User's guide
USER’S
GUIDE
MegaRAID®
Configuration Software
March 2006
Version 2.0
®
DB15-000269-01
This document contains proprietary information of LSI Logic Corporation. The
information contained herein is not to be used by or disclosed to third parties
without the express written permission of an officer of LSI Logic Corporation.
LSI Logic products are not intended for use in life-support appliances, devices,
or systems. Use of any LSI Logic product in such applications without written
consent of the appropriate LSI Logic officer is prohibited.
Purchase of I2C components of LSI Logic Corporation, or one of its sublicensed
Associated Companies, conveys a license under the Philips I2C Patent Rights to
use these components in an I2C system, provided that the system conforms to
the I2C standard Specification as defined by Philips.
Document DB15-000269-01, Second Edition (March 2006)
This document describes LSI Logic Corporation’s MegaRAID software tools and
utilities. This document will remain the official reference source for all
revisions/releases of these products until rescinded by an update.
LSI Logic Corporation reserves the right to make changes to any products herein
at any time without notice. LSI Logic does not assume any responsibility or
liability arising out of the application or use of any product described herein,
except as expressly agreed to in writing by LSI Logic; nor does the purchase or
use of a product from LSI Logic convey a license under any patent rights,
copyrights, trademark rights, or any other of the intellectual property rights of
LSI Logic or third parties.
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
TRADEMARK ACKNOWLEDGMENT
LSI Logic, the LSI Logic logo design, FlexRAID, MegaRAID, MegaRAID
Configuration Utility, MegaRAID Manager, and Power Console Plus are
trademarks or registered trademarks of LSI Logic Corporation. Intel and Pentium
are registered trademarks of Intel Corporation. Linux is a registered trademark of
Linus Torvalds. Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows, and Windows NT are registered
trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. NetWare, Novell, and SUSE are trademarks
or registered trademarks of Novell, Inc. PCI-X is a registered trademark of PCI
SIG. Red Hat is a registered trademark of Red Hat Software, Inc. All other brand
and product names may be trademarks of their respective companies.
CD
To receive product literature, visit us at http://www.lsilogic.com.
For a current list of our distributors, sales offices, and design resource
centers, view our web page located at
http://www.lsilogic.com/contacts/index.html
ii
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Preface
This book is the primary reference and user’s guide for the MegaRAID®
software tools and utilities. These include the MegaRAID BIOS
Configuration Utility (CU), WebBIOS CU, MegaRAID Manager™, and
Power Console Plus™, which enable configuration and management of
RAID systems using the MegaRAID controllers.
Audience
This document assumes that you have familiarity with storage systems,
and are knowledgeable about PCI, SCSI, and Serial ATA interfaces. It
also assumes that you are familiar with computer systems and know how
to use the keyboard, mouse, clipboard functions, toolbars, and drop
down menus.
The people who benefit from this book are:
•
Users who want to configure, monitor, or manage RAID systems that
use MegaRAID controllers
•
Engineers and managers who are evaluating MegaRAID controllers
for use in a system
•
Engineers who are designing MegaRAID controllers into a system
Organization
This document has the following chapters and appendix:
•
Chapter 1, Overview, introduces the MegaRAID software tools and
utilities, and provides operating system information.
•
Chapter 2, Introduction to RAID, describes the components,
functions and benefits of RAID, along with RAID levels, configuration
strategies, and configuration planning.
MegaRAID Configuration Software User’s Guide
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
iii
•
Chapter 3, BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager,
describes the MegaRAID BIOS CU.
•
Chapter 4, WebBIOS Configuration Utility, describes the
WebBIOS CU.
•
Chapter 5, Start the Power Console Plus Utility, describes the
Power Console Plus tool.
•
Chapter 6, Virtual Sizing and Online Capacity Expansion,
describes the FlexRAID Virtual Sizing feature and capacity
expansion under Linux.
•
Appendix A, MegaRAID Service Monitor, describes the messages
used by the MegaRAID Service Monitor.
MegaRAID System Installation Sequences and Document Organization
The following table outlines the installation, configuration, and
management sequences for a MegaRAID Serial ATA system. Each
sequence consists of a series of steps and operations that the reference
manual explains. LSI Logic recommends performing the sequences in
the order listed when you install and configure your Serial ATA system.
Sequence Task
Reference Manual
1
Understand RAID system theory and operation.
MegaRAID Configuration
Software User’s Guide
2
Install the MegaRAID Serial ATA (SATA) or SCSI storage
adapter and the related hardware.
MegaRAID 320 Storage
Adapters User’s Guide,
MegaRAID SATA150 PCI to
Serial ATA Storage Adapters
User’s Guide, and MegaRAID
SATA 300 Storage Adapters
User’s Guide
3
Configure the physical arrays and logical devices using
either the MegaRAID Configuration Utility™ (CU) or the
WebBIOS CU.
MegaRAID Configuration
Software User’s Guide
4
Install the MegaRAID device drivers.
MegaRAID Device Driver
Installation User’s Guide
5
Manage, monitor, and reconfigure the RAID array using
MegaRAID Configuration
either the MegaRAID Manager tool or the Power Console Software User’s Guide
Plus tool. Each tool runs under an operating system and
can manage the RAID array while the system is operating.
iv
Preface
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Related Publications
MegaRAID SATA150 PCI to Serial ATA Storage Adapters User’s Guide
Document Number: DB15-000272-04
This document explains how to install your MegaRAID SATA 150 storage
adapter in the host system. It provides the electrical and physical
specifications, jumper definitions, and connector locations for the
storage adapter.
MegaRAID SATA 300 Storage Adapters User’s Guide
Document Number: DB15-000311-02
This document explains how to install your MegaRAID SATA 300 storage
adapter in the host system. It provides the electrical and physical
specifications, jumper definitions, and connector locations for the
storage adapter.
MegaRAID 320 Storage Adapters User’s Guide
Document Number: DB15-000260-06
This document explains how to install your MegaRAID 320 storage
adapter in the host system. It provides the electrical and physical
specifications, jumper definitions, and connector locations for the
storage adapter.
MegaRAID Device Driver Installation User’s Guide
Document Number: DB11-000018-02
This document explains how to install the MegaRAID device driver for
your operating system. The information in this document is independent
of the back-end bus and applies to both MegaRAID SCSI storage
adapters and Serial ATA storage adapters.
Preface
Version 2.0
v
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Conventions
Throughout the manual, the following conventions are used to describe
user interaction with the product.
Notation
Meaning and Use
Examples
→
Used to indicate a series of Start → Programs
selections in a GUI.
all caps,
plus sign
Key presses are in all caps, ENTER, ALT+CTRL+DEL, TAB
with a plus sign (+) between
key presses in a sequence
courier
typeface
.nwk file
Names of commands, directories, file names, and
on-screen text are shown in courier typeface.
bold typeface fd1sp
In a command line, keywords are shown in bold, nonitalic
typeface. Enter them exactly as shown.
italics
module
In command lines and names, italics indicate user
variables. Italicized text must be replaced with appropriate
user-specified items. Enter items of the type called for,
using lowercase.
Initial Capital letters
Undo
Edit
Apply
Names of menu commands, options, check buttons, text
buttons, options buttons, text boxes, list boxes, etc., are
shown in text with Initial Capital lettering to avoid
misreading. These elements may appear on your screen
in all lowercase.
brackets
[version]
You may, but need not, select one item enclosed within
brackets. Do not enter the brackets.
vi
Preface
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Revision History
Document Number
Version/Date
Description
DB15-000269-01
Version 2.0
February 2006
Added the introduction to RAID chapter. Revised
supported operating systems, spanning, and menu
options, and added port multiplier information in the BIOS
Configuration Utility. Revised information about virtual
sizing. Revised the WebBIOS Adapter Properties Menu
and the Configuration Wizard procedure.
DB15-000269-00
Version 1.0
February 2003
Initial release of document.
Technical Support
LSI provides technical support only for LSI products purchased directly
from LSI or from an LSI-authorized reseller.
If you purchased the MegaRAID controller from LSI or from a certified
LSI reseller, call LSI technical support at [email protected],
1-800-633-4545 #3, or 1-678-728-1250. Please be prepared to specify
the 10-digit number preceded by the letter “E”.
In Europe, you can contact LSI Technical Support at
[email protected] or +44.1344.413.441 (English).
If the MegaRAID controller was installed as part of a system
manufactured by a company other than LSI, or if you purchased an LSI
product from an unauthorized reseller, call the technical support
department of the computer manufacturer or the unauthorized reseller.
LSI does not provide direct technical support in these cases.
To download drivers or documentation, go to the LSI web site at:
http://www.lsilogic.com/downloads/selectDownload.do.
Preface
Version 2.0
vii
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
viii
Preface
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Contents
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Overview
1.1
MegaRAID Tool Description
1.1.1
MegaRAID BIOS Configuration Utility (Ctrl+M)
1.1.2
MegaRAID Manager Configuration Utility
1.1.3
WebBIOS Configuration Utility (CTRL+H)
1.1.4
Power Console Plus Configuration Utility
1.2
Operating System Support
1-1
1-2
1-2
1-2
1-2
1-3
Introduction to RAID
2.1
RAID Description
2.2
RAID Benefits
2.3
RAID Functions
2.4
RAID Components and Features
2.4.1
Physical Array
2.4.2
Logical Drive
2.4.3
RAID Array
2.4.4
Fault Tolerance
2.4.5
Consistency Check
2.4.6
Background Initialization
2.4.7
Patrol Read
2.4.8
Disk Striping
2.4.9
Disk Mirroring
2.4.10 Parity
2.4.11 Disk Spanning
2.4.12 Hot Spares
2.4.13 Disk Rebuilds
2.4.14 SCSI Physical Drive States
2.4.15 Logical Drive States
2.4.16 Enclosure Management
2-1
2-2
2-2
2-3
2-3
2-3
2-3
2-3
2-4
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-7
2-7
2-8
2-9
2-11
2-12
2-13
2-13
MegaRAID Configuration Software User’s Guide
ix
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2.5
Levels
Summary of RAID Levels
Selecting a RAID Level
Configuration Strategies
Maximizing Fault Tolerance
Maximizing Performance
Maximizing Storage Capacity
Availability
Spare Drives
Rebuilding
Configuration Planning
Number of Physical Disk Drives
Array Purpose
2-13
2-13
2-14
2-19
2-19
2-21
2-22
2-23
2-23
2-23
2-24
2-24
2-25
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
3.1
Quick Configuration Steps for the BIOS
Configuration Utility
3.2
Quick Configuration Steps for MegaRAID Manager
3.3
Configuration Utility Menu
3.3.1
Configure Menu
3.3.2
Initialize Option
3.3.3
Objects Menu
3.3.4
Clear Option
3.3.5
Rebuild Option
3.3.6
Check Consistency Option
3.3.7
Reconstruct Option
3.3.8
Select Adapter Menu
3.4
Detailed Configuration Instructions
3.4.1
Starting the MegaRAID Configuration Utility
3.4.2
Resolving a Configuration Mismatch
3.4.3
Starting MegaRAID Manager
3.4.4
Configuring Arrays and Logical Drives
3.4.5
Selecting a Configuration Method
3.4.6
Designating Drives as Hot Spares
3.4.7
Creating Physical Arrays and Logical Drives
3.4.8
Initializing Logical Drives
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
3-6
3-6
3-14
3-14
3-15
3-15
3-15
3-16
3-16
3-16
3-17
3-18
3-18
3-18
3-19
3-26
2.6
2.7
2.8
Chapter 3
x
RAID
2.5.1
2.5.2
RAID
2.6.1
2.6.2
2.6.3
RAID
2.7.1
2.7.2
RAID
2.8.1
2.8.2
Contents
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
3.10
3.11
3.12
3.13
3.14
Chapter 4
Deleting Logical Drives
Performing Drive Roaming
Performing Drive Migration
Rebuilding Failed Disks
3.8.1
Rebuild Types
3.8.2
Manual Rebuild – Rebuilding an Individual Drive
3.8.3
Manual Rebuild – Rebuilding in Batch Mode
FlexRAID Virtual Sizing
Checking Data Consistency
Reconstructing Logical Drives
Replacing a Failed Controller Containing Data
in the TBBU
Using a Preloaded System Drive
Exiting MegaRAID Configuration Utility
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
4.1
General Description
4.2
Quick Configuration Steps
4.3
Starting the WebBIOS Configuration Utility
on the Host Computer
4.4
Screen and Option Descriptions
4.4.1
WebBIOS Toolbar Options
4.4.2
Main Screen
4.4.3
Adapter Properties Screen
4.4.4
Scan Devices Option
4.4.5
SCSI Channel Properties
4.4.6
Logical Drive Screen
4.4.7
Physical Drive Screen
4.4.8
Configuration Mismatch Screen
4.4.9
Configuration Wizard Option
4.4.10 Adapter Selection Option
4.4.11 Physical View/Logical View Option
4.4.12 Exit
4.5
Configuring RAID Arrays and Logical Drives
Contents
Version 2.0
3-27
3-27
3-29
3-30
3-30
3-31
3-31
3-32
3-32
3-33
3-34
3-35
3-36
4-1
4-2
4-2
4-4
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-9
4-9
4-9
4-12
4-13
4-14
4-14
4-14
4-14
4-14
xi
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
xii
Start the Power Console Plus Utility
5.1
Quick Configuration Steps
5.2
Power Console Plus Overview
5.2.1
Power Console Plus Components
5.2.2
Features
5.2.3
Client System Requirements
5.2.4
MegaService Monitor
5.3
Installing the Power Console Plus Utility
5.3.1
Windows Installations
5.3.2
Deregistering and Reregistering under
the Power Console Plus Utility
5.4
Power Console Plus Interface Description
5.4.1
Power Console Plus Main Window Description
5.4.2
Power Console Plus Menus
5.4.3
Physical Drive Menu
5.4.4
Logical Drive Menu
5.4.5
Progress Menu
5.5
Configuring Arrays and Logical Drives
5.5.1
Starting the Power Console Plus Utility
5.5.2
Choosing an Adapter
5.5.3
Running the Configuration Wizard
5.5.4
Defining Logical Drives
5.5.5
Saving the Configuration
5.5.6
Initializing Logical Drives
5.5.7
Checking Rebuild Rate
5.5.8
Exiting the Power Console Plus Utility
5.6
Reclaiming Hot Spare Disks
5.7
Reconfiguring Existing Arrays
5.7.1
Adding a Physical Drive to an Existing Array
5.7.2
Removing a Physical Drive from an Array
5.8
Add Capacity Steps
5-11
5-11
5-12
5-14
5-16
5-17
5-18
5-19
5-19
5-20
5-20
5-22
5-24
5-25
5-25
5-25
5-25
5-26
5-26
5-26
5-27
Virtual Sizing and Online Capacity Expansion
6.1
FlexRAID Virtual Sizing
6.2
Capacity Expansion under the Linux Operating System
6-1
6-2
Contents
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5-1
5-2
5-2
5-3
5-4
5-4
5-5
5-5
Appendix A
MegaRAID Service Monitor
A.1 Power Console Plus Internal Messages
A.2 MegaRAID Service Monitor Event Types
A.3 Event Message IDs
A-1
A-3
A-7
Index
Customer Feedback
Contents
Version 2.0
xiii
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
xiv
Contents
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figures
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
3.1
3.2
3.3
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
Disk Striping (RAID 0) Example
Disk Mirroring (RAID 1) Example
Distributed Parity (RAID 5) Example
Disk Spanning (RAID 10) Example
RAID 10 Logical Drive
RAID 50 Logical Drive
MegaRAID Configuration Utility Menu Tree
Port Multiplier Option
Port and Drive Information
WebBIOS Adapter Selection Screen
WebBIOS Main Screen
WebBIOS Adapter Properties Screen
WebBIOS Logical Drive Screen
WebBIOS Physical Drive Screen
WebBIOS Configuration Mismatch Screen
WebBIOS Configuration Wizard Screen
WebBIOS Logical Drive Definition Screen
2-6
2-7
2-8
2-9
2-17
2-19
3-4
3-9
3-9
4-3
4-5
4-6
4-10
4-12
4-13
4-15
4-16
xv
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
xvi
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Tables
1.1
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.10
2.11
2.12
2.13
2.14
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
3.10
3.11
3.12
4.1
4.2
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
MegaRAID Tool Operating System Support
Types of Parity
Disk Spanning for RAID 10 and RAID 50
SCSI Physical Drive States
Logical Drive States
RAID 0 Overview
RAID 1 Overview
RAID 5 Overview
RAID 10 Overview
RAID 50 Overview
RAID Levels and Fault Tolerance
RAID Levels and Performance
RAID Levels and Capacity
Physical Drives Required for Each RAID Level
Factors to Consider for Array Configuration
Configuration Utility Configure Menu
Configuration Utility Objects Menu
Configuration Utility Adapter Submenu
Configuration Utility Logical Drive Submenu
Configuration Utility View/Update Parameters Submenu
Configuration Utility Physical Drive Submenu
Configuration Utility Channel Submenu
Configuration Utility Battery Backup Submenu
Configuration Hot Keys
Logical Drive Parameters and Descriptions
Spanning Mode Options
Rebuild Types
WebBIOS Toolbar Icon Descriptions
WebBIOS Adapter Properties Menu Options
Power Console Plus Screen Elements
Power Console Plus Toolbar Icons
Power Console Plus Configuration Menu
Power Console Plus Adapter Properties Menu
Power Console Plus Physical Drive Menu
Power Console Plus Change Status Submenu
Power Console Plus Logical Drive Menu
1-3
2-8
2-9
2-12
2-13
2-15
2-15
2-16
2-17
2-18
2-20
2-21
2-22
2-24
2-25
3-5
3-6
3-7
3-10
3-11
3-13
3-13
3-14
3-16
3-21
3-25
3-30
4-4
4-7
5-12
5-13
5-14
5-15
5-16
5-16
5-17
xvii
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5.8
5.9
5.10
5.11
5.12
A.1
A.2
A.3
A.4
A.5
A.6
A.7
A.8
Power Console Plus Change Configuration Submenu
Power Console Plus Read Policy Menu
Power Console Plus Write Policy Menu
Drive State Description
Custom Configuration Wizard Options
Log Messages
General Events Types and Log Messages
Logical Drive Status Messages
Physical Drive Status and Error Messages
Messages for SAF-TE Compliant Boxes
Battery Status Messages
General Event Message IDs
Test-Related Event Message IDs
xviii
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5-17
5-18
5-18
5-19
5-21
A-2
A-3
A-4
A-4
A-5
A-6
A-7
A-7
Chapter 1
Overview
This book describes the following software tools and utilities that enable
configuration and management of RAID systems using the MegaRAID
controllers:
•
MegaRAID BIOS Configuration Utility (CU)
•
WebBIOS CU
•
MegaRAID Manager
•
Power Console Plus
This chapter provides an overview of the MegaRAID software tools and
explains the intended use of each tool. It consists of the following sections:
1.1
•
Section 1.1, “MegaRAID Tool Description”
•
Section 1.2, “Operating System Support”
MegaRAID Tool Description
MegaRAID products provide a powerful set of software products for
configuring and managing Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID)
systems. The following subsections describe each software product.
Subsequent chapters provide detailed information concerning
each product.
You can use any of the listed utilities to configure your RAID system. Or,
you can configure your RAID system with one utility and update it later
with a different utility. All MegaRAID tools provide a full set of RAID array
configuration and monitoring features.
MegaRAID Configuration Software User’s Guide
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
1-1
1.1.1
MegaRAID BIOS Configuration Utility (Ctrl+M)
The MegaRAID BIOS Configuration Utility (CU) provides full-featured,
character-based configuration and management of RAID arrays. The
MegaRAID CU resides in the BIOS and is independent of the operating
system. For information about the BIOS CU, refer to Chapter 3, “BIOS
Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager.”
1.1.2
MegaRAID Manager Configuration Utility
The MegaRAID Manager utility provides full-featured configuration and
management of RAID arrays. The MegaRAID Manager utility enables
configuration and management of RAID systems while the operating
system is running. The MegaRAID Manager utility provides the same
feature set as the MegaRAID CU. For information about MegaRAID
Manager, refer to Chapter 3, “BIOS Configuration Utility and
MegaRAID Manager.”
1.1.3
WebBIOS Configuration Utility (CTRL+H)
The WebBIOS CU tool provides full-featured, html-based configuration
and management of RAID arrays. WebBIOS resides in the BIOS and is
independent of the operating system. The WebBIOS CU provides the
same feature set as the MegaRAID CU. In addition, it allows you to add
drives and migrate between RAID levels. For information about the
WebBIOS CU, refer to Chapter 4, “WebBIOS Configuration Utility.”
1.1.4
Power Console Plus Configuration Utility
The Power Console Plus utility provides on-the-fly RAID migration,
creating almost limitless adaptability and expansion of any logical drive
while the system remains operational. For information about the
Power Console Plus utility, refer to Chapter 5, “Start the Power Console
Plus Utility.”
The Power Console Plus utility is an object-oriented GUI utility that
configures and monitors RAID systems locally or over a network. The
Power Console Plus manager runs on the Microsoft Windows NT,
Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003 operating
systems. With the Power Console Plus manager, you can perform the
same tasks as with the MegaRAID Manager.
1-2
Overview
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
1.2
Operating System Support
Table 1.1 lists the operating system support for each of the
MegaRAID tools.
Table 1.1
MegaRAID Tool Operating System Support
MegaRAID Tool
Supported Operating Systems
BIOS CU
Operating system (OS) support is not required. The CU
runs from the BIOS.
MegaRAID Manager MS-DOS, Novell NetWare, Red Hat Linux, SUSE Linux
Enterprise Server (SLES).
WebBIOS CU
OS support is not required. The CU runs from the BIOS.
Power Console Plus Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Server 2003.
Note:
For information about drivers for the operating systems, refer
to the MegaRAID Device Driver Installation User’s Guide.
Operating System Support
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
1-3
1-4
Overview
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Chapter 2
Introduction to RAID
This chapter describes RAID features and the advantages that RAID
systems offer in terms of fault tolerance, improved I/O performance, and
data storage reliability. In addition, it discusses RAID configuration
strategies and planning.
This chapter consists of the following sections:
2.1
•
Section 2.1, “RAID Description”
•
Section 2.2, “RAID Benefits”
•
Section 2.3, “RAID Functions”
•
Section 2.4, “RAID Components and Features”
•
Section 2.5, “RAID Levels”
•
Section 2.6, “RAID Configuration Strategies”
•
Section 2.7, “RAID Availability”
•
Section 2.8, “RAID Configuration Planning”
RAID Description
RAID is an array of multiple independent hard disk drives that provides
high performance and fault tolerance. The RAID array appears to the
host computer as a single storage unit or as multiple logical units. Data
throughput improves because several disks can be accessed
simultaneously. RAID systems also improve data storage availability and
fault tolerance. Data loss caused by a hard drive failure can be recovered
by rebuilding missing data from the remaining data or parity drives.
MegaRAID Configuration Software User’s Guide
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-1
2.2
RAID Benefits
RAID systems improve data storage reliability and fault tolerance
compared to single-drive storage systems. Data loss resulting from a
hard drive failure can be prevented by reconstructing missing data from
the remaining hard drives. RAID has gained popularity because it
improves I/O performance and increases storage subsystem reliability.
2.3
RAID Functions
Logical drives, also known as virtual disks, are arrays or spanned arrays
that are available to the operating system. The storage space in a logical
drive is spread across all the physical drives in the array.
Note:
The maximum logical drive size for all supported RAID
levels (0, 1, 5, 10, and 50) is 2 Tbytes. You can create
multiple logical drives on the same physical disks.
Your SCSI hard drives must be organized into logical drives in an array
and must be able to support the RAID level that you select. Following are
some common RAID functions:
2-2
•
Creating hot spare drives.
•
Configuring physical arrays and logical drives.
•
Initializing one or more logical drives.
•
Accessing controllers, logical drives, and physical drives individually.
•
Rebuilding failed hard drives.
•
Verifying that the redundancy data in logical drives using RAID level
1, 5, 10, or 50 is correct.
•
Reconstructing logical drives after changing RAID levels or adding a
hard drive to an array.
•
Selecting a host controller to work on.
Introduction to RAID
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2.4
RAID Components and Features
RAID levels describe a system for ensuring the availability and
redundancy of data stored on large disk subsystems. See Section 2.5,
“RAID Levels,” page 2-13 for detailed information about RAID levels.
2.4.1
Physical Array
A physical array is a group of physical disk drives. The physical disk
drives are managed in partitions known as logical drives.
2.4.2
Logical Drive
A logical drive is a partition in a physical array of disks that is made up
of contiguous data segments on the physical disks. A logical drive can
consist of an entire physical array, more than one entire physical array, a
part of an array, parts of more than one array, or a combination of any
two of these conditions.
Note:
2.4.3
The maximum logical drive size for all supported RAID
levels (0, 1, 5, 10, and 50) is 2 Tbytes. You can create
multiple logical drives within the same physical array.
RAID Array
A RAID array is one or more logical drives controlled by the RAID
controller.
2.4.4
Fault Tolerance
Fault tolerance is the capability of the subsystem to undergo a single
failure without compromising data integrity, and processing capability.
The RAID controller provides this support through redundant arrays in
RAID levels 1, 5, 10 and 50. The system can still work properly even with
a single disk failure in an array, through performance can be degraded
to some extent.
Note:
RAID level 0 is not fault-tolerant. If a drive in a RAID 0 array
fails, the whole logical drive (all physical drives associated
with the logical drive) fails.
RAID Components and Features
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-3
Fault tolerance is often associated with system availability because it
allows the system to be available during the failures. However, this
means it is also important for the system to be available during repair.
A hot spare is an unused physical disk that, in case of a disk failure in a
redundant RAID array, can be used to rebuild the data and re-establish
redundancy. After the hot spare is automatically moved into the RAID
array, the data is automatically rebuilt on the hot spare drive. The RAID
array continues to handle requests while the rebuild occurs.
Auto-rebuild allows a failed drive to be replaced and the data
automatically rebuilt by hot-swapping the drive in the same drive bay. The
RAID array continues to handle requests while the rebuild occurs.
2.4.5
Consistency Check
The Consistency Check operation verifies correctness of the data in
logical drives that use RAID levels 1, 5, 10, and 50. (RAID 0 does not
provide data redundancy.) For example, in a system with parity, checking
consistency means computing the data on one drive and comparing the
results to the contents of the parity drive.
Note:
2.4.6
LSI recommends that you perform a consistency check at
least once a month.
Background Initialization
Background initialization is a consistency check that is forced when you
create a logical drive. The difference between a background initialization
and a consistency check is that a background initialization is forced on
new logical drives. This is an automatic operation that starts 5 minutes
after you create the drive.
Background initialization is a check for media errors on physical drives.
It ensures that striped data segments are the same on all physical drives
in an array. The background initialization rate is controlled by the rebuild
rate set using the BIOS Configuration Utility. The default, and
recommended, rate is 30%. Before you change the rebuild rate, you must
stop the background initialization or the rate change does not affect the
background initialization rate. After you stop background initialization and
change the rebuild rate, the rate change takes effect when you restart
background initialization.
2-4
Introduction to RAID
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2.4.7
Patrol Read
Patrol read involves the review of your system for possible hard drive
errors that could lead to drive failure, then action to correct errors. The
goal is to protect data integrity by detecting physical drive failure before
the failure can damage data. The corrective actions depend on the array
configuration and type of errors.
Patrol read starts only when the controller is idle for a defined period of
time and no other background tasks are active, though it can continue to
run during heavy I/O processes.
You can use the BIOS Configuration Utility to select the patrol read options,
which you can use to set automatic or manual operation, or disable patrol
read. Perform the following steps to select a patrol read option:
Step 1.
Select Objects → Adapter from the Management Menu.
The Adapter menu displays.
Step 2.
Select Patrol Read Options from the Adapter menu.
Step 3.
The following options display:
Patrol Read Mode
Patrol Read Status
Patrol Read Control
Step 4.
Select Patrol Read Mode to display the patrol read options:
Manual – In manual mode, you must initiate the patrol read.
Auto – In auto mode, the firmware initiates the patrol read on a
scheduled basis.
Manual Halt – Use manual halt to stop the automatic operation,
then switch to manual mode.
Disable – Use this option to disable the patrol read.
Step 5.
If you use Manual mode, perform the following steps to initiate
a patrol read:
a. Select Patrol Read Control and press ENTER.
b. Select Start and press ENTER.
Note.
Pause/Resume is not a valid operation when Patrol Read
is set to Manual mode.
RAID Components and Features
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-5
Step 6.
2.4.8
Select Patrol Read Status to display the number of iterations
completed, the current state of the patrol read (active or stopped),
and the schedule for the next execution of patrol read.
Disk Striping
Disk striping allows you to write data across multiple physical disks
instead of just one physical disk. Disk striping involves partitioning each
drive storage space into stripes that can vary in size from 8 Kbytes to
128 Kbytes. These stripes are interleaved in a repeated sequential
manner. The combined storage space is composed of stripes from each
drive. It is recommended that you keep stripe sizes the same across
RAID arrays.
Note:
Do not install an operating system on a logical drive with
less than a 16 Kbyte stripe size.
For example, in a four-disk system using only disk striping (used in RAID
level 0), segment 1 is written to disk 1, segment 2 is written to disk 2,
and so on. Disk striping enhances performance because multiple drives
are accessed simultaneously, but disk striping does not provide data
redundancy.
Figure 2.1 shows an example of disk striping.
Figure 2.1
Disk Striping (RAID 0) Example
Segment 1
Segment 5
Segment 9
2.4.8.1
Segment 2
Segment 6
Segment 10
Segment 3
Segment 7
Segment 11
Segment 4
Segment 8
Segment 12
Stripe Width
Stripe width is the number of disks involved in an array where striping is
implemented. For example, a four-disk array with disk striping has a
stripe width of four.
2-6
Introduction to RAID
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2.4.8.2
Stripe Size
The stripe size is the length of the interleaved data segments that the
RAID controller writes across multiple drives.
2.4.9
Disk Mirroring
With disk mirroring (used in RAID 1), data written to one disk is
simultaneously written to another disk. If one disk fails, the contents of the
other disk can be used to run the system and reconstruct the failed disk.
The primary advantage of disk mirroring is that it provides 100% data
redundancy. Because the disk contents are completely written to a second
disk, it does not matter whether one of the disks fails. Both disks contain
the same data at all times. Either drive can act as the operational drive.
Disk mirroring provides 100% redundancy, but is expensive because
each drive in the system must be duplicated. Figure 2.2 shows an
example of disk mirroring.
Figure 2.2
Segment 1
Segment 2
Segment 3
Segment 4
Disk Mirroring (RAID 1) Example
Segment 1 Duplicated
Segment 2 Duplicated
Segment 3 Duplicated
Segment 4 Duplicated
2.4.10 Parity
Parity generates a set of redundancy data from two or more parent data
sets. The redundancy data can reconstruct one of the parent data sets.
Parity data does not fully duplicate the parent data sets. In RAID, this
method is applied to entire drives or stripes across all disk drives in an
array. The types of parity are described in Table 2.1.
RAID Components and Features
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-7
Table 2.1
Types of Parity
Parity Type
Description
Dedicated
The parity of the data on two or more disk drives is stored on
an additional disk.
Distributed
The parity data is distributed across more than one drive in the
system.
If a single disk drive fails, it can be rebuilt from the parity and the data
on the remaining drives. RAID level 5 combines distributed parity with
disk striping, as shown in Figure 2.3. Parity provides redundancy for one
drive failure without duplicating the contents of entire disk drives, but
parity generation can slow the write process.
Figure 2.3
Segment 1
Segment 7
Parity (9–12)
Distributed Parity (RAID 5) Example
Segment 2
Segment 8
Segment 3
Segment 9
Parity (5–8)
Segment 4
Segment 10
Segment 5
Segment 11
Parity (1–4)
Segment 6
Segment 12
Note: Parity is distributed across multiple drives in the array.
2.4.11 Disk Spanning
Disk spanning allows multiple physical drives to function like one big
drive. Disk spanning overcomes lack of disk space and simplifies storage
management by combining existing resources or adding relatively
inexpensive resources. For example, four 20 Gbyte drives can be
combined to appear to the operating system as a single 80 Gbyte drive.
Spanning alone does not provide reliability or performance
enhancements. Spanned logical drives must have the same stripe size
and must be contiguous. In Figure 2.4, RAID 1 arrays are turned into a
RAID 10 array.
Important:
2-8
Make sure that the spans are in different backplanes, so
that if one span fails, you do not lose the whole array.
Introduction to RAID
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 2.4
60 Gbytes/s
Disk Spanning (RAID 10) Example
60 Gbytes/s
60 Gbytes/s
Can Be Accessed as
One 120 Gbyte/s Drive
Note:
60 Gbytes/s
Can Be Accessed as
One 120 Gbyte/s Drive
Spanning two contiguous RAID 0 logical drives does not
produce a new RAID level or add fault tolerance. It
increases the size of the logical volume and improves
performance by doubling the number of spindles.
Disk Spanning for RAID 10 or RAID 50. Table 2.2 describes how to
configure RAID 10 and RAID 50 by spanning. The logical drives must
have the same stripe size, and the maximum number of spans is eight.
The full drive size is used when you span logical drives; you cannot
specify a smaller drive size.
Table 2.2
Disk Spanning for RAID 10 and RAID 50
Level
Description
10
Configure RAID 10 by spanning two contiguous RAID 1 logical drives.
The RAID 1 logical drives must have the same stripe size.
50
Configure RAID 50 by spanning two contiguous RAID 5 logical drives.
The RAID 5 logical drives must have the same stripe size.
2.4.12 Hot Spares
A hot spare is an extra, unused disk drive that is part of the disk
subsystem. It is usually in standby mode, ready for service if a drive fails.
Hot spares permit you to replace failed drives without system shutdown
or user intervention. MegaRAID 320 controllers can implement automatic
and transparent rebuilds of failed drives using hot spare drives, providing
a high degree of fault tolerance and zero downtime.
Note.
When running RAID 0 and RAID 5 logical drives on the
same set of physical drives (a sliced configuration), a
rebuild to a hot spare does not occur after a drive failure
until the RAID 0 logical drive is deleted.
RAID Components and Features
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-9
The RAID management software allows you to specify physical drives as
hot spares. When a hot spare is needed, the RAID controller assigns the
hot spare that has a capacity closest to and at least as great as that of
the failed drive to replace the failed drive. The failed drive is removed
from the logical drive and marked ready awaiting removal after the
rebuild to a hot spare begins. See Table 2.13 for detailed information
about the minimum and maximum number of physical drives supported
by each RAID level for each RAID controller. You can make hot spares
of the physical drives that are not in a RAID logical drive.
Note:
If a rebuild to a hot spare fails for any reason, the hot spare
drive is marked as failed. If the source drive fails, both the
source drive and the hot spare drive are marked as failed.
There are two types of hot spares:
2.4.12.1
•
Global Hot Spare
•
Dedicated Hot Spare
Global Hot Spare
A global hot spare can replace any failed drive in a redundant array as
long as its capacity is equal to or larger than the coerced capacity of the
failed drive. A global hot spare defined on any channel should be
available to replace a failed drive on both channels.
2.4.12.2
Dedicated Hot Spare
A dedicated hot spare can replace a failed drive only in a selected array.
One or more drives can be designated as member of a spare drive pool;
the most suitable drive from the pool is selected for failover. A dedicated
hot spare is used before one from the global hot spare pool.
Hot spare drives can be located on any RAID channel. Standby hot
spares (not being used in RAID array) are polled every 60 seconds at a
minimum, and their status is made available in the array management
software. RAID controllers can rebuild with a disk that is in a system, but
not initially set to be a hot spare.
Observe the following parameters when using hot spares:
2-10
Introduction to RAID
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
•
Hot spares are used only in arrays with data redundancy, for
example, RAID levels 1, 5, 10, and 50.
•
A hot spare connected to a specific RAID controller can rebuild a
drive that is connected to the same controller only.
•
You must assign the hot spare to one or more drives through the
controller BIOS or use array management software to place it in the
hot spare pool.
•
A hot spare must have free space equal to or greater than the drive
it would replace. For example, to replace an 18 Gbyte drive, the hot
spare must be 18 Gbytes or larger.
2.4.13 Disk Rebuilds
When a physical drive in a RAID array fails, you can rebuild the drive by
recreating the data that was stored on the drive before it failed. The RAID
controller uses hot spares to rebuild failed drives automatically and
transparently, at user-defined rebuild rates. If a hot spare is available, the
rebuild can start automatically when a drive fails. If a hot spare is not
available, the failed drive must be replaced with a new drive so the data
on the failed drive can be rebuilt. Rebuilding can be done only in arrays
with data redundancy, which includes RAID 1, 5, 10, and 50.
The failed physical drive is removed from the logical drive and marked
ready awaiting removal after the rebuild to a hot spare begins. If the
system goes down during a rebuild, the RAID controller automatically
restarts the rebuild after the system reboots.
Note:
When the rebuild to a hot spare begins, the failed drive is
often removed from the logical drive before management
applications detect the failed drive. When this occurs, the
events logs show the drive rebuilding to the hot spare
without showing the failed drive. The formerly failed drive is
marked as ready after a rebuild begins to a hot spare.
Note:
If a rebuild to a hot spare fails for any reason, the hot spare
drive is marked as failed. If the source drive fails, both the
source drive and the hot spare drive are marked as failed.
An automatic drive rebuild does not start if you replace a drive during an
online capacity expansion or RAID level migration. The rebuild must be
started manually after the expansion or migration procedure is complete.
RAID Components and Features
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-11
2.4.13.1
Rebuild Rate
The rebuild rate is the percentage of the compute cycles dedicated to
rebuilding failed drives. A rebuild rate of 100 percent means the system
gives priority to rebuilding the failed drives.
The rebuild rate can be configured between 0 and 100 percent. At
0 percent, the rebuild is done only if the system is not doing anything
else. At 100 percent, the rebuild has a higher priority than any other
system activity. LSI recommends not using 0 or 100 percent. The default
rebuild rate is 30 percent.
2.4.13.2
Hot Swap
A hot swap is the manual replacement of a defective physical disk unit
while the computer is still running. When a new drive has been installed,
a rebuild occurs automatically if:
•
The newly inserted drive is the same size as or larger than the
failed drive
•
The drive is placed in the same drive bay as the failed drive it
is replacing
The RAID controller can be configured to detect the new disks and
rebuild the contents of the disk drive automatically.
2.4.14 SCSI Physical Drive States
The SCSI Physical drive states are described in Table 2.3.
2-12
Table 2.3
SCSI Physical Drive States
State
Description
Online
The physical drive is working normally and is a part of a
configured logical drive.
Ready
The physical drive is functioning normally but is not part of a
configured logical drive and is not designated as a hot spare.
Hot Spare
The physical drive is powered up and ready for use as a spare in
case an online drive fails.
Fail
A fault has occurred in the physical drive, placing it out of service.
Rebuild
The physical drive is being rebuilt with data from a failed drive.
Introduction to RAID
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2.4.15 Logical Drive States
The logical drive states are described in Table 2.4.
Table 2.4
Logical Drive States
State
Description
Optimal
The logical drive operating condition is good. All configured
physical drives are online.
Degraded
The logical drive operating condition is not optimal. One of the
configured physical drives has failed or is offline.
Failed
The logical drive has failed.
Offline
The logical drive is not available to the RAID controller.
2.4.16 Enclosure Management
Enclosure management is the intelligent monitoring of the disk
subsystem by software and/or hardware. The disk subsystem can be part
of the host computer or can reside in an external disk enclosure.
Enclosure management helps you stay informed of events in the disk
subsystem, such as a drive or power supply failure. Enclosure
management increases the fault tolerance of the disk subsystem.
2.5
RAID Levels
The RAID controller supports RAID levels 0, 1, 5, 10, and 50. The
supported RAID levels are summarized in Section 2.5.1, “Summary of
RAID Levels.” In addition, it supports independent drives (configured as
RAID 0.) The following subsections describe the RAID levels in detail.
2.5.1
Summary of RAID Levels
RAID 0 uses striping to provide high data throughput, especially for large
files in an environment that does not require fault tolerance.
RAID 1 uses mirroring so that data written to one disk drive is
simultaneously written to another disk drive. This is good for small
databases or other applications that require small capacity, but complete
data redundancy.
RAID Levels
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-13
RAID 5 uses disk striping and parity data across all drives
(distributed parity) to provide high data throughput, especially for small
random access.
RAID 10, a combination of RAID 0 and RAID 1, consists of striped data
across mirrored spans. It provides high data throughput and complete
data redundancy, but uses a larger number of spans.
RAID 50, a combination of RAID 0 and RAID 5, uses distributed parity
and disk striping and works best with data that requires high reliability,
high request rates, high data transfers, and medium-to-large capacity.
LSI does not recommend having RAID 0 and RAID 5 logical drives in the
same physical array. If a drive in the physical array has to be rebuilt, the
RAID 0 logical drive causes a failure during the rebuild.
2.5.2
Selecting a RAID Level
To ensure the best performance, you should select the optimal RAID
level when you create a system drive. The optimal RAID level for your
disk array depends on a number of factors:
2.5.2.1
•
Number of physical drives in the disk array
•
Capacity of the physical drives in the array
•
Need for data redundancy
•
Disk performance requirements
RAID 0
RAID 0 provides disk striping across all drives in the RAID array. RAID 0
does not provide any data redundancy, but does offer the best
performance of any RAID level. RAID 0 breaks up data into smaller
blocks and then writes a block to each drive in the array. The size of each
block is determined by the stripe size parameter, set during the creation
of the RAID set. RAID 0 offers high bandwidth.
Note:
2-14
RAID level 0 is not fault-tolerant. If a drive in a RAID 0 array
fails, the whole logical drive (all physical drives associated
with the logical drive) fails.
Introduction to RAID
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
By breaking up a large file into smaller blocks, the RAID controller can
use several drives to read or write the file faster. RAID 0 involves no
parity calculations to complicate the write operation. This makes RAID 0
ideal for applications that require high bandwidth but do not require fault
tolerance. RAID 0 also denotes an independent or single drive.
Table 2.5 provides an overview of RAID 0.
Table 2.5
2.5.2.2
RAID 0 Overview
Feature
Description
Uses
Provides high data throughput, especially for large files. Any
environment that does not require fault tolerance.
Strong Points
Provides increased data throughput for large files. No
capacity loss penalty for parity.
Weak Points
Does not provide fault tolerance or high bandwidth. All data
lost if any drive fails.
Drives
1 to (14 drives x the number of channels).
RAID 1
In RAID 1, the RAID controller duplicates all data from one drive to a
second drive. RAID 1 provides complete data redundancy, but at the cost
of doubling the required data storage capacity.
Table 2.6 provides an overview of RAID 1.
Table 2.6
RAID 1 Overview
Feature
Description
Uses
Appropriate for small databases or any other environment
that requires fault tolerance but small capacity.
Strong Points
Provides complete data redundancy. RAID 1 is ideal for any
application that requires fault tolerance and minimal capacity.
Weak Points
Requires twice as many disk drives. Performance is impaired
during drive rebuilds.
Drives
2
RAID Levels
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-15
2.5.2.3
RAID 5
RAID 5 includes disk striping at the block level and parity. In RAID 5, the
parity information is written to several drives. RAID 5 is best suited for
networks that perform a lot of small input/output (I/O) transactions
simultaneously.
RAID 5 addresses the bottleneck issue for random I/O operations.
Because each drive contains both data and parity, numerous writes can
take place concurrently. In addition, robust caching algorithms and
hardware-based, exclusive-or assist make RAID 5 performance
exceptional in many different environments.
Table 2.7 provides an overview of RAID 5.
Table 2.7
2.5.2.4
RAID 5 Overview
Feature
Description
Uses
Provides high data throughput, especially for large files. Use
RAID 5 for transaction processing applications because
each drive can read and write independently. If a drive fails,
the RAID controller uses the parity drive to recreate all
missing information. Use also for office automation and
online customer service that requires fault tolerance. Use for
any application that has high read request rates but low write
request rates.
Strong Points
Provides data redundancy, high read rates, and good
performance in most environments. Provides data
redundancy with lowest loss of capacity.
Weak Points
Not well-suited to tasks requiring numerous writes. Suffers
more impact if no cache is used (clustering). Disk drive
performance is reduced if a drive is being rebuilt.
Environments with few processes do not perform as well
because the RAID overhead is not offset by the performance
gains in handling simultaneous processes.
Drives
3 to (14 drives x the number of channels).
RAID 10
RAID 10 is a combination of RAID 0 and RAID 1. RAID 10 consists of
striped data across mirrored spans. RAID 10 breaks up data into smaller
blocks, then mirrors the blocks of data to each RAID 1 set. Each RAID 1
set then duplicates its data to its other drive. The size of each block is
determined by the stripe size parameter, which is set during the creation
of the RAID set. Up to 8 spans can be supported by RAID 10.
2-16
Introduction to RAID
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table 2.8 provides an overview of RAID 10.
Table 2.8
RAID 10 Overview
Feature
Description
Uses
Appropriate when used with data storage that needs 100%
redundancy of mirrored arrays and that also needs the
enhanced I/O performance of RAID 0 (striped arrays.) RAID
10 works well for medium-sized databases or any
environment that requires a higher degree of fault tolerance
and moderate to medium capacity.
Strong Points
Provides both high data transfer rates and complete data
redundancy.
Weak Points
Requires twice as many drives as all other RAID levels
except RAID 1.
Drives
2n, where n is greater than 1.
In Figure 2.5, logical drive 0 is created by distributing data across four
arrays (arrays 0 through 3). Spanning is used because one logical drive
is defined across more than one array. Logical drives defined across
multiple RAID 1 level arrays are referred to as RAID 10 logical drives. To
increase performance, data is striped across arrays, which enables
access to multiple arrays simultaneously.
Using RAID level 10, rather than a simple RAID set, up to 8 spans can
be supported, and up to 8 drive failures can be tolerated, though less
than total disk drive capacity is available. Though multiple drive failures
can be tolerated, only one drive failure can be tolerated in each RAID 1
level array.
Figure 2.5
RAID 10
RAID 10 Logical Drive
Segment 1
Segment 1
Duplicate
Segment 2
Segment 2
Duplicate
Segment 3
Segment 3
Duplicate
Segment 4
Segment 4
Duplicate
Segment 5
Segment 5
Duplicate
Segment 6
Segment 6
Duplicate
Segment 7
Segment 7
Duplicate
Segment 8
Segment 8
Duplicate
...
RAID 1
...
RAID 1
...
RAID 1
...
RAID 1
RAID 0
RAID Levels
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-17
2.5.2.5
RAID 50
RAID 50 provides the features of both RAID 0 and RAID 5. RAID 50
includes both distributed parity and disk striping across multiple arrays.
RAID 50 is best implemented on two RAID 5 disk arrays with data striped
across both disk arrays.
RAID 50 breaks up data into smaller blocks, then stripes the blocks of
data to each RAID 5 disk set. RAID 5 breaks up data into smaller blocks,
calculates parity by performing an exclusive-or on the blocks, then writes
the blocks of data and parity to each drive in the array. The size of each
block is determined by the stripe size parameter, which is set during the
creation of the RAID set.
RAID 50 can support up to 8 spans and tolerate up to 8 drive failures,
though less than total disk drive capacity is available. Though multiple
drive failures can be tolerated, only one drive failure can be tolerated in
each RAID 1 level array.
Table 2.9 provides an overview of RAID 50.
Table 2.9
RAID 50 Overview
Feature
Description
Uses
Appropriate when used with data that requires high
reliability, high request rates, high data transfer, and medium
to large capacity.
Strong Points
Provides high data throughput, data redundancy and very
good performance.
Weak Points
Requires 2 to 8 times as many parity drives as RAID 5.
Drives
6 to (14 drives x the number of channels)
Figure 2.6 provides an example of a RAID 50 level logical drive.
2-18
Introduction to RAID
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 2.6
RAID 50
RAID 50 Logical Drive
Segment 1
Segment 2
(Segment 1, 2)
Segment 3
Segment 4
(Segment 3, 4)
Segment 6
(Segment 5, 6)
Segment 5
Segment 8
(Segment 7, 8)
Segment 7
(Segment 9, 10)
Segment 9
Segment 10
(Segment 11, 12)
Segment 11
Segment 12
RAID 5
RAID 5
RAID 0
2.6
RAID Configuration Strategies
The most important factors in RAID array configuration are:
•
Logical drive availability (fault tolerance)
•
Logical drive performance
•
Logical drive capacity
You cannot configure a logical drive that optimizes all three factors, but
it is easy to choose a logical drive configuration that maximizes one
factor at the expense of another factor. For example, RAID 1 (mirroring)
provides excellent fault tolerance, but requires a redundant drive. The
following subsections describe how to use the RAID levels to maximize
logical drive availability (fault tolerance), logical drive performance, and
logical drive capacity.
2.6.1
Maximizing Fault Tolerance
Fault tolerance is achieved through the ability to perform automatic and
transparent rebuilds using hot spare drives and hot swaps. A hot spare
drive is an available, unused online drive that the RAID controller
instantly plugs into the system when an active drive fails. After the hot
spare is automatically moved into the RAID array, the failed drive is
automatically rebuilt on the spare drive. The RAID array continues to
handle requests while the rebuild occurs.
RAID Configuration Strategies
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-19
A hot swap is the manual substitution of a replacement unit in a disk
subsystem for a defective one, where the substitution can be performed
while the subsystem is running hot swap drives. Auto-Rebuild in the
BIOS Configuration Utility allows a failed drive to be replaced and
automatically rebuilt by hot-swapping the drive in the same drive bay. The
RAID array continues to handle requests while the rebuild occurs,
providing a high degree of fault tolerance and zero downtime. Table 2.10
describes the fault tolerance features of each RAID level.
Table 2.10
RAID
Level
RAID Levels and Fault Tolerance
Fault Tolerance
0
Does not provide fault tolerance. All data lost if any drive fails. Disk striping writes data across
multiple disk drives instead of just one disk drive. It involves partitioning each drive storage
space into stripes that can vary in size. RAID 0 is ideal for applications that require high
bandwidth but do not require fault tolerance.
1
Provides complete data redundancy. If one disk drive fails, the contents of the other disk drive
can run the system and reconstruct the failed drive. The primary advantage of disk mirroring is
that it provides 100% data redundancy. Since the contents of the disk drive are completely written
to a second drive, no data is lost if one of the drives fails. Both drives contain the same data at
all times. RAID 1 is ideal for any application that requires fault tolerance and minimal capacity.
5
Combines distributed parity with disk striping. Parity provides redundancy for one drive failure
without duplicating the contents of entire disk drives. If a drive fails, the RAID controller uses
the parity data to rebuild all missing information. In RAID 5, this method is applied to entire
drives or stripes across all disk drives in an array. Using distributed parity, RAID 5 offers fault
tolerance with limited overhead.
10
Provides complete data redundancy using striping across spanned RAID 1 arrays. RAID 10
works well for any environment that requires the 100 percent redundancy offered by mirrored
arrays. RAID 10 can sustain a drive failure in each mirrored array and maintain drive integrity.
50
Provides data redundancy using distributed parity across spanned RAID 5 arrays. RAID 50
includes both parity and disk striping across multiple drives. If a drive fails, the RAID controller
uses the parity data to recreate all missing information. RAID 50 can sustain one drive failure
per RAID 5 array and still maintain data integrity.
2-20
Introduction to RAID
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2.6.2
Maximizing Performance
A RAID disk subsystem improves I/O performance. The RAID array
appears to the host computer as a single storage unit or as multiple
logical units. I/O is faster because drives can be accessed simultaneously.
Table 2.11 describes the performance for each RAID level.
Table 2.11
RAID
Level
RAID Levels and Performance
Performance
0
RAID 0 (disk striping) offers the best performance of any RAID level. RAID 0 breaks up data
into smaller blocks, then writes a block to each drive in the array. Disk striping writes data
across multiple disk drives instead of just one disk drive. It involves partitioning each drive
storage space into stripes that can vary in size from 8 Kbytes to 128 Kbytes. These stripes
are interleaved in a repeated sequential manner. Disk striping enhances performance
because multiple drives are accessed simultaneously.
1
With RAID 1 (disk mirroring), each drive in the system must be duplicated, which requires
more time and resources than striping. Performance is impaired during drive rebuilds.
5
RAID 5 (distributed parity) provides high data throughput, especially for large files. Use this
RAID level for any application that requires high read request rates, but low write request
rates, such as transaction processing applications, because each drive can read and write
independently. Since each drive contains both data and parity, numerous writes can take
place concurrently. In addition, robust caching algorithms and hardware based exclusive-or
assist make RAID 5 performance exceptional in many different environments.
Parity generation can slow the write process, making write performance significantly lower for
RAID 5 than for RAID 0 or RAID 1. Disk drive performance is reduced if a drive is being
rebuilt. Clustering can also reduce drive performance. Environments with few processes do
not perform as well because the RAID overhead is not offset by the performance gains in
handling simultaneous processes.
10
RAID 10 (disk spanning) works best for data storage that needs the enhanced I/O
performance of RAID 0 (striped arrays), which provides high data transfer rates. Spanning
increases the size of the logical volume and improves performance by doubling the number
of spindles. The system performance improves as the number of spans increases.
(The maximum number of spans is eight.) As the storage space in the spans is filled, the
system stripes data over fewer and fewer spans and RAID performance degrades to that of
a RAID 1 or RAID 5 array.
50
RAID 50 (disk spanning) works best when used with data that requires high reliability, high
request rates, and high data transfer. It provides high data throughput, data redundancy, and
very good performance. Spanning increases the size of the logical volume and improves
performance by doubling the number of spindles. The system performance improves as the
number of spans increases. (The maximum number of spans is eight.) As the storage space
in the spans is filled, the system stripes data over fewer and fewer spans and RAID
performance degrades to that of a RAID 1 or RAID 5 array.
RAID Configuration Strategies
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-21
2.6.3
Maximizing Storage Capacity
Storage capacity is an important factor when selecting a RAID level.
There are several variables to consider. Mirrored data and parity data
require more storage space than striping alone (RAID 0). Parity
generation uses algorithms to create redundancy and requires less
space than mirroring. Table 2.12 explains the effects of the RAID levels
on storage capacity.
Table 2.12
RAID
Level
RAID Levels and Capacity
Capacity
0
RAID 0 (disk striping) involves partitioning each drive storage space into stripes that can vary
in size. The combined storage space is composed of stripes from each drive. RAID 0 provides
maximum storage capacity for a given set of physical disks.
1
With RAID 1 (disk mirroring), data written to one disk drive is simultaneously written to
another disk drive, which doubles the required data storage capacity. This is expensive
because each drive in the system must be duplicated.
5
RAID 5 (distributed parity) provides redundancy for one drive failure without duplicating the
contents of entire disk drives. RAID 5 breaks up data into smaller blocks, calculates parity by
performing an exclusive-or on the blocks, then writes the blocks of data and parity to each
drive in the array. The size of each block is determined by the stripe size parameter, which
is set during the creation of the RAID set.
10
RAID 10 (disk spanning) requires twice as many drives as all other RAID levels except RAID
1. RAID 10 works well for medium-sized databases or any environment that requires a higher
degree of fault tolerance and moderate to medium capacity. Disk spanning allows multiple
disk drives to function like one big drive. Spanning overcomes lack of disk space and
simplifies storage management by combining existing resources or adding relatively
inexpensive resources.
50
RAID 50 (disk spanning) requires two to four times as many parity drives as RAID 5. This
RAID level works best when used with data that requires medium to large capacity.
2-22
Introduction to RAID
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2.7
RAID Availability
Data availability without downtime is essential for many types of data
processing and storage systems. Businesses want to avoid the financial
costs and customer frustration associated with downed servers. RAID
helps you maintain data availability and avoid downtime for the servers
that provide that data. RAID offers several features, such as spare drives
and rebuilds, that you can use to fix any hard drive problems, while
keeping the server(s) running and data available. The following
subsections describe these features.
2.7.1
Spare Drives
You can use spare drives to replace failed or defective drives in an array.
A replacement drive must be at least as large as the drive it replaces.
Spare drives include hot swaps, hot spares, and cold swaps.
A hot swap is the manual substitution of a replacement unit in a disk
subsystem for a defective one, where the substitution can be performed
while the subsystem is running (performing its normal functions). The
backplane and enclosure must support hot swap in order for the
functionality to work.
Hot spare drives are physical drives that power up along with the RAID
drives and operate in a standby state. If a hard drive used in a RAID
logical drive fails, a hot spare automatically takes its place and the data
on the failed drive is rebuilt on the hot spare. Hot spares can be used for
RAID levels 1, 5, 10, and 50.
Note:
If a rebuild to a hot spare fails for any reason, the hot spare
drive is marked as failed. If the source drive fails, both the
source drive and the hot spare drive are marked as failed.
A cold swap requires that you power down the system before replacing
a defective hard drive in a disk subsystem.
2.7.2
Rebuilding
If a hard drive fails in an array that is configured as a RAID 1, 5, 10, or
50 logical drive, you can recover the lost data by rebuilding the drive. If
you have configured hot spares, the RAID controller automatically tries
RAID Availability
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-23
to use them to rebuild failed disks. Manual rebuild is necessary if no hot
spares with enough capacity to rebuild the failed drives are available. You
must insert a drive with enough storage into the subsystem before
rebuilding the failed drive.
2.8
RAID Configuration Planning
Factors to consider when planning a configuration are the number of
hard disk drives the RAID controller can support, the purpose of the
array, and the availability of spare drives.
Each type of data stored in the disk subsystem has a different frequency
of read and write activity. If you know the data access requirements, you
can more successfully determine a strategy for optimizing the disk
subsystem capacity, availability, and performance.
Servers that support video on demand typically read the data often, but
write data infrequently. Both the read and write operations tend to be
long. Data stored on a general-purpose file server involves relatively
short read and write operations with relatively small files.
2.8.1
Number of Physical Disk Drives
Your configuration planning depends in part on the number of physical
disk drives that you want to use in a RAID array. The number of drives
in an array determines the RAID levels that can be supported. Only one
RAID level can be assigned to each logical drive. Table 2.13 shows the
minimum and maximum number of drives required for each RAID level.
Table 2.13
RAID
Level
Physical Drives Required for Each RAID Level
Minimum # of
Physical Drives
Maximum # of Physical Drives
for Single-Channel Controller
Maximum # of Physical Drives
for Dual-Channel Controller
0
1
14
28
1
2
2
2
5
3
14
28
10
4
14
28
50
6
14
28
2-24
Introduction to RAID
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2.8.2
Array Purpose
Important factors to consider when creating RAID arrays include
availability, performance, and capacity. Define the major purpose of the
disk array by answering questions related to these factors, such as the
following, which are followed by suggested RAID levels for each situation:
•
Does this disk array increase the system storage capacity for
general-purpose file and print servers? Use RAID 5, 10, or 50.
•
Does this disk array support any software system that must be
available 24 hours per day? Use RAID 1, 5, 10, or 50.
•
Does the information stored in this disk array contain large audio or
video files that must be available on demand? Use RAID 0.
•
Does this disk array contain data from an imaging system? Use
RAID 0 or 10.
Fill out Table 2.14 to help you plan the array configuration. Rank the
requirements for your array, such as storage space and data redundancy,
in order of importance, then review the suggested RAID levels.
Table 2.14
Factors to Consider for Array Configuration
Requirement
Rank
Suggested RAID Level(s)
Storage space
RAID 0, RAID 5
Data redundancy
RAID 5, RAID 10, RAID 50
Hard drive performance and throughput
RAID 0, RAID 10
Hot spares (extra hard drives required)
RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 10, RAID 50
RAID Configuration Planning
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
2-25
2-26
Introduction to RAID
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Chapter 3
BIOS Configuration
Utility and
MegaRAID Manager
The MegaRAID BIOS Configuration Utility (CU) configures disk arrays
and logical drives. Because the CU resides in the BIOS, it is independent
of the operating system.
MegaRAID Manager is a character-based, non-GUI utility that changes
policies, and parameters, and monitors RAID systems.
MegaRAID Manager runs under the DOS, Red Hat Linux, and NetWare
operating systems.
The BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager use the same
command structure to configure controllers and disks. The following
sections describe the steps to start either utility and detailed instructions
to perform configuration steps using either utility.
Note:
MegaRAID Manager screens differ slightly from the BIOS
Configuration Utility screens, but the utilities have
similar functions.
Use the configuration utilities to do the following:
•
Select a configuration method for physical arrays and logical disks
•
Create physical arrays
•
Define logical drives
•
Initialize logical drives
•
Access controllers, logical drives, and physical arrays to display their
properties
•
Create hot spare drives
•
Verify that the redundancy data in logical drives using RAID level
1, 5, 10, or 50 is correct
•
Rebuild failed drives
MegaRAID Configuration Software User’s Guide
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-1
•
Reconstruct logical drives after changing RAID levels or adding a
hard drive to an array
•
Select a MegaRAID host adapter
This chapter consists of the following sections:
3.1
•
Section 3.1, “Quick Configuration Steps for the BIOS
Configuration Utility”
•
Section 3.2, “Quick Configuration Steps for MegaRAID Manager”
•
Section 3.3, “Configuration Utility Menu”
•
Section 3.4, “Detailed Configuration Instructions”
•
Section 3.5, “Deleting Logical Drives”
•
Section 3.6, “Performing Drive Roaming”
•
Section 3.7, “Performing Drive Migration”
•
Section 3.8, “Rebuilding Failed Disks”
•
Section 3.9, “FlexRAID Virtual Sizing,”
•
Section 3.10, “Checking Data Consistency”
•
Section 3.11, “Reconstructing Logical Drives”
•
Section 3.12, “Replacing a Failed Controller Containing Data in
the TBBU”
•
Section 3.13, “Using a Preloaded System Drive”
•
Section 3.14, “Exiting MegaRAID Configuration Utility”
Quick Configuration Steps for the BIOS Configuration Utility
This section provides quick installation steps for users who are familiar
with the MegaRAID utilities and tools. Refer to Section 3.4, “Detailed
Configuration Instructions,” on page 3-16 for detailed configuration
instructions. To configure arrays and logical drives using the
MegaRAID CU:
3-2
Step 1.
Boot the system.
Step 2.
Start the MegaRAID CU by pressing CTRL+M.
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Note:
3.2
If the configuration utility does not display, go into BIOS
setup and disable Quick boot, Fast boot, Silent boot,
Intel Rapid boot, and Quick POST, then reboot. If you are
still unable to access the configuration utility, check for a
system BIOS upgrade or use Megaconf.exe.
Step 3.
Select a configuration method.
Step 4.
Designate hot spare disks (optional).
Step 5.
Create arrays using the available physical drives.
Step 6.
Define the logical drive(s) using the space in the arrays.
Step 7.
Initialize the new logical drive(s).
Quick Configuration Steps for MegaRAID Manager
This section provides quick installation steps for users who are familiar
with the MegaRAID utilities and tools. See Section 3.4.4, “Configuring
Arrays and Logical Drives,” on page 3-18 for detailed configuration
instructions.
The steps to configure arrays and logical drives with the MegaRAID
CU are:
Step 1.
Boot the system to DOS, Red Hat Linux, or NetWare.
Step 2.
Start the MegaRAID Manager.
Step 3.
Select a configuration method.
Step 4.
Designate hot spares (optional).
Step 5.
Create arrays using the available physical drives.
Step 6.
Define the logical drive(s) using the space in the arrays.
Step 7.
Initialize the logical drives.
Quick Configuration Steps for MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-3
3.3
Configuration Utility Menu
Figure 3.1 shows the menu tree for the BIOS Configuration Utility and
MegaRAID Manager. The following sections describe each menu item.
Figure 3.1
MegaRAID Configuration Utility Menu Tree
Configure
(Section 3.3.1)
Easy Configuration
New Configuration
View/Add Configuration
Clear Configuration
Specify Boot Drive
Initialize (Section 3.3.2)
Adapter
Clear Configuration
Objects
(Section 3.3.3)
FlexRAID PowerFail
Fast Initialization
Disk Spin Up Timings
Cache Flush Timings
Rebuild Rate
Other Adapter Information
Factory Default
Disable BIOS
Emulation
Auto Rebuild
Initiator ID
Boot Time BIOS Options
Patrol ReadOptions
Logical Drive
Physical Drive
Channel
Battery Information
Patrol Read Mode
Patrol Read Status
Patrol Read Control
Initialize
Check Consistency
View/Update Parameters
RAID
Rebuild
Size
Clear
StripeSize
Force Online
Write Policy
Force Offline/Remove HSP
Read Policy
Make Hot Spare
Cache Policy
View Drive Information
#Stripes
View Rebuild Progress
Drive State
SCSI Command Qtagging
Transfer Speed Option
Channels
Termination State
SCSI Transfer Rate
Reset Battery Charge Counter
Clear (Section 3.3.4)
Rebuild (Section 3.3.5)
Check Consistency (Section 3.3.6)
Reconstruct (Section 3.3.7)
Select Adapter (Section 3.3.8)
3-4
BIOS Stops on Error
BIOS Echoes Message
BIOS Configuration Autoselection
Backup Module
Battery Pack
Temperature
Voltage
Fast Charging
No of Cycles
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3.3.1
Configure Menu
Select this option to configure physical arrays and logical drives. This
section describes the options of the Configure menu.
Configuration Menu Options – The Configure menu provides four
methods to modify and/or create logical disk configuration:
Easy Configuration, New Configuration, View/Add Configuration, and
Clear Configuration. Table 3.1 provides an overview of these methods.
The configuration menu has an Advance Menu that enables you to set
specific options. The available options depend upon the configuration
method you use.
To store the configuration information, the CU reserves 32 bytes on a
disk when a hard drive is configured.
Table 3.1
Configuration Utility Configure Menu
Option
Description
Easy
Configuration
Easy Configuration automatically associates every physical array with one logical drive.
Through the Advance Menu, Easy Configuration allows you to modify the RAID level,
stripe size, cache write policy, read policy, and I/O policy. Section 3.4.7.2, “Easy
Configuration,” on page 3-22 provides detailed instructions.
New
Configuration
New Configuration allows you to modify the RAID level, stripe size, cache write policy,
read policy, I/O policy, logical drive size, and array spanning (associating logical drives
with multiple arrays). If you select New Configuration, the CU deletes the existing
configuration information on the selected controller when saving the new configuration.
Section 3.4.7.3, “New Configuration and View/Add Configuration,” on page 3-24
provides detailed instructions.
View/Add
Configuration
View/Add Configuration allows you to control the same logical drive parameters as
New Configuration without disturbing the existing configuration information. The View/Add
configuration also allows you to enable the Configuration on Disk feature. Section 3.4.7.3,
“New Configuration and View/Add Configuration,” provides detailed instructions.
Clear
Configuration
This option erases the current configuration information.
Specify Boot
Drive
This option enables you to specify a logical drive as the boot drive on the adapter. This
displays if you have created logical drives.
Configuration Utility Menu
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-5
3.3.2
Initialize Option
This option initializes one or more logical drives, which prepares them for
use. Initialize each new logical drive you configure. Section 3.4.8,
“Initializing Logical Drives,” on page 3-26 describes how to initialize drives.
Warning:
3.3.3
Initializing a logical drive destroys all data on the logical drive.
Objects Menu
Select Objects from the Configuration Utility main menu to view or
change settings for the controller, logical drives, physical drives, and
channels. Table 3.2 lists and describes the Objects menu options.
Table 3.2
Configuration Utility Objects Menu
Menu Item
Description
Adapter
Use this option to configure the adapter properties. Section 3.3.3.1, “Adapter
Submenu Description,” on page 3-6 provides more information.
Logical Drive
Use this option to perform tasks on the logical drives. Section 3.3.3.4, “Logical
Drive Submenu Description,” on page 3-10 provides more information.
Physical Drive
Use this option to perform tasks on the physical drives. Section 3.3.3.5, “Physical
Drive Submenu Description,” on page 3-12 provides more information.
Channel
Use this option to configure channel-related or port-related properties.
Section 3.3.3.6, “Channel Submenu Description,” on page 3-13 provides
more information.
Battery
Information1
Use this option to display and configure the battery backup on your system, if your
system supports the battery backup feature. Section 3.3.3.7, “Battery Backup
Submenu Description,” on page 3-14 provides more information.
Reset Battery
Charge Counter1
Use this option to reset the battery charge counter.
1.
If the battery is not present on the board, this option does not display.
3.3.3.1
Adapter Submenu Description
The Adapter submenu allows you to select a MegaRAID controller if your
computer has multiple controllers. In addition, this submenu allows you
to modify the parameters for the selected controller. Select Adapter from
the Objects menu to select a controller and modify its parameters.
Table 3.3 provides Adapter submenu options.
3-6
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table 3.3
Configuration Utility Adapter Submenu
Option
Description
Clear Configuration
This option erases the current RAID configuration in the NVRAM.
FlexRAID PowerFail Use this option to enable the FlexRAID® PowerFail feature, which allows drive
reconstruction to continue when the system restarts after a power failure.
Fast Initialization
Use this option to initialize the logical drive by writing zeros to the first sector of
the logical drive. The fast initialization completes in 3 seconds.
When this option is set to Disabled, a full initialization takes place on the entire
logical drive. On a larger array (over five drives), LSI recommends setting fast
initialization to Disabled, then initializing. Otherwise, the controller runs a
background consistency check within 5 minutes of reboot or RAID 5 creation.
Disk Spin up Timings Use this option to configure the timing for spinning up the hard disk drives. The
options are Automatic, 2 disks every 6 secs, 4 disks every 6 secs, and
6 disks every 6 secs.
Cache Flush Timings Use this option to set the cache flush interval to 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 seconds.
Rebuild Rate
Use this option to change the drive rebuild rate. The rebuild rate is the
percentage of system resources dedicated to rebuilding a failed drive. A rebuild
rate of 100 percent means the system is totally dedicated to rebuilding the failed
drive. The default is 30 percent.
Other Adapter
Information
Use this option to display general information about the adapter, such as the
adapter type, firmware version, BIOS version, and DRAM size.
Factory Default
Use this option to load the default MegaRAID Configuration Utility settings.
Disable BIOS
Use this option to disable the BIOS.
Emulation
Use this option to select the I2C or mass storage mode. The default is mass
storage mode.
Auto Rebuild
Use this option to enable automatic drive rebuilds after a drive failure. The failed
drive is rebuilt with data from another drive or drives.
Initiator ID
Use this option to set the initiator ID for the adapter. The default is 7.
Boot Time BIOS
Options
The following are options you can select for events that occur during bootup,
such as BIOS error or messages.
• BIOS Stops on Error: Select this option to have the system BIOS stop during
bootup if there are BIOS errors. This gives you the option to enter the
configuration utility to resolve the problem.
• BIOS Echoes Messages: When set to On (the default), all controller BIOS
messages display during bootup.
• BIOS Configuration Autoselection: Use this option if there is a mismatch
between configuration data in the hard disk drives and NVRAM, so you can
select a method to resolve it. The options are Disk and User. The default
is User.
Configuration Utility Menu
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-7
Table 3.3
Option
Configuration Utility Adapter Submenu (Cont.)
Description
Patrol Read Options The Patrol Read function is designed as a preventive measure that includes
review of your system for possible physical disk errors that could lead to physical
disk failure and damage data integrity. The Patrol Read operation can find and
possibly resolve any potential problem with physical disks prior to host access.
This can enhance overall system performance because error recovery during a
normal I/O operation may not be necessary.
• Patrol Read Mode: The Patrol Read mode can be set to Auto or Manual
mode. In Auto mode, Patrol Read runs continuously on the system and is
scheduled to start a new Patrol Read within four hours after the last iteration
is completed.
• Patrol Read Status: Displays the number of iterations completed, the current
state of the patrol read (active or stopped), and the schedule for the next
execution of patrol read.
• Patrol Read Control: If you use Manual mode, select Patrol Read Control to
initiate a Patrol Read. Press ENTER, then select Start and press ENTER again.
3.3.3.2
Port Multiplier
The port multiplier is a mechanism that connects a MegaRAID SATA
controller to up to four hard drives per port. This allows you to connect
more devices, driving down the cost per port. For example, with the SATA
300-8X Controller, which has eight ports, you can connect up to 32
devices using eight, 1-to-4 port multipliers.
In the BIOS Configuration Utility, the default for the Port Multiplier option
is Disabled. You can access this option and select Enabled in order to
use the port multipliers. When you enable the Port Multiplier option, it
becomes effective after you reboot. When you reboot, the BIOS banner
displays either PM-ENBL or PM-DSBL to indicate whether the Port Multiplier
option is enabled or disabled.
You can change the setting for this option only if no logical drives are
configured. If you attempt to change the setting and if there are any
logical drives present, a message displays to state that this is not
allowed, as shown in Figure 3.2.
3-8
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 3.2
Port Multiplier Option
The BIOS Configuration Utility displays the port and physical drive
information in a matrix format. This format displays the port number and
ID numbers for the hard drives connected to each port. This format is
used for logical drive configuration, physical drive configuration, rebuilds,
and reconstructions. Figure 3.3 displays port and drive information in
this format.
Figure 3.3
Port and Drive Information
Configuration Utility Menu
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-9
3.3.3.3
Enclosure Management
MegaRAID SATA 300 RAID controllers offer enclosure management
through the same protocols used for SCSI Accessed Fault-Tolerant
Enclosures (SAF-TE), using an I2C interface to communicate with the
storage enclosure processor (SEP). This feature allows you to use RAID
capabilities provided by the SATA 300 adapters in an enclosure
containing your hard drives.
The SATA 300 controllers uses the SAF-TE command protocol to
communicate control and status with the SEP. The SAF-TE protocol,
defined in the SATA II specification, communicates or performs SAF-TE
operations such as setting the drive state and turning the LED on or off
with the SEP device. SEP is a microcontroller that resides on a SATA
backplane. It senses drive insertion status, drive activity, and status LEDs
for each hard drive slot. The drive status is reported and LED control
performed according to commands through the I2C bus. LEDs are
located on the backplane near each hard drive slot.
3.3.3.4
Logical Drive Submenu Description
Select this option from the Configuration Utility Objects menu to select a
logical drive and to perform the actions in Table 3.4.
Table 3.4
Configuration Utility Logical Drive Submenu
Option
Description
Initialize
Use this option to initialize the selected logical drive. Initialize every logical drive that
you configure.
Check
Consistency
Use this option to verify the correctness of the redundancy data in the selected logical
drive and have the CU automatically correct any differences found in the data. This
option is available if you are using RAID level 1, 5, 10, or 50.
View/Update
Parameters
Use this option to display the properties of the selected logical drive. This option allows
you to modify the cache write policy, read policy, and the I/O policy.
Refer to Section 3.9, “FlexRAID Virtual Sizing,” on page 3-32 for more information on
virtual sizing.
You can access the Advanced Menu from the View/Update Parameters option.
3-10
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
The View/Update Parameters submenu is accessible through the
View/Update Parameters option in the Logical Drive submenu. Table 3.5
describes the Advance submenu.
Table 3.5
Configuration Utility View/Update Parameters Submenu
Option
Description
RAID
Use this option to indicate the RAID level for the array. The number of physical drives
in a specific array determines the RAID levels that can be implemented with the array.
Size
Use this option to indicate the size of the logical drive in Mbytes.
Stripe Size
Use this option to specify the size of the segments written to each drive in a RAID 1,
5, 10, or 50 configuration. The default stripe size is 64 Kbytes. You can set the stripe
size to 8, 16, 32, 64, or 128 Kbytes.
A larger stripe size improves read performance, especially if your system performs
mostly sequential reads. However, if you are sure that your computer does random
read requests more often, select a small stripe size.
Write Policy1
Use this option to set the caching method to write-through or write-back. The default
setting is write-through caching. In write-through caching, the controller sends a data
transfer completion signal to the host after the disk subsystem receives all the data in
a transaction.
In write-back caching, the controller sends a data transfer completion signal to the
host after the controller cache receives all the data in a transaction.
Write-through caching has a data security advantage over write-back caching, while
write-back caching has a performance advantage.
Read Policy
Use this option to enable the read-ahead cache feature for the logical drive. You can
set this parameter to Normal, Read-Ahead, or Adaptive. The default setting is Normal.
Normal caching specifies that the controller reads only the requested data and does
not read ahead for the current logical drive.
Read-Ahead caching specifies that the controller uses read-ahead caching for the
current logical drive. Read-Ahead caching allows the controller to read sequentially
ahead of requested data and to store the additional data in cache memory,
anticipating that the data is needed soon. Read-Ahead supplies sequential data faster,
but is not as effective when accessing random data.
Adaptive specifies that the controller begins using Read-Ahead caching if the two
most recent disk accesses occurred in sequential sectors. If all read requests are
random, the algorithm reverts to Normal; however, all requests are still evaluated for
possible sequential operation.
Configuration Utility Menu
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-11
Table 3.5
Configuration Utility View/Update Parameters Submenu (Cont.)
Option
Description
Cache Policy
Use this option to enable read buffering in cache memory. Cache Policy applies to
reads on a specific logical drive. It does not affect the Read-Ahead cache. The default
setting is Direct I/O.
Cached I/O specifies that the controller buffers all reads in cache memory.
Direct I/O specifies that the controller does not buffer reads in cache memory. Data
is transferred to cache and the host concurrently. If the same data block is read again,
it comes from cache memory.
#Stripes
Indicates the number of data segments striped across hard drives in a logical drive.
Drive State
Indicates the drive state of a logical drive. The states are OPTIMAL, DEGRADED, and
OFFLINE.
1.
The adapter must have a battery backup unit to support write-back caching.
3.3.3.5
Physical Drive Submenu Description
Select this option from the Objects menu to select a physical drive and
to perform the operations listed in Table 3.6.
3-12
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table 3.6
Configuration Utility Physical Drive Submenu
Option
Description
Rebuild
Use this option to rebuild a failed physical drive that is part of a redundant
array. Data from a good drive or drives rebuilds the failed drive.
Clear
Use this option to clear the data from SCSI disk drives. This is for SCSI
drives only.
Force Online
Use this option to change the state of the selected disk drive to Online.
Force Offline/
Remove HSP
Use this option to change the state of the selected disk drive to Fail.
Make Hot Spare
Use this option to designate the selected disk drive as a hot spare. A hot
spare is an idle, powered-on standby drive ready for use if another drive fails.
When a drive fails, the controller firmware automatically rebuilds the data on
the hot spare from a redundant drive or drives. Data can be rebuilt only from
logical drives with redundancy (RAID 1, 5, 10, and 50, not RAID 0). The hot
spare must be at least as large as the failed drive it is replacing.
View Drive Information
Use this option to display the drive properties for the selected physical
device, such as device type, capacity, vendor ID, and device errors.
View Rebuild Progress
Use this option to enable synchronous negotiation with a physical device.
This is available only for SCSI controllers.
View Rebuild Progress
Use this option to view the progress of the physical drive rebuild.
SCSI Command
Qtagging
Use this option to set the number of queue tags per command to Disabled,
2, 3, 4, or Enhanced. The default setting is Enhanced. This option is
available for SCSI controllers only.
Transfer Speed Option
Use this option to set the data transfer speed.
3.3.3.6
Channel Submenu Description
Select this option from the Configuration Utility Objects menu to choose
a channel or port on the controller. Table 3.7 lists and describes the
Channel submenu options.
Table 3.7
Configuration Utility Channel Submenu
Option
Description
Termination State
Use this option to control termination on the MegaRAID SCSI controller. The
MegaRAID SCSI controller sets this option automatically, though you can set
it manually.
SCSI Transfer Rate
This option enables the user to set the SCSI transfer rate as Fast, Ultra, Ultra2,
Ultra160, or Ultra320 SCSI.
Configuration Utility Menu
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-13
3.3.3.7
Battery Backup Submenu Description
Select this option from the Configuration Utility Objects menu to display
information about the battery backup. Table 3.8 lists and describes the
options for the Battery Backup submenu. This option is available only on
controllers that support the battery back-up feature.
Note:
Table 3.8
If the battery is not present on the board, the battery
options do not display.
Configuration Utility Battery Backup Submenu
Option
Description
Backup Module Indicates whether the battery module is present.
Battery Pack
Indicates whether the battery module is correctly installed.
Temperature
Indicates whether the temperature is within the normal operating range.
Voltage
Indicates whether the voltage is within the normal operating range.
Fast Charging
Indicates whether the battery pack is charging, or if the fast charge cycle is complete.
No of Cycles
Indicates the number of charge cycles that the battery pack has undergone. The
battery pack life is 1100 charge cycles. You must replace the battery pack after it
reaches this limit.
3.3.4
Clear Option
Select the Clear option from the Configuration Utility Management Menu
to clear data on one or more physical drives.
You do not have to select Clear to erase existing information on your
disks, such as a system partition. Initialization of the logical drives erases
all the information on the drive.
3.3.5
Rebuild Option
Select this option to rebuild failed disk drives. If a disk drive fails that is
in a RAID 1, 5, 10, or 50 configuration, you can recover the lost data by
rebuilding the drive. The CU can perform an automatic rebuild if hot spare
disks are available in the system. If no hot spare disks are available, the
data must be manually rebuilt. Refer to Section 3.8, “Rebuilding Failed
Disks,” on page 3-30 for the procedure on rebuilding disks.
3-14
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3.3.6
Check Consistency Option
Select this option to verify the redundancy data in logical drives that use
RAID levels 1, 5, 10, or 50. When you select Check Consistency, the
system displays the parameters of the existing logical drives on the current
controller and a selection menu that lists the logical drives by number. The
CU automatically corrects any discrepancies with the assumption that the
data is correct and that the error exists in the parity information. However,
if the failure is a read error on a data drive, the bad data block is
reassigned with the generated data. See Section 3.10, “Checking Data
Consistency,” on page 3-32 for the Check Consistency procedure.
3.3.7
Reconstruct Option
Select this option to perform a reconstruction. A reconstruction occurs
when you change the RAID level of an array or add a physical drive to
an existing array. Refer to Section 3.11, “Reconstructing Logical Drives,”
on page 3-33 for the procedure to perform a reconstruction.
3.3.8
Select Adapter Menu
This menu item appears only if the system contains more than one
MegaRAID host adapter. The CU lists the adapters present in the system
after you choose the Select Adapter option. Select the MegaRAID
adapter that you want to configure from this menu.
Configuration Utility Menu
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-15
3.4
Detailed Configuration Instructions
This section provides detailed instructions for configuring the logical
disks and arrays in a MegaRAID system. MegaRAID provides several hot
keys that you can use during the configuration process. Table 3.9
summarizes the hot key definitions.
Table 3.9
3.4.1
Configuration Hot Keys
Key
Function
F2
Use this option to display the manufacturer data and error count for the
selected drive.
F3
Use this option to display the configured logical drives.
F4
Use this option to designate the selected drive as a hot spare.
F10
Use this option to display the logical drive configuration screen. The option
is available only when using New Configuration or View/Add Configuration.
Starting the MegaRAID Configuration Utility
While the host computer boots, hold the CTRL key and press the M key
when a BIOS banner such as the following appears:
Press <Ctrl><M> to run MegaRAID BIOS Configuration Utility
This causes the CU start-up window to appear. For each MegaRAID
adapter in the host system, the CU displays the firmware version, the
DRAM size, and the status of logical drives on the adapter. If you do not
press CTRL+M within a few seconds of the prompt, the system continues
the normal boot procedure.
Note:
3.4.2
You can access multiple controllers through the BIOS
Configuration Utility. Be sure to verify which controller you
are currently set to edit.
Resolving a Configuration Mismatch
A configuration mismatch happens when the configuration data in the
NVRAM and that on the hard disk drives are different. In case of a
configuration mismatch, the following message displays during the
power-on self-test (POST): Unresolved configuration mismatch
between disk(s) and NVRAM on the adapter.
3-16
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
You need to update the configuration data in either the NVRAM or on the
hard disk drive. Perform the following steps to resolve the mismatch.
Step 1.
Press CTRL+M when prompted during bootup to access the
BIOS Configuration Utility.
Step 2.
Select Configure → View/Add Configuration.
This gives you the option to view both the configuration on the
NVRAM and the hard drive disk.
3.4.3
Step 3.
Select either NVRAM or configuration on disk.
Step 4.
Press ESC and select YES to update the configuration data.
Step 5.
Press ESC to exit, then reboot.
Starting MegaRAID Manager
MegaRAID Manager runs under the following operating systems:
•
MS-DOS
•
NetWare
•
Red Hat Linux
Note:
For more information about these operating systems and
driver installation, refer to the MegaRAID Device Driver
Installation User’s Guide.
To start MegaRAID Manager, ensure the program file is in your file path.
In DOS, type:
MegaConf
In NetWare, type:
load megamgr
For any other operating system (OS), refer to the documentation that
accompanied the OS.
Detailed Configuration Instructions
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-17
3.4.4
Configuring Arrays and Logical Drives
The following procedures apply to both the BIOS Configuration Utility and
MegaRAID Manager.
Step 1.
Designate hot spares (optional).
See Section 3.4.6, “Designating Drives as Hot Spares” in this
section for more information.
Step 2.
Select a configuration method.
See Section 3.4.7, “Creating Physical Arrays and Logical
Drives” in this section for more information.
Step 3.
Create arrays using the available physical drives.
Step 4.
Define logical drives using the arrays.
Step 5.
Save the configuration information.
Step 6.
Initialize the logical drives.
See Section 3.4.8, “Initializing Logical Drives” in this section for
more information.
3.4.5
Selecting a Configuration Method
The Configure Menu has options for Easy Configuration, New
Configuration, View/Add Configuration, or Clear Configuration.
Section 3.4.7, “Creating Physical Arrays and Logical Drives,” provides
detailed instructions for using each configuration method.
Caution:
3.4.6
When you use the New Configuration option to create a
configuration, the existing configuration data is erased.
Designating Drives as Hot Spares
Hot spare drives are physical drives that power up along with the RAID
drives and operate in a standby state. If a hard drive used in a RAID
logical drive fails, a hot spare automatically takes its place and the data
on the failed drive is rebuilt on the hot spare. Hot spares can be used for
RAID levels 1, 5, 10, and 50.
The hot spare has to be at least as large as the hard drive that it
replaces. Only global hot spares can be assigned; dedicated hot spares
cannot be assigned.
3-18
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
There are two methods for designating physical drives as hot spares:
•
Pressing F4 while creating arrays in Easy, New or View/Add
Configuration mode.
•
Using the Objects → Physical Drive menu.
F4 Key –
When you select any configuration option, a list of all physical devices
connected to the current controller appears. Perform the following steps
to designate a drive as a hot spare:
Step 1.
On the Management Menu select Configure, then a
configuration option.
Step 2.
Press the arrow keys to highlight a hard drive that displays as
READY.
Step 3.
Press F4 to designate the drive as a hot spare.
Step 4.
Click YES to make the hot spare.
The drive displays as HOTSP.
Step 5.
Save the configuration.
Objects Menu –
Step 1.
On the Management Menu select Objects → Physical Drive.
A physical drive selection screen appears.
Step 2.
Select a hard drive in the READY state and press ENTER to
display the action menu for the drive.
Step 3.
Press the arrow keys to select Make Hot spare and press
ENTER.
The selected drive displays as HOTSP.
3.4.7
Creating Physical Arrays and Logical Drives
This subsection provides instructions for using the Easy Configuration,
New Configuration, and View/Add Configuration. LSI recommends using
drives with the same capacity in a specific array. If you use drives with
different capacities in an array, the CU treats all these drives as if they
have the capacity of the smallest drive.
Detailed Configuration Instructions
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-19
The number of physical drives in a specific array determines the RAID
levels that you can implement with the array. RAID 0 requires one or
more physical drives. RAID 1 requires exactly two physical drives.
RAID 5 requires at least three physical drives.
Note:
3.4.7.1
The firmware does not support creation of logical drives
greater than 2 Tbytes.
Logical Drive Parameters
The following paragraphs describe the parameters that you can set for
the logical drives, which include the RAID level, stripe size, read policy,
write policy, cache policy, and spanning mode.
After you create an array or arrays, you can select the parameters for the
logical drive. Table 3.10 contains descriptions of the parameters.
3-20
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table 3.10
Logical Drive Parameters and Descriptions
Parameter
Description
RAID Level
The number of physical drives in a specific array determines the RAID levels that can
be implemented with the array.
Stripe Size
The stripe size parameter specifies the size of the segments written to each disk in
a RAID 1, 5, 10, or 50 configuration. You can set the stripe size as 8, 16, 32, 64, or
128 Kbytes. The default is 64 Kbytes.
A larger stripe size produces higher read performance, especially if your computer
does mostly sequential reads. If your computer regularly performs random read
requests, select a smaller stripe size.
Write Policy
Write Policy specifies the cache write parameter. You can set the write policy to
Write-back or Write-through.
In Write-back caching, the controller sends a data transfer completion signal to the
host when the controller cache has received all the data in a transaction. LSI
recommends using this setting in standard mode.
Note:
If Write-back is enabled and the system is quickly turned off and on,
the RAID controller may hang when flushing cache memory.
Controllers that contain a battery backup default to Write-back
caching.
In Write-through caching, the controller sends a data transfer completion signal to the
host when the disk subsystem has received all the data in a transaction.
Write-through caching has a data security advantage over write-back caching, while
write-back caching has a performance advantage.
Note:
Read Policy
Enabling clustering turns off write cache. The MegaRAID 320-2
controller supports clustering.
The read parameter determines the type of read option for the logical drive. You can
set this parameter to Normal, Read-ahead, or Adaptive. The default setting is Normal.
The options are
• Normal specifies that the controller reads only the requested data and does not
read ahead for the current logical drive.
• Read-ahead specifies that the controller uses read-ahead for the current logical
drive. Read-ahead capability allows the adapter to read sequentially ahead of
requested data and store the additional data in cache memory, anticipating that
the data is needed soon. Read-ahead supplies sequential data faster, but is not
as effective when accessing random data.
• Adaptive specifies that the controller begins using read-ahead if the two most
recent disk accesses occurred in sequential sectors. If all read requests are
random, the algorithm reverts to Normal; however, all requests are still evaluated
for possible sequential operation.
Detailed Configuration Instructions
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-21
Table 3.10
Logical Drive Parameters and Descriptions (Cont.)
Parameter
Description
Cache Policy
Use this option to enable read buffering in cache memory. Cache Policy applies to
reads on a specific logical drive. It does not affect the Read-ahead cache. The default
setting is Direct I/O.
• Cached I/O specifies that the controller buffers reads in cache memory.
• Direct I/O specifies that reads and writes are not buffered in cache memory. Direct
I/O does not override the read policy settings. Data is transferred to cache and the
host concurrently. If the same data block is read again, it comes from cache memory.
Span
The RAID controller supports spanning of RAID 1 and 5 arrays. You can span two or
more RAID 1 arrays into a RAID 10 array and two or more RAID 5 arrays into a RAID
50 array. The maximum number of drives that you can span is eight. For two arrays
to be spanned, they must have the same stripe width (they must contain the same
number of physical drives).
The options are:
Yes – Array spanning is enabled for the current logical drive. The logical drive can
occupy space in more than one array.
No – Array spanning is disabled for the current logical drive. The logical drive can
occupy space in only one array.
3.4.7.2
Easy Configuration
In Easy Configuration, the CU associates each hard drive with a single
logical drive. If logical drives have already been configured, the CU does
not change their configuration. Perform the following steps to create
arrays using Easy Configuration.
Step 1.
Select Configure → Easy Configuration from the MegaRAID
CU Main menu.
The Management Menu array selection menu appears.
Step 2.
Press the arrow keys to select specific physical drives.
Step 3.
Press the spacebar to associate the selected physical drive
with the current array.
After you associate a physical drive with a current array, the
indicator for the drive changes from READY to ONLIN A[array
number]-[drive number]. For example, ONLIN A2-3
indicates array 2 with disk drive 3.
Step 4.
3-22
Press ENTER after you finish creating the current array.
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
The logical drive configuration screen appears. It displays the
logical drive number, RAID level, logical drive size, the number
of stripes in the physical array, the stripe size, and the state of
the logical drive.
Note:
Step 5.
The firmware does not support creation of logical drives
greater than 2 Tbytes.
Highlight RAID and press ENTER to set the RAID level for the
logical drive.
The CU displays the available RAID levels for the current
logical drive.
Step 6.
Select a RAID level and press ENTER.
Step 7.
Click Advanced Menu to open the menu for logical drive settings.
Step 8.
Set the Stripe Size.
Step 9.
Set the Write Policy.
Step 10. Set the Read Policy.
Step 11. Set the Cache Policy.
Step 12. Press ESC to exit the Advanced Menu.
Step 13. After you define the current logical drive, select Accept and
press ENTER.
The array selection screen appears if any disk drives remain
unconfigured.
Step 14. Repeat these steps to configure additional logical drives,
if desired.
MegaRAID supports up to 40 logical drives per controller.
Step 15. If you are through configuring logical drives, press ESC to exit
Easy Configuration.
Step 16. Save the configuration when prompted.
Step 17. Initialize the logical drives.
Refer to Section 3.4.8, “Initializing Logical Drives,” on page 3-26
for detailed instructions.
Detailed Configuration Instructions
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-23
3.4.7.3
New Configuration and View/Add Configuration
New Configuration and View/Add Configuration associate logical drives
with partial and/or multiple physical arrays. New Configuration deletes the
existing configuration and replaces it with the configuration that you specify.
View/Add Configuration lets you view or modify an existing configuration.
Caution:
The New Configuration option erases the existing
configuration data when you save the new array
configuration.
Perform the following steps to configure a disk array using
New Configuration or View/Add Configuration.
Step 1.
Select Configure → New Configuration or Configure →
View/Add Configuration from the Management Menu.
The CU displays an array selection window.
Step 2.
Use the arrow keys to select specific physical drives to include
in the array.
Step 3.
Press the spacebar to associate the selected physical drive
with the current array.
The indicator for the selected drive changes from READY to
ONLIN A[array number]-[drive number]. For example,
ONLIN A2-3 means disk drive 3 in array 2.
Step 4.
Press ENTER after you create the current array.
Step 5.
Press F10 to configure logical drives.
Step 6.
Highlight RAID and press ENTER to set the RAID level for the
logical drive.
The CU displays the available RAID levels for the current
logical drive.
Step 7.
Select a RAID level and press ENTER.
If you have two RAID 1 or RAID 5 arrays, the spanning mode
is set automatically for RAID 10 and RAID 50.
Step 8.
3-24
Move the cursor to Size and press ENTER to set the logical
drive size.
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
By default, the logical drive size associates the available space
in the array(s) with the current logical drive, accounting for the
Span setting and partially-used array space.
Step 9.
Highlight Span and press ENTER.
Table 3.11 describes the spanning mode options.
Table 3.11
Spanning Mode Options
Spanning Option Description
CanSpan
This option enables array spanning for the current logical
drive. The logical drive can occupy space in more than
one array.
NoSpan
This option disables array spanning for the current logical
drive. The logical drive can occupy space in only one array.
For two arrays to be spannable, they must have the same stripe
width and must be consecutively numbered. For example, if
Array 2 contains four disk drives, you can span it only with
Array 1 and/or Array 3, and only if Arrays 1 and 3 each contain
four disk drives. If the criteria are not met, the CU ignores the
span setting for the current logical drive.
Step 10. Select Advanced Menu to open the menu for logical
drive settings.
Step 11. Set the Stripe Size by pressing ENTER and selecting a value.
Step 12. Set the Write Policy.
Step 13. Set the Read Policy.
Step 14. Set the Cache Policy.
Step 15. Press ESC to exit the Advanced Menu.
Step 16. After you define the current logical drive, select Accept and
press ENTER.
If space remains in the arrays, the next logical drive to be
configured appears. If the array space has been used, a list of
the existing logical drives appears.
Step 17. Press any key to continue, then respond to the Save prompt.
Detailed Configuration Instructions
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-25
Step 18. Initialize the logical drives you just configured.
Section 3.4.8, “Initializing Logical Drives,” on page 3-26
provides detailed instructions.
3.4.8
Initializing Logical Drives
You can initialize the logical drives individually or in batches. Individual
initialization initializes a single logical disk. Batch initialization initializes
up to 40 logical drives simultaneously.
Note:
If there are five or more drives in a RAID 5 array,
background batch initialization starts automatically.
Batch Initialization – Perform the following step to initialize logical
drives.
Step 1.
Select Initialize from the Management Menu.
A list of the current logical drives appears.
Step 2.
Press the spacebar to select the desired logical drive for
initialization.
Optionally, you can press F2 to select or deselect all
logical drives.
Step 3.
After you finish selecting logical drives, press F10 and select
Yes at the confirmation prompt.
The CU displays a bar graph showing the initialization progress.
Step 4.
When initialization is complete, press any key to continue or
press ESC to display the Management Menu.
Individual Initialization –
Step 1.
Select Objects → Logical Drive from the Management Menu.
Step 2.
Select the logical drive to be initialized.
Step 3.
Select Initialize from the action menu.
Initialization progress appears as a bar graph on the screen.
Step 4.
3-26
When initialization completes, press any key to display the
previous menu.
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3.5
Deleting Logical Drives
This RAID controller supports the ability to delete any unwanted logical
drives and use that space for a new logical drive. You can have an array
with multiple logical drives and delete a logical drive without deleting the
whole array.
After you delete a logical drive, you can create a new one. You can use
the configuration utilities to create the next logical drive from the
noncontiguous free space (holes), and from the newly created arrays.
The configuration utility provides a list of configurable arrays where there
is a space to configure.
Note:
The deletion of the logical drive can fail under certain
conditions: During a rebuild, initialization or check
consistency of a logical drive, if that drive has a higher
logical drive number than the drive you want to delete.
Perform the following steps to delete logical drives:
Step 1.
Select Objects → Logical Drive from the Management Menu.
The logical drives display.
Step 2.
Use the arrow key to highlight the logical drive you want to
delete.
Step 3.
Press F5 to delete the logical drive.
This deletes the logical drive and makes the space it occupied
available for you to make another logical drive.
3.6
Performing Drive Roaming
Drive roaming occurs when the hard drives are changed to different
channels or different target IDs on the same controller. When the drives
are placed on different channels, the controller detects the RAID
configuration from the configuration data on the drives.
Deleting Logical Drives
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-27
Configuration data is saved in both nonvolatile random access memory
(NVRAM) on the RAID controller and on the hard drives attached to the
controller. This maintains the integrity of the data on each drive, even if
the drives have changed their target ID.
Note:
In a clustering environment, drive roaming is supported
within the same channel only. Drive roaming between
channels in a cluster is not supported.
Note:
Drive roaming from multiple controllers to a cluster-configured
controller is not supported.
Perform the following steps to use drive roaming:
Step 1.
Turn off all power to the system and all hard drives, enclosures,
and system components, then disconnect power cords from
the system.
Step 2.
Open the host system by following the instructions in the host
system technical documentation.
Step 3.
Remove the unshielded, twisted pair, SCSI ribbon cable
connectors from the internal drives or the shielded cables from
the external drives you want to move.
- Make sure pin 1 on the cable matches pin 1 on the connector.
- Make sure that the SCSI cables conform to all SCSI
specifications.
Step 4.
Connect the hard drives to different connectors on the cable.
Step 5.
Determine the SCSI ID and SCSI termination requirements.
Note:
Step 6.
Step 7.
The default for SCSI termination is onboard SCSI termination
enabled. See the MegaRAID 320 Storage Adapters User’s
Guide for more information about SCSI termination.
Perform a safety check.
◊
Make sure all cables are properly attached.
◊
Make sure the RAID controller is properly installed.
◊
Close the cabinet of the host system.
◊
Turn power on after completing the safety check.
Power on the system.
The controller then detects the RAID configuration from the
configuration data on the drives.
3-28
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3.7
Performing Drive Migration
Drive migration is the transfer of a set of hard drives in an existing
configuration from one controller to another. If you put the hard drives on
a new controller, the controller must have a clear configuration.
Drive migration is the transfer of a set of hard drives in an existing
configuration from one controller to another. If you put the hard drives on
a new controller, the controller must have a clear configuration. To keep
the original configuration, the drives must remain on the same channel
and be reinstalled in the same order as were on the previous controller.
Note:
Drive roaming and drive migration cannot be supported at
the same time. The MegaRAID controller can support
either drive roaming or drive migration, but not both at the
same time.
The drives must remain on the same channel and be reinstalled in the
same order as in the original configuration. You can perform online RAID
level migration when you do this. In addition, no reboot is necessary after
capacity expansion.
Perform the following steps to migrate drives:
Step 1.
Turn off all power to the system and all hard drives, enclosures,
and system components, then disconnect power cords from the
systems.
Step 2.
Open the host systems by following the instructions in the host
system technical documentation.
Step 3.
Remove the unshielded, twisted pair, SCSI ribbon cable
connectors from the internal drives or the shielded cables from
the external drives you want to migrate.
◊
Make sure pin 1 on the cable matches pin 1 on the connector.
◊
Make sure that the SCSI cables conform to all SCSI
specifications.
Step 4.
Remove the hard drives from the first system and insert them
into drive bays on the second.
Step 5.
Connect the SCSI cables to the hard drives in the second system.
Step 6.
Determine the SCSI ID and SCSI termination requirements.
Performing Drive Migration
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-29
Note:
Step 7.
The default for SCSI termination is onboard SCSI termination
enabled. See the MegaRAID 320 Storage Adapters User’s
Guide for more information of SCSI termination.
Perform a safety check.
◊
Make sure all cables are properly attached.
◊
Make sure the RAID controller is properly installed.
◊
Close the cabinet of the host system.
◊
Turn power on after completing the safety check.
Step 8.
Power on the system.
The controller then detects the RAID configuration from the
configuration data on the drives.
3.8
Rebuilding Failed Disks
If hot spare disks are present in the system, the MegaRAID controller
automatically uses them to rebuild failed disks.
3.8.1
Rebuild Types
Table 3.12 describes automatic and manual rebuilds.
Table 3.12
Rebuild Types
Type
Description
Automatic
Rebuild
If you have configured hot spares, the RAID controller automatically tries to use them to
rebuild failed disks. Select Objects → Physical Drive to display the list of physical drives
while a rebuild is in progress. The hot spare drive changes to REBLD A[array number][drive number], indicating the hard drive is being replaced by the hot spare. For example,
REBLD A01-02 indicates that the data is being rebuilt in array 1 on hard drive 2.
Manual
Rebuild
Manual rebuild is necessary if no hot spares with enough capacity to rebuild the failed
drives are available.You must insert a drive with enough storage into the subsystem
before rebuilding the failed drive.
The CU allows manual rebuild for an individual drive or a group of drives. Rebuilding a
group of drives is done through the batch mode. Use the following procedures to rebuild
a failed drive manually in individual or batch mode.
3-30
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3.8.2
Manual Rebuild – Rebuilding an Individual Drive
To perform a batch rebuild on an individual drive, follow these steps:
Step 1.
Select Objects → Physical Drive from the Management Menu.
A device selection window displays the devices connected to
the current controller.
Step 2.
Designate an available drive as a hot spare before the
rebuild starts.
See Section 3.4.6, “Designating Drives as Hot Spares” for
instructions on designating a hot spare.
Step 3.
Press the arrow keys to select the failed physical drive you want
to rebuild, then press ENTER.
Step 4.
Select Rebuild from the action menu and respond to the
confirmation prompt.
Rebuilding can take some time, depending on the drive capacity.
Step 5.
3.8.3
When the rebuild is complete, press any key to display the
previous menu.
Manual Rebuild – Rebuilding in Batch Mode
To perform a batch rebuild on a group of drives, follow these steps:
Step 1.
Select Rebuild from the MegaRAID Configuration Utility main
menu. The CU displays a device selection window that marks
the failed drives with FAIL indicators.
Step 2.
Press the arrow keys to select all drives to be rebuilt. Press the
spacebar to select the chosen physical drive for rebuild.
Step 3.
After selecting the physical drives, press F10, and select Yes at
the confirmation prompt. The indicators for the selected drives
change to REBLD.
Step 4.
When rebuild is complete, press any key to continue. Press
ESC to display the main menu.
Rebuilding Failed Disks
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-31
3.9
FlexRAID Virtual Sizing
The FlexRAID Virtual Sizing option can no longer be enabled on the
MegaRAID 320-1 or 320-2 controllers. This option allowed the
Windows NT and NetWare 5.1 operating systems to use the new space
of a RAID array immediately after you added capacity online or
performed a reconstruction.
If you have this option enabled on older cards, you need to disable it,
then upgrade the firmware. Perform the following steps to do this:
Step 1.
Go to the www.lsilogic.com web site.
Step 2.
Download the latest firmware and driver to a diskette or directly
to your system.
The download is an executable file.
Step 3.
Unzip the file and extract it to a blank diskette.
Step 4.
Boot with a DOS diskette to the DOS prompt.
Step 5.
Insert the diskette with the extracted files and type mflash to
flash the firmware.
3.10 Checking Data Consistency
Select this option to verify the data redundancy in logical drives that use
RAID levels 1, 5, 10, and 50. (RAID 0 does not provide data
redundancy.) The parameters of the existing logical drives appear.
Discrepancies are automatically corrected when the data is correct.
However, if the failure is a read error on a data drive, the bad data block
is reassigned and the data is regenerated.
Important:
3-32
LSI recommends that you run periodic data consistency
checks on a redundant array. This allows detection and
automatic replacement of bad blocks. Finding a bad block
during a rebuild of a failed drive is a serious problem, as the
system does not have the redundancy to recover the data.
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Perform the following steps to run Check Consistency.
Step 1.
Select Check Consistency from the Management Menu.
Step 2.
Press the arrow keys to highlight the desired logical drives.
Step 3.
Press the spacebar to select or deselect a drive for consistency
checking.
Step 4.
Press F2 to select or deselect all the logical drives.
Step 5.
Press F10 to begin the consistency check.
A progress graph for each selected logical drive displays.
Step 6.
When the check is finished, press any key to clear the
progress display.
Step 7.
Press ESC to display the Management Menu.
(To check an individual drive, select Objects → Logical Drives from the
Management Menu, the desired logical drive(s), then Check Consistency
on the action menu.)
3.11 Reconstructing Logical Drives
A reconstruction occurs when you change the RAID level of an array or
add a physical drive to an existing array. Perform the following steps to
reconstruct a logical drive:
Step 1.
Move the arrow key to highlight Reconstruct on the
Management Menu.
Step 2.
Press ENTER.
The window entitled Reconstructables displays. This contains
the logical drives that can be reconstructed. You can press F2
to view logical drive information or ENTER to select the
reconstruct option.
Step 3.
Press ENTER.
The next reconstruction window displays. The options on this
window are the spacebar to select a drive, ENTER to open the
reconstruct menu, and F3 to display logical drive information.
Reconstructing Logical Drives
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-33
Step 4.
Press ENTER to open the reconstruct menu.
The menu items are RAID level, stripe size, and reconstruct.
Step 5.
To change the RAID level, select RAID with the arrow key, and
press ENTER.
Step 6.
Select Reconstruct and press ENTER to reconstruct the
logical drive.
Note:
After you start the reconstruct process, you must wait until
it is complete. You cannot reboot, cancel, or exit until the
reconstruction is complete.
3.12 Replacing a Failed Controller Containing Data in
the TBBU
The MegaRAID Transportable Battery Backup Module (TBBU) is a cache
memory module with an integrated battery pack. The module provides
an uninterrupted power source to the module if power is unexpectedly
interrupted while there is still cached data present. If the power failure is
the result of the MegaRAID controller itself failing, then the TBBU can be
moved to a new controller and the data recovered. The replacement
controller must have a cleared configuration.
Perform the following steps to replace a failed controller with data in the
transportable battery backup unit.
Step 1.
Power-down the system and drives.
Step 2.
Remove the failed controller from the system.
Step 3.
Remove the TBBU from the failed controller.
Step 4.
Insert the TBBU into the replacement controller.
Step 5.
Insert the replacement controller into the system.
Step 6.
Power-on the system.
The controller then reads the disk configuration into NVRAM
and flush cache data to the logical drives.
3-34
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Resolving a Configuration Mismatch in a Replacement Controller –
When you move a TBBU from the failed controller to a replacement
controller, a configuration mismatch occurs if the replacement controller
has a previous configuration. A configuration mismatch happens when
the configuration data in the NVRAM and that on the hard disk drives
are different.
In case of a configuration mismatch, the following message displays
during the power-on self-test (POST): Unresolved configuration
mismatch between disk(s) and NVRAM on the adapter.
In this situation, you need to update the configuration data in the NVRAM
with the data from the hard disk drive. Perform the following steps to
resolve the mismatch.
Step 1.
Press CTRL+M when prompted during bootup to access the
BIOS Configuration Utility.
Step 2.
Select Configure → View/Add Configuration.
This gives you the option to view both the configuration on the
NVRAM and the hard drive disk.
Step 3.
Select the configuration on disk.
Step 4.
Press ESC and select YES to update the NVRAM.
Step 5.
Press ESC to exit, then reboot.
3.13 Using a Preloaded System Drive
Note:
Define a preloaded system drive as the first logical drive. If
the drive is not a boot device, the logical drive number is
not critical.
You can use the MegaRAID controller as the adapter for this drive by
performing the following steps:
Step 1.
Connect the drive to the channel or port on the MegaRAID
controller.
Step 2.
Boot the computer, then start the Configuration Utility.
Step 3.
Select Easy Configuration from the Configure menu.
Using a Preloaded System Drive
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
3-35
Step 4.
Press the cursor keys to select the preloaded drive.
Step 5.
Press the spacebar.
The preloaded drive now becomes an array element.
Step 6.
Press ENTER. The preloaded drive is a one-disk array.
Step 7.
Display the logical drive configuration screen.
Step 8.
Set the read policy and cache option on the Advanced menu.
Step 9.
Press ESC to exit the Advanced menu, then highlight Accept
and press ENTER.
Step 10. Press ESC and select Yes at the Save prompt.
Step 11. Exit Configuration Utility and reboot.
Step 12. Set the host system to boot from the drive.
3.14 Exiting MegaRAID Configuration Utility
Press ESC when the MegaRAID Configuration Utility management menu
is displayed to exit MegaRAID Configuration Utility.
3-36
BIOS Configuration Utility and MegaRAID Manager
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Chapter 4
WebBIOS
Configuration Utility
This chapter describes the WebBIOS Configuration Utility and consists
of the following sections:
4.1
•
Section 4.1, “General Description”
•
Section 4.2, “Quick Configuration Steps”
•
Section 4.3, “Starting the WebBIOS Configuration Utility on the
Host Computer”
•
Section 4.4, “Screen and Option Descriptions”
•
Section 4.5, “Configuring RAID Arrays and Logical Drives”
General Description
The WebBIOS Configuration Utility (CU) provides a Web-based utility to
configure and manage RAID volumes. The utility configures disk arrays
and logical drives. Its operation is independent of the operating system
because the utility resides in the MegaRAID BIOS.
The WebBIOS CU performs the following actions:
•
Displays adapter properties
•
Scans devices
•
Creates physical arrays
•
Defines logical drives
•
Displays logical drive properties
•
Initializes logical drives
•
Checks data for consistency
MegaRAID Configuration Software User’s Guide
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
4-1
•
Displays the physical properties of devices
•
Allows capacity expansion and drive migration
The WebBIOS CU provides a configuration wizard to guide you through
the configuration of logical drives and physical arrays.
4.2
Quick Configuration Steps
This section provides the steps to configure arrays and logical drives
using the WebBIOS CU. The following sections describe how to perform
each action using the WebBIOS CU. The steps are:
4.3
Step 1.
Power-on the system.
Step 2.
Start the WebBIOS CU by pressing CTRL+H.
Step 3.
Start the Configuration Wizard.
Step 4.
Select a configuration method.
Step 5.
Create arrays using the available physical drives.
Step 6.
Define the logical drive(s) using the space in the arrays.
Step 7.
Initialize the new logical drives.
Starting the WebBIOS Configuration Utility on the
Host Computer
While the host computer boots, hold down the CTRL key and press the
H key when the following appears:
Copyright© LSI Logic Corporation
Press <Ctrl><M> to Run Configuration Utility
Or press <Ctrl><H> for WebBIOS
After you press CTRL+H, the Adapter Selection screen displays, as
shown in Figure 4.1. This screen lists the adapters, adapter numbers,
and firmware versions. Select an adapter and press the Start button to
begin the configuration.
4-2
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Note:
Figure 4.1
If there is a configuration mismatch between the disks and
the nonvolatile random access memory (NVRAM), the CU
displays the Select Configuration screen.
WebBIOS Adapter Selection Screen
Starting the WebBIOS Configuration Utility on the Host Computer
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
4-3
4.4
Screen and Option Descriptions
This section describes the various WebBIOS screens and options.
4.4.1
WebBIOS Toolbar Options
Table 4.1 describes the WebBIOS toolbar icons.
Table 4.1
Icon
WebBIOS Toolbar Icon Descriptions
Description
Click this icon to return to the main screen.
Click this icon to return to the page you accessed immediately before the current page.
Click this icon to exit the WebBIOS program.
Click this icon to display the adapters that you can select.
Click this icon to scan for devices connected to your system.
Click this icon to display the properties of the adapter, such as the firmware version,
BIOS version, RAM size, and initiator ID.
Click the icon to access the Configuration Wizard so that you can configure the
arrays and logical drives.
Click this icon to turn off the sound on the alarm.
Click this icon to display the WebBIOS version, browser version, and HTML
interface engine.
4-4
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
4.4.2
Main Screen
When you press CTRL+H on the host computer, the WebBIOS CU
displays the main screen.
Figure 4.2
WebBIOS Main Screen
From the main screen you can scan the devices connected to the
controller, select a MegaRAID adapter if multiple adapters are in the
system, alternate between the physical devices view and the logical
devices view, and access other screens. The main screen provides the
following options:
•
Adapter Properties
•
Scan Devices
•
SCSI Channel Properties
•
Logical Drives
•
Physical Drives
•
Configuration Wizard
Screen and Option Descriptions
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
4-5
4.4.3
•
Adapter Selection
•
Physical View
•
Exit
Adapter Properties Screen
The Adapter Properties screen, as Figure 4.3 shows, allows you to view
and configure the software and hardware of the selected adapter. You
access the Adapter Properties screen from the WebBIOS main screen.
Figure 4.3
4-6
WebBIOS Adapter Properties Screen
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table 4.2 describes the Adapter Properties menu options.
Table 4.2
WebBIOS Adapter Properties Menu Options
Option
Description
Firmware Version
This option displays the firmware version number.
BIOS Version
This option displays the BIOS version number.
Battery Backup
This option indicates whether battery backup is present. If present, click
Present to display the following battery details: temperature, voltage,
progress of charging, number of cycles, and reset option.
RAM Size
This option displays the size of the random access memory (RAM).
Cluster Mode
Use this option to enable or disable cluster mode. The default is Disabled.
When this is disabled, the system operates in standard mode. A cluster is
a grouping of independent servers that can access the same data storage
and provide services to a common set of clients.
Initiator ID
Identifying number for the MegaRAID card. The default is 7. You can
change the Initiator ID only when you are in cluster mode. You cannot
change the ID while in standard mode. The ID can be a number from 0 to
15. We recommend that you use 6 or 7. When you are in standard mode,
the ID is always 7.
Rebuild Rate
Use this option to select the rebuild rate for drives attached to the selected
adapter. The default is 30 percent. The rebuild rate is the percentage of
system resources dedicated to rebuilding a failed drive. A rebuild rate of 100
percent means the system is totally dedicated to rebuilding a failed drive.
FlexRAID PowerFail
Use this option to enable the FlexRAID PowerFail feature, which allows drive
reconstruction, rebuild, or check consistency to continue when the system
restarts after a power failure, reset, or hard boot. The default is Enabled.
Alarm Control
Use this option to enable, disable, or silence the onboard alarm tone
generator. The default is Disabled.
Adapter BIOS
Use this option to enable the adapter BIOS. The default is Enabled. If the
boot device is on the RAID controller, the BIOS must be enabled; otherwise,
the BIOS should be disabled or it might not be possible to use a boot
device elsewhere.
Set Factory Defaults
Use this option to load the default MegaRAID WebBIOS CU settings. The
default is No.
ChkConst Restore
When enabled, this option allows the firmware to fix medium errors found
during a data consistency check. The medium error is logged in the
NVRAM. The default is Enabled.
Screen and Option Descriptions
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
4-7
Table 4.2
WebBIOS Adapter Properties Menu Options (Cont.)
Option
Description
Force Boot Option
Use this option to determine how the BIOS handles a configuration
mismatch. A configuration mismatch occurs when the configuration data on
the NVRAM and that on the hard drives are different.
If you set the Force Boot Option to On, then when a configuration mismatch
occurs, the BIOS reads the configuration data that exists on the hard drive,
writes it on NVRAM, and reboots the system. The options are On and Off.
The default is On.
Bios Stops on Error
When set to On, the BIOS stops in case of a problem with the configuration.
This gives you the option to enter the configuration utility to resolve the
problem. The default is On.
BIOS Echoes Messages
When set to On (the default), all controller BIOS messages display during
bootup.
Bios Config AutoSelection Use this option if there is a mismatch between configuration data in the
drives and NVRAM, so you can select a method to resolve it. The options
are NVRAM, Disk, and User. The default is User.
Spinup Parameters
Use this option to set the timing for spinning up the hard disk drives in the
computer. The options are Automatic, 2 per 6 sec, 4 per 6 sec,
or 6 per 6 sec. The default is 2 per 6 sec.
Fast Initialization
When enabled, zeros are written to the first sector of the logical drive so
that initialization occurs in 2 to 3 seconds. The options are Enabled and
Disabled. The default is Enabled.
When disabled, a full initialization takes place on the entire logical drive. On
a larger logical drive, LSI recommends disabling fast initialization, then
initializing. Otherwise, the controller runs a background consistency check
within 5 minutes of reboot or RAID 5 creation.
PCI Delay Trans
Use this option to enable PCI delay transfers, which improve performance
on some older system boards. The choices are Enabled and Disabled.
The default is Enabled.
Auto Rebuild
Use this option to automatically rebuild drives when they fail. The options
are Enabled and Disabled. The default is Enabled.
Class Emulation Mode
Use this option to select I2O or Mass Storage as the class emulation
mode. The default is Mass Storage. This option allows the firmware to
use I2O drivers or regular drivers.
Temporary RAID Offline
Use this option to allow the firmware to bring all the drives in an array back
online, except for the first failed drive. The default is Disabled. Enabling
this option gives you access to the array. If disabled, you cannot access the
array if there are two or more failed drives in the array.
4-8
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
4.4.4
Scan Devices Option
When you select the Scan Devices option on the main screen, WebBIOS
checks the physical and logical drives for any changes of the drive status.
WebBIOS displays the results of the scan in the physical and logical
drive descriptions.
4.4.5
SCSI Channel Properties
The SCSI Channel Properties option displays the following information
about the selected SCSI channel (bus):
4.4.6
•
Channel Width (number of bits)
•
Termination (enabled or disabled)
•
SCSI Capabilities (data transfer speed)
Logical Drive Screen
You can access the Logical Drive screen, as shows in Figure 4.4, by
clicking a logical drive in the logical drive list on the main screen. The
Logical Drive screen provides options to:
•
Set logical drive policies (read, write, I/O, virtual sizing)
•
Initialize the logical drives
•
Check consistency
•
Display the logical drive properties
•
Remove a physical drive from an array
•
Delete a logical drive
•
Select drive migration only or drive migration with addition
You can press Go to perform the selected action or Reset to delete
any changes.
Screen and Option Descriptions
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
4-9
Figure 4.4
4.4.6.1
WebBIOS Logical Drive Screen
Initialization
This option initializes the selected logical drive by writing zeroes to the
entire volume (if fast initialization is selected, zeroes are written to the
first sector only).
Note:
4.4.6.2
After you define a logical drive, WebBIOS asks you for
initialization of the logical drive. LSI does not recommended
choosing to initialize, as a background initialization may run.
Check Consistency
This option verifies that the redundancy data is correct and available for
arrays using RAID 1, 5, 10, or 50. If a difference in the data is found, the
MegaRAID adapter assumes that the data is accurate and automatically
corrects the parity value.
4-10
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
4.4.6.3
Logical Drive Deletion
This option deletes a logical drive. The RAID controller supports the
ability to delete any unwanted logical drives and use that space for a new
logical drive. The configuration utility provides a list of configurable arrays
where there is a space to configure. You can have an array with multiple
logical drives and delete a logical drive without deleting the whole array.
Note:
4.4.6.4
The deletion of the logical drive can fail under certain
conditions: During a rebuild, initialization or check
consistency of a logical drive, if that drive has a higher
logical drive number than the drive you want to delete.
Drive Migration
Drive migration is the transfer of a set of hard drives in an existing
configuration from one controller to another. If you put the hard drives on
a new controller, the controller must have a clear configuration. The
drives must remain on the same channel and must be reinstalled in the
same order as in the original configuration.
In addition, the drives must be on the same channel/target as they were
on the previous controller to keep the same configuration.
Note:
For more information and the procedure for drive migration,
refer to Section 3.7, “Performing Drive Migration,” page 3-29.
Screen and Option Descriptions
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
4-11
4.4.7
Physical Drive Screen
This screen, as Figure 4.5 shows, displays the physical drives for each
channel or port. This screen displays the properties for the selected
physical drive, including drive size, drive state, SCSI level, and drive health.
You can use this screen to make hot spares and format a hard drive.
Figure 4.5
4-12
WebBIOS Physical Drive Screen
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
4.4.8
Configuration Mismatch Screen
A configuration mismatch occurs when the configuration data in the
NVRAM and that on the hard drives are different. You can use the
Configuration Mismatch screen, as shown in Figure 4.6, to resolve the
mismatch by doing one of the following:
•
Select Create New Configuration to delete the previous configuration
and create a new configuration
•
Select View Disk Configuration to restore the configuration from the
hard drive
•
Select View NVRAM Configuration to restore the configuration from
the NVRAM
Figure 4.6
WebBIOS Configuration Mismatch Screen
Screen and Option Descriptions
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
4-13
4.4.9
Configuration Wizard Option
This option enables you to clear a configuration, create a new
configuration, or add a configuration. Section 4.5, “Configuring RAID
Arrays and Logical Drives,” provides detailed steps for using the
Configuration Wizard.
4.4.10 Adapter Selection Option
When you select this option on the main screen, the configuration utility
displays a list of the MegaRAID adapters in the system. You can select
an adapter and begin configuration.
4.4.11 Physical View/Logical View Option
This option toggles between views of the physical drives and logical drives.
4.4.12 Exit
Use this option to exit the WebBIOS Configuration Utility.
4.5
Configuring RAID Arrays and Logical Drives
This section provides detailed steps for using the Configuration Wizard
to configure RAID arrays and logical drives. Figure 4.7 displays the first
screen for the Configuration Wizard.
Step 1.
Start the Configuration Wizard by selecting the
Configuration Wizard icon on the WebBIOS main screen.
The first screen offers the following options:
4-14
•
Clear Configuration, to clear the existing configuration
•
New Configuration, which clears the existing configuration (any data
in previously defined configuration is lost)
•
Add Configuration, which retains the old configuration, then adds
new drives to it (this does not cause any data loss)
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Figure 4.7
Step 2.
WebBIOS Configuration Wizard Screen
Select the type of configuration and press Next.
The next screen displays the configuration methods. LSI
recommends Configuration With Redundancy. You can
select one of the following:
•
Custom Configuration
•
Auto Configuration With Redundancy
•
Auto Configuration Without Redundancy. Auto
Step 3.
Select a configuration method and press Next.
The Array Definition screen displays. Use this screen to
add ready drives to create an array.
Step 4.
Hold the CTRL key while selecting ready drives on the
Physical Drives window, then click Accept Array to add the
drives to the arrays shown in the Arrays window.
If you need to undo the changes, press the Reclaim button.
Configuring RAID Arrays and Logical Drives
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
4-15
Step 5.
After you create the arrays, click Next.
The Logical Drive Definition screen displays. You can
use this screen to select the RAID level, stripe size, read policy,
cache policy, spanning option, and logical drive size.
Step 6.
Set the following options to define the logical drive:
a. Select the RAID level.
The possible RAID levels for the logical drive display in the
drop-down menu.
b. Select the stripe size.
Figure 4.8
WebBIOS Logical Drive Definition Screen
The stripe size parameter specifies the size of the segment
written to each disk in a RAID configuration.
You can set the stripe size to 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, or 128 Kbytes.
A larger stripe size produces higher read performance. If your
computer regularly performs random read requests, choose a
smaller stripe size. The default is 64 Kbytes.
4-16
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
c. Select the read policy.
The read ahead parameter enables the read-ahead feature for
the logical drive. You can set this parameter to No Read Ahead,
Read-ahead, or Adaptive. No Read Ahead is the default
setting. No Read Ahead specifies that the controller does not
use read-ahead for the current logical drive. Read-ahead
specifies that the controller uses read-ahead for the current
logical drive. Adaptive specifies that the controller begins using
read-ahead if the two most recent disk accesses occurred in
sequential sectors.
d. Select the write policy.
You can set the write policy to Write Back or Write Thru.
The default setting is Write Thru caching. In Write Back
caching, the controller sends a data transfer completion signal
to the host when the controller cache receives all the data in a
transaction. In Write Thru caching, the controller sends a
data transfer completion signal to the host after the disk
subsystem receives all the data in a transaction. Write Thru
caching has a data security advantage over Write Back
caching. Write Back caching has a performance advantage
over Write Thru caching.
Caution.
Do not use write back caching for any logical drive in a
NetWare volume.
e. Select the cache policy.
The cache policy applies to reads on a specific logical drive.
The default is Direct I/O. It does not affect the read ahead
cache. The options are Cached I/O or Direct I/O. Cached
I/O buffers all reads in cache memory and is the default
setting. Direct I/O does not buffer reads in cache memory.
Direct I/O does not override the cache policy settings.
Direct I/O transfers data to cache and the host concurrently.
If the same data block is read again, the host reads it from
cache memory.
Configuring RAID Arrays and Logical Drives
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
4-17
f. Configure the spanning mode.
Enable or disable the spanning mode for the current logical
drive. If spanning is enabled, the logical drive can occupy space
in more than one array. If spanning is disabled, the logical drive
can occupy space in only one array.
To span arrays, the arrays must have the same stripe width and
must be consecutively numbered. If these criteria are not met,
the CU ignores the span setting.
g. Select the size of the logical drive in Mbytes.
h. Click the Accept button to accept the changes or click
the Reset button to delete the changes and return to the
previous settings.
i. Click Next.
Step 7.
Check the configuration preview.
The WebBIOS CU displays a preview of the configuration.
Step 8.
4-18
Click Accept to save the configuration or click Back to return to
the previous screens and change the configuration.
WebBIOS Configuration Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Chapter 5
Start the
Power Console Plus
Utility
This chapter describes the installation of the Power Console Plus tool
and consists of the following sections:
5.1
•
Section 5.1, “Quick Configuration Steps”
•
Section 5.2, “Power Console Plus Overview”
•
Section 5.3, “Installing the Power Console Plus Utility”
•
Section 5.4, “Power Console Plus Interface Description”
•
Section 5.5, “Configuring Arrays and Logical Drives”
•
Section 5.6, “Reclaiming Hot Spare Disks”
•
Section 5.7, “Reconfiguring Existing Arrays”
Quick Configuration Steps
This section provides quick installation steps for users who are familiar with
the MegaRAID utilities and tools. Refer to Section 5.5, “Configuring Arrays
and Logical Drives,” on page 5-19 for detailed configuration instructions.
Perform the following steps to configure arrays and logical drives using
the Power Console Plus utility.
Step 1.
Boot the system.
Step 2.
Start the Power Console Plus utility.
Step 3.
Select a configuration method.
Step 4.
Designate hot spare disks (optional).
Step 5.
Create arrays using the available physical drives.
Step 6.
Define the logical drive(s) using the space in the arrays.
Step 7.
Initialize the new logical drives.
MegaRAID Configuration Software User’s Guide
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5-1
5.2
Power Console Plus Overview
Power Console Plus is an object-oriented GUI utility that lets you
efficiently configure and monitor RAID arrays locally or through a
network. The Power Console Plus utility runs on Windows XP,
Windows 2000, and Windows Server 2003 servers that are capable of
monitoring and being monitored.
The Power Console Plus utility provides an object oriented user interface;
the screen picture represents a physical or logical object. You can
right-click an object to display options for that object.
Note:
The Power Console Plus utility requires at least Internet
Explorer 5.5. Be certain to install the latest Service Packs for
the Windows XP, Windows 2000, and Windows Server 2003
operating systems.
With the Power Console Plus manager, you can perform the same tasks as
with the MegaRAID Manager. The Power Console Plus utility allows you to:
5.2.1
•
Add a drive to a RAID logical drive
•
Convert from a RAID 0 configuration to a RAID 1 or 5 configuration
by adding a physical drive
•
Change a degraded redundant logical drive to an Optimal RAID 0
logical drive
•
Remove physical drives from a logical drive
•
Convert a RAID 1 or 5 logical drive to a RAID 0 logical drive
Power Console Plus Components
The Power Console Plus software contains:
5-2
•
MegaService Client
•
MegaRAID Registration Server
•
MegaRAID Server
•
SNMP Agent
•
MegaRAID Service Monitor
Start the Power Console Plus Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
A system running the Power Console Plus utility consists of the client,
registration server, and RAID server.
The MegaRAID Client monitors the registered MegaRAID Servers. The
MegaRAID client does not require a RAID controller. The MegaRAID
Server provides the connection from a host device to a RAID array and
manages its RAID arrays. The MegaRAID Registration Server contains
a database of the computers that have registered as RAID servers. The
MegaRAID Servers register with the MegaRAID Registration Server so
they can be monitored by the MegaRAID Client. The SNMP agent
supports the TCP/IP connection between the Power Console Plus
systems that are running Windows. The MegaService Monitor runs in the
background and tracks the events and status of devices connected to the
MegaRAID Server.
5.2.2
Features
The Power Console Plus tool provides:
•
A configuration wizard that guides you through the disk configuration
process
•
FlexRAID functionality for seamless online expansion without
interrupting server operations
•
RAID level migration
•
A consistency check to ensure parity and mirrored data accuracy
•
A performance monitor
•
The ability to change logical drive write, read, and cache policies
after the logical drive configuration
•
The ability to save the configuration
•
The ability to spin down physical drives before their removal
•
The ability to view the current data transfer rate
•
Complete system monitoring capabilities
Power Console Plus Overview
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5-3
5.2.3
Client System Requirements
The client systems running Power Console Plus must:
5.2.4
•
Run Windows 2000, Windows XP, or Windows Server 2003
•
Use an Intel Pentium grade processor or higher CPU
•
Have at least 8 Mbytes of system memory
•
Have a network interface
•
Have at least 5 Mbytes of free hard disk drive space
•
Use the TCP/IP protocol
MegaService Monitor
The MegaRAID Service Monitor is a Windows Service Process and is
called the MegaService Monitor. The MegaService Monitor runs in the
background and tracks status changes for hardware devices. The
MegaService Monitor polls the status of the resources connected to the
MegaRAID Servers every 10 to 15 seconds.
The MegaService Monitor is part of the Power Console Plus installation
package. The monitor program installs as a service and loads automatically.
This program logs peripheral device activities and status changes to
Event Viewer, which update whether or not the Power Console Plus utility
is running. The changes are also stored in View Log, which records
changes only when the Power Console Plus utility is running. Status
changes are stored in the MEGARAID.LOG file. The contents of the activity
log include all status changes and device activities.
The filename for the MegaService Monitor is: MEGASERV.EXE.
5-4
Start the Power Console Plus Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5.3
Installing the Power Console Plus Utility
This section describes the installation of the Power Console Plus
components on systems.
5.3.1
Windows Installations
The Power Console Plus utility can be installed and registered on the
Windows 2000, Windows XP, or Windows Server 2003 operating
systems. If you are familiar with the Power Console Plus utility and the
Windows operating systems, Section 5.3.1.1, “Installation Overview,”
provides an overview of the installation.
For those not familiar with the Power Console Plus utility and
Windows-based operating systems, Section 5.3.1.2, “Installing the Power
Console Plus Software,” on page 5-7 through Section 5.3.1.6, “Installing the
MegaService Monitor,” on page 5-10 provide detailed installation
instructions.
Note:
For more information about these operating systems and
driver installation, refer to the MegaRAID Device Driver
Installation User’s Guide.
Complete the following system configuration tasks before installing the
Power Console Plus utility.
•
Install the proper operating system software and service packs. The
Power Console Plus utility requires Internet Explorer 5.5 or later. Be
certain to install the latest service packs for the Windows 2000,
Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003 operating systems.
•
Install the required network cards.
•
Install a MegaRAID adapter card in the RAID server.
•
Install the TCP/IP Protocol on all the necessary systems.
•
Ping the systems to verify a proper connection.
Installing the Power Console Plus Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5-5
5.3.1.1
Installation Overview
This subsection provides a summary of the installation steps. For more
detailed instructions, refer to Section 5.3.1.2, “Installing the Power
Console Plus Software,” through Section 5.3.1.6, “Installing the
MegaService Monitor,” on page 5-10.
Step 1.
Install the Power Console Plus software on the MegaRAID
systems included in the Power Console Plus configuration.
During the installation, designate the systems to be
MegaRAID Servers, MegaRAID Clients, the MegaRAID
Registration Server, or a combination these options.
Step 2.
Edit the REGSERV.DAT and HOSTS file to include the name of the
Registration Server. The installation retrieves the files for
editing. The REGSERV.DAT file is located at:
C:\winnt\system32\drivers\etc. The HOSTS file is
located at: C:\winnt\system32\drivers\etc.
The HOSTS file information varies depending on the type of
installation. Enter the IP address and name of all the MegaRAID
servers, including the Registration Server. For example:
123.123.234.1
123.123.234.2
123.123.234.3
MegaRAID Server A
MegaRAID Server B
MegaRAID Workstation C
All specified systems must conform to the TCP/IP specification.
Press ENTER after you type all names of the servers.
5-6
Step 3.
Reboot the system.
Step 4.
Install the Windows SNMP agent.
Step 5.
Install the Power Console Plus SNMP agent.
Step 6.
Secure the Power Console Plus utility.
Step 7.
Install the MegaService Monitor.
Step 8.
Reboot the system.
Start the Power Console Plus Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5.3.1.2
Installing the Power Console Plus Software
The following steps provide detailed instructions for the installation of the
Power Console Plus software.
Step 1.
Insert the Power Console Plus CD in the CD-ROM drive. You
can view the files in the Windows Explorer program. Select the
application folder. Double-click SETUP.EXE to run the program.
Step 2.
Click Next.
The license agreement and README screens appear.
Step 3.
Click Next.
Step 4.
Select the installation packages from the following screen. The
options are: MegaRAID Registration Server; MegaRAID Server;
or MegaRAID Client. The Power Console Plus utility allows any
combination of the configuration options. Commonly used
configurations are:
- MegaRAID Server: This option configures the current system
as a MegaRAID Server, which allows it to register with the
Registration Server for monitoring by the MegaRAID Client.
- MegaRAID Server and Client: This option configures the
current system as a MegaRAID Server and a MegaRAID Client.
This configuration allows the current system to register with the
Registration Server and to monitor any registered MegaRAID
Server, including itself.
- MegaRAID Registration Server: This option configures the
current system as the MegaRAID Registration Server. This
option allows other MegaRAID Servers to register on the
current system.
- MegaRAID Registration Server and Client: This option
configures the current system as the MegaRAID Registration
Server and a MegaRAID Client. This configuration allows
MegaRAID Servers to register on the current system and
enables the current system to monitor registered MegaRAID
Servers. This configuration can monitor any registered
MegaRAID Server.
- MegaRAID Client: This option configures the current system
as MegaRAID Client, which allows it to monitor any registered
MegaRAID Server. MegaRAID Clients do not require an
installed RAID controller to operate.
Installing the Power Console Plus Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5-7
Step 5.
Click Install to begin installation.
Step 6.
Select the destination directory path. The default destination
directory is C:\Program Files\MegaRAID.
Step 7.
Set and verify the password.
Step 8.
Edit the REGSERV.DAT and HOSTS files. The installation
retrieves the files for editing. The REGSERV.DAT file is located
at: C:\winnt\system32\drivers\etc. The HOSTS file is
located at: C:\winnt\system32\drivers\etc. To edit the
files, replace the localhost name with the Registration
Server name.
The HOSTS.DAT file information varies depending on the type of
installation. Enter the IP address and name of all the MegaRAID
servers, including the Registration Server. For example:
123.123.234.1
123.123.234.2
123.123.234.3
MegaRAID Server A
MegaRAID Server B
MegaRAID Workstation C
All specified systems must conform to the TCP/IP specification.
Press ENTER after you type all names of the servers.
Step 9.
Save the file and exit.
Step 10. Reboot your system.
Step 11. Proceed to Section 5.3.1.3, “Installing the Windows
SNMP Agent.”
5.3.1.3
Installing the Windows SNMP Agent
After installing the Power Console Plus software, you must install the
Windows SNMP agent. This section provides installation steps for the
Windows SNMP agent on a Windows 2000, Windows XP, and
Windows Server 2003 system. Before installing the SNMP agent, verify
that all LAN cards are configured with TCP/IP and ping all the IP
addresses to verify the connections.
SNMP Installation on the Windows 2000, Windows XP, and
Windows Server 2003 Operating Systems – The following
instructions install SNMP services and verify the SNMP services on a
Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003 system. You
must install SNMP services for the LSI SNMP agent operate properly.
5-8
Start the Power Console Plus Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5.3.1.4
Step 1.
Select Control Panel → Add/Remove Programs →
Add/Remove Window Components → Component.
Step 2.
Click Management and Monitoring Tools to install SNMP services.
Step 3.
Insert the CD for your Windows operating system and follow the
prompts to install SNMP services.
Step 4.
After completing the installation, reboot the system.
Step 5.
Proceed to Section 5.3.1.4, “Installing the Power Console Plus
SNMP Agent.”
Installing the Power Console Plus SNMP Agent
After you install the Windows SNMP agent, follow these steps to install
the Power Console Plus SNMP agent:
Step 1.
Insert the Driver and Documentation CD in the CD-ROM drive.
Step 2.
From the Start Menu, select Run.
Step 3.
Select Browse.
Step 4.
Select D:\ for the CD-ROM drive.
Step 5.
Select SETUP.EXE and click OK.
Step 6.
Select SNMP from the menu.
The SNMP agent is now installed.
Step 7.
5.3.1.5
Proceed to Section 5.3.1.5, “Securing Power Console Plus
under Windows 2000.”
Securing Power Console Plus under Windows 2000
After installing the Power Console Plus SNMP agent, you must secure
the Power Console Plus utility for operation. This subsection provides
instructions to secure Power Console Plus utility when running the
Windows 2000 operating system. These instructions allow only users
who are part of the selected groups to delete, copy, move, or execute
Power Console Plus files.
Step 1.
Log in as the Administrator.
Step 2.
Run File Manager.
Step 3.
Select the Power Console Plus path.
Installing the Power Console Plus Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5-9
Step 4.
Pull down the Security menu in File Manager and select
PERMISSIONS.
Step 5.
When the Permission dialog box appears, assign the LIST
permission to all groups except Administrator, Backup
Operators, System, and Creator Owner.
Step 6.
In the Permission dialog box, select Replace Permissions On
Subdirectories.
Step 7.
Select OK.
Step 8.
Exit File Manager.
Step 9.
Log in as a guest and verify the permission changes.
Step 10. Proceed to Section 5.3.1.6, “Installing the MegaService Monitor.”
5.3.1.6
Installing the MegaService Monitor
The MegaService Monitor installation uses the Power Console Plus
Installshield. The following steps provide detailed installation instructions.
Step 1.
Insert the first Power Console Plus CD in the CD-ROM drive.
Step 2.
From the Start Menu, select Run.
Step 3.
Select Browse.
Step 4.
Select D:\ for the CD-ROM drive.
Step 5.
Select SETUP.EXE and click OK.
Step 6.
Select MegaService Monitor.
The MegaService Monitor is now installed.
5-10
Start the Power Console Plus Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5.3.2
Deregistering and Reregistering under the Power Console Plus
Utility
If the registration server fails or shuts down, the other MegaRAID
Servers or MegaRAID Clients must log back into the Registration Server
after the Registration Server is online. MegaRAID Servers can register
into the Registration Servers without resetting.
To deregister or reregister in the Windows operating system:
Step 1.
Click Control Panel→ Services in Windows NT 4.0.
Click Control Panel→ Administrative Tools→ Services in
Window XP/2000/Server 2003.
Step 2.
Click Stop RAID_Server to de-register.
Click Start RAID_Server to re-register.
5.4
Power Console Plus Interface Description
This section describes how to use the Power Console Plus tool. To start
the Power Console Plus utility, double-click the Power Console Plus icon
in the MegaRAID program group.
You cannot change from View Only mode to Full Access mode. You must
first exit the Power Console Plus utility, then run the Power Console Plus
utility again.
You cannot select a different server or adapter if an operation is in
progress. When selecting a new server in the Full Access mode, you
must enter the password for the new server. You cannot access the new
server if it is already under management by a system in Full Access
mode, or if the Power Console Plus utility or the MegaRAID Manager
utility is already running on the system.
Power Console Plus Interface Description
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5-11
5.4.1
Power Console Plus Main Window Description
The Power Console Plus utility uses a Windows user interface. Table 5.1
describes the screen elements
Table 5.1
Power Console Plus Screen Elements
Element
Description
Menu Bar
The menu bar allows you to select from the Configuration, Adapter, Physical Drive,
Logical Drive, Progress, or Help menus.
Toolbar
Click a toolbar icon to select an option. Table 5.2 describes the Power Console Plus
toolbar options.
Adapter
This option enables you to select the adapter for configuration.
Views
This option enables you to select the Logical View or Physical View.
Physical Devices This option displays the physical devices in the system.
Logical Devices
This option displays the configured logical devices in the system.
Status Bar
This option displays the number of physical drives and logical drives for the
selected array.
Table 5.2 describes the toolbar icons.
5-12
Start the Power Console Plus Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table 5.2
Icon
Power Console Plus Toolbar Icons
Description
The Display Configuration icon displays the current RAID system configuration.
The Print icon prints the current configuration.
The Wizard Configuration icon starts the configuration wizard, which configures the
devices attached to the MegaRAID controller.
The Clear Configuration icon deletes the RAID configuration on the selected controller.
Selecting Clear Configuration clears all channels or ports on the MegaRAID controller
and resets the controller.
If the operating system is located on a drive attached to the MegaRAID controller, the
system locks up.
The Adapter Properties icon displays the properties of the selected adapter.
The Physical Drive Properties icon displays the properties of the selected physical drive.
The Logical Drive Properties icon displays the properties of the selected logical drive.
The Rebuild Rate icon allows you to set the RAID reconstruction rate, perform a
background initialization, and check consistency.
The Rescan icon causes the currently selected MegaRAID controller to scan its
channels or ports to update the drive configuration information.
The Display Log icon displays a list of MegaRAID activities.
When running under the Windows 2000 operating system, the Power Console Plus
utility logs all messages to RAID.LOG, which resides in the same directory as the
Power Console Plus utility. The Power Console Plus utility does not log information to
the operating system event log.
The Exit icon quits the Power Console Plus utility.
The Help icon displays information about the Power Console Plus utility.
Power Console Plus Interface Description
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5-13
5.4.2
Power Console Plus Menus
This section describes the options available from the Power Console Plus
menu bar.
5.4.2.1
Configuration Menu
Table 5.3 describes the Power Console Plus Configuration menu options.
Table 5.3
Power Console Plus Configuration Menu
Option
Description
Wizard
This option allows you to configure physical arrays and logical drives. You can
select Custom or Automatic array configuration. If you select Automatic, the
Wizard examines the system and automatically configures an optimal RAID
system. If you select Custom, you determine the RAID configuration. Refer to
Section 5.5.3, “Running the Configuration Wizard,” on page 5-20 for details.
Display
This option displays the current RAID configuration.
Print
This option prints the current RAID configuration.
Save
This option saves the current RAID configuration.
Load
This option loads a saved RAID configuration.
Clear Configuration
This option erases the current RAID configuration. After choosing this option,
you must configure a new RAID array.
Exit
This option quits the Power Console Plus utility.
5-14
Start the Power Console Plus Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5.4.2.2
Adapter Menu
Table 5.4 describes the Power Console Plus Adapter menu options.
Table 5.4
Power Console Plus Adapter Properties Menu
Option
Description
Update Firmware
Reserved.
Flush Cache
This option sends the contents of cache memory to the logical drives. If the
MegaRAID system must be powered down rapidly, you must flush the contents of
the cache memory to preserve data integrity.
Performance
Monitor On/Off
This option displays a graphical representation of the logical drive performance.
Properties
This option displays the adapter properties, which include the firmware and BIOS
version, the rebuild rate, cache memory size, fast initialization, and the logical
drive properties.
Diagnostics
Reserved.
Rebuild Rate
This option selects the amount of system resources devoted to rebuilding failed
disk drives. A higher percentage rate rebuilds drives faster, but can degrade the
system performance. The default rate is 30 percent.
Rescan
This option scans the channels and ports, and updates the status of the
attached devices.
View Log
This option displays the MegaRAID event log.
Enclosure
Management
This option displays the fan temperature and voltage levels for the enclosure
cabinet. This option is available only on SCSI subsystems that support SAF-TE.
Alarm Control
This option enables the audio alarm when a drive failure occurs. The alarm
generates a beeping sound when a disk fails. The sound continues until you select
Silence Alarm.
After a rebuild finishes, a beep signals that the rebuild is done.
Fast Initialization
This option initializes a logical drive by writing zeros to the first sector of the logical
drive. Fast initialization occurs in 2 – 3 seconds.
Battery Status
This option indicates whether the battery is operating properly.
S.M.A.R.T. Settings This option establishes the settings for the Self-Monitoring, Analysis, and
Reporting Technology.
Disable Check
Consistency
Restoration
When enabled, a check consistency restoration occurs after a check consistency
is interrupted, by a power failure, for example. When the power is restored, the
check consistency continues from the point at which it had stopped.
Power Console Plus Interface Description
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5-15
5.4.3
Physical Drive Menu
Table 5.5 describes the Power Console Plus Physical Drive menu
options. The following subsections provide a detailed description of each
menu item.
Table 5.5
Power Console Plus Physical Drive Menu
Option
Description
Rebuild
This option rebuilds one or more failed disk drives. Select Abort Rebuild to stop the
rebuild process and revert the drive to its status before the rebuild began.
Update Drive
Firmware
Reserved.
Change Status
Table 5.6 describes the Change Status options.
Properties
This option displays the properties of the selected physical drive.
Table 5.6 lists and describes the Power Console Plus Change Status
submenu options.
Table 5.6
Power Console Plus Change Status Submenu
Option
Description
Make Online
This option brings the selected physical drive online.
Fail Drive
This option takes the selected physical drive offline.
Spin Up
This option allows several seconds for the selected physical drive to reach
operational speed.
Spin Down
This option allows several seconds for the selected physical drive to stop spinning
before taking the drive offline.
Make Hot Spare
This option designates the selected drive as a hot spare drive. The hot spare drive
must have the same, or greater, capacity than the other drives in the RAID array.
5-16
Start the Power Console Plus Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5.4.4
Logical Drive Menu
Table 5.7 describes the Power Console Plus Logical Drive menu options.
Table 5.7
Power Console Plus Logical Drive Menu
Option
Description
Initialize
This option initializes the selected logical drives. The Power Console Plus utility
enables you to initialize a drive at any time.
Note: Warning: Initializing a drive deletes all its data.
Check Consistency
This option verifies the redundancy data in the selected logical drives that use
RAID levels 1, 5, 10, or 50. If a discrepancy is found, MegaRAID assumes that
the data is correct and corrects the parity value. If the failure is a read error on
a data drive, the bad data block is reassigned with the generated data.
Properties
This option displays the properties of the selected logical drive. A screen such
as the following appears. You can display each logical drive by selecting the
Previous or Next buttons.
Change Config
Through a submenu, this option enables you to change the cache policy, read
policy, write policy, RAID level, and virtual size of the logical drive. You can also
add capacity to the logical drive.
Table 5.8 summarizes the Power Console Plus Change Configuration
submenu options.
Table 5.8
Power Console Plus Change Configuration Submenu
Option
Description
Change Cache Policy
This option changes the cache memory policy. You can select Direct I/O or
Cached I/O.
Change Read Policy
This option changes the cache read policy. You can select Normal, Read
Ahead, or Adaptive Read Ahead. Table 5.9 describes the read policy options.
Change Write Policy
This option changes the cache write policy. You can select write-back or
write-through. Table 5.10 describes the write policy options.
RAID Level
This option changes the RAID level of the selected device.
Virtual Size
This option enables the Virtual Sizing feature. Virtual Sizing does not take
effect until a system reboot occurs.
Add Capacity
This option adds drive(s) to the specified logical drive.
Power Console Plus Interface Description
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5-17
5.4.4.1
Read Policy Menu
Table 5.9 describes the Power Console Plus read policy menu.
Table 5.9
Power Console Plus Read Policy Menu
Option
Description
Normal
The MegaRAID controller does not use read-ahead caching for the selected logical drive.
Read Ahead
The MegaRAID controller uses read-ahead caching for the selected logical drive. This
is the default setting.
Adaptive Read The MegaRAID controller uses read-ahead caching if the two most recent disk
Ahead
accesses occurred in sequential sectors. If all read requests are random, the algorithm
reverts to Normal. All requests are evaluated for possible sequential operation.
5.4.4.2
Write Policy Menu
Table 5.10 describes the Power Console Plus write policy menu.
Table 5.10
Power Console Plus Write Policy Menu
Option
Description
Write-back
The MegaRAID controller sends a data transfer completion signal to the host when the
controller cache receives all the data in a transaction.
Write-through The MegaRAID controller sends a data transfer completion signal to the host when the
disk array receives all the data in a transaction. This is the default setting.
5.4.5
Progress Menu
The Progress menu displays a progress bar for a task. Progress bars are
available for rebuilds, initializations, diagnostics tests, consistency
checks, or drive reconstructions. The Progress menu also provides a
performance monitor that displays the MegaRAID system performance.
5-18
Start the Power Console Plus Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5.5
Configuring Arrays and Logical Drives
This section summarizes the configuration steps for arrays and logical
drives using the Power Console Plus utility. The following subsections
provide detailed descriptions of each step.
5.5.1
Step 1.
Start the Power Console Plus utility.
Step 2.
Select an adapter.
Step 3.
Run the configuration wizard.
Step 4.
Save the configuration.
Step 5.
Initialize the system.
Step 6.
Check the rebuild rate.
Starting the Power Console Plus Utility
To start the Power Console Plus utility, double-click the Power Console Plus
icon or click Start → Programs → Power Console Plus from the MegaRAID
group. The Power Console Plus screen appears.
The Power Console Plus utility displays the state of each physical drive
to the right of the driver or array ID. Table 5.11 describes the drive states.
Table 5.11
Drive State Description
Drive State Code
Description
Online
ONLN
The drive is online, is part of a configured logical drive, and is functioning
normally.
Ready
READY
The drive is functioning normally but is not part of a configured logical drive
and is not a hot spare.
Hot Spare
HOTSP
The drive is running as a hot spare drive.
Failed
FAILED
The drive is out of service because it failed.
Rebuilding
REBUILD The drive is being rebuilt with data from a failed drive.
The Logical Device window on the bottom half of the screen displays the
current adapter and the global hot spare pool for this adapter.
The Logical View button displays the configured logical drives. The
Physical View displays the configured physical drives. The physical drive
icon displays the properties of the selected physical drive. The logical
drive icon displays the properties of the selected logical drive.
Configuring Arrays and Logical Drives
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5-19
5.5.2
Choosing an Adapter
Click the Adapter box and select the adapter that you want to configure.
5.5.3
Running the Configuration Wizard
Follow these steps if the RAID system is already operating and you
would like to reconfigure the adapter.
Step 1.
Select Rescan from the Adapter menu to ensure that the
Power Console Plus utility recognizes all the physical drives.
Step 2.
Select Wizard from the Configuration menu.
The Wizard screen appears as follows.
5.5.3.1
Step 3.
Select Custom or Automatic.
Step 4.
Click Next.
Automatic Configuration
If you chose Automatic Configuration, Power Console Plus displays the
proposed RAID configuration in the Logical Devices window. Each logical
drive has a label (such as LD1), RAID level, and drive capacity. Spanned
arrays use hyphenated array numbers, such as LD1-1. Click the
Redundancy box to instruct the Wizard to configure redundant arrays
when possible. Click Finish to complete the configuration process.
You can click Reclaim to undo the array. Depending on the complexity of
the array, clicking Cancel and repeating the configuration process might be
easier. You can reclaim an array only if there are no logical drives defined.
Follow these steps to reclaim an array that has defined logical drives:
5-20
Step 1.
Undo the logical drive on the Logical Drive Definition screen.
Step 2.
Click Back to display the Array Definition screen.
Step 3.
Select the array to be reclaimed.
Step 4.
Click Reclaim.
Start the Power Console Plus Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5.5.3.2
Custom Configuration
If you select Custom Configuration, the Power Console Plus utility displays
the Array Definition Screen with a new array in the Logical Devices
window. Each logical drive has a label (such as LD0), RAID level, and
drive capacity. Spanned arrays use hyphenated array numbers such as
LD0-1, which indicates disk drive 1 in array 0.
Table 5.12 describes the custom array configuration options. The
following subsections provide detailed descriptions of these options.
Table 5.12
Custom Configuration Wizard Options
Option
Description
Add to Array
This option adds the highlighted drives to the configuring array. You can add
drives only to an array under configuration. You cannot use this Wizard to add
drives to a previously configured array.
Add Spare
This option adds the highlighted drive as a hot spare drive.
Accept Array
This option approves the array configuration.
Reclaim
This option clears the last configured array.
Add to Array – You can assign physical drives to a new array by
selecting any combination of physical drives in the READY status and
clicking the Add to Array button.
You cannot add a physical drive to an already existing drive with the
Configuration Wizard. Refer to Section 5.7.1, “Adding a Physical Drive to
an Existing Array,” for information on how to add a physical drive to an
existing array.
Assigning Hot Spares – Select the icon for any physical drive in the
READY state and click Add Spare to add the selected drive to the global
hot spare pool.
Removing a Physical Drive from an Array – You can selectively
remove hard drives from an existing array only on the main menu.
Refer to Section 5.7.2, “Removing a Physical Drive from an Array,” for
more information.
Configuring Arrays and Logical Drives
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5-21
Reclaim – You can click Reclaim to undo the array. Depending on the
complexity of the array, clicking Cancel and repeating the configuration
process might be easier. You can reclaim an array only if there are no
logical drives defined. Follow these steps to reclaim an array that has
defined logical drives:
Step 1.
Undo the logical drive on the Logical Drive Definition screen.
Step 2.
Click Back to display the Array Definition screen.
Step 3.
Select the array that you want to reclaim.
Step 4.
Click Reclaim.
Click the Accept Array button when the configuration is complete. A new
array screen appears. Assign the physical drives. When finished, click
the Next button.
5.5.4
Defining Logical Drives
The Logical Drive Parameter screen appears next, after you configure
the physical drives. This screen displays the logical drive(s) for you to
define. You can specify the RAID level and size. In addition, you can
span arrays and set advanced parameters.
Note.
The firmware does not support creation of logical drives
greater than 2 Tbytes.
The Logical Drive window displays all the arrays on the current adapter
and the global hot spare drive pool. The Power Console Plus utility labels
logical drives as New or LD1, LD2, LD3, and so forth.
You must define all the logical drives to be configured in the new array.
Do not create drives that span the current array and another array.
Uncheck the Span Array box. The following steps provide instructions for
defining logical drives.
Step 1.
Specify the RAID level by clicking the RAID Level drop-down
menu and selecting a RAID level.
The Wizard does not allow an invalid RAID level configuration.
Step 2.
Set the size by accepting the default, or by clicking in the Size
box and typing a smaller size.
Specifying a smaller size leaves room in the array for additional
logical drives.
5-22
Start the Power Console Plus Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Note:
Creating multiple logical drives in the same array disables
the FlexRAID utility, so you cannot change RAID levels or
add capacity. Do not mix redundant and nonredundant
logical drives in the same array.
Step 3.
Click the Advanced button to set the stripe size, read policy,
write policy, virtual sizing, and cache policy.
Step 4.
Click the respective drop-down menus to display the choices for
each parameter.
Step 5.
When finished, click the OK button.
Note:
Step 6.
If you use the Power Console Plus utility to configure an
array on a NetWare server, you cannot use Writeback as
the write policy.
Click Accept.
If space is still available in the current array, the new logical
drive appears in the array.
Step 7.
Define any additional logical drives in the current array.
The Wizard continues to create logical drives for the same array
until there is no more space available in the array, or until there
are 40 logical drives in the array.
Step 8.
To span the arrays, click the Span Arrays box to create a logical
drive that spans all defined arrays.
An array that encompasses both spanned arrays appears in the
Logical Devices window. The Power Console Plus utility labels
the array A[array number]-[disk number]. The capacity
in the Size box increases to reflect the total capacity of the
spanned array.
Step 9.
When you have defined all logical drives for the selected
adapter, click Next.
The Preview Configuration screen displays the arrays, logical
drives, and hot spares for the current adapter in the logical
devices screen. The Physical Devices window displays the
status of the physical drives.
Configuring Arrays and Logical Drives
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5-23
Step 10. Click Finish to accept the displayed configuration.
You can, instead, click Back to return to the previous screen
and redefine the logical drive parameters.
Step 11. After you click Finish, a dialog box prompts you to initialize.
LSI recommends initializing all newly created logical drives.
Warning:
Initializing a logical drive deletes all information on the
physical drives that compose the logical drive.
Step 12. Add newly configured logical drives to the NT Disk Administrator.
Step 13. Refer to the operating system documentation for further
instructions.
Note:
When you are running the Configuration Wizard, you
can remove the most recently created logical drive by
clicking Undo.
You cannot undo an array after you finish running the
Configuration Wizard.
5.5.5
Saving the Configuration
At the prompt, click OK to save the configuration. The configuration is
saved to both the NVRAM and the disks in the array.
LSI recommends saving the configuration to a binary file. Select Save
from the Power Console Plus Configuration menu. Type a directory path
and filename for the Save file. The file extension is .CFG.
LSI recommends printing the configuration. Select Print from the
Power Console Plus Configuration menu. Keep a copy of the
configuration for your records. This information is important if you need
to call LSI technical support or replace a failed adapter.
5-24
Start the Power Console Plus Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5.5.6
Initializing Logical Drives
Select the adapter from the Adapter box. Select the logical drives you
plan to initialize. Select Initialize from the Logical Drive menu.
The Initialize screen has a separate window for each logical drive. A bar
graph displays the progress of the initialization. Click Abort if you want to
stop the initialization.
Repeat this process for each adapter in the system.
5.5.7
Checking Rebuild Rate
Select the correct adapter from the Adapter box. Select Rebuild Rate
from the Adapter menu. If there is more than one adapter in the system,
click each adapter and check the rebuild rate. The rebuild rate is not
affected when you clear the configuration.
5.5.8
Exiting the Power Console Plus Utility
Select Exit from the Configuration menu to quit the Power Console Plus
utility.
5.6
Reclaiming Hot Spare Disks
To reclaim a hot spare disk while running the Configuration Wizard,
select the hot spare disks you want to reclaim. Click the Reclaim button
on the Array Definition screen. The Power Console Plus utility changes
the selected hot spare physical drives to the READY drive status.
To reclaim hot spare disks during normal operation, select the drive and
right-click the mouse button. Select Tools and select Fail Drive. The
Power Console Plus utility changes the state of the selected drives to the
READY state.
Reclaiming Hot Spare Disks
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5-25
5.7
Reconfiguring Existing Arrays
This section provides instructions for adding and removing physical
drives from existing arrays.
5.7.1
Adding a Physical Drive to an Existing Array
Perform the following steps to add a physical drive to an array:
Step 1.
Go to the Power Console Plus main screen.
Step 2.
In the logical view, select the physical drive icon of the drive you
want to add. The drive must be in the READY state.
Step 3.
Drag the drive icon to the array to which you want to add
the drive.
The Power Console Plus utility adds the physical drive to the
existing array.
5.7.2
Removing a Physical Drive from an Array
Perform the following steps to remove a physical drive from an array:
Step 1.
Go to the main menu.
Step 2.
Right-click the drive you want to remove and select Remove. You
may have to change the RAID level to remove the hard drive.
While running the Configuration Wizard, you can also remove a physical
drive from an array by changing the array configuration, selecting the
array, and then clicking the Reclaim button.
If the array has not yet been configured, you can click the drive icon in
the new array and then click Reclaim. You cannot reclaim an array if a
logical drive has already been defined in the array.
5-26
Start the Power Console Plus Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5.8
Add Capacity Steps
The following steps provide detailed instructions on adding capacity.
Step 1.
Click the drive icon for each physical drive to add. The physical
drive must be in the READY state before it can be added to a
logical drive.
Step 2.
Click the icon for the logical drive to which you want to add the
physical drive.
Step 3.
Select Add Capacity from the Logical Drive menu.
Step 4.
Click OK when prompted to confirm the new logical drive
configuration.
Step 5.
You can also select a new RAID level for the selected logical
drive when the Select RAID Level prompt appears. You can
select any RAID level that is not grayed out.
Step 6.
Click OK to complete the operation.
Important:
The MegaRAID controller cannot add a drive while
reconstructing a drive.
Add Capacity Steps
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
5-27
5-28
Start the Power Console Plus Utility
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Chapter 6
Virtual Sizing
and Online Capacity
Expansion
This chapter consists of the following sections:
6.1
•
Section 6.1, “FlexRAID Virtual Sizing”
•
Section 6.2, “Capacity Expansion under the Linux Operating System”
FlexRAID Virtual Sizing
The FlexRAID Virtual Sizing option can no longer be enabled on
MegaRAID 320 controllers. This option allowed the Windows NT and
NetWare 5.1 operating systems to use the new space of a RAID array
immediately after you added capacity online or performed a
reconstruction.
FlexRAID Virtual Sizing is in the BIOS Configuration Utility. If you have
this option enabled on older cards, you need to disable it, then upgrade
the firmware. Perform the following steps to do this:
Step 1.
Go to the http://www.lsilogic.com web site.
Step 2.
Download the latest firmware and driver to a diskette or directly
to your system.
The download is an executable file that generates the firmware
files on bootable diskette.
Step 3.
Restart the system and boot from the diskette.
Step 4.
Run pflash to flash the firmware.
MegaRAID Configuration Software User’s Guide
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
6-1
6.2
Capacity Expansion under the Linux Operating System
Follow these steps after performing a reconstruction to a different RAID
level or drive capacity expansion.
Step 1.
Reboot so the Linux operating system reads the new drive size.
Step 2.
Type fdisk –l at a command prompt to verify that the new
drive size is seen.
Take note of the device name assigned to the hard drive
(such as /dev/sda, /dev/sdb, and /dev/sdc).
Step 3.
Run fdisk /dev/sd*.
Note:
Do not add the numerical value at the end of the device
name. This designates existing partition numbers
The command prompt displays.
Step 4.
Type n for new partition.
Step 5.
When prompted to choose primary partition or extended
partition, enter p for primary partition.
Note:
The Linux operating system allows only four primary
partitions per drive. If you need more than four partitions,
select e for extended partition.
Step 6.
Fdisk prompts you for a partition number, 1–4.
Step 7.
Fdisk prompts you to input the cylinder to begin the partition.
Note:
The Linux operating system defaults to the next available
cylinder.
Step 8.
Press ENTER to continue or type in the starting cylinder
number for the partition.
Step 9.
Fdisk then prompts you to input the cylinder number to end the
partition.
Note:
The Linux operating system defaults to the last
available cylinder.
Step 10. Press ENTER to continue or type in the ending cylinder number
for the partition.
Fdisk returns you to the command prompt
6-2
Virtual Sizing and Online Capacity Expansion
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Step 11. Type w to write the configuration to disk.
Fdisk leaves you at a Linux command prompt.
Step 12. Reboot the system.
Step 13. After the system has rebooted from a command prompt, type
fdisk –l again to verify the partition is there and can be seen
by the system.
Step 14. Open a command prompt and type mkfs /dev/sd* *.
Step 15. Add the number of the partition that was created to the end of
the device name (such as /dev/sda1 and /dev/sdb2).
This creates a default Linux file system on the newly-created
partition.
Step 16. Perform the following steps to mount the partition.
a. To create a mount point, type: mkdir /[any name].
b. To mount the drive, type: /mount /dev/sd** /[any name].
Capacity Expansion under the Linux Operating System
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
6-3
6-4
Virtual Sizing and Online Capacity Expansion
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Appendix A
MegaRAID Service
Monitor
This appendix describes the messages used by the MegaRAID Service
Monitor and consists of the following sections.
A.1
•
Section A.1, “Power Console Plus Internal Messages”
•
Section A.2, “MegaRAID Service Monitor Event Types”
•
Section A.3, “Event Message IDs”
Power Console Plus Internal Messages
The Power Console Plus utility does not run as a Windows NT Service.
The MegaRAID Service Monitor runs as a Windows NT service. It logs
events to the Application log (MEGARAID.LOG) under the Windows NT
operating system.
Table A.1 describes the Power Console Plus logs messages. The
Power Console Plus utility logs the messages to RAID.LOG.
MegaRAID Configuration Software User’s Guide
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
A-1
Table A.1
Log Messages
Message
Number Message
A-2
1
The Power Console Plus utility has started again.
2
An adapter change has occurred.
3
Notify messages.
4
Has begun an operation on a physical or logical drive.
5
An error has occurred during an operation on a physical or logical drive.
6
Has completed an operation on a physical or logical drive.
7
Successfully has aborted an operation on a physical or logical drive.
8
An error has occurred while attempting to abort an operation on a
physical or logical drive.
9
Failure to start an operation on a logical drive.
10
Drive state change for a channel and target.
11
Configuration file written.
MegaRAID Service Monitor
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
A.2
MegaRAID Service Monitor Event Types
Table A.2 lists valid general event types and log messages.
Table A.2
General Events Types and Log Messages
Event
Type
Severity Level Log Messages
–
Informational
RAID Monitor Service Version number.
Month, Day, Year Started
Drive
Media
Errors
Warning
Adapter # Channel # Target #: Media Error Count= #, Other Error Count= #
Informational
Initial Check Consistency Schedule:
Enable Flag: # Date: MM/DD/YY Day of Week # Hour of Day: # Week(s): #
Enable Flag: 0 Sunday; 1 Monday; 2 Tuesday; 3 Wednesday; 4 Thursday;
5 Friday; 6 Saturday
Warning
Adapter # Logical Drive # is in Checking Consistency Progress.
Informational
Adapter # Logical Drive #: Check Consistency is in PROGRESS %.
Informational
Registration Server Alert
Message: REG-SERV Service Started.
Informational
Registration Server Alert
Message: Register Server Successful.
Error
Cannot Allocate Memory Spaces.
Error
No Adapter Found.
Error
Fail to Create Thread megaserv.exe.
Error
Service Program Ver X.YZ started.
Informational
Initial Check Consistency Schedule is rescheduled as:
EnableFlag=0 or 1 Date: MM/DD/YYYY
DayOfMonth=x HourOfDay=yy Weeks=zz
Informational
Check Consistency is rescheduled as:
EnableFlag=0 or 1 Date: MM/DD/YYYY
DayOfMonth=x HourOfDay=yy Weeks=zz
MegaRAID Service Monitor Event Types
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
A-3
Table A.3 describes the Logical Drive status messages.
Table A.3
Logical Drive Status Messages
Event Type
Severity Level
Log Messages
Logical drive is deleted or added Informational
Adapter #: The Number of Logical Drive is
changed to #
Logical drive is not optimal or the Warning
logical drive state changed
Adapter #: Logical Drive # is Degraded
Logical drive is not optimal or the Error
logical drive state changed
Adapter #: Logical Drive # is Offline
Logical drive initialization status
Warning
Adapter #: Logical Drive # is in Initialization
Progress.
Logical drive initialization status
Informational
Adapter #: Logical Drive #: Initialization is OVER
Table A.4 describes the Physical Drive status and error messages.
Table A.4
Physical Drive Status and Error Messages
Event Type
Severity Level
Log Messages
Physical drive state changed
Informational
Adapter #: Logical Drive # is Optimal
Physical drive state changed
Warning
Adapter #: Logical Drive # is Degraded
Physical drive state changed
Error
Adapter #: Logical Drive # is Offline
Physical drive state changed
Informational
Physical Drive # is changed to READY
Physical drive state changed
Error
Physical Drive # is changed to FAILED
Physical drive state changed
Informational
Physical Drive # is changed to REBUILD
Physical drive state changed
Informational
Physical Drive # is changed to Hot spare
Physical drive state changed
Warning
Physical Drive # is changed to Absent
Physical drive format status
Warning
Physical Drive # is in Format Progress.
Physical drive format status
Informational
Physical Drive #: Format over
Physical drive error or the error Warning
count differs from the last check
Warning
A-4
Media Error Count = # Other Error Count =#
Display the last seven SenseData structure entries.
Each SenseData structure has 14 or 16 bytes.
MegaRAID Service Monitor
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Table A.5 describes the SAF-TE messages.
Table A.5
Messages for SAF-TE Compliant Boxes
Event Type
Severity Level Log Messages
–
Informational
Adapter # Channel # Target # [Fans= #, Power Supplies= #,
Slots= # & Temperature Sensors= #] : SAF-TE Information
Temperature is over
threshold or back to
normal Fan is not
operational or its
status has changed
since last check
Warning
Temperature Sensor # is ?? Degree: Out of Range
Warning
Temperature Sensor # is Normal
Device slot ID
number changed
Informational
Status of Fan # =0x##: Operational
Warning
Status of Fan # =0x##: Malfunctioning
Warning
Status of Fan # =0x##: Unknown Status
Warning
Status of Fan # =0x##: Status Not Reportable
Warning
Device Slot # ID=#: The associated physical drive ID has changed.
Physical Drive # is Removed/Power Off. Physical Drive # is
Added/Power On.
These messages are not currently available.
Power supply is not Informational
operational or its
Warning
status has changed
since last check
Warning
Status of Power Supply #=0x##: Operational and On
Status of Power Supply #=0x##: Operational and Off
Status of Power Supply #=0x##: Malfunctioning and
Commanded On
Warning
Status of Power Supply #=0x##: Malfunctioning and
Commanded Off
Warning
Status of Power Supply #=0x##: Not Present
Warning
Status of Power Supply #=0x##: Present
Warning
Status of Power Supply #=0x##: Unknown Status
Warning
Status of Power Supply #=0x##: Status Not Reportable
MegaRAID Service Monitor Event Types
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
A-5
Table A.6 describes the battery status messages.
Table A.6
Battery Status Messages
Event Type
Severity Level Log Messages
Battery backup, module/pack, Warning
missing or added
Warning
Battery temperature out of
range or back to normal
Battery Backup Module is Missing
Battery Backup Module present but Battery Backup
Pack is Missing
Informational
Battery Backup/Pack present
Warning
Battery Temperature OUT OF RANGE
Informational
Battery Temperature GOOD
Battery voltage low or normal Warning
Battery fast charging in
progress/failed/completed
Number of battery charge
cycles
Informational
Battery Voltage GOOD
Warning
Battery Fast Charging IN PROGRESS.
Warning
Battery Fast Charging FAILED.
Informational
Battery Fast Charging COMPLETED.
Informational
“No of Charge Cycles = ??”
Because the monitor program Warning
scans the bus periodically, it
Warning
checks for devices and
compares with the previous
results. If not a match, it logs
messages.
A-6
Battery Voltage LOW
Physical drive is Removed/Powered Off.
Physical drive is Added/Powered On. The Power On/Off
feature is not implemented in the current version.
MegaRAID Service Monitor
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
A.3
Event Message IDs
Each event log message has its unique ID number. For general events,
the event message ID is three digits. Table A.7 describes the general
events log message.
Table A.7
General Event Message IDs
ID Field
Definition
First digit
Test Type ID Status:
1 Logical Drive Status
2 Physical Drive Status
3 Physical Drive Error Count
Last two digits
Two-digit event code
For test-related events, the event message ID is four digits. Table A.8
describes the test-related event message.
Table A.8
Test-Related Event Message IDs
ID Field
Definition
First digit
Test Type ID Status:
1 Logical Drive Status
2 Physical Drive Status
3 Physical Drive Error Count
Second digit
Severity Level:
1 Informational
2 Warning
3 Error
Last two digits
Two-digit event code
Event Message IDs
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
A-7
A-8
MegaRAID Service Monitor
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Index
A
abort rebuild 5-16
accept array 5-21
adapter 5-12
adapter BIOS 4-7
adapter information 3-7
adapter menu 5-15
Configuration Utility 3-6
adapter properties icon 5-13
adapter properties screen 4-6
adapter selection 3-15, 4-14
adapter status 5-16
adaptive 3-21
adaptive cache 3-11
adaptive read ahead 5-18
add capacity 5-17
add drives 5-17
add spare 5-21
add to array 5-21
adding physical drives 5-26
Alarm Control 4-7
alarm control 5-15
array
configurations 5-7
reconfiguring 5-26
span 5-22
undo configuration 5-20, 5-22, 5-25, 5-26
assigning hot spares 5-21
auto rebuild 4-8
automatic configuration 5-14, 5-20
B
backup module 3-14
batch initialization 3-26
batch rebuild 3-31
battery backup 3-14, 4-7
battery backup submenu 3-14
battery charge cycles 3-14
battery fast charging 3-14
battery pack 3-14
battery pack life 3-14
binary file 5-24
BIOS 3-7
version 4-7
BIOS Configuration Utility
clear 3-13
drive state 3-12
force drive offline 3-13
force online 3-13
make hot spare 3-13
rebuild drives 3-14
spanning 3-22
specify boot drive 3-5
transfer speed 3-13
view rebuild progress 3-13
virtual sizing 3-10
boot drive 3-5
bus termination 3-13
C
cache
adaptive 3-11
normal 3-11
policy 3-11, 3-12, 5-17
read-ahead 3-11, 3-21, 5-17
ready policy 5-18
write policy 5-17
write-back 3-11
write-through 3-11
MegaRAID Configuration Software User’s Guide
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
IX-1
cache flush timings 3-7
cache policy 3-12, 3-22
cache write-back 5-17, 5-18
cache write-through 5-17, 5-18
cached I/O 3-12, 3-22, 5-17
CanSpan 3-25
capacity 5-17
adding 5-27
expansion 6-1
change status 5-16
change status menu 5-16
charge cycles 3-14
check consistency 3-10, 3-15, 4-10, 5-17
class emulation mode 4-8
clear configuration 3-5, 3-7, 5-14
clear configuration icon 5-13
client 5-7
requirements 5-4
cluster mode 4-7
command Qtagging 3-13
configurating drives 3-24
configuration 5-14
automatic 5-20
custom 5-21
mismatch 4-13
preview 4-18
save 5-24
undo 5-20, 5-22, 5-25, 5-26
configuration menu 5-14
configuration mismatch screen 4-13
configuration steps 3-2, 3-3, 5-1
power console plus 5-19
WebBIOS 4-2
detailed 4-14
configuration strategies 2-19
Configuration Utility 3-1
adapter menu 3-6
backup module 3-14
battery backup submenu 3-14
battery pack 3-14
cache flush timing 3-7
cache policy 3-12
check consistency 3-10, 3-15
choosing a configuration method 3-18
IX-2
clear configuration 3-5, 3-7
configuration steps 3-2
configure menu 3-5
configuring drives 3-19
description 1-2
designating hot spare drives 3-18
disable BIOS 3-7
disk spin-up timing 3-7
drive information 3-13
easy configuration 3-5, 3-22
exiting 3-36
factory default 3-7
fast charging 3-14
fast initialization 3-7
FlexRAID powerfail 3-7
format 3-14
hot keys 3-16
I/O policy 3-10
initialize menu 3-6
initialize option 3-10
initializing drives 3-26
initializing logical drives 3-6
logical drive configuration screen 3-23
logical drive submenu 3-10
menu tree 3-4
new configuration 3-5, 3-24
number of cycles 3-14
objects menu 3-6, 3-10
other adapter information 3-7
physical drive menu 3-12
read policy 3-10, 3-11
rebuild drive 3-13
rebuild rate 3-7
rebuilding drives 3-30
reserved drive space 3-5
SCSI channel submenu 3-13
SCSI command Qtagging 3-13
SCSI transfer rate 3-13
select adapter 3-15
starting 3-16
steps for configuring drives 3-16
stripe size 3-11
temperature 3-14
termination state 3-13
Index
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
view/add configuration 3-5, 3-24
view/update parameters 3-10
voltage monitor 3-14
write policy 3-10, 3-11
configuration wizard 4-14, 5-14, 5-21
configure menu 3-5
configuring drives
Configuration Utility 3-19
easy configuration 3-22
Power Console Plus 5-19
view/add configuration 3-24
consistency check 2-4
create new configuration 4-13
ctrl-M 3-16
custom configuration 5-14, 5-21
D
data rate 3-13
defining logical drives 5-22
delay PCI transfer 4-8
deleting logical drives 4-11
de-registering under Power Console Plus
5-11
designating hot spare drives 3-18
device 5-12
diagnostics 5-15
direct I/O 3-12, 5-17
disable BIOS 3-7
disk mirroring 2-7
disk spanning 2-8
disk spin-up timings 3-7
disk striping 2-6
display
Power Console Plus 5-14
display configuration icon 5-13
display log icon 5-13
display the logical drive configuration 3-16
display the logical drives 3-16
display the manufacturer data 3-16
drive
adding 5-17
capacity expansion 6-1
choosing a configuration method 3-18
configuration steps using the
Configuration Utility 3-16
hot spare 3-18, 5-16
information 3-13
initializing 3-26, 5-25
logical drive size 3-24
pre-laoded 3-35
properties icon 5-13
rebuilding 3-13, 3-30
reserved space 3-5
spanning 3-25
spin down 5-16
spin up interval 5-16
states 5-19
drive indicator 5-19
FAILED 5-19
HOTSP 5-19
ONLIN 3-22
ONLN 5-19
REBLD 3-31
drive information 3-13
drive menu 5-16
drive state
failed 5-19
hot spare 5-19
online 5-19
ready 5-19
rebuilding 5-19
E
easy configuration 3-5, 3-22
emulation 4-8
Enclosure Management 2-13
enclosure management 5-15
event log 5-15
event message IDs A-7
event types A-3, A-7
event viewer 5-4
exit 5-14
exit icon 5-13
exiting
Configuration Utility 3-36
Index
Version 2.0
IX-3
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
F
icons 5-12
initialization 5-15
batch 3-26
initialize 3-10
drives 3-6
logical drive 5-25
initialize drive 3-26
initialize logical drive 5-17
initialize option 3-6
initiator ID 4-7
installation
configurations 5-7
MegaService Monitor 5-10
overview of Power Console Plus 5-6
Power Console Plus 5-5, 5-7
Power Console Plus SNMP agent 5-9
Windows SNMP agent 5-8
installation packages 5-7
F10 3-16
F2 3-16
F3 3-16
F4 3-16
factory default option 3-7
fail drive 5-16
FAILED 5-19
fan temperature 5-15
fast charging 3-14
fast initialization 3-7, 5-15
fault tolerance 2-3
features
Power Console Plus 5-3
firmware 5-16
firmware version 4-7
FlexRAID 3-7, 4-7, 5-3, 5-23
flush cache 5-15
format option 3-14
L
G
groups 5-9
H
help icon 5-13
HOSTS.DAT 5-6, 5-8
hot keys 3-16
hot spare 3-16, 3-30, 5-16, 5-19, 5-25
assigning 5-21
hot spare drives
designating 3-18
hot spares 2-8, 2-9
creating 3-13
hot swap 2-12
HOTSP 5-19
I
I/O
buffered 3-12
cached 3-12, 3-22, 5-17
direct 3-12, 5-17
policy 3-10
I2O 4-8
IX-4
load 5-14
log icon 5-13
logical device 5-12
logical drive 3-23
deletion 4-11
size 3-24
logical drive configuration screen 3-16, 3-23
logical drive display 3-16
logical drive menu 5-17
logical drive properties icon 5-13
logical drive screen 4-9
logical drive size 3-24, 4-18
logical drive submenu 3-10
logical drives
defining 5-22
initializing 3-6, 3-10, 4-10
spanning 2-8
state 3-12
states 2-13
logical view 4-14
M
main screen 4-5
make hot spare 3-16, 5-16
Index
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
make online 5-16
manufacturer data 3-16
mass storage 4-8
MEGACONF 3-17
MegaManager 3-1
MegaRAID Client 5-7
MegaRAID Manager 3-17
configuration steps 3-3
description 1-2
operating system support 1-3
starting 3-17
MegaRAID Server 5-2, 5-7
MegaRAID service monitor A-1
MEGARAID.LOG 5-4, A-1
MEGASERV.EXE 5-4
MegaService Client 5-2
MegaService Monitor 5-4, 5-6, 5-10
menu bar 5-12
menu tree
Configuration Utility 3-4
monitor
MegaService Monitor 5-10
performance 5-15
N
new configuration 3-5, 3-24
normal 5-18
normal caching 3-11
NoSpan 3-25
number of cycles 3-14
number of drives 3-20
O
objects menu 3-6
Configuration Utility 3-10
ONLIN 3-22
online 5-19
online capacity expansion 6-1
online physical drive 5-16
ONLN 5-19
operating system support 1-3
Power Console Plus 5-2
other adapter information 3-7
P
packages 5-7
parameters
update 3-10
parity 2-7, 2-8
PCI delayed transactions 4-8
performance monitor 5-15
permissions 5-9
physical device 5-12
physical drive
adding 5-26
removing 5-26
physical drive menu
Configuration Utility 3-12
Power Console Plus 5-16
physical drive properties 5-16
physical drive properties icon 5-13
physical drive status 5-16
physical drives screen 4-12
physical view 4-14
policy 3-21
cache 3-10, 3-12, 3-22
I/O 3-10
read 3-10
write 3-10, 3-11
Power Console Plus
abort rebuild 5-16
accept array 5-21
adapter 5-12
adapter menu 5-15
adapter properties icon 5-13
adapter selection 5-20
add capacity 5-17
add spare 5-21
add to array 5-21
adding physical drives 5-26
alarm control 5-15
arrays 5-26
automatic configuration 5-20
cache policy 5-17
capacity 5-17
change status 5-16
change status menu 5-16
Index
Version 2.0
IX-5
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
check consistency 5-17
check rebuild rate 5-25
choosing an adapter 5-20
clear configuration 5-14
clear configuration icon 5-13
client system requirements 5-4
components 5-2
configuration 5-14
configuration menu 5-14
configuration steps
quick 5-1
configuration wizard 5-20, 5-21
configurations 5-7
configuring drives 5-19
custom configuration 5-21
defining logical drives 5-22
de-registering 5-11
description 1-2, 5-11
detailed installation 5-7
device 5-12
diagnostics 5-15
display 5-14
display configuration icon 5-13
display log icon 5-13
drive spin up 5-16
enclosure management 5-15
event viewer 5-4
exit 5-14
exit icon 5-13
fail drive 5-16
fast initialization 5-15
features 5-3
firmware update 5-16
flush cache 5-15
group setup 5-9
help icon 5-13
hot spare 5-21, 5-25
icons 5-12
initialization 5-15
initialize drives 5-25
initialize logical drive 5-17
installation packages 5-7
installation requirements 5-5
interface description 5-11
IX-6
internal messages A-1
load 5-14
log icon 5-13
logical device 5-12
logical drive menu 5-17
logical drive properties icon 5-13
main window 5-12
make hot spare 5-16
make online 5-16
MegaRAID Client 5-7
MegaRAID Server 5-2, 5-7
MegaService Client 5-2
MegaService Monitor 5-4
menu bar 5-12
menus 5-14
operating system support 1-3, 5-2
overview of installation 5-6
performance monitor 5-15
permissions 5-9
physical device 5-12
physical drive menu 5-16
physical drive properties icon 5-13
print 5-14
print icon 5-13
progress menu 5-18
properties 5-15, 5-16, 5-17
quick configuration steps 5-1
RAID level 5-17
read policy 5-17, 5-18
rebuild 5-16
rebuild rate 5-15, 5-25
rebuild rate icon 5-13
reclaim 5-20, 5-21, 5-22, 5-25, 5-26
reconfiguring arrays 5-26
registering 5-11
Registration Server 5-2, 5-7
removing a physical drive 5-21, 5-26
rescan 5-15
rescan icon 5-13
restrictions 5-11
running the configuration wizard 5-20
save 5-14
save configuration 5-24
scan icon 5-13
Index
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
securing 5-9
Service Monitor 5-2, 5-4
silence alarm 5-15
SNMP agent 5-2, 5-9
span array 5-22
spin down 5-16
spin up interval 5-16
start screen 5-12
starting 5-19
status bar 5-12
toolbar 5-12
update firmware 5-15, 5-16
view 5-12
view log 5-15
virtual sizing 5-17
window 5-12
Windows installation 5-5
wizard 5-14
wizard icon 5-13
write policy 5-17
power console plus
configuration steps 5-19
powerfail 3-7
pre-loaded drive 3-35
print 5-14
print icon 5-13
properties 5-15, 5-16, 5-17
Q
Qtagging 3-13
quick configuration steps
Configuration Utility 3-2
MegaRAID Manager 3-3
Power Console Plus 5-1
WebBIOS 4-2
R
RAID 2-1, 2-15, 2-19
availability 2-23
levels 2-3, 2-13
RAID 0 2-15, 2-16, 2-17, 2-18
RAID 0 number of drives 3-20
RAID 1 number of drives 3-20
RAID 5 2-18
definition 2-16
overview 2-16
RAID 5 number of drives 3-20
RAID level 5-17, 5-22
RAID Levels 2-3
RAID.LOG A-1
RAM size 4-7
read ahead 5-18
read policy 3-10, 3-11, 3-21, 5-17, 5-18
adaptive 4-17
no read ahead 4-17
read ahead 4-17
read-ahead 3-21, 4-17, 5-17
cache 3-11
READY 5-19
REBLD 3-31
REBUILD 5-19
rebuild 3-13, 5-16
progress 3-13
rebuild abort 5-16
rebuild rate 3-7, 4-7, 5-15, 5-25
rebuild rate icon 5-13
rebuilding drives 3-30, 5-19
rebuilds 2-11
reclaim 5-21
reclaim array 5-20, 5-22, 5-25, 5-26
reconfiguring arrays 5-26
redundancy
verify 3-10, 5-17
registering under Power Console Plus 5-11
Registration Server 5-2, 5-6, 5-7
REGSERV.DAT 5-6, 5-8
removing a physical drive 5-21, 5-26
requirement
Power Console Plus installation 5-5
rescan 5-15
rescan icon 5-13
reserved disk space 3-5
restrictions for Power Console Plus 5-11
running Power Console Plus 5-11
S
SAFTE 5-15
save 5-14
Index
Version 2.0
IX-7
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
save configuration 5-24
scan devices 4-7
scan icon 5-13
SCSI
bus termination 3-13
channel submenu 3-13
command Qtagging 3-13
drive states 2-12
transfer rate 3-13
securing Power Console Plus 5-9
select adapter menu 3-15
server 5-2, 5-7
service monitor 5-2, 5-4, A-1
event types A-3
service packs 5-5
silence alarm 5-15
SNMP agent
Power Console Plus 5-2, 5-6, 5-9
Windows 5-6, 5-8
span array 5-22
spannable drives 3-25
spanning 3-22
spanning mode 3-24, 4-18
spin down 5-16
spin up interval 5-16
starting
Configuration Utility 3-16
MegaRAID Manager 3-17
Power Console Plus 5-19
status bar 5-12
stop rebuild 5-16
stripe size 2-7, 3-11, 3-21, 4-16
supported operating systems 1-3, 3-17
MegaRAID Manager 3-17
Power Console Plus 5-2
system requirements 5-4
T
TCP/IP 5-5, 5-8
temperature 3-14, 5-15
termination
state 3-13
timing
cache flush 3-7
disk spin-up 3-7
IX-8
toolbar 5-12
toolbar options 4-4
transfer rate 3-13
U
undoing the array 5-20, 5-22, 5-25, 5-26
update drive firmware 5-16
update firmware 5-15
V
verify redundancy 3-10, 4-10, 5-17
view 5-12
view disk configuration 4-13
view log 5-15
view NVRAM configuration 4-13
view/add configuration 3-5, 3-24
view/update parameters 3-10
virtual sizing 3-10, 5-17, 6-1
voltage levels 5-15
voltage monitor 3-14
W
WebBIOS 4-1
adapter BIOS 4-7
adapter properties screen 4-6
adapter selection 4-14
auto rebuild 4-8
battery backup 4-7
BIOS version 4-7
check consistency 4-10
class emulation mode 4-8
cluster mode 4-7
configuration mismatch screen 4-13
configuration preview 4-18
configuration steps 4-14
configuration wizard 4-14
create new configuration 4-13
description 1-2
firmware version 4-7
FlexRAID PowerFail 4-7
initializing logical drives 4-10
initiator ID 4-7
logical drive size 4-18
Index
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
logical drives screen 4-9
logical view 4-14
main screen 4-5
PCI delay transfer 4-8
physical drives screen 4-12
physical view 4-14
quick configuration steps 4-2
RAM size 4-7
read-ahead 4-17
rebuild rate 4-7
scan devices 4-7
spanning 4-18
toolbar options 4-4
view disk configuration 4-13
view NVRAM configuration 4-13
write back cache 4-17
write policy 4-17
write-thru cache 4-17
Windows
Power Console Plus installation 5-5
SNMP agent 5-8
wizard icon 5-13
write back cache 4-17
write policy 3-10, 3-11, 3-21, 4-17, 5-17
write thru cache 4-17
write-back cache 3-11, 5-17, 5-18
write-through cache 3-11, 5-17, 5-18
Index
Version 2.0
IX-9
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
IX-10
Index
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Customer Feedback
We would appreciate your feedback on this document. Please copy the
following page, add your comments, and fax it to us at the number shown.
If appropriate, please also fax copies of any marked-up pages from
this document.
Important:
Please include your name, phone number, fax number, and
company address so that we may contact you directly for
clarification or additional information.
Thank you for your help in improving the quality of our documents.
MegaRAID Configuration Software User’s Guide
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Reader’s Comments
Fax your comments to:
LSI Logic Corporation
Technical Publications
M/S E-198
Fax: 408.433.4333
Please tell us how you rate this document: MegaRAID Configuration
Software User’s Guide. Place a check mark in the appropriate blank for
each category.
Excellent Good Average
Completeness of information
Clarity of information
Ease of finding information
Technical content
Usefulness of examples and
illustrations
Overall manual
Fair
Poor
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
What could we do to improve this document?
If you found errors in this document, please specify the error and page
number. If appropriate, please fax a marked-up copy of the page(s).
Please complete the information below so that we may contact you
directly for clarification or additional information.
Date
Name
Telephone
Title
Fax
Department
Company Name
Street
City, State, Zip
Mail Stop
Customer Feedback
Version 2.0
Copyright © 2003–2006 by LSI Logic Corporation. All rights reserved.
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement