General Safety Plan - Lassen Canyon Nursery

General Safety Plan - Lassen Canyon Nursery
GENERAL SAFETY PLAN
INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................... 2
EMPLOYERS COVERED ........................................................................................................ 2
RELATED PLANS AND REQUIREMENTS ............................................................................. 3
GENERAL SAFETY PLAN ....................................................................................................... 4
PURPOSE ................................................................................................................................ 5
EMPLOYEE COMPLIANCE ..................................................................................................... 5
REPORTING JOB-RELATED INJURIES AND ILLNESSES................................................... 6
GENERAL FIRST AID PRACTICES ........................................................................................ 7
First Aid Kit .......................................................................................................................... 7
Back Injury Prevention ....................................................................................................... 7
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) ..................................................................... 9
Key Safety Rules ............................................................................................................... 10
PERSONAL HYGIENE AND SANITATION ........................................................................... 12
SAFETY RESPONSIBILITIES OF SUPERVISORS .............................................................. 13
EMPLOYEE TRAINING.......................................................................................................... 14
BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS .............................................................................................. 14
LOCK-OUT/ TAG-OUT PROCEDURES ................................................................................ 15
FORKLIFT SAFETY RULES .................................................................................................. 16
SPRINKLER IRRIGATOR ...................................................................................................... 16
WEEDER/HAND LABORER .................................................................................................. 18
WELDING, CUTTING AND BRAZING ................................................................................... 18
TRUCK DRIVERS .................................................................................................................. 18
FIELD LABORERS ................................................................................................................ 19
GENERAL EQUIPMENT OPERATION/ PRE - OPERATION SAFETY CHECKS ................ 20
MOTOR VEHICLES ............................................................................................................... 20
ALL TERRAIN VEHICLES ..................................................................................................... 21
TRACTOR SAFETY ............................................................................................................... 21
HOOKING AND UNHOOKING 3 POINT AND PTO EQUIPMENT ........................................ 22
QUICK HITCH ........................................................................................................................ 22
“3” POINT WITH SLIDING LOWER LINKS .......................................................................... 23
“3” POINT HITCH WITH NON-SLIDING LOWER LINKS ..................................................... 23
CRAWLER TRACTORS ......................................................................................................... 23
BACKHOE/LOADER .............................................................................................................. 24
BACKHOE: SPECIFIC PRECAUTIONS: .............................................................................. 25
SPRAYERS…………………………………………………………………………………………..25
PUMPS ................................................................................................................................... 26
ELECTRICAL PANELS AND STARTER SWITCHES ........................................................... 26
SPRINKLER PIPE .................................................................................................................. 27
BATTERY SAFETY ................................................................................................................ 27
GENERAL SAFETY RULES FOR OFFICES ......................................................................... 28
DISCIPLINARY POLICY ........................................................................................................ 33
DISCIPLINARY PENALTIES.................................................................................................. 36
ORAL OR WRITTEN WARNINGS ......................................................................................... 36
DISCIPLINARY NOTICE TO EMPLOYEE ............................................................................. 37
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INTRODUCTION
All employees must follow safety rules in order for the rules to be effective.
In addition to disciplinary plans, this General Safety Plan emphasizes basic
safety principles that may apply to many businesses. Among the provisions
are:
• General company policies
• Basic personal protective equipment (PPE) policies
• General safety rules
• Office safety rules
• Accident reporting rules
• General first aid practices
• Safety responsibilities for supervisors
• Disciplinary policy statement
• Disciplinary policy
Employers Covered
All employers need to have a general safety plan. OSHA requires that all
employers effectively enforce safety rules to implement OSHA standards.
This requires a general safety plan as well as individual safety plans. In
addition, effective enforcement requires that employees be subject to
discipline and even discharge for failure to follow applicable rules and
standards.
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This general safety plan provides:
• safety policies to provide a framework for a general safety plan; and
• disciplinary policies to enforce safety rules, disciplinary notice, and
certification.
This Plan’s disciplinary provisions apply only to safety matters. It is
presumed that an employer will have disciplinary procedures and penalties
elsewhere (i.e., employee handbook) for other concerns. An employer
should make sure that this Plan does not conflict with any material in its
employee handbook.
In addition, this General Safety Plan is intended for at-will employees who
have no contractual or other right to continued employment.
Related Plans and Requirements
This General Safety Plan is not designed as a substitute for specific plans
that are required by OSHA. Among those plans are the following separate
plans:
• Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Plan
• Emergency Action Plan
• Fire Safety Plan
• Forklift Safety Plan
• Hazard Assessment Plan
• Hazard Communication Plan
• Lock-Out/Tag-Out Plan
• Respirator Plan
References to specific plans or digest topics are not intended as a substitute for
the specific plans or topics. The references in this General Plan are merely
meant to highlight some areas of special concern.
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General Safety Plan
LASSEN CANYON NURSERY, INC.
1300 SALMON CREEK ROAD
REDDING, CA 96003
Prepared by:
Susie Browning
Safety Director
(530)638-8281
signature
General Safety Plan
date
4
PURPOSE
Lassen Canyon Nursery, Inc. is totally committed to employee safety and
loss control. It is our intention:
• that all employees work under the safest conditions possible;
• that we maintain a workplace and equipment free from recognized
hazards; and
• that we provide information, training, and supervision to enable employees
to perform their jobs safely.
The information in this General Safety Plan states basic safety rules and
procedures that are to be followed by all company employees. While this
Plan will help you recognize and avoid obvious hazards, it cannot possibly
cover all situations. When in doubt, consult your supervisor for guidance.
This General Safety Plan is designed to generally reflect company
policy, but it is not intended to be a binding legal contract. Thus, this
General Safety Plan does not alter any employee’s at-will status or
grant any other legal rights to any employee.
Employee Compliance
Lassen Canyon Nursery, Inc. will endeavor to comply with safety
regulations implemented by federal, state, and local agencies. It is company
policy that every employee and all property be protected from controllable
hazards. We believe that accidents can be avoided by using good training
methods, common sense, and personal initiative. Therefore, each employee
is responsible for complying with all safety regulations and the following
basic principles:
1. Always Follow Safety Rules: Applicable safety rules and regulations
are to be followed at all times.
2. Do Not Perform Unsafe Acts: Employees should never perform any
tasks that they believe may be unsafe. Any such conditions or practices
should be reported to a supervisor immediately.
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3. Listen to Supervisors: Supervisors in charge of each operation have
been instructed to familiarize employees with safe operations and
practices. Many accidents occur when employees take shortcuts and
ignore established safety rules and regulations. All employees must
follow established safety rules in performing their assigned tasks.
4. Avoid Discipline or Discharge: Each employee is responsible for his or
her performance and for following safety rules. Failure to do so will lead
to disciplinary action or discharge.
Reporting Job-Related Injuries and Illnesses
All job-related injuries must be reported in accordance with the following
rules:
1. Follow Orientation Rules: Information on reporting job-related
accidents is covered in full in the employee welcome and orientation
class, which is scheduled shortly after each employee is hired.
2. Report Immediately: All on-the-job accidents and illnesses must be
reported to a supervisor immediately—no matter how minor they may
appear!
3. Cooperate in the Investigation: Employees who are involved in
accidents should give full details concerning the nature of their injuries,
the cause, the time/date, and any other relevant information.
4. Secure Medical Treatment: Employees should immediately secure any
necessary medical treatment. Only designated supervisors and
managers can authorize treatment.
5. Record Information: Fill out all accident reporting forms. If first aid is
applied on the premises, the nature of the first aid, condition of the
individual, and recommendation for further treatment must all be
recorded.
6. Detect Symptoms: Learn to detect early signs and symptoms of any
illnesses or ailments to get proper treatment.
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7. Avoid Discipline or Discharge: An employee who does not promptly or
properly report accidents or illnesses in accordance with this policy may
be disciplined or discharged.
General First Aid Practices
First Aid Kit
Items in first aid kit: Eyewash solution, bandage gauze, adhesive tape,
bandaids, ace bandages, aspirin, antibacterial salve, burn ointment,
Vaseline, cold cream, iodine, and any items as requested by the individual
charged with First aid responsibilities.
Back Injury Prevention
The back is a common source of employee injuries. Every year, back injuries
costs employers and employees tens of billions of dollars in lost wages and
medical expenses.
1. Employees may reduce injuries by:
• minimizing any materials handling;
• using mechanical devices and equipment for assistance whenever
possible; and
• following proper lifting techniques.
2. Employees should follow these practices while lifting:
• Lift with legs.
• Keep head high, chin tucked in, and back arched.
• Keep weight close to body and stand straight.
• Create a balanced base of support by using one foot ahead and one
foot behind to get the weight in close.
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• Pivot with the load.
• Put one foot up and change positions often when standing for long
periods of time.
• Keep work at a comfortable height.
• Stand, if possible, on a cushioned mat.
• Interrupt or change stressful positions frequently.
• Keep heavy loads close to body. (Ten pounds at arms length
generates 100 pounds of pressure on spine.)
• Keep back support belt snug while lifting (if one is worn).
3. Employees should avoid these practices while lifting:
• Don’t twist back while moving material. (Remember, always keep
shoulders in line with your hips.)
• Don’t wear high-heeled, hard-heeled, or platform shoes when
standing for long periods of time.
• Don’t stand in one position too long.
• Don’t stand with knees locked, stomach muscles relaxed, and back
swayed.
• Don’t bend forward at the waist with work in a low position.
• Don’t remain in the same position for a long period.
• Don’t reach with a heavy load.
• Don’t lift with your back flexed.
• Don’t loosen back support belt while lifting.
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Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
The company will first use engineering and administrative controls to
eliminate or reduce (if elimination is not possible) any hazards. Whenever
necessary, the company will also use personal protective equipment (PPE)
to provide additional protection.
1. Foot Protection: Safety toe footwear must be worn whenever foot injury
could result from accidental contact with heavy objects. Foot-wear must
meet all requirements in American National Standard for Men’s SafetyToe Footwear, Z41-1991. Employees generally are responsible for
providing their own safety toe footwear.
2. Head Protection: Employees must wear helmets whenever there is a
danger of injury from falling objects. Protective helmets must meet all the
requirements of American National Standard Z89.1-1986. In using
helmets, employees must also consider electrical shock and burn
hazards.
3. Eye and Face Protection: Eye and face protection must meet all
requirements in ANSI Z87.1989. Eye and face protection must be worn
during grinding, chipping, buffing, chemical handling, cutting and other
operations where steel, wood, or dust particles are likely to be present.
4. Hand Protection: Gloves should be used as needed. Leather or leatherlike gloves should be used when handling wire rope. Rubber or PVC
gloves should be worn when acids, caustic soda, or other chemicals are
handled.
5. Clothing: Personal clothing must match working conditions and weather.
Each person must wear full-length trousers and a shirt that covers the
shoulders while working in shop areas. Employees are encouraged to
wear clothing made of cotton or wool as opposed to synthetic fabrics
because of the greater resistance of natural fabrics to fire, chemicals,
etc.
6. Hearing Protection: Hearing protection must be used by all employees
in areas designated as having high noise levels. See Hearing
Conservation Program.
7. Other Personal Protective Equipment: Employees must wear
additional protective equipment whenever other potential hazards exist.
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Use of additional protective equipment is required by Federal and state
OSHA Laws.
Note: All employees must also familiarize themselves with the
detailed procedures contained in the written Hazard Assessment
Plan. These brief safety tips are not intended to be used as a
substitute for that plan and are meant only to highlight some major
areas of concern.
Key Safety Rules
The following list highlights some of the most important and common safety
rules for employees. However, this brief list is not intended as a substitute for
the individual sections that follow or for the separate individual safety plans.
These key safety rules are merely meant to emphasize some rules that
should always be on the minds of employees.
1. Report any injury to supervisor immediately, no matter how slight.
2. Report all unsafe conditions to supervisor immediately.
3. Maintain good housekeeping. Keep work area clean and clear. Put
things where they belong.
4. A first aid kit is available. Be certain where it is located, so you may
reach it in an emergency.
5. Emergency phone numbers are posted near each first aid kit and posting
boards.
6. Familiarize yourself with all escape exits and the location of any
emergency cutoff valves or switches.
7. In case of fire, call the fire department immediately (911) or notify a
supervisor to do so. Alert all occupants of the building so that a safe,
orderly evacuation may take place. (Please see Evacuation Policy).
8. Adequate fire extinguishers are provided throughout the area. Be aware
of their locations and proper operation.
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9. Keep alert! Observe all safety signs.
10. Never make changes on equipment to bypass safety devices.
11. Mechanical material handling devices may be used only by authorized
personnel.
12. Do not tamper with controls or switches on heating, air conditioning, or
other equipment unless authorized to do so.
13. When mixing chemicals, always wear safety glasses, masks, and gloves.
14. When spraying any chemicals, always wear protective equipment that is
approved by the supervisor.
15. Make sure that electrical tools are properly grounded and that no
electrical hazard exists from standing water.
16. Do not keep tools in your pockets.
17. Lift with leg muscles, not the back. Be certain to have a firm grasp and
firm footing before lifting anything.
18. Do not attempt to lift or move anything too heavy. Maximum weight is 85
pounds. Use available equipment (dollies, wheelbarrows, etc.) for
assistance or get help.
19. Horseplay is prohibited.
20. Smoking is allowed only in authorized areas.
21. Good quality work shoes help protect feet if something is dropped on
them. Safety type footwear is required in all shop areas.
22. Do not run. No job is so urgent that running is required.
23. Use approved ladders to climb.
24. Wear tight-fitting clothes and hair net (if your hair is long) when operating
equipment. Loose clothes or hair can get caught in machinery and cause
serious injury.
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25. When operating lathes or other similar equipment, avoid unusually long
hair and beard, which can be a work hazard.
26. Never wear jewelry such as rings, watches, or bracelets while operating
equipment.
27. Do not attempt to repair or fix any machinery while it is operating.
28. Refrain from use of narcotics and alcohol in compliance with company
policies.
29. Use the proper welding masks and gloves when welding or using any
form of cutting torch.
30. Wear an appropriate mask when working in dusty areas as needed.
31. Do not use compressed air to attempt to clean off clothing. Use of
compressed air can cause debris to become imbedded in skin and eyes.
32. Ear protection must be used when requested by a supervisor.
33. Comply with all posted personal protection equipment (PPE) notices.
Personal Hygiene and Sanitation
1. Employees must cooperate in helping to maintain a clean and orderly
workplace.
2. Employees must maintain healthy personal hygiene.
3. Music must not be disruptive to other employees. Loud music will not be
tolerated.
4. Employees are to report to work well-groomed, in accordance with
company policy.
5. Employees must wear clean uniforms with shirt tail tucked in, or jacket
over work clothes, during working hours.
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Safety Responsibilities of Supervisors
Supervisors must comply with all the following:
1. Emphasize safety and participate in all safety meetings.
2. Check for and eliminate hazards.
3. Conduct monthly safety meetings for each crew change. All personnel
must participate in the meetings and help evaluate working conditions.
4. Record attendance and discussions in safety meeting log.
5. Follow through with recommendations from safety meetings, including:
• updating practices;
• improving working conditions; and
• maintaining equipment for safe operations.
6. Keep records as required by applicable state and federal law.
7. Eliminate recognized hazards and help reduce or control any hazards
that cannot be eliminated.
8. Make sure that all employees are properly trained in:
• hazard communication
• bloodborne pathogen
• respirator use
• personal protective equipment
• forklift training
• confined space
• lock-out/tag-out
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• pesticide worker training and any other training programs required by
federal or state laws.
Employee Training
To reduce the chance of injury, the company’s policy is to provide each
employee with training in the tools, equipment, and skills necessary to
perform his or her job. Training will comply with the specifics of any OSHA
safety plans and standards. Employees are to cooperate and take training
very seriously as its purpose is to protect their lives, health, and safety.
Bloodborne Pathogens
With any potential exposure to bloodborne pathogens (e.g., attempting to
give first aid to a bleeding co-worker), employees must follow these basic
rules:
1. Wear rubber gloves.
2. Do not re-use gloves.
3. Wash your hands with soap and water after removing gloves.
4. Wear safety goggles if there is a potential for contaminants to splash in
the eyes.
5. Wear a mask if there is a potential for contaminants to splash into the
mouth or nose.
6. Wear additional protective clothing if skin is not covered.
7. If you become exposed to bloodborne pathogens, wash the area
immediately and report the incident to management. Professional
medical attention may then be provided, including any required Hepatitis
B vaccine.
8. Regulated waste must be properly bagged, labeled and disposed of.
9. Bloodborne pathogen clean-up and personal protective equipment is
located at the first aid kit locations.
10. Further information on bloodborne pathogen control procedures can be
obtained from your supervisor.
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Note: All employees who may possibly be affected must also
familiarize themselves with the detailed procedures contained in
the written Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Plan. These
brief safety tips are not intended to be used as a substitute for that
plan and are meant only to highlight some major areas of concern.
Lock-Out/ Tag-Out Procedures
Lock-out/tag-out is a procedure to control the activation of machinery by
controlling the machine’s power source. These sources include electricity,
steam, or any other source of power. Controlling a machine’s power source
prevents accidents caused by sudden activation of machinery. Failure to
properly control power sources can have very serious consequences. For
example, suppose that maintenance is done while a worker is installing a
new switch, and someone turns the circuit breaker on. The result will be an
electrocuted worker.
The following are some of the key points concerning lockout/tag-out
procedures:
1. Know where all energy source feeders and shut-off locations are for the
machine being operated.
2. If machine is unsafe or being worked on, shut off the power and lock the
switch.
3. Tag the lock (List why the machine is out and the date of installation of
the lock).
4. Only the person who installs the lock and tag should remove it.
5. After all energy sources are shut off:
• proceed with caution (stored energy may still be in the machine and
cause injury);
• follow the manufacturer’s recommendations; and
• test for movement by trying controls.
6. Remember, many machines have multiple power sources. Make sure
that all power sources are locked when working on your machine.
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7. When the machine is safe to operate, remove the lock and tag.
8. Machine operators or maintenance personnel should have their own
keys and locks.
9. No job is too small or too short for lock-out/tag-out! 75% of
accidents involving unexpected machinery activation occur on jobs of 15
minutes or less. –See Lock out/ Tag out Proceedures
Forklift Safety Rules
See Forklift Safety Policy Manual
SPRINKLER IRRIGATOR
1. Farm tractors and equipment - see specific equipment heading.
2. Pipe trailers - Employees are prohibited from riding on pipe trailers.
3. Use proper lifting techniques when handling pipe sections, sprinklers, and
other parts. Keep you back straight and lift with your legs.
4. When moving loads of pipe, be certain the load is properly secured to
avoid injuries caused by load shifting.
5. Do not ride on trailer hitch, tractor fenders, or top of load. Use the
transport safety platform.
6. Do not drink water directly from pumps or irrigation pipes. The water may
have fertilizer or other chemicals in it.
7. Avoid sticking fingers or hands into pipe couplings when connecting
sections to prevent serious injury.
8. Do not start pumps or turn on electrical switches while standing in wet
soil.
9. Avoid pesticide drift at all times. If this should occur, immediately leave
the area and contact your supervisor.
10. Do not take breaks or lie under pipe trailers or tractors.
11. Do not remove PTO guards from pumps or tractors. If they are not in
place, notify your supervisor immediately.
12. Use appropriate precautions to protect your face and head when lifting
and carrying pipe. Watch for fellow employees.
13. No jumping from row to row or over irrigation ditches. Use caution when
working in the mud.
14. Use extreme caution when moving pipe sections to avoid contact with
power lines.
15. Report all unsafe conditions to your supervisor immediately.
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16. Report all accidents, injuries, illnesses to your supervisor immediately.
17. Do not operate any equipment unless you have been trained and
authorized.
18. Keep work areas clean at all times.
19. Proper work clothing is required at all times.
20. Operation of tractors shall be at a safe limit for the road conditions
encountered.
21. The company is aware of the hazards regarding the use of agricultural
chemicals. When these materials are used, only authorized and trained
personnel will be allowed to handle them.
22. Employees will not be allowed to enter production areas which have been
treated with an agricultural chemical until authorized by the
manufacturer’s recommendations for re-entry. An employee who violated
this policy will be terminated immediately.
23. If an employee feels he or she has been exposed to an agricultural
chemical, the employee must report it to his supervisor right away.
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WEEDER/HAND LABORER
Be sure that hoes and knives are in good working order.
The proper way to carry a hoe while working in the field is down at your
side, not on your shoulder.
Protect your face and head when carrying and turning with hoes. Watch
for fellow employees.
Prevent slip and falls. No jumping from row to row or over ditches. Use
caution when working in the mud.
Use proper lifting methods when handling parts: Keep your back straight
and lift with your legs.
Do not enter posted fields that have been sprayed.
Stay clear of all spraying and tractor operations.
Long sleeve shirts and gloves must be worn at all times unless otherwise
directed by your foreman.
WELDING, CUTTING AND BRAZING
Inspect all equipment to make sure that it is in safe working condition.
All required personal protective equipment must be worn at all times.
Head, face, eyes, hand, body protection.
Hot work should not be done within 35 feet of combustible materials or
flammable liquids or gases.
Make sure adequate fire extinguishing equipment is close at hand.
Make certain adequate ventilation is available when welding, cutting, and
brazing work is done.
All cylinders of compressed gas must be properly secured, have
protective caps in place and space cylinders (full and empty) of oxygen
and flammable gases at least 20 feet apart.
TRUCK DRIVERS
Safety chains shall be used at all times when towing equipment on the
highway.
Employees shall exercise safety precautions at all times while operating
vehicles and equipment.
There shall be no smoking when fueling vehicles or using combustible
materials.
Vehicles shall be checked each morning as to condition of fuel, tires, oil,
battery, turn signals, lights, brakes and safety equipment, windshield
wipers and washers.
No vehicles shall be fueled while engine is running.
Smoking or open flame is prohibited within 25 feet of fueling operations.
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7. Radiator pressure shall be released by loosening cap or cooling with
water before the cap is completely removed.
8. Use your seat belts on the highway.
9. Check to rear of vehicles before getting in to back up.
10. Always drive defensively. Speed shall be safe for existing road
conditions.
11. Road signs and California Vehicle Code will be obeyed at all times.
12. Drivers will ensure that their vehicles are in good operating condition at all
times.
13. Vehicles shall be adequately secured against accidental starting or
movement when left unattended.
14. Keep all guards, shields and access doors in place when the machine is
in operation.
15. Don’t permit riders on farm field equipment other than persons required
for instruction or assistance in machine operation.
16. When servicing, adjusting, cleaning, or unclogging the equipment, stop
the engine, disconnect the power source, and wait for al l movement to
stop before proceeding except where the machinery must be running to
be properly serviced or maintained.
17. Make sure everyone is clear of machinery before starting the engine,
engaging power.
18. No employee known to have uncorrected eyesight or hearing or known to
be suffering from any ailment which may suddenly incapacitate him shall
be permitted to operate vehicles or equipment.
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6.
FIELD LABORERS
Use proper lifting techniques. Keep back straight and lift with your legs.
Avoid all vehicles.
Avoid wet and slippery roads.
Do not hitch rides on any vehicles.
Do not run in fields.
Horseplay, practical jokes and throwing objects can cause injury and is
prohibited.
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GENERAL EQUIPMENT OPERATION/ PRE - OPERATION SAFETY
CHECKS
1. Read and follow the safety precautions in the owner’s manual and on the
safety decals.
2. Always check oil levels, water, and fuel. Never remove a radiator cap
when the system is hot. Let it cool down first. Fold several layers of a
large cloth and place it over the cap. Stand to one side and turn your
face away. Then, before removing the cap, loosen it slightly and wait for
all pressure to change.
3. Check that all guards and safety devices are in place and operating.
4. Check tires, rims, tire pressures and steering mechanism.
5. Check that all necessary lights are working.
6. Check for fuel and oil leaks.
7. Look for loose bolts, wheel lugs or cracked frame or supports.
8. See that all safety signs and warning stickers are in place.
9. Be sure brakes and clutch are operating properly and test while moving
slowly before operating at normal speed.
10. Never operate equipment which is not in safe condition, report it to the
supervisor.
11. Never start equipment unless you are in the operator’s seat.
12. Be sure everyone is clear of machinery before starting the engine,
engaging power, or operating the machinery.
13. Never leave equipment without turning it off and lowering all equipment to
the ground.
MOTOR VEHICLES
1. No one without a valid driver’s license will be permitted to operate motor
vehicles on the highway.
2. Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs is prohibited.
3. Always wear your seat belt.
4. Follow all traffic laws.
5. Use defensive driving techniques.
6. Use company vehicles only for company business.
7. Watch for others when operating your own or company cars.
8. Keep your cars away from hazardous areas.
9. Do not operate on roads or in fields that are muddy.
10. Drivers shall have sufficient training or experience to determine whether
cargo they are transporting has been properly loaded, distributed and
secured.
11. Drivers shall be familiar with methods and procedures for securing cargo
in or on the motor vehicle they are driving.
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12. Persons routinely driving company vehicles will be placed in the DMV
“BIT” program. LCN will then receive driving record print outs for those
drivers every six months.
ALL TERRAIN VEHICLES
1. Know your vehicle before you begin to ride
2. Do not ride on public roads.
3. No riders
4. A helmet and eye protection should be used.
5. Before operating, check operating condition; Check wheels, tires,
controls, oil, fuel, etc. Low tire pressure on 3 wheelers can make control
difficult.
6. Always start with transmission in neutral.
7. Always keep your feet on the footrests while riding.
8. When mounting, take care not to step on the shifter.
9. Always close the throttle while shifting gears.
10. Three - wheel ATV’s with solid rear axles are the most dangerous, as
both rear wheels turn at the same speed during turns. As you turn, shift
your body weight forward and lean to the outside of the turn. This takes
the weight off the inside rear wheel and makes turning easier.
11. If your ATV starts to tip during a turn, lean your upper body farther into
the turn while gradually reducing the throttle and making a wider turn.
12. Do not drive too fast for conditions.
13. In orchards, or trees and bushes, watch for low limbs.
14. Braking: Release the throttle, downshift, apply both brakes evenly if so
equipped.
15. Avoid excessive braking while cornering.
16. Apply brakes lightly on slippery surfaces.
17. Shift to low gears when going down hill.
18. Parking: Always put in neutral and set brake.
19. Do not park on a hill.
20. Watch out for bumps, rocks, and holes.
21. Do not drag your feet in the dirt when riding an ATV.
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TRACTOR SAFETY
Be sure you are adequately instructed in the use of each type of
equipment before you operate it
Check tractor before operation. Do not use if it is in an unsafe condition.
Walk around the tractor and implement before operating. On hot days be
sure no one is sleeping in the shade under the tractor or implement
before starting.
Start only when sitting in the seat. Do not jumpstart.
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5. No riders are allowed on the tractor.
6. No horseplay.
7. Keep children away.
8. Use the seat belt if the tractor is equipped with them.
9. Avoid operating near banks, ditches, embankments, and holes.
10. Stay off slopes too steep for operation.
11. Always back up steep slopes.
12. Watch where you are going, especially at row ends and around trees.
13. Operate the tractor smoothly - no jerky turns, starts, or stops.
14. Hitch only to correct hitch points.
15. Be sure all safety shields are in place.
16. Use the right equipment for the job.
17. Do not rush.
18. When leaving the tractor, set brakes, put in park, and lower all
implements to the ground.
19. Turn off the engine and be sure equipment has stopped before servicing
or repairing any powered or PTO
equipment. Be sure there is no
chance of accidental starting or lowering of equipment.
20. Never allow anyone to get near the tractor when it is moving. Take the
tractor out of gear and remove your foot from the clutch before you allow
anyone to approach the tractor.
1.
2.
3.
4.
HOOKING AND UNHOOKING 3 POINT AND PTO EQUIPMENT
Check equipment before starting. Look for loose bolts and pins.
Be sure equipment is secure so it can not fall while being connected.
Check to see that proper pins, bushings and bars are available.
Always keep lynch pins, top link bar and pins and bushings in the location
designated by your supervisor.
Quick Hitch
1. Line up tractor and hitch with implement and raise to connect with
implement pins, adjusting the top link length if necessary.
2. Be sure implement is securely connected and safety latches are secure
before continuing
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1.
2.
3.
4.
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

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1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
“3” Point with Sliding Lower Links
Back up near implement.
Extend links, connect and install lynch pins.
Adjust 3 point height and back up until pins latch.
Attach top link by first putting implement at approximately correct height;
then, adjust top link length to install pin.
“3” point hitch with non-sliding lower links
Back up so both lower arms are as close as possible to correct distance from
pins.
If someone else is helping, back up past pins and pull forward to connect.
Never allow anyone between the tractor and the implement with the
tractor in reverse gear. The tractor should be in forward gear, or neutral
before anyone goes between tractor and implement.
After lower links are connected, attach upper link by adjusting implement
height and then adjusting top link length to connect.
Always set the brake and be sure tractor will not move before
dismounting.
When disconnecting, always disconnect top link first.
When hooking up to PTO, Always turn off tractor engine first.
CRAWLER TRACTORS
Know your equipment, read the operator’s manual and so not operate if
you are not properly trained.
Follow all the rules for tractors.
When you get on or leave the machine, always maintain a three point
contact with the steps and hand holds.
Face the machine
Never jump on or off the machine.
Do not use the steering levers or any control lever as a hand hold
Never dismount tractor with tractor in gear and hand clutch disengaged.
Always put in neutral and engage clutch when dismounting or if you are
not in the operator’s seat.
If you intend to perform any forestry operations, on-site clearing, or
pushing trees over with the dozer blade, or demolition it must be
equipped with a specifically designed operator’s cage or cab.
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BACKHOE/LOADER
1. Know your equipment, read the operator’s manual and do not operate if
you are not properly trained.
2. Follow all the rules for tractors, plus:
3. Wear required protective equipment.
4. Know the capacity and operating characteristics of this machine.
5. Never modify or remove any part of the machine.
6. Keep others away from your operation.
7. Carry the load low.
8. Whenever you leave the machine, Always lower the loader bucket to the
ground. Put the backhoe bucket in the transport lock position or lower
the backhoe bucket to the ground. Engage the parking brake, stop the
engine, cycle the hydraulic controls, and remove the key.
9. Be sure all the safety equipment is in place such as back up warning
device, seat belt, roll over protection (ROP) and falling object protective
structure (FOP).
10. Never use a bucket for a work platform.
11. Always look around before you back up, hook up or swing an attachment.
Be sure that everyone is in the clear.
12. Know the pinch points and rotating parts on the backhoe/loader.
13. Never let anyone in or near the pivot area of articulated machines.
14. Carry the bucket low.
15. Operate at safe speed. Travel slowly over rough or slippery ground and
on hillsides.
16. Stay in gear when traveling down hill. Maintain engine RPM to provide
steering and braking.
17. When working in hazardous areas, be extremely alert.
18. Use extreme caution when backfilling.
19. Never undercut a high bank.
20. When working at the base of a bank or overhang, watch for dangers such
as rock or earth slides, overhanging trees or a cave-in.
21. Always be on the lookout for low branches and dead trees.
22. Watch for low clearance.
23. Avoid steep slopes or unstable surfaces. Keep the load low and proceed
with caution. Do not drive across a steep slope. Drive up and down.
24. Avoid turning on an incline.
25. When going up or down slopes with the bucket loaded, point the bucket
uphill.
26. With the bucket empty, point the bucket downhill.
27. Keep the bucket as level as possible to avoid spilling the load on the
operator.
28. Keep the work area as smooth as possible.
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Backhoe: Specific Precautions:
1. Make sure the area is clear of all persons before you start.
2. Before operating the backhoe, engage the parking brake, lower the front
mounted equipment to the ground. Shift the transmission controls to
neutral, lower, the stabilizers and level the machine.
3. Follow the manufacture’s instructions.
4. Never enter or allow anyone else to enter the backhoe swing or pivot
area.
5. Never operate the backhoe controls from the ground.
6. Be careful that the machine does not roll into the excavation when the
stabilizers are raised.
7. Be sure the truck driver is out of the cab and away from the area before
loading a truck.
8. When operating the backhoe on a slope, swing to the uphill side to dump
load, if possible, If downhill dumping is necessary, swing only as far as
necessary and use extreme caution.
9. Be sure you have nay underground utilities located before digging.
10. Lifting - see manufacture’s manual for capacity.
11. Do no overload.
12. Lift and lower from back end, not side.
13. Lower the stabilizers.
14. Be sure load is properly balanced.
15. Never lift higher than necessary.
16. Never allow anyone beneath a suspended load.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
SPRAYERS
When spraying, use all precautions discussed in the spray section of this
book.
Be sure to do daily checks on the sprayer and tow unit or tractor.
On air-blast sprayers, check fan and shrouds for cracks and corrosion.
Do not operate if unusual vibration is noticed.
Thoroughly clean and decontaminate sprayer before servicing or
repairing. If someone else is going to service or repair the sprayer, warn
them of the chemical hazards.
Wear protective clothing whenever working around the sprayer.
On diaphragm pumps, check oil level at the beginning and end of the
day. If oil contains water, discontinue use and see that pump is
disassembled, cleaned, and broken diaphragm replaced. Never turn on
power to a diaphragm pump when the inlet is closed.
General Safety Plan
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1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
PUMPS
Always check visible wiring and pump before starting.
When turning op pumps, stand to one side of the electrical paned when
starting, they can blow up.
If you hear nay unusual sounds or vibration or if the motor buzzes but
does not start, turn it off, and notify management or repair.
Do not perform maintenance on the motor before disconnecting power
source.
Discharge all capacitors before servicing motors.
Keep hands and clothing away from moving parts.
Electrical repairs should be performed by trained personnel only.
ELECTRICAL PANELS AND STARTER SWITCHES
1. As with pumps, always stand to one side of panels when starting and turn
off power if you hear any unusual sounds or vibration or if the motor does
not start.
2. If repairing, follow lockout/blowout procedure.
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1.
2.
3.
4.
SPRINKLER PIPE
Whenever handling sprinkler pipe, look up, people have been killed when
sprinkler pipe has touched overhead power lines.
On hot days, use protective gloves.
When loading sprinkler trailers, watch out for the tires.
Use proper lifting procedures when lifting pipes.
BATTERY SAFETY
Avoid Explosions
A lead-acid storage battery generates hydrogen and oxygen gas. These can
burn or explode in the presence of a spark or flame. Use eye and face
protection when working around batteries.
To prevent explosions:
1. Maintain the electrolyte at the recommended level, this leaves less space
for gas accumulation. Never use a match to check level.
2. Never short out between battery terminals.
3. When removing or replacing the battery clamps always remove the
ground clamp first and replace the ground clamp last. This way if your
wrench touches the frame a spark will not occur.
4. When using a battery charger always turn off or unplug charger before
connecting or disconnecting charger leads.
When connecting a booster battery:
1. Be sure that booster battery and dead battery are of the same voltage.
2. Turn off accessories and ignition in both vehicles.
3. Place gearshift of both vehicles in neutral or park and set parking brake.
Make sure vehicles do not touch each other.
4. Check electrolyte level in both batteries and add if low.
5. Attach one jumper cable to the positive terminal on both batteries. Be
sure of good contact.
6. Attach one end of the other cable to the engine block or vehicle frame
and as far away from the battery as possible.
7. Connect other end of second cable to the engine block or vehicle frame
and as far away from battery as possible. vehicle and let battery charge
for a few seconds.
When removing cables, do the above procedure in reverse.
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General Safety Rules for Offices
Many employees mistakenly believe that offices are not dangerous and that
they do not need to worry about injuries while working there. However,
offices can pose a number of hazards. Among them are dangers from falls,
floor surfaces, stairs, chairs, filing cabinets, office machinery, sharp objects,
fires, and perilous periods. Some of the more significant hazards and ways
to prevent them are set out below.
Falls
1. Main Cause of Office Accidents: Falls are the number one cause of
office accidents. Employees may fall while walking, while climbing
ladders and stairs, and even while sitting in chairs. Employees may trip
over telephone and electrical cords, open desk and file drawers, loose
and worn carpeting, debris, equipment, and packages left in aisles.
2. Slippery Floor Surfaces and Objects: Water from a wet umbrella, floor
wax, spilled coffee, and any other substance that makes the floor
slippery can cause falls. Also, office tools, such as pencils and paper
clips, can act as skids underfoot.
3. Basic Safety Tips to Prevent Falls:
• Walk, never run.
• Don’t change direction suddenly or stop quickly.
• Use fitted footwear with slip-resistant heels and soles.
• Keep foot wear in good repair. (Flapping soles and broken heels have
caused many a downfall.)
• Carry loads of reasonable size so that your vision is not blocked.
• If you see a slipping or tripping hazard, correct it immediately or mark
it and notify someone who can fix the problem.
• Keep aisles and walkways clear.
4. Good Housekeeping: It prevents accidents, particularly falls. Good
housekeeping is everyone’s job.
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Filing Cabinets
1. Major Source of Office Injuries: Filing cabinets can cause injuries in a
number of unexpected ways.
2. Basic Safety Tips: Here are a few of the precautions to consider when
you work with or around filing cabinets:
• Use the handle to close the file drawer and make sure your fingers are
not curled over the edge.
• To prevent the cabinet from toppling over:
- only open one drawer at a time; and
- keep all heavy materials in the bottom drawer.
• When you file, wear rubber finger guards to avoid cut fingers from
metal fasteners or paper edges.
• Sharp burrs and corners on metal filing cabinets and furniture can
cause injuries as well as clothing tears. Supervisors should:
- file rough metal edges or corners;
- cover the edges and corners with heavy tape; and
- arrange the furniture so that corners are out of the traffic pattern.
Office Machinery
1. Loose Clothing and Dangling Objects: Word processors, typewriters,
duplicating machines, sorters, collators, addressing and mailing
machines—all these can grab a finger or a long strand of hair. Rings,
bracelets, dangling necklaces, neckties, and loose scarves or sleeves
add to the hazard potential.
2. Frayed Wiring: Be alert for frayed wiring, especially near the flex point
of the plug. Exposed wires can cause shock or start a fire. To reduce
fraying and bending of wires:
• always grasp end plug to pull it out (never jerk the cord); and
• do not bend the cord sharply around an obstruction or put it in a travel
path.
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3. Three-Prong Plugs: A three wire grounding system is a must to
eliminate shock hazard. Never use a “cheater” to put a three-prong plug
in a two-prong receptacle.
4. Electrical Problems: If you notice a tingling sensation when touching a
machine or see it smoking or sparking:
• unplug the machine and report the problem to a supervisor; and
• put a sign on the machine to indicate that it is out of order and
dangerous.
5. Turning Off Machines: Even if a machine is in good working order, turn
it off before:
• making any adjustments;
• applying flammable materials; or
• leaving it (even for a little while).
Fingers and Hands
Fingers and hands turn up on the office injury list more often than any other
parts of the body. Little cuts and punctures are not only painful; they can also
become infected. Here are some basic safety tips:
1. Paper Cuts:
• Use finger guards to handle stacks of paper.
• Pick up a sheet of paper by the corner, not the sides.
• Use a letter opener to open envelopes or packages sealed with paper
tape.
• Pull a file out of the drawer to use it. (Don’t flip through the con-tents
in the file cabinet.)
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2. Desk Drawers:
• Keep drawers tidy to avoid punctures from scissors or other hazards
hidden under a pile of papers.
• Keep razor blades, thumbtacks, and other sharp objects in a closed
drawer.
• Close drawers, doors, and safes with the handle—not with your hand
over the top or around the edge. (Using the handle is just as easy and
saves a crushed hand.)
• Watch out when you reach in a drawer for pencils, pens, or other
items, to avoid pencil punctures.
3. Pencil Storage: Keep pencils stored flat—not standing point up in a
pocket or a pencil holder.
4. Staple Removal: Remove staples with a staple remover, not your
fingernail. Never test a jammed stapler with your thumb.
5. Broken Glass:
• Use a broom to pick up broken glass.
• Dispose of broken glass by wrapping it, marking it legibly, and putting
it where a clean-up crew will see it (not in a wastebasket).
6. Light Bulbs: Hot light bulbs can reach temperatures over 400F. Wait for
them to cool before touching.
Eye Protection
The eyes are an extremely important part of the human body and are
naturally protected by the eyelids and the bony framework surrounding the
eyeball. However, when eye injuries do occur they can be devastating. Thus,
employees should take precautions and use personal protective equipment
whenever there is a risk of eye injury. Here are some additional safety tips:
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31
1. Pour Fluids Safely: Keep fluids from splashing and entering the eye by
always pouring fluids slowly and keeping them in tight containers.
2. Check Your Hands: Do not rub eyes if any chemical (even carbon
paper ink) is on hands. Irritation can result.
3. Be Careful With Pencils:
• When reaching for an object, watch out for pencils or edges of
cabinets.
• Do not carry pencils behind the ear.
• When carrying pencils, keep the point down.
4. Check Your Vision: About six people in ten need some correction for
their sight, but many do not realize it. Poor vision can cause accidents.
Have eyes examined for any of the following symptoms:
• Material can be read only very closely or at arm’s length.
• Eyes hurt or inflamed.
• Eyes tire quickly.
• Headaches frequently occur.
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32
Disciplinary Policy
Lassen Canyon Nursery, Inc., wants its employees to work in a positive,
productive atmosphere. However, employees who violate safety rules must
be disciplined in order to protect their own safety and the safety of their coworkers. Depending on the severity and frequency of a safety violation, an
employee may be:
• immediately discharged;
• suspended; or
• given an oral or written warning.
The following disciplinary guidelines classify violations according to their
seriousness (Groups A, B, and C), for which certain penalties are suggested.
Unsafe conduct by an employee may violate several provisions of the
different groups. This list is intended to suggest examples of inappropriate
behavior. It is not a comprehensive list of all safety violations for which an
employee may be disciplined or discharged.
The following disciplinary policies do not in any way bind the Company
to follow a particular course of conduct. The Company in its sole
discretion may change these policies at any time. In addition, nothing
in the policies changes the at-will nature of employment with the
company. An employee may still be terminated with or without cause,
with or without notice, at the option of either the Company or the
employee, except as otherwise provided by law.
Group A
1. Deliberate violation of any security or safety rules
2. Being intoxicated or under the influence of any controlled substances
while at work
3. Deliberate or reckless misconduct that endangers the life or safety of
others
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4. Possession of alcohol or illegal drugs on Company premises
5. Deliberate destruction or damage to Company property
6. Deliberate falsification of any documents related to safety matters
7. Fighting or deliberately harmful contact with co-workers
Group B
1. Negligence that damages Company property
2. Negligence that endangers the safety of others
3. Unintentional safety violations that endanger the safety or health of
others
4. Failure to report conditions that one believes to be unsafe
5. Smoking or eating in unauthorized areas
6. Speeding or unsafe operation of a forklift or any other company vehicle
7. Driving a forklift or any other machinery without required approval
8. Failure to properly record safety information for which one is responsible.
9. Improper refusal to obey a supervisor’s safety instructions
10. Any belligerent or antagonistic conduct toward co-workers, supervisors,
or customers
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Group C
1. Violation of personal protective equipment (PPE) policy that does not
result in injury to oneself or others
2. Poor grooming or a lack of cleanliness
3. Poor housekeeping
4. Failure to participate in group safety meetings
5. Failure to properly and immediately report any accident or injury
6. Failure to properly or immediately report any accident involving company
equipment
7. Failure to perform inspections of tools or machinery
8. Failure to report machine or tool deficiencies
9. Failure to learn company safety rules and regulations
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35
Disciplinary Penalties
The following list provides a general guide for disciplinary actions from the
above violations.
1st Offense
2nd Offense
Group A
Immediate discharge
Group B
Warning or
suspension
Discharge
Group C
First violation:
Warning
Second violation:
Warning or suspension
3rd Offense
Discharge
Oral or Written Warnings
When given, oral or written warnings may help employees know where they
stand and improve their performance. The company attempts to issue oral or
written warnings that include the reasons for the supervisor’s dissatisfaction.
Warnings usually include a statement of the actions you need to take or
results that need to be achieved to avoid further problems. However, the
written warnings do not legally obligate or bind the employer or alter
the at-will nature of the employee’s employment with the Company. An
employee who has received a warning may still be terminated with or
without cause, and with or without notice, at any time.
Any employee who receives a written warning must immediately
acknowledge receipt by signing the warning. An employee who disagrees
with the written warning may discuss his or her reasons for doing so
with the supervisor. It is generally best to inform the supervisor of any error
at the time that the warning is issued. In fact, there is a place on the form for
the employee to do so. An employee who believes that a supervisor has not
responded fairly to the employee’s comments may contact Liz Elwood
Ponce, or Kenny Elwood Jr. or Susie Browning.
General Safety Plan
36
Disciplinary Notice to Employee
LASSEN CANYON NURSERY, INC.
date
employee name
o
First Notice
o
Second Notice
days suspended (if applicable)
department
We believe that an employee wants to know if he or she is violating company
policy or failing to follow company rules. This disciplinary notice is to provide
you notice of a violation of company policy. However, the company is in
not obligated to provide any warnings or to retain an employee once a
warning has been given. All employees are employed “at-will.” “At-will”
employment means that an employee can be terminated with or without
cause, with or without notice, at any time, at the option of either the
Company or the employee.
Your conduct is not in keeping with company practices, standards, and
policies for the following reasons: (Indicate specific standards and policies
with which the employee has failed to comply.)
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Suggestions for improvement:
Employee comments (Note: An employee should state his or her disagreements with the warning in writing.):
Copy received by:
supervisor’s signature
employee signature
date
Copy to employee file
General Safety Plan
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38
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