Alcorn Mcbride Digital Video Machine 4 User`s guide

User’s Guide
Including the DVM2/L, DVM2/V, and DVM2/D
by Alcorn McBride Inc.
Document Revision 2.8
February 2006
Copyright  1996-2004 Alcorn McBride, Inc. All rights reserved. Digital Video Machine 2,
Digital Video Machine 2/L, Digital Video Machine 2/V, DVM2, DVM2/L, DVM2/V, DVM2/D,
DVM2/DL and the other Machine product line names are trademarks of Alcorn McBride Inc.
Windows is a trademark of the Microsoft Corporation. Sony and Pioneer are trademarks of
their respective owners.
Every effort has been made to assure the accuracy of the information contained in this
manual, and the reliability of the hardware and software. Errors sometimes can go
undetected, however. If you find one, please bring it to our attention so that we can correct
it for others.
Alcorn McBride Inc. reserves the right to make changes to these products, without notice,
in order to improve their design or performance.
Applications described herein are for illustrative purposes only. Alcorn McBride Inc.
assumes no responsibility or liability for the use of any of these products, and makes no
representation or warranty that the use of these products for specific applications will be
suitable without further testing or modification.
Our equipment is not intended for use in applications where a malfunction can reasonably
be expected to result in personal injury or damage to equipment. Customers using or
selling Alcorn McBride Inc. products for use in such applications do so at their own risk, and
agree to fully indemnify Alcorn McBride Inc. for any damages resulting from such improper
use or sale.
Dolby is a trademark of Dolby Laboratories.
Product Design:
Jim Carstensen, Jim Janninck, Jeremy Scheinberg, Martin Chaney, Jason Crew, Dave
Mayo, Chris Harden, and Steve Alcorn.
Alcorn McBride Inc.
3300 S. Hiawassee, Suite 105
Orlando, Florida 32835
TEL: (407) 296-5800
FAX: (407) 296-5801
http://www.alcorn.com
info@alcorn.com
Contents
Welcome! ................................................................................ 1
Features ....................................................................................................................... 2
DVM2/L and DVM2/V ................................................................................................... 2
Technical Support ........................................................................................................ 3
Getting Started ....................................................................... 5
How Do I tell the Current Status of the DVM2?............................................................ 5
How Do I Make the DVM2 Play a File Right From the Factory?.................................. 5
How Do I Configure the DVM2? ................................................................................... 6
How Do I Make My Own MPEG File? .......................................................................... 6
How Do I Put Videos onto the DVM2? ......................................................................... 6
How Do I Transfer a File to the DVM2 Using FTP? ..................................................... 6
Multiple DVM2’s with Same IP Address: ...................................................................... 9
Most Importantly! .......................................................................................................... 9
Front Panel ........................................................................... 11
LEDs ........................................................................................................................... 11
Removable Hard Drive Bay........................................................................................ 12
Rear Panel............................................................................. 13
Power Switch.............................................................................................................. 13
Power Connector........................................................................................................ 13
Ground Lift and Video Termination Switches............................................................. 14
Configuration DIP Switch ........................................................................................... 14
Pioneer LDP Connector (RS-232P) ........................................................................... 17
Sony LDP Connector (RS-232S)................................................................................ 18
Sony Professional RS-422 Connector (RS-422)........................................................ 18
MIDI Connector .......................................................................................................... 19
Discrete Control Connector ........................................................................................ 20
Parallel Outputs .......................................................................................................... 23
Composite Video Connectors..................................................................................... 24
Sync Generator Output Connector (DVM2 only)........................................................ 24
C-Sync Daisy-Chain Connectors (DVM2 only) .......................................................... 24
Balanced Audio Connector (DVM2 only) ................................................................... 25
Unbalanced Audio Connectors................................................................................... 25
Digital Audio Connector (DVM2 only) ........................................................................ 25
S-Video (Y-C) Connector ........................................................................................... 26
RGB (VGA) Connector (DVM2 only) .......................................................................... 26
YUV Output ................................................................................................................ 27
Ethernet Connector .................................................................................................... 27
Serial Control ........................................................................29
Pioneer / AMI Serial Protocol......................................................................................29
Select File ...................................................................................................................30
Play .............................................................................................................................30
Loop Play ....................................................................................................................31
Still ..............................................................................................................................31
Stop.............................................................................................................................31
Audio Control ..............................................................................................................31
Video Control ..............................................................................................................31
Active Mode Request..................................................................................................32
Chapter Request.........................................................................................................32
Audio Sample Rate Select ..........................................................................................32
Device ID Set ..............................................................................................................32
Device ID Request ......................................................................................................33
Firmware Version Request .........................................................................................33
IP Address Set ............................................................................................................33
IP Address Request ....................................................................................................33
File List Request .........................................................................................................33
Gateway Address Set .................................................................................................33
Gateway Address Request .........................................................................................34
Subnet Mask Set.........................................................................................................34
Subnet Mask Request.................................................................................................34
Delete File ...................................................................................................................34
Rename File................................................................................................................34
Play Next.....................................................................................................................34
Loop Next....................................................................................................................35
Error Codes.................................................................................................................35
Pioneer/AMI Protocol Summary .................................................................................36
Sony LDP Serial Protocol (DVM2 only) ......................................................................38
Select File ...................................................................................................................39
Play .............................................................................................................................39
Still ..............................................................................................................................40
Stop.............................................................................................................................40
Audio Mute ..................................................................................................................40
Audio Unmute .............................................................................................................40
Video Mute ..................................................................................................................41
Video Unmute .............................................................................................................41
Error Codes.................................................................................................................41
Sony Professional Serial Protocol (DVM2 only) .........................................................42
Select File ...................................................................................................................42
Play .............................................................................................................................43
Still ..............................................................................................................................43
Stop.............................................................................................................................43
Error Codes.................................................................................................................43
MIDI Serial Protocol (DVM2 only) ...............................................................................44
MIDI Machine Control .................................................................................................44
Stop.............................................................................................................................45
Play .............................................................................................................................45
Still ..............................................................................................................................45
Select File................................................................................................................... 45
MIDI Show Control ..................................................................................................... 46
Go............................................................................................................................... 46
Stop ............................................................................................................................ 46
Terminal Mode............................................................................................................ 47
Error Codes ................................................................................................................ 47
Transferring Files into the DVM2......................................... 49
Transferring Files using Ethernet ............................................................................... 49
Transferring Files using the Removable Drive ........................................................... 49
Networking Your DVM2........................................................ 51
Connecting to the DVM2 via Ethernet ........................................................................ 51
Connecting to the DVM2 directly from a PC .............................................................. 52
Connecting to the DVM2 Over a Local Area Network (LAN) or the Internet.............. 54
DHCP Support............................................................................................................ 55
Web Page Setup ........................................................................................................ 55
Welcome..................................................................................................................... 55
Unit Addresses ........................................................................................................... 55
Change Password ...................................................................................................... 56
Set Date and Time ..................................................................................................... 57
Serial Protocol Setup.................................................................................................. 57
Video Setup (DVM2 only) ........................................................................................... 57
Manual........................................................................................................................ 59
Release Notes ............................................................................................................ 59
Update Operating System .......................................................................................... 60
Forgotten Password or IP Address? .......................................................................... 61
Ethernet Control ................................................................... 63
Hardware and Software Requirements ...................................................................... 63
AMINet Protocol ......................................................................................................... 63
Control Message Format............................................................................................ 63
Control Message Checksum ...................................................................................... 64
UDP Message Layer .................................................................................................. 65
Control Message Response ....................................................................................... 65
UDP Protocol Summary ............................................................................................. 66
Playlists................................................................................. 69
Overview..................................................................................................................... 69
Playlist Command Summary ...................................................................................... 70
Example Playlist ......................................................................................................... 72
Seamless Playlists ..................................................................................................... 73
Examples of Seamless and Segmented Playlists ...................................................... 73
Real Time Scheduler ............................................................ 75
DVM2 Hardware Requirements ................................................................................. 75
DVM2 Operating System Requirements.....................................................................75
Schedule File Format..................................................................................................75
Scheduler Command Summary..................................................................................76
Power-Up Behavior.....................................................................................................77
Seamless Transitions..................................................................................................77
Example Schedules ....................................................................................................78
Advanced Scheduler Commands ...............................................................................79
Load a New Schedule.................................................................................................79
Launch an FTP Client .................................................................................................79
CD Update (DVM2/D version only) .............................................................................80
Scheduled Reboot ......................................................................................................80
Summary.....................................................................................................................81
File Names.............................................................................83
Test Files.....................................................................................................................84
Examples Directory.....................................................................................................85
Power-Up Operation .............................................................85
Soft Reboot ...........................................................................86
FTP Client ..............................................................................87
Command Files .....................................................................89
Example Applications...........................................................91
Examples Directory.....................................................................................................91
Retail Display ..............................................................................................................91
Kiosk ...........................................................................................................................94
Video Wall ...................................................................................................................96
Making Videos.......................................................................99
What Is An MPG File? ................................................................................................99
How Do I Make an MPG File? ....................................................................................99
The MPEG-2 Program Stream .................................................................................100
What is a Variable Bitrate? .......................................................................................100
Audio Behavior ...................................................................101
Power-Up Operation .................................................................................................101
Audio Formats...........................................................................................................101
Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Sound ............................................................................102
DVM2 Hardware Requirements ................................................................................102
DVM2 Operating System Requirements...................................................................102
Analog Output ...........................................................................................................102
Audio Stream ID (SID).............................................................................................. 102
Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Multiplexing ................................................................... 102
Operational Notes .............................................................. 103
Specifications ..................................................................... 105
Video ........................................................................................................................ 105
Audio ........................................................................................................................ 105
Playback Time .......................................................................................................... 105
Response Time ........................................................................................................ 105
Power ....................................................................................................................... 105
Physical .................................................................................................................... 105
Switches and Indicators ........................................................................................... 106
Connectors ............................................................................................................... 106
Part Numbers ........................................................................................................... 106
Index.................................................................................... 107
Welcome
Welcome!
Thank you for purchasing The Alcorn McBride Digital Video Machine 2™. The
Digital Video Machine 2 replaces laser disc and VTR machines in permanent
video playback installations. It provides over one hour of superb digital video
and 2 channels of audio. We’ve tried to think of everything you’d need in a
stand-alone video player – three types of video outputs, three types of audio
outputs, and half a dozen different control interfaces make the DVM2 incredibly
flexible.
The DVM2 was designed to be a drop-in replacement for many different brands
of Laser Disc and video tape players, in a wide variety of applications. But it’s
far more than a Laser Disc replacement, offering RGB output, 2 channels of
digital audio, MIDI and parallel control, and hundreds of other features. The
DVM2 is the ultimate choice for almost any new video installation.
We hope you enjoy using it as much as we enjoyed designing it.
Welcome!
1
Features
The Digital Video Machine 2 offers a wide range of features including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Plays high resolution MPEG-2 Video.
Composite, S-Video, RGB and YUV outputs.
Plays over one hour of video from internal drive.
2 Channels of digital audio available as Balanced, Unbalanced, or S/PDIF.
Dolby 5.1 Digital Surround Sound bitstream output
720 x 480 (NTSC) or 720 x 576 (PAL) Resolution
Converts NTSC to PAL and PAL to NTSC.
Stores over 500 Clips per drive.
Serial RS-232 Control is Pioneer and Sony LDP compatible.
Sony 9-pin (RS-422) compatible.
MIDI controllable.
Clips loaded via Ethernet or removable hard drive.
Parallel Contact Closures provide discrete control of 15 files.
The following feature upgrades were implemented in version 0.85 of the DVM2
operating system.
•
DHCP Support
•
Soft Reboot
•
FTP Client
•
Scheduler Commands: N, C, P, X
•
Pioneer Commands: LS, GW, SM, DL, RN
If you have an earlier version of the OS, you need to upgrade your unit before
you can use these features. To get the latest DVM2 operating system, go to
www.alcorn.com/products/dvm2/osupdate.html.
DVM2/L and DVM2/V
The Digital Video Machine 2/L and 2/V include most of the same features as the
full-featured model; however, some features have been excluded in these
models:
•
•
•
2
Composite and S-Video outputs only.
Serial RS-232 Control is Pioneer compatible only.
The 2/V model is only capable of NTSC (720 x 480) Resolution Playback.
Welcome!
Welcome
Technical Support
You can obtain information about specifying, installing, configuring, updating and
programming your Alcorn McBride Digital Video Machine 2 from several sources in
the table below.
For…
Welcome!
Contact…
When?…
Telephone Support
(407) 296-5800
M-F 9am–6pm (EST)
Fax Support
(407) 296-5801
M-F 9am-6pm (EST)
Knowledge Base
http://www.alcorn.com/kb
Any Time
e-mail Support
support@alcorn.com
Any Time
Software/Firmware
Updates
http://www.alcorn.com/support
Any Time
3
Getting
Started
Getting Started
How Do I tell the Current Status of
the DVM2?
Your DVM2 has 7 status LED’ s on the front panel. Shown below are the
locations of these LED’ s, and this manual has a table in the Front Panel section
describing what each one of these means.
How Do I Make the DVM2 Play a File
Right From the Factory?
The DVM2 comes with
6 demo video clips
already on the hard
drive! Make sure the
red DIP Switch #1 is
ON, so it is in contact
closure mode. Simply
grab your nearest
standard-sized paper
clip and plug it into
holes 5 and 24 on the Discrete Control port on the back of the DVM2. You can
do this whether the power is on or off. Refer to the picture and DON’T PUT
THE PAPER CLIP IN THE WRONG HOLES! Some of the other holes will
play the other files. Please read the Discrete Control section for further details.
This is not the only way to play a file. (You can also serially control the DVM2,
but that is a little more advanced. See the Serial Control section)
Getting Started
5
How Do I Configure the DVM2?
The quickest way to configure options like NTSC/PAL, Voltage or Contact
Closure control, serial port protocol, etc… is to use the red DIP Switch on the
back of the DVM2. See the Configuration DIP Switch section in the manual.
(You can also use the DVM2’ s web interface to edit those and other options
like the password, IP address, date and time. You’ ll need to configure your
TCP/IP settings on your computer to do this. See the section Networking Your
DVM2 to do this.)
How Do I Make My Own MPEG File?
MPEG2 video is pretty complicated. If you’ ve never encoded it before, we
recommend hiring an encoding house to do it. You can buy your own encoding
system, but don’ t be cheap. The last thing you want is to find out the encoding
system you purchased has a bug that causes the video to glitch, audio to drift,
pixelation, etc… The encoding house uses their equipment to optimize the
parameters and filtering of your video to achieve the best possible result. If you
want to make your own, our customers have had positive results with the LSX
MPEG Encoder by Ligos and Optibase’ s hardware-based encoder. Darim’ s
DVMPEG is a good encoding solution along with PixelTools’ multiplexer.
How Do I Put Videos onto the DVM2?
One way is to buy a Removable Drive Bay (sold separately) and learn to install
it into your computer. Then you simply pull the drive out of your DVM2 and
put it into the computer’ s new removable drive bay. Then you’ ll be able to see
(in Windows) another drive letter (like D:\) appear on your PC. Then Drag and
Drop the video files onto the drive while using Windows Explorer.
You can also use File Transfer Protocol (FTP). FTP is a way of copying files
over an Ethernet Cable (like the special red one that came with your DVM2). If
you configured your computer for the web interface as listed above, you’ re
already able to use the DVM2’ s FTP interface. You can use any FTP program
you like to talk to the DVM2’ s FTP interface. We frequently use WS
FTP(shareware), Cute FTP(shareware), and even the DOS FTP (which comes on
most PC’ s).
If you don’ t know how to use FTP programs to put the files on your DVM2,
there are plenty of tutorials on the web. Just visit your favorite search engine
and type in “FTP tutorial”. Also see the File Transfers section in the manual.
A basic guide to using DOS FTP follows.
How Do I Transfer a File to the DVM2
Using FTP?
If you’ re not familiar with FTP, begin by searching the Internet for an FTP (File
Transfer Protocol)Tutorial. You’ ll need to configure your DVM2 and the
6
Getting Started
Getting
Started
TCP/IP settings on your computer to use this guide. Please refer to the
Networking Your DVM2 section of this manual. It’ s a good rule of thumb to
keep the demo clips on your DVM2. You can rename them and then, if ever
necessary, use them later to debug potential problems in the field.
DOS FTP usually comes on your PC, which is why we provide this guide. If
using the DOS FTP program doesn’ t work out for you, download from the
Internet an FTP program (like WS_FTP or Cute FTP). They handle all the
commands for you and provide an interface with more of a Windows feel to it.
Select Start\Run
Type command. Press Enter. A DOS
prompt will appear.
Change directories by typing cd
<directory where your videos are>.
Press Enter.
Type ftp 192.168.0.254. Press Enter.
(assuming your IP address is still at
the default value)
Getting Started
7
(The following steps assume the
factory set user name and password.)
Type admin. Press Enter. If it
doesn’ t ask you for the username for
longer than 30 seconds, something’ s
probably wrong. Recheck your
TCP/IP settings with in the
Networking Your DVM2 section.
Type password. (It won’ t show the
password you’ re typing). Press Enter.
It will say you’ re not logged in for
some reason, or it will say you’ re
accepted. Type help to see a menu of
commands.
To see what’ s on the DVM2’ s drive,
type ls. Press Enter. Here you’ ll see
the files that come with the unit from
the factory: the six video files, this
manual, a readme file, and the
operating system directory (os).
To get a status update during a file
transfer, type ha. Press Enter. With
this “hash marks” option turned on,
FTP prints an update character (the #
symbol) to show you the transfer is
still in progress. Type bin to make the
FTP connection a binary one. The
DVM2 provides a “type set to binary”
response.
To copy file 2 from the DVM2 to your
hard drive, type get vid00002.mpg.
Press Enter. (It starts printing hash
marks.) When the FTP> prompt is
shown again, you know the transfer is
complete.
Now type !dir. Press Enter. The file
is now shown in your PC’ s local
directory. Notice the file gets put in
the directory that you are currently in.
8
Getting Started
Getting
Started
To copy playlist 0 to the DVM2 from
your hard drive, type put
ply00000.lst. Press Enter. When the
FTP> prompt is shown again, you
know the transfer is complete. Type
ls. Press Enter. Playlist 0 is now
shown on the DVM2’ s hard drive (not
shown—see above).
To exit DOS FTP, type quit. Press
Enter. To exit DOS, type exit and
press Enter. Take it from here. Be
careful, and understand the commands
that you’ re using before doing
anything crazy.
Multiple DVM2’s with Same IP
Address:
If you use the same computer to talk to several DVM2’ s straight from the
factory, you’ ll need to do the following:
Each time you communicate over Ethernet with a different DVM2, open a DOS
window. Type arp -d 192.168.0.254 Press Enter. (This is assuming the
DVM2 is set up to the default IP address). It clears away old IP address
relationships that can cause problems like delays while connecting when using
FTP, web browsers, etc… Once you change your IP Addresses for the DVM2’ s,
you won’ t have to do this anymore.
Most Importantly!
Read the rest of this manual. Information like how to name your files, the
power of playlists, serial control, etc… are all right at your fingertips. The few
minutes you invest will save you hours of time. Enjoy!
Getting Started
9
10
Getting Started
Front
Panel
Front Panel
LEDs
The Digital Video Machine 2 provides 7 LED indicators.
Five LEDs, located on the DVM2 front panel beside the logo, indicate status:
LED
Color
Behavior
Meaning
Status
Green
Off
Idle
On
Playing
Blink
Paused, Stilled
2 Blinks,
Pause
Waiting within a Playlist
Off
No external sync signal is present
On
Locked to external sync signal
Off
OK
On
Fatal Disk Error
Blink Once
Tried to play file that does not exist
Blink
No Operating System or bad Operating
System present
Sync Status
Error
Yellow
Red
Ethernet
Link
Green
On
Ethernet Connected
Ethernet
Activity
Yellow
Pulse
Ethernet Data Traffic
The DVM2 Power LED as well as the Disk Activity LED are located on the
front of the Removable Disk Drive.
Front Panel
11
Removable Hard Drive Bay
The front of the DVM2 also contains the Removable Hard Drive Bay. This
feature allows you to change your videos from your PC. You can even keep
alternate removable drives to instantly switch program material. Simply place
the drive in your PC’ s Removable Hard Drive Bay (sold separately) and copy
the new videos to the drive. You can also delete any videos that you wish.
Additionally, you can edit the Playlist to determine how the DVM2 will operate
(Playlist functionality is described in detail in the section entitled Playlists).
Place the drive back in the DVM2 and you are ready to go!
12
Front Panel
Rear Panel
The Digital Video Machine 2 rear panel provides connections for all of the
audio and video outputs, control cables, and power. There are also two banks of
configuration switches located here.
Power Switch
Rear
Panel
The DVM2 is “ On” when this switch is in the “ Up” position, labeled “ |” .
NOTE: When power cycling the DVM2, please wait 5 seconds before turning
power back on.
Power Connector
The power input connector is a 5 pin circular DIN connector with the following
pinout.
Pin
Function
1
Common
2
N/C
3
+5 VDC, 3 Amps Max
4
-12 VDC, 0.3 Amp Max
5
+12 VDC, 2 Amps Max
An external UL Class 2 and CE compliant power adapter is provided, which can
operate from 100 to 250 VAC at 50 to 60 Hz, consuming 0.7-0.3 amps.
Rear Panel
13
Ground Lift and Video Termination
Switches
This two-position DIP switch is located between the Sync BNCs and the RCA
jacks. The “ Down” position of the switches is “ On” .
Position
Function
Factory Default
1
Ground Lift
“ Off” (Circuit ground not
connected to chassis.)
2
75 Ohm Termination
“ Off” (no termination)
To prevent AC hum or video noise arising from ground loops, position “ 1” of
this switch is shipped in the open position to isolate the Digital Video Machine
2’ s ground from its chassis. To connect the DVM2’ s ground to the chassis, set
this switch to “ On” .
The DVM2/L and
DVM2/V are not
equipped with Video
Sync connections.
If you are using a video sync signal connected to the DVM2’ s Sync input to frame
synchronize the unit, position “ 2” of this switch may be set “ On” to provide a 75 Ohm
termination to ground. If the second Sync connector is being used to “ daisy chain” the
sync signal to additional connectors, this switch should be left “ Off” .
Configuration DIP Switch
This eight-position DIP switch is on the rear of the unit at the far left. The
“ Right” position of the switches is “ On” . The “ Left” position of the switches is
“ Off” . All DIP Switch settings are continuously monitored by the software.
14
Position
DVM 2
DVM2/L
DVM2/V
Factory
Default
1
Voltage / Contacts
2
NTSC / PAL
NTSC / PAL
Reserved
“ Off” (NTSC)
3-5
Serial Port
Protocol
Selection
Limited Serial
Port Protocol
Selection
Limited Serial
Port Protocol
Selection
"Off" (.ini file
selects
protocol)
6
Password Reset
7-8
Video Select
“ Off” (voltage
inputs)
"Off"
Reserved
Reserved
"Off" (.ini file
selects video
output)
Rear Panel
¾Voltage / Contact Closure
This switch selects between voltage inputs or contact closures for the discrete
controls. In the “ Off” position, a voltage applied between the discrete input pins
on the DB-37 parallel control connector will assert that input. In the “ On”
position, contact closures may be used to assert the input. More information on
these inputs may be found in the section entitled Discrete Control Connector.
This switch determines whether the Digital Video Machine 2’ s output runs at
PAL or NTSC rates. The Digital Video Machine 2 can play either type of
encoding on either type of system, adjusting the number of lines and the vertical
frame rate. This switch determines the output format. When the switch is “ Off” ,
the DVM2 will output NTSC. When the switch is “ On” , the DVM2 will output
PAL. Wait 2-4 seconds after switching the video output before beginning
playback.
¾Serial Port Protocol Selection
These three switches select among Sony, Pioneer and MIDI modes, select the
Sony and Pioneer baud rates, and allow the serial port to be reconfigured using
Web Page Setup. The DVM2/L and DVM2/V support Web Page setup and
Pioneer protocols only.
Rear Panel
Switch 3
Switch 4
Switch 5
Mode
Off
Off
Off
Mode selected via Web Page Setup/.INI
file
Off
Off
On
Pioneer Mode, 9600 baud, 8 bits, No
Parity, 1 Stop Bit
Off
On
Off
Pioneer Mode, 4800 baud, 8 bits, No
Parity, 1 Stop Bit
Off
On
On
Sony Mode, 9600 baud, 8 bits, No Parity,
1 Stop Bit
On
Off
Off
Sony Mode, 1200 baud, 8 bits, No Parity,
1 Stop Bit
On
Off
On
Sony Professional 9 pin Mode, 38.4 kbaud,
8 bits, Odd Parity, 1 Stop Bit
On
On
Off
MIDI Mode 31.25 kbaud, 8 bits, No Parity,
1 Stop Bit
On
On
On
Serial Terminal Mode, 9600 baud, 8 bits,
No Parity, 1 Stop Bit.
15
Rear
Panel
¾NTSC / PAL (not supported for DVM2/V)
Note: All protocol connectors on the DVM2 are internally combined into one
port. Selecting a new protocol effectively causes all connectors to listen for that
protocol, therefore, only one device should be communicating through these
connectors at a time.
¾Password Reset
This switch allows you to reset the User Name, Password, and IP address of
your DVM2 to their default values in the event that they are lost. This
functionality is discussed further in the section entitled Forgotten Password or
IP Address. When the switch is “ Off” , the DVM2 will operate with its set
parameters. When the switch is “ On” , the DVM2 will reset itself to the default
IP Address, User Name and Password.
¾Video Select (DVM2 only)
These switches determines whether the DVM2’ s S-Video component video (YC) output is active, or the RGB (VGA) output is active. Regardless of the setting
of this switch, both of the DVM2’ s composite video outputs are always active.
16
Switch 7
Switch 8
Mode
Off
Off
Setup via Web Page (or .ini file)
Off
On
YUV active through HDB15 connector
On
Off
RGB active through HDB15 connector
On
On
S-Video active
Rear Panel
Pioneer LDP Connector (RS-232P)
This Female DB-15 connector is pin compatible with that found on Pioneer
Laser Disc players such as the LD-V8000. Pioneer emulation is selected using
the configuration DIP switch or Web Page setup.
GROUND
TXD (data from DVM2)
RXD (data to DVM2)
DTR (+12V pull-up)
Rear
Panel
1
9
2
10
3
11
4
12
5
13
6
14
7
15
8
PIONEER DB15
Rear Panel
17
Sony LDP Connector (RS-232S)
This Female DB-25 connector is used to communicate with the DVM2 using
RS-232 and a standard straight-through serial cable or a standard DB-9 to DB25 conversion cable. Sony emulation is selected using the configuration DIP
switch or Web Page setup.
1
14
2
15
3
16
4
17
5
18
6
19
7
20
8
21
9
22
10
23
11
24
12
25
13
TXD (data from DVM2)
RXD (data to DVM2)
RTS (+12V pull-up)
GROUND
DTR (+12V pull-up)
SONY DB25
Sony Professional RS-422 Connector
(RS-422)
This Female DB-9 connector is pin compatible with that found on Sony and
other professional gear. Sony emulation is selected using the configuration DIP
switch or Web Page setup. Do not attach this connector to RS-232 signals.
1
6
2
7
3
8
4
9
5
GROUND
GROUND
TXD- (data from DVM2)
TXD+ (data from DVM2)
RXD+ (data to DVM2)
RXD- (data to DVM2)
GROUND
GROUND
RS-422 DB9
18
Rear Panel
MIDI Connector
Rear
Panel
This Female 5-pin DIN connector allows the DVM2 to be controlled using
MIDI messages to select and play files. The standard MIDI cable may be
connected to the MIDI In connector. The messages coincide with standard
MIDI Show Control messages and MIDI Machine Control messages, which are
detailed in the MIDI Serial Protocol section of this manual. MIDI operation is
selected using the configuration DIP switch or Web Page setup.
Rear Panel
19
Discrete Control Connector
Be sure to configure
the Digital Video
Machine 2 for
contact closures or
voltage inputs
before connecting
any wires to it.
This Female DB-37 connector provides all of the signals needed to control the
Digital Video Machine 2 using discrete inputs. The first fifteen files of the Digital
Video Machine 2 may be played, looped, paused or stopped using the eight
parallel inputs located on this connector. These inputs may be either contact
closures such as momentary buttons, or voltage inputs from a controller such as a
PLC. The first position of the “ Option” DIP switch selects between the two input
types. The “ Off” position will allow the DVM2 to accept voltage inputs; the
“ On” position configures the DVM2 for Contact Closures.
The pinout of the Control Connector is shown below:
Function
Voltage
Input
Pin No’s.
Contact
Closure
Pin No’s.
Description
Resume
11(+),1(-)
1,20
Used when processing a Playlist.
Resumes playing if paused or stilled,
skips to next entry if playing and
“ Interruptible” mode is selected.
Still
12(+),2(-)
2,21
Stills the clip currently playing. Play
resumes by activating Resume.
Stop
13(+),3(-)
3,22
Stops the file currently playing. If the
file is a Playlist, it is aborted.
Loop
14(+),4(-)
4,23
Causes the selected file to loop
indefinitely from beginning to end. If
the file is a Playlist, all clips will be
played and then the file will loop.
File Select 1
15(+),5(-)
5,24
Binary-encoded input plays files 1-15.
File Select 2
16(+),6(-)
6,25
Binary-encoded input plays files 1-15.
File Select 4
17(+),7(-)
7,26
Binary-encoded input plays files 1-15.
File Select 8
18(+),8(-)
8,27
Binary-encoded input plays files 1-15.
The binary file select inputs are used to play the first 15 files. The inputs are
change sensitive; that is, when a change is detected, the new file will be played.
It is therefore important that the four bits change at about the same time.
If the same file number is selected repeatedly it will normally interrupt itself and
begin again. When processing a Playlist, if the Playlist is selected repeatedly it
advances from entry to entry within the list – unless the “ Uninterruptible” flag
has been set (see the Playlist section for more information).
Note: The RS-232 Transmit line is also located on pin 36 of the DB37
connector. This Receive line is located on pin 37.
20
Rear Panel
8
4
2
1
File
Off
Off
Off
Off
None
Off
Off
Off
On
1
Off
Off
On
Off
2
Off
Off
On
On
3
Off
On
Off
Off
4
Off
On
Off
On
5
Off
On
On
Off
6
Off
On
On
On
7
On
Off
Off
Off
8
On
Off
Off
On
9
On
Off
On
Off
10
On
Off
On
On
11
On
On
Off
Off
12
On
On
Off
On
13
On
On
On
Off
14
On
On
On
On
15
Rear
Panel
The table below shows the binary combinations possible, and what file they
select:
For example, connecting pins 8 and 27 together with the DIP switch set in the
contact closure position will cause file 8 to run.
The loop input is
read when playback
begins, not at the
end of the file.
The file will be looped if the loop command is asserted when the file is
triggered. If the file is a Playlist, all clips will be played and then the file will
loop.
The file select inputs may also be strapped to automatically play a file on
powerup. That file number takes precedence over any autoexec files that may be
on the removable hard drive (see Power Up Operation). If an autoexec file
exists and the loop input is strapped, it will play continuously until the unit loses
power.
The simplest possible configuration is therefore to connect four switches to the
unit’ s four file select lines. These switches will play files 1, 2, 4 and 8. (The
missing file numbers need not exist.) Fifteen switches may be connected without
an external controller, by using a diode matrix. One side of each switch is
connected to a wire that goes to signal ground. The other sides of the switches
are connected through signal diodes, such as a 1N914 or 1N4148, to the file
select inputs.
Rear Panel
21
Using a terminal block to
hold the diodes makes
the wiring neater.
For example, the following circuit allows switches to
select files 1 to 15:
DB37 Contact Closure Diode Network Diagram for 15 Clips
2
2
1
1
I/O connector
1
20
2
21
3
22
4
23
5
24
6
25
7
26
8
27
9
28
10
29
11
30
12
31
13
32
14
33
15
34
16
35
17
36
18
37
19
2
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
Clip 1
1
2
Clip 2
1
2
Clip 3
1
2
Clip 4
1
2
Clip 5
1
2
Clip 6
1
2
Clip 7
Ground
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
1
2
Clip 8
1
2
Clip 9
1
2
Clip 10
1
2
Clip 11
1
1
1
2
Clip 12
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
Clip 13
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
Clip 14
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
Clip 15
SYMBOLS:
1
2
SWITCH
2
1
1N4148
Note:
The 37pin connector
on the diagram is
inverted from what you
see when looking at
the back of our
product. This is so that
you can see what it will look
like when making a cable
assembly. Remember to
have the I/O setting to
Contact Closure.
You may use this as a guide
for building a diode network,
but it is only a reference.
We are not responsible for
any obvious errors in the
diagram. Use logic to verify
your setup is correct. If you
find errors with this diagram,
please notify Alcorn McBride.
You can help us help other
customers with the same
question.
If you don’ t want to wire this circuit yourself, we have a cheap, discrete control
breakout-board that lets you directly select all 15 files and the control contacts
like Play, Stop, etc… without touching a diode or your soldering iron. Look for
the Input Expander at www.alcorn.com for details.
22
Rear Panel
Voltage inputs, such as from a PLC, could be wired this way:
Voltage
1 Contacts
2
3
4
5
6
7
Rear
Panel
I/O CONNECTOR
1
20
2
21
3
22
4
23
5
24
6
25
7
26
8
27
9
28
10
29
11
30
12
31
13
32
14
33
15
34
16
35
17
36
18
37
19
8
On
PLC
24 Volt Output 1
24 Volt Output 2
24 Volt Output 4
24 Volt Output 8
Ground Reference
CONNECTOR DB37
Diodes are not needed, since the PLC can actuate any combination of lines
desired.
Parallel Outputs
Two status outputs are provided. They are dry contact closures rated at 24 VDC
and 0.9 amp max. Their function is described below.
Rear Panel
Function
Pin No’s.
Description
Playing
9,28
Closed when the unit is playing.
Fault
10,29
Closed when the unit detects a fault
condition.
23
Composite Video Connectors
Two are provided, one RCA-type phono jack (colored yellow), and one BNC
connector. Each is individually buffered, and can drive a 75-Ohm load.
Sync Generator Output Connector
(DVM2 only)
This output provides a standard 4.1-volt p-p composite sync signal for
synchronizing external equipment. Using this connector, the DVM2 can be used
as the master sync source, eliminating the need for a separate sync generator1.
(1) Important Note: On DVM2 units manufactured after March 2003 this
connection is used only to source sync to Alcorn McBride show control
equipment. To synchronize DVM2 units together use an external blackburst
generator, or use the video out (BNC connection) of a DVM2 as a master
source. The final connection of the sync chain should be terminated through a
75-Ohm resistor to ground.
C-Sync Daisy-Chain Connectors
(DVM2 only)
These connections provide a convenient means of slaving the DVM2 to an
external video sync source, and also daisy-chaining that source to the next
device in the line. This input 2 accepts standard 4.1-volt p-p composite sync
signals, as well as video level black burst signals. If the DVM2 is the last device
in a 4.1 volt p-p composite sync daisy chain, the 75 Ohm termination switch
should be set in the “ On” position. Otherwise, the switch should be “ Off” .
(2) Important Note: On DVM2 units manufactured after March 2003 this
connection accepts standard video level signals only. Use an external blackburst
sync signal generator or the video out (on BNC connector) from a DVM2 as the
master sync source.
24
Rear Panel
Balanced Audio Connector (DVM2
only)
This DB-25 Male connector provides balanced versions of the audio channels.
Full-scale output level is +4dBm. The pinout of this connector is:
LEFT MAINLEFT MAIN+
SHIELD
SHIELD
RIGHT MAINRIGHT MAIN+
SHIELD
SHIELD
NC
NC
SHIELD
SHIELD
NC
NC
SHIELD
SHIELD
SHIELD
SHIELD
SHIELD
SHIELD
SHIELD
SHIELD
SHIELD
SHIELD
SHIELD
Rear
Panel
1
14
2
15
3
16
4
17
5
18
6
19
7
20
8
21
9
22
10
23
11
24
12
25
13
BALANCED AUDIO DB25
Note: Auxiliary Outputs are not currently implemented.
Unbalanced Audio Connectors
These 4 RCA-type phono connectors emulate the 2 digital and 2 analog audio
channels of a Pioneer LDV-8000 Laser Disc Player. The bottom connectors are
the Left and Right Main audio channels, while the upper connectors are the Left
and Right Auxiliary connectors. Currently, only the Main channels are
functional.
Full-scale output level is .707 VRMS.
Digital Audio Connector (DVM2 only)
This RCA-type phono connector provides the S/PDIF digital audio output as
well as the output for Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Sound bitstreams.
Rear Panel
25
S-Video (Y-C) Connector
This mini DIN connector provides standard S-Video (component Y-C) video
output. To activate this connector, set both Video Select Switches (Switches
#7&8) to the “ On” position. The pinout of this connector is:
GROUND
1
Y
2
-
-
-
-
4
3
GROUND
C
RGB (VGA) Connector (DVM2 only)
This HDB-15 Female connector provides RGB video plus H-Sync and V-Sync
compatible with interlaced VGA monitors. It is important to verify
your monitor is interlaced, as many common computer
monitors are progressive. If you mismatch the two types you
will not see video on your monitor, even though the unit is
playing. The pinout of this connector is:
26
Rear Panel
YUV Output
The Digital Video Machine 2 also supports YUV output through the RGB
connector. When the DVM2 is in YUV mode, pin 1 is “ Y” , pin 2 is “ U” and pin
3 is “ V” .
Ethernet Connector
Rear
Panel
This RJ-45 connector provides connection for a standard 10-Base T Ethernet
cable. This cable would normally be connected to a hub, but may also be
connected directly to a PC’ s Ethernet card using an Ethernet null, or “ crossconnect” cable, which is included with the DVM2.
Ethernet is the primary mechanism for transfer of video data into the DVM2,
and may also be used for control and monitoring. The DVM2 is shipped with a
factory default IP address of 192.168.0.254, which is useful for transferring
video across an Ethernet LAN, but must be changed if the Digital Video
Machine 2 is to be connected to a router on the Internet. Refer to the
Networking Your DVM2 section of this document for more information.
Rear Panel
27
28
Serial Control
Pioneer / AMI Serial Protocol
The most versatile serial protocol of the DVM2 is the Pioneer/Alcorn McBride
Enhanced protocol. This protocol implements nearly all of the Pioneer Laser
Disc player command set, but adds commands to access advanced features of
the DVM2 such as multiple drives.
This section discusses the most commonly used commands in detail, and then
lists the entire Pioneer/Alcorn McBride Inc. protocol in tabular form.
The Digital Video Machine 2 may be controlled using serial RS-232 messages
via either the DB-25 Female Sony LDP connector, the DB-15 Female Pioneer
connector, or the RS-232 wires in the 37-pin Discrete Control Connector. The
DB-15 connector allows the use of an existing Pioneer Laserdisc Player control
cable. The data format is user-defined; however, it is typically: 9600 baud, 8
bits/byte, no parity, with one stop bit. These settings are determined by the
configuration DIP switch or Web Page Setup. The protocol is ASCII-based, and
many commands are identical to Pioneer Disc protocol. Upper or lower case
characters can be used interchangeably.
Addressing Commands
Commands sent
to individual
units using the
address operator
(@) will receive
a message
response, but a
wildcard message
will not.
Serial Control
Any command can be preceded by <ID>@ where <ID> is the ASCII
representation of the unit’ s Device ID (‘0’ -‘126’ ). This allows
commands to be sent to individual units in a control line of multiple
units. ‘127’ and ‘*’ act as wildcard ID’ s; a command sent using ‘127’
or ‘*’ as the ID will cause all units in the control line to execute the
command. The Device ID can be assigned via the Web Page setup or
by using the Set Device ID serial command.
29
Serial
Control
Note: Any reference
to connectors or
serial protocols other
than Pioneer/AMI in
this section applies to
the DVM2 only.
Select File
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to select the specified A/V
clip or Playlist. Once this command is sent, the next Play command causes the
specified file to play from the beginning. The unit defaults to file #1 at powerup, unless an autoexec file exists. When receiving this command, the Digital
Video Machine 2 always looks for the file on the currently selected drive.
Command Bytes:
[<ID>@]nSE<CR> or [<ID>@]nnSE<CR> or [<ID>@]nnnSE<CR> or
[<ID>@]nnnnSE<CR> or [<ID>@]nnnnnSE<CR>
where n, nn, nnn, nnnn or nnnnn is the file number in ASCII.
or
[<ID>@]” <filename>” SE<CR>
where <filename> is an ASCII file name surrounded by quotation marks.
Message Response:
R<CR>
Comments:
This is similar to the “ Search to Address” command in chapter addressing mode
used in Pioneer Laser Disc protocol. The maximum file number is 99999.
Examples:
Select file 215:
215SE<CR>
Select file 4:
4SE<CR> or “ vid00004.mpg” SE<CR>
Select file alcorn.mpg:
“ alcorn.mpg” SE<CR>
Play
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to play the file, which was
specified with the “ Select File” command, meaning that often a user will select a
clip and then play it using the SE command above and then the PL command.
This will interrupt the currently playing video and go onto the newly selected
file. If a clip is stilled, this command resumes play. If this command is issued
while a Playlist is being played, the Digital Video Machine 2 will skip to the
next clip in the Playlist and play it. This command sends a response when it is
executed, and another when the playback is complete.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]PL<CR>
Message Response:
R<CR>
Completion Response: <CR> (This character is configurable from the Advanced section of the Serial
Port Setup Web Page)
Comments:
30
If the video material ends with a non-black screen, that picture will be displayed
until another video file is played.
Serial Control
Loop Play
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to play the file specified by
the Select File command and loop back to the beginning. If the file is a Playlist,
all of the clips in the Playlist will be played and then the entire Playlist will be
restarted.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]LP<CR>
Message Response:
R<CR>
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to still frame. Play will
resume from where it left off whenever another Play command is issued unless a
Select File command is issued, in which case the new file will play from the
beginning. Because the video image is held in a digital buffer, the still frame
will be rock solid, and may be held indefinitely without media wear.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]ST<CR>
Message Response:
R<CR>
Comments:
If a Select File command is issued while in Still mode, playback will start from
the beginning of the selected file whenever another Play command is issued.
Serial
Control
Still
Stop
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to stop video playback. The
last frame displayed will remain on screen. To begin video playback again, you
must first issue a Select File command followed by a Play command.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]RJ<CR>
Message Response:
R<CR>
Audio Control
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to mute or unmute the audio.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]nAD<CR>
where n is 0 (Mute) or 1 (Unmute).
Message Response:
R<CR>
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to mute or unmute the video.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]nVD<CR>
Video Control
where n is 0 (Black) or 1 (Image).
Message Response:
Serial Control
R<CR>
31
Active Mode Request
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to report its Active
Operating Mode.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]?P<CR>
Message Response:
P0n<CR>
where n is 1 (Stopped), 3(Searched), 4 (Playing), 5 (Stilled) or 6 (Paused)
Description:
Chapter Request
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to report its Active Chapter.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]?C<CR>
Message Response:
n<CR>
Where n is the file number of the current video
Audio Sample Rate Select
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to change the sample rate at
which it plays audio.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]nAR<CR>
where n is 0 (Auto Detect), 1 (32KHz), 2 (44.1KHz) or 3 (48KHz)
Message Response:
R<CR>
Comments:
The DVM2 will automatically decide on a default sample rate at power-up. If
an auto executing file exists that causes video to play at power-up (playlist #0,
video #0, schedule, etc), the first video to play will determine the default sample
rate. Otherwise, the lowest numbered clip on the unit will determine the default
sample rate. This default sample rate will persist for the duration of the power
cycle. If the Sample Rate Select command is used to switch to Auto Detect
mode, each search will take longer while the unit determines the sample rate of
the selected video.
Device ID Set
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to change its Device ID.
This command is useful if you cannot use Ethernet and the Web Page Setup.
Setting Device ID’ s should be done one unit at a time. When communicating
with multiple units, do not send this command as a wildcard command, as this
will change every unit’ s Device ID.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]nID<CR> or [<ID>@]nnID<CR> or [<ID>@]nnnID<CR>
where n, nn, or nnn is the Device ID in ASCII (‘0’ -‘126’ ). Do not use ‘127’ as
this is the designated wildcard ID.
Message Response:
32
R<CR>
Serial Control
Device ID Request
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to report its current Device
ID.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]ID<CR>
Message Response:
Device ID String<CR>
Firmware Version Request
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to report its Operating
System revision number.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]?V<CR>
Message Response:
Version String<CR>
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to set its IP address. You
can also do this via the web interface.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]nnn.nnn.nnn.nnnIP<CR>
Message Response:
IP String<CR>
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to get its IP address.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]IP<CR>
Message Response:
IP String<CR>
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to report the list of files
located on its root drive. This is handy, if you don’ t have an Ethernet
connection established and you want to see what files are on the root drive.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]LS<CR>
Message Response:
ASCII dump of root directory files <CR>
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to set its Gateway address.
You can also do this via the web interface.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]nnn.nnn.nnn.nnnGW<CR>
Message Response:
Gateway IP String<CR>
Serial Control
Serial
Control
IP Address Set
IP Address Request
File List Request
Gateway Address Set
33
Description:
Gateway Address Request
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to get its Gateway address.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]GW<CR>
Message Response:
Gateway IP String<CR>
Subnet Mask Set
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to set its Subnet Mask
address. You can also do this via the web interface.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]nnn.nnn.nnn.nnnSM<CR>
Message Response:
Subnet Mask String<CR>
Subnet Mask Request
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to get its Subnet Mask
address.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]SM<CR>
Message Response:
Subnet Mask String<CR>
Description:
Delete File
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to delete the specified file.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]"filename.ext"DL<CR>
Message Response:
R<CR>
Description:
Rename File
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to rename the specified file.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]"oldfilename.ext""newfilename.ext"RN <CR>
Message Response:
R<CR>
Play Next
Description:
This command causes the selected file to be "queued" for playback at the
completion of the current activity. If a file is currently playing, the queued
transition to the selected file will be seamless. If a file is currently looping, the
transition will occur at the next loop point.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]<n[n][n][n][n]>PN<CR>, where <n[n][n][n][n]> is a file number 0-99999
Message Response:
R<CR>
34
Serial Control
Loop Next
Description:
This command causes the selected file to be "queued" for looping playback at
the completion of the current activity. If a file is currently playing, the queued
transition to the selected file will be seamless. If a file is currently looping, the
transition will occur at the next loop point.
Command bytes:
[<ID>@]<n[n][n][n][n]>LN<CR>, where <n[n][n][n][n]> is a file number 0-99999
Message Response:
R<CR>
Error Codes
Serial Control
Error Code
Description
E00
Communication Error
E04
Feature Not Available Yet
E12
Search Error
Serial
Control
The Digital Video Machine 2 returns the following error codes:
35
Pioneer/AMI Protocol Summary
The following table shows the complete Digital Video Machine 2 serial protocol, including the
Pioneer LDP compatible commands and AMI extensions. Using these commands, an external
controller or PC can accomplish extremely complex tasks. Throughout the following table, <CR>
means carriage return, a byte with the hexadecimal value of 0D. Brackets, [ ], denote optional
message bytes.
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Notes:
In the commands above, <filename> is an ASCII file name surrounded by quotation marks.
In the event of an invalid command, an error response will be transmitted.
The DVM2 responds to the Play command with R<CR> when received, and an additional <CR> when
the clip ends. This maintains Pioneer command compatibility while providing completion information.
Serial Control
37
Sony LDP Serial Protocol (DVM2
only)
The Digital Video Machine 2 may also be controlled using the Sony Laser Disc
Player Serial Protocol.
The Digital Video Machine 2 may be controlled using Sony LDP serial RS-232
messages via the DB-25 Sony LDP connector (RS-232S) on the rear of the unit.
The data format is user-defined, however it is typically: 4800 baud, 8 bits/byte,
no parity, with one stop bit. These settings are determined by the configuration
DIP switch or Web Page Setup.
The serial commands that can be transmitted using the Sony LDP protocol are:
Command
38
Function
Select File
Select a file
Play
Play the selected file
Still
Stop output and freeze the current frame
Stop
Stop video playback
Audio Control
Mute or Unmute audio
Video Control
Mute or Unmute video
Serial Control
The details of these commands are listed below. The “ H” following each
command indicates that the command bytes are in hexadecimal.
Select File
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to select the specified A/V
clip, sound or Playlist. Once this command is sent, the next Play command
causes the specified file to play from the beginning. The unit defaults to file #1
at power-up, unless an autoexec file exists. When receiving this command, the
Digital Video Machine 2 always looks for the file on the currently selected
drive.
Command Bytes:
43H 3uH 3vH 3wH 3xH 3yH 40H
Message Response:
0AH for each byte
Comments:
This is similar to the “ Search” command in chapter addressing mode used in
Sony Laser Disc protocol. The maximum file number is 79.
Examples:
Select file 76:
43H 37H 36H 40H
Select file 4:
43H 34H 40H
Serial
Control
where u corresponds to the first digit of the chapter number (or 0), v corresponds
to the second digit, w corresponds to the third digit, x corresponds to the fourth
digit and y corresponds to the fifth digit. Leading zeroes are not required.
Play
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to play the file specified by
the most recent “ Select File” command. The unit defaults to clip 1 at powerup if
no autoexec file exists. If a clip is stilled, this command resumes play. If this
command is issued while a Playlist is being played, the Digital Video Machine 2
will skip to the next clip in the Playlist and play it. This command sends a
response when it is executed, and another when the playback is complete.
Command bytes:
3AH
Message Response:
0AH
Completion Response: 0DH (programmable via Web Configuration)
Comments:
This is similar to the “ Forward Play” command in the Sony Laser Disc protocol.
If the video material ends with a non-black screen, that picture will be displayed
until another video file is played.
Serial Control
39
Still
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to still frame. Play will
resume from where it left off whenever another Play command is issued unless a
Select File command is issued, in which case the new file will play from the
beginning. Because the video image is held in a digital buffer, the still frame
will be rock solid, and may be held indefinitely without media wear.
Command bytes:
4FH
Message Response:
0AH
Comments:
If a Select File command is issued while in Still mode, playback will start from
the beginning of the selected file whenever another Play command is issued. To
accomplish this same function but blank the screen, refer to the Video Mute
command.
Stop
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to stop video playback. The
last displayed frame will remain on screen. To begin playback again, you must
first issue a Select File command followed by a Play command.
Command bytes:
3FH
Message Response:
0AH
Audio Mute
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to mute the audio output
while continuing to play video. Use the Audio Unmute command to resume
audio output
Command bytes:
24H
Message Response:
0AH
Audio Unmute
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to unmute the audio output
after an Audio Mute command is issued
Command bytes:
25H
Message Response:
0AH
40
Serial Control
Video Mute
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to mute the video output
while continuing to play audio. Use the Video Unmute command to resume
video output.
Command bytes:
26H
Message Response:
0AH
Video Unmute
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to unmute the video output
after a Video Mute command is issued
Command bytes:
27H
Message Response:
0AH
Serial
Control
Error Codes
The Digital Video Machine 2 error codes are the same for each serial protocol.
Refer to the Error Codes in the Pioneer / AMI Serial Protocol section.
Serial Control
41
Sony Professional Serial Protocol
(DVM2 only)
The Digital Video Machine 2 may also be controlled using the Sony
Professional Serial Protocol, also known as “ Sony 9-Pin.”
The Digital Video Machine 2 may be controlled using Sony 9-Pin serial RS-422
messages via the DB-9 Female Sony 422 connector on the rear of the unit. The
data format is user-defined, however it is typically: 38400 baud, 8 bits/byte, odd
parity, with one stop bit. These settings are determined by the configuration DIP
switch or Web Page Setup.
The serial commands that can be used with the Sony 9-Pin protocol are:
Command
Function
Select File
Select a file
Play
Play the selected file
Still
Stop output and freeze the current frame
Stop
Stop video playback
The details of these commands are listed below. The “ H” following each
command byte indicates that the command bytes are in hexadecimal.
Select File
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to select the specified A/V
clip, sound or Playlist. Once this command is sent, the next Play command
causes the specified file to play from the beginning. The unit defaults to file #1
at power-up, unless an autoexec file exists.
Command Bytes:
24H 31H wwH xxH yyH zzH checksum
where ww corresponds to the 1’ s digit of the chapter number (01-09),
xx corresponds to the 10’ s digit of the chapter number (01-09), yy corresponds
to the 100’ s digit of the chapter number (01-09), and zz corresponds to the
1000’ s digit of the chapter number (01-09).
The checksum is the sum of all preceding bytes.
Message Response:
10H 01H 11H
Comments:
This is similar to the “ Cue Up With Data” command in the Sony 9-Pin protocol.
The maximum file number is 9999.
Examples:
Select file 76:
42
24H 31H 06H 07H 00H 00H 62H
Serial Control
Select file 4:
24H 31H 04H 00H 00H 00H 59H
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to play the file specified by
the most recent “ Select File” command. The unit defaults to clip 1 at powerup if
no autoexec file exists. If a clip is stilled, this command resumes play. If this
command is issued while a Playlist is being played, the Digital Video Machine 2
will skip to the next clip in the Playlist and play it.
Command bytes:
20H 01H 21H
Message Response:
10H 01H 11H
Comments:
If the video material ends with a non-black screen, that picture will be displayed
until another video file is played.
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to still frame. Play will
resume from where it left off whenever another Play command is issued unless a
Select File command is issued, in which case the new file will play from the
beginning.
Command bytes:
21H 11H 00H 32H
Message Response:
10H 01H 11H
Comments:
This is similar to the “ Jog Forward” at 0 speed command in the Sony 9-Pin
protocol.
Still
If a Select File command is issued while in Still mode, playback will start from
the beginning of the selected file whenever another Play command is issued.
Stop
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to stop video playback. The
last frame displayed will remain on screen. To begin playback again, you must
first issue a Select File command followed by a Play command.
Command bytes:
20H 00H 20H
Message Response:
10H 01H 11H
Error Codes
The Digital Video Machine 2 error codes are the same for each serial protocol.
Refer to the Error Codes in the Pioneer / AMI Serial Protocol section.
Serial Control
43
Serial
Control
Play
Description:
MIDI Serial Protocol (DVM2 only)
The Digital Video Machine 2 may also be controlled using MIDI Machine
Control or MIDI Show Control, via the 5-Pin DIN Programming Connector on
the rear of the unit. The data format is 31250, N, 8, 1: 31250 baud, 8 bits/byte,
no parity, with one stop bit. MIDI operation is selected using the configuration
DIP switch or Web Page setup.
MIDI Machine Control
The serial commands that may be used with the MIDI Machine Control protocol
are:
Command
Function
Stop
Stop playback
Play
Play the selected file
Still
Stop playback and freeze the current frame
Select File
Select a file
The format for a MIDI Machine Control message is:
F0H 7FH <device_ID> 06H <command> F7H
Where:
<device_ID>
<command>
= 7FH for wildcard.
= 00H – 6FH, individual ID’ s
(See “ Web Pages” Section for how to set the MIDI
Device ID)
= 01H, Stop
= 02H, Play
= 09H, Still
= 44H, aa, bb, cc, … , Select File
The details of these commands are listed below. The “ H” following each
command indicates that the command bytes are in hexadecimal.
44
Serial Control
Stop
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to halt video playback.
Command Bytes:
F0H 7FH ID 06H 01H F7H
where ID represents the target device ID.
Example:
Stop device 03:
F0H 7FH 03H 06H 01H F7H
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to play the file specified by
the most recent “ Select File” command. The unit defaults to clip 1 at powerup if
no autoexec file exists. If this command is issued while a Playlist is being
played, the Digital Video Machine 2 will skip to the next clip in the Playlist and
play it. This command sends a response when it is executed, and another when
the playback is complete.
Command bytes:
F0H 7FH ID 06H 02H F7H
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to still frame. Play will
resume from where it left off whenever another Play command is issued unless a
Select File command is issued, in which case the new file will play from the
beginning.
Command bytes:
F0H 7FH ID 06H 09H F7H
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to select the specified A/V
clip, sound or Playlist on the currently selected media. Once this command is
sent, the next Play command causes the specified file to play from the
beginning. The unit defaults to file #1 at power-up, unless an autoexec file
exists. When receiving this command, the Digital Video Machine 2 always
looks for the file on the currently selected drive.
Command Bytes:
F0H 7FH ID 06H 44H aaH bbH ccH ddH eeH F7H
Still
Select File
where aa through ee correspond to the file number.
Examples:
Select file 76 on device 05H: F0H 7FH 05H 06H 44H 00H 00H 00H 07H 06H
F7H
Select file 220 on device 1FH: F0H 7FH 1FH 06H 44H 00H 00H 02H 02H 00H
F7H
Comment:
Serial Control
Leading zeroes are required in the file number.
45
Serial
Control
Play
MIDI Show Control
Serial commands that may be used with the MIDI Show Control protocol are:
Command
Function
Go
Play the specified file
Stop
Stop video playback
The format for a MIDI Show Control message is:
F0H 7FH <device_ID> 02H <control_type> <command> <data> F7H
Where:
<device_ID>
= 7FH for wildcard.
= 00H – 6FH, individual ID’ s
< control_type >
<command>
<data>
(See “ Web Pages” Section for how to set the MIDI
Device ID)
= 30H (general video devices)
= 01H, Go
= 02H, Stop
= File number as five ASCII digits (00000 - 99999)
The “ H” following each command indicates that the command bytes are in
hexadecimal.
Go
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to play the specified file.
This command sends a response when it is executed, and another when the
playback is complete.
Command bytes:
F0H 7FH ID 02H 30H 01H aaH bbH ccH ddH eeH F7H
where aa through ee correspond to the ASCII representation of the file number
(Leading zeroes are not required).
Example:
Go file 76 on device 4F:
F0H 7FH 4FH 02H 30H 01H 37H 36H F7H
Stop
Description:
This command causes the Digital Video Machine 2 to stop playback
Command bytes:
F0H 7FH ID 02H 30H 02H F7H
46
Serial Control
Terminal Mode
The Digital Video Machine 2 broadcasts unit information every 5 seconds via
the serial port. It does not accept serial commands in this mode. This allows
you to see the current status of the unit, or even debug serial connection.
(Requires os version .97 or later. Os updates available at www.alcorn.com.)
Error Codes
Serial
Control
The Digital Video Machine 2 error codes are the same for each serial protocol.
Refer to the Error Codes in the Pioneer / AMI Serial Protocol section.
Serial Control
47
Transferring Files into the DVM2
There are several ways to get files (videos, playlists, schedules, etc.) into the
DVM2. The first method involves connecting to the DVM2 from your PC or
Local Area Network using a network card and the Ethernet port on the back of
the DVM2. The second method involves installing a removable drive bay (sold
separately) in your PC and copying the files to the removable drive.
Transferring Files using Ethernet
To transfer a file to or from the DVM2, run FTP, selecting the proper IP address,
login name, and password. You should then be able to connect to the DVM2,
and transfer video files across the Network to the DVM2. Verify that the files
are properly named for playback on the DVM2. For help with FTP, please refer
to the Getting Started section at the beginning of this manual. Other helpful
information can be found in the section entitled Networking Your DVM2
You will also be able to update the DVM2’ s Operating System by transferring
the file OS.NEW to the DVM2 via FTP, and then power-cycling the unit, as
discussed in the section entitled Updating the Operating System.
Transferring Files using the
Removable Drive
Another way to move files to the DVM2 is via the removable hard drive. To do
so, you will need to install the removable drive bay that is sold separately.
NOTE: The removable hard drive will only work with a FAT32 file system
(examples Windows 95 release B/C, Windows 98, Windows 2000.)
Windows 3.1, Windows 95 release A, and Windows NT 4.0 do not provide
native support for FAT32 file systems. Support for FAT32 under Windows
NT 4.0 may be purchased from www.winternals.com, but is not supported
by Alcorn McBride Inc.
Transferring Files into the DVM2
49
File
Transfer
File Transfers to the DVM2 can be accomplished by using a common
Internet/Unix file transfer utility called FTP (which stands for File Transfer
Protocol), such as WS_FTP. This program is freely available on most computer
platforms, just like a web browser.
50
Transferring Files into the DVM2
Networking Your DVM2
The Ethernet connection is a useful tool for transferring video and other files to
and from the unit. It is also useful for transferring feature updates and
controlling and monitoring the DVM2. Ethernet is a physical medium for
transferring data. TCP/IP is used to transmit the data over the Ethernet. TCP/IP
is a common “ protocol” for transmitting data on local Ethernet connections
(Intranet) and also global connections (Internet). The DVM2 allows both. We
will refer to the use of either an Intranet or the Internet as the Network.
Connecting to the DVM2 via Ethernet
The DVM2 is configured with default TCP/IP settings. These setting are the IP
address, the login name, and the login password. These settings need to be
changed only if the unit is to be used on an Intranet or the Internet. If you intend
to use Ethernet only to transfer video files into the unit, then the default settings
will work just fine.
If you are connecting the DVM2 to an existing Ethernet LAN Intranet, then the
Network System Administrator will need to provide you with a unique IP
address for the DVM2. If you are connecting the DVM2 to the Internet, then
your Internet Service Provider (ISP) will provide you with a unique IP address.
The default login name is admin, and the default login password is password.
The password should be changed if the DVM2 is going to remain on the
Network.
To change any of these three settings, you need to connect to the DVM2 using a
web browser, such as Netscape or Internet Explorer, which is freely available on
most computer platforms like Windows 95, Unix, Macintosh, and so on. You
can also change these settings serially while in Pioneer Mode (see Pioneer
Mode section of the Serial Control Chapter)
The DVM2 comes with a red “ Null-Ethernet” (also known as a “ cross-connect” )
cable. This cable allows two peers (such as a PC and a DVM2) to communicate
directly without going through a network hub. DO NOT USE THIS CABLE
TO CONNECT THE DVM2 OR A PC TO A NETWORK HUB.
Networking Your DVM2
51
Networking
Your DVM2
The DVM2 is shipped with a factory default IP address of 192.168.0.254, which
is useful for transferring video across an Ethernet LAN, but must be changed if
the Digital Video Machine 2 is to be connected to a router on the Internet. This
IP address represents the official test IP address.
Connecting to the DVM2 directly from a PC
If you are not connecting to the DVM2 from your Local Area Network (LAN),
the Internet, or an Ethernet hub, you should follow these instructions:
52
1.
Plug one end of the red “ Null-Ethernet” cable that came with your DVM2
into the Ethernet port on the rear of the DVM2.
2.
Plug the other end of the red “ Null-Ethernet” cable into the Ethernet port on
your computer.
3.
Using Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows NT, right-click on the
Network Neighborhood icon and select Properties. If you are not using
Windows or you do not have TCP/IP Networking installed on your
computer, please consult your computer’ s documentation for further
instructions on Network Configuration.
4.
Double-click on the TCP/IP option. The “ TCP/IP Properties” window
should be displayed. Select the “ IP Address” tab.
5.
Write down your current IP address and Subnet Mask settings and keep
them in a safe location.
6.
Change your IP Address to the value shown above (192.168.0.2). Change
your Subnet Mask to the value shown above (255.255.255.0).
7.
Click the OK button twice to exit and save the changes to the Network
setup.
Networking Your DVM2
8.
Your computer will require you to reboot to change the settings. Click the
Yes button to do so.
9.
Once your computer has finished rebooting, launch a Web Browser
(Netscape, Internet Explorer, etc.).
10. In the address box, type “ http://” followed by the IP address of your DVM2.
If this is your first time connecting to your DVM2, or you have not changed
the IP address, the correct entry should be:
http://192.168.0.254
11. Upon hitting the Enter key on your keyboard, you should be presented with
the introductory Web Page from your DVM2.
Note: If you are unable to connect to the DVM2 over Ethernet after following
the above procedure, the problem may be a result of internal conflicts in
Windows TCP/IP settings. To avoid this Windows problem, right-click on the
Network Neighborhood icon and select Properties. Select each reference to
TCP/IP and click Properties. Write down the old settings and then delete all
references to TCP/IP by highlighting them individually and selecting Remove.
Then click Add, select Protocol and click Add. Select Microsoft on the left
side of the Select Network Protocol dialog. Now select TCP/IP from the right
side of the Select Network Protocol dialog and press OK. Windows will ask
you to insert the Windows installation disk(s) to complete the process. This
procedure will eliminate any conflicts with other TCP/IP entries in Windows.
You will need to perform the above procedure again to connect to the DVM2.
Networking Your DVM2
53
Networking
Your DVM2
12. When you are finished configuring your DVM2, follow steps 3-8 to restore
your computer’ s TCP/IP settings.
Connecting to the DVM2 Over a Local Area
Network (LAN) or the Internet
Note: This process can only be accomplished once you have already
connected to the DVM2 directly and have changed the default IP address to
an address approved by your Network Administrator.
To connect to the DVM2 over a LAN or the Internet:
1.
Connect one end of a 10-Base-T Ethernet cable to the Ethernet connector on
the DVM2. DO NOT USE THE SUPPLIED RED “NULLETHERNET” CABLE.
2.
Connect the other end of the Ethernet cable to your network hub.
3.
On your computer, launch a Web Browser (Netscape, Internet Explorer,
etc.).
4.
In the address box, type “ http://” followed by the IP address of your DVM2.
Upon hitting the Enter key on your keyboard, you will be presented with the
introductory Web Page from your DVM2.
54
Networking Your DVM2
DHCP Support
Now your DVM2 can dynamically get its IP address from the network by using
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP). Your dvm2 comes default with
an IP address of 192.168.0.254. So you’ll need to turn on the DHCP feature to
take advantage of it. The DHCP feature does not collect the Gateway and
Subnet Mask information, so you will need to fill that in either serially or
via the web page. Here are the ways you can turn on the DHCP mode:
•
Pioneer serial command: "DHCPIP<carriage return>" puts the DVM2
in DHCP mode and it attempts to automatically get an IP address.
•
Web page support: DHCP On/Off drop down menu. Press the Default
button to fill in all of the fields listed on the addresses.html page in the
web interface. Update your subnet mask and Default Gateway if
necessary. Then select the ON option in the DHCP Mode drop-down
menu and press the Change button.
•
Manually edit the dvm.ini file in the os directory and reboot.
Web Page Setup
This section lists the different Web Pages you can access. Only the introductory
Web Page is accessible without an authorized User Name and Password.
Welcome
The Welcome Web Page gives you a short introduction to the Web Page frontend. This page allows you to jump to one of the following pages:
Unit Addresses
The Unit Addresses Web Page allows you to change the current IP address and
Device ID of your DVM2.
IP Address
If the DVM2 is not going to be connected to a Local Area Network or to the
Internet, you may leave the IP address set to 192.168.0.254.
Networking Your DVM2
55
Networking
Your DVM2
You can then issue IP<carriage return> to learn the new IP address.
However, if you intend to connect the DVM2 to a Local Area Network or to the
Internet, it will be necessary to change the IP Address. To obtain a new IP
address, contact your Network Administrator or your Internet Service Provider.
When you have obtained your new IP address, simply enter the new address in
the New IP Address field and click the Change button. Write the new IP address
down. Upon clicking Change, you will immediately be rerouted to the DVM2 at
its new IP Address.
If you get to this page and decide not to change your IP address, simply click the
Cancel button. This will return you to the Welcome page without changing your
IP address. If you would like to reset the DVM2 to the default address of
192.168.0.254, simply click the Default button.
Serial / Midi Device ID
The Device ID is used to differentiate the DVM2 from other devices in a MIDI
control chain. The Device ID can also be used with the addressable
Pioneer/AMI serial protocol. Each device in the chain should have a unique
device ID. All devices can be referenced using a control ID of 127 (7Fh)
regardless of their device ID’ s. The DVM2 ships with a default Device ID of 1
(01h).
To change the device ID, simply enter the new ID in the New Device ID field.
Click the Change button. This new address will take effect immediately. You
will be returned to the Configuration page. A valid Device ID should be
between 0 and 126 decimal. Do NOT use address 127 (7Fh), as this is the
designated wildcard address.
Change Password
This page allows you to change your Password. If you have just entered the
default User Name and Password after accessing the DVM2 for the first time,
you will be able to change these parameters on this page.
The User Name and Password must be 8 characters (letters or numbers only) or
less.
Warning: Keep your User Name and Password in a safe location. These
parameters will allow the holder full access to the DVM2 features.
To return to the Welcome page without making any changes to the Password,
click the Cancel button.
56
Networking Your DVM2
Set Date and Time
When you receive your DVM2, the time should be consistent with the current
time on the Eastern coast of the United States (where Alcorn McBride is
located). The DVM2’ s Real Time Clock has a battery back-up so that if power
is removed from your DVM2, it will be able to keep the time. If your DVM2 is
to be located elsewhere, it will be necessary to change the hours (and possibly
the date) of the Real Time Clock.
The DVM2 Real Time Clock operates in 24-hour time mode, otherwise known
as Military Time (i.e. 1:00 AM = 0100 hours, 1:00 PM = 1300 hours).
To change the Real Time Clock, click the Set Time button. The DVM2 will
immediately set its time and date to the time and date on your computer. The
setup screen will return the time and date that the DVM2 has been set to.
Serial Protocol Setup
To set up the port:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Choose the correct Protocol in the pull-down box for Pioneer, Sony
LaserDisc, Sony Professional, or MIDI.
Choose the correct Baud Rate.
Choose the correct Data Bits.
Choose the correct Parity.
Choose the correct number of Stop Bits.
Press the Change button to save the changes. To cancel changes, press
the Cancel button.
The Advanced button on this page allows you to alter more advanced features of
the serial port such as the playback completion ack character.
Video Setup (DVM2 only)
This page allows you to set the video output to RGB, S-Video, or YUV.
Regardless of this setting, the DVM2 will always output composite video. In
order to use this Web Page to setup the video output, Switches 7 and 8 (Video
Select) must be in the “ Off” position. Otherwise, the output will be configured
according to the switch settings (See the section labeled Configuration DIP
Switch).
Networking Your DVM2
57
Networking
Your DVM2
This page allows you to set up the Baud Rate, data bits, parity, and stop bits
setting of the Pioneer, the Sony RS-422, or the Sony LDP connector on the rear
panel of the DVM2. In order to use this Web Page to setup the port, Switches
#3, 4 and 5 (Serial Protocol Setup) must be in the “ Off” position. Otherwise, the
port will be configured according to the switch settings (See the section labeled
Configuration DIP Switch).
To set up the port:
•
•
58
Choose the correct Format in the pull-down box for S-Video, RGB, or
YUV.
Press the Change button to save the changes. To cancel changes, press
the Cancel button.
Networking Your DVM2
Manual
The Manual page is simply an on-line representation of this manual.
Release Notes
Networking
Your DVM2
The Release Notes page contains applicable information about the current
Operating System release.
Networking Your DVM2
59
Update Operating System
Alcorn McBride periodically adds enhancements to its products. These
Operating System updates can be downloaded to your DVM2 to add
new features if you wish. The DVM2 retains 2 copies of its Operating
System: the Current version and the Previous version. This allows you
to switch between the versions if you wish to.
NOTE: There is no need to upgrade your operating system if your
show is already programmed, but installing the new operating
system brings your unit up to date with current production, and
allows you to take advantage of the latest features.
To Upgrade the DVM2 Operating System:
1.
Use a web browser to connect to the Alcorn McBride DVM2
support page and follow the links to the OS Update Page
(http://www.alcorn.com/support/DVM2).
2.
Compare the Operating System version on the Alcorn McBride
Web Pages to the version on the DVM2’ s internal Web Pages.
3.
If the version on the Alcorn McBride page is the same, there is no
need to download. If the version on the Alcorn McBride page is
newer, click the Download Now button. Save the file to a known
location on your local computer. DO NOT MAKE ANY
CHANGES TO THE FILE NAME.
4.
Once the file download has completed, use a File Transfer Protocol
(FTP) program (such as WS_FTP) to place the file (OS.NEW) in
the root directory of the DVM2. Do this in binary mode!
5.
Once the file transfer has completed, quit the FTP program and
power-cycle the DVM2.
6.
On power-up the DVM2 will detect the new OS version and
perform a check to verify that it is valid.
7.
If the new Operating System is determined to be valid, the DVM2
will then move the file OS.NEW into the OS directory. The
yellow LED will blink twice. The DVM2 will then move the
current OS to a file called OS.OLD and it will rename OS.NEW to
OS.BIN. The Operating System upgrade is now complete.
NOTE: If the new Operating System is found to be invalid, the
DVM2 will rename it OS.BAD and it will leave the file in the root.
60
Networking Your DVM2
Forgotten Password or IP Address?
If you have forgotten your User Name, Password and/or IP Address, you will
not be able to connect to your machine remotely to solve the problem. You will
be required to toggle the Password Reset switch (Switch #6) on the rear panel
of the DVM2 and power-cycle the unit to return the User Name, Password, and
IP Address to their defaults.
After turning on the Password Reset switch, simply power-cycle the DVM2.
When it returns to its ready state, turn the Password Reset switch to the “ Off”
position.
This will reset the User Name to “ admin” , the Password to “ password” , and the
IP Address to 192.168.0.254. You will need to go back through the setup
procedures to change these to new values.
Networking
Your DVM2
WARNING: Any person who has access to the DVM2 and this manual will
be able to reset the User Name, Password, and IP Address. You must keep
these items secure to prevent tampering!
Networking Your DVM2
61
Ethernet Control
Control up to 127
DVM2s at once
over a standard
Ethernet
network!
Now you can use a powerful subset of commands from the Pioneer/AMI
serial protocol to control multiple DVM2s at once that are connected to a
standard Ethernet network. By sending UDP (User Datagram Protocol)
packets across a network, you can communicate with and control up to
127 DVM2s simultaneously or independently.
A Software Developer’s Kit with C Source Code implementing this
protocol is available on our website at http://www.alcorn.com/support
Hardware and Software Requirements
Any Ethernet-capable show controller or PC with a network interface card can
send messages to DVM2’ s located on the same network. To use Ethernet
control, your control source must have a way to broadcast UDP packets
containing arbitrary message bytes to a specific UDP port number (2639). Each
DVM2 must be connected to the physical network via the RJ-45 Ethernet
connector on the rear of the unit. All DVM2s must have different IP Addresses
to reside on the same Ethernet network. IF you plan to send UDP commands to
the broadcast IP address (255.255.255.255), each unit must also have a unique
Unit ID. See the Web Page Setup section for information on setting IP Address
and Unit ID. Only DVM2s running version 0.70 and later of the DVM2
Operating System will be capable of responding to Ethernet control.
Ethernet
Control
AMINet Protocol
The user data sent in the UDP packet follows our AMINet Ethernet protocol.
AMINet was originally developed for use with our Ethernet Machine which
provides an Ethernet backbone for communication between Alcorn McBride
Show Controllers. Now the same, easy to use protocol can be used to control
the DVM2.
AMINet is a very flexible and robust Ethernet protocol that allows for many
different uses; however, only one of AMINet’ s command op-codes is necessary
to transmit commands to the DVM2 making the usage very simple.
Control Message Format
The control source will send a UDP packet that contains a DVM2 Control
Message as the User Data in the packet. A DVM2 Control Message is
comprised of a few bytes needed specifically for AMINet and some Command
bytes. The Command simply needs to contain an Addressed Pioneer / AMI
Ethernet Control
63
serial protocol command. For example, A DVM2 Control Message containing
the Command bytes 7@?V<CR> would cause the DVM2 on the network with
Unit ID 7 to send back a UDP packet containing its version information. Please
see the Pioneer / AMI Serial Protocol section for detailed information about the
rest of the command set.
The basic format of a DVM2 Control Message is as follows:
0xF1 0x01 0x04 <Pioneer / AMI Serial Command> <Checksum> 0xF2
The only bytes that change from message to message are the Command bytes
and the Checksum. The command corresponds exactly to an Addressed Pioneer
/ AMI serial command.
Control Message Checksum
The Checksum is the summation of the hexadecimal value of all of the bytes in
the Control Message except the first byte (0xF1), the last byte (0xF2) and of
course the Checksum itself. The value of the checksum may easily increase to a
value that cannot be represented by one byte. This situation calls for what we
call number expansion.
If the value of the Checksum is between 0x00 and 0xF9 (0-249), the value is
represented in only 8 bits (1 byte). If the value is between 0xFA and 0xFFFF
(250-65535), the value is represented in 16 bits (2 bytes) and is preceded by
0xFF to signify the number has been expanded to 16 bits. If the value is
between 0x10000 and 0xFFFFFF (65536-16777215), the value is represented in
24 bits (3 bytes) and is preceded by 0xFE to signify the number has been
expanded to 24 bits. The following example shows a Control Message with an
expanded Checksum.
0xF1 0x01 0x04 5 5 @ R J <CR> 0xFF 0x01 0x58 0xF2
The value of the checksum is calculated by adding the hexadecimal values of
each byte preceding it except the first byte (0xF1) as follows:
0x01 + 0x04 + 0x35 + 0x35 + 0x40 + 0x52 + 0x4A + 0x0D = 0x158.
The Checksum in this example is 0x158, but because it is greater 0xF9, the two
byte Checksum is preceded by 0xFF.
64
Ethernet Control
UDP Message Layer
The control source sends UDP Packets to the DVM2. A UDP Packet contains
information about the packet source (IP Address, Port number) as well as
definable user data. The user data contains the entire DVM2 Control Message
including all AMINet specific bytes. These packets should be sent to the
broadcast IP Address (0xFFFFFF) with UDP port number 2639.
Control Message Response
The DVM2 will normally send back a response to each Control Message it
receives. The user data in these responses will match the responses in the
Pioneer / AMI Serial control command descriptions but will have the added
AMINet wrapper like a Control Message. For example, you’ ll receive an “ R”
contained in the AMINet wrapper when you send a “ PL” contained in the
AMINet wrapper. The responses are sent to the IP Address and UDP Port
number found in the UDP packet that contained the original Control Message.
As with the Addressable serial protocol, any Control Message sent to the
wildcard unit ID (127) will not receive any response. This practice avoids any
potential confusion at the source of the Control Message due to many responses
to the same message.
Ethernet
Control
A Software Developer’s Kit with C Source Code implementing this protocol
is available on our website at http://www.alcorn.com/support
Ethernet Control
65
UDP Protocol Summary
The following table shows the complete Digital Video Machine 2 UDP protocol. Using these
commands, an external controller or PC can accomplish extremely complex tasks. Throughout the
following table, <CR> means carriage return, a byte with the hexadecimal value of 0D. Brackets, [
], denote optional message bytes. For a more detailed description of these commands refer to the
Pioneer/AMI Protocol section earlier in this book.
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Ethernet
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Notes:
In the event of an invalid command, an error response will be transmitted. The DVM2 responds to the
Play command with R<CR> when received, but does not provide an additional <CR> when the clip
ends, like the serial protocol.
Ethernet Control
67
68
Ethernet Control
Playlists
Playlists provide a mechanism for the Digital Video Machine 2 to automatically
play a collection of clips in a predefined sequence. Playlists often allow the
Digital Video Machine 2 to be used to perform complex functions that would
normally require an external controller. Playlists can perform functions as
simple as looping a single clip, or as complex as user prompted pacing of the
playback.
Overview
Playlists hold the
key to the power of
the Digital Video
Machine 2.
A Playlist file contains a list of numbers which refer to audio or A/V
clips (or other Playlists) on the media in the Digital Video Machine 2.
When a Playlist is being used, the clips are played back in the order in
which they appear in the list. The Playlist is an ASCII text file and can
be made using any ASCII editor. The maximum Playlist file size is 64
Kbytes (or about 16,000 clips, if no comments are used).
A Playlist can be started by serial or parallel commands, in exactly the same
way as an A/V clip. For example, the serial message
2SE<CR>PL<CR>
Causes Playlist PLY00002.LST to start. Discrete File Select Input 2 will also
start PLY00002.LST.
Play
Lists
If Playlist 0 (PLY00000.LST) exists, it will be automatically executed on power
up.
If a Playlist contains the number of another Playlist, execution of the first
Playlist will be terminated at that point, and the new Playlist will begin.
Playlists
69
Playlist Command Summary
The Playlist is mainly a list of the clip numbers that are to be played. Clip
numbers are entered as one to three ASCII digits, and are separated by any
“ white space” characters or punctuation (other than the command characters
listed below). Special command characters further modify the behavior of the
Digital Video Machine 2. These characters are:
Char
70
Meaning
L
Loop next clip. The clip loops until the Resume input is activated or a serial play command is received,
whereupon the next entry in the Playlist is played.
L
C
Loop to Completion. Works just like the Loop command, "L", and causes the file number following the
command to loop. The ’C’ indicates that when a Serial Play or a Parallel Resume is issued, the file will
complete the current iteration of the loop before transition to the next item in the playlist instead of
transitioning immediately.
W
Wait. Play stops at the end of current clip until the Resume input is activated or a serial play command is
received, whereupon the next entry in the Playlist is played.
U
Uninterruptible. Causes the DVM2 to ignore the Resume input and serial Play command while playing. It still
processes them when waiting, paused or stilled.
I
Interruptible. Allows the Resume input or serial Play command to skip to the next clip. This is the power-up
default.
S
Switch to Seamless Playback mode (default). Video clips will transition seamlessly when listed consecutively
with no other playlist commands separating them. The playing LED and relay will stay on during the transition
between clips.
G
Switch to Segmented Playback mode. Video clips will transition with approximately one quarter second of the
previous clip’ s last frame stilled on screen. The playing LED and relay will switch off during the transition
between clips.
O
Turn Playing output On. Playing output will normally be on when a clip is playing. This option allows you to
turn the output on, even if a clip is not playing, to trigger an external device (animation, lighting, etc.)
N
Turn Playing output Off. Playing output will normally be on when a clip is playing. This option allows you to
turn the output off, even if a clip is playing, to trigger an external device (animation, lighting, etc.)
_
Mute audio
~
(Tilde) Unmute audio
-
Disable video output. The video output will remain black during playback until a ‘+’ character is encountered.
Audio is unaffected.
+
Enable video output. This is the power-up default.
<
Repeat entire Playlist. The only way to stop the Playlist from looping is to use the Stop input or serial
command, or to start another file. Anything in the Playlist after the ‘<’ character is ignored.
;
Comment. Ignore all characters until the next carriage return.
An
This allows you to change the rate dynamically between videos with different sample frequencies. Where n is
the same as the ‘n’ in the nAR serial commands. Please see serial section for details. n=0,1,2,3,4,5
Playlists
Commands may be entered into the Playlist in either upper or lower case. All
text following a semicolon (;) is interpreted as comments, until the next carriage
return. You may put anything you want in comments, including the special
command characters normally used in the Playlist.
The discrete Resume
input and serial Play
command change
functions when using a
Playlist.
When the Digital Video Machine 2 is processing a Playlist, the discrete
Resume input and the serial play command take on different meanings,
depending upon whether the unit is playing, paused, stilled or waiting.
Here is how the discrete Resume input and serial play command behave:
Mode
Interruptible
Uninterruptible
Playing
Immediately play next file
Ignored
Paused (black screen)
Play from current frame
Play from current frame
Stilled (still frame)
Play from current frame
Play from current frame
Waiting
Play next file
Play next file
One thing to be cautious of is the unintended endless loop. For example, if a
Playlist contains a U followed by an L command, it doesn’ t matter how many
more clips may occur in it, there is no way to get to them! When using the U
command, always include an I command before the next L, unless this is the
desired behavior. Of course, you can always terminate the loop with a stop
command, or by selecting a different file.
Play
Lists
Playlists may contain references to other Playlists, but as soon as such a
reference is encountered the new Playlist begins execution, and the old one is
abandoned.
Playlists can be called from inside a Schedule.
Playlists
71
Example Playlist
i,1,L6,37,w,-,415,+,5,60 <
The Playlist is a list of numbers representing the file numbers of video or audio
clips. The list can also contain special control codes or symbols to govern
playback. The list can be arranged all on the same line, as shown above, or
vertically as shown below.
I
1
L6
37
w
415
+
5
60
<
;You can comment your Playlist file by using
;semicolons. All text after a semicolon is
;ignored until the end of the line where a
;carriage return is encountered.
;The non-digit characters you see are special
;control commands which are described below.
The “ i” character places the Digital Video Machine 2 into “ interruptible” mode,
which means that the unit will respond to discrete Resume inputs and serial play
commands by jumping immediately to the next entry in the list. The unit
remains in interruptible mode until a “ u” character is encountered, which in this
example is never – the entire list is interruptible.
Clip numbers may
be 1 - 5 digits long.
Leading zeroes are
ignored.
Next, the unit plays clip #1. This clip will be interrupted by clip #6 if the user
presses the Resume button or issues a serial Play command.
When clip #1 is done, the unit loops clip #6 continuously until the user presses
Resume or issues a Play command.
After the Resume, clip #37 plays. When the clip is complete, the “ w” causes the
Digital Video Machine 2 to wait for another Resume input or Play command.
Upon Resuming, the video gets blacked out by the “ -“ character, then clip #415
plays (we hear audio only), and the video is restored by the “ +” character.
The unit continues straight into clip #5 followed by clip #60, at which point the
list loops back to the beginning, continuing straight into clip #1.
72
Playlists
Seamless Playlists
Moving between MPEG-1,
MPEG-2, NTSC, and PAL
video formats must be done
in Segmented Playback
mode.
In Seamless Playback mode, the DVM2 will seamlessly transition
from one video clip to another in a playlist. It is important to
understand the usage of this mode as well as Segmented Playback
mode. The Playlist Command Summary earlier in this section
describes the behavior of the ‘S’ and ‘G’ commands in detail. If
any command separates file numbers in Seamless mode (including
the ‘S’ command to enter Seamless mode), that transition will be
segmented.
Examples of Seamless and
Segmented Playlists
Seamlessly play clips 1 and 2 in a continuous loop:
1, 2, <
Play clips 1 and 2 seamlessly, then transition to clip 3 in segmented mode and
loop continuously (transition at playlist loop point will be segmented because a
command separates file numbers 3 and 1).
1, 2, G, 3, S, <
Play
Lists
Play clips 1 and 2 seamlessly, mute video, then make a segmented transition to
clip 3.
1, 2, -, 3
Playlists
73
74
Playlists
Real Time Scheduler
The DVM2’ s Real Time Scheduler is an amazingly powerful tool for
automating your videos. This section will enable you to take full advantage of
these easy-to-use features.
DVM2 Hardware Requirements
If you purchased your DVM2 prior to December of 1999, you will probably
need a hardware update in order to use the Real Time Scheduler. If you do not
intend to use the scheduler, no hardware update is required. Alcorn McBride
will perform any necessary hardware update at no charge. You can check your
unit’ s compatibility by setting the date and time from the Date and Time web
page on the unit and then power cycling the DVM2. If the date and time are
correct, no update is necessary.
DVM2 Operating System
Requirements
The Real Time Scheduler function of the DVM2 was implemented in version
0.66 of the DVM2 operating system. If you have an earlier version of the OS,
you must upgrade your unit to take advantage of this feature. To get the latest
DVM2 operating system, go to www.alcorn.com/products/dvm2/osupdate.html.
Schedule File Format
The DVM2 scheduler is controlled using a schedule file named schedule.csv
which resides in the root directory of the drive. The schedule is loaded once, at
power up. The schedule file is a standard comma separated file, which can be
created and edited using Microsoft Excel or any standard text editor. When
using Excel, be sure to save the file in the comma separated format.
Real Time Scheduler
Scheduler
The scheduler divides the day into fifteen-minute blocks. When the time
advances into a new block, the scheduler checks to see if there is a new
scheduled event. If there is, when the current clip finishes playing, the new
scheduled event is executed.
75
Scheduler Command Summary
The following table lists the commands that can be used in the schedule.csv file.
Command
Description
Comments
M or m
Start Monday Section
Every day of the schedule must begin
with a day of week command. Each
time and file number pair following a
day of week command will be scheduled
for that day of the week until another
day of week command is found.
T or t
Start Tuesday Section
W or w
Start Wednesday Section
H or h
or R or r
Start Thursday Section
F or f
Start Friday Section
S or s
Start Saturday Section
U or u
Start Sunday Section
nnnn
Time of Scheduled Event
Where nnnn represents the 24-hour time
to begin the event. For example, 11:00
AM is 1100 and 11:00 PM is 2300.
Times earlier than 1000 hours can be
represented with 3 digits.
e.g. 8:30 AM = 830 or 0830
A time must be followed by a file
number. All times must be multiples of
15 minutes. For example 1015 is a valid
time, but 1017 is not.
n[nnnn]
File number of Schedule
Event
The 1 to 5 digit file number of the file to
be played at the specified time. A file
number must be preceded by a time.
,
Standard separating
character
Can be used to separate any command
from another. New lines can also
separate commands.
;
Comment delimiter
Anything following this command on a
line will be considered a comment and
will not be used for schedule data.
76
Real Time Scheduler
Power-Up Behavior
At power up, the DVM2 begins playback of any playlist zero (ply00000.lst) or
video zero (vid00000.mpg) that is in the root directory of the drive. After this,
the schedule is loaded. The scheduler incorporates a “ look back” feature, which
allows the schedule to continue to operate, even after a power loss. It does this
in several ways:
If an item was scheduled for the fifteen-minute block in which the unit was
powered up, that item is immediately scheduled for playback.
If there is no item scheduled for the current fifteen-minute block, the scheduler
backs up to the last block that contained a scheduled item (this could be several
days before). If that last item was to loop a playlist, it is executed.
If a playlist or video zero was found and played on power up, then there is
already a clip playing when the “ look-back” is performed. This clip will be
allowed to finish before the scheduled item begins.
For example, suppose that there is a power loss at 3:00 PM on Saturday, that
there is a playlist zero that loops two videos, and that the last event in the
schedule prior to the restoration of power was at 9:00 AM on Saturday. On
power up, the first video in playlist zero will play to completion, then the event
scheduled for 9:00 AM will execute.
Seamless Transitions
Scheduler
The scheduler will never “ Cut off” a video. If the unit is already playing video
when it is time to play a new scheduled item, the currently video will finish
before playback of the scheduled item begins. If the scheduled item is a single
video, the transition to this video is seamless; in other words, there is no still
frame delay between the videos while the second video is searched. If the
scheduled item is a playlist, the last frame of the previous video remains onscreen approximately one fourth of a second while the DVM2 processes the
scheduled playlist.
Real Time Scheduler
77
Example Schedules
The following schedule plays file number 10 every day at 8:00 AM except on
Saturday and Sunday.
M
800, 10
T
800, 10
W
800, 10
H
800, 10
F
800, 10
The next example shows the use of comments in a schedule. This schedule
plays playlist 2078 on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 9:00 AM and 1:30 PM
and plays playlist 1078 at the same times on Tuesday and Thursday. On
weekends, there is a loop started in playlist 78 at 9:00 AM each day.
;XYZ Inc’ s Weekly Video Schedule
M
900, 2078 ;Playlist 2078 contains videos 10,20 and 30
1330, 2078
T
900, 1078 ;Playlist 1078 contains videos 40,50 and 60
1330, 1078
W
900, 2078
1330, 2078
H
900, 1078
1330, 1078
F
900, 2078
1330, 2078
S
900, 78
;Playlist 78 loops videos 10 and 60
U
;If there is a reboot between Saturday at 9:00 AM and
900, 78
;Monday at 9:00 AM, playlist 78 will restart
;End of schedule
78
Real Time Scheduler
Advanced Scheduler Commands
The Scheduler now has the ability to launch activities in the DVM2 besides
playback of video clips and playlists.
Load a New Schedule
Schedules are one week long, so what if you want to load a new one for the next
week?
Simply use the following naming convention for your schedule files:
SCHxxxxx.CSV where xxxxx is a number from 00000 to 99999. Then use the
command format below to load your new schedule.
Example:
;Sunday load SCH00002.CSV at 10pm.
If you want to automatically load your schedule upon bootup, make that
schedule SCH00000.CSV. What happens if you are three weeks into the month
and you have a 4 weeks worth of programming, and a blackout reboots the unit?
Not to worry. Upon loading a new schedule, the player actually copies the new
schedule to active_schedule.csv and then loads active_schedule.csv. Upon bootup the DVM2 attempts to find active_schedule.csv, sch00000.csv, then
schedule.csv in that order. Upon finding one of these, it stops looking any
further and loads the script as usual. Note, don’t ever write anything into
active_schedule.csv. It is a temporary file that gets copied over every time a
new schedule is loaded. Or, let’s say you are 6 weeks into an 8 week long
progression of schedule files, and you want to make a change to the current
week’s events. You’d probably have named your schedule files SCH00001.CSV
through SCH00008.CSV. Simply edit SCH00006.CSV and then copy it to
active_schedule.csv. Voilà, the next time you boot the unit, your changes will
have taken place, and you'
ll still be playing in week 6.
Launch an FTP Client
Execute an FTP script to download new content at a certain time of the week.
Example:
Real Time Scheduler
79
Scheduler
U
2000,N00002
W
745,P00003
;Wednesday launch ftp00003.txt
CD Update (DVM2/D version only)
Check for a CD and update the contents of the directory at a certain time of the
week. Instead of manually rebooting your DVM2D, you can schedule a CD
check every Saturday at 3am in the morning. Have your store owner drop in the
new CD and walk away. That night the DVM2 checks for a new CD at 3am. If
it finds one, it updates the files according to the command0.bat, then
automatically reboots incase you have autoexec playlists or videos.
Example:
U
2245,C
;Sunday Check for a CD at 1045pm
Scheduled Reboot
DVM2s manufactured since December 1999 can be rebooted using the
following scheduler command:
Example:
S
2000,X
;Reboot on Saturday at 800pm
Advanced Scheduler Commands Summary:
80
Real Time Scheduler
Command
Description
Comments
Nnnnnn
Load a new schedule
This uses the new naming convention
for schedules. (see above)
Pn[nnnn]
Start FTP client file
ftpnnnnn.txt
See FTP Client section above
C
Update from a CD
This extends the CD update feature of
DVM2/D models from doing an update
at reboot to doing an update at a
scheduled time.
X
Reboot
Reboots the unit.
Summary
Scheduler
The DVM2 Scheduler is obviously very powerful. Even we haven’ t figured out
all of the things it can be used for. If you come across an interesting application,
or are puzzled by its behavior in any way, please don’ t hesitate to email your
schedule and playlists to us.
Real Time Scheduler
81
82
Real Time Scheduler
File
Names
File Names
File names are represented in simple DOS 8.3 format – in other words, an eightcharacter name, a period, and then a three-character extension. The name is
typically made up of eight characters specifying the type (VID for audio/video
file, PLY for Playlist), and the number of the file (5 digits from 00000 to
99999). The three-character extension is used to tell the Digital Video Machine
2 the data format of the file. Supported formats are shown in the table below.
Extension
Format
.MPG
MPEG-2 Audio/Video file
.LST
Playlist
.CSV
Schedule
.BAT
Command File
Some example file names:
File Name
Any type of file may
be stored in the
DVM2, but only
those listed in the
table may be played.
File Names
Description
VID00001.MPG
Clip number one. MPEG-1 Video with stereo Audio.
PLY00002.LST
Playlist Number 2
SCH00003.CSV
Schedule (File 3)
COMMAND0.BAT
This file contains batch copy commands. See the
section on Command Files for more information.
Although any file may be copied from or to the internal drive in the
Digital Video Machine 2, only the above-described file formats and
file names may be played back. This allows archiving of ANY
information on the drive: CAD drawings, spreadsheets,
documentation, etc.
83
To avoid confusion,
don’t duplicate file
numbers.
File numbers are used to identify which file is to be played in
response to Select File serial commands or rear panel file selection
parallel inputs. File numbers contained on a drive should be unique,
regardless of the file type. In other words, you shouldn’ t have
PLY00002.LST and VID00002.MPG on the same drive. The two files
should have different numbers. If more than one file has the same
number, the first file found in the directory will be used.
Autoexec files are
invaluable in standalone applications.
File 00000 is an autoexec file. A file numbered 00000 is automatically
executed on power up. For example, Playlist PLY00000.LST will start
as soon as the Digital Video Machine 2 is turned on. If the loop input
is strapped on, or if the Playlist is designed to repeat, playback will
continue indefinitely.
The order of precedence for file execution is:
1.
Command File
2.
Schedule
3.
Random Playlist
4.
Playlist
5.
Video
Long file names and file names not containing numbers are not currently
supported.
Test Files
When shipped the DVM2 removable hard drive contains the following test files:
vid00001.mpg – NTSC 30 second National Geographic commercial (10Mbits/s)
vid00002.mpg – NTSC red, 2kHz tone, alignment grid, & blinks (sync test)
vid00004.mpg – NTSC green, 4kHz tone, alignment grid, & blinks (sync test)
vid00008.mpg – NTSC blue, 2kHz tone, alignment grid, & blinks (sync test)
vid00010.mpg – PAL red, 2kHz tone, alignment grid, & blinks (sync test)
vid00012.mpg – PAL green, 4kHz tone, alignment grid, & blinks (sync test)
vid00014.mpg – PAL blue, 2kHz tone, alignment grid, & blinks (sync test)
vid01001.mpg – NTSC SMPTE color bars with 1 kHz tone
vid01002.mpg – NTSC Projector Registration Pattern
Videos 1, 2, 4, 8, 10, 12, &14 are primarily for factory testing. You may delete
or rename any of these files as you wish. Videos 1001 and 1002 are common
video test patterns.
84
File Names
The later DVM2s’ also ship with a new Examples Directory on their harddrives.
It contains examples of how to set up commonly used playlists, schedules, and
FTP client scripts. It also contains a set of video clips you can use to test out
your schedules and playlists. In fact, some of the schedules we have created for
you already refer to these videos for your convenience. The videos have a black
background and a white number "1" through "12". If you want to use these
schedules and videos, copy them to the root directory of the unit.
Power-Up Operation
The order of power
up execution allows
the DVM2 to use the
removable drive to
update itself.
When power is first applied to the Digital Video Machine 2, it
initializes itself and performs a self-test. When it is ready, it flashes the
front panel LEDs in a “ traffic light” pattern (green, yellow, red). It then
checks to see if a clip or Playlist should be played, according to the
following priority:
•
If a COMMAND0.BAT file exists on the removable media, the DVM2 will
process the file.
•
If a Schedule exists on the hard drive, the DVM2 will load the Schedule.
•
If any clip or playlist has been hardwired at the Control Connector, the
DVM2 will play the file. The audio sample rate for this file will be the
default sample rate for the duration of the power cycle.
•
If a Playlist exists on the hard drive and it is named file 0, the DVM2 will
play the file. The audio sample rate of the first file in the playlist will be the
default sample rate for the duration of the power cycle.
•
If a Video exists on the hard drive and it is named file 0, the DVM2 will
play the file. The audio sample rate of this file will be the default sample
rate for the duration of the power cycle.
•
If no auto executing files exist on the drive the DVM2 will automatically
search for the lowest numbered video clip and retrieve the audio sample rate
information for that file. This audio sample rate will be used as the default
sample rate for the duration of the power cycle.
85
Power Up
Examples Directory
Soft Reboot
This performs a reboot just like the one achieved when recycling power.
DVM2 Hardware Requirements
The DVM2 requires a hardware upgrade to implement the soft reboot option. If
you try the serial or web reboot commands below and the hardware is NOT
upgraded yet, you’ll get an informational message telling you that you need to
have it upgraded for the feature.
How to cause a soft reboot of the unit:
86
•
Pioneer serial command: XX<carriage return>
•
Ethernet UDP command: XX<carriage return>
•
Web page support: Remotely Reboot by pressing a web button on the
Maintenance page
•
Scheduler supported Reboot the DVM2 at a certain time of the week.
(read more in scheduler section)
•
FTP client script "REBOOT" entry at bottom of script. Don’t use QUIT
then REBOOT. Just use REBOOT. It quits the session for you and
then reboots.
Soft Reboot
FTP Client
The DVM2 now supports an FTP client that gets initiated by the scheduler, as described below. It
operates by reading in a text file, which has an FTP script inside of it. The filename convention is
ftpxxxxx.txt. Here’ s and example of one:
ftp00003.txt
CONNECT 216.122.40.9 dvm2client1 password
TYPE I
GET vid00001.mpg vid00001.mpg
QUIT
The commands available for the FTP client are:
Command
Data1
Data2
Data 3
Description/Comment
CONNECT
IP address
Username
Password
This must be the first line. It is used to log into the FTP
server you are trying to reach. Note the IP address must be
an IP address – not a URL. Ex 192.168.0.200 is correct
TYPE
I, A
GET
Remote
Filename
Local
Filename
You have to have both. GET README.TXT
README.TXT for example
PUT
Local
Filename
Remote
Filename
You have to have both. PUT README.TXT
README.TXT for example
CWD
Directory
Change to this directory
DELETE
Remote
Filename
Deletes that file
Sets the mode to binary or ASCII. Binary mode is necessary
for videos, ASCII mode is necessary for text files.
QUIT
Exit the FTP session
DISCONN
Same as QUIT, just whatever your preference is…
REBOOT
Use this INSTEAD of QUIT to log out and then reboot
your DVM2 automatically.
FTP Client
87
To update the
contents of the
internal drive from
the optional DVDROM drive, use a
Command File.
A Command File is a simple yet powerful way to automatically update
the contents of one or many Digital Video Machine 2’ s in the field,
without using a laptop or other external device. If your DVM2 has the
optional DVD-ROM drive installed, just insert a CD-ROM or DVDROM into the drive that contains your new video files, playlists, real
time scheduler files or any other files you wish to store on the DVM2
like equipment diagrams, or installer notes along with a command file
and the Digital Video Machine 2 automatically updates the internal
drive itself.
Use the Update
command to replace
existing files or the
Copy command to
copy new files onto
the drive.
When power is applied to the Digital Video Machine 2, the DVM2
searches for a command file named “ command0.bat” on the disk in the
DVD-ROM drive. If found, this file will be processed before any other
power-up operations take place. The command file supports the
processing of an Update command (U) or a Copy command (C).
Command
Files
Command Files
If a ‘U’ appears in the file, the Digital Video Machine 2 will automatically
search for any files on the internal drive that match those on the DVD-ROM
drive. It then overwrites the matching files on the internal drive with those
from the DVD-ROM drive.
Just as with playlists and schedules, you can add any comments you wish to the
command file that will not affect the update operation. Placing a ‘;’ on any line
in the file will cause the rest of that line to be ignored.
Example of a command0.bat command file using the update command:
U ; This command will update all existing files on the DVM2 with
; matching files from this DVD-ROM.
If a ‘C’ character appears in the file, the Digital Video Machine 2 will copy all
of the files from the DVD-ROM drive (except command0.bat) onto the internal
drive but will not overwrite any existing files. Place the letter ‘O’ in the file to
force overwriting of existing files that have the same names as those on the
CD/DVD-ROM.
Example of a command0.bat command file using the copy and overwrite
command:
O, C ; These commands will copy every file from this DVD-ROM (except
; this command file) onto the DVM2’ s drive. Any existing files that
; match the ones on this disk will be overwritten.
Removing the ‘O’ from this example would prevent any existing files from
being overwritten.
Command Files
89
During a media update, the green LED on the left, front panel will continue to
flash just as it was before the update began. The yellow LED just below the
green will begin to flash along with it in an alternating pattern. Once the update
has completed, the DVM2 will finish the “ Traffic Light” LED sequence. After
this sequence, it is safe to remove the CD/DVD-ROM disk from the drive.
There is no real need to remove the media update, however, because the DVM2
checks the date and time of any removable media files to be copied against those
already on the disk and will not update the same files again at the next power
cycle. Only when a new media update is placed in the DVD-ROM drive and the
unit is power cycled will another update take place.
Just insert the
media update,
power cycle
and you’re
done!
90
All updates from the DVD-ROM drive will take place before any other power-up files are
processed. This means that updates to a Real Time Scheduler file or a playlist #0 will take effect
as soon as the update finishes without having to cycle power again.
Command Files
Example Applications
The later DVM2s’ also ship with a new Examples Directory on their harddrives.
It contains examples of how to set up commonly used playlists, schedules, and
FTP client scripts. It also contains a set of video clips you can use to test out
your schedules and playlists. In fact, some of the schedules we have created for
you already refer to these videos for your convenience. The videos have a black
background and a white number "1" through "12". If you want to use these
schedules and videos, copy them to the root directory of the unit. This directory
is also available on our website in the DVM2 section or search for DVM2
Examples in the Knowledge Base.
Retail Display
The DVM2 can function as a stand-alone video player in a retail or themed
environment. Simply connect the video out from the DVM2 to a monitor or
video projector and the audio outputs to speakers contained within the monitor
or to external speakers.
To control the playback of video on your DVM2, simply create a looping
Playlist that will play your video(s) in order. Flip the DVM2 power switch to on
and it will play endlessly until you turn it off. For example. the following line, if
saved in a file named PLY00000.LST will play file #1, #2, and #3 and will loop
this sequence indefinitely.
1,2,3 <
To update your video, you have several options:
Example Applications
•
Change the removable hard drive to another drive with the new
material.
•
Take the removable hard drive out. Place it in your PC and copy the
new material to the drive. Replace the drive in the DVM2. (Requires
removable drive bay for PC – sold separately).
•
Connect the DVM2 to a network via the Ethernet port on the rear of the
unit. Copy the video onto the drive via FTP.
91
Example
Apps
Examples Directory
92
Example Applications
The following table contains a listing of the cables shown in the previous
diagram for the Projection Display example:
From
To
A
DVM2, RGBS Connector (HDB15
Female), pin 1 (Red)
Projector, RGBHV Input, Red
(BNC/HDB15)
B
DVM2, RGBS Connector (HDB15
Female), pin 2 (Green)
Projector, RGBHV Input, Green
(BNC/HDB15)
C
DVM2, RGBS Connector (HDB15
Female), pin 3 (Blue)
Projector, RGBHV Input, Blue
(BNC/HDB15)
D
DVM2, RGBS Connector (HDB15
Female), pin 13 (H-Sync)
Projector, RGBHV Input, H-Sync
(BNC/HDB15)
E
DVM2, RGBS Connector (HDB15
Female), pin 14 (V-Sync)
Projector, RGBHV Input, V-Sync
(BNC/HDB15)
F
DVM2, Balanced Audio Output
(DB25 Female) pin 1(Left Main -)
Audio Amplifier, Left Channel input
(XLR), pin 2
DVM2, Balanced Audio Output
(DB25 Female) pin 14 (Left Main +)
Audio Amplifier, Left Channel input
(XLR), pin 1
Example
Apps
Cable
DVM2, Balanced Audio Output
(DB25 Female) pin 2 (Shield)
G
DVM2, Balanced Audio Output
(DB25 Female) pin 3 (Right Main -)
Audio Amplifier, Right Channel input
(XLR), pin 2
DVM2, Balanced Audio Output
(DB25 Female) pin 16 (Right Main +)
Audio Amplifier, Right Channel input
(XLR), pin 1
DVM2, Balanced Audio Output
(DB25 Female) pin 4 (Shield)
H-M
Audio Amplifier Output
Speakers
N
DVM2, Ethernet Connector (RJ-45)
Ethernet Router, Port (RJ-45)
Notes:
•
Example Applications
Please consult your specific hardware documentation for the appropriate
connectors and pinouts
93
Kiosk
The DVM2 can also be used to operate a kiosk in a retail or themed
environment.
94
Example Applications
The following table contains a listing of the cables shown in the previous
diagram for the Kiosk example:
Cable
From
To
DVM2, Audio Output Left (RCA)
Powered Speaker, Input
B
Button 1, Contact 1, through Diodes
DVM2, Discrete Control Connector
(DB37) pin 5 (File Select 1)
Button 1, Contact 2
DVM2, Discrete Control Connector
(DB37) pin 27 (Ground)
Button 2, Contact 1, through Diodes
DVM2, Discrete Control Connector
(DB37) pin 6 (File Select 2)
Button 2, Contact 2
DVM2, Discrete Control Connector
(DB37) pin 27 (Ground)
Button 3, Contact 1, through Diodes
DVM2, Discrete Control Connector
(DB37) pin 5 (File Select 1) and pin 6
(File Select 2)
Button 3, Contact 2
DVM2, Discrete Control Connector
(DB37) pin 27 (Ground)
Button 4, Contact 1, through Diodes
DVM2, Discrete Control Connector
(DB37) pin 7 (File Select 4)
Button 4, Contact 2
DVM2, Discrete Control Connector
(DB37) pin 27 (Ground)
DVM2, Composite Out (RCA/BNC)
Monitor, Video In (RCA or BNC)
C
Example Applications
Example
Apps
A
95
Video Wall
The DVM2 can also be used as the video source for a Video Wall.
96
Example Applications
The following table contains a listing of the cables shown in the previous
diagram for the Video Wall example:
Cable
From
To
V16+, Serial Ports 1-12 (DB9 Male)
DVM2, Pioneer Port (DB15 Female)
M-R
Audio Amplifier
Speakers
S
DVM2 #1, Sync Output (BNC)
Video Distribution Amplifier, Input
(BNC)
S1
Video Distribution Amplifier, Output #1
(BNC)
DVM2 #1-4 Sync Input (BNC) – Daisychain from C-Sync Loop to Sync In of
next DVM2
S2
Video Distribution Amplifier, Output #2
(BNC)
DVM2 #5-8, V16+ Sync Input (BNC) –
Daisy-chain from C-Sync Loop to Sync In
of next DVM2
S3
Video Distribution Amplifier, Output #3
(BNC)
DVM2 #9-12, Sync Input (BNC) – Daisychain from C-Sync Loop to Sync In of
next DVM2
T
DVM2 #5, Balanced Audio Output
(DB25 Female) pin 1(Left Main +)
Audio Amplifier, Left Channel input
(XLR), pin 2
DVM2 #5, Balanced Audio Output
(DB25 Female) pin 2 (Left Main -)
Audio Amplifier, Left Channel input
(XLR), pin 1
Example
Apps
A-L
DVM2 #5, Balanced Audio Output
(DB25 Female) pin 3 (Shield)
U
DVM2 #5, Balanced Audio Output
(DB25 Female) pin 5(Right Main +)
Audio Amplifier, Right Channel input
(XLR), pin 2
DVM2 #5, Balanced Audio Output
(DB25 Female) pin 6 (Right Main -)
Audio Amplifier, Right Channel input
(XLR), pin 1
DVM2 #5, Balanced Audio Output
(DB25 Female) pin 7 (Shield)
V1-V12
DVM2, Composite Video Output (BNC)
Monitor, Video Input (BNC)
Notes:
Example Applications
•
Some video wall cubes may use an RGBHV input instead of a Composite
input. Please consult your video wall documentation and use the RGBHV
connector on the DVM2, if necessary.
•
Some designers prefer to use an external video sync generator with a video
distribution amplifier to provide the sync to the DVM2s. This involves a
separate cable run from the video distribution amplifier to each DVM2’ s
Sync input. As a general rule, it is best to use a maximum of 4 outputs from
each sync source.
•
Please consult your specific hardware documentation for the appropriate
connectors and pinouts.
97
98
Example Applications
Making Videos
What Is An MPG File?
The Digital Video Machine 2 plays MPG files that contain digital
video encoded in high-resolution by an algorithm known as
“ MPEG-2” .
Many encoding systems produce MPG files, but not all MPG files may
be played on the DVM2. Many MPG files are designed for playback in
a small window on a PC, or for transfer over the internet. These MPG
files are generally of very low resolution at slow frame rates.
Making
Videos
MPG is short for
MPEG, which
stands for Motion
Picture Experts
Group, the
organization that
codified the
audio/video
compression scheme
used in the DVM2.
The Digital Video Machine 2 is designed to accept MPG files encoded
at a resolution of 720 x 480 (NTSC) or 720 x 576 (PAL).
The Digital Video Machine 2 can play MPG files encoded at bit rates
up to 10.0 Megabits per second. Since higher bit rates equate to better
picture quality, we encourage you to encode your video at the highest
bit rate supported.
How Do I Make an MPG File?
The most important step in creating video for your application is to perform the
highest quality MPEG encoding of your source material.
Encoding professional-quality MPEG material is more of an art than a science.
The person encoding the material must be experienced and the hardware wellchosen, so users deciding whether or not to encode their material themselves
should put a lot of thought into what would best suit their needs.
The quality of
encoded video
depends upon the
quality of the source
video, the encoding
system used, and the
skill of the operator.
Making Videos
Although encoding your own video is very cost effective and surprisingly
straightforward, only an experienced individual can create the highest-quality
MPEG. Video material encoded without regard to bleeding colors and motion
artifacts will include them, so it is important for the user to decide whether these
elements are acceptable. A good alternative to hiring an on-staff MPEG expert
(or becoming one yourself) is to hire an experienced post-production house to
encode and format your video for you. All you have to do is to provide a Digital
Betacam or D-1 master and they do the rest!
99
MPEG-2 Formats
The MPEG-2 Program Stream
The DVM2 plays MPEG-2 Program Streams. This stream is a Variable or
Constant bitrate stream containing both audio and video. In order to achieve
playback of video only, you must encode an elementary stream of silent audio
that will be combined with your elementary video stream to create a program
stream. A program stream is not the same as a DVD VOB file. The DVM2
does not play VOB files.
What is a Variable Bitrate?
Unlike MPEG-1, which uses a constant bitrate, MPEG-2 supports variable
bitrate program streams. This means that the encoding process scales the bitrate
up and down depending on quality needs. A scene with a tremendous amount of
movement requires more bits than a much more still scene.
Program Stream:
Mux Bit Rate:
10.0 Mbits/s max
The stream should be authored according to ISO 13818-1 Format
MPEG-2 Video:
Picture Format
SIF-NTSC: 240 lines by 352
pixels
SIF-PAL: 288 lines by 352 pixels
HalfD1-NTSC: 480 lines by 352
pixels
HalfD1-PAL: 576 lines by 352
pixels
CCIR-NTSC: 480 lines by 704(or
720) pixels
CCIR-PAL: 576 lines by 704(or
720) pixels
Chroma Format
4:2:0
MPEG-1 Audio (Layer I or II):
100
Sample Rate:
44.1 KHz or 48KHz
Emphasis:
Off
Mode:
Stereo
Making Videos
Audio Behavior
Power-Up Operation
Audio Formats
After this power-up operation, all files will be played using these parameters,
unless the parameters are manually set using the AR command, or unless the
autodetect feature is turned on. Please note that when autodetect is on, the
playback of every file will be delayed by a fraction of a second while the DVM2
determines its audio settings.
Set Audio Rate:
0AR<cr>
1AR<cr>
2AR<cr>
3AR<cr>
4AR<cr>
5AR<cr>
Autodetect On
Sample Rate = 32KHz
Sample Rate = 44.1KHz
Sample Rate = 48KHz
AC3 mode, Stream ID (SID) must = 80
Go back to MPEG Audio Mode, set sample rate and SID from next
clip that is searched. (Thus is different from 0AR, in that it keeps
that setting after the first search)
Get Audio Rate:
AR<cr>
Response Format: Current Audio Rate prefix : Audio SID
For Example:
1:C0 – The 1 means you are at 32KHz and the C0 denotes a SID of C0
2:CC – The 2 means you are at 44.1KHz and the CC denotes a SID of CC
3:DC – The 3 means you are at 48KHz and the DC denotes a SID of DC
4:80 – The 4 means you are at 48KHz and the 80 denotes a SID of 80 in AC3
mode.
If you have just told the DVM2 to auto-detect, the response is the set of freq and
SID the DVM2 currently has. They will be changed during every search.
Audio Behavior
101
Audio
Behavior
The DVM2 decides at power up what type of audio (MPEG or Dolby
Digital bitstream) and at what audio bit rate to play. It does this by checking
the dvm.ini file for MPEG vs. AC3, then if in MPEG mode, auto-detecting the
audio rate of file 0 (either an automatically executed clip or the first clip played
by a playlist). If there is no file 0, then the unit finds the lowest numbered video
file on the drive and determines its audio type. (If the lowest numbered file on
the drive is a very large number, it can take a while to find it. We suggest using
file number 1 for this purpose.) If there are no numbered files, then the
autodetect feature is engaged the first time that a file is played, and then it turned
back off again.
Dolby Digital bitstreams default to an audio rate to 48KHz.
Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Sound
The DVM2 supports output of Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Sound bitstreams as
well as standard 2 channel MPEG audio. The DVM2 does not default to Dolby
Digital mode, so read the Audio Formats section to understand how the unit
treats them differently and how to put the DVM2 into Dolby Digital Bistream
mode.
DVM2 Hardware Requirements
The DVM2 outputs a Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Sound encoded bitstream on
the digital audio output on the rear of the unit. (The DVM2/L and DVM2/V do
not support this feature.) To decode the bitstream you will need an external
Dolby Digital decoder.
DVM2 Operating System Requirements
Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Sound support was implemented in version 0.66 of
the DVM2 operating system. If you have an earlier version of the OS, you need
to upgrade your unit before you can use this feature. To get the latest DVM2
operating system, go to www.alcorn.com/products/dvm2/osupdate.html.
Analog Output
The DVM2 analog audio outputs are inactive when playing a video file with a
Dolby Digital audio bitstream.
Audio Stream ID (SID)
The DVM2 requires the Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Sound stream to have an
MPEG stream ID of 0x80. This is generally the default used when producing
Dolby Digital bitstreams. If the stream ID of your Dolby Digital bitstream is not
0x80, no audio will be output.
Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Multiplexing
We are often asked how to multiplex Dolby Digital bitstreams (also called AC-3
streams) into the MPEG-2 program stream. One program with which we have
had good success is called DVD Quick Builder. It is produced by
AuthoringWare Co. and can be purchased from BernClare Multimedia
(www.bernclare.com).
102
Audio Behavior
Operational Notes
File Size Limitation
Op. Notes
The DVM2 has a FAT32 operating system, and as a result for earlier versions of
the operating system the unit cannot handle videos that are larger than 2GB in
size. With the release of .70. it can handle up to 4GB file sizes. If you need to
play material that results in a file larger than 4GB, split it into pieces and use a
seamless playlist.
Operational Notes
103
Specifications
Video
720 x 480 (NTSC), 720 x 576 (PAL) resolution
704 x 480 (NTSC), 704 x 576 (PAL) resolution
Up to 10.0 Mbits/sec (including audio)
25 fps (PAL), 29.97 fps (NTSC)
4:2:0
Audio
16 bit stereo linear sampling
44.1KHz or 48KHz sample rate or AC3
20-20KHz Frequency Response
Unbalanced, 2V P-P max into 20K
Balanced
Playback Time
2.4 hours (10.2 GB) IDE drive (10 Megabit/sec)
Response Time
Specs
Less than 33 msec, however video playback response depends upon encoding.
Typical video playback in less than 0.5 seconds.
Power
+5V at 3 Amps max.
+12V at 2 Amps max.
-12V at 0.3 Amps max.
Connector: 5-pin DIN
Adapter for 115 or 230 volts provided.
115/230 volts, 50/60 Hz, 25 W max.
Physical
19” Wx 17” D x 1.75” H
10 lbs
0oC (32oF) to 38oC (100oF), free air circulation.
0-90% relative humidity, non-condensing
1g max Vibration (with internal IDE drive)
Specifications
105
Switches and Indicators
Front panel - 7 LEDs for Status.
Rear panel – Dual piano switches for Ground Lift, 75 Ohm Termination.
Rear panel – Eight DIP switches for Contact Closure/Voltage Inputs, PAL/NTSC, Serial Protocol Select,
Password Reset, Video Select.
Connectors
Rear Panel:
DB-9F Sony RS-422 serial I/O connector.
DB-37F parallel and serial I/O connector.
DB-15F Pioneer Serial I/O connector.
DB-25F Sony LDP Serial I/O connector.
DB-25M Balanced Audio Outputs connector.
RJ-45 10-Base T Ethernet connector.
5-pin DIN MIDI In
2x2 RCA-Type Phono connectors – Front Right, Front Left, Right Auxiliary, Left Auxiliary.
1x2 RCA-Type Phono connectors – AES/EBU Digital Audio Out, Video Out.
2x2 BNCs – Sync In, Sync Loop-through, Genlock Out, Video Out.
S-Video
HDB-15 RGB/YUV Video Out.
5-pin DIN Power
Part Numbers
Digital Video Machine 2, with removable hard drive, Part Number 230-100330
Digital Video Machine 2/L, with removable hard drive, Part Number 230-100499
Digital Video Machine 2/D, with removable hard drive, Part Number 230-100624
Digital Video Machine 2, with removable hard drive, secondary internal hard drive, Part Number 230-100480
Digital Video Machine 2 spare hard drive in carrier (black), Part Number 790-001057
Digital Video Machine 2 docking station (cream), Part Number 790-001056
Mating Connector and Housing for DB-37F, Solder Cup, Part Number 230-100376
106
Specifications
Index
A
Active Mode Request ....................................................................32
Addressable Commands ................................................................29
AMINet .........................................................................................63
Audio.......................................................................................98, 99
Audio Control................................................................................31
autoexec...........................................................21, 30, 39, 42, 45, 82
B
Balanced Audio .............................................................................25
baud .............................................................................29, 38, 42, 44
Baud Rate ......................................................................................57
Betacam.........................................................................................97
Bitrate............................................................................................98
C
Index
CCIR-NTSC ..................................................................................98
CCIR-PAL.....................................................................................98
Checksum......................................................................................64
Chroma Format .............................................................................98
&RPPDQG%\WHV .................................................................36, 39, 42, 45
Command File ...............................................................................87
Command0.bat ..............................................................................87
comments ....................................................................30, 36, 39, 42
Component Video .........................................................................16
Composite Video...........................................................................24
Connectors.............................................................................15, 104
Contact Closure .........................................................2, 6, 15, 20, 23
contact closures .............................................................................22
D
D-1 ................................................................................................97
DB-25..........................................................................18, 25, 29, 38
DB-37......................................................................................38, 42
DB-9........................................................................................18, 42
Delete File .....................................................................................34
Device ID ..........................................................................32, 55, 56
Digital Audio.........................................................................25, 100
Disable video.................................................................................68
Dolby Digital...............................................................................100
Index
107
DOS.............................................................................................. 81
DVD ............................................................................................. 87
E
Enable video ................................................................................. 68
encoding ....................................................................................... 97
error codes .................................................................................... 35
Ethernet ............................ 2, 11, 27, 49, 51, 52, 54, 63, 89, 91, 104
Example Applications .................................................................. 89
F
FAT32 .......................................................................................... 49
Fault.............................................................................................. 23
file extension ................................................................................ 81
File List Request........................................................................... 33
File names .................................................................................... 81
Firmware Version......................................................................... 36
Frequency Response................................................................... 103
FTP........................................................................................... 6, 60
G
Gateway Address Request ............................................................ 33
Gateway Address Set.................................................................... 33
Getting Started................................................................................ 5
Ground Lift................................................................................... 14
H
HalfD1-NTSC .............................................................................. 98
HalfD1-PAL ................................................................................. 98
hum............................................................................................... 14
I
interlaced ...................................................................................... 26
Internet ......................................................................................... 51
Interruptible ............................................................................ 20, 68
Intranet ......................................................................................... 51
IP Address .............................................................. 9, 51, 52, 55, 61
IP Address Request ...................................................................... 33
IP Address Set .............................................................................. 33
K
Kiosk ............................................................................................ 92
L
LAN.............................................................................................. 54
laser disc................................................................. 1, 17, 30, 39, 42
108
Index
LED Meaning................................................................................11
Loop ..................................................................................31, 36, 68
LST................................................................................................81
M
MIDI............................................................1, 2, 15, 19, 44, 57, 104
MPEG..............................................................................................6
MPEG-1 ........................................................................................97
MPEG-2 ........................................................................2, 81, 97, 98
MPG ........................................................................................81, 97
N
noise ..............................................................................................14
NTSC ..........................................................................2, 14, 15, 103
O
Operating System ..........................................................................60
P
Index
PAL .............................................................................2, 14, 15, 103
Parallel Control .............................................................................20
Parallel Outputs .............................................................................23
parity ...........................................................................29, 38, 42, 44
Password ...........................................................................16, 56, 61
Pause .............................................................................................36
Pioneer ......................................................15, 17, 29, 36, 38, 42, 57
Pioneer Error Codes ......................................................................35
Play......................................................30, 38, 39, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46
Play List ......................................................................12, 20, 67, 70
Playing ..........................................................................................23
PLC .........................................................................................20, 23
Power ..........................................................................................103
Power Connector ...........................................................................13
power-up ............................................21, 30, 39, 42, 45, 75, 83, 99
Program Stream.............................................................................98
progressive ....................................................................................26
protocol .............................................................................29, 38, 42
R
Real Time Clock......................................................................56, 73
Real Time Scheduler ...............................................................73, 74
removable drive.......................................................................49, 83
Rename File ..................................................................................34
Repeat............................................................................................68
Resolution .............................................................................98, 103
Resume..................................................................31, 40, 43, 45, 68
Retail Display................................................................................89
Index
109
RGB.............................................................................. 2, 16, 26, 57
RS-232.............................................................................. 29, 38, 42
RS-422............................................................................................ 2
S
Sample Rate.................................................................... 32, 98, 103
Seamless ....................................................................................... 75
Seamless Playlist .................................................................... 68, 71
Search ............................................................. 30, 36–37, 39, 42, 45
Segmented Playlist ................................................................. 68, 71
Select File ................................................................... 30, 39, 42, 45
Serial Control ............................................................................... 29
Serial Protocol ........................................................................ 36, 57
SIF-NTSC..................................................................................... 98
SIF-PAL ....................................................................................... 98
Sony............................................................................ 15, 18, 38, 57
Sony Professional ............................................................. 18, 42, 57
Specifications ............................................................................. 103
stereo .................................................................................... 98, 103
Still ............................................... 31, 36, 38, 40, 42, 43, 44, 45, 69
Stop ...................................................................... 31, 40, 43, 45, 46
Subnet Mask Request ................................................................... 34
Subnet Mask Set........................................................................... 34
S-Video......................................................................... 2, 16, 26, 57
Synchronization............................................................................ 24
T
TCP/IP.............................................................................. 51, 52, 53
Technical Support........................................................................... 3
Test Files .......................................................................... 82, 83, 89
U
UDP........................................................................................ 63, 64
Uninterruptible ............................................................................. 68
V
Version Request ........................................................................... 33
Vibration..................................................................................... 103
Video Control ......................................................................... 31, 36
Video Setup .................................................................................. 57
Video Termination ....................................................................... 14
Video Update.................................................................... 12, 49, 87
Video Wall ................................................................................... 94
voltage inputs ......................................................................... 20, 23
VTR................................................................................................ 1
110
Index
Y
Index
YUV ......................................................................2, 16, 27, 57, 104
Index
111