Discrete Manufacturing LAN Deployment Guide - Feb 2013

Discrete Manufacturing LAN Deployment Guide - Feb 2013
SBA
SOLUTIONS
Discrete Manufacturing LAN
Deployment Guide
S M A R T
B USI NE S S
A R C HI TEC TURE
February 2013 Series
Preface
Who Should Read This Guide
How to Read Commands
This Cisco® Smart Business Architecture (SBA) guide is for people who fill a
variety of roles:
Many Cisco SBA guides provide specific details about how to configure
Cisco network devices that run Cisco IOS, Cisco NX-OS, or other operating
systems that you configure at a command-line interface (CLI). This section
describes the conventions used to specify commands that you must enter.
• Systems engineers who need standard procedures for implementing
solutions
• Project managers who create statements of work for Cisco SBA
implementations
Commands to enter at a CLI appear as follows:
• Sales partners who sell new technology or who create implementation
documentation
Commands that specify a value for a variable appear as follows:
• Trainers who need material for classroom instruction or on-the-job
training
Commands with variables that you must define appear as follows:
configure terminal
ntp server 10.10.48.17
class-map [highest class name]
In general, you can also use Cisco SBA guides to improve consistency
among engineers and deployments, as well as to improve scoping and
costing of deployment jobs.
Commands shown in an interactive example, such as a script or when the
command prompt is included, appear as follows:
Release Series
Long commands that line wrap are underlined. Enter them as one command:
Cisco strives to update and enhance SBA guides on a regular basis. As
we develop a series of SBA guides, we test them together, as a complete
system. To ensure the mutual compatibility of designs in Cisco SBA guides,
you should use guides that belong to the same series.
The Release Notes for a series provides a summary of additions and
changes made in the series.
All Cisco SBA guides include the series name on the cover and at the
bottom left of each page. We name the series for the month and year that we
release them, as follows:
month year Series
For example, the series of guides that we released in February 2013 is
the “February Series”.
Router# enable
wrr-queue random-detect max-threshold 1 100 100 100 100 100
100 100 100
Noteworthy parts of system output or device configuration files appear
highlighted, as follows:
interface Vlan64
ip address 10.5.204.5 255.255.255.0
Comments and Questions
If you would like to comment on a guide or ask questions, please use the
SBA feedback form.
If you would like to be notified when new comments are posted, an RSS feed
is available from the SBA customer and partner pages.
You can find the most recent series of SBA guides at the following sites:
Customer access: http://www.cisco.com/go/sba
Partner access: http://www.cisco.com/go/sbachannel
February 2013 Series
Preface
Table of Contents
What’s In This SBA Guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Access Layer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Cisco SBA Solutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Business Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Route to Success. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Technology Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
About This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Deployment Details. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Related Reading. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Design Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Discrete Manufacturing LAN Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Architecture Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Network Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Configuring the Access Layer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Connecting the Access Layer to the Distribution/Core Layer. . . . . . . 32
Operations and Server Room. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Business Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Technical Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Deployment Details. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Configuring the Server Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Distribution/Core Layer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Connecting the Server Room to the Distribution/Core Layer. . . . . . . 46
Business Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Appendix A: Product List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Technology Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Deployment Details. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Appendix B: Configuration Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Configuring the Distribution/Core Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Distribution/Core-Layer Configurations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Access Layer Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Server Room Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
February 2013 Series
Table of Contents
What’s In This SBA Guide
Cisco SBA Solutions
About This Guide
Cisco SBA helps you design and quickly deploy a full-service business
network. A Cisco SBA deployment is prescriptive, out-of-the-box, scalable,
and flexible.
This deployment guide contains one or more deployment chapters, which
each include the following sections:
Cisco SBA incorporates LAN, WAN, wireless, security, data center, application
optimization, and unified communication technologies—tested together as a
complete system. This component-level approach simplifies system integration
of multiple technologies, allowing you to select solutions that solve your
organization’s problems—without worrying about the technical complexity.
Cisco SBA Solutions are designs for specific problems found within the
most common technology trends. Often, Cisco SBA addresses more than
one use case per solution because customers adopt new trends differently
and deploy new technology based upon their needs.
Route to Success
To ensure your success when implementing the designs in this guide, you
should first read any guides that this guide depends upon—shown to the
left of this guide on the route below. As you read this guide, specific
prerequisites are cited where they are applicable.
• Business Overview—Describes the business use case for the design.
Business decision makers may find this section especially useful.
• Technology Overview—Describes the technical design for the
business use case, including an introduction to the Cisco products that
make up the design. Technical decision makers can use this section to
understand how the design works.
• Deployment Details—Provides step-by-step instructions for deploying
and configuring the design. Systems engineers can use this section to
get the design up and running quickly and reliably.
You can find the most recent series of Cisco SBA guides at the following
sites:
Customer access: http://www.cisco.com/go/sba
Partner access: http://www.cisco.com/go/sbachannel
Prerequisite Guides
You Are Here
SOLUTIONS
Discrete Manufacturing
Design Overview
February 2013 Series
Discrete Manufacturing LAN
Deployment Guide
What’s In This SBA Guide
1
Introduction
The Cisco SBA—Solutions Discrete Manufacturing LAN Deployment
Guide describes how to deploy wired network access that scales from small
environments with one to a few LAN switches to a large LAN. Resiliency,
high availability, segmentation, security, and scalability are included in order
to provide a robust communications environment. Quality of service (QoS)
and multicast management are integrated in order to ensure that the base
architecture can support a multitude of applications, including latency- and
jitter-sensitive industrial automation and control system (IACS) applications
that coexist with enterprise data applications on a single network.
The Cisco Smart Business Architecture (SBA) discrete manufacturing LAN
architecture is designed for connectivity requirements that range from a
small plant to up to 2,500 connected devices at a single plant location.
Cisco SBA—Solutions Discrete Manufacturing networks is a solid network
foundation designed to provide networks with up to 2,500 connected
devices the flexibility to support new devices or network services without
re-engineering the network. This is a prescriptive, out-of-the-box deployment guide that is based on best-practice design principles and that
delivers resiliency, security, flexibility, and scalability.
Related Reading
The Discrete Manufacturing Design Overview orients you to the overall
Cisco SBA design and explains the requirements that were considered
when selecting specific products.
Design Goals
This architecture is based on requirements gathered from customers,
partners, and Cisco field personnel for organizations with up to 2,500 connected manufacturing devices. Based on this input, the Cisco SBA discrete
manufacturing design focuses on ease of deployment and scalability as the
primary requirements of a manufacturing organization.
Because plant facilities range in size and organizations may have multiple
plants of varying sizes, and because IT expertise may be limited in a manufacturing environment, ease of deployment is considered to be a critical
network requirement. This architecture uses a small number of standard
designs for common portions of the network. This allows the support staff
to more effectively design services for the network and then to implement
and support the network. The modular design not only simplifies deployment, but it enhances scalability by providing a set of standard, global
building blocks that can be assembled in order to meet your organization’s
requirements.
Many of the design’s plug-in modules look identical for several service
areas, allowing you to use the same support methods for multiple areas of
network, providing additional consistency and scalability. To ensure that
interfaces between the plug-ins are well defined, the plug-in modules use
the standard hierarchical design model that is composed of core, distribution, and access layers. This allows for easy replication and enhanced
scalability.
The Discrete Manufacturing Security Deployment Guide focuses on
deploying firewall, intrusion prevention system, and VPN services in the
DMZ, between the enterprise and industrial Ethernet networks.
February 2013 Series
Introduction
2
Discrete Manufacturing LAN Overview
The purpose of the architecture and the network services used in this guide
is to provide a single, reliable industrial Ethernet network infrastructure that
enables easy communication and access to IACSs, their devices, and the
critical information that flows between them.
Architecture Overview
The discrete manufacturing LAN design model combines the zones of the
converged industrial Ethernet network architecture with the layers of the
Cisco SBA LAN hierarchical design model in order to meet the design goals
of a highly scalable, resilient, secure, and easy-to-deploy standard industrial
Ethernet network.
Converged Industrial Ethernet Network Architecture
A converged industrial Ethernet network consolidates all device and control
management functions into a single, standards-based infrastructure that is
converged with the enterprise network through a demilitarized zone (DMZ).
The converged industrial Ethernet network is divided into the following
functional zones and their levels of operations:
• Enterprise zone—Is analogous to the Cisco SBA enterprise network.
Although important, these services may not be viewed as critical to the
industrial Ethernet network or the plant-floor operations. This level is
typically under the management and control of the IT department.
• Demilitarized zone—Consists of firewalls that ensure separation
between the Manufacturing zone and the Enterprise zone. This separation protects the real-time availability and security of the industrial
February 2013 Series
Ethernet network. For more information about the Demilitarized zone and
security, see the Discrete Manufacturing Security Deployment Guide.
• Manufacturing zone—Contains the Cell/Area zones and site’s manufacturing operation and control equipment. All of the IACS applications,
devices, and controllers critical to monitoring and controlling the plantfloor IACS operations are in this zone, and it is the highest level of the
industrial Ethernet network.
Figure 1 - Zones and levels of operation
Enterprise
Zone
Enterprise Network
Level 5
Site Business Planning and Logistics Network Level 4
Demilitarized
Zone
Manufacturing
Zone
Cell/Area
Zone
Safety
Zone
Site Manufacturing Operations and Control
Level 3
Area Supervisory Control
Level 2
Basic Control
Level 1
Process
Level 0
Safety-Critical
Discrete Manufacturing LAN Overview
2275
Industrial automation and control system (IACS) is a term that describes the
automation and control applications typically found on the plant floor. IACSs
perform the automated tasks and processes that make up the production
environment, and they consist of devices such as programmable automation
controllers, human machine interfaces, drives, motors, sensors, actuators,
and I/O units. An IACS would typically include the network infrastructure that
connects the other IACS devices. For more on IACSs, see the Cisco SBA—
Solutions Discrete Manufacturing Design Overview.
3
• Cell/Area zone—Is a functional area within the plant facility. It may be as
small as a single controller and its associated devices on a process skid,
or it may be multiple controllers on an assembly line. Each plant facility
defines the Cell/Area zone demarcation differently, but most plants have
multiple Cell/Area zones.
• Safety zone—Consists of the safety systems that provide predictable,
fail-safe shutdown of IACS applications in order to protect personnel, the
environment, and the applications themselves.
Reader Tip
For more detailed information about the architecture of a converged industrial Ethernet network and its design considerations,
please refer to the Discrete Manufacturing Design Overview.
February 2013 Series
Discrete Manufacturing LAN Overview
4
The following figure shows the architecture of a converged industrial Ethernet network and the relationship between the zones and the enterprise network.
Figure 2 - Converged industrial Ethernet network architecture
DMZ
Patch Management
Terminal Services
Application Mirror
UCS Rack-mount
Servers
AV Server
Storage
ASA 5500
Firewall
(Active)
Nexus
2000
UCS Blade
Chassis
Communications
Managers
ASA 5500
Firewall
Data Center
Firewalls
Nexus 5500
Data Center
FactoryTalk
Application Servers
Operator
Workstation
Remote
Access
Server
Catalyst 6500
VSS Switch
Catalyst 3750
StackWise
Switch Stack
Wireless LAN
Controllers
Network
Services
Manufacturing Zone
Collapsed
LAN Core
Access
Switches
Cell / Area Zone
February 2013 Series
Controller
DIO
HMI
LAN Access
Discrete Manufacturing LAN Overview
1076
VFD
5
Hierarchical LAN Design Model
Cisco SBA uses a hierarchical design model to divide the design into modular groups, or layers. Breaking the design up into layers allows each layer to
focus on specific functions, which simplifies the design, provides simplified
deployment and management, and enhances scalability.
The hierarchical design model includes the following three layers:
In the discrete manufacturing LAN design model, the distribution layer and
the core layer are combined into one layer, called the distribution/core layer.
This layer consists of the Manufacturing zone operations, and it provides
interconnectivity between the systems in in the Manufacturing zone and
between the Cell/Area zones, and it also provides access to the DMZ.
Figure 4 - Combined distribution/core layer model
• Access layer—Provides workgroup or user access to the network.
• Distribution layer—Aggregates access layers and provides connectivity
to services.
Distribution/Core
Figure 3 - Cisco SBA LAN hierarchical design model
Client
Access
Core
1089
• Core layer—Provides connection between distribution layers for large
LAN environments.
In the discrete manufacturing design model, the access layer consists of the
Cell/Area zone operations, and this is where all the IACS devices are connected. This layer carries most of the critical IACS traffic, and most of that
traffic does not even leave the Cell/Area zone in which it originates.
Distribution
Network Services
Client
Access
1002
This section describes the key services the network provides for proper
functioning of the systems and applications that rely upon it.
Reader Tip
For more information about the Cisco SBA hierarchical design
model, see the “Architecture Overview” chapter of the Cisco
SBA—Borderless Networks LAN Deployment Guide.
February 2013 Series
Redundant Star Topology
The topology of the network from the distribution/core layer to the access
layer is logically a hub-and-spoke, or redundant star topology, which
reduces complexity of design and troubleshooting. This topology design
provides a more efficient operation for IP Multicast in the distribution/core
layer because there is now a single, logical, designated router that forwards
IP Multicast packets to a given VLAN in the access layer.
Discrete Manufacturing LAN Overview
6
Reader Tip
For more information about the redundant star topology
and its recommended resiliency protocols, see the Discrete
Manufacturing Design Overview.
Protocols
The following protocols are used throughout the LAN deployment process:
• Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP)—Performs consistency
checks for interfaces programmed to be in the channel, and it provides
protection to the system from inconsistent configurations. This design
model uses LACP because it is the only EtherChannel protocol that can
be used in all configurations in this design.
• VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP)—Allows network managers to configure
a VLAN in one location of the network and have that configuration
dynamically propagate out to other network devices. However, in most
cases, VLANs are defined once during switch setup with few, if any,
additional modifications. This deployment uses VTP transparent mode
because the benefits of dynamic propagation of VLAN information
across the network are not worth the potential for unexpected behavior
due to operational error.
• Secure HTTP (HTTPS) and Secure Shell (SSH)—Are more secure
replacements for the HTTP and Telnet protocols. They use Secure
Sockets Layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS) to provide
device authentication and data encryption. The SSH and HTTPS protocols enable secure management of LAN devices. Both protocols are
encrypted for privacy, and the nonsecure protocols, Telnet and HTTP,
are turned off.
• Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)—Is an applicationlayer protocol that facilitates the exchange of management information
between network devices. It is part of the TCP/IP protocol suite.
• Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP)—Is the IP unicast routing protocol used in this design because it is easy to configure,
does not require a large amount of planning, has flexible summarization
and filtering, and can scale to large networks.
• Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)—Enables communication between network devices on an IP network. DHCP snooping is a
feature that provides security by filtering untrusted DHCP messages
and by building and maintaining a DHCP snooping binding table. In this
design, DHCP snooping is enabled on the access-layer port interfaces
that are connected to IP phones and workstations.
• Network Time Protocol (NTP)—Synchronizes timekeeping among a
set of distributed time servers and clients. A local NTP server typically
references a more accurate clock feed.
• TACACS+—Authenticates management logins to infrastructure devices
against an authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) server.
Use of this protocol and AAA services is optional in this deployment.
• Rapid Per VLAN Spanning Tree Plus (RPVST+)—Provides an instance
of RSTP (802.1w) per VLAN. It greatly improves the detection of indirect
failures or linkup restoration events over classic Spanning Tree Protocol
(802.1D). Although this architecture is built without any Layer 2 loops, you
must still enable RPVST+ in order to ensure that if any physical or logical
loops are accidentally configured, no actual Layer 2 loops occur.
BPDU Guard
• Unidirectional Link Detection Protocol (UDLD)—Is a Layer 2 protocol
that enables devices connected through fiber-optic or twisted-pair
Ethernet cables to monitor the physical configuration of the cables and
detect when a unidirectional link exists. When UDLD detects a unidirectional link, it disables the affected interface and alerts you. Unidirectional
links can cause a variety of problems, including spanning-tree loops,
black holes, and non-deterministic forwarding. In addition, UDLD
enables faster link-failure detection and quick reconvergence of interface trunks, especially with fiber-optic cables, which can be susceptible
to unidirectional failures.
If a PortFast-enabled interface receives a BPDU, an invalid configuration
exists, such as the connection of an unauthorized device. The BPDU guard
feature prevents loops by moving a nontrunking interface into an errdisable
state when a PortFast-enabled interface receives a BPDU.
February 2013 Series
The PortFast Bridge Protocol Data Unit (BPDU) guard feature is a Spanning
Tree Protocol enhancement that improves switch network reliability, manageability, and security. BPDU guard protects against a user plugging a
switch into an access port or into a PortFast-enabled interface, which could
cause a catastrophic undetected spanning-tree loop.
Discrete Manufacturing LAN Overview
7
The key multicast management recommendation is to enable the IGMP
process in the Cell/Area zone. To enable and configure IGMP, it is recommended that you:
Figure 5 - Scenario that BPDU guard protects against
• Configure the IGMP querier on the distribution/core-layer switch and
ensure the distribution/core-layer switch has the lowest IP address in
the subnet, statically defined.
Cisco SBA
Access-Layer
Switch
User-Installed
Low-End Switch
Loop caused by mis-cabling the switch
1083
Spanning tree doesn’t detect the
loop because PortFast is enabled
Segmentation
Each Cell/Area zone should be a subnet with a defined VLAN. Careful consideration should be given when designing an industrial Ethernet network,
identifying which IACS devices belong to which Cell/Area zone, and minimizing the size of the Cell/Area zone. When segmenting Cell/Area zones for
your organization, follow the guidance in the Discrete Manufacturing Design
Overview.
Prioritization and QoS
Quality of service (QoS) refers to network control mechanisms that can
provide various priorities to network traffic or data flows. In a converged
industrial Ethernet network, it is important that the network assign priority to the IACS traffic in order to deliver improved performance for these
applications.
QoS can be challenging to configure and maintain, but the template,
platform-specific approach in this guide makes it much easier and adds
significant value to the overall availability and reliability of the data transmission on the industrial Ethernet network. If changes are made to the QoS
settings used in this guide, verify the configuration in a lab in order to ensure
it operates as expected prior to deployment in production.
IP Multicast and IGMP
Multicast traffic is an important consideration of a Cell/Area zone because
it is used by many of the key IACS communication protocols, and Internet
Group Management Protocol (IGMP) is the standard method to manage
multicast traffic. IGMP enables the network infrastructure to understand
which endpoints are interested in which multicast data, enabling the network
infrastructure to forward messages only to those endpoints that want them.
February 2013 Series
• Configure Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) sparse mode on all
Layer 3 interfaces. It builds unidirectional shared trees that are rooted at
a rendezvous point (RP) per group, and it scales well.
• Configure Layer 3 switches in the distribution/core layer to use Anycast
RP, which provides load-sharing and redundancy in PIM sparse mode
networks.
IP Addressing
Use of IPv6 is very limited and not widely supported by IACS applications at
this time. IPv4 is still the most commonly deployed address space and will
remain so for some time inside of industrial Ethernet networks with the use
of Network Address Translation (NAT) and newer IPv4-to-IPv6 translation
techniques. IPv4 is used in this deployment.
For ease of use and to simplify security policies, it is recommended that in
the Manufacturing zone, you use a private contiguous block of addresses
that is not in use in the enterprise network.
Reader Tip
For more information on IPv4 and IPv6 addressing design, please
refer to the following:
Cisco SBA—Borderless Networks IPv4 Addressing Guide
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/solutions/SBA/February2013/
Cisco_SBA_BN_IPv4AddressingGuide-Feb2013.pdf
Cisco SBA—Borderless Networks IPv6 Addressing Guide
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/solutions/SBA/February2013/
Cisco_SBA_BN_IPv6AddressingGuide-Feb2013.pdf
Discrete Manufacturing LAN Overview
8
802.1Q Trunking
AAA services
An 802.1Q trunk is used for connections to upstream devices, which allows
the uplink to provide Layer 3 services to all VLANs on the downstream
switch.
As networks scale in the number of devices to maintain, there is an operational burden to maintain local user accounts on every device. A centralized
authentication, authorization and accounting (AAA) service reduces operational tasks per device and provides an audit log of user access for security
compliance and root-cause analysis. When AAA is enabled for access
control, all management access to the network infrastructure devices (SSH
and HTTPS) is controlled by AAA. A local AAA user database is also defined
on each network infrastructure device in order to provide a fallback authentication source in case the centralized AAA server is unavailable. This deployment guide provides optional instructions for configuring AAA services for
management logins to infrastructure devices.
There is a remote possibility that an attacker can create a double
802.1Q-encapsulated packet. If the attacker has specific knowledge of
the 802.1Q native VLAN, they could create a packet that when processed,
removes the first or outermost tag when the packet is switched onto the
untagged native VLAN. When the packet reaches the target switch, the inner
or second tag is then processed, and the potentially malicious packet is
switched to the target VLAN. This attack is known as a VLAN-hopping attack.
Figure 6 - VLAN-hopping attack
VLAN A
VLAN B
Data
Access
Interface
VLAN B
Reader Tip
Host
The AAA server used in this architecture is Cisco Secure Access
Control System (ACS). Configuration of Secure ACS is discussed
in the Device Management Using ACS Deployment Guide.
VLAN B
Data
Data
2097
802.1Q Tags
802.1Q Trunk
802.1Q Trunk with
Native VLAN A
802.1Q Tag
Attacker
At first glance, this appears to be a serious risk. However, the traffic in this
attack scenario is in a single direction, and no return traffic can be switched
by this mechanism. Additionally, this attack cannot work unless the attacker
knows the native VLAN ID.
In order to mitigate the remote risk of a VLAN-hopping attack, you configure
an unused VLAN on all switch-to-switch 802.1Q trunk links. By using a hardto-guess, unused VLAN for the native VLAN, you reduce the possibility that
a double 802.1Q-encapsulated packet can hop VLANs.
February 2013 Series
Discrete Manufacturing LAN Overview
9
Distribution/Core Layer
Business Overview
The challenge for a plant organization is to provide reliable access between
the plant operation services (for example, a manufacturing execution system
or an asset manager) and the Cell/Area functional zones. As the number
of Cell/Area zones at a plant grows, it creates the need to aggregate the
connectivity at a common point. One of the benefits of aggregation is that
you can reduce costs by reducing the number of interconnections from
each Cell/Area access-layer switch to the rest of the network, which is used
to get to the applications and resources hosted in the center of the network
or across the WAN.
Traditional IACS network design used physical networks that were separate
from the enterprise Ethernet network. To reduce costs, organizations must
create a single multi-use network infrastructure on a single physical infrastructure per site. The dominant Internetwork protocol in use in networks
today is IP, which allows a routed network topology, but some applications
require that network-connected endpoints be Layer 2 adjacent. IT must work
to design networks that accommodate the IACS application requirements
without sacrificing the reliability or scalability of the network. The goal of
the network foundation architecture is to provide a design that supports an
ever-increasing number of services required from the LAN and to control
the increasing complexity of delivering those services, without eliminating
essential functionality.
Technology Overview
The distribution/core layer provides interconnectivity between the operations and server-room systems in in the Manufacturing zone and between
the Cell/Area zones, and it also provides access to the DMZ. In a typical
hierarchical network, the distribution/core layer connects the systems by
routing traffic between the various VLANs.
February 2013 Series
The layer’s network infrastructure provides services such as the following:
• Routing based upon a chosen routing protocol
• IGMP querier
• Default gateway
• Root switch (if running Spanning Tree Protocol).
The distribution/core layer also enables scalability. If new lines or zones
are added to an industrial Ethernet network, they can be connected to the
distribution/core layer without disrupting ongoing operations in the Cell/
Area or Manufacturing zones.
The primary function of the distribution/core layer is to aggregate accesslayer switches in a given building; additionally in plant designs, the distribution/core layer also connects to the plant-edge DMZ and operations and
server-room segments. The distribution/core layer provides a boundary
between the Layer 2 domain of the access layer and the Layer 3 domain that
provides a path to the rest of the network. This boundary provides two key
functions for the LAN. On the Layer 2 side, the distribution/core layer creates a boundary for Spanning Tree Protocol, limiting propagation of Layer 2
faults. On the Layer 3 side, the distribution/core layer is a logical point to
summarize IP routing information before it enters the network and to reduce
IP route tables for easier troubleshooting and faster failure recovery.
Distribution/Core Layer Design
The distribution layer design in the Cisco SBA discrete manufacturing
design model uses multiple physical switches that act as a single logical
switch or a single, highly redundant physical switch. This design minimizes
spanning-tree dependence, and all uplinks from the access layer to the
distribution/core layer are active and passing traffic. Spanning-tree links that
are blocked due to looped topologies are eliminated. You reduce dependence on Spanning Tree Protocol by using EtherChannel to the access layer
and using dual-homed uplinks. This is a key characteristic of this design, and
you can load-balance up to eight links if needed, for additional bandwidth.
Distribution/Core Layer
10
EtherChannel is a logical interface that can use a control plane protocol in
order to manage the physical members of the bundle. It is recommended
that you run a channel protocol instead of using forced-on mode. A channel
protocol performs consistency checks for interfaces programmed to be
in the channel, and it provides protection to the system from inconsistent
configurations. Cisco Catalyst switches provide both Port Aggregation
Protocol (PAgP), which is a widely deployed Cisco-designed protocol, and
Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) based on IEEE 802.3ad. This
design uses LACP for EtherChannel because it is the only protocol that can
be used in all configurations in this design.
There are several other advantages to the simplified distribution/core layer
design. Due to the default IP gateway being located on a logical interface
and to the resiliency provided by the distribution/core layer switch, you no
longer need IP gateway redundancy protocols such as Hot Standby Router
Protocol, Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol, and Gateway Load Balancing
Protocol. Also, the network converges faster now that it is not depending
on Spanning Tree Protocol in order to unblock links when a failure occurs,
because EtherChannel provides fast failover between links in an uplink
bundle. Finally, by using the single logical distribution/core layer design,
there are fewer boxes to manage, which reduces the amount of time spent
on ongoing provisioning and maintenance.
The network design from the distribution layer to the access layer is a
redundant star topology design that reduces complexity and troubleshooting. The single, logical designated router forwards IP Multicast packets to a
designated VLAN in the access layer, providing more efficient operation for
IP Multicast in the distribution/core layer.
Distribution/Core Layer Roles
Much emphasis has been placed on the distribution/core layer as the
access-layer aggregation point because this is the most common role.
The distribution/core layer serves other roles in the Cisco SBA for discrete
manufacturing LAN deployments.
The distribution/core layer in industrial Ethernet environments typically connects to the access layer, server and operations systems, and plant-edge
DMZ.
February 2013 Series
The distribution/core layer provides:
• Communication routing within the Cell/Area and Manufacturing zones.
• Multicast management querier function for Cell/Area zones.
• Modular growth for plant access-layer switches.
• Separated fault domains for the access layer, server room, and plantedge DMZ.
• IP address summarization for the plant.
Whether the distribution/core layer role in your network design is serving
as purely LAN-access aggregation, a collapsed core, or network-services
aggregation, the Cisco SBA distribution/core layer configuration provides
the processes and procedures to prepare this layer of the LAN for your
organization.
Distribution/Core Layer Platforms
You can use multiple platforms in order to deploy the simplified distribution/
core layer design. Physically, the distribution/core layer can be a highly
available Cisco Catalyst 4507R+E switch or a stack of Cisco Catalyst 3750-X
Series switches. It is important to note that although each platform has
different physical characteristics, each appears to the rest of the network as
a single node and provides a fully resilient design.
Cisco Catalyst 4507R+E Switch
Cisco Catalyst 4507R+E switches have redundant supervisors, line cards,
and power supplies. In this design, Cisco uses a single Catalyst 4507R+E
chassis configured with resilient components as a distribution/core layer
platform. Cisco Catalyst 4500 Supervisor Engine 7-E has the ability to
provide the access layer a medium density of 1-Gigabit and 10-Gigabit
Ethernet EtherChannel uplinks.
The Cisco Catalyst 4507R+E chassis also provides Cisco Stateful
Switchover (SSO). SSO is critical to Cisco Nonstop Forwarding, which continues to forward IP packets even in the event of a switchover or failure, and
SSO also allows in-service software upgrades for the system. SSO enables
a fast, transparent data-plane failover by synchronizing active process
information and configuring information between supervisor modules.
Distribution/Core Layer
11
Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series Switch Stack
The Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series switch stack is configured as a single unit,
but it has independent load-sharing power supplies and a processor for
each switch in the Cisco StackWise Plus stack. The Cisco SBA discrete manufacturing architecture uses a pair of stacked Cisco Catalyst 3750X-12S-E
switches that provide Layer 2 and Layer 3 switching. The following are some
of the benefits of using the Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series switch stack:
• For EtherChannel uplinks to access closets, the switches use Small
Form-Factor Pluggable transceivers for a port-by-port option of copper
or fiber-optic Gigabit Ethernet.
• Cisco StackWise Plus enables up to nine Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series
switches to be stacked together by using a 64-Gbps stack interconnect,
providing subsecond failure recovery.
• Cisco StackPower shares power across the Cisco Catalyst 3750-X
Series switch stack. This allows the flexible arrangement of power supplies in the stack and enables a zero-footprint redundant power supply
deployment and intelligent load shedding.
• Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series switches have modular uplinks for connectivity at 1-Gigabit or 10-Gigabit Ethernet speeds, and they support
upgrading the Cisco IOS feature set.
Deployment Details
The single, logical, resilient, distribution/core-layer design simplifies the
distribution/core-layer switch configuration.
Process
Configuring the Distribution/Core Layer
1. Configure the distribution/core platform
2. Configure switch universal settings
3. Configure switch global settings
4. Configure IP unicast routing
5. Configure IP Multicast routing
6. Configure the IP Multicast RP
Procedure 1
Configure the distribution/core platform
Some platforms require a one-time initial configuration prior to configuring
the features and services of the switch. If you are using a Cisco Catalyst
4507R+E chassis for the platform, complete Option 1. If you are using a
Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series switch stack for the platform, complete Option
2.
Option 1. Using a Cisco Catalyst 4507R+E switch
Step 1: Create class maps that differentiate the various types of manufacturing and voice traffic.
class-map match-any
match cos 3
class-map match-any
match cos 1
class-map match-any
match cos 5 6
class-map match-any
match cos 7
February 2013 Series
CONTROL-MGMT-QUEUE
SCAVENGER-QUEUE
CIP-PTP-General
PRIORITY-QUEUE
Distribution/Core Layer
12
Step 2: Configure QoS parameters and policy maps that define how traffic
is prioritized as it passes through the network.
policy-map 1P5Q1T
class PRIORITY-QUEUE
priority
class CONTROL-MGMT-QUEUE
bandwidth remaining percent 40
class CIP-PTP-General
bandwidth remaining percent 40
class SCAVENGER-QUEUE
bandwidth remaining percent 1
class class-default
bandwidth remaining percent 18
dbl
!
policy-map 1P5Q1T-PC
class PRIORITY-QUEUE
police cir 200000000 conform-action transmit exceed-action
drop
Step 3: Configure the macros that apply the QoS parameters, as defined by
the class maps and policy maps, to the port-channel interfaces.
macro name CiscoIEEgress
service-policy output 1P5Q1T
@
macro name CiscoIEEgress-PC
service-policy output 1P5Q1T-PC
@
Step 4: If you have two Cisco Catalyst 4500 Supervisor Engine 7-Es and if
the license level for the switch supervisors is ipbase or entservices, configure the switch to use Cisco Stateful Switchover (SSO) when moving the
primary supervisor functionality between modules.
redundancy
mode sso
Tech Tip
You can check the current license level of operation with the
show version command.
Tech Tip
When the police cir [rate in bps] command is used on port
channels, the rate must be calculated based on the speed of
the link being used. For example, on a port channel consisting of
four 1-Gbps links on which you wanted to police traffic to 10% of
the aggregate bandwidth, you take the total bandwidth, 4 Gbps
or 4,000,000,000 bps, multiply by 10%, or 0.1, and get the rate
400,000,000 bps.
Option 2. Using a Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series switch stack
When there are multiple switches configured in a stack, one of the switches
controls the operation of the stack. This switch is called the stack master. If
three or more switches are configured as the stack, configure the stack-master switch functionality on a switch that does not have uplinks configured.
By default, the active stack-master switch assigns a new stack MAC address
when the stack-master switch fails. This new MAC address assignment can
cause the network to reconverge because LACP and many other protocols
rely on the stack MAC address and must restart. This configuration preserves the original stack-master MAC address in order prevent convergence
issues.
If you are using a Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series switch stack, a single reboot
is required in order to force the stack master to operate on the switch that
you configured with the highest priority. Reboot the switch stack after all of
the distribution/core-layer switch configuration is complete.
February 2013 Series
Distribution/Core Layer
13
Step 1: Assign a stack-master switch.
switch [switch number] priority 15
Step 2: Ensure that the original master MAC address remains the stack
MAC address after a failure.
stack-mac persistent timer 0
Step 3: Configure QoS parameters that define how traffic is prioritized as it
passes through the network.
mls qos map policed-dscp 24 27 31 43 46 47 55 59 to 0
mls qos map dscp-cos 9 11 12 13 14 15 to 0
mls qos map dscp-cos 25 26 28 29 30 to 2
mls qos map dscp-cos 40 41 42 44 45 49 50 51 to 4
mls qos map dscp-cos 52 53 54 56 57 58 60 61 to 4
mls qos map dscp-cos 62 63 to 4
mls qos map cos-dscp 0 8 16 27 32 47 55 59
mls qos srr-queue input bandwidth 40 60
mls qos srr-queue input threshold 1 16 66
mls qos srr-queue input threshold 2 34 66
mls qos srr-queue input buffers 40 60
mls qos srr-queue input cos-map queue 1 threshold 2 1
mls qos srr-queue input cos-map queue 1 threshold 3 0 2
mls qos srr-queue input cos-map queue 2 threshold 2 4
mls qos srr-queue input cos-map queue 2 threshold 3 3 5 6 7
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 2 8 10
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 0 1 2 3 4
5 6 7
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 9 11 12
13 14 15 16 17
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 18 19 20
21 22 23 25 26
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 28 29 30
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 32 33 34
35 36 37 38 39
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 40 41 42
44 45 49 50 51
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 52 53 54
56 57 58 60 61
February 2013 Series
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 62 63
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 24 27 31
43 46 47 48 55
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 59
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 1 threshold 3 7
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 2 threshold 2 1
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 2 threshold 3 0 2 4
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 3 threshold 3 5 6
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 4 threshold 3 3
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 59
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 8 10
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 0 1 2 3
4 5 6 7
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 9 11 12
13 14 15 16 17
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 18 19 20
21 22 23 25 26
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 28 29 30
32 33 34 35 36
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 37 38 39
40 41 42 44 45
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 49 50 51
52 53 54 56 57
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 58 60 61
62 63
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 3 threshold 3 43 46 47
48 55
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 4 threshold 3 24 27 31
mls qos queue-set output 1 buffers 10 25 40 25
no mls qos rewrite ip dscp
mls qos
Distribution/Core Layer
14
Step 4: Create a macro that applies the platform-specific QoS configuration. This macro is used in later procedures and eases consistent deployment of QoS.
macro name CiscoIEEgress
mls qos trust cos
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
@
Procedure 2
Configure switch universal settings
In this design, there are features and services that are common across all
LAN switches, regardless of the type of platform or role in the network.
These system settings simplify and secure the management of the industrial
Ethernet network.
This procedure provides examples for some of those settings. The actual
settings and values depend on your current network configuration.
Table 1 - Common network services used in the deployment examples
Network parameter
Cisco SBA value
Domain name
cisco.local
Active Directory, DNS, DHCP server
10.13.48.10
Cisco Secure ACS
10.13.48.15
Network Time Protocol server
10.13.48.17
EIGRP Autonomous System
101
Multicast range
239.1.0.0/16
In this procedure, you configure a local login account and password that
provide basic device access authentication in order to view platform operation. The enable password secures access to the device configuration
mode. By enabling password encryption, you prevent the use of plain text
passwords when viewing configuration files. By default, HTTPS access to
the switch uses the enable password for authentication.
February 2013 Series
Reader Tip
For more information about the protocols used in this procedure,
see the “Protocols” section of the “Discrete Manufacturing LAN
Overview” chapter.
Step 1: On the distribution/core layer switch, configure the device hostname. This makes it easy to identify the device.
hostname [hostname]
Step 2: Configure VTP transparent mode.
vtp mode transparent
Step 3: Enable RPVST+.
spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
Step 4: Set the distribution/core layer switch to be the spanning-tree root
for all VLANs on access-layer switches or appliances that you are connecting to the distribution/core layer switch.
spanning-tree vlan 1-4094 root primary
Step 5: Enable UDLD.
udld enable
Step 6: Set EtherChannels to use the traffic source and destination IP
address when calculating which link to send the traffic across. This normalizes the method in which traffic is load-shared across the member links of
the EtherChannel.
port-channel load-balance src-dst-ip
Step 7: Configure DNS for host lookup. At the command line of a Cisco
IOS device, it is helpful to be able to type a domain name instead of the IP
address for a destination.
ip name-server 10.13.48.10
Distribution/Core Layer
15
Step 8: Configure HTTPS and SSH device management protocols, and then
specify the transport preferred none command on vty lines.
ip domain-name cisco.local
ip ssh version 2
no ip http server
ip http secure-server
!
line vty 0 15
transport input ssh
transport preferred none
Tech Tip
The transport preferred none command prevents errant connection attempts from the CLI prompt, and without it, long timeout
delays may occur for mistyped commands if the IP name server
is unreachable.
Step 9: Enable SNMP in order to allow the network infrastructure devices
to be managed by a Network Management System, and then configure
SNMPv2c both for a read-only and a read-write community string.
snmp-server community cisco RO
snmp-server community cisco123 RW
Step 10: If your network operational support is centralized and you want
to increase network security, use an access list to limit the networks that
can access your device. In this example, only devices on the 10.13.48.0/24
network are able to access the device via SSH or SNMP.
Caution
If you configure an access list on the vty interface, you may lose
the ability to use SSH to log in from one router to the next, for
hop-by-hop troubleshooting.
Step 11: Configure a local login and password.
username admin password c1sco123
enable secret c1sco123
service password-encryption
aaa new-model
Step 12: If you want to use AAA services for centralized user authentication, use TACACS+ protocol in order to authenticate management logins to
infrastructure devices.
tacacs server TACACS-SERVER-1
address ipv4 10.13.48.15
key SecretKey
!
aaa group server tacacs+ TACACS-SERVERS
server name TACACS-SERVER-1
!
aaa authentication login default group TACACS-SERVERS local
aaa authorization exec default group TACACS-SERVERS local
aaa authorization console
ip http authentication aaa
access-list 55 permit 10.13.48.0 0.0.0.255
line vty 0 15
access-class 55 in
!
snmp-server community cisco RO 55
snmp-server community cisco123 RW 55
February 2013 Series
Distribution/Core Layer
16
Step 13: Program network devices to synchronize to a local NTP server in
the network, and then configure console messages, logs, and debug output
to provide time stamps on output, which allows cross-referencing of events
in a network.
ntp server 10.13.48.17
ntp update-calendar
!
clock timezone PST -8
clock summer-time PDT recurring
!
service timestamps debug datetime msec localtime
service timestamps log datetime msec localtime
Step 2: Configure an in-band management interface.
The loopback interface is a logical interface that is always reachable as long
as the device is powered on and any IP interface is reachable to the network.
Because of this capability, the loopback address is the best way to manage
the switch in-band. Layer 3 process and features are also bound to the
loopback interface in order to ensure process resiliency.
The loopback address is commonly a host address with a 32-bit address
mask. Allocate the loopback address from the IP address block that the
distribution/core-layer switch summarizes to the rest of the network.
interface Loopback0
ip address [ip address] 255.255.255.255
ip pim sparse-mode
Step 3: Configure the SNMP,SSH, TACACS, and PIM processes to use the
loopback interface address.
Tech Tip
The ntp update-calendar command configures the switch to
update the hardware clock from the NTP time source periodically.
Since not all switches have a hardware clock, this command is not
supported by all devices.
snmp-server trap-source Loopback 0
ip ssh source-interface Loopback 0
ip pim register-source Loopback 0
ip tacacs source-interface Loopback 0
ntp source Loopback 0
Step 4: Save the running configuration that you have entered as the startup
configuration file. When the distribution/core-layer switch is reloaded or
power-cycled, this configuration is used.
Procedure 3
Configure switch global settings
Step 1: On the distribution/core-layer switch, configure Bridge Protocol
Data Unit (BPDU) guard globally. This protects PortFast-enabled interfaces.
spanning-tree portfast bpduguard default
Reader Tip
For more information about BPDU guard, see the “BPDU Guard”
section of the “Discrete Manufacturing LAN Overview” chapter.
copy running-config startup-config
Step 5: If the distribution/core-layer switch is a Cisco Catalyst 3750-X
Series switch stack, reload your switch stack. This ensures that
EtherChannel operates with other features configured on the switch stack
and that the switch with the highest priority becomes the master of the
stack.
reload
Procedure 4
Configure IP unicast routing
Enhanced IGRP (EIGRP) is the IP unicast routing protocol used in this design
because it is easy to configure, does not require a large amount of planning,
has flexible summarization and filtering, and can scale to large networks.
February 2013 Series
Distribution/Core Layer
17
The single, logical distribution/core layer design uses Cisco Stateful
Switchover and Cisco Nonstop Forwarding in order to provide subsecond
failover in the event of a supervisor data or control-plane failure. This
feature reduces packet loss during a control plane switchover and keeps
packets flowing when the data plane is still intact to adjacent nodes. In the
stack-based distribution/core layer approach, a single, logical control point
still exists, and the master control plane in a stack can fail over to another
member in the stack, providing near-second or subsecond resiliency.
When the supervisor or master switch of a distribution/core platform
switches over from the active to the hot-standby supervisor, it will continue
switching IP data traffic flows in hardware. However, the supervisor requires
time to reestablish control-plane two-way peering with EIGRP routing
neighbors and to avoid the peer router from tearing down adjacencies due
to missed hellos, which would cause a reroute and traffic disruption. To
allow this time for the supervisor to recover, the routing protocol’s Cisco
Nonstop Forwarding (NSF) setting waits for the dual-supervisor peer switch
to recover. The neighboring router is NSF-aware if it has a newer release
of Cisco IOS that recognizes an NSF peer. All of the platforms used in this
design are NSF-aware for the routing protocols in use.
The distribution/core layer switch must be configured to enable Cisco NSF
for the protocol in use. In the event of a switchover to a hot-standby supervisor, NSF signals a peer to allow the supervisor time to reestablish the EIGRP
protocol to that node. You do not need to tune the default NSF timers in this
network, and no additional configuration is required in order to set up the
NSF-aware function for the peer router.
Step 1: On the distribution/core-layer switch, enable EIGRP for the IP
address space that the network will be using. If needed for your network, you
can enter multiple network statements. Disable auto-summarization of the IP
networks and enable all routed links to be passive by default. The loopback
0 IP address is used for the EIGRP router ID.
ip routing
!
router eigrp 101
network 10.13.0.0 0.0.255.255
no auto-summary
passive-interface default
eigrp router-id [ip address of loopback 0]
nsf
February 2013 Series
Tech Tip
Verify that eigrp stub connected summary is not configured
in your EIGRP routing instance. This command may have been
automatically configured if you have changed platform licensing
from an IP base capable image.
Procedure 5
Configure IP Multicast routing
IP Multicast allows a single IP data stream to be replicated by the infrastructure (that is, routers and switches) and sent from a single source to multiple
receivers. Using IP Multicast is much more efficient than multiple, individual
unicast streams or a broadcast stream that would propagate everywhere,
and IP Multicast is essential to the operation of many industrial Ethernet
network protocols.
To receive a particular IP Multicast data stream, end hosts must join a
Multicast group by sending an Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP)
message to their local Multicast router. In a traditional IP Multicast design,
the local router consults another router in the network that is acting as a
rendezvous point (RP) to map the receivers to active sources so they can
join their streams.
The RP is a control-plane operation that should be placed in the core of the
network or close to the IP Multicast sources on a pair of Layer 3 switches
or routers. IP Multicast routing begins at the distribution/core layer if the
access layer is Layer 2 and provides connectivity to the IP Multicast RP.
Every Layer 3 switch and router must be configured to discover the IP
Multicast RP by using AutoRP. This configuration provides for future scaling and control of the IP Multicast environment and can change based on
network needs and design.
Distribution/Core Layer
18
Example
Figure 7 - Rendezvous point placement in the network
Rendezvous Point
1084
Multicast Source
In this design, which is based on sparse-mode Multicast operation, Cisco
uses Anycast RP to provide a simple yet scalable way to provide a highly
resilient RP environment.
Step 1: If you are using a Cisco Catalyst 4507R+E chassis, on the platform,
in global configuration mode, configure IP Multicast routing.
ip multicast-routing
If you are using a Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series switch stack, on the platform,
in global configuration mode, configure IP Multicast routing.
ip multicast-routing distributed
Step 2: Configure the switch to discover the IP Multicast RP.
ip pim autorp listener
Step 3: Configure sparse-mode IP Multicast operation for all Layer 3
interfaces in the network.
spanning-tree portfast bpduguard default
!
interface Loopback 0
ip address 10.13.15.254 255.255.255.255
ip pim sparse-mode
!
snmp-server trap-source Loopback 0
ip ssh source-interface Loopback 0
ip pim register-source Loopback 0
ip tacacs source-interface Loopback 0
ntp source Loopback 0
!
ip routing
!
router eigrp 101
network 10.13.0.0 0.0.255.255
no auto-summary
passive-interface default
eigrp router-id 10.13.15.254
nsf
!
ip multicast-routing
ip pim autorp listener
!
ip pim sparse-mode
February 2013 Series
Distribution/Core Layer
19
Procedure 6
Configure the IP Multicast RP
Every Layer 3 switch and router must know the address of the IP Multicast
RP, including the distribution/core layer switches that are serving as the RP.
This design uses AutoRP to announce candidate RPs, which are the distribution/core layer switches, to the rest of the network. The AutoRP-mapping
agent listens for candidate RPs and then advertises the list of available RPs
to the rest of the network.
Step 1: On the distribution/core-layer switch, configure a second loopback
interface to be used as the RP interface. The interface uses a host address
mask (32 bits). All routers then point to this common IP address on Loopback
1 for the RP.
interface Loopback 1
ip address 10.13.15.253 255.255.255.255
ip pim sparse-mode
Step 2: Configure the AutoRP candidate RP by issuing the
send-rp-announce command in conjunction with the group-list option. This
advertises the RP address, with the IP Multicast range the device is willing to
serve, as a candidate RP to the AutoRP-mapping agents.
access-list 10 permit 239.1.0.0 0.0.255.255
ip pim send-rp-announce Loopback1 scope 32 group-list 10
Step 3: Configure the AutoRP-mapping agent by issuing the
send-rp-discovery command. This enables this switch to act as an AutoRPmapping agent.
ip pim send-rp-discovery Loopback0 scope 32
February 2013 Series
Distribution/Core Layer
20
Access Layer
Business Overview
Technology Overview
To conduct business in today’s competitive global economy, organizations
rely on the flow of information. They must provide a dispersed workforce
with access to applications and communication tools that support the manufacturing business and operations among internal and external associates.
The access layer is composed of the Cell/Area zones, and this is where
all the IACS devices are connected. This layer carries most of the critical
IACS traffic. Although the traffic may not leave the Cell/Area zone or VLAN,
because a Cell/Area zone may span several access-layer switches, the
distribution/core layer switch plays critical roles, such as acting as IGMP
querier and default gateway and providing interconnectivity between the
VLANs.
Traditional IACS networks do not support the flexibility that organizations
need in order to control IT expenses and streamline operations. Traditional,
proprietary systems create multiple networks in the same space. These networks have separate power, cabling, and communication requirements, and
they have multiple sets of spares, skill requirements, and support programs.
Most importantly, IACS networks segregate the critical Cell/Area zones and
IACS systems, making them hard to reach and difficult to get information
from.
The ability to move information around the organization is critical; no longer
will siloed IACS networks suffice. By ensuring that users, regardless of their
location, have the ability to access this information or push communications
by using an increasingly diverse set of communications devices, the organization is able to help the workforce become more productive. This ability
increases original equipment effectiveness (OEE), reduces downtime in the
plant, and reduces the cost of deployment and operations. The security,
speed, reliability, and availability of the transport are critical to success.
IACS devices are precise, and meeting the timing requirements, including latency and jitter sensitivity, is essential to ensuring that plant floor
operations run smoothly and efficiently. In the industrial Ethernet network,
80–90% of the Cell/Area zone traffic is local and occurs between IACS
devices. Because this communication occurs in the access layer, it is critical
that the network and physical infrastructure of the access layer are highly
available and resilient, and the IACS traffic must be prioritized appropriately
in order to prevent costly delay or outages.
This chapter focuses on the configuration of the access-layer switches,
those with end-devices connected to them and with uplinks that carry traffic
to other parts of the network.
The Cell/Area zone access-layer switches are the ingress and egress points
for the IACS traffic. The access-layer switches provide:
• Resilient interconnectivity to the rest of the industrial Ethernet network.
• Security for end-devices by assigning them to a VLAN.
• Management of Multicast traffic by passing it to subscribing
end-devices.
• Monitoring and prevention of inadvertent loops that would impact
network services.
• Protection from broadcast storms and other forms of unwanted traffic.
• Quality of service (QoS) that gives priority to critical IACS traffic throughout its journey in the industrial Ethernet network.
The Cell/Area zone access layer is the point at which IACS devices are
connected to the network, and it is one architecture component that is found
in every industrial Ethernet LAN.
Deployment Method
To provide consistent access capabilities and simplify network deployment and operation, the design uses a common deployment method for all
access-layer devices. To reduce complexity, the access layer is designed so
that you can use a single interface configuration for an IACS device, standalone computer, an IP phone, or a wireless access point.
February 2013 Series
Access Layer
21
The LAN access layer provides high-speed connections to devices via
10/100/1000 Ethernet with both 1-Gigabit and 10-Gigabit uplink connectivity
options. The 10-Gigabit uplinks also support 1-Gigabit connectivity in order
to provide flexibility and help business continuity during the transition to
10-Gigabit Ethernet. The LAN access layer is configured as a Layer 2 switch,
with all Layer 3 services being provided by the directly connected distribution/core layer.
Wiring Closet Equipment
Wiring closet components can vary depending on the manufacturing
environment and IACS requirements. Use the following information to select
equipment that is appropriate for your organization.
For Harsh Environments
Cisco Industrial Ethernet (IE) 2000 and 3000 Series switches allow for a
variety of interfaces and configurations, are extendable from 4-port to
24-port combinations, and offer a variety of 10/100/1000 Ethernet copper
and fiber-optic options. The Cisco IE 2000 and 3000 Series switches feature
a design with extended environmental ratings, convection cooling, DIN-rail
mounting, redundant 24VDC power input, alarm relays, and surge and noise
immunity.
Up to 48 Ports
Cisco Catalyst 2960-S and 3560-X Series switches are both economical
10/100/1000 Ethernet fixed-port switches that provide flexibility and common features required for wiring closets that can be supported by a single
fixed-port switch. Cisco Catalyst 2960-S and 3560-X Series switches
are available in both Power over Ethernet Plus (PoE+) and non-powered
versions.
In addition to the capabilities supported by Cisco Catalyst 2960-S Series
switches, Cisco Catalyst 3560-X Series switches support modular uplinks,
an upgradable Cisco IOS feature set, and enhanced capabilities such as
Cisco TrustSec and medianet, but it does not support stacking.
Greater than 48 Ports
When a wiring closet requires greater interface density than can be provided by a single switch, an intelligent stack of fixed configuration switches
or a modular switch is recommended.
February 2013 Series
Intelligent stacks or modular Ethernet switches provide the following major
benefits:
• Single point of management—All switches in the stack are managed as
one.
• Built-in redundancy and high availability—The high-speed dedicated
stack connections provide redundant communication for each stack
member.
• Scalable to fit network needs—As the need for additional access
interfaces grows, adding a new switch to a stack or a module to a modular switch is easy.
Cisco Catalyst 2960-S or 3750-X Series switches are used in this design
when intelligent stacking or a modular deployment is required.
Cisco Catalyst 2960-S Series are fixed-configuration, stackable, 10/10/1000
Ethernet switches, with PoE+ and non-powered versions designed for entrylevel enterprise, midmarket, and remote-site networks. Cisco FlexStack
is implemented by adding a stacking module to the switch. This enables
up to four Catalyst 2960-S Series switches to be stacked together. Cisco
FlexStack links are full duplex 10-Gigabit Ethernet links with a recovery time
between 1–2 seconds.
Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series are fixed-port, stackable, 10/100/1000
Ethernet switches, with PoE+ and non-powered versions, and they provide
enhanced resiliency through the following technologies:
• Cisco StackWise Plus—Enables up to nine Cisco Catalyst 3750-X
Series switches to be stacked together by using a 64-Gbps stack
interconnect, providing near subsecond failure recovery.
• Cisco StackPower—Shares power across the Cisco Catalyst 3750-X
Series switch stack. This allows the flexible arrangement of power supplies in the stack and enables a zero-footprint redundant power supply
deployment and intelligent load shedding.
Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series switches have modular uplinks, support
upgrading the Cisco IOS feature set, and provide enhanced capabilities
such as Cisco TrustSec and medianet. These features ensure that the switch
functionality grows as the organization grows.
Access Layer
22
Deployment Details
As you review the Discrete Manufacturing LAN Deployment Guide, you may
find it useful to understand the IP addressing and VLAN assignments used.
Although your design requirements may differ, by addressing the various
distribution layers at a location with contiguous IP address space, you can
summarize the IP address range to the rest of the network. For ease of
reference, this design uses VLAN assignments that reflect the third octet of
the IP address range for a given access-layer switch.
Table 2 - VLANs and IP address assignments for a single distribution block
VLAN
IP addressing
Cell/Area zone
Usage
100
10.13.0.x/24
1
IACS devices
101
10.13.1.x/24
1
Workstations
102
10.13.2.x/24
1
Voice
103
10.13.3.x/24
2
IACS devices
104
10.13.4.x/24
2
Workstations
105
10.13.5.x/24
2
Voice
106
10.13.6.x/24
3
IACS devices
107
10.13.7.x/24
3
Workstations
108
10.13.8.x/24
3
Voice
Continue
through 114
10.13.9-114.x/24
—
—
115
10.13.15.x/25
—
Management
Process
Configuring the Access Layer
1. Configure the access-layer platform
2. Configure switch universal settings
3. Configure switch global settings
4. Configure IACS interface
5. Configure workstation and voice interface
Procedure 1
Configure the access-layer platform
Some platforms require a one-time initial configuration prior to configuring
the features and services of the switch. If you are using a Cisco Catalyst
3560-X or 3750-X Series switch or if you are using a Cisco Industrial
Ethernet 2000 or 3000 Series switch, complete Option 1 of this procedure. If
you are using a Cisco Catalyst 2960-S switch, complete Option 2.
When there are multiple switches configured in a stack, one of the switches
controls the operation of the stack. This switch is called the stack master. If
three or more switches are configured as the stack, configure the stack-master switch functionality on a switch that does not have uplinks configured.
Figure 8 - Stack master placement in a switch stack
U
in
k
Distribution
Switch
U
k
in
pl
pl
Switch Stack
February 2013 Series
2092
Stack Master
Access Layer
23
By default, the active stack-master switch assigns a new stack MAC address
when the stack-master switch fails. This new MAC address assignment can
cause the network to reconverge because LACP and many other protocols
rely on the stack MAC address and must restart. This configuration preserves the original stack-master MAC address in order prevent convergence
issues.
At the end of the “Configuring Access-Layer Switch Services” process,
a single reboot of the switch stack is required in order to force the stack
master to operate on the switch that you configured with the highest priority.
Option 1. Using a Cisco Catalyst 3560-X or 3750-X Series switch or
using a Cisco IE 2000 or 3000 Series switch
Step 1: If you are using the Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series switch stack, set
the stack master switch.
switch [switch number] priority 15
If you are not using the Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series switch, proceed to
Step 3.
Step 2: If you are using the Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series switch stack,
ensure that the original master MAC address remains the stack MAC
address after a failure.
stack-mac persistent timer 0
Step 3: Create access lists and class maps that differentiate the various
types of manufacturing and voice traffic.
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
101
102
103
104
105
105
106
107
permit
permit
permit
permit
permit
permit
permit
permit
udp
udp
udp
udp
udp
tcp
udp
udp
any
any
any
any
any
any
any
any
eq
eq
eq
eq
eq
eq
eq
eq
2222 any dscp 55
2222 any dscp 47
2222 any dscp 43
2222 any
44818 any
44818 any
319 any
320 any
ip access-list extended default-data-acl
permit ip any any
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_55
February 2013 Series
match access-group 101
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_47
match access-group 102
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_43
match access-group 103
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_any
match access-group 104
class-map match-all CIP-Other
match access-group 105
class-map match-all 1588-PTP-Event
match access-group 106
class-map match-all 1588-PTP-General
match access-group 107
class-map match-all voip-data
match ip dscp ef
class-map match-all default-data
match access-group name default-data-acl
class-map match-all voip-control
match ip dscp cs3
Step 4: Configure QoS parameters and policy maps that define how traffic
is prioritized as it passes through the network.
mls
mls
mls
mls
mls
mls
mls
mls
mls
mls
mls
mls
mls
mls
mls
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
map policed-dscp 24 27 31 43 46 47 55 59 to 0
map dscp-cos 9 11 12 13 14 15 to 0
map dscp-cos 25 26 28 29 30 to 2
map dscp-cos 40 41 42 44 45 49 50 51 to 4
map dscp-cos 52 53 54 56 57 58 60 61 to 4
map dscp-cos 62 63 to 4
map cos-dscp 0 8 16 27 32 47 55 59
srr-queue input bandwidth 40 60
srr-queue input threshold 1 16 66
srr-queue input threshold 2 34 66
srr-queue input buffers 40 60
srr-queue input cos-map queue 1 threshold 2 1
srr-queue input cos-map queue 1 threshold 3 0 2
srr-queue input cos-map queue 2 threshold 2 4
srr-queue input cos-map queue 2 threshold 3 3 5 6 7
Access Layer
24
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
5 6 7
mls qos srr-queue
13 14 15 16 17
mls qos srr-queue
21 22 23 25 26
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
35 36 37 38 39
mls qos srr-queue
44 45 49 50 51
mls qos srr-queue
56 57 58 60 61
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
43 46 47 48 55
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
4 5 6 7
mls qos srr-queue
13 14 15 16 17
mls qos srr-queue
21 22 23 25 26
mls qos srr-queue
32 33 34 35 36
mls qos srr-queue
40 41 42 44 45
mls qos srr-queue
52 53 54 56 57
February 2013 Series
input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 2 8 10
input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 0 1 2 3 4
input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 9 11 12
input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 18 19 20
input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 28 29 30
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 32 33 34
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 40 41 42
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 52 53 54
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 62 63
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 24 27 31
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 59
output cos-map queue 1 threshold 3 7
output cos-map queue 2 threshold 2 1
output cos-map queue 2 threshold 3 0 2 4
output cos-map queue 3 threshold 3 5 6
output cos-map queue 4 threshold 3 3
output dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 59
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 8 10
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 0 1 2 3
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 9 11 12
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 18 19 20
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 28 29 30
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 37 38 39
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 49 50 51
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 58 60 61
62 63
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 3 threshold 3 43 46 47
48 55
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 4 threshold 3 24 27 31
mls qos queue-set output 1 buffers 10 25 40 25
no mls qos rewrite ip dscp
mls qos
policy-map CIP-PTP-Traffic
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_55
set ip dscp 55
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_47
set ip dscp 47
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_43
set ip dscp 43
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_any
set ip dscp 31
class CIP-Other
set ip dscp 27
class 1588-PTP-Event
set ip dscp 59
class 1588-PTP-General
set ip dscp 47
policy-map Voice-Map
class voip-data
set dscp ef
police 128000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
class voip-control
set dscp cs3
police 32000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
class default-data
set dscp default
police 10000000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
Access Layer
25
Step 5: Configure three macros that will be applied to different kinds of
access ports. These macros are used in later procedures and ease consistent deployment of QoS.
macro name CiscoIEPhone
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 25 35 30
priority-queue out
mls qos trust device cisco-phone
mls qos trust cos
service-policy input Voice-Map
@
Option 2. Using a Cisco Catalyst 2960-S Series switch or switch
stack
Step 1: Set the stack master switch.
switch [switch number] priority 15
Step 2: Ensure that the original master MAC address remains the stack
MAC address after a failure.
stack-mac persistent timer 0
Step 3: Create access lists and class maps that differentiate the various
types of manufacturing and voice traffic.
permit
permit
permit
permit
February 2013 Series
udp
udp
udp
udp
any
any
any
any
eq
eq
eq
eq
2222
2222
2222
2222
permit
permit
permit
permit
udp
tcp
udp
udp
any
any
any
any
eq
eq
eq
eq
44818 any
44818 any
319 any
320 any
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_55
match access-group 101
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_47
match access-group 102
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_43
match access-group 103
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_any
match access-group 104
class-map match-all CIP-Other
match access-group 105
class-map match-all 1588-PTP-Event
match access-group 106
class-map match-all 1588-PTP-General
match access-group 107
macro name CiscoIEEgress
mls qos trust cos
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
@
101
102
103
104
105
105
106
107
ip access-list extended default-data-acl
permit ip any any
macro name CiscoEtherNetIP
service-policy input CIP-PTP-Traffic
priority-queue out
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
@
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
access-list
any dscp 55
any dscp 47
any dscp 43
any
class-map match-all voip-data
match ip dscp ef
class-map match-all default-data
match access-group name default-data-acl
class-map match-all voip-control
match ip dscp cs3
Step 4: Configure QoS parameters and policy maps that define how traffic
is prioritized as it passes through the network.
mls
mls
mls
mls
mls
mls
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
map
map
map
map
map
map
policed-dscp 24 27 31 43 46 47 55 59 to 0
dscp-cos 9 11 12 13 14 15 to 0
dscp-cos 25 26 28 29 30 to 2
dscp-cos 40 41 42 44 45 49 50 51 to 4
dscp-cos 52 53 54 56 57 58 60 61 to 4
dscp-cos 62 63 to 4
Access Layer
26
mls qos map cos-dscp 0 8 16 27 32 47 55 59
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 1 threshold 3 7
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 2 threshold 2 1
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 2 threshold 3 0 2 4
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 3 threshold 3 5 6
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 4 threshold 3 3
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 59
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 8 10
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 0 1 2 3
4 5 6 7
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 9 11 12
13 14 15 16 17
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 18 19 20
21 22 23 25 26
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 28 29 30
32 33 34 35 36
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 37 38 39
40 41 42 44 45
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 49 50 51
52 53 54 56 57
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 58 60 61
62 63
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 3 threshold 3 43 46 47
48 55
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 4 threshold 3 24 27 31
mls qos queue-set output 1 buffers 10 25 40 25
no mls qos rewrite ip dscp
mls qos
policy-map CIP-PTP-Traffic
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_55
set ip dscp 55
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_47
set ip dscp 47
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_43
set ip dscp 43
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_any
set ip dscp 31
class CIP-Other
February 2013 Series
set ip dscp 27
class 1588-PTP-Event
set ip dscp 59
class 1588-PTP-General
set ip dscp 47
policy-map Voice-Map
class voip-data
set dscp ef
police 128000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
class voip-control
set dscp cs3
police 32000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
class default-data
set dscp default
police 10000000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
Step 5: Configure three macros that will be applied to different kinds of
access ports. These macros are used in later procedures and ease consistent deployment of QoS.
macro name CiscoIEPhone
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 25 35 30
priority-queue out
mls qos trust device cisco-phone
mls qos trust cos
service-policy input Voice-Map
@
macro name CiscoEtherNetIP
service-policy input CIP-PTP-Traffic
priority-queue out
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
@
macro name CiscoIEEgress
mls qos trust cos
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
@
Access Layer
27
Procedure 2
Configure switch universal settings
Within this design, there are features and services that are common across
all LAN switches, regardless of the type of platform or role in the network.
These are system settings that simplify and secure the management of the
solution.
This procedure provides examples for some of those settings. The actual
settings and values depend on your current network configuration.
Table 3 - Common network services used in the deployment examples
Network parameter
Cisco SBA value
Domain name
cisco.local
Active Directory, DNS, DHCP server
10.13.48.10
Cisco Secure ACS
10.13.48.15
NTP server
10.13.48.17
In this procedure, you configure a local login account and password that
provide basic device access authentication in order to view platform operation. The enable password secures access to the device configuration
mode. By enabling password encryption, you prevent the use of plain text
passwords when viewing configuration files. By default, HTTPS access to
the switch uses the enable password for authentication.
Reader Tip
For more information about the protocols used in this procedure,
see the “Protocols” section of the “Discrete Manufacturing LAN
Overview” chapter.
Step 1: On the access-layer switch, configure the device hostname. This
makes it easy to identify the device.
Step 3: Enable RPVST+.
spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
Step 4: Enable Unidirectional Link Detection (UDLD).
udld enable
Step 5: Set EtherChannels to use the traffic source and destination IP
address when calculating which link to send the traffic across. This normalizes the method in which traffic is load-shared across the member links of
the EtherChannel.
port-channel load-balance src-dst-ip
Step 6: Configure DNS for host lookup. At the command line of a Cisco
IOS device, it is helpful to be able to type a domain name instead of the IP
address for a destination.
ip name-server 10.13.48.10
Step 7: Configure HTTPS and SSH device management protocols, and then
specify the transport preferred none command on vty lines.
ip domain-name cisco.local
ip ssh version 2
no ip http server
ip http secure-server
!
line vty 0 15
transport input ssh
transport preferred none
Tech Tip
The transport preferred none command prevents errant connection attempts from the CLI prompt, and without it, long timeout
delays may occur for mistyped commands if the IP name server
is unreachable.
hostname [hostname]
Step 2: Configure VTP transparent mode.
vtp mode transparent
February 2013 Series
Access Layer
28
Step 8: Enable SNMP in order to allow the network infrastructure devices
to be managed by a Network Management System, and then configure
SNMPv2c both for a read-only and a read-write community string.
snmp-server community cisco RO
snmp-server community cisco123 RW
Step 9: If your network operational support is centralized and you want
to increase network security, use an access list to limit the networks that
can access your device. In this example, only devices on the 10.13.48.0/24
network are able to access the device via SSH or SNMP.
access-list 55 permit 10.13.48.0 0.0.0.255
line vty 0 15
access-class 55 in
!
snmp-server community cisco RO 55
snmp-server community cisco123 RW 55
Caution
If you configure an access list on the vty interface, you may lose
the ability to use SSH to log in from one router to the next, for
hop-by-hop troubleshooting.
Step 10: Configure a local login and password.
username admin password c1sco123
enable secret c1sco123
service password-encryption
aaa new-model
Step 11: If you want to use AAA services for centralized user authentication, use TACACS+ protocol in order to authenticate management logins to
infrastructure devices.
tacacs server TACACS-SERVER-1
address ipv4 10.13.48.15
key SecretKey
!
aaa group server tacacs+ TACACS-SERVERS
February 2013 Series
server name TACACS-SERVER-1
!
aaa authentication login default group TACACS-SERVERS local
aaa authorization exec default group TACACS-SERVERS local
aaa authorization console
ip http authentication aaa
Step 12: Program network devices to synchronize to a local NTP server in
the network, and then configure console messages, logs, and debug output
to provide time stamps on output, which allows cross-referencing of events
in a network.
ntp server 10.13.48.17
!
clock timezone PST -8
clock summer-time PDT recurring
!
service timestamps debug datetime msec localtime
service timestamps log datetime msec localtime
Procedure 3
Configure switch global settings
The access-layer devices use VLANs to separate traffic from different
devices into the following logical networks:
• The IACS VLAN provides network connectivity for industrial automation
devices such as the following: programmable automation controllers
(PAC), variable frequency drives (VFD), human machine interfaces (HMI),
and distributed input/output (DIO) devices.
• The workstation VLAN enables network access for PCs on the factory
floor.
• The voice VLAN provides network access for IP phones.
• The management VLAN provides in-band network access for the
switch’s management interface.
In a Cell/Area zone, IACS devices, workstations, and IP phones should not
share the same VLAN. User-facing interfaces are configured with both the
workstation VLAN and the voice VLAN. The management VLAN is not configured on any user-facing interface, and the VLAN interface of the switch is
the only member.
Access Layer
29
Step 1: On the access-layer switch, configure the IACS, workstation, voice,
and management VLANs.
vlan [IACS vlan]
name CZ1-IACS
vlan [Workstation vlan]
name CZ1-Workstation
vlan [Voice vlan]
name CZ1-Voice
vlan [Management vlan]
name Management
Step 2: Configure an IP address for the switch. This allows management via
in-band connectivity.
interface Vlan [Management vlan]
ip address [ip address] [mask]
no shutdown
ip default-gateway [default router]
Step 3: Configure DHCP snooping and enable it on the workstation and
voice VLANs. The switch intercepts and safeguards DHCP messages within
the VLANs. This ensures that an unauthorized DHCP server cannot serve up
addresses to end-user devices.
ip dhcp snooping vlan [Workstation vlan],[Voice vlan]
no ip dhcp snooping information option
ip dhcp snooping
Step 4: Configure ARP inspection on the workstation and voice VLANs.
ip arp inspection vlan [Workstation vlan],[Voice vlan]
Step 5: Configure BPDU guard globally. This protects PortFast-enabled
interfaces by disabling the port if another switch is plugged into the port.
spanning-tree portfast bpduguard default
Reader Tip
For more information about BPDU guard, see the “BPDU Guard”
section of the “Discrete Manufacturing LAN Overview” chapter.
February 2013 Series
Example
vlan 100
name CZ1-IACS
vlan 101
name CZ1-Workstation
vlan 102
name CZ1-Voice
vlan 115
name Management
!
interface Vlan 115
description In-band Management
ip address 10.13.15.5 255.255.255.128
no shutdown
!
ip default-gateway 10.13.15.1
!
ip dhcp snooping vlan 101,102
no ip dhcp snooping information option
ip dhcp snooping
!
ip arp inspection vlan 101,102
spanning-tree portfast bpduguard default
Procedure 4
Configure IACS interface
The host port configuration described below supports PAC, VFD, HMI, and
DIO devices.
To make configuration easier, when you apply the same configuration to
multiple interfaces on the switch, use the interface range command. This
command allows you to issue a command once and have it apply to many
interfaces at the same time. Because most of the interfaces in the access
layer are configured identically, it can save a lot of time. For example, the
following command allows you to enter commands on all 24 interfaces
(GigabitEthernet0/1 to GigabitEthernet0/24) simultaneously.
interface range Gigabitethernet 0/1-24
Access Layer
30
Step 1: On the access-layer switch, configure the switch interface to support IACS devices.
interface range [interface type] [port number]–[port number]
switchport access vlan [IACS vlan]
Step 2: Because only end-device connectivity is provided at the access
layer, enable PortFast. By disabling 802.1Q trunking and channel group
negotiation, PortFast shortens the time it takes for the interface to go into a
forwarding state.
switchport host
Step 3: Apply the CiscoEtherNetIP QoS macro that was defined in
Procedure 1, “Configure the access-layer platform.”
Procedure 5
Configure workstation and voice interface
The host interface configurations support workstations or IP phones. Inline
power is available on switches that support 802.3af/at for capable devices.
The number of MAC addresses allowed on each interface is specific to
the organization. However, the popularity of virtualization applications, IP
phones, and passive hubs on the desktop drives the need for the number
to be larger than one might guess at first glance. This design uses 11 MAC
addresses, which allows flexibility in the organization while still protecting
the network infrastructure. Additional MAC addresses are considered to be
in violation, and their traffic is dropped.
Step 1: On the access-layer switch, configure the switch interfaces to support clients and IP phones.
macro apply CiscoEtherNetIP
Step 4: Limit the storm control rate. This prevents LAN interfaces from being
disrupted by broadcast storms, which occur when broadcast packets flood
the subnet and create excessive traffic that degrades network performance.
storm-control broadcast level 3.00 1.00
interface range [interface type] [port number]–[port number]
switchport access vlan [Workstation vlan]
switchport voice vlan [Voice vlan]
Step 2: Because only end-device connectivity is provided at the access
layer, enable PortFast. By disabling 802.1Q trunking and channel-group
negotiation, PortFast shortens the time it takes for the interface to go into a
forwarding state.
Example
Figure 9 - IACS devices connected to the access layer
switchport host
VLAN 100
IACS VLAN
Step 3: Apply the CiscoIEPhone QoS macro that was defined in Procedure
1, “Configure the access-layer platform.”
macro apply CiscoIEPhone
802.1Q Trunk
VLANs 100, 101, 102, 115
Native VLAN 999
IP: 10.13.15.5 / 25
VLAN 115
Management VLAN
interface range FastEthernet 1/1–4
description Cell/Area Zone - IACS Access Port
switchport access vlan 100
switchport host
macro apply CiscoEtherNetIP
storm-control broadcast level 3.00 1.00
February 2013 Series
LAN
Distribution
Switch
1087
VLAN 100
IACS VLAN
All client-facing interfaces allow for an untrusted PC and a trusted Cisco IP
Phone to be connected to the switch, and QoS parameters are automatically
set. When a Cisco IP Phone is connected, trust is extended to the phone.
Any device that connects to the phone is considered untrusted, and all traffic from that device is remarked to best-effort or class of service (CoS) 0.
Next, you configure port security on the interface.
Step 4: Configure 11 MAC addresses to be active on the interface at one
time.
switchport port-security maximum 11
switchport port-security
Access Layer
31
Step 5: Set an aging time that removes learned MAC addresses from the
secured list after 2 minutes of inactivity.
switchport port-security aging time 2
switchport port-security aging type inactivity
Step 6: Configure the restrict option to drop traffic from MAC addresses
that are in violation but not to shut down the port. This configuration ensures
that an IP phone can still function on this interface when there is a portsecurity violation.
switchport port-security violation restrict
Step 7: Configure DHCP snooping and ARP inspection on the interface to
process 100 packets per second of traffic on the port.
ip arp inspection limit rate 100
ip dhcp snooping limit rate 100
Step 8: Configure IP Source Guard on the interface. IP Source Guard is a
means of preventing IP spoofing.
interface range GigabitEthernet 1/0/1–24
description Cell/Area Zone - Workstation/VoIP Access Port
switchport access vlan 101
switchport voice vlan 102
switchport host
macro apply CiscoIEPhone
switchport port-security maximum 11
switchport port-security
switchport port-security aging time 2
switchport port-security aging type inactivity
switchport port-security violation restrict
ip arp inspection limit rate 100
ip dhcp snooping limit rate 100
ip verify source
Process
ip verify source
Example
Connecting the Access Layer to the Distribution/Core Layer
Figure 10 - Workstation and IP phone connected to the access layer
1. Create access-layer EtherChannel uplinks
2. Configure distribution/core-layer downlinks
VLAN 101
Workstation
VLAN
VLAN 102
Voice
VLAN
IP: 10.13.15.5 / 25
VLAN 115
Management VLAN
LAN
Distribution
Switch
1086
802.1Q Trunk
VLANs 100, 101, 102, 115
Native VLAN 999
Procedure 1
Create access-layer EtherChannel uplinks
In this design, which users a redundant star topology, access-layer devices
are a component of a larger LAN and are connected to the distribution/corelayer switch. Layer 2 EtherChannels are used to interconnect the devices in
the most resilient method possible.
When using EtherChannel, for the highest resiliency, the member interfaces
should be on different switches in the stack or different modules in the
modular switch.
February 2013 Series
Access Layer
32
The physical interfaces that are members of a Layer 2 EtherChannel are
configured prior to configuring the logical port-channel interface. This
allows for minimal configuration because most of the commands entered to
a port-channel interface are copied to its members’ interfaces and do not
require manual replication.
Figure 11 - EtherChannel example
Distribution
Switch
Switch Stack
2096
In
r
be e
c
em fa
M ter
In
M
e
te mb
rfa e
ce r
Logical
PortChannel
Interface
Configure two or more physical interfaces to be members of the
EtherChannel. It is recommended that they are added in multiples of two.
An 802.1Q trunk is used for the connection to this upstream device, which
allows the uplink to provide Layer 3 services to all the VLANs defined on the
access-layer switch.
This procedure details how to connect any Cisco SBA discrete manufacturing access-layer switch (Cisco Catalyst 3750-X, Catalyst 3560-X, Catalyst
2960-S, Cisco IE 2000, or IE 3000) to a distribution/core-layer switch. Where
there are differences for configuring a specific switch model, it is called out
in the step.
Step 1: On the access-layer switch, set LACP negotiation to active, and
then apply the CiscoIEEgress QoS macro that was defined in Procedure 1,
“Configure the access-layer platform.” This configures the EtherChannel
member interfaces and ensures traffic is prioritized appropriately.
February 2013 Series
If the access-layer switch is a Cisco Catalyst 2960-S Series switch, the
switchport command is not required.
interface [interface type] [port 1]
description Link to Distribution Layer port 1
interface [interface type] [port 2]
description Link to Distribution Layer port 2
!
interface range [interface type] [port 1], [interface type]
[port 2]
switchport
macro apply CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group [number] mode active
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
Step 2: Configure an 802.1Q trunk, prune the VLANs on the trunk to only
the VLANs that are active on the access-layer switch, and then set DHCP
snooping and ARP inspection to trust. The interface type is port-channel,
and the number must match the channel group configured in Step 1.
If the access-layer switch is a Cisco Catalyst 3750-X or 3560-X Series
switch, the switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q command is required.
interface Port-channel [number]
description EtherChannel link to Distribution Layer
switchport trunk allowed vlan [IACS vlan],
[Workstation vlan],[Voice vlan],[Management vlan]
switchport mode trunk
ip arp inspection trust
ip dhcp snooping trust
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
no shutdown
Access Layer
33
Step 3: Configure an unused VLAN on all switch-to-switch 802.1Q trunk
links from the access layer to the distribution/core layer, and then set the
native VLAN for the access-layer uplink 802.1Q trunk to the VLAN you just
created. Choosing an arbitrary, non-default, unused VLAN assignment for
the native VLAN reduces the possibility of a VLAN-hopping attack.
Example
Figure 12 - Access-layer switch EtherChannel connection to distribution/core-layer
switch
VLAN 100
IACS VLAN
vlan 999
!
interface Port-channel [number]
switchport trunk native vlan 999
802.1Q Trunk
VLANs 100, 101, 102, 115
Native VLAN 999
For more information about VLAN-hopping attacks, see the
“802.1Q Trunking” section of the “Discrete Manufacturing LAN
Overview” chapter.
Step 4: Save the running configuration that you have entered as the startup
configuration file. When the access-layer switch is reloaded or powercycled, this configuration is used.
copy running-config startup-config
Step 5: If the access-layer switch is a Cisco Catalyst 2960-S or Cisco
Catalyst 3750-X Series switch stack, reload your switch stack. This ensures
that EtherChannel operates with other features configured on the switch
stack and that the switch with the highest priority becomes the master of the
stack.
reload
February 2013 Series
VLAN 101
Workstation
VLAN
VLAN 102
Voice
VLAN
LAN
Distribution
Switch
VLAN 115
Management
VLAN
vlan 999
!
interface GigabitEthernet 1/1
description Link to Distribution Layer port 1
interface GigabitEthernet 1/2
description Link to Distribution Layer port 2
!
interface range GigabitEthernet 1/1/1, GigabitEthernet 1/1/2
macro apply CiscoIEEgress
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 1 mode active
!
interface Port-channel 1
description Etherchannel to Distribution Layer
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
switchport trunk allowed vlan 100,101,102,115
switchport mode trunk
switchport trunk native vlan 999
ip arp inspection trust
ip dhcp snooping trust
no shutdown
Access Layer
34
1085
Reader Tip
Procedure 2
Configure distribution/core-layer downlinks
The resilient, single, logical, distribution/core layer switch design is based
on a redundant star topology that eliminates spanning-tree loops. The links
to access-layer switches and connected routers are Layer 2 EtherChannels.
When using EtherChannel, for the highest resiliency, the member interfaces
should be on different switches in the stack or different modules in the
modular switch.
The physical interfaces that are members of a Layer 2 EtherChannel are
configured prior to configuring the logical port-channel interface. This
allows for minimal configuration because most of the commands entered to
a port-channel interface are copied to its members’ interfaces and do not
require manual replication.
Configure two or more physical interfaces to be members of the
EtherChannel. It is recommended that you add them in multiples of two.
An 802.1Q trunk is used for the connection to the access layer, which allows
the distribution/core-layer switch to provide Layer 3 services to all the
VLANs defined on the access-layer switch.
Step 1: On the distribution/core-layer switch, configure VLANs for the
access-layer switches that you are connecting to the distribution/core-layer
switch.
vlan [IACS vlan]
name CZ1-IACS
vlan [Workstation vlan]
name CZ1-Workstation
vlan [Voice vlan]
name CZ1-Voice
vlan [Management vlan]
name Management
Step 2: If there is no external, central-site DHCP server in the network and
you want to provide DHCP service, configure DHCP service in Cisco IOS
on the distribution/core-layer switch. This function can also be useful at a
remote site where you want to provide local DHCP service and not depend
on the WAN link to an external, central-site DHCP server.
ip dhcp excluded-address 10.13.1.1 10.13.1.10
ip dhcp excluded-address 10.13.2.1 10.13.2.10
February 2013 Series
ip dhcp pool CZ1-Workstation
network 10.13.1.0 255.255.255.0
default-router 10.13.1.1
domain-name cisco.local
dns-server 10.13.48.10
!
ip dhcp pool CZ1-Voice
network 10.13.2.0 255.255.255.0
default-router 10.13.2.1
domain-name cisco.local
dns-server 10.13.48.10
The example configuration provides IP addresses via the Cisco IOS-based
DHCP service for the subnets 10.13.1.0/24 10.13.2.0/24 and prevents the
server from assigning reserved addresses .1-.10.
Step 3: Connect the access-layer EtherChannel uplinks to separate
switches or switch modules in the distribution/core layer. On the distribution/core-layer switch, set LACP negotiation to active on all EtherChannel
member interfaces, and then apply the QoS macro that was defined in
Procedure 1, “Configure the distribution/core platform.” This configures
EtherChannel member interfaces and ensures traffic is prioritized
appropriately.
If you are using a Cisco Catalyst 4507R+E chassis, connect the
EtherChannel uplinks to separate modules. This provides additional
resiliency.
interface [interface type] [port 1]
description Link to {your device here} port 1
interface [interface type] [port 2]
description Link to {your device here} port 2
!
interface range [interface type] [port 1],[interface type]
[port 2]
switchport
macro apply CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group [number] mode active
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
Access Layer
35
interface Port-channel [number]
description EtherChannel link to {your device here}
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
switchport trunk allowed vlan [IACS vlan],
[Workstation vlan],[Voice vlan],[Management vlan]
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
no shutdown
If you are using a Cisco Catalyst 4507R+E switch, on the distribution/
core-layer switch, configure an 802.1Q trunk, and then prune the VLANs on
the trunk to only the VLANs that are active on the access-layer switch. The
interface type is port-channel, and the number must match the channel
group configured in Step 3.
interface Port-channel [number]
description EtherChannel link to {your device here}
macro apply CiscoIEEgress-PC
switchport trunk allowed vlan [IACS vlan],
[Workstation vlan],[Voice vlan],[Management vlan]
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
no shutdown
Reader Tip
For more information about VLAN-hopping attacks, see the
“802.1Q Trunking” section of the “Discrete Manufacturing LAN
Overview” chapter.
Step 6: For every access-layer VLAN, configure a switched virtual interface
(SVI). This enables devices in the VLAN to communicate with the rest of the
network.
Use the ip helper-address command to allow remote DHCP servers to
provide IP addresses for this network. The address that the helper command points to is the central DHCP server. If you have more than one DHCP
server, you can list multiple helper commands on an interface.
If you completed Step 2 in order to enable the Cisco IOS DHCP server function on the distribution/core layer switch, the ip helper-address command is
not needed on the VLAN interface.
interface Vlan [number]
ip address [ip address] [mask]
ip helper-address [dhcp server ip]
ip pim sparse-mode
no shutdown
Example: Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series switch stack
VLAN 100
IACS VLAN
Step 5: Configure an unused VLAN on all switch-to-switch 802.1Q trunk
links from the access layer to the distribution/core layer, and then set the
native VLAN for the access-layer uplink 802.1Q trunk to the VLAN you just
created. By using a hard-to-guess, unused VLAN for the native VLAN, you
reduce the risk of a VLAN-hopping attack.
vlan 999
!
interface Port-channel [number]
switchport trunk native vlan 999
February 2013 Series
802.1Q Trunk
VLANs 100, 101, 102, 115
Native VLAN 999
VLAN 101
Workstation
VLAN
VLAN 102
Voice
VLAN
VLAN 115
Management
VLAN
LAN
Distribution
Switch
Access Layer
36
1088
Step 4: If you are using a Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series switch stack, on the
distribution/core-layer switch, configure an 802.1Q trunk, and then prune the
VLANs on the trunk to only the VLANs that are active on the access-layer
switch. The interface type is port-channel, and the number must match the
channel group configured in Step 3.
vlan 100
name CZ1-IACS
vlan 101
name CZ1-Workstation
vlan 102
name CZ1-Voice
vlan 115
name Management
vlan 999
spanning-tree vlan 1-4094 root primary
!
interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/1
description Link to Access Switch port 1
interface GigabitEthernet 3/0/1
description Link to Access Switch port 2
!
interface range GigabitEthernet 1/0/1, GigabitEthernet 3/0/1
switchport
macro apply CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 10 mode active
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
no shutdown
!
interface Port-channel 10
description EtherChannel link to Access Switch
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
switchport trunk allowed vlan 100,101,102,115
switchport mode trunk
switchport trunk native vlan 999
no shutdown
!
interface Vlan 100
description Cell Zone 1 IACS VLAN
ip address 10.13.0.1 255.255.255.0
February 2013 Series
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan 101
description Cell Zone 1 Workstation VLAN
ip address 10.13.1.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan 102
description Cell Zone 1 Voice VLAN
ip address 10.13.2.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan 115
description Management VLAN
ip address 10.13.15.1 255.255.255.128
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
Access Layer
37
Example: Cisco Catalyst 4507R+E chassis
VLAN 100
IACS VLAN
VLAN 101
Workstation
VLAN
VLAN 102
Voice
VLAN
VLAN 115
Management
VLAN
LAN
Distribution
Switch
vlan 100
name CZ1-IACS
vlan 101
name CZ1-Workstation
vlan 102
name CZ1-Voice
vlan 115
name Management
vlan 999
spanning-tree vlan 1-4094 root primary
!
interface GigabitEthernet 1/1
description Link to Access Switch port 1
interface GigabitEthernet 2/1
description Link to Access Switch port 2
!
interface range GigabitEthernet 1/1, GigabitEthernet 2/1
switchport
macro apply CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 10 mode active
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
no shutdown
February 2013 Series
1085
802.1Q Trunk
VLANs 100, 101, 102, 115
Native VLAN 999
!
interface Port-channel 10
description EtherChannel link to Access Switch
macro apply CiscoIEEgress-PC
switchport trunk allowed vlan 100,101,102,115
switchport mode trunk
switchport trunk native vlan 999
no shutdown
!
interface Vlan 100
description Cell Zone 1 IACS VLAN
ip address 10.13.0.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan 101
description Cell Zone 1 Workstation VLAN
ip address 10.13.1.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan 102
description Cell Zone 1 Voice VLAN
ip address 10.13.2.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan 115
description Management VLAN
ip address 10.13.15.1 255.255.255.128
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
Access Layer
38
Operations and Server Room
Business Overview
Technical Overview
The operation and server-room network connects the Manufacturing zone
(Level 3) applications, servers, and control-engineering workstations to
the industrial Ethernet network. This network interconnects with the rest of
the network via the distribution/core layer, giving the Level 3 applications
access to the devices and data residing in the IACS systems.
Cisco SBA recognizes the importance of the operations and server-room
facility and its function in the converged industrial Ethernet network. The
design provides a small, yet resilient and scalable, Ethernet LAN foundation
that connects the application servers to the users located throughout the
rest of the industrial Ethernet network.
The guideline for converged industrial Ethernet network design is that
applications critical to plant operations should be placed in the industrial
Ethernet network, segmented from the enterprise network. The systems,
applications, and databases may be replicated or share data with applications in the Enterprise zone via the DMZ. Applications typically found in the
operation and server-room network include:
• Production schedule and manufacturing execution systems
• Plant asset managers
• Plant historians and reporting applications
Design Goals
This chapter is designed to address four primary operations and serverroom needs of manufacturing organizations:
• Provide reliable access for servers and operator workstations
• Provide a an organization with a primary server room for plant systems
• Secure the organization’s critical data
• Reduce operational costs
• Control-engineering workstations and programming applications
Reliable Access to Organization Resources
• Terminal server for remote-access services
Data networks are critical to an organization’s ability to operate and
compete. Industrial Ethernet networks must be functional for the plant to
continue operation. Operator workstations and management and monitoring
servers reside in the operations and server room, within the Manufacturing
zone, and they need reliable access to the manufacturing devices in the
Cell/Area zone and to the enterprise network. As networks become more
complex, the risk increases that the operations and server-room systems
may lose availability or suffer poor performance due to inadequate design,
configuration errors, maintenance and upgrade outages, or hardware and
software faults. The design and methods used in this deployment guide
were created to minimize these risks.
• Patch servers and application staging servers
• Human machine interface (HMI) servers
• Network monitoring and management (for example, Simple Network
Management Protocol server)
• Domain services such as Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP),
Active Directory, Domain Name System (DNS), Network Time Protocol
(NTP), and file and print servers
These applications are critical to plant operations, but they often do not have
the same tight convergence or performance requirements (for example, low
latency and jitter) as the IACS devices on the network.
Plant productivity depends on the ability of operators to access IACS applications and services necessary to do their job quickly and efficiently. Consistent
and reliable access to the servers that support the applications that drive the
plant is critical to ensuring the plant stays online and productive.
February 2013 Series
Primary Server Room for the Plant
As organizations merge Ethernet and IACS networks into industrial Ethernet
networks, reliance on the converged network increases. Plant machines
or lines are no longer isolated, and operator workstations and monitoring
and management servers need an available and secure place to reside
within the industrial Ethernet network. Because these systems are critical
Operations and Server Room
39
to plant floor operations, they should not be placed in the Enterprise zone’s
data center, and the best solution is a server-room segment within the
Manufacturing zone and located at the plant. An example environment has
controlled cooling and power, two to three equipment racks for application
servers, network connectivity, and a backup system.
Securing the Organization’s Critical Data
Frequently, threats to an organization’s data may come from within the
internal network. This may come in the form of onsite vendors, contaminated
employee laptops, or existing servers that are already compromised and
may be used as a platform to launch further attacks. With the centralized
repository of the manufacturing organization’s critical data being the industrial Ethernet network server room, security for the server room is not an
optional component. The plant needs to be secured from traffic and threats
from the enterprise network, as something that would be a minor disruption
in an enterprise network could cause a manufacturing environment to shut
down.
The Cisco SBA discrete manufacturing security design illustrates how to
cleanly integrate network security capabilities such as VPN, firewall, and
intrusion prevention, protecting areas of the network housing plant systems.
The architecture provides the flexibility to secure specific portions of the
industrial Ethernet network via the DMZ, according to the security policy
agreed upon by the organization.
Design Overview of the Server Room
In Cisco SBA, the operations and server room provides basic compute
capability for plant operations and is designed to accommodate 24-48
physical servers and workstations. The design uses the Cisco Catalyst
3560-X Series standalone switch and Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series stackable Ethernet LAN switches, and both switches support 10/100/1000
Ethernet in order to accommodate a wide range of server and workstation
Ethernet interface speeds.
The Cisco StackWise Plus feature of Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series switches
provides a resilient, high-speed backplane for the operations and serverroom environment and provides the ability to dual-home servers and
workstations to the server-room LAN, for increased resiliency. With two
switches in the stack and dual-homing to servers and the plant LAN distribution/core-layer switches, your server room is protected from single points
of failure. The Catalyst 3750-X Series switches in a stack provide automated
control-plane failover in the event that the master switch experiences an
issue. The option of dual power supplies and Cisco StackPower with the
Catalyst 3750-X Series switches provides more resilience to the operations
and server-room design. Cisco Catalyst 3560-X Series does not provide the
same level of resilience as Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series, but it is suitable for
single connected servers and workstations running less-critical systems.
Figure 13 - Server-room switch or switch stack with EtherChannel uplinks
Reduced Operational Costs
February 2013 Series
Servers
Switch
Stack
Distribution
Switch
3013
Organizations constantly pursue opportunities to reduce network operational costs while maintaining the network’s effectiveness. Operational
costs include not only the cost of the physical operation (for example, power
and cooling), but also the labor cost required to staff an IT department that
monitors and maintains the network. Additionally, network outages and performance issues impose costs that are more difficult to quantify, in the form
of loss of productivity and interruption of business continuity. Consolidating
industrial Ethernet and enterprise networks allows you to build a single
higher-performing network that centralizes IT service and support and can
lower the risk of unplanned and lengthy outages that stop production in the
plant. The network design provided by this deployment guide offers network
resilience in its ability to tolerate failure or outage of portions of the network,
and it is a sufficiently robust—yet simple—design that staff should be able
to operate, troubleshoot, and return to service in the event of a network
outage.
In the Cisco SBA design, the server-room switches are connected to the
distribution/core layer with an EtherChannel so that two 1-Gigabit Ethernet
ports combine to make a single 2-Gigabit Ethernet channel. It is possible to
increase the number of distribution/core layer links from the server room
up to four or eight, for more bandwidth if needed. If you require very high
bandwidth, you can use 10-Gigabit Ethernet links in order to connect the
appropriate distribution/core-layer switch ports to 10-Gigabit ports on
uplink modules installed in the server-room switches.
Both the server-room and the client LAN-access methods connect devices
to the network; the difference between the two methods that changes the
switch model is whether LAN access requires Power over Ethernet (PoE).
Operations and Server Room
40
Although PoE-capable devices are not typical in the server room, using
PoE-capable switches offers a benefit worth considering: the minor initial
cost savings of a non-PoE switch may not be worth the benefits of using the
same switch across multiple modules of your local LAN. Although configurations differ between LAN access-layer switches and server-room switches,
the ability to use a single switch type between multiple modules can lower
operational costs by allowing for simpler sparing and management, as well
as provide a better chance of reuse as the industrial Ethernet network grows.
Deployment Details
This section includes the procedures you need to perform in order to
configure your server-room Ethernet LAN connectivity. As you review the
deployment procedures, refer to the following table for the IP addressing
and VLAN assignments used in the server-room deployment. Your design
requirements for IP addressing and VLAN numbering may differ.
Table 4 - VLANs and IP addressing for server-room deployment
VLAN
IP address range
Usage
148
10.13.48.x /24
Server VLAN 1
149
10.13.49.x /24
Server VLAN 2
115
10.13.15.x /25
Management VLAN
Process
Configuring the Server Room
1. Configure the server-room platform
2. Configure switch universal settings
3. Configure switch global settings
For the server-room Ethernet LAN, the following procedures are designed to
configure a standalone Cisco Catalyst 3560-X Series server-room switch or
a stack of two Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series switches.
February 2013 Series
Procedure 1
Configure the server-room platform
When there are multiple Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series switches configured
in a stack, one of the switches controls the operation of the stack and is
called the stack master.
By default, the active stack-master switch assigns a new stack MAC address
when the stack-master switch fails. This new MAC address assignment can
cause the network to reconverge because LACP and many other protocols
rely on the stack MAC address and must restart. This configuration preserves the original stack-master MAC address in order prevent convergence
issues.
Step 1: If you are using a Cisco Catalyst 3560-X Series switch, skip to the
next step.
If you are using the Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series switch stack, ensure that
the original master MAC address remains the stack MAC address after a
failure.
stack-mac persistent timer 0
Step 2: Create access lists and class maps that differentiate the various
types of manufacturing traffic.
access-list 101 permit udp any eq 2222 any dscp 55
access-list 102 permit udp any eq 2222 any dscp 47
access-list 103 permit udp any eq 2222 any dscp 43
access-list 104 permit udp any eq 2222 any
access-list 105 permit udp any eq 44818 any
access-list 105 permit tcp any eq 44818 any
access-list 106 permit udp any eq 319 any
access-list 107 permit udp any eq 320 any
!
ip access-list extended default-data-acl
permit ip any any
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_55
match access-group 101
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_47
match access-group 102
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_43
match access-group 103
Operations and Server Room
41
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_any
match access-group 104
class-map match-all CIP-Other
match access-group 105
class-map match-all 1588-PTP-Event
match access-group 106
class-map match-all 1588-PTP-General
match access-group 107
class-map match-all voip-data
match ip dscp ef
class-map match-all default-data
match access-group name default-data-acl
class-map match-all voip-control
match ip dscp cs3
Step 3: Configure the global quality of service (QoS) settings and create
two macros. These macros are used in later procedures and ease consistent
deployment of QoS.
mls qos map policed-dscp 24 27 31 43 46 47 55 59 to 0
mls qos map dscp-cos 9 11 12 13 14 15 to 0
mls qos map dscp-cos 25 26 28 29 30 to 2
mls qos map dscp-cos 40 41 42 44 45 49 50 51 to 4
mls qos map dscp-cos 52 53 54 56 57 58 60 61 to 4
mls qos map dscp-cos 62 63 to 4
mls qos map cos-dscp 0 8 16 27 32 47 55 59
mls qos srr-queue input bandwidth 40 60
mls qos srr-queue input threshold 1 16 66
mls qos srr-queue input threshold 2 34 66
mls qos srr-queue input buffers 40 60
mls qos srr-queue input cos-map queue 1 threshold 2 1
mls qos srr-queue input cos-map queue 1 threshold 3 0 2
mls qos srr-queue input cos-map queue 2 threshold 2 4
mls qos srr-queue input cos-map queue 2 threshold 3 3 5 6 7
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 2 8 10
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 0 1 2 3 4
5 6 7
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 9 11 12
13 14 15 16 17
February 2013 Series
mls qos srr-queue
21 22 23 25 26
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
35 36 37 38 39
mls qos srr-queue
44 45 49 50 51
mls qos srr-queue
56 57 58 60 61
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
43 46 47 48 55
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
4 5 6 7
mls qos srr-queue
13 14 15 16 17
mls qos srr-queue
21 22 23 25 26
mls qos srr-queue
32 33 34 35 36
mls qos srr-queue
40 41 42 44 45
mls qos srr-queue
52 53 54 56 57
mls qos srr-queue
62 63
mls qos srr-queue
48 55
mls qos srr-queue
input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 18 19 20
input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 28 29 30
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 32 33 34
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 40 41 42
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 52 53 54
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 62 63
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 24 27 31
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 59
output cos-map queue 1 threshold 3 7
output cos-map queue 2 threshold 2 1
output cos-map queue 2 threshold 3 0 2 4
output cos-map queue 3 threshold 3 5 6
output cos-map queue 4 threshold 3 3
output dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 59
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 8 10
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 0 1 2 3
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 9 11 12
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 18 19 20
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 28 29 30
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 37 38 39
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 49 50 51
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 58 60 61
output dscp-map queue 3 threshold 3 43 46 47
output dscp-map queue 4 threshold 3 24 27 31
Operations and Server Room
42
mls qos queue-set output 1 buffers 10 25 40 25
no mls qos rewrite ip dscp
mls qos
policy-map CIP-PTP-Traffic
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_55
set ip dscp 55
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_47
set ip dscp 47
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_43
set ip dscp 43
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_any
set ip dscp 31
class CIP-Other
set ip dscp 27
class 1588-PTP-Event
set ip dscp 59
class 1588-PTP-General
set ip dscp 47
policy-map Voice-Map
class voip-data
set dscp ef
police 128000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
class voip-control
set dscp cs3
police 32000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
class default-data
set dscp default
police 10000000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
macro name CiscoIEEgress
mls qos trust cos
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
@
macro name CiscoEtherNetIP
February 2013 Series
service-policy input CIP-PTP-Traffic
priority-queue out
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
@
Procedure 2
Configure switch universal settings
This procedure configures system settings that simplify and secure the
management of the switch. The values and actual settings used in your
deployment depend on your current network configuration.
Table 5 - Common network services used in the deployment examples
Network parameter
Cisco SBA value
Domain name
cisco.local
Active Directory, DNS, DHCP server
10.13.48.10
Cisco Secure ACS server
10.13.48.15
NTP server
10.13.48.17
In this procedure, you configure a local login account and password that
provide basic device access authentication in order to view platform operation. The enable password secures access to the device configuration
mode. By enabling password encryption, you prevent the use of plain text
passwords when viewing configuration files. By default, HTTPS access to
the switch uses the enable password for authentication.
Reader Tip
For more information about the protocols used in this procedure,
see the “Protocols” section of the “Discrete Manufacturing LAN
Overview” chapter.
Step 1: On the server-room switch, configure the device host name. This
makes it easy to identify the device.
hostname [hostname]
Operations and Server Room
43
Step 2: Configure VTP transparent mode.
vtp mode transparent
Step 3: Enable RPVST+.
spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
Step 4: Enable UDLD.
udld enable
Step 5: Set EtherChannels to use the traffic source and destination IP
address when calculating which link to send the traffic across. This normalizes the method in which traffic is load-shared across the member links of
the EtherChannel.
port-channel load-balance src-dst-ip
Step 6: Configure DNS for host lookup. At the command line of a Cisco
IOS device, it is helpful to be able to type a domain name instead of the IP
address for a destination.
ip name-server 10.13.48.10
Step 7: Configure HTTPS and SSH device management protocols, and then
specify the transport preferred none command on vty lines.
ip domain-name cisco.local
ip ssh version 2
no ip http server
ip http secure-server
line vty 0 15
transport input ssh
transport preferred none
Tech Tip
Step 8: Enable SNMP in order to allow the network infrastructure devices
to be managed by a Network Management System, and then configure
SNMPv2c both for a read-only and a read/write community string.
snmp-server community cisco RO
snmp-server community cisco123 RW
Step 9: If your network operational support is centralized and you want
to increase network security, use an access list to limit the networks that
can access your device. In this example, only devices on the 10.13.48.0/24
network are able to access the device via SSH or SNMP.
access-list 55 permit 10.13.48.0 0.0.0.255
line vty 0 15
access-class 55 in
!
snmp-server community cisco RO 55
snmp-server community cisco123 RW 55
Caution
If you configure an access list on the vty interface, you may lose
the ability to use SSH to log in from one router to the next, for
hop-by-hop troubleshooting.
Step 10: Configure the local login and password.
username admin password c1sco123
enable secret c1sco123
service password-encryption
aaa new-model
The transport preferred none command prevents errant connection attempts from the CLI prompt, and without it, long timeout
delays may occur for mistyped commands if the IP name server
is unreachable.
February 2013 Series
Operations and Server Room
44
Step 11: If you want to use AAA services for centralized user authentication, use TACACS+ protocol in order to authenticate management logins to
infrastructure devices.
tacacs server TACACS-SERVER-1
address ipv4 10.13.48.15
key SecretKey
!
aaa group server tacacs+ TACACS-SERVERS
server name TACACS-SERVER-1
!
aaa authentication login default group TACACS-SERVERS local
aaa authorization exec default group TACACS-SERVERS local
aaa authorization console
ip http authentication aaa
Step 12: Program network devices to synchronize to a local NTP server in
the network, and then configure console messages, logs, and debug output
to provide time stamps on output, which allows cross-referencing of events
in a network.
ntp server 10.13.48.17
!
clock timezone PST -8
clock summer-time PDT recurring
!
service timestamps debug datetime msec localtime
service timestamps log datetime msec localtime
Step 2:
vlan [Server vlan 1]
name Server_VLAN_1
vlan [Server vlan 2]
name Server_VLAN_2
vlan [Management vlan]
name Management
Step 3: Configure the switch with an IP address, and then assign an IP
default gateway. This allows management via in-band connectivity.
interface Vlan [Management vlan]
ip address [ip address] [mask]
no shutdown
ip default-gateway [default router]
Step 4: Configure BPDU guard globally. This protects PortFast-enabled
interfaces by disabling the port if another switch is plugged into the port.
spanning-tree portfast bpduguard default
Reader Tip
For more information about BPDU guard, see the “BPDU Guard”
section of the “Discrete Manufacturing LAN Overview” chapter.
Example
Procedure 3
Configure switch global settings
Configure the server-room switch VLANs according to the values listed in
Table 4.
Step 1: On the server-room switch, configure the server and management
VLANs.
February 2013 Series
vlan 148
name Server_VLAN_1
vlan 149
name Server_VLAN_2
vlan 115
name Management
!
interface Vlan 115
ip address 10.13.15.50 255.255.255.128
no shutdown
ip default-gateway 10.13.15.1
Operations and Server Room
45
Process
Connecting the Server Room to the Distribution/Core Layer
1. Configure server-room uplink ports
2. Configure server-room access ports
3. Configure distribution/core-layer downlinks
Procedure 1
Configure server-room uplink ports
This procedure details how to connect a server-room switch to the distribution/core layer.
Configure the physical interfaces that are members of a Layer 2
EtherChannel prior to configuring the logical port-channel interface. This
sequence allows for minimal configuration because most of the commands
entered to a port-channel interface are copied to its members’ interfaces
and do not require manual replication.
An 802.1Q trunk is used for the connection to the upstream device, which
allows the uplink to provide Layer 3 services to all the VLANs defined on the
server-room switch.
Step 1: On the server-room switch, set LACP negotiation to active. Then
apply the CiscoIEEgress QoS macro that was defined in Procedure 1,
“Configure the server-room platform.” This configures EtherChannel member interfaces and ensures traffic is prioritized appropriately.
interface [interface type] [port 1]
description Link to Distribution port 1
interface [interface type] [port 2]
description Link to Distribution port 2
interface range [interface type] [port 1], [interface type]
[port 2]
switchport
macro apply CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
February 2013 Series
channel-group
logging event
logging event
logging event
1 mode active
link-status
trunk-status
bundle-status
Step 2: Configure the 802.1Q trunk, and then prune the VLANs allowed on
the trunk to only the VLANs that are active on the server-room switch. When
using EtherChannel, the interface type is port-channel, and the number
must match the channel group configured in Step 1.
interface Port-channel [number]
description EtherChannel Link to Distribution
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
switchport trunk allowed vlan [server vlan 1],
[server vlan 2],[management vlan]
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
no shutdown
Step 3: Configure an unused VLAN on the switch-to-switch 802.1Q trunk
link from the server room to the distribution/core layer, and then set the
native VLAN for the server-room uplink 802.1Q trunk to the VLAN you just
created. Using a hard-to-guess, unused VLAN for the native VLAN reduces
the possibility of a VLAN-hopping attack.
vlan 999
!
interface Port-channel [number]
switchport trunk native vlan 999
Reader Tip
For more information about VLAN-hopping attacks, see the
“802.1Q Trunking” section of the “Discrete Manufacturing LAN
Overview” chapter.
Operations and Server Room
46
interface GigabitEthernet1/1/1
description Link to LAN Distribution port 1
interface GigabitEthernet2/1/1
description Link to LAN Distribution port 2
interface range GigabitEthernet 1/1/1, GigabitEthernet 2/1/1
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 1 mode active
macro apply CiscoIEEgress
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
no shutdown
!
interface Port-channel 1
description EtherChannel Link to LAN Distribution
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
switchport trunk allowed vlan 148-149,115
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
no shutdown
!
vlan 999
!
interface Port-channel 1
switchport trunk native vlan 999
Procedure 2
Configure server-room access ports
To make configuration easier when you are applying the same configuration
to multiple interfaces on the switch, use the interface range command. This
command allows you to issue a command once and have it apply to many
interfaces at the same time.
Step 1: On the server-room switch, configure switch interfaces to offer
basic server connectivity.
interface range [interface type] [port number]–[port number]
switchport access vlan [server vlan 1]
February 2013 Series
Step 2: Set the switchport to host made. This shortens the time it takes for a
port to go into a forwarding state.
switchport host
Step 3: Apply the CiscoEtherNetIP macro defined in Procedure 1,
“Configure the server-room platform.” This enables trust for the QoS markings on the traffic from the servers.
macro apply CiscoEtherNetIP
Tech Tip
It is possible that your server or application may require special
configuration such as trunking or port-channeling. Refer to
vendor documentation for this information.
Step 4: Save the running configuration that you have entered as the startup
configuration file. When your server-room switch is rebooted or powercycled, this configuration is used.
copy running-config startup-config
Procedure 3
Configure distribution/core-layer downlinks
The links to the server-room switch are Layer 2 EtherChannels. Connect the
server-room EtherChannel uplinks to separate stack members or interface
modules on the distribution/core-layer switch.
Figure 14 - EtherChannel with stack member or switch blade diversity
Distribution
Switch
Switch
Stack
gig - 1/1/1
gig - 1/7
gig - 2/1/1
gig - 2/7
EtherChannel
Operations and Server Room
3016
Example
47
An 802.1Q trunk is used for the connection between the distribution/corelayer switch and the server-room switch, which allows the uplink to provide
Layer 3 services to all the VLANs defined in the server room.
Step 1: On the distribution/core-layer switch, add the server-room VLANs
to the VLAN database that the downlink carries.
vlan [Server vlan 1]
name Server_VLAN_1
vlan [Server vlan 2]
name Server_VLAN_2
Step 2: Set LACP negotiation to active and then apply the CiscoIEEgress
QoS macro that was defined in Procedure 1, “Configure the distribution/core
platform.” This configures the EtherChannel member interfaces and ensures
traffic is prioritized appropriately.
interface [interface type] [port 1]
description Link to Server Room port 1
interface [interface type] [port 2]
description Link to Server Room port 2
interface range [interface type] [port 1], [interface type]
[port 2]
switchport
macro apply CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group [number] mode active
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
Step 3: If you are using a Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series switch stack, on the
distribution/core-layer switch, configure an 802.1Q trunk, and then prune the
VLANs allowed on the trunk to only the VLANs that are active on the serverroom switch. When using EtherChannel, the interface type is port-channel,
and the number must match the channel group configured in Step 2.
interface Port-Channel[number]
description EtherChannel Link to Server Room
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
switchport trunk allowed vlan [server vlan 1],
[server vlan 2],[mgmt vlan]
February 2013 Series
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
no shutdown
If you are using a Cisco Catalyst 4507R+E switch, on the distribution/corelayer switch, configure an 802.1Q trunk, and then prune the VLANs allowed
on the trunk to only the VLANs that are active on the server-room switch.
When using EtherChannel, the interface type is port-channel, and the
number must match the channel group configured in Step 2.
interface Port-Channel[number]
description EtherChannel Link to Server Room
macro apply CiscoIEEgress-PC
switchport trunk allowed vlan [server vlan 1],
[server vlan 2],[mgmt vlan]
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
no shutdown
Step 4: Add VLAN-hopping mitigation for the trunk.
interface Port-channel [number]
switchport trunk native vlan 999
Step 5: If the VLANs for the server room do not already exist on the
distribution/core-layer switch, add a switched virtual interface (SVI) for
every server-room VLAN. This enables the VLANs to route to the rest of the
network.
If you are using DHCP to assign IP addresses for servers in the server
room, use the ip helper-address command to allow remote DHCP servers
to provide IP addresses for this network. The helper command points to
the DHCP server address; if you have more than one DHCP server, multiple
helper commands can be listed on an interface.
interface Vlan [number]
ip address [ip address] [mask]
ip helper-address [dhcp server ip]
ip pim sparse-mode
no shutdown
Operations and Server Room
48
Example
vlan 148
name Server_VLAN_1
vlan 149
name Server_VLAN_2
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/23
description Link to Server Room port 1
interface GigabitEthernet2/23
description Link to Server Room port 2
interface range GigabitEthernet 1/23, GigabitEthernet 2/23
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 1 mode active
macro apply CiscoIEEgress
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
no shutdown
!
interface Port-channel 1
description EtherChannel Link to Server Room
macro apply CiscoIEEgress-PC
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
switchport trunk allowed vlan 148-149,115
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
no shutdown
!
interface Port-channel 1
switchport trunk native vlan 999
!
interface Vlan 148
ip address 10.13.48.1 255.255.255.0
ip pim sparse-mode
no shutdown
interface Vlan 149
ip address 10.13.49.1 255.255.255.0
ip pim sparse-mode
no shutdown
February 2013 Series
Operations and Server Room
49
Appendix A: Product List
LAN Access Layer
Functional Area
Product Description
Part Numbers
Software
Stackable Access Layer
Switch
Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series Stackable 48 Ethernet 10/100/1000 PoE+ ports
WS-C3750X-48PF-S
Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series Stackable 24 Ethernet 10/100/1000 PoE+ ports
WS-C3750X-24P-S
15.0(2)SE
IP Base license
Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series Two 10GbE SFP+ and Two GbE SFP ports
network module
C3KX-NM-10G
Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series Four GbE SFP ports network module
C3KX-NM-1G
Cisco Catalyst 3560-X Series Standalone 48 Ethernet 10/100/1000 PoE+
ports
WS-C3560X-48PF-S
Cisco Catalyst 3560-X Series Standalone 24 Ethernet 10/100/1000 PoE+
ports
WS-C3560X-24P-S
Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series Two 10GbE SFP+ and Two GbE SFP ports
network module
C3KX-NM-10G
Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series Four GbE SFP ports network module
C3KX-NM-1G
Cisco Catalyst 2960-S Series 48 Ethernet 10/100/1000 PoE+ ports and Two
10GbE SFP+ Uplink ports
WS-C2960S-48FPD-L
Cisco Catalyst 2960-S Series 48 Ethernet 10/100/1000 PoE+ ports and Four
GbE SFP Uplink ports
WS-C2960S-48FPS-L
Cisco Catalyst 2960-S Series 24 Ethernet 10/100/1000 PoE+ ports and Two
10GbE SFP+ Uplink ports
WS-C2960S-24PD-L
Cisco Catalyst 2960-S Series 24 Ethernet 10/100/1000 PoE+ ports and Four
GbE SFP Uplink ports
WS-C2960S-24PS-L
Cisco Catalyst 2960-S Series Flexstack Stack Module
C2960S-STACK
Standalone Access Layer
Switch
Stackable Access Layer
Switch
February 2013 Series
15.0(2)SE
IP Base license
15.0(2)SE
LAN Base license
Appendix A: Product List
50
Functional Area
Product Description
Part Numbers
Software
Industrial Ethernet Modular
Access Layer Switch
Cisco Catalyst IE 3000 Switch, 8 10/100 + 2 T/SFP
IE-3000-8TC
Cisco Catalyst IE 3000 Switch, 4 10/100 + 2 T/SFP
IE-3000-4TC
15.0(2)SE
LAN Base license
Cisco Catalyst IE 3000 Expansion Module, 8 10/100
IEM-3000-8TM=
Cisco Catalyst IE 3000 Expansion Module, 8 100FX
IEM-3000-8FM=
Cisco Catalyst IE 3000 8 port SFP expansion module
IEM-3000-8SM=
Cisco Catalyst IE 3000 4 port SFP expansion module
IEM-3000-4SM=
Cisco Catalyst IE 16 10/100,2 FE SFP+2 T/SFP, Base with 1588, Comf. Coat
IE-2000-16TC-G-X Cisco Catalyst IE 16 10/100,2 FE SFP+2 T/SFP, Base with 1588 IE-2000-16TC-G-E Cisco Catalyst IE 16 10/100,2 FE SFP+2 T/SFP FE, Base IE-2000-16TC-B Cisco Catalyst IE 8 10/100,2 T/SFP, Base with 1588 IE-2000-8TC-G-E Cisco Catalyst IE 8 10/100,2 T/SFP, Base IE-2000-8TC-G-B Cisco Catalyst IE 8 10/100,2 FE SFP+2 T/SFP FE, Base IE-2000-8TC-B Cisco Catalyst IE 4 10/100,2 SFP Gig port, Base IE-2000-4TS-G-B Cisco Catalyst IE 4 10/100,2 FE SFP, Base IE-2000-4TS-B Cisco Catalyst IE 4 10/100,2 Gig port, Base IE-2000-4T-G-B Cisco Catalyst IE 4 10/100,2 FE, Base IE-2000-4T-B Industrial Ethernet Access
Layer Switch
15.0(2)SE
LAN Base license
LAN Distribution Layer
Functional Area
Product Description
Part Numbers
Software
Modular Distribution Layer
Switch
Cisco Catalyst 4507R+E 7-slot Chassis with 48Gbps per slot
WS-C4507R+E
Cisco Catalyst 4500 E-Series Supervisor Engine 7-E, 848Gbps
WS-X45-SUP7-E
Cisco Catalyst 4500 E-Series 24-port GbE SFP Fiber Module
WS-X4624-SFP-E
3.3.0.SG(15.1-1SG)
Enterprise Services
license
Cisco Catalyst 4500 E-Series 12-port 10GbE SFP+ Fiber Module
WS-X4712-SFP+E
Stackable Distribution Layer Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series Stackable 12 GbE SFP ports
Switch
Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series Two 10GbE SFP+ and Two GbE SFP ports
network module
Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series Four GbE SFP ports network module
February 2013 Series
WS-C3750X-12S-E
C3KX-NM-10G
15.0(2)SE
IP Services license
C3KX-NM-1G
Appendix A: Product List
51
Server Room
Functional Area
Product Description
Part Numbers
Software
Stackable
Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series Stackable 48 Ethernet 10/100/1000 ports
WS-C3750X-48T-S
Ethernet Switch
Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series Stackable 24 Ethernet 10/100/1000 ports
WS-C3750X-24T-S
15.0(2)SE
IP Base license
Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series Four GbE SFP ports network module
C3KX-NM-1G
Standalone
Cisco Catalyst 3560-X Series Standalone 48 Ethernet 10/100/1000 ports
WS-C3560X-48T-S
Ethernet Switch
Cisco Catalyst 3560-X Series Standalone 24 Ethernet 10/100/1000 ports
WS-C3560X-24T-S
Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Series Four GbE SFP ports network module
C3KX-NM-1G
February 2013 Series
15.0(2)SE
IP Base license
Appendix A: Product List
52
Appendix B: Configuration Files
Distribution/Core-Layer Configurations
D4507R
version 15.1
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec localtime
service timestamps log datetime msec localtime
service password-encryption
service compress-config
!
hostname D4507R
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 /DtCCr53Q4B18jSIm1UEqu7cNVZTOhxTZyUnZdsSrsw
!
username admin password 7 04585A150C2E1D1C5A
aaa new-model
!
aaa group server tacacs+ TACACS-SERVERS
server name TACACS-SERVER-1
!
aaa authentication login default group TACACS-SERVERS local
aaa authorization console
aaa authorization exec default group TACACS-SERVERS local
!
aaa session-id common
clock timezone PST -8 0
clock summer-time PDT recurring
udld enable
February 2013 Series
!
ip vrf mgmtVrf
!
ip multicast-routing
ip domain-name cisco.local
ip name-server 10.13.48.10
!
vtp mode transparent
!
crypto pki trustpoint CISCO_IDEVID_SUDI
revocation-check none
rsakeypair CISCO_IDEVID_SUDI
!
crypto pki trustpoint CISCO_IDEVID_SUDI0
revocation-check none
!
crypto pki trustpoint TP-self-signed-14461
enrollment selfsigned
subject-name cn=IOS-Self-Signed-Certificate-14461
revocation-check none
rsakeypair TP-self-signed-14461
!
power redundancy-mode redundant
!
spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
spanning-tree portfast bpduguard default
spanning-tree extend system-id
spanning-tree vlan 1-4094 priority 24576
!
redundancy
mode sso
Appendix B: Configuration Files
53
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
vlan 100
name CZ1-IACS
!
vlan 101
name CZ1-Workstation
!
vlan 102
name CZ1-Voice
!
vlan 103
name CZ2-IACS
!
vlan 104
name CZ2-Workstation
!
vlan 105
name CZ2-Voice
!
vlan 106
name CZ3-IACS
!
vlan 107
name CZ3-Workstation
!
vlan 108
name CZ3-Voice
!
vlan 115
name Management
!
vlan 148
name Server_VLAN_1
!
vlan 149
February 2013 Series
name Server_VLAN_2
!
vlan 999
!
ip ssh source-interface Loopback0
ip ssh version 2
!
class-map match-any CONTROL-MGMT-QUEUE
match cos 3
class-map match-any SCAVENGER-QUEUE
match cos 1
class-map match-any CIP-PTP-General
match cos 5 6
class-map match-any PRIORITY-QUEUE
match cos 7
!
policy-map 1P5Q1T
class PRIORITY-QUEUE
priority
class CONTROL-MGMT-QUEUE
bandwidth remaining percent 40
class CIP-PTP-General
bandwidth remaining percent 40
class SCAVENGER-QUEUE
bandwidth remaining percent 1
class class-default
bandwidth remaining percent 18
dbl
policy-map 1P5Q1T-PC
class PRIORITY-QUEUE
police cir 200000000
conform-action transmit
action drop
!
macro name CiscoIEEgress
service-policy output 1P5Q1T
@
macro name CiscoIEEgress-PC
Appendix B: Configuration Files
exceed-
54
service-policy output 1P5Q1T-PC
@
!
interface Loopback0
ip address 10.13.15.254 255.255.255.255
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Loopback1
ip address 10.13.15.253 255.255.255.255
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Port-channel1
description EtherChannel Link to Server Room
switchport
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 115,148,149
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
flowcontrol receive on
macro description CiscoIEEgress-PC
service-policy output 1P5Q1T-PC
!
interface Port-channel10
description EtherChannel link to CZ1-IE2K-1
switchport
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 100-102,115
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
flowcontrol receive on
macro description CiscoIEEgress-PC
service-policy output 1P5Q1T-PC
!
interface Port-channel11
description EtherChannel link to CZ2-2960S-1
switchport
switchport trunk native vlan 999
February 2013 Series
switchport trunk allowed vlan 103-105,115
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
flowcontrol receive on
macro description CiscoIEEgress-PC
service-policy output 1P5Q1T-PC
!
interface Port-channel12
description EtherChannel link to CZ3-3560X-1
switchport
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 106-108,115
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
flowcontrol receive on
macro description CiscoIEEgress-PC
service-policy output 1P5Q1T-PC
!
interface FastEthernet1
ip vrf forwarding mgmtVrf
no ip address
speed auto
duplex auto
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/1
description Link to CZ1-IE2K-1 port 1
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 100-102,115
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 10 mode active
service-policy output 1P5Q1T
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/2
Appendix B: Configuration Files
55
description Link to CZ2-2960S-1 port 1
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 103-105,115
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 11 mode active
service-policy output 1P5Q1T
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/3
description Link to CZ3-3560X-1 port 1
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 106-108,115
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 12 mode active
service-policy output 1P5Q1T
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/4
shutdown
!
! *************************************************************
! Interface GigabitEthernet 1/5 - 1/22 are all configured
! the same as 1/4 and have been removed for conciseness
! *************************************************************
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/23
description Link to Server Room port 1
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 115,148,149
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
February 2013 Series
logging event trunk-status
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 1 mode active
service-policy output 1P5Q1T
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/24
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet2/1
description Link to CZ1-IE2K-1 port 2
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 100-102,115
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 10 mode active
service-policy output 1P5Q1T
!
interface GigabitEthernet2/2
description Link to CZ2-2960S-1 port 2
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 103-105,115
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 11 mode active
service-policy output 1P5Q1T
!
interface GigabitEthernet2/3
description Link to CZ3-3560X-1 port 2
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 106-108,115
Appendix B: Configuration Files
56
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 12 mode active
service-policy output 1P5Q1T
!
interface GigabitEthernet2/4
shutdown
!
! *************************************************************
! Interface GigabitEthernet 2/5 - 2/22 are all configured
! the same as 2/4 and have been removed for conciseness
! *************************************************************
!
interface GigabitEthernet2/23
description Link to Server Room port 2
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 115,148,149
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 1 mode active
service-policy output 1P5Q1T
!
interface GigabitEthernet2/24
shutdown
!
interface TenGigabitEthernet3/1
shutdown
!
! *************************************************************
! Interface TenGigabitEthernet 3/1 - 4/4 are all configured
! the same as 3/1 and have been removed for conciseness
February 2013 Series
! *************************************************************
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
!
interface Vlan100
description CZ1-IACS
ip address 10.13.0.1 255.255.255.0
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan101
description CZ1-Workstation
ip address 10.13.1.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan102
description CZ1-Voice
ip address 10.13.2.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan103
description CZ2-IACS
ip address 10.13.3.1 255.255.255.0
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan104
description CZ2-Workstation
ip address 10.13.4.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan105
description CZ2-Voice
ip address 10.13.5.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
Appendix B: Configuration Files
57
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan106
description CZ3-IACS
ip address 10.13.6.1 255.255.255.0
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan107
description CZ3-Workstation
ip address 10.13.7.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan108
description CZ3-Voice
ip address 10.13.8.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan115
description Management
ip address 10.13.15.1 255.255.255.128
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan148
description Servers 1
ip address 10.13.48.1 255.255.255.0
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan149
description Servers 2
ip address 10.13.49.1 255.255.255.0
ip pim sparse-mode
!
router eigrp 101
network 10.13.0.0 0.0.255.255
passive-interface default
February 2013 Series
eigrp router-id 10.13.15.254
eigrp stub connected summary
nsf
!
no ip http server
ip http authentication aaa
ip http secure-server
ip pim autorp listener
ip pim send-rp-announce Loopback1 scope 32 group-list 10
ip pim send-rp-discovery Loopback0 scope 32
ip pim register-source Loopback0
ip tacacs source-interface Loopback0
!
access-list 10 permit 239.1.0.0 0.0.255.255
!
snmp-server community cisco RO
snmp-server community cisco123 RW
snmp-server trap-source Loopback0
tacacs server TACACS-SERVER-1
address ipv4 10.13.48.15
key 7 0812494D1B1C113C1712
!
line con 0
stopbits 1
line vty 0 4
transport preferred none
transport input ssh
line vty 5 15
transport preferred none
transport input ssh
!
ntp source Loopback0
ntp update-calendar
ntp server 10.13.48.17
end
Appendix B: Configuration Files
58
D3750X
version 15.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec localtime
service timestamps log datetime msec localtime
service password-encryption
!
hostname D3750X
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 /DtCCr53Q4B18jSIm1UEqu7cNVZTOhxTZyUnZdsSrsw
!
username admin password 7 141443180F0B7B7977
aaa new-model
!
aaa group server tacacs+ TACACS-SERVERS
server name TACACS-SERVER-1
!
aaa authentication login default group TACACS-SERVERS local
aaa authorization console
aaa authorization exec default group TACACS-SERVERS local
!
aaa session-id common
clock timezone PST -8 0
clock summer-time PDT recurring
switch 1 provision ws-c3750x-12s
switch 2 provision ws-c3750x-12s
switch 3 provision ws-c3750x-12s
stack-mac persistent timer 0
system mtu routing 1500
ip routing
!
ip domain-name cisco.local
ip name-server 10.13.48.10
vtp mode transparent
February 2013 Series
udld enable
!
mls qos map policed-dscp 24 27 31 43 46 47 55 59 to 0
mls qos map dscp-cos 9 11 12 13 14 15 to 0
mls qos map dscp-cos 25 26 28 29 30 to 2
mls qos map dscp-cos 40 41 42 44 45 49 50 51 to 4
mls qos map dscp-cos 52 53 54 56 57 58 60 61 to 4
mls qos map dscp-cos 62 63 to 4
mls qos map cos-dscp 0 8 16 27 32 47 55 59
mls qos srr-queue input bandwidth 40 60
mls qos srr-queue input threshold 1 16 66
mls qos srr-queue input threshold 2 34 66
mls qos srr-queue input buffers 40 60
mls qos srr-queue input cos-map queue 1 threshold 2 1
mls qos srr-queue input cos-map queue 1 threshold 3 0 2
mls qos srr-queue input cos-map queue 2 threshold 2 4
mls qos srr-queue input cos-map queue 2 threshold 3 3 5 6 7
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 2 8 10
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 0 1 2 3 4 5
6 7
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 9 11 12 13
14 15 16 17
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 18 19 20 21
22 23 25 26
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 28 29 30
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 32 33 34 35
36 37 38 39
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 40 41 42 44
45 49 50 51
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 52 53 54 56
57 58 60 61
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 62 63
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 24 27 31 43
46 47 48 55
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 59
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 1 threshold 3 7
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 2 threshold 2 1
Appendix B: Configuration Files
59
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 2 threshold 3 0 2 4
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 3 threshold 3 5 6
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 4 threshold 3 3
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 59
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 8 10
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 0 1 2 3 4 5
6 7
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 9 11 12 13
14 15 16 17
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 18 19 20 21
22 23 25 26
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 28 29 30 32
33 34 35 36
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 37 38 39 40
41 42 44 45
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 49 50 51 52
53 54 56 57
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 58 60 61 62
63
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 3 threshold 3 43 46 47 48
55
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 4 threshold 3 24 27 31
mls qos queue-set output 1 buffers 10 25 40 25
no mls qos rewrite ip dscp
mls qos
!
crypto pki trustpoint TP-self-signed-2103206656
enrollment selfsigned
subject-name cn=IOS-Self-Signed-Certificate-2103206656
revocation-check none
rsakeypair TP-self-signed-2103206656
!
license boot level ipservices switch 1
license boot level ipservices switch 2
license boot level ipservices switch 3
!
spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
February 2013 Series
spanning-tree portfast bpduguard default
spanning-tree extend system-id
spanning-tree vlan 1-4094 priority 24576
!
port-channel load-balance src-dst-ip
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
vlan 100
name CZ1-IACS
!
vlan 101
name CZ1-Workstation
!
vlan 102
name CZ1-Voice
!
vlan 103
name CZ2-IACS
!
vlan 104
name CZ2-Workstation
!
vlan 105
name CZ2-Voice
!
vlan 106
name CZ3-IACS
!
vlan 107
name CZ3-Workstation
!
vlan 108
name CZ3-Voice
!
vlan 115
name Management
Appendix B: Configuration Files
60
!
vlan 999
!
ip ssh source-interface Loopback0
ip ssh version 2
!
macro name CiscoIEEgress
mls qos trust cos
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
@
!
interface Loopback0
ip address 10.13.15.254 255.255.255.255
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Loopback1
ip address 10.13.15.253 255.255.255.255
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Port-channel10
description EtherChannel link to SR-3750X
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 115,148-149
switchport mode trunk
!
interface Port-channel10
description EtherChannel link to CZ1-IE2K-1
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 100-102,115
switchport mode trunk
!
interface Port-channel11
description EtherChannel link to CZ2-2960S-1
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
February 2013 Series
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 103-105,115
switchport mode trunk
!
interface Port-channel12
description EtherChannel link to CZ3-3560X-1
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 106-108,115
switchport mode trunk
!
interface FastEthernet0
no ip address
no ip route-cache
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/0/1
description Link to CZ1-IE2K-1 port 1
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
mls qos trust cos
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 10 mode active
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/0/2
description Link to CZ2-2960S-1 port 1
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
mls qos trust cos
macro description CiscoIEEgress
Appendix B: Configuration Files
61
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 11 mode active
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/0/3
description Link to CZ3-3560X-1 port 1
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
mls qos trust cos
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 12 mode active
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/0/4
shutdown
!
! *************************************************************
! Interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/5 - 1/0/10 are all configured
! the same as 1/0/4 and have been removed for conciseness
! *************************************************************
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/0/11
description Link to SR-3750X port 1
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
mls qos trust cos
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 1 mode active
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/0/12
shutdown
February 2013 Series
!
! *************************************************************
! Interface GigabitEthernet 1/1/1 - TenGigabitEthernet 2/1/2
! are all configured the same as GigabitEthernet 1/0/12 and
! have been removed for conciseness
! *************************************************************
!
interface GigabitEthernet3/0/1
description Link to CZ1-IE2K-1 port 2
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
mls qos trust cos
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 10 mode active
!
interface GigabitEthernet3/0/2
description Link to CZ2-2960S-1 port 2
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
mls qos trust cos
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 11 mode active
!
interface GigabitEthernet3/0/3
description Link to CZ3-3560X-1 port 2
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
Appendix B: Configuration Files
62
priority-queue out
mls qos trust cos
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 12 mode active
!
interface GigabitEthernet3/0/4
shutdown
!
! *************************************************************
! Interface GigabitEthernet 3/0/5 - 3/0/10 are all configured
! the same as 3/0/4 and have been removed for conciseness
! *************************************************************
!
interface GigabitEthernet3/0/11
description Link to SR-3750X port 2
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
mls qos trust cos
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 1 mode active
!
interface GigabitEthernet3/0/12
shutdown
!
! *************************************************************
! Interface GigabitEthernet 3/1/1 - TenGigabitEthernet 3/1/2
! are all configured the same as GigabitEthernet 3/0/12 and
! have been removed for conciseness
! *************************************************************
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
February 2013 Series
shutdown
!
interface Vlan100
description Cell Zone 1 IACS VLAN
ip address 10.13.0.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan101
description Cell Zone 1 Workstation VLAN
ip address 10.13.1.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan102
description Cell Zone 1 Voice VLAN
ip address 10.13.2.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan103
description Cell Zone 2 IACS VLAN
ip address 10.13.3.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan104
description Cell Zone 2 Workstation VLAN
ip address 10.13.4.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan105
description Cell Zone 2 Voice VLAN
ip address 10.13.5.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
Appendix B: Configuration Files
63
!
interface Vlan106
description Cell Zone 3 IACS VLAN
ip address 10.13.6.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan107
description Cell Zone 3 Workstation VLAN
ip address 10.13.7.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan108
description Cell Zone 3 Voice VLAN
ip address 10.13.8.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
interface Vlan115
description Management VLAN
ip address 10.13.15.1 255.255.255.128
ip helper-address 10.13.48.10
ip pim sparse-mode
!
router eigrp 101
network 10.13.0.0 0.0.255.255
passive-interface default
eigrp router-id 10.13.15.254
nsf
!
no ip http server
ip http authentication aaa
ip http secure-server
!
ip pim autorp listener
ip pim send-rp-announce Loopback1 scope 32 group-list 10
February 2013 Series
ip pim send-rp-discovery Loopback0 scope 32
ip pim register-source Loopback0
ip tacacs source-interface Loopback0
!
access-list 10 permit 239.1.0.0 0.0.255.255
snmp-server community cisco RO
snmp-server community cisco123 RW
snmp-server trap-source Loopback0
tacacs server TACACS-SERVER-1
address ipv4 10.13.48.15
key 7 04680E051D2458650C00
!
line con 0
line vty 0 4
transport preferred none
transport input ssh
line vty 5 15
transport preferred none
transport input ssh
!
ntp source Loopback0
ntp server 10.13.48.17
end
Access Layer Configurations
CZ1-IE2K-1
version 15.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec localtime
service timestamps log datetime msec localtime
service password-encryption
!
hostname CZ1-IE2K-1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
Appendix B: Configuration Files
64
enable secret 5 $1$r9g5$1SkSAiFWL9xcGECtFSa5o1
!
username admin password 7 15115A1F07257A767B
aaa new-model
!
aaa group server tacacs+ TACACS-SERVERS
server name TACACS-SERVER-1
!
aaa authentication login default group TACACS-SERVERS local
aaa authorization console
aaa authorization exec default group TACACS-SERVERS local
!
aaa session-id common
clock timezone PST -8 0
clock summer-time PDT recurring
system mtu routing 1500
ip arp inspection vlan 101-102
!
ip dhcp snooping vlan 101-102
no ip dhcp snooping information option
ip dhcp snooping
ip domain-name cisco.local
ip name-server 10.13.48.10
vtp mode transparent
udld enable
!
mls qos map policed-dscp 24 27 31 43 46 47 55 59 to 0
mls qos map dscp-cos 9 11 12 13 14 15 to 0
mls qos map dscp-cos 25 26 28 29 30 to 2
mls qos map dscp-cos 40 41 42 44 45 49 50 51 to 4
mls qos map dscp-cos 52 53 54 56 57 58 60 61 to 4
mls qos map dscp-cos 62 63 to 4
mls qos map cos-dscp 0 8 16 27 32 47 55 59
mls qos srr-queue input bandwidth 40 60
mls qos srr-queue input threshold 1 16 66
mls qos srr-queue input threshold 2 34 66
mls qos srr-queue input buffers 40 60
February 2013 Series
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
6 7
mls qos srr-queue
14 15 16 17
mls qos srr-queue
22 23 25 26
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
36 37 38 39
mls qos srr-queue
45 49 50 51
mls qos srr-queue
57 58 60 61
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
46 47 48 55
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
6 7
mls qos srr-queue
14 15 16 17
mls qos srr-queue
22 23 25 26
mls qos srr-queue
33 34 35 36
input
input
input
input
input
input
cos-map queue 1 threshold 2 1
cos-map queue 1 threshold 3 0 2
cos-map queue 2 threshold 2 4
cos-map queue 2 threshold 3 3 5 6 7
dscp-map queue 1 threshold 2 8 10
dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 0 1 2 3 4 5
input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 9 11 12 13
input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 18 19 20 21
input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 28 29 30
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 32 33 34 35
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 40 41 42 44
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 52 53 54 56
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 62 63
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 24 27 31 43
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 59
output cos-map queue 1 threshold 3 7
output cos-map queue 2 threshold 2 1
output cos-map queue 2 threshold 3 0 2 4
output cos-map queue 3 threshold 3 5 6
output cos-map queue 4 threshold 3 3
output dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 59
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 8 10
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 0 1 2 3 4 5
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 9 11 12 13
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 18 19 20 21
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 28 29 30 32
Appendix B: Configuration Files
65
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 37
41 42 44 45
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 49
53 54 56 57
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 58
63
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 3 threshold 3 43
55
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 4 threshold 3 24
mls qos queue-set output 1 buffers 10 25 40 25
no mls qos rewrite ip dscp
mls qos
!
crypto pki trustpoint TP-self-signed-1283359360
enrollment selfsigned
subject-name cn=IOS-Self-Signed-Certificate-1283359360
revocation-check none
rsakeypair TP-self-signed-1283359360
!
spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
spanning-tree portfast bpduguard default
spanning-tree extend system-id
!
port-channel load-balance src-dst-ip
!
alarm profile defaultPort
alarm not-operating
syslog not-operating
notifies not-operating
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
vlan 100
name CZ1-IACS
!
vlan 101
name CZ1-Workstation
February 2013 Series
38 39 40
50 51 52
60 61 62
46 47 48
27 31
!
vlan 102
name CZ1-Voice
!
vlan 115
name Management
!
vlan 999
!
ip ssh version 2
lldp run
!
class-map match-all 1588-PTP-General
match access-group 107
class-map match-all 1588-PTP-Event
match access-group 106
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_any
match access-group 104
class-map match-all CIP-Other
match access-group 105
class-map match-all voip-data
match ip dscp ef
class-map match-all voip-control
match ip dscp cs3
class-map match-all default-data
match access-group name default-data-acl
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_43
match access-group 103
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_55
match access-group 101
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_47
match access-group 102
!
policy-map CIP-PTP-Traffic
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_55
set ip dscp 55
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_47
Appendix B: Configuration Files
66
set ip dscp 47
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_43
set ip dscp 43
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_any
set ip dscp 31
class CIP-Other
set ip dscp 27
class 1588-PTP-Event
set ip dscp 59
class 1588-PTP-General
set ip dscp 47
policy-map Voice-Map
class voip-data
set dscp ef
police 128000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
class voip-control
set dscp cs3
police 32000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
class default-data
set dscp default
police 10000000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
!
macro name CiscoIEPhone
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 25 35 30
priority-queue out
mls qos trust device cisco-phone
mls qos trust cos
service-policy input Voice-Map
@
macro name CiscoEtherNetIP
service-policy input CIP-PTP-Traffic
priority-queue out
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
@
macro name CiscoIEEgress
mls qos trust cos
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
February 2013 Series
priority-queue out
@
!
interface Port-channel1
description EtherChannel link to Distribution Layer
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 100-102,115
switchport mode trunk
ip arp inspection trust
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
ip dhcp snooping trust
!
interface FastEthernet1/1
description Cell/Area Zone - IACS Access Port
switchport access vlan 100
switchport mode access
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
macro description CiscoEtherNetIP
storm-control broadcast level 3.00 1.00
spanning-tree portfast
service-policy input CIP-PTP-Traffic
!
interface FastEthernet1/2
description Cell/Area Zone - Workstation/VoIP Access Port
switchport access vlan 101
switchport mode access
switchport voice vlan 102
switchport port-security maximum 11
switchport port-security
switchport port-security aging time 2
switchport port-security violation restrict
switchport port-security aging type inactivity
ip arp inspection limit rate 100
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 25 35 30
priority-queue out
Appendix B: Configuration Files
67
mls qos trust device cisco-phone
mls qos trust cos
macro description CiscoIEPhone
spanning-tree portfast
service-policy input Voice-Map
ip verify source
ip dhcp snooping limit rate 100
!
interface FastEthernet1/3
shutdown
!
interface FastEthernet1/4
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/1
description Link to Distribution Layer port 1
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 100-102,115
switchport mode trunk
ip arp inspection trust
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
mls qos trust cos
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 1 mode active
ip dhcp snooping trust
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/2
description Link to Distribution Layer port 2
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 100-102,115
switchport mode trunk
ip arp inspection trust
February 2013 Series
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
mls qos trust cos
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 1 mode active
ip dhcp snooping trust
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface Vlan115
ip address 10.13.15.5 255.255.255.128
!
ip default-gateway 10.13.15.1
no ip http server
ip http authentication aaa
ip http secure-server
!
ip access-list extended default-data-acl
permit ip any any
logging esm config
access-list 101 permit udp any eq 2222 any dscp 55
access-list 102 permit udp any eq 2222 any dscp 47
access-list 103 permit udp any eq 2222 any dscp 43
access-list 104 permit udp any eq 2222 any
access-list 105 permit udp any eq 44818 any
access-list 105 permit tcp any eq 44818 any
access-list 106 permit udp any eq 319 any
access-list 107 permit udp any eq 320 any
snmp-server community cisco RO
snmp-server community cisco123 RW
tacacs server TACACS-SERVER-1
Appendix B: Configuration Files
68
address ipv4 10.13.48.15
key 7 04680E051D2458650C00
!
line con 0
line vty 0 4
transport preferred none
transport input ssh
line vty 5 15
transport preferred none
transport input ssh
!
ntp server 10.13.48.17
end
CZ2-2960S-1
version 15.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec localtime
service timestamps log datetime msec localtime
service password-encryption
!
hostname CZ2-2960S-1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 /DtCCr53Q4B18jSIm1UEqu7cNVZTOhxTZyUnZdsSrsw
!
username admin password 7 070C705F4D06485744
aaa new-model
!
aaa group server tacacs+ TACACS-SERVERS
server name TACACS-SERVER-1
!
aaa authentication login default group TACACS-SERVERS local
aaa authorization console
aaa authorization exec default group TACACS-SERVERS local
February 2013 Series
!
aaa session-id common
clock timezone PST -8 0
clock summer-time PDT recurring
switch 1 provision ws-c2960s-24pd-l
ip arp inspection vlan 104-105
!
ip dhcp snooping vlan 104-105
no ip dhcp snooping information option
ip dhcp snooping
ip domain-name cisco.local
ip name-server 10.13.48.10
vtp mode transparent
udld enable
!
mls qos map policed-dscp 24 27 31 43 46 47 55 59 to 0
mls qos map dscp-cos 9 11 12 13 14 15 to 0
mls qos map dscp-cos 25 26 28 29 30 to 2
mls qos map dscp-cos 40 41 42 44 45 49 50 51 to 4
mls qos map dscp-cos 52 53 54 56 57 58 60 61 to 4
mls qos map dscp-cos 62 63 to 4
mls qos map cos-dscp 0 8 16 27 32 47 55 59
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 1 threshold 3 7
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 2 threshold 2 1
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 2 threshold 3 0 2 4
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 3 threshold 3 5 6
mls qos srr-queue output cos-map queue 4 threshold 3 3
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 59
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 8 10
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 0 1 2 3 4 5
6 7
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 9 11 12 13
14 15 16 17
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 18 19 20 21
22 23 25 26
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 28 29 30 32
33 34 35 36
Appendix B: Configuration Files
69
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 37
41 42 44 45
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 49
53 54 56 57
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 58
63
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 3 threshold 3 43
55
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 4 threshold 3 24
mls qos queue-set output 1 buffers 10 25 40 25
no mls qos rewrite ip dscp
mls qos
!
crypto pki trustpoint TP-self-signed-3554231936
enrollment selfsigned
subject-name cn=IOS-Self-Signed-Certificate-3554231936
revocation-check none
rsakeypair TP-self-signed-3554231936
!
spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
spanning-tree portfast bpduguard default
spanning-tree extend system-id
!
port-channel load-balance src-dst-ip
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
vlan 103
name CZ2-IACS
!
vlan 104
name CZ2-Workstation
!
vlan 105
name CZ2-Voice
!
vlan 115
February 2013 Series
38 39 40
50 51 52
60 61 62
46 47 48
27 31
name Management
!
vlan 999
!
ip ssh version 2
!
class-map match-all 1588-PTP-General
match access-group 107
class-map match-all 1588-PTP-Event
match access-group 106
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_any
match access-group 104
class-map match-all CIP-Other
match access-group 105
class-map match-all voip-data
match ip dscp ef
class-map match-all voip-control
match ip dscp cs3
class-map match-all default-data
match access-group name default-data-acl
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_43
match access-group 103
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_55
match access-group 101
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_47
match access-group 102
!
policy-map CIP-PTP-Traffic
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_55
set ip dscp 55
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_47
set ip dscp 47
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_43
set ip dscp 43
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_any
set ip dscp 31
class CIP-Other
Appendix B: Configuration Files
70
set ip dscp 27
class 1588-PTP-Event
set ip dscp 59
class 1588-PTP-General
set ip dscp 47
policy-map Voice-Map
class voip-data
set dscp ef
police 128000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
class voip-control
set dscp cs3
police 32000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
class default-data
set dscp default
police 10000000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
!
macro name CiscoIEPhone
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 25 35 30
priority-queue out
mls qos trust device cisco-phone
mls qos trust cos
service-policy input Voice-Map
@
macro name CiscoEtherNetIP
service-policy input CIP-PTP-Traffic
priority-queue out
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
@
macro name CiscoIEEgress
mls qos trust cos
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
@
!
interface Port-channel1
description EtherChannel link to Distribution Layer
switchport trunk native vlan 999
February 2013 Series
switchport trunk allowed vlan 103-105,115
switchport mode trunk
ip arp inspection trust
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
ip dhcp snooping trust
!
interface FastEthernet0
no ip address
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/0/1
description Cell/Area Zone - IACS Access Port
switchport access vlan 103
switchport mode access
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
macro description CiscoEtherNetIP
storm-control broadcast level 3.00 1.00
spanning-tree portfast
service-policy input CIP-PTP-Traffic
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/0/2
description Cell/Area Zone - Workstation/VoIP Access Port
switchport access vlan 104
switchport mode access
switchport voice vlan 105
switchport port-security maximum 11
switchport port-security
switchport port-security aging time 2
switchport port-security violation restrict
switchport port-security aging type inactivity
ip arp inspection limit rate 100
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 25 35 30
priority-queue out
mls qos trust device cisco-phone
mls qos trust cos
macro description CiscoIEPhone
Appendix B: Configuration Files
71
spanning-tree portfast
service-policy input Voice-Map
ip verify source
ip dhcp snooping limit rate 100
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/0/3
shutdown
!
! *************************************************************
! Interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/4 - 1/0/24 are all configured
! the same as 1/0/3 and have been removed for conciseness
! *************************************************************
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/0/25
description Link to Distribution Layer port 1
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 103-105,115
switchport mode trunk
ip arp inspection trust
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
mls qos trust cos
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 1 mode active
ip dhcp snooping trust
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/0/26
description Link to Distribution Layer port 2
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 103-105,115
switchport mode trunk
ip arp inspection trust
logging event link-status
February 2013 Series
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
mls qos trust cos
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 1 mode active
ip dhcp snooping trust
!
interface TenGigabitEthernet1/0/1
shutdown
!
interface TenGigabitEthernet1/0/2
shutdown
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
!
interface Vlan115
ip address 10.13.15.6 255.255.255.128
!
ip default-gateway 10.13.15.1
no ip http server
ip http authentication aaa
ip http secure-server
!
ip access-list extended default-data-acl
permit ip any any
access-list 101 permit udp any eq 2222 any dscp 55
access-list 102 permit udp any eq 2222 any dscp 47
access-list 103 permit udp any eq 2222 any dscp 43
access-list 104 permit udp any eq 2222 any
access-list 105 permit udp any eq 44818 any
access-list 105 permit tcp any eq 44818 any
access-list 106 permit udp any eq 319 any
access-list 107 permit udp any eq 320 any
Appendix B: Configuration Files
72
snmp-server community cisco RO
snmp-server community cisco123 RW
tacacs server TACACS-SERVER-1
address ipv4 10.13.48.15
key 7 00371605165E1F2D0A38
!
line con 0
line vty 0 4
transport preferred none
transport input ssh
line vty 5 15
transport preferred none
transport input ssh
!
ntp server 10.13.48.17
end
CZ3-3560X-1
version 15.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec localtime
service timestamps log datetime msec localtime
service password-encryption
!
hostname CZ3-3560X-1
!
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 /DtCCr53Q4B18jSIm1UEqu7cNVZTOhxTZyUnZdsSrsw
!
username admin password 7 070C705F4D06485744
aaa new-model
!
aaa group server tacacs+ TACACS-SERVERS
server name TACACS-SERVER-1
!
February 2013 Series
aaa authentication login default group TACACS-SERVERS local
aaa authorization console
aaa authorization exec default group TACACS-SERVERS local
!
aaa session-id common
clock timezone PST -8 0
clock summer-time PDT recurring
system mtu routing 1500
ip arp inspection vlan 107-108
!
ip dhcp snooping vlan 107-108
no ip dhcp snooping information option
ip dhcp snooping
ip domain-name cisco.local
ip name-server 10.13.48.10
vtp mode transparent
udld enable
!
mls qos map policed-dscp 24 27 31 43 46 47 55 59 to 0
mls qos map dscp-cos 9 11 12 13 14 15 to 0
mls qos map dscp-cos 25 26 28 29 30 to 2
mls qos map dscp-cos 40 41 42 44 45 49 50 51 to 4
mls qos map dscp-cos 52 53 54 56 57 58 60 61 to 4
mls qos map dscp-cos 62 63 to 4
mls qos map cos-dscp 0 8 16 27 32 47 55 59
mls qos srr-queue input bandwidth 40 60
mls qos srr-queue input threshold 1 16 66
mls qos srr-queue input threshold 2 34 66
mls qos srr-queue input buffers 40 60
mls qos srr-queue input cos-map queue 1 threshold 2 1
mls qos srr-queue input cos-map queue 1 threshold 3 0 2
mls qos srr-queue input cos-map queue 2 threshold 2 4
mls qos srr-queue input cos-map queue 2 threshold 3 3 5 6 7
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 2 8 10
mls qos srr-queue input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 0 1 2 3 4 5
6 7
Appendix B: Configuration Files
73
mls qos srr-queue
14 15 16 17
mls qos srr-queue
22 23 25 26
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
36 37 38 39
mls qos srr-queue
45 49 50 51
mls qos srr-queue
57 58 60 61
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
46 47 48 55
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
6 7
mls qos srr-queue
14 15 16 17
mls qos srr-queue
22 23 25 26
mls qos srr-queue
33 34 35 36
mls qos srr-queue
41 42 44 45
mls qos srr-queue
53 54 56 57
mls qos srr-queue
63
input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 9 11 12 13
input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 18 19 20 21
input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 28 29 30
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 32 33 34 35
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 40 41 42 44
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 52 53 54 56
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 62 63
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 24 27 31 43
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 59
output cos-map queue 1 threshold 3 7
output cos-map queue 2 threshold 2 1
output cos-map queue 2 threshold 3 0 2 4
output cos-map queue 3 threshold 3 5 6
output cos-map queue 4 threshold 3 3
output dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 59
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 8 10
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 0 1 2 3 4 5
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 9 11 12 13
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 18 19 20 21
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 28 29 30 32
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 37 38 39 40
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 49 50 51 52
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 58 60 61 62
February 2013 Series
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 3 threshold 3 43 46 47 48
55
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 4 threshold 3 24 27 31
mls qos queue-set output 1 buffers 10 25 40 25
no mls qos rewrite ip dscp
mls qos
!
crypto pki trustpoint TP-self-signed-1212907008
enrollment selfsigned
subject-name cn=IOS-Self-Signed-Certificate-1212907008
revocation-check none
rsakeypair TP-self-signed-1212907008
!
cts server deadtime 0
no cts server test all enable
cts server test all idle-time 0
cts server test all deadtime 0
!
spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
spanning-tree portfast bpduguard default
spanning-tree extend system-id
!
port-channel load-balance src-dst-ip
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
vlan 106
name CZ3-IACS
!
vlan 107
name CZ3-Workstation
!
vlan 108
name CZ3-Voice
!
vlan 115
name Management
Appendix B: Configuration Files
74
!
vlan 999
!
ip ssh version 2
!
class-map match-all 1588-PTP-General
match access-group 107
class-map match-all 1588-PTP-Event
match access-group 106
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_any
match access-group 104
class-map match-all CIP-Other
match access-group 105
class-map match-all voip-data
match ip dscp ef
class-map match-all voip-control
match ip dscp cs3
class-map match-all default-data
match access-group name default-data-acl
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_43
match access-group 103
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_55
match access-group 101
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_47
match access-group 102
!
policy-map CIP-PTP-Traffic
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_55
set ip dscp 55
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_47
set ip dscp 47
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_43
set ip dscp 43
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_any
set ip dscp 31
class CIP-Other
set ip dscp 27
February 2013 Series
class 1588-PTP-Event
set ip dscp 59
class 1588-PTP-General
set ip dscp 47
policy-map Voice-Map
class voip-data
set dscp ef
police 128000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
class voip-control
set dscp cs3
police 32000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
class default-data
set dscp default
police 10000000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
!
macro name CiscoIEPhone
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 25 35 30
priority-queue out
mls qos trust device cisco-phone
mls qos trust cos
service-policy input Voice-Map
@
macro name CiscoEtherNetIP
service-policy input CIP-PTP-Traffic
priority-queue out
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
@
macro name CiscoIEEgress
mls qos trust cos
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
@
!
interface Port-channel1
description EtherChannel link to Distribution Layer
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
switchport trunk native vlan 999
Appendix B: Configuration Files
75
switchport trunk allowed vlan 106-108,115
switchport mode trunk
ip arp inspection trust
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
ip dhcp snooping trust
!
interface FastEthernet0
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/1
description Cell/Area Zone - IACS Access Port
switchport access vlan 106
switchport mode access
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
macro description CiscoEtherNetIP
storm-control broadcast level 3.00 1.00
spanning-tree portfast
service-policy input CIP-PTP-Traffic
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/2
description Cell/Area Zone - Workstation/VoIP Access Port
switchport access vlan 107
switchport mode access
switchport voice vlan 108
switchport port-security maximum 11
switchport port-security
switchport port-security aging time 2
switchport port-security violation restrict
switchport port-security aging type inactivity
ip arp inspection limit rate 100
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 25 35 30
priority-queue out
mls qos trust device cisco-phone
mls qos trust cos
February 2013 Series
macro description CiscoIEPhone
spanning-tree portfast
service-policy input Voice-Map
ip verify source
ip dhcp snooping limit rate 100
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/3
shutdown
!
! *************************************************************
! Interface GigabitEthernet 0/4 - 0/5 are all configured
! the same as 0/3 and have been removed for conciseness
! *************************************************************
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/1
description Link to Distribution Layer port 1
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 106-108,115
switchport mode trunk
ip arp inspection trust
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
mls qos trust cos
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 1 mode active
ip dhcp snooping trust
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/2
description Link to Distribution Layer port 2
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 106-108,115
Appendix B: Configuration Files
76
switchport mode trunk
ip arp inspection trust
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
mls qos trust cos
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 1 mode active
ip dhcp snooping trust
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/3
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/4
shutdown
!
interface TenGigabitEthernet1/1
shutdown
!
interface TenGigabitEthernet1/2
shutdown
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
shutdown
!
interface Vlan115
ip address 10.13.15.7 255.255.255.128
!
ip default-gateway 10.13.15.1
no ip http server
ip http authentication aaa
ip http secure-server
!
February 2013 Series
ip access-list extended default-data-acl
permit ip any any
access-list 101 permit udp any eq 2222 any dscp 55
access-list 102 permit udp any eq 2222 any dscp 47
access-list 103 permit udp any eq 2222 any dscp 43
access-list 104 permit udp any eq 2222 any
access-list 105 permit udp any eq 44818 any
access-list 105 permit tcp any eq 44818 any
access-list 106 permit udp any eq 319 any
access-list 107 permit udp any eq 320 any
snmp-server community cisco RO
snmp-server community cisco123 RW
tacacs server TACACS-SERVER-1
address ipv4 10.13.48.15
key 7 113A1C0605171F270133
!
line con 0
line vty 0 4
transport preferred none
transport input ssh
line vty 5 15
transport preferred none
transport input ssh
!
ntp server 10.13.48.17
end
Server Room Configuration
SR-3750X
version 15.0
no service pad
service timestamps debug datetime msec localtime
service timestamps log datetime msec localtime
service password-encryption
!
hostname SR-3750X
!
Appendix B: Configuration Files
77
boot-start-marker
boot-end-marker
!
enable secret 4 /DtCCr53Q4B18jSIm1UEqu7cNVZTOhxTZyUnZdsSrsw
!
username admin password 7 04585A150C2E1D1C5A
aaa new-model
!
aaa group server tacacs+ TACACS-SERVERS
server name TACACS-SERVER-1
!
aaa authentication login default group TACACS-SERVERS local
aaa authorization console
aaa authorization exec default group TACACS-SERVERS local
!
aaa session-id common
clock timezone PST -8 0
clock summer-time PDT recurring
switch 1 provision ws-c3750x-24
switch 2 provision ws-c3750x-24
stack-mac persistent timer 0
system mtu routing 1500
!
ip domain-name cisco.local
ip name-server 10.13.48.10
vtp mode transparent
udld enable
!
mls qos map policed-dscp 24 27 31 43 46 47 55 59 to 0
mls qos map dscp-cos 9 11 12 13 14 15 to 0
mls qos map dscp-cos 25 26 28 29 30 to 2
mls qos map dscp-cos 40 41 42 44 45 49 50 51 to 4
mls qos map dscp-cos 52 53 54 56 57 58 60 61 to 4
mls qos map dscp-cos 62 63 to 4
mls qos map cos-dscp 0 8 16 27 32 47 55 59
mls qos srr-queue input bandwidth 40 60
mls qos srr-queue input threshold 1 16 66
February 2013 Series
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
6 7
mls qos srr-queue
14 15 16 17
mls qos srr-queue
22 23 25 26
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
36 37 38 39
mls qos srr-queue
45 49 50 51
mls qos srr-queue
57 58 60 61
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
46 47 48 55
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
mls qos srr-queue
6 7
mls qos srr-queue
14 15 16 17
mls qos srr-queue
22 23 25 26
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
input
threshold 2 34 66
buffers 40 60
cos-map queue 1 threshold 2 1
cos-map queue 1 threshold 3 0 2
cos-map queue 2 threshold 2 4
cos-map queue 2 threshold 3 3 5 6 7
dscp-map queue 1 threshold 2 8 10
dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 0 1 2 3 4 5
input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 9 11 12 13
input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 18 19 20 21
input dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 28 29 30
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 32 33 34 35
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 40 41 42 44
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 52 53 54 56
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 62 63
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 24 27 31 43
input dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 59
output cos-map queue 1 threshold 3 7
output cos-map queue 2 threshold 2 1
output cos-map queue 2 threshold 3 0 2 4
output cos-map queue 3 threshold 3 5 6
output cos-map queue 4 threshold 3 3
output dscp-map queue 1 threshold 3 59
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 2 8 10
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 0 1 2 3 4 5
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 9 11 12 13
output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 18 19 20 21
Appendix B: Configuration Files
78
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 28
33 34 35 36
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 37
41 42 44 45
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 49
53 54 56 57
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 2 threshold 3 58
63
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 3 threshold 3 43
55
mls qos srr-queue output dscp-map queue 4 threshold 3 24
mls qos queue-set output 1 buffers 10 25 40 25
no mls qos rewrite ip dscp
mls qos
!
crypto pki trustpoint TP-self-signed-157229824
enrollment selfsigned
subject-name cn=IOS-Self-Signed-Certificate-157229824
revocation-check none
rsakeypair TP-self-signed-157229824
!
cts server deadtime 0
no cts server test all enable
cts server test all idle-time 0
cts server test all deadtime 0
!
spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst
spanning-tree portfast bpduguard default
spanning-tree extend system-id
!
port-channel load-balance src-dst-ip
!
vlan internal allocation policy ascending
!
vlan 115
name Management
!
February 2013 Series
29 30 32
38 39 40
50 51 52
60 61 62
46 47 48
27 31
vlan 148
name Server_VLAN_1
!
vlan 149
name Server_VLAN_2
!
vlan 999
!
ip ssh version 2
!
class-map match-all 1588-PTP-General
match access-group 107
class-map match-all 1588-PTP-Event
match access-group 106
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_any
match access-group 104
class-map match-all CIP-Other
match access-group 105
class-map match-all voip-data
match ip dscp ef
class-map match-all voip-control
match ip dscp cs3
class-map match-all default-data
match access-group name default-data-acl
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_43
match access-group 103
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_55
match access-group 101
class-map match-all CIP-Implicit_dscp_47
match access-group 102
!
policy-map CIP-PTP-Traffic
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_55
set ip dscp 55
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_47
set ip dscp 47
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_43
Appendix B: Configuration Files
79
set ip dscp 43
class CIP-Implicit_dscp_any
set ip dscp 31
class CIP-Other
set ip dscp 27
class 1588-PTP-Event
set ip dscp 59
class 1588-PTP-General
set ip dscp 47
policy-map Voice-Map
class voip-data
set dscp ef
police 128000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
class voip-control
set dscp cs3
police 32000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
class default-data
set dscp default
police 10000000 8000 exceed-action policed-dscp-transmit
!
macro name CiscoIEEgress
mls qos trust cos
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
@
macro name CiscoEtherNetIP
service-policy input CIP-PTP-Traffic
priority-queue out
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
@
!
interface Port-channel1
description EtherChannel Link to Distribution
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 115,148,149
switchport mode trunk
February 2013 Series
logging event link-status
!
interface FastEthernet0
no ip address
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/0/1
switchport access vlan 148
switchport mode access
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
macro description CiscoEtherNetIP
spanning-tree portfast
service-policy input CIP-PTP-Traffic
!
! *************************************************************
! Interface GigabitEthernet 1/0/2 - 1/0/24 are all configured
! the same as 1/0/1 and have been removed for conciseness
! *************************************************************
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/1/1
description Link to Distribution port 1
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 115,148,149
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
mls qos trust cos
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 1 mode active
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/1/2
shutdown
Appendix B: Configuration Files
80
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/1/3
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet1/1/4
shutdown
!
interface TenGigabitEthernet1/1/1
shutdown
!
interface TenGigabitEthernet1/1/2
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet2/0/1
switchport access vlan 148
switchport mode access
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
priority-queue out
macro description CiscoEtherNetIP
spanning-tree portfast
service-policy input CIP-PTP-Traffic
!
! *************************************************************
! Interface GigabitEthernet 2/0/2 - 2/0/24 are all configured
! the same as 2/0/1 and have been removed for conciseness
! *************************************************************
!
interface GigabitEthernet2/1/1
description Link to Distribution port 2
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
switchport trunk native vlan 999
switchport trunk allowed vlan 115,148,149
switchport mode trunk
logging event link-status
logging event trunk-status
logging event bundle-status
srr-queue bandwidth share 1 19 40 40
February 2013 Series
priority-queue out
mls qos trust cos
macro description CiscoIEEgress
channel-protocol lacp
channel-group 1 mode active
!
interface GigabitEthernet2/1/2
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet2/1/3
shutdown
!
interface GigabitEthernet2/1/4
shutdown
!
interface TenGigabitEthernet2/1/1
shutdown
!
interface TenGigabitEthernet2/1/2
shutdown
!
interface Vlan1
no ip address
!
interface Vlan115
ip address 10.13.15.50 255.255.255.128
!
ip default-gateway 10.13.15.1
no ip http server
ip http authentication aaa
ip http secure-server
!
ip access-list extended default-data-acl
permit ip any any
access-list 101 permit udp any eq 2222 any dscp 55
access-list 102 permit udp any eq 2222 any dscp 47
access-list 103 permit udp any eq 2222 any dscp 43
Appendix B: Configuration Files
81
access-list 104 permit udp any
access-list 105 permit udp any
access-list 105 permit tcp any
access-list 106 permit udp any
access-list 107 permit udp any
snmp-server community cisco RO
snmp-server community cisco123
tacacs server TACACS-SERVER-1
address ipv4 10.13.48.15
key 7 13361211190910012E3D
!
line con 0
line vty 0 4
transport preferred none
transport input ssh
line vty 5 15
transport preferred none
transport input ssh
!
ntp server 10.13.48.17
end
February 2013 Series
eq
eq
eq
eq
eq
2222 any
44818 any
44818 any
319 any
320 any
RW
Appendix B: Configuration Files
82
Feedback
Please use the feedback form to send comments
and suggestions about this guide.
SMART BUSINESS ARCHITECTURE
Americas Headquarters
Cisco Systems, Inc.
San Jose, CA
Asia Pacific Headquarters
Cisco Systems (USA) Pte. Ltd.
Singapore
Europe Headquarters
Cisco Systems International BV Amsterdam,
The Netherlands
Cisco has more than 200 offices worldwide. Addresses, phone numbers, and fax numbers are listed on the Cisco Website at www.cisco.com/go/offices.
ALL DESIGNS, SPECIFICATIONS, STATEMENTS, INFORMATION, AND RECOMMENDATIONS (COLLECTIVELY, “DESIGNS”) IN THIS MANUAL ARE PRESENTED “AS IS,” WITH ALL FAULTS. CISCO AND ITS SUPPLiERS DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT OR ARISING FROM A COURSE OF DEALING, USAGE, OR TRADE PRACTICE. IN NO EVENT SHALL CISCO OR ITS SUPPLIERS BE LIABLE
FOR ANY INDIRECT, SPECIAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, LOST PROFITS OR LOSS OR DAMAGE TO DATA ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THE DESIGNS, EVEN IF CISCO OR ITS SUPPLIERS
HAVE BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. THE DESIGNS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. USERS ARE SOLELY RESPONSIBLE FOR THEIR APPLICATION OF THE DESIGNS. THE DESIGNS DO NOT CONSTITUTE THE TECHNICAL
OR OTHER PROFESSIONAL ADVICE OF CISCO, ITS SUPPLIERS OR PARTNERS. USERS SHOULD CONSULT THEIR OWN TECHNICAL ADVISORS BEFORE IMPLEMENTING THE DESIGNS. RESULTS MAY VARY DEPENDING ON FACTORS NOT TESTED BY CISCO.
Any Internet Protocol (IP) addresses used in this document are not intended to be actual addresses. Any examples, command display output, and figures included in the document are shown for illustrative purposes only. Any use of actual IP addresses in illustrative content
is unintentional and coincidental.
© 2013 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
Cisco and the Cisco logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cisco and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. To view a list of Cisco trademarks, go to this URL: www.cisco.com/go/trademarks. Third-party trademarks mentioned are the property of their
respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company. (1110R)
B-0000168-1 2/13
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement