DigiDesign Bomb Factory Plug-ins Specifications

Bomb Factory Plug-ins
Version 8.0
Legal Notices
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“bombfactory,” “Bomb Factory,” BF76, BF2A, BF3A, “Digital
Done Right,” “Classic Compressors,” “BF Essentials,”
“Fairchild,” “Cosmonaut Voice,” “Plutonium Pack,” “Slightly
Rude Compressor,” and “Tel-Ray” are trademarks of
Digidesign, a division of Avid Technology, Inc.
“JOEMEEK” trademarks owned by PMI Audio LTD, used under
license.
“Moogerfooger” trademarks owned by Moog Music, Inc., used
under license.
“SansAmp” and “SansAmp PSA-1” trademarks owned by Tech
21, Inc., used under license.
“Voce” trademarks owned by Amels and Alonso Electronic
Design, used under license.
“Funk Logic” and “Mastererizer” trademarks owned by Derek
Choice dba Funk Logic, used under license.
“Purple Audio” and “MC-77” trademarks owned by Purple
Audio, used under license.
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Guide Part Number 9329-59270-00 REV A 11/08
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contents
Chapter 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Contents of the Boxed Version of Your Plug-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Registering Your Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
System Requirements and Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Using Bomb Factory Plug-ins with Pro Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Using Bomb Factory Plug-ins with VENUE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Conventions Used in This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
About www.digidesign.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Chapter 2. Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Installing Plug-ins for Pro Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Installing Plug-ins for VENUE Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Authorizing Plug-ins. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Uninstalling Plug-ins for Pro Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Uninstalling Plug-ins for VENUE Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Chapter 3. BF Essentials Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
BF Essential Clip Remover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
BF Essential Correlation Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
BF Essential Meter Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
BF Essential Noise Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Contents
iv
Chapter 4. Bomb Factory BF76 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Chapter 5. Bomb Factory BF-3A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Chapter 6. Bomb Factory BF-2A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Chapter 7. Cosmonaut Voice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Chapter 8. Fairchild Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Fairchild 660 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Fairchild 670 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Chapter 9. JOEMEEK Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
JOEMEEK VC5 Meequalizer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
JOEMEEK SC2 Compressor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Chapter 10. Moogerfooger Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Moogerfooger Analog Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Moogerfooger Ring Modulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Moogerfooger 12-Stage Phaser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Moogerfooger Low-Pass Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Chapter 11. Pultec Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Pultec EQP-1A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Pultec EQH-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Pultec MEQ-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Chapter 12. Purple Audio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Chapter 13. SansAmp PSA-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
PSA-1 Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Tips and Tricks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
v
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
Chapter 14. Slightly Rude Compressor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Chapter 15. Tel-Ray Variable Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Chapter 16. Voce Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Voce Chorus/Vibrato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Voce Spin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Appendix A. DSP Requirements for TDM Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
HD Accel Card. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
HD Core and Process Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Appendix B. DSP Delays Incurred by TDM Plug-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Appendix C. All About Compressors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
What Is Compression? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Contents
vi
chapter 1
Introduction
Welcome to the Bomb Factory® plug-ins for
Pro Tools|HD®, Pro Tools LE®, Pro Tools
M-Powered™ and VENUE systems, brought to
you by Digidesign®.
Paid Bomb Factory Plug-ins
The following plug-ins are also available:
• Bomb Factory BF-3A
• Bomb Factory BF-2A
References to Pro Tools LE in this guide are
usually interchangeable with Pro Tools MPowered, except as noted in the Pro Tools
M-Powered Setup Guide.
• Cosmonaut Voice
• Fairchild 660 and 670
• JOEMEEK SC2 Compressor
• JOEMEEK VC5 Meequalizer
Digidesign Bomb Factory plug-ins include the
following:
• Moogerfooger Analog Delay
Free Bomb Factory Plug-ins
• Moogerfooger 12-Stage Phaser
• Moogerfooger Ring Modulator
• Moogerfooger Lowpass Filter
The following plug-ins are installed with
Pro Tools:
• BF Essentials, which includes:
• BF Essential Clip Remover
• BF Essential Correlation Meter
• BF Essential Meter Bridge
• BF Essential Noise Meter
• Pultec EQP-1A
• Pultec EQH-2
• Pultec MEQ-5
• Purple Audio MC77
• SansAmp PSA-1
• Slightly Rude Compressor
• Tel-Ray Variable Delay
• Bomb Factory BF76
• Voce Spin
• Bomb Factory SansAmp
• Voce Chorus/Vibrato
Chapter 1: Introduction
1
Contents of the Boxed
Version of Your Plug-in
System Requirements and
Compatibility
Boxed versions of plug-ins contains the following components:
To use Bomb Factory plug-ins you need the following:
• Installer disc
• An iLok USB Smart Key
• Activation Card with an Activation Code for
authorizing plug-ins with an iLok USB Smart
Key (not supplied)
• An iLok.com account for managing iLok licenses
• One of the following:
• A Digidesign-qualified Pro Tools system
Registering Your Plug-ins
If you purchased a download version of a plugin from the DigiStore (www.digidesign.com),
you were automatically registered.
If you purchased a boxed version of a plug-in,
you will be automatically registered when you
authorize your plug-in (see “Authorizing Plugins” on page 6).
• A Digidesign-qualified Pro Tools system
and a third-party software application that
supports the Digidesign TDM, RTAS®, or
AudioSuite™ plug-in standard
• A qualified Avid® Xpress®, Avid Xpress DV
or Avid DNA™ system
• A Digidesign-qualified VENUE system
(TDM only)
• DVD drive for Installation disc (boxed version
of plug-in only)
Registered users receive periodic software update
and upgrade notices.
• Internet access for software activation and
registration purposes
Please refer to the Digidesign website
(www.digidesign.com) for information on technical support.
Digidesign can only assure compatibility and
provide support for hardware and software it has
tested and approved.
For complete system requirements and a list of
Digidesign-qualified computers, operating systems, hard drives, and third-party devices, refer
to the latest information on the Digidesign website:
www.digidesign.com/compatibility
2
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
Using Bomb Factory Plug-ins
with Pro Tools
Conventions Used in This
Guide
Refer to the Pro Tools Reference Guide for information on working with plug-ins, including:
All Digidesign guides use the following conventions to indicate menu choices and key commands:
• Inserting plug-ins on tracks
• Plug-in Window controls
• Adjusting plug-in controls
• Automating plug-ins
Convention
Action
File > Save
Choose Save from the
File menu
Control+N
Hold down the Control
key and press the N key
Control-click
Hold down the Control
key and click the mouse
button
Right-click
Click with the right
mouse button
• Using side-chain inputs
• Using plug-in presets
• Clip indicators
Using Bomb Factory Plug-ins
with VENUE
Refer to the D-Show Guide that came with your
VENUE system for information on working with
plug-ins.
The names of Commands, Options, and Settings
that appear on-screen are in a different font.
The following symbols are used to highlight important information:
User Tips are helpful hints for getting the
most from your Pro Tools system.
Important Notices include information that
could affect your Pro Tools session data or
the performance of your Pro Tools system.
Shortcuts show you useful keyboard or
mouse shortcuts.
Cross References point to related sections in
this guide and other Digidesign guides.
Chapter 1: Introduction
3
About www.digidesign.com
The Digidesign website (www.digidesign.com) is
your best online source for information to help
you get the most out of your Pro Tools system.
The following are just a few of the services and
features available.
Product Registration Register your purchase online.
Support and Downloads Contact Digidesign
Technical Support or Customer Service; download software updates and the latest online
manuals; browse the Compatibility documents
for system requirements; search the online Answerbase; or join the worldwide Pro Tools community on the Digidesign User Conference.
Training and Education Study on your own using
courses available online or find out how you can
learn in a classroom setting at a certified
Pro Tools training center.
Products and Developers Learn about Digidesign
products; download demo software or learn
about our Development Partners and their plugins, applications, and hardware.
News and Events Get the latest news from
Digidesign or sign up for a Pro Tools demo.
Pro Tools Accelerated Videos Watch the series of
free tutorial videos. Accelerated Videos are designed to help you get up and running with
Pro Tools and its plug-ins quickly.
4
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
chapter 2
Installation
Installing Plug-ins for
Pro Tools
Installers for your plug-ins can be downloaded
from the DigiStore (www.digidesign.com) or can
be found on the plug-in installer disc (included
with boxed versions of plug-ins).
An installer may also be available on the
Pro Tools installer disc or on a software bundle
installer disc.
Installation
To install a plug-in:
1 Do one of the following:
• Download the installer for your computer
platform from the Digidesign website
(www.digidesign.com). After downloading,
make sure the installer is uncompressed
(.ZIP on Windows or .SIT on Mac).
– or –
• Insert the Installer disc into your computer.
Installation steps are essentially the same, regardless of the package, system, or bundle.
2 Double-click the plug-in installer application.
Free Bomb Factory Plug-ins
3 Follow the on-screen instructions to complete
the installation.
The free Bomb Factory plug-ins are installed
when you install Pro Tools. For more information about installing Pro Tools, see the Setup
Guide that came with your system.
Updating Older Plug-ins
4 When installation is complete, click Finish
(Windows) or Quit (Mac).
When you open Pro Tools, you are prompted to
authorize your new plug-in (see “Authorizing
Plug-ins” on page 6).
Because the Bomb Factory Plug-in installers contain the latest versions of Bomb Factory plugins, use them to update any plug-ins you already
own.
Be sure to use the most recent versions of
Bomb Factory plug-ins available from the
Digidesign website (www.digidesign.com).
Chapter 2: Installation
5
Installing Plug-ins for VENUE
Systems
Installers for VENUE plug-ins can be downloaded from www.digidesign.com. After downloading, the installer must be transferred to either a USB drive or a CD-ROM. Plugs-ins can be
installed using a USB drive connected to the
UDB ports on any VENUE system, or using a CDROM inserted into the CD drive available on an
FOH Rack or Mix Rack.
For complete instructions on installing
plug-ins for VENUE systems, see the documentation that came with your VENUE system.
This key can hold over 100 licenses for all of
your iLok-enabled software. Once an iLok is authorized for a given piece of software, you can
use the iLok to authorize that software on any
computer.
The iLok USB Smart Key is not supplied
with your plug-in or software option. You
can use the one included with certain
Pro Tools systems (such as Pro Tools|HDseries systems), or purchase one separately.
For more information, visit the iLok website
(www.iLok.com) or see the iLok Usage
Guide.
Authorizing Download Versions of
Plug-ins for Pro Tools
Authorizing Plug-ins
Bomb Factory plug-ins are authorized using the
iLok USB Smart Key (iLok), manufactured by
PACE Anti-Piracy, Inc.
If you purchased a download version of a plugin from the DigiStore (www.digidesign.com),
authorize the plug-in by downloading licenses
from iLok.com to an iLok.
Authorizing Boxed Versions of
Plug-ins for Pro Tools
iLok USB Smart Key
Not all Bomb Factory plug-ins require authorization. For example, no authorization
is required for Free Bomb Factory plug-ins.
The iLok is similar to a dongle, but unlike a dongle, it is designed to securely authorize multiple
software applications from a variety of software
developers.
6
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
If you purchased a boxed version of a plug-in, it
comes with an Activation Code (on the included
Activation Card). You will need this code to authorize your plug-in.
To authorize a plug-in using an Activation Code:
1 If you do not have an existing iLok.com ac-
count, visit www.iLok.com and sign up for an
iLok.com account.
2 Transfer the license for your plug-in to your
VENUE Systems
iLok.com account by doing the following:
• Visit http://secure.digidesign.com/
activation.
– and –
• Input your Activation Code (listed on your
Activation Card) and then your iLok.com
User ID. Your iLok.com User ID is the name
you create for your iLok.com account.
3 Transfer the licenses from your iLok.com ac-
count to your iLok USB Smart Key by doing the
following:
• Insert the iLok into an available USB port
on your computer.
• Go to www.iLok.com and log in.
• Follow the on-screen instructions for transferring your licences to your iLok.
4 Launch Pro Tools.
5 If you have any installed unauthorized plugins or software options, you are prompted to authorize them. Follow the on-screen instructions
to complete the authorization process.
After installing a plug-in on a VENUE system,
the system re-creates the list of available plugins. Whenever the racks initialize, the system
checks authorizations for all installed plug-ins.
If no previous authorization for a plug-in is recognized, you will be prompted to authorize the
the plug-in.
For complete instructions on authorizing
plug-ins for VENUE systems, see the documentation that came with your VENUE system.
VENUE supports challenge/response and iLok
USB Smart Key authorization, including pre-authorized iLoks and Activation Cards.
Challenge/Response Challenge/response authorization is only valid for the VENUE system the
plug-in is currently installed on. Challenge/response codes can be communicated using any
computer with Internet access.
iLok USB Smart Key Plug-ins supporting web authorizations through iLok.com can be authorized for your iLok Smart Key from any computer with Internet access. This lets you take
your iLok and your plug-in authorizations anywhere, to use plug-ins installed on any system.
For more information, visit the iLok website
(www.iLok.com) or see the iLok Usage
Guide.
Chapter 2: Installation
7
Uninstalling Plug-ins for
Pro Tools
If you need to uninstall a plug-in from your system, follow the instructions below for your
computer platform.
Mac OS X
To remove a plug-in:
1 Locate and open the Plug-ins folder on your
Startup drive (Library/Application Support
/Digidesign/Plug-ins).
2 Do one of the following:
Windows Vista
To remove a plug-in:
1 Choose Start > Control Panel.
2 Double-click Programs and Features.
• Drag the plug-in to the Trash and empty
the Trash.
– or –
• Drag the plug-in to the Plug-ins (Unused)
folder.
3 Select the plug-in from the list of installed applications.
4 Click Uninstall.
Uninstalling Plug-ins for
VENUE Systems
5 Follow the on-screen instructions to remove
the plug-in.
Windows XP
To remove a plug-in:
1 Choose Start > Control Panel.
2 Double-click Add or Remove Programs.
3 Select the plug-in from the list of installed applications.
4 Click Remove.
5 Follow the on-screen instructions to remove
the plug-in.
8
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
Plug-ins installed on VENUE systems can be disabled, uninstalled, or deleted. A plug-in that has
been disabled or uninstalled (but not deleted)
can be reinstalled without the CD-ROM or USB
drive containing the plug-in installers. Deleted
plug-ins, however, must be installed from installers located on either a USB drive or a
CD-ROM.
For complete instructions on uninstalling
plug-ins for VENUE systems, see the documentation that came with your VENUE system.
chapter 3
BF Essentials Plug-ins
(RTAS and AudioSuite)
This chapter describes the following plug-ins in
the BF Essential series:
• Clip Remover (see “BF Essential Clip Remover” on page 9)
• Correlation Meter (see “BF Essential Correlation Meter” on page 10)
• Meter Bridge (see “BF Essential Meter
Bridge” on page 10)
• Noise Meter (see “BF Essential Noise Meter”
on page 11)
BF Essential Clip Remover
(AudioSuite)
The BF Essential Clip Remover repairs clipped
audio recordings. That red light no longer
means a blown take! You’ll be amazed how
quickly this essential tool can repair clipped recordings. Best of all, it’s much quicker and more
accurate than using the Pencil tool. Set your levels very carefully. But when your signal gets too
excited, try the BF Essential Clip Remover.
BF Essential Clip Remover
Chapter 3: BF Essentials Plug-ins
9
BF Essential Correlation
Meter
(RTAS)
Solve tracking and mix problems, and troubleshoot phase coherency with the BF Essential
Correlation Meter. It works on stereo tracks or
stereo submixes. Use it to stop phase problems
before they start.
BF Essential Meter Bridge
(RTAS)
The BF Essential Meter Bridge provides best-ofbreed VU metering on any channel while using
minimal DSP resources. Enjoy the ease of use afforded by a needle, a big meter, and a faithful
emulation of the decades-old standard for meter
ballistics. Select RMS or Peak metering, and calibrate instantly for useful viewing at any signal
level, just like a pro tape machine.
BF Essential Correlation Meter
BF Essential Meter Bridge
10
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
BF Essential Noise Meter
(RTAS)
The BF Essential Noise Meter is three meters in
one:
• Set to “A,” it’s an A-weighted noise meter
(A-weighting is the most commonly used
of a family of curves relating to the measurement of sound pressure level, as opposed to actual sound pressure).
• Set to “R-D,” it’s a Robinson-Dadson equalloudness meter (An equal-loudness contour is a measure of sound pressure, over
the frequency spectrum, for which a listener perceives a constant loudness).
• Set to “None,” it’s a VU meter with 100 DB
of visual range (Volume Unit metering averages out peaks and troughs of short duration to reflect the overall perceived
loudness).
BF Essential Noise Meter
Chapter 3: BF Essentials Plug-ins
11
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Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
chapter 4
Bomb Factory BF76
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
Modeled after the solid-state (transistor) 1176
studio compressor, the Bomb Factory BF76 preserves every sonic subtlety of this classic piece of
studio gear.
enjoy this sound—previously only available to
super-serious-pro-engineers working in expensive pro recording studios—in the privacy of
your own cubicle.
The Bomb Factory BF76
How the Bomb Factory BF76
Works
Deep inside the 1176
The 1176 Compressor, originally introduced in
the late 1970s, uses a FET (field-effect transistor).
The 1176 also uses solid state amplification. The
1176 still provides an extremely high quality audio signal path, but because of these internal differences offers a much different compression
sound than other compressors.
How the Bomb Factory BF76 is
Used
Four selectable compression ratios are provided,
along with controls allowing variable attack and
release times.
The Output control sets output level. Use it to
bring the signal back to unity after applying
gain reduction.
The Input control sets the input signal level to
the compressor, which, in the 1176 design, determines both the threshold and amount of
peak reduction.
Various explanations overheard in the control
room include “its 100:1 compression ratio!” or
equally adept quantitative analysis like “it
makes it super squishy sounding.” Now you can
Chapter 4: Bomb Factory BF76
13
The Attack and Release controls set the attack
and release times of the compressor. Full counterclockwise is slowest, and full clockwise is fastest. Attack times vary between 0.4 milliseconds
to 5.7 milliseconds. Release times vary between
0.06 and 1.1 seconds.
The Ratio Push switches select the compression
ratio from 4:1 to 20:1.
Finally, the Meter Push switches affect the metering.
• GR shows the amount of gain reduction.
• –18 and –24 show the output level (calibrated so that 0VU indicates –18dB FS and
–24dB FS respectively).
• The “Off” switch turns off the meter.
Tips and Tricks
AudioSuite Processing
When using the AudioSuite version of the Bomb
Factory BF76, be sure to select a side-chain input
(normally the track you are processing). The default is “None” and if you leave it set like this,
there’s nothing feeding the detector and you
won’t hear any compression action.
Unexpected Visit from A&R Weevil Yields
Instant Hit Mix
A favorite feature on one megabuck mixing console is its stereo bus compressor. With the flick
of a switch, a punchy 8:1 compressor grabs the
current mix producing “instant radio hit.” Although Bomb Factory strongly disapproves of
anything which adds further chaos to the already opaque A&R decision-making process,
you may find that the Bomb Factory BF76 set to
8:1 ratio on a stereo mix provides a fast, easy alternate mix that can provide fresh ideas. It’s also
a handy way to make quick headphone submixes when tracking overdubs.
14
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
Give the Kids What They Want
Shift-click one of the Ratio Push switches to enable the “All Buttons In” mode. The compression ratio is still only 20:1, but the knee changes
drastically and the compressor starts (mis)behaving a little bit like an expander—watch the
meter for details. Hey, try it—sometimes it even
sounds good.
Selecting Proper Attack and Release Times
As on the original unit, setting either the attack
or release time too fast generates signal distortion. Again, this may or may not be the desired
effect. A good starting point for attack and release is “6” and “3” (the defaults), and you can
adjust as follows:
When compressing, use the slowest attack you
can that preserves the desired dynamic range.
Faster attacks remove the “punch” from the performance; slower attacks inhibit the compression you need to smooth things out.
When limiting, use the fastest attack time you
can before you start to hear signal distortion in
the low end. But don’t sweat it too much: on the
Bomb Factory BF76, the attack time ranges from
“incredibly fast” to “really damn fast” by modern standards. It can be hard to hear the difference.
Release times are more critical on the Bomb Factory BF76. To set release times, listen for loud attacks and what happens immediately after the
peaks. Set the release time fast enough that you
don’t hear unnatural dynamic changes, but slow
enough that you don’t hear unnecessary pumping between two loud passages in rapid succession.
chapter 5
Bomb Factory BF-3A
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
Bomb Factory extends its award-winning Classic
Compressors line with the BF-3A, based on the
classic LA-3A. A secret weapon of pros in the
know, the LA-3A adds a smoothness and sonic
texture that makes sounds jump right out of the
mix.
While the LA-2A’s gain comes from a tube amplifier, the LA-3A's gain comes from a solid-state
(transistor) amplifier.þ This gives the LA-3A a
solid midrange and more aggressive tone.þ
Other subtle modifications change the behavior
of the T4B, causing it to respond differently—
particularly in response to percussive material.
How BF-3A is Used
The LA-3A is famous for its unique sonic imprint
on guitar, piano, vocals and drums.þ Because it's
so easy to control, you'll be getting classic tones
in no time with the BF-3A.þ
Setting the Compression Action
BF-3A
How BF-3A Works
Designed and manufactured in the late 1960s,
the original LA-3A shares many components in
common with the LA-2A compressor.þ Just like
the LA-2A, the heart of the LA-3A is the T4B
Electro-Optical Attenuator.þ This is a device that
converts audio to light and back and is largely
responsible for the compression character of the
unit.
The Peak Reduction and Output Gain controls
combine with the Comp/Limit switch to determine the amount and sound of the compression.
Peak Reduction controls the amount of signal
entering the side-chain. The more Peak Reduction you dial in, the more “squashed” and compressed the sound will be. Too little peak reduction and you won’t hear any compression
action; too much and the sound becomes muffled and dead sounding.
Output Gain provides makeup gain to make the
signal louder after passing through the peak reduction.
Chapter 5: Bomb Factory BF-3A
15
The Comp/Limit switch affects the compression
ratio. The common setting for audio production
is Comp, which provides a maximum compression ratio of approximately 3:1. In Limit mode,
the unit behaves more like a broadcast limiter,
with a higher threshold and compression ratio
of approximately 15:1.
Metering
Both Gain Reduction and Output metering are
provided.
In GR (Gain Reduction) mode, the needle moves
backward from 0 to show the amount of compression being applied to the signal in dB.
In Out (Output) mode, the needle indicates the
output level of the signal. The meter is calibrated with 0 VU indicating –18 dBFS.
16
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
Tips and Tricks
AudioSuite Processing
When using the AudioSuite version of the
BF-3A, be sure to select an auxillary side-chain
input (normally the track you are processing).
The default is “None” and if you leave it set like
this, there is nothing feeding the detector and
you will not hear any compression action.
Line Amp
Turn the Peak Reduction knob full counterclockwise (off) and use the Gain control to increase the signal level. Although the BF-3A does
not compress the sound with these settings, it
still adds its unique character to the tone.
chapter 6
Bomb Factory BF-2A
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
Meticulously crafted to capture every nuance of
the legendary LA-2A tube studio compressor,
the Bomb Factory BF-2A provides the most authentic vintage compression sound available.
BF-2A
How BF-2A Works
Designed and manufactured in the early 1960s,
the LA-2A achieved wide acclaim for its smooth
compression action and extremely high quality
audio signal path.
next to the terminal strips and tube sockets in
the original version. In the BF-2A plug-in, the
switch has been placed on the front panel,
where you can make better use of it.
The heart of the LA-2A is its patented T4B ElectroOptical Attenuator, which provides the compression action. The T4B consists of a photoconductive cell, which changes resistance when
light strikes it. It is attached to an electro-luminescent panel, which produces light in response
to voltage. Audio (voltage) is applied to the light
source, and what happens as the audio converts
to light and back to voltage gives the LA-2A its
unique compression action. (Yes, the Bomb Factory BF-2A preserves all the subtle characteristics
of this unique electronic circuit.) After compression, gain brings the signal back to its original
level. The LA-2A’s gain comes from a tube amplifier, which imparts further character to the
tone. In fact, it’s common to see engineers using
the LA-2A simply as a line amp, without any
compression applied to the signal.
Originally designed as a limiter for broadcast audio, a Comp/Limit switch was added to LA-2A
compressors after serial number 572. The subsequent addition of a Comp (Compress) setting
made the LA-2A even more popular for use in
audio production. However, the switch was inconveniently located on the back of the unit
Chapter 6: Bomb Factory BF-2A
17
How BF-2A is Used
One beautiful side effect of the LA-2A’s elegant
design is that it’s easy to hear the compression
action. When the BF-2A’s two knobs are set
properly, you know you got it right. It’s a great
unit for learning the art of compression!
Setting the Compression Action
The Peak Reduction and Gain controls combine
with the Comp/Limit switch to determine the
amount and sound of the compression.
Peak Reduction controls the amount of signal
entering the side-chain, which in turn affects
the amount of compression and the threshold.
The more Peak Reduction you dial in, the more
“squashed” the sound. Too little peak reduction
and you will not hear any compression action;
too much and the sound becomes muffled and
dead sounding.
Gain provides makeup gain to bring the signal
back after passing through peak reduction.
The Comp/Limit switch affects the compression
ratio. The common setting for audio production
is Comp, which provides a maximum compression ratio of approximately 3:1. In Limit mode,
the unit behaves more like a broadcast limiter,
with a higher threshold and compression ratio
of approximately 12:1.
18
This side-chain filter reproduces the effect of an
adjustable resistor on the back panel of the
LA-2A. This control cuts the low frequencies
from the side-chain, or control signal, that determines the amount of gain reduction applied
by the compressor.
By increasing the value of the side-chain filter,
you filter out frequencies below 250 Hz from the
control signal, and decrease their effect on gain
reduction.
‹ A setting of zero means that the filter is not
applied to the side chain signal.
‹ A setting of 100 means that all frequencies below 250 Hz are filtered out of the side chain signal.
To access the side-chain filter on-screen:
1 Click the Plug-in Automation button in the
Plug-in window to open the Automation Enable
window.
2 In the list of controls at the left, click to select
Side-Chain Filter and click Add (or, just doubleclick the desired control in the list).
3 Click OK to close the plug-in automation win-
dow.
4 In the Edit window, do one of the following:
• Click the Track View selector and select
Side-Chain Filter from the BF-2A submenu.
Using the Side-Chain Filter
– or –
The BF-2A provides an extra parameter, a sidechain filter, that does not have a control on the
plug-in interface, but that can be accessed onscreen through Pro Tools automation controls.
In addition, the side-chain filter can be adjusted
directly from any supported control surface.
• Reveal an Automation lane for the track,
click the Automation Type selector and select Side-Chain Filter from the BF-2A submenu.
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
5 Edit the breakpoint automation for the BF-2A
side-chain filter. Control range is from 0 (the default setting where no filtering is applied to the
side-chain) to 100% (maximum side-chain filtering).
To access the side-chain filter from a control
surface:
Tips and Tricks
1 Focus the BF-2A plug-in on your control sur-
AudioSuite Processing
face.
When using the AudioSuite version of the
BF-2A, be sure to select an auxillary side-chain
input (normally the track you’re processing).
The default is “None” and if you leave it set like
this, there is nothing feeding the detector and
you will not hear any compression action.
2 Adjust the encoder or fader current targeting
the Side-Chain Filter parameter.
To automate your adjustments, be sure to
enable automation for that parameter as described above. See the Pro Tools Reference
Guide for complete track automation instructions.
Metering
Both Gain Reduction and Output metering are
provided.
In Gain Reduction mode, the needle moves
backward from 0 to show the amount of compression being applied to the signal in dB.
In Output mode, the needle indicates the output
level of the signal. The meter is calibrated with
0 VU indicating –18 dBFS.
Line Amp
Turn the Peak Reduction knob full counterclockwise (off) and use the Gain control to increase the signal level. Although the BF-2A does
not compress the sound with these settings, it
still adds its unique character to the tone.
Feed the BF-2A into the BF76
Or vice versa. Glynn Johns (who has worked
with the Stones, the Who, and others) popularized the early ‘70s British trick of combining a
slower compressor with a faster one. The effect
can produce very interesting sounds! Try applying Peak Reduction using the BF-2A, then
squash the missed attacks using the faster BF76.
Chapter 6: Bomb Factory BF-2A
19
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Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
chapter 7
Cosmonaut Voice
(RTAS and AudioSuite)
The Cosmonaut Voice plug-in is a radio and
shortwave simulator. Use it to add squelch or
noise to tracks.
How the Cosmonaut Voice is Used
Cosmonaut Voice is, in simple terms, an amplitude-driven noise generator with adjustable sensitivity, selectable noise type (beep or squelch),
and an additional RFI/static noise generator.
Cosmonaut Voice provides controls on-screen
for Threshold, Noise, and Beep/Squelch.
Cosmonaut Voice
Threshold Sets the point at which the selected
voice (beep or squelch) is triggered. Turning
Threshold clockwise raises the threshold and increases sensitivity (resulting in more triggering);
turning Threshold counter-clockwise decreases
sensitivity.
Noise Raises or lowers the amount of RFI/static
noise mixed in with the signal (independent of
the Beep/Squelch or Threshold controls). Turning Noise to the right adds a more constant
noise “bed” behind the Beep/Squelch effect;
turning Noise to the left decreases the ambient
noise, resulting in sharper Beep/Squelch cut-in.
Beep/Squelch Sets the voice mode between
Beep (NASA-style radio beep) and Squelch (noise
burst).
Chapter 7: Cosmonaut Voice
21
Accessing Additional Controls On-Screen
Accessing Controls from a Control Surface
Cosmonaut Voice also provides a
Beep/Squelch Level control to set the balance of
the generated noise and dry signal.
Beep/Squelch level can be adjusted on-screen by
editing Pro Tools breakpoint automation data.
When using a control surface, all plug-in parameters are available whenever the plug-in is focused. You only need to enable plug-in automation (as described previously) if you want to
record your adjustments as breakpoint automation.
To access Beep/Squelch level on-screen:
1 Click the Plug-in Automation button in the
Plug-in window to open the Plug-in Automation
window.
2 In the list of controls at the left, select B/S
Level and click Add (or, just double-click the desired control in the list). Repeat to access and enable additional controls.
3 Click OK to close the Plug-in Automation win-
dow.
4 In the Edit window, do one of the following:
• Click the Track View selector and select B/S
Level from the Cosmonaut Voice submenu.
– or –
• Reveal an Automation lane for the track,
click the Automation Type selector and select B/S Level from the Cosmonaut Voice
sub-menu.
5 Edit the breakpoint automation for the en-
abled control.
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Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
To access the Beep/Squelch level from a control
surface:
1 Focus the Cosmonaut Voice plug-in on your
control surface. All available parameters are
mapped to encoders, faders, and switches.
2 Adjust the control currently targeting the de-
sired parameter.
To automate your adjustments, be sure to
enable automation for that parameter as described above. See the Pro Tools Reference
Guide for complete track automation instructions.
chapter 8
Fairchild Plug-ins
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
This chapter describes the following Fairchild
plug-ins:
• Fairchild 660 (see “Fairchild 660” on
page 23)
• Fairchild 670 (see “Fairchild 670” on
page 25)
Fairchild 660
How the Fairchild 660 Works
Designed in the early 1950s, the Fairchild 660 is
a variable-mu tube limiter. Variable-mu designs
use an unusual form of vacuum tube that is capable of changing its gain dynamically.
The result? In addition to featuring a tube audio
stage like the LA-2A, the Fairchild actually
achieves gain reduction through the use of
tubes!
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
Re-introducing the undisputed champion in
price, weight, and performance: the $35,000,
one-hundred pound, Fairchild 660.
Bomb Factory’s no-compromise replica captures
every detail of this studio classic.
The heart of the Fairchild limiter—a 6386 triode—is one such variable-mu tube. In fact, four
of these tubes are used in parallel. A key part of
the Fairchild design, it ensures that the output
doesn’t get darker as the unit goes further into
gain reduction, and also reduces distortion as
the tubes are biased further into Class-B operation.
Bomb Factory Fairchild 660
Tubes, wires, and iron
Chapter 8: Fairchild Plug-ins
23
How the Fairchild 660 is Used
Tips and Tricks
Input Gain Sets the input level to the unit and
the compression threshold, just like the Input
control on an 1176. Full clockwise is loudest.
5,6,7,8…
Threshold Adjusts the gain to the sidechain, just
like the Peak Reduction control on an LA-2A.
Adjust the Input Gain and Threshold controls
together until you get the sound you want. Like
many classic compressors, after a little bit of
tweaking, you’ll know immediately when you
get it right.
Time Constant Selects the attack and release
times for the compressor. One is fastest, and six
is slowest. Seven and eight are Bomb Factory
custom presets.
The Fairchild manual documents Time Constant settings 5 and 6 as user presets—although
you have to go inside with a soldering iron to
change them. We used the “factory default” values.
Bonus Settings
Settings 7 and 8 do not exist on real-world
units—well, at least most of them. These settings are taken from a real-world Fairchild modification invented by Dave Amels many years
before he designed the plug-in version.
What do they do? Settings 7 and 8 offer versions
of Time Constant 2 with a gentler release useful
for compressing vocals and other program material where you desire more subtlety in the compression action. Give them a try—you’ve already heard them on hit songs on the radio.
Pump It Up
With a carefully adjusted Input Gain and
Threshold, you can use Time Constant 1 to
achieve a cool pumping effect on drums. The
sound gets darker and fuller, and sits beautifully
in a mix.
24
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
Fairchild 670
(TDM and RTAS)
Bomb Factory’s no-compromise replica captures
every detail of the Fairchild 670. The Fairchild
670 is a dual-channel unit and, as such, is only
available on stereo tracks.
Note that the companion Fairchild 660 also supports stereo operation. Bomb Factory modeled
both a Fairchild 660 and a Fairchild 670 from
scratch using two different hardware units. This
gives you a choice of two different-sounding
Fairchild units to try on your stereo tracks!
How the Fairchild 670 Works
The Fairchild 670’s internal design is similar to
the Fairchild 660. However, the Fairchild 670 offers two channels of compression instead of one.
Combined with the AGC control, this gives you
even more compression options on stereo
tracks.
How the Fairchild 670 is Used
Input Gain Sets the input level to the unit and
the compression threshold, just like the Input
control on an 1176. Full clockwise is loudest.
Threshold Adjusts the gain to the sidechain, just
like the Peak Reduction control on an LA-2A.
Adjust the Input Gain and Threshold controls
together on both channels until you get the
sound you want. Like many classic compressors,
after a little bit of tweaking, you’ll know immediately when you get it right.
Time Constant Selects the attack and release
times. One is fastest, and six is slowest. Seven
and eight are Bomb Factory custom presets. See
“Fairchild 670” on page 25 for details on these
custom settings.
AGC Lets you select Left/Right processing or
Lat/Vert processing of the two channels.
Left/Right works like a dual-mono compressor
with separate controls for the left and right
channels. In Lat/Vert mode the top row of controls affects the in-phase (Lat) information and
the bottom row of controls affects the out of
phase (Vert) information. Although originally
designed for vinyl mastering where excess Vert
(vertical) information could cause the needle to
jump out of the groove, you can use the Lat/Vert
mode to achieve some amazing effects – especially on drums.
Tips and Tricks
Fairchild 670
To exactly match the settings between channels,
hold down the Alt key (Windows) or the Shift
key (Mac) while dragging the mouse. This is useful when trying to preserve the existing
Left/Right balance on stereo material.
Chapter 8: Fairchild Plug-ins
25
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Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
chapter 9
JOEMEEK Plug-ins
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
This chapter describes the JOEMEEK VC5 Meequalizer and the JOEMEEK SC2 Compressor
RTAS and AudioSuite plug-ins.
How the Meequalizer is Used
Operation of the Meequalizer is dead simple,
and that’s the whole point.
The Bass control adjusts low frequencies ±11.
JOEMEEK VC5 Meequalizer
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
The JOEMEEK VC5 Meequalizer offers simple
controls and incredibly warm, musical results.
The Mid and Mid Freq controls allow you to adjust mid frequencies, from 500Hz to 3.5KHz,
±11.
The Treble control adjusts high frequencies ±11.
Finally, the Gain control allows you to adjust
the output level ±11.
Tips and Tricks
JOEMEEK Meequalizer VC5 EQ
How the Meequalizer Works
Picture this: drums in the spare bedroom. Microphones, cables, and recording gear strewn about
the living room. A familiar scene—especially to
legendary producer Joe Meek in 1962 as he prepared to record yet another chart topping hit.
Twelve O’Click
Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Mac) any
knob to reset any knob to its unity position
quickly.
Among countless other achievements, Joe Meek
built custom gear to get the sounds in his head
onto tape. One device was a treble and bass circuit with a sweepable mid control, built into a
tiny tobacco tin! The Meequalizer VC5 recreates
the exact circuitry used by Joe Meek.
Chapter 9: JOEMEEK Plug-ins
27
JOEMEEK SC2 Compressor
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
Add a little magic to your mixes with the
JOEMEEK SC2 Compressor.
In use by top producers the world over,
JOEMEEK compression is the secret weapon that
gives your sound the character and excitement
it deserves!
JOEMEEK SC2 Compressor
How the JOEMEEK Compressor
Works
Legendary producer Joe Meek used to say, “If it
sounds right, it is right.” Nowhere is this more
apparent than in Joe Meek’s masterful use of
non-linear, sometimes severe compression in
his productions.
The JOEMEEK Compressor is designed purely as
an effects compressor. Its purpose is to change
the way the ear perceives sound; its action
changes the clarity, balance and even rhythmic
feel of music.
28
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
How the JOEMEEK Compressor is
Used
Input Gain adjusts the input level to the compressor.
The Compression control affects the gain to the
side-chain of the compressor. Use it along with
Slope to adjust the amount of compression.
Output Gain provides makeup gain after compression.
Slope is similar to the compression ratio controls found on other compressors. However, on
the JOEMEEK, the actual ratio varies based on
program material so the term Slope is used instead. In practice, 1 is very gentle compression
and 2 or 3 are typically right for voice and submixes. The higher numbers are better for instruments and extreme sounds. (At the suggestion
of the original designers, Bomb Factory added
the 5 setting found on the later-model JOEMEEK
SC2.2. Use 5 to create severe pumping effects.)
Attack sets the time that the compressor takes to
act. Slower attacks are typically used when the
sound of the compression needs to be less obvious.
Release sets the time during which signal returns
to normal after compression. With longer release times, the compression is less noticeable.
Tips and Tricks
Not Perfect. Just Right
Standard engineering practice says that a compressor should work logarithmically. For a certain increase of volume, the output volume
should rise proportionally less, with a result that
the more you put in, the more it’s pushed down.
The JOEMEEK compressor doesn’t work this
way. As volume increases at the input, a point is
reached where the compressor starts to work
and the gain through the amplifier is reduced. If
the input level keeps rising, gradually the gain
reduction becomes less effective and the amplifier goes back to being a linear amplifier except
with the volume turned down.
This is by design, and is based on an understanding of how the human ear behaves! The result is
that the listener is fooled into thinking that the
JOEMEEK compressed sound is louder than it really is—but without the strange psycho-acoustic
effect of “deadness” that other compressors suffer from.
Attack/Release Times
It may be difficult to understand the interactions between the Attack and Release controls,
because the JOEMEEK Compressor behaves very
differently than typical compressors. Experimentation is the best option, but an explanation may help you understand what’s going on.
The JOEMEEK Compressor uses a compound release circuit that reacts quickly to short bursts of
volume, and less quickly to sustained volume.
While the unit was being prototyped and designed, the values and ranges of these timings
were chosen by experimentation using wide
ranges of program material.
Because of these intentional effects produced by
the compressor, the JOEMEEK makes a perfect
tool for general enhancement of tracks to
“brighten,” “tighten,” “clarify,” and catch the
attention of the listener, functions that are difficult or impossible to achieve with conventional
compressor designs.
Overshoot
At fast Attack settings, it is possible to make the
JOEMEEK “overshoot” on percussive program
material. This means that the compression electronics are driven hard before the light cells respond to the increased level. The cells catch up
and overcompress momentarily giving a tiny
dip immediately following the start of the note.
To hear it, use a drum track, set Slope to 5, and
Attack and Release to Fast. Used sparingly, this
effect can contribute to musical drive in your
tracks.
Chapter 9: JOEMEEK Plug-ins
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Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
chapter 10
Moogerfooger Plug-ins
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
This chapter describes the following Moogerfooger plug-ins:
• Moogerfooger Analog Delay (see “Moogerfooger Analog Delay ” on page 31)
• Moogerfooger Ring Modulator (see
“Moogerfooger Ring Modulator” on
page 33)
Moogerfooger Analog Delay
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
The Moogerfooger Analog Delay is simply the
coolest (and warmest sounding!) delay in the
digital domain.
• Moogerfooger 12-Stage Phaser (see
“Moogerfooger 12-Stage Phaser ” on
page 35)
• Moogerfooger Low-Pass Filter (see
“Moogerfooger Low-Pass Filter” on
page 37)
Moogerfooger Analog Delay
Chapter 10: Moogerfooger Plug-ins
31
How the Moogerfooger Analog
Delay Works
A Delay Circuit produces a replica of an audio
signal a short time after the original signal.
Mixed together, the delayed signal sounds like
an echo of the original. And if this mixture is fed
back to the input of the delay circuit, the delayed output provides a string of echoes that repeat and die out gradually. It’s a classic musical
effect.
The Moogerfooger Analog Delay uses Bucket Brigade Analog Delay Chips to achieve its delay.
These analog integrated circuits function by
passing the audio waveform down a chain of
thousands of circuit cells, just like water being
passed by a bucket brigade to put out a fire. Each
cell in the chip introduces a tiny time delay. The
total time delay depends on the number of cells
and on how fast the waveform is “clocked,” or
moved from one cell to the next.
With the advent of digital technology, these
and similar analog delay chips have gradually
been phased out of production. In fact, Bob
Moog secured a supply of the last analog delay
chips ever made, and used them to build a Limited Edition of 1,000 “real-world” Moogerfooger
Analog Delay units.
So Why Analog?
Compared to digital delays, the frequency and
overload contours of well-designed analog delay
devices generally provide smoother, more natural series of echoes than digital delay units. Another difference is that the echoes of a digital delay are static because they are the same digital
sound repeated over and over, whereas a bucket
brigade device itself imparts a warm, organically
evolving timbre to the echoes.
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Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
Of course, Bomb Factory’s digital replica re-creates all the warm, natural sounds of its analog
counterpart.
Not Better—Different
Working directly with Bob Moog, Bomb Factory
enhanced the Moogerfooger Analog Delay to be
even more useful for digital recording. An integrated Highpass Filter allows you to remove unwanted bass buildup from the feedback loop, allowing you to have warmer, more-controllable
echo swarms while minimizing the potential for
digital clipping.
How the Moogerfooger Analog
Delay is Used
Delay Section
Delay Time allows you to select the length of delay between the original and the delayed signal.
Used with Feedback, it also affects how long
apart the echoes are.
The Short/Long switch sets the range of the Delay Time control. Set to Short, the Delay Time
ranges from 0.04 to 0.4 seconds. Set to Long, it
ranges from 0.08 to 0.8 seconds.
Feedback determines how much signal is fed
back to the delay input, affecting how fast the
echoes die out.
Filter Section
The Highpass knob removes low frequencies
from the feedback loop. It removes undesirable
low frequency “mud” common when mixing
with delays and also allows the creation of
amazing echo swarms that won’t clip the output. Dial in a highpass frequency from 50 Hz to
500 Hz. Frequencies below the setting are filtered from the feedback loop.
The HPF Off/HPF On enables or disables the
highpass filter (HPF).
Moogerfooger Ring Modulator
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
Audio Input and Mixing
The remaining controls set the input level and
effect mix.
The Drive control sets the input gain.
The Moogerfooger Ring Modulator provides a
wide-range carrier oscillator and dual
sine/square waveform LFO. Add motion to
rhythm tracks and achieve radical lo-fidelity
textures—you set the limits!
The Mix control blends the original input signal
with the delayed signal.
LED Indicators
Three LEDs down the center of the unit provide
visual feedback. Level glows green when signal
is present. HPF turns green when the highpass
filter is enabled. And Bypass glows either red
(bypassed) or green (not bypassed) to show
whether or not the effect is in the signal path.
Tips and Tricks
Infidelity
Because analog delay chips offer only a fixed
number of cells, the extended delay times store a
lower-fidelity version of the input signal. Try the
Long delay setting when going for cool “lo-fi”
sounds and textures.
Echo Swarms
By carefully adjusting the Feedback, Drive, and
Highpass controls, you can use the Moogerfooger Analog Delay as a sound generator. Simply pulse the delay unit with a short piece of audio (even a second will do), and adjust the Delay
Time knob. Set correctly, the unit will generate
cool timbres for hours all by itself.
Moogerfooger Ring Modulator
How the Moogerfooger Ring
Modulator Works
Like the Lowpass Filter, the Moogerfooger Ring
Modulator has its roots in the original MOOG
Modular synthesizers. It provides three classic
MOOG modules: a Low Frequency Oscillator, a
Carrier Oscillator, and a Ring Modulator.
Low Frequency Oscillators (or LFOs) create slow
modulations like vibrato and tremolo. The LFO
in the Moogerfooger Ring Modulator is a widerange, dual-waveform (sine/square) oscillator.
Chapter 10: Moogerfooger Plug-ins
33
The Carrier Oscillator is a wide-range sinusoidal
oscillator. It’s called the Carrier Oscillator because, like the carrier of an AM radio signal, it’s
always there, ready to be modulated by the input.
A Ring Modulator takes two inputs, and outputs
the sum and difference frequencies of the two
inputs. For example, if the first input contains a
500 Hz sine wave, and the second input contains a 100 Hz sine wave, then the output contains a 600 Hz sine wave (500 plus 100) and a
400 Hz (500 minus 100) sine wave.
Modulator Section
The Carrier Oscillator is controlled by the Frequency knob and the Low/High switch.
In the Low position, the Frequency knob ranges
from 0.5 Hz to 80 Hz. In the High position, the
Frequency knob ranges from 30 Hz to 4 kHz.
Operating at the selected frequency, the carrier
oscillator provides one input to the ring modulator, with the other coming from the input signal.
Audio Input and Mixing
How the Moogerfooger Ring
Modulator is Used
LFO Section
Control the LFO using the Amount and Rate
knobs and the Square/Sine waveform selector
switch.
Amount determines the amount of LFO waveform that modulates the frequency of the carrier
oscillator. When the knob is full counterclockwise, the carrier is unmodulated. Fully clockwise, the carrier oscillator is modulated over a
range of three octaves.
Rate determines how fast the LFO oscillates,
from 0.1 Hz (one cycle every ten seconds) to
25 Hz (twenty-five cycles per second). The LFO
light blinks to give a visual indication of the LFO
rate.
The Square/Sine switch selects either a square or
sine waveform. The square wave produces trill
effects, whereas the sine waveform produces vibrato and siren effects.
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Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
The Drive control sets the input gain.
The Mix control blends the input signal and the
Ring Modulator output. You hear only the input
signal when the knob is counterclockwise, and
only the ring modulated signal with the knob
fully clockwise
LED Indicators
Three LEDs provide visual feedback. Level glows
green when signal is present. LFO blinks to show
the LFO rate. And Bypass glows either red (bypassed) or green (not bypassed) to show whether
or not the effect is in the signal path.
Tips and Tricks
A Little Goes a Long Way
You’ll discover tons of great uses for the Moogerfooger Ring Modulator through experimentation. But don’t forget to try using it in subtle
ways, adding “just a hint” to harshen up or add
a metallic quality to individual tracks buried in
the mix. Almost all the great MOOG sounds feature subtle, clever uses of Ring Modulation.
Moogerfooger 12-Stage
Phaser
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
The Moogerfooger 12-Stage Phaser combines a
6- or 12-stage phaser with a wide-ranging variable LFO. Start with subtle tremolo or radical
modulation effects, then crank the distortion
and resonant filters for unbelievable new
tones—all featuring classic MOOG® sound.
How the Moogerfooger 12-Stage
Phaser Works
The Moogerfooger 12-Stage Phaser offers 6 or 12
stages of MOOG resonant analog filters. Unlike
the Lowpass Filter, however, the filters are arranged in an allpass configuration.
Different types of filters
Moogerfooger 12-stage Phaser
A phaser works by sweeping the mid-shift frequency of the filters back and forth. As this happens, the entire frequency response of the output moves back and forth as well. The result is
the classic phaser “whooshing” sound as different frequency bands of the signal are alternately
emphasized and then attenuated.
A sweep control allows you to adjust the range
of the frequency shift. And, keeping in the spirit
of the MOOG modular synthesizers, an integrated LFO allows you to modulate the sweep
control, allowing for extreme effects.
Chapter 10: Moogerfooger Plug-ins
35
How the Moogerfooger 12-Stage
Phaser is Used
LFO Section
Control the LFO using the Amount and Rate
knobs and the Lo/Hi selector switch.
Amount varies the depth of phaser modulation,
from barely perceptible at the full counterclockwise position, to the full sweep range of the
phaser (full clockwise or “Kill” setting).
Rate determines how fast the LFO oscillates. The
LFO light blinks to give a visual indication of the
LFO rate.
The Lo/Hi switch selects the range of the Rate
control. When the switch is Lo, the Rate control
varies from 0.01 Hz (one cycle every hundred
seconds) to 2.5 Hz (2.5 cycles every second).
When the switch is Hi, the Rate control varies
from 2.5 Hz (2.5 cycles every second) to 250 Hz
(two hundred fifty cycles per second). With such
a wide range of rates available, obviously you’ll
need to adjust Rate after you flick the Lo/Hi
switch to get the sound you desire.
Phaser Section
Control the Phaser with the Sweep and Resonance knobs and the 6-Stage/12-Stage switch.
Resonance adjusts the feedback of the analog filters. As you add more resonance, the peaks
caused by the filters get sharper and more noticeable.
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Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
Responses of a phaser with high resonance
Sweep adjusts the center frequency point of the
filters. Use it in conjunction with Amount to
control the frequencies affected by the phaser.
Sweep adjusts the center frequency point
Audio Input
Finally, the Drive control sets the input gain.
LED Indicators
Three LEDs provide visual feedback. Level glows
green when signal is present. LFO blinks to show
the LFO rate. And Bypass glows either red (bypassed) or green (not bypassed) to show whether
or not the effect is in the signal path.
Tips and Tricks
More Harmonics = More Fun
The richer the harmonic content of the sound,
the more there is to filter and sweep. Try adding
distortion using the SansAmp PSA-1 before the
phaser–it’s a cool variation on the common signal path used when putting a phaser in front of
a guitar amp.
Moogerfooger Low-Pass Filter
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
The Moogerfooger Lowpass Filter features a 2pole/4-pole variable resonance filter with envelope follower. Use it to achieve classic 60s and
70s sounds on bass and electric guitar, or just
dial in some warm, fat analog resonance when
you need it.
Aggressive. Extreme.
Dr. Moog apparently took these mantras of early
21st Century recording science to heart when he
designed the Rate knob on his phaser. Flick the
Rate switch to Hi and let the party begin. Try
muting a track and mixing in bits of extremely
phase-swept material.
It’s an Effect—Play with It
All the controls on the Moogerfooger 12-Stage
Phaser are fully independent of one another.
This means you can set them in any combination that you wish. There is no such thing as a
“wrong” combination of settings, so you can experiment all you like to find new, exciting effects for your music.
Moogerfooger Low-Pass Filter
How the Moogerfooger Lowpass
Filter Works
With the invention of the MOOG® synthesizer
in the 1960s, Bob Moog started the electronic
music revolution. A direct descendent of the
original MOOG Modular synthesizers, the
Moogerfooger Lowpass Filter provides two classic MOOG modules: a Lowpass Filter and an Envelope Follower.
Chapter 10: Moogerfooger Plug-ins
37
A Lowpass Filter allows all frequencies up to a
certain frequency to pass, and cuts frequencies
above the cutoff frequency. It removes the high
frequencies from a tone, making it sound more
mellow or muted. The Moogerfooger Lowpass
Filter contains a genuine four-pole lowpass filter. We say “genuine” because the four-pole filter—a major part of the “MOOG Sound” of the
60s and 70s—was first patented by Bob Moog in
1968! Bob worked directly with Bomb Factory to
ensure that the digital version preserved all the
character, nuances, and personality of his original classic analog design.
An Envelope Follower tracks the loudness contour, or envelope, of a sound. Think of it like
this: each time you play a note, the envelope
goes up and then down. The louder and harder
you play, the higher the envelope goes. In the
Moogerfooger Lowpass Filter, the Envelope Follower drives the cutoff frequency of the Lowpass
Filter. Since the envelope follows the dynamics
of the input, it “plays” the filter by sweeping it
up and down in response to the loudness of the
input signal.
How the Moogerfooger Lowpass
Filter is Used
Envelope Section
The Amount knob determines how much the
envelope varies the filter. When the knob is
counterclockwise, the envelope signal has no effect on the filter. When the knob is fully clockwise, the envelope signal opens and closes the
filter over a range of five octaves.
The Smooth/Fast switch determines how closely
the envelope tracks the loudness of the input
signal. Some sounds (like guitar chords) have
long, rough envelopes, and often sound better
with less dramatic changes in the filter. Other
sounds (like bass or snare drum) are quick and
sharp, and sound great when the filter closely
tracks their attack.
Filter Section
Control the filter using the Cutoff and Resonance knobs and the 2-Pole/4-Pole switch.
Cutoff opens and closes the filter. Turned counterclockwise, fewer high frequencies pass
through the filter. Turned clockwise, more high
frequencies pass.
Envelope
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Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
The 2/4 pole switch selects the filter slope
Resonance changes the way the filter sounds. At
low resonance, low frequencies come through
evenly. At high resonance, frequencies near the
cutoff frequency are boosted, creating a whistling or vowel-type quality. When resonance is
maxed out, the filter oscillates and produces its
own tone at the cutoff frequency. This oscillation interacts with other tones as they go
through the filter, producing the signature
Moog sound.
Tips and Tricks
Auto Wah Using an External LFO
Try inserting an LFO ahead of the Moogerfooger
Lowpass Filter to produce a cool “auto wah.” Or
use Voce Spin’s rotating speaker for even trippier sounds!
The 2-Pole/4-Pole switch selects whether the signal goes through half the filter (2-pole) or the
entire filter (4-pole). 2-pole is brighter, while 4pole has a deeper, mellow quality.
Audio Input and Mixing
The remaining controls set the input level and
effect mix.
The Drive control sets the input gain. Use it to
adjust the input to the filter and envelope follower for desired impact.
The Mix control blends the original input signal
with the filtered signal. Use it to get any mixture
of filtered and unfiltered sound.
LED Indicators
Three LEDs down the center of the unit provide
visual feedback. Level glows green when signal
is present to the envelope circuit. Env (envelope) glows redder in response to the envelope
tracking of the input. And Bypass glows either
red (bypassed) or green (not bypassed) to show
whether or not the effect is in the signal path.
Chapter 10: Moogerfooger Plug-ins
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Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
chapter 11
Pultec Plug-ins
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
This chapter describes the following Pultec EQ
plug-ins:
• Pultec EQP-1A (see “Pultec EQP-1A” on
page 41)
• Pultec EQH-2 (see “Pultec EQH-2” on
page 42)
• Pultec MEQ-5 (see “Pultec MEQ-5” on
page 43)
How Pultec EQP-1A Works
Built in the early 1960s, The Pultec EQP-1A offers gentle shelving program equalization on
bass and highs, and offers a variable bandwidth
peak boost control. A custom (and secret) filter
network provides all its equalization functionality. Quality transformers interface it to realworld studio equipment. And a clean and welldesigned tube amplifier provides a fixed amount
of make-up gain.
Pultec EQP-1A
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
The Pultec EQP-1A provides smooth, sweet EQ
and an extremely high quality tube audio signal
path. Use it on individual tracks, critical vocals,
or even across a stereo mix for mastering applications.
How Pultec EQP-1A is Used
Low Frequency Section
Adjust low frequencies using the Boost and Atten knobs and the Low Frequency switch, located at the left side of the unit. All low-frequency equalization is a gentle shelving type,
6 dB per octave.
High Frequency Boost Section
Boost mid and high frequencies using the Bandwidth and Boost knobs and the High Frequency
switch.
High Frequency Attenuate Section
Pultec EQP-1A
Cut high frequencies using the Atten knob and
the Atten Sel switch located at the right side of
the plug-in.
Chapter 11: Pultec Plug-ins
41
Tips and Tricks
Twelve O’Click
Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Mac) any
knob to reset it to its unity position.
“Q” and A
You may wonder why the Pultec EQP-1A has
separate knobs for boost and cut. The short answer is that they connect to different circuitry in
the unit.
Use caution, because the Sharp bandwidth setting results in up to 10 dB higher output than
Broad bandwidth at maximum Boost, just like
on the original. But don’t feel like you’re getting
cheated. Here at Bomb Factory, we consider anything that encourages very careful and infrequent use of peaky boosts to be a Very Good
Thing.
Pultec EQH-2
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
You can use the “extra” knob to your advantage.
Because the filters are not phase perfect, a Boost
setting of 3 and an Atten setting of 3 can make a
huge difference, even though a frequency plot
wouldn’t show much difference in tone. You’re
hearing the phase shift, not the tone shift.
The Pultec EQH-2 is a program equalizer similar
to the Pultec EQP-1A. It is designed to provide
smooth equalization across final mixes or individual tracks.
Our ears of very sensitive to phase, and using the
two knobs together, you can adjust phase at the
low end while also making tonal adjustments.
On the high end, you can set Boost to 10k and
Atten to 10k, then adjust Boost and Atten simultaneously. However, because Boost is a peak
equalizer and Atten is a shelving equalizer, the
results are much different, and you don’t get independent control of phase.
“Q” and Boost
In the high frequency boost section, the Bandwidth and Boost controls affect one another.
This is different from modern equalizers, where
adjusting Q typically doesn’t affect the amount
of equalization applied.
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Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
Pultec EQH-2
How Pultec EQH-2 Works
The Pultec EQH-2 offers three equalization sections: low frequency boost and attenuation,
midrange boost only, and 10k attenuation. Like
its EQP-1A sibling, it features high-quality transformers and a tube gain stage. But unlike the
EQP-1A, the tube stage in the EQH-2 is a pushpull design. As a result, the EQH-2 offers a beefier tone.
How Pultec EQH-2 is Used
How Pultec MEQ-5 Works
Low Frequency Section
The Pultec MEQ-5 offers three equalization sections: low frequency boost, mid frequency
boost, and wide-range attenuation. Like all
Pultecs, it features quality transformers and a
tube gain stage.
Adjust low frequencies using the top row of
Boost and Atten knobs and the CPS (cycles per
second) switch. All low-frequency equalization
is a gentle shelving type, 6 dB per octave.
High Frequency Boost Section
Boost mid and high frequencies using the KCS
(kilocycles per second) and Boost knobs on the
second row.
High Frequency Attenuate Section
Cut high frequencies using the 10k Atten knob
located at the right side of the plug-in.
How Pultec MEQ-5 is Used
Low Frequency Peak
Boost low frequencies (200, 300, 500, 700,
1000 Hz) using the upper left controls.
Mid Frequency Peak
Boost mid-frequencies (1.5k, 2k, 3k, 4k, 5k) using the controls at the upper right.
Tips and Tricks
Wide-Range Dip
Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Mac) any
knob to reset it to its unity position.
Cut frequencies using Dip controls on the bottom row.
Tips and Tricks
Pultec MEQ-5
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
The Pultec MEQ-5 is the most unique equalizer
in the Pultec family. It is particularly useful on
individual tracks during mixdown.
Guitars
Have multiple guitars that sound like mush in
the mix? The Pultec MEQ-5 is a classic tool for
achieving amazing guitar blends. Try boosting
one guitar and cutting another to achieve an octave of separation. For example, cut one guitar
using 1.5 (1500 Hz) Dip, then boost the other
using 3 (3000 Hz) Peak. View the matched pairs
of presets (Guitar 1A and 1B, 2A and 2B, etc.) for
further examples of this technique.
Twelve O’Click
Alt-click (Windows) or Option-click (Mac) any
knob to reset it to its unity position.
Pultec MEQ-5
Chapter 11: Pultec Plug-ins
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Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
chapter 12
Purple Audio
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
The Purple Audio MC77 is a spot-on digital replica of Andrew Roberts’s acclaimed MC77 Limiting amplifier, which in turn is an update of his
classic MC76 hardware unit. Representing a different take on the 1176-style FET limiter, the
Bomb Factory Purple Audio MC77 preserves every audio nuance and sonic subtlety of the classic originals.
The Bomb Factory MC77
How the Bomb Factory Purple
Audio MC77 Works
The Bomb Factory Purple Audio MC77 has controls identical in name to those of the Bomb Factory BF76, and which function similarly. For
more information, see Chapter 4, “Bomb Factory BF76.”
Chapter 12: Purple Audio
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Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
chapter 13
SansAmp PSA-1
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
SansAmp PSA-1
Punch up existing tracks or record great guitar
sounds with the SansAmp PSA-1. Capture bass
or electric guitar free of muddy sound degradation and dial in the widest range of amplifier,
harmonic generation, cabinet simulation and
equalization tone shaping options available!
How the PSA-1 Works
B. Andrew Barta of Tech 21, Inc. introduced the
SansAmp Classic in 1989. A guitar player with
both a trained ear and electronics expertise, Andrew and Tech 21 pioneered the market for tube
amplifier emulation.
SansAmp also features a proprietary speaker simulator which emulates the smooth, even response of a multiple-miked speaker cabinet—
free of the harsh peaks, valleys and notches associated with single miking or poor microphone
placement.
Finally, SansAmp provides two extremely sweet
sounding tone controls (high and low) that
sound great on most anything.
Tube sound, speaker simulation, warm equalization and cool lo-fi textures—no wonder thousands of records feature the classic sounds of
SansAmp!
SansAmp’s FET-hybrid circuitry captures the
low-order harmonics and sweet overdrive
unique to tube amplifiers. And pushed harder,
SansAmp also generates cool lo-fi and grainy
sound textures that still retain warmth.
Chapter 13: SansAmp PSA-1
47
PSA-1 Controls
Use the eight knobs to dial in your desired tone
or effect.
Pre-Amp Determines the input sensitivity and
pre-amp distortion. Increasing the setting produces an effect similar to putting a clean booster
pedal ahead of a tube amp, overdriving the first
stage. For cleaner sounds, use settings below the
unity-gain point.
Tips and Tricks
Buzz Controls low frequency break up and overdrive. Boost the effect by turning clockwise from
the center point indicated by the arrows. As you
increase towards maximum, the sound becomes
(you guessed it) buzzy, with added harmonic
content. For increased clarity and definition
when using distortion, position the knob at its
midpoint or towards minimum.
Louder and Cleaner
Punch Sets midrange break up and overdrive.
Decreasing from the center produces a softer,
“Fender”-style break up. Increasing the setting
produces a harder, heavier distortion. At maximum, it produces a sound similar to a wah pedal
at mid-boost position placed in front of a Marshall amp.
Pre-Amp Versus Drive
Crunch Brings out upper harmonic content and,
on guitars, pick attack. For cleaner sounds or
smoother high end, decrease as needed.
Drive Increases the amount of power amp distortion. Power amp distortion is associated with
the “Vintage Marshall” sound—using SansAmp,
you can produce the effect even at low levels.
Low Provides a tone control specially tuned for
maximum musicality when used to EQ low frequencies on instruments. Boost or cut by ±12 dB
by turning from the center point indicated by
the arrows.
High Boosts or cuts high frequencies ±12 dB.
48
Level Boosts or cuts the overall gain to re-establish unity after adding distortion or equalizing
the signal.
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
Peace and Unity
A little known fact: The arrows in the SansAmp
controls indicate the unity-gain position.
For best results, don’t set the Pre-Amp level
lower than unity gain when the Drive knob is at
9 o’clock or higher. However, if you want a crystal-clear sound and the Drive control is already
near minimum, decrease Pre-Amp to further remove distortion.
To create varying types of overdrive, vary PreAmp in relation to Drive. A high Pre-Amp setting emphasizes pre-amp distortion (see
“Mark 1” preset), while high Drive settings emphasize power amp distortion (see “Plexi” preset).
chapter 14
Slightly Rude Compressor
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
The Slightly Rude Compressor is Bomb Factory's
first completely custom compressor design.
Used conservatively, it sounds beautiful on vocals, drums, guitars and piano. Pushed hard, it's
unique and aggressive. The stereo version is specifically designed to solve the problems that often plague digital mixes.
How the Slightly Rude Compressor
Works
The Slightly Rude Compressor is not based on
any specific piece of vintage hardware. It is a
completely custom design that features all of
Bomb Factory’s knowledge and expertise in the
realm of digital compression.
Slightly Rude Compressor
Controls
Input Amount Sets the input level to the unit and
the compression threshold, just like the Input
control on an 1176. Full clockwise is loudest.
Make-Up Gain Adds gain after compression. It
works just like the Gain control on an LA-2A.
Release Time Adjusts the release time; full clockwise is fastest and provides the most “pump.”
Slightly Rude Compressor
Rudeness Affects the sound of the compression
action.
Slightly Rude/Super Rude Switch Affects the
sound of the compression action.
Chapter 14: Slightly Rude Compressor
49
Tips and Tricks
For a classic sound, use the “Slightly Rude” setting and keep the Rudeness control below the
half-way point. Settings above 50% will increase
the aggressiveness of the compressed sound.
To achieve more dynamic effects, switch to the
“Super Rude” mode. In this mode, the Rudeness
knob controls the amount of overshoot in the
compressor. This results in a distinctive processed sound on percussive material, especially
on piano and drums.
Try chaining the Slightly Rude Compressor either before or after other compressors. Using the
Bomb Factory Fairchild 660 (or 670) or Bomb
Factory BF76 before or after the Slightly Rude
Compressor will give you an amazing variety of
compression options—especially if you experiment with the Super Rude mode.
Also be sure to try the Slightly Rude Compressor
on full mixes or stereo submixes! It adds the
“glue” that helps hold mixes together, something that’s often hard to achieve in the digital
domain.
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Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
chapter 15
Tel-Ray Variable Delay
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
Add delay or echo to any voice or instrument using the Tel-Ray Variable Delay. It provides lush
delay, amazing echo, and warms up your tracks
and mixes.
How the Tel-Ray Works
In the early 1960s, a small company experimented with electronics and technology. When
they came up with something great, they would
Tell Ray (the boss).
Tel-Ray Variable Delay
Space-age technology in a can
One invention involved a tuna can, a motor,
and a few tablespoons of cancer-causing oil. The
creation: an Electronic Memory Unit. A technology, they were sure, that would be of great interest to companies like IBM and NASA.
Though it never made it to the moon, most every major guitar amp manufacturer licensed the
killer technology that gives Tel-Ray its unique
sound.
Chapter 15: Tel-Ray Variable Delay
51
How the Tel-Ray is Used
Tips and Tricks
Input/Output Section
Variation? Do They Ever!
Input sets the signal level to the tuna can echo
unit.
Each and every Tel-Ray we tested (and Bomb
Factory owns more than a dozen) varied drastically in motor and flywheel stability, resulting
in different pitch and variation effects. The
same unit even sounded different day to day, depending on temperature, warm-up time and
other factors.
Tone is a standard tone control like those commonly found on guitar effects.
Mix adjusts the amount of dry (unprocessed)
signal relative to the amount of wet (processed)
signal. Full clockwise is 100% wet. (On original
units, this control is located deep inside the box,
typically soaked in carcinogenic PCB oil.)
Output is a simple digital output trim control.
Echo/Delay Section
Variable Delay selects the delay time. Delay
times vary from 0.06 to 0.3 seconds. Full clockwise is slowest.
Variation adjusts how much variation occurs in
the delay. The more variation you use, the more
warbled and wobbly the sound becomes.
Sustain determines how long the delay takes to
die out. It is actually a feedback control similar
to the one found on the Moogerfooger Analog
Delay.
Echo/Doubler determines whether or not a second record head is engaged, resulting in a double echo.
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Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
Since the original units are basically thirty yearold tuna cans bolted to plywood with springs
and motors flopping around inside, Bomb Factory added the Variation knob so you can dial in
a Tel-Ray in whatever state of disrepair you desire.
chapter 16
Voce Plug-ins
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite
This chapter describes the Voce™ Chorus/Vibrato and Voce Spin plug-ins.
Voce Chorus/Vibrato
Inside every B-3 organ, on the end of the driveshaft that spins the tonewheels, you’ll find a
mechanical contraption that delays the sound
of the organ. Originally added to make the B-3
sound more like a pipe organ, it imparts frequency variation to the sound.
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
Voce Chorus/Vibrato recreates the mechanical
scanner vibrato found in the B-3 Organ. Three
settings of chorus and three settings of vibrato
presented on one cool knob! Fun and easy to
use, it’s a classic effect used for over sixty years.
Although well received by churches, the signature B-3 Chorus/Vibrato graced jazz and rock recordings ever since. Now you can use this beautiful effect on any instrument.
How Voce Chorus/Vibrato is Used
Simply click the Big Knob to rotate between settings of Vibrato and Chorus. V1 provides the
least amount of vibrato, V2 slightly more, and
V3 the most. Likewise the amount of Chorus increases from C1 to C3.
Option-Click the knob to rotate it in the opposite direction, or click the lettering to select a
specific setting.
Voce Chorus/Vibrato
How Voce Chorus/Vibrato Works
In a large pipe organ, “ranks” of pipes (multiple
pipes designed to emit the same frequency)
aren’t perfectly in tune. The effect goes by the
name “multirank” or, more commonly, “chorus.”
Tips and Tricks
The classic setting for organ is “C3” but you’ll
find other settings useful on a variety of instruments. Some of our favorites include:
Chapter 16: Voce Plug-ins
53
Electric Pianos
How Voce Spin Works
Many electric pianos feature built-in vibrato.
But if the sound you’re using doesn’t provide a
realistic vibrato (perhaps you’re wrestling with a
sampler), track dry and apply the effect later.
Don Leslie invented the rotating speaker in
1937. His design is simple and elegant: an internal 40-watt tube amplifier feeds a speaker crossover, which splits the signal.
Guitar
All frequencies below 800 Hz go to a 15” bass
speaker and all frequencies above 800 Hz go to a
compression horn driver.
A certain popular guitar amp has a knob that
says “Vibrato” but it’s really just Tremolo. Tremolo is amplitude modulation; the sound gets
louder and quieter. Vibrato, in contrast, imparts
pitch change. A select few highly sought after
‘50s Magnatone guitar amps feature a true tube
vibrato (one even does stereo!) You can approximate this sound by recording guitar direct (or
starting with a clean miked sound), applying
Voce Chorus/Vibrato, then using SansAmp™
PSA-1.
Lower speaker assembly
Voce Spin
(TDM, RTAS, and AudioSuite)
Voce Spin provides the most accurate simulation of the well-loved rotating speaker. 15 classic
recording setups feature horn resonance,
speaker crossover, varying microphone placement—even the “Memphis” sound with the
lower drum’s slow motor unplugged!
Voce Spin
54
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
The large bass speaker is bolted to the cabinet
and a foam drum directly below the speaker reflects the bass outward.
For the high frequencies, a treble horn with two
bells reflects the sound from the compression
horn driver located below.
Only one bell actually produces sound; the
other is merely a counterbalance.
Upper speaker assembly
Then, of course, it spins. Separate belts, pulleys
and motors drive the upper treble horn and the
lower foam drum. Adding to the effect, the upper horn and lower drum spin in opposite directions. Most rotating speakers feature two sets of
motors, allowing both slow (“Chorale”) and fast
(“Tremolo”) rotation speeds.
How Voce Spin is Used
Of course, all that motion creates a rich sound—
but then you have to capture it using microphones. Spin provides fifteen classic recording
setups to choose from, giving you the sounds
you’ve heard on countless records instantly.
Just choose a preset and click Chorale, Tremolo,
or Off. Alternately, click and drag the flip
switch. Short flicks of the wrist land on Off;
longer flicks toggle between Chorale and Tremolo.
See also “Additional Controls” on page 56.
Foam Drum Middle pulleys, microphones close.
Memphis Lower drum slow motor unplugged,
microphones close.
Steppenwolf Lower drum only, loose belts, microphones close.
Rover (Slow to Fast) Guitar rotating speaker,
maximum speed differential.
Rover (Slow to Medium) Guitar rotating speaker,
slower variation.
Rover (Medium to Fast) Guitar rotating speaker,
faster variation.
Phaser Medium rotation rate, microphones very
close.
Watery Guitar Fast rotation rate, microphones
close.
Speed Options
Chorale Slow rotation.
You may also Alt-click (Windows) or Optionclick (Mac) anywhere to toggle between Chorale
and Tremolo speeds.
Spin Presets
Tremolo Fast rotation.
Off No rotation, but still through the crossover
and speakers (wherever the speakers comes to
rest relative to the microphones!).
122 Model 122 speaker, medium pulleys.
122 (Small Pulley) Small pulleys (fastest rotation).
122 (Large Pulley) Large pulleys (slowest rotation).
122 (Wide Stereo) Middle pulleys, wide stereo
microphone placement.
122 (Mono) Middle pulleys, one mic each top
and bottom.
21H Model 21H speaker.
Chapter 16: Voce Plug-ins
55
Additional Controls
Accessing Controls On-Screen
Though the Voce Spin plug-in window contains
only the Chorale/Off/Tremolo control, the following parameters are also available:
All Voce Spin parameters can be adjusted onscreen by editing Pro Tools breakpoint automation data.
• Input Trim
• Speed Switch
To access additional Voce Spin parameters onscreen:
• Rotor Balance
• Upper Slow Speed
• Upper Accel Rate
1 Click the Plug-in Automation button in the
Plug-in window to open the Plug-in Automation
window.
• Upper Decel Rate
• Upper Mic Angle
• Lower Fast Speed
• Lower Slow Speed
• Lower Accel Rate
• Lower Decel Rate
2 In the list of controls at the left, click to select
a control and click Add (or, just double-click the
desired control in the list). Repeat to access and
enable additional controls.
3 Click OK to close the Plug-in Automation win-
dow.
• Lower Mic Angle
4 In the Edit window, do one of the following:
Using these controls, you can adjust and automate parameters such as input trim (from
–24 dB to +24 dB), set the rotor balance (the mix
between the upper and lower speakers), specify
acceleration and deceleration times (in seconds)
for both the upper and lower speakers, tweak the
fast and slow speeds of each speaker, and specify
the microphone angle for each stereo pair of microphones.
You can access these additional controls
through Pro Tools plug-in automation, and/or
from a compatible control surface.
56
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
• Click the Track View selector and select the
automation control you just enabled from
the Voce Spin sub-menu.
– or –
• Reveal an Automation lane for the track,
click the Automation Type selector and select the automation control you just enabled from the Voce Spin sub-menu.
5 Edit the breakpoint automation for the en-
abled control.
Accessing Controls from a Control Surface
When using a control surface, all Voce Spin parameters are available whenever the plug-in is
focused. You only need to enable plug-in automation (as described previously) if you want to
record your adjustments as breakpoint automation.
To access additional Voce controls from a control
surface:
1 Focus the Voce Spin plug-in on your control
surface. All available parameters are mapped to
encoders, faders, and switches.
2 Adjust the control currently targeting the de-
sired parameter.
Tips and Tricks
The “One Mic Way Back In The Corner Of The
Room” Trick
Spin isn’t designed to sound like a rotating
speaker spinning all by itself in a large room.
Spin provides the sound of a miked rotating
speaker, the sound the producer and engineer
hear in the control room. But don’t let that stop
you from getting the sound you want!
To achieve the sound of a distant microphone
capturing the rotating speaker, run Spin using
the wide stereo preset. Now apply a room reverb,
remove any pre-delay, and adjust the wet/dry reverb balance until you get the distant sound
you’re looking for.
3 If necessary, use the previous/next Page con-
trols to access additional controls.
To automate your adjustments, be sure to
enable automation for that parameter as described above. See the Pro Tools Reference
Guide for complete track automation instructions.
Spin into Moogerfooger Lowpass Filter
Try using the amplitude modulation effects of
Spin as an LFO driving the Moogerfooger Lowpass Filter!
Distortion and Spin
To simulate overdriving the tube amp powering
the rotating speaker, apply distortion before
Spin, since, in the real-world signal path, the
amp distorts the signal before the speakers
throw the sound around. Among tons of other
great distortion sounds, the SansAmp PSA-1
plug-in provides distortion presets for both the
model 122 and model 147 rotating speakers.
Organ Signal Path
Likewise, when going for classic organ sounds,
route through the Voce Chorus/Vibrato before
Spin, as that’s the signal path in the B-3 organ.
Chapter 16: Voce Plug-ins
57
The John Lennon Vocal Thing
In what seems like a particularly dangerous
Beatles studio experiment, a Leslie speaker cabinet was dismembered, a microphone was affixed
to the rapidly spinning upper rotor, and John
Lennon attempted to sing into it. Fortunately
the deafening wind noise captured by the microphone put a stop to the proceedings before
anyone got maimed. Feel free just to run the vocal through the rotating speaker—that’s what
they wound up doing.
Reverse Spin
Those reverse-vocal and reverse-guitar tricks are
even more fun when you run ‘em through Spin.
Try reversing the vocal and putting it through
Spin, as well as putting the vocal through Spin
then reversing the processed vocal.
Generator Leakage
Of all the sounds to pass through a Leslie, no
sound has been amplified more often than the
sound of B-3 Organ generator leakage. Even
with no notes keyed, a small amount of B-3
sound leaks out.
58
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
appendix a
DSP Requirements for TDM Plug-ins
The number of TDM plug-ins you can use at one
time depends on how much DSP power is available in your system. Since the TDM hardware on
Pro Tools cards provide dedicated DSP for plugins, plug-in performance is not limited by CPU
processing power.
The DSP tables on the following pages show the
theoretical number of instances of each plug-in
that can be powered by a single DSP chip on
Pro Tools|HD cards. DSP usage differs according
to card type.
DSP tables show the theoretical maximum
performance when no other plug-ins or system tasks (such as I/O) are sharing available DSP resources. You will typically use
more than one type of plug-in simultaneously. The data in these tables are provided as guidelines to help you gauge the
relative efficiency of different plug-ins on
your system. They are not guaranteed performance counts that you should expect to
see in typical real-world sessions and usage.
Not all plug-ins are supported on all types of
chips. The following tables indicate the number
of compatible chips per card.
Using Multi-Mono Plug-ins on GreaterThan-Stereo Tracks
Plug-ins used in multi-mono format on greaterthan-stereo tracks require one mono instance
per channel of the multi-channel audio format.
For example, a multi-mono plug-in used on a
5.1 format track, requires six mono instances
since there are six audio channels in the 5.1 format.
There are a total of nine DSP chips on a
Pro Tools|HD card (HD Core™, HD Process™,
and HD Accel). HD Core and HD Process cards
provide identical chip sets. HD Accel cards provide newer, more powerful DSP chips (making
the HD Accel card ideal for DSP-intensive plugins, and for high sample rate sessions).
Appendix A: DSP Requirements for TDM Plug-ins
59
HD Accel Card
Digidesign TDM plug-ins on HD Accel cards have the following DSP requirements:
44.1/48 kHz (Mono and Stereo)
Table 1. Maximum instances of real-time TDM plug-ins per DSP chip for an HD Accel card, at 44.1 or 48 kHz sample
rates (mono and stereo).
44.1/48 kHz
Mono
Sample Rate
Instances
on Chips
with
SRAM
Instances
on Chips
without
SRAM
Instances
on Chips
with
SRAM
Instances
on Chips
without
SRAM
BF Essential Clip Remover
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
BF Essential Correlation
Meter
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
BF Essential Meter Bridge
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
BF Essential Noise Meter
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Bomb Factory BF 76
9
9
8
8
9
Bomb Factory BF-3A
9
9
7
7
9
Bomb Factory BF-2A
9
9
7
7
9
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Fairchild 660
8
8
4
4
9
Fairchild 670
n/a
n/a
5
5
9
JOEMEEK VC5 Meequalizer
11
11
5
5
9
JOEMEEK SC2 Compressor
9
9
9
9
9
Moogerfooger Analog Delay
9
9
4
4
9
12
12
5
5
9
5
5
3
3
9
Plug-in
Cosmonaut Voice
Moogerfooger 12-Stage
Phaser
Moogerfooger Ring
Modulator
60
Compatible DSP
Chips per
HD Accel Card
44.1/48 kHz
Stereo
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
Table 1. Maximum instances of real-time TDM plug-ins per DSP chip for an HD Accel card, at 44.1 or 48 kHz sample
rates (mono and stereo).
44.1/48 kHz
Mono
Sample Rate
Compatible DSP
Chips per
HD Accel Card
44.1/48 kHz
Stereo
Instances
on Chips
with
SRAM
Instances
on Chips
without
SRAM
Instances
on Chips
with
SRAM
Instances
on Chips
without
SRAM
Moogerfooger Lowpass Filter
5
5
2
2
9
Pultec EQH-2
5
5
3
3
9
Pultec EQP-1A
6
6
3
3
9
Pultec MEQ-5
6
6
3
3
9
10
10
5
5
9
SansAmp
3
3
1
1
9
Slightly Rude Compressor
8
8
6
6
9
Tel-Ray Variable Delay
6
6
3
3
9
Voce Chorus/Vibrato
33
33
16
16
9
6
6
6
6
9
Plug-in
Purple Audio MC77
Voce Spin
Appendix A: DSP Requirements for TDM Plug-ins
61
88.2/96 kHz (Mono and Stereo)
Table 2. Maximum instances of real-time TDM plug-ins per DSP chip for an HD Accel card, at 88.2 or 96 kHz sample
rates (mono and stereo).
88.2/96 kHz
Mono
Sample Rate
Instances
on Chips
with
SRAM
Instances
on Chips
without
SRAM
Instances
on Chips
with
SRAM
Instances
on Chips
without
SRAM
BF Essential Clip Remover
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
BF Essential Correlation
Meter
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
BF Essential Meter Bridge
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
BF Essential Noise Meter
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Bomb Factory BF 76
4
4
4
4
9
Bomb Factory BF-3A
4
4
4
4
9
Bomb Factory BF-2A
4
4
4
4
9
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Fairchild 660
4
4
2
2
9
Fairchild 670
n/a
n/a
2
2
9
JOEMEEK VC5 Meequalizer
5
5
2
2
9
JOEMEEK SC2 Compressor
4
4
4
4
9
Moogerfooger Analog Delay
4
4
2
2
9
Moogerfooger 12-Stage
Phaser
6
6
3
3
9
Moogerfooger Ring
Modulator
5
5
2
2
9
Moogerfooger Lowpass
Filter
2
2
1
1
9
Pultec EQH-2
3
3
1
1
9
Plug-in
Cosmonaut Voice
62
Compatible DSP
Chips per
HD Accel Card
88.2/96 kHz
Stereo
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
Table 2. Maximum instances of real-time TDM plug-ins per DSP chip for an HD Accel card, at 88.2 or 96 kHz sample
rates (mono and stereo).
88.2/96 kHz
Mono
Sample Rate
Compatible DSP
Chips per
HD Accel Card
88.2/96 kHz
Stereo
Instances
on Chips
with
SRAM
Instances
on Chips
without
SRAM
Instances
on Chips
with
SRAM
Instances
on Chips
without
SRAM
Pultec EQP-1A
3
3
1
1
9
Pultec MEQ-5
6
6
3
3
9
Purple Audio MC77
5
5
3
3
9
SansAmp
2
2
1
1
9
Slightly Rude Compressor
4
4
3
3
9
Tel-Ray Variable Delay
3
n/a
1
n/a
4
Voce Chorus/Vibrato
16
16
8
8
9
3
3
3
3
9
Plug-in
Voce Spin
Appendix A: DSP Requirements for TDM Plug-ins
63
176.4/192 kHz (Mono and Stereo)
Table 3. Maximum instances of real-time TDM plug-ins per DSP chip for an HD Accel card, at 176.4 or 192 kHz
sample rates (mono and stereo).
Sample Rate
176.4/96 kHz
Stereo
Compatible DSP
Chips per
HD Accel Card
Instances
on Chips
with
SRAM
Instances
on Chips
without
SRAM
Instances
on Chips
with
SRAM
Instances
on Chips
without
SRAM
BF Essential Clip Remover
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
BF Essential Correlation
Meter
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
BF Essential Meter Bridge
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
BF Essential Noise Meter
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Bomb Factory BF 76
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Bomb Factory BF-3A
2
2
2
2
6
Bomb Factory BF-2A
2
2
2
2
9
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Fairchild 660
1
2
1
1
9
Fairchild 670
n/a
n/a
1
1
9
JOEMEEK VC5 Meequalizer
2
2
1
1
9
JOEMEEK SC2 Compressor
2
2
2
2
9
Moogerfooger Analog Delay
2
2
1
1
6
Moogerfooger 12-Stage
Phaser
3
3
1
1
9
Moogerfooger Ring
Modulator
2
2
1
1
9
Moogerfooger Lowpass
Filter
1
1
0.5
0.5
6
Pultec EQH-2
1
1
0.5
0.5
6
Plug-in
Cosmonaut Voice
64
176.4/96 kHz
Mono
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
Table 3. Maximum instances of real-time TDM plug-ins per DSP chip for an HD Accel card, at 176.4 or 192 kHz
sample rates (mono and stereo).
Sample Rate
176.4/96 kHz
Mono
176.4/96 kHz
Stereo
Compatible DSP
Chips per
HD Accel Card
Instances
on Chips
with
SRAM
Instances
on Chips
without
SRAM
Instances
on Chips
with
SRAM
Instances
on Chips
without
SRAM
Pultec EQP-1A
1
1
0.5
0.5
6
Pultec MEQ-5
4
4
2
2
9
Purple Audio MC77
2
2
1
1
9
SansAmp
1
1
0.5
0.5
6
Slightly Rude Compressor
1
1
0.5
0.5
6
Tel-Ray Variable Delay
1
n/a
0.5
n/a
4
Voce Chorus/Vibrato
7
7
3
3
9
Voce Spin
1
1
0.5
0.5
6
Plug-in
Appendix A: DSP Requirements for TDM Plug-ins
65
HD Core and Process Card
Digidesign TDM plug-ins on HD Core and Process cards have the following DSP requirements:
Mono and Stereo
Table 4. Maximum instances of real-time TDM plug-ins per DSP chip for an HD Core or HD Process card, at different
sample rates (mono and stereo).
Sample Rate
Plug-in
88.2/96 kHz
176.4/192 kHz
Compatible DSP
Chips per
HD Core or HD
Process Card
Mono
Stereo
Mono
Stereo
Mono
Stereo
BF Essential
Clip Remover
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
v
n/a
BF Essential
Correlation
Meter
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
BF Essential
Meter Bridge
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
BF Essential
Noise Meter
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Bomb Factory
BF 76
4
4
2
2
n/a
n/a
9
Bomb Factory
BF-3A
4
4
2
2
not
supported
not
supported
9
Bomb Factory
BF-2A
4
4
2
2
1
1
9
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Fairchild 660
3
2
1
1
n/a
n/a
9
Fairchild 670
n/a
2
n/a
1
n/a
n/a
9
JOEMEEK VC5
Meequalizer
5
2
2
1
1
0.5
9
Cosmonaut
Voice
66
44.1/48 kHz
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
Table 4. Maximum instances of real-time TDM plug-ins per DSP chip for an HD Core or HD Process card, at different
sample rates (mono and stereo).
Sample Rate
Plug-in
44.1/48 kHz
88.2/96 kHz
176.4/192 kHz
Compatible DSP
Chips per
HD Core or HD
Process Card
Mono
Stereo
Mono
Stereo
Mono
Stereo
JOEMEEK SC2
Compressor
4
4
2
2
1
1
9
Moogerfooger
Analog Delay
4
2
2
1
n/a
n/a
9
Moogerfooger
12-Stage
Phaser
5
2
2
1
1
n/a
9
Moogerfooger
Ring
Modulator
2
1
2
1
1
n/a
9
Moogerfooger
Lowpass Filter
2
1
1
n/a
n/a
n/a
9
Pultec EQH-2
2
1
1
n/a
n/a
n/a
9
Pultec EQP-1A
3
1
1
n/a
n/a
n/a
9
Pultec MEQ-5
3
1
2
1
2
1
9
Purple Audio
MC77
4
2
2
1
1
0.5
9
SansAmp
1
n/a
1
n/a
n/a
n/a
9
Slightly Rude
Compressor
3
2
1
1
n/a
n/a
9
Tel-Ray Variable
Delay
2
1
1
n/a
n/a
n/a
9
13
7
7
3
3
1
9
3
3
1
1
n/a
n/a
9
Voce Chorus/Vibrato
Voce Spin
Appendix A: DSP Requirements for TDM Plug-ins
67
For maximum instance counts for plug-ins that are compatible with the most powerful chips on
HD Accel, see “HD Accel Card” on page 60.
Monitoring DSP Usage
The System Usage window (Windows > Show System Usage) shows approximately how much DSP is
available in your system and how it is being used in the current Pro Tools session.
For more information about DSP usage and allocation, see the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
68
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
appendix b
DSP Delays Incurred by TDM Plug-ins
Virtually all TDM plug-ins incur some amount
of signal delay.
The following table shows the delays inherent
in each type of Bomb Factory TDM plug-in:
≈
If you are working with mono tracks, or are processing all channels with the same plug-in, the
signal delays are not long enough to be significant and should not be a concern.
This signal delay is significant only if you use a
plug-in on one channel of a stereo or multichannel signal but not the others, since this can
cause the channels to be slightly out of phase.
Pro Tools systems provide automatic Delay
Compensation (and other methods) to compensate for signal processing delays. For detailed information, see the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
Table 5. Samples of delay incurred by each TDM plug-in
on HD cards
Plug-in
Samples of Delay
on Pro Tools|HD
Cards
BF Essential Clip Remover
0
BF Essential Correlation
Meter
0
BF Essential Meter Bridge
0
BF Essential Noise Meter
0
Bomb Factory BF 76
0
Bomb Factory BF-3A
3
Bomb Factory BF-2A
3
Cosmonaut Voice
0
Fairchild 660
0
Fairchild 670
0
JOEMEEK VC5
Meequalizer
0
JOEMEEK SC2
Compressor
3
Appendix B: DSP Delays Incurred by TDM Plug-ins
69
Table 5. Samples of delay incurred by each TDM plug-in
on HD cards
Plug-in
70
Samples of Delay
on Pro Tools|HD
Cards
Moogerfooger Analog
Delay
3
Moogerfooger 12-Stage
Phaser
3
Moogerfooger Ring
Modulator
3
Moogerfooger Lowpass
Filter
3
Pultec EQH-2
3
Pultec EQP-1A
3
Pultec MEQ-5
3
Purple Audio MC77
6
SansAmp
3
Slightly Rude Compressor
3
Tel-Ray Variable Delay
3
Voce Chorus/Vibrato
3
Voce Spin
3
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
appendix c
All About Compressors
This appendix provides an overview of dynamics processing for general reference, and for specific examples of how some of the Bomb Factory
dynamics plug-ins can be utilized.
What Is Compression?
The difference between the softest and loudest
portion of an audio signal determines its dynamic range. Compressors allow you to control
the dynamic range of a signal.
Common uses for compression include smoothing out vocals, adding punch to bass tracks, or
taming that drummer who gets a little too excited with the kick drum right before each chorus. Used as a de-esser, compression also assists
in removing excess sibilance from vocals.
How a Compressor Works
The heart of a compressor lies in its detector and
voltage-controlled-amplifier (VCA). The detector monitors the output and calculates the
proper gain reduction. It then passes that information to the VCA, which automatically “rides
the gain” of the input signal, decreasing the
louder peaks.
Detectors use various electronic circuits. Some
respond instantly to program peaks, making
them useful for “brickwall” limiting in audio
broadcast or mastering applications. Other circuits perform simple averaging or more natural
sounding RMS calculations that are better suited
to a wider range of program material.
Once the detector determines the output level,
the VCA adjusts the signal level. VCAs vary in
type from cheap operational amplifiers (op
amps) to elaborate tube circuitry. Because the
VCA is a gain element in the signal path, it
greatly impacts the perceived quality of the final
sound. In a true compressor, the VCA only reduces the input signal and, as a result, you need
to add gain afterward to bring the average signal
back to the original perceived level.
The 1176 compressor allows you to select a compression ratio. Compression ratio determines
how the input signal relates to the output signal.
If for each 4 dB increase in input level above a
threshold the output level only increases by
1 dB, the compression ratio is 4:1. Small ratios
(like 2:1 or 4:1) add subtle polish; higher compression ratios (like 20:1) produce a distinctly
“compressed” sound.
Most modern compressors also feature a
sidechain input. A sidechain allows you to feed a
separate audio signal directly into the detector,
while still applying compression to the original
input signal. Although neither the 1176 nor the
Appendix C: All About Compressors
71
LA-2A originally had sidechains, many were put
under drill presses to accommodate the wishes
of audio engineers. Both the Bomb Factory BF76
and Bomb Factory BF-3A offer sidechain capability.
How Compression is Used
Restrict Dynamic Range
The simplest use of a compressor involves taming the louder peaks of an input signal. The
1176 and LA-2A are very easy to use—set the
Output Level (“Gain” on the LA-2A) to a comfortable setting, then adjust Input Level (“Peak
Reduction” on the LA-2A) until you clearly hear
the compression action.
If the sound is too quiet, muffled, or dead
sounding, you’re probably using too much compression. But if you notice motion around the
louder peaks in the program material (either a
“squashed” sound or a “pumping” effect),
you’re getting close.
Because the compression action decreases the
overall signal level, adjust the Input/Gain control to smooth out the level differences. Then readjust Peak Reduction as necessary for the desired sound.
To get a better understanding of what’s going
on, look at the meter. The typical setting is
“Gain Reduction” (“GR” on the 1176). In this
mode, the compressor’s VU meter moves backward from 0 VU to show the amount of gain reduction being applied to the signal. To get a feel
for each compressor, adjust so the needle
bounces backward about 10 dB on each peak,
and listen for the effect.
72
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
Breathe Life Into Lame Tracks
What is the correct way to use compression? It
depends on the desired effect and the problem
at hand. Smoothing the overall dynamics of a
performance often increases the strength and
presence of a track in the final mix. On the other
hand, misuse of compression can suck all the
life out of a performance, making highly marketable recordings for radio airplay in certain decades. Which is to say that there’s no wrong way
to use compression, just wrong ways right now.
Let’s suppose it’s 3:00 AM and your mix just
isn’t happening. The CD burner blinks ominously, waiting to be fed the shiny master disc
due at 9:00 AM. You solo each track one more
time. And there it is: the bass. It sucks. Undeniably, it sucks. Never has a bass sucked like this
bass sucks.
Depressed, you analyze the situation. In addition to being incredibly lame, the bass has too
much high end, the attack doesn’t cut through,
and the tail end of long notes disappears into
the mix. A perfect candidate for the LA-2A compressor! The LA-2A is slow enough to respond
that the attack will beef up and the tails will
smooth out. Plus, if you squash it hard and
crank up the gain, the LA-2A fattens up the
sound. Problem solved. (But don’t forget to fire
the bass player.)
De-Essing
Pre-Compression
Using the compressor’s sidechain, you can remove unwanted sibilance from vocals. Now it’s
8:00 AM and, after a brief nap, you notice that
the backing vocals are ripping your ears off.
Since you ran out of tracks about six hours into
the process, you’ve only got the stereo submix
to work from, so there’s no hope for manually
fading the “S” sounds on the individual tracks.
So fire up the BF76—it’s faster than the BF-2A
and more suited to this task. Instead of using EQ
to cut the frequencies on the input signal, use
EQ to boost the problem frequencies feeding the
sidechain. The BF76 compressor responds by
compressing more of the problem frequencies,
removing unwanted sibilance from the output.
There’s a lot of marketing-speak about “pumping and breathing” out there. Since they’re modeled after the original devices, Bomb Factory dynamics plug-ins “pump and breathe” just like
the real ones do. Think of it as the old fashioned
pumping and breathing that started this whole
mess.
Un-Pumping Drum Tracks
Using a similar technique, you can remove unwanted pumping from drum tracks. Perhaps
you’re doing a submix of drum tracks and you
want to compress the submix. One thing to listen for is any unwanted “pumping”—typically
low frequency energy sucking down the high
end.
If you want more of an exaggerated effect, try
timeshifting the sidechain signal. Simply duplicate the track you’re compressing and shift it
back in time. (Or get fancy with a delay and signal routing—whatever works for you.) Then
take the earlier signal and use it to feed the
sidechain input.
Depending on the amount of pre-delay, you can
achieve instantaneous attack times (a very fresh
sound on the LA-2A) or even unusual “pre-compression” sounds where you hear the compression before you hear the louder program material that caused the compressor response.
Suppose the drummer is using mallets on a ride
cymbal while playing a kick drum. Because of
the enormous bass energy, a side effect of the
compression is the cymbal getting quieter during each kick. Depending on the compression
settings required for the remainder of the program material, this may or may not produce the
desired result.
Similar to the De-Essing process, if you EQ the
sidechain and reduce low frequency energy (perhaps shelving everything below 300 Hz by
12 dB), there’s less low frequency feeding the
detector. You gain flexibility in the amount of
compression you can use, plus the option of using faster attack times without introducing distortion.
Appendix C: All About Compressors
73
74
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
index
Numerics
C
660 (Fairchild Limiter) 23
cabinet simulation 47
Carrier Oscillator 34
clarify 29
Class-B 23
clip remover 9
compensating for DSP delays 69
compound release circuit 29
compression 71
compressor
BF-2A 17
BF-3A 15
BF76 13
JOEMEEK SC2 28
Slightly Rude 49
Cosmonaut Voice 21
crunch 48
A
Activation Code 6
aggressive tone 15
allpass 35
Amels, Dave 24
amp simulation 47
analog delay (see also delay) 31
analog filters 35
AudioSuite 9
authorizing plug-ins 7
auto wah 39
B
beefier 42
BF Essential Clip Remover 9
BF Essential Correlation Meter 10
BF Essential Meter Bridge 10
BF-2A 17
side-chain filter 18
BF-3A 15
BF76 13, 45
Bomb Factory BF76 13, 45
boxed version 2
brickwall 71
brighten 29
broadcast limiter 16
broadcast noise 21
Bucket Brigade Analog Delay Chips 32
buzz 21, 48
D
deadness (avoiding) 29
de-essing 73
delay
Moogerfooger Analog Delay 31
Tel-Ray Variable Delay 51
distortion 48
DSP delays inherent in plug-ins 69
dynamics
BF-2A 17
BF-3A 15
Bomb Factory BF76 13, 45
Fairchild 660 23
Fairchild 670 25
JOEMEEK 28
Slightly Rude Compressor 49
Index
75
E
L
echo
analog delay 32
variable delay 51
Electronic Memory Unit 51
envelope follower 38
EQ
JOEMEEK Meequalizer 27
Moogerfooger LowPass Filter 37
Pultec EQH-2 42
Pultec EQP-1A 41
Pultec MEQ-5 43
see also SansAmp
LA-2A 17
LA-3A 15
LFO 33
limiter
BF-3A 16
Fairchild 660 23
Fairchild 670 25
lo-fi 33
ring modulation 33
textures 47
F
Fairchild
660 23
660 Amels mod 24
670 25
FET 13
filters 37, 38
G
glue 50
guitar
amp simulators 47
envelope filter 37
EQ for separation 43
H
harmonic generation 47
HD-series cards
DSP delays 69
hit 14
I
installing plug-ins 5
J
JOEMEEK
Meequalizer VC5 EQ 27
SC2 Compressor 28
76
Bomb Factory Plug-ins Guide
M
metallic 34
metering
correlation meter 10
Essential Meter Bridge 10
noise meter 11
midrange 15
modulation 35
Moog, Bob 32, 38
Moogerfooger
12-stage phaser 35
Analog Delay 31
Lowpass Filter 37
Ring Modulator 33
N
noise
adding radio noise 21
meter 11
O
oscillator 33
overshoot 29, 50
P
package contents 2
Peak 10
phase
for EQ 42
metering 10
phaser (phase shifter) 35
plug-ins
installing 5
registration 2
working with 3
pre-compression 73
program equalization 41
Pultec
EQH-2 42
EQP-1A 41
MEQ-5 43
pumping 24, 73
punch 48
R
radio effects 21
ratio 71
registration 2
removing plug-ins 8
resonance filter 37
resonant filters 35
ring modulator 33
RMS 10
Robinson-Dadson 11
Rotor Balance 56
S
SansAmp PSA-1 47
separation 43
shortwave simulation 21
side-chain 14, 71
filter in BF-2A 18
signal delay 69
sinusoidal 34
Slightly Rude Compressor 49
smooth EQ 41
sound generator 33
squawk and squelch 21
squishy 13
sum and difference frequencies 34
System Usage window 68
T
TDM plug-ins
DSP requirements 59
Tel-Ray Variable Delay 51
tighten 29
tin 27
tremolo 33, 35
triode 23
tube sounds 47
tubes 23
tuna can 51
U
uninstalling plug-ins
Mac 8
Windows Vista 8
Windows XP 8
unity 48
V
variable-mu 23
VCA 71
VENUE
working with plug-ins 3
vibrato 33
vinyl mastering 25
VU meters 10
W
wah 39, 48
website 4
whistling 39
whooshing 35
working with plug-ins 3
Index
77
www.digidesign.com
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