COMPANION | Meridian Mail | User`s guide | COMPANION Meridian Mail User`s guide

555-7001-301
Meridian 1
Meridian Mail
System Administration Guide
Product release 12
Standard 1.0
January 1998
P0875914
Meridian 1
Meridian Mail
System Administration Guide
Publication number:
Product release:
Document release:
Date:
555-7001-301
12
Standard 1.0
January 1998
© 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998 Northern Telecom
All rights reserved
Printed in the United States of America
Information is subject to change without notice. Northern Telecom reserves the right to make
changes in design or components as progress in engineering and manufacturing may warrant.
Meridian 1, Meridian, and Nortel are trademarks of Northern Telecom.
iii
Publication history
January 1998
Manual released as Standard 1.0. This version of the
Meridian Mail System Administration Guide is intended for
Meridian Mail Release 12 base software.
November 1996
Manual released as Standard 1.0. This version of the
Meridian Mail System Administration Guide is intended for
Meridian Mail Release 11 base software.
August 1995
Manual released as Standard 1.0. This version of the
Meridian Mail System Administration Guide is intended for
Meridian Mail Release 10 base software.
April 1995
Manual released as Standard 1.0. This version of the
Meridian Mail System Administration Guide is intended for
Meridian Mail Release 9.5 base software.
March 1994
Manual released as Standard 1.0. This version of the
Meridian Mail System Administration Guide is intended for
Meridian Mail Release 9 base software.
April 1993
Manual released as Standard 1.0. This version of the
Meridian Mail System Administration Guide is intended for
Meridian Mail Release 8 base software.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
iv
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Contents
1
About this guide
1-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
What this guide is about . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
Who should use this guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Systems supported by this guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Structure of this guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Typographic conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-11
Referenced documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-14
2
Navigating through system administration 2-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Section A: The administration menu hierarchy
2-3
The system administration menu hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
The Main menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
User administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
General administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
Voice administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10
Hardware administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14
System status and maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
Operational measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-18
Class of Service administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-20
Fax administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-21
Network administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-22
Hospitality administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-23
Section B: Understanding menus, screens, and keys
2-25
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keypad functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Meridian Mail menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Meridian Mail screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Getting around in screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering information in fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-26
2-27
2-28
2-31
2-33
2-34
vi
Contents
Softkeys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-39
Getting help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-40
Error messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-41
Section C: Meridian Mail features and interfaces
2-43
The main administration terminal and multiple
administration terminals (MATs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-44
Meridian Mail feature availability. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-46
Meridian Mail telset interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-48
3
Logging on
3-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Types of consoles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Logon/Status screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Setting the system administration password . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Changing the system administration password . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Recovering a system administration password . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
Logging on from the main administration terminal . . . . . . 3-11
Logging on from a MAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13
Logging on from a remote terminal (non-EC system) . . . . 3-15
Logging on from a remote terminal (EC system) . . . . . . . . 3-18
Using a single terminal to access the M1 and
Meridian Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-23
4
Setting up the system
4-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Section A: Basic setup procedures
4-3
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Changing the system administration password . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
Checking the hardware configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Checking the system status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Checking the Channel Allocation Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
Configuring general system options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
Setting up dialing translations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10
Setting up restriction and permission lists. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11
Customizing voice messaging options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12
Adding networking information to a network database . . . 4-13
Adding DNs to the VSDN table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Contents
vii
5
Defining classes of service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring operational measurement options . . . . . . . . . .
Adding users to the system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating system distribution lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring optional features and other services . . . . . . . .
Setting up system security. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Backing up the system. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-15
4-16
4-17
4-18
4-19
4-20
4-21
Section B: Setting up optional features
4-23
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up the Outcalling feature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up the Voice Menus feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up the Voice Forms feature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up the Fax on Demand feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up the Meridian Networking feature. . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up the AMIS Networking feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up the Virtual Node AMIS Networking feature . . .
Setting up the Enterprise Networking feature . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up the Network Message Service feature . . . . . . . .
Setting up the Hospitality feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up the Meridian Mail Reporter feature . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up the Meridian Mail AutoAdmin feature . . . . . . .
Setting up the ACCESS feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-24
4-25
4-26
4-27
4-28
4-29
4-30
4-31
4-32
4-33
4-34
4-35
4-36
4-37
Making voice recordings
5-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Types of recordings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
How Call Answering uses personal greetings and
personal verifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Voice recording tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-11
Standard 1.0
Section A: Making recordings
5-13
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Logging in to Meridian Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recording a call answering greeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recording personal greetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recording a personal verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recording a personal verification for a system
distribution list. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-14
5-15
5-18
5-24
5-26
System Administration Guide
5-31
January 1998
viii
Contents
Identifying remote site names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recording a personal verification for the broadcast
mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recording and sending broadcast messages . . . . . . . . . . . .
Making Voice Services recordings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-34
5-37
5-39
5-43
Section B: VMUIF recordings
5-47
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-48
VMUIF introductory tutorials and the VMUIF
login greeting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-49
Recording the VMUIF login greeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-52
6
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
Section A: Telecommunication criminals and the
problems they pose
6-3
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
Designing a security system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7
Ongoing security measures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8
Section B: Using Basic Access Restrictions features
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trunk Group Access Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Class of Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TGAR/TARG and CLS interaction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transfer feature on modems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Standard 1.0
6-9
6-10
6-11
6-13
6-17
6-19
Section C: Features that modify access restrictions
6-21
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Speed Call. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Authorization Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Station Specific Authorization Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Forced Charge Account. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controlled Class of Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enhanced Controlled Class of Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flexible Feature Codes—Electronic Lock . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Code Restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New Flexible Code Restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-22
6-23
6-24
6-25
6-27
6-29
6-32
6-33
6-34
6-36
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Contents
Standard 1.0
ix
Section D: Controlling remote access to calling
privilege
6-39
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call Forward All Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call Forward External Deny . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call Forward to Trunk Access Code—DID Calls. . . . . . . .
Internal Call Forward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flexible Feature Codes—Remote Call Forward . . . . . . . . .
User Selectable Call Redirection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-40
6-41
6-42
6-43
6-44
6-45
6-46
Section E: Controlling access through Least
Cost Routing (BARS/NARS)
6-47
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supplemental Digit Recognition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supplemental Digit Restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Class of Service—Facility Restriction Level . . . .
Network Speed Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Authorization Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Authorization Code Conditionally Last . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Time-of-Day Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Routing Control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Incoming Trunk Group Exclusion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-48
6-50
6-52
6-55
6-58
6-60
6-61
6-64
6-67
6-70
Section F: Controlling access to PBX administration
programs
6-73
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Password control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Limited access to overlays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Limited access password—user name. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single Terminal Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multi-user login. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Input/Output port recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
History file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-74
6-75
6-77
6-78
6-79
6-80
6-81
6-82
Section G: Controlling Direct Inward System Access
6-83
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DISA and security codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DISA and Class of Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DISA and authorization codes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-84
6-85
6-86
6-87
System Administration Guide
January 1998
x
Contents
Section H: Restriction/Permission lists
6-89
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What are restriction/permission lists and codes? . . . . . . . .
Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding how restriction/permission codes work . . .
Recommendations for using the first four restriction/
permission lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining and applying restriction/permission lists . . . . . . .
6-90
6-91
6-93
6-94
6-97
6-99
Section I: Controlling access to Meridian Mail
services and features
6-103
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Custom Revert. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Thru-Dial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Call Answering or Express Messaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Extension dialing (mailbox thru-dial) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fax on Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote Notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Delivery to Non-User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
External Call sender . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AMIS Networking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-104
6-106
6-109
6-110
6-112
6-115
6-116
6-118
6-120
6-121
Section J: Controlling access to Meridian Mail
mailboxes
6-123
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-124
Using the Voice Security Options screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-125
Default security settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-131
Initial password change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-133
Password display suppression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-135
Password prefix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-136
Password length. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-138
Forced regular password changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-139
Invalid logon attempts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-142
Modifying mailbox security settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-146
Restricting off-site access to mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-147
Disabling unused mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-148
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Contents
xi
7
Section K: Monitoring access to Meridian Mail
mailboxes and features
6-149
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hacker Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mailbox Login Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Thru-Dial Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CLID Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Services Summary Traffic report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-150
6-151
6-152
6-154
6-157
6-160
Section L: Equipment security
6-161
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Switchroom access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Administration terminals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Meridian Mail and switch printouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-162
6-163
6-164
6-165
User administration—an overview
7-1
Section A: Introduction to User Administration
7-3
The User Administration menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4
Types of users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7
Distribution lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-10
Limitations and guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-11
Support for multiple appearance DNs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-12
8
Section B: New user planning
7-15
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Class of service planning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Distributing local voice users evenly over volumes . . . . . .
Guidelines for adding users to a system that has
disk shadowing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guidelines for adding a large number of users . . . . . . . . . .
How user models in pre-Release 9 systems are
converted to classes of service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-16
7-17
7-19
Local voice users
Section A: Adding local voice users
7-21
7-22
7-23
8-1
8-3
Integrated mailbox administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
Before you begin adding local voice users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
Adding a local voice user . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
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Contents
Setting the default administration context for NMS . . . . . . . 8-8
Accessing the Add Local Voice User screen . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10
The Add Local Voice User screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-13
Entering user information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-15
Assigning a user to a class of service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-20
Primary DN and extension DNs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-24
The revert DN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-26
The message waiting indication DN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-29
Specifying the primary DN, extension DNs,
the revert DN, and message waiting indication DN . . . . . . 8-31
Recording a personal verification for a user . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-34
Creating a remote notification schedule for a user . . . . . . . 8-36
Setting other local voice user characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . 8-39
9
Standard 1.0
Section B: Finding local voice users
8-45
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wildcard characters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing the Find Local Voice Users screen . . . . . . . . . .
The Find Local Voice Users screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Restrictions on how you can combine search criteria . . . . .
Finding, listing, and printing local voice users . . . . . . . . . .
Reassigning a subset of local voice users to another
class of service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-46
8-47
8-49
8-50
8-67
8-69
8-73
Section C: Modifying and deleting local voice users
8-79
Accessing the View/Modify Local Voice User screen . . . .
Viewing and modifying a local voice user . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking a user’s status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling a disabled mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing a user’s password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring mailbox logins for suspected hacker activity . .
Reassigning a mailbox to another user . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting a local voice user . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-80
8-84
8-86
8-91
8-93
8-94
8-96
8-97
Remote voice users
9-1
Section A: Introduction
9-3
What is a remote voice user?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote voice user changes and enhancements. . . . . . . . . . .
Permanent remote voice users. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Temporary remote voice users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-4
9-6
9-8
9-9
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Contents
xiii
Section B: Adding remote voice users
9-11
The Add Remote Voice User screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding remote voice users through User Administration. .
Recording a personal verification for a remote voice user .
Adding temporary remote voice users using RVU
Propagation via Enterprise Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding remote voice users using RVU Propagation via
Bulk Provisioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-12
9-17
9-19
Section C: Finding remote voice users
9-27
Accessing the Find Remote Voice Users screen . . . . . . . . .
The Find Remote Voice Users screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wildcard characters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finding, listing, and printing remote voice users . . . . . . . .
9-28
9-29
9-32
9-34
9-21
9-24
Section D: Modifying and deleting remote voice users 9-39
Viewing and modifying remote voice users . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-40
Manually deleting remote voice users. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-45
How temporary remote voice users are automatically
deleted from the system. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-49
10
Directory entry users
10-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-2
What is a directory entry user? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3
The Add Directory Entry User screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-4
Adding directory entry users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7
Recording a personal verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-8
The Find Directory Entry Users screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-10
Finding directory entry users. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-12
The List of Directory Entry Users screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-13
Printing directory entry users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-15
Viewing or modifying directory entry users . . . . . . . . . . . 10-16
Deleting directory entry users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-18
11
Distribution lists
11-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding distribution lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Limitations on distribution lists. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing the Distribution Lists softkeys screen . . . . . . . .
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
11-2
11-3
11-4
11-7
January 1998
xiv
Contents
Adding a system distribution list. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-9
Finding and viewing a system distribution list . . . . . . . . . 11-17
Modifying a system distribution list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-22
Printing a system distribution list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-24
Deleting a system distribution list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-26
12
General administration–an overview
12-1
General Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-2
13
General options
13-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-2
Accessing the General Options screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-3
Modifying the system name and system number . . . . . . . . 13-5
Defining the system addressing length and the supervised
transfer delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-8
Verifying installed features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-11
Assigning classes of service to the system . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-13
Setting the attendant DN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-15
Setting the date format for reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-18
Setting printer port names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-20
14
Volume administration
14-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-2
Volume names. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-3
Volume contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-5
Volume distribution on single- and multi-node systems. . . 14-7
Voice storage capacity in single- and multi-node systems . 14-8
Checking volume capacity and usage levels for
your system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-10
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Contents
xv
15
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-2
Section A: Preparing for backups
15-3
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-4
The three types of backups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-5
Selective backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-6
Partial backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-8
Full backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-9
Volumes to back up. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-10
How often to do backups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-11
Disk backup or tape backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-13
Before you perform a backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-14
Section B: Full and partial backups to tape
15-15
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-16
Performing a full backup to tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-18
Performing a partial backup to tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-20
Section C: Selective backup of users and services
15-23
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-24
Backing up all users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-25
Backing up individual users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-27
Backing up all users in a specified volume . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-29
Backing up all users assigned to a particular
class of service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-31
Backing up all users in a specific department . . . . . . . . . . 15-33
Backing up all multimedia services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-35
Backing up selected individual multimedia services . . . . 15-37
Section D: Partial backups to disk
15-39
Performing a partial backup to disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-40
Section E: Scheduled backups
15-41
Scheduling the backup for a later time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-42
Deleting a scheduled backup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-45
Section F: Backup maintenance
15-47
Checking the status of a backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-48
Cleaning/maintaining the tape drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-52
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
xvi
Contents
Section G: Restoring information from a Selective
backup
15-53
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-54
Restore from Selective backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-56
16
Password and system time changes
16-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-2
Changing the system administrator password . . . . . . . . . . . 16-3
Changing the customer administrator password for
MATs and Meridian Mail AutoAdmin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-5
Setting the minimum password length for all
administrator passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-7
The AdminPlus Download password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-8
Changing the system time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-10
17
Dialing translations
17-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-2
Section A: Introduction to dialing translations
17-3
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-4
Dialing translations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-5
Default dialing prefixes and local system defaults . . . . . . . 17-7
When default dialing translations defaults are required . . 17-10
Translation tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-12
When translation tables are required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-14
Standard 1.0
Section B: How dialing translations work
17-17
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Meridian Mail collects digits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How dialing translations translate numbers . . . . . . . . . . .
How Meridian Mail uses the dialable number . . . . . . . . .
17-18
17-19
17-22
17-27
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Contents
xvii
Section C: Setting up network dialing prefixes
and local defaults
17-29
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-30
Worksheet for default dialing prefixes and local
system defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-31
Dialing translation defaults screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-33
Configuring the default dialing prefixes and local system
defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-37
Sample datafills for dialing translation defaults . . . . . . . . 17-40
Section D: Setting up translation tables
17-43
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-44
Identifying translation table requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-45
Identifying translation tables required on your system . . . 17-48
Local dialing to a different area/city code (area/city code
required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-52
Local dialing to a different area/city code (no area/city
code required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-56
Long distance dialing to the same area/city code
(area/city code required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-59
Long distance dialing to the same area/city code
(area/city code not required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-61
The View/Modify Translation Table screen . . . . . . . . . . . 17-62
Configuring translation tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-64
Deleting translation tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-67
Section E: Sample datafills
17-69
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-70
Datafill for countries without area/city codes . . . . . . . . . . 17-71
Datafill for a case where the switch handles
dialing translation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-72
Section F: Troubleshooting dialing translations
17-75
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-76
Diagnosing and tracing problems in a dialing translation. 17-77
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
xviii
Contents
18
Routine maintenance
18-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Meridian Mail operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Meridian Mail hardware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Backing up the system. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cleaning the tape drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19
Voice administration—an overview
18-2
18-3
18-5
18-7
18-9
19-1
Voice Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-2
20
Voice messaging options
20-1
Section A: Introduction
20-3
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-4
Accessing the Voice Messaging Options screen. . . . . . . . . 20-5
The Voice Messaging Options screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-6
Defining voice messaging options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-9
Section B: Languages on multilingual systems
20-11
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-12
The default language and the user’s preferred language. . 20-13
Setting up languages on systems without dual language
prompting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-15
Setting up languages on systems with dual language
prompting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-19
Standard 1.0
Section C: Customizing recordings
20-27
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recording a customized call answering greeting . . . . . . .
VMUIF introductory tutorials and the VMUIF
login greeting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recording or disabling VMUIF tutorials and
login greeting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20-28
20-29
System Administration Guide
20-32
20-34
January 1998
Contents
xix
Section D: Defining operational characteristics
for voice messaging
20-37
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-38
Enabling/disabling timed delivery and name dialing/name
addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-40
Defining the lockout revert DN and personal distribution
list prefix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-45
Setting up the broadcast mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-47
Defining the billing DN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-51
Specifying the message delivery priority for
networked systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-53
Specifying the mailbox full warning threshold . . . . . . . . . 20-55
Specifying the maximum read message retention. . . . . . . 20-57
Enabling/disabling external call sender. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-60
Enabling and configuring speed control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-62
21
Display options
21-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21-2
Different ways of sorting the VSDN table . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21-3
Different ways of sorting the service definitions tables . . . 21-5
Different ways of sorting the Choice of Services
and Menu Actions list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21-7
Changing the display options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21-9
22
Finding and printing VSDNs and service
definitions
22-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-2
Wildcards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-5
The Find Subset of VSDNs/Services screen . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-7
Finding and printing VSDNs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-9
Finding and printing service definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-11
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
xx
Contents
23
Configuring Meridian Mail services
23-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23-2
Section A: Introduction
23-3
Automatic Call Distribution (ACD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23-4
Meridian 1 – Meridian Mail connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23-6
How Meridian Mail uses ACD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23-7
Types of queues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23-9
Assigning DNs to services in the VSDN table . . . . . . . . . 23-11
Section B: Planning your configuration
23-13
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of Meridian Mail ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Port requirements for Meridian Mail services. . . . . . . . . .
Identifying the ports that are installed on your system . . .
Should you dedicate ports? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dedicating ports because of mixed port types. . . . . . . . . .
Dedicating ports to services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Determining how many ACD queues you need . . . . . . . .
Determining how many dummy queues you need . . . . . .
23-14
23-15
23-18
23-20
23-23
23-24
23-26
23-28
23-29
Section C: Configuring the Meridian 1 for
Meridian Mail services
23-31
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating ACD queues for a totally shared configuration .
Creating ACD queues for a combination
(shared and dedicated) configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Partially dedicating ports – blocking inbound calls only .
Partially dedicating ports – blocking outbound calls only
Fully dedicating ports – blocking inbound and
outbound calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating an agent queue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding agents to a queue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a dummy queue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving agents from one queue to another . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing agents from a queue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying the Channel Allocation Table after
moving agents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
23-32
23-33
23-35
23-40
23-43
23-49
23-52
23-55
23-59
23-61
23-63
23-64
January 1998
Contents
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24
The VSDN table
24-1
Section A: Introduction
24-3
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
When to create a VSDN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Message Service requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing the VSDN table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The VSDN table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24-4
24-5
24-6
24-7
24-9
Section B: Adding messaging VSDNs
24-11
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for Voice Messaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for Express Messaging. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for Call Answering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for hospitality voice messaging . . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for the Post-Checkout Mailbox service .
Adding a VSDN for the Greetings Service . . . . . . . . . . . .
24-12
24-13
24-15
24-17
24-19
24-22
24-24
Section C: Adding networking and ACCESS VSDNs
24-27
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for AMIS Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for Meridian Networking. . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for Enterprise Networking . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for a Meridian ACCESS application . . .
24-28
24-29
24-31
24-33
24-36
Section D: Adding voice service and fax service DNs 24-39
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for an announcement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for a thru-dial service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for a voice menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for a time-of-day controller . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for Voice Prompt Maintenance . . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for Remote Activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for a voice form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for the Transcription Service . . . . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for the Fax Information Service. . . . . . .
Adding a VSDN for the Fax Item Maintenance Service. .
24-40
24-41
24-43
24-45
24-48
24-52
24-54
24-56
24-58
24-61
24-64
Section E: Session profiles
24-67
What is a session profile? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-68
How session profiles work when multiple services are
invoked by one VSDN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-70
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Contents
How Meridian Mail 9/10 session profiles are
converted to Meridian Mail 12 session profiles . . . . . . . . 24-72
Fax callback number formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-74
Determining how many VSDNs you need for a callback
fax service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-78
The basic service session profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-81
The full-service voice session profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-83
The full-service multimedia session profile . . . . . . . . . . . 24-86
Customizing the session profile for Voice Menus,
Fax Items, and Time-of-Day Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-90
Specifying the channel capability, session time limit,
and maximum number of invalid selections . . . . . . . . . . . 24-92
Specifying fax service options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-96
Specifying callback delivery options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-102
Creating a custom cover sheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-107
Customizing the session profile for the Fax Item
Maintenance Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-109
Section F: Viewing, modifying, and deleting VSDNs
24-115
Viewing and modifying a VSDN or session profile,
or both . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-116
Deleting a VSDN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-119
25
Voice services profile
25-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Timeouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How timeouts work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying the voice services profile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
26
Class of Service administration
25-2
25-3
25-4
25-6
26-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26-2
Section A: Introduction to Class of Service
26-3
What is a Class of Service? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26-4
System Class of Service versus Personal Class of Service . 26-6
How Class of Service is administered. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26-7
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January 1998
Contents
xxiii
Section B: Adding, changing, printing, and
deleting System Classes of Service
26-9
Adding a Class of Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Add Class of Service screen (MMUI) . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Add Class of Service screen (VMUIF) . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning Classes of Service to the system . . . . . . . . . . .
The Find Class of Service screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finding, listing, or printing a Class of Service . . . . . . . . .
Modifying a Class of Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting a Class of Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
26-10
26-13
26-30
26-49
26-50
26-51
26-54
26-59
Section C: Assigning Classes of Service to users
26-63
Assigning a Class of Service to a user . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26-64
Creating and Assigning a Personal Class of Service to
a user . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26-65
The Class of Service conversion utility for converted
systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26-66
27
Hardware administration
27-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27-2
The Hardware Administration menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27-3
Section A: Viewing the node configuration
27-5
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27-6
The Node Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27-7
The View Node screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27-10
Standard 1.0
Section B: Viewing the data port configuration
27-17
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Data Port Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing data ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
View Terminal data ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
View Printer data port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
View MMLink data port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
View/Modify NWModem data port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
View PMS data port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
View AdminPlus data port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
View Modem data port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
View MSLink data port. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27-18
27-23
27-25
27-27
27-30
27-32
27-34
27-36
27-38
27-40
27-42
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January 1998
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Contents
Section C: Printing node and data port information
27-45
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27-46
Printing node and data port information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27-47
28
System status and maintenance
28-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-2
What is system status and maintenance?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-3
Section A: System Status
28-5
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-6
The System Status screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-8
Disabling/activating the system (“Courtesy Down”) . . . . 28-15
Disabling/enabling nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-17
Courtesy disabling/enabling ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-18
Section B: Card Status
28-19
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Card Status screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling/disabling cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running out-of-service diagnostics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
28-20
28-21
28-27
28-28
Section C: DSP Port Status
28-29
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-30
The DSP Port Status screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-31
Detailed view of the DSP Port Status screen . . . . . . . . . . 28-38
Single mode and range mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-39
Disabling/enabling DSP ports in single mode. . . . . . . . . . 28-40
Disabling/enabling DSP ports in range mode . . . . . . . . . . 28-42
Standard 1.0
Section D: Channel Allocation Table
28-45
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Channel Allocation Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Should you dedicate ports? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying the Channel Allocation Table . . . . . . . . . . . . .
28-46
28-47
28-56
28-59
Section E: Disk Maintenance
28-61
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking disk status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disabling disk shadowing (unsynching) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing a failed disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reenabling disk shadowing (synching a disk pair) . . . . . .
Running diagnostics on a disk or a disk pair. . . . . . . . . . .
28-62
28-63
28-68
28-69
28-70
28-72
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January 1998
Contents
xxv
Section F: Diagnostic Schedules
28-75
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-76
What are Voice Path Diagnostics? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-77
Changing the parameters and schedule for diagnostics. . . 28-78
Analyzing the results of the diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-82
29
SEERs and Meridian Mail Alarms
29-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29-2
Section A: SEERs and Alarms
29-3
What is a SEER? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29-4
Retrieving SEERs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29-6
What is an alarm? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29-9
How to check alarm status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29-10
Silencing an alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29-12
Section B: Customizing SEER processing
29-15
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using SEER remapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using SEER throttling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using SEER escalation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29-16
29-17
29-20
29-23
Section C: Notification options for SEERs and alarms 29-27
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Notification options for SEERs and alarms . . . . . . . . . . .
Using SEER filtering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using SEER triggering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SEERs printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the SEER printer port name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30
Operational Measurements
29-28
29-29
29-31
29-35
29-38
29-40
30-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30-2
Section A: Overview of Operational Measurements
(OM)
30-3
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30-4
What are Operational Measurements? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30-5
How Operational Measurements are useful . . . . . . . . . . . . 30-7
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January 1998
xxvi
Contents
Section B: Setting up Operational Measurements
31-11
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Operational Measurements menu . . . . . . . . . . .
Calculating disk space required for OM data storage . . . .
Operational Measurements Options screen. . . . . . . . . . . .
Fields in the Operational Measurement Options screen . .
Setting Meridian Mail to collect and receive data. . . . . . .
31-12
31-13
31-15
31-19
31-21
31-24
Section C: Interpreting Operational Measurements
30-25
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30-26
Calculating centi-call seconds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30-27
Interpretation guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30-28
31
Operational Measurements traffic reports 31-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31-2
Section A: Generating traffic reports
31-3
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31-4
Traffic Reports screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31-5
Generating traffic reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31-7
Section B: Traffic reports
31-9
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Services Summary report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fields in the Services Summary report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing the Services Summary report. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Voice Messaging Detail report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fields in the Voice Messaging Detail report . . . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing the Voice Messaging Detail report . . . . . . . . .
Channel Usage Detail report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fields in the Channel Usage Detail report . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing the Channel Usage Detail report . . . . . . . . . . .
Services Detail report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fields in the Services Detail report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing the Services Detail report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Networking Detail report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fields in the Networking Detail report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing the Networking Detail report . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AMIS Networking Detail report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fields in the AMIS Networking Detail report. . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing the AMIS Networking Detail report . . . . . . . .
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
31-11
31-12
31-13
31-15
31-18
31-19
31-21
31-22
31-23
31-25
31-26
31-27
31-29
31-31
31-32
31-35
31-37
31-38
31-40
January 1998
Contents
xxvii
Outcalling Detail report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fields in the Outcalling Detail report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing the Outcalling Detail report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fax Delivery Detail report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fields in the Fax Delivery Detail report . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing the Fax Delivery Detail report . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disk Usage Detail report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fields in the Disk Usage Detail report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing the Disk Usage Detail report . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hospitality Statistics report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fields in the Hospitality Statistics report . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing the Hospitality Statistics report . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guest Console Statistics report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fields in the Guest Console Statistics report. . . . . . . . . . .
Analyzing the Guest Console Statistics report . . . . . . . . .
32
User Usage reports
31-41
31-42
31-45
31-47
31-48
31-50
31-52
31-53
31-54
31-56
31-57
31-58
31-59
31-60
31-61
32-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32-2
The User Usage Reports screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32-3
Fields in the User Usage Reports screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32-4
Generating User Usage reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32-7
User Usage report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32-9
Fields in the User Usage report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32-11
Analyzing User Usage reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32-14
33
Audit Trail reports
33-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33-2
Section A: Collecting Audit Trail data
33-3
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33-4
Enabling the collection of audit trail data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33-5
Section B: Outcalling Audit Trail reports
33-9
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Generating an Outcalling Audit Trail report . . . . . . . . . . .
The Summary Outcalling Audit Trail report. . . . . . . . . . .
Fields in the Summary Outcalling Audit Trail report . . . .
Analyzing the Summary Outcalling Audit Trail report . .
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
33-10
33-11
33-15
33-16
33-18
January 1998
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Contents
The Detail Outcalling Audit Trail report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33-19
Fields in the Detail Outcalling Audit Trail report . . . . . . . 33-20
Analyzing the Detail Outcalling Audit Trail report . . . . . 33-28
34
Section C: Fax Audit Trail reports
33-29
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Fax Audit Trail Report screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Summary Fax Audit Trail report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fields in the Summary Fax Audit Trail report screen . . . .
Analyzing the Summary Fax Audit Trail report . . . . . . . .
The Detail Fax Audit Trail report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fields in the Detail Fax Audit Trail report screen. . . . . . .
Analyzing the Detail Fax Audit Trail report . . . . . . . . . . .
33-30
33-31
33-35
33-36
33-37
33-38
33-39
33-43
Bulk provisioning
34-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34-2
Section A: Introduction to bulk provisioning
34-3
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34-4
What is bulk provisioning? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34-5
Using bulk provisioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34-6
Section B: Working with bulk provisioning data sets
34-9
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assembling bulk provisioning data sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating and modifying bulk provisioning data sets. . . . .
Viewing and printing bulk provisioning data sets. . . . . . .
Deleting bulk provisioning data sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
34-10
34-11
34-14
34-21
34-25
Section C: Transferring bulk provisioning data
onto tape
34-27
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34-28
Copying provisioning data sets onto tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34-29
Standard 1.0
Section D: Provisioning data into a Meridian Mail
system
34-33
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Before you start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Provisioning data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing and printing data conflicts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
34-34
34-35
34-37
34-43
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Contents
xxix
A
Integrated Mailbox Administration
A-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
Section A: Interaction between IMA and Meridian Mail
A-3
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
What is Integrated Mailbox Administration? . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5
IMA data translations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6
Synchronizing IMA and Meridian Mail databases . . . . . . . . A-9
IMA and Meridian Mail processing differences and
implementation issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10
Section B: System installation using VMBA
A-15
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-16
Installing at a new site without a preconfigured database
on Meridian Mail or the Meridian 1 core . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-17
Installing at a new site with sets and VMBs preconfigured
on the Meridian 1 core but not on Meridian Mail . . . . . . . . A-18
Installing at an existing site with VMBs preconfigured
on Meridian Mail but not the Meridian 1 core . . . . . . . . . . A-20
B
Meridian Mail AutoAdmin Utility
B-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3
Meridian Mail AutoAdmin installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-5
AutoAdmin Configurator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-12
AutoAdmin Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-21
The AutoAdmin window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-25
Using Meridian Mail AutoAdmin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-34
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-51
Standard 1.0
Index
Index-1
List of Fields
Fields-1
System Administration Guide
January 1998
xxx
Standard 1.0
Contents
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 1
About this guide
In this chapter
Overview
1-2
What this guide is about
1-3
Who should use this guide
1-4
Systems supported by this guide
1-5
Structure of this guide
1-6
Typographic conventions
1-11
Referenced documents
1-14
1-2
About this guide
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This system administration guide provides the procedures and
related information necessary to administer a Meridian Mail
Release 12 system operating on a Meridian 1 platform. This
guide includes the initial setup of your system, its daily
operation, and its routine maintenance.
Before you begin
All your hardware, including the main administration terminal
and optional printer, must already be installed.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
About this guide
1-3
What this guide is about
What this guide is about
Introduction
This guide explains how to set up, operate, and maintain your
Meridian Mail system.
Administrative tasks
This guide contains information and procedures for the
following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
setting up the initial system configuration (normally a
once-only operation)
logging on and navigating
adding users and maintaining the user database
making voice recordings, such as announcements and voice
menus
administering fax services on the system
setting up system security
backing up the system
monitoring system status
performing routine maintenance
monitoring traffic reports and system usage reports
troubleshooting
configuring special features on your system
Where more detailed information is available in other manuals,
this guide directs you to the appropriate resources.
Task frequency
Some of these tasks must be performed every day. Others are
carried out frequently, while some need to be done only
occasionally.
These tasks are performed either through menu-driven screens
at your administration terminal or through your telephone.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
1-4
About this guide
Who should use this guide
Who should use this guide
Introduction
This guide is intended for users who are responsible for setting
up, operating, and maintaining the Meridian Mail system.
Guide users
There are two main groups of users who refer to this guide:
•
•
Examples of users
The guide’s primary users rely on this documentation to do
their job.
The guide’s secondary users may need to refer to the
documentation to do their jobs.
The following table identifies the primary and secondary users
of this guide.
Users
Example
Primary users
• database administrators located at customer
sites who perform all Meridian Mail
administration tasks
• technical support personnel
Secondary users • installation and maintenance technicians
• database administrators located at customer
sites who perform only basic Meridian Mail
administration tasks
• sales engineers
• trainers and courseware developers
• technical application specialists
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
About this guide
1-5
Systems supported by this guide
Systems supported by this guide
Introduction
This administration guide is common to the following hardware
platforms:
•
•
•
Meridian Mail Modular Option
Meridian Mail Modular Option EC
Meridian Mail Option 11
All of these platforms are connected to a Meridian 1/SL-1
switch using an AML/CSL link.
Supported systems
Some of the features documented in this guide may not be
installed on your system.
In addition, because certain features are hardware dependent, it
may not be possible for you to install them.
To determine whether you can install a particular feature on
your system, see “Meridian Mail feature availability” on
page 2-46.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
1-6
About this guide
Structure of this guide
Structure of this guide
Introduction
This guide is organized to reflect the hierarchical set of
procedures accessible from the Main Menu. Most items that
appear in the Main Menu have a corresponding chapter
describing the administrative tasks and the screens and fields
required to complete the tasks.
Contents of this guide This guide contains the following chapters.
Chapter number and title
Description
Chapter 1:
About this guide
Identifies the purpose, scope, audience, and structure of this guide.
Sets out the typographic conventions used in the guide.
Explains the guide’s structure.
Lists the publications referred to in this guide.
Provides an overview of the functional areas presented in the
Chapter 2:
Navigating through system System Administration menu.
administration
Describes basic screen navigation tools and techniques.
Introduces the two Meridian Mail Release 12 user interfaces.
Lists the features available for each Meridian Mail hardware
platform and user interface.
Chapter 3:
Logging on
Describes how to log on to Meridian Mail.
Chapter 4:
Setting up the system
Refers users to procedures for checking the provisioning of
Meridian Mail Release 12.
Describes how to log on to the Meridian 1 switch through a
Meridian Mail administration terminal.
Provides an overview of a complete basic setup of Meridian Mail
Release 12, with cross-references to relevant information and
procedures in other chapters and guides.
Chapter 5:
Making voice recordings
Standard 1.0
Describes how to make voice recordings for use by Meridian Mail.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
About this guide
1-7
Structure of this guide
Chapter number and title
Description
Chapter 6:
Setting up Meridian Mail
security
Identifies the high-risk areas of a Meridian Mail system and the
types of abuse that can occur.
Lists the measures that can be taken to set up and monitor system
security.
Describes the use of security features to prevent unauthorized
mailbox access.
Describes measures to prevent the use of Meridian Mail features for
unauthorized long distance calling.
Suggests procedures to prevent unauthorized use of the
administration terminal.
Describes the reporting features available to help administrators
detect abuse.
Chapter 7:
User administration —
an overview
Introduces the concepts and issues concerning user administration.
Chapter 8:
Local voice users
Describes procedures for administering local voice users.
Chapter 9:
Remote voice users
Describes procedures for administering remote voice users.
Chapter 10:
Directory entry users
Describes procedures for administering directory entry users.
Chapter 11:
Distribution lists
Describes procedures for administering system distribution lists.
Chapter 12:
General administration —
an overview
Introduces the concepts and issues concerning general
administration.
Chapter 13:
General options
Describes how to perform the tasks and locate the information
available under the General Options screen.
Chapter 14:
Volume administration
Describes the tasks that can be performed through the volume
administration side of Volume and selective backups.
Standard 1.0
Cross-references appropriate chapters for routine user
administration tasks of particular interest or concern.
Directs users to the appropriate chapters for routine general
administration tasks.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
1-8
About this guide
Structure of this guide
Chapter number and title
Description
Chapter 15:
Back up and restore
Meridian Mail data
Explains the importance of Meridian Mail system backups.
Suggests which volumes to back up, and how frequently.
Describes the two available backup media and how to perform a
backup with either one.
Describes the procedures for scheduling a backup to occur
automatically at a later time and for checking on the status of a
backup in progress.
Chapter 16:
Password and system time
changes
Describes how and how often to change the administration
password and the AdminPlus password.
Chapter 17:
Dialing translations
Introduces the concept of dialing translations.
Describes how to change Meridian Mail’s system time setting.
Specifies the situations and features requiring dialing translations.
Guides users through setting up dialing prefixes and translation
tables appropriate to their system.
Provides in-depth detail for those who wish to customize dialing
translations.
Chapter 18:
Routine maintenance
Lists the routine maintenance tasks recommended for optimum
Meridian Mail operation.
Chapter 19:
Voice administration—an
overview
Provides an overview of voice administration.
Chapter 20:
Voice messaging options
Describes the tasks that can be performed using the Voice
Messaging Options screen.
Chapter 21:
Display options
Describes how to change the display options for the Voice Services
Administration screen using the Set Display Options screen.
Chapter 22:
Finding and printing
VSDNs and service
definitions
Describes how to use the Find function to find and print VSDNs and
service definitions.
Chapter 23:
Configuring Meridian
Mail services
Provides an overview of the configuration of Meridian Mail
services: the setup of the Meridian 1 switch and Meridian Mail
setup.
Standard 1.0
Describes the Voice Administration menu and its menu options.
Directs users to the appropriate chapters for documentation of the
menus and screens accessible from the Voice Administration menu.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
About this guide
1-9
Structure of this guide
Chapter number and title
Description
Chapter 24:
The VSDN table
Documents the procedures for configuring VSDNs for each
Meridian Mail feature that potentially requires a DN.
Chapter 25:
Voice services profile
Documents the tasks that can be performed using the Voice Services
Profile screen.
Provides information about the different kinds of timeouts and how
they work.
Chapter 26:
Class of Service
administration
Introduces the concept of Class of Service and the types of Class of
Service.
Chapter 27:
Hardware administration
Describes the methods for viewing and printing out the
configuration of Meridian Mail’s dedicated nodes and data ports.
Chapter 28:
System status and
maintenance
Describes procedures for checking on system, card, and port status.
Guides users through creating, assigning, changing, and deleting
individual Classes of Service.
Describes procedures for enabling and disabling certain system
components as part of routine maintenance, troubleshooting, and
replacement.
Describes the use of the Channel Allocation Table during system
expansion or reorganization.
Chapter 29:
SEERs and Meridian Mail
Alarms
Introduces the concepts of SEERs and Meridian Mail alarms.
Describes how to customize a system’s SEER processing protocols
to control how certain SEER messages are categorized and reported.
Provides an overview of the Operational Measurements feature and
Chapter 30:
Operational Measurements how it can be used to monitor Meridian Mail system activity.
Describes how to generate, view, print, and analyze Operational
Measurement reports.
Chapter 31:
Operational
Measurements traffic
reports
Provides information and procedures for Operational Measurements
traffic reports.
Chapter 32:
User Usage reports
Provides information and procedures for Operational Measurements
user usage reports.
Chapter 33:
Audit Trail reports
Provides information and procedures for Operational Measurements
audit trail reports.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
1-10
About this guide
Structure of this guide
Chapter number and title
Description
Chapter 34:
Bulk provisioning
Introduces the concept of bulk provisioning.
Offers examples of situations where bulk provisioning can be used.
Describes procedures for transferring bulk provisioning data onto
tape and into another Meridian Mail system.
Appendix A:
Integrated Mailbox
Administration
Presents information and procedures for avoiding data corruption or
task conflicts when using the Integrated Mailbox Administration
feature to administer mailboxes.
Appendix B:
Presents information and procedures for using Meridian Mail
Meridian Mail AutoAdmin AutoAdmin to administer mailboxes from a PC, and to use data files
Utility
from other applications to supply user information for new
mailboxes.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
About this guide
1-11
Typographic conventions
Typographic conventions
Introduction
This topic describes the typographic conventions used in this
guide for the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Conventions
Convention
for
softkey
softkeys
keyboard keys or hardkeys
telephone keypad keys
text input
fields in a menu
values in a field
system responses
spoken words
recorded prompts
The following table identifies, describes, and provides
examples of the conventions used in this guide.
Description
Example
Softkeys are displayed on the
[Exit]
administration menus and screens. They
[Record]
indicate which keyboard function keys you
press to carry out specific Meridian Mail
tasks.
A softkey is referred to by its label (as
displayed in the menu or screen) enclosed
in square brackets.
It appears in the same typeface as the
accompanying text.
keyboard key
or
hardkey
A keyboard key or hardkey is referred to
by its label enclosed in angle brackets.
<1>
<Prev Screen>
When two key names appear together, you <Help>
press them both at the same time.
<Return>
A keyboard key or hardkey appears in the
same typeface as the accompanying text.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
<Ctrl> <r>
January 1998
1-12
About this guide
Typographic conventions
Convention
for
Description
Example
telephone
keypad key
The telephone keypad keys that you press Press 829 on the telephone
appear in bold print in the same typeface as keypad.
the accompanying text.
text input
Text that you type appears in bold print. In Type m.
a procedure, it appears in the same
typeface as the accompanying text. In other
text, it appears in a different typeface from
the accompanying text.
fields in a menu The name of a field is capitalized and
appears in the same typeface as the
accompanying text.
the Last Name field
the Invalid Logon Attempt field
values in a field A value in a field is capitalized and appears The default is No.
in the same typeface as the accompanying
text.
system
responses
System responses appear in the same
typeface as the accompanying text. They
are often introduced with Result:.
Result: The system prompts you
for a password.
spoken words
The suggested wording of a greeting or an
announcement appears in italics enclosed
in double quotation marks.
You might want to include the
following statement in your voice
menu: “Please wait on the line.
An Attendant will be with you
shortly.”
recorded
prompts
Prompts played by the system appear in
italics enclosed in double quotation marks
(the same as spoken words).
“You have no new voice
messages. One old message is still
unsent.”
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
About this guide
1-13
Typographic conventions
Cross-references
For a cross-reference to another part of this guide or to another
manual, the following conventions are used.
Cross-reference
Convention
to another topic in this guide
This cross-reference is enclosed For more information, see
in double quotation marks.
“Logging in to Meridian Mail”
on page 5-15.
to another manual
The title of the manual appears
in italics.
The applicable reference
number is also presented.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
Example
Refer to the Meridian
Mail System Installation
and Modification Guide
(NTP 555-7001-215).
January 1998
1-14
About this guide
Referenced documents
Referenced documents
Introduction
You may find it useful to have a number of additional resources
available as you are reading this manual.
Referenced
documents
The following table identifies the documents that are referred to
in this guide.
Note: An “x” in a Nortel (Northern Telecom) Publication
(NTP) number indicates that this digit varies, depending on the
Meridian Mail hardware platform:
•
•
•
7041 indicates Meridian Mail Modular Option
7061 indicates Meridian Mail Modular Option EC
7071 indicates Option 11
NTP number
Title
Description
555-7001-000
NTP Contents Overview
Lists the NTPs in the Meridian Mail suite and
provides a brief description of their content.
555-7001-100
Meridian Mail Messaging
Overview
Provides an overview of the Meridian Mail
system and features.
555-70x1-200
Meridian Mail Site Installation
and Planning Guide
Documents the steps necessary to engineer
and plan a Meridian Mail system.
This is available only for Meridian Mail
Modular Option and Modular Option EC.
555-7001-215
Meridian Mail System
Installation and Modification
Guide
Documents software installation, port
reconfiguration, and upgrades, among other
topics.
555-7001-221
Hospitality Voice Services
Implementation Guide
Documents the implementation of a
hospitality system.
555-70x1-250
Meridian Mail Installation and
Maintenance Guide
Documents the installation of Meridian Mail
hardware.
Also describes how to provision the
Meridian 1 switch for Meridian Mail.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
About this guide
1-15
Referenced documents
NTP number
Title
Description
555-7071-210
Meridian Mail Installation and
Maintenance Guide (Card
Option)
Documents the installation of Meridian Mail
hardware.
555-7001-241
Meridian Networking Planning Provides descriptive information and
Guide
instructions for choosing a networking
service.
555-7001-242
AMIS Networking Installation
and Administration Guide
Documents the implementation of AMIS
Networking (networking with the AMIS
protocol).
555-7001-243
Meridian Mail Network
Message Service Installation
and Administration Guide
Documents the implementation of Meridian
Mail Network Message Service.
555-7001-244
Meridian Networking
Installation and
Administration Guide
Documents the implementation of Meridian
Networking (networking with modems).
555-7001-245
Virtual Node AMIS Installation Documents the implementation of Virtual
and Administration Guide
Node AMIS Networking (a combination of
Meridian Networking and AMIS
Networking).
555-7001-246
Meridian Mail Enterprise
Networking Installation and
Administration Guide
Documents the implementation of Meridian
Mail Enterprise Networking (networking
without modems).
555-7001-305
Meridian Mail System
Administration Tools
Documents additional administrative tools
and utilities that are available at the tools
level.
555-7001-310
Meridian Mail Reporter System Documents the Meridian Mail Reporter
Administration Guide
feature, which allows you to use a PC to
download information from the Meridian
Mail system.
555-7001-315
Meridian ACCESS
Configuration Guide
Documents the Meridian Mail and PBX
configuration required to support Meridian
ACCESS.
555-7001-316
Meridian ACCESS
Developer’s Guide
Documents how to develop and maintain
Meridian ACCESS applications.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
1-16
About this guide
Referenced documents
NTP number
Title
Description
555-7001-318
Meridian ACCESS Voice
Prompt Editor User’s Guide
Documents how to use the voice prompt
editor to create and maintain voice segment
files and individual voice segments.
555-7001-320
Meridian Mail Outcalling
Application Guide
Documents the implementation of the Remote
Notification feature and Delivery to NonUser feature.
555-7001-325
Meridian Mail Voice Services
Application Guide
Documents the planning, configuration, and
implementation of voice services.
555-7001-327
Meridian Mail Fax on Demand Documents the planning, configuration, and
Application Guide
implementation of the fax information service
and fax item maintenance service.
555-7001-510
Meridian Mail Maintenance
Messages (SEERs)
Lists System Event and Error Reports
(SEERs) to help isolate and fix system
problems.
553-3001-300
Meridian 1 X11 System
Management Overview,
Applications, and Security
Provides an introduction to the system
management facilities provided with the
Meridian 1 switch.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 2
Navigating through system
administration
In this chapter
Overview
2-2
Section A: The administration menu hierarchy
2-3
Section B: Understanding menus, screens, and keys
2-25
Section C: Meridian Mail features and interfaces
2-43
2-2
Navigating through system administration
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This chapter contains the following information:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
an overview of how the menus are arranged into a
hierarchy
an overview of the functional areas presented in the Main
menu
the layout of screens and menus
navigation tools and techniques
instructions on how to modify fields
a list of the features available for each Meridian Mail
hardware platform
an introduction to the two Meridian Mail telset interfaces
and the features available in each
- Meridian Mail User Interface (MMUI)
- Voice Messaging User Interface Forum (VMUIF)
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
Section A:
2-3
The administration menu
hierarchy
In this section
Standard 1.0
The system administration menu hierarchy
2-4
The Main menu
2-6
User administration
2-7
General administration
2-8
Voice administration
2-10
Hardware administration
2-14
System status and maintenance
2-15
Operational measurements
2-18
Class of Service administration
2-20
Fax administration
2-21
Network administration
2-22
Hospitality administration
2-23
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-4
Navigating through system administration
The system administration menu hierarchy
The system administration menu hierarchy
Menu hierarchy
Standard 1.0
The following is an example of the system administration menu
hierarchy.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-5
The system administration menu hierarchy
DSP Port
Status
Logon with
System Administrator
Password
Logon with
Tools Password
System
Administration Tools
General
Administration
Silence
Alarm
Logon
Screen
System
Status
Main
Menu
Voice
Administration
User
Administration
General Options
Voice Security Options
Local Voice User
Volume and Selective
Backup
Restriction/Permission
Lists
Remote Voice User *
Restore from
Selective Backup
Voice Services
Administration
Change System
Administrator Password
Outcalling Administration*
Fax
Administration*
Directory Entry User
Distribution Lists
Network
Administration*
\
Change Customer
Administrator Password
Change AdminPlus
Download Password *
Change System Time
Dialing Translation*
System Status and
Maintenance
System Status
Node Configuration
Card Status
Data Port Configuration
DSP Port Status
Print All Node
Information
Channel Allocation Table
Operational
Measurements
Operational Measurement
Options
Hardware
Administration
Disk Maintenance
Fax Audit Trail Report *
Class of Service
Administration
Print All Data Port
Information
Diagnostic Schedules
Bulk
Provisioning
System Event and Error
Reports
Traffic Reports
Outcalling Audit Trail
Report *
Customer
Administration
Data Set Maintenance
Hospitality
Administration
Copy Date to Tape
Provision from Tape
* Available only if the necessary feature is installed.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-6
Navigating through system administration
The Main menu
The Main menu
Introduction
The Main menu is the first screen that is displayed after you log
on. This menu is your starting point for performing Meridian
Mail administration tasks.
The menu
Here is an example of the Main menu.
Feature-dependent items
The following menu items are displayed only if the appropriate
feature is installed:
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
Fax Administration is displayed if Fax on Demand is
installed.
Network Administration is displayed if Meridian
Networking or AMIS Networking, or both, are installed.
Hospitality Administration is displayed if Hospitality
Voice Messaging is installed.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-7
User administration
User administration
Description
User administration involves creating and maintaining a
database of users.
Local voice users
Local voice users have mailboxes. You can add, modify, and
delete local voice users in User Administration. You can also
carry out other user-related functions such as recording personal
verifications and setting up remote notification schedules.
Remote voice users
If Meridian Networking or Enterprise Networking, or both, are
installed, you can add users at remote sites to your local user
database. One way of adding and deleting remote voice users is
through User Administration.
Remote voice users can be added to distribution lists at the local
site. Local users can use name dialing and call sender to call
remote voice users and name addressing to compose messages
to them.
Directory entry users
Directory entry users do not have mailboxes. They are,
however, in the user directory, and therefore can be accessed by
features such as name dialing and Thru-Dial. These users are
added, modified, and deleted from User Administration.
Distribution lists
Distribution lists contain a list of mailbox numbers. Whenever
you send a message to a distribution list, it is sent to all of the
mailboxes in the list.
Administering distribution lists involves
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
assigning a number to each list
adding mailbox numbers to each list
keeping the lists up to date
recording a personal verification for each list
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-8
Navigating through system administration
General administration
General administration
Introduction
General Administration is divided into a number of
administration areas from which you can perform a variety of
tasks.
Defining general
options
Defining general system options involves the following tasks:
Backing up and
restoring data
You can perform the following types of backups:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
assigning classes of service to the system
defining the attendant DN
setting the date format for reports
specifying the SEER printer and Reports printer port names
full backups (of data and voice) to tape
partial backups (of data only) to tape or disk (if the Disk to
Disk Backup feature is installed)
selective backups of users or services to tape
From Generation Administration, you can restore only users or
services that were selectively backed up.
For information about restoring data from a full or partial
backup, refer to the System Installation and Modification Guide
[NTP 555-7001-215].
Changing passwords
and the system time
You can change the following:
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
the system administrator password
the customer administrator password (for Multiple
Administration Terminals and Meridian Mail AutoAdmin)
the AdminPlus download password (if AdminPlus is
installed)
the system time
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-9
General administration
Setting up dialing
translations
Standard 1.0
If Fax on Demand, or AMIS Networking, or both, are installed,
you must set up translation tables. These tables tell Meridian
Mail how to translate collected digits (from an AMIS message
header or a fax callback number entered by a caller) into a
number that Meridian Mail can dial.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-10
Navigating through system administration
Voice administration
Voice administration
Introduction
Voice Administration is divided into a number of
administration areas from which you can perform a variety of
tasks.
Defining voice
messaging options
Defining voice messaging options involves the following tasks:
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
If more than one language is installed, you must define the
default language and whether it overrides users’ preferred
languages.
If Dual Language Prompting is installed, you must define
the secondary language in which prompts are played.
You can record customized versions of the call answering
greeting (MMUI) and VMUIF tutorials.
You can enable or disable name dialing/name addressing
and external call sender.
You can define operational characteristics for voice
messaging such as
- the maximum delay for timed delivery
- the broadcast mailbox number
- the maximum number of days that read messages are
retained
- the playback speeds that mailbox users can apply to
individual mailbox messages
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-11
Voice administration
Defining voice
security options
Defining voice security options is extremely important in order
to safeguard your system from unauthorized use and abuse by
hackers and users. You can do the following to secure your
Meridian Mail system:
•
•
•
Defining restriction/
permission lists
Make mailbox passwords more secure by
- defining the password prefix
- specifying the minimum password length
- forcing users to change their passwords the first time
they log on
- suppressing the display of passwords on the telset
Specify the maximum number of invalid logon attempts
that are allowed before a mailbox is disabled or a session is
terminated.
Set up monitoring periods for
- system accesses
- thru-dials
- specific internal or external calling line IDs (CLIDs), or
both
Restriction/permission lists are another very important part of
ensuring system security. A restriction/permission list specifies
which dialing codes are not allowed, thereby preventing users
or callers from placing calls to unauthorized numbers such as
domestic long distance numbers or international numbers.
You can define up to 80 different restriction/permission lists
that can then be applied to different features that place outcalls
such as call sender, Thru-Dial, Remote Notification, and AMIS
networking.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-12
Navigating through system administration
Voice administration
Performing voice
services
administration
Voice Services Administration is divided into a number of
administration areas:
•
•
•
The VSDN Table is where you add voice service DNs
(VSDNs) for each service that you want to make directly
dialable by a unique number.
The Voice Services Profile is where you define
characteristics for voice services such as timeouts and
holidays (used by time-of-day controllers).
You can add, modify, and delete the following voice and
fax services from Voice Services Administration:
- announcement definitions
- thru-dial definitions
- time-of-day controller definitions
- voice menu definitions
- fax item definitions
Setting display options
Display options allow you to choose
•
•
Performing outcalling
administration
how you want information sorted in Voice Services
Administration screens
whether the Choice of Services and Menu Actions lists are
displayed
Outcalling includes the Remote Notification (RN) and the
Delivery to Non-User (DNU) features. If installed, you must
check that the default settings are acceptable, or change them to
suit your needs.
Remote Notification parameters include
•
•
the maximum number of remote notification retry repeats
the numeric pager data terminator
Delivery to Non-User parameters include
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
allowed delivery times for weekdays and weekends
retry limits and intervals for busy, unanswered, and
answered conditions
the number of times to play a DNU message
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-13
Voice administration
Defining voice forms
Standard 1.0
Creating voice forms involves setting operational
characteristics for each voice form as a whole, recording all of
the prompts (known as fields), and setting field-specific
operational characteristics.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-14
Navigating through system administration
Hardware administration
Hardware administration
Introduction
Almost all of the screens in Hardware Administration are readonly. They are for viewing purposes only.
To modify your hardware configuration, you must log on to the
Tools level and access the Modify Hardware tool. For more
information, refer to Meridian Mail System Administration
Tools (NTP 555-7001-305).
Node configuration
You can view the number of nodes that are installed and the
types of cards that have been configured for each node.
Data port
configuration
You can view configurations for the following data ports:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
MMLink
Terminal
Printer
PMS
Modem
MSLink (for Meridian Mail AutoAdmin)
AdminPlus (if installed)
NWModem
Note: You can modify the Network Modem DN from Hardware
Administration.
Printing information
Standard 1.0
You can print all node and all data port information.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-15
System status and maintenance
System status and maintenance
Introduction
System Status and Maintenance primarily involves viewing the
status of the system and various hardware components to see if
everything is operational.
When a hardware component needs servicing, it must first be
disabled and then reenabled when the problem is fixed. This is
done in System Status and Maintenance.
Viewing status and
For each of the following hardware components, you can view
disabling components its status, disable (or courtesy disable) it for servicing, and
reenable it:
•
•
•
•
Channel Allocation
Table
the entire system
nodes
cards
DSP ports
The Channel Allocation Table shows how channels (ports) are
allocated to services.
From the Channel Allocation Table, you can view the
following:
•
•
the channels that are on your system, their type, and
whether they are shared by services or dedicated to a
particular service for placing outbound calls
the maximum number of each type of port, and how many
of each port type have been allocated
If you disable ports, you can do the following:
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
Modify the Primary DN.
Modify Channel DN.
Modify the port type and capability.
Dedicate ports to a particular service (for outcalls only).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-16
Navigating through system administration
System status and maintenance
Disk maintenance
Shadowed systems
On shadowed systems, you can do the following from the Disk
Maintenance screen:
•
•
•
View the status of the prime and shadow disks in a disk
pair.
Disable and enable a disk.
Perform diagnostics.
Unshadowed systems
On unshadowed systems, you can view the status of the prime
disk and perform diagnostics.
Diagnostic schedules
You can schedule diagnostics to occur at a specific time on
certain days. You can specify the following about the scheduled
diagnostics:
•
System event and
error reports
whether voice path diagnostics should be performed, and
other related parameters
You can perform the following tasks from the System Event
and Error Reports menu.
SEER retrieval
If you do not want all SEERs to be retrieved, you can specify
which SEERs should be retrieved according to SEER class,
severity level, or SEER type.
SEER configuration
From the SEER Configuration screen, you can do the following:
•
•
Standard 1.0
Specify the mailbox (the message trigger mailbox) to
which you want messages to be sent when a SEER that
meets a specific criteria is generated. This allows you to be
notified immediately of SEERs that you consider to be
critical.
Set SEER throttling parameters which allow you to prevent
SEERs that are duplicated a certain number of times from
being sent to the printer or message trigger mailbox, or
both.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-17
System status and maintenance
•
•
Set SEER escalation parameters which allow you to
specify how many times a SEER needs to be duplicated
before it is escalated to the next severity level.
Set the SEER filtering levels which allow you to control
which SEERs are sent to the printer and message trigger
mailbox (according to type and severity level).
SEER remapping
SEER remapping allows you to remap the severity level of up to
60 SEERs to a different severity level and have that information
stored on disk.
For example, a SEER that is classified as major in Meridian
Mail may be critical to your particular system. You could,
therefore, remap this SEER as critical.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-18
Navigating through system administration
Operational measurements
Operational measurements
Introduction
There are three kinds of operational measurement reports:
traffic reports, user usage reports, and audit trail reports.
Operational
measurement options
Setting operational measurement options involves specifying
•
•
•
Traffic reports
whether to collect traffic, user usage, session trace, and
audit trail data
the start and end times for the traffic period
the number of days traffic data, user usage data, and audit
trail data are stored
You can view or print a summary of traffic report services that
shows the number of accesses, the average length, and voice
mail usage.
You can view or print more detailed traffic reports for the
following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Voice Messaging
Channel Usage
Services
Networking
AMIS Networking
Outcalling
Fax
Disk Usage
You can view or print statistics for the following:
•
•
User usage reports
Standard 1.0
Hospitality
Guest Console
You can view or print user usage reports which provide local
usage data, Meridian network usage data, and AMIS network
usage data.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-19
Operational measurements
Audit trail reports
Outcalling audit trails
If Outcalling is installed, you can view or print summary reports
that show the target DNs to which users are sending DNU
messages and remote notifications as well as the status of each
call.
You can also view or print more detailed reports that also show
the channel DN that was used and how many retries there were.
Fax audit trails
If Fax on Demand is installed, you can view or print summary
reports that show the called DN, billing DN, duration, and status
of each fax call.
You can also view or print more detailed reports that show the
channel DN that was used and how many retries there were.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-20
Navigating through system administration
Class of Service administration
Class of Service administration
Introduction
Before you can add local voice users, you must create your
classes of service (COS). Each local voice user must be
assigned to an already defined class of service.
COS-controlled
features
Classes of service determine the feature capabilities of the local
voice users assigned to them. Some examples of features and
limits that are controlled by classes of service are
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Maintaining classes
of service
the voice storage limit
the maximum length of composed messages
the maximum length of call answering messages
the ability to send broadcast and network broadcast
messages
notification of busy line to callers
delivery to non-user (DNU) capability and related DNU
parameters
remote notification (RN) capability and related RN
parameters
the ability to receive and send AMIS open network
messages
the restriction/permission lists that are applied to AMIS
open networking, extension dialing, and custom revert
Maintaining classes of service involves modifying classes of
service as needed. Whenever a change is made to a class of
service, the change is propagated to all users belonging to that
class of service.
It also involves deleting classes of service that are no longer
needed (and reassigning users to another class of service before
you delete).
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-21
Fax administration
Fax administration
Administration of the
Fax on Demand
service
Fax Administration is available only if Fax on Demand is
installed. It involves configuring the following parameters for
the Fax on Demand service:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Creating fax items
Standard 1.0
the maximum number of fax delivery channels
the maximum resolution of fax reception (normal or fine)
the maximum number of pages allowed per fax item
fax delivery retry limits and intervals for cases where fax
items cannot be delivered (due to transmission errors or no
carrier availability)
allowed times for delivery of fax items on weekdays and
weekends
the delivery time limit
Fax items are not created in Fax Administration. You must
access the Voice Services Administration menu at the Customer
Administration level to add fax item definitions.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-22
Navigating through system administration
Network administration
Network administration
Description
Network administration involves the administration of Meridian
Networking, Enterprise Networking, and AMIS Networking.
Meridian Networking
and Enterprise
Networking
Administration of the Meridian Networking and Enterprise
Networking features involves
•
•
•
•
•
local site maintenance
remote site maintenance, which involves adding remote
sites, specifying the networking protocol and dialing plan
for each site, and recording a spoken site name
network configuration, which involves setting initiation
times, holding times, stale times, the batch threshold, and
wakeup interval
performing a modem verification test
checking the network status periodically
AMIS and Virtual Node Administration of AMIS Networking includes the following:
AMIS Networking
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
enabling or disabling incoming and outgoing messages
specifying the allowed delivery times for outgoing
messages
specifying the initiation time, holding times, stale times,
batch threshold, and wakeup interval
defining the AMIS compose prefix
specifying the number of messages to transmit per session
defining the system access number
checking the status of the AMIS Networking service
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-23
Hospitality administration
Hospitality administration
Introduction
Hospitality Administration is available only if the Hospitality
Voice Messaging feature is installed.
Hospitality profile
The Hospitality Profile screen is where you define parameters
for all Guest Messaging services. Some examples are
•
•
•
•
Modifying mailboxes
the initial guest password length
whether the initial guest password is generated using the
guest’s last name or the check-in date
Post Check-out Mailbox settings
customizable greetings for
- the guest logon greeting
- unanswered and busy guest phones
- vacant rooms
- rooms that do not have voice messaging
You can view or modify a guest mailbox from Hospitality
Administration. You can modify settings such as
•
•
•
•
room number and status
the guest’s first and last name
autologon
the revert DN
Changing the GAC
password
You should change the default GAC password after installation
and continue to change it on a regular basis.
Hospitality system
status
You can view the status of the Hospitality system, including the
links from Meridian Mail to the PMS (if there is one) and the
Meridian 1.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-24
Navigating through system administration
Hospitality administration
Hospitality install
parameters
Standard 1.0
Modifying install parameters involves
•
•
•
•
•
setting PMSI parameters
setting SL-1 link parameters
setting voice count parameters
configuring the language identifier table
providing international character mapping for the PMSI
link
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
Section B:
2-25
Understanding menus, screens,
and keys
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
2-26
Keypad functions
2-27
Meridian Mail menus
2-28
Meridian Mail screens
2-31
Getting around in screens
2-33
Entering information in fields
2-34
Softkeys
2-39
Getting help
2-40
Error messages
2-41
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-26
Navigating through system administration
Overview
Overview
Introduction
System administration menus and screens have a consistent
format. The way in which items are selected and data is entered
is the same for all menus and screens.
In this section
This section describes
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
keypad functions
the layout of menus
the layout of screens
types of fields
how to select menu items
how to select options and enter data in fields
how to navigate through fields in screens
how to scroll through multipage screens
softkeys
how to get help
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-27
Keypad functions
Keypad functions
Application mode
When the keypad is in application mode, certain functions are
available on the keypad when you press single keys or key
combinations. Application mode is the default whenever the
system is rebooted.
Supported terminals
Keypad functions are supported on VT220 terminals and the
following VT200-compatible terminals: VT320, VT420,
HP700/22, and HP700/32.
Numeric keypad
If you choose to work with a numeric keypad (where the
numeric keys generate numbers when you press them), then
only the F1, F2, F3, and F4 keys retain the functions indicated.
The keypad is set to numeric mode through the terminal’s setup
function.
Keypad function key
positions
The following illustration shows the functions available when
the keypad is in application mode.
F1
F2
F3
F4
7
8
99
–
4
5
6
,
1
2
3
0
.
ENTER
F1F1- -Softkey
Softkey 11
Softkey 22
F2F2- -Softkey
F3
Softkey 33
F3 - Softkey
F4 - Softkey 4
F4 - Softkey 4
1 - Start of field
1 2 - -Previous
Next word word
in fieldin field
3
End
of
field
2 - Next word in field
4 - Previous field
4 - Previous field
5 - Next field
5 7 - -Next
fieldpage
Previous
8
Next
page
7 - Previous page
- - Delete field contents
8 . -- Next
HELPpage
- Softkey
– ENTER
- Delete
field 5contents
. - HELP
ENTER - Softkey 5
(shading indicates that the key does not have a function)
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-28
Navigating through system administration
Meridian Mail menus
Meridian Mail menus
Description
A menu presents a list of items from which you can choose.
When an item is selected, either another menu or a screen is
displayed.
A typical menu
The following is an example of a menu.
Menu title
Menu items
Message area
Softkeys
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-29
Meridian Mail menus
Parts of a menu
This table describes the parts of a menu.
Part
Description
Menu title
Menu titles are always on the first line.
Menu items
Each menu has a list of choices that are
preceded by numbers. These are menu items
from which you can choose.
Choosing a menu item causes either another
menu or a screen to be displayed.
Standard 1.0
Message area
This is where system prompts, responses, and
error messages are displayed.
Softkeys
The bottom line in a menu is a set of softkeys.
Softkeys are used to carry out actions.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-30
Navigating through system administration
Meridian Mail menus
Choosing a menu item Each item in a menu has a number. The system displays a
prompt requesting you to make a selection from the items
presented.
To select a menu item, follow these steps.
Starting Point: Any menu with the “Select an item” prompt displayed
Step Action
1
Enter the number that corresponds to the item you want to
choose and press <Return>.
Example: You want to add local voice users to your system so
you enter 1 and press <Return>.
1
Result: Another menu or a screen is displayed.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-31
Meridian Mail screens
Meridian Mail screens
Description
Screens contain fields in which you can either make selections
or enter data. It is by filling in fields that you customize
Meridian Mail to meet your requirements and suit your needs.
A typical screen
The following is an example of a screen.
Menu title
Screen
title
Fields
More below
indicator
Message
area
Softkeys
More above
indicator
Fields
Message
area
Softkeys
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-32
Navigating through system administration
Meridian Mail screens
Parts of a screen
This table describes the parts of a screen.
Part
Description
Menu title
This is the name of the menu from which the
screen was accessed.
Screen title
The name of the screen.
Fields
Fields in screens are much like fields in forms.
You can either enter information in them, or
select from a predetermined set of options.
It is by filling in fields that you define how you
want Meridian Mail to work and customize the
system to meet your needs.
Standard 1.0
Message area
This is where system prompts, responses, and
error messages are displayed.
Softkeys
The bottom line in a menu is a set of softkeys.
Softkeys are used to carry out actions.
More below
indicator
This indicator is displayed in multipage
screens. It indicates that there are more fields
below the last field that is currently displayed.
More above
indicator
This indicator is displayed in multipage
screens. It indicates that there are more fields
above the first field that is currently displayed.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-33
Getting around in screens
Getting around in screens
Navigating between
fields
The following keys on the keyboard and on the application
keypad (see “Keypad functions” on page 2-27) move the cursor
between fields.
IF you want to
THEN press
move to the next field
•
•
•
•
move to the previous field
• the up arrow key, or
• 4 on the application keypad.
the Tab key
the down arrow key
the Return key, or
5 on the application keypad.
Moving through
multipage screens
Certain screens contain more fields than can be displayed at one
time on the display terminal. You can view additional pages in
one of two ways: by scrolling and by paging.
Scrolling
If you see “More Below” at the bottom of a screen or “More
Above” at the top of a screen, you can use the following keys.
IF you want to
THEN press the
view the next page of a multipage screen
• Next Scrn hardkey.
view the previous page of a multipage screen • Prev Scrn hardkey.
When the “More Below” prompt disappears, you are at the end
of the screen. When the “More Above” prompt disappears, you
are at the top of the screen.
Using the down arrow
key
The down arrow key displays only the last input field, even if
there is instructional text below it. To view any text that may
appear at the end of a screen, use the Next Scrn hardkey.
Paging
In some screens, a [Next Page] softkey is displayed that can be
used to move between the pages of a screen.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-34
Navigating through system administration
Entering information in fields
Entering information in fields
Introduction
Information is entered in the fields of Meridian Mail screens.
There are two types of fields:
•
•
Example
selectable fields
data entry fields
This screen contains both types of fields.
Selectable fields
Data entry fields
Selectable fields
Selectable fields
Selectable fields present a number of predefined options from
which you can choose.
The option that is in reverse video (light text on a dark
background) is the selected option.
After installation, selectable fields always have one of the
options selected as the default.
Examples
Examples of selectable fields in the above screen example are
Receive Composed Messages and Retain Copy of Sent
Messages.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-35
Entering information in fields
Choosing an option in
a selectable field
To choose a predefined option in a selectable field, follow these
steps.
Step Action
1
Move the cursor to the field you want to modify.
2
Use the right (and left) arrow keys, or the spacebar, to select
the option you desire.
Note: The selected option appears in reverse video.
Data entry fields
You type information, such as titles and numbers, into data
entry forms. There are often limitations placed on data entry
fields, such as the types of characters you can enter or a range of
numbers. Data entry fields are indicated by an underline next to
the field name. This is where you enter information.
Some of these fields are prefilled with default values. These
values can be changed as needed. Others are blank by default
and require an entry.
Example
An example of a data entry field (on page 2-34) is the Read
Message Retention (days) field.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-36
Navigating through system administration
Entering information in fields
Entering information
in a data entry field
To enter information in a data entry field, follow these steps.
Step Action
1
Move the cursor to the field you want to modify.
2
Is there currently any information in the field?
•
•
3
4
Standard 1.0
If yes, go to step 3.
If no, type the information in the field.
Delete the current content of the field.
IF you want to
THEN press
clear the current contents
the <Remove> key.
delete one character to the left of
the cursor
the <x> key.
delete the character on which the
cursor is positioned
the <Back Space>
key.
Type the information in the field.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-37
Entering information in fields
Selecting an entire
line
In some screens, especially those that provide a list of things
from which to choose, you need to select an entire line to
indicate on which item you want to perform an action, and then
press a softkey to indicate which action you want to perform.
To select an entire line in a screen, follow these steps.
Step Action
1
2
Move the cursor to the line you want to select using the up and
down arrow keys.
Press the spacebar.
Result: The entire line is selected (as indicated by reverse
video).
Prompt
Screens requiring this mode of selection often indicate this with
the following prompt: “Move the cursor to the item and press
the spacebar to select it.”
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-38
Navigating through system administration
Entering information in fields
Example
You want to record a personal verification for all users assigned
to class of service 2 that do not currently have personal
verifications. After using Find, you get this list of users. You
select the first user, Bob LePage, and then press [View/Modify]
to modify the user.
2
2
Mandatory fields
Certain data fields require you to insert values, whereas other
fields are optional. Mandatory fields are identified in the field
descriptions.
If you do not fill in a mandatory field and then try to save your
settings, the system does not save the screen but, instead,
prompts you to fill in the necessary field.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-39
Softkeys
Softkeys
Description
Softkeys appear on the bottom two lines of menus and screens
and are displayed in reverse video (light characters on a dark
background).
They correspond to function keys F1 through F5 or F6 through
F10 on the top row of the keyboard. The softkeys change
according to the menu or screen. They may also change with the
function you are performing.
Purpose
Softkeys are always actions. When you select a softkey, you are
performing a function.
Common softkeys
The following softkeys occur frequently on the administration
screens:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Softkey positions
Standard 1.0
[Exit]
[Add]
[View/Modify]
[Delete]
[Find]
[Save]
[Cancel]
If any of these keys occur on a screen, they typically occur in
the following positions.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-40
Navigating through system administration
Getting help
Getting help
Introduction
Online help is available for most of the menus and screens,
including the Main Menu.
Procedure
To get Help, follow these steps.
Step Action
1
Press the Help key.
Result: The system displays explanations of the fields on the
menu or screen in which you are working.
2
A typical Help screen
Standard 1.0
Once you are done reading the Help information, press the
[Exit] softkey to return to the menu or screen.
The following shows an example of a Help screen.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-41
Error messages
Error messages
Introduction
The system displays error messages, both general and screenspecific, on the line above the softkey display.
These messages remain on the screen until the next user input or
until another error message appears.
Purpose
These messages provide feedback on administration actions.
They should not be confused with System Event and Error
Report (SEER) messages.
SEER messages
If SEER printing is disabled, SEER messages will print out on
the administration screen.
Examples of error
messages
The following are two examples of error messages:
Standard 1.0
•
•
“The key entered is not valid at this time.”
“Enter a number in the range of 1 to 6.”
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-42
Navigating through system administration
Error messages
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
Section C:
2-43
Meridian Mail features and
interfaces
In this section
Standard 1.0
The main administration terminal and multiple administration
terminals (MATs)
2-44
Meridian Mail feature availability
2-46
Meridian Mail telset interfaces
2-48
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-44
Navigating through system administration
The main administration terminal and multiple administration terminals (MATs)
The main administration terminal and multiple
administration terminals (MATs)
Introduction
Meridian Mail is administered through a menu-driven
administration interface available at a terminal or personal
computer (PC) using terminal emulation software. Using the
administration menus, you establish the initial configuration of
your system, maintain the user information base, create voice
applications such as announcements and voice menus, monitor
system usage and performance, and perform routine system
maintenance.
The main
administration
terminal
All of these tasks are performed from the main administration
terminal or from a PC using terminal emulation software.
Multiple
administration
terminals
The Multiple Administration Terminals (MATs) feature enables
you to configure your main administration terminal and up to
three secondary terminals, or MATs, on your system.
Tasks performed on
MATs
Only a limited number of administrative tasks can be performed
from a MAT. These include the following:
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
User Administration
You can perform all User Administration tasks, such as
adding, modifying, and deleting users and distribution lists.
Class of Service administration
You can only view existing classes of service from a MAT.
You cannot add, modify, or delete them.
Voice Administration
You can add, view, modify, and delete
- voice service DNs
- announcement and voice menu definitions
- thru-dial definitions
- time-of-day control definitions
- fax item definitions
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-45
The main administration terminal and multiple administration terminals (MATs)
See also
Standard 1.0
For more information about configuring MATs, refer to the
System Administration Tools Guide (NTP 555-7001-305).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-46
Navigating through system administration
Meridian Mail feature availability
Meridian Mail feature availability
Available platforms
This system administration guide is common to the following
hardware platforms:
•
•
Meridian Mail Modular Option
Meridian Mail Modular Option EC
Both of these platforms are connected to a Meridian 1/SL-1
switch using an AML/CSL link.
Feature availability
Standard 1.0
Use the following table to determine whether you can install a
particular feature on your system.
Feature
Meridian Mail
Modular Option
Meridian Mail
Modular
Option EC
ACCESS
yes
yes
AdminPlus
yes
yes
AMIS Networking
yes
yes
Calling Line ID (CLID)
yes
yes
Disk Shadowing
yes
yes
Disk to Disk backup
yes
yes
Dual Language Prompting
yes
yes
Enterprise Networking
yes
yes
Fax on Demand
yes
yes
Hospitality
yes
yes
Integrated Mailbox
Administration
yes
yes
Maximum number of
languages supported
4
4
Meridian Mail AutoAdmin
yes
yes
Meridian Networking
yes
yes
Multiple Administration
yes
yes
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-47
Meridian Mail feature availability
Meridian Mail
Modular Option
Meridian Mail
Modular
Option EC
Network Message Service
(NMS)
yes
yes
Outcalling
yes
yes
Password Display
Suppression
yes
yes
Single Terminal Access
yes
yes
Virtual Node AMIS
Networking
yes
yes
VMUIF Voice Messaging
yes
yes
Voice Forms
yes
yes
Voice Menus
yes
yes
9600 bps Meridian Mail
Interface
yes
yes
Feature
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-48
Navigating through system administration
Meridian Mail telset interfaces
Meridian Mail telset interfaces
Introduction
Through the Meridian Mail telset interfaces, users interact with
the Meridian Mail system to log in to their mailboxes, listen to
messages, and compose and send messages.
Two telset interfaces
There are two Meridian Mail interfaces:
•
•
Meridian Mail User Interface (MMUI)
Voice Messaging User Interface Forum (VMUIF)
Note: A Meridian Mail system can support only one of these
interfaces. When the system is installed, it is defined as using
either the MMUI interface or the VMUIF interface.
Definition:
MMUI
The MMUI interface is a full-featured, command-driven Nortel
proprietary voice mail interface. It is intended primarily for
large business users.
Definition:
VMUIF
VMUIF is a menu-driven interface. It is intended primarily for
small business users, providing either full-featured voice
messaging or only call answering and message retrieval.
VMUIF is also well suited to large campus environments such
as universities or hospitals.
Terminology:
Users added to a system on which the MMUI interface is
users and subscribers installed are referred to as users. Users added to a system on
which the VMUIF interface is installed are referred to as
subscribers, because they typically subscribe to a service
through a central office.
Note: All of the Meridian Mail administration screens refer
simply to users, even though user administration applies to
both MMUI users and VMUIF subscribers.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Navigating through system administration
2-49
Meridian Mail telset interfaces
Available features of
MMUI and VMUIF
This table indicates which features are available for the two
Meridian Mail user interfaces.
Feature
MMUI
VMUIF
handling of forwarded calls
yes
yes
personalized greetings
yes
yes
message waiting indication (MWI) support
yes
yes
remote notification (although user-changeable remote notification
schedules from the telephone set are available only in the MMUI
interface)
yes
yes
password-protected mailboxes
yes
yes
mailbox summaries and message playback
yes
yes
message reply, reply all, and message forward
yes
yes
personal distribution lists
yes
yes
message compose and send
yes
yes
AMIS Networking (if installed)
yes
yes
ability to assign a class of service (COS)
yes
yes
18-digit mailbox
yes
yes
mailbox Thru-Dial (A user can press 0 and dial a number while logged yes
in to the mailbox.)
name addressing (A user can dial another user by name instead of by
extension.)
yes
Meridian Mail Networking (if installed)
yes
Virtual Node AMIS Networking (if installed)
yes
message tagging options (During message composition, a user can tag yes
messages as urgent or for timed delivery.)
retention of sent or unsent messages
yes
internal, external, and temporary greeting
yes
1 greeting
user-changeable personal verification
yes
yes
choice of identification (mailbox number or personal verification) to
be played during call answering
yes
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
2-50
Navigating through system administration
Meridian Mail telset interfaces
Feature
MMUI
customizable customer greeting and customer attendant
yes
custom operator revert
yes
user-changeable remote notification schedules through the telephone
set
yes
express messaging
yes
bilingual prompting (if more than one language is installed)
yes
record, playback, and message tagging during call answering
yes
speed control during message playback
yes
adding to a recorded message
yes
VMUIF
call answer only mailbox (Compose and Send must be disabled.)
yes
send only mailbox (Call Answering must be disabled.)
yes
rotary set interface (message retrieval with no DTMF input required)
yes
greeting change service (greeting change with no DTMF input
required)
yes
introductory tutorial (special greeting on first access)
yes
volume control (DTMF control of default volume and volume setting)
yes
family mailboxes (Up to eight submailboxes can be administered
through one telephone set.)
yes
“save as new” (Read messages can be reverted to “unread” or “new”
status.)
yes
send on disconnect (implicit send command if a user hangs up after
composing a message)
yes
mailbox resources (limiting receipt of messages based on mailbox
resources)
yes
customizable login greeting
yes
disable reset (automated, timed reset of automated lockout resulting
from password violation)
yes
editing capabilities for personal distribution lists
lockout revert (If locked out from the mailbox, a revert DN is
possible.)
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
yes
yes
January 1998
Chapter 3
Logging on
In this chapter
Overview
3-2
Types of consoles
3-3
Logon/Status screen
3-4
Setting the system administration password
3-6
Changing the system administration password
3-8
Recovering a system administration password
3-10
Logging on from the main administration terminal
3-11
Logging on from a MAT
3-13
Logging on from a remote terminal (non-EC system)
3-15
Logging on from a remote terminal (EC system)
3-18
Using a single terminal to access the M1 and Meridian Mail
3-23
3-2
Logging on
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This chapter explains how to set your administration password
and log on to the Meridian Mail system from the following
types of consoles:
•
•
•
•
the main administration terminal
a multiple administration terminal (MAT)
a remote terminal (non-EC system)
a remote terminal (EC system)
After you are logged on, you can begin to work with the system
administration menus, which are the starting point for general
administrative functions and for customizing your system.
The chapter also describes how to change or recover your
administration password.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Logging on
3-3
Types of consoles
Types of consoles
Introduction
Administrative functions can be carried out from the main
administrative console for your Meridian Mail system or from a
remote terminal connected to the system through a modem.
Multiple
administration
terminals
If the Multiple Administration Terminal feature is installed,
your Meridian Mail system can support up to four
administration terminals: one main administration terminal and
up to three secondary terminals, or MATs.
Console types
The following table lists the types of consoles and their
available features.
Multiple
administration
terminal
Remote terminal
installed with your
system
available feature
available feature
all functions
user administration:
add, modify, and
delete mailboxes
generally used by offsite service personnel
to troubleshoot a
system
Main administration
terminal
COS administration:
view and find (readonly)
voice services
administration: add,
view, modify, delete
voice service DNs,
announcement
definitions, Thru-Dial
definitions, time-ofday control
definitions, and voice
menu definitions
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
3-4
Logging on
Logon/Status screen
Logon/Status screen
Description
From this screen, you log on to the administration console to
perform the following tasks:
•
•
•
•
•
setting up and customizing your system
carrying out administrative tasks on a system-wide basis, or
a per-user basis
configuring voice services
viewing system status or DSP port status
silencing alarms
The Logon/Status screen is displayed when the administration
terminal is idle.
The Logon/Status
screen
The following shows an example of the Logon/Status screen.
Note: When you log on at a MAT, only the [Logon] softkey is
displayed.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Logging on
3-5
Logon/Status screen
ATTENTION
For security and memory usage reasons, do not leave the
administration console unattended while you are logged
on. Also, remember to log out at night. If you do not log
out, critical audit and backup routines may not run
because of insufficient memory.
Available softkeys
For information about the softkeys available from the Logon/
Status screen, see Chapter 28, “System status and
maintenance”.
Redrawing the Logon/
Status screen
If you power down your terminal and then power it back up, the
screen may be drawn incorrectly. If the screen is corrupted, you
see a row of “q”s (qqqqqqqqqqqqq) instead of the line near the
bottom of the screen above the softkeys.
To redraw a corrupted screen, follow these steps.
Step Action
1
Press <Ctrl> <w>.
Result: A small window opens.
2
Type if.
Note: You do not have to press <Return>. The “i” means
initialize, and the “f” means full screen.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
3-6
Logging on
Setting the system administration password
Setting the system administration password
Overview
To log on to the Meridian Mail system from an administration
terminal, you require a system administration password.
Your password can be any combination of letters and numerals.
It can be between 6 and 16 characters long. (The minimum
length can be increased by the System Administrator. See
“Setting the minimum password length for all administrator
passwords” on page 16-7.)
Passwords are not case sensitive; even if you use capital letters
when you define your password, you do not need to use capital
letters when you type it.
Password security
For greater system security, your password should be no fewer
than seven characters in length. A longer password is more
difficult to guess than a shorter password.
For more information about ensuring the security of your
system, see Chapter 6, “Setting up Meridian Mail security”.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Logging on
3-7
Setting the system administration password
Procedure
To set your system administration password for the first time,
follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Logon/Status screen
Step Action
1
Select the [Logon] softkey.
Result: The system prompts you for a password.
2
Type the default password adminpwd.
Result: The system prompts you for a new password. It does
not allow you to log on until you change the default password.
3
Type a new password, and press <Return>.
Result: The system prompts you to reenter the password for
verification.
4
Type your new password a second time, and press <Return>.
Result: The system records the new password and displays
the Main Menu.
Note: If you type a different password the second time, the
system reports that the password has not changed because the
new passwords did not match. If you receive this message,
repeat step 1 to step 4.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
3-8
Logging on
Changing the system administration password
Changing the system administration password
Introduction
To help ensure the security of your system, change the logon
password regularly.
You can change the password only at the main administration
terminal. The change is then automatically made to the
configured MATs.
Your password can be any combination of letters and numerals.
It can be between 6 and 16 characters long. (The minimum
length can be increased by the System Administrator. See
“Setting the minimum password length for all administrator
passwords” on page 16-7.)
For more information about ensuring the security of your
system, see Chapter 6, “Setting up Meridian Mail security”.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Logging on
3-9
Changing the system administration password
Procedure
To change your system administration password, follow these
steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
2
Select Change System Administrator Password.
Result: The system prompts you to enter your existing
administration password.
3
Type your existing password.
Note: Your password is not displayed on the screen as you
type it.
Result: The system prompts you to enter a new password.
4
Type your new password, and press <Return>.
Result: The system prompts you to reenter the password for
verification.
5
Type your new password a second time, and press <Return>.
Result: The system records the new password, and you are
returned to the General Administration menu.
Note: If you type a different password the second time, the
system reports that the password has not changed because the
new passwords did not match. If you receive this message,
repeat steps 2 to 5.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
3-10
Logging on
Recovering a system administration password
Recovering a system administration password
Introduction
This topic describes how to restore a password that has been
forgotten or lost to the system.
Procedure
To recover a system administration password, follow these
steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Insert the install tape in the tape drive.
2
Reboot the system from the tape.
3
Select More Utilities from the menu.
4
Select Change to Default System Password.
Result: You are prompted to enter Yes to continue, or No to
stop.
5
Enter Yes to continue.
Result: The system reports that the operation has been
successfully completed.
6
Remove the install tape from the tape drive.
7
Reboot the system from the disk.
8
Select the [Logon] softkey.
Result: The system prompts you for a password.
9
Type the default password adminpwd.
Result: The system prompts you for a new password. It does
not allow you to log on until you change the default password.
10
Type a new password, and press <Return>.
Result: The system prompts you to reenter the password for
verification.
11
Type your new password a second time, and press <Return>.
Note: If you type a different password the second time, the
system reports that the password has not changed because the
new passwords did not match. If you receive this message,
repeat step 8 to step 11.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Logging on
3-11
Logging on from the main administration terminal
Logging on from the main administration terminal
Introduction
This topic explains how to log on as the system administrator
from the main administration terminal.
Note: If you are logging on from a multiple administration
terminal, you cannot perform step 2.
Procedure
To log on from the main administration terminal, follow these
steps.
Starting Point: The Logon/Status screen
Step Action
1
Select the [Logon] softkey.
Result: The system prompts you for a password.
2
3
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF
THEN
you are logging on for the
first time
see “Setting the system
administration password” on
page 3-6.
you have logged on before
go to step 3.
Type your system administration password, and press
<Return>.
Result: The system displays the Main Menu.
Note: If an invalid password is entered, an error message
appears. Repeat step 1 and step 3.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
3-12
Logging on
Logging on from the main administration terminal
The Main Menu
The following shows an example of the Main Menu displayed
at the main administration terminal.
Note: Some of these features may not be available on your
system.
ATTENTION
An unsuccessful logon attempt is automatically recorded in the
system log file. As a security precaution, after a third
unsuccessful attempt to log on, the system forces a 10-minute
delay before a further logon attempt is accepted. Only your
Nortel representative has the required privileges to gain access
to the system during the lockout period.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Logging on
3-13
Logging on from a MAT
Logging on from a MAT
Introduction
If the Multiple Administration Terminal (MAT) feature is
installed on your system, your Meridian Mail system can
support up to four administration terminals (one main
administration terminal and up to three MATs).
When you are logged on to a secondary terminal, you can
perform a limited number of administrative tasks. For more
information, see “Types of consoles” on page 3-3.
Your logon password is the same for both the main
administration terminal and a MAT.
This topic explains how to log on from a MAT.
The default password
The default password for logging onto a MAT is custpwd.
Changing the default
password
The system will prompt you to change the default password the
first time you log on. This is for security reasons.
Once you have changed the password after initial logon, you
can change the password at any time from the General
Administration menu by selecting the Change Customer
Administrator Password item.
Restriction
You cannot make the MAT password the same as the system
administration password.
Before you begin
Standard 1.0
The Multiple Administration Terminal feature must be installed
on your system.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
3-14
Logging on
Logging on from a MAT
Logging on from a
MAT
To log on from a MAT, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Logon/Status screen
Step Action
1
Select the [Logon] softkey.
2
Type the system administration password, and press <Return>.
Result: The system displays the Main Menu.
Note: If an invalid password is entered, an error message
appears. Repeat step 1 and step 2.
The Main Menu at a
MAT
Standard 1.0
The following shows an example of the Main Menu displayed
at a MAT.
1
User Administration
2
Voice Services Administration
3
Class of Service Administration
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Logging on
3-15
Logging on from a remote terminal (non-EC system)
Logging on from a remote terminal (non-EC system)
Introduction
This topic explains how to log on to the system through a
remote terminal from a system that is not a Modular Option EC
system.
If your installation has a remote administration terminal
installed for service personnel, administrative functions can be
performed remotely.
Your logon password is the same for both the main
administration terminal and the remote terminal.
The administrative functions described in this guide are
identical whether viewed from the local administration terminal
or from the remote terminal.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
3-16
Logging on
Logging on from a remote terminal (non-EC system)
Typical remote
The following diagram shows a typical remote terminal
terminal configuration configuration for a system that is not a Modular Option EC
(non-EC system)
system.
Remote
terminal
Administrative
console
Printer
Modem
Modem
A/B
switch
Meridian
Mail
MMP40
(Meridian Mail
Processor 40)
Link
Local
Switch
Voice and/or
multimedia
channels
g100106
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Logging on
3-17
Logging on from a remote terminal (non-EC system)
Coordinating a
remote logon
Because no administrative functions can be carried out from the
local console while a remote logon is in effect, a remote logon
should be coordinated with the local administrator.
Logging on from a
remote terminal
(non-EC system)
To log on from a remote terminal on a non-EC system, follow
these steps.
Starting Point: The Logon/Status screen at the local administration
console
Step Action
1
Change the A/B switch setting to remote.
2
Notify the user at the remote terminal. The user at the remote
terminal does the following:
a.
b.
c.
d.
Disabling remote
terminal access
(non-EC system)
Dial in to the modem.
Press <Ctrl> <r> to display the Logon screen.
Type the administration password.
Carry out administrative tasks as required, and then log off.
To disable remote terminal access on a non-EC system, follow
these steps.
Step Action
1
At the local site, change the A/B switch back to the local
setting.
Result: Control is returned to the local console where the
Logon/Status screen is again displayed.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
3-18
Logging on
Logging on from a remote terminal (EC system)
Logging on from a remote terminal (EC system)
Introduction
This topic explains how to log on to the system through a
remote terminal on a Modular Option EC system.
If your installation has a remote administration terminal
installed for service personnel, administrative functions can be
performed remotely.
Your logon password is the same for both the main
administration terminal and the remote terminal.
The administrative functions described in this guide are
identical whether viewed from the local administration terminal
or from the remote terminal.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Logging on
3-19
Logging on from a remote terminal (EC system)
Typical remote
The following diagram shows a typical remote terminal
terminal configuration configuration for a Modular Option EC system.
(EC system)
Remote
terminal
Administrative
console
Printer
Modem
Modem
A/B
switch
Meridian
Mail
MMP40
(Meridian Mail
Processor 40)
Link
Local
Switch
Voice and/or
multimedia
channels
g100106
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
3-20
Logging on
Logging on from a remote terminal (EC system)
Typical remote
The following diagram shows a typical remote administration
terminal configuration configuration with an internal modem on the utility card for a
(EC system with
Modular Option EC system.
internal modem)
Remote
terminal
Administrative
console
Printer
Modem
(a)
Meridian
Mail
UTIL
(b)
MMP40
(Meridian Mail
Processor 40)
Link
Local
Switch
Internal
Modem
Voice and/or
multimedia
channels
g100105
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Logging on
3-21
Logging on from a remote terminal (EC system)
Coordinating a
remote logon
Because no administrative functions can be carried out from the
local console while a remote logon is in effect, a remote logon
should be coordinated with the local administrator.
Logging on from a
remote terminal
(EC system)
To log on from a remote terminal on an EC system, follow these
steps.
Starting Point: The Logon/Status screen at the local administration
console
Step Action
1
To bring up the COBRAVT selection window, press <Ctrl> <w>.
Result: The COBRAVT selection window is displayed.
Note: For help using COBRAVT, type a question mark (?). A
help screen is displayed.
2
Type m (case does not matter).
3
Notify the user at the remote terminal.
4
Dial in to the modem. The user at the remote terminal does the
following:
a. Press the <Break> key to gain control of the console.
b. Type the administration password.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
3-22
Logging on
Logging on from a remote terminal (EC system)
Disabling remote
terminal access
(EC system)
To disable remote terminal access, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Logon/Status screen at the local administration
console
Step Action
1
To bring up the COBRAVT selection window, press <Ctrl> <w>.
Result: The system displays the COBRAVT selection window.
2
Type m (case does not matter).
Result: Control is returned to the local console where the
system again displays the Logon/Status screen.
Note: You can terminate a remote logon at any time if you
press <Ctrl> <w> and type m.
CAUTION
Risk of data loss
If the remote administrator is in the process of
changing system data and a save is not
performed before a remote logon is
terminated, data may be lost.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Logging on
3-23
Using a single terminal to access the M1 and Meridian Mail
Using a single terminal to access the M1 and Meridian Mail
Introduction
If you are logging on at a site with only one terminal access,
then you will need to toggle back and forth between the M1 and
Meridian Mail.
Procedure
To toggle between the M1 and Meridian Mail, follow these
steps.
Step Action
1
Determine the steps you need to follow.
IF you want to toggle
THEN go to
from the M1 to MM
step 2.
from MM to the M1
step 7.
2
Flip the toggle switch to MM.
3
Press <Ctrl> <w> to clear the screen.
4
Press i, then f.
5
Is the screen displaying the MM interface?
If yes, continue.
If no, press <Ctrl> <r> to refresh the screen.
6
You can work at the terminal now.
7
Flip the toggle switch to the M1.
8
Press the Setup Key on the keyboard.
9
Use the up and down arrow keys to move to the Clear Display
screen, and press <Return>.
Result: If you are already logged on, the screen displays the
M1 prompt: >
Result: If you are not logged on to the M1, the screen displays
the prompt:.
10
Standard 1.0
You can work at the terminal now.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
3-24
Logging on
Using a single terminal to access the M1 and Meridian Mail
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 4
Setting up the system
In this chapter
Overview
4-2
Section A: Basic setup procedures
4-3
Section B: Setting up optional features
4-23
4-2
Setting up the system
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This chapter contains the following information:
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
It provides an overview of a complete basic setup of your
system.
It refers you to procedures for checking the provisioning of
your Meridian Mail system.
It lists and describes optional features and refers you to the
procedures to set up these features.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up the system
Section A:
4-3
Basic setup procedures
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
4-4
Changing the system administration password
4-5
Checking the hardware configuration
4-6
Checking the system status
4-7
Checking the Channel Allocation Table
4-8
Configuring general system options
4-9
Setting up dialing translations
4-10
Setting up restriction and permission lists
4-11
Customizing voice messaging options
4-12
Adding networking information to a network database
4-13
Adding DNs to the VSDN table
4-14
Defining classes of service
4-15
Configuring operational measurement options
4-16
Adding users to the system
4-17
Creating system distribution lists
4-18
Configuring optional features and other services
4-19
Setting up system security
4-20
Backing up the system
4-21
System Administration Guide
January 1998
4-4
Setting up the system
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This section provides general information and procedures for
checking the provisioning of your Meridian Mail system.
Wherever necessary, it refers you to more detailed information
in other chapters of this guide and in other manuals.
It also provides an overview of a complete basic setup of your
system.
Objective
This section is intended as a checklist for system setup.
Before you begin
To ensure that your Meridian Mail system is properly
provisioned, refer to the procedures in the Meridian Mail
Installation and Maintenance Guide (NTP 555-70x1-250).
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up the system
4-5
Changing the system administration password
Changing the system administration password
Introduction
This involves logging on to the main administration terminal
using the current password, and then following the system
instructions to change the password.
You can make password changes only at the main
administration terminal. If you have MATs on your system,
your changes are then automatically made to them.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
For information and procedures for changing the system
administration password, see Chapter 3, “Logging on”.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
4-6
Setting up the system
Checking the hardware configuration
Checking the hardware configuration
Introduction
This involves checking the node configuration and the data port
configuration.
Check the data port configuration to verify the assignment of
data devices, especially parameters such as the baud rate and
parity for the administration console.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
To check the hardware configuration, refer to the procedures in
the Meridian Mail Installation and Maintenance Guide
(NTP 555-70x1-250).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up the system
4-7
Checking the system status
Checking the system status
Introduction
This involves verifying the status of the system and enabling or
disabling system nodes and DSP ports.
Procedure
For information and procedures for checking the system status,
see Chapter 28, “System status and maintenance”.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
4-8
Setting up the system
Checking the Channel Allocation Table
Checking the Channel Allocation Table
Introduction
This involves configuring the primary DN and Channel DN for
each agent/channel. It also involves configuring the service or
services for which the channel will be used. In most cases,
channels are shared by all services. If any channels are to be
dedicated to a specific service, enter the service in the Channel
Allocation Table.
You check the Channel Allocation Table to ensure consistency
between the switch and the Meridian Mail system.
Note: This step should be carried out only by a qualified
technician.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
To check the Channel Allocation Table, see “Channel
Allocation Table” on page 28-45.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up the system
4-9
Configuring general system options
Configuring general system options
Introduction
This involves viewing the features that are installed on your
system and configuring the attendant DN and date format for
reports. The General Options screen is also where you assign
classes of service to the system. You can also modify the SEER
and Reports printer port names if different from the console
port.
Procedure
For information and procedures for configuring general system
options, see Chapter 13, “General options”.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
4-10
Setting up the system
Setting up dialing translations
Setting up dialing translations
Introduction
This involves defining network access prefixes for local offswitch, long distance, and international dialing, and for dialing
translation tables.
Procedure
For information and procedures for setting up dialing
translations, see Chapter 17, “Dialing translations”.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up the system
4-11
Setting up restriction and permission lists
Setting up restriction and permission lists
Introduction
This involves modifying the restriction and permission codes to
allow users to dial only the external phone numbers or internal
extension numbers that you specify. Unless you are upgrading
from an earlier release of Meridian Mail, features such as
Mailbox Thru-Dial, Custom Revert DN, or Extension Dialing
are initially restricted and do not work until you modify the
restriction and permission codes.
You define restriction and permission codes to prevent external
callers or internal users from placing local or long distance calls
that you do not want billed to your system.
Note: This is a very important step.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
For information and procedures for setting up restriction and
permission lists, see Chapter 6, “Setting up Meridian Mail
security”.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
4-12
Setting up the system
Customizing voice messaging options
Customizing voice messaging options
Introduction
This involves setting voice messaging parameters.
If the MMUI interface is installed, this includes such tasks as
setting the broadcast mailbox number, the maximum allowed
delay for timed delivery, and the name dialing prefix.
If VMUIF is installed, this includes such tasks as recording
various greetings and setting the personal distribution list
prefix, the lockout revert DN, and the maximum length of time
that read messages are kept before they are deleted by the
system.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
For information and procedures for customizing voice
messaging options, see Chapter 20, “Voice messaging options”.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up the system
4-13
Adding networking information to a network database
Adding networking information to a network database
Introduction
If the Network Message Service (NMS) feature is installed, you
must configure the prime location and all satellite locations that
are part of your network. This must be done before you add any
service DNs and users.
Procedure
To add networking information to a network database, refer to
the procedure in the Network Message Service Installation and
Administration Guide (NTP 555-7001-243).
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
4-14
Setting up the system
Adding DNs to the VSDN table
Adding DNs to the VSDN table
Introduction
The VSDN table lists the DNs associated with specific voice
services. A DN is required for each voice service that you want
users to be able to access directly by dialing a unique DN. The
VSDN table maps voice services onto DNs so that when your
Meridian Mail system receives an incoming call, it looks up the
DN to determine which service is being requested and which
prompts to play.
You define a DN in the VSDN table for each voice service that
is to be directly dialable by internal users or external callers.
This includes services such as voice messaging and express
messaging.
Before you begin
For each service you plan to add to the VSDN table, an
existing ACD queue must already be configured on the
Meridian 1.
Procedure
For information and procedures for adding DNs to the VSDN
table, see Chapter 24, “The VSDN table”.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up the system
4-15
Defining classes of service
Defining classes of service
Introduction
This involves identifying which of your users have similar
needs and what those needs are, and then defining the operating
parameters or Class of Service (COS) for each group of users.
When you change a parameter in a COS, all users belonging to
that COS have the changes automatically updated.
ATTENTION
You must add classes of service before you add users.
Each user must be assigned to a class of service.
Procedure
For information and procedures for defining classes of service,
see Chapter 26, “Class of Service administration”.
Assigning COSs to the After you add classes of service you must assign them to the
system
system. If you do not do this, the classes of service will not
show up in the Add a Local Voice User screen and you will not
be able to assign them to users.
Classes of service are assigned to the system in the General
Options screen.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
4-16
Setting up the system
Configuring operational measurement options
Configuring operational measurement options
Introduction
This involves defining how system and user statistics are
collected. This includes, for example, the kinds of data to be
collected, the time that traffic data collection begins and ends
each day, and how often collected traffic statistics are written to
disk.
You do not need to configure the operational measurement
options right away. You may choose instead to use the default
settings.
You can then modify these settings after your system has been
in use for a time to provide a level of detail that is more
appropriate for your needs.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
For information and procedures for configuring operational
measurement options, see Chapter 30, “Operational
Measurements”.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up the system
4-17
Adding users to the system
Adding users to the system
Introduction
This involves a number of tasks. Before you begin, you need to
determine the capacity of your disk volume, survey users to
establish the classes of services that will be necessary, estimate
the average system usage of each class of user, and create
classes of service to reflect your research.
You also identify users as local voice users, remote voice users,
or directory entry users according to their needs.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
For information and procedures for adding users to the system,
see the following chapters.
For information about
See
user administration in
general
Chapter 7, “User administration—an
overview”
local voice users
Chapter 8, “Local voice users”
remote voice users
Chapter 9, “Remote voice users”
directory entry users
Chapter 10, “Directory entry users”
distribution lists
Chapter 11, “Distribution lists”
System Administration Guide
January 1998
4-18
Setting up the system
Creating system distribution lists
Creating system distribution lists
Introduction
A distribution list is a collection of mailbox numbers. It allows
you to send the same message to a number of people.
Distribution lists are convenient if you frequently have to send
messages to the same group or groups of people.
You do not need to create system distribution lists as part of the
initial configuration. If you know which lists you need, then you
can create them, but they can be created at any time.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
For information and procedures for creating system distribution
lists, see Chapter 11, “Distribution lists”.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up the system
4-19
Configuring optional features and other services
Configuring optional features and other services
Introduction
This involves configuring optional features that are installed on
your system, such as Fax on Demand or AMIS Networking.
You can either continue with the configuration of these optional
features or back up the system now and continue at a later time.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
For information and procedures for configuring optional
features and other services, see “Setting up optional features”
on page 4-23.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
4-20
Setting up the system
Setting up system security
Setting up system security
Introduction
In today’s telecommunications environment, every
computerized system is potentially open to unauthorized access.
It is necessary to take all possible precautions to prevent
security breaches.
If your system is properly secured, it is difficult for a user
connected to Meridian Mail (such as a user who is logged on to
a mailbox or an external caller who has connected to Meridian
Mail through a call answering session or a voice menu) to place
unauthorized calls that will be billed to your system.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
For information and procedures for setting up system security,
see Chapter 6, “Setting up Meridian Mail security”.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up the system
4-21
Backing up the system
Backing up the system
Introduction
After you have finished customizing your system configuration,
back up the new data onto tape to ensure its safety. This
involves making backup copies of some or all of the system’s
data.
In the event of disk failure, you will not need to reenter user and
site-specific information, and you can bring your system back
into service quickly.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
For information and procedures for backing up the system, see
Chapter 15, “Back up and restore Meridian Mail data”.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
4-22
Setting up the system
Backing up the system
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up the system
Section B:
4-23
Setting up optional features
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
4-24
Setting up the Outcalling feature
4-25
Setting up the Voice Menus feature
4-26
Setting up the Voice Forms feature
4-27
Setting up the Fax on Demand feature
4-28
Setting up the Meridian Networking feature
4-29
Setting up the AMIS Networking feature
4-30
Setting up the Virtual Node AMIS Networking feature
4-31
Setting up the Enterprise Networking feature
4-32
Setting up the Network Message Service feature
4-33
Setting up the Hospitality feature
4-34
Setting up the Meridian Mail Reporter feature
4-35
Setting up the Meridian Mail AutoAdmin feature
4-36
Setting up the ACCESS feature
4-37
System Administration Guide
January 1998
4-24
Setting up the system
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This section introduces the following optional features:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Outcalling
Voice Menus
Voice Forms
Fax on Demand
Meridian Mail Networking (includes Meridian and
Enterprise Networking)
AMIS Networking
Network Message Service
Hospitality
Meridian Mail Reporter
Meridian Mail AutoAdmin
ACCESS
It also refers you to the procedures and information you require
to set up these features.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up the system
4-25
Setting up the Outcalling feature
Setting up the Outcalling feature
Introduction
The Outcalling feature refers to two functions: the Remote
Notification feature and the Delivery to Non-User feature.
Remote Notification allows Meridian Mail users to be notified
of new messages at remote phone or pager numbers. Delivery to
Non-User allows users to compose and send messages to people
outside the Meridian Mail system.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
For information and procedures for setting up the Outcalling
feature, refer to Meridian Mail Outcalling Application Guide
(NTP 555-7001-320).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
4-26
Setting up the system
Setting up the Voice Menus feature
Setting up the Voice Menus feature
Introduction
The Voice Menus feature enables you to create a number of
custom call answering applications.
The Announcements service allows you to record messages that
can be played back within a voice menu or as a stand-alone
service that can be dialed directly.
Thru-Dial services access predefined DNs or user-prompted
DNs that can be used either within a voice menu service or as a
separate service with a directory number. Thru-Dial services
can be set up to allow Name Dialing and can have restrictions
barring users from dialing unauthorized numbers, such as long
distance access codes.
The Time-of-Day Controllers service allows you to control the
activation of voice services based on the date and time at which
a call is received. This allows you to control the availability of
voice services during off-hours and holidays.
The Voice Menus service enables you to create single-layered
or multilayered menus that present callers with a series of
choices about the action they can perform.
The Voice Prompt Maintenance service enables you to modify
the prompts and greetings available in your voice menus and
announcements using a telephone.
The Remote Activation service allows you to enable or disable
voice services while you are offsite through a standard dualtone multifrequency (touch tone) telephone set.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
For information and procedures for setting up the Voice Menus
feature, refer to Meridian Mail Voice Services Application
Guide (NTP 555-7001-325).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up the system
4-27
Setting up the Voice Forms feature
Setting up the Voice Forms feature
Introduction
The Voice Forms feature has two parts: Voice Forms
administration and Voice Forms transcription.
Voice Forms administration involves the creation of
applications that collect voice information from callers. An
application consists of a series of questions, played in sequential
order, to which callers give voice responses. It is as if callers are
filling in a form over the phone.
Voice Forms transcription refers to the process of retrieving the
information collected by a voice form application. Once
retrieved, the data can be processed in a number of ways,
depending on why you have collected the information.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
For information and procedures for setting up the Voice Forms
feature, refer to Meridian Mail Voice Services Application
Guide (NTP 555-7001-325).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
4-28
Setting up the system
Setting up the Fax on Demand feature
Setting up the Fax on Demand feature
Introduction
Fax on Demand is a Meridian Mail feature that allows a caller
to obtain information in the form of a fax. The fax information
is stored in Meridian Mail and is sent on request to a fax device.
The configuration of the Fax on Demand application affects its
available features. For example, fax documents may be stored
either as stand-alone, directly dialed fax items, or as items
selected from voice menus. Depending on how the Fax on
Demand application is configured and on whether the caller is
using a fax phone, fax information may be delivered as part of
the call requesting the information, or later, by callback to the
caller’s fax device.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
For information and procedures for setting up the Fax on
Demand feature, refer to Meridian Mail Fax on Demand
Application Guide (NTP 555-7001-327).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up the system
4-29
Setting up the Meridian Networking feature
Setting up the Meridian Networking feature
Introduction
Meridian Networking is a Meridian Mail networking protocol
that permits one or more Meridian Mail systems to send
messages to and receive messages from users at remote
Meridian Mail sites.
It uses the following:
•
•
•
Procedure
Standard 1.0
a network database to define local and remote sites
a hybrid analog and digital transmission scheme
modems to transmit control passwords, message header
information, and message delivery acknowledgments
between sites
For information and procedures for setting up the Meridian
Networking feature, refer to Networking Planning Guide
(NTP 555-7001-241) and Meridian Networking Installation and
Administration Guide (NTP 555-7001-244).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
4-30
Setting up the system
Setting up the AMIS Networking feature
Setting up the AMIS Networking feature
Introduction
AMIS Networking uses the Audio Messaging Interface
Specification (AMIS) protocol. This protocol permits users to
send messages to and receive messages from users at other
voice messaging systems that also use the AMIS protocol (not
necessarily Meridian Mail systems).
AMIS does not require special hardware or passwords. It does,
however, require the ability to generate dual-tone
multifrequency (DTMF) tones.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
For information and procedures for setting up the AMIS
Networking feature, refer to Networking Planning Guide
(NTP 555-7001-241) and AMIS Networking Installation and
Administration Guide (NTP 555-7001-242).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up the system
4-31
Setting up the Virtual Node AMIS Networking feature
Setting up the Virtual Node AMIS Networking feature
Introduction
Virtual Node AMIS Networking is a combination of Meridian
Networking and AMIS Networking. Meridian Networking
provide the ability to define local and remote sites as using the
AMIS protocol. Sites that use the AMIS protocol are called
virtual nodes. They may or may not have a Meridian Mail
system installed.
Virtual Node AMIS uses the AMIS protocol to deliver
messages. As a result, Virtual Node AMIS messages are
restricted to the same functionality as the AMIS protocol.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
For information and procedures for setting up the
Virtual Node AMIS Networking feature, refer to Networking
Planning Guide (NTP 555-7001-241) and Virtual Node AMIS
Networking Installation and Administration Guide
(NTP 555-7001-245).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
4-32
Setting up the system
Setting up the Enterprise Networking feature
Setting up the Enterprise Networking feature
Introduction
Enterprise Networking is a Meridian Mail Networking protocol
that permits one or more Meridian Mail systems to send
messages to and receive messages from users at remote
Meridian Mail sites. It uses the following:
•
•
Procedure
Standard 1.0
a network database to define local and remote sites
DTMF signaling based on the AMIS protocol, instead of
modems, to transmit messages between sites
For information and procedures for setting up the Enterprise
Networking feature, refer to Networking Planning Guide
(NTP 555-7001-241) and Enterprise Networking Installation
and Administration Guide (NTP 555-7001-246).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up the system
4-33
Setting up the Network Message Service feature
Setting up the Network Message Service feature
Introduction
Network Message Service (NMS) is a Meridian Mail feature
that permits one Meridian Mail system to provide voice
messaging services to users in a network of Meridian 1 switches
that are interconnected by ISDN PRA trunks.
Procedure
For information and procedures for setting up the Network
Message Service feature, refer to Networking Planning Guide
(NTP 555-7001-241) and Network Message Service Installation
and Administration Guide (NTP 555-7001-243).
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
4-34
Setting up the system
Setting up the Hospitality feature
Setting up the Hospitality feature
Introduction
The Meridian Hospitality Voice Service (MHVS) provides
specialized functions for the hotel industry. The MHVS system
consists of Meridian 1/SL-1 and Meridian Mail components
connected to a Property Management System. MHVS provides
voice messaging services to hotel staff and guests and
automates the management of mailboxes for guest rooms.
When a guest checks in to the hotel, a mailbox is created for the
room the guest will be occupying. Upon checkout, the mailbox
is removed, and any read or unread messages that arrived for
that guest prior to checkout are moved to a post-checkout
mailbox for later retrieval.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
For information and procedures for setting up the Hospitality
feature, refer to the Hospitality Voice Services Implementation
Guide (NTP 555-7001-221).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up the system
4-35
Setting up the Meridian Mail Reporter feature
Setting up the Meridian Mail Reporter feature
Introduction
Meridian Mail Reporter is an application that runs on a PC
connected to Meridian Mail and enables you to download
operational measurements data. Using this information, you can
produce and print summary and detailed reports for use in
managing Meridian Mail systems.
These reports support all areas of administrative responsibility,
including general administration, troubleshooting, security,
capacity analysis, and billing.
Procedure
Standard 1.0
For information and procedures for setting up the Meridian
Mail Reporter feature, refer to the Meridian Mail Reporter
User’s Guide (P019082).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
4-36
Setting up the system
Setting up the Meridian Mail AutoAdmin feature
Setting up the Meridian Mail AutoAdmin feature
Introduction
Meridian Mail AutoAdmin is an application that runs on a PC
connected to Meridian Mail; through it you can add, view,
update, and delete user mailboxes. AutoAdmin allows large
messaging customers such as universities, hospitals,
government entities, and so on, to mass-create mailboxes with
user data entered in another system and transferred to
AutoAdmin, thereby reducing errors and data entry effort.
Procedure
For instructions on setting up and using AutoAdmin, see
Appendix B, “Meridian Mail AutoAdmin Utility”, in this
manual.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up the system
4-37
Setting up the ACCESS feature
Setting up the ACCESS feature
Introduction
ACCESS uses a Unix interface to provide a development tool
for creating specialized voice service applications for incoming
or outgoing calls or for administrative purposes.
ACCESS applications can make use of the full range of voice
and telephony functions that a digital voice processing system
and a telephone switching system can offer. No special voice or
telephone interface cards are needed, as the PBX and Meridian
Mail together provide all of the necessary resources.
An ACCESS application can receive or place telephone calls,
play prompts, receive “input” in the form of keypresses on a
touch tone phone keypad (which can be interpreted as
commands or data), transfer calls, record messages, and use
Meridian Mail services.
Examples of ACCESS applications include banking-by-phone
and order entry-by-phone, where the system places orders for
callers based on the caller input on a touch tone telephone.
Procedure
For information and procedures for setting up the ACCESS
feature, refer to the following publications:
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
Meridian ACCESS Configuration Guide
(NTP 555-7001-315)
Meridian ACCESS Developer’s Guide
(NTP 555-7001-316)
Meridian ACCESS Voice Prompt Editor User’s Guide
(NTP 555-7001-318)
System Administration Guide
January 1998
4-38
Setting up the system
Setting up the ACCESS feature
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 5
Making voice recordings
In this chapter
Overview
5-2
Types of recordings
5-4
How Call Answering uses personal greetings and personal
verifications
5-7
Voice recording tips
5-11
Section A: Making recordings
5-13
Section B: VMUIF recordings
5-47
5-2
Making voice recordings
Overview
Overview
Introduction
As administrator, you make two types of voice recordings:
those used only for administrative purposes, and those played to
the public or other users. You make these recordings through
the administration terminal (with a telephone nearby) or by
using a telephone handset alone.
This chapter provides information and procedures for making
different kinds of voice recordings or, where necessary, refers
you to other chapters or manuals for this information.
The overview presents an introduction to the types of voice
recordings you can make. It also offers some guidelines for
making voice recordings.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-3
Overview
Section A
Section A presents information and procedures for logging in to
Meridian Mail and creating, playing back, editing, and deleting
recordings.
These recordings include the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
the call answering greeting
personal verifications (which can be recorded by you or the
users on your system)
system distribution list personal verifications
remote site name verifications
broadcast mailbox personal verifications
Voice Services recordings (announcements, Thru-Dial
services, Fax on Demand, voice menus, and Voice Prompt
Maintenance)
For your reference, Section A also presents an overview of
some of the voice recordings that users on your system make.
These include the following:
•
•
personal greetings
broadcast messages
For more information about the recordings users can make,
refer to the Meridian Mail Voice Messaging User Guide
(P0875935).
Section B
Section B provides information and procedures for the greetings
and introductory tutorials available for the VMUIF interface.
For information about making recordings for Hospitality
systems, refer to the Hospitality Voice Services Implementation
Guide (NTP 555-7001-221) and to the Hospitality Voice
Services Guest Administration Console Guide xxxxxxxxxxx
(NTP 555-7001-222).
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-4
Making voice recordings
Types of recordings
Types of recordings
Introduction
You can make different kinds of voice recordings from the
administration terminal and a telephone or from a telephone
handset alone. This overview presents an introduction to these
recordings.
Call answering
greeting
When MMUI is installed on your system, the call answering
greeting identifies your organization to external callers. This
greeting is not available if VMUIF is installed.
You record the call answering greeting from the administration
terminal or from a telephone handset with administrator
capabilities.
For information and procedures, see “Recording a call
answering greeting” on page 5-18.
Personal greetings
If MMUI is installed on your system, users can record three
kinds of personal greetings from their telephone handsets:
external, internal, and temporary greetings.
If VMUIF is installed, users can record external and internal
greetings.
For information and procedures, see “Recording personal
greetings” on page 5-24. You may also wish to refer to the
Meridian Mail Voice Messaging User Guide (P0875935). For
information on how Meridian Mail decides which prompts,
personal greetings, and personal verifications to play during an
individual Call Answering session, see “How Call Answering
uses personal greetings and personal verifications” on page 5-7.
Personal verification
The personal verification is used to identify local, remote, or
directory entry users. Typically, it is recorded by the users
themselves from their telephones, but you can also record it
from the administration terminal as you add a user to the system
or if you are logged into a mailbox as administrator.
For information and procedures, see “Recording a personal
verification” on page 5-26. For information on how Meridian
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-5
Types of recordings
Mail decides which prompts, personal greetings, and personal
verifications to play during an individual Call Answering
session, see “How Call Answering uses personal greetings and
personal verifications” on page 5-7.
System distribution
list personal
verification
The system distribution list personal verification is an optional
recording. This verification helps you to confirm you have
selected the correct distribution list when you enter its number
as you compose a message. The list title can describe who is
included in the list or the purpose of the list.
For information and procedures, see “How Call Answering uses
personal greetings and personal verifications” on page 5-7.
Remote site name
verification
The site name verification is available if MMUI is installed on
your system. It works like a personal verification for network
sites. You record the site name verification from the
administration terminal. It is used to confirm the site name
when a message is addressed or when users receive a message
from a network site.
For information and procedures, see “Identifying remote site
names” on page 5-34, and refer to the Meridian Networking
Installation and Administration Guide (NTP 555-7001-244).
Broadcast mailbox
personal verification
Broadcast mailboxes can be set up for both the MMUI and
VMUIF interface.
A broadcast message is a message that is sent to all Meridian
Mail users.
You can record a personal verification for the broadcast
mailbox so that when you enter the mailbox number during
message composition, you get a verification that you have
entered the correct number.
The personal verification for a broadcast mailbox can say
something like: “Broadcast mailbox 5555.”
For information and procedures, see “Recording a personal
verification for the broadcast mailbox” on page 5-37.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-6
Making voice recordings
Types of recordings
Broadcast messages
A broadcast message is a message that is sent to all Meridian
Mail users.
When you or the users on your system compose a message to
the broadcast mailbox, the message is sent to all of the users on
the system. If you have Meridian Mail Networking or NMSMM, you can choose to send broadcast messages to all users at
a particular Networking remote site, or at a particular NMSMM location.
For more information and procedures, see “Recording and
sending broadcast messages” on page 5-39.
Voice Services
recordings
The Voice Services feature enables you to create custom call
answering applications. Voice services recordings include
announcement recordings, Thru-Dial greetings, fax item
confirmation prompts, voice menu greetings, voice menu
choices, and voice menu prompts.
For more information and procedures, see “Making Voice
Services recordings” on page 5-43, and refer to the Voice
Services Application Guide (NTP 555-7001-325).
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-7
How Call Answering uses personal greetings and personal verifications
How Call Answering uses personal greetings and personal
verifications
Introduction
Call Answering is the collection of Meridian Mail features
which deals with directing callers to a user’s mailbox when
•
•
•
the user does not answer his or her phone
the call has been transferred directly to the mailbox by a
Call Answering DN
the DN is busy with another call
There is a variety of prompts Meridian Mail can play to a caller,
depending on which prompts have been recorded, where the call
originates, and the mailbox user’s Class of Service settings. The
charts below show how Meridian Mail decides which prompts
to play during an MMUI Call Answering session.
VMUIF users
Call Answering is simpler for VMUIF mailbox users.
Call Answering - no answer/call transferred to mailbox
1.
Is there a greeting recorded?
If yes, play the greeting.
If no, play the standard system “Nobody is available to
take your call...” message.
Call Answering - user busy
1.
Play the standard system “This line is busy...” message.
2.
Is there a greeting recorded?
If yes, play the greeting.
If no, proceed to the next step.
3.
HVS Staff and Guest
users
Play the standard system “Please leave a message after the
tone...” message.
HVS Staff users are treated as MMUI mailbox users.
HVS Guest users behave as VMUIF mailbox users.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
5-8
Making voice recordings
How Call Answering uses personal greetings and personal verifications
Call Answering - no
This is how Meridian Mail decides which prompt(s) to play to a
answer/call
caller when a mailbox user does not answer his or her phone, or
transferred to mailbox when a Call Answering DN has sent the call directly to the
mailbox.
No answer at the
dialed number
Is there a Temporary
Greeting (TAG) recorded?
NO
YES
Play the TAG.
Internal or external call?
External
Internal
Is there an Internal
Greeting (IG) recorded?
NO
Play the IG.
YES
Is there an External
Greeting (EG) recorded?
NO
YES
Play the EG.
Is the mailbox user’s COS
set to “Number” or
“Name” for the
“Prompt played during
call answering” option?
Number
Name
Is there a Personal
Verification (PV) recorded
for this user?
NO
YES
Play the standard “No
answer” message,
incorporating the PV.
Play the standard “No answer” message,
incorporating the phone number.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-9
How Call Answering uses personal greetings and personal verifications
Call Answering - user
busy
This is how Meridian Mail decides which prompt(s) to play to a
caller when a mailbox user’s phone is already busy.
Is the mailbox user’s COS
set to “Yes” or “No” for the
“Callers notified of busy
line” option?
NO
User’s number(s) busy.
YES
Is the mailbox user’s COS
set to “Number” or
“Name” for the
“Prompt played during
call answering” option?
Number
Name
Is there a Personal
Verification (PV) recorded
for this user?
NO
YES
Play the standard “User
busy” message,
incorporating the PV.
Play the standard “User
busy” message,
incorporating the phone
number.
Is there a Temporary
Greeting (TAG)
recorded?
YES
Play the TAG.
...
NO
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-10
Making voice recordings
...
How Call Answering uses personal greetings and personal verifications
Internal or external call?
External
Internal
Is there an Internal
Greeting (IG) recorded?
NO
YES
Play the IG.
Is there an External
Greeting (EG) recorded?
NO
YES
Play the EG.
Play the standard
“Please leave a message
after the tone, or press
zero for assistance”
prompt.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-11
Voice recording tips
Voice recording tips
Introduction
As administrator, you make two types of voice recordings:
•
•
prompts that are used only for administrative purposes
(such as broadcast mailbox personal verifications or system
distribution list personal verifications)
recordings played to the public or other users (such as the
call answering greeting, personal verifications, remote site
name verifications, and Voice Services recordings such as
announcements, Thru-Dial services, Fax on Demand, or
voice menus)
Prompts used only for administrative purposes require little
preparation after you decide on their wording.
Voice menus or announcements played to the public or other
users may require more formal preparation. For more
information, you may wish to refer to the Voice Services
Application Guide (NTP 555-7001-325).
Guidelines for voice
recordings
The following are some suggestions for making voice
recordings:
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
Use only one voice for your voice recordings, so that
callers are not distracted by changes in pitch, tone,
intonation, or accent.
To select a person to make your voice recordings, begin by
auditioning a few candidates. Record their voices and then
listen to the recordings over the telephone line. Lowpitched voices reproduce better than high-pitched voices
over telephone lines. The voice used for the Meridian Mail
prompts provides a good model.
Print out complete, definitive copies of the script.
Record in quiet surroundings.
Start recording immediately after the tone, and stop the
recording immediately after the last word. This prevents
unnecessary pauses when system prompts and personal
verifications are joined.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-12
Making voice recordings
Voice recording tips
Guidelines for voice
recordings (cont’d)
•
•
Standard 1.0
To stop recording, press the number sign (#) if you are
recording from a telephone handset, or the [Stop] softkey if
you are recording from the administration terminal. Do not
hang up the phone while you are recording as this may
produce clicks in the recording.
For applications that provide current information, have the
person who knows the information monitor the prompts to
ensure that the information is always up-to-date.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
Section A:
5-13
Making recordings
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
5-14
Logging in to Meridian Mail
5-15
Recording a call answering greeting
5-18
Recording personal greetings
5-24
Recording a personal verification
5-26
Recording a personal verification for a system distribution list
5-31
Identifying remote site names
5-34
Recording a personal verification for the broadcast mailbox
5-37
Recording and sending broadcast messages
5-39
Making Voice Services recordings
5-43
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-14
Making voice recordings
Overview
Overview
Introduction
Standard 1.0
This section presents information and procedures for logging in
to Meridian Mail from the administration terminal or from a
telephone on your system. It also explains how to create, play
back, edit, and delete voice recordings.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-15
Logging in to Meridian Mail
Logging in to Meridian Mail
Introduction
Before you can create, play back, modify, or delete voice
recordings, you need to log in to Meridian Mail. You do this
either through a telephone set or through an administration
terminal with a telephone nearby.
About using the
telephone to make
recordings
Using a telephone on your system, you or the users on your
system log into Meridian Mail and access personal greetings.
You can then make a number of kinds of voice recordings:
•
•
•
external, internal, and temporary absence greetings
personal verifications
broadcast messages
About using a terminal Using the administration terminal or a telephone set with
to make recordings
administrator capabilities, you can make certain kinds of
recordings:
•
•
•
•
•
•
the call answering greeting
personal verifications
system distribution list personal verifications
site name verifications
broadcast mailbox personal verifications
Voice Services recordings
To make recordings through the system interface, the [Voice]
softkey must be displayed.
Note: A telephone set is required to make recordings through
the administration terminal. Ensure that a phone set is available
near the administration terminal where you are working.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-16
Making voice recordings
Logging in to Meridian Mail
Screens with
recording softkeys
Recording softkeys are available from some of the User
Administration screens and Voice Services Administration
screens.
Recording softkey
positions
The following shows typical recording softkey positions.
b Play
Return
Logging in using a
telephone
Record
Delete
Disconnect
To log in to Meridian Mail using a telephone set, follow these
steps.
Step Action
Standard 1.0
1
Dial the Meridian Mail access number.
2
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you are logging in from
THEN
your own telephone
press #.
another touch tone
telephone
using the telephone keypad,
enter your mailbox number,
and press #.
3
Enter your password using the telephone keypad, and press #.
4
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
create, play back, modify,
or delete an internal
greeting
see “Recording personal
greetings” on page 5-24.
create, play back, modify,
or delete an external
greeting
see “Recording personal
greetings” on page 5-24.
create, play back, modify,
or delete a temporary
absence greeting
see “Recording personal
greetings” on page 5-24.
create, play back, or delete
a personal verification
see “Recording a personal
verification” on page 5-26.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-17
Logging in to Meridian Mail
Logging in from the
administration
terminal
To log in to Meridian Mail from the administration terminal,
follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Logon/Status screen
Step Action
1
Select [Logon].
Result: The system prompts you for a password.
2
3
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF
THEN
you are logging in for the
first time
see “Setting the system
administration password” on
page 3-6.
you have logged in before
go to step 3.
Type your system administration password, and press
<Return>.
Result: The system displays the Main Menu.
Note: If an invalid password is entered, an error message
appears. Return to step 1.
4
Standard 1.0
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to record
THEN
the call answering greeting
see “Recording personal
greetings” on page 5-24.
a personal verification
see “Recording a personal
verification” on page 5-26.
a personal verification for a
system distribution list
see “How Call Answering
uses personal greetings and
personal verifications” on
page 5-7.
a personal verification for a
remote site name
see “Identifying remote site
names” on page 5-34.
a broadcast mailbox
personal verification
see “Recording a personal
verification for the broadcast
mailbox” on page 5-37.
make Voice Services
recordings
see “Making Voice Services
recordings” on page 5-43.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-18
Making voice recordings
Recording a call answering greeting
Recording a call answering greeting
Introduction
This topic provides information and procedures for recording a
call answering greeting.
When you have MMUI installed, the call answering greeting
identifies your organization to callers and users. Typically, this
greeting consists of the spoken name of the organization.
The call answering greeting is played when
•
•
an external caller is transferred to Meridian Mail to leave a
message
a user answers a remote notification call
Note: This greeting is available only if the MMUI interface is
installed on your system. It is not available if VMUIF is
installed.
You record the call answering greeting from the administration
terminal or from a telephone set with administrator capability.
Using the call
answering greeting
This greeting is optional. If you record the greeting, external
callers hear it before they hear a user’s personal greeting. If no
greeting is recorded, callers hear only the user’s personal
greeting when they connect to a mailbox.
During remote notification calls, the following prompt is played
to users if no call answering greeting is recorded: “Hello.
Meridian Mail has received a message for ....”
When a call answering greeting exists, the following prompt is
played: “Hello. <Call Answering Greeting> has received a
message for ....”
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-19
Recording a call answering greeting
Guidelines for
composing
The following are some guidelines for composing a call
answering greeting:
•
•
•
•
Multilingual systems
Standard 1.0
Because this greeting is used in a variety of situations,
consider how best to word it (or decide whether you want
to record a greeting at all).
If you do not record a call answering greeting, your
organization’s name is not announced at the beginning of a
call answering session. If you feel that the user’s personal
greeting is sufficient, you may regard the call answering
greeting as unnecessary.
If you record only the organization’s name (“Myelin
Incorporated”), the greeting played during call answering
may be too abrupt, but the prompt played during remote
notification sounds quite natural.
A friendlier greeting (“Thank you for calling Myelin
Incorporated”) is ideal for call answering but is awkward
when it is played for remote notification.
If more than one language is installed on your Meridian Mail
system and you want to record a call answering greeting, you
need to record one greeting for each language.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-20
Making voice recordings
Recording a call answering greeting
Recording the call
answering greeting
from a telephone set
To record, play back, modify, or delete the call answering
greeting from a telephone set with administrator capabilities,
follow these steps.
Step Action
1
Press 82 on the telephone keypad.
2
Press 9 for the system greeting.
3
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
review the greeting
go to step 4.
delete the greeting
go to step 5.
rerecord the greeting
go to step 5.
add to the greeting
go to step 6.
4
To review the greeting, press 2.
5
To delete the greeting, press 76.
Note: If you do not delete the existing greeting, your new
recording is appended to it.
6
To begin recording or add to the greeting, press 5.
7
At the tone, record the call answering greeting.
8
To stop recording, press #.
Note: Do not hang up the phone during recording as this may
produce a click sound.
Standard 1.0
9
To review the greeting, press 2.
10
To end your voice messaging session, press 83, and then hang
up.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-21
Recording a call answering greeting
Procedure
To create, play back, modify, or delete a call answering greeting
through the administration terminal, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select Voice Administration.
2
Select Voice Messaging Options.
Result: The system displays the Voice Messaging Options
screen.
3
Move the cursor to the first Call Answering Greeting (Voice)
field.
4
Select the [Voice] softkey.
Result: The current screen remains displayed; the softkey
display changes to [Cancel].
The system prompts for an extension number.
5
Type the extension number of the telephone set you will use to
make the recording, and press <Return>.
Result: The phone rings.
6
Pick up the telephone handset.
Result: The system displays the recording softkeys.
7
Select the [Record] softkey.
Result: The system displays the [Stop] softkey in place of the
[Record] softkey.
You hear a tone through the telephone receiver.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-22
Making voice recordings
Recording a call answering greeting
Step Action
8
At the tone, begin speaking into the receiver.
Note: Recording stops automatically if the greeting exceeds
the Maximum Prompt Size or the Record Timeout set in the
Voice Services Profile.
9
To stop recording, select the [Stop] softkey.
Result: The recording stops automatically, and the system
again displays the recording softkeys.
10
11
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
play back the recording
go to step 11.
delete the recording
go to step 13.
record the greeting again
go to step 7.
save the recording
go to step 17.
Select the [Play] softkey.
Result: If a recording is available, it is played.
The system displays the [Stop] softkey.
Note: If there is no current recording, the system displays a
message on the console.
12
To stop the playback at any time, select the [Stop] softkey.
Result: The system again displays the recording softkeys.
13
To delete the recording, select the [Delete] softkey.
Result: The system displays the [OK to Delete] and [Cancel]
softkeys.
You are requested to confirm the deletion.
14
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
15
THEN
cancel the deletion
go to step 15.
confirm the deletion
go to step 16.
To cancel the deletion, select the [Cancel] softkey.
Result: The recording is not deleted.
The system again displays the recording softkeys.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-23
Recording a call answering greeting
Step Action
16
To delete the recording, select the [OK to Delete] softkey.
Result: The system deletes the recording.
The system again displays the recording softkeys.
17
To save the recording and disconnect the call, use either the
[Return] softkey or the [Disconnect] softkey, and hang up the
phone.
Result: The system displays the original softkeys.
Note: When you use the [Return] softkey, the line is not
disconnected unless you hang up the receiver. This means that
if you decide to rerecord or listen to the recording, you do not
have to enter the telephone extension again after selecting the
[Voice] softkey.
When you use the [Disconnect] softkey, the line is
disconnected, and if you select the [Voice] softkey to access
the recording softkeys again, you must enter the telephone
extension again.
18
Standard 1.0
To update the screen and store the changes to the recording,
use the [Save] softkey.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-24
Making voice recordings
Recording personal greetings
Recording personal greetings
Introduction
You and the users on your system record personal greetings—
external, internal, and temporary greetings—from the
telephone. These recordings are played when callers connect to
a mailbox. The external greeting is played to external callers,
the internal greeting is played to internal callers, and the
temporary greeting, when one is recorded, preempts both
internal and external greetings. The temporary greeting is
commonly used for short-term messages to notify all callers that
the mailbox user is away sick that day, or on vacation, or to
otherwise alter the user’s greeting on the short term.
This is an overview of personal greetings. For more
information, refer to the Meridian Mail Voice Messaging User
Guide (P0875935). For information on which personal
greetings are used during a Call Answering session, see “How
Call Answering uses personal greetings and personal
verifications” on page 5-7.
Note: If VMUIF is installed on your system, users can record
only external and internal greetings.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-25
Recording personal greetings
Recording personal
greetings
To create, play back, modify, or delete a personal greeting,
follow these steps.
Note: You must be logged in to a Meridian Mail mailbox. See
“Logging in to Meridian Mail” on page 5-15.
Step Action
1
Press 82 on the telephone keypad.
2
Select an external, internal, or temporary personal greeting.
IF you want to select
THEN
your external greeting
press 1.
your internal greeting
press 2.
your temporary greeting
press 3.
Result: The system confirms the greeting you select.
3
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
review your greeting
go to step 4.
delete your greeting
go to step 5.
record your greeting again
go to step 5.
add to your greeting
go to step 6.
set an expiry date for your
temporary greeting
go to step 9.
4
To review the greeting, press 2.
5
To delete the greeting, press 76.
Note: If you do not delete your existing greeting, your new
recording is appended to it.
6
To begin recording or add to the greeting, press 5.
7
At the tone, record your greeting.
8
To stop recording, press #.
Note: Do not hang up the phone during recording as this may
produce a click sound.
9
To set the expiry date for your temporary greeting, press 9.
Note: Whenever you log in to your mailbox, the system
prompts that you are using a temporary greeting.
10
Standard 1.0
To end your voice messaging session, press 83, and then hang
up.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-26
Making voice recordings
Recording a personal verification
Recording a personal verification
Introduction
This topic provides information and procedures for recording a
personal verification using either a telephone handset alone or
the administration terminal and a telephone.
The personal verification is a recording of a user’s first and last
names (and extension, if desired). It is used to identify the
owner of a mailbox. Ideally, users should record personal
verifications in their own voice. However, as administrator, you
can record personal verifications for users either from the
administration terminal or from a telephone set with
administrator capabilities.
Using a personal
verification
A personal verification is played in the following situations:
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
Call Answering can be activated by a caller encountering a
busy/unanswered DN, or by a caller calling a Call
Answering service DN which directs the call to a particular
mailbox.
In Call Answering, the personal verification is played when
the called number is busy. It is also played when the called
number does not answer, and no personal greeting has been
recorded. See “How Call Answering uses personal
greetings and personal verifications” on page 5-7. for a
complete explanation of the use of personal verifications in
Call Answering.
During message composition, the system plays the
verification after a user enters a mailbox number to verify
that the correct person is being addressed.
When a user receives a message, the system plays the
verification to identify who the message is from (such as
the system administrator) or to advise all recipients that the
message is a broadcast message.
When messages are delivered to nonusers (using the
Delivery to Non-Users feature), the system includes the
verification. Recipients are more likely to listen to
messages if they recognize who the messages are from.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-27
Recording a personal verification
•
•
When callers use the Name Dialing feature, the system
plays the personal verification. If a personal verification
has not been recorded, the system spells out the name
instead.
During remote notification, the system plays the
verification to identify who the message is intended for.
No personal
verification recorded
If no verification is recorded, the system plays a recording of
the user’s extension number. Because it is easier for callers to
confirm they have reached the correct person by hearing a name
rather than by hearing an extension number, it is highly
recommended that you or the users on your system record a
personal verification for each mailbox.
Who can change
personal verifications
Users can change their personal verifications only if this
capability is enabled in the class of service to which they are
assigned. For more information, see Chapter 26, “Class of
Service administration”.
Guidelines for
composing
The following are some suggestions for recording personal
verifications:
•
•
Standard 1.0
Record a few names for personal verification, and listen to
them before recording the remaining names.
This ensures that the procedure is done correctly and the
intonation is good. Test each of the following areas where
personal verification applies:
- call answering
- message envelope playback
- address playback in the compose command
- name dialing
- name addressing
- express messaging
- delivery to non-user
When you are recording a personal verification for two or
more people in your organization who have the same name
(or very similar names), provide more information (their
extension number or title, for example) to distinguish them.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-28
Making voice recordings
Recording a personal verification
Recording a personal
verification using a
telephone
To create, play back, or delete a personal verification using a
telephone handset, follow these steps.
Note: You must be logged in to a Meridian Mail mailbox. See
“Logging in to Meridian Mail” on page 5-15.
Step Action
1
Press 89 on the telephone keypad.
Result: The system plays the existing name for personal
verification.
If no name is recorded, the system reports this.
2
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
hear the name for personal
verification again
go to step 3.
record a new personal
verification
go to step 4.
delete the existing personal
verification
go to step 8.
3
To hear the name for personal verification again, press 2.
4
To record a new personal verification, press 5.
5
At the tone, record your greeting.
Note: The maximum length is 20 seconds.
6
To stop recording, press #.
Result: The system replays your recording.
Standard 1.0
7
To add to the recording, press 5, and repeat step 5 and step 6.
8
To delete the existing personal verification, press 76.
9
To end your voice messaging session, press 83, and then hang
up.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-29
Recording a personal verification
Recording a personal
verification through
the administration
terminal
To create, play back, or delete a personal verification from the
administration terminal, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
1
Select User Administration.
2
Select Local Voice User.
3
Select the [View/Modify] softkey, and type the mailbox number
of the user whose personal verification you want to record.
Result: The system displays the View/Modify Local Voice User
screen.
4
Select the [Voice] softkey.
Result: The current screen remains displayed; the softkey
display changes to [Cancel].
The system prompts for an extension number.
5
Type the extension number of the telephone set you will use to
make the recording, and press <Return>.
Result: The phone rings.
6
Pick up the telephone handset.
Result: The system displays the recording softkeys.
7
Select the [Record] softkey.
Result: The system displays the [Stop] softkey in place of the
[Record] softkey.
You hear a tone through the telephone receiver.
8
At the tone, begin speaking into the receiver.
Note: Recording stops automatically if the recording exceeds
the Maximum Prompt Size or the Record Timeout set in the
Voice Services Profile.
9
To stop recording, select the [Stop] softkey.
Result: The recording stops automatically, and the system
again displays the recording softkeys.
10
Standard 1.0
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
play back the recording
go to step 11.
delete the recording
go to step 14.
record the verification again
go to step 7.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-30
Making voice recordings
Recording a personal verification
11
To review your recording, select the [Play] softkey.
Result: The system plays the recording.
The system displays the [Stop] softkey.
12
To stop the playback at any time, select the [Stop] softkey.
Result: The system again displays the recording softkeys.
13
To save the recording and disconnect the call, use either the
[Return] softkey or the [Disconnect] softkey, and hang up the
phone.
Result: The system displays the original softkeys.
Note: When you use the [Return] softkey, the line is not
disconnected unless you hang up the receiver. This means that
if you decide to rerecord or listen to the recording, you do not
have to enter the telephone extension again after selecting the
[Voice] softkey.
When you use the [Disconnect] softkey, the line is
disconnected, and if you select the [Voice] softkey to access
the recording softkeys again, you must enter the telephone
extension again.
14
To delete a personal verification, use the arrow keys to select
the entry, select the name using the spacebar, and press
[Delete].
Result: The system displays the [OK to Delete] and [Cancel]
softkeys.
15
Select [OK to Delete] to delete the personal verification.
Result: The system deletes the personal verification and
updates the list.
16
Standard 1.0
To update the screen and store the changes to the recording,
use the [Save] softkey.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-31
Recording a personal verification for a system distribution list
Recording a personal verification for a system distribution
list
Introduction
It is a good idea to make a voice recording of the title of each
system distribution list. This procedure is optional, but a voice
title helps you to confirm you have selected the correct list
when you enter its number as you compose a message. The list
title can describe who is included in the list or the purpose of the
list.
Procedure
To record a personal verification for a system distribution list,
follow this procedure.
Note: This procedure is optional.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select User Administration.
2
Select Distribution Lists.
Result: The system displays the Distribution Lists softkeys
screen.
3
Select the [View/Modify] softkey.
Result: The system prompts for a distribution list number.
4
Type the number of the distribution list for which you are
recording a title.
5
Select the [Voice] softkey.
Result: The system prompts for an extension number.
6
Type the extension number of the telephone set you are going
to use to record the title, and press <Return>.
Result: The phone rings.
7
Pick up the telephone handset.
Result: The system displays the recording softkeys.
8
Select the [Record] softkey.
Result: The system displays the [Stop] softkey in place of the
[Record] softkey.
You hear a tone through the telephone receiver.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-32
Making voice recordings
Recording a personal verification for a system distribution list
Step Action
9
At the tone, begin speaking into the receiver.
Note: Recording stops automatically if the recording exceeds
the Maximum Prompt Size or the Record Timeout set in the
Voice Services Profile. At the tone, record the personal
verification.
10
To stop recording, select the [Stop] softkey.
Result: The recording stops automatically, and the system
again displays the recording softkeys.
11
12
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
play back the recording
go to step 11.
delete the recording
go to step 14.
record the verification again
go to step 8.
To review your recording, select the [Play] softkey.
Result: The system plays the recording.
The system displays the [Stop] softkey.
13
To stop the playback at any time, select the [Stop] softkey.
Result: The system again displays the recording softkeys.
14
To delete the recording, select the [Delete] softkey.
Result: The system displays the [OK to Delete] and [Cancel]
softkeys.
You are requested to confirm the deletion.
15
16
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
cancel the deletion
go to step 16.
confirm the deletion
go to step 17.
To cancel the deletion, select the [Cancel] softkey.
Result: The recording is not deleted.
The system again displays the recording softkeys.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-33
Recording a personal verification for a system distribution list
Step Action
17
To delete the recording, select the [OK to Delete] softkey.
Result: The system deletes the recording.
The system again displays the recording softkeys.
18
To save the recording and disconnect the call, use either the
[Return] softkey or the [Disconnect] softkey, and hang up the
phone.
Result: The system displays the original softkeys.
Note: When you use the [Return] softkey, the line is not
disconnected unless you hang up the receiver. This means that
if you decide to rerecord or listen to the recording, you do not
have to enter the telephone extension again after selecting the
[Voice] softkey.
When you use the [Disconnect] softkey, the line is
disconnected, and if you select the [Voice] softkey to access
the recording softkeys again, you must enter the telephone
extension again.
19
Standard 1.0
To update the screen and store the changes to the recording,
use the [Save] softkey.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-34
Making voice recordings
Identifying remote site names
Identifying remote site names
Introduction
The site name verification works like a personal verification for
network sites. You record the site name verification from the
administration terminal. It is used to confirm the site name
when a message is addressed or when users receive a message
from a network site. A site name can be recorded for Meridian
Mail network sites and Network Message Service (NMS)
locations.
If no site name is recorded, the system instead plays a recording
of the site or location number that identifies the site.
For more information, refer to the Meridian Networking
Installation and Administration Guide (NTP 555-7001-244).
Remote site name
verification
The site name verification is available if MMUI is installed on
your system. It works like a personal verification for network
sites. You record the site name verification from the
administration terminal. It is used to confirm the site name
when a message is addressed or when users receive a message
from a network site.
For more information, refer to the Meridian Networking
Installation and Administration Guide (NTP 555-7001-244).
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-35
Identifying remote site names
Procedure
To record a site name verification, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select Network Administration.
2
Select the type of networking administration.
3
Select the type of site maintenance.
4
Select the [Add] softkey for a new site or the [View/Modify]
softkey for an existing site.
5
Select the [Voice] softkey.
Result: The current screen remains displayed; the softkey
display changes to [Cancel].
The system prompts for an extension number.
6
Type the extension number of the telephone set you will use to
make the recording, and press <Return>.
Result: The phone rings.
7
Pick up the telephone handset.
Result: The system displays the recording softkeys.
8
Select the [Record] softkey.
Result: The system displays the [Stop] softkey in place of the
[Record] softkey.
You hear a tone through the telephone receiver.
9
At the tone, begin speaking into the receiver.
Note: Recording stops automatically if the recording exceeds
the Maximum Prompt Size or the Record Timeout set in the
Voice Services Profile.
10
To stop recording, select the [Stop] softkey.
Result: The recording stops automatically, and the system
again displays the recording softkeys.
11
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
Standard 1.0
THEN
play back the recording
go to step 11.
delete the recording
go to step 14.
record the verification again
go to step 7.
save the recording
go to step 18.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-36
Making voice recordings
Identifying remote site names
Step Action
12
To review your recording, select the [Play] softkey.
Result: The system plays the recording.
The system displays the [Stop] softkey.
13
To stop the playback at any time, select the [Stop] softkey.
Result: The system again displays the recording softkeys.
14
To delete the recording, select the [Delete] softkey.
Result: The system displays the [OK to Delete] and [Cancel]
softkeys.
You are requested to confirm the deletion.
15
16
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
cancel the deletion
go to step 15.
confirm the deletion
go to step 16.
To cancel the deletion, select the [Cancel] softkey.
Result: The recording is not deleted.
The system again displays the recording softkeys.
17
To delete the recording, select the [OK to Delete] softkey.
Result: The system deletes the recording.
The system again displays the recording softkeys.
18
To save the recording and disconnect the call, use either the
[Return] softkey or the [Disconnect] softkey, and hang up the
phone.
Result: The system displays the original softkeys.
Note: When you use the [Return] softkey, the line is not
disconnected unless you hang up the receiver. This means that
if you decide to rerecord or listen to the recording, you do not
have to enter the telephone extension again after selecting the
[Voice] softkey.
When you use the [Disconnect] softkey, the line is
disconnected, and if you select the [Voice] softkey to access
the recording softkeys again, you must enter the telephone
extension again.
19
Standard 1.0
To update the screen and store the changes to the recording,
use the [Save] softkey.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-37
Recording a personal verification for the broadcast mailbox
Recording a personal verification for the broadcast mailbox
Introduction
This topic provides information and procedures for recording a
personal verification for the broadcast mailbox.
You can record a personal verification for the broadcast
mailbox so that when you enter the mailbox number during
message composition, you get a verification that you have
entered the correct number.
The personal verification for a broadcast mailbox can say
something like: “Broadcast mailbox 5555.”
To set up a broadcast message, a special mailbox number (the
broadcast mailbox number) is defined in the Voice Messaging
Options screen. When you compose a broadcast message, you
specify this broadcast mailbox number, and all users receive
your message.
Recording from the
administration
terminal
To record a personal verification for the broadcast mailbox
from the administration terminal, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select Voice Administration.
2
Select Voice Messaging Options.
3
Move the cursor to the Broadcast Mailbox Personal Verification
Recorded (Voice) field.
4
Select the [Voice] softkey.
Result: The system prompts you for a phone number in
dialable format.
5
Type the extension of the phone you will use to record the
verification, and press <Return>.
Result: The phone rings.
6
Pick up the receiver.
Result: The recording softkeys are displayed.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
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Making voice recordings
Recording a personal verification for the broadcast mailbox
Step Action
7
Select the [Record] softkey.
Result: The system displays the [Stop] softkey in place of the
[Record] softkey.
You hear a tone through the telephone receiver.
8
At the tone, say the verification.
Example: “Broadcast mailbox 5555.”
9
To stop recording, select the [Stop] softkey.
Result: The recording stops automatically, and the system
again displays the recording softkeys.
10
11
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
play back the recording
go to step 11.
save the recording
go to step 13.
rerecord the recording
press the [Delete] key, and
go to step 7.
To play back the recording, select the [Play] softkey.
Result: The system plays the recording.
The system displays the [Stop] softkey.
12
To stop the playback at any time, select the [Stop] softkey.
Result: The system again displays the recording softkeys.
13
To save the recording and disconnect the call, use either the
[Return] softkey or the [Disconnect] softkey, and hang up the
phone.
Result: The system displays the original softkeys.
Note: When you use the [Return] softkey, the line is not
disconnected unless you hang up the receiver. This means that
if you decide to rerecord or listen to the recording, you do not
have to enter the telephone extension again after selecting the
[Voice] softkey.
When you use the [Disconnect] softkey, the line is
disconnected, and if you select the [Voice] softkey to access
the recording softkeys again, you must enter the telephone
extension again.
14
Standard 1.0
To update the screen and store the changes to the recording,
use the [Save] softkey.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-39
Recording and sending broadcast messages
Recording and sending broadcast messages
Introduction
This topic explains how you and the users on your system can
record and send broadcast messages using the telephone
handset.
Definition:
broadcast message
A broadcast message is a message that is sent to all Meridian
Mail users. When you or the users on your system compose a
message to the broadcast mailbox, the message is sent to all
users on your Meridian Mail system.
Network broadcast
message option for
Meridian Mail
Networking users
Users who have Meridian Mail Networking (either Meridian
Networking or Enterprise Networking) can choose to send
broadcast messages to all users at
•
•
•
a single site, either the local one or a remote one
a combination of sites (this involves putting in the network
prefix numbers and broadcast mailbox number for each
site, or incorporating them into a Personal Distribution
List)
all sites
Network broadcast messages sent to multi-customer remote
systems will only be delivered to users in the networking
customer group.
Enabling network broadcast messaging
To enable network broadcast messaging, you must fill in the
Network Broadcast Administration fields when configuring
Networking in the Network Configuration screen. See your
Network Administration books for details.
You must also record a personal verification for the local
broadcast mailbox (see “Recording a personal verification for
the broadcast mailbox” on page 5-37.) Otherwise, network
broadcast messaging will not work.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-40
Making voice recordings
Recording and sending broadcast messages
Restrictions on network broadcast messages
A user must have “Broadcast Capability” and “Network
Broadcast Capability” set to “Yes” in their Class of Service to
send network broadcast messages.
The acknowledgment message tag cannot be applied to network
broadcast messages, or to any Personal Distribution List
containing a network broadcast address, because this could
result in the system attempting to return thousands of messages
to the sender.
Network broadcast messages can only be sent to sites running
MM11 and later releases. Network broadcast messages sent to
MM10 and earlier releases will fail, with no NDN delivered to
the sender.
Location-specific
broadcast message
option for NMS-MM
users
Users who have NMS-MM can choose to send broadcast
messages to all users at
•
•
•
a single NMS location, either the prime location or a
satellite location
a combination of locations (this involves incorporating the
network prefix numbers and broadcast mailbox number for
each location into a Personal Distribution List)
all locations
Note: If Meridian Mail Networking is also installed, all the
above applies to locations at remote sites as well as local ones.
Setting up a broadcast To set up a broadcast mailbox, you assign a mailbox number to
mailbox
the broadcast mailbox in the Voice Messaging Options screen.
You do not need to set up an actual mailbox through User
Administration. For more information about setting up
broadcast mailboxes, see Chapter 20, “Voice messaging
options”.
Who can compose
and send broadcast
messages
Standard 1.0
Any user who knows the broadcast mailbox number and has
access to a mailbox with broadcast capability can compose and
send broadcast messages. It is recommended that users try to
avoid sending broadcast messages during busy hours.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-41
Recording and sending broadcast messages
Procedure
To record and send a broadcast message, follow these steps.
Step Action
Standard 1.0
1
Log on to a Meridian Mail mailbox with broadcast capability.
2
Press 75, and enter a number to specify the type of broadcast
message you want.
IF you want to send a
broadcast message to all
users at
THEN enter
this site
nothing.
this site, including NMS
users
nothing.
a particular NMS location,
local or remote
the location’s Network
Prefix. (If your system uses
overlap in its Network
Prefixes, ignore the overlap
and use the entire prefix.)
a particular remote
Meridian Mail Networking
site (this includes any NMS
locations served by this
site)
the site’s Network Prefix. (If
your system uses overlap in
its Network Prefixes, ignore
the overlap and use the
entire prefix.)
all sites, local and remote
(this includes all NMS
locations as well)
the Network-Wide Broadcast
Prefix. (This is set through
the Network Configuration
screen. See your Network
Administration guide.)
3
Enter the broadcast mailbox number for your local Meridian
Mail system (the default is 5555), and press #.
4
Repeat step 2 and step 3 to add other broadcast destinations
to the list, if desired.
5
Press # again, to end the list.
6
To start recording, press 5.
7
At the tone, record your broadcast message.
8
To stop recording, press #.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-42
Making voice recordings
Recording and sending broadcast messages
Step Action
Standard 1.0
9
To listen to your broadcast message, press 2.
10
To send the broadcast message, press 79.
11
To end your voice messaging session, press 83, and then hang
up.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-43
Making Voice Services recordings
Making Voice Services recordings
Introduction
The Voice Services feature enables you to create custom call
answering applications. Voice services recordings include
announcement recording, Thru-Dial greetings, fax item
confirmation prompts, voice menu greetings, voice menu
choices, and voice menu prompts.
This topic provides an overview of making Voice Services
recordings. For more information and more detailed procedures,
refer to the Voice Services Application Guide xxxxxxxxxxxx
(NTP 555-7001-325).
Announcements
This service enables you to record messages that can be played
back within a voice menu or as a stand-alone service that can be
dialed directly by a caller.
Thru-Dial services
These services access predefined DNs or user-prompted DNs
that can be used within a voice menu service or as a separate
service with a directory number. Thru-Dial services can be
created to provide a variety of dialing options to users of
Meridian Mail.
Fax on Demand
Fax on Demand is a Meridian Mail feature that allows a caller
to obtain information in the form of a fax. Depending on the
configuration of this feature on a system, fax documents may be
stored either as stand-alone, directly dialed fax items, or as
items selected from voice menus.
Voice Menus
The Voice Menus service enables you to create single-layered
or multilayered menus that present choices to callers. Callers
make their selections by pressing the key on the telephone
keypad that corresponds to the action they wish to perform.
Voice Prompt
Maintenance
This service enables you to modify the prompts and greetings
available in your voice menus and announcements using a
telephone.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-44
Making voice recordings
Making Voice Services recordings
Procedure
To make a Voice Services recording, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select Voice Administration.
2
Select Voice Services Administration.
3
Select the type of voice service.
4
Use the following table to determine the next step.
5
IF you want to
THEN
create a new Voice
Service recording
select the [Add] softkey.
add a new voice recording
to an existing voice service
select the [View/Modify]
softkey.
modify an existing voice
recording
select the [View/Modify]
softkey.
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to make
THEN move the cursor to
the
an Announcement
recording
Announcement Recorded
field.
a Thru-Dial recording
Greeting Recorded field.
a Fax Item recording
Continuation Prompt
Recorded field.
a Voice Menu recording
Greeting Recorded field or
Menu Choices Recorded
field.
a Voice Form recording
Form Name Recorded field.
6
Select the [Voice] softkey.
7
Type the extension of the phone you will use to make the
recording, and press <Return>.
Result: The phone rings.
8
Pick up the receiver.
Result: The recording softkeys are displayed.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-45
Making Voice Services recordings
Step Action
9
Select the [Record] softkey.
Result: The system displays the [Stop] softkey in place of the
[Record] softkey.
You hear a tone through the telephone receiver.
10
At the tone, make your recording.
11
To stop recording, select the [Stop] softkey.
Result: The recording stops automatically, and the system
again displays the recording softkeys.
12
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
13
THEN
play back the recording
go to step 13.
save the recording
go to step 15.
rerecord the recording
press the [Delete] key, and
go to step 9.
To play back the recording, select the [Play] softkey.
Result: The system plays the recording.
The system displays the [Stop] softkey.
14
To stop the playback at any time, select the [Stop] softkey.
Result: The system again displays the recording softkeys.
15
To save the recording and disconnect the call, use either the
[Return] softkey or the [Disconnect] softkey, and hang up the
phone.
Result: The system displays the original softkeys.
Note: When you use the [Return] softkey, the line is not
disconnected unless you hang up the receiver. This means that
if you decide to rerecord or listen to the recording, you do not
have to enter the telephone extension again after selecting the
[Voice] softkey.
When you use the [Disconnect] softkey, the line is
disconnected, and if you select the [Voice] softkey to access
the recording softkeys again, you must enter the telephone
extension again.
16
Standard 1.0
To update the screen and store the changes to the recording,
use the [Save] softkey.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-46
Making voice recordings
Making Voice Services recordings
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
Section B:
5-47
VMUIF recordings
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
5-48
VMUIF introductory tutorials and the VMUIF login greeting
5-49
Recording the VMUIF login greeting
5-52
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-48
Making voice recordings
Overview
Overview
Introduction
Three recordings are prerecorded for the VMUIF interface:
•
•
•
the introductory tutorial (for touch tone users)
the introductory tutorial (for dial pulse users)
the login greeting
These default recordings are enabled by default.
You can use these default recordings, customize them, or
disable them.
This section provides information and procedures for the
tutorials and greeting.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-49
VMUIF introductory tutorials and the VMUIF login greeting
VMUIF introductory tutorials and the VMUIF login greeting
Introduction
An introductory tutorial greeting is played to VMUIF
subscribers the first time they log in to their mailboxes. This
tutorial familiarizes them with the Meridian Mail system.
The default DTMF
tutorial
The Meridian Mail system plays the following introductory
tutorial the first time a user logs in to a new mailbox from a
touch tone telephone (a dual tone multifrequency or DTMF
phone).
“You are about to hear an introduction to Call Answering. This
service will allow your callers to leave you recorded messages.
You can play back your messages from your home phone, or, if
you create a password, from any touch tone phone outside your
home. You can also record a personalized greeting that will be
played to your callers, and you can erase your messages right
away, or store them temporarily in your mailbox. Step-by-step
instructions will guide you through your sessions. And
remember, for help at any time, just press zero.”
The default dial pulse
tutorial
The Meridian Mail system plays the following introductory
tutorial the first time a user logs in to a new mailbox that is set
up as a dial pulse user.
“You are about to hear an introduction to Call Answering. This
service will allow your callers to leave you recorded messages.
You can listen to your messages from your home phone at any
time. You can also play your messages from any touch tone
phone. And by calling the Greeting Change Service, you can
record a personalized greeting that will be played to your
callers. Step-by-step instructions will guide you through your
sessions. Consult the brochure for more information.”
The login greeting
The login greeting is played when subscribers log on to
Meridian Mail.
“Welcome to Call Answering.”
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-50
Making voice recordings
VMUIF introductory tutorials and the VMUIF login greeting
The custom tutorial
You may prefer to record a custom tutorial to address particular
needs of users on your system.
In preparing your tutorial, you may wish to refer to the text of
the default tutorials in this section.
Procedure
To record or disable the VMUIF tutorial, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select Voice Administration.
2
Select Voice Messaging Options.
Result: The system displays the Voice Messaging Options
screen.
3
Select the VMUIF introductory tutorial for dial pulse or touch
tone service.
4
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
disable the tutorial
go to step 5.
record a custom tutorial
go to step 6.
5
Select None.
6
Move the cursor to the Voice/Tutorial Recorded field.
7
Select the [Voice] softkey.
Result: The system prompts you for a phone number in
dialable format.
8
Type the number of the telephone you will use to make the
recording, and press <Return>.
Result: The telephone rings.
9
Pick up the telephone handset.
Result: The system displays the recording softkeys.
10
Select the [Record] softkey.
Result: The [Record] softkey changes to the [Stop] softkey.
11
At the tone, record your tutorial.
12
To stop recording, select the [Stop] softkey.
Result: The recording stops.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-51
VMUIF introductory tutorials and the VMUIF login greeting
Step Action
13
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
play back the recording
go to step 14.
record the tutorial again
select the [Delete] softkey,
and go to step 10.
save the recording
go to step 15.
14
To play back the recording, select the [Play] softkey.
15
To save the recording and disconnect the call, use either the
[Return] softkey or the [Disconnect] softkey, and hang up the
phone.
Result: The system displays the original softkeys.
Note: When you use the [Return] softkey, the line is not
disconnected unless you hang up the receiver. This means that
if you decide to rerecord or listen to the recording, you do not
have to enter the telephone extension again after selecting the
[Voice] softkey.
When you use the [Disconnect] softkey, the line is
disconnected, and if you select the [Voice] softkey to access
the recording softkeys again, you must enter the telephone
extension again.
Standard 1.0
16
To update the screen and store the changes to the recording,
use the [Save] softkey.
17
To enable the recording, in the Voice Messaging Options
screen, move the cursor to the VMUIF Introductory Tutorial
(Voice) field, and select Custom.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-52
Making voice recordings
Recording the VMUIF login greeting
Recording the VMUIF login greeting
Introduction
You may prefer to customize or disable the default login
greeting.
Procedure
To record or disable the VMUIF login greeting, follow these
steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select Voice Administration.
2
Select Voice Messaging Options.
Result: The system displays the Voice Messaging Options
screen.
3
Select Login Greeting (Voice).
4
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
disable the greeting
go to step 5.
record a custom greeting
go to step 7.
5
Select None.
6
Move the cursor to the Login Greeting Recorded field.
7
Select the [Voice] softkey.
Result: The system prompts you for a phone number in
dialable format.
8
Type the number of the telephone from which you will make the
recording, and press <Return>.
Result: The telephone rings.
9
Pick up the telephone handset.
Result: The system displays the recording softkeys.
10
Select the [Record] softkey.
Result: The [Record] softkey changes to the [Stop] softkey.
11
Standard 1.0
At the tone, say your greeting.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Making voice recordings
5-53
Recording the VMUIF login greeting
Step Action
12
To stop recording, select the [Stop] softkey.
Result: The recording stops.
13
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
play back the recording
go to step 14.
record the greeting again
select the [Delete] softkey,
and go to step 10.
save the recording
go to step 15.
14
To play back the recording, select the [Play] softkey.
15
To save the recording and disconnect the call, use either the
[Return] softkey or the [Disconnect] softkey, and hang up the
phone.
Result: The system displays the original softkeys.
Note: When you use the [Return] softkey, the line is not
disconnected unless you hang up the receiver. This means that
if you decide to rerecord or listen to the recording, you do not
have to enter the telephone extension again after selecting the
[Voice] softkey.
When you use the [Disconnect] softkey, the line is
disconnected, and if you select the [Voice] softkey to access
the recording softkeys again, you must enter the telephone
extension again.
Standard 1.0
16
To update the screen and store the changes to the recording,
use the [Save] softkey.
17
To enable the recording, in the Voice Messaging Options
screen, move the cursor to the Login Greeting (Voice) field, and
select Custom.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
5-54
Making voice recordings
Recording the VMUIF login greeting
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 6
Setting up Meridian Mail
security
In this chapter
Overview
6-2
Section A: Telecommunication criminals and the problems
they pose
6-3
Section B: Using Basic Access Restrictions features
6-9
Section C: Features that modify access restrictions
6-21
Section D: Controlling remote access to calling privilege
6-39
Section E: Controlling access through Least Cost Routing
(BARS/NARS)
6-47
Section F: Controlling access to PBX administration programs 6-73
Section G: Controlling Direct Inward System Access
6-83
Section H: Restriction/Permission lists
6-89
Section I: Controlling access to Meridian Mail services and
features
6-103
Section J: Controlling access to Meridian Mail mailboxes
6-123
Section K: Monitoring access to Meridian Mail mailboxes and 6-149
features
Section L: Equipment security
6-161
6-2
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Overview
Overview
Introduction
In today’s telecommunications environment, every
computerized system is potentially open to unauthorized access.
As system administrator, it is your responsibility to take all
necessary precautions to prevent security breaches. For
example, unless your system has been properly secured,
someone who is connected to Meridian Mail (such as a user
who is logged on to a mailbox, or an external caller who has
connected to Meridian Mail through a call answering session or
a voice menu) can place unauthorized calls that will be billed to
your system.
In this chapter
This chapter is divided into
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
an overview which describes the purpose and contents of
this chapter
Section A: Telecommunication criminals and the problems
they pose, which describes the types of telecommunication
criminals and the problems they pose to your system
a third part which provides information and instructions on
how you can use Meridian 1 software features to control
access to your switch
This part starts at Section B: and ends at Section G:.
a fourth part which provides information and instructions
on how to use Meridian Mail security features
This part starts at Section H: and ends at Section K:.
Section L: Equipment security which describes how to
control access to your system hardware
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Section A:
6-3
Telecommunication criminals
and the problems they pose
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
6-4
Designing a security system
6-7
Ongoing security measures
6-8
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-4
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Overview
Overview
Introduction
Telecom fraud has existed since the 1970s when “telephone
criminals,” or hackers, called their families and friends using
stolen credit calling codes. By the late 1970s, hackers were
using modems to access computerized systems from remote
locations. By the mid-1980s, they were able to crack codes at
computer speed using a personal computer with random number
generating programs and autodialers.
Today, telephone operating companies are no longer the
primary target for toll fraud as these companies have decreased
their vulnerability by aggressively using software controls and
prosecuting toll fraud criminals. For this reason, hackers trying
to steal codes have migrated to new and potentially more
devastating targets—customer premise equipment (for example,
the PBX, Meridian Mail, and so on). Hackers are now using
PBXs to place thousands of unauthorized calls primarily
through inbound 800 numbers and voice mail.
What they gain
Hackers usually want one of the following:
•
•
•
How they do it
Standard 1.0
authorization codes which allow them to use your private
branch exchange (PBX) for local and long-distance calls
Authorization codes can then be sold or stored for future
use.
the use of your voice messaging system for their own
purposes
For example, they can use your system as a bulletin board
to exchange lists of calling card numbers, coordinate illegal
activities, and so on.
to degrade your system performance
There are several ways in which a hacker can try to access your
system. The first is unauthorized access to the PBX; the second
is unauthorized access to the voice messaging system, in this
case, Meridian Mail; unauthorized access to personal
mailboxes; and unauthorized access to the equipment.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-5
Overview
Therefore, a good security system has to incorporate elements
from PBX and system security, and awareness on the part of
your users in order to provide effective security.
Unauthorized access
to the PBX
Hackers are using the PBX to place unauthorized calls primarily
through inbound 800 numbers and voice mail.
Nortel’s Meridian 1 products meet a wide variety of customer
requirements. In particular, the Meridian 1 (M1) has security
features to help minimize its vulnerability while maintaining its
flexibility.
For more information, see Sections B to G.
Unauthorized Meridian Hackers may attempt to hack into your voice messaging system
Mail access
so they can use the outdialing feature to make free local- and
long-distance calls.
With Meridian Mail, you can reduce, if not eliminate, this abuse
by implementing some or all of the recommendations for
system access. For more information, see Sections H to K.
Unauthorized mailbox
access
Most hackers want access to the outdialing features—they are
not concerned with personal mailboxes. If they do hack into a
personal mailbox, they usually have some “fun” with it like
changing the greeting, listening to messages, and so on.
With Meridian Mail, you can reduce the risk of unauthorized
mailbox access by implementing some or all of the
recommendations for mailbox access. For more information,
see “Controlling access to Meridian Mail mailboxes” on
page 6-123.
Unauthorized access
to the equipment
Standard 1.0
Your system hardware could be a potential point of
unauthorized access.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-6
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Overview
What can be done
about it?
Inadequate control of calling privileges and of physical access
to switching systems can cost your business millions of dollars.
To secure your PBX and limit its exposure to corporate
espionage and toll fraud, you need to implement security
measures for
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
PBX access
Meridian Mail system access
personal mailbox access
equipment access
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-7
Designing a security system
Designing a security system
Introduction
When designing a security system, consider the following two
questions:
•
•
How can you train your staff to responsibly use Meridian
Mail?
How can you prevent unauthorized use of your PBX and
Meridian Mail system?
Both of these factors will help in keeping your Meridian Mail
system safe from individuals who want to abuse your system.
Training your staff
Standard 1.0
Controlling access privileges to prevent PBX toll fraud and
abuse of your telephone system will affect all employees in
your organization, regardless of their positions or
responsibilities. Implementing a communication program about
the potential for fraud and abuse of your Meridian Mail
communication system will help motivate your employees to
prevent such abuse.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-8
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Ongoing security measures
Ongoing security measures
Introduction
Once you have established your security practices, you should
review them
•
•
several months after the practices have been implemented
so you can evaluate the results
This will help determine if certain practices require
modification.
whenever you notice strange calling patterns
These patterns will appear on reports listing numbers that
are being called from your location or charges that are
being billed to your company.
Remember to include your security practices in the orientation
session for new employees.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 6
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Section B:
6-9
Using Basic Access
Restrictions features
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
6-10
Trunk Group Access Restrictions
6-11
Class of Service
6-13
TGAR/TARG and CLS interaction
6-17
Transfer feature on modems
6-19
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-10
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Overview
Overview
Introduction
By providing internal and external users access only to the
facilities and calling privileges that their jobs require, you can
greatly decrease the potential for system abuse and toll fraud.
With Basic Access Restrictions features, you can deter internal
abuse and restrict external access to toll facilities.
The features
The Basic Access Restrictions features you can apply to
stations, TIE trunks, and authorization codes are as follows:
•
•
Standard 1.0
Trunk Group Access Restrictions (TGAR/TARG) controls
the specific trunk groups to which a station, TIE trunk,
Direct Inward System Access (DISA) directory number, or
authorization code has direct access.
For more information, see “Trunk Group Access
Restrictions” on page 6-11.
Class of Service (CLS) controls the degree of access; that
is, once access is provided, CLS determines whether users
can make local, TIE trunk, or long-distance calls.
For more information, see “Class of Service” on page 6-13.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-11
Trunk Group Access Restrictions
Trunk Group Access Restrictions
Introduction
Trunk Group Access Restrictions (TGAR) controls access to
various trunk groups including trunks that interface with the
exchange network, with TIE and CCSA networks, and with
services such as paging, dictation, and recorded
announcements.
How it works
Stations, TIE trunks, DISA directory numbers (DNs), and
authorization codes are assigned to a group (TGAR). When
users attempt to access a trunk route from a station, TIE trunk,
DISA DN, or authorization code, the Meridian 1 software
compares their group assignment (TGAR) against the list of
denied Trunk Access Restrictions Group (TARG) associated
with the trunk route they are trying to access.
If access is permitted, the Meridian 1 software then uses the
Class of Service (CLS) assignment to determine call eligibility.
The system always uses the most restrictive assignment (CLS or
TGAR) to determine call eligibility when a user is trying to
access trunk facilities directly.
By partitioning stations, TIE trunks, DISA DNs, and
authorization codes into appropriate groups based on your
corporate culture, you can stem internal abuse and external
fraudulent activity, such as “looping” from PBX to PBX or to
other carriers to mask the call’s origin.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-12
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Trunk Group Access Restrictions
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to implement or audit the TGAR/TARG
feature on the Meridian 1.
For
Implement using
Print using
Stations
LD 10/11—TGAR
LD 20 by TN
LD 10/11 by TN from Release
19 and up
Authorization codes
LD 88—TGAR
LD 88 by authorization code
TIE trunks
LD 14—TGAR
LD 20 by TN
Trunk groups (Route)
LD 16—TARG
LD 21 by route or access code
DISA DNs
LD 24—DISA
LD 24 by DISA DN
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-13
Class of Service
Class of Service
Introduction
Class of Service provides the flexibility to partition stations,
TIE trunks, DISA DNs, and authorization codes into calling
privilege “levels” that suit your business needs. Again, these
features can inhibit internal abuse and help protect your system
by preventing users from placing calls through external sources.
Class of Service
restriction levels
You can assign any one of the following Class of Service
restriction levels to each station, TIE trunk, and authorization
code to control the degree of access to the exchange network.
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
Unrestricted Service (UNR) Allowed to originate and
receive calls from the exchange network.
Conditionally Unrestricted (CUN) Allowed to receive
calls from the exchange network. Considered toll-denied
for calls placed through direct access to trunk but
unrestricted for toll calls placed through Automatic
Number Identification (ANI).
Conditionally Toll-Denied (CTD) Allowed to receive
calls from the exchange network. Considered toll-denied
for calls placed through direct access to trunks, but
unrestricted for toll calls placed through Basic/Network
Alternate Route Selection (BARS/NARS).
Toll-Denied Service (TLD) Allowed to receive calls from
the exchange network and to dial local exchanges. Calling
privileges of toll-denied stations may be modifiable
through Code Restriction or New Flexible Code Restriction
to allow or deny certain dialing sequences.
Semi-Restricted Service (SRE) Allowed to receive calls
from the exchange network. Restricted from all dial access
to the exchange network but allowed access to TIE trunks.
Allowed to access the exchange network through an
attendant or an unrestricted station.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-14
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Class of Service
Class of Service
restriction levels
(cont’d)
Standard 1.0
•
Fully Restricted Service Three classes of Fully Restricted
Service are available:
- FRE Allowed to originate and receive internal calls.
Allowed access to TIE and CCSA networks, and to and
from the exchange network using call modification
from an unrestricted station. Denied access, either
through dialing or through the attendant, to and from
the exchange network.
- FR1 Allowed to originate and receive internal calls.
Allowed access to TIE and CCSA networks. Denied
access to and from the exchange network.
- FR2 Allowed to originate and receive internal calls.
Denied access to TIE and CCSA networks, and to the
exchange network.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-15
Class of Service
The following table outlines various call types and indicates
whether they are possible within each Class of Service
assignment.
Assigning a Class of
Service
Class of Service assignment
Call type
UNR
CTD/CUN
TLD
SRE
FRE
FR1
FR2
Incoming Yes
trunk calls
Yes
Yes
Yes
Through
No
No
Outgoing
non-toll
trunk call
Yes
Yes
No
No
Outgoing
toll trunk
call (see
Note 2)
Yes
No direct
access.
Yes,
through
BARS,
NARS, or
CDP if
allowed
through
NCOS
No
No
call
modification
only (see
Note 1)
Yes
Stationextended
only
Attendant
Attendant or station- NA
or station- extended
extended only
only
Incoming/ Yes
outgoing
TIE call
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Stationto-station
call
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Note 1: Call modification (transfer from station, call pickup, or transfer answer from any
station) may be allowed or denied for each system.
Note 2: A toll call to the Meridian 1 is 0+ or 1+ dialing on a central office or foreign exchange
trunk.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-16
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Class of Service
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlay programs
and prompts should be used for implementing or auditing the
Class of Service feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
Stations
LD 10/11—CLS
LD 20 by TN; LD 10/11 by TN
from Release 19 and up
LD81 by COS
Authorization codes
LD 88—CLS
LD 88 (by authorization code)
TIE trunks
LD 14—CLS
LD 20 by TN
Trunk groups (Route)
LD 24—CLS
LD 24 (by DISA DN)
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-17
TGAR/TARG and CLS interaction
TGAR/TARG and CLS interaction
Introduction
You can use CLS and TGAR/TARG to control access to and
from your trunk facilities. By assigning the most appropriate
Class of Service (COS) and TGAR, you can limit your system’s
vulnerability to toll fraud and internal abuse.
Interaction
The following illustration shows the interaction between the
Class of Service (CLS) assignment and Trunk Group Access
Restrictions (TGAR).
A
Class of
Service =
TLD
Denied direct access
to Paging Trunk
CO Trunk Group (COT)
B
WATS Trunk Group (WATS)
Class of
Service =
UNR
Paging Trunk
Paging
Speaker
Denied direct access
to WATS Trunk Group
C
Class of
Service =
SRE
Allowed direct access
to all Trunk Groups
G100446
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-18
Setting up Meridian Mail security
TGAR/TARG and CLS interaction
In this illustration, the following occurs:
•
•
•
•
User C dials access code to CO trunk group, followed by
555-6100.
Meridian 1 checks Trunk Access Restriction Group to see
if user has access to CO trunks.
User C does.
Meridian 1 checks CLS (SRE) to see if user can make a
local call.
User C cannot make a local call.
Call is not allowed through CLS.
In summary, when a user attempts to access a trunk route, the
Meridian 1 compares the TGAR assignment against the list of
denied TARGs associated with the route that the user is trying
to access. If the TARG is not listed, the Meridian 1 then uses the
CLS assignment to determine call eligibility.
The system uses the most restrictive assignment, CLS or
TGAR, to determine call eligibility when a user is attempting to
place a call by way of direct access to trunk facilities.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-19
Transfer feature on modems
Transfer feature on modems
Introduction
Hackers also use “smart” modems to infiltrate a PBX taking
advantage of systems whose 2500 dataports were programmed
with unnecessary features. The most common data hack is
perpetrated by one “smart” modem calling another and leaving
a series of instructions at the receiving modem.
How it works
The instructions require the receiving modem to emulate a
switchhook flash (transfer), out pulse a series of numbers from
the calling modem, and switchhook again. This effectively
transfers the call back to the PBX and out again.
What you can do
about it
The modem port usually has calling privileges assigned that are
not required for the modem to function. Many times, a 2500-set
template is used that is also used for single-line phones.
Frequently, the administrator is unaware that the 2500 port will
be used for data,
Modem phones should be identified and the transfer feature
removed if possible. The default on 2500 sets is “deny.” Be sure
the class of service, TGAR, and NCOS do not allow longdistance calling whenever possible.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-20
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Transfer feature on modems
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Section C:
6-21
Features that modify access
restrictions
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
6-22
System Speed Call
6-23
Authorization Codes
6-24
Station Specific Authorization Codes
6-25
Forced Charge Account
6-27
Controlled Class of Service
6-29
Enhanced Controlled Class of Service
6-32
Flexible Feature Codes—Electronic Lock
6-33
Code Restriction
6-34
New Flexible Code Restriction
6-36
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-22
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Overview
Overview
Introduction
The following features can be used to selectively override Class
of Service (CLS) and Trunk Group Access Restrictions
(TGAR) when you need to extend a station’s or TIE trunk’s
normal calling capabilities:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
System Speed Call
For more information, see “System Speed Call” on
page 6-23.
Authorization Code
For more information, see “Authorization Codes” on
page 6-24.
Station Specific Authorization Code
For more information, see “Station Specific Authorization
Codes” on page 6-25.
Forced Charge Account
For more information on, see “Forced Charge Account” on
page 6-27.
Controlled Class of Service
For more information, see “Controlled Class of Service” on
page 6-29.
Enhanced Controlled Class of Service
For more information, see “Enhanced Controlled Class of
Service” on page 6-32.
Flexible Feature Codes—Electronic Lock
For more information, see “Flexible Feature Codes—
Electronic Lock” on page 6-33.
Code Restrictions
For more information, see “Code Restriction” on
page 6-34.
New Flexible Code Restriction
For more information, see “New Flexible Code
Restriction” on page 6-36.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-23
System Speed Call
System Speed Call
Introduction
System Speed Call extends the capabilities of the Speed Call
feature. In addition to providing abbreviated dialing, using an
entry in a System Speed Call list lets the internal user
temporarily override the Class of Service and TGAR assigned
to a station, and place a call to a telephone number in the
System Speed Call list.
How it works
With this feature, you can assign the most appropriate CLS and
TGAR restrictions to a station to limit the potential for
unauthorized calling, and, at the same time, allow calls to
approved destinations. The “approved telephone numbers” that
you define in a system Speed Call list extend the station’s
calling privileges beyond the station restriction levels.
You can assign stations to different System Speed Call lists.
You can also designate these stations as either System Speed
Call Users (SSUs) or System Speed Call User/Controllers
(SSCs) of the list. You can also assign list controlling
capabilities to a key on the attendant console. However, this key
cannot override CLS and TGAR because the attendant is not
subject to these restrictions.
Note: A System Speed Call list can also override the station
restrictions imposed through the Least Cost Routing software.
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlay programs
and prompts should be used for implementing or auditing the
System Speed Call feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
Stations
LD 10—FTR
LD 20 by TN; LD 10/11 by TN
from Release 19 and up
LD11—SSU, KEY
LD81 by SSU, SSC, KEY
Speed Call list
LD 18—SSC, all prompts
LD 20 by list number
Attendant
LD 12—KEY
LD 20 by TN
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-24
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Authorization Codes
Authorization Codes
Introduction
Authorization codes allow users to place business calls from
stations normally restricted from doing so. These restricted
stations may be located in areas of public access or used by
employees who do not require broader calling privileges.
How it works
Authorization codes enable selected users to temporarily
override the access restrictions assigned to a station or a TIE
trunk. A user enters an authorization code which has an
associated Class of Service (CLS), TGAR, and Least Cost
Routing or Network Class of Service (NCOS). The user has the
calling privileges of the authorization codes rather than those of
the station or TIE trunk for the duration of the call.
Considerations
When you implement the Authorization Code feature, you
should consider making the authorization codes as long as your
corporate culture will allow, assigning unique authorization
codes to each user, and allowing calling privileges based on
user requirements.
You can also output the codes as part of the Call Detail Records
(CDR) to look for call patterns that indicate possible
unauthorized access or abuse. You should design and
implement procedures for assigning authorization codes to new
employees and for deleting codes that are no longer valid
because of attrition or abuse.
Note: You may use authorization codes to override the station
restrictions imposed through the Least Cost Routing software.
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlay programs
and prompts should be used for implementing or auditing the
Authorization Codes feature.
For
Implement using Overlay
programs/features prompts
Print using Overlay programs
Authorization codes
LD88—all prompts
LD 88 by authorization code
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-25
Station Specific Authorization Codes
Station Specific Authorization Codes
Introduction
The Station Specific Authorization (Authcode) Code is offered
in X11 Release 19 as a separate package. It allows you to define
the authorization code access level of a set.
How it works
The Station Specific Authorization Code feature is
implemented on a per set basis. The system will cross-check
between overlays 10, 11, and 88 to ensure that the authorization
code being used is valid. The only time cross-checking is not
performed is when authorization codes are deleted from
overlays 10 or 11. You must remove the authorization codes
from overlay 88 as well as overlays 10 or 11.
Levels of access
There are three levels of authorization code access:
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
Authcode Unrestricted (AUTU) A set programmed
AUTU will be allowed to enter any authorization code
without additional restrictions.
Authcode Restricted (AUTR) When a set is configured
AUTR, the authorization code entered by the user must
match one of the preassigned authorization codes. Any
other authcode will be treated as invalid, and an error
message will be generated at the TTY.
Authcode Denied (AUTD) No authorization code entry
will be accepted for a set configured as AUTD.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-26
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Station Specific Authorization Codes
Implementing and
auditing
Use the following table to determine which overlay programs
and prompts should be used for implementing or auditing the
Station Specific Authorization Codes feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
LD 10/11 stations
LD 10/11
LD 20 by TNB
(AUTU), AUTR, AUTD
LD 10, 11 by TNB from
Release 19 and up
MAUT YES/NO
SPWD (prompted if MAUT=YES)
AUTH
LD 81 ODAS
LD 81 FEAT AUTU, AUDT, AUTD
LD 81 by FEAT
LD 88 Authorization
Code
LD 88 AUTH
LD 88 by AUTH
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-27
Forced Charge Account
Forced Charge Account
Introduction
With Forced Charge Account (FCA), the system forces the user
to act before greater calling privileges are granted.
How it works
The Forced Charge Account feature temporarily overrides the
toll-denied Class of Service Restriction (TLD) provided the
user enters an account code before placing a toll call. After the
user enters an account code, the Meridian 1 software checks
only for a valid account code length—not for valid digits within
an account code. Once the Meridian 1 verifies the account code
length, the user has an unrestricted Class of Service or the
customer-defined Forced Charge Account Network Class of
Service (NCOS), or both, for the duration of the call.
The Call Detail Recording (CDR) software outputs a charge
record which identifies the charge account used for the call.
Note: You can use the Forced Charge Account feature to
override the restrictions imposed through the Least Cost
Routing software.
Example
The following illustration is an example of how Forced Charge
Account works.
Charge Account Key
CUSTOMER DATA
Denied access to
WATS routes
Class of Service = TLD
Account code length is
6 digits
Forced Charge Account
NCOS/FRL = 6
G100450
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-28
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Forced Charge Account
Example, cont’d
In this example, the following takes place:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Implementing and
auditing the feature
User goes off-hook to obtain a dial tone.
User presses Charge Account key.
User dials six-digit account code.
Account code record is generated in CDR.
User receives a dial tone and dials a number in the normal
manner.
Set becomes UNR (unrestricted) for this one call.
Use the following table to determine which overlay programs
and prompts should be used for implementing or auditing the
Forced Charge Account feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
Customer
LD 15—CHLN, FCAF,
CHMN, FCNC
LD 21 by CUST, by CDR from
Release 19 and up
Stations
LD 10/11—TLD, FCAR
LD 10, 11 by TN from Release
19 and up
LD 20 by TN
TIE trunks
Standard 1.0
LD 14—TLD, FCAR
System Administration Guide
LD 20 by TN
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-29
Controlled Class of Service
Controlled Class of Service
Introduction
You can use Controlled Class of Service to lower calling
privileges of sets in unsecured areas and still raise their calling
privileges when required. This feature is particularly effective
in preventing internal abuse.
How it works
The Controlled Class of Service (CCOS) feature allows users of
SL-1 and Meridian digital sets designated as controllers, and
users of TTYs designated as background terminals, to
temporarily alter a designated station’s Class of Service
assignments (CLS). When a station is in the controlled mode, its
CLS is derived from the Controlled Class of Service restriction
level defined for each customer.
Users of SL-1 and Meridian digital sets designated as
controllers can place stations in a controlled mode one at a time
whereas background terminals can alter individual, group, or all
designated stations at one time.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-30
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Controlled Class of Service
Example
The following illustration is an example of how the Controlled
Class of Service feature works.
Class of Service is allowed to be controlled.
Class of Service = UNR
CUSTOMER DATA
The Controlled Class of
Service is FR2
Controlled Class of Service
Controller Key
CLASS OF SERVICE
CONTROLLER
G100451
In this example, the controller does the following:
•
•
•
presses the Controller key
dials the directory number of the set to be controlled
presses the Controller key.
The set is now an FR2 Class of Service
To return that set to the UNR Class of Service, the controller
presses the Controller key, dials the DN for the set, and presses
the Controller key again. The set will be reset to a UNR Class
of Service.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-31
Controlled Class of Service
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlay programs
and prompts should be used for implementing or auditing the
Controlled Class of Service feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
Customers
LD 15—CCRS
LD 21 by CUST or by CCOS
Stations to be controlled
LD 10/11—CLS
LD 10, 11 by TN from Release
19 and up
LD 20 by TN
Stations to be controllers
LD 11—KEY
LD 20 by TN
LD 81 CCOS Key
Background terminals
Standard 1.0
LD 17—ADAN, USER
System Administration Guide
LD 22 by CFN, ADAN from
Release 19 and up
January 1998
6-32
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Enhanced Controlled Class of Service
Enhanced Controlled Class of Service
Introduction
This enhancement expands the Controlled Class of Service
feature to further control calling privileges of stations in
unsecured areas. Enhanced Controlled Class of Service (ECCS)
extends the controller function of Controlled Class of Service
(CCOS) to attendant consoles and the M3000 sets equipped
with a Controller key. In addition, this enhancement allows for
two more customer-defined levels of CCOS restriction.
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlay programs
and prompts should be used for implementing or auditing the
Enhanced Controlled Class of Service feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
Customers
LD 15—CCRS, ECC1, ECC2
LD 21 by CUST or by CCOS
from Release 19 and up
Stations to be controlled
LD 10/11—CLS
LD 10, 11 by TN from Release
19 and up
LD 20 by TN
Stations to be controllers
LD 11—KEY
LD 11 by TN from Release 19
and up
LD 20 by TN
LD 81 CCOS Key
Attendants to be controllers
LD 12—KEY
LD 20 by TN
LD 81 CCOS key
Background terminals
Standard 1.0
LD 17—USER
System Administration Guide
LD 22 by CFN, by ADAN from
Release 19 and up
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-33
Flexible Feature Codes—Electronic Lock
Flexible Feature Codes—Electronic Lock
Introduction
Electronic Lock (ELK) allows selected users to activate and
deactivate the Controlled Class of Service (CCOS) mode from
their stations by entering the Station Control Password (SCPW)
and the appropriate Electronic Lock code.
Station users can activate the Electronic Lock feature to prevent
unauthorized calls from their sets when they are not able to
control physical access. The feature is used typically in the
evenings or on weekends.
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlay programs
and prompts should be used for implementing or auditing the
Electronic Lock feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
Customers
LD 15-CCRS, SCPL
LD 21 by CUST or by CCOS
from Release 19 and up
Flexible Feature code
LD 57—FFCT, CODE, ELKA, LD 57
ELKD
Stations
LD 10/11—SCPW, CLS
LD 10/11 by TN from Release
19 and up
LD 20 by TN
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-34
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Code Restriction
Code Restriction
Introduction
The Code Restriction feature allows toll-denied stations, TIE
trunks, DISA DNs, and authorization codes limited access to
the toll-exchange network—that is, to CO and FX trunks. For
each CO and FX trunk group, you can build a code restriction
block that specifies the allowed area codes and exchange codes
for toll-denied users accessing those facilities.
Example
The following illustration is an example of how the Code
Restriction feature works.
CO Trunks
Allowed access to
Central Office
Trunk Group
CODE RESTRICTION BLOCK
All codes are denied except:
LOCAL EXCHANGES
1214
1800
1817
G100452
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-35
Code Restriction
Example (cont’d)
In this example, the following takes place:
•
•
•
•
Implementing and
auditing the feature
The user goes off-hook and dials the access code for CO
trunks followed by 1-800-555-0110.
The station is TLD and not normally allowed to dial 1+, but
a code restriction is in effect.
Meridian 1 checks the Code Restriction Table for CO
trunks and finds that 1-800 is allowed.
The call is completed.
Use the following table to determine which overlay programs
and prompts should be used for implementing or auditing the
Code Restriction feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
Code Restriction
LD 19 all prompts
LD 21 by CRB
Stations
LD 10/11—CLS=TLD
LD 10/11 by TN from Release
19 and up
LD 20 by TN
LD 81 by TLD
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-36
Setting up Meridian Mail security
New Flexible Code Restriction
New Flexible Code Restriction
Introduction
To extend the calling privileges normally associated with tolldenied Class of Service, New Flexible Code Restriction allows
you to partition toll-denied users into groups. Each toll-denied
group can have unique calling privileges. New Flexible Code
Restriction (NFCR) enhances Code Restriction by letting you
selectively allow or deny toll-denied stations, TIE trunks, DISA
DNs, and authorization codes to make certain calls on outgoing
trunk routes. With New Flexible Code Restriction, the Meridian
1 determines whether the toll-denied user can make a call on a
specific trunk route by checking the specific digit sequence
dialed, the number of digits dialed, or both.
How it works
You can assign toll-denied users to a Network Class of Service
(NCOS) and allow or deny calling privileges according to the
Facility Restriction Level (FRL) of the NCOS. Toll-denied
stations, TIE trunks, and authorization codes can be assigned
from 1 to 100 possible NCOS groups. Each NCOS group can be
assigned to one of eight possible FRLs.
When the toll-denied user accesses an outgoing route, the
Meridian 1 compares the FRL of the user’s NCOS to a table that
defines the calling privileges associated with that trunk group.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-37
New Flexible Code Restriction
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlay programs
and prompts should be used for implementing or auditing the
New Flexible Code Restriction feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
Customer
LD 15—NFCR, MAXT
LD 21 by CUST or by ESN
from Release 19 and up
Network control
LD 87—NCOS, FRL
LD 87 by NCOS
New Flexible Code
Restriction block
LD 49-FCR for all prompts
LD 49 FCR
Route
LD 16—FRL
LD 21 RDB
Station
LD 10/11—NCOS, CLS=TLD
LD 10, 11 by TN from Release
19 and up
LD 20 by TN
LD 81 by COS, NCOS
DISA
Standard 1.0
LD 24—NCOS
System Administration Guide
LD 24 by DISA DN
January 1998
6-38
Setting up Meridian Mail security
New Flexible Code Restriction
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 6
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Section D:
6-39
Controlling remote access to
calling privilege
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
6-40
Call Forward All Calls
6-41
Call Forward External Deny
6-42
Call Forward to Trunk Access Code—DID Calls
6-43
Internal Call Forward
6-44
Flexible Feature Codes—Remote Call Forward
6-45
User Selectable Call Redirection
6-46
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-40
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Overview
Overview
Introduction
Two of the most commonly abused features are Call Forward
All Calls and Direct Inward System Access (DISA).
Call Forward
Call Forward is a convenient feature that allows users who are
going to be away from their desks to forward their calls to
another set or location.
Call Forward All Calls
The Call Forward All Calls feature is assigned on a per station
basis and designates the maximum number of digits to which a
user may call forward. DISA allows users in remote locations to
place calls through your corporate PBX.
Types of abuse
Station users have abused Call Forwarding by forwarding their
sets to either a long-distance telephone number or to a trunk
access code, then going offsite, and making a call to their sets.
With the introduction of Remote Call Forward, non-users can
abuse Call Forward if proper controls are not in place.
In this section
This section describes additional controls you can use with the
Call Forward features to stem abuse and unauthorized calls.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-41
Call Forward All Calls
Call Forward All Calls
Description
Call Forward (CFW) allows users to forward all calls manually
to another number either internal or external to the system. The
ability to forward a phone outside the system depends not only
on the number of digits assigned to the call forward feature, but
on the assignment of the feature Call Forward External Allow,
also assigned on a phone-by-phone basis.
What you should look
for
The default for CFW is 16, adequate for many international
calls. Ensure this feature is restricted to the minimum in all
cases (usually four—the standard number of digits in an
extension). Be aware of the combinations of external
forwarding and long digit strings allowed. Permit only where
absolutely necessary.
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the Call Forward
All Calls feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
Stations
LD10, 11—CFW
LD 10, 11 by TN from Release
19 and up
LD 20 by TN
LD 81 by CFW
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-42
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Call Forward External Deny
Call Forward External Deny
Description
This feature provides the option to restrict, on a set-by-set basis,
the ability to call forward all calls to an external directory
number (DN).
With Release 19, the default value for Call Forward External
becomes “deny.”
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the Call Forward
External Deny feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
Stations
LD 10, 11—CLS
LD 10, 11 by TN from Release
19 and up
LD 20 by TN
LD 81 by CFXA, CFXD
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-43
Call Forward to Trunk Access Code—DID Calls
Call Forward to Trunk Access Code—DID Calls
Description
You may not want your users to call forward their stations to an
access code. After all, an unrestricted station forwarding to the
central office trunk (COT) access code puts a whole world of
calling capabilities at the caller’s fingertips. Call Forward to
Trunk Access Code provides you with the option to restrict, on
a customer-by-customer basis, the ability to call forward direct
in dial (DID) calls to a trunk access code.
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the Call Forward
to Trunk Access—DID calls feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
Customer
LD 15—CFTA
LD 21 by customer
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-44
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Internal Call Forward
Internal Call Forward
Description
Internal Call Forward (ICF) is available for systems using X11
software Release 19 and up. ICF directs all internal calls to a
specified location different from the call forward destination of
external calls. An internal call is considered an extension-toextension call, Direct Inward System Access (DISA) call,
Group Call, a call over a trunk route designated as internal, an
incoming trunk call using private numbering, or an attendantoriginated call. The default for this feature is 4 digits but can be
defined for up to 23 digits.
How to use ICF
Ensure that Call Forward to Trunk Access Codes is set to “no”
in the customer Data Block and that Call Forward External is
denied. A combination of these features in the “allow” state
would permit users to call forward their phones to BARS/
NARS access codes or trunk access codes, and receive a second
dial tone when looping through private networks or entering the
system through DISA.
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the Internal Call
Forward feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
Customer
LD 15—CFTA
LD 21 by customer
Stations
LD 10—FTR, ICF
LD 10, 11 by TN from Release
19 and up
LD 20 by TN
LD 81 by ICF
Flexible Feature Codes
Standard 1.0
LD 57—ICFA, ICFD, ICFV
System Administration Guide
LD 57 by CODE
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-45
Flexible Feature Codes—Remote Call Forward
Flexible Feature Codes—Remote Call Forward
Description
The Remote Call Forward feature (RCFW) allows a user to
activate and deactivate the Call Forward All Calls feature from
a remote station.
How RCFW works
Users enter codes to activate and deactivate the feature, and
must also enter a station-specific password. You can selectively
provide this capability to users as job functions require. The
user can also activate this feature from an offsite location by
using DISA.
Exercise care in assigning this capability to minimize
opportunities for abuse.
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the Remote Call
Forward feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
Customer
LD 15—SCPL
LD 21 by CUST or by CFCO
from Release 19 and up
Flexible Feature Code
LD 57—CODE, RCFA, RCFD, LD 57 by FFC
RCFV
Station
LD 10/11—SCPW
LD 21 by TN
DISA
LD 24 by DISA
LD 24 DISA by DN
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-46
Setting up Meridian Mail security
User Selectable Call Redirection
User Selectable Call Redirection
Introduction
Release 19 introduces the ability to user-select the destination
for Forward No Answer, Busy Hunt, External Forward No
Answer, and External Hunt. The feature is controlled by
Flexible Feature Code, Special Prefix Code, or a User key on a
multiline phone.
This feature requires a Station Control Password.
Ensure that the SCPW is unique for each phone with the feature
allowed.
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the User
Selectable Call Redirection feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
LD 10/11 SETS
LD 10 SCPW, CLS, USRA
LD 10, 11 by TN, DN from
Release 19 and up
LD 20 by TN
LD 20 by DN
LD 15 CDB
LD 15 SPCL, FFCS
LD 21 by CUST, by CFW from
Release 19 and up
LD 57 FFC
LD 57 USCR
LD 57 by CODE
LD 81 by CODE
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Section E:
6-47
Controlling access through Least
Cost Routing (BARS/NARS)
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
6-48
Supplemental Digit Recognition
6-50
Supplemental Digit Restriction
6-52
Network Class of Service—Facility Restriction Level
6-55
Network Speed Call
6-58
Network Authorization Code
6-60
Authorization Code Conditionally Last
6-61
Time-of-Day Routing
6-64
Routing Control
6-67
Incoming Trunk Group Exclusion
6-70
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-48
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Overview
Overview
Introduction
Basic Alternate Routing System (BARS) and Network
Alternate Routing System (NARS) software allows you to route
outgoing calls over the least expensive facility available at the
time the user places the call. You can use the BARS/NARS
feature to prevent calls to a specific area code or exchange, or to
international locations.
How BARS and NARS
work
When the user dials an access code followed by the desired
number, the software processes and routes the call. Based on the
number the user dials, the Meridian 1 system reads a digit
translation table. The translation determines which list of
alternate routes the system will use to process the call. This list
is called a route list index and contains alternate outgoing routes
(trunk groups) for call completion.
Because the majority of toll-fraud calls terminate in the 809
area code and in international locations such as Egypt, Pakistan,
and Columbia, consider not defining these codes in your
translation tables if your business does not require that users
call these locations. If your corporate culture requires calls to
destinations associated with fraud, you should consider
assigning unique route list indexes to each of these destinations.
Such a scheme provides the capability to assess normal call
volumes and detect variations.
Assessment tools
Statistics are available to indicate the number of calls placed
through each route list index. It is TFN001.
Available features
The following features are elements of BARS/NARS which
allow you flexibility in restricting calling privileges:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
Supplemental Digit Recognition
Supplemental Digit Restriction
Network Class of Service—Facility Restriction Level
Network Speed Call
Network Authorization Code
Authorization Code Conditionally Last
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-49
Overview
Available features
(cont’d)
•
•
•
Time-of-Day Routing
Routing Control
Incoming Trunk Group (TIE) Exclusion
BARS/NARS features
to control access
privileges
The following table lists the features you should consider
implementing depending on the requirements of your business.
If your business requirement is to
Then we recommend you
totally deny an area code or a local exchange
do not define them in the translation table.
Calls to those numbers attempted through BARS/
NARS are blocked.
deny all access to certain country codes, or
exchanges within an area code
use the Supplemental Digit Restriction feature or
Translation Data Block.
For more information, see “Supplemental Digit
Restriction” on page 6-52.
inhibit the use of certain trunk groups
use the Network Class of Service (NCOS)
Facility Restriction Level (FRL) and also
(optionally) Trunk Group Access Restriction
(TGAR) feature.
For more information, see “Network Class of
Service—Facility Restriction Level” on
page 6-55 and “Trunk Group Access
Restrictions” on page 6-11.
deny access to certain trunk groups or
destinations at a specific time
use the Time-of-Day Routing feature.
For more information, see “Time-of-Day
Routing” on page 6-64.
deny access to certain destinations after
use the Routing Control feature.
business hours, on weekends and holidays, or For more information, see “Routing Control” on
at other selected times.
page 6-67.
deny calls to certain dialing sequences when
those calls originate on TIE trunks
Standard 1.0
use the Incoming Trunk Group Exclusion.
For more information, see “Incoming Trunk
Group Exclusion” on page 6-70.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-50
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Supplemental Digit Recognition
Supplemental Digit Recognition
Description
One type of internal abuse or misuse occurs when callers use
incoming TIE trunks. Callers on TIE trunks sometimes dial the
BARS/NARS access code followed by the whole telephone
number of an internal station.
When using Supplemental Digit Recognition, the Meridian 1
“recognizes” dialing sequences associated with internal calls,
and thus prevents callers from using two trunks to complete an
internal call.
Example
The following figure illustrates how the Supplemental Digit
Recognition feature works.
1214-555-81XX
DID TRUNKS
1214-555-81XX
DID TRUNKS
555-9120
CO TRUNKS
555-9120
CO TRUNKS
555-8100
555-8100
G100453
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-51
Supplemental Digit Recognition
Example (cont’d)
In this example, the following takes place:
•
•
Implementing and
auditing the feature
User A dials 9-555-8100.
Meridian 1 is not programmed to recognize 555-8100 as an
internal number.
The call is routed out over a CO trunk group and is returned
to the Meridian through the DID trunk group. An internal
call now requires two trunks to be complete.
User B dials 9-555-8100.
Meridian 1 is programmed to recognize 555-8100 as an
internal number and deletes 555. Meridian 1 dials 8100.
The call is completed internally.
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the Supplemental
Digit Recognition feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
ESN
LD 86—MXSD
LD 86 by FEAT=ESN
Network translation
LD 90—DENY, LDID, LDDD LD 90 by NPA, NXX, or SPN
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-52
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Supplemental Digit Restriction
Supplemental Digit Restriction
Description
Because most toll-fraud calls are placed to international
locations, you can use Supplemental Digit Restriction (SDR) to
block calls to international locations that your users do not need
to call.
How SDR works
Supplemental Digit Restriction enables you to block calls to
certain telephone numbers within exchanges, area codes, or
country codes. For example, you may have legitimate
international calling requirements to many countries but none to
those countries typically associated with fraud. Supplemental
Digit Restriction lets you block calls to those countries.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-53
Supplemental Digit Restriction
Example
The following figure illustrates how the Supplemental Digit
Restriction feature works.
Call is blocked
BARS/NARS DATA
Access Code is 9.
WATS Trunk Group
All calls to the area code
316 area are allowed except
for those followed by 976.
G100454
In this example, the following takes place:
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
The user dials 9-1-316-976-9090.
The 9 triggers the Meridian 1 to use BARS/NARS data.
Meridian 1 checks the Translation Table for 1316 and finds
that 1316, followed by 976, is blocked.
The call is blocked.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-54
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Supplemental Digit Restriction
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the Supplemental
Digit Restriction feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
ESN
LD 86—MXSD
LD 86 by FEAT=ESN
Network translation
LD 90—DENY, LDID, LDDD LD 90 by NPA, NXX, or SPN
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-55
Network Class of Service—Facility Restriction Level
Network Class of Service—Facility Restriction Level
Description
A Network Class of Service (NCOS) designation is a group of
calling privileges you can assign to a station, TIE trunk, DISA
DN, or authorization code.
How NCOS works
The Meridian 1 system uses the NCOS to determine caller
treatments and eligibility for outgoing calls that use the Least
Cost Routing (BARS/NARS) software. By partitioning stations,
TIE trunks, DISA DNs, and authorization codes into unique
NCOS groups, you can track the normal calling patterns of each
group (TFN002). You can then promptly detect variances which
can indicate fraudulent activity, and take action.
Within the NCOS, you can assign the user to one of eight
Facility Restriction Levels (FRL). The FRL is compared to the
minimum FRL requirement assigned to each entry in a route
list. The entries in the route list are trunk routes that are able to
place calls to the NPA, NXX, or special number. The routes are
listed in the order the system searches them when trying to
complete an external call. Callers are eligible to complete a call
on an entry in the route list when their FRL is equal to, or higher
than, the entry’s FRL level.
In conjunction with
TGAR
The BARS/NARS database can be configured to ignore Trunk
Group Access Restrictions (TGAR) or to use them. When
TGARs are ignored, the BARS/NARS software assesses the
Class of Service and the FRL to determine which call facilities
are eligible for a particular call. This configuration allows
flexibility in using a given trunk group while forcing users to
place calls through BARS/NARS. You can base trunk access
for each call on the FRL requirements for the number dialed
rather than basing it on the TGAR.
You can also configure the BARS/NARS database to assess
TGAR assignments in determining how the system can route a
call. In this case, the BARS/NARS software will use the COS,
TGAR, and FRL to determine which call facilities are eligible
to process a particular call.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-56
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Network Class of Service—Facility Restriction Level
Example
The following illustration shows how the NCOS Facility
Restriction Level feature works.
BARS/NARS DATA
Yes
Access Code is 9.
All calls to area code 1-417
use Route List #2.
Route List #2- The first choice
is the WATS Route. The
second choice, if all the WATS
Trunks are busy, is the
CO Trunks.
WATS Trunk Group
No
The caller must have an
NCOS/FRL of 2 or greater
to access the WATS Route
and an NCOS/FRL of 3 to
access the CO Trunks.
CO Trunk Group
NCOS/FRL= 2
G100454
In this example, the following occurs:
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
The user dials 9-1-417-555-9090.
The 9 triggers Meridian 1 to use BARS/NARS data.
The Meridian 1 searches the Translation Table for 1417.
Calls to 1417 use Route List Index 2.
Route List Index 2 is searched for an idle available trunk.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-57
Network Class of Service—Facility Restriction Level
•
•
•
•
•
•
Implementing and
auditing the feature
The first choice is the WATS route.
The NCOS/FRL assigned to the first choice (2) is
compared to the NCOS/FRL (2) of the station.
The station’s NCOS/FRL (2) is equal to, or greater than,
the WATS NCOS/FRL (2), so the call is allowed for this
choice.
If all WATS trunks are busy, then the second choice (CO
trunks) is checked.
The NCOS/FRL of the CO trunks (3) is compared to the
NCOS/FRL of the station (2).
The station’s NCOS/FRL (2) is lower than the CO trunks’
NCOS/FRL (3), so the call cannot be completed over CO
trunks.
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the NCOS
Facility Restriction Level feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
Network control
LD 87—NCTL all prompts
LD 87 FEAT=NCTL by NCOS
Route list index
LD 86—RLB, FRL
LD 86 FEAT=RLB
Authorization code
LD 88—AUT, NCOS
LD 88 TYPE=AUT
Stations
LD 10 and LD 11—NCOS
LD 10, 11 by TN from Release
19 and up
LD 20 by TN
LD 81 by NCOS
Trunk
LD 14—NCOS
LD 20 by TN
Customer
LD 15—NCOS, FCNC
LD 21 by CUST or ESN/CDR
from Release 19 and up
System Speed Call list
LD 18—NCOS
LD 20 by SCL
DISA
LD 24—NCOS
LD 24 by DISA DN
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Network Speed Call
Network Speed Call
Description
You can enable a user who is normally restricted from making
certain types of BARS/NARS calls, to make such a call if the
destination is a company-approved number defined in a System
Speed Call list. Network Speed Call expands the System Speed
Call feature by allowing users to access the System Speed Call
feature from the public and private networks.
You can use the Network Speed Call feature in conjunction
with a restricted DISA DN. The incoming DISA caller can gain
access to approved destinations through the Network Speed
Call list.
Example
Incoming WATS
Trunk Group
1-800-555-4545
The following illustration shows how the Network Speed Call
feature works.
Auto Terminated
at DISA DN
Security Code
12341
Authorization
Code 7322871
NARS DATA
Access Code is 9
SYSTEM
SPEED CALL
LIST #7
Entry 00
1216-555-3399
Entry 01
131-555-7677
Entry 02
121-555-5656
BCIS/FRL= 7
Call dialing 28
will access
System Speed
Call List #7
CO Trunk Group
G100455
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-59
Network Speed Call
Example (cont’d)
In this example, the following occurs:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Implementing and
auditing the feature
The caller dials 1-800-444-4545.
When dial tone is returned, the user dials 12341.
When dial tone is returned, the user dials 167322871
When dial tone is returned, the user dials 9-20-00 to access
System Speed Call Number 7.
9 triggers the Meridian 1 to use NARS data.
Meridian 1 checks the Translation Table for 20 and finds
20 to be the Access Code for System Speed Call List 7.
System Speed Call List is checked for entry 00.
The call completes to 1-216-555-3399 based on the calling
capabilities of NCOS/FRL 7.
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the Network
Speed Call feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
Network translation
LD 90—NSCL all prompts
LD 90 AC1 or AC2, SSCL
System Speed Call
LD 18—SSC all prompts
LD 20 by SCL
Network control
LD 87—NCTL, NSC, LIST
LD 87 by NCOS
Authorization code
LD 88—AUT, NCOS
LD 88 by AUT
Stations
LD 10 and LD 11—NCOS
LD 10, 11 by TN from Release
19 and up
LD 20 by TN
LD 81 by NCOS
Trunk
LD 14—NCOS
LD 20 by TN
Customer
DL 15—NCOS, FCNC
LD 21 by CUST or ESN/CDR
from Release 19 and up
System Speed Call List
LD 18—NCOS
LD 20 by SCL
DISA
LD 24—NCOS
LD 24 by DISA DN
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Network Authorization Code
Network Authorization Code
Description
Standard 1.0
With the Network Authorization Code feature, you can assign
up to 20 000 authorization codes of up to 14 digits each, and
you have the option of requiring users to enter an authorization
code before certain calls can be processed. You may want to use
this requirement for certain locations typically associated with
unauthorized access like the 809 area code.
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January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-61
Authorization Code Conditionally Last
Authorization Code Conditionally Last
Introduction
The system can prompt users “conditionally” for an
authorization code after they attempt to place a call using the
BARS/NARS call processing software. Users who fail to meet
the minimum Facility Restriction Level requirement assigned to
a route list will hear tones or a recorded announcement
indicating that they need to enter an authorization code.
How this feature
works
Users must enter a valid authorization code at that point to
complete the call. This control provides another level of
security by requiring all callers placing calls to international
locations or selected area codes, for example, to enter an
authorization code.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Authorization Code Conditionally Last
Example
The following illustration shows how the Authorization Code
Conditionally Last feature works.
BARS/NARS DATA
Access Code is 9
All calls to area code
1-417 use Route List #2.
Route List #2- the first
choice is the WATS
Route. The second
choice, if all the WATS
Trunks are busy, is the
CO Trunks.
Any caller with an
NCOS/FRL of 7 or less
will be prompted for an
Authorization Code.
Call is
prompted
for an
Authorization
Code and
must enter a
valid
Authorization
Code before
the Route List
is searched
for an available route.
WATS Trunk Group
CO Trunk Group
Dials 91417-888-9090
G100456
In this example, the following takes place:
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
The user dials 9-1417-555-3376.
9 triggers the Meridian 1 to use the BARS/NARS data.
The Meridian 1 checks the Translation Table for 1417 and
sends calls to Route List Index 2.
The system checks Route List Index 2 for the minimum
NCOS/FRL required; it is found to be 7.
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January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-63
Authorization Code Conditionally Last
Example (cont’d)
•
•
•
Implementing and
auditing the feature
The NCOS/FRL of 7 is compared to the user’s NCOS/FRL,
in this case 2.
Because the user’s NCOS/FRL is equal to or lower than the
minimum NCOS/FRL for the route list, the user is
prompted for an authorization code.
The user must enter a valid authorization code before the
call can be completed. The calling capabilities of the
authorization code’s NCOS/FRL will determine call
eligibility.
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the Authorization
Code Conditionally Last feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
Authorization code
LD 88—all prompts
LD 88 by AUT
Route List Index
LD 86—RLB MFRL
LD 86 by RLB
Network Control
LD 87 —NCTL, NCOS FRL
LD 87 by NCOS
Authorization Code
LD 88—AUT CODE, NCOS
LD 88=AUT
Stations
LD 10 and LD 11—NCOS
LD 10, 11 by TN from Release
19 and up
LD 20 by TN
LD 81 by NCOS
Trunk
LD 14—NCOS
LD 20 by TN
Customer
LD 15—NCOS, FCNC
LD 21 by CUST or ESN/CDR
from Release 19 and up
System Speed Call List
LD 18—NCOS
LD 20 by SCL
DISA
LD 24—NCOS
LD 24 by DISA DN
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Time-of-Day Routing
Time-of-Day Routing
Description
Time-of-day routing allows you to restrict access to certain
destinations during specified time frames. For example, because
the majority of fraudulent toll calls occur on holidays or after
normal business hours, you can use this feature to turn off the
route lists supporting calls to international locations or to the
809 area code after hours. Whether you can take this action
depends on the needs of your user community.
How this feature
works
The Time-of-Day Routing feature specifies the hours that users
can access each entry in a route list. BARS/NARS provides for
up to eight time-of-day schedules. With this feature you can
specify the most cost-effective route alternatives based on the
time of day, and restrict employees from calling locations they
have no need to call for business purposes at certain hours.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-65
Time-of-Day Routing
Example
The following illustration shows how the Time-of-Day Routing
feature works.
BARS/NARS DATA
Access Code is 9.
All calls to the area code 1-417
use Route List #2.
Route List #2- The first choice
is the WATS trunk group. The
second choice, if all the WATS
trunks are busy, is the CO trunk
group.
WATS Trunk Group
CO Trunk Group
The WATS trunk group is not
available from the hours of
5 p.m. to 8 a.m.
NCOS/FRL= 2
G100457
In the example, the following occurs:
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
The user dials 9-1-417-555-9090 at 6:00 p.m.
9 triggers the Meridian 1 software to use BARS/NARS
data.
The system checks the Translation Table.
Calls to 417 use Route List Index 2.
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January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Time-of-Day Routing
Example (cont’d)
•
•
•
Implementing and
auditing the feature
The system searches Route List Index 2.
The first choice, a WATS Route, is not available at 6:00
p.m.
The second choice, CO Trunks, is available, and the call is
sent out over the CO trunks.
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the Time-of-Day
Routing feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
ESN
LD 87—ESN TODS
LD 87 by ESN
Route List Index
LD 86—RLB TOD
LD 86 by RLB
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-67
Routing Control
Routing Control
Introduction
Again, because the majority of toll fraud and internal abuse
occurs after normal business hours, or on weekends or holidays,
you may want to program the system to automatically modify
users’ calling privileges during these times.
Description
The Routing Control feature lets you reduce or raise a user’s
network access capabilities if necessary.
How Routing Control
works
Each Network Class of Service (NCOS) is assigned an alternate
NCOS when a special time-of-day schedule is in effect or
during a specified day of the week. This feature enables you to
change calling privileges automatically for a defined time frame
each day or on weekends. You can also place a key on the
attendant console that will manually activate routing control.
With these features, you can implement controls on holidays
and in response to critical situations.
Activating this feature prevents people from accessing
unattended stations after hours to place unauthorized calls.
However, authorization codes are not subject to the alternate
NCOS assignments imposed through Routing Control. When
users enter a valid authorization code, they are provided with
the NCOS assigned to the authorization code for the duration of
the call.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Routing Control
Example
The following illustration shows how the Routing Control
feature works.
BARS/NARS DATA
Access Code is 9.
All calls to the area code
1-417 use Route List #2.
The caller must have an
NCOS/FRL of 2 or greater
to access the WATS
Route and an NCOS/FRL
of 3 to access the
CO Trunks.
Call is
blocked
between
5 p.m. and
8 a.m. and
all day
Saturday
and Sunday.
Between the hours of
5 p.m. and 8 a.m. and all
day Saturday and Sunday,
NCOS/FRLs of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
will drop to an NCOS/FRL
of 0 (internal calls only)
and an NCOS/FRL of 6
will remain the same.
WATS Trunk Group
CO Trunk Group
G100458
In this example, the following takes place:
•
•
Standard 1.0
The user dials 9-1-417-555-4436 at 9:00 p.m.
9 triggers the Meridian 1 to use BARS/NARS data.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-69
Routing Control
Example (cont’d)
•
•
•
•
•
•
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Between 5:00 p.m. and 8:00 a.m., all users with an NCOS/
FRL of 2 drop to an NCOS/FRL of 0.
Meridian 1 checks the Translation Table for 1417 and
sends the call to Route List Index 2.
A user must have an NCOS/FRL of 2 to access the WATS
routes (first choice) and an NCOS/FRL of 3 to access the
CO trunk group (second choice).
Because it is between 5:00 p.m. and 8:00 a.m., the user’s
NCOS/FRL is 0.
This call is not eligible for any route in the Route List
Index.
The call is blocked.
Use the following table to determine which overlay and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the Time-of-Day
Routing feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
ESN
LD 87—ESN, TODS 7, RTCL, LD 87 ESN
NMAP ETOD
Attendant
LD 12—KEY
LD 20 by TN
Network Control
LD 87—NCTL NCOS
LD 87 by NCOS
Stations
LD 10 and LD 11—NCOS
LD 10, 11 by TN from Release
19 and up
LD 20 by TN
LD 81 by NCOS
Trunk
LD 14—NCOS
LD 20 by TN
Customer
LD 15—NCOS, FCNC
LD 21 by CUST or ESN/CDR
from Release 19 and up
System Speed Call List
LD 18—NCOS
LD 20 by Speed Call List
DISA
LD 24—NCOS
LD 24 by DISA DN
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Incoming Trunk Group Exclusion
Incoming Trunk Group Exclusion
Description
Standard 1.0
You may want to control calls originating on various TIE
routes. The Incoming Trunk Group Exclusion feature blocks
BARS/NARS calls originating on TIE trunks from reaching
destinations that employees do not need to reach for business
purposes, and keeps users from attempting to circumvent the
restrictions that are imposed at their home PBX. Each TIE route
is associated with a table that defines the dialing sequences
allowed for calls originated on that TIE route.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-71
Incoming Trunk Group Exclusion
Example
The following figure illustrates how the Incoming Trunk Group
(TIE) Exclusion feature works.
BARS/NARS DATA
Access Code is 9.
WATS Trunk Group
All calls to the area code 1-417
use Route List #2.
Except for calls incoming on
TIE Route #3, block these calls.
Route List #2- first choice is
TIE Route #3. If all those trunks
are busy, go to WATS Route.
If all those trunks are busy, go
to COT Route.
CO Trunk Group
PBX
TIE Route #3 IN AREA
CODE 417
Dial access code
for TIE Route and
91-417-376-5589
CO Trunk
Group
G100459
In this figure, the following occurs:
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
The user dials the access code for the TIE route and
9-1-417-555-5589.
9 triggers Meridian 1 to use BARS/NARS data.
BARS/NARS checks the Translation Table for the 417 area
code and finds it restricted for calls from TIE Route 3.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-72
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Incoming Trunk Group Exclusion
Example (cont’d)
•
•
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Meridian 1 validates that the call is incoming on TIE Route
3.
The call is blocked.
Use the following table to determine which overlay and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the Incoming
Trunk Group Exclusion feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
ESN
LD 87—FEAT=ESN MXSD,
MXIX
LD 87 FEAT=ESN
Incoming Trunk Group
Exclusion
LD 86—FEAT=ITGE all
prompts
LD 86 FEAT=ITGE by
Incoming Trunk Group
Exclusion Index
Network Translation
LD 90—FEAT=NET ITED,
ITEI
LD 90 FEAT=NET by NPA or
NXX or SPN
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 6
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Section F:
6-73
Controlling access to PBX
administration programs
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
6-74
Password control
6-75
Limited access to overlays
6-77
Limited access password—user name
6-78
Single Terminal Access
6-79
Multi-user login
6-80
Input/Output port recovery
6-81
History file
6-82
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-74
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Overview
Overview
Introduction
You can use the following to control access to PBX
administration programs:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
Password control
- Level 1 password
- Level 2 password
For more information, see “Password control” on
page 6-75.
Limited access to overlays
For more information, see “Limited access to overlays” on
page 6-77.
Limited access password—user name
For more information, see “Limited access password—user
name” on page 6-78.
Single Terminal Access (STA)
For more information, see “Single Terminal Access” on
page 6-79.
Multi-user login
For more information, see “Multi-user login” on page 6-80.
Input/Output port recovery
For more information, see “Input/Output port recovery” on
page 6-81.
History file
For more information, see “History file” on page 6-82.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-75
Password control
Password control
Introduction
Hackers have been known to access a system to obtain printouts
of valid authorization codes, reassign control characteristics,
defeat security measures in place, or degrade system
performance. By controlling system passwords, you can
minimize unauthorized access to the system. You can define a
number of passwords that administrators can use to access the
system for the purpose of the database.
Two types of
passwords
As of X11 Release 16, two types of passwords allow access to
all aspects of the database and maintenance programs:
•
•
Level 1 password
Level 2 password
Level 1 password
You can use the Level 1 password to log on to the switch. Upon
entering the valid password, you can change virtually all aspects
of the database with the exception of changing the Level 1 and 2
passwords and, if defined, the secure data password associated
with assigning authorization codes and DISA parameters.
Implementing and
auditing the Level 1
password
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the Level 1
password.
For
Implement using
Print using
Configuration
LD 17—PWD2, NPW1
LD 22 by PWD
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Password control
Level 2 password
The Level 2 password provides all the capabilities of the Level
1 password, and also allows you to change the Level 1 and
Level 2 passwords as well as the secure data password.
Implementing and
auditing the Level 2
password
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the Level 2
password.
For
Implement using
Print using
Configuration
LD 17—PWD2, NPW1
LD 22 by PWD
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-77
Limited access to overlays
Limited access to overlays
Description
The Limited Access to Overlays (LAPW) feature introduced in
X11 Release 16 provides a greater degree of control of
password assignment and overlay access. In addition, it expands
tracking of switch access.
This feature provides additional security by allowing you to
define up to 100 LAPW passwords per system. The LAPW
password may be 4 to 16 alphanumeric characters in both
uppercase and lowercase. A maximum of four characters are
allowed in either Password 1 or Password 2.
How LAPW works
You can define access to specific overlays for each password
and specify a “Print-only” capability. You can also configure an
audit trail to record the date, time, and password used, and the
overlay programs accessed.
The system monitors failed logon attempts, compares the
number with a predefined threshold, and locks the entry port if
the threshold is exceeded. The Meridian 1 reports lock-out
conditions on all TTYs and provides a special report to the next
administrator who logs on.
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the Limited
Access to Overlays feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
Configuration
LD 17—LAPW, PWNN,
OVLY, CUST, TEN, OPT,
LPWED, NLPW, FLTH,
LOCK, AUDT, SIZE, INIT
LD 22 by CFN or LAPW from
Release 19 and up
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Limited access password—user name
Limited access password—user name
Introduction
In addition to Level 1 and Level 2 passwords and the 100
limited access passwords, Release 19 can also require users to
enter a user name with up to eight alphanumeric characters.
Only the Level 2 password can configure user names, and
change and print all passwords.
LAPW users may change their own passwords but not their user
names.
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the Limited
Access Password feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
CFN
LD 17—LNAME_OPTION,
LOGIN_NAME
LD 22 TYPE CFN, AUDT
from Release 19 and up
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-79
Single Terminal Access
Single Terminal Access
Description
The Single Terminal Access feature (STA) introduced in
Release 19 provides an integrated solution to reduce the number
of physical devices needed to administer and maintain a
Meridian 1 system and its associated subsystems.
How STA works
A mechanism for ensuring the terminal of the original session
when the user intends to switch to another system is provided in
the STA application through a user-determined logout
sequence. Specified in the database with each STA port, this
sequence will automatically be sent to the destination system by
the application to prevent users from leaving a session open in
the background without logging out. If the logout sequence is
not programmed or programmed incorrectly, the user could
leave a program open in the background and subject to
unauthorized access.
The STA master terminal will use the configured logout
sequence to automatically exit from the active and existing
background sessions when the modem connection for the
terminal experiences carrier dropout.
A password is required before the user can new or change the
configuration of STA ports. This process is designed to protect
the STA port from unauthorized alteration.
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the Single
Terminal Access feature.
For
Implement using
Configuration record
LD 17—ADAN, TTY, CTYP, LD 22 by CFN, or ADAN from
GRP, DNUM, PORT, DES,
Release 19 and up
BPS, PRTY, STOP, BITL,
PARM, FUNC, USER, MPRT,
APRT
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
Print using
January 1998
6-80
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Multi-user login
Multi-user login
Description
Multi-user login allows up to three users to simultaneously log
in to a Meridian 1 PBX to load and execute overlays. A fourth
overlay running in the background or at midnight is also
allowed.
The feature is activated and deactivated in Overlay 17.
Release 19 support
Release 19 supports only Set Administration (Overlays 10 and
11), associated print loads (Overlays 20, 21, and 22),
Maintenance, Midnight Routines, Background Routines, or
Attendant Administration.
Forced logoff
Additionally, a user can force the logoff from a specific
terminal when logged in to the Level Password or an
appropriate Limited Access Password.
Monitoring input/
output
The monitor command allows a logged in user to monitor the
input/output of a different specified terminal either locally or
remotely; this feature is assigned on a per password level or to
the Level 2 password.
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the Multi-user
Login feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
CFN
LD 17—PWD2, LAPW,
TLOG, SIZE, MULTI-USER,
OPT
LD 22 PRT by CFN or LAPW
from Release 19 and up
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-81
Input/Output port recovery
Input/Output port recovery
Introduction
Ports defined as TTY and PRT are controlled by two counters
monitoring invalid characters. Ports disabled due to garbage
characters or interference can be automatically enabled after a
four-minute timer has expired.
Disabled ports can be enabled a maximum of three times in 30
minutes. The fourth time a port is disabled in a 30-minute
period requires manual enabling. Messages print at the TTY
each time the port disables and reenables.
Implementing and
auditing the feature
The documentation is built into the base software.
No alteration is possible.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-82
Setting up Meridian Mail security
History file
History file
Description
You may want to track certain system messages or activity and
print that information at will. The History file stores system
messages in memory. You can access the stored information
through a system TTY or from a remote location, and you can
print its contents.
How the History file
works
You can specify the types of information that you want to store
in the History file including maintenance messages (MTC),
service change activity (SCH), customer service change activity
(CSC), traffic outputs (TRF), and software error messages
(ERR and BUG). By storing SCH activity and TRF output
messages, you can store records of unauthorized access to the
switch and retrieve information associated with calling patterns.
Implementing and
auditing the feature
Use the following table to determine which overlays and
prompts should be used to implement or audit the History file
feature.
For
Implement using
Print using
LD1F Configuration
LD 17—IOTB, HIST, ADAN,
USER
LD 22 CFN or ADAN from
Release 19 and up
Release 19
enhancements
With Release 19, you may selectively view the History file
using the command VHST. Commands allow you to search
forward, repeat the last forward or backward search, and
perform other various navigational movements within the file.
The History file may also have three categories of files: Log
files (see “Multi-user login” on page 6-80), System History file,
and Traffic files. Traffic files have two categories: system
(scheduled) or user-generated reports. There is one traffic file
per system.
These enhancements are included in the base software package.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Section G:
6-83
Controlling Direct Inward System
Access
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
6-84
DISA and security codes
6-85
DISA and Class of Service
6-86
DISA and authorization codes
6-87
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-84
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Overview
Overview
Description:
DISA
Direct Inward System Access (DISA) provides a convenient
means by which employees, when they are offsite, can place
calls to internal extensions, and to private and public network
locations by accessing your company’s switching system.
How DISA is abused
The type of unauthorized access associated with this feature
begins when perpetrators find the telephone number associated
with DISA. In most DISA intrusion cases, hackers use PCbased programs to obtain valid DISA DNs, and security and
authorization codes. Once a PC program finds a valid DISA
telephone number, the PC inputs codes, redials the telephone
number repeatedly, and stores the valid codes. Hackers then sell
the numbers and codes they obtain illegally to third parties who
then use this information for their own “business purposes.”
In this section
In this section, you will learn how to effectively manage and
monitor the Meridian 1 DISA feature.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-85
DISA and security codes
DISA and security codes
Introduction
The first level of restricting DISA access is the security code.
How security codes
work
If you program your system to require a security code, when the
Meridian 1 answers a DISA call, callers must enter the security
code assigned to the DISA DN before they can gain access to
the system. This security code can be from one to eight digits
long.
Remember, the longer the code, the harder it is for a hacker to
crack.
Standard 1.0
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
DISA and Class of Service
DISA and Class of Service
Introduction
The second level of restriction is the class of service assigned to
the DISA DN. Each DISA DN has its own Class of Service
(COS), Trunk Group Access Restriction (TGAR), and Network
Class of Service (NCOS).
How Class of Service
works
When the Meridian 1 answers, if you do not require callers to
enter authorization codes, then they automatically receive the
DISA DN’s calling privileges and class of service. You should
consider making these controls as restrictive as possible
(internal calls only, for example) and force users to enter an
authorization code to access trunking facilities.
In addition, if the Meridian 1 records authorization codes in Call
Detail Recording (CDR), you can track calls made through
DISA and bill them back to users.
Implementing this
feature
Standard 1.0
To implement this feature, see “Class of Service” on page 6-13.
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-87
DISA and authorization codes
DISA and authorization codes
Introduction
For a third level of security, you can require callers to enter an
authorization code before they gain access to system facilities.
You can assign authorization codes that are from 1 to 14 digits
long. By assigning 14-digit authorization codes, you ensure that
the hacker’s PC-based code-cracking program has to try more
combinations to obtain valid codes.
You can also configure Call Detail Recording to output the
authorization codes used for call placement. In reviewing these
reports, you should investigate any surge in activity for a given
authorization code.
Assigning and
changing codes
For further security, you should change authorization codes
often and assign one code per person. If you cannot change
authorization codes often because you have assigned a large
number of codes and communicating the change would be
difficult, then consider changing the DISA security code often.
Removal of codes
You should remove the authorization codes of terminated
employees immediately. Establish a procedure with Human
Resources or your Personnel department to advise you when
employees leave the company.
Standard 1.0
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
DISA and authorization codes
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 6
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Section H:
6-89
Restriction/Permission lists
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
6-90
What are restriction/permission lists and codes?
6-91
Defaults
6-93
Understanding how restriction/permission codes work
6-94
Recommendations for using the first four restriction/
permission lists
6-97
Defining and applying restriction/permission lists
6-99
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January 1998
6-90
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Overview
Overview
Introduction
In today’s telecommunications environment, the same features
that provide you with flexibility can also be the source of
unauthorized use and abuse.
Meridian Mail features
Features such as remote notification, external call sender, call
answering/express messaging thru-dial, and AMIS networking
can dial numbers external to your telephone switch. This means
that they can be used by users or external callers to place
unauthorized long-distance calls at your organization’s expense.
Restriction/
permission lists
The primary weapon in your outcalling security arsenal are the
restriction/permission lists. These lists are your first line of
defense.
Standard 1.0
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-91
What are restriction/permission lists and codes?
What are restriction/permission lists and codes?
Introduction
Restriction/permission lists are an important part of preventing
users and callers from abusing your Meridian Mail system.
Definition:
restriction/permission
list
A restriction/permission list is a group (or set) of restriction
codes and permission dialing codes that can be applied to
Meridian Mail features or services that are capable of placing
outcalls.
Up to 80 lists can be created, but each list must have a unique
name. Each list can have up to 30 restriction codes and up to 30
permission codes. Once a list is defined, it can be applied to a
number of Meridian Mail features.
Definition:
restriction code
A restriction code is a dialing code that Meridian Mail is not
permitted to dial. When Meridian Mail is passed a number that
begins with a restricted code, the call is blocked.
Restriction codes can be up to 20 digits in length.
Example 1
Your local dialing prefix is 9, your long distance dialing prefix
is 91, and your international dialing prefix is 9011. You want to
restrict all off-switch dialing. The restriction code is 9.
Example 2
Your long distance dialing prefix is 91 and you want to restrict
calls to the 801 area code. The resulting restriction code is
91801.
Definition:
permission code
A permission code is a dialing code that Meridian Mail is
permitted to dial. These are usually exceptions to the restriction
“rules.”
Permission codes can be up to 20 digits in length.
Standard 1.0
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
What are restriction/permission lists and codes?
Example of a
restriction/permission
list
In this example, 91 is the long distance dialing prefix and 9011
is the international dialing prefix. All internal extensions begin
with 7 and 8.
List Name: Local
Restriction codes: 1 2 3
4
5
6
91
9011
Permission codes: 91617 911
This list restricts all international and long-distance calls, except
those to 911 and to the 617 area code. In addition to the
permitted codes, it allows on-switch calls to internal extensions
beginning with 7 or 8, and local calls beginning with 9.
Standard 1.0
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-93
Defaults
Defaults
Introduction
The defaults for new installations and conversions are described
here. The default values when you first view a restriction/
permission list are also described.
Defaults for new
installations
For newly installed Meridian Mail Release 12 systems, all
restriction/permission lists are fully restricted. The first four
lists are named On_Switch, Local, Long_distance_1, and
Long_Distance_2, and the remaining 76 lists are named
RPList5 to RPList80 respectively.
ATTENTION
You must modify restriction/permission lists after
installation. If you do not, many Meridian Mail features
that place outcalls will not work.
Defaults for
converted systems
If you have converted to Release 12, the four existing
restriction/permission lists remain as they were in the previous
release. The new lists are named RPList5 to RPList80 and are
fully restricted.
Note: Even though the codes remain the same, you must apply
restrictions to any new Release 12 features you implement.
Default list entries
If you have not modified a restriction/permission list, it will be
defined as follows the first time you view it:
Restriction codes: 0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Permission codes: (none)
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Understanding how restriction/permission codes work
Understanding how restriction/permission codes work
Introduction
The restriction codes in a restriction/permission list specify the
general dialing rule. Permission codes are used to indicate any
exceptions to the more general rules described by the restriction
codes.
Levels of security
It is up to your organization to decide how to configure the
restriction/permission lists. They are typically configured to
provide various levels of security, from permitting only onswitch dialing (most secure) to allowing all long-distance
dialing (least secure).
Examples
The following table contains examples of restriction/permission
codes and how Meridian Mail interprets them.
In these examples, 9 is the dialing code for local calls, and 91 is
the dialing code for long distance calls.
Rule
Standard 1.0
Restriction
code(s)
Permission
code(s)
91
91416, 9911 Most long distance calls are restricted,
except for 911 calls and numbers in the
416 area code.
Result
1, 2, 5, 6, 7, none
8, 9
All local and long distance calls are
restricted. Internal extensions
beginning with 3 or 4 are allowed.
91900
1-900 numbers are restricted, but local
calls and all other long distance calls
are permitted.
9
Numbers beginning with a permission code that is shorter than a
restriction code and that matches a subset of the restriction code
are allowed. They are not restricted.
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January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-95
Understanding how restriction/permission codes work
Rule (cont’d)
Example
91900 is a restriction code. 9 is a permission code. Calls
beginning with 9 (local calls) or 91 (long distance) are
permitted as long as they are not to 91900.
How restriction/
permission codes are
processed
The following flowchart shows how Meridian Mail and the
Meridian 1 process restriction and permission codes when a DN
is dialed.
User/caller dials a DN.
The DN is compared to
the restriction codes.
Is the DN preceded by
or equal to a restriction
code?
NO
The DN is dialed.
YES
The DN is compared to
the permission codes.
Is the DN preceded by
or equal to a permission
code?
NO
The call is blocked.
YES
The call is sent to
switch for call processing.
A message is played
indicating the number cannot
be reached from the service.
Is the DN allowed through
the NCOS, TGAR, and
CLS assigned to the agent? NO
YES
The DN is dialed.
Standard 1.0
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Understanding how restriction/permission codes work
Example:
Call answering
thru-dial
Call answering/express messaging thru-dial allows callers to
transfer to another internal extension or valid telephone number
once Meridian Mail answers. If the proper restrictions are not
placed on this feature, callers will be able to place calls at your
organization’s expense.
The following illustration shows how restriction/permission
codes work in the case of call answering thru-dial.
1
Meridian Mail
Caller dials
555-6800.
2 Ext 6800 is
not answered
in 3 rings.
3 Call is forwarded
to Meridian Mail.
While connected to
Mailbox 6800, caller dials
091-809-555-1111# to
make a long distance call.
Meridian Mail checks the
restrictions for call answering/
express messaging thru dial.
91 is a restricted code.
4
Mailbox
6800
Voice Security Options
5
Call answering/express messaging
thru dial: Local
List Name: Local
Restriction Codes: 91 9011
The call is blocked.
Standard 1.0
6
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-97
Recommendations for using the first four restriction/permission lists
Recommendations for using the first four restriction/
permission lists
The first four restriction/permission lists are named as follows:
Introduction
•
•
•
•
On_Switch
Local
Long_Distance_1
Long_Distance_2
These names can be changed.
Recommendations
Nortel recommends that you use the default restriction/
permission lists as follows.
Note: You are responsible for developing a policy for
restricting outcalling that is suitable to your organization’s
needs.
List name
Onswitch
List function
Restriction codes
Permits calls to on-switch
extensions only.
• local dialing
prefix
Restricts all local, long distance,
and international calls.
• long distance
dialing prefix
Permission codes
optional (as
required)
• international
dialing prefix
Local
Standard 1.0
Permits all on-switch and local
calls.
• long distance
dialing prefix
Restricts all long distance and
international calls.
• international
dialing prefix
System Administration Guide
optional (as
required)
January 1998
6-98
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Recommendations for using the first four restriction/permission lists
List name
Long
Distance
1
List function
Restriction codes
Permits all on-switch calls, local
calls, and long distance calls to
certain area codes only.
Restricts all international calls and
long distance calls (in general).
Long
Distance
2
• international
dialing prefix
• specific long
distance area
codes
• international
dialing prefix
• none
or
or
or
Permits all on-switch calls, local
calls, and long distance calls to
certain area codes only. (Similar
in function to Long Distance 1,
but permits different area codes.)
• long distance
dialing prefix
• specific area
codes
Permits all on-switch, local, and
long distance calls.
Restricts all international calls.
Restricts all international calls and
long distance calls (in general).
Standard 1.0
• long distance
dialing prefix
Permission codes
• international
dialing prefix
• specific area
codes
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January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-99
Defining and applying restriction/permission lists
Defining and applying restriction/permission lists
Introduction
Restriction/permission lists can only be defined through the
Restriction/Permission Lists screen. They are, however, applied
to specific Meridian Mail features or services through other
screens.
Defining restriction/
permission lists
To define restriction/permission lists, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select Voice Administration.
2
Select Restriction/Permission Lists.
Result: The Restriction/Permission Lists screen appears.
3
Position the cursor beside the List number you want to view or
modify.
4
Press the [SpaceBar] to highlight the list.
5
Press the [View/Modify] softkey.
Result: The View/Modify Restriction/Permission List screen
appears.
6
7
Do you want to modify or view the codes in the list?
IF you want to
THEN
modify the list
go to step 7.
view the file
use the cursor keys to scroll
through the screen and then
go to step 10.
Do you want to change the list name?
IF
THEN
yes
press [Backspace] to delete
the current name.
Enter the new list name.
no
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
go to step 8.
January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Defining and applying restriction/permission lists
Step Action
8
Do you want to change the restriction codes?
IF
THEN
yes
delete the existing code (if
not appropriate) and enter a
new code.
Press <Return> or <Tab> to
move to the next field.
no
9
go to step 9.
Do you want to change the permission codes?
IF
THEN
yes
enter the new code.
Press <Return> or <Tab> to
move to the next field.
no
10
go to step 10.
Do you want to save your changes?
IF
THEN
yes
press [Save].
no
press [Cancel].
Result: The Restriction/Permission Lists screen appears.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
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6-101
Defining and applying restriction/permission lists
Applying
restriction/permission
lists
The following table identifies which Meridian Mail screens are
used to apply restriction/permission lists to Meridian Mail
features or services.
To apply restrictions/permissions to the
following feature
Use the following screen
Call Answering/Express Messaging
Thru-Dial
Voice Security Options
Fax Information service
Session Profile (accessed from the VSDN table;
necessary only if Fax on Demand is installed).
Fax Item Maintenance service
Voice Menus (that activate fax service)
Time-of-Day Controllers (that activate fax
service)
For more information, refer to the
Fax on Demand Application Guide
(NTP 555-7001-327).
Extension dialing (mailbox thru-dial)
Custom Operator revert
Remote Notification
Add (or View/Modify) Class of Service
Delivery to Non-User
External Call Sender
AMIS Networking
Thru-Dial service
Standard 1.0
Add (or View/Modify) Thru-Dial Definition
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Defining and applying restriction/permission lists
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 6
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Section I:
6-103
Controlling access to Meridian
Mail services and features
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
6-104
Custom Revert
6-106
Thru-Dial
6-109
Call Answering or Express Messaging
6-110
Extension dialing (mailbox thru-dial)
6-112
Fax on Demand
6-115
Remote Notification
6-116
Delivery to Non-User
6-118
External Call sender
6-120
AMIS Networking
6-121
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January 1998
6-104
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Overview
Overview
Introduction
Meridian Mail is a voice mail system that is integrated into the
Meridian 1 PBX. One of the most feature-rich voice messaging
products on the market, the system provides flexible features
like Voice Menus which allow callers to choose from lists of
services, and Remote Notification which notifies off-site system
users that they have messages waiting.
Restriction/
permission lists
You can minimize the risk of toll fraud and system abuse by
using the restriction/permission features to control access to
your Meridian Mail system and switch. If you fail to put the
proper safeguards in place, callers answered by your voice mail
system can place toll calls.
Restriction permission lists are applied to features that are
capable of dialing outside your switch and are, therefore, a
potential source of unauthorized system use and abuse.
Features to which
restriction/permission
lists can be applied
Restriction/permission lists can be applied to the following
features.
Feature
Description
Custom
Users can define their own Custom Revert DN.
(operator) revert Assign a list to this feature to restrict the DNs that
users can specify.
Standard 1.0
Thru-dial
services
Once connected to a thru-dial service, callers can
thru-dial to external numbers if restrictions are not
in place. Assign a list to all thru-dialers to restrict
the numbers to which callers can thru-dial.
Call answering/
Express
messaging
Thru-dial
Callers can transfer to other numbers during call
answering and express messaging sessions. Assign
a list to this feature to restrict the numbers to
which callers are allowed to transfer themselves.
Extension
dialing
(mailbox
thru-dial)
Users can thru-dial to other numbers while they
are logged on to their mailbox. Assign a list to this
feature to restrict the numbers to which they are
allowed to thru-dial.
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January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-105
Overview
Standard 1.0
Feature
Description
Fax
information
service
Callers can request faxes using this service. Assign
a list to this feature to restrict the numbers to
which faxes are sent.
Fax item
maintenance
This service is used to send verification faxes to
designated fax phones. Assign a list to this feature
to restrict the numbers to which verification faxes
can be sent.
Remote
notification
Users can set up their own remote notification
schedules which specify the remote device (phone,
pager) to which notification of new messages
should be sent. Assign a list to this feature to
restrict the numbers at which users can be
remotely notified.
Delivery to
non-users
Users can send voice messages to people who do
not have mailboxes. Assign a list to this feature to
restrict the non-user numbers to which users can
send voice messages.
Call sender
Users can return a call with a single telephone set
command (9). Assign a list to restrict the numbers
they can call back with external call sender.
AMIS
Networking
Users can send voice messages to other voice mail
systems. Assign a list to this feature to restrict the
voice mail systems to which users can send
messages.
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January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Custom Revert
Custom Revert
Introduction
Once Meridian Mail answers, callers may dial zero (0) anytime
during the personal greeting or during the record cycle, and
transfer to a predefined extension, usually a receptionist or
secretary. This extension is the Revert DN.
Description
Each mailbox user can define his or her own Custom Revert DN
through the telephone set. To prevent users from (unknowingly)
abusing the system, you should assign restriction/permission
lists to the revert feature.
Example
The following illustration shows how the Custom Operator
Revert feature works.
Meridian Mail
ON-SWITCH
Block 0 1 2 3
45679
MAILBOX 8100
8100
Access
Code 9
CO Trunk
Group
Custom Operator Revert
restrictions = On-Switch
G100461
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
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6-107
Custom Revert
Example (cont’d)
In this example, the following takes place:
•
•
The user logs in to Meridian Mail.
The user activates the Custom Operator Revert feature and
attempts to define the operator revert as 9-555-0000.
Meridian Mail checks the Custom Operator Revert
restrictions.
The On-Switch Table blocks the code 9, and the function is
disallowed.
•
•
Defining a restriction/
permission list
To define a restriction/permission list, see “Defining and
applying restriction/permission lists” on page 6-99.
Assigning a
restriction/permission
list
To assign a restriction/permission list to the Custom Revert
feature, follow these steps.
Step Action
1
Log in to the administration terminal.
2
Select Class of Service Administration from the Main Menu.
3
Press [View/Modify], and then enter the number of the class of
service that the mailbox is using.
If you do not know the class
a. Press [Find].
b. Press [List].
c. Position the cursor beside the class you want to view or
modify, and then press [SpaceBar] to highlight.
d. Press [View/Modify].
Result: The Class of Service Administration screen for the
particular class appears.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Custom Revert
Step Action
4
Position the cursor beside the Custom Revert Restriction/
Permission List field.
5
Enter the number of the restriction/permission list you want to
assign to the Custom Revert feature.
Note: The name of the corresponding restriction/permission list
does not appear until the cursor is off the field.
6
Standard 1.0
Do you want to save your changes?
IF
THEN press
yes
[Save].
no
[Cancel].
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January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-109
Thru-Dial
Thru-Dial
Introduction
All Thru-Dial services you create using the Voice Menus
feature must be adequately protected with an appropriate
restriction/permission list.
Defining a restriction/
permission list
To define a restriction/permission list, see “Defining and
applying restriction/permission lists” on page 6-99.
Assigning a
restriction/permission
list
To assign a restriction/permission list to the Thru-Dial service,
follow these steps.
Step Action
1
Log in to the administration terminal.
2
Select Voice Administration from the Main Menu.
3
Select Voice Services Administration from the Voice
Administration menu.
4
Select Thru-Dial Definitions.
5
Position the cursor beside the definition, and press the
[SpaceBar].
6
Press [View/Modify].
7
Position the cursor beside the Restriction/Permission List field.
8
Enter the number of the restriction/permission list you want to
assign to the feature.
Note: The name of the corresponding restriction/permission list
does not appear until the cursor is off the field.
9
Standard 1.0
Do you want to save your changes?
IF
THEN press
yes
[Save].
no
[Cancel].
System Administration Guide
January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Call Answering or Express Messaging
Call Answering or Express Messaging
Description
During a call answering or express messaging session, an
external caller could potentially use thru-dial capabilities to
place unauthorized calls which would be billed to the system.
To use Thru-Dial, a caller must press 0 followed by a dialable
DN. (If the caller waits more than two seconds after entering 0,
he or she will be connected to an attendant instead.)
Example
The following illustration shows how the extension dialing
feature works during a Call Answering/Express Messaging
session.
DID Trunk Group
422-8100
Meridian Mail
CO
ON-SWITCH
LOCAL
Block 0 1 2 3
45679
Block 91
801 811 821
Extension Dialing Restrictions = Local
No answer
MAILBOX 8100
CA/EM Thru-dial
restrictions = On-Switch
Dials 09233-444
Access
Code 9
CO Trunk
Group
Call is
blocked
DN 6800
G100462
Standard 1.0
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-111
Call Answering or Express Messaging
Example (cont’d)
In this example, the following takes place:
•
The caller dials 555-8100. No answer is encountered at
extension 8100.
The caller is forwarded to Meridian Mail.
Once answered, the caller dials 09233-44.
Meridian Mail checks the Call Answering/Express
Messaging Thru-dial restrictions.
9 is not allowed so the call is blocked. If the caller had
logged in to Meridian Mail, the call would have been
allowed.
•
•
•
•
Restricting thru-dial
capabilities
To prevent callers and users from abusing thru-dial capabilities
during call answering or express messaging sessions, make sure
an appropriate restriction/permission list is applied to call
answering or express messaging thru-dial in the Voice Security
Options screen.
To restrict thru-dial capabilities for call answering or express
messaging sessions, use the following procedure.
Step Action
1
Select Voice Administration from the Main Menu.
2
Select Voice Security Options.
3
Move the cursor to the Call Answering/Express Messaging
Thru-Dial Restriction/Permission List Number field.
4
Enter the number of the restriction/permission list you want to
apply to call answering and express messaging thru-dial.
Note: The name of the corresponding restriction/permission
list does not appear until the cursor is moved off the field.
5
Standard 1.0
Do you want to save your changes?
IF
THEN press
yes
[Save].
no
[Cancel].
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January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Extension dialing (mailbox thru-dial)
Extension dialing (mailbox thru-dial)
Description
Another standard feature available with Meridian Mail is
extension dialing, or Thru-dial for mailboxes. The extension
dialing feature allows callers to transfer to another extension
number or valid telephone number once they log in to Meridian
Mail. Callers can dial zero (0) followed by an extension
number, or valid access code, telephone number, and the pound
sign (#).
This feature only applies to MMUI systems.
Controls you can
exercise
Meridian Mail is shipped with the mailbox Thru-dial feature
turned on. You can control access and use of Thru-dial in two
ways:
•
•
Controlling access
within Meridian Mail
within the Meridian Mail system
within the Meridian 1 system through the virtual agent
This method allows you to define and apply the restrictions
codes that best fit the needs of your user community and the
security requirements of your organization.
This method involves
•
•
defining restriction permission lists
(see “Defining and applying restriction/permission lists” on
page 6-99)
applying restriction/permission lists to features
Note: See “Applying a restriction/permission list” on
page 6-113. These codes affect all mailbox Thru-dial functions
that use the same Class of Service.
Standard 1.0
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-113
Extension dialing (mailbox thru-dial)
Applying a restriction/ To apply a restriction/permission list, follow these steps.
permission list
Step Action
1
Log in to the administration terminal.
2
Select Class of Service Administration from the Main Menu.
3
Press [View/Modify], and then enter the number of the class of
service that the mailbox is using.
If you do not know the class
a. Press [Find].
b. Press [List].
c. Position the cursor beside the class you want to view or
modify, and then press [SpaceBar] to highlight.
d. Press [View/Modify].
Result: The Class of Service Administration screen for the
particular class appears.
4
Position the cursor beside the Extension Dialing Restriction/
Permission List field.
5
Enter the number of the restriction/permission list you want to
assign to the Extension dialing feature.
Note: The name of the corresponding restriction/permission list
does not appear until the cursor is off the field.
6
Standard 1.0
Do you want to save your changes?
IF
THEN press
yes
[Save].
no
[Cancel].
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January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Extension dialing (mailbox thru-dial)
Controlling access
within the switch
To control access of the Thru-dial feature within the Meridian 1
system, use the following procedure. This method allows you to
restrict the Thru-dial feature through the virtual agent.
Note 1: To restrict all access to the outside world through Thrudial, be sure to restrict both your Least Cost Routing access
code and your direct access code to each trunk group in the
Meridian 1.
Note 2: Be sure to block access to your Special Prefix (SPRE)
code as well.
Step Action
1
Assign the appropriate Network Class of Service (NCOS).
For more information, see “Network Class of Service—Facility
Restriction Level” on page 6-55.
2
Assign the appropriate Trunk Group Access Restrictions
(TGAR).
For more information, see “Trunk Group Access Restrictions”
on page 6-11.
3
Assign the appropriate Class of Service (COS).
For more information, see “Class of Service” on page 6-13.
The restrictions you impose through the virtual agent apply to
Thru-dial functions accessed both through the voice menus
feature and at the mailbox level.
Standard 1.0
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Fax on Demand
Fax on Demand
Description
If Fax on Demand is installed, you will need to determine the
restrictions that need to be applied to external callers who
request that faxes be delivered using callback delivery. In other
words, with callback delivery, callers are asked to specify the
number to which a fax should be delivered. You will have to
decide if you want faxes to be delivered to all numbers, only
local numbers, all long distance numbers, only certain area
codes, and so on.
Note: This topic is only applicable to systems that have Fax on
Demand installed.
Restricting thru-dial
for Fax on Demand
When adding the VSDN of the service through which the fax
item will be made accessible, you must specify a session
profile. In this session profile, you choose the fax delivery
method. If it is set to either Call Back or Caller Choice, you will
have to specify a restriction/permission list (also in the session
profile).
Refer to the Fax on Demand Application Guide
(NTP 555-7001-327) for information on securing the callback
options.
Standard 1.0
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Remote Notification
Remote Notification
Description
Remote Notification allows a user to be notified at a remote
telephone or pages when a new message arrives in his or her
mailbox. Users can define their own remote notification
schedules and target DNs from their telephone sets.
Note: This topic is only applicable to systems that have the
Outcalling feature installed.
Restricting target DNs To restrict the target DNs to which users try to send remote
notifications, you must assign a restriction/permission list to the
Remote Notification feature in the classes of service you set up.
Defining a restriction/
permission list
To define a restriction/permission list, see “Defining and
applying restriction/permission lists” on page 6-99.
Applying a restriction/ To apply a restriction/permission list to the Remote
permission list
Notification, follow these steps.
Step Action
1
Log in to the administration terminal.
2
Select Class of Service Administration from the Main Menu.
3
Press [View/Modify], and then enter the number of the class of
service that the mailbox is using.
If you do not know the class
a. Press [Find].
b. Press [List].
c. Position the cursor beside the class you want to view or
modify, and then press [SpaceBar] to highlight.
d. Press [View/Modify].
Result: The Class of Service Administration screen for the
particular class appears.
Standard 1.0
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Remote Notification
Step Action
4
5
Do you want to enable Remote Notification capabilities for this
class of service?
IF
THEN go to
yes
step 5.
no
step 9.
Set the Remote Notification Capability field to Yes.
Result: The following four fields will appear:
•
•
•
•
6
Remote Notification Restriction/Permission List
Remote Notification Keypad Interface
Remote Notification Retry Limits and Frequency
RN Business Days
Enter the number of the restriction/permission list you want to
assign to the feature.
Note: The name of the corresponding restriction/permission list
does not appear until the cursor is off the field.
7
Do you want your users in this class of service to be able to use
their keypad interface to change the remote notification DN?
Note: The Keypad Interface field applies only to MMUI
systems.
IF
8
yes
yes.
no
no.
Enter the retry limits and frequencies for the following:
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
THEN set the Keypad
Interface field to
Busy
No Answer
Answered
9
Select the business days on which remote notification will (not)
be available.
10
Do you want to save your changes?
IF
THEN press
yes
[Save].
no
[Cancel].
System Administration Guide
January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Delivery to Non-User
Delivery to Non-User
Description
Delivery to Non-User (DNU) allows a Meridian Mail user to
compose and send a voice message to someone who is not a
Meridian Mail user. To restrict the numbers to which users are
allowed to send voice messages, assign an appropriate
restriction/permission list to the Delivery to Non-User feature in
the classes of service you set up.
Note: This topic is only applicable to systems that have the
Outcalling feature installed.
Defining a restriction/
permission list
To define a restriction/permission list, see “Defining and
applying restriction/permission lists” on page 6-99.
Applying a restriction/ To apply a restriction/permission list to the Delivery to Nonpermission list
user feature, follow these steps.
Step Action
1
Log in to the administration terminal.
2
Select Class of Service Administration from the Main Menu.
3
Press [View/Modify], and then enter the number of the class of
service that the mailbox is using.
If you do not know the class
a. Press [Find].
b. Press [List].
c. Position the cursor beside the class you want to view or
modify, and then press [SpaceBar] to highlight.
d. Press [View/Modify].
Result: The Class of Service Administration screen for the
particular class appears.
4
Standard 1.0
Do you want to enable Delivery to Non-User capabilities for this
class of service?
IF
THEN go to
yes
step 5.
no
step 9.
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Delivery to Non-User
Step Action
5
Set the Delivery to Non-User Capability field to Yes.
Result: The following three fields appear:
•
•
•
6
Delivery to Non-User Restriction/Permission List
Send Messages via DNU if Mailbox Not Found
DNU DTMF Confirmation Required
Enter the number of the restriction/permission list you want to
assign to the feature.
Note: The name of the corresponding restriction/permission list
does not appear until the cursor is off the field.
7
8
9
Standard 1.0
Do you want to send messages if the mailbox is not found?
IF
THEN set the Send
Messages via DNU if
Mailbox Not Found field to
yes
Yes.
no
No.
Do you require a DTMF confirmation?
IF
THEN set the DNU DTMF
Confirmation Required
field to
yes
Yes.
no
No.
Do you want to save your changes?
IF
THEN press
yes
[Save].
no
[Cancel].
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
External Call sender
External Call sender
Description
This feature allows a Meridian Mail user to immediately call
back someone who has left a message and who is external to the
switch, by pressing 9 after listening to the message. (This only
applies to messages that have been left during call answering
sessions, and composed voice messages.)
Defining a restriction/
permission list
To define a restriction/permission list, see “Defining and
applying restriction/permission lists” on page 6-99.
Applying a restriction/ To apply a restriction/permission list to External Call Sender,
permission list
follow these steps.
Step Action
1
Log in to the administration terminal.
2
Select Class of Service Administration from the Main Menu.
3
Press [View/Modify], and then enter the number of the class of
service that the mailbox is using.
If you do not know the class
a. Press [Find].
b. Press [List].
c. Position the cursor beside the class you want to view or
modify, and then press [SpaceBar] to highlight.
d. Press [View/Modify].
Result: The Class of Service Administration screen for the
particular class appears.
4
Position the cursor beside the External Call Sender Restriction/
Permission List field.
5
Enter the number of the restriction/permission list you want to
assign to the Call Sender feature.
Note: The name of the corresponding restriction/permission list
does not appear until the cursor is off the field.
6
Standard 1.0
Do you want to save your changes?
IF
THEN press
yes
[Save].
no
[Cancel].
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AMIS Networking
AMIS Networking
Description
When a user composes a voice message and tries to send it to an
AMIS site (that is not defined as a virtual node), Meridian Mail
checks the restriction/permission list that is assigned to AMIS
networking to see if it is restricted. The restriction/permission
list is assigned to AMIS networking in classes of service.
Note: This topic is only applicable to systems that have the
AMIS Networking feature installed.
Virtual Node AMIS
In the case of Virtual Node AMIS, where the local site also has
Meridian Networking, these restrictions do not apply to remote
AMIS sites that are defined as virtual nodes in the local network
database.
For more information on Virtual Node AMIS, refer to the
Virtual Node AMIS Installation and Administration Guide
(NTP 555-7001-245).
Defining a restriction/
permission list
To define a restriction/permission list, see “Defining and
applying restriction/permission lists” on page 6-99.
Applying a restriction/ To apply a restriction/permission list to AMIS Networking,
permission list
follow these steps.
Step Action
1
Log in to the administration terminal.
2
Select Class of Service Administration from the Main Menu.
3
Press [View/Modify], and then enter the number of the class of
service that the mailbox is using.
If you do not know the class
a. Press [Find].
b. Press [List].
c. Position the cursor beside the class you want to view or
modify, and then press [SpaceBar] to highlight.
d. Press [View/Modify].
Result: The Class of Service Administration screen for the
particular class appears.
Standard 1.0
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AMIS Networking
Step Action
4
5
Do you want mailbox users assigned to this class of service to
be able to receive AMIS Open Network Messages?
IF
THEN set the Receive AMIS
Open Network Messages
field to
yes
Yes.
no
No.
Do you want mailbox users assigned to this class of service to
be able to compose and send AMIS Open Network Messages?
IF
THEN set the
Compose/Send AMIS Open
Network Messages field to
yes
Yes.
no
No.
Result: The following field appears when the field is set to Yes:
•
6
AMIS Open Network Restriction/Permission List
Enter the number of the restriction/permission list you want to
apply to this class of service in the AMIS Open Networking
Restriction/Permission List field.
Note: The name of the restriction/permission list will not appear
until the cursor is off the field or the changes have been saved.
7
Standard 1.0
Do you want to save your changes?
IF
THEN press
yes
[Save].
no
[Cancel].
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 6
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Section J:
6-123
Controlling access to Meridian
Mail mailboxes
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
6-124
Using the Voice Security Options screen
6-125
Default security settings
6-131
Initial password change
6-133
Password display suppression
6-135
Password prefix
6-136
Password length
6-138
Forced regular password changes
6-139
Invalid logon attempts
6-142
Modifying mailbox security settings
6-146
Restricting off-site access to mailboxes
6-147
Disabling unused mailboxes
6-148
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January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Overview
Overview
Introduction
Mailboxes are a potential source of unauthorized system use if
proper safeguards are not put in place.
The kind of damage a
hacker can do
The damage a hacker can do depends on what has been
accessed:
•
•
•
Proactive mailbox
security measures
Standard 1.0
A personal mailbox without thru-dial capabilities
This causes minimal damage as the hacker has only gained
access to the personal mailbox. In this case, the hacker
would have access to all of the mailbox and message
commands and could record obscene greetings, listen to
messages, and so on.
A personal mailbox with thru-dial capabilities
This can cause significant damage to your PBX and
Meridian Mail system, especially if the hacker is able to
break in to the system.
The business or Meridian Mail system
This can cause significant damage to your PBX and
Meridian Mail system since this mailbox usually allows
users calling in access to the thru-dial feature.
Meridian Mail provides four ways that you can control the level
of security for users’ mailboxes:
1.
Use the password prefix and increase the minimum
password length to make passwords harder to guess.
2.
Force users to change their passwords regularly.
3.
Control the number of maximum invalid logon attempts.
4.
Disable external logon to mailboxes (when the highest
level of security possible is required).
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January 1998
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Using the Voice Security Options screen
Using the Voice Security Options screen
Introduction
The Voice Security Options screen allows you to control
various security features and set restriction and permission
codes that can be applied to features such as call answering, call
sender, Express Messaging, mailbox Thru-Dial, and AMIS
networking
Voice Security
Options screen
Part 1
Standard 1.0
This is the first part of the Voice Security Options screen.
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Using the Voice Security Options screen
Part 2
To view the additional fields in part 2 of the screen, press the
<Page down> key or the down arrow.
Field descriptions
The following fields are used to protect mailboxes against
unauthorized use. The fields used to monitor mailbox access
can be found in Section K: Monitoring access to Meridian Mail
mailboxes and features.
Password Prefix
Description
The Password Prefix is a set of (up to four) digits
that is inserted at the start of the default mailbox
password whenever you create a new mailbox.
Default
System-generated four-digit code
Maximum
Length
4 digits
The prefix plus the user’s DN cannot exceed 16
digits.
Maximum Invalid Logon Attempts Permitted per Session
Standard 1.0
Description
This is the maximum number of times a user or
caller can enter an invalid password within one
logon session.
Default
3
Valid Range
1 to 99
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Using the Voice Security Options screen
Maximum Invalid Logon Attempts Permitted per Mailbox
Description
This is the number of maximum invalid passwords
that can be entered for a mailbox. This does not
apply to the current logon session only. The
number of invalid logons are counted over time.
Default
9
Valid Range
1 to 99
Maximum Days Permitted Between Password Changes
Description
This field determines how often users are forced to
change their mailbox passwords.
Default
30
Valid Range
0 to 90
0 indicates users do not have to change passwords.
Dependencies
MMUI only
Password Expiry Warning (days)
Description
When a user’s password is about to expire, a
warning is played to notify the user and give him
or her the chance to change it before it expires.
This field determines how many days before
password expiry the warning is played.
Default
5
Valid Range
0 to 60
0 indicates that a warning will not be played.
Dependencies
MMUI only
Displayed when the maximum days between
password changes is one or greater.
Standard 1.0
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Using the Voice Security Options screen
Minimum Number of Password Changes Before Repeats
Description
This field determines the number of different
passwords that must be used before the same
password can be reused.
Default
5
Valid Range
0 to 5
0 indicates that users can reuse the same password.
Dependencies
MMUI only
Displayed when the maximum days between
password changes is one or greater.
Minimum Password Length
Description
This is the minimum number of digits required in
passwords that are entered from the telephone
keypad. This includes mailbox passwords and
access and update passwords for voice services.
Default
4
Valid Range
4 to 16
Dependencies
MMUI only.
External Logon
Description
This feature is usually enabled to allow users to log
on to their mailboxes from remote off-switch
phones.This feature can be disabled to provide
maximum security. When disabled, users cannot
log on to their mailboxes from off-switch phones.
Default
Enabled
To disable
Call your Nortel distributor to disable this feature.
ATTENTION
Once disabled, this feature can never be
reenabled.
Standard 1.0
Valid Options
Enabled, Disabled
Dependencies
MMUI only
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January 1998
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Using the Voice Security Options screen
Call Answering/Express Messaging Thru-Dial
Restriction/Permission List Number
Description
This field indicates which Restriction/Permission
List should be applied to Call Answering/Express
Messaging Thru-Dials.
Default
None
Force Password Change on Initial Logon
Description
This field compels users who are logging in to
their mailbox for the first time to immediately
change the default password.
Default
Yes
Dependencies
This field is displayed only if the interface is
MMUI.
Suppress Display of Telset Password
Description
This field suppresses the display of password
digits by replacing them with dashes on telephones
with displays.
Default
Yes
Dependencies
None
System Access Monitoring Period from (hh:mm)
Description
This field indicates the monitoring period during
which any or all of the following is monitored:
• mailbox logons for requested users
• the use of Thru-Dial services
• the use of a mailbox or Thru-Dial service from a
specified CLID
Default
Standard 1.0
Start time: 23:00
End time: 05:00
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Using the Voice Security Options screen
Monitor All Thru-Dials during Monitoring Period
Description
This field indicates whether all Thru-Dial services
(from a mailbox, voice menu, or directly from a
VSDN) are to be monitored, and if yes, when.
Default
No
Valid Options
No, Yes, Always_Monitor
If Yes, you are prompted for the monitoring
period.
Monitor CLIDs during Monitoring Period
Description
This field indicates whether calling line IDs
(CLIDs) are to be monitored during logon or by
the Thru-Dial service, and if yes, when.
Default
No
Valid Options
No, Yes, Always_Monitor
If Yes, you are prompted for the monitoring
period.
CLID Format—Internal—CLIDs to Monitor
Description
These are the internal CLIDs to be monitored
during login or by the Thru-Dial service.
Default
None
Dependencies
The Monitor CLIDs during Monitoring Period
field is set to Yes or Always_Monitor.
CLID Format—External—CLIDs to Monitor
Standard 1.0
Description
These are the external CLIDs to be monitored
during login or by the Thru-Dial service.
Default
None
Dependencies
The Monitor CLIDs during Monitoring Period
field is set to Yes or Always_Monitor.
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Default security settings
Default security settings
Purpose
On a newly installed system, the security parameters are
configured with default settings. These defaults may be
appropriate for your system. If this is the case, you will not have
to modify the settings.
However, the default settings may not adequately secure your
Meridian Mail system to meet your business requirements.
Security checklist
Review the checklist below to determine if you need to change
any of the default values that are assigned to passwords. You
can also fill in this checklist with your new settings.
Information about these parameters is provided on the
following pages.
Standard 1.0
Parameter
Default
value
Password Prefix
4-digit code
Maximum Invalid Logon Attempts Permitted per
Mailbox
9
Maximum Invalid Logon Attempts Permitted per
Session
3
Maximum Days Permitted Between Password
Changes
30
Password Expiry Warning (days)
5
Minimum Number of Password Changes before
Repeats
5
Minimum Password Length
4
External Logon
Enabled
Call Answering/Express Messaging Thru-Dial
Restriction/Permission List Number
None
Force Password Change on Initial Logon
Yes
Suppress Display of Telset Password
Yes
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January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Default security settings
Parameter
Standard 1.0
Default
value
System Access Monitoring Period from (hh:mm)
23:00 to
05:00
Monitor All Thru-Dials during Monitoring Period
No
Monitor CLIDs during Monitoring Period
No
CLID Format—Internal—CLIDs to Monitor
None
CLID Format—External—CLIDs to Monitor
None
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
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Initial password change
Initial password change
Introduction
Another measure to enhance security is to ensure that users
change their initial password. This way, unauthorized access is
prevented by those who may know the password prefix and
mailbox number.
The initial password change feature provides the ability to force
users to change their password the first time they log in.
How it works
When users log in to their mailbox for the first time, their
default password is treated as “expired,” and they are forced to
change their password at this time.
Note: When a user enters his or her password for the first time,
and any time thereafter, it is not displayed on the telephone set
display. For more information on this feature, see “Password
display suppression” on page 6-135.
This feature is enabled for all systems.
This feature only applies to MMUI mailboxes including
Hospitality staff users. For VMUIF systems, this feature will be
disabled, and it will not apply to hospitality guest users.
Standard 1.0
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Initial password change
Enforcing an initial
password change
To ensure that new users are forced to change their passwords
when they log in for the first time, use the following procedure.
Step Action
1
Select Voice Administration from the Main Menu.
Result: The Voice Administration menu appears.
2
Select Voice Security Options.
Result: The Voice Security Options screen appears.
Standard 1.0
3
Select Yes in the Force Password Change on Initial Logon
field.
4
Do you want to save the configuration?
IF
THEN press
yes
[Save].
no
[Cancel].
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January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-135
Password display suppression
Password display suppression
Introduction
The password display suppression feature prevents display of
entered password digits on telephone sets that have display
screens. This prevents “shoulder surfers” from seeing your
password.
How password display When users enter their passwords, each digit in the password is
suppression works
replaced by a dash (-). The pound (#) key continues to be
displayed as #, but the star (*) key is displayed as a dash if the
feature is enabled.
This feature is not supported for external calls because the local
switch has no control on the suppression capability.
Suppressing the
display
To suppress the display of password each time a user logs in to
Meridian Mail, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Meridian Mail Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select Voice Administration.
Result: The Voice Administration menu appears.
2
Select Voice Security Options.
Result: The Voice Security Options screen appears.
Standard 1.0
3
Select Yes in the Suppress Display of Telset Password field.
4
Do you want to save the configuration?
IF
THEN press
yes
[Save].
no
[Cancel].
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January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Password prefix
Password prefix
Introduction
When a new mailbox is created, the default password is the
user’s extension number. Until the user changes the default
password, this may be a potentially serious security risk.
Password prefix
A password prefix provides another level of security by
appending a short code before the default password. This code
can be between two to four digits in length.
When a password prefix is defined, it is inserted at the
beginning of the default mailbox password—the prefix is only
inserted for new mailboxes.
Example
If mailbox 2339 is created and a password prefix of 34 has been
defined, then the mailbox user will enter 342339 as the
password the first time he or she logs in to Meridian Mail.
How prefixes work
The password prefix only applies to new MMUI users
regardless of whether it is being defined for the first time or has
been changed. VMUIF users continue to have their default
password set to null and must log in from their “home phone” to
change their password.
The password prefix applies only until the user changes the
password. For example, when the user of mailbox 2339 changes
the password for the first time, the prefix is no longer required.
Guidelines
Standard 1.0
Change the password prefix on a regular basis for maximum
security. When you change the password prefix, it does not
affect existing mailboxes, only newly created mailboxes.
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Password prefix
Setting up the
password prefix
To apply a password prefix, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Meridian Mail Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select Voice Administration.
Result: The Voice Administration menu appears.
2
Select Voice Security Options.
Result: The Voice Security Options screen appears.
3
Enter the prefix in the Password Prefix field.
Note: The combined password prefix and the actual password
cannot exceed 16 digits in length.
4
Standard 1.0
Do you want to save the configuration?
IF
THEN press
yes
[Save].
no
[Cancel].
System Administration Guide
January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Password length
Password length
Introduction
The length of the password, in conjunction with other mailbox
features, can make it very difficult for hackers to break into
your Meridian Mail system. You should never depend on one
feature alone to safeguard your system.
Note: The password length feature only applies to MMUI
systems.
How having a long
password increases
security
A long password increases your security provided that the
password and the mailbox number are not the same. Having a
long password means that there are more combinations to enter
which could discourage the hacker.
Defining the
password length
To define the minimum password length, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Meridian Mail Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select Voice Administration.
Result: The Voice Administration screen appears.
2
Select Voice Security Options.
Result: The Voice Security Options screen appears.
3
Set the password length in the Minimum Password Length
field.
Note: The password length including the password prefix
cannot exceed 16 digits in length.
4
Standard 1.0
Do you want to save the configuration?
IF
THEN press
Yes
[Save].
No
[Cancel].
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January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-139
Forced regular password changes
Forced regular password changes
Introduction
Forced password changes help increase security especially if
they are done regularly. By compelling mailbox users to change
their passwords and encouraging them to vary the length, it
makes it very difficult for hackers to guess your password
patterns.
Who can change the
password
The mailbox password is changeable by both the administrator
and the mailbox user. It can be altered as often as desired.
Relevant fields
The following fields in the Voice Security Options screen are
related to forced password changes. The second and third fields
are displayed only if the first field is set to a value of 1 or more:
•
•
•
Maximum Days Permitted Between Password Changes
Password Expiry Warning (days)
Minimum Number of Password Changes before Repeats
Note: These fields apply to the MMUI interface only.
For more information on the Voice Security Options screen and
its fields, see “Modifying mailbox security settings” on
page 6-146.
Maximum days
between password
changes
You can either force users to change their passwords on a
regular basis, or you can allow them to change them when or if
they want.
Default
On a newly installed system, the default setting forces users to
change their passwords every 30 days. You can choose a value
between 0 and 90 days.
Guideline
Forcing users to change their passwords on a regular basis is
recommended since this results in a much greater level of
security.
Standard 1.0
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Forced regular password changes
Expired passwords
If a user’s password expires, the user is not allowed to retrieve
messages until he or she changes the password.
ATTENTION
If you change this value from 0 to another value on an
operational system, user passwords expire immediately.
Make this change during a slow traffic time and inform
users of the change. After the change, you may notice a
number of 3134 DR SEERs that indicate users did not
change their passwords when prompted.
Password expiry
warning
If the maximum days between password changes is set to 1 or
more, you can play an expiry warning message to users before
their password is about to expire. This warning reminds the user
that the password is going to expire in X days and gives the user
the chance to change the password before it expires.
This field gives you control over when this password is played.
Minimum password
changes before
repeats
WHEN this field is
set to
THEN the warning will
a value between 1
and 60
be played this many days before the
password is set to expire.
0
not be played. When the user’s password
expires, he or she will be prompted for a
new password at logon.
To further increase mailbox security, you can force users to use
a different password whenever their password expires.
Otherwise, users may simply enter the same password over and
over every time their password expires.
This setting is not applicable if the maximum days permitted
between password changes is zero (0).
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-141
Forced regular password changes
Enforcing regular
password changes
To set up your system so that mailbox users will have to change
their passwords, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Meridian Mail Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select Voice Administration.
Result: The Voice Administration menu screen appears.
2
Select Voice Security Options.
Result: The Voice Security Options screen appears.
3
Set the expiration period in the Maximum Days Permitted
Between Password Changes field.
Note: The valid range is from 0 to 90 days and the default is
30. If you set this field to 0, the users are not forced to change
their password and you do not have to configure any other
fields. In this case, go to step 6 to save or cancel the changes.
Standard 1.0
4
Set the number of days of advance notice that users will hear
before their password expires in the Password Expiry Warning
(days) field.
5
Set the number of passwords that have to expire before a user
can reuse an old password in the Minimum Number of
Password Changes Before Repeat field.
6
Do you want to save the configuration?
IF
THEN press
yes
[Save].
no
[Cancel].
System Administration Guide
January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Invalid logon attempts
Invalid logon attempts
Introduction
The Invalid Logon Attempts feature allows you to define the
number of times, within a range of one to nine, that a caller can
enter an invalid logon password for a mailbox before the system
disables the mailbox. Once the mailbox is disabled, only the
system administrator can reenable it at the administration
terminal. When a mailbox is disabled, Meridian Mail still takes
and stores incoming messages but does not permit logons.
The feature is useful in preventing hackers from entering one
password after another until they gain access to a mailbox.
The feature also allows you to specify the number of invalid
logon attempts per session as well as per mailbox. This
discourages hackers from hopping around from one mailbox to
another, disabling them with invalid logon attempts.
Relevant fields
There are two fields in the Voice Security Options screen that
control the number of allowable invalid logon attempts:
•
•
Maximum Invalid Logon Attempts Permitted per Session
Maximum Invalid Logon Attempts Permitted per Mailbox
For more information on the Voice Security Options screen and
its fields, see “Modifying mailbox security settings” on
page 6-146.
Invalid logons per
session
Standard 1.0
This field determines how many invalid passwords can be
entered in a row during one logon session. If this limit is
reached, the logon session is terminated.
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-143
Invalid logon attempts
Example
If a hacker knows your Meridian Mail access code and some
DNs, this is what would happen if your maximum invalid logon
attempts per session were set to 3.
Attempt
Description
1
The hacker tries logging in to mailbox 2498 but enters
an incorrect password.
2
The hacker tries logging in to mailbox 2498 again but
enters an incorrect password.
3
The hacker tries logging in to mailbox 2475 but enters
an incorrect password.
The logon session is terminated.
Invalid logons per
mailbox
Meridian Mail also keeps track of how many invalid logon
attempts have been made on each mailbox. This does not apply
to the current logon session only. The number of invalid
passwords entered is counted over time.
The counter is reset to 0 when the user changes the password.
If the limit is reached, the mailbox is disabled. Meridian Mail
still takes and records incoming messages, but does not allow
the user to log on.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
6-144
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Invalid logon attempts
Disabling a mailbox
To specify how many invalid logon attempts will be allowed
before a mailbox is disabled, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Meridian Mail Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select Voice Administration.
Result: The Voice Administration menu screen appears.
2
Select Voice Security Options.
Result: The Voice Security Options screen appears.
3
Set the number of invalid logon attempts per session in the
Maximum Invalid Logon Attempts Permitted per Session field.
The valid range is from 1 to 99, and the default is 3.
4
Set the number of invalid logon attempts per mailbox in the
Maximum Invalid Logon Attempts Permitted per Mailbox field.
The valid range is from 1 to 99, and the default is 9.
5
Reenabling an MMUI
mailbox
Do you want to save the configuration?
IF
THEN press
yes
[Save].
no
[Cancel].
To reenable a disabled MMUI mailbox, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Meridian Mail Main Menu
Step Action
1
Choose User Administration.
2
Choose Local Voice User.
3
Do you know the user’s DN?
IF
THEN
yes
press [View/Modify].
Enter the user’s DN and
press <Return>.
Go to step 9.
no
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
follow step 4 to step 8.
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-145
Invalid logon attempts
Step Action
Reenabling a VMUIF
mailbox
4
Press [Find] to do a search.
5
Specify the criteria for the search.
6
Press [List].
7
Position the cursor beside the user you want to modify and
press the spacebar to highlight the entry.
8
Press [View/Modify].
9
Move the cursor to the Logon Status field.
10
Select Enabled.
11
Do you want to save the configuration?
IF
THEN press
yes
[Save].
no
[Cancel].
The setting in the Mailbox Lockout Duration field determines
how a VMUIF mailbox has to be reenabled. This field is located
in the View/Modify Class of Service screen. The duration is
specified in hours and minutes (hh:mm).
WHEN the lockout
duration is
THEN
00:01 or greater
the mailbox will be automatically reenabled
after the specified time.
00:00 (zero)
you must manually reenable the mailbox in
the Logon Status field in the View/Modify
Local Voice User screen.
The procedure is the same as “Reenabling an
MMUI mailbox” on page 6-144.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
6-146
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Modifying mailbox security settings
Modifying mailbox security settings
When to use
Follow this procedure
•
after installation, if some or all of the default settings do not
meet your organization’s requirements
to change the current settings to reflect a new security
policy or tougher security measures
•
Procedure
To modify current mailbox security settings, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Meridian Mail Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select Voice Administration.
2
Select Voice Security Options.
Result: The Voice Security Options screen appears.
3
Modify some or all of the following fields to meet your security
requirements:
• Password Prefix
• Maximum Invalid Logon Attempts Permitted per Session
• Maximum Invalid Logon Attempts Permitted per Mailbox
• Maximum Days Permitted Between Password Changes
• Password Expiry Warning
• Minimum Number of Password Changes before Repeats
• Minimum Password Length
• Force Password Change on Initial Logon
• Suppress Display of Telset Password
For more information, see the appropriate topics.
4
Standard 1.0
Do you want to save the configuration?
IF
THEN press
yes
[Save].
no
[Cancel].
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January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-147
Restricting off-site access to mailboxes
Restricting off-site access to mailboxes
Introduction
External logon is enabled by default, allowing users to log on to
their mailboxes from phones that are external to the switch. If
security is of the highest priority, Meridian Mail provides a
facility allowing the system to restrict access to a mailbox from
an offsite location.
Implementing this
feature
This feature (SW7007) can be ordered from a Nortel sales
representative and is implemented by authorized field
technicians.
ATTENTION
Once the external logon feature is disabled on the system,
it can never be reenabled.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
6-148
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Disabling unused mailboxes
Disabling unused mailboxes
Introduction
Whenever employees are terminated, you should immediately
disable their mailbox. This prevents them from abusing your
system by billing toll calls to your company.
You should make arrangements with your Personnel
department to inform you of terminations so you can disable
system access.
Procedure
To disable an unused mailbox, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Meridian Mail Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select User Administration.
2
Select Local Voice User.
3
Press [View/Modify], and then enter the local voice user.
If you do not know the local voice user, do the following:
a. Press the [Find] softkey followed by the [List] softkey.
b. Position the cursor beside the user you want to view or
modify, and press the [SpaceBar].
c. Press [View/Modify].
Standard 1.0
4
Position the cursor on the Logon Status field.
5
Set the field to Disabled to disable the mailbox.
6
Press [Save] to save the configuration.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 6
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Section K:
6-149
Monitoring access to Meridian
Mail mailboxes and features
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
6-150
Hacker Monitor
6-151
Mailbox Login Monitoring
6-152
Thru-Dial Monitoring
6-154
CLID Monitoring
6-157
The Services Summary Traffic report
6-160
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January 1998
6-150
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This section of the chapter describes the reports and features in
Meridian Mail intended to assist you in identifying attempts to
violate the security of your system.
These include the following:
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
the Services Summary Traffic report
the Hacker Monitor feature
mailbox login monitoring
Thru-Dial monitoring
CLID monitoring
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January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-151
Hacker Monitor
Hacker Monitor
Introduction
This feature enables you to monitor selected or all mailbox
logins and Thru-Dials, which helps you to check for activity on
your system that may indicate the presence of hackers.
When this feature is combined with the SEER Mailbox feature,
you can be notified through Remote Notification when a
suspected unauthorized user attempts a Thru-Dial or enters a
particular mailbox.
Description
The Hacker Monitor capability is provided by three different
methods:
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
by monitoring mailbox logins (see “Mailbox Login
Monitoring” on page 6-152)
by monitoring the use of Thru-Dial services (see “ThruDial Monitoring” on page 6-154)
by monitoring mailbox logins or attempted Thru-Dials
from specified calling line identification numbers (CLIDs)
(see “CLID Monitoring” on page 6-157)
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January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Mailbox Login Monitoring
Mailbox Login Monitoring
Introduction
Possible hacker activity may be detected by monitoring mailbox
logins of requested local voice users.
How to do it
You use the System Access Monitoring Period field on the
Voice Security Options screen and the Monitor Mailbox during
Monitoring Period field on the Local Voice User screen to set
up mailbox login monitoring.
Field descriptions
This table describes the fields that are used to set up mailbox
monitoring.
System Access Monitoring Period
Description
This field indicates the monitoring period during
which any or all of the following is monitored:
• mailbox logins for requested users
• the use of Thru-Dial services
• the use of a mailbox or Thru-Dial service from a
specified CLID
Default
Start time: 23:00
End time: 5:00
Both the start and the end time for this period are
specified in the hh:mm format using the 24-hour
clock.
Monitor Mailbox during Monitoring Period
Standard 1.0
Description
When this field is set to Yes, all logins into the
mailbox during the system access monitoring
period will result in SEER 2262 being issued for
MMUI users or SEER 5662 being issued for
VMUIF users.
Default
No
References
For more information on local voice users, see
Chapter 8, “Local voice users”.
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January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-153
Mailbox Login Monitoring
Procedure
To monitor mailbox logins, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Meridian Mail Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select Voice Administration.
2
Select Voice Security Options.
3
Specify a time interval in the System Access Monitoring Period
field.
4
Press [Save].
5
Return to the Main Menu .
6
Select User Administration.
7
Select Local Voice Users.
8
Select the local voice user you want to modify or add.
For more information on modifying or adding local voice users,
see Chapter 8, “Local voice users”.
Standard 1.0
9
Set the Monitor Mailbox during Monitoring Period field to Yes.
10
Press [Save].
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January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Thru-Dial Monitoring
Thru-Dial Monitoring
Introduction
Possible hacker activity may be detected by monitoring selected
or all Thru-Dial services used either during the system access
monitoring period or at all times.
How to do it
Use the Voice Security Options screen and the Thru-Dial
Definition screen to set up Thru-Dial Monitoring.
Note: The monitoring period is determined by the values
entered in the System Access Monitoring Period from (hh:mm)
field on the Voice Security Options screen.
THEN in the Voice
Security Options
screen
AND in the
Thru-Dial Definition
screen
all Thru-Dials
set the Monitor all
Thru-Dials during
Monitoring Period
field to Yes or
Always_Monitor
no action is required.
specified ThruDials
set the Monitor all
Thru-Dials during
Monitoring Period
field to No
for the desired
service, set the
Monitor this Service
during Monitoring
Period field to Yes.
IF you want to
monitor
Field descriptions
Standard 1.0
You will find descriptions of the Voice Security Options fields
on page 6-125. For descriptions of the fields in the Thru-Dial
Definition screen, see Chapter 26, “Class of Service
administration”.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-155
Thru-Dial Monitoring
Field descriptions
(cont’d)
The following table only describes those fields which are used
to set up Thru-Dial monitoring.
System Access Monitoring Period from (hh:mm)
Description
This field indicates the monitoring period during
which one or all of the following will be
monitored:
• mailbox logons for requested users
• the use of Thru-Dial services
• the use of a mailbox or Thru-Dial service from a
specified CLID
Default
Start time: 23:00
End time: 05:00
Available on
Voice Security Options screen
Monitor All Thru-Dials during Monitoring Period
Description
When this field is set to Yes, all accesses to the
Thru-Dial service (from a mailbox, voice menu, or
directly from a VSDN) during the system access
monitoring period will result in a 10613
informational SEER. Included in this SEER is the
CLID of the user.
When this field is set to Always_Monitor, any
access to the Thru-Dial service at any time will
result in a class 106 informational SEER.
Default
No
Available on
Voice Security Options screen
Monitor this Service during Monitoring Period
Standard 1.0
Description
When this field is set to Yes, all accesses to this
Thru-Dial service during the system access
monitoring period will result in a 10613
informational SEER. Included in this SEER is the
CLID of the user.
Default
No
Available on
Thru-Dial Definition screen
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January 1998
6-156
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Thru-Dial Monitoring
Monitoring all
Thru-Dials
To monitor all Thru-Dials, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Meridian Mail Main Menu
Step Action
Monitoring specific
Thru-Dials
1
Select Voice Administration.
2
Select Voice Security Options.
3
Set the Monitor all Thru-Dials during Monitoring Period field to
Yes or Always_Monitor.
IF you have set this field
to
THEN go to
Yes
step 4.
Always_Monitor
step 5.
4
Set the monitoring period in System Access Monitoring Period
from (hh:mm) field.
5
Press [Save].
To monitor a specific Thru-Dial, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Meridian Mail Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select Voice Administration.
2
Select Voice Security Options.
3
Set the Monitor all Thru-Dials during Monitoring Period field to
No.
4
Set the monitoring period in System Access Monitoring Period
from (hh:mm) field.
5
Press [Save].
6
Go to the Thru-Dial Definitions screen.
7
Select the thru-dial definition you want to modify or add.
Fore more information on thru-dials, refer to the Voice Services
Application Guide (NTP 555-7001-325).
Standard 1.0
8
Set the Monitor this Service during Monitoring Period field to
Yes.
9
Press [Save].
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-157
CLID Monitoring
CLID Monitoring
Introduction
Possible hacker activity may be detected by monitoring mailbox
logins or thru-dials that have been attempted from a specified
calling line ID (CLID).
You can specify the type of CLID (Internal or External) and a
string of digits (up to 15) of a CLID. That is, you can specify the
complete CLID, the area code only, or the area code and office
code. Up to 12 CLIDs can be entered for each type of CLID
format. For more information on CLID, see Chapter 17,
“Dialing translations”.
How to do it
Use the Voice Security Options screen to set up CLID
Monitoring.
IF you want to
monitor
CLIDs
THEN in the Voice
Security Options
screen
AND in the Voice
Security Options
screen
set the Monitor
CLIDs during
Monitoring Period
field to Yes or
Always_Monitor
enter the numbers in
the CLIDs to
Monitor field.
Monitoring a subset of If a subset of a CLID is to be monitored (an office code, for
a CLID
instance), this string of digits will be compared only to the
beginning of the CLID and not with the number. Thus, if you
want to monitor the office code, you must also specify the area
code.
Remote notification of When this feature is combined with the SEER Trigger Message
mailbox logons
feature, you can be notified through Remote Notification when
a suspected unauthorized user attempts to access Thru-Dial or
enters a particular mailbox.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
CLID Monitoring
Field descriptions
The following table only describes those fields which are used
to set up CLID monitoring. For descriptions of all the Voice
Security Options fields, see “Using the Voice Security Options
screen” on page 6-125.
Monitor CLIDs during Monitoring Period
Description
This field indicates whether CLIDs are to be
monitored by the Voice Messaging Service during
login or by the Thru-Dial service. This field also
indicates when this monitoring should take place.
When this field is set to No, CLIDs are not
monitored, even if there are entries in the CLIDs to
Monitor field.
When this field is set to Yes, CLIDs are monitored
during the system access monitoring period only.
When this field is set to Always_Monitor, CLIDs
are monitored at all times.
Default
No
CLIDs to Monitor
Description
You can enter up to 12 CLIDs.
These CLIDs are monitored by Voice Messaging
on mailbox login or by the Thru-Dial service if the
Monitor CLIDs during Monitoring Period is set to
Yes or Always_Monitor.
Standard 1.0
Maximum
length
CLIDs can be up to 15 digits in length.
Format
You can enter complete CLIDs, area codes only, or
area codes and office codes. Do not include any
dialing prefixes, such as ESN prefixes, in the
numbers you enter.
Examples
4165551234 is a complete CLID.
416 is an area code. All CLIDs from this area code
are monitored.
416555 is an area code and exchange code. All
CLIDs in the 555 exchange in the 416 area code
are monitored.
Default
None
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-159
CLID Monitoring
SEERs issued
An informational SEER is issued if the CLID of a caller
matches one of the numbers specified in the Voice Security
Options screen during a mailbox login or Thru-Dial access. The
informational SEERs can be 5562, 2262, or 10612. For more
information on SEERs, refer to the Maintenance Messages
(SEERs) (NTP 555-7001-510).
Procedure
To monitor calling line IDs, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Meridian Mail Main Menu
Step Action
Standard 1.0
1
Select Voice Administration.
2
Select Voice Security Options.
3
Set the Monitor CLIDs during Monitoring Period field to Yes or
Always_ Monitor.
IF you have set this field
to
THEN go to
Yes
step 4.
Always_Monitor
step 5.
4
Set the monitoring period in the format hh:mm.
5
Enter the internal CLIDs to be monitored in the CLID Format—
Internal block.
6
Enter the external CLIDs to be monitored in the CLID Format—
External block.
7
Press [Save].
System Administration Guide
January 1998
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
The Services Summary Traffic report
The Services Summary Traffic report
Introduction
This report provides statistics for each of the voice services
installed on your system. It records the number of times a user
dials a service (the number of accesses) during the reporting
period and the average length of each access. The report records
both direct and indirect accesses.
Direct accesses occur when a user dials the DN of the menu,
announcement, or fax item.
Indirect accesses occur when a service is accessed from another
service through a menu selection or a time-of-day controller.
For more information, see “Services Summary report” on
page 31-12.
Report availability
This report is available on all systems.
Report frequency
Run this report regularly to check for unusually long Thru-Dial
sessions or for unusual numbers of after-hours Thru-Dial
sessions. These may be a sign that hackers are present on your
system.
What to do
If you suspect hackers are accessing the Thru-Dial feature, first
check how the Thru-Dial service is set up to see whether the
Operational Measurements (OM) data are unusual. For
example, if executives call in and access a Thru-Dial service,
then you can expect an average number of calls. If this average
is exceeded, it may be an indication of hacker activity.
If your research still suggests the presence of hackers, review
the dialing restrictions for Thru-Dial. For details, refer to the
Voice Services Application Guide (NTP 555-7001-325).
If you are using an access password for Thru-Dial, change the
access password, and continue to monitor the Thru-Dial usage.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 6
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Section L:
6-161
Equipment security
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
6-162
Switchroom access
6-163
Administration terminals
6-164
Meridian Mail and switch printouts
6-165
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-162
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This section of the chapter discusses security measures that you
should exercise to safeguard the Meridian Mail and switch
hardware.
General security
measures
The following is a list of general security measures you can take
to secure your Meridian Mail and PBX:
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
Limit access to your switchroom and escort all visitors.
Keep a list of authorized technicians on hand. Whenever a
regular technician appears, ask for ID to ensure that he or
she is still employed by the company.
Establish procedures for temporary technicians. Ask the
technician for ID and to sign in, and issue a visitor’s badge.
If the technician does not have a company ID, check with
the company to ensure that the person is a valid employee.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-163
Switchroom access
Switchroom access
Introduction
When a switchroom is not secure, criminals can gain access to
all your system resources. Their activity can be as benign as
turning off printers or as malicious as removing cards from your
switch and rendering your system inoperable.
Security measures
The following is a list of safety measures you should exercise:
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
Physically lock the room in which your equipment is
located.
Use combination locks—hardkey locks can easily be
broken. Nortel recommends using an electronic key and
program to safeguard your equipment room.
Change the combination regularly and only inform those
who need to know the new combination.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
6-164
Setting up Meridian Mail security
Administration terminals
Administration terminals
Introduction
There are two facilities provided for protecting against
unauthorized access to the Meridian Mail administration
terminal:
•
•
Administration
password
the administration password
hardware-based remote access restriction
The administration terminal is password protected. When
Meridian Mail is first installed, there is a default password. The
first time you log on to the Meridian Mail administration
terminal, you are forced to change this default password. You
are recommended to change this password on a regular basis to
maximize system security.
Passwords can be between 1 and 16 characters in length.
However, it is recommended that the password be no less than
seven characters in length. The longer the password, the less
likely it is that someone will guess it.
Always log off before you leave the administration terminal,
even if only for a short period.
Remote access
restriction
If remote access is enabled on your system, anyone can dial in
and commandeer your system. Remote access should not be
enabled unless required (for example, for remote support
personnel to work on your system).
Modular Option EC (ModOpEC) systems have an internal
modem which is enabled using the <Ctrl> <w> key sequence.
When a remote access session is in progress, local access is
prohibited.
Non-EC systems are configured with an A/B switchbox
between the terminal and the modem. When the switch is set to
the modem setting, the system can be remotely accessed (but
not from the local terminal). When the switch is set to the
terminal setting, access is only possible from the local terminal.
The switch is controllable at the site and must be switched
manually.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Setting up Meridian Mail security
6-165
Meridian Mail and switch printouts
Meridian Mail and switch printouts
Introduction
“One man’s garbage is another man’s treasure.”
Anonymous
This is very true for the telecommunication criminal known as
the “dumpster diver.” These divers search through your garbage
looking for printouts or records of your system’s codes.
Security measures
Standard 1.0
Do not throw out call detail records and credit card receipts.
Dispose of these materials, including switch printouts and old
documentation, as you do any proprietary materials.
System Administration Guide
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Setting up Meridian Mail security
Meridian Mail and switch printouts
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 7
User administration—an
overview
In this chapter
Section A: Introduction to User Administration
7-3
Section B: New user planning
7-15
7-2
Standard 1.0
User administration—an overview
System Administration Guide
January 1998
User administration—an overview
Section A:
7-3
Introduction to User
Administration
In this section
Standard 1.0
The User Administration menu
7-4
Types of users
7-7
Distribution lists
7-10
Limitations and guidelines
7-11
Support for multiple appearance DNs
7-12
System Administration Guide
January 1998
7-4
User administration—an overview
The User Administration menu
The User Administration menu
The User
Administration menu
This is the User Administration menu, the starting point for all
user administration tasks. In this example of the screen, the
Network Message Service (NMS) and Meridian Networking
features are installed.
Local Voice User
This menu item allows you to add, view, modify, and delete
local voice users. Local voice users have mailboxes on your
local Meridian Mail site.
Remote Voice User
This menu item is displayed if the Meridian Networking feature
is installed. It allows you to add, view, modify, and delete
remote voice users. Remote voice users are users at remote sites
that are added to your local site’s database.
Directory Entry User
This menu item allows you to add, view, modify, and delete
directory entry users. Directory entry users do not have
mailboxes.
Distribution Lists
This menu item allows you to add, view, modify, and delete
distribution lists. Distribution lists are used to send messages to
a number of people.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
User administration—an overview
7-5
The User Administration menu
Set Default User
Administration
Context
Standard 1.0
This menu item is displayed if the Network Message Service
(NMS) feature is installed on your system. It allows you to
select one of the NMS locations and make it the default (or
current) location so that you can add users to it, or delete users
from it.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
7-6
User administration—an overview
The User Administration menu
Related chapters
Standard 1.0
This table directs you to the chapters that contain information
about each of the items in the User Administration menu.
For the following option
Refer to
Local Voice User
Chapter 8, “Local voice users”
Remote Voice User
Chapter 9, “Remote voice users”
Directory Entry User
Chapter 10, “Directory entry users”
Distribution Lists
Chapter 11, “Distribution lists”
Set Default User
Administration Context
Page 8-8 in “Local voice users”
System Administration Guide
January 1998
User administration—an overview
7-7
Types of users
Types of users
Three types of users
There are three types of users that you can add to Meridian
Mail:
•
•
•
Local voice users
local voice users
remote voice users
directory entry users
Local voice users have extensions on the local switch.
Local voice users have mailboxes with call answering and voice
messaging capability. This means the following:
•
•
If the user is away from his or her phone, callers are
forwarded to the user’s mailbox to leave a message.
The user can compose and send voice messages to other
users.
Voice Messaging interfaces
There are three Voice Messaging interfaces. Each customer can
only use one of the installed interfaces. This is set up when the
customer is added.
Standard 1.0
Interface
Description
MMUI
This is full-featured Voice Messaging that provides
users with call answering and voice messaging
capabilities.
VMUIF
This is a call answering interface intended for users
who primarily need call answering capability only
(although compose capability can be enabled in
users’ classes of service).
Hospitality
This interface is intended for the hospitality industry
and is available only if Hospitality Voice Messaging
is installed. It provides two specialized interfaces:
one for guests and one for staff.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
7-8
User administration—an overview
Types of users
Remote voice users
Users can be added as remote voice users only if the Meridian
Networking feature is installed.
When you add a user who is located at a remote Meridian Mail
site as a remote voice user, you are adding that user to your
local user database.
Benefits
The benefits of adding users at remote sites to your local site’s
database as remote voice users are as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
Whenever a user at the local site addresses a message to a
remote voice user, the remote voice user’s personal
verification (spoken name) is played.
Local users can use Name Dialing and Name Addressing to
call and compose messages to remote voice users.
While listening to a message left by a remote voice user, a
local user can use Call Sender (press 9 on the keypad) to
immediately call back the originator of the message.
External callers can name-dial remote voice users (if this
feature is enabled).
Remote voice users can be added to distribution lists.
Types of remote voice users
There are two types of remote voice users.
User type
Description
Permanent Permanent users remain on the system until you delete
them using User Administration.
Temporary If the number of temporary users exceeds the
maximum, those who have not been active for a long
time are automatically deleted by the system during
nightly audits.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
User administration—an overview
7-9
Types of users
Directory entry users
Directory entry users are registered in the Meridian Mail
directory. However, they do not have mailboxes. This means
that they do not have access to call answering or voice
messaging capability.
They can, however, be reached by features such as Name
Dialing and Thru-Dialers.
Example
You have added Rupert Haynes as a directory entry user. If he
does not answer his phone, callers are not forwarded to
Meridian Mail in order to leave a message. He also cannot
compose and send voice messages to other users.
However, when a caller accesses a thru-dial service and enters
Rupert’s extension (or name, if name dialing is used), his phone
rings.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
7-10
User administration—an overview
Distribution lists
Distribution lists
Description
A distribution list is a list of mailbox numbers. When you enter
the distribution list number during message composition, the
message is sent to all of the mailbox numbers in the list.
Distribution lists, therefore, make it easier and quicker to
address messages to groups of people. Once the distribution list
has been created, you only need to enter one number during
message composition (the distribution list number).
Personal versus
system distribution
lists
Users can create their own distribution lists from the telephone
set. These are known as personal distribution lists.
The distribution lists that you create through User
Administration are system distribution lists, and are created and
maintained by the system administrator, not users.
You can add up to 120 mailbox numbers to a system
distribution list. Users can add up to 99 mailbox numbers to
personal distribution lists.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
User administration—an overview
7-11
Limitations and guidelines
Limitations and guidelines
Multiple
Administration
Terminals
If the Multiple Administration Terminals (MAT) feature is
installed, you can perform User Administration from a
secondary terminal.
If more than one administrator accesses a user or distribution
list at the same time, the administrator who first gained access
to the user or list can modify the information. The other
administrator can only view the information (no [Save] softkeys
are displayed in the User Administration screens).
Nightly audits
Meridian Mail performs a system audit every day at 2:30 a.m.
This audit can take anywhere from ten minutes to two hours.
The more changes that have been made to the system since the
last audit, the longer the audit will take.
CAUTION
Risk of Interrupted Service
Do not perform user administration during the nightly audit.
Doing so may cause loss of service.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
7-12
User administration—an overview
Support for multiple appearance DNs
Support for multiple appearance DNs
Description:
MADN
A Multiple Appearance DN (MADN) is a directory number
(DN) that is programmed on several phone sets.
Usage
Multiple Appearance DNs are typically used in customer
support environments in which you want to ensure that calls are
answered. MADNs allow more than one call to be handled at a
time.
How MADNs work
A call to a multiple appearance DN rings a number of phone
sets, increasing the chances that the call will be answered.
The primary phone
The telephone set on which the MADN is programmed as key 0
is considered the primary phone.
Example
DN 5000 is programmed on four Meridian 1/SL-1 terminal
numbers (TNs):
•
•
•
•
DN 5000 is programmed as key 3 on TN 0-0-1-0.
DN 5000 is programmed as key 4 on TN 0-0-5-7.
DN 5000 is programmed as key 0 on TN 26-0-4-2. This is
the primary phone.
DN 5000 is programmed as key 1 on TN 26-0-4-3.
A call comes in to the customer support center. All four
telephone sets ring.
When someone answers the call, the other phones stop ringing.
When another call comes in on DN 5000, the three remaining
telephone sets ring even though the first call is still in progress.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
User administration—an overview
7-13
Support for multiple appearance DNs
How Meridian Mail
treats MADNs
Multiple appearance DNs are treated as one DN by Meridian
Mail. How the primary phone is programmed determines what
happens to a call when it is not answered in the predetermined
number of rings or when all telephones are busy.
Programming
requirement
The primary phone must be programmed to forward to the voice
messaging DN on busy and no answer conditions. Otherwise,
calls will not get forwarded to Meridian Mail when all
telephone sets are busy or when a call goes unanswered.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
7-14
User administration—an overview
Support for multiple appearance DNs
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
User administration—an overview
Section B:
7-15
New user planning
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
7-16
Class of service planning
7-17
Distributing local voice users evenly over volumes
7-19
Guidelines for adding users to a system that has disk
shadowing
7-21
Guidelines for adding a large number of users
7-22
How user models in pre-Release 9 systems are converted to
classes of service
7-23
System Administration Guide
January 1998
7-16
User administration—an overview
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This section describes how to plan the task of adding users to a
newly installed system.
Planning tasks
Before you begin adding users to your system, you should do
the following.
1.
2.
Standard 1.0
Identify the types of users that you will be adding to the
system.
Will you be adding remote voice users or directory entry
users, or both, in addition to local voice users?
Classify local voice users into categories that serve as the
basis for your classes of service.
3.
See “Class of service planning” on page 7-17.
If you have disk shadowing on some nodes but not on
others, identify which local voice users should be put on
the shadowed nodes.
4.
See “Guidelines for adding users to a system that has disk
shadowing” on page 7-21.
If you are adding a large number of users (600 or more)
within a 24-hour period, review the guidelines on
page 7-22.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
User administration—an overview
7-17
Class of service planning
Class of service planning
Introduction
Classes of service (COSs) act as templates to simplify the
process of adding and maintaining local voice users.
When you create a class of service, you specify three types of
information about the users to which the class of service will be
assigned:
•
•
•
which features are enabled/disabled
limitations and attributes
which restriction/permission lists are applied to certain
features
When you assign a class of service to a user, all of the attributes
defined in the class of service are applied to the user.
When you modify a class of service, all users who are assigned
to that class of service are immediately updated.
Example
These are some of the features you can enable/disable in classes
of service:
•
•
•
Delivery to Non-User
Remote Notification
AMIS Networking
These are some of the limitations and attributes you can specify:
•
•
•
•
maximum lengths for composed and call answering
messages
maximum voice storage limit
how long read messages are stored before being deleted
whether invalid personal distribution list addresses are
automatically deleted
You can assign restriction/permission lists to features such as
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
Extension Dialing
External Call Sender
Custom Revert
System Administration Guide
January 1998
7-18
User administration—an overview
Class of service planning
When to create
classes of service
Because each local voice user must be assigned to a class of
service, classes of service must be defined before you begin
adding local voice users to your system.
Classifying users
Classify your users into types, and then create classes of service
that meet the needs and requirements of each type.
Example
You might create classes of service for different departments or
jobs, or both, that have different usage profiles and
requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
See also
Standard 1.0
Sales
Engineering
Marketing
Manager
Secretary
For more information about classes of service, see Chapter 26,
“Class of Service administration”.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
User administration—an overview
7-19
Distributing local voice users evenly over volumes
Distributing local voice users evenly over volumes
Introduction
Meridian Mail systems can have from one to five nodes, each of
which contains a hard disk drive for data storage. These disk
drives are partitioned into volumes.
When you add a local voice user, the user must be assigned to a
particular volume. This is where all user-related data and voice
are stored, such as mailbox information, personal greetings,
voice messages, and voice prompts.
User volumes
This table indicates user volume names and where they are
distributed across the various nodes.
Number of Nodes
Node 1
Node 2
Node #
1 Node
2 Nodes 3 Nodes 4 Nodes 5 Nodes
VS2
VS2
VS2*
VS2*
VS2*
VS202
VS202
VS202
VS202
VS203
VS203
VS203
VS204
VS204
Node 3
Node 4
Node 5
VS205
Note: The asterisk (*) indicates that the volume contains only
voice prompts and is considered to be a system volume, not a
user volume.
The default volume
When you press the [Add] softkey to enter the Add a Local
Voice User screen, the volume that is selected as the default is
the volume with the greatest amount of free space at that time.
All users that you add during a single session are added to that
volume by default, unless you specify otherwise.
When you exit the Add a Local Voice User screen and then
reenter it, the system reassesses which volume has the most
available space and that volume becomes the new default.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
7-20
User administration—an overview
Distributing local voice users evenly over volumes
Recommendations
To guarantee an effective distribution of users, the following
actions are recommended:
•
•
Disk usage
information
Distribute local voice users across volumes randomly in
such a manner that does not result in heavy users all being
assigned to the same volume(s).
Spread employees in the same department across a number
of nodes (do not place them all on the same node). This
way, if a node is taken out of service for troubleshooting,
the entire department will not be affected.
Monitor disk usage on a regular basis to ensure that user
volumes do not fill up. This is done by generating the Disk
Usage report.
For more information about the Disk Usage report, see “Disk
Usage Detail report” on page 31-52 in Chapter 31, “Operational
Measurements traffic reports.”
Moving users from a
full volume
If a volume becomes (nearly) full, you can use the Move User
utility to move local voice users from one volume to another.
This utility is accessible from the Tools menu.
Refer to System Administration Tools (NTP 555-7001-305) for
details.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
User administration—an overview
7-21
Guidelines for adding users to a system that has disk shadowing
Guidelines for adding users to a system that has disk
shadowing
Introduction
Disk shadowing is an optional feature that is available on the
Modular Option EC platform. It provides protection against
data loss in the event of disk failure.
How it works
This feature works by writing new information to two disks at
the same time. If one disk fails, it is taken out of service without
service interruption. Disks are shadowed on a node-by-node
basis.
If a shadowed disk fails, voice messages of users on that node
are not lost since they will be on the second disk of the
shadowed pair.
Before you add users
Before adding users, you need to do the following.
1.
Determine which nodes are shadowed and which are not.
2.
Identify which users you want to put on shadowed nodes.
Local voice users whose messages may not be critical can
be placed on nonshadowed nodes.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
7-22
User administration—an overview
Guidelines for adding a large number of users
Guidelines for adding a large number of users
Recommendation
Avoid adding a large number of users (1000 or more) within a
24-hour period. Every 24 hours, a nightly audit takes place
between 2:30 a.m. and 5:00 a.m. When a large number of users
is added between audits, the directory that stores user
information can become unbalanced and perform less
efficiently.
Guidelines
If you must add a large number of users between audits, follow
these guidelines:
•
•
•
•
System slowdown
while adding users
Ensure that the number of local voice users to be added is
within the engineering guidelines for the system.
Add users in reverse alphabetical order.
When you add users in alphabetical order, performance
gradually degrades as you add more users. This
degradation in performance is corrected when the next
nightly audit occurs.
Distribute local voice users across volumes as evenly as
possible.
If you add a lot of users who either belong to the same
department or who have mailbox numbers beginning with
the same numbers, the system will begin to slow down as
you add more users. Therefore, try to add users in a more
random fashion to avoid performance degradation.
If you notice that the system is slowing down as you add users,
stop. You can force an audit from the Tools menu using the
Rebalance Directory tool. However, do not force an audit
during a busy traffic time. During a forced audit, you will not be
able to add more users.
For more information about this utility, refer to System
Administration Tools (NTP 555-7001-305).
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
User administration—an overview
7-23
How user models in pre-Release 9 systems are converted to classes of service
How user models in pre-Release 9 systems are converted to
classes of service
Introduction
Classes of service (COSs) replaced user models in Meridian
Mail Release 9. Prior to Release 9, a user model was assigned to
each user. However, if you modified the user model, it was
changed for that user only. You could not propagate changes to
a user model to all local voice users that were added using that
model.
How user models are
converted to COSs
When you convert to Meridian Mail 12 from a release prior to
Meridian Mail 9, all existing local voice users are assigned to a
personal class of service. This means that each user has a unique
class of service that is not connected to any of the system
classes of service. Therefore, local voice users must be
reassigned to system classes of service after a conversion.
COS conversion utility The COS Conversion utility is available from the Tools menu
and should be used when converting from a system that used
user models to one that uses classes of service.
For more information about this utility, refer to System
Administration Tools (NTP 555-7001-305).
How it works
Standard 1.0
This utility checks each local voice user’s personal class of
service.
WHEN the personal COS
THEN
matches an existing system
COS
the local voice user is assigned to
the matching system COS.
does not match an existing
system COS
the personal COS is used for that
user.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
7-24
User administration—an overview
How user models in pre-Release 9 systems are converted to classes of service
How to use this utility
You can use the COS Conversion utility to do one or both of the
following:
•
•
Standard 1.0
View unassigned local voice users, and then create a
system class of service based on the personal class of
service.
Assign unassigned users to defined system classes of
service.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 8
Local voice users
In this chapter
Section A: Adding local voice users
8-3
Section B: Finding local voice users
8-45
Section C: Modifying and deleting local voice users
8-79
8-2
Standard 1.0
Local voice users
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Local voice users
Section A:
8-3
Adding local voice users
In this section
Integrated mailbox administration
8-4
Before you begin adding local voice users
8-5
Adding a local voice user
8-6
Setting the default administration context for NMS
8-8
Accessing the Add Local Voice User screen
8-10
The Add Local Voice User screen
8-13
Entering user information
8-15
Assigning a user to a class of service
8-20
Primary DN and extension DNs
8-24
The revert DN
8-26
See “Specifying the primary DN, extension DNs, the revert DN, 8-28
and message waiting indication DN” on page 8-31.
Standard 1.0
Specifying the primary DN, extension DNs, the revert DN, and
message waiting indication DN
8-31
Recording a personal verification for a user
8-34
Creating a remote notification schedule for a user
8-36
Setting other local voice user characteristics
8-39
System Administration Guide
January 1998
8-4
Local voice users
Integrated mailbox administration
Integrated mailbox administration
Description
Integrated Mailbox Administration (IMA) is a feature that
allows you to add mailboxes for users at the Meridian 1
terminal. This feature was introduced in Release 9.0 of
Meridian Mail and Release 19 of X11. In X11, this feature is
known as Voice Mailbox Administration (VMBA).
Other types of users
The following types of mailboxes and users cannot be added
using VMBA and, therefore, must be added through User
Administration in Meridian Mail:
•
•
•
•
Fields you cannot
change in User
Administration
guest mailboxes (Hospitality voice messaging)
local voice users at satellite NMS locations
remote voice users
directory entry users
If you add mailboxes using VMBA, you cannot modify any
of the following fields in Meridian Mail User Administration.
These fields are controlled by VMBA on the Meridian 1.
X11 Field
Meridian Mail Field
DN
Mailbox Number, Primary DN
VMBA Class of Service
Class of Service
CPND Name
Last Name, First Name, Initials
Second DN
Second of the Extension DN
fields
Third DN
Third of the Extension DN fields
If you change any of these fields in Meridian Mail,
discrepancies may arise. Periodic audits are performed on the
Meridian 1. During these audits, VMBA settings override any
settings configured in Meridian Mail.
See also
Standard 1.0
For more information about the Integrated Mailbox
Administration feature, see Appendix A, "Integrated Mailbox
Administration".
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Local voice users
8-5
Before you begin adding local voice users
Before you begin adding local voice users
Introduction
Before you begin adding local voice users, consider the
following points.
Classes of service
All local voice users must be assigned to a class of service.
Classes of service should be defined before you begin adding
local voice users.
Have you created all of the necessary classes of services? If
you have not, do the following:
•
•
Password for MMUI
users
Create all the classes of service that you need.
See Chapter 26, “Class of Service administration. ”
Add the classes of service to the system.
See “Assigning Classes of Service to the system” on
page 26-49.
All MMUI users must have a password. When you add a new
local voice user, the system assigns a default password (the
user’s mailbox number).
To make this initial default password more secure, you can
enter a password prefix in the Voice Security Options screen.
This prefix is added in front of the user’s mailbox number to
make initial passwords more difficult to guess.
Passwords for VMUIF
users
A default password is not assigned to new VMUIF users. A
VMUIF user that does not have a password can access
Meridian Mail from his or her “home phone” only.
Users who want to be able to log in from any phone need a
password. This includes users who want remote notification
capability, since users need to be able to call in from any
phone in order to log in and listen to messages.
You can either leave it up to users to create their own
passwords from the telephone set or create a password for
VMUIF users. See “Changing a user’s password” on
page 8-93.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
8-6
Local voice users
Adding a local voice user
Adding a local voice user
Introduction
Local voice users are added in the Add a Local Voice User
screen. There are a number of things you must do in this
screen in order to define a local voice user.
Procedure
This is a high-level procedure that lists the steps involved in
adding a local voice user. Detailed step-by-step procedures
are provided on the following pages.
Step Action
Page
1
8-8
Do you want to add a number of users to an NMS
location?
•
•
If yes, set the default administration context.
If no, go to step 2.
2
Access the Add Local Voice User screen.
8-10
3
Enter user information such as the user’s first and
last names.
8-15
4
Assign the user to a class of service.
8-20
5
Specify the following DNs for the user if necessary: 8-24
•
•
•
6
up to seven additional extension DNs
a revert DN
the MWI DN (if different from the mailbox
number)
Record a personal verification for the user if
necessary.
8-34
Note: Most users record their own verifications.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Local voice users
8-7
Adding a local voice user
Step Action
7
Page
If remote notification is enabled for the user, create 8-36
a remote notification schedule if necessary.
Note: Users can create their own schedules from
the telephone set.
8
Change the following if necessary:
•
•
•
•
9
Standard 1.0
8-39
If the interface is MMUI, disable/enable name
dialing by external callers (default is enabled).
If Hospitality is installed, set the hospitality user
class (default is guest).
If the interface is VMUIF, select the volume
level.
If more than one language is installed, select
the user’s preferred language.
Save the local voice user.
System Administration Guide
8-43
January 1998
8-8
Local voice users
Setting the default administration context for NMS
Setting the default administration context for NMS
Introduction
When the Network Message Service (NMS) is installed, all
local voice users are associated with a particular NMS
location. You must specify this location whenever you
•
•
•
add a new local voice user
modify or delete an existing local voice user
add a local voice user to a distribution list
The system default
The system default is the prime NMS location.
How to use the
default administration
context
If you want to add or delete a number of users to or from the
same location, rather than entering the location for each user,
you can make their location the default location
(administration context). This means that you will not have to
specify the location in the Add or Delete Local Voice Users
screens for each user. The user will be automatically added to
or deleted from the location that is specified as the default
administration context.
How long the default context stays in effect
The new context stays in effect only as long as you remain in
User Administration. Once you exit User Administration, the
system resets the default administration context to the prime
location.
You, therefore, need to set the default administration context
whenever you enter User Administration if you plan on
adding, modifying, or deleting a number of users to the same
location.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Local voice users
8-9
Setting the default administration context for NMS
Procedure
To set the default administration context, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select User Administration.
2
Select Set Default User Administration Context.
Result: The Set Default User Administration Context Screen is
displayed.
3
Move the cursor to the location you want to make the new
default and press <spacebar> to select it.
4
Do you want to save the selected location as the new default
administration context?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, press [Save].
If no, press [Cancel].
System Administration Guide
January 1998
8-10
Local voice users
Accessing the Add Local Voice User screen
Accessing the Add Local Voice User screen
Mailbox numbers
To access the Add Local Voice User screen, you must enter
the user’s mailbox number.
Valid range
The mailbox number can be up to 18 digits long. It can be a
number between 10 and 999999999999999999.
System addressing length
If the system addressing length is set to a non-zero value, the
length of all mailbox numbers must equal the system
addressing length.
The system addressing length is defined in the General
Options screen.
Potential conflicts
Make sure mailbox numbers do not conflict with any of the
following numbers:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
the broadcast mailbox number (default is 5555)
the network broadcast prefix
other DNs
the name dialing prefix (default is 11)
the delivery to non-user prefix
system distribution list numbers
other mailbox numbers
the AMIS compose prefix (default is 13)
the personal distribution list prefix (VMUIF only)
NMS location prefixes (if NMS is installed)
networking prefixes (if networking is installed)
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Local voice users
8-11
Accessing the Add Local Voice User screen
Procedure
To access the Add Local Voice User screen, follow these
steps.
Starting Point: Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select User Administration.
Result: The User Administration Menu is displayed.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
8-12
Local voice users
Accessing the Add Local Voice User screen
Step Action
2
Select Local Voice User.
Result: This screen is displayed if Integrated Mailbox
Administration (IMA) is installed.
This screen is displayed if IMA is not installed.
3
Press the [Add] softkey.
Result: You are prompted for a mailbox number.
4
Enter the user’s mailbox number and press <Return>.
Result: The Add Local Voice User screen is displayed. The
number you entered is used to fill in the following fields:
Mailbox Number, Primary Extension DN, and Message Waiting
Indication DN.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-13
The Add Local Voice User screen
The Add Local Voice User screen
Feature-dependent
fields
The fields that appear in this screen will vary depending on
the following factors:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
When the interface is MMUI, the following fields are
displayed (that are not applicable to VMUIF):
- Department
- Name Dialable by External Callers
When the interface is VMUIF, the following field is
displayed (that is not applicable to MMUI):
- Volume level
If Remote Notification is enabled in the user’s class of
service, the Remote Notification Schedules field is
displayed.
If NMS is installed, two additional fields are displayed at
the top of the screen. These are Location Prefix and
Location Name.
If Hospitality is installed, the Hospitality User Class
field is displayed after the Name Dialable by External
Callers field.
If multiple languages are installed, the Preferred
Language field is displayed at the bottom of the screen.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
8-14
Local voice users
The Add Local Voice User screen
The screen
This is the MMUI version of the Add Local Voice User
screen. NMS is not installed in this example.
Part 1
Part 2
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Local voice users
8-15
Entering user information
Entering user information
Introduction
The first step in adding a local voice user is to enter
information about the user such as the user’s first and last
names, and the department to which the user belongs.
The Add Local Voice
User screen
The dotted box highlights the fields in which you enter user
information.
System with the Network Message Service (NMS)
System without NMS
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
8-16
Local voice users
Entering user information
Field descriptions
This table describes the fields in which you enter user
information.
Location Prefix
Description
This prefix identifies the location in the NMS
network at which the user is located.
Feature
dependencies
This field is displayed only if Network Message
Service (NMS) is installed.
See Also
See “Setting the default administration context for
NMS” on page 8-8.
Location Name
Description
This is a read-only field that indicates the name of
the NMS location at which the user is located.
Mailbox Number
Description
The user’s mailbox number
Default
The number you entered to access the Add Local
Voice User screen
Maximum
length
18 digits
Valid Range
10 to 999999999999999999
Mandatory
The user cannot be saved if this field is blank.
Volume ID
Standard 1.0
Description
This is the hard disk volume to which the local
voice user is assigned. This is the volume where
user messages and user profiles are stored.
Default
The volume with the greatest amount of free space
at the time the [Add] softkey is pressed.
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-17
Entering user information
Storage used
Description
This read-only field indicates how many minutes
of voice messages are stored for this user.
This number is rounded up to the nearest minute.
VMUIF
submailboxes
If submailboxes are enabled, this number also
indicates the storage space taken up by all
submailbox greetings and voice messages.
Last Name and First Name
Description
The user’s first and last names.
Maximum
length
You can enter up to 41 characters for the last name
and 21 characters for the first name.
Restricted
characters
Do not use the following characters in these fields:
plus sign (+), underscore (_), or question mark (?).
Attention
Make sure the spelling is correct and use
alphanumeric characters only. These fields are
used by name dialing and name addressing.
Initials
Description
Initials can be used to distinguish users with
identical first and last names. They are not used by
the name dialing and name addressing feature.
Default
Blank
If you leave this field blank, Meridian Mail will
automatically insert the first initial of the user’s
first name when you save the user.
Maximum
length
Standard 1.0
5 characters
System Administration Guide
January 1998
8-18
Local voice users
Entering user information
Department
Procedure
Description
The user’s department
Interface
MMUI only
Default
This field is blank for the first user you add. For
subsequent users, this field defaults to the
department entered for the last user you added.
Maximum
length
31 characters
Restricted
characters
Do not use the following characters in these fields:
plus sign (+), underscore (_), or question mark (?).
Make the first 12 characters unique. If you want to
later find users based on department, the List of
Local Voice Users screen displays only the first
12 characters of the department name.
To enter user information, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Add Local Voice User screen
Step Action
1
Is NMS installed?
•
•
2
Does the user belong to the location that is currently the default
administration context?
•
•
3
If yes, go to step 3.
If no, enter the prefix of the NMS location at which the user
is located in the Location Prefix field.
Is the current volume the volume to which you want to assign
the user?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, go to step 2.
If no, go to step 3.
If yes, go to step 4.
If no, change the volume ID.
4
Enter the user’s last name.
5
Enter the user’s first name.
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-19
Entering user information
Step Action
6
Enter the user’s initials if needed to distinguish this user from
another user with the same first and last name.
7
If the interface is MMUI, enter the user’s department.
Note: Make sure that the first 12 characters are unique.
8
Standard 1.0
Go to page 8-20 to continue defining the user.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
8-20
Local voice users
Assigning a user to a class of service
Assigning a user to a class of service
Introduction
All local voice users must be assigned to a class of service.
The class of service to which a user belongs determines
things like the user’s voice storage limit, the maximum
message length, and the retention period for read messages.
Personal classes of
service versus defined
classes of service
You should assign most users to one of the classes of service
you have already defined in Class of Service Administration.
However, there may be some users with special requirements.
Instead of defining a class of service for just one user
(through Class of Service Administration), create a unique
personal class of service here in the Add Local Voice User
screen.
To assign a user to a defined class of service, see “Assigning
a user to a defined class of service” on page 8-21.
To create a personal class of service for a user, see “Creating
a personal class of service” on page 8-22.
Maintenance issues
Each personal class of service that you create will have to be
maintained separately. You should, therefore, minimize the
number of personal classes of service that you create.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-21
Assigning a user to a class of service
Assigning a user to a
defined class of
service
To assign a user to a class of service that has been defined in
Class of Service Administration, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Add Local Voice User screen
Step Action
1
Move your cursor to the Class of Service field, and select the
class of service to which you want to assign the user.
2
Do you want to view the class of service definition to verify that
this is an appropriate class of service for this user?
•
•
3
If yes, go to step 3.
If no, go to step 6.
Press the [More Detail] softkey.
Result: The Class of Service definition is displayed. You
cannot modify any fields in this screen.
Standard 1.0
4
Review the class of service configuration to see if it is
appropriate for the user.
5
Press the [Return to Basic Fields] softkey to return to the Add
Local Voice User screen.
6
Go to page 8-24 to continue defining the local voice user.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
8-22
Local voice users
Assigning a user to a class of service
Creating a personal
class of service
To create a unique personal class of service for a user, follow
these steps.
Starting Point: The Add Local Voice User screen
Step Action
1
Move your cursor to the Class of Service field, and select
Personal.
2
Press the [More Detail] softkey.
Result: The View Class of Service screen is displayed.
3
Make the necessary modifications.
See Chapter 26, “Class of Service administration. ”
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-23
Assigning a user to a class of service
Step Action
4
Press the [Return to Basic Fields] softkey when you are done
modifying the class of service.
Result: The Add Local Voice User screen is displayed.
Note: The personal class of service will be saved when you
save the local voice user.
5
Standard 1.0
Go to page 8-24 to continue defining the local voice user.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
8-24
Local voice users
Primary DN and extension DNs
Primary DN and extension DNs
Introduction
The next step in adding a local voice user is to identify and
define the extension DNs, including the primary DN,
associated with the user.
Definition:
extension DNs
An extension DN is a dialable number that, when dialed,
rings a telephone.
When telephone set configuration is done in the Meridian 1,
one or more DNs are defined for each telephone set. These
are the extension DNs that you need to enter in Meridian
Mail for each user.
Definition: primary DN
The primary DN is the “main” extension DN. All phones
will have a primary DN.
The primary DN field
When you add a mailbox user, the Primary DN field is
prefilled with the mailbox number that you entered to access
the Add Local Voice User screen.
Call sender
When a user uses the Call Sender feature to call the sender of
a message, Call Sender attempts to place the call to the
primary DN only.
Note: The Call Sender feature can be supported on a network
with CO trunks if
Extension DNs
Standard 1.0
1.
the network is configured in the “None” dialing plan
2.
the “Dial Prefix” field is properly defined
In addition to the primary DN, users can have a number of
additional DNs programmed on their telephone sets.
Meridian Mail supports seven additional extension DNs in
addition to the primary DN, for a total of eight supported
extension DNs.
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-25
Primary DN and extension DNs
Requirements
All DNs defined on a user’s telephone set must be defined in
Meridian Mail. If a call comes in on a non-primary extension
DN which is not defined for the mailbox user, the mailbox
will not be found and, as a result, messages cannot be left.
Mailboxes for users
without phones
You can create a mailbox (add a local voice user) for people
who do not have phones. To do this, make all DN fields
blank.
Callers can use thru-dial services and express messaging to
leave messages for these users. Users can then call into their
mailbox from any phone in order to pick up voice messages.
Entering the extension
DNs (primary and nonprimary)
See “Specifying the primary DN, extension DNs, the revert
DN, and message waiting indication DN” on page 8-31.
Duplicating
extension DNs
Extension DNs should not duplicate any other DN already
registered in Meridian Mail, either as a primary or a
secondary DN. Meridian Mail prevents duplications, unless
you have changed the “Allow Duplicate User DNs” field
setting to Yes in the General Options screen (the default is
No).
In the case of a duplication, Meridian Mail will only ring one
of the DNs, not both, when the number is dialed.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
8-26
Local voice users
The revert DN
The revert DN
Introduction
Another type of DN that is associated with each user is the
revert DN.
Definition:
revert DN
The revert DN is a directory number to which callers or users
are transferred under certain specific conditions.
When the revert DN is
used
The revert DN is used under two conditions:
Call answering
A caller can press “0” during a call answering session in
order to transfer to another number (such as that of an
attendant or secretary). This gives callers the chance to
transfer to a person for assistance.
Mailbox thru-dial (extension dialing)
Mailbox thru-dial allows MMUI users to dial a number while
they are logged in to their mailbox. The user enters “0”
followed by the number. If the user waits for more than 2
seconds after entering “0,” he or she is transferred to the
revert DN.
Revert for MMUI users
For MMUI users, you can specify a system-wide revert DN.
This is done in the Attendant DN field in the General Options
screen. The attendant DN is used if there is no revert DN
defined for a user.
Custom revert
The MMUI telephone set interface has a feature called
Custom Revert that allows MMUI users to define their own
revert DNs. You can either
•
•
Standard 1.0
allow users to define their own revert DNs
or
prohibit users from defining their own DNs and define
one system-wide revert DN for all users
In this case, you can still define a different revert DN for
users in the Add or View/Modify Local Voice User
screen.
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-27
The revert DN
Allowing MMUI users
to define their own
revert DNs
To allow MMUI users to define their own revert DNs
through the telephone set, you must ensure that appropriate
restrictions are applied to the Custom Revert feature so that
users do not enter unauthorized DNs, such as long distance
numbers.
To allow users to define their own revert DNs, you must do
the following.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Standard 1.0
Define an Attendant DN in the General Options screen.
This will serve as a default or backup for users who do
not define a revert DN.
See “Setting the attendant DN” on page 13-15.
Create a restriction/permission list that contains the
restriction and permission codes you want to apply to the
Custom Revert feature.
This list cannot have all digits from 0 to 9 as restriction
codes (the default). At least some digits have to be
permitted to allow users to specify a DN.
See the section “Restriction/Permission lists” on
page 6-89.
In the classes of service to which you will be assigning
users, select one of the above restriction/permission
lists in the Custom Revert Restriction/Permission List
field.
This imposes the proper restrictions on the DNs that
users try to define as their custom revert DNs.
See “The Add Class of Service screen (MMUI)” on
page 26-13.
Assign users to the appropriate class(es) of service.
Leave the Revert DN field blank in the Add Local Voice
User screen, or enter the DN if you know where the user
wants to revert calls.
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January 1998
8-28
Local voice users
The revert DN
Prohibiting MMUI
users from defining
revert DNs
To prohibit MMUI users from defining their own Revert
DNs, you must assign a restriction/permission list that has the
digits 0 to 9 as restriction codes to the custom revert feature.
This does not prevent you from defining a Revert DN in User
Administration. It only affects telephone set definition of this
DN.
To prohibit users from defining their own revert DNs, you
must do the following.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Revert for VMUIF
users
Define an Attendant DN in General Options.
This will serve as the revert DN for all users.
See “Setting the attendant DN” on page 13-15.
Create a restriction/permission list in which the digits 0
to 9 are entered as restriction codes.
See the section “Restriction/Permission lists” on
page 6-89.
In the classes of service to which you will be assigning
users, select the fully restricted restriction/permission list
in the Custom Revert Restriction/Permission List field.
See “The Add Class of Service screen (MMUI)” on
page 26-13.
Assign users to the class of service.
Leave the Revert DN field blank in the Add Local Voice
User screen if the Attendant DN is appropriate for the
user; or, enter a different revert DN for the user.
You cannot configure an Attendant DN if VMUIF is installed
on the system. This means that if no Revert DN is defined for
a VMUIF user, callers will not be able to press “0” to transfer
to another DN.
For most VMUIF users, this is desirable. However, if revert
capability is required for a user, you must define a Revert DN
in the Add Local Voice User screen.
Entering the revert DN
Standard 1.0
See “Specifying the primary DN, extension DNs, the revert
DN, and message waiting indication DN” on page 8-31.
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-29
The message waiting indication DN
The message waiting indication DN
Introduction
The next DN that is associated with a local voice user is the
message waiting indication (MWI) DN.
Description
This is the DN to which the message waiting indication
(flashing light or stutter dial tone) is sent
•
•
•
The default MWI DN
Standard 1.0
when the user has a new voice message waiting to be
read
in a hospitality system, to notify the user of an external
message
An external message can be a written message that has
been taken by the front desk, in which case the front desk
clerk can turn a guest’s MWI on in order to notify the
guest of the message. The MWI can also be used to
indicate that there is a message waiting that can be
accessed through the hotel’s TV messaging system.
from an ACCESS application to indicate that a certain
type of message has been received for the user (The
message type depends on the ACCESS application.)
When you add a local voice user, this DN is automatically set
to the number you entered as the mailbox number to access
the Add Local Voice User screen. Typically, you leave this
DN as it is so that it is the same as the mailbox number and
primary DN. This is because you usually want the indication
to go to the user’s phone where the user will see the
indication.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
8-30
Local voice users
The message waiting indication DN
Choosing another
MWI DN
However, there are a number of cases where the MWI DN
should be configured as something other than the user’s
primary DN. These conditions are outlined in this table.
IF
THEN
the user wants the indication to
go to another phone, such as a
secretary’s
enter the other person’s primary
DN as the MWI DN.
the user has a mailbox only, but make the MWI DN field blank.
no physical phone
Example
A senior executive has requested that her secretary be
notified of her new voice messages so that the secretary can
screen them. In the executive’s mailbox setup, you enter the
secretary’s primary DN as the MWI DN. However, this is
also the secretary’s MWI DN. This means that the secretary
will not be able to tell who new messages are for. The
secretary will have to log on to both mailboxes to find out.
Entering the MWI DN
Standard 1.0
See “Specifying the primary DN, extension DNs, the revert
DN, and message waiting indication DN” on page 8-31.
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-31
Specifying the primary DN, extension DNs, the revert DN, and message waiting indication DN
Specifying the primary DN, extension DNs, the revert DN,
and message waiting indication DN
DN fields in the Add
Local Voice User
screen
The dotted box highlights the fields that are used to define
user DNs.
Field descriptions
This table describes the fields you use to define DNs that are
associated with a user.
Primary DN
Standard 1.0
Description
When dialed, this number rings a user’s telephone.
It is the number used for Call Sender and Name
Dialing.
Maximum
length
30 digits
Default
This field is filled in with the mailbox number you
entered to access the Add Local Voice User
screen.
More
information
See “Primary DN and extension DNs” on
page 8-24.
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January 1998
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Local voice users
Specifying the primary DN, extension DNs, the revert DN, and message waiting indication DN
Extension DNs
Description
These fields allow seven secondary DNs to be
entered. This means that a caller can dial any one
of these numbers and reach the user.
Maximum
length
30 digits
Default
Blank
More
information
See “Primary DN and extension DNs” on
page 8-24.
Revert DN
Description
This is the DN to which calls are transferred when
• a caller presses “0” during a call answering
session
• an MMUI user trying to use mailbox thru-dial
waits more than 2 seconds after dialing the “0”
Maximum
length
30 digits
Default
Blank
More
information
See “The revert DN” on page 8-26.
Message Waiting Indication DN
Standard 1.0
Description
This is the DN to which message waiting
indications are sent when the user has unread
voice messages, external HVS messages, or
messages from an ACCESS application. This DN
is usually the same as the user’s primary DN.
Conditions of
display
This field is displayed if the Message Waiting
Indication Options field in the user’s Class of
Service is set to something other than None.
Default
The mailbox number you entered to access the
Add Local Voice User screen
More
information
See “The message waiting indication DN” on
page 8-29.
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-33
Specifying the primary DN, extension DNs, the revert DN, and message waiting indication DN
Procedure
To specify DNs for the user, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Local Voice User screen
Step Action
1
Does the user have a phone?
•
•
2
Does the user have more than one DN?
•
•
3
If yes, go to step 2.
If no, make all DN fields blank, and go to step 4.
If yes, go to step 3.
If no, go to step 4.
Enter the user’s other DN(s) in the Extension DN fields.
Note: For details, see “Primary DN and extension DNs” on
page 8-24.
4
Enter a Revert DN if necessary.
Note: For details, see “The revert DN” on page 8-26.
5
Change the Message Waiting Indication DN if necessary.
IF
THEN
the user should be notified of new
messages at his or her phone
leave the default MWI
DN (same as mailbox
number).
the user does not have a phone
delete the MWI DN.
the user wants someone else to
be notified of his or her messages
enter that person’s DN
in the MWI DN field.
Note: For more information, see “See “Specifying the primary
DN, extension DNs, the revert DN, and message waiting
indication DN” on page 8-31.” on page 8-28.
6
Standard 1.0
Continue defining the local voice user.
IF you want to
THEN go to
record a personal verification for the user
page 8-34.
create a remote notification schedule for
the user
page 8-36.
define other local voice user
characteristics
page 8-39.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
8-34
Local voice users
Recording a personal verification for a user
Recording a personal verification for a user
Introduction
Ideally, users should record personal verifications in their
own voice. However, as administrator, you can record
personal verifications from the administration terminal on
behalf of users.
When to use
If the user belongs to a class of service in which the Personal
Verification Changeable by User field is set to No and the
user needs a personal verification, you will have to record it
for him or her.
Procedure
To record a personal verification, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Add Local Voice User screen
Step Action
1
Put the cursor on the Personal Verification Recorded (Voice)
field.
2
Press the [Voice] softkey.
3
Enter the extension of the phone you will use to record the
verification, and press <Return>.
Result: The phone rings.
4
Pick up the receiver.
Result: The recording softkeys are displayed.
5
Press the [Record] softkey.
6
At the sound of the beep, speak the user’s name (and,
optionally, the user’s extension).
Example: “Heather McGee at extension 8523.”
7
Press the [Stop] key to stop recording.
8
Do you want to verify the recording?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, press the [Play] softkey.
If no, go to step 10.
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-35
Recording a personal verification for a user
Step Action
9
Do you want to rerecord the verification?
•
•
10
Do you need to record personal verifications for any other
users?
•
•
11
Standard 1.0
If yes, repeat steps 5 to 8.
If no, go to step 10.
If yes, press the [Return] softkey and do not hang up the
receiver.
The next time you press [Voice] to record another
verification, you will not have to reenter the phone extension
since the line has not been disconnected.
If no, press the [Disconnect] softkey and hang up the
receiver.
Continue defining the local voice user.
IF you want to
THEN go to
create a remote notification schedule for
the user
page 8-36.
define other local voice user
characteristics
page 8-39.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
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Local voice users
Creating a remote notification schedule for a user
Creating a remote notification schedule for a user
Introduction
The Remote Notification Schedules field is displayed if
•
•
User-defined versus
administrator-defined
Users can create their own remote notification schedules
from their telephone sets. You may, however, have to create
remote notification schedules for users under the following
conditions:
•
•
•
See also
Standard 1.0
Outcalling is installed
the Remote Notification Capability field in the user’s
class of service is set to Yes
The Remote Notification Keypad Interface field in the
user’s class of service is set to No, and the user cannot
create his or her own schedule from the telephone set.
A user does not want to use the telephone set interface to
create a schedule and asks you to create it for him or her.
New features in Meridian Mail 12 (concerning the type
of remote notification a user receives) cannot be
accessed through the telephone keypad interface, and
your user requires them.
For more information about remote notification schedules,
refer to the Outcalling Guide (NTP 555-7001-320).
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-37
Creating a remote notification schedule for a user
Procedure
To create a remote notification schedule for a user, follow
these steps.
Starting Point: The Add Local Voice User screen
Step Action
1
Put your cursor on the Remote Notification Schedules field and
press the [More Detail] softkey.
Result: The Outcalling fields are displayed.
2
Create a business day schedule. For each required time period
a. Enter the from and to time.
b. Select Enabled to enable the time period.
c. Specify whether the user must log into their mailbox for
Meridian Mail to consider the notification “successful” and
stop its notification attempts.
d. Enter up to three target DNs.
e. For each target DN, specify the type of device.
For pagers, specify the Pager Callback Number. For general
access pager services, enter the Pager ID Number.
3
Create a nonbusiness days schedule. For each required time
period, repeat steps 2a. to 2d.
4
Do you need to create a temporary schedule?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, repeat steps 2a. to 2d. for each required time period.
If no, go to step 5.
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January 1998
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Local voice users
Creating a remote notification schedule for a user
Step Action
Standard 1.0
5
Press the [Return to Basic Fields] softkey to return to the basic
fields in the Add Local Voice User screen.
6
Go to page 8-39 to continue defining the local voice user.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Local voice users
8-39
Setting other local voice user characteristics
Setting other local voice user characteristics
Introduction
To finish defining a local voice user, you may have to modify
some or all of the remaining fields:
•
•
•
•
•
Relevant fields:
MMUI
Standard 1.0
Monitor Mailbox during Monitoring Period
Name Dialable by External Callers (MMUI only)
Hospitality User Class (if Hospitality is installed and
used by the customer)
Volume Level (VMUIF only)
Preferred Language (if multiple languages are installed)
The dotted box highlights the fields that are available when
the interface is MMUI.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
8-40
Local voice users
Setting other local voice user characteristics
Relevant fields:
VMUIF
The dotted box highlights the fields that are available when
the interface is VMUIF.
Field descriptions
This table describes the fields that are used to define the
remaining local voice user characteristics.
Monitor Mailbox during Monitoring Period
Description
This field determines whether the mailbox is
monitored for logons.
This is a security feature that you can use when
you suspect a hacker is trying to get into a
particular mailbox. Typically, you would not
enable this feature for new users, but only for
existing users when hacker activity is suspected.
Standard 1.0
Interface
MMUI and VMUIF
Default
No
More
information
See “Monitoring mailbox logins for suspected
hacker activity” on page 8-94.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Local voice users
8-41
Setting other local voice user characteristics
Name Dialable by External Callers
Description
This field determines whether external callers can
use name dialing to call the user.
For users that have their calls screened, you might
want to disable this feature. Otherwise, any caller
can get through to the user’s extension through a
thru-dialer by entering their name.
Interface
MMUI
Default
Yes
Valid Options
Yes, No
Hospitality User Class
Description
This field indicates whether the mailbox belongs
to a staff member or guest.
Feature
dependencies
This field is displayed only if Hospitality is
installed.
Default
Guest
Valid Options
Guest, Staff
Volume Level
Standard 1.0
Description
This is the volume level at which recorded
prompts and voice messages are played.
Interface
VMUIF
Default
Normal
Valid Options
Normal, Loud, Louder, Loudest
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January 1998
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Local voice users
Setting other local voice user characteristics
Preferred Language
Standard 1.0
Description
This is the language in which prompts are played
to the user during a login session and to callers
during call answering and express messaging.
Feature
dependencies
This field is displayed only if more than one
language is installed on the system.
System
override
If the Default Language Overrides User’s
Preferred Language field in the Voice Messaging
Options screen is set to Yes, call answering and
express messaging prompts will be played to
callers in the system default language. Prompts to
the user while logged in to Meridian Mail
continue to be played in the user’s preferred
language.
Default
The first language in the list
More
information
See “The default language and the user’s preferred
language” on page 20-13.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Local voice users
8-43
Setting other local voice user characteristics
Procedure
To set the remaining local voice user characteristics, follow
these steps.
Starting Point: The Add Local Voice User screen
Step Action
1
Do you want to prohibit external callers from using name dialing
to call this user?
•
•
2
If yes, set the Name Dialable by External Callers field to No.
If no, leave the Name Dialable by External Callers field set
to Yes.
If Hospitality is installed, are you adding a mailbox for a guest?
•
•
If yes, leave the Hospitality User Class as “Guest.”
If no, set the Hospitality User Class field to “Staff.”
3
If VMUIF is installed, change the volume level if necessary.
4
If more than one language is installed on the system, specify
the user’s preferred language.
5
Do you want to save the local voice user as currently defined?
• If yes, press the [Save] softkey.
Note: If the entered DN is already in use by another Local
Voice User or Remote Voice User, a warning message will
appear. You can either modify the DN or press the [Save]
softkey to save the DN for the user who originally had the DN.
•
Standard 1.0
If no, make any necessary changes and then press [Save],
or press [Cancel] if you do not want to add this user.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
8-44
Local voice users
Setting other local voice user characteristics
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 8
Local voice users
Section B:
8-45
Finding local voice users
In this section
Overview
8-46
Wildcard characters
8-47
Accessing the Find Local Voice Users screen
8-49
The Find Local Voice Users screen
8-50
Restrictions on how you can combine search criteria
8-67
Finding, listing, and printing local voice users
8-69
Reassigning a subset of local voice users to another class of 8-73
service
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
8-46
Local voice users
Overview
Overview
Introduction
The Find function allows you to find a single local voice user
or a subset of local voice users that meet the search criteria
that you specify in the Find Local Voice User screen.
Examples of use
Here are some examples of how you can use the Find
function. You can
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
find Pierre LaMontaigne’s user profile when you do not
know his mailbox number
find all users who belong to Class of Service 12 and
reassign them to Class of Service 9
find all users who are in the Marketing department that
do not have Remote Notification capability, and reassign
them to a class of service in which Remote Notification
is enabled
find all users who have exceeded their voice storage
limit
find all users whose primary DN differs from their MWI
DN
find all users in the Customer Documentation
department, which has been renamed the Information
Products department, so that you can update their
department definitions
find all users whose mailboxes are disabled (due to too
many invalid logon attempts)
find all users who have a specific voice storage limit so
that you can either increase or decrease this limit
find all users whose passwords have expired
find all users on a particular volume (which is
overloaded) so that you can move some of them to
another volume
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-47
Wildcard characters
Wildcard characters
Definition:
wildcard
A wildcard is a character that is used in a search string to
represent an unknown or variable character or string of
characters.
Purpose
Wildcards have two main purposes. They allow you to find
•
•
Types of wildcards
Where you can use
wildcards
Standard 1.0
a particular user when you do not know the user’s
mailbox number and have only partial information about
the user
a range of users
There are two wildcards that you can use.
Wildcard
Description
_
The underscore (_) replaces a single character.
+
The plus sign (+) replaces a string of characters.
You can enter wildcards in the following fields:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Mailbox Number
Last Name
First Name
Department
Extension Number (DN)
Message Waiting Indication DN
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January 1998
8-48
Local voice users
Wildcard characters
Examples
Standard 1.0
The following examples show how wildcards can be used to
find a range of users.
You enter
Result
“210_” in the Mailbox
Number field
All mailboxes in the range 2100 to
2109 are found.
“7_99” in the Extension
Number field
Users with the following extension
DNs are found: 7099, 7199, 7299,
7399, 7499, 7599, 7699, 7799, 7899,
and 7999.
“3+” in the Mailbox
Number field
All mailboxes beginning with 3 are
found.
“+Engineering” in the
Department field
Users belonging to all engineering
departments are found (such as
Software Engineering, Hardware
Engineering, and Information
Engineering).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Local voice users
8-49
Accessing the Find Local Voice Users screen
Accessing the Find Local Voice Users screen
Procedure
To access the Find Local Voice Users screen, follow these
steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select User Administration.
2
Select Local Voice User.
3
Press the [Find] softkey.
Result: The Find Local Voice Users screen is displayed.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
8-50
Local voice users
The Find Local Voice Users screen
The Find Local Voice Users screen
Introduction
The fields in the Find Local Voice Users screen vary
depending on the interface (MMUI or VMUIF).
The screen:
MMUI version
This is how the Find Local Voice Users screen looks when
the interface is MMUI.
Part 1
Part 2
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-51
The Find Local Voice Users screen
Part 3
The screen:
VMUIF version
This is how the Find Local Voice Users screen looks when
the interface is VMUIF.
Part 1
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
8-52
Local voice users
The Find Local Voice Users screen
Part 2
Part 3
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Local voice users
8-53
The Find Local Voice Users screen
Field descriptions
These are the fields in the Find Local Voice Users screen that
you can fill in to specify your search criteria.
Status
Description
Use this field to find users with a particular
mailbox status.
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, Enabled, Disabled, Expired, Violation
• Any finds all users.
• Enabled finds all users whose mailboxes are
enabled.
• Disabled finds all users whose mailboxes have
been disabled from the MMI or due to too many
invalid logon attempts per mailbox. This
maximum logon attempts value is defined in the
Voice Security Options screen.
• Expired finds all users whose passwords have
expired.
• Violation finds all users whose maximum
number of invalid logon attempts per session has
been reached or exceeded. This maximum is
defined in the Voice Security Options screen.
Mailbox Number
Description
Use this field to find users within a certain range of
consecutive mailbox numbers. This requires the
use of wildcards.
Maximum
Length
You can enter up to 18 characters.
IF NMS, Meridian Networking, or Enterprise
Networking is installed, you can enter up to 28
characters. This is because you need to enter the
location/network prefix and the mailbox number.
Volume ID
Standard 1.0
Description
Use this field to find all users on a particular
volume.
Default
Blank
Valid Options
Any valid user volume
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January 1998
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Local voice users
The Find Local Voice Users screen
COS
Description
Use this field to find all users who are assigned to a
particular class of service.
Default
Blank
Valid Options
Any class of service that has been created and
assigned to the system
See Also
If you enter a number in this field, you cannot use
any of the fields which concern COS-controlled
features. See “Restrictions on how you can
combine search criteria” on page 8-67.
Last Name
Description
Use this field if you want to find a particular user.
Use wildcards if you are unsure of the exact
spelling.
Default
Blank
First Name
Description
Use this field if you want to find a particular user.
Use wildcards if you are unsure of the spelling.
Default
Blank
Department
Description
Use this field to find users who belong to a
particular department.
Use wildcard characters if you are unsure of the
exact name or spelling, or if you want to find users
in a number of similarly named departments.
Standard 1.0
Interface
MMUI only
Default
Blank
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-55
The Find Local Voice Users screen
Extension Number (DN)
Description
Use this field if you want to find users with a
particular primary extension DN. Use wildcards to
find users within a range of DNs.
Default
Blank
Message Waiting Indication DN
Description
Use this field if you want to find users with a
particular message waiting indication DN.
Default
Blank
Revert DN
Description
Use this field to find users who have a specific
Revert DN.
Default
Blank
Maximum
Length
You can enter a DN up to 30 digits in length.
Voice Storage Limit (minutes)
Standard 1.0
Description
Use this field to find users that have a specific
voice storage limit.
Default
Blank
Valid Range
1 to 360
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January 1998
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Local voice users
The Find Local Voice Users screen
Read Message Retention (days)
Description
Use this field to find users who have their
messages automatically deleted after a specified
number of days.
Note: The number of days that a message is stored
may be set in either the Maximum Read Message
Retention field of the customer’s Voice Messaging
Options or in the Read Message Retention field in
the user’s Class of Service. When searching with
this parameter, the smaller of the two values is
used.
Default
Blank
Valid Range
0 to 99
Minimum Number of Invalid Logon Attempts
Description
Use this field to find users who have at least the
specified number of invalid logon attempts. This
field is useful for monitoring possible attempts at
unauthorized logon.
Default
Blank
Valid Range
0 to 99
Minimum Number of Days since Last Logon
Description
Use this field to find users who have not logged
into their mailbox in at least the specified number
of days.
Default
Blank
Valid Range
0 to 99
Minimum Number of Days since Pswd Changed
Standard 1.0
Description
Use this field to find users who have not changed
their mailbox logon password in at least the
specified number of days.
Interface
MMUI only
Default
Blank
Valid Range
0 to 99
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-57
The Find Local Voice Users screen
Maximum Message Length (mm:ss)
Description
Use this field to find users who have a specific
maximum allowable message length. This is for
composed voice messages.
Default
Blank
Valid Range
00:30 to 99:00 in 10-second increments
Maximum CA Message Length (mm:ss)
Description
Use this field to find users who have a specific
maximum allowable call answering message
length. These are messages left by callers.
Default
Blank
Valid Range
00:30 to 99:00 in 10-second increments
Maximum Personal Greeting Length (mm:ss)
Description
Use this field to find users who have a specific
maximum personal greeting length.
Interface
VMUIF only
Default
Blank
Valid Range
00:30 to 05:00 in 10-second increments
Maximum Number of SubMailboxes
Standard 1.0
Description
Use this field to find users who have a specific
maximum number of submailboxes.
Interface
VMUIF only
Default
Blank
Valid Range
0 to 8
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January 1998
8-58
Local voice users
The Find Local Voice Users screen
Login from Call Answering
Description
Use this field to find users who are allowed, or not
allowed, to log in to their own mailbox while in a
call answering session.
Interface
VMUIF only
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Owner
• Any finds all users.
• No finds users who are not allowed to log in to
their mailbox during a call answering session.
• Owner finds users who are allowed to log in only
if they are connected to their own mailbox.
Receive Messages for Call Answering
Description
Use this field to find users who are allowed, or not
allowed, to receive call answering messages.
Interface
VMUIF only
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
Call Sender
Description
Use this field to find users who have, or do not
have, the capability to call the sender of a message.
Interface
VMUIF only
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
Calls were Rejected after Mailbox Full
Standard 1.0
Description
Use this field to find users who have, or have not
had, calls rejected because their mailbox is full.
Interface
VMUIF only
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-59
The Find Local Voice Users screen
Personal Greeting Recorded
Description
Use this field to find users who have, or do not
have, a personal greeting recorded.
Interface
VMUIF only
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
Compose Capability
Description
Use this field to find users who are allowed, or not
allowed, to compose messages.
Interface
VMUIF only
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
Receive Composed Messages
Description
Use this field to find users who are allowed, or not
allowed, to receive composed messages.
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
Auto Logon
Description
Use this field to find users who are allowed, or not
allowed, to log in to their mailbox without entering
a mailbox number or password.
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
Broadcast Capability
Standard 1.0
Description
Use this field to find users who have, or do not
have, broadcast capability.
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
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January 1998
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Local voice users
The Find Local Voice Users screen
Network Broadcast Capability
Description
Use this field to find users who have, or do not
have, network broadcast capability.
Note: This field is displayed only if the
Networking feature is installed and enabled for the
customer.
Interface
MMUI only
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
Administrator Capability
Description
Use this field to find users who have, or do not
have, administrator capability.
Interface
MMUI only
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
Internal Personal Greeting Recorded
Description
Use this field to find users who have, or do not
have, an internal personal greeting recorded.
Interface
MMUI only
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
External Personal Greeting Recorded
Standard 1.0
Description
Use this field to find users who have, or do not
have, an external personal greeting recorded.
Interface
MMUI only
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-61
The Find Local Voice Users screen
Temporary Absence Greeting Recorded
Description
Use this field to find users who have, or do not
have, a temporary absence greeting recorded.
Note: If the Temporary Absence Greeting expiry
date has passed, then the corresponding mailbox
field will be reset to No when the user logs in to
their mailbox.
Interface
MMUI only
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
Auto Deletion of Invalid PDL Addresses
Description
Use this field to find users who have, or do not
have, mailboxes with the capability to
automatically delete invalid addresses from
personal distribution lists.
Interface
MMUI only
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
Personal Verification Changeable by User
Description
Use this field to find users who have, or do not
have, the capability to change their personal
verification.
Interface
MMUI only
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No , Yes
Name Dialable by External Callers
Standard 1.0
Description
Use this field to find users who can, or cannot, be
name dialed by external callers.
Interface
MMUI only
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
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January 1998
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Local voice users
The Find Local Voice Users screen
Voice Storage Limit Exceeded
Description
Use this field to find users who have, or have not,
exceeded their voice storage limit.
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
Primary DN differs from MWI DN
Description
Use this field to find users whose primary DN and
MWI DN are different or identical.
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
Delivery to Non-User Capability
Description
Use this field to find users who have, or do not
have, delivery to nonuser capability.
Feature
dependencies
This field is displayed only if Outcalling is
installed.
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
Send Message via DNU if Mailbox Not Found
Description
Use this field to find users who have, or do not
have, implicit DNU capability.
Feature
dependencies
This field is displayed if Outcalling is installed.
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
Remote Notification Capability
Standard 1.0
Description
Use this field to find users who have, or do not
have, remote notification capability.
Feature
dependencies
This field is displayed if Outcalling is installed.
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-63
The Find Local Voice Users screen
Current State of Remote Notification
Description
Use this field to find users according to their
current state of remote notification.
Default
Any
Feature
dependencies
This field is displayed if Outcalling is installed.
Valid Options
Any, On, Off, Off_by_Retry,
Off_by_Called_Party, Off_due_to_BadDN
• Any finds all users.
• On finds all users whose current remote
notification state is on.
• Off finds all users whose current remote
notification state is off.
• Off_by_Retry finds all users whose remote
notification state has been turned off after
reaching the maximum number of retries.
• Off_by_Called_Party finds all users whose
remote notification state has been turned off by
the called party.
• Off_due_to_BadDN finds all users whose remote
notification state has been turned off because a
nonfunctional DN was called.
Message Remote Notification Option
Description
Use this field to find users who are notified when a
message is deposited in their mailbox.
Feature
dependencies
This field is displayed if Outcalling is installed.
Interface
MMUI only
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, All, Urgent
• Any finds all users.
• All finds all users who are notified when any
message is deposited in their mailbox.
• Urgent finds all users who are notified only
when a message marked as Urgent is deposited
in their mailbox.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
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Local voice users
The Find Local Voice Users screen
Remote Notification Keypad Interface
Description
Use this field to find users who have, or do not
have, the capability to set up their own remote
notification schedules.
Feature
dependencies
This field is displayed if Outcalling is installed.
Interface
MMUI only
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
Receive AMIS Open Network Messages
Description
Use this field to find users who are allowed, or not
allowed, to receive AMIS open network messages.
Feature
dependencies
This field is displayed if AMIS is installed.
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
Compose/Send AMIS Open Network Messages
Description
Use this field to find users who are allowed, or not
allowed, to compose and send AMIS open network
messages.
Feature
dependencies
This field is displayed only if AMIS networking is
installed.
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, No, Yes
Preferred Language
Standard 1.0
Description
Use this field to find users who have a specific
preferred language.
Feature
dependencies
This field is displayed only if more than one
language is installed.
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any one of the listed installed languages
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-65
The Find Local Voice Users screen
Message Waiting Indication Options
Description
Use this field to find users by when they receive
their message waiting indication for new
messages, depending on priority.
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, None, All, Urgent
• Any finds all users.
• None finds all users who do not receive a
message waiting indication.
• All finds all users who receive a message waiting
indication for any message.
• Urgent finds all users who receive a message
waiting indication only for messages marked as
Urgent.
Personal Verification Status
Standard 1.0
Description
Use this field to find users who do not have, or
have, a recorded personal verification.
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, Not Recorded, Recorded
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January 1998
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Local voice users
The Find Local Voice Users screen
Display the List in MWI Status Format
Description
Use this field to select the format in which you
want the list of found users to be displayed or
printed. Your selection determines the kind of
information that is displayed for each found user.
Default
No
Valid Options
No, Yes
• No displays the list in General format.
• Yes displays the list in MWI Status format.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-67
Restrictions on how you can combine search criteria
Restrictions on how you can combine search criteria
Restriction
If you enter a Class of Service number in the COS field, you
cannot use any of the class of service feature fields that
appear in the Find Local Voice Users screen. If you do so, a
message notifies you that this type of search is not allowed.
Rationale
This prevents you from entering self-contradictory
combinations that would result in no users being found.
Example
If you enter 12 in the COS field and set DNU Capability to
Yes, but DNU is disabled in that class of service, you have a
conflict which results in no users being retrieved.
Class of Service fields
in the Find screen
The following fields in the Find Local Voice User screen are
class of service fields and, therefore, cannot be used in
combination with the COS field:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
Voice Storage Limit
Read Message Retention Time
Maximum Message Length
Maximum Call Answering Message Length
Maximum Personal Greeting Length (VMUIF only)
Maximum Number of SubMailboxes (VMUIF only)
Login from Call Answering (VMUIF only)
Receive Messages for Call Answering (VMUIF only)
Call Sender (VMUIF only)
Compose Capability (VMUIF only)
Receive Composed Messages
Auto Logon
Broadcast Capability
Network Broadcast Capability (MMUI only)
Administrator Capability (MMUI only)
Auto Deletion of Invalid PDL Addresses (MMUI only)
Personal Verification Changeable by User (MMUI only)
Delivery to Non-User Capability (Outcalling feature)
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Local voice users
Restrictions on how you can combine search criteria
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
Send Message via DNU if Mailbox Not Found
(Outcalling feature)
Remote Notification Capability (Outcalling feature)
Remote Notification Keypad Interface (MMUI only,
Outcalling feature)
Receive AMIS Open Network Messages (AMIS feature)
Compose/Send AMIS Open Network Messages (AMIS)
Message Waiting Indication Options
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Local voice users
8-69
Finding, listing, and printing local voice users
Finding, listing, and printing local voice users
Introduction
You can enter many different combinations of search criteria
in the Find Local Voice Users screen.
The procedure that begins on page 8-70 is generic and applies
to all types of searches. Several examples follow this
procedure to show you how you would perform certain kinds
of searches.
Purpose
You can use the find function in order to
•
•
•
•
•
•
list the found users on the screen
print a list of the found users
reassign the found users to another class of service
view or modify any of the found local voice users
delete any of the found local voice users
record a personal verification for any of the found local
voice users
Reassigning users to
another COS
If you want to reassign found local voice users to another
class of service, see “Reassigning a subset of local voice
users to another class of service” on page 8-73, and use that
procedure instead of this one.
Specifying search
criteria
You only need to change a search field if that field is part of
your search criteria. All other fields should be left so that they
display their default setting (blank or Any). When you leave a
field at its default setting, it is disregarded in the search.
Example
You want to find all users in a particular department that have
remote notification capability. You leave all other fields set
to their default values.
Since, for example, Delivery to Non-User capability was not
changed from its default value of Any, users that have it
enabled and users who do not have it enabled will be found.
Delivery to Non-User capability is not a relevant search
criteria.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
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Local voice users
Finding, listing, and printing local voice users
Procedure
This is a generic procedure that describes the steps to perform
any kind of search.
Starting Point: The Find Local Voice Users screen
Step Action
1
Determine the search criteria that will find all of the users you
are looking for.
2
Fill in the necessary fields in order to define your search
criteria.
Note: Field descriptions begin on page 8-53.
3
Select the format in which you want to display or print the list of
found users.
IF you want to
THEN set
see the following information
the Display the List in MWI
Status Format field to No.
•
•
•
•
•
mailbox number
department
COS number
storage used
if the user has a
personal verification
see the following information
•
•
•
•
•
•
4
Standard 1.0
DN
mailbox number
number of read
messages
number of unread
messages
number of text
messages
the MWI status
the Display the List in MWI
Status Format field to Yes.
List, print, or assign found users to another class of service.
IF you want to
THEN
list the found users
go to step 5.
print the found users
go to step 8.
assign found users to
another COS
go to page 8-73.
cancel the search
press [Exit].
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-71
Finding, listing, and printing local voice users
Step Action
5
Press the [List] softkey.
Result: The List of Local Voice Users screen is displayed.
6
Do you want to modify or delete a local voice user or record a
personal verification?
•
•
7
8
If yes, go to step 7.
If no, press [Exit] to return to the Find Local Voice Users
screen.
Select the user by moving your cursor to the user’s name and
pressing the <spacebar>.
IF you want to
THEN press
AND go to
view or modify a local
voice user
[View/Modify]
page 8-80.
delete a local voice user
[Delete]
page 8-97.
record a personal
verification for the user
[Voice]
page 8-34.
Press the [Print] softkey.
Result: The Printing softkeys are displayed.
9
Standard 1.0
Do you want to continue printing?
•
If yes, press the [Continue Printing] softkey.
Note: You can stop printing once started by pressing
[Cancel Printing].
•
If no, press the [Cancel Printing] softkey.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
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Local voice users
Finding, listing, and printing local voice users
Example 1
You want to find and print all users in the Marketing
department who have exceeded their voice storage limit.
Step Action
1
Enter Marketing in the Department field.
2
Set Voice Storage Limit Exceeded to Yes.
3
Do you want the list in MWI status format?
•
•
4
If yes, set the Display the List in MWI Status Format field to
Yes.
If no, set the Display the List in MWI Status Format field to
No.
Press [Print].
Result: A list of the found users is printed.
Example 2
You want to find and list all users assigned to class of service
12 who have not recorded a personal verification.
Step Action
1
Enter 12 in the COS field.
2
Set Personal Verification Status to Not_Recorded.
3
Do you want the list in MWI status format?
•
•
4
If yes, set the Display the List in MWI Status Format field to
Yes.
If no, set the Display the List in MWI Status Format field to
No.
Press [List].
Result: The found users are listed on the screen.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-73
Reassigning a subset of local voice users to another class of service
Reassigning a subset of local voice users to another class
of service
When to use
Use this procedure when you want to
•
•
Toggle COS
assignment
find a group of local voice users that meet a certain set of
search criteria and reassign them to another class of
service
find all users in a particular class of service and reassign
them to a different class of service
If you want to reassign users who meet a certain set of search
criteria to another class of service, you should verify the list
of found users before you actually reassign them.
You may find that you have not found all required users, in
which case you will have to redefine the search criteria; or,
you may find that you have found some users who you do not
want to reassign.
If you do not want to reassign some of the found users to
another class of service, you can use the [Toggle COS
Assignment] softkey to deselect them.
Reassigning users
from one COS to
another
Standard 1.0
If you want to reassign users from one class of service to
another, you must enter the class of service number in the
COS field. You will not be able to use any of the other class
of service fields in the Find Local Voice Users screen. For a
list of these fields, see “Restrictions on how you can combine
search criteria” on page 8-67.
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January 1998
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Local voice users
Reassigning a subset of local voice users to another class of service
Reassigning users to
another COS
To reassign found local voice users to another class of
service, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Find Local Voice Users screen
Step Action
1
Do you want to reassign users in one class of service to
another class of service?
•
•
2
If yes, enter the users’ current class of service number in the
COS field and go to step 11.
If no, go to step 2.
Fill in the necessary fields to define your search criteria.
Attention: If you enter a number in the COS field, you cannot
use any of the other class of service fields in this screen.
Note: Field descriptions begin on page 8-53.
3
Select the format in which you want to display or print the list of
found users.
IF you want to
THEN set
see the following information
the Display the List in MWI
Status Format field to No.
•
•
•
•
•
mailbox number
department
COS number
storage used
personal verification
status
see the following information
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
DN
mailbox number
number of read
messages
number of unread
messages
number of text
messages
the MWI status
System Administration Guide
the Display the List in MWI
Status Format field to Yes.
January 1998
Local voice users
8-75
Reassigning a subset of local voice users to another class of service
Step Action
4
Press the [List] softkey.
Result: The List Local Voice Users screen is displayed.
5
Does the list contain all of the users you want to reassign?
•
•
6
Does the list contain any users who you do not want to
reassign to another class of service?
•
•
7
If yes, go to step 6.
If no, redefine the search criteria.
Press [Exit] to return to the Find screen, and repeat steps 2
to 4 until all users you want to reassign have been found.
If yes, go to step 7.
If no, go to step 10.
Select the user you do not want to reassign by moving your
cursor to the user’s name and pressing the spacebar.
Result: The user is highlighted.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
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Local voice users
Reassigning a subset of local voice users to another class of service
Step Action
8
Press the [Toggle COS Assignment] softkey.
Result: An asterisk appears next to the user’s name. This
asterisk indicates that the user will not be reassigned to the
new class of service.
9
Are there any other users you do not want to reassign?
•
•
10
11
If yes, repeat steps 7 to 8 until you have deselected all users
you do not want to reassign.
If no, go to step 10.
Press [Exit] to return to the Find Local Voice Users screen.
Press [Assign to COS] to reassign the found users.
Result: You are prompted for a COS number.
12
Enter the number of the class of service to which you want to
reassign the users and press Return.
Result: As users are reassigned, a message is displayed,
counting each user who is added to the new class of service.
13
If you want to abort the operation at any time, press the [Abort]
softkey.
Result: This stops the reassignment. However, it cannot undo
any users who have already been reassigned.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
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8-77
Reassigning a subset of local voice users to another class of service
When reassignment
is complete
Standard 1.0
Once all users have been reassigned to the specified class of
service, a message and a SEER are sent, stating that the COS
assignment is complete. This message and SEER also report the
number of users who were assigned and the number of users
who failed to be reassigned.
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January 1998
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Local voice users
Reassigning a subset of local voice users to another class of service
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Local voice users
Section C:
8-79
Modifying and deleting local
voice users
In this section
Standard 1.0
Accessing the View/Modify Local Voice User screen
8-80
Viewing and modifying a local voice user
8-84
Checking a user’s status
8-86
Enabling a disabled mailbox
8-91
Changing a user’s password
8-93
Monitoring mailbox logins for suspected hacker activity
8-94
Reassigning a mailbox to another user
8-96
Deleting a local voice user
8-97
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January 1998
8-80
Local voice users
Accessing the View/Modify Local Voice User screen
Accessing the View/Modify Local Voice User screen
Introduction
You may or may not know the mailbox number of the user
you want to view or modify. Use this table to decide which
procedure to follow to access the View/Modify Local Voice
User screen.
IF
THEN follow
you know the user’s mailbox number the procedure on this page.
you do not know the user’s mailbox
number
Accessing the screen
when you know the
mailbox number
the procedure on page 8-81.
To access the View/Modify Local Voice User screen directly,
follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select User Administration.
2
Select Local Voice User.
3
Press the [View/Modify] softkey.
Result: You are prompted for a mailbox number.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-81
Accessing the View/Modify Local Voice User screen
Step Action
4
Enter the user’s mailbox number and press <Return>.
Result: The View/Modify Local Voice User screen is displayed.
Finding a local voice
user and accessing
the screen
To find the local voice user you want to modify when you do
not know the mailbox number, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
Standard 1.0
1
Select User Administration.
2
Select Local Voice User.
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January 1998
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Local voice users
Accessing the View/Modify Local Voice User screen
Step Action
3
Press [Find].
Result: The Find Local Voice Users screen is displayed.
4
Enter the information you know about the user.
5
Press [List].
Result: The List of Local Voice Users screen is displayed.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-83
Accessing the View/Modify Local Voice User screen
Step Action
6
Select the user you want to view or modify by moving your
cursor to the user’s name and pressing the spacebar.
7
Press [View/Modify].
Result: The View/Modify Local Voice User screen is displayed.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
8-84
Local voice users
Viewing and modifying a local voice user
Viewing and modifying a local voice user
Once you access the View/Modify Local Voice User screen,
it functions exactly like the Add Local Voice User screen.
Most of the procedures are, therefore, in Section A:: Adding
local voice users. Several procedures that are unique to
modifying an existing local voice user are described in this
section. These are
Introduction
•
•
•
changing the user’s last name
enabling a disabled mailbox
changing the user’s password
Use this table to decide what you need to modify in the user
profile, and then find the page.
Deciding what you
need to modify
IF you want to
THEN go to
check the user’s status
page 8-86.
change other user information (such as department) page 8-15.
reassign the user to another class of service
page 8-20.
reassign a subset of users to another class of service page 8-73.
create a personal class of service
page 8-22.
modify the revert DN, MWI DN, or extension DNs
page 8-31.
record a personal verification for a user
page 8-34.
create a remote notification schedule for a user
page 8-36.
monitor a mailbox for suspected hacker activity
page 8-94.
modify any of these local voice user characteristics: page 8-39.
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
name dialable by external callers
hospitality user class (if Hospitality is installed)
volume level (VMUIF only)
preferred language (multilingual systems only)
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-85
Viewing and modifying a local voice user
Procedure
IF you want to
THEN go to
enable a disabled mailbox
page 8-91.
change a user’s password
page 8-93.
reassign a mailbox to another user
page 8-96
To modify a local voice user, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The View/Modify Local Voice User screen
Step Action
Standard 1.0
1
Look up the type of change(s) you need to make in the table on
page 8-84, and go to the page that is indicated for instructions.
2
Make the necessary changes.
3
Press the [Save] softkey.
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January 1998
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Local voice users
Checking a user’s status
Checking a user’s status
Introduction
The View/Modify Local Voice Users screen contains a
number of status fields that are not displayed in the Add
Local Voice Users screen. These are read-only information
fields.
MMUI user status
fields
The dotted box highlights the status fields that are displayed
in the MMUI version of the screen.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-87
Checking a user’s status
VMUIF user status
fields
The dotted box highlights the status fields that are displayed
in the VMUIF version of the screen.
Field descriptions
The following are descriptions of the status fields that are
displayed in the View/Modify Local Voice Users screen.
Invalid Logon Attempts
Description
This is the number of successive logon attempts
that have been made using an incorrect password.
This field is reset to 0 when
• a valid password is entered and the user is
allowed to log in
• you reenable the mailbox (if it has been disabled
due to too many invalid logon attempts)
Standard 1.0
Potential
security risk
A high number in this field can indicate that a
hacker has been trying to get into this mailbox.
More
information
See the section “Controlling access to Meridian
Mail mailboxes” on page 6-123.
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January 1998
8-88
Local voice users
Checking a user’s status
Time of Last Logon
Description
This is the time at which the user last logged in to
his or her mailbox.
A series of asterisks indicates that the user has not
logged in.
Potential
security risk
If a considerable amount of time has passed since
the user’s last logon, you may want to investigate
why this is the case. It could be that
• the user is on holiday or extended leave
• the user has forgotten his or her password and
has not notified you
• the user has left the organization (in which case
the mailbox should be deleted for security
reasons)
Time of Last Mailbox Lockout
Description
If the user has been locked out of his or her
mailbox, this is the time at which the last lockout
occurred.
Interface
VMUIF only
Potential
security risk
VMUIF users are locked out of their mailboxes
after an excessive number of invalid logon
attempts.
Lockout could indicate that a hacker has been
trying to get into this mailbox.
More
information
Standard 1.0
See the section “Controlling access to Meridian
Mail mailboxes” on page 6-123.
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-89
Checking a user’s status
Calls Rejected after Mailbox Full
Description
Yes indicates that the user’s mailbox became full
and that call answering messages were rejected as
a consequence.
No indicates that calls have not been rejected.
Interface
VMUIF only
Voice storage
limit
If a user complains of many lost messages,
consider reassigning him or her to another class of
service that has a higher voice storage limit. This
will allow more messages to be deposited in the
mailbox before becoming full.
Personal Greeting Recorded
Description
This field indicates whether the user has recorded a
personal greeting.
Interface
VMUIF only
Internal Greeting Recorded
Standard 1.0
Description
This field indicates whether the user has recorded
an internal greeting. This greeting is played to
internal callers when they are transferred to
Meridian Mail to leave a message.
Interface
MMUI only
Interaction
with external
greeting
This table indicates which greeting is played to
internal callers.
WHEN
THEN
there is an internal greeting
the internal
greeting is played.
there is no internal greeting
but there is an external
greeting
the external
greeting is played.
there is no internal greeting
and no external greeting
a standard system
greeting is played.
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January 1998
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Local voice users
Checking a user’s status
External Personal Greeting Recorded
Description
This field indicates whether the user has recorded
an external greeting. The external greeting is
played to external callers (or internal callers if no
internal greeting is recorded) when they are
transferred to Meridian Mail.
Interface
MMUI only
Temporary Absence Greeting Recorded
Description
This field indicates whether the user has recorded a
temporary absence greeting. If this greeting is
recorded, it is played to internal and external
callers until the expiry date.
Interface
MMUI only
Temporary Absence Greeting Expiry Date
Description
If a temporary absence greeting has been recorded,
this field is displayed to indicate when that
greeting will expire.
Interface
MMUI only
Possible
Values
A date and time indicate that the user has defined
an expiry date for the greeting.
Indefinite indicates that the user has not defined an
expiry date for the greeting.
Expired
greetings
If the current date has passed the expiry date, the
field will be followed by the word “Expired.”
Password Last Changed
Description
This field indicates when the user last changed his
or her password. Both the date and time are
displayed.
MMUI versus
VMUIF
When a new VMUIF user is added, this field is set
to Nil. For users who were added a while ago, Nil
indicates that they have not changed their default
passwords.
When a new MMUI user is added, this field is set
to the time at which the user was added.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-91
Enabling a disabled mailbox
Enabling a disabled mailbox
Introduction
If too many invalid logon attempts are made to a mailbox and
the Maximum Invalid Logon Attempts Permitted per
Mailbox (as defined in the Voice Security Options screen) is
reached, that user’s mailbox is disabled.
What happens:
MMUI users
When there are too many invalid logon attempts to the
mailbox, the mailbox is disabled.
The MMUI user cannot log on to his or her mailbox, but
messages are still recorded. When the user’s mailbox is
reenabled, he or she will be able to listen to the messages that
were received while the mailbox was disabled.
What happens:
VMUIF users
When there are too many invalid logon attempts on a VMUIF
user’s mailbox, the following happens:
•
•
•
The mailbox is disabled.
The Time of Last Mailbox Lockout field in the View/
Modify Local Voice User screen displays the time at
which the mailbox was disabled.
Meridian Mail checks the Lockout Duration field in the
user’s class of service to see how long the user should be
locked out.
While a VMUIF user’s mailbox is disabled, the user can
logon, but calls are rejected and new messages are not
recorded.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
8-92
Local voice users
Enabling a disabled mailbox
Deciding if action is
needed for VMUIF
users
Potential security risk
For VMUIF users who have been locked out of their mailbox,
you may or may not have to manually reenable the mailbox.
IF the Lockout Duration is
THEN
00.00
you must manually reenable the
user’s mailbox.
not 00.00
you do not have to manually
reenable the mailbox. The
mailbox is automatically
reenabled after the lockout period
has passed.
A high number of invalid logon attempts could be an
indicator that a hacker has been attempting to get into your
system through this user’s mailbox.
Contact the user and investigate why so many invalid logon
attempts were made. If the user does not think he or she was
responsible for these attempts, you should monitor this user’s
mailbox for future logon attempts.
Procedure
To enable a disabled mailbox, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The View/Modify Local Voice User screen
Step Action
1
Go to the Logon Status field and set it to Enabled.
2
Do you suspect hacker activity?
•
If yes, set the Monitor Mailbox during Monitoring Period field
to Yes.
• If no, go to step 3.
Note: See “Monitoring mailbox logins for suspected hacker
activity” on page 8-94.
3
Press [Save].
Result: The mailbox is reenabled and the Invalid Logon
Attempts field is reset to 0.
4
Standard 1.0
Notify the user that his or her mailbox has been reenabled.
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-93
Changing a user’s password
Changing a user’s password
When to use
If a local voice user has forgotten his or her password, you
will have to change it at the administration terminal.
Procedure
To change a user’s password, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The View/Modify Local Voice User screen
Step Action
1
Press the [Change User Password] softkey.
Result: You are prompted for a new password.
2
Enter the new password and press <Return>.
Note: This password must contain numbers only. It can be up
to 16 digits in length.
Result: You are prompted to reenter the password for
verification.
3
Enter the same password and press <Return>.
4
Did you get a message indicating a mismatch between the two
passwords you entered?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, repeat steps 2 to 3 until there is no mismatch.
If no, go to step 5.
5
Press [Save].
6
Inform the user of the new password.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
8-94
Local voice users
Monitoring mailbox logins for suspected hacker activity
Monitoring mailbox logins for suspected hacker activity
Introduction
Hacker Monitor is a new feature that flags hacker activity by
issuing information SEERs to bring your attention to
suspicious activity. Since mailboxes are a potential security
risk, mailbox logins are one type of activity that you should
check using Hacker Monitor.
When to use
Typically, you do not need to turn mailbox monitoring on for
new users. Turn it on only if you suspect that a hacker has
been using a particular mailbox. You may, for example, get
complaints of abusive messages being sent from a particular
mailbox. This is an indication of potential hacker abuse.
How it works
A monitoring period is defined in the Voice Security Options
screen. This is the time period during which logins will be
monitored.
If mailbox monitoring is enabled, every time someone logs in
to the mailbox during the monitoring period, a SEER will be
issued. For MMUI users, SEER 2262 will be issued, whereas
for VMUIF users, SEER 5662 will be issued.
Procedure
To enable mailbox monitoring, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Obtain the times when the suspected hacker uses the system.
Note: You can do this from Meridian 1 CDR records, or from
Meridian Mail Reporter.
2
Is the monitoring period set up to reflect these times?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, go to step 5.
If no, go to step 3.
3
Select Voice Administration and then Voice Security Options.
4
Enter the time period in the System Access Monitoring Period
field, save your change, and return to the Main Menu.
5
Select User Administration.
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-95
Monitoring mailbox logins for suspected hacker activity
Step Action
6
Select Local Voice User and press the [View/Modify] softkey.
Result: You are prompted for a mailbox number.
7
Enter the user’s mailbox number.
8
Go to the Monitor Mailbox during Monitoring Period field and
set it to Yes.
9
Press the [Save] softkey.
Result: Whenever the mailbox is logged into during the
monitoring period, SEER 2262 for MMUI users or SEER 5662
for VMUIF users will be generated.
Immediate
notification of login
If you (or a support person) want to be notified immediately
of an occurrence of these SEERs, you can set up a SEER
message trigger mailbox and then enable remote notification
for that mailbox. To do this you must do the following.
1.
Enable mailbox monitoring as described above.
2.
Set up a message trigger for SEER 2262 or 5662, or
both, so that an urgent SEER message is deposited in a
designated mailbox when the mailbox is logged into.
3.
See “Using SEER triggering” on page 29-35.
Set up remote notification for the designated mailbox so
that you (or a support person) will be paged or phoned as
soon as the urgent message is deposited.
Refer to the Outcalling Application Guide
(NTP 555-7001-320) for more information.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
8-96
Local voice users
Reassigning a mailbox to another user
Reassigning a mailbox to another user
Two methods
There are two methods for reassigning a mailbox from one
user to another. They are:
•
•
First method: modify
the mailbox
modify the mailbox, changing the appropriate fields
(Name, Title, Department, etc.) from the old user’s data
to the new user’s data
delete the mailbox, then re-add it, filling in the new
user’s data as you configure the mailbox
If you use this method, Operational Measurements will not
differentiate between traffic/usage associated with the old
user and traffic/usage associated with the new user. The
reports will supply statistics for that mailbox as if no change
had been made.
To use this method, see “Viewing and modifying a local
voice user” on page 8-84 for details on how to modify the
mailbox.
Second method:
delete and add the
mailbox
If you use this method, Operational Measurements reports
will present the statistics for the old user separately from the
statistics for the new user, even though the mailbox number is
the same for both.
To use this method, follow the steps below.
1.
Contact the current owner of the mailbox and make sure
he or she has listened to all of his or her messages.
2.
Access the Delete Local Voice User screen and delete
the local voice user.
3.
See “Deleting a local voice user” on page 8-97.
Add a new local voice user, using the same mailbox
number, and enter the new user’s information.
See “Accessing the Add Local Voice User screen” on
page 8-10.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-97
Deleting a local voice user
Deleting a local voice user
When to use
You will have to delete a local voice user when
•
•
reassigning the mailbox to another user
a user leaves the company
Potential security risk
When a user leaves the company, be sure to delete the
mailbox immediately. An unused mailbox is a security risk
since it is forgotten about and suspicious activity often goes
unnoticed.
Choosing the correct
procedure
You may or may not know the mailbox number of the user
you want to delete. Use this table to decide which procedure
to follow to access the Delete Local Voice User screen and
then delete a user.
IF
THEN follow
you know the user’s mailbox number the procedure on page 8-98.
you do not know the user’s mailbox
number
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
the procedure on page 8-99.
January 1998
8-98
Local voice users
Deleting a local voice user
Deleting a local voice
user when you know
the mailbox number
To delete a local voice user when you know the user’s
mailbox number, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select User Administration.
2
Select Local Voice User.
3
Press the [Delete] softkey.
Result: You are prompted for the mailbox number.
4
Enter the mailbox number and press <Return>.
Result: The Delete Local Voice User screen is displayed.
5
Is this the user you want to delete?
•
•
6
If yes, go to step 6.
If no, press [Cancel] and abandon the procedure. Obtain the
correct mailbox number or use the next procedure on
page 8-99 to find the user.
Press the [OK to Delete] softkey.
Result: The user is deleted and you are prompted for another
mailbox number.
7
Do you want to delete another local voice user?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, repeat steps 4 to 6 until you have deleted all local
voice users that you need to delete at this time.
If no, press the [Cancel] softkey.
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January 1998
Local voice users
8-99
Deleting a local voice user
Finding and deleting a
local voice user
To find a local voice user you want to delete when you do not
know the mailbox number, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select User Administration.
2
Select Local Voice User.
3
Press [Find].
Result: The Find Local Voice Users screen is displayed.
4
Enter the information you know about the user.
Examples: Last Name, First Name, Department
5
Standard 1.0
Press [List].
System Administration Guide
January 1998
8-100
Local voice users
Deleting a local voice user
Step Action
6
Select the user you want to view or modify by moving your
cursor to the user’s name and pressing the spacebar.
7
Press [Delete].
Result: The Delete Local Voice User screen is displayed.
8
Press the [OK to Delete] softkey.
Result: The user is deleted and you are prompted for another
mailbox number.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 9
Remote voice users
In this chapter
Section A: Introduction
9-3
Section B: Adding remote voice users
9-11
Section C: Finding remote voice users
9-27
Section D: Modifying and deleting remote voice users
9-39
9-2
Standard 1.0
Remote voice users
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Remote voice users
Section A:
9-3
Introduction
In this section
Standard 1.0
What is a remote voice user?
9-4
Remote voice user changes and enhancements
9-6
Permanent remote voice users
9-8
Temporary remote voice users
9-9
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-4
Remote voice users
What is a remote voice user?
What is a remote voice user?
Definition
A remote voice user (RVU) is a Meridian Mail user whose
mailbox resides on a remote networking site and who has been
added to the local site’s user database.
Benefits
The benefits of adding users from remote sites as remote voice
users in the local site are as follows.
•
•
•
•
•
Example
Whenever a user at the local site addresses a message to a
remote voice user, the remote voice user’s personal
verification (spoken name) is played.
Local users can use the name dialing and name addressing
features to call and compose messages to remote voice
users.
While listening to a voice message left by a remote voice
user, a local user can use call sender (press 9 on the
keypad) to immediately call back the originator of the
message.
External callers can name-dial remote voice users (if this
feature is enabled).
Remote voice users can be added to system and personal
distribution lists.
David Murphy is a local user at your San Francisco Meridian
Mail site. Paula Marchand is a user at the remote Montreal
Meridian Mail site. Paula has been added to your local site as a
remote voice user.
Meridian Mail
Montreal
(remote site)
Meridian Mail
San Francisco
(local site)
David Murphy
(local user)
Paula
Marchand
(local user)
Paula Marchand
(remote voice user)
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Remote voice users
9-5
What is a remote voice user?
Example (cont’d)
David Murphy can use name addressing when composing a
voice message to Paula Marchand. During message addressing,
David will hear Paula’s spoken name as a verification of the
mailbox number he has entered.
When David listens to a voice message received from Paula, he
presses 9 (call sender) to call Paula back.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-6
Remote voice users
Remote voice user changes and enhancements
Remote voice user changes and enhancements
Introduction
In recent Meridian Mail releases, a number of enhancements
have been made to the administration of remote voice users to
•
•
New type of remote
voice user
provide support for remote voice user propagation to other
sites
to simplify the management of the remote voice user
database
In Meridian Mail Releases 11 and 12, you can add remote voice
users as temporary users. In the past, users at remote sites could
only be added as permanent remote voice users. They had to be
added and deleted manually, one at a time.
Temporary users can be added and deleted automatically by the
system.
Simplified addition of
remote voice users
Prior to Meridian Mail 11, you had to enter each remote voice
user to your local site one user at a time.
Now, you can quickly and easily add remote voice users in one
of two ways.
•
•
Standard 1.0
RVU Propagation via Enterprise Networking automatically
adds remote voice users to your local site whenever a user
at a remote site addresses a voice message to a user at your
local site. These users are added as temporary users.
RVU Propagation via Bulk Provisioning allows you to
copy all (or a subset of) users at a remote site to tape and
then copy them into your local database as remote voice
users. These users can be added as temporary or
permanent.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Remote voice users
9-7
Remote voice user changes and enhancements
Personal verification
in user’s voice
Prior to Meridian Mail 11, personal verifications (spoken
names) for remote voice users could only be recorded by the
local administrator, and, therefore, in a voice other than the
user’s.
In Meridian Mail Releases 11 and 12, when temporary remote
voice users are added to the system using RVU Propagation, the
personal verification of each user is added in that user’s voice,
provided that the user has recorded a personal verification.
When the personal verification is played for remote voice
users
A personal verification is played for remote voice users in the
following situations:
•
•
•
•
A local user composes a message to a remote voice user.
When the user enters the remote user’s mailbox (or name if
using name addressing), he or she will hear the remote
voice user’s personal verification in the user’s voice.
A local user name dials a remote voice user.
A local user uses the call sender feature on a message from
a remote voice user.
The envelope of a message received from a remote voice
user is played.
When no personal verification has been recorded for a
remote voice user
When no personal verification has been recorded, the system
plays the remote site’s spoken name and the mailbox number
(for example, “Maidenhead, mailbox 1334.”)
If there is no spoken name recorded for the remote site, the
system plays the mailbox number in network format (for
example, “Mailbox 64441334.”)
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-8
Remote voice users
Permanent remote voice users
Permanent remote voice users
Introduction
All remote voice users that existed prior to Meridian Mail
Release 11 were permanent remote voice users. As of Meridian
Mail 11, remote voice users can still be added as permanent
remote voice users.
Adding permanent
users
Permanent remote voice users can be added in one of two ways.
User Administration
They can be added one at a time through User Administration.
This is the way you had to enter them prior to Release 11.
See “Adding remote voice users through User Administration”
on page 9-17.
Bulk Provisioning
You can use the Bulk Provisioning feature to copy users from a
remote site to your local site’s database as permanent remote
voice users.
See “Adding remote voice users using RVU Propagation via
Bulk Provisioning” on page 9-24.
Deleting permanent
users
Permanent remote voice users remain on the system until you
delete them. Permanent users must be deleted one at a time
through the User Administration menu.
See “Manually deleting remote voice users” on page 9-45.
Making permanent
users temporary
You can convert permanent remote voice users who have not
been active for a long time to temporary remote voice users and
allow the system to take care of deleting inactive users.
You can verify when a user was last active in one of two ways.
•
•
Standard 1.0
Check the Last Access Time field in the View/Modify
Remote Voice User screen.
Use the Find function and list all permanent remote voice
users. You can then select and modify users from the List
screen.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Remote voice users
9-9
Temporary remote voice users
Temporary remote voice users
Introduction
Temporary remote voice users were also introduced in Meridian
Mail 11. Temporary remote voice users make administration of
remote voice users much easier since they can be both added
and deleted automatically by the system.
Adding temporary
users
Temporary remote voice users can be added in one of three
ways.
User Administration
You can add temporary remote voice users one at a time
through User Administration in the same way that you add
permanent users.
See “Adding remote voice users through User Administration”
on page 9-17.
RVU Propagation via Enterprise Networking
You can have remote voice users automatically added to your
system when they send network messages to the local site.
When temporary users are added this way, the personal
verifications that users have recorded in their own voices are
used.
See “Adding temporary remote voice users using RVU
Propagation via Enterprise Networking” on page 9-21.
RVU Propagation via Bulk Provisioning
You can also use the Bulk Provisioning feature to copy users
from a remote site to tape and then to your local site’s database
as temporary or permanent remote voice users. This method is
not automatic, but it does allow you to quickly add all users (or
a subset of users) from a remote site to your local database.
When remote voice users are added this way, the personal
verifications that users have recorded in their voice are used.
See “Adding remote voice users using RVU Propagation via
Bulk Provisioning” on page 9-24.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-10
Remote voice users
Temporary remote voice users
Deleting temporary
users
Temporary remote voice users can be deleted in one of two
ways.
Manual deletion
If you want to delete a particular remote voice user, you can do
so through the User Administration menu in the same way that
you delete permanent remote voice users.
See “Manually deleting remote voice users” on page 9-45.
Automatic deletion during nightly audits
Nightly audits are performed on the database of temporary
remote voice users in order to keep it from getting too large.
Whenever the number of temporary remote voice users exceeds
a threshold, the nightly audit removes the oldest temporary
remote voice users in the system. If the number of temporary
remote voice users reaches the maximum number allowed on
the system, no more temporary users will be added by Remote
Voice User Propagation until after the nightly audit is run.
See “How temporary remote voice users are automatically
deleted from the system” on page 9-49.
Making temporary
users permanent
If you do not want a particular temporary user to be deleted
during a nightly audit, you can change that user to a permanent
user. Permanent users are not deleted during the nightly audit.
See “Viewing and modifying remote voice users” on page 9-40.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Remote voice users
Section B:
9-11
Adding remote voice users
In this section
The Add Remote Voice User screen
9-12
Adding remote voice users through User Administration
9-17
Recording a personal verification for a remote voice user
9-19
Adding temporary remote voice users using RVU
Propagation via Enterprise Networking
9-21
Adding remote voice users using RVU Propagation via Bulk 9-24
Provisioning
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-12
Remote voice users
The Add Remote Voice User screen
The Add Remote Voice User screen
Introduction
Permanent and temporary remote voice users can be added to
the system one at a time from this screen.
The screen
This is the Add Remote Voice User screen.
Part 1
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Remote voice users
9-13
The Add Remote Voice User screen
Part 2
Field descriptions
This table describes the fields in the Add Remote Voice User
screen.
Mailbox Number
Description
The remote voice user’s mailbox number.
Format
The mailbox number must be in network format. It
must include the network prefix or steering code of
the remote site.
Example
If the dialing plan is ESN, a valid mailbox number
is 6233 4433, where 6233 is the network prefix and
4433 is the mailbox number.
If the dialing plan is CDP, a valid mailbox number
is 54433, where 54 is the steering code.
Standard 1.0
Default
The number you entered to access the Add Remote
Voice User screen.
Maximum
length
28 digits (including network prefix)
Mandatory
This field is mandatory. The user cannot be saved
if this field is blank.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-14
Remote voice users
The Add Remote Voice User screen
Last Name and First Name
Description
The remote voice user’s last and first names.
Maximum
length
You can enter up to 41 characters for the last name
and 21 characters for the first name.
Restricted
characters
Do not use the following characters in these fields:
plus sign (+), underscore (_), or question mark (?).
Attention
Make sure the spelling is correct. These fields are
used by the name dialing and name addressing
features. For this reason, it is recommended that
you use only alphanumeric characters.
Initials
Description
Initials can be used to distinguish users with
identical first and last names. They are not used by
the name dialing or name addressing features.
Default
If you leave this field blank, Meridian Mail will
automatically insert the first letter of the user’s
first name when you save the user.
Maximum
length
5 characters
Department
Standard 1.0
Description
The remote voice user’s department.
Default
This field is blank for the first user you add. For
subsequent users, this field defaults to the
department entered for the last user you added (as
the [Cancel] softkey was not pressed).
Maximum
length
31 characters
Restricted
characters
Do not use the following characters in these fields:
plus sign (+), underscore (_), or question mark (?).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Remote voice users
9-15
The Add Remote Voice User screen
Extension DNs
Description
A user can have up to three extensions. This means
that a caller can dial any one of these numbers and
reach the user.
The first field is for the primary DN.
Format
These DNs must be in network format. They must
include the network prefix or steering code of the
remote site.
Maximum
length
30 digits
Default
The first DN field is typically filled in with the
mailbox number you entered to access the Add
Remote Voice User screen.
See Also
See “Primary DN and extension DNs” on
page 8-24.
Personal Verification Recorded (Voice)
Description
This read-only field indicates whether a spoken
name has been recorded for this user (either by the
user or by the administrator).
Default
This field is set to No when you first add a user.
Name Dialable by External Callers
Standard 1.0
Description
This field determines whether this user can be
name dialed by external callers. An external caller
is anyone who is calling in from a phone that is not
on your PBX.
Default
This field uses the setting for the Name Dialable
by External Callers field in the Networking
Configuration screen under the Network
Administration menu.
Valid Options
Yes, No
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-16
Remote voice users
The Add Remote Voice User screen
User Type
Description
This field identifies the type of remote voice user.
Default
Permanent
Valid Options
Permanent, Temporary
See Also
See “Permanent remote voice users” on page 9-8
and “Temporary remote voice users” on page 9-9.
Last Access Time
Description
This is a read-only field that indicates the last time
• the user was modified via User Administration
• the user’s personal verification was played
• an Enterprise Networking message was received
from this user
• the user was updated using bulk provisioning
Standard 1.0
Default
This field is set to the date and time at which the
user is added.
Usage
This time-stamp is used by the nightly audit to
determine which temporary remote voice users
should be deleted when there are too many
temporary users on the system.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Remote voice users
9-17
Adding remote voice users through User Administration
Adding remote voice users through User Administration
When to use
Use this procedure to add either permanent or temporary remote
voice users one at a time.
Procedure
To add a remote voice user, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select User Administration.
Result: The User Administration menu is displayed.
2
Select Remote Voice User.
3
Press the [Add] softkey.
Result: You are prompted for a mailbox number.
4
Enter the mailbox number of the remote voice user.
Requirement: Enter the necessary network prefix or steering
code as part of the mailbox number.
Result: The Add Remote Voice User screen is displayed.
Note: Field descriptions begin on page 9-13.
Standard 1.0
5
Enter the user’s last name and first name.
6
Enter the user’s initials.
7
Enter the user’s department.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-18
Remote voice users
Adding remote voice users through User Administration
Step Action
8
Does the user have a phone and can he or she be dialed
directly from the local site?
•
•
9
Does the user have more than one extension DN?
•
•
If yes, go to step 10.
If no, go to step 11.
10
Enter the user’s other DN(s) in the remaining Extension DN
fields.
11
Do you want to record a personal verification (spoken name)
for the user?
•
•
12
•
13
If yes, set the Name Dialable by External Callers field to
Yes.
If no, set the Name Dialable by External Callers field to No.
Is this a permanent user?
•
•
14
If yes, see “Recording a personal verification for a remote
voice user” on page 9-19.
If no, go to step 12.
Do you want external callers to be able to name dial this user?
•
If yes, select Permanent.
If no, select Temporary.
Do you want to save the user with the information you have
entered?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, go to step 9.
If no, make all Extension DN fields blank and go to step 11.
If yes, press the [Save] softkey.
If no, press the [Cancel] softkey or make the necessary
changes and then press [Save].
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Remote voice users
9-19
Recording a personal verification for a remote voice user
Recording a personal verification for a remote voice user
Introduction
Ideally, users should record personal verifications (spoken
names) in their own voice. However, as administrator, you can
record personal verifications from the administration terminal
on behalf of users.
Procedure
To record a personal verification, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Add Remote Voice User screen
Step Action
1
Put the cursor on the Personal Verification Recorded (Voice)
field.
2
Press the [Voice] softkey.
Result: You are prompted to enter the extension of the phone
you want to use to record the verification.
3
Enter the extension of the phone and press <Return>.
Result: The phone rings.
4
Pick up the receiver.
Result: The recording softkeys are displayed.
5
Press the [Record] softkey.
Result: The [Stop] softkey is displayed.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-20
Remote voice users
Recording a personal verification for a remote voice user
Step Action
6
At the sound of the beep, speak the user’s name (and,
optionally, the user’s extension).
Example: “Heather McGee at extension 8523.”
7
Press the [Stop] key to stop recording.
8
Do you want to verify the recording?
•
•
9
Do you want to rerecord the verification?
•
•
10
If yes, repeat steps 5 to 8 to rerecord the verification.
If no, go to step 10.
Do you need to record personal verifications for any other
users?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, press the [Play] softkey.
If no, go to step 10.
If yes, press the [Return] softkey and do not hang up the
receiver.
The next time you press [Voice] to record another
verification, you will not have to reenter the phone extension
since the line has not been disconnected.
If no, press the [Disconnect] softkey and hang up the
receiver.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Remote voice users
9-21
Adding temporary remote voice users using RVU Propagation via Enterprise Networking
Adding temporary remote voice users using RVU
Propagation via Enterprise Networking
Introduction
The RVU Propagation via Enterprise Networking feature can be
used to add temporary remote voice users.
When this feature is enabled, temporary remote voice users are
added automatically.
Requirement
Enterprise Networking must be enabled on both sites: your local
site and the remote site from which you want to add users to
your system.
Enabling RVU
To automatically add temporary remote voice users to your
Propagation via
system, you must enable the RVU Propagation via Enterprise
Enterprise Networking Networking feature. It is disabled by default.
This feature is enabled through Network Administration.
1.
Enable RVU Propagation via Enterprise Networking for
the local site.
In the Networking Configuration screen of the local
Meridian Mail site, set the Add/Update Remote Voice
Users field to Yes.
This informs Meridian Mail that you want to receive
remote voice user information at the local site.
See also
Standard 1.0
2.
Choose the sites whose users you want added as remote
voice users to your system. The sites you choose must be
Enterprise Networking sites.
3.
To enable the sending of RVU information from each
remote site, you must set the Send the Sender’s text name
and personal verification field to Yes in the Remote Site
Maintenance screen at the remote Meridian Mail system
(not the local system).
For detailed instructions on enabling this feature, refer to the
Enterprise Networking Guide NTP (555-7001-246),
“Maintaining the network” chapter.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-22
Remote voice users
Adding temporary remote voice users using RVU Propagation via Enterprise Networking
When users are
added/updated
A temporary remote voice user is added to the local site when a
user at a remote site sends a network message to a user at the
local site. Remote voice user information is taken from the
header of the Enterprise network message that is received.
A user at a remote site
sends a voice message to
a user at the local site.
Is the remote site set up
to send the text name and
personal verification?
Yes
The message is delivered
but the remote user is not
added as a temporary user.
No
Is the local site set up
to receive the sender’s
name?
Yes
No
Meridian Mail checks the
user database to see
if the user is defined as a
remote voice user.
Is the remote user defined
as a remote voice user?
Yes
No
Is the user defined as
permanent or temporary?
Permanent
Temporary
Meridian Mail adds the
user as a temporary
remote voice user to the
local network database.
The message is delivered.
The existing temporary
user’s time stamp, spoken
name, text names, and
first extension DN are
updated.
The message is delivered.
The existing permanent
user’s time stamp and
spoken name are updated.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Remote voice users
9-23
Adding temporary remote voice users using RVU Propagation via Enterprise Networking
Limitations
The following are limitations of the RVU Propagation via
Enterprise Networking feature:
•
•
•
•
•
Users at remote sites are added to your system as
temporary remote voice users only when messages are
received from them.
Remote voice users who do not send network messages
will not be added as remote voice users even if they are
regularly name-dialed or have a lot of messages sent to
them.
For a description of how to work around this limitation, see
“Application 2: Seeding temporary users” on page 9-25.
No operational measurements are collected for remote
voice users.
If the sender’s site does not have mailbox numbers that
match the dialing plan, the call sender and name dialing
features are not available.
Additions and updates of temporary remote voice users is
blocked during the nightly audit.
Only 18 characters of the remote voice users text name will
be sent.
WHEN
THEN
the first and last names are 18
characters or less
the first and last names of the
user are sent.
the last name and initials are
18 characters or less
the last name and initials of the
user are sent.
the last name only is 18
characters or less
only the last name is sent.
the last name is more than 18 only the last name is sent and is
characters long
truncated to 18 characters.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-24
Remote voice users
Adding remote voice users using RVU Propagation via Bulk Provisioning
Adding remote voice users using RVU Propagation via Bulk
Provisioning
Introduction
Bulk Provisioning is a Meridian Mail 12 feature that allows you
to transfer data between Meridian Mail systems using tapes.
One of the ways in which you can use this feature is to copy
local users from a remote site to tape and then to your local user
database as temporary or permanent remote voice users.
Information that is
added/updated
The following user information is added to the local system:
Application 1:
Provisioning
permanent users
You can use this feature to add a large number of permanent
remote voice users to your local user database. This eliminates
the need to add each user manually.
•
•
•
•
•
the user’s entire name
the user’s mailbox
the user’s primary DN
the user’s personal verification (spoken name)
the user’s department
The other benefit over adding each user manually, is that the
personal verifications (spoken names) that users have recorded
in their own voice will be used. This means that you no longer
have to record users’ personal verifications at the administration
terminal.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Remote voice users
9-25
Adding remote voice users using RVU Propagation via Bulk Provisioning
Application 2: Seeding RVU Propagation via Bulk provisioning
temporary users
You can use bulk provisioning to initially add temporary remote
voice users in a batch as the network is set up. In this way, all
the users at a remote site could be made available at one time.
RVU Propagation via Enterprise Networking
Once users have been added using bulk provisioning, you can
use RVU Propagation via Enterprise Networking to maintain
the database of temporary users.
This means that any additional temporary remote voice users
will automatically be added on an as-needed basis. Over time,
the less frequently used temporary remote voice users will be
deleted during the nightly audit to lessen the system load. Only
regularly accessed temporary users will be kept on the system.
Application 3:
Selective seeding of
temporary users
In Application 2, you use RVU Propagation via Bulk
Provisioning to seed a large number of temporary remote voice
users.
If you want to add a selective (smaller) subset of remote voice
users to your system, you can do the following.
1.
Compose a voice message to the users you want to add as
remote voice users to your system.
2.
Tag the message for acknowledgment.
3.
Send the message.
When the read message acknowledgment comes back, the
users are added as temporary remote voice users.
See also
Standard 1.0
For information about how to use the bulk provisioning feature,
see Chapter 34, “Bulk provisioning”.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-26
Remote voice users
Adding remote voice users using RVU Propagation via Bulk Provisioning
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 9
Remote voice users
Section C:
9-27
Finding remote voice users
In this section
Standard 1.0
Accessing the Find Remote Voice Users screen
9-28
The Find Remote Voice Users screen
9-29
Wildcard characters
9-32
Finding, listing, and printing remote voice users
9-34
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-28
Remote voice users
Accessing the Find Remote Voice Users screen
Accessing the Find Remote Voice Users screen
Introduction
You fill in your search criteria in the Find Remote Voice Users
screen. You can then choose to print or list (on screen) the users
that are found. If you choose to view the list on screen, you can
then select a user in order to view, modify, or delete the user.
Procedure
To access the Find Local Voice Users screen, follow these
steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select User Administration.
2
Select Remote Voice User.
3
Press the [Find] softkey.
Result: The Find Remote Voice Users screen is displayed.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Remote voice users
9-29
The Find Remote Voice Users screen
The Find Remote Voice Users screen
Introduction
By entering what you know about the user or subset of users
you want to find, Meridian Mail will search the database and
return a list of remote voice users that meet the criteria you have
specified.
The screen
This is the Find Remote Voice Users screen.
Field descriptions
This table describes the fields in the Find Remote Voice Users
screen.
Mailbox Number
Description
Use this field to find users within a certain range of
consecutive mailbox numbers or a particular user.
To find a range of mailbox numbers, use the
appropriate wildcards.
The mailbox number must include the network
prefix of the remote site.
Maximum
Length
Standard 1.0
You can enter up to 28 characters.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-30
Remote voice users
The Find Remote Voice Users screen
Last Name
Description
Use this field (in combination with the first name
field) if you want to find a particular user, or alone
to find all users with a particular last name.
Use wildcards if you are unsure of the exact
spelling.
Default
Blank (finds users with any last name)
First Name
Description
Use this field (in combination with the last name
field) to find a particular user, or alone to find all
remote voice users with a particular first name.
Use wildcards if you are unsure of the spelling.
Default
Blank (finds users with any first name)
Department
Description
Use this field to find users that belong to a
particular department.
Use wildcard characters if you are unsure of the
exact name or spelling, or if you want to find users
in a number of similarly named departments.
Default
Blank (finds users in any department)
Extension Number (DN)
Description
Use this field if you want to find users with a
particular primary extension DN. Use wildcards to
find users within a range of DNs.
Default
Blank (finds users with any extension DN)
Personal Verification Status
Standard 1.0
Description
Use this field to find users who do not have, or
have, a recorded personal verification.
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, Not Recorded, Recorded
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January 1998
Remote voice users
9-31
The Find Remote Voice Users screen
User Type
Standard 1.0
Description
Use this field to find either temporary users or
permanent users.
Default
Any
Valid Options
Any, Permanent, Temporary
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January 1998
9-32
Remote voice users
Wildcard characters
Wildcard characters
Introduction
You can use wildcards in most of the fields in the Find Remote
Voice Users screen in order to find a subset of users.
Definition:
wildcard
A wildcard is a character that is used in a search string to
represent an unknown or variable character or string of
characters.
Types of wildcards
There are two wildcards that you can use.
Where you can use
wildcards
Standard 1.0
Wildcard
Description
_
The underscore (_) replaces a single character.
+
The plus sign (+) replaces a string of characters.
You can enter wildcards in the following fields:
•
•
•
•
•
Mailbox Number
Last Name
First Name
Department
Extension Number (DN)
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Remote voice users
9-33
Wildcard characters
Examples
The following examples show how wildcards can be used to
find a range of users.
You enter
Result
“6321210_” in the
All mailboxes in the range 63212100 to
Mailbox Number field
63212109 are found.
(6321 is the ESN prefix of
the remote site).
Standard 1.0
“7_99” in the Extension
Number field.
Users with the following extension
DNs are found: 7099, 7199, 7299,
7399, 7499, 7599, 7699, 7799, 7899,
7999.
“3213+” in the Mailbox
Number field.
All mailboxes beginning with 3213 are
found.
“+Engineering” in the
Department field.
Users belonging to all engineering
departments are found (such as
Software Engineering, Hardware
Engineering, Information
Engineering).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-34
Remote voice users
Finding, listing, and printing remote voice users
Finding, listing, and printing remote voice users
Purpose
Use the find function to
•
•
•
list (on screen) or print the found users
view or modify any of the found users
delete any of the found users
Specifying search
criteria
You only need to change a field if that field is part of your
search criteria. All other fields should be left so that they
display their default setting (blank or Any).
Network format
The mailbox numbers and DNs that are listed or printed are
displayed in network format.
This means that any necessary network prefixes or steering
codes are included as part of the DN or mailbox number.
Examples
If the dialing plan is ESN, you would see DNs like 62334433
where 6233 is the ESN prefix of the remote site and 4433 is the
local DN.
If the dialing plan is CDP, you would see DNs like 54433,
where 54 is the steering code of the site to which the user
belongs.
Examples of use
Here are some examples of how you can use the Find function.
You can
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
find Cameron in the Technology department
find an employee by last name only when you are not sure
whether they go under Elizabeth, Liz, or Beth as a first
name
find any users who have not yet recorded a personal
verification
find all users in the Documentation department, so that they
can be reassigned to the new Information Products
department
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Remote voice users
9-35
Finding, listing, and printing remote voice users
Procedure
To find a remote voice user (or subset of users), follow these
steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select User Administration.
2
Select Remote Voice User.
3
Press the [Find] softkey.
Result: The Find Remote Voice Users screen is displayed.
4
Fill in the necessary fields in order to define your search
criteria.
Note: Field descriptions begin on page 9-29.
5
Standard 1.0
List or print the users that match the search criteria.
IF you want to
THEN
list the users that match the search criteria
go to step 6.
print the users that match the search
criteria
go to step 9.
cancel the search
press [Exit].
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-36
Remote voice users
Finding, listing, and printing remote voice users
Step Action
6
Press the [List] softkey.
Result: The List of Remote Voice Users screen is displayed.
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7
Do you want to view, modify, or delete a local voice user or
record a personal verification?
•
•
8
Standard 1.0
If yes, go to step 8.
If no, press [Exit] to return to the Find Remote Voice Users
screen.
Select the user by moving your cursor to the user’s name and
pressing the Spacebar.
IF you want to
THEN press
AND go to
view or modify a user
[View/Modify]
page 9-40.
delete a user
[Delete]
page 9-45.
record a personal
verification for the user
[Voice]
page 9-19.
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January 1998
Remote voice users
9-37
Finding, listing, and printing remote voice users
Step Action
9
Press the [Print] softkey.
Result: The Printing softkeys are displayed.
10
Standard 1.0
Do you want to continue printing?
•
If yes, press the [Continue Printing] softkey.
Note: Once printing has started, you can stop it at any time
by pressing the [Cancel Printing] softkey.
•
If no, press the [Cancel Printing] softkey.
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January 1998
9-38
Remote voice users
Finding, listing, and printing remote voice users
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Remote voice users
Section D:
9-39
Modifying and deleting remote
voice users
In this section
Viewing and modifying remote voice users
9-40
Manually deleting remote voice users
9-45
How temporary remote voice users are automatically deleted 9-49
from the system
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-40
Remote voice users
Viewing and modifying remote voice users
Viewing and modifying remote voice users
Introduction
When to use
You may or may not know the mailbox number of the user you
want to view or modify. Use this table to decide which
procedure to follow to access the View/Modify Remote Voice
User screen.
IF you
THEN follow
know the user’s mailbox number
the procedure on this page.
do not know the users’s mailbox
number
the procedure on page 9-41.
Use this procedure when you need to
•
•
•
Accessing the screen
when you know the
mailbox number
modify user information (such as last name or department)
make a temporary user permanent
make a permanent user temporary
To access the View/Modify Remote Voice User screen directly,
follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select User Administration.
2
Select Remote Voice User.
3
Press the [View/Modify] softkey.
Result: You are prompted for a mailbox number.
4
Enter the user’s mailbox number (including the access code
and network prefix) and press Return.
Result: The View/Modify Remote Voice User screen is
displayed. See page 9-43.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Remote voice users
9-41
Viewing and modifying remote voice users
Finding a remote
voice user and
accessing the screen
To find the remote voice user you want to modify when you do
not know the mailbox number, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select User Administration.
2
Select Remote Voice User.
3
Press [Find].
Result: The Find Remote Voice Users screen is displayed.
4
Enter the information you know about the user.
Examples: Last Name, First Name, Department
If you are not sure of your information, or want to see all the
remote voice users listed, go to step 7.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
9-42
Remote voice users
Viewing and modifying remote voice users
Step Action
5
Press [List].
Result: The List of Remote Voice Users screen is displayed.
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6
If you do not see the user you are looking for, scroll down using
the down arrow key or the Page Down key to see more users.
7
Select the user you want to view or modify by moving your
cursor to the user’s name and pressing the Spacebar.
8
Press [View/Modify].
Result: The View/Modify Remote Voice User screen is
displayed. See page 9-43.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Remote voice users
9-43
Viewing and modifying remote voice users
The View/Modify
Remote Voice User
screen
This is the View/Modify Remote Voice User screen.
Part 1
Part 2
Field descriptions
Standard 1.0
The fields in this screen are the same as in the Add Remote
Voice User screen. For field descriptions, see “The Add Remote
Voice User screen” on page 9-12.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-44
Remote voice users
Viewing and modifying remote voice users
Procedure
To view or modify a remote voice user, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The View/Modify Remote Voice User screen
Step Action
1
Change the user’s last name if necessary.
2
Change the user’s department if necessary.
3
Change the extension DNs associated with the user if
necessary.
4
Do you want to record a personal verification for the user?
•
•
5
Do you want to allow name dialing by external callers?
•
•
6
7
If yes, select Yes in the Name Dialable by External Callers
field.
If no, select No in the Name Dialable by External Callers
field.
Change the user type if necessary.
IF you want to
THEN select
make a temporary user
permanent
Permanent in the User Type
field.
make a permanent user
temporary
Temporary in the User Type
field.
Do you want to save the user with the current information?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, see “Recording a personal verification for a remote
voice user” on page 9-19.
If no, go to step 5.
If yes, press [Save].
If no, press [Cancel] or make any necessary changes and
press [Save].
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Remote voice users
9-45
Manually deleting remote voice users
Manually deleting remote voice users
Introduction
Deleting a user when
you know the mailbox
number
You may or may not know the mailbox number of the user you
want to delete. Use this table to decide which procedure to
follow to access the Delete Remote Voice User screen and then
delete a user.
IF you
THEN follow
know the user’s mailbox number
the procedure on this page.
do not know the users’s mailbox
number
the procedure on page 9-46.
To access the Delete Remote Voice User screen directly, follow
these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select User Administration.
2
Select Remote Voice User.
3
Press the [Delete] softkey.
Result: You are prompted for a mailbox number.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
9-46
Remote voice users
Manually deleting remote voice users
Step Action
4
Enter the user’s mailbox number (including the access code
and network prefix) and press Return.
Result: The Delete Remote Voice User screen is displayed.
5
Is this the user you want to delete?
•
•
6
If yes, go to step 6.
If no, press [Cancel].
Obtain the correct mailbox number or use the next
procedure on page 9-46 to find the user.
Press the [OK to Delete] softkey.
Result: The user is deleted and you are prompted for another
mailbox number.
7
Do you want to delete another remote voice user?
•
•
Deleting a remote
voice user when you
do not know the
mailbox number
If yes, repeat steps 5 to 6 until you have deleted all remote
voice users that you need to delete at this time.
If no, press the [Cancel] softkey.
To find the remote voice user you want to delete when you do
not know the mailbox number, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
Standard 1.0
1
Select User Administration.
2
Select Remote Voice User.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Remote voice users
9-47
Manually deleting remote voice users
Step Action
3
Press [Find].
Result: The Find Remote Voice Users screen is displayed.
4
Enter the information you know about the user.
Examples: Last Name, First Name, Department
If you are not sure of your information, or want to see all the
remote voice users listed, go to step 5.
5
Press [List].
Result: The List of Remote Voice Users screen is displayed.
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Standard 1.0
Select the user you want to delete by moving your cursor to the
user’s name and pressing the Spacebar.
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January 1998
9-48
Remote voice users
Manually deleting remote voice users
Step Action
7
Press [Delete].
Result: The Delete Remote Voice User screen is displayed.
8
Is this the user you want to delete?
•
•
9
If yes, go to step 9.
If no, press [Cancel].
Press the [OK to Delete] softkey.
Result: The user is deleted and you are prompted for another
mailbox number.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Remote voice users
9-49
How temporary remote voice users are automatically deleted from the system
How temporary remote voice users are automatically
deleted from the system
Introduction
Temporary remote voice users are automatically deleted by the
system during nightly audits.
Timestamps
When a temporary remote voice user is added, the date and time
at which the user was added is recorded. This is the timestamp.
When the timestamp is updated
This timestamp is updated whenever
•
•
•
the user is modified via User Administration
an Enterprise Networking message is received from the
remote voice user
a remote voice user’s personal verification or mailbox
number (when no verification is recorded) is played
The remote notification is played whenever
•
•
•
•
•
the header of a message from the remote voice user is
played
a message is composed to the remote voice user
the envelope of a message received from a remote voice
user is played (when the local user presses 7-2)
the remote voice user is name-dialed or name-addressed
the recipient of a network message uses call sender to call
the remote voice user back
Where timestamp information is displayed
The timestamp is displayed in the View/Modify Remote Voice
User screen and the List of Remote Voice Users screen in the
Last Access Time field.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
9-50
Remote voice users
How temporary remote voice users are automatically deleted from the system
The cutoff limit
There is a maximum number of temporary remote voice users
that can be added to the system. Up to 1000 temporary remote
voice users can be added to 1 and 2 node systems. For systems
that have 3 or more nodes, up to 10 000 temporary remote voice
users can be added. This value can be modified in the Network
Configuration screen. The default maximum is 1000.
Whenever the total number of temporary remote voice users
exceeds 75% of the cutoff limit, the nightly audit is run to delete
some remote voice users.
However, temporary remote voice users can still be added
(using any method) up to the 100% mark. If this 100% limit is
reached, no more remote voice users can be added to the system
until after some temporary users are deleted by the audit.
During the nightly audit, the least recently used users (those
with the oldest timestamps) are deleted until the number of
remaining temporary voice users equals 50% of the cutoff limit.
Example
The cutoff limit is 2000 temporary remote voice users. On the
14th day (as marked by point A), the number of temporary
remote voice users reaches the 75% mark (1500). That night the
nightly audit is run and the number of temporary remote voice
users is reduced to 1000 (50%).
Number of temporary
remote voice users
The nightly audit
Cutoff Limit
2000
A
75% of Cutoff Limit
1500
50% of Cutoff Limit
1000
0
10
20
Time in Days
0
Users removed by Nightly Audit
Nightly Audit is not run
Nightly Audit is run
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 10
Directory entry users
In this chapter
Overview
10-2
What is a directory entry user?
10-3
The Add Directory Entry User screen
10-4
Adding directory entry users
10-7
Recording a personal verification
10-8
The Find Directory Entry Users screen
10-10
Finding directory entry users
10-12
The List of Directory Entry Users screen
10-13
Printing directory entry users
10-15
Viewing or modifying directory entry users
10-16
Deleting directory entry users
10-18
10-2
Directory entry users
Overview
Overview
Introduction
The User Administration screens provide the administrator with
the facilities to add, find, view/modify, and delete directory
entry users.
This chapter explains who directory entry users are and how to
administer them.
User interface
Standard 1.0
Directory entry users are available in the VMUIF interface but
lack name-dial capability (which is specific to the MMUI
interface).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Directory entry users
10-3
What is a directory entry user?
What is a directory entry user?
Concept
Directory entry users are users registered in the Meridian Mail
directory who do not have mailboxes and, therefore, do not
have access to voice messaging functions. They can, however,
be referenced by such features as name dialing and automated
attendant functions such as voice menus (if they are installed on
your system).
Who should be a
directory entry user
There are several reasons why users might not have a mailbox
associated with their extensions.
•
•
Feature implications
The user may not require or want a mailbox, or perhaps the
user is not authorized to have a mailbox.
Another common reason is that a user shares the same
phone with other users. (In other words, you can associate a
number of directory entry users with the same DN. This is
unlike local voice users in that each local voice user must
have a unique primary DN and mailbox number.)
Because directory entry users do not have mailboxes, they do
not have access to voice messaging functions (such as compose
and send) or other features such as Outcalling, AMIS
Networking, and so on.
Directory entry users are included in the Meridian Mail
directory. Therefore, you can dial those users using Thru-Dial
features such as name dialing and automated attendant.
For example, if three people (say Tom, Dick, and Harriet) share
the same phone, then another user can call Tom using the name
dialing feature instead of dialing their extension number.
Similarly, an external caller can ring a directory entry user’s
phone through a voice menu or automated attendant. If the
external caller does not remember Tom’s extension, the caller
can still dial the phone by entering Tom’s name.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
10-4
Directory entry users
The Add Directory Entry User screen
The Add Directory Entry User screen
Introduction
You may add directory entry users through the Add Directory
Entry User screen.
The screen
Following is an example of the Add Directory Entry User
screen.
Field descriptions
The following table describes the fields in the Add Directory
User screen.
Last Name
Standard 1.0
Description
This is the last name of the directory entry user. Be
sure to fill in this field and ensure correct spelling
because the name dialing feature uses this
information.
Default
Blank
Maximum
length
41 alphanumeric characters
Special
characters
This field accepts any characters with the
exception of the restricted characters “+”, “#”, and
“?”. You should limit yourself to alphanumeric
characters for name dialing to work properly.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Directory entry users
10-5
The Add Directory Entry User screen
First Name
Description
This is the first name of the directory entry user.
Default
Blank
Maximum
length
21 alphanumeric characters
Special
characters
Same as Last Name
Initials
Description
These are the initials of the directory entry user.
You may use initials to distinguish users with
identical first and last names. These initials,
however, cannot be used in name dialing.
If you do not enter any initials, the system will
automatically fill in this field with the first initial
of the user’s first name.
Maximum
length
5 alphanumeric characters
Department
Description
This is the department of the directory entry user.
You can retrieve users on the basis of their
department when using the Find Directory Entry
Users function (described later in this chapter).
Only the first 26 characters of the department are
displayed in the List of Directory Entry Users
screen. Therefore, make sure that department
names are unique based on the first 26 characters
of their names.
Standard 1.0
Note
This field is not available in the VMUIF interface.
Default
Initially blank. After the first user, this field
defaults to the department entered for the last user
added.
Maximum
length
31 alphanumeric characters
Special
characters
Same as Last Name
System Administration Guide
January 1998
10-6
Directory entry users
The Add Directory Entry User screen
Extension DNs
Description
This is the user’s extension number(s). A user can
be associated with up to three extensions.
Default
This field defaults to the primary extension.
ATTENTION
Make sure that none of these DNs conflict
with any distribution list numbers. If a
distribution list and a directory entry user
share the same number, the distribution list
number will take precedence over a directory
entry user number during compose. The
message will not be sent to the directory entry
user.
Personal Verification Recorded (Voice)
Description
If a personal verification has been recorded for this
user, this field displays Yes. No indicates that no
verification is currently recorded. The setting in
this field changes when the [Voice] softkey is used
to record a verification.
The personal verification is played when the user’s
phone is dialed using Thru-Dial service (including
name dialing). It informs callers that they have
reached the correct phone.
Name Dialable by External Callers
Standard 1.0
Description
When the field is set to Yes, external callers can
reach the user through the name dialing feature.
This may occur when a caller reaches a voice
menu and is prompted to enter an extension or the
name of the person they want to speak to. (Internal
callers can always use name dialing to call
directory entry users.)
Note
This field is not available in the VMUIF interface.
Default
Yes
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Directory entry users
10-7
Adding directory entry users
Adding directory entry users
Introduction
Use the following procedure to add new directory entry users.
Up to three extensions Like local voice users, each directory entry user can be
associated with up to three different extensions. Primary
extension numbers do not have to be unique. A number of users
can share the same extension.
Procedure
To add a new directory entry user, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Choose User Administration.
2
Choose Directory Entry User.
3
Press the [Add] softkey.
4
Enter the extension number and press <Return>.
5
Enter the Last Name of the new user.
6
Enter the First Name of the new user.
7
If the interface is MMUI, enter the Department of the new user.
8
Enter the Extension Number(s) of the new user.
9
Do you want to record a personal verification?
•
•
10
If the interface is MMUI, do you want external callers to be able
to name dial this user?
•
•
11
If yes, set the Name dialable by external callers field to Yes.
If no, set the Name dialable by external callers field to No.
Do you want to save the user?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, see “Recording a personal verification” on page 10-8.
If no, go to step 10.
If yes, press [Save].
If no, press [Cancel].
System Administration Guide
January 1998
10-8
Directory entry users
Recording a personal verification
Recording a personal verification
Introduction
The administrator can use this procedure to record a personal
verification on behalf of a directory entry user.
Procedure
To record a personal verification, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Add Directory Entry User screen, or the View/
Modify Directory Entry User screen
Step Action
1
Put the cursor on the Personal Verification Recorded (Voice)
field.
2
Press the [Voice] softkey.
3
Enter the extension of the phone you will use to record the
verification and press <Return>.
Result: The phone rings.
4
Pick up the receiver.
Result: The recording softkeys are displayed.
5
Press the [Record] softkey.
6
At the sound of the beep, speak the user’s (and, optionally, the
user’s extension).
Example: “Billy McGee at extension 8123.”
7
Standard 1.0
Press the [Stop] key to stop recording.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Directory entry users
10-9
Recording a personal verification
Step Action
8
Do you want to verify the recording?
•
•
9
Do you want to rerecord the verification?
•
•
10
Standard 1.0
If yes, press the [Play] softkey.
If no, go to step 10.
If yes, press the [Delete] softkey to delete the current
recording and repeat steps 5 to 8.
If no, go to step 10.
Do you need to record personal verifications for any other
users?
•
If yes, press the [Return] softkey and do not hang up the
receiver.
The next time you press [Voice] to record another
verification, you will not have to reenter the phone extension
since the line has not been disconnected.
•
If no, press the [Disconnect] softkey and hang up the
receiver.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
10-10
Directory entry users
The Find Directory Entry Users screen
The Find Directory Entry Users screen
Introduction
You can locate a directory entry user by extension number or
name using the Find function.
The screen
Following is an example of the Find Directory Entry Users
screen.
Field descriptions
The following table describes the fields in the Find Directory
Users screen.
Last Name
Description
Fill in this field if you want to retrieve a particular
user and remember only the last name. Use
wildcard characters (“+”, “?”, and”_”) if you are
unsure of the spelling.
First Name
Description
Standard 1.0
Fill in this field if you want to retrieve a particular
user and you remember only the first name. If you
also know the last name, the first name will narrow
the search (if a number of users have the same last
name). Use wildcard characters (“+”, “?”, and”_”)
if you are unsure of the spelling.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Directory entry users
10-11
The Find Directory Entry Users screen
Department
Description
This field can help you narrow down a search even
further if, for example, you can remember only the
first or last name of the user you want to find.
You can also use this field if you want to retrieve
all users that belong to a particular department.
Use wildcard characters if you are unsure of the
spelling or the exact name of the department.
Extension DNs
Description
This is the user’s primary extension DN. Enter the
user’s DN if it is known. Use wildcard characters
(“+”, “?”, and”_”) to retrieve a subset of users in a
particular range of DNs.
Personal Verification Recorded (Voice)
Description
Standard 1.0
Set this field to Not_Recorded to retrieve all
directory users who do not have a recorded
personal verification. Since it is a good idea for all
users to have a personal verification, you should
record a verification for the user. If the personal
verification status is not important, make sure that
this field is set to Any (the default).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
10-12
Directory entry users
Finding directory entry users
Finding directory entry users
Introduction
The [Find] softkey can be used to search for a directory entry
user, depending upon your search parameters.
Procedure
To access the Find Directory Entry User screen, follow these
steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Choose User Administration.
2
Choose Directory Entry User.
3
Press the [Find] softkey.
Result: The Find Directory Entry User screen is displayed.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Directory entry users
10-13
The List of Directory Entry Users screen
The List of Directory Entry Users screen
Introduction
The List of Directory Entry Users screen appears when the
[List] softkey on the Find Directory Entry Users screen is used.
It provides a list of user names matching the search parameters
entered in the Find Directory Entry Users screen.
Screen
Following is an example of the List of Directory Entry Users
screen.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
10-14
Directory entry users
The List of Directory Entry Users screen
Field descriptions
The following table describes the fields in the List of Directory
Entry Users screen.
Name
Description
This is the user’s last name followed by the first
name.
Department
Description
This is the name of the department to which the
user belongs.
Personal Verific. Recorded
Description
Viewing a list of
directory entry users
This field indicates whether or not a spoken name
(personal verification) has been recorded for this
user.
To view a list of directory entry users from your search, follow
this procedure.
Starting Point: The Find Directory Entry Users screen
Step Action
Standard 1.0
1
Fill in the screen with the required search parameters.
2
Press [List] to display the results of the search on the screen.
3
To view or modify a directory entry user, move to the user’s line
and press the <spacebar> to select it.
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January 1998
Directory entry users
10-15
Printing directory entry users
Printing directory entry users
Introduction
The results of your search for an individual or list of directory
entry users can also be printed. Instead of using the [List]
softkey on the Find Directory Entry Users screen, use the [Print]
softkey.
Screen
Following is an example of the Find Directory Entry Users
screen, after being filled out for an individual user.
Procedure
To print out a list of directory entry users from your search,
follow this procedure.
Starting Point: The Find Directory Entry Users screen
Step Action
1
Do you want to print a list of all directory entry users?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, leave all fields blank.
If no, fill in the screen with the required search parameters.
2
Press the [Print] softkey.
3
Ensure the printer is working and press the [Continue Printing]
softkey.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
10-16
Directory entry users
Viewing or modifying directory entry users
Viewing or modifying directory entry users
Introduction
This procedure explains how to view or modify a directory
entry user. Initially, you are prompted for an extension number.
WHEN
THEN
more than one directory entry
user is associated with that
extension
you will see the List of Directory
Entry Users screen (see
page 10-13).
only one directory entry user is
associated with the extension
the View/Modify Directory Entry
User screen is displayed.
Field descriptions
The fields in the View/Modify Directory Entry User screen are
identical to those on the Add Directory Entry User screen,
described on page 10-4.
Procedure
To view or modify a directory entry user, follow this procedure.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Choose User Administration
2
Choose Directory Entry User.
3
Do you know the user’s extension number?
•
•
4
If yes, press the [View/Modify] softkey. Go to step 4.
If no, press, the [Find] softkey.
Enter the extension number.
IF
THEN
more than one user shares the
extension only
the List of Directory Entry
Users screen appears.
Go to step 5.
one user is assigned to the
extension number
the View/Modify
Directory Entry User
screen appears.
Go to step 6.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Directory entry users
10-17
Viewing or modifying directory entry users
Step Action
5
Choose a user by placing the cursor on the user you want to
view or modify. Press the <spacebar> to select the user and
press [View/Modify].
6
Modify the fields as needed.
7
Do you want to record a personal verification?
•
•
8
If yes, go to “Recording a personal verification” on
page 10-8.
If no, go to step 8.
Do you want to save the modified user?
•
If yes, press [Save].
Result: The system saves the modified directory entry user.
You are prompted for another extension number. (Go to step 4
to modify another user.)
•
Standard 1.0
If no, press [Cancel].
Result: Any changes will be discarded. The Directory Entry
User Administration softkeys screen or the List of Directory
Entry Users screen is displayed.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
10-18
Directory entry users
Deleting directory entry users
Deleting directory entry users
Introduction
This procedure explains how to delete a directory entry user.
The Delete Directory
Enter User screen
Following is an example of the Delete Directory Entry User
screen.
Procedure
To delete a directory entry user once you have selected the user
from the list of users, follow this procedure.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Choose User Administration.
2
Choose Directory Entry User.
3
Do you know the user’s extension DN?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, press the [Delete] softkey and go to step 6.
If no, press the [Find] softkey.
Result: The Find Directory Entry Users screen is displayed.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Directory entry users
10-19
Deleting directory entry users
Step Action
4
Enter the extension number.
IF
THEN
more than one user
shares the extension only
the List of Directory Entry
Users screen appears.
Go to step 5.
one user is assigned to
the extension number
the View/Modify Directory
Entry Users screen
appears.
Go to step 6.
5
Choose a user by placing the cursor on the user you want to
delete. Press the <spacebar> to select the user and press
[Delete].
6
Do you want to delete the user?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, press [OK to Delete].
If no, press [Cancel].
System Administration Guide
January 1998
10-20
Directory entry users
Deleting directory entry users
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 11
Distribution lists
In this chapter
Overview
11-2
Understanding distribution lists
11-3
Limitations on distribution lists
11-4
Accessing the Distribution Lists softkeys screen
11-7
Adding a system distribution list
11-9
Finding and viewing a system distribution list
11-17
Modifying a system distribution list
11-22
Printing a system distribution list
11-24
Deleting a system distribution list
11-26
11-2
Distribution lists
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This chapter provides an overview of distribution lists. It
explains what a distribution list is and briefly sets out the
differences between system and personal distribution lists.
It also provides information and procedures for administering
system distribution lists:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
adding a system distribution list
finding an existing system distribution list
viewing a system distribution list
modifying a system distribution list
printing a system distribution list
deleting a system distribution list
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Distribution lists
11-3
Understanding distribution lists
Understanding distribution lists
Introduction
A distribution list is a mailing list that enables you to send the
same message to a number of people. After you add and save a
distribution list, you can reuse it whenever you need to send
messages to the same group or groups of people.
Adding a distribution list involves assigning a unique number
and title to the list and specifying the mailbox numbers that you
want to include on it. If you choose to, you can also make a
voice recording of the list’s title.
When you compose a message, you specify the distribution list
number as you would any other mailbox number. Then when
you send your message, it is deposited in every mailbox
included in the list.
There are two types of distribution lists: system distribution lists
and personal distribution lists.
This chapter contains information about administering system
distribution lists. Personal distribution lists are explained in the
Meridian Mail Voice Messaging User Guide (P0839942).
Definition:
system distribution
list
You add a system distribution list through Meridian Mail User
Administration.
You can add any number of system distribution lists, each
containing up to 120 entries.
Definition:
personal distribution
list
Meridian Mail users create personal distribution lists from their
telephone sets.
A user can create up to 9 personal distribution lists, each
containing up to 99 entries.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
11-4
Distribution lists
Limitations on distribution lists
Limitations on distribution lists
Introduction
This topic presents an overview of factors that affect the
creation and use of distribution lists.
Message number and
size
The number of addresses to which a user can successfully send
a message simultaneously depends on the size of the message,
as shown in the following table.
Length of message
Number of addresses
90 minutes voice
up to 290 addresses
60 minutes voice
up to 350 addresses
10 minutes voice
up to 425 addresses
1 minute voice
up to 440 addresses
Note: Each system distribution list is one address, regardless of
the number of entries on the list, while each entry on a personal
distribution list is one address. Therefore, a system distribution
list with 10 entries is 1 address, while a personal distribution
list with 10 entries is 10 addresses.
Restrictions on
distribution list
numbers
The following restrictions are placed on distribution list
numbers:
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
A system distribution list cannot be assigned a number
between 1 and 9. These numbers are reserved for personal
distribution lists.
Each distribution list must have a unique distribution list
number.
A distribution list number must not conflict with any
dialing plan prefixes or codes. (These are explained further
in the description of the List Number field on page 11-12.)
This includes the Network Wide Broadcast Prefix, defined
in the Network Configuration screen.
A distribution list number cannot be the same as any
mailbox number, including the broadcast mailbox number.
The default broadcast mailbox number is 5555.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Distribution lists
11-5
Limitations on distribution lists
•
MMUI restrictions
A distribution list number cannot share a directory entry
user’s DN. If a distribution list number and a directory
entry user number are the same, the distribution list number
takes precedence over the directory entry user number
when a list is composed.
Distribution lists can include the following types of numbers:
•
•
•
mailbox numbers of local voice users (including users at
any location in an NMS network)
mailbox numbers of remote voice users
broadcast mailbox numbers for particular Networking sites
and NMS locations (personal distribution lists only)
To include a mailbox number at an AMIS site, you must have
Meridian Networking installed. You must also define the AMIS
site as a virtual node in the Meridian network. For more
information, refer to the Virtual Node AMIS Installation and
Administration Guide (NTP 555-7001-245).
To include individual users at remote sites in a Meridian
network, you must define them as remote voice users in the
local database.
The following types of numbers do not have mailboxes
associated with them and, therefore, cannot be included in a
distribution list:
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
numbers of directory entry users
remote notification targets
delivery to non-user targets
System Administration Guide
January 1998
11-6
Distribution lists
Limitations on distribution lists
Restrictions on
personal distribution
lists
A personal distribution list can contain up to 99 entries. There
are, however, some limitations on the total number of addresses
to which an outgoing message can be sent using personal
distribution lists. If a user tries to send a message to a number of
distribution lists, he or she may get the following message if the
maximum address size of the message is exceeded: “Your
command cannot be completed at this time. Please try again, or
contact your administrator.” The message is deleted, and the
user is positioned at the next message in the mailbox (or at the
end of the mailbox) and can use other commands normally.
Note: If VMUIF is installed and you want VMUIF subscribers
to be able to address messages to personal distribution lists,
you must define a personal distribution list prefix in the Voice
Messaging Options screen. By default, no prefix is defined.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Distribution lists
11-7
Accessing the Distribution Lists softkeys screen
Accessing the Distribution Lists softkeys screen
Introduction
Many of the administration tasks concerned with distribution
lists begin with the Distribution Lists softkeys screen. These
tasks include the following:
•
•
•
•
adding a distribution list by using the [Add] softkey
adding mailboxes to or removing mailboxes from an
existing distribution list by using the [View/Modify]
softkey
deleting a distribution list by using the [Delete] softkey
finding a distribution list by using the [Find] softkey
followed by the [List] softkey
This topic explains how to get to the Distribution Lists screen.
The Distribution Lists
softkeys screen
Standard 1.0
The following shows an example of the Distribution Lists
softkeys screen.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
11-8
Distribution lists
Accessing the Distribution Lists softkeys screen
Procedure
To go to the Distribution Lists softkeys screen, follow these
steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select User Administration.
2
Select Distribution Lists.
Result: The system displays the Distribution Lists softkeys
screen.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Distribution lists
11-9
Adding a system distribution list
Adding a system distribution list
Introduction
You add a distribution list using the Add Distribution List
screen. Adding a distribution list involves assigning a unique
number and title to the list and specifying the mailbox numbers
that you want to include on it. If you choose to, you can also
make a voice recording of the list’s title.
When you compose a message, you specify the distribution list
number as you would any other mailbox number. Then when
you send your message, it is deposited in every mailbox
included in the list.
If you assign numbers to distribution lists that are of a different
length from those you use as mailbox numbers, you are able to
avoid confusion or conflict with your mailbox numbers.
Although making a voice recording of the list title is optional,
the voice recording has the same purpose as a personal
verification. That is, it is played when a distribution list number
is entered when addressing messages. The list title describes
who is included in the list or the purpose of the list. This makes
it easier to identify whether you have entered the correct list
number when you address messages.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
11-10
Distribution lists
Adding a system distribution list
The Add Distribution
List screen
Standard 1.0
The following shows an example of the Add Distribution List
screen.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Distribution lists
11-11
Adding a system distribution list
Field descriptions
The following table describes the fields in the Add Distribution
List screen.
Location Prefix
Description
This number identifies the location where the
mailboxes on the list (or those to be added to the
list) reside.
Note: The system displays this field only if
Network Message Service (NMS) is installed.
If you do not specify a location prefix, the system
defaults to your current administration context. See
“Setting the default administration context for
NMS” on page 8-8.
Default
There is no default.
Valid range
There is no default range.
Location Name
Standard 1.0
Description
This field indicates the name of the location that
corresponds to the location prefix. (See the
description above for the Location Prefix field.)
Default
There is no default.
Valid range
There is no default range.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
11-12
Distribution lists
Adding a system distribution list
List Number
Description
This value uniquely identifies the distribution list.
The list number cannot be the same as the
following numbers:
• personal distribution list numbers
The single digits 1 to 9 are reserved for personal
distribution lists.
• any mailbox number, including the broadcast
mailbox number
The default broadcast mailbox number is 5555.
• a directory entry user’s DN
If a distribution list and a directory entry user
share a number, the distribution list number takes
precedence over the directory entry user number
when a list is composed.
• the name dialing prefix
The default name dialing prefix is 11. Do not use
11 to number a list unless you have changed the
name dialing prefix in the Voice Messaging
Options screen.
• the Delivery to Non-User prefix
• another distribution list number
• any dialing plan access code prefixes
• the Network-Wide Broadcast prefix
Standard 1.0
Default
There is no default. You can use any valid number.
Valid range
from 10 to 999999999999999999 (there are 18 9s;
only digits are allowed)
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Distribution lists
11-13
Adding a system distribution list
List Title
Description
This is the title of the distribution list. It can be up
to 41 characters in length. Do not use “?”, “+”, or
“__” (underscore) which are wildcard characters.
The title can be used to address the distribution list
by name when you are composing and sending a
message to mailboxes on the distribution list.
Default
There is no default value.
Valid range
There is no default range.
List Title Recorded (Voice)
Description
This read-only field indicates whether a voice
recording of the list title has been made. It is a
good idea to record a title for each distribution list.
This helps you to identify the list after you have
entered its number when composing a message.
Choose a name that uniquely identifies this list.
This field changes only when you use the [Voice]
softkey to record or delete a list title.
Default
No
Valid range
There is no default range.
Mailbox Numbers
Description
In these fields, you type the mailbox numbers of
the users you want to include on the distribution
list. Mailbox numbers can be up to 18 digits in
length.
If Meridian Networking is installed and enabled,
you can enter up to 28 characters in each of these
fields. You can include up to 120 mailbox numbers
in a system distribution list.
To add more mailbox fields, use the [More Fields]
softkey.
Default
These fields are blank.
Valid range
from 10 to 999999999999999999 (there are 18 9s)
Note: These must be valid local and remote voice
users.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
11-14
Distribution lists
Adding a system distribution list
Adding a system
distribution list
To add a system distribution list, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Distribution Lists softkeys screen
Step Action
1
Select the [Add] softkey.
Result: The system prompts for a distribution list number.
2
Type a valid number.
Note: For information about valid distribution list numbers, see
the description of the List Number field on page 11-12.
Result: The system displays the Add Distribution List screen.
3
Type a name for the list in the List Title field.
4
Type the mailbox numbers of the users you want to include in
the distribution list.
Note: If you are including the mailbox number of a remote
voice user, type the network prefix (ESN prefix or CDP steering
code), followed by the mailbox number.
The system informs you if any of the numbers are not valid.
5
To add more mailboxes, use the [More Fields] softkey.
Note: The system draws one row of fields each time you use
this softkey. You can include up to 120 mailboxes in a system
distribution list.
6
Make a voice recording of the title of the distribution list.
Note: This step is optional. For more information, see
“Recording a distribution list title” on page 11-15.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Distribution lists
11-15
Adding a system distribution list
Step Action
7
8
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
save your distribution list
go to step 8.
add another distribution list
go to step 8.
exit without saving your
distribution list
go to step 9.
To save your distribution list, use the [Save] softkey.
Result: The system saves your distribution list. If your
distribution list is long, it may take a few moments to save.
The system then prompts you to enter a number for a new
distribution list. To add another distribution list, type a valid
number, and go to step 3.
Note: For information about valid distribution list numbers, see
the description of the List Number field on page 11-12.
9
To exit without saving your distribution list, use the [Cancel]
softkey.
Result: The system does not save the distribution list, and you
are returned to the Distribution Lists softkeys screen.
Recording a
distribution list title
To make a voice recording of the title of a distribution list,
follow these steps.
Note: This procedure is optional.
Starting Point: The Distribution Lists softkeys screen
Step Action
1
Select the [View/Modify] softkey.
Result: The system prompts for a distribution list number.
2
Type the number of the distribution list for which you are
recording a title.
3
Select the [Voice] softkey.
Result: The system prompts for an extension number.
4
Type the extension number of the telephone set you are going
to use to record the title, and press <Return>.
Result: The phone rings.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
11-16
Distribution lists
Adding a system distribution list
Step Action
5
Pick up the telephone handset.
Result: The system displays the recording softkeys.
6
Select the [Record] softkey.
Result: The system displays a message on the console
requesting you to make the recording.
The system displays the [Stop] softkey in place of the [Record]
softkey.
You hear a beep through the telephone receiver.
7
At the beep, say the list title into the telephone handset.
8
To stop recording, use the [Stop] softkey.
Result: The recording stops automatically, and the system
again displays the recording softkeys.
9
If you are satisfied with the recording, select either the
[Disconnect] softkey or the [Return] softkey.
Note: When you use the [Return] softkey, the line is not
disconnected unless you hang up the receiver. This means that
if you decide to rerecord or listen to the recording, you do not
have to type the telephone extension again after selecting the
[Voice] softkey.
When you use the [Disconnect] softkey, the line is
disconnected, and if you select the [Voice] softkey to access
the recording softkeys again, you must again type the
telephone extension.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Distribution lists
11-17
Finding and viewing a system distribution list
Finding and viewing a system distribution list
Introduction
The Find function generates a list of distribution lists. Use this
function to locate a particular distribution list or a subset of lists.
Use the List function to view onscreen the distribution lists that
you retrieve. You can then view, modify, or delete these
distribution lists.
The Find Distribution
Lists screen
The following shows an example of the Find Distribution Lists
screen. In this example, the user is searching for a list by name.
Field descriptions
For explanations of the fields in the Find Distribution Lists
screen, see “Field descriptions” on page 11-11.
The fields are identical to those in the Add Distribution List
screen, except that you can use the wildcards “ +”, “_”, and “?”
to retrieve subsets of lists.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
11-18
Distribution lists
Finding and viewing a system distribution list
Using wildcards
If you do not know the name or number of a list you want to
retrieve but do not want to retrieve all available distribution
lists, you can use wildcards to narrow your search.
Types of wildcards
There are three wildcards that you can use.
Wildcard
Description
_
The underscore (_) replaces a single character.
+
The plus sign (+) replaces a string of characters.
?
The question mark (?) produces a “sound match”. It
finds distribution lists with names that sound alike.
Examples
The following examples show how wildcards can be used to
find a subset of distribution lists.
Standard 1.0
You enter
Result
“2_” in the List Number
field
All lists in the range 20 to 29 are found.
“3+” in the List Number
field
All distribution lists beginning with 3
are found.
“+Engineering” in the
List Name field
All distribution lists that end in
“Engineering” are found (such as
Software Engineering, Hardware
Engineering, Information
Engineering).
Braymore?
All distribution lists with names that
sound like Braymore (Breymore,
Braemore), are found.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Distribution lists
11-19
Finding and viewing a system distribution list
Finding and viewing a
distribution list
To find a distribution list or a subset of a distribution list, follow
these steps.
Starting Point: The Distribution Lists softkeys screen
Step Action
1
Select the [Find] softkey.
Result: The system displays the Find Distribution Lists screen.
2
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
find a distribution list
type the complete number or
name of the list.
find a subset of a
distribution list
use wildcard characters to
create a search pattern.
Example: To retrieve all lists
beginning with 1, type 1+ in
the List Number field.
Note: For more information
about wildcards, See “Using
wildcards” on page 11-18.
retrieve a distribution list
whose name you do not
know
3
leave both fields blank.
To view a list of the retrieved distribution lists, use the [List]
softkey.
Result: The system displays the List of Distribution Lists
screen.
Note: The system displays only the first 20 characters of the
name of each retrieved list.
4
Standard 1.0
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
print the retrieved list title or
list entries
go to step 5.
modify a retrieved list
see “Modifying a system
distribution list” on
page 11-22.
delete a retrieved list
see “Deleting a system
distribution list” on
page 11-26.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
11-20
Distribution lists
Finding and viewing a system distribution list
Step Action
5
Use the [Print Titles] softkey or the [Print Entries] softkey,
depending on what you want to print.
IF you want to print
THEN
the titles and list numbers
only
select the [Print Titles]
softkey.
the mailboxes associated
with the retrieved list or lists
select the [Print Entries]
softkey.
Result: The system displays the [Continue Printing] softkey
and the [Cancel Printing] softkey.
It also prompts you to check that the printer is ready.
6
7
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
print the list
go to step 7.
cancel printing
go to step 8.
Select the [Continue Printing] softkey.
Result: The system begins to print the distribution list titles or
entries.
When printing is complete, the system again displays the Find
Distribution Lists screen.
Note: To stop printing at any time, select [Cancel Printing].
8
Select the [Cancel Printing] softkey.
Result: The system cancels the print operation, and you are
returned to the List of Distribution Lists screen.
Note: There may be some delay before control is returned to
the screen because the system waits for the printer to stop.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Distribution lists
11-21
Finding and viewing a system distribution list
The List of
Distribution Lists
screen
The following shows an example of the List of Distribution
Lists screen with two retrieved lists.
Field descriptions
For explanations of the fields in the List of Distribution Lists
screen, see “Field descriptions” on page 11-11. The fields are
identical to those in the Add Distribution List screen.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
11-22
Distribution lists
Modifying a system distribution list
Modifying a system distribution list
Introduction
This topic explains how to make changes to an existing
distribution list. From the View/Modify Distribution List
screen, you can add one or more mailbox numbers to a
distribution list. You can change the mailboxes that you include
on a list, or you can delete one or more mailboxes.
Note: To delete an entire distribution list, see “Deleting a
system distribution list” on page 11-26.
The View/Modify
Distribution List
screen
The following shows an example of the View/Modify
Distribution List screen.
Field descriptions
For explanations of the fields in the View/Modify Distribution
List screen, see “Field descriptions” on page 11-11. The fields
are identical to those in the Add Distribution List screen.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Distribution lists
11-23
Modifying a system distribution list
Procedure
To modify a distribution list, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Distribution Lists softkeys screen
Step Action
1
2
Do you know the number of the distribution list you want to
modify?
IF
THEN
yes
go to step 2.
no
see “Finding and viewing a
system distribution list” on
page 11-17.
Select the [View/Modify] softkey.
Result: The system prompts for a distribution list number.
3
Type the number of the list you want to modify, and press
<Return>.
Result: The system displays the View/Modify Distribution List
screen.
4
Make your changes to your list.
Note: Use the [More Fields] softkey if you reach the last
available mailbox number and wish to add more mailboxes to
the list. You can include up to 120 mailboxes in a system
distribution list.
5
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
6
THEN
save your distribution list
go to step 6.
exit without saving your
distribution list
go to step 7.
To save your modified distribution list, use the [Save] softkey.
Result: The system saves your changes.
It then prompts you for another distribution list number. To
modify another list, go to step 3.
7
To exit without saving your changes, use the [Cancel] softkey.
Result: The system returns you to the Distribution Lists
softkeys screen.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
11-24
Distribution lists
Printing a system distribution list
Printing a system distribution list
Introduction
This topic explains how to print information in a system
distribution list using the softkeys in the Find Distribution Lists
screen.
The Find Distribution
Lists screen
The following shows the position of the print keys on the Find
Distribution Lists screen.
Field descriptions
For explanations of the fields in the Find Distribution List
screen, see “Field descriptions” on page 11-11. The fields are
identical to those in the Add Distribution List screen.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Distribution lists
11-25
Printing a system distribution list
Procedure
To print distribution list information, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Find Distribution Lists screen
Step Action
1
Use the [Print Titles] softkey or the [Print Entries] softkey,
depending on what you want to print.
IF you want to print
THEN
the titles and list numbers
only
select the [Print Titles]
softkey.
the mailboxes associated
with the retrieved list or lists
select the [Print Entries]
softkey.
Result: The system displays the [Continue Printing] softkey
and the [Cancel Printing] softkey.
It also prompts you to check that the printer is ready.
2
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
3
THEN
print the list
go to step 3.
cancel printing
go to step 4.
Select the [Continue Printing] softkey.
Result: The system begins to print the distribution list titles or
entries.
When printing is complete, the system again displays the Find
Distribution Lists screen.
Note: To stop printing at any time, go to step 4.
4
Select the [Cancel Printing] softkey.
Result: The system cancels the print operation, and you are
returned to the List of Distribution Lists screen.
Note: There may be some delay before control is returned to
the screen because the system waits for the printer to stop.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
11-26
Distribution lists
Deleting a system distribution list
Deleting a system distribution list
Introduction
This topic explains how to delete a system distribution list using
the Delete Distribution List screen. This screen enables you to
view a distribution list before you delete it.
To delete mailbox numbers from a distribution list but not the
entire list, see “Modifying a system distribution list” on
page 11-22.
The Delete
Distribution List
screen
The following shows an example of the Delete Distribution List
screen.
Field descriptions
For explanations of the fields in the Delete Distribution List
screen, see “Field descriptions” on page 11-11. The fields are
identical to those in the Add Distribution List screen.
Note: In the Delete Distribution List screen, these fields are
read-only.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Distribution lists
11-27
Deleting a system distribution list
Procedure
To delete a system distribution list, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Distribution Lists softkeys screen
Step Action
1
2
Do you know the number of the distribution list you want to
delete?
IF
THEN
yes
go to step 2.
no
see “Finding and viewing a
system distribution list” on
page 11-17.
Select the [Delete] softkey.
Result: The system prompts for a distribution list number.
3
Type the number of the list you want to delete, and press
<Return>.
Result: The system displays the Delete Distribution List
screen.
4
5
Use the following table to determine the next step.
IF you want to
THEN
delete your distribution list
go to step 5.
exit without deleting your
distribution list
go to step 6.
To delete your distribution list, use the [Delete] softkey.
Note: The system deletes the list.
It then prompts you for another distribution list number. To
delete another list, go to step 3.
6
To exit without deleting the list, use the [Cancel] softkey.
Result: The system returns you to the Distribution Lists
softkeys screen.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
11-28
Distribution lists
Deleting a system distribution list
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 12
General administration–an
overview
In this chapter
General Administration
12-2
12-2
General administration–an overview
General Administration
General Administration
Introduction
This chapter provides an overview of the General
Administration menu and related screens.
The General
Administration menu
When you select the General Administration option from the
main menu, the General Administration menu appears.
General Options
The General Options option allows you to
•
•
•
Volume and Selective
Backup
view installed features
assign Classes of Service to the system
configure the following:
— attendant DN
— date formats for reports
— SEER printer
The Volume and Selective Backup option allows you to make
backup copies of some or all of the data stored on your hard
disk. You can perform the following types of backups:
•
•
full backup to tape
partial backup to tape or disk
Note: Partial backup to disk can only be done if the
Disk-to-Disk Backup feature is installed.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
General administration–an overview
12-3
General Administration
•
•
selective backup of users
selective backup of services
Restore from Selective The Restore from Selective Backup option allows you to restore
Backup
data that was selectively backed up to tape.
Note: If you want to restore your system using the data from a
full or partial backup, you must use the Restore from backup
utility available on the Install/data tape. For more information
on this utility, refer to the System Installation and Modification
Guide (NTP 555-7001-215).
Change System
Administrator
Password
The Change System Administrator Password option allows you
to change the password for the administration terminal. Your
password should be changed on a regular basis to ensure
maximum security.
Change Customer
Administrator
Password
The Change Customer Administrator Password option allows
you to change the password for Multiple Administration
Terminals (MATs). Your password should be changed on a
regular basis to ensure maximum security.
Change AdminPlus
Download Password
The Change AdminPlus Download Password option allows you
to change the password used by Meridian Mail Reporter
(MMR) to download data from the system. The same password
must be set up on the MMR side before data can be
downloaded. This password must be set up when the system is
installed as the default value will not allow the download to take
place.
Note: This option only appears if the AdminPlus feature is
installed.
Change System Time
The Change System Time option allows you to change your
system time.
Dialing Translation
If Fax on Demand or AMIS Networking, or both, are installed,
you must set up translation tables. These tables tell Meridian
Mail how to translate collected digits (from an AMIS message
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
12-4
General administration–an overview
General Administration
header or a fax callback number entered by a caller) into a
number that Meridian Mail can dial.
Note: In Meridian Mail 12, this option appears for all Meridian
1 systems.
Related chapters
The following table describes which chapter you should refer to
when using one of the General Administration menu options.
For the following option
See
General Options
Chapter 13, “General options.”
Volume and Selective Backup
Chapter 15, “Back up and restore
Meridian Mail data.”
Restore from Selective Backup
Chapter 15, “Back up and restore
Meridian Mail data.”
Change System Administrator
Password
Chapter 16, “Password and
system time changes.”
Set Minimum Length for
Administrator Passwords
Chapter 16, “Password and
system time changes.”
Change AdminPlus Download
Password
Chapter 16, “Password and
system time changes.”
For more information on Meridian
Mail Reporter, refer to the MMR
document (P0847870).
Standard 1.0
Change System Time
Chapter 16, “Password and
system time changes.”
Dialing Translation
Chapter 17, “Dialing
translations.”
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 13
General options
In this chapter
Overview
13-2
Accessing the General Options screen
13-3
Modifying the system name and system number
13-5
Defining the system addressing length and the supervised
transfer delay
13-8
Verifying installed features
13-11
Assigning classes of service to the system
13-13
Setting the attendant DN
13-15
Setting the date format for reports
13-18
Setting printer port names
13-20
13-2
General options
Overview
Overview
Introduction
Defining general system options involves the following:
•
•
•
•
Modifying general
options
Standard 1.0
assigning classes of service to the system
defining the attendant DN
setting the date format for reports
specifying the SEER printer and Reports printer port names
Review the default settings in the General Options screen to see
which fields you need to modify in order to customize the
system to satisfy your requirements.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
General options
13-3
Accessing the General Options screen
Introduction
All of the procedures in this chapter are performed from the
General Options screen.
Procedure
To access the General Options screen, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration and press <Return>.
Result: The General Administration menu appears.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
13-4
General options
Accessing the General Options screen
Step Action
2
Select General Options and press <Return>.
Result: The General Options screen appears.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
General options
13-5
Modifying the system name and system number
Modifying the system name and system number
Introduction
The system name and system number are defined during
installation.
When to use
Use this procedure if you need to modify the system name or
number, or both, from the values defined during installation.
The General Options
screen
The dotted box highlights the fields in the General Options
screen in which you define the system name and number.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
13-6
General options
Modifying the system name and system number
Field descriptions
This table describes the fields used to define the system name
and number.
System Name
Description
This is the name by which Meridian Mail is
identified. This name is printed on all reports and
lists in Meridian Mail.
Default
The name supplied during installation.
Maximum
length
You can enter up to 30 alphanumeric characters.
System Number
Standard 1.0
Description
This field is prefilled with the number supplied
during system installation. The system number
must match the Meridian 1’s customer number.
Attention
Because this number is entered during installation,
you should not have to change it. If there is a
mismatch with the Meridian 1’s customer number,
certain Meridian Mail features that dial out (such
as call sender and thru-dial) will not work.
Default
The value supplied during installation.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
General options
13-7
Modifying the system name and system number
Procedure
To change the system name or number, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The General Options screen
Step Action
1
Delete the current name and enter the new name in the System
Name field.
2
Change the system number, if necessary.
Attention: The system number must equal the Meridian 1
customer number.
Note: If you modify the system number, you must reboot the
system for the change to take effect.
3
Have you finished modifying general options?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, press [Save] to save your changes and return to the
General Administration menu.
If no, go to the next procedure to continue modifying general
options, or press [Cancel] to return to the General
Administration menu without saving your changes.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
13-8
General options
Defining the system addressing length and the supervised transfer delay
Defining the system addressing length and the supervised
transfer delay
System addressing
length
The system addressing length is intended for Meridian Mail
systems connected to DMS-family and SL-100 switches. When
set to a non-zero value, the address expansion feature is
enabled.
Address expansion is used on systems where the local
addressing lengths are shorter than the system addressing
lengths.
Meridian 1
For systems connected to Meridian 1 PBXs, the system
addressing length should be set to 0 to disable address
expansion. This is the default.
Supervised transfer
delay
Usage
This transfer delay is used by ACCESS applications when
transferring a call to a non-local telset. It is important in cases
where the telset to which the call is transferred is busy.
Meridian Mail 11 and 12 versus prior releases
In releases prior to Meridian Mail 11, this delay was set to 200
centi-seconds (2 seconds) and could not be modified.
Default and range
200 centi-seconds is now the default, but it can be modified (to
a value between 100 and 1000 centi-seconds, or 1 to 10
seconds).
Centi-seconds
A centi-second is 1/100th of a second. Therefore, 100 centiseconds equals 1 second.
Do you need to change the default?
If you get reports of callers hearing busy signals when
transferred from an ACCESS application to a telset, you need to
increase this value.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
General options
13-9
Defining the system addressing length and the supervised transfer delay
Finding the right value for your system may take some trial and
error. Try incrementing this value by 50 or 100 centi-seconds
until you find a setting that works for your system.
How it works
When an ACCESS application transfers a call off-switch, it
waits for the amount of time specified in the delay field. If the
telset is busy, a certain amount of time is required to detect the
busy signal.
If the delay is not long enough, the busy signal is not detected,
the call is transferred to the telset, and the caller hears the busy
signal. When the busy signal is detected, the transfer is denied.
The General Options
screen
Standard 1.0
The dotted box highlights the fields in the General Options
screen in which you define the system addressing length and
supervised transfer delay.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
13-10
General options
Defining the system addressing length and the supervised transfer delay
Procedure
To change the system addressing length and supervised transfer
delay, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The General Options screen
Step Action
1
Leave the system addressing length as 0.
2
If the current delay is too short to detect busy signals, then
increase the value in the Supervised Transfer Delay field.
3
Have you finished modifying general options?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, press [Save] to save your changes and return to the
General Administration menu.
If no, go to the next procedure to continue modifying general
options, or press [Cancel] to return to the General
Administration menu without saving your changes.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
General options
13-11
Verifying installed features
Verifying installed features
When to use
Use this procedure if you need to verify the features that are
installed on your system.
The General Options
screen
View the list of Available Features in the General Options
screen.
Possible features
These are the features that may be installed on your system:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
Multiple Administration Terminals
Disk To Disk Backup
Meridian ACCESS (Unix Access)
AdminPlus
Meridian Mail AutoAdmin
Integrated Mailbox Administration
Voice Messaging (MMUI)
Voice Messaging (VMUIF)
Hospitality
Note: Voice Messaging (MMUI), Voice Messaging
(VMUIF), and Hospitality are mutually exclusive and
cannot be installed on the same system.
Network Message Services (NMS)
System Administration Guide
January 1998
13-12
General options
Verifying installed features
•
•
•
•
Voice Menus and Announcements
This feature allows you to create the following voice
services: Voice Menus, Announcements, Thru-Dial
services, Time-of-Day Controllers, Prompt Maintenance,
and Remote Activation.
Voice Forms
Fax on Demand
This enables a number of fax-related services: Fax
Information Service, Fax Item Maintenance Service, Fax
Call Back Delivery, and Fax Same Call Delivery.
Meridian Mail Networking (not available for VMUIF
customer groups)
To make the following features available to users, certain fields
must be enabled in the user’s class of service:
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
AMIS
Dual Language Prompting (MMUI only)
Outcalling (includes Remote Notification and Delivery to
Non-User)
System Administration Guide
January 1998
General options
13-13
Assigning classes of service to the system
Assigning classes of service to the system
Introduction
Once you have created Meridian Mail classes of service
(through Class of Service Administration), you must assign
them to the system. Otherwise, they will not be available when
you add local voice users.
The General Options
screen
The dotted box highlights the fields in which you assign classes
of service to the system.
Field description
You enter the classes of service that you want to assign to the
system in the Class of Service Selection fields.
When adding local voice users, you will assign them to one of
the COSs specified here.
Default
All fields are blank.
Maximum number of classes of service
You can enter up to 15 classes of service in these fields.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
13-14
General options
Assigning classes of service to the system
Procedure
To assign classes of service, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The General Options screen
Step Action
1
Use the cursor keys to move to the Class of Service Selection
field.
2
Enter up to 15 classes of service in the Class of Service
Selection fields.
3
Have you finished modifying general options?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, press [Save] to save your changes and return to the
General Administration menu.
If no, go to the next procedure to continue modifying general
options, or press [Cancel] to return to the General
Administration menu without saving your changes.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
General options
13-15
Setting the attendant DN
Setting the attendant DN
The attendant DN
The Attendant DN is the extension number to which a caller is
transferred when the user’s revert DN is unsuccessful or
undefined.
The revert DN
When adding users, you can define a unique revert DN for each
user. If the Custom Revert DN feature is enabled, users can
define their own revert DNs from their telsets.
When the attendant
DN is used
The Attendant DN that is defined in General Options is used if
the revert DN is not defined or the call is not successfully
transferred to the user’s revert DN.
The revert DN and attendant DN are used under two conditions.
Call answering
A caller can press “0” during a call answering session in order
to transfer to another number (such as that of an attendant or
secretary). This gives callers the chance to transfer to a person
for assistance.
Mailbox thru-dial (extension dialing)
Mailbox thru-dial allows MMUI users to dial a number while
they are logged into their mailbox. The user enters “0” followed
by the number. If the user waits for more than 2 seconds after
entering “0”, he or she is transferred to the revert DN.
See also
Standard 1.0
For more information, see “The revert DN” on page 8-26.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
13-16
General options
Setting the attendant DN
The General Options
screen
The dotted box highlights the field in which you define the
Attendant DN.
Field description
This field may be left blank. However, it is recommended that
you define this DN so that it can serve as a backup if the user’s
revert DN is not defined or unsuccessful.
Maximum length
You can enter a DN that is up to 30 digits in length. This DN
can begin with 0.
Default
0
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
General options
13-17
Setting the attendant DN
Procedure
To change the attendant DN, follow these steps.
Starting Point: General Options screen
Step Action
1
Use the cursor keys to move to the Attendant DN field.
2
Do you want to revert callers to a DN other than 0?
•
•
3
Have you finished modifying general options?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, delete the current DN and enter the new DN in the
Attendant DN field.
If no, leave the Attendant DN field set to 0.
If yes, press [Save] to save your changes and return to the
General Administration menu.
If no, go to the next procedure to continue modifying general
options, or press [Cancel] to return to the General
Administration menu without saving your changes.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
13-18
General options
Setting the date format for reports
Setting the date format for reports
Introduction
The date format that is selected in General Options is used on
administration and maintenance reports.
The General Options
screen
The dotted box highlights the field in which you specify the
date format.
Field description
The date format selected in the Date Format for Administration
and Maintenance Reports field affects the following:
•
•
•
reports generated by Meridian Mail (including operational
measurements)
SEERs
the format for inputting dates in Meridian Mail screens
Default
The default is mm/dd/yy.
Valid options
You can choose from the following date formats:
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
mm/dd/yy (default)
yy/mm/dd
dd/mm/yy
System Administration Guide
January 1998
General options
13-19
Setting the date format for reports
Procedure
To change the date format, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The General Options screen
Step Action
1
Use the cursor keys to move to the date format field.
2
Select the date format you want used on reports and in
screens.
3
Have you finished modifying general options?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, press [Save] to save your changes and return to the
General Administration menu.
If no, go to the next procedure to continue modifying general
options, or press [Cancel] to return to the General
Administration menu without saving your changes.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
13-20
General options
Setting printer port names
Setting printer port names
Introduction
You can define separate printer port names for a SEER printer
and a reports printer.
If you do not define these printer port names, SEERs or reports,
or both, are printed to the console printer port.
The General Options
screen
The dotted box highlights the fields in which printer port names
are defined.
Field descriptions
This table describes the printer port name fields.
SEER Printer Port Name
Description
This is the printer port to which the SEER printer
is connected.
Requirement
You must have additional data ports on an RSM
card to support a SEER printer. They must be
defined as printer ports in the hardware database.
Default
Blank
If this field is left blank, the SEERs will print to the
console printer port.
Maximum
length
Standard 1.0
The printer port name may be up to 12
alphanumeric characters long.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
General options
13-21
Setting printer port names
Reports Printer Port Name
Description
This is the printer port to which the Reports printer
is connected.
Operational measurements and general print jobs
from the administration terminal are sent to this
printer.
Requirement
Additional data ports on an RSM card are required.
The data ports must be defined as printer ports in
the hardware database.
Default
Blank
If this field is left blank, the reports will print to the
console printer port.
Maximum
length
Procedure
You can enter a printer port name up to 12
alphanumeric characters long.
To set or change the printer port names, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The General Options screen
Step Action
1
2
Use the cursor keys to move to the printer name field to be
modified.
Have you set up a special printer for SEERs?
•
•
3
Have you set up a special printer for printing reports?
•
•
4
Standard 1.0
If Yes, enter its port name in the SEER Printer Port Name
field.
If No, leave this field blank and proceed to the next step.
If Yes, enter its port name in the Reports Printer Port Name
field.
If No, leave this field blank and proceed to the next step.
You are finished defining general options. Do you want to save
your changes?
•
If yes, press [Save].
Result: The changes are saved, and you are returned to the
General Administration screen.
•
If no, press [Cancel].
Result: The changes are not saved, and you are returned to
the General Administration screen.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
13-22
General options
Setting printer port names
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 14
Volume administration
In this chapter
Overview
14-2
Volume names
14-3
Volume contents
14-5
Volume distribution on single- and multi-node systems
14-7
Voice storage capacity in single- and multi-node
systems
14-8
Checking volume capacity and usage levels for your
system
14-10
14-2
Volume administration
Overview
Overview
Introduction
Meridian Mail systems can have from one to five nodes, each of
which contains a hard disk drive for data storage. The hard disk
drives are partitioned into volumes. Volumes are storage areas
for system and user-related information.
Volume administration involves making backup copies of some
or all of the data stored on a hard disk. If a disk fails, data can be
restored from the backup so that the system can be brought back
into service quickly with minimal loss of information.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Volume administration
14-3
Volume names
Volume names
Introduction
Volume names are used to identify volume partitions on hard
disk drives. The volumes are already set up when your Meridian
Mail system is installed.
Definition
Each hard disk on each node is partitioned into two volume
types: system and user. Volume names follow specific formats
to ensure easy identification when backing up the system.
In the first node, the system volume is named VS1 and the user
volume is named VS2.
In three-node, four-node, and five-node configurations, the disk
drive on the first node contains no user volume. Volumes on
nodes other than the first node are named VStnnX.
Components
Volume names consist of four components. These four
components are listed in the following table.
Component
Description
VS
Volume server
t
The first digit in the volume name indicates the
type of information stored on the volume.
Possible digits are
1 system information
2 user information
9 disk-to-disk backup (if installed, for partial
backup)
Example
Standard 1.0
nn
The last two digits in the volume number
indicate the node number.
X
The region on the volume, either T for text data,
or V for voice data.
VS205T refers to the text region (T) of a user volume (2) on
node 5 (05).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
14-4
Volume administration
Volume names
Name exceptions
There are some special cases where volume names differ from
the standard volume name format.
These are the exceptions:
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
User volume on node 1 is labeled VS2.
System volume on node 1 is labeled VS1.
Full backup of VS1 creates volume backup labels B102V
and B102T.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Volume administration
14-5
Volume contents
Volume contents
Introduction
The two types of volumes, system and user, contain different
sets of information. For backup purposes, it is important to be
aware of the type of information stored on each volume type.
System volume
The system volume VS1 contains the user information listed
below:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
each user’s personal verification
system profile
corporate directory
operation measurement traffic and billing data
program software
network database*
voice menus and announcements*
voice forms*
fax items*
network message queues
voice prompts for third and fourth languages*
Items marked with an asterisk (*) may not be installed and
stored on VS1, depending on how your system was set up.
Note: Voice services (voice menus, voice forms, fax items) are
stored on VS1 by default. However, they can be moved to
another volume if there is not enough space on VS1.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
14-6
Volume administration
Volume contents
User volumes
The user volumes (VS2, VS202, VS203, VS204, VS205) can
contain the following information:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
messages
greetings
voice services (voice menus, voice forms, fax items) which
may be moved from VS1 to VS2 or VS202 if voice
services require more space than is available on VS1
user information
voice prompts for first and second languages (on VS2 only)
voice form responses
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Volume administration
14-7
Volume distribution on single- and multi-node systems
Volume distribution on single- and multi-node systems
Introduction
Single-node and multi-node systems contain different volume
configurations.
Node contents
The following table shows the possible volume configuration
for each node.
System
Node 1
Single-node
VS1 - system
Node 2
Node 3
Node 4
Node 5
VS2 - user
Two-node
VS1 - system
VS202 - user
VS2 - user
VS902 - backup
VS901- backup
Three-node
VS1 - system
VS202 - user
VS203 - user
VS202 - user
VS203 - user
VS204 - user
VS202 - user
VS203 - user
VS204 - user
VS2 - system
VS901 - backup
Four-node
VS1 - system
VS2 - system
VS901 - backup
Five-node
VS1 - system
VS205 - user
VS2 - system
VS901- backup
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
14-8
Volume administration
Voice storage capacity in single- and multi-node systems
Voice storage capacity in single- and multi-node systems
Voice storage capacity The following table shows the voice storage capacity for single-
node and multi-node systems.
Voice Storage capacity
System Size
1-node
1.2 Gbyte disk
(EC and
ModOp)
2-node
1.2 Gbyte disk
(EC and
ModOp)
3-node
1.2 Gbyte disk
(EC and
ModOp)
4-node
1.2 Gbyte disk
(EC and
ModOp)
Standard 1.0
Total
hours per
volume
Maximum hours available for voice storage (per disk volume)
VS1
VS2
5
11
24
36
54
100
200*
2
2
3.5
3.5
3.5
5.5
10.2
5
11
24
36
54
100
200
26
54
84
114
200
400*
2
3.5
3.5
3.5
5.5
10.2
11
24
24
54
100
200
30
60
90
120
200
400*
45
90
120
180
300
600*
VS202
VS203
15
30
60
60
100
200
n/a
22.2
52.2
52.2
90.1
184.8
18.4
18.4
18.4
18.4
18.4
51.9
15
30
60
60
100
200
n/a
6.3
36.3
36.3
76.3
142.4
15
30
30
60
100
200
18.4
18.4
18.4
18.4
18.4
68.6
15
30
60
60
100
200
n/a
5.3
35.3
35.3
75.3
124.5
15
30
30
60
100
200
System Administration Guide
VS204
VS205
15
30
30
60
100
200
January 1998
Volume administration
14-9
Voice storage capacity in single- and multi-node systems
Voice Storage capacity
System Size
5-node
1.2 Gbyte disk
(EC and
ModOp)
Maximum hours available for voice storage (per disk volume)
Total
hours per
volume
60
120
180
240
400
800*
VS1
19.6
19.6
19.6
19.6
19.6
86.6
VS2
VS202
15
30
60
60
100
200
––
2.4
32.4
32.4
72.4
104.6
VS203
VS204
VS205
15
30
30
60
100
200
15
30
30
60
100
200
15
30
60
60
100
200
Note: VS202 lists two columns of figures. The first column is without disk-to-disk backup.
The second column is with disk-to-disk backup.
* — A 2.0 Gbyte disk is required for each of these configurations.
Additional language
exceptions
The number of languages your system uses has an impact on the
available volume capacity for each hard disk.
If your system has three or more nodes and a second language
installed, subtract three hours from the volume capacity of VS2.
If your system only has one or two nodes, then subtract three
hours from the volume capacity of VS1.
If your system has a third language installed, subtract three
hours from VS1, and an additional three hours for the fourth
language.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
14-10
Volume administration
Checking volume capacity and usage levels for your system
Checking volume capacity and usage levels for your system
Description
The Volume and Selective Backup screen displays all the
volumes on your system, their designated use, their capacity in
kbytes and equivalent hours and minutes, and the percentage of
voice and data storage currently used.
Accessing the
Volume and Selective
Backup screen
To access the Volume and Selective Backup screen, follow
these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
2
Select Volume and Selective Backup.
Result: The Volume and Selective Backup screen is displayed.
Volume and Selective
Backup screen
Standard 1.0
The following shows the Volume and Selective Backup screen.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Volume administration
14-11
Checking volume capacity and usage levels for your system
Field descriptions
This table describes the fields in the Volume and Selective
Backup screen.
Volume Name
Description
Displays the name of the volume. The volume
name indicates the type of data contained on the
volume, and the node on which it resides.
Format
Volume names are in the format VSTnn. The
region of the volume (x) is not displayed.
Valid options
Any of the listed volumes.
Use
Description
Describes the type of volume, either system or
user.
Volume Size Data (kbytes)
Description
Displays the amount of storage allocated for
blocks of data on the volume.
Measurement
Storage is expressed in thousands of bytes
(kbytes).
Volume Size Voice (kbytes)
Description
Displays the amount of storage allocated for
blocks of voice data on the volume.
Measurement
Storage is expressed in thousands of bytes
(kbytes).
Volume Size Voice (hh:mm)
Description
Displays the amount of storage allocated for
blocks of voice data on the volume.
Measurement
Storage is expressed in hours and minutes.
Usage (% Full) Data
Description
Standard 1.0
Displays the percentage of allocated data storage
currently in use.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
14-12
Volume administration
Checking volume capacity and usage levels for your system
Usage (% Full) Voice
Description
Displays the percentage of allocated voice storage
currently in use.
Number of Mailboxes
Description
Displays the number of local voice users on the
volume.
Dependency
This number is dependent on the number of voice
users configured for your system.
Total number of mailboxes on the system
Description
Checking disk
capacity and usage
levels
Standard 1.0
Displays the total number of mailboxes on the
system.
For information on checking disk capacity and usage levels for
your system, see “Disk Usage Detail report” on page 31-52.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 15
Back up and restore
Meridian Mail data
In this chapter
Overview
15-2
Section A: Preparing for backups
15-3
Section B: Full and partial backups to tape
15-15
Section C: Selective backup of users and services
15-23
Section D: Partial backups to disk
15-39
Section E: Scheduled backups
15-41
Section F: Backup maintenance
15-47
Section G: Restoring information from a Selective backup
15-53
15-2
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Overview
Overview
Description
This chapter
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
explains the importance of Meridian Mail system backups
suggests which volumes to back up, and how frequently
describes selective backup of mailboxes and services
describes the two available backup media, and how to
perform a backup with either one
describes the procedures for scheduling a backup to occur
automatically at a later time, and for checking on the status
of a backup in progress
describes procedures for restoring selective backup data
from backup media (disk or tape) back to the Meridian
Mail system
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Section A:
15-3
Preparing for backups
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
15-4
The three types of backups
15-5
Selective backup
15-6
Partial backup
15-8
Full backup
15-9
Volumes to back up
15-10
How often to do backups
15-11
Disk backup or tape backup
15-13
Before you perform a backup
15-14
System Administration Guide
January 1998
15-4
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This section describes the three types of backups: selective,
partial, and full.
It is important to perform backups regularly as they provide a
safeguard against disk failure. Recovery from a system where
no backups have been made entails a complete reentry of all
user and site-specific information.
Nightly audits
Nightly VS audits have been modified to permit an overnight
full backup. If a backup is running, the VS audit will be
repeatedly delayed until either the backup completes or a
specified time limit, set upon installation, is reached, (around
4:30 a.m.). If the time limit is reached, the VS audit will force
the backup to be aborted. Previously, overnight full backups
were likely to fail due to a conflict with one of the automatic
nightly VS audits.
The Volume and
Selective Backup
screen
The following is an example of the Volume and Selective
Backup screen where backup options are accessed.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-5
The three types of backups
The three types of backups
Introduction
There are three types of backups that can be performed:
•
•
•
selective
partial
full
Description
The three backup options allow you to select the appropriate
type for your backup without always having to perform a full
backup.
Selective backup
Selective backups allow you to back up user messages, personal
distribution lists, and multimedia services. Selective backup
also enables you to back up mailboxes by specific criteria (such
as volume or department).
Partial backup
Partial backups save the administration configuration of the
system, including the system volume and user profiles. This
type of backup saves user data only, not voice.
Full backup
Full backups back up all volumes on your system, including
voice and data from system and user volumes.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
15-6
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Selective backup
Selective backup
Introduction
The selective backup option provides online backups for user
messages, personal distribution lists (PDLs), and multimedia
services.
Description
The selective backup feature provides you with considerable
flexibility in backing up data. User messages, PDLs, and
multimedia services may be backed up at any time or as part of
the regular backup schedule.
Backup criteria for
messages and PDLs
To use the selective backup option, you must select a criteria by
which to back up from the list below. You can select only one
criteria per selective backup, and this criteria defines the content
to be backed up:
•
•
•
•
•
all messages and PDLs of all users on the system
by volume, up to the total number of volumes on the
system
by classes of service, up to 15
by departments, up to five input areas. The wildcards ‘+’
and ‘_’ are permitted so that more than five departments
may be backed up.
by individually specified mailboxes, up to 10 input areas.
The wildcards ‘+’ and ‘_’ are permitted so that more than
10 mailboxes may be backed up.
Note: Only one wildcard can be used per input field, and it
should be the last character.
Example
Valid
805+
805_
Standard 1.0
Invalid
80+1
80_1
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-7
Selective backup
Backup criteria for
voice services
One of the following criteria must be selected for the selective
backup of voice services:
•
•
all voice services on the system
by service ID, up to 30 input areas. The wildcards ‘+’ and
‘_’ are permitted so that more than 30 services may be
backed up.
Note: Only one wildcard can be used per input field, and it
should be the last character.
Example
Valid
Invalid
805+
80+1
805_
80_1
Backup order
Standard 1.0
If a selective backup is chosen together with a regular backup,
the volume backups will always be done first. The selective
backup will always be the last backup on the tape.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
15-8
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Partial backup
Partial backup
Introduction
Partial backups allow you to back up and save the
administration configuration of your system. It will back up the
system volume and user profiles. During a restore, this avoids
having to reenter user information; however, all voice messages
and user greetings will be lost.
Data that is backed up When you perform a partial backup, you save the administration
configuration of the system including the following:
•
•
•
the user database
spoken names (personal verification)
voice services (voice menus, voice forms, fax items) if
stored on VS1
Volumes that are
backed up
A partial backup saves the following volumes:
Exceptions
Partial backups do not back up the following information:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
VS1T
VS1V
VS1B
VS901T
users’ voice data (including voice messages and greetings)
voice services (voice menus, voice forms, fax items) if
stored on a volume other than VS1
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-9
Full backup
Full backup
Introduction
A full backup is used to back up all system and user voice and
data on the entire system. A full backup is not normally done
unless significant changes have been made to your system.
Data that is backed up A full backup backs up all system data including
•
•
•
•
the user database
spoken names (personal verification)
voice services (voice menus, voice forms, fax items)
users’ voice data (including voice messages and greetings)
Volumes that are
backed up
A full backup saves the following volumes:
VS1B
VS1B is a temporary volume that is created during backup and
is copied to tape. It is automatically deleted from disk once the
backup is complete.
Exceptions
Normally, full backups are not done because user messages and
greetings are transitory and do not warrant the extra time
required to back them up.
•
•
•
•
VS1T
VS1V
VS1B
all VSxT, VSxV, and VSxB, where x is 2 or 202 through
205, depending on the number of nodes in your system.
CAUTION
Risk of data loss
If the loss of messages carries financial or legal
implications, weekly or even daily backups of voice data
may be warrranted.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
15-10
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Volumes to back up
Volumes to back up
Introduction
Backups are essential to safeguard your system against disk
failure. It is important to back up volumes with all necessary
system and user voice and data information.
Volumes
recommended for
regular backup
The following table shows the recommended volumes for
backup on single-node, two-node, three-node, four-node, and
five-node systems.
Volumes marked with * store data unless voice services are
installed there, in which case you select Voice and Data, rather
than Data.
Single-node
system
Two-node
system
Three-node
system
Four-node
system
Five-node
system
VS1 - Voice and
Data
VS1 - Voice and
Data
VS1 - Voice and
Data
VS1 - Voice and
Data
VS1 - Voice and
Data
VS2 - Data *
VS2 - Data *
VS202 - Data *
VS202 - Data *
VS202 - Data
VS202 - Data *
VS203 - Data *
VS203 - Data *
VS203 - Data *
VS204 - Data *
VS204 - Data *
VS205 - Data *
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-11
How often to do backups
How often to do backups
Introduction
Backups should be performed regularly. Recovery from a
system where no backups have been made entails a complete
reentry of all user and site-specific information.
Nightly audits
Nightly VS audits have been modified to permit an overnight
full backup. If a backup is running, the VS audit will be
repeatedly delayed until either the backup completes, or a
specified time limit, set upon installation, is reached (around
4:30 a.m.). If the time limit is reached, the VS audit will force
the backup to be aborted.
Backup
considerations
Keep the following in mind when determining how often and
when to do backups:
•
•
•
Location of voice
services
Backups should be carried out at a time when the system is
relatively quiet, or outside the regular business hours for
your organization.
Do not back up the system while it is being actively used
(more than half the ports or channels are active). The
system may not have enough resources to complete the
backup.
Backups to disk can be done frequently with relatively little
effort, and reduce the need for frequent and timeconsuming backups to tape. However, disk-to-disk backups
do not eliminate the need for tape backups.
Verify where voice services (such as voice menus, thru-dialers,
and voice forms) are stored.
ATTENTION
If voice services are stored on a volume other than VS1,
be sure to do a full backup of that volume, selecting the
Voice and Data option.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
15-12
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
How often to do backups
Verifying the location
of voice services
To verify where voice services are stored, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select Voice Administration.
2
Select Voice Services Administration.
3
Select Voice Services Profile.
4
Check the Voice Services Volume field.
This is where voice services are stored.
System backup
requirements
A field support representative can restore a system to the state it
was in at the time of the last backup. To ensure that this
recovery process is complete, you should make certain that you
have on hand a complete set of backup tapes.
If no backups have been kept, a complete reentry of all user and
site-specific information will be required. How often you back
up your data is influenced by how often changes are made to
user and system information. If you make important changes to
the system daily, then daily backups may be in order.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-13
Disk backup or tape backup
Disk backup or tape backup
Introduction
Meridian Mail offers two types of backups, disk and tape.
Disk backup
Backup to disk can be either partial or selective. To use the
backup-to-disk feature, the disk-to-disk option must be
installed. Full backups cannot be done to disk and must be
backed up using tape.
On multi-node systems, the backup-to-disk option copies
selected information from the first hard disk to the second hard
disk on the system. This allows for data to be copied from one
disk to another in order to allow for recovery after a single disk
failure. Backup to disk can be done frequently with relatively
little effort, and reduces the need for frequent and timeconsuming backups to tape.
Backups to disk do not completely eliminate the need for tape
backups.
CAUTION
Risk of data loss
If a disk failure occurs in the middle of a disk-to-disk
backup, the copy will not be consistent and recovery
from this backup copy will not be possible. For this
reason, disk-to-tape backups should also be performed
periodically.
Tape backup
Backup to tape allows for the backup of the entire Meridian
Mail system including voice and data on all volumes. This
provides you with a full backup copy of all information needed
to restore your system to full working order in case of failure.
All Meridian Mail systems have a tape drive capable of reading
and writing industry-standard 1/4-inch data cartridges.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
15-14
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Before you perform a backup
Before you perform a backup
Overview
There are many considerations that need to be taken into
account before performing a backup.
Timing
Avoid backing up the system between the hours of 1:00 a.m.
and 5:00 a.m. since important system audits take place during
these hours.
Do not back up the system when it is operating above 50% of
the rated capacity for call answering, voice messaging, and port
usage. Try to choose the lowest traffic time outside of the audit
hours.
Storage
Backup tapes should be stored in a secure area free of
electromagnetic fields. Important backups should be stored offsite for added security.
Store tapes in their cases, label them clearly, and set the write
protection tab (turn the rotating knob until the arrow points to
Safe).
Other backup
considerations
Consider the following before backing up:
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
Restoring from a full or partial backup from tape involves
downtime as the system is booted from tape and data is
restored onto disks one at a time.
Do not schedule a backup to tape that requires multiple
tapes unless you will be around during the backup to switch
tapes.
Do not use Nortel software distribution tapes for backing
up your system; these tapes are important for recovering
from disk failures.
Do not reuse the same tapes for consecutive backups. It is
recommended that you maintain at least two sets of backup
tapes and that you use these sets in rotation.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Section B:
15-15
Full and partial backups to tape
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
15-16
Performing a full backup to tape
15-18
Performing a partial backup to tape
15-20
System Administration Guide
January 1998
15-16
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This section details information on full and partial backups to
tape.
Types of tape drives
Meridian Mail supports two tape drives: the Tandberg
TDC4220 drive, and the Archive Viper drive.
The Tandberg TDC4220 drive reads and writes tapes with a
capacity up to 2.5 Gbytes and is backwards compatible with all
existing Meridian Mail tapes.
The Archive Viper drive supports a maximum storage capacity
of 250 Mbytes, and should be used only with DC6250 tapes.
CAUTION
Risk of tape load failure
Use of 6150 tapes may cause tape load
failures. 6150 tapes are no longer
supported.
Using the Archive
Viper tape drive
When using a Viper tape drive, insert the tape with the metal
side facing the left side of the drive and the opening on the tape
facing up. Once the tape is inserted, secure it by pressing down
on the lever on top of the opening until the latch catches. To
remove a tape, slide the latch up and the tape will be ejected.
Using the Tandberg
tape drive
When using a Tandberg tape drive, press the Release button to
open the door. (If there is a tape in the drive already, remove it.)
Gently push the tape into the drive and close the door. To
remove a tape, press the Release button to open the door and
remove the tape.
Write-protection
Tape cartridges can be write-protected by turning the rotating
knob on the cartridge until the arrow points to the Safe
indicator. Any attempt to write on a write-protected cartridge
will generate an error.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-17
Overview
Tape errors
Standard 1.0
If a tape error occurs during backup, you do not have to restart
the backup process from tape 1. Follow the instructions as they
appear on your screen. In some instances, you are required to
keep the tape, as the data that was recorded is not corrupt; in
other instances, you will be required to discard the tape. At this
stage, you should clean the tape heads before inserting another
tape. See “Cleaning/maintaining the tape drive” on page 15-52.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
15-18
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Performing a full backup to tape
Performing a full backup to tape
Introduction
A full backup to tape backs up all of your system and user voice
and data.
Labeling backup tapes During every backup, all tapes should be labeled and numbered
as they are removed from the tape drive.
Backup tape
requirements and
time estimates
The following table lists the backup tape requirements for a full
backup for each system.
One full backup (250 Mbyte tapes)
System
# Tapes
System
1 node
System
2 node
# Tapes
3 node
5h
1
26 h
2
30 h
2
11 h
1
54 h
3
60 h
4
24h
2
84 h
4
90 h
5
36 h
2
114 h
5
120 h
6
54 h
3
200 h
8
200 h
9
100 h
5
4 node
Standard 1.0
# Tapes
5 node
45 h
3
60 h
3
90 h
5
120 h
5
120 h
6
180 h
8
180 h
8
240 h
10
300 h
12
400 h
16
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-19
Performing a full backup to tape
Procedure
To perform a full backup to tape, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select Volume and Selective Backup.
Result: The Volume and Selective Backup screen appears.
3
Position the cursor on the volume you want to back up, and
press <Space Bar> to select it.
Note: It is recommended that you back up only one volume at a
time. However, you can select more than one volume.
4
Press [Backup to Tape].
Result: The Disk to Tape Backup screen appears.
5
Enter an appropriate label for this backup.
6
Use the arrow keys to move to the Backup Options column.
Select Voice and Data for a full backup.
7
Do you want to back up now?
8
•
If yes, then press [Immediate Backup] and go to step 8.
Result: If you select Immediate Backup, the softkeys
change to [OK to Start Backup] and [Cancel]. The system
also displays how much data (in Mbytes) will be backed up.
•
If no, go to “Scheduling the backup for a later time” on
page 15-42.
Insert the tape for backup into the tape drive.
See “Overview” on page 15-16 for information on inserting
tapes.
9
10
Do you want to continue with the backup?
•
If yes, press [OK to Start Backup] to initiate the backup.
Result: The tape is automatically retensioned.
•
If no, press [Cancel] to return to the Disk to Tape backup
screen.
If the tape becomes full, you are prompted to insert the next
tape.
Note: Do not remove the tape from the tape drive until it has
finished rewinding.
11
Standard 1.0
Repeat this procedure until all volumes have been backed up.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
15-20
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Performing a partial backup to tape
Performing a partial backup to tape
Introduction
A partial backup to tape backs up your system configuration
and user information. This backup backs up only user data, and
not voice.
Labeling backup tapes During every backup, all tapes should be labeled and numbered
as they are removed from the tape drive.
Backup tape
requirements and
time estimates
The following table lists the backup tape requirement estimates
for a partial backup for each system.
One partial backup (250 Mbyte tapes)
System
# Tapes
System
1 node
System
2 node
# Tapes
3 node
5h
1
26 h
1
30 h
1
11 h
1
54 h
1
60 h
1
24h
1
84 h
1
90 h
1
36 h
1
114 h
1
120 h
1
54 h
1
200 h
1
200 h
1
100 h
1
4 node
Standard 1.0
# Tapes
5 node
45 h
1
60 h
1
90 h
1
120 h
1
120 h
1
180 h
1
180 h
1
240 h
1
300 h
1
400 h
2
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-21
Performing a partial backup to tape
Procedure
To perform a partial backup to tape, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select Volume Administration and Selective Backup.
Result: The Volume Administration and Selective Backup
screen appears.
3
Position the cursor on the volumes you want to back up, and
press <Space bar> to select them.
4
Press [Backup to Tape].
Result: The Disk to Tape Backup screen appears.
5
Enter an appropriate label for this backup.
6
Use the arrow keys to move to the Backup Options column.
7
Are you backing up the system volume?
•
•
8
9
If yes, select Voice and Data.
If no (you are backing up a user volume), select Data.
Do you want to back up now?
•
If yes, then press [Immediate Backup].
Result: The [OK to Start Backup] and [Cancel] softkeys are
displayed.
•
If no, go to “Scheduling the backup for a later time” on
page 15-42.
Insert the tape for backup into the tape drive.
See “Overview” on page 15-16 for information on inserting
tapes.
10
11
Do you want to continue with the backup?
•
If yes, press [OK to Start Backup].
Result: The tape is automatically retensioned.
•
If no, press [Cancel] to return to the Disk to Tape Backup
screen.
If the tape becomes full, you are prompted to insert the next
tape.
Note: Do not remove the tape from the tape drive until it has
finished rewinding.
Standard 1.0
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Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Performing a partial backup to tape
Standard 1.0
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Section C:
15-23
Selective backup of users and
services
In this section
Overview
15-24
Backing up all users
15-25
Backing up individual users
15-27
Backing up all users in a specified volume
15-29
Backing up all users assigned to a particular class of service 15-31
Standard 1.0
Backing up all users in a specific department
15-33
Backing up all multimedia services
15-35
Backing up selected individual multimedia services
15-37
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January 1998
15-24
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Overview
Overview
Introduction
The selective backup feature allows for the selective backup of
user messages, personal distribution lists (PDLs), and
multimedia services. Selective backups can be performed as
immediate backups or scheduled on a regular basis.
Example
The Selective Backup and Restore feature allows users to
request a backup of their messages and PDLs for safekeeping,
and can have them restored at any time. If scheduled daily
selective backups are being done, the user can request the
restore of an accidentally deleted message or PDL and have it
restored from the previous day’s backup.
Flexibility
The selective backup feature offers new flexibility in backing
up and restoring data. User messages, PDLs, and multimedia
services may be backed up at any time or as part of the regular
backup schedule.
Selective backup
criteria
When specifying which data to back up, there are a number of
criteria from which to choose. To back up messages and PDLs,
one (and only one) of the following criteria may be used:
•
•
•
•
•
all the messages and PDLs of all users on the system
by volume, up to the total number of volumes on the
system
by classes of service, up to 15
by departments, up to five input areas
by individually specified mailboxes, up to 10 input areas
(more can be backed up using the wildcards ‘+’ and ‘_’)
For services, one of the following criteria may be used:
•
•
Standard 1.0
all services on the system
by service ID, up to 30 input areas (more can be backed up
using the wildcards ‘+’ and ‘_’)
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-25
Backing up all users
Backing up all users
Introduction
The selective backup All option backs up all mailboxes on the
system.
Labeling backup tapes During every backup, all tapes should be labeled and numbered
as they are removed from the tape drive.
Procedure
To perform a selective backup of all users, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select Volume and Selective Backup.
Result: The Volume and Selective Backup screen appears.
3
Use the arrow keys to move to SELECTIVE BACKUP
Messages and PDLs, press the Space Bar, and then press
[Backup To Tape].
Result: The Disk to Tape Backup window appears.
4
Enter an appropriate label for this selective backup.
5
Use the Space Bar or arrow keys to select All, and press the
Tab key.
6
Enter the appropriate label for this selective backup.
7
Do you want to back up now?
8
•
If yes, then press [Immediate Backup].
Result: The softkeys change to [OK to Start Backup] and
[Cancel].
•
If no, go to “Scheduling the backup for a later time” on
page 15-42.
Insert the tape for backup into the tape drive.
See “Overview” on page 15-16 for information on inserting
tapes.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
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Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Backing up all users
Step Action
9
10
Do you want to continue with the backup?
•
If yes, press [OK to Start Backup].
Result: The tape is automatically retensioned.
•
If no, press [Cancel] to return to the Disk to Tape Backup
screen.
If the tape becomes full, you are prompted to insert the next
tape.
Note: Do not remove the tape from the tape drive until it has
finished rewinding.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-27
Backing up individual users
Backing up individual users
Introduction
The selective backup Individual option allows you to select
specific mailboxes for backup by mailbox number.
Up to 10 individual mailbox input areas are provided, but the
actual number of mailboxes may be much larger with the use of
wildcards (‘+’ and ‘_’).
Labeling backup tapes During every backup, all tapes should be labeled and numbered
as they are removed from the tape drive.
Procedure
To perform a selective backup of specified individual users,
follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select Volume and Selective Backup.
Result: The Volume and Selective Backup screen appears.
3
Use the arrow keys to move to SELECTIVE BACKUP
Messages and PDLs, press the Space Bar to select it, and then
press [Backup To Tape].
Result: The Disk to Tape Backup window appears.
4
Enter an appropriate label for this selective backup.
5
Use the Space Bar or arrow keys to select Individual, and press
the Tab key.
6
Enter the mailbox numbers for all individual mailboxes to back
up. Use wildcards ‘+’ and ‘_’ to specify more than 10 mailboxes.
Note: Wildcards are only permitted as the last character of an
input, and only one wildcard is allowed per input field.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
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Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Backing up individual users
Step Action
7
8
Do you want to back up now?
•
If yes, then press [Immediate Backup].
Result: The softkeys change to [OK to Start Backup] and
[Cancel].
•
If no, go to “Scheduling the backup for a later time” on
page 15-42.
Insert the tape for backup into the tape drive.
See “Overview” on page 15-16 for information on inserting
tapes.
9
10
Do you want to continue with the backup?
•
If yes, press [OK to Start Backup].
Result: The tape is automatically retensioned.
•
If no, press [Cancel] to return to the Disk to Tape Backup
screen.
If the tape becomes full, you are prompted to insert the next
tape.
Note: Do not remove the tape from the tape drive until it has
finished rewinding.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-29
Backing up all users in a specified volume
Backing up all users in a specified volume
Introduction
The selective backup volume option backs up all users in the
specified volume. As many volumes may be specified as are on
the system.
Recommendation
It is recommended that you perform selective backups on a
different tape from other backups (such a volume backups.)
Labeling backup tapes During every backup, all tapes should be labeled and numbered
as they are removed from the tape drive.
Procedure
To perform a selective backup of specified volumes, follow
these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select Volume and Selective Backup.
Result: The Volume and Selective Backup screen appears.
3
Use the arrow keys to move to SELECTIVE BACKUP
Messages and PDLs, press Space Bar to select it, and then
press [Backup To Tape].
Result: The Disk to Tape Backup window appears.
Standard 1.0
4
Enter an appropriate label for this selective backup.
5
Use the Space Bar or arrow keys to select Volume, and press
the Tab key.
6
Enter the volume numbers to be backed up.
7
Do you want to back up now?
•
If yes, then press [Immediate Backup].
Result: The softkeys change to [OK to Start Backup] and
[Cancel].
•
If no, go to “Scheduling the backup for a later time” on
page 15-42.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
15-30
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Backing up all users in a specified volume
Step Action
8
Insert the tape for backup into the tape drive.
See “Overview” on page 15-16 for information on inserting
tapes.
9
10
Do you want to continue with the backup?
•
If yes, press [OK to Start Backup].
Result: The tape is automatically retensioned.
•
If no, press [Cancel] to return to the Disk to Tape Backup
screen.
If the tape becomes full, you are prompted to insert the next
tape.
Note: Do not remove the tape from the tape drive until it has
finished rewinding.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-31
Backing up all users assigned to a particular class of service
Backing up all users assigned to a particular class of service
Introduction
The selective backup Class of Service option backs up selected
classes of service. Up to 15 classes of service may be specified.
Recommendation
It is recommended that you perform selective backups on a
different tape from other backups (such a volume backups.)
Labeling backup tapes During every backup, all tapes should be labeled and numbered
as they are removed from the tape drive.
Procedure
To perform a selective backup of selected classes of service,
follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select Volume and Selective Backup.
Result: The Volume and Selective Backup screen appears.
3
Use the arrow keys to move to SELECTIVE BACKUP
Messages and PDLs, press Space Bar to select it, and press
[Backup To Tape].
Result: The Disk to Tape Backup window appears.
Standard 1.0
4
Enter an appropriate label for this backup.
5
Use the arrow keys or space bar to move to COS (class of
service) and press Tab.
6
Enter a list of class of service numbers to be backed up.
7
Do you want to back up now?
•
If yes, then press [Immediate Backup].
Result: The softkeys change to [OK to Start Backup] and
[Cancel].
•
If no, go to “Scheduling the backup for a later time” on
page 15-42.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
15-32
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Backing up all users assigned to a particular class of service
Step Action
8
Insert the tape for backup into the tape drive.
See “Overview” on page 15-16 for information on inserting
tapes.
9
10
Do you want to continue with the backup?
•
If yes, press [OK to Start Backup].
Result: The tape is automatically retensioned.
•
If no, press [Cancel] to return to the Disk to Tape Backup
screen.
If the tape becomes full, you are prompted to insert the next
tape.
Note: Do not remove the tape from the tape drive until it has
finished rewinding.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-33
Backing up all users in a specific department
Backing up all users in a specific department
Introduction
The selective backup Department option backs up all specified
departments. Up to five departments may be specified, but the
actual number of specified departments may be much larger
with the use of wildcards (‘+’ and ‘_’).
Recommendation
It is recommended that you perform selective backups on a
different tape from other backups (such a volume backups.)
Labeling backup tapes During every backup, all tapes should be labeled and numbered
as they are removed from the tape drive.
Procedure
To perform a selective backup of selected departments, follow
these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select Volume and Selective Backup.
Result: The Volume and Selective Backup screen appears.
3
Use the arrow keys to move to SELECTIVE BACKUP
Messages and PDLs, press Space Bar to select it, and press
[Backup To Tape].
Result: The Disk to Tape Backup window appears.
4
Enter an appropriate label for this backup.
5
Use the arrow keys or Space Bar to select Dept, and press
Tab.
6
Enter the department numbers to be backed up. Use wildcards
‘+’ and ‘_’ to specify more than 10 wildcards.
Note: Wildcards are only permitted as the last character of an
input, and only one wildcard is allowed per input field.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
15-34
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Backing up all users in a specific department
Step Action
7
8
Do you want to back up now?
•
If yes, then press [Immediate Backup].
Result: The softkeys change to [OK to Start Backup] and
[Cancel].
•
If no, go to “Scheduling the backup for a later time” on
page 15-42.
Insert the tape for backup into the tape drive.
See “Overview” on page 15-16 for information on inserting
tapes.
9
10
Do you want to continue with the backup?
•
If yes, press [OK to Start Backup].
Result: The tape is automatically retensioned.
•
If no, press [Cancel] to return to the Disk to Tape Backup
screen.
If the tape becomes full, you are prompted to insert the next
tape.
Note: Do not remove the tape from the tape drive until it has
finished rewinding.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-35
Backing up all multimedia services
Backing up all multimedia services
Introduction
The selective backup All option backs up all multimedia
services.
Recommendation
It is recommended that you perform selective backups on a
different tape from other backups (such a volume backups.)
Labeling backup tapes During every backup, all tapes should be labeled and numbered
as they are removed from the tape drive.
Procedure
To perform a selective backup of all multimedia services,
follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select Volume and Selective Backup.
Result: The Volume and Selective Backup screen appears.
3
Use the arrow keys to move to SELECTIVE BACKUP Services,
press the Space Bar to select it, and press [Backup To Tape].
Result: The Disk to Tape Backup window appears.
4
Enter an appropriate label for this selective backup.
5
Use the arrow keys or Space Bar to move to All.
6
Do you want to back up now?
7
•
If yes, then press [Immediate Backup].
Result: The softkeys change to [OK to Start Backup] and
[Cancel].
•
If no, go to “Scheduling the backup for a later time” on
page 15-42.
Insert the tape for backup into the tape drive.
See “Overview” on page 15-16 for information on inserting
tapes.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
15-36
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Backing up all multimedia services
Step Action
8
9
Do you want to continue with the backup?
•
If yes, press [OK to Start Backup].
Result: The tape is automatically retensioned.
•
If no, press [Cancel] to return to the Disk to Tape Backup
screen.
If the tape becomes full, you are prompted to insert the next
tape.
Note: Do not remove the tape from the tape drive until it has
finished rewinding.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-37
Backing up selected individual multimedia services
Backing up selected individual multimedia services
Introduction
The selective backup Individual option backs up all specified
multimedia services. Services are specified by service ID. There
are 30 input areas for specified services, which can be expanded
with the use of ‘+’ and ‘_’ wildcards.
Recommendation
It is recommended that you perform selective backups on a
different tape from other backups (such a volume backups.)
Procedure
To perform a selective backup of all multimedia services,
follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select Volume and Selective Backup.
Result: The Volume and Selective Backup screen appears.
3
Use the arrow keys to move to SELECTIVE BACKUP Services,
press the Space Bar to select it, and press [Backup To Tape].
Result: The Disk to Tape Backup window appears.
4
Enter an appropriate label for this selective backup.
5
Use the arrow keys or space bar to select Individual, and press
Tab.
6
Enter the numbers for service ID for all services to be backed
up. Use wildcards ‘+’ and ‘_’ to specify more than 10 wildcards.
Note: Wildcards are only permitted as the last character of an
input, and only one wildcard is allowed per input field.
7
Standard 1.0
Do you want to back up now?
•
If yes, then press [Immediate Backup].
Result: The softkeys change to [OK to Start Backup] and
[Cancel].
•
If no, go to “Scheduling the backup for a later time” on
page 15-42.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
15-38
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Backing up selected individual multimedia services
Step Action
8
Insert the tape for backup into the tape drive.
See “Overview” on page 15-16 for information on inserting
tapes.
9
10
Do you want to continue with the backup?
•
If yes, press [OK to Start Backup].
Result: The tape is automatically retensioned.
•
If no, press [Cancel] to return to the Disk to Tape Backup
screen.
If the tape becomes full, you are prompted to insert the next
tape.
Note: Do not remove the tape from the tape drive until it has
finished rewinding.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Section D:
15-39
Partial backups to disk
In this section
Performing a partial backup to disk
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
15-40
January 1998
15-40
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Performing a partial backup to disk
Performing a partial backup to disk
Introduction
Backups to disk are only partial backups as the Voice and Data
backup option is not allowed for user volumes. The backups
options are Voice and Data for the system volume, and Data for
user volumes.
Procedure
To perform a partial backup to disk, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select Volume and Selective Backup.
Result: The Volume and Selective Backup screen appears.
3
Position the arrow on the volume you want to backup and press
<Space bar> to select it.
4
Enter an appropriate label for this backup.
5
Press [Backup to Disk].
Result: The Disk to Disk Backup screen appears.
6
7
Standard 1.0
Do you want to back up now?
•
If yes, then press [Immediate Backup].
Result: The softkeys change to [OK to Start Backup] and
[Cancel].
•
If no, go to “Scheduling the backup for a later time” on
page 15-42.
Do you want to continue with the backup?
•
If yes, press [OK to Start Backup] to initiate the backup.
Result: The Backup status screen appears.
•
If no, press [Cancel] to return to the Disk to Disk backup
screen.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Section E:
15-41
Scheduled backups
In this section
Standard 1.0
Scheduling the backup for a later time
15-42
Deleting a scheduled backup
15-45
System Administration Guide
January 1998
15-42
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Scheduling the backup for a later time
Scheduling the backup for a later time
Introduction
The Schedule Backup screen allows you to schedule the backup
frequency (daily, weekly, or monthly) and start time for your
backup to occur. This allows you to schedule a backup for
which you do not need to be present.
ATTENTION
Do not schedule important backups between 1:00 a.m. and
5:00 a.m. when important system audits occur. Do not
schedule a backup if more than one tape is required.
The Schedule Backup
screen
Standard 1.0
This is the Schedule Backup screen.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
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15-43
Scheduling the backup for a later time
Field descriptions
This table describes fields in the Schedule Backup screen.
Backup frequency
Description
This field determines how often scheduled backups
occur.
Default
Weekly
Valid options
Daily, Weekly, Monthly
Weekly
Description
This field determines on which day of the week
weekly backups occur.
Conditions of
display
This field is displayed if the backup frequency is
Weekly.
Default
Sun
Valid options
Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, Sat
Day of Month
Description
This field determines on which day of the month
monthly backups occur.
Conditions of
display
This field is displayed only if the backup
frequency is Monthly.
Default
1
Valid range
0 to 31
Backup start time
Standard 1.0
Description
This is the time of day at which scheduled backups
begin.
Default
00:00
Valid range
00:00 to 23:59
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Scheduling the backup for a later time
Tape label
Description
This is the label that is given to the backup tape.
Default
Blank
Information to backup
Description
Procedure
This field displays the volumes you have selected
to back up, or the criteria specified for a selective
backup.
To schedule a backup, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select Volume and Selective Backup.
Result: The Volume and Selective Backup screen appears.
3
Position the cursor on the volumes and selective backups you
want to back up and press <Space Bar> to select them.
4
Press [Backup to Tape] or [Backup to Disk].
5
Press [Schedule Backup].
6
Move the cursor to the required backup frequency (daily,
weekly, or monthly) and press Return.
Result: For weekly backups, the screen displays the days of
the week; for monthly backups, the screen displays a prompt
for the date on which the backups will occur.
7
For weekly backups, choose the day on which the backup will
occur. For monthly backups, enter the required date.
8
Enter the backup start time.
9
Do you want to save the schedule?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, press [Save Schedule].
If no, press [Cancel] to return to the Volume and Selective
Backup screen.
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January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-45
Deleting a scheduled backup
Deleting a scheduled backup
Introduction
The View/Delete Backup Schedule screen displays the
currently scheduled backups. The screen is read-only and
displays the current settings of the backup schedule, including
the type of backup (to disk or tape), frequency of backup, start
time, backup selection, and backup options.
Procedure
To delete a previously scheduled backup, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select Volume and Selective Backup.
Result: The Volume and Selective Backup screen appears.
3
Press [View/Delete Schedule].
Result: The View/Delete Backup Schedule screen appears.
4
Press [Cancel Schedule].
Result: The schedule is deleted and you are returned to the
Volume and Selective Backup screen.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
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Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Deleting a scheduled backup
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
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Section F:
15-47
Backup maintenance
In this section
Standard 1.0
Checking the status of a backup
15-48
Cleaning/maintaining the tape drive
15-52
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January 1998
15-48
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Checking the status of a backup
Checking the status of a backup
Introduction
The Backup Status screen displays the current status of a
backup, if one is in progress. The screen displays the time at
which the backup started, time remaining for backup
completion, volumes being backed up, selective backup criteria,
and current progress of the backup. Time remaining will not be
shown if selective backup was chosen.
Exceptions
If you are performing a partial backup (Data) of a volume, there
is an intermediate step in the backup process that will be
reported in the status screen.
VS901T is used as a partial backup of VS202T, VS203T,
VS204T, and VS205T. Text files are first copied to VS901T
and then copied from VS901T to tape. While files are being
copied to VS901T, the tape drive will be inactive. The status of
VS901T will be reported on the Backup status screen while the
backup is occurring.
Standard 1.0
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15-49
Checking the status of a backup
The Backup Status
This is the Backup Status screen for a partial backup.
screen: partial backup
The Backup Status
screen: selective
backup
Standard 1.0
This is the Backup Status screen for a selective backup. There is
no Time Remaining field.
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Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Checking the status of a backup
Field descriptions
The following table provides field descriptions for the Backup
Status screen.
Backup Started
Description
The date and time the current backup started.
Date format
The date format is determined by the Date Format
for Administration and Maintenance Reports field
in the General Options screen.
Time Remaining
Description
This is the time remaining to complete the backup,
displayed in hh:mm.
Conditions of
display
This field is not displayed if selective backup is
chosen.
Backup Completed
Description
This is the date and time at which the backup was
completed.
If the backup is still in progress, this field displays
“Immediate backup in progress.”
Tape Label
Description
This is the label that was assigned to the tape.
Backup Volumes
Description
If a full or partial backup is being performed, this
field displays the list of volumes that are being
backed up.
Backup Selected
Description
Standard 1.0
If a selective backup is being performed, this field
displays the criteria chosen to selected users and/or
services for backup.
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15-51
Checking the status of a backup
Procedure
To check the status of a current backup, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select Volume and Selective Backup.
Result: The Volume and Selective Backup screen appears.
3
Press [Backup Status].
Result: The Backup Status screen appears displaying
information about the backup in progress, or about the last
backup that was completed.
4
When you are finished viewing the status, you can exit the
screen or abort the backup.
• To exit the Backup Status screen, press [Exit].
• To abort a current backup, press [Abort Backup].
Result: You are returned to the Volume and Selective Backup
screen.
Standard 1.0
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Cleaning/maintaining the tape drive
Cleaning/maintaining the tape drive
Guidelines
Preventive maintenance of the tape drive involves periodic
cleaning after every four to six hours of use.
Precautions
To ensure reliable tape drive performance, you should establish
a regular cleaning schedule and observe the following
precautions:
•
•
•
•
•
Reference
Standard 1.0
Maintain a clean, dust-free environment within the
temperature and humidity limits listed in the specifications
of the Meridian Mail system.
Keep all liquids away from the drive and tapes to prevent
spills into the equipment.
Exercise reasonable care when using and storing tape
cartridges. Do not place cartridges on the Meridian Mail or
Meridian 1 cabinets, or on the monitor of the system
administrator’s terminal.
When a stored tape is moved to an environment with a
greatly different temperature, allow the tape to slowly
reach room temperature before using it.
Do not touch the tape surface.
For detailed procedures on cleaning and maintaining the tape
drive, see the Meridian Mail Installation and Maintenance
Guide (NTP 555-70x1-250).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Section G:
15-53
Restoring information from a
Selective backup
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
15-54
Restore from Selective backup
15-56
System Administration Guide
January 1998
15-54
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This section provides information on restoring from a Selective
backup.
Description
The Selective Restore feature allows for an online restore of
users’ messages, individually specified Personal Distribution
Lists (PDLs), or multimedia services. An entire mailbox is not
restored, only the messages and PDLs for an existing mailbox.
When restoring a user’s messages and PDLs, the user is locked
out of his or her mailbox until the restore is complete.
Restoring messages
and PDLs
In restoring both messages and PDLs, if one already exists, it is
not overwritten. For VMUIF users, no message will be restored
to a mailbox once it is full. For MMUIF users, all messages are
restored unless the Call Answering Blocking Factor is set.
Call Answering Blocking Factor limits the number of call
answering messages that can be deposited in a mailbox once the
number of messages in the mailbox exceeds the mailbox storage
limit.
Restoring multimedia
services
Restoring multimedia services can be done by service ID, or by
restoring all services.
Restore exceptions
Data not restored from a selective backup includes mailbox
configuration such as passwords, auto-login, storage limits,
login status, and other data kept in the user’s profile.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-55
Overview
The More Detail
screen
The Restore from Selective Backup More Detail screen
provides a summary of the data backed up on a backup tape.
The More Detail screen is accessed by the [More Detail]
softkey in the Selective Backup and Restore screen.
Reference
For information on Full and Partial restores, see Chapter 6,
“Restore system from backup,” in the System Installation and
Modifications Guide (NTP 555-7001-215).
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
15-56
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Restore from Selective backup
Restore from Selective backup
Introduction
The Selective backup option allows you to restore messages,
PDLs, and multimedia services. This procedure allows you to
select to restore none, all, or individual messages, PDLs, and
multimedia services.
If you choose None, then nothing for that option will be
restored. If you choose All, then everything for that option will
be restored. If you choose Individual, then the system displays a
list of the available Individual options from which to select. If
you require more information about your restore tape, when in
the Selective Restore screen, press [More Detail].
Procedure
To restore from a selective backup, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select Restore from Selective Backup.
Result: The Restore from Selective Backup screen appears
and prompts you to insert the restore tape in the tape drive.
3
Insert the tape in the tape drive, and press [OK to Read Tape].
Result: The tape drive retensions the tape. This takes
approximately three to four minutes. Once the tape is
retensioned, the screen displays the tape label and creation
date.
Note: If you require more information about the restore tape
that you are using, press [More Detail] which will present a
more detailed summary of the criteria used to perform the initial
backup.
4
Use the arrow keys or space bar to select one of None, All, or
Individual for Messages and PDLs, and press Tab.
If you choose Individual, enter the mailbox(es), then select Yes
or No for each of the Mailboxes, to restore messages or not
respectively, and enter the PDL numbers you want to be
restored.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
15-57
Restore from Selective backup
Step Action
5
Use the arrow keys or Space Bar to select one of None, All, or
Individual for Services, and press Tab.
If you choose Individual, then enter the Service IDs that you
want restored.
6
Once you have selected all the required restore options, press
[Restore].
Result: The system begins to read the requested data from the
tape and transfer it to disk. Status information is displayed as %
complete in the Status field.
Note: When the restore is finished, a summary line will show
the number of successes and failures for both mailboxes and
services.
7
Do you want to perform another restore?
•
•
8
Standard 1.0
If yes, repeat steps 3 to 7.
If no, go to step 9.
Press [Exit] to return to the General Administration screen.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
15-58
Back up and restore Meridian Mail data
Restore from Selective backup
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 16
Password and system time
changes
In this chapter
Overview
16-2
Changing the system administrator password
16-3
Changing the customer administrator password for MATs
and Meridian Mail AutoAdmin
16-5
Setting the minimum password length for all administrator 16-7
passwords
The AdminPlus Download password
16-8
Changing the system time
16-10
16-2
Password and system time changes
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This chapter describes
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
how and how often to change the Administrator password
and the AdminPlus Download password
how to set the minimum length for the System and
Customer Administrator passwords
how to change Meridian Mail’s system time setting
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Password and system time changes
16-3
Changing the system administrator password
Changing the system administrator password
Introduction
When the Meridian Mail system is first installed, you are given
a default system administrator password (adminpwd). When
you log on for the first time using this default password, you are
prompted for a new password.
Password
requirements
Passwords are not case sensitive; any capitalization used in
defining the password need not be used when entering the
password. The password can contain both alpha and numeric
characters.
The minimum password length is set in the General Options
screen. See “Setting the minimum password length for all
administrator passwords” on page 16-7. The default length is
six characters. It is recommended that your administration
password be at least seven characters for added security. The
longer the password, the better.
Frequency of
password changes
Once you have initially changed your password, you should
continue to change it on a regular basis.
Procedure
To change the system administrator password, follow these
steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select Change System Administrator Password.
Result: You are prompted to enter the existing system
administrator password.
3
Enter the existing password.
Note: The passwords are not displayed on the screen as you
enter them.
Result: You are prompted to enter the new administrator
password.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
16-4
Password and system time changes
Changing the system administrator password
Step Action
4
Enter the new password.
Result: You are prompted to enter the new password again for
verification purposes.
5
Reenter the new password.
Result: The new password is recorded and you are returned to
the General Administration menu.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Password and system time changes
16-5
Changing the customer administrator password for MATs and Meridian Mail AutoAdmin
Changing the customer administrator password for MATs
and Meridian Mail AutoAdmin
Introduction
If the Multiple Administration Terminals (MATs) feature or the
Meridian Mail AutoAdmin feature is installed, the password
you use to log on is called the Customer Administrator
Password. The default password is custpwd.
The first time you log on with this password, you are forced to
change it for security purposes.
However, any subsequent password changes must be done from
the General Administration menu.
Password
requirements
Passwords are not case sensitive; any capitalization used in
defining the password need not be used when entering the
password. The password can contain both alpha and numeric
characters.
The minimum password length is set in the General Options
screen. See “Setting the minimum password length for all
administrator passwords” on page 16-7. The default length is
six characters. It is recommended that your administration
password be at least seven characters for added security. The
longer the password, the better.
Frequency of
password changes
Standard 1.0
Once you have initially changed your password, you should
continue to change it on a regular basis.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
16-6
Password and system time changes
Changing the customer administrator password for MATs and Meridian Mail AutoAdmin
Procedure
To change the customer administrator password, follow these
steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select Change Customer Administrator Password.
Result: You are prompted to enter the existing customer
administrator password.
3
Enter the existing password.
Note: The passwords are not displayed on the screen as you
enter them.
Result: You are prompted to enter the new administrator
password.
4
Enter the new password.
Result: You are prompted to enter the new password again for
verification purposes.
5
Enter the new password.
Result: The new password is recorded and you are returned to
the General Administration menu.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Password and system time changes
16-7
Setting the minimum password length for all administrator passwords
Setting the minimum password length for all administrator
passwords
Introduction
Longer passwords generally offer higher system security. At
least seven characters in length is a minimum recommendation.
The minimum length you set here will be applied when system
administrator and customer administrator passwords are
changed.
Default minimum
password length
The default minimum password length is 6 characters, and the
maximum length is 16 characters.
Procedure
To check or change the current minimum administration
password length setting, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select General Options.
Result: The General Options screen appears.
3
Cursor down to the Minimum Admin Password Length field.
4
Enter the new Minimum Admin Password Length, and press
<Return>. The number must be a value between 6 and 16.
5
When you have entered the new value, press <Save>.
Result: The new Minimum Admin Password Length is
recorded and you are returned to the General Options menu.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
16-8
Password and system time changes
The AdminPlus Download password
The AdminPlus Download password
Introduction
The AdminPlus Download password allows Meridian Mail
Reporter to download data from the system. This password
must match the OM password on the Meridian Mail Reporter
side before data can be downloaded. Both passwords must be
set up when the system is installed as the default values will not
allow the download to take place.
Note: This capability is only available if AdminPlus is an
installed feature.
Password
requirements
Passwords are not case sensitive; any capitalization used in
defining the password need not be used when entering the
password. The password can contain both alpha and numeric
characters.
The minimum password length is 1 character, and the maximum
length is 16 characters. It is recommended that your AdminPlus
password be at least seven characters for added security. The
longer the password, the better.
Frequency of
password changes
Once you have initially changed your password, you should
continue to change it on a regular basis.
Procedure
To change the AdminPlus password, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select Change AdminPlus Password.
Result: You are prompted to enter the existing system
administrator password.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Password and system time changes
16-9
The AdminPlus Download password
Step Action
3
Enter the existing password.
Note: The passwords are not displayed on the screen as you
enter them.
Result: You are prompted to enter the new AdminPlus
password.
4
Enter the new password.
Result: You are prompted to enter the new password again for
verification purposes.
5
Enter the new password.
Result: The new password is recorded and you are returned to
the General Administration menu.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
16-10
Password and system time changes
Changing the system time
Changing the system time
Introduction
The Meridian Mail system gets its time from the Meridian 1. It
receives time stamps passed from the switch at regular intervals.
However, you can set up your Meridian Mail database while the
link to the switch is down. If you will be configuring the
database when the link is not operational, you will have to set
the system time on the Meridian Mail side. Then, once the link
is up, the switch time will override the Meridian Mail time.
Procedure
To change the system time, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Select General Administration.
Result: The General Administration screen appears.
2
Select Change System Time.
Result: You are prompted to enter the date and time.
3
Enter the date and time, and press <Return>.
Result: The clock is synchronized to the clocking signals from
the network, the time is recorded, and the General
Administration screen is redisplayed.
4
Standard 1.0
When you have set the system time, press <Exit>.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 17
Dialing translations
In this chapter
Overview
17-2
Section A: Introduction to dialing translations
17-3
Section B: How dialing translations work
17-17
Section C: Setting up network dialing prefixes and local
defaults
17-29
Section D: Setting up translation tables
17-43
Section E: Sample datafills
17-69
Section F: Troubleshooting dialing translations
17-75
17-2
Dialing translations
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This chapter introduces dialing translations as a concept and the
ways that you, as the system administrator, can plan and set up
dialing translation defaults and translation tables, if necessary.
Meridian Mail users do not directly access dialing translations.
Taking the features and requirements of the system into
consideration, the administrator needs to examine how private
or public network numbers are dialed. Various features then use
dialing translations to produce dialable numbers.
In the chapter, you will find explanations of what translations
are, how they function, and when they are required. In addition,
this chapter contains procedures that guide you through the
administration of dialing translations.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
Section A:
17-3
Introduction to dialing
translations
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
17-4
Dialing translations
17-5
Default dialing prefixes and local system defaults
17-7
When default dialing translations defaults are required
17-10
Translation tables
17-12
When translation tables are required
17-14
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-4
Dialing translations
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This section introduces the concept of dialing translations and
the ways in which they are implemented.
This section discusses the two main parts of dialing translations:
dialing translation defaults and translation tables.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-5
Dialing translations
Dialing translations
Description
Dialing translations are the means by which Meridian Mail
transforms a number into a dialable directory number (DN). For
instance, translation determines how to dial a DN depending on
whether a number is a local, national, international, or ESN.
How translations are
used
Users of Meridian Mail do not directly use translation. Rather,
certain features use dialing translations in order to generate a
dialable DN to call back:
•
•
The system administrator uses default dialing prefixes to
handle normal situations for local, national, international
and (if they exist) ESN calls.
Exceptional situations, such as calls to other area codes that
are still considered local calls, use translation tables.
Example
For example, if a caller requests that a fax be sent to 214-5551234 (a long distance number), this number must be translated
into a DN that can be dialed from your system. In this case, the
dialable DN must include the long distance dialing prefix. If
your system dials “91” to place long distance calls, then the
resulting DN will be 91-214-555-1234.
Features that use
dialing translations
The following features use dialing translations:
•
•
Standard 1.0
Fax on Demand
- For example, a user calls Meridian Mail, enter a fax
number without a prefix and wait for the fax to call
back.
AMIS Networking
- For example, a user receives a message from a remote
AMIS site and the number is included in the message
header. The number must be translated to use the Reply
feature to call back.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-6
Dialing translations
Dialing translations
•
Outcalling does not
use translations
Standard 1.0
External CLID
- For example, CLID collects the caller’s number from
the switch. Meridian Mail translates the number, and it
is announced in a message to you with the prefixes
included, ready to dial out.
Default dialing prefixes are not required for outcalling (remote
notification and delivery to non-user.) The numbers entered are
already in a dialable format and, therefore, do not need to be
translated for a callback.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-7
Default dialing prefixes and local system defaults
Default dialing prefixes and local system defaults
Introduction
There are two levels to the translation process. The first level
involves dialing translation defaults, which include default
dialing prefixes and local system defaults. Both are used only
under normal dialing conditions.
Default dialing
prefixes
The system administrator must define four default dialing
prefixes:
•
•
•
•
local
long distance
international
ESN
These prefixes are the dialing digits that are used to dial out of
the switch to place local, long distance, international, and ESN
calls using either the public network, the ESN network, or a
combination of both.
Meridian Mail uses these prefixes to generate a DN that is
understandable to the switch.
Local dialing prefix
This is the prefix that is used by the system to dial out of the
switch and access the public network or a private network in
order to place a local call.
Format
The prefix you enter will depend on whether you use a private
network or a public network to place local calls. Typical
examples of network dialing prefixes are 9 or 8 to access the
public network.
To access a private ESN network is a little more complicated.
You would typically dial 6 plus the digits needed to make a
national call to the same local site. For instance, the area/city
code of Manhattan is 212, so the prefix would be 61212.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-8
Dialing translations
Default dialing prefixes and local system defaults
Long distance dialing
prefix
This is the prefix that is used by the system to dial out of the
switch and access the public network or a private network in
order to place a long distance call.
Format
The prefix you enter will depend on whether you use a private
network or a public network to place long distance calls.
Typical examples of long distance dialing prefixes are 91 or 81
in North America, or 90 or 80 in Germany, to access the public
network, or 6 to access a private ESN network.
International dialing
prefix
This is the prefix that is used by the system to dial out of the
switch and access the public network or a private network in
order to place an international call.
Format
The prefix you enter will depend on whether you use a private
network or a public network to place international calls. Typical
examples of international dialing prefixes in North America are
9011 or 8011 to access the public network, or 6011 to access a
private ESN network.
An international dialing prefix in England, for example, is 900.
ESN dialing prefix
This is the prefix that is used by the system to access the private
ESN network.
Local system defaults
Local system defaults identify the country and the area/city
codes of the switch connected to your Meridian Mail.
You will fill out these fields to inform Meridian Mail of its
location within the public network. This information is used by
dialing translations to determine how to translate a number.
Country code
Identify the country code for your system. (For instance, it is 1
for the U.S.A. and Canada. It is 44 for England, 61 for Austria,
and 86 for China.)
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-9
Default dialing prefixes and local system defaults
Local system defaults
(cont’d)
Area/city code
Identify the area/city code for the local system.
The term “area/city code” is used to define either area code or
city code. The two terms are used interchangeably.
Countries that use city codes should use this field for city codes,
and countries that use area codes should use the field for area
codes. However, if a country uses both area and city code for its
dialing plan, the field should be used for either the area or city
codes for the site in which the Meridian Mail is located.
When a number that includes an area/city code is provided by a
caller for a fax callback delivery or by a user when replying to
an AMIS message, it will be stripped out if it matches the code
entered in the field.
Example
A caller requests that a fax item be sent (using callback
delivery) to the DN 416-555-9911. The local system’s area/city
code is also 416. Therefore, the area code will be stripped out
and the dialable DN will be 9-555-9911, where 9 is the network
dialing prefix (for local calls).
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-10
Dialing translations
When default dialing translations defaults are required
When default dialing translations defaults are required
Description
The dialing translation defaults must be filled in before features
like AMIS networking, Fax on Demand, and External CLID can
be used.
The dialing translation defaults consist of
•
•
Scenario
default dialing prefixes
This is where you specify the network access codes that are
used by your system for placing local calls, long distance
calls, international calls and ESN calls. These prefixes are
needed to generate dialable DNs from
- fax callback numbers
- numbers contained in the headers of AMIS messages
(so that local users can reply to AMIS messages)
- numbers of external callers who left messages with
users on your system
local system defaults
This is where you enter the country code and the area/city
code of your Meridian Mail site. These codes are used to
determine if the country or area/city code entered by a
caller needs to be stripped out.
In a Fax on Demand application, for example, a caller includes
the country code and area/city code in the callback number he
or she has entered.
Meridian Mail checks the values defined to see if the country
and area/city codes specified in the callback number match the
codes of the Meridian Mail system. If there is a match, the
country and area/city codes which are not required, if any, for
dialing purposes and are stripped out.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-11
When default dialing translations defaults are required
Example of the
scenario
A caller enters 1-214-555-2222 as a callback number for a fax.
The country code (1) and the area/city code (214) are the same
as the one for the Meridian Mail system. Therefore these codes
are not needed to dial the number.
Meridian Mail strips out the 1214, gets the network dialing
prefix for local dialing (9), and generates the following dialable
DN: 9-555-2222.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-12
Dialing translations
Translation tables
Translation tables
Concept
Translation tables are the second level of the translation
process, after the dialing translation defaults.
These tables handle certain dialing exceptions that may not
arise in your system. Therefore, translation tables will not be
required by all systems.
For example, in a normal local dialing scenario, the area/city
code (in North America, it is called the Numbering Plan Area or
NPA) of the calling site is the same as the called site. A call in
this situation would be handled by the dialing defaults.
However, there may be a dialing scenario where the area/city
codes are different but the call is still considered local. A
translation table would have to handle this case in order to
determine that the call in question could be handled as local
rather than as long distance.
The exceptional cases that require translation tables are outlined
in “When translation tables are required” on page 17-14.
Restriction/
permission lists
Meridian Mail applies translation tables before checking
restriction/permission lists.
Example
For example, a call to another area/city code is considered local,
and the restriction/permission list applied to a Fax on Demand
application allows only local calls.
If a translation table is not set up for this exceptional dialing
scenario, the system will assume that the callback number is
long distance (because the area/city code is different from the
local site) and Meridian Mail will not deliver the fax (since the
restriction/permission list does not allow delivery to long
distance numbers).
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-13
Translation tables
Restrictions for AMIS
and Fax on Demand
Standard 1.0
For more information on how restrictions and permissions
interact with Fax on Demand and AMIS Networking, refer to
the following NTPs: Fax on Demand Application Guide
(NTP 555-7001-327) and the AMIS Networking Installation
and Administration Guide (NTP 555-7001-242).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-14
Dialing translations
When translation tables are required
When translation tables are required
Description
Translation tables need only be defined if
1.
some calls placed to the same area/city code as the local
site are dialed differently than local (for example, long
distance)
2.
calls placed to different area codes are not dialed long
distance
For example, if calls to some numbers in an area/city code are
long distance, while calls to other numbers in that same area/
city code are local, a translation table would be used to
determine dialable DNs. This situation is normally dictated by
the dialing plan of the local public network.
Translation tables for
four exemplary cases
If any of the following situations occur in your system, you will
have to define a translation table for each area/city code.
Type of dialing
To what area/city code?
Is the area/city code required in
the DN?
Local dialing
Different
Required
Local dialing
Different
Not required
Long distance dialing
Same
Required
Long distance dialing
Same
Not required
In all other dialing scenarios (such as long distance dialing to a
different area/city code and local dialing to the same area/city
code), the network dialing prefixes are used instead.
Example 1
For example, if a neighboring area code (905) contains both
local and long-distance numbers, and a call to a local number in
the 905 area needs a different number format than a call to a
long-distance number in the 905 area, at least one translation
table will be required.
The table determines on the basis of the local prefix which calls
are local, and which are long distance.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-15
When translation tables are required
Consider the following example which shows the dialing plan
of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Example 1 (cont’d)
905 Area/City Code
905 Area/City Code
C
(Vicinity of Toronto)
Long
Distance
Call
416 Area/City Code
(TORONTO)
B
Local A
Call
905
Area/City
Code
Lake Ontario
You can see that both local (A→B) and long-distance (A→C)
dialing is used depending on the location of the destination call.
A translation table must be defined to tell Meridian Mail which
905 numbers must be dialed as long distance and which ones
must be dialed as local.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-16
Dialing translations
When translation tables are required
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
Section B:
17-17
How dialing translations work
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
17-18
How Meridian Mail collects digits
17-19
How dialing translations translate numbers
17-22
How Meridian Mail uses the dialable number
17-27
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-18
Dialing translations
Overview
Overview
Introduction
The dialing translation process occurs in three stages:
•
•
•
input to the translation process (how DN digits are
collected)
the translation itself (how the collected DN is translated)
output from the translation process (what happens to the
translated DN)
This section will discuss each stage.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-19
How Meridian Mail collects digits
How Meridian Mail collects digits
Description
The format in which Meridian Mail requires a DN depends on
the feature using dialing translations.
The three features using dialing translations are
•
•
•
Fax on Demand
AMIS Networking
External Calling Line Identification (External CLID)
The following descriptions explain how each feature collects
digits for translation.
Fax on Demand
When users call the Meridian Mail Fax on Demand service
(VSDN), Meridian Mail prompts users for the number of their
fax machine to which the fax will be sent.
A session profile sets up the operational characteristics of the
Fax on Demand service. Using the session profile, the Fax on
Demand VSDN can be set up as national, international, dial-asentered, or ESN.
This setup is done in the Treat Callback Number As field in the
Session Profile screen for that VSDN.
Different prompts exist for each type of service. The prompts
ask the user to enter the fax number in a particular format
(national, international, dial-as-entered, or ESN.)
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-20
Dialing translations
How Meridian Mail collects digits
Digit collection for fax
callback
The following diagram illustrates the different types of the Fax
on Demand VSDN and what the caller is prompted for each
type.
Type of FOD VSDN
ESN
National
Caller is prompted
to enter
Number (including
area/city code)
International
Caller is prompted
to enter Number
(incl. country code
+ area/city code)
Dial as Entered
Caller is
prompted to
enter the
Number in a
dialable format
Caller is
prompted to
enter ESN
prefix + Number
No translation
occurs
DN is passed for
translation
After the DN is passed for translation, the translation type
depends on the type of FOD VSDN.
For more information about VSDNs, see Chapter 24, “The
VSDN table” under Section E: Session profiles.
AMIS
AMIS collects digits for translation in two ways:
•
Standard 1.0
When an AMIS message is received from a remote AMIS
site, the number from that site (in an international,
nondialable format) is included in the message.
When the user replies to this message, or when the
Meridian Mail system determines that the message cannot
be delivered and generates a Non-Delivery Notification
(NDN) to that remote system, the number must be
translated into dialable DN before the remote system can
be reached.
Refer to the AMIS Networking Installation and
Administration Guide (NTP 555-7001-242) for more
details.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-21
How Meridian Mail collects digits
•
When a message is sent to a Virtual Node AMIS site, the
connection DN defined for that site must be translated into
a dialable DN.
Refer to the Virtual Node AMIS Networking Installation
and Administration Guide (NTP 555-7001-245) for more
details.
In both AMIS cases, the number is translated as an international
number.
External CLID
External CLID collects digits from the switch. When an
external caller calls a user at the local system and leaves a
message for the local user, the caller’s number is passed to
Meridian Mail by the switch. The type of this number (national,
international, ESN, and so on) is also passed to Meridian Mail
from the switch.
In order to make this number dialable, the External CLID
feature translates the number to a dialable format using dialing
translations. The type of translation depends on the number type
received from the switch.
Suggestions for CLID
This feature must set the translation of the unknown calling
number type to one of the following: local, long distance,
international, or ESN. It means that the system administrator
must be confident that all the unknown incoming calls are the
same type (because all the unknown calls will be translated as
though they were the same type).
If those unknown calls are of more than one type, the system
administrator must either decide not to translate the number (to
treat it as dialed), or not to collect the unknown numbers.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-22
Dialing translations
How dialing translations translate numbers
How dialing translations translate numbers
Introduction
Once the number has been captured (as explained in the
previous section), dialing translations is applied to it.
The following flowcharts illustrate the way in which the
translation is achieved by individual type.
Five translation types are available:
•
•
•
•
•
international
national
local
ESN
dial-as-entered
The translation type used depends on the type of number
collected by the Fax on Demand, AMIS, or External CLID
features. For instance, an international number will undergo an
international translation, and so on.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-23
How dialing translations translate numbers
International number
translation
An international number is always in the format of
•
country code + national significant number
It is translated in the following manner:
Input Number
Is the
Country Code
of this number the
same as the Local
Country Code?
Yes
Strip the Local Country Code from
the number.
No
Add the Prefix for International
Dialing in front of the number.
National Number Translation
Output Number
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-24
Dialing translations
How dialing translations translate numbers
A national number is always in the following format:
National number
translation
•
area/city code + exchange code + station number
It is translated in the following manner:
Input Number
Is there
a translation
table with the
number’s Area/City
Code?
No
No
Yes
Is
the number’s
Area/City Code
the same as the
Local Area/
City Code?
Yes
Is
the number’s
Exchange Code
found in that
table?
No
Yes
Is there
another translation table with
the number’s Area/
City Code?
Attach the Long
Distance Dialing Prefix
to the number.
Yes
No
Strip the Area/City Code
from the number.
Strip the Area/City Code
from the number.
Strip the Area/City Code
from the number.
Attach the Prefix for
Exchange Codes IN the
Table to the number.
Attach the Prefix for
Exchange Codes NOT IN
the Table to the number.
Attach the Local Dialing
Prefix to the number.
Output Number
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-25
How dialing translations translate numbers
Local number
translation
The local number is always in the following format:
•
Local subscriber number (without country code or area/city
code)
The translation proceeds as follows:
Input Number
Attach the Prefix for Local Dialing to the number
Output Number
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-26
Dialing translations
How dialing translations translate numbers
ESN number
translation
The ESN number can be in one of the following formats:
•
•
a number on the ESN network
- for example, 444-1000
where 444 is the location code of the ESN switch, and
1000 is the DN at the ESN location
any number dialable via the ESN network
- for example, 1-212-555-1234
where the entire number can be dialed via the ESN
network by adding the prefix for ESN dialing in front of
it
In both cases, the translation proceeds as follows:
Input Number
Attach the Prefix for ESN Dialing to the number
Output Number
Dial-as-Entered
translation
The dial-as-entered number is always in the following format:
•
Any string of digits
A dial-as-entered number is not translated. The number is
assumed to be dialable exactly as it is specified (that is,
containing all required prefixes and codes).
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-27
How Meridian Mail uses the dialable number
How Meridian Mail uses the dialable number
Introduction
Once the number is translated, it is returned to the feature that
required the translation.
Fax on Demand
For Fax on Demand, the translated number will be checked
against restriction/permissions for that VSDN.
If the number passes the check, Meridian Mail dials the number
so that the requested fax can be delivered to the user. If the fax
fails the restriction/permission check, the user requesting the
fax will be informed that the number cannot be reached from
that service and asked to enter another number.
AMIS
In AMIS, the translated, dialable number will be checked
against AMIS restriction/permission lists. If the number passes
the check, Meridian Mail uses the number to call the remote
AMIS system so that AMIS Networking messages can be
delivered to the system.
If the number fails the check (that is, it is restricted and
Meridian Mail cannot dial the number), the AMIS message will
not be delivered and a Non-Delivery Notification (NDN) will
be sent to the sender of the message.
External CLID
In External CLID, the translated number is used for
•
•
call sender
The user places a call to the number.
announcing the sender’s number
In the message header, or when the user uses call sender, or
call reply.
When the user listens to a message from an external caller, the
user will hear
•
Standard 1.0
“From phone number: <digits>”
where “digits” is the translated number
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-28
Dialing translations
How Meridian Mail uses the dialable number
External CLID (cont’d)
When the user requests a reply or call-sender to the caller, the
number will be announced. When the user requests call sender,
this translated number will be dialed so that the caller who left
the number can be reached.
Note: Before being dialed, the number will also be checked
against the restriction/permission list. Call sender will only
continue if the number passes this check (that is, it is not
restricted.)
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
Section C:
17-29
Setting up network dialing
prefixes and local defaults
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
17-30
Worksheet for default dialing prefixes and local system
defaults
17-31
Dialing translation defaults screen
17-33
Configuring the default dialing prefixes and local system
defaults
17-37
Sample datafills for dialing translation defaults
17-40
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-30
Dialing translations
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This section explains how to set up and maintain dialing
translation defaults for your system.
In addition to explanatory concepts and procedures, there are
sample datafills to which you may compare your system and a
worksheet to help you plan your dialing translations.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-31
Worksheet for default dialing prefixes and local system defaults
Worksheet for default dialing prefixes and local system
defaults
Worksheet
Standard 1.0
You can use the following worksheet to plan default dialing
prefixes and local system defaults.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-32
Dialing translations
Worksheet for default dialing prefixes and local system defaults
Dialing Translation Defaults worksheet
Default Dialing Prefixes
Local Dialing:
Long Distance Dialing:
International Dialing:
ESN Dialing:
Local System Defaults
Local Country Code:
Local Area/City Code:
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-33
Dialing translation defaults screen
Dialing translation defaults screen
Introduction
When you are ready to configure the default dialing prefixes
and the local system defaults, you will need to access the dialing
translation defaults.
The screen
The following shows an example of the Dialing Translation
Defaults screen.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-34
Dialing translations
Dialing translation defaults screen
Field descriptions
The following table describes the fields in the Dialing
Translation Defaults screen.
Local Dialing
Description
This field specifies the prefix needed in front of a
number when dialing it (and the number dialed is
in the same area/city as the Meridian Mail system).
Minimum
length
0 (zero characters)
Maximum
length
10 characters
Valid
characters
0-9, * (where * is a pause)
Long Distance Dialing
Description
This field specifies the prefix used for longdistance dialing of public network numbers.
Meridian Mail places this prefix in front on long
distance DNs before placing a call (for example,
National numbers with a different area/city code)
Minimum
length
Zero characters
Maximum
length
10 characters
Valid
characters
0-9, * (* is a 3-second pause)
International Dialing
Standard 1.0
Description
This field specifies the prefix used for international
dialing of public network numbers. Meridian Mail
places this prefix in front of international DNs (for
example, DNs with a different country code)
Minimum
length
Zero characters
Maximum
length
10 characters
Valid
characters
0-9, * (* is a 3-second pause)
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-35
Dialing translation defaults screen
ESN Dialing
Description
This field specifies the prefix that needs to be
attached to a number to access the ESN network.
Meridian Mail places this prefix in front of ESN
DNs.
Minimum
length
Zero characters
Maximum
length
Three characters
Valid
characters
0-9, * (* is a 3-second pause)
Local Country Code
Description
This field defines the country code of the local
system.
Minimum
length
Zero characters
Maximum
length
Four characters
Valid
characters
0-9, * (* is a 3-second pause)
Local Area/City Code
Standard 1.0
Description
This field defines the area/city code of the local
system.
Minimum
length
0
Maximum
length
Eight characters
Valid
characters
0-9
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-36
Dialing translations
Dialing translation defaults screen
Capture External CLID with Unknown Format
Description
This field specifies whether to capture an external
caller’s number (External CLID) if that caller’s
format is unknown. This capability may be
necessary in the case where the numbers received
by Meridian Mail from the switch are in an
unknown format.
Default
No
Feature
dependency
This field appears only on systems with either
AML or DIAL.
Default Translation for CLID with Unknown Format
Description
This field specifies how the external caller’s
number (External CLID) of unknown type is
translated if it is captured.
Setting this field to Local, National, International,
or ESN results in the External CLID being
translated as though the DN were Local, National,
International, or ESN, respectively.
Standard 1.0
Default
None (that is, no translation is performed on the
number)
Field status
This field appears only if Capture External CLID
with Unknown Format is set to Yes.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-37
Configuring the default dialing prefixes and local system defaults
Configuring the default dialing prefixes and local system
defaults
Introduction
Once you have identified the ways that your system makes
external calls through a private or public network, or a
combination of both, you are ready to configure your dialing
translation defaults which include the default dialing prefixes
and the local system defaults.
Procedure
To configure the default dialing prefixes and the local system
defaults, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Choose General Administration.
Result: The General Administration menu is displayed.
2
Choose Dialing Translation.
Result: The Dialing Translation menu is displayed.
3
Choose Dialing Translation Defaults.
Result: The Dialing Translation Defaults screen is displayed.
4
Define the Prefix for Local Dialing.
Note: For more information, see “Local dialing prefix” on
page 17-7.
5
Define the Prefix for Long Distance Dialing.
Note: For more information, see “Long distance dialing prefix”
on page 17-8.
6
Define the Prefix for International Dialing.
Note: For more information, see “International dialing prefix”
on page 17-8.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
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Dialing translations
Configuring the default dialing prefixes and local system defaults
Step Action
7
Define the Prefix for ESN Dialing.
IF your system is
THEN
connected to an ESN
network
define the prefix.
not connected to an ESN
network
leave the field blank.
Note: For more information, see “ESN dialing prefix” on
page 17-8.
8
Define the local Country Code.
Note: For more information, see “Local system defaults” on
page 17-8.
9
Define the local Area/City Code.
IF
THEN
your MM system is located
in an area code
enter that area code.
your MM system is located
in a city code
enter that city code.
your country does not have
either area or city codes
leave this field blank.
Note: For more information, see “Local system defaults” on
page 17-8.
10
Does your system have AML or DIAL?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, continue with the next step.
If no, go to step 13.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-39
Configuring the default dialing prefixes and local system defaults
Step Action
11
Do you want to capture External CLIDs that are of an unknown
type?
•
•
12
13
Set the “Default Translation for CLID with Unknown Format”
field so that all numbers with an unknown call type will be
translated as though they were all of one format.
IF all numbers of
unknown format are
THEN set the field to
international
International.
national
National.
ESN
ESN.
not to be translated
None.
of various different formats
Nothing. Do not use this field.
Return to step 11, and select
No.
Do you want to save the screen?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, set the “Capture External CLID with Unknown
Format” field to Yes.
If no, set the “Capture External CLID with Unknown Format”
field to No. Go to step 13.
If yes, press the [Save] softkey.
If no, press the [Cancel] softkey.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-40
Dialing translations
Sample datafills for dialing translation defaults
Sample datafills for dialing translation defaults
Introduction
You may compare the following sample datafills of dialing
translation defaults to handle different methods of dialing
(private versus public network).
Defaults screen for
North America
The screen below illustrates a standard dialing plan situation in
Toronto, Ontario, Canada, where the country code is 1and the
area code is 416. In this example, the digit 6 accesses the ESN
network.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-41
Sample datafills for dialing translation defaults
Defaults screen for
England
The screen below illustrates a standard dialing plan situation in
England where the country code is 44. In this example, the digit
6 accesses the ESN network.
All ESN screen
If your system makes all calls though a private network, then
your network dialing prefixes would all begin with the access to
the ESN network. In this example, the digit 6 accesses the ESN
network.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-42
Dialing translations
Sample datafills for dialing translation defaults
Mixture of ESN and
public screen
If your system makes calls through a combination of private and
public networks, then you may use a combination of access
prefixes.
This example illustrates the datafill for a system in which the
local calls are dialed on the public network, but long distance
and international calls are dialed on the ESN network.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 17
Dialing translations
Section D:
17-43
Setting up translation tables
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
17-44
Identifying translation table requirements
17-45
Identifying translation tables required on your system
17-48
Local dialing to a different area/city code (area/city code
required)
17-52
Local dialing to a different area/city code (no area/city code
required)
17-56
Long distance dialing to the same area/city code (area/city
code required)
17-59
Long distance dialing to the same area/city code (area/city
code not required)
17-61
The View/Modify Translation Table screen
17-62
Configuring translation tables
17-64
Deleting translation tables
17-67
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-44
Dialing translations
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This section guides the system administrator through all aspects
of translation tables.
First, this section explains and illustrates the differences
between normal dialing scenarios (ones that do not require
translation tables) and exceptional dialing scenarios (ones that
require translation tables). In so doing, this section
demonstrates when translation tables are needed.
Second, this section explains in detail some of the exceptional
dialing scenarios to provide you with a better idea of what each
scenario is, how to handle each one, and how to handle any
other exceptions that may occur.
Finally, this section contains procedures for adding, modifying,
and deleting translation tables on the Meridian Mail, as well as
field descriptions for those tables.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-45
Identifying translation table requirements
Identifying translation table requirements
Introduction
Not all systems require translation tables, so you must first
identify if there is a need for a table on your system.
If the following cases are the only local and long distance
scenarios that take place, you will not have to create any
translation tables. Meridian Mail will use the prefixes that are
defined in the Dialing Translation Defaults screen to perform all
the translations required.
Normal dialing cases
All DNs with the same area/city code as the local site are treated
as local calls.
All DNs with a different area/city code to the local site, are
treated as long-distance.
Meridian Mail assumes that all the numbers in the local area/
city code are dialed with the local dialing prefix and without the
local area/city code (in other words, with a format such as
9-xxx-xxxx).
Meridian Mail also assumes that all numbers in area/cities other
than the local area/city are dialed with the long distance dialing
prefix and with the area/city code of the number (in other
words, with a format such as 6 [xxx]-xxx-xxxx).
If these two statements are true for your system, you do not
need to define any translation tables. Otherwise, if either or both
of these statements are not always true for your system, then
translation tables will have to be defined for the exceptional
cases.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-46
Dialing translations
Identifying translation table requirements
Dialing cases
requiring translation
tables
Cases 1 and 2
The following table shows examples of the exceptional dialing
scenarios that require translation tables.
Case
Is area/city code in
called DN same as or
different than the
local site’s area/city
code?
Called Area Is
1
Different
Local
Local dialing prefix +
area/city code + local
number
2
Different
Local
Local dialing prefix +
local number
3
Same
Long Distance
Long distance dialing
prefix + area/city
code + local number
4
Same
Long Distance
Long distance dialing
prefix + local number
DN Format needs to
be
Local dialing to another area/city code
For cases 1 and 2, you need to define those instances in which
calls to certain exchanges in another area/city code (other than
your system’s) are considered local.
These are exceptional scenarios and require translation tables.
In the translation table, specify either the exchange codes to
which a call is considered local or the exchange codes to which
a call is considered long distance.
Use the method that results in entering the smaller number of
exchange codes. For example, if 200 exchange codes in the
area/city code are considered local and 12 are long distance,
enter the exchange codes to which dialing is considered long
distance.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-47
Identifying translation table requirements
Cases 3 and 4
Long distance dialing to the same area/city code
For cases 3 and 4, define those instances in which a call to
certain exchanges in the same area/city code as your system’s
area/city code are considered long distance.
These cases are also exceptional scenarios, and require
translation tables. A translation table allows you to define which
exchanges in your area/city are considered local and which
exchange codes are considered long distance.
In the translation table, enter either the exchange code to which
calls are considered long distance or local (depending on which
method results in entering the lesser number of exchange
codes).
Creating multiple
tables
If more than 120 exchange codes are required for one area/city
code, create another table for the area/city code. A number of
tables that are created for the same area/city code can be
considered a “joint” table. If this is the case, the Prefix for
exchange codes not in the table field must be identical for all
tables that are created for the same area/city code.
Other dialing
exceptions
Other dialing exceptions may exist, for example, dialing to the
local area/city with a local dialing prefix and with the local
area/city code in the number dialed. You would also need to
define translation tables for these exceptions.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-48
Dialing translations
Identifying translation tables required on your system
Identifying translation tables required on your system
Introduction
A translation table is needed for an area/city code if calls placed
from your system to that area/city code are made in one of the
ways that are not supported by the dialing translation defaults.
(The scenario where defaults alone support dialing translation is
described in “Identifying translation table requirements” on
page 17-45.)
Area/city code
A translation table is defined for an area/city code. You should
have a good idea of the exchange codes and the two prefixes for
the table before you define the table.
Exchange codes
You should identify the exchange codes for the translation table
before you identify the prefix for the exchange codes in the
table and the prefix for the exchange codes not in the table. This
is because depending on which exchange codes you define in
the table (they may be considered local or long distance), these
prefixes will change.
Prefix for exchange
codes in the table
For those exchange codes that are defined in the table, this
prefix will be used by the system to dial out of the switch and
place the call. Therefore, depending on the scenario, this prefix
will either be for local dialing or long distance dialing. The
prefix is needed to generate a dialable DN that is understood by
the switch.
Prefix for exchange
codes not in the table
For those exchange codes not defined in the table (or any other
table for this area/city code) that belong to the area code to
which the table applies, this prefix will either be for local
dialing or long distance dialing. This prefix is needed to
generate a dialable DN that is understood by the switch.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-49
Identifying translation tables required on your system
Prefixes for exchange
codes - North
American example
This table illustrates the format of the prefixes for exchange
codes in, and not in, the translation table of a North American
dialing plan. Remember that you can find these same examples
in the scenarios described in more detail on the following pages.
Prefix for exchange
codes in table
Prefix for exchange
codes NOT in table
Exchange codes defined in table are
considered local.
Y-NPA (9-905)
P-NPA (9-1-905)
Exchange codes defined in table are
considered long distance.
P-NPA (9-1-905)
Y-NPA (9-905)
Exchange codes defined in table are
considered local.
Y (9)
P (9-1)
Exchange codes defined in table are
considered long distance.
P (9-1)
Y (9)
Exchange codes defined in table are
considered long distance.
P-NPA (9-1-214)
Y (9)
Exchange codes defined in table are
considered local.
Y (9)
P-NPA (9-1-214)
Exchange codes defined in table are
considered long distance.
P (9-1)
Y (9)
Exchange codes defined in table are
considered local.
Y (9)
P (9-1)
Dialing scenario
1. Local dialing to a different area/city
code (area/city code required in DN).
2. Local dialing to a different area/city
code (no area/city code).
3. Long distance dialing to same area/city
code (area/city code required in dialing).
4. Long distance dialing to same area/city
code (area/city code required in dialing).
• Y is the local dialing prefix (9, 8, or 6).
• P is the long distance dialing prefix (91).
• NPA is the Numbering Plan Area (area code).
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-50
Dialing translations
Identifying translation tables required on your system
You can use the following worksheet to plan the exchange
codes in your translation table. Remember that each translation
table may contain up to 120 exchange codes.
Translation table
worksheet
Translation table worksheet
Table ID:
____________
Area/City Code:
_______________
Prefix for exchange codes in the table:
__________________
Prefix for exchange codes NOT in the table:
__________________
Exchange codes:
_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____
_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____
_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____
_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____
_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____
_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____
_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____
_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-51
Identifying translation tables required on your system
Compiling a list of
required translation
tables
To prepare the data for translation tables, follow these steps.
Step Action
1
Does your system need a translation for any of the four
exceptional dialing situations?
•
•
If yes, continue with this procedure.
If no, you do not need this procedure.
2
Select the area code and the two prefixes for exchange codes
in, and not in, the translation table.
3
Fill in the associated exchange codes.
Note: It is recommended that you configure a table that
requires fewer exchange codes for the prefix with exchange
codes in the table than for the prefix with exchange codes not
in the table.
4
Standard 1.0
Repeat steps 2 and 3 if there are more exceptional dialing
cases requiring a table.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-52
Dialing translations
Local dialing to a different area/city code (area/city code required)
Local dialing to a different area/city code (area/city code
required)
Introduction
The area/city code of the dialed DN is different from your local
system’s area/city code, but no long distance charges apply and
a local dialing prefix is required instead of a long distance
prefix. The area/city code is required as part of the dialable DN.
Scenario
This scenario may occur in larger metropolitan areas that are
serviced by a number of area codes. For instance, a large city
may have two or three area/city codes (like 416 and 905) to
cover the entire metropolitan area.
When a call is placed from the 416 area/city code to some
exchange codes in the 905 area/city code, the call may be local.
However, for other exchanges, the call may be considered long
distance. For those exchanges that are considered local, the long
distance prefix must not be inserted in the dialed DN.
In this scenario, the area/city code of the dialed DN is different
than your local system’s area/city code. However, the local
dialing prefix must be included in the dialed number, not the
long distance prefix. (Charges do not apply to certain calls to
the destination area/city code, and the long distance dialing
prefix need not be used.) The area/city code must be part of the
dialable DN.
A translation table is required for each area/city code that has
both local and long distance exchanges, and is dialed from your
local system.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-53
Local dialing to a different area/city code (area/city code required)
Area/city code
required for local call
As you can see in the following diagram, in the 905 area code,
the exchange codes 22x (which means from 220 to 229), 232,
235, 236, and 555 are local from the 416 area/city code.
Exchanges 231, 237, 238, 33x, 34x, 60x, 61x are all long
distance from the 416 area/city code
.
905
area/city
code
416
area/city
code
Exchanges
26x
27x
Meridian
31x
Mail
322
Site
325
322-1111
329
41x
42x
Example
Local
Exchanges
22x
232
235
236
555
Long distance
231
237
238
33x
34x
60x
61x
Your Meridian Mail system is located in area/city code 416.
The network dialing prefix is 9 and the long distance prefix is
91. A caller phones your system and requests a fax item. Your
Fax on Demand service is configured for callback delivery, so
the caller is prompted for a callback number in national format.
The caller enters 1-905-555-2121 (the 1 is the country code).
If you look at the exchange code diagram above, you will notice
that calls to the 555 exchange are considered local. The dialable
DN is therefore 9-905-555-2121, and not 91-905-555-2121.
Translation table
setup (version 1)
Standard 1.0
The screen example on page 17-54 shows the translation table
that you would have to create to handle the above scenario. This
screen example assumes that the local dialing prefix is 9 and
that the long distance dialing prefix is 91.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-54
Dialing translations
Local dialing to a different area/city code (area/city code required)
Screen (version 1)
The following screen illustrates the version 1 translation table.
Logic of version 1
This example selects those exchange codes in area/city code
905 that require only a local call to area/city code 416. The
example shows that the exchange codes (22x, 232, 235, 236,
and 555) are local and, therefore, they are assigned the Prefix
for exchange codes in the table.
Any other exchange code will be considered long distance by
consequence and will be assigned the long distance prefix
(91-905), which is defined in the Prefix for exchange codes not
in the table field.
Standard 1.0
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January 1998
Dialing translations
17-55
Local dialing to a different area/city code (area/city code required)
Translation table
setup (version 2)
You could also define the translation in the inverse manner
from version 1. That is, you could define the exchange codes
that require the long distance prefix, while the remaining
exchange codes would be assigned the local prefix by default.
Screen (version 2)
The following screen illustrates the version 2 translation table.
Logic of version 2
The exchange codes that are long distance within the 905 area/
city code are explicitly defined in the table instead of the local
codes. (Note that the two prefixes for exchange codes in the
table and exchange codes not in the table fields are reversed
from version 1).
Hint for planning
translation tables
The way in which you define the table will depend on how
many exchange codes within the area/city code are considered
local and how many are considered long distance. If, for
example, 100 exchange codes in the 905 area/city code are long
distance and ten are local, the version 1 translation table would
be easier to create since you would have to define only ten
codes. However, if there were more local exchange codes than
long distance codes, you would create a table similar to that in
version 2.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-56
Dialing translations
Local dialing to a different area/city code (no area/city code required)
Local dialing to a different area/city code (no area/city code
required)
Introduction
This scenario is almost identical to the first scenario because
there is local dialing from one area/city code to a different area/
city code. However, the difference is that no area/city code is
required in the dialable DN. Using the example from
page 17-52, the dialable DN would be 9-555-2121 instead of
9-905-555-2121.
Scenario
This situation may occur if, for example, a metropolitan area is
in the process of adopting a new area code in which certain
exchanges will be considered local (as described in the previous
example).
Therefore, in the exchange code diagram that follows, the first
column of exchange codes in the 905 area code are local if
dialed from the 416 area code. In order to make the transition
easier for people in the area, the service provider will allow
calls to the local exchanges in the 905 area code to be placed
without the area/city code since this is what people are
accustomed to dialing. However, after a certain specified date
(when the phone company ends the transition period), the new
area code will have to be entered and the translation table
prefixes updated (to those in the previous example).
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-57
Local dialing to a different area/city code (no area/city code required)
Area/city code not
required for local call
This diagram shows the same relationship between 416 and 905
area/city codes as in the previous example except that this time
an area/city code is not required to make a local or a long
distance call.
905
area/city
code
416
area/city
code
Exchanges
26x
27x
Meridian
31x
Mail
322
Site
325
322-1111
329
41x
42x
Example
Standard 1.0
Local
Exchanges
22x
232
235
236
555
Long distance
231
237
238
33x
34x
60x
61x
If you had to create a translation table to handle the instance in
the exchange code diagram above (which does not require area/
city codes in a dialable DN), it would look like the View/
Modify Translation Table screen that follows.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-58
Dialing translations
Local dialing to a different area/city code (no area/city code required)
Translation Table
screen–different area/
city code
Standard 1.0
This example assumes that the default translation prefix for
local calls is 9 and for long distance calls is 91.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-59
Long distance dialing to the same area/city code (area/city code required)
Long distance dialing to the same area/city code (area/city
code required)
Introduction
This scenario describes toll call (long distance) dialing within
the same area/city code. Calls involve the long distance dialing
prefix even though both the calling party and the called party
are under the same area code. In this scenario, the area/city code
is also required as part of the dialable DN.
Scenario
This sort of dialing scenario may occur when a number of
smaller rural areas or towns share an area/city code, yet calls
from one town to another are considered long distance.
Area code 214
Tiny Town
Meridian
Mail
689-1111
Smallville
Long
Distance
677
Local
672
Example
A caller from Smallville calls into the Meridian Mail system
located in Tiny Town and requests that a fax be delivered to DN
214-677-1133. Exchange 677 is in the 214 area code, however,
so this is considered long distance because it is in a different
town.
Meridian Mail must convert this DN to the dialable DN 91-214677-1133, where 91 is the long distance dialing prefix.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-60
Dialing translations
Long distance dialing to the same area/city code (area/city code required)
Translation table
Standard 1.0
The following translation table illustrates long distance dialing
to the same area/city code where the area/city code is not
required to make a dialable DN.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-61
Long distance dialing to the same area/city code (area/city code not required)
Long distance dialing to the same area/city code (area/city
code not required)
Introduction
This scenario is almost identical to the preceding scenario
because there is long distance dialing from one area/city code to
the same area/city code. The only difference is that no area/city
code is required in the dialable DN. Using the previous
example, the dialable DN in this case would be 91-677-1133
instead of 91-214-677-1133.
Translation table
The following translation table illustrates long distance dialing
to the same area/city code where the area/city code is not
required to make a dialable DN.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-62
Dialing translations
The View/Modify Translation Table screen
The View/Modify Translation Table screen
Introduction
A translation table is defined on the View/Modify Translation
Table screen. This subsection explains this screen and the
contents of each field in the screen.
How to access the
screen
See “Configuring translation tables” on page 17-64.
View/Modify
Translation Table
screen
The following is an example of the View/Modify Translation
Table screen.
Field descriptions
The following table describes the fields in the View/Modify
Translation Table screen.
Table ID
Standard 1.0
Description
This field contains the number of the translation
table.
Field status
Read-only. There are 15 tables, numbered
1-15. This is the ID of the selected table. This field
cannot be changed. (Once the table is deleted, the
table ID can be reused.)
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-63
The View/Modify Translation Table screen
Area/City Code
Description
This field contains the area/city code of the
translation table. A translation table is defined for
an area/city code.
Valid
characters
0-9
Valid length
1-8 characters
Prefix for exchange codes in the table
Description
This field contains the prefix used for dialing
telephone numbers in the area/city of this table,
whose exchange codes are defined in the
translation table.
Valid
characters
0-9, * (where * means pause)
Valid length
0-12 characters
Prefixes for exchange codes NOT in the table
Description
This field contains the prefix used for dialing
telephone numbers in the area/city of this table and
whose exchange codes are not defined in the
translation table. If more than one table is defined
for one area/city code, this field is enforced to be
the same in every table (so that there is only one
set of exchange codes not in any table).
Valid
characters
0-9, * (where * means pause)
Valid length
0-12 characters
The following exchange codes are defined:
Description
These fields contain the exchange codes defined in
the translation table. Up to 120 exchange codes
may be defined for one table. (To display more
empty rows of exchange codes, press the [More
Fields] softkey.)
Valid length
0-8 characters
If the length of a given exchange code is 0, then
that field is empty.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-64
Dialing translations
Configuring translation tables
Configuring translation tables
Procedure
To configure a translation table, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Choose General Administration.
2
Choose Dialing Translation.
3
Choose Translation Tables.
Result: The Translation Tables screen appears listing the
existing and empty tables.
Standard 1.0
4
If you want to add a new table, move the cursor to an empty
table. To modify an existing table, move the cursor to that
table.
5
Press the <Space Bar> to select it.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-65
Configuring translation tables
Step Action
6
Press the [View/Modify] softkey.
Result: You are prompted for an area/city code.
7
Enter the area/city code for the translation table that you want
to create and press <Return>.
Result: The View/Modify Translation Table screen is
displayed.
Standard 1.0
8
Specify the prefix for the exchange codes that are defined in
the table. This prefix is applied to DNs entered by callers/
users in order to generate the appropriate dialable DN.
9
Specify the prefix for exchange codes that are not defined in
the table. This prefix is applied to DNs entered by callers/
users in order to generate the appropriate dialable DN.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-66
Dialing translations
Configuring translation tables
Step Action
10
Enter the appropriate exchange codes.
To display more empty fields, press the [More Fields] softkey.
Up to 120 exchange codes can be defined for a table.
Note: All entries will be validated to avoid duplication.
11
Do you want to save the screen?
•
If yes, press the [Save] softkey to save the table.
Result: The updated Translation Tables screen is
displayed.
Note: If you run out of exchange code fields for an area/
city code, create another table for that area/city code.
Return to step 4. The values you enter in the Area/City
Code and the Prefix for exchange codes not in the table
fields of the second table must match those of the first
table.
•
Standard 1.0
If no, press the [Cancel] softkey.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-67
Deleting translation tables
Deleting translation tables
Introduction
You can use the following procedure if you want to remove a
translation table in its entirety.
Procedure
To delete the data from a translation table, follow these steps.
Starting Point: The Main Menu
Step Action
1
Choose General Administration.
2
Choose Dialing Translation.
3
Choose Translation Tables.
4
Move the cursor to the (non-empty) table that you want to
delete.
5
Press <Space Bar> to select it.
6
Press the [Delete] softkey.
Result: The Delete Translation Table screen is displayed. All
fields in this screen are read-only.
7
Do you want to delete the table?
•
•
Standard 1.0
If yes, press the [OK to Delete] softkey.
If no, press the [Cancel] softkey.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-68
Dialing translations
Deleting translation tables
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
Section E:
17-69
Sample datafills
In this section
Overview
17-70
Datafill for countries without area/city codes
17-71
Datafill for a case where the switch handles dialing translation 17-72
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-70
Dialing translations
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This section illustrates two special cases for dialing translation
which require a slightly different setup.
The two cases are
•
•
Standard 1.0
countries without area/city codes in their dialing plans
the switch is already handling the dialing translations
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-71
Datafill for countries without area/city codes
Datafill for countries without area/city codes
Introduction
Some countries, such as Costa Rica, do not require area/city
codes for national calls in their dialing plans.
For example, the following Dialing Translation Defaults screen
leaves the area/city code field blank. The other field as defined
as usual.
No area/city codes
screen
The following shows an example of the Dialing Translation
Defaults screen defined for a location without an area/city code.
Description
When the Local Area/City Code is not entered, the system will
treat all numbers undergoing translations as having no area/city
code.
This eliminates the difference between local and long distance
calls, and all national numbers will be treated in the same
fashion as local numbers.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-72
Dialing translations
Datafill for a case where the switch handles dialing translation
Datafill for a case where the switch handles dialing
translation
Introduction
In the case where the switch is already set up and used to handle
dialing translations, you may choose to bypass the definition of
any translation tables on Meridian Mail.
In order to allow the switch to take over dialing translations, all
calls must be handled by the switch.
On the M1, this can be accomplished using ESN. To implement
this, all numbers dialed by the Meridian Mail must be in the
same format (for example, 6-1-area/city code - local number).
The switch will use its ESN software to correctly dial and route
the call.
Defaults screen for
switch handling
translation
The following shows an example of the Dialing Translation
Defaults screen with fields set so that the number passed to the
switch by Meridian Mail is always in the same format so that
on-switch dialing translations are used.
Scenario:
International number
Company X publishes a Fax On Demand number set up for
international callback for callers outside of North America. A
caller from England enters the number of her fax machine as
44-628-812810 in response to the prompt “Please enter the fax
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-73
Datafill for a case where the switch handles dialing translation
number, including country code and area or city code, followed
by number sign.”
The system translates the number according to the defaults in
the example screen:
•
•
Scenario: Local
number
The service is set up for international callback and,
therefore, the system performs an international number
translation on the entered number. First the system checks
for the local country code (in this case, 1) at the start of the
number. However, the callers country code is different.
The caller’s country code is 44 and the city code is 628, so
the system attaches 6011 to create the number 6011-44628-812810.
The new External CLID feature has been installed on the
system and allows the system to recognize the type of a number
based on the information received from the switch.
An external caller leaves a message in the Meridian Mail user’s
mailbox. The CLID received is 795 9851, and the switch
indicates that this is a local subscriber number.
To reply to this number, the number must be translated by the
system as follows:
•
•
Standard 1.0
Since this is a local subscriber number, the system knows
that the number should be dialed for a local call. The
system adds the local dialing prefix to the beginning of the
number.
The final number is 6 1 509 795 9851, where 6 1 509 is the
added prefix.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-74
Dialing translations
Datafill for a case where the switch handles dialing translation
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
Section F:
17-75
Troubleshooting dialing
translations
In this section
Standard 1.0
Overview
17-76
Diagnosing and tracing problems in a dialing translation
17-77
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-76
Dialing translations
Overview
Overview
Introduction
Standard 1.0
This section provides you with a procedure to diagnose
problems with dialing translations. It should be used in
conjunction with the NTP of the feature (like the Fax on
Demand Application Guide [NTP 555-7001-327] or AMIS
Networking Installation and Administration Guide
[NTP 555-7001-242] that uses dialing translations).
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-77
Diagnosing and tracing problems in a dialing translation
Diagnosing and tracing problems in a dialing translation
Introduction
Dialing translation problems show up as an inability to reach a
number specified in the AMIS, External CLID, or Fax on
Demand services. Diagnosis of such problems is best
accomplished by collecting all setup information and then
following the flowcharts of the translation process to determine
the translated number.
Procedure
To troubleshoot the translation process, follow these steps.
Step Action
1
Collect all relevant information.
Note: This includes the dialing translation defaults and
translation table settings.
IF the problem occurred
in
2
the Fax on Demand VSDN
definition and session profile.
AMIS
local AMIS VSDN definition.
Virtual Node AMIS
local AMIS VSDN definition
and the VSDN definition of
the Virtual Node AMIS
remote site.
External CLID
the External CLID (the
caller’s number) to which the
user listened or to which the
user tried to send a
message.
Is the translated number already dialable?
•
•
Standard 1.0
THEN go to
Fax on Demand
If yes, go to step 5.
If no, the dialing translation setup is likely incorrect.
Continue with the following steps.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-78
Dialing translations
Diagnosing and tracing problems in a dialing translation
Step Action
3
Determine the translated dialable number that was found to be
invalid.
IF the invalid number
used
Fax on Demand
THEN
the Fax Audit Trail will
contain the translated DN
that the system is attempting
to dial.
For more information about
the Fax Audit Trail, see
Chapter 33, “Audit Trail
reports” under Section C: Fax
Audit Trail reports.
4
AMIS
SEER 4211 is generated.
(The SEER text is “The
number XXXXXXX cannot be
reached,” where XXXXXXX
is the translated number).
External CLID
ask the user for the number
that is announced by
Meridian Mail when listening
to the message from which
the error was reported.
Pick a particular scenario that is causing problems and walk
through the translation process flowcharts from page 17-23 to
17-26 to determine the translated number.
This method will help you determine if the problem is caused by
dialing translations.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Dialing translations
17-79
Diagnosing and tracing problems in a dialing translation
Step Action
5
If the translated number is dialable on the system, then the
problem may not be related to dialing translations. In this case,
the problem is likely to be one of the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
The fax callback number, AMIS number, or External CLID
number is restricted in the Meridian Mail restriction/
permission lists and cannot be dialed.
For External CLID, the number that is passed from the
switch to Meridian Mail may be incorrect. Use the Session
Trace feature from the Tools level to determine the number
and call type that was received from the switch when the
external caller left the user a message in the user’s mailbox.
For External CLID, refer to System Administration Tools
(NTP 555-7001-305.)
For Fax on Demand, check the session profile and ensure
that it is set up correctly.
For AMIS, check the class of service to which the user
belongs and ensure that it allows the user to send or receive
Open Network (AMIS) messages.
The area/city code of the callback number or AMIS number
may be restricted on the switch. Check LD 90 in the
Meridian 1.
Alternatively, the entire number may be restricted because
it is considered a “special number” (also check LD 90 in the
Meridian 1).
The agent is restricted in the switch. Check NCOS and
FCAS in LD 87.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
17-80
Dialing translations
Diagnosing and tracing problems in a dialing translation
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Chapter 18
Routine maintenance
In this chapter
Overview
18-2
Monitoring Meridian Mail operation
18-3
Monitoring Meridian Mail hardware
18-5
Backing up the system
18-7
Cleaning the tape drive
18-9
18-2
Routine maintenance
Overview
Overview
Introduction
This chapter identifies the routine maintenance tasks
recommended for optimum operation of your Meridian Mail
system. It then refers you to the chapters or manuals that contain
the information and procedures you need to perform these tasks.
Purpose
These tasks are carried out regularly to ensure efficient
operation of your system and to anticipate future capacity needs
or necessary services available to users.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Routine maintenance
18-3
Monitoring Meridian Mail operation
Monitoring Meridian Mail operation
Introduction
Operational Measurement (OM) reports enable you to monitor
your system usage. You can study which features are being used
on your system and how heavily they are being used.
OM reports can reveal potential technical problems with your
system, such as low disk space (which affects the ability of the
Meridian Mail system to store messages and perform its
functions).
Operational
measurements
The following provides an overview of OM reports.
OM traffic reports
The OM traffic reports show both how the system is being used
and how much the system is being used. That is, they identify
the number of calls processed, and the number of times a user
logs in to Meridian Mail or accesses particular features. If a
feature is not being used, this may indicate that users are not
aware of it or do not know how to use it. It may also reveal that
the feature is not required.
These reports also help you to ensure the security of your
system. If certain features are being accessed frequently during
off-hours, this may indicate that hackers are attempting to use
your system to place unauthorized long distance calls.
OM user usage reports
The OM user usage reports monitor how specific users employ
features such as Voice Messaging or networking, if they are
installed.
User usage reports display daily summary statistics about each
user, including the following:
•
•
•
•
Standard 1.0
the number of times a user has logged on
the number and total length of times that callers have
connected to a user’s mailbox
the number and total length of messages created and
received
the disk space used by the user’s messages and greetings
System Administration Guide
January 1998
18-4
Routine maintenance
Monitoring Meridian Mail operation
Operational
measurements
(cont’d)
Disk Usage Detail report
This report shows the voice space used on a disk volume. If the
voice space is consistently greater than your disk usage warning
level, then disk space is getting low, and you should take steps
to reduce the voice space used.
Channel Usage Detail report
This report shows the number of calls and voice mail usage per
channel. If the number of calls is high or the average message
length is exceptionally long, the channels may be too busy to
handle all incoming calls. As a result, users may not be able to
access the Meridian Mail system.
Frequency
Check the performance of your Meridian Mail system
periodically to ensure that efficient use is made of the voice
services provided on your system.
Procedure
For information and procedures required for monitoring the
operation of your Meridian Mail system, see Chapter 30,
“Operational Measurements”.
For information and procedures required for helping to ensure
the security of your Meridian Mail system, see Chapter 6,
“Setting up Meridian Mail security”.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Routine maintenance
18-5
Monitoring Meridian Mail hardware
Monitoring Meridian Mail hardware
Introduction
The System Status and Maintenance menu provides monitoring
and control screens through which you obtain views of the
operational state of the system at four levels:
•
•
•
•
system status
card status
DSP port status
disk status
Description
The System Status and Maintenance functions are used in the
course of routine maintenance and enable you to take any
component of the system out of service while performing
maintenance. A component can be taken out of service by
disabling it (forcing it out of its operational state), or by
performing a courtesy disable, which progressively disables
active DSP ports as they become idle. The Courtesy Disable
feature avoids any disruption of calls in progress.
What to check
The System Status and Maintenance menu provides options for
viewing the system status, card status, and DSP port and disk
status. From this menu, you can also manipulate the Channel
Allocation Table, perform Disk Maintenance, and view System
Event and Error Reports.
The Hardware Administration screens allow you to view the
contents of the hardware database in your Meridian Mail
system. The hardware database is a system utility that maintains
a current listing and description of all nodes, cards, and ports in
your system.
Modifying the
hardware database
To modify the hardware database, you must use the “modify
hardware” tool. Refer to Meridian Mail System Administration
Tools (NTP 555-7001-305).
Frequency
Check the operation of Meridian Mail hardware periodically
and when a problem is reported by the system.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
18-6
Routine maintenance
Monitoring Meridian Mail hardware
Procedure
Standard 1.0
For information and procedures required for checking the
operation of your Meridian Mail hardware, see Chapter 27,
“Hardware administration” and Chapter 28, “System status and
maintenance”.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Routine maintenance
18-7
Backing up the system
Backing up the system
Introduction
If a disk drive fails, the system can be restored to a working
state by copying the data back from tape onto a replacement
disk. Backup copies of the system data are fundamental to
restoring the system with as little disruption and data loss as
possible.
Backups to tape
All Meridian Mail systems have a tape drive capable of reading
and writing industry-standard quarter-inch data cartridges
(QIC). Backups to tape can be either full or partial. You can
also selectively back up users or services to tape, or both.
Backups to disk
If the Disk-to-Disk Backup feature is installed, you can copy
data from one disk to another. This allows you to recover data if
a disk fails.
Backups to disk can be done frequently, with relatively little
effort, and reduce the need for frequent and time-consuming
backups to tape. However, disk-to-disk backups do not
completely eliminate the need for tape backups.
Storage impact
Disk-to-disk backup reduces the voice message storage
somewhat and sets aside some of the disk space for backup
copies.
Scheduling a backup
Standard 1.0
Schedule backups for a time when your system is relatively
quiet or outside the regular business hours for your
organization. Do not back up the system if it is operating above
50% of the rated capacity or between the hours of
1:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m., since important system audits take
place during these hours. These audits are activated
automatically at the same time every day and ensure the
continued operation of your system. Do not schedule a backup
if more than one tape is required for it unless you are going to
be available to switch tapes when you are prompted to do so.
System Administration Guide
January 1998
18-8
Routine maintenance
Backing up the system
Frequency
Back up your system on a regular schedule. You can set the
frequency as daily, weekly, or monthly in the Schedule Backup
screen under the General Administration menu. You should also
back up your system whenever you make changes to it.
Procedure
For information and procedures required for backing up your
Meridian Mail system, see Chapter 15, “Back up and restore
Meridian Mail data”.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
Routine maintenance
18-9
Cleaning the tape drive
Cleaning the tape drive
Introduction
As occurs with any high-capacity removable media such as
tapes or floppy drives, debris collects on the tape heads each
time a tape drive is used. If too much debris collects, the tape
drive is unable to write or read data correctly, and the tape head
must be cleaned.
Frequency
Most tape drive manufacturers recommend cleaning the tape
heads after a brand-new tape has been used for the first time,
and after every eight hours of tape drive operation. If media
(parity) errors occur when reading or writing tapes, it is an
indication of either a faulty tape or dirty tape heads.
Procedure
For information and procedures required for cleaning your tape
drive, refer to the Meridian Mail Installation and Maintenance
Guide (NTP 555-70x1-250) appropriate for your system.
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
18-10
Routine maintenance
Cleaning the tape drive
Standard 1.0
System Administration Guide
January 1998
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