Bench Dog Tools | Acrylic ProPlate | Owner`s manual | Bench Dog Tools Acrylic ProPlate Owner`s manual

(20253)
I N S T R U C T I O N S
Stock No. 40-001
Congratulations on your Bench Dog ProTop
Contractor’s Table purchase! Follow these
simple assembly instructions to construct
your quality router table and cabinet.
Note: Please read these instructions
completely before starting to assemble your
ProTop Contractor’s Table. Familiarity with
the process will make the steps easier to
understand. Please follow all steps carefully.
RTD10000485AC
V I E W
7
1
8
P R O T O P
E X P L O D E D
6
10
9
4
5
3
2
PARTS LIST 1
2
3
4
5
6
Router Top
Base Panel
Door
Left Side Panel
Right Side Panel
Back Panel
4XDQWLW\
1
1
1
1
1
1
7
8
9
10
11
12
Router Insert Plate
24" Miter Track
Right Insert Bracket
Left Insert Bracket
Insert Plate Template (Not Shown)
Decals (Not Shown)
4XDQWLW\
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
L I S T
15
21
13
34
22
18
P R O T O P
H A R D W A R E
25
19
14
17
29
28
30
16
20
24
26
27
23
PARTS LIST 13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
1/4-28
1/4-20
1/4-20
1/4-20
1/4-20
1/4-20
1/4-20
1/4-20
1/4-20
1/4-20
1/4-20
1/4-20
4XDQWLW\
x 1/2" Set-Socket Screw
11
x 3/4" Hex Head Bolt
4
x 11⁄4" Button Head Socket Cap screw
4
x 5/8" Flat Head Socket Cap Screw
2
x 1" Flat Head Phillips Screw
2
x 11⁄4" Flat Head Socket Cap Screw
6
x 13⁄4" Flat Head Socket Cap Screw
12
x 50mm (2") Round Head Bolt
4
x 3/4" Socket Head Cap Screw
8
T-Nut (Joint Connector)
4
Cross Dowel
18
Nylon Insert Lock Nut
10
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
4XDQWLW\
1/4-20 Hex Nut
8
8-32 x 1/2" Flat Head Phillips Screws
3
10-24 x 5/8" Flat Head Phillips Screws
3
6 x 20 mm, Flat Head Phillips Screws
3
5/16-18 x 3/4", Flat Head Phillips Screws
3
10-32 x 5/8", Flat Head Phillips Screws
3
3/16" Hex Wrench (Not Shown)
1
5/32" Hex Wrench (Not Shown)
1
1/8" Hex Wrench (Not Shown)
1
Rubber Feet
4
Self Closing Euro Style Hinge (Not Shown)
2
Hinge Mounting Plate (Not Shown)
2
3
V I E W
E X P L O D E D
F E N C E
1
8
10
6
4
7
5
9
2
7
9
3
5
1
2
8
10
9
Table Top
Follow this diagram to attach the
fence to the table.
PROFENCE PARTS LIST 1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
4XDQWLW\
Aluminum Fence
Adjustable MDF Fence Faces
Bit Safety Guard
Dust Port
3/8-16 T-Knobs
5/16-18 x 11⁄4" T-Bolts
1" Round Knobs
Knob Spacer
3/8-16 x 21⁄2" Carriage Bolts
3/8" Nylon Washer
1
2
1
1
2
6
6
2
2
2
4
12
5
C A B I N E T
A S S E M B L Y
3
35
Fig. 1
Fig. 2
1. Press the hinge “cups” (35) into the large
bore in the door (3). Fig 1. With a Phillips
screwdriver, tighten the integral hinge cams
clockwise approximately 1/4 turn. Do not over
tighten the cams.
4
2. Attach the two decals (12) to the side panels.
The decals go on the outside of the left and right
side panels (4 and 5). The right side panel decal
is positioned near the front curved edge, as
shown in Fig 2. In this photo the person is
installing the decal on the left side panel, about
two inches from the back edge. If you find it
easier, attach the decals AFTER your router
table is fully assembled.
36
Fig. 3
5
6
4
Fig. 4
2
32
34
Fig. 5
2
3. Attach the two hinge mounting plates (36) to the
left side panel (4). Carefully study the orientation
in Fig. 3. The hinge mounting plates resemble a
cross. Locate the top of the cross nearest the
curved front edge of the left side panel, as
shown. On the bottom of the cross you will find
the hinge release lever. All cross dowel holes are
located inside the cabinet.
4. Attach side panels to the back panel (6). The
back panel has two notches that identify the top
of the panel, as shown in Fig 4. The left panel
has the hinges. Align the two holes in side
panels with the corresponding holes in the back
panel. Use 1/4-20 x 2" round head bolts (20) and
1/4-20 cross dowels (23). The cross dowels go in
the back panel. Tighten with the included 5/32"
hex wrench (32). Repeat this step for the right
panel. Do not fully tighten the bolts at this time.
5. Attach the four rubber feet (34) to base
panel (2). Fig 5. Insert the “T” nuts (22) into the
four large holes in the base panel (2). Locate the
head of the “T” nut on the top side of the base
panel. The bottom of the base panel has
countersink holes, the top does not. Insert a
1/4-20 x 3/4" hex head bolt (14) through the
rubber feet, and thread into “T” nut, as shown.
Tighten using the 3/16" hex wrench (31) and a
7/16" socket. Do not overtighten.
6. Attach base panel to cabinet assembly. Flip the
cabinet assembly upside down, as shown in
Fig 6. Use the 1/4-20 x 13⁄4" flat head socket
cap screws (19) and 1/4-20 cross dowels (23).
Tighten securely. Flip the cabinet assembly right
side up when done.
Fig. 6
5
10
A S S E M B L Y
10
9
10
Fig. 7
Fig. 8
7. Attach insert brackets (9 and 10) to routertop
using four 1/4-20 x 11⁄4" flat head socket cap
screws (18) and nylon nuts (26). Position insert
brackets as shown in Fig 7. Be sure to mount
the brackets to the underside of the routertop
(Fig 7 inset). The routertop surface has
countersinks, the underside does not. Do not
fully tighten the bolts.
8. Fully thread a 1/4" hex nut (25)on each of
the eight 1/4-20 x 3/4" socket head cap
screws (21). Install these bolt assemblies
into the eight leveling holes in the insert
brackets(9 and 10). Fig. 8. DO NOT use
the two insert plate attachment holes. These
holes have protruding round nuts on the
underside of the insert brackets. You will
adjust these leveling screws in step 14.
Fig. 9
9. Attach routertop to cabinet asssembly using
1/4-20 x 13⁄4" flat head socket cap screws (19)
and 1/4-20 cross dowels (23). Do not fully
tighten at this time.
C A B I N E T
8
Fig. 10
10. Connect insert brackets to the back panel.
Attach using 1/4-20 x 11⁄4" button head
screws (15) and 1/4" nylon insert lock
nuts (24), as shown in Fig. 9. Locate the nuts
to the inside of the cabinet. Do not fully tighten
at this time.
11. Attach the miter track to routertop. Use two
1/4-20 x 5/8" flat head socket cap screws (16)
and 1/4" nylon insert lock nuts (24) to fasten
the miter track to the insert brackets. Use two
1/4-20 x 11⁄4" flat head socket cap screws(18)
and 1/4-20 cross dowels (23) to fasten the miter
track to the cabinet side panels (Fig 10).
Eliminate any gap between the miter track and
routertop before tightening the bolts.
Fig. 11
12. Fully tighten all bolts and screws. Correct any
misalignments at this time. Fig. 11.
13. Adjust miter gauge track to fit your standard
miter gauge (Not included). First test fit your
miter gauge into the track. If it’s too tight,
squeeze the gib against the front wall of the
miter track with a pair of Channel Locks, using
a shop towel to prevent marring. Next, install
the eleven 1/4-28 x 1/2" set screws (13).
Fig 12. Tightening the screws will deflect the
gib into your miter gauge. Tighten all screws
uniformly and gradually until the desired
fit is achieved.
Fig. 12
6
C A B I N E T
A S S E M B L Y
37
36
Fig. 13
Fig. 14
14. Install the insert plate into the routertop. Adjust
leveling screws until the plate is flush with
routertop. To tighten, hold the socket head cap
screw with the 3/16" hex wrench (31), and use
your 7/16" open end wrench to tighten the
nuts, as shown in Fig 13. Note: it may be
necessary to fine tune the adjustment after
installing router.
Fig. 15
15. Attach door. Clip on door by “hooking” front of
hinge onto hinge mounting plate (37) first.
Fig 14. Then push on back edge of hinge until
it locks into place. If door does not clip on,
check hinge mounting plates for proper
installation. To remove door, push down on
release levers.
16. Attach fence (see page 4 for exploded view).
For more workpiece support, the fence can be
reversed and positioned on the “front” of router
table as shown in Fig. 15. Install the bolts from
inside the cabinet.
Fig. 16
18. Attach the bit guard to fence. Fig. 16.
Pre-assemble the guard with the two
5/16-18 x 11⁄4" hex bolts (6) and two knobs (7).
Slide both bolt heads into the fence’s T-slot to
attach to fence.
19. Mount router to the insert plate. This insert
plate is predrilled to fit most popular routers,
and comes with proper mounting screws for
these routers. Fig. 17. In some cases, you
must drill your own holes and purchase your
own mounting screws. Please refer to the
included template (11) to complete this step.
Fig. 17
Fig. 18
20. Install router and plate into the routertop as
shown in Fig. 18. Re-adjust the insert plate
flush if necessary (see step 13). Install the
two 1/4-20 x 1" flat head phillips screws (17)
into the two corners of the insert plate. These
screws prevent side-to-side movement and keep
the insert plate firmly seated, preventing
excessive vibration. Do not overtighten as this
could damage the insert plate.
7
T I P S
Securing the Router Table
The base has rubber feet to reduce vibrations
and slippage of the base on a smooth suface. For
permanent mounting, the base can be bolted
through the rubber feet for a workstation or
bench. For a secure yet portable mounting, the
base is equipped with two special recesses that
accept scrap 2 x 4 dimensional lumber. Fasten
the scrap 2 x 4 pieces to your bench using
clamps or screws (Fig. 19).
O P E R A T I O N A L
Fig. 19
Using Your Miter Gauge
The miter track has two slots: an accessory
T-slot and a T-bar compatible miter gauge slot.
The accessory T-slot is the narrower of the
two. It accepts 1/4" hex bolts for attaching
Feather-Loc featherboards (see Bench Dog
Tools accessories) and other fence accessories
like Panel-Loc and Power-Loc. The miter gauge
slot is used in conjunction with a miter gauge,
and fits standard 3/8" x 3/4" miter bars (with
or without the T-bar). The miter gauge is not
included. To adjust fence perpendicular to miter
gauge, set miter gauge to 90° and place in slot
(make sure miter track is adjusted, see step 13).
Loosen the fence’s lock knobs and align the
miter gauge to fence using a square, as shown
in Fig. 20.
Dust Collection
The integral dust collection port (Fig. 21) is
designed to accept a standard 21⁄2" fitting, typical
on most shop vacs. Most of these fittings actually measure 21⁄4" (outside diameter). Bench Dog
Tools recommends 21⁄2" hose, or larger, because
it is more effective at evacuating dust and chips,
and provides proper air flow over the router
motor. Any hose larger or smaller than 21⁄2"
requires an adapter you must provide. If
additional dust collection is needed, a dust port
can be added to your cabinet or motor area.
DO NOT USE YOUR ROUTER TABLE
WITHOUT DUST COLLECTION!
Fig. 20
Temperature Regulation
To prevent router overheating, periodically open
the cabinet door during use and never let dust
and debris collect inside the cabinet. Always use
a vacuum at the fence-mounted dust port. For
extended operation you must install a dust port
in the cabinet or remove the door
during operation.
Fig. 21
8
Feed Direction
Router top (top view)
Router bit rotation
Fence
Workpiece
F E N C E
T R A P S
Proper feed direction
Fig. 22 - A typical setup. Here, the fence is
partially covering the router bit.
Always feed the workpiece against the cutter
rotation, as shown in Fig. 22. Feeding the
workpiece with the cutter rotation is called
“climb cutting”. Climb cutting is very
dangerous, because the cutter will grab the
workpiece and thrust it the same direction as
the cutter rotation. Even small router bits will
overpower your ability to hold onto the
workpiece during a climb cut.
Do not use this router table until you
understand proper feed direction and bit
rotation. If climb cutting is still unclear, ask
your retailer for help, give us a call, or reference
a book on router table usage.
CAUTION: NEVER CLIMB CUT!
Avoiding Fence Traps
Fence
Workpiece
Bit rotation
Proper feed
direction
Fig. 23 - A classic trap resulting in a climb cut. Always
avoid this set-up!
Fence
Workpiece
Bit rotation
Proper feed direction
Fig. 24 - Not a trap as long as the router bit does not
cut all the way through the stock.
Fence traps occur when the work piece is fully
“trapped” between the router bit and fence.
Fence traps pose two real concerns: the
possibility of climb feeding, and human
exposure to the router bit. As stated earlier,
climb cutting should be avoided as loss of
control of the operation is a possibility!
Figure 23 shows a classic trap to be
avoided. What appears as a normal feed
direction (working from right to left) is wrong,
and will instead produce a climb cut. Because
the work piece is trapped it can easily be pulled
from one’s grip and thrown with great velocity.
Feeding the stock from left to right will
eliminate the climb cut but not the danger. It
will be difficult to keep the stock tight against
the fence as the bit’s rotation will thrust the
stock away from the fence. Also, your body will
be dangerously exposed to the spinning router
bit. The bit guard will not protect you against
flying stock, nor guard against this level
of exposure.
Figure 24 is not a trap, as long as the router bit
cuts only partially into the stock. In other words,
the router bit must not completely cut through
the workpiece. In this cut, the bit will grab and
push the stock toward the fence. This is good, as
the fence will control the workpiece better than
your hands. Typical dado cuts resemble this
set-up, and are commonly performed on router
tables. If the dado is to be widened with two (or
more) passes, be careful not to set a classic trap
or climb cut.
9
A D J U S T M E N T
Adjusting the Subfences
The two MDF (medium density fiberboard)
subfences are designed to slide along the fence
approximately 2". This results in a router bit
opening from 0 to 4".
A. “Close” Setting
Many applications require adjusting the subfences
close to the router bit. (Fig. 25) This accomplishes
nearly the same benefits of a true “zero clearance”
setting (see B) without cutting the subfences.
Before the router is turned on, and after the fence
and router bit height are properly adjusted, slide
the subfences toward the bit to reduce the gap.
Confirm that the router bit can freely rotate
without touching the subfences!
B. “Zero Clearance” Setting
Cutting the subfences into the router bit profile
produces “zero clearance”. Zero clearance
eliminates the gap between the fence and router
bit. (Fig. 26) This prevents the workpiece from
getting pulled into the fence just before the router
bit. Moreover, a zero clearance setting achieves a
cleaner cut because the subfence supports the
workpiece fibers. If a true zero clearance setting
is desired, follow these steps:
MDF subfence
MDF subfence
Fig. 25 - “Close” Setting
MDF subfence
MDF subfence
1. Adjust the bit height and fence position.
Note: The subfences must NOT contact the
router bit at this time.
2. Install the bit guard and secure.
S U B F E N C E
Fig. 26 - “Zero Clearance” Setting
3. Start router, and use dust collection. From the
back of the fence, slightly loosen the subfence
knobs and carefully slide the infeed subfence
into the spinning router bit. Hold onto the
subfence knobs.
4. After the subfence has reached the guide
bearing of the router bit, fully tighten the
knobs on the subfence.
Note: If the bit does not have a guide
bearing (i.e. vertical raised panel bits), slide
the subfence half-way into the bit, then tighten
the subfence knobs.
Caution: Never adjust or slide the subfences
from the front! Always work from the back
with both hands on the adjustment knobs.
Important Notes:
The outfeed subfence is rarely set to zero
clearance, because doing so has little performance
benefit and can damage the subfence. A “close”
setting is more desirable for most applications.
Setting the outfeed subfence to zero requires
great care because the router bit can cause a
portion of the subfence to chip or break. If an
outfeed zero clearance is absolutely necessary,
slide the outfeed subfence very slowly into the
bit to minimize the chipping and tearing.
The subfences can be flipped when changing
profiles or bit heights. New, replacement
subfences are available when a new profile is
to be created or if the subfence cannot be
trimmed to provide a fresh edge.
MDF works very well as a subfence because it
is softer than most woods and is much less likely
to damage expensive router bits. MDF also
retains the shape of delicate profiles and thus
allows proper support for zero clearance
settings. When adjusting the fence, ensure
that no part of the aluminum fence body could
contact the router bit.
10
S A F E T Y
Important Safety Points
Before operating your router table please read this manual thoroughly. Safety and use tips are contained in the
manual. This page is not the sole source of safety information. Retain the manual for future reference. Refer to your
router owner’s manual for safety instructions regarding use of that tool. This manual is not an instruction book on
how to do woodworking with a power tool. We encourage all woodworkers to continually
seek improvement in their woodworking skills, regardless of their craftsmanship or years of experience. The router table, fence and accessories must only be used for their intended purpose: woodworking via normal
routing operations. “Normal operations” means basic shaping of wood in conditions where grounded electricity,
sharp tools, dust, and rapidly spinning parts can be used or encountered safely. The following instructions
elaborate on this concept.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
&
8.
9.
10.
W A R R A N T Y
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Do not use your router table as a step or seat.
The top and cabinet must be properly secured, and must be level before use. Inspect your table and base for
damage and levelness prior to each use.
Keep work area clean, dry and well lit.
The hardware affixing the insert to the routertop must be installed for safe use. Tighten insert hold-down
screws before each use.
Safe operation requires a router table fence, bit guard, dust collection system, starting pin or fulcrum, and
speed reducer for large diameter bits. We recommend reducing router speed for 1” or larger diameter bits.
Consult your bit manufacturer for the exact speed.
Use the right tool for the job. Do not force a tool or attachment to do a job for which it was not designed.
Secure your work with a featherboard, clamps, or a vice when appropriate. The use of inappropriate
accessories may cause injury.
Wear safety glasses, dust mask, face shield and ear protection. This is not an exhaustive list. Every-day eye
glasses do not substitute for safety glasses.
Do not wear gloves or jewelry while using a power tool and ProMAX.
Maintain your equipment and its accessories in good working condition. Look for wear, poor alignment of
moving parts, binding of moving parts, breakage, poor mounting, or other conditions that may affect
operation and safety. Repair or replace any damaged parts.
Disconnect the power before moving, adjusting, or repairing parts, or otherwise maintaining your router table
and any accessories you may be using.
Keep children, pets, and those who may disregard safety away from work area, cords, sockets and tools.
Wear snug fitting clothes and keep long hair back to avoid catching in moving parts.
Do not overreach. Maintain balanced footing and stance.
Stay alert. Use common sense.
LIMITED TWO-YEAR WARRANTY
We make every effort to assure that our products meet quality and durability standards, and warrant to the
original retail purchaser that this product is free from defects in materials and workmanship for two years. Remedy
shall be limited to Bench Dog’s choice of repair, replacement or refund. This warranty does not provide remedy
for consequential economic loss.
This is a limited two-year warranty. It requires the purchaser to contact Bench Dog in writing within 30 days of
discovering the defect. Warranty does not apply to defects due directly or indirectly to misuse, abuse, negligence
or accidents, repairs or alterations, or due to lack of maintenance. It excludes components and parts not
manufactured by Bench Dog, defects caused by failure to provide a suitable installation environment, and damage
caused by use for purposes other than those for which the product was designed. Bench Dog, Inc. reserves the
right to make product changes without notice and without obligation to make these changes on products
previously sold. It excludes warranties of fitness for a particular purpose.
If the product is defective, we reserve the right to fix it, replace it, or refund the cost of the product to you.
Typically, this results in a refund. All claims are limited to the two-year claims period. We must receive the product
before a credit or refund will be issued. The warranty language on the product or in the product’s manual may contain additional limitations, which govern.
If you wish to return something, call the dealer where you purchased the product. If you wish to return something
purchased from Bench Dog directly, call 1-800-786-8902 to receive an RMA number. Upon receipt and inspection
of the goods, a credit or replacement will be issued for defective products. Return of nondefective items to Bench
Dog are subject to a 7% restocking charge. This is necessary due to the cost of checking, repackaging, and
inventorying the stock.
BENCH DOG DISCLAIMS AND BUYER EXPRESSLY WAIVES ANY AND ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, IMPLIED CONDITIONS OF FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE, MERCHANTABILITY, OR ANY OTHER MATTER.
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11
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