Portable Power Tools Safety Compliance & Training Gameplan

Portable Power Tools Safety Compliance & Training Gameplan
Portable Power Tools Safety Compliance & Training Gameplan
These are just a few of the common injuries workers can suffer when they use portable power tools like
drills, nail guns, chain saws and sanders. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, power tool
accidents account for 400,000 emergency room visits per year. Many of these accidents can and should be
prevented.






Electrocution;
Eye injury;
Severed tendons;
Laceration;
Amputation;
Puncture.
OSHA rules specify that employers are “responsible for the safe condition of tools and equipment” that
their workers use, including the personal tools and equipment that workers furnish for themselves. Click
here to find out about OSHA portable power tool safety requirements.
This Program sets out a strategy you can implement over a 30-day period to protect your workers from
power tool injuries and ensure that your workplace complies with OSHA portable power tool safety
requirements.
Defining Our Terms
Most workplaces contain a large variety of different tools. This Program addresses the class of tools:
known as portable power tools:
 Power tools, as opposed to hand tools, are operated with external power such
as electric, pneumatic, liquid fuel, hydraulic, and powder actuated;
 Portable, as opposed to stationary power tools, are those that workers can
easily carry from one location to another.
Step One: Perform Hazard Assessment (Day 1-5)
The first step in controlling portable power tool hazards is to conduct a hazard assessment. Methods to
use include:
 Identifying all the different portable power tools used at your workplace,
including personal tools that are owned by the worker;
 Inspecting each of those tools;
 Observing workers as they use those tools to ensure they follow safe work
practices and use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE);
 Interviewing workers and supervisors who work with portable power tools;
1
 Reviewing written records of worker complaints or safety committee
recommendations involving portable power tool safety; and
 Reviewing OSHA 300 Logs, workers’ comp claims, first aid records, incident
reports and other materials that may reveal power tool injury patterns or
trends.
Implementation Strategy: In carrying out your hazard assessment, be on the lookout for the risk factors
that commonly cause power tool injuries, including:







Improper tool design or construction;
Careless or improper use of the tool;
Using the wrong tool for the job;
Failure to wear suitable PPE when using the tool;
Failure to maintain the tool in safe condition;
Improper grounding of electric power tools;
Failure to store tools in a safe location or manner.
Tools & Implementation
* See “Legal Briefing: OSHA Portable Power Tools Rules” to find out what power tool safety measures
OSHA requires
* Use the “Power Tool Safety Self-Assessment Checklist” to carry out your hazard assessment;
* See “15 Questions to Ask to Determine Compliance with OSHA Tool Safety Rules” for further
guidance on hazard identification and assessment.
Step Two: Select Safety Controls (Day 6-15)
Next, select appropriate measures to manage the hazards you identify in your assessment. General
approach:
First Choice: Elimination: If it’s reasonably practicable, totally eliminate the hazard, e.g., by ending use
of power tools at your workplace and/or eliminating jobs that require workers to use such tools.
Second Choice: Management & Control: Eliminating power tool use won’t be a realistic option for
most employers. If elimination isn’t reasonably practicable and you have to let workers use dangerous
portable power tools to do their jobs, you must take measures to control or minimize hazards.
Level 1: Engineering Controls: Start with engineering controls, i.e., measures affecting the portable
power tool’s:




Design;
Construction;
Components and materials; and
Safety features, including guards, switches and insulation.
2
Level 2: Work/Administrative Controls: The next layer of hazard control is use of “work” or
“administrative controls affecting how power tool work is actually carried out. At a minimum, you must
develop and implement safe work procedures for use of portable power tools. Such procedures should
address:
 Transport and Handling: Tools shouldn’t be carried by the cord or hose and be
disconnected by pulling the cord gently from the receptacle by the plug end
and not the cord itself;
 Proper Use: Require operators to use tools in accordance with manufacturer’s
instructions and company safety procedures and steer clear of any distracting
activities during use;
 Work Area Restrictions: Require workers to operate their tools in work areas
with a level surface and adequate lighting and that are dry and free of
explosive or combustible materials;
 Use of PPE: Require operators and nearby workers to use the appropriate PPE
(which we’ll discuss below);
 Clothing Restrictions: Workers must dress and groom themselves safely when
operating power tools. Examples:
o Long-sleeve shirts and pants to protect limbs from sharp flying debris
during cutting operations;
o No loose clothing or jewelry that can get caught in the tool’s moving
parts;
o Long hair must be tied back or confined;
 Electrical: Electrical tools must be properly grounded, insulated and kept away
from damp and wet conditions;
 Disconnection: Tools should be disconnected when they’re not in use;
 De-Energization for Servicing: Power tools must be totally de-energized during
servicing or maintenance operations like changing blades or tips.
o Most power tools are “cord and plug,” i.e., and can be completely deenergized by unplugging them from the outlet;
o Tools that can’t be de-energized by pulling the plug should be deenergized in accordance with your company’s lockout/tagout procedure;
 Inspection: All power tools, including the personal tools that workers bring to
work. Your workers should be trained to inspect all tools before and after each
use, looking for defects or damage. Any tool that malfunctions or appears
damaged when inspected should be tagged out and placed in an area where it
can’t be accidentally used by another worker;
 Maintenance: Tools must be properly maintained in accordance with
manufacturer’s instructions;
 Storage: Tools and cords should be stored in clean, dry places that are free of
sharp edges, corrosive chemicals, heat or environmental conditions that can
damage the tool or its safety features;
Level 3: PPE & Protective Equipment: PPE is necessary for most portable power tools. Specific PPE
required varies depending on tool and operation but may include hard hats, eye and face protection,
hearing protection and gloves.
3
General Implementation Strategy: Engineering, work controls and PPE are not mutually exclusive, i.e.,
not either-or, and should be used in combination with each other.
Tools & Implementation
* See “How to Use Engineering Controls to Manage Portable Power Tool Hazards” for step-by-step
instructions in selecting engineering controls;
* Use the “Power Tool Safety Measures Checklist” to select appropriate engineering controls;
* See “How to Create Portable Power Tool Safe Work Practices” to find out how to create general safe
work procedures for use of portable power tools;
* Use the “Model Portable Power Tools Safety Policy” to create safe work procedures and policies for
your workplace;
* See the Section below for guidance on creating safe work procedures for particular types of power tools;
* Use the Models in the Section below to create actual safe work procedures for particular types of power
tools.
Implementation Strategies for Different Types of Portable Power Tools
In addition to the general tool safety measures above, you need to take steps to control hazards associated
with six particular types of portable power tools:
1. Portable Circular Saws
Saw blades must be fitted with particular kinds of guards and tools must have certain kinds of switches
and safety devices. There are different technical requirements for:
 Portable, power-driven circular saws with blades greater than 2 inches in diameter;
 Hand-held powered circular saws with blades greater than 2 inches in diameter;
 Electric, hydraulic or pneumatic chain saws and percussion tools without positive accessory
holding means;
 Hand-held powered drills, tappers, fastener drivers, horizontal, vertical and angle grinders with
wheels greater than 2 inches in diameter;
 Portable belt sanding machines.
2. Pneumatic Tools
Pneumatic powered tools must have an installed tool retainer and hoses and hose connections used to
transmit compressed air must be able to withstand the air pressure and workloads to which they’re
subjected.
3. Abrasive Wheels
Portable abrasive wheels (and other portable grinding machines) must have appropriate safety and/or
wheel guards and be properly mounted and inspected.
4
4. Explosive Actuated Fastening Tools
Explosive actuated fastening tools, i.e., tools that use explosives or similar methods to propel a stud, pin,
fastener or other object (not counting devices for attaching objects to soft construction materials like
wood, plaster, tar or dry wallboard or stud-welding equipment) must:
 Have designated safety features (depending on type of tool);
 Be safely loaded, aimed, fired and used; and
 Be properly inspected and maintained.
5. Power Lawnmowers
Power lawnmowers must meet specific design, marking, use and maintenance requirements depending on
whether the lawnmower is a walk-behind, riding-rotary or reel powered.
6. Jacks
Powered jacks, i.e., devices used to lift or horizontally move loads by applying a pushing force, must
meet specific requirements covering loading, marking, operation and maintenance depending on whether
the jack is a lever-and-ratchet, screw or hydraulic device.
Tools & Implementation
* See “How to Comply with OSHA Circular Saw Safety Rules” to ensure proper guarding of circular
saws;
* Use the “Model Circular Saw Safety Use Policy” to create your own circular saw safety procedures;
* See “How to Comply with OSHA Hand-Held Power Drill Requirements” to ensure safe use of hand
drills;
* Use the “Model Hand-Held Power Drill Policy” to create your own hand drill safety procedures;
* See “How to Comply with OSHA Hand-Held Grinder Requirements” to ensure safe use of grinders;
* Use the “Model Hand-Held Grinder Safety Use Policy” to create your own grinder safety procedures;
* See “How to Comply with OSHA Portable Belt Sanding Machine Requirements” to ensure safe use of
portable sanders;
* Use the “Model Circular Portable Belt Sanding Machine Use Policy” to create your own sander safety
procedures;
* See “How to Ensure Safe Use of Chainsaws” to find out how to prevent injuries and OSHA violations;
* Use the “Model Chainsaw Use Policy” to create your own chainsaw safety procedures;
* See “How to Comply with OSHA Portable Abrasive Wheel Requirements” to ensure safe use of
portable abrasive wheels;
* Use the “Portable Abrasive Wheel Safety Policy” to create your own portable grinding wheel safety
procedures;
* See “How to Comply with OSHA Explosive Actuated Fastening Tools Requirements” to ensure safe
use of power actuated tools;
5
* Use the “Model Safe Work Procedure for Explosive Actuated Fastening Tools” to create your own
power actuated tool safety procedures;
* See “How to Comply with OSHA Power Lawnmower Requirements” to ensure safe use of power
mowers;
* Use the “Model Safe Work Procedure for Power Lawnmowers” to create your own power mower safety
procedures;
* See “How to Comply with OSHA Jack Requirements” to ensure safe use of portable powered jacks;
* Use the “Model Safe Work Procedure for Power Jacks” to create your own power jacks safety
procedures
Step Three: Provide Portable Power Tool Safety Training (Day 16-20)
The next step is to provide safety training to workers who operate portable power tools. Such training
should cover 8 things, at a minimum:








The different types of portable tools that workers use;
The hazards posed by each of these tools;
How to select the right power tool for a job;
How to set up the work area when using power tools;
Safe work procedures for using different kinds of power tools;
What PPE to use when operating power tools;
How to inspect power tools; and
How to care for and store power tools.
Implementation Strategy: Use the SafetySmart training programs and resources, including the samples
listed in the box below, to deliver effective and legally compliant portable power tool safety training to
your workers.
Also keep in mind that simply providing training isn’t enough. You must also ensure that workers
actually understand and are capable of applying their training on the job. Methods of verifying the
effectiveness of training include:
 Quizzing workers on the lesson after you deliver it (note that quizzes are
included in all of the SafetySmart “Meeting Kits” and e-Learning courses listed
in the box below);
 Making workers demonstrate the safe work procedures covered during the
training;
 Making workers demonstrate proper use of the PPE covered during the
training; and
 Observing workers operate power tools to ensure they’re actually following
their training on the job.
Tools & Implementation
6
For onsite training, use one or more of the following resources:
* Meeting Kit: Using Portable Electric Tools Safely;
* Meeting Kit: Sharpen Your Tool Safety Sense;
* Meeting Kit: Power Tools Are Not Toys;
* Meeting Kit: No-Fault Electrical Equipment;
* Meeting Kit: Chainsaws Can Be Friend or Foe;
* Meeting Kit: Grinders Pose High-Speed Danger;
* Meeting Kit: Great Guns! Powder Actuated Power Tools Are Dangerous;
* Meeting Kit: Pneumatic Nailers;
* Meeting Kit: Compressed Air Is Dangerous;
* Meeting Kit: Use Jacks Safely
(Note: Meeting Kits include all the resources about a topic needed to deliver on-site training, including
Leader Sheets, Handouts, PowerPoints and Quizzes)
For online training, assign the following e-Learning courses:
* Basic Electrical Safety Course
* Chainsaw Safety—Oil and Gas Course;
* Hand and Power Tool Safety—Cal/OSHA;
* Hand and Power Tool Safety;
* Hand and Power Tools for Oil and Gas Personnel;
For video training, use SafetySmart’s videos:
* Interactive Safety Video: Hand and Power Tools;
* Video: Basic Electrical Safety;
* Video: Basic Electrical Safety (Spanish);
* Hand & Power Tool: Construction Safety Video;
To document power tool safety training, use the:
* Model OSHA Training Log to document that safety training was provided and what it covered; and
* Model OSHA Training Verification Form to document that you ensured that the training was effective.
Step Four: Inspect, Monitor, Reinforce and Improve Your Portable Power Tool Safety Measures
(Day 21-30 and forever after)
The final step of the Program is to monitor your controls to ensure they’re effective and determine
whether adjustments or corrective actions are necessary. Monitoring must be carried out on an ongoing
and continuous basis. So even though we “schedule” it as starting on Day 21 and ending on Day 30, the
monitoring process never ends. Monitoring should be done on a regular basis, e.g., as part of monthly
work inspections and scheduled safety audits, and in response to red flags like:
 Worker complaints;
 Incident and injuries;
7
 Significant changes to power tool operations etc. that weren’t accounted for
or anticipated in the previous hazard assessment.
Implementation Strategy: One of the key parts of monitoring is to implement a program for inspecting
and maintaining power tools at appropriate intervals. For Best Results, combine this Calendar with your
regular preventive maintenance and inspection schedule for portable powered tools covered.
TRIGGER
Accidents, injuries,
illnesses or near misses
involving power tools
MONTHLY AT LEAST
YES
NO
TASK
[ ] Review and verify adequacy of current
safety procedures for affected tool
[ ] Review and verify adequacy of current
training for workers using, servicing or
maintaining tool
[ ] Provide new, refresher or re-training if
necessary
[ ] Implement any other necessary
corrective actions
Comments:
Changes in procedures
for use of tools
[ ] Review and verify adequacy of current
safety procedures for affected tool
[ ] Review and verify adequacy of current
training for workers using, servicing or
maintaining tool
[ ] Provide new, refresher or re-training if
necessary
[ ] Implement any other necessary
corrective actions
Comments:
Changes in
service/maintenance
procedures for tools
[ ] Review and verify adequacy of current
safety procedures for affected tool
[ ] Review and verify adequacy of current
training for workers using, servicing or
maintaining tool
[ ] Provide new, refresher or re-training if
necessary
[ ] Implement any other necessary
corrective actions
8
Comments:
Changes in tools or tool
equipment
[ ] Review and verify adequacy of current
safety procedures for affected tool
[ ] Review and verify adequacy of current
training for workers using, servicing or
maintaining tool
[ ] Provide new, refresher or re-training if
necessary
[ ] Implement any other necessary
corrective actions
Comments:
New worker assigned
job involving use of
tools
[ ] Make sure worker has adequate training
to use tool safely
[ ] Furnish new or refresher training if
training is inadequate
Comments:
Current worker assigned
job involving use of
tools he/she hasn’t been
required to use
previously
[ ] Make sure worker has adequate training
to use tool safely
[ ] Furnish new or refresher training if
training is inadequate
Comments:
Outside contractor(s)
assigned to use tools
[ ] Notify contractor of your safe work
procedures for use of tool
[ ] Get notification by contractor of its
own safe work procedures for tool
[ ] Ensure that your workers who use tool
understand and comply with contractor’s
safe work procedure OR
[ ] Ensure that contractor’s workers
understand and comply with your
procedures for use of tool
[ ] Verify that contractor’s workers are
properly trained to use tool
Comments:
9
Other indications give
you reason to believe
workers don’t have
adequate training in use
of tools
[ ] Review and verify adequacy of
worker’s training
[ ] Provide worker training, re-training or
refresher training, as needed
[ ] Certify training
Comments:
Tools returned to service
after repairs made
BEFORE TOOL IS USED, INSPECT
TOOL and PARTS TO VERIFY:
[ ] Repairs conform to manufacturer’s
instructions
[ ] Tool is once more fit for service
Comments:
Jack(s) was sent out of
shop for special work, or
subject to abnormal load
or shock
IMMEDIATELY AFTER TRIGGER &
IMMEDIATELY BEFORE RE-USE:
[ ] Inspect jack to verify repairs conform
to manufacturer’s instructions
[ ] Inspect repair or replacement parts for
defects
[ ] Tag any parts found to be defective and
remove them from service
Comments:
TRIGGER
At least once every 6
months
SEMI-ANNUALLY (AT LEAST)
YES
NO
TASK
[ ] Thoroughly inspect jack(s) for constant
or intermittent use at one place
Comments:
TRIGGER
At least once a year
ANNUALLY (AT LEAST)
YES
NO
TASK
[ ] Inspect all portable power tools
[ ] Certify inspection
[ ] Review and verify adequacy of current
safe work procedures for tools
[ ] Provide necessary re-training or
refresher training to workers that use tool
[ ] Certify training
[ ] Implement any other necessary
corrective actions
10
Comments:
Tools & Implementation
* Use the “Workers’ Portable Power Tools Safety Questionnaire” and “Supervisors’ Portabe Power Tools
Safety Questionnaire” to determine if lsafety measures are working;
* Use the “Model Power Tool Incident Investigation Form” to investigate tool injuries and incidents;
* Use the “Corrective Actions Form” to determine how to modify and improve tool safety measures.
Final Word…
Remember that most power tool injuries are preventable. Following the steps of this Plan will enable you
to correct the common problems that lead to incidents and help you pass OSHA inspections and avoid
citations and fines for violating OSHA portable power tool safety requirements.
Need help? Call us anytime to discuss how SafetySmart can help your company improve its power and
hand tool safety program.
Success programs are a tool to improve safety program success. Use of a success program does not
guarantee compliance or elimination of all safety-related liabilities. Every organization’s compliance and
training needs differ. SafetySmart and its employees, managers, owners, and other related parties are not
liable for any criminal or civil liability, damages, or other negative outcome arising from the use of a
success program.
11
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement