8
0
9
9
BRUNTON ECLIPSE
INSTRUCTION MANUAL
MANUEL D'INSTRUCTIONS
Copyright 1998, The Brunton Company
A subsidiary of Silva Production, AB
Printed in U.S.A.
form 62-8099 rev 9951
ECLIPSE 8099
INSTRUCTION MANUAL
Section 1 – ORIENTATION (Brunton Eclipse 8099)
Page(s): 1 - 3
Section 2 – MAGNETIC DECLINATION
Section 3 – 1° GRADUATED DIAL
4-6
6
Section 4 – FIELD BEARING (Forward & Reverse Sighting)
6-7
Section 5 – DIRECTION OF TRAVEL
7-8
Section 6 – TOPOGRAPHIC MAP
8
Section 7 – MAP BEARING (Map & Compass Alignment)
Section 8 – TRIANGULATION
8 - 12
12 - 14
Section 9 – BACK BEARING
14
Section 10 – COORDINATE POSITIONING (UTM & Lat./Lon.)
14 - 18
Section 11 – INCLINATION (Hinge, Card & Graduated Dial)
19 - 21
Section 12 – HEIGHT MEASUREMENT (Level & Sloping Ground)
22 - 23
Section 13 – ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
23
Section 14 – ECLIPSE 8099 SPECIFICATIONS
23
i
1 – Orientation: Brunton Eclipse 8099
The Eclipse 8099 compass is a sighting instrument which uses the Earth’s magnetic field to display
a bearing (direction) in degrees. The Eclipse 8099 also contains three clinometer scales to measure angles from horizontal (0°).
The orientation section provides a description of important Eclipse 8099 parts. A detailed
description of Eclipse 8099 operation is provided throughout the instruction manual.
1.1 Sight Cover (Fig 1)
The sight cover opens to three pre-measured angles – 45°, 90° and 120°. Use 45° for forward
mirror sighting and 120° for reverse mirror sighting.
1.2 Vial (Fig 1)
The vial is a clear fluid filled extrusion containing a needle disk with a red circled "N" (described
in 1.3), blue orienting circle (described in 1.9) and a green clinometer arrow (described in 1.10).
The fluid inside the vial stabilizes the needle disk and clinometer arrow.
1.3 Needle Disk – RED circled "N" (Fig 1)
The needle disk contains a permanently magnetized ferrous material which orients the red
circled "N" to magnetic north. Also printed on the needle disk are "E", "S" and "W", for quick
directional reference.
1
1.4 Rotating Azimuth Ring (Fig 1)
The rotating azimuth ring includes a graduated dial (described in section 1.7). The blue
orienting circle and the graduated dial rotate with the rotating azimuth ring.
1.5 Index Lens (Fig 1)
The bubble shaped index lens magnifies the graduated dial (described in 1.7). Also, notice the
green index line in the center of the index lens. Read bearing and inclination at this line.
1.6 Rubber Shoe (Fig 1)
The removable rubber shoe encloses and protects the Eclipse 8099 and a set of quick reference cards (described in 1.11). Also, the rubber shoe can be used as a pencil eraser for maps.
1.7 Graduated Dial (Fig 2)
The graduated dial is graduated 0° through 360° *, incremented by 1°. Read compass bearing
and inclination at the green index line in the index lens. Note the green and black scales for
forward and back bearing, respectively.
1.8 Viewing Lens (Fig 2)
Use the viewing lens to magnify small writing on a map.
*
0° = 360° (one complete revolution)
2
1.9 Orienting Circle – BLUE (Fig 2)
Printed on the bottom of the vial, the adjustable blue orienting circle is used in bearing and
clinometer measurements as well as magnetic declination adjustments. Additionally, the blue
orienting line extending across the vial allows for precise bearing and clinometer measurments,
as well as map alignment.
1.10 Clinometer Arrow – GREEN (Fig 2)
Located inside the vial, the weighted green clinometer arrow points to the ground when the
Eclipse 8099 is positioned on its side. Use the green clinometer arrow in combination with the
blue orienting circle, to measure angle of inclination.
1.11 Quick Reference Information Cards (Fig 3)
The quick reference cards supply quick, valuable information on navigation, formulas and scales
for field use.
1.12 Magnetic Declination Scale (Fig 3)
Magnetic declination is the difference between true north and magnetic north, at a position. The
magnetic declination scale, located on the bottom of the azimuth ring, is used in combination
with the adjustable blue orienting circle to set the Eclipse 8099 for magnetic declination.
1.13 Clinometer Index Mark (Fig 3)
Use the clinometer index mark in combination with the green clinometer arrow and the blue
orienting circle to measure angles up or down from the horizon.
3
2 -- Magnetic Declination
The Earth is completely surrounded by a magnetic field, and an unobstructed magnetized object
will orient itself with magnetic north and south poles. Magnetic declination (or magnetic variation) is
the difference between true geographic north (north pole) and magnetic north (in northern Canada),
with respect to your position. It is important to note magnetic declination at your position, because
magnetic declination varies and fluctuate slowly at different rates, around the world. (Fig 4)
Contact Brunton for current information at (307) 856-6559, or e-mail us at support@brunton.com.
Figure 4
4
The isogonic chart shows North America, only. Use an isogonic chart, or a current United States
Geological Survey (USGS), Bureau of Land Management (BLM), or another map to determine
magnetic declination at your position. Declination can be east, west or even 0°, from your current
position. At 0° declination, true north and magnetic north are aligned.
True North
Example: If magnetic declination at your position is 15° east, then
magnetic north is 15° east of true geographic north – Figure 5 displays
true geographic north and magnetic north, as indicated in the legends
of USGS and BLM maps.
Most maps use true north as a reference. When adjustment for magnetic declination is complete, a bearing measurement will be with
respect to true north, same as the map.
Magnetic North
15o E
Your Position
Figue 5
2.1 Magnetic Declination Adjustment
1. Find the magnetic declination at your current position, from a map or chart.
2. Remove rubber shoe, and open both covers.
3. Position the Eclipse 8099 with bottom of clear base facing you. (Fig 6)
Figure 6
5
4. Locate declination scale.
5. Grasp azimuth ring in one hand, and the vial in the other. (Fig 6)
6. Hold azimuth ring stationary, and rotate vial until the arrow on the blue orienting circle points
to the value of magnetic declination at your current position.
· Make sure declination is correct (east or west).
3 – 1 Degree Graduated Dial
The 1° graduated dial has two scales, a green and a black scale and both are incremented by 1°.
(Fig 7) The green scale is for forward sighting and the black scale is for reverse sighting. The
scale increments from 0° to 360°, where 0° & 360° are the same value, and both indicate north.
In addition, 90° indicates east, 180° is south and 270° is west.
0
10
20
0
15
200
0
190 180 170 16
21
0
0
33
40
50
0
14
60
12
0
260 270 280 29
0
250
30
0
0
24
290
0
280 270 260 25
13
0
31
0
30
0
23
350
340
30
0
33
22
0
0
32
70
110
100
80
90
90
100
110
80
31
0
13
0
50
0
23
60
12
0
0
24
30
0
70
170 180 190 20
0
160
21
0
10
0
40
350 3
0
15
20
0
32
0
14
40
22
0
Figure 7
4 – Field Bearing
There are two methods to sight a field bearing – forward mirror sighting
and reverse mirror sighting. Since there are two methods and two
scales, please follow instructions carefully for each method.
4.1 Forward Mirror Sighting
This is the most accurate method of sighting a field bearing.
1. Find and set the magnetic declination at your position.
· Refer to section 2.1, Magnetic Declination Adjustment, for help.
2. Open sight cover to 45°.
3. At eye-level, sight object through sight hole, and align sighting
lines and peep sight. (Fig 8)
6
Figure 8
4. Rotate azimuth ring until reflection of blue orienting circle
outlines the red circled "N".
· Make sure base is level and sighting lines and peep
sight are aligned.
5. Position Eclipse 8099 close enough to read field bearing
in magnified index lens.
· Read bearing from green scale at the green index
line – 170°, Figure 9.
Figure 9
4.2 Reverse Mirror Sighting
Reverse mirror sighting is another method of sighting a
field bearing.
1. Find and set magnetic declination at your position.
2. Open sight cover to 120°.
3. Hold Eclipse 8099 at waist-level, with sight cover
pointing at you. (Fig 10)
4. Sight object in the mirror and align mirror line with the
reflection of the cover line.
5. Rotate azimuth ring until blue orienting circle
surrounds the red circled "N".
· Make sure mirror line and reflection of cover line are
aligned with sighted object.
Figure 10
6. Read field bearing from the black scale in the magnified
index lens – 170°, Figure 11.
5 – Direction Of Travel
When field bearing to a destination is already known, set
compass to the known field bearing, sight and travel to the
destination. The bearing you travel is known as the direction
of travel. The following example uses forward mirror sighting.
Figure 11
1. Set magnetic declination.
2. Open sight cover to 45°.
3. Rotate azimuth ring until compass is set to known field bearing, using green scale.
7
4. Position Eclipse 8099 at eye level and sight
through the sight hole.
5. Pivot your body until reflection of the blue
orienting circle outlines red circled "N".
(Figures 12 & 13)
· Do not rotate azimuth ring.
6. Sight destination or object through sight hole.
7. Travel to destination or object.
Figure 12
Always sight a destination or object in the distance.
Do not follow compass bearing by watching the
compass. If final destination is too far away to see,
sight a tree, mountain or something else and walk
to the object. At object, re-sight compass bearing to another object.
Repeat until final destination is reached.
Figure 13
6 – Topographic Map
A topographic map (topo-map) is a 2-dimensional drawing of 3-dimensional terrain. Hills, valleys,
ridges, cliffs and other terrain are represented through a series of contour lines. Each line
represents constant elevation in meters or feet above sea level. The contour interval (vertical
distance) between each line is indicated in the legend of the topographic map. Lines positioned
close together indicate a rapid change in elevation, while lines further apart indicate a more gradual
change in elevation.
With practice, you’ll begin to recognize many different contours
on a topo-map, and identify the
best possible route from one
position to another. (Fig 14) In
addition, by studying the map it
will be possible to identify
landmarks and determine
positions, bearings and
distances.
Figure 14
7 – Map Bearing
Whether in the field or at home, it is possible to determine a bearing from one position to another
directly from a map. The Eclipse 8099 provides two methods of finding map bearings – map
alignment and compass alignment.
7.1 Map Alignment
Align a topo-map to true north, then find a map bearing.
8
This is a popular method because it is possible to compare the map to the actual terrain. The
following examples use a USGS topographic map.
1. Remove rubber shoe.
2. Adjust for magnetic declination.
3. Rotate azimuth ring until compass bearing reads 0° -green scale, figure 15.
4. With mirrored end of compass pointing to true north on
the map, place the clear base along the map’s margin
(edge of printed map). (Fig 16)
· On maps other than a USGS or BLM, true northsouth may not be aligned with the map’s margin, so
it may be necessary to place the clear base next to
the true north indicator.
Figure 15
Figure 16
5. Rotate map until blue orienting circle outlines the red circled "N". (Fig 16)
· The compass base should remain along the map’s margin.
9
The topo-map is now aligned with true north. In the field, it is possible to compare the map to
the actual terrain. Now, find the map bearing from one position to another.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Place a "point" at a starting position and an "X" at a destination.
Draw a line connecting the "point" and the "X".
Open cover and sight cover as far as possible.
With both covers pointing to the "X", position clear base next to the line. (Fig 17)
· Do not move the map.
10. Rotate azimuth ring until blue orienting
circle outlines the red circled "N". (Fig
18)
11. Read bearing at the magnified index
line from the green scale. (Fig 18)
Figure 17
Figure 18
This bearing is the map bearing from the starting "point" to the destination.
7.2 Compass Alignment
Another way of finding a map bearing is using the compass alignment method. This method
allows for quick bearing determination, without aligning the map to true north. Use this method
for pre-planning at home, or in the office. The following example uses a USGS topo-map,
where the margin is aligned to true north.
1. Remove rubber shoe.
2. Adjust for magnetic declination, shown on topo-map.
· If your map does not have magnetic declination, adjust to 0° declination.
3. Set a long straight edge next to the map’s margin line (running true north-south).
4. Using a pencil, draw a true north-south line from the bottom to the top of the map.
10
Figure 19
5.
6.
7.
8.
· Fill map with additional true
north-south lines, spaced
approximately 1 inch apart,
parallel to map’s margin. (Fig
19)
On the map, mark a start position
with a "point" and a destination
with an "X".
Draw a line connecting both
marks.
Remove the rubber shoe and
open both covers to 180°.
With both covers pointing to the
"X", place clear base next to the
line. (Fig 20)
Figure 20
11
9. Keeping clear base stationary on the map,
rotate azimuth ring until blue orienting circle
points in a northerly direction, and the red lines
on graduated circle are aligned with the drawn
true north-south lines. (Fig 21)
10. Read bearing from the green scale in magnified
index lens. (Fig 21)
If using a map other than a USGS or BLM map,
check that the map’s margin is aligned to true
north. If not aligned, it is necessary to draw true
north-south lines from the true north indicator
(indicated by an arrow with an "N" or a star).
Then, find map bearing.
8 -- Triangulation
In this section, you will determine field bearings to
Figure 21
three visible landmarks and plot them as map bearings.
The intersection of the bearing lines indicate your approximate position. A landmark can be a
mountain peak, a cliff, or any visible object displayed on your map. The following example uses a
USGS 7.5 minute topo-map, and forward mirror sighting for bearing determination.
1. Adjust for magnetic declination.
2. Find three prominent landmarks in the field.
3. Orient the map to true north.
· See Section 7.1, Map Alignment, for help.
4. Find all three landmarks on the map, place an ‘X’ at the positions and label them ‘1’, ‘2’ & ‘3’.
(Fig 22)
Figure 22
12
5. Sight a field bearing to
landmark ‘1’ – 320° (green
scale), this example.
· See Section 4.1, Forward
Mirror Sighting, for help.
6. With both covers open to
180°, place clear base of
8099 next to landmark ‘1’,
on the map.
7. With green scale set to
320°, pivot compass around
landmark ‘1’ until blue
orienting circle outlines red
circled "N". (Fig 23)
8. Draw the 320° map bearing
line using the side of the
base, passing through
landmark ‘1’.
· Your position is some
where along this line.
(Fig 23)
Figure 23
9. Repeat process for
landmarks ‘2’ (50°) and
‘3’ (90°).
Either a point or a small
triangle will form at the
intersection of the three
lines. Your position is at
the point, or within the
small triangle. (Fig 24)
Figure 24
13
It is also possible to determine three map bearings using the compass alignment method (section
7.2, Compass Alignment). This method uses the map’s true north, so the map can be positioned
any direction while bearings on a map are determined. With compass set at sighted bearing, rotate
compass about position until the blue orienting circle is in a northerly direction, and red lines on the
graduated dial are aligned with the map’s true north-south lines.
9 – Back Bearing
A back bearing is 180° from another bearing. If you face true north (0° bearing) a back bearing is
directly behind you, or 180°. Another example: If you sight a field bearing of 320° the back bearing will be 140° (320° – 180° = 140°).
When using the Eclipse 8099 there is no
need to add or subtract because there are
two scales (Fig 25). When sighting a bearing
using the green scale, simply determine the
back bearing by reading the black scale. If
you read the black scale for your bearing,
read the green scale for the back bearing.
Figure 25 – Forward and Back Bearing In
Magnified Index Lens
10 – Coordinate Position
Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers
Figure 25
are becoming a valuable navigation tool with
map and compass. GPS receivers require an understanding of coordinate systems to locate a
position. This section explains positioning on a 7.5 minute topographic map using Universal
Transverse Mercator (UTM) grid (grid coordinate system) and latitude and longitude (spherical
coordinate system). The Eclipse 8099 provides Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) gird scales
on the clear base and reference card 6.
14
84 o N Lat.
Zone 59
180 o E Long.
Meridian
174o E Long.
10.1 UTM Coordinate System
Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) is a grid
coordinate system measured from the Equator (0°
latitude) and a zone meridian. UTM flattens and
divides the Earth into 60 zones, each zone 6° wide
and each with a zone meridian down the center (Fig
26). Since UTM grid is a flat representation of
Earth, grids above 84° N. and below 80° S. latitude
are considerably distorted, and are excluded from
maps.
Zone 60
Zone 1
Equator
o
80 S Lat.
Figure 26
A UTM position is measured
using an easting and a northing
from a known reference point
called a datum. If using a Global
Positioning System (GPS)
receiver, document the zone
number and map datum, since
not every map uses the same
local geodetic datum. (Fig 27)
Mapped, edited, and published by the Geological Survey
Control by USGS and USC&GS
Topography by photogrammeteric methods from aerial
photographs taken 1966. Field checked 1968
Polyconic projection. 1927 North American datum
10,000-foot grid based on Wyoming coordinate system,
west zone
1000-meter Universal Transverse Mercator grid ticks,
zone 12. shown in blue
The following example uses a
1:24,000 scale, 7.5 minute topomap, with 1,000 meter grid tick
marks, indicated by the 3 small
zeros in the label (4790000mE).
Fine red dashed lines indicate selected fence lines
Where omitted, land lines have not been established
Figure 27
10.1.a -- UTM Grid Coordinate Positioning
This example uses a 1:24,000 map & roamer scale.
1. Locate UTM roamer scales on reference card 6.
2. Identify and document the zone number and map datum (zone 11 & North American
Datum 1927, this example).
599
600
601
47
91
4791
47
90
Easting
Increases
47
90000m N
Scale: 1:24,000
zone 11
NAD-27
5
99000m E
600
601
Figure 28
3. Identify UTM grid tick marks and labels around the map’s margin.
4. Draw lines connecting equal valued UTM tick marks. (Fig 28)
· A 1,000 meter by 1,000 meter square grid will form.
5. Identify and mark a position on the map with an ‘X’.
15
Northing
Increases
6. Place corner of roamer scale ("0") at the ‘X’, with scale increasing left and down. (Fig 29)
· Make sure roamer scale is parallel to the UTM grid lines.
599
600
601
47
91
4791
8
6
4
1:24k
(50 meters)
47
90
2
1k
4
6
47
90000m N
8
1k
600
5
99000m E
601
Figure 29
7. Count from the ‘X’ to the nearest left easting line – 100, 200, … 500, 600 and 650 m.
8. Add 650 meter to the nearest left easting line.
· 650 m E + 599000mE = 599650mE
9. Count from the ‘X’ to the nearest northing line, below – 100, 200, …600 and 700 m.
10. Add 700 m to the nearest northing line below the ‘X’.
· 700 m N + 4790000mN = 4790700mN
The final UTM coordinate is:
99650mE, 4790700mN (zone 11, NAD-27)
5
The 1:24,000 roamer scale, in the illustration above, has 50 meter resolution (50 meters
between marks), where the 1:24,000 roamer scale on the 8099 base and quick reference
card 6 provide 20 meter resolution.
The grids change with respect to the scales. So, identify the grid values and grid resolution
when using a UTM grid scale other than 1:24,000.
With UTM grid it is possible to identify a position within 100 meters of the actual position,
without a scale. After identifying tick marks around the map’s margin, and drawing the grid
lines, simply estimate the distance from the lower left-hand corner of the grid that surrounds the
‘X’. Remember, eastings always increase to the right, and northings always increase up.
10.2 Latitude And Longitude Coordinate System
Latitude and longitude scales are not provided with the Eclipse 8099, but determining a position
using a latitude and longitude scale, or a ruler is an essential navigation skill.
Latitude and longitude is a spherical coordinate system measured from the Earth’s center point
16
to locations on its surface. A position on Earth is measured in degrees ( ° ), minutes ( ‘ ) and
seconds ( " ), where 60 second = 1 minute & 60 minutes
45o 00' 00" N. Latitude
= 1 degree. Very similar to time on a clock. Measurements
60o 00' 00" W. Longitude
begin at the Equator (0° latitude) and the Prime Meridian
60
(0° longitude).
N
o
40o
In Figure 30, the position is read:
45° 00’ 00" N. Lat. = 45 degrees, 0 minutes and 0
seconds north latitude
60° 00’ 00" W. Long. = 60 degrees, 0 minutes and 0
seconds west longitude.
20o
Latitude
Increase
45o N.
80
o
S
60o W.
60o 40o
W
o
20o 0
E
Longitude
Increase
Figure 30
o
108 30'
43o 07' 30"
5'
2' 30"
o
108 22' 30"
43o 07' 30" 10.2.a -- Latitude And Longitude
Coordinate From A Topo-Map
27'30" 25'
5'
2' 30"
27' 30" 25'
43o 00'
43o 00'
o
108 30'
108o 22' 30"
Figure 31
10.2.b -- Map Preparation
1. Identify the tick marks, and draw lines
connecting the tick marks. (Fig 32)
· The lines produce 9 small
rectangles.
2. Identify and mark a position on the
map with an ‘X’.
3. Use a 1:24,000 latitude-longitude
scale to determine the coordinate
position of the ‘X’ (not available with
the Eclipse 8099).
All 7.5 minute USGS topo-maps are
bound by 7.5 minutes of latitude and 7.5
minutes of longitude. The four corners
of the map are identified by coordinates
in latitude and longitude. In addition, tick
marks are placed every 2’ 30" around
the margin of the map, with crosses in
the middle. The 4 crosses identify the
intersections of the 2’ 30" tick marks.
(Fig 31)
108o 30'
43o 07' 30"
108o 22' 30"
43o 07' 30"
43o 00'
108o 22' 30"
43o 00'
108o 30'
Figure 32
17
10.2.c -- Latitude Determination
1. Use the small rectangle that completely
surrounds the ‘X’.
2. Place scale vertically, until bound by both
horizontal latitude lines, and touches the
‘X’. (Fig 33)
3. At the ‘X’, add the value indicated by the
scale (00’ 50") to the lowest latitude value
(43° 02’ 30").
30"
20
43o 05' 00"
2'
40
20
Latitude
Lines
1'
40
N
Add values as you would when adding time on
a clock.
o
43 02' 30"
43° 02’ 30"
+ 00’ 50"
Figure 33
43° 02’ 80" = 43° 03’ 20" N. Latitude
00"
Longitude
Lines
00
"
N
20
108° 22’ 30"
+
01’ 15"
108° 23’ 45" = 108° 23’ 45" W. Longitude
40
1'
20
40
2'
30
20 "
10.2.d -- Longitude Determination
1. Slope the scale until bound by both vertical
longitude lines, and touches the ‘X’. (Fig 34)
· Make sure scale increases with increasing
longitude lines.
2. At the ‘X’, add value indicated by the scale
(1’ 15") to the lowest longitude value (108°
22’ 30").
20
108o 25' 00"
108o 22' 30"
Figure 34
Final position of the ‘X’ is:
43° 03’ 20" N. Latitude
108° 23’ 45" W. Longitude
Follow the same procedures when using different scaled maps (1:100,000, for example).
Just make sure to use the correct scale.
If you do not have a latitude-longitude finder, you may use 10 inches on a ruler. Each inch
represents 15 minutes of latitude or longitude on a 1:24,000 scale map. Ten inches
may not fit, as in section 10.2.c, Latitude Determination, so you must slant the ruler until the
10 inches are completely enclosed by the 2’ 30" lines, and ruler is next to the position.
18
11 – Inclination
Inclination is the angular difference from horizontal (0°). The Eclipse 8099 implements three
clinometer scales, where each is incremented in degrees. The three clinometers are the 5° hinge,
5° card and the 1° graduated dial clinometer.
11.1 5 Degree Hinge Clinometer
This is the quickest method of measuring inclination. The resolution of the scale is 5°, with 2.5°
readable accuracy.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Remove rubber shoe to reveal the 5° clinometer scale, located on the end of the hinge.
Open the sight cover to at least 120°.
Hold the Eclipse 8099 at eye level with 5° scale facing you, and extend to arms length.
Sight object behind the Eclipse 8099. (Fig 35)
Figure 35
5. With the base level, open cover until it reaches the inclination of the object sighted.
6. Read inclination at the white index line, on the hinge – 40°, figure 35.
11.2 5 Degree Card Clinometer
Use 5° clinometer (reference card 1), for this method. Notice the resolution of the scale on the
card is 5°, so use this method to sight inclination up or down from the horizon, with 2.5°
readable accuracy.
11.2.a -- Edge Sighting
1. Make sure the 5° clinometer, reference card 1, is centered under the vial.
2. Open sight cover to 120°.
19
3. At eye-level and arms length, position Eclipse 8099 on its side with the clinometer facing
you and down.
4. Sight object behind the compass.
(Fig 36)
· Align either side of the clear base
with object.
5. On the clinometer card, read
inclination at the end of the green
clinometer arrow - 40°.
11.2.b -- Sight Hole Sighting
1. Make sure the 5° clinometer,
reference card 1, is centered in the vial.
2. Open sight cover to 45°.
Figure 36
3. Position Eclipse 8099 at eye-level with
mirror extending outward to the left.
4. Above or below the horizon, sight an object
through sight hole. (Fig 37)
· Align cover line with the sight cover line.
5. Read inclination in the mirror, on reference
card - 40°. (Fig 37)
Figure 37
11.3 1 Degree Graduated Dial Clinometer
The 1° graduated dial clinometer is the most accurate means of sighting inclination. The
resolution of the graduated dial is 1°. Use this method to sight up from the horizon (0°) to
overhead (90°), or from the horizon down.
11.3.a -- Up Angle
1. Remove rubber shoe to expose back side
of compass.
2. Locate the clinometer index mark on the
back side of the azimuth ring.
3. Holding azimuth ring stationary, rotate vial
until the arrow on the blue orienting circle
points to the clinometer index mark.
(Fig 38)
20
Figure 38
4. Place rubber shoe back on the base.
Figure 39
5. Close cover and open the sight
cover to 45°.
6. Position Eclipse 8099 at eye-level with
mirror extending outward to the
left.
7. Above the horizon (level, 0°), sight
object through sight hole. (Fig 39)
· Align cover line with the sight
cover line.
8. Rotate azimuth ring until the
reflection of arrow on the blue orienting circle is aligned with
the green clinometer arrow.
9. Position Eclipse 8099 close enough to read inclination through
the index lens.
· Read angle from the black scale – 30°, figure 40.
Figure 40
11.3 b -- Down Angle
1. Remove rubber shoe to expose back side of compass.
2. Locate the clinometer index mark on the back side of the azimuth ring.
3. Holding azimuth ring stationary, rotate vial until the arrow on the blue orienting circle
points to the clinometer index mark.
4. Place rubber shoe back on the base.
5. Close cover and open the sight
cover to 45°.
6. Position Eclipse 8099 at eye-level
with mirror extending outward to
the right.
7. Below the horizon (level, 0°), sight
object through sight hole. (Fig 41)
· Align cover line with the sight
cover line.
8. Rotate azimuth ring until the
reflection of arrow on the blue
Figure 41
orienting circle is aligned with the
green clinometer arrow.
9. Position the Eclipse 8099 close enough to read inclination in
index lens.
· Read 20° from the green scale. (Fig 42)
Figure 42
21
12 – Height Measurement
We can now apply clinometer measurement to height measurement and percent grade. In order to
calculate height of an object you must know distance to the object, and measure the angle of inclination with the Eclipse 8099. The following example uses the 1° graduated dial clinometer.
12.1 Level Ground Height Measurement
1. Measure distance to object (50 feet, this example)
2. Adjust blue orienting circle to clinometer
index mark.
3. Position Eclipse 8099 at eye-level with
mirror extending outward to the left.
· See section 11.3.a, Up Angle, for help.
4. Above the horizon (level, 0°), sight top of
object through sight hole. (Fig 43)
5. Read bearing from black scale (36°, this
example).
6. Position Eclipse 8099 at eye-level with
mirror extending outward to the right.
· See section 11.3.b, Down Angle, for help.
7. Below the horizon (level 0°), sight base of
object through sight hole. (Fig 43)
8. Read bearing from green scale (10°, this
example).
9. Calculate height of object using the equation.
· Height = (TanA + TanB) x Distance
· Height = (Tan36° + Tan10°) x 50 feet
· Height = 45 feet
Figure 43
Note: Do not calculate tangent of an angle by adding tangents of two smaller angles. Example:
Tan(60°) is not equal to Tan(30°) + Tan(30°). You must find Tan(60°) from another table, use
a calculator, or step back from object until the angle of inclination is less than or equal to 45°, to
use tangent tables provided on reference card 8.
12.2 Sloping Ground Height Measurement
1. Measure distance to object (75 feet, this example)
2. Adjust blue orienting circle to clinometer index mark.
3. Position Eclipse 8099 at eye-level with mirror extending outward to the left.
· See section 11.3.a, Up Angle, for help.
22
4. Above the horizon (level, 0°), sight top of
object through sight hole. (Fig 44)
5. Read bearing from black scale (38°, this
example).
6. Above the horizon (level, 0°), sight base of
object through sight hole. (Fig 44)
7. Read bearing from black scale (10°, this
example).
8. Calculate height of the object.
· Height = (TanA – TanB) x Distance
· Height = (Tan38° – Tan10°) x 75 feet
· Height = 45 feet
12.3 Percent Grade
After measuring angle of inclination (20°) and
finding the tangent of the angle, simply move
the decimal two places to the right.
· Example: Tan20° = 0.364 = 36.4% Grade
Figure 44
Remember to readjust for magnetic declination before sighting a bearing.
13 – Additional Information
Before heading into the field, practice using the Eclipse 8099 and a map in a familiar area. Also,
carefully re-read the instruction manual to gain a full understanding of Eclipse 8099 applications.
Become an expert with map and compass and you should never get lost. Also, carry a complete
survival kit and educate yourself on survival techniques.
14 – Eclipse 8099 Specifications
Magnetism:
NdFeB needle disk
Accuracy:
Bearing -- ± 1° accurate reading (0.5° readable)
Clinometer -- ± 1° accurate reading (0.5° readable)
Size:
Length – 4.2 in. (10.7 cm)*
Width – 2.8 in. (7.1 cm)*
Weight – 4.1 oz (116g)**
* Includes Eclipse 8099 compass and rubber shoe
** Includes Eclipse 8099 compass, rubber shoe, reference cards and lanyard
23
ECLIPSE 8099
MANUEL D’INSTRUCTIONS
Section 1 – ORIENTATION (Brunton Eclipse 8099)
Page(s) : 27 - 28
Section 2 – DÉCLINAISON MAGNÉTIQUE
Section 3 – LIMBE 1O
29 - 30
30
Section 4 – RELÈVEMENT (avant et inverse)
30 - 31
Section 5 – LIGNE DE MARCHE
31
Section 6 – CARTE TOPOGRAPHIQUE
32
Section 7 – RELÈVEMENT SUR CARTE (concordance carte et boussole)
32 - 34
Section 8 – TRIANGULATION
34 - 35
Section 9 – RELÈVEMENT INVERSE
35
Section 10 – POSITIONNEMENT PAR COORDONNÉES
36 - 39
Section 11 – INCLINAISON (charnière, carte et limbe)
40 - 42
Section 12 – CALCUL DE LA HAUTEUR (terrain plat et incliné)
42 - 44
Section 13 – RENSEIGNEMENTS COMPLÉMENTAIRES
44
Section 14 – SPÉCIFICATIONS TECHNIQUES DU MODÈLE ECLIPSE 8099
44
ii
1 – ORIENTATION : Brunton Eclipse 8099
La boussole Eclipse 8099 est un instrument de visée qui permet de calculer un relèvement (direction) en degrés par le biais des champs magnétiques de la Terre. Le modèle Eclipse 8099
renferme également trois échelles clinométriques afin de mesurer les angles à partir de
l’horizontale (0O)
La section traitant de l’orientation fournit une description des principales composantes de la boussole. Les autres sections de ce manuel présentent une description détaillée du fonctionnement du
modèle Eclipse 8099.
Figure 1 - p. 1
1.1 Couvercle de visée (Figure 1) [1.1 - Sight Cover]
Le couvercle de visée se déplie à trois angles pré-réglés soit 45O, 90O et 120O. Utilisez l’angle
de 45O pour les relèvements avants et celui de 120O pour les relèvements inverses.
1.2 Fiole (Figure 1) [1.2 - Vial]
La fiole est composée d’un contenant rempli de liquide transparent qui renferme un disque
indicateur formé d’un N encerclé rouge (voir section 1.3), d’un cercle d’orientation bleu (voir
section 1.9) et d’une flèche de clinomètre verte (voir section 1.10). Le liquide permet de ralentir
et de stabiliser le mouvement du disque indicateur et de la flèche de clinomètre.
1.3 Disque indicateur – N encerclé ROUGE (Figure 1) [1.3 - Needle Disk (Circled “N”)]
Le disque indicateur contient une matière ferreuse magnétisée en permanence qui oriente le N
encerclé rouge vers le nord magnétique. On retrouve également sur le disque les symboles E,
S et W pour une consultation rapide.
1.4 Cadran azimutal pivotant (Figure 1) [1.4 - Rotating Azimuth Ring]
Le cadran azimutal est muni d’un limbe (voir section 1.7). Le cercle indicateur bleu et le limbe
pivotent en suivant le mouvement du cadran azimutal.
1.5 Lentille d’index (Figure 1) [1.5 - Index Lens]
La lentille d’index bombée en forme de bulle grossit le limbe (voir section 1.7) De plus, vous
pouvez remarquer une ligne d’indice verte au centre de la lentille. C’est à ce point que vous
lisez les données de relèvements et d’inclinaison.
1.6 Patin de caoutchouc (Figure 1) [1.6 - Rubber Shoe]
Le patin de caoutchouc amovible protège la boussole Eclipse 8099 et renferme une série de
cartes à consultation rapide (voir section 1.11). Le patin sert également de gomme à effacer
pour les cartes.
27
Figure 2 - p. 2
1.7 Limbe (Figure 2) [1.7 - Graduated Dial]
Le limbe est un cadran gradué de 0O à 360O*, par incréments de 1O. Vous pouvez lire les
données de relèvements et d’inclinaison de la boussole sur la ligne d’indice verte dans la lentille
d’index. Prenez note des échelles verte et noire pour les relèvements avant et inverse,
respectivement.
1.8 Viseur (Figure 2) [1.8 - Viewing Lens]
Le viseur permet de grossir les caractères trop petits sur la carte.
1.9 Cercle d’orientation – BLEU (Figure 2) [1.9 Orienting Circle]
Imprimé au fond de la fiole, ce pointeur réglable bleu en forme de cercle permet de calculer les
relèvements et la pente des alignements ainsi que les ajustements de déclinaison magnétique.
De plus, la ligne d’orientation bleue qui traverse la fiole permet de déterminer avec précision
des relèvements et des pentes ainsi que l’alignement sur carte.
1.10 Flèche du clinomètre – VERT (Figure 2) [1.10 - Clinometer Arrow]
Située à l’intérieur de la fiole, la flèche pondérée verte du clinomètre pointe vers le sol lors la
boussole Eclipse 8099 est positionnée sur le flanc. Combinez l’utilisation de la flèche verte du
clinomètre et pointeur en forme de cercle bleu pour mesurer l’angle d’inclinaison.
Figure 3 - p. 3
1.11 Fiches de consultation rapide (Figure 3) [1.11 - Quick Reference Information Cards]
Les fiches de consultation rapide permettent d’avoir sous la main des informations sur
l’orientation, des formules et des échelles pour l’orientation sur le terrain.
1.12 Échelle de déclinaison magnétique (Figure 3) [1.12 - Magnetic Declination Scale]
La déclinaison magnétique correspond à la différence entre le nord géographique et le Nord
magnétique pour une position précise. L’échelle de déclinaison magnétique, située au bas du
cadran azimutal est utilisé en combinaison avec le pointeur réglable bleu pour établir la
déclinaison magnétique.
1.13 Repère du clinomètre (Figure 3) [1.13 - Clinometer Index Mark]
Le repère du clinomètre, jumelé à la flèche verte du clinomètre et au pointeur bleu, permet de
mesuré les angles ascendants et descendants par rapport à l’horizon.
* 0O = 360O (une révolution complète)
28
2 – Déclinaison magnétique
Des champs magnétiques ceinturent la Terre. Un objet magnétique sera naturellement orienté vers
les pôles magnétiques Nord et Sud. LA déclinaison magnétique (ou variation magnétique)
correspond à la différence entre le nord géographique (Pôle Nord) et le Nord magnétique (au nord
du Canada) pour une position précise. Il est important de noter la déclinaison magnétique pour
votre positon actuelle car la déclinaison magnétique fluctue lentement à un taux variable autour de
la planète. (Figure 4) Appelez Brunton pour obtenir des variations de déclinaison exactes au
1-307-856-6559 ou communiquez avec nous par courrier électronique à HYPERLINK mailto:
support@brunton.com
Figure 4 - p. 4
La carte des lignes isogones représente l’Amérique du nord uniquement. Utilisez une carte de
lignes isogones, une relevé USGS (United States Geological Survey) ou BLM (Bureau of Land
Management), ou tout autre carte pour calculer la déclinaison magnétique à votre position. La
déclinaison peut être à l’est, à l’ouest ou à 0O de votre position. Si la déclinaison correspond à 0O,
le nord géographique et le Nord magnétique sont alignés.
Figure 5 - p. 5
Votre positon [your position]
Nord géographique [true north]
Nord magnétique [magnetic north]
Exemple : Si la déclinaison magnétique est à votre position est 15O est, le Nord magnétique est
alors à 15O est du nord géographique. La figure 5 illustre le nord géographique et le nord
magnétique, tel qu’indiqués sur les légendes des cartes USGS et BLM.
La plupart des cartes adoptent le nord géographique comme point de référence. Si le réglage pour
la déclinaison magnétique est dûment complété, le calcul d’un relèvement sera par rapport au nord
géographique, comme sur la carte.
2.1 Réglage pour déclinaison magnétique
1. Trouvez la déclinaison magnétique de votre position actuelle, à partir d’une carte ou d’un
relevé.
2. Retirez le patin de caoutchouc et ouvrez les deux couvercles.
3. Positionnez la boussole de telle façon que le revers de la base transparente soit face à vous
(Figure 6).
Figure 6 - p. 5
4. Repérez l’échelle de déclinaison.
29
5. Tenez le cadran azimutal d’une main et la fiole de l’autre (Figure 6).
6. Tout en maintenant le cadran azimutal en place, faites pivoter la fiole jusqu’à ce que le
pointeur en forme de cercle bleu soit orienté vers la donnée de déclinaison magnétique de
votre position actuelle.
- Assurez-vous que la déclinaison est correcte (est ou ouest).
3 – Limbe 1O
Le limbe 1O est composé de deux échelles, une verte et une noire, toutes deux graduées par
incréments de 1O (Figure 7). L’échelle verte est destinée aux relèvements avant et l’échelle noire
aux relèvements inverses. Les incréments vont de 0O à 360O. Ces deux valeurs sont égales et
correspondent au point nord. De plus, 90O indique l’est, 180O le sud et 270O l’ouest.
Figure 7 - p. 6
4 – Relèvement
Il existe deux méthodes de relèvement : la visée avant au miroir et la visée inverse au miroir. Il faut
suivre attentivement les instructions car chaque méthode réfère à sa propre échelle.
4.1 Visée avant au miroir
Il s’agit de la méthode de visée la plus précise.
1. Déterminez et réglez la déclinaison magnétique à votre position actuelle.
- Reportez-vous à la section 2.1 pour le réglage de la déclinaison magnétique.
2. Ouvrez le couvercle de visée à un angle de 45O.
3. En plaçant la boussole à hauteur d’oeil, visez l’objet à travers la mire et alignez les lignes de
visée et l’oeilleton de visée (Figure 8).
Figure 8 - p. 6
4. Faites pivoter le cadran azimutal jusqu’à ce que la réflexion du pointeur bleu soit superposé
au N encerclé rouge.
5. Placez la boussole suffisamment près pour lire le relèvement dans le viseur grossissant.
- Lisez le relèvement de l’échelle verte à la ligne d’indice verte, soit 170O (Figure 9).
Figure 9 - p. 7
4.2 Visée inverse au miroir
Il s’agit de la seconde méthode pour calculer un relèvement.
1. Déterminez et réglez la déclinaison magnétique à votre position actuelle.
2. Ouvrez le couvercle de visée à un angle de 120O.
30
3. Placez la boussole à hauteur de la taille et le couvercle de visée pointé vers vous
(Figure10).
Figure 10 - p. 7
4. Visez l’objet dans le miroir et alignez la ligne de miroir avec celle réfléchie dans le couvercle.
5. Faites pivoter le cadran azimutal jusqu’à ce que la réflexion du pointeur bleu soit superposé
au N encerclé rouge.
- Assurez-vous que la ligne du miroir et celle réfléchie sont alignées sur l’objet en mire.
6. Lisez le relèvement en référence de l’échelle noire dans le viseur grossissant, soit 170O
(Figure 11)
Figure 11 - p. 7
5 – Ligne de marche
Si vous connaissez déjà le relèvement par rapport à une destination, ajustez la boussole vers ce
point connu, visez et marchez vers cette direction à suivre. Le direction que vous suivez s’appelle
la ligne de marche. La méthode de visée avant au miroir est utilisée pour l’exemple suivant.
1. Réglez la déclinaison magnétique.
2. Ouvrez le couvercle de visée à un angle de 45O.
3. Faites pivoter le cadran azimutal jusqu’à ce que la boussole soit réglée sur le relèvement connu
à l’aide de l’échelle verte.
4. Placez la boussole à hauteur d’oeil et visez l’objet à travers la mire.
5. Pivotez votre corps jusqu’à ce que la réflexion du pointeur bleu soit superposé au N encerclé
rouge (Figure 12 et 13).
- Ne faites pas tourner le cadran azimutal.
Figure 12 et 13 - p. 8
6. Visez la destination ou l’objet à travers la mire.
7. Marchez vers votre destination ou point de repère.
Choisissez toujours une destination ou un point de repère éloigné. Ne suivez pas le relèvement en
gardant les yeux fixés sur la boussole. Si la destination finale est hors de votre champ visuel, visez
un arbre, une montagne ou un objet dans son prolongement et marchez vers cet objet. Une fois
cette cible intermédiaire atteinte, visez à nouveau un autre objet pour recalculer un relèvement.
Répétez cette opération jusqu’à votre destination finale.
31
6 – Cartes topographiques
Une carte topographique est une représentation en deux dimension qui offre un plan tridimensionnel du terrain. Les collines, les vallées, les falaises, les crêtes et tout autre forme du terrains sont
représentés par des courbes de niveau. Chaque courbe est égale à une élévation constante par
rapport au niveau de la mer (en mètre ou en pieds). L’équidistance des courbes de niveau (intervalle vertical) est indiquée sur la légende de la carte. Plus ces courbes sont rapprochées, plus
accentué est le terrain et inversement.
Par la pratique, vous apprendrez à reconnaître les différents contours d’une carte topographique et
à identifier le meilleur itinéraire d’une position à l’autre (Figure 14). De plus, l’étude des cartes vous
permet de reconnaître les points de repères et de calculer les positions, les relèvements et les distances à parcourir.
Figure 14 - p. 8
7 – Relèvement sur carte
Que vous soyez à la maison ou sur le terrain, il possible de calculer le relèvement d’une position à
une autre directement sur la carte. La boussole Eclipse 8099 offre deux méthodes pour déterminer
les relèvements sur carte : alignement sur carte et alignement de la boussole.
7.1 Alignement sur carte
Alignez la carte vers le nord géographique puis déterminez le relèvement. Cette méthode est
très populaire car elle permet de comparer la carte au terrain. Une carte topographique USGS
est utilisée pour l’exemple suivant.
1. Enlevez le patin de caoutchouc.
2. Réglez la boussole pour tenir compte de la déclinaison magnétique.
3. Faites pivoter le cadran azimutal jusqu’à ce que le relèvement corresponde à 0O sur l’échelle
verte (Figure 15).
Figure 15 - p. 9
4. Dirigez l’extrémité munie du miroir vers le nord géographique de la carte. Placez la base
transparente le long de la marge de la carte (rebord de la carte imprimée) (Figure 16).
- Sur les cartes autres que USGS et BLM, il est possible que l’axe nord-sud ne soit pas
aligné à la marge de la carte. Il est alors nécessaire de placer la base transparente près
de l’indicateur de nord géographique.
Figure 16 - p. 9
32
5. Faites pivoter la carte jusqu’à ce que le pointeur bleu en forme de cercle soit superposé au
N encerclé rouge.
- La base de la boussole doit demeurer le long de la marge de la carte.
La carte topographique est maintenant alignée sur le nord géographique. Sur le terrain, il est
possible de comparer la carte au terrain observé. Pour l’étape suivante, nous allons trouver les
relèvements d’une position à une autre.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Placez un « point » à votre position de départ et un « X » à votre destination.
Tracez une ligne connectant ces deux coordonnées.
Ouvrez le couvercle et le couvercle de visée au maximum.
Tout en maintenant les deux couvercles pointés sur le « X », positionnez la base
transparente à côté de la ligne (Figure 17).
- Ne déplacez pas la carte.
Figure 17 - p. 10
10. Faites pivoter le cadran azimutal jusqu’à ce que le pointeur bleu en forme de cercle soit
superposé au N encerclé rouge (Figure 18).
11. Lisez le relèvement dans le viseur grossissant en référence à l’échelle verte (Figure 18).
Figure 18 - p. 10
Ce relèvement correspond au relèvement sur carte du point de départ vers la destination.
7.2 Alignement de la boussole
Une autre façon de calculer un relèvement sur carte est d’utiliser la méthode d’alignement de la
boussole. Cette méthode est rapide et vous n’avez pas besoin d’aligner la carte vers le nord
géographique. Elle peut être utilisée pour planifier les itinéraires de la maison ou au bureau.
Une carte topographique USGS est utilisée pour l’exemple suivant. La marge de la carte est
alignée vers le nord géographique.
1. Enlevez le patin de caoutchouc.
2. Réglez la boussole pour tenir compte de la déclinaison magnétique.
- L’alignement de la boussole ne fonctionnera pas si le pointeur bleu est ajusté pour la
ligne d’indice du clinomètre.
3. Définissez un long bord droit à côté de la ligne de marge de la carte (dans l’axe
géographique nord-sud).
4. À l’aide d’un crayon, tracez une ligne dans l’axe géographique nord-sud à partir du bas de la
carte vers le haut.
33
- Remplissez la carte de lignes additionnelles nord-sud en les espaçant d’environ 2,5 cm et les
disposant de manière parallèle à la marge de la carte (Figure 19).
Figure 19 - p. 11
Nord-sud lignes [North-South Lines]
Long board [Straight Edge]
5.
6.
7.
8.
Sur la carte, marquez une position de départ par une « point » et une destination « X ».
Tracez une ligne reliant ces deux coordonnées.
Enlevez le patin de caoutchouc et ouvrez les deux couvercles à angle de 180O.
Tout en maintenant les deux couvercles pointés sur le « X », disposez la base
transparent à côté de la ligne (Figure 20).
Figure 20 - p. 11
9. Gardez la base transparent immobile. Faites pivotez le cadran azimutal vers les lignes nordsud tracées.
- Alignez la ligne bleue dans la fiole et les lignes nord-sud en rouge sur la limbe sur la
représentation des lignes du Nord et du Sud géographiques.
10. Lisez le relèvement en référence à l’échelle verte dans le viseur grossissant (Figure 21).
Figure 21 - p. 12
Sur les cartes autres que USGS et BLM, assurez-vous que la marge est alignée vers le nord
géographique. Dans le cas contraire, vous devez tracer des lignes géographiques nord-sud à
partir de l’indicateur du nord géographique (défini par la flèche N ou une étoile). Vous pouvez
par la suite trouver le relèvement.
8 – Triangulation
Dans la présente section, vous devez calculer le relèvements de trois points de repère visibles et
ensuite les tracer sur la carte. L’intersection des lignes de relèvements indique votre position
approximative. Un point de repère peut être le sommet d’une montagne, un précipice ou tout autre
objet visible indiqués sur votre carte. Dans le cadre de notre exemple, nous utilisons une carte
topographique USGS 7,5 minutes et la méthode de visée avant au miroir.
1. Réglez la boussole pour tenir compte de la déclinaison magnétique.
2. Trouvez trois points de repères majeurs sur le terrain.
3. Orientez la carte vers le nord géographique.
- Reportez-vous à la section 7.1 pour l’alignement de la carte.
4. Trouvez ces trois points de repères sur la carte, marquez-les d’un « X » et numérotez-les 1, 2
et 3 (Figure 22).
Figure 22 - p. 12
34
5. Visez un relèvement vers le point de repère 1, soit 320O (par référence de l’échelle verte) dans
notre exemple.
- Reportez-vous à ;a section 4 pour la visée avant au miroir.
6. Ouvrez les deux couvercles à angle de 180O. Placez la base transparente de la boussole à côté
du point de repère 1 sur la carte.
7. Tout en gardant l’échelle verte à 320O, faites pivoter la boussole autour du point de repère 1
jusqu’à ce que le pointeur bleu en forme de cercle soit superposé au N encerclé rouge (Fgure
23).
8. Tracez la ligne de relèvement sur carte 320O à l’aide du rebortd de la base en passant par le
point de repère 1.
- Votre position se trouve sur un point de cette ligne (Figure 23).
Figure 23 - p. 13
9. Répétez cette procédure pour les points de repères 2 (50O) et 3 (90O).
Un point ou un triangle devrait apparaître à l’intersection de ces trois lignes. Votre position est à
ce point ou à l’intérieur de ce petit triangle (Figure 24).
Figure 24 - p. 13
Il est également possible de déterminer trois relèvements sur carte à l’Aide de la méthode
d’alignement de la boussole (reportez-vous À al section, Alignemend de la boussole, 7.2). cette
méthode se réfère au nord géographique de la carte. Le positionnement de la carte est donc négligeable pendant le calcul des relèvements. Orientez la boussole vers le relèvement visé. Faites
pivoter la boussole jusqu’à ce que les lignes rouges du limbe soient alignées sur les lignes nordsud de la carte.
9 – Relèvement inverse
Un relèvement inverse est le point correspondant à 180O d’un autre relèvement. Si vous faites face
au nord géographique (orientation 0O), le relèvement inverse est directement derrière vous, soit à
180O. Autre exemple : Si vous visez un pointe de repère à 375O, le relèvement inverse sera de 195O
(375O - 180O = 195O).
Grâce à la boussole Eclipse 8099, vous n’avez plus besoin de soustraire ou d’ajouter une valeur
car elle contient deux échelles distinctes (Figure 25). Si vous visez un relèvement à l’aide de
l’échelle verte, vous n’avez qu’à consulter l’échelle noire pouvez déterminer le relèvement inverse.
Si vous utilisez l’échelle noir d’abord, l’échelle verte indiquera le relèvement inverse.
Figure 25 - p. 14
35
10 – Positionnement par coordonnées
Les récepteurs du système de positionnement global (GPS) sont des outils d’orientation aussi
indispensables que les cartes et les boussoles. Le fonctionnement des récepteurs GPS requiert
une compréhension de base des systèmes de coordonnées pour localiser un position. Ces section
explique le positionnement sur une carte topographique 7,5 minutes à l’aide d’un quadrillage UTM
(système de coordonnées de quadrillage), de longitudes et de latitudes (système de coordonnées
sphériques) La boussole Eclipse 8099 renferme les échelles de quadrillage UTM (Mercator
Transverse Universel) sur la base transparente et la fiche de référence 6.
10.1 Système de coordonnées UTM
Le type de projection UTM est un système de coordonnées de quadrillage mesuré à partir de
l’équateur (0O latitude) et d’une zone méridienne. Ce type de projection « aplatit » le globe et
divise la terre en 60 zones. Chaque zone est large de 6O et chacune renferme une zone
méridienne au milieu (Figure 26). Comme le quadrillage UTM et une représentation plate de la
Terre, les sections quadrillées au-dessus de 34O N et sous 80O S de latitude sont
considérablement déformées et donc exclues des cartes.
Figure 26 - p. 14
Méridien [Meridian]
Équateur [Equator]
Une position UTM est mesurée à l’aide de lignes d’abscisse et d’ordonnée et d’un point de
référence connu appelé datum. Si vous utilisez un récepteur GPS, assurez-vous de noter le
repère de fuseau et la référence de la carte car la référence géodésique locale peut
varier d’une carte à l’autre (Figure 27).
Figure 27 - p. 15
À titre d’exemple, voici une description des caractéristiques de la carte ci-contre : Échelle
1 :24 000, topographie 7,5 minutes, amorces de quadrillage aux 1 000 m indiqué par trois petits
zéros sur l’étiquette (4790000mE).
10.1a Positionnement par coordonnées sur quadrillage UTM
Cet exemple est basé sur un rapporteur de coordonnées et une carte à échelle 1 :24 000.
1. Trouvez le rapporteur de coordonnées UTM sur la fiche de référence 6.
2. Identifiez et notez le repère de fuseau et la référence de la carte (fuseau 11 et North
American Datum 1927 dans l’exemple qui nous concerne).
36
Figure 28 - p. 15
Échelle 1 : 24 000 [Scale: 1:24,000]
Fuseau 11 [zone 11]
Augmentation de l’abscisse [Easting Increases]
Augmentation de l’ordonnée [Northing Increases]
3. Identifiez les amorces de quadrillage UTM et les étiquettes concernant l’origine de la
carte.
4. Tracez des lignes reliant les amorces de quadrillage de même valeur (Figure 28)
- Un quadrillage carré de 1 000m par 1 000m se formera.
5. Identifiez et marquez une position sur la carte par une X.
6. Placez le coin du rapporteur de coordonnées (« 0 ») sur le X en augmentant l’angle du
rapporteur vers la gauche et le bas (figure 29).
- Assurez-vous que le rapporteur est parallèle aux lignes de quadrillage UTM.
Figure 29 - p. 16
7. Comptez vers la gauche à partir du X jusqu’à la ligne d’abscisse la plus proche – 100,
200, 300, 400, 500, 600 et 650 m.
8. Ajoutez 650 m à la ligne d’abscisse la plus proche.
- 650m E + 599000mE = 599650mE
9. Comptez vers le bas à partir du X jusqu’à la ligne d’ordonnée la plus proche – 100, 200,
300, 400, 500, 600 et 700 m.
10. Ajoutez 650 m à la ligne d’ordonnée la plus proche.
- 700m N + 4790000mN = 4790700mN
La coordonnée UTM finale est :
5
99650mE, 4790700mN (fuseau 11, Datum Amérique du Nord-27)
Dans l’exemple qui nous concerne, le rapporteur de coordonnées 1:24 000 affiche une
résolution de 50 m (50 mètres entre chaque amorce). Par contre, le rapporteur 1:24 000 à la
base de la boussole Eclipse et sur la fiche de référence 6 offrent une résolution de 20 mètres.
Les quadrillages changent en fonction des rapporteurs et des échelles. Vous devez donc
identifier les valeurs de quadrillage et les résolutions lorsque vous utilisez un rapporteur de
quadrillage UTM autre que 1 :24 000.
37
Grâce aux quadrillages UTM, vous pouvez déterminer votre position avec exactitude à moins
de 100 mètres sans utiliser un rapporteur. Une fois les amorces de quadrillage identifiées et les
lignes de quadrillage tracées, vous n’avez qu’à estimer la distance au coin inférieur gauche du
quadrillage qui entoure la marque X. Rappelez-vous que la ligne d’abscisse augmente toujours
vers la droite et la ligne d’ordonnée augmente toujours vers le haut.
10.2 Système de coordonnées par longitude et latitude
Les échelles de latitudes et de longitudes ne sont pas fournies avec la boussole Eclipse. Par
contre, la capacité de calculer sa position à l’Aide d’une échelle de latitude et de longitude ou
une simple règle est une habileté essentielle pour l’orientation.
Les latitudes et les longitudes forment un système de coordonnées sphériques dont les
mesures partent du centre de la Terre vers des points précis à sa surface. Une position sur la
Terre est mesurée en degrés (O), minutes(’) et secondes (’’) ; 60 secondes = 1 minute et 60
minutes = 1 degré, de façon similaire au temps indiqué sur une horloge. Les mesures
commencent à l’équateur (0O latitude) et au méridien origine (0O longitude).
Figure 30 - p. 17
Augmentation de la latitude [Latitude Increases]
Augmentation de la longitude [Longitude Increases]
Dans la figure 30, le position se lit comme suit :
45O 00’ 00’’ N lat. = 45 degrés, 0 minutes et 0 secondes latitude nord
60O 00’ 00’’ W long. = 60 degrés, 0 minutes, 0 secondes longitude ouest
10.2a Coordonnées de latitude et de longitude à partir d’une carte topographique
Toutes las cartes topographiques USGS 7,5 minutes sont paramétrées par 7,5 minutes de
longitude et de latitude. Les quatre coins de la carte sont identifiés par des coordonnées de
latitude et de longitude. De plus, les amorces de quadrillage sont disposées à chaque 2’ 30’’
autour de la marge de la carte, avec des croix au milieu. Les quatre croix identifient les
intersections des amorces de 2’ 30’’ (Figure 31).
Figure 31 - p. 17
10.2b Préparation de la carte
1. Identifiez les amorces de quadrillage et tracez des lignes reliant les amorces (Figure 32).
- Les lignes forment neuf petits triangles.
Figure 32 - p. 17
38
2. Identifiez et marquez une position sur la carte par un « X ».
3. Utilisez une échelle de longitude/latitude 1:24 000 afin de déterminer la position en
coordonnées du X (non disponible sur le modèle Eclipse 8099).
10.2c Détermination de la latitude
1. Utilisez le petit rectangle qui entoure complètement le X.
2. Placez l’échelle à la verticale jusqu’à ce qu’elle touche les deux lignes horizontales de
latitude et le X. (Figure 33).
Figure 33 - p. 18
3. Au point X, ajoutez la valeur indiquée par l’échelle (00’ 50’’) `;a la valeur de latitude la
plus petite (43O 02’ 30’’).
Additionnez les valeurs de la même façon que vous le faites pour des données de temps.
43O 02’ 30’’
+ 00’ 50’’
43O 02’ 80’’ = 43O 03’ 20’’ Latitude Nord
10.2d Détermination de la longitude
1. Penchez l’échelle jusqu’à ce qu’elle touche les deux lignes verticales de longitude et le
X. (Figure 34).
- Assurez-vous que les données de l’échelle augmentent dans le même sens que les
lignes de longitudes.
Figure 34 - p. 18
2. Au point X, ajoutez la valeur indiquée par l’échelle (1’ 15’’) à la valeur de longitude la
plus petite (108O 22’ 30’’).
108O 22’ 30’’
+
01’ 15’’
108O 23’ 45’’ = 108O 23’ 45’’ Longitude Ouest
La même procédure s’applique pour les différentes échelles de cartes (par exemple,
1:100 000). Vous n’avez qu’à tenir compte de l’échelle appropriée.
Si vous ne possédez pas de chercheur de longitude/latitude, vous pouvez utiliser une règle
de 10 pouces. Chaque pouce représente 15 minutes de latitude ou de longitude. Si la règle
de 10 po est trop grande, comme pour la section 10.2c sur la détermination de la latitude,
vous devez incliner ;la règle jusqu’à ce qu’elle soit comprise entre les ligne de 2’ 30’’.
39
11 - Inclinaison
L’inclinaison, parfois appelée pente, correspond à la différence angulaire par rapport à l’horizontale
(0O). Le modèle Eclipse 8099 utilise trois échelles clinométriques et chacune est graduée en
degrés. Les trois inclinomètres sont à charnière 5O, à carte 5O et à limbe 1O.
11.1 Clinomètre à charnière 5 degrés
Il s’agit de la méthode la plus rapide pour mesure l’inclinaison. La résolution de l’échelle est de
5O et une exactitude de lecture de 2,5O.
1. Enlevez le patin de caoutchouc afin de déployer l’échelle clinométrique 5O située au bout de
la charnière.
2. Ouvrez le couvercle de visée à un angle minimal de 120O.
3. Tenez la boussole à hauteur d’oeil et l’échelle 5O face à vous ; étendez à bout de bras.
4. Visez l’objet derrière la boussole (Figure 35).
5. Tout en gardant la base à niveau, ouvrez le couvercle jusqu’à ce qu’il atteigne l’inclinaison `
de l’objet en mire.
6. Lisez la donnée d’inclinaison à la ligne d’indice blanche située sur la charnière, soit 40O
(Figure 35)
Figure 35 - p. 19
11.2 Clinomètre à carte 5 degrés
Pour cette méthode, vous devez utiliser le clinomètre 5O (fiche de référence 1). Remarquez
que la résolution de l’échelle sur cette fiche est 5O. Servez-vous donc de cette méthode pour
calculer l’inclinaison ascendante ou descendante par rapport à l’horizon, avec une exactitude de
lecture de 2,5O.
11.2a Visée par l’arête
1. Assurez-vous que le clinomètre 5O, la fiche de référence 1, est centrée sous la fiole.
2. Ouvrez le couvercle et le couvercle de visée à 120O.
3. À hauteur d’oeil et à bout de bras, placez la boussole sur son flanc et l’inclinomètre face
à vous vers le bas.
4. Visez l’objet derrière la boussole (Figure 36).
Figure 36 - p. 20
5. Sur la fiche clinométrique, lisez la pente à l’extrémité de la flèche de clinomètre verte,
soit 40O.
11.2b Visée par la mire
1. Assurez-vous que le clinomètre 5O, la fiche de référence 1, est centrée sous la fiole.
2. Ouvrez le couvercle de visée à 45O.
40
3. Positionnez la boussole à hauteur d’oeil et le miroir déplié vers l’extérieur et la
gauche.
4. Au-dessus ou sous l’horizon, visez un objet à travers la mire (Figure 37).
- Alignez la ligne du couvercle à la ligne du couvercle de visée.
5. Lisez la donnée d’inclinaison à ce point sur la fiche de référence 1(Figure 37).
Figure 37 - p. 20
11.3 Clinomètre à limbe 1 degré
Le clinomètre à limbe 1O est le moyen le plus précis obtenir la pente par visée. La résolution du
limbe est 1O. Cette méthode est utile pour viser un angle correspondant à 90O, soit de l’horizon
(0O) en montant à 90O ou de l’horizon en descendant.
11.3a Angle ascendant
1. Enlevez le patin de caoutchouc afin d’exposer le revers de la boussole.
2. Trouvez le repère du clinomètre au dos du cadran azimutal.
3. Tout en gardant le cadran azimutal immobile, faites pivoter la fiole jusqu’à ce que le
pointeur bleu en forme de cercle soit orienté sur le repère du clinomètre (Figure 38).
Figure 38 - p. 20
4. Replacez le patin de caoutchouc sur la base.
5. Fermez le couvercle et ouvrez le couvercle de visée à 45O.
6. Positionnez la boussole à hauteur d’oeil et le miroir déplié vers l’extérieur et la
gauche.
7. Au-dessus de l’horizon (à niveau, 0O), visez un objet à travers la mire (Figure 39).
- Alignez la ligne du couvercle à la ligne du couvercle de visée.
Figure 39 - p. 21
8. Faites pivoter le cadran azimutal jusqu’à ce que la réflexion du pointeur bleu soit alignée
sur la flèche verte du clinomètre.
9. Tenez la boussole assez près pour que vous puissiez lire la donnée d’inclinaison sur la
lentille d’index.
- Lisez l’angle de pente sur la ligne d’indice verte de l’échelle noire, soit 30O (Figure 40).
Figure 40 - p. 21
11.3b Angle descendant
1. Enlevez le patin de caoutchouc afin d’exposer le revers de la boussole.
2. Trouvez le repère du clinomètre au dos du cadran azimutal.
41
3. Tout en gardant le cadran azimutal immobile, faites pivoter la fiole jusqu’à ce que le
pointeur bleu en forme de cercle soit orienté sur le repère du clinomètre.
4. Replacez le patin de caoutchouc sur la base.
5. Fermez le couvercle et ouvrez le couvercle de visée à 45O.
6. Positionnez la boussole à hauteur d’oeil et le miroir déplié vers l’extérieur et la droite.
Figure 41 - p. 21
7. Au-dessous de l’horizon (à niveau, 0O) visez un objet à travers la mire (Figure 41).
- Alignez la ligne du couvercle à la ligne du couvercle de visée.
8. Faites pivoter le cadran azimutal jusqu’à ce que la réflexion du pointeur bleu soit alignée
sur la flèche verte du clinomètre.
9. Tenez la boussole assez près pour que vous puissiez lire la donnée d’inclinaison sur la
lentille d’index.
- Lisez l’angle de pente (20O) sur la ligne d’indice verte de l’échelle verte (Figure 42).
Figure 42 - p. 21
12 – Calcul de la hauteur
Vous pouvez maintenant appliquer les mesures de clinomètre au clacul de la hauetur et au rapport
de déclivité. Pour calculer la hauteur d’un objet, vous devex connaître la distance entre vous et cet
objet puis mesurer l’angle de déclinaison à l’aide de la boussole. Un clinomètre à limbe 1O est utilisé pour l’exemple suivant.
12.1 Calcul de la hauteur en terrain plat
1. Mesurez la distance à l’objet (50 pieds pour notre exemple)
2. Réglez le poiunteur bleu sur le repère du clinomètre.
3. Positionnez la boussole à hauteur d’oeil et le miroir déplié vers l’extérieur et la gauche.
Reportez-vous à la section Angle ascendant (11.3a)
4. Au-dessus de l’horizon (à niveau, 0O), visez le sommet de l’objet à travers la mire
(Figure 43).
Figure 43 - p. 22
Calcul de la hauteur en terrain plat [Height Mesurement on Level Ground]
À niveau, 0O [Level (0O)]
Pour toute distance appréciable [Any readable Distance]
Hauteur = (TanA + TanB) x Distance [Height = (TanA + TanB) x Distance]
Exemple : Visée A = 36O, B = 10O et Distance = 50 pi [Example: Sight A = 36O, B = 10O &
Distance = 50 ft.]
42
5. Lisez le relèvement en référence de l’échelle noire (36O pour notre exemple).
6. Positionnez la boussole à hauteur d’oeil et le miroir déplié vers l’extérieur et la droite.
Reportez-vous à la section Angle descendant (11.3b)
7. Au-dessous l’horizon (à niveau, 0O), visez la base de l’objet à travers la mire (Figure 43).
8. Lisez le relèvement en référence de l’échelle verte (10O pour notre exemple).
9. Calculez la hauteur de l’objet à l’aide l’équation suivante.
- Hauteur = (TanA + TanB) x Distance
- Hauteur = (Tan 36O + Tan 10O) x 50 pi
- Hauteur = 45 pi
Reamarque : Il ne faut pas calculer la tangente d’un angle en additionnant les tangentes de
deux angles plus petits. Exemple : Tan (60O) n’est pas égal à Tan (30O) + Tan (30O). Vous
devez trouver Tan (60O) à partir d’une autre table, en utilisant une calculatrice ou en reculant de
l’objet jusqu’à ce que l’angle d’inclinaison soit inférieur ou égal à 45O afin d’utiliser les tables de
tangentes fournies sur la fiche de référence 8.
12.2 Calcul de la hauteur en terrain incliné
1. Mesurez la distance à l’objet (75 pieds pour notre exemple)
2. Réglez le pointeur bleu sur le repère du clinomètre.
3. Positionnez la boussole à hauteur d’oeil et le miroir déplié vers l’extérieur et la gauche.
Reportez-vous à la section Angle ascendant (11.3a)
4. Au-dessus de l’horizon (à niveau, 0O), visez le sommet de l’objet à travers la mire
(Figure 44).
Figure 44 - p. 23
Calcul de la hauteur en terrain incliné [Height Measurement on Sloping Ground]
À niveau, 0O [Level (0O)]
Pour toute distance appréciable [Any Readable Distance]
Hauteur = (TanA - TanB) x Distance [Height = (TanA - TanB) x Distance]
Exemple : Visée A = 38O, B = 10O et Distance = 75 pi [Sight A = 38O, B = 10O &
Distance = 75 ft.]
5.
6.
7.
8.
Lisez le relèvement en référence de l’échelle noire (38O pour notre exemple).
Au-dessus de l’horizon (à niveau, 0O), visez la base de l’objet à travers la mire (Figure 44).
Lisez le relèvement en référence de l’échelle noire (10O pour notre exemple).
Calculez la hauteur de l’objet à l’aide l’équation suivante.
- Hauteur = (TanA - TanB) x Distance
- Hauteur = (Tan 38O - Tan 10O) x 75 pi
- Hauteur = 45 pi
43
12.3 Rapport de déclivité
Une fois l’angle de déclinaiosn (20O) et la tangente de l’angle calculés, vous n’avex qu’à
déplacer la décimale de deux espaces vers la droite.
- Exemple : Tan 20O = 0,364 = pente de 36,4%
Rappellez-vous de toujours régler la déclinaiosn magnétique avant de viser un relèvement.
13 – Renseignements complémentaires
Avant d’afronter les grands espaces, il est recommandé de pratiquer les lectures et les calculs
dans un endroit familier en vpous servant de la boussole Eclipse 8099 et d’une carte. De plus,
relisez attentivement votre manuel d’instructions afin de comprendre à fond les différentes apllications de la boussole. Si vous devenez un expert avec votre carte et votre boussole, vous ne serez
jamais perdu. Enfin, apportez toujours une trouse de survie et renseignez-vous sur les tecniques
de surviuvance.
14 – Spécifications techniques de modèle Eclipse 8099
Magnétisme : Disque indicateur en NdFeB
Exactitude : Relèvement – ± O1 lecture précise (0,5O appréciable)
Clinomètre – ± O1 lecture précise(0,5O appréciable )
Dimension : Longueur – 10,7 cm* (4,2 po)
Largeur – 7,1 cm* (2,8 po)
Poids – 116g** (4,1onces)
* Cette donée inclut le patin de caoutchoiuc et la boussole Eclipse 8099
** Cette donnée inclut le patin de caoutchoiuc, la boussole Eclipse 8099, les fiches de référence
et le cordon.
44
Warranty card must be filled out completely and returned with proof
of purchase within 30 days of purchase for warranty to be valid.
THEBRUNTON CO.
Attn: Eclipse Warranty
620 East Monroe
Riverton, WY 82501
307.856.6559
BRUNTON WARRANTY REGISTRATION
NAME_______________________________________________________
ADDRESS___________________________________________________
CITY_________________________ST/PROV_______ZIP__________
MODEL#__________________DATE PURCHASED____________
PURCHASED FROM_______________________________________
CITY_________________________ST/PROV_______ZIP__________
PRICE PAID $___________________
OPTIONAL INFORMATION
TYPE OF STORE PURCHASED FROM:
A. CATALOG
B. ARCHERY
C. DEPARTMENT
D. SPORTING GOODS
E. GIFT
F. TELEVISION
OTHER____________________________________________________
DO YOU OWN OTHER BRUNTON PRODUCTS?
YES
NO
I DECIDED TO BUY THIS COMPASS BECAUSE OF...
A. RECOMMENDATION
B. FEATURES
C. GIFT
D. SALESPERSON
E. MAGAZINE AD
F. CATALOG
OTHER____________________________________________________
THIS COMPASS WILL BE USED PRIMARILY FOR...
A. GENERAL
B. MAPPING
C. FORESTRY
D. BACKPACKING
E. ORIENTEERING F. INSTRUCTIONAL
OTHER____________________________________________________
OCCUPATION ________________________________________________________
1198
.
GET OUT THERE