MediaShield User��s Guide

ForceWare Software

MediaShield User’s

Guide

Version 7.3

(for NVIDIA MediaShield Storage v10.3.x.x)

NVIDIA Corporation

May 13, 2008

NVIDIA Applications MediaShield User’s Guide Version 7.3

Published by

NVIDIA Corporation

2701 San Tomas Expressway

Santa Clara, CA 95050

Notice

ALL NVIDIA DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS, REFERENCE BOARDS, FILES, DRAWINGS, DIAGNOSTICS,

LISTS, AND OTHER DOCUMENTS (TOGETHER AND SEPARATELY, “MATERIALS”) ARE BEING

PROVIDED “AS IS.” NVIDIA MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED, IMPLIED, STATUTORY, OR

OTHERWISE WITH RESPECT TO THE MATERIALS, AND EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMS ALL IMPLIED

WARRANTIES OF NONINFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY, AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR

PURPOSE.

Information furnished is believed to be accurate and reliable. However, NVIDIA Corporation assumes no responsibility for the consequences of use of such information or for any infringement of patents or other rights of third parties that may result from its use. No license is granted by implication or otherwise under any patent or patent rights of NVIDIA Corporation. Specifications mentioned in this publication are subject to change without notice.

This publication supersedes and replaces all information previously supplied. NVIDIA Corporation products are not authorized for use as critical components in life support devices or systems without express written approval of

NVIDIA Corporation.

Trademarks

NVIDIA, the NVIDIA logo, MediaShield, 3DFX, 3DFX INTERACTIVE, the 3dfx Logo, STB, STB Systems and

Design, the STB Logo, the StarBox Logo, NVIDIA nForce, GeForce, NVIDIA Quadro, NVDVD, NVIDIA Personal

Cinema, NVIDIA Soundstorm, Vanta, TNT2, TNT, RIVA, RIVA TNT, VOODOO, VOODOO GRAPHICS,

WAVEBAY, Accuview Antialiasing, the Audio & Nth Superscript Design Logo, CineFX, the Communications & Nth

Superscript Design Logo, Detonator, Digital Vibrance Control, DualNet, FlowFX, ForceWare, GIGADUDE, Glide,

GOFORCE, the Graphics & Nth Superscript Design Logo, Intellisample, M-BUFFER, nfiniteFX, NV, NVChess, nView, NVKeystone, NVOptimizer, NVPinball, NVRotate, NVSensor, NVSync, the Platform & Nth Superscript

Design Logo, PowerMizer, Quincunx Antialiasing, Sceneshare, See What You've Been Missing, StreamThru,

SuperStability, T-BUFFER, The Way It's Meant to be Played Logo, TwinBank, TwinView and the Video & Nth

Superscript Design Logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of NVIDIA Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. Other company and product names may be trademarks or registered trademarks of the respective owners with which they are associated.

Intel, Indeo, and Pentium are registered trademarks of Intel Corporation. Microsoft, Windows, Windows NT,

Direct3D, DirectDraw, and DirectX are trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. OpenGL is a registered trademark of Silicon Graphics Inc.

Other company and product names may be trademarks or registered trademarks of the respective owners with which they are associated.

Copyright

© 2008 by NVIDIA Corporation. All rights reserved.

Drivers for Windows

®

MediaShield User’s Guide Version 7.3

Table of Contents

1.About NVIDIA® MediaShield™

System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Hardware Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Operating System Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

RAID Arrays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

RAID 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

RAID 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

RAID 0+1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

RAID 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

JBOD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Summary of RAID Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

NVIDIA MediaShield Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Additional RAID Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Changes in this Release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

2.Configuring the BIOS

Enabling RAID in the System BIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

Creating a RAID Array Using the RAID BIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

3.Creating RAID Arrays

Creating an Array and Making it Bootable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22

Step 1: Enable RAID in the system BIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22

Step 2: Create a RAID array using the RAID BIOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22

Step 3: Install the RAID Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22

Creating a RAID Array from your Boot Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

Creating a Non-Bootable Array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

4.Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

Installing the NVIDIA MediaShield Software Under Windows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

Using the NVIDIA MediaShield Storage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

Accessing the NVIDIA Control Panel Storage Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34

Creating an Array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36

Deleting an Array. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37

Synchronizing an Array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

Designating a Spare Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39

Removing a Spare Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41

Rebuilding an Array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

Migrating an Array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44

Using the SMART Disk Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47

5.Using Disk Alert

About Disk Alert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Disk Alert Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54

Example of All Good Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54

Example of a Degraded Array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55

Example of a Failed Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56

6.MediaShield RAID Frequently Asked Questions

Basic RAID Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58

RAID ROM Setup Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59

Rebuilding Arrays Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59

NVIDIA Corporation

i

Drivers for Windows

®

MediaShield User’s Guide Version 7.3

Dedicated Disk Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60

Array Migrating Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60

MediaShield Application Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61

NVIDIA Corporation

ii

NVIDIA Corporation

C

H A P T E R

A

BOUT

NVIDIA

®

M

EDIA

S

HIELD

NVIDIA brings Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID) technology—which is  used by the world’s leading businesses—to the common PC desktop. This technology  uses multiple drives to either increase total disk space or to offer data protection.

RAID techniques were first published in 1988 by a multivendor consortium—the RAID 

Advisory Board. RAID techniques were divided into different categories or levels. 

Originally, RAID levels focused on improving resiliency or data availability. As  additional RAID levels were defined, one was introduced for improving performance. For  all levels, RAID techniques optimize storage solutions by using multiple disks grouped  together and treating them as a single storage resource.

This chapter describes NVIDIA MediaShield in the following sections:

“System Requirements” on page 2 .

“RAID Arrays” on page 5  describes the RAID levels supported by NVIDIA 

MediaShield.

“NVIDIA MediaShield Features” on page 7

 describes additional features offered by 

NVIDIA MediaShield.

1

2

C

HAPTER

1

About NVIDIA® MediaShield™

System Requirements

Hardware Support

Table 1.1

 lists the NVIDIA

®

 nForce

 platforms supported by NVIDIA MediaShield, and  the RAID arrays supported on each platform.

Table 1.1

Supported nForce Platforms, RAID Arrays, and Pass-through Disk Management

NVIDIA nForce Platform

NVIDIA nForce 790i Ultra SLI

NVIDIA nForce 790i SLI

NVIDIA nForce 780i SLI

NVIDIA nForce 750i SLI

NVIDIA nForce 680i SLI

NVIDIA nForce 680i LT SLI

NVIDIA nForce 680a SLI

NVIDIA nForce 650i SLI

NVIDIA nForce 650i Ultra

NVIDIA nForce 630a

NVIDIA nForce 590 SLI

NVIDIA NFP 3600

NVIDIA NFP 3400

NVIDIA NFP 3050

NVIDIA nForce 570 SLI

NVIDIA nForce 570 Ultra

NVIDIA nForce 570

NVIDIA nForce 560

NVIDIA nForce 550

NVIDIA nForce 520

NVIDIA nForce 430

NVIDIA nForce 430 (NVIDIA

Business Platform)

NVIDIA nForce 410

NVIDIA nForce 405

NVIDIA nForce 400

NVIDIA nForce4

NVIDIA nForce4 Ultra

NVIDIA nForce4 Ultra Intel Edition

NVIDIA nForce4 SLI

Passthrough

Disk

Management

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

RAID

0

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

RAID

1

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

RAID

0+1

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

RAID

5

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

JBOD

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

1

About NVIDIA® MediaShield™

Table 1.1

Supported nForce Platforms, RAID Arrays, and Pass-through Disk Management

NVIDIA nForce Platform

NVIDIA nForce4 SLI Intel Edition

NVIDIA nForce4 SLI X16

NVIDIA nForce4 SLI XE Intel

Edition

NVIDIA nForce4 Professional IO-4

NVIDIA nForce4 Professional Pro

NVIDIA nForce4 Professional Pro

SLI

NVIDIA nForce3 Pro250

NVIDIA nForce3 250Gb

NVIDIA nForce3 Ultra

NVIDIA nForce3 250

NVIDIA nForce3 150

NVIDIA nForce2 MCP2S

Passthrough

Disk

Management

RAID

0

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

RAID

1

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

RAID

0+1

RAID

5 JBOD

NVIDIA Corporation

3

C

HAPTER

1

About NVIDIA® MediaShield™

Operating System Support

NVIDIA MediaShield supports the following operating systems:

• Windows Vista (both 32‐bit and 64‐bit editions)

Windows Vista Home Basic

Windows Vista Home Premium

Windows Vista Business

Windows Vista Enterprise Edition

Windows Vista Ultimate

• Windows

®

 XP Home Edition

• Windows XP Professional Edition

• Windows Server 2003 

Software

This document describes MediaShield accessible through the NVIDIA Control 

Panel—Storage interface, available with NVIDIA ForceWare graphics drivers Release 158  and higher.

4

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

1

About NVIDIA® MediaShield™

RAID Arrays

This section describes the following types of RAID arrays that MediaShield supports:

Note: Not all nForce platforms provide support for all the RAID levels listed. See  Table 

1.1, “Supported nForce Platforms, RAID Arrays, and Pass‐through Disk 

Management” on page 2  for a matrix of supported RAID levels.

RAID 0

In a RAID 0 array, the controller ʺstripesʺ data across multiple drives in the RAID  subsystem. RAID 0 breaks up a large file into smaller blocks and then performs disk reads  and writes across multiple drives in parallel. The size of each block is determined by the  stripe size parameter, which you set during the creation of the RAID 0 set. Performance of  applications running with a RAID 0 can vary greatly depending on the stripe size  configured when creating the array. The default stripe size is 64K, but 32K or 16K may be  more efficient if the application issues many smaller I/O operations. Some amount of trial  and error may be appropriate to find the optimum stripe size.

RAID 0 is ideal for applications that require high bandwidth but do not require fault  tolerance. RAID 0 has the best performance and capacity of any RAID level, but the lowest  availability (no fault tolerance). If one drive fails, the entire array fails because part of the  data is missing with no way to recover it other than restoring from a backup.

RAID 1

RAID 0+1

In a RAID 1 array, every read and write is carried out in parallel across two disk drives. 

The mirrored—or backup—copy of the data can reside on the same disk or on a second  redundant drive in the array. RAID 1 provides a hot‐standby copy of data if the active  volume or drive is corrupted or becomes unavailable due to a hardware failure. RAID 1  techniques can be applied for high‐availability solutions, or as a form of automatic backup  that eliminates tedious manual backups to more expensive and less reliable media.

RAID 1 provides complete data redundancy, but at the cost of doubling the required data  storage capacity, resulting in 50% capacity utilization. Performance is roughly the same as  for a single drive, although in some instances the dual write may be somewhat slower.

RAID 0 drives can be mirrored using RAID 1 techniques, resulting in a RAID 0+1 solution  for improved performance plus resiliency

The controller combines the performance of data striping (RAID 0) and the fault tolerance  of disk mirroring (RAID 1). Data is striped across multiple drives and duplicated on  another set of drives.

NVIDIA Corporation

5

C

HAPTER

1

About NVIDIA® MediaShield™

RAID 5

RAID 5

1

 stripes both data and parity information across three or more drives. It writes  data and parity blocks across all the drives in the array. Fault tolerance is maintained by  ensuring that the parity information for any given block of data is placed on a different  drive from those used to store the data itself 

JBOD

JBOD stands for “Just a Bunch of Disks”. Each drive is accessed as if it were on a standard 

SCSI host bus adapter. This is useful when a single drive configuration is needed, but it  offers no speed improvement or fault tolerance

Summary of RAID Configurations

Table 1.2

RAID Configuration Summary

Array Uses

RAID 0

Non-critical data requiring high performance.

RAID 1

Small databases or any other small capacity environment requiring fault tolerance.

RAID

0+1

Critical data requiring high performance.

Advantages Drawbacks

High data throughput. No fault tolerance.

100% data redundancy.

Allows spare disks

Requires two drives for the storage space of one drive.

RAID 5

Critical data and reasonable level of performance.

JBOD

Combining odd size drives into one big drive.

Optimized for both

100% data redundancy and performance.

Allows spare disks.

Fault tolerance and better utilization of disk space.

Combines and uses the capacity of odd size drives.

Requires two drives for the storage space of one drive—the same as

RAID level 1.

Decreased write performance due to parity calculations.

Requires at least three drives.

Decreases performance because of the difficulty in using drives concurrently or to optimize drives for different uses.

# Hard

Disks

Fault

Tolerance

multiple None

2

4+

3+

Yes

Yes

Yes multiple No

6

1. RAID 5 is supported on select boards only. Please check with your motherboard manufacturer to determine whether RAID 5 is supported for the type and model of your motherboard.

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

1

About NVIDIA® MediaShield™

NVIDIA MediaShield Features

Additional RAID Features

NVIDIA MediaShield offers the following additional features:

• Dedicated Spare Disk

A dedicated spare disk is automatically used in case one drive in a fault‐tolerant array  fails. NVIDIA MediaShield defines a fault‐tolerant array as either RAID 1, RAID 0+1, or 

RAID 5. A dedicated spare disk can be used only by the array to which it is assigned.

• Bootable RAID

This allows you to install the operating system onto the RAID volume.

• Migrating

Migrating is the ability to convert from one RAID mode to another RAID mode. This  allows the user to upgrade their current disk or array for better performance, higher  security, and increased capacity. More importantly, this is accomplished without  having to go through multiple steps. The migrating feature gives the user an  upgradeable option to manage storage easily.

• Disk Failure Identification

The NVIDIA MediaShield application includes a disk alert feature that provides a  graphical indication of the status of the hard disks in the system. It notifies you when a  disk fails and indicates which one to replace. 

Self‐Monitoring, Analysis, and Reporting Technology (SMART) lets you monitor the  health of the drives in the array at regular intervals. 

Changes in this Release

RAID Pass‐through Disk Management 

Depending on the motherboard support, NVIDIA MediaShield Release 10 lets you  manage “pass‐through” disks using the NVIDIA Control Panel Storage interface. 

This provides greater flexibility for creating RAID arrays on systems that support this  feature. With direct pass‐through disk management, you can add or remove array  disks within Windows without having to restart the system and enter the RAID section  of the system BIOS. 

SMART Self‐test 

This allows you to run a SMART diagnostic test on individual disk drives within a 

RAID array.

NVIDIA Corporation

7

C

HAPTER

1

About NVIDIA® MediaShield™

8

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

NVIDIA Corporation

C

H A P T E R

C

ONFIGURING THE

BIOS

This chapter provides instructions for two basic BIOS configuration tasks:

Enabling RAID in the System BIOS

This task is required to create a RAID array or to add disks to an existing array.

Creating a RAID Array Using the RAID BIOS

This task is required when you are creating a bootable RAID array, but can also be used  to create non‐bootable RAID arrays.

You perform these tasks in the process of creating arrays as described in the chapter 

“Creating RAID Arrays” on page 21

9

C

HAPTER

2

Configuring the BIOS

Enabling RAID in the System BIOS

1 Start your computer, then press Delete to enter the BIOS setup.

The BIOS CMOS Setup Utility window appears. 

Phoenix - Award BIOS CMOS Setup Utility

Standard CMOS Features

Advanced BIOS Features

Advanced Chipset Features

Integrated Peripherals

Power Management Setup

PnP / PCI Configurations

Load Fail-Safe Defaults

Load Optimized Defaults

Set Supervisor Password

Set User Password

Save & Exit Setup

Exit Without Saving

Esc : Quit

F10: Save & Exit Setup

: Select Item

Figure 2.1

BIOS CMOS Setup Utility Main Window

2 Use the arrow keys to select Integrated Peripherals, then press Enter

10

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

2

Configuring the BIOS

The Integrated Peripherals window appears.

Phoenix - Award BIOS CMOS Setup Utility

Integrated Peripherals

RAID Config

OnChip IDE Channel0

Primary Master PIO

Primary Slave PIO

Primary Master UDMA

Primary Slave UDMA

OnChip IDE Channel1

Secondary Master PIO

Secondary Slave PIO

Secondary Master UDMA

Secondary Slave UDMA

IDE Prefetch Mode

Init Display First

OnChip USB

USB Keyboard Support

USB Mouse Support

Serial - ATA

SATA Spread Spectrum

AC97 Audio

[Press Enter]

[Enabled]

[Auto]

[Auto]

[Auto]

[Auto]

[Enabled]

[Auto]

[Auto]

[Auto]

[Auto]

[Enabled]

[PCI Slot]

[V1.1 - V2.0]

[Disabled]

[Disabled]

[Enabled]

[Disabled]

[Auto]

Item Help

Menu Level

:Move Enter:Select +/-/PU/PD:Value F10:Save ESC:Exit F1:General Help

F5: Previous Values F6: Fail-Safe Defaults F7: Optimized Defaults

Figure 2.2

Integrated Peripherals Window

3 Use the arrow keys to select the RAID Config (see 

Figure 2.2

), then press Enter.

The RAID Config window appears. .

Phoenix - Award BIOS CMOS Setup Utility

RAID Config

Item Help

RAID Enable x x x x x x

SATA 1 (A0) RAID

SATA 2 (A1) RAID

SATA 3 (B0) RAID

SATA 4 (B1) RAID

SATA 5 (C0) RAID

SATA 6 (C1) RAID

[Disabled]

Disabled

Disabled

Disabled

Disabled

Disabled

Disabled

Menu Level

:Move Enter:Select +/-/PU/PD:Value F10:Save ESC:Exit F1:General Help

F5: Previous Values F6: Fail-Safe Defaults F7: Optimized Defaults

Figure 2.3

RAID Config Window–RAID disabled

4 Globally enable RAID.

NVIDIA Corporation

11

C

HAPTER

2

Configuring the BIOS

Press Enter and then use the arrow keys to select the Enabled option and press Enter to  accept.  .

Phoenix - Award BIOS CMOS Setup Utility

RAID Config

RAID Enable

SATA 1 (A0) RAID

SATA 2 (A1) RAID

SATA 3 (B0) RAID

SATA 4 (B1) RAID

SATA 5 (C0) RAID

SATA 6 (C1) RAID

[Enabled]

[Disabled]

[Disabled]

[Disabled]

[Disabled]

[Disabled]

[Disabled]

Item Help

Menu Level

:Move Enter:Select +/-/PU/PD:Value F10:Save ESC:Exit F1:General Help

F5: Previous Values F6: Fail-Safe Defaults F7: Optimized Defaults

Figure 2.4

RAID Config Window

On systems that support NVIDIA’s RAID pass‐through disk management, the  individual SATA ports are not listed. After you globally enable RAID, all SATA  disks are automatically available for use in RAID or non‐RAID applications.

If your system does not support NVIDIA’s RAID pass‐through disk management,  then you will need to enable the SATA ports for any disks that you want to use in 

RAID arrays or as “free” RAID disks.

5 Press F10 to save the configuration and exit.

The PC reboots.

12

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

2

Configuring the BIOS

Creating a RAID Array Using the RAID BIOS

The NVIDIA RAID BIOS setup lets you choose the RAID type and which hard drives you  want to make part of the array.

You can also create a RAID array using the MediaShield application (see  “Creating an 

Array” on page 36

). 

Entering the RAID BIOS Setup

1 After rebooting the system, wait until you see the RAID software prompting you to  press F10.

The RAID prompt appears as part of the system POST and boot process prior to  loading of the OS. You have a few seconds to press F10 before the prompt disappears. 

2 Press F10.

If you have already created a RAID array, the  MediaShield BIOS—Array List screen  appears, listing the arrays in the system.  

MediaShield BIOS

-

Array List -

Boot Status Vendor Array Size

Healthy NVIDIA MIRROR 232.88G

[Ctrl-X] Exit [ ] Select [B] Set Bootable [N] New Array [ENTER] Detail

Figure 2.5

MediaShield BIOS–Array List Window

NVIDIA Corporation

13

C

HAPTER

2

Configuring the BIOS

Press N to go to the MediaShield BIOS—Define a New Array screen.   

RAID Mode

: Mirrored

Media Shield BIOS

-

Define a New Array

-

Stripe Block: Optimal

Free Disks

Port

Disk Model

Capacity

0.1

WDC WD1500ADFD 139.73GB

1.0

WDC WD3200JS-6 298.09GB

1.1

ST3120026AS 111.79GB

[ ] Add

Array Disks

Port Disk Model Capacity

[ ] Del

[ESC] Quit [F6] Back [F7] Finish [TAB] Navigate [ ] Select [ENTER] Popup

Figure 2.6

MediaShield BIOS–Define a New Array

If you have not already created a RAID array, this screen appears instead of the 

Array List screen. 

By default, RAID Mode is set to Mirroring and Stripe Block is set to Optimal.

Understanding the Define a New Array Window

Use the Define a New Array window to

• Select the RAID Mode

• Set up the stripe block

• Specify which disks to use for the RAID Array

The SATA ports are called channels and they are associated with adapters. The first  digit in the Location field defines the adapter that the port is associated with. The 2nd  digit defines the channel.

Note: Both digits (adapter and channel) begin with 0, so 0.0 indicates the first channel  on the first adapter.

14

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

2

Configuring the BIOS

In  Figure 2.7

, 1.1. means the hard drive is attached to Adapter 1, Channel 1. 

1.1

Channel

Adapter

Figure 2.7

Port Column Information

The location, disk model and capacity fields should allow you to identify disks. It may be  useful to try attaching a SATA hard drive to the ports provided with your platform and  determine which location IDs are associated with SATA ports on your motherboard.

Using the Define a New Array Screen

If necessary, press the tab key to move from field to field until the appropriate field is  highlighted. 

Selecting the RAID Mode

By default, this is set to Mirroring. To change to a different RAID mode, press the down  arrow key until the mode that you want appears in the RAID Mode box—either 

Mirroring, Stripe, Spanning, Stripe Mirroring or RAID 5. 

Note: Not all RAID levels are supported on all platforms.

Selecting the Stripe Block Size

Stripe block size is given in kilobytes, and affects how data is arranged on the disk. It is  recommended to leave this value at the default Optimal, which is 64KB, but the values  can be between 4 KB and 128 KB (4, 8, 16, 32, 64, and 128 KB).

Note: Stripe block size selection is not available for Mirroring or Spanning RAID  arrays. 

Assigning the Disks

Any disks in your system that are not part of a RAID array appear in the Free Disks block. 

These are the drives that are available for use as RAID array disks.

To designate a free disk to be used as a RAID array disk, 

1 Tab to the Free Disks section.

The first disk in the list is selected.

2 Move it from the Free Disks block to the Array Disks block by pressing the right‐arrow  key (Æ).

The first disk in the list is moved, and the next disk in the list is selected and ready to be  moved.

NVIDIA Corporation

15

C

HAPTER

2

Configuring the BIOS

3 Continue pressing the right‐arrow key (Æ) until all the disks that you want to use as 

RAID array disks appear in the Array Disks block.

Figure 2.8

 illustrates the Define a New Array screen after two disks have been assigned as 

RAID1 array disks  

RAID Mode

: Mirrored

Media Shield BIOS

-

Define a New Array

-

Stripe Block:

Optimal

Free Disks

Port Disk Model Capacity

Array Disks

Port

Disk Model Capacity

1.0

WDC WD3200JS-6 298.09GB

[ ] Add

0.1

WDC WD1500ADFD 139.73GB

1.1

ST3120026AS 111.79GB

[ ] Del

[ESC] Quit [F6] Back [F7] Finish [TAB] Navigate [ ] Select [ENTER] Popup

Figure 2.8

MediaShield BIOS—Array Disks Assigned

16

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

2

Configuring the BIOS

Completing the RAID BIOS Setup

1 After assigning your RAID array disks, press F7.

The Clear disk array prompt appears.  

RAID Mode

: Mirrored

Media Shield BIOS

-

Define a New Array

-

Stripe Block: Optimal

Free Disks

Port Disk Model Capacity

Array Disks

Port Disk Model Capacity

1.0

WDC WD3200JS-6 298.09GB

0.1

WDC WD1500ADFD 139.73GB

[ ] Add

1.1

[Y] YES [N] NO

ST3120026AS 111.79GB

[ ] Del

[ESC] Quit [F6] Back [F7] Finish [TAB] Navigate [ ] Select [ENTER] Popup

Figure 2.9

Clear Disk Data Prompt

2 Press Y to clear the disk data. 

NVIDIA Corporation

17

C

HAPTER

2

Configuring the BIOS

The Clear MBR prompt appears. 

RAID Mode

: Mirrored

Media Shield BIOS

-

Define a New Array

-

Stripe Block: Optimal

Free Disks

Port

Disk Model

Capacity Clear MBR?

Array Disks

Port Disk Model Capacity

1.0

WDC WD3200JS-6 298.09GB

[ ] Add

0.1

WDC WD1500ADFD 139.73GB

1.1

ST3120026AS 111.79GB

[ ] Del

[ESC] Quit [F6] Back [F7] Finish [TAB] Navigate [ ] Select [ENTER] Popup

Figure 2.10

Clear MBR Prompt

3 Press Y to clear the MBR.

The Array List screen appears, where you can review the RAID arrays that you have  set up.  

MediaShield BIOS

-

Array List

-

Boot Status Vendor Array Size

Healthy NVIDIA STRIPE 232.88G

Healthy NVIDA MIRROR 111.79G

18

[Ctrl-X] Exit [ ] Select [B] Set Bootable [N] New Array [ENTER] Detail

Figure 2.11

Array List Window

4 If you are creating a bootable array, then use the arrow keys to select the array that you  want to set up and press B to specify the array as bootable.

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

5 Press Enter to view and verify details for the selected array..

The Array Detail screen appears. 

Array 2 : NVIDIA MIRROR 111.79G

-

Array Detail

-

RAID Mode: Mirroring

Stripe Width : 1 Stripe Block 64K

Port Index Disk Model Capacity

0.1 0 WDC WD1500AFD-OONLR1 139.73G

1.1 1 ST3120026AS 111.79G

C

HAPTER

2

Configuring the BIOS

[R] Rebuild [D] Delete [C] Clear MBR [V] Remove Vol [Enter] Return

Figure 2.12

Array Detail Screen

The Array Detail screen shows various information about the array that you selected,  such as Stripe Block, RAID Mode, Stripe Width, Disk Model Name, and disk capacity. 

From this screen you can

Rebuild the array (press R, then use the arrow keys to select the disk to rebuild and  press F7)

Delete the array (press D, then press Y at the prompt).

Clear the MBR (press C, then press Y at the prompt).

Remove the volume (press V, then use the arrow keys to select the disk volume to  remove and press F7).

For Mirroring (RAID1), single‐disk Stripe (RAID0),  and single‐disk Spanning   arrays, removing a volume is a way to remove a disk from an array and convert it to  a basic disk without deleting any data.  In a Mirroring (RAID1) array, the array  becomes degraded (if there are still disks in the array) and must be rebuilt.

The Remove Vol option is not available with systems that do not support NVIDIA’s 

RAID pass‐through disk management.

6  Press Enter again to go back to the previous screen and then press F10 to exit the RAID  setup.

NVIDIA Corporation

19

C

HAPTER

2

Configuring the BIOS

20

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

NVIDIA Corporation

C

H A P T E R

C

REATING

RAID A

RRAYS

This chapter provides instructions for creating bootable and non‐bootable RAID arrays.

Creating an Array and Making it Bootable

This section describes how to create a RAID array and then install the operating system  on it. 

Creating a RAID Array from your Boot Disk

This section applies to systems that support NVIDIAʹs RAID pass‐through disk  management, and describes how to create a RAID array from your non‐RAID boot  disk. 

Creating a Non‐Bootable Array

This section describes the standard method of creating a RAID array using non‐ bootable data disks. 

21

C

HAPTER

3

Creating RAID Arrays

Creating an Array and Making it Bootable

This section explains how to create a RAID array and then install the Windows operating  system on it.

You cannot install Windows onto arrays that are greater than 2 TB. 

Arrays greater than 2 TB must use the GPT format, and only Windows XP x64 for 

Itanium‐based systems and Windows Server 2003 for Itanium‐based systems can boot off  of GPT partitioned disks.

For further information, see the following Microsoft articles:

• Large Logical Unit Support and Windows Server 2003 SP1 

(http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/storage/LUN_SP1.mspx)

• Windows and GPT FAQ  

(http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/storage/GPT_FAQ.mspx)

Step 1: Enable RAID in the system BIOS

See  “Enabling RAID in the System BIOS” on page 10  for detailed instructions.

Step 2: Create a RAID array using the RAID BIOS

See  “Creating a RAID Array Using the RAID BIOS” on page 13  for detailed instructions.

Step 3: Install the RAID Drivers

Installing the RAID Drivers Under Windows XP

Installing the RAID Drivers Under Windows Vista

Installing the RAID Drivers Under Windows XP

If your Windows installation CD includes NVIDIA RAID drivers, then the drivers will be  installed when you install Windows and you can skip this section.

If your Windows installation CD does not include RAID drivers (or you are trying to  install a new version of Windows), then you will need an NVIDIA RAID driver F6 install  floppy. Check to see if one came with your system. If not, you can create one by  downloading the appropriate driver package and following the steps in this section.

22

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

3

Creating RAID Arrays

1 Obtain a formatted floppy disk and then copy the contents of folder “ ... \IDE\WinXP\ sataraid\” to the disk.

2 After you complete the RAID BIOS setup, boot from the Windows CD.

The Windows Setup program starts.

3 Press F6 at the prompt at the bottom of the screen to install a third party or RAID  driver.

The setup program continues to load files and then the Windows Setup screen appears.  

Windows Setup

Setup could not determine the type of one or more mass storage devices installed in your system, or you have chosen to manually specify an adapter.

Currently, Setup will load support for the following mass storage device(s):

< none >

* To specify additional SCSI adapters, CD-ROM drives, or special

disk controllers for use with Windows, including those for

which you have a device support disk from a mass storage device

manufacturer, press S.

* If you do not have any device support disks from a mass storage

device manufacturer, or do not want to specify additional

mass storage devices for use with Windows, press ENTER.

S=Specify Additional Devices ENTER=Continue F3=Exit

Figure 3.1

Windows Setup—Specify Devices

4 Specify the NVIDIA drivers.

a Insert the floppy disk that contains the RAID driver, press S, then press Enter.

NVIDIA Corporation

23

C

HAPTER

3

Creating RAID Arrays

The following Windows Setup screen appears:

Windows Setup

You have chosen to configure a SCSI Adapter for use with Windows, using a device support disk provided by an adapter manufacturer.

Select the SCSI Adapter you want from the following list, or press ESC to return to the previous screen.

NVIDIA RAID CLASS DRIVER (required)

NVIDIA NForce Storage Controller (required)

Enter=Select F3=Exit

Figure 3.2

Windows Setup—Select SCSI Adapter

b Select “NVIDIA RAID CLASS DRIVER (required)” and then press Enter.

c Press S again at the Specify Devices screen, then press Enter.

d  Select “NVIDIA NForce Storage Controller (required)” and then press Enter.

The following Windows Setup screen appears listing both drivers:.

Windows Setup

Setup will load support for the following mass storage device:

NVIDIA RAID CLASS DRIVER

NVIDIA NForce Storage Controller

* To specify additional SCSI adapters, CD-ROM drives, or special disk controllers for use with Windows, including those for which you have a device support disk from a mass storage device manufacturer, press S.

* If you do not have any device support disks from a mass storage

device manufacturer, or do not want to specify additional mass storage devices for use with Windows, press ENTER.

S=Specify Additional Devices ENTER=Continue F3=Exit

Figure 3.3

Windows Setup—NVIDIA drivers listed

24

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

3

Creating RAID Arrays

5 Press Enter to continue with Windows XP Installation. 

Setup continues to load the files from the floppy disk.

Be sure to leave the floppy disk inserted in the floppy drive until prompted to remove  it. 

6 Follow the instructions on how to install Windows XP.  

7 Windows Setup will restart your system. Be sure to remove the floppy.

After Windows XP is completely installed, it is recommended that you install the 

ForceWare software in order to access the MediaShield Storage interface. See 

“Installing the NVIDIA MediaShield Software Under Windows” on page 32

.

Note:  Each time you add a new hard drive to a RAID array, the RAID driver will have to  be installed under Windows once for that hard drive. After that, the driver will not  have to be installed. 

NVIDIA Corporation

25

C

HAPTER

3

Creating RAID Arrays

Installing the RAID Drivers Under Windows Vista

The process for installing the NVIDIA RAID drivers depends on whether your Windows 

Vista installation disc includes NVIDIA RAID drivers.

If your Windows installation CD includes NVIDIA RAID drivers, then the drivers will be  installed when you install Windows. After installing Windows, be sure to use Windows 

Update to get the latest NVIDIA RAID drivers.

If your Windows installation CD does not include RAID drivers (or you are trying to  install a new version of Windows), then follow these steps:

1 Put the NVIDIA RAID installation files on a removable storage media such as a floppy  disk, CD, or USB drive.

2 After you complete the RAID BIOS setup, boot from the Windows CD.

The Install Windows screen appears.

3 Click Install Now and then continue the installation process until you get to the Which 

type of installation do you want? screen.

4 Click Custom (advanced).

The Where do you want to install Windows? screen appears.

5 Insert your removable media containing the NVIDIA RAID installation files, then click 

Load Driver.

6 At the Load Driver dialog box, click Browse and then navigate to the removable media  and folder containing the installation files.

The Select the driver to be installed screen appears.

7 Select both [Ctrl+click] the NVIDIA nForce RAID Controller and the NVIDIA nForce 

Serial ATA Controller, then click Next.

Note: You do not need to install the nForce RAID Device because Windows handles it  automatically as part of the RAID and SATA controller installation process.

When the drivers finish installing, the Where do you want to install Windows? page  appears again.

8 Select the disk where you want to install Windows and proceed with the installation.

After Windows Vista is completely installed, it is recommended that you install the 

ForceWare software in order to access the MediaShield Storage interface. See 

“Installing the NVIDIA MediaShield Software Under Windows” on page 32 .

Note:  Each time you add a new hard drive to a RAID array, Windows will automatically  install the RAID driver once for that hard drive. After that, the driver will not have  to be installed. 

26

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

3

Creating RAID Arrays

Creating a RAID Array from your Boot Disk

This section applies to systems that support NVIDIAʹs RAID pass‐through disk  management, and describes how to convert your non‐RAID boot disk (the disk from  which you boot to Windows) to the following bootable arrays:

• Single‐disk RAID 0 (stripe)

• Two‐disk RAID 0 (stripe)

• Two‐disk RAID 1 (mirror)  

Note:  If you want to create an array type other than the ones listed, you must first create 

one of the listed arrays and then migrate it to another array type. See  “Migrating an 

Array” on page 44

 for further instructions.

1 Enable RAID in the system BIOS

If you have not already done so, globally enable RAID in the system BIOS.

See  “Enabling RAID in the System BIOS” on page 10  for detailed instructions.

2 Make sure the NVIDIA MediaShield software is installed. 

See  “Installing the NVIDIA MediaShield Software Under Windows” on page 32

 for  instructions.

3 Open the NVIDIA Control Panel, then from the Select a Task pane under the Storage  category, click Create array to start the Create Array Wizard.

4 Follow the Wizard’s instructions to create a single‐disk RAID 0 (Striping) array, a two‐ disk RAID 0 array, or a two‐disk RAID 1 (Mirror) array.

You can press F1 to access online help that walks you through the array creation  process.

5 Click OK at the prompt to restart your computer.

Your computer reboots and your boot disk has been converted to a single‐disk RAID 0  array.

If you create a two‐disk RAID 0 or RAID 1 array,  MediaShield automatically begins  the migration process from the single‐disk RAID 0 array to the RAID array that you  selected using the Wizard.

NVIDIA Corporation

27

C

HAPTER

3

Creating RAID Arrays

Creating a Non-Bootable Array

This section explains how to create a RAID array that is not intended to be bootable.

Note: Windows XP 32‐bit editions cannot read drives or arrays with a capacity greater  than 2 TB. 

1 Enable RAID in the system BIOS

If you have not already done so, globally enable RAID in the system BIOS.

See  “Enabling RAID in the System BIOS” on page 10  for detailed instructions.

2 Create the RAID Array

There are two methods you can use to create a RAID array:

Using the RAID BIOS

This method involves rebooting the system and then entering the RAID BIOS. Follow  the instructions under 

“Creating a RAID Array Using the RAID BIOS” on page 13

.

Using the MediaShield software

a Make sure the NVIDIA MediaShield software is installed.

See  “Installing the NVIDIA MediaShield Software Under Windows” on page 32

 for  instructions.

b Open the NVIDIA Control Panel, then from the Select a Task pane under the Storage  category, click Create array to start the Create Array Wizard.

c Follow the Wizard’s instructions.

You can press F1 to access online help that walks you through the array creation  process.

3 Initialize the RAID Array

After creating the array, reboot the PC and then initialize the newly created array  under Windows as follows:

a Launch Computer Management by clicking Start Æ Control Panel, then open the 

Administrative Tools folder and double click on Computer Management.

b Click Disk Management (under the Storage section).

28

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

3

Creating RAID Arrays

Under Windows XP, the The Initialize and Convert Disk Wizard appears. 

Figure 3.4

Initialize and Convert Disk Wizard - Windows XP

Under Windows Vista, the Initialize Disk dialog box appears.  

NVIDIA Corporation

Figure 3.5

Initialize Disk - Windows Vista

c Follow the instructions in the wizard or dialog box to initialize your disks. 

29

C

HAPTER

3

Creating RAID Arrays

4 Format the Unallocated Disk Space 

30

Figure 3.6

Computer Management Window

The actual disks listed will depend on your system. In  Figure 3.6

, there is a 223.58 GB 

unallocated partition. You must format the unallocated disk space in order to use it.

Under Windows XP:

a Right‐click “Unallocated space”, select “New Partition…” and follow the Wizard  instructions. 

b After the drive has been formatted, it is ready for use. See 

“Using the NVIDIA 

MediaShield Storage” on page 33  for instructions on performing other storage 

management tasks.

Under Windows Vista:

a Right‐click “Unallocated ”, select “New Simple Volume” and follow the Wizard  instructions.

For additional information on initializing, partitioning, and formatting the newly  created array, refer to the section on Disk Management in your system’s Help and 

Support Center.

After the drive has been formatted, it is ready for use. See  “Installing and Using NVIDIA 

MediaShield Storage” on page 31  for instructions on performing other storage 

management tasks.

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

NVIDIA Corporation

C

H A P T E R

I

NSTALLING AND

U

SING

NVIDIA M

EDIA

S

HIELD

S

TORAGE

The MediaShield RAID software ships with an application called MediaShield Storage,  which you access from the NVIDIA Control Panel. This chapter describes MediaShield 

Storage in the following sections: 

“Installing the NVIDIA MediaShield Software Under Windows” on page 32

“Using the NVIDIA MediaShield Storage” on page 33

31

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

Installing the NVIDIA MediaShield Software Under Windows

This section describes how to run the setup application and install the RAID software.

1  Start the nForce Setup program to open the NVIDIA Windows nForce Drivers page.

32

Figure 4.1

nForce Driver Installation Window

2 Select the modules that you want to install.

Make sure that the “NVIDIA IDE Driver” is selected.

You must install the NVIDIA IDE driver in order to enable NVIDIA MediaShield. If  you do not install the NVIDIA IDE driver, NVIDIA MediaShield will not be enabled.

3 Click Next and then follow the instructions. 

4 After the installation is completed, be sure to reboot the PC.

5 After the reboot, initialize the newly created array as described in the next section.

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

Using the NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

The user interface for the MediaShield Storage appears in the NVIDIA Control Panel,  under the Storage module. 

This section describes how to accomplish the following MediaShield Storage actions:

Accessing the NVIDIA Control Panel Storage Pages

Creating an Array

Deleting an Array

Synchronizing an Array

Designating a Spare Disk

Removing a Spare Disk

Rebuilding an Array

Migrating an Array

Using the SMART Disk Feature

NVIDIA Corporation

33

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

Accessing the NVIDIA Control Panel Storage Pages

To access the NVIDIA Control Panel Storage pages:

1 Right‐click the desktop and then click NVIDIA Control Panel from the pop‐up menu  to open the NVIDIA Control Panel.

The NVIDIA Control Panel opens to the last page that was visited. 

2 From the Select a Task pane, under the Storage category, click View storage 

configuration to view the storage devices in your system. 

34

Figure 4.2

NVIDIA Control Panel View Storage Configuration Page

The View Storage Configuration page provides the following information about the hard  drives in your system: 

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

Devices on this system

Name: Indicates the disk drive model information and where they are used–

RAID Array type–for example, Striping, Mirrored, etc.

Free Disk (applicable on systems that do not support NVIDIA’s RAID pass‐through  disk management)–free disks are spare RAID disks that can be re‐assigned to an  array or as a spare disk for an array. 

Basic Disk (applicable on systems that support NVIDIA’s RAID pass‐through disk  management)–basic disks are pass‐through disks that the OS can use as non‐array  disks. They can also be re‐assigned to an array or as a spare disk for an array.

Status: Indicates the process state of the array.  

For example, ʺHealthyʺ, ʺRebuildingʺ, ʺInitializingʺ, ʺSynchronizingʺ, or ʺUpgradingʺ 

Capacity: Indicates the size of each hard drive.

For example, ʺ110.00 GBʺ

Channel: Indicates the adapter and channel (SATA port) information for each hard  drive.

For example, ʺ1.0.ʺ means the hard drive is attached to Adapter 1, Channel 0.

Notes Section

Partitions: Indicates any partitions created on the selected array or disk.

Status: Indicates the applicable status for the selected hard disk–such as SMART,  rebuilding, or synchronize status. 

Note: On systems that use NVIDIA’s RAID pass‐through disk management, only disks  that are part of an array will show SMART status.

NVIDIA Corporation

35

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

Creating an Array

This option is available only if there are available disks that are not assigned to an array.

1 Click Create array from the NVIDIA Control Panel Select a Task pane.

The NVIDIA MediaShield Setup Wizard appears.

36

2 Follow the instructions in the Wizard.

You can press F1 to access the online help that walks you through the Wizard with  step‐by‐step instructions.

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

Deleting an Array

This option is available only if RAID arrays have been created.

1 Click Delete array from the NVIDIA Control Panel Select a Task pane. .

The NVIDIA Delete Array Wizard appears.

2 Follow the instructions in the Wizard.

You can press F1 to access the online help that walks you through the Wizard with  step‐by‐step instructions.

NVIDIA Corporation

37

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

Synchronizing an Array

Synchronizing an array will force a rebuild of redundancy or parity. The operation  applies to any fault‐tolerant array such as RAID 1, RAID0+1, or RAID 5

1.

1 Click Synchronize array from the NVIDIA Control Panel Select a Task pane.

The NVIDIA Synchronize Array Wizard appears.

38

2 Follow the instructions in the Wizard.

You can press F1 to access the online help that walks you through the Wizard with  step‐by‐step instructions.

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

Designating a Spare Disk

About Spare Disks

Spare disks are used to replace a failed disk in a RAID array. You can designate a hard  drive to be used as a spare disk for a RAID 1, RAID 0+1 or RAID 5 array

1.

MediaShield RAID supports the following types of spare disks:

Free Disk

Available only on systems that do not support NVIDIA’s RAID pass‐through disk management.

A free disk is a disk that is not part of any RAID array, but can be used by any available 

RAID 1, RAID 0+1, or RAID 5 array that requires another disk when one of its disks  crashes or becomes unusable. The process is automatic and requires no user interaction. 

Example: A system may have four hard disks where one disk is used to boot the OS, two  hard drives are set up in a mirrored array, and a fourth hard disk is set up as a free disk. If  one of the mirrored array drives fails, the free disk will be assigned automatically to the  mirrored array to replace the failed disk and the rebuilding process starts. 

Dedicated Spare Disk

A dedicated spare disk is a disk that is assigned to a RAID 1, RAID 0+1, or RAID 5 array. It  is used only by the array that it is assigned to and not by any other array. 

The dedicated disk is used by that array only when needed ‐ for example, during a system  crash where a RAID mirrored drive is broken, the dedicated spare disk replaces the failed  disk and the rebuilding process starts. 

Requirements for Designating a Spare Disk

The Designate Spare option appears only if all the following conditions are met. 

• On systems that support NVIDIA’s RAID pass‐through disk management, there must  be at least one fault‐tolerant array already created.

• On systems that do not support NVIDIA’s RAID pass‐through disk management, there  must be at least two fault tolerant arrays already created.

(Some OEMS allow a designated spare to be created when only one fault‐tolerant array  exists.) 

• There must be at least one free disk with capacity equal to or greater than the smallest  disk in the given fault tolerant array.

For example, if a mirror array is created with disk capacities of 40 GB and 80 GB, there  should be at least one free disk available of capacity equal to or greater than 40GB to be  used as a spare disk for that array.

NVIDIA Corporation

39

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

Instructions

1 Click Designate spare disk from the NVIDIA Control Panel Select a Task pane.

The NVIDIA Spare Disk Allocation Wizard appears.

40

2 Follow the instructions in the Wizard.

You can press F1 to access the online help that walks you through the Wizard with  step‐by‐step instructions.

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

Removing a Spare Disk

The Remove spare option appears only if you have a RAID array with a spare disk  allocated to it.

1 Click Remove spare disk from the NVIDIA Control Panel Select a Task pane.

The NVIDIA MediaShield Setup Wizard appears.

2 Follow the instructions in the Wizard.

You can press F1 to access the online help that walks you through the Wizard with  step‐by‐step instructions.

NVIDIA Corporation

41

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

Rebuilding an Array

About Rebuilding

Rebuilding is the process of restoring data to a hard drive from other drives in the array. 

This occurs automatically if a disk in an array fails and there are spare disks available for  that array.

If no disks have been designated as spare disks, you can manually rebuild an array using  an available disk. 

For example, if you have a three disk RAID 5 array and one of the drives fails, you will  need to replace the failed drive with a new one, and rebuild the array to re‐generate the  lost data on the newly added drive.

• Rebuilding applies only to fault‐tolerant arrays such as RAID 1, RAID 0+1, or RAID 5 

Arrays

1

.

• The new disk must have a capacity equal to or greater than the smallest disk in the  target array.

Instructions

1 Click Rebuild array from the NVIDIA Control Panel Select a Task pane.

42

1. See

Table 1.1, “Supported nForce Platforms, RAID Arrays, and Pass-through Disk Management” on page 2 for a matrix of supported RAID levels.

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

The NVIDIA Rebuild Array Wizard appears.

2 Follow the instructions in the Wizard.

You can press F1 to access the online help that walks you through the Wizard with  step‐by‐step instructions.

The rebuilding process takes some time to complete, and occurs in the background so as  not to affect the performance of the system. 

Note: To avoid delays in rebuilding your array, be sure to turn off all automatic system  power‐saving settings, such as Standby or Hibernate. The rebuilding process is  temporarily interrupted while the system is in those power‐saving states.

NVIDIA Corporation

43

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

Migrating an Array

In a traditional RAID environment, the process of changing the current state of a disk or a  current array to a new RAID configuration typically involves multiple steps. You must  back up the data, delete the array, re‐boot the PC, and then reconfigure the new array. 

MediaShield RAID simplifies this by allowing you to change the current state of the disk  or array to another with a one‐step process called ʺMigratingʺ. This section describes the 

NVIDIA Migrating process and explains how to use Migrating to convert from one RAID  array type to another.

General Migrating Requirements

• The new array capacity must be equal to or greater than the previous array. 

For example, it is possible to migrate from a RAID 1 array to a RAID 0 array as long as  the RAID 0 array is the same size as (or larger than) the RAID 1 array. 

• The number of disks in the new array cannot be less than the number of disks in the  original array.

• You cannot migrate

To or from a JBOD (Spanning) array

From RAID 1 to RAID 1 

From RAID 0+1 to RAID 1

From RAID 5 to 1

Migrating to an Array Larger Than 2 TB

Your disks must be partitioned using the GUID partition table (GPT) if you plan to  migrate to an array with greater than 2 TB storage.

If your original array is not a GPT disk and you expand your array’s capacity using the  migration feature to over 2 TB, you will not be able to access the additional storage above 

2 TB in the new array. To use the additional storage in this situation, back up your data,  repartition the array using GPT, then restore your data to the new volume.

Note: Be sure to make the volume dynamic if you plan to have more than four partitions.

44

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

Specific Migrating Requirements

The following table lists the disk requirements for a new RAID array for various  migrating combinations. 

Table 4.1

RAID Array Disk Requirements for Migrating

From To New Array Disk Requirements i

RAID 0

RAID 1

RAID

0+1

RAID 5

RAID 0

m > n

Number of disks in the new array must be greater than the original array.

RAID 1

m=2, n=1

RAID 1 array must include two disks, converted from a one disk RAID 0 array.

RAID 0+1

m >= 2 x n

RAID 5

Number of RAID 0+1 disks must be equal to or greater than twice the number of RAID 0 disks.

m >= n + 1

RAID 0

RAID 1

No additional restrictions.

** Not a valid combination **

RAID 0+1

No additional restrictions.

RAID 5

RAID 0

m >= 3

m >= n

Number of RAID 0 disks must be equal to or greater than the number of

RAID 0+1 disks.

** Not a valid combination **

RAID 1

RAID 0+1

m >= n + 2; where m must be an even number of disks.

The new array must include at least two more disks than the original array, and can include any even number of disks beyond that.

RAID 5

m >= n

RAID 0

RAID 1

m >= n

** Not a valid combination **

RAID 0+1

m >= 2 x (n - 1); where m is an even number of disks.

RAID 5

m > n i. m = quantity of disks in the new array. n = quantity of disks in the original array.

NVIDIA Corporation

45

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

Instructions

1 Click Migrate array from the NVIDIA Control Panel Select a Task pane.

The NVIDIA Migrate Array Wizard appears.

46

2 Follow the instructions in the Wizard.

You can press F1 to access the online help that walks you through the Wizard with  step‐by‐step instructions.

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

The migrate process takes some time to complete, and occurs in the background so as not  to affect the performance of the system. 

Note: To avoid delays in migrating your array, be sure to turn off all automatic system  power‐saving settings, such as Standby or Hibernate. The migrate process is  temporarily interrupted while the system is in those power‐saving states.

Using the SMART Disk Feature

S.M.A.R.T. stands for Self‐Monitoring, Analysis, and Reporting Technology. It is a disk  drive feature that allows software to monitor degradations in disk drive specifications. 

Using this technology, NVIDIA MediaShield lets you monitor the health of disk drives in  a RAID array and alerts you when certain degradations indicate an impending hardware  failure, giving you time to back up data and replace the drive. 

When you click on an array disk from the View Storage Configuration page, the SMART  status appears, indicating whether (as of the last polling) the disk is healthy (good) or  whether there is a problem that can result in a catastrophic failure within 24 hours. 

Configuring SMART Settings

Viewing the SMART Status

Viewing the SMART Status Event Logs

Running the SMART Self‐Test

NVIDIA Corporation

47

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

Configuring SMART Settings

To configure the SMART settings:

1 Click Configure SMART settings from the NVIDIA Control Panel Select a Task pane.

The Configure SMART Settings page opens..

48

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

2 Select the Enable SMART monitoring radio button.

3 If you want to track the test results, check the Record events in the system log check  box.

4 Click the Polling interval list arrow and then select one of the time options  corresponding to how often you want MediaShield to run the SMART test.

5 Click Apply when done.

Viewing the SMART Status

To see the SMART status for a specific disk:

1 Click View storage configuration to open the associated page . 

2 Click on a disk from the list of array disks.

The SMART status, if available, appears in the STATUS notes section. 

NVIDIA Corporation

Figure 4.3

NVIDIA Control Panel View Storage Configuration Page

49

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

Viewing the SMART Status Event Logs

To view the SMART status event logs:

Windows XP

1 Open the Windows Control Panel.

2 Double‐click Administrative Tools, then double‐click Computer Management.

3 Under System Tools‐>Event Viewer‐>Windows Logs, click System.

The events are listed in the NVRAIDSERVICE Source entries.

Windows Vista

1 Open the Windows Control Panel.

2 Double‐click Administrative Tools, then double‐click Computer Management.

3 Under System Tools‐>Event Viewer‐>Windows Logs, click Application

The events are listed in the NVRAIDSERVICE Source entries.

Running the SMART Self-Test

You can run a SMART self‐test on‐the‐fly. In the event of a hard disk problem, the test  provides additional information such as whether the problem is electrical, mechanical, or  data‐related. 

SMART Self-Test Requirements

You can use NVIDIA MediaShield to run the SMART self‐test on disk drives that meet the  following conditions:

• The disk drive must support the self‐test feature.

The drive firmware is what actually runs the SMART self test. 

• On systems that use NVIDIA’s RAID pass‐through disk management, the disk drive  must be part of an array or assigned as a dedicated spare disk.

You cannot run the SMART self‐test on “Basic” disks.

• On systems that do not use NVIDIA’s RAID pass‐through disk management, you can  run the SMART self‐test on disk drives assigned to an array as well as any “Free” disks,  provided the disk supports the self‐test feature. 

50

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

Instructions

To run the SMART self‐test, 

1 Click SMART Self‐Test from the NVIDIA Control Panel Select a Task pane.

NVIDIA Corporation

51

C

HAPTER

4

Installing and Using NVIDIA MediaShield Storage

This opens the SMART Self‐Test page..

52

2 From the ‘Drives on this system’ list box, select the disk that you want to test, then click 

Run Self‐Test.

The test takes a few minutes to complete.

The Status column shows the test status ‐ whether the test is in progress, passed, or  failed.

3 When the test has completed, click the disk for additional information regarding the  test results.

Note: When you initiate the self‐test using NVIDIA MediaShield, the application sends a  command to the drive. From that point on the drive firmware controls how and  when the self‐test is run. 

If the drive is busy, or is experiencing much traffic (I/O reads or writes), the drive  firmware wonʹt run the self test until the drive is no longer busy. So if a RAID job  such as migrate, rebuild, initialize, or sync is in progress and you initiate a self test,  the test may not finish until the RAID job has completed. 

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

H A P T E R

U

SING

D

ISK

A

LERT

About Disk Alert

With NVIDIA MediaShield Storage, original equipment manufacturers have the option of  incorporating a disk alert feature that provides a graphical indication of the status of the  hard disks in the system.

When the NVIDIA MediaShield application detects a failure condition of an attached  drive, a pop‐up box appears in the clock area of the Windows system tray. Click the pop‐ up box to view the manufacturer‐provided bitmap image of the system motherboard. The  image shows the hard drive connector ports and provides a visual indication of the  location and status of the drives as follows:

Red rectangle: A red rectangle will flash around the port connector that is attached to  the failed drive. 

Green rectangle: Ports that have a drive attached, and are in a healthy state, are  indicated with a green rectangle around the port connector. 

Yellow rectangle: Ports that have a drive attached, are members of a failed RAID array,  but are not the cause of the failure have a yellow rectangle around the port connector. 

Unconnected ports have no visual indication. On systems that support NVIDIA RAID  pass‐through disk management, visual indicators are available only for disks that are part  of an array.

NVIDIA Corporation

53

C

HAPTER

5

Using Disk Alert

Disk Alert Examples

Figure 5.1

 through  Figure 5.3

 illustrate how the Disk Alert feature is implemented on an 

NVIDIA reference board. The actual picture in your system will depend on the  motherboard.

Example of All Good Drives

Figure 5.1

 shows four green connections indicating four active SATA ports—all SATA 

ports are OK.

54

Figure 5.1

Disk Alert Example—All SATA Drive Connections OK

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

5

Using Disk Alert

Example of a Degraded Array

Figure 5.2

 shows a yellow SATA port indicating that an array has been degraded as well 

as a single black SATA port indicating that there is no longer a SATA hard drive  connected to that port.

SATA drive connected to this port is part of a degraded array.

No SATA drive connected to this port.

Figure 5.2

Disk Alert Example—Degraded and Missing SATA Connection

NVIDIA Corporation

55

C

HAPTER

5

Using Disk Alert

Example of a Failed Drive

Figure 5.3

 shows a red SATA port indicating that a drive failure (or a RAID error) has 

occurred.

Failed SATA drive connected to this port.

Figure 5.3

Disk Alert Example—Failed SATA Drive

56

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

NVIDIA Corporation

C

H A P T E R

M

EDIA

S

HIELD

RAID F

REQUENTLY

A

SKED

Q

UESTIONS

The FAQ in this chapter are organized by the following categories:

Basic RAID Questions

RAID ROM Setup Questions

Rebuilding Arrays Questions

Dedicated Disk Questions

Array Migrating Questions

MediaShield Application Questions

57

C

HAPTER

6

MediaShield RAID Frequently Asked Questions

Basic RAID Questions

• What is RAID?

RAID stands for Redundant Array of Independent Disks, and refers to the grouping of 2 or  more disk drives that the system views as a single drive. Different groupings have  difference advantages that include better performance and data fault tolerance.

See  “About NVIDIA® MediaShield™” on page 1  for detailed descriptions of the 

different types of RAID arrays.

• What type of RAID array is right for me?

In general, for better throughput of non‐critical data, use RAID 0; for fault tolerance,  use RAID1 or RAID 5, and for better throughput as well as fault tolerance use RAID 

0+1.

See  “About NVIDIA® MediaShield™” on page 1  for detailed descriptions of the 

different types of RAID arrays.

• What is the difference between a bootable and a non‐bootable RAID array?

A system with a non‐bootable RAID array includes a separate hard disk that contains  the OS and is not part of the RAID array.

See  “Creating a Non‐Bootable Array” on page 28

 for more information.

In a bootable RAID array, the OS is installed on the RAID array disks.

See  “Creating an Array and Making it Bootable” on page 22  for more information.

• I just configured a RAID 1 array—why is the array size one‐half the total cumulative  size of the drives?

RAID 1 uses one‐half the total disk space for data redundancy.

See  “RAID 1” on page 5

 for more information on RAID1 arrays. 

• What is the optimal hard drive configuration for RAID 1 (mirror)?

In a mirrored array, a mirror is created using the maximum drive size of the smaller of  the two drives. Ideal configuration is achieved using drives of identical size.

• How do I configure a multiple array system?

Up to eight different RAID arrays can be configured and active at the same time. You  need to configure each array separately in the RAID BIOS as well as initialize the arrays  in Windows.

58

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

6

MediaShield RAID Frequently Asked Questions

• Why is the cumulative size of a RAID 0 (Stripe) or RAID 0+1 (Stripe‐Mirror) not equal  to the sum of the drives?

The drive size is controlled by stripe blocks.

For RAID 0: Array size = (smallest drive size) x (number of disks in the array) 

For RAID 0+1: Array size is = ((smallest drive size) x (number of disks in the array)) / 2

• Why can I not get into Windows after adding a non‐bootable array?

Possible cause would be adding the boot drive to the array and then clearing the array.

RAID ROM Setup Questions

• Why can I not get into the RAID ROM Setup?

You must enable RAID functionality in the system BIOS as explained in 

“Enabling 

RAID in the System BIOS” on page 10 . 

• What is the Optimal Striping Block Size in the RAID ROM Setup?

The default optimal striping block size is 64KB. NVIDIA recommends using the  optimal block size.

• What does BBS stand for in the RAID ROM [F10] setup?

BBS stands for BIOS Boot Specification. This indicates that the boot device is defined in  the BIOS.

• Why do I need to clear the MBR (Master Boot Record) when creating an array in the 

RAID ROM Setup?

This is needed to prevent invalid data from appearing in the MBR space on any of the  drives included in the array. Not doing so could render the system unstable.

Rebuilding Arrays Questions

• How long does the RAID rebuilding process take?

In the rebuilding process, all data is copied from one hard drive to another and then the  data is synchronized between the two hard drives. Because the rebuilding process  occurs in the background in a way that does not affect system performance, the process  can take some time and the time it takes depends on the size of the drive, system  performance and other factors. 

See  “Synchronizing an Array” on page 38  for more information.

NVIDIA Corporation

59

C

HAPTER

6

MediaShield RAID Frequently Asked Questions

Dedicated Disk Questions

• Can I assign a dedicated disk to a striped array/JBOD or use a free disk with striped  array/JBOD?

No, free disks and dedicated disks can be only used with a mirrored array, striped‐ mirror array, or a RAID 5 array. 

• Once a dedicated disk has been assigned to a RAID 1, RAID 0+1, or RAID 5 array, can 

I remove it?

Yes, a dedicated disk can be removed from a RAID 1, RAID 0+1, or a RAID 5 array.

Array Migrating Questions

• Is it possible to migrate a single bootable drive to a two‐disk stripe array? 

That is, if I have a single drive in the system that is not RAID enabled, then decide to add a  second drive to the system, will I then be able to migrate the single bootable drive to a two‐disk  stripe array?

If ʺRAID Enableʺ in the BIOS RAID Config screen is not enabled when the OS is  installed, it is not possible to convert the SATA boot drive into a multi‐disk bootable 

RAID array. 

Therefore, if you want to retain the capability to migrate a single SATA boot drive into  a multi‐disk RAID array at a future time, you must perform the OS install onto a single  disk stripe array. You can do this by following the instructions in 

“Creating an Array  and Making it Bootable” on page 22  and selecting ʺRAID Modeʺ striping and then 

adding just your single boot disk. Then install the OS using the F6 install mechanism as 

described in  Step 3: Install the RAID Drivers

.

Later, when you want to migrate the single disk into a multi‐disk RAID array, follow  the instructions in 

“Migrating an Array” on page 44 .

• Can I delete an array while it is being migrated?

Yes, but doing so will erase all the data stored on the soon to be migrated array.

• Can I migrate a bootable RAID array?

Yes, you can migrate to and from any supported RAID configuration.

60

MediaShield User’s Guide – Version 7.3

C

HAPTER

6

MediaShield RAID Frequently Asked Questions

MediaShield Application Questions

• What functions can be performed using the MediaShield application?

The following tasks can be performed:

View information about RAID 0, RAID 1,RAID 0+1, RAID 5 and JBOD (as well as  any supported configuration if you have more than one RAID array active)

View Free Disks

Assign a dedicated disk to RAID 1, RAID 0+1, and RAID 5

Remove a dedicated disk from a RAID 1, RAID 0+1, or RAID 5 array

Rebuild a RAID 1, RAID 0+1, or RAID 5 array 

View the status of the rebuilding process

Create a RAID Array

Delete a RAID Array

Migrate a RAID Array

Synchronize an Array

Note: Not all nForce platforms provide support for all the RAID levels listed. See  Table 

1.1, “Supported nForce Platforms, RAID Arrays, and Pass‐through Disk 

Management” on page 2  for a matrix of supported RAID levels.

• What is S.M.A.R.T. ?

S.M.A.R.T. stands for Self‐Monitoring, Analysis, and Reporting Technology. It is a disk  drive feature that allows software to monitor degradations in disk drive specifications. 

Using this technology, NVIDIA MediaShield lets you monitor the health of disk drives  in a RAID array and alerts you when certain degradations indicate an impending  hardware failure, giving you time to back up data and replace the drive. 

• Why is there no content on the NVIDIA Control Panel Storage pages under Windows 

Vista?

If you are logged onto Windows Vista as a guest user, then you will not have access to 

NVIDIA MediaShield Storage functionality.

The guest account under Windows Vista has limited security privileges and therefore  users logged in under that account are not able to change or view the system  configuration. 

To view the storage information you can log in under any ʹstandardʹ user or 

ʹadministratorʹ account. To change the system configuration you must have  administrative credentials.

NVIDIA Corporation

61

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement

Table of contents