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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
BlueTree 4000 & 5000 Series CDMA
Modems
User’s Guide
Revision 1.5
Copyright © 2007 BlueTree Wireless Data Inc.
Page 1 of 67
4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
BlueTree Wireless Data, Inc.
2425 46th Avenue
Lachine, QC, Canada H8T 3C9
Tel: +1 (514) 422-9110
Toll Free: 1-877-422-9110
http://www.bluetreewireless.com
Copyright © 2007 BlueTree Wireless Data, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
Printed in Canada
BlueTree™, the BlueTree logo, and BlueVue™ are trademarks of BlueTree Wireless Data, Inc.
All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
Liability Notice
While every effort has been made to achieve technical accuracy, information in this document
is subject to change without notice and does not represent a commitment on the part of
BlueTree Wireless Data, Inc., or any of its subsidies, affiliates, agents, licensors, or resellers.
There are no warranties, express or implied, with respect to the content of this document.
Revision 1.5
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
Declaration of Conformity
FCC Compliance and Industry Canada Statement
4200/5200
4600/5600
4600A/5600A
FCC
O9EQ2438
IC
3651C-Q2438
FCC
QWV-BTX600
IC
4420A-BTX600
FCC
QWV-BTX600A
IC
4420A-BTX600A
The device complies with Part 15 of FCC rules and with ICES-003 of Industry Canada Rules.
Operation is subject to the following two conditions:
This device may not cause harmful interference.
This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause
undesired operation.
This equipment generates uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed
and used in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions, may cause interference harmful
to radio communications.
However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If
this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be
determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the
interference by one or more of the following measures:



Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which
the receiver is connected.
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
Warning: “The antenna gain including cable loss must not exceed 3 dBi
for operation under part 22 subpart H Cellular band and 4 dBi for
operation under part 24 subpart E PCS band. The antenna(s) used for this
transmitter must be installed to provide a separation distance of at least
30 cm from all persons and must not be co-located or operating in
conjunction with any other antenna or transmitter. End-users must be
provided with specific information required to satisfy RF exposure
requirements.”
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
Table of Contents
Section 1:
Package Contents...................................................................................6
Section 2:
Product Overview...................................................................................7
2.1
Introduction.......................................................................................................7
2.2
Features............................................................................................................8
2.3
Specifications....................................................................................................10
2.3.1 General specifications.................................................................................10
2.3.2 I/O Specifications......................................................................................11
2.3.3 Power specifications and consumption..........................................................12
2.3.4 GPS specifications (5000 series modems only)...............................................13
2.4 Modem Views....................................................................................................13
2.5
Indicators Lights (LED).......................................................................................14
2.6
Data Interface Specifications: Serial, Ethernet & USB..............................................16
2.6.1 Ethernet Port............................................................................................16
2.6.2 USB Device Port........................................................................................16
2.6.3 Serial Port (DB9).......................................................................................16
Section 3: BlueVue Device Manager......................................................................17
3.1.1 Connecting to the modem...........................................................................17
3.1.2 Software overview.....................................................................................19
Section 4: Activation & WAN Setup.......................................................................20
4.1
Activation.........................................................................................................20
4.1.1
4.1.2
4.1.3
4.2 WAN
Get an account for the modem....................................................................20
Program the account information into the modem..........................................20
Confirm the success of activation.................................................................21
Setup.......................................................................................................22
4.2.1 Enter the account information.....................................................................22
4.2.2 Test the connection....................................................................................23
Section 5: LAN Setup............................................................................................24
5.1
Ethernet and USB LAN........................................................................................24
5.1.1 LAN configuration......................................................................................24
5.1.2 DHCP server.............................................................................................25
5.2 Dial-up Networking (DUN) over serial...................................................................27
Section 6:
IP Networking Features........................................................................28
6.1.1
6.1.2
6.1.3
6.1.4
6.1.5
Section 7:
Port-forwarding.........................................................................................29
DMZ........................................................................................................30
IP Pass-through.........................................................................................30
Dynamic IP registration..............................................................................31
Password protection...................................................................................32
Serial-IP...............................................................................................33
Section 8:
I/O Management..................................................................................34
Section 9:
GPS Settings.........................................................................................35
Section 10:
Event Reporting..................................................................................37
Section 11:
Hardware Installation.........................................................................38
11.1
Cellular antenna..............................................................................................38
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
11.2
Antenna diversity
...............................................................................................................................39
11.3
GPS antenna...................................................................................................39
11.4
Ethernet cable.................................................................................................40
11.5
USB cable.......................................................................................................40
11.6
Serial cable.....................................................................................................40
11.7
Power source...................................................................................................41
11.7.1 Powering up the modem...........................................................................42
11.7.2 Testing the power connection.....................................................................42
11.8 I/O Cable Wiring..............................................................................................43
11.8.1 Connecting a panic button or a passive on/off sensor to the modem’s digital
input:.................................................................................................................44
11.8.2 Connecting an active voltage source to the modem’s digital input:..................45
11.8.3 Turning on and off an external peripheral using a power relay on the modem’s
digital output:......................................................................................................46
11.8.4 Connecting an analog gauge or source (0-5Vdc) to the modem’s analog input:. 47
11.8.5 Connecting an analog gauge or source (4-20mA) to the modem’s analog input: 48
11.9 Mounting the modem.......................................................................................48
Appendix A :
Firmware Upgrades..........................................................................49
Appendix B :
Sending AT Commands.....................................................................52
Appendix C :
Basic GPS Reporting in BlueVue Device Manager...............................54
Appendix D :
Dial-Up Networking in Windows.......................................................57
Appendix E :
BlueVue Device Manager Troubleshooting.........................................59
Appendix F :
Activation Troubleshooting...............................................................63
Appendix G :
Application & Miscellaneous Troubleshooting...................................65
Section 12:
Revision 1.5
Warranty............................................................................................68
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
Section 1: Package Contents
The modem’s retail package contains the following items:
1
4000/5000 Series modem
2
15-foot power cable with 1A fuse
3
Extra serial number label
4
5-foot Ethernet CAT5 cross-over
cable
Quick Start Guide
5
(also available at
www.bluetreewireless.com)
6
Warranty card
Table 1 - Package Contents
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
Section 2: Product Overview
2.1
Introduction
The BlueTree 4000 & 5000 series modems are rugged cellular modems built to provide simple
and reliable communication over a CDMA cellular data network. They are typically used in
applications such as Public Safety, Field Force Automation, Asset Tracking, Telemetry, SCADA,
meter reading and WAN backup.
Figure 1
The modem manages two connections at the same time, thus acting as a gateway/router:
•
Cellular WAN connection: this is the Wide Area Network connection to the cellular
network/Internet. The modem can be configured to automatically and autonomously
establish a packet data connection to the cellular carrier and acquire a WAN IP
address.
•
LAN connection: this is the local connection between the modem and any device
attached to its serial/Ethernet/USB ports. In the case of Ethernet and USB, the modem
acts as a server and assigns a private LAN IP address to the attached device.
Alternatively, it can perform IP pass-through and assign the WAN IP to the attached
host, thus becoming a fully transparent actor in the communication process.
The modem then routes packets back and forth between its WAN and LAN connections, thus
allowing the locally attached device to communicate with remote computers.
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
2.2
Features
3 different data connection
interfaces
Serial/RS-232/COM, Ethernet, and USB
Autonomous & persistent
connection management
Fully integrated TCP/IP protocols allow the modem to
connect autonomously to the packet network (Internet).
This feature enables capabilities such as: in-call
diagnostic, Serial-IP, stand-alone GPS, remote
configuration and remote firmware upgrade.
Network Address
Translation (NAT)
When packets leave a LAN IP and reach the modem, it
performs NATing. The source IP of the packet is modified
to match the modem's WAN IP. When packets come back
from the WAN the modem then performs a reverse NAT.
IP pass-through
The modem can assign its WAN IP address to the attached
host, thus disabling NAT. The modem remains reachable
through its reserved TCP and UDP ports.
In-call diagnostic
The user can get modem status information while in a data
call, without interrupting the data session
Serial IP
The modem encapsulates data coming from the serial port
into a TCP or UDP packet and sends it to a remote server
on the packet network. It decapsulates IP packets coming
from the network and sends raw data to the serial port.
Remote configuration
The user can remotely configure or perform remote
diagnostics on the modem using BlueVue Device Manager
or a terminal session
Remote firmware upgrade
The user can remotely upgrade the modem’s firmware
using BlueVue Device Manager
Password protection
The modem can be protected from tampering by
requesting the user to enter a password before the
existing modem configuration can be viewed or modified
Integrated GPS Receiver
Available on the 5000 series modems only. A Trimble GPS
receiver is embedded into the modem for Automatic
Vehicle Location (AVL). The modem can report this
positioning data locally to any of the local data interfaces
(serial, Ethernet, or Ethernet-over-USB), and/or remotely
to a predefined server (see stand-alone).
Stand-alone GPS
Store and Forward
Revision 1.5
Available on the 5000 series modems only. This feature
allows remote asset tracking by sending GPS data to a
remote server without the need for a client application
connected to the modem.
This feature allows I/O and/or GPS report preservation. If
a unit loses its WAN connection, the data being collected
through I/O and/or GPS event reporting will be stored in
memory and automatically forwarded when the WAN
connection is established.
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
Inputs and Outputs
Event Reporting
Sensors can be connected to the I/O port of the modem (4
digital inputs, 3 digital outputs and 3 analog inputs). The
modem is capable of monitoring its digital input sensors
for any change in state and sending a report to a remote
server based on an event trigger. The analog inputs allow
monitoring of gradient data sources. The modem's outputs
can be used to remotely trigger relays.
The modem can send a report to up to 10 destinations
when a user-defined event is triggered. The modem has
an intuitive embedded Event Reporting Protocol that
automatically formats the messages reported to the
remote server.
Table 2
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2.3
Specifications
2.3.1
General specifications
CDMA Dual-band
Supports both North American frequency bands: 800 MHz and
1900 MHz
All modems are compatible with CDMA IS-2000 Cellular data
services.
CDMA
Model:
4600A/5600A modems support EV-DO Rev.A, EV-DO Rel.0
and 1XRTT
4600/5600 modems support EV-DO Rel.0 and 1XRTT
4200/5200 modems support 1XRTT and IS95
Maximum bandwidth: (depends on service provider)
Data Rates
EV-DO Rev.A:
3.1Mbps downstream, 1.8Mbps upstream
EV-DO Rel.0:
2.4Mbps downstream, 153Kbps upstream
1XRTT:
153Kbps downstream and upstream
IS95:
14Kbps downstream and upstream
Programming/Setup
BlueVue Device Manager software, AT commands
LED Status
Indicators
PWR, TX, RX, DTR, REG, LNK, ACT, and SER/GPS
Material: extruded aluminium
Enclosure & Weight
Size: 166 mm × 127 mm × 56 mm (6.55” × 5.00” × 2.20”)
Weight: 500g (1.1 lbs)
4200/5200 modems: TNC Female Connector, 50 Ohms
Cellular Antenna
Connection
4600/5600 modems: 2x SMA Female Connector, 50 ohms
4600A/5600A modems: 2x SMA Female Connector, 50 ohms
GPS Antenna
Connection
SMA Female Connector (3.3 Volts active antenna)
Operating Temperature: -40° to +85° C (-40° to +185° F)
Environmental
Specifications
Storage Temperature: -40° to +85° C (-40° to +185° F)
Humidity: 95% non-condensing
Table 3
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
2.3.2
I/O Specifications
The modem has 4 digital inputs, 3 analog inputs and 3 digital outputs for remote control and
monitoring. The third digital output (O3) is located on the power connector for all modems.
The third analog input (AI3) is not available on the 4200/5200 models.
AI2
GND
O2
DI2
DI4
AI1
AI3
O1
DI1
DI3
Figure 2 – I/Os (Looking at back of modem)
3x Digital Outputs (O1, O2, O3) – O3 available on Power connector
Configuration
Open Collector, reference to ground
Absolute Maximum IDC
500mADC (Vce = 750mVDC)
Absolute Maximum VDC
30VDC (open circuit)
Absolute Minimum VDC
0.4VDC (open circuit)
4x Digital Inputs (DI1, DI2, DI3, DI4)
Configuration
Non-isolated level detection, reference to ground
Active level
1.6VDC to 30VDC
Inactive level
0VDC to 1.3VDC
Absolute Minimum VDC
0.3VDC
Absolute Maximum VDC
33VDC
Leakage IDC at 5VDC
150uADC
3x Analog Inputs (AI1, AI2, AI3) – AI3 only available on 4600/5600
Configuration
Not isolated input, reference to ground
Resolution
1024 (ADC 10-bit)
VDC per step
4.8875855mVDC
Full scale level
5VDC
Zero level
0VDC
Absolute Minimum VDC
-0.3VDC
Absolute Maximum VDC
8.3VDC
Leakage IDC at 5VDC
265.96 uADC TYPE
Table 4
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
2.3.3
Power specifications and consumption
Power is supplied to the modem via the 4-pin connector on the rear panel. The pins are
described as follows:
Pin
O3
IGN
GND
POS
Figure 3 –
Power (Looking
at back of
modem)
•
•
Name
Description
1
GND
Ground
2
POS
Power supply input (8 to 30 Vdc)
3
IGN
Ignition sense input – Switches the modem on or off
4
O3
Digital Output 3
Table 5
Table 6
•
Power input to the modem is protected against reverse
polarity and over-voltage
The POS input is monitored by the modem as a dedicated analog input. Used to
monitor the Voltage
The IGN input is monitored by the modem as a dedicated digital input
The modem’s power consumption is as follows:
Mode
Description
Active
(average)
The modem is in a call and
is transmitting or receiving
data
The modem is in a call and
is transmitting or receiving
data
The modem is either not in
a call, or is in one but is
Dormant. The modem is
Dormant after 20s of
inactivity.
The modem is turned OFF
but still has power from its
POS input. All circuitry is
shut down except for NonVolatile memory and Realtime Clock.
Active
(peak)
Idle
Ignition
OFF
Approximate consumption (mA)
4200
5200
4600
5600
4600A
5600A
169
182
179
188
190
200
287
300
300
311
330
340
49
62
56
67
70
80
1
1
1
1
1
1
Table 6
Wiring instructions are provided in Section 11: Hardware Installation.
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
2.3.4
GPS specifications (5000 series modems only)
General
•
•
•
•
L1 frequency (1575.42 MHz)
C/A code (Standard Positioning Service)
12-channel
Continuous tracking receiver
Update rate
•
•
TSIP @ 1 Hz
NMEA @ 1Hz
Accuracy
•
•
•
•
Horizontal: <5 meters (50%), <8 meters (90%)
Altitude: <10 meters (50%), <16 meters (90%)
Velocity: 0.06 m/sec.
PPS (static): ±50 nanoseconds
Autonomous Operation in Standard Sensitivity Mode:
•
•
•
•
Acquisition
Reacquisition: <2 sec. (90%)
Hot Start: <10 sec. (50%), <13 sec. (90%)
Warm Start: <38 sec. (50%), <42 sec. (90%)
Cold Start: <50 sec. (50%), <84 sec. (90%)
Cold Start requires no initialization.
Warm Start implies last position, time and almanac are saved by
backup power.
Hot start implies ephemeris also saved.
Optional (COCOM) limits:
•
•
Altitude: 18,000 m
Velocity: 515 m/s
Either limit may be exceeded, but not both.
Dynamics
Revision 1.5
•
•
Acceleration: 4g (39.2 m/sec2)
Motional jerk: 20 m/sec3
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
Table 7
2.4
Modem Views
Front
Back
(5600)
Figure 4
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2.5
Indicators Lights (LED)
The modem has 8 green LEDs on its front panel providing information on the state of the
modem:
LED
Indication
PWR
Power
TX
Transmit
Flashing
Attached terminal is transmitting data to
modem via serial port
RX
Receive
Flashing
Attached terminal is receiving data from
modem via serial port
DTR
REG
Data Terminal
Ready
Registration
LNK
RF link
ACT
RF activity
SER
(4000
series)
SER
GPS
(5000
series)
GPS
Status
Corresponding State
OFF
Modem is powered off
ON
Modem is powered on
OFF
No terminal is detected over modem serial
port
ON
Terminal host is detected over modem serial
port
OFF
Radio is off (contact customer support)
Flashing
Radio is registered on cellular network
ON
Radio not registered on cellular network
OFF
Not in a data call
ON
In a data call (connected to network)
Flashing
Transmitting/receiving data over cellular
network
This LED is unused
ON
Flashing
No position fix available
Position fix acquired
Table 8
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
2.6 Data Interface Specifications: Serial, Ethernet &
USB
2.6.1
Ethernet Port
The modem's 10/100Mbps Ethernet port is compliant with the EIA-568 standard, and requires
a crossover cable to connect to host terminals.
2.6.2
USB Device Port
This is a USB2.0 Device interface on a Type B connector. It offers Ethernet-over-USB
functionality using the RNDIS driver.
The BlueTree RNDIS driver must be installed before the USB interface can be used. You can
obtain the driver at www.bluetreewireless.com.
2.6.3
Serial Port (DB9)
The modem’s serial port is an RS232 DCE, compliant with EIA-232 standard. The connector
used is DB9 female and is shown in the illustration below.
Figure 5 – Serial connector (looking at back of modem)
For further serial wiring information, refer to Section 11: Hardware Installation.
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
Section 3: BlueVue Device Manager
The 4000/5000 series modems can be configured using BlueVue Device Manager, a software
application which is available as a free download at www.bluetreewireless.com. Later sections
of this guide will refer to configuration options in this program. For more in-depth information
on using BlueVue Device Manager, refer to the BlueVue Device Manager User's Guide. It can
be accessed from within BlueVue itself by clicking the Help button, or downloaded separately
at www.bluetreewireless.com.
BlueVue Device Manager is a Graphical User Interface for modem configuration and
administration that allows the user to:
•
•
•
•
•
3.1.1
Activate the modem (program the MDN and MIN) for use on the cellular network
Register the modem on the cellular network (WAN Setup)
Configure operation parameters (such as LAN setup or GPS)
Monitor diagnostic and status information
Perform firmware upgrades on the modem
Connecting to the modem
Should you run into any issues connecting to the modem, refer to Appendix E: BlueVue Device
Manager Troubleshooting.
Click on Tools > Settings > Connection tab to select the interface that will connect your PC
to the modem.
Figure 6
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
If using a serial cable:
1.
Select Serial
2.
Select the COM port in the dropdown list, then click OK
If using an Ethernet or USB cable:
1.
Select Modem IP
2.
Enter the appropriate modem IP then click OK. By default, the DHCP-assigned IPs will
be 192.168.0.1 for Ethernet and 192.168.111.1 for USB. If using USB, the driver
must be installed as explained in section 2.
If connecting to a remote modem:
1.
Select Remote Configuration and click OK. A new panel will open to the left of
BlueVue Device Manager.
2.
Right-click Available Modems in the panel
3.
Click Add…
4.
Enter the modem’s information, then click OK. The description is optional.
5.
The modem will be added to the list of Available Modems, which will be saved for easy
access in the future. Double-click the modem name in order to connect to it.
Figure 7
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
3.1.2
Software overview
Modem Diagnostic
This screen displays various technical information pertaining to the modem's state.
Modem Configuration
This screen allows the user to configure the modem to suit the application
requirements.
Modem Activation
This screen is where the user performs cellular account activation so that the
modem may connect to the cellular network.
Modem WAN Settings
The screen allows the user to set the connection profile on the modem, such as the
user name and password of the account.
Modem GPS
The screen allows the user to configure the modem for basic GPS reporting.
(Available only for the 5200 and 5600/A modems)
Help
This button opens the BlueVue Device Manager User's Guide, a document that
explains every parameter of BlueVue Device Manager in detail.
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
Section 4: Activation & WAN Setup
4.1
Activation
A modem must be activated before it can be used on the cellular network. Here are the steps
to follow to activate a modem.
4.1.1
Get an account for the modem
Contact a cellular service provider or cellular dealer and request a CDMA account with the
packet data service option for 1xRTT, 1xEV-DO, or 1xEV-DO Rev. A. The provider will require
the Electronic Serial Number (ESN) of the modem. The ESN is located on the label under the
modem as well as on the modem’s box.
The cellular service provider will then provide the following account credentials:

4.1.2
•
Mobile Directory Number (MDN): the 10-digit telephone number assigned to
your unit, including the area code
•
Master Lock Code (MLC/SPC): the 6-digit number representing the Service
Provisioning Lock Code. If one was not provided, assume it is 000000.
•
Mobile Station ID (MIN/MSID/IMSI): the 10-digit or 15-digit number required
for Local Number Portability; If not provided, assume it is the same as the MDN.
•
User Name/Password (Optional): required for network access in some cases.
IMPORTANT: Ask your cellular service provider whether the carrier blocks
incoming connections. If they do, you will be unable to communicate with the
modem remotely unless you ask the service provider to allow incoming
connections to your application’s TCP and UDP ports. If possible, ask them to open
the following ports as well: TCP 21 (used for firmware upgrades), TCP 5070 (used
by BlueVue Device Manager), and TCP 6070 (used for troubleshooting and AT
command configuration).
Program the account information into the modem
Open BlueVue Device Manager and navigate to ACT (Activation). The Quick Start Guide
booklet included in the modem package contains a step-by-step walkthrough for activating the
modem. The Quick Start Guide is also available at www.bluetreewireless.com.
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
4.1.3
Confirm the success of activation
Once the activation process above is complete, navigate to WAN (WAN Settings). The
modem’s phone number should be displayed at the top left as outlined in the figure below.
Figure 8
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
4.2
WAN Setup
Once the modem has been activated, it must be configured in order to authenticate for use
with the cellular network.
4.2.1
Enter the account information
Navigate to WAN (WAN Settings) to configure the WAN connection once the modem has
been activated.
Figure 9
1.
Enter #777 as the Dial String
2.
Enter the User Name and Password if provided by your cellular carrier
3.
Select Always On or On Demand (explained below) depending on the desired
connection initiation behavior.
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
Always On & On Demand
When the modem is set to Always On, it will attempt to maintain a permanent connection to
the cellular network on its own. Most applications will require the modem to be remotely
accessible at any time, and will require the modem to be set to Always On.
When the modem is set to On Demand, the modem does not connect to the cellular network
unless told to by the attached terminal. If disconnected from the cellular network, it will not
attempt to reconnect. The most common On Demand scenario is when using the serial port in
order to establish a PPP session through a Dial-Up Networking (DUN) connection.
Unless you are sure the modem should be set to On Demand, the modem should be set to
Always On.
4.2.2
Test the connection
Once you've finished entering the settings, and once a connection is established (depending on
the connection initiation behavior described above), navigate to DIAG (Modem Diagnostic):
the modem’s WAN IP should be displayed as outlined in the figure below. This is the IP
address that has been assigned to the modem by the cellular carrier. At this time, the
modem’s LNK light will stay on as long as the connection is maintained.
Figure 10
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4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
Section 5: LAN Setup
5.1
Ethernet and USB LAN
Computers and devices that use the modem’s Ethernet and USB connectivity
experience much higher transfer speeds and more importantly, they employ all
the benefits of TCP/IP communication.
5.1.1
LAN configuration
Whether an Ethernet or USB cable is used, it is essential that both the modem
and the attached device be within the same LAN subnet for IP communication to
take place. By default, the modem has a DHCP server running, which will initially
assign the following IP address to the attached device (providing the device is
set to use DHCP):
Modem IP
Host IP
Ethernet
192.168.0.1
192.168.0.4
USB
192.168.111.1
192.168.111.20
Figure 11
Revision 1.5
Copyright © 2007 BlueTree Wireless Data Inc.
Page 24 of 67
4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
If the attached device must use a specific (static) IP, then the modem's LAN
configuration must be changed so that the modem's IP lies in the same subnet
as the device. Navigate to CONF (Modem Configuration) > LAN IP and
change the parameters under Ethernet or USB.
Figure 12 - Sample modem configuration for a device that
must use the IP 10.127.0.17
5.1.2
DHCP server
As mentioned above, the modem has a DHCP server which automatically assigns
an IP to the attached device. If an Ethernet hub or switch is connected to the
modem’s Ethernet port, the modem will assign an IP address to each device
connected to the hub or switch (Max. 254 devices) provided the devices are set
to use DHCP. The DHCP server can be configured or turned off at CONF
(Modem Configuration) > LAN IP as shown above.
Revision 1.5
Copyright © 2007 BlueTree Wireless Data Inc.
Page 25 of 67
4000 & 5000 Series User’s Guide
5.2

Dial-up Networking (DUN) over serial
Regardless of the modem type, using a serial cable will cap the
bandwidth at 115200 kbps. For owners of EV-DO modems (4600/A
& 5600/A), the serial port will be a bottleneck in terms of
performance, as it will reduce the data throughput to approximately
5% of its maximum potential, and even less for EV-DO Rev. A
modems. Whenever possible, use an Ethernet or USB connection to
take full advantage of throughput.
Some terminals do not have RJ45 Ethernet or USB connectors and require using
a DB9 RS232 standard serial connector to interface with the modem. This
section covers programmable devices such as PC or smart (programmable)
machinery.
Revision 1.5
•
If the attached device is not programmable, then you cannot do
DUN, and will have to use the Serial IP feature to communicate with
the device. Refer to Section 7: Serial IP for details.
•
If the modem will be used with a programmable device that can
make PPP connections, then refer to that device's documentation to
create the dial-up session. The phone number to dial will be #777.
•
If the modem will be used with a PC, then the user must install a
standard modem driver on the COM port to which the modem is
physically connected, and then create a dial-up connection running
on that driver. This dial-up connection will dial the modem so that a
PPP session is established between modem and PC. Meanwhile, the
modem will make a PPP session of its own to connect to the network.
For a walkthrough on creating a DUN connection in Windows, refer to
Appendix D.
Copyright © 2007 BlueTree Wireless Data Inc.
Page 26 of 67
Section 6: IP Networking Features
As mentioned previously, the modem acquires an external public or private IP address (WAN
IP, or Wide Area Network IP) from the cellular network upon establishing a connection. A
remote user can communicate with the modem or a host behind the modem, however the
appropriate port-forwarding and LAN IP configuration settings have to be set on the modem.

Some carriers disable remote access as a security measure. If you are certain that
the modem is on the cellular network (i.e., it has acquired a WAN IP) but you
cannot reach it remotely, ask the carrier to allow incoming IP data traffic on the
required port. Read the Troubleshooting appendix for more details.
6.1.1
Port-forwarding
Since the 4000/5000 series modem is a network address translation (NAT) enabled router, the
remote computer connecting to the modem’s cellular WAN IP cannot access devices/servers on
the modem’s LAN if the modem is not specifically configured to forward the appropriate ports
to the LAN devices/servers. Port-forwarding, or tunneling, is the act of relaying an incoming
packet to one or more local destinations depending on the port(s) through which the packet
came.
The main use of port-forwarding is to allow an external user to reach a port on a private IP
address from the outside via a NAT. This allows remote computers to connect to a specific
computer within a private LAN, depending on the port used to connect.
To set up the modem's port forwarding rules, navigate to CONF (Modem Configuration) >
Port Forwarding/DMZ.
Figure 13
The WAN Port is the destination port number used by the remote computer and the LAN Port is
where the data is forwarded to. Typically the WAN port and LAN port are the same. Select the
appropriate protocol (TCP or UDP), and submit the new settings.
6.1.2
DMZ
This feature, when enabled, instructs the modem to forward all incoming traffic to a single IP
destination on the LAN. An exception will be made for traffic coming on the ports designated
by the port-forwarding rules (this would be ports 9000, 23, and 777 in Figure 13). This
exception can be overridden by checking the “DMZ overrides all forwarded ports below”
checkbox.
Figure 14
DMZ is ideal in situations where there is already a server on the LAN that handles portforwarding, as it avoids having to re-program all the port-forwarding rules into the modem. It
is also practical when the user does not know which ports his local device listens on, and just
wants everything to work with minimal configuration.
DMZ can be enabled at CONF (Modem Configuration) > Port Forwarding/DMZ.
6.1.3
IP Pass-through
When this feature is enabled, the modem will disable NAT and assign its WAN IP address to
the attached host. The modem will remain reachable though its reserved TCP and UDP ports.
To enable IP pass-through, navigate to CONF (Modem Configuration) > LAN IP and select
the data interface to perform pass-through on, then check the “Enable IP Pass-through”
checkbox.
Figure 15

If IP pass-through is enabled, then port-forwarding and DMZ should be disabled.

If the host is attached to the modem via an Ethernet cable, then the host must
have DHCP enabled (i.e., it should be perform automatic IP negotiation instead of
using a pre-defined static IP).
6.1.4
Dynamic IP registration
This feature allows the modem to report a message to a user-configurable IP address every
time its WAN IP address changes.
It is useful when the cellular account is associated with a dynamic IP address. Since the WAN
IP address will be changing regularly, it will be impossible for the user to know which WAN IP
address is assigned to the modem. With Dynamic IP Registration enabled, the modem will
notify a remote server of the new WAN IP address as well as the modem’s ESN in hexadecimal
format. The IP Registration packet can be sent using either TCP or UDP.
To configure Dynamic IP Registration, navigate to CONF (Modem Configuration) >
General, and set the destination IP address and port. The registration timer is a value (in
minutes) that controls how often the modem should report its IP to the server. If it is set to
zero, the modem will report its WAN IP address upon boot-up or upon acquiring a new IP
address from the cellular carrier after losing the cellular connection. If it is set to a value
between 1 and 65535, then it will report its ESN and WAN IP regularly at the specified
interval.
Figure 16
6.1.5
Password protection
This feature allows administrators to restrict configuration access to certain users.
Figure 17
To enable password protection:
1.
Navigate to CONF (Modem Configuration) > Password and check the “Enable”
box.
2.
Select the interfaces to prompt for a password on. The WAN interface (remote
connections) is the most commonly password-protected interface, however some
users may wish to password-protect both the WAN & LAN interfaces. Note that the
modem cannot prevent configuration changes made from its serial port.
3.
Finally, set the modem password. The password must be a case-sensitive string that is
6-30 characters long.
Section 7: Serial-IP
This feature allows communication over the cellular network in two common setups. The first
is a server communicating with a remote serial-only device and the other, a serial-only device
communicating with another remote serial-only device. Serial IP is used to emulate a direct
serial connection to the attached device, or to emulate a landline modem. The modem then
becomes a transparent middleman between the poller and the pollee. Serial IP is most
commonly used in telemetry applications such as meter reading and SCADA devices.
Figure 18
When the modem is in Serial IP mode, IP packets intended for the attached serial device have
their IP headers stripped before being passed on to the device. This means that the serial
device receives raw serial data that it can understand. Inversely, when the serial device is
sending data, the modem encapsulates this data in IP packets to be transmitted over-the-air
to the remote destination.
When a Serial IP server is running, the modem waits until a connection is made on the defined
Serial IP port, then triggers Serial IP mode. The incoming data will be relayed to the attached
serial device. Any output from the serial device will be sent to the IP of the remote computer
that made the connection on the port that the remote computer used to make the connection.
When using Serial IP, the modem configuration depends on the application requirements. The
four different scenarios are documented in a Support Note (#SN0703121) available at:
http://www.bluetreewireless.com/support/downloads/documents/details.asp?id=69
Section 8: I/O Management
BlueTree offers a complete set of AT commands to query/set its general purpose and dedicated
input and output pins. This section is only meant to offer a glimpse of how the user can
interact with the modem’s I/Os.
Refer to Appendix B for basic help on sending AT commands to the modem. For full details on
I/O management AT commands, read the 4000 & 5000 Series AT Command Reference
manual, a document available at www.bluetreewireless.com.
The modem’s Event Reporting feature (explained in Section 10: Event Reporting) covers I/Os
as well. This will allow the automation of some queries and set the modem to report to a local
or remote destination when an input value reaches a certain threshold.
Digital Output Control
The three outputs on the modem can be used to toggle peripheral equipment ON or OFF.
Peripherals such as lights, sirens, valves, door lock mechanisms, and/or ignitions can be
controlled through these I/Os.
Example of turning ON digital output 2:
AT+BDOSET=DO2,1
Digital Input State Query
The modem monitors all of its 4 general purpose digital inputs for a change in state, along
with the dedicated ignition input. The state of these inputs can be queried by sending the
following AT command:
AT+BDIGET?
Sample response from modem:
+BDIGET: DI1,0
+BDIGET: DI2,0
+BDIGET: DI3,0
+BDIGET: DI4,0
+BDIGET: IGN,1
Analog Input Value Query
The modem has a 10-bit Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) which allows it to monitor all of its
3 general purpose analog inputs for a change in state, along with the dedicated power input.
The value of these inputs can be queried by sending the following command:
AT+BAIGET?
Sample response from modem:
+BAIGET: PWR,13.553
+BAIGET: AI1,3.056
+BAIGET: AI2,1.987
+BAIGET: AI3,0.000
Section 9: GPS Settings

The modem’s GPS reporting frequency determines the cellular network bandwidth
consumption. A higher reporting frequency will result in higher bandwidth
consumption.
The 5200 and 5600/A modems have an embedded GPS receiver which can be used to track
their movement. This feature is commonly used in applications such as asset-tracking and
Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL). These modems support two protocols: the National Marine
Electronics Association (NMEA) protocol and the Trimble ASCII Interface Protocol (TAIP).
The modem can report the fixes acquired from its GPS receiver to the local serial port, and/or
to an IP address, either local (Ethernet/USB) or remote (over the air). A variety of reporting
options are available, ranging from basic NMEA/TAIP timer-based reports to intelligent
condition-triggered reports which leverage the modem's Event Reporting capabilities.
TAIP protocol
TAIP is the more complex of the two GPS protocols, allowing greater control over the report
contents. It is configured using a single command string. Read Trimble’s TAIP documentation
to learn to create a command that meets your needs and for report parsing information. The
document is available here:
http://www.bluetreewireless.com/extranet/documents/Trimble_ASCII_Interface_Protocol.pdf
The modem listens on UDP port 21000 for TAIP commands, allowing its configuration to be
modified on the fly by software applications that support TAIP.
NMEA protocol
NMEA uses one or more of the following seven pre-defined, fixed-format messages.
Message
GGA
GLL
GSA
GSV
RMC
VTG
ZDA
Contents
Time, position, and various status information
Latitude, longitude, and time
GPS DOP and active satellites
Active satellites in view
Time, date, position, course, and speed
Track made good and ground speed
Time and date
Size
75
48
63
70
67
37
35
bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
Table 9
Refer to Trimble’s NMEA 0183 documentation for additional information. It is available here:
http://www.bluetreewireless.com/extranet/documents/NMEA_0183.pdf
Feature: Store & Forward
The 5200 and 5600/A series modems have an integrated 512Kbytes Static RAM memory chip
dedicated to storing GPS fixes. It can store approximately 5000 position fixes.
This feature will activate automatically when the WAN connection is lost, such as in the event
of loss of cellular coverage. When coverage is regained and communication is re-established
with the listening server, the modem will send the buffered fixes to ensure that no positions
have been lost.
When Store & Forward is activated, the modem stores GPS data in static memory on a First In
First Out (FIFO) basis. This means that if the modem is unable to transmit fixes over an
extended period of time, and the memory becomes full as a result, the newest fixes overwrite
the oldest stored fixes. When the cellular connection is re-established, or when the TCP socket
at the reporting destination is re-established, the modem will send all the stored fixes to the
destination.
Stored fixes are not lost when ignition is turned off and the modem is running in low power
mode. They are lost only when the modem completely loses power.
Feature: Odometer
The modem can keep track of the total distance traveled by aggregating the data obtained
from the GPS fixes. It calculates the distance traveled based on a straight line between the
current and previous fix. By appending these calculations to a total, the modem is able to keep
track of the total distance travelled. When using the NMEA protocol, the GPS fix is updated
every second, so the odometer can be very accurate. However, when using the TAIP protocol,
the GPS fix is acquired as per the configured fix acquisition timer. If the timer is set to a high
value such as 5 minutes, then the odometer will most likely be inaccurate.
Configuring the modem for GPS reporting
The modem can be configured to report GPS in two ways.
The first is to use BlueVue Device Manager for basic GPS reporting. This allows easy
configuration of timer-based GPS reports. Refer to Appendix C for a step-by-step configuration
example.
The second is to use AT commands for advanced configuration. This method is more complex
and can take advantage of the modem's Event Reporting capabilities (see next section). Event
Reporting allows the modem to report automatically when a user-defined condition is met.
Read Section 10: Event Reporting for details.
Section 10: Event Reporting
Event Reporting is covered in its own document, the I/O Management & Event Reporting
Guide, available at www.bluetreewireless.com. This section is meant to provide a general
overview of what can be accomplished with Event Reporting.
Event Reporting is used to program the modem to automatically transmit a report whenever a
user-defined event occurs to as many as 10 local or remote destinations. An event occurs
when its defined conditions have been met.
Events
The event that triggers an automatic report can be any of the following:
•
•
•
A timer has finished counting down
An analog input signal has reached a certain value
A digital input signal has changed state (this includes vehicle ignition monitoring)
The 5200 and 5600/A modems are equipped with a GPS receiver and can react upon these
additional GPS-based event triggers:
•
•
•
•
The
The
The
The
modem
modem
modem
modem
is in motion at a particular speed
is in motion in a particular direction (heading)
is unable to acquire a GPS fix
has traveled for a set distance
Events can also be combined using logical statements to create more complex events. For
example, a combination of the timer and speed event triggers could define an event that
would trigger when a vehicle has been speeding, by defining speeding as moving at 60+ mph
for more than 10 seconds.
Reports
Once an event occurs, the modem sends a report to a set destination. All reports, with the
exception of one (unformatted GPS reports), are custom-formatted by the BlueTree Event
Protocol (BEP) as defined in the I/O Management & Event Reporting document, so they require
some manipulation on the destination end in order to be parsed.
A report can contain one or more of the following information:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The modem's name and ESN
The modem's RSSI (signal strength)
The value of a specific analog signal
The state of a specific digital signal
The modem's odometer value (total distance traveled)
A BEP-formatted GPS report containing NMEA or TAIP data
An unformatted GPS report containing NMEA or TAIP data
The modem can be configured to wait for confirmation (“ACK”) from the remote server that it
has received the report. If this confirmation does not come, the modem will assume the report
has not been received and will continue sending the same report at a configured interval until
it receives confirmation of receipt.
To ease the parsing of the packets on the server, the modem can sync flags in the beginning
and end of each packet it sends.
Section 11: Hardware Installation
11.1
Cellular antenna
The selected cellular antenna(s) must meet the following specifications:
•
•
•
•
•
Maximum rated gain of 3dBi for Cellular band and 4dBi for PCS band
Dual-band 800 & 1900 MHz
Nominal 50 ohm impedance
Voltage Standing Wave Ratio (VSWR) less then 2.5:1
Connector:
o Male SMA connector for 4600/A & 5600/A modems
o Male TNC connector for 4200 & 5200 modems
The length of the antenna cable may affect the signal strength. Choose the appropriate cable
type and length. The table below provides can help pre-determine the loss to expect.
Cable type
Loss per 100 feet
8216 (RG58)
31 dB
8267 (RG213)
7.6 dB
LMR-400
3.9 dB
LMR-500
3.15 dB
LMR-600
2.5 dB
LMR-1200
1.26 dB
Table 10
Installation and verification
When installing the antenna, follow the FCC and Industry Canada guidelines and keep the
following in mind:
•
•
Mount the antenna(s) at least 30 cm (12 inches) from other antennas
Do not install the antenna in a closed metallic enclosure (such as a cabinet or the
trunk of a car).
Once a modem has a signal, the REG LED indicator will start flashing, indicating that the
modem is registered on the cellular network (i.e. within coverage). Additionally, BlueVue
Device Manager will display the received signal strength (RSSI) in the top right. The modem
should have at the very least one bar of signal strength.
11.2
Antenna diversity
The 4600/A & 5600/A modems have two antenna connectors available, labeled RF-1 and RF-2.
•
•
RF-1 : This is the main antenna that is used for data transmission. It is mandatory
to have RF-1 connected to an antenna.
RF-2 : This is the diversity antenna, used to improve on the signal strength
obtained from RF-1. This antenna is not mandatory however it can improve
reception in some situations.
Diversity is a transmission technique that consists of using two separate antennas to achieve
the best cellular signal possible. The transmissions will be done using the antenna which has
the best reception. Diversity is particularly useful in mobile environments.
The diversity antenna should be placed with these recommendations in mind for optimal use:
•
•
•
11.3
The minimum distance between the main antenna and the diversity antenna
should be 9".
The recommended minimum distance between main antenna and the diversity
antenna is 18".
If it is possible to increase the distance between the two antennas, use increments
of 9", such as 27", 36", 45", etc.
GPS antenna
The 5200 & 5600/A modems have an additional SMA connector for the GPS antenna. The
selected GPS antenna must meet the following specifications:
•
•
•
•
Active antenna with 3.3 volts preamplifier
Nominal 50 Ohms impedance
Male SMA connector
Frequency band: 1575 MHz
When installing the GPS antenna, make sure it has line-of-sight with the sky. Then connect the
cable’s connector into the modem’s GPS connector by screwing it in tightly by hand.
To test the installation, look at the GPS LED at the front of the modem. It will start flashing
once a fix has been acquired. After the antenna is installed, allow a couple of minutes before a
fix is acquired, as it can take up to three minutes for the modem to synchronize with the
available GPS satellites.
11.4
Ethernet cable
If you are connecting to the modem via the Ethernet port, you will need a crossover category
5 cable with two 8-pin RJ45 connectors on each end.
To visually confirm that Ethernet cabling was done properly, check the LED indication on the
Ethernet port located at the rear panel of the modem. The Link LED should be on when the
right cable is used.
11.5
USB cable
This is an Ethernet-over-USB connection which behaves like an Ethernet connection. If you are
connecting to the modem via the USB port, you will need a TypeA/TypeB male USB cable. You
will also need to install the BlueTree USB driver which is available at
www.bluetreewireless.com.
11.6
Serial cable
The modem has all its serial port pins enabled. If all the pins are enabled on the attached
serial device, it is important to know whether the device is using DTE or DCE as a
communication mode.
The modem is a DCE device, so use a straight-through serial cable between the modem and a
DTE device such as a terminal. Use a NULL modem cable adapter between the modem and a
DCE device such as another modem.
If using custom wiring or if some pins are disabled, follow the guidelines below. The wiring will
vary depending on whether the attached serial device is a DTE or DCE.
11.7

Power source
IMPORTANT: Any installations involving electrical wiring and connections should
be done by someone who is experienced in this field.
To power the modem, a 12 VDC nominal power (8Vdc to 30Vdc) source is required. Further
details are available in Section 2.3.
The modem package includes a 15-foot power cable with 2A in-line fuse with, on one end, a 4pin Molex MiniFit connector that connects to the modem, and stripped wires on the other end
to connect to your power source.
Figure 19
The ignition sense line (white wire) acts as an ON/OFF power switch. The modem will turn on
when the ignition sense line is set between 8 and 30 volts DC. The modem will turn off if the
ignition sense line is less than 5 volts DC.
Pin designations for the connector are shown in Figure 20.
Figure 20
11.7.1
Powering up the modem
Figure 21
•
•
•
Connect the red wire directly to the battery’s positive (+) terminal or to a source
of 8-to-30Vdc
Connect the black wire directly to the battery’s negative (-) terminal or to ground
(GND)
The white wire must be connected to either:
o The red wire to keep the modem powered on when there is power
o A switch for manually turning on and off the modem
o The vehicle’s “Accessory for position 2”, for turning ON the modem
without turning on the engine
o The vehicle’s “Accessory for position 3”, for turning ON the modem
only when the engine is turned on.
Figure 22
11.7.2
Testing the power connection
Check the PWR light on the modem: if it is turned on then the modem is powered. If it’s off,
then review the installation procedures.
If LED indicators are not accessible to the installer a personal computer can be used to verify
it’s functionality by running BlueVue Device Manager and attempt to connect to the modem.
11.8
I/O Cable Wiring
The I/O specifications are available in the Product Overview section of this document.
It should be noted that the I/Os of the modem are not insulated. Caution must be used in
order to avoid causing damage to the modem and its attached peripherals.
The 15-foot 10-pin I/O cable is available for purchase from BlueTree.
The Molex plug shown in the figure below is found at one end of the cable, and stripped wires
are found at the other end for easy connection to your equipment or sensors.
Figure 23
Pin
Color
Label
Description
1
BLUE
DI3
Digital Input #3
2
ORANGE
DI1
Digital Input #1
3
GREEN
O1
Digital Output #1
4
BROWN
AI3 (4600/5600 only)
Analog Input #3
5
GRAY
AI1
Analog Input #1
6
VIOLET
DI4
Digital Input #4
7
YELLOW
DI2
Digital Input #2
8
RED
O2
Digital Output #2
9
BLACK
GND
GROUND
10
WHITE
AI2
Analog Input #2
Table 11
The I/O port on the BT-4000 and 5000 series is designed to allow for a variety of uses,
including:
•
connecting a panic button or a passive on/off sensor
•
connecting an active voltage source
•
turning on and off an external peripheral
•
connecting an analog gauge or source (0-5Vdc) (4-20mA)
11.8.1 Connecting a panic button or a passive on/off sensor to
the modem’s digital input:
Figure 24
1.
Connect the negative side of the voltage source to the Ground pin (GND).
2.
Connect the first wire of the panic button, or the passive on/off sensor, to one of the 4
digital inputs.
3.
Connect the second wire to the positive of a power source (2VDC - 30VDC).
11.8.2 Connecting an active voltage source to the modem’s
digital input:
Figure 25
1.
Connect the negative side of the voltage source to GND.
2.
Connect the positive side (0VDC - 30VDC) of the voltage source to one of the 4 digital
inputs.
3.
Check the polarity of the source before connecting it to the I/O connector.
11.8.3 Turning on and off an external peripheral using a
power relay on the modem’s digital output:
Figure 26
1.
Connect the positive side of the relay to a positive power source (Max. 30VDC) that
corresponds to the specifications of the relay used.
2.
Connect the negative side of the relay to one of the 3 digital outputs (Max. current
500mADC).
11.8.4 Connecting an analog gauge or source (0-5Vdc) to the
modem’s analog input:
Figure 27
1.
Connect the negative side of the analog source to GND.
2.
Connect the positive side of the analog source (0VDC - 5VDC) to one of the 2 digital
inputs.
3.
These analog inputs are not designed to detect a signal at high speed. This approach
was adopted to minimize the errors which could be caused by the noise of high
frequencies captured by wiring. The detection of a DC source with a slow variation will
not cause any problems.
11.8.5 Connecting an analog gauge or source (4-20mA) to the
modem’s analog input:
Figure 28
Follow the above diagram to convert a 4-20mA source into a 0-5Vdc input to the modem’s
analog input (ADC). 249 and 255 ohms are standard values for a 1% resistor.
Readings:
•
•
•
11.9
At 20mA, the modem reads around 5V on the analog pin
At 4mA, the modem reads around 1V
When the current loop is missing, the modem reads 0V
Mounting the modem
The modem requires four #4 screws (3/16”) pan or fillister head, as well as corresponding lock
washers.
Appendix A : Firmware Upgrades
BlueTree periodically releases updates to the BlueX firmware used on the 4000/5000 modems.
These updates improve the modem's stability and functionality by addressing bugs and
introducing new features. It is recommended to always upgrade to the latest version of the
firmware.
Firmware upgrades can only be performed if BlueVue Device Manager is accessing the modem
through an IP connection such as a local Ethernet, USB connection or a remote connection
over the Internet. It is not possible to update the firmware using a serial cable.
To upgrade a modem remotely over the air, it must have a static IP account with the cellular
carrier. If the modem has a dynamic IP (i.e. if its IP changes regularly), and the IP is changed
when the modem resets during the firmware update procedure, then BlueVue Device Manager
will not be able to reconnect and finalize the update, and the modem will revert back to its
previous firmware the next time it is reset. If you are able to connect to the modem, send the
AT command “AT+BFWUPS=0” to finalize the upgrade and prevent the modem from reverting
back on the next reset. To learn how to send an AT commands, read Appendix B.
1. Ensure that the modem is at a 3.x firmware version
It is not possible to upgrade a modem from firmware versions 1.x or 2.x to 3.x by following
the steps below. They are intended for modems that are upgrading from a 3.x release to a
more recent 3.x release. Modems with older firmware such as 1.x or 2.x require an advanced
firmware upgrade. Download the latest Advanced firmware upgrade package from
www.bluetreewireless.com and follow the instructions contained within.
You can check your modem’s firmware using BlueVue Device Manager under CONF
(Modem Configuration) > Firmware:
Figure 29
2. Download the firmware files
Download the latest standard firmware package files from www.bluetreewireless.com, and
extract the zip file to a folder on your hard drive. It should contain a file named abt_version.upd and a file named kbt_version.upd as well as a document containing the same upgrade instructions as this appendix.
3. Perform the abt firmware upgrade
Figure 30
1.
Navigate to CONF (Modem Configuration) > Firmware.
2.
Click the magnifying glass icon and locate the abt_version.upd file from the
package that you extracted at step 1.
3.
Click Upgrade.
4.
Wait for BlueVue Device Manager to confirm that the firmware update was
completed. If the upgrade is being performed locally, it should approximately take 2
minutes. If it the upgrade is being performed remotely, then it could take up to 5
minutes depending on upload speed.
4. Perform the kbt firmware upgrade
The steps to upgrade the kbt firmware are identical to those of the abt firmware, however they
are rarely necessary as kbt updates are few and far between. To check whether the modem
requires a kbt upgrade, navigate to DIAG (Modem Diagnostic), and look under modem
version for the portion highlighted below.
Figure 31
If the version of the kbt file you downloaded is identical to the version displayed in the modem
information box, then the kbt upgrade is not necessary. However, if the version downloaded is
more recent (i.e., it has a higher version number) than the version displayed, then the kbt
firmware must be upgraded.
The steps to upgrade the kbt are identical to those of the abt file. Click the magnifying glass
icon and locate the kbt_version.upd file from the package that you extracted at step 1, and
then click Upgrade.
Your modem should now be at the latest firmware version. Confirm the change as shown in
step 1.
Appendix B : Sending AT Commands
AT commands are short text strings that can be sent to the modem to set, remove and query
a modem's configuration parameters. BlueVue Device Manager is a software application that
provides a graphical user interface designed to avoid manual entry of AT commands. However,
not all configuration commands are available in BlueVue. Additionally, BVDM is only available
in Microsoft Windows operating systems. For these and various other reasons, some users
may want to send AT commands to the modem.
The full list of AT commands and their description is in the 4000 & 5000 Series AT Command
Reference manual, available at www.bluetreewireless.com.

IMPORTANT: After sending AT commands to configure the modem, you must
send AT&W to save the changes. Otherwise, they will be lost the next time the
modem resets. You do not need to send AT&W after each command, you can send
it just once when you’re done configuring the modem.
Sending AT commands over an IP connection
If you can reach the modem using a crossover Ethernet cable, or a USB cable, or remotely to
the modem's WAN IP, AT commands can be sent by performing a TCP (telnet) connection to
the modem on port 6070. Here is an easy way to do this in Windows:
1.
Click the Start button, then Run.
2.
In the Run window, type command and click OK. A command prompt window will
open.
3.
Type telnet xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx 6070 (replacing the x’s with the modem’s IP) and
press Enter. By default, the modem's IP will be 192.168.0.1 for Ethernet, and
192.168.111.1 for USB. If connecting to a remote modem, you will need to know
its WAN IP.
4.
You should get a "Welcome to BlueTree Wireless" message. You can now send AT
commands.
Sending AT commands over a serial connection
If connected to the modem using a straight DB9 serial cable, AT commands can be sent using
a terminal emulation software. The terminal and the modem must be using identical serial port
settings to communicate. By default, the modem uses 115200 bps, 8 data bits, no parity, 1
stop bit, and hardware flow control. Below is an example for connecting to a modem with
default serial port settings.
1.
Open HyperTerminal. To do so, click the Start button and then click on Run. In
the Run window, enter hypertrm and click OK.
2.
On the Connection Description screen, enter any name, select any icon, and
then click OK.
3.
On the Connect To screen, change the Connect using value to the COM port
the modem is connected to and click OK.
4.
On the COM Properties screen, change the Bits per second value to 115200,
leave all the other options untouched (8, None, 1, Hardware), and click OK.
You should now be able to send AT commands. You will not see what you type until you send
the command ATE1 or enable echo in HyperTerminal's settings, but the commands will still be
sent to the modem. Send ATI and confirm that you see the words “BlueTree Wireless” in the
response.
Appendix C : Basic GPS Reporting in
BlueVue Device Manager

The modem’s GPS reporting frequency determines the cellular network bandwidth
consumption. A higher reporting frequency (i.e., a low reporting timer value) will
result in higher bandwidth use.
This appendix shows how to use BlueVue Device Manager to configure the modem for basic
GPS reporting. For more complex and/or automatic reports, read Section 10: Event Reporting.
These GPS reports will be unformatted TAIP or NMEA data that can be interpreted by any
application written with one of these standards in mind. For example, the Microsoft's Streets &
Trips can interpret the modem's GPS output if the modem is using the NMEA protocol.
To configure GPS reporting, navigate to CONF (Modem Configuration) > GPS. You will
now have to select a protocol and set a destination for the reports. Note that if the TAIP
protocol is selected, reporting will not begin until the modem has acquired a valid GPS fix.
Figure 32

When the modem has not acquired a GPS fix, the reporting behavior is different
depending on the protocol. if using NMEA, then the modem will report empty fixes.
If using TAIP, then the modem will not send any reports.
1a. Using the NMEA protocol
Read Section 9: GPS Settings for details on NMEA.
Figure 33
1.
Set the reporting timer (in seconds). This timer is the interval at which the
modem will report its GPS position fix.
2.
Select the NMEA message(s) to report
3.
Click Submit
1b. Using the TAIP protocol
Read Section 9: GPS Settings for details on TAIP.
Figure 34
1.
Enter the TAIP command that will be used. The command shown in Figure 34
acquires and reports its position, time and velocity every 10 seconds.
2.
Optionally, enter an identifier (“Vehicle ID”) to be reported alongside the fixes
3.
Click Submit
2. Setting a destination
Figure 35
BlueVue Device Manager allows you to send GPS reports to the serial port and/or up to two IP
destinations. Check the appropriate destination checkboxes. For IP destinations, select the IP
address to report to, the port protocol, and the port number. When done, click Submit to save
the changes.
If using NMEA, the reports will start coming in immediately (although if there is no fix, the
reports will be empty). If using TAIP, the reports will not come in until there is a valid fix.
Appendix D : Dial-Up Networking in
Windows
This appendix shows how to create a dial-up networking session to access the Internet/cellular
network when connected to the modem using a serial cable. Although these instructions are
written for computers running Microsoft Windows XP, this procedure should be similar with
other versions of Microsoft Windows.
Installing a modem driver
1.
Click Start > Run, type control modem.cpl and then click OK to open the Phone
and Modem Options panel
2.
Click the Modems tab and then click Add
3.
You may be required to enter location information if this is the first modem installed. If
this is the case, choose your region and area code in the information window.
4.
Check the box labeled Don’t detect my modem… and then click Next
5.
Select Standard 33600 bps Modem from the list and click Next
6.
Select the COM port that the modem is attached to then click Next
7.
Click Finish to complete the driver installation
Figure 36
Creating a Dial-Up Networking session
1.
Click Start > Run, type control ncpa.cpl and then click OK to open the Network
Connections panel.
2.
Click on File > New Connection (as per the screenshot above)
3.
The New Connection Wizard welcome dialogue will appear. Click Next.
4.
The Network Connection Type dialogue will appear. Select Connect to the Internet
and click Next.
5.
The Getting Ready dialogue will appear. Select Set up my connection manually and
click Next. Name the connection in the new window.
6.
The Internet Connection dialogue will appear. Select Connect to a dialup modem
and click Next.
7.
If there is more than one modem installed in Windows, the Select a Device
dialogue will appear. If this is the case, select Standard 33600bps Modem and click
Next. Otherwise, proceed to the next step.
8.
The Connection Name dialogue will appear. Type in any name for the connection and
click Next.
9.
The Phone Number To Dial dialogue will appear. Enter #777.
10. The Internet Account Information box will appear. Enter the username and
password associated with the account in the corresponding fields and click Next.
The DUN connection is now set up, and your PC is ready to connect to the cellular network.
Right-click your new connection in the Network Connections list, and click Connect.
Once the connection has been established, the modem will by default assign the attached
device the LAN IP 192.168.0.3, while the modem itself will have the LAN IP 192.168.0.2.
These settings are configurable in BlueVue Device Manager under CONF (Modem
Configuration) > LAN IP > PPP.
Appendix E : BlueVue Device Manager
Troubleshooting

Before troubleshooting, download and install the latest version of BlueVue Device
Manager and upgrade the modem’s firmware to the latest version if possible.
1. (ETHERNET) The BlueVue Device Manager message box displays
“Detecting Modem at 192.168.0.1” indefinitely
Connect the modem to a computer using a cross-over Ethernet cable, and open
BlueVue Device Manager. Set BlueVue Device Manager’s connection type to IP. BlueVue
Device Manager will attempt to connect to 192.168.0.1 by default.
Possible cause #1:
The wrong type of cable is being used.
Troubleshooting:
Check the Link LED on the modem’s Ethernet connector (located on the back of the
modem). If the LED is off, check the cable type. A cross-over RJ-45 Ethernet cable is
required for communication between the modem and the PC. A standard Ethernet
cable won’t do.
Possible cause #2:
The computer’s local IP configuration is incorrect.
Troubleshooting:
1.
In Windows XP, go to Control Panel > Network Connections and select the
local area connection that corresponds to the Ethernet port in the “LAN or
High-Speed Internet” list (it’s usually “Local Area Connection 1”).
2.
Right-click the connection and click Properties. Select Internet Protocol
(TCP/IP) in the list and click Properties.
3.
Write down the existing values in order to restore them after configuring the
modem, then select Obtain an IP address automatically and Obtain DNS
server address automatically. The computer will now be ready to use the
modem to access the Internet.
Possible cause #3:
The modem is in a different network and DHCP is disabled. (This issue does not apply
to brand-new modems at factory settings. It only applies to modems that have had
their configuration modified.)
Troubleshooting:
The easiest way is to perform a firmware recovery. This resets the modem’s
configuration to its default settings, which will restore the default modem IP and
enable DHCP. The firmware recovery package is available at
www.bluetreewireless.com.
If you wish to attempt to recover the modem without performing a firmware recovery,
then you can follow the instructions below:
1.
Connect the computer to the modem using a straight serial cable
2.
Set BlueVue Device Manager to connect to the modem over the serial port
by changing the connection type to Serial
3.
Once the modem has been accessed, navigate to CONF (Modem
Configuration) > LAN IP
4.
Under Ethernet, confirm that the Modem IP is set to 192.168.0.1
5.
Confirm that DHCP is enabled and that the DHCP Start IP is 192.168.0.4.
Set the End IP range to any value higher than 192.168.0.4. The default is
192.168.0.39.
6.
Click Submit to save the changes
7.
Reset the modem and restart the computer
2. (USB) The BlueVue Device Manager message box displays “Detecting
Modem at 192.168.111.1” indefinitely
Possible cause #1:
The USB driver is not installed.
Troubleshooting:
The USB driver for Windows must be installed before the modem’s USB functionality
can be used. Visit www.bluetreewireless.com to download the USB driver then install
it. It may be necessary to reboot the computer.
Possible cause #2:
The modem has an old firmware version which does not support USB.
Troubleshooting:
The USB functionality was introduced in version 3.0 of the firmware. Upgrade the
modem’s firmware to the latest version available at www.bluetreewireless.com. See
Appendix A for details.
3. (SERIAL) The BlueVue Device Manager message box displays “COMx is
already in use”
Possible cause:
Another software application is already using the COM port.
Troubleshooting:
Close all applications that could be using the serial port, including other instances of
BlueVue Device Manager, then try again.
4. (SERIAL) The BlueVue Device Manager message box displays “Detecting
modem on COMx” indefinitely, or displays a warning about an unsupported
modem
Examine the DTR LED. If it is off, then the computer and the modem are not
communicating.
Possible cause:
The wrong type of cable is being used.
Troubleshooting:
Use a straight-through RS232 standard DB9 cable. If using a custom-made cable,
confirm that it follows the instructions in Section 11.6. If the correct cable is being
used, then the DTR LED on the modem will turn on when BlueVue Device Manager
attempts to access it.
Possible cause:
BlueVue Device Manager is trying to connect to the wrong COM port.
Troubleshooting:
Confirm that the correct COM port is selected in BlueVue Device Manager. It will
attempt to use COM1 by default, but computers with built-in dial-up modems might
have COM1 assigned to the built-in modem instead. To set the COM port BlueVue
Device Manager should use, click on Tools > Settings > Connection and browse
through the available COM ports. If the DTR LED turns on, then you will have found
the right COM port.
5. (SERIAL) The BlueVue Device Manager message box displays “Detecting
modem on COMx” and then “Modem is not responding”
Possible cause:
BlueVue Device Manager and the modem are using different serial port settings.
Troubleshooting:
Installing BlueVue Device Manager 1.7.1 or later will allow communication with a
modem regardless of its serial settings.
6. The BlueVue message box displays “[Modem]…is not responding to
expected commands”
Possible cause:
The modem’s firmware and BlueVue Device Manager are incompatible because either
or both versions are not current.
Troubleshooting:
Upgrade the modem’s firmware to the latest version.
Uninstall BlueVue Device Manager, and then install the latest version.
Appendix F : Activation Troubleshooting
When the modem is connected to the cellular network, its LNK LED will stay on, and BlueVue
Device Manager’s Modem Diagnostic screen will display a WAN IP. If the modem is not
connected, the LNK light will be off, or intermittent, and the displayed WAN IP will be “N/A”.
This appendix covers issues with connecting to the network. If your modem is connected to
the network but you cannot browse the internet, refer to Appendix X.
All the following conditions must be met before a modem can connect to the cellular
network:
1.
2.
3.
4.
The modem must be within coverage, and have an acceptable RF signal strength
The modem must be activated for use on the cellular network
The modem must be configured to connect to the cellular network
If the cellular carrier requires a user name and password, the modem’s connection
parameters (WAN Settings) must be configured
1. Verify the signal strength
The modem’s REG LED should always be flashing when it has a strong enough signal to
detect a cellular network. Additionally, the signal strength is displayed in the information box
in the top right of the BlueVue Device Manager window. The minimum required for
communication is 1 signal strength bar; however, a signal this weak is not likely to provide a
stable connection.
If the REG LED stays on, or if the signal strength is lower than -98 dBm (such as -105
dBm), there may be an issue with the antenna or the modem may be in a low coverage
area.
Figure 37
2. Confirm the activation’s success
Once a modem has been activated, BlueVue Device Manager will display its phone number
in the WAN (Modem WAN Settings) screen.
If the phone number is blank, or does not correspond to the account’s phone number, then
activation has not been performed. Follow the instructions written in the Quick Start Guide
that shipped with the modem to perform activation. The Quick Start Guide is also available at
www.bluetreewireless.com.
Figure 38
3. Configure the Connection Initiation
The modem must be configured to connect to the network.
To do this, open BlueVue Device Manager and navigate to WAN (WAN Settings), and then
ensure that the following settings are applied:
•
•
The Dial String is #777
The Connection Initiation is Always On
Click Submit to apply any changes. The modem should now connect to the cellular network.
Refer to this section’s introduction for instructions on how to verify whether your modem is
connected to the network or not.
4. Configure the User Profile
If the modem’s LNK LED turns on for a few seconds then turns off, this indicates that
authentication on the cellular network is failing. The modem’s User Profile will need to be
configured.
Navigate to WAN (WAN Settings). Enter the user name and password as provided by the
cellular service provider.
5. Conclusion
As mentioned previously, when the modem is connected to the cellular network, BlueVue
Device Manager’s Modem Diagnostic screen will display a valid WAN IP and the LNK LED
will stay on.
Figure 39
If after going through all of the above troubleshooting steps, the modem still does not acquire
a WAN IP, then it is very likely that the account is not enabled by the cellular carrier, or that
there has been a mix-up on the carrier side with the account details. Contact the cellular
service provider and ask them to confirm that the phone number assigned matches the
modem’s ESN (electronic serial number) as shown in DIAG (Modem Diagnostic), and that the
account is ready to be used.
Appendix G : Application & Miscellaneous
Troubleshooting
This appendix assumes that the modem is currently online, and therefore the problem cannot
be attributed to a lack of connectivity. BlueVue Device Manager’s Modem Diagnostic screen
should be displaying a valid WAN IP, i.e. an IP other than “N/A”. If this is not the case, refer to
Appendix F: Activation Troubleshooting.
1. You cannot browse the Internet
Possible cause #1 (Ethernet only):
The computer’s local IP configuration is incorrect.
Troubleshooting:
The computer must be in the same subnet as the modem and must have the modem
set as its gateway. The easiest way to achieve this is to enable automatic IP
configuration (DHCP) on the computer.
1.
In Windows XP, go to Control Panel > Network Connections and select the
local area connection that corresponds to the Ethernet port in the “LAN or
High-Speed Internet” list (it’s usually “Local Area Connection 1”).
2.
Right-click the connection and click Properties. Select Internet Protocol
(TCP/IP) in the list and click Properties.
3.
Write down the existing values in order to restore them if needed, then select
Obtain an IP address automatically and Obtain DNS server address
automatically. The computer will now be ready to use the modem to access
the Internet.
Possible cause #2 (Serial only):
You’re connected to the modem using a serial cable and did not start a Dial-Up
Networking session.
Troubleshooting:
Unlike Ethernet/USB, you must configure Windows to use a serial cable to access
the network. Even though the modem is connected to the Internet, your computer is
not configured to browse the Internet through the modem.
You will need to install a standard 33600bps modem driver and create a Dial-Up
Networking session in order to be able to browse the internet. Refer to Appendix
D for a walkthrough for creating a Dial-Up Networking connection in Windows XP.
Possible cause #3:
Your web browser is configured to use a proxy which cannot be accessed by the
modem.
Troubleshooting:
1.
Open a command prompt window by clicking Start > Run then entering
“cmd” in the Run window.
2.
At the command prompt, type ping google.com and press Enter.
If you get a “Reply from xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx: bytes=32 time=xxxms TTL=xxx” response,
then your web browser is configured to use a web proxy which is preventing you from
browsing the Internet through the modem. Consult your network administrator for
help on fixing this issue.
Possible cause #4:
The cellular account does not allow web access.
Troubleshooting:
Certain cellular accounts, particularly those where security is a high concern, do not
allow web access. If you are attempting to test the connection by browsing the
Internet, you may not be able to do so because of this account restriction.
2. (ETHERNET/USB) You cannot communicate with a computer/device
behind the modem
This section is meant for USB/Ethernet connectivity. If the device is a serial-only
device, skip to the next issue.
Possible cause #1:
Your cellular carrier is operating a firewall which is blocking your attempts to connect.
Troubleshooting:
Certain carriers have a firewall turned on by default that blocks all incoming
connections.
1.
2.
Open a command prompt window by clicking Start > Run then typing
“command” in the Run window
Type telnet xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx 6070 where x is the modem’s WAN IP as
assigned by the carrier
If you do not connect and see a “Welcome to BlueTree Wireless” message, then your
carrier is likely blocking incoming connections. Contact your cellular service provider
and ask them to open the TCP and UDP ports you will be using to access the device.
Possible cause #2:
Your computer (from which you are initiating the connection) or network has a firewall
blocking outgoing connections.
Troubleshooting:
Confirm with your IT technician that no firewall is blocking outgoing connections.
Possible cause #3:
You did not perform the appropriate port-forwarding rules on the modem.
Troubleshooting:
The modem must be configured to forward incoming traffic to the device, otherwise
your connection attempts will never reach the device. Refer to Section 6: IP
Networking Features for further details.
3. (SERIAL) You cannot communicate with a device behind the modem
First, make sure the modem is configured to enable outside communication with the
attached device. Refer to the “Serial IP” section of the main guide for details. The
troubleshooting steps below assumes the modem is configured properly.
Possible cause #1:
The modem and the device are using different serial port settings.
Troubleshooting:
Using BlueVue Device Manager, navigate to CONF (Modem Configuration) > Serial
Port, and change the serial port settings to the same values as those of the serial
device. If the CTS and RTS pins are partially (or both) disabled, set the modem to use
no flow control (“none”).
Possible cause #2:
The cable wiring is incorrect.
Troubleshooting:
Refer to Section 11.6 for details on the required cable type.
Possible cause #3:
The DTR signal is inconsistent.
Troubleshooting:
A flickering DTR signal will interrupt communication with the modem. The modem can
be configured to ignore the changes in the DTR state. In BlueVue Device Manager,
navigate to CONF (Modem Configuration) > Serial Port, and check the option to
Ignore DTR.
Section 12: Warranty
BlueTree Wireless Data Inc. warrants its cellular modems against all defects in materials and
workmanship for a period of one (1) year from the date of purchase. The sole responsibility of
BlueTree Wireless Data Inc. under this warranty is limited to either repair or, at the option of
BlueTree Wireless Data Inc., replacement of the cellular modem. There are no expressed or
implied warranties, including those of fitness for a particular purpose or merchantability, which
extend beyond the face hereof. BlueTree Wireless Data Inc. is not liable for any incidental or
consequential damages arising from the use, misuse, or installation of the BlueTree Wireless
modem. This warranty does not apply if the serial number label has been removed, or if the
cellular modem has been subjected to physical abuse, improper installation, or modification.
The unit is automatically registered for warranty at the date it is purchased and/or shipped.
Customer Support
Toll-free
(877) 422-9110 option 2
Phone
(514) 422-9110 option 2
Hours
Mon. – Fri. 9:00 - 17:00 EST (Eastern Standard Time)
Fax
(514) 422-3338
Email
techsupport@bluetreewireless.com
Web
http://www.bluetreewireless.com
Address
BlueTree Wireless Data, Inc.
2425 46th Avenue
Lachine, QC, Canada H8T 3C9
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