MD-1210 MIDI Keyboard
Please read before using this equipment.
Owner’s Manual
MD-1210 MIDI Keyboard
ˆ Contents
Features ................................................................................................................... 4
The FCC Wants You to Know ............................................................................. 5
Preparation ..............................................................................................................
Connecting Power ..............................................................................................
Connecting Headphones ....................................................................................
Connecting an External Amplifier .......................................................................
Using the Sheet Music Stand .............................................................................
6
6
7
7
7
A Quick Look at Your Keyboard ............................................................................ 8
Operation ................................................................................................................. 8
Basic Operation .................................................................................................. 8
Playing the Demonstration Tunes ...................................................................... 9
Using the Preset Tones ...................................................................................... 9
Using the Drum Pads ....................................................................................... 11
Using Reverb .................................................................................................... 11
Using Split ........................................................................................................ 11
Using Layer ...................................................................................................... 12
Using Split and Layer Together ........................................................................ 12
Using the Preset Auto-Rhythms ....................................................................... 13
Using Auto Accompaniment ............................................................................. 15
Using the Mixer ................................................................................................. 18
Using the Custom Tone Synthesizer ................................................................ 20
Using the Registration Memory ........................................................................ 23
Special Features ...................................................................................................
Changing Keys .................................................................................................
Tuning the Keyboard ........................................................................................
Using Touch Response .....................................................................................
Changing Auto Power Off .................................................................................
Using Pitch Bend ..............................................................................................
Using a Sustain Pedal ......................................................................................
© 2000 Tandy Corporation.
All Rights Reserved.
RadioShack, Adaptaplug, and RadioShack.com are trademarks used by Tandy Corporation.
2
Contents
24
24
25
25
25
26
26
Using the Memory .................................................................................................
Real-Time Recording .......................................................................................
Playing Back from Memory ..............................................................................
Step Recording .................................................................................................
Recording Multiple Tracks ................................................................................
Editing Memory Contents .................................................................................
27
27
29
29
31
33
Using MIDI .............................................................................................................
About MIDI .......................................................................................................
Making the MIDI Connections ..........................................................................
MIDI Data .........................................................................................................
Changing MIDI Settings ...................................................................................
Dumping/Importing Data ..................................................................................
Notes About the MIDI Implementation Chart ....................................................
34
35
35
35
37
38
39
Troubleshooting .................................................................................................... 40
Care .................................................................................................................. 41
Appendix ...............................................................................................................
Note Table ........................................................................................................
Drum Assignment List ......................................................................................
Fingered Chord Chart .......................................................................................
42
42
44
45
MIDI Implementation Chart .................................................................................. 46
Specifications ....................................................................................................... 47
Contents
3
ˆ Features
Your RadioShack MIDI Keyboard is a
state-of-the-art musical instrument that
offers you a vast array of sounds. You
can choose from 200 different musical
instruments or sound effects and 100
rhythms, as well as automatic accompaniments and percussion sounds.
Your keyboard also includes a MIDI
(Musical Instrument Digital Interface)
feature, which lets you connect it to other MIDI-equipped musical instruments
or devices — even your personal computer.
This versatile keyboard can provide
hours of fun and is ideal for anyone who
wants to make music, from the beginner
to the experienced musician.
Note: The keyboard conforms to most,
but not all, General MIDI specifications.
Because of this, you might experience
some incompatibility when using the
keyboard with another General MIDI device. For more information, see “Using
MIDI” on Page 34.
Your keyboard’s features include:
24-Note Polyphonic Sound — lets you
play and hear up to 24 notes at the
same time, so you can play or create almost any type of music.
Synthesizer Function — lets you create up to 32 of your own original tones.
you play them, along with the current
tone, rhythm, and tempo. The display’s
built-in backlight makes it easy to read it
even in dim light.
Two Built-In Stereo Bass-Reflex
Speakers — let you feel the bass your
keyboard can produce and hear the
sound you create.
Registration Memory — lets you store
up to 32 different setups of the keyboard’s controls, letting you instantly recall them when you need them.
Drum Pads — play drum sounds regardless of the keyboard’s tone setting.
61 Full-Sized Keys — provide the feel
of a fine musical instrument.
Touch Response — the keyboard’s
volume varies in response to the force of
your touch, just like an acoustic piano or
organ, so you can add emotion to your
music.
Pitch Bender Wheel — lets you bend
notes by altering their pitch, creating realistic effects for tones such as reed instruments or guitar tones.
200 Tones — you can set your keyboard to sound like anything from a
harpsichord to a honky-tonk piano. You
can even create your own tones with the
custom tone synthesizer feature.
Memory — lets you set the keyboard to
record up to 2 songs, 6 tracks, and
4,900 notes. The recording remains
stored even while the keyboard is off.
100 Auto-Rhythms — provide a steady
beat for many styles of music, from
rhumba to rock.
Large LCD Music Information Display
— shows you the notes and chords as
Headphones/Output Jack — lets you
connect headphones so you can play
without disturbing others, or an external
4
Features
amplifier so you can play for a crowd
(neither supplied).
tion or 3- to 8-measure ending to the
selected auto-rhythm.
Assignable Jack — lets you connect a
sustain pedal (not supplied) to the keyboard so you can sustain or soften your
keyboard’s sound, or start/stop an autorhythm.
MIDI In/Out Jacks — let you connect
the keyboard to another MIDI-equipped
device.
Tune Control — lets you adjust the
pitch of your keyboard so you can play
in tune with other instruments.
Two Power Options — let you power
the keyboard from internal batteries (not
supplied) or standard AC power (with an
optional adapter), so you can make music almost anywhere.
Transpose Function — lets you instantly change the key of the music,
even while you are playing.
Note: This Owner’s Manual explains
how to use this electronic keyboard. It
does not teach music.
Tempo Control — lets you speed up or
slow down the tempo of any selected
music pattern.
THE FCC WANTS YOU TO
KNOW
Fill-In Rhythm — lets you insert a short
variation into any auto-rhythm.
Auto Accompaniment — lets you automatically play a preset harmonic pattern
to match the selected auto-rhythm.
Reverb — lets you add depth and space
to the sound.
Layer Function — lets you set the keyboard to play two different tones at the
same time, giving your music a “layered”
effect.
This equipment complies with the limits
for a Class B digital device as specified
in Part 15 of FCC Rules. These limits
provide reasonable protection against
radio and TV interference in a residential
area. However, your equipment might
cause TV or radio interference even
when it is operating properly. To eliminate interference, you can try one or
more of the following corrective measures:
• reorient or relocate the receiving
antenna
Split Function — lets you use different
sounds for the low-end and high-end
keys.
Mixer Function — lets you make the
keyboard sound multiple tones for auto
accompaniment, memory playback, or
to play MIDI data received from another
MIDI device.
Automatic Intro/Ending Rhythm —
you can set the keyboard so it automatically adds a 3- to 8-measure introduc-
• increase the distance between the
equipment and the radio or TV
• use outlets on different electrical circuits for the keyboard and the radio
or TV.
Consult your local RadioShack store if
the problem still exists.
You must use shielded interface cables
with this equipment.
Features
5
ˆ Preparation
Note: To connect a MIDI device to your
keyboard, see “Making the MIDI Connections” on Page 35. To connect a sustain
pedal, see “Using a Sustain Pedal” on
Page 26.
CONNECTING POWER
You can power your keyboard using internal batteries or with standard AC
power using an optional AC adapter
Notes:
• Connecting an AC or DC adapter
automatically disconnects any internal batteries.
• Always disconnect the AC or DC
adapter when you finish using the
keyboard.
tom of the keyboard, pull up the
cover to remove it.
2. Place the batteries in the compartment as indicated by the polarity
symbols (+ and –) marked below the
compartment.
3. Replace the cover.
When the keyboard stops operating
properly, replace the batteries.
Warning: Dispose of old batteries
promptly and properly. Do not burn or
bury them.
Caution: If you do not plan to use the
keyboard with batteries for a week or
more, remove the batteries. Batteries
can leak chemicals that can destroy
electronic parts.
Using Batteries
Using AC Power
Your keyboard can use six D batteries
(not supplied) for power. For the best
performance and longest life, we recommend RadioShack alkaline batteries.
You can power the keyboard using a 9V,
1200-mA AC adapter and a size M
Adaptaplug™ adapter (neither supplied). Both are available at your local
RadioShack store.
Cautions:
Cautions:
• Use only fresh batteries of the
required size and recommended
type.
You must use a Class 2
power source that supplies
9V DC and delivers at least
1200 mA. Its center tip must be set
to negative and its plug must fit the
keyboard's DC 9V jack. Using an
adapter that does not meet these
specifications could damage the
keyboard or the adapter.
!
• Do not mix old and new batteries,
different types of batteries (standard, alkaline, or rechargeable), or
rechargeable batteries of different
capacities.
Follow these steps to install batteries.
1. While pressing the tabs on the battery compartment cover on the bot6
• Always connect the AC adapter to
the keyboard before you connect it
Preparation
to AC power. When you finish, disconnect the adapter from AC power
before you disconnect it from the
keyboard.
Follow these steps to connect an AC
adapter to the keyboard.
1. Set the DC adapter’s voltage switch
to 9V.
2. Insert the Adaptaplug adapter into
the adapter’s cord so it reads – TIP.
3. Connect the AC adapter’s barrel
plug to the DC 9V jack on the back of
the keyboard.
Listening Safely
To protect your hearing, follow these
guidelines when you use headphones.
• Set the volume to the lowest setting
before you begin listening. After you
begin listening, adjust the volume to
a comfortable level.
• Do not listen at extremely high volume levels. Extended high-volume
listening can lead to permanent
hearing loss.
• Once you set the volume, do not
increase it. Over time, your ears
adapt to the volume level, so a volume level that does not cause discomfort might still damage your
hearing.
DC 9V
4. Plug the AC adapter’s other end into
a standard AC outlet.
CONNECTING
HEADPHONES
To listen to your keyboard without disturbing others, you can connect an optional pair of stereo headphones with a
1 4
/ -inch (6.35-mm) plug. Your local RadioShack store sells a wide selection of
headphones. Insert the headphones’
plug into the PHONES/OUTPUT jack on
the back of the keyboard.
CONNECTING AN
EXTERNAL AMPLIFIER
To amplify your keyboard’s sound, you
can connect it to an optional external
amplifier using an audio cable with a 1/4inch (6.35-mm) plug (not supplied). To
connect an external amplifier to your
keyboard, insert the cable’s plug into the
PHONES/OUTPUT jack on the back of
the keyboard, and connect the cable’s
other end to the amplifier’s input jack(s)
(such as AUX IN or TAPE IN).
Your local RadioShack store sells a full
line of amplifiers, speakers, and cables.
USING THE SHEET MUSIC
STAND
PHONES/
OUTPUT
Note: Connecting headphones disconnects the keyboard’s built-in speakers.
To easily view sheet music while playing
your keyboard, insert the supplied sheet
music stand into the slot on the top back
panel.
Preparation
7
ˆ A Quick Look at Your Keyboard
STEP
ACCOMP
VOLUME
100
RHYTHMS
List
SPLIT TOUCH
ONE TOUCH
RESPONSE
PRESET
MIXER
TRANSPOSE/
200
SYNTH
TUNE/MIDI
TONES
TONE
REVERB
DEMO
List
MEMORY
TEMPO
Speaker
INTRO
LAYER
BANK
PITCH
BEND
VOLUME
VARIATION/
FILL-IN
MODE
POWER
START/ NORMAL/
STOP
FILL-IN
STORE
Number
Keys
Speaker
REGISTRATION
Buttons
SYNCHRO/
ENDING
CHORD
Buttons
+/–
RHYTHM
ˆ Operation
BASIC OPERATION
1. Slide VOLUME to MIN (minimum).
Important: To prevent hearing damage, always set the keyboard’s volume to MIN before you turn it on.
2. To turn on the keyboard, press
POWER. The POWER indicator
lights and the display turns on.
minutes if you do not press a key. To
turn on the keyboard again, press
POWER. To cancel auto power off,
see “Cancelling Auto Power Off” on
Page 9.
3. Slide MODE to NORMAL.
4. Slide VOLUME toward MAX slightly
and begin playing the keyboard.
Notes:
Note: To save power, the keyboard
automatically turns off after about 6
8
• The keyboard automatically selects the tone GRAND PIANO
A Quick Look at Your Keyboard
• To select an auto-rhythm, see
“Using the Preset Auto-Rhythms”
on Page 13.
dle row shows the tempo in beats per
minute, the number of the measure playing and the beat count in each measure.
The treble and bass clefs to the right of
the display show the notes as they play.
The bar graph shows the sound level on
each of the 16 channels (see “Using the
Mixer” on Page 18). The keyboard at the
bottom of the display shows the location
of the keys being pressed.
• To play auto accompaniment, see
“Using Auto Accompaniment” on
Page 15.
USING THE PRESET
TONES
(No. 000) when you turn the
power on. Each time you turn it
on after that, it selects the last
selected tone. To select a different tone, see “Using the Preset
Tones”.
5. Slide VOLUME toward MAX to
increase the sound level or toward
MIN to decrease it.
6. To turn off the keyboard, press
POWER. The POWER indicator and
the keyboard’s display turn off.
Cancelling Auto Power Off
To have the keyboard not automatically
turn off during a session, turn on the
keyboard while holding down TONE.
The next time you turn the keyboard off
then back on again, it will automatically
turn off after about 6 minutes.
PLAYING THE
DEMONSTRATION TUNES
To showcase its sounds, your keyboard
can play two preprogrammed demonstration tunes. To start the demonstration, press DEMO. The keyboard plays
the first demonstration tune (No. 0). To
select the other tune, press – or + on the
keypad. The selected tune’s number appears and the tune plays.
Your keyboard can sound like 200 different musical instruments or sound effects. The name and three-digit number
for each preset tone is listed on the 200
TONES list on the keyboard’s top panel.
Notes:
• The keyboard has 24-note (maximum) polyphonic sound. This
means that you can play up to 24
different notes at the same time with
most of the keyboard’s preset tones.
Some of the keyboard’s preset
tones, however, are capable of only
12-note polyphony.
• Most tones on this keyboard have
been recorded and processed using
a technique called digital sampling.
To ensure a high level of tonal quality, samples are taken in the low,
mid, and high ranges and are then
combined to sound amazingly close
to the originals. You might notice
very slight differences in volume or
sound quality for some tones when
you play them at different positions
on the keyboard. This is an unavoidable result of multiple sampling and
is not a malfunction.
The demo tune number and Demo appear at the top of the display. The midOperation
9
Follow these steps to select and play a
preset tone.
No.
Tone
1. Press TONE. TONE and the current
tone’s number appear.
136
STRINGS PIANO
137
E. PIANO STRINGS
Note: The first time you turn the
keyboard on, it automatically selects
the tone GRAND PIANO (No. 000).
138
STEREO PIANO
139
12 STR GUITAR 2
2. To play a different tone, choose a
preset tone from the 200 TONES list
and enter its three-digit number on
the keypad. As you press the keys,
the selected digits appear.
140
BRASS FALL
141
BASS SLIDE
142
FEEDBACK GT
143
PIANO
144
ECHO ORGAN
• You can select the next highest or
lowest numbered tone by simply
pressing + or – on the keypad.
145
ROTARY ORGAN
146
CHORUSED EP
• The names of tone numbers 000–
127 are marked to the right of the
keyboard’s display. The names for
tone numbers 128–167 appear in
the table below. Memory locations
168 199 are reserved for custom
tones that you create (see “Using
the Custom Tone Synthesizer” on
Page 20).
147
STRINGS GT
148
PAD ENS 1
149
PAD ENS 2
150
SEQUENCE 1
151
SEQUENCE 2
152
SYNTH PAD 3
153
SYNTH PAD 4
154
SYNTH PAD 5
155
SYNTH PAD 6
156
SYNTH PAD 7
157
SYNTH PAD 8
158
REVERSE ECHO
159
FAST TREMOLO
160–167
DRUM SET 1-8
Notes:
No.
10
STRINGS
Tone
128
SYNTH PAD 1
129
SYNTH PAD 2
130
OCT PIANO
131
OCT HARP
132
12 STR GUITAR 1
133
JAZZ OCT GUITAR
134
OCT SAXOPHONE
135
TOUCH BASS
• Precede a single-digit number
with 0 0. For example, to select
Operation
ELEC PIANO 1 (No. 004), press 0
0 4.
• If you enter an incorrect first digit,
press TONE to clear your entry,
then enter the correct digit.
and reverberate. To turn on the reverb,
repeatedly press REVERB until an indicator appears next to the type of reverb
you want.
HALL — creates a concert hall effect.
• When you select one of the drum
sets (tone numbers 160–167),
each key plays a different percussion sound. See “Drum Assignment List” on Page 44.
STAGE — creates the acoustics of a
• The drum set sounds change
when you change the rhythm
number, play back data stored in
memory, or receive MIDI program
change data.
REVERB until the indicator disappears.
• Tone numbers 168–199 are the
user tone area. See “Using the
Custom Tone Synthesizer” on
Page 20.
3. Play the keyboard to hear the
selected tone and adjust VOLUME to
the desired level.
4. To select a different tone, repeat
Step 2 while TONE appears.
USING THE DRUM PADS
The keyboard has six drum pads that
you can use to play percussion sounds
independent of the keyboard keys. Simply tap on a drum pad to play the percussion sound currently assigned to it.
To change the drum pad sounds, use
the mixer function to change the tone
assigned to Channel 10. See “Using the
Mixer” on Page 18.
small club.
ROOM — adds the acoustics of a studio.
To turn off the reverb, repeatedly press
USING SPLIT
The SPLIT feature lets you play two different tones on opposite ends of the
keyboard, so the low-end keys play one
tone, and the high-end keys play another. Follow these steps to use SPLIT.
1. Press TONE.
2. Enter the three-digit number for the
tone you want the high-end keys to
play.
3. Press SPLIT. The SPLIT indicator
appears.
4. Enter the three-digit number for the
tone you want the low-end keys to
play.
5. Hold down SPLIT, and press the key
where you want the high-end tones
to begin. The selected key’s name
appears.
For example, if you set the split
point to be F below middle C, F3
appears.
Note: You can change the split point
at any time.
USING REVERB
The REVERB feature creates ambiance
effects by causing the sound to linger
6. Play both the low and high-end keys
to hear the selected split tones.
Operation
11
To select a different low-end tone, enter
the three-digit number for the new lowend tone while the SPLIT indicator appears. To select a different high-end
tone, press SPLIT to turn off its indicator,
then enter the three-digit number for the
new high-end tone. Then press SPLIT
again so the SPLIT indicator appears.
To cancel SPLIT play, repeatedly press
SPLIT until its indicator disappears.
Notes:
• If SPLIT is on when you turn off the
keyboard, SPLIT will still be on the
next time you turn on the keyboard.
• When you turn on SPLIT, the last
selected settings appear.
USING LAYER
The keyboard lets you play two different
preset tones at the same time, creating
a “layered effect” when you press one
key. The first tone you select when using LAYER is called the base tone and
the second tone is called the layer tone.
1. Press TONE.
2. Enter the three-digit number for the
base tone then press LAYER. The
LAYER indicator appears.
three-digit number for the new base
tone. Then press LAYER again so the
LAYER indicator appears.
To cancel LAYER, repeatedly press
LAYER until its indicator disappears.
Notes:
• If LAYER is on when you turn off the
keyboard, LAYER will still be on the
next time you turn on the keyboard.
• When you turn on LAYER, the previous tone settings appear.
USING SPLIT AND LAYER
TOGETHER
You can combine the SPLIT and LAYER
features, so you can play one layered
combination of tones on the low-end
keys and another on the high-end keys.
1. If the SPLIT or LAYER indicator is
on, press SPLIT or LAYER to turn it
off.
2. Enter the number for the high-end
base tone on the keypad.
3. Repeatedly press SPLIT until the
SPLIT indicator appears.
4. Enter the number for the low-end
base tone.
3. Enter the three-digit number for the
layer tone.
5. Repeatedly press SPLIT until the
SPLIT indicator disappears.
4. Play the keyboard to hear the
selected layered tones.
6. Repeatedly press LAYER until the
LAYER indicator appears.
To select a different layer tone, enter the
three-digit number for the new layer tone
while the LAYER indicator appears. To
select a different base tone, press LAYER to turn off its indicator, then enter the
7. Enter the number of the layered
tone for the high-end keys.
12
8. Press SPLIT. The SPLIT indicator
appears.
Operation
9. Enter the number of the layered
tone for the low-end keys.
10. If desired, hold down SPLIT then
press the key where you want the
high-end tones to begin.
Selecting/Playing
an Auto-Rhythm
1. Press RHYTHM. RHYTHM and the
name and number of the current
auto-rhythm appears.
11. Play the keyboard to hear the
selected tones.
Note: The keyboard automatically
selects the rhythm CLUB POP (No.
00) when you turn the power on.
Each time you turn it on after that, it
selects the last selected rhythm.
To cancel the SPLIT/LAYER combination, press each button so both the
SPLIT and LAYER indicators disappear.
USING THE PRESET
AUTO-RHYTHMS
Your keyboard has 100 preset autorhythms that provide a steady beat for
your music. The name and two-digit
number of each preset auto-rhythm is
listed on the keyboard’s top panel.
2. To select a different rhythm, choose
an auto-rhythm from the 100
RHYTHMS list and enter its twodigit number on the keypad. Or,
repeatedly press + or – to move to
the next higher or lower numbered
rhythm.
Notes:
• Precede a single-digit number
with a 0. For example, press 0 5
to select 8-BEAT BALLAD 2 (No.
05).
You can play a preset auto-rhythm on
the keyboard in any of the following
ways:
• select and play a rhythm (see
“Selecting/Playing
an
AutoRhythm”)
• synchronize the start of a rhythm
with your music (see “Using SYNCHRO” on Page 14)
• If you incorrectly enter the first
digit of the rhythm, press RHYTHM
to clear the entry and return to the
last selected auto-rhythm.
3. Set MODE to NORMAL, then press
START/STOP to start the selected
auto-rhythm.
• start a rhythm with a special introduction (see “Using INTRO” on
Page 14)
4. Adjust VOLUME to the desired level.
• briefly vary the pattern of a rhythm
(see “Using FILL-IN” on Page 14)
5. To change the auto-rhythm speed,
press TEMPO ▼ or ▲. The current
tempo setting appears.
• stop a rhythm with a special ending
(see “Using ENDING” on Page 14)
Notes:
• play an alternate version (variation)
of a rhythm (see “Using VARIATION” on Page 14)
• You can adjust the tempo to play
an auto-rhythm from 40 to 255
beats per minute.
Operation
13
• To quickly slow down or speed up
the tempo, hold down TEMPO ▼
or ▲.
• You can also adjust the tempo by
first pressing TEMPO ▼ or ▲, then
entering the desired number of
beats per minute in three digits
(040 to 255), or by holding down +
or – on the keypad.
INTRO. The introduction plays, then the
selected auto-rhythm automatically
starts.
Using FILL-IN
This feature lets you insert a short (1- to
2-measure) variation in the beat pattern
of a selected auto-rhythm.
6. Play the keyboard along with the
auto-rhythm.
Simply press and release NORMAL/FILLIN while the auto-rhythm is playing. The
keyboard inserts a 1- to 2-measure variation, then the original rhythm automatically resumes at the end of the current
measure.
7. To select a different rhythm, repeat
Steps 1–2.
Using VARIATION
• To reset the tempo to its default
(original) speed, press TEMPO ▼
or ▲. at the same time.
8. To stop the auto-rhythm, press
START/STOP.
Using SYNCHRO
This feature lets you synchronize the
start of an auto-rhythm with the beginning of your music.
After you select and enter an autorhythm, press SYNCHRO/ENDING, then
begin playing the keyboard. The keyboard automatically begins to play the
rhythm when you press any key within
the first 11/2 octaves of the lower end of
the keyboard (the first 18 keys from the
left side of the keyboard).
Using INTRO
To play the alternate rhythm, press
VARIATION/FILL-IN. The variation plays
continuously at the selected tempo.
To insert the fill-in segment in the alternate rhythm, press VARIATION/FILL-IN.
The keyboard adds a 1- to 2-measure
variation in the rhythm.
To return to the normal rhythm, press
NORMAL/FILL-IN.
To stop the auto-rhythm, press START/
STOP.
This feature lets you start the selected
auto-rhythm with a light, 3- to 8-measure
introduction that blends easily into the
selected rhythm.
To start a rhythm with an introduction,
select and enter the rhythm, then press
14
Each of the keyboard’s 100 preset autorhythms has a built-in variation (alternate) to its normal beat pattern. The
variation differs slightly from the normal
rhythm, so it is almost like having two
rhythms in one!
Using ENDING
To end the selected rhythm with a special 3- to 8-measure flourish, press SYNCHRO/ENDING while the auto-rhythm is
Operation
playing, about 3–8 measures before you
want the rhythm to end. The keyboard
plays a special ending, then automatically stops the rhythm.
USING AUTO
ACCOMPANIMENT
The 18 keys on the left side of the keyboard with note labels above them are
called accompaniment keys.
Accompaniment
Keyboard
Melody
Keyboard
You can set the keyboard to play three
different types of auto accompaniment
using the accompaniment keys.
• Concert Chord — lets you play
chords on the accompaniment keys
using chord formations of from one
to four notes. The number of keys
you press determines the type of
chord that plays (see “Concert
Chord” on Page 16).
• Standard Fingering — lets you play
chords on the accompaniment keys
using standard chord formations of
three or four notes (see “Standard
Fingering” on Page 16).
• Full-Range Chord — lets you play
the melody using the entire keyboard while the keyboard plays
accompaniment based on your
auto-rhythm selection.
Notes:
ENDING) with all three types of auto
accompaniment.
• After you press the auto accompaniment keys while using concert chord
or standard fingering, the keyboard
plays the same chord until you
press other accompaniment keys to
play a different chord or press
START/STOP.
Adjusting the Accompaniment
Volume
The keyboard lets you adjust the volume
of your accompaniment separately from
the overall volume of the keyboard.
1. Press ACCOMP VOLUME. The current accompaniment volume setting
appears.
2. Within 5 seconds, enter a number
from 0 0 0 (softest) to 1 2 7 (loudest)
on the keypad. The numbers appear
as you press the keys.
Or, press ACCOMP VOLUME then
repeatedly press – or + to select the
next lowest or highest accompaniment volume setting.
To reset the accompaniment volume to
its default value of 87, press ACCOMP
VOLUME then press – and + at the same
time.
Note: The auto-accompaniment patterns consist of four parts: chord 1,
chord 2, bass, and rhythm. You can delete any of the parts by using the mixer
function. See “Using the Mixer” on
Page 18.
• You can use the keyboard’s rhythm
controls (INTRO, NORMAL/FILL-IN,
VARIATION/FILL-IN, and SYNCHRO/
Operation
15
Concert Chord
1. Set MODE to CONCERT CHORD.
The concert chord method lets beginning keyboard players easily select and
play a chord.
2. Enter a two-digit auto-rhythm number.
The number of accompaniment keys
you press determines the type of chord
that plays. This chart shows the chord
type that plays when you press one,
two, three, or four accompaniment keys
at the same time.
Number of Keys
Pressed
3. To start the auto-rhythm before the
auto accompaniment, press START/
STOP or INTRO.
Or, to synchronize the start of the
selected auto-rhythm with your
accompaniment, press SYNCHRO/
ENDING.
4. Begin the accompaniment at the
desired interval by pressing the
desired accompaniment key(s).
Chord Type
C DE F G ABCDE F
To play a melody along with the
accompaniment, press any key(s) to
the right of the accompaniment
keys.
Major
C DE F G ABCDE F
Minor (m)
5. Adjust the tempo and VOLUME to
the desired levels.
Dominant
Seventh (7)
6. To change chords without interrupting the rhythm, simply press the
auto
accompaniment
key(s)
required to form the new chord.
C DE F GABC DE F
C DE F G ABCDE F
7. To stop auto accompaniment and
the auto-rhythm, press START/STOP.
Minor
Seventh
(m7)
Standard Fingering
The lowest note you play determines the
key of the chord. For example, if the lowest note is C, the keyboard plays a C
chord.
The standard fingering method uses
standard formations of three or four
notes, and lets the experienced musician play a wider variety of accompaniment chords.
Note: You can press any labeled note(s)
to the right of the lowest note in the
chord to produce a minor, a dominant
seventh, or minor seventh chord.
This chart shows the 15 chord types you
can play on your keyboard by using
standard fingering.
Follow these steps to start concert chord
auto accompaniment.
16
Operation
Major (M)
Minor (m)
( )
Suspended
4th (SUS4)
Dominant
7th (7)
Augmented
(aug)
(
)
Minor 7th
(m7)
Note: See “Fingered Chord Chart” on
Page 45 for a list of all the chords you
can play on your keyboard using standard fingering accompaniment.
Follow these steps to start standard fingering auto accompaniment.
( )
Major 7th
(M7)
• When you play an aug, 7–5, or dim7
chord, the lowest note you play
determines the root of the chord. Be
sure that your fingering correctly
defines the root you want.
Minor HalfDiminished
(m7-5)
Major HalfDiminished
(7-5)
1. Set MODE to FINGERED.
2. Select and enter an auto-rhythm.
( )
Dominant
Suspended
4th (7sus4)
Major 9th
(add9)
( )
Minor 9th
(madd9)
3. To start the auto-rhythm before your
auto accompaniment, press START/
STOP or INTRO.
Or, to synchronize the start of the
selected auto-rhythm with your
accompaniment, press SYNCHRO/
ENDING.
( )
Minor/Major
7th (mM7)
Diminished
Diminished
7th (dim7)
Notes:
• You do not have to press the key
marked with parentheses on the
keyboard in the preceding chart to
produce a 7, m7, M7, mM7, add9, or
madd9 chord.
• This chart shows only one possible
fingering position for each chord. It
is possible to play a chord using
several different positions. For
example, the following three fingering positions produce the same C
chord.
4. Begin the accompaniment at the
desired interval by pressing at least
three accompaniment keys to play
the desired chord.
To play a melody along with the
accompaniment, press any key(s) to
the right of the accompaniment
keys.
5. Adjust TEMPO and VOLUME to the
desired levels.
6. To change chords without interrupting the rhythm, simply press the
auto accompaniment keys required
to form the new chord.
7. To stop auto accompaniment and
the auto-rhythm, press START/STOP.
Operation
17
Full-Range Chords
While the easy random and standard fingering methods limit chord formations to
the accompaniment keys, the full-range
chord method lets you play chords of
any type using any of the keyboard’s
keys.
Set MODE to FULL RANGE CHORD and
follow the steps under “Standard Fingering” on Page 16. If you press three or
more keys anywhere on the keyboard
that form a chord, the keyboard plays
that chord. The keyboard responds with
melody sounds if you press fewer than
three keys.
Notes:
• In the full-range chord mode, the
keyboard recognizes these 23
chords in addition to the 15 chords
in the standard fingering mode
(examples show C as the base
note):
selecting a rhythm, press ONE TOUCH
PRESET, then start the accompaniment.
The rhythm starts playing at a suitable
tempo, and the keyboard sounds the
suitable tone for the rhythm you selected
as you play the keyboard.
USING THE MIXER
The keyboard plays multiple parts at the
same time during auto accompaniment,
or memory playback, or when receiving
MIDI data, in up to 16 separate channels. You can control the on/off setting,
volume, and parameters of each of the
keyboard’s channels just as you would
with a sound mixer.
This chart shows the parts assigned to
each channel.
Channel
Part
1
Main tone
2
Layered tone
C6
Cm6 C69
C#/C
D/C
E/C
3
Split tone
F/C
G/C A /C B /C
B/C
C#m/
C
4
Layered/split tone
Dm7 A 7/
-5/C C
5
These channels only produce
sound when they receive
MIDI signals
Dm/ Fm/
C
C
F7/
C
Gm/
C
Bm/C
6
Fm7 Gm7/ A add9/
/C
C
C
• When the composite notes of a
chord are more than five notes
apart, the lowest sound becomes
the base note.
7
Auto accompaniment chord
part 1
8
Auto accompaniment chord
part 2
9
Auto accompaniment bass
part
10
Auto accompaniment rhythm
part, drum pad
11
Memory Track 1
Using One-Touch Preset
The keyboard’s one-touch preset feature recalls the tone and tempo best
suited for the rhythm you selected. After
18
Operation
Channel
3. Repeatedly press or
(CURSOR)
to display the current status of the
channel — on, oFF, or SoL (solo).
Part
12
Memory Track 2
13
Memory Track 3
14
Memory Track 4
15
Memory Track 5
16
Memory Track 6
4. Repeatedly press + or – to select the
status you want.
on (default): Turns on the current
channel. A bar appears at the bottom of the level meter for the
selected channel.
Notes:
oFF: Turns off the current channel.
The bar at the bottom of the level
meter disappears.
• Normally, keyboard play is assigned
to Channel 1 and the drum pads are
assigned to Channel 10. When you
use auto accompaniment, each part
is assigned to Channels 7–10.
SoL: Turns the current channel on
• When you use the keyboard as the
sound source for another MIDI
device, all 16 channels are assigned
musical instrument parts (Channel
10 is reserved for drum parts only,
per MIDI standard).
5. To edit other channels, press or
to return to the channel selection
screen and repeat Steps 2–4.
• The mixer settings also affect the
corresponding MIDI output.
Editing the Status of a Channel
You can edit the status (on, off, solo) of
a channel to delete a specific part or to
play a specific part by itself.
Follow these steps to edit the status of a
channel.
1. Press MIXER. The MIXER indicator
and the last selected channel
appear.
2. Use + or – on the keypad to select
the channel you want to edit.
and all the other channels off. A bar
appears over only the current channel.
To exit the edit mode, press MIXER. The
display shows the performance status of
the channels as edited.
Editing the Parameter
You can change the settings of six parameters such as tone, volume, and pan
(relative position of the tone between the
left and right speaker channels) for the
selected channel.
Follow these steps to edit the parameters.
1. Select the channel you want to edit
as described in Steps 1 and 2 of
“Editing the Status of a Channel”.
2. Press ▼ (ENTER) to enter the
parameter edit mode.
Operation
19
3. Repeatedly press
or
to select
the parameter you want to change.
Program Change Number (000 to
199) — sets the tone assigned to
the channel.
Note: Channel 10 is reserved for
percussion, so only tone numbers
160 (DRUM SET1) through 167
(DRUM SET 8) can be set for Channel 10.
Volume (000 to 127) — controls the
volume of the selected channel.
Pan (000 to 127) — controls the
pan. 000 is fully left, 64 is the center
position, and 127 is fully right.
Fine Tune (–50 to +50) — fine
tunes the pitch of the selected channel in cent units. A cent is one hundredth of a semitone. There are 12
semitones per octave.
C (Coarse) Tune (–12 to +12) —
coarsely tunes the pitch of the
selected channel in semitone units.
Express (Expression) (000 to 127)
— controls the volume of the
selected channel. Similar to the volume setting, this is often used to
control crescendo/decrescendo.
4. Use the number buttons or + or – to
change the parameter setting.
5. To edit other channels, press ▼ to
return to the channel selection display, select the channel, then repeat
Steps 2–4.
6. To exit the parameter edit mode,
press MIXER.
20
USING THE CUSTOM
TONE SYNTHESIZER
The keyboard’s custom tone synthesizer
lets you create up to 32 of your own
original tones. To create a “user” tone,
you simply select one of the keyboard’s
200 preset tones, change its parameters, then store the new tone in any
memory location from 168–199. You select and use a user tone the same as a
preset tone.
Notes:
• You cannot use tones 160–167
(drum set tones) as base tones.
• The preset tone you use as the
basis for a user tone is not changed.
• The tone locations 168–199 are not
empty (before you store user tones
there). They initially contain duplicate versions of tone numbers 128–
159. The user tone you store in any
of those locations replaces the existing tone. If you delete a user tone,
the keyboard automatically restores
the initial, duplicate tone there.
The parameters you can change are divided into four groups. For the details of
each parameter, see “Creating and Storing a User Tone” on Page 21.
• Tone Characteristic Waveform —
PCM Set
• Volume Characteristic — Amp
Envelope Set
• Tone Pitch — Pitch and Pitch
Envelope Set
• Tone Characteristic — Attack
Rate, Release Rate, Level, Touch
Sensitivity, and Pan
Operation
Understanding 1DCO and
2DCO Tones
A Digital Controlled Oscillator (DCO)
controls the sound output of a digital signal. Some of the keyboard’s built-in
tones are simple tones (1DCO), and
some are layered tones (2DCO). When
you select a 2DCO tone as the basis for
creating a user tone, you need to
change the parameters of both tones.
For example, if you selected tone 19
(Church Organ), 019 ChrchOrg
appears. Then, when you press
SYNTH, 026 ChrchOrgA appears.
Note: To cancel the save operation
at any time, press SYNTH or TONE
twice.
3. Repeatedly press or
to display
the parameter you want to change.
When you select a layered tone, dCo1
appears, indicating that this is the first
tone of a layered tone.
Creating and Storing a User
Tone
Follow these steps to create and store
your own tone. (Refer to “Hints on Creating a User Tone” on Page 23.)
Notes:
• A new or revised user tone replaces
the existing user tone.
• Layer, split, auto accompaniment,
demo tune play, and MIDI functions
are all disabled while the keyboard
is in the Custom Tone Synthesizer
mode.
1. Select the preset tone (except 160–
167) you want to use as a basis for
your user tone.
2. Press SYNTH. The keyboard enters
the Custom Tone Synthesizer mode
and the first parameter (PCM Set)
appears. The display also shows
whether the tone you selected is a
DCO1 or DCO2 tone (if it is a layered
tone), and shows the current PCM
setting.
Operation
PCM Set (0 to 173) — Determines
the characteristic of a tone by
changing its digitally sampled waveform.
Amp Envelope Set (Amp.Set) (0
to 137) — Selects the volume envelopes. 000 to 048 set volume envelopes for a decaying note (how fast
or slow the sound diminishes). 049
to 137 set volume envelopes that
sustain the note. Samples of the
amp envelopes appear in a graph
near your keyboard’s right speaker.
Attack Rate (Atk Rate) (1 to 127)
— Sets the speed of the attack (the
period from when you press a key to
when the tone reaches its maximum
volume). The greater the value, the
quicker the attack. Use this parameter to make fine adjustments to the
tone characteristics of the amp
envelope.
Release Rate (Rel.Rate) (1 to
127) — Controls the speed of a
tone’s release (the period from
when you release a key to when the
tone stops sounding). The greater
the value, the quicker the release.
Use this parameter to make fine
adjustments to the tone characteristics of the amp envelope.
Pitch Envelope Set (PitchSet)
(0 to 49) — Selects the pitch enve21
Notes:
lopes. 00 specifies no change, a
value from 01 to 19 changes the
vibrato, and a value from 20 to 49
changes a parameter other than the
vibrato. Samples of the pitch envelopes appear in a graph near your
keyboard’s right speaker.
Pitch (Pitch) (–64 to +63) —
Controls the overall pitch of the
tone. A positive value increases the
pitch, a negative value lowers it. A
setting of zero sets the pitch to the
standard setting for the selected
tone.
• If you want to change another
parameter, repeat Steps 3 and 4.
• If you selected a layered preset
tone, press
to recall the DCO2
parameters (d Co2 appears), and
repeat Steps 3 and 4 to set the
parameters. Press TONE again to
return to the DCO1 parameters.
5. Press SYNTH. Save? appears.
To store the settings, press
to
display the tone number where you
want to save the user tone.
Level (Level) (0 to 127) — Controls the overall volume of the tone.
The greater the value, the greater
the volume. Setting a level of zero
means that the tone does not sound
at all.
Touch Sensitivity (TchSense)
(–64 to +63) — Controls changes in
the volume of the tone depending
on how hard you strike the keys.
You can specify more volume for
stronger striking and less volume for
lighter striking, or you can specify 00
to set the same volume regardless
of how hard you strike the keys.
Pan (Pan) (–64 to +63) — Controls
the relative position of the tone
between the left and right speaker
channels. A greater positive value
moves the center point further to the
right, a negative value moves it to
the left.
4. Use + or – to change the parameter’s setting. You can also use the
number buttons to directly enter a
value for the parameter.
To exit the Custom Tone Synthesizer mode without storing a new
tone, press . Cancel? appears.
Press
to cancel.
6. Press + or – until the tone number
you want appears. If you do not
want to assign a name, skip to Step
10.
7. To give a name to your tone, press
. The first character of the tone
name flashes.
8. Repeatedly press + or – until the first
character of the new name appears.
9. Press to move to the next character position. Repeat Steps 8 and 9 to
enter the rest of the characters in
the new name.
Note: Press
to change the tone
number (the name of the tone
returns to its preset name).
10. Press
to save the user tone.
Save OK appears briefly and the
keyboard exits the Custom Tone
Synthesizer mode.
22
Operation
Hints on Creating a User Tone
• Use a preset tone that is similar to
the one you are trying to create.
When you already have a general
idea of the tone you are trying to
create, it is a good idea to start with
a similar preset tone. If you want to
use a layered tone, start out with a
2DCO tone.
sists of eight banks (0-7), and each bank
has four memory locations (A – D), totaling up to 32 settings. You can save each
of the following settings in each registration memory:
• tone
• rhythm
• tempo
• Determine the most important
parameter. The PCM Set and Amp
Envelope Set parameters are the
major factors that determine the
overall tone characteristic. Start out
by setting these two parameters to
get the general sound you want, and
then set the other parameters to add
the finishing touches.
• split on/off
• Experiment with different settings.
There are no real rules about what a
tone should sound like. Let your
imagination run free and experiment
with different combinations. You
might be surprised at what you can
achieve!
• reverb settings
Deleting a User Tone
To delete an existing user tone, follow
Steps 1–5 of “Creating and Storing a
User Tone” on Page 21. When SAVE ?
appears in Step 5, press
twice. Delete? appears. Press
to delete.
The parameters of the default tone for
that number are restored.
USING THE
REGISTRATION MEMORY
Your keyboard can save different setups
of controls in its registration memory.
This lets you instantly recall your favorite
settings. The registration memory con-
• split point
• layer on/off
• mixer settings (Channels 1 – 4)
• keyboard channel on/off (Channels
1 – 10)
• touch response settings
• assignable jack setting (see “Using
a Sustain Pedal” on Page 26)
• transpose (see “Changing Keys” on
Page 24)
• tuning (see “Tuning the Keyboard”
on Page 25)
• pitch bend range (see “Using Pitch
Bend” on Page 26)
• accompaniment volume
Notes:
• You cannot use the registration
memory while you are using the
synthesizer, memory, or demo tune
functions.
• You cannot delete a registration
setup from memory, but you can
store a different setup in its place.
Operation
23
• You can use the keyboard’s MIDI
function to save your setup data to
your PC or other storage device.
Storing a Setup
1. Set the desired controls to the setting you want to store.
2. Within 5 seconds, repeatedly press
BANK until the desired bank number
appears.
3. While holding down STORE, press
the desired REGISTRATION button
(A, B, C, or D). Store appears after
the selected bank/location number/
letter.
4. Release STORE and REGISTRATION.
5. Repeat Steps 1–4 to store more setups.
Recalling a Setup
1. Repeatedly press BANK until the
desired bank number appears.
2. Within 5 seconds, press the desired
REGISTRATION button (A, B, C, or
D). Recall appears after the
selected bank/location number/letter.
Note: You can skip Step 1 if the setting
you want to recall is in the same bank as
the current one.
ˆ Special Features
CHANGING KEYS
The keyboard automatically selects the
key of middle C each time you turn it on.
For added flexibility as you play, the
keyboard lets you change (transpose)
the musical key in which it plays.
Note: You cannot change the key while
a prerecorded tune is selected or playing.
1. Repeatedly press TRANSPOSE/
TUNE/MIDI until 00 Trans appear.
Note: The number on the display is
the number of “semitones” to which
the keyboard is set, compared to its
default key. A semitone is a measurement that represents the acoustical interval between the tones of
any two keys on the keyboard. For
24
example, the difference between C
and C or B and B is one semitone. You can transpose the key
down 6 semitones (to an F ) and up
5 semitones (to an F) — a full
octave.
2. Within 5 seconds, press – or + to
lower or raise the key. Each time
you press – or +, the number
decreases or increases by 1 (semitone).
As you raise the key, 1 is C , 2 is D,
and so on. As you lower the key, –1
is B, –2 is B , –3 is A, and so on.
Notes:
• The transpose setting also affects
memory playback (see “Playing
Back from Memory” on Page 29)
and auto accompaniment.
Special Features
• The keyboard automatically resets
the key to the default value of 0
(middle C) each time you play a prerecorded tune.
TUNING THE KEYBOARD
Although your keyboard never goes out
of tune, it lets you adjust its pitch to
match other instruments or musical recordings.
Note: You cannot tune the keyboard
while a prerecorded tune is displayed or
playing.
Follow these steps to tune the keyboard.
1. Repeatedly
TUNE/MIDI
press TRANSPOSE/
until
00
Trans
appears.
2. Repeatedly press
TUNE appears.
or
until 00
Note: The number on the display is
the number of “cents” to which the
keyboard is currently tuned, compared to its default pitch. A cent is
the measurement that represents
the acoustical interval between two
tones. 1,200 cents equal 1 octave.
You can tune the keyboard to within
50 cents (101 levels) of its default
pitch.
3. Within 5 seconds, repeatedly press
– or + to lower or raise the keyboard’s pitch. Each time you press
the key, the number decreases or
increases by 1 (cent).
Notes:
• Memory playback uses the pitch
with which the memorized tune was
recorded.
• Auto accompaniment uses the currently set pitch.
• The keyboard automatically resets
the tuning pitch to the default value
of 00 (cents) each time you turn off
the keyboard.
USING TOUCH RESPONSE
Your keyboard has a touch response
feature that lets you adjust the volume of
your music’s tone based on how hard
you strike the key(s), so you can add
emotion to your music.
Repeatedly press TOUCH RESPONSE
until its indicator appears (to turn touch
response on) or disappears (to turn it
off).
Notes:
• The touch response setting does not
affect auto accompaniment or
received MIDI data.
• The MIDI data sent out from the
keyboard is affected by the touch
response setting.
CHANGING AUTO POWER
OFF
When you operate the keyboard with
battery power, the keyboard automatically shuts off after about 6 minutes if
you do not press a key. Press POWER
again to turn power back on.
To have the keyboard not automatically
turn off during a session, turn the keyboard on while holding down TONE.
The next time you turn the keyboard off
then back on again, it automatically
turns off after about 6 minutes.
Special Features
25
USING PITCH BEND
Your keyboard has a pitch bend feature
that lets you bend a note by altering its
pitch. Pitch bend lets you create realistic
effects for sounds such as a saxophone,
other reed instruments, and guitar
tones.
To use pitch bend, rotate and hold
PITCH BEND while holding down a key.
The pitch of the key you pressed slides
smoothly up and down. Release PITCH
BEND to stop the effect.
To connect a sustain pedal to your keyboard, insert the pedal’s plug into ASSIGNABLE JACK on the back of the
keyboard.
You can adjust the keyboard to these
settings when you use a sustain pedal.
Setting
Adjusting the Pitch Bend
Range
You can adjust the bend range of pitch
controls from 1 to 12 semitones.
Note: The keyboard automatically selects a bend range of 2 semitones the
first time you turn it on after connecting
power. Each time you turn it on after
that, it recalls the last selected bend
range.
Follow these steps to adjust the pitch
bend range.
1. Repeatedly press TRANSPOSE/
TUNE/MIDI until a number and Bend
appear.
2. Within 5 seconds, repeatedly press
+ or – until the pitch bend range you
want appears, or enter a number
from 01–12.
USING A SUSTAIN PEDAL
For added flexibility and control as you
make music, you can connect a sustain
26
pedal (not supplied), available through
your local RadioShack store. A sustain
pedal lets you sustain or soften the keyboard’s sound, and even start or stop an
auto-rhythm.
Description
SUS (Sustain)
Causes one or more
notes to linger after
they are played
SoS (Sostenuto)
Similar to SUS, but
only sustains one
note just played
SFt (Soft)
Softens the sound
rHy (Rhythm)
Starts or stops the
selected auto-rhythm
Follow these steps to change the ASSIGNABLE JACK jack’s setting.
1. Repeatedly
press TRANSPOSE/
until Bend appears.
Then repeatedly press
until the
current setting for ASSIGNABLE
JACK and Jack appear.
TUNE/MIDI
2. Within 5 seconds, repeatedly press
+ or – until the desired setting (SUS,
SoS, SFt, or rHy) appears.
Press the sustain pedal as you play to
hear the desired sound or to start/stop
the selected auto-rhythm.
Special Features
ˆ Using the Memory
The keyboard lets you record up to two
separate songs in memory for later playback. You can use either of two methods to record a song — real-time
recording (you record as you play) or
step recording (you enter notes and
chords one-by-one).
You can record on each of the keyboard’s six tracks separately. Besides
notes, each track can have its own tone
number. Then, when you play back the
tracks together, it sounds like an entire
six-piece band. Also, you can use different mixer settings for each track.
Track 1 is the main track, and you can
use it to record auto accompaniment
and drum pad sounds, as well as keyboard play. Tracks 2 through 6 are melody tracks, and you can use these for
recording a secondary melody that includes keyboard play and the drum pad.
Because each track is independent of
the others, you only need to re-record a
single track if you make a mistake while
recording on it.
REAL-TIME RECORDING
With real-time recording, the notes are
recorded as you play them on the keyboard. Before you start, read these tips.
• To record without an auto-rhythm,
skip Step 5 of “Real-Time Recording.” Recording starts when you
press a key.
• To start recording with synchro start,
press SYNCHRO/ENDING instead of
START/STOP in Step 5 of “Real-Time
Recording.” Recording starts when
you play a note or a chord on the
accompaniment keys.
• To record using an intro, ending, or
fill-in, use INTRO, SYNCHRO/ENDING, NORMAL/FILL-IN, or VARIATION/FILL-IN as you normally would.
• To synchro start auto accompaniment with an intro pattern, press
SYNCHRO/ENDING and then INTRO
instead of START/STOP in Step 5 of
“Real-Time Recording.” Recording
starts with the intro pattern when
you play a note or a chord on the
accompaniment keys.
• To start auto accompaniment during
a recording, press SYNCHRO/ENDING instead of START/STOP in Step
5. Play the melody keys to start
recording. When you reach the point
where you want accompaniment to
start, play a chord on the accompaniment keys.
Follow these steps to record as you
play.
1. Repeatedly press MEMORY until
Rec. No. appears.
Note: MEMORY is a three-way
switch. When you press it once, the
keyboard enters the memory playback mode. When you press it
again, it enters the memory record
mode. When you press the button a
third time, it turns off the memory
function.
2. Within 5 seconds, press + or – (or 0
or 1) to select a song number.
Using the Memory
27
3. Press CHORD/1 to select Track 1.
While the keyboard is in memory
record mode, the level meters for
channels 11 through 16 correspond
to memory tracks 1 through 6. When
all four bars are lit, that channel has
something in memory: if only one
bar is lit, that track is empty.
4. If desired, you can change these
settings:
• tone number
• tone number
• rhythm number
• rhythm controller (INTRO, NORMAL/
FILL-IN, etc.) operations
• pitch bender operations
• pedal operations
• drum pad operations
• rhythm number
See “Recording Multiple Tracks” on
Page 31 to record on the other five
tracks.
• tempo
• MODE
Notes:
Note: Do not change the tempo
unless you already know the desired
tempo. Pressing START/STOP to
hear the tempo causes recording to
begin.
5. Press START/STOP to start recording.
• When you record on a track that
contains data, the new recording
replaces the previous recording.
• The touch response setting (on/off)
is not recorded. However, the
strength of the strike is recorded.
• Channel 1 mixer parameters are
automatically recorded to Track 1.
6. Play the keyboard.
You can also record auto accompaniment chords, the drum pad, pitch
bender, and pedal operations.
7. Press START/STOP to end recording.
If you make a mistake, press START/
STOP to stop recording and begin again
from Step 1, or you can edit the contents. See “Editing Memory Contents”
on Page 33.
Press
after you select Track 1 in Step
3 to use the drum pads. That way, you
can also start recording by playing a
drum pad.
28
This data is stored on Track 1 along with
the notes you played:
• The memory can store a total of
about 4,900 notes. If the remaining
memory is less than 100 notes, the
measure and beat numbers flash.
When memory becomes full, recording automatically stops (and autoaccompaniment or rhythm stops
playing, if used).
• Memory contents are saved as long
as power is supplied to the keyboard. Unplugging the adapter without batteries or with weak batteries
erases the memory. To prevent data
loss, connect an adapter before
replacing the batteries.
Using the Memory
• Turning off the keyboard while
recording erases the contents of the
track you were recording.
• You can transfer memory contents
to another MIDI device.
PLAYING BACK FROM
MEMORY
1. Repeatedly press MEMORY until
Play No. appears.
2. Within 5 seconds, use + or – (or 0 or
1) to select a song number.
3. Within 5 seconds, press START/
STOP to play back the song you
selected. You can use TEMPO to
adjust the playback tempo.
4. Press START/STOP again to stop
playback.
Notes:
• You can use layer and/or split during
memory playback.
• You can change the rhythm during
playback.
• Pressing START/STOP during the
song restarts the song from the
beginning.
• You can set the volume and pan
position of the playback tracks using
the mixer. This setting data is output
through MIDI OUT.
• The entire keyboard functions as a
melody keyboard during playback,
regardless of the MODE setting.
STEP RECORDING
With step recording, you can record a
chord progression one chord at a time.
Before you start, read these tips. (If you
want to record one note at a time, refer
to “Recording Multiple Tracks” on
Page 31.)
• To start accompaniment with an
intro pattern, press INTRO after SYNCHRO/ENDING in Step 6 of “Step
Recording.”
• To switch to a rhythm variation,
press VARIATION/FILL-IN immediately before entering the chord in
Step 6 of “Step Recording.”
• To insert an ending or fill in, press
SYNCHRO/ENDING or NORMAL/FILLIN (VARIATION/FILL-IN for variation
rhythm) immediately before entering
the chord in Step 6 of “Step Recording.”
• To step-record chords without a
rhythm, skip Step 5 of “Step Recording.” The chord of the specified
length is recorded. A rest can be
specified there, so you can create
an original chord pattern.
• To add chord accompaniment during rhythm play, enter rests from the
beginning of the recording up to
where you want accompaniment to
start. Then enter only the chords (no
rests).
Follow these steps to record chords with
step recording.
1. Repeatedly press MEMORY until
REC.No. appears.
2. Within 5 seconds, repeatedly press
+ or – to select a song number.
Using the Memory
29
3. Press CHORD/1 to select Track 1.
4. If desired, you can change these
settings:
• rhythm number
• tempo
• MODE
5. Press STEP to start recording.
6. Press SYNCHRO/ENDING, then play
a chord.
• Use the chord play method determined by the current MODE setting (Fingered, Concert Chord,
Full Range Chord, or Normal).
• When MODE is set to NORMAL,
specify the chord using the root
keys and chord-type keys. See
“Specifying Chords in the Normal
Mode”.
7. Use the number buttons to specify
the length of the chord. See “Specifying the Length of a Note”.
8. For each additional chord you want
to enter, play the chord and use the
number buttons to specify its length.
9. When you finish recording, press
MEMORY, STEP, or START/ STOP.
To play back the song, press START/
STOP.
Notes:
beat, or clock (1/48 of a beat) — and
adds your new entry to it.
• You can enter a 0 (a rest) in Step 6,
but the rest is ignored when the
accompaniment plays.
• The rhythm number and INTRO,
SYNCHRO/ENDING, NORMAL/FILLIN, and VARIATION/FILL-IN operations are stored on Track 1, along
with the notes you played.
See “Recording Multiple Tracks” on
Page 31 to record on the other five
tracks.
Specifying Chords in the
Normal Mode
To enter chords when MODE is set to
NORMAL during step recording, you
must specify them using a method other
than Concert Chord or Fingered. That
way, you can enter 18 chord types using
only two keys.
While holding down the desired chord
root key, press the chord key to specify
the chord.
The root and chord types are labeled
above each key. The chord root letter
and type of chord also appear as you
play a chord.
Specifying the Length of a Note
• To correct entry mistakes, see “Editing Memory Contents” on Page 33.
During step recording, use the number
buttons (or + or –) to specify the length
of each note.
• When you record on a track that
already contains data, the keyboard
automatically locates the end of the
previous recording — measure,
Use numbers 1 through 6 to specify
whole notes (1), half notes (2), quarter
notes (3), eighth notes (4), 16th notes
(5), and 32nd notes (6).
30
Using the Memory
Hold down 7 (dot) or 9 (triplicate), then
press 1 through 6 to enter the lengths of
the notes.
To enter a tie, press 8 and enter the first
then the second notes.
To enter a rest, press 0 then use numbers 1 through 9 to specify the length of
the rest.
Correcting Mistakes
Before finishing your step recording entry, you can move the entry point back to
correct the data you entered. However,
this operation deletes all data after the
point where you make corrections.
RECORDING MULTIPLE
TRACKS
In addition to Track 1, where you record
auto accompaniment as well as keyboard play, there are five other melody
tracks that you can use to record melody
parts only. You can record different
tones on these tracks and build a full ensemble of instruments.
You can play back what you already recorded on Track 1 (or any other track)
while you record on Tracks 2–6.
Real-Time Recording
1. Repeatedly press MEMORY until
Rec. No. appears.
1. Before you press MEMORY, STEP, or
START/STOP to end recording, press
. This moves the entry point back
one “space.”
2. Within 5 seconds, repeatedly press
+ or – to select a song number.
The data recorded at the current
entry point appears.
3. Press the desired CHORD button (2–
6) to select the track you want to
record on.
2. While monitoring the data on the
display, repeatedly press or
to
move the entry point to the data you
want to change.
Note: Check the display for Channels 11–16 to see which memory
tracks contain data and which are
empty.
3. Press + and – at the same time.
Rewrite? appears.
4. If desired, you can change these
settings:
4. Press
to clear all data after the
current entry point.
5. Press , , +, or – to cancel the
rewrite operation. After that, you can
press or to move the entry point
to another location if you want.
Note: TrackEnd appears if you
press at the end of the recording.
• tone number
• tempo (to a tempo that is easy for
you to follow)
5. Press START/STOP to start recording. The contents of any tracks
already recorded start to play.
6. Play on the keyboard what you want
to record on the selected track.
Using the Memory
31
7. Press START/STOP to end recording.
7. Use 1–9 to enter the length of the
note or rest.
This data is stored on the selected
track in addition to the notes you
played:
8. Repeat entering chords by playing
them and specifying their length.
• tone number
9. Press MEMORY, STEP, or START/
STOP to end recording.
Notes:
• optional pedal operations
• If you make a mistake, see “Correcting Mistakes” on Page 31.
• pitch bender operations
• drum pad operations
1. Repeatedly press MEMORY until
Rec. No. appears.
• When you record on a track that
already contains data, the keyboard
automatically locates the end of the
previous recording — measure,
beat, or clock (1/48 of a beat) — and
appends your new entry from there.
2. Within 5 seconds, repeatedly press
+ or – to select a song number.
• To record a drum pad part, play a
drum pad in Step 5.
3. Press the desired CHORD button (2–
6) to select the track you want to
record on.
• During recording on Tracks 2
through 6, the entire keyboard functions as a melody keyboard, regardless of the current MODE setting.
Step Recording
4. Change the tone, if desired.
• This data is stored on the selected
track in addition to the notes you
played:
5. Press STEP to start recording.
6. Use the keyboard or + or – to enter
notes, or 0 to enter rests.
• When you enter the note using
the keyboard with touch response
turned on, the key pressure is
also recorded.
• You can also enter the chords
using the keyboard.
• When you use + or – to enter a
note, a staff on the display shows
the note you enter.
• To delete a rest entry, press 0
again.
32
• tone number
• drum pad operations
• You can turn off a specific track during playback by using the mixer
function (see “Using the Mixer” on
Page 18).
Changing the Navigation Track
After you record, the display shows the
contents of the last recorded or edited
track. To display a different track, repeatedly press TRANSPOSE/TUNE/MIDI
until Bend appears, then repeatedly
Using the Memory
press
until Navi. Tr. appears.
Then repeatedly press + or – until the
track you want appears.
EDITING MEMORY
CONTENTS
You can recall and change individual
notes and parameter settings (such as
tone number) in memory contents.
1. Repeatedly press MEMORY until
Play No. appears.
2. Within 5 seconds, use + or – to
select a song number.
3. Press STEP.
4. Use the CHORD buttons to select
the track you want to edit.
5. Repeatedly press or to move to
the entry point you want to change.
You can change the parameter that
is flashing on the display. To change
a different parameter, press
so
the parameter you want to edit
starts flashing.
Make the desired changes to the
selected parameter.
The actual procedures you use to
change a parameter depend on the
type of data it contains. See “Editing
Techniques and Display Contents”.
• When you change note, key pressure, chord, or drum pad data, the
keyboard sounds the new setting
so you can hear what it sounds
like.
6. Repeat Steps 5 and 6 to edit other
parameters.
7. Press MEMORY, STEP, or START/
STOP when you are finished.
Notes:
• When you interrupt playback of a
song and immediately start an editing operation, the entry point (or
point of interruption) appears on the
editing screen.
• The only parameters that can be
edited for Tracks 2–6 are notes,
chords, tone, rhythm, key pressure,
and drum pad.
• You cannot add data to a recording.
• You cannot move portions of a
recording to a different location
within the recording.
• You cannot change note lengths.
Editing Techniques and
Display Contents
Notes:
Note: You can edit Chord, Tone Number/Rhythm Number, and Rhythm Controller controls only when you first record
these items.
• Do not change a note identical to
the preceding or succeeding note.
Doing so might alter the length of
the note and you will have to rerecord the entire track.
Key Pressure (Velocity) — Use the
keyboard, number buttons, or + and – to
adjust the key pressure. To change the
key pressure using the keyboard, be
sure to turn on touch response.
Using the Memory
33
Pitch — Enter a new note on the keyboard or use + or – to change to the next
higher or lower note. The keyboard and
the staff on the display show your new
entry.
2. Within 5 seconds, repeatedly press
+ or – to select a song number.
Chord — Use the appropriate chord fingering method as determined by the
MODE setting.
4. Within 5 seconds, press the CHORD
number (2–6) for the track(s) you
want to delete.
Tone Number/Rhythm Number — Use
the number buttons or + or –.
• You can specify more than one
track by pressing more than one
button.
Rhythm Controller (INTRO, NORMAL/
FILL-IN, VARIATION/FILL-IN, SYNCHRO/
ENDING), CHORD — Press the button for
• To deselect a track, simply press
its button again.
3. Hold
the function you want to change to.
MEMORY
until
The track contents indicator(s) for
the selected track flash(es).
Deleting Individual Data
1. Follow Steps 1–5 under “Editing
Memory Contents” on Page 33.
5. To delete the data in the selected
track(s), press
. The keyboard
goes into playback standby mode.
2. Press + and – at the same time.
DataDel? appears.
3. Press
data.
down
Tr.Del.? appears.
To exit the track deletion procedure
without changing any data, press
MEMORY.
to delete the selected
Notes:
Or press or (or + or –) to cancel
the procedure without deleting anything.
Deleting All Data in a Specific
Track
• You cannot change the song number after Tr.Del.? appears.
• You cannot select a track that does
not contain any recorded data.
1. Repeatedly press MEMORY until
Rec. No. appears.
ˆ Using MIDI
Your keyboard includes a feature called
MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface). MIDI is the universal standard for
sending and receiving performance data
between all types of electronic musical
34
instruments, regardless of the manufacturer. Using MIDI, you can play music on
your keyboard and another instrument
at the same time while pressing the keys
on only one, record your music to a se-
Using MIDI
quencer, acquire a wider selection of
preset tones from a sound module, and
much more.
MAKING THE MIDI
CONNECTIONS
ABOUT MIDI
To connect your keyboard to another
MIDI-equipped device, you must use a
MIDI cable (available at your local RadioShack store).
Every MIDI-equipped instrument has
MIDI OUT and IN terminals, and some
also have a MIDI THRU terminal. Each
of these terminals serves a different purpose.
MIDI OUT sends MIDI data to (“talks
to”) the other MIDI instrument(s).
MIDI IN receives (“listens to”) MIDI data
sent by the other MIDI instrument(s).
MIDI THRU lets you connect (“network”)
additional MIDI instruments, and sends
along to other MIDI devices a copy of all
data it receives through its MIDI IN terminal.
Your keyboard has MIDI OUT and MIDI IN
terminals.
The cable that connects MIDI devices
does not actually carry sound between
them, like a speaker wire carries sound
from a receiver to a speaker. Instead,
MIDI-equipped devices communicate
with each other using digital codes (instructions). One MIDI device sends digital instructions representing exactly
what is being played on it. The other
MIDI device receives and translates
those instructions, then produces (or
records) the sound exactly as it was
played on the first device.
Note: Connecting your keyboard to another MIDI device requires a MIDI cable
(not supplied). See “Making the MIDI
Connections”.
Cautions:
• Always turn off power to your keyboard and the other MIDI device
before you connect or disconnect
MIDI cables.
• As you make the cable connections,
be sure to align the MIDI cable pins
with the matching holes on your keyboard’s MIDI OUT and MIDI IN terminals. If you have trouble plugging in
the cable, do not force it! You might
damage the plug or the instrument.
To send MIDI data from your keyboard,
use a MIDI cable to connect the keyboard’s MIDI OUT terminal to the other
device’s MIDI IN terminal.
To receive MIDI data on your keyboard,
use a MIDI cable to connect the keyboard’s MIDI IN terminal to the other device’s MIDI OUT terminal.
Note: You do not need to make both
connections if you are only either sending or receiving.
MIDI DATA
Your keyboard can send and receive
several different types of MIDI data. The
keyboard’s tones, rhythms, and other
types of MIDI data are sent automatically as you play.
Using MIDI
35
Notes:
• The keyboard’s prerecorded tunes
cannot be sent as MIDI data.
• For detailed specifications of the
MIDI function, see the “MIDI Implementation Chart” on Page 46.
Note On/Off — specifies which keys are
pressed (Note On) or released (Note
Off). Also includes how loud a note is
played as a value from 0 to 127.
Notes:
• The pitch of a note depends on the
tone that is being used, as shown in
the “MIDI Implementation Chart” on
Page 46.
• If the keyboard receives a “request”
to play notes outside of its range
(higher or lower), it automatically
selects the same note in the nearest
octave.
Effect
Control
Number
Bank Select
0, 32
Volume
7
Pan
10
Expression
11
Hold1 (Sustain)
64
Sostenuto
66
Soft Pedal
67
RPN (Registered Parameter
Number)
100/101
Data Entry
6/38
Use the Bank Select setting to select the
keyboard’s tone groups to be changed
by the Program Number message.
• Bank 0 — 0 to 127 (General MIDI
tones)
• Bank 1 — 128 to 159 (synthesized
tones)
Program Change — specifies the tone.
• Bank 2 — 160 to 167 (drum sets)
Pitch Bend — supplies pitch bend information. The keyboard’s pitch changes
as it receives a Pitch Bend message
through the MIDI IN terminal, and the
keyboard sends pitch bend information
through the MIDI OUT terminal as you rotate PITCH BEND.
• Bank 3 — 168 to 199 (user tones)
Control Change — adds effects such
as vibrato and volume changes applied
during keyboard play. The message includes a control number (the effect type)
and a control value (the on/off and depth
of the effect).
Here is the data that can be received
with this keyboard and the corresponding control number.
Just before sending a Program Change
message, send two Control Change
messages with this data to the keyboard:
• Control Number = 0, Control Value =
<bank number>
• Control Number = 32, Control Value
=0
For example, to select tone number 190
(user tone number 22), enter:
• Control Number = 0, Control Value =
3 (bank number for user tone)
• Control Number = 32, Control Value
=0
36
Using MIDI
Notes:
• Program Change = 22 (22nd tone in
bank 3)
• GM is a standard list of specifications that allows music created on
one MIDI device to sound the
same when played on another
MIDI device. This keyboard’s GM
mode incorporates most of these
specifications.
Note: Channel 10 is reserved for drum
sounds only, so it is not necessary to
send bank select data when changing
tones.
RPN is used when combining multiple
control changes. RPN (100 and 101) selects the parameter to control, and Data
Entry (6 and 38) sets the contents of the
parameter. On the keyboard, RPN is
used to set pitch bend range, transpose,
and tune control from an external MIDI
device.
All Sound Off forces all sound on the
current channel to turn off, regardless of
how the sound is being produced.
All Notes Off turns off all note data sent
from an external device on the channel.
The notes being sustained by the pedal
continue to sound until the next pedal off
signal is received.
• This message takes more time to
process than other messages;
when you program GM Mode On
in the sequencer, leave at least a
100 msec pause before the next
message.
• GM Mode Off ([F0][7E][7F][09]
[02][F7]) — used to turn off the keyboard’s GM mode.
• Reverb Change ([F0][44][0E][09]
[yy][F7]) — switches the keyboard’s
reverb function. yy determines the
type of reverberation effect.
yy Value
Reset All Controllers initializes pitch
bend and all other control changes.
System Exclusive controls fine tone
adjustments unique to a particular system. The system exclusives are unique
to a particular system; however, there
are “universal” system exclusives that
are common among devices produced
by individual manufacturers.
These are the system exclusive messages supported by this keyboard.
• GM Mode On ([F0][7E][7F][09]
[01][F7]) — used to turn on the keyboard’s GM (General MIDI) mode
from an external MIDI device.
Reverb
00
Room
01
Stage
02
Hall
0F
Off
Note: The contents of the System Exclusive message affect the entire keyboard. Other messages affect only the
current MIDI channel.
CHANGING MIDI
SETTINGS
The keyboard lets you change a number
of MIDI parameters, including turning
Using MIDI
37
and as MIDI data. Set to oFF to
send data only as MIDI data (the
speakers on the keyboard remain
silent).
General MIDI mode on/off and selecting
a MIDI channel.
Follow these steps to change MIDI parameters.
AcompOut (Accompaniment Out)
(Default: Off): set to on to send auto
accompaniment as MIDI data. Set to
oFF to turn it off.
1. Repeatedly
press TRANSPOSE/
TUNE/MIDI until oFF GM Mode
appears.
2. Within 5 seconds, repeatedly press
or
to select the parameter you
want to change.
GM Mode on/off (Default: Off): set to
on when you want to have the keyboard receive GM data from another
MIDI device. Turning GM mode on
automatically turns CHORD off,
since GM mode and MIDI In Chord
Judge cannot be used at the same
time.
Set to oFF to turn GM mode off.
The tone, volume and other parameter settings of each channel are initialized. When playing received
MIDI data, bass tones are lowered
one octave and the piccolo tone is
raised one octave.
DUMPING/IMPORTING
DATA
The keyboard’s internal data, including
data recorded to memory and synthesizer data, can be sent and received in bulk
as MIDI exclusive data through the MIDI
terminals. Thus, you can use a computer or other MIDI device as an external
storage device.
First make connections from the MIDI IN
and MIDI OUT terminals to an external
device using MIDI cables.
Keybd Ch (Keyboard Basic Channel) (Default: 01): sets the channel
for sending MIDI data to an external
device.
Note: Some software does not support
MIDI exclusive data.
Chord (MIDI In Chord Judge)
Dumping Data
(Default: Off): when set to on, the
keyboard determines basic channel
note data as auto accompaniment
chords per the current chord fingering method. Turning GM mode on
automatically turns Chord off,
since GM mode and MIDI In Chord
Judge cannot be used at the same
time.
Local (Local Control) (Default:
On): set to on to send data simultaneously to the keyboard’s speakers
38
3. Within 5 seconds, use + or – to
change the setting of the parameter.
1. Put the other device in its receive
standby mode.
See the owner’s manual that comes
with the receiving device for details.
2. Repeatedly
TUNE/MIDI
press TRANSPOSE/
until BulkSnd? ap-
pears.
3. Within 5 seconds, press
to start
data send. Sending appears. The
Using MIDI
keyboard automatically exits the
data transfer mode after all the data
is sent.
Importing Data
1. Repeatedly
TUNE/MIDI
press TRANSPOSE/
until BulkSnd? ap-
pears.
2. Within 5 seconds, repeatedly press
or until BulkRcv? appears.
3. Within 5 seconds, press
to prepare the keyboard to receive data.
4. Start the send operation on the
sending device. See the owner’s
manual that comes with the connected device for details. The keyboard automatically exits the data
transfer mode after all the data is
received.
NOTES ABOUT THE MIDI
IMPLEMENTATION
CHART
The “MIDI Implementation Chart” on
Page 46 illustrates the details of the keyboard’s MIDI function. An O in the chart
means that the keyboard has this feature; X means it does not have this feature. This section explains what the
keyboard can do.
Basic Channel — MIDI uses up to 16
channels to exchange data. As in a TV
broadcast, different channels send different data.
Mode — The chart shows that Mode 3 is
OMNI OFF, POLY. This means the keyboard sends and receives polyphonic
data on only one channel at a time.
Note Number — This number represents each key of the keyboard. The
lowest number (0) is five octaves below
middle C. Since the keyboard’s lowest
note is two octaves below middle C and
the highest is three octaves above middle C, your keyboard can send a note
number between 36 and 96. But, it can
receive all 0 through 127 note numbers,
so those keys outside the keyboard’s
key range are interpreted as notes inside the key range.
Velocity — This number shows how
fast the key was pressed, or how loud
the note should sound. 1 is the lowest
velocity, pianissimo; 127 is the loudest,
fortissimo. 0 means the key is released.
9n — This means that the Note On message is 9 hexadecimal, and n is the
channel number.
For example, if you select Channel 16
and press Key D in mezzo-piano, 9E (E
is 15 in hexadecimal; note that Channel
1 is 0 in MIDI data) is first sent from MIDI
OUT, then 3D (decimal 61) is sent as
the key number, finally 21 (decimal 33)
is sent as velocity.
Pitch Bender — The keyboard sends
and receives pitch bending signals.
Control Change — This feature sends
data on various controllers, each having
its own number. For the details of each
parameter, see “MIDI Data” on Page 35.
Program Change — This feature
changes the preset sounds. Each sound
number corresponds to a program number between 0 and 127.
System Exclusive — This feature
sends special signals unique to the key-
Using MIDI
39
board. For details, see “MIDI Data” on
Page 35.
music to begin at whatever point it was
last stopped.
System Real Time — “Clock” is like a
metronome to send the synchronizing
signal.
All Notes Off — This feature is a kind of
panic button: it stops the sounds currently playing. The keyboard only receives this message.
System real time commands send three
kinds of signals — start tells the keyboard to start playing from the beginning, stop tells all the synchronized
instruments to stop playing, and continue is similar to start, but it signals the
Active Sensing — This means the keyboard’s sound turns off in the event the
connection cable to MIDI IN terminal is
accidentally disconnected.
ˆ Troubleshooting
If your keyboard is not performing as it should, these suggestions might help. If you
still cannot solve the problem, take the keyboard to your local RadioShack store for
assistance.
Trouble
No sound, even if keys
are pressed.
No sound when connected to an external
amplifier.
40
Possible Cause
Remedy
The keyboard has turned
off automatically.
Set MODE to OFF then ON.
Volume is turned down.
Repeatedly press MAIN VOLUME ▲ to increase the volume.
Headphones connected.
Disconnect headphones.
Power supply problem.
Check the power supply.
Are battery symbols
(+/–) facing correctly?
Are the batteries fresh?
Is the AC or DC adapter connected properly?
You are pressing too few
accompaniment keys
while MODE is set to FINGERED.
Set MODE to NORMAL or
CONCERT CHORD.
Volume is turned down.
Repeatedly press VOLUME ▲
to increase the volume.
Defective connection cord.
Replace the connection cord.
Troubleshooting
Press 3 or 4 keys to form a
chord while MODE is set to FINGERED.
Trouble
Possible Cause
Remedy
No sound when receiving
and playing MIDI data.
MIDI cables are not connected properly.
Check the connection.
The key or tuning does
not match when playing
along with another MIDI
instrument.
The tuning or transpose
parameter is set to a value
other than 0 or 00.
Set the tuning or transpose to 0
or 00.
Bass notes in General
MIDI data are sent out
one octave lower.
Tone map parameter is set
to N.
Sounds sent to another
MIDI device by the keyboard do not sound correct.
The other device’s MIDI
THRU function is turned
on.
Set the tone map parameter to
G (see “Changing MIDI Settings”
on Page 37).
Turn off the MIDI THRU function
on the other device.
CARE
To enjoy your MIDI Keyboard for a long time:
• Keep the keyboard dry. If it gets wet, wipe it dry immediately.
• Use and store the keyboard only in normal temperature environments.
• Handle the keyboard gently and carefully. Do not drop it.
• Keep the keyboard away from dust and dirt.
• Wipe the keyboard with a damp cloth occasionally to keep it looking new.
Modifying or tampering with the keyboard’s internal components can cause a malfunction and might invalidate its warranty and void your FCC authorization to operate
it. If your keyboard is not performing as it should, take it to your local RadioShack
store for assistance.
Troubleshooting
41
ˆ Appendix
NOTE TABLE
42
Appendix
Legend:
1. Tone number
2. Maximum polyphony
3. Digital Controlled Oscillator
4. Range type
5. Recommended sound range for General MIDI
* Tones without scale
* The following shows maximum polyphone for synthesized tones 128 through 159:
141 BASS SLIDE: 24 notes 1 DCO
Other tones: 12 notes 2 DCO
Appendix
43
DRUM ASSIGNMENT LIST
44
Appendix
FINGERED CHORD CHART
Note: Chords marked with a
cannot be played in the FINGERED mode due to the
limitation of the accompaniment keyboard range. Use FULL RANGE CHORD to play
pieces that contain these chords.
Appendix
45
ˆ MIDI Implementation Chart
FUNCTION
TRANSMITTED
*1
RECOGNIZED
1–16
1–16
Basic
Channel
Default
Changed
1–16
1–16
Mode
Default
Messages
Altered
Mode 3
X
Mode 3
X
❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊
❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊
36–96
0–127
12–108*2
Note
Number:
True voice
❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊
Velocity
Note ON
Note OFF
O 9nH v=1–127
X 9nH v=0
O 9nH v=1–127
X 9nH v=0, 8nH
v=XX
After
Touch
Keys
Channels
X
X
X
O*3
Pitch Bender
O
O
Control
Change
O
X
O*4
O
O
O
O*5
O*5
O*5
O*4
X
X
O
O*3
O*4
O
O
O
O
O
O
O*4
O
O
0, 32
1
6, 38
7
10
11
64
66
67
100, 101
120
121
O 0–127
O 0–127
True #
❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊
❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊❊
System
Exclusive
O*6
O*6
System
Common
: Song Pos
: Song Sel
: Tune
X
X
X
X
X
X
System
: Clock
Real Time : Commands
O
O
X
X
Aux
X
X
X
X
O
O
X
X
Program
Change:
: Local ON/OFF
: All notes OFF
Messages : Active Sense
: Reset
46
MIDI Implementation Chart
REMARKS
*1
Held in memory
with power supplied
*2See “Note Table”
on Page 42
XX=no relation
Bank Select
Modulation
Data entry
Volume
Pan
Expression
Hold 1
Sostenuto
Soft pedal
RPN LSB, MSB
All sound off
Reset all controller
Remarks
*3 Modulation and after touch for each channel are the same effect.
*4 Pitch bend sense, fine tune, coarse tune send/receive, and RPN Null receive
*5 In accordance with assignable jack setting
*6 GM on/off GM ON:[F0][7E][7F][09][01][F7]
GM OFF: [F0][7E][7F][09][02][F7]
Reverb change [F0][44][0E][09][XX][F7] XX=00: ROOM, 01: STAGE, 02: HALL, 0F: OFF
Bulk dump [F0] [44][0E][07] [0L0][0H0]...[0L127][0H127] [0LCS][0HCS] [F7] × 255 Block
ID Number Data (128 × 2 = 256 Bytes) Checksum (1 × 2 = 2 bytes)
Mode 1: OMNI ON, POLY
Mode 2: OMNI ON, MONO
Mode 3: OMNI OFF, POLY
Mode 4: OMNI OFF, MONO
O: Yes
X: No
ˆ Specifications
Number of Keys ..................................................................................................................... 61
Drum Pads ............................................................................................................................... 6
Polyphonic Sound ............................................................................................... 24-note (Max.)
Preset Tones ............................ 200 (128 General MIDI, 32 synthesized, 32 user, 8 drum sets)
with Layer and Split
Rhythm Instrument Tones ...................................................................................................... 61
Digital Effects ............................................................... 3 reverb types (HALL, STAGE, ROOM)
Demo Tunes ............................................................................................................................ 2
Auto Accompaniment
Rhythm Patterns .................................................................................................................. 100
Tempo ....................................................................................... Variable (216 steps, 40 to 255)
Chords ......................................... 3 fingering methods (Concert Chord, Fingered, Full Range)
Rhythm Controller ................. Start/Stop, Intro, Normal/Fill-In, Variation/Fill-In, Synchro/Ending
Accompaniment Volume ............................................................................ 0 to 127 (128 steps)
One-Touch Preset ........... Recalls tone and tempo settings best suited for the selected rhythm
Registration Memory
Number of Setups ............................................................................. 32 (4 locations × 8 banks)
Memory Contents ................ Tone, rhythm, tempo, split setting, split point, layer setting, mixer
settings, keyboard channel on/off, reverb setting, touch response
setting, ASSIGNABLE JACK setting, transpose setting, tuning setting,
pitch bend range, accompaniment volume setting
Memory Function
Songs ...................................................................................................................................... 2
Recording Tracks .................................................................. 6 (2 through 6 are melody tracks)
Specifications
47
Recording Methods ........................................................................................... Real-time, Step
Memory Capacity ............................................ Approximately 4,900 notes (total for two songs)
Edit Function ............................................................................................................... Equipped
Custom Tone Parameter Function
Parameters ............................................ PCM set, amp envelope set, attack rate, release rate,
pitch envelope set, pitch, level, touch sense, pan
Mixer Function
Channels ................................................................................................................................ 16
Parameters ....................................................... Program change number, volume, expression,
pan, coarse tuning, fine tuning, on/off/solo
MIDI .................................................................... 16 multi-timbre receive, GM Level 1 standard
Transpose .............................................................................. –12 semitones to +12 semitones
Tuning ................................................................................. Adjustable A4 = 440 Hz ±50 cents
Pitch Bend Range ............................................................................12 semitones up and down
Built-In Speakers ......................................................................................................... 12 cm × 2
Terminals
MIDI Terminals .............................................................................................................. IN, OUT
Assignable Terminal .................................................................................... 1/4-Inch Phone Jack
(sustain, sostenuto, soft, rhythm start/stop)
Power Supply .......................................................................................................... 9V DC Jack
Headphones Stereo Standard Jack .............................................Output Impedance:150 Ohms
Output Voltage: 5 V (RMS) MAX at 47K ohm load
Power Sources ............................................................................................... DC: 6 D batteries
AC: 9V with AC adapter
Power Consumption ......................................................................................................... 7.7 W
Dimensions (HWD) ........................................................................ 515/16 × 377/8 × 1413/16 Inches
(15.2 × 96 × 37.6 cm)
Weight (Without Batteries) ..................................................................................... 12 lbs 12 oz
(5.8 kg)
Included Accessories .................................................................................. Sheet Music Stand
Play Guide for the Prerecorded Tunes
Specifications are typical; individual units might vary. Specifications are subject to change and
improvement without notice.
48
Specifications
ˆ Notes
Notes
49
50
Notes
Notes
51
Limited One-Year Warranty
This product is warranted by RadioShack against manufacturing defects in material and workmanship under normal use for one (1) year from the date of purchase from RadioShack company-owned
stores and authorized RadioShack franchisees and dealers. EXCEPT AS PROVIDED HEREIN, RadioShack MAKES NO EXPRESS WARRANTIES AND ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING
THOSE OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, ARE LIMITED
IN DURATION TO THE DURATION OF THE WRITTEN LIMITED WARRANTIES CONTAINED
HEREIN. EXCEPT AS PROVIDED HEREIN, RadioShack SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY OR RESPONSIBILITY TO CUSTOMER OR ANY OTHER PERSON OR ENTITY WITH RESPECT TO ANY
LIABILITY, LOSS OR DAMAGE CAUSED DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY BY USE OR PERFORMANCE OF THE PRODUCT OR ARISING OUT OF ANY BREACH OF THIS WARRANTY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, ANY DAMAGES RESULTING FROM INCONVENIENCE, LOSS
OF TIME, DATA, PROPERTY, REVENUE, OR PROFIT OR ANY INDIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, EVEN IF RadioShack HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE
POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
Some states do not allow limitations on how long an implied warranty lasts or the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages, so the above limitations or exclusions may not apply to
you.
In the event of a product defect during the warranty period, take the product and the RadioShack
sales receipt as proof of purchase date to any RadioShack store. RadioShack will, at its option, unless otherwise provided by law: (a) correct the defect by product repair without charge for parts and
labor; (b) replace the product with one of the same or similar design; or (c) refund the purchase
price. All replaced parts and products, and products on which a refund is made, become the property of RadioShack. New or reconditioned parts and products may be used in the performance of
warranty service. Repaired or replaced parts and products are warranted for the remainder of the
original warranty period. You will be charged for repair or replacement of the product made after the
expiration of the warranty period.
This warranty does not cover: (a) damage or failure caused by or attributable to acts of God, abuse,
accident, misuse, improper or abnormal usage, failure to follow instructions, improper installation or
maintenance, alteration, lightning or other incidence of excess voltage or current; (b) any repairs
other than those provided by a RadioShack Authorized Service Facility; (c) consumables such as
fuses or batteries; (d) cosmetic damage; (e) transportation, shipping or insurance costs; or (f) costs
of product removal, installation, set-up service adjustment or reinstallation.
This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which vary from
state to state.
RadioShack Customer Relations, 200 Taylor Street, 6th Floor, Fort Worth, TX 76102
We Service What We Sell
MD1210E-1
RadioShack
A Division of Tandy Corporation
Fort Worth, Texas 76102
12/99
42-4045
MA0005-A
05A00
Printed in Malaysia
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