ProCurve | 420 | Specifications | ProCurve 420 Specifications

HP ProCurve
Wireless Access Point 420
Installation and Getting Started Guide
© Copyright 2003 Hewlett-Packard Development Company,
L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change
without notice.
This document contains proprietary information, which is
protected by copyright. No part of this document may be
photocopied, reproduced, or translated into another language
without the prior written consent of Hewlett-Packard.
Publication Number
HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY MAKES NO WARRANTY
OF ANY KIND WITH REGARD TO THIS MATERIAL,
INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS
FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Hewlett-Packard shall not be
liable for errors contained herein or for incidental or consequential
damages in connection with the furnishing, performance, or use
of this material.
The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in
the express warranty statements accompanying such products and
services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an
additional warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial
errors or omissions contained herein.
5990-6005
September 2003
Edition 1
Applicable Products
HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420 na
HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420 ww
Disclaimer
(J8130A)
(J8131A)
Hewlett-Packard assumes no responsibility for the use or
reliability of its software on equipment that is not furnished by
Hewlett-Packard.
Warranty
See the Customer Support/Warranty booklet included with the
product.
A copy of the specific warranty terms applicable to your HewlettPackard products and replacement parts can be obtained from your
HP Sales and Service Office or authorized dealer.
Safety
Before installing and operating these products, please read the
“Installation Precautions” in chapter 2, “Installing the Access
Point 420”, and the safety statements in appendix C, “Safety and
Regulatory Statements”.
Hewlett-Packard Company
8000 Foothills Boulevard, m/s 5552
Roseville, California 95747-5552
http://www.hp.com/go/hpprocurve
Contents
1 Introducing the HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420
Top of the Access Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Back of the Access Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Antennas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Console Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Network Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Power Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Reset Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
Access Point Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8
2 Installing the Access Point 420
Included Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Installation Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Installation Precautions: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
1. Prepare the Installation Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
2. Verify the Access Point Passes the Self Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
LED Behavior: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
3. Mount the Access Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
Wall Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
Horizontal Surface Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9
4. Connect the Access Point to a Power Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9
5. Connect the Network Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10
Using the RJ-45 Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10
6. Position the Antennas on the Access Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10
7. (Optional) Connect a Console to the Access Point 420 . . . . . . . . . 2-11
Terminal Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11
Direct Console Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12
i
Sample Network Topologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14
Ad Hoc Wireless LAN (no access point) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14
Infrastructure Wireless LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
Infrastructure Wireless LAN for Roaming Wireless PCs . . . . . . . . . . 2-16
3 Getting Started With Access Point Configuration
Recommended Minimal Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Using the Command Line Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Where to Go From Here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Using the IP Address for Remote Access Point Management . . . . . 3-8
Starting a Telnet Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Starting a Web Browser Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
4 Troubleshooting
Basic Troubleshooting Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Diagnosing with the LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Proactive Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
Hardware Diagnostic Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Testing the Access Point by Resetting It . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Checking the Access Point’s LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Checking Event Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Testing Twisted-Pair Cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Testing Access Point-to-Device Network Communications . . . . . . . . 4-7
Testing End-to-End Network Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Restoring the Factory Default Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
Downloading New Access Point Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
HP Customer Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
Before Calling Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
ii
A Specifications
Physical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
Electrical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
Environmental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
EMC Compliance (Class B) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
Radio Signal Certification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
Immunity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
Wireless . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3
Receiver Sensitivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3
B Access Point Port and Network Cables
Access Point Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
Twisted-Pair Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
Twisted-Pair Cable/Connector Pin-Outs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2
Straight-Through Twisted-Pair Cable for
10 Mbps or 100 Mbps Network Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3
Cable Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3
Pin Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3
Crossover Twisted-Pair Cable for
10 Mbps or 100 Mbps Network Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4
Cable Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4
Pin Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4
C Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements
Safety Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
EMC Regulatory Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-9
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Index-1
iii
iv
1
The HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420 is a wireless repeater that seam­
lessly integrates with existing wired networks to support connectivity for
mobile users or wireless workstations. This solution offers fast, reliable
wireless connectivity with considerable cost savings over wired LANs. Just
install enough wireless access points to cover your network area, plug wireless cards into your notebooks or install wireless adapters into your desktops,
and start networking.
HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420 na (J8130A)
HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420 ww (J8131A)
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1-1
Introducing the HP ProCurve
Wireless Access Point 420
Introducing the HP ProCurve
Wireless Access Point 420
Introducing the HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420
Introducing the HP ProCurve
Wireless Access Point 420
Throughout this manual, this access point will be abbreviated as the
Access Point 420.
The Access Point 420 has one 10/100Base-TX RJ-45 port. This port also
supports Power over Ethernet (PoE) based on the IEEE 802.3af standard. The
access point supports wireless connectivity at speeds up to 54 Mbps based on
the IEEE 802.11g standard.
This access point is designed to be used primarily for connecting wireless
clients to an enterprise network. This access point allows wireless clients to
connect directly to each other, or to connect to other computers or network
resources located on the wired network.
This chapter describes your HP Access Point 420 including:
■
■
1-2
Top and back of the access point
Access point features
Introducing the HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420
Top of the Access Point
HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420
Antennas
Power,
10/100-TX Link,
and Wireless
Link LEDs
hp procurve
wireless
access point
Link/Activity
Po we r
10/10 0 -TX Wireless
420
Indicator Panel
hp procurve
wireless
access point
Link/Activity
Power
10/100-TX Wireless
420
Power LED
Ethernet LED
Wireless LED
1-3
Introducing the HP ProCurve
Wireless Access Point 420
Top of the Access Point
Introducing the HP ProCurve
Wireless Access Point 420
Introducing the HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420
Top of the Access Point
LEDs
Table 1-1.
Access Point LEDs
Access Point
LEDs
State
Meaning
Power
(green)
On
The access point is receiving power.
Off
The access point is NOT receiving power.
Blinking*
The access point is undergoing self test or downloading software.
The self test and initialization are in progress after you have power cycled or reset
the access point. The access point is not operational until this LED stops blinking.
Blinking*
(prolonged)
A component of the access point has failed its self test.
On (green)
The RJ-45 port is enabled and receiving a link indication from a 100 Mbps device.
On (amber)
The RJ-45 port is enabled and receiving a link indication from a 10 Mbps device.
Off
The RJ-45 port has no active network cable connected, or is not receiving a signal.
Otherwise, the port may have been disabled through the access point console, or the
web browser interface.
Blinking*
The RJ-45 port is transmitting or receiving traffic.
On
The wireless interface is enabled and receiving a link indication from a wireless client
Off
The wireless interface is not receiving a signal. Otherwise, the wireless interface may
have been disabled through the access point console, or the web browser interface.
Blinking*
The wireless interface is transmitting or receiving traffic.
10/100-TX
Wireless
* The blinking behavior is an on/off cycle once every 1.6 seconds, approximately.
1-4
Introducing the HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420
Back of the Access Point
HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420
Antennas
DC power connector
Console port
Lock
Reset button
Network port
10/100Base-TX RJ-45
port and PoE input
Antennas
The access point includes two antennas for wireless communications. The
outbound signal transmitted from both antennas is identical, but only the best
inbound signal received on one of the antennas is used. The antennas transmit
the outgoing signal as a toroidal sphere, so the antennas should be adjusted
to different angles to provide better coverage. For further information, see
“Position the Antennas on the Access Point” on page 2-10 .
Lock
The access point includes a Kensington security slot on the rear panel, marked
with the lock symbol ( ). You can prevent unauthorized removal of the
access point by wrapping the Kensington security cable (not provided) around
an unmovable object, inserting the lock into the slot, and turning the key.
1-5
Introducing the HP ProCurve
Wireless Access Point 420
Back of the Access Point
Introducing the HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420
Back of the Access Point
Introducing the HP ProCurve
Wireless Access Point 420
Console Port
This port connects a console to the access point using a serial cable. This
connection is described under “Connect a Console to the Access Point” in
chapter 2, “Installing the Access Point 420”. The console can be a PC or
workstation running a VT-100 terminal emulator, or a VT-100 terminal.
Network Port
The access point includes one 10/100Base-TX port. This port uses MDI
(i.e., internal straight-through) pin configuration. You can therefore use
straight-through twisted-pair cable to connect this port to most network
interconnection devices such as a switch or router that provide MDI-X ports.
However, if you need to connect the access point to a workstation or other
device that only has MDI ports, then use crossover twisted-pair cable.
Ports on most HP switches have the “HP Auto MDIX” feature, which means
that you can use either straight-through or crossover twisted-pair cables to
connect the access point to these switches.
Refer to the following section for information on supplying power to the
access point through its RJ-45 port from a network device, such as a switch,
that provides Power over Ethernet (PoE).
Power Connector
The Access Point 420 does not have a power switch; it is powered on when
connected to the AC power adapter, and the power adapter is connected to
an active AC power source. The access point's power adapter automatically
adjusts to any voltage between 100--240 volts and either 50 or 60 Hz. There are
no voltage range settings required.
Caution
Use only the AC power adapter supplied with the access point. Use of other
adapters, including adapters that came with other HP network products, may
result in damage to the equipment.
The access point may also receive Power over Ethernet (PoE) from a switch
or other network device that supplies power over the network cable based on
the IEEE 802.3af standard.
Note that if the access point is connected to a PoE source device and also
connected to a local power source through the AC power adapter, PoE will
be disabled.
1-6
Introducing the HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420
Back of the Access Point
This button is used to reset the hardware or restore the factory defaults:
■
To Reset the Access Point While it is Powered On – This action clears
any temporary error conditions that may have occurred and executes the
access point self test.
■
To Restore Factory Default Configuration – When the Reset button
is pressed for more than five seconds, any configuration changes you may
have made through the access point console or the web browser interface
are removed, and the factory default configuration is restored to the
access point. For the specific method to restore the factory default
configuration, see “Restoring the Factory Default Configuration” in
chapter 4, “Troubleshooting” of this manual.
1-7
Introducing the HP ProCurve
Wireless Access Point 420
Reset Button
Introducing the HP ProCurve
Wireless Access Point 420
Introducing the HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420
Access Point Features
Access Point Features
The wireless features of the Access Point 420 include:
■
supports up to 128 wireless clients
■
IEEE 802.11g Compliant – interoperable with multiple vendors
■
precise control over signal transmission power and data rate
■
advanced security through 64/128/152-bit WEP encryption, Wi-Fi
Protected Access (WPA), IEEE 802.1x, remote authentication via a
RADIUS server, and MAC address filtering features to protect your sensi­
tive data and authenticate only authorized users to your network
■
remote logging of system messages
■
time synchronization via SNTP server for message logs
■
auto channel selection – simplifies access deployment by testing all
available channels and selecting the best channel based on signal-to-noise
ratio
■
international country configuration – select the appropriate country and
the access point automatically configures radio operation to match regu­
latory requirements (model J8131A only)
The other basic features of the Access Point 420 include:
1-8
■
one 10/100Base-TX RJ-45 port
■
supports Power over Ethernet based on the IEEE 802.3af standard
■
full-duplex operation for the 10/100 RJ-45 port
■
easy management of the access point through several available interfaces:
•
console interface—a full featured, easy to use, VT-100 terminal
interface that is especially good for out-of-band access point manage­
ment or for Telnet access to the access point
•
web browser interface—an easy to use built-in graphical interface
that can be accessed from common web browsers
■
support for up to 64 IEEE 802.1Q-compliant VLANs (as specified for each
client in the RADIUS server) so that wireless clients can join the appro­
priate logical grouping for the network user's needs
■
support for many advanced features to enhance network performance—
for a description, see the Management and Configuration Guide, which
is on the Documentation CD-ROM that is included with your access point.
■
download of new access point software for product enhancements or
software updates
■
dual flash images – enables auto-recovery upon unsuccessful download
2
Installing the Access Point 420
The HP Access Point 420 is easy to install. It comes with an accessory kit that
includes a bracket for mounting the access point on a wall. The bracket is
designed to allow mounting the access point in a variety of locations and
orientations.
This chapter shows you how to install your Access Point 420.
Installing the
Access Point 420
Included Parts
The Access Point 420 has the following components shipped with it:
■
HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420 Installation and Getting
Started Guide (J8130A-90001), this manual
■
HP ProCurve Product Documentation CD-ROM
(contains PDF file copies of the documentation for the Access Point 420,
including the Management and Configuration Guide)
■
Customer Support/Warranty booklet
■
Accessory kit (5069-5700)
• four 5/8-inch number 12 wood screws to attach the access point to a
wall
• four plastic wall plugs for mounting on a brick or concrete wall
• four rubber feet
■
Antenna (5092-0723)
■
Mounting bracket (5092-0711)
■
AC power adapter (5092-0728)
■
AC power cord, one of the following:
United States/Canada/Mexico
Continental Europe
United Kingdom/Hong Kong/Singapore
Australia/New Zealand
Japan
China
Denmark
Switzerland
8120-0740
8121-0731
8121-0739
8121-0730
8121-0736
8121-0742
8121-0733
8121-0738
2-1
Installing the Access Point 420
Installation Procedures
Installation Procedures
Summary
Follow these easy steps to install your access point. The rest of this chapter
provides details on these steps.
Installing the
Access Point 420
1. Prepare the installation site (page 2-4). Make sure that the physical
environment into which you will be installing the access point is properly
prepared, including having the correct network cabling ready to connect
to the access point and having an appropriate location for the access
point. Please see page 2-3 for some installation precautions.
2. Verify that the access point passes self test (page 2-5). This is a
simple process of plugging the access point into a power source, or
connecting it to a switch that provides Power over Ethernet, and
observing that the LEDs on the access point’s top panel indicate correct
access point operation.
3. Mount the access point (page 2-7). The Access Point 420 can be
mounted on a wall, or on a horizontal surface.
4. Connect power to the access point (page 2-9). Once the access point
is mounted, plug it into a nearby main power source, or connect it to a
switch that provides Power over Ethernet.
5. Connect to the network (page 2-10). Using the appropriate network
cable, connect the access point to a network connection point, such as a
switch. The network connection can also be used to provide power to the
access point through its PoE feature.
6. Position the antennas on the access point (page 2-10). Position
each antenna along a different axis to enhance signal coverage.
7. Connect a console to the access point (optional—page 2-11). You
may wish to modify the access point’s configuration, for example, to
configure an IP address so it can be managed using a web browser or
through a Telnet session. Configuration changes can be made easily by
using a console cable to connect a PC to the access point’s console port.
At this point, your access point is fully installed. See the rest of this chapter if
you need more detailed information on any of these installation steps.
2-2
Installing the Access Point 420
Installation Procedures
Installation Precautions:
Follow these precautions when installing your HP Access Point 420:
Cautions
Make sure that the power source circuits are properly grounded, then use
the power adapter supplied with the access point to connect it to the
power source.
■
You can alternatively power the access point through a network connec­
tion to a switch or other network connection device that provides Power
over Ethernet. However, note that if the access point is connected to a
power source using its AC power adapter, Power over Ethernet is
disabled.
■
Use only the AC power adapter supplied with the access point. Use of
other adapters, including adapters that came with other HP network
products, may result in damage to the equipment.
■
When using the acess point's AC power adapter, note that the AC outlet
should be near the access point and should be easily accessible in case
the access point must be powered off.
■
Ensure that the access point does not overload the power circuits, wiring,
and over-current protection. To determine the possibility of overloading
the supply circuits, add together the ampere ratings of all devices installed
on the same circuit as the access point and compare the total with the
rating limit for the circuit. The maximum ampere ratings are usually
printed on devices near the AC power connectors.
■
Do not install the access point in an environment where the operating
ambient temperature might exceed 40°C (104°F).
■
Make sure the air flow around the sides of the access point is not
restricted.
2-3
Installing the
Access Point 420
■
Installing the Access Point 420
Installation Procedures
1. Prepare the Installation Site
■
Cabling Infrastructure - Ensure that the cabling infrastructure meets
the necessary network specifications. See the following table for cable
types and lengths, and see appendix B, “Access Point Port and Network
Cables” for more information.
Table 2-1.
Port Type
Summary of Cable Types to Use With the Access Point
Cable Type
Length Limits
Twisted-Pair Cables
Installing the
Access Point 420
10/100Base-TX
• 10 Mbps operation:
Category 3, 4, or 5, 100-ohm unshielded
twisted-pair (UTP)
• 100 Mbps operation:
Category 5, 100-ohm UTP or shielded
twisted-pair (STP) cable.
■
2-4
100 meters
Note: Since the 10Base-T operation is through the 10/100Base-TX port on the access point, if
you ever want to upgrade the ports on other
devices to 100Base-TX, it would be best to
cable the 10/100Base-TX port on the access
point initially with category 5 cable.
The 10/100-Base-TX port on the Access Point 420 uses an MDI pin configuration, which requires you to use
straight-through cable when connecting to
another device that has an MDI-X port, or
crossover cable when connecting to a device
that has an MDI port. However, if the device to
which you are connecting supports auto-
MDIX, then you can use either a straight-
through or crossover cable.
Installation Location - Before installing the access point, plan its loca­
tion and orientation relative to other devices and equipment:
•
Try to place the access point in the center of your wireless network.
Normally, the higher you place the antenna, the better the perfor­
mance. You may need to reposition the access point after testing the
signal strength on several wireless clients to ensure that the access
point’s location provides optimal reception throughout your office.
•
At the back of the access point, leave at least 7.6 cm (3 inches) of
space for the twisted-pair cabling and the power cord.
•
On the sides of the access point, leave at least 7.6 cm (3 inches) for
cooling.
Installing the Access Point 420
Installation Procedures
2. Verify the Access Point Passes the Self Test
Before mounting the access point in its network location, you should first
verify that it is working properly by plugging it into a power source, or
connecting it to a switch that provides Power over Ethernet, and verifying that
it passes its self test.
1. Connect a network cable from a PoE source device (such as a switch) to
the RJ-45 port on the back of the access point, or connect the supplied
power adapter to the power connector on the back of the access point,
and then into a properly grounded electrical outlet.
N o t e
Installing the
Access Point 420
Connect network
cable to PoE switch
Or connect power adapter
to the power connector
The Access Point 420 does not have a power switch. It is powered on when
the power adapter is connected to the access point and to a power source, or
when a network cable is connected to the access point and to a network device
that provides Power over Ethernet. For safety, when connecting to an elec­
trical outlet, the power outlet should be located near the access point.
Use only the AC power adapter supplied with the access point. Use of other
adapters, including adapters that came with other HP network products, may
result in damage to the equipment.
2-5
Installing the Access Point 420
Installation Procedures
2.
Check the LEDs on the access point as described below.
hp procurve
wireless
access point
Link/Activity
Power
10/100-TX Wireless
420
Power LED
Ethernet LED
Wireless LED
Installing the
Access Point 420
When the access point is powered on, it performs its diagnostic self test.
The self test takes approximately 50 seconds to complete.
LED Behavior:
During the self test:
•
The 10/100Base-TX and Wireless LEDs go off and then may come on
again during phases of the self test. For the duration of the self test,
the Power LED blinks.
When the self test completes successfully:
•
The Power LED remains on.
•
The 10/100Base-TX and Wireless LEDs on the top of the access point
go into their normal operational mode:
–
–
If the ports are connected to active network devices, the LEDs
should be on.
If the ports are not connected to active network devices, the LEDs
stay off.
If the LED display is different than what is described above, especially if
the Power LED does not stop blinking, the self test has not completed
correctly. Refer to chapter 4, “Troubleshooting” for diagnostic help.
2-6
Installing the Access Point 420
Installation Procedures
3. Mount the Access Point
After you have verified that the access point passes the self test, you are ready
to mount the access point in a stable location. The Access Point 420 can be
mounted in these ways:
■
■
on a wall
on a horizontal surface
Wall Mounting
You can mount the access point on a wall as shown in the illustrations on the
next page.
The access point should be mounted only to a wall or wood surface that is at
least 1/2-inch plywood or its equivalent.
1. Position the mounting bracket on the wall, and mark the holes. The
orientation shown in the following figure is the most secure position for
mounting the access point. Do not mount the access point with the
retaining latches pointing down.
2.
To mount the access point on a plastered brick or concrete wall, first drill
four holes 22 mm deep and 3.5 mm in diameter, and press the four included
wall plugs firmly into the drilled holes until they are flush with the surface
of the wall.
3. Set the four 5/8-inch number 12 wood screws in the holes, leaving about
3 mm (0.12 in.) clearance from the wall.
4. Position the mounting bracket over the wall screws, slide the bracket onto
the screws, and then tighten down the screws.
5.
There are two alignment slots along the lower edge of the mounting
bracket as shown in the following figures. Match these slots up with the
protrusions on the unit’s plastic cover. This makes it easy to get the metal
fingers on the bracket aligned with the three protruding slots in the bottom
of the access point.
6.
Slide the access point down onto the bracket so that the three metal
fingers on the bracket enter the three protruding slots on the bottom of
the access point. The two retaining latches will slip into place over the
back edge of the access point.
7. To prevent unauthorized removal of the access point, you can use a
Kensington Slim MicroSaver security cable (not included) to attach the
access point to an immovable object.
2-7
Installing the
Access Point 420
C a u t i o n
Installing the Access Point 420
Installation Procedures
N o t e
If mounting the access point in an air conditioning or heating duct, leave the
cover on to aid in mounting the unit on the bracket as described in the
preceding steps. The unit’s plastic cover should then be removed for safety
reasons.
Installing the
Access Point 420
Mounting the Bracket on a Wall
5/8-inch
wood screws
Sliding the Access Point onto the Bracket
Retaining
latches
Mounting
slots
Alignment tabs
2-8
Mounting
points
Alignment slots
Installing the Access Point 420
Installation Procedures
Horizontal Surface Mounting
Place the access point on a table or other horizontal surface. The access point
accessory kit provides rubber feet that can be used to help keep the access
point from sliding on the surface.
Attach the rubber feet to the four corners on the bottom of the access point
within the embossed lines. Use a sturdy surface in an uncluttered area. You
may want to secure the networking cable and access point’s power cord to
the table leg or other part of the surface structure to help prevent tripping over
the cords.
Caution
Make sure the air flow is not restricted around the sides of the access point.
1.
Plug the included power adapter into the access point’s power connector
and into a nearby AC power source.
Or, alternatively, connect the Ethernet port on the access point to a switch
or other network device that provides Power over Ethernet.
2.
Re-check the LEDs during self test. See “LED Behavior” on page 2-6.
2-9
Installing the
Access Point 420
4. Connect the Access Point to a Power Source
Installing the Access Point 420
Installation Procedures
5. Connect the Network Cable
Connect the network cable, described under “Cabling Infrastructure”
(page 2-4), from the network device or your patch panel to the RJ-45 port on
the access point.
Using the RJ-45 Connectors
Installing the
Access Point 420
To connect:
Push the RJ-45 plug into the RJ-45
port until the tab on the plug clicks
into place. When power is on for the
access point and for the connected
device, the 10/100Base-TX link LED
should light to confirm a powered-on
device (for example, a switch) is at
the other end of the cable.
If the 10/100Base-TX link LED does
not go on when the network cable is
connected to the port, see “Diag­
nosing with the LEDs” in chapter 4,
“Troubleshooting”.
RJ-45 connector
Cable:
• Category 3, 4, or 5 for 10 Mbps ports (UTP)
• Category 5 or better for 100 Mbps ports (STP)
Maximum distance: 100 meters
To disconnect:
Press the small tab on the plug and pull the plug out of the port.
6. Position the Antennas on the Access Point
The antennas emit signals along a toroidal plane—and thus provide more
effective coverage when positioned along different axes. For example, you
might position the antennas around 45 to 90 degrees from each other.
The access point compares the strength of an incoming signal on both
antennas, and uses the antenna receiving the stronger signal to communicate
with a wireless client.
2-10
Installing the Access Point 420
Installation Procedures
7. (Optional) Connect a Console to the Access Point 420
The Access Point 420 has a full-featured, easy to use console interface for
performing access point management tasks, including the following:
■
modify the access point’s configuration to optimize access point perfor­
mance, enhance network traffic control, and improve network security
■
download new software to the access point
■
add a password to control access to the access point from the console,
web browser interface, and network management stations
The console can be accessed through these methods:
Out-of-Band: Use a serial cable for connecting a PC or VT-100 terminal
to be used as a console directly to the access point.
■
In-Band: Access the console using Telnet from a PC on the network, and
a VT-100 terminal emulator. This method requires that you first configure
the access point with an IP address and subnet mask by using either outof-band console access or through DHCP. For more information on IP
addressing and on starting a Telnet session, see chapter 3, “Getting Started
With Access Point Configuration”, and the Management and Configura­
tion Guide, which is on the Documentation CD-ROM that came with your
access point.
The Access Point 420 can simultaneously support one out-of-band console
session through the Console Port and four in-band Telnet console sessions.
N o t e
For information on using the web browser interface to configure the access
point, refer to the Management and Configuration Guide.
Terminal Configuration
To connect a console to the access point, configure the PC terminal emulator
as a DEC VT-100 (ANSI) terminal or use a VT-100 terminal, and configure either
one to operate with these settings:
•
9600 baud
•
8 data bits, 1 stop bit, no parity, and flow control set to None
•
For the Windows Terminal program, also disable (uncheck) the “Use
Function, Arrow, and Ctrl Keys for Windows” option
•
For the Hilgraeve HyperTerminal program, select the “Terminal keys”
option for the “Function, arrow, and ctrl keys act as” parameter
You can only attach to the console using these configuration settings.
2-11
Installing the
Access Point 420
■
Installing the Access Point 420
Installation Procedures
Direct Console Access
To connect a console to the
access point, follow these steps:
Installing the
Access Point 420
1.
Console port
Connect the PC or terminal
to the access point’s Console
port using a DB-9 female-tofemale serial cable. (If your
PC or terminal has a 25-pin
serial connector, first attach
a 9-pin to 25-pin straightthrough adapter at one end
of the console cable.)
The Console cable is
described below. A nullmodem cable or an HP
serial cable, part number
5184-1894 (shipped with
many HP ProCurve
switches), may be used.
Console cable
(not supplied)
PC running a terminal
emulator program, or
a VT-100 terminal
Access Point 420 serial port pin and signalling details
Access Point 420 Pin Assignment
1
6
DB-9 male
Pin Number
5
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Access Point Signal (DTE)
Reserved
RXD (input)
TXD (output)
Reserved
GND
Reserved
RTS (output)
CTS (input)
Reserved
Connection to PC serial ports also requires a crossover (null-modem)
cable with a female DB-9 connector on both ends. Terminal connections
will vary, requiring either a DB-9 or DB-25 connector, male or female.
Serial cable options between an HP ProCure Wireless Access Point 420
and a PC terminal are shown in the following table.
2-12
Installing the Access Point 420
Installation Procedures
Note: As indicated in the following table, some of the wires should not
be connected. If you do connect the wires that are labeled “Reserved”,
you might get unexpected results with some terminals.
Serial interface signal directions
DB-9 (DTE)
Access Point 420
2.
Reserved
Reserved
GND
Reserved
Reserved
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
DB-9 (DTE)
Access Point 420
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Reserved
Reserved
GND
Reserved
Reserved
DB-25 (DTE)
Terminal or PC
8
3
2
20
7
6
4
5
22
Turn on the terminal or PC’s power and, if using a PC, start the PC terminal
program.
3. Enter admin at the Username: prompt, and press the [Enter] key at the
Password prompt. You will then see the access point console command
(CLI) prompt, for example:
HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420#
If you want to continue with console management of the access point at this
time, see chapter 3, “Getting Started With Access Point Configuration” for
some basic configuration steps. For more detailed information, refer to the
Management and Configuration Guide, which is on the Documentation
CD-ROM that came with your access point.
2-13
Installing the
Access Point 420
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
DB9 (DTE)
Terminal or PC
Installing the Access Point 420
Sample Network Topologies
Sample Network Topologies
This section shows you a few sample network topologies in which the
Access Point 420 is implemented. The wireless solution supports a standalone wireless network configuration as well as an integrated configuration
with wired Ethernet LANs. Wireless network cards, adapters, and access
points can be configured as:
■
■
■
ad hoc for departmental or SOHO LANs
infrastructure for wireless LANs
infrastructure wireless LAN for roaming wireless PCs
Installing the
Access Point 420
For more topology information, see the HP network products World Wide Web
site, http://www.hp.com/go/hpprocurve.
Ad Hoc Wireless LAN (no access point)
Ad Hoc Network with
No Access Point
Notebook with
Wireless USB Adapter
Notebook with
Wireless PC Card
PC with
Wireless PCI Adapter
An ad-hoc wireless LAN consists of a group of computers, each equipped with
a wireless adapter, connected via radio signals as an independent wireless
LAN. Computers in a specific ad-hoc wireless LAN must therefore be config­
ured to the same radio channel. An ad-hoc wireless LAN can be used for a
branch office or SOHO operation.
2-14
Installing the Access Point 420
Sample Network Topologies
Infrastructure Wireless LAN
Wired LAN Extension
to Wireless Adapters
File
Server
Desktop PC
Notebook with
wireless PC
Card Adapter
Switch
Installing the
Access Point 420
Access Point 420
PC with
wireless PCI
Adapter
The Access Point 420 is designed to provide access to a wired LAN for wireless
clients. An integrated wired/wireless LAN is called an Infrastructure configuration. A Basic Service Set (BSS) consists of a group of wireless PC users, and
an access point that is directly connected to the wired LAN. Each wireless PC
in this BSS can talk to any computer in its wireless group, or access other
computers or network resources in the wired LAN infrastructure via the
access point.
The infrastructure configuration not only extends the accessibility of wireless
PCs to the wired LAN, but also increases the effective wireless transmission
range for wireless PCs by passing their signal through one or more access
points.
2-15
Installing the Access Point 420
Sample Network Topologies
Infrastructure Wireless LAN for Roaming Wireless PCs
Seamless Roaming
for Wireless Clients
File
Server
Desktop PC
Switch
Installing the
Access Point 420
Wireless Client
Switch
Access Point 420
Wireless Client
<BSS2>
Access Point 420
<BSS1>
<ESS>
Wireless Client
The Basic Service Set (BSS) defines the communications domain for each
access point and its associated wireless clients. The BSS ID is a 48-bit binary
number based on the access point’s wireless MAC address, and is set automatically and transparently as clients associate with the access point. The BSS ID
is used in frames sent between the access point and its clients to identify traffic
in the service area.
The BSS ID is only set by the access point, never by its clients. The clients
only need to set the Service Set Identifier (SSID) that identifies the service set
provided by one or more access points. The SSID can be manually configured
by the clients, can be detected in an access point’s beacon, or can be obtained
by querying for the identity of the nearest access point. For clients that do not
need to roam, set the SSID for the wireless card to that used by the access
point to which you want to connect.
2-16
Installing the Access Point 420
Sample Network Topologies
A wireless infrastructure can also support roaming for mobile workers. More
than one access point can be configured to create an Extended Service Set
(ESS). By placing the access points so that a continuous coverage area is
created, wireless users within this ESS can roam freely. All HP wireless
network cards, adapters, and access points within a specific ESS must be
configured with the same SSID.
Installing the
Access Point 420
2-17
Installing the
Access Point 420
Installing the Access Point 420
Sample Network Topologies
2-18
3
Getting Started With Access Point
Configuration
This chapter is a guide for using the access point’s console to quickly assign
an Internet Protocol (IP) address and subnet mask to the access point, set a
manager password, and, optionally, configure other basic features.
For more information on using the access point’s console and the web browser
interface, please see the Management and Configuration Guide, which is on
the Documentation CD-ROM that came with your access point.
Recommended Minimal Configuration
Caution
The country code for the HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420 na (J8130A)
sold in the United States and Canada is fixed in the firmware and cannot be
changed. This means that only radio channels 1-11 are available for this model.
The country code for the HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420 ww
(J8131A) sold in other countries is not set, and must be configured before you
can enable radio communications for the access point. Setting the country
code enables only those radio channels permitted for wireless networks in the
specified country. Please refer to step 10 on page 3-4 for information on setting
the country code.
Note that once you have set the country code, it can only be changed by
restoring the factory default settings as described under “Restoring the
Factory Default Configuration” on page 4-8.
3-1
Getting Started With Access
Point Configuration
In the factory default configuration, the access point is configured as a DHCP
client. If the access point fails to obtain an IP address from the DHCP server,
its IP address defaults to 192.168.1.1. If this address is not compatible with
your network, then the access point can only be managed through a direct
console connection. To manage the access point through in-band (networked)
access, you should configure the access point with an IP address and subnet
mask compatible with your network. Also, you should configure a manager
password to control access privileges for the console and web browser
interface. Other parameters can be left at their default settings or you can
configure them with values you enter.
Getting Started With Access Point Configuration
Many other features can be configured through the access point’s console
interface to optimize the access point’s performance, to enhance your control
of the network traffic, and to improve network security. Once an IP address
has been configured on the access point, these features can be accessed more
conveniently through a remote Telnet session or through the access point’s
web browser interface.
For more information on IP addressing, refer to “Configuring IP Settings” in
the Management and Configuration Guide.
N o t e
By default, the access point is configured to acquire an IP address configura­
tion from a DHCP server. To use DHCP instead of the manual method
described in this chapter, see “Configuring IP Settings” in the Management
and Configuration Guide, which is on the Documentation CD-ROM that came
with your access point.
Using the Command Line Interface
The quickest and easiest way to minimally configure the access point for
management and password protection in your network is to use a direct
console connection to the access point, start a console session, and access
the command line interface (CLI).
Getting Started With Access
Point Configuration
1.
Using the method described in the preceding chapter, connect a terminal
device to the access point, and press [Enter] to initiate the console connec­
tion.
2. Type admin for the default user name. The default password is null, so just
press [Enter] at the password prompt. The CLI prompt appears displaying
the access point’s model number.
Username: admin
Password:
HP ProCurve Access Point 420#
3.
Type configure to enter global configuration mode.
HP ProCurve Access Point 420#configure
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CTRL/Z
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(config)#
4. Type username username to create a user name for the manager, where
username can consist of 3 to 16 alphanumeric characters and is case
sensitive. (Note that only one user name is allowed for the access point.)
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(config)#username admin
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(config)#
3-2
Getting Started With Access Point Configuration
5. Type password password to create a password for the manager, where
password can consist of up to 8 alphanumeric characters and is case
sensitive.
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(config)#password 1AB2F
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(config)#
6. Type interface ethernet to access the Ethernet interface-configuration
mode.
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(config)#interface ethernet
Enter Ethernet configuration commands, one per line.
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(if-ethernet)#
7. Type show to display the access point’s default IP configuration, including
IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway. The following illustration
shows the default settings.
8. To manually assign an IP address, first type no ip dhcp to disable DHCP
client mode. Then type ip address ip-address netmask gateway, where
ip-address is the access point’s IP address, netmask is the network mask
for the network, and gateway is the default gateway router. Check with
your system administrator to obtain an IP address that is compatible with
your network.
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(if-ethernet)#no ip dhcp
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(if-ethernet)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.254
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(if-ethernet)#
3-3
Getting Started With Access
Point Configuration
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(if-ethernet)#show
Ethernet Interface Information
========================================
IP Address
: 192.168.1.1
Subnet Mask
: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway
: 0.0.0.0
Primary DNS
: 0.0.0.0
Secondary DNS
: 0.0.0.0
Speed-duplex
: 100Base-TX Full Duplex
Admin status
: Up
Operational status : Up
===========================================================
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(if-ethernet)#
Getting Started With Access Point Configuration
9. Type exit to leave configuration mode, then type the show interface wireless g command to display the access point’s default wireless configura­
tion, including wireless communication domain, radio channel, and
operation status. The following illustration shows the default settings.
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(if-ethernet)#exit
HP ProCurve Access Point 420#show interface wireless g
Getting Started With Access
Point Configuration
Wireless Interface Information
===========================================================
----------------Identification-----------------------------
Description
: Enterprise 802.11g Access Point
SSID
: Enterprise Wireless AP
Radio mode
: 802.11b + 802.11g
Channel
: 0 (AUTO)
Status
: Disabled
----------------802.11 Parameters--------------------------
Transmit Power
: FULL (5 dBm)
Max Station Data Rate
: 54Mbps
Fragmentation Threshold
: 2346 bytes
RTS Threshold
: 2347 bytes
Beacon Interval
: 100 TUs
DTIM Interval
: 2 beacons
Maximum Association
: 128 stations
----------------Security-----------------------------------
Closed System
: DISABLED
WPA mode
: Dynamic key
Multicast cipher
: WEP
Unicast cipher
: TKIP
WPA clients
: SUPPORTED
Authentication Type
: OPEN
Encryption
: DISABLED
Default Transmit Key
: 1
WEP Key Data Type
: Hexadecimal
Static Keys :
Key 2: EMPTY
Key 3: EMPTY
Key 4: EMPTY
===========================================================
HP ProCurve Access Point 420#
10. If you are using the HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420 na (J8130A)
model sold in the United States, radio channels 1 - 11 are the only options
supported under FCC regulations, and cannot be changed. However, if
you are using HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420 ww (J8131A) model
sold in other countries, then you need to set the country code to indicate
the channels permitted for you area. The wireless radio is automatically
enabled once a country code is set.
First type country ? to display the list of countries. Select the code for your
country, and enter the country command again, followed by your country
code (e.g., GB for Great Britain).
HP ProCurve Access Point 420#country gb
HP ProCurve Access Point 420#
3-4
Getting Started With Access Point Configuration
11. Type configure to return to global configuration mode, and then type
interface wireless g to access the wireless interface-configuration mode.
HP ProCurve Access Point 420#configure
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CTRL/Z
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(config)#interface wireless g
Enter Wireless configuration commands, one per line.
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(if-wireless g)#
12. Set the Service Set Identifier (SSID) to identify the communications
domain for the access point. Type ssid identifier, where identifier can consist
of up to 32 alphanumeric characters and is case sensitive.
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(if-wireless g)#ssid 420
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(if-wireless g)#
13. Set the radio channel through which the access point communicates with
its wireless clients. Use the default setting (auto) to have the access point
automatically select the first available channel. Otherwise, type channel
number, where number can be from 1 to 14, depending on the wireless
regulations specified by your country.
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(if-wireless g)#channel 9
HP ProCurve Access Point 420(if-wireless g)#
Getting Started With Access
Point Configuration
Note
All settings are immediately saved and retained on a reboot.
3-5
Getting Started With Access Point Configuration
Here is some information on the basic IP address and wireless configuration
parameters. For more information on these fields, see the Management and
Configuration Guide, which is on the Documentation CD-ROM that came
with your access point:
Default
Username
admin
The name of the manager.
Password
none
The password for the manager.
IP Address
192.168.1.1
IP address compatible with your network.
Subnet Mask
255.255.255.0
Subnet mask compatible with your network.
Default Gateway
0.0.0.0
IP address of the next-hop gateway node for network traffic that needs to be
able to reach off-subnet destinations.
SSID
Enterprise
Wireless AP
The Service Set Identifier is a unique name identifying the communications
domain for the access point. Clients that want to connect to the wireless
network via this specific access point must set their SSIDs to the same name.
Channel
0 (AUTO)
The radio channel through which the access point communicates with its
wireless clients. When attempting to connect, most wireless clients
automatically set their radio channel to the same channel used by the access
point.
Wireless Operation
Disabled
Wireless operation is enabled as soon you set the country code.
Getting Started With Access
Point Configuration
Parameter
Note: The IP address and subnet mask assigned for the access point must be compatible with the IP addressing used
in your network. For more information on IP addressing, see the Management and Configuration Guide, which is on
the Documentation CD-ROM that came with your access point.
3-6
Getting Started With Access Point Configuration
Where to Go From Here
The above procedure, using the CLI, configured your access point with a
manager password, IP address, and subnet mask. As a result, with the proper
network connections, you can now manage the access point from a PC
equipped with Telnet or a web browser interface. The above procedure also
configured the Service Set Identifier (SSID), radio channel, and enabled
wireless operation. Your wireless clients can now access the network by
setting their SSID and radio channel to the same values used by the access
point. Note that some wireless clients can be configured to scan all of the radio
channels for an access point and the SSID.
Some basic information on managing your access point is included in the next
section. For more information on the console and web browser interfaces,
and all the features that can be configured on the Access Point 420, please see
the Management and Configuration Guide, which is on the Documentation
CD-ROM that came with your access point.
To Recover from a Lost Manager Password: If you cannot start a console session because of a lost manager password, you can clear the password
and user name by getting physical access to the access point and pressing and
holding the Reset button for more than five seconds. However, note that this
action resets all configuration settings to the factory defaults.
Getting Started With Access
Point Configuration
3-7
Getting Started With Access Point Configuration
Using the IP Address for Remote Access Point Management
Using the IP Address for Remote Access
Point Management
With your Access Point 420, you can use the access point’s IP address to
manage the access point from any PC that is on the same subnet as the access
point. You can use either a Telnet session or a standard web browser to manage
the access point.
Starting a Telnet Session
To access the access point through a Telnet session, follow these steps:
1. Make sure the access point is configured with an IP address and that the
access point is reachable from the PC that is running the Telnet session
(for example, use a ping command to the access point’s IP address).
2.
Start the Telnet program on a PC that is on the same subnet as the access
point and connect to the access point’s IP address.
Getting Started With Access
Point Configuration
Example:
telnet 192.168.1.19
3. Enter the user name and password. (The default user name is admin and
the default password is null. You will then see the access point’s console
command (CLI) prompt, for example:
Username: admin
Password:
HP ProCurve Access Point 420#
Enter ? to see a list of commands that can be executed at the prompt.
Entering any command followed by ? displays a list of options that are
available at that point in the command entry.
Starting a Web Browser Session
Your Access Point 420 can be managed through a graphical interface that you
can access from any PC or workstation on the same subnet as the access point.
Open a compatible browser and type the access point’s IP address as the URL.
(See “Using the Command Line Interface” on page 3-2 for information on
setting the IP address.) No additional software installation is required to make
this interface available; it is included in the access point’s onboard software.
3-8
Getting Started With Access Point Configuration
Using the IP Address for Remote Access Point Management
The operating systems, web browsers, and Java support required to manage
the access point through the browser interface are listed in the following table:
Operating System
Internet
Explorer
Windows 2000 SP3
5.01, SP1
6.0, SP1
Windows XP
Professional Hotfix SP2
6.0, SP1
Java
Sun Java 2 Runtime Environment, Ver. 1.4.1
Microsoft Virtual Machine 5.0.38.09
A typical web browser interface screen is shown in the next illustration.
Getting Started With Access
Point Configuration
For more information on using the web browser interface, please see the
Management and Configuration Guide, which is on the Documentation
CD-ROM that came with your access point.
A help system is also available for the web browser interface. Click the
in the upper-right corner of the screen.
box
3-9
Getting Started With Access
Point Configuration
Getting Started With Access Point Configuration
Using the IP Address for Remote Access Point Management
3-10
4
Troubleshooting
This chapter describes how to troubleshoot your HP ProCurve Wireless Access Point 420. Note that this document describes troubleshooting mostly
from a hardware perspective. You can perform more in-depth troubleshooting
on the Access Point 420 using the software tools available with the access point, including the full-featured console interface and the built-in web
browser interface. This chapter describes the following:
■
basic troubleshooting tips (page 4-1)
■
diagnosing with the LEDs (page 4-3)
■
proactive networking tools (page 4-5)
■
hardware diagnostic tests (page 4-6)
■
restoring the factory default configuration (page 4-8)
■
downloading new software to the Access Point 420 (page 4-9)
■
HP Customer Support Services (page 4-9)
Basic Troubleshooting Tips
Most problems are caused by the following situations. Check for these items
first when starting your troubleshooting:
■
Connecting to devices that have a fixed full-duplex configuration.
By default, the RJ-45 port uses auto-negotiation to determine the duplex
mode. That is, when connecting to attached devices, the access point will
operate in one of two ways to determine the link speed and the commu­
nication mode (half duplex or full duplex):
If the connected device is also configured to use auto-negotiation, the
access point will automatically negotiate both link speed and commu­
nication mode.
•
If the connected device has a fixed configuration, for example
100 Mbps, at half or full duplex, the access point will automatically
sense the link speed, but will default to a communication mode of half
duplex.
4-1
Troubleshooting
•
Troubleshooting
Basic Troubleshooting Tips
Because the Access Point 420 behaves in this way (in compliance with
the IEEE 802.3 standard), if a device connected to the access point has
a fixed configuration at full duplex, the device will not connect correctly
to the access point. The result will be high error rates and very inefficient
communications between the access point and the device.
All devices connected to the Access Point 420 should be configured to
auto-negotiate. To correct this problem you have to manually set the
access point’s RJ-45 port to match the duplex mode used by the attached
device.
■
Faulty or loose cables. Look for loose or obviously faulty connections.
If the cables appear to be OK, make sure the connections are secure. If
that does not correct the problem, try a different cable.
■
Non-standard cables. Non-standard and miswired cables may cause
network collisions and other network problems, and can seriously impair
network performance. Use a new correctly-wired cable or compare your
cable to the cable in appendix B, “Access Point Port and Network Cables”
for pinouts and correct cable wiring. A category 5 cable tester is a
recommended tool for every 100Base-TX network installation.
■
Improper Network Topologies. It is important to make sure you have
a valid network topology. Common topology faults include excessive
cable length and excessive repeater delays between end nodes. If you have
network problems after recent changes to the network, change back to
the previous topology. If you no longer experience the problems, the new
topology is probably at fault. Sample topologies are shown at the end of
chapter 2 in this book, and some topology configuration guidelines can
be found online at the HP ProCurve web site, http://www.hp.com/rnd/
index.htm. under “network configuration examples.”
■
Mobile users cannot connect to the network. Make sure that the
access point and wireless clients are configured with compatible security
settings. Check to ensure that the wireless client is within the maximum
range supported by the access point. Also verify that the wireless client
has been configured with an IP address compatible with the attached
network, either manually or via DHCP.
Troubleshooting
For more information on possible network problems and their solutions, refer
to the technical note “Troubleshooting LAN Performance and Intermittent
Connectivity Problems”, which can be found on the HP ProCurve web site,
http://www.hp.com/go/hpprocurve, in the Reference Library section under
http://www.hp.com/rnd/library/index.htm under “T” in the “A-Z index.”
4-2
Troubleshooting
Diagnosing with the LEDs
Diagnosing with the LEDs
Table 4-1 shows LED patterns on the access point that indicate problem
conditions.
1.
Check in the table for the LED pattern that you see on your access point.
2.
Refer to the corresponding diagnostic tip on the next few pages.
Table 4-1.
LED Error Indicators
LED Pattern Indicating Problems
Power
Wireless LED
10/100-TX LED
Diagnostic
Tips
Off with power cord plugged in
*
*
1
Off without power cord plugged in,
but linked to a PoE source
*
*
2
Prolonged Blinking†
*
*
3
On
Off
*
4
On
*
Off with cable
connected
5
On
*
On, but the port is not
communicating
6
* This LED is not important for the diagnosis.
†
The blinking behavior is an on/off cycle once every 3 seconds, approximately.
Diagnostic Tips:
Problem
Solution
1
The access point
is not plugged
into an active AC
power source, or
the access
point’s AC power
adapter may
have failed.
1. Verify that the power cord is plugged into an active power source and to the access
point's AC power adapter. Make sure these connections are secure.
2. Try power-cycling the access point by unplugging and plugging the power cord back
in.
3. If the Power LED is still not on, verify that the AC power source works by plugging
another device into the outlet. Or try plugging the access point into a different outlet
or try a different power cord.
If the power source and power cord are OK and this condition persists, the access point’s
AC power adapter may have failed. Call your HP-authorized LAN dealer, or use the
electronic support services from HP to get assistance. See the Customer Support/
Warranty booklet for more information.
4-3
Troubleshooting
Tip
Troubleshooting
Diagnosing with the LEDs
Problem
Solution
2
The access point
is not receiving
power from the
PoE source.
1. Verify that access point’s 10/100Base-TX port is attached to a PoE source device.
2. Verify that the PoE source device is powered on, and that the PoE function has been
administratively enabled on the source port attached to the access point.
3. Refer to Tip 6 to verify that the network cable is functioning properly.
3
The access point
has experienced
a software
failure during self
test.
1. Try resetting the access point by pressing the Reset button on the back of the access
point, or by power cycling the access point.
2. If the fault indication reoccurs, attach a console to the access point (as indicated in
chapter 2). Then, reset the access point. Messages should appear on the console
screen identifying the error condition. You can view the console log at that point using
the web browser interface. Select the Status tab, then Events Log, or view the entry
file on your Syslog server if one is configured.
If necessary to resolve the problem, contact your HP-authorized LAN dealer, or use the
electronic support services from HP to get assistance. See the Customer Support/
Warranty booklet for more information.
4
Wireless link has
been
administratively
disabled.
Verify that the wireless port has not been disabled through an access point configuration
change. You can use the console interface, or, if you have configured an IP address on
the access point, use the web browser interface to determine the state of the wireless
port and re-enable the port if necessary. Also verify that the country code has been set.
5
The
10/100Base-TX
network
connection is not
working
properly.
Try the following procedures:
• Verify that both ends of the cabling, at the access point and the connected device, are
connected properly.
• Verify the connected device and access point are both powered on and operating
correctly.
• Verify duplex operation (see page 4-1).
• If these procedures don’t resolve the problem, try using a different cable.
6
The port may be
improperly
configured.
VLAN configuration may affect the port operation. Use the access point’s console to see
how the port is configured for VLANs.
Make sure also, that the device at the other end of the connection is indicating a good
link to the access point. If it is not, the problem may be with the cabling between the
devices or the connectors on the cable.
Troubleshooting
Tip
4-4
Troubleshooting
Proactive Networking
Proactive Networking
The following interfaces provide tests, indicators, and an event log that can
be used to monitor the access point and its network connections and to help
you troubleshoot:
■
A graphical web browser interface that you can use to manage your access
point from a PC running a supported web browser, for example Microsoft
Internet Explorer.
The Status tab can be used to display access point configuration settings,
attached client station settings, and the event log.
■
A full-featured easy-to-use console interface that you can access by
connecting a standard terminal or PC running a terminal emulator to the
access point’s console port. (For information on the console port’s pin
assignments, see “Direct Console Access” on page 2-12.) The console
interface is also accessible through a Telnet connection.
The ping command can test device access and connectivity. The show
command at all levels of the CLI provides detailed access point configu­
ration information.
Troubleshooting
4-5
Troubleshooting
Hardware Diagnostic Tests
Hardware Diagnostic Tests
Testing the Access Point by Resetting It
If you believe that the access point is not operating correctly, you can reset
the access point to test its circuitry and operating code. To reset an access
point, either
Caution
■
Unplug and plug in the power cord (power-cycling).
■
Press the Reset button on the back of the access point for just a second.
If you are attached to the console port, you will see that the access point
starts the power-on self test.
If you hold the reset button down for 5-10 seconds, you reset the board and
reload the factory default settings. See “Restoring the Factory Default Config­
uration” on page 4-8.
Power-cycling the access point and pressing the Reset button both cause the
access point to perform its power-on self test, which normally resolves any
temporary operational problems. These reset processes also cause any
network traffic counters to be reset to zero, and cause the System Up Time
timer to reset to zero. Also, event log messages are erased, and the IP address
may be changed if you are using DHCP.
Checking the Access Point’s LEDs
The self test passes if the Power LED on the front of the access point stops
blinking after approximately 50 seconds. If this LED continues blinking longer
than 60 seconds or goes off, there may be a problem with the access point.
See “Diagnosing with the LEDs” on page 4-3 for information on interpreting
the LED patterns.
Troubleshooting
Checking Event Messages
Useful diagnostic messages may be displayed on the console screen when the
access point is reset. As described in chapter 2 under step 7, “Connect a
console to the access point,” connect a PC running a VT-100 terminal emulator
program or a standard VT-100 terminal to the access point’s Console Port and
configure it with the terminal communication settings shown on page 2-11.
4-6
Troubleshooting
Hardware Diagnostic Tests
Then, when you reset the access point, note the messages that are displayed.
Additionally, you can check the access point’s event log, which can be
accessed from the web browser or a Syslog server.
Testing Twisted-Pair Cabling
Network cables that fail to provide a link or provide an unreliable link between
the access point and the connected network device may not be compatible
with the IEEE 802.3 Type 10Base-T, or 100Base-TX standards. The twisted-pair
cables attached to the Access Point 420 must be compatible with the appro­
priate standards. To verify that your cable is compatible with these standards,
use a qualified cable test device.
Testing Access Point-to-Device Network
Communications
You can perform the following communication tests to verify that the network
is operating correctly between the access point and any connected device that
can respond correctly to the communication test.
■
Ping Test -- a network layer test used on IP networks that sends test
packets to any device identified by its IP address
These tests can be performed through the access point’s console interface
from a terminal connected to the access point or through a Telnet connection.
For more information, see the Management and Configuration Guide, which
is on the Documentation CD-ROM that came with your access point.
Testing End-to-End Network Communications
Both the access point and the cabling can be tested by running an end-to-end
communications test -- a test that sends known data from one network device
to another through the access point. You can run a Ping test to verify that the
entire communication path between the two network devices is functioning
correctly.
Troubleshooting
4-7
Troubleshooting
Restoring the Factory Default Configuration
Restoring the Factory Default
Configuration
As part of your troubleshooting process on the Access Point 420, it may
become necessary to return the access point’s configuration to the factory
default settings. This process momentarily interrupts the access point’s oper­
ation, clears any passwords, clears the console event log, resets the network
counters to zero, performs a complete self test, and reboots the access point
into its factory default configuration including deleting the IP address, if one
is configured.
N o t e
This process removes all access point configuration changes that you have
made from the factory default settings. This includes, for example, IP
addresses, and radio interface settings. Returning the configuration of these
features to their factory default settings may result in network connectivity
issues.
If the access point has a valid configuration, and you are restoring the factory
default settings for a reason other than configuration problems, you should
save the access point configuration prior to performing the factory default
reset. Then, after the reset and resolution of the original problem, you can
restore the saved configuration to the access point. For both the save and
restore processes, you can use the console copy command. For more informa­
tion on this command, see the Management and Configuration Guide, which
is on the Documentation CD-ROM that came with your access point.
You can restore the factory default configuration either from the access point
itself, or through the access point console.
To execute the factory default reset on the access point, perform these steps:
Troubleshooting
1. Using a pointed object, press and hold the Reset button on the back of the
access point for 5-10 seconds. On the console display, the cursor will move
down to the next line, indicating that the factory defaults have been
reloaded.
2.
Release the Reset button.
The access point will then complete its self test and begin operating with
its configuration restored to the factory default settings.
To restore the factory default configuration using the console, execute the
reset configuration command from the console command prompt.
4-8
Troubleshooting
Downloading New Access Point Software
Downloading New Access Point
Software
When product enhancements occur for the Access Point 420, new software
can be downloaded to the access point by several methods. For more infor­
mation, see the Management and Configuration Guide, which is on the
Documentation CD-ROM that came with your access point.
The new access point software is made available on the HP ProCurve web
site, http://www.hp.com/go/hpprocurve under “product support – software
upgrades.”
HP Customer Support Services
If you are still having trouble with your access point, Hewlett-Packard offers
support 24 hours a day, seven days a week through the use of a number of
automated electronic services. See the Customer Support/Warranty booklet
that came with your access point for information on how to use these services
to get technical support. The HP ProCurve web site, http://www.hp.com/go/
hpprocurve also provides up-to-date support information under “product
support.
Additionally, your HP-authorized network reseller can provide you with assis­
tance, both with services that they offer and with services offered by HP.
Before Calling Support
To make the support process most efficient, before calling your networking
dealer or HP Support, you first should retrieve the following information:
Information Item
Information Location
the front of the access point,
Access Point 420 (HP J8130A or HP J8131A)
• details about the access point’s status
including the software (OS) version, a
copy of the access point configuration,
a copy of the access point Event Log,
and a copy of the access point status
and counters information
• access point console (Global Configura­
tion Level): show command
• access point web interface: Event Log
• Syslog server entry file, if configured
4-9
Troubleshooting
• product identification
Troubleshooting
HP Customer Support Services
Information Item
Troubleshooting
• copy of your network topology map, including network addresses assigned to
the relevant devices
4-10
Information Location
your network records
A
Specifications
Specifications
Physical
Width:
21.83 cm (8.60 in)
Depth:
13.73 cm (5.40 in)
Height:
3.27 cm (1.29 in)
Weight:
0.80 kg (1.76 lbs)
Electrical
Adapter
AC voltage:
100-240 volts, 0.4A, 50/60 Hz
DC voltage:
3.3 volts, 4A
Power consumption:
13.2 watts
PoE (DC)
-48 VDC, 0.27A, 12.96 watts
Input voltage:
Note: Power can also be provided to the access point through the Ethernet
port based on IEEE 802.3af Power over Ethernet (PoE) specifications. When
both PoE is provided and the adapter is plugged in, PoE is turned off.
Environmental
Operating
Non-Operating
Temperature:
0°C to 40°C (32°F to 104°F)
-40°C to 70°C (-40°F to 158°F)
Relative humidity:
(non-condensing)
15% to 95% at 40°C (104°F)
90% maximum at 65°C (149°F)
Maximum altitude:
4.6 Km (15,000 ft)
4.6 Km (15,000 ft)
A-1
Specifications
Connectors
Specifications
■
The 10/100 Mbps RJ-45 twisted-pair port is compatible with the
IEEE 802.3u 100Base-TX and IEEE 802.3 Type 10Base-T standards.
Note: To provide Power over Ethernet to the access point, all 4 pairs of
wires must be connected for any network cable attached to this port.
Safety
Complies with:
■
LVD/EN 60950
EMC Compliance (Class B)
Complies with:
■
FCC Part 15.107
■
ICES-003 (Canada)
■
VCCI
Radio Signal Certification
Complies with:
■
FCC Part 15.247 (2.4GHz)
■
RSS-210 (Canada)
■
EN 300.328
■
MPT RCR std.33 (D33 1~13 Channel, T66 Channel 14)
Immunity
A-2
■
EN 301.489-1
■
EN 301.489-17
Specifications
Wireless
IEEE 802.11b/g
Radio Technology:
Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS),
Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM)
Data Rate:
1, 2, 5.5, 6, 9, 11, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, 54 Mbps per channel
Operating Frequency:
2.4 ~ 2.4835 GHz (US, Canada, ETSI)
2.4 ~ 2.497 GHz (Japan)
Maximum Channels:
FCC/IC: 1-11, ETSI: 1-13, MKK: 1-13 (802.11g), 1-14 (802.11b)
Modulation Type:
BPSK, QPSK, 16QAM, 64QAM / OFDM, BPSK, QPSK, CCK / DSSS
Media Access Protocol:
CSMA/CA with ACK
Operating Range:
Up to 350 m (1148 ft)
Transmit Output Power:
15 dBm
Specifications
Radio Standard:
Receiver Sensitivity
Data Rate (Mbps)
Typical Receiver Sensitivity (dBm)
1
-85
11
-80
54
-65
A-3
Specifications
Specifications
A-4
B
Access Point Port and Network Cables
This appendix includes access point connector information and network
cable information for cables that should be used with the Access Point 420,
including minimum pin-out information and specifications for twisted-pair
cables.
N o t e
Access Point Ports
The fixed RJ-45 10/100Base-TX port on the access point accepts 100-ohm
unshielded and shielded twisted-pair cable with RJ-45 connectors as
described on the next page.
Twisted-Pair Cables
10 Mbps Operation
Category 3, 4, or 5 100-ohm unshielded twisted-pair (UTP)
or shielded twisted-pair (STP) cable, complying with IEEE
802.3 Type 10Base-T specifications, fitted with RJ-45
connectors
100 Mbps Operation
Category 5 100-ohm UTP or STP cable, complying with
IEEE 802.3u 100Base-TX specifications, fitted with RJ-45
connectors
B-1
Access Point Port and
Network Cables
Incorrectly wired cabling is the most common cause of problems for LAN
communications. HP recommends that you work with a qualified LAN cable
installer for assistance with your cabling requirements.
Access Point Port and Network Cables
Twisted-Pair Cable/Connector Pin-Outs
Twisted-Pair Cable/Connector Pin-Outs
The access point includes one 10/100Base-TX port. This port uses MDI (i.e.,
internal straight-through) pin configuration. You can therefore use “straightthrough” twisted-pair cable to connect this port to most network interconnec­
tion devices such as a switch or a router that provide MDI-X ports. However,
if you need to connect the access point to a workstation or other device that
only has MDI ports, then use “crossover” twisted-pair cable.
Access Point Port and
Network Cables
Ports on most HP switches have the “HP Auto MDIX” feature, which means
that you can use either straight-through or crossover twisted-pair cables to
connect the access point to the switch.
Other Wiring Rules:
B-2
■
All twisted-pair wires used for 10 Mbps, and 100 Mbps operation must be
twisted through the entire length of the cable. The wiring sequence must
conform to EIA/TIA 568-B (not USOC). See “Twisted-Pair Cable Pin
Assignments” later in this appendix for a listing of the signals used on each
pin.
■
For 10 Mbps connections to the ports, you can use Category 3, 4, or 5
unshielded twisted-pair cable, as supported by the IEEE 802.3 Type
10Base-T standard.
■
For 100 Mbps connections to the ports, use 100-ohm Category 5 UTP or
STP cable only, as supported by the IEEE 802.3u Type 100Base-TX stan­
dard.
■
To provide Power over Ethernet to the access point, all 4 pairs must be
connected for any network cable attached to this port; the cable must
meet ISO/DIS 11801 Class D requirements and IEEE 802.3af requirements.
Access Point Port and Network Cables
Twisted-Pair Cable/Connector Pin-Outs
Straight-Through Twisted-Pair Cable for
10 Mbps or 100 Mbps Network Connections
Because the 10/100 port on the access point uses an MDI pin configuration,
you must use “straight-through” cable for network connections to hubs or
switches that only have MDI-X ports. However, if the device to which you are
connecting supports auto-MDIX operation, you can use either “straightthrough” or “crossover” cable.
Cable Diagram
Access Point Port and
Network Cables
N o t e
Pins 1 and 2 on connector “A” must be wired as a twisted pair to pins 1 and 2
on connector “B”.
Pins 3 and 6 on connector “A” must be wired as a twisted pair to pins 3 and 6
on connector “B”.
Pins 4, 5, 7, and 8 are not used for transmitting or receiving data, although they
must be wired straight-through in the cable to support Power over Ethernet.
.
Pin Assignments
Access Point End (MDI)
Hub or Switch Port, or Other
MDI-X Port End
Signal
Pins
Pins
Signal
receive +
receive transmit +
transmit -
1
2
3
6
1
2
3
6
transmit +
transmit receive +
receive -
B-3
Access Point Port and Network Cables
Twisted-Pair Cable/Connector Pin-Outs
Crossover Twisted-Pair Cable for
10 Mbps or 100 Mbps Network Connection
Because the 10/100 port on the access point uses an MDI pin configuration,
you must use “crossover” cable for network connections to PCs, servers or
other end nodes that only have MDI ports. However, if the device to which you
are connecting supports auto-MDIX operation, you can use either “straightthrough” or “crossover” cable.
Access Point Port and
Network Cables
Cable Diagram
N o t e
Pins 1 and 2 on connector “A” must be wired as a twisted pair to pins 3 and 6
on connector “B”.
Pins 3 and 6 on connector “A” must be wired as a twisted pair to pins 1 and 2
on connector “B”.
Pins 4, 5, 7, and 8 are not used for transmitting or receiving data, although they
must be wired straight-through in the cable to support Power over Ethernet.
.
Pin Assignments
B-4
Access Point End (MDI)
Computer, Transceiver, or
Other MDI Port End
Signal
Pins
Pins
Signal
receive +
receive transmit +
transmit -
1
2
3
6
6
3
2
1
transmit transmit +
receive receive +
C
Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements
Safety Information
!
Documentation reference symbol. If the product is marked with this
symbol, refer to the product documentation to get more information
about the product.
WARNING
A WARNING in the manual denotes a hazard that can cause injury
or death.
CAUTION
A CAUTION in the manual denotes a hazard that can damage
equipment.
Do not proceed beyond a WARNING or CAUTION notice until you
have understood the hazardous conditions and have taken appro­
priate steps.
For LAN cable grounding:
■
If your LAN covers an area served by more than one power distribu­
tion system, be sure their safety grounds are securely interconnected.
■
LAN cables may occasionally be subject to hazardous transient voltages (such as lightning or disturbances in the electrical utilities power
grid). Handle exposed metal components of the network with caution.
Servicing
There are no user-serviceable parts inside this product. Any servicing, adjust­
ment, maintenance, or repair must be performed only by service-trained
personnel.
This product does not have a power switch; it is powered on when the power
cord is plugged in.
C-1
Safety and EMC Regulatory
Statements
Grounding
This product is a safety class I compliant product and has a protective earthing
terminal. There must be an uninterruptible safety earth ground from the main
power source to the product's power cord or supplied power cord set.
Whenever it is likely that the protection has been impaired, disconnect the
power cord until the ground has been restored..
Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements
Safety Information
Regulatory Model Identification Number
Safety and EMC Regulatory
Statements
For regulatory identification purposes, this product has been assigned a
Regulatory Model Number (RMN). The RMN for your product is RSVLC0301. The RMN should not be confused with the marketing name (Wireless
Enterprise Access Point 420) or the Product Number (J8130A, J8131A).
C-2
Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements
Informations concernant la sécurité
Informations concernant la sécurité
!
Symbole de référence à la documentation. Si le produit est marqué de
ce symbole, reportez-vous à la documentation du produit afin d'obtenir
des informations plus détaillées.
WARNING
Dans la documentation, un WARNING indique un danger susceptible
d'entraîner des dommages corporels ou la mort.
CAUTION
Un texte de mise en garde intitulé CAUTION indique un danger suscep­
tible de causer des dommages à l'équipement.
Ne continuez pas au-delà d'une rubrique WARNING ou CAUTION avant
d'avoir bien compris les conditions présentant un danger et pris les
mesures appropriées.
Cet appareil est un produit de classe I et possède une borne de mise à la terre. La source
d'alimentation principale doit être munie d'une prise de terre de sécurité installée aux
bornes du câblage d'entrée, sur le cordon d'alimentation ou le cordon de raccordement
fourni avec le produit. Lorsque cette protection semble avoir été endommagée,
débrancher le cordon d'alimentation jusqu'à ce que la mise à la terre ait été réparée.
Mise à la terre du câble de réseau local:
si votre réseau local s'étend sur une zone desservie par plus d'un système de
distribution de puissance, assurez-vous que les prises de terre de sécurité
soient convenablement interconnectées.
■
Les câbles de réseaux locaux peuvent occasionnellement être soumis à des
surtensions transitoires dangereuses (telles que la foudre ou des perturba­
tions dans le réseau d'alimentation public). Manipulez les composants
métalliques du réseau avec précautions.
Aucune pièce contenue à l'intérieur de ce produit ne peut être réparée par l'utilisateur.
Tout dépannage, réglage, entretien ou réparation devra être confié exclusivement à un
personnel qualifié.
Cet appareil ne comporte pas de commutateur principal ; la mise sous tension est
effectuée par branchement du cordon d'alimentation.
C-3
Safety and EMC Regulatory
Statements
■
Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements
Hinweise zur Sicherheit
Hinweise zur Sicherheit
!
Symbol für Dokumentationsverweis. Wenn das Produkt mit diesem
Symbol markiert ist, schlagen Sie bitte in der Produktdokumentation
nach, um mehr Informationen über das Produkt zu erhalten.
WARNING
Eine WARNING in der Dokumentation symbolisiert eine Gefahr, die
Verletzungen oder sogar Todesfälle verursachen kann.
CAUTION
CAUTION in der Dokumentation symbolisiert eine Gefahr, die dis
Gerät beschädigen kann.
Fahren Sie nach dem Hinweis WARNING oder CAUTION erst fort,
nachdem Sie den Gefahrenzustand verstanden und die entsprech­
enden Maßnahmen ergriffen haben.
Dies ist ein Gerät der Sicherheitsklasse I und verfügt über einen schützenden Erdung­
sterminal. Der Betrieb des Geräts erfordert eine ununterbrochene Sicherheitserdung
von der Hauptstromquelle zu den Geräteingabeterminals, den Netzkabeln oder dem
mit Strom belieferten Netzkabelsatz voraus. Sobald Grund zur Annahme besteht, daß
der Schutz beeinträchtigt worden ist, das Netzkabel aus der Wandsteckdose herausz­
iehen, bis die Erdung wiederhergestellt ist.
Safety and EMC Regulatory
Statements
Für LAN-Kabelerdung:
■
Wenn Ihr LAN ein Gebiet umfaßt, das von mehr als einem Stromverteilungs­
system beliefert wird, müssen Sie sich vergewissern, daß die
Sicherheitserdungen fest untereinander verbunden sind.
■
LAN-Kabel können gelegentlich gefährlichen Übergangsspannungen aus­
gesetzt werden (beispielsweise durch Blitz oder Störungen in dem
Starkstromnetz des Elektrizitätswerks). Bei der Handhabung exponierter
Metallbestandteile des Netzwerkes Vorsicht walten lassen.
Dieses Gerät enthält innen keine durch den Benutzer zu wartenden Teile. Wartungs-,
Anpassungs-, Instandhaltungs- oder Reparaturarbeiten dürfen nur von geschultem
Bedienungspersonal durchgeführt werden.
Dieses Gerät hat keinen Netzschalter; es wird beim Anschließen des Netzkabels
eingeschaltet.
C-4
Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements
Considerazioni sulla sicurezza
Considerazioni sulla sicurezza
!
Simbolo di riferimento alla documentazione. Se il prodotto è contras­
segnato da questo simbolo, fare riferimento alla documentazione sul
prodotto per ulteriori informazioni su di esso.
WARNING
La dicitura WARNINGdenota un pericolo che può causare lesioni o
morte.
CAUTION
La dicituraCAUTION denota un pericolo che può danneggiare le
attrezzature.
Non procedere oltre un avviso di WARNING o di CAUTIONprima di
aver compreso le condizioni di rischio e aver provveduto alle misure
del caso.
Questo prodotto è omologato nella classe di sicurezza I ed ha un terminale protettivo
di collegamento a terra. Dev'essere installato un collegamento a terra di sicurezza, non
interrompibile che vada dalla fonte d'alimentazione principale ai terminali d'entrata,
al cavo d'alimentazione oppure al set cavo d'alimentazione fornito con il prodotto.
Ogniqualvolta vi sia probabilità di danneggiamento della protezione, disinserite il cavo
d'alimentazione fino a quando il collegaento a terra non sia stato ripristinato.
■
se la vostra LAN copre un'area servita da più di un sistema di distribuzione
elettrica, accertatevi che i collegamenti a terra di sicurezza siano ben collegati
fra loro;
■
i cavi LAN possono occasionalmente andare soggetti a pericolose tensioni
transitorie (ad esempio, provocate da lampi o disturbi nella griglia d'alimen­
tazione della società elettrica); siate cauti nel toccare parti esposte in metallo
della rete.
Nessun componente di questo prodotto può essere riparato dall'utente. Qualsiasi
lavoro di riparazione, messa a punto, manutenzione o assistenza va effettuato esclusi­
vamente da personale specializzato.
Questo apparato non possiede un commutatore principale; si mette scotto tensione
all'inserirsi il cavo d'alimentazione.
C-5
Safety and EMC Regulatory
Statements
Per la messa a terra dei cavi LAN:
Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements
Consideraciones sobre seguridad
Consideraciones sobre seguridad
!
Símbolo de referencia a la documentación. Si el producto va
marcado con este símbolo, consultar la documentación del
producto a fin de obtener mayor información sobre el producto.
WARNING
Una WARNING en la documentación señala un riesgo que podría
resultar en lesiones o la muerte.
CAUTION
Una CAUTION en la documentación señala un riesgo que podría
resultar en averías al equipo.
No proseguir después de un símbolo de WARNING o CAUTION hasta
no haber entendido las condiciones peligrosas y haber tomado las
medidas apropiadas.
Este aparato se enmarca dentro de la clase I de seguridad y se encuentra protegido por
una borna de puesta a tierra. Es preciso que exista una puesta a tierra continua desde
la toma de alimentación eléctrica hasta las bornas de los cables de entrada del aparato,
el cable de alimentación o el juego de cable de alimentación suministrado. Si existe la
probabilidad de que la protección a tierra haya sufrido desperfectos, desenchufar el
cable de alimentación hasta haberse subsanado el problema.
Safety and EMC Regulatory
Statements
Puesta a tierra del cable de la red local (LAN):
■
Si la LAN abarca un área cuyo suministro eléctrico proviene de más de una
red de distribución de electricidad, cerciorarse de que las puestas a tierra
estén conectadas entre sí de modo seguro.
■
Es posible que los cables de la LAN se vean sometidos de vez en cuando a
voltajes momentáneos que entrañen peligro (rayos o alteraciones en la red
de energía eléctrica). Manejar con precaución los componentes de metal de
la LAN que estén al descubierto.
Este aparato no contiene pieza alguna susceptible de reparación por parte del usuario.
Todas las reparaciones, ajustes o servicio de mantenimiento debe realizarlos sola­
mente el técnico.
Este producto no tiene interruptor de potencia; se activa cuando se enchufa el cable
de alimentación.
C-6
Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements
Safety Information (Japan)
Safety Information (Japan)
Safety and EMC Regulatory
Statements
C-7
Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements
Safety Information (China)
Safety and EMC Regulatory
Statements
Safety Information (China)
C-8
Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements
EMC Regulatory Statements
EMC Regulatory Statements
Notice for U.S.A.
Manufacturer's FCC Declaration of Conformity Statement
Tested to Comply
with FCC Standards
Product No:
J8130A
FCC ID No:
HEDWA4101ACCAA
Manufacturer:
Hewlett-Packard Company
3000 Hanover Street
Palo Alto, CA 94304-1185 USA
Phone:
650-857-1501
For questions regarding this declaration, contact the Product Regulations
Manager at the above address or phone number.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class
B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are
designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a
residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio
frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with instruc­
tions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However,
there is no guarantee that the interference will not occur in a particular
installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or
television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off
and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more
of the following measures:
■
■
■
■
Reorient the receiving antenna
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to
which the receiver is connected
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help
C-9
Safety and EMC Regulatory
Statements
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to
the following two conditions: 1) this device may not cause harmful interfer­
ence, and 2) this device must accept any interference received, including
interference that may cause undesired operation.
Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements
EMC Regulatory Statements
The FCC requires the user to be notified that any changes or modifications
made to the device that are not expressly approved by the Hewlett-Packard
Company may void the user's authority to operate the equipment.
!
Warning: Exposure to Radio Frequency Radiation
The radiated output power of this device is below the FCC radio
exposure limits. Nevertheless, the device should be used in such
a manner that the potential for human contact during normal
operation is minimized. To avoid the possibility of exceeding the
FCC radio frequency exposure limits, human proximity to the
antennas should not be less than 20 cm (8 inches) during normal
operation.
Notice for Canada
This device complies with the limits for a Class B digital device and conforms
to Industry Canada standard ICES-003. Products that contain a radio trans­
mitter comply with Industry Canada standard RSS210 and are labeled with an
IC approval number.
Safety and EMC Regulatory
Statements
Cet appareil numérique de la classe B est conforme à la norme ICES-003 de
Industry Canada. La radio sans fil de ce dispsitif est conforme à la certification
RSS 210 de Industry Canada et est étiquetée avec un numéro d'approbation IC.
This device complies with the Class B limits of Industry Canada. Operation
is subject to the following two conditions: 1) this device may not cause harmful
interference, and 2) this device must accept interference received, including
interference that may cause undesired operation.
C-10
Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements
EMC Regulatory Statements
Notice for European Community
0560
!
This device complies with the EMC Directive 89/336/EEC, Low Voltage Direc­
tive 73/23/EEC and R&TTE Directive 1999/5/EC. Compliance with these
directives implies conformity to the following European Norms:
•
EN 55022 (CISPR 22) - Electromagnetic Emissions
•
EN 55024 (IEC 61000-4-2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 11) - Electromagnetic Immunity
•
EN 61000-3-2 (IEC 61000-3-2) - Power Line Harmonics
•
EN 61000-3-3 (IEC 61000-3-3) - Power Line Flicker
•
EN 60950 (IEC 60950) - Product Safety
•
EN 300 328-1 / EN 300 328-2 - Technical requirements for 2.4 GHz radio
equipment
•
EN 301 489-1 / EN 301 489-17 - General EMC requirements for radio
equipment
EU country restriction notices
This device may be used in the following EU and EFTA countries:
Austria
Belgium
Denmark
Finland
France1
•
•
•
•
•
Germany
Greece
Iceland
Ireland
Italy
•
•
•
•
•
Liechtenstein
Luxembourg
Netherlands
Norway
Portugal
•
•
•
Sweden
Switzerland
United Kingdom
Notes:
1. For normal wireless LAN operation of this device, only a limited band is
available for operation in France (Channels 10, 11, 12, and 13). L'Autorité
de régulation des telecommunications (ART) has special regulations for
hotspots allowing other channels, too. Please check with ART (http://
www.art-telecom.fr) for local rulings and authorization.
2. For up-to-date information on worldwide country authorizations, power
levels and usage restrictions, please visit http://www.hp.com/go/
hpprocurve. Click on technical support, then manuals. Select your wireless product and open the document Wireless Radio Country Approvals
Matrix.
C-11
Safety and EMC Regulatory
Statements
•
•
•
•
•
Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements
EMC Regulatory Statements
EU Declaration of Conformity
DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY
according to ISO/IEC Guide 22 and EN 45014
Manufacturer's Name:
Hewlett-Packard Company
Manufacturer's Address: 8000 Foothills Blvd.
Roseville, CA 95747-5502
U.S.A.
declares, that the product
Product Name:
HP Procurve Wireless Access Point 420
Product Number(s):
J8131A
Regulatory Model:
RSVLC-0301
conforms to the following Product Specifications:
Safety and EMC Regulatory
Statements
Safety:
EN 60950:2000 / IEC 60950:1999
Health:
EU 1999/519/EC
EMC:
EN 55022:1998 +A1 / CISPR 22:1997 +A1 Class B
EN 55024:1998 +A1 / CISPR 24:1997 +A1
EN 301 489-1 V1.4.1 (2002-08)
EN 301 489-17 V1.2.1 (2002-08)
EN 61000-3-2:2000 / IEC 61000-3-2:2000
EN 61000-3-3:1995 +A1 / IEC 61000-3-3:1994 +A1
Radio:
EN 300 328-1 V1.3.1 (2001-12)
EN 300 328-2 V1.2.1 (2001-12)
1
Supplementary Information:
The product herewith complies with the requirements of the Low Voltage Directive
73/23/EEC, the EMC Directive 89/336/EEC and the R&TTE Directive 1999/5/EC and
carries the CE marking accordingly.
1) The Product was tested in a typical configuration with a laptop computer.
Roseville, August 6, 2003
European Contact: Your local Hewlett-Packard Sales and Service Office or Hewlett-Packard GmbH, Department
HQ-TRE, Herrenberger Straße 140, D-71034 Böblingen (FAX: + 49-7031-14-3143)
C-12
Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements
EMC Regulatory Statements
Notice for Japan
Safety and EMC Regulatory
Statements
C-13
Safety and EMC Regulatory
Statements
Safety and EMC Regulatory Statements
EMC Regulatory Statements
C-14
Index
Numerics
10/100Base-TX
connections, length limitations … 2-4
ports, cables used with … 2-4
10/100Base-TX port
location on access point … 1-5
10/100-T LED … 1-4
behaviors … 1-4
A
access point
connecting to a power source … 2-9
description … 1-1
downloading new software … 4-9
electrical specifications … A-1
emmissions specifications … A-2
environmental specifications … A-1
features … 1-8
included parts … 2-1
LED descriptions … 1-4
mounting on a wall … 2-7
mounting on horizontal surface … 2-9
physical specifications … A-1
top panel description … 1-3
access point operation
verifying after installation … 2-5
antennas
location on access point … 1-5
auto MDI/MDI-X operation … B-3
B
C
cables
10/100Base-TX connections … 2-4
connecting cables to the access point
port … 2-10
effects of non-standard cables … 4-2
infrastructure requirements … 2-4
length limitations … 2-4
required types … 2-4
serial, for direct console connection … 2-12
cables, twisted pair
access point-to-computer connection … B-3
access point-to-switch or hub connection … B-4
category 3, 4, 5 … B-2
cross-over cable pin-out … B-4
MDI-X to MDI connections … B-3
MDI-X to MDI-X connections … B-4
pin-outs … B-3
straight-through cable pin-out … B-3
cables, twisted-pair
wiring rules … B-2
cables, twisted-pair connector pin-outs … B-2
cabling infrastructure … 2-4
CLI prompt, console
displaying … 2-13
command line interface
key command descriptions … 3-6
configuration
command line interface … 3-2
DHCP … 3-2
IP address, manually … 3-2
restoring factory defaults … 4-8
connecting the access point to a power source … 2-9
connector specifications … A-2
Index – 1
Index
back of access point
10/100Base-TX port … 1-5
console port … 1-6
description … 1-5
lock … 1-5
network port … 1-6
power connector … 1-6
basic access point configuration
command line interface … 3-2
basic troubleshooting tips … 4-1
blinking LEDs
error indications … 4-3
buttons
Reset button … 1-7
console
checking messages during
troubleshooting … 4-6
command line interface … 3-2
displaying the CLI prompt … 2-13
features … 2-11
how to connect in-band … 2-11
how to connect out-of-band … 2-11
serial cable connection … 2-12
Telnet access … 3-8
terminal configuration … 2-11
console port
location on access point … 1-5–1-6
cross-over cable
pin-out … B-4
D
DC power connector
location on back of access point … 1-5
description
access point … 1-1
back of access point … 1-5
LEDs … 1-4
top of access point … 1-3
DHCP
automatic access point configuration … 3-2
for in-band access … 2-11
diagnostic tests … 4-6
checking the console messages … 4-6
checking the LEDs … 4-6
end-to-end connectivity … 4-7
testing the access point only … 4-6
testing twisted-pair cabling … 4-7
downloading new access point software … 4-9
E
Index
electrical specifications, access point … A-1
EMC regulatory statements … C-9
emmissions specifications, access point … A-2
environmental specifications, access point … A-1
F
factory default configuration, restoring … 4-8
2 – Index
features
access point … 1-8
console … 2-11
front of access point
Reset button … 1-7
full-duplex fixed configuration
effects on network connections … 4-1
H
horizontal surface
mounting access point on … 2-9
I
in-band … 3-1
in-band console access
types of … 2-11
included parts … 2-1
installation
connecting the access point to a power
source … 2-9
horizontal surface mounting … 2-9
location considerations … 2-4
network cable requirements … 2-4
precautions … 2-3
site preparation … 2-4
summary of steps … 2-2
wall mounting … 2-7
L
LEDs
10/100-T … 1-4
behavior during self test … 2-6
blinking definition … 1-4
checking during troubleshooting … 4-6
descriptions of … 1-4
error indications … 4-3
location on access point … 1-3
on access point … 1-4
Power … 1-4
behavior during self test … 2-6
Self Test
behavior during self test … 2-6
Wireless … 1-4
length limitations
10/100Base-TX connections … 2-4
location for the access point, considerations … 2-4
lock
location on access point … 1-5
M
MDI-X to MDI network cable … B-3
MDI-X to MDI-X network cable … B-4
mounting the access point
on a horizontal surface … 2-9
on a wall … 2-7
precautions … 2-7
N
network cables
10/100Base-TX connections … 2-4
required types … 2-4
twisted-pair connector pin-outs … B-2
twisted-pair, wiring rules … B-2
network devices
connecting to the access point … 2-10
network ports
connecting to … 2-10
location on access point … 1-6
standards compliance … A-2
types of … 2-4
non-standard network cables, effects … 4-2
O
ports
10/100Base-TX, location on access point … 1-5
connecting to … 2-10
console … 2-11
network connections … 2-10
power connector … 1-6
Power LED … 1-4
behavior during factory default reset … 4-8
behavior during self test … 2-6
behaviors … 1-4
location on access point … 1-3
power source
connecting the access point to … 2-9
precautions
mounting the access point … 2-3
power requirements … 2-3
preparing the installation site … 2-4
Proactive Network tools
diagnostics with … 4-5
R
regulatory statements … C-9
Reset button
description … 1-7
location on access point … 1-7
to delete password protection … 3-7
resetting the access point
factory default reset … 4-8
location of Reset button … 1-7
troubleshooting procedure … 4-6
out-of-band console access … 3-8
P
safety and regulatory statements … C-1
safety specifications … A-2
self test
LED behavior during … 2-6
Power LED behavior … 2-6
Self Test LED
behavior during self test … 2-6
serial cable
for direct console connection … 2-12
sides of access point
antennas … 1-5
Index
parts, included with the access point … 2-1
passwords
deleting with the Reset button … 3-7
if you lose the password … 3-7
physical specifications, access point … A-1
Ping test … 4-7
pin-outs
twisted-pair cables … B-2
PoE power connector
location on back of access point … 1-5
port LEDs
normal operation … 2-6
S
Index – 3
specifications
connectors … A-2
electrical … A-1
emmissions … A-2
environmental … A-1
physical … A-1
safety … A-2
wireless … A-3
straight-through cable
pin-out … B-3
summary
of access point installation … 2-2
of cables used with the access point … 2-4
T
Index
Telnet access to the console … 3-8
terminal configuration … 2-11
testing
access point operation … 4-6
access point-to-device communications … 4-7
checking the console messages … 4-6
checking the LEDs … 4-6
diagnostic tests … 4-6
end-to-end communications … 4-7
Ping test … 4-7
twisted-pair cabling … 4-7
tips for troubleshooting … 4-1
top of access point … 1-3
description … 1-3
LEDs … 1-4
topologies
effects of improper topology … 4-2
samples of … 2-14
4 – Index
troubleshooting … 4-1
basic tips … 4-1
checking the console messages … 4-6
checking the LEDs … 4-6
common network problems … 4-1
connecting to fixed full-duplex devices … 4-1
diagnostic tests … 4-6
effects of improper topology … 4-2
effects of non-standard cables … 4-2
Ping test … 4-7
Proactive Network tools … 4-5
restoring factory default configuration … 4-8
testing connections to other devices … 4-7
testing end-to-end communications … 4-7
testing the access point … 4-6
testing the twisted-pair cables … 4-7
twisted-pair cable
access point-to-computer connection … B-3
access point-to-switch or hub connection … B-4
cross-over cable pin-out … B-4
pin-outs … B-2–B-3
straight-through cable pin-out … B-3
testing … 4-7
V
VCCI compliance … C-13
VT-100 terminal
serial cable connection for … 2-12
W
wall
mounting access point on … 2-7
warranty … 1-ii
wireless infrastructure
topology with … 2-15
wireless infrastructure for roaming clients
topology with … 2-16
Wireless LED … 1-4
behaviors … 1-4
wireless specifications … A-3
wiring rules for twisted-pair cables … B-2
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