Setting up and using an external USB Flash Drive (Thumb Drive) on

Setting up and using an external USB Flash
Drive (Thumb Drive) on your Mac
IMPORTANT! Backup your flash drive data!
1. Plug in the external flash drive into a USB port with enough power. This
is usually found on the CPU or monitor.
DO NOT plug the USB flash drive into the keyboard. The keyboard
does not have enough power to run the USB flash drive.
a). On the iMac G5, look on the back right side, find the USB 2.0 ports.
b). On the iMac Intel, look on the back, bottom for the USB 2.0 ports.
c). On the iMac G4, look on the back left side and find the USB ports.
d). On the G5’s or G4’s, locate the 17” Studio Display. This monitor has two
USB ports built into it. These ports are located on the back right side.
e). You can also plug the USB flash drive directly into the front of the G5.
f). On the G4’s, locate the USB ports on the back of the G4’s.
2. Once the USB flash drive is plugged into a good USB port, the first time
it is connected, it should appear on your desktop as a NO NAME drive icon.
3. Open the Disk Utility program found in the Utilities folder located in
the Applications folder.
4. The Disk Utility program opens to show the various drives available to
work with.
5.
Click on the SanDisk Cruz… disk as seen above to start working with it.
6. Let’s take a look at the variety of formats we have to chose from for
the USB flash drive.
7. If the USB flash drive is to be used ONLY with Macintosh systems and
will NOT be connected to ANY Microsoft Windows computers, select Mac
OS Extended or (Journaled) from the list. The other varieties of Mac OS
Extended may or may not be compatible with the various Macintosh
computers throughout MATC or other Macintosh systems you may
encounter. Mac OS Extended or (Journaled) is the most common and safest
way to store Macintosh based files on your USB Flash drive.
8.
Type in a name you wish to provide the USB flash drive.
9.
Leave the Install OS 9 Driver checked.
10. Your settings should now look like this with your name being whatever
you typed in.
11. Click on the Erase button in the lower right corner of the screen to reformat the USB flash drive for use with only Macintosh systems.
12. A warning dialog window will appear.
13. Click on the Erase button to confirm the action.
14. Moments later, the flash drive will appear on your desktop.
Microsoft Windows Compatibility:
To Format the flash drive for use with Microsoft Windows as well as
Macintosh, we need to format the flash drive as MS-DOS.
1. Open the Disk Utility program found in the Utilities folder located in
the Applications folder.
4. The Disk Utility program opens to show the various drives available to
work with.
5. If this is the first time you have used the flash drive, click on the
SanDisk Cruz… disk as seen above to start working with it. If not, locate
your flash drive by locating the your correctly named drive in the list.
6. Let’s take a look at the variety of formats we have to chose from for
the USB flash drive.
7.
We want to select MS-DOS File system.
8. Type in the name you wish to give it. Remember that in a MS-DOS name
you are limited to a certain numbers of characters you can have for the
volume name. Click on the erase button.
9.
A warning dialog window will appear.
10.. Click on the Erase button to confirm the action.
11. Shortly, the newly created MS-DOS formatted flash drive appears on
the desktop.
12. The flash disk is now formatted and ready for use on both Macintosh
and Windows OS based systems.
Final Thoughts:
So you may ask, “Why wouldn’t we format a disk for MS-DOS if the Mac can
read and write to a MS-DOS formatted disk?” The reason is pretty straight
forward.
I took this tidbit from Penn State’s own Website:
“Remember to NEVER format the a disk as MS-DOS
format for use on a Macintosh. Macintosh file
recovery and repair utilities cannot recover Mac files
from a disk that is formatted as MS-DOS. Many
Macintosh applications will NOT be able to correctly save
files to an MS-DOS disk. So NEVER format a disk as MSDOS if you intend on saving Macintosh files to it.”
I suggest to only use MS-DOS formatted disks when moving data between
Macintosh and Windows based systems based on the above situation. If you
lose data for any reason, it will be almost impossible to recover your Mac
files from a MS-DOS based drive, hard drive or flash drive. The Macintosh
OS Extended format is the safest and most reliable format for use on the
Macintosh today. MS-DOS based drives should only be used for
transporting files to and from computers, NOT for storing data.
You risk losing data that is stored on a drive that is NOT formatted as a
Mac OS Extended (Journaled) drive.