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00332
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DRAFT
INITIAL ASSESSMENTSTUDY
NAVY ASSESSMENTAND CONTROL
OF INSTALLATION POLLUTANTS (NACIP) PROGRAM
MCB CAMP LEJEUNE, NORTH CAROLINA
Prepared
for:
NAVAL FACILITIES ENGINEERING COMMAND
NAVAL ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUPPORT ACTIVITY
Prepared
by:
WATER AND AIR RESEARCH, INC.
Gainesville,
Florida
June 1982
WAR Project
No. 7188-020
0033%
[IAS-CLJ.llTOC.1
6/22/82
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section
Page
FOREWORD
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
1.0
INTRODUCTION
1.1
1.2
1.3
PURPOSE OF INITIAL ASSESSMENTSTUDY
SEQUENCEOF EVENTS
SUBSEQUENTNACIP STUDIES
2.0
SIGNIFICANT FINDINGS
3.0
CONCLUSIONS
4.0
RECOMMENDATIONS
4.1
4.2
5.0
OVERVIEW OF THE RECOMMENDATIONSPROCESS
SPECIFIC RECOMMENDATIONBY SITE
BACKGROUND
5.1
5.2
5.3
GENERAL
HISTORY
PHYSICAL FEATURES
5.3.1
5.3.2
5.3.3
5.3.4
Climatoloev
ToI lography
_
Geolog z
Hvdrol -0gy
5.3.4.1
5.3.4.2
5.3.4.3
5.4
Surface Water
Ground Water
Migration
Potential
BIOLOGICAL FEATURES
5.4.1
Terrestrial
5.4.1.1
5.4.1.2
5.4.1.3
5.4.1.4
Ecosystems
Longleaf
Pine
Loblolly
Pine
Loblolly
Pine/Hardwood
Oak/Hickory
[IAS-CLJ.llLOT.1
6/24/82
LIST
Table
OF TABLES
No.
Title
at
Page
2-1
Disposal
Sites
2-2
Pesticide
Day-Care
Levels
Center
2-3
Volatile
Organic
Contaminant
Well Nos. 15 and 16 at Rifle
Dump (in ppb) March 30, 1981
2-4
Volatile
Organic
Contaminant
Levels
in Test
Well Nos. 15 and 16 and Potable
Wells
at Rifle
Range (in ppb) April
10, 1981
2-5
Volatile
Organic
Contaminant
Well Nos. 15 and 16 at Rifle
Dump (in ppb) May 20, 1981
5-1
State
and
for North
5-2
Proposed
Protected
Carolina
Listing
Occur in Carteret,
Onslow Counties
5-3
Comments
on Sensitive
Species
Occurrence
Within
Study Area
Complex)
6-1
Constituents
6-2
Water
6-3
Total
Trihalomethane
Values
at Rifle
Range,
Camp Lejeune,
(in mb)
in
6-4
Trihalomethane
1982 (in mg/l)
at
6-5
Results
of Application
Study Ranking
System
Federal
Carolina
Treatment
in
Camp Lejeune
in
(in
Soil
ppm)
at
Status
of
Complex
Camp Lejeune
Levels
Range
Levels
Range
in Test
Chemical
in Test
Chemical
Sensitive
Species
Plant
List
for North
Only Those Taxa Known to
Craven,
Jones,
or
Waste
Oil,
Regarding
(Camp Lejeune
Camp Lejeune,
1981
at MCB Camp Lejeune
(Tml)
Levels
of
to
Part
Sites
Treated
Water
1981 and 1982
MCB Camp Lejeune,
1 Confirmation
[IAS-CLJ.llLOF.1
6/24/82
LIST
Figure
OF FIGURES
Page
Title
No.
2-1
Site
Locations
at MCB Camp Lejeune
2-2
Site
Locations
at Midway
2-3
Site
Locations
at Open
2-4
Site
Locations
at Montford
2-5
Site
Locations
at Hadnot
Point
2-6
Site
Locations
at
Combat
Town Training
2-7
Site
Locations
at
Geiger
Area
A
2-8
Site
Locations
at
Geiger
Area
B
2-9
Site
Locations
at
MCAS New River
2-10
Site
Locations
Training
Area
at Engineer
2-11
Site
Locations
at
Rifle
2-12
Site
Locations
at
HOLF Oak Grove
2-13
Physical
Site
69
5-l
Regional
Climatic
Conditions
of MCB Camp Lejeune
5-2
Surface
Point,
Water Drainage
MCB Camp Lejeune
Sub-Basins
5-3
Surface
River,
Water Drainage
MCB Camp Lejeune
Sub-Basin
5-4
Geologic
Cross Section
from
to Carteret
County,
N.C.
Wayne
5-5
Geologic
Cross
N.C. to Onslow
Section
County,
Cumberland
5-6
New River
Geology
Features
Area
Park
Housing
Storage
Area
Area
Point
and Vicinity
Area
and Amphibious
Range
Area
and Locator
from
N.C.
Map for
in
the
Vicinity
at Hadnot
at
MCAS New
County,
N.C.
County,
[IAS-CLJ.llLOF.2
6/24/82
LIST OF FIGURES
(Continued,
Page 2 of
Figure
2)
Title
No.
Page
5-7
Water
River
Quality
Classifications
at MCB Camp Lejeune
5-8
Wildlife
5-9
Red-Cockaded
Camp Lejeune
6-1
Site
No.
1 - Midway
Park
6-2
Site No.
Building
Foreground
2 - Nursery
712--Water
Day-Care
Treatment
6-3
Site
6 - Storage
6-4
Site No. 9 - Fire Fighting
Training
Pit near
Piney
Green Road--Oil
Water Separation
in
Foreground
6-5
Site No.
Asbestos
16 - Montford
Pipe Insulation
6-6
Site
No.
22 - Industrial
Area
Tank
6-7
Site
No.
24 - Industrial
Area
Fly
6-8
Site
No.
28 - Hadnot
Point
6-9
Site
No.
35 - Geiger
Area
6-10
Site No. 41 - Camp Geiger
Trailer
Park
6-11
Site No. 45 - Campbell
Storage
Area
6-12
Site
No.
54 - Crash
Crew Fire
6-13
Site
No.
68 - Rifle
Range
6-14
Site
No.
Discarded
Units
No.
for
the
New
at MCB Camp Lejeune
Woodpecker
Colony
Areas
at
Center
Plant
at
in
MCB
Dump
Lots
201-202
Point
Burn
Burn
Fuel
Cump Showing
Farm
Ash Dump
Dump
Farm
Dump Near
Street
the
Underground
Training
Fuel
Burn
Pit
Dump
Range Chemical
69 - Rifle
Gas Detection
Kits
Dump Showing
Naval
l-hvironmcntal
FOREWORD
Protection
Su]‘port
Scwicc
The Navy initiated
the
Navy
Assessment
and Control
of
Installation
Pollutants
(NACIP)
program
in OPNAVNOTE 6240 ser 45/733503
of
11 September
1980.
The purpose
of the program
is to systematically
idenassess,
and control
contamination
of the environment
resulting
from
tify,
past hazardous
materials
management
operations.
An Initial
Assessment
Study (IAS)
was performed
at Marine
Corps Base
Camp Lejeune,
Jacksonville,
North
Carolina,
by a team
of specialists
under
the direction
of the Naval
Energy
and Environmental
Support
Activity
(NEESA),
Port
Hueneme,
California.
Further
confirmation
studies
under
the NACIP program
were recommended
at several
areas at the activity.
Sections
dealing
with significant
findings,
conclusions,
and recomThe later
mendations
are presented
in the earlier
section
of the report.
technical
sections
provide
more in-depth
discussion
on important
aspects
of the study.
Questions
regarding
the NACIP
program
should
be referred
to the
NACIP
Program
Director,
NEESA (Code
112N),
Fort
Hueneme,
CA 93043,
Further
AUTOVON 360-3351,
FTS 799-3351,
or commercial
(805)
982-3351.
information
regarding
this
study
may be obtained
from Mr. Bill
Powers,
NACIP Program
Director
at the above numbers.
Daniel
Naval
L. Spiegelberg,
LCDR, CEC, USN
Environmental
Officer
Energy
and Environmental
Support
Activity
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.4]1/INTRO.l
6/11/82
1.0
INTRODUCTION
1.1
PURPOSE
OF INITIAL
As directed
purpose
of
imminent
IAS
by CNO,
the
45/733503
of
conjunction
and
the
and
materials
STUDY
people
of
with
NACIP
conducts
evidence
on or off
which
transfer,
1980
IASs.
which
has
the
indicates
The
objective
of
contamination
processing,
initiated
from
and disposal
by OPNAVNOTE
and Marine
The
an installation.
environmental
has been
11 September
all
program,
controlling
program
OESO,
evaluate
located
storage,
The NACIP
30 January
1.2
for
phase
hazardous
in
collect
assessing,
operations.
ser
to
bazard
first
identifying,
past
NEESA,
an IAS is
health
is
ASSESSMENT
Corps
Order
6240
6280.1
of
1981.
SEQUENCE OF EVENTS
1.
MCB Camp Lejeune
ser
was designated
4511397464
Helicopter
of
Outer
August
1981.
Landing
Field
The environmental
Inc.
3.
The
Commanding
Facilities
Division
Lejeune
(Appendix
for
the
for
A to
LANTDIV
staff
Jerry
Putnam,
5.
1982
same
review
briefed
Steinberg,
Wallace
Research,
October
1981.
was notified
via
selection
to
Atlantic
of
MCB Camp
Plan
Support
to
Requirements
outline
personnel,
IAS
NACIP
Eakes,
WAR Project
in
Management
by the
on the
and Air
installation
guidelines
for
by Mr.
the
Program
the
IAS is
(NAVFACENGCOM),
and Activity
to
provide
were
and request
team.
program
and
NEESA Project
Coordinator,
and
the
IAS on
Officer,
Dr.
Hugh
WAR Team Leader.
MCAS Commanding
the
forwarded
scope,
information
Dr.
Command
NEESA 20.2-035)
IAS were
IAS
MCB Camp Lejeune
The NACIP
this
Oak Grove.
the
and by NEESA of
an IAS.
advance
25 January
of
in
of Water
conduct
Engineering
(LANTDIV),
assessment
4.
Officer
Included
firm
to
an IAS by CNO letter
(HOLF)
consulting
(WAR) was selected
Naval
for
team
Officer
and staff
on 26 January
1982.
received
the
same briefing
by
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.4]1/INTR0.2
6/11/82
6.
During
were
the
contacted
Agencies
a.
period
for
February
documents
contacted
1982
various
pertinent
to
government
the
IAS
agencies
effort.
included:
NAVFACENGCOM Historian,
(NCBC),
b.
8-25
Port
Naval
Hueneme,
NEESA Information
Construction
Battalion
Center
California;
Management
Department,
NCBC,
Port
Hueneme,
California;
c.
NEESA Information
Services
Department,
NCBC,
Port
Hueneme,
California;
d.
Installations
the
e.
f.
Planning
LANTDIV
Facilities
Utilities,
Energy,
Facilities
Management
Federal
East
Records
Point,
Archives,
h.
National
Archives
i.
Federal
5
Operational
Records
Division
Planning
and Real
Estate
Department;
Division
of
the
of
LANTDIV
Department;
Center,
Southeast
Washington,
Annex,
Service
Regional
Branch,
D.C.;
Suitland,
Center,
Archives,
Naval
Washington,
D.C.;
History
Office,
Aviation
Estate
Georgia;
National
k.
and Real
and Environmental
Service
!3*
Yard,
Division
Maryland;
Suitland,
History
Maryland;
Office,
Washington
Navy
Washington
Yard,
Navy
Washington,
D.C.;
1.
Naval
History
Collection,
m.
Division,
Washington
Department
of
Defense
Curator's
Navy
Branch,
Yard,
Explosive
Photographic
Washington,
Safety
D.C.;
Board,
Alexandria,
Virginia;
n.
Navy
0.
Marine
Bureau
Corps
Washington,
P*
4*
of Medicine
History
Sea Systems
Naval
Surface
Virginia;
Office,
Surgery,
Washington,
Washington
Navy
D.C.;
Yard,
D.C.;
Naval
Accident
and
Incident
Command,
Weapons
Data
Center
Bank
Safety
Ordnance
(NSWC),
(AID),
File
Dahlgren,
NSWC, Dahlgren,
(SAFEORD),
Virginia;
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.4]1/INTR0.3
6111182
r.
EPA Environmental
Farm,
7.
Virginia
NAVFAC Real
Estate
t.
USGS Public
Information
U.
NCIC,
15-24
Reston,
interviewed
visited
and past
employees,
potential
disposal
WAR personnel
Hugh
b.
Mr.
James
Nichols,
c.
Mr.
Michael
Hein,
d.
Mr.
William
Adams,
e.
Mr.
Charles
Fellows,
f.
Dr.
Jerry
Putnam,
and aerial
interviews.
affecting
through
recommendations
were
included
review
Headquarters,
1.3
SUBSEQUENT
for
study,
on the
conducted
1.
based
only
if
Sufficient
contaminated;
Eakes
in
of
NEESA
on-site
Author,
and
work:
biologist;
engineer;
P.E.,
were
chemist;
environmental
made
of
engineer.
MCB and the
specific
aerial
has been
obtained
significant
findings
25 October,
information,
and comment
Corps
for
Commandant
and
most
and
interview
recommendations.
conclusions,
final
by NEESA,
present
photographs,
and
this
field.
discovered
included
knowledge,
into
outer
information
sources
developed
and
report
LANTDIV,
and
document.
MCAS,
NAVFAC
staff.
STUDIES
Recommendations
is
Wallace
environmental
and Marine
NACIP
records,
hydrogeologist;
direct
information
team
scientist;
corroborate
Substantiation
field
environmental
Verification
with
1 April
and
period
examined
Report
environmental
to
the
participated
P.E.,
tours
made
the
Mr.
Team Leader,
documents.
This
sites.
Steinberg,
employees
Virginia;
during
current
Dr.
From
conducted
duties,
were
Hill
Virginia;
Reston,
Among other
a.
past
Office,
1982.
following
during
Alexandria,
were
the
Efforts
Vint
Virginia.
and
Ground
Center,
photos);
Office,
investigations
March
Interpretative
(aerial
s.
On-site
8.
Photo
the
next
phase
findings
of
an IAS concludes
evidence
and
exists
of
the
NACIP
an IAS.
program,
A Confirmation
a Confirmation
Study
is
that:
to
suspect
that
an installation
is
[IAS-CLJ.4]1/INTR0.4
DRAFT
6111182
2.
The contamination
a.
b.
If
the
these
NACIP
As explained
warranted.
presents
Health
of
civilians
within
the
base
Environment
criteria
are
within
not
met,
a definite
in
adjoining
fenceline,
or
danger
communities
to:
or
personnel
or;
outside
no further
the
installation.
studies
will
be conducted
under
program.
in
this
report,
a Confirmation
Study
at MCB Camp Lejeune
is
2.0
SIGNIFICANT FINDINGS
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.3]2/FINDINGS.l
6/23/82
2.0
SIGNIFICANT
Because
ized
it
is
so large,
Camp Lejeune
for
disposal.
dump sites
authorized
to
the
roads
for
Located
spreading
dust
at
72 sites
were
records
involved
judged
Overall,
most
and
more
of
the
Many
at
the
use of
borrow
POL compounds
on
sites
the
buried.
throughout
the
Farms,
material
there
have
significant
been
releases
to
factors
migration.
therefore
wastes
activity,
Air
are
POT,
and hydraulic
POL spills
Station
either
in
contain
solvents,
unavoidable
of
do
and at MCAS
confirmation
Point
such
migration,
received
oils,
generate
human
analysis.
industrial
Hadnot
been
enough
which
sites
potentially
confirmation
as needing
have
At the
for
waste
of
and
potential
fuels,
base.
risk
are
former
contaminant
had
base
These
by considering
Some 17 sites
judged
There
place.
with
no significant
and areas
of
OLF Oak Grove,
Assessments
for
dumps
much
the
made
i.e.,
contaminated
JP-5
dumped
of
to
and
took
2-1.
analysis,
old
of
were
Fuel
present
evaluated.
home of
that
part
and other
interviews
Figure
and reasonable
compounds--mainly
and
to
be further
warranted
and Camp
Avgas,
concern
about
large
numbers
and
Mogas,
the
ground-
of
tracked
or
aquifer.
Training
functions
and wheeled
operations
This
past
potential
New River.
use local-
was not
surface,
disposal
and
material
and thus
water
of waste
been
Point,
to
every
MCAS New River
have
to
about
solvents
risk
materials
JP-4
oils,
including
through
hazardous
Geiger
ground
or environmental
need
leaks
on the
in
sites
though,
in
indicated
of
waste,
dumping
are
as type
fluids
waste
some form
They
employees.
Hadnot
of
Camp Lejeune,
at which
health
disposal
has had
control.
documented
Most
from
historically
All
Indiscriminate
ranged
pits,
were
waste
areas.
installation
not
FINDINGS
has
separators
on the
vehicles.
were
been
has
either
In
base
the
dumped
stopped
and
been
instituted.
require
past,
waste
on the
a pollution
use of
ground
oils
or
abatement
from
put
maintenance
into
storm
drains.
program
using
oil-water
At MCAS New River,
waste
oils,
solvents
LEGEND
++tSlTES
FI GURE
ivater
SELECTED
2-1.
FOR
CONFIRMATION
Site Locations at MCB Camp Lejeune
and Air Research,
Inc.
\. -../
\
Consulting
Environmental
Engineers
and
Scientist:
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.3]2/FINDINGS.2
6/23/82
and other
compounds
River.
them
of
to
were
Another
practice
control
dust
contaminated
used
crash
each
Since
the
have
been
known,
was constructed
involve
used,
buried
test
and
solvents
roads.
About
1,000
gallons
fluids,
paint
thinners,
the
and solvents
entered
New
and use
per
week
and other
were
There
now,
here.
Although
have
base
requires
but
chemicals
is
and still
are
a separate
area
amounts
been
in
is
the
all
types
past
the
It
it
the
chemicals
lost.
although
installed
chemicals
site
been
Because
of
disposal
some of
have
involved,
wastes.
wells
large
One principal
is
of
194Os,
closed
other
pounds
is
is
of
are
not
recognized
groundwater
to
contamination
and an intermittent
sampling
instituted.
The mission
of
this
purpose
, year-round
have
a local
to
is
how much material
a concern,
program
in
identifying
of
oils,
and wasted.
were
hundreds
fuel,
Fuels
that
base.
The area
exactly
drains
and firefighting.
base
materials
storm
store
used.
on the
records
known
were
training
landfill.
to
crankcase
activity
hazardous
is
crew
stored,
chemical
was to
JP fuel,
POL compounds
for
released
on unimproved
assorted
for
often
blast
threaten
rounds
the
the
in
impact
effect
ground
contained
training
areas
on the
water.
areas
have
live
been
environment,
Skilled
where
using
ordnance.
set
but
aside.
they
EOD personnel
ordnance
is
Explosions
are
not
handle
either
For
burned
thought
unexploded
or
exploded
electrically.
The
Camp Lejeune
the
history
of
complex
the
regarding
the
may never
be found
gained
summary
Potential
of
the
from
of
base
location
for
wastes
of
little
disposal
have
been
170 square
dumped
dump sites
information
sites
nature
approximately
base
from
contamination
discontinuous
the
and much
recall,
all
covers
in
is
now known
existing
investigated
of
the
aquifer
of
confining
records.
at
areas.
Knowledge
Some sites
incomplete.
lacks
and over
detail.
Table
2-1
Most
presents
was
a
Camp Lejeune.
varies
layers.
many
miles
at
Camp Lejeune
Therefore
because
knowledge
of
[L~SUJ.~]HIB/~-1.6
6122182
Table 2-1. MSFZCXWI.
Sites at Cknp Lejeme Canplex (Cimtinwd, Page 6 of 7)
Site No.
Site Deaxiption
SpXid
w
cooxlinates
Dates used
57
my36Dump
TJIIdalm
Debris
58
MXSTalkTrainiKgArArea
lJldaown
Ta&~rts,udsxllmea~s
59
Mxs Infantry TraiIlirg
195Qs
sm
60
ExpkiveOr&anceMsposal
K-326 Rarge
1974~Present Burnpits
" 61
F&m&sPoint Rxd Emp
LJLdalm
62
RacecourseAreaIxmp
63
. _
Fig*
NO.*
76%+l9
P9
76%17
2-9
753424
2-9
818365
--
Bixmac wxte
799363
-
unlulom
Biwxxx wste
738447
-
Vemm~Ikmp
unknm
Bivouac wstes
757393
-
64
+xl.nesRoactSne&Ferry
Roazi-MogasSpill
1978
Mop spXllF&.
65
EI-gineerAreaDump
Pm-1958 to
I.972
66
k9GRACIanlirg
Storag Area
195~Present
67
Etngineers INC Burn Site
1951
TNT dispsal
68
RifleRargekIIp
1952-1972
Solvents, comtruuion
WI? sludge
Site ard
A?xa
trash
fk explc&ves
28, 1975
835297
240
lhrn area dump, constructiondebris
837293
HO
Oil s&l.ls,EOL,kattery
815285
2-10
acid
materials,
845284
-
748302
211
[IASxLJ*3]HTB/2-1.2
6/22/82
Table 2-1. Disposal Sites at Canp Lejeu-te Canplex (Contiti,
Site I%.
Site Desxiption
rkltes used
WterLal Deposited
Spedal
w
cooanates
FQ*
NO.*
12
Ekplc6iveOrdnanceDispxal
Early 196Qs Ordnance lurnd or explakd, colord
smkes, titephcsphms
925325
-
13
calf coursecorl3tnlction
1944
827437
-
lbp Site
._
Page 2 of 7)
Cfippirgs,
bra&m,
smeasphalt
.
14
KncIxArea Rip-Rap
1973
Broken concrete anl asphalt
809454
2-A
15
1%8-1958
Litter,
78%53
2-4
16
MM-ord Point Tkunp, Site B
.
Nxlthrd Point %Rn Dump,
Site A
1958-1972
Garlxge,wasteoils,
795450
2-4
17
kkmtford Point AreaRip-Rap
1968-
Concrete rubble
787446
2-4
18
~atldns Wllage (E) Site
1976-1978
ComtructiDnuaterialsand
19
NavalResearchLsblhmq
1956-1960
kkiioactive contminattrl animals,
mptytanks, sx-apurzQ.ls
848402
2-5
20
WwlResear&LabIndnerat~r
19561960
Saneash,debxis
850402
2-5
21
TramformrStmxgeLnt14
Pre1960 to
Present
PCBspill
863391
2-5
22
MusttialAreaTaxkFam
1979
Fi.d (hdcs)
864339
2-5
asphalt, STPsarxl
asbestos
&ris
853419
[TAS-cr.J.3~/~1.3
6/22/82
Table 2-1. Disposal. Sites at Cmp Lejeme Cauplec (Conti&,
Site No.
Site Desxiption
Page 3 of 7)
Lhtes used
23
RDadsarxi Cramds, Bldg. 1105
19573960
24
IrdustialAreaFlyAshIXmp
l!372Apprcx.
1980
&terialDepcsiteti
Pesticide, herbicide stmxge
862387
2-5
Flyashand cLnders,TJrp slulg,
SD sludg, constructiondebris
866380
2-5
25
BaseIndneramr
1%0-%60
Bumdtrash,meltedgbss
%3398
2-5
26
Coal StorzgeArea
Present
Cual stor~enmoEf
855383
2-5
27
NakJHcspitalAreaRQ-Rq
l970-
Corrcrete, granite rip-rap erasion
control
833337
2-5
2%
Hadnot Point Burnbmp
19S6-I.971
Solidmms,irdustialw3stes,
gxlage, trash,oil-kmed
pint
855364
2-5
29
Base sanitary
1972~Present &rbsg,constructiDnd&ris,
trash
88370
-
30
SneadsFerryRoadFwlTaxkSludgArea
1970
Sludg ~anfuelstmagetank,
[email protected]
ard related caqmmds
31
EngineerigStockadeG-4RargeRoad
1950early 1970s
Wasteoils
32
Frhs
19731979
33
OnslowBeachRoad
laIdfffl
crd
llllknom
Waste oil an3 d.&rs
general
89 8324
9Oi320-59327
--
856356
-
fir &stcontrol506298-917276
-
[IASUJ
.3]HwH
.4
6/22/82
Table 2-1. DisposalSites at CampLejeme Canplex (Continwxl, Page4 of 7)
Site N3.
Site Desxiption
Lkltes used
Spdd
Man,
cootinates
MaterialDepcsited
Fig*
No.*
Waateoil
¶ 5273
-
1957-1958
MO&= (spm)
756466
2-7
GeigerAreaSEDump
Late194&Late 195Ck
Mixed irdustrial
u&e
763462
2-7
GeigerAreaSurfaceDump
1950-1951
Motor~rts,garlage,wood
758vs
Ge$grCcmtructionknp
Present
Construction debris, branches
756469
39
GeigerCmstructionSlabDump
unknown
Concrete slabs
753468
40
GeigrAreaEkxrmHt
l969-
Auto p~rts,mztal
738+46
41
Camp*tier
&JF1%6-1970
Mixed irrlustrial ax-dImnicipal tastea,
RIL, &vents, old batteries
732442
42
Bldg. 705, B3Q&m-g
1950-1960
Trees, tree stumps, boards
773448
2-9
43
Agm street Borrow Pit
lJl.lhown
Boards, trash,WlYP slulg,
ffiterglass
766454
2-9
44
Jones Streetkmp
195Oi
Debris, cloth, boarda, old @r&cans
761455
2-9
45
Cqb&LStreetUn&rgrourl
Avgas StorzgeardAdjacent
JPFwlFarmatAirStation
1978
Avga,JP4arrIJP-5
754444
Et9
34
OceanDrive
35
Cei&zAreaFuelFa?m
36
37
.* 38
Dump
ardumicipd
slid
Table 2-1. Disposal Sites at Caq Lejeme Canplex (Continued, Page 5 of 7)
Site ND.
Site Description
rcwxs used
46
EASMainGateDump
47
MIS Rip-Rap lkar Stick Creek
48
%A5 Merarcy mmrpSite
19561966
*
49
Mxs Suspctd Minor lIlunq3
XAS snail-craft
R&-m
'* 50
Berthing
19584962
kterial
Spedal
Maq,
cooniinates
Depcsitsl
Fk*
NO.*
Corstructbn ard demlition
debris
755451
2-9
Comtruction and dmlition
d&is
777447
2-9
IxmplLrg of appozdmately 1 gal. xmmry
yzxly fbr appcoxbmtely 10 years
772438
2-9
unknuixl
Paint cans
774437
2-9
unknom
Dmmlition debris, asphalt, comete
777434
s-9
51
KAS Football Field
ApP=*
1967-1968
Paint cam, tfydra~Uc fluId cam
773433
2-9
52
ECASDirect Refuel Depot
197l
Aviation fuzl spIl1, JP f&s
762436
2-9
53
HAS Warel-mse Buildfng 3525
Area. oiledllods
1970-1975
Crankcase, kaste oils, Jp fuels,
pint thinners
755426-764430766427
2-9
54
Crash Crew Fire Trainirg
Burn Pit
755428
%9
55
M.r Station East Perimeter
195cS-1960
Barrels, tires, trash, metril plarkkg,
telqlone pks
774421
2-9
56
l.cAs oiled Rods to I+klriM
1975-
Crafkcase arrl Fsste oils, contaninakl
fuels
773423
2-9
195osPresent ContamLmted fuels, oil spills
DRp;ET
[IAsUJ.3]KIB/El.6
61'22182
Table 2-1.
Di.spal Sites at &up Lejeme Canplex (Continwd, Page 6 of 7)
Site No.
Site Desxiption
Spdal
Map
cooIrlinates
mtes used
57
my36Dump
Debris
58
MX!5TSdCTl-&IlirlgAr~
Tarkprts,nd~ellanea~s
59
I-as
60
Explo3iveOr&anceMsposal
Infantry
Trainirg
Area
trash
Stumps
Burnpfts
kx eqiLosivea
F%
No.*
76SGl9
2-9
768417
s-9
753424
Ii+9
818365
K-326 Barge
” 61
Rhxks Point W
Dump
unknm
Bivax
Gslste
799363
-
62
REcecQurseArea~
unknom
Bivousc mste
73%47
-
63
VenmnRoalIxmrp
unknm
Bivouac wstes
757393
-
64
I-JarinesRoad-SneadsFerry
R&33-McgasSpill
I978
MO&~ spXlFeb.
835297
2-l.o
65
EngineerAreaDump
Pre-1958 to
1972
837293
HO
66
f%flRACLamlirg Site ard
StmagpArea
195CkPresent oil spilla,R)L,trattezy
a.5285
2-10
67
Engineers WT Eiurn Site
1951
Tm disp3al
845284
68
RifleRangerkmp
1942-1972
Solxzmzs,constructionuaterials,
WrPsludg
748302
28, I975
Earn area dump, comtructiondebris
acid
-
241
[US-CW .3]H-lB/24.7
6f22/82
Table 2-l.
Disposal Sites at CampLejeme Canpler (Contirnxd, Page 7 of 7)
Site Desxiption
Site I&
mtes used
Spedal
M;p,
clcxxdinatea
kterialDepcsitcd
69
RifleRarge(JtmdcdDLrmp
Mid495Q3 to (chemical warfare trainkg) Gas
1976
testixg,Malathim,DDT,
KBs
70
&kGruveFieldSurfaceDump
194~195Cb
.
&ss hall wastes, cam, t&ties,
pxintcam
71
Oak Grove Burial Amp
194~195Qs
Carbge,cans
0akGrmGoalPile
1%0!3
Coalsbxageuse
qmrters
‘. 72
.
%ite Nos. l-72 are lmtal
on Figure 2-l.
old
ard bcttles
fixhzatirg
living
Fig*
No.*
770290
2-11
-
2-12
-
2-12
-
212
DRAFT
[US-CLJ.3]2/FINDINGS.3
6/23/82
nearby
geological
completely.
is
Geohydrology
water
generally
wells
at
moves
the
layer,
this
times
produce
base
and
The
following
Ranking
and
judgments
later
made
detailed
to
in
site
1.
Cautions
2.
Supporting
in
report.
information
information
water
may at
laterally
to surface
layer.
on consideration
of
Confirmation
within
section
is
these
extracted
from
reference
in
Section
of
activities
type
Study
which
on estimates
regarding
confining
(1)
included
limitations
the
semi-confined
As a minimum,
forms
ground
the
framework
this
in
for
The NACIP
in
that
Potable
confining
based
as the
this
regarding
in
the
migration.
Information
sections
demands
pressure
gaps
was used
made.
to voids
heavy
confirmation
for
(model)
were
or more
warrant
due
such
site
tributaries.
can migrate:
through
potential
System
Also,
of
is
and its
but,
contaminants
sites
material
deep,
a specific
complex
New River
decline
vertically
to evaluate
Lejeune
some risk.
an overall
(2)
needed
the
usually
Therefore,
water
of
toward
are
carries
aquifer.
of
conditions
one
should
6.6
be
for:
some quantities;
and dates
of
use,
and;
Site
3.
Locations
No.
1:
859458
that
according
Midway
Park
2-2).
It
(Figure
was excessed
construction
to
Dump--The
is
were
near
siding.
This
Amount
of material
in
retired
personnel.
The dump
200,000
cubic
of material.
100 to
the
total
200 cubic
this
value.
Site
No.
Special
yards
yards
site
the
is
would
Map coordinates
pesticides
of
various
kinds
Residuals
are
present
but
to
Center
were
percent
reliable
data
concern
to around
interviews
2-2).
handled,
from
which
1972.
to
was found
were
asbestos,
support
712)--This
From
is
with
100,000
do not
(Building
stored,
of
1960s
contain
Data
(Figure
and
information
0.1
be present.
on property
Building
material
despite
estimated
855441
College
early
No reliable
Nursery/Day-Care
2:
from
If
Map coordinates
now a park.
unknown,
asbestos.
landmarks.
Special
The only
was active
is
at
known
Community
and is
here.
dump
is
is
Cnslow
buried
asbestos
or other
site
by Camp Lejeune
debris
how much of
streets
1943
then
or refute
site
to
is
at
1958,
and dispensed
to quantify
as to
here.
r
MIDWAY
PARK
HOUSING
AREA
LEGEND
*l
*2
FIGURE
b’illc‘r
2-2.
c71lcf
,\ir
Site
Locations
Ilcscr‘arch.
at Midway
Inc.
Park
Housing
03
Midway
Park
Nursery/Day-Care
Old Creosote
04
Sawmill
Road
Dump
Center,
Building
712
Plant
Construction
Debris
Dump
Area
Consulting
Environmental
Engineers and
Scientir
[IAS-CLJ.3]2/FINDINGS.4
DRAFT
6123182
residuals
or
spill
significant
only
amounts
or used
Malathion,
Mirex,
2-2
April
1982.
No.
Storage
6:
coordinates
Lot
866406
203 was a dump.
was buried
and
is
unsuccessful.
80-
to
of
25 and
PCBs and DDT also
were
Reports
found.
the
referring
of white
site
194Os,
at
the
area
an unknown
to estimate
amount
is
in
of
Map
occupied
by
quantity
of DDT
been
to be within
an
Lots
203
201 and
Transformers
and there
on the
and spills.
have
assumed
The size
is
ground
containing
a possibility
to
fenced
225 square
Special
corner,
specifically
powder
the
pad covering;
program
is
respectively.
here
Lindane,
are
washout
sampling
the
Stored
approximately
received
dump marker.
stored
mixing
in
2,4-D.
areas
the
DDT was buried
46 acres,
No information
Dursban,
203--This
Attempts
where
radius
Dieldrin,
wash pad,
northeast
marked.
approximately
'spills.
the
and
a preliminary
In
used
Diazinon,
feet;
possibly
2-3).
Chemicals
Contaminated
the
201 and
In
The area
100-foot
of
(Figure
Baygon,
and
ditch
Lots
DDT,
square
feet;
results
found.
2,4,5-T.
6,300
drainage
presents
been
were
and
100 square
Table
Site
extent
Silvex,
An adjacent
not
Chlordane,
approximately
approximately
feet.
have
include
to a minor
playground,
is
volumes
of
PCB leaks
indicate
has
leaks
or
been
DDT spills
have
Road--This
site
occurred.
Site
at
No.
9:
Special
from
the
1960s
to
installed.
late
Site
196Os,
coordinates
Pit
868398
(Figure
present.
16:
per
are
burned
during
training
pit
was unlined.
sandy
Montford
Point
(Figure
lack
Burn
2-4).
It
in
abatement
devices,
including
in
training
pit,
year
the
of
ground
Dump Site
It
used
oil,
site
pit
is
Until
is
about
lined
an
have
and
the
and
1 to
is
operation
solvents,
exercises.
The present
The entire
and
Green
has been
liner
gallons
are
795450
Pollution
feet.
Piney
2-3).
30,000
the
soils
at
About
800 square
The
No.
Training
and an impermeable
fuels
approximately
size.
the
separator
contaminated
to
Fighting
Map coordinates
oil-water
been
Fire
midis
2 acres
in
Special
Map
cover.
A-- The dump
was opened
around
is
1958
at
and was
OPEN
STORAGE
AREA
LEGEND
l
A
5
$6
l
8
*9
010
A
B
C
t
0
FIGURE
2-3.
Site Locations
at Open Storage
Well
Piney
Green
Road
Storage
Lots 201 81 203
Flammable
Storage
Warehouse
Fire Fighting
Training
Pit
Original
Base Dump
DDT Dumping
Location
PCB Tranformers
Storage
Site
,,DT s+nrm~
1 nr.tinnr
Bldg.
TP 451
& TP 452
Locations
l
SCALE
IN FEET
I
2500
Area
Consulting~Environmentol
Engineers
and
Sc~enhstl
FIGURE
2-4.
Site Locations
at Montford
Point and Vicinity
Consulting
Environmental
Engine&
and
Scienti
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.3]2/FINDINGS.5
6/23/82
closed
in
1972.
The
occurs.
oils.
site
is
of
is
at
No.
22:
864389
leak
was in
of
site
24:
coordinates
active
sanitary
Cogdels
of
sewage
sludge,
ash is
estimated
dumped
here
No.
370,000
and
area
proximity
(Figure
2-5).
yards
with
to
risks.
Base
Cogdels
Creek.
1946
It
and
Creek
environmental
site
site
that
buried
Map
and was
the
present
portions
Materials
compounds,
stripping
is
of
of
fly
compounds
at
a good
have
poses
seen
Special
for
the
Map
base
industrial
between
here.
and New River
personnel
Special
7 years.
A variety
now supports
a
tank.
The amount
The dump was used
is
at
upstream
sludge.
Dump--This
1971.
fuel
stripping
of
1979,
loading
25 acres.
paint
Map
The leak
to
to
be 20 to
over
Special
1972
ash
The estimate
4 acres.
In
is
in
adjacent
used
estimated
of material
grass
Cogdels
to
is
to
gallons
Burn
from
is
at
aboveground
used
spiractar
tons.
Point
and covered.
cubic
treatment
about
truck
when transporting
site
The amount
occurred.
tank
was first
solvents,
45,000
Hadnot
It
estimated
ash,
31,500
about
855364
seeded
is
pipes.
covers
Ash Dump --This
The dump
fly
at
is
coordinates
burned
large
1980,
and water
28:
industrial
and the
2-5).
on the
operation.
the
(Figure
dumped
in
behind
Fly
buried
farm,
gallons
Area
oil
tank
50,000
Industrial
include
The site
to
approximately
disposed
for
20,000
building
Size
been
still
and waste
of
Farm--The
slightly
began.
have
currently
4 acres.
Creek.
Tank
tires,
amount
material
yard.
dumping
the
is
about
landfill
but
2-5),
line
866380
until
Site
Area
the
garbage,
unknown,
insulating
(Figure
between
covers
No.
debris,
1 cubic
an estimated
and
Site
than
an underground
facility
The
less
unauthorized
Materials
asbestos
Industrial
coordinates
fuel
these
closed,
insignificant.
and include
estimated
Site
of
building
considered
surface
officially
contains
The quantity
here
is
Although
waste
185,000
to
The area
has
ground
health
leachate
cover.
was
been
graded
Its
and environmental
and
seepage
to
ASH
*
22
STREET
HADNOT
GUM
.,bL
wr-
STREET
LEGEND
.‘&
3 27
A
011
*19
020
021
*22
023
*24
a25
l 26
027
*:28
Well
Pest
Control
Shop
Naval
Research
Lab
Naval
Research
Lab
Transformer
Storage
Dump
Incinerator
Lot 14
Industrial
Area Tank
Farm
Roads
and Grounds,
Bldg. 1105
Industrial
Area Fly Ash Dump
Base
Coal
Naval
Hadnot
Incinerator
Storage
Hospital
Point
Area
Area
Burn
Rip-Rap
Dump
F
0
FIGURE
2-5.
POIN
4
SCALE
IN FEET
2500
Site Locations at Hadnot Point
i’atcr ancl ,,\ir i~csearcll, Inc.
ConsuItIng
Environmental
Engineers
and
Sclenllr
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.3]2/FINDINGS.6
6/23/82
Site
No.
30:
Sneads
Ferry
Special
Map coordinates
washout
from
contents
of
sludge
898324
storage
the
and/or
tanks
tank
of
Two 12,000-gallons
a tank
capacity
below
tank
dumped.
It
possible
from
other
tanks.
minimum.
from
mostly
cleaning
migration
toward
tetraethyl
lead
No.
35:
compounds.
Soils
is
near
probably
in
the
The fuel
the
table,
water
moved
east
where
The
approximately
No.
from
burned
on the
1950
drainage
covers
(Figure
were
dumped
was active
Estimated
Area
763462
been
roadside
is
estimated
the
similar
wastes
be considered
and may vary
lead
containing
to
and conducive
at
in
Map
the
to be in
fuel
line
late
195Os,
the
Holes
thousands
were
also
Brinson
of
dug to
surface
Creek
to
to
warranted.
Special
tanks
a
Because
groundwater
farm
tank
for
away.
Brinson
fuel
of
and were
Creek.
on the
Road.
sludge
sandy
is
Brinson
floating
Ferry
an underground
overhead
toward
from
in
contractor
of
is
site
1970,
unknown
are
feet
the
contaminating
distance
Geiger
36:
These
wastes.
Fuel
1,500
A leak
fuel
fuel
area
in
was
was ignited
Creek
is
400 feet.
coordinates
site
of
is
and/or
fuel
must
investigation
2-7).
Amount
amount
at
When the
on knowledge
tetraethyl
the
farm.
Sneads
used
is
sludge
by a private
been
Farm--The
supporting
and burned.
and burned.
have
(Figure
1958.
in
site
to unleaded
600 gallons
of
about
Fuel
fuel
washout
further
Area
pad
gallons.
Site
involved,
area
tank
has
and/or
Creek,
contains
600-gallon
amounts
756466
occurred
the
It
Based
site
Area--This
intersects
about
the
sludge
Frenchs
the
which
substantial
Geiger
coordinates
ignited
of
from
ports,
that
Composition
leaded
involved.
Therefore,
containing
Site
outflow
2-6).
from
trail
were
Sludge
industrial
changed
tanks
is
the
was drained
along
Tank
(Figure
at
were
washout
and disposed
Road--Fuel
ditch
25,000
volume
to
Treatment
2-7),
received
and later
surface
1959.
The site
is
14,000
located
feet
cubic
Dump--The
mixed
covered;
ground
square
is
Sewage
on the
and
rises
yards.
however,
near
Wastes
side
12 feet
of
Special
Map
and municipal
some materials
unburned.
Brinson
opposite
10 to
at
industrial
and covered
is
site,
The dump
Creek
of
above
concern
may
and a small
the
dump.
grade.
are
The
COMBAT
TOWN
TRAINING
AREA
SCALE
IN FEET
2500
LEGEND
*30
FIGURE
2-6.
Site
Locations
at Combat
Town
Training
Sneads
Ferry
Road-Fuel
Tank
Sludge
Area
Area
Consulting
Environmental
Engineers
and
Scientist
s
GEIGER
AREA
A
1
t
SCALE
0
IN FEET
,5;0
LEGEND
A
2-7,
FIGURE
‘i1lc.r
ilrlcl
Air
Site
Locations
Itcbsc-:lrc-l~.
at
Ifn:.
Geiger Area
A
9635
#36
l 37
038
Well
Fuel Farm
STP Oump
Surface
Oump
Construction
Dump
039
Construction
Consulting
Environmontol
Slab
Oump
EnOlnoers
ond
Sclonllsts
I
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.3]2/FINDINGS.7
6/24/82
hydrocarbons
at
(solvents,
Camp Geiger
or
waste
the
air
may have
been
disposed
Site
41:
Camp Geiger
No.
732442
(Figure
interviews
with
solvents,
old
estimated
to
Solvents
and
15,000
No.
Fuel
Farm--
of
station
be 15 acres
As many
as 10,000
to
Most
dump,
from
1953
personnel,
it
and
other
and
to
disposed
Campbell
This
of
contain
were
at
are
generated
15,000
gallons
burned.
Map coordinates
1970.
According
received
to
POL compounds,
municipal
110,000
were
probably
Special
to
assorted
here
is
waste.
The area
cubic
yards
of waste.
to
be about
10,000
estimated
at
leaked
into
Site
No.
Map at
is
to
from
buried
around
Special
has
been
compounds.
1981
Street
Farm,
and
more
soil.
and
of
due
than
100,000
lines
volume
(Figure
on the
Avgas
1982,
These
the
and Adjacent
754444
300 gallons
of
delay
the
in
this
Crash
since
Originally,
Later,
a pit
of
lab,
area.
From
radar
to
of
JP
2-9).
north
were
side
spilled
corrosion
of
been
Avgas
or
of
gallons
have
fuel
replaced
loss
Trainina
755428
1950s
training
was used,
for
to
Burn
is
low,
1966,
per
Special
metallic
to have
year
been
was
over
New River.
Pit--This
crew
on the
may be dispersed
site
The area
2-9).
was on the
which
to
One gallon
(Figure
crash
located
was reported
100 pounds
adjacent
is
1956
units
804.
than
feet
Crew Fire
the
the
More
area
2-9).
Building
square
Map coordinates
used
(Figure
lines
photo
20,000
54:
Dump Site--This
772438
the
approximately
at
to
White
Although
MCAS Mercury
mercury
a berm.
system.
coordinates
No.
of
During
surrounding
Storage
may be conservative.
48:
disposed
200
JP Fuel
Avgas
Map coordinates
side
1978,
the
an aboveground
estimate
Special
facility.
lines
the
Underground
on each
In
this
underground
at
are
Street.
from
may have
Street
site
facilities
Campbell
leaked
Site
that
Dump--This
batteries,
oils
fluids)
9 years.
was active
air
45:
two
with
over
hydraulic
gallons.
Site
The
station.
of
2-8),
oils,
training
with
ground
surface
was eventually
lined.
can be located
off
Runway
various
surrounded
5-23
POL
by
The affected
GEIGER
*
AREA
B
41
LEGEND
l 40
*41
FIGURE
Vatcr
and
2-8.
Air
Borrow
Pit
Camp Geiger
Dump
Site Locations at Geiger Area B
Iicw3rch.
In<*;-
Consulting
Envlronmental
Engineers
and
Scientis
NEW
RIVER
RIVER
SE
1.
LEGEND
A
042
05g
Bldg.
Agan
049
50
051
052
a53
*54
055
056
FIGURE
2-g.
l 57
l 56
l 59
Site Locations at MCAS New River
j’ater and Air Research,
Inc.
Consultlng
765, BOG.
Dump
Street
Borrow
Pit
Jones Street
Dump
Campbell
Street
Underground
Avgas Storage
and Adjacent
Fuel Farm
Main
Gate Dump
Rip-Rap
near Stick Creek
if.46
l
Well
Mercury
Suspected
Small-Craft
Dumpsite
Minor
Dump
Berthing
Rip-Rap
Football
Field
Direct
Refuel
Depot
Warehouse
Bldg. 3525 Area Oiled
Roads
Crash
Crew
Fire Training
Burn
Pit
East Perimeter
Dump
Oiled
Roads
to Marina
Runway
36 Dump
Tank Training
Area
Infantry
Training
Area
Environmental
Engineers
and
Sclenti!
rti
ENGINEER
AND AMPHIBIOUS
TRAINING
AREA
LEGEND
l
065
066
A
64
Well
Marines
Engineer
AMTRAC
Roadheads
Ferry
Area Dump
Landing
Site
and
Road
Storage
- Mogas
Spill
Area
I
0’
FIGURE
2-10.
Site Locations
at Engineer
and Amphibious
Training
SCALE
IN FEET
*ioo
Area
ConsulllnO
Environmental
Engineers
and
Scenta
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.3]2/FINDINGS.8
6/24/82
area
is
about
of
POL,
nearly
one-half
at
this
site.
Most
4,000
1.5
gallons
Site
No.
(Figure
buried
here
have
are
be about
100,000
Nos.
cubic
RR-45
the
wells
are
upgradient,
Table
RR-47,
Rifle
pesticides,
here.
guts),
already
have
(Figure
with
concern
run
is
estimated
nearby
feet.
Well
between
Although
toward
on active
to
at
The distance
contaminants
analyses
of
because
1,500
However,
estimated
contaminants.
draw
Chemical
2-11).
It
2-13
records
the
these
wells
wells.
Well
Nos.
surface
New River
Rifle
Range
on or near
metals,
volatile
from
at
Special
(including
wells,
from
the
site.
organics
It
a small
Results
lost,
early
difficult
RR-45,
for
disposal
and
is
it
is
other
of
discussed
known
that
compounds
to mid-1950s
when on-foot
shows an aerial
Map
were
to
at
the
site.
perspective
of
identified.
surface
sampling
and
been
Everette
and
designated
and many
the
features
intermittent
collected
pools
have
included.
is
much attention
TCE,
is
site
was once
has received
past
is
to
and
Dump --This
It
Orientation
notable
exist
been
of
of wastes
solvents.
cleaning.
is
pentachlorophenol,
1976.
the
weapons
volume
The dump was active
Tributaries
to
Types
and
Fill
of
Although
Figure
site
1972.
disposed
could
Range
PCBs,
approximately
the
used
Map coordinates
WTP sludge,
approximately
chemicals.
here.
Therefore,
been
and RR-97.
hazardous
buried
to
volume
organic
results
770290
detail
is
gallons
have
as 3,000
Special
and total
are
contain
at
1942
for
gallons.
dump
15,000
compounds
as many
is
debris,
extensively
pumping
69:
Coordinate
in
building
Solvents
contains
No.
all
the
RR-85,
Site
from
yards.
and
2.4
and was active
2,000
and RR-97
but
of
to soils.
small
to
usage
these
burned,
site
used
annual
of
Dump--This
relatively
1,000
were
soaked
garbage,
been
gallons
these
Range
2-11)
are
on present
million
of
Rifle
748302
amounts
Based
may have
68:
Solvents
acres.
tributary
of
pesticides
Creek
seeps
are
has been
to
nearby.
done.
Everett
analyses
are
and unnamed
for
in
Tables
Test
Also,
Creek
the
creeks
wells
samples
and from
presence
2-3,
and
2-4
of
and 2-5.
LEGEND
A
*66
*69
0’
FIGURE
2-11
. Site Locations
lrater and Air Research,
Well
Rifle
Rifle
Range
Range
Dump
Chemical
Dump
I
SCALE
IN FEET
&J
at Rifle Range Area
Inc.
Consultlng
Environmental
Engineers
and
Scientk
HOLF
OAK GROVE
LEGEND
070
Field
071
Buried
Dump
Coal Pile
072
FIGURE
‘atcr
and
2-12.
,,\ir
Site Locations
Ilcscarch,
at HOLF
Inc.
Surface
Dump
Oak Grove
Consulting
Envlronmental
Erqineers
and
kientlst
5
ney
to
1.
ground
site
water
moniwell
f/l5
canvas
tent
Eragments
fired
and unfired
blank
rifle
cartridges
rectangular
depression
empty
malathion
drum
exposed
vooden
boxes
WI white
powder;
exposed
rim of 55 gallon
drum;
holes
apparently
formed
by collapse
of
buried
material
pooled
water
with
organic
film
on surface
1 quart
cans
exploded
by fire
gas samples
pool
toring
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
\
Former
Dirt
-*Lrrsned
Boundary
Everett
Watershed
Creek
Basin
0
500
L
1
Scale
,___FIGURE
"_.. Source:
2-13.
Physical
for Site
(locations
WAR,1982
Features
and Locator
Map
69
of site
features
are approximate)
in
Feet
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.3]2/FINDXNGS.9
6/23/82
Data
show that
levels
of
pool
also
pool
is
sides
organic
and
there
dump
is
per
Well
showed
Samples
from
analyzed
for
August
the
of
in
were
from
organic
ground
a nearby
compounds.
water
latter
run
for
The
through
in
(ppb)
Well
No.
of
its
sources
of
Fange
wells
of
total
levels
and
1982
(with
approximately
here
process.
reducing
the
half
may well
Elimination
trihalomethanes
Well
and
raw and
exception
reduction
in
feet
of
of
No.
observed
through
in
other
RR-45
had
water
(Well
have
in
been
treated
water
Further
December)
August.
changes
prechlorination
plants.
2-4,
in
100 ppb.
in
from
3 ppb of methylene
water
that
Well
No
show that
excess
were
Table
discussed
treated
Results
those
in
Finished
are
be possible
or
but
Rifle
Analyses
shown
chloroform
THM in
6,000
contaminants.
RR-47,
contamination
1981
contained
results,
the
These
about
chloride.
17 ppb of
at
contaminants.
organic
of methylene
levels
is
organic
three
supply
wells.
well
These
had
potable
operating
The
water.
RR-97
Rifle
three
compounds.
1981
in
at
trihalomethane
trihalomethanes
successful
the
elevated
water
volatile
contaminating
detected
Possible
4.0.
treatment
No.
billion
Section
of
16 contains
surface
collects
and RR-97.
were
chloride.
indicates
of
It
collected
on finished
that
RR-85)
sampling
15 and
of
deep.
of
Analyses
contaminants
in
Nos.
concentration
a risk
RR-47
made
indicate
No.
Well
Samples
15 feet
were
site.
also
4 parts
Test
bottom.
RR-45,
were
a high
10 to
samples
R-w,
Nos.
from
contaminants.
showed
a pit
Because
the
water
Reduction
in
the
water
has been
3.0
CONCLUSIONS
DRAFT
3.0
[IAS-CLJ.3]3/CONC.l
6/24/82
CONCLUSIONS
1.
2.
Potentially
hazardous
military
activities
Although
sites
station
and
(Site
3.
No.
4.
at
were
1) is
have
been
generated
by
Camp Lejeune.
Point
throughout
areas
off-base
had
the
the
largest
were
found
base,
the
air
number.
One site
property.
or municipal
base
wastes
identified
Hadnot
No industrial
onto
chemical
wastes
to be migrating
property.
Confining
beds
semi-confined
separating
aquifer
condition
increases
migrating
into
the
are
the
the
water
table
aquifer
discontinuous
risk
of
at
the
Camp Lejeune.
leachate
from
aquifer,
the
semi-confined
and
old
This
dumps
source
of
potable
water.
5.
The water
from
6.
table
hazardous
waste
Surface
water
shallow
unconfined
discharges
river
7.
aquifer
disposal
to
is
aquifer
surface
susceptible
to
contamination
practices.
contamination
use
of
also
possible
generally
because
follows
tributaries
aircraft,
tracked
These
POT, contamination.
8.
highly
of
the
land
flow
17 sites
Monitoring
judged
should
to
contours
New River
or
vehicles
has
involved
in
require
at
entering
downgradient
and away from
These
on the
wells,
risk
from
Nos.
RR-45
buried
at
upgradient
basis
chemical
to
the
and
the
site
toward
the
these
chemical
ground
the
of
requires
(68)
were
potable
this
does
not
contain
of
water
the
from
this
source
at
the
Rifle
study,
are
wells
The dump west
further
of
investigation.
heavy
any
significant
move
Range.
not
Solvents
had an opportunity
during
Rifle
Well
to move
groundwater
withdrawal.
HOLF Oak Grove
eight
dump near
preliminary
may have
wells
caused
confirmation.
dump wastes.
and RR-97
this
and wheeled
substances
continue
Contaminants
Range.
9.
in
itself.
Past
the
is
sites.
at
4.0
RFXOMMFaNDATIONS
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.4]4/REC.l
6/23/82
4.0
In
RECOMMENDATIONS
this
section,
presented.
The
tigation.
potential.
are
to
determine
to
precise
a confirmation
location
aspect
of
of
the
tigation
at
firmation
will
section,
each
site
strictly
to
a yes
or no answer
worthy
ideals,
Regarding
using
the
at many
sites,
remain
notion
of reasonable
to formal
has
has
been
which
at
been
may be
some
sites,
them.
given
for
In
a limited
regarding
is
it
at
is
for
to
sites.
rule
is
Therefore,
no or
intended
many
out
is
most
some
Rather,
judgment
either
for
there
be considered.
requiring
con-
contamination.
difficult
some professional
is
to attain
all
inves-
sense,
assessment
easy
most
additional
contamination
contamination;
must
groups
in
and an important
potential
potential
potential
into
example,
initial
regarding
contamination
guidelines,
sites
this
assessment:
of
study
this
For
are
neither
for
varies
PROCESS
or no answer
practically
this
information
define
which
inves-
to be gathered
all
inexact,
better
speaking,
criteria
probability
segregating
a yes
initial
finite
tion
and
confirmation.
Also,
sites
of
requiring
presence.
sites.
purpose
recommendations
produce
While
the
be to
would
produce
because
OF THE RECOMMENDATIONS
following
may remain
processing
are
of contamination
sites
boundaries
confirmation
OVERVIEW
extent
investigation.
site
work
at
without
at 17 sites
confirmation
field
and
potential,
assessed
relevent
is
study
to require
involve
information
This
further
judged
magnitude
contamination
satisfactorily
those
perceived
confirmation.
for
typically
Important
during
In
17 sites
according
4.1
suggestions
Recommendations
effort
to
specific
the
in
relied
addiupon
when
some additional
investigation.
For
the
following
Objectives
necessary.
difficult
to
One must
based
confirmation
nearly
of a Confirmation
impossible
be particularly
on limited
recommendations,
samples
cautious
that
Study
are,
in
a single
concluding
that
to achieve
in
a similar
show no contamination.
in
framework
some cases,
sampling
no problem
Movement
effort.
exists
of
is
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.~]~/REC.~
6/23/82
pollutants
sample
in
wells
ground
water
may not
draw
one
Consequently,
all
facts
there,
known
should
about
samples
is
number
of
samples
be present.
This
potential
not
philosophical
confirmation
Recommendations
are
presented
used
Problem:
contains
statement
Information
for
not
in
the
a limited
and/or
will
not
making
basis,
types
type
statement
and a standard
following:
indicated
may also
A concise
used
the
regarding
contamination
Goal:
is
into
work.
It
A short
are
was put
groundwater
results
pollutants
results,
waste
back
in
on a site-by-site
throughout.
sampling
pollutants
pollutants
framework
for
is
that
with
negative
so that
aquifers.
and how much
of
evidence,
prove
recommendations
format
routes
of
the
along
what
detection
nonuniform,
of
consider,
conclusive
does
and/or
parts
including
whereas
generally
slow
affected
carefully
and
Thus,
from
a site,
hydrogeology,
environment.
may be very
of
of materials
potential
involved.
environmental
be given.
addressing
specific
confirmation
objectives
Approach:
An overview
Wells:
General
instructions
Samples:
General
directions
sediment,
of
Analyses:
is
often
specification
collect
the
each
analyses
Frequency
recommended.
and
analyses
types
location
if
used
and numbers
or surface
water
for
of when,
samples,
types
type
of
of
and over
of
soil,
samples
other
than
specified,
sample,
may also
specifications
period,
specification
Generally
but
what
samples
to be collected.
are
information
various
different
information
wells,
included.
A brief
For
water
applied
siting
giving
General
wells,
strategy
for
ground
specified.
Frequency:
general
relevant
of
laboratory
supporting
be noted.
are
omitted
if
not
samples
are
to
DRAFT
4.2
[IAS-CLJ.4]4/REC.3
6/24/82
SPECIFIC
RECOMMENDATION
BY SITE
Recommendations
for
confirmation
below.
for
monitoring-well
Details
Note:
Core
down into
sampling
water
is
This
10 feet
water
of
5 to
ground
water
is
greater,
samples
Note:
of
between
surface
Tetraethyl
lead
potential
be present
indicator.
Note:
Upgradient
specified
or
at many
two background
Site
No.
Problem:
1:
(i.e.,
several
wells
may serve
all
Park
Building
Goal:
Clean
Approach:
Conduct
has
been
more
is
construction.
permanently
None
are
the
excluded
to
surface
be cleaned
at
instances
is
may also
considered
a
quality
relatively
are
close,
one
nonmobile
in
probably
of
in
the
of
site
the
any
move
site.
movement.
up and buried
use
Asbestos
in
a hand
disposal
would
land
manner.
using
test
Once demarcated,
from
proper
soil,
the
asbestos
site.
dispose
of
integrity
includes
this
extent
Asbestos
through
Samples:
to
4 or 5
substances
lead
which
of
precisely
of
None
depth
certain
groundwater
sites
inspection
disruption
Wells:
in
tetraethyl
on surface,
asbestos
recommended.
asbestos
If
to
sites.
disposed
a careful
Because
intervals
to yield
hazardous
debris,
up asbestos
to define
2-foot
depth
A.
Dump
construction
siding,
Appendix
table.
background
Where
in
samples).
specified
Other
outlined
on an assumed
water
has been
sites.
to
be selected
below
document
are
given
l-
5 total
However,
to
are
based
4 or
1 foot
analysis
wells
sites
as at
should
additives.
Midway
should
is
contamination.
as fuel
useful
spacing
and
specific
specified
intervals
gasoline
at
construction
generally
table.
ground
work
area.
wells
that
not
of
could
site
a
occur
should
would
on the
a sanitary
are
because
This
the
auger
expose
surface
landfill.
be
DRAFT
Site
[IAS-CLJ.4]4/REC.4
6/24/82
No.
Problem:
Goal:
2:
Nursery/Day-Care
This
Center
building
at
Building
was formerly
Residual
handling
facility.
building
may pose
small
children.
Table
2-2.
the
health
pesticide
in
sampling
An adjacent
drainage
washout
Determine
types
and amounts
and building,
remainder
results
creek
and
soils
to supervisory
Preliminary
and
storage
pesticides
risks
received
area
712
and the
personnel
and
are
in
(ditch)
shown
probably
spills.
of
pesticides
of
area,
and
in
the
playground
in
creek
sediments.
Approach:
Collect
cores
thorough
fence)
soil
and
for
sample
In
creek
behind
locations.
near
likely
location
Frequency:
Analyses:
from
From
most
downstream
of
646,
about
Overs
site,
Creek,
widening
sampling
in
then
extent
and distribution
sediments,
and residues:
Chlordane.
pesticides,
phosphate-based
feet
samples
e.g.,
samples
at
1,400
feet
in
Overs
Northeast
four
above
above
Creek.
above.
intensive
of
places:
downstream
Creek
specified
If
sampling
contamination.
DDT and isomers,
herbicides
pesticides;
sampling
residue
downstream
further
determine
pertinent
present,
one
substances,
about
locations
three
air
rooms,
and
at
from
areas,
sediment
are
organochlorine
and obtain
chlordane.
soils
fugitive
residuals
Soils,
and
thorougly
building,
used
4,000
creek
of
outdoor
each.
creek,
with
An initial
other
In
No.
of
inside
occurred
or volatile
cores
to harbor
moldings.
confluence
Conduct
(both
building
residue
from
plus
Well
Examine
In
core
immediately
areas
and handling
18-inch-deep
places
playground.
outdoor
mixing
pesticide
volatiles
from
the
sediments.
18-inch-deep
for
in
other
samples.
playground,
separate
sites
of
where
additional
Sample
three
inspection
outside
Samples:
from
(including
air:
volatile
2,4,5-T),
to
a
DRAFT
Site
[IAS-CLJ.4]4/REC.5
6123182
No.
Problem:
6:
Storage
Lots
201 and 203
DDT contamination
section
of
Goal:
Determine
Approach:
Sample
of
Lot
203
of DDT.
in
of DDT in
vicinity
Emphasize
locations.
storage.
costs
may favor
corings
of
areas
Consider
former
due
in
northeast
soils
suspected
radially
limited
Although
gaining
radially
to burial
and spills
presence
soils
soils
from
dumping
from
the
analyses
added
the
four
for
no spills
and spilling
PCB near
reported,
measure
DDT-related
of
trans-
incremental
confidence.
two transformer
Take
storage
locations.
Samples:
At
each
location,
Unless
there
places,
are
on-site
encircle
(kgs)
of
cores
soil
and handled
dump,
3-foot
shallow
at
Frequency:
Once
Analyses:
DDT and
diameter
sample
as a single
deeper
isomers
cores
to
sample
cores.
sampling
circle,
deep
point.
for
may be necessary.
or PCB,
obtain
to concentrate
At each
12 inches
each
places
indications
locations.
an approximately
five
five
select
as appropriate
to
take
produce
Cores
each
sampling
place,
within
minimum
of
3 kilograms
are
point.
cornposited
At
the
DDT
DRAFT
Site
[IAS-CLJ.~]~/REC.~
6/23/82
No.
Problem:
9:
Fire
Fighting
Pit
Contaminated
fuels
and
at
with
potential
this
site
water
Goal:
Training
at
Piney
other
Green
Road
POL compounds
have
contamination
of
been
soils
used
and
table.
Determine
if
POL compounds
present
and
if
migration
has
occurred.
Approach:
Sample
soils
and groundwater
lined,
plume
of material
approximately
twenty-years
collect
adjacent
cores
Well
HP-635
is
Well
No.
Samples:
Sample
it
soils
at
lines
of
levels
Frequency:
Once
Analyses:
Oil
liner;
two cores,
groundflow
downgradient
of
away.
should
is
downgradient
Therefore,
and
1 foot
below
and
should
and grease,
of
pit
surface
below
perpendicular
and downgradient
outside
pit
lining.
300 feet
pumping
1 foot
down to
coring
moved
since
to plus
Because
now
during
pit.
Although
not
be sampled.
635
intervals
Take
is
POL.
may have
approximately
downgradient,
Wells:
for
water
sample:
1)
each
away,
side
intersecting
pit.
be recorded
referenced
volatile
hydrocarbons
l-
table.
flow
Adjacent
and 3)
of a line
Static
to 2-foot
Locate
to groundwater
2) 200 feet
50,feet
and at
three
(gradient)
to pit
1,000
feet
parallel
and dynamic
to datum.
away.
to
water
DRAFT
Site
[LAS-CLJ.4]4/REC.7
6123182
No.
16:
Montford
Point
Problem:
Unauthorized
Coal:
Confirm
Dump
dumping
quantity
estimate
clean
Burn
of
asbestos
of asbestos
clean-up
effort.
up and remove
friable
on land
surface
in
Alternately,
proceed
asbestos
to a properly
order
to
directly
to
operated
landfill.
Approach:
Conduct
a careful
collect
asbestos
an approved
Samples:
None
manner.
inspection
material
of
the
on ground
site.
surface
Alternately,
and
dispose
in
DRAFT
Site
[IAS-CLJ.4]4/REC.8
6/23/82
No.
Problem:
22:
Industrial
Area
Fuels
amounting
soils
around
ground
Goal:
Approach:
Farm
to 20,000
to
50,000
farm.
There
is
tank
gallons
leaked
potential
into
migration
to
water.
Determine
area
Tank
whether
and assess
Sample
soils
No.
602,
Wells:
Use
existing
Samples:
Soil
cores
at
water
table.
Frequency:
Soils--once;
Analyses:
Oil
and
is
Well
at
l-
present
1,100
No.
tank
downgradient
of
the
ground
tank
water.
Sample
farm.
farm
Well
and pumping.
602.
around
tank
intervals
water-lead,
soils
into
of
feet
5 places
well
in
movement
perimeter
to 2-foot
grease,
is
potential
around
which
cores
fuel
and
twice
volatile
farm
perimeter.
down to 1 foot
separated
Obtain
into
by 2 to
hydrocarbons
the
3 months
DRAFT
Site
[IAS-CLJ.4]4/REC.9
6/24/82
No.
Problem:
24:
Industrial
Disposal
Area
Fly
Ash Dump
fly
ash,
sludges
of
treatment
plants,
potential
for
from
and solvents
migration
water
and wastewater
has occurred.
to ground
There
water
and/or
are
present
is
surface
water.
Goal:
Approach:
Determine
whether
potential
for
an inspection
Install
wells
adjacent
three
wells
From
each
well.
downstream.
Frequency:
Wells:
Analyses:
Surface
Creek
ground
the
datum.
boundaries.
Sample
sediments
at
edge
of
the
site
background.
at
site
and
100 yards
wet
season.
heavy
metals,
site.
by 2 months
in
once.
conductance,
Groundwater:
Static
water.
downgradient
separated
TOC.
to determine
sediments:
Specific
water:
site
establish
and water:
others.
common
the
Creekwater:
and grease,
plus
to
Two times
Sediments
and assess
creek.
at
and one upgradient
Samples:
of
and sample
in
Install
wastes
migration.
Conduct
and water
Wells:
hazardous
water
Sediments:
pH,
volatile
organic
levels
in
wells
metals
only.
oil
solvents
referenced
to
DRAFT
Site
[IAS-CLJ.4]4/REC.10
6/24/82
No.
Problem:
28:
Hadnot
Point
Domestic
Burn
and
Dump
industrial
wastes
were
disposed
of
at
this
site.
Goal:
Determine
whether
potential
for
Conduct
a careful
Determine
from
for
of
well.
Freauencv:
Analyses:
(1)
and
side
the
(3)
surface
if
define
water
and
individual
sample
fish
one well
persons
for
Cogdels
dump and
downgradient
Creek;
adjacent
of
the
dump,
adjacent
downstream
at
the
during
wet
mouth
and sediment:
of
Twice
the
wells
New River.
of
(2)
of
three
upstream
months
three
creek
to dump
Cogdels
separated
Creek.
by 2
season.
conductance,
PCB,
pesticides,
TOC;
PCB,
pesticides;
in
datum.
so,
better
from
column,
common
If
to
and sediment
water
specific
of
column
Wells,
Water:
on
compounds.
Water
locations:
area,
pond.
background;
east
downgradient
Each
and assess
impacts
site
Creek.
organic
on the
the
Cogdels
often
Upgradient
of
and sample
eat
fish
inspection
wells
in
chlorinated
Samnles:
present
on potential
Install
sediment
dump
Check
are
pond.
boundaries.
Wells:
wastes
migration.
recreational
Approach:
hazardous
oil
sediment:
wells:
and grease,
oil
water
level
pH,
and grease,
referenced
metals,
metals,
to
DRAFT
Site
[IAS-CLJ.4]4/REC.11
6123182
No.
Problem:
Goal:
Approach:
30:
Sneads
Ferry
Road
Sludge
or bottom
Fuel
Tank
deposits
from
disposed
of on the
ground.
Determine
whether
hazardous
toward
ground
water
Define
location
of
residuals.
Wells:
Three
Samples:
Each
Sample
downgradient
well.
Cores
Sludge
a large
waste
dumping.
water
toward
Frenchs
5 places
fuel
is
Sample
ground
at
Area
tank
present
soil
toward
were
and migrating
for
substantial
Frenchs
Creek.
Creek
near
dumping
sites
at
surface.
Frequency:
Well:
Analyses:
Specific
Twice
separated
conductance,
by 2 to 3 months.
oil
and
grease,
Cores:
tetraethyl
once.
lead
DRAFT
Site
[IAS-CLJ.4]4/REC.12
6123182
No.
Problem:
35:
Geiger
Area
Fuel
Fuel
Farm
have
contaminated
spills
possibility
Goal:
Determine
with
Approach:
of
if
groundwater
soils
for
soil
between
near
into
due
water
remain
Collect
a
contaminated
gradient,
line
soil
cores
gradient
passing
perpendicular
cross-lines
and
cores,
one 50 to
Once
Analyses:
Oil
and
intermediate.
grease,
at
down to
through
creek,
sample
100 feet
lead
soil
the
At
points
each
on each
line:
of
the
the
leak.
table
parallel
at
to
the
three
near
cross-line
side
is
along
side
Establish
the
to creek
migration
water
a line
leak.
along
the
below
Establish
at
extent
potential
gradient
either
through
1 foot
assess
of spill
locations
directly
increments.
path
to
to assess
Surface
exact
but
passing
Creek
and
Creek.
Therefore,
to 2-foot
Frequency:
any remains,
however,
documented.
gradient
and Brinson
Brinson
east;
topographic
leak
if
movement
not
l-
is
contamination.
and ground
of contamination,
Samples:
There
Mogas.
Sample
is
soils.
original
leak,
core,
line.
near
take
two
DRAFT
Site
[IAS-CLJ.4]4/REC.13
6/24/82
No.
36:
Geiger
Area
Problem:
Industrial
Goal:
Sewage Treatment
wastes
may have
Determine
whether
hazardous
migration
has occurred
Approach:
Establish
monitor
Wells:
Four
wells
downgradient,
north
through
Samples:
Each well
Frequency:
Twice
Analyses:
Specific
separated
pesticides,
to
herbicides
disposed
wastes
to boundary,
of
are
at
present
groundwater
surrounding
this
and
site.
if
quality
mound
south.
by 2 to
conductance,
been
Dump
to document
close
east
Plant
3 months
pH,
oil
and grease,
metals,
TOC,
DRAFT
Site
[IAS-CL..I.~]~/REC.~~
6123182
No.
Problem:
41:
Camp Geiger
Dump
Industrial
wastes
contamination
Goal:
Approach:
(Trailer
Park)
may have
of
ground
been
water
Southwest
Creek.
Determine
whether
migration
has occurred
toward
Test
Nos.
20,
Well
place.
and
ground
18,
19,
Determine
location
these
be downgradient.
water
are
plugged.
movement
to each
Wells:
As noted
above
Samples:
Each
Frequency:
Twice
Analyses:
Specific
small
tributaries
and 21 are
of construction
wells
to
(see
three
can be used
nearby
if
surface.
reported
At least
in
and
water
information.
unsuitable,
Potential
contaminated
nearby
wells.
other
background
found
holes
if
here.
two
is
One upgradient
quality
sufficient
and
water
adequacy
of
dumped
Appendix
wells
should
for
background
do not
provide
If
existing
any
be in
wells
then
casings
should
be removed
Downgradient
wells
should
address
small
tributary
and
potential
and wetland.
well
in
pesticides,
a 3-month
period
conductance,
PCB;
water
during
pH,
oil
levels
wet
and
season
grease,
referenced
metals,
to
common
TCE,
datum.
B)
DRAFT
Site
[IAS-CLJ.4]4/REC.15
6/23/82
No.
45:
Campbell
Fuel
Problem:
Street
Farm
at
Potential
Underground
Air
Avgas
Storage
and Adjacent
JP
Station
migration
and
groundwater
if
contaminated
contamination
from
fuels
Goals:
Determine
farm,
of
JP has
groundwater,
or
contamination
of
soils
surface
soil
outside
drainage.
and
of
fuel
Determine
surface
drainage
extent
due
to Avgas
leak.
Approach:
Sample
soils
near
Sample
surface
No.
of
surface
4140,
sites
lies
Wells:
Existing
Well
Samples:
Well:
quarterly.
sites
on Campbell
Schmidt
Frequency:
Soils
Analyses:
Oil
water
:
and
canal
fuel
about
near
the
No.
This
flow
700
extent
parallels
ditch
to 800
should
feet
impact.
roadway
southward.
drainage
of
south
intercept
Sample
Well
downgradient
of
ditch/canal.
4140
Drainage
ditch/canal:
Street,
(i.e.,
once.
Well
grease;
define
which
farm.
is
Street
levels
to
and subsurface
which
and
sites
drainage
(downgradient)
most
both
about
No.
volatile
referenced
near
Well
3,000
4140:
No.
feet
4140,
from
and
near
south
site).
quarterly
hydrocarbons;
to
sediments
datum.
static
and dynamic
of
DRAFT
Site
[IAS-CLJ.4]4/REC.16
6/23/82
No.
Problem:
48:
MCAS Mercury
Metallic
Dumpsite
mercury
period
behind
Building
indicate
a central
disposal
occurred
containing
Goal:
Determine
Approach:
Install
close
exist.
only
due
in
mercury
line
involved.
to
potential
Elaborate
consitutent
four
Frequency:
Initial
sampling,
sampling
mercury
is
Well
to six
are
a lo-year
has been
found
summized
that
It
places
with
each
of
mercury.
in
parallel
wells
over
place.
amounts
for
of
Install
Total
random
small
is
Wells:
annual
at
dumped
No evidence
disposal
whether
wells
been
804.
relatively
shoreline
Analvses:
may have
ground
to
several
near
About
should
pockets
needed
place
water
river.
spacing
not
is
river.
100 feet
monitoring
sampling
6 months
of mercury
because
to
mercury
is
wells
later,
of
be relatively
interest.
simple
to
followed
by
DRAFT
Site
[IAS-CLJ.4]4/REC.17
6123182
No.
Problem:
54:
Crash
Crew Fire
Contaminated
training
Training
fuels
Burn
Pit
and various
purposes.
Spills
at
the
Air
Station
POL compounds
may have
used
contaminated
for
the
soils.
Goal:
Determine
whether
contaminated
and
ground
water.
Approach:
Sample
soil
Wells:
None
Samples:
Cores
at
five
Frequency:
Once
Analyses:
Oil
in
should
groundwater
soils
if
table.
and grease,
there
immediate
be deep
places
in
lead
is
area
potential
of
for
site
are
POL to enter
area.
enough
Take
west
immediate
to
examples
and northwest
extend
1 foot
at
l-
of
pit.
into
to 2-foot
intervals
DRAFT
Site
[IAS-CLJ.4]4/REC.18
6/24/82
No.
Problem:
68:
Rifle
Range
Solvents
disposed
nearby
Goal:
potable
Determine
moved
Approach:
to
test
wells
to
rather
this
site
which
solvents
may be affecting
Upgradient
wells
downgradient
of
pollutants
have
moved
upgradient
between
present
with
used
to
and have
wells.
and downgradient
conjunction
document
are
potable
upgradient
in
to
or
threatened
be sampled
than
Three
at
POL compounds
upgradient
wells.
Wells:
of
wells.
if
Establish
site
Dump
of
nearby
assess
dump
water
possible
supply
migration
background.
dump
site
toward
to
determine
Stones
dump site
Creek.
and Well
Nos.
whether
Three
RR-45
wells
and
RR-97.
Sampling:
Each well
Frequency:
Test
wells
Well
Nos.
Analyses:
Volatile
dynamic
to be sampled
RR-45
organic
water
and RR-97
twice
to be sampled
compounds,
levels
separated
referenced
oil
by 2 or
quarterly.
and grease,
to
datum.
3 months.
static
and
DRAFT
Site
[IAS-CLJ.4]4/REC.19
6/24/82
No.
Problem:
69:
Rifle
Hazardous
of
Goal:
Range
wastes
Dump
of
various
types
buried
here
over
a period
years
Determine
whether
sufficient
Anproach:
Chemical
quantities
Consider
is
properly
take
because
wells
(at
Sample
Five
Samnles:
Each well.
Frequency:
Wells:
Analyses:
Specific
to
risk
to health.
surface
out,
are
of
Document
ground
wells.
water
plug
They
and
Use additional
background
surface
from
in
downgradient
Upgradient
value
due to
off-site
wells.
seeps*
downgradient
Two or
three
Quarterly.
Seeps:
conductance,
organochlorine
hydrocarbon
levels
seeps
pH,
oil
pesticides,
analysis,
referenced
northward.
Twice,
6 months
and grease,
PCBs,
purge
pentachlorophenol,
to
common
apart.
DDT,
and volatile
HTC,
datum.
in
may need
Another
put
drainage.
questionable
water
runoff.
holes,
of multidirectional
some nearby
Wells:
migrating
monitor
from
wells.
site)
topography.
old
wells
installed
wells
water
of
sealed
to
are
to cause
suitability
to be properly
option
wastes
mercury;
5.0
BACKGROUND
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.l]5/BCKGRND.l
6/23/82
5.0
BACKGROUND
5.1
GENERAL
Camp Lejeune
is
The
covers
facility
New River,
on the
which
coastal
plain
approximately
flows
in
170 square
a generally
system
forms
a large
Eleven
miles
of Atlantic
shoreline
western
and northeastern
Lejeune.
Road
The
24,
northern
at
locations
The
the
under
Geiger,
New River
area.
west
River
side
Air
the
of
Station,
These
is
the
There
are
also
10 miles
as the
five
and
is
to
geographical
They
the
include
Rifle
Camp
Range
a separate
two OLFs under
HOLF Oak Grove,
and OLF Camp Davis,
acts
command.
base,
are
17 and State
in
Bay,
Camp
outline.
primarily
Courthouse
of
U.S.
triangular
base
This
boundary
are
by the
Ocean.
Carolina,
a helicopter
of New River.
Station.
north,
complex
bisected
Atlantic
eastern
a roughly
Carolina.
direction.
boundaries
has
Mainside,
Air
the
North
and is
the
North
jurisdiction
Point,
miles
entering
form
Camp Lejeune
the
Montford
before
complex
County,
southeasterly
Jacksonville,
boundary.
Development
the
estuary
respectively.
in Onslow
command
control
on
of
New
approximately
25 miles
southwest
(NAVFACENGCOM,
the
to
1975).
Northwest
In
the
of
only
Northwest
base,
2,672
training
past,
Presently,
active
the
was carried
helicopter
under
and occasionally
Infrequent
use
landings.
Oak Grove
Within
15 miles
land--Croatan
Because
of
is
also
of
National
the
low
is
for
used
for
for
ground
Camp Lejeune
elevations
are
The
in
the
the
troop
station.
is
has
no longer
some camping
by scouting
County.
publicly
owned
and Camp Davis
plain,
groups.
and helicopter
Jones
large,
Forest,
coastal
field
exercises
eastern
three
air
aircraft.
property
recreation
in
Hofmann
for
here.
The
on 976 acres
Forest,
used
fixed-wing
occurs
status.
is
made
is
out
been
HOLF Oak Grove.
caretaker
facilities
have
training
of Camp Lejeune
and is
acres
wetlands
tracts
Forest.
form
of
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.l]5/BCKGRND.2
6/23/82
significant
acreage.
agricultural
and
a state
require
the
small
Productive
grains,
resort
regional
economy.
to
the
two major
corridors
New Bern
base
46,000
110,000
is
(NAVFACENGCOM,
5.2
HISTORY
Site
selection
was made
John
for
the
land
"The
1940s.
sawmill
closed
concern
to the
commercial
time
on
coastal
Typical
crops
finfish
and
and
turn,
tourism
has
are
in
the
and
area.
from
The
at
or are
eligible
the
the
there
extend
Swansboro
military
stationed
1975),
These
24 and 258.
and
stimulated
(NAVFACENGCOM,
associated
are
has boosted
in
58,
Routes
employed
World's
9 million
feet
in
1944,
was being
1954,
Complete
of
and was named
USMC (Odell,
In
Most
Construction
acquisition
reservation.
board
unique
by
south
northwest
to
principal
More
activities.
base,
for
are
and more
than
support
1975).
construction,
10,000
support
land
along
personnel
A. Lejeune,
During
the
in
exploited
a growing
agricultural.
plan
17 and U.S.
either
been
survive.
This,
master
Camp Lejeune
are
is
ecosystems,
leisure
developable
U.S.
military
people
coast
areas*
and Richlands
economic
extensive
the
recent
of
There
use is
Increased
most
have
tobacco.
along
along
Jacksonville
to
land
residential
According
some extent,
these
status
and
industries.
enlarged
then
that
remaining
estuaries
shellfish
from
level
part,
to
interests.
a protected
most
soybeans,
areas,
silvicultural
and national
plain,
For
These
the
Amphibious
camp began
in
honor
Training
in
1941
Base"
after
of Lieutenant
General
1970).
board
a sawmill
operated
when lumber
feet
of
with
a daily
by base
needs
timber
were
capacity
maintenance
were
filled
harvested
from
of
personnel.
by contract.
The
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.1]5/BCKGRND.3
6123182
Construction
of
functions
Point
the
were
became
problem
to the
present
and
During
World
War II,
Marines
for
with
that
This
has
plan
was used
been
and Vietnam
time,
and
the
major
developed,
and industrial
a master
Camp Lejeune
combat.
grew
where
Hadnot
activities.
that
The
addressed
these
and
problems.
camp was designated
Since
of
Point,
facility
maintenance
potential
the Korean
on Hadnot
As the
creation
other
the
started
centered.
crowded
led
during
base
a continuing
conflicts.
also
have
for
the
been
area
function
Toward
as a home base
FMF units
as a training
of
the
end of
Second
Marine
stationed
here
to
the
prepare
facility
World
War II,
Division.
as tenant
commands.
By 1945,
construction
Bay areas
was complete.
training
of black
Schools.
In
tactical
the
housing
is
Naval
World
provides
Camp Geiger.
housing
in
War II
and
services
It
once
a new medical
center
MCAS New River
was set
the
This
Terrace
was called
In
1942,
jurisdiction
Peterfield
three
the
in
Korean
for
all
operated
1975).
1968.
from
and Courthouse
designated
Marine
Corps
Parris
practice
has
discontinued,
while
I and II,
Support
received
been
personnel.
for
Service
Island
training,
commissioned
opened
(NAVFACENGCOM,
it
for
amphibious
Tarawa
Hospital
medical
dependents.
and
of
used
Camp Geiger,
originally
recruits
Bay hosts
site
Point,
now is
recent
Point,
Paradise
Point
Noncommissioned
Midway
Park,
and
other
areas.
U.S.
during
at
Montford
Montford
194Os,
provided
designated
The
the
Courthouse
still
the
troops,
training
however.
is
in
is
1943
and
War.
In
assigned
Point,
new runways
of MCAS Cherry
addition,
unit,
construction
up as a separate
but
the
were
Point.
served
along
in
During
and
hospital
Brewster
1951.
the
this
and
has become
name was changed
added
personnel
personnel
but
command
military
the
military
as a 500-bed
under
has
obsolete,
Boulevard
At that
time,
to New River
station
time,
their
came under
a PBJ squadron
in
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.1]5/BCKGRND.4
6/23/82
was based
here
and
(~~~VFACENGC~M,
the
facility
1975).
During
training
base
Resource
Management
In
MCOLF Oak Grove
1968,
River.
The
Grove.
During
Cherry
the
and
exception
Korean
War,
it
glider
training
was used
for
under
the
as a helicopter
end
the
for
training
was placed
War II,
the
used
jet
as a helicopter
fighters
(Natural
1975).
was used
of
PHYSICAL
5.3.1
Plan,
At
the
touch-and-go
World
Point.
5.3
for
field
was also
the
of
field
that
jurisdiction
base
and
was under
war,
all
of
renamed
the
MCAS New
HOLF Oak
command
structures
were
of MCAS
destroyed
with
runways.
FEATURES
Climatology
The
coastal
Summers
are
averages
wet
plain
area
of
humid
with
typically
more
than
seasons.
January
Winds
50 inches
Temperature
and 71°F
during
shown
5.3.2
in
Figure
days.
Winter
are
are
winters.
Rainfall
are
to be 33°F
usually
the
to 53°F
usual
during
1970).
generally
in
by mild
and summer
reported
(Odell,
predominate
of 230
influenced
temperatures.
year.
July
warm seasons
winds
season
per
in
is
elevated
ranges
to 88°F
the
north-northwest
growing
Camp Lejeune
south-southwesterly
winter.
A summary
of
There
is
while
a relatively
regional
climatic
Camp Lejeune
complex
long
conditions
is
5-1.
Topography
The
generally
the
seaward
the
base
of most
of
guarded
of
the
although
through
topography
portions
vary
is
msl.
flat
of
from
by a 200field
Drainage
areas
the
is
North
Intracoastal
Carolina
to 72 feet
between
barrier
Camp Lejeune
near
the
the
coast
coastal
above
islands
predominately
drain
directly
In
above
from
developed
of
the
on
elevation
msl.
The coast
complex.
Elevations
10 to 40 feet
toward
toward
typical
Elevations
however,
island
range
is
Waterway.
msl;
barrier
is
plain.
20 and 40 feet
to SOO-foot-wide
on the
at
the
sea level
Camp Lejeune
dune
of
the
areas,
the
above
New River,
Atlantic
Ocean
natural
drainage
TYPICAL
WIND
PATTERN
%OF WIND COMING FROM
INDICATED DIRECTION
WlNDS
3 MPH
CALMS
AVERAGE
F
,J
M
A
MONTHLY
M
AVERAGE
FIGURE
5-l.
Regional
Climatic
J
SOURCE:
‘ater and Air Research,
Inc.
14 MPH
TEMPERATURE
J
MONTHLY
Conditions
GUSTS OMR
3TOl4MPH
OR LESS
A
S
0
N
D
RAINFALL
in the Vicinity
MASTER
PLAN
CAMP
Consultlng
of MCB Camp
LEJEUNE,
Environmental
NOR
Lejeune
TH
CAROLINA,
Engineers
and
DRAFT
has
[IAS-CLJ.L]5/BCKGRND.5
6/23/82
been
crete
changed
by drainage
and asphalt
areas.
MCAS New River
sites
are
evaluated
stream
soils
are
is
plain.
a potential
of
the
elevation
of
11.0
msl
feet
5.3.3
con-
Point
area
respectively.
and
Most
two areas.
is
1965).
Hadnot
5-3,
these
extensive
in
the
Drainage
broad,
here
is
flat
inter-
poor,
and
the
problem
at
feet
Resource
floodplain
within
the
has mapped
at 7.0
(Natural
open
areas
of Engineers
loo-year
on the
base
Camp Lejeune
New River
the
for
the
above
limits
msl
Management
increases
loo-year
floodof
in
Plan,
the
upper
1975).
downstream
The
and is
coast.
Geology
geology
sediments
is
of
in
this
5-4
rock
similar
physiographic
province.
limestone,
and dolostone.
pattern
(Figure
Although
thick
important
and 5-5)
of
the
with
Cretaceous
younger
area.
Plain
on a basement
at
the
of
of
sediments
coastal
layers
sands
of
the
vary
and
in
clay,
commonly
in
nearest
land
is
approximately
1,400
the
300
age
covers
the
toward
from
marl,
a belted
surface
surface
igneous
silt,
is
of
Piedmont
plain
sand,
mantle
of
the
and clays
this
nearest
in
province.
wedge
complex
surface
the
Beneath
sediments
physiographic
a seaward-thickening
and Recent
sediments
the
subcrop
west
the
and
coast
5-6).
the
beneath
the
typically
and consist
of Pleistocene
progressively
is
Coastal
Sediments
to Recent
older
Atlantic
to that
Cretaceous
A mantle
the
area
(Figures
metamorphic
to
in
and
Camp Lejeune
Army Corps
MCB Camp Lejeune
The
are
Division,
floodplain
reaches
5-2
for
and
wet.
The U.S.
loo-year
of
sewers,
sub-basins
Figures
study
(Atlantic
often
Flooding
this
in
70 percent
areas
storm
Drainage
shown
in
Approximately
ditches,
purpose
sedimentary
sequence
MCB Camp Lejeune,
of
this
water-bearing
only
report.
rocks
Because
at
uppermost
these
Camp Lejeune.
strata
to
feet
contain
1,700
are
the
feet
pertinent
NEW
RIVER
HADNOT
FIGURE
5-2.
Surface
Water
Drainage
Sub-Basins
POINT
at Hadnot
AREA
Point,
MCB Camp
SOURCE:
and Air Research,
Inc.
MASTER
Lejeune
PLAN
CAMP
Consulting
SCALE
’
LEJEUNE,
IN FEET
NORTH
Environmental
2500
CAROLINA,
Engineers
1975
and
Scientists
NEW
EN1
RIVER
,’
HANCt
AIR STATION
-Q,-
FIGURE
5-3.
AREA
Surface Water
/r-j,
Drainage
Sub-Basin
at MCAS
p,.
New River,
SOURCE:
Vater
and Air Research,
Inc.
ConsulthO
MCB Camp
WATER
AND
Environmental
AIR
Lejeune
RESEARCH,
Engineers
INC.
and
Scientis
FIGURE
5-4.
Geologic
F
I
I
’
,
I
Cross Section
91.5
1 PLEISTOCENE,
,2oa
from Wayne
MILES
County,
CAMP
I 1
1
I
I
I
N.C. to Carteret
LEJEUNE
L
I
I
I
I
f
I
County,
N.C.
-I
I
b100
a
0
:
.
.
OLIGOCENE
500
LIOCENE
fllOCENE
500
EOCENE
\
000
1000
\
\
\
1500
2000
F:
ii
‘L
\
iii
2500
\
-----
a
:
VIRGINIA
NORTH
2
\
CAROLINA
2-I
3000
iz
\
3500
\
4000
CAMP
LOCATION
CRETACEOUS
AND
LATE
JURASSIC
UNIT
H
LEJEUNE
4500
MAP
5000
SOURCE:
Vater and
Air Research,
Inc.
Consulting
Environmental
BROWN,
Engineers
ET AL.,
and
1972
kientis
FIGURE
5-5.
Geologic
Cross
Section
from.Cumberland
County,
N.C. to Onslow
CAMP
86.3
MILES
I
I
F
z
k
2
w
2
I
County,
N.C.
LEJEUNE
I
+200
Cl00
0
2
2
v)
100
5:
200
!OO
300
100
100
ioo
500
i=
t
v
‘00
ii
>
300
ii
300
2
v)
1000
2
s
1100
VIRGINIA
_aw--------e--m-NORTH
CAROLINA
1200
1300
1400
1500
1600
1700
CAMP LEJEUNE
LOCATION MAP
SOURCE:
Ct’ater
and
&r
Research,
Inc.
Consultlng
Environmental
BROWN,
Engineers
ET AL.,
and
197:
Scientl
LEGEND
RECENT
PLIOCENE,
YORKTOWN
OLIGOCENE,
TRENT
EOCENE,
m-rm-m-
FIGURE
5-6.
SANDS
CASTLE
AND
FORMATION
FORMATION
HAYNE
CRETACEOUS
PEEDEE
PLEISTOCENE
SCARP
LIMESTONE
FORMATION
New River Area Geology
SOURCE:
Consulting
Environmental
BURNETTE.
Engineers
and
1977
Went
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.1]5/BCKGRND.6
6123182
The Eocene
Castle
calcareous
sand,
Hayne
and
Limestone
clay.
thickness
from
Oligocene
age unconformably
consist
of
--et
--et
The Yorktown
south
Late
Miocene,
date
it
the
of
time,
when the
5.3.4
Hydrology
the
The New River
central
is
is
sands
varies
feet.
Rocks
These
sediments
and clay
recent
of Onslow
County,
of
charts
rocks
than
in
and are
correlation
to more
Oligocene
unit
and outcrops
consists
of
Formation
lenses
has
charts
and clays
area
of
plain
1977).
It
with
to
of
200
feet
in
a band
of
long
been
(Baum,
--et
flows
thick
sand,
east
clay,
considered
al.,
1979a&b)
by the
into
the
coastal
New River
water
the
Atlantic
creeks
and
at
most
of the
of its
drain
tributaries.
area
clays,
flows
through
the
course,
the
sands,
base.
on the
entrenched
of Jacksonville,
New River
Camp
50 miles
channel
Ocean
its
feature
most
resistant
of
sea levels.
from
Over
narrow
less
band
and Recent
approximately
Carolina.
At Camp Lejeune,
small
of
South
seaward
raised
drainage
a relatively
stratigraphic
in Pleistocene
surface
a course
older
most
glaciers
receives
across
the
the
deposited
limestones.
and empties
form
dominant
of North
confined
mantle
continental
New River.
short,
and
were
Water--The
as it
drained
sand,
to
correlation
study
and Oligocene
Several
not
latest
sediments
is
dramatically
Inlet.
Hayne.
40 feet
the
This
retreat
coastal
New River
direction
the
Surface
is
Castle
subsurface
overlies
the
These
Lejeune
200
Hayne
Pliocene.
most
5.3.4.1
than
according
approximately
and Recent
sediments.
to more
calcareous
The Yorktown
but
Pleistocene
Castle
marl,
1972).
limestone.
in
(Burnette,
from
the
of Jacksonville.
and
Eocene
In
limestone,
the
the
Formation
Formation
marl,
in
overlie
of shell
County,
feet
limestone,
1979).
al.,
Onslow
100
Trent
age vary
(Brown,
units
the
al.,
Oligocene
and
approximately
to
(Baum,
In
fossiliferous
equivalent
consists
in
the
the
in
river
widens
and marls
a southerly
New River
of Camp Lejeune
These
the
creeks
that
flow
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.1]5/BCKGRND.7
6/23/82
into
the
Intracoastal
Waterway,
by Bear
Inlet,
Wilder,
(1978)
--et al.
by the U.S.
employed
Brown's
which
Inlet,
and the
state
the
Geological
is
probably
This
New River
below
Jacksonville
has not
New River
Inlet
have
upstream
flood
prism
determined
mined;
annual
the
tribution
to
runoff
Craven
annual
average
runoff
of
the
of
as 65 percent
of
total
runoff
in
the
New River
Salinity
rainfall.
is
at
largely
thousand
near
the
that
of
cantly
(ppt)
New River
sea water
lower
only
quality
published
by the
shellfishing
in
state
5-7).
for
is
shallow,
from
the
of
and
10 parts
However,
rainfall.
usually
inlet
esti-
and
ocean
salinities
equivalent
become
to
signifi-
1977).
North
Carolina
have
Title
15 of
the
North
Carolina
Administra-
at
Camp Lejeune
SC applies
usage
of
other
purposes."
falls
to
into
three
SC waters
usage
except
of
is
primary
the
been
two classifications
areas
Class
The rest
an
con-
in
and any
market
groundwater
waters
under
The best
for
(Burnette,
have
surface
Classification
recreation,
rains
was
deter-
northeast,
brackish,
the
The
been
1978).
is
diminishes
1977).
the
low
of
cycle
--et al.,
river
near
range
Camp Lejeune
of
the
at
1982).
has not
distance
Salinities
heavy
The New River
Camp Lejeune.
secondary
salinity
criteria
Code.
(Figure
Inlet,
tides
tidal
The
may reach
periods
the
of
is
of
extended
during
to
Camp Lejeune
New River
ppt).
area
(Wilder,
in
range
(Burnette,
northeast
during
(35
ft3
one
18 inches.
a function
At Jacksonville,
in
Counties,
same area
tidal
(Howard,
Camp Lejeune
the
The
The
Inlet
approximately
low-
and a spring
1979).
x lo5
and Carteret
in
why streamflow
Jacksonville
2.35
Ocean
measurements
determined.
New River
in
warm.
Water
at
runoff
The water
at
entering
however,
mated
1 foot
Atlantic
applicable
3.0.feet
Commerce,
to be approximately
The average
tive
of
to approximately
tidal
per
Department
(U.S.
of
the
Inlet.
not
been
range
to
streamflow
are
conditions.
feet
New River
Survey
tidal
a normal
connected
standard
gradient,
3.6
is
of
the
New River
"fishing,
recreation
New River
at
or
Camp
FIGURE
SC
5-7.
Water
Quality
Classifications
ESTUARINE
WATERS NOT SUITED
BODY CONTACT
SPORTS OR
COMMERCIAL
SHELLFISHING
FOR
SOURCE:
h’atc-r and Air Research.
Inc.
for the New
SA
NORTH
River at MCB Camp
ESTUARINE
COMMERCIAL
CAROLINA
WATERS SUITED
SHELLFISHING
DEPARTMENT
Consulting
Lejeune
FOR
OF NATURAL
Environmental
RESOURCES,
Engineers
and
197
Scienti!
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.1]5/BCKGRND.8
6/23/82
Lejeune
is
Class
usage
of
other
usage
Class
5.3.4.2
The
SA,
specified
water
table
beds
lie
between
semi-confined
uppermost
land
surface
In
purposes
best
and any
general,
the
or more
systems
in
history
of
unit,
first
aquifer
the
than
system
consists
aquifers.
local
water
of
source
of
300
feet
of
a
Confining
the
layers
of
hydrogeology
the
result
from
area.
bed.
amounts
the
deeper
and between
the
the
confining
and small
found
semi-confined
Variations
hydrogeologic
the
usually
is
table
This
clay.
aquifer,
aquifer
These
extends
consists
sediments
from
of
are
sand,
usually
and younger.
The
water
and
percolates
table
saturation
aquifer
into
is
the
10 feet
the
or
toward
stream
valleys
stream
areas,
some ground
and
expressed
geology.
using
Q=
at
it
when rainfall
saturation.
generally
discharges
to
will
aquifer
flow
of
the
into
the
the
given
zone
from
water.
water
table
aquifer
Law as
KA
m
where:
Q = Quantity
hl = Hydraulic
h2 = Hydraulic
m = Thickness
of
recharge
per
unit
time,
head
in
the
water
head
in
the
semi-confined
of
the
confining
table
bed,
ground
of
1965).
upland
In
favorable
semi-confined
the
Division,
flows
surface
from
as recharge
Recharge
to
(Atlantic
aquifer
water
seeps
Depth
Camp Lejeune
table
where
Darcy's
hl-h2
of
less
water
semi-confined
gradient
recharged
zone
water
first
in
is
Ground
the
market
Camp Lejeune
is
two aquifer
depositional
to
at
water
and one
the
limestone,
Pliocene
sediments
aquifers.
The
silt,
of
1982).
aquifer
complex
for
The
SB or SC classification."
Brackish
(Shiver,
the
classification.
"shellfishing
by the
300 feet
water.
msl
is
estuarine
Water
uppermost
base.fresh
highest
SA waters
Ground
below
the
aquifer,
aquifer,
areas
interaquifer
hydraulic
may be
to
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.1]5/BCKGRND.9
6/23/82
From
this,
aquifer
it
to
table
Hydraulic
A=
area
the
aquifer.
lower
is
The
the
conductivity
for
which
may be seen
aquifer
retard
k-
greater
flow
ground
only
than
thickness
between
The
semi-confined
aquifer
is
the
Eocene
Hayne
Limestone,
some places,
Regional
sand
and
groundwater
southeast.
The
penetrate
this
Narkunas
(1980)
the
central
day
to 12,100
7.4
x 10-5.
regional
reported
3 gpm/ft
The
confining
clay,
uous
for
thickness
2,000
fining
least
of
feet.
upper
in
the
water
the
limestone
the
Oligocene
the
Pliocene
altered
transmissivity
of North
semi-confined
the
confining
and calcarous
Trent
bed
aquifer
locally
sands
Formation,
Yorktown
of
and in
Formation.
is
toward
by pumping
per minute
per
Recent
the
data
the
wells
that
present,
dense
confining
are
either
some water
from
2.6
the
aquifer
6,100
in
feet2/
x 10m3
Camp Lejeune
to
was reported
(gpm/ft)
in
specific
1960
capacity
Camp Lejeune
well
thin
consist
at
varies
,
of
from
the
less
clay,
sandy
clay,
These
units
occur
as discontin-
any depth.
from
logs
or
water
of
(Appendix
bed
the
from
that
at
limestone
from
of drawdown
limestone.
and HP-616
the
varied
at
foot
the
20 gpm/ft.
where
of
wells
aquifer
to approximately
the
Carolina
indicate
semi-confined
HP-613
of
varied
of
Many
units
of
that
and may be present
Nos.
the
two aquifers.
Storativity
and occasionally
Well
in
of
semi-confined
capacity
units,
lenses
from
head
conductivity
is
feet2/day.
1960).
than
flow
head
flow
plain
as 5 to 10 gallons
tapping
and
aquifer.
Specific
wells
the
will
hydraulic
of
bed,
calculated.
hydraulic
composed
in
is
confining
the
the
limestone
flow
coastal
(LeGrand,
if
the
the
water
and hydraulic
of water
Castle
recharge
that
aquifer
of
D) shows
27 feet
for
absent.
table
A comparison
the
Wells
aquifer.
a reduction
to 6 feet
base
indicate
in
of
these
in
silty
the
logs
in
the
less
than
that
the
areas
con-
withdraw
at
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.1]5/BCKGRND.10
6/23/82
5.3.4.3
Migration
There
are
first
case,
age
to the
ground
three
potential
nants
where
minerals.
water
drainage
is
drainage
has
areas
of
be transported
At other
water,
except
is
composed
If
a site
In
the
the
of
aquifer
to
the
confining
What
In
contamination
at Georgetown,
is
flow
at
will
the
ground
earth
on the
units.
These
factors
that
conditions
of
lower
aquifers
the
toward
from
surface
still
tend
flow
from
is
it
surface.
and
limestone
gradient
Camp Geiger
rain-
because
in
a vertical
and 2)
near
to
of heavy
contamination
distant
aquifer
known
likely
water
the
zone
interface.
semi-confined
on 1) a hydraulic
base
and
most
through
contaminants
relatively
some circumstances
and
the
sewers,
periods
to
water
under
of
are
horizontally
of
in
of contami-
areas
be to
in
streams.
feature,
component
Camp Lejeune.
some areas,
to
tons,
storm
materials
to move
(i.e.,
semi-confined
conductivity
example,
permeable
horizontal
depend
the
likely
are
semi-confined
adsorption
during
susceptible
water
the
Contaminants
drain-
may then
metallic
by ditches,
to surface
highly
aquifer
developed
drainage
is
table
the
the
groundwater/surface
areas
table
conditions
toward
the
but
water
is
a surface
interstream
topography,
concrete.
can be expected
at
drainage),
and
predominantly
near
aquifer,
discharge
the
aquifer
of
modifed
adjacent
of
in
been
transport
areas
table
rapid
two pathways
down into
the
water
other
chiefly
as a result
In
by surface
water
contaminants,
to surface
times,
in
is
of
may migrate
most
asphalt
directly
fall.
water
they
of
by clay
extensive
the
or
Camp Lejeune.
The
entering
may be expected
natural
table
water,
at
off-base
tributaries.
Contaminants
water
Surface
The
and its
Some attenuation
ground
pathways
may be carried
New River
to surface
aquifer.
migration
contaminants
water.
migrate
Potential
area,
may develop
water
thickness
the
well
with
very
the
from
These
table
and
not
vary
is
follow
aquifer.
the
are
to
aquifer
hydraulic
known at
locations.
unlikely.
For
hydrogeology
tends
to
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.l]5/BCKGRND.l1
6/23/82
prevent
migration
of
water
aquifer
(Division
of
Environmental
the
confining
gradient
zone
is
These
from
is
from
the
water
aquifer
thick
toward
may be present
in
to the
1979).
50 feet
limestone
same conditions
aquifer
Management,
approximately
the
table
and
the
parts,
This
the
water
but
not
deeper
is
because
hydraulic
table
aquifer.
all,
of Camp
Lejeune.
Variability
the
of
the
confining
semi-confined
gradient
limestone
between
water
Camp Lejeune,
large-scale
the
base
water
the
semi-confined
with
contaminant
possible
unknown
status
abandoned,
base
that
there
were
closed.
BIOLOGICAL
three
mink,
and
habitat
wells.
turkey,
The
many
creeks,
types
of
Reptiles
include
alligators,
found
the
latter
the
chain
in
the
ability
of
at
to supply
pressure
to assume
is
Camp Lejeune
not
in
no
is
properly
the
sealed
when
Conversations
treatment
abandoned
plant
wells
group
forests
with
have
nor
bald
swamps,
details
of
Hofmann,
and
eagles,
venemous.
marshes,
and
fly
and
yellow
perch,
pond,
longleaf,
provide
wood-
falcons,
fish
redbreast
and
muskrat,
pocosins
snakes.
Freshwater
bass,
includes
catchers,
peregrine
largemouth
loblolly,
life
raccoons,
egrets,
turtles,
warmouth,
include
Animal
rabbits,
including
include
pickerel,
forests
are
habitat.
quail,
birds,
osprey.
bluegill,
decline
hydraulic
unknown
Camp Lejeune--Croatan,
bays,
owls,
of
water
of
squirrel,
woodcocks,
lakes
necessary
contaminants.
wildlife
hawks,
and
water
at
a well
for
surrounding
extensive
otter.
of
If
and the
peckers,
species
quality
no inventory
areas
bear,
for
is
of
aquifer.
a pathway
is
the
aquifers
an overall
the
protection
although
ground
decreases
deeper
maintenance
Camp Davis--provide
black
produced
of
FEATURES
forest
deer,
of
to groundwater
may become
indicated
The
the
abandoned
at
semi-confined
This
to
personnel
5.4
and
assurance
Furthermore,
withdrawals
threat
it
how they
table
aquifer.
of
decreases
aquifer.
may have
movement
Another
units
catfish.
and
and
Several
in
the
streams
sunfish,
Trees
shortleaf
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.1]5/BCKCRND.12
6/23/82
pines;
and
sweet
gum,
tupelo
bay,
In
loblolly
understory
of
species
also
flytraps
The
evergreen
can
pines)
and
substantial
are
major
streams
under
wildlife
of
cockaded
in
endangered
At
Wildlife
managed
and Venus
with
large
loblolly
areas
of
those
along
to provide
are
species
Wildlife
both
managed
such
for
as the
the
red-
2nd
5-i
fruit
presents
openings,
is
plots,
considered
the
locations
small-game
of
management
and
Plan,
in
grass
wildlife
within
Upland
part
the
quail,
wildlife
the
United
turkey,
management
and wildlife
manage-
by providing
a variety
roads,
seeds
and
food
plots,
the
1975).
game species,
clearings,
access
protection
in
squirrel,
provides
of natural
Management
forest
edible
plots
including
in
forest
produce
shrubs,
on guidelines
fox
perennial
which
plants,
Handbook.
squirrel,
planted
of
pollution,
based
accomplished
trees
and
stream
Resource
is
forestry
enhancement
to coordinate
forests,
food
of
under
species
Forest
populations,
and are
an attempt
including
wildlife
flytraps.
(Natural
gray
are
several
Management
bear,
management
60,000
carnivorous
Camp Lejeune
abundant
is
than
are
wildlife
Wildlife
black
There
shrub
wildlife
are
host
species
at
are
habitats,
Figure
areas
prevention
Service
deer,
program.
of
plant
Timber-producing
exception
Smaller
unusual
primarily
species.
wildlife
and Venus
wildlife
waterfowl,
strips,
and
the
more
soils
protection,
management
including
of
covered,
bay,
a shrub
sundews,
with
borders
increased
Forest
ment.
forests'
Acidic
production,
soil
acres,
sundews,
endangered
and
the
plants,
States
plants,
pond,
control.
or threatened
112,000
and herbs.
beauty,
Several
sweet
woodpecker.
management.
pitcher
These
and erosion
Of Camp Lejeune's
vines,
swamps.
generally
tree
hardwood
management
is
1982).
longleaf,
of
maple,
Wilson,
predominantly
stands
and
species.
1982;
red
there
pitcher
Yang,
(shortleaf,
even-aged
habitat
benefit
deciduous
is
oak,
wetlands,
including
complex
softwood
areas
of
and
1981;
of
yellow-poplar,
pocosin
be found,
Camp Lejeune
wood
the
(Richardson,
amounts
gum,
small-game
and
plantings
fruits.
fish
14 wildlife
ponds,
units
of
LEGEND
l
WILDLIFE
A
FISH
.
WILDLIFE
FOCiD
PONDS
OPENINGS
SMALL
-
l
-0 i -T
FIGURE
SOURCE:
later and Air Research,
Inc.
NATURAL
RESOURCE
5-8.
MANAGEMENT
GAME
PLOTS
WILDLIFE
UNIT
NUMBER
WILDLIFE
UNIT
BOUNDARI
VICINITY
\ .snr
PLOTS
IES
MAP
Wildlife Units at MCB Camp Lejeune
PLAN
CAMP
Consulting
LEJEUNE,
Environmental
NORTH
CAROLINA,
Engineers
and
1975
Sclentisl
DRAFT
the
[IAS-CLJ.L]5/BCKGRND.13
6123182
complex
(Natural
Resource
Management
Plan,
1975;
NAVFACENGCOM,
1975).
Ecosystems
upland),
discussed
wetland,
5.4.1
and
Terrestrial
Camp'Lejeune
report
will
four
upland
Longleaf
pine,
2.
Loblolly
pine,
3.
Loblolly
pine/hardwood,
and
4.
Oak/hickory.
Pine--Longleaf
is
Longleaf
upland
bay,
Gallberry,
sites.
holly,
in
the
low-bush
Quail
find
this
the
gum,
forest
(Natural
principal
pine
post,
are
the
huckleberry,
(or
fox
are
quite
species
and willow
and
species
squirrel
type
Resource
associated
titi,
Herbaceous
and
types
blackjack,
black
understory.
sawgrass.
turkey
terrestrial
are:
Turkey,
and
yaupon,
common
These
habitat
1.
red
into
Ecosystems
1975).
on higher
be broken
communities.
Plan,
5.4.1.1
with
this
aquatic
contains
Management
and
in
conducive
chinquapin
along
are
teaberry,
in
for
oaks,
species.
include
common
and occurs
this
ferns,
habitat
nesting
also
and wild
and brooding
range.
5.4.1.2
area
red
Loblolly
and many
cedar,
Pine-now grow
holly,
, gallberry,
understory.
Weeds
smartweed,
beggarweed,
provided
above
are
species.
farm
and
and herbaceous
this
burning
the
oak
forest
is
main
timber
common,
and wax myrtle
include
pea.
type,
done
Deer,
make
improve
if
food
the
cherry,
huckleberry,
up the
pokeweed,
turkey,
of
black
while
especially
to
stand
Persimmon,
are
plants
and partridge
in
is
homesteads.
scrub
beauty-berry,
common
or prescribed
pine
on old
dogwood,
chinquapin
and quail
Loblolly
ragweed,
gray
squirrel,
clearings
and
cover
are
for
the
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.1]5/BCKGRND.14
6/23/82
5.4.1.3
Loblolly
hardwoods
and
black
cherry,
while
high
just
below
red
bush
understory.
pure
holly,
stands
pea,
common
forest
of
occurs
loblolly
bay,
gallberry,
and herbaceous
are
mixed
sweet
huckleberry,
partridge
mammals
This
the
cedar,
Weeds
pokeweed,
small
Pine/Hardwood--
and
pine.
dogwood
gum,
are
common,
comprise
plants
include
panic
and
beggarweed.
Gray
squirrel,
here.
The
habitat
association
is
also
the
Sweet
trees
and wax myrtle
is
above
the
grass,
broomsedge,
deer,
and other
conducive
to wild
turkey.
5.4.1.4
and
Oak/Hickory-creeks
below
post,
oak
black
chinquapin,
scrub
in
Black
wood duck.
Wetland
Wetlands
bears
are
in
streams
and ponds
unusual
wetland
the
coastal
to
salt
beyond
system
is
water.
as wetlands
formed
physical
According
the
these
systems
bodies,
of
cover
and periodically
along
species.
gum,
black
common.
gum,
Blueberry,
Herbaceous
Wildlife
wild
plants
frequently
turkey,
deer,
term
and
of
depression
expands
water
of
Pocosins
the
are
to fire.
as a
from
an
wetlands
peat
ground
to
retains
water,
above
expand
the
with
level
peat
of
1974).
evergreen
acres,
most
initially
The
as the
above
freshwater
subject
originates
by capillarity
these
The
referred
depressions.
and Bellamy,
freshwater
estuaries.
pocosin
or
the
bordering
has been
basins
Carolina's
are
coastal
on a hill."
(Moore
thousands
those
"swamp
(1981),
North
from
which
The
wetland
mass
to Richardson
50 percent
vary
pocosin,
holding
groundwater
than
in
boundries
as a reservoir,
main
here.
(1979).
name meaning
Eventually,
acting
found
plain
the
Indian
the
sedges.
squirrel,
marshes
bog by Christensen
develop
also
are
streams
bottomland
principal
understory.
gray
the
sweet
also
along
Ecosystems
found
Algonquin
and
include
the
poplar,
up the
found
and above
are
and dogwood
paspalums,
habitat
oak
yellow
make
teaberry,
this
red
oak;
maple,
frequently
stands
southern
cherry,
ferns,
observed
the
and
and beauty-berry
include
shrub
loblolly/hardwood
chestnut,
persimmon,
5.4.2
the
White
hardwoods.
Black,
This
shrub
bogs
wetlands.
isolated
Much
comprise
Typically,
from
of
the
other
pocosin
water
more
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.1]5/BCKCRND.15
6/23/82
habitat
in
North
drainage
with
pocosins
covered
acres
Carolina
subsequent
of
systems
(Richardson,
A shrub
understory
hydrologic
white
The
characteristics
the
species
most
because
also
are
black
species
--et
pocosin
are
species
endemic
the
find
ecosystems
habitat
types
once
in
3.
Sweet
bay/swamp
black
4.
Tidal
marshes,
5.
Coastal
stated
above.
fetter
bush,
pocosin
species
include
maple,
sweet
understood
than
bay,
species,
but
serve
but
those
wildlife
also
now are
are
confined
two vertebrates,
Small
species
mammals
the
and reptiles
as white-tailed
deer
and
into
five
pocosins.
complex
can be separated
Plan,
1975).
pocosin,
and
tupelo,
gum and red
maple,
(commonly
known
and
beaches.
Pine--This
dominated
pine,
in
aquatic
pocosins
widely,
Management
oak/cypress
that
turtle.
Camp Lejeune
Resource
or
the
well
include
Such
gum/water
longleaf
other
red
endemic
ranged
spotted
Sweet
is
pine
the
refuge
(Natural
notes
Endemics
pocosins.
on the
less
for
2.
swamp)
695,000
resulted
Other
pine,
are
habitat
Pond
Pond
example,
1981.)
(1981)
1.
5.4.2.1
or
for
only
dominates
pine.
longleaf
fauna
which
and
to
Wetland
1962,
has
to
trees
pond
al.,
destruction.
also
cutting
by 1979,
export
is
and
Wilbur
treefrog
bear
In
pocosins
emergent
loblolly
They
of habitat
barrens
common
of
those
pine
scattered
community.
for
to timber
but
of
and nutrient
(Christensen,
two ways:
refuge
acres,
Destruction
with
bay
plant
lost
development.
million
2.2
regime,
cedar,
loblolly
being
1981).
The
and
of
than
undisturbed.
changes
Atlantic
gradually
agricultural
more
remained
vegetation.
is
red
habitat
by pond
maple,
Understory
and
sheep
pine
with
sweet
bay,
plant
species
laurel.
Atlantic
white
and loblolly
Associated
as pocosin
include
marsh
bay
cedar,
loblolly
also
present
greenbriar,
and
or upland
aquatic
cyrilla,
plants
and
as
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.1]5/BCKGRND.16
6/23/82
include
mosses,
Animals
which
bear.
seldom
is
bear
with
in
brush
5.4.2.2
the
species
while
hawthorn,
mulberry
make
sweet
are
5.4.2.3
bay,
also
up the
woodcocks)
are
bay or
this
Tidal
coastal
areas
saltgrass,
cordgrass,
provides
wildlife
alligators,
habitat
type.
area
present
is
ash,
make
of the
and
in
the
year,
black
holly,
and waterfowl
are
found
to
Maple,
grape,
maple
overgrown
most
seasonal.
of
at
of
and extends
Huckleberry,
type
include
are
habitat
hornbeam,
rose
habitat
to harvest.
gum,
and
palmetto
(including
habitat.
Gum and Red Maple--As
tidal
is
the
the
name
dominant
and
up the
waterfowl,
free
elm
are
implies,
tree
species
also
present.
understory.
mink,
Fauna
otter,
raccoon,
and
food
at
the
the
New River
of
few remaining
North
filling
or
man-made
aquatic
plants
and cover.
otter
other
such
This
and spikerush.
and river
mouth
the
from
bulrush,
with
marsh
one of
of marsh
raccoons,
is
pocosins
squirrel.
relatively
consists
base
with
Swamp tupelo,
this
complex
Vegetation
this
and
because
existence
rivers
turkey,
gum and red
Marshes--The
Camp Lejeune
along
bear,
, grape,
and gray
bear,
5.4.2.4
in
and
and black
pocosin-type
on the
is
present.
habitat.
found
bear
continued
water
and elm
in
of
the
availability
Black
swamp black
for
and Tupelo--This
if
found
Bay/Swamp
cover
flytraps.
deer
be unprofitable
dominate
bay,
commonly
include
pocosins
would
Deer,
rattan-vine
frequently
the
streams
frequently
floodplain
Greenbrier,
deer,
red
here
for
along
water
understory.
Sweet
sweet
if
and Venus
presence
Oak/Cypress
Cypress
gums dominate
of
that
bottomlands
shoreline.
The
Many
Gum/Water
moist
escape
responsible
area.
pine
sundews,
observed
by humans.
the
and
rich,
plants,
excellent
primarily
Sweet
marine
the
provide
disturbed
Camp Lejeune
black
pitcher
can be frequently
Pocosins
are
in
ferns,
Migratory
are
frequently
Carolina
changes.
as algae,
habitat
waterfowl,
seen
cattails,
generously
shorebirds,
within
this
on
DRAFT
IIAS-CLJ.~]~
5.4.2.5
and
Coastal
along
house
the
of
training
2nd Division,
Force
involve
regulations
the
use
presently
cross
the
ecologically
(greenbrier,
yaupon,
(sea
oats,
barrier
oak
holly,
and red
Although
coastal
beaches
are
generally
low
as buffers
to
in
mainland
and
units.
vehicles
to
The
These
Training
are
permitted
protect
the
vegetation
woody
along
the
plants
and
Virginia
weeds and
creeper,
swamp
to other
types
in
comparison
value
to most
game
habitat
for
provide
to
AMTRACs.
intended
pen,
flower).
Wing
to
also
units
and palmetto),
butterfly
and passion
the
Air
cedar),
wax myrtle,
beachgrass,
company-size
dunes.
and
The Marines
tracked
are
Waterway
recreation
including
heavy
mallow,
serve
from
restrictions
for
beach.
equipment
where
Intracoastal
used
and Marine
heavy
(live
the
are
on the
Troops,
coastal
trees
along
maneuvers
of
These
sensitive
includes
unit
restrict
dunes.
beaches
Camp Lejeune
command
assault
exercises
beaches
Coastal
Banks
military
beach
combined
herbs
Outer
a small
conduct
to
Beaches--
/BCKGRND.~~
6/23/82
species,
the
they
many
shorebirds.
5.4.3
Aquatic
Ecosystems
Aquatic
ecosystems
estuary,
numerous
Waterway.
here.
optimum
of
yields
and
Resource
include
ensure
yellow
The
in
Bay,
Bay,
Traps
The Intracoastal
passes
ponds
the
bluegill,
redfin
estuary
and
Waterway
the
of
lakes,
the
New River
Intracoastal
saltwater
fish
management
of
the
desirable
species
to
live
produce
fish
species
1975).
bass,
and Ellis
between
Plan,
small
under
harvest
species
bays
part
are
continued
perch,
of
and
game fish
New River
especially
and
freshwater
Management
largemouth
pumpkinseed,
catfish.
of
freshwater
freshwater
consist
creeks,
variety
A number
Principal
As it
tributary
A wide
(Natural
River
on Camp Lejeune
in
the
redear
pickerel,
is
used
protected
ponds,
creeks,
sunfish,
pickerel,
extensively
for
of
the
the
New
warmouth,
jack
areas
and
river
and channel
shellfishing,
such
as Stones
Cove.
cuts
mainland
the
southeast
and
the
edge
barrier
of
Camp Lejeune.
islands,
the
waterway
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.1]5/BCKGRND.18
6/23/82
carries
a heavy
steady
flow
is
found
to
the
of
in
the
drum,
part
of
many
species
are
used
the
marsh
The
long-range
North
of
migrating
areas
Waterway
the
near
area
Division
of
5.4.4
the
flora
State
of North
includes
200 freshwater
designated
25 are
North
croaker,
(Natural
Atlantic
flyway
Area
shorebirds
(Table
of
and
habitats
also
Carolina
in
the
employ
recreational
and Intracoastal
marine
for
as the
game
Morehead
fisheries
a marine
laboratory.
Menhaden
Carolina
Department
Research
Institute
of
is
of Marine
Natural
Resources
City.
Species
of
approximately
fauna
fish,
78 amphibians,
or
for
as well
has
of North
vertebrate
(Cooper,
calls
New River
Center
consists
as endangered
Carolina
spot,
abundant
region.
of
University
Service
are
and transient
by the
the
or Endangered
The
mammals
listed
the
species
because
of North
Carolina
plants.
offshore
adjacent
1975).
Duke
Fisheries
vascular
or
the
and photographer
The University
Threatened,
175 winter
within
along
important
Fisheries
Marine
Rare,
access
Beaufort,
Beaufort.
and
Ocean
Shellfish,
also
Camp Lejeune
observer
is
Marine
Sciences
for
(NAVFACENGCOM,
At nearby
The National
fish
1975).
through
and local
plan
wildlife
fisherman
resource.
Atlantic
are
and a
saltwater
bluefish,
clams,
pass
of
and sailfish.
is
summer
as a nursery.
the
Regionally,
and
birds
and increased
and
the
weakfish,
coast
birds,
in
NAVFACENGCOM,
Carolina
management
for
and
and
1975;
the
A variety
marlin,
scallops,
by migrating
improvements
The
tarpon,
Plan,
during
year-round.
flounder,
mackeral,
the
boats
Waterway
include
Management
This
pleasure
barges
by oysters,
Resource
hunter
private
Intracoastal
These
represented
also
of
commercial
base.
whiting,
flow
of
over
79 reptiles,
80 nonmarine
1977).
Of these
federal
government
5-l).
The North
by the
organisms,
State
of
and subspecies
225 breeding
mammals,
as endangered
Carolina
taxa
865 species
birds,
threatened
3,400
and
28 pelagic
26 have
of North
Carolina
or threatened
Department
been
of
and
for
DRAFT
[IAS-cLJ.1]VrB/5-1.1
h/24/82
Table 5-l.
Scientific
State and Federal
Status of Sensitive
Species for North Carolina
&me
Felis concolor cougar
Trichechus manatus
Myotis grisescens
Myotis sodalis
l3.rbalaenaglacialis
Balaenoptera physalus
M9gaptera novaeangliae
Balaenoptera borealis
Nxth
&rolina*
Federalt
E
T
E
T
Eastern cougar
Florida nmnatee
Graybat
Indiana bat
Atlantic
right whale
FYnbackwhale
Humpbackwhale
Seiwhale
BIBDS
Falcoperegrinus
anatun
Falco peregrinus tund~5us
JMiaeetusleucocephalus
Vermivora baclxnanii
Dendroica kirtlandii
Pelecsnus occidentalis
carolinensis
Picoides borealis
American peregrine falcon
Artic peregrine falcon
Bald eagle
Bachaan's warbler
Kirtland's
warbler
kstembrownpelican
Red-cockadedwxdpecker
FISH
Acipenser brevirostrun
Hybopsis mxacha
Short-nose sturgeon
Spotfin chub
REPTILES
Alligator
mississippiensis.
Cheloniamytios
Erenaochelys imbricata
Tepidochelys kempii
Dernochelys coriacfz3
Caretta caretta
American alligator
Green turtle
Hawksbill turtle
Kemp's ridley turtle
Leatherback turtle
loggerhead turtle
Mx,Luss
Mesodonclarkinantahala
N3ondaylandsnai1
T
T
Sagittaria
fasciculata
Wkoniamontana
Bunchedarrowhead
Nxmtain golden heather
E
T
E
* Parker, W. and L. Dixon, 1980.
t U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service,
E=Endangered
andT =Ihreatened.
1980.
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.l]5/BCKGRND.19
6/23/82
Agriculture
state
is
currently
endangered
proposed
occur
in
North
Carolina's
Carteret,
described
Table
and
the
an agreement
that
might
is
the
under
Table
5-2
review
inclusion
Counties.
species
on the
Camp Lejeune
on the
presents
which
or Onslow
protection
and
to
to
U.S.
are
known
to
The presence
Fish
Resource
of
complex
of
is
of
are
rare
and Wildlife
Commission
endangered
Habitats
protection
forest
plans
the
Wildlife
Camp Lejeune.
provided
management
taxa
for
Jones,
Carolina
for
base's
protection
in
North
inhabit
the
list.
MCB Camp Lejeune,
preservation
through
plant
plants
5-3.
of
into
the
and
Craven,
The NREA Division
for
taxa
sensitive
in
additional
and threatened
14 additional
Service,
reviewing
and threatened
maintained
at
and endangered
and wildlife
management
programs.
such
and critical
habitat
species
prevent
or mitigate
have
adverse
entered
species
Camp Lejeune
species
Full
is
effects
of
designated
station
activities.
As part
of
emphasis
is
eagles,
The
the
rare
placed
cougars,
in
5-3.
important
in
controlling
cavities
used
feet
of
(Hooper,
--et
Camp Lejeune
Plan,
1975).
In
other,
al.,
small
in
been
in
pests
are
other
mapped
are
of
attack
in
all
colonies,
they
red-cockaded
and marked
in
(Natural
Figure
woodpeckers.
on insects
pine
cavity
bald
on Camp Lejeune
overmature
the
special
osprey,
forests
subsists
which
usually
shown
program,
alligators,
pine
woodpecker
Numerous
areas
management
and red-cockaded
present
some colonies,
1980).
These
is
birds
but
have
sparrows,
insect
by these
disease.
each
seaside
This
species
and sightings
woodpecker
Table
red-heart
endangered
on habitat
dusky
red-cockaded
noted
and
and is
trees.
pine
trees
may he 0.5
woodpecker
Resource
5-q. Y
as
Nesting
trees
with
are
within
mile
apart
colonies
Management
300
on
[IAs-CLJ.1]&/5-2.1
6/24/82
Table 5-2.
Scientific
Proposed Protected
C&law Counties
Plant
List
for Nx-th &rolina*
only Those Taxa Known to Occur in Carteret,
Known
Countiest
@mnx-iNaw
Naw
Propxed
Listing
Craven, Jones,
01:
PKDpEd
[email protected]
status
Taxa
Arenariagodfreyi
Godfrey's
sandwxt
Aspleniun
heteroresiliens
Carolina
spleenwxt
Calauwilfa
brevipilis
fern
Craven,Jones
kodland
Jones
Shaded marl outcrops
E
Carteret,
&lslow
carex chapnanii
chapnan's sedge
craven
Dry,sandy~~~Is
Cystopteris
Tennessee bladder
Craven, Jones
&rl
Carteret,
Craven,
Jones, Ck~low
savannahs, pcosins,
lowbay, upland bogs,
and mesic envirorxnents.
kidic
soils.
E
Gxrteret,
Craven
Linzesinks,pools,andponds
T
Carteret,
Onslow
Craven,
shrubbogs
plain
SC-E
Lysin&lia
asperulaefolia
Myriophyllun
Sarracenia
W&3ago
Utricularia
&wgh-leaf
bse
laxun
loosestrife
watenxilfoil
Kxmtain
rubra
swet pitcher-plant
Spring-flowering
vema
olivacea
Dzxf
fern
goldenrod
bladderwxt
Long-leaf
E
Riverbanksandreed
tennesseensis
Craven
seepage slopes of marl substrates
pine forests,
bogs, and savannahs
and roadsides
T
T
outcrops
E
and savannahs in the coastal
Craven, 0x&w
Savannahs, pocosins, pine kens,
flatwods,and
shrubbogs
Carteret
Shallcw,acid
Craven
Riverbanks, swmps,andtidalnwshesin
thecoastalplain
I
PP
pmdswithpHof
pine
E
5
T
3to
Taxa UnderReview
Aeschynanenevirginica
Sensitive
Dionaeaawcipula
Venus flytrap
Carteret, Craven
Jones, Onslow
Wet, sandy ditches,
andopenbognkxrgins
Gentiana autumalis
Pine barren gentian
Craven, &slow
Bcosins,
Pamassia
Carolina
Ck-lsloW
SavaImahs
caroliniana
joint-vetch
pamassia
* North Carolina Department of Agriculture,
t Radford, A.E., H.E. Axles, and C.R. Bell,
** Radford, A.E., H.E. Axles, and C.R. Bell,
E=Endangered,T
= Threatened,
SC-E = Special
1981a, 1981b.
1968; JustIce, W.S. and C.R. Bell,
1968 and Cooper, J.E., ed., 1977.
Concern-Endangered,
1968; Beal, E.O.,
I = Indeterminate,
pocosins,
sawwnahs,
savannahs, and pine barrens
PP
PP
1977; axl Wilson,
and PP = Primary
E.J.,
Proposed Species.
1982.
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.l]VTB/5-3.1
6/24/82
Table
Comments on Sensitive
Species
Regarding
Study Area (Camp Lejeune
Complex*)
5-3.
Species
Occurrence
Within
Comment
Eastern
cougar
Florida
manatee
Gray bat
Indiana
bat
Atlantic
right
Finback
whale
Humpback whale
Sei whale
Possible
transient
but not seen since
1974
Study area is northern
extreme
of summer
range
Not in area
Not in area
Possible
migrant
offshore
Possible
migrant
offshore
Possible
migrant
offshore
Possible
migrant
offshore
whale
BIRDS
American
peregrine
falcon
Arctic
peregrine
falcon
Bald eagle
Bachman's
warbler
Kirtland's
warbler
Eastern
brown pelican
Red-cockaded
woodpecker
Possible
but not common
Possible
Not reported
or seen
Possible
migrant
but not observed
Possible
migrant
but not reported
Reported
in area
Frequent
in area with known nesting
FISH
Shortnose
sturgeon
Spotfin
chub
Not
Not
observed
in area
recently
REPTILES
American
alligator
Green turtle
Hawksbill
turtle
Kemp's
ridley
turtle
Leatherback
turtle
Loggerhead
turtle
Not probable
Known nesting
sites
along
Possible
migrant
offshore
Possible
migrant
offshore
Possible
migrant
offshore
Known nesting
sites
along
MOLLUSKS
Noonday
land
snail
Not
in
area
arrowhead
golden
heather
Not
Not
in
in
area
area
PLANTS
Bunched
Mountain
* Peterson,
Cooper,
Parker,
C., 1982.
J.E.,
ed.,
1977.
W. and L. Dixon,
1980.
coast
coast
areas
FIGURE,
5-9.
Red-Cockaded
Woodpecker
Colony
Areas at MCB Camp
SOURCE:
Water and Air Research,
Inc.
Consulting
Envlronmentol
LeJeune
PETERSON,
Engineers
C., 1982
ond
Scientists
6.0
ACTIVITY FINDINGS
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.5]ACT/FIND.l
6/23/82
6.0
ACTIVITY
This
chapter
FINDINGS
contains
may involve
past
potential
practices.
disposal
which
confirmation,
this
information
Throughout
the
to
there
the
site
information
is
sites
at
for
the
operations
public
at
health
was established
base.
of
ordnance
mortar
while
are
feature.
year.
operations,
No manufacturing
ordnance
range
rounds.
smaller
summaries,
this
before
Numerous
amphibious
All
which
sites
requiring
and is
presented
the
In
reader
these
chapter
should
are
carefully
is
instances,
be consulted.
is
from
shipped
small
Principal
storage
arms
magazine
areas
concern
controlled,
about
past
dis-
this
discussion
is abbreviated
and
function.
It is recognized,
however,
a significant
base activity.
Camp Lejeune
as a training
characteristic
the
comprehensive
or environmental
operations
each
For
Camp Lejeune
that
nance
is
information.
end of
For that
reason,
an overview
of this
to
more
operations
Emphasis
is placed
on
an inventory
of all waste
descriptions.
more
posal
practices.
presents
only
training
and
ORDNANCE
little
ordnance
chapter
and operations
forms
ordnance
is
activities
contamination.
includes
specific
OPERATIONS
Because
end of
activities
information
6.1
base
forms.
the
referred
of
environmental
At the
sites
using
summaries
exist
World
War II
activities,
and has retained
from
infantry
require
substantial
or load
and pack
in
and
stored
ammunition
storage
in
other
is
amounts
in
designated
ord-
occur
facility.
rockets,
the
tank
of
operations
on the
to
and
this
on
Types
artillery,
Frenchs
places
and
Creek
area,
on the
base.
Because
of
designated
zones,
the
training
as firing
called
G-10,
mission,
ranges
N-2,
a substantial
and impact
and K-2,
for
areas.
high
amount
There
explosives.'
of
land
has been
are
.
three
impact
The
New River
IG-10
Impact
Area.
Bounded by GC 943361 to 941336 to 920341 to 907336 to
Coordinates
based on Camp Lejeune
Special
Map 5th ed.
896361 to 943361.
1976.
N-l Impact
Area.
Extends
east from the junction
of Gridline
94 and
Onslow Beach along
the beach line
to Bear Creek Inlet,
and then along
Bear Creek to a point
400 yards north
of the Intracoastal
Waterway,
and
thence
on a line
400 yards north
of a parallel
to the Intracoastal
Waterway
to Gridline
94.
Ordnance
from aircraft
will
impact
on Brown's
Island
only.
K-2 Impact
Area.
Bounded by GC 782332 to 794346,
east to New River,
south and west along
the shoreline
of New River
and Stone Bay to 782332.
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.5]ACT/FIND.Z
6/23/82
bisects
west
Camp Lejeune
sections.
A bombing
This
range
for
lery
target
to
There
for
are
the
to as the
Brqwn's
Island
with
ordnance
the
amounts
collected
North
to
exceed
near
the
west
side
of
are
consequence
of
Brown's
is
The
used
by air-
explosive
also
and
Island.
Carolina.
a net
complex
east
Atlantic.
Complex
impact
the
is
weight
used
the
by artil-
propellant
less
by skilled
than
are
are
are
used
methods.
At
burned
typical.
They
of
the
mission
to
There
activity.
and disposed
G-4
and electri-
disposal
incompletely
1 pound
personnel
They
by this
or
They
Burning
main
generated
zones.
camp.
or dud ordnance.
can be residual
but
Swansboro,
Target
into
the
at
not
materials
of
borders
established
base
unserviceable,
waste
and K-2
rounds.
on the
for
G-10
and
The target
trajectory
ordnance
there
tinely
of
inert,
compounds,
has been
southwest
and K-326
no chemical
G-10
7 miles
high
exploding
zones
of
TNT equivalent.
east
times,
impact
as BT-3
two EOD areas
of
cally
splits
southeast
runs
releive
dispose
is
is
250 pounds
is
known
referred
craft
of
N-2
property
island
and
in
munition
are
rou-
an appropriate
way.
6.2
OPERATIONS,
Support
and maintenance
generate
tates
NONORDNANCE
most
waste
functions
materials.
decentralization
6.2.1
Vehicle
Vehicle
use
extensive.
of
both
Vehicles
ventional
wheeled
indicates
that
Ground
contamination
because
maintenance
of
utilities
the
purposes
range
from
activities.
and
tanks
quantities
potential
of
other
fuel
land
essential
(at
spills,
support
area
the
base
necessi-
services.
of
to amphibious
The magnitude
significant
risk
and
of
Operations
training
types.
training
The 170-squaremile
and Aircraft
for
for
of
of
least
leaks
this
wastes
to
activities
assault
activity
have
a limited
from
base
craft
at
been
to
con-
Camp Lejeune
generated.
extent)
POL storage,
is
is
high
and vehicle
DRAFT
In
[IAS-CLJ.5]ACT/FIND.3
6/23/82
addition
to base
2nd Marine
Division,
Maintenance,
fueling,
POL compounds
nately.
Furthermore,
Complex)
has
practices
rather
Before
modern
pollutant
were
pollution
to
ago.
torical
levels
concentrated
at
Operations
of
than
POL.
For
both
designated
old
soils
1979
of
activities.
Point
vehicles
example,
tires
were
An occasional
tion.
Old
in
old
were
example,
for
significant
using
practices,
vehicle
wash racks
most
rapid
Vehicle
1979
data
growth
also
excessed.
than
his-
are
most
materials
often
sites
out
throughout
but
a large
armored
disposed
now carried
be buried,
is
other
of
this
by
the
was an excep-
and continuing
vehicls
for
display
purposes.
6.2.2
Fuel
Fuel-Related
storage,
to environmental
Operations
dispensing,
contamination
and
disposal
issues.
are
in
The Camp Geiger
program,
There
and other
waste
were
various
would
more
to approximate
locations.
a salvage
body
and wash
While
facilities
involve
at
to
Shop area.
and batteries
or buried
added
grease
occurred
can be used
Division
oil-
respectively.
Maintenance
the
and
contamina-
controlled
35 and 23,
dumping
vehicles.
soil
water.
Bay
past
areas,
(BAT).
disposal
tanks
to
Technology
Before
burned
indiscrimi-
Available
tires
vehicle
vehicles
transport
in
generate
on-site
base
the
Courthouse
fostered
general
of
Bay.
applies
isolated
and aircraft
batteries.
for
the
these
Hadnot
This
wooded,
numbered
Therefore,
similar
disposal.
surface
records
of
of much
and/or
to grow,
base.
demand,
Best
areas
(e.g.,
and eventually
and unauthorized
dump received
DPDO,
of
these
activities
resulted
control
continues
30 years
is
Courthouse
disposed
Remoteness
attaining
localized
which
according
base
ones.
components
at
in
been
of many
POL disposal
loading
racks
the
of
POL spills
separators,
sometimes
1) availability
in
vehicular
vehicles
waste
recent
difficulty
water
have
splinter
than
practices
tion.
of
remoteness
two reasons:
Past
repair
which
to
are
2d FSSG and AMTRAC units
and
tended
2) relative
transportation
the
waste
for
motor
significant
One principal
activities
tank
farm
related
is
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.5]ACT/FIND.4
6123182
located
line
in
and
the
diesel
transported
past,
has
via
leaks
(e.g.,
to
vented
are
refer
No.
stored
have
details.
The
enced
leaks
Site
No.
Prompt
these
the
by base
aboveground
lines
in
the
major
at
past
air
Refer
has been
(see
lines.
of
in
environment
trucks
by and
JP-4
and
the
fuel
spills
to description
personnel
the
station.
areas.
underground
and
operation,
tank
has,
gaso-
(e.g.,
large,
pre-
spills.
the
Farm
to
from
In
Fuel
past,
Site
No.
These
35)
events
contamination
one control
of
have
at
leaks
No.
also
45 for
experi-
prompted
problems.
measure
or
Site
has
fuels
JP-5
an
Construction
the
JP Fuel
of
Farm
(Site
45).
6.2.3
POL-Related
Activities
Before
a pollution
control
was common
for
is
spills
trucks
This
POL compounds
or
for
tank
on base.
of
action
facilities
into
as gasoline.
Camp Geiger
in
storage
transferred
22)
from
as well
awareness
No.
to
farm
are
facilities
release
tank
recorded
is
the
contamination
here,
been
fuel
in
64).
principal
These
dispensing
resulted
Site
area.
Here,
smaller
serious
Another
Point
fuel.
to
the
refer
Hadnot
dust
this
to
this
maintenance
are
five
type
shops
was no regulated
to
of
5 percent
going
on roadways
show significant
mg/l).
levels.
per-billion
of
Cadmium,
(ppb)
waste
of
copper,
of volatile
range
with
34,
and
collected
of
at
56)
There
were
have
the
are
year.
quantities
with
are
metals
presented
such
chromium,
organic
as lead
in
(376
and barium
compounds
exception
of
were
phenols
Table
mg/l)
were
estimated
remainder
6-1.
The data
and
also
found
in
various
the
Personnel
dumps
of
which
from
it
surfaces
disposed
throughout
New River.
197Os,
drains.
oil
the
were
early
on road
and substantial
into
storm
the
week were
33,
intervals
was disposed
and into
per
5, 31,
practice,
emptied
levels
Amounts
at
in
POL materials
gallons
Wastes
station
total
Some characteristics
other
(Nos.
disposal.
that
of
and
sites
on the
drains
was implemented
as 1,400
collection
about
(475
oils
As many
There
for
flushed
waste
control.
way.
noted
spread
program
in
zinc
at
elevated
the
parts-
(20 mg/l).
These
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.5]ACT/FIND.5
6/23/82
data
emphasize
improper
the
disposal
many vehicle
cause
these
oil
Utility
is
steam,
Section
base
lines
are
all
above
the
company,
is
although
practice
in
into
soil
on site
and
large
this
has
and proper
instances,
below.
disposal
relatively
small
amounts
of
land,
and
issues
at
the
Waste
storage
Historically,
sig-
base.
disposal
is
steam
plant
hour
and
supplies
used
for
heating
are
stored
not
noted
at
and
the
and
near
and
this
discussed
the
Point
plan
cleaning
Fly
ash has been
No.
24 for
additional
of
to
runoff
that
As many
waste
area
on base
disposal
for
a concern
out
are
Lots
with
stored
in
Road
Exten-
storage
area.
201 and
203.
information.
480,000
as well
pounds
of
steam
as mainside.
Substantial
amounts
coal
control
may be warranted.
demand
tons
of
coal
many
years.
pile
will
of
runoff
Refer
is
coal
were
The
be placed
are
per
Steam
prevent
information.
by
PCB contami-
on Center
Storage
increased
as 45,000
is
now carried
waste
The
performed
potential
additional
Berms
indicates
disposed
at
6 for
to
systems
Road
of equipment.
facility.
future.
stored
Creek
the
is
as a hazardous
can produce
Frenchs
is
transformers
Ferry
Company.
system
of
and
Sneads
No.
some alterations
master
in
Site
Hadnot
because
Presently,
were
of
the
and Light
within
temporary
designated
description
The
leakage
is
transformers
to
of
personnel
Ash Street
currently
Power
Maintenance
controls.
between
is
by Carolina
transformer
Transformer
It
system
past
now (1982)
environmental
supplied
affairs
140,
current
that
collection
most
discussed
ground.
environmental
Refer
part,
from
an issue.
are
environmental
nation.
sion.
seep
result
6.5
the
Lot
to
regulate
influenced
and water
for
proper
most
the
on relatively
not
have
Power
base
recognized
for
in
could
Operation
functions
Power,
is
oil
controls
placed
which
allowed
Furthermore,
were
Utility
It
However,
degradation
6.2.4
oils.
shops
and current
of
nificant
of
waste
materials.
amounts
contamination
maintenance
stopped
in
of
contamination.
been
of
potential
used
per
to
Site
on the
year.
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.5]ACT/FIND.6
6/23/82
Ground
tial
water
source
tegically
the
is
contamination,
located
wells
with
a capacity
tics
of
the
The drinking
because
layer.
of
million
1.4
landfill
the
landfill
to monitor
in
treated
levels
such
(1982).
Source
toring
related
Samples
at
14,
past
and
hazardous
6.2.5
to
Pest
Federal
pest
are
either
cides
disposal
houses
banned
are
not
by DPDO.
pesticides
(4-ounce
were
penetrate
serves
in
at
Frenchs
elevated
presents
tanks
characteris-
been
not
placed
Table
6-3
is
shown
in
total
In
but
Table
THM at
exist
origins
of
detrital
now
moniat
samples
than
(see
the
100
at various
may or may not
(e.g.,
evaluated
Three
or greater
THM
THM
THM levels
obviously
fact,
shows
groundwater
6-4.
to
around
reduce
being
continuing.
precursors
disposal.
to
are
of wells
been
Strategies
known,
a concern
proximity
have
procedures
landfill
activity
and
wells
Range.
is
of
has
characteristics.
THM precursors
sources
area
levels
Test
Rifle
are
restricted
Chlorinated
or have
rigid
Presently,
is
size)
of
here.
use
hydrocarbons
controls
are
be related
precursors
matter,
designated
survey
In
DDT awaiting
of
chemical
are
the
on use.
stored
Building
engineering
stored
the
EPA-approved
and
An environmental
Silvex
6-2
Range
chlorination
have
control.
that
is
within
to
may not
algae).
Control
regulations
for
the
limit.
any human
to
also
Storage
Stra-
plants
enough
plant
Table
69).
contained
material
deep
as a poten-
receptor.
treatment
Point
(THM)
chemical
However,
be related
at
16)
are
Rifle
No.
in
the
water
locations.
the
Camp Lejeune
15,
drinking
at
THM precursors
to
41 locations
ppb
of
eight
Manor.
groundwater
as changes
to
gallons.
(Site
water
not
as a potential
wells
trihalomethane
chemical
significant,
plants.
system
the
levels
water
Berkeley
treatment
elevated
is
rather
The Hadnot
and
water
of
but
Terrace,
water
This
Generally,
impervious
Tarawa
supply.
provide
complex.
one
Creek,
potable
of
military
least
the
in
PT37,
substances
chief
compounds
Pesticides
a controlled
that
and herbiarea
before
Pest
Control
Shop,
as a hazardous
waste
storage
site.
in
that
addition,
disposal
1980
called
used
showed
DPDO had,
at
that
(NAVFACENGCOM,
132 gallons
time,
1980).
5,094
of
cans
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.5]ACT/FIND.7
6/23/82
6.2.6
Solvent
At the
air
Paint
station
and Camp Lejeune,
thinners,
materials
at
Usage
degreasers,
used
commonly
operations
ficult.
drains.
spraying
and
were
(noted
Some spent
cinders
disposal
dumps
other
wastes.
6.2.7
Radar
At the
air
radar
boiler
piles.
where
metallic
the
Lab,
6.3
OPERATIONS--RADIOLOGICAL
Research
Activities
at
studies
on small
small
tons
area
were
was surveyed,
55-gallon
drums
499 beta
Because
buttons
Iodine
radiological
6.4
MATERIAL
Responsibility
ply
POL,
organizations
pesticides,
eventual
firefighting
poured
onto
of
or allowed
fly
at
to
ash
designated
seep
and
(400
The radar
units
were
near
the
using
present
Pest
radionuclides
through
at
the
located
1980,
strontium
November
a parking
items
animal
were
of
of
nil.
of
the
near
the
radioactive
button).
only
disposed
of
Soil
8 days,
a
but-
The area
samples
were
Five
collected
Iodine
in
90 beta
substances.
were
Shop.
metabolic
building.
recovered.
residues
per
is
lot
Control
for
In
a half-life
contamination
lines
were
microcuries
131 has
delay
100 dogs
was cleaned
soil
from
Approximately
grading
site
is
included
contaminated
of
in
for
disposed
was drained
site
building.
while
and the
were
used
was dif-
deposited
in
were
burned
of waste
containers
used
were
804.
laboratory
and
solvents
containment.
Building
the
obtained
were
mercury
animals.
found
Others
Laboratory
the
near
waste
without
near
The Naval
in
principal
These
were
used.
Operations
and buried
Photo
collected
been
base.
solvents
were
three
and control
waste
may have
solvents
are
the
of
some solvents
they
Equipment
of
base
cleaning
Finally,
station,
site
history
earlier).
of
compounds
the
some portion
on roads
training.
the
throughout
Solvents
amounts
stripping
during
scattered
Routinely,
storm
and
large
along
with
131 was used.
potential
for
residual
STORAGE
for
support
of
the
chemicals,
various
and
facility
commands.
radiological
activities
Materials
substances.
rests
of
with
interest
the
sup-
include
DPAFT
[IAS-CLJ.5]ACT/FIND.8
6/23/82
Storage
of
Section
6.2.
adequate
oils,
fuels,
Under
and
the
berms
to contain
pads
reason
to be aware
of
measures
have
been
is
minor,
or leak
sometimes
tank
farms
experienced
aboveground
lem.
Refer
in
a large
at
Hadnot
to
Site
No.
exist
the
tank
lines
22,
35,
lines.
have
been
and 45 for
the
to
detailed
past,
break
soils.
For
Camp Geiger
At the
built
and
detection,
and
leakage.
are
was no
When the
before
station,
or line
or drums
In
surrounding
air
have
compounds
all.
time
with
farms
cans
these
at
entering
stored
tank
in
in
air
lessen
sta-
this
descriptions
prob-
of
vari-
problems.
chemicals
regulations.
not
amount
through
or
or underground
Point,
are
there
with
may be a considerable
distribution
storage
Hazardous
tanks
addressed
Historically,
or did
fuel
losses
tion,
ous fuel
in
there
resulting
example,
have
leaks
tanks
POL products
associated
minor
been
substances
fuel
fenced.
hazards
were
these
Other
and are
the
has
large
spills.
on concrete
there
plan,
safeguards;
stored
containment
lubricants
present
environmental
earthen
other
are
segregated
Containment
must
and
stored
minimize
risk
in
accordance
with
to environment
federal
and to human
health.
Chemicals
There
such
is
adequate
Pesticides
Section
stored
in
6.2).
Building
sequently,
as DDT and
Chlordane
6.5
Dalapon,
Because
From
1943
to
approximately
which
is
used
sanitary
of
the
were
in
at
runoff
moved
Building
as well
the
in
former
case
Building
1105,
1105
were
chlorinated
Malathion,
and
fenced.
a spill.
Research
1958,
to
as Diazinon,
of
Naval
now as the
pads
Laboratory
pesticides
day-care
where
were
Sub-
center.
they
remained
hydrocarbons
Lindane,
such
Mirex,
and Dursban.
WASTE DISPOSAL
Liquid
against
on concrete
stored
pesticides
Stored
now stored
are
712,
1977.
2,4-D,
are
protection
currently
(see
until
as solvents
OPERATIONS
wastes
large
are
surface
conventionally
area,
sewage
treated
treatment
throughout
plants
the
(STPs)
complex.
must
be
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.S]ACT/FIND.9
6/23/82
located
in
various
vey waste
Paradise
plant
Courthouse
as a pH control.
station
plants,
each
has been
waste
Past
practice
were
used
nal
capable
base
age Lot
has not
for
many
dump
(prior
The
individual
wastes
Rifle
Mr.
of
is
of
Donald
DDT,
(some
the
sealed
about
6 acres
93,000
cubic
closed
in
yards
1978.
were
used
for
in
1941,
a number
of
landfill
while
was kept
septic
the
volume
Site
No.
of
of
have
plant
been
were
disposed
from
of
construction
description).
Stor-
dumps
were
located
sites
were
active
was established
chemical
were
waste
receive
toxic
of wastes,
lost,
but
here.
dump
waste
amounts,
according
compounds,
materials
sites
across
an estimated
buried
on land.
The origi-
landfills
types
officer,
69 for
treatment
dump
other
wood preservative
tanks)
been
disposal
to
safety
lime
mgd.
separate
Boulevard
aside
base
using
hazardous.
was set
sludge,
(see
which
began
records
Amphibious
has
This
former
and
past
the
These
area.
and unauthorized
complex
inventory
cement
the
a central
site
to
The Geiger
is
trichloroethylene
in
entire
had
0.8
extended
level
0.5
exception
burial.
Tallman,
in
pit
197Os,
is
time
Holcomb
which
treatment
Second
One possible
area.
A complete
and position
was off
early
plan
con-
station.
As a result,
the
out.
Range
materials.
1950)
the
mains
housing
treatment.
regulated,
some of
been
secondary
one
air
was a borrow
from
phased
the
well
activities.
In
receive
gradually
in
site
at
complex
construction,
simultaneously.
to
base
been
the
of
Manor
the
secondary
substances,
Following
near
the
to
of
the
has
and
at
Camp Geiger
providing
in
Point
School
is
and force
capable
Berkeley
capacity
and now serves
disposal
203.
debris.
of
the
treatment
and nearby
upgraded
Solid
and
The design
plant
Hadnot
Engineer's
Sewage
Battalion.
filter
Creek,
the
gravity
Point,
serving
Frenchs
Bay houses
The air
trickling
originally
Point,
Tractor
At Hadnot
to a secondary
This
mgd.
areas.
to
50 barrels
and
PCBs
The surface
area
may be as high
as
This
dump was
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.5]ACT/FIND.l0
6/23/82
Overall,
to
during
dispose
trash
of
of
tion
contains
trial
wastes
6.6
wastes.
training
week,
or
that
do not
include
Camp Lejeune
approximately
nonhazardous
28 sites
were
used
garbage
and
exercises.
waste
95 tons
in
other
materials
similar
approximately
These
shows
to municipal
from
base,
generates
per
day.
The composi-
communities.
and
is
typical
664 tons
The
of
industrial
commercial
indus-
activities.
SITES
A total
of
72 waste
Figures
2-l
disposal
through
2-12.
included,
as Figures
regarding
foliage,
through
use,
study
not
to
Phase
I of
the
as type
were
require
NACIP
of waste
identified
the
air
require
of
following
pages.
for
exclusion
sites
Appendix
were
B.
further
near
model
three
and
located
have
has been
in
been
information
applied
37 of
as a result
three
on maps
sites.
considered;
for
Camp Lejeune,
show limited
judgments
and potential
and all
These
were
These
are
at
, photographs
consideration
model.
identified
were
these
of
based
these
were
applying
on factors
migration.
sites
to
Fifteen
at
at HOLF Oak Grove
such
sites
Oak Grove.
were
judged
Twelve
not
to
consideration.
Summaries
identified
system
at MCAS New River
further
sites
topography
54 sites
material
station
are
and
been
The sites
6-14.
ranking
At Camp Lejeune,
judged
have
For many
6-1
land
The confirmation
sites.
sites
and HOLF Oak Grove.
MCAS New River,
at
the
liquid
field
per
similar
waste
of
by SCS Engineers
waste
is
or
during
report
solid
history
solid
buried
A 1977
the
pertinent
information
The 54 sites
in
Table
by indicating
eliminated.
6-5.
concerning
sites
excluded
from
further
The table
also
explains
decision
A key
all
to model
points
in
decision
the
are
given
in
consideration
specific
NACIP
points
model
is
given
the
are
reasoning
at
in
which
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE/RPT.l
6/23/82
Site
No.:
1
Name:
Midway
Location:
Special
Map coordinates
700 feet northeast
of
Size:
Area
Previously
Reported:
Activity:
This site
was a surface
dump for the disposal
debris
which included
asbestos
materials.
Materials
Park
Dump
estimated
at
859458;
near
Deep Branch.
11 to
Lee Avenue,
about
12 acres.
No
Asphalt
Involved:
paving,
wood,
asbestos
of
construction
shingles
Quantity:
Records
were not kept detailing
what was received
at the dump.
Based on topography
and water
table
elevations,
a reasonable
depth of fill
is 5 to 10 feet.
This yields
a total
dump
volume
of 100,000
to 200,000
cubic yards.
Only a fraction
of
An upper limit
is estimated
this
is expected
to be asbestos.
Caution:
or 100 to 200 cubic
yards.
This
to be 0.1 percent,
value
is not based on reliable
data and represents
an estimate
for purposes
of providing
order
of magnitude
guidance
only.
When:
Early
Photo:
Yes
Comments:
This site
is part of property
deeded to Onslow Community
College
several
years ago.
It now supports
a low ground
and a growth of mature
pines.
1960s
to
1972
cover
Note:
Size
information.
measurements
for general
estimates
are based on map and photograph
Field
estimates
may have been made, but no field
Estimates
are provided
have been performed.
guidance
only.
See Figures
2-2
and 6-l.
~Site No. 1 - Midway
Park Dump
FIGURE
6-2
Site No. 2 - Nursery/Day
-Care Center at Building
Water Treatment
Plant in Foreground
712
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE/RPT.2
6/23/82
Site
No.:
2
Name:
Nursery/Day-Care
Location:
Special
Boulevard
Size:
See comments
Previously
Reported:
Activity:
Building
mixing.
risks
to
Materials
Involved:
Malathion,
Center
Map coordinates
at Brewster
855441;
Boulevard.
Building
712 on Holcomb
section.
No
712 formerly
was used for pesticide
storage
and
Current
use as a day-care
center
may pose health
young children
and supervisory
staff.
Chlordane,
DDT, Diazinon,
Mirex,
2,4-D,
2,4,5-T,
Dieldrin,
Lindane,
Silvex,
Dalapon,
Dursban
Quantity:
Contamination
would have occurred
as
washout,
and excess disposal.
During
reasonable
to assume several
gallons
Therefore,
estimated
quantity
involved
100 to 500 gallons
of various
strength
residues
in cracks
and crevasses
may
Caution:
Quantity
estimates
are not
and are provided
for order
of magnitude
Disposal
to creek
is undocumented.
When:
1943
Photo:
Yes
Comments:
In late
1957 or 1958, pesticide
storage
and mixing
were
moved to Building
1105.
Chemical
use is reported
to have
been:
Baygon --unknown,
but considered
to be minor;
100 gallons
of 40-percent
powder per year;
Chlordane-DDT--750
to 1,000 gallons
per day of 5- to 15-percent
material;
Diazinon
--25 gallons
per month;
Dieldrin--less
than 100 pounds per year;
Dursban--stored
but not used;
Lindanr--less
than 10 gallons
of l-percent
material
per
year;
Malathion--100
gallons
per year;
Mirex--stored
but not used;
Silvex
(2,4,5-TP)--stored
but not used;
2,4-D--1,000
gallons
per year of 1 to 100 dilution
of concentrate;
2,4,5-T--50
gallons
per year--used
for 1 year only.
The contaminated
areas are the fenced
playground,
approximately
6,300 square
feet;
the mixing
pad covering
approximately
100 square
feet;
the wash pad, approximately
225 square
feet;
and possibly,
the railroad
tracks
drainage
See Figures
2-2 and
ditch
that
is a tributary
of Overs Creek.
6-2.
to
result
of small
spills,
15-year
use, it is
per year were involved,
is on the order
of
liquids.
Solid
total
1 to 5 pounds.
based on reliable
data
guidance
only.
1958
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE/RPT.6
6/2 3/82
Site
No.:
6
Name:
Storage
Lots
Location:
Special
Wallace
Map coordinates
and Bearhead
Size:
Lots 201 and
respectively.
Previously
Reported:
Activity:
The site
was and still
is used to store
hazardous
materials.
DDT is reported
to have been dumped at Lot 203 when it served
as a dump in the 1940s.
There has been long-term
storage
of
DDT and transformers
containing
PCB.
No spills
or leaks
of
PCB have been reported,
but reports
of white powder (DDT) were
noted.
Materials
Quantity:
201 and
203 are
203
866406,
Creeks.
estimated
Yes
Involved:
Pesticides,
building
for transformer
storage
with
contamination.
on Holcomb
at
Boulevard
between
25 and 46 acres,
EPA Form
debris,
attendant
8900-l
MC Bul
metals.
risk
Area
for
6280
was
used
PCB
Inspection
of area of DDT dump reveals
no clues
to area1
extent
of disposal.
Trees are not disturbed
and no ground
depressions
or mounds can been seen.
Reports
of dumping
are
vague;
no indication
of types of containers
disposed
of, e.g.,
aerosol
cans versus
55-gallon
drums.
For site
to be
remembered,
it is reasonable
to assume more than 1 or 2 pounds
However,
there
is no basis
for assuming
were involved.
massive
quantities
were involved.
Therefore,
for purposes
of
indicating
the perceived
magnitude
of importance
of site,
several
hundreds
of pounds of DDT are assumed to have been
No physical
or other
reliable
evidence
is available
dumped.
to indicate
size of contaminated
area.
However,
because
some
assessment
of size is needed to guide
any further
actions
(if
assume
that
an
area
within,
say,
an
80to
100-foot
any),
radius
is involved.
Regarding
PCB and DDT spills
near storage
areas:
Minimal
information
has been discovered
during
site
investigations.
No amount of judgment
by environmental
and public
health
professionals
can yield
reliable
estimates
of spill
quantities
because
conditions
are so variable.
Guidance
for assessing
magnitude
may be obtained
as follows:
No direct
evidence
of
PCB spills
was found.
Therefore,
assume no PCBs are involved.
Inferences
of DDT spills
come from reports
of white powder
DRAFT
Site
No.:
6 (Continued)
on ground.
No recollection
of size of powdered
area is
available.
Assume that
around
storage
pallets,
DDT was
spilled
in a l- or 2-food
band.
This suggests
pounds,
not
hundreds
of pounds,
were involved.
Over time,
quantities
may
be added.
Therefore,
assume 100 to 200 pounds of DDT
involved.
Caution:
data and
in
Estimates
are provided
a variety
of
of
quantities
as order
uses
from
are not
of magnitude
1940s
to
based on reliable
guidance
only.
When:
Lots
present
Photo:
Yes
Comments:
These areas have long history
of various
uses,
including
dumping
and storage.
Area is flat,
unpaved,
and surface
soils
have been moved about
substantially
due to regrading
and
There is no direct
physical
evidence
of
equipment
movement.
hazardous
material
contamination.
There are six areas at the two sites
which have
liklihood
of contamination,
if any contamination
Representitive
These are identified
on Figure
2-3.
given
in Figure
6-3.
highest
exists.
photo
is
Disturbance
of trees
is not evident;
however,
age of trees
is
Therefore,
trees
are more recent
estimated
at 10 to 20 years.
than dumping
and cannot
be used as clues
to dumping
area.
!
FIGURE
6-3
Site No. 6 - Storage Lots 201 - 203
FIGURE
6-4
Site No. 9 - Fire Fighting Training Pit near Piney Green
Oil Water Separation
in Foreground.
Road.
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE/RPT.9
6123182
Site
No.:
9
Name:
Fire
Location:
Special
between
Bearhead
Size:
Estimated
Previously
Reported:
Activity:
Fire
fighting
training
carried
out in an unlined
Flammable
liquids
burned
in pit.
No pollution
equipment
such as oil-water
separators.
Materials
Fighting
Training
Pit
Map coordinates
Piney
Geen Road
Creek.
area
is
Used
Piney
Green
Road
868398;
near Building
and Holcomb
Boulevard,
approximately
Yes
Involved:
at
2 acres.
EPA Form
oil,
solvents,
30,000
gallons
S-TP-454,
south of
8900-l
contaminated
6280
pit.
control
fuels
Quantity:
Approximately
When:
1960s
Photo:
Yes
Comments:
Training
began after
1961.
The pit was unlined
until
approximately
midto late
1960s.
No leaded
fuels
were
Pit presently
used and an
burned.
Used only JP-4 and JP-5.
oil-water
separator
has been installed.
See Figures
2-3 and
6-4.
to
per
MC Bul
year
present
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE/RPT.16
6/23/82
Site
No.:
16
Name:
Montford
Location:
Special
Northeast
Coolidge
Size:
Area
Previously
Reported:
Activity:
Burn
Point
Burn
Dump,
Site
A
Map coordinates
795450;
Creek,
about
900 feet
and Harding
Roads.
affected
is
about
3.5
to
between
east of
Wilson
Drive
intersection
and
of
4 acres.
No
dump for
debris
Building
Materials
Involved:
waste oils
Quantity:
Amount of
less than
When :
Approximately
Photo:
Yes
Comments:
Site
is
debris.
asbestos
1 cubic
1958
, garbage,
and minor
debris,
including
visible
yard.
on the
to
1972.
being
used occasionally
See Figures
2-4 and
is
of
garbage,
estimated
oil
tires,
to be
now closed.
for
6-5.
asbestos,
surface
Site
quantities
unauthorized
disposal
of
FIGURE
6-5
Site No. 16 - Montford
Point Burn Dump
Showing Asbestos Pipe Insulation
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE/RPT.22
6/23/82
Site
No.:
22
Name:
Industrial
Location:
Special
Map coordinates
Road and Ash Street.
Size:
Area
Previously
Reported:
Activity:
Site
is
Leakage
Materials
Area
estimated
Tank
at
3.5
Farm
864389,
to
east
of
intersection
of
Cribb
4 acres.
No
a fuel
storage
and dispensing
has occurred
from fuel
lines.
Involved:
Diesel
and
unleaded
50,000
gallons
loading
facility
from
area
for
vehicles.
gasoline
Quantity:
20,000
to
tank truck
an underground
line
near
the
When:
1979
Photo:
Yes
Comments:
Fuel farm installed
in 1940s.
There have been problems
with
leaks.
The latest
was a 100-gallon
leak of diesel
fuel in
1981.
In 1979, a fuel
leak of an estimated
20,000
to
30,000
gallons
occurred.
The leak was in an underground
line
slightly
to the rear of the tank truck
loading
facility
and
between
the building
and the large
aboveground
fuel
tank.
Fuel has been lost
through
pinhole
leaks
in the underground
lines.
There is no evidence
of extensive
corrosion
in the
system.
Control
is maintained
by an established
fuel audit
system.
See Figures
2-5 and 6-6.
,
FIGURE
6-16
Industrial
Area Tank Farm
Site No. 22 -
FIGURE
Site No. 24 - industrial
6-87
Area Fly Ash Dump
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE/RPT.24
6123182
Site
No.:
24
Name:
Industrial
Location:
Special
Map coordinates
and Duncan Streets.
Size:
Area
Previously
Reported:
Activity:
Fly ash and cinders
dumped on ground
surface.
Solvents
used
to clean
out boilers
were poured
on fly ash and cinder
piles.
During
196Os, construction
rubble
dumped here.
Sludges
from
WTP and STP also placed
here.
Furniture
stripping
wastes also
dumped.
Materials
Involved:
Fly ash, cinders,
and solvent
from central
heating
plant,
tJTP spiractor
sludge
and sludge
from the sewage
treatment
plant.
Limited
quantities
of furniture
lacquers
and
varnish.
Quantity:
The amount of fly ash is estimated
at 31,500
tons based on a
lo-percent
ash content
and a usage of 45,000
tons per year of
coal over 7 years.
The estimate
of furniture
stripping
compounds
dumped here is about
45,000
gallons
over 7 years.
This estimate
is based on assuming
that one vat of fluids
per
month was disposed.
A vat contains
approximately
500 to
550 gallons.
The quantity
of cleaning
solvents
which reached
this
site
is not known but is considered
to be small.
When:
1972
Photo:
Yes
Comments:
Sandy soil
conducive
to migration.
The eastern
boundary
of
this
site
is a tributary
of Cogdels
Creek.
Drainage
is
south and west toward Cogdels
Creek and
probably
to the east,
its tributaries.
is
to
Area
about
Fly
20 to
Ash Dump
866380;
south
of
intersection
of
Birch
25 acres.
No
approximately
1980
Note:.
Size estimates
are based on map and photograph
Field
estimates
may have been made, but no field
information.
measurements
have been performed.
Estimates
are provided
for
general
guidance
only.
See Figures
2-5
and
6-7.
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE/RPT.28
6/23/82
Site
No.:
28
Name:
Hadnot
Location:
Special
Treatment
Map coordinates
Plant
on both
Size:
Area
approximately
Previously
Reported:
Activity:
This
The
has
pond.
with
Materials
Point
is
Burn
Dump
855364,
east of Mainside
sides
of Cogdels
Creek.
Sewage
23 acres.
Yes
EPA Form
8900-l
MC Bul
6280
large
disposal
area received
a variety
of solid
waste.
site
is now closed.
The surface
has been graded,
grass
been planted
and is now a recreational
area with
fishing
When site
was active,
wastes were burned
and covered
dirt.
Involved:
Mixed
industrial
based paint,
garbage
type
waste,
refuse,
trash,
oil-
Quantity:
Volume of fill
is estimated
at 185,000
to 370,000
cubic
yards.
The volume
of waste is based on a surface
area of 23 acres and
a depth
ranging
from 5 to 10 feet.
Because waste was burned,
no approximation
of remaining
amount
of specific
substances
can be reasonably
made.
However,
approximate
size of the
site
provides
order
of magnitude
guidance.
When:
Approximately
Photo:
Yes
Comments:
Reports
of leachate
and oily
is on a former
wetland.
1946
to
1971
seepage
to
Cogdels
Creek.
Site
Note:
Size estimates
are based on map and photograph
information.
Field
estimates
may have been made, but no field
measurements
have been performed.
Estimates
are provided
for
general
guidance
only.
See Figures
2-5
and
6-8.
FIGURE
Site No. 28 - Hadnot
1
I
h
\
6-48
Point
Burn Dump
Y&. .\
FIGURE
6-‘HIa
Site No. 35 - Geiger Area Fuel Farm
__.-- -
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE/RPT.30
6/23/82
Site
No.:
30
Name:
Sneads
Ferry
Road--Fuel
Location:
Special
Map coordinates
898324;
along
a tank trail
which
intersects
Sneads Ferry Road from west,
about
6,000 feet
of intersection
with Marines
Road.
Size:
Exact
location
along
Previously
Reported:
Activity:
One-time
disposal
leaded
gasoline
Materials
Sludge
Involved:
lead and related
Tank
trail
Sludge
unknown.
Area
See comments
south
below.
No
600 gallons
of
sludge
from fuel
compounds;
of
tank
pumped
from
storage
tank,
tank washout
bottom
deposits.
fuel
tank
especially
waters
storing
tetraethyl
Quantity:
About
below
See comments
When:
1970
Photo:
No
Comments:
Soils
conducive
to migration.
The hydraulic
gradient
in the
water
table
aquifer
is toward Frenchs
Creek.
A private
contractor
disposed
of the sludge
along
the tank trail
as an
expedient
measure.
Trail
alignment
is parallel
to groundwater
gradient.
As yet no records
(including
contract
documents)
have been
found to indicate
amount of sludge
disposed
of at this
site.
Two 12,000-gallon
tanks were involved.
Tanks were pumped out
Based on knowledge
of
while
changing
the type of fuel
stored.
tank capacity
below tank outlfow
ports,
about
600 gallons
of
sludge
or tank bottoms
were dumped.
Additional
washout water
may have been present.
There is additional
information
to
suggest
that
the site
has been used for similar
wastes from
other
tanks.
Therefore
the 600 gallon
amount must be
considered
a minimum.
Composition
fo sludge
and/or
washout
is
unknown and may vary from containing
substantial
amounts
of
tetraethyl
lead to containing
mostly
cleaning
compounds.
See
Figure
2-6.
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE/RPT.35
6123182
Site
No.:
35
Name:
Geiger
Area
Location:
Special
Fourth
Map coordinates
Streets.
Size:
Area
Previously
Reported:
Activity:
Area used for storing
and pumping
fuel.
Mogas released
soil
through
a leak or leaks
in underground
line
near
aboveground
storage
tank and tank pad.
Materials
Fuel
estimated
Farm
at
756466,
about
2,500
north
square
of
intersection
of
G and
feet.
No
Involved:
to
Mogas
Quantity:
The amount
of fuel
is estimated
by Chief
Padgett,
Camp Lejeune
Fire Department,
to be in the thousands
of gallons.
Exact
estimates
cannot
be made as these records
were destroyed.
When:
1957
Photo:
Yes
Comments:
Spill
reported
to have migrated
east and northeast
toward and
into
creek.
Spilled
fuel at the surface
of the shallow
aquifer
was disposed
of by digging
holes
near the leak and
igniting
the gas.
Fuel that
contaminated
Brinson
Creek was
also burned
off near the leak.
to
1958
Note:
Size estimates
are based on map and photograph
information.
Field
estimates
may have been made, but no field
measurements
have been performed.
Estimates
are provided
for
general
guidance
only.
See Figures
2-7
and
6-9.
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE/RPT.36
6/23/82
Site
No.:
36
Name:
Geiger
Location:
Special
Treatment
Map coordinates
763462,
east of
Plant
on south side of Brinson
Size:
Area
about
Previously
Reported:
Activity:
Site was used for disposal
of municipal
wastes and mixed
industrial
waste from the air station.
Most material
was
burned
and buried,
but some unburned
material
was buried.
Materials
Area
is
Sewage
25,000
square
Plant
Dump
Geiger
Creek
Area
Sewage
feet.
No
Garbage,
Involved:
fluids
Treatment
trash,
waste
oils,
solvents,
hydraulic
Quantity:
According
to interviews,
less than 5 percent
of all
hydrocarbons
used at the air station
were disposed
of in
dumps.
The rest was used for dust control
on roads or went
directly
into
storm drains.
Based on interviews,
a
conservative
estimate
is that
700 to 1,000 gallons
per week
were used on roads.
A smaller
but undetermined
amount was
washed into
the storm drains.
Using a 5-percent
estimate
for
dumping
over 9 years,
about
25,000
gallons
of material
could
have been dumped into
storm drains.
Assuming
this
amount was
split
between
this
site
and the trailer
park dump (Site
10,000
to 15,000
gallons
of solvent
and
No. 41), an estimated
oil
were placed
here.
Most probably
were burned.
When:
Late
Photo:
Yes
Comments:
Movement
of contaminants
via water
table
aquifer
and surface
runoff
will
be toward Brinson
Creek or roadside
drainage
ditch
south of dump.
See Figure
2-7.
The site
covers
about
25,000
square
feet and rises
10 to 12 feet
above grade.
Estimated
volume
is 14,000
cubic yards,
based on an average
depth of fill
of 15 feet.
1940s
to
late
1950s
Note:
Size estimates
are based on map and photograph
Field
estimates
may have been made, but no field
information.
measurements
have been performed.
Estimates
are provided
for
general
guidance
only.
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE/RPT.41
DRAFT
6/23/82
Site
No.:
41
Name:
Camp Geiger
Location:
Special
Wilson
Size:
Area
Previouslv
Reoorted:
Activity:
Site was used as an open dump.
It received
industrial
municipal
wastes,
as well
as construction
debris.
Materials
Dump
Map coordinates
732442;
south
Boulevard,
Camp Geiger
Trailer
is
approximately
Involved:
asphalt,
of end of Robert
Park (abandoned).
L.
15 acres.
Yes
EPA Form
Waste oils,
solvents
concrete,
old batteries
from
8900-l
air
MC Bul
station,
Quantity:
10,000
to 15,000
gallons
of waste POL and solvents
estimated
to have been disposed
of (refer
to Site
Most probably
were burned.
When:
Approximately
Photo:
Yes
Comments:
Site was operated
as a burn dump.
Based
total
volume
of the site
depth
of 5 feet,
110,000
cubic
yards.
1946
to
6280
and
garbage,
are
No. 36).
1970
on an estimated
is about
fill
Size estimates
are based on map and photograph
Note:
Field
estimates
may have been made, but no field
information.
Estimates
are provided
for
measurements
have been performed.
general
guidance
only.
See Figures
2-8
and
6-10.
FIGURE
6-10
Site No. 41 - Camp Geiger Dump Near the Trailer
Site No. 45 - Campbell
FIGURE
6-H
11
Street Underground
Park
Fuel Storage Area
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE/RPT.45
6123182
Site
No.:
45
Name:
Campbell
Farm at
Location:
Special
Street
Street
Street
Underground
Air Station
Map coordinates
(JP Fuel Farm)
(Avgas).
The underground
storage
feet.
The JP Fuel Farm
Previously
Reported:
Activity:
Underground
tank (or
during
1978.
At the
underground
connecting
Southeastern
one-third
is generally
affected.
Involved:
Storage
754444,
Campbell
and approximately
Size:
Materials
Avgas
and Adjacent
JP Fuel
Street
at White
250 feet east of
area is approximately
covers
approximately
40,000
6 acres.
White
square
No
Avgas
tanks)
leaked
at the fuel
storage
area
JP Fuel Farm, extensive
leakage
from
lines
was discovered
in about
1981.
of area (i.e.,
approximately
2 acres)
and other
JP fuel
Quantity:
200 to 300 gallons
of Avgas.
Assuming
soils
overlying
ground
water are generally
saturated
with oil
over about
about 600,000
gallons
of oil
may be involved
(i.e.,
2 acres,
using
20-percent
porosity
and 5 feet
to groundwater).
Therefore,
estimates
are that more than 100,000
gallons
of
JP fuel have leaked.
When:
1978
Photo:
Yes
Comments:
These two storage
areas are close
together
and are considered
as one site.
Most recent
leaks
were JP-4 and JP-5 from
These pipes have been replaced
by an
underground
pipes.
aboveground
system
in which leaks
can be readily
detected.
An
oil-water
separator
has been installed
on the south boundary
of the fuel
farm,
which now shows a substantial
amount of oil.
Drainage
ditch
and canal
parallel
Campbell
Street,
then flow
southward.
See Figures
2-9 and 6-11.
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE/RPT.48
DPAFT
6/23/82
Site
No.:
48
Name:
MCAS Mercury
Location:
Special
Road
Size:.
See comment
Previously
Reported:
Activity:
Mercury
was drained
from radar
units
periodically
and disposed
in woods near photo
lab (Building
804).
Best information
indicates
that material
was carried
by hand,
probably
to area
between building
and river
and dumped or buried
in small
quantities
at randomly
selected
spots.
Materials
Quantity:
Dump Site
Map coordinates
Building
804 on Longstaff
section.
No
Metallic
Involved:
Approximately
100 pounds
to
772438,
mercury
1 gallon
per
year
over
LO years,
i.e.,
more
than
total
When:
1956
1966
Photo:
No
Comments:
The disposal
area is in
from the rear of Building
a 100 by 200 foot
804 to the river.
corridor
extending
See Figure
2-9.
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE/RPT.54
6/23/82
Site
No.:
54
Name:
Crash
Location:
Special
Runway
Size:
Affected
Previously
Reported:
Activity:
Pit used in
and solvents
Materials
Crew Fire
Training
Burn
Pit
at
Air
Station
Map coordinates
755428,
adjacent
5-23 near of Building
3614.
area
is
approximately
Yes
Involved:
crash
were
1.5
EPA Form
crew training
burned.
Contaminated
fuels,
at
waste
to
southwest
end of
acres.
8900-l
air
station.
MC Bul
6280
Waste
oils
solvents
Quantity:
Based on present
usage of 15,000
gallons
of POL annually,
nearly
one-half
million
gallons
of these compounds
have been
used at this
site.
If only 1 percent
of solvents
and POL
soaked into
ground
before
lining,
then 3,000 to 4,000 gallons
would have entered
the soils.
Caution:
Reliable
data have
not been found from which to quantify
soil
contamination.
The
above estimating
procedure
is used to provide
order
of
magnitude
guidance
only.
When:
First
Photo:
Yes
Comments:
Burn pit was lined
around
1975.
According
to
site
was used unlined
a number of years before
1964 aerial
photographs
reveal
a very "clean"
no large
fuel
stains
are apparent.
use is
believed
to have
been
in
mid-1950s.
some reports,
this.
However,
looking
area,
as
Note:
Size estimates
are based on map and photograph
information.
Field
estimates
may have been made, but no field
measurements
have been performed.
Estimates
are provided
for
general
guidance
only.
See Figures
2-9
and 6-12.
FIGURE
Site No. 54 - Crash Crew
6-M
1st
Fire Training
Burn Pit
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE,'RPT.68
6/23/82
Site
MO.:
68
Name:
Rifle
Location:
Special
Map coordinates
748302;
west of Range Road,
2,000 or more feet west of Rifle
Range water
treatment,
800 or more feet east of Stone Creek.
Size:
Estimated
area
Previously
Reported:
No
Activity:
Operated
Materials
Quantity:
Range
Involved:
Dump
is
as a dump
Construction
6 to
8 acres.
for
materials
debris,
from
Rifle
WTP sludge,
Range
activities
solvents
Using
6 to 8 acres as area and assuming
10 feet of fill,
volume
is estimated
at 100,000
cubic
yards.
Solvent
amounts
are estimated
to be 1,000 to 2,000 gallons,
based on period
use and quantities
noted
in comments
(below).
When:
1942
to
Photo:
Yes
Comments:
Sandy soils
in area make site
favorable
for migration
of
Although
site
is downgradient
from Potable
contaminants.
Well Nos. RR-47 and RR-97,
heavy pumping
may allow
contaminants
to move upgradient.
of
1972
The report
of solvent
waste being
disposed
at the Rifle
Range
Dump has not been substantiated
by follow-up
interviews.
Although
the number of personnel
qualifying
with weapons at
the rifle
range apparently
has decreased
to 20,000
to 30,000
per year (range
use has been higher
during
war years),
weapon
cleaning
practices
are probably
unchanged
for at least
the
last
20 years.
Typically,
weapon cleaning
occurs
at the
"parent
organization"
and does not occur in the rifle
range
area except
for the relatively
small
number of people
working
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE/RPT.68
6/23/82
Site
No.:
68 (Continued)
there.
Dry cleaning
solvent
waste used for weapon cleaning
does not exceed 20 to 30 gallons
per year.
Some discrepancy
exists
as to whether
or not "bare
cleaner"
is presently
used
but,
if it is , quantities
used are expected
to be similar
to
the amounts
of dry cleaning
solvents.
No other
unusual
or
specialized
activity
that uses solvents
has been identified
in
this
area.
Note:
Size estimates
are based on map and photograph
information.
Field
estimates
may have been made, but no field
measurements
have been performed.
Estimates
are provided
for
general
guidance
only.
See Figures
2-11
and 6-13.
FIGURE-
d-19
Site
No.
68 -
Rifle
Range
Dump
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE/RPT.69
6/23/82
Site
No.:
69
Name:
Rifle
Range
Location:
Special
east of
Everett
Chemical
Dump
Map coordinates
intersection
Creek.
Size:
Estimated
Previously
Reported:
Yes
Activity:
Former
site
PCBs, fire
for chemical
retardents
Materials
area
Involved:
Lindane,
materials
is
of
about
770290;
about
8,000 to
Range and Sneads Ferry
9,000
Roads,
feet due
north
of
6 acres.
EPA Form
wastes,
8900-l
including
MC Bul
various
6280
pesticides,
Pentachlorophenol,
DDT, TCE, Malathion,
Diazinon,
gas cylinders,
HTH, PCB, all
other
hazardous
generated
or used on base
Quantity:
Overall
volume
may be 93,000
cubic
yards.
This is
area of approximately
6 acres and an assumed depth
10 feet.
When:
Early
Photo:
Yes
Comments:
Mr. Don Tallman,
former
base safety
officer,
prepared
a list
of what and where chemicals
were buried
in the landfill.
This
list
has been lost,
but some information
is known from an
interview
with Mr. Tallman.
to mid-1950s
This site
Subsurface
Groundwater
to
approximately
based
of
on an
1976
is at a higher
elevation
than surrounding
contaminant
migration
could
be in many
seeps were observed
in the surrounding
Two reports
of atmospheric
emissions
were noted.
occurred
possibly
as a result
of meteorological
terrain.
directions.
area.
One incident
conditions;
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.2]SITE/RPT.69
6/23/82
Site
No.:
69 (Continued)
the second
perturbation
incident
of the
Some PCBs, sealed
buried
here.
was caused by accidental
ground
at the site.
in
cement
septic
tanks,
mechanical
are
reported
to be
Note:
Size estimates
are based on map and photograph
information.
Field
estimates
may have been made, but no field
measurements
have been performed,
Estimates
are provided
for
general
guidance
only.
See Figures
2-11
and 6-14.
FIGURE
6-14
Site No. 69 - Rifle Range Chemical
Showing Discarded Gas Detection
Dump
Kits
7.0
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DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.3lREFS.l
6/22/82
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1980.
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Parker,
W. and L. Dixon.
1980.
Endangered
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North
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Peterson,
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Carolina.
Radford,
A.E.,
H.E. Ahles,
and C.R. Bell.
Flora
of the Carolinas.
The University
Chapel
Hill,
North
Carolina.
Richardson,
C.J.,
Editor.
Publishing
Company,
Natural
Resources
and
Corps Base Camp Lejeune,
1968.
Manual
of the Vascular
of North
Carolina
Press,
1981.
Pocosin
Wetlands.
Stroudsburg,
Pennsylvania.
Hutchinson
Richardson,
C.J.,
R. Evans,
and D. Carr.
1981.
Pocosins:
in Transition.
In:
Pocosin
Wetlands,
pp. 3-19.
C.J.
Editor.
Hutchinzn
Ross Publishing
Company,
Stroudsburg,
Pennsylvania.
Shiver,
R.S.
of Natural
Carolina.
1982.
Personal
Resources
and
U.S.
Department
of
South America.
U.S.
Fish and Wildlife
Service.
Wildlife
and Plants
Native
Office,
Washington,
D.C.
Wilbur,
H.M.
1981.
Pocosin
C.J.
Richardson,
Editor.
Stroudsburg,
Pennsylvania.
Wilder,
H.B.,
T.M. Robison,
and K.L. Lindskov.
Northeast
North
Carolina.
Water Resources
United
States
Geological
Survey,
Raleigh,
Wilson,
E.J.
Beaufort,
Yong,
Personal
Communication.
L.
1982.
New Bern,
North
Carolina.
1982.
North
Commerce.
National
Personal
Carolina.
Communication.
North
Community
Development.
1979.
Ocean
Endangered
U.S.
U.S.
Fauna.
In:
Hutchinson
Communication.
An Ecosystem
Richardson,
Carolina
Department
Wilmington,
North
Tide Tables--East
Survey.
Rockville,
1980.
to the
Coast of
Maryland.
North
and
and Threatened
Government
Printing
Pocosin
Wetlands,
Ross Publishing
pp. 62-68.
Company,
1978.
Water
Investigations
North
Carolina.
Hampton
Croatan
Ross
Resources
77-81.
Mariners
National
Museum,
Forest
Office,
of
APPENDIX A
MONITORING-WELL CONSTRUCTION
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.4]A/APP.l
6/15/82
RECOMMENDATIONS
FOR GROUNDWATER MONITORING
MONITORING-WELL
INVENTORY
Wells
been
that
service
the
have
for
water
a long
table
Lejeune
have
a complete
It
is
improperly
period
to
recommended
of
that
the
drilled
at
with
the
wells
that
are
out
a confirmed
status
the
base.
of
should
abandonment
be made.
or
abandoned
(if
the
of
that
when
the
future
from
Camp
there
is
not
procedure.
installation
be
wells
that
complete
list
have
close
been
have
well
was last
the
of wells
the
the
of
Jells'
reason
used,
well
or
downgradient
of
include
ever
abandoned
to and
should
for
of
at
but
assessment
plans
out
wells
service,
the
the
are
assessment
date
the
the
a further
and
applicable),
all
wells
site,
This
nonuse,
at
of
these
waste
in
of wells
show those
If
of
been
contamination
abandonment
A comparison
service.
hazardous
or
location
use will
have
for
Many
no longer
status
the
now in
are
that
conduits
location
the
or
deeper.
or
by determining
been
potential
those
abandoned
inventory
clarified
are
aquifer
been
abandoned
for
how it
(if
not
was
yet
abandoned).
A satisfactory
pack
with
abandonment
grout
so that
MONITORING-WELL
At
each
are
fourth
well
quality
the
borehole.
the
migrate
well
between
and gravel
aquifers.
groundwater
of
these
to detect
be installed
moving
toward
monitoring,
should
the
be placed
contaminant
upgradient
the
four
immediately
plume,
of
monitoring
the
if
site
wells
down-
present,
and
to monitor
the
the
site.
INSTALLATION
monitoring-well
an effective
site
should
of water
efficient
for
Three
MONITORING-WELL
Each
cannot
contaminants
selected
recommended.
of
filling
involves
PLACEMENT
site
gradient
procedure
hydraulic
seal
should
be constructed
so that
it has both an
,
to the surrounding
water
table
aquifer
connection
against
the
migration
of
surFace
waters
into
the
and
DMFT
The
[IAS-CLJ.4]A/APP.2
6/15/82
following
these
techniques
two aims
1.
(Figure
an a-inch
noted
during
every
Install
length
slot
extend
After
the
2 feet
6.
the
accomplish
water
for
table,
as
lithologic
preparation
of
2-inch,
schedule
the
the
of
filter
pack.
remainder
of
of
the
with
not
more
(94
pounds
than
steel
casing
a l/a-inch
hole
and
to
of
the
space
weight
casing
above
ground
installed
in
level.
the
hole
sand
in
to approximately
of
in
the
annular
with
a sand-cement
sand
to one part
of
clean
steel
protective
water
per
the
permit
protective
casing
The
cap and a padlock.
protective
the
to medium-quartz
pellets
6-inch,
The
grout.
of
space
grout
of
cement
bag of
cement
casing
3 feet
foot).
a 5-foot-long,
the
top
recommended
screen.
6 gallons
or 1 cubic
been
40
a LO-foot
The
The
fine-
bentonite
dry
of
table.
have
bottom
the
top
18 inches
of
annular
two parts
water
screen
the
the
inches.
pack
of
seal
composed
Install
top
the
12 to
and
from
Set
0.010
a filter
the
a l-foot
of
flush-joint,
at
is
casing
space
above
Place
into
to
representative
screen.
screen
size
place
annular
Fill
below
threaded,
approximately
well
borehole,
5.
10 feet
drilling
and well
of PVC well
should
top
during
of
casing
well-screen
4.
to
Collect
5 feet
a string
the
recommended
log.
PVC well
3.
borehole
drilling.
lithologic
are
A-l):
Drill
samples
2.
and materials
should
aboveground
PVC well
the
portions
casing
water
in
have
should
the
a lockable
of
both
be vented
well
to
of
the
screen
grout
if
the
with
fluctuate
freely.
It
may be necessary
the
water
thickness
table
of
is
to
the
less
vary
bentonite
than
the
placement
seal
5 feet,below
and
of
the
land
the
top
sand-cement
surface.
and
the
on
6-INC
:: PROTECTIVE CASING ~~~
8-INCH
\\\
\\\
\\\\\
\\\\\
BOREHOLE
l- .FOOT BENTONITE
SEAL
[[email protected]\\\\\
SAND-CEMENT
2-INCH SCHEDULE
WELL CASING
40 PVC
2-INCH SCHEDULE
WELL SCREEN
40 PVC
---I
FILTER PACK OF FINE- TO
MEDIUM-QUARTZ
SAND
TOTAL
DEPTH OF HOLE
AT -10 FEET BELOW
WATER -,-ABLE
FIGURE
Water
and Air Research,
A-l.
-
Recommended Monitoring-Well
111~‘.
Construction
Consulting
Environmental
Engineers
and
Scientists
APPENDIX B
CONFIRMATION STUDY RANKING SYSTEM
CONFIRMATION
STUDY RANKING
SYSTEM
Background
With
the passage
of "Superfund,"
or CERCLA, in December
1980, a need for a
systematic
approach
towards
the clean-up
of old hazardous
waste disposal
sites
became apparent.
The Department
of Defense
(DOD),
anticipating
"Superfund,"
established
the Installation
Restoration
(IR)
program.
The Navy's
section
of -this
program
is the Navy Assessment
and Control
of Instllation
Pollutants
(NACIP)
program.
This
program
consists
of four phases:
(1) Initial
Assessment
Study (IAS);
(2) Confirmation;
(3) Control
Technology
Development
(if
needed);
and (4) Corrective
Measures.
One of the most important
steps
in the program
is the decision
to go from the IAS, based on record
searches,
interviews,
and minimal
sampling,
to
the Confirmation
Study,
which involves
extensive
sampling.
Another
aspect
of
proceeding
to Confirmation
from the IAS is the IR program
requirement
to
"develop
and maintain
a priority
listing
of contaminated
installations
and
facilities
for remedial
action"
(DEQPPM 81-5,
11 December
1981).
As a result,
a two-step
decision
process
has been designed
specifically
for the NACIP
program.
Description
The first
step is a "yes-no"
flowchart
(figure
1) based on easily
determined
These facts
include
type-of
rzste,
type of containfacts
found during
the IAS.
ment (spills,
ponds,
dumps,
barrels,
etc.),
and hydrogeology.
The flowchart
tells
whether
to go to the Confirmation
phase;
to consider
immediate
mitigating
such as restricting
access
to the site;
or to do nothing
if the site
is
action,
basically
innocuous.
If the flowchart
indicates
that
the Confirmation
phase
the user proceeds
to step two.
should
be implemented,
is given
a numerical
ranking
by going
through
the ConfirIn step two, the site
This ranking
is also
mation
Study Rating
(CSR) Model
(figure
2 and table
1).
based on information
obtained
during
the IAS and is the "priority
listing"
The model
is based on the system used by the Air Force which in
of sites.
turn is based on a model
developed
for EPA by JRB Associates.
the CSR Model assesses
the different
characterisAs with
these previous
models,
areas
of potential
impact
or postics
of each hazardous
waste site
including:
that
the contamination
may take to
sible
receptors
of contamination,
p athways
Each of these
and waste characteristics
and containment.
reach
the receptors,
These are then used to
categories
contains
several
weighted
rating
factors.
calculate
the overall
hazard
rating.
The receptors
rating
is based on the JRB Model and is calculated
by scoring
and adding
the weighted
scores
factor,
multiplying
by a weighting
constant,
obtain
a total
score for the receptors,
category.
each
to
Assessment
Rating
MethodThe pathways
rating
is taken
from the Air Force Hazard
This
rating
is
based
on
direct
evidence
of
contamination
I,
ology
(HARM) model.
with
the
highest
contamination
migration
or on the one of three
pathways
If direct
evidence
of contamination
exists,
the pathways
migration
potential.
.
If
no
evidence
is
found,
the
highest
category
is given
a subscore
of 1.
These
pathways
are
surface
water.
score from three
possible
pathways
is used.
and ground
water migration.
migration,
flooding,
The waste characteristics
category
is similar
in format
to the receptors
category.
The waste characteristics
rating
is obtained
by scoring
each factor,
multiplying
by a weighting
constant,
then adding
or multiplying
these weighted
factors
as
indicated
to obtain
a total
score for the category.
The CSR Model differs
from the other
two models
mentioned
due to differences
in the Waste Characteristics
section,
and minor
changes
in the other
sections.
The major
difference,
however,
lies
in the final
scoring
of the sites.
These
previous
models
have based their
rankings
on the idea that factors,
such as
pathways
of possible
migration,
location
of receptors,
and waste characteristics
are additive
as indicated
by the formula:
U
site
= 2 Lk; Eh~
i=r
= Up + Ur + Uw
ui =
the
Rating
factor
UP = the
total
Pathways
Ur = the
total
Receptors
uw =
total
Waste
Characteristics
constant
- 1 in
this
rating
of
the
k - weighing
- the
U
final
score
(1.0
is
the
worst,
0.0
is
the
best
condition)
factor
factor
or
factor
instance
the
site
site
This
additive
model
is only
theoretically
correct
if the factors
considered
and Waste Characteristics)
are completely
independent
of
(Pathways,
Receptors,
For
However,
these
factors
are not independent
of each other.
one another.
example,
an innocuous
waste such as paper
(low VW) may be found in an area that
has a hydrogeology
conducive
to migration
(high
Up) and be close
to a large
If this
site
somehow slips
into
the above rating
population
(high
Ur).
it will
have a high priority
due to the Up and Ur.
model,
The CSR Model
formula:
uses
instead
a multiplicative
approach
as indicated
by the
= Wr)Wp>W>
This
formula
reflects
the dependent
These formulas
have been included
The multiiplicative
rating
problem.
used in the CSR Model as:
U
site
= 100
nature
of
to show the
approach
(Ur)(Up)(LJw)
2
the factors
mathematical
is resealed
involved.
approach
to the
from 0 to 100 and
By using
the multiplicative
site
previously
mentioned,
using
an additive
model,
Use
of
the
model,
sites
with
a low Ur, Up, or Uw, such as the
will
have a lower
rating
than would be expected
such as the JRB Model.
System
All
sites
found will
be put
This
flowchart
(figure
1).
further
study
is required.
through
the Confirmation
Study Ranking
Flowchart
will
tell
the user to go to the CSR Model if
The CSR.Model
is found in figure
2 and table
1.
Figure
2 contains
the worksheets
for the model
and is divided
into
subsections
on the rating
categories:
I is Receptors,
11 is Pathways,
III
is Waste Characteristics,
and IV is Waste
Table
1 contains
the data needed
or information
Management
and Final
Score.
required
to fill
out the worksheets
in figure
2 and is divided
into
the same
subsections.
Appendix
sites.
A illustrates
the
use
of
the
CSR Model
by showing
the
results
of
two
The Confirmation
Study ranking
System was designed
to be used after
no or
limited
sampling.
The existing
EPA models,
including
the Mitre
and the JKB
were designed
to rank sites
after
a NACIP confirmation
type investigaModels,
Because
the purpose
of the System is to rank sites
before
a full
tion.
this
model differs
from the models
field
investigation
of sampling
is done,
EPA has used.
Ranking
sites
before
the expensive
Phase 11 is done will
enable
the Navy to investigate
as soon as possible
those sites
that pose the
greatest
potential
hazard.
3
References
References
used
in
the
development
of
the
Conffrmation
Study
Rating
Model
include:
Lindenberg,
B., et al.,
Air Force Hazardous
Risk Assessment
Methodology
(ti~w)
Model.
JRB Associates,
Rating
Methodology
Model.
K., Hans,
S., Platt,
A., The Mltre
Corporation
Site
Chang,
S., Barrett,
Ranklna
Model for Determining
Remedial
Action
Priorities
~moun
Uncontrolled
Hazardous
Substances
Facilities.
Utility
Theory
and
Collins,
J. P., and Glysson,,
E. A., "Multiattribute
Environmental
Decisions,"
Journal
of the Environmental
Engineering
106, No. EE 4, Proc.
Paper 15648,
Aug. 1980,
Division,
A.S.C.E.,
vol.
pp. 815-830.
.
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-
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F=LoWcuH/2T
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fic,u~~=
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.-.
. .- - .
.
-. _ .
.. - ---
_-__ _ ._ _-.--.._ ____
_
FIGURE
2
NAME OF SITE
LOCATION
DATE
OF OPERATION
OR OCCURRENCE
OWNER/OPERATOR
COHMENTS/OESCRIPT1ON
SITE
-- 1.
RATED
BY
RECEPTORS
(see
also
table
l-l)
Fat tor
Rating
Rating
A.
(O-3)
Factor
Working
feet
of
population
site
8.
Distance
C.
Land
D.
01 stance
E.
Critical
radius
of
Water
water
quality
body
of
Ground
water
of concern
use
..
F.
‘G.
Ii.
1.
to
1,000
I
I
ier
I
4
we1 1
nearest
use/zoning
to
within
Mu1 tip1
within
1 mile
reservation
radius
boundary
environments
site
within
nearest
of
the
I
~
10
30
3
9
6
18
10
30
6
18
9
27
6
18
6
18
surface
aquifer
surface
water
dowstream
of
Population
served
by
supply
within
3 miles
ground-water
of site
slte
I
180
Subtotals
subscore
-
12
1 mile
Population
served
by
supply
within
3 miles
Receptors
Maximum
Possible
Score
Fat tor
Score
(factor
score
subtotal/maximum
score
subtota
FIGURE
II.
PATHWAYS
(see
also
table
2 (Continued)
I-II)
Fat tor
Rating
Rating
A.
(O-3)
Factor
Hultiplier
If there
is documented
laboratory
evidence
of
-lnants
away from
the site
In question,
assign
point
for
direct
evidence.
If direct
evidence
If no evidence
exists,
proceed
to B.
Hax imum
Possible
Score
Factor
Score
migration
maximum
exists
of
factor
then
hazardous
contamsubscore
of 1
proceed
to C.
Subscore
B.
Rate
the migration
tion,
flooding,
proceed
to C.
1.
Surface
and
water
potential
ground
3 potential
migration.
pathways:
Select
surface
Subscore
-
(factor
score
6
24
Subtotals
108
1
I
-
Subscore
Enter
pathway
the
1
subtotal)
I
(factor
8
6
8
8
8
water
Sub tota
Highest
I
1
store/3)
migration
Depth
to qround
water
Net precipitation
Soil
permeability
Subsurface
flows
D i rect
access
to qround
C.
mlgraand
8
score
1
water
water
rating,
24
18
24
18
subtotal/maximum
Flooding
Ground
surface
hlghest
8
6
8
water
Subscore
3.
the
migration
Distance
to nearest
Net precipitation
Surface.eroslon
Soil
permeability
Rainfall
intensity
2.
for
water
highest
- (f ac t or score
subtotal/maximum
score
I
24
I
24
1s
114
subtotal)
subscore.
subscore
value
from
A,
B-l,
B-2
or
B-3
Pathways
18
24
24
above.
Subscore
FIGURE
III.
WASTE CHARACTERISTICS
(see
also
table
2 (Contlnued)
l-111)
A.
Factor
Ratinq
Waste
Quant
Rating
(o-3)
Factor
i tv
Mu1 tip1
I
fer
We lghted
Fat tor
Q
1
=
8
-
AT
8
-
CT
6
=
P
4
-
F
Reactivity
4
-
R
lncompatability
5
-
I
Acute
Toxicity
Chronic
Toxicity
Perststancy
..:.._
Flammabll
ity
:-
Corrosiveness
3
-
c
Solubility
5
-
s
.6
-
B
Bioaccumulation
Physical
3
= PS
use
1
=
closed
1
= At
State
Years
site
Years
since
Uelghted
was
site
Factor
in
= Factor
Rating
x MultIplier
.
t
FIGURE
Ill.
WASTE CHARACTERISTICS
8.
2 (Contlnued)
(continued)
Take
the weighted
add the results
and multiply
factors
together.
together
Score
as
Hax imum
ATxQ-
72
CTxQ=
72
CxQ
-
27
FxQ
=
36
RxQ
-
36
SxQ
=
45
PxQ>tdt
-
162
-
Sub total=
Add
Physical
State
Subtotal
+
biaste
Score
45
603
-
Weighted
P.
s.
+
Character
Factor
-
(figure
2-IllA)
Subscore
A
612
- maximum
subscore
= sub score
A/maxi
and
subtotal
m
+
603
below,
108
Bx(b t+t)=
IxQ
indicated
9
ist
its
Subscore
A
mum sub score
A
I
General
Note:
If data are not
through
I, II-B-1
of factor
score
divide
the factor
maximum
score).
avallable
or are known
to be incomplete
under
items
I-A
or 11-B-3,
or Ill-A,
then
leave
blank
for
calculation
for
calculation
of the subscore
and maximum
subscore
(I.e.
score
by the maximum
subscore
minus
the unknown
item’s
then
FIGURE
IV.
WASTE HANAGEflENT
A.
Pathways
Enter
(see also
SCORE
above
I-IV)
I
1st lcs
subscores
SI te Subscore
table
L
Subscore
Character
the
FINAL
Subscore
Receptors
Waste
AND
2 (Continued)
ln
- Usfte
-
Subscore
-
the
loo
-
‘R
-
uP
-
“u
equation:
(“,)(u,)(u,)
I
0.
Apply
factor
Site
Subscore
for
waste
x Uaste
containment
Management
If
to
Final
Scores
the confidence
Confirmed
l
At
l
Knowledge
Score
Confirmed
tied
level
for
sites
on one
of the
information.
base,
Criteria
generated
on base.
from
informa-
muld
I-IV)
and quantities
by
shops
and
of
other
be above
suspected
sites
in
the
sites
Criteria
according
.
l
One or no verbal
reports
flicting
verbal
reports,
no written
information
records.
l
Logic
or
conand
from
based
on a knowledge
of
types
and quantl
ties
of wastes
generated
at the base,
and a
history
of past
waste
disposal
practices
Indicate
that these
wastes were disposed
of at the
site.
Based
on the above,
a determination
of the types
and quantities
of
waste
dlsposed of at the slte.
sites
rate
Suspected
of types
(table
management
I
least
2 verbal
reports
fntervlews
or written
tion
from
records.
wastes
areas
o
are
-
waste
Final
X
Note:
from
the
ranking.
*
TABLE
I.
RECEPTORS
Ratlnq
Dlstsnce
C. Land
ml le
0.
Distance
boundary
E.
Crltlcal
(wlthln
F.
Water
to
ie
l
Use/Zoning
radius)
to
Population
surface
wlthln
Population
aquifer
wlthln
Levels
?
25
1 -
Greater
than 3 tniies
Completely
(zoning
not
remote
appl Icable)
Greater
than
2 miles
1 to 3
26
mJles
‘I
- 100
3,.?1
feet
than
Greater
to
1 ml la
0 to
3,000
nultlpller
100
5
feet.
10
ccb.ucm-?
(wlthln
1
Installstlon
Not a crltlcal
l nvl ronment
qusllty/use
deslgnatlon
of nearest
surface
water
body
stream
I.
water
r
environments
1 mlle
radius)
C. Ground-water
aquifer
of
N.
nearest
yL
Scale
1
0
we’1
,
CATEGORY
0
ft.
1
use of
concern
Not
MlY
the
used
Not used,
readily
Government
and idle
1 to
2 miles
Natural
or
boatlng
other
avallabls.
0
served
by
supplies
3 miles downof site
sources
owned,
Agricultural
lndustrlal
Comnerclal,
agrlcu
tural,
lndustrlal,
National
Reglstdr
Historfc/Landmark
sites
1,001
areas
or
use
Comnerclal,
Industrial,
or
Irrlgatlon,
very
I Iml ted other
w4ter
sources.
feet
to
II-
1 mfle
3
Resldentlai
0 to
1,000
feet
6
Prlstlne
natural
areart
minor
wetlands
(< 5 acres)
t
preserved
areas;
presence of economlcally
Important
natural
resources
susceptible
to
contamlnatlon;
estuarine
shores.
HaJor
habltat
of an endangered
or threatened
species;
presence
of
recharge
area;
m4Jor
wet lands (25 acres).
10
Recreation,
propagation
management
and wlldllfe
Potable
water
supplles,
shcllflsh
propegatlon
and harvesting
6
Drinking
water,
no munlclpal
water
avaIlable;
comnerclal,
lndustrlal,
or Irrlgatlon,
no other’
Water source JVJilable.
9
Drlnking
munlclprl
l v4llable.
swimnlng,
and
of flsh
water,
water
’
1 -
50
51 -
1,000
Greater
than
1,000
6
1 -
50
51 -
1,000
Crrrter
than
1,000
6
water
of
3
served
concern
miles
of
by the
supplles
site
0
>LE 1
II.
A.
PATHWAYS
Evidence
CATEGORY
of
Direct
water,
near
evidence
or air.
the site.
B-l
POTENTIAL
Contsmlnstton
Is obtalned
from
laboratory
Evidence
should
confirm
that
FOR SURFACE
Ratlnq
Factor
hazardous
contsmlnants
of contamlnatlon
Is
the
Ratlng
1
0
Greater
Met preclpltatlan
(total
prcclpltatlon
evapotransplratlon)
Less
Sol1
analyses
of
the source
present
site
above
natural
belng
evaluated.
background
levels
In
The samples
should
surface
water,
have been off
ground
site
but
WATER CONTAHINATION
Distance
to nearest
surface
water
(Includes
dralnage
ditches
and storm
sewers)
Surface
itlni
than
than
1 mile
-10
In.
2,001
ml le
feet
-10
to
to
Scale
1
+ 5 In.
Levels
501
feet
+5
*
feet
to
to
+20
3
2,000
In.
0 to
500
Greater
t!ultlpller
feet
than
8
+20
Inches
6
minus
eroslon
None
permeabiilty
Slight
i
Merr
te
0
Severe
0% to 152 clay
(7 10’
cm/set)
Create -6
(4 10
than
50X
cm/ret)
clay
6
2.1-3.0
Inches
(36-48)
Greater
(750)
than
Inches
8
In IO-year
plain
Floods
cm/set)
cm/set)
Ralnfrll
lntenslty
based
on
1 year
24-hr
ralnfall
(or mean annual
nunt8er
of
thunderstorms)
B-2
POTENTIAL
POTENTIM
to
ground
FOR GROUND-WATER
water
preclpltatlcn
Soil
Inch
1.0-2.0
(6-35)
lncher
flowi.
access
to ground
water
faults,
fractures,
well
caslngr,
s&fissure&,
etc.)
In loo-year
plsln
CONTAnINATION
Greater
Less
permesblllty
S&surface
Direct
(through
faulty
sldence
1.0
Beyond
loo-year
f loodplaln
Depth
Net
than
(O-5)
3.0
FCR FLOODING
Fl&plaln
B-3
Less
OF THE AQUIFER
than
than
Create -6
(7 10
500
-10
ft
In.
of
rlsk
flood-
annually
1
OF CONCERN
50 to
-10
to
500
+5
feet
11 to
50 feet
0 to
In.
+5
+20
Greater
than
50% cloy
cm/set)
Bottom
of site
greater
than
5 feet
above
hlgh
ground-water
level
No evfdence
flood-
to
15X-jo
(10
Bottom
of
feet
above
ground-water
Bottom
of
occaslonally
submerged
t Imedyear)
Low
risk
slte<5
hlgh
level
site
to
In.
30% ziay
10
cm/see)
10 feet
than
+20
Inc.
0% to 45% clay
(4 10’
cm/ret)
Bottom
of slte
frequently
submerged
(>3 t Imer/year)
Bottom
of
submerged.
tloderata
tllgh
site
a
(l-3
risk
risk
a
TABLE‘
III.
I (Contlnued)
WASTE CHARACTERISTICS
Ratlnq
Rstlng
YJste
Factors
Quant I ty
(40 CFR 117)
If appl Icable:
creportsbls
quantity
$1
i
spill
l-5
Jble
Level
0
times
sptll
l-100
lbs.
Sax's
Level
Easl ly degraded
compounds
or harmless
materials
Strslght
hydrocarbons
Flamnablllty
NFPA Level
or
EJsh
point
> ZOOOF
0
NFPA
NFPA
0
Rerctlvlty
Inconpatable
wastes
present
(40 CFR 265 Appendlx
at
Level
20°C
Motel
For
Level
>20
spill
times
ieportable
quantity
71000
2
sltc
was
site!.
NFPA
t
tbs.
Sax's
was closed
dlscontlnued
more
Level
1
Insoluable
In
water,
soluable
In acids
or bases
one
8-10
pH 3-5
3
Level
a
or
2
lo-12
or slightly
In water
water
folld
solldated
stsblllzed
hazrrdous
wssts
the
worst
- nonconor non-
Sludge,
or flne
3 c k
5
point
Level
3 & k
4
Yes,
poses
J hrzrrd
5
l-3
to 12-14
3
Soluablc
In water
;r24g/100ml
wlttr
Yes
slurry,
mtcrlrl
powder,
6
NFPA
pH
-se
or
Level
Flash
(800F
lo-24g/lOOml
ldated
Heavy
metrl
compounds,
polycyclic
compounds,
. .
hJlogenJted
hydrocarbons,
or dcgradrtlon
products
Jre hazardous
NFPA
JdeqUJtely
Sparingly
soluable
water
.50
thJn
2
NFPA Level
Yes, but
SeparJted
or
other
Flash
polnt
80°F-140’F
lnroluablc
In use
with
NFPA Level
pH 5-6
Sol Id - consot
stabllired
StJte
since
use
tbs.
Sobst I tute
and
ring
conrpounds
1
pH 6-8
PhyslcJl
WJ~
Level
Unknown
No
or
SIX’S
chslm n
No
Bloaccumulatlon
Yerrs
1
Flash
point
140°F-20O’F
Ot~lOg/lOOml
site
times
repOrtable
quantlty
100-1000
V)
Corrosiveness
Years
5-20
¶plll
reportqusntlty
Chronic
Prrslstancy
Sol&lllty
Level
HultlplIer
lb.
Sax’s
Toxicity
Acute
Scale
0
Llquld
5
6
or
Jlr
emtstlonr
3
45
5-10
-10
1
15-50
5-15
o-5
1
cJse
should
be
used
in
scoring
this
scctlon.
TABLE
IV.
iiASTE
HANAGEHEKT
A.
This
characterlstlcr
risk.
8.
AND FINAL
category
adJust,
categories
for
WASTE HANACEtlENT
The
followlng
1 (Continued)
SCORE
the total
risk
waste
management
PRACTICES
multlpllers
as
determlned
practices
are
then
applied
Hanaqement
to
fully
the
total
In
full
Clay
cap
l
Leachatc
l
Liners
.
Adequate
or
Impermeable
collectlon
cover
system
condttlon
rnonltorlng
spill
l
Contaminated
l
Sol1
total
this
(from
A):
ck&
0.10
Impoundments:
l
Liners
l
Sound
l
Adequate
Fire
Quick
waste
reduce
In good
condltlon
and
adequate
monltorlng
wells
dikes
freeboard
wells
spllls~
l
to
contalnedr
other
In good
points
compliance
Surface
.
and
Hultlpller
LandfIlls:
Llmlted
risk
Practice
No conta I nment
Llmlted
containment
Fully
contalned
and
for
from
the receptors,
pathways,
englneerlng
controls
deslgned
FACTOR
Waste
Culdellnes
and
cleanup
actlon
soil
taken
removed
and/or
water
cleanup
of
samples
the spill
containment
of
a site
conflrm
would
Include
only
sane
Protection
l
Concrete
l
Oil/water
runoff
l
Effluent
treatment
of
the
Tralnlnq
surface
and
separator
from oft/water
plant
above
gul~~allner
Areas:
berms
for
pretreatment
separator
for
fully
of
to
contalned.
APPENDIX
ABBREVIATIONS
C
LIST
DRAFT
[IAS-CLJ.4lAPPC.l
6/11/82
ABBREVIATIONS
LIST
Abbreviation
Term
AID
AMTRAC(s)
BAT
BT
CIA
COD
CNO
DPDO
EOD
EPA
FMF
HOLF(s)
IAS
IWTP
LANTDIV
MACS
MAG
MCALF
MCAS
MCB
MC Bul
MCOLF
NACIP
Accident
Incident
Data Bank
Amphibious
Tractor(s)
Best Available
Technology
Bombing
Target
Controlled
Industrial
Area
Chemical
Oxygen Demand
Chief
of Naval Operations
Defense
Property
Disposal
Office
Explosive
Ordnance
Disposal
Environmental
Protection
Agency
Fleet
Marine
Force
Helicopter
Outlying
Landing
Field(s)
Initial
Assessment
Study
Industrial
Waste Treatment
Plant
Atlantic
Division
MarFne Air Control
Squadron
Marine
Aircraft
Group
Marine
Corps Auxiliary
Landing
Field
Marine
Corps Air Station
Marine
Corps Base
Marine
Corps Bulletin
Marine
Corps Outlying
Landing
Field
Navy Assessment
and Control
of Installation
Pollutants
Naval Air Rework Facility
Naval Facilities
Engineering
Command
Nuclear,
Biological,
Chemical
Naval
Construction
Battalion
Center
Naval
Energy and Environmental
Support
Activity
Natural
Resources
and Environmental
Affairs
Naval Surface
Weapons Center
Ordnance
Environmental
Support
Office
Outlying
Landing
Fields
Petroleum,
Oil,
Lubricant(s)
Safety
Ordnance
File
Sewage Treatment
Plant
Trichloroethylene
Trihalomethane(s)
Water and Air Research,
Inc.
Waste Treatment
Plant
Second Force Service
Support
Group
NARF
NAVFACENGCOM
NBC
NCBC
NEESA
NREA
NSWC
OESO
OLF(s)
POL
SAFEORD
STP
TCE
THM
WAR
WTP
2d FSSG
APPENDIX D
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