DigiDesign | 1622 1 | Installation guide | DigiDesign 1622 1 Installation guide

TDM_Install.book Page 1 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
Pro Tools
TDM Installation Guide
Version 5.1 for Macintosh
Digidesign Inc.
3401-A Hillview Avenue
Palo Alto, CA 94304 USA
tel: 650·842·7900
fax: 650·842·7999
Technical Support (USA)
650·842·6699
650·856·4275
Product Information (USA)
650·842·6602
800·333·2137
Fax on Demand (USA)
1·888·USE·DIGI (873·3444)
International Offices
Visit the Digidesign Web site
for contact information.
World Wide Web
www.digidesign.com
Digidesign FTP Site
ftp.digidesign.com
TDM_Install.book Page 2 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
Copyright
This User’s Guide is copyrighted ©2001 by Digidesign, a
division of Avid Technology, Inc. (hereafter “Digidesign”), with
all rights reserved. Under copyright laws, this manual may not
be duplicated in whole or in part without the written consent of
Digidesign.
DIGIDESIGN, AVID and PRO TOOLS are trademarks or
registered trademarks of Digidesign and/or Avid Technology,
Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective
owners.
All features and specifications subject to change without
notice.
PN 932708441-00 REV A 01/01
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contents
Chapter 1. Pro Tools TDM System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Pro Tools TDM Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Digidesign Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
About the Pro Tools Guides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Chapter 2. Connecting SCSI Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
SCSI Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Connecting SCSI Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Initializing and Maintaining SCSI Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Using Macintosh Drives on Windows Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Chapter 3. Installing Pro Tools Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Pro Tools TDM Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Installing the Pro Tools Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Connecting Audio Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Chapter 4. Connecting Your Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
The 888/24 I/O Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Changing Operating Levels of Individual 888/24 I/O Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Making Signal Connections to the 888/24 I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Using the 888/24 I/O Interface as Standalone Audio Converter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
The 882/20 I/O Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Making Signal Connections to the 882/20 I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Using the 882/20 I/O Interface as Standalone Audio Converter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
The 1622 I/O Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Making Signal Connections to the 1622 I/O Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Using the 1622 I/O Interface as Standalone Audio Converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Connecting Equipment with Digital Audio Ins and Outs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Contents
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Connecting Effects Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Connecting MIDI Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Connecting SMPTE Synchronization Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Chapter 5. Installing Pro Tools Software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Apple System Software Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Installing Pro Tools Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Installing and Configuring OMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Chapter 6. Checking Your TDM System and Launching Pro Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Starting Up Your System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Running DigiTest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Launching Pro Tools the First Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Installing the Demo Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Opening the Demo Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Chapter 7. Calibrating the 888/24 I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
About Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Calibrating The 888/24 I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Appendix A. Determining Slot Order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Card Order Guidelines for Each Pro Tools System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Appendix B. DigiTest Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
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chapter 1
Pro Tools TDM System Requirements
Pro Tools TDM Systems
Pro Tools 24
A core system includes:
Pro Tools 5.1 supports the following TDM systems.
• d24 Audio card
• DSP Farm card
Pro Tools 24 MIX and MIXplus
• Pro Tools software
A core system includes:
• Digidesign audio interface
(sold separately)
• MIX Core card
• MIX Farm card (MIXplus only)
A core system provides:
• Pro Tools software
• Up to 32 tracks of recording and playback of
24-bit and 16-bit audio files
• Digidesign audio interface
(sold separately)
A core system provides:
• Up to 64 tracks of recording and playback of
24-bit and 16-bit audio files
• TDM digital mixing and DSP plug-in environment
• Non-linear, random-access editing and mix
automation
• TDM digital mixing and DSP plug-in environment
• Non-linear, random-access editing and mix
automation
• MIDI recording, playback and editing
Pro Tools 24 requires a MIX Farm card to
support up to 64 tracks.
• MIDI recording, playback and editing
Chapter 1: Pro Tools TDM System Requirements
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Audio Interfaces
To record and play audio you must have one of
the following Digidesign audio interfaces:
888/24 I/O
◆ Analog: XLR (balanced or unbalanced) connectors, +4 dBu or –10 dBV
Digital: XLR (AES/EBU) or RCA (S/PDIF) connectors
System Requirements
The CPU, hard disk, monitoring and MIDI requirements for Pro Tools differ depending on
your system configuration. The requirements
for each configuration are listed below.
Compatibility Information
◆
882/20 I/O
◆ Analog: 1/4" TRS (balanced or unbalanced)
connectors, +4 dBu or –10 dBV
◆
Digidesign can only assure compatibility and
provide support for hardware and software it
has tested and approved. For a list of Digidesignqualified computers, operating systems, and
third-party devices, refer to the latest compatibility information on the Digidesign Web site:
www.digidesign.com/compato/
Digital: RCA (S/PDIF) connectors
1622 I/O
Computer Requirements
Analog: 1/4" TRS (balanced or unbalanced)
connectors. Inputs are variable from +4 dBu to
–10 dBV; outputs are selectable between +4 dBu
or –10 dBV
◆ A Digidesign-qualified Power Macintosh computer with:
◆
◆
• At least 128 MB RAM; 192 MB RAM recommended
Digital: RCA (S/PDIF) connectors
• Additional RAM is highly recommended if
you plan to use other audio or MIDI applications concurrently with Pro Tools; virtual memory is not supported
Digidesign ADAT Bridge I/O
◆ Analog: 1/4" TRS (balanced) connectors, +4
dBu or –10 dBV
◆
◆ Digital: XLR (AES/EBU) or RCA (S/PDIF) connectors
◆ System Utility software (included with
Pro Tools):
Optical: Two pairs of EIAJ fiber optic connectors
◆
Apple System software version 9.0 or later
• OMS (Open Music System) software version 2.3.8 or later
• Apple QuickTime System Extension version 4.0 or later
• ATTO ExpressPro-Tools version 2.3.2 or
later
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A 17-inch or larger color monitor; black and
white monitors are not supported
◆
A Digidesign-qualified floppy drive, along
with the appropriate driver software (included
on the Pro Tools Installer CD-ROM); required to
authorize most plug-ins
◆
Hard Drive Requirements
For audio recording and storage, all Pro Tools
TDM systems require one or more Digidesignqualified drives.
To provide full 64-track, 24-bit, 48 kHz performance, a TDM system must include at least two
Digidesign-qualified SCSI hard drives attached
to a qualified SCSI HBA (host bus adapter) card.
For 64-track sessions that have substantial edit
densities (such as one edit every third of a second across 64 voices) or large amounts of crossfades, up to four SCSI drives may be required, allocated with 16 tracks per drive and two drives
per SCSI channel.
Dedicated internal IDE/ATA drives can provide
32-track performance to all TDM systems.
Refer to the Digidesign Web site for compatible
hard drives and SCSI HBA cards:
Older Power Macintosh Computers
Power Macintosh 9500 and 9600 computers
have two SCSI busses: an internal fast SCSI bus
and an external narrow SCSI bus. On these machines, sessions with higher track counts and
high edit density require a SCSI HBA card. For
optimum performance without a SCSI HBA
card, use the internal fast SCSI bus.
For higher track counts on Power Macintosh 9500, 9600, and Beige G3 computers, avoid using the external narrow SCSI
drive.
MIDI Requirements
Both USB and serial MIDI interfaces work effectively with Pro Tools. Serial MIDI interfaces offer the tightest possible MIDI timing.
Serial MIDI interfaces require either a Mac serial
port or a qualified modem-to-serial port adapter
(thereby not using a PCI slot). Refer to the
Digidesign compatibility page for supported
adapters:
www.digidesign.com/compato/
Digidesign Registration
www.digidesign.com/compato/
Make sure to complete and return the registration card included with Pro Tools TDM system.
Registered users are entitled to one year of free
technical support, and will receive periodic software updates and upgrade notices.
Chapter 1: Pro Tools TDM System Requirements
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About the Pro Tools Guides
PDF versions of the Pro Tools guides are installed automatically with Pro Tools, and can be
easily accessed from the Help menu in
Pro Tools. To read the guide online, or print it,
you must install Acrobat Reader (included on the
Pro Tools Installer CD).
Conventions Used in This Guide
Digidesign guides use the following conventions to indicate menu choices and key commands:
Convention
Action
File > Save
Session
Choose Save Session from the
File menu
Control+N
While pressing the Control key,
press the N key
Option-click
While pressing the Option key,
click the mouse button
Right-click
(Windows)
Click with the right mouse button
The following symbols are used to highlight important information:
User Tips are helpful hints for getting the
most from your system.
Important Notices include information that
could affect your data or the performance of
your system.
Cross References point to related sections in
other Digidesign guides.
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TDM Installation Guide
Choose and Select
The words “choose” and “select” are often interchangeable in conversational english. In this
guide, however, there is a distinction between
the two terms.
Select When the guide instructs you to select
something, it stays selected. This is the case with
dialog box options and menu items that enable
or disable an option.
Choose When the guide instructs you to choose
something, a one-time action is performed. This
is the case with most menu commands; they
perform their chosen action only once.
TDM_Install.book Page 5 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
chapter 2
Connecting SCSI Drives
SCSI hard drives function as the recommended
recording media for Pro Tools TDM systems; it is
there that Pro Tools sessions and audio files are
kept.
Although Pro Tools will let you record to your
system drive, this is generally not recommended. Performance for recording and playback on system drives is worse than on non-system drives, resulting in lower track counts and
fewer plug-ins.
SCSI hard drives offer several advantages over
ATA/IDE drives. First, SCSI drives can be external and therefore provide portable audio storage
that is easily moved between systems. Second,
SCSI drives offer slightly better performance
when recording to large numbers of tracks; attempting to record to a large number of audio
tracks with an ATA/IDE drive will result in a
short delay before recording begins.
For 64-track sessions that have substantial edit
densities (such as one edit every third of a second across 64 voices) or large amounts of crossfades, up to four SCSI drives may be required, allocated with 16 tracks per drive and two drives
per SCSI channel.
SCSI drives must provide a data transfer rate of
at least 9 MB per second of sustained throughput.
Pro Tools 24 requires a MIX Farm card (or
the discontinued Pro Tools 24 Expansion
Kit) to support up to 64 tracks.
Refer to the Digidesign Web site for compatible
hard drives and HBA cards:
www.digidesign.com/compato/
Software RAID is not supported for audio
drives.
Older Macintosh Computers
SCSI Requirements
High-Performance SCSI Drives and
SCSI Host Bus Adapters
To provide full 64-track, 24-bit, 48 kHz performance, a Pro Tools TDM system must include at
least two Digidesign-qualified SCSI hard drives
attached to a qualified SCSI HBA host bus
adapter (HBA) card.
Power Macintosh 9500 and 9600 computers
have two SCSI busses: an internal fast SCSI bus
and an external “narrow” SCSI bus. On these
machines, sessions with higher track counts and
high edit density require a SCSI HBA card. For
optimum performance without a SCSI HBA
card, use the internal fast SCSI bus.
For higher track counts on Power Macintosh
9500, 9600, and Beige G3 computers, avoid using the external narrow SCSI drive.
Chapter 2: Connecting SCSI Drives
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SCSI Cables
Using these guidelines:
Use shorter SCSI cables to improve reliability.
Table 1 provides guidelines for maximum cable
lengths according to SCSI type.
Table 1: Maximum cable length and number of drives
supported according to SCSI type
SCSI type and
transfer rate
maximum
cable length
maximum #
of drives
Fast SCSI
10 MB/sec
3 meters
8
Wide SCSI
20 MB/sec
3 meters
16
Ultra SCSI
20 MB/sec
(8-bit narrow)
3 meters
5
Ultra SCSI
40 MB/sec
(16-bit wide)
3 meters
Ultra SCSI
20 MB/sec
(8-bit narrow)
1.5 meters
6–8
Ultra SCSI
40 MB/sec
(16-bit wide)
1.5 meters
6–8
Ultra2 SCSI
Low Voltage Differential (LVD)
80 MB/sec
12 meters
16
• 64 mono tracks of 24-bit audio takes up about
480 MB of hard drive space per minute.
• 64 mono tracks of 16-bit audio takes up about
320 MB of hard drive space per minute.
• 32 mono tracks of 24-bit audio takes up about
240 MB of hard drive space per minute.
• 32 mono tracks of 16-bit audio takes up about
160 MB per minute.
A 9-gigabyte drive holds:
• 28 minutes of 64 tracks, 16-bit audio
• 37 minutes of 32 tracks, 24-bit audio
• 56 minutes of 32 tracks, 16-bit audio
5
Distribute Audio Across Multiple Drives
Disk Space for Audio Tracks
Audio tracks recorded at 24-bit resolution at a
CD-fidelity sampling rate of 44.1 kHz require
about 7.5 MB of hard drive space per minute.
The same tracks recorded at 16-bit resolution require about 5 MB per minute. Stereo tracks will
require about twice as much hard drive space.
6
• 18 minutes of 64 tracks, 24-bit audio
TDM Installation Guide
For best recording and playback performance,
don’t record and play back all audio files in a
session from the same drive. Instead, use
Pro Tools disk allocation features to distribute
audio files between multiple SCSI drives. See the
Pro Tools Reference Guide for details.
Separate Video and Audio Files
If you are working with imported movies, movie
files must reside on a different SCSI bus than audio files. If audio files reside on disks connected
to a SCSI HBA card, video data should reside on
drives connected to a different SCSI bus.
Dual-Channel SCSI HBA Cards
If you use a dual-channel SCSI HBA card, equally
allocate audio files to drives connected to each
of the two busses on the card for optimal performance.
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Connecting SCSI Drives
To connect an external SCSI drive:
1 Turn off power to both the computer and the
hard drive.
to SCSI accelerator card
2 Attach a SCSI cable from the SCSI port of the
hard drive to the SCSI port of the SCSI HBA card
or computer depending on your system’s SCSI
requirements.
Connecting an external SCSI hard drive
SCSI Termination
3 Secure the cable’s connectors to the hard drive
and computer. Loose cables can cause data loss.
4 Connect additional drives by daisy-chaining
from one drive to another. Keep cable lengths to
a minimum (see Table 1).
5 Verify that the last SCSI device connected is
properly terminated. (See “SCSI Termination”
on page 7.)
6 Attach power cables to the hard drives.
Your computer’s SCSI chain must be properly
terminated or your system will not function correctly. Only the last device on the chain should
be terminated using the termination type recommended by the hard drive manufacturer.
The drive should use either an external terminator plug or have its internal terminators enabled. If you are using a terminator plug, Digidesign recommends that you purchase and use an
active terminator.
Do not enable internal termination and install an external terminator plug on the
same drive. This will cause SCSI errors. See
your hard drive’s documentation for information regarding which type of termination
it uses.
SCSI accelerator card
to SCSI hard drive
Connecting a SCSI cable to a SCSI HBA card
Chapter 2: Connecting SCSI Drives
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Initializing and Maintaining
SCSI Drives
SCSI hard drives used for audio recording on
TDM systems must be formatted (or initialized)
for either the HFS or HFS plus file system. Drive
partitions of up to 2 terabytes (2000 gigabytes)
can be used.
TDM systems require that you use the ExpressPro-Tools software from ATTO (included
with Pro Tools) for all drive formatting and partitioning; only one disk utility should be used
for all drives in a system.
To initialize a new drive:
1 Turn on your hard drives, computer, and any
other peripherals.
2 Use ATTO’s ExpressPro-Tools software version
2.3.2 to initialize and partition any new hard
drives.
Refer to the ExpressPro-Tools User’s Manual.
If you have existing FWB-formatted drives,
don’t install the ExpressPro-Tools extension; this can cause a conflict. This extension is not required to use the ExpressProTools software (to format new drives).
Formatting Drives
There are two different types of formatting:
high-level formatting and low-level formatting.
Low-Level (Physical) Formatting
Low-level formatting means completely erasing
the hard drive and rewriting each sector address
on the drive. In low-level formatting, the sector
and track addresses, error-correction codes, and
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TDM Installation Guide
other details are written on the platters of the
hard drive in the form of a magnetic pattern. A
low-level format permanently erases all data on
the drive.
When is Low-Level Formatting Necessary?
Virtually all hard drives come pre-formatted
from the manufacturer. Low-level formatting is
generally unnecessary except in rare circumstances. They are:
◆ If you want to change the Block Size of the
drive. This is not recommended by Digidesign.
Digidesign systems only recognize 512-byte
blocks.
◆ If you want to perform permanent deletion of
data.
◆ If you want to clean a drive that is being migrated from one operating system to another
(for instance, from UNIX to Macintosh).
Should you decide low-level formatting is necessary, keep in mind that it can take up to three
hours or more (depending on the size of the
drive). Avoid power interruptions and computer
bus resets during the format operation or permanent damage to the drive could occur. In addition, leave the drive powered on for at least 30
minutes prior to formatting so that the drive has
time to make any necessary thermal adjustments or recalibrations.
High-Level Formatting (Initialization)
High-level formatting, or initializing a drive replaces the drive’s directory, volume partition
map and drivers. Information about the drive is
created and drivers that communicate this information to the host CPU are installed. The
drive itself is not erased, nor is verification performed.
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When is High-Level Formatting Necessary?
It is generally necessary to initialize a hard drive
in one of the following cases:
If a new drive is being prepared for use on a
computer for the first time and the drive is not
already initialized.
◆
If a drive is being changed from one platform
to another. For example if you are switching
from a Windows to a Macintosh-based system,
the drive must be reinitialized for the new operating system.
◆
If you suspect that the directories containing
the drive’s information have become corrupted.
In addition, smaller partitions perform faster
than larger partitions. However, this comes at
the expense of contiguous storage space. When
you partition a drive, you will need to find the
compromise that best suits your performance
and storage requirements.
Avoid distributing audio files within a session over different partitions on the same
drive since this will adversely affect drive
performance.
Avoiding File Fragmentation
◆
Partitioning Drives
Partitioning divides a physical drive into multiple, unique volumes, almost as if you were creating virtual hard drives. Partitioning is usually
performed when the drive is initialized.
Mac OS 7.6.1 and above allows drives
larger than 4096 MB to be seen as whole
volumes. Drives must be initialized with
ExpressPro-Tools (or another utility) that
recognizes the 2 terabyte limit. Single files
cannot exceed 2048 MB in size.
Seek Times on Partitioned Drives
Seek times are actually faster on partitioned
drives (assuming that reads and writes are performed on a single partition), since the heads
only have to seek within the partition boundaries, rather than the whole capacity of the
drive.
For maximum recording and playback efficiency, data should be written to your hard
drive in a contiguous fashion—minimizing the
seek requirements to play back the data. Unfortunately, your computer can’t always store the
sound files in this way and must write to disk
wherever it can find space.
In multitrack recording, audio tracks are written
in discrete files, spaced evenly across the disk.
While fragmentation of individual files may be
zero, the tracks may be far enough apart that
playback will still be very seek-intensive. Also,
the remaining free space on the disk will be discontiguous, increasing the likelihood of file
fragmentation on subsequent record passes.
Increased fragmentation increases the chance of
disk errors, which can interfere with playback of
audio, and result in performance errors.
If Norton Utilities is used, it must be
Norton Utilities v4.0 or later to ensure
compatibility with HFS+ drives.
Chapter 2: Connecting SCSI Drives
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Optimizing (Defragmenting) Drives
To prevent fragmentation, you can optimize
your drive, which rearranges your files into a
contiguous format. Most optimizing software
lets you run a check on a drive to find out the
percentage of fragmentation. If your drive
shows moderate to heavy fragmentation, you
should consider optimizing it.
If you use your system for intensive editing, or if
you frequently delete audio or fade files from
your hard drive, you may need to optimize your
drives on a weekly basis, or even every few days,
since it doesn’t take long for even a large hard
drive to become fragmented.
Backing Up Data Before Optimizing
Since your files will be rewritten by the optimization process, always make a backup copy of
the data on your hard drive before you optimize
it. You should also use a hard drive utility to
find and repair any problems before optimizing
data. If there is any damage to your hard drive's
directories prior to optimizing, serious data loss
may result.
Using Macintosh Drives on
Windows Systems
For compatibility with Macintosh-based systems, Pro Tools for Windows lets you record and
play back sessions directly from a Macintoshformatted (HFS or HFS+) drive connected to a
Windows system. This functionality requires
that all Macintosh session and audio files be
stored on Macintosh-formatted drives.
To mount HFS or HFS+ drives on a Windows system, you must use the MacOpener™ software
utility. A demo version of MacOpener is included with Pro Tools Windows.
10
TDM Installation Guide
For details on sharing sessions between Macintosh and Windows systems, see the Pro Tools Reference Guide.
Installing the MacOpener Utility
To use Macintosh-formatted HFS or HFS+ drives,
you will need to install the MacOpener software
utility. The MacOpener installer was placed on
your hard drive when you installed Pro Tools, in
the following location:
Program Files\Digidesign\Pro Tools Utilities\
MacOpener Demo
To Install MacOpener:
1 Locate the Setup.exe file in the above location
and double-click it to launch the installer.
2 Follow the on-screen instructions to install
MacOpener.
3 After installation is complete, restart your
computer.
Enabling the MacOpener Driver
After installing MacOpener, the MacOpener
driver must be enabled to mount HFS and HFS+
drives.
To enable the MacOpener Driver:
1 From the Start menu, choose Programs > Ma-
cOpener > MacOpener Driver Preferences.
2 Under Driver Settings, select Enable Mac-
Opener Driver.
3 Under Extension Mapping, select Do not add
the PC extension to the Mac file name.
TDM_Install.book Page 11 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
Mounting an HFS Drive
If the MacOpener utility is installed and enabled, no additional steps are required to mount
HFS drives. They will appear as normal system
drives after you connect them and restart your
computer.
Formatting and Maintaining HFS
(and HFS+) Drives
While it is possible to use MacOpener to format
HFS (and HFS+) drives from a Windows machine, this can yield unpredictable results. If
you need to format an HFS drive, connect it to a
Macintosh computer and use the ExpressProTools software from ATTO (included with
Pro Tools).
Don’t Use Windows Disk Utility
Software on HFS Drives
Disk utility software for the Windows platform
(such as Norton Utilities for Windows) should
not be used on HFS drives. These utilities do not
recognize HFS-formatted drives and may try to
reformat them. This could cause format errors
on the HFS drive and result in data loss.
If you need to perform disk maintenance on an
HFS-formatted drive, connect the drive to a
Macintosh computer and use a Macintosh utility.
Chapter 2: Connecting SCSI Drives
11
TDM_Install.book Page 12 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
12
TDM Installation Guide
TDM_Install.book Page 13 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
chapter 3
Installing Pro Tools Hardware
Pro Tools TDM Cards
Your Pro Tools TDM cards will differ depending
on your system configuration. Card components for each configuration are listed below.
If you are installing an expanded system in
your computer, or using an Expansion
Chassis to add additional cards to your system, refer to the Expanded Systems Guide
included with your Pro Tools system.
The MIX Core Card
The MIX Core card provides 24-bit, 64-track, 16channel I/O, direct-to-disk recording and playback to your Pro Tools 24 MIX system, as well as
DSP power for its mixing and processing capabilities.
audio interface
port
Pro Tools 24 MIX Hardware
Pro Tools 24 MIX hardware comes in two configurations:
Pro Tools 24 MIX Includes a single MIX Core
card and a 5-node TDM ribbon cable for connecting to other optional TDM-equipped cards.
Pro Tools 24 MIXplus Includes a MIX Core card,
a MIX Farm card, and a 5-node TDM ribbon cable for connecting the MIX Core to the MIX
Farm and other optional TDM-equipped cards.
DigiSerial port
MIX Core card
This card includes a connector for attaching a
single 888/24 I/O, 882/20 I/O, or 1622 I/O Audio Interface. If you purchase the optional 16channel peripheral cable adapter, you can attach two 8-channel audio interfaces. The DigiSerial port is for connecting a Digidesign Universal Slave Driver, or a 9-pin device for use with
the Pro Tools MachineControl option.
The MIX Farm Card
The MIX Farm card provides more DSP power
for mixing, processing, and DSP software such
as the DigiRack plug-ins included with
Pro Tools. It also provides a connector for attaching a single 888/24 I/O, 882/20 I/O, or
1622 I/O Audio Interface. If you purchase the
optional 16-channel peripheral cable adapter,
Chapter 3: Installing Pro Tools Hardware
13
TDM_Install.book Page 14 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
you can attach two 8-channel audio interfaces.
The DigiSerial port is for connecting a Digidesign Universal Slave Driver, or a 9-pin device for
use with the Pro Tools MachineControl option.
The DSP Farm
The DSP Farm provides the power for the
Pro Tools 24 system’s mixing and processing capabilities. It powers DSP software such as the DigiRack plug-ins included with Pro Tools. It also
provides a connector for attaching an 8-channel
audio interface.
audio interface
port
DigiSerial port
MIX Farm card
Pro Tools 24 Hardware
Pro Tools 24 system hardware consists of a d24
audio card, a DSP Farm card, and a 5-node TDM
ribbon cable for connecting them.
The d24 Audio Card
The d24 audio card provides 24-bit, 32-track, 16channel I/O, direct-to-disk recording and playback capabilities to your Pro Tools 24 system. It
also provides a connector for attaching a single
888/24 I/O, 882/20 I/O, or 1622 I/O Audio Interface. If you purchase the optional 16-channel
peripheral cable adapter, you can attach two 8channel audio interfaces.
audio interface
port
DSP Farm card
The 1622 I/O Audio Interface is not supported by the DSP Farm. It must be connected to a MIX Core, MIX Farm, or d24
card. Only one 1622 I/O can be connected
to any of these cards. The optional 16channel peripheral cable adapter is not supported by the 1622 I/O.
The TDM Ribbon Cable
The TDM ribbon cable is used to connect multiple cards in your Pro Tools system so they can
share data along the TDM bus.
audio interface
port
DigiSerial port
14
d24 card
TDM Ribbon Cable
The DigiSerial port is for connecting an optional
Digidesign Universal Slave Driver, or a 9-pin device for use with the Pro Tools MachineControl
option.
A 5-node cable comes with your system. If you
plan to use your system with an expansion chassis, you can order a TDM cable with more nodes
from your Digidesign dealer.
TDM Installation Guide
TDM_Install.book Page 15 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
Installing the Pro Tools Cards
Install the Pro Tools cards:
1 Turn off your computer and any peripherals.
Leave your computer’s power cable plugged in
so the computer is grounded.
2 Open the computer case. The illustrations in
this section show a Blue & White Macintosh G3
and a Macintosh 9600 computer. If you are using a different model, your installation should
be similar. For additional details on installing a
card in your computer, refer to its User’s Guide.
Before handling any card, discharge any
static electricity that may be on your clothes
or body by touching a grounded metal surface, such as the power supply case inside
your computer.
Installing a Pro Tools card in a Macintosh G3
3 Remove the metal access port cover behind
the expansion slot you want to use by removing
the screw (if present) and sliding the cover out
from the access port.
4 Install the primary MIX Core or d24 card
(clock master with primary audio interface) in
the lowest numbered slot in your computer; to
determine which slot is the lowest, refer to “Determining Slot Order” on page 57.
Installing a Pro Tools card in a Macintosh 9600
5 Install the remaining Digidesign cards in suc-
cessive slots.
Pro Tools cards must be installed in a specific order that is dependent on the slot numbering of
the model of Macintosh you are using.
See Appendix A, “Determining Slot Order”
for details on determining slot order in your
Power Macintosh.
Chapter 3: Installing Pro Tools Hardware
15
TDM_Install.book Page 16 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
Group similar cards together (put all MIX Farm
cards next to each other, for example).
6 If installing a SCSI HBA card, install it in the
highest numbered remaining slot.
For 9500 and 9600 computers, the SCSI HBA
should reside before the video card.
Connect all TDM cards with the TDM ribbon cable:
1 Connect the first node of the cable to the first
TDM card. Make sure the TDM cable is facing
the right direction—align the white triangles on
the cable plug with the triangle on the card.
Connecting Audio Interfaces
Pro Tools provides you with a choice of the
888/24 I/O, 882/20 I/O, 1622 I/O, or ADAT
Bridge I/O interfaces. These devices supply the
inputs and outputs for your system.
For instructions on connecting an ADAT
Bridge I/O, see the ADAT Bridge I/O Installation Guide.
Connect the Pro Tools audio interfaces:
1 Connect the primary audio interface to the
primary Mix Core or d24 card with the provided
interface cable. The primary audio interface
functions as the clock master.
2 Connect additional audio interfaces to subse-
quent Digidesign audio cards.
Attaching the TDM ribbon cable to MIX Core and
MIX Farm cards
2 Push down gently but firmly until the node is
fully connected to the card. When the plug is
properly seated, the two tabs on the side of the
cable’s TDM connector will click shut. To detach
the ribbon cable, squeeze the tabs on the TDM
connector inward.
3 Attach the remaining nodes on the TDM cable
to subsequent cards.
If you are connecting both 888/24 and 882/20
or 1622 I/O Audio Interfaces to your system, for
best system performance, connect the 888/24 to
your core Pro Tools card, followed by any additional 888/24 interfaces to the next highest-priority cards. Then connect the 882/20 or
1622 I/O interfaces to subsequent cards.
You can use Digidesign’s 16-channel peripheral
cable adapter (optional) to connect two 8-channel audio interfaces to a single MIX Core, MIX
I/O, d24, or MIX Farm card.
to Audio
Interface
cable
to Audio
Interface
cable
to Pro Tools card
It is OK to have ribbon connectors that go
unused. They should reside after the last
TDM card.
4 Secure the cards in place with the slot access
port screws you removed earlier and close your
computer.
16
TDM Installation Guide
Optional 16-channel peripheral cable adapter
TDM_Install.book Page 17 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
The 1622 I/O Audio Interface is not supported by the DSP Farm. It must be connected to a MIX Core, MIX Farm, or d24
card. Only one 1622 I/O can be connected
to any of these cards. The optional 16channel peripheral cable adapter is not supported by the 1622 I/O.
3 If using multiple audio interfaces, connect the
Slave Clock Out of the primary interface to the
Slave Clock In of the second interface with the
provided BNC cable. Connect the Slave Clock
Out of the second interface to the Slave Clock In
of the next audio interface (and so forth).
COMPUTER
7
5
3
ANALOG OUTPUT
6
4
8
1
7
2
8
5
3
ANALOG INPUT
6
4
1
5/6
1/2
AES/EBU OUTPUT
7/8
3/4
2
5/6
1/2
AES/EBU INPUT
7/8
3/4
S/PDIF S/PDIF
IN
OUT
SLAVE CLOCK SLAVE CLOCK
IN
OUT
COMPUTER
7
5
3
ANALOG OUTPUT
6
4
8
1
7
2
8
5
3
ANALOG INPUT
6
4
1
5/6
1/2
AES/EBU OUTPUT
7/8
3/4
2
5/6
1/2
AES/EBU INPUT
7/8
3/4
S/PDIF S/PDIF
IN
OUT
ANALOG INPUTS
1
2
3
4
5
IN
ANALOG OUTPUTS
6
7
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
IN
IN
COMPUTER
8
OUT
OUT
S/PDIF
SLAVE CLOCK
ANALOG INPUTS
1
2
3
4
5
IN
ANALOG OUTPUTS
6
7
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
SLAVE CLOCK SLAVE CLOCK
IN
OUT
IN
COMPUTER
8
OUT
OUT
SLAVE CLOCK
S/PDIF
Connecting multiple audio interfaces together
Chapter 3: Installing Pro Tools Hardware
17
TDM_Install.book Page 18 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
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TDM Installation Guide
TDM_Install.book Page 19 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
chapter 4
Connecting Your Studio
This chapter explains how to connect Pro Tools
to a mixer, amplification system, digital recorders, and SMPTE synchronization devices.
The information is organized according to the
type of interface or Pro Tools configuration you
have. Instructions are provided for:
888/24 I/O Front Panel
The 888/24 I/O has the following front panel indicators, moving from left to right:
Sample
Rate
Input Level
Trims
Sync
Mode
• 888/24 I/O
• 882/20 I/O
• 1622 I/O
If you have an ADAT Bridge I/O interface,
refer to the ADAT Bridge I/O User’s Guide
for details on connecting it to your studio.
At the end of the chapter is general information
on connecting Pro Tools to digital equipment,
effects units, MIDI gear, and SMPTE synchronization devices.
The 888/24 I/O Interface
This section explains each of the connectors and
indicators on the front and back panels of the
888/24 I/O interface, how they are used, and offers suggestions for connecting the 888/24 I/O
to your studio.
Power
Level Meters
1–2 Format
Output Level
Trims
Front panel of the 888/24 I/O
Power
This switch applies power to the 888/24. The “I”
position is on. The “O” position is off.
Sync Mode
The Sync Mode LEDs indicate which sample rate
clock reference is currently used by the analogto-digital converters (ADCs) and the digital-toanalog converters (DACs).
Chapter 4: Connecting Your Studio
19
TDM_Install.book Page 20 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
Internal This is the 888/24 I/O standard setting.
In this mode, the 888/24 I/O sample rate is generated by its internal crystal oscillator (whose
frequency is determined by the Sample Rate setting in the Session Setup window). Internal
mode should be active whenever the 888/24 I/O
is not synchronized to an external clock source.
Slave This LED is lit when the 888/24 I/O sample rate is synchronized to another Digidesign
audio interface or synchronization peripheral.
In this mode, the sample rate of the slave interface is derived from the frequency of the incoming master clock signal present at the Slave
Clock In (256x) port.
Digital This setting indicates that an AES/EBU or
S/PDIF word clock signal is currently the source
for the 888/24 I/O sample rate. This is the setting to use for inputting material from DAT recorders or other digital devices.
The 888/24 I/O automatically switches to this
mode when a Slave Clock Out signal from another Digidesign interface, Universal Slave
Driver, Video Slave Driver, or SMPTE Slave
Driver is connected to the 888/24 I/O Slave
Clock In port.
To use the 888/24 I/O digital inputs and outputs
as effects sends and returns to digital effects devices, you should set the 888/24 I/O to Internal
mode. You should then set the digital effects device to accept an external digital clock (from the
888/24 I/O) so it synchronizes itself to
Pro Tools.
The 888/24 I/O can only synchronize to and receive word clock lock on channels 1–2 of its digital inputs. To synchronize your system to an
external digital clock source, it must be connected to digital inputs 1–2 of the 888/24 I/O.
In an expanded Pro Tools system, the system
clock is carried by the audio interface connected
to the first Pro Tools card in your system. This
audio interface will act as the master interface in
your system. All other audio interfaces will be
slaved to it.
Because some digital audio devices do not
output proper clock when they are not playing back, leaving the 888/24 I/O in Digital
mode may cause Pro Tools audio playback
quality to suffer, or play back at the wrong
pitch. If you are using digital I/O, reset the
Sync Mode from Digital to Internal after inputting material.
20
TDM Installation Guide
In expanded Pro Tools systems, the Super Clock
output of the master audio interface locks all
other interfaces together with sample accuracy,
keeping all signals phase-synchronous.
When slaving to a Digidesign Universal
Slave Driver, Video Slave Driver, or SMPTE
Slave Driver, set the clock source to Internal.
The audio interface will automatically
switch to Slave mode when it detects the
256x input clock
Sample Rate and 1–2 Format Indicators
These LEDs indicate the sample rate of the
888/24 I/O internal crystal oscillator and the
digital format (AES/EBU or S/PDIF) of the audio
input signal to channels 1 and 2.
The choice of digital format for these two channels is made in the Session Setup window or
Hardware Setup dialog. Digital input pairs 3–4,
5–6, and 7–8 of the 888/24 I/O are always
AES/EBU. Sample Rate is set in the Session Setup
window or Hardware Setup dialog in Pro Tools.
The 888/24 I/O provides the following sample
rates:
TDM_Install.book Page 21 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
48 kHz This is a standard sampling rate of many
professional audio devices. It is recommended
for use with devices that cannot receive digital
transfers at 44.1 kHz.
44.1 kHz This is the compact disc standard sampling rate and the Pro Tools default sample rate.
To avoid the need for sample rate conversion,
you should use this rate when you are recording
material that will ultimately be published on a
compact disc.
When you are using an external digital
source such as a DAT recorder, the front
panel of the 888/24 I/O indicates only the
internal oscillator sample rate, not that of
the external digital source.
Level Meters
The 888/24 I/O level meters monitor the channel outputs of Pro Tools. Input levels are monitored on-screen in the Pro Tools software.
The 888/24 I/O is factory calibrated so that a
meter reading of –18 dB corresponds to the
888/24 I/O nominal operating level (which can
be set to either +4 dBu or –10 dBV). If you sent
the output to an analog device with a VU meter,
this would correspond to “0 VU” on the VU
meter.
The red LED indicators on the audio interface
indicate both full-code (highest level before
clipping) and clipping of Pro Tools output signals. The on-screen meters in Pro Tools software
indicate clipping when at least three consecutive full-code samples follow each other.
Input Level Trims
The 888/24 I/O analog inputs are factory calibrated at a –18 dB nominal level, referenced to a
full code signal. This means that at the nominal
reference input level (either +4 dBu or –10 dBV),
you have 18 dB of headroom before clipping.
The input level trim pots allow adjustment of
the 888/24 I/O input levels to match the operating level of your external equipment. Adjustments can be made with a Phillips screwdriver.
Output Level Trims
The 888/24 I/O analog outputs are factory calibrated at a –18 dB nominal level, referenced to a
full code signal. This means that at the nominal
reference output level (either +4 dBu or
–10 dBV), you have 18 dB of headroom before
clipping. The output level trim pots allow adjustment of the 888/24 I/O output levels to
match the operating level of your external
equipment. Adjustments can be made with a
Phillips screwdriver.
To calibrate the input and output levels of the
888/24 I/O to match your mixing console or
other devices in your studio, use Calibration
Mode and the Signal Generator TDM Plug-In in
Pro Tools.
Instructions for calibrating the 888/24 I/O
appear in Chapter 7, “Calibrating the
888/24 I/O.”
Chapter 4: Connecting Your Studio
21
TDM_Install.book Page 22 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
888/24 I/O Back Panel
AES/EBU Digital Outputs 1–8
The 888/24 I/O has the following back panel
connectors, moving from left to right:
The 888/24 I/O AES/EBU output jacks are balanced, 3-conductor, XLR connectors which output a 24-bit digital data stream. Output is continuously active on both the AES/EBU and
S/PDIF jacks even when the 888/24 I/O input selector is set to analog.
Power
Input
Analog Inputs
50-pin
Interface
AES/EBU Digital Inputs 1–8
Analog Outputs
AES/EBU
Outputs
S/PDIF
I/O
AES/EBU
Inputs
Slave
Clock
I/O
Back panel of the 888/24 I/O
Analog Audio Outputs
These are balanced male XLR connectors for analog audio output connections. All eight output
channels are continuously active. The
888/24 I/O analog outputs feature 24-bit digitalto-analog converters.
Analog Audio Inputs
These are balanced female XLR connectors for
analog audio input connections. The
888/24 I/O analog inputs feature 24-bit analogto-digital converters. Because input channels
1–8 of the 888/24 I/O are software selectable in
pairs between analog or digital format, analog
input to a channel pair is disabled when digital
input format is chosen for that channel.
The 888/24 I/O analog audio connectors are balanced XLRs with pin 2 wired hot, (or “+”); pin 3
cold, (or “–”); and pin 1 ground.
22
TDM Installation Guide
The AES/EBU digital format is used in many professional digital audio devices, including some
DAT recorders. The interface’s AES/EBU input
jacks are balanced, 3-conductor XLR connectors
which accept a full 24-bit digital data stream.
For AES/EBU connections, 110-ohm cables are
highly recommended for use in professional installations. For best results, cable lengths should
not exceed 30 meters.
Input channels 1–8 of the 888/24 I/O are software selectable in pairs between analog or digital format. Digital input to a channel pair is disabled when analog input format is chosen for
that channel in the Hardware Setup dialog. Input to AES/EBU input channels 1–2 is disabled
when S/PDIF digital format is chosen for these
inputs in the Pro Tools Session Setup window.
50-pin Interface Connector
This 50-pin Computer connector is used to connect the 888/24 I/O to a MIX card, d24 audio
card, Disk I/O card, or a DSP Farm card. The necessary cable is supplied with your audio interface. If you plan to connect two 888/24 I/O interfaces to a MIX card or d24 card, a 16-channel
peripheral cable adapter is necessary. (This cable
is available from your Digidesign dealer.)
TDM_Install.book Page 23 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
S/PDIF Digital Input/Output
The Sony Philips Digital Interface Format
(S/PDIF) is used in many professional and consumer CD players and DAT recorders. The
888/24 I/O S/PDIF in/out jacks are unbalanced
2-conductor phono (RCA) jacks which utilize a
full 24-bit digital data stream. To avoid RF interference, use 75-ohm coaxial cable for S/PDIF
transfers and keep the cable length to a maximum of 10 meters.
Because input channels 1–2 of the 888/24 I/O
are software selectable between analog or digital
format, input to these two digital channels is
disabled when analog input is chosen or when
AES/EBU digital format is chosen in the
Pro Tools Session Setup window. Output is continuously active on both the AES/EBU and
S/PDIF output jacks, regardless of which digital
input format is selected for channels 1–2. To
avoid RF interference, use 75-ohm coaxial cable
for S/PDIF transfers and do not exceed a cable
length of 10 meters.
Slave Clock In/Out
The Slave Clock Out jack is a standard BNC type
connector that outputs a 256 times sample rate
Super Clock signal for slaving and synchronizing multiple Digidesign interfaces and synchronization peripherals together.
When the 888/24 I/O Sync Mode is set to Internal, connecting a valid Slave Clock Out signal to
this port will cause the 888/24 I/O to automatically switch to Slave mode. When the
888/24 I/O is the master interface or the first interface in a chain, Digital mode overrides the
Slave Clock input, and an incoming Slave Clock
Out signal will not switch the 888/24 I/O to
Slave mode.
Because crucial timing data is passed over these
ports, you should use high-quality, 75-ohm RG59 cables for making connections, and keep total cable length to less than 3 meters between interfaces.
Power Input
This connector accepts a standard AC power cable. The interface automatically selects power
(100 V to 240 V) and will automatically work
with a standard modular cable to connect to AC
power receptacles in any country.
Changing Operating Levels of
Individual 888/24 I/O
Channels
The 888/24 I/O is factory set to +4 dBu operating levels for input and output. However, the
888/24 I/O allows you to individually switch
any of its analog inputs or outputs to either a
+4 dBu or –10 dBV operating level by moving
internal jumpers on its circuit board.
output level
adjustment switches
+4 dBu or -10 dBV
input level
adjustment switches
+4 dBu or -10 dBV
Input and output level switches inside the 888/24 I/O
Chapter 4: Connecting Your Studio
23
TDM_Install.book Page 24 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
To change the operating level of an input channel:
1 Turn off your computer and the 888/24 I/O.
2 With a Phillips screwdriver, remove the screws
To change the operating level of an output
channel:
1 Turn off your computer and the 888/24 I/O.
2 Using the 1/16-inch hex wrench included
from the top of the 888/24 I/O.
3 Using the 1/16-inch hex wrench included
with the 888/24 I/O, carefully remove the front
four panel screws as noted on the bag containing the hex wrench.
4 Lift the top off of the 888/24 I/O.
5 Inside the 888/24 I/O chassis, next to each of
the channel input trims, there is a jumper
switch with a removable cap. Locate the jumper
switch for the channel you want to modify.
Gently lift the cap off the 3-pronged connector.
Place it in the position corresponding to the operating level that you desire. For +4 dBu levels, it
should be placed over the rear two prongs. For
–10 dBV levels, it should be placed over the
front two prongs.
with the 888/24 I/O, carefully remove the front
four panel screws as noted on the bag containing the hex wrench.
3 With a Phillips screwdriver, remove the screws
from the top of the 888/24 I/O and lift the top
off of the 888/24 I/O.
4 To find the channel output switches, detach
the front part of the ribbon cable at the right
side of the chassis. To do this, grip both sides of
the black connector and gently pull up.
5 With the ribbon cable out of the way you’ll
see eight 3-pronged jumper switches, each with
a removable cap. Locate the switch for the channel you want to modify.
6 After you have made the desired changes, replace the top of the 888/24 I/O.
7 Replace the four front panel screws using the
hex wrench.
remove jumper
8 Replace the top screws with a Phillips screwdriver.
detach
ribbon cable
+4
-10
place jumper
in this position
to set output
to +4 dBu level
pull off jumper
place jumper
in this position
to set output
to -10 dBV level
Setting the output level jumper switches
+4
-10
+4
-10
place jumper
in this position
to set input
to +4 dBu level
+4
-10
place jumper
in this position
to set input
to -10 dBV level
Setting the input level jumper switches
6 Gently lift the cap off of the jumper switch.
Place it in the position corresponding to the operating level that you desire. For +4 dBu levels, it
should be placed over the left two prongs. For
–10 dBV levels, it should be placed over the
right two prongs.
7 After you have made the desired changes, re-
connect the ribbon cable and put the top back
on the 888/24 I/O.
24
TDM Installation Guide
TDM_Install.book Page 25 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
8 Replace the four front panel screws using the
hex wrench.
9 Replace the top screws with a Phillips screw-
driver.
Making Signal Connections to
the 888/24 I/O
Depending on how you plan to use the
888/24 I/O, the way you connect it to your studio will vary.
Most manuals contain device input specifications, including whether or not there are pads or
attenuators. Consult the manufacturer of your
mixer or power amplifier for further information.
Setting Up Your Studio
The following diagram illustrates a typical studio setup, with the 888/24 I/O connected to a
mixing console, effects and other equipment.
Digital Inputs/Outputs
Channel 3-4
To Digital Effects Devices
uter 1
Comp
Choosing between +4 dBu and
–10 dBV operation modes
The 888/24 I/O can be set to operate at +4 dBu
or –10 dBV input and output levels (see “Changing Operating Levels of Individual 888/24 I/O
Channels” on page 23). It is important that you
determine which line level mode is appropriate
for your studio. In +4 dBu operating mode, the
888/24 I/O is a 24-bit digital audio device capable of producing audio signals at or near
+26 dBu. Check the owner’s manual for your
mixer, power amplifier or effects processor to see
if it can handle this load. If it cannot, consider
setting the 888/24 I/O to operate at –10 dBV
line levels.
Consider the following when connecting a
mixer:
1
7
1
7
3
T
5
G OUTPU
ANALO
4
6
3
5
G INPUT
ANALO
4
6
1/2
T
5/6 BU OUTPU
AES/E
3/4
7/8
1/2
5/6 BU INPUT
AES/E
3/4
7/8
S/PDIF
S/PDIF OUT
IN
8
2
8
Digital Effects Devices
(set to external sync)
CLOCK
SLAVE
OUT
Analog
Audio
Inputs 5-8
Digital Inputs/Outputs
Channel 1-2
To DAT Recorder
Analog
Audio
Outputs 5-8
Tape Returns
or Inputs 1-4
CLOCK
SLAVE
IN
2
Effects Devices
Channel
Outputs 1-4
DAT Recorder
Instruments
Connected to Console
Power Amp
and Speakers
Typical studio configuration
The 888/24 I/O analog audio connectors are balanced XLRs with pin 2 wired hot (or “+”), pin 3
cold (or “–”), and pin 1 ground.
◆
If your mixer cannot handle more than 1.5 V
(RMS) inputs at +4 dBu, then you should set the
888/24 I/O to run at –10 dBV line level.
If you are connecting a balanced system, pin 1
and shield should be connected at the input
only (not at the output). This will prevent
ground loops between the shield and pin 1 conductor.
If your mixer can handle up to 8.5 V (RMS) inputs, or has pads or attenuators on its inputs,
then you can use the +4 dBu setting on the
888/24 I/O.
If you are connecting an unbalanced signal to
the 888/24 I/O inputs or outputs, connect only
pin 2 to the “+” signal, and pins 1 and 3 to
ground at all inputs only.
◆
Chapter 4: Connecting Your Studio
25
TDM_Install.book Page 26 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
Using the 888/24 I/O
Interface as Standalone
Audio Converter
To use the 888/24 I/O as a standalone D/A
converter:
1 Make sure that a digital device providing a
word clock signal is connected to AES/EBU inputs 1–2 of the 888/24 I/O and turned on.
The 888/24 I/O can be used apart from Pro Tools
as a standalone 8-channel, 24-bit, analog-to-digital or digital-to-analog converter.
2 Turn on the 888/24 I/O. The 888/24 I/O will
Before you use the 888/24 I/O in standalone
mode:
3 When a valid word clock lock is recognized,
1 Turn off the 888/24 I/O.
2 Do not turn on your computer while the
888/24 I/O is in standalone mode. If you do, the
888/24 I/O will stop functioning in standalone
mode.
search for a valid word clock or a word clock signal on channels 1–2 of its digital input ports.
the 888/24 I/O will enter Digital mode and
function as a standalone D/A converter using
AES/EBU inputs 1–8 and analog outputs 1–8.
The 888/24 I/O D/A sample rate is determined
by the sample rate it detects on channels 1–2 of
its AES/EBU inputs.
To use the 888/24 I/O as a standalone A/D
converter:
The 888/24 I/O defaults to listening to a
digital word clock signal on channels 1–2 of
its AES/EBU digital input ports. To use a
S/PDIF device as your source of word clock,
you must reset this default by opening the
888/24 I/O and moving an internal jumper
switch. Instructions for doing this are provided in the 888/24 I/O Installation Guide.
That guide also provides instructions for
changing other standalone mode default parameters such as sample rate and DAC
muting.
1 Turn off any digital devices that may send a
word clock signal to the 888/24 I/O channel 1–2
digital input ports.
2 Turn on the 888/24 I/O. The 888/24 I/O
searches briefly for a word clock signal on channels 1–2 of its digital input ports.
3 If the 888/24 I/O does not detect word clock,
it functions as a standalone A/D converter using
its internal clock. In this mode you will use analog inputs 1–8 and AES/EBU outputs 1–8.
The default sample rate of the 888/24 I/O
in standalone A/D mode is 44.1 kHz.To
change this default setting to 48 kHz, you
must open the 888/24 I/O and manually reset it by moving an internal jumper switch.
Instructions for doing this are provided in
the 888/24 I/O Installation Guide.
26
TDM Installation Guide
To return the 888/24 I/O to Pro Tools-based
operation:
■
Turn on your computer.
– or –
■
If your computer is on, launch Pro Tools.
TDM_Install.book Page 27 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
The 882/20 I/O Interface
This section explains all of the connectors and
indicators on the front and back panels of the
882/20 I/O interface, how they are used, and offers suggestions for connecting the 882/20 I/O
to your studio.
882/20 I/O Interface Front Panel
The 882/20 I/O has the following front panel indicators, moving from left to right:
Ch 1–2
Input
20
Sample
Rate
Power
Sync Mode
Signal
Present
LEDs
Front panel of the Digidesign 882/20 I/O
Power
This switch applies power to the 882/20. The “I”
position is on. The “O” position is off.
Sync Mode
The Sync Mode LEDs indicate which sample rate
clock reference is currently used by the analogto-digital converters (ADCs) and the digital-toanalog converters (DACs).
Internal This is the 882/20 I/O standard setting.
In this mode, the 882/20 I/O sample rate is generated by its internal crystal oscillator (whose
frequency is determined by the Sample Rate setting in the Session Setup window). Internal
mode should be active whenever the 882/20 I/O
is not synchronized to an external clock source.
Digital This setting indicates that a S/PDIF word
clock signal is the source for the 882/20 I/O
sample rate. This is the setting you would use for
inputting material from DAT machines or other
S/PDIF digital devices.
To use the 882/20 I/O digital input and output
as an effects send and return to a digital effects
device, you should set the 882/20 I/O to Internal mode. You should then set the digital effects
device to accept an external digital clock (from
the 882/20 I/O) so it synchronizes with
Pro Tools.
In an expanded system, the system clock is carried by the audio interface connected to the first
Pro Tools card in your system. This audio interface will act as the master interface in your system, and all other audio interfaces will be slaved
to it. Only the master interface allows you to set
the Sync Mode. Slaved interfaces do not allow
this parameter selection.
Because some digital audio devices do not
output proper clock when they are not playing back, leaving the 882/20 I/O in Digital
mode may cause Pro Tools audio playback
quality to suffer, or to play back at the
wrong pitch. If you are using digital I/O, reset the Sync Mode from Digital to Internal
after inputting material.
Slave This LED is lit when the 882/20 I/O sample rate is synchronized to another Digidesign
audio interface or synchronization peripheral.
In this mode, the sample rate of the slave interface is derived from the frequency of the incoming master clock signal present at the Slave
Clock In (256x) port. The 882/20 I/O automatically switches to this mode when a Slave Clock
Out signal from another Digidesign interface,
Universal Slave Driver, Video Slave Driver, or
SMPTE Slave Driver is connected to its Slave
Clock In port.
Chapter 4: Connecting Your Studio
27
TDM_Install.book Page 28 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
In expanded Pro Tools systems, the Super Clock
output of the master audio interface locks all
other interfaces together with sample accuracy,
keeping all signals phase-synchronous.
When slaving to a Digidesign Universal
Slave Driver, Video Slave Driver, or SMPTE
Slave Driver, set the clock source to Internal.
The audio interface will automatically
switch to Slave mode when it detects the
256x input clock.
Ch 1–2 Input
This LED indicates the format (analog or digital)
of the audio input signal to channels 1 and 2. In
Pro Tools, you choose analog or digital input for
these two channels in the Session Setup window. Input channels 3 through 8 of the
882/20 I/O are always analog.
Sample Rate
When you are using an external digital
source such as a DAT recorder, the front
panel of the 882/20 I/O indicates only the
internal oscillator sample rate, not that of
the external digital source.
Signal Present LEDs
These LEDs indicate whether signal is present
(above the level of –30 dB) at a given channel’s
output. These LEDs indicate the presence of
channel output signals, not input signals. Input
signals are monitored on-screen in the Pro Tools
software. The LEDs do not indicate clipping.
Clipping is indicated by the on-screen meters in
Pro Tools software.
882/20 I/O Back Panel
The 882/20 I/O has the following back panel
connectors, moving from left to right:
These LEDs display the current sample rate of
the 882/20 I/O internal crystal oscillator, which
can be either 44.1 kHz or 48 kHz. In Pro Tools,
this is set in the Session Setup window.
Slave
Clock
In/Out
50-pin
Interface
The 882/20 I/O provides the following sample
rates:
48 kHz This is a standard sampling rate of many
professional audio devices. It is recommended
for use with devices that cannot receive digital
transfers at 44.1 kHz.
44.1 kHz This is the compact disc standard sampling rate and the Pro Tools default sample rate.
To avoid the need for sample rate conversion,
you should use this rate when you are recording
material that will ultimately be published on a
compact disc.
28
TDM Installation Guide
Analog
Inputs
Analog
Outputs
S/PDIF
I/O
Power
Back panel of the Digidesign 882/20 I/O
Analog Audio Inputs
These are balanced, 1/4-inch TRS jacks for analog audio input connections. The 882/20 I/O
analog inputs feature 20-bit analog-to-digital
converters.
Input operating levels are switchable between
+4 dBu and –10 dBV operation. Unbalanced
connections are supported through the use of
standard 1/4-inch TRS mono phone plugs.
TDM_Install.book Page 29 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
Because input channels 1–2 of the 882/20 I/O
are software selectable between analog or S/PDIF
digital format, input to these two analog channels is disabled when S/PDIF digital input format is chosen in the Pro Tools Hardware Setup
dialog.
The 882/20 I/O analog inputs are factory calibrated at a –14 dB nominal level, referenced to a
full code signal. This means that at the nominal
reference input level (either +4 dBu or –10 dBV),
you have 14 dB of headroom before clipping.
Analog Audio Outputs
These are balanced, 1/4-inch TRS jacks for analog audio output connections. The 882/20 I/O
analog outputs feature 20-bit digital-to-analog
converters.
All eight output channels are continuously active. Output operating levels are switchable between +4 dBu and –10 dBV operation. Unbalanced connections are supported through the
use of standard 1/4-inch TRS mono phone
plugs.
The 882/20 I/O analog outputs are factory calibrated at a –14 dB nominal level, referenced to a
full code signal. This means that at the nominal
reference output level (either +4 dBu or
–10 dBV), you have 14 dB of headroom before
clipping.
Slave Clock In/Out
The Slave Clock Out jack is a standard BNC type
connector that outputs a 256x audio sample rate
master Super Clock signal for slaving and synchronizing multiple Digidesign interfaces and
synchronization peripherals together.
The Slave Clock In jack is a standard BNC type
connector designed to receive a Slave Clock Out
signal from another Digidesign interface, a Universal Slave Driver™, Video Slave Driver™, or
SMPTE Slave Driver™ for synchronizing multiple
Digidesign interfaces and synchronization peripherals together.
When the 882/20 I/O Sync Mode is set to Internal, connecting a valid Slave Clock Out signal to
this port will cause the 882/20 I/O to automatically switch to Slave mode. When the
882/20 I/O is the master interface or the first interface in a chain, Digital mode overrides the
Slave Clock input, and an incoming Slave Clock
Out signal will not switch the 882/20 to Slave
mode.
Because crucial timing data is passed over these
ports, you should use high-quality, 75-ohm RG59 cables for making connections, and keep total cable length to less than 3 meters between interfaces.
S/PDIF Digital Input/Output
The Sony Philips Digital Interface Format
(S/PDIF) is used in many professional and consumer CD players and DAT recorders. The
882/20 I/O S/PDIF jacks are unbalanced, 2-conductor, phono (RCA) jacks. Because input channels 1–2 of the 882/20 I/O are software selectable between analog or digital format, input to
these two digital channels is disabled when analog input is chosen in the Hardware Setup dialog in Pro Tools. Output is continuously active
on the S/PDIF output jack, even if the
882/20 I/O input selector is set to Analog in the
Hardware Setup dialog. To avoid RF interference, use 75-ohm coaxial cable for S/PDIF transfers and do not exceed a cable length of 10
meters.
Chapter 4: Connecting Your Studio
29
TDM_Install.book Page 30 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
50-pin Interface Connector
This 50-pin connector is used to connect the
882/20 I/O to a MIX card, d24, Disk I/O, or DSP
Farm card. The necessary cable is supplied with
your audio interface. If you plan to connect two
882/20 I/O interfaces to a MIX card or d24 card,
a 16-channel peripheral cable adapter is necessary. (This cable is available from your Digidesign dealer.)
Power Input
This connector accepts a standard AC power cable. The interface automatically selects power
(100 V to 240 V), and will automatically work
with a standard modular cable to connect to AC
power receptacles in any country.
Making Signal Connections to
the 882/20 I/O
Depending on how you plan to use the
882/20 I/O, the way you connect it to your studio will vary.
Consider the following when connecting a
mixer:
◆ If your mixer cannot handle more than 1.5 V
(RMS) inputs at +4 dBu, then you should set the
882/20 I/O to operate at –10 dBV line level.
◆ If your mixer can handle up to 8.5 V (RMS) inputs, or has pads or attenuators on its inputs,
then you can use the +4 dBu setting on the
882/20 I/O.
Most manuals contain device input specifications, including whether or not there are pads or
attenuators. Consult the manufacturer of your
mixer or power amplifier for further information.
Setting Up Your Studio
The following diagrams provide general suggestions for connecting studio gear to your system.
Figure 1 illustrates a studio setup with the
882/20 I/O connected to a mixing console, with
effects and other gear routed into the console as
well.
S/PDIF Digital Input/Output
To DAT Recorder
Inputs/Outputs 7-8
To Effects Device
R
PUTE
COM
IN
IN
Choosing between +4 dBu and
–10 dBV operation modes
The 882/20 I/O can be set to operate at +4 dBu
or –10 dBV input and output levels. It is important that you determine which line level mode
is appropriate for your studio. In +4 dBu operating mode, the 882/20 I/O is a 20-bit digital audio device capable of producing audio signals at
or near +18 dBu. Check the owner’s manual for
your mixer, power amplifier or effects processor
to see if it can handle this load. If it cannot, consider setting the 882/20 I/O to operate at
–10 dBV line levels.
30
TDM Installation Guide
OUT
UTS
OG OUTP
ANAL
6
5
4
1
2
3
S
OG INPUT
ANAL
6
5
4
1
7
2
7
8
F
S/PDI
OUT
SLAVE
CLOC
K
3
8
DAT Recorder
Analog
Audio
Inputs 1-6
Analog
Audio
Outputs 1-6
Effects Devices
Effects Device
Channel
Outputs 1-6
Instruments
Connected to Console
Tape Returns
or Inputs 1-6
Power Amp
and Speakers
Figure 1. Typical studio configuration with mixer
connections
TDM_Install.book Page 31 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
Figure 2 diagram shows a setup without a mixer,
where effects and monitoring gear are connected directly to the 882/20 I/O.
Mic Preamp,
Direct Box, Synth, etc.
Power Amp
and Speakers
S/PDIF Digital Input/Output
To DAT Recorder
COM
IN
1
2
3
4
5
7
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
OUT
K
E CLOC
SLAV
searches briefly for a word clock signal on channels 1–2 of its digital input ports.
3 If the 882/20 I/O does not detect word clock,
OUT
1
6
word clock signal to the 882/20 I/O S/PDIF digital input.
PUTER
IN
PUTS
OG OUT
ANAL
TS
OG INPU
ANAL
1 Turn off any digital devices that may send a
2 Turn on the 882/20 I/O. The 882/20 I/O
Analog
Audio
Outputs 1-2
Analog
Audio
Inputs 1-2
To use the 882/20 I/O as a standalone A/D
converter:
IF
S/PD
8
DAT Recorder
Analog
Audio
Inputs/Outputs
3-8
Effects Devices
Figure 2. Typical studio configuration without a mixer
Using the 882/20 I/O
Interface as Standalone
Audio Converter
The 882/20 I/O can be used apart from Pro Tools
as a standalone 2-channel, 20-bit, analog-to-digital or digital-to-analog converter.
The 882/20 I/O always operates at
–10 dBV when in standalone mode.
it functions as a standalone A/D converter using
its internal clock. In this mode you will use analog inputs 1–2 and the S/PDIF output.
In standalone mode, the 882/20 only operates at a 44.1 kHz sample rate. If you want
to convert analog signals into 48 kHz digital audio, you must launch Pro Tools (or
any other software which supports the
882/20 I/O) to change the default sample
rate.
To use the 882/20 I/O as a standalone D/A
converter:
1 Make sure that a digital device providing a
word clock signal is connected to the S/PDIF input of the 882/20 I/O and that the device is
powered on.
2 Turn on the 882/20 I/O. The 882/20 I/O will
Before you use the 882/20 I/O in standalone
mode:
1 Turn off the 882/20 I/O.
2 Do not turn on your computer while the
882/20 I/O is in standalone mode. If you do, the
882/20 I/O will stop functioning in standalone
mode.
search for a valid word clock on its S/PDIF input.
3 When a valid word clock lock is recognized,
the 882/20 I/O will enter Digital mode and
function as a standalone D/A converter using
the S/PDIF input and analog outputs 1–2.
The 882/20 I/O sample rate is determined by the
sample rate that it detects on its S/PDIF input.
Chapter 4: Connecting Your Studio
31
TDM_Install.book Page 32 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
To return the 882/20 I/O to Pro Tools-based
operation:
■
Turn on your computer.
– or –
■
If your computer is on, launch Pro Tools.
The 1622 I/O Interface
This section explains the connectors and indicators on the front and back panels of the
1622 I/O interface, how they are used, and offers suggestions for connecting the 1622 I/O to
your studio.
1622 I/O Front Panel
The 1622 I/O has the following front panel indicators, moving from left to right:
Sample
Rate
Output Meters
Sync
Mode
Power
Sync Mode
The Sync Mode LEDs indicate which sample rate
clock reference is currently used by the analogto-digital converters (ADCs) and the digital-toanalog converters (DACs).
Internal This is the 1622 I/O standard setting. In
this mode, the 1622 I/O sample rate is generated
by its internal crystal oscillator (whose frequency is determined by the Sample Rate setting
in the Session Setup window). Internal mode
should be active whenever the 1622 I/O is not
synchronized to an external clock source.
Digital This setting indicates that a S/PDIF word
clock signal is the source for the 1622 I/O sample rate. This is the setting to use for inputting
material from DAT machines or other S/PDIF
digital devices.
To use the 1622 I/O digital input and output as
an effects send and return to a digital effects device, set the 1622 I/O to Internal mode. Set the
digital effects device to accept an external digital
clock (from the 1622 I/O) so it synchronizes
with Pro Tools.
In expanded Pro Tools systems, the Super Clock
output of the master audio interface locks all
other interfaces together with sample accuracy,
keeping all signals phase-synchronous.
Input Meters
Ch 1–2 Input
Channel 15–16
Direct Inputs
Front panel of the Digidesign 1622 I/O
Power
This switch applies power to the 1622 I/O. The
“I” position is on. The “O” position is off.
32
TDM Installation Guide
Because some digital audio devices do not
output proper clock when they are not playing back, leaving the 1622 I/O in Digital
mode may cause Pro Tools audio playback
quality to suffer, or to play back at the
wrong pitch. If you are using digital I/O, reset the Sync Mode from Digital to Internal
after inputting material.
TDM_Install.book Page 33 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
Slave This LED is lit when the 1622 I/O is synchronized to another Digidesign audio interface
or synchronization peripheral. In this mode, the
sample rate of the slave interface is derived from
the frequency of the incoming master clock signal present at the Slave Clock In (256x) port. If
the Sync Mode is set to Internal, connecting a
Slave Clock Out signal from another Digidesign
interface or synchronization peripheral to the
1622 I/O Slave Clock In port will automatically
switch it to Slave mode.
In expanded Pro Tools systems, the Super Clock
output of the master audio interface locks all
other interfaces together with sample accuracy,
keeping all signals phase-synchronous.
When slaving to a Digidesign Universal
Slave Driver, Video Slave Driver, or SMPTE
Slave Driver, set the clock source to Internal.
The audio interface will automatically
switch to Slave mode when it detects the
256x input clock.
48 kHz This is a standard sampling rate of many
professional audio devices. It is recommended
for use with devices that cannot receive digital
transfers at 44.1 kHz.
44.1 kHz This is the compact disc standard sampling rate and the Pro Tools default sample rate.
To avoid the need for sample rate conversion,
you should use this rate when you are recording
material that will ultimately be published on a
compact disc.
When you are using an external digital
source such as a DAT recorder, the front
panel of the 1622 I/O indicates only the internal oscillator sample rate, not that of the
external digital source.
Input Meters
These LEDs indicate whether signal is present at
a given channel’s input. Segment 1 (green) indicates –20.0 dB. Segment 2 (yellow) indicates
–3.0 dB. Segment 3 (red) indicates –0.1 dB.
Ch 1–2 Input
Output Meters
This LED indicates the format (analog or digital)
of the audio input signal to channels 1–2. In
Pro Tools, you choose analog or digital input for
these two channels in the Session Setup window
or the Hardware Setup dialog. Input channels 3
through 16 of the 1622 I/O are always analog.
These LEDs indicate whether signal is present at
one of the two outputs. Segment 1 (green) indicates –20.0 dB. Segment 2 (yellow) indicates
–3.0 dB. Segment 3 (red) indicates –0.1 dB.
Channel 15–16 Direct Inputs
Sample Rate
These LEDs display the current sample rate of
the 1622 I/O internal crystal oscillator, which
can be either 44.1 kHz or 48 kHz. In Pro Tools,
this is set in the Session Setup window or in the
Hardware Setup dialog.
The 1622 I/O provides the following sample
rates:
These are balanced, 1/4-inch TRS jacks for convenient front panel audio input connections.
Inputs can be individually calibrated from
+4 dBu to –10 dBV line levels and higher in 2 dB
gain steps, using the Other Options dialog
(choose Setups > Hardware and click Other Options). This allows the 1622 I/O to accommodate any standard line-level input, including
Chapter 4: Connecting Your Studio
33
TDM_Install.book Page 34 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
synthesizers, samplers and effects devices. Unbalanced connections are supported through
the use of standard 1/4-inch TRS mono phone
plugs.
1622 I/O Back Panel
The 1622 I/O has the following back panel connectors, moving from left to right:
Analog
Outputs
Analog
Inputs
1–14
S/PDIF
I/O
Power
Input
Slave
Clock
In/Out
60-pin
Interface
Back panel of the Digidesign 1622 I/O
Analog Audio Inputs 1–14
These are balanced, 1/4-inch TRS jacks for analog audio input connections.
Inputs can be individually calibrated from
+4 dBu to –10 dBV line levels and higher in 2 dB
gain steps, using the Other Options dialog
(choose Setups > Hardware and click Other Options). This allows the 1622 I/O to accommodate any standard, line-level input, including
synthesizers, samplers and effects devices. Unbalanced connections are supported through
the use of standard 1/4-inch TRS mono phone
plugs.
The 1622 I/O analog inputs are factory calibrated at a –14 dB nominal level, referenced to a
full code signal. This means you can have up to
14 dB of headroom before clipping, depending
on the input levels you set in the Other Options
dialog.
34
TDM Installation Guide
Because input channels 1–2 of the 1622 I/O are
software selectable between analog or S/PDIF
digital format, input to these two analog channels is disabled when S/PDIF digital input format is chosen in the Pro Tools Hardware Setup
dialog.
Analog Audio Outputs L-R
These are balanced, 1/4-inch TRS jacks for analog audio output connections. They carry
Pro Tools main output channels 1–2. The analog outputs feature 24-bit digital-to-analog converters. Both output channels are continuously
active. Output operating levels are switchable
between +4 dBu and –10 dBV operation.
Unbalanced connections are supported through
the use of standard 1/4-inch TRS mono phone
plugs.
The 1622 I/O analog outputs are factory calibrated at a –14 dB nominal level, referenced to a
full code signal. This means that at the nominal
reference output level (either +4 dBu or
–10 dBV), you have 14 dB of headroom before
clipping.
Slave Clock In/Out
The Slave Clock Out jack is a standard BNC type
connector that outputs a 256x audio sample rate
master Super Clock signal for slaving and synchronizing multiple audio interfaces and synchronization peripherals together.
When the 1622 I/O Sync Mode is set to Internal,
connecting a valid Slave Clock signal to the
Slave Clock In port will cause the 1622 I/O to
automatically switch to Slave mode. When the
1622 I/O is the master interface or the first interface in a chain, Digital mode overrides the Slave
Clock input, and an incoming Slave Clock Out
signal will not switch the 1622 I/O to Slave
mode.
TDM_Install.book Page 35 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
Because crucial timing data is passed over these
ports, you should use high-quality, 75-ohm RG59 cables for making connections, and keep total cable length to less than 3 meters between interfaces.
S/PDIF Digital Input/Output
The Sony Philips Digital Interface Format
(S/PDIF) is used in many professional and consumer CD players and DAT recorders. The
1622 I/O S/PDIF jacks are 24-bit capable, unbalanced, 2-conductor, phono (RCA) jacks.
Because input channels 1–2 of the 1622 I/O are
software selectable between analog or digital
format, input to these two digital channels is
disabled when analog input is chosen in the
Hardware Setup dialog in Pro Tools.
Output is continuously active on the S/PDIF
output jack, even if the 1622 I/O input selector
is set to analog in the Hardware Setup dialog. To
avoid RF interference, use 75-ohm coaxial cable
for S/PDIF transfers and do not exceed a cable
length of 10 meters.
Making Signal Connections to
the 1622 I/O Interface
Depending on how you plan to use the
1622 I/O, the way you connect it to your studio
will vary.
Adjusting 1622 I/O Gain Levels
The 1622 I/O input levels are adjustable
through the Pro Tools software to accommodate
a variety of equipment output levels. For optimum fidelity and signal-to-noise performance,
you should adjust these inputs according to the
devices that you connect to them.
After you have set up, configured, and launched
Pro Tools, refer to the instructions below for adjusting input gain levels for the 1622 I/O.
For best signal-to-noise performance, set the
1622 I/O input gain to +4 dBu when recording devices that provide this output level.
To adjust input level gain on the 1622 I/O:
1 Connect the instrument or device to the
60-pin Interface Connector
1622 I/O.
This 60-pin connector is used to connect the
1622 I/O to a MIX or d24 card. The appropriate
interface cable is supplied with the 1622 I/O.
2 In Pro Tools, choose Setups > Hardware.
Power Input
This connector accepts a standard AC power cable. The 1622 I/O automatically selects power
(100 V to 240 V), and will automatically work
with a standard modular cable to connect to AC
power receptacles in any country.
3 Click Other Options.
4 Set the input trim slider to match the output
level of the connected instrument. (Refer to the
manufacturer’s documentation for details.) If
you do not know the output level of the device,
use the default input trim level, then fine tune
the input level gain using the procedure below.
5 Select the desired output gain level, +4 dBu or
–10 dBV, and click Done.
Chapter 4: Connecting Your Studio
35
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To fine tune the input level gain:
1 Create an Auxiliary Input track. This can be either mono or stereo depending on the device
you are monitoring.
2 Set the track input to the 1622 I/O input
channel you just set in the Other Options dialog.
3 Play the instrument at maximum volume,
sending a steady signal to the 1622 I/O. (You
will not be able to hear the input signal while
adjusting your levels in this dialog, but you can
see the levels on the input meters of the
1622 I/O.)
Setting Up Your Studio
The diagrams below provide suggestions for
connecting studio gear to your system. Figure 3
illustrates a studio setup with the 1622 I/O connected to a mixing console, with effects and
other gear routed into the console as well.
S/PDIF Digital Input/Output
To DAT Recorder
DAT Recorder
Analog
Audio
Outputs 1-2
Analog
Audio Inputs 1-16
(15-16 on front panel)
Channel
Outputs 1-16
4 Note where the instrument output signal reg-
Effects Devices
Tape Returns
or Inputs 1-2
isters on the on-screen meters in Pro Tools.
5 In the Other Options dialog, adjust the chan-
nel input trim slider to increase or decrease gain
until you are able to achieve maximum signal
level without clipping.
Instruments
Connected to Console
Power Amp
and Speakers
Figure 3. Typical studio configuration with a mixer
Figure 4 illustrates a setup without a mixer,
where effects processors and monitoring gear
are connected directly to the 1622 I/O.
Adjusting Input Sliders in the Other Options dialog
Mic Preamp,
Direct Box, Synth, etc.
Power Amp
and Speakers
6 Repeat as necessary for other instruments/in-
puts.
7 Click Store, then Done.
Analog
Audio
Inputs 1-14
(15-16 on front panel)
Analog
Audio
Outputs 1-2
S/PDIF Digital Input/Output
To DAT Recorder
8 Click OK when you have finished.
Input trim level, output line level, and sample rate settings are stored in non-volatile
memory so that the 1622 I/O will retain
them when used in standalone mode.
36
TDM Installation Guide
DAT Recorder
Figure 4. Typical studio configuration without a mixer
TDM_Install.book Page 37 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
Using the 1622 I/O Interface
as Standalone Audio
Converter
The 1622 I/O can be used apart from Pro Tools
as a standalone 2-channel, 20-bit analog-to-digital, or 24-bit digital-to-analog converter.
Input and output levels are determined by the
settings last saved by clicking the Store button
in the Other Options dialog (choose Setups >
Hardware and click Other Options).
If no input level settings are stored, input
levels default to +4 dBu and output levels
default to –10 dBV.
There are no panning controls in standalone
mode. Odd-numbered channels are hardpanned left and even-numbered channels hardpanned right. Mono instruments will play out
of output L or R, but not both. Stereo instruments will play out of both outputs L and R.
Output gain must be controlled directly from
connected instruments.
Before you use the 1622 I/O in standalone mode:
1 Turn off the 1622 I/O.
To use the 1622 I/O as a standalone A/D
converter:
1 Turn off any digital devices that may send a
word clock signal to the 1622 I/O S/PDIF digital
input.
2 Turn on the 1622 I/O. The 1622 I/O searches
briefly for a word clock signal on channels 1–2
of its digital input ports.
3 If the 1622 I/O does not detect word clock, it
functions as a standalone A/D converter using
its internal clock. In this mode you will use analog inputs 1–16 and the S/PDIF output.
To use the 1622 I/O as a standalone 24-bit D/A
converter:
1 Make sure that a digital device providing a
word clock signal is connected to the S/PDIF input of the 1622 I/O and that the device is powered on.
2 Turn on the 1622 I/O. The 1622 I/O will
search for a valid word clock on its S/PDIF input
port.
3 When a valid word clock lock is recognized,
the 1622 I/O will enter Digital mode and function as a standalone D/A converter using the
S/PDIF input and analog outputs 1–2.
2 Do not turn on your computer while the
1622 I/O is in standalone mode. If you do, the
1622 I/O will stop operating in standalone
mode.
To return the 1622 I/O to Pro Tools-based
operation:
■
Turn on your computer.
– or –
■
If your computer is on, launch Pro Tools.
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37
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Connecting Equipment with
Digital Audio Ins and Outs
Because the 888/24 I/O, 882/20 I/O, 1622 I/O,
and ADAT Bridge I/O feature digital inputs and
outputs, Pro Tools allows you to digitally record
to or from a digital device such as a DAT recorder. The 888/24 I/O and ADAT Bridge I/O
provide both AES/EBU and S/PDIF digital audio
input and output. The 882/20 I/O and 1622 I/O
provide S/PDIF digital audio input and output.
If you plan to use a DAT player, CD recorder, or
other digital input and output device with your
Pro Tools system, be sure the external device
supports either the AES/EBU or S/PDIF format.
Your interface’s AES/EBU inputs and outputs
should only be connected to another AES/EBU
device. Likewise, its S/PDIF inputs and outputs
should only be connected to another S/PDIF device.
To connect your Pro Tools system to a DAT
recorder:
1 Connect the digital output of the audio interface to the digital input of the DAT deck. Audio
channels 1 and 2 will be sent out of these outputs.
2 Connect the digital output of the DAT to the
digital input of the audio interface. The DAT recorder will be routed to Pro Tools inputs 1 and 2.
Connecting Effects Units
The 888/24 I/O, 882/20 I/O, 1622 I/O, and
ADAT Bridge I/O audio interfaces allow you to
connect effects units to your system by using
any analog (or digital) inputs/outputs as Auxiliary Inputs/Outputs for effects sends and returns. Once an effects unit is attached this way,
you can send a variable amount of a track’s output to the effects unit using a send fader in
Pro Tools.
Five separate send controls on each Pro Tools
track allow you to route audio to any of the
available outputs connected to your system or
through any of the 32-internal busses in the
Pro Tools TDM Mixer. Outputs can be returned
to mono or stereo Auxiliary Inputs for automated mixing or processing.
When you are using an effect in this send-type
of configuration, make sure the unit’s internal
mix or balance between direct (unprocessed)
and wet (effected) signal is set so that only the
processed signal is returned to Pro Tools. On
most effect units, a balance setting of 100%
(completely wet) is the appropriate setting.
If you’ve been using an effects unit in an instrument setup, such as a guitar effects rack, you’ll
probably find the balance to be below 50%. If
the unit has separate dry and effect level knobs,
turn dry level control off. If you don’t do this,
the dry, unprocessed signal will be present in an
effect’s output along with the desired processed
sound, and you’ll have trouble accurately controlling the effect balance in your final mix.
Connecting Effects Units Digitally
To use your audio interface’s inputs and outputs
as effects sends & returns to a digital effects device, set your interface to Internal mode (unless
it is already synchronized to an external clock
38
TDM Installation Guide
TDM_Install.book Page 39 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
source such as a DAT deck). You should then set
your digital effects devices to accept an external
digital clock so that they will synchronize themselves to Pro Tools. In the Pro Tools Hardware
Setup dialog, set the input of the channel pair to
which you have connected the digital effects device to Digital, and set the Sync Mode to Internal.
2 Install any MIDI driver software required by
Connecting MIDI Devices
4 Connect the MIDI IN of your MIDI device or
controller to the MIDI OUT of your MIDI interface.
By adding a Macintosh-compatible MIDI interface to your system, you can take advantage of
all the MIDI features of Pro Tools, including recording and editing tracks, syncing to MIDI
Time Code or MIDI beat clock (this requires an
appropriate MIDI interface) and the use of MIDI
Controllers.
For information on configuring a MIDI control surface for use with Pro Tools, see the
Pro Tools MIDI Control Surfaces Guide.
Blue & White Macintosh G3 computers require additional hardware to allow MIDI
connections. Refer to Chapter 1 of this
guide for more information.
To connect MIDI devices to your system:
1 Connect the MIDI interface to your computer
according to the MIDI interface’s documentation.
On 9600, 9500, and Beige G3 Power Macintosh computers, connect the MIDI interface to the modem port. MIDI timing data
output through the modem port is more accurate than that output through the printer
port.
the MIDI interface. (Once you have installed
your MIDI interface hardware and software,
confirm that it is working properly using the
procedure given in the interface’s documentation.)
3 Connect the MIDI OUT of your MIDI device
or controller to the MIDI IN of your MIDI interface.
See Chapter 5, “Installing Pro Tools Software” for information on configuring OMS
(Open Music System) software, which is required for Pro Tools and MIDI.
Connecting SMPTE
Synchronization Devices
If you intend to synchronize Pro Tools to external devices with SMPTE using MIDI Time Code,
your system must be connected properly. This
section provides setup suggestions for synchronizing Pro Tools to audio or video tape. For details on SMPTE and synchronization, see the
Pro Tools Reference Guide.
Pro Tools and Synchronization
Pro Tools supports a type of SMPTE synchronization known as SMPTE Trigger through the use
of SMPTE-to-MIDI Time Code converters. This
type of synchronization allows Pro Tools to
chase and start (or stop) playback and recording
while slaved to other systems. With SMPTE Trigger alone, once playback or recording starts,
there is no further synchronization, and
Pro Tools will play back at a rate determined by
the internal clock of the audio interface or selected external clock source.
Chapter 4: Connecting Your Studio
39
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For fairly short pieces of audio program material, SMPTE Trigger is acceptable, especially if
the sync master has a fairly stable transport or is
resolved to house sync or a black burst generator. In this case, the master transport and
Pro Tools will probably not drift very far apart in
such a short period of time.
Trigger Sync for Audio Post Applications
(recommended for short duration audio regions)
Video Tape Recorder
SMPTE
OR
VITC Video out
The USD allows synchronization of Pro Tools to
Linear Time Code (LTC), external video black
burst, or word clock signal. It supports all major
industry-standard clocks and formats and can
also act as a standalone MIDI Time Code (MTC)
or VITC reader/generator.
In addition, the Universal Slave Driver offers extremely fast lockup, near-sample accurate synchronization, and an exceptionally low-jitter
clock. These features provide professional performance and maximum audio fidelity under a
wide range of synchronization conditions.
LTC and VITC to MIDI Time
Code Convertor
LTC or VITC-locked Sync for music/audio applications
Composite
Video out
with Digidesign’s Universal Slave Driver
(for resolving to LTC or VITC)
MIDI Time
Code out
MIDI Interface
Video Tape Recorder
to computer
OR
SMPTE
IN
L
T
C
BI-PHASE / TACH / GPI
OUT
PC SERIAL
VIDEO REF
MAC SERIAL
I
N
VIDEO
MTC OUT
Composite
Video out
RGB Monitor
Computer
Computer
Monitor
VITC Video out
L
T
C
O
U
T
A
E
S
I
N
A
E
S
O
U
T
85-264VAC, 47-63HZ, 115 W
IN
IN
Digidesign Universal Slave Driver
9-PIN IN / ACC
OUT
OUT
WORD CLOCK
9-PIN OUT
SUPER CLOCK (256X)
serial output
direct to
MIX or d24 card's
DigiSerial port
Synchronization setup using SMPTE Trigger alone
On the other hand, if the audio piece is several
minutes long, or if the sync master has an unstable transport (as in the case of a low quality recording deck striped with SMPTE, for example),
SMPTE Trigger alone is probably not an acceptable solution, since the two systems may drift
apart noticeably over the duration of the source
material.
A better alternative is to use Digidesign’s Universal Slave Driver.
The Digidesign Universal Slave
Driver
The Universal Slave Driver (USD) is a multi-purpose synchronization peripheral that provides
virtually all of the functions and connections
needed to achieve synchronization to a variety
of devices.
40
TDM Installation Guide
RGB Monitor
Computer
Computer
Monitor
Synchronization setup using a USD
TDM_Install.book Page 41 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
chapter 5
Installing Pro Tools Software
The complete Pro Tools software installation
process includes:
To configure the Apple System software for
optimum Pro Tools use:
• Preparing your Apple System software for
Pro Tools
1 In the Memory Control Panel do the follow-
• Installing Pro Tools software
• Set the Disk Cache to a Custom Setting of
512 K.
• Installing OMS
ing:
• Set Virtual Memory to Off.
After software installation is completed, the first
time you launch Pro Tools you will be prompted
to enter your Pro Tools serial number and configure hardware. Instructions for this begin in
“Launching Pro Tools the First Time” on
page 49.
If you haven’t already installed Pro Tools
hardware, do so now. See Chapter 3, “Installing Pro Tools Hardware” for instructions.
Apple System Software
Settings
To ensure optimum performance with
Pro Tools, configure the Apple System software
with the following settings.
• Set the Ram Disk to Off.
2 In the Energy Saver Control Panel, set the “in-
active” time to Never.
3 In the Appearance Control Panel do the fol-
lowing:
• Click the Fonts tab and set the Large System
Font to Chicago. In addition, deselect
“Smooth all fonts on screen.”
• Click the Sound tab and select None from the
Sound Track pop-up menu.
4 If using a Power Macintosh 9500 or 9600, set
the number of colors to 256 in the Monitors &
Sound Control Panel.
5 In the Extensions Manager Control Panel do
the following:
• Choose Mac OS 9.0 Base (or Mac OS 9.1 Base)
from the Selected Set pop-up menu.
• Click Restart to restart your computer.
Chapter 5: Installing Pro Tools Software
41
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Installing Pro Tools Software
To install Pro Tools software:
1 Locate the Pro Tools Installer CD for Macintosh and place it in your CD-ROM drive. Locate
and double-click the file named “Install
Pro Tools.”
2 Select the hard drive on which to install
Pro Tools from the Install Location pop-up
menu. For maximum reliability, install
Pro Tools on your startup drive.
3 Select the appropriate installer for your
Digidesign hardware: Pro Tools 24 MIX & MIXplus, or Pro Tools 24.
4 Several optional items are listed directly below
the main installation choices. To install any of
these items, select them from the list.
Digidesign Control Panel Add this item if you
want to use your Digidesign hardware with
Sound Manager-compatible applications. When
you launch Pro Tools the first time, you will be
prompted to configure your hardware (see
“Configuring Pro Tools TDM Cards and Audio
Interfaces” on page 50).
Procrastinator Add this item if you have a
Pro Tools 24 MIX system and one or more DSP
Farm cards and you want to use the Procrastinator™ extended delay plug-in. This is useful if you
plan to open old sessions that use the Procrastinator Plug-In. (Do not select this item if you
have a Pro Tools 24 system—Procrastinator is
automatically installed for you.)
42
TDM Installation Guide
Dynamics Add this item to install the original
Dynamics Plug-In included with Pro Tools version 4.2 and earlier. This will allow you to open
older Pro Tools sessions that use this plug-in.
EQ Add this item to install the original EQ PlugIn included with Pro Tools version 4.2 and earlier. This will allow you to open older Pro Tools
sessions that use this plug-in.
SampleCell Patcher Add this to your installation
if you own a Digidesign SampleCell card and
want to update the SampleCell Editor software
for use with the latest version of Pro Tools.
Machine Control Users Guide Install this document if you also use Digidesign’s MachineControl option for Pro Tools.
USD Setup Add this to your installation if you
own a Digidesign Universal Slave Driver ™ (USD).
USD Setup lets you update USD firmware and
configure the USD remotely. Pro Tools
MIX/MIXplus and Pro Tools 24 systems need
only install USD Setup if remote access to the
complete set of USD features is required. Refer to
the Universal Slave Driver Guide for details.
OMF Utilities Add this to your installation if you
are an OMF (Open Media Framework) user.
5 After selecting from the above options, click
Install.
TDM_Install.book Page 43 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
6 Select an initial set of Pro Tools Preferences.
8 If you installed Surround Mixer in the previ-
These Preference “sets” have been pre-configured to include some of the more popular settings for post production, audio, and audio with
MIDI. After selecting a setting, click Continue.
ous step, the Installer prompts you to select a
Surround Monitor Format. Select Standard
Pro Tools if your monitoring is configured for
Film Format, or select ProControl for DTS Format, then click Install.
Selecting a Surround Monitor Format
Selecting a Pro Tools Preference
Preference settings can be customized at any
time in Pro Tools. See the Pro Tools Reference
Guide for more information about Preferences.
7 For Pro Tools 24 MIX and MIXplus systems,
you are prompted to install the Surround Mixer
plug-in. This plug-in is required for mixing,
mastering, and monitoring in surround. Select
Yes to install Surround Mixer, or No for stereo,
then click Continue.
9 When installation is complete, click Restart
(to restart your computer), then install OMS.
Installing and Configuring
OMS
To use Pro Tools you must first install and configure the Open Music System (OMS). OMS,
which is included on the Pro Tools Installer CD,
has the following capabilities:
• Keeps track of which MIDI devices you are using, how they are connected, and which
patches they are using
• Enables MIDI hardware to communicate with
your music applications
Installing Surround Mixer
• Provides timing services and inter-application
communication
OMS stores a description of your MIDI studio in
Studio Setup documents, which are edited in the
OMS Setup application. Once OMS is configured,
your music applications know which MIDI devices you are using by referencing the current
Studio Setup document.
Chapter 5: Installing Pro Tools Software
43
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The following sections provide basic instructions for installing and configuring OMS. For
more detailed information, refer to the online
OMS Guide installed with Pro Tools.
2 Select whether your MIDI interface is con-
nected to the Modem or Printer port. If using a
USB or PCI-based MIDI interface, leave both
ports unchecked. Click Search.
Installing OMS
The OMS Installer is located on your Pro Tools
Installer CD.
To install OMS:
1 Insert the Pro Tools Installer CD in your CDROM drive.
2 Open the OMS Installer folder and doubleclick the Installer.
3 At the Install window, select the Easy Install
option, and set the Install Location to your Startup hard drive. Click Install.
4 Follow the on-screen installation instructions.
5 When the installation is complete, restart
your Macintosh.
Configuring a New Studio Setup
Ports for OMS Driver Search
OMS searches for and displays any detected
MIDI interfaces, MIDI cards, and OMS drivers. If
your interface is not detected, click Troubleshoot. Once your interface is detected, you are
prompted to search for MIDI instruments connected to your interface.
3 Click OK to search for MIDI devices connected
to your MIDI interface. To be detected, the device must be turned on and have both of its
MIDI ports connected to your MIDI interface.
(First-Time OMS Users Only)
Before configuring OMS, make sure your MIDI
interfaces and devices are connected according
to the manufacture’s instructions and turned
on.
To configure a New Studio Setup in OMS:
1 Launch the OMS Setup application. If OMS
has not yet been configured, you’ll be prompted
to configure a New Studio Setup. Click OK.
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TDM Installation Guide
OMS Driver Setup
TDM_Install.book Page 45 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
OMS searches for and displays any detected
MIDI devices. Some older instruments, as well as
some newer ones, may not be recognized by the
OMS auto-detection routines.
Undefined OMS device
Devices not recognized by OMS appear with a
red question mark and are named based on the
interface or port to which they are connected.
These devices can be defined as necessary within
the OMS Setup application (see “Defining MIDI
Devices in OMS” on page 45).
4 Click OK to save your Studio Setup document.
Defining MIDI Devices in OMS
To define a MIDI device in OMS Setup:
1 Double-click the device’s icon in the Studio
3 Select the receiving channel for the device. If
receiving multiple channels, select the option
for “Is Multitimbral.”
4 If you will record from the device in Pro Tools,
select the option for “Is Controller.” If the device will be a source or destination for MIDI
Time Code, Beat Clock, or MMC, select the appropriate option.
5 Click Ok.
Disabling SerialDMA in OMS
Pro Tools requires that you deselect the “Use
Apple Serial DMA Driver When Available” option in OMS Setup. If you do not disable this option, problems will occur with MIDI and synchronization functions in Pro Tools.
To disable SerialDMA in OMS:
1 Double-click the OMS Setup application.
Setup window.
2 Choose Edit > Preferences.
2 In the MIDI Device Info dialog, select the
3 Deselect “Use Apple Serial DMA Driver When
Manufacture and Model for the device from the
pop-up menus. If the device is not listed, leave
the Model set to “other” and enter a name for
the device.
Available.” and click OK.
4 Quit OMS Setup
Machine Control and the IAC
Driver
If you are planning to use MIDI Machine Control (MMC) for Pro Tools synchronization with
other MMC-capable devices or applications, you
must rename the OMS IAC Driver and remove
the infinity symbol (“∞”) from its name. If you
do not do this, MMC will not function properly.
Defining a MIDI device
Chapter 5: Installing Pro Tools Software
45
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To edit the IAC driver’s name:
1 Double-click the OMS Setup application.
2 In the Studio Setup window, double-click the
IAC driver.
Studio Setup window with IAC Driver
3 Rename “∞ IAC bus #1” to “MMC” and click
OK.
Renaming the IAC Driver
4 Quit OMS Setup.
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chapter 6
Checking Your TDM System and Launching
Pro Tools
Before you launch Pro Tools, run the DigiTest diagnostics application located in the Digidesign
Utilities folder (see “Running DigiTest” on
page 48). DigiTest finds your cards and confirms
that they are correctly installed and working.
When DigiTest has completed and you have rebooted your computer, launch Pro Tools for the
first time. Pro Tools provides dialogs to validate
your software and configure your TDM cards
and audio interfaces (see “Launching Pro Tools
the First Time” on page 49).
After completing initial configuration, you can
install and play the demo session included on
the Pro Tools Installer CD (see “Installing the
Demo Session” on page 51).
Starting Up Your System
Whenever you start your system, you must turn
on all of your system components in a specific
order.
Start your Pro Tools System in this order:
1 Turn on your external hard drives. Wait ap-
proximately ten seconds for them to come up to
speed.
2 Lower the volume of all output devices, then
turn on your Pro Tools audio interfaces. Wait at
least ten seconds for them to initialize.
3 Turn on your computer. Or, if it is already on,
restart it.
If you haven’t already installed Pro Tools
software, do so now. See Chapter 5, “Installing Pro Tools Software” for instructions.
Chapter 6: Checking Your TDM System and Launching Pro Tools
47
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Running DigiTest
Run the DigiTest diagnostics application to
identify TDM cards and verify that they are correctly installed and working.
DigiTest is included on the Pro Tools Installer CD and installed with Pro Tools.
DigiTest resides in the Digidesign Utilities
folder.
Before you run DigiTest, lower the volume
of all output devices. Very loud digital noise
may be emitted during the test.
To run DigiTest:
1 From the Digidesign Utilities folder, doubleclick the DigiTest application program. DigiTest
opens and lists the supported cards it finds in
your system in their corresponding slot location.
DigiTest for Pro Tools 24 Mix system with SampleCell II
running on Power Macintosh G4
If a supported card is installed and not listed,
check card seating and ribbon connection.
Close DigiTest, power down your system, and
reinstall the cards (see “Installing the Pro Tools
Cards” on page 15). After power up, begin DigiTest again.
2 From the SlotArrangement menu, select your
computer. The number of computer card slots
updates in the main window to reflect your
computer model.
DigiTest for Pro Tools 24 system running on Power
Macintosh 9600
DigiTest Slot Arrangement window (Power Macintosh
G4 Dual Processor)
48
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When you select a computer type, a second window also opens and displays the lowest slot in
your computer.
3 If using an expansion chassis, select it from
the SlotArrangement menu.The number of Expansion Chassis card slots updates in the main
window to reflect your chassis type.
6 If any cards fail, you can review test details by
clicking the Info button for the corresponding
card and slot. Following review, you will need to
close DigiTest, power down your system, and reinstall your cards. Verify proper card seating and
ribbon cable connection. (See “Installing
Pro Tools Hardware” on page 13.)
If a card continues to fail DigiTest, contact
Digidesign.
4 From the DigiTest window, click Run.
DigiTest begins by checking the arrangement of
your cards. If cards are installed in the correct
order, DigiTest will automatically continue with
the next step and check card functionality.
If cards are not installed in the proper order,
DigiTest will stop, inform you that the system is
misconfigured, and display error codes in the
status box of each card identified as being misconfigured.
7 If all the Digidesign cards have Passed, quit
DigiTest and restart the computer before running any Digidesign application.
Launching Pro Tools the First
Time
Validate Pro Tools Software
For descriptions of error codes, refer to
Appendix B, “DigiTest Error Codes.” For test details, click the Info button to the right of the reported error, then click Failures in the pop-up
window and change Failures to Detailed.
When launching Pro Tools the first time, you
are prompted to enter a serial number to validate your software.
To validate Pro Tools software:
See Appendix A, “Determining Slot Order” for
more help in arranging your cards. Additionally,
refer to the Digidesign Web site for compatibility information:
1 Double-click the Pro Tools application in the
Pro Tools folder inside the Digidesign folder.
2 Enter the serial number in the dialog when
prompted, making sure to observe any spaces,
then click Validate.
www.digidesign.com/compato/
Make sure you close DigiTest and power down
your system, before reconfiguring your cards.
5 After checking card arrangement, DigiTest
checks card functionality. The Status box for
each tested card will indicate Passed or Failed.
DigiTest only reports valid test results for
slots which contain Digidesign cards.
Serial number entry for Pro Tools
The serial number is located on the inside cover
of this guide.
If all the Digidesign cards pass, continue to the
next step.
Chapter 6: Checking Your TDM System and Launching Pro Tools
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Configuring Pro Tools TDM Cards
and Audio Interfaces
The first time you run Pro Tools, the Hardware
Setup dialog automatically opens after you validate Pro Tools software. The Hardware Setup dialog prompts you to configure the parameters
for each Pro Tools card and audio interface in
your system.
To configure Pro Tools hardware:
1 If the Hardware Setup dialog isn’t on-screen,
choose Setups > Hardware in Pro Tools.
2 From the Card pop-up, select the Digidesign
card type.
3 From the Interface Port pop-up, select the port
to which your audio interface is connected (port
A or port B).
Choose port A if only one audio interface is connected to the card. If two audio interfaces are
connected to your card, follow the steps below
for each port and interface.
4 From the Interface pop-up, choose the audio
interface connected to the card you selected in
the previous step.
5 From the Sample Rate pop-up, select the de-
sired sample rate for the current card and interface (the sample rate of the demo session is
44100 Hz).
Hardware Setup dialog
If Pro Tools was previously configured, you can
reconfigure hardware by opening Pro Tools and
choosing Setups > Hardware.
If you have a system with multiple TDM cards
and audio interfaces, you must configure each
by selecting the appropriate items from the popup menus in this dialog.
You must select the card, identify the interface
connected to it, then set the parameters for that
interface—repeating this for each card and interface in your system.
Some parameters explained below do not
apply to all Pro Tools configurations.
50
TDM Installation Guide
6 From the Sync Mode pop-up, select the appro-
priate sync mode on the currently selected interface (Internal or Digital). In most cases you will
use Internal. Digital is used primarily for inputting data from DAT or other digital sources.
7 From the Digital Format pop-up, select the desired digital format of Channels 1–2 of the currently selected interface (AES/EBU or S/PDIF).
8 From the Ch 1–2 Input pop-up, select the in-
put format of Channels 1–2 of the currently selected interface (Analog or Digital).
TDM_Install.book Page 51 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
9 From the H/W Buffer pop-up, select the audio
buffer size, in samples, for host processing tasks
such as Real-Time AudioSuite (RTAS) plug-in
processing.
Select a minimum of 128 samples. Select larger
buffer sizes for slower computers; for a Power
Macintosh 9600 or a beige G3, the Hardware
Buffer size can be set as high as 1024 samples.
◆ Enabling or disabling DAC Muting (mutes the
888/24 I/O digital-to-analog convertors when
its output level falls below a certain threshold,
to reduce noise)
◆ Setting the input and output levels of a
1622 I/O
13 Configure the Other Options parameters as
desired and click Done.
10 From the CPU Usage Limit pop-up, select the
14 Click OK to close the Hardware Setup dialog.
maximum percentage of CPU resources to allocate to host processing tasks.
15 Choose File > Quit to close Pro Tools.
Select a minimum percentage of 65%. Select
higher CPU usage percentages for slower computers; for a Power Macintosh 9600 or a beige
G3, CPU usage percentage can be set as high as
85%.
11 Click Recalibrate Inputs to recalibrate the analog-to-digital convertors of the audio interface
and remove any DC offset that may have built
up in them. (For an explanation of DC offset, see
the DigiRack Plug-Ins Guide.)
Installing the Demo Session
Next you will install the demo session included
on the Pro Tools Installer CD.
To install the demo session:
1 Insert the Pro Tools Installer CD in your CD-
ROM drive.
2 Double-click the file “Install Pro Tools Demo
12 Click Other Options for additional configu-
Session.”
ration options specific to the audio interface.
These include:
3 Select “Pro Tools SoundCheck.” This is the
Setting the input format (analog or digital) of
each pair of input channels on an 888/24 I/O
◆
Configuring the level sensitivity and peak
hold settings for the output level meters on the
front panel of the 888/24 I/O
◆
Selecting S/PDIF compatibility with Tascam
DA30 DAT recorders
◆
session used for testing your system. The other
demo sessions demonstrate more capabilities of
Pro Tools. Since they are not used for testing
purposes, installation is optional.
4 Choose a drive on which to install the demo
session.
5 Click Install. When installation is complete,
click OK to return to the Finder.
To record to or from a Tascam® DA30
DAT recorder, you must set S/PDIF compatibility to “Tascam.” To record to or from a
non-Tascam DA30 DAT recorder, set
S/PDIF compatibility to “Other.”
Chapter 6: Checking Your TDM System and Launching Pro Tools
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Opening the Demo Session
Now you will open the demo session and begin
playback to hear Pro Tools in action.
To open the demo session:
1 Locate and open the demo session folder.
2 Double-click the file, “Pro Tools SoundCheck.”
3 If this is the first time you are launching
Pro Tools, a dialog appears prompting you to
use the Hardware dialog to configure your system. Click OK. (See “Configuring Pro Tools TDM
Cards and Audio Interfaces” on page 50.)
To play the demo session:
1 Adjust the volume control on your monitoring system so that it is set relatively low. You can
adjust levels as the demo begins to play.
2 Press the Spacebar on your keyboard to begin
playback. To stop playback, press the Spacebar
again.
Welcome to Pro Tools!
If you weren’t able to play the demo session,
see the Pro Tools Reference Guide for troubleshooting tips.
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chapter 7
Calibrating the 888/24 I/O
Before you use the 888/24/I/O Audio Interface,
you may want to calibrate its input and output
levels to the level of your mixing console.
The 888/24 I/O is factory-calibrated so that its
input operating level is set to +4 dB nominal
with 18 dB headroom nominal at full code,
unity gain, making calibration unnecessary for
most professional applications.
If you do need to recalibrate your interface or
other components of your studio, you can use
the alignment procedure described in this chapter.
About Calibration
Calibrating levels on a digital recording device is
different from calibrating levels on an analog recording device. Unlike analog devices, most digital devices do not have a standard “0 VU” level
setting that corresponds to nominal input and
output levels. Instead, with an interface such as
the 888/24 I/O, the meters are calibrated in decibels below peak (digital clipping) level.
Headroom
The concept of headroom is slightly different for
analog and digital devices.
Analog Most analog devices allow for a certain
amount of headroom above 0 VU. If you send a
signal above 0 VU to an analog recorder, you
still have a margin of headroom, and if tape saturation occurs, it does so fairly gracefully, giving
the audio a compressed sound that some find
desirable.
Digital Digital devices, on the other hand, do
not allow for signals that exceed the dynamic
range of the input. When a signal exceeds the
maximum input level for a digital device, clipping occurs, causing digital distortion, which is
harsh and usually undesirable.
The AES Standard for Headroom
The AES (Audio Engineering Society) standard
for headroom is currently –18 dB for nominal
level in a digital audio system. The exact value
you use will be determined by the amount of
headroom available in the rest of your system.
For example, if your mixing console has 15 dB
of headroom above nominal level, then you
may want to calibrate the 888/24 I/O to have
15 dB of headroom.
Chapter 7: Calibrating the 888/24 I/O
53
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The Calibration Process
Analog To calibrate the input level of an analog
device to a mixing console’s output level, you
would typically send a 1 kHz tone at 0 VU from
the console to the analog deck and align the recording deck’s meters to read 0 VU.
Digital With a digital recording device such as
the 888/24 I/O, in order to allow for headroom,
you must align a 0 VU tone from the console to
a value less than zero on the 888/24 I/O, by exactly the amount of headroom that you want.
For example, to have 12 dB of headroom above
0 VU with the 888/24 I/O, you must align the
incoming 0 VU 1kHz tone to a level of –12 dB.
For 18 dB of headroom, you would align it to
–18 dB. (Since it is assumed that you are using
the 888/24 I/O with a +4 dBu console, a 0 VU
signal level coming out of the console is actually
equivalent to a nominal +4 dBu level signal.)
To calibrate the 888/24 I/0:
1 Launch Pro Tools by opening the Digidesign
folder, then the Pro Tools folder, and doubleclicking Pro Tools.
2 In Pro Tools, create a new session by choosing
File > New Session.
3 Choose Setups > Preferences and click Opera-
tions.
4 Enter the desired Calibration Reference Level
value in dB. A level of –18 dB is typical. (It isn’t
necessary to type a minus sign here.)
5 Click Done.
6 Create a new mono audio track by choosing
File > New Track.
7 Insert the Signal Generator TDM plug-in on
the track.
8 Set Signal Generator’s output level. This
should be the same value you entered as the Calibration Reference Level.
Calibrating The 888/24 I/O
9 Set Signal Generator’s frequency to 1000 Hz.
To calibrate the 888/24 I/O you will put
Pro Tools in a special operating mode called Calibration mode, then use the Signal Generator
plug-in to generate a test tone for alignment.
10 Set Signal Generator’s signal waveform to
Sine.
11 Route the track’s output to Bus 1.
12 Create a mono Auxiliary Input track for each
The Pro Tools Installer includes several pre-configured calibration session templates that cover
most common calibration setups. You can use
these in addition to the calibration procedure
given below.
Turn down your monitoring system before
beginning calibration! The Signal Generator plug-in emits a continuous signal when
inserted on a track.
54
TDM Installation Guide
888/24 I/O output you want to calibrate. Set the
output assignment for each of these Auxiliary
Inputs to its respective 888/24 I/O output.
13 Set the input of each Auxiliary Input track to
Bus 1.
TDM_Install.book Page 55 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
14 Create an additional mono Auxiliary Input
track for each 888/24 I/O input you want to calibrate. Set the input assignment for each of
these Auxiliary Inputs to its respective
888/24 I/O input. Then set the output of each of
these Auxiliary Inputs to an unused bus pair (for
example Bus 31–32) so that feedback doesn’t occur when monitoring main outputs 1–2.
15 Connect an external VU meter to each of the
888/24 I/O outputs in turn. (One at a time as
you calibrate.)
16 Set all Pro Tools track faders to their default
of 0 dB by Shift-Option-clicking each fader in
the session.
17 Adjust the 888/24 I/O output level trim pots
with a Phillips screwdriver to align the outputs
to read “0 VU” on the external VU meter.
18 Connect each output of the 888/24 I/O directly to its input. Connect channel 1 output to
channel 1 input, and so on for each channel.
19 In Pro Tools, select Operations > Calibration
Mode.
The names of all uncalibrated tracks begin to
flash. In addition, the track volume indicator of
each Auxiliary Input track receiving an external
input signal now displays the reference level
coming from the calibrated output.
20 Adjust the 888/24 I/O input level trim pots
with a Phillips screwdriver to align the inputs to
match the reference level. When the level is
properly matched, the track name will stop
flashing.
The Automatch indicator arrows on each track
show the direction of adjustment required for
alignment:
◆ When the incoming level is higher than the
reference level, the down arrow will appear lit
(blue). In this case, trim the 888/24 I/O input
level down.
◆ When the incoming level is lower than the
reference level the up arrow will appear lit (red).
In this case, trim the 888/24 I/O input level up.
When you have properly aligned the incoming
peak signal levels to match the calibration reference level, both Automatch indicator arrows
will light: the up arrow red and the down arrow
blue.
21 When you have finished, deselect Operations > Calibration Mode.
Calibrating a System with Both
888/24 I/O and 882/20 I/O Audio
Interfaces
The 888/24 I/O is factory preset with 18 dB of
headroom in its +4 dB line level operating
mode. The 882/20 I/O, however, is fixed at
14 dB of headroom and its inputs are not adjustable.
When setting up an 882/20 I/O (particularly in
systems using a combination of the 882/20 I/O
and 888/24 I/O), make sure that you use a headroom setting of –14 dB for your system. This
helps ensure that recorded audio files have the
same relative levels regardless of which interface
they are recorded with.
Chapter 7: Calibrating the 888/24 I/O
55
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appendix a
Determining Slot Order
In order to determine slot order for your TDM
cards, you need to first note the model of your
Power Macintosh, then find its lowest numeric
slot.
The following figures show the lowest slot for
Power Macintosh computers supported by
Pro Tools.
For systems without an Expansion Chassis,
the primary d24 or MIX Core card will always be installed in your computer’s lowest
slot. Subsequent cards will be installed as
described in “Card Order Guidelines for
Each Pro Tools System” on page 58.
G4
For systems using an expansion chassis to
add additional cards to your system, refer to
the Pro Tools Expanded Systems Guide.
G3 Blue & White
G4 Dual Processor
Appendix A: Determining Slot Order
57
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Card Order Guidelines for
Each Pro Tools System
The following are card installation guidelines
for each Pro Tools TDM system. Install your
cards in the following order, starting with the
lowest numeric slot.
The guidelines below may include optional
cards not present in your system.
G3 Beige Minitower
Card order for Pro Tools 24 MIX and MIXplus:
1 MIX Core cards
2 MIX Farm cards
3 MIX I/O cards
4 SampleCell II TDM cards
5 SCSI host bus adapter (HBA)
6 Video capture cards
7 Display card for your computer monitor
G3 Beige Desktop
Card order for Pro Tools 24:
1 Pro Tools d24 audio cards
2 DSP Farm cards
3 SampleCell II TDM cards
4 SCSI host bus adapter (HBA)
5 Video capture cards
6 Display card for your computer monitor
9600 or 9500
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Card order for mixed systems:
1 MIX Core card
2 MIX Farm card
3 d24 audio cards
4 DSP Farm cards
5 MIX I/O cards
6 SampleCell II TDM cards
7 SCSI host bus adapter (HBA)
8 Video capture cards
When configuring a Pro Tools system with a
Power Macintosh 9500 0r 9600 (without an expansion chassis), make sure to install Pro tools
Core cards on a separate PCI bridge from other
bus master cards.
When using an expansion chassis with a 9500 or
9600, install the chassis host card on a separate
bridge from other bus master cards (such as SCSI
HBAs and video capture cards).
Consult the manufacturer of your third-party
PCI cards to determine if they operate as bus
masters.
9 Display card for your computer monitor
Systems Using an Expansion Chassis
Additional Rules for Card
Placement
PCI Slots, Bus Masters, and Bridges (Power
Macintosh 9500 and 9600 computers)
If you are using an expansion chassis, refer to
the Pro Tools Expanded Systems Guide included
with your Pro Tools system for instructions on
connecting an expansion chassis to your computer.
The Power Macintosh 9500 and 9600 have six
PCI slots. These slots are grouped in banks of
three, with each being controlled by a PCI Bridge
Chip. The first three slots are in one group and
the next three slots are in another.
A bus master card is a PCI card that controls the
data transfer to and from the Bridge Chip that
controls its group. The Digidesign MIX Core and
d24 cards are bus masters.
Other cards that act as bus master include:
• Expansion chassis host cards
• SCSI host bus adapters (HBA)
• Most video capture cards (including AVoption
and AVoption XL)
Appendix A: Determining Slot Order
59
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TDM_Install.book Page 61 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
appendix b
DigiTest Error Codes
DigiTest Error Codes
Code
Description
Err3
Cards from different Pro Tools
systems are incorrectly mixed.
See “Card Order Guidelines for
Each Pro Tools System” on
page 58.
Err4
Err5
Err6
Err1010
Err1011
Cards marked with this error are
installed in the wrong order. See
“Card Order Guidelines for Each
Pro Tools System” on page 58.
Too many cards of this type are
installed in the system. Refer to
the Digidesign Web site for compatibility information:
www.digidesign.com/compato/
A card is installed in a reserve
slot. For example, a Digidesign
card is installed in the slot
reserved for the Expansion Chassis Host Interface card. Refer to
“Card Order Guidelines for Each
Pro Tools System” on page 58, as
well as related installation guides.
Too many MIX Core cards
installed. The maximum number
of MIX Core cards allowed is 7.
Too many MIX Farm cards
installed. The maximum number
of MIX Farm cards allowed is 7.
DigiTest Error Codes
Code
Description
Err1012
Too many total MIX cards
installed. The maximum number
of total MIX cards allowed is 7.
Err1020
Too many d24 Core cards
installed. The maximum number
of d24 Core cards allowed is 2.
Err1021
Too many MIX I/O cards installed.
The maximum number of MIX I/O
cards allowed is 2.
Err1022
Too many total d24 cards
installed. The maximum number
of total d24 cards allowed is 2.
Err1220
SCSI Accelerator card is installed
in the wrong slot. See “Card Order
Guidelines for Each Pro Tools System” on page 58 for correct location of the card.
Err1221
Expansion Chassis Host Interface
card is installed in the wrong slot.
See “Card Order Guidelines for
Each Pro Tools System” on
page 58 for correct location of the
card.
Err1301
A Core card is not installed. At
least one Cord card is needed.
Err1310
A DSP Farm card is not installed.
At least one DSP Farm card is
needed.
Appendix B: DigiTest Error Codes
61
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index
Numerics
A
1-2 Format of 888/24 I/O 20
1622 I/O Audio Interface 16
as standalone converter 37
back panel 34
connecting to studio 35
connections & levels 2
front panel 32
input meters 33
output meters 33
16-channel peripheral cable adapter 16
44.1 kHz sample rate
of 1622 I/O 33
of 882/20 I/O 28
of 888/24 I/O 21
48 kHz sample rate
of 1622 I/O 33
of 882/20 I/O 28
of 888/24 I/O 21
50-pin Interface connector
of 882/20 I/O 30
of 888/24 I/O 22
60-pin Interface connector of 1622 I/O 35
882/20 I/O Audio Interface 16, 27
+4dBu mode 25, 30
-10dBV mode 30
as standalone converter 31
back panel 28
connecting to studio 30
connections & levels 2
front panel 27
888/24 I/O Audio Interface 16
as standalone converter 26
back panel 22
calibrating 53
changing operating levels 23
connecting to studio 19
connections & levels 2
front panel 19
ADAT Bridge I/O 16
connections & levels 2
AES/EBU
configuring 50
of 888/24 I/O 22
analog audio inputs
of 1622 I/O 34
of 882/20 I/O 28
of 888/24 I/O 22
analog audio outputs
of 1622 I/O 34
of 882/20 I/O 29
of 888/24 I/O 22
Audio Interface 19, 50
cable 16
configuring 50
connecting to MIX 24 systems 16
primary 15, 16
requirements 2
B
backing up data 10
C
cable length of SCSI drives 6
calibrating the 888/24 I/O 21, 54
Calibration Mode of 888/24 I/O 21
card order 57, 58
additional rules 59
Pro Tools 24 58, 59
Pro Tools 24 MIX 58
Pro Tools 24 MIX Plus 58
Ch 1-2 Input
of 1622 I/O 33
of 882/20 I/O 28
clipping 53
Index
63
TDM_Install.book Page 64 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
clock master 15, 16
compatibility information for Pro Tools 2
computer requirements 2
configuring Expanded Pro Tools systems 47
connecting
digital recorders 38
effects units 38
external SCSI drive 7
SMPTE synchronization devices 39
studio 19
CPU requirements 2
D
d24 card 14
DAC Muting option
Hardware Setup dialog 51
DAT recorder 51
connecting to Pro Tools 38
DC offset 51
Demo Session 47
installing 51
playing 52
Digidesign Control Panel install option 42
DigiSerial port 13, 14
digital distortion 53
Digital Sync mode of 888/24 I/O 20
DigiTest 48
DSP Farm 14
Dynamics install option 42
G3 computer requirements 3
H
hard drives
optimizing 10
requirements 3
Hardware Setup dialog
configuring Pro Tools with 52
DAC Muting option 51
headroom 53
HFS Drives, formatting 11
high-level formatting 9, 10
I
IAC Driver 45
Infinity symbol
removing from IAC Bus name 45
input gain levels of 1622 I/O
setting 35
Input level trims of 888/24 I/O 21
Input meters of 1622 I/O 33
Installer CD 42
installing
Demo Session 51
Pro Tools cards 15
Pro Tools software 42
Surround Mixer 43
Internal Sync mode of 888/24 I/O 20
E
L
effects units, connecting to Pro Tools 38
EQ install option 42
expanded Pro Tools Systems, configuring 13
Expansion Chassis 13, 57
using with Pro Tools 59
level meters for 888/24 I/O 21
low-level formatting 8
F
formatting hard drives
high-level 8
low-level 8
fragmentation 9
64
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TDM Installation Guide
M
Macintosh hard drives, using 10
Macintosh sessions, playing 10
MacOpener 10
MIDI
connections 39
machine control 45
requirements 3
MIX Core card 13
MIX Farm card 13
TDM_Install.book Page 65 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
N
S
Norton Utilities 9
S/PDIF 50
S/PDIF digital input/output
of 1622 I/O 35
of 882/20 I/O 29
of 888/24 I/O 23
SampleCell Patcher install option 42
Sampling rates
of 1622 I/O 33
of 882/20 I/O 28
of 888/24 I/O 20
SCSI
cable length 6
requirements 5
termination 7
seek times of hard drives 9
setting input gain level of 1622 I/O 35
setting output gain levels of 1622 I/O 35
signal connections
to 1622 I/O 35
to 888/24 I/O 25
Signal Generator plug-in with 888/24 I/O 21
Signal Present LEDs of 882/20 I/O 28
signal-to-noise performance of 1622 I/O 35
Slave Clock In/Out
of 1622 I/O 34
of 882/20 I/O 29
of 888/24 I/O 23
Slave LED
of 1622 I/O 33
of 882/20 I/O 27
Slave Sync mode of 888/24 I/O 20
slot order on Macintosh computers 57
Standalone mode
1622 I/O Audio Interface 37
882/20 I/O Audio Interface 31
888/24 I/O Audio Interface 26
starting up your system 47
studio configuration
of 1622 I/O with mixer connections 36
of 1622 I/O without a mixer 36
of 882/20 I/O with mixer connections 30
of 882/20 I/O without a mixer 31
of 888/24 I/O with a mixer 25
without a mixer 31
O
OMF Utilities install option 42
OMS 43
configuring a new studio setup 44
IAC Driver 45
installing 44
operating levels
changing on 888/24 I/O 23
optimizing hard drives 10
Other Options dialog 51
output gain levels of 1622 I/O 36
Output level trims of 888/24 I/O 21
Output meters of 1622 I/O 33
P
partitioning hard drives 9
Power Input
of 1622 I/O 35
of 882/20 I/O 30
of 888/24 I/O 23
Power switch
of 1622 I/O 32
of 888/24 I/O 19
Preferences 43
Pro Tools
installing software 42
Pro Tools 24
capabilities 1
core system 1
installing system hardware 14
Pro Tools 24 MIX
capabilities 1
installing system hardware 13
Pro Tools 24 MIX Plus
capabilities 1
Pro Tools SoundCheck session 51
Procrastinator install option 42
R
recalibrate Inputs button 51
Index
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TDM_Install.book Page 66 Saturday, January 13, 2001 9:35 PM
studio setup
with 1622 I/O 36
with 882/20 I/O 30
with 888/24 I/O 25
Super Clock signal of 888/24 I/O 23
Surround Mixer plug-in, installing 43
Sync Mode LEDs
of 1622 I/O 32
of 882/20 I/O 27
of 888/24 I/O 19
system requirements 2
system startup 47
T
Tascam DA30 DAT recorder 51
TDM Ribbon cable 14
termination of SCSI drives 7
U
Universal Slave Driver 40
USD Setup install option 42
User Tools install option 42
V
validating Pro Tools software 49
W
wiring scheme for 888/24 I/O 25
66
TDM Installation Guide
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