Roland | MMP-2 | Owner`s manual | Roland MMP-2 Owner`s manual

Owner’s manual
Before using this unit, carefully read the sections entitled: “USING THE UNIT
SAFELY”(p. 2), and “IMPORTANT NOTES”(p. 6). These sections provide
important information concerning the proper operation of the unit.
Additionally, in order to feel assured that you have gained a good grasp of
every feature provided by your new unit, Owner’s manual should be read in
its entirety. The manual should be saved and kept on hand as a convenient
reference.
All rights reserved.
No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form
without the written permission of ROLAND CORPORATION.
http://www.roland.co.jp/
Copyright © 2002 ROLAND CORPORATION
USING THE UNIT SAFELY
Used for instructions intended to alert
the user to the risk of death or severe
injury should the unit be used
improperly.
Used for instructions intended to alert
the user to the risk of injury or material
damage should the unit be used
improperly.
* Material damage refers
other adverse effects
respect to the home
furnishings, as well
animals or pets.
to damage or
caused with
and all its
to domestic
• Before using this unit, make sure to read the
instructions below, and the Owner’s Manual.
................................................................................................
• Do not open or perform any internal modifications on the unit.
................................................................................................
• Do not attempt to repair the unit, or replace
parts within it (except when this manual
provides specific instructions directing you
to do so). Refer all servicing to your retailer,
the nearest Roland Service Center, or an
authorized Roland distributor, as listed on
the “Information” page.
................................................................................................
• Never use or store the unit in places that are:
• Subject to temperature extremes (e.g.,
direct sunlight in an enclosed vehicle, near
a heating duct, on top of heat-generating
equipment); or are
• Damp (e.g., baths, washrooms, on wet
floors); or are
• Humid; or are
• Exposed to rain; or are
• Dusty; or are
• Subject to high levels of vibration.
................................................................................................
• Make sure you always have the unit placed
so it is level and sure to remain stable. Never
place it on stands that could wobble, or on
inclined surfaces.
................................................................................................
2
The
symbol alerts the user to important instructions
or warnings.The specific meaning of the symbol is
determined by the design contained within the
triangle. In the case of the symbol at left, it is used for
general cautions, warnings, or alerts to danger.
The
symbol alerts the user to items that must never
be carried out (are forbidden). The specific thing that
must not be done is indicated by the design contained
within the circle. In the case of the symbol at left, it
means that the unit must never be disassembled.
The ● symbol alerts the user to things that must be
carried out. The specific thing that must be done is
indicated by the design contained within the circle. In
the case of the symbol at left, it means that the powercord plug must be unplugged from the outlet.
• The unit should be connected to a power
supply only of the type described in the
operating instructions, or as marked on the
unit.
................................................................................................
• Use only the attached power-supply cord.
.
................................................................................................
• Do not excessively twist or bend the power
cord, nor place heavy objects on it. Doing so
can damage the cord, producing severed
elements and short circuits. Damaged cords
are fire and shock hazards!
................................................................................................
• This unit, either alone or in combination with
an amplifier and headphones or speakers,
may be capable of producing sound levels
that could cause permanent hearing loss. Do
not operate for a long period of time at a high
volume level, or at a level that is uncomfortable. If you experience any hearing loss or
ringing in the ears, you should immediately
stop using the unit, and consult an audiologist.
................................................................................................
• Do not allow any objects (e.g., flammable
material, coins, pins); or liquids of any kind
(water, soft drinks, etc.) to penetrate the unit.
• In households with small children, an adult
should provide supervision until the child is
capable of following all the rules essential for
the safe operation of the unit.
................................................................................................
USING THE UNIT SAFELY
• Protect the unit from strong impact.
(Do not drop it!)
................................................................................................
• Do not force the unit’s power-supply cord to
share an outlet with an unreasonable number
of other devices. Be especially careful when
using extension cords—the total power used
by all devices you have connected to the
extension cord’s outlet must never exceed the
power rating (watts/amperes) for the
extension cord. Excessive loads can cause the
insulation on the cord to heat up and
eventually melt through.
................................................................................................
• Before using the unit in a foreign country,
consult with your retailer, the nearest Roland
Service Center, or an authorized Roland
distributor, as listed on the “Information”
page.
................................................................................................
• DO NOT play a CD-ROM disc on a conventional audio CD player. The resulting sound
may be of a level that could cause permanent
hearing loss. Damage to speakers or other
system components may result.
................................................................................................
• The unit should be located so that its location
or position does not interfere with its proper
ventilation.
................................................................................................
• Always grasp only the plug on the powersupply cord when plugging into, or
unplugging from, an outlet or this unit.
................................................................................................
• Try to prevent cords and cables from
becoming entangled. Also, all cords and
cables should be placed so they are out of the
reach of children.
................................................................................................
• Never climb on top of, nor place heavy
objects on the unit.
................................................................................................
• Never handle the power cord or its plugs
with wet hands when plugging into, or
unplugging from, an outlet or this unit.
................................................................................................
• Before moving the unit, disconnect the power
plug from the outlet, and pull out all cords
from external devices.
................................................................................................
• Before cleaning the unit, turn off the power
and unplug the power cord from the outlet
(p. 18).
................................................................................................
• Whenever you suspect the possibility of
lightning in your area, pull the plug on the
power cord out of the outlet.
................................................................................................
3
Contents
USING THE UNIT SAFELY....................................................... 2
Contents ................................................................................... 4
IMPORTANT NOTES ................................................................ 6
Getting Started ......................................................................... 8
Checking the Included Items.............................................................................................. 8
Main Features ....................................................................................................................... 8
You can use the MMP-2 for a wide variety of applications such as:............................ 8
Top and Rear Panels ............................................................... 9
Top Panel............................................................................................................................... 9
Rear Panel ........................................................................................................................... 10
Function Organization and Signal Flow .............................. 11
Set Up and Basic Operations................................................ 12
Getting Ready to Switch on the Power ........................................................................... 12
Making the Connections........................................................................................ 12
Setting the Output Level........................................................................................ 13
Turning On the Power ........................................................................................... 13
Global Functions ................................................................................................................ 14
Adjusting the Contrast of the LCD Screen (LCDCNT) ..................................... 14
Patches...................................................................................................................... 14
Meters ....................................................................................................................... 16
Edit Channel Select (EDIT CH SELECT)............................................................. 16
Settings for the Analog Inputs ......................................................................................... 17
Pad ............................................................................................................................ 17
Sensitivity (SENS) ................................................................................................... 17
Peak Indicator ......................................................................................................... 17
Phantom Power (+48V).......................................................................................... 17
Phase......................................................................................................................... 18
Low-cut Filter (LO-CUT) ....................................................................................... 18
Attenuator (ATT) .................................................................................................... 18
Turning Off the Power ...................................................................................................... 18
Using Effects .......................................................................... 19
BYPASS................................................................................................................................ 19
Mic Modeling...................................................................................................................... 19
Equalizer.............................................................................................................................. 20
Dynamics............................................................................................................................. 21
Compressor.............................................................................................................. 21
Expander .................................................................................................................. 23
Enhancer/De-esser................................................................................................. 23
Plug-in Effect ...................................................................................................................... 24
Pre-amp Modeling.................................................................................................. 24
4
Contents
Settings for Digital Connections .......................................... 26
Sampling Clock Source .......................................................................................... 26
Sampling Frequency............................................................................................... 26
Audio Input Source ................................................................................................ 26
Display Messages ................................................................................................... 26
Examples of Use .................................................................... 27
Analog Input to Analog Output ...................................................................................... 27
Analog Input to Digital Output ....................................................................................... 27
Other Features ....................................................................... 28
Channel Linking ..................................................................................................... 28
Copying Settings Between Channels ................................................................... 28
Backup Patch ........................................................................................................... 28
Route......................................................................................................................... 29
Initializing................................................................................................................ 29
Use of computer and setup................................................... 30
Set up (PC setting and Install).......................................................................................... 30
MMP-2 settings ....................................................................................................... 30
Computer settings .................................................................................................. 30
Functions work in conjunction with computers............................................................ 41
Backup Patches ....................................................................................................... 41
Intuitive operation of MMP-2 using MMP-2 editor .......................................... 41
Trouble Shooting ................................................................... 42
Trouble Shooting about Computer ...................................... 43
Windows users ................................................................................................................... 43
Macintosh users.................................................................................................................. 44
MIDI Implementation.............................................................. 46
TRANSMITTED DATA AND REGOGNIZED RECEIVE DATA............................... 46
Channel Voice message ......................................................................................... 46
System Exclusive Message .................................................................................... 46
Data Transfer Address Map ............................................................................................. 47
Parameter Address Block ...................................................................................... 47
Appendices ......................................................................................................................... 51
Specifications......................................................................... 53
Index........................................................................................ 54
5
IMPORTANT NOTES
In addition to the items listed under “USING THE
UNIT SAFELY” (p. 2), please read and observe the
following:
• Never use benzine, thinners, alcohol or solvents of
any kind, to avoid the possibility of discoloration
and/or deformation.
Power Supply
Additional Precautions
• Do not use this unit on the same power circuit with
any device that will generate line noise (such as an
electric motor or variable lighting system).
• Please be aware that the contents of memory can be
irretrievably lost as a result of a malfunction, or the
improper operation of the unit. To protect yourself
against the risk of loosing important data, we
recommend that you periodically save a backup
copy of important data you have stored in the unit’s
memory on a storage device (e.g., hard disk or
floppy disk).
• Before connecting this unit to other devices, turn off
the power to all units. This will help prevent
malfunctions and/or damage to speakers or other
devices.
Placement
• Using the unit near power amplifiers (or other
equipment containing large power transformers)
may induce hum. To alleviate the problem, change
the orientation of this unit; or move it farther away
from the source of interference.
• This device may interfere with radio and television
reception. Do not use this device in the vicinity of
such receivers.
• Noise may be produced if wireless communications
devices, such as cell phones, are operated in the
vicinity of this unit. Such noise could occur when
receiving or initiating a call, or while conversing.
Should you experience such problems, you should
relocate such wireless devices so they are at a greater
distance from this unit, or switch them off.
• To avoid possible breakdown, do not use the unit in
a wet area, such as an area exposed to rain or other
moisture.
Maintenance
• For everyday cleaning wipe the unit with a soft, dry
cloth or one that has been slightly dampened with
water. To remove stubborn dirt, use a cloth impregnated with a mild, non-abrasive detergent. Afterwards, be sure to wipe the unit thoroughly with a
soft, dry cloth.
6
• Unfortunately, it may be impossible to restore the
contents of data that was stored on a storage device
once it has been lost. Roland Corporation assumes
no liability concerning such loss of data.
• Use a reasonable amount of care when using the
unit’s buttons, sliders, or other controls; and when
using its jacks and connectors. Rough handling can
lead to malfunctions.
• Never strike or apply strong pressure to the display.
• When connecting / disconnecting all cables, grasp
the connector itself—never pull on the cable. This
way you will avoid causing shorts, or damage to the
cable’s internal elements.
• A small amount of heat will radiate from the unit
during normal operation.
• To avoid disturbing your neighbors, try to keep the
unit’s volume at reasonable levels. You may prefer
to use headphones, so you do not need to be
concerned about those around you (especially when
it is late at night).
• When you need to transport the unit, package it in
the box (including padding) that it came in, if
possible. Otherwise, you will need to use equivalent
packaging materials.
IMPORTANT NOTES
• Use a cable from Roland to make the connection. If
using some other make of connection cable, please
note the following precautions.
• Some connection cables contain resistors. Do not
use cables that incorporate resistors for
connecting to this unit. The use of such cables can
cause the sound level to be extremely low, or
impossible to hear. For information on cable
specifications, contact the manufacturer of the
cable.
• Before you open the included CD-ROM, you must
read the “license agreement.” Opening the CD-ROM
will be taken to mean your acceptance of the license
agreement.
Handling CD-ROMs
• Avoid touching or scratching the shiny underside
(encoded surface) of the disc. Damaged or dirty CDROM discs may not be read properly. Keep your
discs clean using a commercially available CD
cleaner.
Copyright
• When exchanging audio signals through a digital
connection with an external instrument, this unit can
perform recording without being subject to the
restrictions of the Serial Copy Management System
(SCMS). This is because the unit is intended solely
for musical production, and is designed not to be
subject to restrictions as long as it is used to record
works (such as your own compositions) that do not
infringe on the copyrights of others. (SCMS is a
feature that prohibits second-generation and later
copying through a digital connection. It is built into
MD recorders and other consumer digital-audio
equipment as a copyright-protection feature.)
• Do not use this unit for purposes that could infringe
on a copyright held by a third party. We assume no
responsibility whatsoever with regard to any
infringements of third-party copyrights arising
through your use of this unit.
•Microsoft and Windows are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
•Windows® 98 is known officially as: “Microsoft® Windows® 98 operating system.”
•Screen shots in this documents are reprinted with permission from Microsoft Corporation.
•Windows® 2000 is known officially as: “Microsoft® Windows® 2000 operating system.”
•Windows® Me is known officially as: “Microsoft® Windows® Millennium Edition operating system.”
•Macintosh are registered trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.
•MacOS is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.
•Pentium is a registered trademark of Intel Corporation.
•MMX is a trademark of Intel Corporation.
•OMS is a registered trademark of Opcode Systems, Inc.
•FreeMIDI is a trademark of Mark of the Unicorn, Inc.
•All product names mentioned in this document are trademarks or registered trademarks of their
respective owners.
7
Getting Started
Checking the Included Items
This product includes the following items in addition to the MMP-2 itself. Check to make sure they are all present
and accounted for. If anything is missing, contact the retailer from whom you purchased the product.
• Owner’s manual (this document)
• CD-ROM (setup procedures, drivers, editors, etc.)
• Power cable
• USB cable
Main Features
The MMP-2 is a microphone pre-amp that delivers high sound quality and is equipped with a large
number of functions, offering the following features:
Full Range of Input and Output Connectors and Pre-amps
The unit is equipped with two channels of XLR/1/4” phone jacks for balanced analog inputs. It supports
a wide range of input sensitivities, from line level (+4 dBu) to microphone level (-64 dBu). Features such
as phantom power and low-band cutoff are also provided. The unit provides not only balanced-XLR
analog output, but also digital output. It is most definitely ready to play an active role in a variety of
environments, including any place that uses a public-address system, or any recording studio.
Designed with Emphasis on Sound Quality
The design of the MMP-2’s analog circuitry is actually a direct descendent of the design responsible for
the high-quality sound of the VS-2480 Digital Studio Workstation. A separate shielded structure is
employed for the vital heart of the amp circuitry, and only carefully selected parts are used. These
exacting considerations result in the achievement of professional-spec sound.
Mic Modeling
Using Microphone Modeling you can process your input audio so that it models the characteristics of
audio from a variety of high quality microphones. Microphone modeling of even greater fidelity is
achieved through use of the best-selling C 3000 B microphone from AKG Acoustics as the source
microphone for your input.
A Wide Variety of Input Processing
The MMP-2’s four-band parametric equalizer has powerful specifications. The stereo 4 band parametric
equalizers can also be configured from 9 different choices including band-pass filters, and shelving equalizers The
MMP-2 also features a full range of dynamics processing including, models of vacuum-tube compressors.
USB-MIDI Interface
Connection to a computer can be made easily using a USB cable, and you can intuitively monitor and
modify the state of the equalizer and dynamics using the included editor program for Mac and PC.
You can use the MMP-2 for a wide variety of
applications such as:
• When you want to convert signals to digital at an early stage, because leaving them in analog makes
them prone to noise.
• When you want to route your signals through a high-quality pre-amp before inputting them to a mixer
or recorder.
• When you want to alter the response of a microphone or pre-amp.
8
Top and Rear Panels
Top Panel
1
2
6
3
4
5
Top and Rear Panels
5
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14 15 16 17
1.
[METER] Button
This changes the meter display. (p. 16)
2.
[PATCH] Button
This performs Select, Store, and Reset operations for patches. (p. 14)
3.
[SYSTEM] Button
This accesses Clock, USB, and other functions. (“Sampling Clock Source” (p. 26), “MMP-2 settings” (p. 30))
You can also adjust the contrast of the LCD screen by holding down [SYSTEM] and turning the right
Value control. (p. 14)
4.
[ENTER] Button
This confirms operations.
You also use this when you want to save a change right away. (“Save pressing [ENTER] button” (p. 14))
5.
[PAGE] Buttons
These scroll the screen a page at a time.
6.
Value Controls
These edit parameter values. The items shown on the display correspond to the controls below the screen.
These are the left, center, and right Value controls.
7.
[MIC IN] Jacks
These are balanced XLR/phone input jacks. (p. 13)
8.
[PAD] Switches
Pressing one of these attenuates the signal input to the corresponding MIC IN jack by 20 dB. (p. 17)
9.
[SENS] Controls
9
Top and Rear Panels
These adjust the [MIC IN] sensitivity. (p. 17)
10. [PEAK] Indicators
These light up when the input level exceeds the set value. (p. 17)
11. [PHANTOM/PHASE/LO-CUT] Buttons
These call up the Phantom power switches, plus the Phase, Lo-cut, and Attenuator setting screens. (p. 17)
12. [EDIT CH SELECT] Buttons
These specify the channels to manipulate. Pressing them simultaneously links the effect settings for both
channels. (“Linking” (p. 28)).
13. [BYPASS] Buttons
These bypass effects temporarily. (p. 19)
14. [EDIT SELECT] Buttons ([MODEL] Button)
This calls up the editing screen for microphone modeling. (p. 19)
15. [EDIT SELECT] Buttons ([EQ] Button)
This calls up the parameter screen for the equalizer. (p. 20)
16. [EDIT SELECT] Buttons ([DYNAMICS] Button)
This calls up the parameter screen for dynamic effects. (p. 21)
17. [EDIT SELECT] Buttons ([PLUG IN] Button)
This calls up the editing screen for plug-in effects. (p. 24)
Rear Panel
1
10
2
3
4 5
6
7
8
1.
[POWER] Switch
This switches the power on and off. (p. 13)
2.
[AC IN] Connector
This is for connecting the power cable. (p. 12)
3.
[DIGITAL OUT AES/EBU] Jack
This is an AES/EBU-standard digital-output jack.
4.
[DIGITAL OUT] Jack
This is an S/PDIF-standard digital-output jack.
5.
[DIGITAL IN] Jack
This is an S/PDIF-standard digital-input jack.
6.
[USB] Jack
This is for connecting a computer and exchanging parameter settings using MIDI protocol. (p. 30)
7.
[OUTPUT LEVEL] Switch
This switches the output level to either -16 dBu or +4 dBu. (p. 13)
8.
[LINE OUT] Jack
This is a balanced XLR-type line-output jack. (p. 13)
Function Organization and Signal Flow
The diagram below shows how the functions are organized, and how the signals flow.
Function Organization and Signal Flow
fig.e.stract-flow.eps
balanced XLR/phone
S/PDIF
pad
sens
input parameter
phantom
phase
system parameter
low cut
• LCD contrast
• sampling frequency
• peak indicate level
• input source
• sampling clock source • USB driver
attenuater
effects parameter
bypass
mic modeling
bypass
equalizer
bypass
dynamics
bypass
plug in
balanced XLR
•
•
•
•
•
off/on
input
output
proximity effect
time
•
•
•
•
•
•
off/on
attenuater
frequency
gain
Q
type
compresser
expander
enhanser/de-esser
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
off/on
type
key in
threshold
ratio
knee
attack
release
level
auto-gain
off/on
key in
threshold
ratio
attack
release
off/enh/des
frequency
sensitivity
enhance level
rejection level
pre-amp modeling
•
•
•
•
•
off/on
type
warm
bright
harmonic
AES/EBU
S/PDIF
11
Set Up and Basic Operations
This chapter introduces the basic functions of the MMP-2 in the following order, which you should follow
in getting started with your new unit.
Getting Ready
to Switch on the Power
Switching on
the power
Global
Functions
Adjusting
the Input
Switching off
the power
Read through this in sequence as you try things out for yourself.
Getting Ready to Switch on the Power
■ Making the Connections
fig.e.BasicConnect.eps
MMP-2
recorder
power
microphone
MMP-2
Refer to the figures and the following explanation to connect the equipment you’re using.
For information about digital connections, please read “Settings for Digital Connections” (p. 26).
To prevent problems, including malfunction and damage to speakers, turn the volume down
completely and turn off the power for all the devices being connected before making the
connections.
fig.e.PowerConnect.eps
Connecting the Power Source
MMP-2
rear panel
Use the included power cable to connect the unit with a power
source.
power cable
12
Set Up and Basic Operations
Connecting the Input Device
Set Up and Basic Operations
Microphone Input (MIC IN)
Use the XLR or phone plug to connect the input device.
fig.MicInPin.eps
* Microphone input for the unit uses a balanced-type (XLR/TRS) jack which is wired as
shown in the figure. Check the wiring of the device you want to connect and make the
connection.
Depending on the specifications of the input device, the phase of the sound may be inverted,
resulting in input that is not correct. If this happens, refer to “Phase” (p. 18).
If you’re connecting a microphone that requires a phantom power source, refer to “Phantom
Power (+48V)” (p. 17).
Phantom power is not suppled to phone jacks.
Connecting the Output Equipment
Line Output (LINE OUT)
Use an XLR-type plug to make the connection for output to a mixer, recorder, or the like.
■ Setting the Output Level
Select level switching [OUTPUT LEVEL] on rear panel. Level should be selected in accordance with
output destination device. This value serves as the reference for the output level.
Generally, commercial equipment is designed for +4 dBu, while consumer equipment is
designed for -16 dBu.
■ Turning On the Power
Once you’ve got everything hooked up properly, you can turn on the power—but make sure
to follow the order shown below. Should you neglect to follow the correct order, you risk
causing malfunction, or damage to your speakers.
* To protect its circuitry, the unit requires a few moments after power is switched on before it is ready for normal
operation.
1.
Make sure all devices are turned off.
2.
Make sure the volume level on all equipment is turned down.
3.
Press the Power switch (POWER) on the rear panel. When the unit starts
normally, the display shows the model name, then changes to the
Patch-selection screen. (If you perform no operation after that, the screen then
changes to the input meter.)
4.
Turn on the other audio equipment.
5.
Turn up the volume to an appropriate level on the other audio equipment.
• Now sound can be produced.
fig.LcdOpeningLogo.eps
fig.LcdInputMeter.eps
For information on how to turn off the power, please read “Turning Off the Power” (p. 18).
The positioning of the microphone and speakers may produce feedback whine. If this
happens, try using the methods below to correct the problem.
• Change the direction of the microphone.
• Move the microphone and speakers farther apart.
• Lower the volume level.
13
Set Up and Basic Operations
Global Functions
In this manual, parameter settings are grouped into three categories with the following names.
System Parameters
These manipulate global settings for the entire MMP-2: CLOCK, FREQ, INPUT, DRIVER, LCDCNT, and PEAK.
Input Parameters
These manipulate basic settings for the microphone pre-amp: PHANTOM, PHASE, LO-CUT, and ATT.
Effect Parameters
These manipulate settings for microphone modeling, the equalizer, and the like: all of the settings are
called up using the [EDIT SELECT] buttons MODEL, EQ, DYNAMICS, and PLUG IN.
Save pressing [ENTER] button
When you change system parameters or input parameters, the [ENTER] button lights up. This indicates
that there are changes that have not been saved. Pressing the [ENTER] button saves them immediately.
Settings are also saved automatically whenever you change to another screen.
* If you turn off the power without saving first, any changes you have made disappear and are no longer applied.
■ Adjusting the Contrast of the LCD Screen (LCDCNT)
fig.LcdLcdcntPeak.eps
1.
Press the [SYSTEM] button a number of times, until it lights in orange.
2.
If the screen doesn’t show the letters “LCDCNT”, use the [PAGE] buttons to
scroll to the correct page. The setting screen for LCD screen contrast appears.
3.
Turn the left Value control to make adjustments.
You can also adjust this by holding down the [SYSTEM] button and turning the right Value
control.
■ Patches
You can call up and use any of a variety of grouped settings (Patches) suited to different uses and
environments that are stored in memory. You can also take settings you’ve made yourself and save them
as patches. Settings for the presence or absence of links and effect parameters can also be saved as
patches. (“Linking” (p. 28)).
When you turn on the power, the patch you used before turning off is called up.
The functional algorithms are pre-set according to the types of patches. Each patch includes the setting of
algorithms. Users cannot control such algorithms. The [EDIT SELECT] button of each effect lights to show
that the effect is available in this patch.
Operation of patch shall be like below.
14
1.
Select original patch (“Patch Selection (SELECT)” (p. 15))
2.
Customize the patch changing Effect or Link parameters (“Using Effects” (p. 19)/ “Linking” (p. 28))
3.
Save the customized status as a new patch or overwrite (“Saving a Patch (STORE PATCH)” (p. 15))
Set Up and Basic Operations
Patch Selection (SELECT)
Set Up and Basic Operations
The alphabet character shown upper left side of the patch number is showing the status of patch.
(U) to be indicated if it is a user patch. (P) to be indicated if it is a preset patch.
You cannot customize the preset patch. But it is possible to customize the parameter of preset patch and
save as a new user patch.
fig.LcdPatchSelect.eps
1.
Press the [PATCH] button a number of times, until it lights in green. You are
now in the mode where you can choose a patch.
2.
Turn the left Value control to choose a patch.
3.
Press the [ENTER] button to confirm your selection.
The patch currently selected will be shown at first in patch selection screen. If you turn around the knob,
the status changes and let you select other patch. You will see the currently selected patch while turning
around the knob. This to show the patch in saved status.
For example, once you select patch A and customize parameters, it is different from saved status of patch
A. However, it isn't saved yet. If you turn around the knob and re-select patch A, the parameter before
your customize will be shown.
Saving a Patch (STORE PATCH)
Save current status as a new user patch
* The patch stored in the memory area disappears and to be replaced by newly created patch.
* Only the user patch area will be shown as memory area.
fig.LcdStorePatch.eps
1.
Press the [PATCH] button a number of times, until it lights in red. You are now
in the mode where you can choose the destination for saving.
2.
Turn the left Value control to choose the patch to serve as the destination for saving.
3.
Use the center Value control to move the cursor, and use the right Value control to choose characters.
Repeat this to enter the patch name.
4.
Press [ENTER]. Your confirmation will be requested.
5.
Re-press [ENTER]. The patch will be saved. Once the saving procedure is
completed, system go back to normal screen after indicating [Completed] on
screen.
Resetting Effect Parameters (RESET)
This resets the effect parameter to the values shown below. This is the status with almost no effect. If you
want to set effect parameter completely from zero, this shall be executed. You can apply this to all effects
or to just one.
fig.LcdResetPatch.eps
1.
Press the [PATCH] button several times to display “RESET PATCH.” The button
lights up in orange.
2.
Use the left Value control to choose the target effect or effects for the [RESET] operation. Choosing “ALL”
resets all effects.
3.
Press [ENTER]. Your confirmation will be requested.
15
Set Up and Basic Operations
4.
Re-press [ENTER]. Reset will be executed. Once the reset is completed, system
go back to normal screen after indicating “Completed.” on screen.
Effect
mic modeling
equalizer
LOW
LO-MID
HI-MID
HIGH
Parameter
MODEL
INPUT
OUTPUT
PROXFX
TIME
EQ
ATT
LOTYPE
LOW
GAIN
Q
LMTYPE
LO-MID
GAIN
Q
HMTYPE
HI-MID
GAIN
Q
HITYPE
HIGH
GAIN
Q
Value
OFF
C3000B
SML.D
0
0
ON
0
PEAK
80
0.0
2.00
PEAK
400
0.0
2.00
PEAK
2.00k
0.0
2.00
PEAK
10.0k
0.0
2.00
Effect
compressor
expander
enhancer/de-esser
ENH
DES
Parameter
COMP
TYPE
KEYIN
THRESH
RATIO
KNEE
ATTACK
RELEAS
LEVEL
A.GAIN
EXP
KEYIN
THRESH
RATIO
ATTACK
RELEAS
ENH/DE
TYPE
SENS
FREQ
ENHLEV
SENS
FREQ
DESREJ
Value
OFF
SOLID
same channel
-24.0
2.00:1
HARD
10.0
500
0.0
OFF
OFF
same channel
-40
2.00:1
0.0
500
OFF
ENH
25
10.0k
6,0
25
10.0k
-6.0
■ Meters
Press the [METER] button to select from the three types of level meters.
Input (IN)
fig.LcdInputMeter.eps
This displays the input level. The [METER] button lights up in green.
Dynamics (CMP / EXP)
fig.LcdDynamicsMeter.eps
This displays the level suppressed by the dynamics processors (gain reduction).
The [METER] button lights up in red.
Pressing the [PAGE] buttons switches what is displayed between the
compressor and the expander.
Output (OUT)
fig.LcdOutputMeter.eps
This displays the output level. The [METER] button lights up in orange.
■ Edit Channel Select (EDIT CH SELECT)
These choose the channel to edit. Pressing an [EDIT CH SELECT] button makes the button light up green,
showing that the corresponding channel is selected. You make the settings for effects one channel at a time.
The system enters Link Mode pressing channel 2 button holding down channel 1 button. (“Linking” (p. 28))
16
Set Up and Basic Operations
Settings for the Analog Inputs
■ Pad
Set Up and Basic Operations
Pressing either of these switches attenuates the MIC IN input signal by 20 dB. You use these at times such
as when devices other than microphones are connected. Press them again to cancel.
■ Sensitivity (SENS)
These adjust the input sensitivity. You can perform adjustments within a range of -64 dBu to -16 dBu
(within a range of -44 dBu to +4 dBu when PAD is depressed).
When a microphone input has nothing connected to it, it may be a good idea to press the
PAD switch and leave the SENS control set at +4 dBu. This suppresses the amount of noise
sent to the unit.
■ Peak Indicator
The peak indicator lights up when the input level from microphone input jacks exceeds the value set for PEAK.
At the factory default setting, it lights up at -3 dBu. To change this, follow the steps below.
fig.LcdLcdcntPeak.eps
1.
Press the [SYSTEM] button several times to display “PEAK.” The button lights
up in orange.
2.
Turn the center Value control to change the settings.
“ 0 dB”:
The indicator lights up when the input sound is distorted.
“-3 dB”:
The indicator Lights up at -3 dB from the level at which sound will distort.
“-6 dB”:
Lights up at -6 dB from the sound-distortion level.
■ Phantom Power (+48V)
These switch the phantom power supply on and off. When a condenser microphone or other microphone
that requires a power source is connected to the corresponding MIC IN jack, set this to “ON.”
Phantom power is not supplied to 1/4 inch TRS phone jacks. If your microphone requires
phantom power, please connect it to XLR jacks.
Turn this on only when a condenser microphone requiring a phantom power source is
connected. Otherwise, leave it off. Supplying phantom power to a dynamic microphone or
audio playback equipment may cause malfunction, so carefully check the documentation for
the connected device and make the setting accordingly. (The spec for the phantom power
source for this unit is DC 48 V and 7 mA when the output is shorted.)
The phantom power source of MMP-2 can drive Condenser Microphones with electrical
specification 6.0mA or lower at 48V. Microphones that require more ampere is not
supported. Please use phantom power supply devices separately.
To prevent hazard or damage, ensure that only microphone cables and microphones designed to
IEC-268-15A are connected.
Afin d’eviter tout risque ou dommage, ne brancher que des cables de microphone et des
microphones conformes a la norme IEC-268-15A.
* The unit is designed not to produce noise when switching the phantom setting, but just to be on the safe side,
turn down the volume level before switching the setting.
1.
fig.LcdPhantomPhaseLocut.eps
Press the [PHANTOM,PHASE,LO-CUT] button to display “+48V.”
2.
Use the left Value control to switch between “ON” and “OFF.”
3.
Press the [ENTER] button to confirm your selection.
17
Set Up and Basic Operations
■ Phase
fig.MicInPin.eps
The microphone input jacks for this unit are balanced. The jack wiring
is shown in the figure. However, Hot and Cold may be reversed of
MMP-2 on some balanced equipment. If such equipment is connected,
sound localization may be poor, or the balance of left and right will be
disrupted. Furthermore, the left and right channels may cancel each other when stereo input
is used. The phase shall be set same as MMP-2 in all channels before the use.
* If the phase is same through out all channels, it causes no problem even in case the wiring is different from mixers etc.
fig.LcdPhantomPhaseLocut.eps
1.
Press the [PHANTOM,PHASE,LO-CUT] button.
2.
Turn the center Value control to switch “PHASE” between “NORM” and “INV.”
“NORM” (normal):
Normal phase (same phase as input).
“INV” (invert):
Inverted (opposite) phase.
* Usually “NORM” is selected.
■ Low-cut Filter (LO-CUT)
This cuts the audio below a specified frequency. This is effective when you want to eliminate bass noise such
as microphone stand rumble or microphone handling noise. You can set a value from 20 dB to 2.00k dB.
fig.LcdPhantomPhaseLocut.eps
1.
Press the [PHANTOM,PHASE,LO-CUT] button.
2.
Turn the right Value control to specify the threshold frequency for cutoff. When
set to “THRU,” the original signal is passed without performing low-band cutoff.
■ Attenuator (ATT)
This adjusts the level of the input signal using digital processing. You can set a value from -42 dB to +6 dB.
fig.LcdAttenuater.eps
1.
Press the [PHANTOM,PHASE,LO-CUT] button.
2.
Press the [PAGE] buttons to advance the screen until “ATT” appears.
3.
Turn the left Value control to set the value.
Leaving the attenuator set at 0 dB and adjusting for the optimal audio levels using only the
Sensitivity (SENS) control may result in the best possible audio in most cases.
Turning Off the Power
* If you’ve changed any effect parameters, you should note that your changes will be lost if you turn off the power
before they’ve been saved. If you want to keep your settings, save them in a patch (p. 15).
* Similarly, with system parameters, any setting changes you’ve made, but have not saved will be discarded as
soon as you turn off the power. If you want to keep your settings, press the [ENTER] button to save them (p. 14).
18
1.
Lower the volume on the other audio equipment.
2.
Turn off the other audio equipment.
3.
Use the [POWER] switch on the rear panel to turn off the MMP-2.
Using Effects
Using Effects
The effects this unit provides are divided into four groups, which are respectively assigned to the four
[EDIT SELECT] buttons [MODEL], [EQ], [DYNAMICS], and [PLUG IN].
The functional algorithms are pre-set according to the types of patches (p. 14). Each patch includes the
setting of algorithms. Users cannot control such algorithms. The [EDIT SELECT] button of each effect
lights to show that the effect is available in this patch.
If you press [EDIT SELECT] buttons of effects that are not functioning, “Can’t edit. No effects module.”
will be displayed.
The steps for effect operations are as follows.
1.
Press the [EDIT CH SELECT] button to select the channel you want to work on.
2.
Press the [EDIT SELECT] button to select the effect you want to manipulate.
3.
If the screen for the parameter you want to change for does not appear, use the [PAGE] buttons to scroll
through the screens.
* While adjusting some parameters such as effect “TYPE”, you may hear short click noise. This is not a malfunction.
You can call up and use any of a variety of grouped settings (Patches) suited to different uses
and environments that are stored in memory. You can also save settings you have changed
as patches. (“Patches” (p. 14))
BYPASS
This has the same effect as setting the Effect ON/OFF parameter to OFF. (However, the setting for the
ON/OFF parameter does not change.) The Dynamics settings have a number of switches, and they are all
bypassed at one time.
Pressing the [BYPASS] button makes the button light up red, and in this state effects are bypassed. Press
again to cancel.
Mic Modeling
This effect models the sound characteristics of certain types of expensive microphones. It works best
when the input source you use matches the settings available in the processor. For example, the effect is
optimized if you use an AKG C3000B or a Roland DR-20 microphone as the source microphone and then
choose the output microphone whose characteristics you would like to model. You can also edit the
modeling effect by changing microphone proximity or distance effects, and other qualities.
Mic Modeling OFF/ON (MODEL)
This is the On/Off switch for the microphone modeling.
Reference Microphone (INPUT)
This table shows the optimum choices for the microphones or inputs to use when using the microphone
modeling effect.
When you use modeling, specify the microphone used when making the recording or pick the choice
closest to the microphone you used.
DR-20
SML.D
HED.D
MIN.C
FLAT
C3000B
Roland DR-20
Small Dynamic Microphone
Head-worn Dynamic Microphone
Miniature Condenser Microphone
Flat
AKG C 3000 B
Dynamic microphone from Roland
Dynamic microphone used for musical instruments and vocals
Headset-type dynamic microphone
Ultra-compact condenser microphone
Line in
Condenser microphone from AKG Acoustics
19
Using Effects
Modeling Microphone (OUTPUT)
This table shows the choices for different microphones or microphone types that the effect will model.
SML.D
VOC.D
LRG.D
SML.C
LRG.C
VNT.C
FLAT
Ordinary dynamic microphone for musical instruments and vocals. For guitar amps, snare
drums, etc.
Preferred dynamic microphone for vocals. Features a prominent midrange. For vocals.
Dynamic microphone with sustained lower range. For bass drums, tams, etc.
Small condenser microphone for musical instruments. Features a brilliant treble range. For
metallic percussion instruments and acoustic guitars.
Condenser microphone with flat response. For vocals, narration, live instruments, etc.
Vintage condenser microphone. For vocals, instruments, etc.
Microphone with flat frequency response. Used when you want to capture the idiosyncrasies
of the microphone used when recording.
When you select a condenser microphone modeling for “OUTPUT,” lower range response is
extended, so bass noise from the microphone stand may become prominent. If this happens, use
Lo-Cut (p. 18) to cut the unneeded lower range, or install an isolation mount (a vibration-absorbing
microphone holder made of rubber or the like) on the microphone stand when recording.
Proximity Effect (PROX FX)
A microphone’s bass response is enhanced when it is near the source of the sound. This is called the
proximity effect. The Proximity Effect in the models can create this effect. You can set a value from -12 to
+12. Positive values impart close-distance characteristics, and negative values impart the characteristics of
farther distances.
You can also use this to adjust the desired microphone proximity even when the microphone
cannot be placed at the desired location.
Distance from the Sound Source (TIME)
This models the delay that occurs when the microphone is located some distance from the sound source.
You set the distance you want to reproduce to a value from 0 cm to 3,000 cm.
Equalizer
This is a 4-band parametric equalizer and adjusts the volume level for individual frequency bands. You
can choose from nine types of filters for each band. These filters can be used to optimize the sound quality
of the input source. You can also use it to suppress resonant frequencies and prevent feedback whine.
This is called an equalizer because it is used to restore characteristics that have been
modified by the processes of recording and transmission to characteristics equal to those of
the original sound, but like other effects, it is also actively used to create new sounds.
Equalizer OFF/ON (EQ)
This is the On/Off switch for the equalizer. It is the same as using bypass.
Attenuator (ATT)
This uses digital processing to amplify or attenuate the signal input to the equalizer. You can set a value
from -42 dB to +6 dB.
Reference Frequency (LOW, LO-MID, HI-MID, HI)
This sets four points that serve as the frequency response curve’s peak and valley centers (center
frequencies) or as the filter boundaries (cutoff frequencies). You can set a value from 20 Hz to 20,0k Hz.
20
Using Effects
Because you can make the settings anywhere within this range, it’s even possible, for instance, to set all
four points so they’re stacked at the same location, and create a sharp filter.
* A frequency 3 dB lower than the flat portion of the response curve is taken to be the cutoff frequency.
Gain (GAIN)
This sets the amount by which the volume is to be increased/decreased. You can set a value within a
range of ±15.0 dB for each reference frequency.
Using Effects
Q (Q)
This sets the sharpness for peaks and valleys. You can set a value within a range of 0.36 to 16 for each
frequency band. When the filter type is “LPF2” or “HPF2,” making the Q larger makes the cutoff
frequency band more prominent.
On an historical note, with analog peaking equalizers and the like, the sharpness of the peaks that
occur in the response curve changes according to the performance of the coils in the resonance
circuit. For this reason, the value Q (quality factor) is used to indicate coil performance.
Filter Type (TYPE)
This chooses the type of filter for each frequency band. The available filter parameters change according
to which type of filter you choose to use. Unavailable parameters are indicated by “no.”
PEAK
Peaking
LSV
Low shelving
HSV
High shelving
LPF1
Low-pass filter 1st
HPF1
High-pass filter 1st
LPF2
HPF2
Low-pass filter 2nd
High-pass filter 2nd
BPF
Band-pass filter
BRF
Band-reject filter
THRU
Thru
Creates peaks and valleys around the
reference frequency
Adjusts the band lower than the
reference frequency
Adjusts the band higher than the
reference frequency
Passes only sound lower than the
reference frequency
Passes only sound higher than the
reference frequency
Steeper response curve than “LPF1”
Steeper response curve than “HPF1”
Passes only sound near the reference
frequency
Blocks only sound near the reference
frequency
Passes the audio without modification
Reference
frequency
Gain
Q
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
no
yes
yes
no
yes
no
no
yes
no
no
yes
yes
no
no
yes
yes
yes
no
yes
yes
no
yes
no
no
no
Dynamics
This is a group of effects that dynamically control the amount of change in the output level based on the
input level.
■ Compressor
This suppresses or lowers the output level of loud sounds to reduce changes in volume. Input signals that
exceed the threshold are suppressed by an amount determined by the Ratio parameter.
Compressor OFF/ON (COMP)
This is the On/Off switch for the compressor effect.
21
Using Effects
Compressor Type (TYPE)
This chooses the type of compressor.
“SOLID”:
Semiconductor compressor characteristics
“TUBE1”...”TUBE4”: Vacuum-tube compressor characteristics
Key In Channel (KEY IN)
The compressor operates when the input level of the channel specified here exceeds the threshold. You
can choose either channel 1 or channel 2. Normally, the same channel is specified, but a different channel
may be specified for special uses. For example, when there is a microphone input and a background
music input, setting the microphone channel as the key-in for the background-music channel reduces the
volume of the background music when the microphone picks up someone speaking.
Threshold (THRESH)
When the input level exceeds this value, the output is lowered or suppressed according to the ratio. You
can set a value from -24.0 dB to 0.0 dB.
Ratio (RATIO)
This is the ratio for suppressing sound that exceeds the threshold. You can set a value from 1.00 to
infinity. When infinity is selected, the output level won’t get any louder even if the input level gets louder
than the threshold. This is the same effect as using a limiter.
Knee (KNEE)
This setting determines whether the change in the relationship between the input level and the output
level is abrupt or gradual when the input crosses the Threshold level.
“HARD”: Immediate change before and after the threshold
“SOFT”:
Sloping change centering on the threshold
Attack Time (ATTACK)
This sets the time after the input signal exceeds the threshold until the compressor effect is completely
applied. You can set a value from 0.0 ms to 800.0 ms.
Release Time (RELEAS)
This sets the time after the input signal falls below the threshold until the compressor effect disappears
completely. You can set a value from 0 ms to 8,000 ms.
Compression Level (LEVEL)
This sets the output level after passing through the compressor. You can set a value from -24 dB to +24 dB
(from -24.0 dB to +6.0 dB in case Auto Gain is “ON”). If you are compressing the signal to even out the
loud points, you may want to boost the overall output level using this control.
Auto Gain (A-GAIN)
The dynamic range is reduced when sound passes through the compressor, but setting Auto Gain to
“ON” boosts the overall output level so as to match the original overall input level.
Specifically, this assures that the output level is loud but not distorted by creating a margin (output level
upper limit at 0 ms of attack) of 6 dB from the clipping level (0 dB) and then boosting the output level to
this point.
When the attack is set to a long time, the start of the compressor effect is delayed, and so depending on
the input signal the sound may be distorted. The Auto Gain has a margin of 6 dB to prevent spiking of the
output level due to this delay in the compressor effect.
22
Using Effects
■ Expander
This lowers or suppresses, at a constant ratio, low-volume sounds that do not reach the threshold. It is
effective for low-volume noise.
Expander OFF/ON (EXP)
This is the On/Off switch for the expander effect.
Using Effects
Key In Channel (KEY IN)
The expander cuts off when the input level of the channel specified here exceeds the threshold. You can
choose either channel 1 or channel 2. Normally the same channel is specified, but a different channel may
be specified for special uses. For example, specifying a snare drum input as the key-in lets you produce
sound on the other channel when you strike the drum.
Threshold (THRESH)
Input smaller than this is suppressed according to the ratio. You can set a value from -80 dB to 0 dB.
Compression Ratio (RATIO)
This is the ratio for lowering or suppressing sound that does not reach the threshold. You can set a value
from 1.00 to infinity. When you set the Ratio to Infinity, no sound is passed when the input sound doesn’t
get over the Threshold level. This is the same effect as using a Gate.
Attack Time (ATTACK)
This sets the time after the input signal falls below the threshold until the expander effect is applied
completely. You can set a value from 0.0ms to 800.0ms.
Release Time (RELEAS)
This sets the time after the input signal exceeds the threshold until the expander effect disappears
completely. You can set a value from 0ms to 8000ms
■ Enhancer/De-esser
Enhancer/De-esser OFF/ON (ENH/DE)
This is the On/Off switch for the enhancer/de-esser effect.
Switching Between Enhancer and De-esser (TYPE)
This is the switch for choosing either the de-esser or the enhancer.
“ENH”:
This augments the harmonics of human vocals, making the sound more distinct. When the
high-frequency content is deficient, it is increased.
“DES”:
This suppresses harsh sibilant consonants, for a softer sound. When the high-frequency
content is excessive, it is reduced.
Sensitivity (SENS)
In case the high frequency sound reaches certain level, this unit increases/decreases the level. The certain
level can be set in 100 steps (from 0 to 100).
Frequency (FREQ)
This is to set the border of high frequency sound. The border can be set from 500 Hz to 20.0k Hz.
23
Using Effects
Enhance Level (ENHLEV)
This is to set the level to increase. The level can be set from 0.0 dB to 12.0 dB. This is not available for
de-esser.
De-esser Rejection Level (DESREJ)
This is to set the level to decrease. The level can be set from -24.0 dB to 0.0 dB. This is not available for
enhancer.
Plug-in Effect
Pre-amp Modeling is assigned to [PLUG IN] by default. You can also add effect algorithms through the
USB connection.
■ Pre-amp Modeling
Microphone pre-amp brand names are used solely to refer to the sounds modeled by the
Roland MMP-2 product. The trademarks described in this product are trademarks of their
respective owners, which are separate companies from Roland. These companies are not
affiliated with Roland in any way and they have not licensed or authorized the Roland
MMP-2. Their marks are used solely to identify the equipment whose sounds are simulated
by the Roland MMP-2.
Pre-amp Modeling replicates the sonic response of different types of pre-amps. It models such distinctive
features as the frequency response, harmonic balance and distortion.
Press the [PLUG IN] button to display the setting parameters, then use the Value controls to change the
settings. If the item you want is not displayed, use the [PAGE] buttons to scroll through the pages.
Select patches with the “Pre-amp” name to use the Pre-amp modeling function using “Patch Selection
(SELECT)” (p. 15)
Please note that the Pre-amp Modeling requires the use of the DSP that is normally allocated for the EQ
section. For this reason, when you are using Pre-amp Modeling presets, you can not access the EQ section
of the MMP-2.
* It may difficult to figure out the result of Pre-amp modeling effects because very slight character difference of
various Pre-amps were modeled.
Pre-amp OFF/ON (PREAMP)
This is the On/Off switch for the pre-amp modeling.
Pre-amp Type (TYPE)
This chooses the type of pre-amp.
The models are: Red7, N1073, ManSS, AvTube, AvSolS, HHTube, MillHV, SATube, CSSlSt.
Warm
This parameter adjusts the warmth of the input sound by changing the balance of the low frequency
content.
Warm Frequency (WRM F)
This sets the upper limit of this parameter. The sound components that are of a lower frequency than this
parameter will be adjusted. You can set a value from 20 Hz to 1.00k Hz.
Warm Gain (WRM G)
This parameter adjusts the warmth of the signal below the value set with “Warm Frequency”. You can set
a value within a range of ±6.0 dB.
24
Using Effects
Bright
This parameter adjusts the brightness of the input sound by changing the high frequency content's
balance.
Brightness Frequency (BRT F)
This sets the lower limit of this parameter. The sound components that are of a higher frequency than this
parameter will be adjusted. You can set a value from 1.00k Hz to 20.0k Hz.
Using Effects
Brightness Gain (BRT G)
This parameter adjusts the brightness of the signal above the value set with the Brightness Frequency
parameter.You can set a value within a range of ±6.0 dB.
Harmonic
This adjusts the color and balance of the sound's harmonics
Harmonic Threshold (HRM TH)
This sets the threshold for the Harmonic Balance control. If the sound level exceeds this level, the
harmonics control will function. You can set a value from -24 dB to 0.0 dB.
Harmonic Level (HRM LV)
This sets the value of the harmonic control. You can set a value in 100 steps (from 0 to 100).
Harmonic Color (HRM CL)
This sets the value of the harmonic distortion. You can set a value in 100 steps (from 0 to 100).
25
Settings for Digital Connections
When you change the digital-connection settings, sound may stop momentarily until the
new settings are in place.
■ Sampling Clock Source
Select the source of sampling clock.
fig.LcdClock.eps
1.
Press the [SYSTEM] button several times to display “CLOCK.” The button lights
up in green.
2.
Turn the left Value control to make the selection.
“INT”:
Uses the internal clock.
“DIGI”:
Synchronizes with the clock signal from [DIGITAL IN].
■ Sampling Frequency
Set frequency of internal clock (INT). Four are supported: 44.1k Hz, 48.0k Hz, 88.2k Hz, and 96.0k Hz.
* In case the sampling clock source (CLOCK) is supplied from external devices (DIGI), it is impossible to set
sampling frequency on MMP-2.
fig.LcdClock.eps
1.
Press the [SYSTEM] button several times to display “FREQ.” The button lights
up in green.
2.
Turn the center Value control to make the selection.
■ Audio Input Source
Select the jacks to input.
fig.LcdClock.eps
1.
Press the [SYSTEM] button several times to display “AUDIO.” The button lights
up in green.
2.
Turn the right Value control to make the selection.
“MIC”:
Input from [MIC IN]
“DIGI”:
Input from [DIGITAL IN]
* When you change the input source, sound may stop momentarily until the changeover has been completed.
* There is no need to make settings for the output. Outputs include the [LINE OUT], [AES/EBU],
and [DIGITAL OUT] jacks.
* “AUDIO: DIGI” and “CLOCK: INT” cannot be selected simultaneously.
Relation of each setting is shown on the chart below.
CLOCK (sampling clock source)
FREQ (sampling frequency)
AUDIO (audio input source)
INT
44.1k/48.0k/88.2k/96.0k
MIC
DIGI
synchronizes with [DIGITAL IN]
MIC / DIGI
■ Display Messages
Digital In locked.
Wrong sample freq.
DIGITAL IN checking...
DIGITAL IN unlock!
Change INTERNAL?
26
Changed the source of Sampling Clock to [DIGITAL IN].
A digital signal that is not compatible with MMP-2 is coming in from [DIGITAL IN].
The following causes can be considered.
• Sampling frequency of inputting device is not one of followings;
44.1k Hz, 48.0k Hz, 88.2k Hz or 96.0k Hz
• Vari-pitch (function to change sampling frequency continuously) is
used on inputting devices.
Confirming signal from [DIGITAL IN].
The signal compatible with MMP-2 is not coming in. The system waits for the signal. Do you cancel the Digital Input and return to internal clock?
Examples of Use
This section shows some examples of how you can use the MMP-2.
* Before hooking up or turning on any equipment, make sure the volume on all devices is turned down.
Examples of Use
Analog Input to Analog Output
The microphone input is output from the MMP-2 as an analog signal and sent to a recording device or a
mixer.
fig.e.mic-MMP2-a-VS1824.eps
1.
Connect the microphone to [MIC IN].
2.
Connect the destination device to [LINE OUT].
3.
Use the [PHANTOM/PHASE/LO-CUT] buttons and
other controls to set the phantom power setting so it
matches the type of microphone (p. 17).
4.
Use the [METER] button to display the input meter.
5.
Refer to the meters and the [PEAK] indicator and adjust the [PAD] and [SENS] settings.
microphone
MMP-2
recorder
Analog Input to Digital Output
The microphone input is output from the MMP-2 as an S/PDIF-standard digital signal and sent to a
recording device or the like. (The AES/EBU-standard jacks can also be used in the same way.)
fig.e.mic-MMP2-SPDIF-VS1824.eps
1.
Connect the microphone to [MIC IN].
2.
Connect the destination device to [DIGITAL OUT].
3.
Use the [PHANTOM/PHASE/LO-CUT] buttons and
other controls to set the phantom power setting so it
matches the type of microphone (p. 17).
4.
Use the [METER] button to display the input meter.
5.
Refer to the meters and the [PEAK] indicator and adjust the [PAD] and [SENS] settings.
6.
Use the [SYSTEM] button and other controls to set “CLOCK” to “INT,” to set “FREQ” to an appropriate
value for the destination device, and to set “AUDIO” to “MIC” (p. 26).
7.
Make the clock setting on the destination device.
microphone
MMP-2
recorder
27
Other Features
■ Channel Linking
This interlinks the effect parameters for the two channels. You can use it with stereo recording or other
applications. Input parameters are not linked.
Linking
Hold down the [EDIT CH SELECT] button for channel 1 and press the [EDIT CH SELECT] button for
channel 2. Both [EDIT CH SELECT] buttons light up, showing that linking is in effect.
Canceling Linking
Press either one of the [EDIT CH SELECT] buttons to cancel the link. This makes only one button light up,
and lets you edit individual channels in the usual way.
When linked, the effects for channel 2 use the parameter values for channel 1 (the reverse is
not possible). Effect operations you perform while in this state are handled as settings for
channel 1, and so the setting values for channel 2 remain unchanged in memory. When you
cancel the link, the effects for channel 2 revert to the setting values they had before linking.
■ Copying Settings Between Channels
This copies the effect parameters to the other channel. You can use this at times such as when you want to
edit sets of parameters separately after making the same settings. Input parameters are not copied.
Copied settings are overwritten. The original settings cannot be restored after copying.
What follows is the procedure for copying from channel 1 to channel 2. To copy in the
opposite direction, follow the same procedure with the channel numbers reversed.
fig.LcdChannelCopy.eps
1.
Press and hold the [EDIT CH SELECT] button for channel 2 for several seconds.
The message “COPY PARAM CH1 → CH2 OK?” is displayed.
2.
Press [ENTER] to carry out the procedure. The setting values for channel 1 are copied to channel 2.
* If you don’t want to copy, press any button other than [ENTER].
■ Backup Patch
You can save user patch to computers or sequencers and load it from those. You can transfer your user
patch to another MMP-2 using this function. Operation from MMP-2 editor is shown on adopted
CD-ROM “ReadMe”.
Save patch to Computer (BACKUP)
1.
Press [SYSTEM] button of MMP-2 several times and make it lights up
in orange. The screen turn to the status as right.
2.
Press [PAGE] button several times to display “BACKUP” on screen.
3.
Operate external device like computer to start sending/receiving signal.
If commencement of operation is necessary on MMP-2, press [ENTER].
Load patch from computer (RECOVER)
1.
28
Press [SYSTEM] button of MMP-2 several times and make it light orange. The
screen turn to the status as right.
Other Features
2.
Press [PAGE] button several times to display “RECOVER” on screen.
3.
Operate external devices like computer to start sending/receiving signal.
■ Route
Select one of the following routings from input to output. Take “NORM” as a normal rule.
Press the [SYSTEM] button several times to display “ROUTE.” The button lights up in orange.
2.
Turn the right Value control to make the selection.
“NORM”: The normal routing.
“P IN”:
“P OUT”:
Other Features
1.
This divide signal flow into two routes. DSP* can be inserted into
each route individually. This would be suitable for creating “Channel divider” which divides
audio signal into various outputs according to its frequency range.
This divides signal flow into two routes after DSP* insertion. Two divided signals must
always be same.
* DSP: digital signal processor.
NORM
DIGITAL IN
MIC IN 1
MIC IN 2
DIGITAL IN
P IN
DIGITAL IN
MIC IN 1
MIC IN 2
DIGITAL IN
P OUT
DIGITAL IN
MIC IN 1
MIC IN 2
DIGITAL IN
PHANTOM,SENS,PAD
DSP
PHANTOM,SENS,PAD
DSP
PHANTOM,SENS,PAD
DSP
PHANTOM,SENS,PAD
DSP
PHANTOM,SENS,PAD
DSP
PHANTOM,SENS,PAD
DSP
DIGITAL OUT
LINE OUT 1
LINE OUT 2
DIGITAL OUT
DIGITAL OUT
LINE OUT 1
LINE OUT 2
DIGITAL OUT
DIGITAL OUT
LINE OUT 1
LINE OUT 2
DIGITAL OUT
■ Initializing
This returns the contents of memory to their factory defaults.
Initializing erases any parameters or patches you have set yourself. Once they are lost, they
cannot be recovered. Save your settings to a computer if you want to save them before
initializing. (“Backup Patch” (p. 28), “Use of computer and setup” (p. 30))
fig.LcdInitializeSystem.eps
1.
Press the [SYSTEM] button a number of times, until it lights in orange.
fig.LcdInitializeSystem.epsMMP10
2.
Press the [PAGE] buttons several times until the message “INITIALIZE”
appears.
3.
Use the left Value control to choose the target for the initializing.
“SYSTEM”:
system parameters
“USER PATCHES”:user’s effect patches
“ALL”:
both
4.
Press [ENTER]. Your confirmation will be requested.
5.
Re-press [ENTER]. The system will be initialized. Once it's initialized, system
go back to normal screen after indicating [Completed] on screen.
* If you don’t want to initialize, press any button other than [ENTER].
29
Use of computer and setup
You can add effect algorithms via a USB connection. You can also use a computer editor to easily and
intuitively change the equalizer and dynamics parameters. What’s more, you can also exchange MIDI
signals with the computer. For more details and descriptions of this operation, please read “ReadMe” on
the included CD-ROM.
Both Mac OS and Windows are supported. The system requirements are as follows.
USB (Universal Serial Bus) is an interface for connecting peripheral equipment to computers.
It is a standard that lets you connect a variety of peripherals using a single USB cable. It also
allows peripheral devices to be connected or disconnected while the power is left on.
Set up (PC setting and Install)
■ MMP-2 settings
Stop sending meter signal and select USB-MIDI driver to be used on MMP-2
1.
Make sure MMP-2 is NOT connected to the computer.
* The USB driver cannot be switched while the unit is connected to computer by USB.
2.
Press [SYSTEM] button several times to display “METER” on screen. The button lights up in red.
3.
Turn around the value dial and switch “METER” to “OFF”.
“ON”: Send meter signal
“OFF”: Stop sending meter signal
* If you use software that handles meter signal of MMP-2 (like MMP-2 Editor), switch value of “METER” to “ON” again after
installation of the driver.
4.
Turn around the value knob to select driver. Use of “VENDOR” is recommended.
* to reflect the change of driver, you will need to re-boot the system.
“VENDOR”:
“GENRIC” (generic):
MMP-2 driver provided by Roland Corporation
Default MIDI driver
5.
Once you change setting of “METER” or “DRIVER”, the [ENTER] button lights up. Press [ENTER] to save
settings.
6.
Turn off the power of MMP-2.
■ Computer settings
In order to use the MMP-2, you must first install the MMP-2 driver. The MMP-2 Driver is included in the
“MMP-2 Driver & Software CD-ROM.”
* If you wish to use the MMP-2 at the same time as another USB device connected to your computer, disconnect the other USB
device from the USB connector before installing the MMP-2 driver. If another USB device is connected to your computer when
you install the MMP-2 driver, the MMP-2 driver may not be installed correctly.
The explanation about installing and setup the driver is organized according to the computer and MIDI
driver that you are using. Please proceed to the following pages.
* The MMP-2 cannot be used with Windows95 or Windows NT.
Windows 98 / Me Users ..........................p. 31
Windows 2000 Users ................................p. 32
Using OMS on the Macintosh .................p. 35
Using FreeMIDI on the Macintosh .........p. 38
30
Use of computer and setup
OMS or FreeMIDI is a driver to let MacOS to communicate with external devices on MIDI
protocol. USB-MIDI driver is the driver that makes the communication on OMS or FreeMIDI
through USB possible.
You can download OMS from the Web site of Opcode Systems, Inc.
You can download FreeMIDI from the Web site of Mark of the Unicorn, Inc.
Windows Me / 98
Use the following procedure to install the MMP-2 driver.
* Disconnect the MMP-2 from your computer before starting up Windows.
* If the MMP-2 is already connected to your computer and a message of “Add New Hardware Wizard” is displayed, go to the
MMP-2 Driver & Software CD-ROM, open the file Driver\WinMe_98\Readme_e.htm, and read the “Troubleshooting”
section entitled “You attempted to install using the above procedure, but were not able to.”
1.
With all USB cables disconnected, start up Windows. (except the keyboard and mouse)
2.
Exit all applications before you begin installing the driver.
3.
Insert the MMP-2 Driver & Software CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive.
4.
Use of computer and setup
fig.013
From the Windows Start menu, select “Run.”
fig.014
5.
In the “Open” field of the dialog box that appears, enter
“Q:\Driver\WinMe_98\Setupinf.exe” and click “OK.”
* Enter the drive name Q: appropriate for the drive name of your
CD-ROM drive.
* To check the drive name of your CD-ROM drive, double-click
the My Computer icon.
Q:\Driver\WinMe_98\Setupinf.exe
fig.01-08
6.
The SETUPINF dialog box will appear, and the display
will indicate “Ready to install the driver.-”
* If the “Ready to install the driver.—” dialog box does not
appear, go to the MMP-2 Driver & Software CD-ROM, open
the file Driver\WinMe_98\Readme_e.htm, and read the section
entitled “Installation.”
* If the display indicates “The driver is already installed.-”, you
can connect the MMP-2’s USB cable to the computer and use it.
* If the display indicates “The driver was not deleted completely.-”,
refer to “Deleting the MMP-2 Driver”(p. 32) to re-install it.
MMP-2
MMP-2.
Q:\DRIVER\WINME_98
31
Use of computer and setup
7.
Use the USB cable to connect the MMP-2 to your computer.
As appropriate, switch the USB select switch to either the front or the rear position.
fig.02-01.e
MMP-2
USB connector
USB cable
8.
Turn on the power of the MMP-2.
* After you have made connections correctly, you must turn on the power in this step. If you fail to observe the correct sequence,
the system may malfunction.
* To prevent malfunction and/or damage to speakers or other devices, always turn down the volume, and turn off the power on all
devices before making any connections.
fig.01-01
9.
In some cases, the “Insert Disk” dialog box may appear.
Click “OK.”
'Roland MMP-2 USB Driver Installation Disk',
fig.10-01
10. The “New Hardware Found” dialog box will appear.
In the “Copy files from” area, input
“Q:\Driver\WinMe_98” and click the “OK” button.
Installation will be completed.
* Change the drive name Q: to match the drive name of your CDROM drive. For example if your CD-ROM drive is named D:,
you would input “D:\Driver\WinMe_98”.
11. Click “OK” button in the “SETUPINF” dialog box.
7
'Roland
MMP-2 Driver Installation Disk'
Q:\Driver\WinMe_98
This completes the installation of the MMP-2 driver
and the settings.
Read “ReadMe” of adopted CD-ROM in case you use MMP-2 Editor.
Deleting the MMP-2 Driver
If you were not able to install the MMP-2 driver according to the procedure, or if you are unable to use the
MMP-2 even after installing the driver, you must delete the driver.
After deleting the driver, use the procedure described in “Windows Me / 98”(p. 31) to re-install the
driver.
For details on how to delete the driver, refer to the explanation provided in the on-line
manual(Readme_e.htm) within the MMP-2 Driver & Software CD-ROM.
Windows 2000
Use the following procedure to install the MMP-2 driver.
* Disconnect the MMP-2 from your computer before starting up Windows.
* To install the driver, you must log on to Windows as the Administrator or other user with the privileges of the Administrators
group. For more information regarding this, consult your computer system administrator.
* The MMP-2 cannot be used with Windows95 or Windows NT.
32
Use of computer and setup
* If you wish to use the MMP-2 at the same time as another USB device connected to your computer, disconnect the other USB
device from the USB connector before installing the MMP-2 driver. If another USB device is connected to your computer when
you install the MMP-2 driver, the MMP-2 driver may not be installed correctly.
* If the MMP-2 is already connected to your computer and a message of “Add New Hardware Wizard” is displayed, go to the
MMP-2 Driver & Software CD-ROM, open the file Driver\Win2000\Readme_e.htm, and read the “Troubleshooting” section
entitled “You attempted to install using the above procedure, but were not able to.”
1.
With all USB cables disconnected, start up Windows. (except the keyboard and mouse)
2.
Log onto Windows as an Administrator, or other user that is a member of the Administrators group.
3.
Exit all applications before performing the installation.
fig.001
4.
Make “Driver Signing” settings.
Open the “Control Panel,” and double-click “System.”
Click the “Hardware” tab, and then click the “Driver
Signing” button. The “Driver Signing Options” dialog
box will appear.
Use of computer and setup
fig.002
5.
Make sure that “File signature verification” is set to
“Ignore.”
If it is set to “Ignore,” click “OK.” If not, make a note of
the current setting; then change it to “Ignore” and click
the “OK” button.
6.
Click the “OK” button to close “System Properties.”
7.
Insert the MMP-2 Driver & Software CD-ROM into the
CD-ROM drive.
33
Use of computer and setup
fig.003
8.
From the Windows Start menu, select “Run.”
fig.004
9.
In the “Open” field of the dialog box that appears, enter
“Q:\Driver\Win2000\Setupinf.exe” and click [OK].
* Enter the drive name Q: appropriate for the drive name of your
CD-ROM drive.
* To check the drive name of your CD-ROM drive, double-click
the My Computer icon.
Q:\Driver\Win2000\SETUPINF.EXE
10. The SETUPINF dialog box will appear, and the display
will indicate “Ready to install the driver.-”
* If the “Ready to install the driver.—” dialog box does not
appear, go to the MMP-2 Driver & Software CD-ROM, open
the file Driver\WinMe_98\Readme_e.htm, and read the section entitled “Installation.”
* If the display indicates “The driver is already installed.-”, you can connect the MMP-2’s USB cable to the computer and use it.
11. Use the USB cable to connect the MMP-2 and your computer.
fig.02-01.e
MMP-2
USB connector
USB cable
12. After completing the connections between the MMP-2 and your computer, turn on your computer and
start up Windows, and then turn on the MMP-2.
* To prevent malfunction and/or damage to speakers or other devices, always turn down the volume, and turn off the power on all
devices before making any connections.
fig.01-04
13. The “Insert Disk” dialog box will appear.
Click the “OK” button.
'Roland
MMP-2 USB Driver Installation Disk'
34
Use of computer and setup
fig.01-05
14. The “Files Needed” dialog box will appear.
In the “Copy files from” area, input
“Q:\Driver\Win2000” and click the “OK” button.
Installation will be completed.
7
Roland MMP-2
* Change the drive name Q: to match the drive name of your CDROM drive. For example if your CD-ROM drive is named D:,
you would input “D:\Driver\Win2000”.
Q:\Driver\Win2000
fig.01-06
15. The “Found New Hardware Wizard” will appear.
Make sure that “Roland MMP-2 USB Driver” is
displayed, and click the “Finish” button.
Use of computer and setup
fig.009
16. The “System Settings Change” dialog box will appear.
Click the “Yes” button and restart Windows.
17. If you changed the setting for “File signature
verification” in step 5, set it back to the previous
setting.
(To restore the setting, the Administrator or user belonging to the Administrators group must log on to
Windows.)
This completes the installation of the MMP-2 driver and the settings.
Read “ReadMe” of adopted CD-ROM in case you use MMP-2 Editor.
Deleting the MMP-2 Driver
If you were not able to install the MMP-2 driver according to the procedure, or if you are unable to use the
MMP-2 even after installing the driver, you must delete the driver.
After deleting the driver, use the procedure described in “Windows 2000”(p. 32) to re-install the driver.
For details on how to delete the driver, refer to the explanation provided in the on-line
manual(Readme_e.htm) within the MMP-2 Driver & Software CD-ROM.
Macintosh / OMS
Installing the MMP-2 Driver
Use the following procedure to install the MMP-2 driver.
* Disconnect the MMP-2 from your computer before starting up Macintosh.
* Exit all applications before you begin installing the driver.
* The MMP-2 OMS Driver included on the disc is provided as an additional module that allows the MMP-2 to be used with
OMS. In order to use it, OMS must already be installed on the start-up hard disk.
35
Use of computer and setup
fig.e.OmsDriverEInstallIcon.eps
1.
In the “MMP-2 Driver E” folder of the CD-ROM, double-click the “MMP-2 OMS
Driver-E Installer” icon.
fig.e.OmsDriverEInstaller.eps
2.
Make sure that OMS is already installed in the location
where the driver will be installed, and click [Install].
fig.e.QuitRunningApplicatio.eps
3.
If the following message appears, click [Continue] and
all other currently-running applications will be exited,
and installation will continue.
fig.e.InstallSuccessRestart.eps
4.
When installation is completed, the following dialog
box will appear. Click [Restart] to restart your
Macintosh.
OMS settings
1.
Use the USB cable to connect the MMP-2 and your computer.
fig.e.MMP2-USB-PC.eps
MMP-2
USB connector
USB cable
2.
After completing the connections between the MMP-2 and your computer, turn on your computer and
start up Mac OS, and then turn on the MMP-2.
* Once the connections have been completed, turn on power to your various devices in the order specified. By turning on devices
in the wrong order, you risk causing malfunction and/or damage to speakers and the other devices.
3.
36
In the “Opcode” folder in the location where OMS is installed, open the “OMS Applications” folder, and
double-click the “OMS Setup” icon.
Use of computer and setup
fig.OmsAppleTalk.eps
4.
If the “Apple Talk” dialog box appears, click [Turn It
Off].
Then, in the dialog box that appears next, click [OK].
fig.OmsCreateNewStudioSetup.eps
5.
The “Create a New Studio setup” dialog box will
appear.
Click [OK].
* If the “Create a New Studio setup” dialog box does not appear,
click [New Studio setup] in the [File] menu.
* If an error dialog box is displayed during the setup, make the
OMS settings once again.
Use of computer and setup
fig.OmsDriverSearch.eps
6.
The “OMS Driver Search” dialog box will appear.
Click [Search].
fig.OmsDriverSetup.eps
7.
When the search ends, verify that Roland MMP-2 is
listed in the OMS driver setting dialog box, and click
[OK].
37
Use of computer and setup
fig.OmsMidiDeviceSetup.eps
8.
Verify that the MMP-2 is listed in the OMS MIDI device
setting dialog box, then click [OK].
9.
A dialog box will appear, allowing you to save the
settings file.
Input the desired filename, and click [Save].
fig.OmsMyStudioSetup.eps
10. A settings window like the one shown at right will
appear.
Click on the name, and change the name to “Roland
MMP-2 Interface”
* If the name is same, it may be possible for some MIDI application
to confuse the name of interface or connected equipment.
* In case of using “MMP-2 Editor”, please remark that the name
of the device (“Roland MMP-2” comes with keyboard icon in the
setting window shown at right) should always be start from
“Roland MMP-2”, otherwise MMP-2 Editor can not detect
MMP-2 automatically.
* This is only one possible example of the settings window. The
settings window that you actually see will differ depending on
your system.
11. Select the [Quit] command from the File menu to exit
OMS Setup. If the Save dialog box appears, input a
filename, and click [Save].
This completes driver settings.
Read “ReadMe” of adopted CD-ROM in case you use MMP-2 Editor.
Macintosh / FreeMIDI
Installing the MMP-2 Driver
Use the following procedure to install the MMP-2 driver.
* Disconnect the MMP-2 from your computer before starting up Macintosh.
* Exit all applications before you begin installing the driver.
* The MMP-2 FreeMIDI Driver included on the disc is provided as an additional module that allows the MMP-2 to be used with
FreeMIDI. In order to use it, FreeMIDI must already be installed on the start-up hard disk.
fig.e.FmDriverEInstallIcon.eps
1.
38
In the “MMP-2 Driver E” folder of the CD-ROM, double-click the “MMP-2
FreeMIDI Driver-E Installer” icon to start up the installer.
Use of computer and setup
fig.e.FmDriverEInstaller.eps
2.
Click [Install].
If the dialog box that all other currently-running
applications will be exited appears, click [Continue].
fig.e.QuitRunningApplicatio.eps
3.
If the following message appears, click [Continue] and
all other currently-running applications will be exited,
and installation will continue.
Use of computer and setup
fig.e.InstallSuccessRestart.eps
4.
When installation is completed, the following dialog
box will appear. Click [Restart] to restart your
Macintosh.
FreeMIDI settings
1.
Use the USB cable to connect the MMP-2 and your computer.
fig.e.MMP2-USB-PC.eps
MMP-2
USB connector
USB cable
2.
Turn on the power of the MMP-2.
* Once the connections have been completed, turn on power to your various devices in the order specified. By turning on devices
in the wrong order, you risk causing malfunction and/or damage to speakers and the other devices.
3.
Open the “FreeMIDI Applications” folder, and double-click the “FreeMIDI Setup” icon.
39
Use of computer and setup
fig.WelcomeToFreeMidi.eps
4.
The first time FreeMIDI is started up, a “Welcome to
FreeMIDI!” dialog box will appear. Click [Continue].
If this is the second or later time, select “FreeMIDI
Preferences” from the File menu.
fig.FreeMidiPreferences.eps
5.
In the “FreeMIDI Preferences” dialog box, check
“MMP-2 Port” which is located below MMP-2 Driver in
MIDI Configuration, and click [OK].
* If the dialog box does not show “MMP-2 Driver,” check whether
the MMP-2 is connected correctly, and start up FreeMIDI
Setup once again.
fig.AboutQuickSetup.eps
6.
The About Quick Setup dialog box will appear.
Click [Continue].
* If the About Quick Setup dialog box is not displayed, select
Quick Setup... from the Configuration menu.
fig.NewDevice.eps
40
7.
Confirm the studio location is set “MMP-2” and click
[>>Add>>]. “Device1” will be added in right column.
8.
Click [Done].
Use of computer and setup
fig.FreeMidiConfiguration.eps
9.
A setting window like the following will appear.
Change “MMP-2, MMP-2 Port” to different name like
“MMP-2 interface”. Change “Device1” to different
name like “MMP-2”.
* If the name is same, it may be possible for some MIDI
application to confuse the name of interface or connected
equipment.
* This is one example of a setting window. The window that
appears will depend on your setup.
10. From the File menu, select [Save], and save your settings.
11. Select [Quit] from the File menu to exit FreeMIDI.
This completes driver settings.
Functions work in conjunction with computers
Use of computer and setup
■ Backup Patches
You can save user patch to computers or sequencers (BACKUP) and load it from those (RECOVER). You
can transfer your user patch to another MMP-2 using this function. Operation from MMP-2 editor is
shown on adopted CD-ROM “ReadMe”.
■ Intuitive operation of MMP-2 using MMP-2 editor
Using MMP-2 on computer, you can execute intuitive customize of graph curve of equalizer/dynamics.
Operation from MMP-2 editor is shown on adopted CD-ROM “ReadMe”.
41
Trouble Shooting
If the unit doesn’t work the way you think it should, check the items shown in the following table before
you assume that there is a malfunction. If the cause of the problem is still unclear, contact your retailer or
Roland Corporation’s Customer Service Center.
For other computer-related problems, please read “ReadMe” on the included CD-ROM.
Symptom
Nothing appears on
the LCD screen.
No sound.
Cause
The display contrast is too
dark or too light.
The volume is turned
down.
The microphone is not
receiving the required
power.
The audio input-source
settings are different from
the actual configuration.
External malfunction
The volume of the
MIC IN sound is
too low.
The output sound is
too low or too loud.
Effects are not
applied.
You could be using a
connection cable that
contains a resistor.
The switch setting for the
output level is not
appropriate.
The unit is set to OFF or
BYPASS.
RESET was applied.
42
Changes in system
parameters are not
saved.
The power was turned off
immediately after making
the changes.
I can't change the
“DRIVER” setting
parameter of
MMP-2 unit.
The unit is already
connected to the computer
via USB.
I changed the USB
driver, but the
change does not
take effect.
LCD screen
displays unstable
image when
buttons are pressed
in rough.
The power was not cycled.
Buttons were pressed in
rough.
Remedy
Adjust the contrast of the LCD screen (p. 14).
Check the [SENS] controls and the volume
levels for connected amplifiers, mixers, and
other equipment (“Sensitivity (SENS)” p. 17).
Check the documentation for the microphone
and make the phantom setting if necessary (p.
17).
Make settings that match the input jack and
standard (“Audio Input Source” p. 26).
Check the cables, amp, mixer, and other
equipment.
Use a connection cable that does not contain a
resistor (such as one from the Roland PCS
series).
Set the [OUTPUT LEVEL] switch on the rear
panel to match the destination device (p. 13).
Check the settings (“Using Effects” p. 19).
The RESET function changes the effect
parameter settings so the most minimal effect is
produced. Change the parameters or choose
another patch (“Resetting Effect Parameters
(RESET)” p. 15).
When the [ENTER] button is illuminated, it
means there are changes that have not been
saved. Before turning off the power, press the
[ENTER] button to save such changes (p. 14).
The “DRIVER” setting parameter of MMP-2
unit cannot be switched during the USB
connection of MMP-2 unit and computer exists.
Disconnect once and then change setting.
(“MMP-2 settings” p. 30).
A change in the driver takes effect after you
switch off the MMP-2’s power, then turn it on
again (“MMP-2 settings” p. 30).
The temporary distortion of image on LCD after
rough pressing is not because of malfunction.
Please be careful to press buttons in moderate
pressure.
Trouble Shooting about Computer
* Please read the “ReadMe” file in the MMP-2 Driver & Software CD-ROM. You can get any additional information not written
in the owner’s manual from the “ReadMe” file.
Windows Users...... p.43
Macintosh Users .... p.44
Windows users
USB connections cannot be made correctly.
◆Has the MMP-2 been recognized?
Disconnect the USB cables, and then re-connect them.
It is possible that the computer has failed to recognize or initialize the MMP-2. Leave the USB cable
connected to the MMP-2, and restart Windows. If connection still does not occur, exit Windows, and turn
off the power of your computer. Then turn on the power of your computer and start Windows.
Cannot shift to Suspend*
◆Is an application which uses the MMP-2 running?
Exit the application which is using the MMP-2.
The computer cannot shift to Suspend mode if an application such as a sequencer is using the MMP-2.
Trouble Shooting about Computer
What is Suspend?
This is a function which minimizes power consumption by shutting down the internal circuitry of the
computer and the peripheral devices while the power remains supplied to the computer.
MMP-2 does not resume correctly from the suspended state
◆When suspended, was the MMP-2 still connected via the USB cable?
Disconnect the USB cable, and then re-connect it.
On some computers when Windows resumes from the suspended state, the MMP-2 may fail to resume. If
this occurs, the USB cable connected to the MMP-2 should be disconnected and then reconnected.
Windows hangs up (freezes) when returning from the suspended state
Disconnect the USB cable before suspending.
On some computers when Windows resumes from the suspended state, it may hang up (freeze). If this
occurs, the USB cable connected to the MMP-2 should be disconnected before suspending.
When you once again wish to use the MMP-2, make sure that the computer has resumed correctly from
the suspend state, and then connect the USB cable to the MMP-2.
* If the computer itself has a suspend switch, the USB cable connected to the MMP-2 should be disconnected before you press that
switch.
* For a notebook computer, some settings of the computer may cause it to automatically enter suspend mode when the lid (LCD
display) is closed, so the USB cable connected to the MMP-2 should be disconnected before the lid is closed.
Does not work with Windows 95
It will not operate on Windows 95.
43
Trouble Shooting about Computer
My computer hangs up when I open a MIDI file
This problem can occur if the USB waveform of your computer does not sufficiently meet the standards.
In this case, the problem may be solved if you connect the MMP-2 via a USB hub (USB hub containing a
power supply).
Windows 98 / Me users
The latest information is provided in the “Troubleshooting” section of the file Readme_e.htm,
located in the Driver\WinMe_98 folder of the CD-ROM. Please refer to the appropriate section.
• Cannot install/uninstall/use the driver
• Cannot select the MMP-2 device
• Cannot transfer data
• Data transfer is interrupted
Windows 2000 users
The latest information is provided in the “Troubleshooting” section of the file Readme_e.htm,
located in the Driver\Win2000 folder of the CD-ROM. Please refer to the appropriate section.
• Cannot install/uninstall/use the driver
• Cannot select the MMP-2 device
• Cannot transfer data
• Data transfer is interrupted
• The “Digital Signature Not Found” dialog box appears
• You are asked for the driver file even thought it has already been installed
• Cannot use two or more units simultaneously
• Other
Macintosh users
An error dialog box is displayed
◆Is the MMP-2 driver installed?
An error dialog box will be displayed if the MMP-2 is connected to your computer before the MMP-2
driver is installed.
If the display indicates “The software needed to use the USB device “Unknown Device” cannot be
found. Please refer to the device documentation to install the necessary software”, click “OK.”
If the display indicates “Software needed for the USB device “Unnamed Device” is not available.
Would you like to look for the software on the Internet?”, click “Cancel.”
After closing the dialog box, follow the procedure for “Macintosh / OMS” (p. 35) or “Macintosh /
FreeMIDI” (p. 38) to install the MMP-2 driver.
Cannot install the USB MIDI driver
◆Did you exit all other programs?
Exit all currently-running programs.
44
Trouble Shooting about Computer
Cannot make USB connections correctly
◆Was the MMP-2 recognized?
Disconnect the USB cable, and then re-connect it.
If another USB device is connected, try connecting only the MMP-2.
It is possible that the computer did not correctly recognize or initialize the MMP-2. Leave the USB cable
connected to the MMP-2, and restart your Macintosh. If the connection is still not achieved, exit your
Macintosh and turn off the power of the computer. Then turn on the power of the computer once again,
and start up your Macintosh.
The computer cannot recognize the MMP-2 when the USB connector of Macintosh’s keyboard is used. Reconnect the USB cable to the USB connector of the main body.
The MMP-2 does not recover correctly from sleep mode
After your Macintosh has been in sleep mode, exit the software and re-start it.
* We recommend that you make Energy saving settings in the Control panel so that your computer does not enter sleep mode.
Macintosh hangs up
◆Did you try to plug and unplug USB cable during the booting of MMP-2 editor?
It is possible for your Macintosh to hang in case plugging and unplugging of USB cable is done during the
MMP-2 editor is booting. Please do plugging and unplugging with confirmation that MMP-2 editor is not
booted.
◆Did you try to communicate with MMP-2 without establishing connection via USB?
It is possible to hang or freeze if you try to send data from the MMP-2 Editor to MMP-2 unit without
turning the power of MMP-2 unit on or connecting your Macintosh with MMP-2 unit using USB cable.
Please confirm MMP-2 unit and your Macintosh is correctly connected via USB and the power of MMP-2
unit is turned on before the communication of MMP-2 Editor and MMP-2 unit.
Trouble Shooting about Computer
◆Did you booted MMP-2 editor before turning the power of MMP-2 unit on?
MMP-2 editor is set to obtain setup status of MMP-2 unit immediately after booting. In order to avoid
hanging or freezing, please boot up MMP-2 editor after connection of MMP-2 unit with your Macintosh
and turning the power on.
45
MIDI Implementation
Model: MMP-2
Version: 1.00
TRANSMITTED DATA AND
REGOGNIZED RECEIVE DATA
The Roland system exclusive messages use device IDs to specify multiple
MMP-2 units.
The MMP-2 sends system exclusive messages with the device ID set with “MIDI
Device ID(*1)”, and receives the system exclusive messages whose device ID is
same as its device ID and 7FH.
(*1) See “Data Transfer Address Map” (p. 47) section.
■Channel Voice message
●Universal System Exclusive Message
●Polyphonic Key Pressure
Transmits the level meter value of MMP-2(MIDI ch. is fixed to 16.)
Status
AFH
Second
mmH
❍Identity Request
mm = Note No.: 00H - 07H (0 - 7)
ll = Level Meter Value: 00H - 7FH (0 - 127)
Level Meter
Target
——————————————————————————
Note
Level
Meter
Number
Channel
——————————————————————————
0
Input
1
1
Input
2
2
Output
1
3
Output
2
4
GR(COMP)
1
5
GR(COMP)
2
6
GR(EXP)
1
7
GR(EXP)
2
Switches the group of effect patch (MIDI ch. is fixed to 16.)
Select
| LSB
| 00H
| 40H
Third
mmH
llH
00H
00H - 7FH (0 - 127)
| Program Change
| Patch Number
|
|
| 00H - 28H( 0 - 40) | Preset #01 - #41
| 00H - 3FH( 0 - 63) | User
#01 - #64
●Program Change
Second
ppH
00H - 3FH (0 - 63)
■System Exclusive Message
Status
F0H
Data Byte
iiH,ddH, ..., eeH
Byte
F0H
iiH
Description
Status of System Exclusive Message
Manufacturer ID
41H Roland’s Manufacturer ID
7EH Universal Non Real-time Message
7FH Universal Real-time Message
Data:
00H - 7FH (0 - 127)
:
Data
EOX
(End of System Exclusive message)
ddH
:
eeH
F7H
Description
Status of System Exclusive Message
Universal System Exclusive Message Non Real-time Header
Device ID (or 7FH)
General Information (sub ID #1)
Identify Request
(sub ID #2)
EOX (End of System Exclusive Message)
Status
F7H
Status
F0H
Data Bytes
Status
7EH,Dev,06H,02H,41H,4EH,01H,00H,00H,ssH,ssH,ssH,ssH F7H
Byte
F0H
7EH
Dev
06H
02H
41H
4EH 01H
00H 00H
ssH ssH
ssH ssH
F7H
Description
Status of System Exclusive Message
Universal System Exclusive Message Non Real-time Header
Device ID
General Information
(sub ID #1)
Identify Request
(sub ID #2)
Manufacturer ID
(Roland)
Device Family Code
(MMP-2)
Device Family No.
Software Revision Level
EOX
(End of System Exclusive Message)
●Data Transfer
Switches the effect patch (MIDI ch. is fixed to 16.)
Status
CFH
pp = Program No.:
Data Byte
7EH,Dev,06H,01H
Byte
F0H
7EH
Dev
06H
01H
F7H
❍Identity Reply
●Control Change
Bank
MSB
00H
00H
Status
F0H
The message is used to request the particular information of the MMP-2.
The MMP-2 does not transmit the message.
If the MMP-2 received the message and the device ID of the message is same as its
device ID or 7FH, the MMP-2 transmits the following Identity Reply message.
Level Meter Value and Level
Value
Level
0
0dB
1
-1dB
2
-2dB
:
127
-Infinite
Status
Second
BFH
00H
BFH
20H
mm = upper byte of bank number:
ll = lower byte of bank number:
❍INQUIRY MESSAGE
Third
llH
Status
F7H
The MMP-2 can transfer and receive the internal parameters information using
system exclusive messages, and also can be controlled by the external devices using
system exclusive message.
The MMP-2 can transmit and receive Universal System Exclusive messages, Data
Request (RQ1) and Data set (DT1) as the System Exclusive Message.
❍About Model ID
The Model ID of the MMP-2 is 00H,4EH as for Data Request (RQ1) and Data set
(DT1).
(RQ1, DT1)
❍Data Request (RQ1)
Status
F0H
Data Bytes
41H,Dev,00H,4EH,11H,aaH,bbH,ccH,ssH,ssH,ssH,Sum
Status
F7H
Byte
F0H
41H
Dev
00H 4EH
11H
aaH
bbH
ccH
ssH
ssH
ssH
Sum
F7H
Description
Status of System Exclusive Message
Manufacturer ID
(Roland)
Device ID
Model ID
(MMP-2)
Command ID
(RQ1)
Address MSB
Address MID
Address LSB
Size MSB
Size MID
Size LSB
Check Sum
EOX
(End of System Exclusive Message)
The message is used to request data to the MMP-2.
The MMP-2 does not transmit this message.
The MMP-2 transmits the requested data using Data Set(DT1) under following
condition when it received the message.
1. The requested address correspond to the specified parameter base address
of the MMP-2.
2. The requested size is over 1 byte.
❍About Device ID
System Exclusive messages are not assigned to any particular MIDI channel.
Instead, they have their own special control parameter called device ID.
46
MIDI Implementation
●Input Parameters
❍Data Set (DT1)
Status
F0H
Data Bytes
41H,Dev,00H,4EH,12H,aaH,bbH,ccH,ddH, ..., eeH,Sum
Byte
F0H
41H
Dev
00H 4EH
12H
aaH
bbH
ccH
ddH
:
eeH
Sum
F7H
Description
Status of System Exclusive Message
Manufacturer ID
(Roland)
Device ID
Model ID
(MMP-2)
Command ID
(DT1)
Address MSB
Address MID
Address LSB
Data
:
Data
Check Sum
EOX
(End of System Exclusive Message)
Status
F7H
❍The message is received under the following condition.
If the device ID on the message is same as that of the receive device, and the
address on the message correspond to the specified parameter base address, the
received data are stored from the specified parameter base address.
If the interval of received messages is shorter than 25m sec., the MMP-2 can not
work the receive message procedure correctly.
❍The message is transmitted under the following condition.
When the MMP-2 transmit the data on the requested parameter after receiving the
Data Request message(RQ1).
See “Data Transfer Address Map” (p. 47) for more details of the transfer
parameters.
Data Transfer Address Map
The each address value is expressed as a 7bit hex number.
+————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
|
Address
|
MSB
|
|
LSB
|
|—————————————————————+————————————————+————————————————+————————————————+
|
Binary
|
0aaa aaaa
|
0bbb bbbb
|
0ccc cccc
|
|
7—bit Hex
|
AA
|
BB
|
CC
|
+————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
■Parameter Address Block
<Model ID = 00H 4EH>
+————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
| Start
|
|
|Address
|
Contents and Remarks
|
|==========+=============================================================|
| 00 00 00 | System Parameter
|
|——————————+—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————|
| 00 01 00 | Input Parameter
|
|——————————+—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————|
| 00 02 00 | Effect Parameter (Temp)
|
|——————————+—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————|
| 00 04 00 | Status
|
|——————————+—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————|
| 00 05 00 | Remote Operation
|
|——————————+—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————|
| 01 00 00 | Bulk Data
|
|——————————+—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————|
●System Parameter
+————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
| Start
|
|
|
| Address | Data
|
Contents and Remarks
|
|==========+=========+===================================================|
|
00 00 | 00 - 01 | Master Clock(*1)
INTERNAL, DIGITAL |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
00 01 | 00 - 03 | Sampling Frequency(*1)
44.1K,48K,88.2K,96KHz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
00 02 | 00 - 01 | Audio Source(*1)
MIC, DIGITAL |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
00 03 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|
:
:
|
|
00 0F | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
00 10 | 00 - 01 | USB Driver(*1)
VENDER, GENELIC |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
00 11 | 00 - 1F | MIDI Device ID(*1)
1,,,32 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
00 12 | 00 - 01 | MIDI Level Meter Tx. Switch
OFF,ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
00 13 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|
:
:
|
|
00 1F | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
00 20 | 00 - 0F | LCD Contrast
1,,,16 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
00 21 | 00 - 02 | Peak Level Select
-6,-3,0dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
00 22 | 00 - 02 | Effects Routing
NORM,P IN,P OUT |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
00 23 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|
:
:
|
|
00 7F | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
(*1)Read Only Parameters.
+————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
| Start
|
|
|
| Address | Data
|
Contents and Remarks
|
|==========+=========+===================================================|
|
01 00 | 00 — 01 | Phantom Power 1
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
01 01 | 16 — 46 | ATT 1
(0dB:40H) —42 — +6dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
01 02 | 00 — 01 | Phase 1
NORMAL, INVERT |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
01 03 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
01 04 | 00 — 51 | LO—Cut 1
TURU,20 — 2.00kHz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
01 05 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|
:
:
|
|
01 0F | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
01 10 | 00 — 01 | Phantom Power 2
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
01 11 | 16 — 46 | ATT 2
(0dB:40H) —42 — +6dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
01 12 | 00 — 01 | Phase 2
NORMAL, INVERT |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
01 13 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
01 14 | 00 — 51 | LO—Cut 2
TURU,20 — 2.00kHz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
01 15 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|
:
:
|
|
01 7F | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
●Effect Parameters
❍Basic Address
+————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
| Start
|
|
|
| Address | Data
|
Contents and Remarks
|
|==========+=========+===================================================|
|
02 00 | 20 — 7F | Effects Patch Name — 1
(ASCII)|
|
:
|
:
|
:
|
|
02 0B | 20 — 7F | Effects Patch Name —12
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 0C | 10 — 11 | Effects Algorithm Number
|
|
|
| 10H: MIC MODEL + 4 BAND EQ + DYNAMICS
|
|
|
| 11H: MIC MODEL + DYNAMICS + PLUG IN(Preamp)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 0D | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|
:
:
|
|
02 0F | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 10 | 00 — 7F | Effects Parameters
|
|
:
|
:
|
|
|
03 7F | 00 — 7F |
|
+————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
❍Algorithm 0 (MIC MODELING + 4 BAND EQ + DYNAMICS)
+————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
| Start
|
|
|
| Address | Data
|
Contents and Remarks
|
|==========+=========+===================================================|
|
02 10 | 00 — 01 | LINK
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 11 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 12 | 00 — 01 | Bypass MODEL 1
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 13 | 00 — 01 | Bypass MODEL 2
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 14 | 00 — 01 | Bypass EQ 1
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 15 | 00 — 01 | Bypass EQ 2
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 16 | 00 — 01 | Bypass DYN 1
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 17 | 00 — 01 | Bypass DYN 2
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 18 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|
:
:
|
|
02 1F | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 20 | 00 — 01 | MODEL 1: SW
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 21 | 00 — 05 | MODEL 1: Input 0,,,5 =
|
|
|
|
DR—20,SmlDy,HedDy,MinCn,Flat,AKGC3K |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 22 | 00 — 06 | MODEL 1: Output 0,,,6 =
|
|
|
|
SML.DY,VOC.DY,LRG.DY,SML.CN,LRG.CN,VNT.CN,FLAT |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 23 | 34 — 4C | MODEL 1: Proximity Effect
(0:40H) —12,,,+12 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 24 | 00 — 6B | MODEL 1: Timelag
0,,,107 = 0,,,3000cm |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 25 | 00 — 01 | MODEL 2: SW
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 26 | 00 — 05 | MODEL 2: Input 0,,,5 =
|
|
|
|
DR—20,SmlDy,HedDy,MinCn,Flat,AKGC3K |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 27 | 00 — 06 | MODEL 2: Output 0,,,6 =
|
|
|
|
SML.DY,VOC.DY,LRG.DY,SML.CN,LRG.CN,VNT.CN,FLAT |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 28 | 34 — 4C | MODEL 2: Proximity Effect
(0:40H) —12,,,+12 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 29 | 00 — 6B | MODEL 2: Timelag
0,,,107 = 0,,,3000cm |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 2A | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|
:
:
|
|
02 2F | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 30 | 00 — 01 | EQ 1: SW
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 31 | 16 — 46 | EQ 1: ATT
(0dB:40H) —42 — +6dB |
47
MIDI Implementation
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 32 | 01 — 79 | EQ 1: Low EQ Frequency
20 — 20.0kHz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 33 | 22 — 5E | EQ 1: Low EQ Gain
(0dB:40H) —15,,,+15dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 34 | 1E — 60 | EQ 1: Low EQ Q
0.36,,,16.0 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 35 | 01 — 79 | EQ 1: Lo—Mid EQ Frequency
20 — 20.0kHz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 36 | 22 — 5E | EQ 1: Lo—Mid EQ Gain
(0dB:40H) —15,,,+15dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 37 | 1E — 60 | EQ 1: Lo—Mid EQ Q
0.36,,,16.0 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 38 | 01 — 79 | EQ 1: Hi—Mid EQ Frequency
20 — 20.0kHz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 39 | 22 — 5E | EQ 1: Hi—Mid EQ Gain
(0dB:40H) —15,,,+15dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 3A | 1E — 60 | EQ 1: Hi—Mid EQ Q
0.36,,,16.0 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 3B | 01 — 79 | EQ 1: Hi EQ Frequency
20 — 20.0kHz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 3C | 22 — 5E | EQ 1: Hi EQ Gain
(0dB:40H) —15,,,+15dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 3D | 1E — 60 | EQ 1: Hi EQ Q
0.36,,,16.0 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 3E | 00 — 02 | EQ 1: Low—Type
0,,,9 = PEAK,,,THRU |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 3F | 00 — 02 | EQ 1: Lo—Mid Type
0,,,9 = PEAK,,,THRU |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 40 | 00 — 02 | EQ 1: Hi—Mid Type
0,,,9 = PEAK,,,THRU |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 41 | 00 — 02 | EQ 1: Hi Type
0,,,9 = PEAK,,,THRU |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 42 | 00 — 01 | EQ 2: SW
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 43 | 16 — 46 | EQ 2: ATT
(0dB:40H) —42 — +6dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 44 | 01 — 79 | EQ 2: Low EQ Frequency
20 — 20.0kHz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 45 | 22 — 5E | EQ 2: Low EQ Gain
(0dB:40H) —15,,,+15dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 46 | 1E — 60 | EQ 2: Low EQ Q
0.36,,,16.0 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 47 | 01 — 79 | EQ 2: Lo—Mid EQ Frequency
20 — 20.0kHz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 48 | 22 — 5E | EQ 2: Lo—Mid EQ Gain
(0dB:40H) —15,,,+15dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 49 | 1E — 60 | EQ 2: Lo—Mid EQ Q
0.36,,,16.0 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 4A | 01 — 79 | EQ 2: Hi—Mid EQ Frequency
20 — 20.0kHz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 4B | 22 — 5E | EQ 2: Hi—Mid EQ Gain
(0dB:40H) —15,,,+15dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 4C | 1E — 60 | EQ 2: Hi—Mid EQ Q
0.36,,,16.0 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 4D | 01 — 79 | EQ 2: Hi EQ Frequency
20 — 20.0kHz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 4E | 22 — 5E | EQ 2: Hi EQ Gain
(0dB:40H) —15,,,+15dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 4F | 1E — 60 | EQ 2: Hi EQ Q
0.36,,,16.0 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 50 | 00 — 02 | EQ 2: Low—Type
0,,,9 = PEAK,,,THRU |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 51 | 00 — 02 | EQ 2: Lo—Mid Type
0,,,9 = PEAK,,,THRU |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 52 | 00 — 02 | EQ 2: Hi—Mid Type
0,,,9 = PEAK,,,THRU |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 53 | 00 — 02 | EQ 2: Hi Type
0,,,9 = PEAK,,,THRU |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 54 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|
:
:
|
|
02 5F | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 60 | 00 — 01 | DYN 1: COMP SW
OFF,ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 61 | 00 — 04 | DYN 1: COMP Type 0,,,4 =
|
|
|
|
SOLID,TUBE1,TUBE2,TUBE3,TUBE4 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 62 | 00 — 01 | DYN 1: COMP KEYIN
IN1,IN2 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 63 | 10 — 40 | DYN 1: COMP Threshold
(0dB:40H) —24 — 0dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 64 | 00 — 0D | DYN 1: COMP Ratio
0,13 = 1.00:0,,,INF:0 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 65 | 00 — 01 | DYN 1: COMP Knee
HARD,SOFT |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 66 | 00 — 7C | DYN 1: COMP Attack
0,,,800.0ms |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 67 | 00 — 7C | DYN 1: COMP Release
0,,,8000ms |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 68 | 10 — 70 | DYN 1: COMP Level
(0dB:40H) —24 — +24dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 69 | 00 — 01 | DYN 1: COMP Autogain
OFF,ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 6A | 00 — 01 | DYN 1: EXP SW
OFF,ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 6B | 00 — 01 | DYN 1: EXP KEYIN
IN1,IN2 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 6C | 10 — 60 | DYN 1: EXP Threshold
(0dB:60H) —80 — 0dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 6D | 00 — 0D | DYN 1: EXP Ratio
0,13 = 1.00:0,,,INF:0 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 6E | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 6F | 00 — 7C | DYN 1: EXP Attack
0,,,800.0ms |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 70 | 00 — 7C | DYN 1: EXP Release
0,,,8000ms |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 71 | 00 — 01 | DYN 1: ENH/DES SW
OFF,ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 72 | 00 — 01 | DYN 1: ENH/DES Type
ENH,DES |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 73 | 00 — 64 | DYN 1: ENH Sens
0,,,100 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 74 | 39 — 79 | DYN 1: ENH Freq
500,,,20000Hz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 75 | 40 — 58 | DYN 1: ENH Mix Level
(0dB:40H) 0 — +12dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 76 | 00 — 64 | DYN 1: DES Sens
0,,,100 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 77 | 39 — 79 | DYN 1: DES Freq
500,,,20000Hz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 78 | 10 — 40 | DYN 1: DES Rejection Level
(0dB:40H) —24 — 0dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 79 | 00 — 01 | DYN 2: COMP SW
OFF,ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 7A | 00 — 04 | DYN 2: COMP Type 0,,,4 =
|
|
|
|
SOLID,TUBE1,TUBE2,TUBE3,TUBE4 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
48
|
02 7B | 00 — 01 | DYN 2: COMP KEYIN
IN1,IN2 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 7C | 10 — 40 | DYN 2: COMP Threshold
(0dB:40H) —24 — 0dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 7D | 00 — 0D | DYN 2: COMP Ratio
0,13 = 1.00:0,,,INF:0 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 7E | 00 — 01 | DYN 2: COMP Knee
HARD,SOFT |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 7F | 00 — 7C | DYN 2: COMP Attack
0,,,800.0ms |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 00 | 00 — 7C | DYN 2: COMP Release
0,,,8000ms |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 01 | 10 — 70 | DYN 2: COMP Level
(0dB:40H) —24 — +24dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 02 | 00 — 01 | DYN 2: COMP Autogain
OFF,ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 03 | 00 — 01 | DYN 2: EXP SW
OFF,ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 04 | 00 — 01 | DYN 2: EXP KEYIN
IN1,IN2 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 05 | 10 — 60 | DYN 2: EXP Threshold
(0dB:60H) —80 — 0dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 06 | 00 — 0D | DYN 2: EXP Ratio
0,13 = 1.00:0,,,INF:0 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 07 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 08 | 00 — 7C | DYN 2: EXP Attack
0,,,800.0ms |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 09 | 00 — 7C | DYN 2: EXP Release
0,,,8000ms |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 0A | 00 — 01 | DYN 2: ENH/DES SW
OFF,ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 0B | 00 — 01 | DYN 2: ENH/DES Type
ENH,DES |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 0C | 00 — 64 | DYN 2: ENH Sens
0,,,100 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 0D | 39 — 79 | DYN 2: ENH Freq
500,,,20000Hz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 0E | 40 — 58 | DYN 2: ENH Mix Level
(0dB:40H) 0 — +12dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 0F | 00 — 64 | DYN 2: DES Sens
0,,,100 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 10 | 39 — 79 | DYN 2: DES Freq
500,,,20000Hz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 11 | 28 — 40 | DYN 2: DES Rejection Level
(0dB:40H) —12 — 0dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 12 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|
:
:
|
|
03 7F | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
❍Algorithm 1 (MIC MODELING + DYNAMICS + PLUG IN(Preamp))
+————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
| Start
|
|
|
| Address | Data
|
Contents and Remarks
|
|==========+=========+===================================================|
|
02 10 | 00 — 01 | LINK
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 11 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 12 | 00 — 01 | Bypass MODEL 1
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 13 | 00 — 01 | Bypass MODEL 2
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 14 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 15 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 16 | 00 — 01 | Bypass DYN 1
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 17 | 00 — 01 | Bypass DYN 2
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 18 | 00 — 01 | Bypass PLUGIN 1(Preamp)
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 19 | 00 — 01 | Bypass PLUGIN 2(Preamp)
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 1A | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|
:
:
|
|
02 1F | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 20 | 00 — 01 | MODEL 1: SW
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 21 | 00 — 05 | MODEL 1: Input 0,,,5 =
|
|
|
|
DR—20,SmlDy,HedDy,MinCn,Flat,AKGC3K |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 22 | 00 — 06 | MODEL 1: Output 0,,,6 =
|
|
|
|
SML.DY,VOC.DY,LRG.DY,SML.CN,LRG.CN,VNT.CN,FLAT |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 23 | 34 — 4C | MODEL 1: Proximity Effect
(0:40H) —12,,,+12 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 24 | 00 — 6B | MODEL 1: Timelag
0,,,107 = 0,,,3000cm |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 25 | 00 — 01 | MODEL 2: SW
OFF, ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 26 | 00 — 05 | MODEL 2: Input 0,,,5 =
|
|
|
|
DR—20,SmlDy,HedDy,MinCn,Flat,AKGC3K |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 27 | 00 — 06 | MODEL 2: Output 0,,,6 =
|
|
|
|
SML.DY,VOC.DY,LRG.DY,SML.CN,LRG.CN,VNT.CN,FLAT |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 28 | 34 — 4C | MODEL 2: Proximity Effect
(0:40H) —12,,,+12 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 29 | 00 — 6B | MODEL 2: Timelag
0,,,107 = 0,,,3000cm |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 2A | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|
:
:
|
|
02 5F | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 60 | 00 — 01 | DYN 1: COMP SW
OFF,ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 61 | 00 — 04 | DYN 1: COMP Type 0,,,4 =
|
|
|
|
SOLID,TUBE1,TUBE2,TUBE3,TUBE4 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 62 | 00 — 01 | DYN 1: COMP KEYIN
IN1,IN2 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 63 | 10 — 40 | DYN 1: COMP Threshold
(0dB:40H) —24 — 0dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 64 | 00 — 0D | DYN 1: COMP Ratio
0,13 = 1.00:0,,,INF:0 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 65 | 00 — 01 | DYN 1: COMP Knee
HARD,SOFT |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 66 | 00 — 7C | DYN 1: COMP Attack
0,,,800.0ms |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 67 | 00 — 7C | DYN 1: COMP Release
0,,,8000ms |
MIDI Implementation
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 68 | 10 — 70 | DYN 1: COMP Level
(0dB:40H) —24 — +24dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 69 | 00 — 01 | DYN 1: COMP Autogain
OFF,ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 6A | 00 — 01 | DYN 1: EXP SW
OFF,ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 6B | 00 — 01 | DYN 1: EXP KEYIN
IN1,IN2 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 6C | 10 — 60 | DYN 1: EXP Threshold
(0dB:60H) —80 — 0dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 6D | 00 — 0D | DYN 1: EXP Ratio
0,13 = 1.00:0,,,INF:0 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 6E | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 6F | 00 — 7C | DYN 1: EXP Attack
0,,,800.0ms |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 70 | 00 — 7C | DYN 1: EXP Release
0,,,8000ms |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 71 | 00 — 01 | DYN 1: ENH/DES SW
OFF,ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 72 | 00 — 01 | DYN 1: ENH/DES Type
ENH,DES |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 73 | 00 — 64 | DYN 1: ENH Sens
0,,,100 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 74 | 39 — 79 | DYN 1: ENH Freq
500,,,20000Hz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 75 | 40 — 58 | DYN 1: ENH Mix Level
(0dB:40H) 0 — +12dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 76 | 00 — 64 | DYN 1: DES Sens
0,,,100 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 77 | 39 — 79 | DYN 1: DES Freq
500,,,20000Hz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 78 | 10 — 40 | DYN 1: DES Rejection Level
(0dB:40H) —24 — 0dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 79 | 00 — 01 | DYN 2: COMP SW
OFF,ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 7A | 00 — 04 | DYN 2: COMP Type 0,,,4 =
|
|
|
|
SOLID,TUBE1,TUBE2,TUBE3,TUBE4 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 7B | 00 — 01 | DYN 2: COMP KEYIN
IN1,IN2 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 7C | 10 — 40 | DYN 2: COMP Threshold
(0dB:40H) —24 — 0dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 7D | 00 — 0D | DYN 2: COMP Ratio
0,13 = 1.00:0,,,INF:0 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 7E | 00 — 01 | DYN 2: COMP Knee
HARD,SOFT |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
02 7F | 00 — 7C | DYN 2: COMP Attack
0,,,800.0ms |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 00 | 00 — 7C | DYN 2: COMP Release
0,,,8000ms |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 01 | 10 — 70 | DYN 2: COMP Level
(0dB:40H) —24 — +24dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 02 | 00 — 01 | DYN 2: COMP Autogain
OFF,ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 03 | 00 — 01 | DYN 2: EXP SW
OFF,ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 04 | 00 — 01 | DYN 2: EXP KEYIN
IN1,IN2 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 05 | 10 — 60 | DYN 2: EXP Threshold
(0dB:60H) —80 — 0dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 06 | 00 — 0D | DYN 2: EXP Ratio
0,13 = 1.00:0,,,INF:0 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 07 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 08 | 00 — 7C | DYN 2: EXP Attack
0,,,800.0ms |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 09 | 00 — 7C | DYN 2: EXP Release
0,,,8000ms |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 0A | 00 — 01 | DYN 2: ENH/DES SW
OFF,ON |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 0B | 00 — 01 | DYN 2: ENH/DES Type
ENH,DES |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 0C | 00 — 64 | DYN 2: ENH Sens
0,,,100 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 0D | 39 — 79 | DYN 2: ENH Freq
500,,,20000Hz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 0E | 40 — 58 | DYN 2: ENH Mix Level
(0dB:40H) 0 — +12dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 0F | 00 — 64 | DYN 2: DES Sens
0,,,100 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 10 | 39 — 79 | DYN 2: DES Freq
500,,,20000Hz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 11 | 28 — 40 | DYN 2: DES Rejection Level
(0dB:40H) —12 — 0dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 12 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|
:
:
|
|
03 1F | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 20 | 00 — 01 | PLUGIN 1: Preamp SW
OFF,0N |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 21 | 00 — 08 | PLUGIN 1: Preamp Type
0,,,8 = RED7,,,CSSLST |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 22 | 01 — 45 | PLUGIN 1: Preamp Warm Freq
20,,,1000Hz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 23 | 04 — 7C | PLUGIN 1: Preamp Warm Gain
—6,,,+6dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 24 | 45 — 79 | PLUGIN 1: Preamp Brightness Freq
1000,,,20000Hz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 25 | 04 — 7C | PLUGIN 1: Preamp Brightness Gain
—6,,,+6dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 26 | 28 — 40 | PLUGIN 1: Preamp Harmonic Distortion Threshold
|
|
|
|
(0dB:40H) —12 — 0dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 27 | 00 — 64 | PLUGIN 1: Preamp Harmonic Distortion Level
|
|
|
|
0,,,100 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 28 | 00 — 64 | PLUGIN 1: Preamp Harmonic Distortion Color
|
|
|
|
0,,,100 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 29 | 00 — 01 | PLUGIN 2: Preamp SW
0FF,0N |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 2A | 00 — 08 | PLUGIN 2: Preamp Type
0,,,8 = RED7,,,CSSLST |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 2B | 01 — 45 | PLUGIN 2: Preamp Warm Freq
20,,,1000Hz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 2C | 04 — 7C | PLUGIN 2: Preamp Warm Gain
—6,,,+6dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 2D | 45 — 79 | PLUGIN 2: Preamp Brightness Freq
1000,,,20000Hz |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 2E | 04 — 7C | PLUGIN 2: Preamp Brightness Gain
—6,,,+6dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 2F | 28 — 40 | PLUGIN 2: Preamp Harmonic Distortion Threshold
|
|
|
|
(0dB:40H) —12 — 0dB |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 30 | 00 — 64 | PLUGIN 2: Preamp Harmonic Distortion Level
|
|
|
|
0,,,100 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 31 | 00 — 64 | PLUGIN 2: Preamp Harmonic Distortion Color
|
|
|
|
0,,,100 |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
03 32 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|
:
:
|
|
03 7F | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
●Status
+————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
| Start
|
|
|
| Address | Data
|
Contents and Remarks
|
|==========+=========+===================================================|
|
04 00 | 00 — 01 | Lock Flag
UNLOCK, LOCK |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
04 01 | 00 — 02 | Operation Mode
NORMAL, BULK DUMP, BULK RCV |
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
04 02 | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|
:
:
|
|
04 7F | 00
| (Reserved)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
(*) Read Only Parameters.
●Remote Operation
+————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
| Start
|
|
|
| Address | Data
|
Contents and Remarks
|
|==========+=========+===================================================|
| 00 05 00 | 00 —
| Remote Command / Response
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
|
05 01#| 00 —
| Parameter
|
|
:
:
|
|
00 7F#| 00 —
| Parameter
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
*
The addresses with # marks are invalid. Set data in regulated size (DT1) to the
addresses without # marks.
*
It is necessary to set parameter in regulated size simultaneously with the
Command.
❍Remote Operation Command List
Command
00
01
02
Remarks
NOP (No Operation)
Reset Temporary Patch
Set Application Control Mode
❍Remote Operation Response List
Command
40
41
Remarks
Complete (No Error)
Error
❍Command 00
NOP (No Operation)
+————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
| Start
|
|
|
| Address | Data
|
Contents and Remarks
|
|==========+=========+===================================================|
| 00 05 00 | 00
| NOP (No Operation)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
❍Command 01
Reset Temporary Patch
+————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
| Start
|
|
|
| Address | Data
|
Contents and Remarks
|
|==========+=========+===================================================|
| 00 05 00 | 01
| Reset Temporary Patch
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
❍Command 02
Set Application Control Mode
+————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
| Start
|
|
|
| Address | Data
|
Contents and Remarks
|
|==========+=========+===================================================|
| 00 05 00 | 02
| Set Application Control Mode
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
| 00 05 01 | 00 — 01 | PC—Base Application (MMP—2 Editor) Control Mode
|
|
|
| 00 = Off Line
|
|
|
| 01 = On Line
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
49
MIDI Implementation
❍Response 40
Complete (No Error)
+————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
| Start
|
|
|
| Address | Data
|
Contents and Remarks
|
|==========+=========+===================================================|
| 00 05 00 | 40
| Complete (No Error)
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
❍Response 41
Error
+————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
| Start
|
|
|
| Address | Data
|
Contents and Remarks
|
|==========+=========+===================================================|
| 00 05 00 | 41
| Error
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
| 00 05 01 | 00 — 7F | Error Code
|
|
|
| 00 = No Error (Complete, End of data)
|
|
|
| 01 = Illegal Command
|
|
|
| 02 = Busy
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
●Bulk Data
+————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
| Start
|
|
|
| Address | Data
|
Contents and Remarks
|
|==========+=========+===================================================|
| 01 00 00 | 00 —
| User Effect Patch Data
|
|
:
:
:
|
|
7F 7F | 00 —
| User Effect Patch Data
|
|——————————+—————————+———————————————————————————————————————————————————|
See Table as follows for settings.
MIDI Data - EQ Frequency Table
+————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————+
| Data |
Hz
|| Data |
Hz || Data |
Hz
|| Data |
Hz
|
+————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————+
| 00H — | TURU || 10H — |
47
|| 20H — | 120
|| 30H — | 300
|
| 01H — |
20
|| 11H — |
50
|| 21H — | 125
|| 31H — | 315
|
| 02H — |
21
|| 12H — |
53
|| 22H — | 133
|| 32H — | 335
|
| 03H — |
22
|| 13H — |
56
|| 23H — | 140
|| 33H — | 355
|
| 04H — |
24
|| 14H — |
60
|| 24H — | 150
|| 34H — | 376
|
| 05H — |
25
|| 15H — |
63
|| 25H — | 160
|| 35H — | 400
|
| 06H — |
27
|| 16H — |
67
|| 26H — | 170
|| 36H — | 422
|
| 07H — |
28
|| 17H — |
71
|| 27H — | 180
|| 37H — | 450
|
| 08H — |
30
|| 18H — |
75
|| 28H — | 190
|| 38H — | 473
|
| 09H — |
32
|| 19H — |
80
|| 29H
| 200
|| 39H — | 500
|
| 0AH — |
33
|| 1AH — |
84
|| 2AH — | 210
|| 3AH — | 530
|
| 0BH — |
36
|| 1BH — |
90
|| 2BH — | 224
|| 3BH — | 560
|
| 0CH — |
38
|| 1CH — |
94
|| 2CH — | 237
|| 3CH — | 600
|
| 0DH — |
40
|| 1DH — | 100
|| 2DH — | 250
|| 3DH — | 630
|
| 0EH — |
42
|| 1EH — | 106
|| 2EH — | 266
|| 3EH — | 670
|
| 0FH — |
45
|| 1FH — | 112
|| 2FH — | 280
|| 3FH — | 710
|
+——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
+————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————+
| Data |
Hz
|| Data |
Hz || Data |
Hz
|| Data |
Hz
|
+————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————+
| 40H — |
750 || 50H — | 1.90k || 60H — | 4.73k || 70H — | 12.0k |
| 41H — |
800 || 51H — | 2.00k || 61H — | 5.00k || 71H — | 12.5k |
| 42H — |
840 || 52H — | 2.10k || 62H — | 5.30k || 72H — | 13.3k |
| 43H — |
900 || 53H — | 2.24k || 63H — | 5.60k || 73H — | 14.0k |
| 44H — |
944 || 54H — | 2.37k || 64H — | 6.00k || 74H — | 15.0k |
| 45H — | 1.00k || 55H — | 2.50k || 65H — | 6.30k || 75H — | 16.0k |
| 46H — | 1.06k || 56H — | 2.66k || 66H — | 6.70k || 76H — | 17.0k |
| 47H — | 1.12k || 57H — | 2.80k || 67H — | 7.10k || 77H — | 18.0k |
| 48H — | 1.20k || 58H — | 3.00k || 68H — | 7.50k || 78H — | 19.0k |
| 49H — | 1.25k || 59H — | 3.15k || 69H
| 8.00k || 79H — | 20.0k |
| 4AH — | 1.33k || 5AH — | 3.35k || 6AH — | 8.40k || 7AH — |
——
|
| 4BH — | 1.40k || 5BH — | 3.55k || 6BH — | 9.00k || 7BH — |
——
|
| 4CH — | 1.50k || 5CH — | 3.76k || 6CH — | 9.44k || 7CH — |
——
|
| 4DH — | 1.60k || 5DH — | 4.00k || 6DH — | 10.0k || 7DH — |
——
|
| 4EH — | 1.70k || 5EH — | 4.22k || 6EH — | 10.6k || 7EH — |
——
|
| 4FH — | 1.80k || 5FH — | 4.50k || 6FH — | 11.2k || 7FH — |
——
|
+——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
MIDI Data - EQ Gain Table
+————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————+
| Data |Gain(dB)|| Data |Gain(dB)|| Data |Gain(dB)|| Data |Gain(dB)|
+————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————+
|
|
|| 20H
| —16.0 || 40H
|
0.0 || 60H
| 16.0 |
|
|
|| 21H
| —15.5 || 41H — |
0.5 || 61H — | 16.5 |
|
|
|| 22H — | —15.0 || 42H — |
1.0 || 62H — | 17.0 |
|
|
|| 23H — | —14.5 || 43H — |
1.5 || 63H — | 17.5 |
|
|
|| 24H — | —14.0 || 44H — |
2.0 || 64H — | 18.0 |
|
|
|| 25H — | —13.5 || 45H — |
2.5 || 65H — | 18.5 |
|
|
|| 26H — | —13.0 || 46H — |
3.0 || 66H — | 19.0 |
|
|
|| 27H — | —12.5 || 47H — |
3.5 || 67H — | 19.5 |
|
|
|| 28H — | —12.0 || 48H — |
4.0 || 68H — | 20.0 |
|
|
|| 29H — | —11.5 || 49H — |
4.5 || 69H — | 20.5 |
|
|
|| 2AH — | —11.0 || 4AH — |
5.0 || 6AH — | 21.0 |
|
|
|| 2BH — | —10.5 || 4BH — |
5.5 || 6BH — | 21.5 |
|
|
|| 2CH — | —10.0 || 4CH — |
6.0 || 6CH — | 22.0 |
|
|
|| 2DH — | — 9.5 || 4DH — |
6.5 || 6DH — | 22.5 |
|
|
|| 2EH — | — 9.0 || 4EH — |
7.0 || 6EH — | 23.0 |
|
|
|| 2FH — | — 8.5 || 4FH — |
7.5 || 6FH — | 23.5 |
| 10H
| —24.0 || 30H — | — 8.0 || 50H — |
8.0 || 70H — | 24.0 |
| 11H
| —23.5 || 31H — | — 7.5 || 51H — |
8.5 ||
|
|
| 12H
| —23.0 || 32H — | — 7.0 || 52H — |
9.0 ||
|
|
| 13H
| —22.5 || 33H — | — 6.5 || 53H — |
9.5 ||
|
|
| 14H
| —22.0 || 34H — | — 6.0 || 54H — | 10.0 ||
|
|
| 15H
| —21.5 || 35H — | — 5.5 || 55H — | 10.5 ||
|
|
| 16H
| —21.0 || 36H — | — 5.0 || 56H — | 11.0 ||
|
|
| 17H
| —20.5 || 37H — | — 4.5 || 57H — | 11.5 ||
|
|
| 18H
| —20.0 || 38H — | — 4.0 || 58H — | 12.0 ||
|
|
50
| 19H
| —19.5 || 39H — | — 3.5 || 59H — | 12.5 ||
|
|
| 1AH
| —19.0 || 3AH — | — 3.0 || 5AH — | 13.0 ||
|
|
| 1BH
| —18.5 || 3BH — | — 2.5 || 5BH — | 13.5 ||
|
|
| 1CH
| —18.0 || 3CH — | — 2.0 || 5CH — | 14.0 ||
|
|
| 1DH
| —17.5 || 3DH — | — 1.5 || 5DH — | 14.5 ||
|
|
| 1EH
| —17.0 || 3EH — | — 1.0 || 5EH — | 15.0 ||
|
|
| 1FH
| —16.5 || 3FH — | — 0.5 || 5FH — | 15.5 ||
|
|
+————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————+
MIDI Data - EQ Quality Table
+————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————+
| Data |
|| Data |
|| Data |
|| Data |
|
+————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————+
| 00H — |
——
|| 10H — |
——
|| 20H — | 0.40 || 30H — | 1.00 |
| 01H — |
——
|| 11H — |
——
|| 21H — | 0.42 || 31H — | 1.06 |
| 02H — |
——
|| 12H — |
——
|| 22H — | 0.45 || 32H — | 1.12 |
| 03H — |
——
|| 13H — |
——
|| 23H — | 0.47 || 33H — | 1.20 |
| 04H — |
——
|| 14H — |
——
|| 24H — | 0.50 || 34H — | 1.25 |
| 05H — |
——
|| 15H — |
——
|| 25H — | 0.53 || 35H — | 1.33 |
| 06H — |
——
|| 16H — |
——
|| 26H — | 0.56 || 36H — | 1.40 |
| 07H — |
——
|| 17H — |
——
|| 27H — | 0.60 || 37H — | 1.50 |
| 08H — |
——
|| 18H — |
——
|| 28H — | 0.63 || 38H — | 1.60 |
| 09H — |
——
|| 19H — |
——
|| 29H
| 0.67 || 39H — | 1.70 |
| 0AH — |
——
|| 1AH — |
——
|| 2AH — | 0.71 || 3AH — | 1.80 |
| 0BH — |
——
|| 1BH — |
——
|| 2BH — | 0.75 || 3BH — | 1.90 |
| 0CH — |
——
|| 1CH — |
——
|| 2CH — | 0.80 || 3CH — | 2.00 |
| 0DH — |
——
|| 1DH — |
——
|| 2DH — | 0.84 || 3DH — | 2.10 |
| 0EH — |
——
|| 1EH — | 0.36 || 2EH — | 0.90 || 3EH — | 2.24 |
| 0FH — |
——
|| 1FH — | 0.38 || 2FH — | 0.94 || 3FH — | 2.37 |
+——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
+————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————+
| Data |
|| Data |
|| Data |
|| Data |
|
+————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————+
| 40H — | 2.50 || 50H — | 6.30 || 60H — | 16.0 || 70H — |
——
|
| 41H — | 2.66 || 51H — | 6.70 || 61H — |
——
|| 71H — |
——
|
| 42H — | 2.80 || 52H — | 7.10 || 62H — |
——
|| 72H — |
——
|
| 43H — | 3.00 || 53H — | 7.50 || 63H — |
——
|| 73H — |
——
|
| 44H — | 3.15 || 54H — | 8.00 || 64H — |
——
|| 74H — |
——
|
| 45H — | 3.35 || 55H — | 8.40 || 65H — |
——
|| 75H — |
——
|
| 46H — | 3.55 || 56H — | 9.00 || 66H — |
——
|| 76H — |
——
|
| 47H — | 3.76 || 57H — | 9.44 || 67H — |
——
|| 77H — |
——
|
| 48H — | 4.00 || 58H — | 10.0 || 68H — |
——
|| 78H — |
——
|
| 49H — | 4.22 || 59H — | 10.6 || 69H
|
——
|| 79H — |
——
|
| 4AH — | 4.50 || 5AH — | 11.2 || 6AH — |
——
|| 7AH — |
——
|
| 4BH — | 4.73 || 5BH — | 12.0 || 6BH — |
——
|| 7BH — |
——
|
| 4CH — | 5.00 || 5CH — | 12.5 || 6CH — |
——
|| 7CH — |
——
|
| 4DH — | 5.30 || 5DH — | 13.3 || 6DH — |
——
|| 7DH — |
——
|
| 4EH — | 5.60 || 5EH — | 14.0 || 6EH — |
——
|| 7EH — |
——
|
| 4FH — | 6.00 || 5FH — | 15.0 || 6FH — |
——
|| 7FH — |
——
|
+——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
MIDI Data - EQ Type Table
+————————+————————+
| Data | TYPE |
+————————+————————+
| 00H
| PEAK |
| 01H — |
LSV |
| 02H — |
HSV |
| 03H — | LPF1 |
| 04H — | HPF1 |
| 05H — | LPF2 |
| 06H — | HPF2 |
| 07H — | BPF2 |
| 08H — | BRF2 |
| 09H — | THRU |
+————————+————————+
MIDI Data - EXP/CMP Ratio Table
+————————+————————+
| Data | RATIO |
+————————+————————+
| 00H
| 1.00:1 |
| 01H — | 1.12:1 |
| 02H — | 1.25:1 |
| 03H — | 1.40:1 |
| 04H — | 1.60:1 |
| 05H — | 1.80:1 |
| 06H — | 2.00:1 |
| 07H — | 2.50:1 |
| 08H — | 3.20:1 |
| 09H — | 4.00:1 |
| 0AH — | 5.60:1 |
| 0BH — | 8.00:1 |
| 0CH — | 16.0:1 |
| 0DH — | INF:1 |
+————————+————————+
MIDI Data - Time Table (Time Lag Table)
+————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————+
| Data | ms(cm) || Data | ms(cm) || Data | ms(cm) || Data | ms(cm) |
+————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————+
| 00H — |
0
|| 10H — |
16
|| 20H — |
40
|| 30H — | 100
|
| 01H — |
1
|| 11H — |
17
|| 21H — |
42
|| 31H — | 106
|
| 02H — |
2
|| 12H — |
18
|| 22H — |
45
|| 32H — | 112
|
| 03H — |
3
|| 13H — |
19
|| 23H — |
47
|| 33H — | 120
|
| 04H — |
4
|| 14H — |
20
|| 24H — |
50
|| 34H — | 125
|
| 05H — |
5
|| 15H — |
21
|| 25H — |
53
|| 35H — | 133
|
| 06H — |
6
|| 16H — |
22
|| 26H — |
56
|| 36H — | 140
|
| 07H — |
7
|| 17H — |
24
|| 27H — |
60
|| 37H — | 150
|
| 08H — |
8
|| 18H — |
25
|| 28H — |
63
|| 38H — | 160
|
| 09H — |
9
|| 19H — |
27
|| 29H
|
67
|| 39H — | 170
|
| 0AH — |
10
|| 1AH — |
28
|| 2AH — |
71
|| 3AH — | 180
|
| 0BH — |
11
|| 1BH — |
30
|| 2BH — |
75
|| 3BH — | 190
|
| 0CH — |
12
|| 1CH — |
32
|| 2CH — |
80
|| 3CH — | 200
|
| 0DH — |
13
|| 1DH — |
33
|| 2DH — |
84
|| 3DH — | 210
|
| 0EH — |
14
|| 1EH — |
36
|| 2EH — |
90
|| 3EH — | 224
|
| 0FH — |
15
|| 1FH — |
38
|| 2FH — |
94
|| 3FH — | 237
|
+——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
+————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————+
| Data | ms(cm) || Data | ms(cm) || Data | ms(cm) || Data | ms(cm) |
+————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————+
| 40H — |
250 || 50H — |
630 || 60H — | 1600 || 70H — | 4000 |
| 41H — |
266 || 51H — |
670 || 61H — | 1700 || 71H — | 4220 |
| 42H — |
280 || 52H — |
710 || 62H — | 1800 || 72H — | 4500 |
| 43H — |
300 || 53H — |
750 || 63H — | 1900 || 73H — | 4730 |
| 44H — |
315 || 54H — |
800 || 64H — | 2000 || 74H — | 5000 |
| 45H — |
335 || 55H — |
840 || 65H — | 2100 || 75H — | 5300 |
| 46H — |
355 || 56H — |
900 || 66H — | 2240 || 76H — | 5600 |
| 47H — |
376 || 57H — |
944 || 67H — | 2370 || 77H — | 6000 |
MIDI Implementation
| 48H — |
400 || 58H — | 1000 || 68H — | 2500 || 78H — | 6300 |
| 49H — |
422 || 59H — | 1060 || 69H
| 2660 || 79H — | 6700 |
| 4AH — |
450 || 5AH — | 1120 || 6AH — | 2800 || 7AH — | 7100 |
| 4BH — |
473 || 5BH — | 1200 || 6BH — | 3000 || 7BH — | 7500 |
| 4CH — |
500 || 5CH — | 1250 || 6CH — | 3150 || 7CH — | 8000 |
| 4DH — |
530 || 5DH — | 1330 || 6DH — | 3350 || 7DH — |
——
|
| 4EH — |
560 || 5EH — | 1400 || 6EH — | 3550 || 7EH — |
——
|
| 4FH — |
600 || 5FH — | 1500 || 6FH — | 3760 || 7FH — |
——
|
+——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————+
MIDI Data - PREAMP Type Table
+————————+————————+
| Data | TYPE |
+————————+————————+
| 00H
|
RED7 |
| 01H - | N1073 |
| 02H - | MANSS |
| 03H - | AVTUBE |
| 04H - | AVSOLS |
| 05H - | HHTUBE |
| 06H - | MILLHV |
| 07H - | SATUBE |
| 08H - | CSSLST |
+————————+————————+
MIDI Data - PREAMP Gain Table
+————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————+
| Data |Gain(dB)|| Data |Gain(dB)|| Data |Gain(dB)|| Data |Gain(dB)|
+————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————+
|
|
|| 20H
| — 3.2 || 40H
|
0.0 || 60H
|
3.2 |
|
|
|| 21H
| — 3.1 || 41H — |
0.1 || 61H — |
3.3 |
|
|
|| 22H — | — 3.0 || 42H — |
0.2 || 62H — |
3.4 |
|
|
|| 23H — | — 2.9 || 43H — |
0.3 || 63H — |
3.5 |
| 04H
|
6.0 || 24H — | — 2.8 || 44H — |
0.4 || 64H — |
3.6 |
| 05H
|
5.9 || 25H — | — 2.7 || 45H — |
0.5 || 65H — |
3.7 |
| 06H
|
5.8 || 26H — | — 2.6 || 46H — |
0.6 || 66H — |
3.8 |
| 07H
|
5.7 || 27H — | — 2.5 || 47H — |
0.7 || 67H — |
3.9 |
| 08H
|
5.6 || 28H — | — 2.4 || 48H — |
0.8 || 68H — |
4.0 |
| 09H
|
5.5 || 29H — | — 2.3 || 49H — |
0.9 || 69H — |
4.1 |
| 0AH
|
5.4 || 2AH — | — 2.2 || 4AH — |
1.0 || 6AH — |
4.2 |
| 0BH
|
5.3 || 2BH — | — 2.1 || 4BH — |
1.1 || 6BH — |
4.3 |
| 0CH
|
5.2 || 2CH — | — 2.0 || 4CH — |
1.2 || 6CH — |
4.4 |
| 0DH
|
5.1 || 2DH — | — 1.9 || 4DH — |
1.3 || 6DH — |
4.5 |
| 0EH
| — 5.0 || 2EH — | — 1.8 || 4EH — |
1.4 || 6EH — |
4.6 |
| 0FH
| — 4.9 || 2FH — | — 1.7 || 4FH — |
1.5 || 6FH — |
4.7 |
| 10H
| — 4.8 || 30H — | — 1.6 || 50H — |
1.6 || 70H — |
4.8 |
| 11H
| — 4.7 || 31H — | — 1.5 || 51H — |
1.7 || 71H — |
4.9 |
| 12H
| — 4.6 || 32H — | — 1.4 || 52H — |
1.8 || 72H — |
5.0 |
| 13H
| — 4.5 || 33H — | — 1.3 || 53H — |
1.9 || 73H — |
5.1 |
| 14H
| — 4.4 || 34H — | — 1.2 || 54H — |
2.0 || 74H — |
5.2 |
| 15H
| — 4.3 || 35H — | — 1.1 || 55H — |
2.1 || 75H — |
5.3 |
| 16H
| — 4.2 || 36H — | — 1.0 || 56H — |
2.2 || 76H — |
5.4 |
| 17H
| — 4.1 || 37H — | — 0.9 || 57H — |
2.3 || 77H — |
5.5 |
| 18H
| — 4.0 || 38H — | — 0.8 || 58H — |
2.4 || 78H — |
5.6 |
| 19H
| — 3.9 || 39H — | — 0.7 || 59H — |
2.5 || 79H — |
5.7 |
| 1AH
| — 3.8 || 3AH — | — 0.6 || 5AH — |
2.6 || 7AH — |
5.8 |
| 1BH
| — 3.7 || 3BH — | — 0.5 || 5BH — |
2.7 || 7BH — |
5.9 |
| 1CH
| — 3.6 || 3CH — | — 0.4 || 5CH — |
2.8 || 7CH — |
6.0 |
| 1DH
| — 3.5 || 3DH — | — 0.3 || 5DH — |
2.9 ||
|
|
| 1EH
| — 3.4 || 3EH — | — 0.2 || 5EH — |
3.0 ||
|
|
| 1FH
| — 3.3 || 3FH — | — 0.1 || 5FH — |
3.1 ||
|
|
+————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————++————————+————————+
Appendices
●Decimal and Hexadecimal table
(Hexadecimal number is shown with H.)
In MIDI documentation, data values and addresses/sizes of system exclusive
messages etc. are expressed as hexadecimal values for each 7 bits.
The following table shows how these correspond to decimal numbers.
+——————+——————++——————+——————++——————+——————++——————+——————+
| Deci | Hexa || Deci | Hexa || Deci | Hexa || Deci | Hexa |
+——————+——————++——————+——————++——————+——————++——————+——————+
|
0 | 00H ||
32 | 20H ||
64 | 40H ||
96 | 60H |
|
1 | 01H ||
33 | 21H ||
65 | 41H ||
97 | 61H |
|
2 | 02H ||
34 | 22H ||
66 | 42H ||
98 | 62H |
|
3 | 03H ||
35 | 23H ||
67 | 43H ||
99 | 63H |
|
4 | 04H ||
36 | 24H ||
68 | 44H || 100 | 64H |
|
5 | 05H ||
37 | 25H ||
69 | 45H || 101 | 65H |
|
6 | 06H ||
38 | 26H ||
70 | 46H || 102 | 66H |
|
7 | 07H ||
39 | 27H ||
71 | 47H || 103 | 67H |
|
8 | 08H ||
40 | 28H ||
72 | 48H || 104 | 68H |
|
9 | 09H ||
41 | 29H ||
73 | 49H || 105 | 69H |
|
10 | 0AH ||
42 | 2AH ||
74 | 4AH || 106 | 6AH |
|
11 | 0BH ||
43 | 2BH ||
75 | 4BH || 107 | 6BH |
|
12 | 0CH ||
44 | 2CH ||
76 | 4CH || 108 | 6CH |
|
13 | 0DH ||
45 | 2DH ||
77 | 4DH || 109 | 6DH |
|
14 | 0EH ||
46 | 2EH ||
78 | 4EH || 110 | 6EH |
|
15 | 0FH ||
47 | 2FH ||
79 | 4FH || 111 | 6FH |
|
16 | 10H ||
48 | 30H ||
80 | 50H || 112 | 70H |
|
17 | 11H ||
49 | 31H ||
81 | 51H || 113 | 71H |
|
18 | 12H ||
50 | 32H ||
82 | 52H || 114 | 72H |
|
19 | 13H ||
51 | 33H ||
83 | 53H || 115 | 73H |
|
20 | 14H ||
52 | 34H ||
84 | 54H || 116 | 74H |
|
21 | 15H ||
53 | 35H ||
85 | 55H || 117 | 75H |
|
22 | 16H ||
54 | 36H ||
86 | 56H || 118 | 76H |
|
23 | 17H ||
55 | 37H ||
87 | 57H || 119 | 77H |
|
24 | 18H ||
56 | 38H ||
88 | 58H || 120 | 78H |
|
25 | 19H ||
57 | 39H ||
89 | 59H || 121 | 79H |
|
26 | 1AH ||
58 | 3AH ||
90 | 5AH || 122 | 7AH |
|
27 | 1BH ||
59 | 3BH ||
91 | 5BH || 123 | 7BH |
|
28 | 1CH ||
60 | 3CH ||
92 | 5CH || 124 | 7CH |
|
29 | 1DH ||
61 | 3DH ||
93 | 5DH || 125 | 7DH |
|
30 | 1EH ||
62 | 3EH ||
94 | 5EH || 126 | 7EH |
|
31 | 1FH ||
63 | 3FH ||
95 | 5FH || 127 | 7FH |
+——————+——————++——————+——————++——————+——————++——————+——————+
*
Decimal values such as MIDI channel, bank select, and program change are
listed as one (1) greater than the values given in the above table.
*
A 7-bit byte can express data in the range of 128 steps. For data where greater
precision is required, we must use two or more bytes. For example, two
hexadecimal numbers aa bbH expressing two 7-bit bytes would indicate a value
of aa x 128 + bb.
* In the case of values which have a ± sign, 00H = -64, 40H = ±0, and 7FH
= +63, so that the decimal expression would be 64 less than the value given in the
above chart. In the case of two types, 00 00H = -8192, 40 00H = ±0, and 7F 7FH =
+8191.
*
Data marked “nibbled” is expressed in hexadecimal in 4-bit units. A value
expressed as a 2-byte nibble 0a 0bH has the value of a x 16 + b.
<Ex.1> What is 5AH in decimal system?
5AH = 90 according to the above table.
<Ex.2>What in decimal system is 12034H in hexadecimal of every 7 bit?
12H = 18, 34H = 52 according to the above table. So 18 x 128 + 52 = 2356.
<Ex.3> What in decimal system is 0A 03 09 0D in nibble system?
0AH = 10, 03H = 3, 09H = 9, 0DH = 13 according to the table.
So ((10 x 16 + 3) x 16 + 9) x 16 + 13 = 41885.
<Ex. 4> What in nibble system is 1258 in decimal system?
____
16)1258
16) 78 ... 10
16)
4 ... 14
0 ... 4
0 = 00H, 4 = 04H, 14 = 0EH, 10 = 0AH According to the table.
So it is 00 04 0E 0AH.
●Example of system exclusive message and
Checksum calculation
On Roland system exclusive message (DT1), checksum is added at the end of
transmitted data (in front of F7) to check the message is received correctly. Value of
checksum is defined by address and data (or size) of the system exclusive message
to be transmitted.
How to calculate checksum (Hexadecimal number is shown with H.)
Checksum is a value which lower 7 bit of the sum of address, size and checksum
itself turns to be 0.
If the address of the system exclusive message to be transmitted is aa bb ccH and
data or size is dd ee ffH,
aa + bb + cc + dd + ee + ff = sum
sum / 128 = quotient and odd
When odd is 0, 0 = checksum
When odd is other than 0, 128 - odd = checksum
51
MIDI Implementation
MIC MODELING PREAMP
Date : Jan. 1, 2002
MIDI Implementation Chart
Model MMP-2
Transmitted
Function...
Recognized
Basic
Channel
Default
Changed
16
X
16
X
Mode
Default
Messages
Altered
Mode 3
X
X
Mode 3
X
X
X
X
X
X
Note
Number : True Voice
Version : 1.00
Remarks
Velocity
Note On
Note Off
X
X
X
X
After
Touch
Key's
Channel's
O
X
X
X
X
X
O
X
X
O
X
X
O
0 - 63
O
0 - 63
Effect Patch
System Exclusive
O
O
Parameter
: Song Position
System
: Song Select
Common
: Tune Request
X
X
X
X
X
X
: Clock
System
Real Time : Commands
X
X
X
X
X
: All Sound Off
: Reset All Controllers X
Aux
X
: Local On/Off
Messages : All Notes Off
X
X
: Active Sensing
X
: System Reset
X
X
X
X
X
X
Pitch Bend
0, 32
1
2
Control
Change
Program
Change
: True Number
Level Meter
Effect Bank select
Notes
Mode 1 : OMNI ON, POLY
Mode 3 : OMNI OFF, POLY
52
Mode 2 : OMNI ON, MONO
Mode 4 : OMNI OFF, MONO
O : Yes
X : No
Specifications
Analog Input
Connector:
XLR-3-31 type (balanced)
1/4 inch TRS phone type (balanced)
Input Impedance:
40k Ω
Phantom Power:
DC 48 V and 7m A when the output is shorted
PAD:
20 dB pad
Maximum Input Level:
+ 2 dBu (PAD off)
+22 dBu (PAD on)
Nominal Input Level:
-64 dBu – +4 dBu
Equivalent Input Noise:
-132 dBu (IHF-A typ.)
Analog Output
Connector:
XLR-3-32 type (balanced)
Output Impedance:
600 Ω
Recommended Load Impedance:
1k Ω or greater
Nominal Output Level:
-16 dBu / +4 dBu
Signal-to-Noise Ratio:
105 dB typ.
Digital Input
Connector: RCA for S/PDIF
Impedance: 75 Ω
Digital Output
Connector: XLR for AES/EBU, RCA for S/PDIF
Impedance: 110 Ω for AES/EBU, 75 Ω for S/PDIF
Signal Processing
A/D Conversion: 24-bit, 64 times oversampling
D/A Conversion: 24-bit, 128 times oversampling
Sample Rate
96.0kHz, 88.2k Hz, 48.0k Hz, 44.1k Hz
Frequency Response
96.0k Hz: 20 Hz – 40k Hz (+0.1 / -3.0 dB)
88.2k Hz: 20 Hz – 40k Hz (+0.1 / -3.0 dB)
48.0k Hz: 20 Hz – 20k Hz (+0.1 / -0.5 dB)
44.1k Hz: 20 Hz – 20k Hz (+0.1 / -0.5 dB)
Microphone Modeling
Reference Microphone:
DR-20, Small Dynamic Microphone,
Head-worn Dynamic Microphone,
Miniature Condenser Microphone, AKG C3000B, Flat
Modeling Microphone:
Small Dynamic, Vocal Dynamic, Large Dynamic,
Small Condenser, Large Condenser,
Vintage Condenser, Flat
Equalizer
4-Band parametric equalizer
Reference Frequency: 20 Hz – 20k Hz
Type:
Peaking, Low-Shelving, High-Shelving, Low-Pass,
High-Pass, Low-Pass2, Hi-Pass2, Band-Pass,
Band-Eliminate
GAIN: -15 dB – +15 dB
Compressor
Type: Solid, Tube1, Tube2, Tube3, Tube4
Knee Type: Hard or Soft knee
Other Effects
Expander, Enhancer, De-esser, Pre-amp Modeling
Display
20 characters, 2 lines (back light LCD)
Power Supply
AC 117 V, AC 230 V or AC 240 V
Power Consumption
9W
Dimension
250 (W) x 165 (D) x 76 (H) mm
9-7/8 (W) x 6-1/2 (D) x 3 (H) inches
Weight
1.8 kg
4 lbs
Accessories
Owner’s Manual, CD-ROM, AC Cord, USB Cable
(0 dBu = 0.775 Vrms)
* In the interest of product improvement, the specifications and/or
appearance of this unit are subject to change without prior notice.
53
Index
Symbols
E
+48V .......................................................................................... 17
EDIT CH SELECT ................................................................... 16
Effect Parameters .................................................................... 14
Initializing ........................................................................... 29
Effects ........................................................................................ 19
ENH .......................................................................................... 23
ENH/DE .................................................................................. 23
Enhance Level .......................................................................... 24
Enhancer ................................................................................... 23
ENHLEV ................................................................................... 24
ENTER ...................................................................................... 14
EQ .............................................................................................. 20
Equalizer .................................................................................. 20
EXP ...................................................................................... 16, 23
Expander .................................................................................. 23
A
A-GAIN .................................................................................... 22
ATT
analog input ......................................................................... 18
equalizer .............................................................................. 20
Attack Time ........................................................................ 22–23
Attenuator
analog input ......................................................................... 18
equalizer .............................................................................. 20
Auto Gain ................................................................................. 22
B
BACKUP ...................................................................................
Band-pass .................................................................................
Band-reject ...............................................................................
bass noise .................................................................................
BPF ............................................................................................
BRF ............................................................................................
Bright ........................................................................................
BRT ............................................................................................
BYPASS .....................................................................................
28
21
21
18
21
21
25
25
19
C
Canceling Linking ...................................................................
Channel divider ......................................................................
Channel Linking ......................................................................
CLIP ..........................................................................................
CLOCK .....................................................................................
CMP ..........................................................................................
COMP .......................................................................................
Compression Ratio ..................................................................
Compressor ..............................................................................
Type ....................................................................................
Connecting
Input Device ........................................................................
Output Equipment ...............................................................
Power Source .......................................................................
Contrast ....................................................................................
Copying ....................................................................................
cutoff frequency band ............................................................
54
feedback whine ........................................................................ 13
Filter Type ................................................................................ 21
FreeMIDI ............................................................................ 31, 38
FREQ ................................................................................... 23, 26
G
Gain ........................................................................................... 21
H
28
29
28
17
26
16
21
23
21
22
HARD .......................................................................................
Harmonic ..................................................................................
HI ...............................................................................................
High-pass .................................................................................
HI-MID .....................................................................................
HPF ...........................................................................................
HRM ..........................................................................................
HSV ...........................................................................................
13
13
12
14
28
21
IN ...............................................................................................
Initializing ................................................................................
INPUT .......................................................................................
Input Parameters .....................................................................
Input Source .............................................................................
INT ............................................................................................
interlinks ...................................................................................
isolation mount .......................................................................
D
De-esser ....................................................................................
De-esser Rejection Level ........................................................
DES ............................................................................................
DESREJ .....................................................................................
DIGI ..........................................................................................
Digital Connections ................................................................
Distance ....................................................................................
DYNAMICS .............................................................................
F
23
24
23
24
26
26
20
21
22
25
20
21
20
21
25
21
I
16
29
19
14
26
26
28
20
K
Key In Channel .................................................................. 22–23
Knee .......................................................................................... 22
Index
L
R
LCDCNT ..................................................................................
LEVEL .......................................................................................
Line Output ..............................................................................
Load patch from computer ....................................................
LO-CUT ....................................................................................
LO-MID ....................................................................................
LOW ..........................................................................................
Low-cut Filter ..........................................................................
Low-pass ..................................................................................
LPF ............................................................................................
LSV ............................................................................................
14
22
13
28
18
20
20
18
21
21
21
M
Macintosh
FreeMIDI ............................................................................. 38
OMS .................................................................................... 35
MIC ...........................................................................................
MIC IN ......................................................................................
Mic Modeling ..........................................................................
Microphone Input ...................................................................
MODEL ....................................................................................
Modeling Microphone ...........................................................
26
13
19
13
19
20
O
OMS .................................................................................... 31, 35
OUT ........................................................................................... 16
OUTPUT ................................................................................... 20
OUTPUT LEVEL ..................................................................... 13
P
Pad ............................................................................................
parameter .................................................................................
Patch ..........................................................................................
Initializing ...........................................................................
Load patch from computer ...................................................
Resetting Effect Parameters ..................................................
Save patch to Computer .......................................................
Saving a Patch ......................................................................
Selection ..............................................................................
PEAK
indicator ..............................................................................
peaking equalizer .................................................................
Phantom Power .......................................................................
PHANTOM,PHASE,LO-CUT ...............................................
PLUG IN ...................................................................................
Plug-in Effect ...........................................................................
Power switch ...........................................................................
PREAMP ...................................................................................
Pre-amp Modeling ..................................................................
PROX FX ...................................................................................
Proximity Effect .......................................................................
17
14
14
29
28
15
28
15
15
Ratio .................................................................................... 22–23
RECOVER ................................................................................ 28
Reference Frequency ............................................................... 20
Reference Microphone ............................................................ 19
Rejection Level ......................................................................... 24
Release Time ...................................................................... 22–23
RESET ....................................................................................... 15
resonant frequencies ............................................................... 20
Route ......................................................................................... 29
S
Sampling Clock Source ........................................................... 26
Sampling Frequency ............................................................... 26
Save patch to Computer ......................................................... 28
Saving a Patch .......................................................................... 15
SELECT (patch) ....................................................................... 15
SENS
analog inputs ....................................................................... 17
enhancer/de-esser ................................................................ 23
shelving .................................................................................... 21
SOFT .......................................................................................... 22
SOLID ....................................................................................... 22
STORE PATCH ........................................................................ 15
System Parameters .................................................................. 14
Initializing ............................................................................ 29
T
Threshold ........................................................................... 22–23
TIME .......................................................................................... 20
TUBE ......................................................................................... 22
Turning Off the Power ........................................................... 18
Turning On the Power ............................................................ 13
TYPE
compressor ........................................................................... 22
enhancer/de-esser ................................................................ 23
equalizer .............................................................................. 21
pre-amp ............................................................................... 24
U
USB ............................................................................................ 30
17
21
17
18
24
24
13
24
24
20
20
Q
W
Warm ........................................................................................ 24
Windows
Windows 2000 ...................................................................... 32
Windows Me / 98 ................................................................ 31
WRM ......................................................................................... 24
Wrong sample freq. ................................................................ 26
X
XLR ............................................................................................ 13
Q ................................................................................................ 21
55
memo
56
memo
57
Information
When you need repair service, call your nearest Roland Service Center or authorized Roland distributor in your country as
shown below.
AFRICA
EGYPT
Al Fanny Trading Office
9, EBN Hagar A1 Askalany Street,
ARD E1 Golf, Heliopolis,
Cairo 11341, EGYPT
TEL: 20-2-417-1828
REUNION
Maison FO - YAM Marcel
25 Rue Jules Hermann,
Chaudron - BP79 97 491
Ste Clotilde Cedex,
REUNION ISLAND
TEL: (0262) 218-429
SINGAPORE
Swee Lee Company
150 Sims Drive,
SINGAPORE 387381
TEL: 846-3676
CRISTOFORI MUSIC PTE
LTD
Blk 3014, Bedok Industrial Park E,
#02-2148, SINGAPORE 489980
TEL: 243 9555
TAIWAN
PANAMA
ITALY
ISRAEL
SUPRO MUNDIAL, S.A.
Roland Italy S. p. A.
Boulevard Andrews, Albrook,
Panama City, REP. DE PANAMA
TEL: 315-0101
Viale delle Industrie 8,
20020 Arese, Milano, ITALY
TEL: (02) 937-78300
Halilit P. Greenspoon &
Sons Ltd.
PARAGUAY
NORWAY
Distribuidora De
Instrumentos Musicales
J.E. Olear y ESQ. Manduvira
Asuncion PARAGUAY
TEL: (021) 492-124
Roland Scandinavia Avd.
Kontor Norge
245 Prince Mohammad St.,
Amman 1118, JORDAN
TEL: (06) 464-1200
Easa Husain Al-Yousifi
PERU
POLAND
Portinari 199 (ESQ. HALS),
San Borja, Lima 41,
REP. OF PERU
TEL: (01) 4758226
P. P. H. Brzostowicz
SOUTH AFRICA
Room 5, 9fl. No. 112 Chung Shan
N.Road Sec.2, Taipei, TAIWAN,
R.O.C.
TEL: (02) 2561 3339
VIDEO Broadcast S.A.
UL. Gibraltarska 4.
PL-03664 Warszawa POLAND
TEL: (022) 679 44 19
That Other Music Shop
(PTY) Ltd.
THAILAND
URUGUAY
PORTUGAL
11 Melle St., Braamfontein,
Johannesbourg, SOUTH AFRICA
P.O.Box 32918, Braamfontein 2017
Johannesbourg, SOUTH AFRICA
TEL: (011) 403 4105
Paul Bothner (PTY) Ltd.
17 Werdmuller Centre,
Main Road, Claremont 7708
SOUTH AFRICA
P.O.BOX 23032, Claremont 7735,
SOUTH AFRICA
TEL: (021) 674 4030
ASIA
CHINA
Beijing Xinghai Musical
Instruments Co., Ltd.
6 Huangmuchang Chao Yang
District, Beijing, CHINA
TEL: (010) 6774 7491
Shanghai Xingtong Acoustics
Equipment CO.,Ltd.
5F. No.1500 Pingliang Road
New East Club Plaza, Shanghai,
CHINA
TEL: (021) 5580-0800
HONG KONG
Tom Lee Music Co., Ltd.
Service Division
22-32 Pun Shan Street, Tsuen
Wan, New Territories,
HONG KONG
TEL: 2415 0911
INDIA
Rivera Digitec (India) Pvt. Ltd.
409, Nirman Kendra Mahalaxmi
Flats Compound Off. Dr. Edwin
Moses Road, Mumbai-400011,
INDIA
TEL: (022) 498 3079
INDONESIA
330 Verng NakornKasem, Soi 2,
Bangkok 10100, THAILAND
TEL: (02) 2248821
VIETNAM
Av. Francisco de Miranda,
Centro Parque de Cristal, Nivel
C2 Local 20 Caracas
VENEZUELA
TEL: (212) 285-8586
Piata Libertatii 1,
RO-4200 Gheorghehi
TEL: (095) 169-5043
AUSTRALIA
AUSTRIA
Roland Corporation
Australia Pty., Ltd.
38 Campbell Avenue
Dee Why West. NSW 2099
AUSTRALIA
TEL: (02) 9982 8266
NEW ZEALAND
Roland Corporation Ltd.
32 Shaddock Street, Mount Eden,
Auckland, NEW ZEALAND
TEL: (09) 3098 715
CENTRAL/LATIN
AMERICA
ARGENTINA
Instrumentos Musicales S.A.
Av.Santa Fe 2055
(1123) Buenos Aires
ARGENTINA
TEL: (011) 4508-2700
BRAZIL
Roland Brasil Ltda
Rua San Jose, 780 Sala B
Parque Industrial San Jose
Cotia - Sao Paulo - SP, BRAZIL
TEL: (011) 4615 5666
COSTA RICA
JUAN Bansbach
Instrumentos Musicales
Ave.1. Calle 11, Apartado 10237,
San Jose, COSTA RICA
TEL: 258-0211
Cosmos Corporation
CHILE
1461-9, Seocho-Dong,
Seocho Ku, Seoul, KOREA
TEL: (02) 3486-8855
Comercial Fancy S.A.
BENTLEY MUSIC SDN BHD
140 & 142, Jalan Bukit Bintang
55100 Kuala Lumpur,MALAYSIA
TEL: (03) 2144-3333
PHILIPPINES
G.A. Yupangco & Co. Inc.
339 Gil J. Puyat Avenue
Makati, Metro Manila 1200,
PHILIPPINES
TEL: (02) 899 9801
Rut.: 96.919.420-1
Nataniel Cox #739, 4th Floor
Santiago - Centro, CHILE
TEL: (02) 688-9540
EL SALVADOR
OMNI MUSIC
75 Avenida Norte y Final
Alameda Juan Pablo ,
Edificio No.4010 San Salvador,
EL SALVADOR
TEL: 262-0788
MEXICO
Casa Veerkamp, s.a. de c.v.
Av. Toluca No. 323, Col. Olivar
de los Padres 01780 Mexico D.F.
MEXICO
TEL: 668-0480
Roland Austria GES.M.B.H.
Siemensstrasse 4, P.O. Box 74,
A-6063 RUM, AUSTRIA
TEL: (0512) 26 44 260
BELGIUM/HOLLAND/
LUXEMBOURG
Roland Benelux N. V.
Houtstraat 3, B-2260, Oevel
(Westerlo) BELGIUM
TEL: (014) 575811
DENMARK
Roland Scandinavia A/S
Nordhavnsvej 7, Postbox 880,
DK-2100 Copenhagen
DENMARK
TEL: (039)16 6200
FRANCE
Roland France SA
4, Rue Paul Henri SPAAK,
Parc de l'Esplanade, F 77 462 St.
Thibault, Lagny Cedex FRANCE
TEL: 01 600 73 500
FINLAND
Roland Scandinavia As,
Filial Finland
Lauttasaarentie 54 B
Fin-00201 Helsinki, FINLAND
TEL: (9) 682 4020
GERMANY
Roland Elektronische
Musikinstrumente HmbH.
FBS LINES
RUSSIA
MuTek
3-Bogatyrskaya Str. 1.k.l
107 564 Moscow, RUSSIA
TEL: (095) 169 5043
SPAIN
Roland Electronics
de España, S. A.
Calle Bolivia 239, 08020
Barcelona, SPAIN
TEL: (93) 308 1000
SWEDEN
Roland Scandinavia A/S
SWEDISH SALES OFFICE
Danvik Center 28, 2 tr.
S-131 30 Nacka SWEDEN
TEL: (08) 702 0020
SWITZERLAND
Roland (Switzerland) AG
Musitronic AG
Gerberstrasse 5, Postfach,
CH-4410 Liestal, SWITZERLAND
TEL: (061) 927-8383
UKRAINE
TIC-TAC
Mira Str. 19/108
P.O. Box 180
295400 Munkachevo, UKRAINE
TEL: (03131) 414-40
UNITED KINGDOM
Roland (U.K.) Ltd.
Atlantic Close, Swansea
Enterprise Park, SWANSEA
SA7 9FJ,
UNITED KINGDOM
TEL: (01792) 700139
Oststrasse 96, 22844 Norderstedt,
GERMANY
TEL: (040) 52 60090
MIDDLE EAST
GREECE
BAHRAIN
STOLLAS S.A.
Music Sound Light
155, New National Road
Patras 26442, GREECE
TEL: (061) 43-5400
HUNGARY
Intermusica Ltd.
Warehouse Area ‘DEPO’ Pf.83
H-2046 Torokbalint, HUNGARY
TEL: (23) 511011
IRELAND
Roland Ireland
Audio House, Belmont Court,
Donnybrook, Dublin 4.
Republic of IRELAND
TEL: (01) 2603501
LEBANON
A. Chahine & Fils
Gerge Zeidan St., Chahine Bldg.,
Achrafieh, P.O.Box: 16-5857
Beirut, LEBANON
TEL: (01) 20-1441
Al Emadi Co. (Badie Studio
& Stores)
Musicland Digital C.A.
ROMANIA
EUROPE
Abdullah Salem Street,
Safat, KUWAIT
TEL: 243-6399
QATAR
VENEZUELA
AUSTRALIA/
NEW ZEALAND
KUWAIT
Cais Das Pedras, 8/9-1 Dto
4050-465 PORTO
PORTUGAL
TEL: (022) 608 00 60
138 Tran Quang Khai St.,
District 1
Ho Chi Minh City
VIETNAM
TEL: (08) 844-4068
J1. Cideng Timur No. 15J-150
Jakarta Pusat
INDONESIA
TEL: (021) 6324170
MALAYSIA
Francisco Acuna de Figueroa 1771
C.P.: 11.800
Montevideo, URUGUAY
TEL: (02) 924-2335
Tecnologias Musica e Audio,
Roland Portugal, S.A.
Saigon Music
PT Citra IntiRama
KOREA
Todo Musica S.A.
JORDAN
AMMAN Trading Agency
Lilleakerveien 2 Postboks 95
Lilleaker N-0216 Oslo
NORWAY
TEL: 273 0074
ROLAND TAIWAN
ENTERPRISE CO., LTD.
Theera Music Co. , Ltd.
8 Retzif Ha'aliya Hashnya St.
Tel-Aviv-Yafo ISRAEL
TEL: (03) 6823666
Moon Stores
No.16, Bab Al Bahrain Avenue,
P.O.Box 247, Manama 304,
State of BAHRAIN
TEL: 211 005
CYPRUS
Radex Sound Equipment Ltd.
17, Diagorou Street, Nicosia,
CYPRUS
TEL: (02) 66-9426
P.O. Box 62,
Doha, QATAR
TEL: 4423-554
SAUDI ARABIA
aDawliah Universal
Electronics APL
Corniche Road, Aldossary Bldg.,
1st Floor, Alkhobar,
SAUDI ARABIA
P.O.Box 2154, Alkhobar 31952
SAUDI ARABIA
TEL: (03) 898 2081
SYRIA
Technical Light & Sound
Center
Bldg. No. 47,
Khaled Ebn Al Walid St.
Damascus, SYRIA
TEL: (011) 221-1230
TURKEY
Barkat muzik aletleri ithalat
ve ihracat Ltd Sti
Siraselviler Caddesi Siraselviler
Pasaji No:74/20
Taksim - Istanbul, TURKEY
TEL: (0212) 2499324
U.A.E.
Zak Electronics & Musical
Instruments Co. L.L.C.
Zabeel Road, Al Sherooq Bldg.,
No. 14, Grand Floor, Dubai, U.A.E.
TEL: (04) 3360715
NORTH AMERICA
CANADA
Roland Canada Music Ltd.
(Head Office)
5480 Parkwood Way Richmond
B. C., V6V 2M4 CANADA
TEL: (0604) 270 6626
Roland Canada Music Ltd.
(Toronto Office)
Unit 2, 109 Woodbine Downs
Blvd, Etobicoke, ON
M9W 6Y1 CANADA
TEL: (0416) 213 9707
U. S. A.
Roland Corporation U.S.
5100 S. Eastern Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90040-2938,
U. S. A.
TEL: (323) 890 3700
IRAN
MOCO, INC.
No.41 Nike St., Dr.Shariyati Ave.,
Roberoye Cerahe Mirdamad
Tehran, IRAN
TEL: (021) 285-4169
As of January 1, 2002 (Roland)
The lightning flash with arrowhead symbol, within an
equilateral triangle, is intended to alert the user to the
presence of uninsulated “dangerous voltage” within the
product’s enclosure that may be of sufficient magnitude to
constitute a risk of electric shock to persons.
CAUTION
RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK
DO NOT OPEN
ATTENTION: RISQUE DE CHOC ELECTRIQUE NE PAS OUVRIR
CAUTION: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK,
DO NOT REMOVE COVER (OR BACK).
The exclamation point within an equilateral triangle is
intended to alert the user to the presence of important
operating and maintenance (servicing) instructions in the
literature accompanying the product.
NO USER-SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE.
REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED SERVICE PERSONNEL.
INSTRUCTIONS PERTAINING TO A RISK OF FIRE, ELECTRIC SHOCK, OR INJURY TO PERSONS.
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS
WARNING - When using electric products, basic precautions should always be followed, including the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Read these instructions.
Keep these instructions.
Heed all warnings.
Follow all instructions.
Do not use this apparatus near water.
Clean only with a dry cloth.
Do not block any of the ventilation openings. Install in
accordance with the manufacturers instructions.
Do not install near any heat sources such as radiators,
heat registers, stoves, or other apparatus (including
amplifiers) that produce heat.
Do not defeat the safety purpose of the polarized or
grounding-type plug. A polarized plug has two blades with
one wider than the other. A grounding type plug has two
blades and a third grounding prong. The wide blade or the
third prong are provided for your safety. When the provided
plug does not fit into your outlet, consult an electrician for
replacement of the obsolete outlet.
10. Protect the power cord from being walked on or pinched
particularly at plugs, convenience receptacles, and the
point where they exit from the apparatus.
11. Only use attachments/accessories specified by the
manufacturer.
12. Never use with a cart, stand, tripod,
bracket, or table except as specified by the
manufacturer, or sold with the apparatus.
When a cart is used, use caution when
moving the cart/apparatus combination to
avoid injury from tip-over.
13. Unplug this apparatus during lightning storms or when
unused for long periods of time.
14. Refer all servicing to qualified service personnel. Servicing
is required when the apparatus has been damaged in any
way, such as power-supply cord or plug is damaged, liquid
has been spilled or objects have fallen into the apparatus,
the apparatus has been exposed to rain or moisture, does
not operate normally, or has been dropped.
For the U.K.
WARNING:
THIS APPARATUS MUST BE EARTHED
IMPORTANT: THE WIRES IN THIS MAINS LEAD ARE COLOURED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE FOLLOWING CODE.
GREEN-AND-YELLOW: EARTH, BLUE: NEUTRAL, BROWN: LIVE
As the colours of the wires in the mains lead of this apparatus may not correspond with the coloured markings identifying
the terminals in your plug, proceed as follows:
The wire which is coloured GREEN-AND-YELLOW must be connected to the terminal in the plug which is marked by the
letter E or by the safety earth symbol or coloured GREEN or GREEN-AND-YELLOW.
The wire which is coloured BLUE must be connected to the terminal which is marked with the letter N or coloured
BLACK.
For EU Countries
This product complies with the requirements of European Directives EMC 89/336/EEC and LVD 73/23/EEC.
For the USA
FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
RADIO FREQUENCY INTERFERENCE STATEMENT
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the
FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential
installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in
accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee
that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or
television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the
interference by one or more of the following measures:
– Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
– Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
– Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.
– Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions:
(1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and
(2) This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
Unauthorized changes or modification to this system can void the users authority to operate this equipment.
This equipment requires shielded interface cables in order to meet FCC class B Limit.
For Canada
NOTICE
This Class B digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations.
AVIS
Cet appareil numérique de la classe B respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur le matériel brouilleur du Canada.
This owner’s manual is printed on recycled paper.
02897523
’02-2-E2-21KS
About the Phantom Power of the MMP-2
Limitations and Conditions of Condenser Microphone
The phantom power source of MMP-2 can drive Condenser Microphones
with electrical specification 6.0mA or lower at 48V. Microphones that require
more ampere is not supported. Please use phantom power supply devices
separately.
Please see owner's manual of microphones regarding specification or
conditions of use.
About Input Jacks
Phantom power is not supplied to 1/4 inch TRS phone jacks. If your
microphone requires phantom power, please connect it to XLR jacks.
40457423
1*REC
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