Yamaha | GW50 | Specifications | Yamaha GW50 Specifications

FCC INFORMATION (U.S.A.)
1. IMPORTANT NOTICE: DO NOT MODIFY THIS UNIT!
This product, when installed as indicated in the instructions contained in this manual, meets FCC requirements. Modifications not expressly approved
by Yamaha may void your authority, granted by the FCC, to use the product.
2. IMPORTANT: When connecting this product to accessories and/or another product use only high quality shielded cables. Cable/s supplied with this
product MUST be used. Follow all installation instructions. Failure to follow instructions could void your FCC authorization to use this product in the
USA.
3. NOTE: This product has been tested and found to comply with the requirements listed in FCC Regulations, Part 15 for Class ”B” digital devices.
Compliance with these requirements provides a reasonable level of assurance that your use of this product in a residential environment will not
result in harmful interference with other electronic devices. This equipment generates/uses radio frequencies and, if not installed and used according
to the instructions found in the users manual, may cause interference harmful to the operation of other electronic devices. Compliance with FCC
regulations does not guarantee that interference will not occur in all installations. If this product is found to be the source of interference, which can
be determined by turning the unit ”OFF” and ”ON”, please try to eliminate the problem by using one of the following measures:
Relocate either this product or the device that is being affected by the interference.
Utilize power outlets that are on different branch (circuit breaker or fuse) circuits or install AC line filter/s.
In the case of radio or TV interference, relocate/reorient the antenna. If the antenna lead-in is 300 ohm ribbon lead, change the lead-in to co-axial type
cable.
If these corrective measures do not produce satisfactory results, please contact the local retailer authorized to distribute this type of product. If you
can not locate the appropriate retailer, please contact Yamaha Corporation of America, Electronic Service Division, 6600 Orangethorpe Ave, Buena
Park, CA 90620
The above statements apply ONLY to those products distributed by Yamaha Corporation of America or its subsidiaries.
* This applies only to products distributed by YAMAHA CORPORATION OF AMERICA.
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Bör endast bytas av servicepersonal.
Explosionsfara vid felaktig hantering.
VAROITUS!
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Pariston saa vaihtaa ainoastaan alan
ammattimies.
ADVARSEL!
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Eksplosionsfare. Udskiftning må kun foretages
af en sagkyndig, – og som beskrevet i
servicemanualen.
CANADA
THIS DIGITAL APPARATUS DOES NOT EXCEED THE “CLASS B” LIMITS FOR RADIO
NOISE EMISSIONS FROM DIGITAL APPARATUS SET OUT IN THE RADIO INTERFERENCE REGULATION OF THE CANADIAN DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS.
LE PRESENT APPAREIL NUMERIQUE N’EMET PAS DE BRUITS RADIOELECTRIQUES
DEPASSANT LES LIMITES APPLICABLES AUX APPAREILS NUMERIQUES DE LA “CLASSE
B” PRESCRITES DANS LE REGLEMENT SUR LE BROUILLAGE RADIOELECTRIQUE
EDICTE PAR LE MINISTERE DES COMMUNICATIONS DU CANADA.
* This applies only to products distributed by YAMAHA CANADA MUSIC LTD.
* Ceci ne s’applique qu’aux produits distribués par Yamaha Canada Musique Ltée.
SPECIAL MESSAGE SECTION
This product utilizes an external power supply (adapter). DO NOT
connect this product to any power supply or adapter other than one
described in the manual, on the name plate, or specifically recommended by Yamaha.
WARNING: Do not place this product in a position where anyone
could walk on, trip over, or roll anything over power or connecting
cords of any kind. The use of an extension cord is not recommended! If you must use an extension cord, the minimum wire size
for a 25’ cord (or 1 cm) is I8 AWG. NOTE: The smaller the AWG
number, the larger the current handling capacity. For longer extension cords, consult a local electrician.
This product should be used only with the components supplied, or
a cart, rack, or stand that is recommended by Yamaha. If a cart,
etc., is used, please observe all safety markings and instructions
that accompany the accessory product.
SPECIFICATIONS SUBJECT TO CHANGE: The information
contained in this manual is believed to be correct at the time of
printing. However, Yamaha reserves the right to change or modify
any of the specifications without notice or obligation to update
existing units.
Do not attempt to service this product beyond that described in the
user-maintenance instructions. All other servicing should be referred to qualified service personnel.
This product, either alone or in combination with an amplifier and
headphones or speaker/s, may be capable of producing sound levels
that could cause permanent hearing loss. DO NOT operate for long
periods of time at a high volume level or at a level that is uncomfortable. If you experience any hearing loss or ringing in the ears,
you should consult an audiologist. IMPORTANT: The louder the
sound, the shorter the time period before damage occurs.
Battery Notice: This product MAY contain a small non-rechargeable battery which (if applicable) is soldered in place. The average
life span of this type of battery is approximately five years. When
replacement becomes necessary, contact a qualified service representative to perform the replacement.
This product may also use “household” type batteries. Some of
these may be rechargeable. Make sure that the battery being
charged is a rechargeable type and that the charger is intended for
the battery being charged.
When installing batteries, do not mix old batteries with new, or
with batteries of a different type. Batteries MUST be installed correctly. Mismatches or incorrect installation may result in overheating and battery case rupture.
Warning: Do not attempt to disassemble, or incinerate any battery.
Keep all batteries away from children. Dispose of used batteries
promptly and as regulated by the laws in your area. Note: Check
with any retailer of household type batteries in your area for battery
disposal information.
Disposal Notice: Should this product become damaged beyond repair, or for some reason its useful life is considered to be at an end,
please observe all local, state, and federal regulations that relate to
the disposal of products that contain lead, batteries, plastics, etc. If
your dealer is unable to assist you, please contact Yamaha directly.
NAME PLATE LOCATION: The graphic below indicates the location of the name plate for this model. The model number, serial
number, power requirements, etc., are located on this plate. You
should record the model number, serial number, and the date of
purchase in the spaces provided below and retain this manual as a
permanent record of your purchase.
Some Yamaha products may have benches and/or accessory mounting fixtures that are either supplied with the product or as optional
accessories. Some of these items are designed to be dealer assembled or installed. Please make sure that benches are stable and any
optional fixtures (where applicable) are well secured BEFORE
using. Benches supplied by Yamaha are designed for seating only.
No other uses are recommended.
NOTICE: Service charges incurred due to lack of knowledge relating to how a function or effect works (when the unit is operating as
designed) are not covered by the manufacturer’s warranty, and are
therefore the owner’s responsibility. Please study this manual carefully and consult your dealer before requesting service.
ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES: Yamaha strives to produce products that are both user safe and environmentally friendly. We sincerely believe that our products and the production methods used to
produce them, meet these goals. In keeping with both the letter and
the spirit of the law, we want you to be aware of the following:
Model
Serial No.
Purchase Date
PLEASE KEEP THIS MANUAL
92-BP
Congratulations and thank you for purchasing the Yamaha GW50 Guitar Performance Effector.
The GW50 combines high-quality multi effects for guitar (and other instruments as well) with a
sophisticated backing section that provides realistic automatic rhythmic accompaniment for you
to play along with. The dual functions — effects and backing — make the GW50 useful in a wide
range of applications, from live performance and studio use to home recording and individual
music practice.
Some of the advanced features of the GW50 include:
Effect Section
■ Five basic effect blocks, featuring Compressor,
Distortion, Equalizer, Chorus and Reverb/
Delay, plus additional effect types within each
block, such as Overdrive, Wah, Amp Simulator,
Flanger, Phaser, Pitch Shifter, Tap Delay, and a
built-in Noise Gate.
■ User memory for storing up to 50 user-created
effect programs, all instantly selectable from
the convenient Pedal Switches. (See pages 11,
25.)
■ High-quality sound in all effects, plus added
sonic benefit of having all effects integrated
into one unit.
■ Comprehensive parameter control over all
effects, yet exceptional ease-of-use — you can
adjust the main parameters of the effect blocks
just as you would on conventional pedal effects.
■ Song record capability, for creating songs with
the rhythm/accompaniment patterns and chord
changes, as well as automating effect program
changes, effect bypass and other functions. (See
pages 36-38.)
■ A special Root Select function (see page 78),
which lets you change the root note of the
backing chord by playing the note on your
guitar, and Triggered Run (see page 82), which
allows you to start a song or pattern just by
playing a note on your guitar.
Other Features
■ Convenient Pedal Switch control over many
functions, including chord change, start/stop of
pattern/song playback, bypassing of effects, and
so on.
■ Built-in tuner, allowing you to tune your instrument without removing it from the signal chain.
(See page 39.)
Backing Section
■ A total of 248 automatic rhythm and accompaniment patterns, using realistic drum, bass and
other backing instrument sounds. (See page 32.)
The automatic accompaniment includes sophisticated chord control, with 25 different chord
types available in all keys. (See pages 33-35.)
■ Various MIDI features for interfacing with a
wide range of other MIDI devices. (See pages
101-107.)
i
PRECAUTIONS
PRECAUTIONS
■ USE THE CORRECT POWER
SUPPLY
Power to the GW50 should be supplied only
from the appropriate Yamaha AC adaptor (the
included PA-3). Use of another adaptor may
cause serious damage to the unit. Also make
sure that the adaptor you have is appropriate for
the AC mains supply voltage in the area where
you intend to use the GW50. (The correct input
voltage is marked on the adaptor.)
■ USE ONLY APPROPRIATE FOOT
CONTROLLERS AND
FOOTSWITCHES
Certain functions of the GW50 can be controlled by the optional Yamaha FC7 Foot Controller and the FC5 (or FC4) Footswitch. Use
of any other pedal or footswitch besides those
recommended here may result in erratic operation or may cause some other trouble in the foot
controller or footswitch itself.
■ MEMORY BACKUP
The GW50 memorizes the following data, even
when the power is turned off: Memory effect
program data, Manual effect data (excepting
main parameter values), song data, and
general panel settings. The GW50 contains a
special long-life lithium battery that retains this
data in the internal RAM memory. The battery
should last for approximately five years from
the date of manufacture. When the backup
battery power becomes too low to maintain the
memory contents, a warning message appears
in the LCD:
ii
PRECAUTIONS
(This message appears only when the power is
turned on, and stays in the LCD until a panel
button is pressed.) When this happens, save all
original data to a MIDI data storage device (see
note below) or write down all necessary settings
to a piece of paper, then have the battery
replaced by qualified Yamaha service personnel as soon as possible. DO NOT ATTEMPT
TO REPLACE THE BACKUP BATTERY
YOURSELF!
IMPORTANT
BACKING UP DATA—We recommend that you
transfer all important data to a MIDI data recorder, such as the Yamaha MDF2 MIDI Data Filer
or another data storage device, for safe, longterm storage. (For more information, refer to the
section on the MIDI Bulk Dump function, page
102.) Yamaha cannot be held responsible for data
loss caused by battery failure or improper
operation of the GW50.
■ AVOID PHYSICAL SHOCKS
Although the GW50 has been constructed to
withstand the normal rigors of stage and studio
use for optimum sturdiness and reliability,
avoid subjecting it to strong physical shocks
(such as dropping or hitting it), since this may
damage the unit. Since the GW50 is a precision-made electronic device, also avoid applying excessive force to the various controls.
Also, avoid stepping on any part of the GW50
other than the Pedal Switches, since this may
damage or break the controls or glass of the
display.
PRECAUTIONS
■ AVOID EXCESSIVE HEAT,
HUMIDITY, DUST AND VIBRATION
Keep the unit away from locations where it is
likely to be exposed to high temperatures (such
as direct sunlight) or humidity. Also avoid
locations which are subject to excessive dust
accumulation or vibration which could cause
mechanical damage.
■ CLEAN WITH A SOFT, DRY CLOTH
Never use solvents such as benzine or thinner to
clean the unit, since these will damage the
finish. Wipe clean with a soft, dry cloth. If
necessary, use a soft, clean cloth slightly moistened with a diluted, mild detergent — making
sure to wipe the case off again with a dry cloth.
■ ELECTRICAL INTERFERENCE
■ DO NOT OPEN THE CASE OR
ATTEMPT REPAIRS OR
MODIFICATIONS YOURSELF
This product contains no user-serviceable parts.
Refer all maintenance to qualified Yamaha
service personnel. Opening the case and/or
tampering in any way with the internal circuitry
will void the warranty.
■ MAKE SURE POWER IS OFF
BEFORE MAKING OR REMOVING
CONNECTIONS
Since the GW50 contains digital circuitry, it
may cause interference and noise if placed too
close to TV sets, radios or similar equipment. If
such a problem occurs, move the GW50 further
away from the affected equipment.
■ MIDI CABLES
When connecting the GW50 to other MIDI
equipment, be sure to use only high-quality
cables made especially for MIDI data transmission. Also avoid cables longer than 15 meters,
since long cables can result in data errors.
Always turn the power off prior to connecting
or disconnecting cables.
■ HANDLE ALL CONNECTIONS
CAREFULLY
Always be careful to connect and disconnect all
cables and cords by gripping the connector
itself, not by pulling on the cord.
PRECAUTIONS
iii
TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PRECAUTIONS ....................................................
ii
REFERENCE/EFFECT SECTION
ABOUT THE MANUAL, MEMORY AND
MEMORY EDIT MODES ....................................
43
MANUAL MODE .................................................
44
Selecting an Effect Type ...............................
44
Turning Individual Effects On and Off.........
44
Editing Parameters ........................................
44
Utility Functions ............................................
45
Determining the Order of the Effect
Blocks — CONNECT ...............................
45
Bypass Switching of Effect Blocks —
GROUP .....................................................
45
19
Setting the Function of the External Foot
Controller — FOOT ..................................
46
DEMO MODE — PLAYING THE
DEMONSTRATION SONGS ..............................
22
Setting the MINIMUM VOLUME Level
(for External Foot Controller and
ASSIGNABLE Block Volume Control) —
MIN VOL ..................................................
47
EFFECT SECTION ...............................................
24
PLAYING WITH SOME OF THE
EFFECTS ..........................................................
24
CHANGING THE SOUND OF
THE EFFECTS .................................................
26
CHANGING (EDITING) AN EFFECT
PROGRAM AND SAVING IT ........................
29
USING THE NOISE GATE TO GET
A CLEAN SIGNAL ..........................................
31
BACKING SECTION ...........................................
32
PLAYING PATTERNS —
PATTERN MODE ............................................
HOW TO USE THIS MANUAL
(READ THIS FIRST!!) .........................................
1
THE GW50:
WHAT IT IS AND WHAT IT CAN DO .............
2
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS ..........
5
ASSIGNABLE BLOCK AND PEDAL
SWITCH FUNCTIONS ................................
10
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL) — SETTING UP,
PLAYING AND USING YOUR GW50
SETTING UP AND PLAYING YOUR
GW50 ....................................................................
ASSIGNABLE Block Functions —
MIN/MAX Volume and Auto Volume .........
48
Setting the AUTO VOLUME Rate —
AUTO VOL ..................................................
49
MANUAL JOB MODE ........................................
50
Saving the Manual Mode Settings to
an Effect Program .........................................
50
MEMORY MODE ................................................
51
Selecting Effect Programs .............................
51
32
Checking Parameter Values of the Effect
Program .........................................................
51
PLAYING AND RECORDING SONGS —
SONG MODE ...................................................
36
ASSIGNABLE Block and Pedal Switch
Functions .......................................................
51
Effect Program Selection ..........................
51
USING THE BUILT-IN TUNER .........................
39
Bypass Switching of Effect Blocks ..........
52
iv
TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS
MEMORY EDIT MODE ..................................
53
SONG MODE .......................................................
79
Compare Mode (Comparing the Edited
Program with the Original) ...........................
53
SONG PLAY MODE
(SONG PLAYBACK) .......................................
79
Selecting and Playing Songs .........................
79
53
Cursor Control in Song Mode .......................
80
Recalling the Settings of the Original Program
(in Compare Condition) ................................
54
Changing the Tempo .....................................
80
Saving the Memory Edit Mode Settings to
an Effect Program .........................................
MEMORY JOB MODE ....................................
54
Muting the Accompaniment, Bass and
Drums ............................................................
80
Copying an Effect Program ..........................
54
Position Controls ...........................................
81
Swapping One Effect Program with
Another ..........................................................
55
ASSIGNABLE Block and Pedal Switch
Functions in Song Mode ...............................
82
Naming an Effect Program ...........................
55
Using an External Footswitch .......................
56
Backing Control —
Selecting and Playing a Song ...................
82
Triggered Run ...........................................
82
RESTORING FACTORY PRESET EFFECT
PROGRAMS .....................................................
57
RECORDING AND EDITING SONGS ..........
83
EFFECTS AND PARAMETERS .........................
58
REALTIME RECORDING MODE
(REALTIME RECORDING) ............................
83
COMPRESSOR .................................................
58
DISTORTION ...................................................
59
ASSIGNABLE Block and Pedal Switch
Functions in Song Realtime Recording ........
86
EQUALIZER .....................................................
59
Hints on Realtime Recording ........................
87
CHORUS ...........................................................
63
REVERB/DELAY .............................................
66
STEP RECORDING MODE
(STEP RECORDING) .......................................
88
NOISE GATE ...................................................
69
SONG EDIT MODE (SONG EDITING) .........
90
Viewing Recorded Events .............................
90
Editing (Changing) Recorded Events ...........
92
REFERENCE/BACKING SECTION
PATTERN MODE ................................................
73
Erasing Recorded Events ..............................
92
Selecting and Playing Patterns ......................
73
Set A and Set B Operations ..........................
92
Cursor Control in Pattern Mode ....................
74
Marking Measure A and Measure B .........
92
Changing Chords ...........................................
74
Jumping to Measure A or Measure B .......
92
Changing the Tempo .....................................
76
Loop (Repeat) Playback (A to B) .............
92
Loop (Repeat) Recording (A to B) ...........
93
SONG JOB MODE ...........................................
94
Muting the Accompaniment, Bass and
Drums ............................................................
76
ASSIGNABLE Block and Pedal Switch
Functions in Pattern Mode ............................
Copying Measures Between A and B ...........
94
77
Deleting Measures Between A and B ...........
94
Backing Control ........................................
77
Naming Songs ...............................................
95
Chord Recall .............................................
77
RESTORING FACTORY PRESET SONGS ...
95
Root Select ................................................
78
TABLE OF CONTENTS
v
TABLE OF CONTENTS
REFERENCE/OTHER FUNCTIONS
(TUNER/MIDI)
TUNER MODE .....................................................
99
MIDI ......................................................................
101
MIDI BULK TRANSMISSION MODE ..........
102
CHANGING EFFECT PROGRAMS ON
THE GW50 FROM A CONNECTED
DEVICE ............................................................
103
CHANGING PROGRAMS ON A CONNECTED
DEVICE FROM THE GW50 ........................... 104
ASSIGNABLE BLOCK AND PEDAL
SWITCH FUNCTIONS CHART ..........................
128
EFFECT PARAMETER CHART .........................
130
FACTORY SET MEMORY EFFECT
PROGRAM LIST ..................................................
132
MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST ...........
133
MANUAL EFFECT FACTORY SET
PARAMETER CHART ........................................
143
TURNING INDIVIDUAL EFFECTS
ON AND OFF FROM A CONNECTED
DEVICE ............................................................
104
PRESET PATTERN LIST ....................................
144
SYNCHRONIZING ANOTHER DEVICE
WITH THE GW50 ............................................
105
DRUM AND PERCUSSION SOUNDS
USED FOR DRUM PARTS .................................
146
FACTORY SET SONG LIST ...............................
147
USING THE BACKING PATTERNS
TO PLAY OTHER SOUND MODULES ........
106
APPENDICES
ERROR MESSAGES ............................................
111
MIDI SPECIFICATIONS .....................................
148
TROUBLESHOOTING ........................................
114
MIDI IMPLEMENTATION CHART ..................
150
SPECIFICATIONS ...............................................
117
CHART OF CHORD FINGERINGS
FOR GUITAR .......................................................
152
INDEX ...................................................................
119
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
BLOCK DIAGRAM .............................................
125
JOB TABLE ..........................................................
126
vi
TABLE OF CONTENTS
USE OF ADVANCED RECORDING TECHNIQUES
– FACTORY SET SONG 1 .................................. 153
DEMO SONG 1-6 – CHORD CHARTS ..............
156
HOW TO USE THIS MANUAL (READ THIS FIRST!)
HOW TO USE THIS MANUAL
You are probably eager to try out your new GW50
right away and hear what it can do, rather than
have to read through a lot of instructions before
you can even get a sound out of it.
Before you do anything else, however, you should
read the PRECAUTIONS section. This tells you
briefly how to care for your new GW50, how to
avoid damaging it, and how to ensure long-term,
reliable operation.
Next, read through the section The GW50:
WHAT IT IS AND WHAT IT CAN DO.
This briefly gives you an overview of the
functions of the GW50 and how you can use it
effectively.
The bulk of the manual has been organized into
two parts: the GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
and the REFERENCE section.
Read the GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL) next. It
guides you step-by-step in setting up your GW50,
connecting it properly, and (most importantly!)
getting sound out of it. The section also goes on to
take you through some of the more important
functions of the GW50, explaining by way of
example how to use it.
(READ THIS FIRST!!)
The PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS is
also mainly for reference. However, you should
read through the parts here concerning the Pedal
Switches, since these are particularly useful and
convenient in operating the GW50. In general,
look through this section to familiarize yourself
with the controls, and refer to it when necessary.
The INDEX in the APPENDICES sections at the
back of this manual is also very helpful. It lists and
gives page numbers for virtually every function,
feature, control and terminal found on the GW50,
and gives you a quick, easy way to find what
you’re looking for.
Other parts of the APPENDICES and SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION sections provide
additional useful information: lists of all effect
programs, patterns and songs of the GW50, a list
of error messages, tips on troubleshooting (when
something doesn’t work as expected), and other
important information.
The REFERENCE section, on the other hand, is a
comprehensive guide to all functions. You won’t
need (or want) to read through all of it at once, but
it is there for you to refer to when you need information about a certain feature or function.
HOW TO USE THIS MANUAL (READ THIS FIRST!!)
1
THE GW50: WHAT IT IS AND WHAT IT CAN DO
THE GW50: WHAT IT IS AND WHAT IT CAN DO
WHAT IT IS …
Effect and Backing Sections
The GW50 is actually two different devices in one.
On the one hand, it has an Effect section which
provides high-quality and easy-to-use multi effects
designed especially for processing electric guitar.
On the other, it has a Backing section which
provides realistic automatic rhythm, chord and
bass patterns for creating your own accompaniment. Moreover, the GW50 includes a built-in
tuner for tuning your instrument without having to
remove it from the effect chain.
The Effect section has two mode groups: Manual,
which lets you use the GW50 effects just as would
a normal pedal effect unit, and Memory, which
lets you call up preset effect programs and create
your own original programs.
The Backing section also has two mode groups:
Pattern, which lets you play the various rhythm
patterns, and Song, which lets you play pre-programmed songs and create your own original
songs.
Modes of the GW50
The tree chart on the next page shows the relationships of the various modes of the GW50. There
are four main modes — Manual, Memory, Pattern
and Song — indicated by the shaded areas. All
other modes are either separate from them (as with
Tuner, MIDI Bulk Transmission and Demo) or are
subordinate to them.
2
THE GW50: WHAT IT IS AND WHAT IT CAN DO
The Effect and Backing sections are active simultaneously; however, when making adjustments or
performing certain operations within a mode in
one of the sections, generally you should press the
desired mode button ([MANUAL], [MEMORY]
or [SONG/PATTERN]) to make sure that the
mode is properly called up before attempting the
operation.
Functions in Each Mode
Specific functions and operations of the various
modes include:
Manual: Changing the parameters of the effects.
Manual Job: Storing parameter settings to a program.
Memory: Selecting and using an effect program.
Memory Edit: Changing the parameters of an
effect program.
Memory Edit Compare: Comparing the sound and
values of edited program with the
original.
Memory Job: Copying, swapping and naming
effect programs.
Pattern: Playing the patterns of the Backing section.
Song: Playing a song, or using the Step Recording
features to edit a song.
Song Realtime Recording: Recording events to a
song in realtime.
Song Job: Copying or deleting measures within a
song; naming a song.
Keep in mind as you read this manual that the
phrase “main modes” refers to the Manual,
Memory, Pattern and Song modes, and that
“mode buttons” refers to the [MANUAL],
[MEMORY] and [SONG/PATTERN] buttons.
THE GW50: WHAT IT IS AND WHAT IT CAN DO
EFFECT SECTION
MANUAL MODE
JOB MODE
or
EDIT MODE
or
MEMORY MODE
COMPARE MODE
JOB MODE
BACKING SECTION
PATTERN MODE
or
REALTIME RECORDING MODE
or
SONG MODE
(PLAY / STEP RECORDING / EDIT)
JOB MODE
or
TUNER MODE
or
Main modes
MIDI BULK TRANSMISSION MODE
or
DEMO MODE
The illustration below shows what comprises an
effect program (either Manual or Memory), and
Manual Effect Program
Contents of an Effect Program
EFFECT
ORDER
IN
Compressor
EFFECT
TYPE
Memory Effect Program
write
(store)
ONE EFFECT PROGRAM
order changeable
the bank number/program number configuration to
which they can be stored.
There are 50 factory preset memory
effect programs. These can be freely
edited and stored.
Noise
Gate order changeble
Distortion
Equalizer
Chorus
Reverb/Delay
•DIST1
•DIST2
•DIST3
•DIST4
•Overdrive
•Equalizer
•Wah+EQ
•Amp
Simulator
+EQ
•Chorus 1
•Chorus 2
•Pitch
Shifter
•Flanger
•Phaser
•Reverb
•Delay (Tap)
•Delay
+Reverb
OUT
Bank
number
Program number
EFFECT
PARAMETERS
BYPASS
SETTINGS
OTHER UTILITY
SETTINGS (Group, Foot Controller, Minimum Volume, Auto Volume)
THE GW50: WHAT IT IS AND WHAT IT CAN DO
3
THE GW50: WHAT IT IS AND WHAT IT CAN DO
The illustration below shows how the Pattern
mode and Song mode are used.
Pattern Mode
In the Pattern mode, individual patterns are played
back and repeated.
Song Mode
In the Song mode, the preset patterns can be strung
together to create a song. Other events, such as
chord changes and muting events, can also be
entered.
Pattern A
Pattern B
(for examples,
2 measures)
Recorded events (chord changes, muting events etc.)
WHAT IT CAN DO …
Here are a few ideas on how you can
use your GW50. The list below is in
no way comprehensive, but is meant
to be a starting point or springboard for your own creative ideas
and explorations.
■ All-in-one effect unit for
on the stage, in the
studio, or in rehearsal
With its five effect blocks, the GW50 has all you
need to augment your sound, whatever the application. Any or all five effects can be used in virtually
any combination as an effect program, and you can
instantly select from 50 different effect programs
as you play. Plus, flexible effect bypass (on/off)
functions give you even more real time control
over the sound.
■ Convenient practice tool
The rhythm, bass and accompaniment patterns of
the GW50 are perfect for playing along with. By
stringing together the rhythm patterns and recording chord changes, you can create and playback
complete songs over which you can practice.
4
THE GW50: WHAT IT IS AND WHAT IT CAN DO
Having the full accompaniment behind you is a
much more inspiring and exciting way of
practicing than using just a metronome.
■ Sketchpad for composing and
arranging
The accompaniment features can also be used to
help you flesh out your own musical ideas. With
the wealth of chords (a total of 25 different chord
types for each of the 12 keys) and the convenient
editing features, the GW50 makes it exceptionally
easy to quickly turn your inspirations into complete
songs. Plus, the extraordinarily realistic sounds
give you the tools to present polished versions of
your ideas to others.
Now that you have a basic idea of how the GW50
can help you in your music, go on to the GUIDED
TOUR (TUTORIAL), and learn how to set up and
use your GW50.
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
This section shows and explains all of the controls and terminals of the GW50. Since
the explanations below are fairly brief, you should turn to the page references given
for more information on individual buttons and features.
A few general comments:
■ Some of the buttons described below must be
pressed together to call up a certain function.
These are indicated either by a “+” mark (for
example, “[SHIFT] + [SUB PARAM]”), or by
the word “with” (for example, “With
[SHIFT]:”).
■ Markings for three of the panel controls which
are used simultaneously with another control —
SHIFT , CHORD and B (for the ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch) — are enclosed in a
border which indicates the direction(s) in which
their companion controls can be found. For
example, the CHORD mark points to the right,
indicating that the settings below the buttons on
the right can be selected by simultaneously
pressing CHORD and the appropriate button.
■ Also, keep in mind that the function which is
enabled — simultaneously holding down
SHIFT , CHORD or B , and pressing that
button — is always printed below the button.
■ The buttons whose primary functions are indicated in boxed titles above each button
([MANUAL], [MEMORY] and [SONG/PATTERN]) are referred to as the “mode buttons”
and can be conveniently used as exit buttons to
“escape” from most in-progress operations
(such as Copying, Naming, MIDI Bulk
Transmission, etc.).
■ All controls that are used to increase or decrease values feature continuous and rapid
operation, to let you more quickly and easily
reach a desired value. With the [–]/[+] buttons,
hold down one button to continuously move
through the values and, while holding down
that button, press the other to increase the
speed. Releasing the second button returns to
normal speed. With Pedal Switches 1 and 2
(when used for [–]/[+] control) and the Position
Control buttons (<, >, etc.), holding down the
appropriate control moves through the values
with increasing speed.
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
5
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
■ TOP PANEL
21
20
22
s
14
4
15
16
19
17 18
5
6
8
7
9
10
11
12
13
2
23
1
24
3
1Effect Type Switch
• For selecting the different effect types available
in each effect block. These are active only in the
Manual and Memory Edit modes. (See pages 26,
44.)
2Parameter Knobs
• For adjusting the main parameters of the effects. These are active only in the Manual and
Memory Edit modes. (See page 26.)
3Effect Block Pedal Switches
• The Pedal Switches have different functions
depending on the mode selected.
In Manual mode: For turning individual effect
blocks (or groups) on and off. (See page 11.)
In Memory mode: For selecting effect programs and changing the banks of the effect
programs. (See page 11.) Also, when ASSIGNABLE Pedal Switch has been pressed
twice quickly, for turning individual effect
blocks (or groups) on and off. (See page 11.)
6
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
In Memory Edit mode: For selecting which
effect blocks are active in an effect program.
(See page 11.)
In Pattern mode: For performing various
control functions, such as (when BACKING
CONTROL is selected) selecting patterns,
starting or stopping a pattern, or (in CHORD
RECALL) changing to pre-assigned chords.
(See page 12.)
In Song mode (playback): For performing
various control functions, such as: selecting
songs, fast forwarding/rewinding within a
song, starting/stopping songs. (See page 13.)
In Song mode (recording): For starting or
stopping song recording and selecting preassigned chords. (See page 13.)
• The REVERB/DELAY Pedal Switch is also
used as a delay time tap control. (See page 67.)
For more information on the Pedal Switches, see the
boxed section “ASSIGNABLE BLOCK AND PEDAL
SWITCH FUNCTIONS” on pages 10-14.
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
4MANUAL (TUNER)
• For selecting the Manual mode. Pressing this
button in any operating condition calls up the
Manual mode.
• With [SHIFT]: For selecting the Tuner
function. (See pages 39, 99.)
5MEMORY (COPY/NAME)
• For selecting the Memory mode. Pressing this
button in any operating condition calls up the
Memory mode.
• With [SHIFT]: For calling up (and toggling
between) the Effect Copy, Effect Swap and
Effect Name operations.
6EDIT/COMPARE (MIDI BULK)
• In Memory mode: Selects the Memory
Edit mode, and serves as a Compare switch to
toggle between the newly edited settings of an
effect program and its original settings (the
LED flashes in the Compare condition). (See
pages 29, 53.)
• With [SHIFT]: For calling up the MIDI
Bulk Transmission operation. (See page 102.)
7Effect Utility Switch
(CONNECT … AUTO VOL)/(SUB PARAM)
• For selecting the miscellaneous Utility functions of the GW50:
■ CONNECT — For determining the order of
the effect blocks. (See page 45.)
■ GROUP — For simultaneously switching
several effect blocks on/off. (See page 45.)
■ FOOT (Foot Controller) — For determining how the optional FC7 Foot Controller is
used. (See pages 46, 47.)
■ MIN VOL (Minimum Volume) — For determining the minimum volume setting for the
optional FC7 Foot Controller and the ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch (which can be used
to instantly change between minimum and
maximum volume). (See page 47.)
■ AUTO VOL (Auto Volume) — ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch can be used to
gradually fade up volume at the rate set here.
(See page 49.)
• With [SHIFT]: For calling up Noise
Gate effect parameter. (See pages 31, 69.)
This also calls up the sub parameters of the
Equalizer, Chorus and Reverb/Delay effects.
(See page 44.)
8~# Position Control Buttons
8~@ Effect Selector Buttons
8CMP/<< (SONG NAME)
• After pressing [SHIFT] + [SUB PARAM]:
Calls up Noise Gate parameter.
• In Connect and Group functions: Selects
Compressor effect block.
• In Song mode: For moving to the top of the
current or last measure. Hold down for rapid
operation.
• In Song mode, with [v]: For returning to the
beginning of a song.
9DST/< (MEAS DEL)
• After pressing [SHIFT] + [SUB PARAM]:
Calls up Noise Gate parameter.
• In Connect and Group functions: Selects
Distortion effect block.
• In Song mode: For moving backward in 16thnote steps. Hold down for rapid operation.
• In Song mode (with [SHIFT]): For deleting a
selected range of measures from a song.
• In Song mode, with [n]: For returning to the
beginning of a song.
0EQ/> (MEAS COPY)
• After pressing [SHIFT] + [SUB PARAM]:
Calls up Equalizer Sub parameters.
• In Connect and Group functions: Selects
Equalizer effect block.
• In Song mode: For moving forward in 16thnote steps. Hold down for rapid operation.
• In Song mode, with [ >>]: For moving to the end
(last recorded event) of a song.
• In Song mode (with [SHIFT]): For copying a
selected range of measures in a song.
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
7
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
21
20
22
s
14
4
15
16
19
17 18
5
6
8
7
9
10
11
12
13
2
23
1
24
3
!CHO/>> (ERASE)
• After pressing [SHIFT] + [SUB PARAM]:
Calls up Chorus Sub parameters.
• In Connect and Group functions: Selects
Chorus effect block.
• In Song mode: For moving to the top of the
next measure. Hold down for rapid operation.
• In Song mode, with [>>]: For moving to the end
(last recorded event) of a song.
• In Song mode (with [SHIFT]): For erasing the
recorded event(s) at a specific position in a
song.
@REV/SET-A (JUMP-A)
• After pressing [SHIFT] + [SUB PARAM]:
Calls up Reverb/Delay Sub parameters.
• In Connect and Group functions: Selects
Reverb/Delay effect block.
• In Song mode: For setting the “A” mark in a
song. Pressing [SHIFT] + [JUMP-A] jumps to
the A-marked measure.
8
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
#Foot Controller/SET-B (JUMP-B)
• In the Foot (Foot Controller) function: For
determining how the connected foot controller
is used. (See page 46.)
• In Song mode: For setting the “B” mark in a
song. Pressing [SHIFT] + [JUMP-B] jumps to
the B-marked measure.
$SHIFT
• For selecting the shifted-state functions, indicated by the names printed below the appropriate buttons. Hold down this button and simultaneously press the appropriate button. (The
arrow marks printed with the button name
indicate the direction in which the appropriate
buttons can be found.)
%– (ACCOMP)
• For decreasing a selected parameter value (as
described for the modes below). Hold down for
rapid operation.
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
In Song/Pattern mode: For decreasing the
value at the cursor position (for example,
Tempo or Pattern).
In Memory mode: For moving backward through
the effect programs, one by one (when the
cursor arrow is not shown in the display).
In Manual and Memory Edit mode (sub parameters, MIN VOL, and AUTO VOL): For
decreasing the value of the selected sub
parameter (when the cursor arrow is at the
bottom of the display).
• With [SHIFT] (in the Song/Pattern modes):
For turning the sound of the Backing Accompaniment on and off, while the song or pattern is
playing.
^+ (BASS)
• For increasing a selected parameter value (as
described for the modes below). Hold down for
rapid operation.
In Song/Pattern mode: For increasing the value
at the cursor position (for example, Tempo
or Pattern).
In Memory mode: For moving forward through
the effect programs, one by one (when the
cursor arrow is not shown in the display).
In Memory Edit mode (sub parameters, MIN
VOL, and AUTO VOL): For increasing the
value of the selected sub parameter (when the
cursor arrow is at the bottom of the display).
• With [SHIFT] (in the Song/Pattern modes):
For turning the sound of the Backing Bass on
and off, while the song or pattern is playing.
*SONG/PATTERN (SONG REC)
• For switching between the Song and Pattern
modes. The LED of the selected function lights.
• With [SHIFT]: For enabling realtime recording
of a song (the LED flashes to indicate record
standby). (See pages 37, 84.)
(START/STOP (A-B REPEAT )
• For starting/stopping the Backing Song or
Pattern (the LED flashes).
• With [SHIFT]: For enabling the Repeat function. (See pages 92, 93.)
)CHORD
• Similar to [SHIFT], for selecting the secondary
(lower) functions of the Chord buttons. The
arrow mark pointing right (printed with the
button name) indicates the direction in which
the appropriate buttons can be found. (For
details on this and other chord-related functions,
refer to pages 74-76.)
qChord Buttons
• For selecting the chord root note, or (after
pressing [CHORD] + [on/ROOT]) for selecting the bass note.
• With [CHORD]: For selecting the chord type.
wENTER (on/ROOT)
• In Song mode (step recording): For recording or
entering event data to a song.
• With [CHORD]: For enabling selection of the
bass note.
&6 CURSOR (DRUMS)
• In Song/Pattern modes: For moving the cursor
arrow in the display.
• With [SHIFT] (in Song/Pattern modes): For
turning the sound of the Backing Drums on and
off, while the song or pattern is playing.
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
9
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
LCD Display
ASSIGNABLE Block Controls
2
4
s
eASSIGNABLE Block Type Switch
• For selecting various control functions for the
ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch and the
other Pedal Switches including effect program
selection, turning individual effect blocks (or
groups) on and off, MIN/MAX Volume, Auto
Volume, Backing Control and Chord Recall.
3
4
1
1 INPUT PEAK indicator — for monitoring the input signal
level (lights continuously when level is too high).
2 BANK/MEMORY indicator — displays the memory bank
and program numbers. When selecting songs, this briefly
displays the song number. In the Tuner function, this displays
the string number (when an open string is played) and/or the
name of the note played (for example, 6E).
3 Sharp indicator — This flashes when a sharp note (for
example, G or C) is played in the tuner function.
4 6 — This cursor arrow points to a value in the display that can
currently be changed by using the [–]/[+] buttons.
When [MANUAL] or [MEMORY] are pressed (calling up
the Effect mode display), the arrow automatically disappears
from the display. You can use [6 CURSOR] to move the
cursor arrow back “in” the display. When [SONG/PATTERN] is pressed (calling up the Backing mode display), the
cursor automatically appears in the display.
rASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch
• For performing various control functions,
including effect program selection, turning
individual effect blocks (or groups) on and off,
MIN/MAX Volume, Auto Volume, Backing
Control and Chord Recall. (The arrow mark
printed with the button name at the bottom left
indicates the direction in which the appropriate
buttons can be found.)
For more information on the ASSIGNABLE
Block Pedal Switch and the other Pedal
Switches, see the section “ASSIGNABLE
BLOCK AND PEDAL SWITCH FUNCTIONS”
on pages 10-14.
Note: Other display indications are explained later in
the relevant sections of the manual.
ASSIGNABLE BLOCK AND PEDAL SWITCH FUNCTIONS
ABOUT THE ASSIGNABLE BLOCK LED INDICATORS
LED status
The following illustration shows how and under what conditions
the ASSIGNABLE block LEDs are lit.
: Lit
: Flashing
: Off
Indicates bank/
program number
can be selected.
Indicates effect
(or effect group) can
be turned on/off.
Indicates maximum Indicates minimum
volume.
volume.
Off
(not active).
MEMORY (
BANK)/
x2 ON•OFF
MIN/MAX VOLUME
Off
(not active).
AUTO VOLUME (
MUTE
FADE IN)
Note: The MEMORY LED
above will still be lit or flashing,
even if either of these is on.
BACKING CONTROL
Indicates maximum
Indicates mute
volume.
or fade-in condition.
On
(active).
Indicates Triggered
Run standby condition.
On
(active).
10
Off
(not active).
Off
(not active).
Off
(not active).
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
CHORD RECALL
When [MANUAL] is pressed
the MEMORY LED here flashes,
and no other LED in this block is lit.
When [MEMORY] is pressed
only the MEMORY LED here is lit or flashing.
When [SONG/PATTERN] is pressed
When [SHIFT] + [SONG REC]
are pressed
only the BACKING CONTROL LED is lit.
only the CHORD RECALL LED is lit.
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
ABOUT THE PEDAL SWITCHES
The Pedal Switches have many different functions, depending on the ASSIGNABLE block settings
(indicated by the LEDs in the ASSIGNABLE block) and the selected mode. The following panel illustrations and explanations should help you in understanding how the Pedal Switches are used.
In the Manual, Memory* and Memory Edit modes:
When switching on/off individual effect blocks (or Groups) is enabled —
* Available in Memory mode only when ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch has been pressed twice
quickly (enabling effect on/off control).
Memory LED flashes.
Turns Compressor
(or selected Group)
on or off.
Turns Distortion
(or selected Group)
on or off.
Turns Equalizer
(or selected Group)
on or off.
Turns Chorus
(or selected Group)
on or off.
Turns Reverb/Delay
(or selected Group)
on or off.
In Memory mode, pressing
once enables effect program
selection with Pedal Switches
1–5. For controlling MIN/MAX
VOLUME or AUTO VOLUME
(when either of those functions
have been selected with the
type switch).
In the Memory mode:
When selection of effect bank number/program number is enabled —
Memory LED is lit continuously.
Selects effect program
number 1 (for the
current bank); with the
ASSIGNABLE Block
Pedal Switch, selects
bank 1 or 6.
Selects effect program
number 2 (for the
current bank); with the
ASSIGNABLE Block
Pedal Switch, selects
bank 2 or 7.
Selects effect program
number 3 (for the
current bank); with the
ASSIGNABLE Block
Pedal Switch, selects
bank 3 or 8.
Selects effect program
Selects effect program
number 4 (for the
number 5 (for the
current bank); with the
current bank); with the
ASSIGNABLE Block
ASSIGNABLE Block
Pedal Switch, selects
Pedal Switch, selects
bank 4 or 9.
bank 5 or 0.
Pressing this once and pressing another Pedal Switch selects banks 1 – 5.
Holding this and pressing another Pedal Switch selects banks 6 – 0.
Pressing twice quickly enables Pedal Switch control over on/off of individual effect or selected Group.
For controlling MIN/MAX VOLUME or AUTO VOLUME
(when either of those functions have been selected with the type switch).
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
11
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
In the Pattern mode:
With BACKING CONTROL selected —
When pattern is stopped:
Decreases pattern
number by 2
(every other odd
numbered pattern).
Increases pattern
number by 2 (every
other odd numbered
pattern).
Starts pattern playback.
Pressing once selects CHORD RECALL; holding this and pressing one of
Pedal Switches 1 – 4 assigns current chord to the pressed Pedal Switch.
Holding this enables the Root Select function (see page 78).
When pattern is playing back:
Decreases pattern
number by 2
(every other odd
numbered pattern).
Increases pattern
number by 2
(every other odd
numbered pattern).
Plays fill in pattern.
Plays ending pattern
(then stops playback).
Stops pattern
playback.
Pressing once selects CHORD RECALL; holding this and pressing one of
Pedal Switches 1 – 4 assigns current chord to the pressed Pedal Switch.
Holding this enables the Root Select function (see page 78).
In the Pattern mode:
With CHORD RECALL selected —
Plays chord 1 (with
ASSIGNABLE Pedal
Switch; assigns
chord 1).
Plays chord 2 (with
ASSIGNABLE Pedal
Switch; assigns
chord 2).
Plays chord 3 (with
ASSIGNABLE Pedal
Switch; assigns
chord 3).
Plays chord 4 (with
ASSIGNABLE Pedal
Switch; assigns
chord 4).
Starts/stops pattern
playback.
Pressing once selects BACKING CONTROL; holding this and pressing one
of Pedal Switches 1 – 4 assigns current chord to the pressed Pedal Switch.
Holding this enables the Root Select function (see page 78).
12
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
In the Song mode (playback):
With BACKING CONTROL selected —
When song is stopped:
Decreases song
number by 1.
Increases song
number by 1.
Moves to previous
measure.
Moves to next
measure.
Starts song playback.
Holding this and pressing Pedal Switch 5 enables
Triggered Run function (see page 82).
When song is playing back:
Moves to beginning
of current measure.
Moves to
next measure.
Stops song playback.
Plays chord 4.
Starts/stops song
recording.
In the Song Realtime Recording mode:
With CHORD RECALL selected —
Plays chord 1.
Plays chord 2.
Plays chord 3.
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
13
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
* The following chart shows which ASSIGNABLE Block functions are available in which modes.
Also refer to the section “ASSIGNABLE BLOCK AND PEDAL SWITCH FUNCTIONS CHART”
on page 128.
ASSIGNABLE Block function
Manual
MEMORY: BANK/NUMBER select
×
Memory
Memory
Edit
Pattern
Song
Song Realtime
Recording
●
×
—
—
—
or
MEMORY: ON/OFF
●
●
●
—
—
—
MIN/MAX VOLUME
●
●
●
—
—
—
AUTO VOLUME
●
●
●
—
—
—
BACKING CONTROL
—
—
—
●
●
×
CHORD RECALL
—
—
—
●
×
●
● : Available
× : Not available
— : Not relevant (to this mode)
Shaded sections indicate settings that are automatically selected when the corresponding mode buttons are pressed.
14
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
■ REAR PANEL
1
2
3 4
5
6 7
1POWER ON/OFF Switch
2DC IN Terminal
For connection to the supplied PA-3 AC
adaptor.
The cable clip located next to this terminal
helps to prevent accidental unplugging of the
power supply during use. Wrap the adaptor
cord firmly around the clip (as shown at right).
8 9 0 ! @
#
5L/L+R OUTPUT and R OUTPUT Jacks
For stereo or mono output of the instrument/
effect sound. Connect both of these to the
corresponding left and right channels of your
stereo amplification system to take full advantage of the stereo effects of the GW50. For
mono operation, connect your system to the
L/L+R jack; this provides a mono mix of the
instrument/effect sound.
6BACKING/MONO OUTPUT Jack
When only this output jack is connected, this
outputs a mono mix of the Backing Accompaniment, Bass and Drums sound, plus the input
instrument/effect sound. When the other
output(s) are also connected, only the Backing
sound is output from this jack.
7BACKING LEVEL Control
For adjusting the level of the Backing Accompaniment, Bass and Drums output.
3PHONES Jack
For output of both the Backing sound (mono)
and the instrument/effect sound (stereo) to a set
of stereo headphones.
4Headphone LEVEL Control
For adjusting only the headphone output; this
does not affect the output of the other output
jacks.
8Input LEVEL Control
For adjusting the level of the input signal.
9INPUT Jack
For connection of an instrument (guitar, bass,
etc.). (See pages 19, 20 for more information on
input/output connections.)
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
15
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
0LCD SETTING Switch
Two-position (Floor/Desktop) switch for setting
the display contrast for optimum
viewing.
@FOOT CONTROLLER Jack
For connection of an optional foot controller
(Yamaha FC7), for controlling certain functions
and parameters as you play. (See page 46.)
!FOOT SW Jack
For connection of an optional footswitch
(Yamaha FC5 or FC4), for controlling certain
functions and parameters as you play. (See
pages 56, 57.)
#MIDI IN/OUT Terminals
For connection of MIDI cables, when using the
GW50 with other MIDI devices. (See page
101.)
16
PANEL CONTROLS AND TERMINALS
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL) —
SETTING UP, PLAYING AND
USING YOUR GW50
SETTING UP AND PLAYING YOUR
GW50 ....................................................................
19
DEMO MODE — PLAYING THE
DEMONSTRATION SONGS ..............................
22
EFFECT SECTION ...............................................
24
PLAYING WITH SOME OF THE
EFFECTS ..........................................................
24
CHANGING THE SOUND OF
THE EFFECTS .................................................
26
CHANGING (EDITING) AN EFFECT
PROGRAM AND SAVING IT ........................
29
USING THE NOISE GATE TO GET
A CLEAN SIGNAL ..........................................
31
BACKING SECTION ...........................................
32
PLAYING PATTERNS —
PATTERN MODE ............................................
32
PLAYING AND RECORDING SONGS —
SONG MODE ...................................................
36
USING THE BUILT-IN TUNER .........................
39
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
18
SETTING UP AND PLAYING YOUR GW50
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
SETTING UP AND PLAYING YOUR GW50
Once you’ve taken your GW50 out of the box and are ready to use it, follow the
simple instructions below in making the connections and setting it up.
1.
First, make sure that the power switch on the
GW50 is off before making ANY connections.
INPUT
2.
Plug the DC output cable from the supplied
PA-3 adaptor into the DC IN terminal on the
rear panel, then plug the adaptor into a convenient AC outlet.
For the sake of these instructions, we’ll
assume you’re using an electric guitar; however, most any electronic instrument can be
used.
Cable clip (see page 15).
DC IN
Note: You should be careful if you are connecting a
synthesizer or electronic keyboard; generally
their output level is much higher than that of a
guitar and the input level (see step #6 below)
should be turned down accordingly.
Note: Be sure to check whether the rated voltage is
appropriate. The provided adaptor is intended
for use in the area which you purchased the
GW50. If you intend to use it in a different area,
consult your Yamaha dealer for more information on voltage requirements.
CAUTION
4.
CAUTION
3.
Do not attempt to use a different AC adaptor with the GW50. The use of an incompatible adaptor may cause irreparable damage
to the unit and pose a serious shock hazard.
Plug your instrument into the INPUT jack on
the rear panel.
Do not connect the BACKING/MONO output
jack with the INPUT jack in an attempt to
use the effects of the GW50 on the Backing
sound. Doing so results in feedback.
Connect the GW50 outputs to your amplifier/
speaker system, making sure that the power
on the system is first turned off.
Four example connection systems are
shown below. Use the one which most
closely resembles your own system.
Note:When using Distortion on the GW50,
use the clean channel of the guitar amp.
SETTING UP AND PLAYING YOUR GW50
19
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
Example 1 — One Input
In this system, a guitar amp with
only one input is used. Since the
Backing sound and instrument/effect
sound are output together, adjust the
balance between the two with the
rear panel BACKING LEVEL control.
In examples 2, 3 and 4 above, only the Backing
parts (rhythm, accompaniment, etc.) are output
from the BACKING/MONO jack and only the
instrument/effect sound is output from the L/L + R
jack or the L/L + R and R jacks.
You can also listen to the GW50 through a set
of headphones. Connect them to the PHONES jack
on the rear panel.
Example 2 — Two Inputs
In this system, a guitar amp with
two inputs is used. The balance
between the instrument/effect
output and the Backing sound can
be adjusted on the amp.
5.
Example 3 — Guitar Amp(s) and Stereo System
Stereo
System
Use this (the L/L + R) jack
if only one amp is available.
Here, a stereo system is used
for only the Backing sound,
while the instrument/effect
sound goes into one or two
guitar amps.
This step isn’t necessary for using your
GW50 for the first time; however, you may
wish later to take advantage of some of the
external foot controller and footswitch functions. (See pages 46, 56 for more information.)
Example 4 — Mixing Console
This set up is best used with the
Amp Simulator effect.
In this system for studio recording
applications, the Backing sound
only goes into one channel of a
mixer, while the left and right
Mixing channels of the instrument/effect
Console sound go into separate mixer
channels.
20
If you have them, connect a foot controller
(the optional Yamaha FC7) to the FOOT
CONTROLLER jack, and a footswitch (the
optional Yamaha FC5 or FC4) to the FOOT
SW jack.
SETTING UP AND PLAYING YOUR GW50
6.
Make sure that all volume settings are at the
minimum: the guitar controls, the INPUT
LEVEL and BACKING LEVEL on the GW50
(and the PHONES LEVEL, if you’re using
headphones), and the volume on the amp.
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
Note: To set the controls on the GW50 to minimum,
turn them all the way counterclockwise.
7.
Turn on the power of all the equipment,
starting with the GW50, then the connected
amplifier.
* Adjust the LCD SETTING switch on the
rear panel to set the LCD for proper viewing. Set it to FLOOR when you are using
the GW50 on the floor, and to DESKTOP
when you have it set on a table or desk in
front of you.
8.
Before turning up the volume and trying to
play, set all effects to off.
To do this, press [MANUAL] (even if the
[MANUAL] LED is lit) …
9.
While playing your guitar, slowly bring up
the volume controls to suitable levels —
starting with the amp, then the guitar output.
Finally, adjust the input level control on
the rear panel. Increase the level slowly as
you play the guitar while looking at the
INPUT PEAK indicator on the panel. The
indicator should flash only slightly when you
play the guitar at its loudest.
Also, check that the guitar sound doesn’t
have distortion at its loudest.
10. Do the same with the BACKING LEVEL.
First turn the backing on by pressing
[START/STOP]…
…then, if any effect block LED is lit, press
Pedal Switches 1–5 to turn all effects off (all
effect block LEDs should be off).
off
…then turn up the BACKING LEVEL to a
suitable volume.
If you’ve followed all these instructions carefully,
you should be able to hear both your guitar sound
processed by the effects, and the sound of the
backing parts.
Note: To stop the backing, press [START/STOP]
press these
again.
SETTING UP AND PLAYING YOUR GW50
21
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
DEMO MODE —
PLAYING THE DEMONSTRATION SONGS
The GW50 features a special Demo mode that showcases some of the interesting
things that can be accomplished by using the Backing patterns and the song recording
functions. The Song Demo plays continuously through preset songs 1 to 6, while the
Pattern Demo plays various patterns in succession. Try playing along on your guitar
with both of the demos, since they feature some effect program changes as well.
To use the Demo mode:
1.
Simultaneously hold down [SONG/PATTERN] and press [START/STOP].
Note:
The Demo mode cannot be entered from the Memory
Edit modes (EDIT/COMPARE LED is lit or flashes).
In this case, exit the Memory Edit modes (see pages
30, 53).
Select Pattern Demo
Select Song Demo
The Song or Pattern Demo begins playing
once you press the appropriate button.
(The [START/STOP] LED flashes.)
(You can abort or exit the Demo mode at this
stage by pressing any of the mode buttons.)
2.
Select the Song Demo by pressing [SET-A]
(below “SONG” in the display), or the Pattern Demo by pressing [SET-B] (below
“PTN” in the display).
3.
While the Song Demo or Pattern Demo is
playing back, try playing your guitar along
with the song or pattern.
You’ll notice that some effect program
changes have been recorded to the Demo,
automatically changing the sound as you
play.
If you’ve selected the Pattern Demo, you
can change chords as it plays by pressing
Pedal Switches 1 – 4. The following chords
have been assigned to the Pedal Switches:
C
22
DEMO MODE — PLAYING THE DEMONSTRATION SONGS
Am
F
G
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
4.
To stop the Demo, press [SET-B] (below
“STOP” in the display) or [START/STOP]
(or any of the mode buttons).
Note: All the songs or patterns play in succession
indefinitely until stopped.
Note:While the Demo mode is called up,
other functions are not active.
DEMO MODE — PLAYING THE DEMONSTRATION SONGS
23
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
EFFECT SECTION
The GW50 is equipped with a comprehensive set of effects designed specifically for
the guitar player. As you’ll see below, the GW50 lets you switch these effects on and
off as needed and adjust them quickly and easily from the panel controls and Pedal
Switches.
The effects are divided into five groups or blocks, and they include the following
specific effects:
Compressor
Distortion
Equalizer
Chorus
Reverb/Delay
Compressor
Distortion 1, 2, 3, 4, and Overdrive
Four-band Parametric EQ, Wah + Two-band EQ, and
Amp Simulator + Two-band EQ
Chorus 1, 2, Pitch Shifter, Flanger, and Phaser
Reverb, Delay, and Delay + Reverb,
(Refer to the “EFFECTS AND PARAMETERS” section, page 58, for more detailed
descriptions and explanations of these effects.)
A programmable Noise Gate is also included for filtering out hum, hiss and
other undesirable noise when the signal is low. (See pages 31, 69.)
PLAYING WITH SOME OF THE EFFECTS
Now that you’ve got sound out of the
GW50 and have heard some of the Demo
Songs, let’s try playing with some of the
effects.
1.
2.
First, try playing with a clean chorus and
delay effect. Use the [–]/[+] buttons to select
program number 25. (The [–]/[+] buttons also
feature rapid operation; see page 5.)
Press [MEMORY], even if the MEMORY
LED is lit.
s
24
EFFECT SECTION
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
3.
Now, try a heavy distortion sound. Use the
[–]/[+] buttons again, this time selecting
program number 74.
6.
s
4.
Press the Pedal Switch corresponding to the
bank you wish to select, 1 – 5 (printed at the
top left of each Pedal Switch).
s
Next, let’s call up a classic rock’n’roll delay
effect. This time though, use the Pedal
Switches to select the program. (If the
MEMORY LED in the ASSIGNABLE Block
is flashing, press the ASSIGNABLE Block
Pedal Switch to make it light continuously.)
Press Pedal Switch 1. This selects program
number 71.
To select one of the banks 6 – 0, simultaneously press and hold down the ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch, and press the
corresponding Pedal Switch, 6 – 0 (printed at
the bottom left of each Pedal Switch).
Notice that the program numbers all have two
digits. The first number is actually the bank
number. The 50 programs are divided into 10
banks of five programs each. In the last step,
you just selected the 1st program of the 7th
bank.
5.
To select both a bank number and program
number with the Pedal Switches, press the
ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch once.
s
The bank number flashes
to indicate the bank can be selected.
7.
Finally, select one of the five programs in the
bank (as you did in step #4 above).
8.
Now, go on to explore some of the other
effect programs, selecting them either with
the [–]/[+] buttons or the Pedal Switches.
Look through the Preset Effect Program list
on page 132 for more information about the
programs, and play with a few of them to
hear how they sound.
EFFECT SECTION
25
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
CHANGING THE SOUND OF THE EFFECTS
The effect section of the GW50 has three
basic modes: Manual, Memory and
Memory Edit. In this section we’ll use the
Manual mode, since it provides a
convenient starting point for adjusting
and creating effects.
1.
ATTACK: 7
SENSE: –24 dB
OUTPUT: 100%
DRIVE: 50%
SPEED: 0.60 Hz
BRIL (Brilliance):
0 dB
TONE: 0%
DEPTH: 50%
OUTPUT: 50%
To select the Manual mode, press
[MANUAL].
LOW: 0 dB
L MID: 0 dB
H MID: 0 dB
TIME:
2.0 seconds
HIGH: 0.5
MIX: 25%
HIGH: 0 dB
4.
2.
Next, use the Pedal Switches to turn on only
the Chorus block. For example, if the Compressor is on (its red LED will be lit), press
the Pedal Switch in the block to turn it off; if
the Chorus is off (its LED will be off), press
the Pedal Switch in the block to turn it on.
Make sure that each effect block is set to its
first effect, as shown below. If it isn’t, press
the effect type switch until the LED next to
the appropriate effect is lit. (For example, the
DIST 1 LED should be lit in the Distortion
block.)
Note: The settings you’ve made in steps #2, #3 and
#4 above are only arbitrary; they make it possible for you to use and hear all of the effect
blocks. (However, the Equalizer effect is “flat”
for these settings, and cannot be heard unless
you adjust them.)
3.
26
To start out, set the parameter knobs of the
effect blocks roughly to the positions shown
below. (The approximate suggested values of
the parameters are also given.)
EFFECT SECTION
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
5.
Try playing your guitar now, and as you play,
adjust the SPEED control in the CHORUS
block and listen to how the sound changes.
LED is off.
LED is off.
Notice that the red LED at the top of the
block is now off, indicating that the effect is
off. Press the CHORUS Pedal Switch again
to turn the effect and the LED back on.
The Speed parameter is shown in the LCD,
along with the value. Notice how the value
changes as you turn the knob.
Do the same with the other controls in the
CHORUS block, too. In fact, go on and try
out the other effects as well, first by turning
them on with the respective Pedal Switches,
then adjusting their parameter knobs.
In the Manual mode, all the effect controls
are “live” or active — you can change the
effect settings directly from the panel knobs
as you would with a normal pedal effect box.
Moreover, the values are displayed instantly
as you change them.
6.
As you’ve seen, you can also turn individual
effect blocks on or off by simply pressing the
Pedal Switch of the appropriate block. For
example, to turn off CHORUS here, press the
CHORUS Pedal Switch. (Note: This only
works for individual effects that have not
been assigned to a Group; see page 45 for
details.)
Although we’re using the Pedal Switches to
turn a single effect block on and off, it is
possible to “group” together several effect
blocks to be turned on and off from just one
Pedal Switch. For more information on how
to use this function, see page 45.
7.
Take a look now at the LCD again. Notice
the chain of five boxes at the bottom left.
These represent the effect blocks.
Compressor
Equalizer
Distortion
Reverb/Delay
Chorus
This shows the current order of the effects in
the chain, from left to right. Remember that
you can change this order. To do this, press
the Utility switch until “CONECT” is shown
in the LCD.
EFFECT SECTION
27
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
8.
Use the five switches just below the LCD
(labeled CMP, DST, EQ, CHO and REV) to
select the order of the corresponding effects.
Next, press [CMP] to select Compressor for
the second effect.
Note:
Compressor, Distortion and Equalizer can only be
selected for the first three effects, while Chorus and
Reverb/Delay are always the last two.
Equalizer (EQ) is automatically selected for
the third effect, since the last two are reserved for Chorus and Reverb/Delay.
Compressor
Equalizer
Distortion
Reverb/Delay
Chorus
For example, to put the Distortion first in the
chain, press [DST].
28
EFFECT SECTION
Finally, select the fourth effect in the chain.
Press [CHO].
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
Like with Equalizer above, Reverb/Delay is
selected automatically for the fifth effect after
you’ve selected Chorus for the fourth.
CHANGING (EDITING) AN EFFECT PROGRAM AND SAVING IT
In this section, you’ll learn how to take an
existing effect program in the Memory
mode and “tweak” it, or change its sound.
You’ll also learn how to compare it with
the original program. Finally, you’ll learn
how to recall that original program or
save your newly created one.
1.
2.
3.
Now, try changing the settings of the effect
blocks, as you did in the Manual mode
above.
4.
You can compare the sound of the newly
edited program with the sound of the original
one by pressing [EDIT/COMPARE] again.
Press [MEMORY], (even if the MEMORY is
lit) then select program number 25. Use the
[–]/[+] buttons or the Pedal Switches.
Press [EDIT/COMPARE]. This calls up the
Memory Edit mode.
The MEMORY and the EDIT/COMPARE LEDs both light, indicating
that the Memory Edit mode has been selected.
LED
flashes
The EDIT/COMPARE LED and the
BANK/MEMORY indicator flash,
indicating that the Compare function
is on and the original program is
active.
s
In this condition, you can hear the sound of
the original effect program. You can also
view the old parameter values by turning the
panel knobs. Doing this doesn’t change the
value, it simply displays it so that you can
check it against the value you’ve edited.
EFFECT SECTION
29
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
Switch between the original program and
your newly edited as often as you like by
pressing [EDIT/COMPARE].
5.
You have two choices here:
1) you can recall the original program (and
erase your changes), or
2) you can store your changes to the current
program number (and erase the original
one).
1) If you happen to like the sound of the
original effect program better than your
changes, press [MANUAL] or
[MEMORY] while the EDIT/COMPARE
LED is flashing (Compare condition).
This recalls the original program.
CAUTION
AVOID LOSING IMPORTANT DATA—After you’ve
made some edits using the steps above, be
careful NOT to press [MANUAL] or [MEMORY]
unless you are absolutely sure that you want to
either recall the original program or save the new
one. Be careful also to check which condition is
active — Edit (with the continuously lit LED) or
Compare (with the flashing LED). If you
mistakenly press [MANUAL] or [MEMORY] in either condition, you may irretrievably lose important data!
Note: Regarding the above caution, there are certain
precautions you can take to avoid losing important programs, such as backing up your original
ones with the MIDI Bulk Transmission function
(see page 102), and restoring factory preset
programs (see page 57) if you’ve erased them.
2) If you want to save your newly edited
program (and don’t mind erasing the
original one), press [MANUAL] or
[MEMORY] while the EDIT/COMPARE
LED is lit continuously (Edit condition).
30
EFFECT SECTION
HINT
TROUBLESHOOTING SOUND PROBLEMS—
Keep in mind that the sound of one effect
depends on the effects that are placed before it in the chain. If while creating an effect program, you don’t get any sound or
the sound is not what you expected it to
be, try listening to each effect block alone
in order to isolate the “problem” effect.
Usually the trouble is in the input or output
settings of an effect (see notes on pages
58, 59, 63 and 66 for more information). If
the input or output is too low, you may get
too soft a sound or no sound at all; if the
input or output is too high, you may get a
signal that is overloading subsequent
effects.
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
USING THE NOISE GATE TO GET A CLEAN SIGNAL
Since all its effects are connected internally,
the GW50 generates no noise of its own.
However, since the guitar and connecting
cord you use may not be as quiet as the
GW50, a built-in Noise Gate has been included
to filter out any unwanted noise or hum and
keep the signal completely quiet when you’re
not playing. (For more information on the
Noise Gate, see page 69.)
2.
Adjust the Threshold (THRESH) value in the
display, using the [–]/[+] buttons.
To select and adjust the noise gate:
1.
From Manual or Memory Edit mode, simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press
[SUB PARAM] until “N.GATE” is shown in
the LCD.
Set this to a high value when the noise level
is particularly high.
EFFECT SECTION
31
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
BACKING SECTION
The Backing section of the GW50 is divided into two modes:
Pattern and Song.
PLAYING PATTERNS — PATTERN MODE
The Pattern mode lets you play various
rhythm and accompaniment patterns in a
wide variety of styles. The patterns feature
dynamic and realistic drum, bass and other
accompaniment sounds, such as piano, guitar
and organ. What’s more, the sophisticated
accompaniment and bass sounds can be
changed to any key and automatically reharmonized in 25 different chord types. With
this kind of control, you’ve got a complete
backing band to accompany you as you
practice, play or perform.
1.
2.
32
3.
Press [SONG/PATTERN] until the PATTERN LED lights (even if the LED is already lit). This selects the Pattern mode.
Using [6 CURSOR], move the arrow in the
display to the PTN (Pattern) box.
BACKING SECTION
Now, you can use the [–]/[+] buttons to select
a pattern number. (The [–]/[+] buttons also
feature rapid operation; see page 5.)
With the exception of the last several patterns
(see note on page 73), note that only odd
number patterns can be selected here. These
are the basic rhythm patterns, and the even
ones are Fill In patterns. For example, pattern
#1 is the basic pattern and #2 is its companion Fill In pattern. (We’ll describe how to
play the Fill In patterns in step #5 below.)
4.
Press [START/STOP] to play the pattern
you’ve selected. (The LED above the button
flashes in time with the rhythm.)
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
You can also use Pedal Switch 5 (in the
Reverb/Delay block) to start the pattern.
6.
While one of the patterns is playing, try this:
Hold down [SHIFT] and press [ACCOMP].
Start/stop function
Notice that the accompaniment parts have
dropped out, and that all you hear are the
bass and drums. To bring the accompaniment
back in, hold down [SHIFT] and press
[ACCOMP] again. Try doing this in time
with the rhythm, pressing the button at the
end of a measure.
While the pattern is playing, you can use the
[–]/[+] buttons to select and listen to other
patterns. Try out various patterns to get a feel
for the enormous stylistic range of the Backing section. (There are a total of 248 patterns;
refer to the list on pages 144 and 145 for
more information about them.)
5.
Try doing the same with the bass and drum
parts as well, using [SHIFT] + [BASS] and
[SHIFT] + [DRUMS].
Now, play the corresponding fill in pattern
by pressing the Fill Pedal Switch (Pedal
Switch 3).
After you’ve played around with this for a
while, turn all of the backing sounds back on.
Fill In pattern
7.
Normally, you should press the Fill Pedal
Switch at the beginning of the measure you
wish the fill in pattern to play. However, you
can press it in the middle of a measure and
play only the last part of the fill in.
Note: If you press the Fill Pedal Switch too late
in the measure, you may not hear any
change from the normal pattern.
Now, let’s change chords while the pattern is
playing. The automatic chord features of the
GW50 are very sophisticated, so for the
moment we’ll show you one of the easiest
ways to change chords — by using the Pedal
Switches.
To set this up, press the ASSIGNABLE Type
switch until the CHORD RECALL LED is
lit. (You can also use the ASSIGNABLE
Block Pedal Switch to switch between
BACKING CONTROL and CHORD RECALL.)
Press Type switch until CHORD RECALL is lit.
BACKING SECTION
33
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
While the pattern is playing, press Pedal
Switch 2.
The chord changes as soon as you press the
Pedal Switch, and the new chord is shown in
the display. Press the other Pedal Switches
(1–4) to change to other chords. (These are
the factory-assigned chord settings for the
Pedal Switches.) Try doing this in time with
the rhythm as well.
Note: Be careful not to press Pedal Switch 5 here,
since it does not change the chord, but starts
or stops the pattern.
This mark is used to represent “” or “sharp.”
If the root note that you want isn’t selected
(each button has more than one root note),
press it again until the note is selected.
Next, let’s change the chord type. Remember
that the GW50 gives you a total 25 different
chord types for all keys. These chord types
are shown below the Chord buttons.
Note:
8.
For more information about the chord types, see the
lists of chord types on pages 76 and 152.
While the pattern is still playing, try using
the chord section at the top right of the panel
to select some other chords.
First, let’s change the root note of the chord.
To do this, press the Chord button corresponding to the desired note (written above
the button).
To select a different chord type, simultaneously hold [CHORD] and press the Chord
button corresponding to the desired type
(written below the button). Press it repeatedly
until the desired chord type is shown in the
LCD.
For example, hold [CHORD] and press
[D/E/E] until the “m” chord is selected.
34
BACKING SECTION
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
Try pressing other buttons now as the rhythm
plays to change to other bass notes.
To cancel this bass note and have the bass
line automatically change with the root note
again, hold [CHORD] and press one of the
Chord buttons to reselect the chord type.
HINT
Finally, you can even change the bass note.
First, simultaneously hold [CHORD] and
press [on/ROOT].
9.
You can also use the chord section functions to assign chords to the Pedal
Switches. (See page 78 for details.)
To stop playing the pattern, press [START/
STOP] again (or Pedal Switch 5).
You can also have the pattern stop with a
special ending pattern. To do this, first press
the ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch to
switch to BACKING CONTROL.
Next, press the Chord button corresponding
to the desired note (written above the button).
Press it repeatedly until the note you want is
shown in the LCD.
… then press the End Pedal Switch (Pedal
Switch 4) while the pattern is playing.
For example, to use C as the bass note, press
[C/C ] until the “/C ” is shown.
BACKING SECTION
35
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
PLAYING AND RECORDING SONGS — SONG MODE
The Song mode has eight songs (made up of
the patterns in the Pattern mode) for playing.
You can also record your own songs in this
mode, using the patterns and chords of the
Pattern mode. This provides a simple, yet
powerful “sketchpad” for composing, and it
also gives you solid, dynamic rhythm parts
complete with pre- programmed chord
changes for performing along with.
4.
Press [START/STOP] to start playing the
selected song. (The LED above the button
flashes in time with the rhythm.)
5.
When the song is finished playing, playback
stops. You can also pause (and resume)
playback in the middle of the song by pressing [START/STOP].
Playing a Song
1. Press [SONG/PATTERN] until the SONG
LED lights. This selects the Song mode.
Note: If you’ve stopped playback in the middle of a
2.
Using [6 CURSOR], move the arrow in the
display to the SONG box.
song and you want to return to the beginning,
simultaneously press [n] and [v].
Recording a Song
3.
36
Use the [–]/[+] buttons to select a song
number. (Refer to page 147 for a list of the
available songs and their descriptions.)
BACKING SECTION
You can use the drum, bass and accompaniment
patterns, along with the chords, as well as other
types of data, to create your own songs. Up to
eight songs can be recorded, and each song can
have up to 299 measures.
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
Songs can be recorded by using two different
methods: Realtime recording and Step recording.
2.
Using [6 CURSOR], move the arrow in the
display to the SONG box.
3.
Use the [–]/[+] buttons to select a song number.
(For this example, select song number 8, since
this has deliberately been left blank for you to
use in creating your own song.)
Realtime recording is similar to using a multitrack
tape recorder; you can hear the events as you
record them, and you can hear previously recorded
events as you record new ones on top.
Step recording, on the other hand, allows you to
record events one-by-one, using the controls on the
panel to “program” them to 16th note divisions of
a measure. It is much like writing down notes onto
a sheet of music paper; each event is entered one
at a time, and you cannot actually hear what the
event sounds like as you are entering it.
Each method has its own advantages and uses.
Step recording is good for precision and for editing purposes (erasing an event or replacing an
event). Realtime recording is best for capturing the
“feel” of the song, since it allows you to actually
“play” the events in time as you record them.
Note:
You can even switch between the two methods,
recording the basic parts with Realtime recording,
then using Step recording to add details and edit or
“clean up” the recording if needed.
HINT
RECORDING EFFECT CHANGES—After recording
the basic parts of the song (the patterns and
chord changes), you can also record effect program changes and their on/off settings in real
time as you play. (See page 86 for details.)
AVOID LOSING IMPORTANT SONGS—Once you do any
recording to a song, the changes that you make are
automatically saved to that song number. For this
reason, you should be careful when recording or editing an existing song. There are certain precautions
you can take to avoid losing important songs, such as
backing up your original ones with the MIDI Bulk
Transmission function (see page 102), and restoring
factory preset songs (see page 95) if you’ve erased
them.
4.
Simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press
[SONG REC].
To record a song:
1. First select the Song mode by pressing
[SONG/PATTERN] until the SONG LED
lights.
The SONG LED flashes to indicate record
standby.
BACKING SECTION
37
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
5.
The first thing to do before actually recording
is to select a pattern and a chord to start the
song with.
For this example, let’s use pattern number 5,
and start the song out with a C major chord.
You can do this while the GW50 is still in
record standby:
6.
Finally, start recording by pressing Pedal
Switch 5 (or [START/STOP]). The pattern
and the chord you selected are automatically
recorded to the first note of the first measure.
7.
As the recording continues, let’s try entering
new chords from the Pedal Switches, just as
we did in step #7 in the Pattern mode section
(see pages 33, 34):
Move the cursor arrow in the display to the
PTN box, by using [-> CURSOR].
While the song is recording, press Pedal
Switch 2.
Next, use the [–]/[+] buttons to select pattern
number 5. The pattern name appears in the
display.
The chord is recorded as soon as you press
the Pedal Switch, and the new chord is
shown in the display. Press the other Pedal
Switches (1–4) to change to other chords, in
time with the rhythm.
Note: Be careful not to press Pedal Switch 5
here, since it does not change the chord,
but starts or stops the pattern.
Now, select the chord. Press [C/C] until “C”
is shown in the display. If another chord type
appears (such as “C m” or “C SUS4”), simultaneously hold down [CHORD] and press [C/
C] until “C” (C major) is shown.
38
BACKING SECTION
8.
Now, stop the recording by pressing
[START/STOP].
If you’ve made some mistakes while recording above or just want to make some changes
or additions, you can always go back to the
start of the song and use Step recording
techniques to edit the existing song. (See
page 88 in the Reference section for information on Step recording.)
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
USING THE BUILT-IN TUNER
The GW50 has a convenient built-in tuner that lets you tune
your guitar without having to disconnect it.
1.
toward the left, indicating that the string is
slightly flat. When the string is sharp, the
marks will be on the right.
Simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press
[TUNER] (or simultaneously press and hold
don Pedal Switches 1 and 2 until the Tuner
mode display “PITCH” appears in the LCD).
Adjust the tuning of the string and play it
again. The tuning marks in the display should
move toward the center. When they are in or
around the center, the string is in tune.
or
s
2.
Now, making sure that other strings do not
sound, play the bottom E string on your
guitar. Let the string ring out, so that the
tuner receives a fairly constant pitch.
The effect block LEDs also function as
tuning indicators when the tuner is used, with
the Equalizer block LED serving as the
center tuning indicator.
The number of the string and the note name
appears in the BANK/MEMORY indicator.
s
3.
Go on and tune the other strings in the same
way.
The marks in the display shown above are
USING THE BUILT-IN TUNER
39
GUIDED TOUR (TUTORIAL)
4.
Return to normal operation by pressing any
of the mode buttons (or any of the Pedal
Switches).
This concludes our short tour of some of the functions of the
GW50. To find out more about using your GW50, look through the
Reference section now and read some of the topics that interest
you.
40
USING THE BUILT-IN TUNER
REFERENCE
EFFECT SECTION
ABOUT THE MANUAL, MEMORY AND
MEMORY EDIT MODES ....................................
43
ASSIGNABLE Block and Pedal Switch
Functions .......................................................
51
MANUAL MODE .................................................
44
Effect Program Selection ..........................
51
Selecting an Effect Type ...............................
44
Bypass Switching of Effect Blocks ..........
52
Turning Individual Effects On and Off.........
44
MEMORY EDIT MODE ..................................
53
Editing Parameters ........................................
44
Utility Functions ............................................
45
Compare Mode (Comparing the Edited
Program with the Original) ...........................
53
Saving the Memory Edit Mode Settings to
an Effect Program .........................................
53
Determining the Order of the Effect
Blocks — CONNECT ...............................
Bypass Switching of Effect Blocks —
GROUP .....................................................
Setting the Function of the External Foot
Controller — FOOT ..................................
Setting the MINIMUM VOLUME Level
(for External Foot Controller and
ASSIGNABLE Block Volume Control) —
MIN VOL ..................................................
45
45
46
47
Recalling the Settings of the Original Program
(in Compare Condition) ................................
54
MEMORY JOB MODE ....................................
54
Copying an Effect Program ..........................
54
Swapping One Effect Program with
Another ..........................................................
55
Naming an Effect Program ...........................
55
Using an External Footswitch .......................
56
ASSIGNABLE Block Functions —
MIN/MAX Volume and Auto Volume .........
48
RESTORING FACTORY PRESET EFFECT
PROGRAMS .....................................................
57
Setting the AUTO VOLUME Rate —
AUTO VOL ..................................................
49
EFFECTS AND PARAMETERS .........................
58
MANUAL JOB MODE ........................................
50
COMPRESSOR .................................................
58
DISTORTION ...................................................
59
Saving the Manual Mode Settings to
an Effect Program .........................................
50
EQUALIZER .....................................................
59
MEMORY MODE ................................................
51
CHORUS ...........................................................
63
Selecting Effect Programs .............................
51
REVERB/DELAY .............................................
66
NOISE GATE ...................................................
69
Checking Parameter Values of the Effect
Program .........................................................
51
EFFECT SECTION
42
ABOUT THE MANUAL, MEMORY AND MEMORY EDIT MODES
ABOUT THE MANUAL, MEMORY AND MEMORY EDIT MODES
EFFECT SECTION
ABOUT THE MANUAL, MEMORY AND MEMORY EDIT MODES
ABOUT THE MANUAL, MEMORY AND MEMORY EDIT
MODES
The Effect section of the GW50 is basically divided into three operating modes:
Manual mode, Memory mode and Memory Edit mode.
In the Manual mode, you can use the effect blocks just as you would conventional
pedal effects. All parameter knobs are active for adjusting the main parameters, and
the sub parameters can be selected and adjusted here as well (see page 44). You can
also perform other effect-related operations, such as determining the order of effects,
setting the external foot controller, and so on.
To select the Manual mode, press [MANUAL]. (“MANUAL” appears in the display.)
In the Memory mode, you can select effect programs. The GW50 has 50 programs in
its internal memory, divided into ten banks of five programs each. The parameter
knobs cannot be used here, except to check the set values of the main parameters
(see page 51). The Pedal Switches can be used either to select programs or turn
effect blocks of a selected program on or off (see pages 51, 52).
To select the Memory mode, press [MEMORY]. (The MEMORY LED lights and the program number is shown in the BANK/MEMORY indicator.)
In the Memory Edit mode, you can create your own effect programs, for selecting later
in the Memory mode. As in the Manual mode, all controls are active and you can make
main and sub parameter settings, as well as set all other effect-related operations.
Note:
ABOUT THE PARAMETER KNOBS—In the Memory and Memory Edit modes, remember that the
position of the parameter knobs in the effect blocks does not necessarily correspond to the actual
value of the parameters. Also, in the Memory Edit mode, once you adjust a parameter knob —
even slightly — the value of that parameter instantly changes to the new position of the knob.
(Only the knob adjusted will correspond to the actual value.)
To select the Memory Edit mode, press [EDIT/COMPARE] from the
Memory mode. (The EDIT/COMPARE LED lights.)
ABOUT THE MANUAL, MEMORY AND MEMORY EDIT MODES
43
EFFECT SECTION
MANUAL MODE
MANUAL MODE
Selecting an Effect Type
The Distortion, Equalizer, Chorus and Reverb/
Delay effect blocks feature different effect types.
Press the Type switch to step through the available
effects. The LED of the selected effect lights.
Editing the Sub Parameters and Noise Gate
1.
Simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press
[SUB PARAM].
2.
To select a parameter, keep holding down
[SHIFT] and repeatedly press [SUB
PARAM] to step through the sub parameters
for all selected Equalizer, Chorus and
Reverb/Delay effects (indicated by the lit
green LEDs in the effect blocks) and the
Noise Gate.
Turning Individual Effects On and
Off
When not assigned to a group, individual effect
blocks can be turned on and off in the Manual
mode. To do this, make sure that MEMORY ON/
OFF is selected in the ASSIGNABLE Block (the
MEMORY LED flashes), then press the Pedal
Switch of the appropriate effect block. The LED of
the selected effect lights when the effect is on.
(For information on assigning effects to a group,
see page 45.)
Or, after step #1, release [SHIFT] and simply
press one of the effect selector buttons beneath the LCD ([EQ], [CHO], and [REV]) to
step through the sub parameters of the corresponding effect. Pressing [CMP] or [DST]
selects the Noise Gate parameter.
Editing Parameters
Effect parameters can be edited in the Manual
mode. The Manual mode is designed to be a kind
of “blank slate” on which you can make settings as
you wish. If you create some settings in the
Manual mode that you want to keep as an effect
program, save them to a program number (see
“Saving the Manual Mode Settings to an Effect
Program,” page 50).
Editing the Main Parameters
1.
Select the desired type of effect with the
Type button in each effect block.
2.
Adjust the desired parameters with the knobs
in each effect block. (The display automatically shows the adjusted parameter name and
value.)
44
MANUAL MODE
3.
Adjust the selected parameter with the [–]/[+]
buttons.
EFFECT SECTION
4.
Exit this operation by pressing any of the
mode buttons ([MANUAL], [MEMORY] or
[SONG/PATTERN]).
HINT
FOR EASIER EDITING—You can easily switch back
and forth between editing main and sub
parameters in any of the effects by first selecting
the sub parameters (as done in step #1 above).
After that, you can edit the main parameters as
usual, and switch back to the sub parameters at
any time by pressing the appropriate effect selector buttons.
MANUAL MODE
boxes representing the blocks in order from
left to right.) Compressor, Distortion and
Equalizer must always be among the first
three blocks; Chorus and Reverb must be the
last two.
Utility Functions
There are five Utility functions: CONNECT,
GROUP, FOOT, MIN VOL and AUTO VOL. The
Utility functions can be executed from both the
Manual and Memory Edit modes (however, the
following explanation refers only to the Manual
mode). To exit any of these operations, press any
of the mode buttons ([MANUAL], [MEMORY]
or [SONG/PATTERN]).
Determining the Order of the Effect Blocks
— CONNECT
For example, if you press [EQ] first, the
display will prompt you to press either
[CMP] or [DST]. Then, if you press [CMP],
Distortion (DST) will automatically be assigned to the third block. Finally, determine
the order of the last two effects by pressing
either [CHO] or [REV]; the one NOT pressed
will automatically be assigned to the fifth
block.
The Connect function allows you to determine in
what order the effect blocks will be used to process the signal.
Repeat steps #1 and #2 above if you want to
change the order again.
Operation —
1. From the Manual mode, repeatedly press the
Effect Utility switch until “CONECT” is
shown in the display.
HINT
For best results in connecting the various
effects, follow these guidelines:
* When using the Equalizer or Amp Simulator effects with Distortion, put Distortion BEFORE the EQ block.
* When using the Wah effect with Distortion, put Distortion AFTER the EQ block.
Bypass Switching of Effect Blocks — GROUP
2.
Press the corresponding Effect Selector
buttons in the order that you wish the effects
to be placed. (The selected effect configuration is shown graphically in the display, with
The Group function allows you to determine which
effect blocks are grouped together for one-press
effect bypassing. The effect blocks that have been
assigned here can be switched off or on all together
by pressing any one of the Pedal Switches of those
effects (when MEMORY ON/OFF is selected in the
ASSIGNABLE block). (Also see “Bypass Switching
of Effect Blocks” on page 52.) For example, if
Compressor, Distortion and Chorus have been
MANUAL MODE
45
EFFECT SECTION
MANUAL MODE
grouped together, pressing any of those Pedal
Switches alternately bypasses or activates all those
effects simultaneously.
Operation —
1. From the Manual mode, repeatedly press the
Utility button until “GROUP” is shown in the
display.
2.
Press the Effect Selector buttons (CMP, DST,
EQ, etc.) corresponding to the effect blocks
you wish to assign to the group.
Setting the Function of the External Foot
Controller — FOOT
The Foot function here determines how the connected foot controller (the optional Yamaha FC7)
is to be used: whether for realtime control over
certain effect parameters, or as a volume pedal.
Operation —
1. From the Manual mode, repeatedly press the
Utility button until “FOOT” is shown in the
display.
2.
Repeatedly press [SET-B] (the Foot Controller button, indicated by the pedal graphic on
the panel) to step through the settings. The
available settings are: Volume Pedal, Wah
Pedal, Distortion Drive, Chorus Depth,
Reverb Feedback, and Reverb Mix.
■ Using as a Volume Pedal
Volume Pedal (VOL PEDAL) — For using the
foot controller to control the volume of the
input signal, at programmable points in the
effect chain. Each press of [SET-B] steps
through the various positions.
The dark bars at the top of the graphic boxes indicate each
selected effect block.
When MEMORY ON/OFF is selected in the
ASSIGNABLE Block (MEMORY LED
flashes), the assigned effect blocks can be
switched on and off all together by pressing
any one of their Pedal Switches. Unassigned
effects can be switched off and on normally
from their individual Pedal Switches.
To turn off the group assignment, press the
appropriate Effect Selector button again.
Repeat steps #1 and #2 above if you want to
change the assignment again.
46
MANUAL MODE
The pedal graphic in the LCD shows the selected position
of the volume Pedal.
Note: VOLUME PEDAL PLACEMENT—Since placing the
Volume Pedal before the Equalizer may result in
some added noise, generally it should be used
after the Compressor, Distortion and Equalizer
except when using it to control the Distortion
Input level.
EFFECT SECTION
HINT
You can set the minimum volume of the
foot controller to a value other than zero
(for example, when you want to use the
foot controller to easily move between loud
and soft settings). See “Setting the
MINIMUM VOLUME Level” on page 47 for
details.
MANUAL MODE
Note:
When using the foot controller as a Wah pedal or to
control one of these other parameters, the ASSIGNABLE Block functions MIN/MAX VOLUME and AUTO
VOLUME apply only to the volume of the first three
effects (Compressor, Distortion and Equalizer).
■ Using as a Wah Pedal
Wah Pedal — For using the foot controller to
control the Wah effect or filter sweep, when the
Wah + EQ effect is selected in the Equalizer
block. (When the external foot controller is set
to Wah Pedal operation here, the Wah + EQ
Type parameter is automatically set to
PEDAL.) Refer to page 61 for more information on the Wah + EQ effect.
■ Using for Control of Other Parameters
Distortion Drive (DST DRIVE) — For using
the foot pedal to control the Distortion Drive
parameter (see page 59).
Chorus Depth (CHO DEPTH) — For using the
foot controller to control the Depth parameter
of the Chorus, Flanger or Phaser effects, or the
Mix parameter of the Pitch Shift effect (see
pages 64-66).
Reverb Feedback (REV FB) — For using the
foot controller to control the High parameter of
the Reverb effect, the Feedback parameter of
the Delay effect, or the Delay Mix parameter of
the Delay + Reverb effect (See pages 67-69).
Reverb Mix (REV MIX) — For using the foot
controller to control the Reverb Mix parameter
of the Reverb effect, the Delay Mix parameter
of the Delay effect, or the Reverb Mix parameter of the Delay + Reverb effect (See pages 67,
68).
Note: When selecting Wah Pedal and control of other
parameters for the foot controller, make sure
that the foot controller is properly connected to
the GW50.
ASSIGNABLE block’s MIN/MAX
VOLUME and AUTO VOLUME
control placed here.
Setting the MINIMUM VOLUME Level
(for External Foot Controller and
ASSIGNABLE Block Volume Control) —
MIN VOL
When using the connected foot controller as a
volume pedal (see previous page), you can set the
minimum volume for the controller from the
GW50.
When using the ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal
Switch to control MIN/MAX Volume or Auto
Volume (see pages 48, 49), this parameter also
determines what the minimum volume will be for
both of these functions.
Operation —
1. From the Manual mode, repeatedly press the
Utility button until “MIN” is shown in the
display.
2.
Use the [–]/[+] buttons to set the desired
Minimum Volume value. (Range: 0–9)
A minimum setting of “0” results in no
output or off, while a maximum of “9” results in the same level as normal (or no
volume change).
Note:
Keep in mind that a maximum setting of “9” results in
no volume change for ALL related functions — the foot
controller, and the ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch’s
MIN/MAX Volume and Auto Volume functions.
MANUAL MODE
47
EFFECT SECTION
MANUAL MODE
❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉
ASSIGNABLE Block Funtions —
MIN/MAX Volume and Auto
Volume
The ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch has two
volume-related functions: MIN/MAX Volume and
Auto Volume. (These are available in all modes —
Manual, Memory and Memory Edit.) Select one of
them by pressing the ASSIGNABLE Block Type
switch. (The LED next to the selected function
lights.)
HINT
The main use of this function is to change volume
instantly as you play, for example, when you need
to instantly go from playing a backing, rhythm
guitar part to playing a solo.
Use the Minimum Volume parameter to set the
low (minimum) volume. (See page 47.)
HINT
For ease in making the low volume setting,
press the ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch
to turn the MIN Volume on, then play the
connected instrument and listen to the
sound as you adjust the MIN Volume value.
Minimum/Maximum Volume
When this is selected, you can use the ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch to instantly change
between high and low output level. Press the Pedal
Switch once to switch to low (minimum) volume
(the LED flashes), and once again to switch back
to high (or normal) volume (the LED is lit continuously).
Low (minimum) volume
LED flashes
High (maximum) volume
LED stays lit
Note: MIN/MAX VOLUME AND EFFECT PROGRAM
CHANGES—When the MIN/MAX Volume function
is set to minimum or low volume (the MIN/MAX
VOLUME LED flashes), the volume does not
change even when other effect programs are
selected with Pedal Switches 1–5. However,
the volume reverts back to normal when effect
program changes are made from the [–]/[+]
buttons or from events in a song.
48
MANUAL MODE
Auto Volume
When this is selected, you can use the ASSIGNABLE Pedal Switch as a kind of automatic swell
function, to automatically fade up the output level.
The fade starts from silence or low volume and
increases to normal level, according to the rate set
with the Auto Volume Rate parameter (see page
49).
Operation —
1. Make sure that the AUTO VOLUME LED is
lit (use the ASSIGNABLE Block Type
switch to select it), then press and hold down
the ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch. The
LED flashes indicating that the minimum
volume setting is in effect.
Note: The change to minimum volume is not instantaneous. Some time is required for
minimum volume to be reached.
2.
Release the Pedal Switch and the level begins
to fade up. (The LED stays flashing during
the fade up.)
EFFECT SECTION
3.
The LED stops flashing and remains lit when
the fade up is complete and the volume is at
maximum.
LED flashes
When LED stops
flashing, volume
reaches maximam.
Press and hold
Pedal Switch
HINT
Release Pedal
Switch
Applications of this would include imitating
the slow attack of other instrument sounds
like a softly-bowed violin, or a pedal steel
guitar. Since Auto Volume cuts off the picking sound and slowly brings up the level, it
is ideal for playing soft, lyrical solos.
Note: The low volume of this function (or the
level at which the fade in starts) is determined by the Minimum Volume parameter.
(See page 47.)
❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉
MANUAL MODE
Setting the AUTO VOLUME Rate —
AUTO VOL
When using the ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal
Switch to control the Auto Volume (see page 48),
this parameter determines the rate (speed) at which
the volume automatically fades up.
Operation —
1. From the Manual mode, repeatedly press the
Utility button until “AT VOL” is shown in
the display.
2.
Use the [–]/[+] buttons to set the desired
Auto Volume Rate. (Range: 1–10)
A minimum setting of “1” results in a slow
fade in, while a maximum of “10” results in a
nearly instantaneous return to normal level.
(See the graph below.)
Maximum
(normal)
volume
Level
Switch is pressed.
Volume
pedal position
Rate = 10
Rate = 1
Minimum
volume
Time
Sound is at
minimum volume
as long as Switch
is held.
Switch is released.
MANUAL JOB MODE
49
EFFECT SECTION
MANUAL MODE
MANUAL JOB MODE
Saving the Manual Mode Settings to
an Effect Program
Operation —
1. After making the desired effect settings in the
Manual mode, simultaneously hold down
[MANUAL] and press [MEMORY]. (The
[MEMORY] LED and BANK/MEMORY
indicator flash.)
s
Note: When the settings have been saved, “COMPLETED” is shown in the display and operation
automatically goes to the Memory mode.
Data Saved to an Effect Program
When you save an effect program, all the following data is saved together with it:
* Effect types for each block
* Effect parameters (main and sub) for each block
* Bypass status of each effect block
* Noise gate setting
* Utility function settings (Connect, Group, Foot
Controller, Minimum Volume, Auto Volume)
Note: When you save the settings in the Manual
mode to an effect program, the GW50 automatically gives it a name, starting with the letters “MEM” and followed by the bank number
and memory number to which it has been saved
(e.g., “MEM 15”).
2.
Select the destination program number with
the [–]/[+] buttons.
3.
To save, select “GO” (press [SET-B]). To
cancel and return to Manual mode, select
“EXIT” (press [SET-A]).
CAUTION
50
Be careful when performing this operation,
since it automatically and irretrievably
erases the program at the destination.
MANUAL JOB MODE
EFFECT SECTION
MEMORY MODE
MEMORY MODE
Selecting Effect Programs
Operation —
1. Select the Memory mode by pressing
[MEMORY] (even if the MEMORY LED is
lit).
2.
Use the [–]/[+] buttons to step up or down
through the programs in order, or use the
Pedal Switches. (See page 11 for more details
on using the Pedal Switches.)
The effect program name appears in the
LCD.
Note: If the cursor arrow in the display is at “TEMPO,”
“SONG” or “PTN,” the [–]/[+] cannot be used
to select effect programs and the Backingrelated display appears instead of the effect
program name. In this case, use [6 CURSOR] to
move the cursor arrow “out” of the display.
❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉
ASSIGNABLE Block and Pedal
Switch Functions
Effect Program Selection
Operation —
1. Making sure that MEMORY is selected in
the ASSIGNABLE Block (the MEMORY
LED should be lit; if flashing, press the
ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch once),
press the desired Pedal Switch, 1–5. This
selects programs 1–5 in the current bank. For
example, if bank 2 is currently selected,
pressing Pedal Switch 3 selects program
number 23.
2.
To change among banks 1–5, press the ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch and then the
appropriate Pedal Switch, 1–5.
1) Press ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch…
Checking Parameter Values of the
Effect Program
In the Memory mode, effect parameters cannot be
edited (this is done in the Manual mode or
Memory Edit mode). However, you can check the
values of the main parameters of the selected
effect program by turning the desired parameter
knob. The selected parameter’s current value is
shown in the screen and does not change even
when the knob is turned. (Sub parameters cannot
be viewed from the Memory mode. However, you
can check these values without altering them from
the Memory Edit mode; see page 53.)
2) …then press Pedal Switch 1–5.
To change among banks 6–0, simultaneously
hold down the ASSIGNABLE Pedal Switch
and then the appropriate Pedal Switch, 6–0.
1) While holding down ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch…
2) …press Pedal Switch, 6–0.
MEMORY MODE
51
EFFECT SECTION
MEMORY MODE
Bypass Switching of Effect Blocks
The Pedal Switches can also be used to bypass or
activate individual effect blocks or the assigned
effect Group.
Note:
When [MANUAL] is pressed, the bypass function is
automatically selected (the MEMORY LED in the ASSIGNABLE Block flashes). When [MEMORY] is pressed,
either the bypass function (LED flashes) or the effect
program selection function (LED is lit continuously) is
automatically selected, depending on the last setting
made.
Operation —
1. In the Memory mode, press the Type switch
in the ASSIGNABLE Block until the
MEMORY LED is lit.
2.
To select bypass operation, press the ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch twice
quickly.
Note:
Whether the ASSIGNABLE Block is set for use as a
bypass switch (the MEMORY LED is flashing) or as a
bank/program selector (the MEMORY LED is lit continuously), you can also select the MINIMUM VOLUME
and AUTO VOLUME functions of the ASSIGNABLE
Block Pedal Switch. Either of these functions can be
performed with the ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch
without disturbing the bypass or effect program
selection operations (excepting bank selection) of the
effect block Pedal Switches. (See pages 10, 11 for
more information.)
LED flashes.
4.
Press the ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch
once to return to normal operation in the
Memory mode.
Press twice quickly.
HINT
3.
52
In this condition, the Pedal Switches can be
used as bypass on/off switches. Those effect
blocks as part of a group can be switched on
and off together, while those not part of a
group can be switched on and off individually. The LEDs of the effect blocks are lit in
red when the effects are on.
MEMORY MODE
You can also use the external footswitch as
an total effect bypass switch to turn all
active effects on or off; see page 57 for
details.
❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉
EFFECT SECTION
MEMORY MODE
MEMORY EDIT MODE
The Memory Edit mode is similar to the Manual mode in
PERIODICALLY CHECK YOUR EDITS—While you edit
an effect program, you should regularly and often
compare the sound with the original. In this way,
if you find that you like the original value of a
parameter better than the value you most recently set, you can recall the original program
settings (see page 54). Remember, though, that
this permanently erases whatever edits you have
made.
that all effect parameters can be edited and the
resulting program stored to memory. However, the
HINT
Memory Edit mode uses an existing effect program’s
parameters as the basic “material” for editing; the new
program you create by editing in the Memory Edit mode
can be saved to the currently selected program
number.
To enter the Memory Edit mode, first select the effect
program you wish to edit from the Memory mode, then
press [EDIT/COMPARE]. (The orange EDIT/COMPARE
LED lights.)
Note: No other effect operation (except for checking
parameter values and settings) can be performed while Compare is on. To exit the Compare function, press [EDIT/COMPARE]. (The
EDIT/COMPARE LED will stop flashing.)
For information on editing effect parameters and the
Utility settings (which can also be done from the
Memory Edit mode), refer to the relevant sections in
“MANUAL MODE” above. For information on saving an
effect program from the Memory Edit mode, see the
section “Saving the Memory Edit Mode Settings to an
CAUTION
Be careful not to inadvertently press [MANUAL]
or [MEMORY] at any time in the Edit or Compare
conditions. Important data could be irretrievably
lost. (See the sections on Saving and Recalling
programs below for more information.)
Effect Program” below.
Saving the Memory Edit Mode
Settings to an Effect Program
Compare Mode (Comparing the Edited
Program with the Original)
Once you’ve made edits to a program, you can
compare the sound (and values) of the new program with that of the original one. To do this,
press [EDIT/COMPARE]. (The orange LED
above the button and the program number in the
display both flash, indicating that the original
program settings are active.)
Operation —
After making the desired effect settings in the
Memory Edit mode, simply press either
[MANUAL] or [MEMORY]. The following
display appears.
Press [EDIT/COMPARE] again to return to the
edited values.
In the compare condition, you can also check the
main parameter values of the original program simply
by turning the desired parameter knob. To check its
sub parameters, follow the same steps as given in
“Editing the Sub Parameters” in “MANUAL MODE”
above. (The parameter values cannot be changed
here, however; an “EXIT COMPARE” message
appears if you press the [–]/[+] buttons.)
The mode then returns to either Manual or
Memory, depending on the button pressed.
MEMORY EDIT MODE
53
EFFECT SECTION
MEMORY MODE
Recalling the Settings of the
Original Program
(in Compare Condition)
At any time during editing, you can recall the
settings of the original program. Keep in mind,
however, that this permanently erases whatever
edits you have made.
Operation —
To recall the original program settings, simply
press either [MANUAL] or [MEMORY] while in
the Compare condition (the EDIT/COMPARE
LED is flashing). The following display appears.
The mode then returns to either Manual or
Memory, depending on the button pressed.
CAUTION
AVOID LOSING IMPORTANT DATA—After
you’ve made edits to the program, be careful NOT to press [MANUAL] or [MEMORY]
unless you are absolutely sure that you
want to either recall the original program or
save the new one. Be careful also to check
which condition is active — Edit (with the
continuously lit LED) or Compare (with the
flashing LED). If you mistakenly press
[MANUAL] or [MEMORY] in either condition,
you may irretrievably lose important data!
Note: Regarding the above caution, there are certain
precautions you can take to avoid losing important programs, such as backing up your original
ones with the MIDI Bulk Transmission function
(see page 102), and restoring factory preset
programs (see page 57) if you’ve erased them.
MEMORY JOB MODE
Copying an Effect Program
Operation —
1. In the Memory mode, select the effect program to be copied.
2.
54
Simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press
[COPY/NAME] repeatedly until the Copy
display appears.
MEMORY EDIT MODE / MEMORY JOB MODE
LED flashes
EFFECT SECTION
3.
Select the destination program number with
the [–]/[+] buttons.
4.
To copy the selected program to the destination number, select “GO” (press [SET-B]).
To cancel and return to Memory mode, select
“EXIT” (press [SET-A]), or press any of the
mode buttons.
CAUTION
Be careful when performing this operation,
since it automatically and irretrievably
erases the program at the destination.
Swapping One Effect Program with
Another
4.
cluding the program name, to the designated
program number.
Naming an Effect Program
Operation —
1. Select the effect program to be named, or use
the program currently being edited.
Note:
Naming can only be done in the Memory mode. If you
are editing in the Manual mode, simultaneously press
[MANUAL] and [MEMORY], select the destination
program number with the [–]/[+] buttons, then [SETB] to save the effect program before naming it.
(When you save the settings in the Manual mode to
an effect program, the GW50 automatically gives it a
name, starting with the letters “MEM” and followed by
the bank number and memory number to which it has
been saved.) If you are editing in the Memory Edit
mode, press [MEMORY] to save the program and
return to the Memory mode before naming it.
Operation —
1. In the Memory mode, select one of the effect
programs to be swapped.
Simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press
[COPY/NAME] repeatedly until the Swap
display appears.
2.
LED flashes
To swap the two selected programs, select
“GO” (press [SET-B]). To cancel and return
to Memory mode, select “EXIT” (press
[SET-A]), or press any of the mode buttons.
Note: This operation changes or swaps all data, in-
This is a simple renumbering operation, similar to
Copy above, that lets you switch the program
numbers of two effect programs.
2.
MEMORY MODE
Simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press
[COPY/NAME] repeatedly until the Name
display (“MEM<”) appears.
LED flashes
3.
Select the other program number with the
[–]/[+] buttons.
Cursor
MEMORY JOB MODE
55
EFFECT SECTION
3.
MEMORY MODE
Use the [–]/[+] buttons to select the desired
character at the cursor (<) position. Use
[6 CURSOR] to move the cursor (<) in
the display. The following characters are
available:
❈ Total effects bypass (Turning all active effects
on/off) (See “Using the External Footswitch as
a Total Effect Bypass Switch” below.)
Operation (other than ❈)—
1. Connect the footswitch to the FOOT SW jack
on the rear panel.
2.
4.
Press [MANUAL] or [MEMORY] to return
to the desired mode. The name is automatically saved to the program.
For example, if you want to use the
footswitch to start and stop the Backing Song
or Pattern, hold down the footswitch and
press [START/STOP].
❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉
Using an External Footswitch
An optional external footswitch (the Yamaha FC5
or FC4) can be used to perform certain operations,
letting you execute the selected operation without
having to use the appropriate panel controls.
The following operations can be assigned to the
footswitch:
* Entering and exiting the Tuner mode (pressing
[SHIFT] + [TUNER])
* Switching between functions in the ASSIGNABLE Block (pressing the ASSIGNABLE
Block Type switch)
* Changing the effect type in an effect block
(pressing the effect block Type switch)
* Starting/stopping a song or pattern (pressing
[START/STOP])
* Switching Pedal Switch operation between bank
select and Memory select or effect on/off.
(Normally, this is done by pressing the ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch. However, if
the MIN/MAX VOLUME or AUTO VOLUME
functions are active, the ASSIGNABLE Block
Pedal Switch is used for either of these. Assign
the footswitch to substitute for this ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch function when you
are using the MIN/MAX VOLUME or AUTO
VOLUME functions.)
56
MEMORY JOB MODE
Simultaneously hold the footswitch down and
press the switch corresponding to the operation that you wish to control with the
footswitch.
3.
Release the footswitch. It can now be used
instead of the panel switch you selected in
step #2.
Note:
To use the footswitch for entering and exiting the
Tuner mode:
1. Hold down the footswitch.
2. Press and hold down [SHIFT].
3. Then while holding the two above, press [TUNER]
and release the buttons and footswitch.
Note: Functions other than those listed above
are not controllable with the footswitch.
Even if you’ve properly assigned one of the
functions listed above to the footswitch,
certain messages (such as “NOT AVAILABLE,”
“STOP SONG,” “STOP PATTERN,” “EXIT
TUNER” or “EXIT MEM EDIT”) may appear,
indicating that the selected function cannot be
performed in the current condition. When this
happens, simply follow the directions of the
message and/or use the appropriate panel
button (depending on the function currently
selected) to return to the appropriate mode.
EFFECT SECTION
For example, if you are using the footswitch
to enter and exit the Tuner mode, and press it
while the MIDI Bulk Trasmission function is
active, the message “EXIT MIDI BULK” will
appear. Either continue with the MIDI Bulk
Transmission operation, or press one of the
mode buttons on the panel to return to normal
operation.
Using the External Footswitch as a
Total Effect Bypass Switch
(All Effects ON/OFF)
You can also use the external footswitch to turn all
active effects on and off at once, as a total bypass
switch.
HINT
MEMORY MODE
This function is useful when you want to turn on
or off ALL effects (not just the group-assigned
effects) at once. It is also useful as a kind of
“panic” switch in live performance, to turn off all
effects if some kind of trouble (such as feedback)
suddenly occurs.
Operation —
1. Simultaneously hold down the connected
external footswitch and press [SHIFT].
2.
Now, when you press the external footswitch,
all currently active effects are turned on or
off.
RESTORING FACTORY PRESET EFFECT PROGRAMS
If you’ve erased one of the factory effect
programs by replacing it with one of your
own creation, this function lets you
restore the original program.
HINT
Operation —
1. Turn off the power of the GW50.
2.
Simultaneously hold down [MEMORY] and
turn the power back on. The MEMORY LED
and the BANK/MEMORY indicator both
flash. (“LD MEM” appears in the LCD.)
3.
Select the number of the effect program you
wish to restore with the [–]/[+] buttons.
4.
Press [SET-B] (below “GO”) to restore the
program, or press [SET-A] (below “EXIT”)
to abort the operation. (You can also abort
the operation by using any of the mode
buttons: [MANUAL], [MEMORY], or
[SONG/PATTERN].)
CAUTION
You can continue loading successive
factory effect programs by repeating
steps #3 and #4 above as necessary.
AVOID LOSING IMPORTANT DATA—Keep in
mind that this operation automatically and
irretrievably erases the program you created
at the selected number. To avoid losing the
program entirely, save it and others you
have created by using the MIDI Bulk
Transmission function. (See page 102.)
MEMORY JOB MODE / RESTORING FACTORY PRESET EFFECT PROGRAMS
57
EFFECT SECTION
EFFECTS AND PARAMETERS
EFFECTS AND PARAMETERS
This section briefly explains each of the effect types and their parameters.
For information on how to select effects and edit the main and
sub parameters, see the sections “Selecting an Effect Type,”
“Editing Parameters” (page 44), “Selecting Effect Programs”
(page 51) and the “MEMORY EDIT MODE” section (page 53).
Note: The characters that appear in parentheses after certain effect and parameter names
in this section indicate those names as they appear in the LCD. For example, the title
“WAH + EQ (WAH, WEQ)” indicates that either WAH or WEQ are shown in the LCD.
COMPRESSOR
The Compressor block is especially effective
for guitar since it smooths out the “peaks”
and “valleys” in the sound. Compression
“squashes” the dynamic range of the signal,
making loud signals softer and soft signals
louder. Normally, the Compressor should be
put before the other effect blocks since it
limits signals of widely varying loudness to a
dynamic range more suitable for use with the
other effects. For this reason, compression is
also effective on guitar in smoothing out the
level differences caused by uneven picking
technique.
SENSE — Range: –6 ~ –42 dB
Determines the threshold level of compression.
Compression is applied to signal levels above
the Sense point, while signals below this point
are unaffected.
OUTPUT — Range: 0 ~ 200%
Determines the level of the processed sound.
Settings above 100% are used for boosting the
overall signal to an appropriate level, since
compression effectively lowers the level of the
sound.
HINT
ATTACK — Range: 1 ~ 14
Determines the amount of time it takes for
compression to begin after an input signal is
detected. Longer attack times (higher values) let
through more of the natural attack of the input
signal.
58
COMPRESSOR
SETTING THE OUTPUT PARAMETER—In
general — for this effect and others —
set the Output parameter so that the
level of the sound is constant,
even when switching the effect on and
off. If the Output parameter (and the
Input parameter on other effects) are
set too high or low, you may get
unwanted sudden jumps in the level of
the sound when turning the effects on
and off, sometimes resulting in overloading of subsequent effects.
EFFECT SECTION
EFFECTS AND PARAMETERS
DISTORTION
The Distortion block features five different
distortion effects, some of which recreate the
same warm distortion as that of a tube
ampflifier. Dist 1 is a general-purpose
distortion sound, Dist 2 provides a warm,
tube amplifier sound, Dist 3 has a hard
“edgy” sound, Dist 4 provides a heavy, “fat”
distortion effect, while the Overdrive effect
provides a sound like the natural overdrive
produced by a guitar amp.
For best results, set the Drive
parameter to roughly 25%–60%.
HINT
TONE — Range: –16 ~ +16
Determines the total quality of the distortion
sound. Negative values cut the high frequencies
for a “fatter” sound, while positive values boost
the high frequencies for a brighter sound.
OUTPUT — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the output level of the processed
sound.
DIST 1–4, OD (Overdrive)
DRIVE — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the intensity of the distortion or
overdrive sound. The higher the value, the
greater the distortion.
Note: SETTING THE OUTPUT PARAMETER—In
order to avoid sudden jumps in level when
changing between effect programs, or to
avoid overloading subsequent effects
within an effect program, the Output parameter should be set to an appropriate
value — a value at which the level
difference is small or nonexistent when
switching the effect on and off.
EQUALIZER
The Equalizer block features a parametric
equalizer, wah (or filter sweep) effect,
and an amp simulator that effectively
reproduces the sound of a guitar amp and
speaker cabinet.
Note:
SETTING THE INPUT AND OUTPUT PARAMETERS—For
each of the Equalizer types below, the Input parameter should be set to an appropriate value to avoid
overloading of this and subsequent effects. Also, the
Output parameter should be set appropriately to avoid
sudden jumps in level when changing between effect
programs, or to avoid overloading subsequent effects
within an effect program. (See Note in the Distortion
section, above.)
Note:
When the Wah + EQ effect or Amp Simulator +EQ
effect is placed before Distortion (in CONNECT), the
EQ portion of the effect is actually applied AFTER
Distortion.
DISTORTION / EQUALIZER
59
EFFECTS AND PARAMETERS
EFFECT SECTION
Equalizer (EQ)
The Equalizer effect is a highly versatile and
flexible four-band parametric equalizer that includes bandwidth (Q) controls on the Lo Mid and
Hi Mid frequencies.
HIGH (500 Hz – 12 kHz)
LMID F, HMID F (80 Hz – 12 kHz)
LOW F
(40 Hz – 1.2 kHz)
Q=1.0 Q=5.0
+15
+10
+5
Gain
0
(dB)
–5
–10
–15
LOW F
20 100
500
LMID F
HMID F
1k
5k
Frequency (Hz)
HIGH F
10 k
20 k
LOW — Range: –15 ~ +15 dB
Determines the amount of boost or cut applied
to the low frequencies (as set in Low Frequency
below).
LOW MID (L MID) — Range: –15 ~ +15 dB
Determines the amount of boost or cut applied
to the low-midrange frequencies (as set in Low
Mid Frequency below).
HIGH MID (H MID) — Range: –15 ~ +15 dB
Determines the amount of boost or cut applied
to the high-midrange frequencies (as set in High
Mid Frequency below).
HIGH — Range: –15 ~ +15 dB
Determines the amount of boost or cut applied
to the high frequencies (as set in High Frequency below).
60
EQUALIZER
Sub parameters:
INPUT — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the level of the input signal. Normally, this should be set to 100%; however, if
equalizer adjustments have been made that
bring the overall signal level up, lower values
can be used here to compensate to reduce the
volume to an appropriate level.
LOW FREQUENCY (LOW F) —
Range: 40 Hz ~ 1.2 kHz
Determines the cutoff frequency of the low
frequency band (as adjusted in Low above).
LOW MID FREQUENCY (LMID F) —
Range: 80 Hz ~ 12.0 kHz
Determines the central frequency of the lowmidrange frequency band (as adjusted in Low
Mid above).
HIGH MID FREQUENCY (HMID F) —
Range: 80 Hz ~ 12.0 kHz
Determines the central frequency of the highmidrange frequency band (as adjusted in High
Mid above).
HIGH FREQUENCY (HIGH F) —
Range: 500 Hz ~ 12.0 kHz
Determines the cutoff frequency of the high
frequency band (as adjusted in High above).
LOW MID Q (LMID Q) — Range: 0.1 ~ 5.0
Determines the bandwidth or range of the lowmidrange frequencies (adjusted in Low Mid
above). The higher the value, the greater the
range of frequencies affected.
HIGH MID Q (HMID Q) — Range: 0.1 ~ 5.0
Determines the bandwidth or range of the highmidrange frequencies (adjusted in High Mid
above). The higher the value, the greater the
range of frequencies affected.
EFFECT SECTION
OUTPUT — Range: 0 ~ 200%
Determines the level of the processed sound.
Settings above 100% are used for boosting the
signal to an appropriate level to compensate for
equalizer adjustments that bring the overall
signal level down.
WAH + EQ (WAH, WEQ)
Wah is a filter sweep effect that, as its name
implies, produces a “wah” type sound. The sweep
of the filter can be made to vary automatically, or
it can be controlled by the input level or with a
connected external foot controller. A separate twoband parametric equalizer is included after the wah
effect and can be adjusted with the sub parameters.
FB=100%
Range
Gain
FB=0%
Frequency
Center
Frequency
Pedal
Pedal
minimum
Touch
Guitar
minimum
High
speed
In Pedal and Touch, the
setting of the pedal or
Pedal
maximum the level of the guitar
signal (minimum or
maximum) determines
the position of the filter
Guitar
in the specified range.
maximum
EFFECTS AND PARAMETERS
TYPE — Settings: Touch Slow (TOUCH SLW),
Touch Fast (TOUCH FST), Auto, Pedal (Wah
Pedal operation only; see page 47).
The Touch settings let you control the Wah effect
by the level of the input signal (or how hard you
play). The filter sweep (or “wah” sound) starts at
the beginning each time it is triggered. Touch
Slow creates a slow single sweep down, while
Touch Fast has a fast single sweep down.
The Auto setting creates a repeating sweep cycle
that runs freely, independent of the input signal;
the speed of this cycle can also be adjusted.
The Pedal setting lets you sweep the filter manually with a connected foot controller. This setting
is available only when WAH PEDAL operation
has been selected for the external foot controller;
also, Touch Slow, Touch Fast and Auto cannot be
selected when the foot controller has been assigned to WAH PEDAL operation. (Refer to the
section “SETTING THE FUNCTION OF THE
EXTERNAL FOOT CONTROLLER — FOOT,”
page 47, for more information on WAH PEDAL
operation.)
SENSE (controlled with the second knob from the
left, when Touch Slow or Touch Fast are selected) — Range: 1 ~ 10
The higher the value, the more sensitive the
trigger of the Wah effect is to low level signals.
Note:The second knob from the left
controls
different
parameters,
depending on the selected type.
Low
speed
Auto uses an LFO (low
frequency oscillator) to
move the center
frequency back and forth
in a cycle as far as the
specified range.
HINT
Touch Slow
Touch Fast
Sense
Auto
Speed
Pedal
(No parameter)
For best results, when playing a solo or
a line, try setting Sense to a high value;
when performing backing or rhythm
parts, try setting Sense to a low value.
EQUALIZER
61
EFFECT SECTION
EFFECTS AND PARAMETERS
SPEED (controlled with the second knob from the
left, when Auto is selected) —
Range: 0.4 ~ 6.4 Hz
Determines the speed of the filter sweep cycle.
EQ HIGH FREQUENCY (HIGH F) —
Range: 500 Hz ~ 12.0 kHz
Determines the cutoff frequency of the high
frequency band (as adjusted in High above).
CENTER FREQUENCY (CENTER) —
Range: 125 Hz ~ 9.0 kHz
Determines the center frequency of the Wah
effect. The emphasized frequency is swept
around this frequency.
EQ OUTPUT — Range: 0 ~ 200%
Determines the level of the processed sound.
Settings above 100% are used for boosting the
signal to an appropriate level to compensate for
equalizer adjustments that bring the overall
signal level down.
RANGE — Range: 0 ~ 28
Determines the width of the center frequency,
or how far the sweep extends above and below
the center frequency. (See illustration above.)
Sub parameters:
FEEDBACK (FB) — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the amount of the Wah-processed
signal that is fed back to the Wah input. Higher
values result in a stronger Wah sound.
EQ INPUT — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the level of the input signal. Normally, this should be set to 100%; however, if
equalizer adjustments have been made that
bring the overall signal level up, lower values
can be used here to compensate to reduce the
volume to an appropriate level.
EQ LOW — Range: –15 ~ +15 dB
Determines the amount of boost or cut applied
to the low frequencies (as set in Low Frequency
below).
EQ LOW FREQUENCY (LOW F) —
Range: 40 Hz ~ 1.2 kHz
Determines the cutoff frequency of the low
frequency band (as adjusted in Low above).
EQ HIGH — Range: –15 ~ +15 dB
Determines the amount of boost or cut applied
to the high frequencies (as set in High Frequency below).
62
EQUALIZER
Amp Simulator + EQ (AEQ)
This effect realistically reproduces the characteristic sound of a guitar amplifier, and provides a
natural sound for direct recording purposes when
not using an external amplifier. A separate twoband parametric equalizer is included after the
Amp Simulator effect.
TYPE — Settings: Stack, Combo, Tube
Determines the type of amplifier that is simulated. Stack recreates the powerful sound of a
huge amp/speaker setup, Combo recreates a
compact amp cabinet, and Tube recreates the
warm sound of a tube amplifier.
EQ LOW — Range: –15 ~ +15 dB
Determines the amount of boost or cut applied
to the low frequencies (as set in Low Frequency
below).
Note: This parameter is for adjusting the low
gain of the two-band EQ, which is
independent of the Amp Simulator effect.
EQ HIGH — Range: –15 ~ +15 dB
Determines the amount of boost or cut applied
to the high frequencies (as set in High Frequency below).
EFFECT SECTION
Note: This parameter is for adjusting the high
gain of the two-band EQ, which is
independent of the Amp Simulator effect.
MIX BALANCE (MIX) — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the balance between the dry (direct)
and processed signals. A setting of 0% outputs
only the dry signal, and a setting of 100%
outputs only the processed sound.
Sub parameters:
EQ INPUT — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the level of the input signal. Normally, this should be set to 100%; however, if
equalizer adjustments have been made that
bring the overall signal level up, lower values
can be used here to compensate to reduce the
volume to an appropriate level.
EFFECTS AND PARAMETERS
EQ LOW FREQUENCY (LOW F) —
Range: 40 Hz ~ 1.2 kHz
Determines the cutoff frequency of the low
frequency band (as adjusted in Low above).
EQ HIGH FREQUENCY (HIGH F) —
Range: 500 Hz ~ 12.0 kHz
Determines the cutoff frequency of the high
frequency band (as adjusted in High above).
EQ OUTPUT — Range: 0 ~ 200%
Determines the level of the processed sound.
Settings above 100% are used for boosting the
signal to an appropriate level to compensate for
equalizer adjustments that bring the overall
signal level down.
HINT
ENHANCING THE AMP SIMULATOR—
By judicious use of the Pitch Shift effect
(see the Amp Simulation settings in the
table on page 65), you can create a
richer, more natural amplifier simulation.
CHORUS
The Chorus block features a wide range
of pitch change and modulation effects,
including Chorus, Flanger and Phaser.
Chorus uses modulation of the pitch and
volume to enhance the sound by generally making it richer and fatter.
Note: For each of the Chorus types below, the
MIX and DRY parameters should be set
appropriately to avoid sudden jumps in
level when changing between effect
programs, or to avoid overloading
subsequent effects within an effect
program. (See Note in the Distortion
section, page 59.) Also, when MIX and DRY
are both set to 0, no sound is output.
EQUALIZER / CHORUS
63
EFFECT SECTION
EFFECTS AND PARAMETERS
Chorus 1, 2 (CH1, CH2)
Two chorus effects are provided: Chorus 1 features both pitch and volume modulation for an
animated sound, while Chorus 2 provides a richer,
more spacious effect.
SPEED — Range: 0.03 ~ 6.18 Hz
Determines the speed of the pitch modulation.
BRILLIANCE (BRIL)
(controlled with the center knob) —
Range: –3 ~ +6 dB
This functions as a tone control, for adjusting
the brightness of the chorus sound.
DEPTH — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the depth of the pitch modulation,
or how widely the pitch is varied.
Sub parameters:
EFFECT MIX (MIX) — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the level of the processed signals.
A setting of 0% results in no effect output.
Use this control with the Dry Level (DRY)
parameter below to determine the balance
between the effect and dry (direct) sound.
AMD (Chorus 1 only) — Range: 0 ~ 100%
AMD (Amplitude Modulation Depth) varies the
volume instead of the pitch, creating a tremolo
effect along with the chorus.
DRY LEVEL (DRY) — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the level of the dry (direct) sound.
A setting of 0% results in no direct sound
output. Use this control with the Effect Mix
(MIX) parameter above to determine the balance between the effect and dry sound.
Pitch Shift (P.L, P.R, P.S)
Pitch Shift lets you change the pitch of the sound,
up to an octave above or below normal pitch.
Since the amount of pitch shift can be set independently for the left and right channels, three
separate pitches (including the original direct
signal) can be heard. One application for this
would be to create a natural yet complex chorus
effect in which the left and right pitches are
detuned slightly relative to the direct sound. Other
applications include setting the pitch shift to an
octave below or above (to make a six-string guitar
sound like a twelve-string), or setting the pitch to
other intervals (such as a fourth or fifth) to create
instant harmonies and fill out the sound..
PITCH LEFT (LEFT) —
Range: –1200 ~ +1200 cents
Determines the amount of pitch shift for the left
channel, up to one octave above or below the
input pitch. Fine pitch shift values can be set in
5-cent steps up to +/–200 cents; 100 cents is
equivalent to a half step or semitone.
PITCH RIGHT (RIGHT) —
Range: –1200 ~ +1200 cents
Determines the amount of pitch shift for the
right channel, up to one octave above or below
the input pitch.
EFFECT MIX (MIX) — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the level of the processed signals.
A setting of 0% results in no effect output. Use
this control with the Dry Level (DRY) parameter below to determine the balance between the
effect and dry sound.
Sub parameters:
LEFT DELAY TIME (DL TIM, P.L) —
Range: 0.1 ~ 10 ms
Determines the time that the left pitch-shifted
signal is delayed.
64
CHORUS
EFFECT SECTION
LEFT DELAY FEEDBACK (DL FB, P.L) —
Range: 0 ~ 99%
Determines the amount of regeneration of the
left signal’s delayed repeats. The higher the
value, the greater the number of repeats. Since
the pitch shift is applied to each delayed repeat,
each successive repeat has a different pitch.
RIGHT DELAY TIME (DL TIM, P R)
Range: 0.1 ~ 10 ms
Determines the time that the right pitch-shifted
signal is delayed.
RIGHT DELAY FEEDBACK (DL FB, P R)—
Range: 0 ~ 99%
Determines the amount of regeneration of the
right signal’s delayed repeats. The higher the
value, the greater the number of repeats. Since
the pitch shift is applied to each delayed repeat,
each successive repeat has a different pitch.
DRY LEVEL (DRY, P.S) — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the level of the dry sound. A setting
of 0% results in no direct sound output. Use
this control with the Effect Mix (MIX) parameter above below to determine the balance
between the effect and dry sound.
HINT
Pitch Shift is capable of creating a wide
range of effects — from subtle “fattening”
of the sound to wild, special effects. To get
you started exploring some of the possibilities, here are some suggested settings.
Detuning
Pitch Left
Pitch Right
Effect Mix
DL TIM, P.L
DL FB, P.L
DL TIM, P.R
DL FB, P.R
DRY
Harmony
–5 ~ –25 cents
–100 ~ –1200 cents
(–1200 = –1 octave)
+5 ~ +25 cents +100 ~ +1200 cents
(+1200 = +1 octave)
50%
50%
10ms
10ms
0%
0%
10ms
10ms
0%
0%
50%
50%
Amp Simulation
0 cents
0 cents
50%
0.1~2ms
0%
0.1~2ms
0%
100%
EFFECTS AND PARAMETERS
The detuning settings create a soft, natural chorus
effect, while the harmony settings provide a completely separate pitch, enabling two- or three-part
harmonies. With the octave and harmony settings
in particular, try increasing the Left and Right
Delay Feedback values to create interesting special
effects like stacked harmonies.
Flanger (FL)
Flanger is used to enhance the sound with modulation, creating an animated, swirling motion effect.
It is effective in emphasizing the metallic sound of
a guitar. This is a stereo flanging effect that lets
you set separate left and right delay times.
SPEED — Range: 0.03 ~ 6.18 Hz
Determines the speed of the pitch modulation.
FEEDBACK (FB) — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the amount of the Flanger-processed signal that is fed back to the Flanger
input. Higher values result in a stronger Flanger
sound.
DEPTH — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the depth of the pitch modulation,
or how widely the pitch is varied.
Sub parameters:
EFFECT MIX (MIX) — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the level of the processed signals. A
setting of 0% results in no effect output. Use
this control with the Dry Level (DRY) parameter below to determine the balance between the
effect and dry sound.
LEFT DELAY TIME (L TIME) —
Range: 0.1 ~ 12.0 ms
Determines the time that the signal is delayed
before applying the flanger to the left channel.
CHORUS
65
EFFECT SECTION
EFFECTS AND PARAMETERS
RIGHT DELAY TIME (R TIME) —
Range: 0.1 ~ 12.0 ms
Determines the time that the signal is delayed
before applying the flanger to the right channel.
FEEDBACK (FB) — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the amount of the Phaser-processed
signal that is fed back to the Phaser input.
Higher values result in a stronger Phaser sound.
DRY LEVEL (DRY) — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the level of the dry sound. A setting
of 0% results in no direct sound output. Use
this control with the Effect Mix (MIX) parameter above below to determine the balance
between the effect and dry sound.
DEPTH — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the depth of the phase modulation.
Phaser (PH)
Phaser is a strong and pronounced modulation
effect.
SPEED — Range: 0.03 ~ 6.18 Hz
Determines the speed of the phase modulation.
Sub parameters:
EFFECT MIX (MIX) — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the level of the processed signals. A
setting of 0% results in no effect output. Use
this control with the Dry Level (DRY) parameter below to determine the balance between the
effect and dry sound.
DRY LEVEL (DRY) — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the level of the dry sound. A setting
of 0% results in no direct sound output. Use
this control with the Effect Mix (MIX) parameter above below to determine the balance
between the effect and dry sound.
REVERB/DELAY
The Reverb/Delay block provides a reverb
effect, a delay effect, and a delay
combined with reverb. Used judiciously,
reverb is one of the most important
effects, since without it the sound is
generally flat, dry and unnatural. Putting
reverb on a guitar is an effective way to
bring the sound to life and make it sound
more natural. Delay, although more of a
special effect, also helps in creating a
sense of space and depth in the sound.
Generally, delay and/or reverb effects are
best used as the last effect in the chain,
since they reproduce the echoes and
ambience that follow a sound when heard
in an actual performance environment.
66
CHORUS / REVERB/DELAY
Note: SETTING THE MIX AND DRY PARAMETERS—For
each of the Reverb/Delay types below, the MIX
and DRY parameters should be set appropriately
to avoid sudden jumps in level when changing
between effect programs, or to avoid
overloading subsequent effects within an effect
program. (See Note in the Distortion section,
page 59.) Also, when MIX and DRY are both set
to 0, no sound is output.
EFFECT SECTION
Reverb (REV)
This is a high-quality, yet simple and easy-to-use
Reverb effect that provides three reverb types and
lets you create long reverbs of up to 10 seconds.
TIME — Range: 0.3 ~ 10.0 sec
Determines the time it takes for the reverberation to decay. Higher values create a larger
apparent room size.
HIGH (controlled with the center knob) —
Range: 0.1 ~ 1.0
Determines the amount of high frequencies in
the reverb sound. In other words, it is similar to
a tone control, except that it affects only the
reverberation, not the original signal. The
higher the value, the greater the amount of high
frequencies. Higher settings make the apparent
room sound more reflective and “live,” while
lower settings help to keep the sound from
becoming too harsh or metallic.
EFFECT MIX (MIX) — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the level of the processed signals.
A setting of 0% results in no effect output. Use
this control with the Dry Level (DRY) parameter below to determine the balance between the
effect and dry sound.
Sub parameters:
TYPE — Settings: Hall, Room, Plate
Determines the type of reverb. Use this to set
the kind of acoustic environment you wish to
reproduce. Hall simulates the ambience of large
enclosed spaces, such as concert halls, auditoriums and stadiums. Room simulates smaller
performance spaces and various types of rooms.
Plate recreates the special characteristics of a
plate reverb, and is particularly effective at
enhancing and filling out solo sounds.
EFFECTS AND PARAMETERS
LOW — Range: –3 ~ +6 dB
Determines the amount of low frequencies in
the reverb sound. The higher the value, the
greater the amount of low frequencies.
DRY LEVEL (DRY) — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the level of the dry sound. A setting
of 0% results in no direct sound output. Use
this control with the Effect Mix (MIX) parameter above below to determine the balance
between the effect and dry sound.
Delay (DLY)
Delay adds echoed repeats to the sound. This delay
effect is a sophisticated multiple delay, with a
main delay and an additional short “doubling”
delay. The main delay time also has a tap delay
function that lets you “play” the delay time, setting
it in time with the rhythm you’re playing by tapping the Pedal Switch. The Tap Delay function can
also be used to temporarily change the delay time
of effect programs in the Memory mode (for those
programs that have Delay).
TIME — Range: 7 ~ 896 ms
Determines the time between delayed repeats of
the main delay. Very short delays (7–50 ms)
have a doubling effect, making one instrument
sound like two. Slightly longer delays (roughly
60–150 ms) can be used for creating slap-back
echo or a reverb-type effect. Longer times are
used for special effects.
To use the Tap Delay function, press the Pedal
Switch of the Delay block twice, when Delay is
on. (If Delay has not been selected, pressing the
Pedal Switch for tap delay will not set the delay
time, but will simply turn the effect on and off.)
The GW50 automatically sets the delay time to
match the time between presses of the Pedal
Switch.
REVERB/DELAY
67
EFFECT SECTION
EFFECTS AND PARAMETERS
Note: The Tap Delay function can be used in the
Manual, Memory or Memory Edit modes, if the
MEMORY ON/OFF function is selected in the ASSIGNABLE Block (the MEMORY LED flashes).
DOUBLING BALANCE (DB BAL) —
Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the level of the short (or doubling)
delay. A setting of 0% outputs only the main
delay, while a setting of 100% outputs only the
short (or doubling) delay.
Note: If you tap the Pedal Switch a little beyond the
maximum time (up to about one second), the
delay time will be set to the maximum value
(896 ms). However, taps made much longer
than one second will not set the delay time.
Note: The time set by Tap Delay is not saved as part
DRY LEVEL (DRY) — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the level of the dry sound. A setting
of 0% results in no direct sound output. Use
this control with the Effect Mix (MIX) parameter above below to determine the balance
between the effect and dry sound.
of the program data; only the delay time set by
the panel knob can be saved.
Delay + Reverb (D+R)
HINT
QUANTIZE FUNCTION ON TAP DELAY—The
GW50 has a convenient “quantize” function
that works with the backing rhythm patterns
to keep your tap delay settings in time with
the rhythm. This function measures the
delay time that you tap with the Pedal
Switch, and adjusts the time (if necessary)
to synchronize the delay with the tempo of
the rhythm pattern that is playing.
FEEDBACK (FB) — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the number of the delayed repeats.
Values close to 0 repeat the delay once or
twice, while for higher values the repeats carry
on almost indefinitely.
This effect combines both the Delay and Reverb
effects above in one program. All parameters in
the two effects are available in this program. (For
parameter descriptions, refer to the Delay and
Reverb effects above.)
DELAY TIME (DL TIM) —
Range: 4 ~ 512 ms
DELAY EFFECT MIX (DL MIX) —
Range: 0 ~ 100%
REVERB EFFECT MIX (RV MIX) —
Range: 0 ~ 100%
EFFECT MIX (MIX) — Range: 0 ~ 100%
Determines the level of the processed signals. A
setting of 0% results in no effect output. Use
this control with the Dry Level (DRY) parameter below to determine the balance between the
effect and dry sound.
Sub parameters:
Sub parameters:
DOUBLING BALANCE (DB BAL) —
Range: 0 ~ 100%
DOUBLING TIME (DB TIM) —
Range: 30 ~ 50 ms
Determines the time between delayed repeats of
the short (or doubling) delay.
68
REVERB/DELAY
DELAY FEEDBACK (DL FB) —
Range: 0 ~ 100%
DOUBLING TIME (DB TIM) —
Range: 30 ~ 50 ms
DELAY DRY LEVEL (DL DRY) —
Range: 0 ~ 100%
EFFECTS AND PARAMETERS
EFFECT SECTION
REVERB TYPE (RV TYP) —
Settings: Hall, Room, Plate
REVERB TIME (RV TIM) —
Range: 0.3 ~ 10.0 sec
REVERB HIGH (RV HI) — Range: 0.1 ~ 1.0
REVERB DRY LEVEL (RV DRY) —
Range: 0 ~ 100%
REVERB LOW (RV LOW) —
Range: –3 ~ +6 dB
NOISE GATE
Noise Gate is a separate effect that is placed
before the Chorus and Reverb/Delay effects,
and is used to eliminate any noise or hum in
the signal when the instrument isn’t being
played. All signals below the Threshold point
are filtered out, thus cutting off the noise.
Noise Gate is always active no matter what
the effect program or configuration.
Note: The Noise Gate cannot be used to
eliminate any noise occurring after the
Chorus or Reverb/Delay effects.
Parameter
THRESHOLD — Range: 0 ~ 9
Determines the sensitivity of the noise gate, or
how loud an input signal is required to open the
gate (letting the signal through). The higher the
value, the louder the signal needs to be to open
the gate. For optimum operation, Threshold
should be set just above the level of the noise;
setting it too high may cause notes to be cut off
too abruptly.
Guitar
signal
Operation —
1. From the Manual or Memory Edit mode,
simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press
[SUB PARAM]. This calls up the sub parameters. If “N.GATE” is not displayed here,
press [CMP] or [DST] (or simultaneously
hold down [SHIFT] and repeatedly press
[SUB PARAM]).
2.
Adjust with [–]/[+] buttons.
3.
Exit this operation by pressing any of the
mode buttons ([MANUAL], [MEMORY] or
[SONG/PATTERN]).
Level
Threshold level
NOISE
NOISE
Time
This part of signal is filtered out.
REVERB/DELAY / NOISE GATE
69
EFFECT SECTION
70
EFFECTS AND PARAMETERS
REFERENCE
BACKING SECTION
PATTERN MODE ................................................
73
RECORDING AND EDITING SONGS ..........
83
Selecting and Playing Patterns ......................
73
Cursor Control in Pattern Mode ....................
74
REALTIME RECORDING MODE
(REALTIME RECORDING) ............................
83
Changing Chords ...........................................
74
Changing the Tempo .....................................
76
ASSIGNABLE Block and Pedal Switch
Functions in Song Realtime Recording ........
86
Muting the Accompaniment, Bass and
Drums ............................................................
Hints on Realtime Recording ........................
87
76
ASSIGNABLE Block and Pedal Switch
Functions in Pattern Mode ............................
STEP RECORDING MODE
(STEP RECORDING) .......................................
88
77
SONG EDIT MODE (SONG EDITING) .........
90
Backing Control ........................................
77
Viewing Recorded Events .............................
90
Chord Recall .............................................
77
Editing (Changing) Recorded Events ...........
92
Root Select ................................................
78
Erasing Recorded Events ..............................
92
SONG MODE .......................................................
79
Set A and Set B Operations ..........................
92
Marking Measure A and Measure B .........
92
SONG PLAY MODE
(SONG PLAYBACK) .......................................
79
Jumping to Measure A or Measure B .......
92
Selecting and Playing Songs .........................
79
Loop (Repeat) Playback (A to B) .............
92
Cursor Control in Song Mode .......................
80
Loop (Repeat) Recording (A to B) ...........
93
Changing the Tempo .....................................
80
SONG JOB MODE ...........................................
94
Copying Measures Between A and B ...........
94
Muting the Accompaniment, Bass and
Drums ............................................................
80
Deleting Measures Between A and B ...........
94
Position Controls ...........................................
81
Naming Songs ...............................................
95
ASSIGNABLE Block and Pedal Switch
Functions in Song Mode ...............................
RESTORING FACTORY PRESET SONGS ...
95
82
Backing Control —
Selecting and Playing a Song ...................
82
Triggered Run ...........................................
82
BACKING SECTION
72
PATTERN MODE
PATTERN MODE
BACKING SECTION
PATTERN MODE
PATTERN MODE
In the Pattern mode, you can select and play rhythm and accompaniment
patterns. There are 248 preset patterns covering a wide variety of musical
styles, and they feature realistic drum, bass and other accompaniment sounds.
Combined with the sophisticated chord controls of the GW50, these preset
patterns provide easy-to-use backing tracks for performing along with.
Note:
Unless indicated otherwise, all operations in the Pattern mode covered below can be performed either
while the pattern is stopped or being played.
HINT
PATTERN TYPES—The patterns can be
roughly divided into groups of four types,
each designed to fill a specific role in a song.
The types are indicated by the last one or
two characters in the pattern name:
…A
— Basic pattern, used generally for the “A”
part of a song, such as the verse.
…AF — Fill in based on the basic pattern.
…B — Variation pattern, used generally for the “B”
part of a song, such as the bridge or chorus.
…BF — Fill in based on the variation pattern.
To select the Pattern mode, press [SONG/PATTERN] so that the PATTERN LED lights. (The
current pattern name appears in the display.)
IMPORTANT
2.
Use the [–]/[+] buttons to select the desired
pattern number. (Refer to pages 144 and 145
for a list of the available patterns and their
descriptions.)
Note: Only the odd number patterns from 1 – 239
(the basic patterns) can be selected here in the
Pattern mode. Fill in patterns (even numbered
patterns from 2 – 240) cannot be selected
here; however, once a basic pattern has started,
the companion fill in pattern for that basic
pattern can be played by pressing Pedal Switch
3. (See page 77 for details.) Patterns 241 –
248, which include the special Retrigger, Ending,
Metronome and Blank patterns, can all be
selected.
The operations covered in this section on the
Pattern mode pertain specifically to the Pattern
mode. Make sure that the Pattern mode has been
selected before trying each operation.
Selecting and Playing Patterns
3.
Operation —
1. Using [6 CURSOR], move the arrow in the
display to the PTN (Pattern) box.
To play the selected pattern, press [START/
STOP].
PATTERN MODE
73
BACKING SECTION
PATTERN MODE
This flashes
on every beat
in time with
the tempo.
Position indicator — Displays the
current position in the measure
(in 16th notes); moves when pattern
is playing.
Pattern tempo
Beat Beat
1
2
Time signature of the pattern
Backing mute status
Beat
3
Pattern name
Beat
Current
chord
4
Measure/Beat — This changes as the
pattern in playing; the indication
depends on the length of the pattern and
its time signature.
Pattern number — This display title (“PTN”) changes briefly to
“NEXT PTN” if a second pattern is selected while the first is
still playing. (The second pattern begins from the next measure,
and the title changes back as well.)
Cursor Control in Pattern Mode
Whether a pattern is playing or not, the cursor
arrow can be moved (using [6 CURSOR]) among
the TEMPO and PTN sections of the Backing
mode display, and the Effect mode display. (The
cursor arrow actually disappears from the LCD
when the Effect mode display is selected.)
Changing Chords
The GW50 features a sophisticated automatic bass
and accompaniment function that automatically
and instantly adds matching bass lines and chord
voicings according to the chords you specify here.
A total of 25 different chord types are available for
each of the 12 keys.
In addition to the methods described below, the
Pedal Switches can be used to assign chords to the
Pedal Switches and change to pre-assigned chords.
See the section “Chord Recall,” page 77, for
details.
Changing the Root Note
Note: If the cursor arrow has been moved, “MANUAL”
or the current effect program name may be
displayed instead of the pattern name and
current chord. (This is the Effect mode display.)
To restore the Backing mode display shown
above, press [6 CURSOR]. (See Cursor Control in
Pattern Mode below for details.)
4.
To stop the pattern, press [START/STOP]
again.
HINT
74
You can also use the Pedal Switches to
select and play patterns; see page 12
for more information.
PATTERN MODE
Operation —
To change the root note of the chord, press the
Chord button corresponding to the desired note
(written above the button). Press it repeatedly until
the desired note is shown in the LCD.
Note: The mark “ #” in the LCD is used to
represent “ ” or “sharp.”
Note:For this, and all other note/chord
select operations, the Chord buttons
“remember” the last selection made. For
example, if you’ve selected “E” as the root
note by pressing [D/E E] three times, and
press another Chord button, you will need
to press [D/E E] only once to call up “E.”
BACKING SECTION
Changing the Chord Type
PATTERN MODE
Optionally, if you want to change the root
note of the chord here (yet keep the currently
selected bass note), simultaneously hold
[CHORD] and press [on/ROOT] again. (The
slash mark stops flashing.) The selected bass
note will continue to play even when you
change to other root notes.
Operation —
To change the chord type, simultaneously hold
[CHORD] and press the Chord button corresponding to the desired type (written below the button).
Press it repeatedly until the desired chord type is
shown in the LCD.
Changing the Bass Note of the Chord
This is used when you want to have the bass play
a note other than the root. It is effective in adding
harmonic complexity to transitions or in adding
tension before resolving to the main chords of a
progression.
To switch between the two conditions below, simultaneously hold
[CHORD] and press [on/ROOT].
Operation —
1. Simultaneously hold [CHORD] and press
[on/ROOT].
In this condition, the bass note can be changed.
In this condition, the bass note is fixed and the root note of
chord can be changed.
3.
Flashes (waiting for note entry).
2.
To cancel the selected bass note and have the
bass line automatically change with the root
note, hold [CHORD] and press one of the
Chord buttons to reselect the chord type.
Press the Chord button corresponding to the
desired note (written above the button). Press
it repeatedly until the desired note is shown
in the LCD.
As long as the slash mark (/) in the display is
flashing, different bass notes can be selected.
PATTERN MODE
75
BACKING SECTION
PATTERN MODE
2.
List of Chord Types
M
m
7
m7
M7
major
minor
seventh
minor
seventh
major
seventh
Madd9
madd9
9
m9
M9
ninth
minor ninth
major ninth
major
minor
added ninth added ninth
sus4
m6
7+9
m7-11
7-9
suspended
fourth
minor sixth
seventh
sharp ninth
minor
seventh
flatted
eleventh
seventh
flatted ninth
7sus4
mM7
7+11
6
7-13
seventh
suspended
fourth
minor
major
seventh
seventh
sharp
eleventh
sixth
seventh
flatted
thirteenth
dim
m7-5
13
6.9
aug
diminshed
minor
seventh
flatted fifth
thirteenth
sixth ninth
augmented
Note: A fingering chart for all these chords (in the key of C) is
provided on page 152.
Changing the Tempo
Although each of the rhythm patterns has its own
appropriately pre-programmed tempo, you can
change this either before playing the pattern or
while it is running.
Operation —
1. Using [6 CURSOR], move the arrow in the
display to the TEMPO box.
Use the [–]/[+] buttons to adjust the tempo.
(Hold down either button for rapid operation;
see page 5.) The range is from 30 – 250 BPM
(beats per minute).
Note: ABOUT TEMPO CHANGES AND PATTERN
GROUPS—The tempo change you make here remains in effect as long as you stay within the
A/B pattern “group.” For example, patterns 201
(JT2 A) and 203 (JT2 B), with their fill in
patterns 202 and 204 comprise one such group.
Any pattern you select within this group,
including the companion fill in patterns, will stay
at the same tempo. However, if you select a
pattern from another group (for example, 205
— JT3 A), that new pattern will play at its
default tempo. If you return to the first group
again (for example, 203 — JT2 B), the tempo
change you made before will be cancelled and
the pattern will play at its default tempo.
Muting the Accompaniment, Bass
and Drums
This function lets you turn the sound of the individual backing parts (accompaniment, bass and
drums) on and off, either before starting a pattern
or while it is playing.
Operation —
Simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press the
appropriate button: [ACCOMP], [BASS] or
[DRUMS].
(on)
(off)
(on)
The speaker symbol indicates
the on/off status.
76
PATTERN MODE
BACKING SECTION
❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉
ASSIGNABLE Block and Pedal
Switch Functions in Pattern Mode
PLAYING FILL IN PATTERNS—You can use
Pedal Switch 3 (Fill) to play the fill in pattern
at any point in a measure. In other words, if
you press the Pedal Switch on the third beat
of a measure, the fill in pattern will playback
from the third beat to the end of the
measure and then will return to the normal
pattern. Also, holding down the Fill Pedal
Switch through successive measures
continues playing the fill in pattern.
HINT
The Pedal Switches can be used in the Pattern
mode either to select and play patterns (Backing
Control) or to change chords (Chord Recall).
HINT
USING ASSIGNABLE BLOCK PEDAL SWITCH
TO SWITCH BETWEEN BACKING CONTROL
AND CHORD RECALL—Although the Type
switch in the ASSIGNABLE Block is normally
used to select Backing Control and Chord
Recall, you can use the ASSIGNABLE Block
Pedal Switch in the Pattern mode to switch
between the two, after either one has been
selected.
PATTERN MODE
Note: If you press the Fill Pedal Switch on the last
16th note of a measure, the fill in pattern will
play in its entirety from the next measure.
HINT
Note: When pressing [SONG/PATTERN] to select the
PLAYING AN ENDING PATTERN—Rather than
simply stopping the pattern with [START/STOP],
you can use Pedal Switch 4 (End) to play a simple
ending pattern. Press it during the measure
previous to the intended ending.
Pattern or Song mode, Backing Control will automatically be selected.
Chord Recall
Backing Control
■ Selecting and Playing Patterns
Operation —
1. Use the ASSIGNABLE Block Type switch to
select BACKING CONTROL. (The LED
next to the function name lights.)
2.
The Pedal Switches function as shown below.
Press the appropriate Pedal Switch for the
desired function.
Decreases pattern
number by 2
(every other odd
numbered pattern)
Plays fill in pattern
Starts/stops
(during pattern
pattern play
play only)
Plays ending pattern
(during pattern play only)
Increases pattern number
by 2 (every other odd
Switches to Chord Recall (Hold this and press
numbered pattern)
one of Pedal Switches 1 – 4 to assign current
chord to the pressed Pedal Switch.)
■ Selecting Chords
Operation —
1. Use the ASSIGNABLE Block Type switch to
select CHORD RECALL. (The LED next to
the function name lights.)
2.
The Pedal Switches function as shown below.
Press the appropriate Pedal Switch for the
desired function. Chords can be selected
whether a pattern is playing or not.
Selects
chord 1
Selects
chord 2
Selects
chord 3
Selects Starts/stops
chord 4 pattern play
Switches to Backing Control (Hold this and
press one of Pedal Switches 1 – 4 to assign
current chord to the pressed Pedal Switches.)
PATTERN MODE
77
BACKING SECTION
PATTERN MODE
■ Assigning Chords to the Pedal Switches
Operation —
1. Select CHORD RECALL or BACKING
CONTROL in the ASSIGNABLE block.
2.
Select a chord root note, chord type and (if
desired) a bass note by using the Chord
buttons. (Refer to the instructions in the
section “Changing Chords,” page 74.)
3.
To assign the selected chord to a Pedal
Switch, simultaneously hold down the ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch and press
one of the Pedal Switches 1 – 4. (Pedal
Switch 5 is reserved for pattern start/stop.)
Note:Chords can be assigned whether a
pattern is currently playing or not.
Root Select
3.
While holding down the Pedal Switch, play a
note on the connected instrument. If you’ve
played a note other than the root note of the
chord currently playing, the root note will
change to the note you just played.
The note you play on the instrument is muted
and not output until you release the Pedal
Switch. In this way you can hold down the
Pedal Switch, play a note to change the root,
then let up on the Pedal Switch and play
along with the backing part as usual. (When
this is done, CHORD RECALL is automatically selected in the ASSIGNABLE Block.)
HINT
HINT
Root Select lets you change the root note of the
chord to the note you play on the connected instrument.
Operation —
1. Make sure that either BACKING CONTROL
or CHORD RECALL have been selected in
the ASSIGNABLE Block, then start the
pattern.
2.
78
Press and hold down the ASSIGNABLE
Block Pedal Switch.
PATTERN MODE
For best results with Root Select, the connected instrument should be tuned properly.
Use the Tuner function of the GW50 (see
page 99) to tune the instrument.
Keep in mind that this function is not instantaneous; a short time is necessary for
the GW50 to “hear” the pitch of the note
and respond accordingly. Play around with
this function to get a feel for the response
time before you try using it in performance.
The GW50 detects and responds to
high notes more quickly than low notes.
HINT
❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉
BACKING SECTION
SONG MODE
SONG MODE
In the Song modes, you can select and play preset songs. You can also use the
sequencer functions to record and create your own songs.
To select the Song mode, press [SONG/PATTERN] so that the SONG LED lights. (The
current song name briefly appears in the display.)
IMPORTANT
The operations covered in this section on the Song mode pertain specifically to the
Song mode. Make sure that the Song mode has been selected before trying each
operation.
SONG MODE (SONG PLAYBACK)
Selecting and Playing Songs
3.
To play the selected song, press [START/
STOP].
Operation —
1. Using [6 CURSOR], move the arrow in the
display to the SONG box.
This flashes
on every beat
in time with
the tempo.
Measure/Event section
Pattern number
Song Song
tempo number
2.
Use the [–]/[+] buttons to select the desired
song number. (Refer to page 147 for a list of
the factory preset songs and their descriptions.)
Time signature of the current pattern
Measure/Beat — Indicates the current
position in the song.
Backing mute status
Beat Beat Beat Beat Current Pattern name
2
3
4 chord
1
Position indicator — Displays current position in
measure (in 16th notes); moves when song is playing.
Event indicator — Shows that an event or events
(pattern number, chord change, effect program number, etc.)
has been recorded at the marked position.
The song name briefly appears in the LCD,
and the song number briefly appears in the
BANK/MEMORY indicator. (The song
number is shown continuously in the SONG
box in the LCD.)
SONG MODE (SONG PLAYBACK)
79
BACKING SECTION
SONG MODE
Note: If the cursor arrow has been moved, “MANUAL”
or the current effect program name may be
displayed instead of the pattern name and
current chord. (This is the Effect mode display.)
To restore the Backing mode display shown
above, press [6 CURSOR]. (See “Cursor Control
in Song Mode” below for details.)
Note: If many events (particularly those of effect
program changes) have been recorded within a
measure of a song, the position indicator may
move jerkily through the measure. This only applies to the display; actual playback is unaffected.
HINT
4.
A Repeat function (A-B Repeat) lets you repeatedly and continuously play a specified
section of the song. (See page 92 for
details.)
To stop the song, press [START/STOP]
again.
Note: ABOUT SONG STOP—If you let the song play
to the end, it will stop automatically and return
to the first measure. If you’ve stopped the song
in the middle of playback, [START/STOP]
functions like a pause button, alternately pausing and resuming playback from the paused
point. To return to the first measure of the
song, simultaneously press the [n] and [v] buttons.
Cursor Control in Song Mode
The cursor arrow can be moved (using [6 CURSOR]) among the various sections of the display
as described below:
When a song is not playing —
The cursor arrow can be moved among the
TEMPO, SONG and PTN sections of the Backing
mode display, and the Effect mode display
(“MANUAL” or the current effect program name).
(The cursor arrow actually disappears from the
LCD when the Effect mode display is selected.)
80
SONG MODE (SONG PLAYBACK)
When a song is playing —
The cursor can only be moved between TEMPO
and the Effect mode display.
Note: Although you can change the displayed chord
and pattern number, this has no effect on song
playback, since the GW50 returns to the originally programmed chord and pattern number
before starting the song. For more information
on entering these and other types of events,
see STEP RECORDING, page 88.)
Changing the Tempo
You can change the tempo of a song, either before
or during playback.
To change the tempo, simply use [6 CURSOR] to
move the cursor arrow to TEMPO in the display,
and adjust the tempo with the [–]/[+] buttons.
Note: The tempo change you make here is automatically saved as the tempo setting for the song,
erasing the previous setting. (In other words,
the last tempo setting made is the one that is
in effect.)
Muting the Accompaniment, Bass
and Drums
This function lets you turn the sound of the individual backing parts (accompaniment, bass and
drums) on and off, either before starting a song
(providing no muting events are at the start of the
song) or while it is playing.
Note:If muting events have been entered
in a song, the mute status will
change accordingly during playback.
Operation —
Simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press the
appropriate button: [ACCOMP], [BASS] or
[DRUMS].
BACKING SECTION
SONG MODE
Note: USING
POSITION CONTROLS TO VIEW
RECORDED EVENTS—When you press any of the
four main Position Controls ([n], [v], [ /], or
[ m]), the currently active pattern number, mute
status, pattern name, and chord appear in the
display. (If the cursor arrow is in the Effect
mode display — the cursor arrow disappears
from the display — “MANUAL” or an effect
program name appears instead of the pattern
name and chord.) To restore the Backing mode
display, press [ -> CURSOR].
In the example display shown below, no event
has been recorded to the current position:
Position Controls
These are used to move the position indicator in
the Measure/Event section of the display in Song
play.
Reverse one measure. (Hold down for continuous rapid operation.)
Forward one 16th note.
(Hold down for continuous rapid operation.)
Forward one measure.
Reverse one
(Hold down for
16th note.
continuous rapid
(Hold down for
operation.)
Set measure B.
continuous rapid
operation.)
Set measure A.
Simultaneously
Simultaneously
press these to
press these to jump
jump to end of
to beginning
of song (first beat song (last recorded
event in song).
of first measure).
When you press [ /] to move to the next
16th note, even if that 16th note also has
no event, the display shows the active
pattern number, mute status, pattern
name, and chord:
Simultaneously
hold down
[SHIFT] and
press this to
jump to
measure B
(first beat).
Simultaneously
hold down [SHIFT]
and press this to
jump to measure
A (first beat).
Note: USING POSITION CONTROLS DURING
PLAYBACK—With the exception of the Ameasure and B-measure controls, all the
Position Controls above can also be used
while the song is playing back. When using
the [n] and [v] buttons to reverse during
playback, hold down the appropriate button
until the desired position is reached.
Note: VIEWING MULTIPLE RECORDED EVENTS—With
the song stopped and the cursor arrow in the
Backing mode display, and when the position
indicator is moved to position where certain
multiple events have been recorded, each event
appears briefly in the LCD, one after the other.
(See the section “Viewing Recorded Events,”
page 90, for details.)
SONG MODE (SONG PLAYBACK)
81
BACKING SECTION
SONG MODE
❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉
ASSIGNABLE Block and Pedal
Switch Functions in Song Mode
Backing Control — Selecting and Playing a
Song
Operation —
1. Use the ASSIGNABLE Block Type switch to
select BACKING CONTROL. (The LED
next to the function name lights.)
Triggered Run
Triggered Run lets you start the currently selected
song by simply playing a note on the connected
instrument.
Operation —
1. Make sure that BACKING CONTROL has
been selected in the ASSIGNABLE Block.
2.
Press and hold down the ASSIGNABLE
Block Pedal Switch.
3.
While holding down the ASSIGNABLE
Block Pedal Switch, press Pedal Switch 5
(start/stop).
Note: Chord Recall cannot be selected here. Only
Backing Control is available in the Song
mode (in playback). When pressing [SONG/
PATTERN] to select the Pattern or Song
mode, Backing Control will automatically be
selected.
2.
BACKING CONTROL LED
flashes
1) While holding
this down
The Pedal Switches function as shown below.
Press the appropriate Pedal Switch for the
desired function.
2) Press this
n — Reverse
one measure
— Starts/stops
song play
b
– — Decreases
song number by
1 (only when
song is stopped).
The instrument sound output will be cut off
temporarily, and the song playback is in
standby condition waiting for an input signal.
m — Forward one measure
+ — Increases song number by 1
(only when song is stopped).
Holding this and pressing Pedal Switch 5 enables Triggered
Run function (see below).
4.
Play a note on the connected instrument. If
the input level of the GW50 has been set
appropriately and the note is not too low, the
song will start.
This initial note is muted; however, once the
song starts, the instrument sound is output
again.
❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉
82
SONG MODE (SONG PLAYBACK)
BACKING SECTION
SONG MODE
RECORDING AND EDITING SONGS
Virtually all of the functions of the Pattern mode —
including selecting patterns, changing chords, muting
and turning on backing tracks, etc. — can be programmed into a song for completely automatic
playback. You can also have effect programs automatically change within a song, as well as the on/off
(bypass) setting of individual effects. Moreover,
using several techniques described in the Hints
section (page 87), you can customize the accompaniment patterns and bass lines for creating highly
sophisticated recordings.
Two different recording methods are available:
Realtime and Step. (See page 37 for a more detailed
discussion of the two methods.) Up to eight songs
can be recorded, each song having a maximum length
of 299 measures, with a maximum of 4000 chord
events available for all songs. (However, if individual songs have a large amount of recorded data,
less than eight songs may be available.)
Keep in mind that once you do any recording or
editing to a song, the changes that you make are
automatically saved to that song number. The original song is altered or lost. For this reason, you
should be careful when recording or editing an
existing song. If you have song data you wish to
keep, you should use the MIDI Bulk Transmission
function (see page 102) to save it before recording or
editing. If you’ve erased one of the original factory
songs, you can restore it. (See “RESTORING FACTORY PRESET SONGS,” page 95, for details.)
REALTIME RECORDING MODE (REALTIME RECORDING)
Note: ABOUT TEMPO CHANGES AND RECORDING—
Realtime recording allows you to enter
data as the song is playing. The types of
data that can be recorded in realtime, as
well as how and when they can be
recorded are shown in this chart:
Data Type
Method of Entry
Available
Recording Position
Pattern
By panel controls.
At the beginning
of the current
measure.*
Chords
By Pedal Switches
only; also by panel
controls during record
standby.
At start of song,
and any point
after.
Effect program
numbers
By Pedal Switches
or panel controls.
At start of song,
and any point
after.
Effect on/off
setting
By Pedal
Switches only.
At start of song,
and any point
after.
Backing
(Accompaniment,
Bass, Drums) mute
status
By panel controls.
At start of song,
and any point
after.
*
Tempo changes themselves cannot be recorded.
However, the tempo of the song can be
changed manually, either during or before or after recording of a song, and the last tempo
setting made is the one that is subsequently
used for the song. For example, if you’ve originally recorded a song at a tempo of 120 and
you later change this to 135 during playback,
the next time you select the song, it will play
back at the new tempo of 135, not 120.
This section on Realtime recording is divided into
three basic parts: 1) overall operation instructions,
2) individual instructions on recording different
types of data, and 3) helpful hints. You may want
to skim through all three parts first, then follow the
instructions in the first two parts as you record a
song. The section of hints at the end provides
some practical tips and helpful additional information for recording.
When the current song has no recorded patterns, a single
pattern may be selected during record standby, and it will be
entered once recording has started. In Realtime recording, a
pattern can be entered only one time, and pattern changes can
be entered only in Step recording.
1) Overall Operation Instructions
1.
First, make sure that the Song mode has been
selected (the SONG LED should be lit).
REALTIME RECORDING MODE (REALTIME RECORDING)
83
BACKING SECTION
SONG MODE
Then, using [6 CURSOR] move the cursor
arrow to SONG in the display and select an
empty song number with the [–]/[+] buttons
for recording. (Song number 8 has been
deliberately left blank for this purpose.)
If there are no empty songs, you’ll have to
use the Measure Delete function to erase a
song before continuing (see pages 94-95).
You can check for empty songs by trying to
play back each song; “SONG EMPTY”
briefly appears in the display if the song has
no data, and the song will not play back, and
pressing [START/STOP] has no effect.
HINT
2.
CHECKING FOR DATA IN A SONG—Another
way to check whether a song is empty or
not is to make sure the position indicator is
at the beginning of the song, then simultaneously press [ /] and [ m] to go to the last
recorded data in the song. If the position
indicator stays at the same place, the song
is empty.
Note: You can cancel recording here by pressing
[SONG REC] again (without [SHIFT]).
4.
Using [6 CURSOR], more the cursor arrow
to PTN in the display and select the pattern
number with which you wish to start the
recording with the [–]/[+] buttons.
Note: Once a pattern has been set for a song, it
cannot be changed during Realtime recording
(the cursor arrow cannot be moved to the PTN
box in the display). However, you can change
and enter patterns by using Step recording operations if necessary. (See page 88.)
5.
You may also want to select the chord for the
start of the song. Do this from the Chord
section (see page 74), or by using the
CHORD RECALL function of the Pedal
Switches (see page 86).
6.
Press [START/STOP] to start recording. (The
pattern and chord that you selected in steps
#4 and #5 above are automatically entered to
the first 16th note in the song, and a dot
appears at the position to indicate recorded
events.)
Make sure that the position indicator in the
display is at the start of the song. (Simultaneously press the [n] and [v] buttons if necessary.)
Note: Generally, you should start recording at the
beginning of a song, since the GW50 needs to
recognize both a chord and a pattern to start
playback. If the starting measures of a song are
empty, but there is pattern data in later measures, the GW50 automatically provides a default
chord (C) and the METRO pattern (No. 246) for
the empty starting measures. (Since the METRO
pattern has no bass or accompaniment parts,
however, the chord sound cannot be heard while
METRO is playing.) If the song has no pattern
data, but other data exists, the GW50 automatically provides a METRO pattern for the entire song.
3.
84
The Position Controls ([n], [v], [/], [m]) can
be used to “pause” the song during Realtime
recording (for recording standby), and select
a different measure or position in a song. To
resume recording, simply press [START/
STOP]. (For more information, refer to Hint
#7 on page 88.)
Note:When a song is running, the LCD
display in Realtime recording is the same as
that for song playback (see page 79).
To enable song recording, simultaneously hold
down [SHIFT] and press [SONG REC].
Recording is now in standby. (The SONG LED
flashes and the cursor arrow in the display automatically moves to the PTN or TEMPO box.)
REALTIME RECORDING MODE (REALTIME RECORDING)
BACKING SECTION
Note: If for some reason the position indicator is
not at the first 16th note in the song but
instead is at some point in the middle of
the measure, the chord will be properly
entered at the indicated position, but the
pattern will be entered at the beginning of
the measure (since patterns cannot begin
in the middle of a measure).
SONG MODE
7.
Enter additional data as the song plays, as
described in the sections below. (Event
indicator dots in the display appear at the
position each time data is entered.)
8.
Stop recording by pressing [START/STOP].
Note: Doing this exits the Realtime recording
mode and automatically returns to the
Song mode.
2) Individual Instructions on Recording
Different Types of Data
The chord is entered at the selected position.
The pattern is automatically entered here.
The sections below provide detailed instructions for
recording specific events.
Note: USE OF STARTING EVENTS AT BEGINNING
OF SONG—If you intend to record Backing
mute status, effect program numbers, and
effect on/off events at some point in a
song, you should enter starting events for
these types of data as well. If no such
events are recorded at the beginning of
the song, the GW50 simply plays back the
current settings. Thus, the start of the
song (up until the properly entered data)
may not sound as you expect.
To record Backing mute status, effect program numbers, and effect on/off events at
the start of a song:
Operation —
1.
Simultaneously press [SHIFT]
and [SONG REC] to enable recording.
2.
Make the desired settings. (Even if
the current settings are the ones you
wish to use, you must actually use
the panel here to select them; the
GW50 will not record the current settings of these types of events unless
they are properly set from the panel.)
3.
Press [START/STOP] to start recording. The data is automatically recorded to the start of the song.
■ To record chord changes in realtime:
1. Before recording the song, go to the Pattern
mode and assign the chords that you wish to
record to the four available Pedal Switches.
(See page 78.)
2.
Return to Realtime recording, and make sure
that the CHORD RECALL function is selected in the ASSIGNABLE Block, then start
recording (see “REALTIME RECORDING”
section steps #3 and #6 above).
3.
Then, while recording the song, press the
appropriate Pedal Switches at the points in
the song that you want the chords to change.
HINT
Since only four different chords can be
assigned to the Pedal Switches and you
may want to record more in the song,
simply repeat the operation above —
this time, after assigning four new
chords to the Pedal Switches — and
start recording from where you left off
the last time.
REALTIME RECORDING MODE (REALTIME RECORDING)
85
BACKING SECTION
SONG MODE
!❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉❉
ASSIGNABLE Block and Pedal
Switch Functions in Song Realtime
Recording
Note: This step is optional, since you can also
select the bank number with the Pedal
Switches in step #5.
4.
Make sure that Realtime recording is enabled
and that MEMORY is selected in the ASSIGNABLE block (the LED is lit), then start
recording (see “REALTIME RECORDING”
section steps #3 and #6 above).
5.
Then, while recording the song, press the
appropriate Pedal Switches at the points in
the song that you want the effect programs to
change.
Chord Recall
Backing Control cannot be selected in Realtime
Recording mode. Only Chord Recall is available
here. When using [SHIFT] + [SONG REC] to
select the Realtime Recording mode, Chord Recall
will automatically be selected.
The pre-assigned chords in the Pattern mode can
be used here.
Note: TIMING OF EFFECT PROGRAM EVENTS—Since
effect program events take slightly longer than
other events to register, you should record
them a little before the position you want them
to actually take effect. A good rule of thumb is
to record an effect program change about four
16th notes earlier, for a tempo of 120.
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
■ To record muting data (turning on/off the
Accompaniment, Bass and/or Drums parts):
While the song is recording, simply hold down
[SHIFT] and press the appropriate button
([ACCOMP], [BASS] or [DRUMS]).
■ To record effect bypass changes in realtime:
1. Before doing this, you should record an
appropriate effect program, for which you
will turn individual or group of effects on and
off.
2.
Make sure that: 1) Realtime recording is
enabled (see “REALTIME RECORDING”
section, steps #3 and #6 above), 2) Memory
mode is selected, and 3) MEMORY ON/OFF
is selected in the ASSIGNABLE Block (the
LED flashes). Finally, start recording.
3.
Then, while recording the song, press the
appropriate Pedal Switches at the points in
the song that you want to bypass or turn on
effect blocks.
■ To record effect program changes in realtime:
1. Before recording the song, select the Memory
mode (press [MEMORY]).
2.
Make sure MEMORY is selected in the
ASSIGNABLE block. (The LED will be lit
continuously, not flashing.)
3.
Select the bank number in which the desired
effect programs are located.
86
REALTIME RECORDING MODE (REALTIME RECORDING)
SONG MODE
BACKING SECTION
3) Hints on Realtime Recording
1
ENSURING PROPER SONG ENDING—Keep in
mind that the end of the song is not the
point at which you pressed [START/STOP]
to end recording, but is determined by the
last event entered in the song.
1
HINT
In the example shown below, the last event
recorded to a song is a chord change, and
[START/STOP] was pressed to end recording several measures after that.
At beginning of
two-measure pattern
2
At beginning of
intended last measure
3
At intended
end of song
*Enter one of these events.
2
HINT
RECOMMENDED RECORDING ORDER—Even
though there are no immutable rules to follow when recording a song, it’s generally
best to start by recording chord changes
over a single basic rhythm pattern, then
adding additional events as needed.
During recording:
Sound of pattern (for a two-measure pattern)
3
HINT
Measures
Last event
(chord change)
During playback:
START / STOP
pressed here
(intended end of
song)
No sound
(since nothing has been recorded here)
4
HINT
Measures
Playback
stops here
Intended
end of song
1 Chord (The same chord as the last
one entered is fine.)
5
HINT
3 Ending pattern (Done by Step
recording only.)
RECORDING IN SECTIONS—Keep in mind that
you can also start recording from the middle
of a song. This would come in handy when
you have a fairly complex song with a lot of
chord changes and mute status changes
that would be difficult, or impossible, to
record all at once.
Think of the song in sections, and stop the
recording (or pause it using the Position
Controls) at the end of each section. Then,
to record the next section, use the position
controls to move to the desired measure
(or slightly before), and begin or resume
recording as usual. Of course, if you want
to, you can start recording from the
beginning and “jump in” when you’re ready
to record the next part.
To actually end the song at the point
you originally intended, you should
enter some event at an appropriate
point. Typical events for this purpose
would be:
2 Accompaniment, Bass and Drums
muting (All turned off at the same
time; preferably done by Step
recording.)
ENSURING PROPER TIMING IN REALTIME RECORDING—In Realtime recording, timing is
important. You can make it easier to enter
events in time by recording the song at a
slow tempo. This gives you a better chance
of “hitting” each event precisely. However,
if you make a mistake in the timing while
recording an event, you can always use Step
recording and song editing techniques (see
page 88) to erase the mistake and then
enter it in the proper place.
OVERDUB RECORDING—You can use the
same technique as described in Hint #2
above to “overdub” events, or record different events over the measures in two or
more passes. For example, you can record
chord changes in the first pass and effect
program changes in the second.
REALTIME RECORDING MODE (REALTIME RECORDING)
87
BACKING SECTION
6
HINT
7
HINT
SONG MODE
A Repeat function (A-B Repeat) lets you repeatedly and continuously record over a
specified section of the song. (See page 93
for details.)
• Mute (page 86) — The Mute function can
USING POSITION CONTROLS IN RECORDING—
The Position Controls ([n], [v], [ /], and
[ m]) can be used to pause the song during
Realtime recording (for recording standby),
and select a different measure or position in
the song. You can also set events such as
effect program number and effect on/off
settings at the paused position, and these
will be automatically entered once you
resume recording.
To do this:
1. While the song is recording in realtime,
press any of the Position Controls ([n],
[v], [ /], and [ m]). Song recording will
then pause.
2. Use the Position Controls to select a different position in the song. (The jumpto-beginning ( b) and jump-to-end ( )
controls can also be used in this condition.)
The effective chords, patterns and mute
on/off status events at the current
position are indicated in the LCD display,
when the Backing mode display is
selected (the cursor arrow appears at
the PTN or TEMPO box).
3. If you want, you can set additional
events here as recording is paused.
These will automatically be recorded to
the current position when you press
[START/STOP] to resume recording in
realtime. Then, as Realtime recording
continues, you can “overdub” additional
events as you wish.
• Changing the bass note function (page 75) —
This lets you make your own bass lines; keep in
mind that you can enter a different bass note for
each 16th note in a measure.
be used to create sophisticated arrangements and
textures, allowing you to selectively bring instruments in and out, adding variety to the song.
• Retrigger — The Retrigger function lets you
record rhythmic “hits” in which some of the Backing parts sound altogether, to create accents in a
song. Special Retrigger patterns (nos. 241 –
244) are provided for this purpose, letting you
enter the retrigger “hits” by entering a chord
event at the desired 16th note position.
However, the Retrigger function can be used with
any of the other patterns by entering a chord
event while a note of the pattern data is playing
(in other words, not during a rest).
To get a better idea of how the above tools
can be effectively used, refer to the section
“USE
OF
ADVANCED
RECORDING
TECHNIQUES—FACTORY SET SONG 1” on
page 153.
b
8
HINT
MUTE, BASS NOTE, AND RETRIGGER—The
various automatic accompaniment and recording features of the GW50 make it possible to easily create polished, complex compositions. Here are three important tools
and some ideas on how to use them:
9
HINT
MUTING SUSTAINED SOUNDS—Since mute
events only affect notes on or after the
event, it is possible that certain backing
sounds may continue even after the mute.
For example, if a whole note bass note
starting at the top of a measure is muted
part of the way through the measure, the
note will continue to sound to the end of
the measure. You can mute the note part
of the way through the measure by entering
both a mute event and a Retrigger or chord
event at the desired position. In effect, this
cuts off the current note, replacing it with
the new Retrigger or chord event; however,
this new event is not heard, since a muting
event occurs at the same position. (Also
see page 154.)
STEP RECORDING MODE (STEP RECORDING)
Step recording allows you to individually
and precisely enter data “step-by-step”
to each 16th note in a measure, without
having to worry about the timing
problems inherent in Realtime recording.
88
STEP RECORDING MODE (STEP RECORDING)
The following chart indicates the types of
data that can be recorded in Step
recording as well as how and when they
can be recorded.
BACKING SECTION
Data Type
Method of Entry
Available
Recording Position
Patterns (including
Fill In, Ending)
By panel controls
only.
At the beginning
of any measure.
Chords
By panel controls
only.
Anywhere in song.
Backing
(Accompaniment,
Bass, Drums)
mute status
By panel controls.
Anywhere in song.
(For more information on recording data at
the beginning of a song, refer to step #2 on
page 84 in “REALTIME RECORDING.”)
Note: SETTING BACKING MUTE STATUS—To set the
Backing mute status, simultaneously hold down
[SHIFT] and press the button corresponding to
the part you wish to mute or turn on
([ACCOMP], [BASS] or [DRUMS]). (The speaker
symbol in the display next to each part appears
when the part has been turned on.)
Note:
ABOUT TEMPO CHANGES AND RECORDING—Tempo
changes themselves cannot be recorded. However,
the tempo of the song can be changed manually,
either before, during or after recording of a song, and
the last tempo setting made is the one that is
subsequently used for the song.
Operation —
1. Make sure that the Song mode has been
selected (the SONG LED should be lit), then
use [6 CURSOR] to move the cursor arrow
to SONG in the display and select an empty
song number for recording. (You can also use
an existing song that has data, and add new
data to it.)
Note: In Step recording, you do not need to use the
[SONG REC] button. As long as you are in the
Song mode and the song is stopped, Step recording can be performed at any time.
Note: If you have to erase a song to make an
empty song, refer to operation step #1 in
“REALTIME RECORDING”, page 83; also see
page 95 for details on erasing a song.
4.
To record all the data you’ve set in steps #2
and #3 above, press [ENTER]. (All events
are automatically recorded to the position
with one press of [ENTER]; a dot appears at
the position to indicate recorded events.)
Note: In Step recording, pattern numbers can only be
recorded to the first 16th note of a measure. A
pattern cannot begin playing in the middle of a
measure. (If you attempt to do this, an “ONLY
MEAS TOP” message appears in the display.)
5.
After step #4, the position indicator in the
Measure/Event section of the display automatically moves ahead (by one quarter note)
to the next beat in the measure. You can
record the next event or events there, or use
the Position Controls to move ahead or back
to any 16th note position in any measure.
HINT
2.
3.
SONG MODE
RECORDING EFFECT CHANGES—Even though
effect program changes and bypass (effect
on/off) events cannot be actually entered
in Step recording, you can pause recording
in Realtime recording and enter them individually (see hint #7 on page 88).
Make sure that you are at the beginning of
the song, then use [6 CURSOR] to move the
cursor arrow to PTN in the display and select
the pattern number with which you wish to
start the recording.
Note: MULTIPLE EVENTS—Remember that several
Also, set all the other data that you wish to
record at the start of the song: the starting
chord (see page 84) and the initial Backing
mute status (see note below for instructions).
events of different types can occupy the same
position in a song. However, since two events
of the same type (for example, two different
chords) cannot occupy the same position, the
most recently recorded event takes precedence
and the previous one is erased.
STEP RECORDING MODE (STEP RECORDING)
89
BACKING SECTION
HINT
SONG MODE
USING BOTH REALTIME AND STEP RECORDING—Realtime recording and Step
recording can be effectively used in tandem with each other. Though the possible uses are too numerous to explain
here, one common application is given
below:
Operation —
1. Enter a single pattern at the
beginning of the song and record the
basic chord changes of a song in
Realtime recording.
2. Use Step recording to add pattern
changes in the song, putting in Fill In
patterns and variations, as well as
changing to another basic pattern.
3. Switch back and forth between the
two methods as necessary, generally
using Realtime recording to record
chord and Backing mute status
changes “on the fly,” and using Step
recording to put in pattern changes
and when you wish to enter events
to specific positions in the song.
4. Also, take advantage of the various
song editing operations (described in
“SONG EDITING” and “SONG JOB
MODE” below) to correct mistakes,
erase or copy sections of the song,
and perform other functions.
HINT
Also refer back to Hints #1, #3, #8 and
#9 on pages 87 and 88, since these are
also useful in Step recording.
SONG EDIT MODE (SONG EDITING)
Viewing Recorded Events
You can easily tell whether an event has been
recorded in a measure or not and what position it
has been recorded to, since it appears as a dot (or
“Event indicator”) in the Measure/Event section of
the display (when playback of a song is stopped in
Song mode and when the cursor arrow is in the
Backing mode display). By moving the position
indicator to one of these dots (by using the Position
Controls), you can also check what event or events
have been recorded at the position. The various
types of events are indicated on the GW50 as
follows:
Patterns — Pattern numbers are indicated in the PTN (Pattern) box
and the pattern name appears in the top right of the LCD.
Effect program numbers and effect on/off
settings — These are shown in alternation
with or instead of the pattern name and
chord in the right part of the LCD. (See
note “VIEWING MULTIPLE EVENTS,”
page 91.)
Chords — Chords are indicated
at the bottom right of the LCD.
Muting of backing parts — The speaker symbol to the right of
BASS, ACCOMP, and DRUMS in the display indicates that the
corresponding part will be turned on from this position.
No speaker symbol indicates that the part will be muted.
90
SONG EDIT MODE (SONG EDITING)
BACKING SECTION
Note:
DISPLAY DIFFERENCES IN BACKING MODE AND EFFECT MODE—The recorded chords, patterns and mute
on/off status events at the current position are indicated in the LCD display, when the Backing mode
display is selected (the cursor arrow appears in the
TEMPO, SONG, and PTN boxes in the display). When
the Effect mode display is selected (the cursor arrow
disappears), “MANUAL” or the current effect program
name is shown in the LCD instead of the pattern name
and current chord.
Note: VIEWING MULTIPLE EVENTS—When multiple
events have been recorded to the same position
in a song, each event appears briefly in the LCD,
one after the other. For example:
When four events (pattern, chord, effect program number and effect on/off) have been entered to the same position, the three following
indications will appear in succession in the LCD.
SONG MODE
Note: ABOUT EFFECT EVENTS—Effect program
number and effect on/off events are indicated
in the LCD for the positions to which they were
recorded. However, the effect program number
shown in the BANK/MEMORY indicator LED and
the effect on/off status shown by the LEDs in
the effect blocks indicate the current state of
the Effect section of the GW50.
Let’s say, for example, that effect program
number 12 has been recorded at the start of a
song, and a change to program number 44 has
been recorded to the thirteenth 16th note of
the fourth measure (as shown below). When
you move the position indicator to the
thirteenth 16th note of the fourth measure, the
LCD shows “44,” but the BANK/MEMORY LED
shows “12.”
s
Pattern and Chord events
Pattern name
Effect program number event
If you move the position indicator one 16th
note step forward, the BANK/MEMORY LED will
change to “44” accordingly.
Effect number
Effect on/off event
Distortion
Equalizer Chorus
Indicates effect program
number event at current
position in song (#44)
The two indications are different because the
Backing section is stopped and the event (#44)
has not been played yet.
Chord
Compressor
Indicates current
effect program (#12)
Reverb/Delay
“–” indicates that the effect (corresponding to
the letter directly above the mark) is off or bypassed.
“ ” indicates that the effect (corresponding to the letter directly
above the mark) is on.
Also, consider that the current effect program
number may be changed via the Pedal Switches
or panel controls without the position indicator
being moved.
Therefore, there will always be a discrepancy
between the effect program number event data
displayed for the Backing section and the actual
effect program number currently active in the
Effect section. (All of the above applies to effect on/off events, as well.)
Simply put, the BANK/MEMORY indicator and
effect block LEDs indicate the current condition
of the Effect section; the LCD indicates the
events that have been recorded to the song in
the Backing section. These two are different.
SONG EDIT MODE (SONG EDITING)
91
BACKING SECTION
SONG MODE
Note: When at a position where no event exists and
you press any of the four main position controls
([n], [ v], [ /], or [ m]), the currently active pattern number, mute status, pattern name, and
chord appear in the display. (Also refer to the
3.
Use the Position Controls to select the measure to be marked as “B.”
4.
Press [SET-B].
note in “POSITION CONTROLS,” page 81.)
You can check the current measure A and B
settings by holding down [SHIFT]. The
settings also appear briefly when you set
them in steps #2 and #4 above.
Make sure that the Song mode is selected before
attempting the following operations.
Editing (Changing) Recorded Events
Editing a recorded event is done in the same way
as Step recording. First, move the position indicator to the event you wish to change, select the new
value or setting, then press [ENTER]. (The data
that can be entered is the same as that for Step
recording; see page 89.)
Note:
ABOUT THE “A” AND “B” MARKS—When using the
Repeat or Copy functions, the “A” mark corresponds
to the beginning of measure A and the “B” mark corresponds to the end of measure B. When the Jump
function is used, both the “A” and “B” marks correspond to the beginning of those respective measures.
A specific beat or 16th note (other than the first)
cannot be marked; the marks are for measures only.
Also, the “B” mark cannot be set to a measure earlier
than “A.”
Erasing Recorded Events
To erase a single recorded event (or all events at a
specific position), move the position indicator to
the position of the event(s), then hold down
[SHIFT] and press [ERASE].
Set-A and Set-B Operations
By using the Set-A and Set-B operations, you can
specify a series of consecutive measures, and have
them repeat, copy them to another location in a
song, or delete them. You can also use the A and
B marks to instantly “jump” to a specified measure.
Marking Measure A and Measure B
Operation —
1. Use the Position Controls [<<] [<] [>] [>>]
to select the measure to be marked as “A.”
2.
92
Press [SET-A].
SONG EDIT MODE (SONG EDITING)
Jumping to Measure A or Measure B
To jump to a marked measure, simultaneously
hold down [SHIFT] and press [JUMP-A] to go to
measure A, or [JUMP-B] to go to measure B.
Loop (Repeat) Playback (A to B)
This function allows you to repeat indefinitely the
measures between A and B.
Operation —
1. Mark the A and B points of the measures you
wish to repeat.
2.
Simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press
[A-B REPEAT ]. The “repeat” indication
appears in the SONG box.
BACKING SECTION
SONG MODE
Operation —
1. Mark the A and B points of the measures you
wish to repeat.
2.
Indicates repeat function.
3.
Use the Position Controls to move to the
starting position in the song, at or before
measure B.
4.
Press [START/STOP] to begin playback.
Playback will start from the point selected,
continue to measure B, go back to measure
A, and repeat between A and B indefinitely.
Simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press
[A-B REPEAT ]. The “repeat” indication
appears in the SONG box.
Indicates repeat function.
3.
Simultaneously press [SHIFT] and [SONG
REC] to enable recording.
Note:
For the A-B Repeat function to operate properly, you
should start playback from a point AT or BEFORE
measure B.
Note: In Repeat recording, if the current position is
somewhere outside the A-B region (before or
after), the position indicator automatically
moves to the beginning of measure A for the
starting position, when step #3 is executed.
If you start from a point AFTER the B measure, the
song will playback until the end of the song and then
simply stop, without going to either the A or B measure.
This happens because the A-B Repeat function “looks
for” the B measure, and if it is not “found” (in other
words, if there is no B measure after the playback
starting point), there will be no repeat.
4.
Use the Position Controls to move the starting point within the A-B region, if you wish.
Note: POSITION CONTROLS IN REPEAT RECORDING—
5.
Press [START/STOP] to stop playback.
6.
To turn off the repeat function, simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press [A-B
REPEAT ] again.
The Position Controls are only effective within
the A-B range in Repeat recording. Moreover,
the jump-to-beginning ( b ) and jump-to-end
(
) controls function respectively the same
as JUMP-A and JUMP-B. In other words, pressing
[n] + [v] moves the position to the beginning of
measure A, not the beginning of the song, and
pressing [ /] + [ m] moves the position to the
beginning of measure B, not the last event of
b
Loop (Repeat) Recording (A to B)
the song.
This function allows you to record events in
realtime, while a specified range of measures (A to
B) loops or repeats indefinitely.
SONG EDIT MODE (SONG EDITING)
93
BACKING SECTION
5.
SONG MODE
Press [START/STOP] to begin recording.
Recording will start from the point selected,
continue to measure B, go back to measure
A, and repeat between A and B indefinitely.
6.
Press [START/STOP] to stop recording.
7.
To turn off the repeat function, simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press [A-B
REPEAT] again.
SONG JOB MODE
Copying Measures Between A
and B
Before copying
This function allows you to copy the data between
the two marked measures to another location in the
song. This is a convenient composing tool, since it
lets you easily copy parts of the song that are
similar (such as the verse sections), without having
to program each measure.
Operation —
1. Mark the A and B points of the measures you
wish to copy.
2.
Use the position controls to select the destination measure.
3.
Simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press
[MEAS COPY]. (You can still use the position controls to select the destination measure
here, if you wish.)
4.
Press [SET-B] (below “GO”) to copy the
measures, or press [SET-A] (below “EXIT”)
to abort the operation.
Note: In the Copy and Delete operations, the
measure numbers for the A and B points do not
change after the operations, but the actual
contents may be altered. For this reason, you
should be careful when copying the same
section to different parts of the song, for example; the desired section may have been moved
from its original location because of a Copy or
Delete operation.
94
SONG JOB MODE
Original measures 17 and beyond are moved forward
the end of the song to make room for the copied measures.
Notice that this operation inserts the measures at
the destination and shifts all existing measures
there forward toward the end of the song to make
room for the copied measures.
Deleting Measures Between A
and B
This function allows you to delete a specified
range of measures from a song.
Operation —
1. Mark the A and B points of the measures you
wish to delete.
2.
Simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press
[MEAS DEL].
3.
Press [SET-B] (below “GO”) to delete the
selected measures, or press [SET-A] (below
“EXIT”) to abort the operation.
BACKING SECTION
Before deleting
Measures
2.
5
10
15
20
25
SONG MODE
Simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press
[SONG NAME].
Measures to
delete
After deleting
Measures
5
10
15
20
25
Original measures 21 – 24
are moved back toward the
start of the song to fill space
left by delete operation.
Notice that this operation shifts all existing measures after measure B back toward the start of the
song.
HINT
Cursor
3.
Use the [–]/[+] buttons to select the desired
character at the cursor position. Use [6
CURSOR] to move the cursor (<) in the
display. The following characters are available for naming:
4.
Press any of the mode buttons to exit the
operation. The name is automatically saved
to the song and briefly appears whenever the
song is selected.
DELETING ALL DATA OF A SINGLE SONG
The following operation can be used to delete all
the data of a song. Simply mark measure A to the
starting measure of the song and measure B to
the ending measure (measure with the last event)
(using [n] + [v] and/or [ /] + [ m] if necessary),
then delete the range of measures.
Naming Songs
Operation —
1. Select the song to be named, or use the song
currently being recorded.
RESTORING FACTORY PRESET SONGS
If you’ve erased one of the factory songs
by replacing it with one of your own
creation, this function lets you restore
the original song.
Operation —
1. Turn off the power of the GW50.
2.
Simultaneously hold down [SONG] and turn
the power back on. (The SONG LED lights
and “LD SONG” appears in the LCD.)
3.
Select the number of the song you wish to
restore with the [–]/[+] buttons.
RESTORING FACTORY PRESET SONGS
95
BACKING SECTION
4.
SONG MODE
Press [SET-B] (below “GO”) to restore the
song, or press [SET-A] (below “EXIT”) to
abort the operation. (You can also abort the
operation by using any of the mode buttons:
[MANUAL], [MEMORY], or [SONG/
PATTERN].)
HINT
96
You can continue loading successive
factory songs by repeating steps #3
and #4 above as necessary.
RESTORING FACTORY PRESET SONGS
Note: Keep in mind that this automatically and
irretrievably erases the song you created
at the selected number. To avoid losing the
song entirely, save it and others you have
created by using the MIDI Bulk Transmission function. (See page 102.)
REFERENCE
OTHER FUNCTIONS
(TUNER/MIDI)
TUNER MODE .....................................................
99
MIDI ......................................................................
101
MIDI BULK TRANSMISSION MODE ..........
102
CHANGING EFFECT PROGRAMS ON
THE GW50 FROM A CONNECTED
DEVICE ............................................................
103
CHANGING PROGRAMS ON A CONNECTED
DEVICE FROM THE GW50 ........................... 104
TURNING INDIVIDUAL EFFECTS
ON AND OFF FROM A CONNECTED
DEVICE ............................................................
104
SYNCHRONIZING ANOTHER DEVICE
WITH THE GW50 ............................................
105
USING THE BACKING PATTERNS
TO PLAY OTHER SOUND MODULES ........
106
OTHER FUNCTIONS
98
TUNER MODE
TUNER MODE
OTHER FUNCTIONS
TUNER MODE
The built-in Tuner lets you tune
your instrument simply and quickly
without having to remove it from
the INPUT jack.
Operation —
1. Simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press
[TUNER] (or simultaneously press and hold
down Pedal Switches 1 and 2 until the Tuner
mode display “PITCH” appears in the LCD).
HINT
2.
Note: The flashing dot in the BANK/MEMORY indicator represents “ s” or “sharp”.
s
3.
The tuning is made for a standard pitch of A
= 440Hz (as shown in the display). However,
this can be adjusted up to 445 Hz if you wish
by using the [–]/[+] buttons. (The pitch of the
backing tracks is also raised by this operation.) The last setting mode is retained even
after the power is turned off.
The output sound is automatically cut off
when the Tuner is turned on, so that you
can tune your guitar silently on stage.
Play only one string on the guitar.
The number of the string (when one of the
open strings — E, A, D, G, B, or E — is
played) and the note name appears in the
BANK/MEMORY indicator. The tuning is
indicated both in the Measure/Event section
of the LCD and by the red LEDs of the effect
blocks, as shown below.
s
Tune the string so that the indicators are in
the center as much as possible.
4.
Continue in the same way with the other
strings.
5.
Return to normal operation by pressing any
of the mode buttons (or any of the Pedal
Switches).
The illustration below shows the various
tuning indications both in the Measure/Event
section of the LCD and in the effect block
LEDs, along with the amount in cents away
from normal pitch.
The indications here show that the tuning is flat.
TUNER MODE
99
TUNER MODE
OTHER FUNCTIONS
LCD Indications
–50 cents (or no signal)
+50 cents
between –40 and –50 cents
between +40 and +50 cents
between –30 and –40 cents
between +30 and +40 cents
between –20 and –30 cents
between +20 and +30 cents
between –5 and –20 cents
between +5 and +20 cents
–4 cents*
+4 cents*
±2 cents*
* The signal is regarded
in tune for these indications.
Effect Block LED Indications
–20 cents or more
cmp dst
eq
+20 cents or more
cho
rev
between –5 and –20 cents
cmp dst
eq
cho
rev
±4 cents or less*
cmp dst
100
eq
cmp dst
eq
cho
rev
between +5 and +20 cents
cmp dst
eq
cho
rev
eq
cho
rev
no signal
cho
rev
TUNER MODE
cmp dst
MIDI
OTHER FUNCTIONS
MIDI
MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) is a system built into many
electronic and digital musical instruments. It allows many different devices
— not only instruments, but computers, effect devices, and so on — to
“communicate” with each other. Some typical applications include playing one
instrument from the controls of another, recording performances as MIDI data
to a sequencer for further editing and control, and instantly changing the
programs and settings on many connected devices from just one device.
The MIDI functions and applications of the GW50 include:
* MIDI Bulk Transmission — for storing effect program, song data, and other
settings to another MIDI data storage device.
* Program change reception — for changing effect programs on the GW50 from
another MIDI device.
* Program change transmission — for changing programs on another MIDI device
from the GW50.
* Control change reception — for turning individual effects on and off from
another MIDI device (via Control Change messages).
* Synchronizing another MIDI device (such as a rhythm machine or sequencer)
to the Backing section of the GW50.
* Using the rhythm, accompaniment and bass patterns to play sounds on other
MIDI sound modules.
The rest of this section provides instructions on how to use these
functions. For all MIDI applications given below, connect the devices as
shown in the illustration:
Note: This manual cannot cover every application or connection possibility. For
more information on how to use the GW50
in a MIDI system, refer to the owner’s
manuals of the other MIDI devices you
are using, or read any of the many
books and magazine articles on MIDI
applications and setups.
MIDI
101
OTHER FUNCTIONS
MIDI
MIDI BULK TRANSMISSION MODE
Although the GW50 has space in memory
for 50 effect programs and 8 songs, you
may want to free up that memory for
additional programs and songs. Also, you
may want to save the existing programs
and songs to another device for backup
purposes. The MIDI Bulk Transmission
function lets you do this. For quick,
safe and economic storage of GW50 data,
use the Yamaha MDF2 MIDI Data Filer .
Note:USE
OF OTHER MIDI DATA STORAGE DEVICES—
Though the operation steps for transmitting
and receiving data below assume you are
using the MDF2 MIDI Data Filer, they also
apply to any MIDI data storage device.
(Refer to the owner’s manual of the device
you are using for more information.)
Storing GW50 Data to the MDF2
(Transmitting)
Operation —
1. Connect the Yamaha MDF2 MIDI Data Filer
to the GW50 as shown in MIDI connection
example A on page 101.
2.
Prepare the MDF2 for receiving MIDI data.
(Refer to the owner’s manual of the MDF2.)
3.
Simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and press
[MIDI BULK].
4.
MANUAL — The current effect settings in the
Manual mode [with the exception of the parameter
knob (main parameter) settings].
1MEM — One effect program (selected prior to
step #3); this includes all effect settings of a program.
ALLMEM — All 50 effect programs currently in
memory.
1SONG — One song (selected prior to step #3).
ALLSNG — All 8 songs currently in memory.
SETUP — Miscellaneous data of the GW50
(includes: currently selected modes, bank/program
numbers, song/pattern numbers, chord recall
assignments, tuner pitch, etc.).
ALL — All the above settings.
For more information on the specific data
that is transmitted for each of these settings,
refer to the “MIDI SPECIFICATIONS”
section on page 148.
Note: ABOUT
“1 MEM” AND “1 SONG”—If you use “1
MEM” or “1 SONG” to transmit a single
program or song, you must select that program or song before step #3 above. If you
go to step #4 without selecting it, return
to the appropriate mode (Memory or Song) by
pressing [MEMORY] or [SONG/PATTERN], select
the desired number with the [–]/[+] buttons,
then return to step #3.
5.
102
MIDI BULK TRANSMISSION MODE
Use [SET-A] (below “SEL,” Select) to determine the type of data to be transmitted. The
following settings are available:
To send the data to the MDF2, press [SET-B]
(below “GO”). When the operation is
completed, the message “COMPLETED” will
appear in the display. The MIDI Bulk
Transmission mode remains active here, so
you can continue to send other types of data
as needed (with the exception of 1MEM and
1SONG; see above note). To exit the MIDI
Bulk Transmission mode or abandon the
operation without sending data, press any of
the mode buttons: [MANUAL], [MEMORY],
or [SONG/PATTERN].
OTHER FUNCTIONS
Bulk data can be received only in the main
modes, and cannot be received while a song
is playing.
Restoring GW50 Data from the
MDF2 (Receiving)
Operation —
1. Connect the Yamaha MDF2 MIDI Data Filer
as shown in MIDI connection example A on
page 101, and prepare it for sending MIDI
data. (Refer to the owner’s manual of the
MDF2.)
2.
MIDI
Note: Single
song data (“1SONG”) can be received
only if the destination song number on the
GW50 is empty. If song data exists at the
number, the message “SONG EXISTS” appears.
Select an empty song or delete the current
song before continuing. Also, keep in mind
that types of data other than “1SONG” are
handled differently, and no warning message
like “SONG EXISTS” appears; the transmitted
data
automatically
replaces
the
original
data at the destination.
Make sure that the right type of data is selected on the MDF2, then execute the MIDI
Bulk Dump function from the MDF2. When
transmitting one effect program (“1MEM”)
or one song (“1SONG”), be sure to select the
destination program number or song number
to which you intend to transfer the data,
before attempting the operation.
CHANGING EFFECT PROGRAMS ON THE GW50
FROM A CONNECTED DEVICE
This function lets you change the effect
programs of the GW50 remotely from
another MIDI device, such as a MIDI
keyboard or sequencer. This would come
in handy if you are using a keyboard
instead of a guitar with the GW50 and
want to change programs from the
keyboard. It would also be useful if you
already have a MIDI sequencer system and
want to control the program changes from
that sequencer. A MIDI foot controller
(such as the Yamaha MFC06 MIDI Foot Controller) can also be used for this purpose.
Operation —
1. Make sure all MIDI connections have been
made properly (see connection examples B
and C on page 101). Also, make sure that the
MIDI transmit channel on the connected
device is set to 1. (Refer to the owner’s
manual of the device for details.)
2.
Transmit the program change message from
the connected device. The new effect program on the the GW50 should now be selected.
Note:This function can be used from the
main modes of the Effect section
and any of the Backing section
modes.
Note:Refer to the chart
“MIDI to GW50
Program Number Correspondence” on
page 104, for information on what
program numbers to use.
RESTORING GW50 DATA FROM THE MDF2 (RECEIVING)
103
OTHER FUNCTIONS
MIDI
CHANGING PROGRAMS ON A CONNECTED DEVICE
FROM THE GW50
This function lets you remotely select programs
on another MIDI device, such as on an external
sound module or effect unit. Applications of this
would include automatically changing programs on
a second, supplemental effect unit when changing
programs from the GW50 panel. Likewise, it could
be used to automatically change sound programs
on a guitar synthesizer module as you change
programs on the GW50.
Operation —
1. Make sure all MIDI connections have been
made properly (see connection example D on
page 101). Also, make sure that the MIDI
receive channel on the connected device is
set to 1 (or OMNI ON). (Refer to the owner’s
manual of the device for details.)
2.
From the Memory mode, change the effect
program on the GW50. The program on the
connected device should change as well.
Note:Refer to the chart below, “MIDI to
GW50
Program
Number
Correspondence,” for information on what
program numbers to use.
MIDI to GW50 Program Number
Correspondence
Since the program numbering system of the
GW50 differs from that of MIDI, the following
chart shows which MIDI program number must
be transmitted to select the desired effect
program on the GW50, and vice versa. Refer
to this chart before trying to make any
program changes via MIDI.
MIDI
GW50
0–4
5–9
10–14
15–19
20–24
25–29
30–34
35–39
40–44
11–15
21–25
31–35
41–45
51–55
61–65
71–75
81–85
91–95
45–49
01–05
TURNING INDIVIDUAL EFFECTS ON AND OFF FROM A
CONNECTED DEVICE
This function lets you turn individual
effects on and off from the connected
MIDI devices, by using Control Change
messages. Applications of this would
include automating effect on/off switching from a connected MIDI sequencer. A
MIDI foot controller (such as the Yamaha
MFC06 MIDI Foot Controller) can also be
used for this purpose.
104
Before using this function, use the
operation below to set the Control
Change numbers that the GW50 will
respond to (91 – 95 or 116 – 120).
Operation —
1. With the power on the GW50 turned off,
simultaneously hold down [SHIFT] and turn
the power back on again. The following
display appears:
CHANGING PROGRAMS ON A CONNECTED DEVICE FROM THE GW50
OTHER FUNCTIONS
3.
MIDI
Press any of the mode buttons ([MANUAL],
[MEMORY], or [SONG/PATTERN]) to
return to normal operation.
Once you’ve set the Control Change numbers
in the above operation, use the operation
below to actually receive Control Change
messages on the GW50.
2.
Two different sets of Control Change numbers can be used for this operation: 91 – 95,
or 116 – 120. Select which set of numbers
you wish to use with the [–]/[+] buttons.
Operation —
1. Make sure all MIDI have been made properly
(see connection examples B and C on page
101). Also, set the MIDI transmit channel on
the connected device to 1.
2.
Transmit a value of 0 with the appropriate
Control Change message to turn the desired
effect on and off (the transmitted message
acts as a toggle switch between on and off).
(Refer to the chart below for Control Change
number/Effect correspondence.)
Effect
Note: If you are using the Yamaha MFC06 MIDI
Foot Controller, set this to 116 – 120. If
you are using another device, check the
MIDI Implementation of that device to determine which Control Change numbers to
use.
Control Change number
Compressor
92 (or 116)
Distortion
94 (or 117)
Equalizer
95 (or 118)
Chorus
93 (or 119)
Reverb/Delay
91 (or 120)
Note: Control Change messages can be received
in the main modes and the Memory Edit
mode of the Effect section and any of the
Backing section modes.
SYNCHRONIZING ANOTHER DEVICE WITH THE GW50
Since the GW50 transmits MIDI clock
messages, you can have a sequencer and
connected tone generator play back in
perfect time with the Backing parts of the
GW50. In this way, you can add other instrumental parts from the tone generator (such
as melodies, riffs, etc.) to the accompaniment, bass and drum patterns of the GW50.
Operation —
1. Make sure all MIDI connections have been
made properly (see connection example E on
page 101).
TURNING INDIVIDUAL EFFECTS ON AND OFF FROM A CONNECTED DEVICE
105
OTHER FUNCTIONS
2.
3.
MIDI
Set the connected rhythm machine or
sequencer to receive on one of channels 6 –
16 (1 – 5 should be avoided, since these are
used for transmitting program changes and
Backing part note data from the GW50).
Also, set its operation to “external sync” or
the equivalent, (refer to the owner’s manual
of the device for details).
Now, select a song or pattern on the GW50
and press [START/STOP] to start it. The
rhythm machine or sequencer will play back
in perfect synchronization with the Backing
parts of the GW50.
HINT
ADDING SEQUENCER PARTS TO THE
GW50’S BACKING—You can record additional parts on the sequencer to
match and supplement parts in the
song of the GW50. The sequencer can
then be synchronized with the GW50 in
playback, allowing you to play both the
GW50 parts and the sequencer parts at
the same time.
Note: Since the GW50 does not, however,
respond to incoming clock messages
(it has no “external sync” operation), you
cannot synchronize and control the GW50
from the connected device.
USING THE BACKING PATTERNS TO PLAY OTHER
SOUND MODULES
The accompaniment, bass and drum
patterns of the GW50 are stored
in the unit as MIDI data, and can
be used to play back sounds from
connected synthesizers, rhythm
machines and sound modules. For
example, the GW50 could be hooked
up to the Yamaha TG500 Tone Generator, and be used to play the
bass, drums, and various accompaniment
instrument sounds (such as piano, guitar,
organ, etc.) on the TG500, to complement or even replace the Backing sounds
of the GW50.
* The GW50 transmits accompaniment
sounds on channels 2 and 3, bass on
channel 4, and drums on channel 5.
Note: Program change messages (effect
program changes on the GW50) are
transmitted on Channel 1.
HINT
Operation —
1. Make sure all MIDI connections have been
made properly (see connection example F on
page 101).
2.
Make the following settings on the connected
instrument (referring to the owner’s manual
of that instrument for details):
* Set up different instrumental parts (for
example, piano, guitar, bass and drums) as
part of a multi-timbral program.
106
3.
MATCHING ACCOMPANIMENT SOUNDS—
Since the specific accompaniment instruments differ according to the pattern selected, refer to the Preset
Pattern List on page 144; this will help
you decide what kinds of accompaniment sounds you should select on your
tone generator, depending on the Backing pattern. Refer also to the chart on
page 146 for specific drum and percussion sound assignments.
Now, select a song or pattern on the GW50
and press [START/STOP] to start it. The
Backing tracks will now play on both the
GW50 and the connected instrument. (If the
BACKING LEVEL is set to 0, only the
connected tone generator will sound.)
SYNCHRONIZING ANOTHER DEVICE WITH THE GW50
OTHER FUNCTIONS
Note: PROBLEMS WITH PATTERN CHANGES—If
there are pattern changes in the
song, the accompaniment sounds of the
GW50 may change (in an extreme example,
from guitar to strings when changing from
a rock pattern to a ballad). However, the
tone generator will not change but
continue to play the accompaniment sound
which was set for the start of the song. To
get around this problem, follow the hint
below and record the accompaniment to a
sequencer, then make the necessary
program changes from the sequencer.
HINT
MIDI
RECORDING THE GW50’S BACKING
TRACKS TO A SEQUENCER—In a variation of the above operation,
you
could
connect
a
MIDI
sequencer to the GW50, and connect the tone generator to the
sequencer (as shown in connection example E on page 101),
then record the Backing tracks
to the sequencer. In this way,
you take advantage of the editing functions and conveniences of your
sequencer, making program changes
and changing the tracks as you like,
then playing them back on another
sound module. (The Backing sounds of
the GW50 cannot be played from
another device.)
USING THE BACKING PATTERNS TO PLAY OTHER SOUND MODULES
107
OTHER FUNCTIONS
108
MIDI
APPENDICES
ERROR MESSAGES ............................................
111
TROUBLESHOOTING ........................................
114
SPECIFICATIONS ...............................................
117
INDEX ...................................................................
119
APPENDICES
110
ERROR MESSAGES
ERROR MESSAGES
APPENDICES
ERROR MESSAGES
ERROR MESSAGES
The GW50 monitors the battery voltage only
once (when the power is turned on), and if
there is a problem with the battery, one of
the following battery-related error messages
will appear.
This is shown when the Edit Compare function has
been selected without any edits having been made
in the Memory Edit mode.
This indicates that the voltage of the battery is
low. Have the battery changed by Yamaha service
personnel as soon as possible (see your nearest
Yamaha dealer). (Also refer to “PRECAUTIONS,”
page ii.)
This indicates that the voltage of the battery may
be too high because something is wrong with the
battery backup circuit. Have the GW50 serviced
by Yamaha service personnel as soon as possible
(see your nearest Yamaha dealer).
This indicates that the button pressed is inactive in
the current mode.
This appears when Pedal Wah has been selected in
the WAH + EQ effect, and the [L MID/SPEED]
knob is adjusted.
This appears when the Memory Edit mode is
active and some other incompatible operation
(such as selecting the Bulk Dump or Tuner functions) has been attempted. Exit the Memory Edit
mode by pressing [MANUAL] or [MEMORY],
and then attempt the operation again. (Keep in
mind that doing this stores your recent edits to the
current program number.)
This appears when bulk data is received in the
Memory Job mode, or when some unavailable
operation or function has been attempted in this
mode. Exit the mode by pressing any of the mode
buttons.
This appears when bulk data is received in the Song
Job mode, or when some unavailable operation or
function has been attempted in this mode. Exit the
mode by pressing any of the mode buttons.
ERROR MESSAGES
111
APPENDICES
ERROR MESSAGES
This appears when bulk data is received or some
other incompatible operation is executed while the
Demo mode is selected. Exit the Demo mode by
pressing any of the mode buttons.
This appears when Song recording is in standby
and some other incompatible operation (such as
selecting the Bulk Dump or Tuner functions) has
been attempted. Exit the Song recording by pressing [SONG/PATTERN], and then attempt the
operation again.
This appears when the Compare condition is still
active and some other incompatible operation
(such as selecting the Bulk Dump or Tuner functions) has been attempted. Exit the Compare
function by pressing [MANUAL] or [MEMORY],
and then attempt the operation again. (Keep in
mind that doing this recalls the original effect
program to the current program number.)
This appears when attempting to transmit an
empty song using the Bulk Dump function, or
when attempting to playback an empty song.
This appears when attempting to start a song from
a point beyond the end measure.
This appears when the song memory is full. Delete
any unnecessary song or songs.
This appears when bulk data is received or some
other incompatible operation is executed while the
Tuner function is active. Exit the Tuner mode by
pressing any of the mode buttons (or any of the
Pedal Switches).
This appears when attempting to create a song
over the 299-measure limit.
This appears when bulk data is received or some
other incompatible operation is executed in the
MIDI Bulk transmission mode.
This appears when attempting to input a pattern
number to a position in the song other than the
beginning of a measure (in Step recording).
112
ERROR MESSAGES
APPENDICES
ERROR MESSAGES
This appears when bulk data for a song is received
and data already exists for the destination song
number. Select an empty song or delete the current
song.
This appears when the MIDI buffer is full (when
too much MIDI data is being received at one
time). When transmitting Bulk Data from the
MIDI storage device (such as the Yamaha MDF2
MIDI Data Filer), set a relatively long interval
time between data blocks on that device.
This appears when a pattern is playing and some
other incompatible operation (such as selecting the
Bulk Dump or Tuner functions) has been attempted. Stop the pattern by pressing [START/
STOP], and then attempt the operation again.
This appears when some error has occurred in data
reception or transmission. Check the MIDI cable
connections, and then attempt the operation again.
This appears when a song is being played back or
recorded and some other incompatible operation
(such as selecting the Bulk Dump or Tuner functions) has been attempted. Stop the song by pressing [START/STOP], and then attempt the operation again.
This appears when song data has somehow been
corrupted and made unreadable. The song or songs
in memory are cleared automatically. This message appears only once when the power is turned
on.
ERROR MESSAGES
113
APPENDICES
TROUBLESHOOTING
TROUBLESHOOTING
Even though the GW50 is exceptionally easy to use, it may occasionally not
function as you expect it to. Note that the problems covered here are not
malfunctions of the GW50. (Also refer to the “ERROR MESSAGES” section.)
PROBLEM
The instrument (guitar) sound cannot be heard.
POSSIBLE CAUSE AND SOLUTION
■ Check that all connections have been properly made and that
all levels have been appropriately set (including the INPUT
LEVEL control on the rear panel).
■ Check that the HEADPHONES LEVEL control has been set to
an appropriate level (if using headphones).
■ Check that the Input and Output parameters of the various effects
are set to appropriate levels. (In particular, check the sub
parameters of the Equalizer block effects.)
■ Make sure that the Effect Mix and Dry Level parameters are set
appropriately. When they are set to 0, no sound is output.
■ Make sure that the MIN/MAX Volume function is not active
(and that the Minimum Volume setting is not 0). (See page 48.)
■ If an external foot controller is connected, make sure that it is not
all the way up (at the minimum setting).
■ Make sure that the Tuner mode or MIDI Bulk Dump functions are
not active. (See pages 99 and 102.)
The effect sound cannot be heard or is nearly
inaudible.
■ Check all of the above points (for when the instrument sound
cannot be heard).
■ Check that the desired effect blocks are turned on (LEDs are lit).
■ Check that the Effect Mix and Dry Level parameters of the
Chorus and Reverb/Delay blocks are set to appropriate levels.
(See pages 64-69.)
■ Check that other effect parameters (such as Depth in the Chorus,
or Reverb Time in Reverb) are set to appropriate levels.
The sound is too loud or the effect sound is
abnormal or unexpected.
■ The guitar level is too loud (the INPUT PEAK LED is lit
continuously). Set all levels appropriately (see page 21).
■ In general, remember that the parameters within an effect
interact with and depend on each other. If you are using more
than one effect, try each effect block separately, checking and
adjusting all parameters in the effect until you get the sound you
want.
114
TROUBLESHOOTING
APPENDICES
PROBLEM
The sound is too loud or the effect sound is
abnormal or unexpected.
TROUBLESHOOTING
POSSIBLE CAUSE AND SOLUTION
■ If there is too much distortion or noise, check:
● The Output parameters of the effects — especially,
Compressor, Distortion and Equalizer.
● The Input parameter of the Equalizer.
● That the Equalizer gain controls (for example, Low and High)
have not been set too high.
● That the Effect Mix and Dry Level parameters of the Chorus
and Reverb/Delay blocks are set to appropriate levels.
■ Also check your connected amplifier. If you are getting too much
distortion, check that the GW50 is connected to the clean
channel and not to the distortion channel.
The effect sound doesn’t change, even when
the parameter knobs are adjusted.
■ Make sure that either the Manual mode or Memory Edit mode
has been selected. (Effects cannot be changed in the Memory
mode.)
The foot controller volume, ASSIGNABLE block
MIN/MAX Volume and the Auto Volume controls
do not have any effect.
■ The Minimum Volume is set to 9 (9 equals the maximum volume).
Set it to a lower value. (See page 47.)
The ASSIGNABLE Block and Pedal Switch
do not function as expected.
■ The functions that are available or called up automatically depend
on the selected mode. (See the “ASSIGNABLE Block and Pedal
Switch Functions Chart” on page 128.)
In the Delay effect, tapping the Pedal Switch
does not set the expected delay time
(Tap Delay function).
■ In tapping the Pedal Switch, make sure that the time between
taps is not longer than the maximum delay time (896 ms).
(See pages 67-68.)
Note:If you tap the Pedal Switch a little beyond the maximum time (up
to about one second), the delay time will be set. However, taps
longer than one second may not register at all.
■ For the Tap Delay function to be effective, 1) the REVERB/DELAY
block must be on, 2) Delay (or Delay + Reverb) must be selected
for the effect type, and 3) the MEMORY ON/OFF function in the
ASSIGNABLE Block must be on (the LED flashes).
A selected song or pattern does not play, even
when [START/STOP] is pressed.
■ In the case of song playback, make sure that the selected song
is not empty.
■ In the case of either song or pattern playback, make sure that
the Tuner mode or MIDI Bulk Dump functions are not active.
If one of them is, press [SONG/PATTERN] to return to the Song
or Pattern mode.
TROUBLESHOOTING
115
APPENDICES
TROUBLESHOOTING
PROBLEM
The Backing sounds cannot be heard.
POSSIBLE CAUSE AND SOLUTION
■ Check that all connections have been properly made and that
the BACKING LEVEL control has been appropriately set.
■ Check that the HEADPHONES LEVEL control has been set to
an appropriate level (if using headphones).
■ Check that the Backing tracks have not been muted.
(See page 76.)
Song playback stops before the end of the song.
■ Move to the last event of the song check what that event is; you
may have to enter another “ending” event to the song for it to
end as you intended. (See hint #1on page 87.)
Song playback (or recording) only continues
for a few measures and repeats those measures
over and over.
■ The A-B Repeat function is active. Turn it off by simultaneously
pressing [SHIFT] and [A-B REPEAT]. (See pages 92~93.)
During song playback, even though the A-B
Repeat function is active (the repeat mark is
displayed in the LCD), the selected measures
do not repeat.
■ Playback must be started before the B measure for the A-B
Repeat function to work. (See page 93.)
When using one of the metronome patterns,
chords cannot be heard or entered.
■ This is normal; the metronome pattern was designed for using
alone, without chord or bass accompaniment. (See note in step
#2, page 84.)
Pattern number 248 does not sound.
■ This is normal; pattern number 248 is a blank pattern designed
for inserting blank measures into a song.
MIDI bulk data cannot be received by the
GW50; or, when transmitting from the GW50
to another device, the other device cannot
receive bulk data.
■ Check all MIDI connections and settings on both devices, then
try the operation again. (See pages 101, 102.)
The LCD cannot be read.
■ Use the LCD SETTING switch on the rear panel to set the LCD
for proper viewing. Set it to FLOOR when you are using the
GW50 on the floor, and to DESKTOP when you have it set on
a table or desk in front of you.
The LCD is completely dark.
■ Leaving the GW50 in environments with temperatures over 50°C
(122°F) causes the LCD to turn completely black. If this happens,
you can make the LCD readable again by putting the GW50 in
a cool location.
116
TROUBLESHOOTING
■ The A/B measure setting may have changed if you’ve last used
the Copy or Delete functions.
APPENDICES
SPECIFICATIONS
SPECIFICATIONS
EFFECT SECTION
Memory
1 Manual effect and 50 Memory effect programs
(factory-set/user-programmable)
Effect Types
Compressor
Distortion
Equalizer
Distortion 1 – 4, Overdrive
4-band Equalizer, Wah (Auto/
Touch/Pedal) + 2-band Equalizer,
Amp Simulator (Stack/Combo/Tube)
+ 2 band Equalizer
Chorus
Chorus 1, 2, Pitch Shifter, Flanger,
Phaser
Reverb/Delay Reverb, Delay (Tap), Delay + Reverb
Noise Gate
Effect Functions
Combination/order of Compressor, Distortion and
Equalizer effects; combination/order of Chorus
and Reverb/Delay effects
Group/individual on/off (with Pedal Switches)
Tap Delay control
Min/Max Volume, Auto Volume
Parameter control (with optional foot controller)
Effect program Bank/Number selection
(with –/+ buttons or Pedal Switches)
BACKING SECTION
Tone Generation
AWM (Advanced Wave Memory)
Preset Patterns
248 (60 styles × 4 variations, plus 8 special patterns; Accompaniment, Bass and Drums parts with
independent on/off switching)
Chord Types
25
Songs
8 (7 × factory-set, 1 × blank; all user-programmable)
Record Modes
Realtime, Step
Data Capacity
8 songs, 299 measures/song, approximately 4000
chord events for all 8 songs
Backing Functions
Pattern/accompaniment control with Pedal Switches
(song/pattern select, start/stop, measure reverse
(n)/forward (m), Fill In, Ending, Chord Recall)
Root Select and Triggered Run (from guitar input)
TUNER SECTION
Chromatic auto tuner
GENERAL
Display
Custom large backlit LCD (with adjustable contrast)
and 7-segment, 2-digit bank/memory number LED,
input peak LED
Input Jacks
Instrument input (INPUT)
–17 dBm (1 Mohm), mono, phone jack
Foot Controller
Footswitch (FOOT SW)
Output Jacks
Instrument outputs (OUTPUT: L/L+R, R), stereo/mono,
phone jack
0 dBm (10 Kohm or greater)
Backing output (OUTPUT: BACKING/MONO),
mono, phone jack
+3 dBm (10 Kohm or greater)
Headphones (PHONES)
10 mW/47 ohm, stereo, stereo phone jack
SPECIFICATIONS
117
APPENDICES
SPECIFICATIONS
MIDI Terminals
MIDI IN, MIDI OUT
Weight
2.4 kg (5 lbs., 5 oz.)
Other Controls, Fittings
Input level, Backing output level, headphones level,
LCD contrast switch (LCD SETTING), DC IN jack,
power switch, AC adaptor cord holder
Supplied Accessories
PA-3 AC adaptor, owner’s manual
Optional Accessories
FC5 (or FC4) Footswitch, FC7 Foot Controller
Power Supply
Supplied PA-3 AC adaptor
Dimensions (W × D × H)
499 × 230 × 56 mm (19 5/8" × 9" × 2 1/4")
Note: Specifications and appearance subject to change without notice.
118
SPECIFICATIONS
APPENDICES
INDEX
INDEX
A
Accompaniment part .......................................................... 76
AMD ................................................................................... 64
Amp Simulator + EQ ......................................................... 63
ASSIGNABLE Block and Pedal Switch functions
in Memory mode ................................................... 11, 51
in Pattern mode ...................................................... 12, 77
in Realtime recording ............................................ 13, 86
in Song mode ................................................... 13, 77, 86
ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch, using to switch
between Backing Control and Chord Recall ............ 13, 77
ASSIGNABLE Block volume control, setting minimum
volume level for (MIN VOL) ......................................... 47
ASSIGNABLE Block, LED indicators .............................. 10
Attack ................................................................................. 58
audio connection examples ........................................... 19-20
Auto (Wah + EQ) ............................................................... 62
auto volume ........................................................................ 48
auto volume rate (AUTO VOL) ......................................... 49
B
Backing Control
in Pattern mode ...................................................... 12, 77
in Song mode ......................................................... 13, 82
banks, changing .................................................................. 51
Basic patterns ..................................................................... 73
bass note, changing ................................................ 35, 75, 88
Bass part ............................................................................. 76
Blank pattern ...................................................................... 73
Brilliance ............................................................................ 64
bypass switching ................................................................. 52
C
cable clip ............................................................................. 15
Center Frequency ............................................................... 62
changing chord type ........................................................... 75
changing chords .................................................................. 74
chord changes, recording in realtime ................................. 85
Chord Recall ..................................................... 12, 13, 77, 86
chord types
changing ....................................................................... 34
list of .................................................................... 76, 152
chords
assigning to the Pedal Switches .................................. 78
changing bass note ....................................................... 75
changing chord type .................................................... 75
changing during playback of pattern ........................... 33
changing in Pattern mode ............................................ 74
changing root note ....................................................... 74
selecting with ASSIGNABLE Block and
Pedal Switches (Chord Recall) ............... 12, 13, 77, 86
Chorus 1, 2 ......................................................................... 64
Chorus block ....................................................................... 63
Compare mode ............................................................. 29, 53
Compressor block ............................................................... 58
CONNECT ......................................................................... 45
connection examples
audio ....................................................................... 19-20
MIDI .......................................................................... 101
copying an effect program ................................................. 54
copying measures ............................................................... 94
cursor arrow
moving in Pattern mode .............................................. 74
moving in Song mode .................................................. 80
D
data
saved to an effect program ..........................................
types and methods of entering in Realtime
recording ...................................................................
types and methods of entering in Step recording ........
Delay ...................................................................................
Delay + Reverb ...................................................................
Delay Dry Level (Delay + Reverb) ....................................
Delay Effect Mix (Delay + Reverb) ...................................
Delay Feedback (Delay + Reverb) .....................................
Delay Time (Delay + Reverb) ............................................
deleting
a single song ................................................................
measures ......................................................................
Demo mode ........................................................................
Depth (Chorus 1, 2) ............................................................
Depth (Flanger) ..................................................................
Depth (Phaser) ....................................................................
Dist 1 – 4 ............................................................................
Distortion block ..................................................................
Doubling Balance ...............................................................
Doubling Balance (Delay + Reverb) ..................................
Doubling Time ...................................................................
Doubling Time (Delay + Reverb) ......................................
Drive ...................................................................................
Drums part ..........................................................................
Dry Level (Chorus 1, 2) .....................................................
Dry Level (Delay) ..............................................................
Dry Level (Flanger) ............................................................
Dry Level (Phaser) .............................................................
Dry Level (Pitch Shift) .......................................................
Dry Level (Reverb) ............................................................
INDEX
50
83
89
67
68
68
68
68
68
95
94
22
64
65
66
59
59
68
68
68
68
59
76
64
68
66
66
65
67
119
APPENDICES
INDEX
E
F
editing effect parameters, in Manual mode ........................ 44
editing recorded events ....................................................... 92
effect blocks ....................................................................... 24
effect blocks
bypass switching (GROUP) ........................................ 45
determining the order (CONNECT) ............................ 45
turning on and off ........................................................ 44
Effect Mix (Chorus 1, 2) .................................................... 64
Effect Mix (Delay) ............................................................. 68
Effect Mix (Flanger) ........................................................... 65
Effect Mix (Phaser) ............................................................ 66
Effect Mix (Pitch Shift) ...................................................... 64
Effect Mix (Reverb) ........................................................... 67
effect on/off (bypass) data, recording in realtime ........ 85, 86
effect on/off (bypass) switching ......................................... 52
effect program data, recording in realtime ......................... 85
effect programs
comparing edited program with original ............... 29, 53
copying ........................................................................ 54
data saved to ................................................................ 50
naming ......................................................................... 55
recalling original .................................................... 30, 54
restoring factory preset ................................................ 57
saving ............................................................... 30, 50, 53
selecting in Memory mode .......................................... 51
selecting with ASSIGNABLE Block and
Pedal Switches .......................................................... 51
swapping ...................................................................... 55
effect type, selecting ........................................................... 44
effects
changing (editing) in Manual mode ............................ 26
changing (editing) in Memory mode ............................ 29
End Pedal Switch ............................................................... 77
Ending pattern .................................................................... 73
EQ High (Amp Simulator + EQ) ....................................... 63
EQ High (Wah + EQ) ......................................................... 62
EQ High Frequency (Amp Simulator + EQ) ..................... 63
EQ High Frequency (Wah + EQ) ....................................... 62
EQ Input (Amp Simulator + EQ) ....................................... 63
EQ Input (Wah + EQ) ........................................................ 62
EQ Low (Amp Simulator + EQ) ........................................ 62
EQ Low (Wah + EQ) ......................................................... 62
EQ Low Frequency (Amp Simulator + EQ) ...................... 63
EQ Low Frequency (Wah + EQ) ....................................... 62
EQ Output (Amp Simulator + EQ) .................................... 63
EQ Output (Wah + EQ) ..................................................... 62
Equalizer ............................................................................. 60
Equalizer block ................................................................... 59
erasing (deleting) a song .................................................... 95
erasing recorded events ...................................................... 92
event indicator .................................................................... 79
Feedback (Delay) ............................................................... 68
Feedback (Flanger) ............................................................. 65
Feedback (Phaser) .............................................................. 66
Feedback (Wah + EQ) ........................................................ 62
fill in pattern ....................................................................... 33
Fill in patterns ............................................................... 73, 77
Fill Pedal Switch ................................................................ 77
Flanger ................................................................................ 65
FOOT .................................................................................. 46
foot controller
setting (FOOT) ............................................................. 46
setting minimum volume level for (MIN VOL) .......... 47
using as a volume pedal .............................................. 46
using as a wah pedal .............................................. 47, 61
using for control of Chorus Depth .............................. 47
using for control of Distortion Drive .......................... 47
using for control of Reverb Feedback ......................... 47
using for control of Reverb Mix .................................. 47
footswitch (external)
using as total effect bypass switch .............................. 57
using instead of certain panel controls ........................ 56
120
INDEX
G
GROUP ............................................................................... 45
H
High (Equalizer) .................................................................
High (Reverb) .....................................................................
High Frequency ..................................................................
High Mid ............................................................................
High Mid Frequency ..........................................................
High Mid Q ........................................................................
60
67
61
60
60
60
I
Input (Equalizer) ................................................................. 60
L
Left Delay Feedback ..........................................................
Left Delay Time (Pitch Shift) ............................................
Left Delay Time (Flanger) .................................................
Loop playback ....................................................................
Loop recording ...................................................................
Low (Equalizer) ..................................................................
Low (Reverb) .....................................................................
Low Frequency ...................................................................
Low Mid .............................................................................
Low Mid Frequency ...........................................................
Low Mid Q .........................................................................
65
64
65
92
93
60
67
60
60
60
60
APPENDICES
M
Manual Job mode ........................................................... 2, 50
Manual mode ....................................................... 2, 43, 44-49
Manual mode settings, saving to an effect program .......... 50
measure A/B
checking current settings ............................................. 92
copying ........................................................................ 94
deleting ........................................................................ 94
jumping to .................................................................... 92
Loop playback ............................................................. 92
Loop recording ............................................................ 93
marking ........................................................................ 92
using to delete a single song ........................................ 95
measure/event section ................................................... 79, 81
Memory Edit mode .............................................. 2, 43, 53-54
Memory Edit mode settings, saving to an effect
program ........................................................................... 53
Memory Job mode ..................................................... 2, 54-57
Memory mode ..................................................... 2, 43, 51-52
Metronome patterns ............................................................ 73
MIDI
Bulk Transmission mode ........................................... 102
changing effect programs on connected device
from GW50 ............................................................. 104
changing effect programs on GW50 from
connected device ..................................................... 103
connection examples .................................................. 101
Control Change number to effect correspondence .... 106
Control Change numbers .................................... 104-105
MIDI clock messages ................................................ 106
MIDI to GW50 program number correspondence .... 104
restoring GW50 data from MDF2 MIDI Data
Filer ......................................................................... 103
storing GW50 data to MDF2 MIDI Data Filer ......... 102
synchronizing another device with GW50 ................ 105
transmit channels for Backing parts and effect
program changes ..................................................... 107
turning effects on and off from connected device ..... 104
types of transmitted data ............................................ 102
using patterns to play connected sound modules ...... 106
MIN VOL ........................................................................... 47
minimum/maximum (MIN/MAX) volume ........................ 48
Mix Balance (Amp Simulator + EQ) ................................. 63
multiple events, display of ................................................. 91
muting accompaniment
bass and drums parts in Pattern mode ......................... 76
bass and drums parts in Song mode ................ 80, 86, 88
muting data (Backing mute status),
recording in realtime ................................................. 85, 86
N
INDEX
Noise Gate .................................................................... 31, 69
O
Output (Compressor) ..........................................................
Output (Distortion) .............................................................
Output (Equalizer) ..............................................................
Overdrive ............................................................................
58
59
61
59
P
parameter values, checking ................................................ 51
parameters
main ............................................................................. 44
sub ................................................................................ 44
Pattern Demo ...................................................................... 22
Pattern mode ............................................................. 2, 32, 73
patterns
selecting and playing ................................................... 73
selecting with ASSIGNABLE Block and
Pedal Switches (Backing Control) .............................. 77
Pedal (Wah + EQ) .............................................................. 62
Pedal Switch functions .................................................. 11-13
Pedal Switches
using for Backing Control ......................... 12, 13, 77, 86
using for Chord Recall .............................. 12, 13, 77, 86
using for effect on/off (bypass) switching ............. 11, 52
using to select effect bank/program numbers ......... 11, 25
Phaser ................................................................................. 66
Pitch Left ............................................................................ 64
Pitch Right .......................................................................... 64
Pitch Shift ........................................................................... 64
playing songs ...................................................................... 36
Position Controls ................................................................ 81
Position Controls
using to pause Realtime recording .................. 84, 87, 88
using to view recorded events ............................... 81, 90
position indicator ................................................................ 79
R
Range (Wah + EQ) ............................................................. 62
Realtime recording ....................................................... 37, 83
Realtime recording and Step recording, using together ..... 89
Realtime recording
hints .............................................................................. 87
Loop recording ............................................................ 93
overdub technique ........................................................ 87
pausing ............................................................. 84, 87, 88
recording chord changes .............................................. 85
recording from middle of song .................................... 87
types and methods of entering data ............................. 83
recalling preset effect program during editing ................... 30
naming an effect program .................................................. 55
naming songs ...................................................................... 95
INDEX
121
APPENDICES
INDEX
recorded events
editing .......................................................................... 92
erasing .......................................................................... 92
viewing ........................................................................ 90
recording chord changes ..................................................... 85
recording songs ................................................................... 36
recording
Backing mute events .................................. 83, 85, 86, 89
chord changes .................................................. 83, 85, 89
effect on/off settings ........................................ 83, 85, 86
effect program numbers ......................................... 83, 85
entering mute, effect program and
effect on/off events at start of song ............................. 85
patterns ................................................................... 83, 89
restoring factory preset effect programs ............................ 57
restoring factory preset songs ............................................. 95
Retrigger function ......................................................... 73, 88
Reverb Dry Level (Delay + Reverb) .................................. 69
Reverb Effect Mix (Delay + Reverb) ................................. 68
Reverb High (Delay + Reverb) .......................................... 69
Reverb Low (Delay + Reverb) ........................................... 69
Reverb Time (Delay + Reverb) .......................................... 69
Reverb Type (Delay + Reverb) .......................................... 69
Reverb/Delay block ............................................................ 67
Right Delay Feedback ........................................................ 65
Right Delay Time (Pitch Shift) .......................................... 65
Right Delay Time (Flanger) ............................................... 66
root note of chord, changing .............................................. 34
root note, changing ............................................................. 74
Root Select ......................................................................... 78
S
saving edited effect program .............................................. 30
saving Manual mode settings to an effect program ........... 50
saving Memory Edit mode settings to an effect program .. 53
selecting effect programs in Memory mode ...................... 51
Sense (Compressor) ............................................................ 58
Sense (Wah + EQ) .............................................................. 61
Set-A and Set-B operations ................................................ 92
Song Demo ......................................................................... 22
Song Edit mode .................................................................. 90
song editing ........................................................................ 90
Song Job mode ................................................................... 94
Song mode ................................................................ 2, 36, 79
songs
erasing (deleting) ......................................................... 95
naming ......................................................................... 95
empty, checking for ..................................................... 84
factory preset, restoring ............................................... 95
list of .......................................................................... 147
maximum length and size (recorded events) ............... 83
selecting and playing ................................................... 79
122
INDEX
selecting with ASSIGNABLE Block and
Pedal Switches (Backing Control) .............................. 82
playback ....................................................................... 36
recording .......................................................... 36, 83, 88
Speed (Chorus 1, 2) ............................................................ 64
Speed (Flanger) .................................................................. 66
Speed (Phaser) .................................................................... 66
Speed (Wah + EQ) ............................................................. 62
Step recording ............................................................... 37, 88
Step recording and Realtime recording, using together ..... 90
Step recording, types and methods of entering data .......... 88
swapping an effect program ............................................... 55
switching between Backing Control and Chord Recall
with ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch ....................... 77
T
Tap Delay ..................................................................... 67, 68
tempo
changing in Pattern mode ............................................ 76
changing in recording and playback ............................ 83
changing in Song mode ............................................... 80
Threshold ............................................................................ 69
Time (Delay) ...................................................................... 67
Time (Reverb) .................................................................... 67
Tone .................................................................................... 59
Touch Fast .......................................................................... 62
Touch Slow ......................................................................... 62
Triggered Run ..................................................................... 82
Tuner ............................................................................. 39, 99
tuning indications ............................................................... 99
Type (Amp Simulator + EQ) ............................................. 62
Type (Reverb) ..................................................................... 67
Type (Wah + EQ) ............................................................... 61
U
utility functions ................................................................... 45
V
Variation patterns ...............................................................
viewing recorded events .....................................................
volume, auto .......................................................................
volume, minimum/maximum (MIN/MAX) .......................
73
90
48
48
W
Wah + EQ ........................................................................... 61
Wah Pedal ........................................................................... 61
SUPPLEMENTAL
INFORMATION
BLOCK DIAGRAM .............................................
JOB TABLE ..........................................................
125
DRUM AND PERCUSSION SOUNDS
USED FOR DRUM PARTS .................................
146
FACTORY SET SONG LIST ...............................
147
126
ASSIGNABLE BLOCK AND PEDAL
SWITCH FUNCTIONS CHART ..........................
128
MIDI SPECIFICATIONS .....................................
148
EFFECT PARAMETER CHART .........................
130
MIDI IMPLEMENTATION CHART ..................
150
FACTORY SET MEMORY EFFECT
PROGRAM LIST ..................................................
132
CHART OF CHORD FINGERINGS
FOR GUITAR .......................................................
152
MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST ...........
133
MANUAL EFFECT FACTORY SET
PARAMETER CHART ........................................
143
PRESET PATTERN LIST ....................................
144
USE OF ADVANCED RECORDING TECHNIQUES
– FACTORY SET SONG 1 .................................. 153
DEMO SONGS 1-6 – CHORD CHARTS ............
156
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
124
BLOCK DIAGRAM
BLOCK DIAGRAM
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
BLOCK DIAGRAM
BLOCK DIAGRAM
BLOCK DIAGRAM
125
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION JOB TABLE
JOB TABLE
JOB TABLE
* In this chart, a plus mark between two button names (for example, SHIFT + SUB PARAM )
indicates that the two are to be pressed simultaneously. An arrow between buttons
(for example,
CURSOR ➔ – / + ) indicates that they are to be pressed in sequence.
*
—Main modes
MANUAL mode— MANUAL
• Editing main parameters—Parameter knobs
• Editing sub parameters and Noise Gate— SHIFT + SUB PARAM ➔Effect Selectior buttons
• Utility functions—Effect Utility switch
• CONNECT
• GROUP
• FOOT (Foot Controller)
• MIN VOL (Minimum Volume) @
• AUTO VOL (Auto Volume)
ASSIGNABLE block functions
• Effect ON/OFF
• MIN/MAX VOLUME
• AUTO VOLUME
EFFECT
SECTION
or
MEMORY mode— MEMORY
• Effect program selection—
CURSOR ➔ – / +
ASSIGNABLE block functions
• MEMORY BANK/NUMBER selection
• Effect ON/OFF
• MIN/MAX VOLUME
• AUTO VOLUME
active
at the
same
time
PATTERN mode— SONG/PATTERN
• Pattern selection & playback—
CURSOR ➔ – / + START/STOP
• Chord entry (change)— CHORD , Chord buttons, ON/ROOT
• Mute on/off— SHIFT + ACCOMP / BASS / DRUMS
ASSIGNABLE block functions
• BACKING CONTROL
• CHORD RECALL
• Root Select—Pedal switch
B +Note played on guitar
or
SONG mode (Play/Step Recording/Edit
BACKING
SECTION
• Song selection and playback—
CURSOR ➔ – / + START/STOP
• Step recording
Patterns
(recordable data types)
Chords
Make setting(s) & press ENTER
Mute
• Edit
“A”/“B” Location Set—Position Controls ➔ SET-A / SET-B
Jumping to “A”/“B”— SHIFT + JUMP-A / JUMP-B
(Loop Recording/Loop Play)— SHIFT + A-B REPEAT
Erase— SHIFT + ERASE
}
ASSIGNABLE block functions
• BACKING CONTROL
• Triggered Run—Pedal switch
B + Pedal Switch 5 ➔ Note played on guitar
or
TUNER mode— SHIFT + TUNER
• Tuning
• Center pitch adjustment
or
MIDI BULK TRANSMISSION mode— SHIFT + MIDI BULK
• MIDI bulk transmission
or
DEMO mode— SONG/PATTERN + START/STOP
• Song demo play (with effect changes)
• Pattern demo play (with effect changes)
126
JOB TABLE
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
JOB TABLE
JOB mode
• WRITE (Save)— MANUAL + MEMORY
ASSIGNABLE block functions
• Effect ON/OFF
• MIN/MAX VOLUME
• AUTO VOLUME
EDIT mode— EDIT/COMPARE
COMPARE mode— EDIT/COMPARE
• Same as MANUAL mode
(including ASSIGNABLE block functions)
+
• Save— MANUAL or MEMORY
• Comparing with original effect
• Recalling original effect— MANUAL or MEMORY
ASSIGNABLE block functions
• MIN/MAX VOLUME
• AUTO VOLUME
or
JOB mode
• COPY
• SWAP
• NAME
}
SHIFT + COPY/NAME
ASSIGNABLE block functions
• MIN/MAX VOLUME
• AUTO VOLUME
• Factory set recall
REALTIME RECORDING mode— SHIFT + SONG REC
• Realtime recording
(recordable data types)
(Pattern)
Chords
Mute
Effect Program Number
Effect on/off
}
Enter data as song is playing
(— START/STOP )
ASSIGNABLE block function
• CHORD RECALL
or
JOB mode
• COPY— SHIFT + MEAS COPY
• DELETE— SHIFT + MEAS DEL
• NAME— SHIFT + SONG NAME
ASSIGNABLE block function
• BACKING CONTROL
(only measure
&
available)
• Factory set recall
Other Functions
• MIDI functions : Program Change (Effect change) reception
: Program Change (Effect change) transmission
: Control Change (Effect on/off) reception
: Clock transmission
: Note on/off (for Backing parts) transmission
• External Footswitch function assignments—External Foot switch + apporopiate switch/button
(for SHIFT + TUNER , ASSIGNABLE Block Type switch, START/STOP etc; see page 56.)
• Tempo change (in Backing modes)—
CURSOR ➔ – / +
• LCD contrast adjustment— LCD SETTING
JOB TABLE
127
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION ASSIGNABLE BLOCK AND PEDAL SWITCH FUNCTIONS CHART
ASSIGNABLE BLOCK AND PEDAL SWITCH FUNCTIONS CHART
This chart indicates the availability of the ASSIGNABLE block functions for the various modes
of the GW50. The shaded sections indicate settings
that are automatically selected when the corresponding mode buttons are pressed.
The BANK/NUMBER select or ON/OFF settings
and the MIN/MAX VOLUME or AUTO VOLUME settings can be used simultaneously (the
LEDs of both will be lit or flash). BACKING
CONTROL and CHORD RECALL are independent and cannot be used simultaneously. Also, Pedal
Switches 1–5 are applicable, except for MIN/MAX
VOLUME and AUTO VOLUME (which are
controlled by the ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal
Switch).
ASSIGNABLE Block Function
Mode
Manual
MEMORY: BANK/NUMBER Select
×
MEMORY: ON/OFF
●
MIN/MAX VOLUME
●
AUTO VOLUME
●
1
7
13
19
Manual Job
Memory
×
●
●
●
●
ASSIGNABLE Block Function
3
|
or|
●
8
●
14
●
20
9
15
21
Memory
Edit
Compare
×
×
●
●
●
4
10
16
22
Mode
Pattern
Song
BACKING CONTROL
●
●
CHORD RECALL
●
128
2
Memory Edit
25
29
×
26
30
Song
Realtime
Recording
Song Job
×
●
●
27
31
ASSIGNABLE BLOCK AND PEDAL SWITCH FUNCTIONS CHART
×
28
32
×
●
●
Memory Job
5
11
17
23
×
×
●
●
6
12
18
24
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
For 7, 8, 10, 28, 31 —
The ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch has no
function.
For 3, 9 —
Pressing [MEMORY] calls up either BANK/
NUMBER select or ON/OFF, depending on
which was last selected with the Pedal Switch
(pressing twice selects ON/OFF; pressing once
selects BANK/NUMBER).
For 15, 21 —
The ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch is used
for MIN/MAX VOLUME or AUTO VOLUME
and cannot be used for BANK select or switching between BANK/NUMBER select and ON/
OFF.
For 5, 6, 11, 12 —
Despite the LED being lit (or flashing), these
functions are not available.
ASSIGNABLE BLOCK AND PEDAL SWITCH FUNCTIONS CHART
For 25, 26 —
The functions of Pedal Switches 1–5 differ
between the two settings. The functions also
differ between song/pattern playback and
stopped conditions.
For 29 —
The functions of Pedal Switches 1–5 are the
same for pattern playback and stopped conditions.
For 25, 29 —
The ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch can be
used to switch between the two settings, and
(when held down) can be used for the Root
Select function.
For 26 —
The ASSIGNABLE Block Pedal Switch (when
held down) can be used for the Triggered Run
function.
For 28 —
Only measure reverse (n) and forward (m) are
available.
This chart shows how pressing various Pedal Switches affects some specific operations.
If the ASSIGNABLE
Block is set to:
… in the condition below:
… and one of the following
Pedal Switches is pressed:
… the following result occurs:
The selected song or pattern is called
up and the Job operation is aborted
(operation returns to Memory mode).
BACKING CONTROL
When attempting a Memory
Job mode operation
(with the Pattern or Song
mode selected).
Pedal Switches 1, 2
(song/pattern number
selected)
MEMORY
BANK/NUMBER
When attempting a Song Job
mode operation
(with the Memory mode
selected).
Pedal Switches 1–5,
The Job operation is aborted and
ASSIGNABLE Pedal Switch operation returns to Song mode).
(effect program bank/number
select)
CHORD RECALL
When attempting a Memory
Job mode operation
(with the Pattern or Realtime
Recording mode selected).
Pedal Switches 1–4
(chord select)
The Job operation is aborted and
operation returns to Memory mode.
(Realtime Recording is also still
active if this had been selected.)
ASSIGNABLE BLOCK AND PEDAL SWITCH FUNCTIONS CHART
129
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION EFFECT PARAMETER CHART
EFFECT PARAMETER CHART
Note: For this chart and the ones on pages 131 and 133–143, sub parameters are denoted by the shaded sections.
Effect
Compressor
Effect Type
Comp
Distortion
Dist1~4, Od
Equalizer
Equalizer
Wah+EQ
Amp Simulator+EQ
Chorus
Chorus1
Chorus2
Pitch Shifter
130
Parameter
Attack
Sense
Output
Drive
Tone
Output
Low Gain
Low Middle Gain
High Middle Gain
High Gain
Input
Low Frequency
Low Mid Frequency
High Mid Frequency
High Frequency
Low Mid Q
High Mid Q
Output
Type
Range
1~14
–6~–42dB
0~200%
0~100%
–16~+16
0~100%
–15~+15dB
–15~+15dB
–15~+15dB
–15~+15dB
0~100%
40~1.2kHz
80~12.0kHz
80~12.0kHz
500~12.0kHz
0.1~5.0
0.1~5.0
0~200%
Touch Slow
Touch Fast
Auto
Pedal
Sense (Touch types) 1~10
Speed (Auto type)
0.4~6.4Hz
(no parameter for Pedal type)
Center Frequency
125~9.0kHz
Range
0~28
Feedback
0~100%
EQ Input
0~100%
EQ Low Gain
–15~+15dB
EQ Low Frequency 40~1.2kHz
EQ High Gain
–15~+15dB
EQ High Frequency 500~12.0kHz
EQ Output
0~200%
Type
Stack
Combo
Tube
EQ Low Gain
–15~+15dB
EQ High Gain
–15~+15dB
Mix Balance
0~100%
EQ Input
0~100%
EQ Low Frequency 40~1.2kHz
EQ High Frequency 500~12.0kHz
EQ Output
0~200%
Speed
0.03~6.18Hz
Brilliance
–3~+6dB
Depth
0~100%
Mix
0~100%
AMD (Chorus1 only) 0~100%
Dry
0~100%
Speed
0.03~6.18Hz
Brilliance
–3~+6dB
Depth
0~100%
Mix
0~100%
Dry
0~100%
Pitch L
–1200~+1200 cent
Pitch R
–1200~+1200 cent
Mix
0~100%
EFFECT PARAMETER CHART
Effect
Effect Type
Flanger
Phaser
Reverb/Delay
Reverb
Delay (Tap)
Delay+Reverb
Parameter
L Delay Time
L Delay FB
R Delay Time
R Delay FB
Dry
Speed
Feedback
Depth
Mix
L Delay Time
R Delay Time
Dry
Speed
Feedback
Depth
Mix
Dry
Time
High
Mix
Type
Low Gain
Dry
Time
Feedback
Mix
Doubling Time
Doubling Balance
Dry
Delay Time
Delay Mix
Reverb Mix
Delay Feedback
Doubling Time
Doubling Balance
Delay Dry
Reverb Type
Reverb Time
Reverb Low Gain
Reverb High
Reverb Dry
Utility Settings Connect
Group
Foot Controller
Minimum Volume
Auto Volume
Noise Gate
Range
0.1~10 ms
0~99%
0~10 ms
0~99%
0~100%
0.03~6.18Hz
0~100%
0~100%
0~100%
0.1~12 ms
0.1~12 ms
0~100%
0.03~6.18Hz
0~100%
0~100%
0~100%
0~100%
0.3~10.0 sec
0.1~1.0
0~100%
Hall
Room
Plate
–3~+6dB
0~100%
7~896 ms
0~100%
0~100%
30~50 ms
0~100%
0~100%
4~512 ms
0~100%
0~100%
0~100%
30~50ms
0~100%
0~100%
Hall
Room
Plate
0.3~10.0 sec
–3~+6dB
0.1~1.0
0~100%
cmp, dst, eq, cho, rev
cmp, dst, eq, cho, rev
vol pedal, wah pedal, dst drive,
cho depth, rev fb, rev mix
0~9
1~10
0~9
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
EFFECT PARAMETER CHART
Effect Parameter Blank Chart
Copy this page and use it for keeping records of your own original parameter settings.
Effect
Compressor
Effect Type
Comp
Distortion
Dist1~4, Od
Equalizer
Equalizer
Chorus
Wah+EQ
Parameter
Attack
Sense
Output
Drive
Tone
Output
Low Gain
Low Middle Gain
High Middle Gain
High Gain
Input
Low Frequency
Low Mid Frequency
High Mid Frequency
High Frequency
Low Mid Q
High Mid Q
Output
Type
Amp Simulator+EQ
Sense (Touch types)
Speed (Auto type)
(no parameter for Pedal type)
Center Frequency
Range
Feedback
EQ Input
EQ Low Gain
EQ Low Frequency
EQ High Gain
EQ High Frequency
EQ Output
Type
Chorus1
Chorus2
Pitch Shifter
EQ Low Gain
EQ High Gain
Mix Balance
EQ Input
EQ Low Frequency
EQ High Frequency
EQ Output
Speed
Brilliance
Depth
Mix
AMD (Chorus1 only)
Dry
Speed
Brilliance
Depth
Mix
Dry
Pitch L
Pitch R
Mix
Range
Effect
Effect Type
Flanger
Phaser
Reverb/Delay
Reverb
Delay (Tap)
Delay+Reverb
Parameter
L Delay Time
L Delay FB
R Delay Time
R Delay FB
Dry
Speed
Feedback
Depth
Mix
L Delay Time
R Delay Time
Dry
Speed
Feedback
Depth
Mix
Dry
Time
High
Mix
Type
Range
Low Gain
Dry
Time
Feedback
Mix
Doubling Time
Doubling Balance
Dry
Delay Time
Delay Mix
Reverb Mix
Delay Feedback
Doubling Time
Doubling Balance
Delay Dry
Reverb Type
Reverb Time
Reverb Low Gain
Reverb High
Reverb Dry
Utility Settings Connect
Group
Foot Controller
Minimum Volume
Auto Volume
Noise Gate
EFFECT PARAMETER CHART
131
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION FACTORY SET MEMORY EFFECT PROGRAM LIST
FACTORY SET MEMORY EFFECT PROGRAM LIST
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Styles
American Hard Rock
Loc.
11
12
13
14
15
21
22
23
24
25
Heavy Metal
31
32
33
34
35
Funk & Jazz
41
42
43
44
45
British Progressive Rock 51
52
53
54
55
60’s & 70’s Rock
61
62
63
64
65
Rock’n’Roll & Blues
71
72
73
74
75
Special Trick Effects
81
82
83
84
85
Line Sound
91
92
93
94
95
01
02
03
04
05
132
Name
SO FAT
POPTOP
CHINA
TALKBX
BIGBOT
HIWAY
ALIEN
CROWS
DRYBAK
SWIRL
METAL
DRIVER
TOKYO
TOUCH
WOMEN
JAZZY
FUNKY
COMP+D
QUACK
SKANK
PROGRE
OWNER
BREATH
MYSTRY
CHURCH
ERA 66
TROWER
BUSTER
WOW
70/90
TELE
TURKEY
RHYFAT
*TUSH*
LONDON
TRICK
GHOSTS
HORROR
5 /11TH
OCTAVE
HARD-L
LEAD-L
META-L
COMP-L
CLN-L
BACK-L
NECK-L
OLD-L
PHAS-L
JAZZ-L
Note
Foot Controller Function
Fat distortion for hard rock
Volume
Volume before Distortion
Tight, bright distortion with chorus and delay
Overdrive with rhythmic delay
Reverb Mix
Fat distortion with Touch Wah
Volume
Fat distortion with detuning and delay
Volume
Straight “crunch” distortion
Distortion Drive
Heavy distortion for solos
Volume
Tight distortion
Volume
Dry distortion for backing parts
Volume
Soft, clean sound with chorus and delay
Volume
Fat and warm metal distortion
Volume
Tight, dry metal distortion, with small room ambience
Reverb Mix
Hard, bright metal distortion
Volume
Metal distortion with Touch Wah
Volume
Clean, bright sound for rhythm parts
Volume
Clean jazz sound, with small room ambience
Volume
Slow phase sound for funky “chicken scratching,” etc.
Phaser Depth
American rock/fusion sound, with long delay, reverb
Volume
Dry, funky phase sound with Touch Wah
Volume
Clean sound for funky rhythm parts
Volume
Warm “fuzz” distortion, with long delay
Volume
Distortion with fifths (in octaves) for solos
Volume
Clean sound with short delay and heavy chorus
Volume
Distortion with Touch Wah and long delay
Volume
Three-octave pitch shift sound
Volume
Vintage 60’s sound
Volume
70’s spacey flanger/distortion sound, with long delay
Volume
Classic smooth and loud overdrive
Volume
Fat distortion with half-open Pedal Wah
Wah
Vintage phaser sound
Volume
Slap back delay for rock’n’roll
Volume
Dry overdrive sound for heavy comping and rhythm parts
Volume
Fat sound for rhythm parts
Volume
Heavy distortion for blues rhythm or slide parts
Volume
Clean, warm amp sound with slight reverb
Volume
Spacey phaser sound with long, rhythmic delay
Volume
Distant modulated sound with heavy, cavernous reverb
Volume
Heavy modulated phaser sound with Auto Wah and long rhythmic delay Volume
Three-pitch distortion sound for solos
Reverb Mix
Clean, two-octave sound, with slight detuning for natural chorus Volume
Distortion for hard rock
Volume
Bright distortion with long delay for lead parts
Volume
Metal distortion with chorus for solos
Volume
Funky sound for rhythm parts
Volume
Clean sound with slight detuning
Volume
Distortion for backing parts
Volume
Blues sound (for use with the neck pickup)
Volume
Old style rock’n’roll sound, slightly detuned with small room ambience
Distortion Drive
Distortion with classic phaser sound
Distortion Drive
Modern jazz sound, with chorus and heavy reverb
Volume
FACTORY SET MEMORY EFFECT PROGRAM LIST
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
■ 11: SO FAT
on=o/off=X
■ 12: POPTOP
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
■ 13: CHINA
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
o
comp
attack
sense
output
14
–26dB
170%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
1
–22dB
122%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
4
–19dB
164%
o
dist4
drive
tone
output
55%
+8
39%
o
dist3
drive
tone
output
65%
+3
60%
o
od
drive
tone
output
57%
+16
30%
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
+3dB
–15dB
+15dB
+2dB
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
combo
0dB
+2dB
9%
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
+7dB
+7dB
+1dB
+5dB
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
80%
1.2kHz
1.0kHz
1.2kHz
4.5kHz
5.0
5.0
100%
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
100%
200Hz
2.8kHz
70%
speed
brilliance
depth
1.02Hz
–3dB
14%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
80%
125Hz
630Hz
1.0kHz
3.2kHz
2.0
2.0
100%
left
right
mix
–15cent
+10cent
10%
mix
amd
dry
78%
0%
50%
speed
brilliance
depth
0.57Hz
0dB
80%
time
dly mix
rev mix
428ms
11%
10%
mix
amd
dry
60%
0%
40%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
14%
30ms
50%
89%
hall
1.9s
+1dB
0.3
90%
time
dly mix
rev mix
512ms
18%
11%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
20%
50ms
50%
81%
hall
2.2s
0dB
0.5
100%
X
pitch
L delay
L delay
R delay
R delay
dry
o
Utility
Settings
rev
time
fb
time
fb
o
o
10ms
0%
10ms
0%
90%
time
high
mix
2.4s
0.6
20%
type
low
dry
hall
–3dB
100%
cho1
dly+rev
X
o
connect
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—*1
foot controller
cho-rev*2
foot controller
cmp-dst
minimum volume
0
minimum volume
5
auto volume
noise gate
Utility
Settings
5
connect
cmp,dst,eq,rev,cho
group
—
auto volume
4
noise gate
Utility
Settings
cho1
dly+rev
connect
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—
5
foot controller
rev mix
6
minimum volume
0
auto volume
noise gate
■ 14: TALKBX
on=o/off=X
■ 15: BIGBOT
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
o
comp
attack
sense
output
1
–18dB
156%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
14
–29dB
200%
o
od
drive
tone
output
71%
+4
45%
o
dist4
drive
tone
output
66%
+10
50%
o
wah+eq
type
sense
center freq
range
touch slow
7
400Hz
14
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
+3dB
+5dB
+3dB
+4dB
fb
input
lo
lo freq
hi
hi freq
output
0%
100%
0dB
125Hz
0dB
3.2kHz
130%
speed
fb
depth
0.75Hz
18%
56%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
100%
125Hz
800Hz
1.0kHz
3.2kHz
2.0
2.0
70%
mix
L time
R time
dry
60%
3.0ms
6.0ms
40%
left
right
mix
–5cent
+5cent
81%
time
dly mix
rev mix
304ms
9%
11%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
25%
30ms
66%
91%
hall
2.0s
0dB
0.5
89%
X
o
Utility
Settings
flanger
dly+rev
o
pitch
L delay
L delay
R delay
R delay
dry
o
Utility
Settings
rev
time
fb
time
fb
10ms
11%
10ms
10%
75%
time
high
mix
1.7s
0.4
14%
type
low
dry
hall
+3dB
86%
connect
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—
connect
cmp,eq,dst,rev,cho
foot controller
cho-rev
group
—
minimum volume
0
foot controller
cho-
auto volume
minimum volume
0
auto volume
noise gate
5
4
noise gate
5
5
5
3
*1: The dash (—) means that there is no group assignment.
*2: Hyphens in this row indicate that the foot controller is used as a volume pedal and is placed at the hyphen position. For example, “cho-rev” indicate that the foot controller is
placed between the Chorus and Reverb/Delay blocks.
MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
133
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
■ 21: HIWAY
on=o/off=X
■ 22: ALIEN
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
■ 23: CROWS
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
X
comp
attack
sense
output
14
–28dB
186%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
8
–21dB
178%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
1
–13dB
144%
o
dist1
drive
tone
output
26%
+9
42%
o
dist1
drive
tone
output
77%
+3
56%
o
dist4
drive
tone
output
27%
+8
38%
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
stack
0dB
+5dB
25%
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
stack
–5dB
+3dB
21%
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
stack
–4dB
+4dB
25%
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
100%
125Hz
4.0kHz
74%
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
100%
200Hz
2.8kHz
100%
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
100%
280Hz
3.6kHz
100%
left
right
mix
–5cent
+10cent
32%
left
right
mix
–10cent
+10cent
65%
speed
fb
depth
1.05Hz
0%
44%
mix
L time
R time
dry
60%
3.0ms
6.0ms
40%
time
high
mix
3.0s
0.3
12%
type
low
dry
hall
0dB
88%
X
pitch
L delay
L delay
R delay
R delay
dry
o
Utility
Settings
dly+rev
time
fb
time
fb
X
pitch
10ms
0%
10ms
0%
68%
time
dly mix
rev mix
4ms
0%
4%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
20%
30ms
0%
100%
hall
2.6s
0dB
0.1
96%
L delay
L delay
R delay
R delay
dry
o
connect
dst,eq,cmp,cho,rev
group
—
Utility
Settings
dly+rev
time
fb
time
fb
0.1ms
0%
0.1ms
0%
76%
time
dly mix
rev mix
380ms
12%
5%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
14%
30ms
0%
88%
hall
2.6s
0dB
0.2
95%
group
—
dst drive
foot controller
eq-rev
0
minimum volume
0
auto volume
5
auto volume
3
noise gate
■ 24: DRYBAK
on=o/off=X
5
■ 25: SWIRL
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
comp
attack
sense
output
3
–20dB
134%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
7
–20dB
200%
o
dist3
drive
tone
output
43%
+1
52%
X
dist4
drive
tone
output
61%
0
54%
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
+6dB
+6dB
+7dB
–5dB
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
combo
+3dB
+6dB
100%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
81%
180Hz
630Hz
2.0kHz
5.0kHz
1.2
1.9
70%
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
80%
280Hz
3.6kHz
60%
speed
brilliance
depth
0.66Hz
–1dB
64%
left
right
mix
–5cent
+5cent
14%
mix
dry
75%
50%
time
dly mix
rev mix
392ms
44%
43%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
25%
30ms
66%
90%
hall
3.8s
0dB
0.8
100%
pitch
o
o
L delay
L delay
R delay
R delay
dry
o
Utility
Settings
noise gate
134
rev
time
fb
time
fb
dly+rev
0.1ms
80%
0.1ms
55%
86%
time
high
mix
1.8s
0.8
24%
type
low
dry
hall
0dB
90%
connect
cho2
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—
foot controller
eq-cho
minimum volume
0
auto volume
5
5
Utility
Settings
connect
cmp,eq,dst,rev,cho
group
—
foot controller
cho-
minimum volume
0
auto volume
noise gate
MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
5
6
flanger
rev
connect
cmp,dst,eq,rev,cho
group
—
foot controller
cho-
minimum volume
0
auto volume
noise gate
8
o
o
Utility
Settings
cmp,dst,eq,rev,cho
minimum volume
noise gate
o
connect
foot controller
X
5
4
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
■ 31: METAL
on=o/off=X
■ 32: DRIVER
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
■ 33: TOKYO
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
X
comp
attack
sense
output
5
–33dB
126%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
12
–25dB
26%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
12
–21dB
148%
o
dist4
drive
tone
output
70%
+15
35%
o
dist1
drive
tone
output
85%
+3
37%
o
dist4
drive
tone
output
82%
+4
34%
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
+7dB
+5dB
–10dB
+15dB
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
+2dB
+1dB
+3dB
+6dB
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
–2dB
+2dB
+2dB
+12dB
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
85%
450Hz
1.2kHz
500Hz
9.0kHz
5.0
5.0
70%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
85%
160Hz
700Hz
2.2kHz
4.0kHz
1.6
1.7
76%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
70%
140Hz
700Hz
1.2kHz
5.0kHz
2.2
1.8
100%
left
right
mix
–5cent
+5cent
16%
speed
brilliance
depth
0.57Hz
0dB
80%
speed
fb
depth
2.04Hz
24%
44%
mix
amd
dry
60%
0%
40%
time
high
mix
1.2s
0.5
33%
mix
L time
R time
dry
38%
3.4ms
4.7ms
62%
type
low
dry
room
0dB
100%
time
high
mix
2.4s
0.7
30%
type
low
dry
room
–1dB
100%
o
pitch
L delay
L delay
R delay
R delay
dry
o
Utility
Settings
rev
time
fb
time
fb
X
0.1ms
0%
0.1ms
0%
86%
time
high
mix
2.0s
0.4
22%
type
low
dry
hall
–3dB
100%
o
Utility
Settings
cho1
rev
connect
o
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
connect
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
cmp,dst
group
—
foot controller
rev mix
foot controller
cho-rev
minimum volume
0
minimum volume
0
auto volume
5
auto volume
noise gate
noise gate
5
on=o/off=X
3
noise gate
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
attack
sense
output
12
–18dB
100%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
11
–25dB
200%
o
dist4
drive
tone
output
54%
+1
50%
X
dist4
drive
tone
output
64%
–2
28%
o
wah+eq
type
sense
center freq
range
touch slow
5
220Hz
22
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
stack
–1dB
+15dB
0%
fb
input
lo
lo freq
hi
hi freq
output
60%
29%
+10dB
100Hz
+10dB
3.2kHz
200%
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
90%
280Hz
3.6kHz
64%
speed
fb
depth
0.75Hz
14%
26%
speed
brilliance
depth
0.60Hz
+1dB
70%
mix
L time
R time
dry
60%
5.0ms
6.0ms
40%
mix
amd
dry
78%
0%
50%
time
dly mix
rev mix
416ms
45%
35%
time
high
mix
3.0s
0.7
16%
time
low
dry
hall
0dB
84%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
25%
30ms
49%
100%
hall
3.8s
0dB
0.4
100%
noise gate
connect
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—
foot controller
cho-rev
minimum volume
0
5
5
value
comp
Utility
Settings
rev
■ 35: WOMEN
parameter
o
o
Utility
Settings
flanger
auto volume
5
■ 34: TOUCH
X
X
flanger
rev
connect
o
o
cho1
dly+rev
cmp,eq,dist,cho,rev
group
—
foot controller
cho-rev
minimum volume
0
foot controller
rev-
auto volume
5
minimum volume
0
Utility
Settings
4
connect
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—
auto volume
noise gate
5
6
MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
135
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
■ 41: JAZZY
■ 42: FUNKY
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
■ 43: COMP+D
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
o
comp
attack
sense
output
14
–19dB
68%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
14
–24dB
116%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
13
–42dB
144%
X
od
drive
tone
output
0%
–8
100%
X
dist1
drive
tone
output
60%
+6
34%
o
od
drive
tone
output
55%
+6
32%
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
+9dB
+7dB
+2dB
0dB
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
–2dB
+4dB
+9dB
+9dB
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
+10dB
+6dB
–6dB
+7dB
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
80%
125Hz
630Hz
1.0kHz
3.2kHz
2.0
2.0
130%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
60%
180Hz
800Hz
1.8kHz
4.0kHz
2.0
2.0
80%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
100%
125Hz
630Hz
1.0kHz
3.2kHz
2.0
2.0
110%
speed
brilliance
depth
0.48Hz
+1dB
16%
speed
brilliance
depth
0.75Hz
+3dB
9%
mix
amd
dry
60%
0%
40%
mix
amd
dry
60%
0%
40%
time
high
mix
1.6s
0.2
22%
time
dly mix
rev mix
512ms
13%
19%
type
low
dry
hall
+6dB
100%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
20%
50ms
50%
87%
hall
3.0s
0dB
0.5
100%
X
o
Utility
Settings
cho1
rev
connect
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—
foot controller
cho-rev
minimum volume
0
auto volume
5
noise gate
o
phaser
speed
fb
depth
0.18Hz
33%
43%
mix
dry
62%
38%
o
rev
time
high
mix
1.2s
0.6
24%
type
low
dry
plate
0dB
76%
Utility
Settings
connect
o
cho1
dly+rev
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—
foot controller
cho depth
minimum volume
0
auto volume
Utility
Settings
5
noise gate
3
X
0
connect
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
amp,dst
foot controller
cho-rev
minimum volume
0
auto volume
noise gate
■ 44: QUACK
on=o/off=X
■ 45: SKANK
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
o
comp
attack
sense
output
6
–20dB
200%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
1
–16dB
200%
X
dist4
drive
tone
output
70%
0
64%
X
dist4
drive
tone
output
69%
+1
65%
o
wah+eq
type
sense
center freq
range
touch fast
5
1.0kHz
14
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
–7dB
+5dB
+6dB
+11dB
fb
input
lo
lo freq
hi
hi freq
output
0%
70%
+15dB
125Hz
+6dB
3.6kHz
132%
speed
fb
depth
0.72Hz
17%
50%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
50%
125Hz
630Hz
1.8kHz
3.2kHz
2.0
2.0
40%
mix
dry
50%
50%
left
right
mix
–10cent
+5cent
55%
time
dly mix
rev mix
512ms
25%
19%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
14%
30ms
0%
75%
hall
2.8s
+2dB
0.5
81%
o
X
Utility
Settings
noise gate
phaser
dly+rev
connect
cmp,dst,eq,rev,cho
group
dst,rev
foot controller
cho-
minimum volume
0
auto volume
o
pitch
L delay
L delay
R delay
R delay
dry
X
Utility
Settings
dly+rev
0.1ms
0%
0.1ms
0%
90%
time
dly mix
rev mix
512ms
23%
27%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
14%
30ms
0%
77%
hall
2.8s
+2dB
0.5
73%
connect
cmp,dst,eq,rev,cho
group
dst,rev
5
foot controller
cho-
7
minimum volume
0
auto volume
noise gate
136
time
fb
time
fb
MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
5
7
5
3
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
■ 51: PROGRE
on=o/off=X
■ 52: OWNER
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
■ 53: BREATH
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
o
comp
attack
sense
output
5
–29dB
134%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
1
–14dB
156%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
4
–25dB
200%
o
dist3
drive
tone
output
60%
+10
41%
o
dist1
drive
tone
output
89%
+2
40%
X
od
drive
tone
output
78%
0
39%
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
+10dB
+6dB
–4dB
+2dB
X
wah+eq
type
sense
center freq
range
touch fast
10
900Hz
7
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
stack
+5dB
+8dB
51%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
84%
125Hz
500Hz
1.1kHz
4.0kHz
1.7
2.0
60%
fb
input
lo
lo freq
hi
hi freq
output
0%
100%
–15dB
280Hz
–13dB
6.3kHz
200%
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
80%
280Hz
3.2kHz
90%
1.20Hz
+1dB
29%
0.03Hz
+3dB
28%
+700cent
–500cent
32%
speed
brilliance
depth
speed
brilliance
depth
left
right
mix
mix
amd
dry
61%
0%
39%
mix
amd
dry
90%
0%
60%
time
dly mix
rev mix
156ms
50%
22%
time
fb
mix
539ms
18%
25%
db time
db balance
dry
50ms
58%
100%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
10%
30ms
49%
75%
hall
1.9s
0dB
1.0
100%
o
o
Utility
Settings
cho1
dly
connect
o
pitch
L delay
L delay
R delay
R delay
dry
o
dly+rev
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
cho-rev
foot controller
cho-
minimum volume
0
auto volume
5
noise gate
Utility
Settings
5
time
fb
time
fb
188ms
0%
28%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
25%
30ms
66%
100%
hall
0.4s
+6dB
0.1
100%
o
Utility
Settings
connect
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—
foot controller
rev-
minimum volume
0
noise gate
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
foot controller
cho-
minimum volume
0
5
3
value
1
–37dB
200%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
10
–18dB
146%
o
dist4
drive
tone
output
62%
+2
70%
X
od
drive
tone
output
1%
+9
95%
o
wah+eq
type
sense
center freq
range
touch fast
9
450Hz
12
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
+5dB
+2dB
+5dB
+10dB
fb
input
lo
lo freq
hi
hi freq
output
0%
100%
–13dB
125Hz
+15dB
5.6kHz
120%
speed
brilliance
depth
0.39Hz
–3dB
11%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
86%
180Hz
900Hz
1.4kHz
4.5kHz
1.8
1.2
70%
mix
amd
dry
61%
0%
39%
left
right
mix
+1200cent
+1200cent
33%
time
dly mix
rev mix
496ms
20%
10%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
6%
30ms
0%
80%
hall
1.9s
+1dB
0.2
90%
cho1
dly+rev
o
connect
cmp,dst,eq,rev,cho
group
—
foot controller
cho-
minimum volume
0
auto volume
pitch
L delay
L delay
R delay
R delay
dry
o
noise gate
cmp,dst,eq,rev,cho
—
■ 55: CHURCH
parameter
attack
sense
output
Utility
Settings
connect
group
8
comp
o
dly+rev
auto volume
o
X
cho1
5
noise gate
on=o/off=X
10ms
0%
10ms
0%
100%
time
dly mix
rev mix
auto volume
■ 54: MYSTRY
o
Utility
Settings
5
6
dly+rev
2ms
76%
0.1ms
99%
67%
time
dly mix
rev mix
348ms
39%
37%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
33%
36ms
45%
100%
hall
3.0s
–1dB
0.6
100%
connect
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—
foot controller
cho-rev
minimum volume
0
auto volume
noise gate
time
fb
time
fb
5
4
MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
137
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
■ 61: ERA 66
on=o/off=X
■ 62: TROWER
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
■ 63: BUSTER
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
o
comp
attack
sense
output
1
–22dB
200%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
1
–19dB
200%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
3
–15dB
158%
o
dist1
drive
tone
output
17%
0
33%
o
dist4
drive
tone
output
66%
+7
47%
o
od
drive
tone
output
37%
+16
30%
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
stack
–3dB
+6dB
36%
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
–7dB
+3dB
+6dB
+8dB
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
+8dB
–1dB
–3dB
+6dB
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
100%
280Hz
3.6kHz
70%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
90%
63Hz
630Hz
1.4kHz
3.2kHz
2.0
2.0
50%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
100%
125Hz
560Hz
2.0kHz
4.5kHz
2.3
2.0
100%
speed
fb
depth
0.81Hz
40%
40%
speed
fb
depth
6.18Hz
0%
9%
mix
L time
R time
dry
60%
3.0ms
6.0ms
40%
mix
L time
R time
dry
60%
3.0ms
6.0ms
40%
time
dly mix
rev mix
420ms
19%
19%
time
high
mix
0.3s
0.1
16%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
25%
30ms
66%
81%
hall
3.2s
+2dB
0.3
100%
type
low
dry
plate
0dB
100%
X
phaser
speed
fb
depth
5.10Hz
0%
16%
mix
dry
50%
50%
o
rev
time
high
mix
0.8s
0.2
39%
type
low
dry
hall
0dB
100%
Utility
Settings
connect
o
o
flanger
dly+rev
cmp,dst,eq,rev,cho
group
—
foot controller
cho-
minimum volume
0
auto volume
5
noise gate
4
Utility
Settings
o
Utility
Settings
value
cho0
group
—
auto volume
foot controller
cho-
minimum volume
0
noise gate
5
5
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
comp
attack
sense
output
1
–6dB
196%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
1
–20dB
134%
o
dist4
drive
tone
output
71%
+16
93%
X
dist3
drive
tone
output
93%
+7
27%
o
wah+eq
type
pedal
no parameter
2.2kHz
28
o
eq
center freq
range
low
l mid
h mid
high
+3dB
+5dB
+3dB
+8dB
fb
input
lo
lo freq
hi
hi freq
output
22%
26%
0dB
1.2kHz
0dB
800Hz
140%
speed
fb
depth
0.75Hz
72%
29%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
50%
220Hz
800Hz
1.2kHz
3.6kHz
1.1
1.4
100%
mix
dry
60%
40%
speed
fb
depth
0.60Hz
48%
61%
time
high
mix
1.4s
0.3
24%
mix
dry
61%
39%
type
low
dry
room
0dB
76%
time
high
mix
1.6s
0.8
14%
type
low
dry
room
0dB
86%
o
Utility
Settings
noise gate
138
phaser
rev
connect
cmp,eq,dst,rev,cho
group
—
foot controller
wah pedal
minimum volume
0
auto volume
5
4
o
o
Utility
Settings
phaser
rev
connect
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—
foot controller
eq-cho
minimum volume
0
auto volume
noise gate
MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
cmp,eq,dst,rev,cho
cmp,eq
minimum volume
X
X
connect
group
foot controller
■ 65: 70/90
parameter
rev
cmp,dst,eq,rev,cho
noise gate
on=o/off=X
flanger
connect
auto volume
■ 64: WOW
X
5
5
5
6
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
■ 71: TELE
on=o/off=X
■ 72: TURKEY
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
■ 73: RHYFAT
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
o
comp
attack
sense
output
3
–14dB
126%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
1
–6dB
172%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
11
–8dB
104%
X
dist3
drive
tone
output
36%
+10
17%
o
od
drive
tone
output
20%
0
50%
o
dist2
drive
tone
output
14%
+8
42%
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
+6dB
+4dB
+4dB
+10dB
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
+11dB
+5dB
–8dB
+10dB
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
stack
+7dB
–2dB
63%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
60%
125Hz
630Hz
1.0kHz
3.2kHz
2.0
2.0
90%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
100%
125Hz
560Hz
2.0kHz
4.5kHz
2.3
2.0
80%
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
100%
125Hz
800Hz
80%
left
right
mix
–10cent
+10cent
34%
speed
brilliance
depth
5.34Hz
+4dB
11%
X
pitch
L delay
L delay
R delay
R delay
dry
o
Utility
Settings
dly+rev
time
fb
time
fb
10ms
0%
10ms
0%
66%
time
dly mix
rev mix
164ms
20%
27%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
21%
30ms
0%
100%
hall
0.9s
0dB
0.2
100%
o
Utility
Settings
connect
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—
foot controller
eq-cho
minimum volume
0
auto volume
noise gate
X
cho2
dly+rev
mix
dry
60%
40%
o
rev
0.3s
1.0
7%
room
0dB
93%
45%
55%
time
dly mix
rev mix
156ms
16%
0%
type
low
dry
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
0%
50ms
83%
100%
hall
3.0s
0dB
0.5
100%
Utility
Settings
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—
foot controller
rev-
minimum volume
0
auto volume
connect
dst,cmp,eq,cho,rev
group
dst,cmp,eq
foot controller
rev-
minimum volume
0
auto volume
connect
noise gate
5
4
5
6
5
■ 75: LONDON
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
comp
attack
sense
output
1
–26dB
122%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
13
–26dB
178%
o
dist3
drive
tone
output
65%
+1
50%
o
dist2
drive
tone
output
0%
+16
50%
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
combo
+3dB
+1dB
15%
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
0dB
+1dB
+2dB
+5dB
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
100%
200Hz
2.8kHz
90%
speed
brilliance
depth
0.93Hz
–3dB
41%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
100%
125Hz
125Hz
5.0kHz
1.0kHz
1.0
1.5
120%
mix
amd
dry
61%
0%
39%
speed
brilliance
depth
0.45Hz
+6dB
37%
time
dly mix
rev mix
428ms
0%
5%
mix
dry
60%
40%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
14%
50ms
100%
100%
hall
2.4s
0dB
0.2
94%
time
high
mix
1.6s
0.4
33%
type
low
dry
hall
0dB
100%
cho1
dly+rev
X
o
connect
cmp,dst,eq,rev,cho
group
—
foot controller
cho-
minimum volume
0
auto volume
noise gate
1.14Hz
–3dB
18%
mix
dry
o
Utility
Settings
speed
brilliance
depth
3
on=o/off=X
o
cho2
time
high
mix
noise gate
■ 74: *TUSH*
X
X
Utility
Settings
cho2
rev
connect
cmp,eq,dst,cho,rev
group
—
foot controller
rev-
minimum volume
0
auto volume
noise gate
5
5
5
6
MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
139
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
■ 81: TRICK
■ 82: GHOSTS
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
■ 83: HORROR
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
o
comp
attack
sense
output
3
–38dB
56%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
14
–42dB
122%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
8
–25dB
200%
o
dist1
drive
tone
output
82%
+13
47%
o
dist4
drive
tone
output
87%
+5
30%
o
dist1
drive
tone
output
46%
+2
20%
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
+3dB
+2dB
+9dB
0dB
o
wah+eq
type
sense
center freq
range
touch slow
3
400Hz
12
o
wah+eq
type
speed
center freq
range
auto
0.4Hz
355Hz
2
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
100%
125Hz
560Hz
1.1kHz
2.5kHz
2.0
1.6
70%
fb
input
lo
lo freq
hi
hi freq
output
0%
60%
+15dB
125Hz
+14dB
3.6kHz
100%
fb
input
lo
lo freq
hi
hi freq
output
90%
100%
+10dB
180Hz
+3dB
3.2kHz
180%
speed
fb
depth
0.12Hz
100%
50%
speed
brilliance
depth
1.14Hz
–3dB
37%
speed
fb
depth
0.78Hz
71%
24%
mix
dry
25%
75%
mix
amd
dry
100%
0%
64%
mix
dry
100%
43%
time
dly mix
rev mix
512ms
46%
30%
time
dly mix
rev mix
392ms
100%
100%
time
dly mix
rev mix
512ms
100%
10%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
30%
50ms
50%
54%
hall
3.0s
0dB
0.5
70%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
15%
50ms
100%
35%
hall
10.0s
+5dB
0.5
0%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
30%
50ms
50%
43%
hall
1.6s
+4dB
0.5
100%
o
phaser
o
cho1
o
o
o
Utility
Settings
dly+rev
connect
o
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
Utility
Settings
dly+rev
connect
cmp,dst,eq,rev,cho
group
—
group
—
foot controller
cho-rev
foot controller
cho-
minimum volume
0
minimum volume
0
auto volume
5
auto volume
noise gate
0
■ 84: 5/11TH
on=o/off=X
noise gate
7
■ 85: OCTAVE
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
o
comp
attack
sense
output
8
–19dB
200%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
3
–24dB
184%
o
dist4
drive
tone
output
56%
+16
30%
X
dist1
drive
tone
output
50%
0
20%
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
–2dB
+8dB
+4dB
+10dB
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
combo
+5dB
+15dB
100%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
23%
800Hz
3.2kHz
8.0kHz
2.2kHz
1.3
2.0
200%
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
60%
630Hz
4.5kHz
70%
left
right
mix
–1200cent
+5cent
77%
left
right
mix
–500cent
+500cent
37%
o
pitch
L delay
L delay
R delay
R delay
dry
o
Utility
Settings
noise gate
dly
time
fb
time
fb
0.1ms
0%
0.1ms
0%
63%
time
fb
mix
623ms
15%
27%
db time
db balance
dry
50ms
50%
100%
o
L delay
L delay
R delay
R delay
dry
o
dly+rev
time
fb
time
fb
0.1ms
0%
10ms
0%
100%
time
dly mix
rev mix
240ms
25%
33%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
30%
50ms
60%
100%
plate
1.0s
+6dB
1.0
100%
connect
cmp,eq,dst,rev,cho
group
—
foot controller
rev mix
minimum volume
0
foot controller
cho-rev
auto volume
5
minimum volume
0
Utility
Settings
6
connect
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—
auto volume
noise gate
140
pitch
MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
5
5
dly+rev
connect
cmp,eq,dst,cho,rev
group
—
foot controller
cho-rev
minimum volume
0
auto volume
5
noise gate
Utility
Settings
phaser
5
9
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
■ 91: HARD-L
on=o/off=X
■ 92: LEAD-L
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
■ 93: META-L
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
o
comp
attack
sense
output
14
–17dB
40%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
7
–16dB
116%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
2
–25dB
98%
o
dist2
drive
tone
output
61%
+2
66%
o
dist3
drive
tone
output
77%
0
40%
o
dist4
drive
tone
output
81%
+3
36%
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
combo
–4dB
+5dB
100%
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
tube
+5dB
+8dB
100%
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
combo
–1dB
+2dB
100%
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
100%
125Hz
4.0kHz
100%
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
90%
140Hz
4.5kHz
50%
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
80%
280Hz
3.6kHz
60%
speed
fb
depth
1.23Hz
16%
25%
speed
fb
depth
1.26Hz
29%
100%
speed
brilliance
depth
0.48Hz
+1dB
49%
mix
L time
R time
dry
60%
3.0ms
6.0ms
40%
mix
L time
R time
dry
54%
3.1ms
4.5ms
46%
mix
amd
dry
78%
0%
50%
time
dly mix
rev mix
4ms
0%
22%
time
dly mix
rev mix
384ms
37%
22%
time
dly mix
rev mix
260ms
45%
23%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
20%
30ms
0%
100%
hall
2.6s
0dB
0.1
100%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
38%
32ms
22%
100%
hall
2.0s
–1dB
0.8
100%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
25%
30ms
49%
100%
hall
3.8s
0dB
0.4
100%
X
o
Utility
Settings
flanger
dly+rev
X
o
connect
dst,eq,cmp,cho,rev
group
—
foot controller
dly+rev
o
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—
cmp-cho
foot controller
cho-rev
minimum volume
0
minimum volume
0
auto volume
5
auto volume
5
3
noise gate
■ 94: COMP-L
on=o/off=X
5
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
connect
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—
foot controller
rev-
minimum volume
0
1
6
value
12
–31dB
168%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
2
–17dB
120%
X
od
drive
tone
output
4%
+11
88%
X
dist1
drive
tone
output
55%
–2
17%
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
+4dB
+3dB
+2dB
+12dB
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
combo
–3dB
+10dB
100%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
94%
180Hz
560Hz
1.0kHz
4.5kHz
1.4
1.7
100%
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
70%
200Hz
2.8kHz
70%
speed
brilliance
depth
1.44Hz
0dB
47%
left
right
mix
–10cent
+5cent
47%
mix
amd
dry
100%
0%
64%
time
dly mix
rev mix
300ms
4%
19%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
14%
30ms
50%
96%
hall
1.9s
+1dB
0.3
100%
pitch
L delay
L delay
R delay
R delay
dry
noise gate
dly+rev
■ 95: CLN -L
parameter
attack
sense
output
Utility
Settings
cho1
auto volume
comp
o
Utility
Settings
noise gate
o
o
o
connect
noise gate
Utility
Settings
flanger
rev
time
fb
time
fb
0.1ms
10%
0.1ms
0%
100%
time
high
mix
1.4s
0.7
19%
type
low
dry
plate
–1dB
100%
o
o
dly+rev
connect
cmp,dst,eq,rev,cho
group
—
eq-cho
foot controller
cho-
0
minimum volume
0
5
auto volume
connect
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—
foot controller
minimum volume
auto volume
5
Utility
Settings
cho1
noise gate
5
7
MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
141
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
■ 01: BACK-L
on=o/off=X
■ 02: NECK-L
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
■ 03: OLD -L
parameter
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
o
comp
attack
sense
output
11
–21dB
158%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
5
–28dB
102%
X
comp
attack
sense
output
3
–10dB
100%
o
dist3
drive
tone
output
78%
+6
62%
o
dist1
drive
tone
output
36%
+1
26%
o
od
drive
tone
output
68%
+5
35%
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
stack
+6dB
+4dB
85%
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
combo
+7dB
+15dB
100%
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
combo
+3dB
+5dB
80%
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
92%
200Hz
3.6kHz
48%
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
100%
200Hz
4.5kHz
56%
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
80%
125Hz
3.2kHz
70%
left
right
mix
–10cent
+15cent
55%
left
right
mix
–10cent
+5cent
37%
left
right
mix
+5cent
+10cent
59%
X
pitch
L delay
L delay
R delay
R delay
dry
o
Utility
Settings
rev
time
fb
time
fb
pitch
0.1ms
7%
0.1ms
0%
45%
time
high
mix
2.2s
0.6
18%
type
low
dry
hall
+2dB
82%
L delay
L delay
R delay
R delay
dry
o
connect
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—
foot controller
cho-rev
minimum volume
0
auto volume
5
noise gate
X
Utility
Settings
6
dly+rev
time
fb
time
fb
4ms
0%
10%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
14%
30ms
0%
100%
room
1.0s
–2dB
0.4
100%
group
—
foot controller
cho-
minimum volume
0
noise gate
■ 04: PHAS-L
on=o/off=X
value
on=o/off=X
parameter
value
14
–16dB
46%
o
comp
attack
sense
output
1
–20dB
200%
o
od
drive
tone
output
72%
+4
65%
X
dist4
drive
tone
output
22%
–4
42%
o
amp+eq
type
low
high
mix
combo
+3dB
+4dB
40%
o
eq
low
l mid
h mid
high
+1dB
+2dB
+8dB
+9dB
input
lo freq
hi freq
output
100%
200Hz
4.0kHz
88%
speed
fb
depth
0.66Hz
0%
25%
input
lo freq
lo mid freq
hi mid freq
hi freq
lo mid q
hi mid q
output
60%
70Hz
630Hz
1.0kHz
3.2kHz
2.0
2.0
50%
mix
dry
90%
90%
time
dly mix
rev mix
512ms
5%
12%
speed
brilliance
depth
0.42Hz
–1dB
30%
mix
dry
75%
50%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
21%
30ms
0%
95%
hall
2.0s
0dB
0.2
100%
time
dly mix
rev mix
408ms
11%
49%
dly fb
db time
db balance
dly dry
rev type
rev time
rev low
rev high
rev dry
14%
30ms
0%
100%
hall
2.8s
–3dB
0.8
100%
noise gate
phaser
dly+rev
connect
dst,eq,cmp,cho,rev
group
cmp,dst,eq
foot controller
dst drive
minimum volume
0
auto volume
o
o
Utility
Settings
cho2
dly+rev
connect
cmp,dst,eq,rev,cho
group
—
5
foot controller
cho-
5
minimum volume
0
auto volume
noise gate
142
MEMORY EFFECT PARAMETER LIST
5
7
rev
time
fb
time
fb
0.1ms
0%
0.1ms
0%
100%
time
high
mix
0.8s
0.4
30%
type
low
dry
room
+2dB
100%
connect
cmp,dst,eq,cho,rev
group
—
foot controller
dst drive
minimum volume
0
auto volume
noise gate
■ 05: JAZZ-L
parameter
attack
sense
output
Utility
Settings
Utility
Settings
5
comp
o
o
7
o
o
L delay
L delay
R delay
R delay
dry
cmp,dst,eq,rev,cho
auto volume
pitch
0.1ms
0%
0.1ms
0%
63%
time
dly mix
rev mix
connect
o
5
5
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
MANUAL EFFECT FACTORY SET PARAMETER CHART
MANUAL EFFECT FACTORY SET PARAMETER CHART
on=●/off=× Effect Type
Parameter
Value
×
Comp
Attack
Sense
Output
*
×
Dist 1~4, Od
Drive
Tone
Output
*
×
Equalizer
Low Gain
Low Middle Gain
High Middle Gain
High Gain
*
Input
Low Frequency
Low Mid Frequency
High Mid Frequency
High Frequency
Low Mid Q
High Mid Q
Output
100%
140Hz
700Hz
1.2kHz
3.6kHz
2.0
2.0
100%
Type
Sense or Speed
Center Frequency
Range
*
Feedback
Input
Low Gain
Low Frequency
High Gain
High Frequency
Output
0%
100%
0dB
125kHz
0dB
3.6kHz
100%
Wah+EQ
Amp Simulator+ Type
EQ
Low Gain
High Gain
Mix
×
Chorus1
Chorus2
Pitch Shifter
on=●/off=× Effect Type
Flanger
Phaser
×
Reverb
Delay (Tap)
Delay+Reverb
*
Input
Low Frequency
High Frequency
Output
100%
200%
3.6kHz
100%
Speed
Brilliance
Depth
*
Mix
AMD
Dry
75%
0%
50%
Speed
Brilliance
Depth
*
Mix
Dry
75%
50%
Pitch L
Pitch R
Mix
*
L Delay Time
L Delay FB
R Delay Time
R Delay FB
Dry
0.1ms
0%
0.1ms
0%
100%
Utility
Settings
Parameter
Value
Speed
Feedback
Depth
*
Mix
L Delay Time
R Delay Time
Dry
75%
3ms
6ms
50%
Speed
Feedback
Depth
*
Mix
Dry
75%
50%
Time
High
Mix
*
Reverb Type
Low Gain
Dry
Hall
0dB
100%
Time
Feedback
Mix
*
Doubling Time
Doubling Balance
Dry
50ms
55%
100%
Delay Time
Delay Mix
Reverb Mix
*
Delay Feedback
Doubling Time
Doubling/Dry Balance
Delay Dry
Reverb Type
Reverb Time
Reverb Low Gain
Reverb High
Reverb Dry
25%
50%
55%
100%
Hall
2.6sec
0dB
0.5
100%
Connect
cmp, dst, eq, cho, rev
Group
—
Foot Controller
cho-rev
Minimum Volume
0
Auto Volume
5
Noise Gate
Factory Set Values for Other Functions
Foot Switch
3
ASSIGNABLE Type switch
Pitch
440Hz
Chord
C, Am, F, G
Control Change
91~95
* Main parameter settings depend on the parameter knob position.
Note: The sub parameter values here are default settings
that are automatically called up in the Memory Edit
mode when the effect type is changed. Main parameters, however, remain the same (or proportionally the
same, if different ranges exist for different types).
MANUAL EFFECT FACTORY SET PARAMETER CHART
143
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
PRESET PATTERN LIST
PRESET PATTERN LIST
Note: The Drums part data is transmitted over MIDI channel 5. For a list of the specific drum and
percussion sounds used in the
Drums part, see page 146.
Instrument
Category
Rock/Pop
Hard Rock
Rock’n’Roll
Ballad
Funk
Dance
144
Pattern No. Name
Type
Tempo
Meas
Style
Accomp1 (MIDI Ch. 2)Accomp2 (MIDI Ch. 3)Bass (MIDI Ch. 4)
1~4
RP1
8-beat
120
2
Popular
Piano
Muted Guitar
Fingered Bass
5~8
RP2
8-beat
146
2
Soul pop
Muted Guitar
Organ 2
Fingered Bass
9~12
RP3
8-beat
120
2
Hard rock pop
Strings Ensemble
Distortion Guitar
Fingered Bass
13~16
RP4
8-beat
200
2
Fast pop
Piano
Electric Guitar
Fingered Bass
17~20
RP5
8-beat
116
2
Slow Euro
Piano
Muted Guitar
Fingered Bass
21~24
RP6
16-beat
130
2
16-beat pop
Piano
Electric Guitar
Fingered Bass
25~28
RP7
8-beat shuffle 150
2
Shuffle rock pop
Piano
Distortion Guitar
Fingered Bass
29~32
RP8
8-beat shuffle 110
2
Old shuffle
Folk Guitar
Electric Guitar
Fingered Bass
33~36
RP9
16-beat shuffle
2
Dance pop
Piano
Clavi
Fingered Bass
37~40
HR1
8-beat
4
Fast rock boogie
Piano
Distortion Guitar
Picked Bass
92
136
41~44
HR2
8-beat
118
2
Slow rock boogie
Piano
Distortion Guitar
Fingered Bass
45~48
HR3
8-beat
100
2
Slow modern
Distortion Guitar
Synth Brass
Fingered Bass
49~52
HR4
8-beat
160
2
Hard rock
Distortion Guitar
Distortion Guitar
Fingered Bass
53~56
HR5
8-beat
118
4
Hard psychedelic
Electric Guitar
Distortion Guitar
Fingered Bass
57~60
HR6
16-beat
100
2
Heavy metal
Distortion Guitar
Distortion Guitar
Fingered Bass
61~64
HR7
16-beat
160
4
Fast 16-beat
Distortion Guitar
Synth Brass
Fingered Bass
65~68
HR8
8-beat shuffle 140
2
Mid tempo shuffle
Distortion Guitar
Clavi
Fingered Bass
69~72
HR9
8-beat shuffle 194
2
Fast shuffle
Electric Guitar
Distortion Guitar
Fingered Bass
73~76
RR1
8-beat
158
2
50s rock’n’roll
Muted Guitar
Organ 2
Fingered Bass
77~80
RR2
8-beat shuffle 155
4
Boogie woogie
Electric Guitar
Piano
Fingered Bass
81~84
RR3
8-beat shuffle 126
2
Modern
Synth Brass
Muted Guitar
Synth Bass 1
85~88
RR4
8-beat shuffle 146
2
with brass section
Piano
Brass Ensemble
Fingered Bass
89~92
BA1
8-beat
80
4
Popular
Piano
Strings Ensemble
Fingered Bass
93~96
BA2
8-beat
80
2
Basic
Electric Piano 2
Strings Ensemble
Fingered Bass
97~100
BA3
16-beat
90
4
Basic funk
Piano
Electric Piano 1
Slap Bass
101~104 BA4
16-beat
84
2
Funk
Clavi
Muted Guitar
Slap Bass
105~108 BA5
8-beat shuffle
66
2
8-beat shuffle
Folk Guitar
Piano
Fingered Bass
109~112 BA6
16-beat shuffle
4
Euro shuffle
Piano
Muted Guitar
Fingered Bass
113~116 BA7
16-beat shuffle
96
2
Popular shuffle
Strings Ensemble
Folk Guitar
Fingered Bass
117~120 BA8
16-beat shuffle
88
4
Funk shuffle
Muted Guitar
Electric Piano 1
Synth Bass 1
86
121~124 BA9
6/4 time
100
2
Gospel
Organ 1
Electric Piano 1
Fingered Bass
125~128 FU1
16-beat
128
4
Late ’70s
Organ 2
Clavi
Fingered Bass
129~132 FU2
16-beat
108
4
Early ’70s
Organ 2
Clavi
Fingered Bass
133~136 FU3
16-beat
100
2
Modern
Clavi
Electric Piano 1
Slap Bass
137~140 DA1
16-beat
120
4
Rock dance
Synth Comp
Electric Guitar
Synth Bass 2
141~144 DA2
16-beat
120
4
Disco
Electric Piano 1
Strings Ensemble
Fingered Bass
145~148 DA3
16-beat
120
149~152 DA4
16-beat shuffle
PRESET PATTERN LIST
90
2
Euro house
Piano
Synth Bass 2
Synth Lead
2
Slow Euro
Piano
Muted Guitar
Fingered Bass
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
PRESET PATTERN LIST
Preset Pattern List (cont.)
Instrument
Category
Rhythm & Blues
Jazz Contemporary
Jazz Traditional
Latin
Reggae
World
For Retrigger*
Pattern No. Name
Type
Tempo
Meas
Style
Accomp1 (MIDI Ch. 2)Accomp2 (MIDI Ch. 3)Bass (MIDI Ch. 4)
153~156 RB1
8-beat
126
2
with organ
Organ 2
Muted Guitar
Fingered Bass
157~160 RB2
8-beat
120
2
Basic
Electric Piano 1
Electric Guitar
Slap Bass
161~164 RB3
8-beat
192
4
Old
Piano
Electric Guitar
Fingered Bass
165~168 RB4
8-beat
122
2
Slow soul
Electric Piano 1
Muted Guitar
Slap Bass
169~172 RB5
16-beat
140
2
Soul with brass
Piano
Brass Ensemble
Fingered Bass
173~176 RB6
8-beat shuffle 132
4
Blues
Organ 1
Distortion Guitar
Fingered Bass
177~180 RB7
8-beat shuffle 180
2
Detroit soul
Electric Piano 1
Electric Guitar
Slap Bass
181~184 RB8
12-beat
93
2
Blues with triplet feel
Piano
Electric Guitar
Fingered Bass
185~188 JC1
16-beat
108
2
Pop fusion
Electric Piano 2
Fingered Bass
Fingered Bass
189~192 JC2
16-beat
104
2
Latin fusion
Piano
Marimba
Fingered Bass
193~196 JC3
16-beat
100
2
West coast
Electric Piano 1
Vibes
Fingered Bass
197~200 JT1
8-beat shuffle 250
3
Bebop
—
Piano
Fingered Bass
201~204 JT2
8-beat shuffle
80
3
Jazz ballad
Vibes
Piano
Fingered Bass
205~208 JT3
8-beat shuffle 126
3
Swing
Muted Guitar
Piano
Fingered Bass
209~212 JT4
3/4 time
200
4
Jazz waltz
—
Piano
Fingered Bass
213~216 LA1
8-beat
146
2
Bossa nova
Folk Guitar
Electric Piano 1
Fingered Bass
217~220 LA2
8-beat
126
2
Rock cha cha
Organ 1
Organ 2
Fingered Bass
221~224 LA3
16-beat
116
4
Salsa
Folk Guitar
Brass Ensemble
Fingered Bass
90
225~228 RE1
16-beat
229~232 RE2
16-beat shuffle
233~236 WO1
2-beat
237~240 WO2
3/4 time
4
Modern with strings Piano
Strings Ensemble
Fingered Bass
4
Basic
Organ 1
Piano
Fingered Bass
128
2
Polka
Folk Guitar
Brass Ensemble
Fingered Bass
104
4
New age ethnic
Synth Bell
Marimba
Fingered Bass
78
241
RT8
8-beat
116
2
Piano
—
Fingered Bass
242
RT8S
8-beat shuffle 146
2
Piano
—
Fingered Bass
243
RT16
16-beat
244
RT16S
16-beat shuffle
245
END
—
246
METRO 4/4 time
247
MET 3
248
BLANK
3/4 time
100
2
Electric Piano 1
—
Fingered Bass
4
Piano
—
Fingered Bass
100
1
the currently sounding voice(s)
120
1
86
100
1
100
1
* The Retrigger function lets you record rhythmic “hits” in which some of the Backing parts sound
altogether, to create accents in
a song. Special Retrigger patterns (nos. 241–244) are provided for this purpose, letting you enter the
retrigger “hits” by entering a chord event at the desired 16th note position. However, the Retrigger
function can be used with any of the other patterns by entering a chord event while a note of the pattern
data is playing (in other words, not during a rest).
PRESET PATTERN LIST
145
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION DRUM AND PERCUSSION SOUNDS USED FOR DRUMS PARTS
DRUM AND PERCUSSION SOUNDS USED FOR DRUMS PARTS
This chart lists the instrument sounds used for
the Drums parts in the Backing section, along with
their assigned note values (given here both in
conventional form and MIDI note number). Drums
part data is transmitted over MIDI channel 5.
Note name
C1
C1
D1
D1
MIDI Note
36
Instrument
Bass drum 1
37 Bass drum 2
38
Snare drum 1
39 Snare drum 2
E1
40
Tom low
F1
41
Tom mid
F1
G1
G1
A
A1
42 Tom high
43
Handclaps
44 Crash cymbal
45
Rimshot
46 Ride cymbal
B1
47
Closed hi-hat
C2
48
Open hi-hat
C3
60
Bass drum 3
C3
D3
D3
61 Cowbell
62
Snare drum 3
63 Snare drum 4
E3
64
Conga low
F3
65
Conga high
F3
G3
G3
A3
A3
66 Conga muted
67
Agogo low
68 Agogo high
69
Timbale low
70 Timbale high
B3
71
Hi-hat 2
C4
72
Shaker
146
DRUM AND PERCUSSION SOUNDS USED FOR DRUMS PARTS
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
FACTORY SET SONG LIST
FACTORY SET SONG LIST
Song
number
Song
name
Beat
Tempo
Length
(in measures)
1
BOOGIE
4/4
150
54
Two-part medley: old-style boogie and hard rock version
2
FUNK
4/4
119
20
Funk motif
3
REGGAE
4/4
78
16
Reggae motif
4
BALLAD
4/4
72
16
Slow ballad motif
5
BOSSA
4/4
131
16
Bossa nova motif
6
R*B
4/4
136
24
Funky R&B motif
7
4MEAS
4/4
120
60
Special four-measure chord progressions/patterns for practice purposes
8
Description
No recorded data (left blank for user recording)
All songs also have their own effect program setting (or settings) specially chosen to match the style,
allowing you to play your guitar along with the song.
Song #7 features several four-measure phrases in different styles, each preceded by a one-bar metronome
introduction. These phrases are intended especially for practice purposes. Each phrase has been recorded
with a different chord progression, and the phrases increase in difficulty, with easy progressions in the first
phrases and more difficult ones in the latter. Use the Repeat A-B function to repeat a single phrase indefinitely while you practice a guitar part over it. These phrases (as well as the other six songs) also should
provide helpful hints as to how to use the Backing section of the GW50 in your own compositions.
FACTORY SET SONG LIST
147
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
MIDI SPECIFICATIONS
MIDI SPECIFICATIONS
EFFECT AND BACKING MODES
■ Data Reception/Transmission
(Received Data)
sw1
MIDI IN
$B0 (Control change)
$C0 (Program change)
$F0 43 00 7A bb bb LM_ _0091MS (Manual effect bulk)
$F0 43 00 7A bb bb LM_ _0091OM (Memory effect bulk)
$F0 43 00 7A bb bb LM_ _0091MA (All memory effect bulk)
$F0 43 00 7A bb bb LM_ _0091OS (Song bulk)
$F0 43 00 7A bb bb LM_ _0091SA (All song bulk)
$F0 43 00 7A bb bb LM_ _0091SY (System setup bulk)
$F0 43 00 7A bb bb LM_ _0091SS (Song setup bulk)
sw1: Selects control numbers 91~95 or 116~120 for Effect on/off.
(Transmitted Data)
$9n (Note on/off)
$C0 (Program change)
$F8 (MIDI clock)
$FA (Start)
$FB (Continue)
$FC (Stop)
$FE (Active sensing)
$F0 43 00 7A bb bb LM_
$F0 43 00 7A bb bb LM_
$F0 43 00 7A bb bb LM_
$F0 43 00 7A bb bb LM_
$F0 43 00 7A bb bb LM_
$F0 43 00 7A bb bb LM_
$F0 43 00 7A bb bb LM_
(over each channel)
l
MIDI OUT
Memory number
Program Change Data
$C0 xx
11~15
00~04
21~25
05~09
31~35
10~14
41~45
15~19
51~55
20~24
61~65
25~29
71~75
30~34
81~85
35~39
91~95
40~44
01~05
45~49
■ Received Channel Messages
_0091MS (Manual effect bulk)
_0091OM (Memory effect bulk)
_0091MA (All memory effect bulk)
_0091OS (Song bulk)
_0091SA (All song bulk)
_0091SY (System setup bulk)
_0091SS (Song setup bulk)
■ Transmitted Channel Messages
Note On/Off
Note on/off messages are transmitted only when Backing patterns (or songs) are played back or when notes are played by
using the Position Controls.
Transmitted note range
:
Transmitted velocity range :
Note off
:
0~127
1~127
Velocity 0
Control Change
Control change messages are not transmitted.
Program Change
Program change messages are transmitted when an effect program is selected in the Memory mode and when effect
148
program change events are played back in Song play. (However, the GW50’s internal effect program does not change if
the Job or Edit mode of the Effect section is currently selected.) The transmit channel is fixed at 1.
The program change number assignments are shown in the
following chart:
MIDI SPECIFICATIONS
Note On/Off
Note on/off messages are not received.
Control Change
Switch individual effect blocks on/off by using the control
change numbers shown below.
The corresponding effect is alternately switched on and off
each time an appropriate control change message is received.
The receive channel is fixed at 1, and the control value is
fixed at 0.
Control Change Data
$B0 xxx $0
Compressor on/off
92 (116)
Distortion on/off
94 (117)
Equalizer Section on/off
95 (118)
Chorus Section on/off
93 (119)
Reverb Section on/off
91 (120)
One of two different sets of control change numbers can be
used: 91~95, or 116~120. The set of numbers used is part of
the system setup data, and the setting is maintained even
when the power is turned off.
The default factory setting is 91~95.
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
Program Change
Program change messages can be received only when the
Effect section is in Memory mode and Manual mode.
The program change number correspondence for receiving is
the same as that for transmission. The MIDI receive channel
is also set to 1.
System Realtime Messages
Status bytes: F8, FA, FB, FC
These are transmitted, but not received.
Status bytes: F9, FD, FF
These are neither transmitted nor received.
Status byte: FE (Active sensing)
This is transmitted, but not received.
BULK DUMP
Reception of bulk dump data is possible in all but the following conditions:
* Demo mode
* Tuner mode
* MIDI Bulk Transmission mode
* While Backing section parts are being played
* During recording and editing in the Backing section
* During editing of effects
Transmission of bulk dump data is executed in the MIDI
Bulk Transmission mode; when “ALL” is selected, data is
transmitted in the following order: Manual effect, all Memory
effect programs, all songs and System setup.
When data is divided into several blocks before transmission,
there is an interval of 100 ms between transmission of each
block.
MIDI SPECIFICATIONS
Current Memory Effect Program Data Bulk Dump
◆ Refer to “EFFECT PARAMETER CHART” on page 130
for details on the data contents.
All Memory Effect Program Data Bulk Dump
When transmitting all Memory effect program data, transmission starts from Memory bank 1 and ends with bank 0.
The data is divided into ten blocks before transmission (one
memory bank equalling one block), with data from the byte
count to check sum treated as a single block.
Current Song Data Bulk Dump
Song data is output by converting one byte into two bytes of
ASCII.
When the amount of data is beyond 512 bytes, the data is
divided into several blocks before transmission, with data
from the byte count to check sum treated as a single block.
Song setup bulk data is always transmitted after transmission
of the bulk data of a single song.
All Song Data Bulk Dump
Song setup data for song 1~8 is transmitted in the first block,
and the actual song data is transmitted starting with the second block.
Song data is output by converting one byte into two bytes of
ASCII.
When the amount of song data is beyond 512 bytes, the data
is divided into several blocks before transmission, with data
from the byte count to check sum treated as a single block.
Song Setup Data Bulk Dump
Song setup bulk data is always transmitted after transmission
of the bulk data of a single song.
◆ Refer to Chart 1 below for details on the data format.
Manual Effect Data Bulk Dump
◆ Refer to “EFFECT PARAMETER CHART” on page 130
for details on the data contents.
The main parameter settings (made with the parameter
knobs) are not transmitted or received.
System Setup Data Bulk Dump
◆ Refer to Chart 2 below for details on the data format.
Chart 1
Chart 2
~
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
11
DATA RANGE
set a measure
0~298
set b measure
0~298
a-b repeat
tempo
song name
0,1(repeat)
30~250
(Space) ,0~9,A~Z,*,+,-,/
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
DATA NAME
DATA RANGE
effect mode
backing mode
effect memory bank
effect memory number
pattern number
song number
tuner pitch
assignable foot type
recall chord
0(manual), 1(memory)
0(pattern), 1(song)
0~9
0~4
0~247
0~7
0~5
0~4
0~255
external foot assign
control change select switch
16~255
0(91~95),1(116~120)
~
DATA NAME
19
20
21
MIDI SPECIFICATIONS
149
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
150
CHART OF CHORD FINGERINGS FOR GUITAR
CHART OF CHORD FINGERINGS FOR GUITAR
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
CHART OF CHORD FINGERINGS FOR GUITAR
MIDI IMPLENTATION CHART — BACKING PART
CHART OF CHORD FINGERINGS FOR GUITAR
151
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
CHART OF CHORD FINGERINGS FOR GUITAR
CHART OF CHORD FINGERINGS FOR GUITAR
This chart shows the fingerings for the 25 different chord types in the key of C. Three different positions
are given for each chord. An “×” indicates that the corresponding string is not part of the chord and
should not be played. An “o” indicates that the corresponding string is an open string and is part of the
chord; an “(o)” indicates that the open string is optional. The stars (“✩”) on the right side of the chart
indicate the strings corresponding to the root note. Use of the thumb is indicated by the letter “T,” and
the number at the bottom of each diagram indicates the position on the fretboard.
MAJOR TRIAD
C
MINOR SEVENTH ELEVENTH
G
E
C
3
Cm7-11
3
8
MINOR
Cm
G
E
C
3
C7-9
10
8
B
G
E
C
3
C7SUS4
3
8
B
G
E
C
3
8
CmM7
10
B
G
E
C
3
10
8
B
G
E
C
3
10
3
B
G
E
C
3
10
8
D
B
G
E
C
3
7
D
B
G
E
C
3
8
8
8
10
B
G
E
C
3
8
10
F
B
(G)
E
C
1
8
A
G
E
C
3
10
10
C6
C7-13
A
B
(G)
E
C
8
3
3
F
D
C
3, 6
9, 12
5
8
Cm7-5
B
G
E
C
3
A
B
G
E
C
1
10
8
THIRTEENTH
D
B
G
E
C
3
8
C13
T
8
G
F
C
8
3
SIXTH NINTH
C
(9)
6
8
3
10
MINOR SIXTH
Cm6
3
MINOR SEVENTH FLATTED FIFTH
SUSPENDED FOURTH
Csus4
C7+11
Cdim
10
MAJOR NINTH
CM9
B
G
F
C
DIMINISHED
MINOR NINTH
Cm9
3
SEVENTH FLATTED THIRTEENTH
NINTH
C9
10
3
SIXTH
MINOR ADDED NINTH
Cm add9
D
B
G
E
C
SEVENTH SHARP ELEVENTH
MAJOR ADDED NINTH
CMadd9
10
MINOR MAJOR SEVENTH
MAJOR SEVENTH
CM7
8
SEVENTH SUSPENDED FOURTH
MINOR SEVENTH
Cm7
3
SEVENTH FLATTED NINTH
SEVENTH
C7
F
B
G
E
C
D
A
G
E
C
3
10
8
AUGMENTED
A
G
E
C
3
5
Caug
8
SEVENTH SHARP NINTH
C7+9
D
B
G
E
C
152
CHART OF CHORD FINGERINGS FOR GUITAR
3
10
8
G
E
C
3, 7
11
3
11 7
5
13 9
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
USE OF ADVANCED RECORDING TECHNIQUES – FACTORY SET SONG 1
USE OF ADVANCED RECORDING TECHNIQUES – FACTORY SET SONG 1
The demo songs take full advantage of the sophisticated accompaniment and recording features of the GW50. We
recommend that you listen closely to the songs and “browse” through the recorded data to pick up helpful pointers on
how you can effectively use these features in your own recordings.
To get you started, some of details of the recording of Song 1 are shown below, illustrating in particular the use of the
Mute, bass note and Retrigger functions. Try some of these techniques in your own recordings, and you’ll soon see how
powerful the accompaniment and recording features of the GW50 can be.
Using Mute to Build Up Instrumental Layers
In this passage from the beginning of Song 1, the instrument sounds are built up in layers, with only the drums playing
in measure 1, the bass coming in at measure 2, and finally the accompaniment starting at the top of the second chorus
at measure 13.
The drums are briefly muted here for three 16th notes,
before coming in again at beat 2.
Using Mute to Create Custom Accompaniment
Although the accompaniment has been designed to best
suit the various patterns of the GW50, you may want to
change the accompaniment slightly to fit your music.
Since the mute status of the accompaniment, bass or
drums can be changed every 16th note, you have a lot
of flexibility in customizing the pre-programmed accompaniment. In this example from measure 22, the accompaniment is muted for one 16th note, effectively cutting
off the brass sound from beat 2.
USE OF ADVANCED RECORDING TECHNIQUES – FACTORY SET SONG 1
153
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION USE OF ADVANCED RECORDING TECHNIQUES – FACTORY SET SONG 1
Using Mute to Interrupt Sustained Sounds
In a variation of the above technique, you can also use mute to break up sustained sounds in the accompaniment, such
as strings or a held bass note. However, this cannot be done by mute events alone; even with an accompaniment mute
event following a chord event, the sustained sound continues to be heard. To get around this, insert a “dummy” chord
event AT or AFTER the mute event. In this way, the sustained sound will be muted from the point of the “dummy” event.
As shown in the example below from measure 53, the
mute event At or is entered at the second 16th note and
the “dummy” chord event (A7+9/Fs ) is entered after it,
at the third 16th note. As a result, the sustained accompaniment note is muted from the third 16th note. In this
example, however, the mute event can be entered
together with the “dummy” chord event at the third 16th
note and the result would still be the same.
s
This effectively interrupts the normally held accompaniment sound by two 8th note rests. The sustained sound
is brought back in again by un-muting the accompaniment at the third 16th note in beat 2.
154
USE OF ADVANCED RECORDING TECHNIQUES – FACTORY SET SONG 1
“Dummy” chord; sustained
sound is muted from this point.
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
USE OF ADVANCED RECORDING TECHNIQUES – FACTORY SET SONG 1
Creating a Custom Bass Line
Since the GW50 allows you to enter different bass notes at each 16th note in a measure, you can create your own
custom bass line. In this example from measures 4 and 5, a custom bass line is played under a constant A7 chord.
s
s
s
Using Retrigger for Rhythmic Accents
With Retrigger, you can record rhythmic “hits” or accents at any 16th note point of a measure. Although special
Retrigger patterns (nos. 241 - 244) are provided for this, you can also enter retrigger accents by simply putting in
additional chord events over the pattern currently playing. This would come in handy, for example, if you want to put
accents in just the first half of a measure and let the rhythm continue normally for the last half. However, there is a
restriction on using normal patterns for retrigger purposes: the retrigger points must come during sustained sounds in the
bass or accompaniment.
In this example from measure 53, four chord events (each with a different bass note) have been entered over a sustained bass sound, providing 8th note accents in the first two beats.
s
s
s
s
USE OF ADVANCED RECORDING TECHNIQUES – FACTORY SET SONG 1
155
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION
DEMO SONGS 1-6 – CHORD CHARTS
DEMO SONGS 1-6 – CHORD CHARTS
The following charts show the chord progressions used in the six demonstration songs.
156
DEMO SONGS 1-6 – CHORD CHARTS
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