Magnum Energy | ME Series | Owner`s manual | Magnum Energy ME Series Owner`s manual

ME Series
Modified Sine Wave
Inverter/Chargers
Owner’s Manual
Disclaimer of Liability
The use of this manual and the conditions or methods of installation, operation, use, and
maintenance of the ME Series Inverter/Charger is beyond the control of Magnum Energy Inc.
Therefore, this company assumes no responsibility and expressly disclaims any liability for loss,
damage, or expense whether direct, indirect, consequential, or incidental that may arise out of or
be in anyway connected with such installation, operation, use, or maintenance.
Due to continuous improvements and product updates, the images shown in this manual may not
exactly match the unit purchased.
Restrictions on Use
The ME Series Inverter/Charger may only be used in life-support devices or systems with the express
written approval of Magnum Energy. Failure of the ME Series Inverter/Charger can reasonably
be expected to cause the failure of that life-support device or system, or to affect the safety or
effectiveness of that device or system. If the ME Series Inverter/Charger fails, it is reasonable to
assume that the health of the user or other persons may be endangered.
Copyright Notice
Copyright © 2004, 2010 by Magnum Energy, Inc. All rights reserved. Permission to copy,
distribute, and/or modify this document is prohibited without express written permission by Magnum Energy, Inc.
Contact Information
Magnum Energy, Inc.
2211 West Casino Rd.
Everett, WA 98204
Phone: 425-353-8833
Fax: 425-353-8390
Record the unit’s model and serial number in case you need to provide this
information in the future. It is much easier to record this information now,
instead of trying to gather it after the unit has been installed.
Model:
Serial Number:
ME2000 (-15B/-20B)
N1
ME2012 (-15B/-20B)
B1
ME2512
C1
ME3112
D1
Magnum Energy® is a registered trademark of Magnum Energy, Inc.
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page i
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
•
This manual contains important safety instructions that must be followed during the installation
and operation of this product.
•
All electrical work must be performed in accordance with local, state and federal electrical codes.
•
Read all instructions and safety information contained in this manual before installing or using
this product.
•
This product is designed for indoor/compartment installation. It must not be exposed to rain,
snow, moisture, or liquids of any type.
•
Use insulated tools to reduce the chance of electrical shock or accidental short circuits.
•
Remove all jewelry such as rings, watches, bracelets, etc., when installing or performing
maintenance on the inverter.
•
Always disconnect the batteries or energy source prior to installing or performing maintenance
on the inverter.
•
Live power may be present at more than one point since an inverter utilizes both batteries
and AC.
•
Always verify proper wiring prior to starting the inverter.
•
There are no user-serviceable parts contained in this product.
•
This unit is provided with integral protection against overloads.
•
The input and output AC and DC circuits are isolated from the inverter chassis. The inverter
system grounding is the responsibility of the installer in accordance with the NEC/CEC, ABYC,
RVIA, and local codes.
•
Both AC and DC overcurrent protection must be provided as part of the installation.
•
Use Class 1 wiring methods for field-wiring connections to terminals of a Class 2 circuit.
•
Use only copper wires with a minimum temperature rating of 90°C.
•
Listed or labeled equipment shall be installed and used in accordance with any instructions
included in the listing or labeling.
Safety Symbols
To reduce the risk of electrical shock, fire, or other safety hazard, the following safety symbols have
been placed throughout this manual to indicate dangerous and important safety instructions.
WARNING: This symbol indicates that failure to take a specified action could result in
physical harm to the user.
CAUTION: This symbol indicates that failure to take a specified action could result in
damage to the equipment.
Info: This symbol indicates information that emphasizes or supplements important
points of the main text.
Remedy: This symbol provides possible solutions for related issues.
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS
Page ii
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
IMPORTANT BATTERY SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
•
Be very careful when working around batteries, they can produce extremely high currents
if short-circuited. Read the battery supplier’s precautions before installing the inverter and
batteries.
•
Wear eye protection such as safety glasses when working with batteries.
•
Remove all jewelry such as rings, watches, bracelets, etc., when installing or performing
maintenance on the inverter.
•
Never work alone. Always have someone near you when working around batteries.
•
Use proper lifting techniques when working with batteries.
•
Never use old or untested batteries. Check each battery’s label for age, type, and date code
to ensure all batteries are identical.
•
Batteries are sensitive to changes in temperature. Always install batteries in a stable
environment.
•
Install batteries in a well ventilated area. Batteries can produce explosive gases. For
compartment or enclosure installations, always vent batteries to the outside.
•
Provide at least one inch (2.5 cm) of air space between batteries to provide optimum
cooling.
•
Never smoke in the vicinity of batteries.
•
To prevent a spark at the battery and reduce the chance of explosion, always connect the
cables to the batteries first. Then connect the cables to the inverter.
•
Use insulated tools at all times.
•
Always verify proper polarity and voltage before connecting the batteries to the inverter.
•
To reduce the chance of fire or explosion, do not short-circuit the batteries.
•
In the event of accidental exposure to battery acid, wash thoroughly with soap and water. In
the event of exposure to the eyes, flood them for at least 15 minutes with running water and
seek immediate medical attention.
•
Recycle old batteries.
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page iii
Table of Contents
1.0
Introduction ..................................................................................1
2.0
Installation ...................................................................................7
3.0
Operation ....................................................................................39
4.0
Maintenance and Troubleshooting ...............................................46
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
Features and Benefits ................................................................................. 2
How an Inverter/Charger Works................................................................... 5
What Appliances will run from a Modified Sine Wave Inverter ........................... 5
Appliances and Run Time ............................................................................ 5
Pre-Installation.......................................................................................... 7
Mounting the Inverter ...............................................................................10
Wiring the Inverter - General Requirements .................................................12
DC Wiring ................................................................................................13
AC Wiring ................................................................................................19
Grounding Inverters ..................................................................................33
Inverter Notification Requirements ..............................................................36
Final Inspection ........................................................................................37
Functional Test .........................................................................................37
Inverter Mode ..........................................................................................39
Standby Mode ..........................................................................................40
Battery Charging ......................................................................................40
Transfer Time ...........................................................................................42
Battery Temperature Sensor Operation ........................................................42
Protection Circuitry Operation .....................................................................43
Inverter Startup .......................................................................................44
Factory Default Values ...............................................................................45
Recommended Inverter and Battery Care .....................................................46
Storage for Mobile Installations...................................................................46
Troubleshooting ........................................................................................47
Resetting the Inverter ...............................................................................48
Appendix A - Specifications and Optional Equipment ...........................49
A-1
A-2
Inverter/Charger Specifications ..................................................................49
Optional Equipment and Accessories............................................................50
Appendix B - Battery Information .......................................................51
B-1
B-2
B-3
B-4
B-5
B-6
Battery
Battery
Battery
Battery
Battery
Battery
Location .......................................................................................51
Types ...........................................................................................51
Temperature .................................................................................51
Bank Sizing ..................................................................................51
Bank Sizing Worksheet ...................................................................52
Wiring Configurations .....................................................................53
Limited Warranty ................................................................................55
How to Receive Repair Service ............................................................55
Page iv
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
List of Figures
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
Figure
1-1, Power Switch, Status LED, and Accessory Connection Ports ................................................3
1-2, Electrical Connection Points ...........................................................................................3
1-3, Left Side Features ........................................................................................................4
2-1, Simplified Installation Diagram for Permanent Installations ................................................8
2-2, Approved Mounting Positions ....................................................................................... 10
2-3, ME Series Dimensions and Side Reference ..................................................................... 11
2-4, DC and Battery Temperature Sensor Wiring ................................................................... 14
2-5, Battery Hardware Installation ...................................................................................... 16
2-6, Inverter DC Hardware Installation ................................................................................ 16
2-7, Battery Temperature Sensor ........................................................................................ 17
2-8, ME Series Inverter/Charger - AC Wiring ........................................................................ 20
2-9, ME Series Inverter/Charger - AC Wiring (Access Cover) .................................................. 20
2-10, AC Terminal Block ..................................................................................................... 21
2-11, AC Wiring for Single In - Single Out (30 A) Configurations ............................................. 24
2-12, AC Wiring for Single In - Single Out (60 A) Configurations ............................................. 25
2-13, AC Wiring for Single In - Dual Out Configurations ......................................................... 26
2-14, AC Wiring for Dual In - Single Out Configurations ......................................................... 27
2-15, AC Wiring for Dual In - Dual Out Configurations ............................................................ 28
2-16, AC Wiring for Single In - Single Out (ME2000 models) Configurations .............................. 31
2-17, AC Wiring for Single In - Dual Out (ME2000-15B/-20B models) Configurations ................. 32
2-18, Neutral-to-Ground Connection (Inverter Mode) ............................................................. 35
2-19, Neutral-to-Ground Connection (Standby Mode)............................................................. 35
2-20, Large Ground Wire Connected to ME Series .................................................................. 36
2-21, Warning Label .......................................................................................................... 36
2-22, AC Voltage Checks .................................................................................................... 38
2-23, AC Voltage Checks (ME2000 model) ............................................................................ 38
2-24, AC Voltage Checks (ME2000-15B/-20B models) ............................................................ 38
3-1, Power Flow - Inverter Mode ......................................................................................... 39
3-2, Power Flow - Standby Mode ......................................................................................... 40
3-3, Automatic 4-Stage Charging Graph ............................................................................... 41
3-4, BTS Temperature to Charge Voltage Change .................................................................. 42
3-5, Power Switch and Status Indicator................................................................................ 44
4-1, Performing an Inverter Reset ....................................................................................... 48
B-1, Series Battery Wiring .................................................................................................. 53
B-2, Parallel Battery Wiring ................................................................................................ 53
B-3, Series-Parallel Battery Wiring....................................................................................... 53
B-4, Battery Bank Wiring Examples (12-volt) ........................................................................ 54
List of Tables
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
1-1,
2-1,
2-2,
2-3,
2-4,
2-5,
3-1,
3-2,
4-1,
Typical Appliance Power Consumption ...............................................................................6
Recommended DC Wire/Overcurrent Device for Rated Use ................................................ 15
DC Wire Size For Increased Distance .............................................................................. 16
AC Input/Output Wiring Configurations (ME2012, ME2512, and ME3112 models).................. 23
AC Input/Output Wiring Configurations (ME2000 models) .................................................. 30
Equipment Grounding Conductor Sizing .......................................................................... 33
Inverter Battery Turn On/Off Levels................................................................................ 43
Inverter/Charger Default Values .................................................................................... 45
Basic Troubleshooting ................................................................................................... 47
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page v
Introduction
1.0 Introduction
Congratulations on your purchase of the ME Series inverter/charger from Magnum Energy. The ME Series is
a modified sine wave inverter designed especially for mobile applications. Powerful, yet simple to operate, this
inverter/charger will provide you with the years of trouble-free performance you have come to expect from
Magnum Energy, all backed by our limited 3 year warranty.
Installation is easy. Simply connect the inverter’s output to your distribution circuits or electrical
panel, connect your AC to the inverter’s easy-to-reach terminal block, connect the batteries, and
then switch it on for power.
Use the optional accessories listed below to control and monitor many other Magnum devices.
The ME Series inverter/chargers provide the following:
•
2000, 2500, or 3100 watt models in a small footprint – less weight and area needed for
installation (shelf, bulkhead, or upside-down mounting)
•
Modified Sine Wave output
•
Automatic Power Factor Corrected (PFC) multi-stage battery charging
•
RS485 standard communication protocol
•
Remote and Network ports (easy connection for optional accessories)
•
ON/OFF inverter-mounted switch with LED indicator
•
30 Amp per leg/input (can connect two inputs together to allow 60 Amp pass-thru)*
•
Large AC access and terminal block [wire size: 10 to 6 AWG (5.3 to 13.3 mm2) CU]*
•
DC terminal covers with 360 degree connection
•
Field-serviceable for qualified personnel – tested repair kits available
•
ETL listed to UL/cUL STDs 458, and CSA STD 22.2 107.01-01 for safety
•
Automatic battery temperature compensation (using battery temperature sensor) – for
optimum charging even during extreme temperature changes
•
Overcurrent, over-temperature, and high/low battery voltage protection
The following accessories are also available for use with the ME Series inverter/charger:
•
ME-RC50 (Basic Remote Control) - easy to read LCD display panel that enables standard
inverter and accessories set up, control, and troubleshooting.
•
ME-ARC50 (Advanced Remote Control) - easy to read LCD display panel that enables advance
inverter and accessories set up, control, and troubleshooting.
•
ME-AGS-N (Automatic Generator Start Module - Network version) - automatically starts/stops
your generator.
•
ME-BMK (Battery Monitor Kit - with Shunt) - provides precise DC voltage/current measurements
and provides information on your battery’s State of Charge (SOC) condition.
•
ME-CB (Conduit Box) - provides 1/2” - 2” knockouts for connecting AC and DC conduit runs
to the inverter.
•
ME-SBC (Smart Battery Combiner) - monitors and keeps a second battery charged using a
portion of the current that is charging a main battery.
* - Not applicable to the ME2000 models.
Page 1
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Introduction
1.1 Features and Benefits
The ME Series inverter/charger is designed to allow easy access to wiring, circuit breakers, and
controls. Its die cast baseplate with one-piece aluminum cover ensures maximum durability with
minimum weight, as well as cooler more efficient operation.
The front of the ME Series is equipped with the following features (see Figures 1-1 and 1-2):
1
Power ON/OFF Switch - a momentary pushbutton switch that alternately turns the inverter
On or Off.
2
Status LED Indicator - this green LED illuminates to provide information on the inverter
or charger operation.
3
Stack/Accessories Connection Port (red label) - a RJ11 port that accepts optional
accessories.
Info: The stacking feature is NOT available with the ME Series.
4
Network Connection Port (green label) - a RJ11 port that accepts optional network
capable accessories (e.g., Auto Gen Start or Battery Monitor).
5
Remote Connection Port (blue label) - a RJ11 port that allows the optional remote
controls (ME-RC50 or ME-ARC50) to be connected.
6
BTS Connection Port (yellow label) - RJ11 port that accepts the remote Battery
Temperature Sensor (BTS).
7
DC Equipment Ground Terminal - this connection is used to tie the exposed chassis of
the inverter to the DC grounding system. This terminal accepts CU/AL conductors from
#14 to #2 AWG (2.1 to 33.6 mm2).
8
AC Input/Output Connections - two 3/4” knockouts provided with cable-clamp strain
reliefs to allow and hold the AC input and output field wiring.
9
Intake Air Vents - ventilation openings to pull in air to help keep the inverter cool for
peak performance.
10
Positive DC Terminal - provides 360 degree connection point for the positive (+) cable
from the battery bank; provided with a Kep or Flange nut on a 5/16-18 bolt (5/8” usable
length) to hold the battery cable to the DC terminal.
11
Negative DC Terminal - provides 360 degree connection point for the negative (-) cable
from the battery bank; provided with a Kep or Flange nut on a 5/16-18 bolt (5/8” usable
length) to hold the battery cable to the DC terminal.
12
Mounting Flange - used to secure the inverter to a shelf or wall.
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 2
Introduction
1
POWER ON/OFF SWITCH
2
STATUS (CHARGING/INVERTING)
LED
STACK/ACCESSORIES PORT
3
(RED
LABEL
- RJ11
CONNECTION)
NETWORK PORT
4
(GREEN
LABEL
- RJ11
CONNECTION)
5
REMOTE PORT
6
BATTERY TEMPERATURE SENSOR
PORT
(BLUE
LABEL
(YELLOW
- RJ11
LABEL
CONNECTION)
- RJ11
CONNECTION)
Figure 1-1, Power Switch, Status LED, and Accessory Connection Ports
INTAKE AIR VENTS
(AND
ON RIGHT SIDE)
9
10
8
POSITIVE (+)
DC TERMINAL
AC INPUT/
OUTPUT
CONNECTIONS
(UNDER
COVER)
11
7
NEGATIVE (-)
DC TERMINAL
(UNDER
DC
COVER)
EQUIPMENT
GROUND
TERMINAL
MOUNTING
FLANGE
12
Figure 1-2, Electrical Connection Points
Page 3
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Introduction
The left side of the ME Series is equipped with the following features (see Figure 1-3):
13
Exhaust Air Vent - ventilation openings that allow heated air to be removed by the
internal cooling fan.
14
Model/Serial Number Label - includes model/serial number information, date of
manufacture, and inverter and charger specifications. See the ME Specifications in
Appendix A for more information and the different models that are available.
AC Access Cover - provides access to the internal AC wiring terminal block. This terminal
block is used to hardwire all inverter AC input and output wiring connections. Remove the
two screws to access the AC wiring terminal block. The ME2000 models do not have
the AC wiring terminal block.
15
Input Circuit Breaker - this circuit breaker protects the unit’s internal charger wiring
and pass-thru relay while in Standby Mode. This circuit breaker will pop out when it
opens. Press in to reset. This input circuit breaker is not branch-circuit rated, therefore,
branch-circuit rated breakers must be installed in the inverter’s input wiring.
16
Output Circuit Breakers - these circuit breakers are branch-rated, but only provided
on the ME2000-15B, ME2000-20B, ME2012-15B, and ME2012-20B models. They allow
the inverter AC loads to be connected directly to the inverter’s output without requiring
an inverter sub-panel. These circuit breakers pop out when they open. Press in to reset.
They can also be manually pulled out to disconnect the inverter’s loads.
17
CAUTION: Inverter models without the output circuit breakers (CB1 and CB2) must
have branch-rated circuit breakers installed in the inverter’s output wiring.
CAUTION: The inverter’s internal AC transfer relay is rated for 30 amps per leg. The
pass-thru current must be no greater than 30 amps per leg or damage to the relays
may occur.
MODEL/SERIAL
NUMBER LABEL
AC ACCESS
COVER
14
15
13
EXHAUST
AIR VENTS
(BACK
SIDE)
OUTPUT CIRCUIT BREAKERS 17
(ONLY
AVAILABLE ON CERTAIN MODELS)
16
INPUT CIRCUIT
BREAKER
Figure 1-3, Left Side Features
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 4
Introduction
1.2
How an Inverter/Charger Works
An inverter takes direct current (DC) from your batteries and turns it into alternating current (AC).
It also takes alternating current (when connected to an onboard generator or to shore power) and
transforms it into direct current to charge your batteries. These two modes of operation associated
with this inverter/charger are referred to in this document as:
•
Inverter Mode:
When the inverter is properly connected to batteries and turned on, the direct current
(DC) from the batteries is transformed into a modified sine wave alternating current (AC).
This AC is similar to the voltage provided by a utility for your home, and is used to power
the electrical appliances (i.e., AC loads) connected to the inverter’s output.
•
Standby Mode:
When an external source of AC power (e.g., shore power or onboard generator) is connected
and qualified on the inverter’s AC input, it operates in the Standby Mode. In the Standby
Mode, the unit operates as a Battery Charger to convert the incoming AC power into DC
power to recharge the batteries; and at the same time, automatically closes an internal AC
Transfer Relay to pass the incoming AC power directly to the inverter’s output to continue
powering the connected electrical appliances.
1.3
What Appliances will run from a Modified Sine Wave Inverter
Today’s inverters come in two basic output waveforms: modified sine wave (which is actually a
modified square wave) and pure sine wave. Modified sine wave inverters approximate a pure sine
waveform and will run most appliances and electronics without any problems. These inverters are
less expensive, and therefore, offer a viable alternative to more expensive pure sine inverters.
The output of a modified sine wave inverter will run most electronic and household items, including
but not limited to: TV, VCR, satellite dish receiver, computers, and printers. Some devices such as
rechargeable power supplies for phones, drills, and other like items may not run, and could even
be at risk for damage from modified sine wave inverters.
1.4
Appliances and Run Time
The ME Series inverter/charger can power a wide range of household appliances including small
motors, hair dryers, clocks, and other electrical devices. As with any appliance using batteries
for power, there is a certain length of time that it can run – this is called “run time.” Actual run
time depends on several variables, including: the size and type of appliance, the type of batteries
installed in your application, as well as the battery’s capacity and age. Other factors such as the
battery’s state of charge (SOC) and temperature can also affect the length of time your appliances
can run.
Appliances such as TVs, VCRs, stereos, computers, and lights can all be successfully powered
by your inverter. Depending on your inverter capacity, electrical appliances that use larger loads
such as coffee pots and hair dryers can be used for short durations. However, loads that are
used for longer periods (stoves, water heaters, etc.) can quickly drain your batteries and are not
recommended for inverter applications.
All electrical appliances are rated by the amount of power they consume (See Table 1-1). The rating
is printed on the product’s nameplate label, usually located on its chassis near the AC power cord.
Even though it is difficult to calculate exactly how long an inverter will run a particular appliance,
the best advice is trial and error. Your ME Series inverter has a built-in safeguard that automatically
protects your batteries from over-discharge.
Page 5
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Introduction
Info: For optimum performance, a minimum battery bank of 200 AH is recommended
for moderate loads (<1000W) and greater than 400 AH for heavy loads (≥1000W).
Table 1-1, Typical Appliance Power Consumption
Device
Load
Device
Load
Blender
400W
Coffee Maker
1200W
Computer
300W
Color TV
150W
Drill
500W
Hair Dryer
1000W
Hot Plate
1800W
Iron
1000W
Light (Flo)
10W
Light (Inc)
100W
Microwave
1000W
Refrigerator
500W
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 6
Installation
2.0 Installation
WARNING: Installations should be performed by qualified personnel, such as a licensed
or certified electrician. It is the installer’s responsibility to determine which safety
codes apply and to ensure that all applicable installation requirements are followed.
Applicable installation codes vary depending on the specific location and application of
the installation.
CAUTION: Review the “Important Product Safety Information” on page ii, and the
“Important Battery Safety Instructions” on page iii before any installation.
CAUTION: The inverter is heavy. Use proper lifting techniques during installation to
prevent personal injury.
The simplified system diagram shown in Figure 2-1 should be reviewed to assist you in planning
and designing your installation. This drawing is not intended to override or restrict any national
or local electrical codes. This drawing should not be the determining factor as to whether the
installation is compliant, that is the responsibility of the electrician and the onsite inspector.
2.1
Pre-Installation
Before installing the inverter, read the entire installation section to determine how you are going
to install your ME inverter/charger. The more thorough you plan in the beginning, the better your
inverter needs will be met.
2.1.1
Unpacking and Inspection
Carefully remove the ME Series inverter/charger from its shipping container and inspect all contents.
Verify the following items are included:
• The ME Inverter/Charger
• Red and black DC terminal covers with Phillips screws
• AC access cover with two Phillips screws
• Two 5/16” Kep or Flange nuts (installed on the DC terminals)
• Battery Temperature Sensor
• Warning label
• ME Series Owner’s Manual
If items appear to be missing or damaged, contact your authorized Magnum Energy dealer or
Magnum Energy. If at all possible, keep your shipping box. It will help protect your inverter from
damage if it ever needs to be returned for service. Save your proof-of-purchase as a record of
your ownership; it will also be needed if the unit should require in-warranty service.
Record the unit’s model and serial number in the front of this manual in case you need to provide
this information in the future. It is much easier to record this information now, instead of trying
to gather it after the unit has been installed.
2.1.2
Required Tools and Materials
Hardware/Materials
•
Strain-reliefs, and appropriate fittings
•
1/4” mounting bolts and lock washers
•
Electrical tape
•
Wire ties
Tools
•
Miscellaneous screwdrivers
•
Pliers
•
Wire strippers
•
Drill and drill bits
•
Pencil or marker
•
Multimeter
•
Level
•
1/2” wrench
Page 7
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Installation
G e n e ra to r P o w e r
1 2 0/2 4 0 V A C O u tp u t
S h o re P o w e r
1 2 0/2 4 0 V A C O u tp u t
F ul x
C a pa c oti r
M E -A G S - N
A u to G en S tart
C o n tro ller
(M ag n u m
A ccesso ry )
G e ne ra t or
M E - A R C 50
M E -R C 50
AC
T ra n s fe r
S w itc h
P WR
FA U LT
S E L E CT
C H G
IN V
ON / OF F
CHARG ER
ON / OF F
I NVERTER
SHO RE
AG S
M ETER
SETUP
TECH
R em o te C o n tro ls ( M ag n u m A ccesso ries )
M a in P a n e l
O FF
OF F
OF F
O FF
OF F
OF F
ON
ON
ON
ON
O FF
OF F
O FF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OF F
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
O FF
ON
ON
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
ON
OF F
M E -B M K
B attery M o n ito r
w ith sh u n t
( M ag n u m
A ccesso ry )
120
VA C
O FF
OF F
ON
O FF
DC
O vercu rren t
p ro tectio n
(B reaker o r
F u se /sw itch )
DC
Shunt
30 A
OF F
O FF
M E S e rie s
In v e rte r /
C h a rg e r
O FF
O FF
120/240 VA C
p o wer to
in verter
OFF
3 0A
ON
O FF
S u b-P a n e l
120 VA C In verter p o wer
(o r 120/240 VA C p ass-th ru
p o wer) to Su b-p an el
240
VA C
120
VA C
B TS
B attery B an k
M E -S B C
S m art B attery
C o m b in er
(M ag n u m
A ccesso ry )
Figure 2-1, Simplified Installation Diagram for Permanent Installations
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 8
Installation
2.1.3 Locating the Inverter
Only install the inverter in a location that meets the following requirements:
Clean and Dry - The inverter should not be installed in an area that allows dust, fumes, insects, or
rodents to enter or block the inverter’s ventilation openings. This area also must be free from any
risk of condensation, water, or any other liquid that can enter or fall on the inverter. The inverter
uses stainless steel fasteners, plated copper busbars, and a power-coated aluminum base. The
internal circuit boards are conformal coated. All of this is done to help fight the harmful effects
of corrosive environments. However, the inverter’s life is uncertain if used in the above types of
environments, and inverter failure under these conditions is not covered under warranty.
Info: If the inverter is installed in an area where moisture may occur, we
recommend putting silicone dielectric grease compound into the electrical ports
(see Figure 1-1, Items 3-6). Before installing the cables, or if leaving any ports open,
squirt a liberal amount into each port. Silicone dielectric compound makes an effective
moisture and corrosive barrier to help protect and prevent corrosion to the RJ11
connections.
Cool - The inverter should be protected from direct sun exposure or equipment that produces
extreme heat. The ambient temperature around the inverter must not exceed 77°F (25°C) to
meet power specifications.
Ventilation - In order for the inverter to provide full output power and avoid over-temperature
fault conditions; do not cover or block the inverter’s ventilation openings, or install this inverter in
an area with limited airflow. The inverter uses two fans to provide forced-air cooling, these fans
pull in air through the intake vents (see Figure 1-2, Item 9) and blow out air through the exhaust
vents (see Figure 1-3, Item 13). Allow at the minimum an airspace clearance of 6” (15.2 cm) at
the intake and exhaust vents, and 3” (7.6 cm) everywhere else to provide adequate ventilation.
If installed in an enclosure, a fresh-air intake opening must be provided directly to the front side
(intake vents) of the inverter, and an exhaust opening on the back side (exhaust vents) of the
inverter. This allows cool air from the outside to flow into the inverter, and heated air to exit the
inverter and the enclosure. When mounted in an enclosed compartment, airflow must be ≥ 100
cfm in order to maintain no more than a 68°F (20°C) rise in compartment temperature.
CAUTION: Do not mount this inverter in a zero clearance compartment, nor cover or
obstruct the ventilation openings – overheating may result.
Safe - Keep any flammable/combustible material (e.g., paper, cloth, plastic, etc.) that may be
ignited by heat, sparks, or flames at a minimum distance of 2 feet (61 cm) away from the inverter.
Do not install this inverter in any area that contains extremely flammable liquids like gasoline or
propane, or in locations that require ignition-protected devices.
WARNING: The ME Series inverter/charger is not ignition-protected and may not be located
in an engine compartment with gasoline fueled engines under any circumstances.
Close to the battery bank - As with any inverter, it should be located as close to the batteries as
possible. Long DC wires tend to loose efficiency and reduce the overall performance of an inverter.
However, the unit should NOT be installed in the same compartment as the batteries, or mounted
where it will be exposed to gases produced by the batteries. These gases are corrosive and will
damage the inverter; also, if these gases are not ventilated and allowed to collect, they could ignite
and cause an explosion.
Info: The battery bank should be installed in a clean, dry, ventilated environment where
they are protected from high and low temperatures. The batteries must be mounted
upright (if using liquid batteries) and securely fastened to the vehicle. The location must
be fully accessible and protected from exposure to heat producing devices, and away
from any fuel tanks.
Page 9
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Installation
Accessible - Do not block access to the inverter’s remote control and accessory ports, as well
as the inverter’s controls and status indicator. Also allow enough room to access the AC and DC
wiring terminals and connections, as they will need to be checked and tightened periodically. See
Figure 2-3 for the ME Series’ inverter/charger dimensions.
Away from sensitive electronic equipment - High-powered inverters can generate levels of RFI
(Radio Frequency Interference). Locate any electronic equipment susceptible to radio frequency
and electromagnetic interference as far away from the inverter as possible.
2.2 Mounting the Inverter
The inverter base can reach a temperature up to 90°C (194°F) and it is recommended that it should
be mounted on a non-combustible surface*. This surface and the mounting hardware must also be
capable of supporting at least twice the weight of the inverter. To meet regulatory requirements,
the ME Series must be mounted in one of the following positions, as shown in Figure 2-2:
• above or under a horizontal surface (shelf or table)
• or, on a vertical surface (wall) with the DC terminals to the right
• or, on a vertical surface (wall) with DC terminals toward the bottom, MP-HOOD (inverter hood)
installed on the top, and either the ME-CB (Conduit Box) or MMP Series (single inverter) enclosure
installed on the inverter’s bottom.
Info: The ME-CB and the MMP Series enclosure prevent material from falling out the
bottom in the event of an internal fire, and also allow sufficient ventilation to prevent the
inverter from overheating under normal operating conditions. The MP-HOOD inverter
hood helps prevent items from falling inside, causing damage to the inverter.
Info: Magnum provides a backplate with a suitable surface for mounting the
inverter. The backplate also provides the ability to mount the MMP Series enclosure
(PN: BP-MMP).
After determining the mounting position, refer to the physical dimensions as shown in Figure 2-3,
or use the base of the inverter as a template to mark your mounting screw locations.
* Non-combustible surface - A surface made of material that will not ignite, burn, support combustion, or
release flammable vapors when subjected to fire or heat as per the ASTM E136 standard. For the most part,
these are materials that are largely comprised of inorganic matter such as stone, steel, iron, brick, tile,
concrete, slate, and glass. Avoid common building materials such as gypsum board, painted surfaces, wall
coverings, and any type of wood.
SHELF OR TABLE MOUNTED
(UP SIDE DOWN)
330
0
SHELF OR TABLE
MOUNTED
(RIGHT SIDE UP)
WALL MOUNTED
(DC TERMINALS
ON THE BOTTOM*)
*WHEN
THE INVERTER
IS MOUNTED IN THIS
POSITION, THE
MPHOOD (INVERTER
HOOD ON TOP), AND THE
ME-CB (CONDUIT BOX
ON BOTTOM) OR MMP
SERIES ENCLOSURE
(DC
WALL MOUNTED
MUST BE USED
TERMINALS TO THE RIGHT)
Figure 2-2, Approved Mounting Positions
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 10
Installation
TOP
SIDE
8"
(20.3 cm)
RIGHT
SIDE
LEFT
SIDE
6 5/8"
(16.8 cm)
BACK
SIDE
LEFT
SIDE
TOP
SIDE
RIGHT
SIDE
4 7/8"
(12.4 cm)
2"
(5.1 cm)
Keyhole slots
(x4) and
mounting holes
(x4) accept
up to 9/32"
(7 mm)
screw/bolt
13 3/4"
(34.9 cm)
4 7/8"
(12.4 cm)
12" (30.5 cm)
12 5/8" (32.1 cm)
Figure 2-3, ME Series Dimensions and Side Reference
Page 11
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Installation
2.3
Wiring the Inverter - General Requirements
This section describes the requirements and recommendations for wiring the ME Series inverter/
charger. Before wiring the inverter/charger, read all instructions.
All wiring should meet all local codes and industry standards, and be performed by
qualified personnel such as a licensed electrician.
The NEC (National Electric Code, ANSI/NFPA 70) for the United States and the CEC (Canadian
Electrical Code) for Canada provide safe wiring standards. The NEC/CEC list requirements for wire
sizes, overcurrent protection, and installation methods/standards.
Inverter/charger systems involve power from multiple sources (e.g., inverter, generator, shore
power, batteries, etc.) which makes the wiring more hazardous and challenging.
The input and output AC and DC circuits are isolated from the inverter chassis. The inverter system
grounding is the responsibility of the installer in accordance with the NEC/CEC and local codes.
WARNING: Ensure the sources of DC power (i.e., batteries) and AC power (shore
power or AC generator) are de-energized (i.e., breakers opened, fuses removed)
before proceeding – to prevent accidental shock.
2.3.1
Protecting Wire - Conduit Box
The AC and DC wires into and out of the inverter must be protected as required by code. This is
usually done by using jacketed wires. Magnum offers for purchase a DC conduit box (ME-CB) or
a single inverter enclosure (MMP Series) that includes the necessary AC and DC inverter breakers
that allow both the AC and DC conduit to be connected to the inverter.
Info: If using the ME-CB conduit box or the MMP enclosure, and the AC wires are
individual conductors (i.e., not jacketed), the strain reliefs can be removed and replaced
with 3/4” grommets.
2.3.2
•
•
•
•
•
•
2.3.3
Wiring Requirements
All conductors that are at risk for physical damage must be protected by tape, or placed
in a raceway.
Always check for existing electrical, plumbing, or other areas of potential damage prior to
making cuts in structural surfaces or walls.
Do not mix AC and DC wiring in the same panel unless specifically approved/designed for
both AC and DC wiring. Where DC wiring must cross AC or vice-versa, try to make the
wires 90° to one another at the crossing point.
Both AC and DC overcurrent protection must be provided as part of the installation.
The inverter requires a reliable negative and ground return path directly to the battery.
Use only copper wires with a minimum temperature rating of 90°C.
Wire Routing
Before connecting any wires, determine all wire routes to and from the inverter. Conductors passing
through walls, bulkheads, or other structural members must be protected to minimize insulation
damage, such as chafing. During installation, always avoid placing conductors near sources of
chafing caused by vibration or constant rubbing. Typical routing scenarios include:
• AC input wiring from shore power source to the inverter
• AC input wiring from an onboard generator (optional) to the inverter
• DC input wiring from the batteries to the inverter
• AC output wiring from the inverter to the coach’s AC main panel or to dedicated circuits
• Battery Temperature Sensor cable from the inverter to the batteries
• Remote control cable (optional) to the inverter
• Ground wiring to and from the inverter
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 12
Installation
2.3.4
•
2.4
Torque Requirements
Torque all AC wiring connections to 16 in lbf (1.8 N-m). Torque DC cable connections from
10 to 12 ft lbf (13.6 to 16.3 N-m).
DC Wiring
This section describes the inverter’s required DC wire sizes, the recommended disconnect/overcurrent
protection, and how to make the DC connections to the inverter and the battery bank.
Refer to Figure 2-4 when connecting the DC wires.
WARNING: Even though DC voltage is “low voltage”, significant hazards may be
present, particularly from short circuits of the battery system.
CAUTION: The inverter is NOT reverse polarity protected, which means that if the
negative and positive battery voltage is connected backwards to the inverter, the
inverter will likely be damaged. You should verify the correct voltage polarity using a
voltmeter BEFORE connecting the DC wires.
CAUTION: Before wiring the DC cables, review the safety information at the beginning
of this manual and the instructions below to ensure a safe and long-lived system.
Info: DO NOT connect the battery cables to the inverter until all wiring is complete.
•
The DC positive and negative cables connected to the inverter from the battery bank should
be tied together with wire ties or electrical tape approximately every 6 inches (153mm). This
helps improve the surge capability and reduces the effects of inductance, which improves the
inverter waveform and reduces the wear of the inverter’s filter capacitors.
•
Crimped and sealed copper ring terminal lugs with a 5/16” hole should be used to connect the
DC wires to the inverter’s DC terminals.
•
The battery bank voltage MUST match the DC voltage required by the inverter (i.e., 12-volt
battery bank for a 12-volt inverter), or the inverter may be damaged.
•
To ensure the maximum performance from the inverter, all connections from the battery bank
to the inverter should be minimized. The exceptions are the DC overcurrent disconnect in the
positive line, and a shunt in the negative line. Any other additional connection will contribute
to additional voltage drops and these extra connection points may loosen during use.
•
All wiring to the battery terminals should be checked periodically (once a month) for proper
tightness. The torque requirement for the DC terminals is between 10 to 12 ft lbf (13.6
to 16.3 N-m). If you don’t have a torque wrench, ensure all DC terminals are tight and
cannot move.
•
Be aware that overtightening or misthreading the nuts on the DC terminals can cause the
bolts to strip and snap/break off.
•
Make sure cables have a smooth bend radius and do not become kinked. Long cable runs
should follow existing wire runs if possible.
•
A brief spark or arc may occur when connecting the battery cables to the inverter DC terminals;
this is normal and due to the inverter’s internal capacitors being charged.
•
Color code the DC cables/wires with colored tape or heat shrink tubing: RED for positive (+),
WHITE for negative (-), and GREEN (or bare copper) for DC ground to avoid polarity problems.
Page 13
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Installation
M E Series
Inverter /Charger
front view
B TS
B TS
Inv e rte r’s D C N e ga tiv e C onne c tion
Inv e rte r’s D C P os itiv e C onne c tion
Inv e rte r’s E quipm e nt G round W ire
B a tte ry Te m p S e ns or C a ble
M M P e nc los ure – for s ingle inv e rte r
ins ta lla tions (inc lude s D C dis c onne c t
bre a k e r, D C s hunt for ba tte ry m onitor , a nd
inv e rte r D C bus ba rs).
B a tte ry B a nk ’s E quipm e nt G round W ire
B a tte ry B a nk ’s N e ga tiv e C a ble
B a tte ry B a nk ’s P os itiv e C a ble
D C S y s te m G rounding point
[E le c trode C onduc tor
(i .e ., c ha s s is/fra m e)]
12 volt
Battery
Bank
Figure 2-4, DC and Battery Temperature Sensor Wiring
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 14
Installation
2.4.1
DC Wire Sizing
It is important to use the correct DC wire to achieve maximum efficiency from the system and
reduce fire hazards associated with overheating. Always keep your wire runs as short as practical
to help prevent low voltage shutdowns and keep the DC breaker from nuisance tripping (or open
fuses) because of increased current draw. See Table 2-1 to select the required minimum DC wire
size (and corresponding overcurrent device) based on your inverter model. The cable sizes listed
in Table 2-1 for your inverter model are required to reduce stress on the inverter, minimize voltage
drops, increase system efficiency, and ensure the inverter’s ability to surge heavy loads.
If the distance from the inverter to the battery bank is greater than 5 feet (1.5 m), the DC wire
size will need to be increased. Longer distances cause an increase in resistance, which affects the
performance of the inverter. Continue to use the overcurrent device previously determined from
Table 2-1, and then refer to Table 2-2 to determine the minimum DC wire size needed for various
distances based on your inverter model.
2.4.2
DC Overcurrent Protection
DC overcurrent protection is not included in the inverter and must be provided as part of the
installation. This requirement is needed in order to comply with electrical code regulations and
for safety reasons. The DC overcurrent protection device must be installed in the positive DC
cable line, it can be a fuse or a circuit breaker, and it must be DC rated. It must be correctly sized
according to the size of DC cables being used, which means it is required to open before the cable
reaches its maximum current carrying capability, thereby preventing a fire. The NEC requires both
overcurrent protection and a disconnect switch. If a circuit breaker is used as the overcurrent
protection device, it can also be used as the required DC disconnect.
If a fuse is used as an overcurrent device, a Class-T type or equivalent is recommended. This fuse
type is rated for DC operation, can handle the high short-circuit currents, and has a time delay
that allows for momentary current surges from the inverter without opening the fuse. However,
because the fuse can be energized from both directions, if it is accessible to unqualified persons
the NEC requires that it be installed in such a manner that the power must be disconnected on
both ends of the fuse before servicing.
The recommendations in Table 2-1 may not meet all local code or NEC requirements.
Table 2-1, Recommended DC Wire/Overcurrent Device for Rated Use
Inverter Model
Maximum
Continuous
Current1
ME2000/ME2012
In Free Air
Minimum DC Wire
Size (rating)2
Maximum DC Fuse
Size3
267 amps
#2/0 AWG
(67.4 mm2)
265 amps
300 amps with time
delay
ME2512
333 amps
#4/0 AWG
(107.16 mm2)
360 amps
400 amps with time
delay
ME3112
413 amps
#4/0 AWG
(107.16 mm2)
360 amps
400 amps with time
delay
DC Grounding
Electrode
Wire Size4
#6 AWG
(13.3 mm2)
#6 AWG
(13.3 mm2)
#6 AWG
(13.3 mm2)
1
2345
Note 1 - Current is based on the Maximum Continuous Current rating with a 120% NEC de-rating for sizing the overcurrent device (when not continuous duty) to prevent it from being operated at more than 80% of rating.
Note 2 - Copper wire rated with 90°C (194°F) insulation at an ambient temperature of 30°C (86°F), with a multiple cable
fill factor (0.8) de-rating (if needed).
Note 3 - The next larger standard size overcurrent device may be used if the de-rated cable ampacity falls between the
standard overcurrent devices found in the NEC.
Note 4 - Per the NEC, the DC grounding electrode conductor can be a #6 AWG (33.6 mm2) conductor if that is the only
connection to the grounding electrode and that grounding electrode is a rod, pipe, or plate electrode.
Page 15
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Installation
Table 2-2, DC Wire Size For Increased Distance (in free air)
Minimum Recommended DC Wire Size (one way)*
Inverter
Model
1-3 feet
3-5 feet
5-10 feet
ME2000
#2/0 AWG (67.4 mm2)
#4/0 AWG (107.16 mm2)
#4/0 AWG (107.16 mm2)
ME2012
#2/0 AWG (67.4 mm2)
#4/0 AWG (107.16 mm2)
#4/0 AWG (107.16 mm2)
ME2512
#4/0 AWG (107.16 mm2)
#4/0 AWG (107.16 mm2)
#4/0 AWG (107.16 mm2)
ME3112
#4/0 AWG (107.16 mm )
#4/0 AWG (107.16 mm )
consult code
2
2
* Copper wire rated with 90°C (194°F) insulation at an ambient temperature of 30°C (86°F).
2.4.3
DC Cable Connections
Do not put anything between the DC cable ring lug and the battery terminal post or the flat metal
part of the inverter’s DC terminal. When connecting the DC cable to the battery or inverter DC
terminals, the cable should be placed directly against the inverter or battery terminals. Incorrectly
installed hardware causes a high resistance connection, which could lead to poor inverter/charger
performance and may melt the cable and terminal connections.
Follow the examples in Figures 2-5 and 2-6 to connect the DC cables and stack the hardware
correctly. Tighten the terminal connections from 10 to 12 ft lbf (13.6 to 16.3 N-m).
CAUTION: The DC terminal and Kep nuts are made of stainless steel, which has a high
likelihood of seizure. To help prevent the bolt and nut from seizing — causing the bolts
to strip or snap/break-off — the use of anti-seize lubricant is highly recommended.
Info: If antioxidant grease or spray is used, apply it after all the connections have been
made and are properly tightened.
Info: A 1/2-inch wrench or socket is used to tighten the 5/16 SAE Kep nuts.
nut
split
washer
flat
washer
Battery
Temperature
Sensor
battery cable
(with ring lug)
CAUTION:
Ensure nothing is
placed between
the cable ring lug and
battery
the battery post.
post
Figure 2-5, Battery Hardware
Installation
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
CAUTION:
Ensure nothing is
placed between
the DC terminal
and the ring lug.
Inverter DC
terminal
(5/16 -18"
bolt,
5/8" length)
battery
cable (with
ring lug)
5/16 -18"
Flange or
Kep nut
Figure 2-6, Inverter DC Hardware
Installation
Page 16
Installation
2.4.4
Wiring the Battery Bank
WARNING: Lethal currents will be present if the positive and negative cables attached
to the battery bank touch each other. During the installation and wiring process, ensure
the cable ends are insulated or covered to prevent touching/shorting the cables.
Info: DO NOT connect the DC wires from the battery bank to the inverter until: 1) all
DC and AC wiring are completed, 2) the correct DC and AC overcurrent protection have
been installed, and 3) the correct DC voltage and polarity have been verified.
Info: For the ME Series inverter/charger to perform optimally, a minimum battery bank
of 200 AH is recommended for moderate loads (<1000W) and greater than 400 AH for
heavy loads (≥1000W).
Depending upon the voltage of the batteries you use in the installation (6 or 12 VDC), the batteries must
be wired in series, parallel, or series-parallel to provide the correct voltage (see Appendix B - Battery
Information for guidance on wiring batteries together). The interconnecting DC wires must be sized
and rated exactly the same as those that are used between the battery bank and the inverter.
Place the batteries as close as practical to the inverter, preferably in an insulated and ventilated
enclosure. Allow adequate space above the batteries to access the terminals and vent caps (as
applicable). Also, allow at least 1” (2.5 cm) of space between the batteries to provide good air
flow. DO NOT mount the batteries directly under the inverter.
CAUTION: Install batteries in a well ventilated area. Batteries can produce explosive
gases. For compartment/enclosure installations, always vent batteries to the outside.
Info: To ensure the best performance from your inverter system, batteries should be of
the same size, type, rating, and age. Do not use old or untested batteries.
2.4.5
Battery Temperature Sensor Installation and Wiring
The Battery Temperature Sensor (see Figure 2-7) provides the inverter with precise battery
temperature information to automatically adjust the ABSORB and FLOAT charge voltage setpoints. This enables the batteries to be correctly charged under extreme temperature changes.
If the temperature sensor is NOT installed and the batteries are subjected to large temperature
changes, battery life may be shortened.
The BTS provided may be extended to a maximum length of 40’ (12 m) using a RJ11 connector
(female to female) and a standard phone cable with RJ-11 connectors. However, your inverter to
battery cable length shouldn’t exceed the recommended distance shown in Table 2-2.
To install the BTS:
1. Attach the ring terminal end of the Battery Temperature Sensor to the negative battery terminal;
see Figure 2-5 for proper connection to the battery terminal.
2. Route the sensor’s cable to the inverter following existing wire runs.
3. Connect the RJ11 connector end of the BTS cable to the yellow-labeled BTS Port on the
inverter (see Figure 1-1, Item 6).
F R O N T V IE W
~ 2"
~ 1"
~¾ ”
C a b le
0 .375 " diam eter
~½ ”
S ID E V IE W
Figure 2-7, Battery Temperature Sensor
Page 17
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Installation
2.4.6
Wiring the Inverter to the Battery Bank
CAUTION: The inverter is NOT reverse polarity protected. If this happens, the inverter
will be damaged and will not be covered under warranty. Before connecting the DC
wires from the batteries to the inverter, verify the correct battery voltage and polarity
using a voltmeter. If the positive terminal of the battery is connected to the negative
terminal of the inverter and vice versa, severe damage will result. If necessary, color
code the cables (with colored tape); red for positive (+), and marked white for negative
(-) to avoid polarity confusion.
Info: The DC overcurrent device (e.g., circuit breaker or fuse) must be placed in
the positive (red) DC cable line between the inverter’s positive DC terminal and the
battery’s positive terminal (red); as close to the battery as possible.
DC Ground Wire
Route an appropriately sized DC grounding wire (green or bare wire) from the inverter’s DC
Equipment Ground Terminal (see Figure 1-2, Item 7) to a dedicated system ground. Recommended
tightening torque is 45 in lbf (5.1 N-m). Refer to Section 2.6 for grounding information and sizing
the DC ground wires.
DC Negative Wire
Route an appropriately sized DC negative wire (marked white) from the negative terminal of the
battery bank to the inverter’s Negative DC Terminal (see Figure 1-2, Item 11).
Info: If installing a battery monitor such as Magnum’s ME-BMK, install a DC shunt inline with the negative battery cable.
DC Positive Wire
Mount the circuit breaker or fuse assembly as near as practical to the batteries and leave open
(i.e., no power to inverter).
WARNING: DO NOT close the DC circuit breaker or connect the fuse to connect
battery power to the inverter at this time. This will occur in the Functional Test after
the installation is complete.
CAUTION: If connecting live battery cables to the inverter DC terminals, a brief spark
or arc may occur; this is normal and due to the inverter’s internal capacitors being
charged.
Route and connect an appropriately sized DC positive wire (red) from the inverter’s Positive DC
Terminal (see Figure 1-2, Item 10) to one end of the circuit breaker (or DC fuse block).
Connect a short wire (same rating as the DC wires) to the other side of the DC circuit breaker
(or one end of the fuse/disconnect assembly), and the other end of the short wire to the positive
terminal of the battery bank (see Figure 2-1 for reference). This is essential to ensure even charging
and discharging across the entire battery bank.
Ensure the DC wire connections (on the batteries, inverter, and DC circuit breaker/fuse lugs) are
flush on the surface of the DC terminals, and the hardware (lock washer and nut) used to hold
these connections are stacked correctly (Figures 2-5 and 2-6). Verify all DC connections are torqued
from 10 to 12 ft lbf (13.6 to 16.3 N-m).
Once the DC connections are completely wired and tested, coat the terminals with an approved
anti-oxidizing spray.
Attach the red and black terminal covers over the inverter’s DC connectors, and then secure them
in place with the supplied screws.
If the batteries are in an enclosure, perform a final check of the connections to the battery terminals,
and then close and secure the battery enclosure.
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 18
Installation
2.5
AC Wiring
This section provides information on how to make the AC connections to the inverter using the
correct AC wire size and the corresponding overcurrent protection. The ME2012, ME2512, and
ME3112 models use an AC Terminal Block (see Figure 2-10) to connect the inverter’s AC input and
output wiring, whereas the ME2000 models have field wiring leads (see Figure 2-16).
2.5.1 Pre-AC Wiring Requirements
CAUTION: Before installing any AC wiring, review the safety information and cautionary
markings at the beginning of this manual and the directions below to ensure a safe and
long-lived system:
•
Always use properly rated circuit-breakers. If using an electrical sub-panel, circuit
breakers can only be moved from the main electrical panel to the sub-panel if the
breakers are also listed to be installed in the sub-panel.
•
AC wiring must be no less than #12 AWG (3.3 mm2) gauge copper wire and be
approved for the application (i.e., mobile or marine wiring).
•
DO NOT connect the inverter’s output to an AC power source. This could cause
severe damage to the inverter and is not covered under warranty.
WARNING: To reduce the risk of fire, do not connect this inverter to an AC load center
(circuit breaker panel) having multi-wire branch circuits connected.
2.5.2 AC Wire Size and Overcurrent Protection
The AC input and output wiring must be sized per the local electrical safety code requirements to
ensure the wire’s ability to safely handle the inverter’s maximum load current. After determining
the proper AC wire sizes, they are required to be protected from short circuits and overloads by
an overcurrent protection device, and have a means to disconnect the AC circuits.
The ME Series allows the AC input and output wiring to be permanently wired. The inverter’s input
is wired to the service/distribution panel (main panel). The inverter’s output is then wired to a
dedicated panel (sub-panel)1. The inverter uses the circuit breakers provided in the panels as the
overcurrent protection and the AC disconnect device.
AC overcurrent protection isn’t included in the inverter and must be provided as part of the inverter
installation. The AC overcurrent protection device must be a circuit breaker or a fuse/disconnect,
be properly sized, and branch circuit rated for the wire it’s protecting and the appliances being
powered.
When in Standby Mode, the full AC continuous pass-thru capacity of the ME Series inverter/charger
is 30 amps for each AC leg2 (AC HOT1 and AC HOT2). However, the AC HOT1 and AC HOT2
may be combined to obtain a 60 amps pass-thru capability3 (see Figure 2-12 for the SISO-60A
configuration). For a 30 amp continuous pass-thru capability, each AC HOT IN input to the inverter
requires a 30 amp continuous duty rated breaker4, which corresponds to a minimum cable size
of #12 AWG (3.3 mm2). When tying the AC HOT1 and HOT2 together for a 60 amp continuous
pass-thru capability, the AC input to the inverter requires a 60 amp continuous duty rated breaker,
which corresponds to a minimum cable size of #6 AWG. If you are using other circuit breakers/wire
sizes, refer to the appropriate electrical codes for proper sizing requirements.
CAUTION: The inverter’s internal AC transfer relay contacts are rated for 30 amps
per leg, the pass-thru current must be no greater than 30 amps per leg or damage to
this relay may occur.
Note 1 - Breaker models (-15B and -20B) do not require a dedicated inverter panel (i.e., sub-panel).
Note 2 - On breaker models (-15B and -20B), the pass-thru current is limited by the output breaker size.
Note 3 - Not allowed on breaker models (-15B and -20B) or the ME2000 model.
Note 4 - The breaker must be de-rated by 80% if not rated for continuous duty. The NEC requires that circuits are not
to be operated continuously at more than 80% of rating unless listed with a 100% continuous rating.
Page 19
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Installation
AC Input/
Output
Strain Relief
AC Input/
Output
Strain Relief
Figure 2-8, ME Series Inverter/Charger - AC Wiring
AC Access Cover
AC Input Circuit Breaker (CB3)
AC Output 2 Circuit Breaker (CB2)
(on -15B, -20B output breaker models only)
AC Output 1 Circuit Breaker (CB1)
(on -15B, -20B output breaker models only)
Figure 2-9, ME Series Inverter/Charger - AC Wiring (Access Cover)
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 20
Installation
2.5.3
Recommended GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interruption) Breakers
Some electrical safety codes require the use of GFCI’s. In compliance with UL standards, Magnum
Energy has tested the following GFCI’s and find that they function properly when connected to
the inverter’s AC output:
Shock SentryTM #XGF15V-SP
Leviton Smart Lock #8899-A
Hubbel #GF520EMBKA
2.5.4
AC Terminal Block Connections (ME2012, ME2512, and ME3112 models)
The inverter for these models has a six-pole AC terminal block and one AC ground terminal to
connect the inverter’s AC input and output wiring. To access and view the AC terminal block and
ground terminal, remove the two Phillips screws holding the AC Access Cover plate (see Figure 1-3,
Item 15).
Each connection on the AC terminal block is rated to accept one #14 to #6 AWG (2.1 to 13.3 mm2)
CU stranded wire, or two #12 AWG (3.3 mm2) CU stranded wires. The connection uses a M3.5 slotted
head screw, and the maximum tightening torque is 16 in lbf (1.8 N-m).
Info: One of the AC wiring configurations [SI/SO (60A), Figure 2-12] uses a #6 AWG
(13.3 mm2) CU wire to carry 60 amps, and splits to two wires to allow 30 amps for
each leg (i.e., AC HOT1 and AC HOT2). IDEAL Industries Inc. (www.idealindustries.
com) manufactures a crimp connector (PN: 412) and a separate insulator (PN: 417)
that allow up to two #8 AWG (8.4 mm2) wires, with one #6 AWG (13 mm2) wire to be
connected together.
Info: For marine installations and to comply with standard safety requirements, the
six-pole AC terminal is provided with a stainless steel wire protector to prevent wire
damage from the set-screw.
Info: The inverter’s NEUT IN and NEUT OUT terminals are electrically isolated from
each other while inverting. This is related to the neutral-ground bonding requirement
and helps to prevent ground-loops (see Section 2.6.3 for more information).
The AC ground terminal can accept one #14 to #6 AWG (2.1 to 13 mm2) CU stranded wire. It uses
a slotted head screw and has a recommended maximum tightening torque of 45 in lbf (5.1 N-m).
For multiple ground wires, use a pressure or mechanical connector to attach the single wire from
the AC ground terminal to the input and output ground connections.
HOT 1 OUT
HOT 2 IN
HOT 2 OUT
HOT 1 IN
NEUT IN
NEUT OUT
AC GROUND
(In & Out)
Figure 2-10, AC Terminal Block
Page 21
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Installation
2.5.5
AC Conductor Wiring (ME2012, ME2512, and ME3112 models)
The following steps are basic guidelines for installing and connecting the AC wiring into and out of
the inverter. Refer to Table 2-3 to determine your AC wiring configurations before beginning.
WARNING: Before making any AC connections, make sure the inverter is disconnected
from the battery and there is no other source of live power connected to the inverter.
Wiring the Inverter AC Input
1. Remove the two Phillips screws on the AC Access Cover (see Figure 1-3, Item 15) to access
the internal AC Terminal Block (see Figure 2-10).
2. Route the cable from the AC electrical main panel through one of the strain relief clamps to
the AC INPUT. Tighten the strain relief clamp securely on the cable. Always leave a little extra
slack in the wiring.
3. Connect the hot wire (black) from the main panel’s dedicated breaker to the “HOT 1 IN”
terminal. Tighten the “HOT 1 IN” terminal to 16 in lbf (1.8 N-m).
Info: Depending on the AC wiring configuration, you may need to connect a wire to
the “HOT 2 IN” terminal, refer to your configuration drawing (Figure 2-11 to 2-15).
4. Connect the neutral (white) from the main panel’s neutral busbar to the “NEUT IN” terminal.
Tighten the “NEUT IN” terminal to 16 in lbf (1.8 N-m).
Wiring the Inverter AC Output
1. Route the cable from the inverter’s AC OUTPUT to the AC electrical sub-panel (or outlets, if
using the output breaker versions) through the other strain relief clamp. Tighten the strain
relief clamp securely on the cable.
2. Connect the hot (black) wire from the “HOT 1 OUT” terminal to the sub-panel main breaker
(or to the hot connections on the outlets, if using the output breaker versions). Tighten the
“HOT 1 OUT” terminal to 16 in lbf (1.8 N-m).
Info: Depending on the AC wiring configuration, you may need to connect a wire to
the “HOT 2 OUT” terminal, refer to your configuration drawing (Figure 2-11 to 2-15).
3. Connect the neutral (white) from the “NEUT OUT” terminal to the sub-panel’s neutral busbar
(or to the neutral connection on the outlets, if using the output breaker versions). Tighten the
“NEUT OUT” terminal to 16 in lbf (1.8 N-m).
Wiring the Inverter AC Ground
1. Combine the ground (green) wire from the main panel’s ground busbar and the ground (green)
wire from the sub-panel’s ground busbar (or the ground connection on the outlets, if using
the output breaker versions). After these grounds are combined, connect them to the “AC
GROUND” terminal. Tighten the “AC GROUND” terminal to 16 in lbf (1.8 N-m).
AC Wiring Inspection
1. Verify all cable runs are secured. If installed in a mobile installation, use wire ties or other
non-conductive fasteners to prevent chafing or damage from movement and vibration.
2. Verify strain reliefs or grommets are in place to prevent damage to the wiring where it passes
through walls/bulkheads or other openings.
3. After verifying all AC connections are correct and all inverter AC terminal screws are torqued to
16 in lbf (1.8 N-m), replace the AC wiring access cover and the covers on the main electrical/
distribution panel.
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 22
Installation
2.5.6
AC Wiring Configuration (ME2012, ME2512, and ME3112 models)
The following table provides the different wiring configurations for installing and connecting the AC
conductors into and out of the ME2012, ME2512, and ME3112 model inverters (see Figures 2-11
to 2-15 for installation diagrams showing these configurations). Refer to Table 2-4 (and Figures
2-16 & 2-17) for the ME2000 models.
Table 2-3, AC Input/Output Wiring Configurations
SI/SO
(30A)
Single In/
Single Out
(30A)
SI/SO (60A)
Single In/
Single Out
(60A)
SI/DO
Single In/
Dual Out
DI/SO
Dual In/
Single Out
DI/DO
Dual In/
Dual Out
AC Source1
Required
120 VAC @
< 30 amps
120 VAC @
> 30 amps
(60 amps
maximum).
120 VAC @
< 30 amps
@ < 15 amps per
leg (-15B models);
or < 20 amps per
leg (-20B models).
120/240 VAC (or 120/240 VAC (or
2 separate legs
2 separate legs
of 120 VAC)
of 120 VAC)
@ < 30 amps
@ < 30 amps per
per leg
leg
Reason to
Use
Have an 120
VAC source
that is < 30
amps.
Requires
a separate
inverter
sub-panel.
Have an 120
VAC source
that is > 30
amps.
Requires
a separate
inverter
sub-panel.
Do not want to
install a separate
inverter sub-panel.
Inverter pass-thru
capability limited
by model used.
Want dedicated
charging and
dedicated passthru while the
AC source is on.
Requires a
separate inverter
sub-panel.
May need to
power 240 VAC
loads when
AC source is
on (requires
120/240 VAC
source).
Requires a
separate inverter
sub-panel.
Appropriate
Models
ME2012
ME2512
ME3112
ME2012
ME2512
ME3112
ME2012-15B
ME2012-20B
ME2012
ME2512
ME3112
ME2012
ME2512
ME3112
Maximum
Input
Breaker
Required
Minimum
Wire Size
30A
(single pole)
#10 AWG
(In & Out)
60A
(single pole)
#6 AWG
(In & Out);
Can be split to
two #10 AWG
(for HOT 1
& HOT 2)
-15B models:
30A (single pole);
-20B models:
30A (single pole)
#10 AWG (In)
(Hot input must
be split to two
#12 AWG);
#12 AWG x2 (Out)
30A
(dual pole)
#10 AWG
(In & Out)
30A
(dual pole)
#10 AWG
(In & Out)
Maximum
Inverter
Pass-thru
capacity
3600W
(30A @
120 VAC)
7200W
(60A @
120 VAC)
-15B models:
15A/leg
(30A max.);
-20B models:
20A/leg
(30A max.)
3600W
(30A @
120 VAC)
7200W
(2 legs of 30A @
120/240 VAC or
2 legs of 30A @
120 VAC)2
Wiring
Diagram
Figure 2-11
Figure 2-12
Figure 2-13
Figure 2-14
Figure 2-15
Note 1: AC Source is from either shore power or an onboard generator.
Note 2: If two legs of 30A @ 120 VAC are used, they must be from the same source.
Page 23
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Installation
A C T e rm in a l B lo c k
( A C in p u t a n d o u tp u t w irin g )
A C N E U T IN
( from M a in P a nel)
A C H O T 1 IN
( from M a in P a nel)
A C H OT 1 OU T
(to S ub-P a nel)
A C N EU T O U T
(to S ub-P a nel)
M E S e rie s In v e rte r
AC G RO UNDS
(to /fro m b o th
P a n e ls)
S IN G L E IN / S IN G L E O U T (3 0A ) w irin g
In m obile installations : neutral is typically not
connected to ground in the m ain panel.
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OF F
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
ON
ON
OF F
ON
OF F
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
OF F
O FF
ON
ON
OF F
ON
ON
O FF
ON
ON
OF F
OF F
30
O FF
OFF
M axim um
30 am p breaker
(single pole )
required to
inverter AC input
120
VA C
M a in P a n e l
(S h o re P o w e r/G e n e ra to r In p u t )
120
VA C
S u b-P a n e l a n d O u tle ts
(In v e rte r L o a d s )
Figure 2-11, AC Wiring for Single In - Single Out (30A) Configurations
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 24
Installation
A C T e rm in a l B lo c k
( A C in p u t a n d o u tp u t w irin g )
A C N E U T IN
( from M a in P a nel)
A C H O T 1 IN
( from M a in P a nel)
A C H O T 2 IN
( from M a in P a nel)
A C H OT 1 OU T
(to S ub-P a nel)
A C H OT 2 OU T
(to S ub-P a nel)
A C N EU T O U T
(to S ub-P a nel)
M E S e rie s In v e rte r
AC G RO UNDS
(to /fro m b o th
P a n e ls)
S IN G L E IN / S IN G L E O U T (6 0A ) w irin g
In m obile installations : neutral is typically not
connected to ground in the m ain panel.
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OF F
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
ON
ON
OF F
OF F
O FF
ON
OF F
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
OF F
O FF
ON
ON
OF F
ON
ON
O FF
ON
ON
O FF
ON
OF F
OF F
60
ON
OFF
M axim um
60 am p breaker
(single pole )
required to
inverter AC input
120
VA C
M a in P a n e l
(S h o re P o w e r/G e n e ra to r In p u t )
120
VA C
120
VA C
120
VA C
S u b-P a n e l a n d O u tle ts
(In v e rte r L o a d s )
Figure 2-12, AC Wiring for Single In - Single Out (60A) Configurations
Page 25
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Installation
A C T e rm in a l B lo c k
( A C in p u t a n d o u tp u t w irin g )
H as optional 15 am p or 20
am p branch-rated circuit
breakers (on side of unit).
A C N E U T IN
( from M ain P ane l)
A C H O T 1 IN
( from M ain P ane l)
A C H O T 2 IN
( from M ain P ane l)
AC HO T 1 O UT
AC HO T 2 O UT
AC NE UT O UT
( x2 )
M E 2 0 1 2- 1 5 B o r
M E 2 0 1 2 -2 0 B In v e rte r
AC G RO UNDS
(to /fro m b o th
P a n e ls)
S IN G L E IN / D U A L O U T w irin g
In m obile installations : neutral is typically not
connected to ground in the m ain panel.
ON
120
VA C
120
VA C
D ire c t fro m in v e rte r
(In v e rte r L o a d s )
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OF F
ON
O FF
ON
OF F
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
ON
ON
OF F
OF F
O FF
OF F
ON
O FF
ON
O FF
ON
OF F
30
M axim um breaker size
required to inverter AC input
should be 30 am ps.
M a in P a n e l
(S h o re P o w e r/G e n e ra to r In p u t )
Figure 2-13, AC Wiring for Single In - Dual Out Configurations
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 26
Installation
A C T e rm in a l B lo c k
( A C in p u t a n d o u tp u t w irin g )
A C N E U T IN
( from M a in P a nel)
A C H O T 1 IN
( from M a in P a nel)
A C H O T 2 IN
( from M a in P a nel)
AC HO T 2 O UT
(t o Sub- Pa ne l)
A C N EU T O U T
(to S ub-P a nel)
M E S e rie s In v e rte r
AC G RO UNDS
(to /fro m b o th
P a n e ls)
D U A L IN / S IN G L E O U T w irin g
In m obile installations : neutral is typically not
connected to ground in the m ain panel.
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OF F
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
ON
ON
OF F
ON
OF F
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
OF F
O FF
ON
ON
OF F
ON
ON
O FF
ON
ON
O FF
OF F
30
30
OF F
OFF
M axim um
30 am p breaker
(double pole)
required to
inverter AC input
120
VA C
M a in P a n e l
(S h o re P o w e r/G e n e ra to r In p u t )
120
VA C
S u b-P a n e l a n d O u tle ts
(In v e rte r L o a d s )
Figure 2-14, AC Wiring for Dual In - Single Out Configurations
Page 27
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Installation
A C T e rm in a l B lo c k
( A C in p u t a n d o u tp u t w irin g )
A C N E U T IN
( from M a in P a nel)
A C H O T 1 IN
( from M a in P a nel)
A C H O T 2 IN
( from M a in P a nel)
A C H OT 1 OU T
(to S ub-P a nel)
A C N EU T O U T
(to S ub-P a nel)
A C H OT 2 OU T
(to S ub-P a nel)
M E S e rie s In v e rte r
AC G RO UNDS
(to /fro m b o th
P a n e ls)
D U A L IN / D U A L O U T w irin g
In m obile installations : neutral is typically not
connected to ground in the m ain panel.
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OF F
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
ON
ON
OF F
O FF
OF F
O FF
ON
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
O FF
ON
OF F
ON
ON
OF F
ON
ON
O FF
ON
O FF
ON
OF F
OF F
30
30
ON
OFF
M a in P a n e l
(S h o re P o w e r/G e n e ra to r In p u t )
M axim um
30 am p breaker
(double pole)
required to
inverter AC input
240
V A C only
in s ta ndby
120
VA C
120
VA C
S u b-P a n e l a n d O u tle ts
(In v e rte r L o a d s )
Figure 2-15, AC Wiring for Dual In - Dual Out Configurations
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 28
Installation
2.5.7
AC Conductor Wiring (ME2000 models)
The ME2000 is a new model in the ME Series family. It offers a cost-effective alternative to the
ME2012 while still providing the same features. This model has a slightly smaller height, but
otherwise has the same footprint as the other ME Series inverters. The ME2000 can be wired in a
single in - single out configuration, as well as a single in - dual out configuration (-15B & -20B).
The following steps are basic guidelines for installing and connecting the AC wiring into and out
of the inverter. Refer to Table 2-4 to determine your AC wiring configurations before beginning.
WARNING: Before making any AC connections, make sure the inverter is disconnected
from the battery and all AC power is disconnected from the inverter.
Wiring the Inverter AC Input
1. Remove the two Phillips screws on the AC Access Cover (see Figure 1-3, Item 15) to access
the internal AC wiring.
2. Route the cable from the AC electrical main panel through one of the strain relief clamps to
the AC INPUT. Tighten the strain relief clamp securely on the cable. Always leave a little extra
slack in the wiring.
3. Connect the AC hot in wire (black) from the main panel’s dedicated breaker to the inverter’s
(black) HOT IN wire using field wiring leads.
4. Connect the AC neutral in wire (white) from the main panel’s neutral busbar to the inverter’s
(white) NEUTRAL IN wire using field wiring leads.
Wiring the Inverter AC Output
1. Route the cable from the inverter’s AC OUTPUT to the AC electrical sub-panel (or outlets, if
using the output breaker versions) through the other strain relief clamp. Tighten the strain
relief clamp securely on the cable.
2. Connect the inverter’s HOT 1 OUT (blue) wire to the sub-panel main breaker (or, to the hot
connections on the outlets if using the output breaker versions) using field wiring leads.
Info: Depending on the AC wiring configuration, you may need to connect a wire to
the inverter’s HOT 2 OUT (orange) wire. (See Figure 2-17)
3. Connect the inverter’s NEUTRAL OUT (white w/black) wire to the sub-panel’s neutral busbar
(or to the neutral connections on the outlets, if using the output breaker versions - see Figure
2-17) using field wiring leads.
Wiring the Inverter AC Ground
1. Combine the ground (green) wire from the main panel’s ground busbar and the ground (green)
wire from the sub-panel’s ground busbar (or the ground connection on the outlets, if using the
output breaker versions). After these grounds are combined, use field wiring leads to connect
them to the inverter’s AC GROUND (green) wire.
AC Wiring Inspection
1. Verify all cable runs are secured. If installed in a mobile installation, use wire ties or other
non-conductive fasteners to prevent chafing or damage from movement and vibration.
2. Verify strain reliefs or grommets are in place to prevent damage to the wiring or conduit where
it passes through walls/bulkheads or other openings.
3. After verifying all AC connections are securely fastened, replace the AC wiring access cover
and the covers to the main electrical/distribution panel.
Page 29
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Installation
2.5.8
AC Wiring Configuration (ME2000 models)
The following table provides the different wiring configurations for installing and connecting the
AC conductors into and out of ME2000 model inverters (see Figures 2-16 and 2-17 for installation
diagrams showing these configurations).
Table 2-4, AC Input/Output Wiring Configurations (ME2000 models)
SI/SO (30A)
Single In/
Single Out
(30A)
SI/DO
Single In/
Dual Out
AC Source1
Required
120 VAC @
< 30 amps
120 VAC @
< 30 amps
@ < 15 amps per
leg (-15B models);
or < 20 amps per
leg (-20B models).
Reason to
Use
Have an 120
VAC source
that is < 30
amps.
Requires
a separate
inverter
sub-panel.
Do not want to
install a separate
inverter sub-panel.
Inverter pass-thru
capability limited
by model used.
Appropriate
Models
ME2000
ME2000-15B
ME2000-20B
Maximum
Input
Breaker
Required
Minimum
Wire Size
30A
(single pole)
#10 AWG
(In & Out)
-15B models:
30A (single pole);
-20B models:
30A (single pole)
#10 AWG (In)
(Hot input must
be split to two
#12 AWG);
#12 AWG x2 (Out)
Maximum
Inverter
Pass-thru
capacity
3600W
(30A @
120 VAC)
-15B models:
15A/leg
(30A max.);
-20B models:
20A/leg
(30A max.)
Wiring
Diagram
Figure 2-16
Figure 2-17
Note 1: AC Source is from either shore power or an
onboard generator.
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 30
Installation
A C T e rm in a l B lo c k
( A C in p u t a n d o u tp u t w irin g )
M E 2 0 0 0 S e rie s In v e rte r
B LA C K
A C H O T IN
W H IT E
A C N E U T IN
GR EEN
AC GR OU N D
AC GR OU N D
W H IT E w / B LA C K
AC N EU T OU T
B LU E
AC H OT 1 OU T
S IN G L E IN / S IN G L E O U T (3 0A ) w irin g
In m obile installations : neutral is typically not
connected to ground in the m ain panel.
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OF F
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
ON
ON
OF F
ON
OF F
ON
ON
O FF
O FF
OF F
O FF
ON
ON
OF F
ON
ON
O FF
ON
ON
OF F
OF F
30
O FF
OFF
M axim um
30 am p breaker
(single pole )
required to
inverter AC input
120
VA C
M a in P a n e l
(S h o re P o w e r/G e n e ra to r In p u t )
120
VA C
S u b-P a n e l a n d O u tle ts
(In v e rte r L o a d s )
Figure 2-16, AC Wiring for Single In - Single Out (ME2000 models)
Configurations
Page 31
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Installation
A C T e rm in a l B lo c k
( A C in p u t a n d o u tp u t w irin g )
B LA C K
A C H O T IN
W H IT E
A C N E U T IN
GR EEN
AC GR OU N D
H as optional 15 am p or 20
am p branch-rated circuit
breakers (on side of unit ).
M E 2 0 0 0 -1 5 B /-2 0 B
In v e rte rs
A C G R O U N D ( x2 )
W H IT E w / B LA C K
AC NEUT
O U T (x 2)
B LU E
AC H OT 1 OU T
OR AN GE
AC H OT 2 OU T
S IN G L E IN / D U A L O U T w irin g
In m obile installations : neutral is typically not
connected to ground in the m ain panel.
ON
120
VA C
120
VA C
D ire c t fro m in v e rte r
(In v e rte r L o a d s )
OF F
O FF
OF F
ON
OF F
ON
OF F
ON
O FF
ON
O FF
ON
ON
OF F
O FF
ON
ON
O FF
ON
ON
OF F
30
ON
O FF
ON
OFF
M axim um 30 am p breaker
(single pole ) required to
inverter AC input.
M a in P a n e l
( S h o re P o w e r/G e n e ra to r In p u t )
Figure 2-17, AC Wiring for Single In - Dual Out (ME2000-15B/-20B models)
Configurations
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 32
Installation
2.6
Grounding Inverters
The inverter/charger should always be connected to a permanent, grounded wiring system. An
inverter system that is properly grounded will limit the risk of electrical shock, reduce radio frequency
noise from the inverter, and minimize excessive surge voltages induced by lightning. This is done
by ensuring there is a well-defined, very low-resistance path from the electrical system to the
grounding system. This low-resistance path helps stabilize the electrical system voltage with respect
to ground and carries fault currents directly to ground if the electrical system malfunctions.
The ME Series inverter/charger uses both AC and DC power; however, the AC electrical system is
isolated from the DC electrical system by an internal transformer. Although this inverter/charger has
two electrical systems, each must be properly grounded and connected to a common point.
For proper grounding, each electrical system must connect all exposed metal parts of equipment
and one of the current carrying conductors together at a common point. This common point of
each electrical system is then connected to the common ground reference. This connection to the
common ground reference should only be made at one point in each electrical system; otherwise,
parallel paths will exist for the currents to flow. These parallel current paths would represent a
safety hazard and are not allowed in installations wired per the NEC/CEC.
2.6.1
Equipment Grounding
The inverter case and all other non-current carrying exposed metal surfaces in the entire electrical
system that may be accidentally energized must be grounded. The equipment-grounding conductor
must be sized to safely carry the maximum ground-fault current likely to be imposed on it from
where a ground-fault may occur. In accordance with the NEC, use Table 2-5 to size the equipmentgrounding conductors. This table requires that the equipment-grounding conductor be sized
according to the rating of the overcurrent device protecting the circuit.
CAUTION: The connections and wiring for the equipment-grounding conductor must
be continuous to allow fault currents to properly operate overcurrent devices. Where
equipment is removed and this disconnects the bonding connection between the
grounding electrode conductor and exposed conducting surfaces, a bonding jumper
must be installed while the equipment is removed.
AC Side - Where the AC output from the inverter is connected to an AC load center, there should
be an equipment grounding conductor connected between the inverter case and the grounding
point in the AC load center. The AC equipment grounding conductor is sized per Table 2-5, and
is connected to the inverter’s AC equipment grounding terminal as shown in Figure 2-10 (or a
grounding wire for the ME2000 models).
DC Side - Since the currents on the DC side are higher than the AC side (10 times at 12 volts,
5 times at 24 volts), the equipment grounding needs are different. The DC equipment grounding
conductor is sized per Table 2-5, and connected to the DC equipment grounding terminal on the
inverter as shown in Figure 2-20.
Table 2-5, Equipment Grounding Conductor Sizing
Page 33
Rating of Overcurrent
Device
Minimum Size of
Copper Ground Wire
15 amp
#14 AWG (2.1 mm2)
20 amp
#12 AWG (3.3 mm2)
30 - 60 amp
#10 AWG (5.3 mm2)
100 amp
#8 AWG (8.4 mm2)
200 amp
#6 AWG (13.3 mm2)
300 amp
#4 AWG (21.1 mm2)
400 amp
#3 AWG (26.6 mm2)
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Installation
2.6.2 Grounding on Boats
When installing the ME Series inverter/charger on a boat, there are several considerations that
must be followed when grounding to ensure a safe installation, prevent galvanic corrosion, and
adhere to American Boat and Yacht Council (ABYC) standards.
Ensure a Safe Ground Connection
When AC on the boat is being supplied by shore power, the onboard neutral should be connected
to safety ground on the dock. Consequently, neutral and safety ground should not be connected
anywhere on the boat when shore power is present. When AC on the boat is being supplied by the
ME Series inverter, the inverter’s output neutral is connected to safety ground through an internal
relay using its neutral to ground connection (see Figure 2-18).
The DC ground terminal on the ME Series must also be connected to the boat’s safety ground
bus. This ensures that both the inverter’s AC and DC ground terminals are connected to the boat’s
safety ground bus as a safety measure to provide protection against faults, and to provide a path
for AC fault currents while the boat is connected to shore power.
Preventing the Risk of Corrosion
The inverter’s AC and DC ground terminals must be connected to the boat’s safety ground to
provide an important safety feature. However, this ground connection introduces the risk of galvanic
corrosion and/or electrolysis of the boat’s underwater metallic hardware.
Two possible solutions are typically used to maintain the correct onboard grounding requirements
while greatly reducing (if not eliminating) the risk of galvanic corrosion. These solutions would be
either using a galvanic isolator, or an onboard isolation transformer.
Galvanic isolators allow high AC voltage faults to pass, but block low voltage corrosion/electrolysis
currents from conducting.
Marine isolation transformers enable the shore power to be connected to one side of the transformer
while the boat’s AC wiring system is connected to the other side. Since transformers do not allow
DC currents to pass, the problem with galvanic corrosion is eliminated.
ABYC Inverter/Charger Grounding Requirements1
•
DC Grounding Connections:
1) The DC grounding conductor (equipment ground) shall be:
a) connected from the metallic case or chassis of the inverter/charger to the engine
negative terminal or its bus;
b) and, an ampacity equal to that of the DC positive conductor (under certain conditions,
this conductor may be one size smaller – refer the ABYC standard).
2) The inverter/charger’s negative battery terminal and DC grounded conductor (negative cable)
shall not be connected to the inverter case or chassis at the inverter/charger itself.
•
AC Grounding Connections:
1) The AC grounding conductor (green) shall be connected to the inverter/charger in a manner so
that the AC ground connection will not be disconnected in servicing. This conductor is in addition
to and independent of the DC grounding conductor.
2) The neutral for AC power sources shall be grounded only at the following points:
a)
b)
c)
The shore power neutral is grounded only through the shore power cable and not
grounded on board the boat.
The inverter neutral shall be grounded at the inverter and the output neutral shall be
disconnected from ground when the inverter is operating in charger/pass-through mode.
On systems using an isolation transformer or a polarization transformer, the inverter
neutral (and the transformer secondary neutral) may be grounded at the AC main grounding
bus instead of at the inverter.
Note 1: See the ABYC standard for complete AC/DC grounding requirements.
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 34
Installation
2.6.3
Neutral to Safety Ground Bonding
The recommended standards for safely wiring mobile and marine installations require that the
neutral and safety ground be connected at the AC source; whether it is an inverter, shore power,
or a generator. This is to establish a specification that maximizes the possibility that a circuit
breaker will activate if a hot-wire-to-ground fault occurs. These standards also require that the
AC neutral be connected to safety ground (often called a “bond”) in one, and only one, place at
any time. The single bond is established in order to make the electrical panel’s neutral line safe,
by connecting it to ground. Without this bond, the neutral can have up to 60 VAC with respect to
ground. On the other hand, if more than one bond is established, currents can circulate between
neutral and ground and cause “ground-loop” currents. These ground-loops can trip GFCIs, cause
an electric shock hazard, and may be the reason for other annoying side effects.
In applications where you are using an inverter as one of your AC sources along with another
AC source (e.g., shore power or generator) there is the potential of having multiple connections
(bonds) between neutral and ground. Therefore, you must ensure that the inverter does not also
connect the neutral-to-ground while the other AC source is actively powering the inverter loads.
This can be prevented if your inverter is equipped with automatic neutral-to-ground switching.
WARNING: In most electrical systems, the neutral-to-ground bond is located in the
main shore power service entrance panel. Remove any bond downstream from the
inverter to prevent multiple bonds. If there is an inverter sub-panel — separate from a
main electrical panel — it should have a removable wire that allows the neutral bus to
be unbonded from the ground busbar.
All ME Series inverter/chargers have automatic neutral-to-ground switching to specifically work
in multiple source applications. The ME Series inverters use an internal relay that automatically
connects the AC neutral output terminal to the vehicle/boat’s ground while inverting (Inverter
Mode) to provide the neutral-to-ground bond; as shown in Figure 2-18. However, when an external
AC source (e.g., shore power or a generator) is qualified, another neutral-to-ground connection is
introduced in the system. When the ME Series is connected to this external AC source and goes
into Standby Mode, the internal relay automatically opens the neutral-to-ground connection, as
shown in Figure 2-19. This design keeps two neutral-to-ground connections from occurring at the
same time, thereby preventing an electrical shock hazard between the vehicle/boat’s neutral and
the external AC source’s neutral.
In sid e M E S e rie s In ve rte r /C h a rg e r
(In ve rte r M o d e)
N EU T IN
N eu-Gnd R elay
(K1)
In sid e M E S e rie s In ve rte r/C h a rg e r
(S ta n d b y M o d e)
N EU T IN
N EU T OU T
N EU T OU T
GR OU N D
Figure 2-18, Neutral-to-Ground
Connection (Inverter Mode)
Page 35
N eu-Gnd R elay (K 1)
GR OU N D
Figure 2-19, Neutral-to-Ground
Connection (Standby Mode)
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Installation
2.6.4
Connecting a Large Ground Wire
Marine installations require the ground wire to be the same size or one size smaller than the
negative cable. Use the following steps to allow a larger ground wire to be connected.
1. Locate the DC Equipment Ground Terminal
(see Figure 1-2, Item 7).
2. Locate and remove the AC Access Cover plate
(see Figure 1-3, Item 15) on the side of the
ME inverter.
3. Within the AC wiring area, locate the hex
nut on the backside of the DC ground terminal. After locating the hex nut, use a 7/16”
wrench/nut driver to remove the hex nut,
bolt, lock washer and DC ground terminal,
and then remove them from the chassis.
DC ground
terminal bolt/nut,
reversed and
tightened
4. Reverse the removed bolt, and place it back
in the chassis hole to attach a correctly sized
ground cable to the ME Series chassis, as
shown in Figure 2-20.
5. Place the washer and nut on the bolt, over
the ground cable, and securely tighten the
nut [from 4 to 5 ft lbf (5.4 to 6.8 N-m)].
Replace the AC Access Cover plate and secure.
2.7
Figure 2-20, Large Ground Wire
Connected to ME Series
Inverter Notification Requirements
A warning label as shown in Figure 2-21 is provided to inform all personnel that an inverter is
installed in your electrical system. Affix this label in a clearly visible location at the electrical panel
that is being powered by the inverter. This is because it might be falsely assumed that the panel is
no longer “hot” after the AC power has been shut off, when power may actually still be available
due to the inverter automatically powering the panel.
T h is e le c tric al s y s te m is e q u ip p e d w ith a n A u to m a tic
G e n era to r S ta rtin g (A G S ) d e v ic e a n d /o r a n in v e rte r.
D is c o nn e c t a ll A C a n d D C p o w e r to th e A G S a n d /o r
in v e rte r b e fo re p e rfo rm in g a n y s e rv ic e to the e le c tric a l
s y ste m . F a ilu re to d o s o c a n re su lt in s h oc k ca u s ing
serio us i n jury or de ath .
P N : 62 -0 002 R e v A
Figure 2-21, Warning Label
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 36
Installation
2.8
Final Inspection
1. Verify all cable runs are secured with wire ties or other non-conductive fasteners to prevent
chafing, or damage from movement and vibration.
2. Verify strain reliefs or grommets are in place to prevent damage to the wiring where it passes
through walls, bulkheads, or other openings.
3. Verify all AC connections are correct and torqued to a maximum of 16 in lbf (1.8 N-m).
4. Replace the covers on the main electrical/distribution panel.
5. Replace the chassis access cover.
6. Verify the inverter’s front panel switch is in the OFF position.
Info: If required by code, have the installation inspected by an electrical inspector.
2.9
Functional Test
After all electrical connections to the inverter, batteries, AC source, and sub-panel have been
completed, follow these steps to test the installation and the inverter operation.
CAUTION: Use a multimeter to verify the correct DC voltage for your particular inverter
model (i.e., 24-volt battery bank for a 24-volt inverter), and to ensure the polarity of the
battery voltage is correct (battery positive connected to inverter positive, and battery
negative connected to inverter negative).
1. Apply battery power to the inverter by closing the DC circuit breaker or inserting a fuse. The
inverter will remain OFF, but the green status indicator on the front of the inverter will quickly
blink once to indicate that DC power has been connected and is ready to be turned on.
2. Prior to turning on the inverter, make sure all AC loads (e.g., appliances) are NOT connected
to the inverter’s output or any AC outlets powered by the inverter.
3. Lightly press and release the inverter’s ON/OFF switch to turn the inverter ON. Verify the
inverter’s status indicator is blinking – indicating the inverter is ON.
4. Connect a small light bulb no larger than 75 watts to the inverter output and verify it comes on
and shines normally. DO NOT connect anything but a light bulb until all wiring and voltages are
confirmed to be correct.
Info: The inverter’s AC output voltage will not be correct until a load greater than
5 watts (5 watts is the default setting) is connected to the inverter; or, when the
Search Mode is turned OFF with a remote display (ME-RC50).
5. Check the AC output voltage of the inverter by connecting an AC voltmeter to the output
terminals (see Figure 2-22) and verify the correct output voltages.
Info: For the ME2000 models, remove the field wiring leads in order to get a good
connection and reading with the AC voltmeter (see Figures 2-23 and 2-24). For the
ME2000-15/-20 models you must check the HOT1 OUT and HOT2 OUT wires in Single
In - Dual Out configurations.
6. Press and release the inverter’s ON/OFF switch to turn the inverter off. The inverter’s status
indicator and the connected load should go off.
7. Apply AC power to the inverter’s AC input. After the AC input power is qualified (approximately
15 seconds), the incoming AC power will transfer through the inverter to the inverter’s AC
output and power the light bulb. Verify the inverter’s status indicator and that the light bulb
comes on.
Page 37
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Installation
8. Even though the light bulb is on, the inverter is currently disabled (off). Press and release the
ON/OFF switch on the inverter to enable (turn-on) the inverter.
9. Disconnect the incoming AC power to the inverter. Verify the light bulb remains on and is
now powered by the inverter.
If the inverter passes all the previous steps, the inverter is ready for use. If the inverter fails any
of the steps, refer to the Troubleshooting section.
A C T e rm in a l B lo c k
A C O u tp u t
120 V ac
( ± 5% )
3300
N eu tral to G ro u n d
< 0.5 V ac
Figure 2-22, AC Voltage Checks
A C W irin g C o m p a rtm e n t
BLAC K
W H IT E
GR EEN
N eu tral to G ro u n d
< 0.5 V ac
3
0
W H IT E W/BLAC K
A C O u tp u t
120 V ac
( ± 5% )
BLU E
Figure 2-23, AC Voltage Checks (ME2000 model)
A C W irin g C o m p a rtm e n t
B LA C K
W H IT E
GR EEN
N eu tral to G ro u n d
< 0.5 V ac
W H IT E w/B LA C K
A C O u tp u t A C O u tp u t
120 V ac
120 V ac
(± 5% )
(± 5% )
2
0
2
0
3
0
B LU E
OR AN GE
Figure 2-24, AC Voltage Checks (ME2000-15B/-20B models)
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 38
Operation
3.0 Operation
The ME Series inverter has two normal operating routines; Inverter Mode, which powers your
loads using the batteries, and Standby Mode, which transfers the incoming AC power (e.g., shore
power or a generator) to power your loads and also uses this incoming power to recharge the
batteries. This inverter also includes an extensive protection circuitry to shut down the inverter
under certain fault conditions.
3.1
Inverter Mode
When the ME Series is first powered up, it defaults to the OFF mode. The momentary Power ON/OFF
Switch (see Figure 1-1, Item 1) must be lightly pressed to turn the inverter ON. Subsequently,
pressing this switch alternately turns the inverter OFF and ON.
Inverter OFF - When the inverter is OFF, no power is used from the batteries to power the AC loads,
and the status LED will be OFF. If AC power from an external source (shore power or generator)
is connected and qualified on the inverter’s AC input, this AC input power will pass through the
inverter to power the AC loads. However, if this AC power is lost, the AC loads will no longer be
powered because the inverter is OFF.
When the inverter is turned ON, it operates either by “searching” or “inverting”, depending on the
connected AC loads.
Searching - When the inverter is first turned ON, the automatic Search feature is enabled. This
feature is provided to conserve battery power when AC power is not required. In this mode, the
inverter pulses the AC output looking for an AC load (e.g., electrical appliance). Whenever an AC load
(greater than 5 watts) is turned on, the inverter recognizes the need for power and automatically
starts inverting. When there is no load (or less than 5 watts) detected, the inverter automatically
goes back into Search Mode to minimize energy consumption from the battery bank. When the
inverter is “searching”, the inverter’s green LED flashes (fast).
Info: The factory default value for the Search feature is 5 watts, it can be turned off
or adjusted from 5 to 50 watts using the ME-RC50 remote display.
Inverting - When a load greater than 5 watts is connected to the inverter output, the ME Series
“inverts” the DC power from the battery and supplies 120 VAC power to your sub-panel. The
inverter’s green LED flashes once every 2 seconds (medium flash) to indicate it is inverting. The
amount of time the inverter can be inverting and providing power is directly related to the amount
of AC loads that are connected, and the capacity of the battery bank. Refer to Figure 3-1 to see
the flow of power from the DC input to the AC output while in the Inverter Mode.
C B2
( optional )
A C H ot
T rans fer R elay
A C H O T 2 IN
A C H O T 1 IN
AC H OT 2 OU T
AC H OT 1 OU T
0
VAC
AC N EU TR AL OU T
120
VAC
C B1
( optional )
C B 3 (3 0A )
A C N E U T R A L IN
AC GR OU N D
IN V
OU T
120
VAC
N eutral -G round
T rans fer R elay
AC
DC
IN
D C N E G A T IV E
D C P O S IT IV E
DC
F E T B ridge
P ow er T rans form er
Figure 3-1, Power Flow - Inverter Mode
Page 39
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Operation
3.2
Standby Mode
The ME Series features an automatic transfer relay and an internal battery charger when operating
in Standby Mode. Standby Mode begins whenever AC power (shore power or generator) is connected
to the inverter’s AC input. Once the AC voltage and frequency of the incoming AC power is within
the AC input limits, an automatic AC transfer relay is activated. This transfer relay passes the
incoming AC power through the inverter to power the AC loads on the inverter’s output. This
incoming power is also used to activate a powerful internal battery charger to keep the battery
bank charged in case of a power failure. Refer to Figure 3-2 to see the flow of power from the AC
input to the DC and AC output while in Standby Mode.
AC
IN
240
VAC
120
VAC
120
VAC
C B2
(optional )
A C H ot
T rans fer R elay
A C H O T 2 IN
A C H O T 1 IN
AC H OT 2 OU T
AC H OT 1 OU T
240
VAC
AC N EU TR AL OU T
120
VAC
C B1
(optional )
C B3 (3 0 A )
A C N E U T R A L IN
AC GR OU N D
AC
OU T
120
VAC
N eutral -G round
T rans fer R elay
AC
DC
OU T
D C N E G A T IV E
DC
D C P O S IT IV E
F E T B ridge
P ow er T rans form er
Figure 3-2, Power Flow - Standby Mode
3.3
Battery Charging
Magnum Energy’s ME Series is equipped with an active PFC (Power Factor Corrected) and PI
(Proportional-Integral) multi-stage battery charger. The PFC feature is used to control the amount
of power used to charge the batteries in order to obtain a power factor as close as possible to 1
(or unity). This causes the battery charger to look like a resistor to the line (forces the charge
current waveshape to mirror the voltage waveshape). The PI feature allows the charger voltage
and current to change independently. These two features maximize the real power available from
either shore power or generator AC power sources, which translates into less power wasted and
greater charging capabilities than most chargers available today.
When an AC source is connected to the AC input, the inverter begins monitoring for acceptable AC
voltage. Once the inverter has accepted this AC voltage, the AC transfer relay closes and the Charge
Mode begins. After Charge Mode begins, the DC voltage is monitored to determine the charging
stage. If the DC voltage is low (≤ 12.8 VDC), the charger begins Bulk Charging. If the DC voltage
is high (> 12.8 VDC), the charger will skip the Bulk and Absorb Charging stages and go directly
to Float Charging. The multi-stage charger can use up to five different charging stages to help
monitor and keep the batteries properly maintained. The five stages include an automatic 4-stage
charging process: Bulk, Absorb, Float, and Full Charge; and a manual Equalization (EQ) Charge
stage. The automatic 4-stage charge process provides complete recharging and monitoring of the
batteries without damage due to overcharging. The EQ stage (requires the ME-RC50 remote to
enable equalization charge) is used to stir up stratified electrolyte and to try to reverse battery
plate sulfation that may have occurred.
While charging, the unit may go into Charger Back-off protection, which automatically reduces
the charge current to the batteries. This is caused by: 1) the internal temperature is too hot – the
charger automatically reduces the charge rate to maintain temperature; or, 2) the AC input voltage
falls below 90 VAC – the charger will stop charging to help stabilize the incoming AC voltage.
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 40
Operation
The Charge Mode provides up to four separate charging stages: Bulk Charging, Absorb Charging,
Float Charging, and Full Charge (see Figure 3-3).
Bulk Charging: This is the initial stage of charging. While bulk charging, the charger supplies the
battery with constant current. The charger will remain in bulk charge until the absorption charge
voltage (determined by the battery type selection*) is achieved. The inverter’s green LED stays
ON (solid) to indicate bulk charging.
Absorb Charging: This is the second charging stage and begins after the absorb voltage has
been reached. Absorb charging provides the batteries with a constant voltage and reduces the DC
charging current in order to maintain the absorb voltage setting. The inverter’s green LED flashes
once every second (medium flash) to indicate absorption charging for 2 hours (determined by the
Battery AmpHrs selection*), then switches to float charging.
Float Charging: The third charging stage occurs at the end of the absorb charging time. While
float charging, the charge voltage is reduced to the float charge voltage (determined by the
battery type selection*). In this stage, the batteries are kept fully charged and ready if needed by
the inverter. The inverter’s green LED flashes once every 8 seconds (slow flash) to indicate float
charging. The Float Charging stage reduces battery gassing, minimizes watering requirements (for
flooded batteries), and ensures the batteries are maintained at optimum capacity.
Full Charge (Battery Saver™ mode): The fourth stage occurs after four hours in the Float
Charging stage. The Full Charge stage is designed to keep batteries fully charged over long periods
and prevent excessive loss of water in flooded batteries, or drying out of GEL/AGM batteries. In
this stage, the charger is turned off and begins monitoring the battery voltage; if the battery
voltage drops low (12.7 VDC or less), the charger automatically initiates another four hours in
float charge.
Info: If the battery voltage falls to the re-bulk voltage (12.1 VDC) or lower, the unit
will begin another bulk charge.
* These settings in the ME Series are changeable and leave the factory with default values (see Table
3-2, Inverter/Charger Default Values). These default values are adequate for most installations,
however, if you determine that some of the values need to be changed for your particular system,
the ME-RC50 remote control may be purchased to adjust these settings.
Bulk
Charging
Absorb
volts
DC
Voltage
Time
DC
Current
Absorb
Charging
Increased
Voltage
Max
Charge
Rate
Constant
Current
Constant
Voltage
Float
Charging
Full
Charge
Float
volts
Reduced
Voltage
Monitored
Voltage
Goes to Full
Charge after
4 hours in
Float Charge
A b s o rb
T im e
Reduced
Current
Monitored
Current
No Current
Figure 3-3, Automatic 4-Stage Charging Graph
Page 41
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Operation
3.4
Transfer Time
While in Standby Mode, the AC input is continually monitored. Whenever AC power falls below the
VAC dropout voltage (80 VAC, default setting), the inverter automatically transfers back to the
Inverter Mode with minimum interruption to your appliances – as long as the inverter is turned
on. The transfer from Standby Mode to Inverter Mode occurs in approximately 16 milliseconds.
While the ME Series is not designed as a computer UPS system, this transfer time is usually fast
enough to hold them up. However, the VAC dropout setting has an effect on the ability of the
loads to transfer without resetting. The lower this setting, the longer the effective transfer will be
and therefore, the higher the probability for the output loads to reset. This occurs because the
incoming AC voltage is allowed to fall to a level that is so low that when the transfer does occur,
the voltage on the inverters output has already fallen to a level low enough to reset the loads.
The disadvantage of a higher VAC dropout setting is that smaller generators (or large generators
with an unstable output) may nuisance transfer. This commonly happens when powering loads that
are larger than the generator can handle – causing the generator’s output voltage to constantly
fall below the inverter’s input VAC dropout threshold.
Info: When switching from Inverter Mode to Standby Mode, the inverter waits
approximately 15 seconds to ensure the AC source is stable before transferring.
3.5
Battery Temperature Sensor Operation
The plug-in Battery Temperature Sensor (BTS) is used to determine the battery temperature around
the batteries. This information allows the multi-stage battery charger to automatically adjust the
battery charge voltages for optimum charging performance and longer battery life.
When the BTS is installed, if the temperature around the BTS is below 77°F (25°C) the absorb and
float charge voltage increases, and if the temperature around the BTS is higher than 77°F (25°C),
the absorb and float charge voltage decreases. See Figure 3-4 to determine how much the charge
voltage changes (increases or decreases) depending on the temperature reading of the BTS. For
example, the nominal absorb charge voltage for a flooded battery at 77°F (25°C) on a 12-volt
model is 14.6 VDC. If the battery temperature is 95°F (35°C), the absorb charge voltage would
decrease to 14.3 VDC (14.6 VDC - 0.3 change).
If the temperature sensor is NOT installed, the charge voltages will not be compensated and the
battery will maintain the charge it had at a temperature of 77°F (25°C). The life of the batteries may
be reduced if they are subjected to large temperature changes when the BTS is not installed.
Info: When the BTS is connected, the battery charger uses a value of 5mV/°C/Cell
from 0-50°C to change the charge voltage based on temperature.
Cha ng e to ba ttery ch arg ing vo ltag e
T em p eratu re C o m p en satio n u sin g B T S
1 2 V D C u n its
+0.75 V0.75
+0.6 V 0.6
+0.45 V0.45
+0.3 V 0.3
+0.15 V0.15
N o C hange0
-0. 15V
-0.15
-0 .3V -0.3
-0. 45V
-0.45
-0 .6V -0.6
-0.75
-0. 75V
0C
0
32F
no B T S
c onnec ted
5C
5
41F
10C
10
50F
15C
15
59F
20C
20
68F
25C
25
77F
30C
30
86F
35C
35
95F
40C
45C
50C
40
45
50
104F 113F 122F
Tem perature reading from BTS
Figure 3-4, BTS Temperature to Charge Voltage Change
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 42
Operation
3.6
Protection Circuitry Operation
The inverter is protected against fault conditions, and in normal usage it will be rare to see any.
However, if a condition occurs that is outside the inverter’s normal operating parameters, it will
shut down and attempt to protect itself, the battery bank, and your AC loads. If there is a condition
that causes the inverter to shut down, it may be one of the following conditions [also refer to the
Troubleshooting section (Section 4.3) to help diagnose and clear the fault condition]:
•
Low Battery - The inverter will shut off whenever the battery voltage falls to the Low
Battery Cut Out (LBCO) level to protect the batteries from being over-discharged. After the
inverter has reached the LBCO level and turned off, the inverter will automatically restart
after one of the following conditions:
— AC Power is applied and the inverter begins operating as a battery charger, or
— Battery voltage rises to the Low Battery Cut In (LBCI) level
The inverter’s status LED turns off when a low battery fault condition occurs. Refer to Table
3-1 to determine the LBCO and LBCI levels for your inverter model.
•
High Battery - In the event the battery voltage approaches the High Battery Cut Out
(HBCO) level, the inverter will automatically shut down to prevent the inverter from
supplying unregulated AC output voltage. The inverter’s status LED turns off when a high
battery fault condition occurs. The inverter will automatically restart when the battery falls
to the High Battery Cut In (HBCI) level. Refer to Table 3-1 to determine the HBCO and
HBCI levels for your inverter model.
Info: High battery voltage may be caused by excessive or unregulated voltage
from the solar panels or other external charging sources.
•
Overload - During inverter and standby operation, the inverter monitors current levels.
In the event of a short-circuit or an overload condition for more than a few seconds, the
inverter will shut down. To start operating after this fault, the inverter would need to be
restarted (turned back on) after the inverter’s AC loads are reduced/removed.
•
Over-temperature - If internal power components begin to exceed their safe operating
temperature level, the inverter will shut down to protect itself from damage. The inverter’s
status LED turns OFF to indicate the over-temperature fault condition. The inverter will
automatically restart after the units cool down.
•
Internal Fault - The inverter continually monitors several internal components and
the processor communications. If a condition occurs that does not allow proper internal
operation, the inverter will shut down to protect itself and the connected loads. The
inverter will need to be reset to start operating again (refer to Section 4.4 for information
on resetting the inverter).
Table 3-1, Inverter Battery Turn On/Off Levels
Inverter Model
Inverter battery turn
ON/OFF Levels
ME2000/ME2012
ME2512
ME3112
HBCO
>15.8 VDC
>15.8 VDC
>15.8 VDC
HBCI
15.5 VDC
15.5 VDC
15.5 VDC
LBCI
≥12.5 VDC
≥12.5 VDC
≥12.5 VDC
LBCO*
(1 minute delay)
10.0 VDC
(9.0 - 12.2 VDC)
10.0 VDC
(9.0 - 12.2 VDC)
10.0 VDC
(9.0 - 12.2 VDC)
LBCO (immediate)
8.5 VDC
8.5 VDC
8.5 VDC
*adjustable with remote control
Page 43
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Operation
3.7
Inverter Startup
ON/OFF Switch - The inverter can be turned on and off by lightly pressing and releasing the Power
ON/OFF switch on the front of the inverter (see Figure 3-5). When the inverter is first connected
to the batteries, or when its automatic protection circuit has turned the inverter off, the ON/OFF
switch will need to be pressed to start the unit (or reset per Section 4.4). Once the inverter has
been turned on, pressing the Power ON/OFF switch alternately turns the inverter on and off.
WARNING: The Power ON/OFF control switch does not turn on or off the charger
feature. If AC power (shore power or generator) is connected and qualified on the AC
input, this AC power will also be available on the AC output and is not controlled by
the Power ON/OFF switch.
Status LED Indicator - The status indicator is a green LED (Light Emitting Diode) that provides
information on the operational mode of the inverter. Watch this indicator (see Figure 3-5) for at least
10 seconds to determine the inverter’s operational condition from the information below:
•
Off - Indicates the inverter is off; there is no AC power (inverter, shore power, or generator)
at the inverter’s output terminals. If the LED stays off after pressing the ON/OFF switch,
there is a “fault condition” such as low battery, high battery, overload, over-temperature,
or an internal fault. Refer to the Troubleshooting section to help diagnose/clear the fault
condition.
•
Slow flash (blinks on once every 8 seconds) - Indicates float charging; the inverter is in
Standby Mode (the external AC power that is connected to the inverter’s input is passing
through the inverter and is powering the AC loads connected to the inverter’s output).
•
Medium flash (blinks on once every second):
When AC power is not connected to inverter input - Indicates the inverter is on and using
energy from the battery. The inverter is either: 1) Inverting - providing full power to the
loads connected to the inverter; or, 2) Searching - conserving power and waiting for a load
to be turned on that meets or exceeds the search watts parameter (5 watts is the inverter
default setting).
When AC power is connected to inverter input - Indicates absorb charging; the inverter is
in Standby Mode (the external AC power that is connected to the inverter’s input is passing
thru the inverter and is powering the AC loads connected to the inverter’s output).
•
On (solid) - Indicates bulk charging; the inverter is in Standby Mode (the external AC
power that is connected to the inverter’s input is passing thru the inverter and is powering
the AC loads connected to the inverter’s output).
Power ON/OFF
pushbutton switch
Charging/Inverting
Status LED indicator
Figure 3-5, Power Switch and Status Indicator
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 44
Operation
3.8
Factory Default Values
Your ME Series inverter/charger uses default values for the adjustable settings (see Table 3-2) that
are adequate for most installations. If some of your operating parameters need to be changed from
the default values, the optional ME-RC50 remote control can be used to make those changes. To
help you determine if you need the ME-RC50 remote display, information on the inverter/charger
settings that can be changed is provided below. The settings, once programmed, are saved in the
remote’s non-volatile memory and are preserved until changed – even if DC power to the inverter
is lost (as long as the ME-RC50 remote is connected). For information on the full range of settings
for each function, refer to the ME-RC50 Owner’s Manual at www.magnumenergy.com.
•
Shore: This setting ensures the inverter AC loads receive the maximum current available
from the shore power or generator. When the total current used to power the AC loads and
to charge the batteries begins to approach the Shore setting, the current that was used
for charging the batteries will automatically be reduced.
•
01 Search Watts: This setting allows you to turn off the power-saving Search Mode circuitry
or adjust the power level at which the inverter will “wake up” and start inverting.
•
02 LowBattCutOut: This setting determines when the inverter will turn off based on
low battery voltage. The inverter turns off automatically after the battery voltage has
been below this setting for more than one minute. This protects the batteries from overdischarge and the AC loads from unregulated power (brown-outs).
•
03 Batt AmpHrs: This setting allows the user to input the battery bank size in amp hours,
which tells the charger how long to charge the batteries in the Absorb Charge stage.
•
04 Battery Type: Sets the type of batteries being used in the system; this information
tells the charger what voltage level to use to charge the batteries.
•
05 Charge Rate: This setting can be used to turn off the charger, limit the amount of
current that the charger can use (leaving more current available to power loads); or, to
ensure small battery banks are not overheated because of a too high charge rate.
•
06 VAC Dropout: Sets the minimum AC voltage that must be present on the AC input
before the unit transfers from Standby Mode to Inverter Mode. This protects the AC loads
from shore power outages and brown-outs.
Using the ME-RC50 remote also provides the following features:
•
•
•
allows you to enable an equalize charge for certain battery types
displays inverter/charger’s operating status
provides fault information for troubleshooting
Table 3-2, Inverter/Charger Default Values
Page 45
Adjustable Settings
Default Values
Shore
30 amps
01 Search Watts
5 watts
02 LowBattCutOut
10 VDC (12-volt models)
03 Batt AmpHrs
600 Amp Hours (Absorb Time = 120 minutes)
04 Battery Type
Flooded - Liquid Lead Acid
05 Charge Rate
100%
06 VAC Dropout
80 VAC
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
4.0 Maintenance and Troubleshooting
The following information is provided to help you keep your ME Series inverter/charger in optimum
operational condition.
4.1
Recommended Inverter and Battery Care
The ME Series inverter/charger is designed to provide you with years of trouble-free service.
Even though there are no user-serviceable parts, it is recommended that every 6 months you
perform the following maintenance steps to ensure optimum performance and extend the life of
your batteries.
WARNING: Prior to performing the following checks, switch OFF both the AC and
DC circuits.
•
Visually inspect the batteries for cracks, leaks, or swelling – replace if necessary.
•
Use baking soda to clean and remove any electrolyte spills or buildups.
•
Check and tighten all battery hold down clamps (if applicable).
•
Clean and tighten all battery terminals and connecting cables [10 to 12 ft lbf
(13.6 to 16.3 N-m)].
•
Check and fill battery water levels (Liquid Lead Acid batteries only).
•
Check individual battery voltages (load test those that have a voltage difference of more
than 0.3 VDC from each other) – replace if necessary.
•
Check all cable runs for signs of chafing – replace if necessary.
•
Check the inverter’s cooling vents – clean as necessary.
•
Check and tighten
[16 in lbf (1.8 N-m)].
4.2
the
inverter’s
internal
AC
terminal
block
connections
Storage for Mobile Installations
When placing the RV, boat, or truck into storage, it is recommended that you perform the following
to ensure the system is properly shut down (or properly configured for storage). This is especially
important for maintaining the batteries.
•
Perform the recommended maintenance steps listed in Section 4.1.
•
Fully charge the batteries.
•
Connect AC power (if available) and verify the breaker to the inverter’s input is switched
ON (to allow battery charging).
•
Verify the inverter is switched OFF.
•
Switch OFF all unnecessary AC and DC loads.
•
Disable the AGS (if installed) when the RV, boat, or truck is in a confined storage area.
WARNING: If an AGS were to start and run the generator for an extended period
of time in a confined area, a potentially fatal level of carbon monoxide (CO) could
accumulate.
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 46
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
4.3
Troubleshooting
The ME Series inverter/charger is a fairly simple device to troubleshoot. There are only two active
circuits (AC and DC) as well as a charging circuit. The following chart is designed to help you
quickly pinpoint the most common inverter failures.
Table 4-1, Basic Troubleshooting
Symptom
Possible Cause
N o o u t p u t p o w e r / Inverter is switched OFF.
Inverter LED is OFF.
Battery voltage is too low. The battery
voltage level has dropped below the
Low Battery Cut Out (LBCO) set-point
for more than one minute.
Recommended Solution
Switch the inverter ON.
Check fuses/circuit breakers and cable connections.
Check battery voltage at the inverter’s terminals. Your
batteries may need to be charged, and this fault condition
will automatically clear when the battery voltage exceeds
the LBCI voltage.
The battery voltage is too high. The
inverter automatically resets and
resumes operation when the battery
voltage drops to the HBCI voltage or
lower.
This condition usually only occurs when an additional
charging source (alternator, solar panels, or other
external charging sources) is used to charge the battery
bank. Reduce or turn off any other charger to the inverter
batteries to allow the voltage level to drop.
Over-temperature condition: The
internal temperature of the inverter has
risen above acceptable limits; caused
by loads too great for the inverter to
operate continuously, or by lack of
ventilation to the inverter. When the
unit has cooled, it will automatically
reset and resume operation.
Reduce the number of electrical loads that you are
operating. This will avoid a repeat over-temp shutdown
if the cause was too many loads for the ambient
conditions.
Check ventilation around the inverter, ensure cool air
is available to pass through the inverter (refer to the
ventilation requirements in Section 2.1.3).
AC overload condition: The inverter Reduce the AC loads connected to the inverter, or remove
has turned off because the connected all AC output wiring and restart the inverter.
loads are larger than the inverter’s
output capacity, or the output wires
are shorted.
Internal fault: This fault occurs when To clear this fault, an inverter reset is required. Remove
an internal fault is detected.
DC power to the inverter, or press and hold down the
power switch on the inverter for 15 seconds (until the
green status LED comes on). If this fault does not clear,
the unit will need to be serviced.
N o o u t p u t p o w e r / Unit is in Search Mode, which means Turn on a load greater than 5 watts to bring the inverter
Green LED is flashing. the load is too small for Search Mode to full output power, or turn off Search with remote.
circuit detection.
Low output or surge Loose or corroded battery cables.
power/Green LED is
Low batteries.
flashing.
Loose AC output connections.
Clean and tighten all cables.
Recharge or replace batteries.
Tighten AC output connections.
Battery cables are the wrong length Verify recommended cable lengths and gauges from the
or gauge.
manual. Replace cables as necessary.
L o w c h a r g i n g ra t e Charge rate set too low.
when connected to AC
Low AC voltage (< 90 VAC).
power.
Adjust charge rate or SHORE settings on remote.
Check AC input wiring.
Low charging rate when Generator output is too low to power Reduce the load, increase the generator’s RPMs.
using a generator.
both the load and the charger.
Check the SHORE settings (if remote connected).
Charger
charge.
d o e s n ’ t Loose or corroded battery cables.
While charging, the
DC charge voltage is
higher or lower than
expected.
Page 47
Clean and tighten battery cables.
Defective batteries.
Replace batteries.
Wrong charger settings.
Adjust the charger settings, ensure the unit is not in
Charger Standby.
Wrong AC input voltage.
Verify proper AC input voltage and frequency.
If the Battery Temperature Sensor This is normal; see Section 3.5 (Battery Temperature
(BTS) is installed, the DC voltage will Sensor Operation) for more information.
increase or decrease depending on the
temperature around the BTS.
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
4.4
Resetting the Inverter
Under some fault conditions (e.g., an internal fault), the inverter will need to be reset.
To reset the inverter:
Press and hold the Power ON/OFF pushbutton (see Figure 4-1) for approximately fifteen (15)
seconds until the Charging/Inverting Status LED comes on and flashes rapidly; once the rapid
flashing has begun, release the Power ON/OFF pushbutton. The Status LED will go off after
the pushbutton is released.
After the inverter reset is completed, press the ON/OFF pushbutton to turn the inverter ON.
Info: The Power ON/OFF pushbutton is a small momentary type switch which operates
by lightly pressing and releasing.
1. Press and hold the Power
ON/OFF pushbutton.
2. Watch the Charging/Inverting
Status LED, after approximately
15 seconds it should come on
and flash rapidly to indicate the
inverter has reset. The Status LED
will go off after the pushbutton is
released.
Figure 4-1, Performing an Inverter Reset
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 48
Appendix A - Specifications
Appendix A - Specifications and Optional Equipment
A-1
Inverter/Charger Specifications
ME2000 (-15B, -20B)
ME2012 (-15B, -20B)
ME2512
ME3112
Input Battery Voltage Range
9 to 16 VDC
9 to 16 VDC
9 to 16 VDC
9 to 16 VDC
Absolute Maximum DC Input
25 VDC
25 VDC
25 VDC
25 VDC
Inverter Specifications
AC Output Voltage Accuracy
120 VAC ±5% (≤ continuous power)
Output Frequency and Accuracy
60 Hz ± 0.1 Hz
Continuous Power Output (at 45° C)
2000 VA
2000 VA
2500 VA
3100 VA
17 A
17 A
21A
26 A
1 msec Surge Current (amps AC)
60
60
100
120
100 msec Surge Current (amps AC)
37
37
45
50
3700
3700
5000
6000
Continuous AC Output Current
5 sec Surge Power (real watts)
30 sec Surge Power (real watts)
3450
3450
4500
4800
5 min Surge Power (real watts)
3100
3100
3500
3950
30 min Surge Power (real watts)
Rated Input Battery Current
Inverter Efficiency (peak)
2400
2400
2900
3500
191 ADC
191 ADC
239.1 ADC
296.5 ADC
95%
95%
91%
90%
23 watts
25 watts
HBCO/HBCI (High Battery Cut Out/In)
≥15.8 VDC
LBCO/LBCI (Low Battery Cut Out/In)
9.0 VDC (adj)/12.5 VDC
Series Stacking 120/240 VAC
No
Transfer Time
16 msecs
Search Mode (typical)
5 watts
No Load (120 VAC output, typical)
20 watts
20 watts
Waveform
Modified Sine Wave
Charger Specifications
Continuous Output at 45°C
Input Current - Rated Output (AC amps)
100 ADC
100 ADC
120 ADC
160 ADC
15
15
18
21
Charger Efficiency
85%
AC Input Frequency Range
50 to 70 Hz
AC Input Voltage Range
60 to 140 VAC (120 VAC nominal)
Power Factor
> 0.95
General Features and Capabilities
Transfer Relay Capability
Single leg in at 30 amps
Five-stage Charging Capability
Two input legs at 30 amps each, or combine for 60 amps
Bulk, Absorb, Float, Equalize (requires remote), and Battery Saver™
Battery Temperature Compensation
Yes, 15 ft Battery Temp Sensor standard
Internal Cooling
0 to 120 cfm variable speed drive using dual 92 mm brushless DC fan
Overcurrent Protection
Yes, with two overlapping circuits
Over-temperature Protection
Corrosion Protection
Yes, on transformer, MOSFETS, and battery
PCB’s conformal coated, powder coated chassis/top, and stainless steel fasteners
Safety Listings
ETL listed to UL/cUL 458, and CSA C22.2 # 107.1-01
Warranty
Dual Branch-Rated Output Breakers
3 years parts and labor
Optional on ME2000 (15 or 20 amp breakers) or ME2012 (15 or 20 amp breakers)
Environmental Specifications
Operating Temperature
-20°C to +60°C (-4°F to 140°F)
Non-operating Temperature
-40°C to +70°C (-40°F to 158°F)
Operating Humidity
0 to 95% RH non-condensing
Physical Specifications
Unit Dimensions (h x w x d)
13.75” x 12.65” x 7.0” (17.8 cm)
Shipping Dimensions (h x w x d)
13.75” x 12.65” x 8.0” (34.9 cm x 32.1 cm x 20.3 cm)
18.5” x 17.5” x 12.5” (47 cm x 44.5 cm x 31.8 cm)
Mounting
Shelf (top or bottom up) or wall (no uncovered vents on top or bottom)
Unit Weight
37 lb (16.8 kg)
37 lb (16.8 kg)
41 lb (18.6 kg)
46 lb (20.9 kg)
Shipping Weight
42 lb (19.1 kg)
42 lb (19.1 kg)
46 lb (20.9 kg)
51 lb (23.1 kg)
Max operating altitude
15,000’ (4570 m)
Specifications @ 25°C (unless otherwise noted) - Subject to change without notice.
Page 49
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Appendix A - Specifications
A-2 Optional Equipment and Accessories
The following Magnum Energy components are available for use with the ME Series inverter/charger.
Some of these items are required depending upon the intended use of the inverter.
MMP Series Enclosures
The MMP175-30D. MMP175-60S, MMP250-30D and MMP250-60S enclosures are for single inverter applications. The MMP Series enclosures have been specifically designed to combine all of
the major components required for a renewable energy system — inverter/battery disconnect,
AC overcurrent protection, grounding connections, and a full system inverter bypass switch as
a convenient way to isolate the inverter for battery maintenance — into a single, easy to install
pre-wired enclosure.
Smart Battery Combiner
The Smart Battery Combiner (ME-SBCTM) is designed to monitor and charge a second battery using a portion of the current that is charging the main battery. The ME-SBC eliminates a significant
voltage drop, and provides automatic turn-on and turn-off based on adjustable voltage set-points.
This allows different batteries to be charged from a single charging source, and prevents overcharging/undercharging.
Remote Switch Adapters
The ME-RSATM and ME-RSA-MTM pigtail adapters allow the inverter to be remotely switched on and
off – with or without the ME-RC50 remote display.
Basic Remote Control
The ME-RC50 Remote Control Panel is simple to use; an LCD screen and “at a glance” LEDs
display complete inverter/charger status. Soft keys provide simple access to menus and a rotary
encoder knob allows you to scroll through and select a wide range of settings such as Inverter
ON/OFF, Charger ON/OFF, Shore Power Breaker Setting, AGS Control, Meter Button, Setup and
Tech menus.
Advanced Remote Control
The ME-ARC50 Remote Control Panel uses an LCD screen and “at a glance” LEDs to provide
operating information and allow advanced features to be configured (requires Magnum inverters
with advanced configurable features). This LCD remote control also provides advanced monitoring/
troubleshooting and includes a FAVS button to access your favorite features quickly.
Auto Generator Start Controller
The ME-AGS-N Automatic Generator Start controller (Network version) is designed to automatically
start your generator based on low battery condition or high temperature. The AGS controller
includes an input voltage jumper (for 12, 24, and 48 volt battery banks) and a 4-position DIP
(Dual In-line Package) switch which provides the ability to change the relay timing configurations
to allow compatibility with a wider range of generators. Adjustable settings when using the MEARC50 include starting the generator based on: Battery Voltage, Time Of Day, Battery ‘State of
Charge’ or High Temperature.
Battery Monitor Kit
The ME-BMK Battery Monitor Kit is a single battery bank amp-hour meter that monitors the condition
of the battery and provides information to let you know how much energy you have available and
let you plan your electrical usage to ensure the battery is not being over-discharged. The ME-BMKNS version does not include a DC shunt – order the ME-BMK to receive a 500A/50mv DC shunt.
Fuse Block/Fuses
The Magnum Fuse/Fuse-blocks are used to protect the battery bank, inverter, and cables from
damage caused by DC short circuits and overloads. They include a slow-blow fuse with mounting
block and protective cover. The 125 and 200 amp models use an ANL type fuse and the 300 and
400 amp models use a Class-T fuse.
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 50
Appendix B - Battery Information
Appendix B - Battery Information
B-1
Battery Location
Periodic maintenance (e.g., checking connections, cleaning, watering) on batteries is required.
Locate the batteries in an accessible location to perform this maintenance.
Batteries must be mounted in a clean, dry, ventilated environment where they are protected
from high and low temperatures. The battery bank should be located as close to the inverter as
possible without limiting access to the inverter’s disconnects. Longer battery cable runs tend to
lose efficiency and reduce the overall performance of an inverter.
To ensure optimum performance, a ventilated battery enclosure is recommended. Two feet
(61 cm) of clearance above the batteries is recommended for access to the battery terminals and
removable caps (lead acid battery types).
WARNING: Be very careful when working around batteries, they can produce extremely
high currents if they are short-circuited. Read the important safety instructions at
the beginning of this manual and the precautions from the battery supplier before
installing the inverter and batteries.
CAUTION: Do not mount the batteries beneath the inverter (or in the same
compartment). Batteries emit corrosive fumes which could damage the inverter’s
electronics. Never locate dedicated batteries near a vehicle/home fuel tank containing
gasoline or propane.
B-2
Battery Types
Batteries are available in different sizes, amp-hour ratings, voltage, and chemistries. They are also
available for starting applications (such as an automobile starting battery) and deep discharge
applications. Only the deep cycle types are recommended for inverter applications; using a starting
battery in an inverter (deep cycle) application will greatly shorten their useful life. Choose the
batteries best suited for the inverter installation and cost. Use only the same battery type for all
batteries in the bank. For best performance, all batteries should be from the same lot and date.
This information is usually printed on a label located on the battery.
B-3
Battery Temperature
Battery performance of lead-acid type batteries is greatly affected by extreme temperatures. When
a lead-acid type battery is cold, its effective amp-hour capacity is reduced. When determining
the battery requirements needed for the inverter system, realize that the battery capacity will be
reduced if they will be installed in a climate where extremely cold temperatures are expected. In
this type of environment, the batteries should be located in a heated area. At the minimum, the
batteries should be installed in an insulated enclosure; which will keep the batteries warmer as
they are being charged.
The battery bank should also be protected from high temperatures, which will shorten battery
life. In high heat situations the battery room/enclosure should be ventilated to bring in cooler air
and exhaust the hotter air. The performance of the battery bank/inverter system will substantially
increase by monitoring and preventing extreme temperatures around the batteries.
B-4
Battery Bank Sizing
The size of the battery bank determines how long the inverter will power the AC loads without
recharging. The larger the battery bank, the longer the run time. Size your battery bank to the
systems AC load requirements and length of time required to run from the batteries. In general,
the battery bank should not be discharged more than 50%. Additional DC charging devices such
as solar, wind, hydro, etc., can provide longer run times by recharging the batteries in the absence
of AC shore power or generator power.
Info: For the ME Series inverter/charger to perform optimally, a minimum battery
bank of 200 AH is recommended for moderate loads (<1000W) and greater than
400 AH for heavy loads (≥1000W).
Page 51
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Appendix B - Battery Information
B-5
Battery Bank Sizing Worksheet
Complete the steps below to determine the battery bank size required to power your AC loads:
1. Determine the daily power needed for each load
a) List all AC loads required to run; and
b) List the Watt-Hours for each load (see Table B-1 for common loads/wattage); and
c)
multiply by how many hours per day (or a fraction of an hour) each load will be used; and
d) multiply by how many days per week you will use the listed loads; and
e) divide by seven = Average Daily Watt-Hours Per Load.
Average Daily Watt-Hours Per Load
AC load
Watt-Hours
(x) hours per day
(x) days per week
(÷7) = total power
2. Determine the total power needed each day for all the loads.
• Add the Average Daily Watt-Hours Per Load together = Total Daily Watt-Hours.
Total Daily Watt-Hours
3. Determine the battery Amp-Hour capacity needed
to run all the loads before recharging.
(inverter battery voltage)
• Multiply this by how many days the loads will need to run
without having power to recharge the batteries (typically 3 to
5 days of storage) = Storage Amp-Hours.
(days of storage)
• Divide the Total Daily Watt-Hours by the nominal battery voltage of the inverter (i.e., 12, 24 volts); and
÷ ___ =
x ___ =
4. Determine how deeply you want to discharge your batteries.
•
Divide the Storage Amp-Hours by 0.2 or 0.5 to get the Total Amp-Hours:
a) 0.2 = Discharges the batteries by 20% (80% remaining), this is considered the
optimal level for long battery life; or
b) 0.5 = Discharges the batteries by 50% (50% remaining), this is considered a
realistic trade-off between battery cost and battery life.
Total Amp-Hours
Additional compensation:
Low battery temperature: If the batteries are installed in a location that will be exposed to low temperatures,
the available output will be less. In these instances, you will need to determine the lowest temperature the
battery bank will experience and multiply the Total Amp-Hours by the Multiplier below.
Temperature
80F/27C
70F/21C
60F/15C
50F/10C
40F/4C
30F/-1C
20F/-7C
Multiplier
1.00
1.04
1.11
1.19
1.30
1.40
1.59
Inverter efficiency: When the inverter is used in a back-up power application the inverter efficiency will not
be a large concern; however if the inverter is the primary AC source for the calculated load, the Total AmpHours should be multiplied by 1.2 to factor in an average 80% inverter efficiency.
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 52
Appendix B - Battery Information
B-6
Battery Wiring Configurations
The battery bank must be wired to match the inverter’s DC input voltage. In addition, the batteries
can be wired to provide additional run time. The various wiring configurations include:
B-6.1
Series Wiring
Wiring batteries in series increases the battery bank’s output voltage. A series connection combines
each battery in a string until the total voltage matches the inverter’s DC requirement. Even though
there are multiple batteries, the capacity remains the same. In Figure B-1 below, two 6 VDC/200
AH batteries are combined into a single string resulting in a 12 VDC, 200 AHr bank.
Series Battery Wiring
combines battery voltage :
6 VDC
(200 AH)
6 VDC
(200 AH)
12 VDC @
200 AH
200 AH @ 6 VDC
+
200 AH @ 6 VDC
=
200 AH @ 12 VDC
Figure B-1, Series Battery Wiring
B-6.2
Parallel Wiring
Wiring batteries in parallel increases the battery bank’s amp-hour capacity, which allows the AC loads
to operate for a longer time. A parallel connection combines the number of batteries in the string to
increase overall battery capacity; however, the voltage remains the same. In Figure B-2 below, two
12 VDC/100 AH batteries are combined into a single 12 VDC, 200 AH battery bank.
12 VDC
(100 AH)
12 VDC @
200 AH
12 VDC
(100 AH)
Parallel Battery Wiring
combines battery capacity:
100 AH @ 12 VDC
+
100 AH @ 12 VDC
=
200 AH @ 12 VDC
Figure B-2, Parallel Battery Wiring
B-6.3
Series-Parallel Wiring
A series/parallel configuration increases both voltage (to match the inverter’s DC requirements)
and Amp-Hour capacity (to increase run-time for operating the loads) using smaller, lower-voltage
batteries. In Figure B-3 below, four 6 VDC/200 AH batteries are combined into two strings resulting
in a 12 VDC, 400 AH battery bank.
Series/Parallel Battery Wiring
combines battery voltage and capacity:
6 VDC
(200 AH)
6 VDC
(200 AH)
6 VDC
(200 AH)
6 VDC
(200 AH)
12 VDC @
400 AH
200 AH @ 6 VDC
+
= 200 AH @ 12 VDC
200 AH @ 6 VDC
+
= 400 AH @ 12 VDC
200 AH @ 6 VDC
+
= 200 AH @ 12 VDC
200 AH @ 6 VDC
add voltage and
capacity together
add voltage
add capacity
in series
in parallel
Figure B-3, Series-Parallel Battery Wiring
Page 53
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Appendix B - Battery Information
overcurrent
protection
String
(12 VDC @ 100 AH)
to 12 VDC
inverter
(total capacity
= 100 AH)
12 VDC
battery
(100 AH)
12 volt battery bank (one string of one 12-volt battery)
overcurrent
protection
Series String
(6 VDC + 6 VDC)
6 VDC
battery
(200 AH)
to 12 VDC
inverter
(total capacity
= 200 AH)
6 VDC
battery
(200 AH)
12 volt battery bank (one string of two 6-volt batteries wired in series)
overcurrent
protection
12 VDC
battery
(100 AH)
Parallel String
(100 AH + 100 AH)
to 12 VDC
inverter
(total capacity
= 200 AH)
12 VDC
battery
(100 AH)
12 volt battery bank (parallel two 12-volt batteries)
Parallel String (200 AH + 200 AH) overcurrent
protection
Series String
(6 VDC + 6 VDC)
6 VDC
battery
(200 AH)
6 VDC
battery
(200 AH)
Series String
(6 VDC + 6 VDC)
6 VDC
battery
(200 AH)
6 VDC
battery
(200 AH)
to 12 VDC
inverter
(total capacity
= 400 AH)
12 volt battery bank (two strings of two 6-volt batteries wired in series and
connected in parallel)
Figure B-4, Battery Bank Wiring Examples (12-volt)
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc.
Page 54
Appendix C - Warranty & Service
Limited Warranty
Magnum Energy, Inc., warrants this ME Series inverter/charger to be free from defects in material
and workmanship that result in product failure during normal usage, according to the following
terms and conditions:
1. The limited warranty for the product extends for 36 months beginning from the product’s
original date of purchase.
2. The limited warranty extends to the original purchaser of the product and is not assignable or
transferable to any subsequent purchaser.
3. During the limited warranty period, Magnum Energy will repair, or replace at Magnum Energy’s
option, any defective parts, or any parts that will not properly operate for their intended use
with factory new or remanufactured replacement items if such repair or replacement is needed
because of product malfunction or failure during normal usage. The limited warranty does not
cover defects in appearance, cosmetic, decorative or structural parts or any non-operative parts.
Magnum Energy’s limit of liability under the limited warranty shall be the actual cash value of
the product at the time the original purchaser returns the product for repair, determined by
the price paid by the original purchaser. Magnum Energy shall not be liable for any other losses
or damages.
4. Upon request from Magnum Energy, the original purchaser must prove the product’s original
date of purchase by a dated bill of sale, itemized receipt.
5. The original purchaser shall return the product prepaid to Magnum Energy in Everett, WA. After
the completion of service under this limited warranty, Magnum Energy will return the product
prepaid to the original purchaser via a Magnum-selected non-expedited surface freight within
the contiguous United States and Canada; this excludes Alaska and Hawaii.
6. This limited warranty is voided if:
•
the product has been modified without authorization
•
the serial number has been altered or removed
•
the product has been damaged from abuse, neglect, accident, high voltage or corrosion
•
the product was not installed and operated according to the owner's manual
How to Receive Repair Service
If your product requires warranty service or repair, contact either:
1. An Authorized Service Center, which are listed on the Magnum Energy website at
www.magnumenergy.com/servicecenters.htm; or
2. Magnum Energy, Inc. at:
Telephone: 425-353-8833
Fax: 425-353-8390
Email: warranty@magnumenergy.com
If returning the product directly to Magnum Energy for repair, you must:
•
return the unit in the original, or equivalent, shipping container
•
receive a Return Materials Authorization (RMA) number from the factory prior to the
return of the product to Magnum Energy for repair
•
place RMA numbers clearly on the shipping container or on the packing slip
BEFORE RETURNING ANY UNIT TO MAGNUM ENERGY INC.,
A RETURN MATERIAL AUTHORIZATION (RMA) NUMBER IS REQUIRED.
Page 55
© 2010 Magnum Energy, Inc
Magnum Energy, Inc.
2211 West Casino Rd.
Everett, WA 98204
Phone: 425-353-8833
Fax: 425-353-8390
Web: www.magnumenergy.com
ME Series Owner’s Manual (PN: 64-0002 Rev A)
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