Campus Security - Little Rock Beauty School

Campus Security - Little Rock Beauty School
Campus Safety and Security Disclosure
By Andi Wilson, Owner
Updated 7-2015
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1
INTRODUCTION
1
14
2
ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT STATEMENT AND NOTICE EX.
CAMPUS SECURITY AUTHORITIES & COMMAND
DECISION TEAM
DRUG TRAFFICKING PENALTIES ARKANSAS
INFORMATION FOR CRIME VICTIMS ABOUT DISCIPLINARY
PROCEEDINGS
14
UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS
2
GEOGRAPHY
14
EVACUATION GUIDELINES
2
PREPARATION OF DISCLOSURE OF CRIME STATISTICS
15
EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION
3
HOW TO REPORT CRIMINAL OFFENSES
15
CODES FOR EMERGENCY SITUATION
3
VOLUNTARY CONFIDENTIAL REPORTING
15
EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES
3
LIMITED VOLUNTARY CONFIDENTIAL REPORTING
16
EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AND SUPPORT
3
CAMPUS SECURITY ACT INFORMATION DISCLOSURE
17
TYPES OF SHELTERS AND SERVICE INFORMATION
3
STUDENT DISCLOSURE OF ANNUAL CRIME STATISTICS
17,18
4
4
CRIME STATISTICS
STATISTICS FROM LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT
AGENCIES
4
DAILY CRIME LOG
5
EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES
5
5,6
6
7
7
18
18,19
19
SAFETY PROCEDURES
DANGEROUS SITUATIONS
EXTREME WEATHER
PANDEMIC
19,20
UTILITY SHUT OFF
BASIC EMERGENCY KIT
20
FIRE PROCEDURE
TIMELY WARNINGS
INSTITUTION THAT HAS A MEMORANDUM OF
UNDERSTANDING
ENCOURAGEMENT OF ACCURATE AND PROMPT
REPORTING
20
FLOOD PROCEDURE
21
EARTHQUAKE PROCEDURE
7
COUNSELORS AND CONFIDENTIAL CRIME REPORTING
SECURITY AWARENESS PROGRAMS FOR STAFF AND
STUDENTS
CRIME PREVENTION PROGRAMS FOR STAFF AND
STUDENTS
7
7
7
SUBSTANCE ABUSE EDUCATION
7
CAMPUS SAFETY
8
EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS
8
DRUG FREE CAMPUS
8
DRUG PREVENTION PROGRAM
8-11
DRUG TRAFFICKING PENALTIES
7
11-13
22,23
BOMB THREATS
23
TERRORIST ATTACKS
24,25
CRIME DEFINITIONS
26
REPORT TO ED VIA THE WEB BASED COLLECTION
ADDRESSING ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
26
MISSING STUDENT NOTIFICATION PROCEDURE
ILLEGAL DRUG POSSESSION
26
PERSONAL IDENTIFIABLE INFORMATION (PII)
26,27
SEXUAL MISCONDUCT OVERVIEW
INTRODUCTION
AN OVERVIEW OF Campus Safety and Security Reporting
Choosing a postsecondary institution is a major decision for students and their families. Along with academic,
financial and geographic considerations, the issue of campus safety is a vital concern. In 1990, Congress
enacted the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990 (Title II of Public Law 101-542), which
amended the Higher Education Act of 1965 (HEA). This act required all postsecondary institutions
participating in HEA’s Title IV student financial assistance programs to disclose campus crime statistics and
security information. The act was amended in 1992, 1998 and 2000. The 1998 amendments renamed the law
the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act in memory of a
student who was slain in her dorm room in 1986. It is generally referred to as the Clery Act. On Aug. 14, 2008,
the Higher Education Opportunity Act or HEOA (Public Law 110-315) reauthorized and expanded the Higher
Education Act of 1965, as amended. HEOA amended the Clery Act and created additional safety- and
security-related requirements for institutions.
ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT
The Academy publishes and distributes an annual security report by Oct. 1 each year to all enrolled students
and all staff via the academy website or by hard copy in the Admissions or Financial aid offices.
The following is an ANNUAL CAMPUS SECURITY NOTICE example provided to all students and staff by hard
copy.
Annual Campus Security Act Information Disclosure – NOTICE
As of October 1, 20__ , The Salon Professional Academy’s annual security report update is available. Under
the Crime Awareness Campus Security Act of 1990, this report is required by federal law and contains
policy statements and crime statistics for the academy. The policy statements address the academy’s
policies, procedures and programs concerning safety and security, for example, policies for responding to
emergency situations and sexual offenses. Three years’ worth of statistics are included for certain types of
crimes that were reported to have occurred on campus, in or on the campus building or property owned
or controlled by the academy and on public property within or immediately adjacent to the campus. This
report is available online at (http://littlerockbeautyschool.com) You may also request a paper copy from
the Admissions Office.
All criminal actions must be reported to a director, educator, or owner immediately. The authority to which
a crime is reported will assist the student or guest in reporting such a crime to the North Little Rock Police
Department or other appropriate security force.
The facilities are open Monday through Saturday according to assigned class/salon area schedules. The
building may also be open for educational classes for licensed professionals in cosmetology or to groups
securing the use of the facilities through the owner. Only educators, directors and owners shall have keys
to the building thus preventing internal crimes to as great an extent as possible.
Any staff member made aware of a crime will notify the rest of the staff as soon as possible, perhaps even
prior to notifying police, depending on the situation. It is a critical that all staff be conscious of any report of
crime and that the local police made aware immediately.
This information will be provided to each student beginning training. Also this information will be provided,
on request, to any prospective students.
1
CAMPUS SECURITY AUTHORITIES
Office Responsible for Safety and Security Compliance:
Area Information is Located:
Date Document was Last Updated:
Date Policies and Procedures Updated:
Andi Wilson, Owner
LittleRockBeautySchool.com / paper copy
upon request
6/2015
6/2015
Command Decision Team Members consists of:
Academy owner/s
Financial Aid Director
Admissions Director
School Coordinator
Educators
Front Desk Support Staff
Command Decision Team Leader: Andi Wilson | O. (501)753-2400|
GEOGRAPHY
The Salon Professional Academy, here in after known as, “The Academy”, facilities are in operation Monday
through Saturday. The Academy may also be used for educational purposes outside of the regular business
hours to hold classes for licensed professionals in cosmetology, esthetics, manicuring, and/or for groups
securing the facilities through the owner. Keys to the academy are held only by the owners, educators and
appointed Members, which helps to prevent internal crimes to an extent. At The Academy we highly
encourage staff and students to be responsible for your own security and the security of others.
The Academy does not have any off-campus locations and therefore all monitoring and recording of any
criminal activity is conducted at the campus location of 4619 JFK Blvd., North Little Rock, AR 72116.
The crime statistics in this report cover an area on 4619 JFK Blvd., North Little Rock, AR 72116 and include any
incidents on campus at the physical location of the The Academy (4619 JFK Blvd.) Including the The
Academy parking lot, and adjacent sidewalk.
Policy: Preparation of Disclosure of Crime Statistics
Andi Wilson, owner and a member of the Command Decision Team Members, prepares this report to comply
with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act. This report is prepared
in cooperation with the local law enforcement agencies surrounding our main campus. Local law
enforcement provides updated information on their educational efforts and programs to comply with the
Act.
Campus crime, arrest and referral statistics include those reported to the Police Department and Command
Decision Team. These statistics may also include crimes that have occurred in private residences or businesses
and is not required by law. The Academy accepts information on a voluntary or confidential basis, should
they feel it is in the best interest of the client. A procedure is in place to anonymously capture crime statistics
disclosed confidentially during such a session.
Each year, a written notification is made to all enrolled students that provides the web site to access this
report. Staff receives similar notification at our staff meetings and/or Professional Development Days. All
prospective staff, potential students may obtain copies of the report at The Salon Professional Academy,
4619 JFK Blvd., North Little Rock, AR 72116 in the Admissions/Financial Aid Office or by calling (501)753-2400
ext. 3.
2
Policy: How to Report Criminal Offenses
To report a crime on or off campus:
Contact North Little Rock Police Department at (501)758-1234 (non-emergencies),
dial 9-1-1- (emergencies only). Additionally you may report a crime to the following areas:
Admissions Office
Owner’s Office
Educator’s Office
Financial Aid Office
Front Desk
The Academy’s Command Decision Team Members
(501)753-2400x 2
(501)753-2400x 3
(501)753-2400x 1
(501)753-2400x 3
(501)753-2400x 1
Policy: Voluntary Confidential Reporting
If you are the victim of a crime and do not want to pursue action within The Academy or the criminal justice
system, you may still want to consider making a confidential report. With your permission, the Command
Decision Team Members can file a report on the details of the incident without revealing your identity. The
purpose of a confidential report is to comply with your wish to keep the matter confidential, while taking
steps to ensure the future safety of yourself and others. With such information, The Academy can keep an
accurate record of the number of incidents involving students, determine where there is a pattern of crime
with regard to a particular location, method, or assailant, and alert the campus community to potential
danger. Reports filed in this manner are counted and disclosed in the annual crimes statistics for the institution.
The Academy prohibits any retaliation against anyone who in good faith reports any violations of the campus
security policy.
Policy: Limited Voluntary Confidential Reporting
The Police Department encourages anyone who is the victim or witness to any crime to promptly report the
incident to the police. Because police reports are public records under state law, the Police Department
cannot hold reports of crime in confidence. Confidential reports for purposes of inclusion in the annual
disclosure of crime statistics can generally be made to Command Decision Team Leader campus security
authorities. Confidential reports of crime may also be made to North Little Rock/Pulaski County Stoppers at
(501) 340-8477.
CRIME STATISTICS
Campus Security Act Information Disclosure - Under the Crime Awareness Campus Security Act of 1990, we
are required to provide you with the following safety information about our campus. The Salon Professional
Academy is committed to providing a violence-free campus.
Student disclosure of Annual Crime Statistics - As stated in the above definition, The Academy agrees to
comply and provide all staff and students a copy of the campus security report annually and to all
prospective students’ enrolling at The Academy. The report will include the previous calendar year statistics
to comply with the consumer reporting requirement of the most recent 3 completed calendar years.
Statistics will be gathered from the Police Department and daily crime logs and compiled in the disclosure.
These same statistics will be entered into our annual security report and entered on the Web-based data
collection prior to October 1st of each year
3
Crime Statistics
Crime Categories
Criminal Homicide:
Murder & Non-negligent manslaughter
a. Negligent manslaughter
Sex Offenses:
a. Forcible sex offenses
b. Non-forcible sex offenses
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Simple Assault
Intimidation
Burglary
Motor Vehicle Theft
Larceny-Theft
Destruction, damage or vandalism to property
Any other crime involving bodily injury
Arson
Liquor/Drug/Illegal Weapons Violations:
a. Arrests for liquor violations, drug law violations, and illegal weapons
possession
b. Persons not included above who were referred for campus disciplinary
action for liquor law violations, drug law violations, and illegal weapons
possessions
Hate Crimes:
a. Race
b. Gender
c. Religion
d. Sexual Orientation
e. Ethnicity
f. Disability
Domestic Violence
Dating Violence
Stalking
Calendar Year Statistics
2012
2013
2014
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
NA
NA
NA
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
STATISTICS FROM LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES
The Academy does not employ security officers, but does have a direct working relationship with the Police
Department. The Police Department provides prompt service and are able to support The Academy with
any crime issues. We encourage accurate and prompt reporting of all crimes to the Police Department.
If for inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statics a student would like to report a crime on a voluntary,
confidential basis they can do so through the Command Decision Team (CDT).
Annually, The Academy collects and reviews crime statistics from:

The Academy’s Crime Log

North Little Rock Police Department

Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department
THE DAILY CRIME LOG
The Academy updates and keeps the Daily Crime Log in the Academy Operations Manual Binder. The
binder is kept in the educator’s office for all team members and the public to access. The owner and other
Command Decision Team members keep the log and must make an entry or an addition to an entry to the
log within two business days of the report of the information to the campus security department, unless that
disclosure is prohibited by law or would jeopardize the confidentiality of the victim.
The Salon Professional Academy may withhold one or more of the required pieces of information if there is
clear and convincing evidence that the release of the information would
Jeopardize an ongoing criminal investigation or the safety of an individual
4


Cause a suspect to flee or evade detection, or
Result in the destruction of evidence
The school will disclose any information that is initially withheld for any of these reasons, once the adverse
effect is no longer likely to occur.
The Salon Professional Academy will make the crime log for the most recent 60-day period open to the
public inspection during normal business hours. The school will make any portion of the log older than 60
days available within two business days of a request for public inspection.
The report at a minimum denotes the nature of the crime, date and time when the crime occurred, the
general location of the crime and the disposition of the complaint, if known.
Disposition is defined as, “pending”, “judicial”, “referral “or “criminal arrest”.
Sample:
Nature
Reported By
DAILY CRIME LOG
Date/Time
Time/ Time
Reported
Occurred
General
Location
Disposition
EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES
The Academy will without delay and taking into account the safety of the community determine the
content of the notification system, unless issuing notification will, in the professional judgement of
responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate
the emergency.
Prior to Preparing For an Emergency
Emergency Kit:
The Academy does not supply the complete “BASIC EMERGENCY KIT” as listed below:
While we have most of the items, we do not store food or water.
Make a communication plan:
The Academy communicates through verbal communications, cell phones, emails and text, social
media, and signage to deliver emergency messages. If necessary a member of the command
decision team will notify the radio and local television stations to confirm significant emergency or
dangerous situations involving immediate threats, to the health or safety of staff and students
occurring on the campus.
Basic Emergency Kit
A basic emergency supply kit could include the following recommended items:

Water, one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation

Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food

Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra
batteries for both

Flashlight and extra batteries

First aid kit

Whistle to signal for help

Dust mask to help filter contaminated air. Plastic sheeting and duct tape to create a shelter

Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation

Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities

Local maps

Cell phone with chargers, inverter or solar charger
TIMELY EMERGENCY WARNINGS
In addition to the required annual campus security report, The Salon Professional Academy will provide a
timely warning to students of any occurrences of the following crimes that are reported to local police
agencies and are considered to represent a serious or continuing threat to students and employees. As
soon as the school becomes aware of the crimes, students and employees will be notified via SMS
5
notification. The Salon Professional Academy will, in a manner that is timely and will aid in the prevention of
similar crimes, report to the student body on crimes that are:

Included in campus crime statistics, such as: Criminal homicide (murder, non-negligent
manslaughter, and negligent manslaughter), Sex offenses (forcible sex offenses and non-forcible
sex offenses), Robbery, Aggravated assault, burglary, fondling, incest, statutory rape, motor vehicle
theft, arson, hate crimes including crimes involving bodily injury reported to local police agencies
that show evidence of prejudice based on race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity or
disability. Dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking. Arrests for violations of liquor and drug
law violations, and illegal weapons possession. Also, persons not included in this section who were
referred for campus disciplinary action for liquor law violations, drug law violations, and illegal
weapons possession.

Reported to local police agencies or to TSPA staff/Command Decision Team Members (as
identified under the school’s statement of current campus policies), and

Considered by the school to represent a threat to students and employees.

Current campus policies - The Salon Professional Academy will report by category of prejudice, the
following crimes reported to local police agencies or to TSPA staff that manifest evidence that the
victim was intentionally selected because of the victim’s actual or perceived race, gender,
religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, or disability. The crimes to include, but are not limited to:
larceny-theft, simple assault, intimidation, and destruction/damage/vandalism of property and any
other crime involving bodily injury.
The school is not required to provide a timely warning with respect to crimes reported to a pastoral or
professional counselor.
If there is an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees occurring on campus, The
Salon Professional Academy will follow its emergency notification procedures. The school will not be
required to issue a timely warning based on the same circumstances, however the school will provide
adequate follow-up information to the community as needed.
If a student wishes to report crimes on a voluntary, confidential basis for inclusion in the annual
disclosure of crime statistics, contact The Salon Professional Academy owner, Andi Wilson.




The facilities are open Monday through Saturday according to assigned class/salon area
schedules. The building may also be open for educational classes for licensed professionals in
cosmetology or to groups securing the use of the facilities through the owner. Only owners and
staff members have keys to the building thus preventing internal crimes as minimal as possible.
We encourage students and employees to be responsible for their own security and the security of
others.
The Salon Professional Academy does not provide any programs on campus regarding security or
prevention of crimes. If students wish to learn more about personal security or prevention of crimes,
contact the local Police Department.
The Salon Professional Academy does not have any off-campus locations and therefore all
monitoring and recording of any criminal activity is conducted on campus and the surrounding
accessible areas.
Statement: Institution That Has a Memorandum of Understanding, (MOU)
The Academy recognizes that laws and rules are necessary for society to function and supports the
enforcement of law by governmental agencies and rules by officials of the academy. All persons on the
campus are subject to these laws and rules at all times. While The Academy is private property, and
Constitutional protections apply, law enforcement officers may enter the campus to conduct business as
needed. Additionally, the officers are invited to patrol the campus to assist the Command Decision Team
Members in deterring crime. All law enforcement agencies are asked to call the Financial Aid Office prior to
entering The Academy. Command Decision Team Members are recognized by the Police Department.
Command Decision Team Members enjoy an especially good relationship with the Police. The response time
of the police department to campus averages less than two minutes for emergency calls. The exercise of
that authority is described in a “memorandum of understanding” (MOU) between Police and Command
Decision Team Members that outlines which law enforcement agency will have jurisdiction over which types
of offenses.
As noted in the introduction and the emergency policies, Police Department is notified of all serious crime on
campus, and is immediately notified of major crimes via the telephone. The Academy relies on the telephone
6
to contact the county emergency dispatch center for fire and emergency medical needs. All victims are
offered an opportunity to report crimes to Police. Annually, The Academy receives an email report or hard
copy report of all crimes committed on the campus from the Police Department.
Policy: Encouragement of Accurate and Prompt Crime Reporting
Staff, students, and guests are encouraged to report all crimes and public safety related incidents to The
Academy in a timely manner. To report a crime or emergency on The Academy, call the Command Decision
Team Member Leader: Andi Wilson | O. (501)753-2400|
Command Decision Team Members will investigate a report when it is deemed appropriate.
If assistance is required from the Police Department or the Fire Department, Command Decision Team
Members will contact the appropriate unit. If a sexual assault or rape should occur, staff on the scene,
including Command Decision Team Members, will offer the victim a wide variety of services.
Policy: Counselors and Confidential Crime Reporting
All reports will be investigated. The Academy does not have procedures for voluntary, confidential reporting
of crime statistics. Violations of the law will be referred to law enforcement agencies and when appropriate,
to The Academy Command Decision Team Member Leader for review.
Policy: Security Awareness Programs for Staff and students
Prior to course start, orientation is held. Students are informed that The Academy does not have campus
police. Students are informed about crime awareness on the academy. Similar information is presented to
new Command Decision Team Members. A common theme of all awareness and crime prevention
programs is to encourage staff and students to be aware of their responsibility for their own security and the
security of others.
Policy: Crime Prevention Programs for Staff and students
Crime Prevention Programs on personal safety and theft prevention are discussed at orientation.
To enhance personal safety, and especially after dark, walk with friends or colleagues from The Academy to
your destination.
Policy: Addressing Alcoholic Beverages
The possession, sale or the furnishing of alcohol on The Academy of Salons is prohibited. The Academy has
been designated “Drug free” and under no circumstances is the consumption of alcohol permitted. The
possession, sale, manufacture or distribution of any controlled substance is illegal under both state and
federal laws. Such laws are strictly enforced by the Police Department. Violators are subject to disciplinary
action, criminal prosecution, fine and imprisonment. It is unlawful to sell, furnish or provide alcohol to a person
under the age of 21. The possession of alcohol by anyone under 21 years of age in a public place or a place
open to the public is illegal. It is also a violation of the The Academy Alcohol Policy for anyone to consume
or possess alcohol in any public or private area of the academy. Organizations or groups violating
alcohol/substance policies or laws may be subject to sanctions by the Police.
Policy: Illegal Drug Possession
The Academy has been designated “Drug free” and under no circumstances is the consumption of alcohol
permitted. The possession, sale, manufacture or distribution of any controlled substance is illegal under both
state and federal laws. Such laws are strictly enforced by the Police Department. Violators are subject to
disciplinary action, criminal prosecution, fine and imprisonment.
Policy: Substance Abuse Education
The Academy has developed a contact list to prevent the illicit use of drugs and the abuse of alcohol by
staff and students. The list provides services related to drug use and abuse including dissemination of
informational materials, educational programs and counseling services.
Policy: Campus Safety
All reported incidents are reviewed and applicable information is collected and presented to the proper
authority. In order to ensure that our campus remains safe, it is important for members of the campus to
report this information in a timely manner. Any suspicious activity should be considered a reasonable
suspicion and reported. (Examples of suspicious activities include seeing an unescorted guest in an
unapproved area, doors propped open, or unauthorized individuals using campus equipment or offices.) If
7
it seems a situation appears abnormal to you in any way, report it. The Academy does not have specific
policies or procedures for confidential crime reporting, but crimes can be reported confidentially to the local
authorities by simply requesting that the complaint be made anonymously.
Bullying or implied threat, intimidation, sexual harassment and violence will not be tolerated at The Academy.
Weapons of any kind are not permitted on campus; this includes the academy building and surrounding
parking lot.
Emergency Phone Numbers:
Administrative offices
North Little Rock, AR Police Department
North Little Rock, AR Fire Department
Immediate Help (Fire, Police, Rescue Squad)
Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department
Arkansas Health Department
501-753-2400
501-758-1234
501-340-5377
9-1-1
501-945-1268
501-791-8551
Mental Health agencies:
North Pulaski Baptist Association
Mental Health Council of Arkansas
NAMI
United Methodist Behavioral Hospital
Methodist Family Health
Arkansas Children’s Hospital
Randy Walker Counselor
Pinnacle House
Interfaith Hospitality Network of Little Rock
Bridgeway Behavioral Health
Arkansas Cares
501-812-6999
501-372-7062
501-661-1548
501-661-0720
501-661-0720
501-364-1100
501-812-6999
501-371-9058
501-372-0733
501-771-1500
501-661-0720
Hospitals:
Arkansas Surgical Hospital
Baptist Health
Springhill Baptist
Arkansas Children’s Hospital
University Hospital – Arkansas
St. Vincent’s Hospital
UAMS Medical Center
501-748-8000
501-945-0246
501-945-5800
501-364-1100
501-686-5673
501-552-6544
501-686-7000
Drug and Alcohol Resources:
Drug Rehab Little Rock
Drug Rehab Conway
Alcohol Rehab & Drug Rehab Treatment Center Little Rock
Alcohol Rehab & Drug Rehab Treatment Center Conway
Alcoholism & Drug Detox Help
501-213-3118
501-260-9284
501-492-0070
501-205-7912
501-218-8472
State government offices related to emergency management (hazards)
FEMA, specifically the regional office
U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
American Red Cross of Arkansas
Salvation Army North Little Rock, AR
800-621-3362
501-682-1001
800-733-2767
501-795-8075
DRUG FREE CAMPUS
The Drug Prevention Policy and its effectiveness is reviewed every two years by The Academy. If changes
are necessary, staff will be notified at the next staff meeting. The new policy will be presented in written form
to all students and will be implemented from that point forward.

In some cases, conviction of drug-related offenses could result in the student’s ineligibility of Title IV
funding or other forms of financial assistance.

The Academy policy supports and enforces state underage drinking and illicit drug laws.
8
DRUG PREVENTION PROGRAM
The Academy prohibits the unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students
and staff on our property or as part of any of our activities. The Academy will immediately contact law
enforcement officials to report these activities.
The health risks of the use of illicit drugs and alcohol abuse require providing education and referral for
students and staff. The Academy provides education annually and refers students and staff to local
services. Area drug abuse information, counseling, referral and treatment centers information is made
available to students and staff members.
The Academy will expel students and terminate staff involved in unlawful possession, use or distribution of
illicit drugs and alcohol. The Academy will refer such cases to the proper authorities for prosecution.
Students and staff may be reinstated upon completion of an appropriate rehabilitation program.
As a condition of employment, employees must notify The Academy of any criminal drug statute
conviction for a violation occurring in the workplace not later than five days after such conviction.
There are serious legal sanctions for illegal use of drugs and/or alcohol. There are serious health risks
associated with drug and/or alcohol use. Health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse
of alcohol include: impaired mental and physical health, neurological disease/damage, memory and
intellectual performance interference, mental and physical depression, uncontrollable violence, impulsive
behavior, convulsive seizures, homicide, suicide, cardiac disease or damage, cardiovascular collapse or
heart failure, gastrointestinal disease or damage, ulcers or erosive gastritis, anemia, liver and pancreatic
disease, liver failure or pancreatitis, deteriorating relationships, and death.
As a student and/or staff member at The Academy, I understand The Academy’s policies as stated above
and recognize their impact on my future at The Academy if I break the law related to drug and/or alcohol
use.
Agencies where the student can get assistance are posted in the student lounge.
DRUG TRAFFICKING PENALTIES
Federal penalties and sanctions for illegal possession of a controlled substance
U. S. C. 844 (a)
1st conviction: Up to 1 year imprisonment and fined at least $1000 but not more than $100,000, or
both
After 1 prior drug conviction: At least 15 days in prison, not to exceed 2 years and fined at least
$2500 but not more than $250,000 or both
After 2 or more prior drug convictions: At least 90 days in prison, not to exceed 3 years and fined at
least $5000 but not more than $250,000 or both
Special sentencing provisions for possession of crack cocaine: Mandatory at least 5 years in prison,
not to exceed 20 years and fined up to $250,000 or both, if:
(a) 1st conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 5 grams
(b) 2nd crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 3 grams
(c) 3rd or subsequent crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds 1 gram
U. S. C. 853(a) (2) and 881 (a) (7)
Forfeiture of personal and real property used to posses or to facilitate possessions of a controlled
substance if that offense is punishable by more than 1 year imprisonment. (See special sentencing
provisions re: crack)
U. S. C. 881 (a) (4)
Forfeiture of vehicles, boats, aircraft or any other conveyance used to transport or conceal a
controlled substance
U. S. C. 844a
Civil fine of up to $10,000 (pending adoption of final regulations)
U. S. C. 853a
9
Denial of Federal benefits, such as student loans, grants, contracts, and professional and
commercial licenses, up to 1 year for first offense, up to 5 years for second and subsequent offences
U. S. C. 922 (g)
Ineligible to receive or purchase firearm
Miscellaneous
Revocation of certain Federal licenses and benefits, e.g., pilot licenses, public housing tenancy,
etc., are vested within the authorities of individual Federal agencies.
Note: These are only Federal penalties and sanctions. Additional state penalties and sanctions may apply.
Federal Trafficking Penalties
DRUG/SCHEDULE
QUANTITY
PENALTIES
Cocaine (Schedule II)
500 - 4999 gms
mixture
Cocaine Base (Schedule II)
28-278 gms mixture Not less than 5 yrs, and
not more than 40 yrs. If
death or serious injury,
40 - 399 gms
not less than 20 or more
mixture
than life. Fine of not
10 - 99 gms mixture more than $2 million if
an individual, $5 million
if not an individual
100 - 999 gms
mixture
Second Offense: Not
Fentanyl (Schedule II)
Fentanyl Analogue (Schedule I)
Heroin (Schedule I)
First Offense:
less than 10 yrs, and not
more than life. If death
or serious injury, life
Methamphetamine (Schedule II) 5 - 49 gms pure or imprisonment. Fine of
50 - 499 gms
not more than $4 million
mixture
if an individual, $10
PCP (Schedule II)
10 - 99 gms pure or million if not an
individual
100 - 999 gms
LSD (Schedule I)
1 - 9 gms mixture
mixture
QUANTITY
PENALTIES
5 kgs or more
mixture
First Offense:
279 gms or more
mixture
Not less than 10 yrs, and
not more than life. If
death or serious injury,
not less than 20 or more
than life. Fine of not more
than $4 million if an
individual, $10 million if
not an individual.
400 gms or more
mixture
100 gms or more
mixture
1 kg or more
mixture
10 gms or more
mixture
50 gms or more
pure or 500 gms or
more mixture
100 gm or more
pure or 1 kg or
more mixture
Second Offense: Not less
than 20 yrs, and not more
than life. If death or
serious injury, life
imprisonment. Fine of not
more than $8 million if an
individual, $20 million if
not an individual.
2 or More Prior Offenses:
Life imprisonment
PENALTIES
Other Schedule I & II drugs (and
any drug product containing
Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid)
Any amount
Flunitrazepam
(Schedule IV)
1 gm or more
Other Schedule III drugs
Any amount
Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)
30 to 999 mgs
First Offense: Not more that 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than
20 yrs, or more than Life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not
an individual.
Second Offense: Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less
than life. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual
First Offense: Not more than 5 years. Fine not more than $250,000 if an
individual, $1 million if not an individual.
Second Offense: Not more 10 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an
individual, $2 million if not an individual
10
All other Schedule IV drugs
Any amount
Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)
Less than 30 mgs
First Offense: Not more than 3 years. Fine not more than $250,000 if an
individual, $1 million if not an individual.
Second Offense: Not more than 6 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an
individual, $2 million if not an individual.
All Schedule V drugs
Any amount
First Offense: Not more than 1 yr. Fine not more than $100,000 if an
individual, $250,000 if not an individual.
Second Offense: Not more than 2 yrs. Fine not more than $200,000 if an
individual, $500,000 if not an individual.
Federal Trafficking Penalties - Marijuana
DRUG
Marijuana
QUANTITY
1,000 kg or more mixture;
or 1,000 or more plants
1st OFFENSE



Marijuana
100 kg to 999 kg mixture;
or 100 to 999 plants



Marijuana
more than 10 kgs hashish;
50 to 99 kg mixture


more than 1 kg of hashish
oil; 50 to 99 plants

Marijuana
1 to 49 plants; less than
50 kg mixture


Hashish
10 kg or less
Hashish Oil
1 kg or less
2nd OFFENSE
Not less than 10 years, not more
than life
If death or serious injury, not less
than 20 years, not more than life
Fine not more than $4 million if an
individual, $10 million if other than
an individual

Not less than 5 years, not more
than 40 years
If death or serous injury, not less
than 20 years, not more than life
Fine not more than $2 million if an
individual, $5 million if other than
an individual

Not more than 20 years
If death or serious injury, not less
than 20 years, not more than life
Fine $1 million if an individual, $5
million if other than an individual


Not more than 5 years
Fine not more than $250,000, $1
million other than individual







Not less than 20 years, not
more than life
If death or serious injury,
mandatory life
Fine not more than $8 million if
an individual, $20 million if
other than an individual
Not less than 10 years, not
more than life
If death or serious injury,
mandatory life
Fine not more than $4 million if
an individual, $10 million if
other than an individual
Not more than 30 years
If death or seroius injury,
mandatory life
Fine $2 million if an individual,
$10 million if other than
individual
Not more than 10 years
Fine $500,000 if an individual,
$2 million if other than
individual
Drug Possession Penalties in Arkansas
How Arkansas Classifies Controlled Dangerous Substances
Arkansas divides its CDS into six “schedules,” according to their potential for abuse:
 Schedule I drugs (such as opiates and hallucinogenics) have the highest likelihood of abuse
 Schedule II drugs (such as raw opium and amphetamines) have a high likelihood of abuse, have an
accepted medical use, and can result in severe psychological and physical dependence if abused.
11

Schedule III drugs (such as pentobarbital and anabolic steroids) have a lower likelihood of abuse
than Schedule I or II drugs, have an accepted medical use, and can lead to low or moderate
physical dependence and high psychological dependence.
 Schedule IV drugs (such as diazepam and tramadol) have a lower likelihood of abuse than Schedule
III drugs, have an acceptable medical use, and may lead to limited psychological and physical
dependence compared to Schedule III drugs.
 Schedule V drugs (such as pseudoephedrine) have a lower likelihood of abuse than Schedule IV
drugs, are the least dangerous, a currently accepted medical use, and likely to lead to only limited
physical or psychological dependence compared to Schedule IV drugs.
 Schedule VI drugs (marijuana) are substances that have been determined not to fit into Schedules IV, have no acceptable medical use, are unsafe even under direct medical supervision, have a high
likelihood of physical and/or psychological dependence, and their use poses a significant risk to
public health.
For more on marijuana possession, see Possession of Marijuana in Arkansas.
If you’ve been arrested for possession of CDS, you’ll need to consult the Arkansas Code that list precisely
which drugs, and in what amounts, fit into each group. Those statutes are Arkansas Code Sections 5-64-203
through 5-64-216.)
Some CDS, like codeine, a common painkiller, may be possessed legally so long as the holder has a valid
prescription.
How Arkansas classifies possession of CDS crimes
Arkansas treats its CDS crimes as either felonies or misdemeanors (which result in less jail time and lower fines
than felonies).
 Felonies are divided among six classes (unclassified, Y, A, B, C, and D), with the most serious crimes
placed in Class Y and unclassified. CDS possession crimes fall into Classes A, B, C, and D.
 Misdemeanors are divided among three classes. Possession of certain CDS is a Class A misdemeanor.
Each of the felony and misdemeanor classes has a punishment range of incarceration and fines. Below,
each of the CDS possession offenses is explained and placed in a felony or misdemeanor class. The
punishment ranges are explained first.
Felony and misdemeanor penalties
Felony convictions incur heavy fines and lengthy incarceration depending on the Class of felony
committed:
 A Class Y felony is punishable by ten to 40 years and the amount of the fine is decided by the court.
 A Class A felony is punishable by six to 30 years of incarceration and a fine of up to $15,000.
 A Class B felony is punishable by five to 20 years of incarceration and a fine of up to $15,000.
 A Class C felony is punishable by three to ten years of incarceration and a fine of up to $10,000.
 A Class D felony is punishable by up to six years of incarceration and a fine of up to $10,000.
 Class A misdemeanors are punishable by up to one year of incarceration and a fine of up to $2,500.
Possession of Schedule I or II CDS, narcotics and methamphetamine only
The punishment for possession of Schedules I or II CDS (narcotics or methamphetamine only) depends on
the amount of the substance in the defendant’s possession.

Possession of less than two grams is a Class D felony.

Possession of two grams or more, but less than ten grams, is a Class C felony.

Possession of ten grams or more, but less than 200 grams, is a Class B felony.
Possession of Schedule I or II CDS that is not methamphetamine or cocaine
The punishment for possession of Schedules I or II CDS (not cocaine or methamphetamine) depends on the
amount of the substance in the defendant’s possession.

Possession of less than two grams is a Class D felony.

Possession of two grams or more, but less than 28 grams, is a Class C felony.

Possession of 28 grams or more, but less than 100 grams, is a Class B felony.
Possession of Schedule III CDS
The punishment for possession of Schedule III CDS depends on the amount of the substance in the
defendant’s possession.

Possession of less than two grams is a Class A misdemeanor.

Possession of two grams or more, but less than 28 grams, is a Class D felony.

Possession of 28 grams or more, but less than 200 grams, is a Class C felony.

Possession of 200 grams or more, but less than 400 grams, is a Class B felony.
Possession of Schedule IV or V CDS
The punishment for possession of Schedules IV or V CDS depends on the amount of the substance in the
defendant’s possession.
12




Possession of less than 28 grams is a Class A misdemeanor.
Possession of 28 grams or more, but less than 200 grams, is a Class D felony.
Possession of 200 grams or more, but less than 400 grams, is a Class C felony.
Possession of 400 grams or more, but less than 800 grams, is a Class B felony.
Possession of Schedule VI CDS
The punishment for possession of Schedules VI CDS depends on the amount of the substance in the
defendant’s possession and whether the defendant has any prior convictions for possession of Schedule VI
CDS.
 Possession of less than four ounces is a Class A misdemeanor

Possession of one ounce or more, but less than four ounces, when the defendant has two previous
convictions for possession of Schedule VI CDS, is a Class D felony.

Possession of four ounces or more, but less than ten pounds, is a Class D felony.

Possession of ten pounds or more, but less than 25 pounds, is a Class C felony.

Possession of 25 pounds or more, but less than 100 pounds, is a Class B felony.

Possession of 100 pounds or more, but less than 500 pounds, is a Class A felony.
Possession of nitrous oxide
Even though nitrous oxide is not a scheduled CDS, Arkansas still punishes people who possess nitrous oxide
for the purpose of intoxication. The unlawful possession of nitrous oxide is a Class A misdemeanor.
Enhanced penalties for possession of CDS in a detention facility
A defendant convicted of possession of CDS in a state, county, city, or juvenile detention facility will be
punished under the next higher criminal classification.
Enhanced penalties for possession of CDS near certain facilities
A defendant convicted of a Class C felony possession or higher within 1,000 feet of these facilities will be
punished by an additional ten years incarceration:
 city or state park
 public or private school, college, or university campus

school bus stop
 skating rink, Boys Club, Girls Club, YMCA, YWCA, community center, recreation center, or video
arcade
 public housing project
 drug or alcohol treatment center
 day care center
 place of worship, or
 shelter as defined.
Repeat Offenders
Like every state, Arkansas imposes harsher penalties on defendants with multiple prior felony
convictions. (Arkansas Code Section 5-4-501.)
One to four prior felony convictions:
 A Class Y felony is punishable by ten years to life
 A Class A felony is punishable by six to 50 years.
 A Class B felony is punishable by five to 30 years.
 A Class C felony is punishable by three to 20 years.
 A Class D felony is punishable by up to 12 years.
More than four prior felony convictions:
 A Class Y felony is punishable by ten years to life.
 Class A felony is punishable by six to 60 years.
 Class B felony is punishable by five to 40 years.
 Class C felony is punishable by three to 30 years.
 Class D felony is punishable by up to 15 years.
If a past conviction is for a violent crime, the additional penalties are higher. You should review the
Arkansas code to see how your past violent crime convictions can affect you.
Sex Offenses
Please contact the Police Department to report any sex offenses immediately. The seriousness of this offense
makes it vital to preserve evidence for proof of the criminal offense. The Academy will provide assistance in
any way possible. Information on counseling or referrals centers are released to staff and students upon
request.
If a sex offense happens where both the accused and the accuser attend The Academy, both the accuser
and the accused:
13
Are entitled to the same opportunities to have others present during a disciplinary proceeding
and

Will be informed of The Academy’s final determination of any The Academy disciplinary
proceeding with respect to the alleged sex offense and any sanction that is imposed against
the accused and

The dismissal that may occur following a final determination of said proceedings regarding rape,
acquaintance rape, or other forcible or no-forcible sex offenses.

The Academy will work with students to change a student’s academic situation (i.e., allowing
the student to take a leave of absence, allowing the student to enroll in a later program, etc.) If
the change is requested by the victim and the change is reasonably available.

The Academy does not provide any programs on campus regarding sexual assault prevention.
If students or staff wishes to learn more about the prevention of sexual assault, contact the Police
Department.
Individuals wishing to learn additional information about registered sex offenders may check website
information for the city of North Little Rock, AR. http://www.arkansassexoffenders.net/

Information for Crime Victims about Disciplinary Proceedings
Information will be disclosed upon written request, to any alleged victim of any crime of violence or nonforcible sex offense, the results of any disciplinary proceedings conducted by The Academy against a
student who is the alleged perpetrator of such crime or offense. If the alleged victim is deceased as a
result of the crime or offense, the information shall be provided upon request, to the next of kin of the
alleged victim.
Uniform Crime Reports
The Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program has been the starting place for law enforcement executives,
students of criminal justice, researchers, members of the media, and the public at large seeking information
on crime in the nation. The program was conceived in 1929 by the International Association of Chiefs of
Police to meet the need for reliable uniform crime statistics for the nation. In 1930, the FBI was tasked with
collecting, publishing, and archiving those statistics.
FBI- Federal Bureau of Investigation http://www.fbi.gov
Evacuation Guidelines
There may be conditions under which you will decide to get away or there may be situations when you are
ordered to leave.
Follow these guidelines for evacuation
 If you have a car, keep a full tank of gas in it if an evacuation seems likely.
 Keep a half tank of gas in it at all times in case of an unexpected need to evacuate. Gas stations
may be closed during emergencies and unable to pump gas during power outages.
 Become familiar with alternate routes and other means of transportation out of your area.
 Leave early enough to avoid being trapped by severe weather.
 Follow recommended evacuation routes. Do not take shortcuts; they may be blocked.
 Be alert for road hazards such as washed-out roads or bridges and downed power lines.

Do not drive into flooded areas.
 If you do not have a car, plan how you will leave if you have to. Make arrangements with family,
friends or your local government.
If Time Allows
 Call or email your family.
 Secure The Academy by closing and locking doors.
 Unplug electrical equipment such as radios, televisions and small appliances. Leave freezers and
refrigerators plugged in unless there is a risk of flooding. If there is damage to The Academy and you
are instructed to do so, shut off water, gas and electricity before leaving.
 Leave a note telling others when you left and where you are going.
 Wear sturdy shoes and clothing that provides some protection such as long pants, long-sleeved shirts
and a cap.
In Case Of Serious Accident or Illness

Call 9-1-1
14



Do not move sick or injured person(s).
Be careful to avoid personal contact with any body fluids such as blood, vomit, or saliva.
Stay with the victim and reassure her/him that help is on the way.
Power Failure

Remain calm

Do not move

Await instructions from the Authority Team members.
If instructed to evacuate, use designated emergency exits ONLY.
Emergency Notification
An emergency notification is an immediate notification of an unforeseen combination of circumstances
that calls for immediate action. The staff has received training on how to handle a pending emergency
and trained in the following Emergency Code.
Codes for an Emergency Situation

Code Lock Down: A lock down situation has occurred. Staff, students and guests are to remain calm
and do not leave the academy.

Code Evacuate Front: Indicates a need to evacuate the academy immediately and exit through a
front entrance only.

Code Evacuate Back: Indicates a need to evacuate through the back entrance only.

Code Dangerous: Indicates a dangerous situation has occurred outside the academy and no one
is allowed to leave the academy.

Code Hostage: A hostage, criminal or terrorist threat / situation
Emergency Response Procedures
At the time of an urgent unanticipated event, Command Decision Team Members will assess the situation to
determine the significance of an emergency. Without delay, the Command Decision Team will take into
account the safety of its staff, students, guests and community neighbors.






The Command Decision Team Members will identify / determine the extent of the emergency and
enact appropriate means of notifications.
The Command Decision Team Members will respond by assisting any victims(s), respond to/or
contain the emergency at hand and diffuse the dangerous situation if possible.
The Command Decision Team Members will determine the extent of information that needs to be
released and will disseminate to staff, students, and guests / public as appropriate.
In the event of a dangerous situation and without delay, the Command Decision Team Members
will assess the situation and will contact authorities or determine the course of action in order to
protect the entire academy population.
Command Decision Team Members will determine means of notification through but not limited to
verbal communications, intercom broadcast system, cell phones, emails and text, social media
and signage to deliver emergency messages. If necessary a member of the Command Decision
Team Members will notify the radio and local television stations.
The verbal/written communication will include the type or types of emergency and steps for the
emergency situation.
The Academy will provide the Fire Department and the Police Department with a floor plan of the building.
The administration will also notify these agencies of any new construction, long-term functions or any other
events which may affect routing or access to the campus. In addition to floor plans, the Police Department,
Fire Department, and other local emergency officials are encouraged to tour and walk through the campus
regularly.
At least annually during student training, the staff will conduct an announced or unannounced test. The
test(s) are documented by dates, times, and whether the exercise was announced or unannounced. The
results are publicized in the Academy Operations Manual. The documentation will have a description of the
exercise, the date, time, and whether it was announced or unannounced. The testing reminds staff and
students of procedures necessary for the security, safety and crime prevention on and off campuses.
Annually the Police Department will speak on practicing safety for staff and students members. Staff and
students complete a tour the academy, locating fire extinguishers and exits. They are informed of what to
do in case of an emergency.
15
Roll call will be taken as soon as reasonably possible to ensure all staff and students has been accounted for
at the time of the emergency.
Emergency Preparedness and Support
North Little Rock, AR list of housing resources: Homeless Shelters, Supportive Housing, Halfway Housing,
Transitional Housing, Day Shelters, Low Income Housing, Residential Alcohol and Drug Treatment Centers.
Shelter Listings is dedicated to serving the homeless and low-income. We have listed out the shelters and
low cost housing services we have in North Little Rock, AR below. This list has homeless shelters, halfway
houses, affordable housing, etc. The database includes emergency shelters, homeless shelters, day shelters,
transitional housing, shared housing, residential drug and alcohol rehabilitation programs and permanent
affordable housing.
o
o
o
Angels Of Mercy
North Little Rock, AR
3618 W Roosevelt Rd
(501) 319-7728
Little Rock, AR
(501) 296-9114
Mercy Health Plan
o
Women & Children First: The Center Against Family
521 President Clinton Ave
Violence
Little Rock, AR
www.wcfarkansas.org
(501) 370-7200
Po Box 1954
Mercy Ministries
Little Rock, AR
www.mercyministries.org
(501) 376-3219
o
Little Rock Compassion Center
Little Rock, AR
4210 Asher Ave # A
(501) 225-8500
Little Rock, AR
(501) 663-2972
Sisters Of Mercy
3508 Kavanaugh Blvd
o
Little Rock Compassion Center
lrcompassioncenter.org
1900 Nichols Rd
o
o
2722 Lincoln Ave
mercyhealthplans.com
o
Local Shelters
Mercy Housing
o
House Rescue
Little Rock, AR
2224 Cantrell Rd
(501) 664-0081
Little Rock, AR
Mercy Seat Missionary Baptist Church
(501) 379-9777
8715 Oman Rd
o
Benevolent House
Little Rock, AR
423 Colonial Ct
(501) 565-8403
Little Rock, AR
(501) 246-3701
o
Family Promise of Pulaski County
www.familypromisepc.org
222 E 8th St
Little Rock, AR
(501) 372-0733
o
Union Rescue Mission Dorcas House
823 S Park St
Little Rock, AR
(501) 374-4022
o
Our House Shelter
ourhouseshelter.org
302 E Roosevelt Rd
16
Little Rock, AR
(501) 374-7383
Types of Shelters and Service Information
Day Shelters supplement homeless and low-income people when the shelter their staying in only offers
shelter on an overnight basis. Case management is often provided and sometimes there are laundry and
shower facilities. Meals and basic hygiene may also be offered. Almost all day shelters provide their
services free of charge. Any emergency or homeless shelter that allows clients to stay during the day is also
classified under this category.
Emergency Homeless Shelters both provide short term relief for the homeless & low-income. Usually there is
a maximum stay of 3 months or less. Many of these shelters ask their clients to leave during the day. Meals
and other supportive services are often offered. 3 times out of 5 these shelters offer their services free of
charge.
Halfway Housing helps transition individuals and families from shelters or homelessness to permanent
housing. Length of stay is usually anywhere from 6 months to 2 years. Residents are often required to pay at
least 30% of their income toward program fees. Sometimes the money they pay in fees is returned to them
when they leave. Any emergency or homeless shelter that allows their clients to stay more than 6 months is
also classified under this category.
Permanent Affordable Housing is a long-term solution for housing. Residents are often allowed to stay as
long as they remain in the low-income bracket but is sometimes limited 3 - 5 years. Residents pay no more
than 30% of their income towards rent. Emergency shelters, homeless shelters and transitional housing
programs that allow their clients to stay without a maximum stay is also classified under this category.
Drug and Alcohol Rehab programs are intended to treat alcohol and/or drug dependency. The cost of
participating in one of these programs and the method of treatment range significantly. The database
operated on this website only includes residential rehab programs (not outpatient programs). We also
provide Access to Recovery (ATR) Grant programs for substance abuse treatment.
Supportive Housing Programs that provide an alternative living arrangement for individuals who, because
of age, disability, substance abuse, mental illness, chronic homelessness or other circumstances, are unable
to live independently without care, supervision and/or support to help them in the activities of daily living;
or who need access to case management, housing support, vocational employment and other services to
transition to independent living.
Shared Housing Programs helps bring low income persons together and helps prevent homelessness by
providing affordable housing options. This service is good for families, disabled persons, and others wanted
more companionship. Shelterlistings.org finds these shared housing locations and lists them throughout our
website.
Rooming House or Boarding House A rooming house is a building in which renters occupy single rooms and
share kitchens, bathrooms, and common areas. The location may be a converted single family home, a
converted hotel, or a purpose built structure. Rooming houses are low cost housing and may have as few
as three rooms for rent, or more than a hundred. The same goes for boarding houses. We list these types of
residences throughout shelterlistings.org.
Transitional housing is affordable low cost supportive housing designed to provide housing and appropriate
support services to persons who are homeless or who are close to homelessness. The transition is to help
them be more self-sufficient to move towards independent living on their own. Services provided at
transitional housing facilities varies, from substance abuse treatment, to psychological assistance, job
training, domestic violence assistance, etc. The assistance provided varies, but it is generally affordable
and low cost housing. Read the descriptions of each of the transitional living locations for more detailed
information.
Safety Procedures

First Aid: A first aid kit is located in the dispensary and the educators’ office.

Fainting: Do not move the person; call 911. Give facts as much as possible. Keep calm and notify
other Authority Team Members for help, if necessary. Make the person comfortable.

Cut finger: Educator should immediately check the wound to see how deep the cut is. Small cuts
should be washed, dried, and then covered with a bandage. Bandages and first aid kits are kept
in the dispensary and the educators’ office.

Cuts requiring stitches: If possible, a staff member should take the student to the doctor.
Dangerous Situations, Alerting Staff, Students, Guests and/or Neighbors
17
Are brought to the attention of Command Decision Team Members and if confirmed, will alert staff and
students by announcing, emailing, text and /or a written notification that will be posted in a conspicuous
area, directing them to either a safe location and or the City County Health Department.
Once the dangerous situation is diminished, an announcement, email, text and/ or a written notification will
be posted or sent to students when classes will resume.
Extreme Weather Conditions Procedures
Are issued from the Local Weather Service, The Academy offices are closed and classes are cancelled.
Once the weather conditions are diminished, the Command Decision Team members will alert the staff and
students when classes will resume.
Winter Storms and Extreme Cold
Before
To prepare for a winter storm you should do the following:
 Before winter approaches, add the following supplies to your automobile.
o Sand to improve traction.
o Snow shovels and other snow removal equipment.
o Sufficient heating fuel.
o Adequate clothing and blankets to keep you warm.
During
The Academy will notify the traveling student if a winter storm and extreme cold is expected. If the student
is traveling long distances, the student will be advised to leave early or not to travel at all. If the winter storm
and extreme cold happens while staff, students and guests are in attendance, the following will apply:
 Stay indoors during the storm.
 Walk carefully on snowy, icy, walkways.
 Let someone know your destination, your route, and when you expect to arrive.
After
 If The Academy loses power or heat for more than a few hours or if you do not have adequate
supplies to stay warm in the academy, you may want to go to a designated public shelter if you
can get there safely. Text SHELTER + your ZIP code to 43362 (4FEMA) to find the nearest shelter in
your area (e.g., SHELTER20472)
 Take precautions when traveling to the shelter. Dress warmly in layers, wear boots, mittens, and a
hat.
 Continue to protect yourself from frostbite and hypothermia by wearing warm, loose-fitting,
lightweight clothing in several layers. Stay indoors, if possible.
Thunderstorms & Lightning Procedures
Before
To prepare for a thunderstorm, you should do the following:
 Secure outdoor objects that could blow away or cause damage.
 Get inside the academy, or an automobile (not a convertible). Although you may be injured if
lightning strikes your car, you are much safer inside a vehicle than outside.
 Rubber-soled shoes and rubber tires provide NO protection from lightning.
 Close window blinds, shades or curtains.
 Unplug any electronic equipment well before the storm arrives.
During
If thunderstorm and lightning are occurring in your area, you should:
 Avoid contact with corded phones and devices including those plugged into electric for
recharging. Cordless and wireless phones not connected to wall outlets are OK to use.
 Avoid contact with electrical equipment or cords.
 Unplug appliances and other electrical items such as computers and turn off air conditioners. Power
surges from lightning can cause serious damage.
 Avoid contact with plumbing.
 Do not wash your hands and do not do laundry. Plumbing and bathroom fixtures can conduct
electricity.
 Stay away from windows and doors.
 Do not lie on concrete floors and do not lean against concrete walls.
 Take shelter in a sturdy building.
 Avoid isolated sheds or other small structures in open areas.
18
 Avoid contact with anything metal—motorcycles and bicycles.
If lightning strikes you or someone you know, call 9-1-1 for medical assistance as soon as possible. The
following are things you should check when you attempt to give aid to a victim of lightning:
 Breathing - if breathing has stopped, begin mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.
 Heartbeat - if the heart has stopped, administer CPR.
 Pulse - if the victim has a pulse and is breathing, look for other possible injuries. Check for burns where
the lightning entered and left the body. Also be alert for nervous system damage, broken bones and
loss of hearing and eyesight.
After
 Never drive through a flooded roadway. Turn around, don’t drown!
 Stay away from downed power lines and report them immediately
Tornadoes
Tornado Watch-Conditions are right to have a tornado. Maintain a close look out for changes in the sky
and stay tuned to local weather stations.
Tornado Warning:-This means there is an actual tornado reported or radar indicates one could develop
within a few minutes. Seek shelter quickly.
During a Tornado:






Basements, inner rooms of a building, and storm cellars provide the best protection.
Stay away from exterior walls, windows, and doors. Stay in the center of the room.
If you are in your car do NOT try and outrun the tornado because it can switch direction and can
cover lots of ground quickly.
Get out of vehicle and go into a strong building if possible. If not, lie flat in a ditch or low area and
cover your head.
Do NOT go under overpasses, wind speeds actually increase under them and can suck you out!
Listen to radio or watch TV so you can be alerted about your current situation.
Plan for a Pandemic
Get involved in your community as it works to prepare for an influenza pandemic.
Limit the Spread of Germs and Prevent Infection
 Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others
to protect them from getting sick too.
 If possible, stay home.
 Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing.
 Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs.
 Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs are often spread when a person touches
something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.
Utility Shut Off
Natural gas
Natural gas leaks and explosions are responsible for a significant number of fires following disasters. It is vital
that all staff know how to shut off natural gas.
Because there are different gas shut-off procedures for different gas meter configurations, it is important to
contact your local gas company for any guidance on preparations and response regarding gas service to
The Academy.
If you smell gas or hear a blowing or hissing noise, get everyone out quickly. Turn off the gas if you can, and
call the gas company.
Caution: If you turn off the gas for any reason, a qualified professional must turn it back on. NEVER attempt
to turn the gas back on yourself.
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Water
Water quickly becomes a precious resource following many disasters. It is vital that all staff learn how to
shut off the water.
Locate the shut-off valve for the water line that enters The Academy and label this valve with a tag for
easy identification.
The effects of gravity may drain the water in your hot water heater and toilet tanks unless you trap it in the
academy by shutting off the main house valve. (This is not the street valve in the cement box at the curb –
the street valve is extremely difficult to turn and requires a special tool.)
Electricity
Electrical sparks have the potential of igniting natural gas if it is leaking. It is wise to teach all responsible
staff where and how to shut off the electricity.
Locate you electrical circuit box. For your safety, always shut off all the individual circuits before shutting off
the main circuit.
Fire Procedure
If you smell smoke or see fire, report it immediately to an educator.
Proceed as follows:

Students exit in single file out the closest doors. If you have a guest at the time, the guest is your
responsibility.

After exiting The Academy, proceed safely away from the academy.

Support staff at front desk will help guest in reception area out the front doors.

Proceed to safety away from the academy.

Familiarize yourself with your evacuation route and the location of all emergency and regular exits.

The evacuation route illustration is found next to the fire extinguisher in the student’s lounge, next to
the fire extinguisher outside the laundry room and front of salon area.
VIOLATION OF FIRE SAFETY RULES PUTS LIVES IN JEOPARDY. TAMPERING WITH FIRE ALARMS OR FIRE
EQUIPMENT CAN RESULT IN FINES AND POSSIBLE INCARCERATION.
Flood
Before
Even if you feel you live in a community with a low risk of flooding, remember that anywhere it rains, it can
flood. Just because you haven't experienced a flood in the past, doesn't mean you won't in the
future. Flood risk isn't just based on history; it's also based on a number of factors including rainfall,
topography, flood-control measures, river-flow and tidal-surge data, and changes due to new construction
and development.
To prepare for a flood, you should:
 "Check valves" are installed in the sinks to prevent water from backing up into the drains.
During
If a flood is likely in your area, you should:

Be aware that flash flooding can occur. If there is any possibility of a flash flood, move immediately
to higher ground. Do not wait for instructions to evacuate.
If you must prepare to evacuate, you should do the following:
 Secure The Academy
 Turn off utilities at the main switches or valves if instructed to do so.
 Disconnect electrical appliances. Do not touch electrical equipment if you are wet or standing in
water.
If you have to leave The Academy, remember these evacuation tips:
 Do not walk through moving water. Six inches of moving water can make you fall. If you have to
walk in water, walk where the water is not moving. Use a stick to check the firmness of the ground
in front of you.
 Do not drive into flooded areas. If floodwaters rise around your car, abandon the car and move to
higher ground, when water is not moving or not more than a few inches deep. You and the vehicle
can be swept away quickly. If your vehicle is trapped in rapidly moving water, stay in the vehicle.
If the water is rising inside the vehicle, seek refuge on the roof.
 Do not camp or park your vehicle along streams, rivers or creeks, particularly during threatening
conditions.
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After
Although floodwaters may be down in some areas, many dangers still exist. Here are some things to
remember in the days ahead:
 Use local alerts and warning systems to get information and expert informed advice as soon as
available.
 Avoid moving water.
 Stay away from damaged areas unless your assistance has been specifically requested by police,
fire, or relief organization.
 Emergency workers will be assisting people in flooded areas. You can help them by staying off the
roads and out of the way.
 Play it safe. Additional flooding or flash floods can occur. Listen for local warnings and information.
If your car stalls in rapidly rising waters, get out immediately and climb to higher ground.
 Return home only when authorities indicate it is safe.
 Roads may still be closed because they have been damaged or are covered by water. Barricades
have been placed for your protection. If you come upon a barricade or a flooded road, go
another way.
 If you must walk or drive in areas that have been flooded.
o Stay on firm ground. Moving water only 6 inches deep can sweep you off your feet.
Standing water may be electrically charged from underground or downed power lines.
o Flooding may have caused familiar places to change. Floodwaters often erode roads and
walkways. Flood debris may hide animals and broken bottles, and it's also slippery. Avoid
walking or driving through it.
 Be aware of areas where floodwaters have receded. Roads may have weakened and could
collapse under the weight of a car.
 Stay out of any building if it is surrounded by floodwaters.
 Use extreme caution when entering buildings; there may be hidden damage, particularly in
foundations.
Earthquake
Before
Every attempt to secure shelves, heavy objects, mirrors, and electronic such as computers and printers.
During
Drop, cover and hold on. Minimize your movements to a few steps to a nearby safe place and if you are
indoors, stay there until the shaking has stopped and you are sure exiting is safe
If indoors
 Drop to your hands and knees.
Cover your head and neck with your arms. This position protects you from falling and provides
some protection for vital organs. Because moving can put you in danger from the debris in your
path, only move if you need to get away from the danger of falling objects. If you can move
safely, crawl for additional cover under a sturdy desk or table. If there is low furniture, or an interior
wall or corner nearby and the path is clear, these may also provide some additional cover. Stay
away from glass, windows, outside doors and walls, and anything that could fall, such as lighting
fixtures or furniture.
HOLD ON to any sturdy shelter until the shaking stops.
 Stay away from glass, windows, outside doors and walls, and anything that could fall, such as
lighting fixtures or furniture.
 DO NOT get in a doorway as this does not provide protection from falling or flying objects and you
likely will not be able to remain standing.
 Stay inside until the shaking stops and it is safe to go outside. Do not exit the academy during the
shaking. Research has shown that most injuries occur when people inside buildings attempt to
move to a different location inside the academy or try to leave.
 Be aware that the electricity may go out or the sprinkler systems or fire alarms may turn on.
After

Do not light a match.

Do not move about or kick up dust.

Cover your mouth with a handkerchief or clothing.

Tap on a pipe or wall so rescuers can locate you.

Use a whistle if one is available. Shout only as a last resort.
21

Shouting can cause you to inhale dangerous amounts of dust.
When the Shaking Stops

When the shaking stops, look around to make sure it is safe to move and there is a safe way out
through the debris. Then exit The Academy.

Expect aftershocks. These secondary shockwaves are usually less violent than the main quake but
can be strong enough to do additional damage to weakened structures and can occur in the first
hours, days, weeks, or even months after the quake. Drop, Cover, and Hold On whenever you feel
shaking.

Check for injuries and provide assistance if you have training. Assist with rescues if you can do this
safely.

Look for and extinguish small fires. Fire is the most common hazard after an earthquake. Never use
a lighter or matches near damaged areas.

Use the telephone only for emergency calls.

Go to a designated public shelter if your home had been damaged and is no longer safe. Text
SHELTER + your ZIP code to 43362 (4FEMA) to find the nearest shelter in your area (example: shelter
12345).

Stay away from damaged areas. Stay away unless your assistance has been specifically requested
by police, fire, or relief organizations. Return home only when authorities say it is safe.

Be careful when driving after an earthquake and anticipate traffic light outages.

After it is determined that its’ safe to return, your safety should be your primary priority as you begin
clean up and recovery.

Leave the area if you smell gas or fumes from other chemicals.

Inspect utilities. (Follow the Utility Shut Off)
Bomb Threats
Most bomb threat are received by phone. Bomb threats are serious until proven otherwise. Staff and
students are to act quickly, but remain calm and obtain as much information as possible and write it down.
If a bomb threat is received by phone

Remain calm. Keep the caller on the line for as long as possible. DO NOT HANG UP, even if the
caller does.

Listen carefully. Be polite and show interest.

Try to keep the caller talking to learn more information.

If possible, write a note to a staff member or student to call the authorities or, as soon as the caller
hangs up, immediately notify them yourself.

If your phone has a display, copy the number and/or letters on the window display.

Write down as much detail as you can remember. Try to get exact words.

Immediately upon termination of the call, do not hang up, but from a different phone, contact FPS
(Federal Protective Services) immediately with information and await instructions.
If A Bomb Threat Is Received By Handwritten Note
• Call 9-1-1
• Handle note as minimally as possible
If A Bomb Threat Is Received By Email
• Call 911
• Do not delete the message.
Signs of a Suspicious Package
• No return address • Poorly handwritten • Excessive postage • Misspelled words • Stains • Incorrect titles •
Strange odor • Foreign postage • Strange sounds • Restrictive notes • Unexpected delivery
Do Not
• Use cell phones; radio signals have the potential to detonate a bomb.
• Evacuate the academy until police arrive and evaluate the threat.
• Activate the fire alarm.
• Touch or move a suspicious package.
Bomb Threat Call Procedures and Checklist
Who to Contact (select one)
• Follow your local guidelines
• Federal Protective Service (FPS) Police 1-877-4-FPS-411 (1-877-437-7411)
22
• 911
Ask Caller
When asking the caller the following, take notes on anything, you might forget and include questions:
• Where is the bomb located? (Building/Floor/Room, etc.)
• When will it go off?
• What does it look like?
• What kind of bomb is it?
• What will make it explode?
• Did you place the bomb? Yes/ No
• Why?
• What is your name?
Exact Words of Threat | Information about Caller
• Where is the caller located? (Background and level of noise)
• Estimated age:
• Is voice familiar? If so, who does it sound like?
• Other points: Take any notes that may aid in the investigation.
Explosion
Before
The following are things you can do to protect yourself, in the event of an explosion.

Knowing your community's warning systems and disaster plans, including evacuation routes.
During
 Get under a sturdy table.
 Exit the academy as quickly as possible. Stay low if there is smoke. Do not stop to retrieve personal
possessions or make phone calls.
 Check for fire and other hazards.
 Once you are out, attempt to meet at designated areas.
 Move away from sidewalks or streets to be used by emergency officials or others still exiting the
academy.
 Tap on a pipe or wall so rescuers can hear where you are.
 If possible, use a whistle to signal rescuers.
 Shout only as a last resort. Shouting can cause a person to inhale dangerous amounts of dust.
 Avoid unnecessary movement so you don’t kick up dust.
 Cover your nose and mouth with anything you have on hand.
After
As we learned from the events of September 11, 2001, the following things can happen after a terrorist
attack:
 There can be significant numbers of casualties and/or damage to buildings and the infrastructure.
So employers need up-to-date information about any medical needs you may have and on how
to contact your designated beneficiaries.
 Heavy law enforcement involvement at local, state and federal levels follows a terrorist attack due
to the event's criminal nature.
 Health and mental health resources in the affected communities can be strained to their limits,
maybe even overwhelmed.
 Extensive media coverage, strong public fear and international implications and consequences
can continue for a prolonged period.
 The academy may be closed.
 The academy may have to evacuate, avoiding blocked roads for your safety.
 Clean-up may take many months.
Terrorist Attacks
The Academy does not want to dismiss or diminish the possibility to terrorism, however, we believe the risk is
low in relationship to Threat/Hazards.
Based on:

Small staff, less than 15

Small student body, less than 100

Building has no significant interest or location

Building is on one level

Building does not store or contains hazardous chemicals
23


No luggage is stored or kept on premise
No underground parking
Criminal or Terrorists Threats Procedures
Upon receipt of information pertaining to a criminal or terrorist threat during business hours, the person
receiving the information should notify a staff member(s) of the impending or occurring emergency.

Response
o Immediate assessment of situation to determine response needed to address the threat at
hand.
o Trained Command Decision Team Members will respond to the situation using Emergency
Codes if necessary.
o Conduct risk assessment of vulnerability of all areas of the academy including classrooms.
o Contact civil authorities to determine appropriate action.
o Advise students to take shelter in pre-defined areas, based on threat and safety of students
 Possible evacuation of entire campus for a length of time to be determined based on
the situation at hand.

Incident Management
o Have current facility maps available for local authorities
 Copy keep readily available off sight
o Video tape of Academy recording all areas of the academy for hostage situations
 Readily accessible at an off-sight location

When applicable, The Academy will post the time class will resume on outside doors.
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT RISK MATRIX
High
Extreme Weather
Thunderstorms/lightening
Pandemic
PROBABILITY
Med
Tornado
Low
Utility
Fire
Low
SEVERITY
Med
Flood
Earthquake
Bomb
Explosion
Terrorist
High
Crime Definitions
The definitions listed below are taken from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Uniform Crime Reporting
Handbook, and are used to classify the criminal offenses listed in the statistics
Criminal Homicide-- Murder and non-negligent manslaughter: The willful (non-negligent) killing of one human
being by another.
Criminal Homicide—negligent manslaughter: The killing of another person through gross negligence.
Forcible Sex Offenses: Any sexual act directed against another person, forcibly and/or against the person’s
will; or not forcibly or against the person’s will, where the victim is incapable of giving consent. Reported
sexual offenses may include forcible rape, forcible sodomy, sexual assault with an object and forcible
fondling.
Non-Forcible Sex Offenses: Unlawful, non-forcible sexual intercourse. Reported offense may include incest
and statutory rape.
Robbery: The taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person
or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or making the victim fearful.
Aggravated Assault/Battery: An unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting
severe or substantial bodily injury. This type of assault may be accompanied by the use of a weapon or other
means likely to produce death or great bodily harm.
Simple Assault/Battery: All assaults and attempted assaults which are not of an aggravated nature and do
not result in serious injury to the victim.
Burglary: The unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or theft.
Motor Vehicle Theft: The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle.
Destruction, Damage Or Vandalism To Property: To willfully or maliciously destroy, injure, disfigure, or deface
any public or private property, real or personal, without the consent of the owner or person having custody
or control by cutting, tearing, breaking, marking, painting, drawing, covering with filth, or any other such
means as may be specified by local law.
24
Arson: Any willful or malicious burning or attempting to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling
house, public building, motor vehicle, aircraft, personal property of another, etc.
Liquor Law Violation: The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting manufacturing, selling, transporting,
furnishing, or possessing of intoxicating liquor; maintaining unlawful drinking places; bootlegging; operating
a still; furnishing liquor to a minor or intemperate person; using a vehicle for illegal transportation of liquor;
drinking on a train or public conveyance; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.
Drug Law Violation: Violation of state and local laws relating to unlawfully possessing, selling, using, growing,
manufacturing and making narcotic drugs.
Weapon Law Violation: The violation of laws or ordinances dealing with weapon offenses, regulatory in
nature, such as: the manufacturing, sale or possession of deadly weapons; carrying deadly weapons,
concealed or openly; furnishing deadly weapons to minors; aliens possessing deadly weapons; and all
attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.
Hate Crimes: Any of the crimes listed here which manifest evidence of prejudice based on race, religion,
sexual orientation, ethnicity, disability and gender.
Larceny-Theft: The unlawful taking and carrying away of someone else's personal property with the intent to
deprive the possessor of it permanently.
Intimidation: Coercing or inhibiting through the use of fear.
Simple Assault/Battery: All assaults and attempted assaults which are not of an aggravated nature and do
not result in serious injury to the victim.
Burglary: The unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or theft.
Motor Vehicle Theft: The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle.
Destruction, Damage Or Vandalism To Property: To willfully or maliciously destroy, injure, disfigure, or deface
any public or private property, real or personal, without the consent of the owner or person having custody
or control by cutting, tearing, breaking, marking, painting, drawing, covering with filth, or any other such
means as may be specified by local law.
Arson: Any willful or malicious burning or attempting to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling
house, public building, motor vehicle, aircraft, personal property of another, etc.
Liquor Law Violation: The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting manufacturing, selling, transporting,
furnishing, or possessing of intoxicating liquor; maintaining unlawful drinking places; bootlegging; operating
a still; furnishing liquor to a minor or intemperate person; using a vehicle for illegal transportation of liquor;
drinking on a train or public conveyance; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.
Drug Law Violation: Violation of state and local laws relating to unlawfully possessing, selling, using, growing,
manufacturing and making narcotic drugs.
Weapon Law Violation: The violation of laws or ordinances dealing with weapon offenses, regulatory in
nature, such as: the manufacturing, sale or possession of deadly weapons; carrying deadly weapons,
concealed or openly; furnishing deadly weapons to minors; aliens possessing deadly weapons; and all
attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.
Hate Crimes: Any of the crimes listed here which manifest evidence of prejudice based on race, religion,
sexual orientation, ethnicity, disability and gender.
Larceny-Theft: The unlawful taking and carrying away of someone else's personal property with the intent to
deprive the possessor of it permanently.
Intimidation: Coercing or inhibiting through the use of fear.
Physical Abuse: Hitting, slapping, shoving, grabbing, pinching, biting, hair pulling, etc are types of physical
abuse. This type of abuse also includes denying a partner medical care or forcing alcohol and/or drug use
upon him or her.
Sexual Abuse: Coercing or attempting to coerce any sexual contact or behavior without consent. Sexual
abuse includes, but is certainly not limited to, marital rape, attacks on sexual parts of the body, forcing sex
after physical violence has occurred, or treating one in a sexually demeaning manner.
Emotional Abuse: Undermining an individual's sense of self-worth and/or self-esteem is abusive. This may
include, but is not limited to constant criticism, diminishing one's abilities, name-calling, or damaging one's
relationship with his or her children.
Economic Abuse: Is defined as making or attempting to make an individual financially dependent by
maintaining total control over financial resources, withholding one's access to money, or forbidding one's
attendance at academy or employment.
Psychological Abuse: Elements of psychological abuse include - but are not limited to - causing fear by
intimidation; threatening physical harm to self, partner, children, or partner's family or friends; destruction of
pets and property; and forcing isolation from family, friends, or academy and/or work.
25
REPORT TO ED VIA THE WEB BASED COLLECTION
The Academy submits crime statistics from the annual security report to ED via an annual Web-based data
collection. The Academy does not have more than one institution, does not have on-campus student
housing and therefore does not report fire statistics or missing student notification procedure.
MISSING STUDENT NOTIFICATION PROCEDURE
The Academy does not have campus housing. Therefore we do not have a missing student notification
procedure.
PERSONAL IDENTIFIABLE INFORMATION (PII)
Organizations should identify all PII residing in their environment.
PII is ―any information about an individual maintained by an agency, including:
(1) any information that can be used to distinguish or trace an individual‘s identity, such as name, social
security number, date and place of birth, mother‘s maiden name, or biometric records;
(2) any other information that is linked or linkable to an individual, such as medical, educational, financial,
and employment information.‖ 6 Examples of PII include, but are not limited to:

Name, such as full name, maiden name, mother‘s maiden name, or alias

Personal identification number, such as social security number (SSN), passport number, driver‘s
license number, taxpayer identification number, or financial account or credit card number

Address information, such as street address or email address

Personal characteristics, including photographic image (especially of face or other identifying
characteristic), fingerprints, handwriting, or other biometric data (e.g., retina scan, voice signature,
facial geometry)
THE SALON PROFESSIONAL ACADEMY – CAMPUS SEXUAL MISCONDUCT POLICIES OVERVIEW
VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN ACT (VAWA)
In 1994 Congress passed the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) in recognition of the severity of crimes
associated with domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. This Act emerged from the efforts of a
broad, grassroots coalition of advocates and survivors who informed the work of Congress. In the two
decades prior to VAWA, a movement had grown within the United States to respond appropriately to
violent crimes against women. Rape crisis centers and women’s shelters were established in localities, and
state and local laws had changed. However, the progress had been uneven around the country. VAWA
was borne out of the need for a national solution. This Act enhances the investigation and prosecution of
violent crimes against women.
“Dating violence: means “violence committed by a personWho is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and
Where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of the following
factors:

The length of the relationship

The type of relationship; and

The frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.”
“Stalking” means “engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a
reasonable person to
Fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; or

Suffer substantial emotional distress.
HOTLINES
National Domestic Violence Hotline
1-800-799-SAFE (7233)
National Sexual Assault Hotline
1-800-656-HOPE (4673)
National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline
1-866-331-9474
Andi Wilson, owner Command Decision Team Leader and the Title IX Coordinator will train the staff each
year on Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA).
For the full Sexual Misconduct – VAWA Policy please go to LittleRockBeautySchool.com or you can obtain a
hard copy in the Admissions or Financial Aid offices.
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