Siemens | CP 1515 | Mobile communications for industrial applications

Product Brief
Mobile communications
for industrial applications
The key to market success in the future
can be found in the provision and availability of information at every location
and at all times. Mobile devices networked using fast, wireless LANs permit
processes to be designed significantly
more efficiently. The advantage of wireless solutions is primarily the simple,
flexible accessibility of mobile stations.
The MOBIC (Mobile Industrial Communicator), RLM (Radio Link Module) and
CP 1515 from SIMATIC NET are industry-compatible products which open up
the advantages of mobile communications for industrial applications.
MOBIC ® is a mobile Internet pad for
local or global access to the intranet and
Internet. Plug-in radio cards make the
MOBIC mobile for data access locally
and at all times. It is industry-compatible thanks to its particularly rugged
splash-proof and dust-tight design.
The RLM is a wireless LAN access point
with which data communication is possible up to 11 Mbit/s, as well as being
free-of-charge and safe. With its rugged
metal housing it is appropriate for
industrial applications.
The CP 1515 communications processor
is a PCMCIA card of type II and is used
both as the radio interface in the RLM
and as the radio interface in the mobile
stations (e.g. MOBIC). The CP 1515 permits communication free-of-charge at a
maximum transfer rate of 11 Mbit/s.
Together with the RLM access point and
the CP 1515 PCMCIA card, the MOBIC is
a solution for a wireless LAN in industrial applications.
Wireless communications: the options
Wireless communications is always a
good choice if stations are difficult to
connect to a wired infrastructure.
Such applications include mobile data
acquisition in production and logistics,
the transmission of service data to
mobile terminals, or the commissioning
of complex plants using radio-connected programming devices.
A further aspect in favor of the use of
mobile communications is the replacement of wired solutions in order, for
example, to eliminate the problem of
electrical isolation of widely remote
communications equipment.
Furthermore, mobile communications
can save expensive, time-consuming
installation of infrastructure in the case
of temporary plants or flexible production plants.
Basic prerequisites for mobile, industrial
communications equipment – in
addition to wireless connection to the
network – include simple operation,
compact design, and the ruggedness
required by harsh industrial environments.
RLM
SIMATIC S7
MOBIC
RLM
SIMATIC S7
Fig. 1:
Seamless integration into existing infrastructure
2
2
2
Possible applications with MOBIC
MOBIC for servicing
Service personnel are provided with
fault signals by means of the MOBIC.
In addition, specific information can be
passed on to the service personnel to
facilitate faster troubleshooting. Spare
parts can be ordered online, and customers can be informed of accurate
delivery dates. For example, maintenance jobs can be directly stored and
planned in the central maintenance
management system from the place of
action. Furthermore, the inventories of
stores can be examined, spare parts
ordered, and documentation viewed for
handling or repair instructions.
· Receive and acknowledge jobs online
· Spare parts lists and manuals are
accessible online
· Call updates from server
· Access to worldwide service data
· Select up-to-date circuit diagrams
from central server
MOBIC e.g. for security services
MOBIC supports security authorities in
their daily mobile operations. Whether
trade vehicles, police squad cars, fire
services vehicles, ambulances or emergency doctor’s vehicles – during mobile
operations, data are exchanged by
radio, and processed locally in the
vehicle. MOBIC can display more information than was previously possible
using short texts in the radio signalling
system. Instead of just 99 characters,
access is possible to databases, networks based on a closed Web, and all
data of a central server.
Calculation of costs and billing for
health insurance companies are carried
out directly following input of data to
the MOBIC. Or you can transmit the data
occurring during a shift to a central
computer for description of the event
and calculation of costs in the control
centers for rescue services or doctors.
Mobile
documentation
Service
Visualization
Diagnostics
Planning
Mobile
data input
Fig. 2:
Possible applications with MOBIC
Police officers can use MOBIC online
and locally to process accidents, to
document them, and transmit the data
to the control center.
Fire services can call the data for hazardous goods from the database, or store
operations directly in the MOBIC.
MOBIC is a rugged device appropriate
for harsh use by safety services on site.
3
3
3
Possible applications with MOBIC
MOBIC for production
MOBIC can of course be used for efficient planning of servicing, a large field
of application in production plants.
There are many further applications. In
production plants, the technician is provided with servicing data on the local
machine from a remote control station.
All information required for troubleshooting can be called locally. In this
manner, many situations can be analyzed faster, and down times minimized.
In the case of flexible production systems, down times and the associated
reasons are recorded by the production
staff using MOBIC. Faults and their
causes are automatically evaluated in
the central information system.
In the same manner, MOBIC can be used
to record machine data in a simple manner, and transmit them immediately to a
central server where they are directly
evaluated. This is particularly meaningful with plants where automatic recording of machine statuses is non-economic. The result is that plant responses
can be improved, and vacant machine
capacities utilized better.
In the quality assurance sector, for
example, faults in a paint shop can be
entered online using MOBIC in a representation of the vehicle. When reworking, these quality data can also be called
online and processed specifically.
This guarantees interruption-free
recording of the quality data.
· Visualization of process data without
being bound to a fixed location
· Online documentation also in areas
which were previously difficult to
access
· Commissioning with optimized time
and personnel requirements
· All fault and alarm systems can be
viewed independent of the location,
even with large plants and machines
· Fast local analysis of situation
· Minimization of down times
Fig. 3:
Possible applications with MOBIC
MOBIC for logistics
The relatively high data transfer rate
and range of industry-compatible wireless LAN components means that fast
networks with blanket coverage can be
produced for a location or hall. For
example, mobile devices with barcode
readers can be used in a warehouse
directly at the shelf or truck to immediately record incoming and outgoing
goods.
In addition to this, inventories can be
examined, new stock ordered, and handling documents viewed and processed
online. Central databases can be permanently kept up to date using MOBIC,
with low effort and reduced paper
requirements.
· Planning of resources
· Display of delivery notes
· Input of incoming/outgoing goods
· Control system for high-lift trucks
· Navigation/GPS
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4
4
Possible applications with MOBIC
Linking of mobile communications
into existing
Wireless LAN components can be integrated without problem into existing
Ethernet LANs using an RJ45 connection.
The RLM access point can be used for
stand-alone operation, and is mainly
connected to a wired Ethernet network.
By connecting several RLMs, a wireless
network is produced for mobile stations.
When using several RLMs whose ranges
overlap, it can be guaranteed that communications to mobile stations remains
possible. This is achieved by passing on
the communications connection from
one access point to the next (roaming).
Web-based network management
with MOBIC and OSM/ESM
Network management can be carried
out extremely conveniently with MOBIC
using browsers. An RLM is connected to
an existing Industrial Ethernet, e.g.
using an optical switch module (OSM)
or electrical switch module (ESM).
The RLM implements the wireless communications to the MOBIC.
The OSM or ESM has the following functions for network management:
· Locally on the module:
Via the CLI (Command Line Interface):
serial interface and PC with terminal
emulation
· Remote via browser
(Web-based management):
Selection of OSM or ESM via the
network from a PC with browser
· Remote via SNMP:
Linking of OSM or ESM via the
network to a network management
station
For the mobile
intranet/Internet
access
PCMCIA card
Wireless LAN
S7-400 with
CP 443-1 IT
S7-300 with
CP 343-1 IT
RLM
ISDN-router
Internet access/
intranet server
Fig. 4:
DP/EIB Link
Linking of existing infrastructures with MOBIC
Mobile network
management
station with
Web browser
Applet of
addressed
components
Stationary network
management station
with Web browser
Wireless LAN
RLM
Fig. 5:
Web-based management with MOBIC and OSM
Access of management station to
network nodes to be
monitored
5
Vertical integration with MOBIC
MOBIC as a mobile terminal permits an integrated flow
of information from the operations management level
down to the production level.
This guarantees that information is provided rapidly, securely
and in an uncomplicated manner at the right place and
at the right time.
ERP, e.g.
SAP, BAAN,
Peoplesoft
Wireless LAN
RLM
Router
Workstation
Wireless LAN
RLM
Router
HMI,
e.g. WinCC
S7-400 with
CP 443-1 IT
Wireless LAN
RLM
S7-300 with
CP 343-1 IT
S7-300 with
CP 342- 5
IE/PB link
ET 200 distributed
I/O system
Fig. 6:
6
Integrated flow of information from the operations management level down to the process control level
e.g. using MOBIC and thin client applications
Thin client applications
Terminal service with Windows 2000
The principle of thin client/server computing is based on the fundamental
physical separation of data, applications
and screen output.
The terminal services of Windows 2000
permit execution of specialized sites such
as Internet pads as thin client applications or typical office applications in the
main memory of a central Windows 2000
terminal server instead of in their own
memory.
Clients are operated as terminals in the
process which are only used to enter data
(using keyboard and mouse) and send
these on to a terminal server. The latter
carries out the actual processing (e.g. the
updating of a process display) in order to
send the resulting screen output back to
the client PC which in turn is then responsible for display on its screen.
Fig. 7:
Advantages
· Remote multi-user solutions with any
client target systems
· Clients as desired: robust and mobile
· Server in secure environment
· Central software administration
· High performance even with simple client hardware
· Simple expansion possible at any time
The clients can be used even under
extremely harsh conditions (vibration,
high temperature, splashing water, dust)
since they do not require a hard disk or
fan. If a client has to be replaced, this can
be carried out within an extremely short
time. A physical connection between a
new, non-configured thin client and the
network is required for this. The current
session on the server can be taken over
without interruption.
Mobile equipment such as the MOBIC is
suitable as the client platform. This can
be linked using various media e.g.
twisted pair Ethernet (10/100 Mbit/s),
wireless LAN, or mobile radio.
Thin client applications with WinCC as example
Shopfloor
RLM
RLM
MOBIC
S7-300
S7-400
MOBIC
Fig. 8:
Cross-factory solution with separate Web and terminal servers
7
Products for mobile communications
MOBIC Internet pad
The MOBIC (Mobile Industrial Communicator) as a mobile, industry-compatible Internet pad permits location-independent access to central information.
Access to the data is possible via Web
browsers, thin clients or application
programs.
In this manner, information e.g. from
the intranet/Internet, can be displayed,
and mobile recording of data is also possible.
The mobile link is via a wireless LAN
(IEEE802.11b) or GSM.
In the case of the wireless LAN, MOBIC
communicates in the plant with wireless LAN access points (e.g. RLMs) via
the PCMCIA card.
The MOBIC has the following configuration:
· A PCMCIA radio interface permits linking to wireless local networks, e.g. to
the CP 1515 communications processor.
· A second PCMCIA connection for a
GSM module is available to make
MOBIC also appropriate for wireless
WANs.
The PCMCIA connection is also suitable for I/O devices such as barcode
readers or memory expansion cards.
· Windows CE Web browser and Java
Virtual Machine can be used for dialling into the local intranet or also into
the World Wide Web in order to call
information such as process data,
diagnostics data, circuit diagrams,
building plans, working instructions
or product information, or to pass on
data recorded locally.
8
Fig. 9:
MOBIC Internet pad
Products for mobile communications
CP 1515 communications processor
The CP 1515 is a PCMCIA card of type II,
and is used as a radio interface both in
the RLM and in the mobile stations,
e.g. MOBIC, SIMATIC Field PG.
Advantages of CP 1515
· Data communications free-of-charge
in the 2.4 GHz ISM band
· Standardized, replaceable radio technology (PCMCIA card) according to
IEEE 802.11b
· High data throughput with transmission rates up to 11 Mbit/s
· Worldwide use with comprehensive
radio approvals (country-specific
operating conditions must be
observed)
· Simple integration of mobile stations
in production assemblies
· Simple installation
· Tested in the SIMATIC TIA environment
· Simple assembly and commissioning
· Noise-insensitive reception characteristic resulting from antenna diversity
· Safe data transmission with 128 bit
data coding
· Tested with MOBIC and SIMATIC Field
PG
Fig. 10: CP 1515 communications processor
9
Products for mobile communications
RLM radio link module
The RLM access point is responsible on
the one hand for managing the radio
connection to the CP 1515, and, on the
other, for establishing the connection to
a local network. The RLM can be configured using the configuration tool "AP
manager".
Advantages of RLM
· Tested in the TIA environment
· Safe investment resulting from
standardized, replaceable radio technology (PCMCIA card) according to
IEEE 802.11b
· Rugged metal housing
· Simple assembly and commissioning
using comprehensive installation
tools
· Noise-insensitive reception characteristic resulting from antenna diversity
· Safe data transmission with 128 bit
data coding
· Data communications free-of-charge
in the 2.4 GHz ISM band
· High data throughput with transmission rates up to 11 Mbit/s
· Worldwide use with comprehensive
radio approvals (country-specific
operating conditions must be
observed)
· Simple integration of mobile stations
in production assemblies
· Permits increase of bandwidth and
redundant communication by inserting two CP 1515 modules
Fig. 11: RLM radio link module
10
Wireless technologies
Frequency ranges
In contrast to copper or fiber-optic
TYPE
cables, wireless transmission processes
use air as the transmission link.
The propagation conditions of electro1 Mbit/s
9.6
Data transfer
11 Mbit/s
kbit/s
rate
magnetic waves in air vary considerably
depending on the room properties and
the wavelength of the electromagnetic
Yes
Yes
Yes
radiation.
Available
PCMCIA
PCMCIA
PCMCIA
State-of-the-art modules use techniques such as antenna diversity and
high-performance receivers in order to
prevent interruptions in radio traffic.
Above
Distance
From approx.
Up to approx.
approx.
30 m to 300 m
10 m
A further aspect is that air is used gener300 m
ally as the transmission link. This necesFig. 12: Technical specifications of the various radio systems
sitates the assignment of various frequency ranges for specific applications,
limitation of the maximum permissible
transmission power, and selection of
specific transmission procedures.
A differentiation is made in the frequency ranges of wireless technologies
between:
· Personal Area Network (PAN) up to
Wireless LAN,
approx. 10 m radius
IEEE 802.11 b
Bluetooth
· Local Area Network (LAN) up to
approx. 30 m to 300 m radius and
· Wide Area Network (WAN).
Current wireless networks such as WireDepending on
less LAN according to IEEE 802.11b and
environment
Bluetooth use frequency ranges in the
so-called ISM bands (Industrial, Medical,
Scientific Band). Data transfer rates up
to 11 Mbit/s can be currently implemented using the modulation procedures selected there.
Up to approx.
Personal Area
Network (PAN)
Above approx.
Up to approx.
Local Area
Network (LAN)
Up to
42 kbit/s
Up to
42 kbit/s
Up to
2 Mbit/s
Yes
PCMCIA
Yes
PCMCIA
In the
future
Above
approx.
300 m
Above
approx.
300 m
Above
approx.
300 m
GSM, HSCSD,
GPRS, UMTS
Above 300 m
Wide Area
Network (WAN)
Fig. 13: Wireless networks for different application areas
11
Wireless technologies
Wireless networks
Bluetooth
Bluetooth is a Personal Area Network
(PAN) and operates in the 2.4 GHz band
with a data transfer rate of 1 Mbit/s.
The range is limited to 10 m. This range,
together with the limited data transfer
rate, mean that Bluetooth is currently
only suitable for industrial wireless
LANs to a very limited extent.
Wireless LAN
Wireless LAN (WLAN) is a local radio
network operating in the 2.4 GHz frequency band. WLAN products are based
on the IEEE 802.11b standard with data
transfer rates from 1 Mbit/s to 11 Mbit/s.
The radio network is connected to a
local Ethernet network using WLAN
access points.
The access points transmit information
within a radius of 30-300 m depending
on the building properties.
Outside buildings, the transmission
ranges can be significantly increased
using dimensional antennae. WLAN
does not require a direct visible link
between the devices. Communications
links can be passed on from one access
point to the next (roaming). This means
that even large ranges can be covered
using WLAN.
GSM, HSCSD, GPRS and UMTS
These networks were primarily developed for mobile telephones. These networks therefore enable connections
extending beyond countries and continents.
The differences to wireless LANs are the
lower data transfer rate, and that
charges are made for connections or the
transmitted data quantity.
12
Fig. 14: Comparison between wired LAN and wireless LAN
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13
Glossary
Glossar
Abbreviations, terms
Explanations
Access point
Wireless LANs can be connected to wired Ethernet networks via access points. In
addition, the range of individual wireless LAN components can be extended by this
device.
Antenna diversity
Radio receivers equipped with two antennae, permitting the receiver to select one of
two received signals.
DSSS
Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum.
Transmission procedure also used by devices compatible to IEEE 802.11b. One bit of
the useful signal is transmitted as a code word, corresponding to multiplication
(spreading) of the transmission rate.
ESD
Electrostatic discharge
ERP
Enterprise Resource Planning, z.B. SAP R3, Peoplesoft, BAAN
ESM
Electrical Switch Module; electrical network component for Industrial Ethernet with
switching functions of SIMATIC NET.
GPRS
General packet radio service on the basis of GSM channels, permits fast communication with high data transfer rates, and is primarily of interest for mobile Internet
access.
GPS
Satellite-based global positioning system. Using three of the total of 24 satellites,
a GPS receiver can be exactly located worldwide. GPS receivers are usually incorporated in navigation systems.
IEEE
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
IEEE 802.11
Standard for radio networks in the 2.4 GHz range with transmission rates up to 2 Mbit/s.
IEEE 802.11a
Standard for radio networks in the 5 GHz range with transmission rates up to 54 Mbit/s.
IEEE 802.11b
Standard for radio networks in the 2.4 GHz range with transmission rates up to 11 Mbit/s.
ISM-Band
Industrial, Scientific and Medical Band approved for use of wireless LAN applications.
LAN
Local Area Network.
OSM
Optical Switch Module; optical network component for Industrial Ethernet with
switching functions of SIMATIC NET.
PAN
Personal Area Network, comparable with an ad hoc network for small individual
devices close to one another.
14
Glossary
Abbreviations, terms
Explanations
PCMCIA
Standard for PC plug-in cards (credit card size). PCMCIA cards (Personal Computer
Memory Card International Association) are primarily used for input/output
(e.g. modem) and memory expansions.
RLM
Radio Link Module; wireless LAN access point of SIMATIC NET.
Roaming
Property of wireless LAN systems which permits free movement of wireless LAN
stations even beyond the limits of the radio cell of an access point. The station can
transfer from one radio cell to the next without a noticeable interruption if better
transmission properties exist with the latter.
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol; standardized protocol for transport of
network management information.
Thin Client
Client computer operating in a server network. The thin client has direct access to the
data and applications of all servers of the network. The applications are executed on
the server, and are only "visualized" on the thin client.
TIA
Totally Integrated Automation; Siemens system for uniform configuring/programming, data management and communications.
Touch-Screen
The touch-sensitive screen of the MOBIC which recognizes the touched position on
the surface (usually made using a pen) and which converts it into the desired action
(e.g. movement of cursor).
USB
Standard for connection of I/O devices. USB (Universal Serial Bus) supports relatively
high data transmission rates, and can be used to connect several devices to one
single computer.
UMTS
Universal Mobile Telecommunications System, standard for mobile voice, audio,
picture, video and data communications at a transmission rate up to 2 Mbit/s.
WAN
Wide Area Network; data network with a diameter of more than 50 km.
WinCC
Open process visualization system for operation and monitoring of SIMATIC HMI.
Wireless WAN
Communication between stations carried out by the transmission of electromagnetic
waves through the air.
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Further information
Visit our SIMATIC NET home page
on the Internet
Ordering information
MOBIC T8
6GK1 611-. . . . .
CP 1515 communications processor
6GK1 151-. . . . .
RLM radio link module
6GK1 110-. . . . .
Industrial Ethernet OSM ITP62
6GK1 105-. . . . .
Industrial Ethernet OSM TP62
6GK1 105-. . . . .
Industrial Ethernet OSM ITP62-LD
6GK1 105-. . . . .
Industrial Ethernet OSM ITP53
6GK1 105-. . . . .
Industrial Ethernet ESM ITP80
6GK1 105-. . . . .
Industrial Ethernet ESM TP80
6GK1 105-. . . . .
www.siemens.de/automation/simatic-net
There you will find information on products and solutions, news on SIMATIC
NET, as well as events and professional
publications.
Read all about MOBIC at:
www.siemens.com/mobic
All designations marked in this Product Brief with ®
are registered trademarks of Siemens AG.
Siemens Aktiengesellschaft
Automation and Drives
SIMATIC NET Industrial Communications
P.O. Box 4848, D-90327 Nuremberg
Order No. 6ZB5 530-1AK02-0BA1
Printed in the Federal Republic of Germany
26000/201558 SB 0602 4.
© Siemens AG 2002
Subject to change without prior
notice
www.siemens.com/automation
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