Transceiver Link

Receiver channel Specifies the name of the selected receiver channel.

Refresh Button

Reset

After loading the

.pof

, loads fresh settings from the registers after running dynamic reconfiguration.

Resets the current test.

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Transmitter

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Receiver

Transceiver Link

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Setting

Rules Based

Configuration

(RBC) validity checking

Run length

Run results table

Description Control Panel

Displays invalid combination of settings in red in each list under Transmitter settings and Receiver settings, based on previous settings. If selected, the settings remain in red to indicate the currently selected combination is invalid. This avoids manually testing invalid settings that you cannot compile for your design. This prevents setting the device into an invalid mode for extended periods of time and potentially damaging the circuits.

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Sets coverage parameters for test runs.

User Interface Settings Reference

Transmitter

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Lists the statistics of each EyeQ test run. The run results table is sortable. You can right-click any of the tests in the table and then click Apply Settings to

Device to quickly apply the chosen PMA settings to your device. You can click Import to load reports from previously generated EyeQ runs into the run results table. You can click Export to export single or multiple runs from the run results table to a report.

Transmitter

Receiver

Transceiver Link

RX CDR PLL status (10)

Shows the receiver in lock-to-reference (LTR) mode.

When in auto-mode, if data cannot be locked, this signal alternates in LTD mode if the CDR is locked to data.

Receiver

Transceiver Link

RX CDR data status Shows the receiver in lock-to-data (LTD) mode.

When in auto-mode, if data cannot be locked, the signal stays high when locked to data and never toggles.

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Serial loopback enabled

Start

Inserts a serial loopback before the buffers, allowing you to form a link on a transmitter and receiver pair on the same physical channel of the device.

Transmitter

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Starts the pattern generator or checker on the channel to verify incoming data.

Transmitter

Receiver

Transceiver Link

11-39

(10) For Stratix V devices, the Phase Frequency Detector (PFD) is inactive in LTD mode. The rx_is_ lockedtoref

status signal toggles randomly and is not significant in LTD mode.

Debugging Transceiver Links

Altera Corporation

Send Feedback

11-40

Stop

User Interface Settings Reference

Setting Description

Stops generating patterns and testing the channel.

Target bit error rate Finds the contour edge of the bit error rate that you

Test mode

Test pattern select. This option only applies to eye contour mode.

Control Panel

Transmitter

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Transmitter

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Allows you to specify the Auto sweep, EyeQ, or Auto

sweep and EyeQ test mode.

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Test pattern sent by the transmitter channel. Arria 10 devices support PRBS9, PRBS15, PRBS23, and

PRBS31).

Stratix V devices support PRBS7, PRBS15,

PRBS23, PRBS31, LowFrequency, HighFrequency, and Bypass mode. The Data Pattern Checker selfaligns both high and low frequency patterns. Use

Bypass mode to send user-design data.

Transmitter

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Time limit

Transmitter channel

TX/CMU PLL status

Specifies the time limit unit and value to have a maximum bounds time limit for each test iteration

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Specifies the name of the selected transmitter channel. Transmitter

Transceiver Link

Provides status of whether the transmitter channel

PLL is locked to the reference clock.

Transmitter

Transceiver Link

Transmitter

Transceiver Link

Use preamble upon start

If turned on, sends the preamble word before the test pattern. If turned off, starts sending the test pattern immediately.

Vertical phase step interval

Specify the number of vertical steps to increment when performing a sweep. Increasing the value increases the speed of the test but at a lower resolution. This option only applies to the eye contour.

Transmitter

Receiver

Transceiver Link

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

VGA

Setting

V

OD

control

Scripting API Reference

Description

The variable gain amplifier (VGA) amplifies the signal amplitude and ensures a constant voltage swing before the data is fed to the CDR for sampling. This assignment controls the VGA output voltage swing and can be set to any value from 0 to 7.

Note: Supports Arria 10 devices only

Control Panel

Receiver

Transceiver Link

Programmable transmitter differential output voltage. Transmitter

Transceiver Link

11-41

Scripting API Reference

You can alternatively use Tcl commands to access Transceiver Toolkit functions, rather than using the

GUI. You can script various tasks, such as loading a project, creating design instances, linking device resources, and identifying high-speed serial links. You can save your project setup in a Tcl script for use in subsequent testing sessions. You can also build a custom test routine script.

After you set up and define links that describe the entire physical system, you can click Save Tcl Script to save the setup for future use. To run the scripts, double-click script names in the System Explorer scripts folder.

View a list of the available Tcl commands in the Tcl Console window. Select Tcl commands in the list to view descriptions, including example usage.

To view Tcl command descriptions from the Tcl Console window:

1. Type help help

. The Console displays all Transceiver Toolkit Tcl commands.

2. Type help

<command name>. The Console displays the command description.

Transceiver Toolkit Commands

The following tables list the available Transceiver Toolkit scripting commands.

Table 11-15: Transceiver Toolkit Channel_rx Commands

Command Arguments Function

transceiver_channel_rx_ get_data

<service-path>

Returns a list of the current checker data.

The results are in the order of number of bits, number of errors, and bit error rate.

transceiver_channel_rx_ get_dcgain

<service-path>

Gets the DC gain value on the receiver channel.

transceiver_channel_rx_ get_dfe_tap_value

<service-path> <tap position> Gets the current tap value of the specified channel at the specified tap position.

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-42

Transceiver Toolkit Commands

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Command Arguments Function

transceiver_channel_rx_ get_eqctrl

<service-path>

Gets the equalization control value on the receiver channel.

transceiver_channel_rx_ get_pattern

<service-path>

Returns the current data checker pattern by name.

transceiver_channel_rx_ has_dfe

<service-path>

Gets whether this channel has the DFE feature available.

transceiver_channel_rx_ has_eyeq

<service-path>

Gets whether the EyeQ feature is available for the specified channel.

transceiver_channel_rx_ is_checking

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_rx_ is_dfe_enabled

<service-path>

Returns non-zero if the checker is running.

Gets whether the DFE feature is enabled on the specified channel.

transceiver_channel_rx_ is_locked

<service-path>

Returns non-zero if the checker is locked onto the incoming data.

transceiver_channel_rx_ reset_counters

<service-path>

Resets the bit and error counters inside the checker.

transceiver_channel_rx_ reset

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_rx_ set_dcgain

<service-path> <value>

Resets the specified channel.

Sets the DC gain value on the receiver channel.

transceiver_channel_rx_ set_dfe_enabled

<service-path><disable(0)/ enable(1)>

transceiver_channel_rx_ set_dfe_adaptive

<service-path>

Enables or disables the DFE feature on the specified channel.

transceiver_channel_rx_ set_dfe_tap_value

<service-path> <tap position>

<tap value>

Sets the current tap value of the specified channel at the specified tap position to the specified value.

Sets the mode of DFE adaptation. 0=off,

1=adaptive, 2= one-time adaptive transceiver_channel_rx_ set_eqctrl

<service-path> <value>

Sets the equalization control value on the receiver channel.

transceiver_channel_rx_ start_checking

<service-path>

Starts the checker.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Command Arguments

transceiver_channel_rx_ stop_checking

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_rx_ get_eyeq_phase_step

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_rx_ set_pattern

<service-path> <pattern-

name>

transceiver_channel_rx_ is_eyeq_enabled

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_rx_ set_eyeq_enabled

<service-path> <disable(0)/

enable(1)>

transceiver_channel_rx_ set_eyeq_phase_step

<service-path><phase step>

transceiver_channel_rx_ set_word_aligner_ enabled

<service-path><disable(0)/ enable(1)>

transceiver_channel_rx_ is_word_aligner_enabled

<service-path><disable(0)/ enable(1)>

transceiver_channel_rx_ is_locked

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_rx_ is_rx_locked_to_data

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_rx_ is_rx_locked_to_ref

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_rx_ has_eyeq_1d

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_rx_ set_1deye_mode transceiver_channel_rx_ get_1deye_mode

<service-path><disable(0)/ enable(1)>

<service-path>

Transceiver Toolkit Commands

Function

Stops the checker.

Gets whether the word aligner feature is enabled on the specified channel.

Returns non-zero if the checker is locked onto the incoming signal.

Returns

1

if transceiver is in lock to data

(LTD) mode. Otherwise

0

.

Returns

1

if transceiver is in lock to reference (LTR) mode. Otherwise

0

.

Detects whether the eye viewer pointed to by <service-path> supports 1D-EyeQ mode.

Enables or disables 1D-EyeQ mode.

Returns the current on or off status of 1D-

EyeQ mode.

11-43

Gets the current phase step of the specified channel.

Sets the expected pattern to the one specified by the pattern name.

Gets whether the EyeQ feature is enabled on the specified channel.

Enables or disables the EyeQ feature on the specified channel.

Sets the phase step of the specified channel.

Enables or disables the word aligner of the specified channel.

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-44

Transceiver Toolkit Commands

Table 11-16: Transceiver Toolkit Channel _tx Commands

Command Arguments

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_tx_ disable_preamble transceiver_channel_tx_ enable_preamble

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_tx_get_ number_of_preamble_beats

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_tx_get_ pattern

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_tx_get_ preamble_word

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_tx_get_ preemph0t

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_tx_get_ preemph1t

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_tx_get_ preemph2t

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_tx_get_ vodctrl

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_tx_ inject_error

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_tx_is_ generating

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_tx_is_ preamble_enabled

<service-path>

transceiver_channel_tx_set_ number_of_preamble_beats

<service-path><number-ofpreamble-beats>

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Function

Disables the preamble mode at the beginning of generation.

Enables the preamble mode at the beginning of generation.

Returns the currently set number of beats to send out the preamble word.

Returns the currently set pattern.

Returns the currently set preamble word.

Gets the pre-emphasis pre-tap value on the transmitter channel.

Gets the pre-emphasis first posttap value on the transmitter channel.

Gets the pre-emphasis second post-tap value on the transmitter channel.

Gets the V

OD

control value on the transmitter channel.

Injects a 1-bit error into the generator's output.

Returns non-zero if the generator is running.

Returns non-zero if preamble mode is enabled.

Sets the number of beats to send out the preamble word.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Command Arguments

transceiver_channel_tx_set_ pattern

<service-path><pattern-name>

transceiver_channel_tx_set_ preamble_word

<service-path><preamble-word>

transceiver_channel_tx_set_ preemph0t

<service-path><preemph0t value>

transceiver_channel_tx_set_ preemph1t

<service-path><preemph1t value>

transceiver_channel_tx_set_ preemph2t

<service-path><preemph2t value>

transceiver_channel_tx_set_ vodctrl transceiver_channel_tx_ start_generation transceiver_channel_tx_ stop_generation

<service-path><vodctrl value>

<service-path>

<service-path>

Transceiver Toolkit Commands

11-45

Function

Sets the output pattern to the one specified by the pattern name.

Sets the preamble word to be sent out.

Sets the pre-emphasis pre-tap value on the transmitter channel.

Sets the pre-emphasis first posttap value on the transmitter channel.

Sets the pre-emphasis second post-tap value on the transmitter channel.

Sets the V

OD

control value on the transmitter channel.

Starts the generator.

Stops the generator.

Table 11-17: Transceiver Toolkit Transceiver Toolkit Debug_Link Commands

Command Arguments

transceiver_debug_link_get_ pattern

<service-path>

transceiver_debug_link_is_ running

<service-path>

transceiver_debug_link_set_ pattern

<service-path> <data pattern> transceiver_debug_link_ start_running

<service-path>

transceiver_debug_link_ stop_running

<service-path>

Function

Gets the currently set pattern the link uses to run the test.

Returns non-zero if the test is running on the link.

Sets the pattern the link uses to run the test.

Starts running a test with the currently selected test pattern.

Stops running the test.

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-46

Transceiver Toolkit Commands

Table 11-18: Transceiver Toolkit Reconfig_Analog Commands

Command Arguments

transceiver_reconfig_ analog_get_logical_channel_ address

<service-path>

transceiver_reconfig_ analog_get_rx_dcgain

<service-path>

transceiver_reconfig_ analog_get_rx_eqctrl transceiver_reconfig_ analog_get_tx_preemph0t transceiver_reconfig_ analog_get_tx_preemph1t transceiver_reconfig_ analog_get_tx_preemph2t transceiver_reconfig_ analog_get_tx_vodctrl

<service-path>

<service-path>

<service-path>

<service-path>

<service-path>

transceiver_reconfig_ analog_set_logical_channel_ address

<service-path><logical channel address>

transceiver_reconfig_ analog_set_rx_dcgain

<service-path><dc_gain value>

transceiver_reconfig_ analog_set_rx_eqctrl

<service-path> <eqctrl value>

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Function

Gets the transceiver logical channel address currently set.

Gets the DC gain value on the receiver channel specified by the current logical channel address.

Gets the equalization control value on the receiver channel specified by the current logical channel address.

Gets the pre-emphasis pre-tap value on the transmitter channel specified by the current logical channel address.

Gets the pre-emphasis first posttap value on the transmitter channel specified by the current logical channel address.

Gets the pre-emphasis second post-tap value on the transmitter channel specified by the current logical channel address.

Gets the V

OD

control value on the transmitter channel specified by the current logical channel address.

Sets the transceiver logical channel address.

Sets the DC gain value on the receiver channel specified by the current logical channel address

Sets the equalization control value on the receiver channel specified by the current logical channel address.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Command

transceiver_reconfig_ analog_set_tx_preemph0t transceiver_reconfig_ analog_set_tx_preemph1t transceiver_reconfig_ analog_set_tx_preemph2t transceiver_reconfig_ analog_set_tx_vodctrl

Transceiver Toolkit Commands

11-47

Arguments Function

<service-path><preemph0t value>

Sets the pre-emphasis pre-tap value on the transmitter channel specified by the current logical channel address.

<service-path><preemph1t value>

Sets the pre-emphasis first posttap value on the transmitter channel specified by the current logical channel address.

<service-path> <preemph2t value> Sets the pre-emphasis second post-tap value on the transmitter channel specified by the current logical channel address.

<service-path> <vodctrl value>

Sets the V

OD

control value on the transmitter channel specified by the current logical channel address.

.

Table 11-19: Transceiver Toolkit Decision Feedback Equalization (DFE) Commands

Command

alt_xcvr_reconfig_dfe_get_ logical_channel_address alt_xcvr_reconfig_dfe_is_ enabled alt_xcvr_reconfig_dfe_set_ enabled alt_xcvr_reconfig_dfe_set_ logical_channel_address alt_xcvr_reconfig_dfe_set_ tap_value

Arguments Function

<service-path>

Gets the logical channel address that other alt_xcvr_reconfig_ dfe

commands use to apply.

<service-path>

Gets whether the DFE feature is enabled on the previously specified channel.

<service-path> <disable(0)/enable(1)

>

Enables or disables the DFE feature on the previously specified channel.

<service-path> <logical channel

address>

Sets the logical channel address that other alt_xcvr_reconfig_ eye_viewer

commands use.

<service-path> <tap position> <tap

value>

Sets the tap value at the previously specified channel at specified tap position and value.

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-48

Transceiver Toolkit Commands

Table 11-20: Transceiver Toolkit Eye Monitor Commands

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Command Arguments Function

alt_xcvr_custom_is_word_ aligner_enabled alt_xcvr_custom_set_word_ aligner_enabled alt_xcvr_custom_is_rx_ locked_to_data alt_xcvr_custom_is_rx_ locked_to_ref alt_xcvr_reconfig_eye_ viewer_get_phase_step

<service-path> <disable(0)/enable(1)

>

Gets whether the word aligner feature is enabled on the previously specified channel.

<service-path> <disable(0)/enable(1)

>

Enables or disables the word aligner of the previously specified channel.

<service-path>

Returns whether the receiver

CDR is locked to data.

<service-path>

Returns whether the receiver

CDR PLL is locked to the reference clock.

alt_xcvr_custom_is_serial_ loopback_enabled alt_xcvr_custom_is_tx_pll_ locked

<service-path>

Returns whether the serial loopback mode of the previously specified channel is enabled.

alt_xcvr_custom_set_serial_ loopback_enabled

<service-path> <disable(0)/enable(1)

>

Enables or disables the serial loopback mode of the previously specified channel.

<service-path>

Returns whether the transmitter

PLL is locked to the reference clock.

alt_xcvr_reconfig_eye_ viewer_get_logical_channel_ address

<service-path>

Gets the logical channel address on which other eye_viewer to apply.

alt_reconfig_

commands will use

<service-path>

Gets the current phase step of the previously specified channel.

alt_xcvr_reconfig_eye_ viewer_is_enabled

<service-path>

Gets whether the EyeQ feature is enabled on the previously specified channel.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Transceiver Toolkit Commands

11-49

Command Arguments Function

alt_xcvr_reconfig_eye_ viewer_set_enabled

<service-path> <disable(0)/enable(1)

>

Enables or disables the EyeQ feature on the previously specified channel.

Setting a value of 2 enables both

EyeQ and the Serial Bit

Comparator.

alt_xcvr_reconfig_eye_ viewer_set_logical_channel_ address

<service-path> <logical channel

address>

Sets the logical channel address on which other eye_viewer to apply.

alt_reconfig_

commands will use alt_xcvr_reconfig_eye_ viewer_set_phase_step

<service-path> <phase step>

Sets the phase step of the previously specified channel.

alt_xcvr_reconfig_eye_ viewer_has_ber_checker

<service-path>

Detects whether the eye viewer pointed to by <service-path> supports the Serial Bit

Comparator.

alt_xcvr_reconfig_eye_ viewer_ber_checker_is_ enabled

<service-path>

Detects whether the Serial Bit

Comparator is enabled.

alt_xcvr_reconfig_eye_ viewer_ber_checker_start

<service-path>

Starts the Serial Bit Comparator counters.

alt_xcvr_reconfig_eye_ viewer_ber_checker_stop

<service-path>

Stops the Serial Bit Comparator counters.

alt_xcvr_reconfig_eye_ viewer_ber_checker_reset_ counters

<service-path>

Resets the Serial Bit Comparator counters.

<service-path>

alt_xcvr_reconfig_eye_ viewer_ber_checker_is_ running

Gets whether the Serial Bit

Comparator counters are currently running or not.

alt_xcvr_reconfig_eye_ viewer_ber_checker_get_data

<service-path>

Gets the current total bit, error bit, and exception counts for the

Serial Bit Comparator.

alt_xcvr_reconfig_eye_ viewer_has_1deye

<service-path>

Detects whether the eye viewer pointed to by <service-path> supports 1D-EyeQ mode.

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-50

Transceiver Toolkit Commands

Command

alt_xcvr_reconfig_eye_ viewer_set_1deye_mode alt_xcvr_reconfig_eye_ viewer_get_1deye_mode

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Arguments Function

<service-path> <disable(0)/enable(1) Enables or disables 1D-EyeQ mode.

<service-path>

Gets the enable or disabled state of 1D-EyeQ mode.

Table 11-21: Channel Type Commands

Command

get_channel_type

Arguments

<service-path><logical-channelnum>

set_channel_type

<service-path><logical-channel-

num> <channel-type>

Function

Reports the detected type (GX/

GT) of channel <logical-channel-

num > for the reconfiguration block located at <service-path>.

Overrides the detected channel type of channel <logical-channel-

num > for the reconfiguration block located at <service-path> to the type specified (0:GX,

1:GT).

Table 11-22: Loopback Commands

Command

loopback_get

Arguments

<service-path>

Function

Returns the value of a setting or result on the loopback channel.

Available results include:

• Status—running or stopped.

• Bytes—number of bytes sent through the loopback channel.

• Errors—number of errors reported by the loopback channel.

• Seconds—number of seconds since the loopback channel was started.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Command

loopback_set loopback_start loopback_stop

Arguments

<service-path>

<service-path>

<service-path>

Data Pattern Generator Commands

11-51

Function

Sets the value of a setting controlling the loopback channel. Some settings are only supported by particular channel types. Available settings include:

• Timer—number of seconds for the test run.

• Size—size of the test data.

• Mode—mode of the test.

Starts sending data through the loopback channel.

Stops sending data through the loopback channel.

Data Pattern Generator Commands

You can use Data Pattern Generator commands to control data patterns for debugging transceiver channels. You must instantiate the Data Pattern Generator component to support these commands.

Table 11-23: Soft Data Pattern Generator Commands

Command Arguments

data_pattern_generator_ start

<service-path>

data_pattern_generator_stop

<service-path>

data_pattern_generator_is_ generating

<service-path>

data_pattern_generator_ inject_error

<service-path>

Function

Starts the data pattern generator.

Stops the data pattern generator.

Returns non-zero if the generator is running.

Injects a 1-bit error into the generator output.

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-52

Data Pattern Generator Commands

Command Arguments

data_pattern_generator_set_ pattern

<service-path> <pattern-name> data_pattern_generator_get_ pattern data_pattern_generator_get_ available_patterns data_pattern_generator_ enable_preamble data_pattern_generator_ disable_preamble

<service-path>

<service-path>

<service-path>

<service-path>

data_pattern_generator_is_ preamble_enabled

<service-path>

data_pattern_generator_set_ preamble_word

<preamble-word>

data_pattern_generator_get_ preamble_word

<service-path>

data_pattern_generator_set_ preamble_beats

<service-path><number-ofpreamble- beats>

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Function

Sets the output pattern specified by the <pattern-name>. In all, 6 patterns are available, 4 are pseudo-random binary sequences (PRBS), 1 is high frequency and 1 is low frequency.

The PRBS7, PRBS15, PRBS23,

PRBS31, HF (outputs high frequency, constant pattern of alternating 0s and 1s), and LF

(outputs low frequency, constant pattern of 10b’1111100000 for

10-bit symbols and 8b’11110000 for 8-bit symbols) pattern names are defined.

PRBS files are clear text and you can modify the PRBS files.

Returns currently selected output pattern.

Returns a list of available data patterns by name.

Enables the preamble mode at the beginning of generation.

Disables the preamble mode at the beginning of generation.

Returns a non-zero value if preamble mode is enabled.

Sets the preamble word (could be 32-bit or 40-bit).

Gets the preamble word.

Sets the number of beats to send out in the preamble word.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Command

data_pattern_generator_ fcnter_start data_pattern_generator_ check_status data_pattern_generator_ fcnter_report

Arguments

data_pattern_generator_get_ preamble_beats

<service-path>

<service-path><max-cycles>

<service-path>

<service-path><force-stop>

Data Pattern Generator Commands

11-53

Function

Returns the currently set number of beats to send out in the preamble word.

Sets the max cycle count and starts the frequency counter.

Queries the data pattern generator for current status.

Returns a bitmap indicating the status, with bits defined as follows: [0]-enabled, [1]-bypass enabled, [2]-avalon, [3]-sink ready, [4]-source valid, and [5]frequency counter enabled.

Reports the current measured clock ratio, stopping the counting first depending on

<force-stop>.

Table 11-24: Hard Data Pattern Generator Commands

Command

hard_prbs_generator_start hard_prbs_generator_stop hard_prbs_generator_is_ generating

Arguments

<service-path>

<service-path>

<service-path>

hard_prbs_generator_set_ pattern hard_prbs_generator_get_ pattern hard_prbs_generator_get_ available_patterns

<service-path> <pattern>

<service-path>

<service-path>

Function

Starts the specified generator.

Stops the specified generator.

Checks the generation status.

Returns

1

if generating,

0 otherwise.

Sets the pattern of the specified hard PRBS generator to parameter pattern

.

Returns the current pattern for a given hard PRBS generator.

Returns the available patterns for a given hard PRBS generator.

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-54

Data Pattern Checker Commands

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Data Pattern Checker Commands

You can use Data Pattern Checker commands to verify your generated data patterns. You must instantiate the Data Pattern Checker component to support these commands.

Table 11-25: Soft Data Pattern Checker Commands

Command

data_pattern_checker_start data_pattern_checker_stop data_pattern_checker_is_ checking

Arguments

<service-path>

<service-path>

<service-path>

data_pattern_checker_is_ locked

<service-path>

data_pattern_checker_set_ pattern

<service-path> <pattern-name> data_pattern_checker_get_ pattern data_pattern_checker_get_ available_patterns data_pattern_checker_get_ data

<service-path>

<service-path>

<service-path>

data_pattern_checker_reset_ counters

<service-path>

data_pattern_checker_ fcnter_start

<service-path><max-cycles>

Function

Starts the data pattern checker.

Stops the data pattern checker.

Returns a non-zero value if the checker is running.

Returns non-zero if the checker is locked onto the incoming data.

Sets the expected pattern to the one specified by the <pattern-

name>.

Returns the currently selected expected pattern by name.

Returns a list of available data patterns by name.

Returns a list of the current checker data. The results are in the following order: number of bits, number of errors, and bit error rate.

Resets the bit and error counters inside the checker.

Sets the max cycle count and starts the frequency counter.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Command

data_pattern_checker_ fcnter_report

Arguments

data_pattern_checker_check_ status

<service-path>

<service-path>

<service-path><force-stop>

Data Pattern Checker Commands

11-55

Function

Queries the data pattern checker for current status. Returns a bitmap indicating status, with bits defined as follows: [0]enabled, [1]-locked, [2]-bypass enabled, [3]-avalon, [4]-sink ready, [5]-source valid, and [6]frequency counter enabled.

Reports the current measured clock ratio, stopping the counting first depending on

<force-stop>.

Table 11-26: Hard Data Pattern Checker Commands

Command

hard_prbs_checker_start

Arguments

<service-path>

hard_prbs_checker_stop

<service-path>

hard_prbs_checker_is_ checking

<service-path>

hard_prbs_checker_set_ pattern hard_prbs_checker_get_ pattern

<service-path>

hard_prbs_checker_get_ available_patterns

<service-path>

hard_prbs_checker_get_data

<service-path>

hard_prbs_checker_reset_ counters

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

<service-path> <pattern>

<service-path>

Function

Starts the specified hard PRBS checker.

Stops the specified hard PRBS checker.

Checks the running status of the specified hard PRBS checker.

Returns a non-zero value if the checker is running.

Sets the pattern of the specified hard PRBS checker to parameter

<pattern>.

Returns the current pattern for a given hard PRBS checker.

Returns the available patterns for a given hard PRBS checker.

Returns the current bit and error count data from the specified hard PRBS checker.

Resets the bit and error counts of the specified hard PRBS checker.

Altera Corporation

11-56

Document Revision History

Document Revision History

Table 11-27: Document Revision History

Date Version

2015.11.02

15.1.0

2015.11.02

15.1.0

Changes

Changed instances of Quartus II to Quartus Prime.

• Added description of new Refresh button.

• Added description of VGA dialog box.

• Added two tables in Transceiver Toolkit Commands section.

• Hard Data Pattern Generator Commands

• Hard Data Pattern Checker Commands

• Separated Arria 10 and Stratix V system configuration steps.

• Added description of new Refresh button.

• Added description of VGA dialog box.

• Added two tables in Transceiver Toolkit Commands section.

• Hard Data Pattern Generator Commands

• Hard Data Pattern Checker Commands

• Separated Arria 10 and Stratix V system configuration steps.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Date

May 2015

Document Revision History

11-57

Version

15.0.0

Changes

• Added section about Implementation Differences Between Stratix V and

Arria 10.

• Added section about Recommended Flow for Arria 10 Transceiver Toolkit

Design with the Quartus Prime Software.

• Added section about Transceiver Toolkit Troubleshooting

• Updated the following sections with information about using the

Transceiver Toolkit with Arria 10 devices:

• Serial Bit Comparator Mode

• Arria 10 Support and Limitations

• Configuring BER Tests

• Configuring PRBS Signal Eye Tests

• Adapting Altera Design Examples

• Modifying Design Examples

• Configuring Custom Traffic Signal Eye Tests

• Configuring Link Optimization Tests

• Configuring PMA Analog Setting Control

• Running BER Tests

• Toolkit GUI Setting Reference

• Reworked Table: Transceiver Toolkit IP Core Configuration

• Replaced Figure: EyeQ Settings and Status Showing Results of Two Test

Runs with Figure: EyeQ Settings and Status Showing Results of Three Test

Runs.

• Added Figure: Arria 10 Altera Debug Master Endpoint Block Diagram.

• Added Figure: BER Test Configuration (Arria10/ Gen 10/ 20nm) Block

Diagram.

• Added Figure: PRBS Signal Test Configuration (Arria 10/ 20nm) Block

Diagram.

• Added Figure: Custom Traffic Signal Eye Test Configuration (Arria 10/ Gen

10/ 20nm) Block Diagram.

• Added Figure: PMA Analog Setting Control Configuration (Arria 10/ Gen

10/ 20nm) Block Diagram.

• Added Figure: One Channel Loopback Mode (Arria 10/ 20nm) Block

Diagram.

• Added Figure: Four Channel Loopback Mode (Arria 10/ Gen 10/ 20nm)

Block Diagram.

Software Version 15.0 Limitations

• Transceiver Toolkit supports EyeQ for Arria 10 designs.

• Supports optional hard acceleration for EyeQ. This allows for much faster

EyeQ data collection. Enable this in the Arria 10 Transceiver Native PHY IP core under the Dynamic Configuration tab. Turn on Enable ODI accelera‐

tion logic.

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

11-58

Document Revision History

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Date Version

December,

2014

14.1.0

June, 2014 14.0.0

November,

2013

May, 2013 13.0.0

November,

2012

13.1.0

12.1.0

August, 2012 12.0.1

Changes

• Added section about Arria 10 support and limitations.

• Updated GUI changes for Channel Manager with popup menus, IP Catalog,

Quartus Prime, and Qsys.

• Added ADME and JTAG debug link info for Arria 10.

• Added instructions to run Tcl script from command line.

• Added heat map display option.

• Added procedure to use internal PLL to generate reconfig_clk.

• Added note stating RX CDR PLL status can toggle in LTD mode.

• Reorganization and conversion to DITA.

• Added Conduit Mode Support, Serial Bit Comparator, Required Files and

Tcl command tables.

• Minor editorial updates. Added Tcl help information and removed Tcl command tables. Added 28-Gbps Transceiver support section.

• General reorganization and revised steps in modifying Altera example designs.

• Maintenance release for update of Transceiver Toolkit features.

• Maintenance release for update of Transceiver Toolkit features.

June, 2012 12.0.0

November,

2011

11.1.0

May, 2011 11.0.0

December,

2010

10.1.0

August, 2010 10.0.1

July 2010 10.0.0

• Added new Tcl scenario.

• Changed to new document template. Added new 10.1 release features.

• Corrected links.

• Initial release.

Related Information

Quartus Handbook Archive

For previous versions of the Quartus Prime Handbook, refer to the Quartus Handbook Archive.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Transceiver Links

Send Feedback

2015.11.02

QPS5V3

Quick Design Debugging Using SignalProbe

12

Send Feedback

Subscribe

Quick Design Debugging Using SignalProbe

The SignalProbe incremental routing feature helps reduce the hardware verification process and time-tomarket for system-on-a-programmable-chip (SOPC) designs. Easy access to internal device signals is important in the design or debugging process. The SignalProbe feature makes design verification more efficient by routing internal signals to I/O pins quickly without affecting the design. When you start with a fully routed design, you can select and route signals for debugging to either previously reserved or currently unused I/O pins.

The SignalProbe feature supports the Arria ® families.

series, Cyclone ® series, MAX ® II, and Stratix ® series device

Related Information

System Debugging Tools Overview documentation

on page 9-1

Overview and comparison of all the tools available in the Quartus Prime software

Design Flow Using SignalProbe

The SignalProbe feature allows you to reserve available pins and route internal signals to those reserved pins, while preserving the behavior of your design. SignalProbe is an effective debugging tool that provides visibility into your FPGA.

You can reserve pins for SignalProbe and assign I/O standards after a full compilation. Each SignalProbesource to SignalProbe-pin connection is implemented as an engineering change order (ECO) that is applied to your netlist after a full compilation.

To route the internal signals to the device’s reserved pins for SignalProbe, perform the following tasks:

1. Perform a full compilation.

2. Reserve SignalProbe Pins.

3. Assign SignalProbe sources.

4. Add registers between pipeline paths and Signalprobe pins.

5. Perform a SignalProbe compilation.

6. Analyze the results of a SignalProbe compilation.

©

2015 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, ENPIRION, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX words and logos are trademarks of Altera Corporation and registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. All other words and logos identified as trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html

. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.

www.altera.com

101 Innovation Drive, San Jose, CA 95134

ISO

9001:2008

Registered

12-2

Perform a Full Compilation

Perform a Full Compilation

You must complete a full compilation to generate an internal netlist containing a list of internal nodes to probe.

To perform a full compilation, on the Processing menu, click Start Compilation.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Reserve SignalProbe Pins

SignalProbe pins can only be reserved after a full compilation. You can also probe any unused I/Os of the device. Assigning sources is a simple process after reserving SignalProbe pins. The sources for SignalProbe pins are the internal nodes and registers in the post-compilation netlist that you want to probe.

Note: Although you can reserve SignalProbe pins using many features within the Quartus Prime software, including the Pin Planner and the Tcl interface, you should use the SignalProbe Pins dialog box to create and edit your SignalProbe pins.

Assign SignalProbe Sources

A SignalProbe source can be any combinational node, register, or pin in your post-compilation netlist. To find a SignalProbe source, in the Node Finder, use the SignalProbe filter to remove all sources that cannot be probed. You might not be able to find a particular internal node because the node can be optimized away during synthesis, or the node cannot be routed to the SignalProbe pin. For example, you cannot probe nodes and registers within Gigabit transceivers in Stratix IV devices because there are no physical routes available to the pins.

Note: To probe virtual I/O pins generated in low-level partitions in an incremental compilation flow, select the source of the logic that feeds the virtual pin as your SignalProbe source pin.

Because SignalProbe pins are implemented and routed as ECOs, turning the SignalProbe enable option on or off is the same as selecting Apply Selected Change or Restore Selected Change in the Change

Manager window. If the Change Manager window is not visible at the bottom of your screen, on the View menu, point to Utility Windows and click Change Manager.

Related Information

SignalProbe Pins Dialog Box online help

Add SignalProbe Pins Dialog Box online help

Engineering Change Management with the Chip Planner documentation

Add Registers Between Pipeline Paths and SignalProbe Pins

You can specify the number of registers placed between a SignalProbe source and a SignalProbe pin. The registers synchronize data to a clock and control the latency of the SignalProbe outputs. The SignalProbe feature automatically inserts the number of registers specified into the SignalProbe path.

The figure shows a single register between the SignalProbe source

Reg_b_1

and SignalProbe

SignalProbe_Output_2

output pin added to synchronize the data between the two SignalProbe output pins.

Note: When you add a register to a SignalProbe pin, the SignalProbe compilation attempts to place the register to best meet timing requirements. You can place SignalProbe registers either near the

SignalProbe source to meet f

MAX

requirements, or near the I/O to meet t

CO

requirements.

Altera Corporation

Quick Design Debugging Using SignalProbe

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Perform a SignalProbe Compilation

Figure 12-1: Synchronizing SignalProbe Outputs with a SignalProbe Register

Logic

Reg_a_1

DFF

D Q

Reg_a_2

DFF

D Q

Logic

12-3

Logic

Reg_b_1

DFF

D Q

Reg_b_2

DFF

D Q

Logic

SignalProbe_Output_1

D Q

SignalProbe

Pipeline

Register

SignalProbe_Output_2

In addition to clock input for pipeline registers, you can also specify a reset signal pin for pipeline registers. To specify a reset pin for pipeline registers, use the Tcl command make_sp

.

Related Information

Add SignalProbe Pins Dialog Box online help

Information about how to pipeline an existing SignalProbe connection

Perform a SignalProbe Compilation

Perform a SignalProbe compilation to route your SignalProbe pins. A SignalProbe compilation saves and checks all netlist changes without recompiling the other parts of the design. A SignalProbe compilation takes a fraction of the time of a full compilation to finish. The design’s current placement and routing are preserved.

To perform a SignalProbe compilation, on the Processing menu, point to Start and click Start SignalP‐

robe Compilation.

Analyze the Results of a SignalProbe Compilation

After a SignalProbe compilation, the results are available in the compilation report file. Each SignalProbe pin is displayed in the SignalProbe Fitting Result page in the Fitter section of the Compilation Report.

To view the status of each SignalProbe pin in the SignalProbe Pins dialog box, on the Tools menu, click

SignalProbe Pins.

The status of each SignalProbe pin appears in the Change Manager window . If the Change Manager window is not visible at the bottom of your GUI, from the View menu, point to Utility Windows and click Change Manager.

Quick Design Debugging Using SignalProbe

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

12-4

What a SignalProbe Compilation Does

Figure 12-2: Change Manager Window with SignalProbe Pins

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

To view the timing results of each successfully routed SignalProbe pin, on the Processing menu, point to

Start and click Start Timing Analysis.

Related Information

Engineering Change Management with the Chip Planner documentation

What a SignalProbe Compilation Does

After a full compilation, you can start a SignalProbe compilation either manually or automatically. A

SignalProbe compilation performs the following functions:

• Validates SignalProbe pins

• Validates your specified SignalProbe sources

• Adds registers into SignalProbe paths, if applicable

• Attempts to route from SignalProbe sources through registers to SignalProbe pins

To run the SignalProbe compilation immediately after a full compilation, on the Tools menu, click

SignalProbe Pins. In the SignalProbe Pins dialog box, click Start Check & Save All Netlist Changes.

To run a SignalProbe compilation manually after a full compilation, on the Processing menu, point to

Start and click Start SignalProbe Compilation.

Note: You must run the Fitter before a SignalProbe compilation. The Fitter generates a list of all internal nodes that can serve as SignalProbe sources.

Turn the SignalProbe enable option on or off in the SignalProbe Pins dialog box to enable or disable each SignalProbe pin.

Understanding the Results of a SignalProbe Compilation

After a SignalProbe compilation, the results appear in two sections of the compilation report file. The fitting results and status of each SignalProbe pin appears in the SignalProbe Fitting Result screen in the

Fitter section of the Compilation Report.

Table 12-1: Status Values

Routed

Not Routed

Status Description

Connected and routed successfully

Not enabled

Altera Corporation

Quick Design Debugging Using SignalProbe

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Failed to Route

Need to Compile

Status

Understanding the Results of a SignalProbe Compilation

Description

Failed routing during last SignalProbe compilation

Assignment changed since last SignalProbe compilation

12-5

Figure 12-3: SignalProbe Fitting Results Page in the Compilation Report Window

The SignalProbe source to output delays screen in the Timing Analysis section of the Compilation

Report displays the timing results of each successfully routed SignalProbe pin.

Figure 12-4: SignalProbe Source to Output Delays Page in the Compilation Report Window

Quick Design Debugging Using SignalProbe

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

12-6

Analyzing SignalProbe Routing Failures

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Note: After a SignalProbe compilation, the processing screen of the Messages window also provides the results for each SignalProbe pin and displays slack information for each successfully routed

SignalProbe pin.

Analyzing SignalProbe Routing Failures

A SignalProbe compilation can fail for any of the following reasons:

Route unavailable—the SignalProbe compilation failed to find a route from the SignalProbe source to the SignalProbe pin because of routing congestion.

Invalid or nonexistent SignalProbe source—you entered a SignalProbe source that does not exist or is invalid.

Unusable output pin—the output pin selected is found to be unusable.

Routing failures can occur if the SignalProbe pin’s I/O standard conflicts with other I/O standards in the same I/O bank.

If routing congestion prevents a successful SignalProbe compilation, you can allow the compiler to modify routing to the specified SignalProbe source. On the Tools menu, click SignalProbe Pins and turn on Modify latest fitting results during SignalProbe compilation. This setting allows the Fitter to modify existing routing channels used by your design.

Note: Turning on Modify latest fitting results during SignalProbe compilation can change the performance of your design.

Scripting Support

You can also run some procedures at a command prompt. For detailed information about scripting command options, refer to the Quartus Prime command-line and Tcl API Help browser. To run the Help browser, type the following command at the command prompt: quartus_sh --qhelp

Note: The Tcl commands in this section are part of the

::quartus::chip_planner

Quartus Prime Tcl

API. Source or include the

::quartus::chip_planner

Tcl package in your scripts to make these commands available.

Related Information

Tcl Scripting documentation

Quartus Prime Settings File Reference Manual

Information about all settings and constraints in the Quartus Prime software

Command-Line Scripting documentation

Making a SignalProbe Pin

To make a SignalProbe pin, type the following command: make_sp [-h | -help] [-long_help] [-clk <clk>] [-io_std <io_std>] \

-loc <loc> -pin_name <pin name> [-regs <regs>] [-reset <reset>] \

-src_name <source name>

Altera Corporation

Quick Design Debugging Using SignalProbe

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Deleting a SignalProbe Pin

To delete a SignalProbe pin, type the following Tcl command: delete_sp [-h | -help] [-long_help] -pin_name <pin name>

Deleting a SignalProbe Pin

Enabling a SignalProbe Pin

To enable a SignalProbe pin, type the following Tcl command: enable_sp [-h | -help] [-long_help] -pin_name <pin name>

Disabling a SignalProbe Pin

To disable a SignalProbe pin, type the following Tcl command: disable_sp [-h | -help] [-long_help] -pin_name <pin name>

Performing a SignalProbe Compilation

To perform a SignalProbe compilation, type the following command: quartus_sh --flow signalprobe <project name>

12-7

Script Example

The example shows a script that creates a SignalProbe pin called sp1

and connects the sp1

pin to source node reg1

in a project that was already compiled.

Creating a SignalProbe Pin Called sp1

package require ::quartus::chip_planner project_open project read_netlist make_sp -pin_name sp1 -src_name reg1 check_netlist_and_save project_close

Reserving SignalProbe Pins

To reserve a SignalProbe pin, add the commands shown in the example to the Quartus Prime Settings File

(

.qsf

) for your project.

Reserving a SignalProbe Pin

set_location_assignment <location> -to <SignalProbe pin name> set_instance_assignment -name RESERVE_PIN \

"AS SIGNALPROBE OUTPUT" -to <SignalProbe pin name>

Valid locations are pin location names, such as

Pin_A3

.

Common Problems When Reserving a SignalProbe Pin

If you cannot reserve a SignalProbe pin in the Quartus Prime software, it is likely that one of the following is true:

Quick Design Debugging Using SignalProbe

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

12-8

Adding SignalProbe Sources

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

• You have selected multiple pins.

• A compilation is running in the background. Wait until the compilation is complete before reserving the pin.

• You have the Quartus Prime Lite Edition software, in which the SignalProbe feature is not enabled by default. You must turn on TalkBack to enable the SignalProbe feature in the Quartus Prime Lite

Edition software.

• You have not set the pin reserve type to As Signal Probe Output. To reserve a pin, on the Assignments menu, in the Assign Pins dialog box, select As SignalProbe Output.

• The pin is reserved from a previous compilation. During a compilation, the Quartus Prime software reserves each pin on the targeted device. If you end the Quartus Prime process during a compilation, for example, with the Windows Task Manager End Process command or the UNIX kill

command, perform a full recompilation before reserving pins as SignalProbe outputs.

• The pin does not support the SignalProbe feature. Select another pin.

• The current device family does not support the SignalProbe feature.

Adding SignalProbe Sources

To assign the node name to a SignalProbe pin, type the following Tcl command: set_instance_assignment -name SIGNALPROBE_SOURCE <node name> \

-to <SignalProbe pin name>

The next command turns on SignalProbe routing. To turn off individual SignalProbe pins, specify

OFF instead of

ON

with the following command: set_instance_assignment -name SIGNALPROBE_ENABLE ON \

-to <SignalProbe pin name>

Related Information

SignalProbe Pins Dialog Box online help

Add SignalProbe Pins Dialog Box online help

Information about how to pipeline an existing SignalProbe connection

Assigning I/O Standards

To assign an I/O standard to a pin, type the following Tcl command: set_instance_assignment -name IO_STANDARD <I/O standard> -to <SignalProbe pin name>

Related Information

I/O Standards online help

Adding Registers for Pipelining

To add registers for pipelining, type the following Tcl command: set_instance_assignment -name SIGNALPROBE_CLOCK <clock name> \

-to <SignalProbe pin name> set_instance_assignment \

-name SIGNALPROBE_NUM_REGISTERS <number of registers> -to <SignalProbe pin name>

Altera Corporation

Quick Design Debugging Using SignalProbe

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Running SignalProbe Immediately After a Full Compilation

Running SignalProbe Immediately After a Full Compilation

To run SignalProbe immediately after a full compilation, type the following Tcl command: set_global_assignment -name SIGNALPROBE_DURING_NORMAL_COMPILATION ON

12-9

Running SignalProbe Manually

To run SignalProbe as part of a scripted flow using Tcl, use the following in your script: execute_flow -signalprobe

To perform a Signal Probe compilation interactively at a command prompt, type the following command: quartus_sh_fit --flow signalprobe <project name>

Enabling or Disabling All SignalProbe Routing

Use the Tcl command in the example to turn on or turn off SignalProbe routing. When using this command, to turn SignalProbe routing on, specify

ON

. To turn SignalProbe routing off, specify

OFF

.

Turning SignalProbe On or Off with Tcl Commands

set spe [get_all_assignments -name SIGNALPROBE_ENABLE] \ foreach_in_collection asgn $spe {

set signalprobe_pin_name [lindex $asgn 2]

set_instance_assignment -name SIGNALPROBE_ENABLE \

-to $signalprobe_pin_name <ON|OFF> }

Allowing SignalProbe to Modify Fitting Results

To turn on Modify latest fitting results, type the following Tcl command: set_global_assignment -name SIGNALPROBE_ALLOW_OVERUSE ON

Document Revision History

Table 12-2: Document Revision History

Date

2015.11.02

June 2014

May 2013

June 2012

Versio n

Changes

15.1.0 Changed instances of Quartus II to Quartus Prime.

14.0.0 Dita conversion.

13.0.0 Changed sequence of flow to clarify that you need to perform a full compilation before reserving SignalProbe pins. Affected sections are “Debugging Using the

SignalProbe Feature” on page 12–1 and “Reserving SignalProbe Pins” on page 12–

2. Moved “Performing a Full Compilation” on page 12–2 before “Reserving

SignalProbe Pins” on page 12–2.

12.0.0 Removed survey link.

Quick Design Debugging Using SignalProbe

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

12-10

Document Revision History

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Date Versio n

Changes

November 2011 10.0.2 Template update.

December 2010 10.0.1 Changed to new document template.

July 2010 10.0.0 • Revised for new UI.

• Removed section SignalProbe ECO flows

• Removed support for SignalProbe pin preservation when recompiling with incremental compilation turned on.

• Removed outdated FAQ section.

• Added links to Quartus Prime Help for procedural content.

November 2009 9.1.0

• Removed all references and procedures for APEX devices.

• Style changes.

March 2009 9.0.0

• Removed the “Generate the Programming File” section

• Removed unnecessary screenshots

• Minor editorial updates

November 2008 8.1.0

• Modified description for preserving SignalProbe connections when using

Incremental Compilation

• Added plausible scenarios where SignalProbe connections are not reserved in the design

May 2008 8.0.0

• Added “Arria GX” to the list of supported devices

• Removed the “On-Chip Debugging Tool Comparison” and replaced with a reference to the Section V Overview on page 13–1

• Added hyperlinks to referenced documents throughout the chapter

• Minor editorial updates

Related Information

Quartus Handbook Archive

For previous versions of the Quartus Prime Handbook, refer to the Quartus Handbook Archive.

Altera Corporation

Quick Design Debugging Using SignalProbe

Send Feedback

2015.11.02

QPS5V3

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer

13

Send Feedback

Subscribe

About the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

The SignalTap

®

II Logic Analyzer is a next-generation, system-level debugging tool that captures and displays real-time signal behavior in an FPGA design. You can examine the behavior of internal signals, without using extra I/O pins, while the design is running at full speed on an FPGA.

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is scalable, easy to use, and available as a stand-alone package or with a software subscription. You can debug an FPGA design by probing the state of the design's internal signals without external equipment. Define custom trigger-condition logic for greater accuracy and improved ability to isolate problems. The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer does not require external probes or design file changes to capture the state of the internal nodes or I/O pins in the design. All captured signal data is conveniently stored in device memory until you are ready to read and analyze the data.

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer supports the highest number of channels, largest sample depth, and fastest clock speeds of any logic analyzer in the programmable logic market.

Figure 13-1: SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Block Diagram

FPGA Device

Design Logic

0 1 2 3

SignalTap II

Instances

0 1 2

Buffers (Device Memory)

3

JTAG

Hub

Altera

Programming

Hardware

Quartus Prime

Software

©

2015 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, ENPIRION, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX words and logos are trademarks of Altera Corporation and registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. All other words and logos identified as trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html

. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.

www.altera.com

101 Innovation Drive, San Jose, CA 95134

ISO

9001:2008

Registered

13-2

Hardware and Software Requirements

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Note to figure:

1. This diagram assumes that you compiled the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer with the design as a separate design partition using the Quartus Prime incremental compilation feature. If you do not use incremental compilation, the SignalTap II logic is integrates with the design.

This chapter is intended for any designer who wants to debug an FPGA design during normal device operation without the need for external lab equipment. Because the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is similar to traditional external logic analyzers, familiarity with external logic analyzer operations is helpful, but not necessary. To take advantage of faster compile times when making changes to the SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer, knowledge of the Quartus Prime incremental compilation feature is helpful.

Note: The Quartus Prime Pro Edition software uses a new methodology for settings and assignments. For example, SignalTap II assignments include only the instance

name, not the entity:instance name. Refer to Migrating to Quartus Prime Pro Edition for more information on migrating existing

.stp

files to Quartus Prime Pro Edition.

Hardware and Software Requirements

You need the following hardware and software to perform logic analysis with the SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer:

• SignalTap software

• Download/upload cable

• Altera

®

development kit or your design board with JTAG connection to device under test

Use the SignalTap software that is included with the following software:

• Quartus Prime design software

• Quartus Prime Lite Edition (with the TalkBack feature enabled)

Alternatively, use the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer standalone software and standalone Programmer software.

Note: The Quartus Prime Lite Edition software does not support incremental compilation integration with the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer.

The memory blocks of the device store captured data. The memory blocks transfer the data to the Quartus

Prime software waveform display over a JTAG communication cable, such as EthernetBlaster or USB-

Blaster

®

.

Table 13-1: SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Features and Benefits

Feature

Quick access toolbar

Multiple logic analyzers in a single device

Multiple logic analyzers in multiple devices in a single JTAG chain

Nios II plug-in support time.

Benefit

Single-click operation of commonly used menu items. Hover over the icons to see tool tips.

Captures data from multiple clock domains in a design at the same

Simultaneously captures data from multiple devices in a JTAG chain.

Easily specifies nodes, triggers, and signal mnemonics for IP, such as the Nios

®

II processor.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Hardware and Software Requirements

13-3

Feature Benefit

Up to 10 basic or advanced trigger conditions for each analyzer instance

Power-up trigger

Enables sending more complex data capture commands to the logic analyzer, providing greater accuracy and problem isolation.

Custom trigger HDL object

State-based triggering flow

Incremental compilation

Incremental route with rapid recompile

Captures signal data for triggers that occur after device programming, but before manually starting the logic analyzer.

You can code your own trigger in Verilog HDL or VHDL and tap specific instances of modules located anywhere in the hierarchy of your design without needing to manually route all the necessary connections. This simplifies the process of tapping nodes spread out across your design.

Enables you to organize your triggering conditions to precisely define what your logic analyzer captures.

Modifies the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer monitored signals and triggers without performing a full compilation, saving time.

Manually allocate trigger input, data input, storage filter input node count, and perform a full compilation to include the SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer in your design. Then, you can selectively connect, disconnect, and swap to different nodes in your design. Use Rapid Recompile to perform incremental routing and gain a 2-4x speedup over the initial full compilation.

Flexible buffer acquisition modes The buffer acquisition control allows you to precisely control the data that is written into the acquisition buffer. Both segmented buffers and non-segmented buffers with storage qualification allow you to discard data samples that are not relevant to the debugging of your design.

MATLAB integration with included MEX function

Up to 2,048 channels per logic analyzer instance

Collects the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer captured data into a MATLAB integer matrix.

Samples many signals and wide bus structures.

Up to 128K samples in each device Captures a large sample set for each channel.

Fast clock frequencies

Resource usage estimator

Synchronous sampling of data nodes using the same clock tree driving the logic under test.

Provides estimate of logic and memory device resources used by

SignalTap II Logic Analyzer configurations.

No additional cost

Compatibility with other on-chip debugging utilities

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is included with a Quartus Prime subscription and with the Quartus Prime Lite Edition (with TalkBack enabled).

You can use the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer in tandem with any

JTAG-based on-chip debugging tool, such as an In-System Memory

Content editor, allowing you to change signal values in real-time while you are running an analysis with the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer.

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-4

Design Flow Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Feature

Floating-Point Display Format

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Benefit

To enable, click Edit > Bus Display Format > Floating-point

Supports the following:

• Single-precision floating-point format IEEE754 Single (32-bit)

• Double-precision floating-point format IEEE754 Double (64-bit)

Related Information

System Debugging Tools Overview documentation

on page 9-1

Overview and comparison of all tools available in the In-System Verification Tool set

Design Flow Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Add a SignalTap II file (

.stp

) and enable it in your project, or instantiate a SignalTap II IP core created with the parameter editor.

Figure 13-2

shows the flow of operations from initially adding the SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer to your design to final device configuration, testing, and debugging.

Figure 13-2: SignalTap II FPGA Design and Debugging Flow

Verilog

HDL

(.v)

VHDL

(.vhd)

AHDL

(.tdf)

Block

Design File

(.bdf)

EDIF

Netlist

(.edf)

VQM

Netlist

(.vqm)

Debug Source File

Analysis and Synthesis

Fitter

Place-and-Route

Assembler

Timing Analyzer

Configuration

No Functionality

Satisfied?

End

Yes

SignalTap II File (.stp) or SignalTap II

IP Core

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Task Flow Overview

SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Task Flow Overview

To use the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer to debug your design, you perform a number of tasks to add, configure, and run the logic analyzer.

Figure 13-3: SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Task Flow

13-5

Create New Project or

Open Existing Project

Add SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer to Design Instance

Configure

SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Define Triggers

Compile Design

Yes

Recompilation

Necessary?

No

Program Target

Device or Devices

Run SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer

View, Analyze, and

Use Captured Data

Adjust Options,

Triggers, or both

Continue Debugging

Functionality

Satisfied or Bug

Fixed?

Yes

End

No

Add the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer to Your Design

Create an

.stp

or create a parameterized HDL instance representation of the logic analyzer using the IP

Catalog and parameter editor. If you want to monitor multiple clock domains simultaneously, add additional instances of the logic analyzer to your design, limited only by the available resources in your device.

Configure the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

After you add the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer to your design, configure the logic analyzer to monitor the signals you want. You can manually add signals or use a plug-in, such as the Nios II processor plug-in, to quickly add entire sets of associated signals for a particular intellectual property (IP). You can also specify

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-6

Define Trigger Conditions

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

settings for the data capture buffer, such as its size, the method in which data is captured and stored, and the device memory type to use for the buffer in devices that support memory type selection.

Related Information

Creating a Power-Up Trigger

on page 13-42

Define Trigger Conditions

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer captures data continuously while the logic analyzer is running. To capture and store specific signal data, set up triggers that tell the logic analyzer under what conditions to stop capturing data. The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer allows you to define trigger conditions that range from very simple, such as the rising edge of a single signal, to very complex, involving groups of signals, extra logic, and multiple conditions. Power-Up Triggers allow you to capture data from trigger events occurring immediately after the device enters user-mode after configuration.

Compile the Design

With the

.stp

configured and trigger conditions defined, compile your project as usual to include the logic analyzer in your design.

Note: Because you may need to change monitored signal nodes or adjust trigger settings frequently during debugging, Altera recommends that you use the incremental compilation feature built into the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, along with Quartus Prime incremental compilation, to reduce recompile times. You can also use Incremental Route with Rapid Recompile to reduce recompile times.

Program the Target Device or Devices

When you debug a design with the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, you can program a target device directly from the

.stp

without using the Quartus Prime Programmer. You can also program multiple devices with different designs and simultaneously debug them.

Note: The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer supports all current Altera FPGA device families.

Related Information

Managing Multiple SignalTap II Files and Configurations

on page 13-21

Run the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

In normal device operation, you control the logic analyzer through the JTAG connection, specifying when to start looking for trigger conditions to begin capturing data. With Runtime or Power-Up Triggers, read and transfer the captured data from the on-chip buffer to the

.stp

for analysis.

Related Information

Analyzing Data in the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer online help

View, Analyze, and Use Captured Data

After you have captured data and read it into the

.stp

, that data is available for analysis and debugging. Set up mnemonic tables, either manually or with a plug-in, to simplify reading and interpreting the captured signal data. To speed up debugging, use the Locate feature in the SignalTap II node list to find the locations of problem nodes in other tools in the Quartus Prime software. Save the captured data for later analysis, or convert the data to other formats for sharing and further study.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Embed Multiple Analyzers in One FPGA

13-7

Embed Multiple Analyzers in One FPGA

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Editor includes support for adding multiple logic analyzers by creating instances in the

.stp

. You can create a unique logic analyzer for each clock domain in the design.

Monitor FPGA Resources Used by the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer has a built-in resource estimator that calculates the logic resources and amount of memory that each logic analyzer instance uses. Furthermore, because the most demanding onchip resource for the logic analyzer is memory usage, the resource estimator reports the ratio of total

RAM usage in your design to the total amount of RAM available, given the results of the last compilation.

The resource estimator provides a warning if a potential for a “no-fit” occurs.

You can see resource usage of each logic analyzer instance and total resources used in the columns of the

Instance Manager pane of the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Editor. Use this feature when you know that your design is running low on resources.

The logic element value reported in the resource usage estimator may vary by as much as 10% from the actual resource usage.

Use the Parameter Editor to Create Your Logic Analyzer

You can create a SignalTap II Logic Analyzer instance by using the parameter editor. The parameter editor generates an HDL file that you instantiate in your design.

Note: The state-based trigger flow, the state machine debugging feature, and the storage qualification feature are not supported when using the parameter editor to create the logic analyzer.

Configuring the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

There are several ways to configure instances of the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer. Some settings are similar to those found on traditional external logic analyzers. Other settings are unique to the SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer because it is configurable.

Note: You can only adjust some settings when you are viewing run-time trigger conditions instead of power-up trigger conditions.

Assigning an Acquisition Clock

Assign a clock signal to control how the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer acquires data. The logic analyzer samples data on every positive (rising) edge of the acquisition clock. The logic analyzer does not support sampling on the negative (falling) edge of the acquisition clock. You can use any signal in your design as the acquisition clock. However, for best results, Altera recommends that you use a global, non-gated clock synchronous to the signals under test for data acquisition. Using a gated clock as your acquisition clock can result in unexpected data that does not accurately reflect the behavior of your design. The Quartus

Prime static timing analysis tools show the maximum acquisition clock frequency at which you can run your design. Refer to the Timing Analysis section of the Compilation Report to find the maximum frequency of the logic analyzer clock.

Note: Exercise caution when using a recovered clock from a transceiver as an acquisition clock for the

SignalTap II Logic Analyzer. A recovered clock can cause incorrect or unexpected behavior, particularly when the transceiver recovered clock is the acquisition clock with the power-up trigger feature.

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-8

Adding Signals to the SignalTap II File

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

If you do not assign an acquisition clock in the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Editor, the Quartus Prime software automatically creates a clock pin called auto_stp_external_clk

. You must make a pin assignment to this pin and ensure that a clock signal in your design drives the acquisition clock.

Related Information

Managing Device I/O Pins documentation

Information about assigning signals to pins

Adding Signals to the SignalTap II File

Add signals to the

.stp

node list to select which signals in your design you want to monitor. You can also select signals to define triggers. You can assign the following two signal types:

Pre-synthesis—These signals exists after design elaboration, but before any synthesis optimizations are done. This set of signals should reflect your Register Transfer Level (RTL) signals.

Post-fitting—This signal exists after physical synthesis optimizations and place-and-route.

Note: If you are not using incremental compilation, add only pre-synthesis signals to the

.stp

. Using presynthesis helps when you want to add a new node after you change a design. Source file changes appear in the Node Finder after you perform an Analysis and Elaboration. On the Processing

Menu, point to Start and click Start Analysis & Elaboration.

The Quartus Prime software does not limit the number of signals available for monitoring in the

SignalTap II window waveform display. However, the number of channels available is directly proportional to the number of logic elements (LEs) or adaptive logic modules (ALMs) in the device.

Therefore, there is a physical restriction on the number of channels that are available for monitoring.

Signals shown in blue text are post-fit node names. Signals shown in black text are pre-synthesis node names.

After successful Analysis and Elaboration, invalid signals are displayed in red. Unless you are certain that these signals are valid, remove them from the

.stp

for correct operation. The SignalTap II Status Indicator also indicates if an invalid node name exists in the

.stp

.

You can tap signals if a routing resource (row or column interconnects) exists to route the connection to the SignalTap II instance. For example, signals that exist in the I/O element (IOE) cannot be directly tapped because there are no direct routing resources from the signal in an IOE to a core logic element. For input pins, you can tap the signal that is driving a logic array block (LAB) from an IOE, or, for output pins, you can tap the signal from the LAB that is driving an IOE.

When adding pre-synthesis signals, make all connections to the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer before synthesis. Logic and routing resources are allocated during recompilation to make the connection as if a change in your design files had been made. Pre-synthesis signal names for signals driving to and from

IOEs coincide with the signal names assigned to the pin.

In the case of post-fit signals, connections that you make to the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer are the signal names from the actual atoms in your post-fit netlist. You can only make a connection if the signals are part of the existing post-fit netlist and existing routing resources are available from the signal of interest to the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer. In the case of post-fit output signals, tap the

COMBOUT

or

REGOUT

signal that drives the IOE block. For post-fit input signals, signals driving into the core logic coincide with the signal name assigned to the pin.

Note: Because

NOT

-gate push back applies to any register that you tap, the signal from the atom may be inverted. You can check this by locating the signal in either the Resource Property Editor or the

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Preserving Signals

13-9

Technology Map Viewer. The Technology Map viewer and the Resource Property Editor can also be used to help you find post-fit node names.

Related Information

Faster Compilations with Quartus Prime Incremental Compilation

on page 13-45

Analyzing Designs with Quartus Prime Netlist Viewers documentation

Information about cross-probing to source design files and other Quartus Prime windows

Preserving Signals

The Quartus Prime software optimizes the RTL signals during synthesis and place-and-route. RTL signal names frequently may not appear in the post-fit netlist after optimizations.

For example, the compilation process can add tildes (

~

) to nets that fan-out from a node, making it difficult to decipher which signal nets they actually represent. When the Quartus Prime software encounters the following synthesis attributes, it does not perform any optimization on the specified signals, allowing them to persist into the post-fit netlist.

• keep

—Ensures that combinational signals are not removed

• preserve

—Ensures that registers are not removed

Using these attributes can increase device resource utilization or decrease timing performance.

Note: These processing results can cause problems when you use the incremental compilation flow with the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer. Because you can only add post-fitting signals to the SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer in partitions of type post-fit, RTL signals that you want to monitor may not be available, preventing their use. To avoid this issue, use synthesis attributes to preserve signals during synthesis and place-and-route.

If you are debugging an IP core, such as the Nios II CPU or other encrypted IP, you might need to preserve nodes from the core to make them available for debugging with the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer.

Preserving nodes is often necessary when a plug-in is used to add a group of signals for a particular IP.

If you use incremental compilation flow with the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, pre-synthesis nodes may not be connected to the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer if the affected partition is of the post-fit type. A critical warning is issued for all pre-synthesis node names that are not found in the post-fit netlist.

Related Information

Quartus Prime Integrated Synthesis documentation

Information about using signal preservation attributes

Assigning Data Signals Using the Technology Map Viewer

You can use the Technology map viewer to add post-fit signal names easily. To do so, launch the

Technology map viewer (post-fitting) after compiling your design. When you find the desired node, copy the node to either the active

.stp

for your design or a new

.stp

.

Node List Signal Use Options

When you add a signal to the node list, you can select options that specify how the logic analyzer uses the signal.

You can turn off the ability of a signal to trigger the analyzer by disabling the Trigger Enable option for that signal in the node list in the

.stp

. This option is useful when you want to see only the captured data for a signal and you are not using that signal as part of a trigger.

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-10

Disabling and Enabling a SignalTap II Instance

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

You can turn off the ability to view data for a signal by disabling the Data Enable column. This option is useful when you want to trigger on a signal, but have no interest in viewing data for that signal.

Related Information

Define Triggers

on page 13-22

Disabling and Enabling a SignalTap II Instance

Disable and enable SignalTap II instances in the Instance Manager pane. Physically adding or removing instances requires recompilation after disabling and enabling a SignalTap II instance.

Untappable Signals

Not all of the post-fitting signals in your design are available in the SignalTap II : post-fitting filter in the

Node Finder dialog box. The following signal types cannot be tapped:

Post-fit output pins—You cannot tap a post-fit output pin directly. To make an output signal visible, tap the register or buffer that drives the output pin. This includes pins defined as bidirectional.

Signals that are part of a carry chain—You cannot tap the carry out ( cout0

or cout1

) signal of a logic element. Due to architectural restrictions, the carry out signal can only feed the carry in of another LE.

JTAG Signals—You cannot tap the JTAG control (

TCK

,

TDI

,

TDO

, and

TMS

) signals.

ALTGXB IP core—You cannot directly tap any ports of an ALTGXB instantiation.

LVDS—You cannot tap the data output from a serializer/deserializer (SERDES) block.

DQ, DQS Signals—You cannot directly tap the

DQ

or

DQS

signals in a DDR/DDRII design.

Adding Signals with a Plug-In

Instead of adding individual or grouped signals through the Node Finder, you can add groups of relevant signals of a particular type of IP with a plug-in. The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer comes with one plug-in already installed for the Nios II processor. Besides easy signal addition, plug-ins also provide features such as pre-designed mnemonic tables, useful for trigger creation and data viewing, as well as the ability to disassemble code in captured data.

The Nios II plug-in, for example, creates one mnemonic table in the Setup tab and two tables in the Data tab:

Nios II Instruction (Setup tab)—Capture all the required signals for triggering on a selected instruc‐ tion address.

Nios II Instance Address (Data tab)—Display address of executed instructions in hexadecimal format or as a programming symbol name if defined in an optional Executable and Linking Format (

.elf

) file.

Nios II Disassembly (Data tab)—Displays disassembled code from the corresponding address.

To add signals to the

.stp

using a plug-in, perform the following steps after running Analysis and Elabora‐ tion on your design:

1. Right-click in the node list. On the Add Nodes with Plug-In submenu, choose the plug-in you want to use, such as the included plug-in named Nios II.

Note: If the IP for the selected plug-in does not exist in your design, a message informs you that you cannot use the selected plug-in.

2. The Select Hierarchy Level dialog box appears showing the IP hierarchy of your design. Select the IP that contains the signals you want to monitor with the plug-in and click OK.

3. If all the signals in the plug-in are available, a dialog box might appear, depending on the plug-in selected, where you can specify options for the plug-in. With the Nios II plug-in, you can optionally

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Adding Finite State Machine State Encoding Registers

13-11

select an .elf containing program symbols from your Nios II Integrated Development Environment

(IDE) software design. Specify options for the selected plug-in as desired and click OK.

Note: To make sure all the required signals are available, in the Quartus Prime Analysis & Synthesis settings, click click Assignments > Settings > Compiler Settings > Advanced Settings

(Synthesis). Turn on Create debugging nodes for IP cores.

All the signals included in the plug-in are added to the node list.

Related Information

Define Triggers

on page 13-22

View, Analyze, and Use Captured Data

on page 13-6

Adding Finite State Machine State Encoding Registers

Finding the signals to debug finite state machines (FSM) can be challenging. Finding nodes from the postfit netlist may be impossible, as FSM encoding signals may be changed or optimized away during synthesis and place-and-route. If you can find all of the relevant nodes in the post-fit netlist or you used the nodes from the pre-synthesis netlist, an additional step is required to find and map FSM signal values to the state names that you specified in your HDL.

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer can detect FSMs in your compiled design. The SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer configuration automatically tracks the FSM state signals as well as state encoding through the compilation process. Shortcut menu commands allow you to add all of the FSM state signals to your logic analyzer with a single command. For each FSM added to your SignalTap II configuration, the FSM debugging feature adds a mnemonic table to map the signal values to the state enumeration that you provided in your source code. The mnemonic tables enable you to visualize state machine transitions in the waveform viewer. The FSM debugging feature supports adding FSM signals from both the presynthesis and post-fit netlists.

Figure 13-4: Decoded FSM Mnemonics

The waveform viewer with decoded signal values from a state machine added with the FSM debugging feature.

Related Information

Recommended HDL Coding Styles documentation

Coding guidelines for specifying FSM in Verilog HDL and VHDL

Modifying and Restoring Mnemonic Tables for State Machines

When you add FSM state signals via the FSM debugging feature, the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer GUI creates a mnemonic table using the format <StateSignalName>

_table

, where StateSignalName is the name of the state signals that you have declared in your RTL. You can edit any mnemonic table using the

Mnemonic Table Setup dialog box.

If you want to restore a mnemonic table that was modified, right-click anywhere in the node list window and select Recreate State Machine Mnemonics. By default, restoring a mnemonic table overwrites the

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-12

Additional Considerations

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

existing mnemonic table that you modified. To restore a FSM mnemonic table to a new record, turn off

Overwrite existing mnemonic table in the Recreate State Machine Mnemonics dialog box.

Note: If you have added or deleted a signal from the FSM state signal group from within the setup tab, delete the modified register group and add the FSM signals back again.

Related Information

Creating Mnemonics for Bit Patterns

on page 13-58

Additional Considerations

The SignalTap II configuration GUI recognizes state machines from your design only if you use Quartus

Prime Integrated Synthesis (QIS). The state machine debugging feature is not able to track the FSM signals or state encoding if you use other EDA synthesis tools.

If you add post-fit FSM signals, the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer FSM debug feature may not track all optimization changes that are a part of the compilation process. If the following two specific optimiza‐ tions are enabled, the SignalTap II FSM debug feature may not list mnemonic tables for state machines in the design:

• If you have physical synthesis turned on, state registers may be resource balanced (register retiming) to improve f

MAX

. The FSM debug feature does not list post-fit FSM state registers if register retiming occurs.

• The FSM debugging feature does not list state signals that have been packed into RAM and DSP blocks during QIS or Fitter optimizations.

You can still use the FSM debugging feature to add pre-synthesis state signals.

Specifying the Sample Depth

The sample depth specifies the number of samples that are captured and stored for each signal in the captured data buffer. To specify the sample depth, select the desired number of samples to store in the

Sample Depth list. The sample depth ranges from 0 to 128K.

If device memory resources are limited, you may not be able to successfully compile your design with the sample buffer size you have selected. Try reducing the sample depth to reduce resource usage.

Capturing Data to a Specific RAM Type

When you use the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer with some devices, you have the option to select the RAM type where acquisition data is stored. Once SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is allocated to a particular RAM block, the entire RAM block becomes a dedicated resource for the logic analyzer. RAM selection allows you to preserve a specific memory block for your design and allocate another portion of memory for

SignalTap II Logic Analyzer data acquisition. For example, if your design has an application that requires a large block of memory resources, such a large instruction or data cache, you would choose to use MLAB,

M512, or M4k blocks for data acquisition and leave the M9k blocks for the rest of your design.

To select the RAM type to use for the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer buffer, select it from the RAM type list.

Use this feature when the acquired data (as reported by the SignalTap II resource estimator) is not larger than the available memory of the memory type that you have selected in the FPGA.

Choosing the Buffer Acquisition Mode

The Buffer Acquisition Type Selection feature in the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer lets you choose how the captured data buffer is organized and can potentially reduce the amount of memory that is required for

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Non-Segmented Buffer

13-13

SignalTap II data acquisition. There are two types of acquisition buffer within the SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer—a non-segmented (or circular) buffer and a segmented buffer. With a non-segmented buffer, the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer treats entire memory space as a single FIFO, continuously filling the buffer until the logic analyzer reaches a defined set of trigger conditions. With a segmented buffer, the memory space is split into a number of separate buffers. Each buffer acts as a separate FIFO with its own set of trigger conditions. Only a single buffer is active during an acquisition. The SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer advances to the next segment after the trigger condition or conditions for the active segment has been reached.

When using a non-segmented buffer, you can use the storage qualification feature to determine which samples are written into the acquisition buffer. Both the segmented buffers and the non-segmented buffer

with the storage qualification feature help you maximize the use of the available memory space.

Figure

13-5

illustrates the differences between the two buffer types.

Figure 13-5: Buffer Type Comparison in the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Post-Trigger Center Trigger Pre-Trigger

Newly

Captured

Data

(a) Circular Buffer

1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1

Oldest Data

Removed

All

Trigger Level

Segment

Trigger Level

Segment

Trigger Level

Segment

Trigger Level

(b) Segmented Buffer

1 1 ...

Segment 1

0 1 1 0 ...

Segment 2

0 1 1 1 ...

Segment 3

0 1 1 0 ...

Segment 4

0 1

Notes to figure :

1. Both non-segmented and segmented buffers can use a predefined trigger (Pre-Trigger, Center Trigger,

Post-Trigger) position or define a custom trigger position using the State-Based Triggering tab. Refer

to

Specifying the Trigger Position

for more details.

2. Each segment is treated like a FIFO, and behaves as the non-segmented buffer shown in (a).

Related Information

Using the Storage Qualifier Feature

on page 13-14

Non-Segmented Buffer

The non-segmented buffer (also known as a circular buffer) shown in

Figure 13-5

(a) is the default buffer

type used by the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer. While the logic analyzer is running, data is stored in the buffer until it fills up, at which point new data replaces the oldest data. This continues until a specified trigger event, consisting of a set of trigger conditions, occurs. When the trigger event happens, the logic analyzer continues to capture data after the trigger event until the buffer is full, based on the trigger position setting in the Signal Configuration pane or the

.stp

. To capture the majority of the data before the trigger occurs, select Post trigger position from the list. To capture the majority of the data after the trigger, select Pre-trigger position. To center the trigger position in the data, select Center trigger

position. Alternatively, use the custom State-based triggering flow to define a custom trigger position within the capture buffer.

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-14

Segmented Buffer

Related Information

Specifying the Trigger Position

on page 13-41

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Segmented Buffer

A segmented buffer allows you to debug systems that contain relatively infrequent recurring events. The acquisition memory is split into evenly sized segments, with a set of trigger conditions defined for each segment. Each segment acts as a non-segmented buffer. If you want to have separate trigger conditions for

each of the segmented buffers, you must use the state-based trigger flow.

Figure 13-6

shows an example of a segmented buffer system. If you want to have separate trigger conditions for each of the segmented buffers, you must use the state-based trigger flow.

Figure 13-6: Example System that Generates Recurring Events

Stratix Device

WADDR[17..0]

RADDR[17..0]

WDATA[35..0]

RDATA[35..0]

CMD[1..0]

INCLK

Reference Design Top-Level File

Pipeline

Registers

(Optional) QDR SRAM

Controller

SRAM Interface Signals

A[17..0]

Q[17..0]

D[17..0]

BWSn[1..0]

RPSn

WPSn

K, Kn

K_FB_OUT

K_FB_IN

QDR

SRAM

C, Cn

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer verifies the functionality of the design shown in

Figure 13-6

to ensure that the correct data is written to the SRAM controller. Buffer acquisition in the SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer allows you to monitor the

RDATA

port when

H'0F0F0F0F

is sent into the

RADDR

port. You can monitor multiple read transactions from the SRAM device without running the SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer again. The buffer acquisition feature allows you to segment the memory so you can capture the same event multiple times without wasting allocated memory. The number of cycles that are captured depends on the number of segments specified under the Data settings.

To enable and configure buffer acquisition, select Segmented in the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Editor and select the number of segments to use. In the example in

Figure 13-6

, selecting sixty-four 64-sample segments allows you to capture 64 read cycles when the

RADDR

signal is

H'0F0F0F0F

.

Using the Storage Qualifier Feature

Both non-segmented and segmented buffers described in the previous section offer a snapshot in time of the data stream being analyzed. The default behavior for writing into acquisition memory with the

SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is to sample data on every clock cycle. With a non-segmented buffer, there is one data window that represents a comprehensive snapshot of the datastream. Similarly, segmented buffers use several smaller sampling windows spread out over more time, with each sampling window representing a contiguous data set.

With carefully chosen trigger conditions and a generous sample depth for the acquisition buffer, analysis using segmented and non-segmented buffers captures a majority of functional errors in a chosen signal set. However, each data window can have a considerable amount of redundancy associated with it; for

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Using the Storage Qualifier Feature

13-15

example, a capture of a data stream containing long periods of idle signals between data bursts. With default behavior using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, you cannot discard the redundant sample bits.

The Storage Qualification feature allows you to filter out individual samples not relevant to debugging the design. With this feature, a condition acts as a write enable to the buffer during each clock cycle of data acquisition. Through fine tuning the data that is actually stored in acquisition memory, the Storage

Qualification feature allows for a more efficient use of acquisition memory in the specified number of samples over a longer period of analysis.

Use of the Storage Qualification feature is similar to an acquisition using a segmented buffer, in that you can create a discontinuity in the capture buffer. Because you can create a discontinuity between any two samples in the buffer, the Storage Qualification feature is equivalent to being able to create a customized segmented buffer in which the number and size of segment boundaries are adjustable.

Note: You can only use the Storage Qualification feature with a non-segmented buffer. The IP Catalog flow only supports the Input Port mode for the Storage Qualification feature.

Figure 13-7: Data Acquisition Using Different Modes of Controlling the Acquisition Buffer

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-16

Input Port Mode

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Notes to figure :

1. Non-segmented Buffers capture a fixed sample window of contiguous data.

2. Segmented buffers divide the buffer into fixed sized segments, with each segment having an equal sample depth.

3. Storage Qualification allows you to define a custom sampling window for each segment you create with a qualifying condition. Storage qualification potentially allows for a larger time scale of coverage.

There are six storage qualifier types available under the Storage Qualification feature:

Continuous

Input port

Transitional

Conditional

Start/Stop

State-based

Continuous (the default mode selected) turns the Storage Qualification feature off.

Each selected storage qualifier type is active when an acquisition starts. Upon the start of an acquisition, the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer examines each clock cycle and writes the data into the acquisition buffer based upon storage qualifier type and condition. The acquisition stops when a defined set of trigger conditions occur.

Note: Trigger conditions are evaluated independently of storage qualifier conditions. The SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer evaluates the data stream for trigger conditions on every clock cycle after the acquisition begins.

The storage qualifier operates independently of the trigger conditions.

Related Information

Define Trigger Conditions

on page 13-6

Input Port Mode

When using the Input port mode, the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer takes any signal from your design as an input. When the design is running, if the signal is high on the clock edge, the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer stores the data in the buffer. If the signal is low on the clock edge, the data sample is ignored. A pin is created and connected to this input port by default if no internal node is specified.

If you are using an

.stp

to create a SignalTap II Logic Analyzer instance, specify the storage qualifier signal using the input port field located on the Setup tab. You must specify this port for your project to compile.

If you use the parameter editor, the storage qualification input port, if specified, appears in the generated instantiation template. You can then connect this port to a signal in your RTL.

Figure 13-8: Data Acquisition of a Recurring Data Pattern in Continuous Capture Mode (Segmented

Buffer)

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Transitional Mode

13-17

Figure 13-9: Data Acquisition of a Recurring Data Pattern Using an Input Signal as a Storage Qualifier

Transitional Mode

In Transitional mode, you choose a set of signals for inspection using the node list check boxes in the

Storage Qualifier column. During acquisition, if any of the signals marked for inspection have changed since the previous clock cycle, new data is written to the acquisition buffer. If none of the signals marked have changed since the previous clock cycle, no data is stored.

Figure 13-10: Transitional Storage Qualifier Setup

Figure 13-11: Data Acquisition of a Recurring Data Pattern in Continuous Capture Mode (Transitional

Mode)

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-18

Conditional Mode

Figure 13-12: Data Acquisition of Recurring Data Pattern Using a Transitional Mode as a Storage

Qualifier

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Conditional Mode

In Conditional mode, the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer evaluates a combinational function of storage qualifier enabled signals within the node list to determine whether a sample is stored. The SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer writes into the buffer during the clock cycles in which the condition you specify evaluates

TRUE

.

You can select either Basic AND, Basic OR, or Advanced storage qualifier conditions. A Basic AND or

Basic OR storage qualifier condition matches each signal to one of the following:

Don’t Care

Low

High

Falling Edge

Rising Edge

Either Edge

If you specify a Basic AND storage qualifier condition for more than one signal, the SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer evaluates the logical AND of the conditions.

Any other combinational or relational operators that you may want to specify with the enabled signal set for storage qualification can be done with an advanced storage condition.

Figure 13-13

details the conditional storage qualifier setup in the

.stp

.

You can specify storage qualification conditions similar to the manner in which trigger conditions are specified.

Figure 13-14

and

Figure 13-15

show a data capture with continuous sampling, and the same data pattern using the conditional mode for analysis, respectively.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 13-13: Conditional Storage Qualifier Setup

Start/Stop Mode

13-19

Figure 13-14: Data Acquisition of a Recurring Data Pattern in Continuous Capture Mode (Conditional)

Figure 13-15: Data Acquisition of a Recurring Data Pattern in Conditional Capture Mode

Related Information

Creating Basic Trigger Conditions

on page 13-23

Creating Advanced Trigger Conditions

on page 13-25

Start/Stop Mode

The Start/Stop mode is similar to the Conditional mode for storage qualification. However, in this mode there are two sets of conditions, one for start and one for stop. If the start condition evaluates to

TRUE

, data is stored in the buffer every clock cycle until the stop condition evaluates to

TRUE

, which then pauses

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-20

State-Based

the data capture. Additional start signals received after the data capture has started are ignored. If both start and stop evaluate to

TRUE

at the same time, a single cycle is captured.

Note: You can force a trigger by pressing the Stop button if the buffer fails to fill to completion due to a stop condition.

Figure 13-16

shows the Start/Stop mode storage qualifier setup.

Figure 13-17

and

Figure 13-18

show a

data capture pattern in continuous capture mode and a data pattern in using the Start/Stop mode for storage qualification.

Figure 13-16: Start/Stop Mode Storage Qualifier Setup

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 13-17: Data Acquisition of a Recurring Data Pattern in Continuous Mode (Start/Stop)

Figure 13-18: Data Acquisition of a Recurring Data Pattern with Start/Stop Storage Qualifier Enabled

State-Based

The State-based storage qualification mode is used with the State-based triggering flow. The state based triggering flow evaluates an if-else based language to define how data is written into the buffer. With the

State-based trigger flow, you have command over boolean and relational operators to guide the execution

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Showing Data Discontinuities

13-21

flow for the target acquisition buffer. When the storage qualifier feature is enabled for the State-based flow, two additional commands are available, the start_store

and stop_store

commands. These commands operate similarly to the Start/Stop capture conditions described in the previous section. Upon the start of acquisition, data is not written into the buffer until a start_store

action is performed. The stop_store

command pauses the acquisition. If both start_store

and stop_store

actions are performed within the same clock cycle, a single sample is stored into the acquisition buffer.

Related Information

State-Based Triggering

on page 13-32

Showing Data Discontinuities

When you turn on Record data discontinuities, the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer marks the samples during which the acquisition paused from a storage qualifier. This marker is displayed in the waveform viewer after acquisition completes.

Disable Storage Qualifier

You can turn off the storage qualifier quickly with the Disable Storage Qualifier option, and perform a continuous capture. This option is run-time reconfigurable; that is, the setting can be changed without recompiling the project. Changing storage qualifier mode from the Type field requires a recompilation of the project.

Related Information

Runtime Reconfigurable Options

on page 13-52

Managing Multiple SignalTap II Files and Configurations

You can use more than one

.stp

in one design. Each file potentially has a different group of monitored signals. These signal groups make it possible to debug different blocks in your design. In turn, each group of signals can also be used to define different sets of trigger conditions. Along with each

.stp

, there is also an associated programming file (SRAM Object File [

.sof

]). The settings in a selected SignalTap II file must match the SignalTap II logic design in the associated

.sof

for the logic analyzer to run properly when the device is programmed. Use the Data Log feature and the SOF Manager to manage all of the

.stp

files and their associated settings and programming files.

The Data Log allows you to store multiple SignalTap II configurations within a single

.stp

.

Figure 13-19

shows two signal set configurations with multiple trigger conditions in one

.stp

. To toggle between the active configurations, double-click on an entry in the Data Log. As you toggle between the different configurations, the signal list and trigger conditions change in the Setup tab of the

.stp

. The active configuration displayed in the

.stp

is indicated by the blue square around the signal specified in the Data

Log. Enable the Data Log by clicking the check box next to Data Log. To store a configuration in the Data

Log, on the Edit menu, click Save to Data Log or click the Save to Data Log icon at the top of the Data

Log. The time stamping for the Data Log entries display the wall-clock time when SignalTap II triggered and the elapsed time from when acquisition started to when the device triggered.

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-22

Define Triggers

Figure 13-19: Data Log

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

The SOF Manager allows you to embed multiple SOFs into one

.stp

. Embedding an SOF in an

.stp

lets you move the

.stp

to a different location, either on the same computer or across a network, without the need to include the associated

.sof

separately. To embed a new SOF in the

.stp

, right-click in the SOF Manager, and click Attach SOF File .

Figure 13-20: SOF Manager

As you switch between configurations in the Data Log, you can extract the SOF that is compatible with that particular configuration. You can use the programmer in the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer to download the new SOF to the FPGA, ensuring that the configuration of your

.stp

always matches the design programmed into the target device.

Define Triggers

When you start the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, it samples activity continuously from the monitored signals. The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer “triggers”—that is, the logic analyzer stops and displays the data

—when a condition or set of conditions that you specified has been reached. This section describes the various types of trigger conditions that you can specify using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer on the

Signal Configuration pane.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Creating Basic Trigger Conditions

13-23

Creating Basic Trigger Conditions

The simplest kind of trigger condition is a basic trigger. Select this from the list at the top of the Trigger

Conditions column in the node list in the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Editor. If you select the Basic

AND or Basic OR trigger type, you must specify the trigger pattern for each signal you have added in the

.stp

. To specify the trigger pattern, right-click in the Trigger Conditions column and click the desired pattern. Set the trigger pattern to any of the following conditions:

Don’t Care

Low

High

Falling Edge

Rising Edge

Either Edge

For buses, type a pattern in binary, or right-click and select Insert Value to enter the pattern in other number formats. Note that you can enter

X

to specify a set of “don’t care” values in either your hexadec‐ imal or your binary string. For signals added to the

.stp

that have an associated mnemonic table, you can right-click and select an entry from the table to specify pre-defined conditions for the trigger.

For more information about creating and using mnemonic tables, refer to

View, Analyze, and Use

Captured Data

, and to the Quartus Prime Help.

For signals added with certain plug-ins, you can create basic triggers easily using predefined mnemonic table entries. For example, with the Nios II plug-in, if you have specified an

.elf

from your Nios II IDE design, you can type the name of a function from your Nios II code. The logic analyzer triggers when the

Nios II instruction address matches the address of the specified code function name.

Data capture stops and the data is stored in the buffer when the logical

AND

of all the signals for a given trigger condition evaluates to

TRUE

.

Using the Basic OR Triggering Condition with Nested Groups

When you specify a set of signals as a nested group (group of groups) with the Basic OR trigger type, an advanced trigger condition is generated. This advanced trigger condition sorts signals within groups to minimize the need to recompile your design. As long as the parent-child relationships of nodes are kept constant, the generated advanced trigger condition does not change. You can modify the sibling relationships of nodes and not need to recompile your design. The precedence of how this trigger condition is evaluated starts at the bottom-level with the leaf-groups first, then their resulting logic 1 or logic 0 value is used to compute the result of their parent group’s logic value. Specifying a value of TRUE for a group sets that group’s logical result to logic 1 and effectively eliminates all members beneath it from affecting the result of the group trigger. Specifying a value of FALSE for a group sets that group’s logical result to logic-0 and effectively eliminates all members beneath it from affecting the result of the group trigger.

1. Select Basic OR under Trigger Conditions.

2. In the Setup tab, select nodes including groups.

3. Right-click in the Setup tab and select Group.

4. Select your signal(s) and right-click to set a group trigger condition that applies the reduction AND,

OR, NAND, NOR, XOR, XNOR, or logical TRUE or FALSE.

Note: The OR and AND group trigger conditions are only selectable for groups with no groups as children (bottom-level groups).

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-24

Using the Basic OR Triggering Condition with Nested Groups

Figure 13-21: Creating Nested Groups

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 13-22: Applying Group Trigger Condition

Creating Advanced Trigger Conditions

13-25

Creating Advanced Trigger Conditions

With the basic triggering capabilities of the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, you can build more complex triggers with extra logic that enables you to capture data when a combination of conditions exist. If you select the Advanced trigger type at the top of the Trigger Conditions column in the node list of the

SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Editor, a new tab named Advanced Trigger appears where you can build a complex trigger expression using a simple GUI. Drag-and-drop operators into the Advanced Trigger

Configuration Editor window to build the complex trigger condition in an expression tree. To configure the operators’ settings, double-click or right-click the operators that you have placed and select

Properties.

Table 13-2: Advanced Triggering Operators

Name of Operator

Less Than

Less Than or Equal To

Equality

Inequality

Greater Than

Greater Than or Equal To

Logical

NOT

Logical

AND

Logical

OR

Comparison

Comparison

Comparison

Comparison

Comparison

Comparison

Logical

Logical

Logical

Type

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-26

Examples of Advanced Triggering Expressions

Name of Operator

Logical

XOR

Reduction

AND

Reduction

OR

Reduction

XOR

Left Shift

Right Shift

Bitwise Complement

Bitwise

AND

Bitwise

OR

Bitwise

XOR

Edge and Level Detector

Note to table :

1. For more information about each of these operators, refer to the Quartus Prime Help.

Logical

Reduction

Reduction

Reduction

Shift

Shift

Bitwise

Bitwise

Bitwise

Bitwise

Signal Detection

Type

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Adding many objects to the Advanced Trigger Condition Editor can make the work space cluttered and difficult to read. To keep objects organized while you build your advanced trigger condition, use the shortcut menu and select Arrange All Objects. You can also use the Zoom-Out command to fit more objects into the Advanced Trigger Condition Editor window.

Examples of Advanced Triggering Expressions

The following examples show how to use Advanced Triggering:

Figure 13-23: Bus outa Is Greater Than or Equal to Bus outb

Trigger when bus outa

is greater than or equal to outb

.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Custom Trigger HDL Object

13-27

Figure 13-24: Enable Signal Has a Rising Edge

Trigger when bus outa

is greater than or equal to bus outb

, and when the enable signal has a rising edge.

Figure 13-25: Bitwise AND Operation

Trigger when bus outa

is greater than or equal to bus outb

, or when the enable signal has a rising edge.

Or, when a bitwise

AND

operation has been performed between bus outc

and bus outd

, and all bits of the result of that operation are equal to 1.

Custom Trigger HDL Object

The Custom Trigger HDL object found in the Advanced Trigger editor allows you to create a customized trigger condition with your own HDL module in either Verilog or VHDL. You can use this object to simulate the behavior of your triggering logic to make sure that the logic itself is not faulty. You can tap specific instances of modules located anywhere in the hierarchy of your design without having to manually route all the necessary connections.

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-28

Custom Trigger Flow

Figure 13-26: Object Library

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Custom Trigger Flow

1. Select Advanced for a given trigger-level to make the Advanced Trigger editor active.

2. Prepare your Custom Trigger HDL module. You can either add a new source file to Quartus Prime that contains the trigger module or append the HDL for your trigger module to a source file already included in Quartus Prime Files under the Project Navigator.

Figure 13-27: Project Navigator

3. Implement the required inputs and outputs for your Custom Trigger HDL module, see

Table 13-3

.

4. Drag in your Custom Trigger HDL object and connect the object’s data input bus and result output bit to the final trigger result.

Figure 13-28: Custom Trigger HDL Object

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Custom Trigger Flow

13-29

5. Right-click your Custom Trigger HDL object and configure the object’s properties, see

Table 13-4

.

Figure 13-29: Configure Object Properties

6. Compile your design.

7. Acquire data with SignalTap II using your custom Trigger HDL object.

Table 13-3: Custom Trigger HDL Module Required Inputs and Outputs

Name

acq_clk reset data_in pattern_in trigger_out

Description

Acquisition clock used by SignalTap II Input

Reset signal used by SignalTap II when restarting a capture. Input

Input

• Data input to be connected in the Advanced Trigger editor.

• Data your module will use to trigger.

Input

• Module’s input for the configuration bitstream property.

• Runtime configurable property that can be set from

SignalTap II GUI to change the behavior of your trigger logic.

Input/Output Required/

Optional

Required

Required

Required

Output signal of your module to be asserted when triggering conditions have been met.

Output

Optional

Required

Table 13-4: Custom Trigger HDL Module Properties

Property

Custom HDL

Module Name

Module name of your triggering logic i.e. module trigger_foo (input x, y ...);

Description

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-30

Trigger Condition Flow Control

Property

Configuration

Bitstream

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Description

• Allows you to create runtime-configurable trigger logic which can change its behavior based upon the value of the configuration bitstream.

• Configuration bitstream property is interpreted as binary and should only contain the characters 1 and 0. The bit-width (number of 1s and 0s) should match the pattern_in

bit width in

Table 13-3

.

• A blank configuration bitstream implies that your module does not have a pattern_in

input.

Pipeline

• Tells the advanced trigger editor how many stages of pipeline your triggering logic has.

• If it takes three clock cycles after a triggering input is received for the trigger output to be asserted, you can denote a pipeline value of three.

Figure 13-30: Example of Verilog Trigger Using Configuration Bitstream

Figure 13-31: Example of Verilog Trigger with No Configuration Bitstream

Trigger Condition Flow Control

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer offers multiple triggering conditions to give you precise control of the method in which data is captured into the acquisition buffers. Trigger Condition Flow allows you to define the relationship between a set of triggering conditions. The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Signal

Configuration pane offers two flow control mechanisms for organizing trigger conditions:

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Sequential Triggering

13-31

Sequential Triggering—The default triggering flow. Sequential triggering allows you to define up to

10 triggering levels that must be satisfied before the acquisition buffer finishes capturing.

State-Based Triggering—Allows you the greatest control over your acquisition buffer. Custom-based triggering allows you to organize trigger conditions into states based on a conditional flow that you define.

You can use sequential or state based triggering with either a segmented or a non-segmented buffer.

Sequential Triggering

Sequential triggering flow allows you to cascade up to 10 levels of triggering conditions. The SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer sequentially evaluates each of the triggering conditions. When the last triggering condition evaluates to

TRUE

, the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer triggers the acquisition buffer. For segmented buffers, every acquisition segment after the first segment triggers on the last triggering condition that you have specified. Use the Simple Sequential Triggering feature with basic triggers, advanced triggers, or a mix of

both.

Figure 13-32

illustrates the simple sequential triggering flow for non-segmented and segmented

buffers.

Note: The external trigger is considered as trigger level

0

. The external trigger must be evaluated before the main trigger levels are evaluated.

Figure 13-32: Sequential Triggering Flow

Segmented Buffer Non-segmented Buffer

Trigger Condition 1

Trigger Condition 1 n - 2 transitions

Trigger Condition 2

Trigger Condition n

trigger

Acquisition Buffer

n - 2 transitions

Trigger Condition 2

Trigger Condition n

trigger

Acquisition Segment 1

m - 2 transitions

Trigger Condition n

trigger

Trigger Condition n

trigger

Acquisition Segment 2

Acquisition Segment m

Notes to figure:

1. The acquisition buffer stops capture when all n triggering levels are satisfied, where n<10.

2. An external trigger input, if defined, is evaluated before all other defined trigger conditions are evaluated.

To configure the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer for Sequential triggering, in the SignalTap II editor on the

Trigger flow control list, select Sequential. Select the desired number of trigger conditions from the

Trigger Conditions list. After you select the desired number of trigger conditions, configure each trigger condition in the node list. To disable any trigger condition, turn on the trigger condition at the top of the column in the node list.

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-32

State-Based Triggering

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

State-Based Triggering

Custom State-based triggering provides the most control over triggering condition arrangement. The

State-Based Triggering flow allows you to describe the relationship between triggering conditions precisely, using an intuitive GUI and the SignalTap II Trigger Flow Description Language, a simple description language based upon conditional expressions. Tooltips within the custom triggering flow GUI allow you to describe your desired flow quickly. The custom State-based triggering flow allows for more efficient use of the space available in the acquisition buffer because only specific samples of interest are captured.

Events that trigger the acquisition buffer are organized by a state diagram that you define. All actions performed by the acquisition buffer are captured by the states and all transition conditions between the states are defined by the conditional expressions that you specify within each state.

Figure 13-33: State-Based Triggering Flow

User-Defined Triggering Flow

Transition Condition i

Transition Condition k

State 1: State 2:

Trigger Condition Set a Trigger Condition Set b

State 3:

Trigger Condition Set c

Transition Condition l

State n (last state):

Trigger Condition Set d

segment_trigger

First Acquisition Segment

Segmented Acquisition Buffer

segment_trigger

Next Acquisition Segment

Transition Condition j segment_trigger

Next Acquisition Segment

segment_trigger

Last Acquisition Segment

Notes to figure:

1. You are allowed up to 20 different states.

2. An external trigger input, if defined, is evaluated before any conditions in the custom State-based triggering flow are evaluated.

Each state allows you to define a set of conditional expressions. Each conditional expression is a Boolean expression dependent on a combination of triggering conditions (configured within the Setup tab), counters, and status flags. Counters and status flags are resources provided by the SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer custom-based triggering flow.

Within each conditional expression you define a set of actions. Actions include triggering the acquisition buffer to stop capture, a modification to either a counter or status flag, or a state transition.

Trigger actions can apply to either a single segment of a segmented acquisition buffer or to the entire nonsegmented acquisition buffer. Each trigger action provides you with an optional count that specifies the number of samples captured before stopping acquisition of the current segment. The count argument allows you to control the amount of data captured precisely before and after triggering event.

Resource manipulation actions allow you to increment and decrement counters or set and clear status flags. The counter and status flag resources are used as optional inputs in conditional expressions.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

State Diagram Pane

13-33

Counters and status flags are useful for counting the number of occurrences of particular events and for aiding in triggering flow control.

This SignalTap II custom State-based triggering flow allows you to capture a sequence of events that may not necessarily be contiguous in time; for example, capturing a communication transaction between two devices that includes a handshaking protocol containing a sequence of acknowledgements.

The State-Based Trigger Flow tab is the control interface for the custom state-based triggering flow. To enable this tab, select State-based on the Trigger Flow Control list. (Note that when Trigger Flow

Control is specified as Sequential, the State-Based Trigger Flow tab is hidden.)

The State-Based Trigger Flow tab is partitioned into the following three panes:

State Diagram pane

Resources pane

State Machine pane

State Diagram Pane

The State Diagram pane provides a graphical overview of the triggering flow that you define. It shows the number of states available and the state transitions between the states. You can adjust the number of available states by using the menu above the graphical overview.

State Machine Pane

The State Machine pane contains the text entry boxes where you can define the triggering flow and actions associated with each state. You can define the triggering flow using the SignalTap II Trigger Flow

Description Language, a simple language based on “if-else” conditional statements. Tooltips appear when you move the mouse over the cursor, to guide command entry into the state boxes. The GUI provides a syntax check on your flow description in real-time and highlights any errors in the text flow.

The State Machine description text boxes default to show one text box per state. You can also have the entire flow description shown in a single text field. This option can be useful when copying and pasting a flow description from a template or an external text editor. To toggle between one window per state, or all states in one window, select the appropriate option under State Display mode.

Related Information

SignalTap II Trigger Flow Description Language

on page 13-34

Resources Pane

The Resources pane allows you to declare Status Flags and Counters for use in the conditional expressions in the Custom Triggering Flow. Actions to decrement and increment counters or to set and clear status flags are performed within the triggering flow that you define.

You can specify up to 20 counters and 20 status flags. Counter and status flags values may be initialized by right-clicking the status flag or counter name after selecting a number of them from the respective pulldown list, and selecting Set Initial Value. To specify a counter width, right-click the counter name and select Set Width. Counters and flag values are updated dynamically after acquisition has started to assist in debugging your trigger flow specification.

The configurable at runtime options in the Resources pane allows you to configure the custom-flow control options that can be changed at runtime without requiring a recompilation.

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-34

SignalTap II Trigger Flow Description Language

Table 13-5: Runtime Reconfigurable Settings, State-Based Triggering Flow

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Setting Description

Destination of goto action Allows you to modify the destination of the state transition at runtime.

Comparison values Allows you to modify comparison values in Boolean expressions at runtime. In addition, you can modify the segment_trigger

and trigger action post-fill count argument at runtime.

Comparison operators

Logical operators

Allows you to modify the operators in Boolean expressions at runtime.

Allows you to modify the logical operators in Boolean expressions at runtime.

You can restrict changes to your SignalTap II configuration to include only the options that do not require a recompilation. Trigger lock-mode allows you to make changes that can be immediately reflected in the device.

1. On the Setup tab, select Allow trigger condition changes only.

2. Modify the Trigger Flow conditions in the Custom Trigger Flow tab.

3. Click the desired parameter in the text box and select a new parameter from the menu that appears.

Incremental Route lock-mode restricts the GUI to only allow changes that require an Incremental Route compilation using Rapid Recompile. Use Rapid Recompile to perform incremental routing and gain a

2-4x speedup over the initial full compilation.

Note: Trigger lock mode restricts changes to the configuration settings that have configurable at

runtime specified. The runtime configurable settings for the Custom Trigger Flow tab are on by default. You may get some performance advantages by disabling some of the runtime configurable options.

Related Information

Performance and Resource Considerations

on page 13-49

Runtime Reconfigurable Options

on page 13-52

SignalTap II Trigger Flow Description Language

The Trigger Flow Description Language is based on a list of conditional expressions per state to define a set of actions. Each line in the example shows a language format. Keywords are shown in bold. Nonterminals are delimited by “

<>

” and are further explained in the following sections. Optional arguments are delimited by “

[]

“.

state <State_label>:

<action_list> if( <Boolean_expression> )

<action_list>

[else if ( <boolean_expression> )

<action_list>]

[else

<action_list>]

Note: Multiple else if

conditions are allowed.

The priority for evaluation of conditional statements is assigned from top to bottom. The

<boolean_expression> in an if

statement can contain a single event, or it can contain multiple event

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

State Labels

13-35

conditions. The action_list

within an if

or an else if

clause must be delimited by the begin and end tokens when the action list contains multiple statements. When the boolean expression is evaluated

TRUE

, the logic analyzer analyzes all of the commands in the action list concurrently. The possible actions include:

• Triggering the acquisition buffer

• Manipulating a counter or status flag resource

• Defining a state transition

Related Information

Custom Triggering Flow Application Examples

on page 13-65

State Labels

State labels are identifiers that can be used in the action goto

.

state

<state_label>: begins the description of the actions evaluated when this state is reached.

The description of a state ends with the beginning of another state or the end of the whole trigger flow description.

Boolean_expression

Boolean_expression

is a collection of logical operators, relational operators, and their operands that evaluate into a Boolean result. Depending on the operator, the operand can be a reference to a trigger condition, a counter and a register, or a numeric value. Within an expression, parentheses can be used to group a set of operands.

Logical operators accept any boolean expression as an operand.

Table 13-6: Logical Operators

!

&&

||

! expr1 expr1 && expr2 expr1 || expr2

Relational operators are performed on counters or status flags. The comparison value, the right operator, must be a numerical value.

Table 13-7: Relational Operators

>

Operator

Operator Description

Greater than

Description

NOT

operator

AND

operator

OR

operator

Syntax

Syntax

<identifier> > <numerical_value>

>=

==

Greater than or

Equal to

Equals

<identifier> >= <numerical_value>

<identifier> == <numerical_value>

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-36

Action_list

Operator

!=

Description

Does not equal

Syntax

<identifier> != <numerical_value>

<=

<

Less than or equal to

Less than

<identifier> <= <numerical_value>

<identifier> < <numerical_value>

Notes to table:

1. <identifier> indicates a counter or status flag.

2. <numerical_value> indicates an integer.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Action_list

Action_list is a list of actions that can be performed when a state is reached and a condition is also satisfied. If more than one action is specified, they must be enclosed by begin

and end

. The actions can be categorized as resource manipulation actions, buffer control actions, and state transition actions. Each action is terminated by a semicolon (

;

).

Resource Manipulation Action

The resources used in the trigger flow description can be either counters or status flags.

Table 13-8: Resource Manipulation Action

Action Description

increment Increments a counter resource by 1

Syntax

increment <counter_identifier>; decrement Decrements a counter resource by 1 decrement <counter_identifier>; reset Resets counter resource to initial value reset <counter_identifier>; set Sets a status Flag to 1 set <register_flag_identifier>; clear Sets a status Flag to 0 clear <register_flag_identifier>;

Buffer Control Action

Buffer control actions specify an action to control the acquisition buffer.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Table 13-9: Buffer Control Action

State Transition Action

13-37

Action

trigger segment_trigger start_store stop_store

Description

Stops the acquisition for the current buffer and ends analysis. This command is required in every flow definition.

Ends the acquisition of the current segment. The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer starts acquiring from the next segment on evaluating this command. If all segments are filled, the oldest segment is overwritten with the latest sample. The acquisition stops when a trigger action is evaluated.

This action cannot be used in nonsegmented acquisition mode.

Asserts the write_enable

to the

SignalTap II acquisition buffer. This command is active only when the Statebased storage qualifier mode is enabled.

De-asserts the write_enable

signal to the

SignalTap II acquisition buffer. This command is active only when the Statebased storage qualifier mode is enabled.

start_store stop_store

Syntax

trigger <post-fill_count>; segment_trigger <post-fill_count>;

Both trigger

and segment_trigger

actions accept an optional post-fill count argument. If provided, the current acquisition acquires the number of samples provided by post-fill count and then stops acquisition.

If no post-count value is specified, the trigger position for the affected buffer defaults to the trigger position specified in the Setup tab.

Note: In the case of segment_trigger

, acquisition of the current buffer stops immediately if a subsequent triggering action is issued in the next state, regardless of whether or not the post-fill count has been satisfied for the current buffer. The remaining unfilled post-count acquisitions in the current buffer are discarded and displayed as grayed-out samples in the data window.

State Transition Action

The State Transition action specifies the next state in the custom state control flow. It is specified by the goto

command. The syntax is as follows: goto <state_label>;

Using the State-Based Storage Qualifier Feature

When you select State-based for the storage qualifier type, the start_store

and stop_store

actions are enabled in the State-based trigger flow. These commands, when used in conjunction with the expressions of the State-based trigger flow, give you maximum flexibility to control data written into the acquisition buffer.

Note: The start_store

and stop_store

commands can only be applied to a non-segmented buffer.

The start_store

and stop_store

commands function similar to the start and stop conditions when using the start/stop storage qualifier mode conditions. If storage qualification is enabled, the

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Altera Corporation

Send Feedback

13-38

Using the State-Based Storage Qualifier Feature

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

start_store

command must be issued for SignalTap II to write data into the acquisition buffer. No data is acquired until the start_store

command is performed. Also, a trigger

command must be included as part of the trigger flow description. The trigger

command is necessary to complete the acquisition and display the results on the waveform display.

The following example illustrates the behavior of the State-based trigger flow with the storage qualifica‐ tion commands.

State 1: ST1: if ( condition1 )

start_store; else if ( condition2 )

trigger value; else if ( condition3 )

stop_store;

Figure 13-34

shows a hypothetical scenario with three trigger conditions that happen at different times after you click Start Analysis. The trigger flow description in the example above , when applied to the scenario shown in

Figure 13-34

, illustrates the functionality of the storage qualification feature for the

state-based trigger flow.

Figure 13-34: Capture Scenario for Storage Qualification with the State-Based Trigger Flow

In this example, the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer does not write into the acquisition buffer until sample a, when Condition 1 occurs. Once sample b is reached, the trigger value

command is evaluated. The logic analyzer continues to write into the buffer to finish the acquisition. The trigger flow specifies a stop_store

command at sample c, m samples after the trigger point occurs.

The logic analyzer finishes the acquisition and displays the contents of the waveform if it can successfully finish the post-fill acquisition samples before Condition 3 occurs. In this specific case, the capture ends if the post-fill count value is less than m.

If the post-fill count value specified in Trigger Flow description 1 is greater than m samples, the buffer pauses acquisition indefinitely, provided there is no recurrence of Condition 1 to trigger the logic analyzer to start capturing data again. The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer continues to evaluate the stop_store and

start_store commands even after the trigger command is evaluated. If the acquisition has paused, you can click Stop Analysis to manually stop and force the acquisition to trigger. You can use counter values, flags, and the State diagram to help you perform the trigger flow. The counter values, flags, and the current state are updated in real-time during a data acquisition.

Figure 13-35

and

Figure 13-36

show a real data acquisition of the scenario.

Figure 13-35

illustrates a scenario where the data capture finishes successfully. It uses a buffer with a sample depth of 64, m = n =

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Using the State-Based Storage Qualifier Feature

13-39

10, and the post-fill count value = 5.

Figure 13-36

illustrates a scenario where the logic analyzer pauses

indefinitely even after a trigger condition occurs due to a stop_store

condition. This scenario uses a sample depth of 64, with m = n = 10 and post-fill count = 15.

Figure 13-35: Storage Qualification with Post-Fill Count Value Less than

Completes) m

(Acquisition Successfully

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-40

Using the State-Based Storage Qualifier Feature

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 13-36: Storage Qualification with Post-Fill Count Value Greater than

Paused) m

(Acquisition Indefinitely

Figure 13-37: Waveform After Forcing the Analysis to Stop

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Specifying the Trigger Position

13-41

The combination of using counters, Boolean and relational operators in conjunction with the start_store

and stop_store

commands can give a clock-cycle level of resolution to controlling the samples that are written into the acquisition buffer. The code example below shows a trigger flow descrip‐ tion that skips three clock cycles of samples after hitting condition 1.

Figure 13-38

shows the data transac‐ tion on a continuous capture and

Figure 13-40

shows the data capture with the Trigger flow description applied, in the example below.

State 1: ST1 start_store if ( condition1 ) begin

stop_store;

goto ST2; end

State 2: ST2 if (c1 < 3)

increment c1; //skip three clock cycles; c1 initialized to 0 else if (c1 == 3) begin

start_store; //start_store necessary to enable writing to finish

//acquisition

trigger; end

Figure 13-38: Continuous Capture of Data Transaction for Example 2

Figure 13-39: Capture of Data Transaction with Trigger Flow Description Applied

Specifying the Trigger Position

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer allows you to specify the amount of data that is acquired before and after a trigger event. You can specify the trigger position independently between a Runtime and Power-Up

Trigger. Select the desired ratio of pre-trigger data to post-trigger data by choosing one of the following ratios:

Pre—Saves signal activity that occurred after the trigger (12% pre-trigger, 88% post-trigger).

Center—Saves 50% pre-trigger and 50% post-trigger data.

Post—Saves signal activity that occurred before the trigger (88% pre-trigger, 12% post-trigger).

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-42

Creating a Power-Up Trigger

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

These pre-defined ratios apply to both non-segmented buffers and segmented buffers.

If you use the custom-state based triggering flow, you can specify a custom trigger position. The segment_trigger

and trigger actions accept a post-fill count argument. The post-fill count specifies the number of samples to capture before stopping data acquisition for the non-segmented buffer or a data segment when using the trigger

and segment_trigger

commands, respectively. When the captured data is displayed in the SignalTap II data window, the trigger position appears as the number of postcount samples from the end of the acquisition segment or buffer.

Sample Number of Trigger Position = (N – Post-Fill Count)

In this case, N is the sample depth of either the acquisition segment or non-segmented buffer.

For segmented buffers, the acquisition segments that have a post-count argument define use of the postcount setting. Segments that do not have a post-count setting default to the trigger position ratios defined in the Setup tab.

Related Information

State-Based Triggering

on page 13-32

Creating a Power-Up Trigger

Typically, the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is used to trigger on events that occur during normal device operation. You start an analysis manually once the target device is fully powered on and the JTAG connection for the device is available. However, there may be cases when you would like to capture trigger events that occur during device initialization, immediately after the FPGA is powered on or reset. With the SignalTap II Power-Up Trigger feature, you arm the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer and capture data immediately after device programming.

Enabling a Power-Up Trigger

You can add a different Power-Up Trigger to each logic analyzer instance in the SignalTap II Instance

Manager pane. To enable the Power-Up Trigger for a logic analyzer instance, right-click the instance and click Enable Power-Up Trigger, or select the instance, and on the Edit menu, click Enable Power-Up

Trigger. To disable a Power-Up Trigger, click Disable Power-Up Trigger in the same locations. Power-

Up Trigger is shown as a child instance below the name of the selected instance with the default trigger conditions specified in the node list.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Managing and Configuring Power-Up and Runtime Trigger Conditions

Figure 13-40: SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Editor with Power-Up Trigger Enabled

13-43

Managing and Configuring Power-Up and Runtime Trigger Conditions

When the Power-Up Trigger is enabled for a logic analyzer instance, you can create basic and advanced trigger conditions for the trigger as you do with a Run-Time Trigger. Power-Up Trigger conditions that you can adjust are color coded light blue, while Run-Time Trigger conditions you cannot adjust remain white. Since each instance now has two sets of trigger conditions—the Power-Up Trigger and the Run-

Time Trigger—you can differentiate between the two with color coding. To switch between the trigger conditions of the Power-Up Trigger and the Run-Time Trigger, double-click the instance name or the

Power-Up Trigger name in the Instance Manager.

You cannot make changes to Power-Up Trigger conditions that would normally require a full recompile with Runtime Trigger conditions, such as adding signals, deleting signals, or changing between basic and advanced triggers. To apply these changes to the Power-Up Trigger conditions, first make the changes using the Runtime Trigger conditions.

Note: Any change made to the Power-Up Trigger conditions requires that you recompile the SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer instance, even if a similar change to the Runtime Trigger conditions does not require a recompilation.

While creating or making changes to the trigger conditions for the Run-Time Trigger or the Power-Up

Trigger, you may want to copy these conditions to the other trigger. This enables you to look for the same trigger during both power-up and runtime. To do this, right-click the instance name or the Power-Up

Trigger name in the Instance Manager and click Duplicate Trigger, or select the instance name or the

Power-Up Trigger name and on the Edit menu, click Duplicate Trigger.

You can also use In-System Sources and Probes in conjunction with the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer to force trigger conditions. The In-System Sources and Probes feature allows you to drive and sample values on to selected nets over the JTAG chain.

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-44

Using External Triggers

Related Information

Design Debugging Using In-System Sources and Probes documentation

on page 17-1

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Using External Triggers

You can create a trigger input that allows you to trigger the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer from an external source. The external trigger input behaves like trigger condition 1, is evaluated, and must be

TRUE

before any other configured trigger conditions are evaluated. The logic analyzer supplies a signal to trigger external devices or other SignalTap II Logic Analyzer instances. These features allow you to synchronize external logic analysis equipment with the internal logic analyzer. Power-Up Triggers can use the external triggers feature, but they must use the same source or target signal as their associated Run-Time Trigger.

You can use external triggers to perform cross-triggering on a hard processor system (HPS). Use your processor debugger to configure the HPS to obey or disregard cross-trigger request from the FPGA, and to issue or not issue cross-trigger requests to the FPGA. Use your processor debugger in combination with the SignalTap II external trigger feature to develop a dynamic combination of cross-trigger behaviors. You can use the cross-triggering feature with the ARM Development Studio 5 (DS-5) software to implement a system-level debugging solution for your Altera SoC.

Related Information

FPGA-Adaptive Software Debug and Performance Analysis white paper

Information about the ARM DS-5 debugging solution

Signal Configuration Pane online help

Information about setting up external triggers

Using the Trigger Out of One Analyzer as the Trigger In of Another Analyzer

An advanced feature of the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is the ability to use the Trigger out of one analyzer as the Trigger in to another analyzer. This feature allows you to synchronize and debug events that occur across multiple clock domains.

To perform this operation, first turn on Trigger out for the source logic analyzer instance. On the

Instance list of the Trigger out trigger, select the targeted logic analyzer instance. For example, if the instance named auto_signaltap_0

should trigger auto_signaltap_1

, select auto_signaltap_1| trigger_in

.

Turning on Trigger out automatically enables the Trigger in of the targeted logic analyzer instance and fills in the Instance field of the Trigger in trigger with the Trigger out signal from the source logic analyzer instance. In this example, auto_signaltap_0

is targeting auto_signaltap_1

. The Trigger In

Instance field of auto_signaltap_1

is automatically filled in with auto_signaltap_0|trigger_out

.

Compile the Design

When you add an

.stp

to your project, the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer becomes part of your design. You must compile your project to incorporate the SignalTap II logic and enable the JTAG connection you use to control the logic analyzer. When you are debugging with a traditional external logic analyzer, you must often make changes to the signals monitored as well as the trigger conditions.

Note: Because these adjustments require that you recompile your design when using the SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer, use the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer feature along with incremental compilation in the Quartus Prime software to reduce recompilation time.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Faster Compilations with Quartus Prime Incremental Compilation

13-45

Faster Compilations with Quartus Prime Incremental Compilation

When you compile your design with an

.stp

, the sld_signaltap

and sld_hub

entities are automatically added to the compilation hierarchy. These two entities are the main components of the SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer, providing the trigger logic and JTAG interface required for operation.

Incremental compilation enables you to preserve the synthesis and fitting results of your original design and add the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer to your design without recompiling your original source code.

Incremental compilation is also useful when you want to modify the configuration of the

.stp

. For example, you can modify the buffer sample depth or memory type without performing a full compilation after the change is made. Only the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, configured as its own design partition, must be recompiled to reflect the changes.

Enabling Incremental Compilation for Your Design

When enabled for your design, the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is always a separate partition. After the first compilation, you can use the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer to analyze signals from the post-fit netlist.

If your partitions are designed correctly, subsequent compilations due to SignalTap II Logic Analyzer settings take less time.

The netlist type for the top-level partition defaults to source. To take advantage of incremental compila‐ tion, specify the Netlist types for the partitions you wish to tap as Post-fit.

Related Information

Quartus Prime Incremental Compilation for Hierarchical and Team-Based Design documentation

Using Incremental Compilation with the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is automatically configured to work with the incremental compilation flow. For all signals that you want to connect to the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer from the post-fit netlist, set the netlist type of the partition containing the desired signals to Post-Fit with a Fitter Preservation

Level of Placement and Routing using the Design Partitions window. Use the SignalTap II: post-fitting

filter in the Node Finder to add the signals of interest to your SignalTap II configuration file. If you want to add signals from the pre-synthesis netlist, set the netlist type to Source File and use the SignalTap II:

pre-synthesis filter in the Node Finder. Do not use the netlist type Post-Synthesis with the SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer.

Caution:

Be sure to conform to the following guidelines when using post-fit and pre-synthesis nodes:

• Read all incremental compilation guidelines to ensure the proper partitioning of a project.

• To speed up compile time, use only post-fit nodes for partitions specified as preservationlevel post-fit.

• Do not mix pre-synthesis and post-fit nodes in any partition. If you must tap pre-synthesis nodes for a particular partition, make all tapped nodes in that partition pre-synthesis nodes and change the netlist type to source in the design partitions window.

Node names may be different between a pre-synthesis netlist and a post-fit netlist. In general, registers and user input signals share common names between the two netlists. During compilation, certain optimizations change the names of combinational signals in your RTL. If the type of node name chosen does not match the netlist type, the compiler may not be able to find the signal to connect to your

SignalTap II Logic Analyzer instance for analysis. The compiler issues a critical warning to alert you of this scenario. The signal that is not connected is tied to ground in the SignalTap II data tab.

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-46

Preventing Changes Requiring Recompilation

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

If you do use incremental compilation flow with the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer and source file changes are necessary, be aware that you may have to remove compiler-generated post-fit net names. Source code changes force the affected partition to go through resynthesis. During synthesis, the compiler cannot find compiler-generated net names from a previous compilation.

Note: Altera recommends using only registered and user-input signals as debugging taps in your

.stp

whenever possible.

Both registered and user-supplied input signals share common node names in the pre-synthesis and postfit netlist. As a result, using only registered and user-supplied input signals in your

.stp

limits the changes you need to make to your SignalTap II Logic Analyzer configuration.

You can check the nodes that are connected to each SignalTap II instance using the In-System Debugging compilation reports. These reports list each node name you selected to connect to a SignalTap II instance, the netlist type used for the particular connection, and the actual node name used after compilation. If the incremental compilation flow is not used, the In-System Debugging reports are located in the Analysis &

Synthesis folder. If the incremental compilation flow is used, this report is located in the Partition Merge folder.

To verify that your original design was not modified, examine the messages in the Partition Merge section of the Compilation Report.

Unless you make changes to your design partitions that require recompilation, only the SignalTap II design partition is recompiled. If you make subsequent changes to only the

.stp

, only the SignalTap II design partition must be recompiled, reducing your recompilation time.

Preventing Changes Requiring Recompilation

You can configure the

.stp

to prevent changes that normally require recompilation. To do this, select a lock mode from above the node list in the Setup tab. To lock your configuration, choose to allow only trigger condition changes.

Related Information

Setup Tab (SignalTap II Logic Analyzer) online help

Incremental Route with Rapid Recompile

You can use Incremental Route with Rapid Recompile to decrease compilation times. After performing a full compilation on your design, you can use the Incremental Route flow to achieve a 2-4x speedup over a flat compile. The Incremental Route flow is not compatible with Partial Reconfiguration.

The Quartus Prime software supports Incremental Route with Rapid Recompile for Arria 10 (Pro Edition only), Arria V, Cyclone V, and Stratix V devices.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Incremental Route Flow

Figure 13-41: Manually Allocate Nodes

Incremental Route Flow

13-47

1. Open your design, and run Analysis & Elaboration (or a full compilation) to give node visibility in

SignalTap II.

2. Add SignalTap II to your design and specify manual allocation for Trigger and Data (Storage Qualifier, if used) nodes in the SignalTap II Signal Configuration pane.

Note: Selecting Manual allows you to control the number of nodes compiled into the design. This is critical for the Incremental Route flow. If you select Auto, the number of nodes compiled into the design will directly reflect the number of nodes (not including groups, which are not signals) currently in the Setup tab. If you then add a node, the number of nodes required on the

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-48

Tips to Achieve Maximum Speedup

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

device will not match what has already been compiled, and you will then need to perform a full compilation.

3. Specify the number of nodes that you estimate will be needed for the debugging process. You can increase the number of nodes later, but this will require more compilation time.

4. Connect nodes you are interested in tapping.

5. Run a full compilation, if you have not already done a full compile on your project. Otherwise, you can start incremental compile using Rapid Recompile.

6. Debug and determine additional signals of interest.

7. (Optional) Turn on Allow incremental route changes only lock-mode.

Figure 13-42: Incremental Route Lock-Mode

8. Add additional nodes in the SignalTap II Setup tab without exceeding the number of manually allocated nodes in step 2. Avoid making changes to non-runtime configurable settings.

9. Click the Rapid Recompile icon from the toolbar (or from the Processing menu, click Start Rapid

Recompile).

Note: The previous steps set up your design for Incremental Route, but the actual Incremental Route process begins when you perform a Rapid Recompile.

Figure 13-43: Rapid Recompile Icon

Tips to Achieve Maximum Speedup

• Basic AND (which applies to Storage Qualifier as well as trigger input) is the fastest for the

Incremental Route flow.

• Basic OR is slower for the Incremental Route flow, but if you avoid changing the parent-child relation‐ ship of nodes within groups, you can minimize the impact on compile time. You can change the sibling relationships of nodes.

• Basic OR and advanced triggers require re-synthesis when the number/names of tapped nodes are changed.

• Use the Incremental Route lock-mode to avoid inadvertent changes requiring a full compilation.

Timing Preservation with the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

In addition to verifying functionality, timing closure is one of the most crucial processes in successful operation of your design.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Performance and Resource Considerations

13-49

Note: When you compile a project with a SignalTap II Logic Analyzer without the use of incremental compilation, you must add IP to your existing design. This addition often impacts the existing placement, routing, and timing of your design. To minimize the effect that the SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer has on your design, use incremental compilation for your project. Incremental compila‐ tion is the default setting in new designs. You can easily enable incremental compilation in existing designs. When the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is in a design partition, it has little to no affect on your design.

For Arria 10 devices, the Quartus Prime Standard Edition software does not support timing preservation for post-fit taps with Rapid Recompile.

Use the following techniques to help maintain timing:

• Avoid adding critical path signals to your

.stp

.

• Minimize the number of combinational signals you add to your

.stp

and add registers whenever possible.

• Specify an f

MAX

constraint for each clock in your design.

Related Information

Timing Closure and Optimization documentation

Performance and Resource Considerations

There is a necessary trade-off between the runtime flexibility of the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, the timing performance of the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, and resource usage. The SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer allows you to select the runtime configurable parameters to balance the need for runtime flexibility, speed, and area. The default values have been chosen to provide maximum flexibility so you can complete debugging as quickly as possible; however, you can adjust these settings to determine whether there is a more optimal configuration for your design.

The following tips provide extra timing slack if you have determined that the SignalTap II logic is in your critical path, or to alleviate the resource requirements that the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer consumes if your design is resource-constrained.

If SignalTap II logic is part of your critical path, follow these tips to speed up the performance of the

SignalTap II Logic Analyzer:

Disable runtime configurable options—Certain resources are allocated to accommodate for runtime flexibility. If you use either advanced triggers or State-based triggering flow, disable runtime configu‐ rable parameters for a boost in f

MAX

of the SignalTap II logic. If you are using State-based triggering flow, try disabling the Goto state destination option and performing a recompilation before disabling f the other runtime configurable options. The Goto state destination option has the greatest impact on

MAX

, as compared to the other runtime configurable options.

Minimize the number of signals that have Trigger Enable selected—All signals that you add to the

.stp

have Trigger Enable turned on. Turn off Trigger Enable for signals that you do not plan to use as triggers.

Turn on Physical Synthesis for register retiming—If you have a large number of triggering signals enabled (greater than the number of inputs that would fit in a LAB) that fan-in logic to a gate-based triggering condition, such as a basic trigger condition or a logical reduction operator in the advanced trigger tab, turn on Perform register retiming. This can help balance combinational logic across

LABs.

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-50

Program the Target Device or Devices

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

If your design is resource constrained, follow these tips to reduce the amount of logic or memory used by the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer:

Disable runtime configurable options—Disabling runtime configurability for advanced trigger conditions or runtime configurable options in the State-based triggering flow results in using fewer

LEs.

Minimize the number of segments in the acquisition buffer—You can reduce the number of logic resources used for the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer by limiting the number of segments in your sampling buffer to only those required.

Disable the Data Enable for signals that are used for triggering only—By default, both the data

enable and trigger enable options are selected for all signals. Turning off the data enable option for signals used as trigger inputs only saves on memory resources used by the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer.

Because performance results are design-dependent, try these options in different combinations until you achieve the desired balance between functionality, performance, and utilization.

Program the Target Device or Devices

After you compile your project, including the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, configure the FPGA target device. When you are using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer for debugging, configure the device from the

.stp

instead of the Quartus Prime Programmer. Because you configure from the

.stp

, you can open more than one

.stp

and program multiple devices to debug multiple designs simultaneously.

The settings in an

.stp

must be compatible with the programming

.sof

used to program the device. An

.stp

is considered compatible with an

.sof

when the settings for the logic analyzer, such as the size of the capture buffer and the signals selected for monitoring or triggering, match the way the target device is programmed. If the files are not compatible, you can still program the device, but you cannot run or control the logic analyzer from the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Editor.

Note: When the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer detects incompatibility after analysis is started, a system error message is generated containing two CRC values, the expected value and the value retrieved from the

.stp

instance on the device. The CRC values are calculated based on all SignalTap II settings that affect the compilation.

To ensure programming compatibility, make sure to program your device with the latest

.sof

created from the most recent compilation. Checking whether or not a particular

.sof

is compatible with the current

SignalTap II configuration is achieved quickly by attaching the

.sof

to the SOF manager.

Before starting a debugging session, do not make any changes to the

.stp

settings that would require recompiling the project. You can check the SignalTap II status display at the top of the Instance Manager pane to verify whether a change you made requires recompiling the project, producing a new

.sof

. This feature gives you the opportunity to undo the change, so that you do not need to recompile your project.

To prevent these types of changes, select Allow trigger condition changes only to lock the

.stp

. The

Incremental Route lock mode, Allow incremental route changes only, limits changes that require an incremental route using Rapid Recompile, and not a full compile.

Although having a Quartus Prime project is not required when using an

.stp

, it is recommended. The project database contains information about the integrity of the current SignalTap II Logic Analyzer session. Without the project database, there is no way to verify that the current

.stp

matches the

.sof

that is downloaded to the device. If you have an

.stp

that does not match the

.sof

, incorrect data is captured in the

SignalTap II Logic Analyzer.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Run the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

13-51

Related Information

Running the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer online help

Run the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

After the device is configured with your design that includes the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, perform debugging operations in a manner similar to when you use an external logic analyzer. You initialize the logic analyzer by starting an analysis. When your trigger event occurs, the captured data is stored in the memory buffer on the device and then transferred to the

.stp

with the JTAG connection.

You can also perform the equivalent of a force trigger instruction that lets you view the captured data

currently in the buffer without a trigger event occurring.

Figure 13-44

illustrates a flow that shows how you operate the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer. The flowchart indicates where Power-Up and Runtime

Trigger events occur and when captured data from these events is available for analysis.

Figure 13-44: Power-Up and Runtime Trigger Events Flowchart

Start

Yes

Changes

Require

Recompile?

No

Compile Design

Program Device

Manually Run

SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer

Possible Missed

Trigger

(Unless Power-Up

Trigger Enabled)

Make Changes to Setup

(If Needed)

Yes

Trigger

Occurred?

Yes

Analyze Data:

Power-Up or

Run-Time Trigger

No Manually

Stop Analyzer

Yes

Data

Downloaded?

No

Manually Read

Data from Device

Continue

Debugging?

End

No

You can also use In-System Sources and Probes in conjunction with the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer to force trigger conditions. The In-System Sources and Probes feature allows you to drive and sample values on to selected signals over the JTAG chain.

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-52

Runtime Reconfigurable Options

Related Information

Design Debugging Using In-System Sources and Probes documentation

on page 17-1

Runtime Reconfigurable Options

Certain settings in the

.stp

are changeable without recompiling your design when you use Runtime

Trigger mode.

Table 13-10: Runtime Reconfigurable Features

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Runtime Reconfigurable Setting

Basic Trigger Conditions and Basic Storage Qualifier

Conditions

Advanced Trigger

Conditions and Advanced

Storage Qualifier Conditions

Switching between a storagequalified and a continuous acquisition

State-based trigger flow parameters

Description

All signals that have the Trigger condition turned on can be changed to any basic trigger condition value without recompiling.

Many operators include runtime configurable settings. For example, all comparison operators are runtime-configurable. Configurable settings are shown with a white background in the block representation.This runtime reconfigurable option is turned on in the Object Properties dialog box.

Within any storage-qualified mode, you can switch to continuous capture mode without recompiling the design. To enable this feature, turn on disable

storage qualifier.

Table 13-5

lists Reconfigurable State-based trigger flow options.

Runtime Reconfigurable options can potentially save time during the debugging cycle by allowing you to cover a wider possible scenario of events without the need to recompile the design. You may experience a slight impact to the performance and logic utilization. You can turn off Runtime re-configurability for

Advanced Trigger Conditions and the State-based trigger flow parameters, boosting performance and decreasing area utilization.

You can configure the

.stp

to prevent changes that normally require recompilation. To do this, in the

Setup tab, select Allow Trigger Condition changes only above the node list.

Incremental Route lock mode, Allow incremental route changes only, limits changes which will only require an Incremental Route compilation, and not a full compile.

The example below illustrates a potential use case for Runtime Reconfigurable features. This example provides a storage qualified enabled State-based trigger flow description and shows how you can modify the size of a capture window at runtime without a recompile. This example gives you equivalent function‐ ality to a segmented buffer with a single trigger condition where the segment sizes are runtime reconfigur‐ able.

state ST1: if ( condition1 && (c1 <= m) ) // each "segment" triggers on condition

//1 begin // m = number of total "segments"

start_store;

increment c1;

goto ST2:

End else (c1 > m ) //This else condition handles the last

//segment.

begin

start_store

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Runtime Reconfigurable Options

13-53

Trigger (n-1) end state ST2: if ( c2 >= n) //n = number of samples to capture in each

//segment.

begin

reset c2;

stop_store;

goto ST1; end else (c2 < n) begin

increment c2;

goto ST2; end

Note: m x n must equal the sample depth to efficiently use the space in the sample buffer.

Figure 13-45

shows a segmented buffer described by the trigger flow in example above.

During runtime, the values m and n are runtime reconfigurable. By changing the m and n values in the preceding trigger flow description, you can dynamically adjust the segment boundaries without incurring a recompile.

Figure 13-45: Segmented Buffer Created with Storage Qualifier and State-Based Trigger

Total sample depth is fixed, where m x n must equal sample depth.

You can add states into the trigger flow description and selectively mask out specific states and enable other ones at runtime with status flags.

The example below shows a modified description of the example above with an additional state inserted.

You use this extra state to specify a different trigger condition that does not use the storage qualifier feature. You insert status flags into the conditional statements to control the execution of the trigger flow.

state ST1 : if (condition2 && f1) //additional state added for a nonsegmented

//acquisition Set f1 to enable state begin

start_store;

trigger end else if (! f1)

goto ST2; state ST2: if ( (condition1 && (c1 <= m) && f2) //f2 status flag used to mask state. Set f2

//to enable.

begin

start_store;

increment c1;

goto ST3: end else (c1 > m )

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-54

SignalTap II Status Messages

start_store

Trigger (n-1) end state ST3: if ( c2 >= n) begin

reset c2;

stop_store;

goto ST1; end else (c2 < n) begin

increment c2;

goto ST2; end

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

SignalTap II Status Messages

Table 13-11

describes the text messages that might appear in the SignalTap II Status Indicator in the

Instance Manager pane before, during, and after a data acquisition. Use these messages to monitor the state of the logic analyzer or what operation it is performing.

Table 13-11: Text Messages in the SignalTap II Status Indicator

Message

Not running

(Power-Up Trigger) Waiting for clock

(1)

Acquiring (Power-Up) pre-trigger data

(1)

Trigger In conditions met

Waiting for (Power-up) trigger

(1)

Trigger level <x>

met

Acquiring (power-up) posttrigger data

(1)

Offload acquired (Power-

Up) data

(1)

Ready to acquire

Message Description

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is not running. There is no connection to a device or the device is not configured.

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is performing a Runtime or

Power-Up Trigger acquisition and is waiting for the clock signal to transition.

The trigger condition has not been evaluated yet. A full buffer of data is collected if using the non-segmented buffer acquisition mode and storage qualifier type is continuous.

Trigger In condition has occurred. The SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer is waiting for the condition of the first trigger condition to occur. This can appear if Trigger In is specified.

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is now waiting for the trigger event to occur.

The condition of trigger condition x has occurred. The

SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is waiting for the condition specified in condition x + 1 to occur.

The entire trigger event has occurred. The SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer is acquiring the post-trigger data. The amount of posttrigger data collected is you define between 12%, 50%, and 88% when the non-segmented buffer acquisition mode is selected.

Data is being transmitted to the Quartus Prime software through the JTAG chain.

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is waiting for you to initialize the analyzer.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

View, Analyze, and Use Captured Data

Message Message Description

Note to

Table 13-11

:

1. This message can appear for both Runtime and Power-Up Trigger events. When referring to a

Power-Up Trigger, the text in parentheses is added.

Note: In segmented acquisition mode, pre-trigger and post-trigger do not apply.

13-55

View, Analyze, and Use Captured Data

Once a trigger event has occurred or you capture data manually, you can use the SignalTap II interface to examine the data, and use your findings to help debug your design.

When in the Data view, you can use the drag-to-zoom feature by left-clicking to isolate the data of interest.

Capturing Data Using Segmented Buffers

Segmented Acquisition buffers allow you to perform multiple captures with a separate trigger condition for each acquisition segment. This feature allows you to capture a recurring event or sequence of events that span over a long period time efficiently. Each acquisition segment acts as a non-segmented buffer, continuously capturing data when it is activated. When you run an analysis with the segmented buffer option enabled, the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer performs back-to-back data captures for each acquisition segment within your data buffer. The trigger flow, or the type and order in which the trigger conditions evaluate for each buffer, is defined by either the Sequential trigger flow control or the Custom State-based

trigger flow control.

Figure 13-46

shows a segmented acquisition buffer with four segments represented as four separate non-segmented buffers.

Figure 13-46: Segmented Acquisition Buffer

Post

Trigger 1

Pre

1

1

0

1 1

0

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

1

0 1

0

1

0

1

1

1

0

1

Segment 1 Buffer

Post

Trigger 2

Pre

1

1

0

1 1

0

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

1

0 1

0

1

0

1

1

1

1

0

Segment 2 Buffer

Post

Trigger 3

Pre

1

1

0

1 1

0

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

1

0 1

0

1

0

1

1

1

1

0

Segment 3 Buffer

Post

Trigger 4

Pre

1

1

0

1 1

0

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

1

0 1

0

1

0

1

1

1

1

0

Segment 4 Buffer

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer finishes an acquisition with a segment, and advances to the next segment to start a new acquisition. Depending on when a trigger condition occurs, it may affect the way the data capture appears in the waveform viewer.

Figure 13-46

illustrates the method in which data is captured.

The Trigger markers in

Figure 13-46

—Trigger 1, Trigger 2, Trigger 3 and Trigger 4—refer to the evaluation of the segment_trigger

and trigger

commands in the Custom State-based trigger flow. If you use a sequential flow, the Trigger markers refer to trigger conditions specified within the Setup tab.

If the Segment 1 Buffer is the active segment and Trigger 1 occurs, the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer starts evaluating Trigger 2 immediately. Data Acquisition for Segment 2 buffer starts when either Segment

Buffer 1 finishes its post-fill count, or when Trigger 2 evaluates as

TRUE

, whichever condition occurs first.

Thus, trigger conditions associated with the next buffer in the data capture sequence can preempt the post-fill count of the current active buffer. This allows the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer to accurately

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-56

Differences in Pre-fill Write Behavior Between Different Acquisition...

capture all of the trigger conditions that have occurred. Samples that have not been used appear as a blank space in the waveform viewer.

Figure 13-47

shows an example of a capture using sequential flow control with the trigger condition for each segment specified as Don’t Care. Each segment before the last captures only one sample, because the next trigger condition immediately preempts capture of the current buffer. The trigger position for all segments is specified as pre-trigger (10% of the data is before the trigger condition and 90% of the data is after the trigger position). Because the last segment starts immediately with the trigger condition, the segment contains only post-trigger data. The three empty samples in the last segment are left over from the pre-trigger samples that the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer allocated to the buffer.

Figure 13-47: Segmented Capture with Preemption of Acquisition Segments

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

A segmented acquisition buffer using the sequential trigger flow with a trigger condition specified as

Don’t Care. All segments, with the exception of the last segment, capture only one sample because the next trigger condition preempts the current buffer from filling to completion.

For the sequential trigger flow, the Trigger Position option applies to every segment in the buffer. For maximum flexibility on how the trigger position is defined, use the custom state-based trigger flow. By adjusting the trigger position specific to your debugging requirements, you can help maximize the use of the allocated buffer space.

Differences in Pre-fill Write Behavior Between Different Acquisition Modes

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer uses one of the following three modes when writing into the acquisition memory:

Non-segmented buffer

Non-segmented buffer with a storage qualifier

Segmented buffer

There are subtle differences in the amount of data captured immediately after running the SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer and before any trigger conditions occur. A non-segmented buffer, running in continuous mode, completely fills the buffer with sampled data before evaluating any trigger conditions. Thus, a nonsegmented capture without any storage qualification enabled always shows a waveform with a full buffer's worth of data captured.

Filling the buffer provides you with as much data as possible within the capture window. The buffer gets pre-filled with data samples prior to evaluating the trigger condition. As such, SignalTap requires that the buffer be filled at least once before any data can be retrieved through the JTAG connection and prevents the buffer from being dumped during the first acquisition prior to a trigger condition when you perform a

Stop Analysis.

For segmented buffers and non-segmented buffers using any storage qualification mode, the SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer immediately evaluates all trigger conditions while writing samples into the acquisition memory. The logic analyzer evaluates each trigger condition before acquiring a full buffer's worth of samples. This evaluation is especially important when using any storage qualification on the data set. The

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Differences in Pre-fill Write Behavior Between Different Acquisition...

13-57

logic analyzer may miss a trigger condition if it waits until a full buffer's worth of data is captured before evaluating any trigger conditions.

If the trigger event occurs on any data sample before the specified amount of pre-trigger data has occurred, then the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer triggers and begins filling memory with post-trigger data, regardless of the amount of pre-trigger data you specify. For example, if you set the trigger position to

50% and set the logic analyzer to trigger on a processor reset, start the logic analyzer, and then power on your target system, the logic analyzer triggers. However, the logic analyzer memory is filled only with post-trigger data, and not any pre-trigger data, because the trigger event, which has higher precedence than the capture of pre-trigger data, occurred before the pre-trigger condition was satisfied.

Figure 13-48

and

Figure 13-49

show the difference between a non-segmented buffer in continuous mode and a non-segmented buffer using a storage qualifier. The logic analyzer for the waveforms below is configured with a sample depth of 64 bits, with a trigger position specified as Post trigger position.

Figure 13-48: SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Continuous Data Capture

Note to

Figure 13-48

:

1. Continuous capture mode with post-trigger position.

2. Capture of a recurring pattern using a non-segmented buffer in continuous mode. The SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer is configured with a basic trigger condition (shown in the figure as "Trig1") with a sample depth of 64 bits.

Notice in

Figure 13-48

that Trig1 occurs several times in the data buffer before the SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer actually triggers. A full buffer's worth of data is captured before the logic analyzer evaluates any trigger conditions. After the trigger condition occurs, the logic analyzer continues acquisition until it captures eight additional samples (12% of the buffer, as defined by the "post-trigger" position).

Figure 13-49: SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Conditional Data Capture

Note to

Figure 13-49

:

1. Conditional capture, storage always enabled, post-fill count.

2. SignalTap II Logic Analyzer capture of a recurring pattern using a non-segmented buffer in conditional mode. The logic analyzer is configured with a basic trigger condition (shown in the figure

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-58

Creating Mnemonics for Bit Patterns

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

as "Trig1"), with a sample depth of 64 bits. The “Trigger in” condition is specified as "Don't care", which means that every sample is captured.

Notice in

Figure 13-49

that the logic analyzer triggers immediately. As in

Figure 13-48

, the logic analyzer completes the acquisition with eight samples, or 12% of 64, the sample capacity of the acquisition buffer.

Creating Mnemonics for Bit Patterns

The mnemonic table feature allows you to assign a meaningful name to a set of bit patterns, such as a bus.

To create a mnemonic table, right-click in the Setup or Data tab of an

.stp

and click Mnemonic Table

Setup. You create a mnemonic table by entering sets of bit patterns and specifying a label to represent each pattern. Once you have created a mnemonic table, assign the table to a group of signals. To assign a mnemonic table, right-click on the group, click Bus Display Format and select the desired mnemonic table.

You use the labels you create in a table in different ways on the Setup and Data tabs. On the Setup tab, you can create basic triggers with meaningful names by right-clicking an entry in the Trigger Conditions column and selecting a label from the table you assigned to the signal group. On the Data tab, if any captured data matches a bit pattern contained in an assigned mnemonic table, the signal group data is replaced with the appropriate label, making it easy to see when expected data patterns occur.

Automatic Mnemonics with a Plug-In

When you use a plug-in to add signals to an

.stp

, mnemonic tables for the added signals are automatically created and assigned to the signals defined in the plug-in. To enable these mnemonic tables manually, right-click on the name of the signal or signal group. On the Bus Display Format shortcut menu, then click the name of the mnemonic table that matches the plug-in.

As an example, the Nios II plug-in helps you to monitor signal activity for your design as the code is executed. If you set up the logic analyzer to trigger on a function name in your Nios II code based on data from an

.elf

, you can see the function name in the Instance Address signal group at the trigger sample, along with the corresponding disassembled code in the Disassembly signal group, as shown in

Figure

13-50

. Captured data samples around the trigger are referenced as offset addresses from the trigger

function name.

Figure 13-50: Data Tab when the Nios II Plug-In is Used

Locating a Node in the Design

When you find the source of an error in your design using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, you can use the node locate feature to locate that signal in many of the tools found in the Quartus Prime software, as well as in your design files. This lets you find the source of the problem quickly so you can modify your

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Saving Captured Data

13-59

design to correct the flaw. To locate a signal from the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer in one of the Quartus

Prime software tools or your design files, right-click on the signal in the

.stp

, and click Locate in

<tool name>.

You can locate a signal from the node list with the following tools:

• Assignment Editor

• Pin Planner

• Timing Closure Floorplan

• Chip Planner

• Resource Property Editor

• Technology Map Viewer

• RTL Viewer

• Design File

Saving Captured Data

The data log shows the history of captured data and the triggers used to capture the data. The SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer acquires data, stores it in a log, and displays it as waveforms. When the logic analyzer is in auto-run mode and a trigger event occurs more than once, captured data for each time the trigger occurred is stored as a separate entry in the data log. This allows you to review the captured data for each trigger event. The default name for a log is based on the time when the data was acquired. Altera recommends that you rename the data log with a more meaningful name.

The logs are organized in a hierarchical manner; similar logs of captured data are grouped together in trigger sets. To open the Data Log pane, on the View menu, select Data Log. To turn on data logging, turn on Enable data log in the Data Log (

Figure 13-19

). To recall and activate a data log for a given

trigger set, double-click the name of the data log in the list. The time stamping for the Data Log entries display the wall-clock time when SignalTap II triggered and the elapsed time from when acquisition started to when the device triggered.

Related Information

Managing Multiple SignalTap II Files and Configurations

on page 13-21

You can use the Data Log feature for organizing different sets of trigger conditions and different sets of signal configurations.

Exporting Captured Data to Other File Formats

You can export captured data to the following file formats, for use with other EDA simulation tools:

• Comma Separated Values File (

.csv

)

• Table File (

.tbl

)

• Value Change Dump File (

.vcd

)

• Vector Waveform File (

.vwf

)

• Graphics format files (

.jpg

,

.bmp

)

To export the captured data from SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, on the File menu, click Export and specify the File Name, Export Format, and Clock Period.

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-60

Creating a SignalTap II List File

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Creating a SignalTap II List File

Captured data can also be viewed in an

.stp

list file. An

.stp

list file is a text file that lists all the data captured by the logic analyzer for a trigger event. Each row of the list file corresponds to one captured sample in the buffer. Columns correspond to the value of each of the captured signals or signal groups for that sample. If a mnemonic table was created for the captured data, the numerical values in the list are replaced with a matching entry from the table. This is especially useful with the use of a plug-in that includes instruction code disassembly. You can immediately see the order in which the instruction code was executed during the same time period of the trigger event. To create an

.stp

list file in the Quartus

Prime software, on the File menu, select Create/Update and click Create SignalTap II List File.

Other Features

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer has other features that do not necessarily belong to a particular task in the task flow.

Using the SignalTap II MATLAB MEX Function to Capture Data

If you use MATLAB for DSP design, you can call the MATLAB MEX function alt_signaltap_run

, built into the Quartus Prime software, to acquire data from the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer directly into a matrix in the MATLAB environment. If you use the MATLAB MEX function in a loop, you can perform as many acquisitions in the same amount of time as you can when using SignalTap II in the Quartus

Prime software environment.

Note: The SignalTap II MATLAB MEX function is available in the Windows version and Linux version of the Quartus Prime software. It is compatible with MATLAB Release 14 Original Release Version

7 and later.

To set up the Quartus Prime software and the MATLAB environment to perform SignalTap II acquisi‐ tions, perform the following steps:

1. In the Quartus Prime software, create an .stp file.

2. In the node list in the Data tab of the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Editor, organize the signals and groups of signals into the order in which you want them to appear in the MATLAB matrix. Each column of the imported matrix represents a single SignalTap II acquisition sample, while each row represents a signal or group of signals in the order they are organized in the Data tab.

Note: Signal groups acquired from the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer and transferred into the MATLAB

MEX function are limited to a width of 32 signals. If you want to use the MATLAB MEX function with a bus or signal group that contains more than 32 signals, split the group into smaller groups that do not exceed the 32-signal limit.

3. Save the .stp and compile your design. Program your device and run the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer to ensure your trigger conditions and signal acquisition work correctly.

4. In the MATLAB environment, add the Quartus Prime binary directory to your path with the following command: addpath <Quartus install directory>\win

You can view the help file for the MEX function by entering the following command in MATLAB without any operators: alt_signaltap_run

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Using SignalTap II in a Lab Environment

13-61

Use the MATLAB MEX function to open the JTAG connection to the device and run the SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer to acquire data. When you finish acquiring data, close the JTAG connection.

To open the JTAG connection and begin acquiring captured data directly into a MATLAB matrix called stp

, use the following command: stp = alt_signaltap_run \

('<stp filename>'[,('signed'|'unsigned')[,'<instance names>'[, \

'<signalset name>'[,'<trigger name>']]]]);

When capturing data you must assign a filename, for example, <stp filename> as a requirement of the

MATLAB MEX function. Other MATLAB MEX function options are described in

Table 13-12

.

Table 13-12: SignalTap II MATLAB MEX Function Options

Option Usage Description

signed unsigned

<trigger name>

'my_trigger'

The signed option turns signal group data into 32-bit two’s-complement signed integers. The MSB of the group as defined in the SignalTap II Data tab is the sign bit. The

unsigned option keeps the data as an unsigned integer. The default is signed.

<instance name>

'auto_signaltap_0'

Specify a SignalTap II instance if more than one instance is defined. The default is the first instance in the

.stp

, auto_ signaltap_0

.

<signal set name>

'signed'

'unsigned'

'my_signalset'

Specify the signal set and trigger from the SignalTap II data log if multiple configurations are present in the

.stp

. The default is the active signal set and trigger in the file.

You can enable or disable verbose mode to see the status of the logic analyzer while it is acquiring data.

To enable or disable verbose mode, use the following commands: alt_signaltap_run('VERBOSE_ON'); alt_signaltap_run('VERBOSE_OFF');

When you finish acquiring data, close the JTAG connection with the following command: alt_signaltap_run('END_CONNECTION');

For more information about the use of MATLAB MEX functions in MATLAB, refer to the MATLAB

Help.

Using SignalTap II in a Lab Environment

You can install a stand-alone version of the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer. This version is particularly useful in a lab environment in which you do not have a workstation that meets the requirements for a complete

Quartus Prime installation, or if you do not have a license for a full installation of the Quartus Prime software. The standalone version of the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is included with and requires the

Quartus Prime stand-alone Programmer which is available from the Downloads page of the

Altera website

.

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-62

Remote Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Remote Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Debugging Using a Local PC and an Altera SoC

You can use the System Console with SignalTap II Logic Analyzer to remote debug your Altera SoC. This method requires one local PC, an existing TCP/IP connection, a programming device at the remote location, and an Altera SoC.

Related Information

Remote Hardware Debugging over TCP/IP for Altera SoC application note

Debugging Using a Local PC and a Remote PC

You can use the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer to debug a design that is running on a device attached to a

PC in a remote location.

To perform a remote debugging session, you must have the following setup:

• The Quartus Prime software installed on the local PC

• Stand-alone SignalTap II Logic Analyzer or the full version of the Quartus Prime software installed on the remote PC

• Programming hardware connected to the device on the PCB at the remote location

• TCP/IP protocol connection

Equipment Setup

On the PC in the remote location, install the standalone version of the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, included in the Quartus Prime standalone Programmer, or the full version of the Quartus Prime software.

This remote computer must have Altera programming hardware connected, such as the EthernetBlaster or USB-Blaster.

On the local PC, install the full version of the Quartus Prime software. This local PC must be connected to the remote PC across a LAN with the TCP/IP protocol.

Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer in Devices with Configuration Bitstream

Security

Certain device families support bitstream decryption during configuration using an on-device AES decryption engine. You can still use the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer to analyze functional data within the

FPGA. However, note that JTAG configuration is not possible after the security key has been programmed into the device.

Altera recommends that you use an unencrypted bitstream during the prototype and debugging phases of the design. Using an unencrypted bitstream allows you to generate new programming files and reconfigure the device over the JTAG connection during the debugging cycle.

If you must use the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer with an encrypted bitstream, first configure the device with an encrypted configuration file using Passive Serial (PS), Fast Passive Parallel (FPP), or Active Serial

(AS) configuration modes. The design must contain at least one instance of the SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer. After the FPGA is configured with a SignalTap II Logic Analyzer instance in the design, when you open the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer in the Quartus Prime software, you then scan the chain and are ready to acquire data with the JTAG connection.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Backward Compatibility with Previous Versions of Quartus Prime Software

13-63

Backward Compatibility with Previous Versions of Quartus Prime Software

You can open an

.stp

created in a previous version in a current version of the Quartus Prime software.

However, opening an

.stp

modifies it so that it cannot be opened in a previous version of the Quartus

Prime software.

If you have a Quartus Prime project file from a previous version of the software, you may have to update the

.stp

configuration file to recompile the project. You can update the configuration file by opening the

SignalTap II Logic Analyzer. If you need to update your configuration, a prompt appears asking if you would like to update the

.stp

to match the current version of the Quartus Prime software.

SignalTap II Command-Line Options

To compile your design with the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer using the command prompt, use the quartus_stp

command.

Table 13-13

shows the options that help you use the

quartus_stp

executable.

Table 13-13: SignalTap II Command-Line Options

Option

stp_file

Usage

quartus_stp --stp_file <stp_ filename>

Description

Assigns the specified

.stp

to the

USE_SIGNALTAP_

FILE

in the

.qsf

.

enable disable create_ signaltap

_hdl_file quartus_stp --enable quartus_stp --disable quartus_stp --create_signaltap_hdl_ file

Creates assignments to the specified

.stp

in the

.qsf

and changes

ENABLE_SIGNALTAP

to

ON

. The

SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is included in your design the next time the project is compiled. If no

.stp

is specified in the

.qsf

, the

--stp_file option must be used. If the

--enable

option is omitted, the current value of

ENABLE_SIGNALTAP

in the

.qsf

is used.

Removes the

.stp

reference from the

.qsf

and changes

ENABLE_SIGNALTAP

to

OFF

. The

SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is removed from the design database the next time you compile your design. If the

--disable

option is omitted, the current value of

ENABLE_SIGNALTAP

in the

.qsf

is used.

Creates an

.stp

representing the SignalTap II instance. The file is based on the last compilation.

You must use the

--stp_file

option to create an

.stp

properly. Analogous to the Create

SignalTap II File from Design Instance(s)

command in the Quartus Prime software.

The first example illustrates how to compile a design with the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer at the command line.

quartus_stp filtref --stp_file stp1.stp --enable quartus_map filtref --source=filtref.bdf --family=CYCLONE quartus_fit filtref --part=EP1C12Q240C6 --fmax=80MHz --tsu=8ns quartus_asm filtref

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-64

SignalTap II Tcl Commands

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

The quartus_stp --stp_file stp1.stp --enable

command creates the QSF variable and instructs the

Quartus Prime software to compile the

stp1.stp

file with your design. The

--enable

option must be applied for the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer to compile properly into your design.

The example below shows how to create a new

.stp

after building the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer instance with the IP Catalog.

quartus_stp filtref --create_signaltap_hdl_file --stp_file stp1.stp

Related Information

Command-Line Scripting documentation

Information about the other command line executables and options

SignalTap II Tcl Commands

The quartus_stp executable supports a Tcl interface that allows you to capture data without running the

Quartus Prime GUI. You cannot execute SignalTap II Tcl commands from within the Tcl console in the

Quartus Prime software. They must be executed from the command line with the quartus_stp executable.

To execute a Tcl file that has SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Tcl commands, use the following command: quartus_stp -t <Tcl file>

The example is an excerpt from a script you can use to continuously capture data. Once the trigger condition is met, the data is captured and stored in the data log.

#opens signaltap session open_session -name stp1.stp

#start acquisition of instance auto_signaltap_0 and

#auto_signaltap_1 at the same time

#calling run_multiple_end will start all instances

#run after run_multiple_start call run_multiple_start run -instance auto_signaltap_0 -signal_set signal_set_1 -trigger \ trigger_1 -data_log log_1 -timeout 5 run -instance auto_signaltap_1 -signal_set signal_set_1 -trigger \ trigger_1 -data_log log_1 -timeout 5 run_multiple_end

#close signaltap session close_session

When the script is completed, open the

.stp

that you used to capture data to examine the contents of the

Data Log.

Related Information

::quartus::stp online help

Information about Tcl commands that you can use with the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer Tcl package

Design Example: Using SignalTap II Logic Analyzers

The system in this example contains many components, including a Nios processor, a direct memory access (DMA) controller, on-chip memory, and an interface to external SDRAM memory. In this example, the Nios processor executes a simple C program from on-chip memory and waits for you to press a button. After you press a button, the processor initiates a DMA transfer, which you analyze using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Custom Triggering Flow Application Examples

13-65

Related Information

AN 446: Debugging Nios II Systems with the SignalTap II Embedded Logic Analyzer application note

Custom Triggering Flow Application Examples

The custom triggering flow in the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer is most useful for organizing a number of triggering conditions and for precise control over the acquisition buffer. This section provides two application examples for defining a custom triggering flow within the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer. Both examples can be easily copied and pasted directly into the state machine description box by using the state display mode All states in one window.

Related Information

On-chip Debugging Design Examples website

Design Example 1: Specifying a Custom Trigger Position

Actions to the acquisition buffer can accept an optional post-count argument. This post-count argument enables you to define a custom triggering position for each segment in the acquisition buffer. The example shows how to apply a trigger position to all segments in the acquisition buffer. The example describes a triggering flow for an acquisition buffer split into four segments. If each acquisition segment is 64 samples in depth, the trigger position for each buffer will be at sample #34. The acquisition stops after all four segments are filled once.

if (c1 == 3 && condition1)

trigger 30; else if ( condition1 ) begin

segment_trigger 30;

increment c1; end

Each segment acts as a non-segmented buffer that continuously updates the memory contents with the signal values. The last acquisition before stopping the buffer is displayed on the Data tab as the last sample number in the affected segment. The trigger position in the affected segment is then defined by

N – post count fill

, where N is the number of samples per segment.

Figure 13-51

illustrates the triggering position.

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-66

Design Example 2: Trigger When triggercond1 Occurs Ten Times between...

Figure 13-51: Specifying a Custom Trigger Position

Trigger

0

1

1

0

Post Count

1

1

0

1

1

0

1

0

Sample #1

1

1

0

1

0

1

0

1

0

1

0

1

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Last Sample

Design Example 2: Trigger When triggercond1 Occurs Ten Times between triggercond2 and triggercond3

The custom trigger flow description is often useful to count a sequence of events before triggering the acquisition buffer. The example shows such a sample flow. This example uses three basic triggering conditions configured in the SignalTap II Setup tab.

This example triggers the acquisition buffer when condition1

occurs after condition3

and occurs ten times prior to condition3

. If condition3

occurs prior to ten repetitions of condition1

, the state machine transitions to a permanent wait state.

state ST1: if ( condition2 ) begin

reset c1;

goto ST2; end

State ST2 : if ( condition1 )

increment c1; else if (condition3 && c1 < 10)

goto ST3; else if ( condition3 && c1 >= 10)

trigger;

ST3: goto ST3;

SignalTap II Scripting Support

You can run procedures and make settings described in this chapter in a Tcl script. You can also run some procedures at a command prompt. For detailed information about scripting command options, refer to

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Document Revision History

the Quartus Prime Command-Line and Tcl API Help browser. To run the Help browser, type the following at the command prompt:

13-67

quartus_sh --qhelp

Related Information

Tcl Scripting documentation

Quartus Prime Tcl Scripting online help

Document Revision History

Table 13-14: Document Revision History

Date

2015.11.02

2015.05.04

2014.12.15

December 2014

Version

15.1.0

15.0.0

14.1.0

14.1.0

Changes Made

Changed instances of Quartus II to Quartus Prime.

Added content for Floating Point Display Format in table: SignalTap II

Logic Analyzer Features and Benefits.

Updated location of Fitter Settings, Analysis & Synthesis Settings, and

Physical Synthesis Optimizations to Compiler Settings.

• Added MAX 10 as supported device.

• Removed Full Incremental Compilation setting and Post-Fit (Strict) netlist type setting information.

• Removed outdated GUI images from "Using Incremental Compilation with the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer" section.

June 2014 14.0.0

November 2013

May 2013

13.1.0

13.0.0

• DITA conversion.

• Replaced MegaWizard Plug-In Manager and Megafunction content with IP Catalog and parameter editor content.

• Added flows for custom trigger HDL object, Incremental Route with

Rapid Recompile, and nested groups with Basic OR.

• GUI changes: toolbar, drag to zoom, disable/enable instance, trigger log time-stamping.

Removed HardCopy material. Added section on using cross-triggering with DS-5 tool and added link to white paper 01198. Added section on remote debugging an Altera SoC and added link to application note 693.

Updated support for MEX function.

• Added recommendation to use the state-based flow for segmented buffers with separate trigger conditions, information about Basic OR trigger condition, and hard processor system (HPS) external triggers.

• Updated “Segmented Buffer” on page 13-17, Conditional Mode on page

13-21, Creating Basic Trigger Conditions on page 13-16, and Using

External Triggers on page 13-48.

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

13-68

Document Revision History

Date

June 2012

Version

12.0.0

November 2011

May 2011

November 2009

March 2009

November 2008

May 2008

11.0.1

11.0.0

December 2010 10.0.1

July 2010 10.0.0

9.1.0

9.0.0

8.1.0

8.0.0

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Changes Made

Updated Figure 13–5 on page 13–16 and “Adding Signals to the

SignalTap II File” on page 13–10.

Template update.

Minor editorial updates.

Updated the requirement for the standalone SignalTap II software.

Changed to new document template.

• Add new acquisition buffer content to the “View, Analyze, and Use

Captured Data” section.

• Added script sample for generating hexadecimal CRC values in programmed devices.

• Created cross references to Quartus Prime Help for duplicated procedural content.

No change to content.

• Updated Table 13–1

• Updated “Using Incremental Compilation with the SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer” on page 13–45

• Added new Figure 13–33

• Made minor editorial updates

Updated for the Quartus Prime software version 8.1 release:

• Added new section “Using the Storage Qualifier Feature” on page 14–

25

• Added description of start_store

and stop_store

commands in section “Trigger Condition Flow Control” on page 14–36

• Added new section “Runtime Reconfigurable Options” on page 14–63

Updated for the Quartus Prime software version 8.0:

• Added “Debugging Finite State machines” on page 14-24

• Documented various GUI usability enhancements, including improve‐ ments to the resource estimator, the bus find feature, and the dynamic display updates to the counter and flag resources in the State-based trigger flow control tab

• Added “Capturing Data Using Segmented Buffers” on page 14–16

• Added hyperlinks to referenced documents throughout the chapter

• Minor editorial updates

Related Information

Quartus Handbook Archive

For previous versions of the Quartus Prime Handbook, refer to the Quartus Handbook Archive.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

Send Feedback

Debugging Single Event Upset Using the Fault

Injection Debugger

14

2015.11.02

QPS5V3

Subscribe

Send Feedback

You can detect and debug single event upset (SEU) using the Fault Injection Debugger in the Quartus

®

Prime software. Use the debugger with the Altera Fault Injection IP core to inject errors into the configuration RAM (CRAM) of an FPGA device.

The injected error simulate the soft errors that can occur during normal operation due to (SEUs). Because

SEUs are rare events, and therefore difficult to test, you can use the Fault Injection Debugger to induce intentional errors in the FPGA to test the system's response to these errors.

The Fault Injection Debugger is available for Stratix V family devices. For assistance with support for

Arria V or Cyclone V family devices, file a service request using

mySupport

.

The Fault Injection Debugger provides the following benefits:

• Allows you to evaluate system response for mitigating single event functional interrupts (SEFI).

• Allows you to perform SEFI characterization, eliminating the need for entire system beam testing.

Instead, you can limit the beam testing to failures in time (FIT)/Mb measurement at the device level.

• Scale FIT rates according to the SEFI characterization that is relevant to your design architecture. You can randomly distribute fault injections throughout the entire device, or constrain them to specific functional areas to speed up testing.

• Optimize your design to reduce SEU-caused disruption.

Related Information

Altera Website: Single Event Upsets

Single Event Upset Mitigation

Integrated circuits and programmable logic devices such as FPGAs are susceptible to SEUs. SEUs are random, nondestructive events, caused by two major sources: alpha particles and neutrons from cosmic rays. Radiation can cause either the logic register, embedded memory bit, or a configuration RAM

(CRAM) bit to flip its state, thus leading to unexpected device operation.

Arria V, Cyclone V, Stratix V and newer devices have the following CRAM capabilities:

• Error Detection Cyclical Redundance Checking (EDCRC)

• Automatic correction of an upset CRAM (scrubbing)

• Ability to create an upset CRAM condition (fault injection)

©

2015 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, ENPIRION, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX words and logos are trademarks of Altera Corporation and registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. All other words and logos identified as trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html

. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.

www.altera.com

101 Innovation Drive, San Jose, CA 95134

ISO

9001:2008

Registered

14-2

Hardware and Software Requirements

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

For more information about SEU mitigation in Altera devices, refer to the SEU Mitigation chapter in the respective device handbook.

Related Information

Altera Website: Single Event Upsets

Hardware and Software Requirements

The following hardware and software is required to use the Fault Injection Debugger:

• Quartus Prime software version 14.0 or later.

FEATURE

line in your Altera license that enables the Fault Injection IP core. For more information, contact your local Altera sales representative.

• Download cable (USB-Blaster, USB-Blaster II, EthernetBlaster, or EthernetBlaster II cable).

• Altera development kit or user designed board with a JTAG connection to the device under test.

• (Optional)

FEATURE

line in your Altera license that enables the Advanced SEU Detection IP core.

Related Information

Altera Website: Contact Altera

Using the Fault Injection Debugger and Fault Injection IP Core

The Fault Injection Debugger works together with the Fault Injection IP core. First, you instantiate the IP core in your design, compile, and download the resulting configuration file into your device. Then, you run the Fault Injection Debugger from within the Quartus Prime software or from the command line to simulate soft errors.

The Fault Injection Debugger communicates with the Fault Injection IP core via the JTAG interface. You perform debugging using the Fault Injection Debugger in the Quartus Prime software or using the command-line interface.

• The Fault Injection Debugger allows you to operate fault injection experiments interactively or by batch commands, and allows you to specify the logical areas in your design for fault injections.

• The command-line interface is useful for running the debugger via a script.

The Fault Injection IP accepts commands from the JTAG interface and reports status back through the

JTAG interface.

Note: The Fault Injection IP core is implemented in soft logic in your device; therefore, you must account for this logic usage in your design. One methodology is to characterize your design’s response to

SEU in the lab and then omit the IP core from your final deployed design.

You use the Fault Injection IP core with the following IP cores:

• The Error Message Register (EMR) Unloader IP core, which reads and stores data from the hardened error detection circuitry in Altera devices.

• (Optional) The Advanced SEU Detection (ASD) IP core, which compares single-bit error locations to a sensitivity map during device operation to determine whether a soft error affects it.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Single Event Upset Using the Fault Injection Debugger

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Instantiating the Fault Injection IP Core

Figure 14-1: Fault Injection Debugger Overview Block Diagram

Altera Device

Command-Line

Interface or

Fault Injection

Debugger User

Interface

JTAG

Fault Injection IP

(1)

Unused Logic

Critical

User Logic

EMR Unloader IP

(2)

Non-Critical

User Logic

Sensitivity Map

Header File (.smh)

Advanced SEU

Detection IP (3)

Injected Error

Notes:

1. The fault Injection IP flips the bits of the targeted logic.

2. The Fault Injection Debugger and Advanced SEU Detection IP use the same

EMR Unloader instance.

3. The Advanced SEU Detection IP core is optional.

14-3

Related Information

Download Center

AN 539: Test Methodology or Error Detection and Recovery using CRC in Altera FPGA Devices

Understanding Single Event Functional Interrupts in FPGA Designs White Paper

Altera Fault Injection IP Core User Guide

Altera Error Message Unloader IP Core User Guide

Altera Advanced SEU Detection (ALTERA_ADV_SEU_DETECTION) IP Core User Guide

Instantiating the Fault Injection IP Core

The Fault Injection IP core does not require you to set any parameters. To use the IP core, create a new IP instance, include it in your Qsys system, and connect the signals as appropriate.

Note: You must use the Fault Injection IP core with the Error Message Register (EMR) Unloader IP core.

The Fault Injection and the EMR Unloader IP cores are available in Qsys and the IP Catalog. Optionally, you can instantiate them directly into your RTL design, using Verilog HDL, SystemVerilog, or VHDL.

Related Information

Altera Fault Injection IP Core User Guide

Using the EMR Unloader IP Core

The EMR Unloader IP core provides an interface to the EMR, which is updated continuously by the device’s EDCRC that checks the device's CRAM bits CRC for soft errors.

Debugging Single Event Upset Using the Fault Injection Debugger

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

14-4

Using the Advanced SEU Detection IP Core

Figure 14-2: Example Qsys System Including the Fault Injection IP Core and EMR Unloader IP Core

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 14-3: Example Altera Fault Injection IP Core and EMR Unloader IP Core Block Diagram

Altera Error

Message Register

Unloader IP Core crcerror_pin emr_data emr_valid

67

Altera Fault

Injection IP Core error_injected error_scrubbed intosc reset clk

System Reset

Related Information

Altera Error Message Unloader IP Core User Guide

Using the Advanced SEU Detection IP Core

Use the Advanced SEU Detection (ASD) IP core when SEU tolerance is a design concern.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Single Event Upset Using the Fault Injection Debugger

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Defining Fault Injection Areas

14-5

You must use the EMR Unloader IP core with the ASD IP core. Therefore, if you use the ASD IP and the

Fault Injection IP in the same design, they must share the EMR Unloader output via an Avalon-ST splitter component. The following figure shows a Qsys system in which an Avalon-ST splitter distributes the

EMR contents to the ASD and Fault Injection IP cores.

Figure 14-4: Using the ASD and Fault Injection IP in the Same Qsys System

Related Information

Altera Advanced SEU Detection (ALTERA_ADV_SEU_DETECTION) IP Core User Guide

Defining Fault Injection Areas

You can define specific regions of the FPGA for fault injection using a Sensitivity Map Header (.smh) file.

The SMH file stores the coordinates of the device CRAM bits, their assigned region (ASD Region), and criticality. During the design process you use hierarchy tagging to create the region. Then, during compilation, the Quartus Prime Assembler generates the SMH file. The Fault Injection Debugger limits error injections to specific device regions you define in the SMH file.

Debugging Single Event Upset Using the Fault Injection Debugger

Altera Corporation

Send Feedback

14-6

Performing Hierarchy Tagging

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Performing Hierarchy Tagging

You define the FPGA regions for testing by assigning an ASD Region to the location. You can specify an

ASD Region value for any portion of your design hierarchy using the Design Partitions Window.

1. Choose Assignments > Design Partitions Window.

2. Right-click anywhere in the header row and turn on ASD Region to display the ASD Region column

(if it is not already displayed).

3. Enter a value from 0 to 16 for any partition to assign it to a specific ASD Region.

• ASD region 0 is reserved to unused portions of the device. You can assign a partition to this region to specify it as non-critical..

• ASD region 1 is the default region. All used portions of the device are assigned to this region unless you explicitly change the ASD Region assignment.

About SMH Files

The SMH file contains the following information:

• If you are not using hierarchy tagging (i.e., the design has no explicit ASD Region assignments in the design hierarchy), the SMH file lists every CRAM bit and indicates whether it is sensitive for the design.

• If you have performed hierarchy tagging and changed default ASD Region assignments, the SMH file lists every CRAM bit and it's assigned ASD region.

The Fault Injection Debugger can limit injections to one or more specified regions.

Note: To direct the Assembler to generate an SMH file:

• Choose Assignments > Device > Device and Pin Options > Error Detection CRC.

• Turn on the Generate SEU sensitivity map file (.smh) option.

Using the Fault Injection Debugger

To use the Fault Injection Debugger, you connect from the tool to the device via the JTAG interface.

Then, configure the device and perform fault injection.

To launch the Fault Injection Debugger, choose Tools > Fault Injection Debugger in the Quartus Prime software.

Note: Configuring or programming the device is similar to the procedure used for the Programmer or

SignalTap II Logic Analyzer.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Single Event Upset Using the Fault Injection Debugger

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 14-5: Fault Injection Debugger

Configuring Your Device and the Fault Injection Debugger

14-7

To configure your JTAG chain:

1. Click Hardware Setup. The tool displays the programming hardware connected to your computer.

2. Select the programming hardware you wish to use.

3. Click Close.

4. Click Auto Detect, which populates the device chain with the programmable devices found in the

JTAG chain.

Related Information

Targeted Fault Injection Feature

on page 14-13

Configuring Your Device and the Fault Injection Debugger

The Fault Injection Debugger uses a .sof and (optionally) a Sensitivity Map Header (.smh) file.

The Software Object File (.sof) configures the FPGA. The .smh file defines the sensitivity of the CRAM bits in the device. If you do not provide an .smh file, the Fault Injection Debugger injects faults randomly throughout the CRAM bits.

Debugging Single Event Upset Using the Fault Injection Debugger

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

14-8

Constraining Regions for Fault Injection

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

To specify a .sof:

1. Select the FPGA you wish to configure in the Device chain box.

2. Click Select File.

3. Navigate to the .sof and click OK. The Fault Injection Debugger reads the .sof.

4. (Optional) Select the SMH file.

If you do not specify an SMH file, the Fault Injection Debugger injects faults randomly across the entire device. If you specify an SMH file, you can restrict injections to the used areas of your device.

a. Right-click the device in the Device chain box and then click Select SMH File.

b. Select your SMH file.

c. Click OK.

5. Turn on Program/Configure.

6. Click Start.

The Fault Injection Debugger configures the device using the .sof.

Figure 14-6: Context Menu for Selecting the SMH File

Constraining Regions for Fault Injection

After loading an SMH file, you can direct the Fault Injection Debugger to operate on only specific ASD regions.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Single Event Upset Using the Fault Injection Debugger

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Specifying Error Types

To specify the ASD region(s) in which to inject faults:

1. Right-click on the FPGA in the Device chain box and click Show Device Sensitivity Map.

2. Select the ASD region(s) for fault injection.

Figure 14-7: Sensitivity Map Viewer

14-9

Specifying Error Types

You can specify various types of errors for injection.

• Single errors (SE)

• Double-adjacent errors (DAE)

• Uncorrectable multi-bit errors (EMBE)

Altera devices can self-correct single and double-adjacent errors if the scrubbing feature is enabled. Altera devices cannot correct multi-bit errors. Refer to the chapter on mitigating SEUs for more information about debugging these errors.

You can specify the mixture of faults to inject and the injection time interval. To specify the injection time interval:

Debugging Single Event Upset Using the Fault Injection Debugger

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

14-10

Injecting Errors

1. In the Fault Injection Debugger, choose Tools > Options.

2. Drag the red controller to the mix of errors. Alternatively, you can specify the mix numerically.

3. Specify the Injection interval time.

4. Click OK.

Figure 14-8: Specifying the Mixture of SEU Fault Types

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Related Information

Mitigating Single Event Upsets

Injecting Errors

You can inject errors in several modes:

• Inject one error on command

• Inject multiple errors on command

• Inject errors until commanded to stop

To inject these faults:

1. Turn on the Inject Fault option.

2. Choose whether you want to run error injection for a number of iterations or until stopped:

• If you choose to run until stopped, the Fault Injection Debugger injects errors at the interval specified in the Tools > Options dialog box.

• If you want to run error injection for a specific number of iterations, enter the number.

3. Click Start.

Note: The Fault Injection Debugger runs for the specified number of iterations or until stopped.

The Quartus Prime Messages window shows messages about the errors that are injected. For additional information on the injected faults, click Read EMR. The Fault Injection Debugger reads the device's EMR and displays the contents in the Messages window.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Single Event Upset Using the Fault Injection Debugger

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 14-9: Quartus Prime Error Injection and EMR Content Messages

Recording Errors

14-11

Error Injection Information

Error Information Read from the Device EMR

Recording Errors

You can record the location of any injected fault by noting the parameters reported in the Quartus Prime

Messages window.

If, for example, an injected fault results in behavior you would like to replay, you can target that location for injection. You perform targeted injection using the Fault Injection Debugger command line interface.

Clearing Injected Errors

To restore the normal function of the FPGA, click Scrub. When you scrub an error, the device’s EDCRC functions are used to correct the errors. The scrub mechanism is similar to that used during device operation.

Command-Line Interface

You can run the Fault Injection Debugger at the command line with the quartus_fid executable, which is useful if you want to perform fault injection from a script.

Table 14-1: Command line Arguments for Fault Injection

Short Argument

c i n t cable index number time

Long Argument Description

Specify programming hardware or cable.

(Required)

Specify the active device to inject fault. (Required)

Specify the number of errors to inject. The default value is 1. (Optional)

Interval time between injections. (Optional)

Note: Use quartus_fid --help

to view all available options.

The following code provides examples using the Fault Injection Debugger command-line interface.

############################################

#

# Find out which USB cables are available for this instance

Debugging Single Event Upset Using the Fault Injection Debugger

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

14-12

Command-Line Interface

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

# The result shows that one cable is available, named "USB-Blaster"

#

$ quartus_fid --list

. . .

Info: Command: quartus_fid --list

1) USB-Blaster on sj-sng-z4 [USB-0]

Info: Quartus Prime 64-Bit Fault Injection Debugger was successful. 0 errors, 0 warning

############################################

#

# Find which devices are available on USB-Blaster cable

# The result shows two devices: a Stratix V A7, and a MAX V CPLD.

#

$ quartus_fid --cable USB-Blaster -a

Info: Command: quartus_fid --cable=USB-Blaster -a

Info (208809): Using programming cable "USB-Blaster on sj-sng-z4 [USB-0]"

1) USB-Blaster on sj-sng-z4 [USB-0]

029030DD 5SGXEA7H(1|2|3)/5SGXEA7K1/..

020A40DD 5M2210Z/EPM2210

Info: Quartus Prime 64-Bit Fault Injection Debugger was successful. 0 errors, 0 warnings

############################################

#

# Program the Stratix V device

# The --index option specifies operations performed on a connected device.

# "=svgx.sof" associates a .sof file with the device

# "#p" means program the device

#

$ quartus_fid --cable USB-Blaster --index "@1=svgx.sof#p"

. . .

Info (209016): Configuring device index 1

Info (209017): Device 1 contains JTAG ID code 0x029030DD

Info (209007): Configuration succeeded -- 1 device(s) configured

Info (209011): Successfully performed operation(s)

Info (208551): Program signature into device 1.

Info: Quartus Prime 64-Bit Fault Injection Debugger was successful. 0 errors, 0 warnings

############################################

#

# Inject a fault into the device.

# The #i operator indicates to inject faults

# -n 3 indicates to inject 3 faults

#

$ quartus_fid --cable USB-Blaster --index "@1=svgx.sof#i" -n 3

Info: Command: quartus_fid --cable=USB-Blaster [email protected]=svgx.sof#i -n 3

Info (208809): Using programming cable "USB-Blaster on sj-sng-z4 [USB-0]"

Info (208521): Injects 3 error(s) into device(s)

Info: Quartus Prime 64-Bit Fault Injection Debugger was successful. 0 errors, 0 warnings

############################################

#

# Interactive Mode.

# Using the #i operation with -n 0 puts the debugger into interactive mode.

# Note that 3 faults were injected in the previous session;

# "E" reads the faults currently in the EMR Unloader IP core.

#

$ quartus_fid --cable USB-Blaster --index "@1=svgx.sof#i" -n 0

Info: Command: quartus_fid --cable=USB-Blaster [email protected]=svgx.sof#i -n 0

Info (208809): Using programming cable "USB-Blaster on sj-sng-z4 [USB-0]"

Enter :

'F' to inject fault

'E' to read EMR

'S' to scrub error(s)

'Q' to quit

E

Altera Corporation

Debugging Single Event Upset Using the Fault Injection Debugger

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Targeted Fault Injection Feature

14-13

Info (208540): Reading EMR array

Info (208544): 3 frame error(s) detected in device 1.

Info (208545): Error #1 : Single error in frame 0x1028 at bit 0x21EA.

Info (10914): Error #2 : Uncorrectable multi-bit error in frame 0x1116.

Info (208545): Error #3 : Single error in frame 0x1848 at bit 0x128C.

Enter :

'F' to inject fault

'E' to read EMR

'S' to scrub error(s)

'Q' to quit

Q

Info: Quartus Prime 64-Bit Fault Injection Debugger was successful. 0 errors, 0 warnings

Info: Peak virtual memory: 1522 megabytes

Info: Processing ended: Mon Nov 3 18:50:00 2014

Info: Elapsed time: 00:00:29

Info: Total CPU time (on all processors): 00:00:13

Targeted Fault Injection Feature

The Fault Injection Debugger injects faults into the FPGA randomly. However, the Targeted Fault

Injection feature allows you to inject faults into targeted locations in the CRAM. This operation may be useful, for example, if you noted an SEU event and want to test the FPGA or system response to the same event after modifying a recovery strategy.

Note: The Targeted Fault Injection feature is available only from the command line interface.

You can specify that errors are injected from the command line or in prompt mode.

Related Information

AN 539: Test Methodology or Error Detection and Recovery using CRC in Altera FPGA Devices

Specifying an Error List From the Command Line

The Targeted Fault Injection feature allows you to specify an error list from the command line, as shown in the following example: c:\Users\sng> quartus_fid -c 1 i "@1= svgx.sof#i " -n 2 -user="@1= 0x2274 0x05EF 0x2264

0x0500"

Where: c 1

indicates that the fpga is controlled by the first cable on your computer.

i "@1= svgx.sof#i " indicates that the first device in the chain is loaded with the object file svgx.sof and will be injected with faults.

n 2

indicates that two faults will be injected.

user=”@1= 0x2274 0x05EF 0x2264 0x0500”

is a user-specified list of faults to be injected. In this example, device 1 has two faults: at frame 0x2274, bit 0x05EF and at frame 0x2264, bit 0x0500.

Debugging Single Event Upset Using the Fault Injection Debugger

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

14-14

Specifying an Error List From Prompt Mode

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Specifying an Error List From Prompt Mode

You can operate the Targeted Fault Injection feature interactively by specifying the number of faults to be

0 (-n 0). The Fault Injection Debugger presents prompt mode commands and their descriptions.

Description

S

Q

F

E

Prompt Mode Command

Inject a fault

Read the EMR

Scrub errors

Quit

In prompt mode, you can issue the

F

command alone to inject a single fault in a random location in the device. In the following examples using the F command in prompt mode, three errors are injected.

F #3 0x12 0x34 0x56 0x78 * 0x9A 0xBC +

• Error 1 – Single bit error at frame 0x12, bit 0x34

• Error 2 – Uncorrectable error at frame 0x56, bit 0x78 (an * indicates a multi-bit error)

• Error 3 – Double-adjacent error at frame 0x9A, bit 0xBC (a + indicates a double bit error)

F 0x12 0x34 0x56 0x78 *

One (default) error is injected:

Error 1 – Single bit error at frame 0x12, bit 0x34. Locations after the first frame/bit location are ignored.

F #3 0x12 0x34 0x56 0x78 * 0x9A 0xBC + 0xDE 0x00

Three errors are injected:

• Error 1 – Single bit error at frame 0x12, bit 0x34

• Error 2 – Uncorrectable error at frame 0x56, bit 0x78

• Error 3 – Double-adjacent error at frame 0x9A, bit 0xBC

• Locations after the first 3 frame/bit pairs are ignored

Determining CRAM Bit Locations

When the Fault Injection Debugger detects a CRAM EDCRC error, the Error Message Register (EMR) contains the syndrome, frame number, bit location, and error type (single, double, or multi-bit) of the detected CRAM error.

During system testing, save the EMR contents reported by the Fault Injection Debugger when you detect an EDCRC fault.

Note: With the recorded EMR contents, you can supply the frame and bit numbers to the Fault Injection

Debugger to replay the errors noted during system testing, to further design, and characterize a system recovery response to that error.

Related Information

AN 539: Test Methodology or Error Detection and Recovery using CRC in Altera FPGA Devices

Advanced Command-Line Options: ASD Regions and Error Type Weighting

You can use the Fault Injection Debugger command-line interface to inject errors into ASD regions and weight the error types.

Altera Corporation

Debugging Single Event Upset Using the Fault Injection Debugger

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Document Revision History

14-15

First, you specify the mix of error types (single bit, double adjacent, and multi-bit uncorrectable) using the

--weight <single errors>.<double adjacent errors>.<multi-bit errors>

option. For example, for a mix of 50% single errors, 30% double adjacent errors, and 20% multi-bit uncorrectable errors, use the option

--weight=50.30.20

. Then, to target an ASD region, use the

-smh

option to include the SMH file and indicate the ASD region to target. For example:

$ quartus_fid --cable=USB-BlasterII --index "@1=svgx.sof#pi" --weight=100.0.0 -smh="@1=svgx.smh#2" --number=30

This example command:

• Programs the device and injects faults ( pi

string)

• Injects 100% single-bit faults (100.0.0)

• Injects only into

ASD_REGION

2 (indicated by the #2)

• Injects 30 faults

Document Revision History

Table 14-2: Document Revision History

Date

2015.11.02

2015.05.04

15.1.0

15.0.0

Version

2014.06.30

December 2012

14.0.0

2012.12.01

Changes

Changed instances of Quartus II to Quartus Prime.

• Provided more detail on how to use the Fault

Injection Debugger throughout the document.

• Added more command-line examples.

• Removed “Modifying the Quartus INI File” section.

• Added “Targeted Fault Injection Feature” section.

• Updated “Hardware and Software Require‐ ments” section.

Preliminary release.

Debugging Single Event Upset Using the Fault Injection Debugger

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

2015.11.02

QPS5V3

Subscribe

In-System Debugging Using External Logic

Analyzers

15

Send Feedback

About the Quartus Prime Logic Analyzer Interface

The Quartus Prime Logic Analyzer Interface (LAI) allows you to use an external logic analyzer and a minimal number of Altera-supported device I/O pins to examine the behavior of internal signals while your design is running at full speed on your Altera

®

- supported device.

The LAI connects a large set of internal device signals to a small number of output pins. You can connect these output pins to an external logic analyzer for debugging purposes. In the Quartus Prime LAI, the internal signals are grouped together, distributed to a user-configurable multiplexer, and then output to available I/O pins on your Altera-supported device. Instead of having a one-to-one relationship between internal signals and output pins, the Quartus Prime LAI enables you to map many internal signals to a smaller number of output pins. The exact number of internal signals that you can map to an output pin varies based on the multiplexer settings in the Quartus Prime LAI.

Note: The term “logic analyzer” when used in this document includes both logic analyzers and oscillo‐ scopes equipped with digital channels, commonly referred to as mixed signal analyzers or MSOs.

The LAI does not support Hard Processor System (HPS) I/Os.

Related Information

Device Support website

Choosing a Logic Analyzer

The Quartus Prime software offers the following two general purpose on-chip debugging tools for debugging a large set of RTL signals from your design:

• The SignalTap ® II Logic Analyzer

• An external logic analyzer, which connects to internal signals in your Altera-supported device by using the Quartus Prime LAI

©

2015 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, ENPIRION, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX words and logos are trademarks of Altera Corporation and registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. All other words and logos identified as trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html

. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.

www.altera.com

101 Innovation Drive, San Jose, CA 95134

ISO

9001:2008

Registered

15-2

Required Components

Table 15-1: Comparing the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer with the Logic Analyzer Interface

Feature Description

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Sample Depth You have access to a wider sample depth with an external logic analyzer.

In the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, the maximum sample depth is set to

128 Kb, which is a device constraint. However, with an external logic analyzer, there are no device constraints, providing you a wider sample depth.

Debugging

Timing Issues

Performance

Using an external logic analyzer provides you with access to a “timing” mode, which enables you to debug combined streams of data.

You frequently have limited routing resources available to place and route when you use the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer with your design.

An external logic analyzer adds minimal logic, which removes resource limits on place-and-route.

The SignalTap II Logic Analyzer offers triggering capabilities that are comparable to external logic analyzers.

Triggering

Capability

Use of Output

Pins

Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, no additional output pins are required. Using an external logic analyzer requires the use of additional output pins.

Acquisition Speed With the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, you can acquire data at speeds of over 200 MHz. You can achieve the same acquisition speeds with an external logic analyzer; however, you must consider signal integrity issues.

Recommended Logic

Analyzer

LAI

LAI

LAI

LAI or SignalTap II

SignalTap II

SignalTap II

Related Information

System Debugging Tools Overview

on page 9-1

Overview and comparison of all tools available in the Quartus Prime software on-chip debugging tool suite

Required Components

You must have the following components to perform analysis using the LAI:

Altera Corporation

In-System Debugging Using External Logic Analyzers

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Required Components

• The Quartus Prime software starting with version 5.1 and later

• The device under test

• An external logic analyzer

• An Altera communications cable

• A cable to connect the Altera-supported device to the external logic analyzer

Figure 15-1: LAI and Hardware Setup

Board

External Logic Analyzer

(2)

FPGA

LAI

Connected to

Unused FPGA Pins

15-3

JTAG

Altera Programming

Hardware

(1)

Quartus Prime Software

Notes to figure:

1. Configuration and control of the LAI using a computer loaded with the Quartus Prime software via the JTAG port.

2. Configuration and control of the LAI using a third-party vendor logic analyzer via the JTAG port.

Support varies by vendor.

In-System Debugging Using External Logic Analyzers

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

15-4

Flow for Using the LAI

Flow for Using the LAI

Figure 15-2: LAI Workflow

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Start the Quartus Prime Software

Create New Logic

Analyzer Interface File

Configure Logic Analyzer

Interface File

Compile Project

Program Device

Control Output Pin

Debug Project

Notes to figure:

1. Configuration and control of the LAI using a computer loaded with the Quartus Prime software via the JTAG port.

2. Configuration and control of the LAI using a third-party vendor logic analyzer via the JTAG port.

Support varies by vendor.

Working with LAI Files

The

.lai

file stores the configuration of an LAI instance. The

.lai

file opens in the LAI editor. The editor allows you to group multiple internal signals to a set of external pins.

Configuring the File Core Parameters

After you create the

.lai

file, you must configure the

.lai

file core parameters by clicking on the Setup View list, and then selecting Core Parameters. The table below lists the

.lai

file core parameters.

Table 15-2: LAI File Core Parameters

Parameter

Pin Count

Description

The Pin Count parameter signifies the number of pins you want dedicated to your LAI. The pins must be connected to a debug header on your board. Within the Altera-supported device, each pin is mapped to a user-configurable number of internal signals.

The Pin Count parameter can range from 1 to 255 pins.

Altera Corporation

In-System Debugging Using External Logic Analyzers

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Mapping the LAI File Pins to Available I/O Pins

Parameter Description

Bank Count

The Bank Count parameter signifies the number of internal signals that you want to map to each pin. For example, a Bank Count of 8 implies that you will connect eight internal signals to each pin.

The Bank Count parameter can range from 1 to 255 banks.

Output/

Capture Mode

Clock

Power-Up

State

The Output/Capture Mode parameter signifies the type of acquisition you perform. There are two options that you can select:

Combinational/Timing—This acquisition uses your external logic analyzer’s internal clock to determine when to sample data. Because Combinational/

Timing acquisition samples data asynchronously to your Altera-supported device, you must determine the sample frequency you should use to debug and verify your system. This mode is effective if you want to measure timing information, such as channel-to-channel skew. For more information about the sampling frequency and the speeds at which it can run, refer to the data sheet for your external logic analyzer.

Registered/State—This acquisition uses a signal from your system under test to determine when to sample. Because Registered/State acquisition samples data synchronously with your Altera-supported device, it provides you with a functional view of your Altera-supported device while it is running. This mode is effective when you verify the functionality of your design.

The Clock parameter is available only when Output/Capture Mode is set to

Registered State. You must specify the sample clock in the Core Parameters view. The sample clock can be any signal in your design. However, for best results, Altera recommends that you use a clock with an operating frequency fast enough to sample the data you would like to acquire.

The Power-Up State parameter specifies the power-up state of the pins you have designated for use with the LAI. You have the option of selecting tri-stated for all pins, or selecting a particular bank that you have enabled.

15-5

Mapping the LAI File Pins to Available I/O Pins

To configure the

.lai

file I/O pin parameters, select Pins in the Setup View list. To assign pin locations for the LAI, double-click the Location column next to the reserved pins in the Name column, and the Pin

Planner opens.

Related Information

Managing Device I/O Pins documentation

Information about how to use the Pin Planner

Mapping Internal Signals to the LAI Banks

After you have specified the number of banks to use in the Core Parameters settings page, you must assign internal signals for each bank in the LAI. Click the Setup View arrow and select Bank n or All

Banks.

To view all of your bank connections, click Setup View and select All Banks.

In-System Debugging Using External Logic Analyzers

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

15-6

Using the Node Finder

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Using the Node Finder

Before making bank assignments, on the View menu, point to Utility Windows and click Node Finder.

Find the signals that you want to acquire, then drag and drop the signals from the Node Finder dialog box into the bank Setup View. When adding signals, use SignalTap II: pre-synthesis for non-incrementally routed instances and SignalTap II: post-fitting for incrementally routed instances.

As you continue to make assignments in the bank Setup View, the schematic of your LAI in the Logical

View of your

.lai

file begins to reflect your assignments. Continue making assignments for each bank in the Setup View until you have added all of the internal signals for which you wish to acquire data.

Compiling Your Quartus Prime Project

When you save your

.lai

file, a dialog box prompts you to enable the LAI instance for the active project.

Alternatively, you can specify the

.lai

file your project uses in the Global Project Settings dialog box.

After you specify the name of your

.lai

file, you must compile your project. To compile your project, on the Processing menu, click Start Compilation.

To ensure that the LAI is properly compiled with your project, expand the entity hierarchy in the Project

Navigator. (To display the Project Navigator, on the View menu, point to Utility Windows and click

Project Navigator.) If the LAI is compiled with your design, the sld_hub

and sld_multitap

entities are shown in the Project Navigator.

Figure 15-3: Project Navigator

Programming Your Altera-Supported Device Using the LAI

After compilation completes, you must configure your Altera-supported device before using the LAI.

You can use the LAI with multiple devices in your JTAG chain. Your JTAG chain can also consist of devices that do not support the LAI or non-Altera, JTAG-compliant devices. To use the LAI in more than one Altera-supported device, create an

.lai

file and configure an

.lai

file for each Altera-supported device that you want to analyze.

Controlling the Active Bank During Runtime

When you have programmed your Altera-supported device, you can control which bank you map to the reserved

.lai

file output pins. To control which bank you map, in the schematic in the Logical View, rightclick the bank and click Connect Bank.

Altera Corporation

In-System Debugging Using External Logic Analyzers

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Figure 15-4: Configuring Banks

Acquiring Data on Your Logic Analyzer

15-7

Acquiring Data on Your Logic Analyzer

To acquire data on your logic analyzer, you must establish a connection between your device and the external logic analyzer. For more information about this process and for guidelines about how to establish connections between debugging headers and logic analyzers, refer to the documentation for your logic analyzer.

Using the LAI with Incremental Compilation

The Incremental Compilation feature in the Quartus Prime software allows you to preserve the synthesis and fitting results of your design. This is an effective feature for reducing compilation times if you only modify a portion of a design or you wish to preserve the optimization results from a previous compilation.

The Incremental Compilation feature is well suited for use with LAI since LAI comprises a small portion of most designs. Because LAI consists of only a small portion of your design, incremental compilation helps to minimize your compilation time. Incremental compilation works best when you are only changing a small portion of your design. Incremental compilation yields an accurate representation of your design behavior when changing the

.lai

file through multiple compilations.

Document Revision History

Table 15-3: Document Revision History

Date

2015.11.02

June 2014

Version

15.1.0

14.0.0

June 2012

November 2011

12.0.0

10.1.1

Changes

Changed instances of Quartus II to Quartus Prime.

• Dita conversion

• Added limitation about HPS I/O support

Removed survey link

Changed to new document template

In-System Debugging Using External Logic Analyzers

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

15-8

Document Revision History

December 2010

Date

August 2010

July 2010

November 2009

March 2009

November 2008

May 2008

Version

10.1.0

10.0.1

10.0.0

9.1.0

9.0.0

8.1.0

8.0.0

Changes

• Minor editorial updates

• Changed to new document template

Corrected links

• Created links to the Quartus Prime Help

• Editorial updates

• Removed Referenced Documents section

• Removed references to APEX devices

• Editorial updates

• Minor editorial updates

• Removed Figures 15–4, 15–5, and 15–11 from

8.1 version

Changed to 8-1/2 x 11 page size. No change to content

• Updated device support list on page 15–3

• Added links to referenced documents throughout the chapter

• Added “Referenced Documents”

• Added reference to Section V. In-System

Debugging

• Minor editorial updates

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Related Information

Quartus Handbook Archive

For previous versions of the Quartus Prime Handbook, refer to the Quartus Handbook Archive.

Altera Corporation

In-System Debugging Using External Logic Analyzers

Send Feedback

2015.11.02

QPS5V3

Subscribe

In-System Modification of Memory and

Constants

16

Send Feedback

About the In-System Memory Content Editor

The Quartus Prime In-System Memory Content Editor allows you to view and update memories and constants with the JTAG port connection.

The In-System Memory Content Editor allows access to dense and complex FPGA designs. When you program devices, you have read and write access to the memories and constants through the JTAG interface. You can then identify, test, and resolve issues with your design by testing changes to memory contents in the FPGA while your design is running.

When you use the In-System Memory Content Editor in conjunction with the SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer, you can more easily view and debug your design in the hardware lab.

The ability to read data from memories and constants allows you to quickly identify the source of problems. The write capability allows you to bypass functional issues by writing expected data. For example, if a parity bit in your memory is incorrect, you can use the In-System Memory Content Editor to write the correct parity bit values into your RAM, allowing your system to continue functioning. You can also intentionally write incorrect parity bit values into your RAM to check the error handling function‐ ality of your design.

Related Information

System Debugging Tools Overview

on page 9-1

Overview and comparison of all tools available in the Quartus Prime software on-chip debugging tool suite

Design Debugging Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer documentation

on page 13-1

Library of Parameterized Modules online help

List of the types of memories and constants currently supported by the Quartus Prime software

Design Flow Using the In-System Memory Content Editor

To use the In-System Memory Content Editor, perform the following steps:

©

2015 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, ENPIRION, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX words and logos are trademarks of Altera Corporation and registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. All other words and logos identified as trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html

. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.

www.altera.com

101 Innovation Drive, San Jose, CA 95134

ISO

9001:2008

Registered

16-2

Creating In-System Modifiable Memories and Constants

1. Identify the memories and constants that you want to access.

2. Edit the memories and constants to be run-time modifiable.

3. Perform a full compilation.

4. Program your device.

5. Launch the In-System Memory Content Editor.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Creating In-System Modifiable Memories and Constants

When you specify that a memory or constant is run-time modifiable, the Quartus Prime software changes the default implementation. A single-port RAM is converted to a dual-port RAM, and a constant is implemented in registers instead of look-up tables (LUTs). These changes enable run-time modification without changing the functionality of your design.

If you instantiate a memory or constant IP core directly with ports and parameters in VHDL or Verilog

HDL, add or modify the lpm_hint

parameter as follows:

In VHDL code, add the following: lpm_hint => "ENABLE_RUNTIME_MOD = YES,

INSTANCE_NAME = <instantiation name>";

In Verilog HDL code, add the following: defparam <megafunction instance name>.lpm_hint =

"ENABLE_RUNTIME_MOD = YES,

INSTANCE_NAME = <instantiation name>";

Running the In-System Memory Content Editor

The In-System Memory Content Editor has three separate panes: the Instance Manager, the JTAG Chain

Configuration, and the Hex Editor.

The Instance Manager pane displays all available run-time modifiable memories and constants in your

FPGA device. The JTAG Chain Configuration pane allows you to program your FPGA and select the

Altera

®

device in the chain to update.

Using the In-System Memory Content Editor does not require that you open a project. The In-System

Memory Content Editor retrieves all instances of run-time configurable memories and constants by scanning the JTAG chain and sending a query to the specific device selected in the JTAG Chain Configu‐

ration pane.

If you have more than one device with in-system configurable memories or constants in a JTAG chain, you can launch multiple In-System Memory Content Editors within the Quartus Prime software to access the memories and constants in each of the devices. Each In-System Memory Content Editor can access the in-system memories and constants in a single device.

Instance Manager

When you scan the JTAG chain to update the Instance Manager pane, you can view a list of all run-time modifiable memories and constants in the design. The Instance Manager pane displays the Index,

Instance, Status, Width, Depth, Type, and Mode of each element in the list.

Altera Corporation

In-System Modification of Memory and Constants

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Editing Data Displayed in the Hex Editor Pane

16-3

You can read and write to in-system memory with the Instance Manager pane.

Note: In addition to the buttons available in the Instance Manager pane, you can read and write data by selecting commands from the Processing menu, or the right-click menu in the Instance Manager pane or Hex Editor pane.

The status of each instance is also displayed beside each entry in the Instance Manager pane. The status indicates if the instance is Not running, Offloading data, or Updating data. The health monitor provides information about the status of the editor.

The Quartus Prime software assigns a different index number to each in-system memory and constant to distinguish between multiple instances of the same memory or constant function. View the In-System

Memory Content Editor Settings section of the Compilation Report to match an index number with the corresponding instance ID.

Related Information

Instance Manager Pane online help

Editing Data Displayed in the Hex Editor Pane

You can edit data read from your in-system memories and constants displayed in the Hex Editor pane by typing values directly into the editor or by importing memory files.

Importing and Exporting Memory Files

The In-System Memory Content Editor allows you to import and export data values for memories that have the In-System Updating feature enabled. Importing from a data file enables you to quickly load an entire memory image. Exporting to a data file enables you to save the contents of the memory for future use.

Scripting Support

The In-System Memory Content Editor supports reading and writing of memory contents via a Tcl script or Tcl commands entered at a command prompt. For detailed information about scripting command options, refer to the Quartus Prime command-line and Tcl API Help browser.

To run the Help browser, type the following command at the command prompt: quartus_sh --qhelp

In-System Modification of Memory and Constants

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

16-4

Programming the Device with the In-System Memory Content Editor

The commonly used commands for the In-System Memory Content Editor are as follows:

• Reading from memory:

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

read_content_from_memory

[-content_in_hex]

-instance_index <instance index>

-start_address <starting address>

-word_count <word count>

• Writing to memory: write_content_to_memory

• Saving memory contents to a file: save_content_from_memory_to_file

• Updating memory contents from a file: update_content_to_memory_from_file

Related Information

Tcl Scripting documentation

Command-Line Scripting documentation

API Functions for Tcl online help

Descriptions of the command options and scripting examples

Programming the Device with the In-System Memory Content Editor

If you make changes to your design, you can program the device from within the In-System Memory

Content Editor.

Example: Using the In-System Memory Content Editor with the SignalTap II Logic

Analyzer

The following scenario describes how you can use the In-System Updating of Memory and Constants feature with the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer to efficiently debug your design. You can use the In-System

Memory Content Editor and the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer simultaneously with the JTAG interface.

Scenario: After completing your FPGA design, you find that the characteristics of your FIR filter design are not as expected.

1. To locate the source of the problem, change all your FIR filter coefficients to be in-system modifiable and instantiate the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer.

2. Using the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer to tap and trigger on internal design nodes, you find the FIR filter to be functioning outside of the expected cutoff frequency.

3. Using the In-System Memory Content Editor, you check the correctness of the FIR filter coefficients.

Upon reading each coefficient, you discover that one of the coefficients is incorrect.

4. Because your coefficients are in-system modifiable, you update the coefficients with the correct data with the In-System Memory Content Editor.

In this scenario, you can quickly locate the source of the problem using both the In-System Memory

Content Editor and the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer. You can also verify the functionality of your device by changing the coefficient values before modifying the design source files.

Altera Corporation

In-System Modification of Memory and Constants

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Document Revision History

16-5

You can also modify the coefficients with the In-System Memory Content Editor to vary the character‐ istics of the FIR filter, for example, filter attenuation, transition bandwidth, cut-off frequency, and windowing function.

Document Revision History

Table 16-1: Document Revision History

Date

2015.11.02

June 2014

June 2012

November 2011

December 2010

August 2010

July 2010

November 2009

March 2009

November 2008

May 2008

Version

15.1.0

14.0.0

12.0.0

10.0.3

10.0.2

10.0.1

10.0.0

9.1.0

9.0.0

8.1.0

8.0.0

Changes

Changed instances of Quartus II to Quartus Prime.

• Dita conversion.

• Removed references to megafunction and replaced with IP core.

Removed survey link.

Template update.

Changed to new document template. No change to content.

Corrected links

• Inserted links to Quartus Prime Help

• Removed Reference Documents section

• Delete references to APEX devices

• Style changes

No change to content

Changed to 8-1/2 x 11 page size. No change to content.

• Added reference to Section V. In-System Debugging in volume 3 of the Quartus Prime Handbook on page 16-1

• Removed references to the Mercury device, as it is now considered to be a “Mature” device

• Added links to referenced documents throughout document

• Minor editorial updates

Related Information

Quartus Handbook Archive

For previous versions of the Quartus Prime Handbook, refer to the Quartus Handbook Archive.

In-System Modification of Memory and Constants

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using In-System Sources and Probes

17

2015.11.02

QPS5V3

Subscribe

Send Feedback

Traditional debugging techniques often involve using an external pattern generator to exercise the logic and a logic analyzer to study the output waveforms during run time. The SignalTap

®

II Logic Analyzer and SignalProbe allow you to read or “tap” internal logic signals during run time as a way to debug your logic design.

You can make the debugging cycle more efficient when you can drive any internal signal manually within your design, which allows you to perform the following actions:

• Force the occurrence of trigger conditions set up in the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer

• Create simple test vectors to exercise your design without using external test equipment

• Dynamically control run time control signals with the JTAG chain

The In-System Sources and Probes Editor in the Quartus Prime software extends the portfolio of verifica‐ tion tools, and allows you to easily control any internal signal and provides you with a completely dynamic debugging environment. Coupled with either the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer or SignalProbe, the In-System Sources and Probes Editor gives you a powerful debugging environment in which to generate stimuli and solicit responses from your logic design.

The Virtual JTAG IP core and the In-System Memory Content Editor also give you the capability to drive virtual inputs into your design. The Quartus Prime software offers a variety of on-chip debugging tools.

The In-System Sources and Probes Editor consists of the ALTSOURCE_PROBE IP core and an interface to control the ALTSOURCE_PROBE IP core instances during run time. Each ALTSOURCE_PROBE IP core instance provides you with source output ports and probe input ports, where source ports drive selected signals and probe ports sample selected signals. When you compile your design, the

ALTSOURCE_PROBE IP core sets up a register chain to either drive or sample the selected nodes in your logic design. During run time, the In-System Sources and Probes Editor uses a JTAG connection to shift data to and from the ALTSOURCE_PROBE IP core instances. The figure shows a block diagram of the components that make up the In-System Sources and Probes Editor.

©

2015 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, ENPIRION, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX words and logos are trademarks of Altera Corporation and registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. All other words and logos identified as trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html

. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.

www.altera.com

101 Innovation Drive, San Jose, CA 95134

ISO

9001:2008

Registered

17-2

Design Debugging Using In-System Sources and Probes

Figure 17-1: In-System Sources and Probes Editor Block Diagram

FPGA

Design Logic

Probes

altsource_probe

Megafunction

Sources

D Q

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

D Q

JTAG

Controller

Altera

Programming

Hardware

Quartus Prime

Software

The ALTSOURCE_PROBE IP core hides the detailed transactions between the JTAG controller and the registers instrumented in your design to give you a basic building block for stimulating and probing your design. Additionally, the In-System Sources and Probes Editor provides single-cycle samples and singlecycle writes to selected logic nodes. You can use this feature to input simple virtual stimuli and to capture the current value on instrumented nodes. Because the In-System Sources and Probes Editor gives you access to logic nodes in your design, you can toggle the inputs of low-level components during the debugging process. If used in conjunction with the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer, you can force trigger conditions to help isolate your problem and shorten your debugging process.

The In-System Sources and Probes Editor allows you to easily implement control signals in your design as virtual stimuli. This feature can be especially helpful for prototyping your design, such as in the following operations:

• Creating virtual push buttons

• Creating a virtual front panel to interface with your design

• Emulating external sensor data

• Monitoring and changing run time constants on the fly

The In-System Sources and Probes Editor supports Tcl commands that interface with all your

ALTSOURCE_PROBE IP core instances to increase the level of automation.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using In-System Sources and Probes

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Hardware and Software Requirements

Related Information

System Debugging Tools

For an overview and comparison of all the tools available in the Quartus Prime software on-chip debugging tool suite

17-3

Hardware and Software Requirements

The following components are required to use the In-System Sources and Probes Editor:

• Quartus Prime software or

• Quartus Prime Lite Edition (with the TalkBack feature turned on)

• Download Cable (USB-Blaster

• Altera

®

TM

download cable or ByteBlaster

TM

cable)

development kit or user design board with a JTAG connection to device under test

The In-System Sources and Probes Editor supports the following device families:

• Arria ®

• Stratix

series

® series

• Cyclone

®

• MAX

®

series

series

Design Flow Using the In-System Sources and Probes Editor

The In-System Sources and Probes Editor supports an RTL flow. Signals that you want to view in the In-

System Sources and Probes editor are connected to an instance of the In-System Sources and Probes IP core.

After you compile the design, you can control each instance via the In-System Sources and Probes

Editor pane or via a Tcl interface.

Design Debugging Using In-System Sources and Probes

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

17-4

Instantiating the In-System Sources and Probes IP Core

Figure 17-2: FPGA Design Flow Using the In-System Sources and Probes Editor

Start

Create a New Project or Open an

Existing Project

Configure altsource_probe

Megafunction

Instrument selected logic nodes by Instantiating the altsource_probe Megafunction variation file into the HDL

Design

Compile the design

Program Target Device(s)

Control Source and Probe

Instance(s)

Debug/Modify HDL

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Functionality

Satisfied?

No

End

Yes

Instantiating the In-System Sources and Probes IP Core

You must instantiate the In-System Sources and Probes IP core before you can use the In-System Sources and Probes editor. Use the IP Catalog and parameter editor to instantiate a custom variation of the In-

System Sources and Probes IP core.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using In-System Sources and Probes

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

In-System Sources and Probes IP Core Parameters

17-5

To configure the In-System Sources and Probes IP core, perform the following steps::

1. On the Tools menu, click Tools > IP Catalog.

2. Locate and double-click the In-System Sources and Probes IP core. The parameter editor appears.

3. Specify a name for your custom IP variation.

4. Specify the desired parameters for your custom IP variation. You can specify up to up to 512 bits for each source. Your design may include up to 128 instances of this IP core.

5. Click Generate or Finish to generate IP core synthesis and simulation files matching your specifica‐ tions. The parameter editor generates the necessary variation files and the instantiation template based on your specification. Use the generated template to instantiate the In-System Sources and Probes IP core in your design.

Note: The In-System Sources and Probes Editor does not support simulation. You must remove the

In-System Sources and Probes IP core before you create a simulation netlist.

In-System Sources and Probes IP Core Parameters

Use the template to instantiate the variation file in your design.

Table 17-1: In-System Sources and Probes IP Port Information

Port Name

probe[] source_clk source_ena source[]

Required?

Direction

No

No

Input

Input

No

No

Input

Output

Comments

The outputs from your design.

Source Data is written synchronously to this clock. This input is required if you turn on Source Clock in the

Advanced Options box in the parameter editor.

Clock enable signal for source_clk

. This input is required if specified in the Advanced Options box in the parameter editor.

Used to drive inputs to user design.

You can include up to 128 instances of the in-system sources and probes IP core in your design, if your device has available resources. Each instance of the IP core uses a pair of registers per signal for the width of the widest port in the IP core. Additionally, there is some fixed overhead logic to accommodate communication between the IP core instances and the JTAG controller. You can also specify an additional pair of registers per source port for synchronization.

When you compile your design that includes the In-System Sources and Probes IP core, the In-System

Sources and Probes and SLD Hub Controller IP core are added to your compilation hierarchy automati‐ cally. These IP cores provide communication between the JTAG controller and your instrumented logic.

You can modify the number of connections to your design by editing the In-System Sources and Probes

IP core. To open the design instance you want to modify in the parameter editor, double-click the instance in the Project Navigator. You can then modify the connections in the HDL source file. You must recompile your design after you make changes.

You can use the Quartus Prime incremental compilation feature to reduce compilation time. Incremental compilation allows you to organize your design into logical partitions. During recompilation of a design, incremental compilation preserves the compilation results and performance of unchanged partitions and reduces design iteration time by compiling only modified design partitions.

Design Debugging Using In-System Sources and Probes

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

17-6

Compiling the Design

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Compiling the Design

When you compile your design that includes the In-System Sources and ProbesIP core, the In-System

Sources and Probes and SLD Hub Controller IP core are added to your compilation hierarchy automatically. These IP cores provide communication between the JTAG controller and your instrumented logic.

You can modify the number of connections to your design by editing the In-System Sources and Probes

IP core. To open the design instance you want to modify in the parameter editor, double-click the instance in the Project Navigator. You can then modify the connections in the HDL source file. You must recompile your design after you make changes.

You can use the Quartus Prime incremental compilation feature to reduce compilation design into logical partitions. During recompilation of a design, incremental compilation preserves the compilation results and performance of unchanged partitions and reduces design iteration time by compiling only modified design partitions.

Running the In-System Sources and Probes Editor

The In-System Sources and Probes Editor gives you control over all ALTSOURCE_PROBE IP core instances within your design. The editor allows you to view all available run time controllable instances of the ALTSOURCE_PROBE IP core in your design, provides a push-button interface to drive all your source nodes, and provides a logging feature to store your probe and source data.

To run the In-System Sources and Probes Editor:

• On the Tools menu, click In-System Sources and Probes Editor.

In-System Sources and Probes Editor GUI

The In-System Sources and Probes Editor contains three panes:

JTAG Chain Configuration—Allows you to specify programming hardware, device, and file settings that the In-System Sources and Probes Editor uses to program and acquire data from a device.

Instance Manager—Displays information about the instances generated when you compile a design, and allows you to control data that the In-System Sources and Probes Editor acquires.

In-System Sources and Probes Editor—Logs all data read from the selected instance and allows you to modify source data that is written to your device.

When you use the In-System Sources and Probes Editor, you do not need to open a Quartus Prime software project. The In-System Sources and Probes Editor retrieves all instances of the

ALTSOURCE_PROBE IP core by scanning the JTAG chain and sending a query to the device selected in the JTAG Chain Configuration pane. You can also use a previously saved configuration to run the In-

System Sources and Probes Editor.

Each In-System Sources and Probes Editor pane can access the ALTSOURCE_PROBE IP core instances in a single device. If you have more than one device containing IP core instances in a JTAG chain, you can launch multiple In-System Sources and Probes Editor panes to access the IP core instances in each device.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using In-System Sources and Probes

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Programming Your Device With JTAG Chain Configuration

17-7

Programming Your Device With JTAG Chain Configuration

After you compile your project, you must configure your FPGA before you use the In-System Sources and

Probes Editor.

To configure a device to use with the In-System Sources and Probes Editor, perform the following steps:

1. Open the In-System Sources and Probes Editor.

2. In the JTAG Chain Configuration pane, point to Hardware, and then select the hardware communi‐ cations device. You may be prompted to configure your hardware; in this case, click Setup.

3. From the Device list, select the FPGA device to which you want to download the design (the device may be automatically detected). You may need to click Scan Chain to detect your target device.

4. In the JTAG Chain Configuration pane, click to browse for the SRAM Object File (.sof) that includes the In-System Sources and Probes instance or instances. (The .sof may be automatically detected).

5. Click Program Device to program the target device.

Instance Manager

The Instance Manager pane provides a list of all ALTSOURCE_PROBE instances in the design and allows you to configure how data is acquired from or written to those instances.

The following buttons and sub-panes are provided in the Instance Manager pane:

Read Probe Data—Samples the probe data in the selected instance and displays the probe data in the

In-System Sources and Probes Editor pane.

Continuously Read Probe Data—Continuously samples the probe data of the selected instance and displays the probe data in the In-System Sources and Probes Editor pane; you can modify the sample rate via the Probe read interval setting.

Stop Continuously Reading Probe Data—Cancels continuous sampling of the probe of the selected instance.

Write Source Data—Writes data to all source nodes of the selected instance.

Probe Read Interval—Displays the sample interval of all the In-System Sources and Probe instances in your design; you can modify the sample interval by clicking Manual.

Event Log—Controls the event log in the In-System Sources and Probes Editor pane.

Write Source Data—Allows you to manually or continuously write data to the system.

The status of each instance is also displayed beside each entry in the Instance Manager pane. The status indicates if the instance is Not running Offloading data, Updating data, or if an Unexpected JTAG

communication error occurs. This status indicator provides information about the sources and probes instances in your design.

In-System Sources and Probes Editor Pane

The In-System Sources and Probes Editor pane allows you to view data from all sources and probes in your design.

The data is organized according to the index number of the instance. The editor provides an easy way to manage your signals, and allows you to rename signals or group them into buses. All data collected from in-system source and probe nodes is recorded in the event log and you can view the data as a timing diagram.

Design Debugging Using In-System Sources and Probes

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

17-8

Reading Probe Data

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Reading Probe Data

You can read data by selecting the ALTSOURCE_PROBE instance in the Instance Manager pane and clicking Read Probe Data.

This action produces a single sample of the probe data and updates the data column of the selected index in the In-System Sources and Probes Editor pane. You can save the data to an event log by turning on the Save data to event log option in the Instance Manager pane.

If you want to sample data from your probe instance continuously, in the Instance Manager pane, click the instance you want to read, and then click Continuously read probe data. While reading, the status of the active instance shows Unloading. You can read continuously from multiple instances.

You can access read data with the shortcut menus in the Instance Manager pane.

To adjust the probe read interval, in the Instance Manager pane, turn on the Manual option in the Probe

read interval sub-pane, and specify the sample rate in the text field next to the Manual option. The maximum sample rate depends on your computer setup. The actual sample rate is shown in the Current

interval box. You can adjust the event log window buffer size in the Maximum Size box.

Writing Data

To modify the source data you want to write into the ALTSOURCE_PROBE instance, click the name field of the signal you want to change. For buses of signals, you can double-click the data field and type the value you want to drive out to the ALTSOURCE_PROBE instance. The In-System Sources and Probes

Editor stores the modified source data values in a temporary buffer.

Modified values that are not written out to the ALTSOURCE_PROBE instances appear in red. To update the ALTSOURCE_PROBE instance, highlight the instance in the Instance Manager pane and click Write

source data. The Write source data function is also available via the shortcut menus in the Instance

Manager pane.

The In-System Sources and Probes Editor provides the option to continuously update each

ALTSOURCE_PROBE instance. Continuous updating allows any modifications you make to the source data buffer to also write immediately to the ALTSOURCE_PROBE instances. To continuously update the

ALTSOURCE_PROBE instances, change the Write source data field from Manually to Continuously.

Organizing Data

The In-System Sources and Probes Editor pane allows you to group signals into buses, and also allows you to modify the display options of the data buffer.

To create a group of signals, select the node names you want to group, right-click and select Group. You can modify the display format in the Bus Display Format and the Bus Bit order shortcut menus.

The In-System Sources and Probes Editor pane allows you to rename any signal. To rename a signal, double-click the name of the signal and type the new name.

The event log contains a record of the most recent samples. The buffer size is adjustable up to 128k samples. The time stamp for each sample is logged and is displayed above the event log of the active instance as you move your pointer over the data samples.

You can save the changes that you make and the recorded data to a Sources and Probes File (

.spf

). To save changes, on the File menu, click Save. The file contains all the modifications you made to the signal groups, as well as the current data event log.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using In-System Sources and Probes

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Tcl interface for the In-System Sources and Probes Editor

17-9

Tcl interface for the In-System Sources and Probes Editor

To support automation, the In-System Sources and Probes Editor supports the procedures described in this chapter in the form of Tcl commands. The Tcl package for the In-System Sources and Probes Editor is included by default when you run quartus_stp.

The Tcl interface for the In-System Sources and Probes Editor provides a powerful platform to help you debug your design. The Tcl interface is especially helpful for debugging designs that require toggling multiple sets of control inputs. You can combine multiple commands with a Tcl script to define a custom command set.

Table 17-2: In-System Sources and Probes Tcl Commands

Command

start_insystem_ source_probe get_insystem_source_ probe_instance_info

-device_name

<device name>

-hardware_name <hardware

name> read_probe_data read_source_data write_source_data end_interactive_ probe

Argument

-device_name

<device name>

-hardware_name

<hardware

name>

-instance_index

<instance_

index>

-value_in_hex

(optional)

-instance_index

<instance_

index>

-value_in_hex

(optional)

-instance_index

<instance_

index>

-value

<value>

-value_in_hex

(optional)

None

Description

Opens a handle to a device with the specified hardware.

Call this command before starting any transactions.

Returns a list of all

ALTSOURCE_

PROBE

instances in your design.

Each record returned is in the following format:

{<instance Index>, <source

width>, <probe width>, <instance

name>}

Retrieves the current value of the probe.

A string is returned that specifies the status of each probe, with the

MSB as the left-most bit.

Retrieves the current value of the sources.

A string is returned that specifies the status of each source, with the

MSB as the left-most bit.

Sets the value of the sources.

A binary string is sent to the source ports, with the MSB as the left-most bit.

Releases the JTAG chain.

Issue this command when all transactions are finished.

Design Debugging Using In-System Sources and Probes

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

17-10

Tcl interface for the In-System Sources and Probes Editor

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

The example shows an excerpt from a Tcl script with procedures that control the ALTSOURCE_PROBE instances of the design as shown in the figure below. The example design contains a DCFIFO with

ALTSOURCE_PROBE instances to read from and write to the DCFIFO. A set of control muxes are added to the design to control the flow of data to the DCFIFO between the input pins and the

ALTSOURCE_PROBE instances. A pulse generator is added to the read request and write request control lines to guarantee a single sample read or write. The ALTSOURCE_PROBE instances, when used with the script in the example below, provide visibility into the contents of the FIFO by performing single sample write and read operations and reporting the state of the full and empty status flags.

Use the Tcl script in debugging situations to either empty or preload the FIFO in your design. For example, you can use this feature to preload the FIFO to match a trigger condition you have set up within the SignalTap II Logic Analyzer.

Figure 17-3: DCFIFO Example Design Controlled by Tcl Script

altsource_probe

(Instance 0)

Write_clock s_write_req s_data[7..0] source_write_sel

D Q wr_req_in data_in[7..0] write_req data[7..0] write_clock read_req read_clock wr_full

Q[7..0] rd_empty data_out rd_req_in altsource_probe

(Instance 1) s_read_req

D read_clock

Q source_read_sel

## Setup USB hardware - assumes only USB Blaster is installed and

## an FPGA is the only device in the JTAG chain set usb [lindex [get_hardware_names] 0] set device_name [lindex [get_device_names -hardware_name $usb] 0]

## write procedure : argument value is integer proc write {value} { global device_name usb variable full start_insystem_source_probe -device_name $device_name -hardware_name $usb

#read full flag

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using In-System Sources and Probes

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Design Example: Dynamic PLL Reconfiguration

set full [read_probe_data -instance_index 0] if {$full == 1} {end_insystem_source_probe return "Write Buffer Full"

}

##toggle select line, drive value onto port, toggle enable

##bits 7:0 of instance 0 is S_data[7:0]; bit 8 = S_write_req;

##bit 9 = Source_write_sel

##int2bits is custom procedure that returns a bitstring from an integer

## argument write_source_data -instance_index 0 -value /[int2bits [expr 0x200 | $value]] write_source_data -instance_index 0 -value [int2bits [expr 0x300 | $value]]

##clear transaction write_source_data -instance_index 0 -value 0 end_insystem_source_probe

} proc read {} { global device_name usb variable empty start_insystem_source_probe -device_name $device_name -hardware_name $usb

##read empty flag : probe port[7:0] reads FIFO output; bit 8 reads empty_flag set empty [read_probe_data -instance_index 1] if {[regexp {1........} $empty]} { end_insystem_source_probe return "FIFO empty" }

## toggle select line for read transaction

## Source_read_sel = bit 0; s_read_reg = bit 1

## pulse read enable on DC FIFO write_source_data -instance_index 1 -value 0x1 -value_in_hex write_source_data -instance_index 1 -value 0x3 -value_in_hex set x [read_probe_data -instance_index 1 ] end_insystem_source_probe return $x

}

Related Information

Tcl Scripting

Quartus Prime Settings File Manual

Command Line Scripting

17-11

Design Example: Dynamic PLL Reconfiguration

The In-System Sources and Probes Editor can help you create a virtual front panel during the prototyping phase of your design. You can create relatively simple, high functioning designs of in a short amount of time. The following PLL reconfiguration example demonstrates how to use the In-System Sources and

Probes Editor to provide a GUI to dynamically reconfigure a Stratix PLL.

Stratix PLLs allow you to dynamically update PLL coefficients during run time. Each enhanced PLL within the Stratix device contains a register chain that allows you to modify the pre-scale counters (m and n values), output divide counters, and delay counters. In addition, the ALTPLL_RECONFIG IP core provides an easy interface to access the register chain counters. The ALTPLL_RECONFIG IP core provides a cache that contains all modifiable PLL parameters. After you update all the PLL parameters in the cache, the ALTPLL_RECONFIG IP core drives the PLL register chain to update the PLL with the updated parameters. The figure shows a Stratix-enhanced PLL with reconfigurable coefficients.

Design Debugging Using In-System Sources and Probes

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

17-12

Design Example: Dynamic PLL Reconfiguration

Figure 17-4: Stratix-Enhanced PLL with Reconfigurable Coefficients

Counters and Clock

Delay Settings are

Programmable

fREF scandata scanclk LSB

(1)

÷n

scanaclr

Δtn

MSB

(2)

PFD

÷m

Charge

Pump

LSB

Loop

Filter

Δt m

MSB

VCO

LSB

All Output Counters and

Clock Delay Settings can be Programmed Dynamically

÷g0

Δt g0

MSB

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

LSB

÷g3

Δt g3

MSB

LSB

÷e3

Δt e3

MSB

The following design example uses an ALTSOURCE_PROBE instance to update the PLL parameters in the ALTPLL_RECONFIG IP core cache. The ALTPLL_RECONFIG IP core connects to an enhanced PLL in a Stratix FPGA to drive the register chain containing the PLL reconfigurable coefficients. This design example uses a Tcl/Tk script to generate a GUI where you can enter in new m and n values for the enhanced PLL. The Tcl script extracts the m and n values from the GUI, shifts the values out to the

ALTSOURCE_PROBE instances to update the values in the ALTPLL_RECONFIG IP core cache, and asserts the reconfiguration signal on the ALTPLL_RECONFIG IP core. The reconfiguration signal on the

ALTPLL_RECONFIG IP core starts the register chain transaction to update all PLL reconfigurable coefficients.

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using In-System Sources and Probes

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Document Revision History

Figure 17-5: Block Diagram of Dynamic PLL Reconfiguration Design Example

50 MHz

Stratix FPGA

17-13

In-System Sources and Probes

Tcl Interface

JTAG

Interface

In-System

Sources and

Probes

Counter

Parameters f ref alt_pll_reconfig

Megafunction

PLL_scandata

PLL_scandlk

PLL_scanaclr

Stratix-Enhanced

PLL

E

0

C

0

C

1

This design example was created using a Nios

DE_dynamic_pll.zip

® II Development Kit, Stratix Edition. The file

sourceprobe_

contains all the necessary files for running this design example, including the following:

Readme.txt

—A text file that describes the files contained in the design example and provides instruc‐ tions about running the Tk GUI shown in the figure below.

Interactive_Reconfig.qar

—The archived Quartus Prime project for this design example.

Figure 17-6: Interactive PLL Reconfiguration GUI Created with Tk and In-System Sources and Probes

Tcl Package

Related Information

On-chip Debugging Design Examples

to download the In-System Sources and Probes Example

Document Revision History

Table 17-3: Document Revision History

Date Versio n

Changes

2015.11.02

15.1.0 Changed instances of Quartus II to Quartus Prime.

June 2014 14.0.0 Updated formatting.

June 2012 12.0.0 Removed survey link.

Design Debugging Using In-System Sources and Probes

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

17-14

Document Revision History

Date

November

2011

December

2010

July 2010

November

2009

Versio n

10.1.1 Template update.

Changes

10.1.0 Minor corrections. Changed to new document template.

10.0.0 Minor corrections.

9.1.0

• Removed references to obsolete devices.

• Style changes.

March 2009 9.0.0

No change to content.

November

2008

8.1.0

Changed to 8-1/2 x 11 page size. No change to content.

May 2008 8.0.0

• Documented that this feature does not support simulation on page 17–

5

• Updated Figure 17–8 for Interactive PLL reconfiguration manager

• Added hyperlinks to referenced documents throughout the chapter

• Minor editorial updates

Related Information

Quartus Prime Handbook Archive

For previous versions of the Quartus Prime Handbook

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Altera Corporation

Design Debugging Using In-System Sources and Probes

Send Feedback

Programming Altera Devices

18

2015.11.02

QPS5V3

Subscribe

Send Feedback

The Quartus Prime Programmer allows you to program and configure Altera ® configure your device, to test the functionality of the design on a circuit board.

CPLD, FPGA, and configuration devices. After compiling your design, use the Quartus Prime Programmer to program or

Related Information

Programming Devices

Programming Flow

Figure 18-1: Programming Flow

Start

Open Quartus Prime Software

Programmer

Hardware setup

Select programming/ configuration mode

Need to bypass another device in the chain?

No

Select programming/ configuration options

Start operation

Finish

Yes

Add device to Quartus Prime

Programmer

©

2015 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, ENPIRION, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX words and logos are trademarks of Altera Corporation and registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. All other words and logos identified as trademarks or service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html

. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.

www.altera.com

101 Innovation Drive, San Jose, CA 95134

ISO

9001:2008

Registered

18-2

Stand-Alone Quartus Prime Programmer

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

The following steps describe the programming flow:

1. Compile your design, such that the Quartus Prime Assembler generates the programming or configu‐ ration file.

2. Convert the programming or configuration file to target your configuration device and, optionally, create secondary programming files.

Table 18-1: Programming and Configuration File Format

File Format FPGA CPLD Configuration

Device

Serial Configuration

Device

SRAM Object File (.sof)

Programmer Object File (.pof)

JEDEC JESD71 STAPL Format

File (.jam)

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Jam Byte Code File (.jbc) Yes Yes Yes —

3. Program and configure the FPGA, CPLD, or configuration device using the programming or configu‐ ration file with the Quartus Prime Programmer.

Figure 18-2: Programming File Generation Flow

Quartus Prime Assembler

FPGA

.sof

CPLD

.pof

EPC or

.pof

.jam

.jbc

Quartus Prime Programmer

.cdf

Stand-Alone Quartus Prime Programmer

Altera offers the free stand-alone Programmer, which has the same full functionality as the Quartus Prime

Programmer in the Quartus Prime software. The stand-alone Programmer is useful when programming your devices with another workstation, so you do not need two full licenses. You can download the standalone Programmer from the Download Center on the Altera website.

Altera Corporation

Programming Altera Devices

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Optional Programming or Configuration Files

18-3

Stand-Alone Programmer Memory Limitations

The stand-alone Programmer may use significant memory during the following operations:

• During auto-detect operations

• When the programming file is added to the flash

• During manual attachment of the flash into the Programmer window

The 32-bit stand-alone Programmer can only use a limited amount of memory when launched in 32-bit

Windows. Note the following specific limitations of 32-bit stand-alone Programmer:

Table 18-2: Stand-Alone Programmer Memory Limitations

Application

32-bit Stand-Alone Programmer

64-bit Stand-Alone Programmer

Maximum Flash Device Size

Up to 512 Mb

Up to 2 Gb

Flash Device Operation Using PFL

Single Flash Device

Multiple Flash Device

The stand-alone Programmer supports combination and/or conversion of Quartus Prime programming files using the Convert Programming Files dialog box. You can convert programming files, such as Mask

Settings File (

.msf

), Partial-Mask SRAM Object File (

.pmsf

), SRAM Object Files (

.sof

), or Programmer

Object Files (

.pof

) into other file formats that support device configuration schemes for Altera devices.

Note the following device-specific file conversion limitations with use of the 32-bit stand-alone

Programmer:

Table 18-3: Stand-Alone Programmer File Conversion Limitations

Programming File Conversion

32-bit Programming File Conversion

64-bit Programming File Conversion

Device Support

All Supported Altera Devices Except Arria 10

All Supported Altera Devices

Related Information

Download Center

You can download the stand-alone Quartus Prime Programmer from this page.

Optional Programming or Configuration Files

The Quartus Prime software can generate optional programming or configuration files in various formats that you can use with programming tools other than the Quartus Prime Programmer. When you compile a design in the Quartus Prime software, the Assembler automatically generates either a .sof or .pof. The

Assembler also allows you to convert FPGA configuration files to programming files for configuration devices.

Related Information

AN 425: Using Command-Line Jam STAPL Solution for Device Programming

Describes how to use the .jam and .jbc programming files with the Jam STAPL Player, Jam STAPL

Byte-Code Player, and the quartus_jli

command-line executable.

Programming Altera Devices

Send Feedback

Altera Corporation

18-4

Secondary Programming Files

Secondary Programming Files

The Quartus Prime software generates programming files in various formats for use with different programming tools.

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Table 18-4: File Types Generated by the Quartus Prime Software and Supported by the Quartus Prime

Programmer

File Type

.sof

.pof

.jam

.jbc

JTAG Indirect Configuration File

(.jic)

Serial Vector Format File (.svf)

Hexadecimal (Intel-Format) Output

File (.hexout)

Raw Binary File (.rbf)

Raw Binary File for Partial Reconfi‐ guration (.rbf)

Tabular Text File (.ttf)

Raw Programming Data File (.rpd)

Generated by the Quartus

Prime Software

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Supported by the Quartus Prime

Programmer

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

(11)

Yes (12)

Quartus Prime Programmer GUI

The Quartus Prime Programmer GUI is a window that allows you to perform the following tasks:

• Adding your programming and configuration files.

• Specifying programming options and hardware.

• Starting the programming or configuration of the device.

To open the Programmer window, on the Tools menu, click Programmer. As you proceed through the programming flow, the Quartus Prime Message window reports the status of each operation.

(11)

(12)

Raw Binary File (.rbf) is supported by the Quartus Prime Programmer in Passive Serial (PS) configuration mode.

Raw Binary File for Partial Reconfiguration (.rbf) is supported by the Quartus Prime Programmer in JTAG debug mode.

Altera Corporation

Programming Altera Devices

Send Feedback

QPS5V3

2015.11.02

Editing the Device Details of an Unknown Device

18-5

Related Information

Programmer Page (Options Dialog Box)

Describes the options in the Tools menu.

Editing the Device Details of an Unknown Device

If the Quartus Prime Programmer automatically detects devices with shared JTAG IDs, the Programmer prompts you to specify the correct device in the JTAG chain.

If the Programmer does not prompt you to specify the correct device in the JTAG chain, then you must add a user defined device in the Quartus Prime software for each unknown device in the JTAG chain and specify the instruction register length for each device.

To edit the device details of an unknown device, follow these steps:

1. Double-click on the unknown device listed under the device column.

2. Click Edit.

3. Change the device Name.

4. Enter the Instruction register Length.

5. Click OK.

6. Save the .cdf.

Setting Up Your Hardware

The Quartus Prime Programmer provides the flexibility to choose a download cable or programming hardware. Before you can program or configure your device, you must have the correct hardware setup.

Related Information

Setting up Programming Hardware in Quartus Prime Software

Describes the programming hardware driver in