Dell | POWEREDGE R515 | MIGRATING TO A DELL POWEREDGE R515 SERVER FROM TWO

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
PERFORMANCE COMPARISON
TCO/ROI COMPARISON
HOW-TO GUIDE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Table of contents .................................................................................. 2
Executive summary ............................................................................... 3
Why consider migrating to SQL Server 2008 R2 on a Dell
PowerEdge R515? ..................................................................... 4
Features of the new Dell PowerEdge R515 .............................. 4
Features of Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 and Microsoft
SQL Server 2008 R2 ................................................................... 5
Consolidation with Dell technology simplifies and adds features ........ 6
The power of consolidation ...................................................... 6
We show you how: Preparing for the move ......................................... 9
Evaluating your databases ........................................................ 9
Configuring your internal storage ........................................... 10
Installing Windows Server 2008 R2 and enabling the Hyper-V
role .......................................................................................... 11
Creating your virtual machines ............................................... 12
Installing SQL Server 2008 R2 on your virtual machines ........ 13
We show you how: Making the move ................................................ 16
Upgrade Advisor makes it easy ............................................... 16
Side-by-side migration ............................................................ 19
We show you how: After the move .................................................... 23
Logins and dependencies ........................................................ 23
Summing it all up ................................................................................ 26
Appendix A – Example database survey ............................................. 27
Appendix B – Preparing the storage ................................................... 29
Appendix C – Installing windows and enabling Hyper-V .................... 30
Appendix D – Creating virtual machines............................................. 32
Appendix E – Installing SQL Server 2008 R2 ....................................... 34
Appendix F – Installing Upgrade Advisor ............................................ 36
Appendix G – Migrating databases ..................................................... 38
Backing up a SQL Server 2000 database ................................. 38
Backing up a SQL Server 2005 database ................................. 39
Restoring a database to SQL Server 2008 R2.......................... 40
Appendix H – Transferring Windows logins........................................ 42
Appendix I – Transferring SQL Server logins ....................................... 43
Mapping transferred logins to database users ....................... 43
About Principled Technologies ........................................................... 45
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Our hypothetical SMB replacing
multiple older HP servers with a
single Dell PowerEdge R515
server running Microsoft SQL
Server 2008 R2 benefits in
several ways:
• Significant performance
increase
• Total cost of investment
(TCO) and return on
investment (ROI) within 19
months
• Easy migration process
This report addresses the ease
of the migration process. To
learn more about performance
increase, see our performance
report. To learn more about the
TCO and ROI, see our TCO/ROI
report.
Small to medium businesses (SMBs) with legacy database servers,
such as older HP ProLiant systems, often find themselves running out
of capacity and at a decision point: Do they continue with the status
quo, almost guaranteeing increased hardware failures and lost
revenue and time, or do they migrate to newer and more powerful
servers? With the release of the Dell PowerEdge R515 and the power
of Microsoft’s Hyper-V™ and SQL Server technologies, the choice is
easy for the SMB market: upgrading to the Dell PowerEdge R515 is
simple, cost-effective, and results in better performance with more
room for growth.
This Principled Technologies® (PT) Guide explains the process for
consolidating an existing two-server installation onto a single Dell
PowerEdge R515 (see Figure 1) and upgrading a legacy
heterogeneous SQL Server 2000 and SQL Server 2005 environment to
a unified Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 platform. We provide
concepts and procedures that will help you successfully consolidate
database instances from multiple older servers onto a single
Microsoft Windows Server® 2008 R2 system running Hyper-V, with
virtual machines (VMs) running SQL Server 2008 R2.
Figure 1. The new Dell PowerEdge R515 server.
In the sections that follow, we discuss some of the new features of
the servers and software, give an overview of the consolidation and
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migration process, and discuss post-migration considerations. The
appendices to the Guide give detailed, step-by-step information on
how to do the migration.
NOTE: Those with more complex configurations, special
requirements, or the desire to avoid doing the migration themselves
may wish to investigate the consulting services Microsoft and Dell
offer.
Why consider migrating to SQL Server 2008 R2 on a Dell PowerEdge R515?
Because any migration requires an investment of time, it should
deliver clear benefits. In this section, we present just a few of the
benefits of migrating to SQL Server 2008 R2 on a Dell PowerEdge
R515.
Features of the new Dell PowerEdge R515
The Dell PowerEdge R515 offers many new features for maximizing
performance and for minimizing operational expenses, including the
following:
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Power. The Dell PowerEdge R515 includes enhancements that
let it use less energy than many older servers do. When you
consolidate multiple legacy servers onto a single Dell
PowerEdge R515, the potential power savings are dramatic.
We highlight this cost savings in our accompanying TCO/ROI
report. 1
Processors. The Dell PowerEdge R515 uses the AMD
Opteron™ 4100 Series processors. This makes the Dell
PowerEdge R515 an excellent yet affordable virtualized
database consolidation platform.
Management. The Dell PowerEdge R515, like all late-model
Dell servers, comes with the Dell Lifecycle Controller. This tool
simplifies server management by providing a single interface
for management functions and by storing critical system
1
“Dell PowerEdge R515 offers savings over two legacy database servers”
http://principledtechnologies.com/clients/reports/Dell/R515_TCO_ROI.pdf
Migrating to a Dell PowerEdge R515 server from two legacy database servers
4


information in the system itself. There are no CDs or USB keys
to keep track of for drivers or firmware.
Storage. The Dell PowerEdge R515, available in both an 8-bay
and 12-bay chassis, holds up to 25 terabytes of internal
storage, giving you many times the capacity of prior common
small business servers.
Memory. The Dell PowerEdge R515 holds up to 64 GB 2 of
RAM, many times the RAM amounts of older small business
servers, allowing for powerful flexibility with virtualized
database solutions.
Features of Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 and Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2
An SMB is not necessarily a simple business. Business needs,
regulatory requirements, and other factors place an increasing strain
on IT resources that are frequently quite limited. Microsoft Windows
Server 2008 R2 and SQL Server 2008 R2 address many of these issues.
For more information about Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2, see
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2008/en/us/default.aspx.
For more information about Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2, see
http://www.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2008/en/us/r2.aspx. Below, we
highlight a few of the major features of this new software platform.

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Virtualization. Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 includes
Microsoft Hyper-V, which you can use to create virtual
machines. These virtual servers, which are often more
powerful than your previous physical machines, can host your
critical business applications and databases. Virtual machines
also allow you to isolate business functions for security or
regulatory reasons.
Simplified installation. The wizard-based setups of Windows
Server 2008 R2 and SQL Server 2008 R2 make the installation
and configuration process considerably simpler than in past
versions.
Windows Management and updated components. Microsoft
Windows Server 2008 R2 includes a revamped Server
Manager console that contains almost all server management
functions, including the ability to quickly add Roles and
Features to your server.
2
The Dell PowerEdge R515 will support 128 GB of RAM by the end of 2010.
Migrating to a Dell PowerEdge R515 server from two legacy database servers
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
SQL Server Management and updated components. SQL
Server 2008 R2 is the latest release of Microsoft’s database
management platform. As with each release, Microsoft has
added new features to expand on the capabilities of their
Database Management System (DBMS) platform. Where
earlier versions of SQL Server required database
administrators to rely primarily on either in-house applications
or third-party tools to monitor multiple instances, SQL Server
2008 R2 simplifies multi-server management. The Standard
Edition includes many of the same business intelligence (BI)
subsystems that larger enterprise installations need. Finally,
SQL Server 2008 R2 contains many new management
features, such as Policy Based Management and PowerShell
Support.
CONSOLIDATION WITH DELL TECHNOLOGY SIMPLIFIES AND ADDS
FEATURES
Using AMD Opteron 4100 Series processors and Microsoft Hyper-V
technology, the Dell PowerEdge R515 allows organizations to
consolidate via virtualization while adding features, creating
additional performance headroom, and realizing savings all at once.
The power of consolidation
What is consolidation?
Generally speaking, consolidation is the process of combining multiple
items to make a single, more effective unit. In an IT context, you can
consolidate the following:


Physical servers. After a successful server consolidation, all
applications should run on fewer servers than before. Ideally,
those applications should run at least as well as they did
previously, and potentially better. In our accompanying
performance report, 3 we highlight the dramatic performance
gains realized in a sample migration.
Storage. Depending on your setup, consolidating servers may
let you also consolidate storage by moving data from a
3
“Dell PowerEdge R515 outperformed two legacy database servers”
http://principledtechnologies.com/clients/reports/Dell/R515_performance.pdf
Migrating to a Dell PowerEdge R515 server from two legacy database servers
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
number of servers to a single large disk storage subsystem in a
new server. In the case of the Dell PowerEdge R515, this is
possible due to its internal storage capacity- up to 16TB for
the 8 hard drive chassis or up to 25TB for the 12 hard drive
chassis.
Space. As you consolidate servers, you will likely reduce the
number of racks or even the number of locations that house
servers.
In this database-specific Guide, we address the consolidation of a
heterogeneous environment containing SQL Server 2000 and SQL
Server 2005 instances to a Dell PowerEdge R515 running Windows
Server 2008 R2 with Hyper-V, with SQL Server 2008 R2 inside virtual
machines. As we will demonstrate, consolidating multiple legacy
database instances to one physical machine is a simple and easy-tofollow process.
Why consolidate?
An effective server consolidation effort has the potential to yield an
environment with more consistent management practices and
improved reliability, security, and hardware utilization—all while
maintaining or exceeding the previous level of application
performance.
Consolidation can also yield a variety of cost savings:

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Hardware savings. Buying, powering, and supporting fewer
servers brings obvious savings. Other potential hardware cost
savings include the need for fewer racks and network
switches: as the number of servers decreases, these costs
decrease as well.
Maintenance and staff savings. A consolidated infrastructure
offers many opportunities to save on maintenance, support,
and staffing. Less hardware and associated equipment means
fewer servers that require security patches, monitoring, and
other ongoing maintenance.
Reduced support costs. The cost of a given level of support is
typically proportional to the size of the installation. As the
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
number of servers decreases, support costs are also likely to
decrease.
Power and cooling savings. Consolidating servers saves power
and cooling by using fewer, more efficient systems.
Sizing and baseline performance
One key to a successful consolidation is sizing, the process of
gathering different performance baselines so you have an
approximate set of requirements the new hardware platform must
meet. You do this by determining the performance characteristics of
existing hardware during normal business operations, and then
applying growth and scalability estimates.
Among the potential characteristics to examine on each server are
the following:

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Processor utilization
Typical and heavy load memory requirements of the operating
system and applications
Disk layout
Database size
Expected database growth
Maximum concurrent users
Types and rates of transactions against the databases
The server you select for consolidation must do more than match the
combined capacity of your current servers. It also must have enough
excess capacity to still perform well at the end of its expected life
span.
The Dell PowerEdge R515 we tested for this Guide is a highperformance server focused on the small to medium business market
segment that can readily support significant consolidation. It has two
AMD Opteron 4100 Series processors, can support up to 64 GB 4 of
4
The Dell PowerEdge R515 will support 128 GB of RAM by the end of 2010.
Migrating to a Dell PowerEdge R515 server from two legacy database servers
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RAM, and has been optimized to reduce both power consumption
and heat dissipation.
WE SHOW YOU HOW: PREPARING FOR THE MOVE
Our accompanying performance and TCO/ROI reports show from
performance and cost perspectives why you should consolidate your
older database servers to a single Dell PowerEdge R515 and use
Hyper-V virtualization technologies with the added benefits of a
newer SQL Server 2008 R2 release. In this Guide, we address the next
question: How to accomplish this? We discuss planning issues, setting
up the Dell PowerEdge R515, the actual migration using a simple
backup/restore method, and post-migration considerations.
Evaluating your databases
As with any migration or consolidation, planning is a key element.
This is especially true when moving to a virtualized environment. You
must be aware of many specific details related to each physical server
you target for consolidation, including the maintenance window in
which you will migrate the server to its new environment, the users
the move will affect, and the configuration tasks necessary to
assimilate the databases into your consolidated environment. A more
comprehensive example survey appears in Appendix A. Information
to gather before consolidation includes the following:
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Server OS version and patch level
SQL Server version and patch level
Number of logins on this SQL Server instance, and what type
of logins these are (Windows or SQL)
Current backup strategy and schedule for the databases on
this server
Replication details for this SQL instance, if any
Detailed information regarding permissions and roles
SQL Server Agent jobs on this SQL Server
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After moving your databases to their new SQL Server instance, you
must make sure that any system or application using the database
has updated connection information. This includes logins,
permissions, applications, SQL Server Agent jobs, third-party backup
products, and so on.
Gathering baseline performance data
During your research phase, you should use Windows® Performance
Monitor, SQL Server Profiler, and other tools to gather data on the
typical query load and performance statistics on the databases you
are considering moving to the new environment. This effort serves
two purposes. First, it provides a prime opportunity to identify
potential problems before you move to a consolidated solution.
Second, you can use the information you gather to map out your
resource allocation needs, which you can then use to configure your
new virtual machines, either by using different memory allocations,
or by allocating differing numbers of virtual CPUs on the virtual
machines.
Configuring your internal storage
In our test bed, we used only internal storage on the Dell PowerEdge
R515, as this adequately served our scenario and our upgrade path.
The Dell PowerEdge R515 offers up to 25TB of internal storage, which
is likely a huge storage capacity boost for many small businesses. This
section provides an overview of the setup of the internal storage
configuration on the Dell PowerEdge R515. Appendix B provides
complete, detailed installation instructions.
1. Power on the Dell PowerEdge R515, and press Ctrl+R to enter the
PERC BIOS Configuration Utility when the system prompts you
during boot. Select the internal RAID controller if offered the
choice.
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2. Highlight the controller, and press F2 to view your options.
Choose to create a new virtual disk.
3. Select the relevant disks and the RAID level required for your
scenario. Use the Tab key to navigate through the available
options. Highlight OK, and press Enter to complete the virtual disk
creation process.
4. We recommend completely initializing the new volume after
creation. Highlight the volume by choosing F2, choose Full
initialization, and begin the initialization.
5. After the installation completes, press Escape to exit the PERC
BIOS Configuration Utility, and press Ctrl+Alt+Delete to reboot the
system.
Installing Windows Server 2008 R2 and enabling the Hyper-V role
After you configure the internal storage on the Dell PowerEdge R515,
you must install the operating system, in this case, Windows Server
2008 R2. We installed Windows Server 2008 R2 with all the default
options, as this provides a robust out-of-the-box solution for most
SMBs. With the new and improved Server Manager feature, you can
easily add Roles and Features to your installation after the initial
configuration, if necessary. Below, we provide an overview of the
steps required to install the operating system. For detailed steps, see
Appendix C.
1. Insert the Windows Server 2008 R2 DVD media into the DVD drive
of the Dell PowerEdge R515 server.
2. By default, the server will boot to the DVD drive. If not, you can
force the server to boot to the DVD drive by selecting F11 for the
one-time boot option prompt.
3. Choose your language, select your edition, select your drive and
partition options, and click Next to complete the installation (see
Figure 2). The server will reboot several times during the
installation process.
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Figure 2. Choosing your edition in the Windows Server 2008 R2 installation.
4. After the operating system installation completes, start the Server
Manager.
5. Choose to add the Hyper-V role, and allow the installation process
to continue. The server will reboot several times.
Creating your virtual machines
To complete your preparation for your SQL Server installation in your
new virtualized environment, you must finally create virtual machines
on which to run the database software. Here, we provide an overview
of the steps required to create your first virtual machine using HyperV Manager. For detailed steps on this process, see Appendix D.
1. Click StartAdministrative Tools, and click Hyper-V Manager.
2. Create a new VM, assigning two virtual processors, 6GB of RAM,
and create a 25GB VHD for the operating system to be installed
on. Create additional VHD files if necessary. You may vary your
resource allocations, such as virtual processors and RAM
amounts, based on your specific needs. See Figure 3 for an
example of the VM properties screen.
3. Insert the Windows Server 2008 R2 installation media, and attach
the physical media to the VM.
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4. Start the VM and install Windows Server 2008 R2, which will
require several reboots of the VM.
Figure 3. Virtual Machine configuration in Hyper-V.
Installing SQL Server 2008 R2 on your virtual machines
After you create your virtual machines, you must install SQL Server
2008 R2 on each virtual machine. Although not required, you should,
when possible, deploy SQL Server 2008 R2 on machines that are part
of an Active Directory® domain. If you do choose to deploy SQL Server
in a domain, do not make the SQL Server service domain accounts
members of the Domain Administrators group. In fact, grant only the
necessary rights on the local server to the SQL Server service account
as part of your pre-installation planning. The SQL Server installation
software creates the local groups it needs for its security purposes.
This section provides an overview of the SQL Server 2008 R2
installation process. Appendix E provides detailed installation
instructions.
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1. Insert the SQL Server 2008 R2 DVD into the host machine DVD
drive, mount it to the virtual machine, and log into the virtual
machine. If prompted to enable the .NET Framework Core role,
click OK.
2. On the Installation Center screens, choose Installation, and
choose to proceed with a new installation. (See Figure 4.)
Figure 4. SQL Server 2008 R2 Installation Center options.
3. Proceed through the first several installation steps, entering
license information, and installing prerequisites with default
options specified. On the Setup Role screen, choose a SQL Server
Feature Installation.
4. On the Feature Selection screen, select only what you need for
your particular configuration (see Figure 5). In our case, we chose
the Database Engine Services and Management Tools.
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Figure 5. Choosing features for installation.
5. On the first installation, choose to install the default instance. If
you perform subsequent installations on the same server, choose
named instance and provide a name for the instance.
6. Configure the credentials of the SQL Server service account and
SQL Server Agent accounts.
7. Specify SQL Server administrators, and specify the authentication
mode desired for your configuration. Microsoft recommends
Windows Authentication mode, but legacy applications may
require SQL Server authentication.
8. Complete the installation.
9. Repeat this process for any remaining virtual machines on this
host.
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WE SHOW YOU HOW: MAKING THE MOVE
Upgrade Advisor makes it easy
The SQL Server 2008 R2 Upgrade Advisor is a major aid in migration
research. This utility, which the SQL Server 2008 R2 setup wizard
includes, scans legacy databases and SQL Server components for
compatibility issues, features, and syntax the newer DBMS does not
support, as well as many other critical components. The utility lets
you view reports quickly in the Upgrade Advisor interface or save
reports for later review.
You can install and execute the Upgrade Advisor on machines running
Windows XP SP2 or greater, Windows Vista® SP1, Windows 7,
Windows Server 2003 SP2, Windows Server 2008 SP2, or Windows
Server 2008 R2. The Microsoft .NETTM framework is also a
requirement.
BEST PRACTICE: Use the Upgrade Advisor tool on your SQL Server
2000 and SQL Server 2005 databases and import a trace file to the
Upgrade Advisor tool for analysis. The trace file lets the Upgrade
Advisor detect issues that might not show up in a simple scan of the
database, such as TSQL embedded in applications. Your migration
research and planning must account for such instances. You can
capture traces of TSQL using SQL Server Profiler on your SQL Server
2000 and SQL Server 2005 servers during typical hours and analyze
these traces using the Upgrade Advisor.
To install the Upgrade Advisor, use the following steps:
1. Insert the SQL Server 2008 R2 DVD. Click the Planning link, and
click Install SQL Server Upgrade Advisor.
2. Click Next to begin the installation wizard, accept the licensing
terms, and click Next.
3. Click Next to accept the default Registration information, click
Next to accept the default installation path, and click Next to
begin the installation.
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Once you have installed the SQL Server 2008 R2 Upgrade Advisor, you
can use this software to scan your SQL Server 2000 and SQL Server
2005 instances for potential migration issues. This section provides a
brief walkthrough; Appendix F gives more detailed instructions.
4. Select StartAll ProgramsMicrosoft SQL Server 2008 R2SQL
Server 2008 R2 Upgrade Advisor.
5. Click the Launch Upgrade Advisor Analysis Wizard link, and click
Next to begin.
6. Enter the older SQL Server computer name, and select the
features you want the Upgrade Advisor to analyze. Alternatively,
click Detect to have the Upgrade Advisor remotely scan the older
SQL Server machine and detect which components are running on
the server. (See Figure 6.)
Figure 6. Upgrade Advisor component selection.
7. Choose your instance, provide proper authentication to the older
SQL Server, and select the database you want to analyze. If
necessary, you can also input SQL script files and trace files here.
8. You may have legacy Data Transformation Services (DTS) packages
on SQL Server 2000 servers. The DTS packages may be present in
the file system or in the database itself. If you selected DTS, or if
the Upgrade Advisor automatically detected the presence of DTS
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packages, you must now select the DTS location you want to
analyze. Click Run to start the analysis. Run times vary.
9. Following the analysis of your older SQL Server instance, you can
view the Upgrade Advisor report, which lists warnings and errors.
Each warning or error will have associated information to solve
the issue. (See Figure 7.)
Figure 7. Sample Upgrade Advisor output report.
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Side-by-side migration
In this section, we provide an overview of the processes involved in
migrating your database from either SQL Server 2000 or SQL Server
2005 to a virtualized SQL Server 2008 R2 environment on the Dell
PowerEdge R515. We provide detailed instructions in Appendix G.
We performed all SQL Server 2000 administration using Query
Analyzer and Enterprise Manager, the two main tools in the SQL
Server 2000 environment. Likewise, we performed all administration
for the SQL Server 2005 and SQL Server 2008 R2 installations using
SQL Server Management Studio, the main administration interface for
those versions.
NOTE: Various methods exist for migrating databases between
instances and versions of SQL Server, including detach/attach,
backup/restore, and the copy database wizard. We chose to use the
backup/restore method because most businesses will have a backup
routine in place, and administrators will be familiar with the process.
Moving your SQL Server 2000 database: performing the backup
Using the SQL Server 2000 server, take the following steps to back up
your database. Backup times vary. Note that you should do any
special planning in advance to minimize your downtime window.
1. To keep users from issuing updates during the migration process,
you can either set the database to read-only mode or set the
access property to SINGLE_USER. Both choices immediately sever
all user connections. See Appendix G for details on setting the
database to single-user mode.
2. Perform a full backup of your SQL Server 2000 database, as we did
in Figure 8. See Appendix G for details.
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Figure 8. SQL Server 2000 backup configuration.
NOTE: If the time a full backup requires is unacceptable given
your migration maintenance schedule, you can take the full
backup at a previously scheduled time, and at this point of the
migration take only a differential or transaction log backup. If
the transaction log size is small relative to the data file size,
this approach can decrease migration time significantly. If you
go this route, be certain to keep your backup chain intact.
Restoring your database to the SQL Server 2008 R2 virtual machine
On the SQL Server 2008 R2 virtual machine, take the following steps:
1. Open the virtual machine console, and log into the virtual
machine.
2. Open SQL Server Management Studio, connect to the SQL Server
2008 R2 instance, and restore the database. (Restore times vary.)
See Appendix G for details.
NOTE: At this step, you must give your new database the same
name as your SQL Server 2000 database. Changing the name
could break applications that refer to the database by name.
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3. While in SQL Server Management Studio, reset the database
access property to multi-user, and set the compatibility level to
SQL 2008 (level 100). See Appendix G for details.
4. Modify application connection strings or change Domain Name
System (DNS) pointers that reference the migrated database.
Moving your SQL Server 2005 database: performing the backup
The process for migrating your SQL Server 2005 databases is almost
identical to SQL Server 2000, with some exceptions in the newer
management tool, SQL Server Management Studio. Using the SQL
Server 2005 server, take the following steps to back up your
database. Backup times vary. Again, note that you must do any
special planning in advance to minimize your downtime window.
1. To keep users from issuing updates during the migration process,
you can either set the database to read-only mode or set the
access property to SINGLE_USER. Both choices immediately sever
all user connections. See Appendix G for details on setting the
database to single-user mode.
2. Perform a full backup of your SQL Server 2005 database, as we did
in Figure 9. See Appendix G for details.
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Figure 9. SQL Server 2005 backup configuration.
NOTE: If the time a full backup requires is unacceptable given
your migration maintenance schedule, you can take the full
backup at a previously scheduled time, and at this point of the
migration take only a differential or transaction log backup. If
the transaction log size is small relative to the data file size,
this approach can decrease migration time significantly. If you
go this route, be certain to keep your backup chain intact.
Restoring your database to the SQL Server 2008 R2 virtual machine
On the SQL Server 2008 R2 virtual machine, take the following steps:
1. Open the virtual machine console, and log into the virtual
machine.
2. Open SQL Server Management Studio, connect to the SQL Server
2008 R2 instance, and restore the database. (Restore times vary.)
See Appendix G for details.
NOTE: At this step, you must give your new database the same
name as your SQL Server 2005 database. Changing the name
could break applications that refer to the database by name.
Migrating to a Dell PowerEdge R515 server from two legacy database servers
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3. While in SQL Server Management Studio, reset the database
access property to multi-user, and set the compatibility level to
SQL 2008 (level 100). See Appendix G for details.
4. Modify application connection strings or change Domain Name
System (DNS) pointers that reference the migrated database.
WE SHOW YOU HOW: AFTER THE MOVE
After you have completed your side-by-side migration, you typically
need to perform some post-migration tasks. Your specific list of tasks
will depend heavily on your pre-migration research and planning. In
this section, we briefly discuss several of the most common tasks.
Logins and dependencies
Windows and SQL Server logins
As in previous versions of SQL Server, there are two methods of
authenticating to SQL Server 2008 R2: Windows logins and SQL Server
logins. You create and administer Windows logins at either the
operating system level or the Active Directory domain level, and you
can assign those logins’ rights to SQL Server resources. You create and
manage SQL Server logins, however, within SQL Server. The processes
for extracting login information and creating the transferred login
entities on the migration server is very similar for both Windowsauthenticated and SQL Server-authenticated logins. You should,
however, take some extra steps to ensure a smooth migration for SQL
Server logins.
Below, we describe how to script both Windows-authenticated logins
and SQL Server-authenticated logins to a query window and recreate
them on the new SQL Server 2008 R2 virtual machine.
Please see Appendix H for details on transferring Windows logins and
Appendix I for details on transferring SQL Server logins.
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To transfer logins, take the following steps on the SQL Server 2008 R2
virtual machine. Note that steps 1 through 6 apply to both Windows
logins and SQL Server logins, while Step 7 refers solely to SQL Server
logins.
1. Log into the virtual machine.
2. In SQL Server Management Studio, in the Object Explorer pane,
connect to both your SQL Server 2000 server and your SQL Server
2008 R2 virtual server. Be sure to have the Object Explorer Details
tab open (ViewObject Explorer Details).
3. Expand the tree view of the SQL Server 2000 server, browse to
the Security tab, and click the Logins node. In the Object Explorer
Details, you will now see a list of all logins on the SQL Server 2000
server.
4. If necessary, use the sorting and filtering options in the Object
Explorer Details tab, and take note of which logins you would like
to migrate. Select them by clicking; use the standard Windows
controls (Ctrl key, Shift key, etc.) to select multiple logins.
5. Right-click the logins you selected, and choose Script Login
AsCreate ToNew Query Window. Be sure to change the
connection of this new query window to connect to your new SQL
Server 2008 R2 virtual server by right-clicking and selecting
Change Connection.
6. Execute the script on your SQL Server 2008 R2 virtual server to
create the logins. If you are transferring Windows-based logins,
the process is complete. If you are transferring SQL Server logins,
continue with Step 7.
7. For SQL Server logins, the script you executed in Step 6 creates
the login, marks it as disabled, and assigns it a random password,
but the script does not map the login to the database user. To
avoid having a database user that is “orphaned” from a login, use
the sp_change_users_login stored procedure, to view orphaned
users and to map a user to a login. Appendix I provides an
example of this process.
SQL Server Agent jobs
Almost all installations schedule SQL Server Agent jobs that run
against their databases, such as backups, index rebuilds, and other
maintenance items. You must migrate these jobs to your new SQL
Server 2008 R2 virtual machine. Log into the virtual machine, open
SQL Server Management Studio, and connect to your older SQL
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Server 2000 server. Locate the jobs you need to migrate in SQL Server
Management Studio (on your SQL Server 2000 server) under the SQL
Server Agent, right-click them, and choose Script Job AsCreate
ToNew Query Window (see Figure 10). Connect to the SQL Server
2008 R2 virtual server, and run the resulting script in a query window.
Verify the job was created successfully in SQL Server Management
Studio.
Figure 10. Scripting out SQL Agent jobs in SQL Server Management Studio.
Other external dependencies
Your pre-migration research may well have yielded a list of items for
you to implement now; the list might include references to local or
remote file shares, database mail or SQL Mail configurations, stored
procedures in system databases, and/or linked servers. Addressing
these external dependencies will ensure a smooth finish to your
migration.
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SUMMING IT ALL UP
The Dell PowerEdge R515, powered by Microsoft’s Windows Server
2008 R2 operating system with Hyper-V virtualization technologies
and paired with SQL Server 2008 R2, offers a compelling case for
consolidation of your SQL Server resources from a legacy SQL Server
2000 and SQL Server 2005 environment to a new environment with
SQL Server 2008 R2. As this Guide has explained, the migration
process is quite simple, consisting of careful planning, simple backup
and restore procedures, and post-migration verifications. In addition,
the tools provided by SQL Server 2008 R2 simplify migrating your
databases. With careful planning, you can execute migrations with
little difficulty and with little to no interruption of service to users.
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APPENDIX A – EXAMPLE DATABASE SURVEY
In this appendix, we provide an example survey of detailed
information you may want to gather about the SQL Server instances
and databases you are targeting for consolidation. While this survey is
a good starting point, it may not contain every relevant detail for your
particular environment.
1. Hardware level
a. CPU
i. Vendor
ii. Model
iii. Number of cores per socket
b. Memory
iv. Total quantity in GB
v. Memory speed
c. Storage
2. OS level
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
vi. Quantity, both current and projected growth
vii. Disk speed
viii. Repository type (Fibre Channel SAN, iSCSI SAN, SCSI
direct-attached)
ix. Disk interface (SCSI, SAS, etc.)
Server name
IP address, subnet, etc.
Domain information
Operating system version, build number, and service pack
Drive letter information and layout
3. SQL Server instance level
a. Whether it’s clustered, version, edition (Workgroup,
Standard, Enterprise), 64-bit or 32-bit (and if 32-bit, with
or without AWE), and service pack level
b. Authentication mode (Windows only or Mixed Mode)
c. Instance name (if not a default instance)
d. SQL port number (e.g., is it the default 1433 or another
port? If a named instance, what is the port?)
e. Communication protocol (named pipes or TCP/IP)
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f. Service account and all service permission information
(does SQL Server Agent run under a different service
account?)
g. Are there any non-default master or model database
objects?
h. Are there any linked server objects?
i. Are other SQL modules involved or dependent on this
instance (e.g., Analysis Services, Reporting Services, etc.)?
j. Default installation directories, data directories, and log
directories
k. Tempdb – highly volatile? Slightly volatile? Medium usage?
4. Database level
a. Database properties and options
i. Recovery model, auto-shrink, etc.
ii. Files and filegroups (size and location)
b. Backups
i. How many full backups, and on what schedule?
ii. How many differential backups, and on what
schedule?
iii. How many log backups, and on what schedule?
iv. Current backup window?
v. Can backup window shift to accommodate the
consolidated backup window?
c. Other database issues
vi. Is this database in a replication configuration?
vii. Is this database a partner in a mirroring session
(2005/2008 only)?
viii. Do any SSIS/DTS packages reference this database?
ix. Do any SQL Server Agent jobs reference this
database?
d. Users/Logins
x. Number of users this database affects
xi. Would this database require a login whose name
conflicts with another name on the target
consolidation server? If so, you would need to
create the login and map the database user using
sp_change_users_login
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APPENDIX B – PREPARING THE STORAGE
For our sample migration, we used only internal storage on the Dell
PowerEdge R515. On our server, we configured two disks in a RAID 1
configuration and the remaining six disks in a RAID 10 configuration.
This created a C: drive and E: drive in our host operating system. We
stored all virtual machine files and virtual hard drives on the E: drive,
our six disk RAID 10 volume. Below, we cover the specifics on
configuring the internal storage.
Configuring the internal storage
1. During the boot process, Press Ctrl+R to enter the PERC BIOS
Configuration Utility.
2. Highlight the controller, press F2, and choose to create the new
virtual disk.
3. Provide the desired RAID setting, such as RAID 1, 5, 10, and so on.
Choose the relevant disks for this volume.
4. Press OK to complete the volume configuration.
5. Highlight the new virtual disk, press F2, then Initialization, and
then Start Init. This will fully initialize your virtual disk.
6. Repeat steps 2 through 5 for the remaining virtual disks in your
server.
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APPENDIX C – INSTALLING WINDOWS AND ENABLING HYPER-V
We installed Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard Edition on the Dell
PowerEdge R515 with all default options. You may wish to perform
additional preparation steps as part of your specific environment,
such as standardizing the machine name, enabling certain firewall
ports, and so on.
Installing the operating system
1. Boot the server, and insert the Windows Server 2008 R2
installation DVD in the DVD-ROM drive.
2. At the Language Selection Screen, click Next.
3. Click Install Now.
4. Select Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard (Full Installation), and
click Next.
5. Click the I accept the license terms check box, and click Next.
6. Click Custom.
7. Click Drive options (advanced).
8. Ensure you select the proper drive, and click New to create a new
partition.
9. Click Apply to apply the changes.
10. Select the newly created partition, and click Format. After the
format completes, click Next.
11. At the User’s password must be changed before logging on
warning screen, click OK.
12. Enter the desired password for the administrator in both fields,
and click the arrow to continue.
13. At the Your password has been changed screen, click OK.
Setting up network configuration on the server
1. Click StartControl PanelNetwork and InternetNetwork
Connections, and double-click the Local Area Connection assigned
to client/server network traffic.
2. Select Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4), and click Properties.
3. In the Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) Properties screen,
select the Use the following IP address radio button.
4. Enter a valid static IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway.
5. Click OK, and click Close to exit.
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Enabling the Hyper-V role
Follow the steps below to enable Hyper-V on Windows Server
2008 R2.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Click StartAdministrative ToolsServer Manager.
Right-click Roles, and select Add Roles.
On the Before You Begin page, click Next.
On the Select Server Roles page, select Hyper-V, and click Next.
On the Hyper-V page, click Next.
On the Create Virtual Networks page, select the appropriate Local
Area Connection, and click Next. In our Dell PowerEdge R515, we
had two onboard NICs and four add-in NICs in the system. We
used one onboard port as a management port, and two add-in
NICs for the virtual machine traffic.
7. On the Confirm Installation Selections page, click Install.
8. On the Installation results screen, click Close.
9. When Windows prompts you to reboot the server, click Yes. The
server will reboot twice.
10. On the Installation Results page, click Close.
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APPENDIX D – CREATING VIRTUAL MACHINES
Below, we provide detailed steps on creating your virtual machines
using Hyper-V manager. Note that drive availability and required
number of VHD files may vary based on your environment.
1. Click StartAdministrative ToolsHyper-V Manager.
2. From the Action menu, select NewVirtual Hard Disk.
3. Choose Fixed Size, assign 25GB for size, and place the VHD in the
appropriate folder on the server. We chose to store all of our VHD
files on our six disk RAID 10 volume.
4. Repeat Step 3 for the remaining VHDs necessary for your VMs. On
our SQL Server VMs, for flexibility, we created a VHD for the OS, a
VHD for SQL Server data, a VHD for SQL Server logs, and a VHD for
backup and utility files.
5. From the Action menu, select NewVirtual Machine.
6. On the Before You Begin page, click Next.
7. On the Specify Name and Location page, enter the name for your
new virtual machine, and click Next.
8. On the Assign Memory page, enter the RAM amount.
9. On the Configure Networking, choose the network assigned to VM
traffic, and click Next.
10. Choose to add a virtual hard disk later.
11. On the Installation Options page, accept the default of Install an
operating system later, and click Next.
12. On the Completing the New Virtual Machine Wizard page, click
Finish.
13. Right-click the virtual machine, and choose Settings.
14. Click Processors, and choose the number of virtual processors. We
chose two virtual processors for our database virtual machines.
15. Click the virtual IDE controller 0.
16. Click Add, and click Hard Drive.
17. Browse to the first VHD you created in Step 4, and choose that
VHD for the guest OS VHD.
18. Click Apply.
19. Click the SCSI controller.
20. Click Add, and click Hard Drive.
21. Browse to the second VHD you created in Step 4, and choose that
VHD for the SQL Server data VHD.
22. Click Apply.
23. Repeat steps 19 through 22 for the remaining SQL Server related
VHDs.
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24. Power on the VM, and then proceed to install Windows Server
2008 R2 on each VM, following the instructions from the above
“Installing the operating system” section.
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APPENDIX E – INSTALLING SQL SERVER 2008 R2
Install an instance of Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 by following these
steps. This installation walkthrough covers only the installation of the
Database Engine and Management Components. For other
components outside the scope of this guide, such as Reporting
Services, Integration Services, or Analysis Services, see Microsoft
documentation at http://msdn.microsoft.com/enus/library/ms143219(SQL.105).aspx.
1. On the Dell PowerEdge R515, click the Start button, and click
Hyper-V Manager.
2. Right-click the virtual machine, and choose to connect.
3. Log into the virtual machine.
4. Insert the installation DVD for SQL Server 2008 R2 into the
physical server’s DVD drive.
5. Using the Hyper-V menu, choose Media, and Capture D: Drive,
where D: is the letter of the physical server’s DVD drive.
6. If Autoplay does not begin the installation, navigate to the SQL
Server 2008 R2 DVD, and double-click.
7. If the installer prompts you with a .NET installation prompt, click
Yes to enable the .NET Framework Core role.
8. At the SQL Server Installation Center screen, click Installation.
Click New installation or add features to an existing installation.
9. At the Setup Support Rules screen, click OK.
10. At the Product Key screen, enter your licensing information, if
applicable, and click Next.
11. At the License Terms screen, accept the license terms, and click
Next.
12. At the Setup Support Files screen, click Install.
13. At the Setup Support Rules screen, click Next.
14. At the Setup Role screen, choose SQL Server Feature Installation,
and click Next.
15. At the SQL Server 2008 R2 Feature Selection screen, select the
features that your organization requires. We chose the following
features for this guide: Database Engine Services, Client Tools
Connectivity, Client Tools Backwards Compatibility, Management
Tools – Basic, and Management Tools – Complete. Click Next.
16. At the Installation Rules screen, click Next.
17. At the Instance Configuration, enter the appropriate details for
your configuration. For a default instance, leave the defaults
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selected. For a named instance, enter a new instance name and
adjust the file paths as necessary.
18. At the Disk Space Requirements screen, click Next.
19. At the Server Configuration screen, choose the service account,
preferably an Active Directory domain account, fill in a password
if necessary, and click Next.
20. At the Database Engine Configuration screen, choose an
authentication mode. If your legacy servers use SQL Server logins
at all, select Mixed Mode. If you exclusively use Active Directory
domain accounts in your SQL Server environment, choose
Windows Authentication.
21. If you choose to use Mixed Mode authentication, enter a
password for the system administrator (SA) account, click Add
Current User, and click Next.
22. At the Error Reporting screen, click Next.
23. At the Installation Configuration Rules screen, click Next.
24. At the Installation screen, click Install.
25. At the Complete screen, click Close.
26. After the SQL Server 2008 R2 installation process completes,
check Microsoft’s Web site for the latest SQL Server service pack
and install that service pack. At the time we wrote this Guide,
there were none.
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APPENDIX F – INSTALLING UPGRADE ADVISOR
In this appendix, we walk through the steps to install and run the SQL
Server 2008 R2 Upgrade Advisor and save Upgrade Advisor reports.
1. Insert the SQL Server 2008 R2 DVD to the machine in which you
wish to install the Upgrade Advisor. On the Planning screen, click
Install SQL Server Upgrade Advisor.
2. Click Next to begin the installation wizard, accept the licensing
terms, and click Next.
3. Click Next to accept the default Registration information, click
Next to accept the default installation path, and click Next to
begin the installation.
4. At the Completing the Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 Upgrade
Advisor screen, click Finish to exit the setup.
5. Start the Upgrade Advisor by selecting StartAll
ProgramsMicrosoft SQL Server 2008 R2SQL Server 2008 R2
Upgrade Advisor.
6. Click the Launch Upgrade Advisor Analysis Wizard link.
7. At the Welcome screen, click Next.
8. On the SQL Server Components screen, by default the Upgrade
Advisor populates the server name field with the local computer
name. If you need to scan a remote server, type the computer
name or IP address of the SQL Server you want to analyze and do
one of the following:
a. Click Detect to allow the Upgrade Advisor to scan the
components on the SQL Server instance you specified. (We
chose this option.)
b. Select the components of the SQL Server instance you
would like the Upgrade Advisor to scan.
9. On the Connection Parameters screen, specify the Authentication
Type and credentials if necessary.
10. On the SQL Server parameters screen, select one or more
databases and, if you so desire, supply a trace file or SQL script file
to analyze. Should you wish to use a trace file, you must generate
it before you begin the Upgrade Advisor. For instructions about
how to generate a trace file, see http://msdn2.microsoft.com/enus/library/ms187929(SQL.105).aspx.
11. If you specified analysis of Data Transformation Packages (or if the
detection process discovered DTS on the SQL Server 2000 server),
you should now choose whether you want the Upgrade Advisor to
scan for (a) DTS packages on the SQL Server 2000 server or (b)
DTS package files stored on the file system. Click Next to continue.
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12. On the Confirm Upgrade Advisor Settings screen, review your
choices, and click Run.
13. When the analysis completes, click Launch Report to view the
analysis report.
14. You can now use the drop-down filter tools to view report items
by component or by issue severity.
NOTE: If you want to export the report, click Export Report in
the lower right corner of the Upgrade Advisor interface.
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APPENDIX G – MIGRATING DATABASES
In this appendix, we give detailed instructions about a basic side-byside migration of a user database from a SQL Server 2000 or SQL
Server 2005 server to a SQL Server 2008 R2 virtual server. There are
multiple methods of accomplishing this task, including using TSQL
commands and automated tools. Here, we discuss performing the
database migration using the graphical interface tools Microsoft
provides with SQL Server 2000, SQL Server 2005, and SQL Server 2008
R2.
Backing up a SQL Server 2000 database
1. Log into the SQL Server 2000 server as either an administrative
user or a user with full rights on SQL Server 2000.
2. Start Enterprise Manager by selecting StartAll
ProgramsMicrosoft SQL ServerEnterprise Manager.
3. Expand Microsoft SQL ServersSQL Server Group(local)
(Windows NT)Databases.
4. Set the database to single-user mode to ensure no updates occur.
Right-click the database, and choose properties. Click the Options
tab, check the Restrict Access checkbox, and choose Single User.
NOTE: Setting the database to single-user mode immediately
disconnects all users. You must notify your users well in
advance of setting the database to single-user mode.
5. Right-click the database, and select All TasksBackup Database.
6. Keep the default of complete backup.
7. Click Add… to add a backup device, and click the “…” button to
browse to the backup location you want to use. Select a folder,
and enter a filename, such as
DatabaseNameMigrationBackup.bak.
8. Click OK to close the Backup Device Location window, and click OK
to close the Select Backup Destination window.
NOTE: To simplify moving the database later, we recommend
creating the backup in a shared local folder.
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9. Optionally, on the Options tab, select the checkbox to verify your
database backup upon completion.
NOTE: This option increases backup time but checks the
integrity of the backup file. We chose to verify the backup.
10. Click OK to begin the SQL Server 2000 database backup. (Backup
times vary with database size and backup device configuration.)
11. After the backup completes, in Enterprise Manager, under
Databases, right-click the database, and choose All TasksTake
Offline. The old database is now offline, so SQL Server 2000 will
not allow any connections to it.
12. Log out of Windows on the SQL Server 2000 server.
Backing up a SQL Server 2005 database
1. Log into Windows on the SQL Server 2005 server as either an
administrative user or a user with full rights on SQL Server 2005.
2. Start SQL Server Management Studio by selecting StartAll
ProgramsMicrosoft SQL Server 2005SQL Server Management
Studio.
3. Enter your server name, and select Windows Authentication.
4. Set the database to single-user mode to ensure no updates occur.
NOTE: Setting the database to single-user mode immediately
disconnects all users, causing them to lose any work in
progress. You must notify your users well in advance of setting
the database to single-user mode.
5. To set the database to single-user mode, in Object Explorer, rightclick the database, and choose properties.
6. Click Options, and scroll to the State section.
7. For the Restrict Access setting, choose SINGLE_USER, and click OK.
Click Yes when prompted that other connections will be cut off.
8. Right-click the database, and choose Tasks, Back Up.
9. Click Add… to add a backup device, and click the “…” button to
browse to the backup location you want to use. Select a folder,
and enter a filename, such as
DatabaseNameMigrationBackup.bak.
10. Click OK to close the Backup Device Location window, and click OK
to close the Select Backup Destination window.
NOTE: To simplify moving the database later, we recommend
creating the backup in a shared local folder.
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11. Optionally, on the Options tab, select the checkbox to verify your
database backup upon completion.
NOTE: This option increases backup time but checks the
integrity of the backup file. We chose to verify the backup.
12. Click OK to begin the SQL Server 2005 database backup. (Backup
times vary with database size and backup device configuration.)
13. After the backup completes, in SQL Server Management Studio,
under Databases, right-click the database, and choose All
TasksTake Offline. The old database is now offline, so SQL
Server 2005 will not allow any connections to it.
14. Log out of Windows on the SQL Server 2005 server.
Restoring a database to SQL Server 2008 R2
1. Transfer either your SQL Server 2000 or SQL Server 2005 backup
file to the virtual machine.
2. Log into Windows on the virtual machine running SQL Server 2008
R2.
3. In Windows Explorer, navigate to backup folder location.
4. Open SQL Server Management Studio by selecting StartAll
ProgramsMicrosoft SQL Server 2008 R2SQL Server
Management Studio.
5. Select Database Engine for Server type, and type the server name
in Server name. For Authentication, we used Windows
Authentication.
6. In the Object Explorer pane, right-click Databases, and select
Restore Database.
7. Enter the name of the database in the To database box.
NOTE: It is critical to use the same database name as on your
SQL Server 2000 or SQL Server 2005 server. If the database
name does not match, applications that depend on the
database name may break.
8. Click the From device button, and click the “…” button to browse
to the local folder where you copied the backup file.
9. To add the backup file location, click Add. Browse to the
appropriate folder, find the backup file, select it, and click OK.
10. To return to the Restore Database window, click OK.
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11. Select the checkbox that now appears in the Restore column.
Optionally, click Options on the left, and ensure the file locations
are appropriate in the Restore As column.
NOTE: In your new virtual machine, your storage layout may
differ significantly from your older physical machine. Modify
the file layout on the Options screen if necessary.
12. To begin the restore, click OK. Note the progress indicator in the
lower left of the Restore window. (Restore time varies with
database size and server and with disk subsystem speed.)
13. After the restore is complete, you must change the database
access state back to multi-user and upgrade the compatibility
level by performing the following steps:
a. Right-click the database in Object Explorer, and select
Properties.
b. On the left side to access database options, click Options.
c. Change Compatibility level to SQL Server 2008 (100).
d. Scroll down to Restrict Access, and change to
MULTI_USER.
e. Click OK.
f. Click Yes to agree to shutting down other connections.
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APPENDIX H – TRANSFERRING WINDOWS LOGINS
In this appendix, we provide detailed instructions for transferring
Windows-based logins from a SQL Server 2000 or SQL Server 2005
machine to SQL Server 2008 R2 in an Active Directory or Windows
login-only environment. For information about transferring logins
when using SQL Server authentication, see Appendix I.
1. On the virtual machine running SQL Server 2008 R2, log into
Windows, then open SQL Server Management Studio by selecting
StartAll ProgramsMicrosoft SQL Server 2008 R2SQL Server
Management Studio.
2. On the Connect to Server screen, select Database Engine for the
server type, enter the computer name of the relevant older
server, either your SQL Server 2000 machine or your SQL Server
2005 machine, and click Connect.
3. Select ViewObject Explorer Details to bring up the Object
Explorer Details tab.
4. In the Object Explorer pane, expand the Security folder, and
highlight the Logins folder.
5. Add the Login Type column to the display by right-clicking the
column-header area in the Object Explorer Details pane and
selecting Login Type. Now Windows Logins appear as Login Type
0. Optionally, use the column headers to sort by Default
Database, or use the filter button to find only logins that you are
interested in migrating.
6. Using the standard Windows multi-select key combinations (Ctrl
key or Shift key), highlight the logins you are interested in
migrating.
7. Right-click the highlighted logins, and select Script Login
asCreate ToNew Query Editor.
8. On the Connect to Database Engine screen, change the Server
name to your SQL Server 2008 R2 virtual machine, and click
Connect.
9. Click Execute to run the resulting script.
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APPENDIX I – TRANSFERRING SQL SERVER LOGINS
In this appendix, we give detailed instructions on transferring SQL
Server logins from a SQL Server 2000 or SQL Server 2005 machine to a
virtual machine running SQL Server 2008 R2. For information about
transferring logins when using Windows authentication, see Appendix
H.
1. On the virtual machine running SQL Server 2008 R2, log into
Windows, and open SQL Server Management Studio by selecting
StartAll ProgramsMicrosoft SQL Server 2008 R2SQL Server
Management Studio.
2. On the Connect to Server screen, select Database Engine for the
server type, enter the computer name of the relevant older
server, either your SQL Server 2000 machine or your SQL Server
2005 machine, and click Connect.
3. Select ViewObject Explorer Details to bring up the Object
Explorer Details tab.
4. In the Object Explorer pane, expand the Security folder, and
highlight the Logins folder.
5. Add the Login Type column to the display by right-clicking the
column-header area and selecting Login Type. Now SQL Server
Logins appear as Login Type 2. Optionally, use the column headers
to sort by Default Database, or the Filter button to find only logins
that you are interested in migrating.
6. Using the standard Windows multi-select key combinations (Ctrl
key or Shift key), highlight the logins you are interested in
migrating.
7. Right-click the highlighted logins, and select Script Login
asCreate ToNew Query Editor Window.
8. On the Connect to Database Engine screen, change the Server
name to your SQL Server 2008 R2 virtual server, and click
Connect.
9. Click Execute to run the resulting script.
Mapping transferred logins to database users
After transferring SQL Server logins from server to server, you must
map those logins to the database users that you migrated during the
restore process.
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NOTE: This process assumes that you have already migrated
the applicable database to the new server.
1. On the SQL Server 2008 R2 virtual server, log into Windows. Then
open SQL Server Management Studio by selecting StartAll
ProgramsMicrosoft SQL Server 2008 R2SQL Server
Management Studio.
2. On the Connect to Server screen, select Database Engine for the
server type, enter the computer name of your SQL Server 2008 R2
virtual server, and click Connect.
3. Right-click the relevant database, and select New Query.
4. Enter the following command, and click Execute:
EXEC sp_change_users_login 'Report';
5. For each user output from the above step, map these orphaned
users to the appropriate matching SQL Server login by taking the
following steps:
a. Open a query window on the SQL Server 2008 R2 virtual
server using steps 1 through 3 above.
b. For each login you wish to map, enter the following
command, and click Execute:
EXEC sp_change_users_login
'Auto_Fix','SQLLogin';
c. The above command maps the database user “SQLLogin”
to the SQL Server login of “SQLLogin”. This procedure
assumes that the database user and SQL Server login have
the same value.
6. To reset the password and enable the account, enter the
following command, and click Execute:
USE [master]
GO
ALTER LOGIN [SQLLogin] WITH
PASSWORD=N'Password1'
GO
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ABOUT PRINCIPLED TECHNOLOGIES
We provide industry-leading technology assessment and fact-based
marketing services. We bring to every assignment extensive
experience with and expertise in all aspects of technology testing and
analysis, from researching new technologies, to developing new
methodologies, to testing with existing and new tools.
When the assessment is complete, we know how to present the
results to a broad range of target audiences. We provide our clients
with the materials they need, from market-focused data to use in
their own collateral to custom sales aids, such as test reports,
performance assessments, and white papers. Every document reflects
the results of our trusted independent analysis.
Principled Technologies, Inc.
1007 Slater Road, Suite 300
Durham, NC, 27703
www.principledtechnologies.com
We provide customized services that focus on our clients’ individual
requirements. Whether the technology involves hardware, software,
Web sites, or services, we offer the experience, expertise, and tools
to help our clients assess how it will fare against its competition, its
performance, its market readiness, and its quality and reliability.
Our founders, Mark L. Van Name and Bill Catchings, have worked
together in technology assessment for over 20 years. As journalists,
they published over a thousand articles on a wide array of technology
subjects. They created and led the Ziff-Davis Benchmark Operation,
which developed such industry-standard benchmarks as Ziff Davis
Media’s Winstone and WebBench. They founded and led eTesting
Labs, and after the acquisition of that company by Lionbridge
Technologies were the head and CTO of VeriTest.
Principled Technologies is a registered trademark of Principled Technologies, Inc.
All other product names are the trademarks of their respective owners.
Disclaimer of Warranties; Limitation of Liability:
PRINCIPLED TECHNOLOGIES, INC. HAS MADE REASONABLE EFFORTS TO ENSURE THE ACCURACY AND VALIDITY OF ITS TESTING, HOWEVER,
PRINCIPLED TECHNOLOGIES, INC. SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, RELATING TO THE TEST RESULTS AND
ANALYSIS, THEIR ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS OR QUALITY, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF FITNESS FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE. ALL
PERSONS OR ENTITIES RELYING ON THE RESULTS OF ANY TESTING DO SO AT THEIR OWN RISK, AND AGREE THAT PRINCIPLED TECHNOLOGIES, INC.,
ITS EMPLOYEES AND ITS SUBCONTRACTORS SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY WHATSOEVER FROM ANY CLAIM OF LOSS OR DAMAGE ON ACCOUNT OF
ANY ALLEGED ERROR OR DEFECT IN ANY TESTING PROCEDURE OR RESULT.
IN NO EVENT SHALL PRINCIPLED TECHNOLOGIES, INC. BE LIABLE FOR INDIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES IN
CONNECTION WITH ITS TESTING, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. IN NO EVENT SHALL PRINCIPLED TECHNOLOGIES, INC.’S
LIABILITY, INCLUDING FOR DIRECT DAMAGES, EXCEED THE AMOUNTS PAID IN CONNECTION WITH PRINCIPLED TECHNOLOGIES, INC.’S TESTING.
CUSTOMER’S SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE REMEDIES ARE AS SET FORTH HEREIN.
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