Rockwell Automation | 1785 PLC-5 | User manual | Rockwell Automation 1785 PLC-5 User manual

AllenBradley
Classic 1785 PLC5
Programmable
Controllers
(1785LT, LT2, LT3, LT4)
User
Manual
Important User Information
Because of the variety of uses for the products described in this
publication, those responsible for the application and use of this control
equipment must satisfy themselves that all necessary steps have been
taken to assure that each application and use meets all performance and
safety requirements, including any applicable laws, regulations, codes,
and standards.
The illustrations, charts, sample programs, and layout examples shown in
this guide are intended solely for purposes of example. Since there are
many variables and requirements associated with any particular
installation, Allen-Bradley does not assume responsibility or liability
(to include intellectual property liability) for actual use based on the
examples shown in this publication.
Allen-Bradley publication SGI-1.1, Safety Guidelines for the Application,
Installation, and Maintenance of Solid State Control (available from your
local Allen-Bradley office), describes some important differences between
solid-state equipment and electromechanical devices that should be taken
into consideration when applying products such as those described in
this publication.
Reproduction of the contents of this copyrighted publication, in whole
or in part, without written permission of Allen-Bradley Company, Inc.,
is prohibited.
Throughout this manual we use notes to make you aware of
safety considerations:
ATTENTION: Identifies information about practices or
circumstances that can lead to personal injury or death,
property damage, or economic loss.
Attention statements help you to:
identify a hazard
avoid the hazard
recognize the consequences
Important: Identifies information that is critical for successful application
and understanding of the product.
Summary of Changes
Summary of Changes
This manual has been revised to cover only Classic PLC-5 programmable
controllers: PLC-5/10, -5/12, -5/15, and -5/25.
It has also been revised to include the accompanying design worksheets
that were formerly available as a separate publication: 1785-5.2. This
separate publication is no longer available; see Appendix B for these
worksheets.
For information about Enhanced and Ethernet PLC-5 processors, see the
Enhanced and Ethernet PLC-5 Programmable Controllers User Manual,
publication 1785-6.5.12.
i
Table of Contents
Summary of Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
i
Classic PLC5 Programmable Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . .
iii
Purpose of this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manual Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Use this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
iii
iv
iv
Understanding Your System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11
Using this Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding the Terms Used in this Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Designing Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preparing Your Functional Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Introducing Classic PLC5 Processor Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Classic PLC5 Processor as a Remote I/O Scanner . . . .
Using the Classic PLC5 Processor as a Remote I/O Adapter . . . .
11
11
12
13
15
18
19
Choosing Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting I/O Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting I/O Adapter Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting I/O Chassis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting an Operator Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choosing a Classic PLC5 Processor for Your Application . . . . . . .
Selecting Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Memory Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a Replacement Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Complementary I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a PLC5 Processor Backup System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting Link Terminators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting a Programming Terminal to a Processor Module . . . . .
Choosing Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21
21
24
26
26
29
29
213
213
213
214
215
215
215
Placing System Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Determining the Proper Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Protecting Your Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Avoiding Electrostatic Damage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Laying Out Your Cable Raceway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Planning Cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Laying Out the Backpanel Spacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grounding Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31
31
34
34
34
35
36
37
ii
Table of Contents
Assigning Addressing Modes, Racks, and Groups . . . . . .
41
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Placing I/O Modules in Chassis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding the Terms Used in this Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choosing the Addressing Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning Racks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Addressing Complementary I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
41
41
42
43
49
412
Choosing Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
51
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Identifying Classic PLC5 Processor Channels/Connectors . . . . . .
Configuring Communication for Your Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a DH+ Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting a DH+ Link to Data Highway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choosing Programming Terminal Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
51
51
53
53
510
510
Planning Your System Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
61
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Planning Application Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using SFCs with PLC5 Processors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preparing the Programs for Your Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Addressing Data Table Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Processor Status File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
61
61
61
63
67
69
Selecting Interrupt Routines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
71
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Programming Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Writing a Fault Routine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding ProcessorDetected Major Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . .
71
71
73
711
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data . . . . . . . . .
81
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transferring Data Using Adapter Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming Discrete Transfer in Adapter Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming Block Transfer in Adapter Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transferring Data Using Scanner Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming Discrete Transfer in Scanner Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming Block Transfer in Scanner Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
81
81
84
87
816
816
817
821
Table of Contents
iii
Calculating Program Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
91
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Introduction to Classic PLC5 Processor Scanning . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O ScanningDiscrete and Block Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Instruction Timing and Memory Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Direct and Indirect Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
91
91
95
97
913
913
Maximizing System Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
101
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Components of Throughput . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Input and Output Modules Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Backplane Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote I/O Scan Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Processor Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calculating Throughput . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
101
101
101
102
102
106
106
Selecting Switch Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A1
Chassis Backplane with Classic PLC5 Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chassis Backplane with Adapter Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chassis Configuration Plug for Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote I/O Adapter Module 1771ASB Series C without
Complementary I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote I/O Adapter Module 1771ASB Series C with
Complementary I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SW1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AdapterMode ProcessorsSW2 in a PLC5 or Scanner Module . .
AdapterMode ProcessorsSW2 in a PLC2/20, 2/30,
or Sub I/O Scanner Module System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AdapterMode ProcessorsSW2 in a PLC3 or PLC5/250
System with 8Word Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AdapterMode ProcessorsSW2 in a PLC3 or PLC5/250
System with 4Word Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SW3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A1
A2
A3
A4
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
A11
A12
Design Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B1
Conventions Used in These Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prepare a Functional Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Determine Control Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Identify Chassis Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Select Module Types and List I/O Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total I/O Module Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assign I/O Modules to Chassis and Assign Addresses . . . . . . . . . .
Select Adapter Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Place System Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B1
B2
B4
B6
B7
B9
B10
B12
B14
iv
Table of Contents
Configure Switch Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Determine Communication Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Select a Classic PLC5 Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Select Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choose a Programming Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Select Programming Terminal Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Select Operator Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Develop Programming Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B15
B17
B21
B23
B24
B25
B26
B28
Preface
Classic PLC5 Programmable Controllers
How to Use
Your Documentation
Your Classic PLC-5 Programmable Controllers documentation is organized
into manuals according to the tasks you perform. This organization lets
you easily find the information you want without reading through
information that is not related to your current task. The arrow in Figure 1
points to the book you are currently using.
Figure 1
Classic PLC5 Programmable Controllers Documentation Library
Classic 1785 PLC5
Programmable Controllers
User Manual
Classic 1785 PLC5
Programmable Controllers
Hardware Installation
Explanation of processor
functionality, system
design, and programming
considerations and worksheets
How to install and set
switches for chassis,
PLC5 processor, how
to wire and ground
your system
17856.2.1
17856.6.1
6200 or AI Series Software
Instruction Set
Reference
1785 PLC5
Programmable Controllers
Quick Reference
Quick access to switches,
status bits, indicators,
instructions, SW screens
17857.1
Instruction execution,
parameters, status
bits and examples
17856.1
For more information on 1785 PLC-5 programmable controllers or the
above publications, contact your local Allen-Bradley sales office,
distributor, or system integrator.
Purpose of this Manual
This manual is intended to help you design a Classic PLC-5 programmable
controller system. Use this manual to assist you in:
selecting the proper hardware components for your system
determining the important features of classic PLC-5 processors and how
to use those features
planning your classic PLC-5 system layout
iii
Preface
Manual Organization
Chapter /
Appendix
This manual has ten chapters and two appendices. The following table
lists each chapter or appendix with its corresponding title and a brief
overview of the topics covered in it.
Title
1
Understanding Your System
Provides an overview of Classic PLC5 processors in different system configurations. Provides
an introduction to Classic PLC5 processors and their primary features and configurations. Also
provides information on using a Classic PLC5 processor as a remote I/O scanner or a remote
I/O adapter.
2
Choosing Hardware
Provides information on your hardware choices when you design a Classic PLC5 processor
system.
3
Placing System Hardware
Describes proper environment, Classic PLC5 processor protection, and prevention of
electrostatic damage for your Classic PLC5 programmable controller system. Also covers
raceway and cable layout, backpanel spacing, and grounding configurations.
4
Assigning Addressing Mode,
Rack, and Groups
Describes the I/O addressing modes that you can choose for your chassis. Explains how you
assign group and rack numbers to your I/O chassis. Also covers how you configure
complementary I/O by assigning rack and group addresses.
5
Choosing Communication
Identifies each Classic 5 processor channel/connector, and explains how to configure your
Classic PLC5 processor. Provides additional information about the Data Highway Plust
(DH+t) link, programming software, and programmingterminal connections.
6
Planning Your System Programs
Explains the use of sequential function charts (SFCs). Provides guidelines and examples for
preparing system programs. Provides a map of data table files and methods to address the
data table files. Explains how to use the processor status file.
7
Selecting Interrupt Routines
Summarizes the conditions for which you would choose fault routines for your application.
Provides a definition of fault routines.
8
Transferring Discrete and
BlockTransfer Data
Explains how your CLassic PLC5 processor transfers discrete and blocktransfer data in both
scanner and adapter modes.
9
Calculating Program Timing
Provides an overview of processor scan timing. Lists execution times and memory
requirements for bit and word instructions as well as file instructions.
10
Maximizing System Performance
Explains how to calculate throughput, and provides methods for optimizing I/O scan time.
A
Selecting Switch Settings
Describes the switch settings for configuring a Classic PLC5 programmable controller system.
B
Design Worksheets
Provides worksheets to help the designer plan the system and the installer to install the system.
How to Use this Manual
iv
Topics Covered
The following flow chart demonstrates a thought process that you can use
when you plan your Classic PLC-5 programmable controller system.
Preface
System Design
Determined
Select I/O
modules, terminals
Assign
addressing
Place
hardware
Configure processor
communication
Configure Data
Highway Plus
Select adapter modules
Select I/O chassis
Select power supply
Select PLC5 processor
Select batteries and
memory modules
Complementary I/O
selected?
Backup system
selected?
Assigning
Addressing Mode,
Racks, and Groups
Choosing
Hardware
and
Placing
System
Hardware
Choosing
Communication
Select programming
software
Design SFCs
Data table layout and
processor status
Planning Your
System Programs
Use fault routines
Transfer data in adapter
and scanner modes
I/O update and ladder
program scan times
Transferring
Discrete and
Block Data
Calculating
Program Timing
and Maximizing
System
Performance
Since your decisions cannot always be made as a part of a strictly linear
process, you can choose to complete tasks in parallel. When you select
your I/O modules, for example, you can also begin to lay out and address
your modules. Consult chapter 3, “Placing System Hardware,” to
determine environmental requirements, enclosures needed, cable layout,
and grounding requirements for your chassis and I/O links. Also, you can
choose to assess block-transfer timing when you determine where you will
place your block-transfer modules (in the processor-resident local I/O
chassis, extended-local I/O chassis, or remote I/O chassis).
v
Chapter
1
Understanding Your System
Using this Chapter
Understanding the Terms
Used in this Chapter
If you want to read about:
Go to page:
Terms used in this chapter
11
Designing systems
12
Preparing your functional specification
13
Identifying Classic PLC5 processor features
15
Using the Classic PLC5 processor as a remote I/O scanner
18
Using the Classic PLC5 processor as a remote I/O adapter
19
Become familiar with the following terms and their definitions.
Term
Definition
Processorresident
local I/O chassis
the I/O chassis in which the PLC5 processor is installed
Processorresident
local I/O
I/O modules located in the same chassis as the PLC5 processor
Remote I/O link
a serial communication link between a PLC5 processor port in scanner
mode and an adapter as well as I/O modules that are located remotely
from the PLC5 processor
Remote I/O chassis
the hardware enclosure that contains an adapter and I/O modules that
are located remotely on a serial communication link to a PLC5
processor in scanner mode
Discretetransfer data
data (words) transferred to/from a discrete I/O module
Blocktransfer data
data transferred, in blocks of data up to 64 words, to/from a block
transfer I/O module (for example, an analog module)
1-1
Chapter 1
Understanding Your System
Designing Systems
You can use Classic PLC-5 processors in a system that is designed for
centralized control or in a system that is designed for distributed control.
HP 9000
or VAX
Host
Centralized control is a
hierarchical system where control
over an entire process is
concentrated in one processor.
Programming Terminal
DH+ Link
Programming
Terminal with
ControlView
Software
Classic PLC5
Processor
Remote I/O Link
Chassis with
1771ASB
Remote I/O
Adapter
Chassis with
1771ASB
Remote I/O
Adapter
To DECnet r
Distributed control is a system in
which control and management
functions are spread throughout a
plant. Multiple processors handle
the control and management
functions and use a Data
Highway or a bus system
for communication.
Pyramid 
Integrator
Programming
Terminal
6200 VMS
INTERCHANGE
Software
ControlView
INTERCHANGE
Software
DH+ Link
PanelView 
Operator
Terminal
Remote I/O Link
Series 8600
CNC with
Remote I/O
SLC 5/01 Processor
7slot Modular System
with 1747DCM Module
Consider the following items as general guidelines when designing
your system.
Will your processor(s) be used in a centralized or distributed system?
What type of process(es) will be controlled by the PLC-5 system?
What processes will be controlled together?
What are the environmental and safety concerns?
What is the flow and functionality of your system?
1-2
18084
Chapter 1
Understanding Your System
Determine the general criteria for your system. Use the chapters that
follow to guide you through the criteria and choices for selecting the major
Classic PLC-5 programmable controller system elements, as shown in
Figure 1.1.
Figure 1.1
PLC5 Processor System Design Flow
System Design
Determined
Select I/O
modules, terminals
Assign
addressing
Place
hardware
Configure processor
communication
Configure Data
Highway Plus
Select adapter modules
Select I/O chassis
Select power supply
Select Classic PLC5
processor
Select batteries and
memory modules
Complementary I/O
selected?
Backup system
selected?
Preparing Your
Functional Specification
Assigning
Addressing Mode,
Racks, and Groups
Choosing
Hardware
and
Placing
System
Hardware
Choosing
Communication
Select programming
software
Design SFCs
Data table layout and
processor status
Planning Your
System Programs
Use fault routines
Transfer data in adapter
and scanner modes
I/O update and ladder
program scan times
Transferring
Discrete and
Block Data
Calculating
Program Timing
and Maximizing
System
Performance
We recommend that you first develop a specification that defines your
hardware selection and your programming application. The specification
is a conceptual view of your system. Use it to determine your:
control strategy
hardware selection, layout, and addressing
sequential function chart (SFC)
special programming features
ladder-logic requirements
1-3
Chapter 1
Understanding Your System
Figure 1.2 illustrates a program-development model that you can use.
Figure 1.2
ProgramDevelopment Model
Functional
Specification
(General Conception)
Acceptance
Signoff
Detailed
Anaylsis
Testing
Program
Development
This model allows for the interaction of activities at the different levels.
Each section represents an activity that you perform. Prepare a functional
specification to start; then, prepare the detailed analysis.
Based on the detailed analysis, you can also develop your programs, enter
your programs, and test them. When testing is complete, you are ready to
implement the programs in your application. The detailed analysis can be
used as the basis for developing your testing procedures and requirements.
Because the functional specification is well thought out, it can be used as
the program sign-off document.
Functional Specification Content
The functional specification represents a very general view of your process
or a description of operation. Identify the events and the overall order in
which they must occur. Identify the equipment that you will need for your
process/operation. Generally indicate the layout of your system. If your
application requires a distributed control system, for example, indicate
where you will need remote I/O links. Also, you can have a process that is
located close to your processor. The process can require faster update time
than that provided by a remote I/O link, so you can select an extendedlocal I/O link for that process.
Important: Choose a communication rate for your remote I/O link at
which every device on the link can communicate.
1-4
Chapter 1
Understanding Your System
The program-development portion of your functional specification can be
in any form: written statement; flowchart; or rough-draft MCPs, SFCs,
and subroutines. Use the form that is most familiar to you. We
recommend, however, that you generate rough-draft SFCs and subroutines
so that you have a better correspondence between your beginning diagrams
and your finished program.
Detailed Analysis
In this phase, you identify the logic needed to plan your programs. This
includes inputs, outputs, specific actions, and transitions between actions
(i.e., the bit-level details needed to write your program).
Program Development
You enter the programs either offline into your computer or online into a
processor. In the next phase, you test the programs that you have entered.
Once testing is complete, your resulting programs should match your
functional specification.
Checking for Completeness
When you complete the functional specification and the detailed analysis,
review them and check for missing or incomplete information such as:
input conditions
safety conditions
startup or emergency shutdown routines
alarms and alarm handling
fault detection and fault handling
message display of fault conditions
abnormal operating conditions
Introducing Classic PLC5
Processor Modules
The following is a list of the PLC-5 processors and their catalog numbers.
Processor
Catalog Number
PLC5/10t
1785LT4
PLC5/12t
1785LT3
PLC5/15t
1785LT
PLC5/25t
1785LT2
For information on other PLC-5 processors (Enhanced, Ethernet, or
ControlNet), see your Allen-Bradley representative.
1-5
Chapter 1
Understanding Your System
Classic PLC5 Family Processor Features
From the family of PLC-5 processors, you can choose the processor(s)
that you need for your application. Features common to all Classic PLC-5
processors are:
same physical dimensions
use of the left-most slot in the 1771 I/O chassis
can use any 1771 I/O module in the processor-resident local I/O chassis
with up to 32 points per module
same programming software and programming terminals
same base set of instructions
ladder programs and SFCs can be used by any of the PLC-5 processors
Check with your Allen-Bradley sales office or distributor if you have
questions regarding any of the features of your PLC-5 processor.
Subprogram Calls
Use a subroutine to store recurring sections of program logic that can be
accessed from multiple program files. A subroutine saves memory
because you program repetitive logic only once. The JSR instruction
directs the processor to go to a separate subroutine file within the logic
processor, scan that subroutine file once, and return to the point
of departure.
For detailed information about how you generate and use subroutines, see
your programming software documentation set.
Sequential Function Charts
Use SFCs as a sequence-control language to control and display the state
of a control process. Instead of one long ladder program for your
application, divide the logic into steps and transitions. A step corresponds
to a control task; a transition corresponds to a condition that must occur
before the programmable controller can perform the next control task. The
display of these steps and transitions lets you see what state the machine
process is in at a given time.
For detailed information about how you generate and use SFCs, see you
programming software.
Ladder Logic Programs
A main program file can be an SFC file numbered 1-999; it can also be a
ladder-logic file program numbered 2-999 in any program file.
1-6
Chapter 1
Understanding Your System
Consider using this technique:
If you are:
SFC
• defining the order of events in a sequential process
Ladder Logic
• more familiar with ladder logic than with programming
languages such as BASIC
• performing diagnostics
• programming discrete control
For detailed information about how you use ladder logic, see your
programming software documentation.
Backup System
The following diagram shows a typical PLC-5 backup system:
Local I/O Chassis
1785BCM Module
PLC5
Processor
Local I/O Chassis
1785BCM Module
PLC5
Processor
1771P4S
Power Supply
1771P4S
Power Supply
HSSL
DH+ Link
Remote I/O Link
DH+ LInk
Remote I/O Chassis
Remote I/O Chassis
Remote I/O Link
18691
In a PLC-5 backup system configuration, one system controls the operation
of remote I/O and DH+ communications. This system is referred to as the
“primary system.” The other system is ready to take control of the remote
I/O and DH+ communications in the event of a fault in the primary system.
This is referred to as the “secondary system.”
See chapter 2, “Choosing Hardware,” to select backup system hardware.
See the PLC-5 Backup Communication Module User Manual, publication
1785-6.5.4, for more information on configuring a PLC-5 backup system.
1-7
Chapter 1
Understanding Your System
Using the Classic PLC5
Processor as a Remote I/O
Scanner
Use scanner mode whenever you want a Classic PLC-5 processor to scan
and control remote I/O link(s). The scanner-mode processor also acts as a
supervisory processor for other processors that are in adapter mode.
The scanner-mode processor scans the processor memory file to read
inputs and control outputs. The scanner-mode processor transfers
discrete-transfer data and block-transfer data to/from the processor-resident
local rack as well as to/from modules in remote I/O racks.
A PLC-5 processor scans processor-resident local I/O synchronously to the
program scan. A PLC-5 processor scans remote I/O asynchronously to the
program scan, but the processor updates the input/output image data table
from the remote I/O buffer(s) synchronously to the program scan. This
occurs at the end of each program scan.
ProcessorResident
Local I/O Scan
Synchronous to
Program Scan
Input
Output
Processor
Resident
I/O
Output
Input
ScannerMode
PLC5
Processor
Remote
I/O
Buffer
Remote I/O
Scan
Asynchronous to
Program Scan
Input
Output
Remote I/O
Link
The scanner-mode PLC-5 processor can also:
gather data from node adapter devices in remote I/O racks
process I/O data from 8-, 16-, or 32-point I/O modules
address I/O in 2-, 1-, or 1/2-slot I/O groups
support a complementary I/O configuration
support block transfer in any I/O chassis
Configure the PLC-5/15 or -5/25 processor for scanner mode by setting
switch assembly SW1.
1-8
Chapter 1
Understanding Your System
Using the Classic PLC5
Processor
as a Remote I/O Adapter
Use a Classic PLC-5 processor (except the PLC-5/10 processor) in adapter
mode when you need predictable, real-time exchange of data between a
distributed control PLC-5 processor and a supervisory processor. You
connect the processors via the remote I/O link (see Figure 1.3). You can
monitor status between the supervisory processor and the adapter-mode
PLC-5 processor at a consistent rate (i.e., the transmission rate of the
remote I/O link is unaffected by programming terminals and other
non-control-related communications).
Figure 1.3
AdapterMode Communication
PLC5
Processor
in Adapter
Mode 2
Supervisory
Processor1
Remote I/O Link
1
1771 I/O
DL40
Message
Display
Remote I/O Link
The following programmable controllers can operate as supervisory processors:
PLC2/20t and PLC2/30t processors
PLC3t and PLC3/10t processors
PLC5/11, 5/15, 5/20, 5/25, and 5/30 processors as well as PLC5/VMEt processors
PLC5/40, 5/40L, 5/60, 5/60L, and 5/80 processors as well as PLC5/40BVt and
PLC5/40LVt processors
PLC5/20Et, 5/40Et
PLC5/250t
2
All PLC5 family processors, except the PLC5/10, can operate as remote I/O adapter modules.
The PLC-5 processor in adapter mode acts as a remote station to the
supervisory processor. The adapter-mode PLC-5 processor can monitor
and control its processor-resident local I/O while communicating with the
supervisory processor via a remote I/O link.
The supervisory processor communicates with the PLC-5/12, -5/15, or
-5/25 adapter with either eight or four I/O image table words.
A PLC-5 processor transfers I/O data and status data using discrete
transfers and block transfers. You can also use block-transfer instructions
to communicate information between a supervisory processor and an
adapter-mode processor. The maximum capacity per block transfer is
64 words.
1-9
Chapter
2
Choosing Hardware
Chapter Objectives
Use this chapter to guide you in the selection of system hardware for
your application.
To select:
Selecting I/O Modules
Go to page:
I/O modules
21
I/O adapters
24
Chassis
26
Operator interface
26
PLC5 processor
29
Power supplies
29
Memory modules
213
Batteries
213
Complementary I/O
213
Backup system
214
Termination resistor
215
Cables
215
System Design
Determined
Choosing Hardware
Placing System
Hardware
Assigning Addressing
Mode, Racks,
and Groups
Choosing
Communication
Selecting Interrupt
Routines
Transferring Discrete
and Block Data
Calculating Program
Timing
Planning Your
System Programs
You select I/O modules to interface your PLC-5 processor with machines
or processes that you have previously determined.
Use the following list and Table 2.A as guidelines for selecting I/O
modules and/or operator control interface(s).
How much I/O is required to control the process(es)?
Where will you concentrate I/O points for portions of an entire process
(when an entire process is distributed over a large physical area)?
What type of I/O is required to control the process(es)?
What is the required voltage range for each I/O module?
What is the backplane current required for each I/O module?
What are the noise and distance limitations for each I/O module?
What isolation is required for each I/O module?
2-1
Chapter 2
Choosing Hardware
Table 2.A
Guidelines for Selecting I/O Modules
Choose this type of
I/O module:
For these types of field devices or operations (examples):
Explanation:
Discrete input module
and block I/O module1
Selector switches, pushbuttons, photoelectric eyes, limit switches,
circuit breakers, proximity switches, level switches, motor starter
contacts, relay contacts, thumbwheel switches
Input modules sense ON/OFF or OPENED/
CLOSED signals. Discrete signals can be either
ac or dc.
Discrete output module
and block I/O module1
Alarms, control relays, fans, lights, horns, valves, motor
starters, solenoids
Output module signals interface with ON/OFF or
OPENED/CLOSED devices. Discrete signals can
be either ac or dc.
Analog input module
Temperature transducers, pressure transducers, load cell transducers,
humidity transducers, flow transducers, potentiometers
Convert continuous analog signals into input
values for PLC processor.
Analog output module
Analog valves, actuators, chart recorders, electric motor drives,
analog meters
Interpret PLC processor output to analog signals
(generally through transducers) for field devices.
Specialty I/O modules
Encoders, flow meters, I/O communication, ASCII, RF type devices,
weigh scales, barcode readers, tag readers, display devices
Are generally used for specific applications such
as position control, PID, and external device
communication.
1
A 1791 block I/O module is a remote I/O device that has a power supply, remote I/O adapter, signal conditioning circuitry, and I/O
connections. A block I/O module does not require a chassis mount. It is used to control concentrated discrete remote I/O such as control
panels, pilot lights, and status indications.
Important: Determine addressing in conjunction with I/O module
selection. The selection of addressing and the selection of I/O module
density are mutually dependent.
Selecting I/O Module Density
The density of an I/O module is the number of processor input or output
image table bits to which it corresponds. A bidirectional module with 8
input bits and 8 output bits has a density of 8. Table 2.B provides
guidelines for selecting I/O module density.
Table 2.B
Guidelines for Selecting I/O Module Density
2-2
Choose this I/O density:
If you:
8point I/O module
• currently use 8point modules
• need integral, separatelyfused outputs
• want to minimize cost per module
16point I/O module
• currently use 16point modules
• need separately fused outputs with a special wiring arm
32point I/O module
•
•
•
•
currently use 32point modules
want to minimize number of modules
want to minimize the space required for I/O chassis
want to minimize cost per I/O point
Chapter 2
Choosing Hardware
Master/Expander I/O Modules
Some I/O modules (called “masters”) communicate with their expanders
over the backplane. These master/expander combinations either:
can time-share the backplane, or
cannot time-share the backplane
For masters that can time-share the backplane, you can use two masters in
the same chassis. For a master/expander combination that cannot
time-share the backplane, you cannot put another master/expander
combination in the same I/O chassis.
Example: The stepper-controller module (cat. no. 1771-M1, part of a
1771-QA assembly) and the servo-controller module (cat. no. 1771-M3,
part of a 1771-QC assembly) always act as masters and cannot time-share
the backplane. Therefore, you cannot put a second master module in the
same chassis with either of these modules.
Table 2.C summarizes the compatibility of master modules within a single
I/O chassis.
Table 2.C
Compatibility of Master Modules within a Single I/O Chassis
1st Master
Module
1771IX1
1771IX1
1771IF1
2nd Master Module
1771OF1
1771M1
Valid2
Valid2
1771IF1
Valid2
Valid2
Valid2
1771OF1
Valid2
Valid2
Valid2
1771M3
1771M1
1771M3
1
These modules have been superseded by 1771IXE, IFE, and OFE master modules that
do not exhibit the master/expander conflict in a chassis as 1771IX, IF, and OF master
modules shown in this table.
2
These are the only master combinations that you can use in a single I/O chassis. These
combinations are valid with or without the module's associated expanders (1771M1 and
M3 have expander modules). You can use a maximum of two masters in the same
chassis; you can use any other intelligent I/O modules not shown here with these masters.
Important: Density is not relevant to an expander module because it
communicates only with its master; an expander module does not
communicate directly with an adapter.
2-3
Chapter 2
Choosing Hardware
Selecting I/O Adapter
Modules
Select I/O adapter modules to interface your PLC-5 processor with I/O
modules. Use Table 2.D as a guide when you select I/O adapter modules.
Table 2.D
Guidelines for Selecting Adapter Modules
ASB
ALX
Choose:
When your requirements are:
1771AS or 1771ASB1
Remote I/O Adapter Module
(or 1771AM1, AM2 chassis
with integral power supply and
adapter module)
a remote I/O link with:
• 57.6 kbps with a distance of up to 10,000 cable feet or
• timing that isn't critical enough to place I/O modules in a processor local
I/O chassis or an extendedlocal I/O chassis
1771ALX ExtendedLocal I/O
Adapter Module
an extendedlocal I/O link with timing that is critical and all extendedlocal
I/O chassis are located within 100 ft of the processor.
11771ASB series C and later have 230.4 kbps communication rate in addition to 57.6 kbps and 115.2 kbps.
17 71AS/ASB Remote I/O Adapter Modules
Table 2.E shows the I/O density per module and addressing modes you can
use with I/O chassis and remote I/O adapter modules.
Table 2.E
I/O Chassis/Adapter Module Combinations
Addressing
Remote I/O Adapter
Module Cat. No.
I/O Density
per Module
2Slot
1Slot
1/2Slot
1771AS
8
16
32
Yes
1
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
1771ASB
Series A
8
16
32
Yes
1
No
Yes
Yes
1
No
No
No
1771ASB
Series B, C, and D
8
16
32
Yes
1
No
Yes
Yes
1
Yes
Yes
Yes
1771AM2
8
16
32
Yes
Yes
1
Yes
Yes
Yes
1 Conditional module placement; you must use an input module and an output module in two
adjacent slots (even/odd pair) of the I/O chassis beginning with slot 0. If you cannot pair the
modules this way, leave the adjacent slot empty.
Using the 1771-ASB Series C or D adapter module, you can choose one of
three communication rates: 57.6 kbps, 115.2 kbps, or 230.4 kbps.
2-4
Chapter 2
Choosing Hardware
1771ALX ExtendedLocal I/O Adapter Module
Table 2.F shows the I/O density per module and addressing modes you can
use with I/O chassis and extended-local I/O adapter modules.
Table 2.F
I/O Chassis/Extended Local I/O Adapter Module Combinations
Module Cat.
Cat No
No.
1771ALX
Series A
1
Addressing
I/O Density
per Module
2Slot
1Slot
1/2Slot
8
16
32
Yes
1
No
Yes
Yes
1
Yes
Yes
Yes
Conditional module placement; you must use an input module and an output module in two adjacent slots (even/
odd pair) of the I/O chassis beginning with slot 0. If you cannot pair the modules this way, leave the adjacent slot
empty.
Other Devices on an I/O Link
Other devices that you can use on a remote I/O link are:
PLC-5 processor in adapter mode
PLC-5/250 remote scanner in adapter mode
PLC interface module for digital ac and dc drives
remote I/O adapter for Bulletin 1336 drives
RediPANELt pushbutton and keypad modules
Datalinert
PanelView (see operator interface)
F30D option module (for T30 plant-floor terminal)
8600 or 9/SERIES CNC with remote I/O adapter option
CVIMt in adapter mode
Pro-Spect 6000 Fastening System with remote I/O adapter option
1747-DCM module (to SLC-500 rack)
1771-DCM module
1771-GMF robot (remote I/O interface module)
See the appropriate Allen-Bradley product catalog for more information on
these devices.
2-5
Chapter 2
Choosing Hardware
Selecting I/O Chassis
An I/O chassis is a single, compact enclosure for the processor,
power-supply modules, remote and extended-local I/O adapter modules,
and I/O modules. The left-most slot of the I/O chassis is reserved for the
processor or adapter module. Consider the following when selecting
a chassis:
When you determine the maximum number of I/O in your application,
allow space for the I/O slots dedicated to power-supply modules,
communication modules, and other intelligent I/O modules.
4-Slot
You must use series B or later chassis with 16- and 32-point
I/O modules.
Allow space for future addition of I/O modules to chassis.
1771A1B
I/O chassis available are:
4-slot (1771-A1B)
8-slot (1771-A2B)
12-slot—rack mount (1771-A3B), panel mount (1771-A3B1)
16-slot (1771-A4B)
You can also choose a chassis with an integral power supply and remote
I/O adapter (show at left). The two types are:
1771AM1
1771AM2
Selecting an Operator
Interface
2-6
1-slot (1771-AM1)
2-slot (1771-AM2)
PanelView and ControlView are operator interface products or packages
that communicate with a PLC-5 processor. Use Table 2.G as a guideline
when selecting either PanelView or ControlView for your PLC-5
programmable controller system. Use Table 2.H for a comparison of
PanelView and ControlView features.
Chapter 2
Choosing Hardware
Table 2.G
Guidelines for Selecting an Operator Interface
Choose this
operator interface:
For these types of
operations (examples):
Explanation:
PanelView1
Starts/stops, auto/manual operations, Used as an operator window to enter commands that make process adjustments such
setpoints, outputs, alarms
as starts/stops and loop changes. Can also be used for alarming operations. Can
communicate with a single PLC5 processor on a remote I/O link. Has a fixed number
of devices and amount of data that it can handle. Has builtin error checking. Is an
industrialhardened CRT with pushbuttons, solid state memory and processor, and no
moving parts (i.e., disk drive).
Utilizes pass through, which is the ability to download/upload via DH+/remote I/O links.
ControlView1
Store, display, and manipulate data
on process performance (i.e., trends,
process graphics, formulas, reports,
and journals)
Used as an operator window that communicates with a PLC5 processor on Data
Highway Plus (DH+) link. Designed for use as an information link. Can communicate
to multiple PLC processors. ControlView is a software package that runs on an IBMr
DOSbased personal computer.
1 Refer to your local AllenBradley sales office or AllenBradley distributor for more information on PanelView and ControlView.
Table 2.H
Comparison of PanelView and ControlView Features
Category
PanelView
Communication with
PLC processor
Remote I/O
Graphics
Character graphics
Create screens with PanelBuilder software
Monochrome or color (8 of 16 colors displayed at a time)
ControlView
DH+ link
5 block transfers per terminal maximum (32 words per transfer) Data Highway
Data Highway II Native Mode
1 discrete transfer per terminal (64 words maximum, one way)
This is 8 racks of transfer
Pixel Graphics
Create screens with Mouse Grafix editor option or C Toolkit
EGA, VGA, or equivalent with 256K RAM
Monochrome or color monitor
Number of
8 to 12 screens of medium complexity typical
Screens per
200 objects maximum per screen
Terminal/Workstation Limited by terminal memory size: 128 Kbytes
Limited only by hard disk capacity
50 data entry locations per screen
50 tags per command list per screen
300 tags/points maximum per screen
Data Capacity
200 objects maximum per screen
10,000 points maximum in database
Communication
Rate
Limited by blocktransfer and discretetransfer timing
8 scan classes, each with userconfigurable foreground and
background update times; limited by performance of Data
Highway, DH+, or Data Highway II link
Hardware
Keypad or Touchscreen terminals, color or monochrome
Depends on PLC processor and remote I/O link size
AllenBradley, IBM, or compatible computer required for
PanelBuilder software
Programming
PanelBuilder software
Menudriven with fillintheblank information entry
Use PanelBuilder to create application file that defines
screens, messages, alarms, then download application file to
PanelView terminal
AB, IBM, or compatible computer with 286 or 386
processor, math coprocessor, hard disk required at each
operator station
Create data base online via the menu. Menudriven,
fillintheblank information entry, or import data via the ASCII
import capability
Create screens with the mouse GRAFIX editor option or C
toolkit option
Messages
496 maximum per terminal
Not Applicable
Alarms
496 maximum per terminal
2000 points with Alarming option
Security
8 levels
16 levels with individual operator login capability
Individual objects with security
Screen lockout
Options
Remote serial port
EEPROM or EPROM memory
Lots of software options
2-7
Chapter 2
Choosing Hardware
For more information on selecting and configuring PanelView, see:
PanelView Operator Terminal and PanelBuilder Development Software
User Manual, cat. no. 2711-ND002 version C, PN40061-139-01—
request latest revision
Replacing Node Adapter Firmware for PanelView Terminals Installation
Data, PN40062-236-01—request latest revision
For more information on selecting and configuring ControlView, see:
ControlView Core User Manual, publication 6190-6.5.1
ControlView Allen-Bradley Drivers User Manual,
publication 6190-6.5.5
ControlView Networking User Manual, publication 6190-6.5.9
Other Operator Interfaces
You can use the following as operator interfaces in your PLC-5
processor system:
RediPANEL pushbutton and keypad modules
Dataliner
1784-T47 and 1784-T53 programming terminals
See the appropriate Allen-Bradley product catalog for more information on
these operator interfaces.
2-8
Chapter 2
Choosing Hardware
Choosing a Classic PLC5
Processor for Your
Application
Processor/
Cat. No.
PLC5/10
(1785LT4)
PLC5/12
(1785LT3)
Maximum User
Memory Words
6K
6K
PLC5/15
(1785LT)
6 K expandable
to 10 K or 14 K
PLC5/25
(1785LT2)
13 K
expandable to
17 K or 21 K
Choose from the following PLC-5 processors.
Table 2.I
Classic PLC5 Processor Selection ChartPart 1
EEPROM Module
Memory (Words) &
Module Number
Total I/O Maximum
(any mix)
Analog
I/O Max
Program Scan Time /
K Word
I/O Scan time/Rack
(in a single Chassis,
extlocal or remote)
Multiple
MCPs /
Quantity
8 K (1785MJ)
• 512 (32I/O modules)
• 256 (16I/O modules)
• 128 (8I/O modules)
256
2 ms (discrete logic)
8 ms (typical)
N/A
No / 1
8 K (1785MJ)
• 512 (32I/O modules)
• 256 (16I/O modules)
• 128 (8I/O modules)
256
2 ms (discrete logic)
8 ms (typical)
• 10 ms @ 57.6 kbps
(remote)
No / 1
8 K (1785MJ)
• 512 (any mix) or
• 512 in + 512 out
(complementary)
512
2 ms (discrete logic)
8 ms (typical)
• 10 ms @ 57.6 kbps
(remote)
No / 1
8 K (1785MJ) or
16 K (1785MK)
• 1024 (any mix) or
• 1024 in + 1024 out
(complementary)
1024
2 ms (discrete logic)
8 ms (typical)
• 10 ms @ 57.6 kbps
(remote)
No / 1
Table 2.J
Classic PLC5 Processor Selection ChartPart 2
Maximum Number of I/O
Chassis
Total
Ext Local
Remote
Number of
RS232/
422/ 423
ports
1
1
0
0
0
2.5A
• 1 DH+
• 1 Remote I/O (Adapter Only)
4
1
0
0
0
57.6 kbps
2.5A
PLC5/15
(1785LT)
• 1 DH+
• 1 Remote I/O (Adapter or Scanner)
4
13
0
12
0
57.6 kbps
2.5A
PLC5/25
(1785LT2)
• 1 DH+
• 1 Remote I/O (Adapter or Scanner)
8
17
0
16
0
57.6 kbps
2.5A
Processor/
Cat. No.
Number of Remote I/O,
ExtendedLocal
I/O Extended
Local
I/O, and DH+ Ports
Maximum
Number of
I/O Racks
PLC5/10
(1785LT4)
• 1 DH+
PLC5/12
(1785LT3)
Selecting Power Supplies
Remote I/O
Transmission
Rates1
Backplane
Current
Load
Use the following steps as guidelines for selecting a power supply for a
chassis that contains a PLC-5 processor, a 1771-AS or -ASB remote I/O
adapter module, or a 1771-ALX extended-local I/O adapter module.
1.
Determine the input voltage for the power supply.
2.
Calculate the total backplane current draw for I/O modules by
adding together the backplane current draw for each I/O module in
that chassis.
1771P7
2-9
Chapter 2
Choosing Hardware
3.
4.
5.
Add to the total of the I/O module backplane current draw either:
a.
3.3 Amps when the chassis will contain a PLC-5 processor
(maximum current draw for any PLC-5 processor) or
b.
1.2 Amps when the chassis will contain either a remote I/O
1771-AS or -ASB module or a 1771-ALX extended-local I/O
adapter module
If you leave slots available in your chassis for future expansion:
a.
list backplane current draw for future I/O modules
b.
add the total current draw for all expansion I/O modules to the
total calculated in step 3.
Determine whether the available space for the power supply is in the
chassis or mounted external to the chassis.
Choose your power supply from Table 2.K or Table 2.L using the input
voltage requirement and the total backplane current draw as determined in
the previous steps, 1 through 5.
See the Automation Products Catalog, publication AP100, for more
information on power supplies.
Powering a Chassis Containing a PLC5 Processor
Table 2.K lists the power-supply modules that you can use with a Classic
PLC-5 processor.
2-10
Chapter 2
Choosing Hardware
Table 2.K
Powering a Chassis Containing a Classic PLC5 processor
Power
Supply
Input
Power
Output Current
(in Amps)
1771P3
120V ac
1771P4
Output Current (in Amps) When Parallel with:
P4S1 P5
P6S
Power Supply
P6S1 Location
P3
P4
P4S
3
6
11
11
chassis, 1slot
120V ac
8
11
16
16
chassis, 2slot
1771P4S
120V ac
8
11
16
16
chassis, 1slot
1771P4S1
100V ac
8
1771P4R
120V ac
8/16/241
1771P5
24V dc
8
1771P6S
220V ac
8
1771P6S1
200V ac
8
1771P6R
220V ac
8/16/241
1771P7
120/220V ac
16
1771PS7
120/220V ac
16
16
16
chassis, 2slot
16
chassis, 1slot
16
external2
1 See publication 17712.136 for more information.
2 You cannot use an external power supply and a slotbased power supply module to power the same chassis;
they are not compatible.
2-11
Chapter 2
Choosing Hardware
Powering a Remote I/O Chassis Containing a 1771AS or 1771ASB or
an ExtendedLocal I/O Chassis Containing a 1771ALX
Table 2.L lists the power supply modules that you can use with a remote
I/O chassis or an extended-local I/O chassis.
Table 2.L
Powering a Remote I/O Chassis (Containing a 1771AS or ASB)
or an ExtendedLocal I/O Chassis (Containing a 1771ALX)
Power
Supply
Input
Power
Output Current
(in Amps)
1771P3
120V ac
1771P4
Output Current (in Amps) When Parallel with:
P4S1 P5
P3
P4
P4S
3
6
11
11
chassis, 1slot
120V ac
8
11
16
16
chassis, 2slot
1771P4S
120V ac
8
11
16
16
chassis, 1slot
1771P4S1
100V ac
8
1771P4R
120V ac
8/16/24 1
1771P5
24V dc
8
1771P6S
220V ac
8
1771P6S1
200V ac
8
1771P6R
220V ac
8/16/24 1
1771P1
120/220V ac
6.5
1771P2
120/220V ac
6.5
1771P7
120/220V ac
16
1771PS7
120/220V ac
16
1777P2
120/220V ac
9
1777P4
24V dc
9
16
16
1 See publication 17712.136 for more information.
2 You cannot use an external power supply and a slotbased power supply module to power the same chassis;
they are not compatible.
2-12
P6S
Power Supply
P6S1 Location
chassis, 2slot
16
chassis, 1slot
16
external 2
Chapter 2
Choosing Hardware
Selecting Memory Modules
Select a memory module from Table 2.M for your PLC-5 processor.
Table 2.M
PLC5 Processor Memory Modules
Nonvolatile Memory Backup (EEPROM)
Selecting a Replacement
Battery
RAM Memory (CMOS)
Words
Catalog Number (and Processor)
Words
Catalog Number (and Processor)
8K
1785MJ
4K
1785MR (PLC5/15 and 5/25)
16 K
1785MK (PLC5/25)
8K
1785MS (PLC5/15 and 5/25)
A battery ships with your PLC-5 processor. Select a replacement battery
using Table 2.N and Table 2.O. See the Allen-Bradley Guidelines for
Handling Lithium Batteries, publication ICCG-5.14, for more information.
Table 2.N
Processor Batteries
Processor
Battery1
Function
PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15,
and 5/25
1770XY, AA
lithium
Retains the processor memory and the
memory in an optional CMOS RAM module
if the processor is not powered.
1 The 1770XY is a 3.6 Volt AA size lithium thionyl chloride battery manufactured by Tadiran as
their part number TL 5104 and type AEL/S.
Table 2.O
Average Battery Life
Selecting
Complementary I/O
Battery
Temperature
Power Off 100%
(Average)
Power Off 50%
(Average)
1770XY
60° C
25° C
329 days
2 years
1.4 years
3.3 years
You configure complementary I/O by assigning an I/O rack number of one
I/O chassis (primary) to another I/O chassis (complementary). You
complement I/O functions in the primary chassis with opposite functions in
the complementary chassis. Use chapter 4, “Assigning Addressing Mode,
Racks, and Groups,” in conjunction with the following selection of
complementary I/O hardware.
2-13
Chapter 2
Choosing Hardware
Use the following modules in either primary or complementary I/O chassis
opposite any type of module:
Communication Adapter Module (1771-KA2)
Communication Controller Module (1771-KE)
PLC-2 Family/RS-232-C Interface Module (1771-KG)
Fiber Optics Converter Module (1771-AF)
DH/DH+ Communication Adapter Module (1785-KA)
DH+/RS-232C Communications Interface Module (1785-KE)
Use the following modules in either primary or complementary I/O chassis
opposite any type of module. However, these modules do not work as
standalone modules; each one has an associated master module. Use care
when placing the master modules in the I/O chassis (refer to the paragraph
on Master/Expander I/O modules):
Analog Input Expander Module (1771-E1, -E2, -E3)
Analog Output Expander Module (1771-E4)
Servo (Encoder Feedback) Expander Module (1771-ES)
Pulse Output Expander Module (1771-OJ)
Selecting a PLC5 Processor
Backup System
A PLC-5 processor backup system contains two of each of the following
hardware components:
Classic PLC-5 processor module
Processor
Catalog Number
PLC5/15
1785LT Series B
PLC5/25
1785LT2
1785-BCM Series C Backup Control Module (for 2 channels)
1785-BEM Backup Expansion Module (for 2 additional channels)
Power supply
Local chassis
Important: The PLC-5 backup system does not back up I/O in the
processor-resident local chassis. Do not install I/O in the processorresident local chassis of a backed up system.
Refer to the PLC-5 Backup Communication Module User Manual,
publication 1785-6.5.4, for more information on configuring a PLC-5
processor backup system.
2-14
Chapter 2
Choosing Hardware
Selecting Link Terminators
Terminate remote I/O links by setting switch assembly SW3. If you cannot
use an 82-Ohm terminator because of devices that you place on your I/O
link (see the table below for a list of these devices), you must use 150-Ohm
terminators. Using the higher resistance reduces the quantity of devices to
16 that you can place per remote I/O link. Also, this limits your
communication rates to 57.6 kbps and 115.2 kbps.
DH+ Network Terminator
Terminate your DH+ network with a 150-Ohm, 1/2-watt terminator.
If you have this processor:
Terminate a DH+ link by:
PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, or 5/25
Setting switch assembly SW3 of the PLC5
processor (refer to your Classic 1785 PLC5 Family
Programmable Controllers Hardware Installation
Manual, publication 17856.6.1).
Connecting a
Programming Terminal to a
Processor Module
Connect the programming terminal directly to the processor through the
D-shell DH+ COMM INTFC connector on the front panel. You can also
connect the programming terminal remotely to a DH+ link through the
3-pin connector or at a remote station.
Choosing Cables
Select cables from the options listed below. See chapter 3, “Placing System
Hardware,” to determine the lengths that you will need for cables in
your system.
Remote I/O Link
Use Belden 9463 twinaxial cable (1770-CD) to connect your PLC-5
processor to remote I/O adapter modules.
Connect your I/O devices using:
single-conductor wire (analog and some discrete applications)
multi-conductor cable (analog and some discrete applications)
multi-conductor shielded cable (some specialty I/O modules and
low-voltage dc discrete modules)
2-15
Chapter 2
Choosing Hardware
See the Classic 1785 PLC-5 Programmable Controllers Hardware
Installation Manual, publication 1785-6.6.1, and the installation data for
the I/O modules that you have selected for more information on I/O wiring.
Also, see Allen-Bradley Programmable Controller Wiring and Grounding
Guidelines, publication 1770-4.1, and Control, Communication and
Information Reference Guide, publication ICCG-1.2, for more information.
Programming Terminal
The cable that you use to connect a processor to a programming terminal
depends on the communication device used. Table 2.P lists the cables that
you need for different configurations.
Table 2.P
Cables for Connecting a Classic PLC5 Processor and Programming
Terminal
If you have this device:
With this
communication device:
Use this cable:
PLC5/10,
PLC
5/10, 5/12,
5/12, 5/15,
5/15,
or 5/25
1784 KT, KT2
1784KT,
KT2
1784KL, KL/B
1784CP
1784
CP
1784KTK1
1784CP5
1784PCMK
1784PCM5
6160T60, 6160T70, 6121
IBM PC/AT (or compatible)
1785KE
1784CAK
1784T47, 6123, 6124
IBM PC/XT (or compatible)
1785KE
1784CXK
6120, 6122
1785KE
1784CYK
You can also use a 1770-KF2/B communication interface to connect to a
PLC-5 processor. You build your own cables to connect your
programming terminal via the COM1 or COM2 serial ports to the
1770-KF2/B. For the cable pin assignments, see the Classic 1785 PLC-5
Programmable Controller Hardware Installation Manual, publication
1785-6.6.1.
2-16
Chapter
3
Placing System Hardware
Chapter Objectives
A well-planned layout is essential to the proper installation of your Classic
PLC-5 programmable controller system. Read this chapter for information
on placing hardware.
If you want to read about:
System Design
Determined
Go to
page:
Proper environment
31
Protecting your system
34
Avoiding electrostatic damage
34
Planning your raceway layout
34
Planning your cabling
36
Grounding your system
37
Choosing Hardware
Placing System
Hardware
Assigning Addressing
Mode, Racks,
and Groups
Choosing
Communication
Selecting Interrupt
Routines
Transferring Discrete
and Block Data
Calculating Program
Timing
Planning Your
System Programs
Determining the Proper
Environment
Place the processor in an environment with conditions that fall within the
guidelines described in Table 3.A.
Table 3.A
Proper Environmental Conditions For Your Processor
Environmental Condition
Acceptable Range
Operating temperature
0 to 60° C (32 to 140° F)
Storage temperature
40 to 85° C (40 to 185° F)
Relative humidity
5 to 95% (without condensation)
Separate your programmable controller system from other equipment and
plant walls to allow for convection cooling. Convection cooling draws a
vertical column of air upward over the processor. This cooling air must
not exceed 60° C (140° F) at any point immediately below the processor.
If the air temperature exceeds 60° C, install fans that bring in filtered air or
recirculate internal air inside the enclosure, or install air-conditioning/heatexchanger units.
3-1
Chapter 3
Placing System Hardware
To allow for proper convection cooling in enclosures containing a
processor-resident chassis and remote I/O chassis, follow these guidelines.
Minimum spacing requirements for a
processorresident chassis:
• Mount the I/O chassis horizontally.
Area reserved for disconnect.
transform er, control relays, m otor
starters or other user devices.
• Allow 153 mm (6 in) above and below the chassis.
• Allow 102 mm (4 in) on the sides of each chassis.
• Allow 51 mm (2 in) vertically and horizontally between
any chassis and the wiring duct or terminal strips.
153mm
(6")
51mm
(2")
102mm
(4")
102mm
(4")
51mm(2")
• Leave any excess space at the top of the enclosure,
where the temperature is the highest.
153mm
(6")
Wiring Duct
13081
3-2
Chapter 3
Placing System Hardware
Minimum spacing requirements for a remote
I/O chassis:
Area reserved for disconnect.
transformer, control relays, mo t o r
starters or other user devices.
102mm
(4")
153mm (6")
153mm
(6 ")
• Allow 153 mm (6 in) above and below all
chassis. When you use more than one
chassis in the same area, allow 152.4 mm
(6 in) between each chassis.
• Allow 102 mm (4 in) on the sides of each
chassis. When you use more than one
chassis in the same area, allow 101.6 mm
(4 in) between each chassis.
• Allow 51 mm (2 in) vertically and
horizontally between any chassis and the
wiring duct or terminal strips.
51mm (2")
Wiring Duct
51mm (2")
102mm
(4")
• Mount the I/O chassis horizontally.
• Leave any excess space at the top of
the enclosure, where the temperature is
the highest.
102mm
(4")
153mm (6")
Wiring Duct
18749
3-3
Chapter 3
Placing System Hardware
Protecting Your Processor
You provide the enclosure for your processor system. This enclosure
protects your processor system from atmospheric contaminants such as oil,
moisture, dust, corrosive vapors, or other harmful airborne substances. To
help guard against EMI/RFI, we recommend a steel enclosure.
Mount the enclosure in a position where you can fully open the doors. You
need easy access to processor wiring and related components so that
troubleshooting is convenient.
When you choose the enclosure size, allow extra space for transformers,
fusing, disconnect switch, master control relay, and terminal strips.
Avoiding Electrostatic
Damage
ATTENTION: Under some conditions, electrostatic
discharge can degrade performance or damage the processor
module. Read and observe the following precautions to guard
against electrostatic damage.
Wear an approved wrist strap grounding device when
handling the processor module.
Touch a grounded object to discharge yourself before
handling the processor module.
Do not touch the backplane connector or connector pins.
When not handling the processor module, keep it in its
protective packaging.
Laying Out Your
Cable Raceway
3-4
The raceway layout of a system reflects where the different types of I/O
modules are placed in I/O chassis. Therefore, you should determine
I/O-module placement prior to any layout and routing of wires. When
planning your I/O-module placement, however, segregate the modules
based on the conductor categories published for each I/O module so that
you can follow these guidelines. These guidelines coincide with the
guidelines for “the installation of electrical equipment to minimize
electrical noise inputs to controllers from external sources” in IEEE
standard 518-1982.
Chapter 3
Placing System Hardware
To plan a raceway layout, do the following:
categorize conductor cables
route conductor cables
Categorize Conductors
Segregate all wires and cables into categories as described in the Industrial
Automation Wiring and Grounding Guidelines, publication 1770-4.1. See
the installation data for each I/O module that you are using for information
about its classification.
Route Conductors
To guard against coupling noise from one conductor to another, follow the
general guidelines for routing cables described in the Industrial
Automation Wiring and Grounding Guidelines, publication 1770-4.1. You
should follow the safe grounding and wiring practices called out in the
National Electrical Code (NEC, published by the National Fire Protection
Association, in Quincy, Massachusetts), and local electrical codes.
Planning Cabling
DH+ Link Cabling
At a DH+ transmission rate of 57.6 kbps, do not exceed 3,048 cable-m
(10,000 cable-ft) for a trunkline cable length or 30.5 cable-m (100 cable-ft)
for a dropline cable length.
Remote I/O Link Cabling
Refer to Table 3.B for remote I/O link trunkline cable length restrictions.
Table 3.B
Maximum Cable Lengths per Communication Rate
Transmission Rate
Maximum Cable Length
57.6 kbps
3,048 m (10,000 ft)
115.2 kbps
1,524 m (5000 ft)
230.4 kbps
762 m (2500 ft)
Important: All devices on the remote I/O link must be communicating at
the same transmission rate.
3-5
Chapter 3
Placing System Hardware
Laying Out the
Backpanel Spacing
Use 6.35 mm (0.25 inch) mounting bolts to attach the I/O chassis to the
enclosure backpanel.
Figure 3.1
Chassis Dimensions (Series B)
1771A1B
1771A2B
1771A3B1
1771A4B
591mm
(23.25")
337mm
(13.25")
193mm1
(7.60")
Side
464mm
(18.25")
210mm
(8.25")
315mm
(12.41")
16slot 1771
12slot
8slot
4slot
254mm
(10")
Power
Connector
171mm
(6.75")
483mm
(19.01")
229mm
(9.01")
1771A3B
217mm1
(8.54")
465mm
(18.31")
610mm
(24.01")
16slot 1771A4B
356mm
(14.01")
8slot 1771A2B
12slot 1771A3B1
4slot 1771A1B
484mm
(19")
9mm
(.34")
26mm
(1.02")
178mm
(7")
Side
339mm
(13.53")
Front
130mm
(5.10")
12450I
1Total maximum depth dimension per installation will be dependent upon module wiring and connectors.
3-6
Chapter 3
Placing System Hardware
Figure 3.2
I/O Chassis and 1771P2 Power Supply Dimensions
Use .25" dia
mounting bolts
(4 places)
315mm
(12.41")
591mm
(23.25")
16-slot
464mm
(18.25")
337mm
(13.25")
12-slot
8-slot
210mm
(8.25")
4-slot
1771P1
1771P2
1771P7
1771PS7
Power Supply
91mm
(3.6")
254mm
(10")
483mm
(19.01")
610mm
(24.01")
16-slot 1771-A4B
12-slot 1771-A3B1
356mm
(14.01")
229mm
(9.01")
Clearance depth is 204 mm (8 in) for 8 I/O connection points per module.
Grounding Configuration
8-slot 1771-A2B
4-slot 1771-A1B
12451I
See Figure 3.3 for the recommended grounding configuration for remote
I/O systems.
Figure 3.3
Recommended Grounding Configuration for Remote I/O Systems
Enclosure
Ground
Bus
Grounding Electrode Conductor
To Grounding
Electrode
System
I/O Chassis Wall
Ground
Lug
Nut
Star
Washer
Ground Lug
15561
3-7
Chapter
4
Assigning Addressing Modes,
Racks, and Groups
Chapter Objectives
This chapter conveys basic hardware addressing concepts and gives you
guidelines with which to choose the addressing modes (including
complementary I/O), racks, and groups to use in your system.
If you want to read about:
Go to
page:
Placing I/O modules in chassis
41
Understanding terms
42
Choosing I/O addressing mode
43
Rack number assignments
49
Addressing complementary I/O
412
System Design
Determined
Choosing Hardware
Placing System
Hardware
Assigning Addressing
Mode, Racks,
and Groups
Selecting Interrupt
Routines
Transferring Discrete
and Block Data
Calculating Program
Timing
Choosing
Communication
Planning Your
System Programs
Placing I/O Modules
in Chassis
Place I/O modules in a chassis depending on the electrical characteristics
of the modules. The placement is made left to right, with the left-most
position being closest in the chassis to the PLC-5 processor or the I/O
adapter module. The placement order is as follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
block-transfer modules (all types)
dc input modules, placed left to right from lowest to highest voltages
dc output modules, placed left to right from lowest to highest voltages
ac input modules, placed left to right from lowest to highest voltages
ac output modules, placed left to right from lowest to highest voltages
4-1
Chapter 4
Assigning Addressing Modes,
Racks, and Groups
The following guidelines are for placing block-transfer modules.
Place as many modules as possible for which you need fast
block-transfer times in your processor-resident local I/O chassis .
Place modules that need fast block-transfer times (but space is not
available in processor-resident local I/O chassis) in an extended-local
I/O chassis.
Place modules in which timing is not as critical as in other
block-transfer modules in remote I/O chassis.
ac output modules should always be the furthest I/O modules from any
block-transfer modules in the same chassis.
Understanding the Terms
Used in this Chapter
Become familiar with the following terms and their definitions:
An I/O group is an addressing unit that corresponds to an input
image-table word (16 bits) and an output image-table word (16 bits). An
I/O group can contain up to 16 inputs and 16 outputs; and it can occupy 2-,
1-, or 1/2-module slots for addressing purposes.
Input
Terminals
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Output
Terminals
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
2Slot I/O Module Group
(I/O Group #0)
4-2
Output or
Input
Terminals
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
1Slot I/O Module Group
(I/O Group #0)
13073
Chapter 4
Assigning Addressing Modes,
Racks, and Groups
An I/O rack is an addressing unit that corresponds to 8 input image-table
words and 8 output image-table words. A rack contains 8 I/O groups.
I/O Group Numbers
.
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
13074
Depending on I/O chassis size and I/O group size, an I/O rack can occupy
a fraction of an I/O chassis, a full I/O chassis, or multiple I/O chassis.
Choosing the
Addressing Mode
Select an addressing mode for each chassis independently, based on the
type and density of the I/O modules contained therein. When you select
addressing mode, limit the number of remote I/O adapters and I/O modules
to the maximum number that the PLC-5 processor can support.
Using 2Slot Addressing
When you select 2-slot addressing, the processor addresses two I/O
module slots as one I/O group. Each physical 2-slot I/O group corresponds
to one word (16 bits) in the input image table and one word (16 bits) in the
output image table. The type (unidirectional or bidirectional) and density
of a module that you install determines the number of bits that are used in
each word.
Important: You cannot use 32-point I/O modules with 2-slot addressing.
4-3
Chapter 4
Assigning Addressing Modes,
Racks, and Groups
8-Point I/O Modules
Eight-point digital discrete I/O modules have a maximum of eight inputs or
up to eight outputs. Because they do not interfere with each other’s I/O
image, you can place any mix of 8-point I/O modules (including
bidirectional modules, such as block-transfer modules) in any order.
2Slot I/O Group with One 8pt Input Module
and One 8pt Output Module
2Slot I/O Group with Two 8pt Input Modules
2-Slot
I/O G roup
2-Slot
I/O G roup
Input
Terminals
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
Input
Terminals
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Input
Terminals
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
Output
Terminals
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Output ImageTable Word Corresponding to the I/O Group.
Output ImageTable Word Corresponding to the I/O Group.
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
Unused
Output Bits Used
Input ImageTable Word Corresponding to the I/O Group.
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
Unused
Input ImageTable Word Corresponding to the I/O Group.
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
Always 0
This I/O group uses 16 bits of the input image table.
11867
4-4
Input Bits Used
This I/O group uses 8 bits of the input image table and
8 bits of the output image table.
14965
Chapter 4
Assigning Addressing Modes,
Racks, and Groups
16-Point I/O Modules
Sixteen-point digital discrete I/O modules have up to 16 inputs or up to
16 outputs. A 16-point I/O module uses a full word in the input or output
image table.
2Slot I/O Group with One 16pt Input Module
and One 16pt Output Module
Word # Output Image Table
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
2-Slot
I/O G roup
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
I/O Group Designation
I/O Chassis Containing
16pt Modules
Input
Terminals
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Output
Terminals
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
I OI OI OI OI OI OI OI O
Input/Output Designation
Word # Input Image Table
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Output ImageTable Word Corresponding to the I/O Group.
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
Input ImageTable Word Corresponding to the I/O Group.
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
Because each 16pt module uses a full word in the
image table, the only type of module that you can install
in a 2slot I/O group with a 16pt input module is an 8 or
16pt output module that performs a complementary
function (inputs and outputs complement each other).
Since all blocktransfer modules are bidirectional,
they cannot be used to complement either input or
output modules.
This I/O group uses 16 bits of the input image table and
16 bits of the output image table.
15559
4-5
Chapter 4
Assigning Addressing Modes,
Racks, and Groups
Using 1Slot Addressing
When you select 1-slot addressing, the processor addresses one I/O
module slot as one I/O group. Each physical slot in the chassis
corresponds to an input and output image-table word. The type
(unidirectional or bidirectional) and density of module that you install
determines the number of bits used in these words.
8-Point I/O Modules
You can place any mix of 8- or 16-point I/O modules
(including bidirectional modules such as
block-transfer modules) in any order with 1-slot
addressing. The 8- or 16-point modules do not
interfere with the I/O image of the other 8- or
16-point modules.
1Slot I/O Group with One 16pt Digital Discrete
I/O Module
1-Slot
I/O G roup
Input
Terminals
0
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
1-Slot
I/O G roup
or
16-Point I/O Modules
A single 16-point module uses an entire word of the
processor image table.
Output
Terminals
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Block-Transfer Module Addressing
To address a single-slot block transfer module in a
1-slot I/O group, use the assigned I/O rack and group
numbers of the slot (in which the module resides) and
0 for the module number. To address a double-slot
block-transfer module, use the assigned I/O rack
number, the lower assigned I/O group number, and 0
for the module number.
Output ImageTable Word Corresponding to the I/O Group.
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
Input ImageTable Word Corresponding to the I/O Group.
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
A single 16pt module uses an entire word of image table.
4-6
11869
Chapter 4
Assigning Addressing Modes,
Racks, and Groups
32-Point I/O Modules
To use 32-point I/O modules with 1-slot addressing, you must install, as a
pair, an input module and an output module in two adjacent slots (even/odd
pair) of the I/O chassis, beginning with I/O slot 0. If you cannot pair the
modules in this way, one of the two slots of the pair must be empty. For
example, if I/O slot 0 holds a 32-point input module, I/O slot 1 must hold
an 8-, 16-, or 32-point output module (or a module using the backplane for
power only); otherwise the slot must be empty.
1Slot I/O Group with 32pt I/O Modules
Word #
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
01 2 34 567
Output Image Table
I/O Group Designation
I/O Chassis with 1Slot Addressing
I O I O I O IO
Slot 0
Input Module
I/O Group 0, 1
Input/Output Designation
Input Image Table
Word #
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Slot 1
Output Module
I/O Group 0, 1
Output ImageTable Words Corresponding to I/O Groups 0 and 1.
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00 000
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00 001
Input ImageTable Words Corresponding to I/O Groups 0 and 1.
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
000
17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 07 06 05 04 03 02 01 00
001
14258
4-7
Chapter 4
Assigning Addressing Modes,
Racks, and Groups
Using 1/2Slot Addressing
When you select 1/2-slot addressing, the processor addresses one-half of
an I/O module slot as one I/O group. Each physical slot in the chassis
corresponds to two input and two output image-table words. The type
(unidirectional or bidirectional) and density of the module that you install
determines the number of bits that are used in each word.
1/2Slot I/O Group with One 32pt Input Module
Input Word 0
17
10
7
0
Im age Table
W ords Allocated
for I/O G roup 0
Output Word 0
17
Input #
01
03
05
07
1/2-Slot
I/O G roup
0
11
13
15
17
01
03
1/2-S lot
I/O G roup
05
1
07
11
13
15
17
-
10 7
Unused
0
Input #
00
02
04
06
1/2-Slot
I/O Group
10
0
12
14
16
00
02
04 1/2 S lot
I/O Group
06
1
10
12
14
16
-
You can mix 8-, 16- and 32-pt I/O modules
in any order in the I/O chassis because 32
input bits and 32 output bits are available in
the image table for each I/O slot. When you
use 8- and 16-pt I/O modules with 1/2-slot
addressing, however, you use fewer total I/O
bits in our image table.
Word #
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
024 6
135 7
Output Image Table
Not
Used
I/O Group Designation
I/O Chassis with 1/2Slot Addressing
I I OO
Input/Output Designation
Word #
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Input Image Table
Always
0
14974
Input Word 1
17
10
7
0
Output Word 1
17
10 7
Unused
0
Im age Table
W ords Allocated
for I/O Group 1
This I/O group uses two words of the image table.
4-8
Chapter 4
Assigning Addressing Modes,
Racks, and Groups
Summary
Table 4.A summarizes the guidelines for selecting an addressing mode.
Table 4.A
Addressing Mode Summary
Assigning Racks
Addressing
Mode
Guidelines
2slot
• Two I/O module slots = 1 group
• Each physical 2slot I/O group corresponds to one word (16 bits) in the input image table and one word
(16 bits) in the output image table
• When you use 16point I/O modules, you must install as a pair an input module and an output module in
an I/O group; if you use an input module in slot 0, you must use an output module in slot 1 (or it must be
empty). This configuration gives you the maximum usage of I/O.
• You cannot use a blocktransfer module and a 16point module in the same I/O group because
blocktransfer modules use 8 bits in both the input and output table. Therefore, 8 bits of the 16point
module would conflict with the blocktransfer module.
• You cannot use 32point I/O modules.
1slot
• One I/O module slot = 1 group
• Each physical slot in the chassis corresponds to one word (16 bits) in the input image table and one
word (16 bits) in the output image table
• When you use 32point I/O modules, you must install as a pair an input module and an output module in
an even/odd pair of adjacent I/O group; if you use an input module in slot 0, you must use an output
module in slot 1 (or it must be empty). This configuration gives you the maximum usage of I/O.
• Use any mix of 8 and 16point I/O modules, blocktransfer or intelligent modules in a single I/O chassis.
Using 8point modules results in fewer total I/O.
1/2slot
• One half of an I/O module slot = 1 group
• Each physical slot in the chassis corresponds to two words (32 bits) in the input image table and two
words (32 bits) in the output image table
• Use any mix of 8, 16, and 32point I/O or blocktransfer and intelligent modules. Using 8point and
16point I/O modules results in fewer total I/O.
• With the processorresident local rack set for 1/2slot addressing, you cannot force the input bits for the
upper word of any slot that is empty or that has an 8point or 16point I/O module. For example, if you
have an 8point or a 16point I/O module in the first slot of your local rack (words 0 and 1 of the I/O
image table, 1/2slot addressing), you cannot force the input bits for word 1 (I:001) on or off.
The number of racks in a chassis depends on the chassis size and the
addressing mode:
If using this
chassis size:
With 2slot
addressing,
rack type is:
With 1slot
addressing,
rack type is:
With 1/2slot
addressing,
rack type is:
4slot
1/4 rack
1/2 rack
1 rack
8slot
1/2 rack
1 rack
2 racks
12slot
3/4 rack
11/2 racks
3 racks
16slot
1 rack
2 racks
4 racks
4-9
Chapter 4
Assigning Addressing Modes,
Racks, and Groups
When assigning rack numbers, use the following guidelines:
One I/O rack number is eight I/O groups, regardless of the addressing
mode that you select.
You can assign from one to four racks in your processor-resident
local chassis (128 inputs and 128 outputs) depending on the chassis
size and addressing mode. You cannot split a processor-resident local
I/O rack over two or more chassis or assign unused processor-resident
local I/O groups to remote I/O racks.
The default address of the processor-resident local rack is 0. You can
change the default to 1 by setting bit 2 in the processor control word
(S:26) on the processor configuration screen; you must also change the
mode of the processor from run to program to run.
An extended-local I/O and a remote I/O chassis cannot be addressed by
the same I/O rack number. For example, if an 8-slot extended-local I/O
chassis is configured as I/O groups 0-3 of I/O rack 2, an 8-slot remote
I/O chassis cannot be configured as I/O groups 4-7 of I/O rack 2.
Remote I/O Racks
You can assign a remote I/O rack to a fraction of a chassis, a single I/O
chassis, or multiple I/O chassis:
I/O Rack No.2
I/O Rack No.0 I/O Rack No.1
01 23 45 67 01 23 45 67
0
1
2 3
4 5
6
7
One 16slot chassis, one rack
Power source not indicated
One 16slot chassis, two racks
Power source not indicated
I/O Rack No.3
0
1
2 3
One 4slot chassis, 1/2 rack
Power source not indicated
4-10
4
5
Two 2slot chassis, 1/4 rack each
Power source not indicated
6
7
16466
Chapter 4
Assigning Addressing Modes,
Racks, and Groups
When assigning remote I/O rack numbers, use the following guidelines:
Limit the number of remote I/O rack numbers to those that your PLC-5
processor can support.
The PLC-5 processor and the 1771-ASB adapter module automatically
allocate the next higher rack number(s) to the remaining I/O groups of
the chassis. For example, if you select 1/2-slot addressing for your
processor-resident local chassis and you are using a 16-slot (1771-A4B)
chassis, the processor will address racks 0, 1, 2, and 3 in this chassis.
BlockTransfer Module Racks Using 1/2Slot Addressing
To address a block-transfer module in a 1/2-slot I/O group, use the
assigned rack number, the lower assigned I/O group number of the slot(s)
in which the module resides, and 0 for the module number (Figure 4.4).
Figure 4.4
Example BlockTransfer Module Address Using 1/2Slot Addressing
I/O Group
Number
Rack 0
0–3
Rack 1
4–7
0–3
This example is valid for a singleslot
BT module only.
Rack 2
4–7
0–3
Rack 3
4–7
0–3
4–7
Rack = 2
Group = 4
Slot = 0
4-11
Chapter 4
Assigning Addressing Modes,
Racks, and Groups
Addressing
Complementary I/O
You configure complementary I/O by assigning an I/O rack number of one
I/O chassis (primary) to another I/O chassis (complementary),
complementing modules I/O group for I/O group. The I/O modules in the
complementary chassis perform the opposite function of the corresponding
modules in the primary chassis.
The PLC-5/15 and -5/25 processors operating as a remote I/O scanner
support complementary I/O.
Use these guidelines when you configure your remote system for
complementary I/O:
Assign the complementary I/O rack number to a chassis of any size.
Do not place an input module opposite an input module; they will use
the same bits in the input image table.
You can place an output module opposite another output module; they
use the same bits in the output image table. This allows you to use one
output module to control a machine and use the other module with the
same address to control an annunciator panel to display the machine
condition. We do not, however, recommend this placement of modules
for redundant I/O.
You cannot configure the PLC-5 processor-resident local chassis with
complementary I/O. The PLC-5 processor communicates with each
processor-resident local I/O chassis as if it were a full I/O rack (eight
I/O groups). Thus, if the processor-resident local chassis contains four
I/O groups, the remaining four I/O groups of that I/O rack are unused;
you cannot assign them to another chassis.
You cannot use complementary I/O with a chassis that uses a
combination of 32-point I/O modules and 1-slot addressing or 16-point
I/O modules with 2-slot addressing.
Important: For the PLC-5/15 and -5/25 processors, an autoconfigure is
performed before the scanner begins communicating with the adapter.
Placing the Modules with 2Slot Addressing
Figure 4.5 shows a possible module placement to configure
complementary I/O using 2-slot addressing.
4-12
Chapter 4
Assigning Addressing Modes,
Racks, and Groups
Figure 4.5
Complementary I/O Configurations with 2Slot Addressing
Primary 16Slot
Chassis
I8
I/O Group
Number
Complementary
16Slot Chassis
I8
0
O8
O8
O8
I 16
1
O8
I8
O16
O8
O8
2
I8
E
M
P
T
Y
3
E
M
P
T
Y
O8
I8
O8
BT 2
BT
BT
4
O8
1
1
O 16
Double–slot
BT
Double–slot
BT
6
7
5
E
M
P
T
Y 3
E
M
P
T
Y 3
O8
E
M
P
T
Y3
O8
3
E
M
P
T
Y 3
O16
I 16
O16
I 16
O16
I 16
O16
E
M
P
T
Y 3
O8
I 16
Example A
Primary 16Slot
Chassis
I/O Group
Number
Complementary
Chassis Not
Allowed
Except for Output
I 16
O16
0
I 16
O16
1
I 16
O16
2
I 16
O16
3
4
5
6
7
Outputs in the complementary chassis use the same bits in the output image table as
the outputs in the primary chassis.
Example B
I = Input Module O = Output Module BT = Block Transfer Module 8 = 8point I/O Modules 16 = 16 point I/O Modules
1 Output modules use the same output image transfer bits
2 Can be 8point input or output module or singleslot block transfer module
3 Must be empty if corresponding primary slot is block transfer module
13079
4-13
Chapter 4
Assigning Addressing Modes,
Racks, and Groups
Placing the Modules with 1Slot Addressing
Figure 4.6 shows a possible module placement to configure
complementary I/O using 1-slot addressing.
Figure 4.6
Complementary I/O Configurations with 1Slot Addressing
Primary 16Slot
Chassis
I
I
O
O
I
O
O
Double–slot
BT
BT
O
I
I
I
O
O
2
3
4
5
6
7
I
O
O
O
I
I
1
I/O Group
Number
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
0
Complementary
16Slot Chassis
O
O
I
I
O
I
O
E
M
P
T
Y
E
M
P
T
Y 3
I, O,
BT
1
3
1
2
Example A
Primary 16Slot
Chassis
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I/O Group
Number
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Complementary
16Slot Chassis
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
Example B
I = Input Module (8 or 16point)
O = Output Module (8 or 16point)
BT = Block Transfer Module
1 Output modules use the same output image table bits
2 Can be input or output module (8 or 16point) singleslot block transfer module
3 Must be empty if corresponding primary slot is block transfer module
4-14
13080
Chapter 4
Assigning Addressing Modes,
Racks, and Groups
Placing the Modules with 1/2Slot Addressing
Figure 4.7 shows a possible module placement to configure
complementary I/O using 1/2-slot addressing.
Figure 4.7
Complementary I/O Configurations with 1/2Slot Addressing
Primary 12Slot
Chassis
I
I/O Group
Number
01
23
45
67
01
23
45
67
01
Complementary
12Slot Chassis
O
O
I
I
O
I
O
E
M
P
T
Y 3
I
O
O
I
O
O
BT
1
1
D o uble-slot
BT
O
I
23
45
67
E
M
P
T
Y 3
I, O ,
BT
I
O
2
Example A
Primary 12Slot
Chassis
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I/O Group
Number
01
23
45
67
01
23
45
67
01
23
45
67
Complementary
12Slot Chassis
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
Example B
I = Input Module (8, 16, 32point)
O = Output Module (8, 16, 32point)
BT = Block Transfer Module
1 Output modules use the same output image table bits
2 Can be input or output module (8 or 16point) singleslot block transfer module
3 Must be empty if corresponding primary slot is block transfer module
1 42 61
4-15
Chapter 4
Assigning Addressing Modes,
Racks, and Groups
Placing Complementary I/O Modules
See Table 4.B for a summary of 8-, 16-, and 32-point I/O module
placement guidelines. See Table 4.C for a summary of block-transfer
module placement guidelines.
Table 4.B
Placement Summary for 8, 16, and 32point Modules Used in
Complementary I/O
Addressing
Method
Guidelines
Types of Modules Used:
2Slot
8 point
1Slot
8 point, 16point,
1/2Slot
8 point, 16point, 32point
Placement
Install input modules opposite output modules and output modules
opposite input modules.
modules
Table 4.C
Placement Summary for Blocktransfer Modules Used in
Complementary I/O
Addressing
Method
4-16
BlockTransfer Placement Guidelines in Primary Chassis
Using singleslot modules:
Using doubleslot modules:
2Slot
• The right slot of the primary I/O group can be
another singleslot block transfer module, or an
8point input or output module.
• The left slot of the complementary I/O group must be
empty.
• In the right slot of the complementary I/O group, you
can place an 8point output module; this slot must be
empty if the corresponding slot in the primary I/O
group is a singleslot block transfer module.
• The left slot of the complementary I/O group must be
empty.
• In the right slot of the complementary I/O group, you
can only place an 8point output module (if any).
1Slot
Leave the corresponding I/O group in the
complementary chassis empty.
• The left slot of the two corresponding I/O slots in the
complementary chassis must be empty.
• In the right slot of the two corresponding I/O slots in
the complementary chassis, you can place an input,
output, or singleslot block transfer module (if any);
the modules can be either 8point or 16point I/O
modules.
1/2Slot
Leave the corresponding I/O group in the
complementary chassis empty.
• The left slot of the two corresponding I/O slots in the
complementary chassis must be empty.
• In the right slot of the two corresponding I/O slots in
the complementary chassis, you can place an input,
output, or singleslot block transfer module (if any);
the modules can be 8point ,16point and/or 32point
I/O modules.
Chapter
5
Choosing Communication
Chapter Objectives
Use this chapter to choose the appropriate communication for
your application.
If you want to read about:
Go to
page:
Identifying channels for the processor
52
Configuring communication for
your processor
53
Configuring Data Highway
Plus (DH+)
53
Connecting DH+ to
Data Highway
510
Choosing programming software
5-10
Choosing programming
terminal connections
510
System Design
Determined
Choosing Hardware
Placing System
Hardware
Assigning Addressing
Mode, Racks,
and Groups
Selecting Interrupt
Routines
Transferring Discrete
and Block Data
Calculating Program
Timing
Choosing
Communication
Planning Your
System Programs
Identifying Classic PLC5
Processor
Channels/Connectors
This section illustrates and describes the processor front-panels. After you
are familiar with the processor hardware, see page 5-3 for information on
configuring communication.
5-1
Chapter 5
Choosing Communication
Figure 5.1
Processor Front Panels
PLC5/10 Processor
PLC5/12, 5/15,
and 5/25 Processors
Battery
Indicator (red)
Communication
Indicator
ACTIVE/FAULT
(green/red)
Processor
RUN/FAULT
Indicator
(green/red)
FORCE
Indicator
(amber)
Keyswitch
REM I/O Indicator
ACTIVE/FAULT
(green/red)
Adapter
Indicator
(green)
P
R
O
G
Battery Holder
Connect
programming
terminal here
Write the DH+
network station
number on this label
Connect
DH+
link here
PLC5 family
member
designation
Connect
remote
I/O link here
Connector Name
Connector
Type
Description
Programming terminal
9pin, Dshell
Use this connector to directly connect a programming terminal to the processor. This programming
terminal connector has a parallel connection with the 3pin DH+ communications link connector.
DH+ communications link
3pin
Use this connector to connect to DH+ communications link.
Remote I/O
3pin
Use this connector for the remote I/O link. (This connector is not available for a PLC5/10 processor.)
5-2
Chapter 5
Choosing Communication
Configuring Communication
for Your Processor
You select scanner or adapter mode for your PLC-5 processor by setting
switches.
Configure Processor Communication
You configure the processor by setting switch assemblies SW1 and SW2
on the processor. See Appendix A for information on switch settings.
Follow these steps to plan configuration for your processor.
1.
Select scanner or adapter mode on switch assembly SW1 (the
PLC-5/10 and -5/12 can not be configured as scanners).
2.
If you select adapter mode, assign a rack address (rack number 0-77
octal) on switch assembly SW2. The supervisory processor uses this
address to reference the adapter-mode processor.
3.
If you select adapter mode, specify the simulated chassis size, either
an 8-slot or 16-slot I/O chassis, and the corresponding first I/O group
on switch assembly SW2. The simulated chassis size and first I/O
group determine the number of discrete-transfer data words (4 words
for an 8-slot chassis, 8 words for a 16-slot chassis) that the processor
transfers to and from the supervisory processor during the
supervisory processor’s remote I/O scan.
Note that the actual size of the chassis has no bearing on the
simulated size of the chassis.
Configuring a DH+ Link
You can use a DH+ link for data transfer to higher level computers and as a
multiple PLC-5 processor programming link. A PLC-5 processor can
communicate over a DH+ link with other processors and with a
programming terminal. You can connect a maximum of 64 stations to a
DH+ link. The network operates under a token-passing protocol with data
transfer at 57.6 kbps.
See your programming software documentation set to configure a
processor for DH+ communication.
Estimating Data Highway Plus Link Performance
Many factors can affect the performance of your DH+ link, including:
nodes
size and number of messages
message destination
internal processing time
5-3
Chapter 5
Choosing Communication
Nodes
Nodes affect transmission time in the following ways:
During one complete token rotation, each node on the DH+ link
receives the token whether or not it has something to send.
Each node spends from 1.5 ms (if it has no messages to send) to 38 ms
(maximum time allotted) with the token, assuming there are no retries
(Figure 5.2).
Figure 5.2
Token Passing
Min. 1.5 ms with
the token
Station
1
Station
5
DH+ link
Station
2
Station
4
Station
3
Max. 38 ms
with the token
Size and Number of Messages
A PLC-5 processor encodes messages into packets for transmission on the
DH+ link. The maximum number of data words in a packet depends on
the sending station and command type. This limit comes from the network
protocol, which limits a station to transmitting a maximum of 271 bytes
per token pass. A station can send more than one message in a token pass,
provided that the total number of combined command and data bytes does
not exceed 271.
If a message exceeds the maximum packet size allotted, however, the
sending station will require more than one token pass to complete the
message. For example, if a PLC-5 processor wants to send a 150-word
message, it will have to transmit two messages, possibly requiring many
token rotations.
The number of messages a station has to send also affects throughput time.
For example, if a station has three messages queued and a fourth is
enabled, the fourth message may have to wait until the previous three
are processed.
5-4
Chapter 5
Choosing Communication
Message Destination
Throughput times vary depending on whether a receiving station can
process the message and generate a reply before that station receives the
token. Figure 5.3 assumes that station 1 wants to send a message to
station 4.
Figure 5.3
Message DestinationExample 1
Station
1
Station
5
Station
2
Message
Station
4
Station 1 has the token. Only the station that has the token can send a
message. Station 1 sends the message to station 4. Now station 1 must
pass the token on to the next highest station number, which is station 2.
Station 2 has the token. Assume that station 2 has messages to send and
holds the token for 30 ms. During this time, station 4 has processed the
message from station 1 and has a reply queued up. When finished, station
2 passes the token on to the next highest station number, which is station 4.
Station 4 can now reply to the message from station 1. This completes the
message transaction.
In Figure 5.3, station 4 has had time to process the message and generate a
reply. But, that is not the case with station 2 in Figure 5.4.
Figure 5.4
Message DestinationExample 2
Station
1
Message
Station
2
Station
5
Station
4
5-5
Chapter 5
Choosing Communication
In Figure 5.4, we assume that station 1 wants to send the identical message
as shown in Figure 5.3 but to station 2. Station 1 has the token. Station 1
sends the message to station 2 and then passes the token on to station 2.
Now station 2 has the token but has not had time to generate a reply to
station 1. So station 2 sends any other messages it has queued and then
passes the token on to station 4. Stations 4, 5, and 1 all receive the token
in order and send any messages they have queued. The token then returns
to station 2, which then sends its reply to station 1. In this example, it took
an extra token pass around the network to complete the message
transaction even though the message was identical to the one shown in
Figure 5.3.
Internal Processing Time
Internal processing time depends on how busy a given processor on the
network is when sending or receiving a message.
For example, processor A has just received a READ request from
processor B on the network. If processor A already has three messages of
its own to send, the reply to the READ request from processor B will have
to wait until the station completes the processing of the messages queued
ahead of it.
Average DH+ Link Response Time Test Results
This section shows graphically the results of testing performed on a DH+
link where the number of stations and words sent in the message varies.
Figure 5.5 shows the average response time of messages of varying sizes
on a DH+ link with a varying numbers of stations. It also gives you an
idea of the typical response time you can expect on a given DH+ link.
5-6
Chapter 5
Choosing Communication
Figure 5.5
Average Response Time for all PLC5 Processors
5.0
4.5
4.0
3.5
Response
Time
(Sec)
3.0
50 W
2.5
2.0
•
100 W
1.5
+
250 W
1.0
X
500 W
0.5
0.0
W=Words
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14
Number of PLC5 Processors
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
Figure 5.6 shows the effect of a programming terminal on message
response time under various configurations.
Figure 5.6
Response Time Increase (%)
40 %
35 %
Effect
on
Response
Time
(%)
30 %
25 %
20 %
15 %
X
50 W
•
100 W
+
250 W
500 W
10 %
W=Words
5%
0%
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
Number of PLC5 Processors
Test Setup
One to 22 PLC-5 processors were used with one programming terminal
online. Each PLC-5 processor executes 1K of ladder logic.
5-7
Chapter 5
Choosing Communication
Initial testing was done with one PLC-5 processor writing data to another
PLC-5 processor. The response time was recorded. Additional PLC-5
processors were added to the network, each writing the same amount of
data to a PLC-5 processor at the next highest station address. Four
separate tests were run using data transmissions of 50, 100, 250, and
500 words.
Application Guidelines
Consider the following application guidelines when configuring a DH+
link for your system.
Configure the number of nodes on your network dependent on the size
and frequency of messages exchanged between devices.
Limit the number of nodes on your network when you are trying to
achieve fastest control response time.
Do not add or remove nodes from the network during machine or
process operation. If the network token resides with a device that is
removed, the token may be lost to the rest of the network. The network
is automatically re-established, but it could take several seconds.
Control would be unreliable or interrupted during this time.
Include watchdog timers in logic programs for DH+ transfer of data (to
provide an orderly shutdown if failure occurs).
Do not program processors online during machine or process operation.
This could result in long bursts of DH+ activity that could increase
response time.
When possible, add a separate DH+ link for programming processors to
keep effects of the programming terminal from the process DH+ link.
Connecting Devices to DH+ Link
You can connect devices on a DH+ link with:
daisy-chain connection
trunkline/dropline connection
See Figure 5.7. Also, see the Data Highway and Data Highway Plus Cable
Guide, publication 1770-6.2.1, for complete network wiring instructions.
5-8
Chapter 5
Choosing Communication
Figure 5.7
Examples of DH+ Link Connections (DaisyChain and
Trunkline/Dropline)
PLC5
PLC5
PLC5
PLC5
1
SH
2
T50
When the processor is an end
device, terminate the link.
Daisychain configuration
Station connector (see notes)
PLC5
PLC5
PLC5
Notes:
T50
Trunkline/dropline configuration
Once a programming terminal is connected to one processor, it can
communicate with each processor you connect on DH+.
Use only AllenBradley station connectors.
13 06 1
5-9
Chapter 5
Choosing Communication
The PLC-5 processor has two connectors that are electrically identical.
Connection to either one provides the same communication link. These
connectors are:
9-pin D-shell DH+ COMM INTFC connector
3-pin DH+ COMM INTFC connector
Connecting a DH+ Link
to Data Highway
You can connect DH+ links to Data Highway via a communication
interface such as the 1785-KA module. The 1785-KA module allows
nodes on a DH+ link to communicate with nodes on Data Highway or on
another DH+ link.
See your local Allen-Bradley sales office or distributor for more
information on connecting DH+ to Data Highway. Also, see the Data
Highway/Data Highway Plus Protocol and Command Set, publication
1770-6.5.16, for more information.
Choosing Programming
Terminal Connection
You can connect your programming terminal to a PLC-5 processor in
several ways:
direct connect to the DH+ link
remote connection (DH+ to Data Highway to DH+)
serial connections
Direct Connect to DH+ Link
Use a 1784-KT to connect a T53 or IBM-compatible programming
terminal directly to a processor or to a DH+ link that connects processors
(Figure 5.8).
5-10
Chapter 5
Choosing Communication
Figure 5.8
Connection to DH+ Link through 1784KT Communication
Interface Module
DH+ link
1784CP
T53 or IBM compatible
with 1784KT
PLC5/10, 5/12 5/15,
or 5/25 processor
Use a 1784-KL/B to connect a T47 programming terminal directly to a
processor or to a DH+ link that connects processors (Figure 5.9).
Figure 5.9
Connection to DH+ Link through 1784KL Communication
Interface Module
DH+ link
1784CP
T47 with 1784KL
PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15,
or 5/25 processor
Remote Connection
The remote programming configurations available with the 1784-KT,
1784-KT2, and 1784-KL boards provide you communication with
processors on other DH+ links in the network to expand the range of
processors that you can use for program development (Figure 5.10).
5-11
Chapter 5
Choosing Communication
Figure 5.10
Example DH+ to Data Highway to DH+ Link Configuration
Data Highway
Remote DH+ link
1785KA
PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, 5/25
processor
1 71 95
Serial Connections
You can connect a programming terminal to a PLC-5/10, -5/12, -5/15, or
-5/25 processor through a serial port (COM1 or COM2) on the terminal
with one of the following communication modules:
1785-KE Series A or B Communication Interface Module
(resides in a 1771 I/O rack)
1770-KF2, Series B Communication Interface Module
(desktop unit as shown in Figure 5.12)
Important: The communication driver is interrupt-driven; the serial port
must support hardware interrupts. On most machines, COM1 and COM2
support these interrupts.
5-12
Chapter 5
Choosing Communication
Figure 5.11
1785KE (Series B) Connection through an RS232C Serial Port
DH+ link
T53 serial port
COM1 or COM2
1785KE Series B
PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, or
5/25 processor
Figure 5.12
1770KF2/B Connection through an RS232C Serial Port
DH+ link
1770KF2/B
T53 serial port
COM1 or COM2
PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, or
5/25 processor
5-13
Chapter
6
Planning Your System Programs
Chapter Objectives
This chapter covers basic programming considerations for planning a
Classic PLC-5 programmable controller system.
System Design
Determined
If you want to read about:
Go to
page:
Planning application programs
61
Using SFCs
61
Preparing programs for
your application
63
Addressing the data table
67
Using the processor status file
69
Choosing Hardware
Placing System
Hardware
Assigning Addressing
Mode, Racks,
and Groups
Selecting Interrupt
Routines
Transferring Discrete
and Block Data
Calculating Program
Timing
Choosing
Communication
Planning Your
System Programs
See your programming software documentation for a discussion of the
instructions used in ladder-logic programming.
Planning Application
Programs
Use the functional specification that you previously developed to define
your programming application. The specification is a conceptual view of
your application and is used to determine your main program, sequential
function chart (SFC), and logic requirements.
In planning and developing the programs for your application, we
recommend that you use the program-development model shown in
chapter 1, “Understanding Your System.”
Using SFCs with
PLC5 Processors
Use SFCs as a sequence-control language by which you can control and
display the state of a control process. Instead of one long program for
your application, divide the logic into steps and transitions. The display of
these steps and transitions lets the user see what state the machine process
is in at a given time.
6-1
Chapter 6
Planning Your System Programs
002
Initial
Step
003
005
004
006
008
007
009
010
011
012
013
014
015
Each step corresponds to a control task (displayed as a box); each step is
related to a program file that contains the logic for the associated control
task. Each transition (displayed as a horizontal line) examines conditions,
specified in an associated program file, that determines when the processor
can continue to the next task.
Deciding How to Use an SFC
After you identify the major areas of machine operation, convert the
logical paths and steps that you labeled in your design specification to SFC
building blocks. Table 6.A helps explain when to use which SFC
building blocks.
Important: At this point, do not worry about the actual logic for each step
and transition. After you complete the SFC, you can develop the logic.
Table 6.A
Deciding When to Use the SFC Structures
If you have:
Then draw:
Using these rules:
An independent machine state
A step with its transition
A step must always be followed by a transition.
A clearly defined chain of events that
occur sequentially
A simple path of steps
and transitions
For design purposes, number steps and transitions
consecutively from 2.
For example, in one heattreating
area, the temperature must ramp up
at a particular rate; maintain the
temperature for a certain duration,
then cool at a particular rate.
Two or more alternative paths where
only one is selected
Start the path with a step; end the path with a transition.
A selection branch
The transitions beginning each path are scanned from left
to right. The first true transition determines the path taken.
A simultaneous branch
All paths are active in the structure.
For example, depending on a build
code, one station must either drill or
polish.
Two or more parallel paths that must
be scanned simultaneously at
least once
For example, communications and
block transfers must occur while
control logic is executing.
6-2
You can define up to 7 parallel paths.
Chapter 6
Planning Your System Programs
Application Example for SFCs
For typical SFC applications, an SFC program controls the order of events
in your process by issuing commands. A command, such as fwdcyr_cmd
to move a conveyor forward, is simply a data table storage bit (for example
B3:0/7) that you set up in the SFC. You then program the logic for
fwdcyr_cmd in a separate ladder program to control the actual outputs to
move the conveyor.
You can have only one main program file, which is either an SFC or a
ladder-logic program. You enter the programs into your computer using the
SFC or ladder editor. For more information on entering SFCs or ladder
logic, see your programming software documentation set.
Programming Considerations for SFCs
Use the information in Table 6.B for SFC rules for special programming.
Table 6.B
SFC Rules for Special Programming Considerations
If you have:
Use these rules:
To jump within the SFC
Use a GOTO statement and label.
A step that needs to be run in
multiple places within the SFC
Repeat the step where needed or use a global subroutine that gets called
from multiple steps.
A step that can be ignored based on
logic conditions
Create two selection branches, one with and one without the step; or
place the step in a subroutine; or combine the step with another step that
is segregated by an MCR zone.
An SFC branch structure within
another branch structure (nesting)
Nest the branch structures. The software supports as many levels of
nested branches as you can store based on processor memory.
A miniSFC (compressed steps)
within the main SFC
Create an SFC macro. A macro begins a with a step; the transition for the
ending step follows the macro.
To reset the logic in an SFC program
Set the SFR instruction to reset the chart.
To disable an MCP
Set the disable bit on the Processor Configuration screen.
See your programming software documentation for further information on any of the techniques listed in this table.
Preparing the Programs
for Your Application
This section uses a drill-machine application example. Information on the
program entry phase is in the programming software documentation set.
You can use only one main program; but you can still apply some of
the steps by incorporating them into your main SFC and supporting
ladder programs.
6-3
Chapter 6
Planning Your System Programs
Organizing a Machine Example
This section uses an example of a specific machine operation to show how
to identify conditions and actions and how to group the actions into steps
of machine operation.
Figure 6.1
Hardware Block Diagram and Description of Machine Process
L oad
S t a t i on
O FF
AUTO
FW D
FW D
C onveyor
M otor
FW D
A dvance
A ssem bly
D rill
M oto r
C lam p
LS 1
N . O.
N . C . LS 2
C L1
LS 3
N. O.
H e ld O pen
N. O. LS 4
LS 5
N . O.
U n l oad
S t a t i on
A description of this operation might be as follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6-4
The operator starts the conveyor by selecting AUTO.
The operator puts a block of wood onto the conveyor.
The wood moves into position and actuates LS1.
When the wood is in position:
a.
the conveyor stops
b.
CL1 clamps the wood
c.
the drill station moves forward
The drill station moves forward and closes LS3. This
action turns on the drill motor.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
The drill station moves to full depth and closes LS4. This action:
a.
stops forward motion of the drill station
b.
initiates a 2second dwell
The drill station backs up after the 2second dwell.
The drill motor stops when LS3 is released.
The drill station reaches home position and opens LS2. This action:
a.
stops the reverse motion
b.
opens the clamp
c.
starts the conveyor forward
The wood is ejected when LS5 toggles to indicate that the cycle is complete.
Chapter 6
Planning Your System Programs
We recommend that you then create a rough-draft SFC to represent the
operation (see Figure 6.2).
Figure 6.2
Drill Machine Example Functional Specification
Step
Transition
initialization
010
AUTO operator starts cycle
conveyor forward
011
LS1 wood in position
drill
012
LS4 hole drilled
dwell
013
TMR1 dwell timer done
reverse drill
014
LS2 station home
eject
015
LS5 wood ejected
Creating the Detailed Analysis for Your Functional Specification
Begin determining the details of your process as discussed in chapter 1,
“Understanding Your System.” Identify the hardware requirements.
Table 6.C identifies hardware requirements for the inputs and outputs of
the drill machine.
6-5
Chapter 6
Planning Your System Programs
Table 6.C
Hardware Requirements for the Inputs and Output of the Drill Example
Input
Part
Description
AUTO
selector switch
select automatic mode
LS1
N.O.
limit switch
part in place
LS2
N.C.
limit switch
drill station home
LS3
N.O.
limit switch
drill motor on
LS4
N.O.
limit switch
drill station at full depth
LS5
N.O.
limit switch
cycle complete
DSF
drive motor
move drill station forward
DSB
drive motor
move drill station back
DM
drill motor
drill motor on
CL1
electric clamp
clamp 1 on
CMF
drive motor
move conveyor forward
TMR1
timer
dwell timer
Use the hardware requirements (with the functional specification) to
match the inputs and outputs with the actions of the process. Table 6.D
shows the hardware requirements with the general description of the drill
machine example.
Table 6.D
List of Conditions and Actions for the Drill Example
6-6
When this happens:
This happens:
AUTO switch closes
Conveyor moves forward
(CMF = on)
LS1 closes
Conveyor stops
Clamp holds wood
Drill station advances
(CMF = off)
(CL1 = on)
(DSF = on)
LS3 closes
Drill motor starts
(DM = on)
LS4 closes
Drill station stops
Dwell timer starts
(DSF = off)
(TMR1 = on)
Timer done
Drill station backs up
(DSB = on)
LS3 opens
Drill motor stop
(DM = off)
LS2 opens
Drill station stops
Clamp releases wood
Conveyor starts
(DSB = off)
(CL1 = off)
(CMF = on)
LS5 closes
Wood is ejected
Chapter 6
Planning Your System Programs
Once you identify the individual actions, you can add these actions to
your plan to complete your program. Once you have an SFC program that
defines the individual machine actions for your process, you can create a
ladder-logic program that controls the outputs of those machine actions. It
does not matter in what order you program these rungs. This program
merely contains the ladder logic that defines a command for each machine
action in your process.
Program Entry
When you finish your detailed analysis, you have your main program
planned. Now, enter your program into your terminal.
Addressing Data Table Files
Input
Data
DATA STORAGE
I/O Image Files
BlockTransfer Files
Other Data Files
Examine Data
Output
Data
PLC-5 memory is divided into two areas: data and program-file storage.
Areas of Storage
Description
Data
All of the data the processor examines or changes is stored in files in data
storage areas of memory. These storage areas store:
• Data received from input modules
• Data to be sent to output modules; this data represents decisions made
by the logic
• Intermediate results made by the logic
• Preloaded data such as presets and recipes
• Control instructions
• System status
Program Files
You create files for program logic, depending on the method you are using:
ladder logic, sequential function charts, and/or structured text. These files
contain the instructions to examine inputs and outputs and return results.
Return Results
PROGRAM FILES
Data Table Memory
You can address data files in different formats when you write your
programs. Refer to Table 6.E for valid data table file-type specifications.
6-7
Chapter 6
Planning Your System Programs
Table 6.E
Data Table Memory Usage
File Type
Identifier
File
Number
Memory Used in Over
head for Each File
(16bit words)
Memory Used
(16bit words) per
Word, Float Word,
Character, or Structure
O
0
2
1/word
Input Image
I
1
2
1/word
Status
S
2
2
1/word
Bit (binary)
B
3
2
1/word
Timer
T
41
2
3/structure
Counter
C
51
2
3/structure
Control
R
61
2
3/structure
Integer
N
71
2
1/word
FloatingPoint
F
81
2
2/float word
ASCII
A
3999
2
1/ per character
2
BCD
D
3999
2
1/word
Undefined
9999
2
0
File Type
Output Image
1 This is the default file number. For this file type, you can assign any file number from 3 thru 999.
Data table files are contiguous in memory. Size in words for I/O files
0 and 1 are:
For this processor:
Files O0 and I1 memory size:
PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15
Is fixed at 32 words
PLC5/25
Varies from 3264 words (32 is the default)
Status file 2 is fixed at 32 words for each processor. Files 3-999 vary in
size. These files contain only the number of words corresponding to the
highest address that you assign. Each B, N, A, and D file can be 1,000
words maximum. Each F file can be 1,000 float words (32-bit words)
maximum. Each T, C, R, and SC file can be 1,000 structures maximum.
6-8
Chapter 6
Planning Your System Programs
Data Table Addressing Formats
Address Type
Description
Example
Logical address
Alphanumeric coded format to specify
the data location
N23:0 addresses an integer file 23, word 0
I/O image address
Logical address format, but relates
physical locations in the I/O chassis to
memory locations in the I/O image file
I:017/17 addresses input file word 017 (octal), bit 17 (octal), which corresponds to
rack 01, module group 7, and terminal 17
Indirect address
Logical address format, but allows you to
change address values in the base
address with your ladder logic program
N[N7:6]:0 has the file number as the variable
The file number is stored in integer file 7, word 6
Indexed address
Index prefix (#) is followed by a logical
address format, but it adds an index
value (offset) from processor status file
to the base address
When #N23:0 is the indexed address and the offset value stored in the processor
status file is 10, then
• the base address is integer file 23, word 0
• and the offset address is integer file 23, word 10
Symbolic address
ASCII character string that relates the
address (file, structure, word, or bit) to a
descriptive, meaningful name that you
assign
For example, a floating point address F10:0 could be given a symbolic address of
Calc_1. These symbols are a feature of the programming software and not of the
processor. Guidelines for setting up an address are as follows:
• Start the name with an alphabetic character.
• The symbol must begin with a letter and can have up to 10 of the following
characters: AZ (upper and lower case), 09, underscore (_) and @.
• You can substitute a symbolic address for structure, word, or bit addresses.
• Record the symbols you define and their corresponding logical addresses.
Using the Processor
Status File
Use the Processor Status screen to monitor:
processor status information
major and minor faults
STIs
program scan times
I/O status
Processor status data is stored in status file S2. See Table 6.F.
6-9
Chapter 6
Planning Your System Programs
Table 6.F
Processor Status File Addresses
This word of the status file:
Arithmetic flags
• bit 0= carry
• bit 1 = overflow
• bit 2= zero
• bit 3 = sign
Processor status and flags
Switch settings:
• bits 0 5 = DH+ station #
• bit 7 = set is scanner; reset is adapter (PLC5/15, 5/25 only)
• bit 11, 12 = HW addressing
bit 12
bit 11
0
0
illegal
1
0
1/2slot
0
1
1slot
1
1
2slot
• bit 13, 14 = EEPROM
bit 14
bit 13
0
0
EEPROM transfer if processor memory bad
0
1
EEPROM transfer disabled
1
1
EEPROM transfer at powerup
• bit 15 = set is memory unprotected
S:0
S:1
S:2
S:3 to S:6
S:8
S:9
S:10
S:11
S:12
S:13
S:14
S:16
S:18
S:19
S:20
S:21
S:22
S:23
S:24
S:25
S:26
6-10
Stores:
(PLC5/12, 5/15, 5/25 only)
Active Node table:
Word
Bits
DH+ Station #
3
015
0017
4
015
2037
5
015
4057
6
015
6077
Last program scan duration (in ms)
Maximum program scan duration (in ms)
Minor fault bits
Major fault bits
Fault code storage location
Program file where fault occurred
Rung number where fault occurred
I/O status file number storage location
Processor clock year
Processor clock month
Processor clock day
Processor clock hour
Processor clock minute
Processor clock second
Indexed addressing offset
I/O adapter image file
User control bits for processor startup routine
Chapter 6
Planning Your System Programs
This word of the status file:
S:28
S:29
S:30
S:31
Stores:
Program watchdog setpoint (in ms)
Fault routine file
STI setpoint (in ms)
STI file number
6-11
Chapter
7
Selecting Interrupt Routines
Chapter Objectives
This chapter covers interrupt routines that you can choose to include when
you program your system.
System Design
Determined
If you want to read about:
Go to
page:
Using programming features
71
Writing a fault routine
73
Choosing Hardware
Placing System
Hardware
Assigning Addressing
Mode, Racks,
and Groups
Selecting Interrupt
Routines
Transferring Discrete
and Block Data
Calculating Program
Timing
Choosing
Communication
Planning Your
System Programs
Using Programming
Features
Use your design specification to determine if you need one or more of the
following programming features:
program execution control
power-up routines
If a portion of logic
should execute:
Example:
Use:
By doing the following:
Immediately on
detecting conditions
that require a startup
Restart the system
after the system has
been shut down
Powerup/Fault
Routine
Create a separate file for a controlled startup procedure for the first time that you
start a program or when you start a program after system down time. The
processor executes the powerup/fault routine to completion.
Immediately on
detecting a major fault
Send critical status
to a supervisory
processor via DH+
after detecting a
major fault
Fault Routine
Create a separate file for a controlled response to a major fault. The first fault
detected determines which fault routine is executed. The processor executes the
fault routine to completion. If the routine clears the fault, the processor resumes
the main logic program where it was interrupted. If not, the processor faults and
switches to program mode.
7-1
Chapter 7
Selecting Interrupt Routines
Program Execution States
User programs in the Classic PLC-5 processor are always in one of the
following five states: completed, ready, executing, waiting, or faulted.
Rescheduling Operation
Rescheduling Operation
Ready State
Program would be executing if it were of a higher priority;
all programs pass through this state; there can be
several programs in this state at any given time
Waiting State
Program is ready for execution but is waiting
for some event to occur (such as an input to
transition or a timer to complete)
Waiting State
While block transfer is taking place,
a rescheduling operation is performed
and lowerpriority programs are executed
(unless all other executions are prohibited by
a UID/UIE zone around the block transfer)
Rescheduling Operation
Completed State
Program has completed execution
or has not yet started execution
Executing State
Program is executing; only
one program can be in this
state at one time
Has a new program
with a higher priority
become ready?
(e.g., an MCP, STI, PII)
Yes
No
Does the program fault?
Yes
Faulted State
A runtime error
has occurred within
the program
No
Yes
Does the program request
a remote block transfer?
(STI and PII routines only)
Program counter is
adjusted to point to
next instruction
Does an appropriate fault routine
choose to clear the fault?
No
Completed State
Program has completed execution
or has not yet started execution
7-2
No
All active user programs
are aborted and processor
enters faulted state
Yes
Chapter 7
Selecting Interrupt Routines
Writing a Fault Routine
You can write a fault routine that the processor runs when it detects a
major fault. For example, if your program file becomes corrupted, you can
tell the processor to interrupt the current program, run your fault routine
and then continue processing the original program.
This section shows you how to set and write a fault routine and how to
protect your processor from powering up in run mode after a power loss.
Responses to a Major Fault
When the processor detects a major fault, the processor immediately
interrupts the current program. If a fault routine exists (i.e., specified in
S:29 as a fault routine), the processor runs that fault routine program for
recoverable faults. Then, depending on the type of fault, the processor:
returns to the current ladder program file if the processor can recover
from the fault
enters fault mode if the processor cannot recover from the fault
For example, the rung in Figure 7.3 includes an instruction that causes
a major fault.
Figure 7.3
Sample Ladder Logic for a Fault
A
B
] [
Causes a
major fault
C
In the example in Figure 7.3, the processor runs the fault routine after
detecting the fault. If the fault routine resets the faulted bits, the processor
returns to the next instruction in the program file that follows the one that
faulted and outputs on the remainder of the rung.
If you do not program a fault routine for fault B, the processor
immediately faults.
The bits in word 11 of the processor status file indicate the type of major
fault. See Table 7.G to determine whether a fault is recoverable.
7-3
Chapter 7
Selecting Interrupt Routines
Table 7.G
Response to Major Faults (Word 11 of the Status File)
This bit:
Indicates this fault:
00
Corrupted program file
01
Corrupted address in ladder program (see fault codes 1019)
02
Programming error (see fault codes 2029)
05
Startup protection fault (see word 26, bit 1)
Processor sets bit 5; if your fault routine does not reset this bit,
the processor inhibits startup
07
Usergenerated fault; processor jumped to fault routine
(see fault codes 09)
08
Watchdog faulted
13
STI file does not contain ladder logic or does not exist
03
Processor detected an SFC fault (see fault codes 7479)
04
Processor detected an error when assembling a ladder
program file (see fault code 70)
09
System is configured wrong; you installed a RAM cartridge but
configured the system for an EEPROM or you violated 32point
I/O module placement rules for 1slot addressing
10
Nonrecoverable hardware error
14
Fault routine does not contain ladder logic or does not exist
15
Fault routine program file does not contain ladder logic
And the fault is:
Recoverable
the
h fault
f l routine
i
can instruct the
processor to clear
the fault and then
resume scanning
g
the pprogram.
recoverable
Not recoverable
the processor
enters fault mode
without scanning
the fault routine.
A remote block transfer from a fault routine causes the processor to stop
scanning all programs until the block transfer completes.
Major Fault Codes
Table 7.H lists major fault codes. The processor stores the fault code in
word 12 of the processor status file.
7-4
Chapter 7
Selecting Interrupt Routines
Table 7.H
Major Fault Codes
Code
Fault
0009
Reserved for userdefined fault codes
12
Bad integer operand type, restore new processor memory file
13
Bad mixed mode operation type, restore new processor memory file
14
Not enough operands for instruction, restore new processor memory file
15
Too many operands for instructions, restore new processor memory file
16
Corrupted instruction, probably due to restoring an incompatible processor memory file
17
Can't find expression end; restore new processor memory file
18
Missing end of edit zone; restore new processor memory file
20
You entered too large an element number in an indirect address
21
You entered a negative element number in an indirect address
22
You tried to access an undefined program file
23
You used a negative file number, you used a file number greater than the number of existing files, or
you tried to indirectly address files 0, 1, or 2
24
You tried to indirectly address a file of the wrong type
30
You tried to jump to one too many nested subroutine files
31
You did not enter enough subroutine parameters
32
You jumped to an invalid (nonladder) file
33 1
You entered a CAR routine file that is not 68000 code
34
You entered a negative preset or accumulated value in a timer instruction
35
You entered a negative time variable in a PID instruction
36
You entered an outofrange setpoint in a PID instruction
37
You addressed an invalid module in a block transfer, immediate input, or immediate output instruction
38
You entered a return instruction from a nonsubroutine file
39
FOR instruction with missing NXT
40
The control file is too small for the PID, BTR, BTW, or MSG instruction
41
NXT instruction with missing FOR
42
You tried to jump to a deleted label
4469
Reserved
70
The processor detected duplicate labels
74
SFC file error detected
75
The SFC has too many active functions
77
SFC missing file or of wrong type for step, action, transition; or
Subchart is created but empty; or
SC or timer file specified in SFC empty or too small
78
The processor cannot continue to run the SFC after power loss
79
You tried to download an SFC to a processor that cannot run SFCs; or
This specific PLC does not support this enhanced SFC
80
You incorrectly installed a 32point I/O module in a 1slot configuration (PLC5/15, 5/25)
81
You illegally set an I/O chassis backplane switch; either switch 4 or 5 must be off
7-5
Chapter 7
Selecting Interrupt Routines
Important: If the PLC-5 processor detects a fault in the fault routine
(double fault condition), the PLC-5 processor goes directly to fault mode
without completing the fault routine.
Programming a Fault Routine
If you choose to program a fault routine, first have the fault routine
examine the major fault information recorded by the PLC-5 processor and
decide whether to do the following before the PLC-5 processor
automatically goes to fault mode:
set an alarm
clear the fault
shutdown in an orderly manner
On detecting a major fault, the PLC-5 processor immediately suspends the
program file it was running and, if programmed, runs the fault routine file
once to completion. If the PLC-5 processor does not run a fault routine, or
the fault routine does not clear the fault, the PLC-5 processor automatically
switches to fault mode.
Set an Alarm
You may need an alarm to signal when a major fault occurs. Put this rung
first in your fault routine program
alarm
output
and combine it with a counter. You can also set an alarm in your fault
routine to signal when the fault routine clears a major fault.
Clearing the Fault
If you decide to clear the fault in the fault routine, place the ladder logic
for clearing the fault at the beginning of the fault routine. You can
compare the fault code with a reference.
Compare fault code with a reference—Identify the possible major faults
and then select only those your application will let you safely clear. These
are your reference fault codes.
From the fault routine, examine the major fault code that the processor
stores in S:12. Use an FSC instruction to compare the fault code to the
reference file that contains “acceptable” fault codes (word-to-file
comparison). If the processor finds a match, the FSC instruction sets the
found (.FD) bit in the specified control structure. Use a MOV instruction
to clear the fault in S:11. Then jump to the end of the fault routine to
quickly complete running the fault routine.
7-6
Chapter 7
Selecting Interrupt Routines
In Figure 7.4, #N10:0 is the reference file.
Figure 7.4
Example of Comparing a Major Fault Code with a Reference
R6:0
RES
R6:0
U
IN
FSC
FILE SEARCH/COMPARE
EN
Control
R6:0
Length
20
Position
0
Mode
Expression
S:12 = #N10:0
R6:0
] [
MOV
FD
Source
DN
ALL
ER
MOVE
Dest
0
S:11
10
JMP
Last rung in fault routine
10
] LBL [
TND
The processor completes the scan of the fault routine. If the routine clears
S:11, the processor returns to the program file and resumes program
execution. If the fault routine does not clear S:11, the processor executes
the rest of the fault routine and goes into FAULTED mode.
Important: If the fault routine clears the major fault, the processor
completes the fault routine and returns to the next instruction in the
program file that follows the one that contained the faulted instruction.
The remainder of the rung is executed. It appears that the fault never
occurred. The fault routine execution continues until you correct the
cause of the fault.
7-7
Chapter 7
Selecting Interrupt Routines
Using Shutdown Logic
Shutdown programming should include the following considerations.
Store initial conditions and reset other data to achieve an orderly
start-up later.
Monitor the shutdown of critical outputs. Use looping if needed to
extend the single fault routine scan time up to the limit of the
processor watchdog timer so that your program can confirm that critical
events took place.
Testing a Fault Routine
To test a fault routine, use a JSR instruction to jump to the fault routine.
Send a fault code as the first input parameter of the JSR instruction. The
processor stores the fault code in status word 12 and sets the corresponding
bit in word 11.
You may detect and set your own faults using fault codes 0-9 or by using
the processor-defined fault codes 10-87.
Setting Up a Fault Routine
You can write multiple fault routine programs and store them in multiple
fault routine files, but the logic processor runs only one fault routine
program when the PLC-5 processor detects a major fault. The number of
the fault routine the PLC-5 processor runs is stored in word 29 of the
processor status file. Typically, you enter a fault routine file number with
the programming software and change the specified fault routine file from
the ladder program.
To set up a fault routine, you need to:
enable the fault routine by entering a fault routine file number in the
status file
create the program file and enter fault routine logic
clear a major fault (other than by the fault routine)
Enabling a Fault Routine
To enable a fault routine, store the program file number (3-999) of the file
that contains the fault routine logic in word 29 of the processor status file.
When the processor encounters a major fault, the processor runs the fault
routine logic to handle the fault.
7-8
Chapter 7
Selecting Interrupt Routines
If you do not specify a program file number, the processor immediately
enters fault mode after detecting a fault.
Changing the Fault Routine File Number from Ladder Logic
You can change the specified fault routine from ladder logic by copying a
new fault routine file number into word 29 of the processor status file.
Figure 7.5 shows an example program for changing the fault routine
file number.
Figure 7.5
Example of Changing the Fault Routine File Number
MOV
MOVE
Source
Dest
12
S:29
ATTENTION: Do not corrupt the program-file number of the
fault routine or use the same file for any other purpose. If the
file number that you specify results in a non-existent fault
routine, the processor immediately enters fault mode after
detecting a fault. Unexpected machine operation may result
with damage to equipment and/or injury to personnel.
Clearing a Major Fault
You can clear a major fault with one of the following methods.
Use the programming software to clear the major fault.
For more information about using the programming software to
clear major faults, see the chapter on clearing faults in the
programming software documentation set.
Turn the keyswitch on the PLC-5 processor from REM to PROG
to RUN.
Important: Clearing a major fault does not correct the cause of the fault.
The PLC-5 processor might continue to repeat the fault cycle until you
correct the cause(s) for the major fault.
7-9
Chapter 7
Selecting Interrupt Routines
Setting PowerUp Protection
You can set your processor so that after a power loss the processor does not
come up in run mode. Bit 1 in word 26 of the processor status file sets
power-up protection. Table 7.I shows the states for this bit.
Table 7.I
Setting and Resetting the PowerUp Protection Bit
If word 26, bit 1 Is:
After power loss, the processor:
Set (1)
Scans the fault routine before returning to normal program scan
Reset (0)
Powers up directly at the first rung on the first program file
Set word 26, bit 1 manually from the processor status screen (see the
chapter on using status data in programming software documentation). Or
you can latch this bit through ladder logic. When set, the processor scans
the fault routine once to completion after the processor recovers from a
power loss. You can write the fault routine to determine whether or not the
processor’s current status permits the processor to respond correctly to
ladder logic—i.e., whether to allow or inhibit the startup of the processor.
Allowing or Inhibiting Powerup
Bit 5 of status word 11 indicates whether or not you want to power up the
processor after a loss of power. After a power loss, the processor
automatically sets this bit; Table 7.J shows how you can change it from
your fault routine.
Table 7.J
Setting and Resetting the Startup Bit
If the fault routine
makes word 11, bit 5:
Then the processor:
Set (1)
Faults at the end of scanning the fault routine.
Leave this bit set to inhibit startup.
Reset (0)
Resumes scanning the processor memory file.
Reset this bit to allow startup
Important: You can use JMP and LBL instructions to scan only
the portion of the fault routine associated with a particular fault or
power-up condition.
For information about startup protection on SFCs, see the programming
software documentation set.
7-10
Chapter 7
Selecting Interrupt Routines
Understanding
ProcessorDetected
Major Faults
In general, if the processor detects a hardware fault, it sets a major fault
and resets I/O. If the processor detects a run-time error, it sets a major
fault bit and the remote I/O racks are set according to their last state
switch. Module outputs in remote racks remain in their last state or they
are de-energized, based on how you set the last state switch in the 1771
I/O chassis.
To decide how to set this switch, evaluate how the machines in your
process will be affected by a fault. For example, how will the machine
react to outputs remaining in their last state or to outputs being
automatically de-energized? What is each output connected to? Will
machine motion continue? Could this cause the control of your process to
become unstable?
To set this switch, see the Classic 1785 PLC-5 Family Programmable
Controllers Hardware Installation Manual, publication 1785-6.6.1.
Important: In the PLC-5 processor local chassis, outputs are
reset—regardless of the last state switch setting—when one of the
following occurs:
processor detects a run-time error
you set a status file bit to reset a local rack
you select program or test mode
Fault in a ProcessorResident Local I/O Rack
The chassis that contains the Classic PLC-5 processor is the
processor-resident local I/O chassis. If a problem occurs with the chassis
backplane, the input and output data table bits for the resident local I/O
rack are left in their last state. The processor sets a minor fault and
continues scanning the program and controlling extended-local and remote
I/O.
Your ladder program should monitor the I/O rack fault bits and take the
appropriate recovery action (covered later in this section).
ATTENTION: If a resident local I/O rack fault occurs and
you have no recovery methods, the input image table and
outputs for the faulted rack remain in their last state. Potential
personnel and machine damage may result.
7-11
Chapter 7
Selecting Interrupt Routines
Fault in a Remote I/O Chassis
In general, when a remote I/O chassis faults, the processor sets an I/O rack
fault bit and then continues scanning the program and controlling the
remaining I/O. The outputs in the faulted rack remain in their last state or
they are de-energized, based on how you set the last state switch in the
1771 I/O chassis.
ATTENTION: If outputs are controlled by inputs in a different
rack and a remote I/O rack fault occurs (in the inputs rack), the
inputs are left in their last non-faulted state. The outputs may
not be properly controlled and potential personnel and machine
damage may result. Make sure that you have recovery methods.
Recovering from a ProcessorResident Local I/O or Remote I/O
Rack Fault
In the PLC-5 processor, you can monitor I/O rack faults using processor
status bits and then recover from the fault using a fault routine or
ladder logic.
Using Status Bits to Monitor Rack Faults
There are two types of status bits used to display information about your
I/O system: global status bits and I/O rack status bits.
The global status bits are set if a fault occurs in any one of the
logical racks.
Processor
Possible Logical Rack Bits
PLC5/105/12, or 5/15
4
PLC5/25
8
Each bit represents an entire rack, no matter how many chassis make up a
rack. (Remember that you can have up to four chassis configured as
quarter racks to make up one logical rack.) These bits are stored in the
lower eight bits of words 7, 32, and 34 of the status file.
For more information on these global status bits, see your programming
software documentation set.
7-12
Chapter 7
Selecting Interrupt Routines
The I/O rack status bits, also known as the “partial rack status bits,” are
used to monitor the racks in your I/O system. The software automatically
creates an integer data file to store this information when an I/O status file
is defined. This file contains 2 words of status bits for every rack
configured in your system. The number of the data file that contains this
I/O information is stored in word 16 (low byte) of the status file. You must
enter this information on the processor status screen. For more information
on monitoring I/O status with I/O rack status bits, see your programming
software documentation set.
Using Fault Routine and Ladder Logic to Recover
You may want to configure a I/O rack fault as a minor fault if you have the
appropriate fault routine and ladder logic to perform an orderly shutdown
of the system. You can program ladder logic in several ways to recover
from a I/O rack fault. These methods are:
user-generated major fault
reset input image table
fault zone programming
Methods:
Description:
Usergenerated You jump to a fault routine when a remote I/O rack fault occurs. In other words, if the status bits
major fault
indicate a fault, you program the processor to act as if a major fault occurred (i.e., jump to the
fault routine). You then program your fault routine to stop the process or perform an orderly
shutdown of your system. When the processor executes the endoffile instruction for the fault
routine, a usergenerated major fault is declared.
Reset input
image table
You monitor the status bits and, if a fault is detected, you program the processor to act as if a
minor fault occurred. After the status bits indicate a fault, use the I/O Status screen to inhibit the
remote rack that faulted. You then use ladder logic to set or reset critical input image table bits
according to the output requirements in the nonfaulted rack.
If you reset input image table bits, during the next I/O update, the input bits are set again to their
last valid state. To prevent this from occurring, your program should set the inhibit bits for the
faulted rack. The global inhibit bits control the input images on a rackbyrack basis; the partial
rack inhibit bits control the input images on a 1/4 rack basis. For more information on these
bits, see the programming software documentation set.
This method requires an extensive and careful review of your system for recovery operations.
For more information on inhibiting I/O racks, see your programming software documentation set
Fault zone
programming
method
Using fault zone programming method, you disable sections of your program with MCR zones.
Using the status bits, you monitor your racks; when a fault is detected, you control the program
through the rungs in your MCR zone. With this method, outputs within the MCR zone must be
nonretentive to be deenergized when a rack fault is detected.
For more information, see your programming software documentation.
7-13
Chapter
8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
Chapter Objectives
This chapter covers discrete and block transfer of I/O data when a
processor is configured for either adapter or scanner mode. Discretetransfer data are words transferred to/from a digital discrete I/O module.
Block-transfer data is transferred, in blocks of data of up to 64 words,
to/from a block-transfer I/O module (such as an analog module).
If you want to read about:
System Design
Determined
Go to
page:
Adapter mode:
81
Discretetransfer data
84
Blocktransfer data
87
Example ladder logic
810
Scanner mode:
Placing System
Hardware
Transferring Discrete
and Block Data
816
Discretetransfer data
816
Blocktransfer data
817
Programming considerations
Selecting Interrupt
Routines
Choosing Hardware
Assigning Addressing
Mode, Racks,
and Groups
821
Calculating Program
Timing
Choosing
Communication
Planning Your
System Programs
Transferring Data Using
Adapter Mode
You can transfer data in adapter mode in two ways.
If you want to transfer:
Use this method:
Words to/from a digital I/O module
Discretedata transfer
Blocks of data (up to 64 words) to/from a
blocktransfer module (such as an analog module)
Block transfer
The processor transfers discrete and block I/O data in a similar way.
The adapter-mode processor and the supervisory processor automatically
discrete transfer I/O data between themselves via the supervisory
processor’s remote I/O scan.
8-1
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
During each remote I/O scan:
the supervisory processor transfers 2, 4, 6 or 8 words—depending on
whether the adapter-mode processor is configured as a 1/4, 1/2, 3/4 or
full rack
the adapter-mode processor transfers 2, 4, 6 or 8 words—depending on
whether the adapter-mode processor is configured as a 1/4, 1/2, 3/4 or
full rack
Supervisory Processor in Scanner Mode
PLC5 Processor in Adapter Mode
Remote I/O
Buffer
Read Inputs
Write Outputs
Data Exchange
Remote I/O Scan
Read Inputs
Write Outputs
Data
Exchange
Data Exchange
I/O Image
Table
I/O Image
Table
x
y
Processor
Resident
Rack
IOT (x)
IIN (y)
Housekeeping
Immediate I/O
Logic
Scan
Program Scan
Figure 8.1 shows the transfers between supervisory processor output file
and adapter-mode processor input file as well as between adapter-mode
processor output file and supervisory processor input file.
8-2
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
Figure 8.1
Automatic I/O Transfer between Supervisory and
AdapterMode Processors
Supervisory Processor
Supervisory Processor
PLC2 0X0-0X7
PLC3 OXX0-OXX7
PLC5 O:X0-O:X7
Word
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
17
14 13
10 07
04 03
AdapterMode Processor
I:30 - I:37 (or adapter image file)
00
17
Output File
Supervisory Processor
PLC2 1X0-1X7
PLC3 IXX0-IXX7
PLC5 I:X0-I:X7
17
14 13
10 07
10 07
04 03
00
Input File
Supervisory Processor
Word
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
14 13
04 03
AdapterMode Processor
O:30 - O:37 (or adapter image file)
00
Input File
Word 0 is reserved for block transfer and status.
17
14 13
10 07
04 03
00
Output File
15298
If data from the supervisory processor is intended to control outputs of the
adapter-mode processor, the ladder logic in the adapter-mode processor
must move the data from its input file (I/O rack 3 or the adapter image file)
to its output file (local I/O). Use XIC and OTE instructions for bit data;
use move and copy instructions for word data.
If you want the supervisory processor to read data from a data file in the
adapter-mode processor, ladder logic in the adapter-mode processor must
move that data to its output file (I/O rack 3 or the adapter image file) for
transfer to the supervisory processor.
8-3
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
Programming Discrete
Transfer in Adapter Mode
For the supervisory processor, use the adapter’s configured I/O rack
number to receive data or store data for transfer.
Using Rack 3 (Addresses 0:300:37 and I:30I:37)
Rack 3 is the default discrete-transfer file for PLC-5/12, -5/15, and -5/25
processors. Typically, each output instruction in one processor should have
a corresponding input instruction in the other processor. The rack number
determines the addresses you use.
The ladder logic in the supervisory processor uses the rack number
(0-76 octal) of the adapter-mode processor.
Condition the ladder logic in the adapter processor with I30/10. When
set, this bit indicates a communication failure between the adapter and
supervisory processors.
Creating an Adapter Image FilePLC5/12, 5/15, and 5/25 Processors
If you use 1/2-slot addressing in a 16-slot chassis, you need rack 3
addresses for scanning processor-resident local I/O on the adapter-mode
processor. In this case, you can create an adapter image file for
transferring data. Before you create an adapter image file, make sure that
these conditions are true:
the PLC-5 processor is in adapter mode
the adapter-mode processor is in a 1771-A4B I/O chassis
you are using 1/2-slot addressing
you have not inhibited rack 3 by setting the rack inhibit bit 3 in
processor status word 27
To create the adapter image file, create a 16-word integer file. This file
must be 16 words regardless of whether you use 4-word or 8-word
transfers. This file must be a unique integer file, for use only as an adapter
image file. Words 0-7 are used for output; words 8-15 are used for input.
Bits are numbered in decimal 0-15 for each word.
To tell the processor which file is the adapter image file, enter the file
number in word 25 of the processor status file. You enter this file number
on the processor status screen. For more information about the processor
status screen, see the chapter on using status data in the programming
software documentation.
Important: If you are using an adapter image file (instead of the rack 3
image), then you cannot use block transfers between the supervisor and the
adapter-mode processor.
8-4
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
Condition the ladder logic in the adapter-mode processor with word 8, bit 8
decimal of the adapter image file. When set, this bit indicates a
communication failure between the adapter and supervisory processors.
ATTENTION: Do not program block transfers to a
supervisory processor if you create an adapter image file.
Transferring Bits between Supervisory and AdapterMode Processors
Figure 8.2 shows ladder logic for transferring bit 17 of the supervisory
processor’s output image word 7 and bit 16 of the adapter-mode
processor’s output image word 5. The x represents the adapter-mode
processor’s rack number; rack 3 is the simulated rack for the adapter-mode
processor. This example assumes 1-slot or 2-slot hardware addressing.
Figure 8.2
Transferring Bits Using Rack 3 in the AdapterMode Processor
Supervisory Processor (PLC2)
Ix5
Adapter Processor (PLC5)
0x7
I:37
17
17
O:35
16
16
When the supervisory processor sets its output file bit 0x:7/17, input file bit
I:37/17 in the adapter-mode processor is automatically set. In the same
way, when the adapter-mode processor sets output file bit O:35/16, input
file bit Ix:5/16 in the supervisory processor is automatically set.
Figure 8.3 shows the ladder logic if you created an adapter image file
because you need rack 3 addresses for local I/O. This example uses N51
as the adapter image file.
Figure 8.3
Transferring Bits Using Your Own Adapter Image File
Supervisory Processor (PLC2)
Ix5
16
Adapter Processor (PLC5)
0x7
N51:15
17
15
N51:05
14
8-5
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
For PLC-5/12, -5/15, and -5/25 processors, words 0-7 in the integer file
represent output, words 8-15 represent input.
Determining the Status of the AdapterMode Processor
Supervisor
Adapter
Adaptermode processor sends to
Supervisory processor
The supervisory processor receives these status bits (Table 8.K) from the
adapter-mode processor in word 0 of the input file for the rack that the
adapter-mode processor is emulating.
Table 8.K
Status Bits of the AdapterMode Processor
When this bit is set:
It indicates this condition:
10 octal
data not valid
15 octal
adaptermode processor is in program or test mode
If you use an adapter image file in a PLC-5/12, -5/15, or -5/25 processor,
then these status bits are not sent.
The supervisory processor should monitor the rack fault bits for the rack
the adapter-mode processor is emulating to determine the status of the
remote I/O link.
Determining the Status of the Supervisory Processor
Supervisor
Adapter
Supervisor processor sends to
adaptermode processor
The adapter-mode processor receives these status bits (Table 8.L) from the
supervisory processor in I:30 (or word 8 of the adapter image file) of the
adapter-mode processor’s data table. These bits tell the adapter-mode
processor the status of the supervisory processor and the integrity of the
remote I/O communication link.
8-6
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
Table 8.L
Status Bits of the Supervisory Processor Set in the AdapterMode
Processor's Data Table
When this bit is set:
It indicates that the adaptermode processor:
Rack 3 Input
Adapter Input Image
Image Table (octal) File (decimal)
10
8
detected a communication failure or received a reset command from the supervisory processor
11
9
received a reset command from the supervisory processor (processor in program or test mode)
13
11
detected that the supervisory processor is powering up; this bit is reset with the first
communication from the supervisory processor
15
13
detected a communication failure (e.g., no communication activity on the remote I/O
communication link within the last 100ms)
Programming Block
Transfer in Adapter Mode
To transfer blocks of data between a PLC-5/12, -5/15, or -5/25
adapter-mode processor and a supervisory processor, the adapter-mode
processor must have a BTW to respond to the BTR from the supervisory
processor (and a BTR to respond to the supervisory processor’s BTW).
For example, when the supervisory processor enables a BTR instruction,
the adapter-mode processor responds by enabling a BTW instruction.
The supervisory processor controls the transfer; the adapter-mode
processor responds to the request. Figure 8.4 shows an example of
block-transfer programming between an adapter-mode processor and a
supervisory processor.
8-7
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
Figure 8.4
Example Adapter/Supervisor BlockTransfer Programming
for a PLC5/12, 5/15, or 5/25 AdapterMode Processor in Rack xx
AdapterMode
Processor (PLC5/12, 5/15, or 5/25)
Supervisory Processor
(PLC3)
1771 I/O Chassis
Remote I/O Link
Set for
Rack xx
BTW
BTR
BTR
BLOCK TRANSFER READ
Rack
0xx
Group
0
Module
0=LOW
Control
FB001:0000
Data File
FB002:0000
Length
0
BLOCK TRANSFER WRITE
Rack
3
Group
0
Module
0
Control Block
N7:15
Data File
N7:200
Length
8
Continuous
Y
BTW
BTR
BTR
BLOCK TRANSFER READ
Rack
3
Group
0
Module
0
Control Block
N7:10
Data File
N7:100
Length
40
Continuous
Y
BLOCK TRANSFER WRITE
Rack
0xx
Group
0
Module
0=LOW
Control
FB001:0000
Data File
FB003:0000
Length
0
15552
Addressing Tips
Table 8.M lists some addressing tips for programming block transfers
between a PLC-5/12, -5/15, or -5/25 adapter-mode processor and a
supervisory processor.
8-8
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
Table 8.M
Addressing Tips for Adapter/Supervisor Block Transfers with a PLC5/12,
5/15, or 5/25 AdapterMode Processor
BTR/BTW Parameter
BTR/BTW in Supervisor
BTR/BTW in Adapter
Rack
PLC2/30: 17 octal
PLC3: 077 octal
PLC5/25: 17 octal
Must be 31
Group
0
Must be 0
Module
0
Length
Must be 0
Number of words transferred
Continuous
Yes (PLC5 and PLC5/250 only)
Yes
1
If you need rack 3 I/O for the adaptermode processor's local I/O, then you must specify an
adapter image file and block transfers can not be used between the supervisory and
adaptermode processor.
ATTENTION: To guarantee the correct destination of
block-transfer data, program only one set of bidirectional block
transfers between supervisory and adapter-mode processors
with PLC-5/12, -5/15, and -5/25 processors in adapter mode.
Important: If you are using a PLC-5/12, -5/15, or -5/25 processor, set the
supervisory processor’s communication rate for remote I/O to 57.6 kbps.
Block transfers between adapter and supervisory processors transfer data
between data table addresses. If you want to transfer processor-resident
local I/O data of the adapter mode processor to a supervisory processor or
if you want to transfer data from the supervisory processor to processorresident local I/O of the adapter mode processor, you must use MOV or
COP instructions within the adapter-mode processor to move the data in or
out of the data file used in the adapter block-transfer instruction.
Figure 8.5 shows data transfers from a supervisory processor to a
PLC-5/12, -5/15, or -5/25 adapter-mode processor to a local block-transfer
module and vice versa.
8-9
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
Figure 8.5
Example Block Transfer from Supervisory Processor to a PLC5/12,
5/15, or 5/25 AdapterMode Processor to Local BlockTransfer Module
and Vice Versa
PLC5/12, 5/15, or 5/25 AdapterMode Processor
in Supervisory Processor's
Remote I/O Rack 2
Supervisory Processor
(PLC3)
Block Transfers over Remote I/O Link
Data File
FB002
0000
0039
Local BT over chassis backplane
Data File
N7
BTR
BLOCK TRANSFER READ
3
Rack
0
Group
0
Module
N7:10
Control Block
Data File
N7:100
Length
40
Continuous
Y
BTR
BLOCK TRANSFER READ
2
Rack
0
Group
0=LOW
Module
FB001:0000
Control
Data File
FB003:0000
Length
0
BTW
BLOCK TRANSFER WRITE
3
Rack
0
Group
0
Module
N7:20
Control Block
Data File
N7:150
Length
8
Continuous
Y
0000
0007
BTW
BLOCK TRANSFER WRITE
0
Rack
2
Group
0
Module
N7:15
Control Block
Data File
N7:100
Length
40
Continuous
Y
N7:100
N7:139
To BT
Module
//
BTW
BLOCK TRANSFER WRITE
2
Rack
0
Group
0=LOW
Module
FB001:0000
Control
Data File
FB002:0000
Length
0
//
Data File
FB003
BT Module in Local
I/O Rack 0, I/O Group 2
Module 0
N7:150
N7:157
BTR
BLOCK TRANSFER READ
0
Rack
2
Group
0
Module
N7:25
Control Block
Data File
N7:150
Length
8
Continuous
Y
From BT
Module
15553
If you block transfer data with a supervisory processor, you cannot use
1/2-slot addressing with a 1771-A4B chassis because the adapter-mode
processor needs the rack 3 I/O image table for block-transfer
communication. (This applies only to PLC-5/12, -5/15, and -5/25
processors in adapter mode.)
ATTENTION: Do not try block transfers to a supervisory
processor when the adapter-mode processor uses rack 3 for
scanning processor-resident local I/O (when you create your
own adapter image file using a PLC-5/12, -5/15, and -5/25
processor in adapter mode). Using rack 3 addresses under this
condition will result in unpredictable machine operation with
possible damage to equipment or personnel.
Example of BlockTransfer Ladder Logic
The following figures show example ladder logic for block transfers
between an adapter-mode processor and a supervisory processor.
8-10
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
Supervisory Processor (PLC2/30, PLC3, PLC5, or PLC5/250)
Follow these guidelines when programming block-transfer instructions in
the supervisory processor.
Set the length to 0.
Set the continuous bit for continuous operation (PLC-5 and -5/250
processors only).
Use the remote I/O rack number for which you configure the adaptermode processor.
Use 0 for the group and module numbers.
Condition the use of BTR data with a “data valid” bit.
All address comments for contacts shown in the following examples
represent the set (1) state of the bit in the PLC-5 processor.
Figure 8.6
Example Block Transfer in PLC2/30 Supervisory Processor
BTR Done Bit
120
06
Store Bit
L
SEND DATA TO ADAPTERMODE PROCESSOR
BTW
BLOCK TRANSFER WRITE
DATA ADDR
030
MODULE ADDR
200
BLOCK LENGTH
0
FILE
140-237
Store Bit
BTW Done Bit
120
07
READ DATA FROM ADAPTERMODE PROCESSOR
BUFFER READ DATA FROM
ADAPTERMODE PROC TO WORK
FILE AREA
06
120
DN
07
Store Bit
U
Store Bit
BTR Done Bit
120
020
EN
07
Data Valid Bit
120
10
PLC5 adaptermode processor in rack 2
BTR
BLOCK TRANSFER READ
DATA ADDR
031
MODULE ADDR
200
BLOCK LENGTH
0
FILE
240-337
FFM
FILE TO FILE MOVE
COUNTER ADDRESS 033
POSITION
0
FILE LENGTH
64
FILE A:
240-337
FILE R:
400-477
RATE PER SCAN
64
020
EN
06
120
DN
06
8-11
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
Figure 8.7
Example Block Transfer in PLC3 Supervisory Processor
BTR Done Bit
READ DATA FROM ADAPTERMODE PROCESSOR
BTR
BLOCK TRANSFER READ
EN
RACK
2
DN
GROUP
0
MODULE
0
ER
#B1:0
CONTROL
DATA FILE
#B2:0
0
LENGTH
B1:0
15
Read Request SEND DATA TO ADAPTERMODE PROCESSOR
BTW
B1:0
BLOCK TRANSFER WRITE
EN
17
RACK
2
DN
GROUP
0
MODULE
0
ER
#B1:0
CONTROL
BUFFER READ DATA FROM
DATA FILE
#B3:0
ADAPTERMODE PROC TO WORK
0
LENGTH
FILE AREA
BTR Done Bit
Data Not Valid Bit
B1:0
I:020
15
10
PLC5 adaptermode processor in rack 2
8-12
MVF
MOVE WITH FILES
SOURCE
DESTIN
COUNTER
MODE
LENGTH
POSITION
#B2:0
#B4:0
C5
ALL
64
0
EN
DN
ER
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
Figure 8.8
Example Block Transfer in PLC5 Supervisory Processor
READ DATA FROM ADAPTERMODE PROCESSOR
BTR and BTW enable bits
N7:15
N7:10
15
15
SEND DATA TO ADAPTERMODE PROCESSOR
BTR and BTW enable bits
N7:15
N7:10
15
15
BTR
BLOCK TRANSFER READ
RACK
2
GROUP
0
MODULE
0
CONTROL BLOCK N7:10
N7:100
DATA FILE
0
LENGTH
N
CONTINUOUS
BTW
BLOCK TRANSFER WRITE
RACK
2
GROUP
0
MODULE
0
CONTROL BLOCK N7:15
N7:200
DATA FILE
0
LENGTH
N
CONTINUOUS
BTR Error Bit
N7:10
12
BTW Error Bit
N7:15
12
BUFFER READ
DATA FROM
ADAPTERMODE
Data Not Valid Bit PROC TO
BTR Done Bit
COP
I:020
N7:10
WORK AREA
COPY FILE
13
10
SOURCE
DEST
LENGTH
PLC5 adaptermode processor in rack 2
EN
DN
ER
EN
DN
ER
BTR Enable Bit
N7:10
U
15
BTW Enable Bit
N7:15
U
15
#N7:100
#N7:300
64
8-13
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
Figure 8.9
Example Block Transfer in PLC5/250 Supervisory Processor
READ DATA FROM ADAPTERMODE PROCESSOR
BR020:0
BWO20:0
EN
EN
SEND DATA TO ADAPTERMODE PROCESSOR
BR020:0
BWO20:0
EN
EN
BTR
BLOCK TRANSFER READ
RACK
002
GROUP
0
MODULE
0
CONTROL BLOCK BR020:0
1BTD1:0
DATA FILE
0
BT LENGTH
N
CONTINUOUS
BT TIMEOUT
3
BTW
BLOCK TRANSFER WRITE
RACK
002
GROUP
0
MODULE
0
CONTROL BLOCKBW020:0
1BTD2:0
DATA FILE
0
BT LENGTH
N
CONTINUOUS
BT TIMEOUT
3
BUFFER READ
DATA FROM
ADAPTERMODE
BTR Done Bit Data Not Valid Bit PROC TO
BR020:0
FAL
I:020
WORK AREA
FILE ARITH/LOGICAL
CONTROL
1R0:0
DN
10
LENGTH
64
POSITION
0
MODE
ALL
DEST
#1N0:0
EXPRESSION
1BTD1:0
PLC5 adaptermode processor in rack 2
8-14
EN
DN
ER
EN
DN
ER
EN
DN
ER
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
AdapterMode Processor (PLC5/12, 5/15, and 5/25)
Follow these guidelines when programming block-transfer instructions in
the adapter-mode processor.
Use 3 for the rack, 0 for the group, and 0 for the module.
Set the continuous bit for continuous operation.
Condition the use of BTR data with status bits from the
supervisory processor.
Figure 8.10
Example Block Transfer for a PLC5/12, 5/15, or 5/25 Processor in
Adapter Mode
ACCEPT DATA FROM SUPERVISORY PROCESSOR
SEND DATA TO
SUPERVISORY PROCESSOR
BTR Error Bit
N7:10
BTR
BLOCK TRNSFR READ
3
RACK
GROUP
0
MODULE
0
CONTROL BLOCK N7:10
N7:100
DATA FILE
40
LENGTH
Y
CONTINUOUS
BTW
BLOCK TRNSFR WRITE
3
RACK
GROUP
0
MODULE
0
CONTROL BLOCK N7:15
N7:200
DATA FILE
8
LENGTH
Y
CONTINUOUS
EN
DN
ER
EN
DN
ER
BTR Enable Bit
N7:10
U
12
15
BTW Error Bit
N7:15
12
I:030
I:030
I:030
I:030
10
11
13
15
Status Bits
BTR Done Bit
N7:10
13
BTW Enable Bit
N7:15
U
15
BUFFER DATA FROM
SUPERVISORY PROCESSOR
COP
COPY FILE
SOURCE
#N7:100
DEST
#N7:300
LENGTH
40
8-15
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
Transferring Data
Using Scanner Mode
A PLC-5 processor, in scanner mode, transfers discrete-transfer and
block-transfer data with processor-resident local and remote I/O chassis. If
you have your processor configured for scanner mode, refer to the
following sections for more information on how a PLC-5 processor
transfers data in scanner mode. Also, the following sections provide
information on how to handle I/O rack faults for processor-resident local
and remote I/O (in scanner mode).
Programming Discrete
Transfer in Scanner Mode
The processor scans processor-resident local I/O synchronously and
sequentially to the program scan.
The processor:
I/O Image
Table
Read Inputs
Write Inputs
Data
Exchange
Processor
Resident
Rack
Housekeeping
scans discrete-transfer data in the processor-resident local I/O chassis
synchronously and sequentially to the program scan.
performs housekeeping once per program scan: 3 ms maximum;
typically 1.5 ms
Logic
Scan
Program Scan
8-16
scans discrete-transfer data in remote I/O chassis asynchronously to the
program scan. The remote I/O scan discrete-transfers I/O data between
remote I/O adapters in I/O chassis and the remote I/O buffer in the
processor.
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
Programming Block
Transfer in Scanner Mode
The processor block transfers data to and from its processor-resident local
and remote I/O chassis when operating in scanner mode. The processor
performs block transfers asynchronously to the program scan. The
processor also interrupts the program scan asynchronously to momentarily
access BTW and BTR data files. The processor performs one remote
block transfer per addressed rack per remote I/O scan in classic PLC-5
systems.
Queued BlockTransfer Requests
If your ladder program requests more than one block transfer to or from the
same I/O chassis in the same program scan, the processor queues the
requests. The PLC-5/12, -5/15, and -5/25 processors can handle up to 17
requests per rack address.
After the processor queues the requests, a PLC-5/12, -5/15, or -5/25
processor runs the block transfers in the order they are requested. The only
exception is a block-transfer request in a fault routine.
The processor has an active buffer. The processor places a block transfer
in the active buffer when the processor takes the request off the queue.
The processor places a block-transfer request directly in the active buffer
only if the queue is empty.
When the processor is changed to program mode, the block-transfer
instructions still in the buffer are cancelled.
Block Transfers to ProcessorResident Local I/O
Block transfers to processor-resident local I/O follow these procedures.
Block-transfer requests are queued for the addressed processor-resident
local I/O rack.
The active buffer handles all block-transfer modules whose blocktransfer instructions were enabled in the program scan continuously via
the queue scan in the order the requests were queued.
The processor momentarily interrupts program scan when the active
buffer performs a block-transfer request to access the block-transfer
data file.
Block transfers of I/O data can finish and the done bit can be set
anytime during the program scan.
The processor runs all enabled block transfers of I/O data to processorresident local I/O continuously as each block-transfer request enters
the active buffer. The processor does not wait for the I/O scan to queue
the requests.
8-17
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
Block Transfers of Remote I/O Data
Block transfers of I/O data to remote I/O follow these procedures.
block-transfer requests are queued for each addressed remote I/O rack
Each active buffer transfers one data block per remote I/O scan.
The processor momentarily interrupts program scan when the active
buffer performs a block-transfer request to access the block-transfer
data file.
If program scans are two or three times longer than remote I/O scans, the
processor can run two or three remote block transfers per program scan
and interrupt the program scan two or three times.
Important: If you split remote rack numbers between scanner channels,
block transfers to lower priority scanner channels do not work. Discrete
transfers function properly. Scanner channels have priority according to
the following order: 1A, 1B, 2A, then 2B. If you configure channels 1B
and 2A as remote scanners and split rack #2 between them, for example,
block transfers will work to 1B (the higher priority channel) but will not
work to the second half of rack #2 (2A, the lower priority channel).
Block Transfers in Fault Routines (STIs)
If the processor runs a fault routine that contains block-transfer
instructions, the processor performs these block transfers immediately
upon completing any block transfers currently in the active buffer, ahead of
block-transfer requests waiting in the queue.
The block transfers in a fault routine should only be between the processor
and processor-resident local I/O.
ATTENTION: The program scan stops when the PLC-5/15 or
-5/25 processor runs a fault routine with a block-transfer
instruction to a remote chassis. The delay for a block transfer
could be unacceptable for your application.
8-18
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
BlockTransfer Sequence
Figure 8.11 shows the sequence the processor follows to run a block
transfer.
Figure 8.11
BlockTransfer Sequence
1, 7
Ladder
Program
6 STI
Data
Files
2
Q17 Buffer
for 17 BT
Requests
Request
Priority Request
3a, 3b, 5
Active BT
area
Data
Data
Acknowledgement
and Incoming Data
Request and Outgoing Data
4a, 4b I/O Chassis
1.
Ladder logic enables the block transfer.
2.
The processor places the blocktransfer request in the queue, or in the active buffer if the queue is empty. If the queue is full, the
request is ignored until the next scan.
3.
If the block transfer is a:
BTW: The processor interrupts the program scan momentarily to transfer data from the BTW file to the active buffer. The active
buffer transfers the request and outgoing data to the processorresident local I/O module or to the remote I/O adapter.
BTR: The active buffer sends the blocktransfer request to the processorresident local I/O module or remote I/O adapter. In
the same local blocktransfer update or in the next remote I/O scan, the active buffer receives the blocktransfer
acknowledgement and incoming data.
4.
Important: The processor interrupts the program scan momentarily to transfer incoming data to the BTR file one word at a
time; therefore, some ladder logic could execute in between word transfers to the BTR file. We recommend that you buffer your
BTR data with a filetofile move or a copy instruction using a BTR done bit to condition the rung if you need file integrity of
the data.
If the block transfer is to:
ProcessorResident Local I/O: The processor continuously runs blocktransfer requests for all processorresident local I/O
modules in the order the processor queues the requests.
Remote I/O: The processor runs one blocktransfer request for one blocktransfer module per rack address per remote
I/O scan.
5.
The processor clears the active buffer and the active buffer accepts the next request after the buffer receives a confirmation of a
valid read or write.
6.
When the processor enables a fault routine or STI, the processor runs any blocktransfer program in the fault routine or STI ahead
of any blocktransfer requests in the queue, as soon as the active buffer completes any block transfer currently in the active buffer.
The program scan is stopped until the STI or fault routine block transfer is complete.
7.
The blocktransfer process runs asynchronously to the program scan, so data can change during program scan.
8-19
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
BlockTransfer Sequence with Status Bits
The following explanations describe how the ladder logic and the I/O
scanner handle block transfers with status bits:
Ladder logic:
detects that the rung containing a block transfer is enabled
sets the enable .EN bit (15)
detects the status of the read/write .RW bit (07)
places the block transfer in the active buffer if the queue is empty; the
processor sets the start .ST bit (14) and begins the transfer
places the block transfer in the queue if the active buffer is not empty;
the processor sets the enabled waiting .EW bit (10)
If the queue is full, block-transfer requests may not occur in the order the
ladder logic requests the transfers. The processor sets the enabled waiting
.EW bit (10) when the request enters the queue.
The I/O scanner:
transfers the request to or from the I/O chassis after the request reaches
the active buffer
detects whether the module responds; if the module does not respond,
the processor sets the no response .NR bit (09)
If there is no response and the timeout .TO bit (08) is reset, the
processor re-queues the request until the watchdog timer times out (4
seconds). If there is no response and the .TO bit is set, the scanner
retries the request one more time before setting the .ER bit.
If the request is a:
- BTW, the processor transfers the data to the module
- BTR, the processor moves data from the module to the BTR data file
one word at a time
sets the done .DN bit (13) on completion of a valid transfer; sets the
error .ER (12) bit if there were errors
checks the status of the continuous .CO bit (11); if set and no error
occurred, the scanner re-queues the block transfer
notifies the active buffer to accept the next request
For a list of block-transfer error codes, see the block-transfer instructions
chapter in the programming software documentation.
8-20
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
Programming
Considerations
In a distributed control system where your process is controlled by several
independent programmable controllers, make sure that your program
considers the status of the PLC processors and the integrity of the
communication link by using the status bits that the supervisory and
adapter mode processor provide for each other.
For example, consider how your process should respond if:
there is an incremental degradation of the systems control due to the loss
of one of the programmable controllers
the supervisory processor is in program mode and someone manually
activates a valve normally controlled by the supervisory processor
the adapter-mode processor faults
The adapter-mode processor can monitor the status of the supervisory
processor by examining the status bits in the first word of the the data
being transferred from the supervisory processor.
The supervisory processor can monitor the status of the adapter-mode
processor by examining the status bits in the first word of the data being
transferred from the adapter-mode processor. The supervisory processor
can also monitor the rack fault bits for the rack the adapter is emulating to
determine the integrity of the remote I/O communications between the
supervisor and the adapter-mode processors. For more information on rack
fault bits, see the faults chapter in the programming software
documentation.
General Considerations for BlockTransferring I/O Data
The following are general programming considerations when you are
block-transferring I/O data.
When performing block transfers (processor-resident local, extendedlocal, or remote I/O) in any PLC-5 processor clear the output image
table corresponding to the block-transfer module rack location before
changing to RUN mode. If you do not clear the output image table, then
you encounter block-transfer errors because unsolicited block transfers
are being sent to the block-transfer module (i.e. if a block-transfer
module is installed in rack 2, group 4, clear output word O:024 to 0. Do
not use the word for storing data).
If you use remote block-transfer instructions and have the timeout bit
(.TO) set to 1, then the processor disables the 4 sec timer and requests
additional block transfers anywhere from 0-1 sec before setting the error
(.ER) bit.
8-21
Chapter 8
Transferring Discrete and BlockTransfer Data
Considerations for ProcessorResident Local Racks
The following are programming considerations when you are blocktransferring data in a processor-resident local rack.
Within the processor-resident local rack, limit the number of
continuous-read block transfers to 16 transfers of 4 words each or 8
transfers of 64 words each. If you attempt to exceed this block-transfer
limit, a checksum error (error code -5) occurs.
Block-transfer instructions to any of the following modules residing in
the processor-resident local rack result in frequent checksum errors.
- 1771-OFE1, -OFE2, and -OFE3 modules, all versions prior to series
B, revision B.
- 2803-VIM module, all versions prior to series B, revision A
- IMC-120, all versions
To eliminate the checksum errors, replace your modules with the current
series and revision. If replacement is not possible then:
1.
Using 6200 Series PLC-5 Programming Software release 4.11/4.12
or later, go to the Processor Status screen.
2.
With the processor in PROG mode, set user control bit 4 to 1. The
User Control Bit word is S:26.
3.
Change the processor mode from PROG to RUN.
Do not program IIN or IOT instructions to a module in the same
physical module group as a BT module unless you know a block
transfer is not in progress. If you must do this, then use an XIO
instruction to examine the EN bit of the block-transfer instruction to
condition the IIN and IOT.
8-22
Chapter
9
Calculating Program Timing
Chapter Objectives
This chapter provides information to help you determine the program
timing for your PLC-5 programmable controller system.
If you want to read about:
Go to
page:
PLC5 processor scan time
91
Choosing Hardware
I/O update timing:
Transfer discrete data
Transfer block data
Instruction timing and
memory requirements:
Bit and word instructions
File instructions
System Design
Determined
95
95
97
9-8
911
Program constants
913
Direct and indirect elements
915
Placing System
Hardware
Assigning Addressing
Mode, Racks,
and Groups
Selecting Interrupt
Routines
Transferring Discrete
and Block Data
Calculating Program
Timing
Choosing
Communication
Planning Your
System Programs
Introduction to Classic
PLC5 Processor Scanning
The basic function of a programmable controller system is to read the
status of various input devices (such as pushbuttons and limit switches),
make decisions based on the status of those devices, and set the status of
output devices (such as lights, motors and heating coils). To accomplish
this, the PLC-5 processor performs two primary operations:
program scanning—where
- logic is executed
- housekeeping is performed
I/O scanning—where input data is read and output levels are set
Logic Scan
Housekeeping
Program Scanning
The program scan cycle is the time it takes the processor to execute the
logic scan once, perform housekeeping tasks, and then start executing
logic again.
The processor continually performs logic scanning and housekeeping. You
can monitor the program scan time using the processor status screen.
Housekeeping activities for most PLC-5 processors includes:
9-1
Chapter 9
Calculating Program Timing
processor internal checks
updating the input image table with processor-resident I/O input status
updating processor-resident local I/O output modules with data from the
output image table
updating the input image table with remote I/O input status as contained
in the remote I/O buffer
updating the remote I/O buffer with output data from the output
image table
If no change in input status occurs and the processor continues to execute
the same logic instructions, the program scan cycle remains consistent (in
our example, at 25 ms). In real systems, however, the program scan cycle
fluctuates due to the following factors:
false logic executes faster than true logic
different instructions execute at different rates
different input states cause different sections of logic to be executed
interrupt programs affect program scan times
Effects of False versus True Logic on Scan Time
The rung below—which changes states from one program scan to the
next—changes your program scan time by about .25 ms.
MVM
MASKED MOVE
Source
N7:0
Mask
1100110011001100
Dest
N7:2
I:000
00
If I:000/00 is:
Then the rung is:
On
True and the processor executes the maskedmove instruction. A maskedmove
instruction takes 258 µs to execute (see appendix A of the PLC5 Programming
Software Instruction Set Reference, publication 62006.4.11).
Off
False and the processor scans the rung but does not execute it. It takes only 1.4
microseconds to just scan the rung.
Other instructions may have a greater or lesser effect.
Effects of Different Instructions on Logic Scan Time
Some instructions have a much greater effect on logic scan time than
others based on the time it takes to execute that instruction.
Program scan time is also affected by the basic construction of your ladder
rungs. The sizes of rungs and the number of branches in each can cause
the scan time to fluctuate greatly.
9-2
Chapter 9
Calculating Program Timing
Effects of Different Input States on Logic Scan Time
You can write your logic so that it executes different rungs at different
times, based on input conditions. The different amounts of logic executed
in the logic scans causes differences in program scan times. For example,
the simple differences in rung execution in the following example cause
the logic scan times to vary.
I:000
20
JMP
rung 1
02
B3:0
00
20
LBL
rung 2
MVM
rung 3
MVM
rung 4
If I:000/02 is:
Rungs 2 and 3 are:
On
Off
Skipped
Executed
O:013
JMP
02
If you use subroutines, program scan times can vary by the scan time of
entire logic files.
I/O Scanning
The remote I/O scan cycle is the time that it takes for the processor
(configured as a scanner) to communicate with all of the entries in its rack
scan-list once. The remote I/O scan is independent of and asynchronous to
the program scan.
The scanner processor keeps a list of all of the devices connected to each
remote I/O link. An example system would look like this:
PLC5/25
DH+
Rem I/O
Rack 1
Rack
Address
1
2
3
I/O Status
Rack
I/O Range
Size
Full
IO 010/00 to 017/17
IO 020/00 to 023/17
1/2
IO 030/00 to 037/17
Full
Rack 2
Rack 3
In this example, the remote I/O channel continually scans the three racks in its scan list
and places the data in the remote I/O buffer in the processor. The processor updates
its own buffer and the I/O image table. During housekeeping, the two buffers are
updated by exchanging the input and output data with each other.
9-3
Chapter 9
Calculating Program Timing
I/O placed in the same chassis as the processor is called “processorresident” local I/O. These inputs and outputs are not updated during the
remote I/O scan—they are updated during the housekeeping portion of the
program scan. During housekeeping, the processor reads and writes the
I/O across the chassis backplane. Thus, the update of processor-resident
local I/O is synchronous to the program scan.
Figure 9.1 shows timing loops for discrete data transfer in a
PLC-5 processor.
Immediate I/O
x y
Remote I/O
Buffer
Data Exchange
I/O Image
Table
Read Inputs
Write Outputs
Rack 1
Adapter
Data
Exchange
x
y
Remote I/O Scan
Timing Loop
Processor
Resident
Rack
IOT (x)
IIN (y)
Housekeeping
Rack 2
Adapter
Rack 3
Adapter
Figure 9.1
Remote I/O Scan and Program Scan Timing Loops
Logic
Scan
Program Scan
Timing Loop
During the housekeeping portion of the program scan, both the remote I/O
buffer and the processor-resident rack are updated. Remember that the I/O
scanner is constantly updating the remote I/O buffer asynchronously to the
program scan.
9-4
Chapter 9
Calculating Program Timing
I/O ScanningDiscrete
and Block Transfer
A Classic PLC-5 processor can transfer discrete data and block data
to/from processor-resident local I/O, extended-local I/O chassis, and
remote I/O chassis.
Transferring Discrete Data
The remote I/O system is scanned in a separate and asynchronous scan to
the program scan. The remote I/O scan takes output data from the remote
I/O buffer to output modules and puts input data into the remote I/O buffer
from input modules. The remote I/O scan time can take 3, 6, or 10 ms per
one rack in a chassis on the remote I/O link, depending on baud rate. The
PLC-5 processor then exchanges the input and output image table data
with the remote I/O buffer during the I/O-update portion of housekeeping.
Immediate I/O
The processor responds to immediate input (IIN) and immediate output
(IOT) requests during the logic scan. The logic scan is suspended at the
request for immediate input/output data. The logic scan resumes after
obtaining the data and fulfilling the request.
IIN and IOT data transfers directly to and from I/O modules in processorresident I/O and extended-local I/O chassis. With remote I/O, only the
remote I/O buffer is updated.
Transferring Block Data
The exchange of block-transfer data and the logic scan run independently
and concurrently. The following paragraphs explain block transfer for
extended-local I/O and then for processor-resident I/O and remote I/O.
9-5
Chapter 9
Calculating Program Timing
Remote I/O and Processor-Resident I/O
The processor performs block transfers asynchronously to the program
scan. The processor also interrupts the program scan asynchronously to
momentarily access BTW and BTR data files. The processor performs one
remote block transfer per addressed rack and per remote I/O scan.
Figure 9.2 shows timing loops for block transfer from a Classic PLC-5
processor.
Figure 9.2
Transferring Block Data to Local and Remote I/O
Remote I/O
Scan ·
One transfer per
I/O scan
Rack 7
A
Adapter
Remote I/O
Q = Queue
A = Active
Buffer BT
Requests
Q
BTR or BTW Data
¶
BT Requests
Q
One transfer per
I/O scan
BTR or BTW Data
A
¶
Rack 6
Adapter
BT Requests
Q
One transfer per
I/O scan
BTR or BTW Data
¶
A
BTRequests
Adapter
Rack 5
One transfer per
I/O scan
Q
BTR or BTW Data
A
¶
Logic
Scan
Processor
Resident
Rack 0
¶
Interrupt from Fault Routine.
The
adapter used in the remote I/O scan is the
·
1771ASB adapter.
9-6
Q
Multiple
Block Transfers
per I/O Scan
A
I/O Scan
BT
Requests
BTR or BTW Data
¶
Program
Scan
Chapter 9
Calculating Program Timing
Instruction Timing and
Memory Requirements
The time it takes for a processor to scan an instruction depends on the type
of instruction, the type of addressing, the type of data, whether the
instruction has to convert data, and whether the instruction is true or false.
This section provides timing and memory requirements estimates with
these assumptions:
direct addressing
integer data, except where noted
no data-type conversions
addresses within the first 4096 words of the data table of a PLC-5/10,
-5/12, -5/15, or -5/25 processor
execution times shown in µs
Memory requirements refer to the number of words the instruction uses. In
some cases, an instruction may have a range of memory requirements. The
range of words exists because the instruction can use different types
of data.
Important: The tables are divided into instruction times and memory
requirements that are specific to PLC-5/10, -5/12, -5/15, and -5/25
processors.
9-7
Chapter 9
Calculating Program Timing
Bit and Word Instructions for PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, and 5/25
Processors
Table 9.N shows timing and memory requirements for bit and word
instructions for PLC-5/10, -5/12, -5/15, and -5/25 processors.
Table 9.N
Timing and Memory Requirements for Bit and Word Instructions
for PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, and 5/25 Processors
Category
Relay
Code
Title
Execution Time (µs)
Integer
Execution Time (µs)
Floating Point
True
False
True
1.3
0.8
Words of
Memory2
False
11
XIC
examine if closed
XIO
examine if open
OTL
output latch
OTU
output unlatch
OTE
output energize
1.6
1.6
branch end
0.8
0.8
1
(0.01 base)
39
27
23
(1.0 base)
44
28
(0.01 base)
30
43
(1.0 base)
30
51
Branch
1.6
next branch
branch start
Timer and Counter
TON
TOF
timer on
timer off
RTO
retentive timer on
(0.01 base)
(1.0 base)
39
44
24
24
CTU
count up
32
34
CTD
count down
34
RES
reset
30
14
1 For every bit address above the first 256 words of memory in the data table, add 0.8 µs to the execution time and 1 wordd of memory to the requirements.
2 Use the smaller number if all addresses are below word 4096; use the larger number if all addresses are above 4096.
9-8
Chapter 9
Calculating Program Timing
Category
Arithmetic
Logic
Move
Comparison
Code
Title
Execution Time (µs)
Integer
Execution Time (µs)
Floating Point
True
False
True
False
36
14
92
14
47
14
35
14
23
Words of
Memory2
ADD
add
SUB
subtract
MUL
multiply
41
14
98
DIV
divide
49
14
172
SQR
square root
82
14
212
NEG
negate
28
14
36
CLE
clear
18
14
23
TOD
convert to BCD
52
14
35
FRD
convert from BCD
44
AND
and
36
14
47
OR
or
XOR
exclusive or
NOT
not
27
14
35
MOV
move
26
14
MVM
masked move
55
14
EQU
equal
32
14
42
14
35
NEQ
not equal
LES
less than
LEQ
less than or equal
GRT
greater than
GEQ
greater than or equal
LIM
limit test
42
14
60
14
47
MEQ
mask compare if equal
41
14
35
14
69
2 Use the smaller number if all addresses are below word 4096; use the larger number if all addresses are above 4096.
9-9
Chapter 9
Calculating Program Timing
Category
Compute
Code
CPT
Execution Time (µs)
Integer
Execution Time (µs)
Floating Point
True
False
True
False
67
34
124
34
69
multiply
73
34
130
divide
80
34
204
square root
113
33
244
34
57
negate
59
33
68
clear
49
30
55
34
45
move
58
33
57
convert to BCD
84
convert from BCD
75
AND
68
34
69
NOT
59
34
57
equal
63
34
Title
add
Words of
Memory2
subtract
OR
XOR
Compare
CMP
73
not equal
less than
less than or equal
greater than
greater than or equal
2 Use the smaller number if all addresses are below word 4096; use the larger number if all addresses are above 4096.
9-10
34
Chapter 9
Calculating Program Timing
File Instructions
The instruction timing for file instructions depends on the data type,
number of files acted on per scan, number of elements acted on per scan,
and whether the instruction converts data between integer and floating
point formats.
Table 9.O shows PLC-5/10, -5/12, -5/15, and -5/25 processors. When you
use these tables, keep these guidelines in mind:
for integer to floating point conversion, add:
8 µs for each element address
10 µs for each file address (# prefix)
for floating point to integer conversion add:
33 µs for each element address
44 µs for each file address (# prefix)
Table 9.O
Timing and Memory Requirements for File Instructions
Category
File Arithmetic and Logic
Code
FAL
Time (µs)
Integer
Time (µs)
Floating point
Time (µs)
Integer or
Floating Point
True
True
False
98 + W[36.7 + N]
98 + W[95.1 + N]
54
712
multiply
98 + W[42.5 + N]
98 + W[101.2 + N]
divide
98 + W[51.1 + N]
98 + W[180.3 + N]
square root
98 + W[84.7 + N]
98 + W[220.5 + N]
54
610
negate
98 + W[29.2 + N]
98 + W[37.2 + N]
clear
98 + W[18.4 + N]
98 + W[24.0 + N]
54
58
move
98 + W[27.3 + N]
98 + W[36.2 + N]
54
610
convert to BCD
98 + W[54.3 + N]
convert from BCD
98 + W[45.4 + N]
AND
98 + W[37.2 + N]
54
712
OR
98 + W[37.2 + N]
XOR
98 + W[37.2 + N]
NOT
98 + W[28.2 + N]
54
610
all comparisons
93 + W[32.7 +N]
Title
add
Words of
Memory1
subtract
File Search and Compare
FSC
93 + W[43.3 +N]
W=
number of elements acted on per scan
N=
2 x (number of integer file addresses) + 8 x (number of floatingpoint file addresses) + 6 x (number of timer, counter, or control
file addresses) + ( number of conversions between integer and floating point formats)
1 Use the smaller number if all addresses are below word 4096; use the larger number if all addresses are above 4096.
9-11
Chapter 9
Calculating Program Timing
Category
File
Shift Register
Diagnostic
Code
Title
Time (µs)
Integer or
Floating Point
True
True
False
copy
counter, timer, and control
88 + 2.7W
98 + 5.8W
104 + 3.8W
20
FLL
fill
81 + 2/.1 W
100 + 3.1W
15
counter, timer, and control
97 + 4.4W
BSL
bit shift left
74 + 3.4W
BSR
bit shift right
78 + 3.0W
FFL
FIFO load
54
44
FFU
FIFO unload
68 + 3.2W
46
FBC
file bit compare
75 + 6W
1 mismatch
130 + 6W
2 mismatches
151 + 6W
0 mismatch
71 + 6W
1 mismatch
150 + 6W
2 mismatches
161 + 6W
12
master control
Immediate I/O
IIN
immediate input
57
31
31
18
1
23
local
196
remote
204
16
immediate output
16
local
202
remote
166
SQI
sequencer input
57
14
59
SQL
sequencer load
55
42
47
SQO
sequencer output
77
42
59
JMP
jump
45
15
23
JSR
jump to subroutine
SBR
0 parameters
56
15
23
1 parameter
91
add per parameter
21
RET
LBL
35
return from sub.
0 parameters
48
1 parameter
70
add per parameter
21
label
12
W = number of elements acted on per scan
1 Use the smaller number if all addresses are below word 4096; use the larger number if all addresses are above 4096.
9-12
4477
diagnostic detect
MCR
IOT
Words of
Memory1
611
0 mismatch
Zone Control
Jump and Subroutine
Time (µs)
Floating point
COP
DDT
Sequencer
Time (µs)
Integer
13
1
23
12
3
Chapter 9
Calculating Program Timing
Category
Miscellaneous
Code
Title
Time (µs)
Integer
Time (µs)
Floating point
Time (µs)
Integer or
Floating Point
True
True
False
Words of
Memory1
1
END
end
negligible
negligible
TND
temporary end
negligible
15
AFI
always false
15
13
ONS
one shot
28
30
23
DTR
data transitional
41
41
47
BTD
bit distributor
77
14
611
PID
PID loop control
608
34
59
BTR
block transfer read
BTW
block transfer write
MSG
message
See Block Transfer BTR, BTW chapter
See Message MSG chapter
W=
number of elements acted on per scan
N=
2 x (number of integer file addresses) + 8 x (number of floatingpoint
floating point file addresses) + 6 x (number of timer, counter, or control
file addresses) + ( number of conversions between integer and floating point formats)
1 Use the smaller number if all addresses are below word 4096; use the larger number if all addresses are above 4096.
Program Constants
Use program constants in compare, compute, and file instructions to
improve instruction execution times. Integer constants and floating-point
constants execute in less than 1 µs. Note that if you program using
constants you must edit the program to change the constants. If you
program using data table addresses, you can change the values by simply
changing the value in the data table.
Direct and Indirect Elements
Directly Addressed Elements
Additional execution time for directly addressed elements depends on:
data types
location in memory, referenced to the beginning of all data files (output
file, word 0)
whether data is stored at the source or destination address
whether the instruction converts data
Table 9.P lists times to add to instruction execution times.
9-13
Chapter 9
Calculating Program Timing
Table 9.P
Additional Execution Time Based on Source and Destination Addresses
Data Type
Source
(integer to floating point)
Destination
(floating point to integer)
02K
24K
4K+
02K
24K
4K+
Integer
0
1
2
0
1
2
Floating point
0
3
4
0
3
4
Data conversion
8
9
10
33
34
35
When file addresses (# prefix) in the expression or destination address
contain indirect addresses for file numbers, add:
45 µs
48 µs
48 µs
when the indirect address is integer type
when the indirect address is floating point type
when the indirect address is timer, counter, or control type
When file addresses in the expression or destination contain indirect
addresses for element numbers, add:
45 µs
46 µs
46 µs
when the indirect address is integer type
when the indirect address is floating point type
when the indirect address is timer, counter, or control type
If the file address contains two indirect addresses, add only one value (the
largest). For example, for #F[N7:20][N7:30], add 48 µs (indirect floating
point file address).
Multiply the additional time by the number of elements in the file for any
type of file or file address. For one FAL example:
Expression:
#N[N7:100]/10 * F8:20
add 10 for converting to floating point
add 45 for indirect address
Destination:
#N7:30
add 35 for converting to integer
FAL multiply:
98 + W[42.5 + N + indirect addressing]
N = 2(2) +8 (1) + 6(0) + 10 + 35 = 57
W = 16
Execution time
in ALL mode:
9-14
98 + 16[42.5 + 57 +45]
2410 µs
Chapter 9
Calculating Program Timing
Indirect Bit or Elements Addresses
Additional execution times for indirectly addressed bits and elements
depends on the number of variable (indirect) addresses in the overall
address. Table 9.Q lists the additional times.
Table 9.Q
Additional Execution Times for Indirectly Addressed Bits and Elements
Data Type
Time (µs) for
Variable File or
Element
Time (µs) for
Variable File and
Element
Bit in binary file
57
60
Bit in integer file
60
63
Bit in timer, counter, or control file
64
66
Integer (N)
42
42
Timer, counter, or control file
43
44
Floating point (F)
61
64
Converting integer to floating point
71
77
Converting timer, counter, or control to floating point
85
81
9-15
Chapter
10
Maximizing System Performance
Chapter Objectives
This chapter explains how to calculate throughput and provides methods
for optimizing remote I/O scan time in PLC-5/11, -5/20, -5/30, -5/40,
-5/40L, -5/60, -5/60L, and -5/80 processors.
If you want to read about:
Go to page:
Components of throughput
101
Input and output modules delay
101
I/O backplane transfer
102
Remote I/O scan time
102
Processor time
106
Calculating throughput
106
For information on the time that it
takes the processor to execute a
specific instruction, see chapter 9.
System Design
Determined
Choosing Hardware
Placing System
Hardware
Assigning Addressing
Mode, Racks,
and Groups
Choosing
Communication
Selecting Interrupt
Routines
Transferring Discrete
and Block Data
Calculating Program
Timing
Maximizing System
Performance
Planning Your
System Programs
Components of Throughput
Throughput is the time that it takes for an output to be energized after its
associated input has been energized. You need to consider the following
components when evaluating throughput:
input and output module delay
I/O backplane transfer
remote I/O scan time
processor time
Input and Output
Modules Delay
All input and output modules have a “delay time”—the time that it takes
the module to transfer information to/from the I/O backplane through the
I/O module to/from the field device. Depending on the type of modules
you are using, these delay times vary; but the times must be taken into
account when calculating system throughput. Choose modules that
perform the function that you need with the lowest possible delay times.
10-1
Chapter 10
Maximizing System Performance
I/O Backplane Transfer
The I/O backplane transfer time is the time it takes for the 1771-ASB
adapter module to exchange data with the I/O modules in the same chassis,
generally 1-2 ms for a full I/O rack.
This time is fairly insignificant compared to total system throughput but
can be optimized in situations where there are empty slots or modules that
only use backplane power in the chassis. For example, if the last four slots
of a rack contain a 1785-KA module and power supply (with 2 empty
slots), the 1771-ASB can be configured to ignore those last four slots.
For more information on configuring your ASB module, refer to the 1771
Remote I/O Adapter Module User Manual, publication 1771-6.5.83.
Remote I/O Scan Time
Rack 1
Remote I/O
Buffer
Data Exchange
I/O Image
Table
Read Inputs
Write Outputs
Data
Exchange
x
y
IOT (x)
IIN (y)
Housekeeping
Adapter
Adapter
Rack 2
Immediate I/O
x y
Adapter
Rack 3
The remote I/O scan time is the time it takes for the scanner to
communicate with each device in the remote I/O system.
Processor
Resident
Rack
Remote I/O Scan
Logic
Scan
Program Scan
Three factors that affect the remote I/O scan time are:
communication rate
number of chassis
block transfers
Communication Rate
The baud rate determines the time it takes for the scanner to communicate
with each individual entry in its scan list. Table 10.A lists the amount of
time required to communicate to a device at each communication rate.
10-2
Chapter 10
Maximizing System Performance
Table 10.A
Communication Times at Different Communication Rates
Communication Rate (kbps)
Time (ms)
57.6
10
115.2
7
230.4
3
Note that these are full rack times.
Smaller racks will decrease this time.
If there are four full-rack entries in the scan list, the I/O scan for that
channel at 57.6 kbps is 4 x 10 = 40 ms. If you change the baud rate to
230.4 kbps, the I/O scan decreases to 4 x 3 = 12 ms.
Important: All devices on the network must support the baud rate you
chose and must be within the required cable lengths.
Number of Rack Entries
You determine the total remote I/O scan time in the remote I/O system by
taking the number of rack entries in the scan list and multiplying by the
time per rack at the baud rate that you are using (see Table 10.A). If one
channel has twice as many racks as another, for example, the scan time for
the first channel is twice as long.
To optimize this scan time, divide your I/O racks between multiple
channels. Place your most time-critical I/O on one channel, and nontime-critical I/O on the other channel. Since all I/O channels are
independent, a long remote I/O scan on one channel will not affect the
remote I/O scan on another channel.
Block Transfers
A block transfer is an interruption of the normal remote I/O scan in order
to transfer a block of data to a specific I/O module. Most of the time that
the processor spends in performing the block transfer is for the
handshaking that occurs between the processor and the block-transfer
module; this handshaking is embedded in the discrete I/O transfer and has
no effect on the remote I/O scan. The remote I/O scan is affected when the
actual transferring of data is occurring.
The amount of time that the block transfer interrupts the remote I/O scan
depends on the number of words being transferred and the baud rate:
Communication Rate (kbps)
ms/Word
Overhead (ms)
57.6
.28
3
115.2
.14
2.5
230.4
.07
2
10-3
Chapter 10
Maximizing System Performance
If the communication rate is 115.2 kbps and you want to block transfer 10
words, for example, the interruption of the remote I/O scan is:
(10 x .14) + 2.5 = 1.4 + 2.5 = 3.9 ms
For the particular remote I/O scan in which the block transfer takes place,
3.9 ms will be added to the remote I/O scan time.
Calculating WorstCase Remote I/O Scan Time
Since it is impossible to predict which remote I/O scan a block transfer will
occur within, you can only calculate the worst-case remote I/O scan time.
To calculate the worst case, determine the normal I/O (without block
transfers) then add the time of the longest block transfer to each entry in
the scan list. (The processor can only perform 1 block transfer per entry in
the scan list per I/O scan.)
For example, if your system is:
Rack 1
PLC
BT
BT
10
20
words words
115.2 kbps
Rack 2
No BTs
Rack 3
Worstcase I/O scan:
(3 x 6)
3 racks at 115.2 kbpsnormal I/O scan
+ (20 x .14) + 2.5
longest BT in rack 1
+ 0
no BTs in rack 2
+ (30 x .14) + 2.5
longest BT in rack 2
18 + 5.3 + 0 + 6.7 = 30 ms
BT
30
words
Optimizing Remote I/O Scan Time
The best way to optimize your scan time is to place your most time-critical
I/O on a separate channel from non-critical I/O. If you only have one
channel available for I/O, however, you can still optimize the scanning by
using the processor’s configurable scan list.
In a normal 4-rack system, the scan list would be:
rack 1
rack 2
rack 3
rack 4
If you are using 57.6 kbps, the normal I/O scan is 4 racks x 10ms—40ms.
Each entry is of equal priority, so each rack is scanned every 40 ms.
10-4
Chapter 10
Maximizing System Performance
However, if rack 2 has the most time-critical I/O, use the configurable scan
rack 1
list to specify:
rack 2
rack 3
rack 2
rack 4
rack 2
Using this scan list, rack 2 is scanned every other rack. There are 6 entries,
so the normal I/O scan time is 6 x 10 ms = 60 ms. Since rack 2 is scanned
every other rack, however, the rack 2 effective scan time is 2 x 10 ms =
20 ms. The remaining racks are scanned every 60ms. Thus, the tradeoff
for the more frequent scanning of rack 2 (every 20 ms) means that the
other racks are scanned only every 60 ms.
You can also optimize block transfers within the channel. You block
transfer to only one block transfer module per entry in the scan list per I/O
scan. If you have three block-transfer modules in one I/O rack, it takes a
minimum of three I/O scans to complete the block transfers to all of
the modules:
System Optimized for DiscreteData Transfer
BT BT BT
Maximum scan time
= 3 discrete scans + 1 block transfer
= 3D + 1BT
Adapter
PLC
Adapter
With this arrangement, there is only one block transfer
to each BT module for every 3 discrete I/O scans.
Minimum time to complete
a block transfer to all modules
Adapter
= 3 * (3D + 1BT)
= 9D + 3BT
If you place the three block-transfer modules in different racks, however,
you can block transfer to all three modules in one I/O scan. To optimize
your system layout for block-data transfers, use an arrangement similar
to the following:
System Optimized for BlockData Transfer
Adapter
Adapter
PLC
Adapter
With this arrangement, there is a block transfer
to each BT module every discrete I/O scan.
BT
Maximum scan time
= 3 discrete scans + 3 block transfers
= 3D + 3BT
BT
Minimum time to complete
a block transfer to all modules
BT
= 1 * (3D + 3BT)
= 3D + 3BT
10-5
Chapter 10
Maximizing System Performance
Processor Time
The processor time is the time needed to process the inputs and set the
corresponding outputs. This processor time varies for different processors
and is based on input buffering, program scan, etc.
In a PLC-5 system, both inputs and outputs are buffered between the I/O
image table and the I/O scanner. The movement of inputs from the scanner
to the input buffer is asynchronous to the movement of data from the input
buffer to the input image table. The worst-case processor time is:
Periodic input buffer update
= 10 ms
One program scan to guarantee
inputs received
= xx ms
One program scan to guarantee
outputs received
= xx ms
.18 ms times the number of racks
= xx ms
For a 3-rack system with a 20 ms program scan, the worst-case processor
time is: 10 + 20 + 20 + .54 = 50.54 ms.
Calculating Throughput
Input
Card
Delay
+
To calculate throughput, use the following equation:
I/O Backplane
+
WorstCase
Remote I/O
Scan Time
+
WorstCase +
Processor
Time
WorstCase
Remote I/O
Scan Time
+
An example of a worst-case update time calculation:
Input card delay
= 20 ms (typical)
I/O backplane
= 1 ms
Worstcase remote I/O scan time
= 30 ms
Worstcase processor time
= 50.54 ms
Worstcase remote I/O scan time
= 30 ms
I/O backplane
= 1 ms
Output card delay
= 8.8 ms (typical)
Total
10-6
141.34 ms
I/O Backplane
Output
+ Card
Delay
Appendix
A
Selecting Switch Settings
Chassis Backplane with
Classic PLC5 Processor
Make the following switch selections for Classic PLC-5 processors.
Switch
Last State
1
Always
Off
ON
Outputs of this I/O chassis remain in their last state when
a hardware failure occurs. 1
OFF
Outputs of this I/O chassis are turned off when a
hardware failure occurs. 1
Switches
Addressing
4
5
OFF
OFF
2 -slot
OFF
ON
1 -slot
ON
OFF
1/2 - slot
ON
ON
Not allowed
Switches
6
OFF
7
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
Switch
8
EEPROM Transfer
EEPROM memory transfer to processor memory at powerup. 2
EEPROM memory transfers to processor memory if processor memory
not valid.
EEPROM memory does not transfer to processor memory. 3
RAM Memory Protection
OFF
RAM memory protection disabled.
ON
RAM memory protection enabled. 4
Pressed in
at top ON (closed)
Pressed in
at bottom OFF (open)
1. Regardless of this switch setting, outputs are reset when either of the following occurs:
• processor detects a runtime error
• an I/O chassis backplane fault occurs
• you select program or test mode
• you set a status file bit to reset a local rack
2. If an EEPROM module is not installed and processor memory is valid, the processor's PROC LED indicator blinks,
and the processor sets S:11/9, bit 9 in the major fault status word.
3. A processor fault occurs if processor memory (solid red PROC LED) is not valid.
19309
4. You cannot clear processor memory when this switch is on
A-1
Appendix A
Selecting Switch Settings
Chassis Backplane with
Adapter Module
Make the following switch selections for a 1771-AS, -ASB, or -ALX
adapter module.
Switch
Last State
1
Always
Off
Always
Off
ON
Outputs of this I/O chassis remain in their last state when a communication fault is
detected by this I/O adapter. 1
OFF
Outputs of this I/O chassis are turned off when a comunication fault is detected
by this I/O adapter.
Switch
Processor Restart Lockout
2
ON
Processor can restart the I/O chassis after a communication fault. 2
OFF
You must manually restart the I/O chassis with a switch wired to the
1771AS or ASB.
Switches
Addressing
5
6
OFF
OFF
2slot
ON
OFF
1slot 3
OFF
ON
1/2slot 3
ON
ON
Not allowed
Pressed in at top Closed (ON)
Pressed in at bottom Open (OFF)
1. ATTENTION: If you set this switch to the ON position, when a communication fault is detected, outputs connected to
this chassis remain in their last state to allow machine motion to continue. We recommed that you set switch 1 to
the OFF position to deenergize outputs wired to this chassis when a fault is detected.
Also, if outputs are controlled by inputs in a different rack and a remote I/O rack fault occurs (in the inputs rack), the
inputs are left in their last nonfaulted state. The outputs may not be properly controlled and potential personnel
and machine damage may result. If you want your inputs to be anything other than their last nonfaulted state,
then you need to program a fault routine.
2. Set this switch to ON if you plan to use I/O rack autoconfiguration.
3. The 1771ASB series A adapter does not support 1/2slot addressing.
A-2
19308
Appendix A
Selecting Switch Settings
Chassis Configuration Plug
for Power Supply
Position the configuration plug for the power supply you add to
your chassis.
Y N
USING
POWER SUPPLY
MODULE IN
THE CHASSIS?
Y N
Set Y when you install
a power supply module
in the chassis.
Y N
Set N when you
use an external
power supply.
1.
Locate the chassis configuration plug (between
the first two left most slots of the chassis).
2.
Set the I/O chassis configuration plug.
The default setting is N (not using a power
supply module in the chassis).
IMPORTANT: You cannot power a single I/O chassis
with both a power supply module and an external
power supply.
17075
A-3
Appendix A
Selecting Switch Settings
Remote I/O Adapter Module
1771ASB Series C without
Complementary I/O
Select the switches to determine I/O rack, group, transmission rate, link
response, and scan for your adapter module without complementary I/O.
Pressed in at top Closed (ON)
Pressed in at bottom Open (OFF)
SW–1
O
N
O
F
F
1
2
3
I/O Rack Number
(see next page)
4
5
6
7
8
O
N
O
F
F
1
2
First I/O Group Number
(see below)
Switch
1
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
A-4
on = closed
off = open
SW–2
3
4
5
6
Link Response: ONfor series B emulation
OFFfor unrestricted
2
Maximum Chassis
Distance
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
57.6 Kbps10,000 ft
115.2 Kbps5,000 ft
230.4 Kbps2,500 ft
Not used
Scan: ONfor all but last 4 slots
OFFfor all slots
First I/O Group
Number
7
8
0
on
on
2
on
off
4
off
on
6
off
off
Appendix A
Selecting Switch Settings
Remote I/O Adapter Module (1771ASB Series C) I/O Rack
Numberwithout Complementary I/O
Rack
1
2
3
4
5
6
01
on
on
on
on
on
off
02
on
on
on
on
off
on
03
on
on
on
on
off
off
04
on
on
on
off
on
on
05
on
on
on
off
on
off
06
on
on
on
off
off
on
07
on
on
on
off
off
off
10
on
on
off
on
on
on
11
on
on
off
on
on
off
12
on
on
off
on
off
on
13
on
on
off
on
off
off
14
on
on
off
off
on
on
15
on
on
off
off
on
off
16
on
on
off
off
off
on
17
on
on
off
off
off
off
20
on
off
on
on
on
on
21
on
off
on
on
on
off
22
on
off
on
on
off
on
23
on
off
on
on
off
off
24
on
off
on
off
on
on
25
on
off
on
off
on
off
26
on
off
on
off
off
on
27
on
off
on
off
off
off
PLC5/15 processorsracks 0103;
PLC5/25 processorsracks 0107;
A-5
Appendix A
Selecting Switch Settings
Remote I/O Adapter Module
1771ASB Series C with
Complementary I/O
Select the switches to determine I/O rack, group, transmission rate, link
response, and scan for your adapter module using complementary I/O.
Pressed in at top Closed (ON)
Pressed in at bottom Open (OFF)
S W -1
O
N
O
F
F
1
2
3
4
5
SW–2
6
7
8
O
N
O
F
F
ONPrimary Chassis
OFFComplementary Chassis
I/O Rack Number
First I/O Group Number
Switch
2
3
4
5
6
Link Response: ONfor
series B emulation
1
2
Maximum Chassis
Distance
ON
OFF
57.6 Kbps10,000 ft
OFF
OFF
115.2 Kbps5,000 ft
OFF
ON
ON
ON
230.4 Kbps2,500 ft
not used
OFFfor unrestricted
ONscans for all but 4 last slots
OFFscans for all slots
ONPrimary Chassis
OFFComplementary Chassis
I/O Rack Number
4
5
6
1
on
on
off
2
on
off
on
3
on
off
off
41
off
on
on
51
off
on
off
61
off
off
on
71
off
off
off
1 Valid for PLC5/25 processors only. Only seven racks can be
complemented in a PLC5 system.
A-6
1
For First I/O Group
Number
7
8
0
on
on
2
on
off
4
off
on
6
off
off
Appendix A
Selecting Switch Settings
SW1
Set SW1 switch assembly switches 1 through 6 for the DH+ station
number. Switch 7 is not used. Set switch 8 for scanner or adapter mode.
T op V iew of M odule
Side View
toggle pushed
toward bottom
on (closed)
toggle pushed
toward top
off (open)
12345678
S w itch A ssem bly S W 1
To select:
Set switch:
To:
DH+ Station Number
1 through 6
(see below)
Switch 7 not used
7
off
Scanner mode
8
off
Adapter
8
on
Switch
DH+
Station
Number
1
2
3
4
5
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
Switch
6
DH+
Station
Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
A-7
Appendix A
Selecting Switch Settings
AdapterMode
ProcessorsSW2 in a
PLC5 or Scanner Module
Set SW2 switch assembly switches for an adapter-mode PLC-5 processor
in a PLC-5 processor or scanner module. Set switches 2 through 8 for
number of words communicated from the host processor to the adapter
processor, for the I/O group, and for the rack number of the I/O group of
the adapter processor, respectively. Switch 1 is unused.
Switch Assembly SW2
Bottom View of Module
Side View
toggle pushed
toward bottom
on (closed)
toggle pushed
toward top
off (open)
12345678
1234
Switch Assembly SW3
If you want:
Set switch:
To:
Switch 1 is always unused.
1
off
The host processor to use 8 words to communicate with the adapter PLC5 processor
2
off
The host processor to use 4 words to communicate with the adapter PLC5 processor
2
on
First I/O group to be 0
3
on
First I/O group to be 4
3
off
4 through 8
see table below
Select the I/O rack number of the adapter PLC5 processor
A-8
Rack
4
5
6
7
8
Rack
4
5
6
7
8
01
on
on
on
on
off
15
on
off
off
on
off
02
on
on
on
off
on
16
on
off
off
off
on
03
on
on
on
off
off
17
on
off
off
off
off
04
on
on
off
on
on
20
off
on
on
on
on
05
on
on
off
on
off
21
off
on
on
on
off
06
on
on
off
off
on
22
off
on
on
off
on
07
on
on
off
off
off
23
off
on
on
off
off
10
on
off
on
on
on
24
off
on
off
on
on
11
on
off
on
on
off
25
off
on
off
on
off
12
on
off
on
off
on
26
off
on
off
off
on
13
on
off
on
off
off
27
off
on
off
off
off
14
on
off
off
on
on
Appendix A
Selecting Switch Settings
AdapterMode
ProcessorsSW2 in a
PLC2/20, 2/30, or Sub I/O
Scanner Module System
Set SW2 switch assembly switches for an adapter-mode PLC-5 processor
in a PLC-2/20 or -2/30 processor system or sub I/O scanner module
system. Set switches 2 through 8 for the number of words communicated
from host processor to adapter processor, for the I/O group, and for the
rack number of the I/O group of the adapter processor, respectively.
Switch 1 is unused.
Switch Assembly SW2
Bottom View of Module
Side View
toggle pushed
toward bottom
on (closed)
toggle pushed
toward top
off (open)
12345678
1234
Switch Assembly SW3
If you want:
Set switch:
To:
Switch 1 is always unused.
1
off
The host processor to use 8 words to communicate with the adapter PLC5
2
off
The host processor to use 4 words to communicate with the adapter PLC5
2
on
First I/O group to be 0
3
on
First I/O group to be 4
3
off
4 through 8
see below
Select the I/O rack number of the adapter PLC5 processor
Rack
4
5
6
7
8
01
on
on
on
on
on
02
on
on
on
on
off
03
on
on
on
off
on
04
on
on
on
off
off
05
on
on
off
on
on
06
on
on
off
on
off
07
on
on
off
off
on
A-9
Appendix A
Selecting Switch Settings
AdapterMode
ProcessorsSW2 in a
PLC3 or PLC5/250 System
with 8Word Groups
Set SW2 switch assembly switches for an adapter-mode PLC-5 processor
in a PLC-3 or PLC-5/250 processor system. Set switch 2 for the number of
words communicated from host processor to the adapter processor. Set
switches 3 through 8 for the I/O rack number of the adapter processor.
Switch 1 is unused.
Switch Assembly SW2
Bottom View of Module
Side View
toggle pushed
toward bottom
on (closed)
toggle pushed
toward top
off (open)
12345678
1234
Switch Assembly SW3
If you want:
Set switch:
To:
Switch 1 is always unused.
1
off
The host processor to use 8 words to communicate with the adapter PLC5 processor
2
off
3 through 8
see below
Select the I/O rack number of the adapter PLC5 processor
I/O
Rack
No.
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
20
21
22
23
24
25
A-10
Switch
3
4
5
6
7
8
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
Switch
I/O
Rack
No.
3
4
5
6
7
8
26
27
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
50
51
52
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
Switch
I/O
Rack
No.
3
4
5
6
7
8
53
54
55
56
57
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
Appendix A
Selecting Switch Settings
AdapterMode
ProcessorsSW2 in a
PLC3 or PLC5/250 System
with 4Word Groups
Set SW2 switch assembly switches for an adapter-mode PLC-5 processor
in a PLC-3 or PLC-5/250 processor system. Set switch 2 for the number of
words communicated from the host processor to the adapter processor. Set
switch 3 for I/O group. Set switches 4 through 8 for the I/O rack number
of the adapter processor. Switch 1 is unused.
Switch Assembly SW2
Bottom View of Module
Side View
toggle pushed
toward bottom
on (closed)
toggle pushed
toward top
off (open)
12345678
1234
Switch Assembly SW3
If you want:
Set switch:
To:
Switch 1 is always unused.
1
off
The host processor to use 4 words to communicate with the adapter PLC5 processor
2
on
First I/O group to be 0
3
on
First I/O group to be 4
3
off
4 through 8
see below
Select the I/O rack number of the adapter PLC5 processor
Switch
Switch
I/O Rack
Number
4
5
6
7
8
I/O Rack
Number
4
5
6
7
8
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
A-11
Appendix A
Selecting Switch Settings
SW3
Set SW3 switch assembly switches to terminate either a DH+ link or a
remote I/O link. Switches 3 and 4 are unused.
Bottom View of Module
1234
Side View
toggle pushed
toward bottom
on (closed)
toggle pushed
toward top
off (open)
12345678
Switch Assembly SW3
If the processor is:
A-12
Set switch:
To:
An end device on the remote I/O link
1
on
Not an end device on the remote I/O link
1
off
An end device on the DH+ link
2
on
Not an end device on the DH+ link
2
off
Switch 3 unused
3
off
Switch 4 unused
4
off
Appendix
B
Design Worksheets
Conventions Used in
These Worksheets
The following symbols are printed in the top left corner of the worksheets.
The symbols indicate whether programmers or installers will need the
completed worksheets. Use the symbols as a way of organizing the
completed worksheets for the appropriate user.
indicates a worksheet that provides information for a programmer
indicates a worksheet that provides information for an installer
BOM
indicates a worksheet that provides information for a bill of materials (BOM)
Important: You may need to make multiple copies of some worksheets to
record all of your system requirements.
B-1
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Prepare a Functional Specification
For more information on:
See:
Functional specifications
Classic 1785 PLC5 Programmable Controllers User Manual, publication 17856.2.1, Chapter 1:
Designing Systems
Preparing Your Functional Specification
1.
Divide your manufacturing process into functional areas.
2.
Make a copy of the reverse side of this worksheet for each functional area.
3.
For each functional area, document the following:
Information to Document
4.
B-2
Example(s)
Inputs
Actions and signals, ranges, quantities, timing, tolerance, units of measure, validation
requirements, possible errors, and error responses
Outputs
Quantities, units of measure, timing, tolerances, ranges, validation methods, method
or reporting invalid outputs, locations, methods of data output, physical requirements
Performance requirements
Accuracy; maximum and minimum transition times; interface timing; operator
response timing; adherence to standards such as IEEE, ANSI
Interfaces
Operator, software, hardware
Failure modes and recovery methods
Fault routines
Security requirements
Operator access, alarming, etc.
Maintenance requirements
Documentation, spare parts, accessibility
Use the information on these worksheets to develop a complete functional specification.
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Functional Area:
Inputs:
Outputs:
Performance Requirements:
Interfaces:
Failure Modes and Recovery Methods:
Security Requirements:
Maintenance Requirements:
B-3
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Determine Control Strategy
For more information on:
See:
Control strategy
Remote I/O scanner mode
Extendedlocal I/O scanner mode
Remote I/O adapter mode
Classic 1785 PLC5 Programmable Controllers User Manual, publication 17856.2.1,
Chapter 1:
Designing Systems
Using the Classic PLC5 Processor as a Remote I/O Scanner
Using the Classic PLC5 Processor as a Remote I/O Adapter
Choosing communication
1.
Classic 1785 PLC5 Programmable Controllers Design Manual, publication 17856.2.1,
Chapter 5
Answer the following questions when you begin planning your control strategy:
What will be controlled together?
What will be controlled separately?
Will control devices communicate as peers (network) or in a hierarchy (master/slave)?
B-4
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
What will be controlled via a remote I/O link?
Which processes will be controlled by a classic 1785 PLC-5 processor?
What are the environmental and safety concerns for your system?
2.
Use text and illustrations to lay out and describe your strategy.
B-5
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Identify Chassis Locations
1.
Make a copy of this worksheet for each of your functional areas.
2.
For each functional area, determine the number of chassis by using the table below.
Functional Area:
Category
Each functional area requires at least one chassis.
Number of
Chassis
1
Add an additional chassis for each case where I/O at this functional area require different:
power disconnects
ac phases
logical or functional groupings
Total chassis for this functional area:
3.
B-6
Assign a unique chassis number to each of the chassis, and record all assigned numbers below.
Chassis ______________
Chassis ______________
Chassis ______________
Chassis ______________
Chassis ______________
Chassis ______________
Chassis ______________
Chassis ______________
Chassis ______________
Chassis ______________
Chassis ______________
Chassis ______________
Chassis ______________
Chassis ______________
Chassis ______________
Chassis ______________
Chassis ______________
Chassis ______________
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
BOM
Select Module Types and List I/O Points
For more information on:
See:
Selecting I/O modules
Selecting I/O points
Classic 1785 PLC5 Programmable Controllers User Manual, publication 17856.2.1, Chapter 2:
Selecting I/O Modules
Selecting I/O Adapter Modules
I/O module catalog numbers
Automation Products Catalog, publication AP 100, Section 3:
Input/Output
1.
Make a copy of the reverse side of this worksheet for each of your chassis.
2.
For each chassis, list each discrete, analog, and specialty I/O module and its electrical
characteristics. Use the table below to determine which characteristics to list.
If you choose this type of I/O module:
List these characteristics:
Discrete input module
Voltage
Special requirements:
- Isolation
- Proximity switch
- Source or sink
- Fast response
- TTL
Discrete output module
Voltage
Current
Special requirements:
- Isolation
- Protection (detection of failed triacs)
- TTL
- High current switching
Analog input module
Voltage or current range
Resolution required
Singleended or differential
Special requirements
- Thermocouple
- RTD
- Isolation
Analog output module
Voltage or current range
Resolution required
Special requirements:
- PID
- Isolation
Specialty or communication I/O modules (including block I/O modules)
Voltage or current range
Resolution required
Noise/distance limits
Singleended or differential
Special requirements
- Thermocouple
- RTD
- PID
- Isolation
B-7
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Chassis Number: _____________________
Input or I/O Module Type
Output
B-8
I/O Module
Catalog
Number
Time
Critical
Yes / No
Voltage or
Range
Current
or Range
Number
of Points
Required
Resolution
(analog only)
SingleEnded
or Differential
(analog only)
Special
Requirements
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Total I/O Module Requirements
BOM
1.
Make a copy of this worksheet for each of your chassis.
2.
For each of the I/O modules identified on the chassis’ Select Module Types and List I/O Points
worksheet on pages 7 and 8, perform the following steps to determine the total number that you
need.
3.
In column A, list the module’s catalog number.
4.
In column B, total the number of I/O points for the module.
5.
In column C, enter the maximum number of I/O points available per module.
6.
In column D, calculate the total number of these modules that you will need for this chassis
by dividing column B by column C.
7.
In column E, enter the number of spare modules that you may need for future expansion of
this chassis.
8.
In column F, enter the total number of these modules that you need for this chassis.
Chassis Number: _________________
A
I/O Module Cat. No.
B
Total I/O Points
C
I/O Points / Module
D
E
I/O Modules Required Spare I/O modules
(B / C)
F
Total I/O modules
B-9
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Assign I/O Modules to Chassis and
Assign Addresses
BOM
For more information on:
See:
Assigning I/O modules to chassis
Selecting addressing mode
Assigning addresses
Addressing complementary I/O
Classic 1785 PLC5 Programmable Controllers User Manual, publication 17856.2.1, Chapter 4:
Placing I/O Modules in Chassis
Choosing the Addressing Mode
Assigning Racks
Addressing Complementary I/O
Selecting the I/O chassis
Classic 1785 PLC5 Programmable Controllers Design Manual, publication 17856.2.1, Chapter 2:
Selecting I/O Chassis
Current requirements to I/O modules
Automation Products Catalog, publication AP 100, Section 3:
Input/Output
9.
Make a copy of the reverse side of this worksheet for each of your chassis, and use it to record
your responses to items 2 through 8.
10. Indicate the addressing mode for each chassis. Use the table below to guide your selection.
If the densest I/O module in the chassis is:
And you want to:
8point
Then choose:
2slot addressing
16point
32point
Assign any mix of modules in adjacent module slots
1slot addressing
Make full use of I/O capacity
2slot addressing
Assign any mix of modules in adjacent module slots
1/2slot addressing
Make full use of I/O capacity
1slot addressing
11. Indicate the chassis size. Use the table below to guide your selection.
If you need to:
Reduce spare parts
Fit space requirements
And are:
Then consider:
Expanding your system
Standard size you now use
Installing a new system
One size using the guidelines listed below
Limited to 9 inches
4slot chassis
Limited to 14 inches
8slot chassis
Limited to 19 inches
12slot chassis
Limited to 24 inches
16slot chassis
Minimize scan time
Minimize cost per slot
Accommodate expansion
Largest chassis containing processor
Largest chassis consistent with decisions above
12. Indicate whether a processor or an adapter is in the left-most slot.
13. Indicate whether you are using this chassis for complementary I/O.
14. Write the module type in each available slot on the chassis diagram.
15. Assign rack numbers, group numbers, and number of points per group.
16. Indicate the current requirement for each module.
B-10
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Chassis Number: _________________
Indicate
Chassis
Size:
Processor
1771A1B
4slot chassis
Identify Groups
and I/O Points:
List Current
Required for
Each Module in
this Chassis:
1771A2B
8slot chassis
R___
R___
1slot
1771A3B, or
1771A3B1
12slot chassis
Complementary I/O?
or Adapter
R___
2slot
Addressing Mode:
R___
R___
1/2slot
1771A4B
16slot chassis
Yes, chassis______
R___
No
R___
R___
Slot 1
G ___
00-07
10-17
G __
00-07
10-17
Slot 2
G ___
00-07
10-17
G __
00-07
10-17
Slot 3
G ___
00-07
10-17
G __
00-07
10-17
Slot 4
G ___
00-07
10-17
G __
00-07
10-17
Slot 5
G ___
00-07
10-17
G __
00-07
10-17
Slot 6
G ___
00-07
10-17
G __
00-07
10-17
Slot 7
G ___
00-07
10-17
G __
00-07
10-17
Slot 8
G ___
00-07
10-17
G __
00-07
10-17
Slot 9
G ___
00-07
10-17
G __
00-07
10-17
Slot 10
G ___
00-07
10-17
G __
00-07
10-17
Slot 11
G ___
00-07
10-17
G __
00-07
10-17
Slot 12
G ___
00-07
10-17
G __
00-07
10-17
Slot 13
G ___
00-07
10-17
G __
00-07
10-17
Slot 14
G ___
00-07
10-17
G __
00-07
10-17
Slot 15
G ___
00-07
10-17
G __
00-07
10-17
Slot 16
G ___
00-07
10-17
G __
00-07
10-17
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Total Current Draw for I/O Modules in this Chassis = _____
B-11
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Select Adapter Modules
BOM
For more information on:
See:
Selecting the I/O adapter modules
Classic 1785 PLC5 Programmable Controllers User Manual, publication 17856.2.1, Chapter 2:
Selecting I/O Adapter Modules
17. In column A of the table below, indicate the chassis number in which you will place each
adapter module.
18. In column B, indicate the name/type of each adapter module.
19. In column C, list any special requirements for the adapter module.
20. In column D, indicate the current draw requirements for the adapter module.
A
Chassis Number
B-12
B
Adapter Module
C
Special Requirements
D
Current Draw
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
21. In the table below, list any device other than an adapter module that you are connecting to a
remote I/O link, list its chassis number, and list any special requirements. For example:
PLC-5 processor in adapter mode
PLC-5/250 remote scanner in adapter mode
PLC interface module for digital ac and dc drives
Remote I/O adapter for Bulletin 1336 drives
RediPANEL pushbutton and keypad modules
Dataliner
PanelView (see operator interface)
Option module (for T30 plant-floor terminal)
8600 CNC with remote I/O adapter option
CVIM in adapter mode
Pro-Spec 6000 Fastening System with remote I/O adapter option
1747-DCM module (to SLC-500 rack)
1771-DCM module
1771-GMF robot (remote I/O interface module)
Device
Attached to Chassis Number
Special Requirements
B-13
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Place System Hardware
For more information on:
See:
Determining proper environment
Enclosures
Raceway layout
Cabling and wiring
Mounting
Grounding
Classic PLC5 Programmable Controllers User Manual, publication 17856.2.1, Chapter 3:
Determining the Proper Environment
Protecting Your Processor
Laying Out Your Cable Raceway
Planning Cabling
Laying Out the Backpanel Spacing
Grounding Configuration
Sketch a layout of your system that indicates the following:
proper environment
enclosures
mounting
raceway layout
cabling and wiring
grounding
B-14
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Configure Switch Settings
For more information on:
See:
Configuring switches
Classic PLC5 Programmable Controllers User Manual, publication 17856.2.1, Appendix A
Record switch setting choices on a copy of this worksheet. You might need to return to the worksheet
several times as you complete your system design.
1.
Locate the chassis configuration plug (between the
first two left most slots of the chassis).
2.
Set the I/O chassis configuration plug.
Y N
USING
POWER SUPPLY
MODULE IN
THE CHASSIS?
Y N
The default setting is N (not using a power supply
module in the chassis).
Y N
Set Y when you install
a power supply module
in the chassis.
IMPORTANT: You cannot power a single I/O chassis
with both a power supply module and an external
power supply.
Set N when you
use an external
power supply.
17075
Rack 0 Chassis and Processor Switch Settings
For PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, 5/25 processors:
Processor Chassis
Back Plane Switches
Rack 0
Notes:
O 1
N
O
F
F
2
3
4
5
6
OFF
7
8
Processor Module
Switch SW1
O 1
F
F
O
N
2
3
4
5
ON
6
7
8
Processor Module
Switch SW2
O 1
F
F
O
N
2
3
4
5
Processor Module
Switch SW3
ON
6
7
8
O
F
F
O
N
1
2
3
ON
4
Switches shown in black are not used, but they must be set to the positions indicated.
B-15
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Chassis and Adapter Switch Settings for Remote I/O
OFF
I/O Chassis
Back Plane Switches
Rack______
O 1
N
O
F
F
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
O 1
N
O
F
F
I/O Chassis
Back Plane Switches
Rack______
O 1
N
O
F
F
2
3
4
5
6
O 1
N
O
F
F
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
O 1
N
O
F
F
O 1
N
O
F
F
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
O 1
N
O
F
F
O 1
N
O
F
F
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
O 1
N
O
F
F
O 1
N
O
F
F
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
O 1
N
O
F
F
O 1
N
O
F
F
2
3
4
5
6
6
7
8
2
3
4
5
2
3
4
5
2
3
4
5
2
3
4
5
7
8
O 1
N
O
F
F
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
8
O 1
N
O
F
F
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
O
N
O
F
F
1
2
3
6
7
8
O
N
O
F
F
1
2
3
6
7
8
O
N
O
F
F
1
2
3
OR
6
7
8
O
N
O
F
F
1
2
3
Adapter Module
Switch SW2Series B
6
7
8
O
N
O
F
F
1
2
3
4
Adapter Module
Switch SW2Series B
6
7
8
O
N
O
F
F
1
2
3
4
OR
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
Adapter Module
Switch SW2Series C
O 1
N
O
F
F
4
4
Adapter Module
Switch SW2Series C
O 1
N
O
F
F
4
3
Adapter Module
Switch SW2Series C
O 1
N
O
F
F
4
2
Adapter Module
Switch SW2Series C
O 1
N
O
F
F
OR
Adapter Module
Switch SW2Series B
Note: Switches previously marked in black are not used, but must be set to the positions indicated.
B-16
OR
4
Adapter Module
Switch SW2Series B
Adapter Module
Switch SW2Series C
O 1
N
O
F
F
4
OR
Adapter Module
Switch SW2Series B
Adapter Module
Switch SW1
7
O
N
O
F
F
Adapter Module
Switch SW2Series B
Adapter Module
Switch SW1
I/O Chassis
Back Plane Switches
Rack______
5
Adapter Module
Switch SW1
I/O Chassis
Back Plane Switches
Rack______
4
Adapter Module
Switch SW1
I/O Chassis
Back Plane Switches
Rack______
3
Adapter Module
Switch SW1
I/O Chassis
Back Plane Switches
Rack______
2
Adapter Module
Switch SW1
I/O Chassis
Back Plane Switches
Rack______
Adapter Module
Switch SW2Series B
Adapter Module
Switch SW1
OR
2
3
4
5
6
Adapter Module
Switch SW2Series C
O 1
N
O
F
F
2
3
4
5
6
Adapter Module
Switch SW2Series C
O 1
N
O
F
F
2
3
4
5
6
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Determine Communication Requirements
BOM
For more information on:
See:
Identifying processor connectors/channels
Configuring Channel 0 (serial ASCII port)
Choosing a DH+ link
Classic 1785 PLC5 Programmable Controllers User Manual, publication 17856.2.1,
Chapter 5:
Identifying Classic PLC5 Processor Channels/Connectors
Using Channel 0
Configuring a DH+ Link
Selecting DH+ cabling, layout
Selecting processor connectors/channels cabling
Classic 1785 PLC5 Programmable Controllers Design Manual, publication 17856.2.1,
Chapter 3:
Laying Out Your Cable Raceway
Planning Cabling
Selecting termination resistors
Classic PLC5 Programmable Controllers Design Manual, publication 17856.2.1, Chapter 2:
Selecting Link Terminators
Defining DH+ station addresses
Classic PLC5 Family Programmable Controller Hardware Installation Manual,
publication 17856.6.1
1.
Make a copy of appropriate pages of this worksheet for each of your processors.
2.
Identify communication modes and network selections.
3.
Indicate channel configurations and DH+ station addresses.
4.
List racks attached to each channel/connector configured for remote I/O scanner or adapter mode.
5.
Identify DH+ link cable layout (daisy chain or trunkline/dropline).
B-17
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
6.
Select your data link cables. Circle or highlight your selections in the following tables.
for remote I/O link
for Ethernet link
With this transmission rate:
Select this maximum cable length (1770CD cable):
57.6 kbaud
10,000 ft
115.2 kbaud
5,000 ft
230.4 kbaud
2,500 ft
If you need this:
Select this catalog number:
Thickwire 2.0 m (6.5 ft) transceiver cable
5810TC02/A
Thickwire 15.0 m (49.2 ft) transceiver cable
5810TC15/A
Thinwire transceiver, and 2.0 m (6.5 ft) cable
5810TAS/A (kit)
Thinwire transceiver, and 15.0 m (49.2 ft) cable
5810TAM/A (kit)
Thickwire transceiver, and 2.0 m (6.5 ft) cable
5810TBS/A (kit)
Thickwire transceiver, and 15.0 m (49.2 ft) cable 5810TBM/A (kit)
7.
B-18
Terminate a DH+ or remote I/O link by setting switch assembly 3.
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
PLC5/10 Processor
BATT
COMM
FAULT
PROC
ACTIVE
RUN
FO RCE
REM
R
U
N
P
R
O
G
List information:
BATTERY
IN S T A L L E D
PEER
COMM
IN T F C
List local rack numbers:
1
SH
2
PEER
COMM
IN T F C
PLC5/10
PROGRAMMABLE
CONTROLLER
DH+ Station Address _______________
Record any additional information about your communication mode and network selection.
B-19
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
PLC5/12, 5/15, or 5/25 Processor
SW1 settings
Scanner
Adapter
SW2 rack address setting
First I/O group
Number of words to
transfer
BATT
COMM
FAULT
PROC
R E M I/O
ACTIVE
RUN
FORCE
ADPT
REM
R
U
N
P
R
O
G
List information:
BATTERY
IN S T A L L E D
DH+
List rack numbers (if
configured for scanner):
DH+ Station Address _______________
1
SH
2
DH+
1
SH
2
REM
I/O
PLC5/25
PROGRAMMABLE
CONTROLLER
Record any additional information about your communication mode and network selection.
B-20
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Select a Classic PLC5 Processor
BOM
For more information on:
See:
Selecting a processor
Selecting optional memory modules
Selecting a replacement battery
Classic 1785 PLC5 Programmable Controllers User Manual, publication 17856.2.1,
Chapter 2:
Choosing a Classic PLC5 Processor for Your Application
Selecting Memory Modules
Selecting a Replacement Battery
Selecting a backup system
PLC5 Backup Communication Module User Manual, publication 17856.5.4
8.
Make copies of both sides of this worksheet for each chassis that requires a processor.
9.
For each chassis that requires a processor, use the table below to help you determine which
processor to use.
Total Memory Total Number
Required
of Racks
Total Number
of Chassis
Need a Serial
Port?
Required Program
Scan Time
Total Number
of DH+ Ports
Total Number of
Remote I/O Ports
10. Record your Classic PLC-5 processor choice below.
Classic PLC-5 processor is:
_______________________________
It will reside in chassis no.:
_______________________________
The current required is:
_______________________________
11. Select additional memory for your classic PLC-5 processor. Circle or highlight your selection in
the
table below.
Nonvolatile Memory Backup (EEPROM)
RAM Memory (CMOS)
Words
Catalog Number (and Processor)
Words
Catalog Number (and Processor)
8K
1785MJ (PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, 5/25)
4K
1785MR (PLC5/15 and 5/25)
16 K
1785MK (PLC5/25)
8K
1785MS (PLC5/15 and 5/25)
12. Select a 1770-XY, AA lithium replacement battery for your classic PLC-5 processor.
B-21
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
13. Select a backup system for your classic PLC-5 processor if required. A classic PLC-5 processor
backup system contains two of each of the following hardware components. Indicate your
selections below.
PLC-5 processor module (PLC-5/15 or -5/25 only)
1785-BCM module (for two channels)
1785-BEM module (for two additional channels)
power supply
local chassis
B-22
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Select Power Supplies
For more information on:
See:
Selecting power supplies
Classic 1785 PLC5 Programmable Controllers User Manual, publication 17856.2.1, Chapter 2:
Selecting Power Supplies
Selecting power supply cables Automation Products Catalog, publication AP 100
1.
Make a copy of this worksheet for each of your chassis.
2.
Refer to the following worksheets for the values that you need to complete the formula to select a
power supply.
Assign I/O Modules to Chassis and Assign Addresses worksheet for total I/O current draw
Select Adapter Module or Select Classic PLC-5 Processor worksheet for current draw
3.
Perform the following steps to calculate the total current required for chassis number
____________ and to select a power supply.
On line A below, record the total backplane current draw for all I/O modules in the chassis. If
you leave slots available in your chassis for future expansion, add current draw for future I/O
modules.
On line B below, record the current draw required for the classic PLC-5 processor or the adapter
module in the chassis.
On line C below, record the total current required from a power supply for that chassis.
A—Total I/O backplane current
____________________
B—PLC-5 processor/adapter module current + ____________________
C—Total backplane current required
= ____________________
4.
Choose your power supply dependent on the input voltage requirement and the total backplane
current required (line C above). Two types of power supplies are:
power supply modules—located in the same chassis as the PLC-5 processor or adapter module
power supplies—located external to the chassis containing the PLC-5 processor or adapter
module
5.
Record your power supply and cable choice below.
Power supply for this chassis is:
Cable for this power supply is:
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
Important: You cannot use an external power supply and a power supply module to power the
same chassis; they are not compatible.
B-23
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Choose a Programming Terminal
BOM
For more information on:
See:
Selecting a programming terminal
Selecting cables for a programming terminal
Classic 1785 PLC5 Programmable Controllers User Manual, publication 17856.2.1,
Chapter 2:
Choosing Programming Terminals
Choosing Cables
6.
Make a copy of this worksheet for each of your PLC-5 processors.
7.
Select a programming terminal for your Classic PLC-5 processor __________ located in chassis
number _____________. Circle or highlight your selection in the table below.
8.
B-24
Programming Terminal
Operating System
• 6160T53
• 6160T60
• 6160T70
• DOS 3.2, 3.3, 4.x, 5.0, or 6.0
Select a communication device and cables. Circle or highlight your selection in the table below.
If you have this device:
With this
communication
device:
Use this cable:
PLC5/10,
PLC
5/10, 5/12,
5/12, 5/15,
5/15, or 5/25
5/25
1784 KT, KT2
1784KT,
KT2
1784KL, KL/B
1784CP
1784
CP
1784KTK1
1784CP5
1784PCMK
1784PCM5
6160T60, 6160T70, 6121 IBM PC/AT (or compatible)
1785KE
1784CAK
1784T47, 6123, 6124
IBM PC/XT (or compatible)
1785KE
1784CXK
6120, 6122
1785KE
1784CYK
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Select Programming Terminal Configuration
1.
Make a copy of this worksheet for each of your programming terminals.
2.
Document your software configuration decisions below for your Classic PLC-5 processor
__________ located in chassis number _____________.
DH+ connections:
Local access or remote network access
________________________________
Direct or multi-drop
________________________________
Type of interface card
________________________________
Unique station address assigned to terminal
________________________________
Bit address of KT board in programming terminal
________________________________
B-25
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Select Operator Interface
BOM
For more information on:
See:
Selecting an operator interface
Classic 1785 PLC5 Programmable Controllers User Manual, publication 17856.2.1, Chapter 2:
Selecting an Operator Interface
Select your operator interface using the table that follows.
3.
In column A, list the operator interface station.
4.
In column B, list the required operator interface screens per station.
5.
In column C, describe the information and control requirements for each screen.
6.
In column D, list the reports that you want to generate.
A
Operator Interface
Station
B-26
B
Operator Interface
Screen(s)
C
Information and Control Requirements
D
Reports
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
A
Operator Interface
Station
B
Operator Interface
Screen(s)
C
Information and Control Requirements
D
Reports
B-27
Appendix B
Design Worksheets
Develop Programming Specifications
1.
Use the following table to guide you in developing a programming design specification.
Design Specification Options
Definition
Will you use SFCs?
What fault routines will you use?
B-28
2.
Lay out your data table memory map.
3.
Plan your ladder-logic program.
4.
What testing will you perform?
Index
Numbers
1/2slot addressing, defined, 48
1770-KF2, 512
1770-XY, 213
1771AS adapter module, selection, 24
1771ALX adapter module, selection, 24,
25
1771ASB adapter module, selection, 24
1784KL, 511
1784KT, 511
1785BCM. See backup system
1785-KE, 512
1785-MJ, 213, B21
1785-MK, 213, B21
1785-MR, 213, B21
1785-MS, 213, B21
1785BEM. See backup system
1slot addressing, defined, 46
2slot addressing, defined, 43
A
adapter mode
adapter image file, PLC5/12, 5/15, 5/25
processors, 84
transferring data, 84
block transfers, 87
blocktransfer addressing tips, 88
blocktransfer programming example,
810
default file for discretetransfer data,
84
determining processor status, 86
determining status of supervisory
processor, 86
transferring bits with supervisory
processor, 85
using processor as a remote I/O adapter,
19
adapter modules
1771ALX selection, 24
1771AS selection, 24
1771ASB selection, 24
switch settings, 1771ASB
with complimentary I/O, A6
without complementary I/O, A4
addressing
1slot
blocktransfer module, 46
complementary, 414
defined, 46
1/2slot
complementary, 415
defined, 48
2slot
complementary, 412
defined, 43
assigning rack numbers, 49
complementary I/O, 412
guidelines for selecting addressing
modes, 49
remote I/O racks, 410
selecting modes, 43
B
backpanel spacing, 36
backup memory modules. See EEPROM or
CMOS RAM
backup system
defined, 17
hardware selection, 214
battery, average life, 213
blocktransfer data
adapter mode, 81
adaptermode programming example,
810
addressing, 88
defined, 11
fault routine, 818
programming considerations, 821
programming in adapter mode, 87
queued requests in scanner mode, 817
scannermode programming, 817
sequence
PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, 5/25
processors, 819
with status bits, 820
timing, 95
to local I/O, 817
to remote I/O in scanner mode, 818
blocktransfer modules, complementary I/O
placement, 416
I–2
Index
C
cables
DH+ link, 35
planning cabling, 35
processor to programming terminal,
216
raceway layout, 34
remote I/O link, 215
routing conductors, 35
selection, 215
chassis
backplane switches, with adapter
module, A2
dimensions, 32
selection, 26
CMOS RAM memory, 213
complementary I/O
addressing guidelines, 412
blocktransfer module placement, 416
module placement summary, 416
module selection, 213
placing modules
1/2slot, 415
1slot, 414
2slot, 412
completed, program state, 72
component spacing, 32
concepts, data storage, 67
ControlView
features, 27
selection guidelines, 27
D
daisychain connection, DH+ link, 58
data storage, concepts, 67
data table
addressing formats, 69
I/O image address, 69
indexed address, 69
indirect address, 69
logical address, 69
symbolic address, 69
file defaults, 68
data transfer
I/O backplane transfer time, 102
I/O transfer time, 101
design specification
detailed analysis, 65
program development model, 14
designing systems
centralized control, 12
distributed control, 12
guidelines, 12
programdevelopment model, 14, 61
DH+
terminal direct connection, 510
terminal remote connection, 510
DH+ link
application guidelines, 58
connect to Data Highway, 510
connecting devices to link, 58
connectors, 510
daisychain connection, 58, 59
estimating link performance
internal processing time, 56
message destination, 55
size and number of messages, 54
nodes/timing, 54
planning cabling, 35
token passing, 54
transmission rate, 53
trunkline/dropline connection, 58, 59
dimensions
chassis, 32
power supplies, 37
discrete I/O, 84
discretetransfer data
adapter image file, PLC5/12, 5/15, 5/25
processors, 84
adapter mode, 81, 84
defined, 11
determining status of adaptermode
processor, 86
determining status of supervisory
processor, 86
programming considerations, 821
rack 3 default file, 84
scannermode transfer, 816
timing, 95
transferring bits with supervisory
processor, 85
dropline connection, DH+ link, 58
E
EEPROM memory, 213
enclosures, EMI/RFI protection, 34
environment
cooling, 31
enclosures, 34
operating temperature, 31
relative humidity, 31
spacing chassis, 31
storage temperature, 31
Index
eventdriven interrupts. See PIIs
executing, program state, 72
F
fault routines
as a programming feature, 71
blocktransfer data, 818
change from ladder logic, 79
defined, 73
enabling, 78
how to program, 76710
major fault bits, 74
major fault codes, 74
powerup protection, 710
program flow, 71
recover rack fault, 713
setting up, 78
startup, 710
testing, 78
when to use, 71
faulted, program state, 72
faults
detecting major, 711
processorresident local I/O rack
recovery, 712
processorresident local I/O rack, 711
remote I/O rack, 712
remote I/O rack recovery, 712
frontpanel, PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, 5/25
processors, 52
functional specification
checking for completeness, 15
content of, 14
definition, 13
detailed analysis, 15, 65
planning application programs, 61
program development, 15
datatransfer programming guidelines,
821
DH+ link application, 58
I/O point size selection, 22
I/O selection, 21
operator interface selection, 27
placing I/O modules
by electrical characteristics, 41
complementary, 412
power supply selection, 29
proper environment, 31
system design, 12
when to use interrupt routines, 71
when to use SFCs, 62
H
hardware placement, backpanel spacing,
36
I
I/O group, defined, 42
I/O housekeeping, 93
I/O image address, 69
I/O modules
blocktransfer module placement, 42
cable categories, 35
master/expander modules, 23
placement in chassis, 41
select point size, 22
selection guidelines, 21
I/O racks
defined, 43
processorresident local I/O, 410
relationship to chassis size and
addressing mode, 49
remote I/O, 410
immediate I/O, 95
G
grounding, remote I/O systems, 37
guidelines
adaptermodule selection, 24
addressing mode selection, 49
backup system hardware selection, 214
cable selection, 215
chassis selection, 26
complementary I/O addressing, 412
complementary I/O module selection,
213
I–3
indexed address, 69
indicators, PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, 5/25
processors, 52
indirect address, 69
instruction timing, 97, 101
interrupt routines. See STIs, PIIs, fault
routines, power up routines
I–4
Index
K
keyswitch, location of, PLC5/10, 5/12,
5/15, 5/25 processors, 52
L
ladder programming
preparing programs for your application,
63
creating the program, 65
packaging example, 64
recover from rack fault, 84
logic scan. See program scan
logical address, 69
M
master/expander I/O modules, 23
MCPs, main program for PLC5/10, 5/12,
5/15, 5/25 processors, 63
mounting, I/O chassis dimensions, 36
N
noise protection, 35
O
operator interface
ControlView, 26
Dataliner, 28
PanelView, 26
programming terminals, 28
RediPANEL, 28
selection guidelines, 27
optimizing your system, 101
P
PanelView
features, 27
selection guidelines, 27
PII
program flow, 71
when to use, 71
PLC5 processors
backup memory modules, 213
backup system hardware selection, 214
battery replacement, 213
catalog numbers, 29
configure communications, PLC5/10,
5/12, 5/15, 5/25 processors, 53
data transfer, 81
environment. See environment
protecting with an enclosure, 34
selection chart, 29
switch settings
SW1PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, 5/25
processors, for DH+ and
adapter/scanner mode, A7
SW2PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, 5/25
processors
for adaptermode processor in
PLC5 system, A8
for adaptermode processor in
PLC2/20 system, A9
for adaptermode processor in
PLC5/250 system
4word groups, A11
8word groups, A10
for adaptermode processor in
PLC2/30 system, A9
for adaptermode processor in
PLC3 system
4word groups, A11
8word groups, A10
for adaptermode processor in
scannermode system, A8
for adaptermode processor in sub
I/O scannermodule system,
A9
for adaptermode processor in VME
system, A8
terminate remote I/O link, SW3 for
PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, 5/25
processors, A12
PLC5 processors
applications programs, 63
creating programs, 65
backup system, 17
catalog numbers, 15
centralized control system, 12
common features, 16
data table
addressing formats, 69
file structure and size, 68
distributed control system, 12
features, 16
preparing programs, packaging example,
64
processor status file, 69
remote I/O adapter mode, 19
remote I/O scanner mode, 18
power supplies
chassis switch settings, A3
mounting dimensions, 37
selection, 29212
powerup protection, 710
Index
powerup routine
as a programming feature, 71
when to use, 71
processor
front panel, PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, 5/25,
52
raceway layout, 34
scan time, 106
scanning, 91
processor status, file addresses, 610
processorresident local I/O
defined, 11
rack fault, 711
recovering from rack fault, 712
processorresident local I/O chassis,
defined, 11
program execution, 72
program scan
executing rungs selectively, 93
false versus true logic, 92
introduction to, 91
programming software
define your programming application,
61
features, 71
preparing application programs
creating the program, 64, 65
packaging example, 63
programming terminal
cables, 216
direct connection, 510
remote connection, 510, 511
serial connection, 510, 512
R
ready, program state, 72
remote I/O, scan time, 102
block transfers, 103
calculating, 104
communication rate, 102
number of rack entries in scan list, 103
optimizing, 104
remote I/O adapter mode
defined, 19
transferring data, 81
remote I/O chassis, defined, 11
remote I/O link
cables, 215
defined, 11
devices on link other than adapter
module, 25
planning cabling, 35
I–5
rack fault, 712
recovering from rack fault, 712
remote I/O scanner mode, defined, 18
routing guidelines, 35
S
scan time, calculating, 106
scanner mode
blocktransfer sequence
PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, 5/25
processors, 819
with status bits, 820
transferring data
block transfer, 817
queued requests, 817
to local I/O, 817
to remote I/O, 818
discrete data, 816
using processor as a remote I/O scanner,
18
scanning
discretetransfer data
to processorresident I/O, 94
to remote I/O, 94
introduction to, 91
sequential function charts. See SFCs
SFCs
application example, 63
as a processor feature, 16
control tasks, 61
defined, 61
programming considerations, 63
sample chart, 62
transitions, 61
when to use, 62
site preparation
conductor categories, 35
raceway layout, 34
routing conductors, 35
status file, processor, 69
STI
program flow, 71
when to use, 71
subprogram calls, as a processor feature.
See SFCs
switch settings
adapter module
1771ASB with complementary I/O,
A6
1771ASB without complementary I/O,
A4
I–6
Index
chassis backplane, with PLC5 processor,
A1
chassis configuration plug, for power
supply, A3
SW1 for PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, 5/25
processor, for adaptermode
processor, in PLC2/20 system, A9
SW1 for PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, 5/25
processors
for adaptermode processor
in PLC5 system, A8
in PLC2/30 system, A9
in PLC3 system 4word groups,
A11
in PLC3 system 8word groups,
A10
in PLC5/250 system 4word groups,
A11
in PLC5/250 system 8word groups,
A10
in scannermode system, A8
in sub I/O scannermodule system,
A9
in VME system, A8
for DH+ and adapter/scanner mode,
A7
SW3 for PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, 5/25
processors, terminate link, A12
symbolic address, 69
system layout
backpanel, 36
environment, 31
protecting processor, 34
T
terminate link, switch setting SW3,
PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15, 5/25
processors, A12
throughput
calculating, 106
components of, 101
defined, 101
I/O backplane transfer time, 102
I/O transfer time, 101
processor scan time, 106
remote I/O scan time, 102
timedriven interrupts. See STIs
timing
See also throughput
blocktransfer data
during logic scan, 95
to processorresident I/O, 96
to remote I/O, 96
calculating, 106
direct elements, PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15,
5/25 processors, 913
discretetransfer data
during I/O scan, 95
to processorresident I/O, 94
to remote I/O, 94
I/O scan, 93
indirect elements, PLC5/10, 5/12, 5/15,
5/25 processors, 913
instruction, bit and word for PLC5/10,
5/12, 5/15, 5/25 processors, 98
instructions, 101
program constants, 913
program scan, 91
I/O scan housekeeping, 91
immediate I/O, 95
transmission rates, DH+ link, 54
trunkline/dropline connection, DH+ link,
58
U
understanding terms
blocktransfer data, 11
discretetransfer data, 11
processorresident local I/O chassis, 11
processorresident local I/O, 11
remote I/O chassis, 11
remote I/O link, 11
W
waiting, program state, 72
Compaq is a registered trademark of Compaq Computer Corporation.
Ethernet is a registered trademark of Digital Equipment Corporation, Intel, and Xerox Corporation.
HP 9000 is a trademark of HewlettPackard Company.
IBM and IBM PC AT are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation.
IBM PS/2 is a trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.
MicroVAX and DECnet are registered trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation.
MSDOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft.
PLC, PLC2, PLC3, and PLC5 are registered trademarks of AllenBradley Company, Inc.
PLC5/250, Pyramid Integrator, Data Highway Plus, CVIM, and INTERCHANGE are trademarks of AllenBradley Company, Inc.
AllenBradley has been helping its customers improve productivity and quality for 90 years.
AB designs, manufactures and supports a broad range of control and automation products
worldwide. They include logic processors, power and motion control devices, manmachine
interfaces and sensors. AllenBradley is a subsidiary of Rockwell International, one of the
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With major offices worldwide.
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Publication 1785-6.2.1—April 1996
PN 955125-29
Supersedes Publication 1785–6.2.1—May 1995, Publication 1785-5.2–February 1994
30
Copyright 1996 Allen-Bradley Company, Inc. Printed in USA
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