Service Manual
Level 3
Release 1
™
DIGITAL WIRELESS TELEPHONE
TDMA T2290/T2297
COMPUTER SOFTWARE COPYRIGHTS
The Motorola products described in this instruction manual may include copy-righted Motorola computer programs stored in semi-conductor memories or othermedia. Laws in the United States and other countries preserve for Motorola certain exclusive rights for copyrighted computer programs, including the exclusive right to copy or reproduce in
any form the copyrighted computer program. Accordingly, any copyrighted Motorola computer programs contained in the Motorola products described in this instruction manual may not be copied or reproduced in any mannerwithout the express written permission of Motorola.
Furthermore, the purchase of Motorola products shall not be deemed to
grant either directly or by implication, estoppel, or otherwise, any license under the copyrights, patents or patent applica-tions of Motorola,
except for the normal non-exclusive, royalty free license to use that
arises by operation of law in the sale of a product.
This manual is the property of Motorola. No part of this
manual may be duplicated in any form without the express written permission of Motorola. This manual must
be returned upon Motorola request
The information in this manual is subject to change without notice. No
guarantee is made for accuracy or thoroughness. This manual is intended as a training aid in conjuction with formal classes provided by
Motorola. Motorola takes no responsibility for the use of this manual
beyond its intended scope.
Motorola, the Motorola Logo and all other trademarks identified as such herein are trademarks of Motorola, Inc. All
other product or service names are the property of their
respective owners.
© Copyright 2000 by Motorola, Inc. All rights reserved
About This Manual
Scope of Manual
General Safety Information
This manual is intended for use by experienced technicians familiar with similar types
of equipment. It is intended primarily to support basic servicing, which consists primarily of mechanical repairs and circuit board
replacement.
Authorized distributors may opt to receive
additional training to become authorized to
perform limited component repairs. Contact
your regional Customer Support Manager for
details.
Model and Kit Identification
Motorola products are specifically identified
by an overall model number on the FCC label. In most cases, assemblies and kits which
make up the equipment also have kit model
numbers stamped on them.
Service
Motorola regional Cellular Subscriber Support Centers offer some of the Þnest repair
capabilities available to Motorola Subscriber
equipment users. The Cellular Subscriber
Support Centers are able to perform computerized adjustments and repair most defective
transceivers and boards. Contact your regional Customer Support Manager for more
information about MotorolaÕ s repair capabilities and policy for in-warranty and outof-warranty repairs in your region.
Portable Operation
DO NOT hold the radio so that the antenna
is very close to, or touching, exposed parts of
the body, especially the face or eyes, while
transmitting. The radio will perform best if
it is held in the same manner as you would
hold a telephone handset, with the antenna
angled up and over your shoulder. Speak directly into the mouthpiece.
DO NOT operate the telephone in an airplane.
DO NOT allow children to play with any
radio equipment containing a transmitter.
Mobile Operation (Vehicle Adaptor)
As with other mobile radio transmitting
equipment, users are advised that for satisfactory operation of the equipment and for
the safety of personnel, it is recommended
that no part of the human body shall be allowed to come within 20 centimeters of the
antenna during operation of the equipment.
DO NOT operate this equipment near electrical blasting caps or in an explosive atmosphere. Mobile telephones are under certain
conditions capable of interfering with blasting operations. When in the vicinity of construction work, look for and observe signs
cautioning against mobile radio transmission. If transmission is prohibited, the cellu-
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
iii
About This Manual
TDMA T2290/T2297
lar telephone must be turned off to prevent any transmission. In standby mode, the
mobile telephone will automatically transmit
to acknowledge a call if it is not turned off.
All equipment must be properly grounded
according to installation instructions for safe
operation.
Portable/Mobile Telephone Use and
Driving
Safety is every driver’s business. The portable
telephone should only be used in situations
in which the driver considers it safe to do so.
Use of a cellular portable while driving may
be illegal in some areas.
Refer to the appropriate section of the product service manual for additional pertinent
safety information.
iv
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
Service Manual
About This Manual
Specifications
Table 1.Overall System
Function
Frequency Range
Specification
TX (800MHz) : 824.04 - 848.97 MHz
Channels 1 to 799, fTX = 0.03 * N+ 825MHz
Channels 990 to 1023, fTX = 0.03(N-1023)+ 825MHz
RX(800 MHz): 869.04 – 893.97 MHz
Channels 1 to 799, fRX = 0.03 * N+ 870MHz
Channels 990 to 1023, fRX = 0.03(N-1023)+ 870MHz
TX (1.9 GHz) : 1850.01 – 1909.95 MHz
Channels 1 to 1999 fTX = 0.03 * N+ 1849.98MHz
RX (1.9 GHz) : 1930.05 – 1989.99 MHz
Channels 1 to 1999 fRX = TX + 80.04MHz
Channel Spacing
Channels
Duplex Spacing
Input/Output Impedance
Operating Voltage
Dimensions
Weight
Display
Analog RF Power Output
Digital RF Power Output
Automatic Power Control
30 kHz
832 (800MHz), 1999 (1.9 GHz)
45 MHz (800MHz), 80.04 MHz (1.9GHz)
50 ohms (nominal)
+3.6 to +4.1Vdc
120cc (Volume)
140 g
96 X 32 Graphic Matrix
0.316 Watts (25 dBm)
0.562 Watts (27.5 dBm)
9, 4 dBm steps
Table 2. EAMPS System
Function
Modulation Type
Frequency Stability
Duty Cycle
Audio Distortion
(transmit and receive)
FM Hum and Noise
(C-MSG weighted)
Voice Modulation
Transmit Audio Sensitivity
Receive Sensitivity
Adjacent and Alternate
Channel Desensitization
IM
Specification
FM
+ 2.5ppm
Continuous
Less than 5% at 1 kHz; + 8 kHz deviation
32 dB below + 8 kHz deviation @ 1 kHz
Maximum + 12 kHz deviation
9 kHz deviation (nom.) @ 97 dB SPL input @ 1 kHz
-116 dBm for 12 dB SINAD (C-MSG weighted)
-16 dB @ +30 kHz, -60 dB @ + 60 kHz
Greater than 65 dB
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
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About This Manual
TDMA T2290/T2297
Table 3. DAMPS System
Function
Modulation Type
Frequency Stability
Duty Cycle
Error Vector Magnitude
(π/4DQPSK mode)
Transmit Audio Sensitivity
Receive Sensitivity
Adjacent and Alternate
Channel Desensitization
IM
Specification
π/4DQPSK
+ 200 Hz
32.3%
Error Vector Magnitude [Digital] 12.5%
TOLR of –46 dB nominal
-116 dBm for 3% static BER
-116 dBm for 3% static BER
Less than or equal to 3% static BER
Table 4. Environment
Function
Temperature
Humidity
Vibration
Shock
vi
Specification
-30ºC to +60ºC
80% RH at 50ºC
EIA PN1376
EIA PN1376
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
Table of Contents
About This Manual ....................................................................................................................... iii
Scope of Manual ....................................................................................................................... iii
Model and Kit Identification ....................................................................................................... iii
Service ...................................................................................................................................... iii
General Safety Information ....................................................................................................... iii
Portable Operation ........................................................................................................................................ iii
Mobile Operation (Vehicle Adaptor) ............................................................................................................... iii
Portable/Mobile Telephone Use and Driving ................................................................................................... iv
Specifications ............................................................................................................................. v
Cellular Overview .......................................................................................................................... 1
Introduction ................................................................................................................................1
Control (Data) Channels ................................................................................................................................ 2
Voice Channels .............................................................................................................................................. 3
Signaling Protocol .......................................................................................................................................... 3
Analog Cellular ...........................................................................................................................5
Signaling Tone (ST) and Digital ST (DST) ....................................................................................................... 5
SAT (Supervisory Audio Tone) and DSAT (Digital SAT) ................................................................................... 6
DTMF (Dual Tone Multi-Frequency) ................................................................................................................ 6
Analog Cellular Signal Summary (AMPS and NAMPS) ................................................................................... 7
Going into Service ......................................................................................................................................... 8
Placing a Call (Mobile to Land or Mobile to Mobile) ....................................................................................... 10
Receiving a Call (Land to Mobile) ................................................................................................................. 11
Power Steps ................................................................................................................................................ 13
Hand-offs ..................................................................................................................................................... 13
Call Termination ........................................................................................................................................... 15
Digital Cellular ..........................................................................................................................17
Multiplexing ................................................................................................................................................. 17
FDMA (Frequency Division Multiple Access) ................................................................................................. 17
Digitizing Voice ............................................................................................................................................ 17
TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access) ......................................................................................................... 18
Digitization and TDMA ................................................................................................................................. 18
Digitization of Voltage ................................................................................................................................... 19
Conventional Radio ...................................................................................................................................... 19
TDMA Radio ................................................................................................................................................ 20
Accessories ................................................................................................................................. 21
TDMA EASY NAM Programming ................................................................................................ 23
Introduction ..............................................................................................................................23
User Mode Programming .........................................................................................................23
Programming Sequence ..........................................................................................................24
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TDMA T2290/T2297
Enter Programming Mode ............................................................................................................................ 24
Enter Security Code ..................................................................................................................................... 24
Enter Phone Number ................................................................................................................................... 24
Programming a second No. .......................................................................................................................... 24
If you make a mistake .................................................................................................................................. 24
TDMA Test Mode NAM Programming ........................................................................................ 25
Introduction ..............................................................................................................................25
Entering Test Mode NAM Programming ...................................................................................25
NAM Programming Steps ........................................................................................................25
NAM Data ................................................................................................................................26
User Mode Programming .........................................................................................................26
Test Mode NAM Programming Sequence ................................................................................27
Manual Test Mode ........................................................................................................................ 31
Introduction ..............................................................................................................................31
Entering Manual Test Mode .....................................................................................................31
Status Display Level ................................................................................................................31
Servicing Level .........................................................................................................................32
Test Procedures .......................................................................................................................... 35
Introduction ..............................................................................................................................35
Automatic Call-Processing Tests ..............................................................................................35
Analog Test Measurements .......................................................................................................................... 35
Digital Test Measurements ........................................................................................................................... 35
Test Connections .....................................................................................................................36
RF Cable Test ..........................................................................................................................37
To test the RF cable for proper loss: ............................................................................................................. 37
Set up for Analog call ...............................................................................................................38
Registration ................................................................................................................................................. 38
Page ............................................................................................................................................................ 38
Select CALL CNTL from the To Screen ......................................................................................................... 38
Origination ................................................................................................................................................... 38
RX Sensitivity Test (SINAD) .....................................................................................................39
Test Mode Commands: ................................................................................................................................ 39
Communications Analyzer Setup: ................................................................................................................. 39
TX Power Out Test ...................................................................................................................40
Test Mode Commands: ................................................................................................................................ 40
Communications Analyzer Setup: ................................................................................................................. 40
Test Mode Commands: ................................................................................................................................ 41
Communications Analyzer Setup: ................................................................................................................. 41
TX Maximum Deviation Test ....................................................................................................42
Test Mode Commands: ................................................................................................................................ 42
Communications Analyzer Setup: ................................................................................................................. 42
TX SAT Deviation Test .............................................................................................................43
Procedure .................................................................................................................................................... 43
Select CALL CNTL from the To Screen ......................................................................................................... 43
TX ST Deviation Test ...............................................................................................................44
Test Mode Commands: ................................................................................................................................ 44
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©2000 Motorola, Inc.
Service Manual
Table of Contents
Communications Analyzer Setup: ................................................................................................................. 44
Setting up for PCS TDMA Measurements ................................................................................45
Power up the PCS Adapter, after two beeps are heard power up the 8920B ................................................. 45
Setting up for PCS TDMA Measurements ................................................................................46
Set up for TDMA call ................................................................................................................47
Call Process ................................................................................................................................................ 47
Registration ................................................................................................................................................. 47
Select CALL CNTL from the To Screen ......................................................................................................... 47
Page ............................................................................................................................................................ 47
Origination ................................................................................................................................................... 47
MAHO Measurements .............................................................................................................48
Setting up the MAHO measurement ............................................................................................................. 48
Measuring MAHO ........................................................................................................................................ 48
BER Measurements .................................................................................................................49
PCS Mode Handset Commands: .................................................................................................................. 49
BER Measurement Procedure ...................................................................................................................... 49
TX Power Measurements ........................................................................................................50
PCS Mode Handset Commands: .................................................................................................................. 50
Digital TX Power Out Test Procedure ........................................................................................................... 50
TX Frequency Error Measurements .........................................................................................51
PCS Mode Handset Commands: .................................................................................................................. 51
TX Frequency Error Measurement Test ........................................................................................................ 51
EVM Measurements ...............................................................................................................52
PCS Mode Handset Commands: .................................................................................................................. 52
TX Frequency Error Measurement Test ........................................................................................................ 52
Disassembly ................................................................................................................................ 53
Introduction ..............................................................................................................................53
Recommended Tools ...............................................................................................................53
Battery Removal ......................................................................................................................54
Antenna Removal ....................................................................................................................55
Back Housing Removal ............................................................................................................55
Transceiver Board Removal .....................................................................................................56
Display Removal ......................................................................................................................56
Keypad Removal ......................................................................................................................57
Speaker Removal ....................................................................................................................57
Parts List ...................................................................................................................................... 59
Introduction ..............................................................................................................................59
Mechanical Explosion ..............................................................................................................59
General Description .................................................................................................................... 61
Antenna Circuit ........................................................................................................................61
RX Front End ...........................................................................................................................61
NADC IC ..................................................................................................................................61
TX Operational Description .....................................................................................................62
Power Amp Integrated 800 MHz or 1900 MHz IC ....................................................................62
Analog TX Audio Processing ...................................................................................................63
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
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TDMA T2290/T2297
Digital TX Audio Processing .....................................................................................................63
DSP Lucent 1629 .....................................................................................................................63
Stuart IC ...................................................................................................................................64
GCAP II ....................................................................................................................................64
Section B
Service Diagrams ....................................................................................................................... B1
Antenna Circuit ....................................................................................................................... B3
Front End IC(U10) ................................................................................................................... B5
ZIFSYNTH(U110) .................................................................................................................... B7
VCO ........................................................................................................................................ B9
TX Offset Oscillator ............................................................................................................... B11
Merlyn(U301) ........................................................................................................................ B13
Exciter ................................................................................................................................... B15
PA Circuit .............................................................................................................................. B17
RF Detect .............................................................................................................................. B19
Reference Oscillator ............................................................................................................. B21
DCI(U1800) ........................................................................................................................... B23
GCAP2(U1500) ..................................................................................................................... B25
Voltage Regulators................................................................................................................ B27
Charger ................................................................................................................................. B29
Audio Circuit .......................................................................................................................... B31
DSP(U1900) .......................................................................................................................... B33
STUART(U1907) ................................................................................................................... B35
Call Processor(U1000) .......................................................................................................... B37
Memory ................................................................................................................................. B39
B+ Disconnect/Backlight Driver ............................................................................................. B41
Keypad .................................................................................................................................. B43
Connectors............................................................................................................................ B44
Layout Side 1 ........................................................................................................................ B45
Layout Side 2 ........................................................................................................................ B46
x
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
Cellular Overview
Introduction
A cellular mobile telephone system divides
the service area into small, low power radio
frequency coverage areas called cells. A cellular system consists of a more or less continuous pattern of these cells, each having a
1 to 40 mile radius (typically 5 - 10 miles).
Within each cell is a centralized cell site with
an elevated antenna and a building. The
building houses a base station with transceivers and related control equipment for the
channels assigned to that cell. All the cell
sites within a system are then connected either by dedicated land lines, microwave links,
or a combination of both to a central control
site called the central controller or switch .
The switch controls the entire cellular system and serves as the interface between the
cellular telephone user and the landline network. Each cell site operates on an assigned
access channel, and may have any number
of paging and voice channels assigned to it.
Figure 1. Channel Assignments
A BAND
CHANNELS
Primary Control Channels (21):
Secondary Control Channels (21):
Voice Channels...
(395 AMPS / 1185 NAMPS):
313 - 333
688 - 708
001 - 312,
667 - 716, and
991 - 1023
B BAND
Primary Control Channels (21):
Secondary Control Channels (21):
Voice Channels...
(395 AMPS / 1185 NAMPS):
NOTE:
CHANNELS
334 - 354
737 - 757
355 - 666 and
717 - 799
In NAMPS applications, each AMPS voice channel
provides space for three NAMPS voice channels.
Digital cellular multiplexes voice channels to allow for the
possibility of several additional conversations on a single channel.
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
1
Cellular Overview
TDMA T2290/T2297
Introduction
are defined in Figure 1.
The cellular radio frequency spectrum has
been divided by the FCC into two equal segments or bands to allow two independent cellular carriers to coexist and compete in the
same geographic coverage area. Each band
occupies one half of the available channels
in the cellular spectrum. Initially there were
666 channels available across the entire cellular spectrum, but that number was expanded to 832 channels in 1987, and with
NAMPS to 2,412 channels in 1991. Digital
cellular promises to make a further expansion. To guarantee nationwide compatibility, the signaling channel frequencies have
been pre-assigned to each segment (band).
The two bands and their assigned channels
Originally the B Band was assigned to the
telephone company (referred to by a euphemism, the Wireline carrier). The A Band, by
default, was referred to as the Non-Wireline
carrier, guaranteed competition to the telephone company. Today the terms Wireline
and Non-Wireline have little meaning since
telephone company carriers now operate A
Band systems, and vice-versa.
Control (Data) Channels
A cellular telephone in the cellular system is
under the indirect control of the switch, or
central controller. The central controller uses
dedicated control channels to provide the sig-
Figure 2. US Cellular Frequency Band
US Cellular Frequency Band
832 channels
333
1023
991
001
A'
334
354
313
A
667
355
312
A
B
Band B
799
B'
A'
Voice
Channels
Control
Channels
667
2
717
716
A'
B
Band A
Voice
Channels
666
717
666
716
TDMA Secondary
Control Channels
688 - 708
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
799
737 - 757
Service Manual
Cellular Overview
Introduction
naling required to establish a telephone call.
Control channels are used to send and receive
only digital data between the base station
and the cellular telephone. Voice channels
are used for both audio and signaling once a
call is established. The 21 control channels
in each band may be dedicated according to
two different applications: access and paging channels.
The data on the forward control channel generally provides some basic information about
the particular cellular system, such as the
system ID and the range of channels to scan
to find the access and paging channels. Access channels are used to respond to a page
or originate a call. The system and the cellular telephone will use access channels
where two-way data transfer occurs to determine the initial voice channel. Paging channels, if used, are the normal holding place
for the idle cellular telephone. When a call
is received at the central controller for a cellular telephone, the paging signaling will
occur on a paging channel. In many systems
both control channel functions will be served
by the same control (access) channel for a particular cell. Only in very high density areas
will multiple control (paging) channels be required.
Primary control channels are used by all
types of telephones. Secondary control channels are only used by TDMA telephones, providing them with an improved probability of
locking onto a TDMA control channel.
Voice Channels
Voice channels are primarily used for conversation, with signaling being employed as
necessary to handle cell-to-cell hand-offs,
output power control of the cellular radiotelephone, and special local control features.
Data from the cell site (known as FORWARD
DATA) and data from the mobile or portable
(known as REVERSE DATA) is sent using
frequency shift keying. In AMPS signaling,
various control and response tones are used
for a variety of applications to be described
later. However, in NAMPS signaling, the signaling data and tones have been replaced by
sub-audible digital equivalents that constantly ride underneath the audio. And, of
course, in digital cellular, all signaling is digital.
Signaling Protocol
In 1983, when the Federal Communications
Commission (the FCC) licensed cellular telephony, the signaling protocol used was
AMPS. AMPS (Advanced Mobile Phone Service) was the invention of Bell Labs, the signaling protocol that was ultimately adopted
by all the governments of the entire Western
Hemisphere and, eventually, several other
governments throughout the world.
Today, with the implementation of Narrow
AMPS and TDMA, and the imminence of
CDMA, it may seem that AMPS is out of date.
The truth is that AMPS is very much alive,
at the very core of all these traffic expanding
alternatives to the original signaling protocol developed for conventional cellular telephony.
Under the original AMPS protocol there were
21 control channels assigned to each of two
possible carriers in any metropolitan area,
with a total of 333 channels assigned to each
carrier. Prior to 1987 the FCC had allocated
312 channels to voice (voice, DTMF, or data)
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
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Cellular Overview
TDMA T2290/T2297
Introduction
applications for each carrier. In 1987 the
FCC expanded the cellular spectrum (Expanded Spectrum) from a total of 666 channels to 832 channels, allowing for an increase
of 83 voice channels for each carrier. But the
number of control channels remained constant, 21 control channels for each carrier.
In 1991, responding to the demand for even
more voice channels, Motorola introduced
NAMPS (Narrow AMPS), expanding the
voice channels by a factor of 3, assuming all
subscribers are using NAMPS telephones.
But one thing remained constant, there were
21 control channels for each carrier.
between digital cellular and AMPS is that
all signals are digitized, including voice.
At a basic level, cellular telephony has two
divisions: analog cellular and digital cellular. In the following section, analog cellular
(AMPS and NAMPS) will be discussed. In
the succeeding section, digital cellular will
be treated.
In 1992, when Motorola tested its TDMA digital product, digitizing three communication
links on each of 395 voice channels, one thing
remained constant: there were still 21 control channels for each carrier.
Leaving the control channels more or less untouched is the key to allowing telephones that
are not capable of NAMPS or digital operation to have access to the system using the
conventional AMPS scheme. In virtually
every scheme (AMPS, NAMPS, or digital),
each control channel has a bandwidth of 30
kHz and uses the signaling protocol, with
minor variations for NAMPS and digital,
developed for conventional AMPS
The primary difference between NAMPS and
AMPS is that a NAMPS voice channel has a
bandwidth of only 10 kHz, whereas an AMPS
voice channel has a bandwidth of 30 kHz. In
addition, NAMPS does not make use of certain control and response tones on voice channels as does AMPS, but uses digital equivalents instead.
As the name implies, the primary difference
4
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
Service Manual
Cellular Overview
Analog Cellular
Analog Cellular
central controller (switch).
The simplified block diagram on page 1 - 7
illustrates an imaginary layout of one side
(Band A, or Band B) of a hypothetical service
area. The hexagons represent cells, and some
of the cell sites shown here also illustrate the
fact that an antenna tower and set of base
stations are associated with each site. In a
real world environment individual cells do
not have the hexagonal shape but may take
any form as dictated by the environment.
As illustrated(figure 3.) by the antenna tower
on the upper left, cell sites transmit overhead
messages more or less continuously even if
there are no mobiles or portables active
within that cell.
The cell sites are in communication with individual portable and mobile cellular telephones. These portables and mobiles may
move from cell to cell, and as they do they
are “handed off”under the supervision of the
Figure 3. Channel Assignments
The switch (center left) is in control of the
system and interfaces with the central office
of the telephone company. As illustrated by
the deskset telephones, the telephone company interfaces with the entire landline network.
The cell sites and the mobiles and portables
communicate through the use of data or, in
the case of AMPS, through the use of data
and tones. A complete analysis of data signaling is beyond the scope of this manual.
Refer to the Electronic Industries Association
standard EIA-553 for a thorough discussion
of AMPS signaling protocol, or to Motorola’s
NAMPS Air Interface Specification for
NAMPS.
The tones used in AMPS signaling are Signaling Tones and Supervisory Audio Tones.
NAMPS uses sub-audible digital equivalents.
Cellular
Switch
Telephone
Company
Central Office
Signaling Tone (ST) and Digital ST (DST)
In AMPS, signaling tone is a 10 kHz signal
used by the mobile or portable on the reverse
voice channel (REVC) to signal certain activities or acknowledge various commands
from the cell site, including hand-offs, alert
orders, and call terminations, and to indicate
switch-hook operation. Various burst lengths
are used for different ST activities. On
NAMPS channels ST is replaced by a digital
equivalent called Digital ST (DST) which is
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
5
Cellular Overview
TDMA T2290/T2297
Analog Cellular
the complement of the assigned DSAT.
SAT (Supervisory Audio Tone) and DSAT
(Digital SAT)
The Supervisory Audio Tone (SAT) is one of
three frequencies around 6 kHz used in
AMPS signaling. On NAMPS channels SAT
is replaced by one of seven sub-audible digital equivalents or vectors called DSAT. SAT
(or DSAT) is generated by the cell site,
checked for frequency or accuracy by the cellular telephone, then transponded (that is,
not merely reflected but generated and returned) to the cell site on the reverse voice
channel (REVC). The cellular telephone uses
(D)SAT to verify that it is tuned to the correct channel after a new voice channel assignment. When the central controller
(switch) signals the mobile regarding the new
Figure 4. Channel Assignments
SAT 0 (5970 Hz)
In general there are three uses of (D)SAT:
(a) it provides a form of squelch; (b) it provides for call continuation (but if equipped
for it, the switch will allow for VOX on all
models); and (c) (D)SAT is used to prevent
co-channel interference.
DTMF (Dual Tone Multi-Frequency)
DTMF (Dual Tone Multi-Frequency) touchcode dialing may also occur on voice channels. DTMF selects two tones from a total of
nine (cellular only uses seven of these tones /
four low and three high tones) to uniquely
represent individual keys.
Table 5. DTMF Values
Cellular System
SAT 1 (6000 Hz)
voice channel, it also informs the mobile of
the SAT frequency or DSAT vector to expect
on the new channel. The returned (D)SAT
is used at the cell site to verify the presence
of the telephone’s signal on the designated
channel.
SAT 2 (6030 Hz)
Key
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
*
0
#
327
320
329
333
324
322
332
328
326
326
330
331
140
119
98
77
56
319
318
324
326
313
198
177
156
135
114
143
122
101
80
330
140
119
98
77
56
Re-use
6
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
Low Tone
697
697
697
770
770
770
852
852
852
941
941
941
High Tone
1209
1336
1477
1209
1336
1477
1209
1336
1477
1209
1336
1477
Service Manual
Cellular Overview
Analog Cellular
Analog Cellular Signal Summary (AMPS
and NAMPS)
The diagrams on the following pages outline the various uses of the signals employed
in cellular systems. These signals include:
SAT (Supervisory Audio Tone) 5970 Hz, 6000
Hz, or 6030 Hz. Used in AMPS for channel reuse, muting audio (squelch), and call
continuation [typically ± 2 kHz deviation].
Digital SAT (DSAT) - One of seven codes or
vectors used in NAMPS for the same purpose as SAT [± 700 Hz sub-audible NRZ
data].
Data - Transmitted at 10 kilobits/second in
AMPS and 200 bits/second in NAMPS. Data
is used for sending System Orders and Mobile Identification. Do not confuse data with
the 10 kHz signaling tone. In AMPS, data is
transmitted as Manchester-encoded Frequency Shift Keying (FSK), where the carrier is shifted high or low 8 kHz, and the trailing edge transition is used to represent the
logic. In NAMPS, data is transmitted as NRZ
(Non-Return to Zero) FSK, where the carrier
is shifted high or low 700 Hz, and the frequency shift itself is used to represent the
logic.
Signaling Tone (ST) - A 10 kHz tone used in
AMPS for mobile ringing, call terminations,
hand-offs, and switch-hook operation [typically ± 8 kHz deviation]. ST is always accompanied by SAT.
Digital ST (DST) - One of seven digital
equivalents of ST used on NAMPS channels.
The transmitted DST is always the complement of the assigned DSAT [± 700 Hz subaudible NRZ data].
Audio - Includes microphone audio and
DTMF [maximum ± 12 kHz deviation AMPS,
± 5 kHz deviation NAMPS]. DTMF deviation should be measured on the radians scale;
use key five looking for 9 radians. Audio is
accompanied by SAT in AMPS signaling.
Figure 5. AMPS Deviation in kHz
AMPS Deviation in kHz
AMPS Voice Channels
±14
±12
±10
±8
±6
±4
±2
Control
Channels
SAT
SAT
Data
Signal
Tone
Audio
Data
SAT
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
7
Cellular Overview
TDMA T2290/T2297
Analog Cellular
Total deviation of two or more signals is cumulative.
Step 5.
Decision point. Can the overhead
message from the strongest control
channel be decoded? If not, go to
step 6. If it can be decoded go to
step 8.*
Step 6.
The telephone tunes to the second
strongest channel.
Step 7.
Decision point. Can the overhead
message stream be decoded? If not,
go to step 12. If it can be decoded,
go to step 8.*
Decision point. Does the decoded
System ID match the Home System ID programmed in the telephone? If not, go to step 9. If it
does match, go to step 10.
Going into Service
When first turned on, the cellular telephone
will scan through the nationwide set of forward control channels (FOCC’s) and measure
the signal strength on each one. It will then
tune to the strongest one and attempt to decode the overhead control message. From the
overhead message, the telephone will be able
to determine whether or not it is in its home
system, and the range of channels to scan for
paging and access. Telephones not in their
home system will be able to use other cellular telephone systems depending on the level
of service requested by the user. If paging
channels are used, the telephone next scans
each paging channel in the specified range
and tunes to the strongest one. On that channel the telephone continuously receives the
overhead message information plus paging
messages. At this point the telephone idles,
continuously updating the overhead message
information in its memory and monitoring
the paging messages for its telephone number.
Step 1.
The telephone powers up and runs
a self-test. The NoSvc indicator is
illuminated.
Step 2.
The telephone scans its preferred
system (A or B) as selected in programming.
Step 3.
The telephone scans all twenty-one
control channels.
Step 4.
8
The telephone tunes to the strongest control channel.
Step 8.
Step 9.
The telephone turns on the ROAM
indicator.
Step 10. The telephone turns off the NoSvc
indicator.
Step 11. The telephone idles. Typically a rescan occurs after 5 minutes.
Step 12. The telephone turns on (or leaves
on) its NoSvc indicator.
Step 13. The telephone switches to the nonpreferred system as recorded in
programming, and goes back to
step 3. The ability to return to step
3 can be disabled by some settings
of System Registration.
*The area between Decision point 5 and Decision point 8 can be quite active.
In a few larger systems, following the suc-
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
Service Manual
Cellular Overview
Analog Cellular
cessful completion of either steps 5 or 7, the
telephone scans a set of paging channels,
tunes to the strongest, and attempts to decode the overhead message train. The procedure is exactly equivalent to that followed
for the access (control) channel. Also at this
point, in a few larger systems, the telephone
is commanded to identity itself (transmit) and
thereby indicate its location in the system.
This is called Autonomous System Registration and, like paging channels, is used to improve paging efficiency.
If the system employs Narrow AMPS, part
of the overhead message stream is used to
ask the for activity on one of the secondary
or “digital” control channels, whereas a
CDMA telephone will look for pilot signals.
If digital signaling is not present, and if the
telephone is capable of dual mode operation,
it will default to AMPS mode.
Figure 6. Going into Serivce
Going Into Service
With a Cellular Telephone
1. Power Up / Self Test
Turn on No Svc Indicator
2. Scan Preferred
System (A or B)
3. Scan all 21
Control Channels
4. Tune to Strongest
Control Channel
5.
Receive
Overhead
Info
?
No
6. Tune to 2nd
Strongest Channel
7.
Receive
Overhead
Info
?
No*
Yes
Yes
Note: In order to turn on the
Roam light, the SID in the
overhead message stream must
NOT match the SID
programmed into the telephone.
8.
SID matches
Home SID
?
Yes
Note: In order to turn off
the NoSvc light, the
overhead message stream
must have been decoded.
No
12. Turn On
NoSvc Indicator
9. Turn on
Roam Indicator
13. Switch to
Non-Preferred System
10. Turn Off
NoSvc Indicator
11. Idle [Rescan
after 5 minutes.]
* In those telephones with Motorola Enhanced Scan, more than two control channels are sampled
before proceeding to step 12.
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
9
Cellular Overview
TDMA T2290/T2297
Analog Cellular
Placing a Call (Mobile to Land or Mobile to
Mobile)
When the cellular telephone user originates
the call, the cellular telephone re-scans
the access channels to assure that it is still
tuned to the strongest one. The cellular tele-
phone then transmits data at the rate of 10
kilobits per second on the control channel to
notify the switch of its mobile identification
number (MIN) and the number it wants to
reach. The switch verifies the incoming data
and assigns a voice channel and a SAT (or
DSAT for NAMPS channels) to the telephone.
Figure 7. Cellular Telephone to Land Call Processing
Cellular Telephone
The cellular telephone is
tuned to the access / paging
channel, and responds to
requests for data.
The cellular telephone user
dials a telephone number
and presses SND. The telephone rescans the access
channels for the strongest
signal. The telephone
sends out data, including
the dialed digits, MIN, ESN,
and NAMPS or digital
capability to the cell site.
Switch / Cell Site
DATA
FOCC
&
RECC
DATA
RECC
DATA
FOCC
The cellular telephone
receives the voice channel
assignment, drops the
access channel, tunes to the
voice channel, and
transponds the assigned
SAT or DSAT.
(D)SAT
Overhead data is sent out
on the control channels.
The cell site receives the
mobile-to-land call request.
The cell site sends the data to
the switch. The switch
verifies the MIN & ESN and
then sends out the call to the
landline network.
The local telephone
company processes the
telephone call.
The switch assigns a voice
channel and SAT or DSAT.
The voice channel assignment is sent to the cellular
telephone on the access
channel. The cell site sends
SAT or DSAT to the cellular
telephone on the assigned
voice channel.
FOVC
(D)SAT
REVC
The cellular telephone user
hears the landline ringing.
Landline Network
The cell site receives the
correct SAT or DSAT, then
unmutes the voice path.
VOICE + (D)SAT
The landline person being
called answers.
FOVC & REVC
Conversation in progress
Conversation in progress
10
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
Service Manual
Cellular Overview
Analog Cellular
The cellular telephone tunes to the assigned
voice channel and verifies the presence of the
proper forward SAT frequency (or DSAT message). If SAT (DSAT) is correct the telephone
transponds SAT (DSAT) back to the cell site
and unmutes the forward audio. The cell site
detects reverse SAT (DSAT) from the cellular telephone and unmutes reverse audio. At
this point both forward and reverse audio
paths are unmuted and the cellular telephone
user can hear the other end ring, after which
conversation can take place. SAT (DSAT) is
sent and received more or less continuously
by both the base station and the cellular telephone. However, SAT (DSAT) is not sent during data transmissions, and the cellular telephone does not transpond SAT continuously
during VOX operation. Also, DSAT is suspended during the transmission of DST.
Notice that SAT and Signaling Tones are only
used on AMPS voice channels, and that the
Signaling Tone is only transmitted by the cellular telephone.
site, the reception of SAT (DSAT) signals the
central controller that the cellular telephone
is ready for the call. An alert order is then
sent to the cellular telephone which responds
with a 10 KHz signaling tone (DST message).
The subscriber unit rings for 65 seconds or
until the user answers. Then the 10 KHz
signaling tone (DST message) is terminated
to alert the central controller that the user
has answered. The switch then connects the
incoming call to the appropriate circuit leading to the cell in contact with the cellular telephone. At this point both forward and reverse audio paths are unmuted and the conversation can take place. SAT (DSAT) is sent
more or less continuously by the base station and transponded by the cellular telephone, except during data transmission.
DSAT is suspended during DST transmission, and during VOX operation SAT (DSAT)
is not transponded continuously by the cellular telephone.
Receiving a Call (Land to Mobile)
Once a cellular telephone has gone into service, it periodically scans the overhead message information in its memory and monitors the paging messages for its telephone
number. When a page match occurs the
cellular telephone scans each of the access
channels and tunes to the strongest one. The
cellular telephone then acknowledges the
page on that access channel and thus notifies the central controller of its cell location.
The switch then assigns a voice channel and
a SAT (DSAT) to the cellular telephone. The
cellular telephone tunes to the voice channel, verifies the presence of the proper SAT
frequency (DSAT message) and transponds
the signal back to the cell site. At the cell
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
11
Cellular Overview
TDMA T2290/T2297
Figure 8. Land to Cellular Telephone Call Processing
Landline Network
The landline caller dials the
cellular telephone number.
The Public Service Telephone
Network (central office)
forwards the call to the central
controller (switch).
Switch / Cell Site
Cellular Telephone
DATA
Overhead data is sent out
on the control channels.
FOCC
&
RECC
The switch receives a call from
land. The switch pages the
cellular telephone. The page is
sent as data on the forward
control channel.
DATA
FOCC
DATA
The cell site receives the
acknowledgement and sends it
to the switch. The switch
verifies the ESN & MIN and
assigns a voice channel.
The cell site informs the
cellular telephone of the voice
channel and SAT (DSAT).
The cell site sends the SAT
(DSAT) on the voice channel.
RECC
(D)SAT
FOVC
(D)SAT
DATA
(D)ST +
(D)SAT
The cell site unmutes the
voice path.
VOICE + (D)SAT
FOVC & REVC
12
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
The cellular telephone
rings. While ringing, the
subscriber unit sends a 10
kHz signaling tone (DST
message) to the cell site.
REVC
(D)SAT
Conversation in progress
The telephone receives
the data and tunes to the
assigned voice channel,
then transponds
the SAT (DSAT).
REVC
FOVC
The cell site receives signaling
tone (DST message) from the
cellular telephone.
The cellular Telephone
decodes the data and
successfully reads its MIN.
The telephone scans the
control channels for the
strongest, then acknowledges the page by sending
it’s ESN, MIN, and NAMPS
or digital capability as data
on the control channel.
DATA
FOCC
The cell site receives the correct
SAT (DSAT) and alerts the
cellular telephone to ring.
The landline caller hears
ringing, busy, etc.
The cellular telephone is
tuned to the
access / paging
channel, and responds
to requests for data.
REVC
The cellular telephone user
answers by pressing SND
The signaling tone stops.
Conversation in progress
Voice path unmuted
Service Manual
Cellular Overview
Analog Cellular
Power Steps
As a call progresses, the cell site continuously
monitors the reverse channel for signal
strength.
Every cellular telephone has a number of
power steps ranging from full power (3 watts
in a mobile and .6 watts in a portable) down
to as low as about half a milliwatt. In reality all cellular telephones have eight power
steps, but portable models are prevented from
using the two highest power steps by the cell
site. Transmit power level commands are
sent to the cellular telephone as required to
maintain the received signal strength within
prescribed limits.
This is done to minimize interference possibilities within the frequency re-use scheme.
If the signal received from the cellular telephone is higher than the prescribed limit
(such as when the unit is very near the cell
site), the subscriber unit will be instructed
to step down to a lower level.
Hand-offs
If the cellular telephone is at its maximum
allowed power for the cell site it is using and
the received signal at the cell site is approaching the minimum allowable (typically -100
dBm), the cell site will signal the switch to
consider the subscriber unit for a hand-off.
The central controller (switch) will in turn
have a scanning receiver at each of the surrounding cell sites measure the cellular
telephone’s signal strength. The site with
the strongest signal will be the site to which
the call will be handed to if there are available voice channels.
On an AMPS channel the hand-off is executed
by interrupting the conversation with a burst
of data (called blank and burst) containing
the new voice channel assignment. The telephone acknowledges the order by a 50 millisecond burst of 10 kHz signaling tone on the
originally assigned voice channel. The mobile telephone then drops the original voice
channel and tunes to the newly assigned voice
channel, keying up on that channel and
transponding the assigned SAT. But on a
NAMPS channel the hand-off is executed
with a low speed data transmission that does
not interrupt the voice. The telephone acknowledges the order in this case by a DST
message. In either case, once the hand-off
has been accomplished, the newly assigned
cell site then alerts the switch that the handoff has been completed, and the old voice
channel is dropped.
It should be noted that this data exchange
happens very quickly, lasting only as long as
260 milliseconds. However, when data or
signaling tones are transmitted, audio is
muted for the duration of that transmission
and a syllable or two may be dropped from
conversation. This is normally not a problem, but during data signaling, such as that
employed for telefacsimile, answering machine, and computer communications, significant amounts of information may be lost. For
this reason it is recommended that when
THE Cellular Connection™ equipment is
used the vehicle should be stationary to avoid
data loss during hand-offs and other data
transmissions. Otherwise the equipment
should employ an error correction protocol.
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
13
Cellular Overview
TDMA T2290/T2297
Figure 9. Cell Site Handoffs
Cellular Telephone
Switch / Cell Site
Conversation in progress.
The voice path is unmuted.
VOICE + (D)SAT
The cellular telephone
acknowledges the handoff
request by sending a10 kHz
signaling tone for 50 msec or
a DST message. The voice
path is muted while sending
ST.
The telephone drops the
voice channel and keys up
on the new voice channel
frequency. The telephone
sends the newly assigned
SAT (DSAT).
Conversation in progress.
The voice path is unmuted.
FOVC & REVC
DATA
FOVC
(D)ST +
SAT
REVC
Conversation in progress.
The voice path is unmuted.
The cell site monitors the cellular
telephone's signal strength. When
the signal strength falls below the
allowed minimum (typically
-100 dBm at the highest power
step), the cell site informs the
switch of the need for a handoff.
The switch orders surrounding cell
sites to measure the cellular
telephone's signal strength. The
switch assigns a new cell site,
voice channel, and SAT (DSAT)
based on the highest signal
strength, and informs both cell
sites. The old cell site mutes the
voice path and sends a data burst
with handoff information to the
cellular telephone
The originally assigned cell site
receives the signaling tone
(DST) and informs the switch to
continue with the handoff.
The switch moves the landline to the
voice channel at the new cell site.
(D)SAT
REVC
The new cell site receives the
correct SAT (DSAT) and unmutes
the voice path.
VOICE + (D)SAT
FOVC & REVC
14
Landline Network
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
Conversation in progress.
The voice path is unmuted.
Service Manual
Cellular Overview
Analog Cellular
Call Termination
When the call is terminated by the landline
caller (not the cellular telephone user), the
central controller (switch) issues a release
order to the subscriber unit. The cellular
telephone acknowledges with a 10kHz signalling tone burst for 1.8 seconds and the
cellular telephone ceases transmission.
signalling tone burst for 1.8 seconds, indicating a call termination request to the switch.
In either case after call termination, the cellular telephone goes back to rescan the nationwide set of forward controlchannels and
repeats the Going into Service process it performed at first turn-on to re-establish itself
on a paging channel.
If the call was terminated by the cellular telephone user, the telephone generates a 10kHz
Figure 10. Cellular Telephone Call Processing Termination
Switch / Cell Site
Cellular Telephone
Conversation in progress.
Voice path is unmuted.
VOICE + (D)SAT
Landline Network
Conversation in progress.
FOVC & REVC
The cellular telephone user
hangs up or hits the END key to
terminate the call.
The cellular telephone sends a
1.8 second burst of 10 kHz
signaling tone or a DST vector
to the cell site, then stops
sending SAT (DST).
(D)ST +
(D)SAT
REVC
The cell site receives the
signaling tone (DST) and
notifies the switch of the
disconnect. The cell site
mutes the audio path on the
voice channel.
The switch 12
informs the TelCo
of the disconnect and the
landline is released.
The cellular telephone rescans
the access / paging channels
for the strongest signal and
decodes data. The cellular
telephone responds to
requests for data.
DATA
FOCC
&
RECC
The landline is released.
Overhead data sent out on
the control channel.
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
15
Cellular Overview
16
TDMA T2290/T2297
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
Service Manual
Cellular Overview
Digital Cellular
Digital Cellular
Multiplexing
Using a single frequency to carry two or more
communication links (e.g., conversations) is
called multiplexing. There are two types of
multiplexing that are feasible for cellular:
code division multiplexing and time division
multiplexing. Both code division multiplexing and time division multiplexing digitize
voice before transmitting the signal. Another
type of multiplexing, frequency division multiplexing, was briefly considered, then abandoned. We will deal with each type of multiplexing separately.
FDMA (Frequency Division Multiple
Access)
Frequency
Division
Multiple
Access
(FDMA) uses two or more modulated subcarriers to modulate a third true carrier simultaneously.
While as many as six communication links
can be accommodated on a single frequency
with FDMA, the bandwidth requirements are
enormous. Given the relatively small 30 kHz
bandwidth of cellular, FDMA was never a
contender for improving the load carrying
capacity of cellular systems. Also, it should
be pointed out that FDMA is not necessarily
digital.
Digitizing Voice
If a person speaks into a microphone, a transducer in the microphone converts the mechanical air movements produced by the
person’s vocal cords into varying voltages. If
an oscilloscope probe is connected to the output from a microphone, a varying voltage
Amplitude (voltage)
Figure 11. Digitizing Voice
Time
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
17
Cellular Overview
TDMA T2290/T2297
Digital Cellular
line, such as that shown in the accompanying illustration, will be produced.
audio.
TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access)
In the illustration on page 1 - 19 we saw how
speech could be sampled at some rate. Suppose we take only one of every three samples.
If our sampling rate is fast enough, and if we
can compress the samples, it turns out that
we can interleave several different conversations (communication links) on a single frequency. However, we also have to provide
some mechanism for ensuring that the transmitter and receiver are in synchronization,
and we have to provide for some alternative
to the control and response tones used in conventional AMPS. All of these non-voice signals are digital and take time from the assigned time slot, leaving only a relatively
small amount of time to represent voice. For
this reason the digital receiver has to filter
the audio to closely approximate the original
18
Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) today provides a times-3 increase in the number of communication links a channel can
carry (just like NAMPS). Eventually TDMA
is expected to take full advantage of all six
time slots, allowing for six communications
links in the bandwidth of a conventional
AMPS channel.
TDMA, like CDMA, employs a form of phase
shift keying to represent symbols. However,
TDMA also compresses the digitized signal,
making use of predictive algorithms to reduce
the number of symbols actually transmitted.
Digitization and TDMA
Here three conversations, represented by
Figure 12. Digitization and TDMA
A
Amplitude
If the varying voltages are sampled at some
rate, the instantaneous voltages can be quantified. Let’s say we want to quantify measurements from values of zero to 255 (the
maximum value a binary byte can hold). The
value of 255 would represent the highest possible voltage we could expect from voice, and
zero would represent silence. Each discrete
integer between zero and 255 would represent a particular voltage, typically presented
in binary form.Because of the redundancies
of speech and the inability of the human ear
to detect more than a fraction of the intelligence in speech, it is possible to sample a
small portion of the sound produced by a person speaking, reproduce that sound at either
a later time or another place, then filter the
resulting reproduction to produce a “sound”
that is indistinguishable from the original
source.
Time
B
C
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
Service Manual
Cellular Overview
Digital Cellular
voice samples as viewed on oscilloscopes, are
clearly shown to be nothing more than varying voltages produced by microphones. Instantaneous samples are discrete voltages.
It has been shown that if the sampling rate
is fast enough, it is possible to make a faithful representation of each conversation.
If these samples are then compressed, it is
possible for more than a single conversation
to occur on a single medium (such as a radio
frequency) by sharing time slots. Here we
see three conversations being shared on six
time slots. The conversations shown are compressed sampled analog audio, not yet digitized.
Figure 13. Slot Assignments
Slot
1
Slot
2
Slot
3
Slot
4
Slot
5
Figure 14. Digitization of Voltage
Slot Slot Slot Slot Slot Slot
1
2
3
4
5
6
2 volts
1.75 volts
1.5 volts
1.25 volts
1 volt
.75 volt
.5 volt
.25 volt
0 volt
A
B
C
A
B
C
The very first instantaneous sample has
an amplitude of .625 volts represented by
01001111 (79 decimal).
This instantaneous sample has an amplitude
of 1.125 volts represented by 10001111
(143 decimal).
Conventional Radio
Slot
6
Radio uses transmitters to convert speech to
radio energy and receivers to convert radio
energy back to speech. In conventional analog radio, speech is converted into varying
voltages called audio by a microphone. The
Figure 15. Convetional Radio
Microphone
A
B
C
A
B
C
Speaker
IF
Digitization of Voltage
A byte, consisting of 8 bits, holds 256 possible numbers (0 through 255). If the maximum voltage we might expect from our voice
samples is 2 volts, we can arbitrarily match
those voltages proportionally to our byte. The
result is a binary string representing voltages. We now have digital voice.
audio is mixed with a carrier frequency, amplified, and propagated through space as radio energy by an antenna. At the remote receiver an antenna converts the received radio energy to varying voltages at radio frequencies. The RF energy is beat against the
output from a local oscillator to produce a
difference frequency called the intermediate
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
19
Cellular Overview
TDMA T2290/T2297
Digital Cellular
frequency. The IF is processed in the IF strip,
which provides filtering and amplification.
A discriminator retrieves audio from the IF
and the varying voltages of the audio are used
to drive a speaker
TDMA Radio
TDMA radios use the same circuitry as analog radios, for the most part, but also have
additional circuitry to convert analog audio
to digitized form and vice versa, and to select the appropriate time slot.
Figure 16. TDMA Radio
101010101010101010101
101
010101010101010101010
010
101010101010101010101
101
010101010101010101010
010
101
Processing
Network
Processing
Network
ZIF
A/D
Slot selector
20
D/A
Slot selector
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
Accessories
STANDARD TRAVEL CHARGER
350 mAh Economy Travel Charger (Fixed Plug)
o Argentina ...................................................................................................................SPN4678A
o Australia ....................................................................................................................SPN4683A
o Brazil 220 ..................................................................................................................SPN4679A
o Brazil 110 ..................................................................................................................SPN4707A
o China .........................................................................................................................SPN4677A
o Euro 220 ....................................................................................................................SPN4682A
o India (Small 5 Amp) ..................................................................................................SPN4684A
o U.K. ............................................................................................................................SPN4680A
o U.S. ............................................................................................................................SPN4681A
VEHICLE POWER ADAPTER ...................................................................................... SYN8087A
o Provides virtually unlimited in-vehicle use.
o Conserves phone’s battery power while simultaneously
providing a rapid battery charge.
EASY INSTALL HANDS-FREE KIT .............................................................................. SYN8088A
o Easy -Install Hands Free Car Kit (Analog Audio)
o Includes Car Clip 2000 and Alligator Clip 2000
HEADSET
o Headset (Mono) .........................................................................................................SYN6962A
o Retractable Headset (Mono) .....................................................................................SYN8284A
o Headset with Boom Microphone (Mono) ..................................................................SYN8146A
BELT CLIP
o Universal Belt Clip (spinning)..................................................................................SYN7158A
o Universal Belt Clip (locking) ....................................................................................SYN8092A
PHONE CLIPS
o Shark “Z Look” Phone Clip .......................................................................................SYN8523A
o Shark “R Look” Phone Clip ..................................................................................... SYN85234A
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
21
Accessories
TDMA T2290/T2297
BATTERY DOORS
o Battery Door - Z Look (Black) ...................................................................................SHN7282A
o Battery Door - R Look (PUTTY GRAY) ....................................................................SHN7476A
o Battery Door - R Look (GUNMTL BLACK) .............................................................SHN7477A
o Battery Door - R Look (METALLIC ORANGE) .......................................................SHN7478A
BATTERIES
o AAA Long Battery 700 mAh NiMH (Q/A: 3) - English ............................................SNN5518A
o AAA Long Battery 700 mAh NiMH (Q/A: 3) - China...............................................SNN5541A
o AAA Long Battery 700 mAh NiMH (Q/A: 3) - Enlish/Port./Span. ..........................SNN5542A
Note: Q/A = Quantity per Assembly
IN-VEHICLE CLIPS
o Car Clip compatible w/Belt Clip-On System ...........................................................SYN8184A
o Alligator Clip compatible w/Belt Clip-On System ...................................................SYN8185A
o Car Clip 2000 (compatible with Shark Belt Clip-On System) ................................SYN8525A
o Alligator Clip 2000 (compatible with Shark Belt Clip-On System) ........................SYN8526A
* The use of wireless devices and their accessories (“devices”) may be prohibited or restricted in certain areas.
Always obey the laws and regulations on the use of these devices.
** All talk and standby times are approximate and depend on network configuration, signal strength and features selected.
Talk times and standby times are lower when in analog mode.
22
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
TDMA Easy NAM
Programming
Introduction
programming steps for User Mode NAM programming.
The Number Assignment Module (NAM) is
a section of memory that retains information
about the phone’s characteristics, such as the
assigned telephone number, system identification number, and options information.
User Mode NAM programming steps are different from Test Mode NAM programming
steps, and do not include all of the option bits
available in Test Mode NAM programming.
Two methods are available to program the
NAM using the keypad: Test Mode and User
Mode.
Regardless of the method used, the NAM
must be programmed before the phone can
be placed into service. This chapter covers
the NAM Programming steps for Easy NAM
Programming which is the preferred programming method
Access to User Mode NAM programming can
be disabled by Test Mode NAM programming
step 11, bit C7. Detailed description on Test
Mode NAM Programming can be found in
the TDMA Test Mode Nam Programming
section of this manual.
The following page describes the step by step
procedure for Easy NAM Programming,
which is the preferred programming method.
User Mode Programming
User Mode NAM programming requires a
special key sequence to enter, but can be accomplished through the telephone keypad
without the use of any specialized hardware.
The telephone number can be changed up to
fifteen times, after which the phone must be
reset in Manual Test Mode using the 32#
command (erasing all repertory memory and
initializing counters).
Some models may be available with a “User
Mode NAM Programming Manual” which
describes the entry key sequences and the
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
23
TDMA Easy NAM Programming
TDMA T2290/T2297
Programming Sequence
Programming Sequence
Enter Programming Mode Ê
Press #
, carrier system ID (from your Cellular Service
Provider), # , * , snd . Phone displays " NAM 1
Prog * = Yes # = No".
Ë Press
*
. Display prompts for Security Code "_ _ _ _ _ _".
Enter Security Code Ì Press 0+ , 0+ , 0+ , 0+ , 0+ , 0+ (factory set).
Phone displays ESN (Electronic Security Number).
Í Press snd . Phone prompts for Phone Number " Phon # _
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _".
Enter Phone Number Î Enter the entire Phone Number "_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _". Press SEND
Phone displays " NAM Program Begins ".
The phone will turn off. When you turn the phone back on,
the phone number will be programmed.
, #
Programming a second No. Press # , carrier system ID , # , 2
, * , SEND .
Continue with steps Ë - Î .
Be sure to check with the carrier of the second telephone
number for the system ID.
ABC
If you make a mistake
24
Try again will appear and you can re-enter the number.
Press
to erase a single digit or press and hold CLR
CLR
to erase the entire entry. Press snd when you are
finished.
©2000Motorola, Inc.
TDMA Test Mode
NAM Programming
Introduction
NAM Programming Steps
The Number Assignment Module (NAM) is
a section of memory that retains information
about the phone’s characteristics, such as the
assigned telephone number, system identification number, and options information.
Two methods are available to program the
NAM using the keypad: Test Mode and User
Mode.
There are 19 steps in the NAM. For each step,
the display shows factory default NAM data.
When new data is entered via the keypad the
display scrolls from left to right.
Regardless of the method used, the NAM
must be programmed before the phone can
be placed into service. This chapter covers
the NAM Programming steps for Test Mode
NAM Programming.
Entering Test Mode NAM
Programming
The recommended Manual Test Mode setup
for NAM programming phones are described
in “Entering Manual Test Mode”on page 33.
Refer to “Test Connections”on page 38to see
the recommended test setup for performing
Servicing Level manual tests.
The phone is in Status Display mode after
powering up in Manual Test mode. To enter
NAM Programming mode, first press the #
key for at least two seconds to suspend the
Status Display. Then enter 5 5 #. The phone
will now be in Step 1 of the NAM.
Use the * key to sequentially step through
the NAM data fields, entering new data as
required, or skipping past factory default
values for parameters that do not need to be
changed.
Table 6, “Minimum Required Test Mode
NAM Programming Steps”, shows the minimum required Test Mode NAM programming
steps. The programming steps not listed in
this table can be “stepped through”, retaining the factory default values for those steps.
Table 7, “Test Mode NAM Programming Sequence,” on page 3 lists all NAM programming steps, complete with parameters and
definitions.
Table 6. Minimum Required
Programming Steps
Service Type
Single NAM
Dual NAM Enable
Dual NAM
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Minimum
Required
Programming
1, 3, 4, 6, 9
11
1, 3, 4, 6
25
TDMA Test Mode NAM Programming
TDMA T2290/T2297
NAM Data
NAM Data
NAM Data is specified by the system operator. For most NAM steps, the information
specified by the system operator is the same
as the factory default data.
ferent from Test Mode NAM programming
steps, and do not include all of the option bits
available in Test Mode NAM programming.
Access to User Mode NAM programming can
be disabled by Test Mode NAM programming
step 11, bit C7.
The factory default System ID (step 01) and
User Telephone Number (step 03) must always be changed.
Other portions of the factory default NAM
data must sometimes be modified to conform
to special system requirements, or to enable/
disable certain features.
If a second phone number is to be programmed, step 11 C Option Byte, bit 6 must
be set to 1. This bit enables dual-NAM operation and will cause NAM program-ming
steps 1-6, 12, and 16 to be repeated for the
second phone number.
User Mode Programming
User Mode NAM programming requires a
special key sequence to enter, but can be accomplished through the telephone keypad
without the use of any specialized hard-ware.
The telephone number can be changed up to
fifteen times, after which the phone must be
reset in Manual Test Mode using the 32#
command (erasing all repertory memory and
initializing counters).
NOTE
Changed NAM values are not stored
until pressing * after Step 19 (Step 16
if a second phone number was entered.)
IMPORTANT
Consult with the System Operator
regarding NAM information. Incorrect
NAM entries can cause the phone to
Some models may be available with a “User
Mode NAM Programming Manual” which
describes the entry key sequences and the
programming steps for User Mode NAM programming.
User Mode NAM programming steps are dif-
26
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Service Manual
TDMA Test Mode NAM Programming
Test Mode NAM Programming Sequence
*
Advances to the next programming step; also programs the NAM after the last
programming step is entered.
CLR
Clears the entered information and displays previously entered data for the current programming step.
#
Exits the programming mode without programming the NAM.
Table 7. Test Mode NAM Programming Sequence
Step
Factory
Default
01
00000
02
10110101
(A7-A0)
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
03
0000000000
04
00
05
00
06
00
Description
System ID Number. Number assigned by system operator for system
identification.
A OPTION BYTE. The display for step 02 represents the status of eight
options, A7 through A0. Bit A7 (msb) is programmed first, followed by A6A0. Bits enter display on the right and scroll left.
Local Use (Bit A7). If set to 1 phone will respond to local control orders in
the home area or when the group ID is matched. Assigned by system
operator.
Preferred System (Bit A6). Applies to units capable of operating on two
service systems (A or B). 0 = system B; 1 = system A.
End-to-End Signaling (Bit A5). When enabled, the phone is equipped for
DTMF signaling during a call. 1 = enabled, 0 = disabled.
Authentication Enable (Bit A4). Enter 1.
Bit not used (Bit A3). Enter 0.
Auxiliary Alert (Bit A2). When enabled, the user can place an Extended
System in auxiliary alert mode and be notified of incoming calls via headlights, horn etc. 1 = enabled, 0 = disabled.
Bit not used (Bit A1). Enter 0.
MIN MARK (Bit A0). Supplied by system operator. When enabled the
user’s area code will be sent with each call initiated or answered. 1 =
enabled, 0 = disabled.
User 10 digit radiotelephone phone number. Number is assigned by
system operator.
Station class mark. A 2 digit number assigned by the system operator.
Indicates maximum power step, VOX capability, and number of channels
used.
Access overload class. Specifies the level of priority assigned to the phone
when accessing the system. Assigned by system operator.
Systems group ID mark. Specifies how many bits of the system ID are
compared during call processing. Assigned by system operator.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
27
TDMA Test Mode NAM Programming
TDMA T2290/T2297
Table 7: Test Mode NAM Programming Sequence (con’t)
07
000000
08
123
09
4
10
00000100
(B7-B0)
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
11
00001000
(C7-C0)
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
12
28
0334
Security code. A 6 digit number supplied by the user. This number is used
by the user to access or change “security” features such as the 3-digit unlock
code or the service level.
Unlock code. A 3 digit number supplied by the user. If the lock feature is
enabled by the user, the phone can be operated only by individuals who
know the unlock code.
Service level. This 3 digit number supplied by the user allows various call
placement restrictions if desired. 004 = no restrictions.
B OPTION BYTE The display for step 10 represents the status of eight
options, B7 through B0. B7 (msb) is programmed first followed by B6-B0.
Bits enter display on the right and scroll left.
Bit not used (Bit B7). Enter 0.
Bit not used (Bit B6). Enter 0.
Bit not used (Bit B5). Enter 0.
Bit not used (Bit B4). Enter 0.
Single System Scan (Bit B3). If set to 1, phone will scan only one system
based on the setting of the preferred system bit (option bit A6).
1=
enabled, 0 = disabled.
Auto Recall (Bit B2). When set to one, the user may access repertory by a
one or two digit send sequence (speed dialing).
Disable Service Levels (Bit B1). If set to 1, the service level (call
restrictions) cannot be changed by the user.
Lock Disable (Bit B0). When set to 1, the user cannot lock and unlock the
phone unit via the 3 digit lock code.
C OPTION BYTE The display for step 11 represents the status of eight
options, C7 through C0. C7 (msb) is programmed first followed by C6-C0.
Bits enter display on the right and scroll left.
User Mode NAM Programming Disable (Bit C7). When set to 1, User
Mode NAM programming cannot be accessed.
Second Number Registration (Bit C6). When set to 1, allows access to
the second phone number.
Bit not used (Bit C5). Enter 0.
Auto Redial Disable (Bit C4). When set to 1, the user cannot access the 6minute auto redial feature.
Speaker Disable (Bit C3). This bit is used to disable internal handset
speaker when adding V.S.P. option. 1 = handset speaker disabled, 0 =
handset speaker enabled.
Bit not used (Bit C2). Enter 0.
Selectable System Scan Disable (Bit C1). When set to 1, the user cannot
select the primary system.
Diversity Antenna Enable (Bit C0). (Extended systems only) 0 = Nondiversity, 1 = Diversity.
Initial Paging System. There are 4 significant bits for the initial paging
channel. For system A enter 0333 and system B enter 0334.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Service Manual
TDMA Test Mode NAM Programming
Table 7: Test Mode NAM Programming Sequence (con’t)
13
14
15
0333
0334
021
16
0737
17
18
19
0708
0737
10111011
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
Initial A system channel. To initialize system A enter 0333.
Initial B system channel. To initialize system B enter 0334.
Dedicated Paging Channels. Number of dedicated paging channels is 21.
Enter 021.
Secondary Initial Paging System. There are 3 significant bits for the
secondary initial paging channel. For system A enter 708 and system B enter
737.
.
Secondary initial paging channels are for digital applications, providing a
secondary scan for a digital channel.
Secondary Initial A system channel. To initialize system A enter 708.
Secondary Initial B system channel. To initialize system B enter 737.
D Option Byte. The display for step 16 represents the status of eight
options, D7 through D0. D7 (msb) is programmed first, followed by D6-D0.
Bits enter display on the right and scroll to left.
Enhanced Scan Enable (Bit D7). Enter 1.
Cellular Connection Enable (Bit D6). Normally set to 0.
Long Tone DTMF Enable (Bit D5). Normally set to 1.
Transportable Internal Ringer/Speaker Disable (Bit D4). When set to
0, audio is routed to the accessory speaker of the transportable. When set to
1, audio is routed to the handset speaker. Normally set to 1.
Eight Hour Time-out Disable (Bit D3). Normally set to 0.
Handset Test Mode Disable (Bit D2). Enter 0.
Failed Page Indicator Disable (Bit D1). When set to 1, the failed-call
tone alert feature is disabled.
Word Sync Scan Disable (Bit D0). Enter 1.
NOTE
If the second phone number bit is enabled, (step 11 C Option Byte bit 6),
then steps 1- 6, 12, and 16 are repeated.
To store NAM data press the * key
until the ’is displayed after step 19
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
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TDMA Test Mode NAM Programming
30
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
TDMA T2290/T2297
Manual Test Mode
Introduction
Status Display Level
Manual Test Mode software allows service
personnel to monitor the telephone status on
the display, and manually control tele-phone
functions via the keypad.
Status Display level is the power-up state in
manual test mode. In this level of manual
test mode the phone will place and receive
calls as normal, but the display shows two
lines of status information.
Manual Test Mode operates at two levels: 1)
Status Display level, which allows the phone
to operate normally while providing status
indications in the display; and 2) Servicing
Level, which disables normal call-processing
and allows commands to be entered through
the keypad to manually control operation of
the phone.
Entering Manual Test Mode
Manual Test Mode is entered by entering the
following keypad sequence:
FCN 0 0 * * T E S T M O D E STO
Once this key sequence is completed the Status Display screen appears. Press and hold
the # key for 2 seconds to enter in manual
test mode.
Figure 19: “Connections for PCS Testing”on
page 38 shows the recommended test setup.
The display alternates between the channel
number, RSSI status information, and primary status information:
•
SAT frequency
•
Carrier state
•
Signaling tone state
•
Power level
•
Voice/data channel mode
•
Audio states
•
DVCC and BER measurements
The format of this status information is
shown in Figure 17: “Test Mode Status Display (Analog Mode)” on page 35 and Figure
18: “Test Mode Status Display (Digital
Mode)” on page 36.
When dialing a phone number, the status
display ceases when the first digit of the
phone number is entered. The telephone
number is then displayed as it is entered.
When the Snd, End, or Clr button is pressed,
the status information display resumes. The
phone remains in Status Display Mode if the
# key is pressed momentarily.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
31
Manual Test Mode
TDMA T2290/T2297
Servicing Level
Servicing Level
The Servicing Level of Manual Test Mode
allows service personnel to manually control
operation of a phone by entering commands
through the telephone keypad. Parameters
such as operating channel, output power
level, muting, and data trans-mission can all
be selected by entering the corresponding
commands.
To enter the Servicing Level, press and hold
the # button for at least 2 seconds while in
Status Display level (power-up state of
manual test mode.)
In the Servicing Level, automatic call processing functions are disabled, and the phone
is instead controlled manually by keypad
commands.
Table 3, “Test Commands For Manual Test
Mode,” on page 23 lists the commonly used
manual test commands and the resulting display and telephone function for each command.
32
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Service Manual
Manual Test Mode
Figure 17. Test Mode Status Display (Analog Mode)
Status Display Line 1
}
}
}
Blank in Analog Mode
RSSI Reading
Blank in Analog Mode
Channel Number
Status Display Line 2
Transmit Audio Path
(Voice Channel)
Busy/Idle
(data channel)
0 = enabled/busy
1 = muted/idle
SAT Frequency (voice channel)
0=5970 Hz, 1=6000 Hz, 2=6030 Hz
3= no SAT lock
}
TX Carrier State
0 = carrier off
1 = carrier on
Signaling Tone (voice channel)
Word Sync Status (data channel)
0 = off, 1 = on/sync acquired
Blank
Receive Audio Path
0 = enabled
1 = muted
RF Power Level
Steps 0-7
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Channel Type
0 = voice channel
1 = data channel
33
Manual Test Mode
TDMA T2290/T2297
Figure 18. Test Mode Status Display (Digital
Status Display Line 1
}
}
Blank
1900 Channel
Assignment
RSSI Reading
800 Channel
Assignment
Call Processing Mode
1 = DAMPS half rate, slot 1
2 = DAMPS half rate, slot 2
3 = DAMPS half rate, slot 3
4 = DAMPS half rate, slot 4
5 = DAMPS half rate, slot 5
6 = DAMPS half rate, slot 6
7 = DAMPS full rate, slot 1
8 = DAMPS full rate, slot 2
9 = DAMPS full rate, slot 3
Blank
Status Display Line 2
}
}
Digital Verification
Color Code (1 - 255)
RF Power Level
Steps 0-7
Blank
Audio Paths
0 = enabled
1 = muted
TX Carrier State
0 = carrier off
1 = carrier on
Bit Error Rate
0-7
NOTE:
800MHz channels are displayed as three digits. Channel Numbers 1000-1023 are represented
on the display as A00-A23.
1900MHz channels are displayed as four digits (0002 to 1998).
34
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Test Procedures
Introduction
The phone allows keypad controlled testing
of various analog and digital operating parameters.
This chapter includes the keypad button
functions and recommended equipment
setup to use when testing a phone.
Automatic Call-Processing Tests
Most communications analyzers can simulate a cell site in order to perform automatic
call-processing tests. Automatic call processing tests can be performed while the phone
is in its power-up state. However, it is useful
to do the tests with the phone in Test Mode
Status Display.
Refer to the communications analyzer’s
manual for details about performing call-processing tests. The following call-processing
test sequence is recommended:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Inbound call, analog mode
Outbound call, analog mode
Analog-to-Analog channel handoff
Analog-to-Digital channel handoff
Inbound call, digital mode
Outbound call, digital mode
Digital-to-Digital channel handoff
Digital-to-Analog channel handoff
Handoffs should be performed between low,
middle, and high frequency channels, such
as, 991 (lowest frequency), 333 (middle frequency), and 799 (highest frequency). In digital mode slots 1 & 4, 2 & 5, and 3 & 6 should
be verified.
Analog Test Measurements
•
RX Sensitivity (SINAD)
•
RX Audio Distortion
•
TX Power Out
•
TX Frequency Error
•
TX Audio Distortion
•
TX Maximum Deviation
•
TX SAT Deviation
•
TX ST Deviation
Digital Test Measurements
•
Digital RX Sensitivity (BER)
•
Digital Power Out
•
TX Frequency Error
•
Digital Modulation Stability (EVM)
The analog and digital parameters are stored
in EPROM on the Transceiver Board. Each
transceiver is shipped from the factory with
these parameters already calibrated. However, if a board is repaired, these parameters
should be measured and, if necessary, adjusted. Checking and adjusting calibration
parameters is also useful as a troubleshooting/diagnostic tool to isolate defective assemblies.
©2000Motorola, Inc.
35
Test Procedures
TDMA T2290/T2297
Test Connections
The Zero Board test interface and an RF
adapter with a low loss RF cable is used to
interface with the communications analyzer.
Test Connections
The diagram below shows the recommended
connections for PCS testing when using the
HP83236B PCS Interface with the HP8920B
via Serial Port. Make sure to set the HP-IB/
Ser switch of the HP-IB Address Selector on
the rear panel of the PCS Interface to “Ser.”
A variety of communications analyzers may
be used. Refer to the analyzer manufacturer’s
user manual for proper setup before starting tests.
Figure 22. Connections for PCS Testing
HP83206A
83 20 6 A
T D M A C E L LU L A R A D A P T E R
Back View
RX TES T
dB
V
S IN AD
HP8920B
8
AC
Lev el
0.00
0. 00011
24
RF G en F r eq
AFg en 1 Fr eq
AFg en 2 Fr eq
Filter 1
AF G e n2 To
Filter 2
To
MH
z
S c re en
KH z
AF G e n1 To
Am pl i tu d
e
dBm
KH z
Atte n
Ho l d
E xt Load R
Ou tp u t
P or t
½
POW ER
HP83236B
83 2 36 B
P O W E R PC S I N T E RF ACE
T E ST SE T
FR O M DU P L E X O U T
1. 7 - 2 .0 GHZ UU T
TO AN T I N
RF I N / O U T
RE F RE F
IN O U T
RF OU T O n ly
HP-IB
OF F
SERIAL PORT
ON
TX
MCEL2000 sierra
RF Connector
2887920K01
CVC Power Cable SKN4834A
MI CRO T. A. C.
TEST
TEST
MODE
MOBILE
TX RX
Zero Bd pwr supply
SPN4029A
Test Cable
3080384L40
-SYEL TO POWER SUPPLY
-VBLK 4.5 VDC
+VRED 2A
+SGR N
Zero Bd-P3
SYN0223A
36
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Service Manual
Test Procedures
RF Cable Test
RF Cable Test
Figure 23. Duplex Test Screen
DUPLEX TEST
Tx Frequency
Off
Tx Power
-0.62
Tune Mode
Auto / Manual
Tune Freq
834.990000
MHz
Input Port
RF In / Ant
IF Filter
15 KHz
Ext TX key
On / Off
dB
dBm
Rf Gen Freq
834.990000
MHz
Amplitude
0.0
dBm
Atten Hold
On / Off
Output Port
RF Out / Dupl
To test the RF cable for proper loss:
AC Level
Off
SINAD
AF Gen1 Freq
1.0000
AFGen1 To
FM
Off
KHz
FM Coupling
AC / DC
Audio Out
AC / DC
AF Anl In
Audio I n
Filter 1
50 Hz HPF
Filter 2
15kHz LPF
DE Emphasis
750 us / Off
Detector
RMS
Off
To Screen
RF GEN
RF ANL
AF ANL
SCOPE
SPEC ANL
ENCODER
DECODER
RADIO INT
•
Tune Freq should be set to TX frequency: 834.990000 MHz.
•
RF Gen Freq should be set to
same frequency (834.990000 MHz).
•
Tx Power should be set to read in
dBm, not Watts.
More
In order to properly measure and adjust
the parameters of a telephone, it is important that you use RF cabling that has
minimal loss. Therefore, it is important
that you test the RF cable for proper loss.
This can easily be done by using the
DUPLEX TEST screen of your HP8920.
To test the cable, set up the DUPLEX
screen as shown above.
Action:
Take the cable under test and connect it
from the RF in/out port to the Duplex
Out port. At this point you will be getting some type of power reading for cable
loss.
If the reading you are getting shows gain
(positive number,) you may need to zero
the power meter. This may happen on
an HP8920 whose memory has just been
cleared.
To zero the meter, press the TX button
on the 8920 panel. Bring the cursor down
to the field under TX Pwr Zero where
it reads Zero. Tap the cursor on the Zero
field and it will highlight for a moment
as it zeroes the meter. Set up the screen
as shown above, and test your cable.
Good range: -.2 dBm through -.8 dBm
Bad cable:
More than -.8 dBm
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
37
Test Procedures
TDMA T2290/T2297
Set up for Analog call
Set up for Analog call
Figure 24. Call Control Screen
CALL CONTROL
Display
Data / Meas
Phone : 111-111-1111
ESN (dec) : 156-4460397
ESN (hex) : 9C440F6D
SCM : Class IV, Continuous, 25 MHz
Active
Register
Page
Access
Connect
Active
Register
Page
Handoff
Release
Order
Chng PL 0
MS Id
Phone Num
1111111111
Select CALL CNTL from the To Screen
System Type
DCCH
Cntrl Chan
334
Traffic Chan Assisgnment
Chan : Pwr Lvl : -
Amplitude
-50.0
dBm
SID
231
SAT :
212
0
5970Hz
•
•
To Screen
•
•
CALL CNTL
CALL CNFG
ANLG MEAS
SPEC ANL
DIG MEAS
More
Registration
1.
Put the Test Set in Active state
by selecting Active from the list on the
left side of the screen.
2.
Select Data from the Data/Meas
field. This is the default mode.
3.
Select Register from the list to
register phone.
4.
If the registration message has
been received, the Test Set will display
registration data in the upper half of the
screen as shown in the sample screen
above.
•
•
•
•
•
Select System type: AMPS
Zero the RF Power meter in the:
Call Config Screen
Set Amplitude to: -50 dBm
Set SID: Your phone’s System
ID
Select: Active
Voice Channel Assignment
Type:
Chan: 212
Pwr Lvl: 4
SAT: 5970Hz
or press SEND on the mobile to start the
conversation.
4
The Connect annunciator lights.
This is the Connect state.
Origination
1
Dial the desired phone number on
the mobile station and press SEND.
2
The Access annunciator will light
while the Test Set signals the mobile on
the assigned voice channel.
3
The connect annunciator will light
if the mobile properly signals the Test
Set.
Page
1
Select page from the list on the left
side of the screen.
2
If the mobile responds, you will
see the Access annunciator light briefly.
3
Answer the call by raising the flip
38
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Service Manual
Test Procedures
RX Sensitivity Test (SINAD)
RX Sensitivity Test (SINAD)
Figure 25. RX Test Screen
Communications Analyzer Setup:
RX TEST
SINAD
8
AC Level
dB
22.25
V
0.6336
24
-116.0
RF Gen Freq
879.990000
MHz
AF Gen1 Freq
1 . 0000
kHz
Amplitude
-116.0
dBm
Atten Hold
On / Off
AF Gen1 To
FM
8.00
kHz
AF Gen2 Freq
1 . 0000
kHz
RF Out
AF Gen2 To
FM
OFF
Filter 1
C message
15
Ext
Output Port
RF Out / Dupl
Filter 2
kHz LPF
To Screen
RF GEN
RF ANL
AF ANL
SCOPE
SPEC ANL
ENCODER
DECODER
RADIO INT
Load R
8 . 00
More
• Select RX button from the Screen Con
trol panel
• Set RX frequency to 879.990 MHz
• Set Amplitude to -116 dBm
• Set AF gen1 to 1 kHz frequency at
8 kHz deviation, using FM modula
tion (PLEASE NOTE: this is for AMPS
only; NAMPS uses much lower devia
tion)
• Set AF Filter 1 set to C message fil
tering
• Set AF Filter 2 to 15 kHz
Test Mode Commands:
11333#
08#
58#
474#
356#
Loads synthesizer to chan
nel 333
Unmute receive audio path
Turn on compandor
Set volume control to level 4
Set RX audio path to Ext. Au
dio Path
Sinad measured on the communications analyzer must be more than
12dB.
Duplex SINAD can be measured with the
same setup by entering 122# and the 05#
test command, which turns on the transmitter at power step 2. Narrow band
SINAD can be measured by entering
571# and setting the FM Deviation to
3kHz. Refer to the RX troubleshooting
section for radios not within the pass
specifications.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
39
Test Procedures
TDMA T2290/T2297
TX Power Out Test
TX Power Out Test
Figure 26. TX Test Screen
TX TEST
TX Frequency
MHZ
834.9900
Tx Power
27.49
Tune Mode
Auto / Manual
Tune Freq
834.990000
MHz
Tx Pwr Zero
Zero
KHz
11.58
AF Freq
dBm
KHz
1.00000
Input Port
RF In / Ant
AF Anl In
FM Demod
If Filter
230 KHz
Filter 1
50 Hz HPF
Ext TX Key
On / Off
Communications Analyzer Setup:
FM Deviation
dB
Filter 2
15 KHz LPF
AF Gen 1 Freq
1.0000
KHz
AF Gen 1 Lvl
6.00
V
To Screen
RF GEN
RF ANL
AF ANL
SCOPE
SPEC ANL
ENCODER
DECODER
RADIO INT
De-Emphasis
750 us / Off
Detector
More
Pk +- Max
Test Mode Commands:
11333#
12X#
05#
• Select TX button from the Screen
Control panel
• PWR is measured in dBm
• Set Frequency Measurement to auto
or manual (display will show TX Freq.
Error)
• Set TX frequency to 834.990 MHz
• Set IF filter to 230 kHz
• Set AF Filter 1 to 50 Hz
• Set AF Filter 2 to 15 kHz
• Set AF gen1 for 1 kHz frequency at
6V level (output will go to the audio
port)
Loads synthesizer to chan
nel 333
Set power level to step X,
where X is a power level
from 1 to 7.
Turns on transmit carrier
The TX Power Out specification for
each portable power level is as
follows:
Power Step 2
Power Step 3
Power Step 4
Power Step 5
Power Step 6
Power Step 7
25dBm - 29dBm
21.5dBm - 25.5dBm
17.5dBm - 21.5dBm
13.5dBm - 17.5dBm
9.5dBm - 13.5dBm
5.3dBm - 9.5dBm
Refer to the TX troubleshooting section
for radios not within the pass specifications.
Note: When taking measurements, remember to compensate for cable loss.
40
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Service Manual
Test Procedures
TX Frequency Error Test
TX Frequency Error Test
Figure 27. TX Test Screen
TX TEST
TX Frequency
MHZ
834.9900
Tx Power
27.49
Tune Mode
Auto / Manual
Tune Freq
834.990000
MHz
Tx Pwr Zero
Zero
KHz
11.58
AF Freq
dBm
KHz
1.00000
Input Port
RF In / Ant
AF Anl In
FM Demod
If Filter
230 KHz
Filter 1
50 Hz HPF
Ext TX Key
On / Off
Communications Analyzer Setup:
FM Deviation
dB
Filter 2
15 KHz LPF
AF Gen 1 Freq
1.0000
KHz
AF Gen 1 Lvl
6.00
V
To Screen
RF GEN
RF ANL
AF ANL
SCOPE
SPEC ANL
ENCODER
DECODER
RADIO INT
De-Emphasis
750 us / Off
Detector
Pk +- Max
More
Test Mode Commands:
11333#
122#
05#
• Select TX button from the Screen
Control panel
• PWR is measured in dBm
• Set Frequency Measurement to auto
or manual (display will show TX Freq.
Error)
• Set TX frequency to 834.990 MHz
• Set IF filter to 230 kHz
• Set AF Filter 1 to 50 Hz
• Set AF Filter 2 to 15 kHz
• Set AF gen1 for 1 kHz frequency at
6V level (output will go to the audio
port)
Loads synthesizer to channel
333
Set power level to step 2
Turn on transmit carrier
The frequency error measured on
the communications analyzer must
be less than ±1 kHz.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
41
Test Procedures
TDMA T2290/T2297
TX Maximum Deviation Test
TX Maximum Deviation Test
Figure 28. TX Test Screen
Communications Analyzer Setup:
TX TEST
TX Frequency
MHZ
834.9900
Tx Power
27.49
Tune Mode
Auto / Manual
Tune Freq
834.990000
MHz
Tx Pwr Zero
Zero
FM Deviation
dB
AF Freq
dBm
KHz
1.00000
Input Port
RF In / Ant
AF Anl In
FM Demod
If Filter
230 KHz
Filter 1
50 Hz HPF
Ext TX Key
On / Off
KHz
11.58
Filter 2
15 KHz LPF
AF Gen 1 Freq
1.0000
KHz
AF Gen 1 Lvl
6.00
V
To Screen
RF GEN
RF ANL
AF ANL
SCOPE
SPEC ANL
ENCODER
DECODER
RADIO INT
De-Emphasis
750 us / Off
Detector
More
Pk +- Max
• Select TX button from the Screen
Control panel
• PWR is measured in dBm
• Set Frequency Measurement to auto
or manual (display will show TX Freq.
Error)
• Set TX frequency to 834.990 MHz
• Set IF filter to 230 kHz
• Set AF Filter 1 to 50 Hz
• Set AF Filter 2 to 15 kHz
• Set AF gen1 for 1 kHz frequency at
6V level (output will go to the audio
port)
Test Mode Commands:
11333#
122#
05#
356#
10#
58#
Load synthesizer to channel
333
Set power level to power step
2
Turn on transmit carrier
Select External TX Audio path
Unmute TX Audio path
Turn on compandor
View FM Deviation for reading.
TX Maximum Deviation Pass Specifications: 9.8 kHz - 12 kHz.
42
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Service Manual
Test Procedures
TX SAT Deviation Test
TX SAT Deviation Test
Figure 29. Call Control Screen
Display
Data / Meas
Active
Register
Page
Access
Connect
Active
Register
Page
Handoff
Release
CALL CONTROL
TX Frequency
MHz
TX Power
dBm
AF Freq
27.49
MS Id
Phone Num
1111111111
KHz
6.00000
Voice Channel Assisgnment
Chan : Pwr Lvl : -
Ampli tude
-50.0
dBm
SID
231
KHz
1.890
834.9900
System Type
AMPS
Cntrl Chan
333
Order
Chng PL 0
Select CALL CNTL from the To Screen
FM Deviation
SAT :
212
2
5970Hz
To Screen
CA LL CN TL
CA LL CNFG
AN LG MEAS
SP EC ANL
DI G ME AS
• Select System type: AMPS
• Zero the RF Power meter in the:
Call Config Screen
• Set Amplitude to: -50 dBm
• Set SID: Your phone’s System ID
• Select: Active
• Voice Channel Assignment Type:
•
Chan: 212
•
Pwr Lvl: 4
•
SAT: 5970Hz
More
Procedure
1
2
3
Dial the desired phone number on
the mobile station and press
SEND.
The Access annunciator will light
while the Test Set signals the
mobile on the assigned voice chan
nel.
The connect annunciator will light
if the mobile properly signals the
Test Set.
View FM Deviation for the reading.
The transponded peak SAT FM deviation should be 2 kHz ±200 Hz.
The demodulated signal on the communications analyzer should have
an audio frequency of 6000 Hz.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
43
Test Procedures
TDMA T2290/T2297
TX ST Deviation Test
TX ST Deviation Test
Figure 30. TX Test Screen
TX TEST
TX Frequency
MHZ
834.9900
Tx Power
27.49
Tune Mode
Auto / Manual
Tune Freq
834.990000
MHz
Tx Pwr Zero
Zero
KHz
7.890
AF Freq
dBm
KHz
10.0000
Input Port
RF In / Ant
AF Anl In
FM Demod
If Filter
230 KHz
Filter 1
50 Hz HPF
Ext TX Key
On / Off
Communications Analyzer Setup :
FM Deviation
dB
Filter 2
15 KHz LPF
AF Gen 1 Freq
1.0000
KHz
AF Gen 1 Lvl
6.00
V
To Screen
RF GEN
RF ANL
AF ANL
SCOPE
SPEC ANL
ENCODER
DECODER
RADIO INT
De-Emphasis
750 us / Off
Detector
More
Pk +- Max
Test Mode Commands:
11333#
122#
05#
14#
• Select TX button from the Screen Con
trol panel
• PWR is measured in dBm
• Set Frequency Measurement to auto
or manual (display will show TX Freq.
Error)
• Set TX frequency to 834.990 MHz
• Set IF filter to 230 kHz
• Set AF Filter 1 to 50 Hz
• Set AF Filter 2 to 15 kHz
• Set AF gen1 for 1 kHz frequency at
6V level (output will go to the audio
port)
Load synthesizer to channel
333
Set power level to power step
2
Turn on transmit carrier
Enable signaling tone
View FM Deviation for reading.
The peak ST deviation measured on
the communications analyzer
should be 8 kHz ±800 Hz deviation.
The demodulated signal on the communications analyzer should have
an audio frequency of 10 kHz.
44
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Service Manual
Test Procedures
Setting up for PCS TDMA Measurements
Setting up for PCS TDMA Measurements
Figure 31. Configure Screen
RX/TX Cntl
Auto / Manual
Carrier / PTT
RF Offset
ON / Off
(Gen) - (Anl)
0.000000
MHz
RF Gen Volts
50 ohm / emf
Range Hold
Auto All
Hold All
State : Auto
Notch Coupl
RF Gen1 None
CONFIGURE
RF Display
Freq / Chan
Intensity
8
Beeper
Quiet
RF Chan Std
MS AMPS
Low Battery
10 min
User Def
Base Freq.
800.000000
MHz
Date
072099
MMDDYY
RF Level
Offset
On / Off
PCS RF I/O
0.0
dB
Total RAM
928kB
RF GEN
RF ANL
AF ANL
SCOPE
SPEC ANL
ENCODER
DECODER
RADIO INT
SERVICE
(Gen) - (Anl)
45.000000
MHz
PCS Mode
Off / On
Power up the PCS Adapter, after two
beeps are heard power up the 8920B
1
Serial No.
US35360396
To Screen
Chan Space
30.0000
KHz
Time
10.38
HH.MM
Firmware
B.05.04
2
3
Go to the Configure screen on the
8920B (press blue shift key and then
the Config/Duplex key).
Turn PCS mode to On.
Go to the Call Cntrl Screen by select
ing More and then Call Cntrl from list.
More
Set PC Mode to “On”
Figure 32. Call Control Screen
CALL CONTROL
Display
Data / Meas
Active
Register
Page
Access
Connect
Active
Register
Page
Handoff
Release
Cntrl Order
Send SMS
MS Id
Phone Num
1111111111
4
5
Phone : 111-111-1111
ESN (dec) : 156-4460397
ESN (hex) : 9C440F6D
SCM : Class IV, Continuous, 25 MHz
Protocol Version : IS - 136
Model (hex) : 4 SW (hex) : 1 FW (hex) : 4
System Type
DCCH
Cntrl Chan
42
Dig / Analog
US PCS
Amplitude
-50.0
dBm
SID
231
Traffic Chan Assisgnment
Type : Band : Chan : Slot :
Pwr Lvl : DVCC : -
DTC
US PCS
1
1
4
1
ACELP
Select Call Config 2 Screen.
In the MS Capab field select select US
PCS
To Screen
CALL CNTL
CALL CNFG
CALL CNFG 2
ANLG MEAS
SPEC ANL
AUTHEN
DIG MEAS
Voc : More
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
45
Test Procedures
TDMA T2290/T2297
Setting up for PCS TDMA Measurements
Setting up for PCS TDMA Measurements
Figure 33. DCCH Call Configure II Screen
Num Voice
0
DCCH CALL CONFIGURE II
Temperature
Compensate
Num SMS
0
MS Capab
US PCS
5
In the MS Capab field select select US
PCS
Num Fax
0
Calling Num
To Screen
RF GEN
RF ANL
AF ANL
SCOPE
SPEC ANL
ENCODER
DECODER
RADIO INT
SERVICE
Calling Name
Name Size
0
Pres Type
Pres OK
Screen Ind
Not Scrn
More
Figure 34. Call Control Screen
CALL CONTROL
Display
Data / Meas
Active
Register
Page
Access
Connect
Active
Register
Page
Handoff
Release
Cntrl Order
Send SMS
MS Id
Phone Num
1111111111
46
Phone : 111-111-1111
ESN (dec) : 156-4460397
ESN (hex) : 9C440F6D
SCM : Class IV, Continuous, 25 MHz
Protocol Version : IS - 136
Model (hex) : 4 SW (hex) : 1 FW (hex) : 4
System Type
DCCH
Cntrl Chan
42
Dig / Analog
US PCS
Amplitude
-50.0
dBm
SID
231
Traffic Chan Assisgnment
Type : Band : Chan : Slot :
Pwr Lvl : DVCC : -
DTC
US PCS
1
1
4
1
ACELP
To Screen
6
On the Call Cntrl Screen under the
Cntrl Chan section select a digital control
channel and select US PCS in the Cellular
/ PCS field.
7
On the Call Cntrl Screen under the
Traffic Channel Assignment section in
the Band field select US PCS.
CALL CNTL
CALL CNFG
CALL CNFG 2
ANLG MEAS
SPEC ANL
AUTHEN
DIG MEAS
Voc : More
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Service Manual
Test Procedures
Set up for TDMA call
Set up for TDMA call
Select CALL CNTL from the To Screen
Figure 35. Call Control Screen
•
•
CALL CONTROL
Display
Data / Meas
Phone : 111-111-1111
ESN (dec) : 156-4460397
ESN (hex) : 9C440F6D
SCM : Class IV, Continuous, 25 MHz
Protocol Version : IS - 136
Model (hex) : 4 SW (hex) : 1 FW (hex) : 4
Active
Register
Page
Access
Connect
Active
Register
Page
Handoff
Release
Cntrl Order
Send SMS
MS Id
Phone Num
1111111111
System Type
DCCH
Cntrl Chan
42
Dig / Analog
US PCS
Amplitude
-50.0
dBm
SID
231
Traffic Chan Assisgnment
Type : Band : Chan : Slot :
Pwr Lvl : DVCC : -
DTC
US PCS
1
1
4
1
ACELP
To Screen
CALL CNTL
CALL CNFG
CALL CNFG 2
ANLG MEAS
SPEC ANL
AUTHEN
DIG MEAS
Voc : More
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Select System type: DCCH
Zero the RF Power meter in the: Call
Config Screen
Set Amplitude to: -50 dBm
Set SID: Your phone’s System ID
Select: Active
Traffic Channel Assignment Type:
Choose DTC to set up a Digital Traf
fic channel
Type: DTC
Chan: 1
Slot: 1
Pwr Lvl: 4
DVCC: 1
Call Process
shown in the sample screen above.
The following 4 steps need to be performed
prior to beginning registration test:
1.
Enter Test Mode using FNC 0, 0, *, *,
T, E, S, T, M, O, D, E, STO.
2.
Perform a 51# command in Test Mode
to clear the Historic List. Turn off the telephone.
3.
Connect the RF connector to the radio
and power on.
Page
Registration
1.
Put the Test Set in Active state by selecting Active from the list on the left side
of the screen.
2.
Select Data from the Data/Meas
field. This is the default mode.
3.
Select Register from the list to register phone.
4.
If the registration message has been
received, the Test Set will display registration data in the upper half of the screen as
1
Select page from the list on the left
side of the screen.
2
If the mobile responds, you will see the
Access annunciator light briefly.
3
Answer the call by raising the flip or
press SEND on the mobile to start the conversation.
4
The Connect annunciator lights. This
is the Connect state. Data to be displayed is
shown above.
Origination
1
Dial the desired phone number on the
mobile station and press SEND.
2
The Access annunciator will light
while the Test Set signals the mobile on the
assigned voice channel.
3
The connect annunciator will light if
the mobile properly signals the Test Set.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
47
Test Procedures
TDMA T2290/T2297
MAHO Measurements
MAHO Measurements
Figure 36. DCCH Call Configure Screen
DCCH DVCC
128
Setting up the MAHO measurement
DCCH CALL CONFIGURE
Country Code
1
310
# Neighbors
5
Channel
Zero
10
135
36
459
70
Downband
Off / On
Access Burst
Norm / Abbrev
Calling Num
RF Path
Bypass / IQ
Dig Signal
DTC Burst
Norm / Shorten
2
Neighbor List
Power Meter
To Screen
CALL CNTL
3
4
CALL CNFG
ANLG MEAS
SPEC ANL
DIG MEAS
Select CALL CNFG from the CALL
CONTROL’s To Screen.
Set the number of neighbors (up to 6)
with the field # Neighbors.
Neighbor List Channel fields ap
pear below the # Neighbors field.
Set the channel number of each neigh
bor channel.
Std / NonStd
More
Figure 37. Call Control Screen
Display
Data / Meas
MAHO
Active
Register
Page
Access
Connect
Active
Register
Page
Handoff
Release
Order
Chng PL 4
MS Id
Phone Num
1111111111
Measuring MAHO
CALL CONTROL
RSSI - Curr Chan dB
>= -51
BER
%
< 0.01
System Type
DCCH
Cntrl Chan
42
Dig/Analog
Amplitude
-50.0
dBm
SID
231
Neighbor List
Channel
RSSI
10
<= -113 dBm
135
<= -113 dBm
36
-89 dBm
459
<= -113 dBm
70
<= -113 dBm
Traffic Chan Assisgnment
Type : Chan : Slot :
Pwr Lvl : DVCC : -
DTC
To Screen
2
3
CALL CNTL
1
1
4
1
CALL CNFG
ANLG MEAS
SPEC ANL
DIG MEAS
More
MAHO (Mobile Assisted HandOff) is actually a measurement, not a handoff. The reported results are used by a base station to
select the channel for the handoff.
The mobile performs the measurements, and
48
1
4
5
From CALL CONTROL screen, set
up a call (Test Set must be in Connect
mode).
Select Meas from the Data / Meas
field.
Select the field that has appeared be
low Data / Meas.
Select MAHO from the list of choices.
The RSSI and BER of the current
channel are reported, as well as the
RSSI of the designated neighbor chan
nels.
them reports the results back to the base station. The mobile measures the RSSI of
neighboring channels, as instructed by the
base station. It also measures and reports
the RSSI and BER of the current channel.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Service Manual
Test Procedures
BER Measurements
BER Measurements
Figure 37. Digital Measurements Screen
BER Measurement Procedure
DIGITAL MEASUREMENTS
DTC Meas
BER
Arm
Disarm
Loopback BER
%
2.8995
1
2
Bits Read: 10140
Ampli tude
-110.0
dBm
CALL CNTL
333
Slot
1
DVCC
1
BER Bits
10000
Trig Type
2x Frame
3
To Screen
Traffic Chan
CALL CNFG
ANLG MEAS
SPEC ANL
DIG MEAS
Cntrl Chan
42
DCCH DVCC
128
More
PCS Mode Handset Commands:
1
2
3
4
5
6
Enter 576# (Loopback mode)
11333# (Loads Synthesizer Channel)
Display prompt “Y” (enter desired
time slot, for this test enter 1)
Display prompt “Y” (enter band, 0 =
800, 1 = 1900)
Set power level to step 2 (122#)
Turn on transmitt carrier (05#)
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
Make sure the Test Set is in Active
mode.
Select DIG MEAS from the To
Screen menu.
Select the DTC Meas field to display
a list of available tests.
Select BER from the list.
Enter the number of bits to be mea
sured in the BER Bits field. (Note: the
number of bits actually read will be
calculated in whole frames.)
Amplitude should be set to -110 dBm.
Traffic Chan to 333.
Slot to 1.
DVCC to 1.
Cntrl Chan to 42.
DCCH DVCC to 128.
Put the mobile into test mode and en
ter the proper test commands for BER
reading.
Select ARM.
After the actual number of bits has
been transmitted and received, the
BER should be displayed.
The BER measured on the communications
analyzer must be less than or equal to 3%.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
49
Test Procedures
TDMA T2290/T2297
TX Power Measurements
TX Power Measurements
Figure 38. Digital Measurements Screen
DTC Meas
Avg Power
Digital TX Power Out Test Procedure
DIGITAL MEASUREMENTS
Average Power
1
dBm
24.1898
2
3
Amplitude
-50.0
dBm
TX Pwr Det
CW Mode
To Screen
Traffic Chan
333
Slot
1
CALL CNTL
CALL CNFG
ANLG MEAS
SPEC ANL
DIG MEAS
DVCC
1
Trig Type
2X Frame
More
4
5
6
7
Make sure the Test Set is in Active
mode.
Select DIG MEAS from the To
Screen.
Select the DTC Meas field. This
shows the To Screen with a list of
available tests.
Select AVG Power.
Traffic Chan should be set to 333.
Put the mobile into test mode.
Make Digital TX Power Out measure
ments.
PCS Mode Handset Commands:
1
2
3
4
5
6
Enter 575# (Digital signaling mode)
11333# (Loads synthesizer Channel)
Display prompt “Y” (enter time slot)
Display prompt “Y” (enter band, 0 =
800, 1 = 1900)
Set power level to step 2 (122#)
Turn on transmitt carrier (05#)
Max Digital TX power out should be around
26 dB minus cable loss.
You can also use Digital Call processing to
make these measurements.
50
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Service Manual
Test Procedures
TX Frequency Error Measurements
TX Frequency Error Measurements
Figure 39. Digital Measurements Screen
TX Frequency Error Measurement Test
DTC Meas
EVM 1
DIGITAL MEASUREMENTS
Frequency Error
kHz
%
EVM
3.9683
0.0081
TX Power
dB
Peak EVM
11.6270
-2.35879
Amplitude
-50.0
%
2
3
To Screen
Traffic Chan
333
dBm
CALL CNTL
Slot
1
Pwr Gain
Auto / Hold
20 dB
1
CALL CNFG
ANLG MEAS
SPEC ANL
DIG MEAS
DVCC
1
Trig Type
2X Frame
4
5
6
7
Make sure the Test Set is in Active
mode.
Select DIG MEAS from the To
Screen.
Select the DTC Meas field. This
shows the To Screen with a list of
available tests.
Select EVM 1.
Traffic Chan should be set to 333.
Put the mobile into test mode.
Frequency error is displayed.
More
PCS Mode Handset Commands:
1
2
3
4
5
6
Enter 575# (Digital signaling mode)
11333# (Loads synthesizer Channel)
Display prompt “Y” (enter time slot)
Display prompt “Y” (enter band, 0 =
800, 1 = 1900)
Set power level to step 2 (122#)
Turn on transmitt carrier (05#)
The frequency error measured on the communications analyzer must be <200Hz.
You can also use Digital Call processing to
make these measurements.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
51
Test Procedures
TDMA T2290/T2297
EVM Measurements
EVM Measurements
Figure 40. Digital Measurements Screen
DTC Meas
EVM 1
Frequency Error
kHz
%
EVM
3.9683
0.0081
TX Power
dB
Peak EVM
%
11.6270
-2.35879
Amplitude
-50.0
TX Frequency Error Measurement Test
DIGITAL MEASUREMENTS
2
3
To Screen
Traffic Chan
333
dBm
CALL CNTL
Slot
1
Pwr Gain
Auto / Hold
20 dB
1
CALL CNFG
ANLG MEAS
SPEC ANL
DIG MEAS
DVCC
1
Trig Type
2X Frame
More
4
5
6
7
Make sure the Test Set is in Active
mode.
Select DIG MEAS from the To
Screen.
Select the DTC Meas field. This
shows the To Screen with a list of
available tests.
Select EVM 1. EVM 10 can also be
selected, it measures a 10 burst aver
age.
Traffic Chan should be set to 333.
Put the mobile into test mode.
EVM is displayed.
PCS Mode Handset Commands:
1
2
3
4
5
6
Enter 575# (Digital signaling mode)
11333# (Loads synthesizer Channel)
Display prompt “Y” (enter time slot)
Display prompt “Y” (enter band, 0 =
800, 1 = 1900)
Set power level to step 2 (122#)
Turn on transmitt carrier (05#)
The 10 burst average EVM measured should
be less than or equal to 12.5%.
You can also use Digital Call processing to
make these measurements.
52
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Disassembly
Introduction
Recommended Tools
Some troubleshooting and maintenance
procedures for cellular phones require
disassembly of the phone to gain access to
internal components. Reasonable care
should be taken to avoid damaging or
stressing the housing and internal
components during disassembly and
reassembly.
The following tools are recommended for use
during the disassembly and reassembly of
the TDMA Modulus 3.
• Anti-Static
Mat
Kit
(RPX-4307A);
includes:
q
Anti-Static Mat
q
Ground Cord
q
Wrist Band
• T6 Torx driver
CAUTION
Many of the integrated circuit
devices used in this equipment
are vulnerable to damage from
static charges. An anti-static
wrist band, connected to an antistatic (conductive) work surface,
must be worn during all phases
of disassembly, repair, and
reassembly.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
53
Disassembly
Antenna Removal
TDMA T2290/T2297
Telephone Disassembly
Antenna Removal
Use the thumb and index finger to
remove
the
antenna
using
a
counterclockwise twisting motion.
Battery Removal
1. Turn off the telephone.
2. While holding the phone firmly with
one hand, use the index finger on the
other hand to press the latch on the
battery cover.
3. Slide the cover back to release it from
the phone.
54
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Disassembly
TDMA T2290/T2297
Speaker Removal
4.Use the thumb and index finger to grab
the batteries and pull them out of the
telephone housing.
Back Housing Removal
1.Using a T6 Torx driver, unscrew the
five torx screws that attach the back
housing to the main body of the phone.
2.Carefully lift the back housing and pull
it off the main assembly.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
55
Disassembly
Keypad Removal
TDMA T2290/T2297
Transceiver Board Removal
While holding the phone firmly with one
hand, use the thumb, middle and index
fingers of the other hand to carefully
separate the transceiver phone from the
main assembly.
Display Removal
1. Lift the latches that hold the display in
place to separate the display from the
main board.
.
2.Carefully separate the display from the
main board, taking special care not to
damage the flex assembly.
56
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Disassembly
TDMA T2290/T2297
Speaker Removal
3.Using tweezers, lift the flex connector to
release the flex assembly from the main
board. Carefully lift the display from the
main board.
Keypad Removal
Lift the keypad from the front housing
using the thumb and index fingers.
Speaker Removal
Carefully pry off the speaker from the
front housing using tweezers.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
57
Disassembly
Keypad Removal
58
TDMA T2290/T2297
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Parts List
Introduction
Mechanical Explosion
Motorola maintains a parts office staffed to
process parts orders, identify part numbers,
and otherwise assist in the maintenance and
repair of Motorola Cellular products. Orders
for all parts listed in this document should
be directed to the following Motorola International Logistics Department:
The Mechanical explosion contains a table
of mechanical part numbers that may change
after publication of this manual. For an updated list of part numbers contact an AAD
representative at the numbers listed above.
Accessories and Aftermarket (AAD)
Schaumburg, IL, USA
The eletrical parts list provided in this
manual contains Motorola part numbers to
all the electrical components that exist in the
phone. The list is arranged in alphabetical
order by reference designator.
Domestic
Customer Service: 1-800-422-4210
Hours: 7am - 7pm US Central Time
International
Customer Service: 1-847-538-8023
Hours: 8am - 6:30pm US Central Time
When ordering replacement parts or equipment information, the complete identification
number should be included. This applies to
all components, kits, and chassis. If the component part number is not known, the order
should include the number of the chassis or
kit of which it is a part, and sufficient description of the desired component to identify it.
Electrical Parts
AAD will have available the most common
electrical components in their warehouse.
Electrical components like resistors and capacitors are not normally available in AAD’s
warehouse. If service centers require the purchase of components that are not available
AAD’s warehouse, call the AAD customer service line and place a request to have the component available. If there is a high demand
for a particular component, AAD will make
the components available for purchase.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
59
60
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
5009076E25
1585832K01
5009005J07
0103884K05
SPEAKER
REAR HOUSING
ALERT
REAR HOUSING
3
4
5
6
7
0509472U01
7288454K02
DISPLAY
2
ALERT GROMMET
8588448K01
ANTENNA
1
6
5
4
3
2
1
Figure 39. Mechanical Explosion
14
13
10
9
6
7
8
SPEAKER DISH
1504779Z01
*
4709038K01 *
SNN5542A
BATTERY
RIGHT SHAFT W/CVR
0309315B07
SCREW
4085941K01
SHN7282A
MYLAR
3285837K01
GRIP LEFT
DOOR BATTERY
7
8
9
21
20
14
15
13
12
11
ANTENNA
SPRING ASSY.
GRIP RIGHT
LENS
FRT. HOUSING
KEYPAD
MIC.
10
14
11
12
15
8585965H01
5509242E01
3285838K03
6185840K04
1585830K01
3885839K02
5009135L07
13
Parts List
TDMA T2290/T2297
Service Manual
Parts List
Reference
Designator
Part Number
Reference
Designator
Part Number
Reference
Designator
Part Number
A100
C1
C10
C100
C1000
C1001
C1002
C1003
C1004
C1005
C1006
C1012
C1021
C1022
C1023
C108
C109
C1093
C11
C111
C112
C113
C12
C1200
C121
C122
C124
C125
C126
C127
C128
C129
C13
C131
C132
C133
C134
C135
C14
C15
C150
C1501
C1502
C1503
C1505
C1506
39-89033K01
21-13743N26
21-13743N69
21-13743N22
21-13743M24
21-13741F49
21-13743E20
21-13743E20
21-13743M24
21-13743M24
21-13743M24
21-13743E20
21-13928P04
21-13743M24
21-13743M24
21-13743L17
21-13743A23
21-13743M24
21-13743N19
21-13743L17
21-13743N40
21-13743L05
21-13743N14
21-13928P04
21-13743N30
21-13743N30
21-13743E07
21-13743L01
21-13743L05
21-13743L11
21-13743L17
21-13741A59
21-13743N40
21-13741F39
21-13743E20
21-13743N50
21-13743L41
21-13743N26
21-13743L17
21-13743N34
21-13743L41
21-13928G01
21-13743N24
21-13743N24
21-13928K09
21-13928K09
C1507
C1508
C1509
C151
C1510
C1511
C1512
C1513
C1514
C1515
C1516
C1518
C1519
C152
C1520
C1521
C1522
C1523
C153
C1530
C1531
C1535
C1536
C1537
C1538
C1539
C1540
C1541
C1542
C1544
C1545
C1546
C155
C1550
C1551
C1552
C1553
C1562
C1563
C1564
C1570
C1571
C1572
C1573
C1574
C1575
21-13743E20
21-13928K09
23-11049A62
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743L17
21-13743L05
21-13743N50
21-13743E20
21-13928N01
23-11049A89
21-13743L01
21-13743N35
21-13743L01
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743N37
21-13928K09
21-13928K09
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13928N01
21-13743L11
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13928N01
21-13743E20
21-13743N40
21-13928N01
21-13743N26
21-13743N50
21-13743E20
21-13743E20
23-11049A62
23-11049A62
21-13928L05
23-11049A65
21-13743L41
21-13928N01
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
C1576
C1577
C1578
C1579
C1580
C1581
C1582
C1583
C1584
C1585
C1587
C1588
C1589
C1590
C1591
C1592
C1593
C1594
C1595
C1596
C1597
C1598
C16
C1700
C1701
C1702
C1800
C1801
C1802
C1803
C1804
C1805
C1806
C1807
C1808
C1809
C1810
C1811
C1812
C1813
C1814
C1815
C1816
C1817
C18853
C18860
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743E20
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743N26
21-13743N26
21-13743G26
21-13743F18
21-13743N24
21-13743E20
21-13743N24
21-13743N24
21-13743N24
21-13743N24
21-13743N24
21-13743N28
21-13743N40
21-13743M24
21-13743M24
21-13743M24
21-13743L41
21-13743E07
21-13743L25
21-13743N50
21-13743L41
21-13743L41
21-13743N16
21-13743E20
21-13743E20
21-13743E20
21-13743E20
21-13743A23
21-13743L41
21-13743E20
21-13743L41
21-13743L17
21-13743L41
21-13743L01
21-13743N50
21-13743N40
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
61
Parts List
TDMA T2290/T2297
Reference
Designator
Part Number
Reference
Designator
Part Number
Reference
Designator
Part Number
C18862
C18871
C18873
C18881
C18885
C18886
C18887
C18889
C18900
C18901
C18902
C18903
C18908
C18910
C18911
C18912
C18913
C18914
C18915
C1900
C1902
C1903
C1904
C1905
C1906
C1910
C1911
C2
C20
C202
C203
C204
C205
C21
C23
C24
C25
C251
C252
C253
C26
C261
C262
C263
C272
C273
23-11049A62
21-13743L41
21-13743N30
21-13743L17
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13740F27
21-13740F27
23-11049A86
21-13928L05
21-13928N01
21-13743N26
21-13743N26
21-13743B29
21-13743N40
23-11049A86
23-11049A86
21-13743G26
21-13743M24
21-13743M24
21-13743M24
21-13743M24
21-13743M24
21-13743G26
21-13743N50
21-13743L17
21-13743N20
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743L41
21-13743N40
21-04801Z18
21-04801Z12
21-13743N40
21-13743L17
21-13928C03
21-13743F16
21-13743L41
21-13743L17
21-13743L41
21-13743F16
21-13743L41
21-13743L27
21-13743L41
C274
C3
C30
C300
C302
C303
C304
C305
C306
C307
C308
C309
C310
C311
C312
C313
C315
C316
C317
C32
C33
C333
C334
C335
C339
C34
C342
C343
C35
C350
C351
C36
C37
C38
C389
C395
C399
C4
C400
C401
C402
C404
C405
C406
C407
C410
21-13743L41
21-13743N40
21-13743N03
21-13743N40
21-13743L17
23-11049A40
21-13743N50
21-13743L17
21-13743E20
21-13743N09
21-13743L17
21-13743L01
21-13743L01
21-13743N33
21-13743N33
21-13743L27
21-13741A61
21-13743N50
21-13743L27
21-13743N69
21-13743N18
21-13743N67
21-13743L41
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743L25
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743N30
21-13743N40
21-13743N03
21-13743N22
21-13743N40
21-13743N05
21-13743N30
21-13743L17
21-13743L17
21-13743L17
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743L41
21-13743N40
21-13743N24
21-13743N40
21-13743N28
21-13743N05
C411
C412
C413
C414
C425
C426
C427
C447
C452
C454
C455
C487
C499
C5
C501
C502
C503
C504
C505
C506
C508
C509
C51
C510
C511
C512
C513
C515
C516
C517
C52
C53
C54
C550
C552
C628
C711
C772
C800
C801
C802
C803
C804
C805
C806
C807
21-13743N26
21-13743N26
21-13743N28
21-13743N05
21-13743N40
21-13743L41
21-13743L17
21-13743N26
21-13743N20
21-13743L17
21-13928N01
21-13743N40
21-13743N67
21-13743N02
21-13743N28
21-13743L41
21-13743N28
21-13743L41
21-13743L41
21-13743N28
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743N09
21-04801Z14
21-13743N28
21-13743N28
21-13743N05
21-13743N16
21-13743N09
21-13743N40
21-13743N18
21-13743N16
21-13743N12
21-13743N02
21-13743N23
21-13743N22
21-13743N30
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743N27
21-13743N17
21-13743N40
21-13743N24
21-13743N23
21-13743N16
62
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Service Manual
Parts List
Reference
Designator
Part Number
Reference
Designator
Part Number
Reference
Designator
Part Number
C808
C811
C814
C815
C820
C821
C822
C823
C824
C825
C826
C827
C828
C829
C830
C831
C882
C883
C884
C885
C886
C887
C888
C898
C899
C902
C903
C904
C905
C906
C907
C911
C912
C913
C914
C962
C963
C9910
C998
CR100
CR1001
CR1540
CR1562
CR1563
CR1590
CR1597
21-13743N40
21-13743N11
21-13743N69
21-13743N15
21-13743N40
21-13743M24
21-13743N40
21-13743N15
21-13743N69
21-13743N40
21-13743N40
21-13743L17
21-13743N40
23-03770S08
21-13743N26
21-13743N40
21-13741F41
21-13741F25
21-13741A45
21-13740F67
21-13741A61
21-13741F25
21-13743N40
21-13743L41
21-13743N40
21-04801Z16
21-04801Z20
21-13743N24
21-13743M24
21-13743N24
21-13743N24
21-04801Z13
21-04801Z11
21-13743N12
21-04801Z12
23-11049A86
23-11049A86
21-13743N40
21-13928N01
48-09877C08
48-09606E07
48-09924D09
48-09653F07
48-09606E02
48-09924D09
48-09948D33
CR1598
CR1599
CR300
CR301
CR302
CR501
CR502
CR503
CR504
CR730
CR810
CR822
CR823
CR910
DS901
DS902
DS903
DS904
DS905
DS906
DS907
DS908
DS909
DS910
DS911
DS912
DS913
F500
FL10
FL100
FL20
FL30
FL350
FL413
FL452
FL453
FL454
J1
J100
J900
J902
J940
J941
J942
L101
L11
48-09948D33
48-09948D33
48-09877C08
48-09877C08
48-09948D13
48-09948D33
48-09948D33
48-09948D12
48-09948D33
48-09606E02
48-09606E02
48-09948D12
48-09948D12
48-09606E02
48-09496B11
48-09496B11
48-09496B11
48-09496B11
48-09496B11
48-09496B11
48-09496B11
48-09496B11
48-09496B11
48-09496B11
48-09496B11
48-09496B11
48-09496B11
91-09381T01
91-03913K04
91-62928D01
91-03917K04
91-85861J02
91-03913K06
91-85623G02
91-03913K03
91-85911J05
91-03913K03
09-85882K01
09-87378K01
09-09195E01
09-09059E01
09-85839G03
39-09301S02
39-09301S02
24-04574Z11
24-09154M62
L12
L150
L1550
L1593
L1594
L1599
L20
L21
L23
L30
L302
L303
L31
L351
L361
L378
L40
L400
L401
L403
L404
L405
L406
L407
L451
L452
L502
L503
L504
L505
L550
L552
L553
L555
L800
L802
L803
L804
L820
L821
L907
L962
L967
L968
L969
Q1099
24-09154M61
24-62587Q53
24-09154M68
24-09154M71
24-09154M71
24-09154M71
24-13926K25
24-13926K23
24-13926K27
24-09154M56
24-09414M17
24-09414M12
24-09154M56
24-62587V33
24-09154M65
24-09154M65
24-09154M54
24-09154M57
24-09154M63
24-09154M51
24-09646M22
24-09646M98
24-09154M60
24-09154M58
24-09154M68
24-09154M68
24-09154M55
24-09154M60
24-09154M62
24-09154M63
24-09154M57
24-09154M55
24-09154M51
24-13926M14
24-09348J08
24-09154M62
24-09154M63
24-09154M63
24-09646M22
24-09646M22
24-09154M71
24-09414M09
24-09154M71
24-09154M61
24-09646M05
48-82033T02
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
63
Parts List
TDMA T2290/T2297
Reference
Designator
Part Number
Reference
Designator
Part Number
Reference
Designator
Part Number
Q1501
Q151
Q152
Q1551
Q1574
Q1597
Q1598
Q1802
Q1803
Q1804
Q1805
Q1806
Q1807
Q1809
Q1810
Q1811
Q1812
Q301
Q351
Q391
Q401
Q411
Q475
Q501
Q502
Q503
Q505
Q810
Q811
Q820
Q821
Q880
Q901
Q910
Q962
R1000
R10013
R10014
R10016
R10017
R10018
R10021
R10023
R10024
R1005
R1009
48-09579E42
48-09579E24
48-09605E02
48-09607E05
48-09579E40
48-09939C06
48-09607E02
48-09579E02
48-09579E02
48-09579E02
48-09579E02
48-09579E24
48-09807C32
48-09605E02
48-09605E05
48-09605E02
48-09807C37
48-09579E02
48-09579E43
48-09527E24
48-09527E22
48-87716K01
48-09579E42
48-09607E05
48-09527E18
48-09579E30
48-09579E02
48-09579E24
48-09579E24
48-09607E05
48-09607E05
48-09579E30
48-09807C32
48-09579E24
48-13824B11
06-62057N03
06-62057N06
06-62057M98
06-62057M98
06-62057M98
06-62057M38
06-62057M98
06-60076N36
06-62057M73
06-62057M98
06-62057M26
R10095
R10096
R1010
R10100
R10101
R10102
R10103
R10104
R10105
R10106
R10107
R10108
R10109
R1011
R10110
R10115
R10117
R1012
R10120
R10124
R10127
R10129
R1013
R10130
R10131
R10132
R10133
R10134
R10136
R1014
R1030
R1031
R1032
R1036
R1050
R1088
R1089
R1090
R1092
R1097
R1098
R1099
R1100
R1101
R1102
R1103
06-62057M36
06-62057M36
06-62057N01
06-62057M90
06-62057M74
06-62057M74
06-62057M74
06-62057M74
06-62057M74
06-62057M74
06-62057M74
06-62057M74
06-62057M74
06-62057N03
06-62057M74
06-62057M98
06-62057M01
06-62057M74
06-62057M01
06-62057N23
06-62057N09
06-62057M67
06-62057M74
06-62057M74
06-62057N17
06-62057M66
06-62057M58
06-11079A20
06-62057N23
06-62057N23
06-62057N09
06-62057N15
06-62057N15
06-62057M84
06-62057N15
06-62057M74
06-62057N23
06-62057M01
06-62057N15
06-62057N15
06-62057N03
06-62057N01
06-62057M38
06-62057M38
06-62057M38
06-62057M38
R1104
R1105
R1106
R1107
R1108
R1109
R1110
R1111
R1112
R1200
R1201
R1203
R1204
R1205
R121
R122
R131
R151
R1512
R1513
R1514
R1515
R1516
R152
R1521
R1522
R1523
R1524
R153
R1532
R1533
R1534
R1536
R1537
R154
R1540
R1553
R1554
R1555
R1561
R1573
R1574
R1575
R1580
R1581
R1592
06-62057M38
06-62057M38
06-62057M38
06-62057M38
06-62057M38
06-62057M38
06-62057M38
06-62057M38
06-62057M38
06-62057M90
06-62057M98
06-62057M98
06-62057N23
06-62057M74
06-62057M98
06-62057M90
06-62057M74
06-62057N03
06-62057M01
06-62057M01
06-62057M01
06-62057M98
06-62057N15
06-62057N15
06-62057N31
06-62057N25
06-62057M82
06-62057M98
06-62057N09
06-62057N25
06-62057N31
06-62057M90
06-62057M54
06-62057M98
06-62057M67
06-62057N15
06-62057M98
06-62057N13
06-62057M01
06-62057M92
06-60076N49
06-62057N23
06-62057N47
06-62057M98
06-62057M82
06-62057M98
64
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Service Manual
Parts List
Reference
Designator
Part Number
Reference
Designator
Part Number
Reference
Designator
Part Number
R1593
R1594
R1596
R1597
R1598
R1700
R1800
R1801
R1804
R1806
R1810
R1811
R1820
R1830
R1900
R1901
R1910
R1911
R1912
R1913
R201
R3
R30
R301
R302
R303
R304
R305
R306
R308
R311
R341
R342
R350
R391
R392
R393
R402
R403
R405
R406
R407
R408
R409
R425
R450
06-09591M45
06-62057N39
06-62057N39
06-62057M98
06-62057M98
06-62057N33
06-62057N11
06-62057M01
06-62057M82
06-62057N16
06-62057N17
06-62057N17
06-62057N23
06-62057N15
06-62057M26
06-62057M01
06-62057M90
06-62057N11
06-62057N11
06-62057N15
06-62057M43
06-62057M37
06-62057M65
06-62057M72
06-62057N17
06-62057N01
06-62057N13
06-62057M81
06-62057N06
06-62057M54
06-62057M43
06-62057N13
06-62057N07
06-62057M68
06-62057M96
06-62057N03
06-62057M64
06-62057M98
06-62057N13
06-62057M34
06-62057M85
06-62057M52
06-62057M40
06-62057M85
06-62057N13
06-62057M50
R451
R452
R498
R499
R501
R502
R503
R504
R505
R506
R507
R508
R509
R510
R511
R515
R52
R53
R551
R552
R554
R562
R60
R712
R721
R722
R723
R724
R725
R726
R727
R728
R729
R730
R734
R735
R800
R801
R802
R804
R806
R807
R808
R809
R811
R825
06-62057M43
06-62057M74
06-62057M98
06-62057M98
06-62057M38
06-62057M98
06-62057M90
06-62057M90
06-62057N11
06-62057M76
06-62057M62
06-62057M38
06-62057M62
06-62057M50
06-62057M56
06-62057M46
06-62057M43
06-62057M43
06-62057A40
06-62057A40
06-62057A05
06-60076S01
06-62057N09
06-62057M01
06-62057M74
06-62057M74
06-62057M74
06-62057M74
06-62057M74
06-62057M74
06-62057M74
06-62057M74
06-62057M74
06-62057M90
06-62057M74
06-62057M74
06-62057M36
06-62057M26
06-62057M95
06-62057M61
06-62057M78
06-62057M43
06-62057M26
06-62057M26
06-62057M76
06-62057M36
R881
R882
R883
R884
R893
R906
R907
R908
R911
R964
R999
RT1
S508
S512
S525
SH1
SH10
SH11
SH2
SH3
SH4
SH5
SH6
SH7
SH8
SH9
U10
U1000
U110
U1200
U1300
U150
U1500
U1501
U1800
U1900
U1907
U1908
U301
U306
U801
U901
U903
U960
VR1500
VR1551
06-62057M92
06-62057N03
06-62057M92
06-62057M85
06-62057M94
06-62057M80
06-62057M80
06-62057M73
06-62057M66
06-80195M64
06-62057M20
06-87802K01
40-09368L01
40-09368L01
40-09368L01
26-87601K01
26-87610K01
26-87963K01
26-87602K01
26-87603K01
26-87604K01
26-87605K01
26-87606K01
26-87607K01
26-87608K01
26-87609K01
51-09944C39
51-09841C57
51-09879E24
51-99404C01
51-09509A16
48-09443R06
51-09879E42
51-09817F27
51-09817F34
51-99400C03
51-09962C16
51-99434A01
51-09879E25
48-09283D38
51-09730C16
51-09730C15
51-09920D22
51-09923D46
48-09788E06
48-09788E06
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
65
Parts List
TDMA T2290/T2297
Reference
Designator
Part Number
VR501
VR502
VR960
XFMR37
Y1500
48-09788E06
48-09788E06
48-09788E06
58-85758J03
48-09995L08
66
Reference
Designator
Part Number
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Reference
Designator
Part Number
General Description
Two RF ports are designed in this transceiver; internal antenna and external antenna. An RF switch controls which antenna
path is going to be used during operation.
Since this transceiver operates in two frequency bands(800MHz and 1900MHz), the
switch also controls the RF frequency paths.
Only one RF port and frequency band is used
at a time, therefore, only one RF switch configuration is used while the other is
irrevelent.
cellular band and 192.36 MHz in the PCS
band. The RX loop operates from 981-1006
MHz in the cellular band and from 1021-1051
MHz in the PSC band. The IC also provides
regulator and superfilter functions for its
synthesizer and the external VCOs. The IF
portion of the IC operates with an input frequency of 112.32 MHz. The IC is linear up
to the I and Q outputs of the baseband filters, can operate with internal or external
AGC, and has a minimum dynamic range of
-96.5 to -5.5 dBm. Both ZIF and SYN sections of the IC contain battery saving circuitry controlled by the SPI, and activated
by an external pin.
RX Front End
TX Operational Description
In 800MHz mode, the receive signal is mixed
with the VCO and the result is the IF signal
which is filtered prior to entering the ZIF/
SYN IC.
For the 800 Mhz band, the TX carrier frequency is generated by mixing the main VCO
signal with the offset VCO.In analog mode,
the Offset VCO is modulated to provide FM.
In 1900MHz mode, the VCO signal goes
through a frequency doubler before getting
mixed with the 1900MHz receive signal. This
process allows the 1900MHz carrier frequency to be removed without the need of a
second VCO.
In digital mode, the mixer output feeds an
IQ modulator which is bypassed in analog
mode.The signal passes through attenuators
before being fed to the driver amplifier with
bandpass filters and then it is sent to the 2
stage power amplifier. The Offset VCO, TX
mixer, IQ modulator and amplifiers are contained within a custom integrated circuit.
Antenna Circuit
NADC/PDC ZIF/SYN IC
The NADC/PDC ZIF/SYN is a 2.75 volt 81
pin BGA. It provides two fractional N phase
locked loops for use with external VCOs. The
transmit loop operates at 157.32 MHz in the
The MerlinTX is a custom IC intended to provide IQ modulator, power control, and exciter
functions for IS-136 TDMA portable cellular
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
67
General Description
TDMA T2290/T2297
Analog TX Audio Processing
phones. Both cellular and PCS bands are
supported. The following functional blocks
are contained in the IC:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Feedback amplifier for offset synthesis
Offset mixer for transmit generation
Quadrature Modulator
VCA for transmit power control
Cellular PA and PCS PA
Upconverter for PCS operation
For the 1900 Mhz band, the signal from the
Offset VCO mixes with the main VCO to provide the TX IF.The signal,after passing
through a series of attenuators, is filtered
and mixed with the Main VCO signal to generate the 1900 TX carrier frequency.This signal goes throught the amplifying stages.The
synthesizer consists of a ZIF/SYN IC that contains a reference divider, phase detector
circuitry,prescaler,regulators and a charge
pump as well as some circuitry for the Offset
VCO.
The reference frequency source for the Main
VCO is provided by a temperature controlled
crystal oscillator.
In analog mode, DTMF, ST and SAT (among
other things) are used to modulate the Offset VCO.In both 800 MHz and 1900 MHz digital modes, audio coming in from the microphone is filtered, digitized and structured into
a TDMA time slot. A directional coupler and
detector circuit at the output of the power
amplifier provides a carrier power indicator
to the logic unit, which then uses this value
as feedback to set the voltageto the voltage
controlled attenuator in an automatic power
control loop.Power output is continually
monitored.
68
The transmitter and receiver are duplexed
with bandpass filters to a switch that feeds
the signal to either the antenna connector or
the external antenna jack.
Analog TX Audio Processing
The analog voice signal coming in through
the microphone is taken by the CODEC and
digitized.The samples produced by this step
are then sent to the DSP.The following steps
are realized with software implementation:
• Nominal TX Mic. Audio adjust amplifier
• Compressor -using a variable gain ampli-
fier that controls the stage’s gain by detecting the power at its output and applying the
result to control the gain
• Deviation Limiter – using an amplifier in
conjunction with a 7th order odd polynomial
with two output comparators. The polynomial
reduces the amount of spectral splatter while
the comparators switch as the signal reaches
a high or low threshold.
• Audio mute
• Summing of all analog transmit modulation signals (Mic. Audio, Data/ST, DTMF and
SAT)
A post-limiter splatter filter works with an
up-shelf and a down-shelf filter to limit the
maximum deviation of the transmitter.Data/
Signaling Tone is generated as a sinusoidal
signal using a look-up table, which eases the
filtering requirements for this signal because
of the reduced harmonic energy it entails.
DTMF is generated using look-up tables and
SAT processing is also performed in the
Transmit Audio Circuitry.
The D/A converts audio samples to an analog signal. This signal is then filtered and
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Service Manual
General Description
GCAP II
applied to the Analog Mod. Input of the synthesizer circuit
function controlled from DSP.
Digital TX Audio Processing
and CS switch module provides a 4-bits general-purpose I/O port, with programmable
data direction, chip testing output pins
muxed with IO pins, 19.44MHz clock control,
SPI bus enable control, and special RAM chip
select switch function. It also is used to generate a PWM output (PWM_OSC pin).
• The GP timer module is a general purpose
timer. It is synchronous, 16 bits, count-down,
preloadable, readable, and reloading on terminal count. It’s input clock is 32.768KHz,
which can be disabled, divided-by-2, or divided-by-4.
• The FIFO SOI Interface provides a 96 bit
and a 16 bit buffer register accessible by either the DSP or HC12. The DSP controls who
has write access to the data buffer and the
SPI control register. Data is written in using
8 bit words and sent via the RF SPI as either
a 96 bit or 16 bit write. The SPI clock speed
is selectable as either 4.86MHz or 1.215MHz.
The external SPI clock automatically stops
after each write. The internal SPI clock can
be disabled to save current. A maskable interrupts are available at the end of each SPI
write.
The analog voice signal coming in through
the microphone is taken by the CODEC and
digitized. The samples are transmitted to the
DSP where microphone compensation and
echo cancellation processes take place. The
DSP uses ACELP to compress the samples
into data bits.These bits are interleaved with
speech data from adjacent speech frames for
error protection. System messages are then
combined with the data bits and sent to the
data converter for modulation. The data converter modulates the data using differential
quadrature phase shift keying (DQPSK). The
bit streams generated from this step are converted to analog signals which are filtered
before being transmitted.
DSP Lucent 1629
Digital Signal Processor, 80 MIPS, 3 volt operation. It has a DPS1600 core with 16k
words of internal dual-port RAM and 48k
words of ROM. It is contained in a 169 ball
µBGA package with the balls on a 13 x 13mm
grid on 0.8mm centers.
Stuart IC
The STUART chip is a device intended for
the following five functions.
• The HPI module provides a bus intercon-
nection function, the host port, for the call
processor (HC12) to talk to the DSP section
via the call processor’s parallel bus, interconnected to the DSP’s parallel memory bus.
• The DSP Timer module provides a timer
• The IO, test, 19.44MHz clock control, SPI,
GCAP II
GCAP II is intended to provide audio and
power management functions for Motorola
cellular telephone applications. GCAP II is
composed of two die. The GCAP II contains
the following functions:
•
•
•
•
2.775V linear regulator (V1)
5V linear regulator (VSIM)
2.775V linear regulator (V2)
2.775V linear regulator (V3)
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
69
General Description
TDMA T2290/T2297
GCAP II
• 2.775V low current reference (REF)
• Two BUCK/BOOST switching regulators
Switcher # 1 not used
Switcher # 2 BUCK mode 3.3V
• Charge Pump Output
• High End PA Regulator
• Differential Speaker (earpiece) amplifier
• Single ended Alert amplifier
• Single ended Auxiliary amplifier
• Turn on control signals to activate the
radio
• Turn off control signals to turn off the
radio if an error is detected
• Battery Charger
• SPI interface
• 10 channel 8 bit A/D
• 8 bit D/A
• Microphone amplifiers
• DSC bus buffers
• Audio CODEC with serial interface
• SPI interface
70
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Diplexer
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Discrete
RF
Detector
CELL_TX: 824 - 849Mhz
PCS_PA
RXPRE_IN
Main VCO
VCA_CNTL
Σ
Φ
Offset
VCO
19.44Mhz
Ref. OSC.
I_OUT
Q_OUT
AGC_RSSI
ZIFSYN_VREF
ATTN_CNTL
MERLIN_TX
TXPRE_IN
FRACTIONAL-N
SYNTHESIZER
LVPADC
ZIF IC
RF_DET
AOC_CNT
TX_I
TX_IX
TX_Q
TX_QX
OUT_BIAS
MOD_EN
MODE_A_D
BAND_SEL
FM Mod. FMOUT
OVCO_C
CLKIN
RX_ I
RX_Q
AGC
VAGIN
AGC_STEP
RX_2.75V
5V
RF_DATA
RF_CLK
ZIFSYN_EN
To DCI
Position
Switch
X2
Internal Buffers
Crystal Filter
112.32Mhz
VCC
HV_SPLY
DATA
CLK
CEX
TX_SF
TX_STEP
QMOD_KEY
A_D
800*_1900
To GCAPII
PCS_TX: 1850 - 1910Mhz
BPF: 1930 - 1990Mhz
1st Mixer
MC13747
1st Mixer
2nd VCO
RXPRE_IN
ZIF
CELL_PA
LNA
LNA
BPF: 869 - 894Mhz
Retractable Antenna
PCS_Duplexer
Cell_Duplexer
Antenna connector/
switch
Figure 40. RF Block Diagram
Service Manual
General Description
To DCI
To DCI
71
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
AUX BATT
B+
SENSE
FR_EN
TR_SET
EXTB+
MAIN BATT
BAT_FDBK_COM
GND
ACCESSORY CONNECTOR
HSET_DTCT
PWRON
BOOM MIC
MAIN
SWITCH
AUX
SWITCH
AUX_BAT_THERM
MAN_LVL
CMP_LVL
3WB_RTN
AGC_RSSI
HEADSET
DETECT
CIRCUIT
B+
AUDIO IN
BOOM OUT
AUDIO OUT
MAIN_FET
AUX_FET
MAIN_BAT
SW_EXT_B+
MAIN_BAT_THERM
CHRG_MAIN_BATT
CHRG_AUX_BATT
EXT_B+
DISCONNECT
CIRCUIT
MANTEST
BATT FDBK
AUDIO OUT
AUDIO IN
AUX_BAT
CHARGE
CONTROL
COVIC
Charger
IC
CMP
M AN_TEST
S CI TX/RX
DISCRETE AUDIO COMPONENTS
EXTB+
MICIN+
MICOUT
MICIN-
SPKRIN
SPKR+
SPKROUT
SPKRMIC_BIAS
MB_CAP
AUX_MICAUX_OUT
EXT_MIC
EXTOUT
ALRTOUT
MAIN_BATT+
MAIN_FET
AUX_FET
AUX_BATT+
MOBPORTB
AD5
AD4
AD3
AD2
AD1
AD0
32KHZ
CE
GCAP 2
BGA
32KHz
XTAL1
SPI BUS
CODECBUS
V3
VIN3
V2
VIN2
V1
VIN1
VSIN
VSIM
RESET
B+
2.75V
SUPPLY
2.75V
SUPPLY
2.75V
SUPPLY
FLIP SWITCH
-5V REG
TX_2.75V
2.75V
RX_2.75V
VSIM
V_DISP
B+
EE_EN
EE HOLD
VOLTAGE
DOUBLER
5V
SUPPLY
128K
EEPROM
PT5
3WB
144 BALL FSBGA
169
PF5
PJ6
KEYPAD
PF3
PH7
uBGA
64Kx16
SRAM
uBGA
8 MEG
FLASH
DATA
IOBIT2_PB6
IOBIT0_PB4
IOBIT3_PB7
SSI BUS
CKO
CKI2
CKI
ADDR
DSPADDR
AGC_RSSI
SPI BUS
RESET
SSI BUS
IRQ
UP_CSB
ECLK
IO3
TXENBLB
TX_CNTL
RF_SPI
DEMOD
PWM_EN
AOC_CNTL
AOCM
AOC
CONTROL
CIRCUIT
PWM_EN
AFC
RX_I
AFC
RX_Q
QMOD_KEY
L0
RX_I
RX_Q
TX_STEP
FM
BAT_SAV
FM
L3
PM
RX_EN
TX_I
TX_IX
PM
TX_QX
TX_I
TX_IX
TX_QX
AGC_STEP
TX_Q
RF_DETECT
DCI
DISC
TX_Q
AGC_STEP
RF_DETECT
VIBRATOR
RF SECTION
CONTROL
LINES
19.44 MHZ
AOC_CNTL
TX_CNTL
RF SPI
BATT_FDBK_EN
CHRG_AUX_BATT
CHRG_MAIN_BATT
IO1
IO2
IO0
TXENABLE
Stuart
ASIC
DSPDATA
DCI_FS
GP_INT
D_RWB
IO_DSP
RESET
R_WB
CPADDR
RAM_CS
FLASH_EN
FLASH_WP
CPDATA
ACP_CNTL
KEYPAD
KEYPAD
AND
DISPLAY
DISPLAY
SED1567
96x32
COG
DATA
AGC_RSSI
DISP_CS
OSC_DIS
FREQ_ERROR
ADDR
PF0
E_PE4
IRQ_PE1
RW_PE2
SIZE8_PE3
LUCENT DSP
1629
CODECBUS
PS7
PF2
SPIBUS
XTAL
EXTAL
144 BALL BGA
Thunder Lite
68HC12
SCI/DATABUS
PF6
PT0
PT2
PT1
PT3
SILENT
ALERT
LED
PJ7
ARSIE
TRST
External Interface
(six test points)
XTAL2
BOOM_MIC_DTCT
INT1
AUX_BAT_SER_DAT
IO
MAIN_BAT_SER_DAT
RESET
RESETB
VSTDBY_PAD7
SRAM VCC
SR_VCCOUT
PT6
DSP_TRAP
TRAP
MOTOROLA
CONFIDENTIAL PROPRIETARY
RJB 2/99
SROUT
PF1
INT0
BACKLIGHT
RWN
TYPHOON
AUDIO/LOGIC
BLOCK DIAGRAM
PF4
SRIN
RDB
OSC_OUT
PJ0
WATCHDOG
WDI
HREQB
CLKIN
PAD1
L2
72
C19_44MHZ
Figure 41. AL Block Diagram
General Description
TDMA T2290/T2297
Service Diagrams
Introduction
nections.
The service diagrams were carefully prepared
to allow a Motorola certified technician to
easily troubleshoot cellular phone failures.
Our professional staff provided directional
labels, color coded traces, measurement values and other guidelines to help a technician
troubleshoot a cellular phone with speed and
accuracy.
Because of the sensitivity of RF, measured
readings will be greatly affected if they’re
taken in certain locations. To get the most
accurate readings, take measurements nearest to the labeled measurement on the service diagram.
We worked hard in trying to provide the best
service diagrams, therefore, to avoid cluttered diagrams, we excluded some components from the service diagrams. Our professional staff carefully selected to excluded
components that are unlikely to fail.
Test Point Measurements
The measurements labeled on the service
diagrams are approximate values and may
vary slightly. These measurements are dependent on the accuracy of the test equipment.
It is strongly recommended that the test
equipment calibration schedule be followed
as stated by the manufacturer. RF probes
should be calibrated for each frequency in
which tests are going to be performed.
The types of probes used will also affect measurement values. Test probes and cables
should be tested for RF losses and loose con-
©1999 Motorola, Inc.
B-1
TDMA T2290/T2297: Antenna Circuit
F500
FL100
A100
J100
RX_800
RF_800
TX_800
FL453
RF_1900
RX_1900
TX_1900
B2
Description
A100 is the internal antenna port for dual band operation(800 &1900MHz). An antenna tap(J100) is used to allow a RF connection to test equipment for proper diagnostic
testing. When nothing is inserted in J100, the switch is closed, allowing the internal antenna path to be used. If a connection is inserted in J100, the switch will open, not
allowing the internal antenna path to be used. During this state the external RF path will be used.
Diplexer FL100 is used to isolate the two operating frequency bands. The cellular(800MHz) frequencies will be routed to duplexer F500. The PCS(1900MHz) frequencies
will be routed to duplexer FL453.
F500 is a 800MHz duplexer used to isolate the cellul ar(800MHz) transmit and receive frequencies. FL453 is a 1900MHz duplexer used to isolate the PCS(1900MHz) transmit and receive frequencies.
TDMA T2290/T2297: Antenna Circuit
J100
A
A100
C554
C24
RX_800
L562
page B5
FL100
C552
L553
TL541
C815
page B19
TX_800
F500
B
L552
B3
FL453
C550 L550
C
Channel: 333
Cellular TX Freq:
PCS TX Freq:
Cellular RX Input Freq:
PCS RX Input Freq:
RX Input:
TX Power Level 2
TX SIGNAL
RX SIGNAL
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
800MHz
C
1.9GHz
800 Mhz
RX
A
TX
-39.64dbm 21.41dbm
1.9Ghz
RX
-47.7dbm
834.99MHz
1859.97MHz
879.99MHz
1940.01MHz
-20dBm
B
RX
TX
-32.97dbm 15.12dbm
RX
TX
-38.55dbm
5.60dbm
TX
7.43dbm
RX_1900
TX_1900
C36
page B5
C772
page B19
TDMA T2290/T2297: Front End IC(U10)
FL10
BUFF_VCO
RX_800
VCO
800*_1900
FL20
BAND_SW
U10
RX_IF
RX_1900
RX_2.75
DBLR_IN
X2
VCC
FE_EN
LO_CTL
SW_QMOD_KEY
B4
FL30
Description
The RX front end IC(U10) is used as a first amplifier an d downconverter for dual-band RF appl ications. It removes the RX carrier frequency to produce the RX IF signal. U10 also
has some internal LNAs for the receive signals a nd buffers for the VCO signals.
U10 has two RF input ports. One is used for the 800MHz receive signal and the other is used for the 1900MHz receive signal. Both signals are amplif ied within U10 and then routed to an external filter(FL10, FL30). The signal is then inje cted into the Down Converter of U10.
In 800MHz mode, the receive signal is mi xed with the VCO and the result is the r eceive intermediate frquency(IF) signal which is filt ered by FL20 prior to entering the ZIF/ZYN
IC(U110).
In 1900MHz mode, the VCO output (DBLR_IN) goes through a frequency doubler internal to U10 before getting mixed with t he 1900MHz receive signal. This process allows the
1900MHz carrier frequency to be removed without the need of a second VCO.
Line 800*_1900 is used to select which frequency path will be enabled for U10. Line 800*_1900 is high in 800MHz mode and low in 190 0MHz mode.
Line FE_EN enables or disables n ormal operation of U10. A low state at FE_EN will disable U10. This line is use d to disable U10 when the transceiver is in it' s idle or transmit
slot state. It is also used during s leep mode conditions.
TDMA T2290/T2297: Front End IC
-20.1dbm
1940.01 Mhz
-18.3dbm
1940.01 Mhz
-34.79dBm
1006.2Mhz
22
21
20
19
1
18
2
17
3
4
U10
IFIF+
5
BUFF_VCO
23
B5
RX_2.75V
FL453
page B3
A SW_QMOD_KEY
7
8
9
10
11
Q1501
page B25
C2
B
16
800*_1900
U1907-64
page B35
15
C
14
13
6
page B13
RX_1900
FE_EN
12
U1800-18
page B23
L11
R53
C3
R3
page B25
C30
24
RX_2.75V
C34
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
-35.18dbm
1940.01 Mhz
R30
L30
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
C32
VCO SIGNAL
RX SIGNAL
page B25
C35
879.99MHz
1940.01MHz
-20dBm
FL30
Channel: 333
Cellular RX Input Freq:
PCS RX Input Freq:
RX Input:
RX_2.75V
C38 L31
page B25
R808
DBLR_IN
-30.16dBm
893.97Mhz
page B9
R808
page B9
VCO
-16.13dBm
1006.252Mhz
-14.7dBm
893.97Mhz
FL20
C20
page B25
C12 C14
-14.9dBm
893.97Mhz
RX_IF
C1806
page B7
TX
On
Off
A
2.87V
0V
Band
B
800
1900
RX
0V
2.81V
C
On
Off
0V
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
L23
F500
page B3
RX_2.75V
page B25
C21
L21
L20
RX_2.75V
FL10
C13
C51
-8.12dBm
112.32Mhz
RX_800
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
TDMA T2290/T2297: ZIF_SYNTH (U110)
C109
RSSI
IF
Step
Atten.
U110
2nd LO
Shifter
U1000
SPI BUS
DATA
CLK
CEX
Offset
LOOP
SPI BUS
8/16/96 BIT
MODES
UP
Converter
VCO
Offset VCO
Demod
DEMOD
B6
Cap
Filters
Ref Osc
Description
MAIN
LOOP
AGC_RSSI
LP_SWITCH
19.44MHz
RX_I
RX_Q
U110(ZIF_SYNTH) can be divided into two functional sub systems: The ZIF (Zero-Intermediate-Frequency) which p rovides all of the functions of the back-end of a
receiver, and the SYN (SYNthesizer) which contains phase-locked loops and modulators to produce the Local Oscillator (LO) and modulated transmit carri er.
The ZIF implements the back end of the receiver. The incomin g signal is attenuated, amplified and mixed down to an extremely low frequency(Baseband)-not quite DC.
The first amplifier a nd an Automatic Gain Control(AGC) circuit adjusts the amplifier gain to maintain a c onstant level in the baseband filter. C109 is used to add stability
to the AGC circuit.
The first mixing that occurs in th e ZIF requires a 2nd Local Oscill ator that is running at 221.184MH z. The 2nd LO is divided down the n phased shifted before being
mixed with the IF signal., produci ng the baseband signal
The baseband si gnal is low-pass filtered using a programmable low-pass fil ter. In TDMA mode, the baseband sign al is routed to U1800(DCI) via the RX_I and RX_Q
lines. In analog mode, the baseband signa l is up-converted and then FM-demodulated, producing the DEMOD signal which is rou ted to U1800(DCI) for filtering and deemphasis.
The RSSI(Receive Signal Strength Indicator) is a voltage that increases with respect to the received sign al strength.
The SPI Bus is a serial i nterface used to program the internal filters and frequency di viders for U110, allowing selectivity of cellular channels.
RF 19.44Mhz input is used to p rovide a frequency reference for U110.
TDMA T2290/T2297: ZIF_SYNTH (U110)
RX Input <-52dBm >-52dBm
A
1.81V 2.83V
TX_SF
page B25
HVCC
C1505
2.75v
4.8v
-15.99dbm@157.32Mhz
-18.82dbm@192.4Mhz
page B13
VI_BYP
4.8v
RXCP_OUT
RXCP_ADA
ZIF_SYN_EN
RF_CLOCK
U110
RF_DATA
FREQ_ERROR
DEMOD
BASE
Channel: 333
Cellular RX Input Freq:
PCS RX Input Freq:
RX Input:
-47.5dbm
221.184Mhz
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
2.75v
CRAMP
U1800-24
page B23
U1800-22
page B23
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
RX_Q
450mvp-p
RX_I
ZIFSYN_VREF
1.4v
RX_2.75V
page B25
L101
U1800-25
page B23
AGC_RSSI
TX SIGNAL
RX SIGNAL
EMIT
VREF
U1500
page B25
VCO SIGNAL
AGC_BYP
VAG_REF
page B11
879.99MHz
1940.01MHz
-20dBm
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
DEMOD
C131
C302,C888
page B9
RX_2.75V
page B25
page B23
LP_SWITCH
HVCC
2.75v
COLL
650mvp-p
RF_19.44MHZ
R807
RX_SF
RXPRE_VR
CR100 L962
page B37
U1800
2.75v
C135
U1000
TXCP_OUT
R131
U1907
page B35
U1907
page B35
RXPRE_IN
HVCC
1.61v
C133
B7
U150
page B21
C884
page B9
R893
page B9
U1907
page B35
-16.3dbm@992.31Mhz
2.52v
HV_BYP
RX_2.75V
page B25
TXCP_ADA
C134
C303
page B11
C203
4.7v
SF_BYP
page B11
C251
OVCO_FDBK
TXPRE_VR
R308
C252
C262
5V
page B25
4.8v
page B9
C272
L351
5v
C204
RX_2.75V
2.48v
2.6v
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
-24.68dbm@112.32Mhz
RX_IF
A
0v
AGC_STEP
BATT_SAV
FL20
page B25
U1800-45
U1800-16
page B23
page B23
TDMA T2290/T2297: VCO
VCO_FDBK
RX_SF
VCO_STEER
LP
Filter
VCO_OUT
Filter Ckt.
U306
RXCP_ADA
Q880
A
Q880
B
B8
LP_SW
Description
U306 is the local oscillator module used to add frequency selectivity to the transceiver. The frequency of oscilla tion is dependent on the channel and frequency band that
the transceiver will be operating in. The frequency is controlled by U110. U110 will receive channel information via the SPI bus and adjust the frequency of U306 by
adjusting the voltage level to the input (VCO_STEER) of U306.
The output of U306 is split into two paths. One path (VCO_FDBK) is used to feed back the generated signal to U110. The signal is prescaled and sent through a phase
detector for proper frequency locking. The second path (VCO_OUT) is sent to the front end IC(U10). This signal is used for proper downconversion of the receive signa l.
When the transceiver is operating in the 800MHz band, U306 will oscillate at a frequency of 112.32+RX frequency. In the 1900MHz band, U306 will oscillate at a frequency of (112.32+RX)/2.
RX_SF (Super Filter) comes from U110 and provides a clean supply voltage to the VCO module.
LP_SWITCH control comes from U110. In Analog mode, the input to Q880 becomes high causin g it to switch on. This condition will complete the filter circuit path
to ground, thus allowing the filter ciruitry to become active on the VCO_STEER line. This filter circuit is used to improve phase noise due to stringent adjacent channels
in Analo g mode.
The RXCP_ADA is a loop filter adapt output. During a high current state R893 will be grounded. This will increase the loop filter bandwidth by decreasing the amount
of resistance at the discharge path of C884. During low curent conditions R893 will not be grounded. This will decrease the loop filter bandwidth by increasing the
amount of resistance at the discharge path of C884.
TDMA T2290/T2297: VCO (U306)
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
A
RXCP_OUT
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
C883
Channel: 333
Cellular VCO Freq:
PCS VCO Freq:
R881
Channel
992.31MHz
1026.165MHz
R882
VCO Signal
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
R893
Q880
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
U110
page B7
A
C886
991 333 799
1.25V 1.69V 2.04V
C884
R884
B9
U110
page B7
B
LP_SW
C888
RX_CP_ADA
C882
C898
C887
C885
C899
U110
page B7
R883
RX_SF
page B7
Analog Digital
B
-14.88 dBm@1900MHHz
1026.165MHz
U306
-16.3 dBm@800MHz
992.31MHz
C202
page B7
1.69V 2.59V
-8.31 dBm@1900MHHz
1026.165MHz
VCO_FDBK
-12.61 dBm@800MHz
992.31MHz
R807
R808
C628
VCO_OUT
C16
page B5
TDMA T2290/T2297: TX Offset Oscillator
FM
U1800
DCI
CR301
Q391
U110
ZIF-SYN
IC
TXCP_OUT
TXCP_ADA
LP_SWITCH
B10
U1907
Loop
Filter
CR300
Tank
Ckt
U301
MERLIN TX
Q301
800*_1900
C316
Q351
VCO_FDBK
Description
The offset oscillator frequency is controlled by U110(ZIF/SYN) via TXCP_OUT. The operating frequency will depend on the dc biasing of CR300. The offset oscillator
frequency is 157.32MHz in 800MHz mode, an d 192.36MHz in 1900MHz mode.
The two operating frequencies are controlled by the 800*_1900 line. A high state at 800*_1900 will switch Q351 on. This condition will bypass path to ground for C316,
thus C316 is not be active with the tank circuit. During this state, the TX offset oscillator will operate at 192.36MHz. A low state at 800*_1900 will switch Q351 off.
This condition will allow C316 to remain active with the tank circuit. Duri ng this state the TX offset oscillator will operate at 157.32MHz.
The TXCP_ADA is a loop filter adapt output. During a high current state R308 will be grounded. This will increase the loop filter bandwidth by decreasing the amount
of resistance at the discharge path of C303. During low curent conditions R308 will not be grounded. This will decrease the loop filter bandwidth by increasi ng the
amount of resistance at the discharge path of C303.
LP_SWITCH control comes from U110. In Analog mode, the input to Q301 becomes high causing it to switch on. This condition will complete the filter circuit path
to ground, thus allowing the filter ciruitry to become active on the VCO_STEER line . This filter circuit is used to improve phase noise due to stringent adjacent channels
in Analo g mode.
In analog mode the FM signal comes from U1800(DCI) pin 39 and is modulated directly in the offset oscillator. The offset oscillator with the FM then enters U301
(QMOD). The Quadmod (U301) will fe ed back the offset frequency to U110 for proper PLL(Phase Locked Loop) operation.
TDMA T2290/T2297: TX Offset Oscillator
TX_SF
C316
page B7
-11.29 dBm@800MHz
157.32MHz
C312
OVCO
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
R305
R350
C311
A
800*_1900
Q351
Channel: 333
Cellular TX Offset Freq:
PCS TX Offset Freq:
157.32MHz
192.36MHz
TX SIGNAL
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
FM
TX_SF
U1800-39
page B23
C308
B11
Q391
L303
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
U1907-64
page B35
B
L302
C350
page B13
C399
R393
C317
-11.39dBm@1900MHz
192.36MHz
page B7
C313
C309
C310
R391
R306
TX_SF
page B7
R304
C307
CR301
R392
R303
R308
U110
page B7
TXCP_ADA
C
LP_SW
D
C302
U110
page B7
Q301
Mode Analog Digital
D 2.72V
0V
1900
.05V
.08V
1.85V
R302
C305
C315
C304
R301
Band 800
A
2.9V
B 2.97V
C
1.4V
TXCP_OUT
U110
page B7
TDMA T2290/T2297: MERLIN (U301)
1900_OUT
U110
ZIFSYN
U301
Merlin
U10
Main VCO
FL413
Offset Oscillator
FM
XFMR377
A_D
U1800
DCI
TX_I
TX_Q
IQ
Mod
B12
TX_STEP
AOC_CNTL
U1700
FL350
800_OUT
800*_1900
Description
U301 is a TX modulator. It takes the TX information and modulates it on a carrier for RF transmission .
In analog mode the offset oscillator with th e FM enters U301 and gets mixed with the mai n VCO. The resulting signal i s a differentia l carrier with the modulated
information. The carrier is then passed through an IQ modulator. The A_D line controls the state of the IQ modulator. In analog mode, the IQ modulator simply f eeds the
carrier though to a voltage controlled amplifier(VC A). The gain of the VCA i s controlled via the AOC_CNTL line, therefore, controlling the TX power steps of the
transceiver. Once the carrier passes through the VCA, it passes through the cellular final p ower amplifier whi ch is still intern al to U301.
In digital mode the offset oscillator doesn't contain the modulated information from the FM line. The offset oscillator is mixe d with the main VCO and a differential output signal is sent through the IQ modulator. In digital mode, the A_D line co nfigures the IQ modulator to allow IQ modulation to the carrier. The result carrier signal is
then passed through the Voltage Controlled Amplifier( VCA). The gain of the VCA is adjusted b y the AOC_CNTL line, thus controlling th e TX digital power steps of the
transceiver.
When operating in th e 800MHz band the carrier is routed through the cellular fi nal power amplifier and out to the 800MHz transmit circuit. In 1900MHz mode the cellular final power amplifier is disabled via the 800*_1900 line and t he VCA output is routed to filter FL3 50 for noise and s purious performance improvement. The differential output is then routed into a PCS upconverter where the signal is upcon vertered to a PCS frequency by mixing the ca rrier signal wi th the main VCO . The output of the
PCS upconverter is then routed to a Balun(XFMR377) for single ended signal conversion. The newly created single ended TX carrier signal is then filtered by FL413 and
routed through the PCS power amplifier intern al to U301 before entering the 1900 TX excite r circuit.
The TX_STEP line is used to control the biasing to the cellular final a mplifier, PC S final ampl ifier, and the PCS upconverter. This line is us ed as a course gain control for
the fina l ampli fiers and PCS upconverter.
TDMA T2290/T2297:
Merlin TX(U301)
-15.95 dBm@1900MHz
-20.39 dBm@800MHz This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
157.32 MHz
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
192.36 MHz
R350
page B11
OVCO
Motorola's request.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
TX_SF
page B7
Channel: 333
Cellular TX Freq: 834.99MHz
PCS TX Freq: 1859.97MHz
L351
-18.82 dBm@1900MHz
192.36 MHz
VCO SIGNAL
-15.99 dBm@800MHz
157.32 MHz
OVCO_FDBK
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
VCO_BUFF
C413
R53
C205
XFMR377
L452
-5.65 dBm
834.99MHz
C499
VCO_OUT
U301
page B25
1900_OUT
R408
page B15
800_OUT
FL452
800*_1900
D
R452
U1907-64
page B35
U1800-17
page B23
TX_STEP
FL350
MERLIN
VCC_OFFSET2
L451
TX_2.75
page B15
UPCON_IN
UPCON_INX
TX_2.75
QMOD_KEY
-27.57 dBm
1859.97MHz
C333
L401
1900_IN
UPCON_OUTX
C300
C389
VCC_OFFSET
OVCO_E
L381
C401
L378
C454
page B25
C395
C339
C447
C487
B13
-23.85 dBm@800MHz
992.31 MHz
C428
C334
UPCON_OUT
R311
-9.11 dBm@1900MHz
1026.165 MHz
-29.31 dBm
1859.97MHz
C412
C402
page B5
TX_QX
U1800-41
page B23
TX_Q
U1800-42
page B23
U1800-37
page B23
C
C425
TX_IX
VCA_OUT
C335
U1800-20
page B23
C1508
C52
FL413
C351
C350
C272
page B7
TX SIGNAL
TX_I
U1800-38
page B23
TX_2.75
R425
page B25
C342
C18871
C18873
R341
R342
AOC_CNTL
A
R403
C343
U1800-30
page B23
B
C427
U1800-14
page B23
A_D
Power Step
A
TX On Off
C
.09V 2.83V
Band 800 1900
D
.05V
Analog Digital
B
2.98V .06V
2
3
4
5
6
7
2.11v 1.81v 1.81v 1.38v 1.66v 1.52v
TDMA T2290/T2297: Exciter
A_D
CR810-A
800KEY
CR810-B
800BIAS
TX_2.75
Q810
DRIVER_B+
Q475-A
800_OUT
FL452
Q401
Q811
R811
800_PA_IN
FL454
CR910-A
1900KEY
CR910-B
DRIVER_B+
B14
1900_OUT
1900BIAS
TX_2.75
Q475-B
Q910
Q411
1900_PA_IN
Description
After the desired transmit informati on is modulated with a TX carrier frequency, enough signal power needs to be provided for RF transmission through the antenna. The
exciter stage is used to relieve amplifi cation of the final stage PA. This reduces excess heat dissipati on and overloading of the final stage PA.
In 800MHz mode, the TX signal passses through FL452 and then is a mplified by Q401. Q401 is driven on by supp ling DRIVER_B+ through Q475-A. Q475-A can be
switched on or off via the 800KEY line. In 8 00MHz TX mode, 800KEY is low. Thi s state brings the gate of Q475-A to a low level, causing Q475-A to switch on.
There are two operating modes in the 800MHz band, analog and digital . In 800MHz mode Q810 is switched on with a low level of the gate. The output of Q810 will then
be used to provide the biasi ng voltage for the final st age PA(U801).
The 800BIAS voltage level determines the operating condition of the fina l stage PA. A lower voltage level at 800BIAS denotes digital mode and a higher voltage level
denotes analog mode. In analog mode, A_D is pulled high caus ing Q811 to be switched off. This state causes a voltage drop across R811, thus, having a lower voltage
level at 800BIAS. In digital mode A_D is pulled low causing Q811 to be switched on. During this state R8 11 is bypassed an d 800BIAS will ha ve a higher voltage level.
In 1900MHz mode, the TX signal is ampli fied by Q411. Q411 is driv en on by suppling DRIVER_B+ through Q475-B. Q475-B can be switched on or off via the
1900KEY line. In 1 900MHz mode, 1900KEY is low. This state brings the gate of Q475-B to a low level, causi ng Q475-B to switch on.
1900BIAS provides the proper biasing voltage for the final stage PA(U901). 1900BIAS is supplied from TX_2.75. In 1900MHz mode, having 1900KEY low will swit ch
Q910 on.
TDMA T2290/T2297: Exciter
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
I
1900KEY*
E
1900KEY
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
U1907-61
page B35
Q901-4
page B17
U1800-14
page B23
C
800BIAS
Q811
C405
-1.21 dBm
834.99MHz
D
E
Q401
L404
L403
R10018
R405
C410
Q411
L406
C411
B
C404
C455
L407
R406
R451
C400
-11.31dbm
843.99Mhz
C452
800_OUT
R450
C499
page B13
1900_PA_IN
L400
R999
page B17
FL452
C407
1900BIAS
1900KEY
800KEY
-15.1dbm
834.99Mhz
-12.16 dBm
834.99MHz
A
2.95V
.11V
C
1.67V
1V
R906
page B17
Q1805
Q1805
Channel: 333
Cellular TX Freq: 834.99MHz
PCS TX Freq: 1859.97MHz
Analog Digital
L405
-20.18 dBm
1859.97MHz
R498
R10016
R408
C406
Q910
H
G
R409
C414
page B25
R10017
Q475
FL454
1900_OUT
Q1807-4
page B17
TX_2.75
R499
L
K
R407
B15
C333
page B13
-7.69 dBm
834.99MHz
800_PA_IN
-25.96 dBm
1859.97MHz
800KEY
U1907-62
page B35
F
Q810
R801
page B17
B
R811
R802
page B17
DRIVER_B+
page B25
A
A_D
800KEY*
J
TX SIGNAL
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
Off
1900TX On
Off
B
4.47V
D
.05V
F
.04V
E
4.46V
G
.27V
H
.05V
J
.04V
I
.05V
L
0V
K
.04V
800TX On
TDMA T2290/T2297: PA Circuit
800KEY
Q1807
B+
800BIAS
800_PA_IN
TX_800
U801
1900KEY
Q901
B+
1900BIAS
B16
TX_800
1900_PA_IN
Description
U901
The final s tage PA circuit provides the n ecessary amount of power for RF trasmission through an antenna . U801 is a PA module that is capable of operating in the
800MHz band under anal og or digital mode.
In analog mode line arity of the PA is not as critical as when operating in digital m ode. For this reason, effeiciency is a more important factor than linearit y when operating in analog mode. In digital mode, because of its IQ modulation scheme, PA lin earity is a more important factor than efficie ncy.
Efficiency and lineari ty is controlled by varying the biasing of the PA(U801). In 1900MHz mode only one bias ing method is needed since 1900M Hz mode only operates
in digital mode .
Q1807 controls the supply voltage to U801. The PA supply is sourced from the B+ line. In 800MHz mode, 800KEY is held low ca using Q1807 to switc h on. When
800KEY is pulled high, Q1807 is turned off and the supply to U801 is cut off.
Q901 controls the supply voltage to U901. The PA supply is sourced from the B+ line. In 800MHz mode, 1900KEY is held low causing Q901 to switch on. When
1900KEY is pulled high, Q901 is turned off and the supply to U901 is cut off.
After the TX carrier is ampli fied it's sent to the duplex filter for final tr ansmission through the antenn a.
TDMA T2290/T2297: PA Circuit
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
D
C911
R911
C907
10.28 dBm
1859.97MHz
F
C906
14
U901
12
6
11
TX SIGNAL
7
10
8
9
4
2
3
1
5
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
R809
C801
7
800KEY
C821
3
Q1807
2
1900TX On
L800
C820
8
6
5
2
15
3
14
4.46V
D
.04V
F
.05V
U801
12
6
11
7
10
8
9
800_TX
C804
page B19
C805
5
13
16.07 dBm
834.99MHz
C806
4
C803
800BIAS
L804
R806
page B15
R802
Q811
16
R800
C807
E
1
C814
-19.4 dBm
834.99MHz
B
L802
800_PA_IN
C808
R801
R804
FL454
page B15
C830
R10021
1
Off
C
R10115
C802
B+
page B29
8
7
Q1805
page B15
4
6
Q901
C772
page B19
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
A
page B15
1900_TX
Channel: 333
Cellular TX Freq: 834.99MHz
PCS TX Freq: 1859.97MHz
13
C
C800
1900KEY
3
5
R906
B17
Q1804
15
4
1900_PA_IN
-38.36 dBm
1859.97MHz
2
C914
R907
R908
C407
page B15
R999
16
C902
page B15
1900BIAS
R10024
Q910
L969
C912
C905
1
C903
C904
800TX On
Off
A
4.47V
B
.04V
Analog Digital
E
1.62v
1v
TDMA T2290/T2297: RF Detect/A_D Switch
TX_800
TX_800
TL800
TL801
Q821
Load
B
SW_QMOD_KEY
Load
A
SW_QMOD_KEY
CR822
A_D
Q505
TX_STEP
TX_1900
TL901
TL900
CR504
TX_2.75
TX_1900
Q503-A
RF_DET
SW_QMOD_KEY
TX_STEP
Q501
B18
Q503-B
Description
CR503
Q502
CR502
The RF detect circuit is use d to detect the RF amplitud e level of the TX signal. RF detect reports back to U1800(DCI) pin 31, using a dc level, for amplitude stabi lization. The RF
detect circuit is RF coupled with the TX sign al from either band, 8 00MHz or 1900MHz. The RF input is then conver ted into a dc level an d sent to the RF_DETECT line. There are
two stages in the RF detect circuit which are used to increase the dynamic range of the RF detect output. The two stages are controlled by the TX_STEP line input. TX _STEP is
high when power steps 0 through 5 are used . TX_STEP is low when power steps 6 through 10 are used .
When TX_STEP is low Q503-A is switched on and Q503-B is swi tched off. Q501 inverts the state of Q503-B. This operation forward biases diode CR504. A t the same time it cuts
off the supply to diode CR502, th us not forward biasing CR502. Whe n TX_STEP is hig h Q503-A is switc hed off and Q503 -B is switched on. This operation cuts off the supply to
diode CR504. At the same time current is supplied to amplifier Q502 and CR502. During low power steps the signal is se nt directly to the RF _DET output through CR504. During
high power steps the signal passes through amplifier Q502 and then sent to the RF _DET output through CR502.
Proper PA loads need to be defined when op erating in 80 0MHz analog and 800MHz digit al mode. This is done by making Load B active or inactive on the PA output path. When
transmitting in 800MHz an alog mode, LOAD A is used and LOAD B is bypassed. LOAD B is bypassed by allowing CR8 22 to be forward biased. Forward biasing CR822 w ill provide a ground state at the anode side, thus allowing only LOAD A(C823) to be present.
CR822 is forward biase d by having a supply voltage present at the AD_SW line. When the A_D line is pulled d own, Q505 is switched on, forcing the base of Q821 low. PNP transistor Q821 will then b e switched on, allowin g the output(AD_SW) to be pulled high from SW _QMOD_KEY.
In 800MHz digital mode, CR821 i s not forward biased, thus having CR821 in an open state. Dur ing this state LOAD A and LOAD B are used for the PA load. To have CR822 in an
open state, AD_SW is not pulled high by SW_QMOD_KEY. The AD_SW state is determined by the A_D line . Having a high state at A_D would switch Q505 off, thus not switching Q821 oon.
TDMA T2290/T2297: RF Detect/A_D Switch
SW_QMOD_KEY
A
TX_STEP
C502
CR501
R502
page B25
C504
C505
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
R509
L502
C510
E
C
TX SIGNAL
CR503
C513
C501
R503
D
Channel: 333
Cellular TX Freq: 834.99MHz
PCS TX Freq: 1859.97MHz
R510
C506
R504
C772
C509
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
R507
CR502
B19
TX_1900
FL453
page B3
F
L504
E
TL901
D
OFF
0.65V
0.19V
1.21V
2.76V
TL900
C
ON
0.2V
0.6V
0.18V
0.19V
Q502
C511
TX_STEP
8.43 dBm
1859.97MHz
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
R506
1900_TX
U901
page B17
Q501
F
R508
page B25
Q503
R511
C508
C512
L503
TX_2.75
CR504
C503
R505
B
22.6 dBm
834.99MHz
G
R501
R515
TL801
C516
C515
C517
TL800
L803
H
C815
1.51V .991V 1.01V .456V 1.24V .94V
CR823
Q821
CR822
G
I
R1806
page B23
TX_800
F500
page B3
23.5 dBm
834.99MHz
L821
LOAD_SW
U1800-13
page B23
Q820
SW_QMOD_KEY
page B25
C18881
C826
C828
H
C827
R402
Q505
A_D
L820
C824
2.89V 2.87V 2.87V 2.86V .14V .14V
C825
7
C804
6
C811
5
R10023
U1800-14
page B23
4
C823
B
3
C822
A
2
I
2.97V .09V
.24V .31V
1V 0V
R825
L505
Power Step
RF_DET
Analog Digital
800_TX
U801
page B17
page B25
U1800-17
page B23
TX_2.75
TDMA T2290/T2297: Reference Oscillator
OSC_DIS
RX_2.75
Q151
Q152
AFC
19.44MHZ
U150
RF_19.44MHZ
B20
Description
The reference oscill ator U150, operating at 19.44MHz, provides a "reference frequency" for the RF synthesize rs and various logic circuits.
The OSC_DIS line which is controlled by U1000 (CPU) is used to turn off U150 during sleep mode. The OSC_DIS line switches Q151 on or off, controllin g the supply
voltage to U150 and Q152.
U1800 (DCI) can "fine tune" U150 via the AFC line. Tuning of the reference oscillator is needed to synchroniz e frequencie s with the cellula r base station, therefore, the
signal re ceived from the base wil l be used to determine th e correct reference frequency.
The output of U150 is split into two signals. RF_19.44MHz is used for the RF frequency reference. Output 19.44MHz is amplified by Q152 and then sent to the logic
section for logic clock synchronization.
TDMA T2290/T2297: Reference Oscillator (U150)
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
RF_19.44MHz
C152
C155
R153
Q152
U150
R154
R152
B21
19.44MHz
AFC
L150
C1803,C18853
page B35
C153
U1500,C1911
page B33
page B25
C133
page B7
U1800-29
page B23
page B23
C150
Q151
C151
RX_2.75V
R151
page B25
OSC_DIS
U1000
page B37
TDMA T2290/T2297: DCI (U1800)
BLOCK DIAGRAM NOT NECESSARY
REFER TO PAGE B23
B22
Description
The DCI (U1800) is data converter interface between the DSP and the RF functions of a dual band TDMA transceiver. It incorporates the following functions:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Dual channel forward data I and Q(RX_I & RX_Q)
Two DACs for reverse data I and Q(TX_I & tx_Q)
DAC for AFC
DAC for AGC & DAC for reverse PA control
DAC for PA bias
Serial Synchronous Interface(SSI)
Serial Peripheral Interface(SPI)
Internally generates clocks from single master input
Analog wide band forward data signalling functio ns with SPI inte rface
Analog modulator interface
Analog discrim inator interfaces
RF Discontinuous Receive du ring Manchester decoding
On chip voltage reference for transmit I and Q
TDMA T2290/T2297: DCI(U1800)
Power Step
U1907-60
page B35
U110
page B7
CR504
page B19
U110
page B7
RX_I
RF_DET
RX_Q
R1806 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13
R1801
A
C1802
B23
RX SIGNAL
10
28
9
29
8
30
7
31
6
32
5
33
4
34
RBIAS
3
35
VREBUF
2
A
TX
-20
-80
-116
2.36V 1.43V .39V
Q1803
C
G
RX Input
F
On
<-51dBm >-39dBm
1.81V 2.83V
RX
B
On
Off
.03V
2.81V
IRQ
TX_DATA
RX_DATA
page B19
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
C153
page B21
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
U1900
page B33
U1900
page B33
RX_2.75V
Off
.11V 2.82V
0.1V 2.82V
U301,Q811
page B13 page B15
Q505
page B19
Q820
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
.11V
0.6Vpp
U301,Q1500
page B13 page B25
U10-14
page B5
U301,Q503
page B13 page B19
U110
page B7
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
MISO
B
R1830
MOSI
19.44MHz
C1506
RX Input
R1804
BATT_SAV
INTEG_EN
C1805
R10013
C1804
FM
FE_EN
2.95V
37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48
TX_IX
TX_I
SS1
CLK
Analog Digital
E
1
Q1802
U10-14
page B5
U1800-18
U1800-16
U1900
page B33
11
27
C1801
page B25
26
36
C1800
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
12
C1803
R1800
834.99MHz
1859.97MHz
879.99MHz
1940.01MHz
-20dBm
LOAD_SWITCH
25
R1820
DEMOD
AFC
AOC_CNTL
AGC_RSSI
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
TX_2.75
D
R1810
E
TX SIGNAL
C306
page B11
QMOD_KEY
FE_EN
TX_STEP
BATT_SAV
A_D
B
Channel: 333
Cellular TX Freq:
PCS TX Freq:
Cellular RX Input Freq:
PCS RX Input Freq:
RX Input:
TX Power Level 2
REF_2.75V
page B25
U301
page B13
U301
page B13
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
C
R1811
U110
page B7
U150
page B21
R342
page B13
U110
page B7
6-10
D
G
C132
U110
page B7
TX_ENB
ZIFSYN_REF
0-5
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
F
FS
SCLK
RESET
AGC_STEP
TX_Q
TX_QX
page B25
U1900
page B33
U1900
page B33
U1000
page B37
U110
page B7
2.75V
page B25
U301
page B13
U301
page B13
TDMA T2290/T2297: GCAP2 (U1500)
BLOCK DIAGRAM NOT NECESSARY
REFER TO PAGE B25
B24
Description
The GCAP2(U1500) provides the regulators and start-up functions for the entire radio. The GCAP2 contains the following hardware
blocks:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
On/Off control signal s to properly activate the radio.
Bandgap reference voltage
Audio amplifica tion for the speaker
Audio amplifi cation for the alert
Audio amplifica tion for the EXT speaker
Audio amplific ation of the microphone
Audio CODEC
8 channel, 8 bit A/D
Linear regulators
- RX_2.75V for RX circuits
- 2.75V for logic circuits
- TX_2.75V for TX circuits
- 5V for negative regulator
- REF_2.75V for negative regulator reference
TDMAPWRON
T2290/T2297: GCAP2
U960-6
page B29
U110
page B7
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
R1011
page B41
1VP-P
Q1501
R1512
SPKR+
SPKRHDST_SPKR
PA_DRV
R1554
C1536
SW_QMOD_KEY
B+
page B29
R10095
page B31
R10096
page B31
R1536
page B31
DRIVER_B+
2.75V
U1500
C1502
SPKR_IN
C1594
AUX_MIC
R1553
SPKROUT
Y1500
U1800-20
page B23
TX_2.75
C1539
J940-1
page B31
CD_CAP
C1503
GCAP2
CONV_BYP
R1516
TX ON TX OFF
C1580
C1522
C1511
C1510 C1521 C1514
C1523
AUDIO_IN
R1524
VAG
C1544
A
R1537
CR1563
MIC_OUT
AUX_OUT
CODEC_BUS
C1540
R1521
C18908
page B41
L1593
L1599
PA_SENSE
LI_CELL
R1513
.46Vpp
AD4
SPI_BUS
U1000
page B37
B
L907
32kHz
650mv-pp@1K
U1900
page B33
QMOD_KEY
A
RAM_CS0
SRAM_S1*
GCAP2_INT
19.44MHZ
WDI
KEY_ON*_OFF
ON2* 4.03V
AUDIO_OUT
RT1
REF_2.75V
R1555
page B31
ALRT_OUT
R10130
B25
SRAM_VCC
U1000
page B37
U1300
page B39
U1000
page B37
C153
page B21
VDOUB
U1000
page B37
5V
RX_2.75V
U1000
page B37
R10100
page B43
TP29
page B44
TP29
page B44
AGC_RSSI
RESET
3WB_RTN
CMP_LVL
MAN_LVL
.113V
B 2.87V
2.82V
0V
MIC_BIAS
C1516
C1595
VAG
MIC+
MICC1507
TX_2.75
R10132
R10133
THERM_AD
R1597
R1514
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
J900-1
page B31
J900-2
page B31
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
2.75V
TDMA T2290/T2297: Voltage Regulators
CR1590
2.75V
-5V
U903
C18914
BATT_SAV
2.75V
U1501
VDOUB
B26
CR1540
Description
There are some circuits that require a voltage higher than the battery source. For this reason, a voltage doublin g charge pump circuit is provided. U1501 takes the 2.75V
source and oscillates it w ith a high pe ak to peak signal. The positive region of the signal is then sent out to produced the VDOUB supply.
BATT_SAV is used to cut off the VDOUB supply to conserve battery power. When the BATT_SAV line is on (high) , U1501 will b e disabled.
U903 is the ne gative supply generator. It is used to supply -5V to the LCD displ ay contrast circuitry.
U903 generates a negative voltage by generating a 3 Vpp square wave from the 2.75V source. The signal is then rectified to generate a -3V supply. This supply is not at a
suffici ent level for proper operation of the LCD display. In order to increase the negative voltage a sample of a square wave that U903 produces is combined with the -3V
output of U903. This process will change the voltage reference of the square wave to -3V instead of 0V. The square wave is now reaching a negative peak value of -5.4V.
The square wave is then rectified by CR1590, allowing a -5V volt supply to be generated.
TDMA T2290/T2297: Voltage Regulators
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
-5V
CR1590
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
U903
B27
2.75V
page B25
B+
page B29
CR1540
VDOUB
U1501
2.75V
page B25
BATT_SAV
U1800-16
page B23
TDMA T2290/T2297: Charger
Q962
Q1812A
EXT_B+
TRICKLE_SET
CHRG_EN
R964
B+
R1593
ISENSE
SENSE
Q1597A
Q1812B
BATT+
U960
PWRON
Q1598
CR1599
C1589
Q1597B
B28
Description
U960 is a Charger control OverVoltage IC(COVIC). It is used to control the rate of charge to Nickel Metal Hydrid(NiMH) batteries that are ins talled in the transceiver.
U960 is al so used to control any excessively hi gh voltage conditions that can damage the transceiver.
EXT_B+ is the external supply from an accessory that is being used to allow the batteries to get charged. Q962 controls the rate of charge and is the disconnecting device to
the internal c ircuit of the phone if a hig h voltage(overvoltage) condition exists. U960 controls the rate of charge through Q962.
Three charging rates existsl;(1) trickel, (2) mainten ance, and (3) full. Trickel and mainten ance charging is controlled by the STUART(U1907) via the TRICKEL_SET line.
Full rate charging is controlled by the STUART(U1907) via the CHRG_EN line. The time period of charging the batteries is determined by monitoring the battery voltage.
The battery level is monitored in three categories; (1) 1/3 charge, (2) 1/2 charge, and (3) 3/4 charge. Each catergory will determine the tim e period of charge.
Once the charging rate has been determined, the batteries will be charged through Q18 12B. Q1812B also helps in pre venting reverse battery conditions.
If an over-voltage condition exists, Q962 needs to be completely turned off to protect the circuitry of the phone. The SENSE line in the U960 is used to determine whether
there is a over-voltage condition. If an overvoltage condition exists, the TRICKLE_SET and CHRG_EN ports in the U960 will be disabled . Having these two ports disabled
will not allow Q962 to be driven on.
The SENSE line is also used to detect a charging accessory. When a charging accessory is detected the PWRON line is pulled high. This will in form the GCAP(U1500) that
an external source is attached to the phone.
Having the PWRON high will also switch Q1598 on and allow the voltage to rise across C1589. C1589 will then discharge into the base of Q1597B. Q1597B will be
switched on during the discharge cycle of C1597. Switching Q1597B on will lower the base voltage of Q1597A and switch Q1597A on. Having Q1597A on will pull the
gate of Q1812A high , switching Q1812A into an off state. Q1812A will remain off until C1589 is discharged. This circuit design is used to prolong the accessory source
connection to the B+ lin e, giving U960 enough time to react to an overvoltage condition.
TDMA T2290/T2297: Charger
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
EXT_B+
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
EXT_B+
R1011
page B41
CR1562
J1
C1573
MANUAL_TEST
B
J605
R964
EXT_B+
Q962
1
3
C1574
4
2
C
C1589
Q1597
B29
B+
R1593
B
4.47V
0V
C
3.79V
U1907-50
page B35
U1500
page B25
J604
0V
CHRG_EN
A
PWRON
D
Q1812
Off
.11V
Q1598
R1596
A
On
2.68V
R1598
CR1598
R1594
CR1597
Charger
U960
TRICKEL_SET
CR1599
U1907-51
page B35
BATT+
VR960
EXT_B+
C1592
C1590
R1592
C829
Supply External Battery
D
3.44V
0V
BATT+
TDMA T2290/T2297: Audio Circuit
J940
Headset Speaker
HDST_ SPKR
AUX_MIC
Headset Mic
2.75V
BOOM_MIC_DET
B30
Q1551
R1540
Description
When a headset is in serted in J940, the internal speaker an d microphone is dis abled. The user can now use the headset for handsfree conversation. BOOM_MIC_DET
informs U1000 whethe r a headset is inse rted or not. The state of BOOM_MIC_DET is controlled by Q1551.
When the headset is inserted the biasing voltage for the AUX_MIC will no longer be pr esent at the base of the NPN transistor Q1551. This will switch Q1551 on, thus,
allowing BOOM_MIC_DE T to be pulled high by source 2.75V. When the headset is not inserted, the AUX_MIC biasing voltage is present at the base of Q1551. This
condition will switch Q1551 off, thus, pulling the BOOM_MIC_DET to ground through R1540.
There are two distinct audio paths for the microphone. One is for the auxilia ry microphone(headset mic) and the other is for the internal microphone. This is not the case
with the speaker audio paths. The headset speaker and the int ernal speaker share the same audio path which comes from the GCAP(U1500). In order to disable the internal speaker when the headset is attached, the phase of the audio signal on the SPKR- line is phase shifted by 180 º. When the internal speaker is enabled the SPKR+ and
SPKR- have the same audio signal e xcept that SPKR- is phase shifted 1 80º. When a headset is attached, the SPKR- is not phase shifted 180º . The SPKR+ and SPKRhave the same audio signal and are in phase. This condition will no t allow the internal s peaker to function, thus, disabling the inte rnal speaker.
TDMA T2290/T2297: Audio Circuit
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
A
Headset
A
B
On Off
0v 2.78v
2.78v
0v
R1540
C18858
B
BOOM_MIC_DET
U1000
page B37
Q1551
J940
2.75V
page B25
VR1551
HDST_SPKR
SPKR+
R10095
VR501
B31
C1519
R1536
L1593
page B25
L907
page B25
C1572
VR502
ALERT_OUT
R1555
C18901
SPKRMIC+
R1523
R1581
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
C1582
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
C18850
B+
page B29
J900
ALERT+
C1583
R10096
ALERT-
VR1500
AL600
page B45
C18900
C1550
AL600
page B45
C1571
U1500
page B25
C1520
L1594
page B25
AUX_MIC
J941
C1515
page B25
MIC_BIAS
MIC-
J942
L967
page B25
page B25
C1581
page B25
TDMA T2290/T2297: DSP (U1900)
BLOCK DIAGRAM NOT NECESSARY
REFER TO PAGE B33
Description
B32
The following list is a description of the DSP(U1900):
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ROM Mask Device(48K)
Patch RAM space(16K)
Fixed point MAC(multi ply accumulator)
8-bit parallel interface
8-bit control I/O interface
Dual serial I/O ports
Two external int errupts
Flexible power management includi ng Sleep mode, Sleep with slow internal
clock, and stop
•
•
Three modes of operation
•
1. Actively running
2. Light sl eep - Clocks running , but lower power consumption
3. Deep sleep - All cl ocks off, extremely l ow power consumption
•
Digital Traffic Channel
1. Acquiring and maintaining synchronization with the Digital Channel
2. AFC, AGC, AOC control loops
3. Vocoders (ACELP)
4. Channel equalization
5. Channel decoding
6. Channel encoding
7. Audio functions
8. MAHO measurements
Digital Control channel
1. Essentially DTC minus audi o and vocoders
2. ROCM instead of MAHO
3. Modem goes into deep sleep for long periods
Analog Control Channel
1. No RX functions - modem in d eep sleep
2. Manchester Encoder
3. Transmitter control
Analog voice channel
1. Audio processing
2. SAT detection/Transponding
TDMA T2290/T2297: DSP(U1900)
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
R1913
U1000
page B37
DSP_RST
R1901
C1906
2.75V
page B25
C9910
R1912
R1900
U1907
page B35
MODEM_ADDR
R10117
CODEC_BUS
C1904
U1500
page B25
C1910
MODEM_DATA
VPP
C1905
U1907
page B35
U1900
C1903
C1911
19.44MHZ
INTEG_EN
GP_INT
DSP_TRAP
TX_DATA
RX_DATA
SCLK
FS
RWN
IO
2.75V
page B25
VDDA
C1900
Q1802
page B23
U1903-27
page B35
U1000
page B37
U1800-2
page B23
U1800-1
page B23
U1800-47
page B23
U1800,U1907
page B35
page B23
U1907-28
page B35
U1907-29
page B35
C1902
B33
2.75V
page B25
C153
page B21
CK12
R1910
2.75V
page B25
TDMA T2290/T2297: STUART (U1903)
BLOCK DIAGRAM NOT NECESSARY
REFER TO PAGE B35
B34
Description
The STUART IC(U1903) is a custom gate array that uses the following functions:
Host Port Emulation - This provides a bus interconnection between the call processor and the DSP via the call processor’s parallel memory bus, interconnected to
the modem DSP’s parallel memory bus. This communicati ons port is functionally identical to the host port provided for the Motorola DSP; To both devices, the port
appears as a bus-mapped peripheral. The call processor sees the port as an 8-address block in memory at a location determined by the call processor’s programming
of its own chip select for the START IC. The DSP sees the port as an 8-address block in I/O space. Because the STUART IC uses the high byte of the DSP’s bus,
provisions are made for byte/word conversion, to be compatible with the existin g word-wide communications with U1000(Call processor).
DSP Timer - It provides a timer function. This is a device, accessible to the DSP, which implement a continuously clocked timer, with rollover, a feature needed for
modem functionalit y but difficult to implement with the Lucent device. The Lucent timer can be set up to either stop on count=0, or to repeat the last count interval.
We need a counter that can be set up to in terrupt at a particular point in time, and then keeps counting, so that real-time is preserved, and can be set for a future time
interval. This timer has a clock that is coherent with the symbol rate.
General Purpose I/O - It provides a 4-bit general purpose I/O port, with programming d ata direction function, as an extension to the call processor bit I/O set.
RF SPI interface - Improved interface between the Call processor, DSP, and ZIFSYN for scanning requirements needed because of the PCS band
Transmitter control logic - Transmitter keying and frequency band selection.
TDMA T2290/T2297: STUART(U1907)
C153
page B21
19.44MHZ
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
C18853
U1000
page B37
800TX
Pin 62
CALL_ADD
Off
.055v
On
Off
.055v
R1036
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
RWB
16 15 14 13 12 11 10
ECLK
HOST_EN
RESET
R1700
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
17
64
18
63
19
62
20
61
21
22
23
24
25
U1907
STUART
U1900
page B33
RWN
28
53
29
52
U1900
page B33
IO
30
51
31
50
32
49
55
54
FS
C18910
MODEM_ADDR
C1702
U1900
page B33
C1701
2.75V
page B25
Q351
page B11
U10,U301
page B5 page B13
U104
page BXX
Q1805
page B15
Q1804
page B15
U1800
page B23
U1200
page B39
U110
page B7
U110
page B7
U110
page B7
U1000
page B37
R1099
page B41
U960-3
page B29
U960-3
page B29
U1900
page B33
TX On
Off Charger On
Off
A
0.1V 2.82V
C 2.68V .11V
MODEM_DATA
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
2.75V
page B25
TRICKLE_SET
CHRG_EN
57
56
26
33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48
C
58
GP_INT
U1900
page B33
B
59
U1900
page B33
27
RDB
ZIFSYN_EN
RF_DATA
RF_CLK
IRQ
ACC_STATE
60
C18911
2.75V
page B25
9
800Mhz 1.9Ghz
.055v
2.82v
2.82v
.052v
800*_1900
800*_1900
800_1900*
800KEY*
1900KEY*
A TX_ENB
C1700
B35
U1000
page B37
Pin 63
Pin 64
C1531
U1000
page B37
CALL_DATA
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
1900TX
On
Pin 61
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
Accessory
B
CLA
AC
Chrgr
DHFA
TDMA T2290/T2297: Call Processor (U1000)
BLOCK DIAGRAM NOT NECESSARY
REFER TO PAGE B37
B36
Description
U1000 is a single-chip microcontroller that controls major functions of the cellular phone. U1000 will perform the functions of both
the master controller and keyboard processor. These functions include:
•
•
•
•
•
Keypad interrupt and scanning
Display driving
Control of audio and RF hardware
Call processing (signalli ng) software
- ON/OFF control
- EEPROM access
- Synthesizer programmin g
- Automatic Frequency Control(AFC)
- Transmit power setting
User Interface
U1000 is not packaged with internal memories as past Call processors. This m eans that vital in formation that was previously stored in the memory of previous call processors is now stored in the external EEPROM(U1908).
TDMA T2290/T2297: Call Processor(U1000)
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
LSTRB
EEPROM_HOLD
R10120
R1089
CALL_DATA
3WB_RTN
DISP_SEL
CALL_ADD
DATA_OUT
R1009
R1032
0V
U110
page B7
U1300
page B39
U1908
page B39
2.75V
page B25
R1088
page B44
U1800-3
page B23
U1907-54
page B35
2.75V
page B25
R1013
page B41
R1012
page B41
page B25
MAN_LVL
GCAP2_INT
BOOM_MIC_DET
DISP_CS*
OSC_DIS
DSP_TRAP
CMP_LVL
FLASH_EN
RAM_CS0
MOB_PORT
32kHz
U1200
U1500,U1800
SRAM_VCC
C1022
2.68V
R1030
Off
MODA
On
C1002
A
DATA_IN
R1031
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
Backlight
MODA
U1907-17
page B35
Q1810
page B41
2.75V
page B25
C1001
VRH
U1908
page B39
C1012
C1003
MISO
MOSI
CLK
SPI_BUS
IRQ
U1000
KPR(1:5)
KPC(1:4)
KEYPAD_BUS
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
R729
page B44
U1500
page B25
C1000
C1004
XFC
U1500
page B25
R10129
U1500
U1908
U1800
C1005
KEYPAD
page B43
DSP_RST
RESET
FREQ_ERROR
R1098
B37
U1500
page B25
U1903
U1200
U1300
RWB
BACKLIGHT
A
BKGND
J7
U1903
U1200
WP*
WDI
R1050
U1900
page B33
ECLK
C1006
R1205
page B39
U1500
page B25
EE_CS
HOST_ENB
R10136
U1907-19
page B35
U1907-18
page B35
2.75V
page B25
R1011
page B41
U1500
page B25
Q1551
page B31
Q151
page B21
U1900
page B33
U1500,R1005
page B25
U1200
page B39
Q1099
page B41
page B41
TDMA T2290/T2297: Memory
WP*
Q1811
R1201
U1200
B+
WP*
Q1806
B38
Description
A serial EEPROM(U1908) of 256K bytes is used for storage of the NAM information, authentication keys, phasing data, ESN, and memory. The EEPROM serial inter face to the microcontroller i s a standard SPI-compatible i nterface.
U1300 is a 64K x 16 low voltage, low power SRAM. U1300 uses a parallel interface bus.
U1200 is a 512K x 16 flash EPROM. U1200 uses a parallel interface bus.
The WP* line is used during EPROM flash con ditions. When the EPROM is not being flash ed, WP* is at a low state. This condition w ill switch Q1811 off, thus, allowing
the gate of Q1806 to be pulled high. A high state at th e gate of Q1806 will switch Q1806 off, thus, not allow ing WP* from U1200 to be pulled high by B+.
During flashing condi tions, WP* is pulled high. This condition will switch Q1811 on , allowing the voltage at the gate of Q1806 to drop. A lower voltage at the gate of
Q1806 will switch the transistor on. This condition will allow WP* from U1200 to be pulled high by B+.
TDMA T2290/T2297: Memory
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
U1000
page B37
CALL_DATA
U1000
page B37
CALL_ADD
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
CALL_ADD
U1000
page B37
2.75V
page B25
FLASH_ENB
C1093
R1090
B39
U1500
page B25
U1000
page B37
CALL_DATA
SRAM_S1*
LSTRB
U1200
C1200
SRAM_VCC
page B25
C1021
RDB
C1023
2.75V
page B25
U1300
WP*
RESET
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
2.75V
page B25
B+
page B29
SPI_BUS
EE_CS
EEPROM_HOLD
U1908
U1000
page B37
U1907-58
page B35
R1092
U1000
page B37
R1204
R1201
Q1806
Q1811
R1203
R1205
R1200
B+
page B29
WP*
U1000
page B37
TDMA T2290/T2297: B+ Discharge/Backlight Driver
BKLT_BIAS
B+
2.75V
R1573
Q1810
BACKLIGHT
Q1574B
SRAM_VCC
Q1574A
Q1809
R1573
R10134
B40
Description
The B+ discharge circ uit consists of Q1574 and it's related components. This circuit is used in conjuncti on with the Power Cut process.
The Power Cut process will initiate an automatic power up cycle if battery power is disrupted for less than 3 seconds. During a Power Cut transistion, the phone will power
up automatically without activating the wake-up tone. Also, the phone will wake up to the same state that is had prior to the power disruption. The customer will never realize that a power disruption occurred. If power is disrupted and not re-covered within 3 sec onds, the phone will re main off.
Capacitor C1563(GCAP section, page B25) is used to maintain the SRAM_VCC supply active when a power disrupti on occurs. SRAM_VCC is the supply voltage to maintain the RAM(U1300) active durin g a power disruption. During a power disruption everything except SRAM_VCC, will be powered off. In this condtion the supply 2.75V
is off. This will allow Q1574A to be switched on, allowing the gate of Q1574B to be pulled high by the source SRAM_VCC. Q1574B will be tu rned on when a high state is
present at the gate. This will then ground R1573 and allow the B+ line to discharge through R1573. The process of discharging the B+ line help s in eliminati ng any parasiti cal voltages on the B+ line wh en the power is re-covered prior to the 3 second time out.
When the phone is powered on, 2.75V will be present. This will switched Q1574A off and allow the gate of Q1574B to be pulled low by R1573. A low state at the gate of
Q1574B will turn it off and not al low R1573 to be grounded.
The BACKLIGHT line is used to activate the keypad backlights. A high state at BACKLIGHT will activate Q1810 and complete the backlight circui t path to ground. The
LEDs will then turn on. Q1809 is used as an overvoltage protection. If the voltage at the base of Q1809 is high than the voltage at the base of Q1810, Q1809 will be
switched on. This will force the BACKLIGHT line to ground and disable Q1810. The backlight circuit path will no longer have its path to ground and the backlights won't
activate.
The ACC_STATE lin e is used to in dicate what type of accessory is attached to the phone. The accessory will place a specific load on the MANUEL_TEST line that is
unique to other types of accessories.
TDMA T2290/T2297: B+ Discharge/Backlight Driver
EXT_MIC
AUDIO_IN
TP28
page B44
CMP
CMP_LVL
DATA_OUT
MANUAL_TEST
MAN_LVL
J1-4
U1500,U1000
page B25
page B37
page B29
C1546
R1574
R1099
R1011
2.75V
page B25
R1010
B41
R1573
MOB_PORT
U1000
page B37
TP21
page B44
R1013
R1097
B
U1000
page B37
SRAM_VCC
page B25
R1575
R1005
CR1001
2.75V
page B25
TP22
page B44
A
ACC_STATE
U1907-53
page B35
C18908
R10131
R10127
C18913
U1500
page B25
Q1099
B+
page B29
DATA_OUT*
EXT_B+
U1000
page B37
page B29
External Battery
2.79V
0V
R1000
B
Q1810
Source
R10134
Q1809
DATA_IN*
page B37
R1014
R1012
DATA_IN
D
BKLT_BIAS
C
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
Accessory
A
BACKLIGHT
CLA
AC
Chrgr
Channel: 333
AF Gen1 Freq:
AF Gen1 Level:
DHFA
U1000
1kHz
600mV
TX AUDIO SIGNAL
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
Backlight
C
D
On
Off
1.35V
0V
2.1V 3.16V
TP23
page B44
2.75V
page B25
LEDS
page BXX
U1000
page B37
TDMA T2290/T2297: Keypad
BLOCK DIAGRAM NOT NECESSARY
REFER TO PAGE B43
Description
B42
To cycle the power on the phone, the power key needs to be depressed. Upon depressing the power key, KEY_ON*_OFF will be pulled low. As soon as the power
key is released the KEY_ON*_OFF line will be pulled high. The GCAP(U1500) will then recognize this transi stion and cycle the power to the phone. A power cycle
can also be done externally using TP29. TP29 is a mupliplexe d line used for power cycling and an audio output line. CR730 isolates the power cycle function to the
KEY_ON*_OFF line.
U1000 will scan the row(KPR1:KPR6) and column(KPC1:KPC4) matrix to determine if a key is being depressed. One key press will h ave a row and column combination that U1000 uses to distinguish e ach key.
TDMA T2290/T2297: KEYPAD
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
KPR(1)
KPR(2)
KPR(3)
KPR(4)
KEY_ON*_OFF
KPC(2)
KPC(1)
KPR(5)
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
R10106
C112
R10107
R10108
C18885
R10102
R10104
R10105
R10100
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
U1500
page B35
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
R10103
END
SND
STORE
RCL
FCN
B43
CLEAR
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
1
2 ABC
3 DEF
4GHI
5 JKL
6 MNO
KPR(6)
7PQRS
8 TUV
9 WXYZ
R730 KEY_ON*_OFF
0 OPR
#
*
R10101
AUDIO_OUT
U1000
page B37
U1500
page B25
TP29
page B44
CR730
C18887
U1000
page B37
R10109
R10110
C18886
KPC(3)
KPC(4)
U1000
page B37
TDMA T2290/T2297: Connectors
This manual is Motorola property. Copying or
distribution strictly prohibited without prior written
consent from Motorola and must be returned upon
Motorola's request.
RESET
Motorola Confidential Proprietary
DISP_CS*
J902
VOLTAGE SUPPLIES
Colored boxes represent the area in
which the components are placed.
CA0
R734
TP25
TP961 GND
RWB
R728
CD8
1
R727
2
CD9
3
B44
SCI_RXD
TP23
TP29
ON*/AUDOUT
R726
4
CD10
5
R725
6
7
MANUAL_TEST
TP20
TP21
R724
8
SCI_TXD
9
10
R723
AUDIN
TP28
TP22
CMP
12
R722
R721
R1088
16
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
CD12
U1000
page B37
14
15
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
CD14
13
U1000
page B37
CD11
CD13
11
R712
U1000
page B37
R729
R735
B+
U1000
page B37
CD15
DISP_SEL
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
U1000
page B37
C711
-5V
page B37
2.75V
page B35
TDMA T2290/T2297: Board Layout Side 1
Board Issue: P8
L551
C554
J100
C101
C887
C882
C23
C26
C801
L803
C824
CR823
CR822
R10023
Q821
C825
L820
C823
C822
C804
C811
R825
C815
R501
R515
C516
L505
C805
L804
C803
R802
R806
U801
C806
R800
C517
C515
C814
C808
C802
L802
R804
R801
R401
C342
C18871
C18873
C807
L800
C820
R10115
C830
C821
L821
Q820
VR501
C18900
VR502
R10096
C18901
C800
C389
Q1807
C772
C915
C906
R906
R907
R908
C401
C395
C428
R809
R10095
C902
C903
C912
R10024
C1508
U901
F500
L21
C25
C302
L20
R302
C305
C304
FL453
CR301
C309
C310
R822
C826
C828
C18881
C827
R402
Q505
VR1500
C1550
C829
FL350
R10021
C343
R403
R893
Q880
C308
C306
CR302
C425
R425
Q901
L401 C499
MERLIN
R341
C1523 C1516
C1512 R1524
C1585
L451
C914
L381 C333
U301
L23
C628
C911
L378
R342
R1521
L452
C335 C427
C1510 C1521 C1514
C412
C300
C831
Q1551
L969
C21
C20
R999
XFMR377
R1540
R452
C1511
C339
C905
C454
Q1812
R1532 C1513 C1522
R1516
Q151
R151
J604
R10131
R1515 R1522 R1580 C1580
C1585
C447
C151
R808
R911
C904
C402
C205
C487
VR960
FL413
C413
R311
C153
L150
U1501
R1533 R1537
C1545
R1534
C1540
C1544
CR1540
C1542
C1502 C1503
GCAP2
R53
C334
C150
C1537 C1594
L302
C351
C1584 C1578
C154
R807
C907
C350
C1577
R1553 L1594
C1541
Q301
C152
C153
U306
R303
C315
R308
L351
C1597
C1538 L1550
L303
C1803
R1804
R154
CR300
C555
C551
FL20
R306
C307
L100
A100
L562
C898
R304
R301
U150
C155
C884
R883
C885
C899
C1506
C1804
C1805
C1801
Q1802
C1903 C1904 R10124 C1564 R10117
C1576
R152
C1539
U1500
C317 R305
R1820
R1801
C1906
C1802 R1800 C1800
C1579
R881
R884
C888
C313
C1575
R1830 Q1803
Q351
C311
R392
R1555
C883
C399
C886
R391
R10013
R1812
Q152
L1599
R1554
C1535
RT1
CR1563
C1591
R350
Q391
R882
C132
R1811
C1910
L967
C1551
Q1501
C1593
L1593
L907
C312
U1800
DCI
C1536
C18910
C1701
Y1500
C1905
R1513
C1530
R1030
C1002
C1022
R1031
C1702
R1032
C1003 R1009
U1000
C1501
U903
C18911 R1512
STUART
C1562
CR1590
C1700
U1907
C18903
U1900
R1700
R1098
U1908
C1001
R1036
C18859
R1900
R1911
C1911
C1531
C1005
R1050
C18850
C1004
C1000
R1092
R1798
R1799
R10129
C1582
C1006
J900
B45
R1593
U1300
C1021
C316
R1806
C1900
U1200
R1090
C1012
C1023
C1589
Q1597
C1583
R1810
R393
C9910 R1910
R1912
C1093 C1200
C18853
C1902
J605
C1574
Q1810
Q1809
R10134
J1
C1573
R964
Q962
CR1562
TDMA T2290/T2297: Layout Side 2
Board Issue: P8
C18858
S508
C1598
R1597
R499 R498
Q503
C1571
C1520
C505
L502 CR503
C501
R503
Q502
C30
C34
C35
C32
L30
C4
C3
R52
C10
C24
FL10
C15
C500
C12 C14
L552
C51
C550 L550
R10
L11
R60
C13
FL100
C552
S525
C2
C37
U10
L988
L101
C36
C1
C1813
C1815 C100
C108
C1810
C1809
C1808
C1811
R507
R30
C33
C5
C1816
C6
C1814
C54
C113 C111
L50
C1812 C1806
R506
R510
C38 L31
C1817
C504
CR504 C503
R3
U110
Q501
C509
R505
C203
C251
C124
C1807
R1200 Q1806 Q1811
C506
C513
C253 C261 C202 R201
C131
DS911
R1201 R1204
R1202
R10110
R1561
C18887
R10109
C252
CR100 L962
R1110
R1596
C18886
C262
FL30
R1111
R1913
R1901
R1014
R1012
R10014
Q1598
C1590
DS912
DS901
R1104
R1000
CR1598
R1598
R1102
DS908
C204 C272 C134 C133 R131 C135
R1100
Q1099
R1107
U960
R730
DS905
DS903
C1505
C407
R406 C400
FL452
C711
R509
L407
C414
R1536
C1519
C1572
C511
R451
R1109
L503
R508
R723
R722
C502
L504 R504 CR502
R712
Q401
Q411
R724
R1088
DS910
R1592
R1573
R1105
C408
L403
L404
C1592
C406
R10018
J902
C1546
R1574
R1575
R728
R727
R726
R725
R10017
FL454 Q475 R10016
CR501 R511
R1108
R735
R734
Q810 Q910
R729
R10101
R407 R408
DS909
DS907
R1106
R1103
DS913
C1596
R1099
R1010
R1011
B46
R1097
R1013
C1570
DS904
DS906
VR1551
J940
Q811
R1005
R1101
DS902
R1112
S512
R811
R10106
R10108
C18913
C112
R10107
C18885
R10130
R10127
R10102
R10133
R10132
R10104
R10105
R10103
R10100
R10120
R1080
R1581
R1523
R10136
C18908
C1507
R1514
L553
Feedback Form
TDMA T2290/T2297 Feedback Form
To report any problems or omissions to this service manual;
1. Photocopy this page.
2. Fill out the lines below and give your comments.
3. Fax this form to Motorola TDMA Global Service Support
Fax number 1-815-884-3121
Attn: Documentation Staff
Service Manual Number: ____________________ Revision: ___________
Your Name: ________________________________
Telephone Number: ____________________________
Nature of Problem or Omission: _______________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
©2000 Motorola, Inc.
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