Radio Shack Pro-2035 Owner`s manual

PRO-2035 1000-Channel Programmable Home Scanner
(200-0460)
Action Bands
Faxback Doc. # 16916
United States Broadcast Bands
In the United States, there are several broadcast bands. The standard AM
and FM bands are probably the most well known, and you can monitor the FM
band on the scanner. There are also four television audio broadcast bands
- the lower three transmit on the VHF band and the fourth transmits on the
UHF band. You can monitor all three of the VHF bands and the UHF band.
Frequency Range
54.0
76.0
88.0
174.0
470.0
- 72.00 MHz
- 88.00 MHz
- 108.00 MHz
- 216.00 MHz
- 805.75 MHz
Allocation
VHF Television
VHF Television
Standard FM
VHF Television
UHF Television
International Broadcast Bands
Several shortwave bands are allocated for international broadcasting
because of the nature of propagation of high frequencies. The bands are
sometimes identified according to the approximate wavelength of the signals
in meters.
Frequency Range
(in MHz)
25.60 - 26.10
Band
(in meters)
11
Typical Band Usage
HF Band (3.00-30.0 MHz)
Mid Range, Citizens Band ....................... (25.00 - 28.00 MHz)
10-Meter Amateur ............................... (28.00 - 29.70 MHz)
VHF Band (30.00-300.0 MHz)
Low Range .............................. ........ (29.70 - 50.00
6-Meter Amateur ................................ (50.00 - 54.00
FM-TV Audio Broadcast, Wide Band ............... (54.00 - 72.00
Land Mobile Service ............................ (72.00 - 76.00
FM-TV Audio Broadcast, Wide Band ............... (76.00 - 88.00
FM Radio Broadcast, Wide Band ................. (88.00 - 108.00
Aircraft ..................................... (108.00 - 136.98
U.S. Government .............................. ( 137.00 - 144.00
2-Meter Amateur .............................. (144.00 - 148.00
High Range ................................... (148.00 - 174.00
FM-TV Audio Broadcast, Wide Band ............. (174.00 - 216.00
New Mobile Narrow Band ....................... (220.00 - 222.00
1 1/4-Meter Amateur .......................... (222.00 - 225.00
Military Aircraft ............................ (225.00 - 287.80
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
UHF Band (300.00 MHz-3.0 GHz)
Military Aircraft .... ........................
U.S. Government ..............................
70-Centimeter Amateur ........................
Low Range ....................................
(311.00
(406.00
(420.00
(450.00
-
384.00
450.00
450.00
470.00
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
FM-TV Audio Broadcast, Wide Band ............. (470.00 - 806.00
Public Service ............................... (806.00 - 823.98
Conventional Systems ......................... (851.00 - 856.00
Conventional/Trunked Systems . ................ (856.00 - 861.00
Trunked Systems .............................. (861.00 - 866.00
Public Safety ................................ (866.00 - 869.00
High Range ................................... (894.01 - 902.00
33-Centimeter Amateur ........................ (902.00 - 928.00
Private Trunked .............................. (935.00 - 940.00
General Trunked .............................. (940.00 - 941.00
Fixed Services ....................... ........ (941.00 - 944.00
Studio-to-Transmitter Broadcast Links ........ (944.00 - 952.00
Private Fixed Services, Paging ............... (952.00 - 960.00
Aeronautical Navigation ..................... (960.00 - 1240.00
23-Centimeter Amateur ...................... (1240.00 - 1300.00
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
MHz)
Primary Usage
As a general rule, most of the radio activity is concentrated on the
following frequencies:
VHF Band
Activities
Government, Police, and Fire
Emergency Services
Railroad
Frequencies
153.785 - 155.980 MHz
158.730 - 159.460 MHz
160.000 - 161.900 MHz
UHF Band
Activities
Frequencies
Land-Mobile Paired Frequencies
Base Stations
Mobile Units
Relay Repeater Units
Remote Control Stations
NOTE:
450.000 - 470.000 MHz
451.025
456.025
460.025
465.025
-
454.950
459.950
464.975
469.975
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
Remote control stations and mobile units operate at 5 MHz higher
than their associated base stations and relay repeater units.
FREQUENCY CONVERSION
The tuning location of a station can be expre ssed in frequency (kHz or MHz)
or in wavelength (meters). The following information can help you make the
necessary conversions.
1 MHz (million)=1,000 kHz (thousand)
To convert MHz to kHz, multiply by 1,000.
(9.62 MHz x 1000 = 9620 kHz)
To convert from kHz to MHz, divide by 1,000.
(2780 kHz divided by 1000 = 2.780 MHz)
To convert MHz to meters, divide 300 by the number of megahertz.
(300 divided by 7.1 MHz = 42.25 meters)
PRO-2035 1000-Channel Programmable Home Scanner
(200-0460)
Care and Maintenance
Faxback Doc. # 16918
The Radio Shack PRO-2035 1000-Channel Programmable Home Scanner is an
example of superior design and craftsmanship. The following suggestions
will help you care for the scanner so you can enjoy it for years.
Keep the scanner dry. If it gets wet, wipe it dry immediately.
Liquids can contain minerals that can corrode the electronic circuits.
Use and store the scanner only in normal temperature environments.
Temperature extremes can shorten the l ife of electronic devices and
distort or melt plastic parts.
Handle the scanner gently and carefully. Dropping it can damage
circuit boards and cases, and can cause the scanner to work improperly.
Keep the scanner away from dust and dirt , which can cause premature
wear of parts.
Wipe the scanner with a damp cloth occasionally to keep it looking
new. Do not use harsh chemicals, cleaning solvents, or strong
detergents to clean it.
Modifying or tampering with the scanner's internal components can cause a
malfunction and might invalidate its warranty and void your FCC
authorization to operate it. If the scanner is not operating as it should,
take it to your local Radio Shack store for assistance.
PRO-2035 1000-Channel Programmable Home Scanner
(200-0460)
Connecting Optional Equipment
Faxback Doc. # 16912
CONNECTING AN EXTERNAL SPEAKER
You can connect an optional external speaker with a 1/8 -inch plug to the
scanner. Use an 8-ohm external speaker capable of handling over 2.5 watts
of power (such as Radio Shack Cat. No. 21 -549).
Insert the speaker's plug into the EXT SPKR jack on the back of the
scanner.
NOTE:
Plugging in an external speaker disconnects the scanner's internal
speaker.
CONNECTING HEADPHONES
You can connect an optional pair of headphones with a 1/8 -inch plug to the
scanner. Use monaural headphones (such as Radio Shack Cat. No. 20 -210).
Insert the headphones' plug into the headphone jack on the front of the
scanner.
NOTE:
Plugging in headphones disconnects the scanner's internal speaker.
Listening Safely
To protect your hearing, follow these guidelines when you use headphones.
Set OFF/VOLUME to the lowest setting before you begin listening.
put on the headphones, adjus t OFF/VOLUME to a comfortable level.
Do not listen at extremely high volume levels.
listening can lead to permanent hearing loss.
After you
Extended high -volume
Once you set OFF/VOLUME, do not increase it. Over time, your ears adapt to
the volume level, so a vol ume level that does not cause discomfort might
still damage your hearing.
CONNECTING A TAPE RECORDER
You can connect an optional tape recorder to your scanner to record
transmissions. To record from the scanner, you need a tape recorder with a
microphone jack (such as Radio Shack Cat. No. 14 -1151). Also, you need a
connecting cable with a phono plug and a 1/8 -inch plug (such as Cat. no.
42-2461).
1.
Insert the connecting cable's phono plug into the TAPE OUT jack on the
back of the scanner.
2.
Connect the other end of the connecting cable to your tape recorder's
microphone jack.
Follow the instructions provided with your tape recorder to record
transmissions while the scanner is on.
PRO-2035 1000-Channel Programmable Home Scanner
(200-0460)
Features
Faxback Doc. # 16908
The Radio Shack PRO-2035 1000-Channel Programmable Home Scanner lets you
in on all the action! With its convenient rotary tuner and keypad, you
can quickly tune to over 196,000 frequencies that include those used by
police and fire departments, ambulance services, aircraft communications,
amateur radio services, transportation services, Citizen's Band and
commercial FM and television broadcasters. You can select up to 1,000
channels to scan and you can change your selections at any time.
The secret to the scanner's ability to scan so many frequencies is its
custom-designed microprocessor - a tiny, built-in computer.
The scanner has all these special features.
Hyperscan - lets you scan and search up to 50 channels
or steps per second.
Weather Band Key - scans ten pre-programmed weather
frequencies to keep informed about current
weather conditions.
Ten Channel-Storage Banks - you can store 100 channels in each bank to
group channels so calls are easier to
identify.
Monitor Memory - temporarily saves up to 100 frequencies
located during a frequency search, letting
you move selected frequencies to permanent
channel storage later.
Priority Channel - you can set the scanner to check every 2
seconds so you do not miss important calls.
Auto Store - quickly finds and automatically stores
active frequ encies in channels, then
searches for additional active frequencies
while skipping previously stored channels.
TAPE OUT Jack - lets you connect an optional tape recorder
to the scanner to record transmissions.
Rotary Tuner - lets you manually tune and select desired
frequencies or channels.
Two-Second Channel Scan Delay - delays scanning for 2 se conds before moving
to another channel so you can hear more
replies.
Memory Backup - keeps channel frequencies stored in memory
for up to 3 mon ths during a power loss.
Lock-Out Function - keeps selected channels from being scanned,
so you can skip over busy channels.
Direct Frequency Search - lets you scan for new and unlisted
frequencies.
Sound Squelch - keeps the scanner from stopping on
frequencies with only a carrier signal and
no voice or other sound, so you can hear
calls instead of static.
Backlit Display - makes it easy to view and change
programming information.
Two Power Options - let you power the scanner from standard AC
power (with the supplied AC power cord), or
your vehicle's battery (with an optional DC
cigarette lighter power cord).
The PRO-2035 scanner can receive all of these bands:
25-28 MHz (HF Hi)
28-29.7 MHz (10-Meter Amateur Radio)
29.7-50 MHz (VHF Lo)
50-54 MHz (6-Meter Amateur Radio)
54-72 MHz (FM-TV Audio Broadcast, Wide Band)
72-76 MHz (Land Mobile Service Band)
76-88 MHz (FM-TV Audio Broadcast, Wide Band)
88-108 MHz (FM Radio Broadcast, Wide Band)
108-136.975 MHz (Aircraft)
137-144 MHz (Government)
144-148 MHz (2-Meter Amateur Radio)
148-174 MHz (VHF Hi)
174-216 MHz (FM-TV Audio Broadcast, VHF Wide Band)
216-224.9875 MHz (VHF Hi, 1 1/4-Meter Amateur Radio)
225-399.9875 MHz (Military Aircraft)
400-450 MHz (UHF Lo, 70-Centimeter Amateur Radio, Government)
450-470 MHz (UHF Lo)
470-805.750 (UHF "T" Band)
806-823.9875 MHz (UHF Public Service)
849.0125-868-9875 MHz (UHF Hi)
894.0125-956 MHz (UHF Hi, 33-Centimeter Amateur Radio)
956-1300 MHz (Private Fixed Services, Paging, Aircraft
Navigation, Experimental, 23 -Centimeter Amateur Radio)
The scanner can receive these pre -programmed weather ch annels:
161.650
161.775
162.400
162.425
162.450
162.475
162.500
162.525
162.550
163.275
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
FCC NOTICE
The scanner might cause TV or radio interference even when it is operating
properly. To determine whether or not the scanner is causing the
interference, turn off the scanner. If the interference goes away, the
scanner is causing it. Try to eliminate the interference by:
Moving the scanner away from the receiver.
Connecting the scanner to an outlet that is on a different electrical
circuit from the receiver.
Contacting your local Radio Shack store for help.
If you cannot eliminate the interference, the FCC requires that you stop
using the scanner.
This device complies with Part 15 of FCC Rules. Operation is subject to
the following conditions; (1) This device must not cause harmful
interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received,
including interference that may cause undesired opera tion.
This scanner is capable of Triple Conversion.
(/ir-01/15/96)
PRO-2035 1000-Channel Programmable Home Scanner
(200-0460)
Frequency Guide
Faxback Doc. # 16915
Reception of the frequencies covered by the scanner is mainl y "line-ofsight. That means you usually cannot hear stations that are beyond the
horizon.
During the summer
MHz range located
because of summer
unpredictable but
months, you might be able to hear stations in the 30 -50
several hundred or even thousands of miles away. This is
atmospheric conditions. This type of reception is
often very interesting!
National Weather Frequencies
161.650 MHz
161.775 MHz
162.400 MHz
162.425 MHz
162.440 MHz
162.450 MHz
162.475 MHz
162.500 MHz
162.525 MHz
162.550 MHz
16 3.275 MHz
Ham Radio Frequencies
Ham radio operators often broadcast emergency information when other means
of communication break down.
The following chart shows the voice frequencies that you can monit or:
Wavelength (meters)
10
6
2
1 1/4
70
33
23
-
meter
meter
meter
meter
cm
cm
cm
Voice (MHz)
28.300
50.100
144.100
222.000
420.000
902.000
1240.000
29.700
54.000
148.000
225.000
450.000
928.000
1300.000
Citizens Band Frequencies
Channel
Frequency (MHz)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
26.965
26.975
26.985
27.005
27.015
27.025
27.035
27.055
27.065
27.075
27.085
27.105
27.115
27.125
27.135
27.155
27.165
27.175
27.185
27.205
Birdie Frequencies
Channel
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
Frequency (MHz)
27.215
27.225
27.255
27.235
27.245
27.265
27.275
27.285
27.295
27.305
27.315
27.325
27.335
27.345
27.355
27.365
27.375
27.385
27.395
27.405
Birdies are frequencies the scanner uses when it operates. These operating
frequencies might interfere with broadcasts on the same frequencies. If
you program one of these frequencies, you hear only noise on that
frequency.
If the interference is not severe, you might be able to turn SQUELCH
clockwise to cut out the birdie. These are the most common birdies to
watch for:
25.800
33.170
48.045
64.275
80.360
116.525
152.655
212.950
237.0125
311.400
421.800
491.375
821.600
978.500
1025.6875
1113.000
1182.4375
1227.000
1281.250
NOTE:
MHz
27.640 MHz
28.125 MHz
30.405
MHz
36.160 MHz
40.180 MHz
41.46 0
MHz
48.215 MHz
52.235 MHz
54.750
MHz
68.305 MHz
72.320 MHz
76.340
MHz
80.600 MHz
84.360 MHz 108.4825
MHz 120.5375 MHz
123.375 MHz
144.135
MHz
155.625 MHz
184.830 MHz
192.860
MHz
220.950 MHz
224.960 MHz
225.000
MHz
241.075 MHz 249.1125 MHz 265.1875
MHz
343.600 MHz
362.000 MHz
387.000
MHz 425.9125 MHz
466.250 MHz
467.250
MHz
772.200 MHz
773.400 MHz
774.600
MHz
822.800 MHz 906.3125 MHz 907.5625
MHz 1004.250 MHz 1008.600 MHz 1013.000
MHz 1055.125 MHz 1068.4375 MHz 1074.600
MHz 1117.6875 MHz 1152.750 MHz 1164.625
MHz 1186.800 MHz 1188.375 M Hz 1196.125
MHz 1227.500 MHz 1251.875 MHz 1264.9375
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
32.145 MHz
44.195 MHz
56.345 MHz
80.200 MHz
112.500 MHz
144.645 MHz
200.900 MHz
233.050 MHz
299.5625 MHz
412.000 MHz
490.375 MHz
820.400 MHz
908 .8125 MHz
1022.800 MHz
1090.400 MHz
1166.200 MHz
1200.250 MHz
1271.950 MHz
Depending on the temperature of some of the scanner's components,
you might hear birdies on frequencies slightly above or below the
frequencies listed here.
PRO-Series Direct Entry Programmable Scanners
General Guide To Scanning
Faxback Doc. # 17653
Birdies
Birdies are frequencies your scanner uses when it operates. These
operating frequencies might interfere with broadcasts on the same
frequencies. If you program one of these frequencies, you hear only noise
on that frequency.
If the interference is not severe, you might be able to turn SQUELCH
clockwise to cut out the birdie. The most comm on birdies to watch for are
listed below.
Birdie Frequencies:
31.05 MHz
41.40 MHz
51.75 MHz
113.85 MHz
124.20
134.55
144.90
155.25
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
Reception Notes
Reception of the frequencies covered by yo ur scanner is mainly "line of
sight". That means you usually cannot hear stations that are beyond the
horizon. During the summer months you may be able to hear stations in the
30-50 MHz range located several hundred or even thousand of miles away.
This is because of summer atmospheric conditions. This type of reception
is unpredictable but often very interesting!
One very useful service is the National Weather Service's continuous
weather broadcast. These broadcasts contain weather forecasts and data
for the areas around the station, plus bulletins on any threatening
weather conditions. These stations use three frequencies - 162.40,
162.475 or 162.55 MHz. In most areas of the country, you can receive one
of these frequencies.
A Guide To The Action Ba nds
With the right frequencies programmed into your PRO -Series Scanner, you
can monitor exciting events. With a little investigation, you can find
active frequencies in your community. We can give you some general
pointers, and you can take it from ther e. Please use caution and common
sense when you hear an emergency call. Never go to the scene of an
emergency. It could be very dangerous.
Find out if there is a local club that monitors your community's
frequencies. Perhaps a local electronics repair shop that works on
equipment similar to your scanner can give you frequencies used by local
radio services.
A volunteer police department or fire department can also be a good source
for this information.
As a general rule on VHF, most activity is conce ntrated between 153.785
and 155.98 MHz and then again from 158.73 to 159.46 MHz. Here you find
local government, police, fire and most such emergency services. If you
are near a railroad yard or major railroad tracks, look around 160.0 to
161.9 MHz for signals.
In some larger cities, there has been a move to the UHF bands for
emergency service. Here, most of the activity is between 453.025 and
453.95 MHz and between 456.025 and 467.925 MHz.
In the UHF band, frequencies between 456.025 and 459.95 MHz an d between
465.025 and 469.975 MHz are used by mobile units and control stations
associated with base and repeater units that operate 5 MHz lower (that is,
451.025 to 454.950 and 460.025 to 464.975 MHz). This means that if you
find an active frequency insi de one of these spreads, you can look 5 MHz
lower (or higher) to find the base station/repeater for that service.
Typical Band Usage
The following is a brief listing of the typical services that use the
bands you scanner can receive. This listing helps you decide which ranges
you would like to scan.
These frequencies are subject to change, and might vary from area to area.
For a more complete listing refer to the Police Call Radio Guide available
at you local RadioShack store.
Abbreviations:
Affiliate Radio System: ............................................. Mars
Amateur: ............................................................. Ham
Automobile Emergency: ......................................... Auto Emer.
Broadcast Remote: ...................... ............................. BC.R
Bureau of Reclamation: ......................................... Bur.Recl.
Civil Air Patrol: .................................................... CAP
Department of Agriculture and Forestry: .................... Agr. And F or.
Fire Department: .................................................... F.D.
Forest Products: ............................................... For.Prod.
Forestry Conservation: ........................................ Fors.Cons.
Government: ............... ......................................... Govt.
Highway Maintenance: ................................................ Hwy.
Land Transportation: ............................................ Land Tr.
Local Government: ........................................ ........ L.Govt.
Manufacturers: ...................................................... Mfg.
Military: ............................................................ MIL
Mobile Telephone : .............................................. Mob.Tel.
Motion Picture: ................................................... Mot.P.
Motor Carrier: .............................................. Buses.Trucks
National Parks: ................................................. Nat.Park
Petroleum: .................................. ........................ Pet.
Police: ............................................................. P.D.
Power Utilities: ................................................... Power
Radio Paging: ....................................................... Page
Railroad: ........................................................... R.R.
Relay Press: ....................................................... Press
State Police: .................................................... St.P.D.
Special Emergency: ............. ................................. Sp.Emer.
Special Industry: ................................................ Sp.Ind.
Taxicab Radio: ...................................................... Taxi
Telephone Maintenance: ........................................ Tel.Maint.
U.S. Coastal and Geodetic Survey: ............................. U.S.C.G.S.
U.S. Navy: ........................................................... USN
U.S. Weather Bureau: ............................................ U.S.W.B.
ATTENTION:
Your scanner may not be able to receive all frequencies and/or
modes of reception that are contained within this document.
For complete information of your scanner's capabilities, be
sure to read your owner's manual completely .
Guide To Frequencies
National Weather Frequencies:
1)
2)
3)
4)
161.650
161.775
162.400
162.425
5)
6)
7)
8)
162.440
162.450
162.475
162.500
9) 162.525
10) 162.550
11) 163.275
Ham Radio Frequencies
Ham operators often transmit emergency information when other
communication methods break down. The following chart shows some of the
frequencies that Hams use.
Wavelength
(Meters)
Frequency
(MHz)
10-meter
6-meter
2-meter
70-cm
28.000 -29.700
50.000 -54.000
144.000 -148.000
420.000 -450.000
The following are the channels and freq uencies of the Citizens Band:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
9)
10)
11)
12)
13)
14)
15)
16)
17)
18)
19)
20)
26.965
26.975
26.985
27.005
27.015
27.025
27.035
27.055
27.065
27.075
27.085
27.105
27.115
27.125
27.135
27.155
27.165
27.175
27.185
27.205
21)
22)
23)
24)
25)
26)
27)
28)
29)
30)
31)
32)
33)
34)
35)
36)
37)
38)
39)
40)
27.215
27.225
27.255
27.235
27.245
27.265
27.275
27.285
27.295
27.305
27.315
27.325
27.335
27.345
27.355
27.365
27.375
27.385
27.395
27.405
Guide To The Action Bands
United States Broadcast Bands
In the United States, there are several broadcast bands. The standard AM
and FM bands are probably the most well known. There are also four
television audio broadcast bands-the lower three transmit on the VHF band
and the fourth transmits on the UHF band.
Frequency Range
Allocation
54.0 - 72.0 MHz ........................................... VHF Television
76.0 - 88.0 MHz ........................................... VHF Television
88.0 - 108.0 MHz ............................................. Standard FM
174.0 - 216.0 MHz ......................................... VHF Television
470.0 - 805.75 MHz .................... .................... UHF Television
International Broadcast Bands
Several short-wave bands are allocated for international broadcasting
because of the nature of propagation of high frequencies. The bands are
sometimes identified according to the approxi mate wavelength of the
signals in meters. Your scanner may receive the 11 -meter band, from
25.6 - 26.10 MHz.
Typical Band Usage
HF Band (3.0 - 30.0 MHz):
Mid Range: ............................................. 25.00 - 28.63 MHz
10-Meter Amateur Band: ................................. 28.00 - 29.70 MHz
High Range: ............................................ 29.70 - 29.90 MHz
VHF Band (30.00 - 300.0 MHz):
Low range: ............................................. 30.00 - 50.00
6-Meter Amateur: ....................................... 50.00 - 54.00
FM-TV Audio Broadcast, Wide Band: ...................... 54.00 - 72.00
FM Radio Broadcast, Wide Band: ........................ 88.00 - 108.00
Aircraft: ........................................... . 108.00 - 136.00
U.S. Government: ..................................... 138.00 - 144.00
2-Meter Amateur: ..................................... 144.00 - 148.00
High Range: .......................................... 148.00 - 174.00
New Mobile Narrow Band: .............................. 220.00 - 222.00
1.3-Meter Amateur: ................................... 222.00 - 225.00
Military Aircraft: ................................... 225.00 - 287.80
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
UHF Band (300.00 MHz - 3.0 GHz):
Military Aircraft: ...................................
U.S. Government: .....................................
0.6-Meter Amateur: ...................................
Low Range: ......................... ..................
FM-TV Audio Broadcast, Wide Band: ....................
Conventional Systems: ................................
Conventional/Trunked Systems: ........................
Trunked Systems: .....................................
Public Safety: .......................................
Common Carrier: ......................................
Private Trunked: ...... ...............................
General Trunked: .....................................
311.00
406.00
420.00
450.00
470.00
851.00
856.00
861.00
866.00
869.00
935.00
940.00
-
384.00
470.00
450.00
470.00
806.00
856.00
861.00
866.00
869.00
894.00
940.00
941.00
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
Primary Usage:
As a general rule, most of the radio activity is concentrated on the
following frequencies:
VHF Band:
2-Meter Amateur Band: ..............................
Government, police, and Fire: ......................
Emergency Services: ................................
Railroad: ............................. .............
UHF Band:
144.000
153.785
158.730
160.000
-
148.000
155.980
159.460
161.900
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
.6 cm Amateur Band FM Repeaters: ...................
Land Mobile "Paired" Frequencies: ..................
Base Stations: .....................................
Mobile Units: ......................................
Repeater Units: ....................................
Control Stations: ..................................
NOTE:
440.000
450.000
451.0 25
456.025
460.025
465.025
-
450.000
470.000
454.950
459.950
464.975
469.975
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
UHF remote control stations and mobile units typically operate at 5
MHz higher than their associated base and relay repeater units.
Specified Intervals
Frequencies in different bands are accessible only at specific intervals.
For Example:
VHF, HAM, and Government: .................................. 5.0 kHz steps
All Others: ............................................... 12.5 kHz steps
Aircraft: ................................................. 25.0 kHz steps
Note:
Your scanner rounds the entered fre quency to the nearest valid
frequency. For example, if you try to enter 151.473, the scanner
might accept this as 151.470.
Band Allocation
To help you decide which frequency ranges to search, use the following
listing of the typical service s that use the frequencies your scanner
receives. These frequencies are subject to change, and might vary from
area to area. For a more complete listing, refer to the "Police -Call Radio
Guide including Fire and Emergency Services", as well as "Beyond Polic e
Call", "Aeronautical Directory", "Nautical Directory" and "Now you're
Talking" texts available at your local RadioShack store.
Abbreviations
AIR: ............................................................ Aircraft
BIFC: .............................. .... Boise (ID) Interagency Fire Cache
BUS: ............................................................ Business
CAP: .................................................... Civil Air Patrol
CB: ........................................................ Citize ns Band
CCA: ...................................................... Common Carrier
CSB: ................................................ Conventional Systems
CTSB: ....................................... Conventional/Trunked Systems
FIRE: ................. ................................... Fire Department
HAM: ................................................. Amateur (HAM) Radio
GOVT: ................................................. Federal Government
GMR: ................................................ General Mobile Radio
GTR: ..................................................... General Trunked
IND: ................................................. Industrial Services
MARI: ............................................. Maritime Limited Coast
MARS: .................................... Military Affiliate Radio System
MED: .......................................... Emergency/Medical Services
MIL: ....................................................... U.S. Military
MOV: .................................... ... Motion Picture/Video Industry
NEW: ................................................... New Mobile Narrow
NEWS: ........................................................ Relay Press
OIL: .............................................. Oil/Petroleum Indust ry
POL: ................................................... Police Department
PUB: ..................................................... Public Services
PSB: ....................................................... Public Safety
PTR: ....................... .............................. Private Trunked
ROAD: ......................................... Road & Highway Maintenance
RTV: .................................... Radio/TV Remote Broadcast Pickup
TAXI: ..................................................... . Taxi Services
TELBL: .................................................. Mobile Telephone
TELC: ................................................ Cordless Telephones
TELM: .............................................. Telephone Maintenance
TOW: .......................................................... Tow Trucks
TRAN: ............................................ Transportation Services
TSB: ..................................................... Trunked Systems
TVn: ......................................... ...... FM-TV Audio Broadcast
USXX: .............................................. Government Classified
UTIL: ............................................ Power & Water Utilities
WTHR: ............................................................ Weather
High Frequency (HF)-(3 - 30 MHz):
High Band - (25.00 - 27.36 MHz):
25.020
25.870
26.62:
26.966
27.430
- 25.320: ..................................................... IND
- 26.470: ..................................................... RTV
................................ ............................... CAP
- 27.405: ...................................................... CB
- 27.630: ..................................................... BUS
10-Meter Amateur Band - (28.0 - 29.7 MHz):
28.000 - 29.700: ..................................................... HAM
Very High Frequency (VHF) - (30 - 300 MHz):
Low Band - (29.7 - 50 MHz - in 5 kHz steps):
29.700 - 29.790: ..................................................... IND
29.900 - 30.550: ...................... ......................... GOVT, MIL
30.580 - 31.980: ................................................ IND, PUB
32.000 - 32.990: ............................................... GOVT, MIL
33.020 - 33.980: ........................................... BUS, IND, PUB
34.010 - 34.990: ............................................... GOVT, MIL
35.020 - 35.980: ..................................... BUS, PUB, IND, TELM
36.000 - 36.230: ............................................... GOVT, MIL
36.250: .................. ............................. Oil spill clean up
36.270 - 36.990: ............................................... GOVT, MIL
37.020 - 37.980: ................................................ PUB, IND
38.000 - 39.000: ........................................ ....... GOVT, MIL
39.020 - 39.980: ..................................................... PUB
40.000 - 42.000: ......................................... GOVT, MIL, MARI
42.020 - 42.940: ..................................................... POL
42.960 - 43.180: ..................................................... IND
43.220 - 43.680: .......................................... TELM, IND, PUB
43.700 - 44.600: .................................................... TRAN
44.620 - 46.580: ........................... ..................... POL, PUB
46.600 - 46.990: .............................................. GOVT, TELC
47.020 - 47.400: ..................................................... PUB
47.420: ............................................... American Red Cross
47.440 - 49.580: ................................................ IND, PUB
49.610 - 49.990: ............................................... MIL, TELC
6-METER Amateur Band (50 -54 MHz):
50.00 - 54.00: ....................................................... HAM
FM-TV Audio Broadcast, Wide Band (54 -72 MHz):
59.750: .............................................................. TV2
65.750: .............................................................. TV3
71.750: ............................................. ................. TV4
Land Mobile Service Band (72 -76 MHz):
FM-TV Audio Broadcast, Wide Band (76 -88 MHz):
81.750: .............................................................. TV5
87.750: .............................................................. T V6
FM Radio Broadcast, Wide Band (88 -108 MHz):
Aircraft Band (108-136 MHz):
108.000 - 121.490: ................................................... AIR
121.500: ................................................... AIR emergency
121.510 - 136.000: ................................................... AIR
U.S. GOVERNMENT BAND (138 -144 MHz):
137.000 - 144.000: ............................................. GOVT, MIL
VHF-Hi BAND (148-174 MHz):
148.050 - 150.345: ........................................ CAP, M ARS, MIL
150.775 - 150.790: ................................................... MED
150.815 - 150.965: ................................................... TOW
150.980: .............................................. Oil spill clean up
150.995 - 151.130: .................................................. ROAD
151.145 - 151.475: ................................................... POL
151.490 - 151.955: .............................................. IND, BUS
151.985: ............................................ ................ TELM
152.030 - 152.240: .................................................. TELB
152.270 - 152.465: ............................................. IND, TAXI
152.480: ............................................................. BUS
152.510 - 152.840: .................................................. TELB
152.870 - 153.020: .............................................. IND, MOV
153.035 - 153.175: ........................................ IND, OIL, UTIL
153.740 - 154.445: ..................... ........................ PUB, FIRE
154.490 - 154.570: .............................................. IND, BUS
154.585: .............................................. Oil spill clean up
154.600 - 154.625: ................................................... BUS
154.665 - 156.240: ................................... MED, ROAD, POL, PUB
165.255: ............................................................. OIL
156.275 - 157.425: .................................................. MARI
157.450: .................. ........................................... MED
157.470 - 157.515: ................................................... TOW
157.530 - 157.725: ............................................. IND, TAXI
157.740: ................................................. ............ BUS
157.770 - 158.100: .................................................. TELB
158.130 - 158.460: ............................. BUS, IND, OIL, TELM, UTIL
158.490 - 158.700: .. ............................................... TELB
158.730 - 159.465: ........................................ POL, PUB, ROAD
159.480: ............................................................. OIL
159.495 - 161.565: .................................................. TRAN
161.580: .................................... ......................... OIL
161.600 - 162.000: ............................................. MARI, RTV
162.0125 - 162.35: ....................................... GOVT, MIL, USXX
162.400 - 162.550: .................................................. WTHR
162.5625 - 162.6375: ..................................... GOVT, MIL, USXX
162.6625: ............................................................ MED
162.6875 - 163.225: ...................................... GOVT, MIL, USXX
163.250: ....................... ...................................... MED
163.275 - 166.225: ....................................... GOVT, MIL, USXX
166.250: ................................................. GOVT, RTV, FIRE
166.275 - 169.400: ............................................ GOVT, BIFC
169.445: .................................................. WIRELESS MIKES
169.500: ............................................................ GOVT
169.505: .................................................. WIRELESS MIKES
169.55 - 169.9875: ....................................... GOVT, MIL, USXX
170.000: ............................................................ BIFC
170.025 - 170.150: ....................................... GOVT, RTV, FIRE
170.175 - 170.225: ............................... ................... GOVT
170.245 - 170.305: ........................................ WIRELESS MIKES
170.350 - 170.400: ............................................. GOVT, MIL
170.425 - 170.450: .................................................. BIFC
170.475: ............................................................. PUB
170.4875 - 173.175: ............................ GOVT, PUB, WIRELESS MIKES
173.225 - 173.375: ....................................... MOV, NEWS, UTIL
173.3875 - 178.5375: ................ ................................. MIL
173.5625 - 173.5875: ............................. MIL Medical/Crash Crews
173.60 - 173.9875: .................................................. GOVT
FM-TV Audio Broadcast, VHF Wide Band (174 -216 MHz):
179.750:
185.750:
191.750:
197.750:
203.750:
209.750:
215.750:
............................................................. TV7
............................................................. TV8
............................................................. TV9
.................................... ........................ TV10
............................................................ TV11
............................................................ TV12
............................................................ TV13
New Mobil Narrow Band (220 -222 MHz):
220.000 - 222.000: ................................................... NEW
1.3-Meter Amateur Band (222 -225 MHz):
222.000 - 225.000: ................................................... HAM
MILITARY AIRCRAFT BAND (237 .9-287.8 MHz):
237.900:
239.800:
241.000:
243.000:
255.400:
257.800:
287.800:
Rescue
..................................... Coast Guard Search & Rescue
..................................................... FAA Weather
............................................................ ARMY
....................................................... EMERGENCY
.............................................. FAA FLIGHT SERVICE
................................................. CIVILIAN TOWERS
..................................... ........ Coast Guard Air/Sea
Ultra High Frequency (UHF) -(300 MHz-3 GHz)
Military Aircraft Band (319.1 - 383.9 MHz):
319.100: ............................................. FAA Traffic Control
321.000 - 336.600: ................................... .......... Air Force
342.500 - 344.600: ........................................... FAA Weather
346.400 - 364.200: ............................. Air Force Traffic Control
381.800 - 383.900: ........................................... Coast Guard
U.S. Government Band (406-420 MHz):
406.125 - 419.975: ............................................ GOVT, USXX
70-cm Amateur Band (420-450 MHz):
420.000 - 450.000: ................................................... HAM
Low Band (450-470 MHz):
450.050 - 450.925: ................................................... RTV
451.025 - 452.025: .................................. IND, OIL, TELM, UTIL
452.0375 - 453.00: ............................ IND, TAXI, TRAN, TOW, NEWS
453.0125 - 453.9875: .......................... ....................... PUB
454.000: ............................................................. OIL
454.025 - 454.975: .................................................. TELB
455.050 - 455.925: ................................................... RTV
457.525 - 457.600: ................................................... BUS
458.025 - 458.175: ................................................... MED
460.0125 - 460.6375: ...................................... FIRE, POL, PUB
460.650 - 462.175: ............... .................................... BUS
462.1875 - 462.450: ............................................. BUS, IND
462.4625 - 462.525: ................................. IND, OIL, TELM, UTIL
462.550 - 462.725: .............................................. ..... GMR
462.750 - 462.925: ................................................... BUS
462.9375 - 463.1875: ................................................. MED
463.200 - 467.925: ................................................... BUS
FM-TV Audio Broadcast, UHF Wide Band (470 -512 MHz):
(Channels 14-69 in 6 MHz steps):
475.750:
481.750:
487.750:
805.750:
......................................................
......................................................
............................... .......................
......................................................
Channel
Channel
Channel
Channel
14
15
16
69
Note: Some cities use the 470 -512 MHz band for land/mobile service.
Conventional Systems Band - Locally Assigned
851.0125 - 855.9875: ................................................. CSB
Conventional/Trunked Systems Band - Locally Assigned
856.0125 - 860.9875: ................................................ CTSB
Trunked Systems Band - Locally Assigned
861.0125 - 865.9875: .................. ............................... TSB
Public Safety Band - Locally Assigned
866.0125 - 868.9875: ................................................. PSB
Common Carrier
869.010 - 894.000: ................................................... CCA
Private Trunked
935.0125 - 939.9875: ................................................. PTR
General Trunked
940.0125 - 940.9875: ................................................. GTR
Frequency Conversion
The tuning of a station can be expressed in frequency (kHz o r MHz) or in
wavelength (meters). The following information can help you make the
necessary conversions.
1 MHz (million)=1,000 kHz (thousand)
To convert MHz to kHz, multiply by 1,000:
9.62 MHz x 1000 = 9620 kHz
To convert from kHz to MHz, div ide by 1,000
2780 kHz / 1000 = 2.780 MHz
To convert MHz to meters, divide 300 by the number of megahertz
300 / 7.1 MHz = 42.25 meters
A Note on Image Reception
Radios work by simple mathematics. For example, most tune to a frequency
by mixing that frequency with another (local oscillator) frequency which
is slightly different. This mixing process primarily gives us the two
original frequencies, their sum, and their difference. Well, the radio's
Intermediate Frequency (I.F.) filter normally passes either the sum or
difference frequency, and this is then processed into the sound we hear.
Because nothing is perfect, certain "harmonics" will also get through if
they are strong enough. For example, if a radio's I.F. is 10.7 MHz, we
might be able to tune to a frequency 21.4 MHz (2 x I.F.) above (or below,
depending on the radio's design) a strong signal and hear it! This is more
evident in a double-conversion radio than a triple -conversion radio,
because the triple-conversion radio's 1st intermedia te frequency is quite
high. This causes the image to be so far off frequency that it is easy to
effectively filter it out.
So remember that just because a radio doesn't receive something which
another does is not necessarily an indication of a problem. The one radio
may simply not be "tricked" into picking up an image! This rejection of
undesired signals is one reason that a triple -conversion receiver costs
more than a similar dual -conversion model.
You might be interested in finding more out about rad io. One good
location to start looking is your local public library. You might also
wish to contact the A.R.R.L., as they are an excellent source of
informative texts on the subject.
PRO-2035 1000-Channel Programmable Home Scanner
(200-0460)
Hints and Tips
Faxback Doc. # 16588
Q:
In Auto Storing, this Scanner keeps storing the same frequency over
and over again. In the Owner's Manual under Features, it is stated
that Auto Store will scan and store the frequency. If t he same
frequency comes up again, it checks the frequency and if it is the
same frequency, it skips it. But under Operation of Auto Storing. it
does not state that it will skip a frequency if it is already stored.
A:
This is a known problem with this scanner. The PRO -0464 (200-0464)
Scanner was introduced to replace the PRO -2035 Scanner.
PRO-2035 1000-Channel Programmable Home Scanner
(200-0460)
Listening to the Weather Band
Faxback Doc. # 16914
The FCC (Federal Communica tions Commission) has allocated 11 channels for
use by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). NOAA
broadcasts your local forecast and regional weather information on one or
more of these channels. We have preprogrammed the scanner wi th ten of the
U.S. frequencies available to NOAA.
To scan the preprogrammed weather channels, press WEATHER, the press the UP
or DOWN ARROW.
To manually tune through the preprogrammed weather channels, repeatedly
press WEATHER or turn TUNING.
NOTE:
For a list of all 11 national weather frequencies, see "National
Weather Frequencies."
BAND MODE AND FREQUENCY STEP
The scanner scans in the following band modes:
AM (amplitude modulation) - used in aircraft bands and Citizen's Band.
NFM (narrowband frequency modulation) - used in action bands such as
police, fire, ambulance, Amateur Radio, etc.
WFM (wideband frequency modulation) - used in commercial FM broadcasts
and television sound.
This table shows the preset band modes an d frequency steps your scanner
uses for each frequency range.
Frequency Rand (MHz)
Band Mode
25.000 - 29.995
30.000 - 87.495
87.500 - 107.950
108.000 - 136.9875
137.000 - 224.995
225.000 - 400.000
400.0125 - 520.000
760.000 - 1300.000
AM
NFM
WFM
AM
NFM
AM
NFM
NFM
Frequency Step (kHz)
5
5
50
12.5
5
12.5
12.5
12.5
If you scan some of the 225 -400 MHz and TV audio bands, you might have to
manually change the band mode or frequency step.
Changing/Resetting the Band Mode
To change the displayed band mode while a frequency appears, press MODE
until the desired band mode appears. The band mode flashes anytime it is
different from the preset band mode. To reset the displayed band mode to
its preset, press RESET.
NOTES:
You cannot change the band mode unless it appears on the display.
Keep in mind that improperly changing the band mode can cause poor
reception. For example, the sound is distorted when you listen to
an FM broadcast or TV audio in the NFM mode or to a police
broadcast in the WFM mode.
Changing/Resetting the Frequency Step
The scanner scans at a preset frequency step (5, 12.5, or 50 kHz) for each
frequency range. However, if you scan some of the 225 -400 MHz and TV audio
bands, you might have to manually change the frequency step.
You can change the displayed frequency step while searching for frequencies
or automatically storing frequencies.
Follow these steps to change the displayed frequency step.
1.
Display the frequency step or frequency range which uses the frequency
step.
2.
Press STEP until the desired frequency step appears.
The frequency step flashes anytime it is different from the preset
frequency step.
To change the displayed fr equency step back to its preset value, press
RESET.
NOTES:
You cannot change the frequency step unless it appears on the
display.
Keep in mind that improperly changing the frequency step can cause
you to miss stations while scann ing. For example, if you use a 50
kHz frequency step to search for broadcasts, and the band mode is
set to NFM, you might miss frequencies between the 50 kHz steps.
PRO-2035 1000-Channel Programmable Home Scanner
(200-0460)
Operation -Part 1
Faxback Doc. # 16910
CONNECTING POWER
Plug the scanner's attached AC power cord into a standard AC outlet.
CAUTION: To prevent electric shock, the plug's blades are polarized and fit
only one way. If the plug does not fit easily, turn it over and
try again. Do not force the plug into the AC outlet.
The memory backup circuit begins to function a few minutes after you supply
power to the scanner. The length of time that the scanner maintains
channels stored in memory depends on how long power has been supplied to
the scanner. For example, if power is supplied to the scanner for at least
4 days, the memory backup circuit maintains the channels stored in memory
for up to 3 months.
Using Your Vehicle's Batt ery
If your AC power does not work in an emergency, you can power your scanner
from your vehicle's cigarette lighter socket with an optional DC cigarette
lighter power cable such as Cat. No. 270 -1533 (not supplied).
To connect an optional DC cigarette li ghter power cable, insert its barrel
plug into the DC 13.8V jack on the back of the scanner, then plug the power
cable into your vehicle's cigarette lighter socket.
CAUTIONS:
The scanner can work in a vehicle that has a 12 -volt, negativeground electrical system. Most vehicles have this type of
system. If you are not sure about your vehicle, check with
your vehicle's dealer
If you use a DC cigarette lighter power cable with the scanner,
it must supply 12 volts and deliver at least 1 amp. Its center
tip must be set to positive, and its plug must correctly fit
the DC 13.8V jack on the back of the scanner. The recommended
power cable meets these specifications. U sing a power cable
that does not meet these specifications could seriously damage
the scanner or the power cable.
NOTE:
Mobile use of this scanner is unlawful or requires a permit in some
areas. Check the laws in your area.
RESTARTING/RESETTING THE SCANNER
If the scanner's display locks up or the scanner does not work properly
after you connect power, you might have to restart or reset the scanner.
Restarting the scanner clears and resets the scanner's display, but does
not erase any channel information stored in the scanner's memory. Follow
these steps to restart the scanner.
1.
Turn off the scanner, then turn it on again.
2.
Insert a pointed object such as a straightened paper clip into the
RESTART hole on the b ack of the scanner for about 2 seconds.
If the scanner still does not work properly, you might have to reset it.
CAUTION:
This procedure clears all the information you have programmed
into the scanner. Use this procedure only when you are sur e the
scanner is not working properly.
1.
Turn off the scanner, then turn it on again.
2.
Press and hold down CLEAR and insert a pointed object such as a
straightened paper clip into the RESTART hole on the back of the
scanner for about 2 seconds. Information on the scanner's display
disappears.
3.
When information reappears on the scanner's display, release CLEAR.
A LOOK AT THE KEYBOARD
A quick glance at this section should help you understand each key's
function.
WEATHER - scans through the ten preprogrammed weather channels.
SOUND SQUELCH - sets the scanner to continue to scan if it stops on a
carrier signal with no voice or other sound.
OFF/VOLUME - turns the scanner on or of f and adjusts the volume.
SQUELCH - adjusts the scanner's squelch.
PRIORITY - sets and turns on and off priority for a particular
channel.
DIRECT - starts a direct frequency search.
MODE - changes the band mode (AM, NFM, or WFM).
L/OUT - lets you lock out selected channels.
STEP - changes the frequency step (5, 12.5, or 50 kHz).
L/O RVW - lets you review locked -out channels.
RESET - resets the default band mode and frequency step.
DELAY - programs a 2-second delay for the selected mode.
Number Keys - each key has a single -digit label and a range of
numbers. Use the digits on the keys to ent er the
numbers for a channel or a frequency. Use the range
of numbers above the key (201 -300, for example) to
select the channel -storage bank. See "Understanding
Channel -Storage Banks."
DECIMAL SYMBOL - enters the decimal point when you enter a frequency.
CLEAR - clears an incorrect entry.
LIMIT - sets the channel or frequency range you want to
search.
UP AND DOWN ARROWS - searches up or down from the currently displayed
frequency.
MONITOR - accesses the 100 monitor memories.
TUNING Knob - turn to tune through channels or frequencies.
SCAN - scans through the channe ls.
MANUAL - stops scanning to let you directly enter a channel
number.
TUNE - lets you use the scanner's rotary tuner to tune
through frequencies.
PROGRAM - programs frequencies into channels.
AUTO - lets you automatically program frequencies into
channels.
ENTER - enters frequencies into channels.
A LOOK AT THE DISPLAY
The display has indicators that show the scanner's curr ent operating mode.
A good look at the display will help you understand the scanner.
SCAN - appears when you scan channels.
BANK - appears with numbers (1 -10). Numbers with a bar under
them show which ch annel-storage banks are turned on
for scanning. See "Understanding Channel -Storage
Banks."
SEARCH BANK - appears with numbers (1 -10). Numbers with a bar under
them show which search b anks are turned on for a limit
search.
TUNE - appears when you press TUNE to use the scanner's
rotary tuner.
MANUAL - appears when you manually select a channel.
WX - appears when you scan the ten preprogrammed weather
band channels.
AUTO - appears when the scanner automatically stores
frequencies in channels.
SEARCH - appears during a direct search and a limit search.
UP AND DOWN ARROWS - appears when the scanner is scanning, when you press
the UP or DOWN ARROW while the scanner is in limit or
direct search, when you tune through weather channels,
or when you store frequencies.
P - appears when the scanner is set to the priority
channel.
CH - appears with a number (1 -1000) to show which of the
scanner's 1,000 channe ls it is tuned to.
MHz - appears with digits to show which frequency the
scanner is currently tuned to.
PRIORITY - appears when the priority feature is turned on.
MON - appears with a number ( 1-100) to show which monitor
memory you are listening to.
LOCK-OUT - appears when you lock out a channel or manually select
a locked -out channel.
DELAY - appears when scanning stops at a ch annel you have
programmed for a 2 -second delay.
AM - appears when the scanner scans a frequency set to the
AM mode or when you change a frequency to the AM mode.
See "Band Mode and Frequency Step."
NFM - appears when the scanner scans a frequency set to the
narrowband FM mode, or when you change a frequency
to the narrowband FM mode. See "Band Mode and
Frequency Step."
WFM - appears when the scanner scans a frequency set to the
wideband FM mode, or when you change a frequency to
the wideband FM mode. See "Band Mode and Frequency
Step."
kHz - appears with digits to show which frequency step (5,
12.5, or 50) the scanner is set to.
PROGRAM - appears when you press PROGRAM while selecting a
channel to store a frequency in, or while selecting a
search bank.
- d - - appears instead of the channel number during a direct
search.
Error - appears instead of the correct entry when you make an
incorrect entry.
UNDERSTANDING BANKS
You can store frequencies into either a permanent memory location called a
channel, or a temporary memory location called a monitor memory. You can
store up to 1,000 channels and up to 100 monitor mem ories.
CHANNEL-STORAGE BANKS
To make it easier to identify and select the channels you want to listen
to, channels are divided into 10 channel -storage banks (1-10) of 100
channels each. You can use each channel -storage to group frequencies, such
as those used by the police department, fire department, ambulance
services, and aircraft (see "Guide to the Action Bands").
For example, there might be three or four police departments in your area,
each using several different frequencies. Additionally, there might be
other law enforcement agencies such as state police, county sheriffs, or
SWAT teams that use their own frequencies. You can program all law
enforcement frequencies starting with Channel 1 (the first channel in Bank
1), then program the fire depa rtment, paramedic, and other public safety
frequencies starting with Channel 101 (the first channel in Bank 2).
MONITOR MEMORIES
TURNING ON THE SCANNER/SETTING VOLUME AND SQUELCH
1.
Turn SQUELCH fully counterclockwise.
2.
Turn VOLUME clockwise until you hear a hissing sound.
3.
Turn SQUELCH clockwise, then leave it set to a point just after the
hissing sound stops.
NOTE:
If the scanner picks up unwanted, partial, or very weak
transmissions, turn SQUELCH clockwise to decrease the scanner 's
sensitivity to these signals. If you want to listen to a weak or
distant station, turn SQUELCH counterclockwise.
TURNING CHANNEL-STORAGE BANKS ON AND OFF
When you turn on the scanner the first time, the scanner scans all ten
channel-storage banks. As the scanner scans a bank, the bar under the
bank's number flashes.
To turn off banks while scanning, press the bank's number key until the bar
under the bank's number disappears. The scanner does not scan any of the
stored channels within banks you have turned off.
NOTES: You cannot turn off all banks.
bank.
There must be at least one active
You can manually select any channel in a bank, even if the bank is
turned off.
The normal way to search is between two frequency points.
Enter
PROGRAM, LIMIT and the display will show the current "Lo" frequency
limit. If you want to change it, enter the frequency (146,000 for
example) and hit ENTER. Press LIMIT again to see the "Hi" frequency
limit. To change it enter the frequency (148,000 for example) and
hit ENTER. To begin the search hit the / \ to scan up or \/ to scan
down. Unit will scan between 146,000 and 148,000 in example above.
To turn on banks while scanning, p ress the bank's number key until a bar
appears under the bank's number.
PRO-2035 1000-Channel Programmable Home Scanner
(200-0460)
Operation - Part 2
Faxback Doc. # 16911
SCANNING THE CHANNELS
To begin scanning the channels or t o start scanning again after monitoring
a specific channel, press SCAN. The scanner scans through all non -locked
channels in the active banks (see "Locking Out Channels").
The scanner scans either up or down through the channels in the activated
banks. To change the scanning direction, either press the UP or DOWN
ARROWS, or rotate TUNING counterclockwise to scan down, or clockwise to
scan up.
USING THE ROTARY TUNER
The scanner's rotary tuner lets you quickly select channels and
frequencies.
NOTE:
If you turn TUNING too slowly, the scanner might accidentally change
the search or scan direction. If you turn TUNING too quickly, the
scanner might not display the frequency or channel you expected.
Tuning Channel Numbers
To tune a higher channel numbers, turn TUNING clockwise one notch at time.
To tune to lower channel numbers, turn TUNING counterclockwise one notch at
a time.
Tuning Frequencies
NOTE:
You cannot use the rotary tuner to tune to frequencies while the
scanner is scann ing the priority channel.
1.
When the scanner stops on a frequency while scanning, press MANUAL.
MANUAL appears.
2.
Press TUNE.
MANUAL, the frequency number, and TUNE appear.
To tune to higher frequencies, turn TUNING clockwise one notch at a tim e.
To tune to lower frequencies, turn TUNING counterclockwise one notch at a
time.
USING MONITOR MEMORIES
Monitor memories are temporary storage areas where you can store up to 100
frequencies while you decide whether to save them into channels. You can
manually select monitor memories, but you cannot scan them.
You can store frequencies you find during a limit or direct search into
monitor memories by pressing MONITOR when the desired frequency appears on
the display. The channel number to the right o f MON indicates the current
monitor memory.
To listen to a monitor memory, press MANUAL, then press MONITOR. The
current monitor memory appears. To select other monitor memories, either:
Turn TUNING
one click to select each monitor memory.
Use the number keys to enter the monitor memory's channel number,
then press MONITOR.
Both MON and the frequency stored in the monitor memory are displayed.
MOVING FREQUENCIES
Moving a Frequency from a Monitor Memory to a Channel
1.
Press PROGRAM.
2.
Use the number keys to enter the channel number where you want to
store the monitor frequency, then press PROGRAM.
3.
Press MONITOR. MON flashes. Use the number keys to enter the monitor
memory's channel number, then press MONITOR. Or, tur n TUNING to select
the channel number.
MON flashes and the monitor memory's channel number and frequency
appear.
4.
Press ENTER.
number.
The scanner stores the frequency in the selected channel
To move the next frequency to the nex t channel, turn TUNING to select
the next channel and repeat Steps 3 and 4.
Moving Frequencies from Monitor Memories to Banks
The scanner can move frequencies stored in monitor memories into
banks you specify.
1.
Press AUTO.
2.
Using the number keys, select the bank numbers where you want to store
the frequencies from the monitor memories.
Notes:
AUTO appears.
To select bank 10, press 0.
If you select a bank that does not contain any empty channels, a
bar flashes under the bank number, and -FULL- and AUTO appear. To
store new frequencies into this bank, you must delete one or more
frequencies stored in it, then repeat Step 2. See "Deleting
Frequencies."
If you select a bank that contains an empty channel, a bar flashes
under the bank number, and AC -, the number of vacant channels in
the bank, Ch, and AUTO appear.
If you do not want to select the bank, press the bank's number
again.
If you select more than one bank and want to review your
selections, turn the TUNING knob one click for each selected bank.
As you turn the TUNING knob, a bar flashes under each selected bank
number.
3.
Press and hold down ENTER, then press MONITOR . A bar flashes under the
bank number, and AC -, the number of vacant channels in the bank, Ch,
and AUTO appear.
Moving Frequencies Within Banks
You can move all stored frequencies within a bank you select from higher
channels to lower, empty cha nnels. This helps you group all of the
frequencies you stored within a bank into consecutive channels. For
example, if you stored frequencies in channels 1 through 25, left channels
26 through 30 empty, then stored more frequencies in channels 30 through
40, the scanner can move all the frequencies together into channels 1
through 35.
1.
Press AUTO.
AUTO appears.
2.
Using the number keys, select the bank's number.
3.
Press and hold down ENTER, then press RESET. The scanner automatically
moves all frequencies in channels within the bank to the lowest
available channels within the bank.
Moving Frequencies from Banks to Monitor Memory
1.
Press AUTO.
AUTO appears.
2.
Using the number keys, select the bank's number.
3.
Press and hold dow n ENTER, then press the decimal point. The scanner
automatically moves all frequencies in channels within the bank to
monitor memories.
DELETING FREQUENCIES
Deleting a Frequency from a Channel or Monitor Memory
1.
Press PROGRAM.
2.
Use the number keys to enter the channel number or monitor memory
channel containing the frequency you want to delete.
3.
If you are deleting the frequency in a channel, press PROGRAM.
If you are deleting the frequency in a monitor memory, press MONITOR.
4.
Press 0, then press ENTER.
NOTE:
The frequency is deleted from the channel.
To delete all frequencies in all banks at the same time, you must
reset the scanner. See "Restarting/Resetting the Scanner."
Deleting Frequencies from Locked -out Channels within a Bank
You can delete the frequencies in all locked -out channels within a bank you
select. This lets you delete all the old or uninteresting frequencies in
channels you have locked out.
1.
Press AUTO.
AUTO appears.
2.
Using the number keys, select the bank's number.
3.
Press and hold down ENTER, then press L/OUT.
Deleting All Frequencies from Channels with a Bank
1.
Press AUTO.
AUTO appears.
2.
Using the number keys, select the bank's number.
3.
Press and hold down ENTER, th en press CLEAR.
SPECIAL FEATURES
DELAY
Many agencies use a two -way radio system that might have a pause of several
seconds between a query and a reply. The scanner's delay feature lets it
wait for 2 seconds after each transmission on a channel or frequ ency while
scanning or searching.
To program a 2-second delay for a channel while scanning, manually select
the channel and press DELAY until DELAY appears. When the scanner stops on
the channel, it waits for 2 seconds after each transmission on that cha nnel
before it resumes scanning.
To program a 2-second delay for any active frequency while searching, press
DELAY until DELAY appears. When the scanner stops on a transmission, it
waits for 2 seconds after each transmission on that frequency before it
resumes searching.
USING THE ATT SWITCH
To reduce interference or noise caused by signals from a strong local
broadcaster, you can reduce the scanner's sensitivity to signals by setting
the ATT (attenuate) switch on the back of the scanner.
Switch ATT to 10dB to reduce the scanner's sensitivity, or 0dB to increase
the scanner's sensitivity.
NOTE:
If you switch ATT to 10dB, the scanner might not receive weak
signals.
USING THE SOUND SQUELCH SWITCH
You can have the scanner skip frequencies that b roadcast only a carrier
signal (without an accompanying modulated signal) by setting the SOUND
SQUELCH switch on the front of the scanner. When SOUND SQUELCH is turned
on, the scanner continues scanning if it does not detect a modulated signal
on a frequency within 0.5 seconds.
NOTES:
This feature works only while the scanner is scanning, searching,
or monitoring the priority channel.
The sound squelch feature might not work properly if the monitored
frequency contains a transmis sion with a low modulated signal.
To set sound squelch, press SOUND SQUELCH until the scanner beeps and the
SOUND SQUELCH indicator turns on. To turn off sound squelch, press SOUND
SQUELCH again.
If the scanner receives a frequency that broadcasts both a carrier and a
modulated signal, it stops scanning and monitors the frequency. If the
modulated signal stops being broadcast on the frequency, the scanner stays
on the frequency for 5 seconds, then resumes scanning. If the carrier
signal stops being bro adcast on the frequency, the scanner resumes scanning
immediately unless DELAY is set.
LOCKING OUT CHANNELS
You can scan existing channels faster by locking out channels that have a
continuous transmission, such as a weather channel.
To lock out a channel while scanning, press L/OUT when the scanner stops on
the channel. To lock out a channel manually, manually select the channel
and press L/OUT until LOCK -OUT shows on the display.
To remove the lockout from a channel, manually select the channel and p ress
L/OUT until LOCK-OUT disappears from the display.
NOTES:
You can delete the frequencies stored in locked -out channels within
a bank. See "Deleting Frequencies from Locked -Out Channels within
a Bank."
You can still manually select locked-out channels.
You cannot lock out all channels.
active channel in each bank.
There must be at least one
Reviewing Locked-Out Channels
To review which channels are locked out, press MANUAL, then repeatedly
press L/O RVW. As you press L/O RVW, the scanner displays all locked -out
channels.
PRIORITY
With the priority feature, you can scan through programmed channels and
still not miss an important or interesting call on a specific channel. You
can program one stored channel as a priority channel.
NOTE:
Before you first program the scanner, it automatically designates
Channel 1 in Bank 1 as the priority channel.
Follow these steps to program a channel as the priority channel.
1.
Press PROGRAM.
2.
Use the number keys to enter the channel number you want to program as
the priority channel, then press PRIORITY. P appears on the display to
the left of the channel number.
To turn on the priority feature, press PRIORITY during scanning. The
scanner checks the priority channel every 2 seconds. It stays on the
channel if there is activity, and PRIORITY appears.
To turn off the priority feature, press PRIORITY.
the display.
PRIORITY disappears from
MANUALLY SELECTING A CHANNEL
You can continuously monitor a specific channel without scanning. This is
useful if you hear an emergency broadcast on a channel and do not want to
miss any details (even though there might be periods of silence) or if you
want to monitor a locked -out channel.
Follow these steps to m anually select a channel.
1.
Press MANUAL.
2.
Use the number keys to enter the channel number you want to hear, then
press MANUAL.
NOTES:
If the scanner is scanning and stops at the channel you want, you
do not have to press MANUAL again in Step 2.
If you repeatedly press MANUAL, the scanner steps through the
channels. To change the step direction, press either the UP or
DOWN ARROW before you press MANUAL.
PRO-2035 1000-Channel Programmable Home Scanner
(200-0460)
Preparation
Faxback Doc. # 16909
This scanner is primarily designed for use in the home as a base station.
You can place it on a desk, shelf, or table.
The scanner's front feet fold up or down.
view of the display.
Adjust them to give you the best
CONNECTING AN ANTENNA
The supplied telescoping antenna helps the scanner receive strong local
signals. To install the antenna, screw it clockwise into the hole on the
scanner's top.
The scanner's sensitivity depends on the antenna's length and various
environmental conditions. For the best reception of the transmissions you
want to hear, adjust the antenna's length.
Frequency
25-300
300-520
520-760
760-1300
MHz
MHz
MHz
MHz
Antenna Length
Extend fully
Extend three segments
Extend two segments
Collapse all segments
Instead of the supplied antenna, you can connect an outdoor base antenna
(not supplied) to the scan ner. Your local Radio Shack store sells a
variety of antennas. Choose the one that best meets your needs.
When deciding on an outdoor base antenna and its location, consider the
following:
The location of the antenna should be as high as possible.
The antenna and antenna cable should be as far as possible from sources
of electrical noise (appliances, other radios, and so on).
The antenna should be vertical for the best performance.
To connect an optional antenna, always use 50 -ohm coaxial cable, such as
RG-58 or RG-8. For lengths over 50 feet, use RG -8 low-loss dielectric
coaxial cable. If the coaxial cable's connector does not fit in the ANT
jack, you might also need a PL -259-to-BNC antenna plug adapter, such as
Cat. No. 278-120. Your local Radio Shack store carries a wide variety of
coaxial antenna cable and connectors.
Follow the mounting instructions supplied with the antenna. Then route the
antenna cable to the scanner, and connect it to the ANT jack on the back of
the scanner.
CAUTION:
Do not run the cable over sharp edges or moving objects.
WARNING:
Use extreme caution when you install or remove an outdoor
antenna. If the antenna starts to fall, let it go! It could
contact overhead power lines. If the antenna touches a power
line, contact with the antenna, mast, cable, or guy wires can
cause electrocution and death. Call the power company to remove
the antenna. DO NOT attempt to do so yourself.
PRO-2035 1000-Channel Programmable Home Scanner
(200-0460)
Search and Storing Active Frequencies
Faxback Doc. # 16913
You can store frequencies into channels using any of the following methods:
Manual storage
Auto storage
Limit search (within a range of f requencies you select)
Direct search (any range of frequencies before or after a frequency you
select)
Moving a frequency from a monitor memory
Good references for active frequencies are Radio Shack's "Police Call Radio
Guide Including Fire and Emergency Services," "Aeronautical Frequency
Directory," and "Maritime Frequency Directory." We update these
directories every year, so be sure to get a current copy. See also "Guide
to the Action Bands".
If you do not have a reference to frequencie s in your area, follow the
steps in "Automatically Storing Frequencies" or "Limit Search" to search
for transmissions.
Manually Storing Frequencies
If you know a frequency you want to store, you can store it manually.
1.
Press PROGRAM.
2.
To select the channel where you want to store the frequency, either
turn TUNING until the channel number appears, or use the number keys to
enter the channel number. Then press PROGRAM.
3.
Using the number keys, enter the frequency you wa nt to store into that
channel.
4.
Press ENTER to store the frequency.
NOTES:
PROGRAM appears .
If you entered an invalid frequency in Step 3, the scanner
beeps and displays the channel number and ERROR. Simply repeat
steps 3 and 4.
The scanner automatically rounds the entered frequency down to
the closet valid frequency. For example, if you try to enter a
frequency of 151.473, the scanner accepts it as 151.470.
5.
Repeat steps 2-4 to store more frequencies into channels.
Automatically Storing Frequencies
The scanner can automatically store active frequencies into empty channels
in the banks you specify.
1.
Press AUTO.
AUTO appears.
2.
Using the number keys, select the numbers of the banks wher e you
want to store frequencies.
NOTES:
To select a bank that does not contain any empty channels, a
bar flashes under the bank number, and -FULL- and AUTO appear.
To enter new frequencies into this bank, you must delete one or
more frequencies stored in it, then repeat Step 2. See
"Deleting Frequencies."
If you select a bank that contains an empty channel, a bar
flashes under the bank number, and AC -, the number of vacant
channels in the bank, Ch, and AUTO appear.
If you do not want to select the bank, press the bank's number
again.
If you select more than one bank and want to review your
selections, turn TUNING one click for each selected bank. As
you turn TUNING, a bar flashes under each selected bank number.
3.
Press LIMIT. Lo appears.
4.
Use the number keys to enter the lower limit of the frequency range you
want to search, then press ENTE R.
NOTES:
If you enter an invalid frequency in Step 4 or 6, the scanner
displays ERROR. Simply repeat the step.
If you enter any frequency in a range from 823.950 to 823.995
MHz for a lower limit in this step, th e scanner displays and
uses 823.950 as the lower limit after you press ENTER. If you
enter any frequency in a range from 868.950 to 868.995 MHz for
a lower limit in this step, the scanner displays and uses
868.950 as the lower limit after your press ENTER.
5.
Press LIMIT.
6.
Use the number keys to enter the upper limit of the frequency range you
want to search, then press ENTER.
NOTE:
7.
Hi appears.
If you enter any frequency in a range from 849.0 05 to 849.050
MHz for an upper limit in this step, the scanner displays and
uses 849.050 as the upper limit after you press ENTER. If you
enter any frequency in a range from 894.005 to 894.050 MHz for
an upper l imit in this step, the scanner displays and uses
894.050 as the upper limit after you press ENTER.
Press the UP ARROW to search from the lower to the upper limit, or
DOWN ARROW to search from the upper to the lower limit. AUTO and
the bar under the selected bank number flash on the display.
When the scanner finds an active frequency, it stores the
frequency in the displayed channel, then continues searching for
more active frequencies and storing them in any subsequent empty
channels. When the scanner fills all channels within the selected
banks, the scanner beeps rapidly and displays the number of the
last channel where a frequency was stored.
NOTE:
8.
During auto store, you can manually change the frequ ency step or
band mode. See "Changing/Resetting the Frequency Step" or
"Changing/Resetting the Band Mode."
To interrupt auto store, press AUTO. The scanner displays the last
channel number where a frequency was stored. To continue auto store,
press the UP or DOWN ARROW.
9.
To stop auto store, press MANUAL.
MANUAL appears.
Limit Search
You can search for transmissions within a range of frequencies you select,
called the limit search range. You can set and store up to ten limit
search ranges into search banks (1 -10).
NOTES:
You can use the scanner's delay feature while using limit search.
See "Delay."
When the scanner searches for frequencies within limit search
range, you can store frequen cies you hear during the search into
monitor memories.
Follow these steps to set and store limit search ranges and search them for
active frequencies.
1.
Press PROGRAM.
PROGRAM appears.
2.
Using the number keys, select the number for the sear ch bank where
you want to store a limit search range.
NOTE: To select bank 10, press 0.
3.
Press LIMIT. SEARCH BANK and Lo appear, and a bar flashes under the
selected search bank's number. If you already entered limit search
ranges in other search banks, a bar appears under each search bank's
number.
4.
Use the number keys to enter the lower limit of the frequency range you
want to search, then press ENTER.
NOTES:
If you enter an invalid frequency in Step 4 or 6, the sc anner
displays ERROR. Simply repeat the step.
If you enter any frequency in a range from 823.950 to 823.995
MHz for a lower limit in this step, the scanner displays and
uses 823.950 as the lower limit after yo u press ENTER. If you
enter any frequency in a range from 868.950 to 868.995 MHz for a
lower limit in this step, the scanner displays and uses 868.950
as the lower limit after you press ENTER.
5.
Press LIMIT.
6.
Use the number keys to enter the upper limit of the frequency range you
want to search, then press ENTER.
NOTES:
SEARCH BAN K and Hi appear.
If you create more than one search bank and you want to review
your limit search ranges, turn TUNIN G one click for each
selected search bank. As you turn TUNING, a bar flashes under
the active search bank number, and either Lo or Hi is
displayed. Press LIMIT to review the high and low limits of
the frequ ency ranges for the selected search bank.
If you enter any frequency in a range from 849.005 to 849.050
MHz for an upper limit in this step, the scanner displays and
uses 849.050 as the upper limit after you press ENTER . If you
enter any frequency in a range from 894.005 to 894.050 MHz for
an upper limit in this step, the scanner displays and uses
894.050 as the upper limit after you press ENTER.
7.
Press the UP ARROW to search from the lower to the upper limit, or the
DOWN ARROW to search from the upper to the lower limit. As the scanner
searches, it displays SEARCH, and the bar under the selected search
bank number flashes.
When the scanner finds an active frequen cy, it stops searching. To
save the frequency into a monitor memory, press MONITOR. MON and the
current monitor channel number appear on the display. Press the UP or
DOWN ARROW again to continue searching for additional active
frequencies.
NOTES:
If you set the limit search range to a range that is narrower than
the step frequency, the scanner beeps and displays -PASS- when you
press the UP or DOWN ARROW. To correct this problem, either press
STEP to change the step frequency or enter a wider frequency or
enter a wider frequency range in Steps 4 and 6.
As the scanner searches, you can also use TUNING to search through
frequencies manually by pressing TUNE, then turning the TUNING
knob. Press TUNE again to continue the limit search.
During the limit search, you can manually change the frequency step
or band mode. See "Changing/Resetting the Frequency Step" or
"Changing/Resetting the Band Mode."
DIRECT SEARCH
You can search up or down from the currently displayed frequency and store
frequencies you hear during the search into monitor memories.
NOTE:
You can use the scanner's delay feature while using direct search.
See "Delay."
1.
Press MANUAL or PROGRAM.
2.
Use the number keys to enter the frequency you want to start the search
from. Or, use the number keys to enter the channel number containing
the starting frequency and press MANUAL or PROGRAM again.
3.
Press DIRECT.
the display.
4.
Press the UP or DOWN ARROW to search up or down from the selected
frequency.
SEARCH, -d-, and the starting frequency appear on
When the scanner finds an active frequency, it stops searching.
To save the frequency into a monitor memor y, press MONITOR. MON
and the current monitor channel number appear on the display.
Press the UP or DOWN ARROW again to continue searching for more
active frequencies.
NOTES:
As the scanner searches, you can also use the TUNING knob to searc h
through frequencies manually by pressing TUNE, then turning the
TUNING knob. Press TUNE again to continue the direct search.
During direct search, you can manually change the frequency step or
band mode. See "Changing/R esetting the Frequency Step" or
"Changing/Resetting the Band Mode."
PRO-2035 1000-Channel Programmable Home Scanner
(200-0460)
Specifications
Faxback Doc. # 16919
Frequency Coverage
HF Hi:........................... .......... 25 - 28 MHz (in 5
VHF Lo:.................................. 29.7 - 50 MHz (in 5
Amateur Radio:........................... 28 - 29.7 MHz (in 5
50 - 54 MHz (in 5
144 -148 MHz (in 5
222 - 225 MHz (in 5
420 - 450 MHz (in 12.5
1240 - 1300.000 MHz (in 12.5
FM-TV Audio:............................... 54 - 72 MHz (in 5
76 - 87.5 MHz (in 5
87. 5 - 107.95 MHz (in 50
174 - 216 MHz (in 5
Amateur Radio/Government:............. 406 - 450 MHz (in 12.5
Aircraft:......................... 108 - 136.995 MHz (in 12.5
225 - 406 MHz (in 12.5
Government:.............................. 137 - 144 MHz (in 5
406 - 450 MHz (in 12.5
VHF Hi:............. ..................... 148 - 174 MHz (in 5
216 - 224.9950 MHz (in 5
UHF Standard:......................... 450 - 470 MHz (in 12.5
UHF "T":.......................... 470 - 520.000 MHz (in 12.5
760.000 - 805.995 MHz (in 12.5
UHF Public Service:............... 806 - 823.995 MHz (in 12.5
UHF Hi:....................... 849.005 - 868.995 MHz (in 12.5
894.005 - 956 MHz (in 12.5
Land Mobile Service:........................ 72 -76 MHz (in 5
Private Fixed Services/Paging/
Aircraft Navigation/
Experimental:........................ 956 - 1240 MHz (in 12.5
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
steps)
steps)
steps)
steps)
steps)
steps)
steps)
steps)
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
kHz
steps)
steps)
steps)
steps)
steps)
st eps)
steps)
steps)
steps)
steps)
steps)
steps)
steps)
steps)
steps)
steps)
steps)
steps)
kHz steps)
GENERAL
Channels of Operation:........... 1100 Channels in Any Band Combinations
(100 Channels per bank x 10 banks
and 100 Monitor C hannels)
Sensitivity
AM (20 dB S/N with 60% modulation)
25-520 MHz:................................................ 2 microvolts
760-1000 MHz:.............................................. 2 microvolts
1000.005-1300 MHz:......................... ................ 5 microvolts
NFM (20 dB S/N at 3 kHz deviation)
25-520 MHz:.............................................. 0.5 microvolts
760-1000 MHz:............................................ 0.5 microvolts
1000-005-1300 MHz:................. ........................ 3 microvolts
WFM (30 dB S/N at 22.5 kHz deviation)
25-520 MHz:................................................ 3 microvolts
760-1000 MHz:.............................................. 3 microvolts
1000.005-1300 MHz:........................................ 10 microvolts
Selectivity
AM
+/6 kHz:.......................................................... -6 dB
+/12 kHz:........................................................ -50 dB
NFM
+/10 kHz:...................... ................................... -6 dB
+/20 kHz:........................................................ -50 dB
WFM
+/150 kHz:........................................................ -6 dB
+/300 kHz:............................................. .......... -50 dB
Scanning Rate:.................................... Up to 50 channels/second
Search Rate:......................................... Up to 50 steps/second
Delay Time:...................................................... 2 seconds
Priority Sampling:............................................... 2 seconds
Intermediate Frequencies (IF)
1st:.................................................. 609.005 -613.5 MHz
2nd:........................................................... 48.5 MHz
3rd (for WFM)...................................................10.7 MHz
3rd (for NFM and AM).............................................455 kHz
IF Rejection
612 MHz at 70 MHz (NFM):.......................................... 60 dB
612 MHz at 1000 MH z (NFM):........................................ 60 dB
Squelch Sensitivity
AM/NFM Threshold
25-520 MHz:.............................................. 0.5 microvolts
760-1000 MHz:............................................ 0.5 microvolts
1000.005-1300 MHz:......................................... 3 microvolts
AM/NFM Tight (S+N)/N
25-520 MHz:....................................................... 25 dB
760-1000 MHz:..................................................... 25 dB
1000.005-1300 MHz:................................................ 20 dB
WFM Threshold
25-520 MHz:................................................ 3 microvolts
760-1000 MHz:.............................................. 3 microvolts
1000.005-1300 MHz:........................................ 15 microvolts
WFM Tight (S+N)/N
25-520 MHz:....................................................... 40 dB
760-1000 MHz:..................................................... 40 dB
1000.005-1300 MHz:................. ............................... 40 dB
Antenna Impedance:................................................. 50 Ohms
Audio Output Power
HEADPHONE Jack:................................................... 16 mW
EXT SPKR Jack:............................ .................... 1.8 Watts
TAPE OUT Jack (Z=10 K Ohm):.............................. 600 mV Nominal
Built-In Speaker:........................ 3 Inches (77 mm), 8 Ohms, dynamic
Audio Output Power:................................... 1.3 Watts Nomi nal
Power Requirements
AC:.......................................... 120 Volts, 60 Hz, 18 Watts
DC:................................................ 13.8 Volts, 10 Watts
Dimensions:.............................
3 1/2 x 9 1/8 x 8 1/16 Inches HWD
(90 mm x 232 mm x 210 mm)
Weight:........................................................ 70.5 Ounces
(2 kg)
Specifications are typical; i ndividual units might vary.
are subject to change and improvement without notice.
Specifications
PRO-2035 1000-Channel Programmable Home Scanner
(200-0460)
Troubleshooting
Faxback Doc. # 16917
If the scanner is not working as it should, these suggestions might help
you eliminate the problem. If the scanner still does not operate normally,
take it to your local Radio Shack store for assistance.
Symptom
Suggestion
Scanner is on, but wi ll not scan.
Be sure SQUELCH is adjusted
properly.
Scanner receives stations poorly
or not at all.
Check the antenna (indoor
or outdoor).
Signals may be blocked from
being received by the
scanner due to metal frames
or material in building.
Change the scanner's and
try again.
Be sure frequencies are
programmed properly and set
with the correct mode (AM,
NFM, or WFM).
Scanner's keys or display work
poorly or not at all.
The scanner's processor may
be locked. Restart the
scanner. See "Restarting/
Resetting the Scanner."
Scanner does not work at all.
Check the AC power cord and
outlet.
The scanner may require a
reset. See "Restarting/
Resetting the Scanner."
Scanner locks on frequencies that
have an unclear transmission.
Be sure birdie freq uencies
are not programmed, or
listen to birdie
frequencies manually. See
"Birdie Frequ encies" in
"Guide to Frequencies."
200-0460
PRO2035 1000 CH BASE SCAN
Faxback Doc. # 30424
To order parts call 1 -800-843-7422 or visit your local RadioShack store.
Reference #
Cat. No.
Description
NP Part #
-----------------------------------------------------------------------11318532 DIODE 1N4002 RECT 600V.1A 1N4002
Q20
10511228 XSTR 2SC2712 SI NPN LO PW 1TD001 1
Q21 Q23 Q24 Q29 Q42
10511228 MARKED LG NPN
1TD0011
Q503 Q10 Q14 Q17 Q18
10511228
1TD0011
Q40
10511392 XSTR DTA114EK CHIP
1TD0051
Q501 Q502
1051297 8 XSTR 2SA1298 SI PNP LO PW 1TD0400
10512978 MARKED IY PNP
1TD0400
Q28 Q34 Q36
10512986 XSTR UN5214 RF MIXER 3 PI 1TD0401
Q30 Q41
10514107 XSTR 2SK209GR FET N -CH
1TD0553
Q1 Q2 Q7 Q8 Q9 Q27 Q31 10514404 XSTR 2SC4226(R24) SI NPN
1TD0585
Q32 Q33 Q35 Q43 Q44
10514404
1TD0585
Q22
10514800 XSTR,UN5213 NPN
1TD0625
Q4 Q5 Q6
10515732 XSTR 2SC3356R25 NPN
1TD0720
11332251 XSTR 2SC2458 SI NPN
2SC2458
11334075
2SD1406
10528032 REPLACED BY 2SD1406
2TR0765
10538270 SEGMENT
A0123
10906600 REGUALTOR BIPOLAR
AN7805
IC3
11433455 IC,BA10358FT1 8 PIN
BA10358FT1
11433455 BIPOLAR
BA10358FT1
TC1
10554749 CAP,TRIMMER 6PF CHIP
C0211
CB1 CB2
11497864 CAP ARRAY,.01UFX2/250V
C1816
T1
11480290 COIL,TRANSFORMER IF
CA0176
T8
10557882 COIL,DETECTOR 455KHZ
CA0533
T5
10559508 COIL,QUARATURE 7MHZ
CA1213
T9
10559516 COIL,QUARATURE 455KHZ
CA1214
L55
10562445 COIL,CHOKE 5 PIN 100UH
CA3134
10562445 DC -DC CONVERTER
CA3134
T2 T3 T6
10563666 COIL,INTERMEDIATE
CA3692
10563666 48.5MHZ
CA3692
T4
10567519 COIL,10.7MHZ
CA7246
10570166 FILTER,CERAMIC 455KHZ
CB0600
10586253 PC MOUNT
CS0121
X1
11497989 C RYSTAL,TC-43 TYPE
CX0551
11497989 37.8MHZ
CX0551
X2
10592095 CRYSTAL,TC -43 48.045MHZ
CX0552
X3
10597706 CRYSTAL,12MHZ
CX1358
CX501
10597714 CRYSTAL,RESONTOR CERAMIC
CX1359
10597714 8MHZ
CX1359
D34 D35
10617322 DIODE SI MA728
DD0056
10617322 MARKED 2A SILICON
DD0056
D48-51
10617728 DIODE HVU306A5 SI
DD0170
D57
10617736 DIODE HVU308 -1 VAR SI
DD0171
10617736 MARKED 8 SILICON
DD0171
D31
10618627 DIODE SK BARRIER SI
DD0274
10618627 SCHOTTKY BARRIER
DD0274
D43
10618908 DIODE MA716 SI
DD0303
10618908 MAR KED M1U SILICON
DD0303
D54
10619260 DIODE VAR HVU12 -3 SILICON DD0340
10619260 MARKED A SILICON
DD0340
D55 D56
10619278 DIODE HVU300A SI VARACTOR DD0341
10619278 MARKED O SILICON
DD0341
10619286 USE DX0114
DD0342
D1 D2 D58
10619294 DIODE FAST RECT SI
DD0343
10619294 MARK ED C SILICON
DD0343
D38 D40 D501
D505
D3 D4 D5 D6
D10 D11 D12
D15 D16 D17
D20 D21 D22
D25 D26 D27
D30 D32 D33
D7 D8 D9
D13 D14
D18 D19
D23 D24
D28 D29
D52 D53
D37 D39 D41 D44 D504
D47
D36
D42
D45
D55 D56
D57
D502 D503
J1
J4
J2
8
9
10
12
11
LC501
LED501 LED502 LED503
LED504 LED505 LED506
LED507 LED508 LED509
IC3
IC4
IC9
IC14
IC2
IC10
IC503
10619302
10619302
10619310
10619310
11273612
11273612
11273612
11273612
11273612
11273612
10622298
10625317
10625317
10626323
10627156
10627289
10627289
10629707
10629707
10630747
10630747
10637098
10637098
11390648
10715266
10720209
10720209
10720704
10720720
10731511
10731511
10784429
10784437
10784445
10784452
10784460
10793925
10793933
10793933
10793933
10895951
10823334
10845345
10875672
10879575
10879575
10880854
10880854
10895951
10897049
10897049
10897718
10901775
10903672
10903672
10906154
10906600
10914802
10914802
10915924
DIODE SI 1SS354 2 PIN
MARKED B SILICON
DIODE SC REF/REG GEN PURP
MARKED 93 SILICON
DIODE HSU277TRF SI FAST R
MARKED 3 SILICON
REPLACED BY 1N4002
DIODE DA227 MULTI ARRAY
MARKED N20 SILICON
DIODE RC202 RECT SI
DIODE SCHOTTKY SD103
DIODE ZN HZ9B2L
ORANGE/BLACK BAND
DIODE ZN HZ11B2L
DIODE HVU300A VARAICAP TU
MARKED O SILICON
DIODE H VU308-1 TRF
MARKED 8 SILICON
DIODE 1MN10 S06 SI
MARKED N10 SILICON
16 PIN DIP
SCREW 4X8 SPECIAL BHMACH2
JACK,ANTENNA
BABY N C ONNECTOR
JACK,DC POWER
JACK,TAPE OUT
JACK,3.5MM
MICROPHONE/SPEAKER
KEYTOP,2 -KEY
KEYTOP,6 -KEY
KEYTOP,24 -KEY
KNOB,VOLUME/SQUELCH
KNOB,TUNING
LCD
LED
14 PIN DIP
MS2000464
XEROXCOPY
REPLACED BY TC4066BP
USE BA10358FT1
REPLACED BY BA10358FT1
IC,TC4S66F BIPOLAR SO 5 (
SURFACE MOU NT TYPE
REPLACED BY LM324N
IC,S81250HG -RD REGULATOR
CMOS VOLTAGE REGULATOR
REPLACED BY HA12413
IC AN78L05 92 T REG 5V
IC TK10420 DIP16 T FM IF
16 PIN DIP
REPLACED BY TDA1905
REPLACED BY AN7805
IC,CXA1356N BIPOLAR
SURFACE MOUNT TYPE
IC,S8054HN -CB MOS
DD0344
DD0344
DD0345
DD0345
DX0114
DX0114
DX0114
DX0114
DX0114
DX0114
DX0206
DX1385
DX1385
DX1693
DX1975
DX2009
DX2009
DX2687
DX2753
DX2753
DX3141
DX3141
DX3795
DX3795
HA12413
HW2000460
J0085
J0085
J0171
J0173
J1821
J1821
K4653
K4654
K4655
K4656
K4657
L0466
L0467
L0467
L0467
LM324N
MS2000460
MU2000460
MX1082
MX1750
MX1750
MX1899
MX1899
MX4213
MX4397
MX4397
MX4542
MX5487
MX5880
MX5880
MX6439
MX6567
MX8053
MX8053
MX8176
IC11
IC12
IC501
IC502
IC13
RA1 RA501 RA502 RA503
RA504 RA505 RA506
RA507 RA508 RA509
RA510 RA511 RA512
RA513 RA514 RA515
SW1
SW2
14
TH1
T801
15
15
29
30
45
46
2
3
4
10915924
10926970
10926970
10926988
10926988
10926996
10926996
10927002
10927002
10927820
10927820
10958916
10958916
10958916
10958916
10958916
11063724
11073749
11081627
11090602
11097169
11393212
11393402
11120961
11120961
11120961
11166964
11166972
11166980
11166998
11223617
11223617
11223625
11223625
11223633
11223633
DETECTOR
IC,MB1505PF -G-BND PLL
M0S SURFACE MOUNT TYPE
IC,BU2040F SELECTOR MOS
SURFACE MOUNT TYPE
IC,GRE -9312 UP 4 BIT
MICROPRESSOR
IC,CXK5864CM -10LL 12LL
S0 -28
IC,M5291FP -600C BIPOLAR
S0 -8 DC-DC CONVERTER
RES,ARRAY 1KX4 1/16W + -5
SWITCH,SLIDE ATTENUATOR
SWITCH,TACT RESET
SPEAKER,8 OHM 1 WATT
THERMISTOR,1.7K
TRANSFORMER,POWER
14 PIN DIP SWITCHING
16 PIN DIP
IS A BASE SCANNER
CORD,POWER AC 6 FOOT
USE W0906
REPLACED BY W0906
PCB ASSY,HEADPHONE JACK
PCB ASSY,KEYBOARD SWITCH
PCB ASSY,TUNING S WITCH
PCB ASSY,VOLUME/SQUELCH
CABINET ASSY,BOTTOM
TIP RUBBER
ESCUTCHEON ASSY,FRONT
W/WINDOW LCD
CABINET ASSY,TOP
W/CUSHION
(This list was generated on 07/08/2005)
MX8176
MX9330
MX9330
MX9331
MX9331
MX9332
MX9332
MX9333
MX9333
MX9415
MX9415
NY0667
NY0667
NY0667
NY0667
NY0667
S3627
SD0114
SP0034
T0182
TA0790
TC4066BP
TDA1905
W0000X
W0906
WB0006
WB0006
XB5457
XB5458
XB5459
XB5460
Z7233
Z7233
Z7234
Z7234
Z7235
Z7235