Apple | Power Macintosh 6500/300 | Specifications | Apple Power Macintosh 6500/300 Specifications

K Service Source
Power Macintosh/Server
G3 Minitower
K Service Source
Hot Issues
Power Macintosh/Server G3
Minitower
Hot Issues
Introduction - 1
Introduction
This chapter is designed to highlight unique or highpriority product issues that you should be aware of before
servicing the Power Macintosh G3 Minitower or Macintosh
Server G3 computers.
This chapter alerts you to important issues and provides
links to other areas in the manual where more complete
information can be found. This chapter is not intended to
replace other parts of this manual; it merely provides a
pointer to pertinent information in those chapters.
To familiarize yourself with a new product family, always
read the Basics chapter in its entirety.
Hot Issues
Shared Logic Board - 2
Shared Logic Board
The Power Macintosh G3 Desktop, G3 Minitower, and
Macintosh Server G3 computers use the same logic board,
but there are jumper settings that differ between them (see
“Jumper Location J28” and “Jumper Location J16” in the
Troubleshooting chapter).
Processor Module Vs. Card
Whereas previous Power Macintosh computers featured a
user-installable processor card, this logic board uses a
processor module that must not be removed by the customer
(see “Processor Module” in the Take-Apart chapter).
Hot Issues
Power Supply Jumper - 3
Power Supply Jumper
The Power Macintosh/Server G3 Minitower logic board has
a power supply jumper installed at J28. The setting of this
jumper differs between the Power Mac G3 Desktop and
Power Mac/Server G3 Minitower models. Failure to install
this jumper in the correct position may result in a
computer that won’t boot up. (See “Jumper Location J28”
in the Troubleshooting chapter.)
Processor Module Jumper
The Power Mac/Server G3 logic board has a processor
module jumper installed at J16. The processor jumper is
color coded for the speed of processor module used. Failure
to install the correct jumper may result in a computer that
won’t boot up. (See “Jumper Location J16” in the
Hot Issues
Warranty Sticker - 4
Troubleshooting chapter.)
Warranty Sticker
There is a warranty sticker that covers the processor
module jumper. The customer’s warranty is void if this
sticker is tampered with. Service Providers must replace
this sticker if they have removed it during servicing to
protect the customer’s warranty. (See “Processor Module”
in the Take-Apart chapter.)
Power Supply Voltage Setting
There is a switch on the back of the power supply that
controls the voltage setting. The voltage switch must be set
correctly to avoid damaging the computer. (See “Voltage
Hot Issues
Voltage Regulator - 5
Switch” in the Basics chapter for more information,
including an international voltage chart.)
Voltage Regulator
There is a removable voltage regulator on the logic board,
which comes with the logic board and can also be ordered as a
separate module. (See “Voltage Regulator” in the
Troubleshooting chapter.)
I/O Card
Some I/O functions on the Power Mac/Server G3 logic board
are handled through a removable I/O card that must be
installed for the computer to operate properly. (See “I/O
Cards” in the Troubleshooting chapter.)
Hot Issues
ROM DIMM - 6
ROM DIMM
The Power Mac/Server G3 Minitower logic board uses a
ROM DIMM as opposed to soldered ROM. You should not
remove the ROM DIMM from the logic board. (See “Logic
Board” in the Take-Apart chapter for instructions on how to
prepare the logic board for return to Apple Computer.)
SDRAM DIMMs
The Power Mac/Server G3 Minitower uses SDRAM DIMMs.
DIMMs from older Macintosh computers, although they will
fit, are not compatible and should never be used in the Power
Mac/Server G3 computers. (See “SDRAM DIMMs” in the
Basics chapter and refer to the Power Macintosh G3
Minitower or Macintosh Server G3 sections of the Memory
Guide.)
Hot Issues
SGRAM Video Memory - 7
SGRAM Video Memory
Power Mac/Server G3 computers use SGRAM video memory.
Use only SGRAM SO-DIMMs in these machines. Never install
the 256K or 512K video memory DIMMs used in older
Macintosh computers. (See “SGRAM Video Memory” in the
Basics chapter.)
EIDE Bus Issue
If you have only one device connected to the EIDE bus, the
device must be plugged into the first EIDE connector on the
logic board (the one closer to the rear panel), which is
marked J9. If you plug the device into J10 and leave J9
empty, the device may not boot up. (See “Connecting EIDE
Devices to the Logic Board” in the Basics chapter.)
Hot Issues
Master/Slave Support - 8
Master/Slave Support
Some Power Mac/Server G3 computers support adding two
ATA/IDE devices to the same ATA/IDE channel, or what is
commonly known as master and slave. This configuration
provides user with the ability to add additional hard drives
or removal media devices to their system. Because the
cabling is different, you cannot replace ATA drives with SCSI
drives and vice versa. (See “Support for Master and Slave”
in the Basics chapter.)
Ultra Wide SCSI Cable Routing
The Ultra Wide SCSI cable (if present) must be routed
inside the computer’s chassis in a very specific manner.
Failure to route the cable correctly could result in
performance problems. (See “Ultra Wide SCSI PCI Card” in
Hot Issues
DVD-ROM Disk Damage - 9
the Take-Apart chapter.)
DVD-ROM Disk Damage
The Power Macintosh G3 Minitower and Macintosh Server
G3 offer DVD-ROM drives as a build-to-order option. It is
important to note that DVD disks are much more prone to
damage than CD-ROM disks. Any type of scratch or other
abuse may result in a disk that is unreadable. (See “DVDROM Drive Technology” in the Basics chapter.)
Hot Issues
HFS+ Formatted Drives - 10
HFS+ Formatted Drives
Hard drives that ship with the Version 2 Power Macintosh
G3 logic board (part number 661-2063) use a file format
called Mac OS Extended format, also referred to as HFS+.
Norton Utilities version 3.5 is not compatible with Mac OS
and version 3.5.1 and earlier can result in hard drive
corruption and loss of all data on the hard drive. If you
experience problems with a hard drive in one of these
systems, Apple Computer recommends using the version of
Disk First Aid included on the system software CD that
shipped with the unit. (See “HFS+ Formatted Drives” in the
Troubleshooting chapter.)
Hot Issues
PM G3 Minitower "Sleep/Beep" Issue - 11
PM G3 Minitower "Sleep/Beep" Issue
A problem has been reported with some of the AV I/O cards
installed in the Power Macintosh G3 Minitower computer.
Systems with the problem exhibit the following symptoms:
The computer goes into sleep mode and begins beeping about
2 times a second. Then one of three things happens:
1
The computer wakes itself up after 3 to 4 seconds.
3
The user is unable to wake the computer.
2
The user is able to wake up the computer in a normal
fashion.
Note: this problem only occurs on the Minitower version of
the Power Macintosh G3 computer and only with the AV I/O
card installed (that is, the problem does not occur with the
Audio Only card).
Hot Issues
PM G3 Minitower "Sleep/Beep" Issue - 12
To resolve this issue, replace the AV I/O card (p/n 6611456) only if the customer's system meets both of the
following criteria:
• The computer has a serial number date range of
xxx42xxxxxx-xxx47xxxxxx; and
• The AV I/O card has not been repaired already (see
"Identifying Repaired Cards" below).
Identifying Repaired Cards
Repaired cards will have a blue dot on the back fence of the
card, OR the system serial number will have an “AA”
appended to the serial number label. Make sure that you are
not replacing a repaired card for this problem.
Hot Issues
Power-On Issue - 13
Power-On Issue
If you experience a power-on issue with the Power
Macintosh G3 Minitower or Macintosh Server G3 where the
power supply fan is spinning, but there is no boot tone, no
hard drive noise, no power LED, and no video, you may have
an improperly installed or faulty voltage regulator. You
should always reseat and/or replace the voltage regulator
before replacing the logic board. (See “System” symptom/
cures in the Troubleshooting chapter.)
K Service Source
Basics
Power Mac/Server G3 Minitower
Basics
Overview - 1
Overview
The Power Macintosh/
Server G3 Minitower
chassis design allows you to
access the logic board and its
components without having
to remove the power supply
or any drives. This flexible
design makes this computer
easy to service and upgrade.
The Power Mac/Server G3
Minitower has a unique
PERCH slot that accepts an
I/O card that determines the
audio and video capabilities
of the computer.
Basics
Features - 2
Features
There are standard features available with every Power
Macintosh G3 Minitower computer as well as build-toorder features that are optional. The standard and optional
features are listed below:
Standard Power Mac G3 Minitower Features:
• 233 MHz, 266 MHz, or 300 MHz PowerPC G3
microprocessor
• RAM expandable to 384 MB in three DIMM card slots
using 64-bit, 168-pin, JEDEC-standard, 3.3 V,
unbuffered, SDRAM DIMM cards
• 512K backside L2 cache (233 and 266 MHz) or 1 MB
backside L2 cache (300 MHz) on processor module
• Built-in 2D and 3D hardware graphics acceleration
• PERCH slot to support Apple I/O cards
• One modem slot on I/O cards for optional fax/modem card
Basics
Features - 3
• 4 GB or 6 GB ATA hard drive
• CD-ROM ATAPI drive at 24X speed (unless customer
orders DVD-ROM drive)
• 1.4 MB SuperDrive
• Three expansion bays for adding internal 3.5” SCSI
devices
• One SCSI port
• Two GeoPort serial ports
• 10BASE-T Ethernet port
• One ADB port
• Three PCI expansion slots to accept three 12” PCI cards,
or three 15 W cards, or two 25 W cards
• Voltage switch
• Fan speed thermally controlled
• Energy Saver control panel
• 2 MB video RAM expandable to 4 MB or 6 MB with
3.3 V, 83 MHz or faster SGRAM on a 144-pin small
outline dual inline memory module (SO-DIMM)
Basics
Features - 4
Optional Build-to-Order Power Mac G3 Minitower Features:
• 100 MB SCSI Iomega or ATAPI Zip drive in the expansion
bay
• Ultra Wide SCSI PCI card
• 4 GB or 9 GB Ultra Wide 3.5” SCSI hard drive(s)
(replaces 4 GB or 6 GB ATA hard drive(s))
• DVD-ROM Drive (in place of CD-ROM drive)
• 8 MB IX Micro 3D graphics accelerator card
• 10/100 BaseT ethernet card
• FireWire DVC card
Features of the Macintosh Server G3 include
• 233 MHz, 266 MHz, or 300 MHz PowerPC G3
microprocessor
• RAM expandable to 384 MB in three DIMM card slots
using 64-bit, 168-pin, JEDEC-standard, 3.3 V,
unbuffered, SDRAM DIMM cards
• 512K backside L2 cache (233 and 266 MHz) or 1 MB
Basics
Features - 5
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
backside L2 cache (300 MHz) on processor module
Built-in 2D and 3D hardware graphics acceleration
PERCH slot to support Apple I/O cards
One modem slot on I/O cards for optional fax/modem card
4 GB or 9 GB Ultra Wide 3.5” SCSI hard drive(s)
Ultra Wide SCSI PCI card
10/100 BaseT ethernet card
Three expansion bays for adding internal 3.5’’ SCSI
devices (CD-ROM drive pre-installed in one bay)
CD-ROM ATAPI drive at 24X speed (unless customer
orders DVD-ROM drive)
1.4 MB SuperDrive
One SCSI port
Two GeoPort serial ports
10BASE-T Ethernet port
One ADB port
Three PCI expansion slots to accept three 12” PCI cards,
or three 15 W cards, or two 25 W cards (two slots filled
Basics
Features - 6
•
•
•
•
in standard Server G3 configuration with 10/100 BaseT
ethernet card and Ultra Wide SCSI PCI card; one to two
slots filled only in build-to-order G3 Minitower
configurations with 10/100 BaseT ethernet card and/or
Ultra Wide SCSI PCI card)
Voltage switch
Fan speed thermally controlled
Energy Saver control panel
2 MB video RAM expandable to 4 MB or 6 MB with
3.3 V, 83 MHz or faster SGRAM on a 144-pin small
outline dual inline memory module (SO-DIMM)
Optional Build-to-Order Macintosh Server G3 Features:
• 6 GB ATA hard drive (in place of Ultra Wide SCSI drive)
• DVD-ROM drive (in place of CD-ROM drive)
• DDS-3 tape drive
Basics
Features - 7
Software included with Macintosh Server G3 Units:
• Mac OS 8.1, specifically tuned for server use
• AppleShare IP 5.0 server software
• Apple Network Administrator Toolkit network
management software
• SoftRAID volume management software
• Virex 5.8
Basics
Data Buses - 8
Data Buses
The data buses on the Power Macintosh G3 Minitower and
Macintosh Server G3 include:
• Narrow SCSI-1: The SCSI-1 chain transfers data at up to
5 MB per second. The narrow SCSI-1 chain supports up
to seven internal and external SCSI devices. The Narrow
SCSI-1 bus is used to connect the ZIP drive (if present)
and any SCSI-1 hard drives.
• Ultra Wide SCSI-3 (provided on Ultra Wide SCSI card,
which is optional on the G3 Minitower and standard on
the Server G3): The Ultra Wide SCSI-3 chain can
transfer data at up to 40 MB per second and supports up
to three internal devices. This bus is used to connect any
Ultra Wide SCSI devices.
• EIDE (Extended Integrated Drive Electronics): There are
two EIDE connectors on the logic board (the ATAPI CDROM drive or DVD-ROM drive uses one of these
Basics
Data Buses - 9
connectors, and if an ATA hard drive is installed, it uses
the second connector). In the standard G3 Minitower
configuration, both channels are in use. In the standard
G3 Server configuration, one EIDE channel is available.
Note: Some Power Mac G3 system use a Master/Slave
interface. See “Support for Master and Slave” later in this
section for more information.
The following table gives more information about the data
buses in the Power Macintosh G3 Minitower and Macintosh
Server G3 computers.
Basics
Data Buses - 10
Table 1: Internal Buses on G3 Server and Minitower
Interface
Connector
Type
Notes
Max # of
Drives
Max Data
Transfer
Rate
SCSI-31
(Ultra Wide)
68-Pin
Requires Ultra Wide SCSI PCI card.
32
EIDE
40-Pin
There are two EIDE connectors on
the logic board.
23
SCSI-24
(Fast)
50-Pin
Requires Ultra Wide SCSI PCI card.
7
10 MB
per second
SCSI-1
(Narrow)
50-Pin
Standard connector on logic board.
Used to connect internal devices to
Narrow SCSI-1 bus (e.g. ZIP drive).
75
5 MB per
second
40 MB
per second
—
Basics
Data Buses - 11
Notes for Table 1:
1
The Ultra Wide SCSI PCI card is optional on G3 Minitower and standard on G3 Server. The
Apple Ultra Wide SCSI card and cable allow you to connect a maximum of 3 devices to this
bus.
2
Physical space inside the computer limits this number to 3.
3
The ATAPI CD-ROM drive, ATAPI DVD-ROM drive, and ATA hard drive (if present) use
this bus.
4
Ultra Wide SCSI PCI card is optional on G3 Minitower and standard on G3 Server. It’s
best not to use this bus because it will cause any Ultra Wide SCSI-3 devices to transfer
data at the slower SCSI-2 rate. No cable is provided for the SCSI-2 bus.
5
The G3 Minitower comes with a Zip drive attached to this bus. The standard G3 Server
configuration does not use this bus; however, an internal cable may be provided that can
connect up to two internal SCSI-1 devices. You can add additional SCSI-1 devices as long as
the combined number of internal and external devices is no more than seven.
Basics
Data Buses - 12
Narrow SCSI-1 Bus
All internal and external devices on the SCSI-1 chain must
have unique ID numbers. SCSI ID numbers 0 through 6 are
available. Always terminate the last internal and the last
external SCSI-1 device, as shown in the following graphic.
If you connect only internal devices or only external devices,
the computer will automatically terminate one end of the chain.
Terminate the
last external
SCSI device.
Narrow SCSI-1 Bus Termination
Terminate the
last internal
SCSI device.
Basics
Data Buses - 13
Ultra Wide SCSI-3 Bus
Ultra Wide SCSI support is offered on the Power Macintosh
G3 Minitower (optional feature) and G3 Server (standard
feature) via an Ultra Wide SCSI PCI card (p/n 661-2011).
If present, this card is installed in the first PCI slot on the
logic board. You can connect a total of three internal devices
to the Ultra Wide SCSI-3 bus.
Important: Before you connect an internal device to the Ultra
Wide SCSI-3 bus, refer to the information on cable length
limits and termination later in this section.
The following illustration shows where to install SCSI
devices for use with the Ultra Wide SCSI-3 bus and how to
route the Ultra Wide cable. (Note: More detailed information
on how to route and tape the Ultra Wide SCSI cable can be
found in the Take-Apart chapter in the Hard Drive topic.)
Basics
Data Buses - 14
If present, the Ultra Wide internal hard drive (SCSI ID 0)
is connected to the Ultra Wide SCSI-3 bus.
Floppy drive
CD-ROM drive
You can install
Ultra Wide SCSI devices
in these expansion
bays.
SCSI PCI card
SCSI Device Locations for SCSI-3 Bus
Basics
Data Buses - 15
All devices on the same SCSI bus must have unique ID
numbers, but devices on different SCSI buses may use the
same SCSI ID number. (For example, you could have a
removable media drive with ID number 3 connected to the
Narrow SCSI-1 bus and a hard drive with ID number 3
connected to the Ultra Wide SCSI-3 bus.)
Some of the drives that were installed at the factory, as well
as the SCSI card itself, have already reserved certain SCSI
ID numbers on the Ultra Wide SCSI-3 bus. Other ID
numbers are available for assignment to SCSI devices that
are added later.
The following table provides more information on assigning
SCSI ID numbers to Ultra Wide devices.
Basics
Data Buses - 16
Table 2: Assigning Ultra Wide SCSI ID Numbers
Ultra Wide
SCSI ID #
Device
0
Factory-installed hard drive (terminated)
1
Factory-installed hard drive (optional)
2—6
Available (but not recommended)
7
8 —15
SCSI PCI card (terminated)
Available
Important: The factory-installed internal hard drive and the SCSI card
are both terminated. Other SCSI devices you install and connect to the
internal Ultra Wide SCSI-3 bus must not be terminated, or the computer will malfunction.
Basics
Data Buses - 17
EIDE Bus
The internal EIDE bus supports the internal CD-ROM or
DVD-ROM drive. You can connect another EIDE device, such
as an EIDE hard drive, to the second channel of the EIDE bus.
(Note that in the standard G3 Minitower configuration, there
is already an ATA hard drive attached to the second EIDE
channel. Some build-to-order G3 Minitowers, however,
come with the optional Ultra Wide SCSI card and Ultra Wide
SCSI hard drive, in which case the second EIDE channel is
available.) You can install an EIDE device in one of the
available expansion bays.
Connecting EIDE Devices to the Logic Board
There are two EIDE connectors on the G3 Minitower logic
board, which are marked J9 and J10. Use the internal
ribbon cable with the 40-pin connector to connect EIDE
Basics
Data Buses - 18
devices to the EIDE bus.
If you are connecting a single device to the EIDE bus, you
should use the J9 connector (the one closer to the rear
panel). If you plug a single device into the J10 EIDE
connector and leave J9 empty, the device may not boot.
If the Power Macintosh G3 Minitower ships with two EIDE
devices (a CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive and an ATA hard
drive), both EIDE connectors (J9 and J10) will be
automatically used. Service Providers should keep the J9 vs.
J10 issue in mind, however, when testing G3 Minitower
units.
Support for Master and Slave
Some Power Mac/Server G3 computers support adding two
ATA/IDE devices to the same ATA/IDE channel, or what is
commonly known as master and slave. This configuration
Basics
Data Buses - 19
provides user with the ability to add additional hard drives
or removal media devices to their system.
The Power Macintosh G3 Minitower and Macintosh Server
G3 units that support this feature can only be identified by
looking at the logic board itself and verifying the revision of
the built-in video ASIC made by ATI Technologies. If you are
looking at the logic board with the rear connector towards
you, the video ASIC is located approximately 1” from the
built-in video connector on the logic board.
If the ASIC reads: “ATI 3D Rage II+DVD,” the logic board
does not support the master and slave configuration; If the
controller reads: “ATI 3D Rage Pro PCI,” the logic board
does support the master and slave configuration.
Note: Although the ATI chip is an ideal way to identify the
version of the logic board, it does not control the EIDE
interface.
Basics
Data Buses - 20
Configuring or Connecting Master/Slave Devices
Each IDE channel can support either one or two devices. All
Power Macintosh G3's have two ATA/IDe channels. ATA/IDE
devices each contain their own integrated controllers, and so
in order to maintain order on the channel, it is necessary to
have some way of differentiating between the two devices.
This is done by giving each device a designation as either
master or slave, and then having the controller address
commands and data to either one or the other. The drive that
is the target of the command responds to it, and the other one
remains silent.
Note: Despite the hierarchical-sounding names of "master"
and "slave", the master drive does not have any special
status compared to the slave one; they are really equals in
most respects. The slave drive doesn't rely on the master
drive or anything like that, despite the names.
Basics
Data Buses - 21
Devices are designated as master or slave using jumpers,
small connectors that fit over pairs of pins to program the
drive through hardware. Each hard drive manufacturer uses
a different combination of jumpers (usually named
differently) for specifying whether its drive is master or
slave on the channel. Some disks put this information right
on the top label of the drive itself, while many do not; it
sometimes takes some hunting around to find where the
jumper pins are on the drive even once you know how the
jumpers are supposed to go.
ATAPI drives, or ATA/IDE devices that support removable
media like CD-ROM's are jumpered in exactly the same way,
and they have the advantage of having their jumpers much
more universally labeled than their hard disk counterparts.
If you are using two drives on a channel, it is important to
ensure that they are jumpered correctly. Making both
Basics
Data Buses - 22
drives the master, or both the slave will likely result in a
very confused system.
Note: It makes no difference which connector on the ATA/
IDE cable is used in a standard ATA/IDE setup, because it is
the jumpers that control master and slave, not the cable. As
long as one device is jumpered as master and the other as
slave, any two ATA/IDE or ATAPI devices should work
together on a single channel.
Basics
Expansion Bays - 23
Expansion Bays
It is important to remember that customers may upgrade
their drives or have different types of drives installed in the
drive bays. You can replace the hard drive with a 3.5-inch
hard drive (1-inch high). You can replace the floppy drive
with a 5.25-inch or smaller device (maximum 1 inch
high). The CD-ROM drive, Zip drive (Power Mac G3 only),
and lower expansion bays accept a 5.25-inch or smaller
device (maximum 1.625 inches high).
The following illustration shows where the expansion bays
are located:
Basics
Expansion Bays - 24
Internal hard drive
Floppy drive
CD-ROM drive
This expansion bay accepts a 5.25"
(or smaller) EIDE or SCSI device
(1.625" high or shorter).
Some models come with
a Zip drive already installed here.
This expansion bay accepts a 5.25"
(or smaller) EIDE or SCSI device
(1.625" high or shorter).
Expansion Bays in Power Mac/Server G3
Basics
Ultra Wide SCSI Card - 25
Ultra Wide SCSI Card
Ultra Wide SCSI support is offered on the Power Macintosh
G3 Minitower (optional feature) and G3 Server (standard
feature) via an Ultra Wide SCSI PCI card (p/n 661-2011).
If present, this card is installed in the first PCI slot on the
logic board.
Connecting Additional Internal Devices
If you add an internal drive to the Ultra Wide SCSI bus, you
need to assign it a SCSI ID number in the 8 to 15 range.
Devices assigned to numbers 2 through 6 may not work
reliably.
Only internal SCSI devices may be attached to the primary
Ultra Wide SCSI card; that is to say, you cannot use the
external 68-pin connector on the card. To connect external
Basics
Ultra Wide SCSI Card - 26
Ultra Wide SCSI devices to the computer, you must install a
second Ultra Wide SCSI card.
To install a second Ultra Wide SCSI card, follow these
guidelines:
• Use a single-channel card if possible.
• If you need to add a dual-channel Ultra Wide SCSI card,
contact the PCI card vendor to verify compatibility with
the Power Macintosh G3 Minitower and Macintosh
Server G3.
• Do not use the Apple Ultra Wide SCSI PCI card (p/n
661-2011) as the second card unless it is shipped from
the factory this way.
Specifications for the Ultra Wide SCSI Card
The Ultra Wide SCSI PCI card specifications are as follows:
• Automatic termination
Basics
Ultra Wide SCSI Card - 27
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Advanced Data Streaming Technology (ADS)
RAID Ready
Embedded RISC I/P processor
Ultra SCSI connector: Fine pitch 68-pin “P”
Flash ROM BIOS
PCI 2.1 compliant
Large command FIFO
Supports disconnect/reconnect
Asynchronous I/O support
Multiple initiator support
SCSI-3 tagged command queuing
SCSI Manager 4.3 compatible
SCSI-3 Bus
• Adapter interface: Special Bus management hardware for
video, fileservers, and real-time environments
• Maximum host transfer rate: 133 MB/sec.
• Maximum SCSI transfer rates: Synchronous data rate—
Basics
Ultra Wide SCSI Card - 28
40 MB/sec. per channel; asynchronous data rate—
12 MB/sec.
• SCSI interface: SCSI-1, SCSI-2, SCSI-3, Ultra SCSI
• Electrical signals: Single-ended versions
• Extensive device support: Up to 105 Through Logical
Unit Numbers (LUN’s) (Wide and Narrow devices)
Cable Length Limits
When using Ultra SCSI single-ended devices, you can connect
up to 8 devices if the total cable length is no longer than 1.5
meters (about 4.5 feet). If total cable length is between 1.5
meters and 3.0 meters (about 9 feet), you can connect only
4 SCSI devices. Error-free operation is not guaranteed if
you exceed these limits.
When not using Ultra SCSI devices, SCSI specification limits
total bus cable length for single-ended SCSI to 6 meters or
Basics
Ultra Wide SCSI Card - 29
approximately 18 feet (this is a combined figure of both
internal and external cable lengths). You should keep cable
lengths as short as possible to ensure high signal quality and
performance.
If you connect a combination of Wide 16-bit devices and
Narrow 8-bit devices on the same connector (not
recommended), Wide devices must be connected first
(closest to the connector), followed by the Narrow devices.
Refer to the documentation that came with your SCSI devices
to determine if your device is Wide or Narrow, and if it is an
Ultra SCSI device.
Basics
10/100 BaseT Ethernet Card - 30
10/100 BaseT Ethernet Card
The specifications for the 10/100 BaseT ethernet card,
which is an optional feature in the G3 Minitower and
standard in the Server G3, are as follows:
• Open Transport: Mac OS 8.1 or later, AppleShare,
AppleTalk, NetWare for Macintosh, TCP-IP
• Connector: RJ-45 (for 10BaseT and 100BaseT)
• Media, 10BaseT: Cat 3, 4, or 5 UTP on 2 pairs up to
100M
• Media, 100BaseT: Cat 5 UTP on 2 pairs up to 100M
• Bus interface: PCI revision 2.0 and 2.1, share
interrupt A
• Channel speeds: IEEE Auto Negotiation of 10BaseT and
100BaseTX
• Communications: IEEE 802.3u 100BaseTX; IEEE 802.3i
10BaseT
• Power: 1.2A @ 5V typical
Basics
10/100 BaseT Ethernet Card - 31
• Controllers: DECchip 21140, 32-bit internal processor
per channel
Basics
DVD-ROM Drive Technology - 32
DVD-ROM Drive Technology
DVD stands for Digital Versatile Disc, an audio/video/data
standard based on high-density next-generation optical
discs. Apple Computer offers a DVD-ROM drive through the
build-to-order (BTO) program which is capable of playing
DVD-ROM disks.
Warning: DVD disks are much more prone to damage than
CD-ROM disks. Any type of scratch or other abuse may
result in a disk that is unreadable.
DVD Discs
The DVD Forum designed several standards for disk
manufacture ranging from a single-sided, single-layer disk
with 4.7 Gigabytes of data to a double-sided, double-layer
disk with 17 Gigabytes of data stored on the disk.
Basics
DVD-ROM Drive Technology - 33
DVD discs can hold nearly 26 times the amount of data that
can be stored on a conventional CD. This capacity virtually
eliminates the need to swap discs in the middle of a game or
application and at the same time reduces the cost and the
number of discs necessary to hold the data. The following
table clearly illustrates the difference between CD and DVD
storage possibilities.
Basics
DVD-ROM Drive Technology - 34
Table 3: Storage Capacities
Disc Type
Diameter
Sides &
Layers
Capacity
Playback Time
(video)
CD-ROM
120mm
SS
650 MB
Max 74 min audio
DVD-5
120mm
SS/SL
4.7 GB
Over 2 hours of video
DVD-9
120mm
SS/DL
8.5 GB
Approx. 4 hours
DVD-10
120mm
DS/SL
9.4 GB
Approx. 4.5 hours
DVD-18
120mm
DS/DL
17 GB
Over 8 hours
Table Notes: SS=Single Sided, SL=Single Layer, DS=Double Sided,
DL=Double Layered
Basics
DVD-ROM Drive Technology - 35
To squeeze all this information onto the CD-sized disc, DVD
disc designers: 1)made track spacing and the pits and lands
used to record data nearly half the size of the original CD
design; 2) made the discs double sided and added another data
layer to each side creating a potential for four layers of data
per disc.
The figure below illustrates the layers of a DVD disc.
Basics
DVD-ROM Drive Technology - 36
DVD Layers
Basics
DVD-ROM Drive Technology - 37
Compared to CD, DVD uses smaller pits and a more closely
spaced track.The result is a significant increase in data
density. The higher Numerical Aperture (NA) lens of DVD
helps the laser focus on the smaller pits.
Like CD, DVD is 120 mm (4-3/4 inches) in diameter. Like
CD, DVD is 1.2 mm thick composed of (2) 0.6 mm
substrates bonded together. The new DVD Players will be
able to play existing music CDs.
The DVD standard defines a disc that maintains the overall
dimensions, look and feel of the current Compact Disc. Some
of these similarities will be unmistakable to customers
experiencing DVD for the first time.
Ê
Basics
DVD-ROM Drive Technology - 38
Table 4: CD vs. DVD Comparison
CD
DVD
Disc Diameter
120mm
120mm
Disc Thickness
1.2mm
1.2mm
Disc Structure
Single substrate
Two bonded 0.6mm
substrates
Laser Wavelength
780nm (infrared)
650 and 635nm (red)
Numerical Aperature
0.45
0.60
Track Pitch
1.6um
0.74um
Shortest Pit/Land Length
0.83um
0.4um
Basics
DVD-ROM Drive Technology - 39
Table 4: CD vs. DVD Comparison
CD
DVD
Data Layers
1
1 or 2
Data Capacity
Approx. 680 MB
Single Layer: 4.7 GBx2
Dual Layer: 8.5 GBx2
Data Transfer Rate
Mode 1: 153.6 KB/sec
Mode 2: 176.4 KB/sec
1,108 KB/sec, nominal
Basics
DVD-ROM Drive Technology - 40
Apple DVD-ROM Drive Specs
The Apple DVD-ROM Drive is an ATAPI drive. It uses an IDE
port on the Macintosh for connection to the computer. Below
are some of the specs for the drive. Note that the above
transfer rate info varies from the data below. The numbers
above reflect the DVD specification where the below
numbers are for the drive that Apple is shipping.
Access Times (including latency)
DVD 170 ms or faster typical
CD 100 ms or faster typical
Data Capacity
DVD maximum 17 GB 256K Buffer
Basics
DVD-ROM Drive Technology - 41
Transfer Rate
DVD: 2,705 KB/second
CD Mode 1: 1,293 to 3,000 KB/second
CD Mode 2: 1,474 to 3,429 KB/second
Disk Format Support
DVD 9660 Bridge (DVD-ROM Book, DVD-Video Book) RedBook, Yellow-Book, CD-ROM XA, DA-I Bridge, Photo-CD,
Video CD, CD-I Ready, CD-G, Multi-session (Photo-CD, CD
Extra)
Note: To be able to play the DVD-Video disks, you must have
an additional PCI decoder card installed that will allow the
playback of movie disks. This PCI card contains controllers
that decode the MPEG-2 video and Dolby AC-3 audio tracks
on the movie. Without the card, movies cannot be played.
Because of this, the DVD-ROM drive is only intended for
DVD-ROM disks. These are DVD disks that contain data just
like CDs do currently. If you wish to play DVD Video disks,
Basics
DVD-ROM Drive Technology - 42
you will need to purchase a PCI decoder card.
DVD Software Drivers
Apple DVD-ROM
UDF Volume Access
These two extensions will allow a DVD disk to be mounted on
the desktop. DVD disks use a format called universal disk
format (UDF) to store data on the disks. All DVD disks are
formatted UDF; this includes DVD-VIDEO and DVD-ROM
disks.
Basics
DVD-ROM Drive Technology - 43
File Management System Micro UDF & ISO9660
Universal Disk Format (UDF) is a file system standard that
supports both rewritable and write-once media. It is a
cross-platform data format that allows transparent
interchange of data via optical discs or CD-ROMs. UDF also
defines methods for reading, writing and other operations.
Discs that are read on a Mac OS-based computer may also be
read on a DOS, UNIX or Windows based computer. The format
can coexist with CD-ROM data format (ISO 9660) but also
incorporates the International Standards Organization
interchange standard for rewritable and write-once media
(ISO 13346) thus providing support for CD-Recordable
discs (CD-R).
Before UDF was available, every CD-Recordable drive used a
proprietary format of writing data, which prevents the
ability to interchange files. Fortunately, most drives
Basics
DVD-ROM Drive Technology - 44
supported either software or hardware updates to allow the
drive to be upgraded so that it could write UDF. The first
generation of DVD drives could not read CD-R media and in
some cases actually damaged the media.
UDF Features
• Enables operating system independent interchange on
optical media.
• Designed to support the massive capacities of optical
jukeboxes.
• Only ISO standard file system for WORM media (Write
Once Read Many).
• Industry selected file system for second generation (high
capacity) CD-ROM.
• Industry selected file system for DVD.
• Enables full interchange between computer-based and
entertainment-based media.
• Endorsed by world leading optical manufacturers.
Basics
DVD-ROM Drive Technology - 45
Stand-alone players use UDF while computer applications
use the UDF bridge format, which consists of both ISO-9660
CD-ROM format and UDF.
Basics
FireWire Technology - 46
FireWire Technology
This section explains what FireWire technology is and gives
specific information on Apple Computer’s FireWire card,
which ships as an optional build-to-order module on the
Power Macintosh G3 Minitower.
FireWire Defined
FireWire technology refers to Apple Computer’s crossplatform implementation of the high-speed serial data bus
(defined by IEEE Standard 1394-1995) that can move large
amounts of data between computers and peripheral devices.
FireWire is:
• A digital interface - no need to convert digital data into
analog for better signal integrity
Basics
FireWire Technology - 47
• A physically small thin serial cable - replaces today's
bulky and expensive interfaces
• Easy to use - no need for terminators, device IDs,
screws, or complicated set-ups
• Hot pluggable - devices can be added and removed while
the bus is active
• Scalable - the Standard defines 100, 200, and 400
Mbps devices and can support the multiple speeds on a
single bus
• Flexible - the Standard supports freeform daisy
chaining and branching for peer-to-peer
implementations
• Fast, guaranteed bandwidth - the Standard supports
guaranteed delivery of time critical data which enables
smaller buffers (lower cost)
• Non-proprietary - no licensing problems, adoption is
encouraged
Basics
FireWire Technology - 48
FireWire technology speeds up the movement of multimedia
data and large files and enables the connection of digital
consumer products -- including digital camcorders, digital
video tapes, digital video disks, set-top boxes, and music
systems -- directly to a personal computer.
Devices can be connected in any combination of branching
and chaining, as long as no loops are formed. A FireWire bus
can support up to 16 consecutive cable hops of 4.5 meters
each. There are no SCSI-style ID numbers to set and no
termination requirements.
FireWire supports two types of data transfer: asynchronous
and isochronous. For traditional computer memory-mapped,
load and store applications, asynchronous transfer is
appropriate and adequate; but, one of FireWire's key
features is its support of isochronous data channels.
Basics
FireWire Technology - 49
Isochronous data transfer provides guaranteed data
transport at a pre-determined rate. This is especially
important for multimedia applications where uninterrupted
transport of time-critical data and just-in-time delivery
reduce the need for costly buffering. This leads to perhaps
one of the most important uses of FireWire as the digital
interface for consumer electronics and AV peripherals.
FireWire is a peer-to-peer interface. This allows dubbing
from one camcorder to another without a computer. It also
allows multiple computers to share a given peripheral
without any special support in the peripheral or the
computers. It is a result of all of these features that
FireWire has become the digital interface of choice and its
acceptance is growing.
In the world of video editing, FireWire enabled cameras
remove the need for costly analog video computer frame
Basics
FireWire Technology - 50
buffers to capture digital video. FireWire will gradually
improve upon existing interfaces such as SCSI. FireWire
provides higher speed, lower cost, and is more user friendly
than most existing interfaces. SCSI products such as
scanners, CDROMs, disk drives, and printers are already
evaluating when they will move to FireWire.
FireWire has the bandwidth capacity to replace and
consolidate most other peripheral connection communication
methods in use today. Hot plugging, power sourcing, and
dynamic reconfiguration make FireWire a user-friendly
alternative to today's interconnects. These features will
allow "plugging in" of computer peripherals as easily as
plugging in a home appliance.
The Apple FireWire Digital Video Camera Card
The optional Apple FireWire Digital Video Camera (DVC)
Basics
FireWire Technology - 51
card is Apple Computer’s first implementation of FireWire
technology. This card is designed to work with digital video
camcorders and decks that use the DV format and have a
FireWire port (sometimes marked IEEE 1394 or DV IN/
OUT).
The FireWire DVC hardware and software, together with a
non-linear editing application, allow the user to capture DV
movie clips to their hard disk. They can view the clips in
MoviePlayer or other QuickTime 3.0 applications, and edit
and render the DV movies.
If the user has a video editing application with an export
function, they can send (print or record) movies back to the
tape in their camcorder or deck. The software also allows the
FireWire device to be controlled from the computer.
The Apple FireWire DVC card installs in any available PCI
slot on the Power Mac/Server G3 logic board. It operates at
Basics
FireWire Technology - 52
200 Mbps and supports a single digital video camera. The
external FireWire cable, which ships with the card,
connects any one of the 6-pin, external connectors on the
card to a 4-pin connector on the digital video camera.
The Apple FireWire Card is designed to keep the network
alive even if the Macintosh is shut down. Loss of power to the
Macintosh will not affect the operation of a FireWire card as
long as it can draw power from other cards on the bus. Each
card provides power which is available to other devices on
the network. This means that a system shutdown will not
result in interrupted transmission over a FireWire
network.
Important: For more information about cable management
and power issues, please refer to the FireWire ReadMe file
on the FireWire CD.
Basics
FireWire Technology - 53
Connecting the FireWire DVC Card
The 6-pin connector on the external FireWire cable plugs
into the card and the 4-pin connector plugs into the
camera’s DV port. Both connectors snap into place when
properly engaged. A third-party cable is required in order
to connect two computers together (or if the camera has a 6pin FireWire port).
External FireWire Cable Connectors
Basics
FireWire Technology - 54
Installing the FireWire Card Software
To install the Apple FireWire Card software:
1
Insert the FireWire CD.
3
Follow the on-screen instructions.
2
4
Double-click the Installer icon.
Restart the computer.
Important: An extension called FireWire Support may be
located in a folder titled FireWire in the Apple Extras folder
on the Macintosh. Do not move this older extension to the
Extensions folder, as it may interfere with the operation of
the new Apple FireWire software.
Basics
The DDS-3 Tape Drive - 55
The DDS-3 Tape Drive
The Power Macintosh G3 Minitower and Macintosh Server
G3 offer a DDS-3 tape drive as a build-to-order option.
This internal DDS-3 tape backup drive and accompanying
software can perform full or partial backup and restore
procedures for all of the data on the computer’s hard drives.
In addition, the tape drive automatically performs error
correction and data compression of the files that are backed
up and restored.The error-correction feature helps ensure
a high level of data integrity. The data-compression feature
allows more data to fit on a cassette than do conventional
backup mechanisms.
The DDS-3 tape drive is fully compatible with tapes in
DDS-3, DDS-2, DDS, and DDS-DC format. For best
performance, customer’s should use Sony Digital Data
Basics
The DDS-3 Tape Drive - 56
Storage (DDS) computer-grade tape, part number DGD
125P, with 12 GB capacity (125 meters/410 feet). Once
you insert a tape, it takes about 24 seconds for it to load.
When you eject a tape, it takes about 20 seconds for it to
unload.
The DDS-3 tape drive comes with a cleaning cassette that
customers should use to clean the tape-drive heads. The
intervals at which the tape drive should be cleaned depends
on how often it is used. In general, if backups are performed
daily, the tape drive should be cleaned weekly. If backups
are performed weekly, the tape drive should be cleaned once
a month. The tape drive should also be cleaned when the
status light shows a Flash-2 pattern. Status lights are
described in the next section.
When the cleaning cassette is inserted into the drive, the
drive automatically loads it and cleans the heads. When the
Basics
The DDS-3 Tape Drive - 57
cleaning process is completed, the drive automatically
ejects the cassette.
Customers are advised to keep a record of how many times
they use the cleaning cassette. After 25 uses, it should be
replaced. (For best results, use Sony part number
DG5CL/2.)
Status Lights
Underneath the tape drive opening are three lights that
inform you of the status of tape operations. The lights are
labeled (left to right) Busy, Tape, and Status. The following
table lists what a light indicates when it is on, off, or
flashing a pattern.
Basics
The DDS-3 Tape Drive - 58
Table 5: Status Lights
Light Behavior
Busy
Tape
Status
Off
Not busy
Not loaded
Steady on
SCSI active
Loaded
Tape is write-protected
Flash 11
Drive active
Loading/unloading
Cleaning tape inserted
Warning-tape has high number of errors
Cleaning needed
Flash 22
Flash 33
Waiting for tape to
reset
Flash 44
(See footnotes on following page.)
Waiting for tape to eject
Wrong firmware tape inserted
Self-test failure
Basics
The DDS-3 Tape Drive - 59
1
Flash 1 - the light flashes .25 seconds on, .25 seconds off.
2
Flash 2 - the light flashes 3.5 seconds on, .5 seconds off.
3
Flash 3 - the light flashes .25 seconds on, one second off.
4
Flash 4 - the light flashes twice every 1.25 seconds.
Basics
The DDS-3 Tape Drive - 60
Operating Environment
The tape drive will not operate properly in high humidity.
Be sure to adhere to the environmental requirements for the
server described in the technical information that came with
the computer. In addition, follow the recommendations for
use that came with the tape cassette.
Follow these guidelines to avoid temperature problems:
– Avoid exposing cassettes to extreme heat or cold. For
example, don’t store a cassette in a car in bright
sunlight.
– Avoid transferring data to or from a tape cassette when
the temperature is changing by more than 10 degrees F
per hour (roughly 5 degrees C per hour).
Basics
The Cuda Chip - 61
The Cuda Chip
The Cuda is a microcontroller chip. Its function is to
• Turn system power on and off
• Manage system resets from various commands
• Maintain parameter RAM (PRAM)
• Manage the Apple Desktop Bus (ADB)
• Manage the real-time clock
Many system problems can be resolved by resetting the Cuda
chip (see Symptom Charts for examples). Press the Cuda
reset button on the logic board to reset the Cuda chip. (The
Cuda reset button is at the edge of the logic board near the
PCI slots. See “Logic Board Diagram” later in this chapter.)
If you continue to experience system problems, refer to
“Resetting the Logic Board” in this Basics chapter.
Basics
Resetting the Logic Board - 62
Resetting the Logic Board
Resetting the logic board can resolve many system problems
(refer to “Symptom Charts” for examples). Whenever you
have a unit that fails to power up, you should follow this
procedure before replacing any modules.
1
Unplug the computer.
3
Disconnect the power supply cable from the logic board
and then press the Power On button. (See “Logic Board
Diagram” later in this chapter to locate the Power On
button.)
2
4
5
Remove the battery from the logic board.
Wait at least 10 minutes before replacing the battery.
Make sure the battery is installed in the correct +/direction.
Basics
Resetting the Logic Board - 63
6
Reassemble the computer and test the unit.
Note: This procedure resets the computer’s PRAM. Be sure
to check the computer’s time/date and other system
parameter settings afterwards.
Basics
Sound - 64
Sound
The sound system for the Power Macintosh/Server G3
computers is implemented entirely on the I/O cards (there
are two versions available for the Power Macintosh G3 and
one available for the Macintosh Server G3). The I/O cards
support 16-bit stereo sound output and input, available
simultaneously.
The sound circuitry on the I/O cards and system software
can create sounds digitally and either play the sounds
through speakers inside the enclosure or send the sound
signals out through the sound output jacks. The sound
circuitry digitizes and records sound as 16-bit samples. The
computer can use 11.025K, or 22.050K, or 44.100K
samples per second. The sound system plays samples at the
sampling rate specified in the Monitors & Sound control
panel.
Basics
Sound - 65
The Power Macintosh G3 also records sound from several
sources:
• A microphone connected to the line-level sound input
jack
• The sound-in ports on the video input module
• Analog sound from optional communications cards
• A compact disc in the CD-ROM player
• Analog sound from the cross-platform card in a PCI slot
With each sound input source, sound playthrough can be
enabled or disabled.
Basics
Sound - 66
Sound Output
All sound output features for the Power Macintosh/Server
G3 computer are provided by an I/O card. The Audio I/O card
provides one mini jack for sound output on the back of the
enclosure. The AV I/O card (not available for the Macintosh
Server G3) provides three sound output connectors—two
RCA jacks for right and left sound out, and one 1/8-inch
mini jack for a stereophonic phone plug.
The output jacks are connected to the sound amplifier. The
mini jack is intended for connecting a pair of headphones or
amplified external speakers. There is one built-in speaker.
Inserting a plug into the sound output mini jack disconnects
the internal speaker.
Basics
Sound - 67
Sound Input
The I/O cards provide a stereo sound input jack on the back
of the enclosure for connecting an external Apple PlainTalk
line-level microphone (not standard equipment on the
Macintosh Server G3) or other sound source pair of linelevel signals. The sound input jack accepts a standard 1/8inch stereophonic phone plug (two signals plus ground).
Note: The microphone for the Macintosh LC and LC II does
not work with the I/O cards.
The AV I/O card provides an additional pair of RCA jacks for
right and left sound input for an external source, such as a
TV, VCR, or VTR.
Options in the Monitors & Sound control panel determine the
interaction between the sound input and output devices. The
sound circuitry normally operates in one of three modes:
Basics
Sound - 68
• Sound playback—computer-generated sound is sent to the
speaker and the sound output jacks.
• Sound playback with playthrough—computer sound and
sound input are mixed and sent to the speakers and sound
output jacks.
• Sound record with playthrough—input sound is recorded
and also sent to the speakers and sound output jacks.
Basics
Video Input and Output - 69
Video Input and Output
The AV I/O card (not available for the Macintosh Server G3)
supports video input and output of composite and S-video
signals. The card supports input and output of NTSC, PAL,
and SECAM video formats.
The AV I/O card accepts video from an external source and
displays it in a window on the computer’s display. The
features of the video portion of the card include:
•
•
•
•
•
Video display in a 320 X 240 pixel window
Pixel expansion for 640 X 480 pixel maximum display
Video overlay capability
YUV format for digital video input
A bi-directional digital audio video (DAV) connector for
adding a video processor on a PCI expansion card
Basics
Video Input and Output - 70
The card can accept video input from an external device,
such as a VCR or camcorder.
Sound Output
Port
Sound Input
Port
Composite Video
Ports
(OUT and IN)
S-Video Ports
(OUT and IN)
Audio Output
Ports
(left & right)
Audio Input Ports
(left & right)
AV I/O Panel (Power Macintosh G3 Minitower Only)
Basics
Running a G3 Server without a Monitor - 71
Running a G3 Server without a Monitor
You can use software such as the Apple Network
Administrator Toolkit and a video terminator (p/n 9223470) to run the G3 Server remotely from another
computer, thereby allowing you to disconnect the monitor
attached to the Server.
To run the Macintosh Server G3 without a monitor:
1
2
3
Follow the instructions in the “Setting Up Your Server”
manual to set up the server, including connecting a
monitor, mouse, and keyboard.
Follow the instructions in the “Macintosh Server
Administration” manual to configure the server. Be sure
the server is up and running and that network services
are operating properly.
Turn off the server and then disconnect the monitor.
Basics
Running a G3 Server without a Monitor - 72
4
5
Attach a video terminator to the monitor port on the back
panel of the server and then turn on the server again.
Follow the instructions that came with the remote access
software for logging in to and controlling the server.
Note: If you want to connect a monitor at a later time, you
must turn off the server before you connect the monitor.
The table on the following page explains the DIP switch
functions for the video terminator.
Basics
Running a G3 Server without a Monitor - 73
Table 6: DIP Switch Function Chart
Resolution
Monitor
Sep. Sync1
C. Sync 12
C. Sync 23
Sync On
Grn4
Switch ON
Switch ON
Switch ON
Switch ON
512 x 384
12” RGB
13467
1345
13456
134
640 x 480 66 Hz
13” RGB
1467
145
1456
14
640 x 870
Portrait
23467
2345
23456
234
640 x 480/
800 x 600 60 Hz
VGA/SVGA
2367
235
2356
23
800 x 600 60 Hz
15” Tilt
2467
245
2456
24
832 x 624
16” Color
1367
135
1356
13
1024 x 768
19” Color
1267
125
1256
12
Basics
Running a G3 Server without a Monitor - 74
Table 6: DIP Switch Function Chart
Resolution
Monitor
Sep. Sync1
C. Sync 12
C. Sync 23
Sync On
Grn4
Switch ON
Switch ON
Switch ON
Switch ON
1152 x 870
21” Color
123467
12345
123456
1234
1152 x 870
2-Page Mono
3467
345
3456
34
NTSC5
12467
1245
12456
124
NTSC/PAL5
12367
1235
12356
123
On-The-Fly Resolution Switching 13”
1467
145
1456
14
On-The-Fly Resolution Switching 14”
146789
14589
145689
1489
On-The-Fly Resolution Switching 17”
14678
1458
14568
148
On-The-Fly Resolution Switching 21”
14679
1459
14569
149
Basics
Running a G3 Server without a Monitor - 75
Notes for Table 3:
1 Sep. Sync: denotes Separate Synchronization.
2 C. Sync 1: denotes Composite Synchronization Type 1
(DB15 Pin 3 connected to HD15 Pin 13).
3 C. Sync 2: denotes Composite Synchronization Type 2
(DB15 Pin 3 & 15 connected to HD15 Pin 13).
4 Sync On Grn: denotes Synchronization on Green.
Video Terminator Dip Switch Settings
Set the dip switches on the terminator as shown:
ON
1
DIP
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
ON
DIP
10
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Dip Switch Settings for Video Terminator
8
9
10
Basics
The DAV Connector - 76
The DAV Connector
The AV I/O Personality card has a digital audio video (DAV)
connector. The DAV connector allows a PCI expansion card to
access the AV I/O card video input data bus and associated
control signals. The PCI card can use the digital video bus on
the AV I/O card to transfer real-time video data to the
computer. The PCI expansion card can contain a hardware
video compressor or other video processor.
The DAV connector is a 60-pin flat-ribbon connector located
at the top edge of the AV I/O card. A PCI expansion card can
connect to the AV I/O card with a 7-inch 60-conductor flatribbon cable that is installed between the DAV connector and
the PCI card. The DAV connector accepts YUV video and analog
sound from the PCI expansion card.
Basics
Voltage Switch - 77
Voltage Switch
Voltage
Switch
The voltage switch must be
set correctly to avoid
damaging the computer.
Insert a screw driver in the
slot to set the switch to show
“115” for voltages between
100 and 130. Set the switch
to show “230” for voltages
between 200 and 270. Some
countries use two
standardized voltages. If you
aren’t sure which voltage is
available, check with the
electricity supply company
before plugging in the
computer.
Basics
Voltage Switch - 78
Here is a table listing voltages for some countries:
Country
Voltage
Japan
100
Jamaica, Taiwan
110
South Korea
Peru
Brazil, Lebanon
Philippines
100 or 220
110 or 220
110–220
115
Bermuda, Canada, Puerto Rico, United States, Venezuela
120
Saudi Arabia
127 or 220
Mexico
Hong Kong
127
200
Basics
Voltage Switch - 79
Country
Voltage
India, South Africa
220–250
Australia, Kuwait, Malta, New Zealand, Northern Ireland,
Papua New Guinea, Oman, Qatar, United Kingdom
240
Bahrain, Chile, China (People’s Republic), Czechoslovakia,
Egypt, Greenland, Hungary, Iceland, Iran, Jordan,
Liechtenstein, Nepal, Paraguay, Poland, Romania, United
Arab Emirates, Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent
States (CIS), Yemen, Yugoslavia
220
Israel, Pakistan, Singapore
Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany,
Greece, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal,
Spain, Sweden, Switzerland
230
220–230
Basics
PowerPC G3 and Backside Cache - 80
PowerPC G3 and Backside Cache
Backside cache is a significant architectural design change
from earlier PowerPC processors. The main advantage of the
backside cache architecture is the speed of the dedicated
CPU-to-L2 cache interface. Using the dedicated bus allows
the CPU to access the fast L2 cache storage through a high
speed bus without addressing the slower system bus or
competing with other devices attached to the system bus. In
comparison, a “far-side” cache running on the system bus
would limit that SRAM interface to 50MHz.
The PowerPC G3 microprocessor interfaces with SRAM
storage via a dedicated bus running at various multiples of
the core PLL CPU speed. With high speed L2 SRAM and a
dedicated L2 bus, the CPU can access stored information up
to the speed of the processor clock. L2 access is determined
by the clock ratio setting. For example, with a 250MHz
Basics
SDRAM DIMMs - 81
PowerPC G3, and a 2.5 L2 bus ratio, the backside cache bus
speed will be 100MHz, twice the speed of the system bus.
SDRAM DIMMs
Three DRAM expansion slots on the logic board accept 3.3 V
SDRAM unbuffered 8-byte DIMMs. The 168-pin DIMM has a
64-bit-wide data bus per bank. The minimum bank size
supported is 2 MB, and the largest is 64 MB. The largest
DIMM supported is a two-bank DIMM of 128 MB using 64
Mbit SDRAM devices. The minitower chassis on the Power
Macintosh G3 and Macintosh Server G3 accommodates a RAM
DIMM height of 1.15 inches.
The DRAM DIMMs can be installed one or more at a time. The
logic board supports only linear memory organization.
Therefore, no performance gains are seen when two DIMMs
Basics
SGRAM Video Memory - 82
of the same size are installed. Any supported size DIMM can
be installed in any DIMM slot, and the combined memory of
all the DIMMs installed will be configured as a contiguous
array of memory.
Important: Power Mac/Server G3 computers use SDRAM
DIMMs. DIMMs from older Macintosh computers are not
compatible and should not be used even though they fit into
the Power Mac/Server G3 DRAM DIMM slots.
SGRAM Video Memory
The Power Mac/Server G3 logic board comes with 2 MB of
Synchronous Graphic RAM (SGRAM) video memory soldered
on. The logic board also contains a video memory expansion
slot that accepts a Small Outline DIMM (SO-DIMM) to
increase video memory up to a maximum of 6 MB. Apple
Basics
SGRAM Video Memory - 83
supports a 4 MB SGRAM SO-DIMM that is 32-bit wide,
144-pin, fast-paged, 83 MHz/12 ns cycle time or faster.
Important: Use only SGRAM SO-DIMMs. Never use the 256K
or 512K video memory DIMMs used in older computers.
Basics
DIMM Slots - 84
DIMM Slots
Video Memory Expansion Slot
DRAM DIMM Slots
ROM Slot
(Do not remove
the ROM DIMM.)
(Front of computer)
Basics
Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) - 85
Peripheral Component Interconnect
(PCI)
The Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) expansion
slots accept 6.88-inch and 12.283-inch PCI cards. Because
the PCI bus is an industry standard, most existing PCI 2.0compliant cards (with the addition of a Mac OS-specific
software driver) will work in these computers.
PCI offers significantly higher performance than the NuBus
architecture used in previous Macintosh models. Running at
33 MHz, the PCI bus is up to three times faster than NuBus,
offering overall enhanced system performance, particularly
in the areas of video and networking.
Basics
Front View - 86
Front View
Floppy Drive
CD-ROM Drive
CD-ROM Drive
Open/Close Button
Zip Drive
Expansion Bay
Power Button /
Power-on Light
Speaker
Note: The Power Mac G3 Minitower computer comes with a
Zip drive (as shown); the Macintosh Server G3 does not.
Basics
Rear View - 87
Rear View
SCSI Port
Apple Desktop Bus
(ADB) Port
Ethernet Port (10Base-T)
Printer Port
External Modem Port
Monitor Port
Internal Modem Card
(optional)
Expansion Slot
Access Covers
Internal Hard Drive
Lockable Cover Latch
Power Socket
Monitor Power Socket
Sound Input Port
Sound Output Port
Security Lock Port
Basics
Logic Board Diagram - 88
Logic Board Diagram
Power Supply PERCH
Jumper Block
Slot
Ethernet
ADB
Port
Port
Monitor
Serial
SCSI
Port
Ports
Port
Internal SCSI
Connector
CUDA Reset
Button
IDE Connector
PCI
Slots
Power Supply
Connector
Video Memory
SO DIMM
Floppy Drive
Connector
Voltage Regulator
Processor Jumper Block
Battery
LED
Speaker Power CD ROM
On/Off Audio DIMM
DRAM
DIMM
Microprocessor
Basics
Fan Installation - 89
Fan Installation
One or two auxiliary fans may be installed in the baffle
handle. Third-party PCI card manufacturers may suggest
these fans be installed based on the thermal characteristics
of their cards.
Two sets of four fan screw posts indicate where you can
install these fans. Fans must be positioned so they pull air
into the computer, not push air out. Be sure the screws don’t
extend down into the space where PCI cards or cables may be
present.
Basics
Fan Installation - 90
Fan Screw Posts
Fan Screw Posts
Screw Installation
Direction
Air
Flow
Direction
Basics
Repair Strategy - 91
Repair Strategy
Service the Power Mac/Server G3 computers through
module exchange and parts replacement. Customers can
request on-site service from an Apple Authorized Service
Provider Plus (AASP+) Apple Assurance (US only), or
Apple Canada Technical Answerline (Cananda only). They can
also choose carry-in service from an AASP.
Ordering
Apple Service Providers planning to support the computer
systems covered in this manual may purchase Service
modules and parts to develop servicing capability. To order
parts, use the AppleOrder (US only) or ARIS (Canada only)
system and refer to the Power Macintosh G3 “Service Price
Pages.”
Basics
Repair Strategy - 92
Large businesses, universities, and K-12 accounts must
provide a purchase order on all transactions, including
orders placed through the AppleOrder (US only) or ARIS
(Canada only) system.
USA Ordering
US Service providers not enrolled in AppleOrder may fax
their orders to Service Provider Support (512-9088125) or mail them to
Apple Computer, Inc.
Service Provider Support
MS 212-SPS
Austin, TX 78714-9125
For US inquiries, please call Service Provider Support at
800-919-2775 and select option #1.
Basics
Repair Strategy - 93
Canadian Ordering
Canadian Service providers not enrolled in ARIS may fax
their orders to Service Provider Support in Canada
(1-800-903-5284). For Canadian inquiries, please call
Service Provider Support at 905-513-5782 and select
option #3.
Basics
Warranty/AppleCare/ARIS - 94
Warranty/AppleCare/ARIS
US Only
The Power Macintosh G3 computers are covered under the
Apple One-Year Limited Warranty. The AppleCare Service
Plan is also available for these products. Service Providers
are reimbursed for warranty and AppleCare repairs made to
these computers. For pricing information, refer to “Service
Price Pages.”
Canada Only
The Power Macintosh G3 computers are covered under
AppleCare. The Extended AppleCare Service Plan is also
available for these products. Service Providers are
reimbursed for warranty and AppleCare repairs made to
these computers. For pricing information, refer to “Service
Price Pages.”
The Power
Macintosh G3
Series: Innovative
Product Design for
Affordable High
Performance
A little background
Two decades ago, Apple made its name by bringing advanced technology to mainstream
users through extraordinarily easy-to-use products. In particular, we gained a reputation
for success in pioneering the educational use of computers and championing the advancement of multimedia technology.
Although that reputation has remained remarkably unchanged through the years—
Apple is still regarded as the industry leader in both education and multimedia—the
technology behind it has been altered practically beyond recognition, as have customer
expectations. Today’s mainstream computer users want affordable high-performance
systems that provide outstanding communications and multimedia capabilities. The Power
Macintosh G3 series was developed to satisfy that need—and to exceed customer expectations about price/performance value.
The Power Macintosh G3 series product design
When you talk about overall system design, you are really talking about a number of
things—from the processor to the physical enclosure to the system software to the logic
board—whose interrelationships are central to the user experience. The Power Macintosh
G3 products were designed to meet the needs of our customers for performance, flexibility, and expandability through a streamlined development process in which a single logic
board design provides a variety of capabilities. This approach simplifies testing, speeding
development and increasing system reliability. In addition, the use of greater numbers of
industry-standard parts than in previous Apple systems makes Power Macintosh G3
computers even more affordable.
Logic board. A computer’s logic board design is the ultimate determinant of its
functionality, involving such key features as processor, memory setup (controller and
expansion capabilities), graphics support, and storage capabilities. The Power Macintosh G3
series systems use a mini-ATX board, which features, among other innovations, a faster system
bus (66 megahertz as opposed to 50 megahertz, with room for further growth as processor
speeds continue to increase) to support higher performance. This relatively tiny board,
roughly the size of this fact sheet, allows for outstanding expandability—for example, by
permitting the hard disk drive to fit within the base of the desktop model, so that it can also
easily accommodate a Zip drive. In addition, it features an easy-to-access audio/video card slot
that gives Apple the flexibility of offering a single product that provides a range of communications and multimedia capabilities to meet the varying needs of our users. For example, the
Power Macintosh G3 is currently available in two versions: one system with stereo-quality
audio capabilities and the other a full-featured, multimedia-optimized computer that also
provides video-input/output capabilities and is suitable for content authoring.
Enclosure. The board’s efficient use of space is also the key to our ability to use the
same logic board in two very different physical enclosures. The Power Macintosh G3 series
is currently available in a sleek, low-lying desktop model and a convenient, space-saving
minitower. Both enclosures reflect Apple’s tradition of user-centered design—offering
exceptionally easy access to the board for expansion and servicing.
System software. These systems run Apple’s latest and already outstandingly
successful system software: Mac OS 8. Providing significant enhancements in the areas of
user interface (including true multitasking and virtual memory capabilities) and Internet
access and publishing (including integrated support for Java, and software tools that let
users easily publish information on the Internet or a local intranet), Mac OS 8 has quickly
gained a reputation for providing the industry’s best overall user experience.
http://www.apple.com
Graphics controller
and video expansion
3 PCI slots
Audio/Video
card slot
In addition, the logic board design of the Power Macintosh G3 systems exhibits the following
characteristics in these vital areas:
Processor. These computers use the innovative, next-generation PowerPC G3
processor, which was designed specifically to provide increased power at affordable cost.
It does so through three major innovations: a state-of-the-art 0.25-micron manufacturing
process, optimization for the Mac OS, and a new, more efficient approach to level 2 cache
known as backside cache. Backside cache boosts performance far above the performance
of earlier systems—even those with higher clock speeds—by positioning the cache
directly on the processor module and making it directly accessible through a faster,
dedicated bus. This bus can run at varying speeds in proportion to the processor speed.
So, for example, the Power Macintosh G3 system based on a 266-megahertz PowerPC G3
processor features a 133-megahertz dedicated backside bus—more than twice the speed
of the system bus.
Memory. The memory controller
I/O: graphics, 2 serial,
and PCI bridge support the Power
Ethernet, ADB, SCSI
Macintosh G3 systems’ three memory
slots and three PCI expansion slots.
These systems make use of a faster,
industry-standard memory, SDRAM,
I/O ASIC
which adds to both their economy
and their availability.
Memory
Graphics controller. The
controller
and PCI bridge Power Macintosh G3 series systems
incorporate an ATI RAGE II+ graphics
controller, which not only provides
outstanding performance, but also
enables far greater expandability
(2MB to 6MB) than was previously
available, so users can choose the
level of graphics performance that
PowerPC G3
meets their needs.
processor with
I/O ASIC. This component
backside cache
3 DIMM (RAM) slots
provides support for the input and
output of all standard Macintosh
graphics functionality and Apple Desktop Bus (ADB), serial, and SCSI connections. It also
efficiently incorporates 10BASE-T Ethernet, to meet users’ growing demands for easy and
immediate access to high-performance networking capabilities.
The “why”
The motivation behind this innovative product design is the same simple idea that drives
all of Apple’s efforts: bringing truly outstanding computing performance to our users more
and more easily and economically. So when you’re looking for the computer that’s just right
for you, don’t just look at the numbers (things such as processor speed and hard disk
capacity). Because today, it’s more important than ever to consider overall product design.
Apple Computer, Inc. 1 Infinite Loop Cupertino, CA 95014 (408) 996-1010 www.apple.com
© 1997 Apple Computer, Inc. All rights reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, Mac, Macintosh, and Power Macintosh are
trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S.A. and other countries. Java is a trademark or registered trademark of
Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the U.S.A. and other countries. PowerPC is a trademark of International Business Machines Corporation,
used under license therefrom. Other product and company names mentioned herein may be trademarks of their respective companies.
November 1997. Product specifications are subject to change without notice. Printed in the U.S.A.
L02589A
The PowerPC G3
Processor: Taking
the Macintosh to
the Next Level
A little background
Nearly six years ago, Apple, IBM, and Motorola joined forces to create a new processor
technology that would bring the performance advantages of the RISC (Reduced Instruction
Set Computing) architecture—at that time limited to costly workstations—to personal
computers. The result of this initiative was the development of PowerPC processor technology, which Apple debuted in 1994 with the introduction of the Power Macintosh line.
The initial Power Macintosh models were based on the first implementation of the
new chip technology: the PowerPC 601, which was intended for use in high-end personal
computers. In early 1995, Apple introduced products based on the PowerPC processor
technology’s second generation—the PowerPC 603, which utilized a chip design optimized
for use in low-end to midrange desktop systems and portables. This was quickly followed
by the introduction of the second-generation high-end PowerPC processor: the PowerPC
604. Since then, both IBM and Motorola have made enhancements to the PowerPC 603 and
604 (now the 603e and 604e), and these enhanced chips have been used in subsequent
Apple systems.
The PowerPC G3 performance story
PowerPC Processor Roadmap
A roadmap for the development of PowerPC processor technology,
from its inception to the end of the century.
PowerPC G3 optimization features
include the following:
• Addition of a second integer ALU (arithmetic
and logic unit), which allows the processor
to execute two successive integer operations
in parallel
• The ability to fetch four instructions per cycle
from the cache
• A “hardware tablewalk” feature, which allows
the CPU to access virtual page tables directly
• Adoption of a dynamic prediction method for
improving the efficiency of branch handling
The emergence of the PowerPC G3 processor marks the third
phase in the development of this advanced processor technology.
Touted by Microprocessor Report (February 17, 1997) as “an
outstanding combination of high performance and low cost,”
the PowerPC G3 builds on many of the features pioneered by the
PowerPC 603 and 604. However, this innovative chip differs from
the earlier implementations of PowerPC processor technology in
several significant ways:
• The PowerPC G3 is the first processor specifically optimized for
the Mac OS.
• It incorporates an innovative backside cache design that speeds
access to level 2 cache.
• It contains large (32K) on-chip level 1 data and instruction
caches, for a total of 64K level 1 cache.
• It’s produced using an industry-leading 0.25-micron manufacturing process.
These four innovations share one very important characteristic: the capacity to provide
significant performance gains. Following is a more detailed breakdown of the advantages
offered by each.
Mac OS optimization. Because the earlier PowerPC processor models were essentially developed simultaneously with Apple’s Power Macintosh line, there was no opportunity to optimize these chips’ performance for running Mac OS–based applications. But that
was more than half a decade ago. Today, the Power Macintosh line is well established and
Mac OS–based software abounds, placing the developers of the PowerPC G3 processor in
the unique position of having the luxury to consider—and optimize—chip design in light
of actual software performance.
http://www.apple.com
Learning to look beyond megahertz
The performance enhancements of the PowerPC
G3 processor significantly reduce the usefulness
of clock speed in attempting to compare computer performance. Apple systems based on
this processor consistently outperform systems
with higher clock speeds—in fact, they also
outperform Pentium II–based systems. Some
examples follow.
• A 250-megahertz Macintosh PowerBook G3
is faster than a 266-megahertz Pentium II
desktop.*
• A 233-megahertz Power Macintosh G3 is
faster than the Power Macintosh 6500/300
and the Power Macintosh 8600/300.**
• A 266-megahertz Power Macintosh G3
provides performance that is on average
30 percent faster than that of a comparable
266-megahertz Pentium II system.*
All of which means that when you’re looking
for the computer that’s right for you, it’s more
important than ever to consider overall product
design—megahertz alone does not tell the
whole story.
* Based on Apple internal tests running 15 separate Adobe
Photoshop filters.
** Based on Apple internal testing using MacBench 4.0
processor performance scores. Actual performance on
applications may vary. MacBench is a subsystem-level
benchmark that measures the relative performance of
Mac OS–based systems.
Level 2 backside cache. By far the biggest boost to performance that the PowerPC G3
offers can be credited to its incorporation of an approach to level 2 cache memory known as
backside cache. This approach effectively bypasses limitations on the speed at which transactions between the processor and the level 2 cache can occur. Earlier PowerPC processors used
the system bus to access both the level 2 cache memory and the main memory, which could
result in conflicts. For example, under the previous approach, at processor clock speeds above
200 megahertz, the CPU would often stall as it waited for data to arrive from the level 2 cache.
To prevent such slowdowns, the PowerPC G3 processor features a new dedicated bus that
handles only the CPU/cache transactions. This bus can operate at higher speeds than the
system bus—speeds that relate incrementally to the clock speed of the processor. This enables
the more effective use of level 2 cache, because even the relatively large amounts of data it can
store can be accessed by the processor rapidly and efficiently. In fact, as clock speeds increase,
so does the performance value offered by the backside cache design.
Large level 1 (on-chip) data and instruction caches. In comparison with the 8K
on-chip caches incorporated into the design of the original PowerPC 603, the PowerPC G3
processor includes 32K of instruction cache and 32K of data cache, for a total of 64K level 1
cache. These relatively large on-chip caches support—and add to—the overall performance
gains offered by the PowerPC G3 processor.
New manufacturing process. Finally, the industry-leading 0.25-micron process used to
produce the PowerPC G3 processors does more than merely boost performance; it also enables
the creation of smaller, cooler processors with extremely low power requirements. In essence,
it represents a brand-new approach to chip design, one that brings workstation-class performance not only to desktop systems, but even to notebook computers—using the same processor.
Benefits to the user
As the PowerPC G3 processor becomes central to Apple system designs, increasing numbers
of Macintosh users will enjoy these benefits:
• Significant performance gains, which enhance the power available to handle
such resource-intensive tasks as video editing, Internet authoring, and
Processor card
Windows emulation through software alone, rather than requiring more
costly and complex hardware add-ons
Level 2 Cache
CPU
• Even more affordable higher performance—in particular, providing a radical
I
improvement in the value proposition offered by our entry-level and midrange
Dedicated processor bus
System bus
systems
RAM
• The ability to purchase a notebook system that can truly offer the performance
of a desktop computer
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
PCI slots
The “why”
Memory bus
Backside Cache
The backside cache design allows the CPU to access the cache
directly at speeds that vary proportionally to the CPU speed
The rationale for Apple’s introduction of the PowerPC G3 processor is strikingly simple. It’s the same concept that led us to embark on the PowerPC effort
initially: At Apple, we are committed to developing and supporting processor
technology that can offer our entire range of users truly outstanding performance—so they can spend less time dealing with the mechanics of computing
and more time exploring their creative potential.
Apple Computer, Inc. 1 Infinite Loop Cupertino, CA 95014 (408) 996-1010 www.apple.com
© 1997 Apple Computer, Inc. All rights reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, Mac, Macintosh, PowerBook, and Power Macintosh are
trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S.A. and other countries. Adobe is a trademark of Adobe Systems
Incorporated. PowerPC is a trademark of International Business Machines Corporation, used under license therefrom.
November 1997. Product specifications are subject to change without notice. Printed in the U.S.A.
L02588A
K Service Source
Specifications
Power Macintosh/Server G3
Minitower
Specifications
Introduction - 1
Introduction
Specifications information for this product can be found in this chapter and also in the Spec
Database, which you can access in one of three ways:
— Launch it directly by double-clicking the Apple Spec Database runtime alias at the top
level of the Main Service Source CD.
— Select "Apple Spec Database" from the Service Source drop-down main menu.
— Click the Acrobat toolbar icon for the database, which is near the right end of the toolbar with the letters "SP."
Specifications
Processor - 2
Processor
CPU
Minitower
Server
Processor Bus
PowerPC G3 RISC microprocessor running at 233 MHz,
266 MHz, or 300 MHz
Built-in FPU
Original logic board requires system software version 8.0 or
later with appropriate Enabler version; Version 2 of the logic
board requires system software version 8.1 or later with
system enabler 777
Requires system software version 8.1 or later with appropriate
software extensions
64-bit wide, 66 MHz, supporting split address and data tenures
Specifications
Memory - 3
Memory
SDRAM
Minitower
Server
Uses 168-pin, 64-bit, 70 ns or faster, 3.3 V, unbuffered
synchronous dynamic access memory (SDRAM) DIMMs
(1K, 2K, or 4K refresh rate)
32 MB standard, expandable to 384 MB
64 MB or 128 MB standard, expandable to 384 MB
Cache
Supports 512K cache module, 3.3 V with SRAM and 178-pin card
ROM
4 MB ROM on 160-pin DIMM, 64-bit ROM data bus width
Video RAM
2 MB expandable to 4 MB or 6 MB using 32-bit wide, 144-pin,
3.3 V, fast-paged SGRAM SO-DIMM connector with 70 ns RAM
access time or faster
Specifications
I/O Interfaces - 4
I/O Interfaces
SCSI Port
External SCSI connector is 25-pin D-type connector; supports up
to seven SCSI devices
Serial Port
Two serial ports support AppleTalk and GeoPort serial protocols;
accept 8-pin or 9-pin plugs
ADB Port
One Apple Desktop Bus port for a keyboard, mouse, etc.
Ethernet Port
10Base-T, RJ-45
Specifications
Expansion
I/O Interfaces - 5
Three PCI expansion slots, compatible with all PCI 2.0
specification-compliant cards with the addition of Mac OSspecific software driver (not NuBus compatible);
accepts three PCI cards (6.88" or 12.283"), or three 15 W
cards, or two 25 W cards
Three SCSI expansion bays for 3.5" devices (one bay may be
occupied by optional Zip drive on Minitower); 50-pin
connectors for internal SCSI devices
Specifications
I/O Devices - 6
I/O Devices
Keyboard
AppleDesign Keyboard
Mouse
ADB Mouse II
Microphone
Apple PlainTalk microphone standard
Specifications
Disk Storage - 7
Disk Storage
Hard Drive
Minitower
Server
4 GB or 6 GB internal ATA hard drive standard; 4 GB or 9 GB Ultra
Wide hard drive optional
One or two 4 GB Ultra Wide hard drives standard; 9 GB Ultra Wide
hard drive optional
Floppy Drive
One Apple SuperDrive 1.4 MB floppy drive
CD-ROM or
DVD-ROM Drive
One internal 24x ATAPI CD-ROM drive or one internal 2x ATAPI
DVD-ROM drive
Zip Drive
Optional 100 MB SCSI Iomega or ATAPI Zip drive (depending on
the logic board version)
Specifications
Video - 8
Video
Video Display Modes
Graphics
Acceleration
Built-in monitor port supports:
• 640 x 480, 800 x 600, 832 x 624 at 32 bits per pixel
• 1024 x 768, 1152 x 870, 1280 x 1024, 1600 x 1200 at
16 bits per pixel
Built-in graphics controller, 2D and 3D hardware graphics
acceleration of 2D QuickDraw graphics
Specifications
I/O Cards - 9
I/O Cards
PERCH Slot
182-pin microchannel connector (PERCH slot connector) that
supports Apple Audio I/O or Audio and Video I/O cards; Note:
PERCH slot does not accept PCI cards
Audio/Video
Sound on Minitower
and Server
Optional front jack for headphones
Rear jack for stereophonic speakers
One built-in speaker
Supports 16 bits/channel stereo input and output
External 1/8" jack for sound in
Sample rates of 11.025, or 22.050, or 44.100 kHz
Specifications
Video on Minitower
Modem Slot
I/O Cards - 10
Video input and output through RCA or S-Video connectors
Accepts NTSC, PAL, or SECAM format
YUV format for digital video input
Video display in 320 x 240 pixel window
Pixel expansion for 640 x 480 pixel maximum display
Video overlay capability
Bi-directional digital audio video (DAV) 60-pin connector for
adding video processor on PCI card
112-pin connector to accept optional fax/modem card
Note: Does not carry PCI signals
Specifications
Electrical - 11
Electrical
Line Voltage
100–130 V or 200–240 V depending on voltage switch setting
Frequency
50—60 Hz
Maximum Power
161 W, 1.5 A
Specifications
Physical - 12
Physical
Dimensions
Height:
Width:
Depth:
Weight:
385 mm; 15.15 in
245 mm; 9.64 in
435 mm; 17.75 in
15 kg; 33.1 lbs
Specifications
Environmental - 13
Environmental
Operating
Temperature
50 to 104° F (10 to 40° C)
Storage
Temperature
-40 to 116° F (-40 to 47° C)
Relative Humidity
5–95% noncondensing
Maximum Altitude
10,000 ft. (3,048 m)
Power Macintosh G3 Series
The Power Macintosh G3 series features exciting Apple innovations in
processor technology and system architecture that significantly increase
both performance and expandability, to enhance your productivity and
encourage your creativity. These systems are designed to transform your
ideal vision of professional computing into affordable reality.
Built on the PowerPC G3 processor, with its Mac OS optimization and
performance-boosting backside level 2 cache memory, the Power Macintosh
G3 computers have dramatically altered the price/performance equation for
professional computing. Boasting impressive benchmark test results, these
are the fastest Macintosh computers ever, with scores of up to 1155. And all
Power Macintosh G3 series systems feature an innovative logic board design
with a fast system bus, to maximize their processing power.
Every Power Macintosh G3 also includes a high-capacity hard disk drive
and at least one expansion bay for additional storage, a 24x-speed (maximum)
CD-ROM drive, built-in 10BASE-T Ethernet networking, and high-quality video
and audio. To complement their hardware innovations, these advanced computers run the latest Mac OS system software from Apple. They feature three
PCI slots for easy expansion of their already impressive capabilities. So no matter what challenges your job entails, there’s a Power Macintosh G3 computer
to handle them.
Need even more flexible or faster communications? A variety of options
are available, including a high-speed modem and high-speed Ethernet, that
make it easy to work collaboratively with colleagues—whether they’re just
across the hall or clear across the country. And if you want to work with highquality digital video, you’ll appreciate the Apple FireWire option that allows
you to connect your digital video camcorder to produce professional-quality
digital video more easily and more affordably than ever; and the Apple DVDVideo solution, which provides high-quality DVD-Video playback so you can
watch the latest DVD movies right on your computer.*
The Power Macintosh G3 series: the professional choice.
Desktop and Minitower
Computers
Features
Next-generation PowerPC processor
technology
• Introduces the first processor specifically
optimized for the Mac OS—the PowerPC G3,
running at 266, 300, or 333 MHz
• Uses a leading-edge process for a smaller,
lower-power chip design
• Features an innovative backside cache
architecture to increase performance
Innovative system architecture
• Uses an efficient logic board design
• Increases the system bus speed to maximize
processor performance gains
High-quality communications and
multimedia support
• Makes communications fast and easy through
built-in Ethernet networking
• Offers 16-bit stereo audio input/output and
high-quality video input/output**
• Includes a 24x-speed (maximum) CD-ROM drive
• Is available with a Zip drive**
Outstanding flexibility
• Provides three standard 12-inch PCI slots for
easy expansion of system functionality (open
slots vary by configuration)
• Includes expansion bays for additional storage
devices (varies by configuration)
• Speeds system expansion and servicing
through an exceptionally easy-to-access design
Power Macintosh Performance Comparisons
Based on MacBench Processor Scores***
1155
G3 at 333
1050
G3 at 300
878
G3 at 266
733
8600/300
6500/300
7300/200
432
358
*Must be configured at the time of purchase; see Ordering
Information for details.
**Available in some configurations; see Configurations
chart for product details.
***Based on Apple internal testing using MacBench 4.0
processor performance scores. Actual performance on
applications will vary. MacBench is a subsystem-level
benchmark that measures the relative performance of
Mac OS–based systems.
Power Macintosh G3 Series
Technical Specifications
Processor and memory
• 266-, 300-, or 333-MHz PowerPC G3
processor
• 512K or 1MB backside level 2 cache on
processor module; 133-, 150-, or 16-MHz
dedicated 64-bit backside bus
• 66-MHz system bus
• Integrated floating-point unit and 64K
on-chip level 1 cache (32K for data and 32K
for instruction)
• At least 32MB of SDRAM (3.3-volt, unbuffered,
64-bit wide, 168-pin, running at more than 100
MHz, 10-nanosecond cycle time); three DIMM
slots support up to 768MB
• 64-bit memory bus
Storage
• Internal IDE or Ultra/Wide SCSI hard disk drive
• Internal high-capacity floppy disk drive
— Accepts high-density 1.44MB disks and
800K disks
— Reads, writes, and formats Mac OS, Windows,
MS-DOS, OS/2, and ProDOS disks
• Internal 24x-speed (maximum) ATAPI
CD-ROM drive
• Internal 100MB Zip drive*
• Expansion bays for additional storage devices
— Desktop models: One or two 3.5-inch drive bays
— Minitower models: One or two 5.25-inch
drive bays
Interfaces
• Three 12-inch PCI expansion slots compatible
with PCI 2.1–compliant cards (open slots vary
by configuration)
• Two high-speed DMA serial (RS-232/RS-422)
ports compatible with LocalTalk cables
• Built-in 10BASE-T Ethernet connector
• Internal and external SCSI buses (up to 5 MBps)
• Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) expansion port
• DB-15 connector for monitor
• Communications slot for modem card
• Minijacks for 16-bit stereo audio input/output;
up to 44.1-kHz sampling rate
• Composite and S-video connectors for video
input/output*
Video capabilities*
• 24-bit video input
— Support for NTSC, PAL, and SECAM
— Up to 320- by 240-pixel capture at up to 30
frames per second
— Maximum capture size of 640 by 480 pixels
• 24-bit video output
— High sample rate on output signal eliminates
need for external and analog filtering
— Support for NTSC and PAL
Electrical requirements and agency
approvals
• Line voltage: 100 to 125V AC or 200 to 240V
AC, RMS single phase
• Frequency: 50 to 60 Hz, single phase
• Power: 230W maximum for desktop, 240W
maximum for minitower; not including display
• EPA Energy Star and Blue Angel compliant
(desktop models only)
ADB power requirements
• Maximum current draw for all devices: 500 mA
(maximum of three ADB devices recommended)
• Mouse draws 10 mA
• Keyboard draws 25 to 80 mA
Environmental requirements
• Operating temperature: 50° to 104° F
(10° to 40° C)
• Storage temperature: –40° to 116° F
(–40° to 47° C)
• Relative humidity: 5% to 95% noncondensing
• Maximum altitude: 10,000 ft. (3,048 m)
Graphics support
• Built-in 64-bit graphics and multimedia
accelerator chip
• 2MB or 6MB of SGRAM video memory;
supports up to 6MB
*Available in some configurations; see Configurations
chart for product details.
**May differ based on configuration.
Desktop and Minitower
Computers
Power Macintosh G3 Series
Desktop and Minitower
Computers
Ordering Information
For detailed information about the currently available configurations, see the chart below. All models
also include an internal 1.44MB floppy disk drive;
keyboard and mouse; Mac OS 8.1 (which includes
Internet access software); complete setup, learning,
and reference documentation; and limited warranty.
Build-to-order (BTO) options
In addition to choosing from among Apple’s
prebuilt systems (see Configurations chart), you
can order a custom-configured computer from
your local reseller or the online Apple Store. This
allows you to select the processor speed, amount
of RAM, hard disk drive capacity, audio/video
capabilities, and other features. You can also
add options such as the following:
• Zip drive for flexible storage capabilities
• DVD option, which includes internal ATAPI
DVD-ROM drive that supports CD-ROMs
at 20x speed (maximum) and DVD-ROMs
•
•
•
•
at 2x speed (maximum), and the DVD-Video
and AV card that allows you to watch the latest
DVD titles right on your computer
High-speed 10/100BASE-T Fast Ethernet
PCI card
FireWire option, which lets you use your
FireWire-based digital video (DV) camcorder
to produce professional-quality digital video;
comes with Adobe Premiere plug-ins that
support capture, edit, and playback, as well
as export to tape
Internal 56-Kbps data/14.4-Kbps fax modem*
plus FAXstf software
128-bit 2D/3D graphics PCI card with 8MB
of EDO VRAM for accelerated high-resolution
graphics and connection of a second monitor;
this supports monitor resolution up to 1,920 by
1,080 pixels (32 bit) at up to 72 Hz, and up to
1,920 by 1,200 pixels (16 bit) at up to 76 Hz
• Ultra/Wide SCSI hard drives and arrays with
PCI card and SoftRAID software for highperformance storage solutions
For more information
For more information about these products, or
to find out where to buy Apple products, visit
www.apple.com on the World Wide Web or call
1-800-538-9696. To purchase these products
from the Apple Store, go to www.apple.com/store.
*Data speeds up to 56 Kbps, fax speeds up to 14.4 Kbps.
Actual download speeds vary with line conditions and
your Internet service provider’s modem capabilities.
FCC regulations limit ISP transmission speeds to 53 Kbps
in the U.S. Note that only one serial port is available in
systems with the internal modem installed.
Configurations
Order no.
M6503LL/A
M7104LL/A
Power Macintosh G3
desktop computers
Processor speed
Memory (SDRAM)
Backside level 2 cache
Backside bus speed
System bus speed
Hard disk drive
CD-ROM drive
Zip drive
Graphics support
Audio/Video capabilities
Ethernet
266 MHz
32MB; supports up to 768MB
512K
133 MHz
66 MHz
4GB IDE drive
24x speed (maximum)
—
2MB SGRAM
Audio input/output
Built-in 10BASE-T
300 MHz
64MB; supports up to 768MB
1MB
150 MHz
66 MHz
6GB IDE drive
24x speed (maximum)
Yes
2MB SGRAM
Audio input/output
Built-in 10BASE-T
Order no.
M7246LL/A
M7106LL/A
Processor speed
Memory (SDRAM)
300 MHz
64MB (one 64MB DIMM);
supports up to 768MB
1MB
150 MHz
66 MHz
8GB IDE drive
24x speed (maximum)
Yes
6MB SGRAM
Audio/video input/output
Built-in 10BASE-T
333 MHz
128MB (one 128MB DIMM);
supports up to 768MB
1MB
167 MHz
66 MHz
9GB Ultra/Wide SCSI drive and PCI card
24x speed (maximum)
—
6MB SGRAM
Audio input/output
Built-in 10BASE-T
Power Macintosh G3
minitower computers
Backside level 2 cache
Backside bus speed
System bus speed
Hard disk drive
CD-ROM drive
Zip drive
Graphics support
Audio/Video capabilities
Ethernet
Apple Computer, Inc.
1 Infinite Loop
Cupertino, CA 95014
(408) 996-1010
www.apple.com
© 1998 Apple Computer, Inc. All rights reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, FireWire, LocalTalk, Mac, Macintosh, Power Macintosh, and ProDOS are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc.,
registered in the U.S.A. and other countries. The Apple Store is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc. Adobe is a trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. PowerPC is a trademark of
International Business Machines Corporation, used under license therefrom. Other product and company names mentioned herein may be trademarks of their respective companies.
Mention of non-Apple products is for informational purposes only and constitutes neither an endorsement nor a recommendation. Apple assumes no responsibility with regard to
the selection, performance, or use of these products. All understandings, agreements, or warranties, if any, take place directly between the vendors and the prospective users.
Product specifications are subject to change without notice.
August 1998
L02515G
Macintosh Server G3
The Macintosh Server G3 brings Apple’s recent desktop system innovations
into the server world. It builds on the features behind the stunning success
of the Power Macintosh G3 computer line by offering additional capabilities
designed to enhance workgroup efficiency, such as high-capacity storage and
state-of-the-art collaboration, productivity, and reliability software. The result
is a unique server solution combining high performance with ease of use and
economy. In fact, with its low cost (and even lower cost of ownership relative
to competitors), the Macintosh Server G3 is the ideal tool to help small to
medium-size workgroups in education, publishing/media, and other businesses get the most from their information technology.
Servers from Apple are highly reliable systems with large storage capacity
that provide organizations with faster, more efficient shared network services
and secure centralized storage. The Macintosh Server G3 not only meets
these criteria, but also runs the familiar graphical Mac OS, making all of its
capabilities incredibly easy to use.
An affordable and versatile midrange server, the Macintosh Server G3
offers outstanding performance through its 233-, 266-, or 300-megahertz
PowerPC G3 processor. A new approach to cache memory called backside
cache enables the Macintosh Server G3 to provide outstanding performance.
The server also features a new logic board design with a faster system bus,
to maximize its power—and your productivity.
The Macintosh Server G3 comes configured with AppleShare IP 5.0—
software that makes it easy to incorporate this advanced server into your
organizational intranet—and includes the Apple Network Administrator
Toolkit, SoftRAID, and more.
The Macintosh Server G3: helping network managers and users to
work even more efficiently and effectively.
Features
Affordable high performance with room
to grow
• Is based on the PowerPC G3 processor,
running at 233, 266, or 300 MHz
• Provides three standard PCI expansion slots
• Supports up to two additional removable mass
storage devices
Bundled software
• Is configured with AppleShare IP 5.0 server
software
• Includes the Apple Network Administrator
Toolkit, SoftRAID, and more
Ease of setup and use
• Comes with Mac OS 8.1
• Features the true plug-and-play capabilities
that characterize Apple systems
Outstanding networking support
• Includes 10/100BASE-T Ethernet as well as
LocalTalk connectivity
• Supports TCP/IP and AppleTalk networking
protocols
Macintosh Server G3
Technical Specifications
Processor and memory
• 233-, 266-, or 300-MHz PowerPC G3 processor
• 512K or 1MB backside level 2 cache on
processor module; 117-, 133-, or 150-MHz
dedicated 64-bit backside bus
• Integrated floating-point unit and 64K level 1
on-chip cache (32K for data and 32K for
instruction)
• 66-MHz system bus
• 64MB or 128MB of SDRAM; supports up to
384MB via three DIMM slots
• 64-bit memory bus
Storage
• Internal 1.44MB floppy disk drive
• One or two internal 4GB Ultra/Wide SCSI hard
disk drives
• Internal 24x-speed (maximum) CD-ROM drive
• Expansion bays for additional removable storage devices: one or two 5.25-inch SCSI bays
Interfaces
• Three PCI expansion slots compatible with PCI
2.1–compliant cards (two used, one for Fast
Ethernet and one for Ultra/Wide SCSI)*
• Two high-speed DMA serial (RS-232/RS-422)
ports compatible with LocalTalk
• Two SCSI channels: one internal Ultra/Wide
SCSI-3 (40 MBps) on PCI card; one
internal/external standard SCSI-1 (5 MBps)
• Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) expansion port
• Minijacks for 16-bit stereo audio input and
output; up to 44.1-kHz sampling rate
• DB-15 connector for monitor
Networking
• Built-in 10BASE-T Ethernet connector
• 10/100BASE-T Fast Ethernet on PCI card
• Two serial ports for LocalTalk connections
• Software support for TCP/IP and AppleTalk
networking through Open Transport software
included in Mac OS 8.1
Display support
• 2MB of SGRAM; supports up to 6MB
• Support for displays as large as 14 inches at up
to millions of colors; 16- and 17-inch Apple
displays at up to thousands of colors
• Support for most third-party displays as well as
VGA and SVGA monitors
ADB power requirements
• Maximum current draw for all devices: 500 mA
(maximum of three ADB devices recommended)
• Mouse draws 10 mA
• Keyboard draws 25 to 80 mA (varies with
keyboard used)
Environmental requirements
• Operating temperature: 50° to 95° F
(10° to 35° C)
• Storage temperature: –40° to 116° F
(–40° to 47° C)
• Relative humidity: 5% to 95% noncondensing
• Maximum altitude: 10,000 feet (3,048 m)
Keyboard and mouse
• AppleDesign Keyboard
• ADB Mouse II
• Support for ADB keyboards with numeric
keypads
Size and weight
• Height: 15.2 inches (38.6 cm)
• Width: 9.6 inches (24.3 cm)
• Depth: 17.8 inches (45.2 cm)
• Weight: 33.1 lb. (15.0 kg)—will vary based on
configuration
Clock/calendar
• Custom integrated circuit with long-life lithium
battery
*Single-function PCI cards are supported; limited support
for multifunction PCI cards. Please contact card vendors
for additional information.
Electrical requirements and agency
approvals
• Line voltage: 100 to 125 V AC or 200 to 240 V
AC, RMS single phase
• Frequency: 50 to 60 Hz, single phase
• Power: 160W maximum, not including display
• FCC Class B
Ordering Information
For detailed information about currently available
configurations, see the chart below. All models
also include an internal 1.44MB floppy disk drive;
keyboard and mouse; Mac OS 8.1; complete setup,
learning, and reference documentation; and limited
warranty. In addition, the following software has
been preinstalled, configured, and tested with every
Macintosh Server G3:
• Mac OS 8.1
• Apple Network Administrator Toolkit network
management software
• AppleShare IP 5.0 server software
• SoftRAID volume management software
• Virex 5.8
Build-to-order (BTO) options
These systems can also be ordered through the
online Apple Store, which allows you to customconfigure your computer in such areas as processor speed, RAM, and hard disk size.
For more information
For more information about these products, or to
find out where to buy Apple products—through
a reseller or from the Apple Store—visit
www.apple.com or call 1-800-538-9696.
Configurations
Order no.
M6389LL/A
M6461LL/A
M6579LL/A
Macintosh Server G3
Processor speed
Memory (SDRAM)
Backside level 2 cache
Backside bus speed
System bus speed
Hard disk drive
233 MHz
64MB: supports up to 384MB
512K
117 MHz
66 MHz
4GB Ultra/Wide SCSI and PCI card
CD-ROM drive
Graphics support
Audio/Video capabilities
Ethernet
24x speed (maximum)
2MB SGRAM
Audio input/output
10BASE-T; 10/100BASE-T PCI card
266 MHz
128MB: supports up to 384MB
512K
133 MHz
66 MHz
Two 4GB Ultra/Wide SCSI and
PCI card
24x speed (maximum)
2MB SGRAM
Audio input/output
10BASE-T; 10/100BASE-T PCI card
300 MHz
128MB: supports up to 384MB
1MB
150 MHz
66 MHz
Two 4GB Ultra/Wide SCSI and
PCI card
24x speed (maximum)
2MB SGRAM
Audio input/output
10BASE-T; 10/100BASE-T PCI card
Apple Computer, Inc.
1 Infinite Loop
Cupertino, CA 95014
(408) 996-1010
www.apple.com
© 1998 Apple Computer, Inc. All rights reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, AppleDesign, AppleShare, AppleTalk, LocalTalk, Mac, Macintosh, and Power Macintosh are trademarks of
Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S.A. and other countries. The Apple Store is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc. PowerPC is a trademark of International Business Machines
Corporation, used under license therefrom. Other product and company names mentioned herein may be trademarks of their respective companies. Mention of non-Apple products
is for informational purposes only and constitutes neither an endorsement nor a recommendation. Apple assumes no responsibility with regard to the selection, performance, or
use of these products. All understandings, agreements, or warranties, if any, take place directly between the vendors and the prospective users. Product specifications are subject to
change without notice.
May 1998
L02723C
K Service Source
Take Apart
Power Macintosh/Server G3
Minitower
Take Apart
Side Access Panel - 1
Side Access Panel
No preliminary steps are
required before you begin
this procedure.
Take Apart
Side Access Panel - 2
1
Press the release button
and pull the side access
panel away from the
computer.
Take Apart
Floppy Drive - 3
Floppy Drive
Note: This topic includes
instructions for removing
the floppy drive bezel,
floppy drive shield, drive
carrier, and floppy drive.
Before you begin, remove
the side access panel.
Take Apart
Floppy Drive - 4
1
Gently pry up the tab on
the left side of the floppy
drive bezel, swing the
bezel open, and remove
the bezel from the right
edge of the floppy drive.
Replacement Note:
Place the two latches on
the right side of the
bezel into the two slots
in the right side of the
bezel shield before
connecting the bezel to
the left edge of the drive.
Take Apart
Floppy Drive - 5
2
3
Using a Phillips
screwdriver, remove
the two floppy drive
shield screws.
Remove the floppy drive
shield.
Take Apart
Floppy Drive - 6
4
5
Disconnect the floppy
drive cable from the
back of the floppy drive.
Slide the floppy drive
carrier and drive out of
the front of the
computer.
Take Apart
Floppy Drive - 7
Replacement Note: When
inserting the drive into the
computer, make sure the
drive carrier aligns with
the carrier guides. The
carrier should slide between
five metal tabs below and
two metal tabs above the left
and right edges of the
carrier.
Take Apart
Floppy Drive - 8
Note: Perform the following
procedure if you are
replacing the floppy drive.
6
7
Using a Phillips
screwdriver, remove
the four carrier
mounting screws.
Lift the drive off the
carrier.
Take Apart
CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Drive - 9
CD-ROM or
DVD-ROM Drive
Note: This topic includes
instructions for removing
the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM
drive and their associated
bezels, shields, and
carriers. Special
instructions for cable
routing for Master/Slave
configurations can be found
at the end of this section.
Before you begin, remove
the side access panel.
Take Apart
CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Drive - 10
1
Gently pry up the tab on
the left side of the drive
bezel, swing the bezel
open, and remove the
bezel from the right edge
of the chassis.
Replacement Note:
Place the two latches on
the right side of the
bezel into the two slots
in the right side of the
bezel shield before
connecting the bezel to
the left edge of the drive.
Take Apart
CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Drive - 11
2
3
Using a Phillips
screwdriver, remove
the two shield screws.
Remove the drive shield.
Take Apart
CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Drive - 12
4
5
Disconnect the following
cables from the back of
the CD-ROM or DVDROM drive:
• Power cable
• IDE data cable
• CD audio cable
Slide the drive and
carrier out of the
computer.
Take Apart
CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Drive - 13
Replacement Note: When
inserting the drive into the
computer, make sure the
drive carrier aligns with
the carrier guides. The
carrier should slide between
five metal tabs below and
two metal tabs above the left
and right edges of the
carrier.
Take Apart
CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Drive - 14
Note: Perform the following
procedure if you are
replacing the CD-ROM or
DVD-ROM drive.
6
7
Using a Phillips
screwdriver, remove
the four carrier
mounting screws.
Lift the drive off the
carrier.
Take Apart
CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Drive - 15
Master/Slave Cable
Routing
Some G3 Minitower logic
boards support master and
slave IDE configurations,
allowing you to connect two
devices to a single IDE
channel. These boards ship
with a special split IDE
cable that also supports
master and slave
configurations.
The graphic at left shows
how the split master/slave
IDE cable connects to the
devices in the unit.
Take Apart
CD-ROM or DVD-ROM Drive - 16
The graphic at left shows
how the split master/slave
IDE cable connects to the
logic board. The same
connector is used for both
the regular IDE and master/
slave IDE cables.
Take Apart
Zip Drive - 17
Zip Drive
Note: This topic includes
instructions for removing
the Zip drive bezel, Zip
drive shield, drive carrier,
and Zip drive. Special
instructions for cable
routing for Master/Slave
configurations can be found
at the end of this section.
Before you begin, remove
the side access panel.
Take Apart
Zip Drive - 18
1
Gently pry up the tab on
the left side of the Zip
drive bezel, swing the
bezel open, and remove
the bezel from the right
edge of the Zip drive.
Replacement Note:
Place the two latches on
the right side of the
bezel into the two slots
in the right side of the
bezel shield before
connecting the bezel to
the left edge of the drive.
Take Apart
Zip Drive - 19
2
3
Using a Phillips
screwdriver, remove
the two Zip drive shield
screws.
Remove the Zip drive
shield.
Take Apart
Zip Drive - 20
4
5
Disconnect the power
cable and SCSI cable
from the back of the Zip
drive.
Slide the Zip drive
carrier and drive out of
the front of the
computer.
Take Apart
Zip Drive - 21
Replacement Note: When
inserting the drive into the
computer, make sure the
drive carrier aligns with
the carrier guides. The
carrier should slide between
five metal tabs below and
two metal tabs above the left
and right edges of the
carrier.
Take Apart
Zip Drive - 22
Note: Perform the following
procedure if you are
replacing the Zip drive.
6
7
Using a Phillips
screwdriver, remove
the four carrier
mounting screws.
Lift the drive off the
carrier.
Take Apart
Zip Drive - 23
Master/Slave Cable
Routing
Some G3 Minitower logic
boards support master and
slave IDE configurations,
allowing you to connect two
devices to a single IDE
channel. These boards ship
with a special split IDE
cable that also supports
master and slave
configurations.
The graphic at left shows
how the split master/slave
IDE cable connects to the
devices in the unit.
Take Apart
Zip Drive - 24
The graphic at left shows
how the split master/slave
IDE cable connects to the
logic board. The same
connector is used for both
the regular IDE and the
master/slave IDE cables.
Take Apart
Hard Drive - 25
Hard Drive
Note: This topic includes
instructions for removing
the drive carrier and hard
drive.
Before you begin, remove
the side access panel.
Take Apart
Hard Drive - 26
1
2
3
Using a Phillips
screwdriver, remove
the two hard drive
screws.
Disconnect the power
cable and IDE data cable
from the back of the hard
drive.
Slide the hard drive
carrier and drive out of
the computer.
Take Apart
Hard Drive - 27
Replacement Note: When
inserting the drive into the
computer, make sure the
drive carrier aligns with
the metal tabs in the drive
bay.
Take Apart
Hard Drive - 28
Note: Perform the following
procedure if you are
replacing the hard drive.
4
5
Using a Phillips
screwdriver, remove
the four carrier
mounting screws.
Slide the drive forward
out of the carrier.
Take Apart
Open the Chassis - 29
Open the Chassis
Before you begin, carefully
lay the computer on its side
with the side access panel
facing up.
1
Unlock the top chassis by
moving the two green
locking latches upward
and outward.
Take Apart
Open the Chassis - 30
2
Using the handle, gently
swing the top chassis up
and out until it rests
firmly on the work
surface.
Take Apart
Power Supply - 31
Power Supply
Before you begin, remove
the following:
• Side access panel
• Hard drive
Take Apart
Power Supply - 32
1
2
3
Disconnect the power
cables from the logic
board.
Release the power
cables from the cable tie
wrap.
Using a Phillips
screwdriver, remove
the two power supply fan
mounting screws.
Take Apart
Power Supply - 33
4
Using a Phillips
screwdriver, remove
the four power supply
mounting screws.
Take Apart
Power Supply - 34
5
6
Remove the interior
power supply screws.
Thread the power cables
through the opening in
the top chassis and lift
the power supply and fan
assembly from the
computer.
Take Apart
Power Supply - 35
7
Remove the two screws
securing the power
supply to the mounting
bracket.
Replacement Note: When
replacing the power supply
and fan assembly, you must
tie up the power supply
cables with a tie wrap and
secure the tie wrap to the
internal chassis. Also, be
sure that all cables are
pulled through the chassis
opening as far as possible to
prevent interference with
the fan assembly.
Take Apart
Power Supply - 36
IMPORTANT: You must set the power supply voltage switch
to the correct setting (115V in the U.S.) to avoid damaging
the computer. See “Voltage Switch” in Basics for
instructions and an international voltage chart. The switch
is accessible through the computer’s rear panel when the
power supply is installed.
IMPORTANT: There is a power supply jumper on the logic
board located next to the PCI slots. If the logic board is
installed in the PM G3 Minitower, the power supply jumper
must cover the pins marked “PS”. If the logic board is
installed in the PM G3 Desktop model, the jumper must
cover the pins marked “Mac”. The logic board comes from
the factory preset for the Desktop model (i.e. the power
supply jumper covers the pins marked “Mac”).
Take Apart
Fan - 37
Fan
Before you begin, remove
the following:
• Side access panel
• Hard drive
• Power supply
Take Apart
Fan - 38
1
Using a Phillips
screwdriver, remove
the interior power
supply mounting screws
and disconnect the
power supply-to-fan
connector.
Take Apart
Fan - 39
Replacement Note: Before
removing the fan, notice the
direction in which the fan is
installed. Replace the fan in
the same direction (i.e.
insert the fan into the
housing so that 1) the fan
cable is nearest the open end
of the housing, and 2) the
label on the fan is not
visible).
2
Remove the four screws
securing the fan to the
fan housing and lift out
the fan.
Take Apart
Speaker Bezel - 40
Speaker Bezel
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Remove the side access
panel
• Open the chassis
Take Apart
Speaker Bezel - 41
1
2
Gently pry up the four
tabs on the top side of the
speaker bezel and swing
it open.
Release the eight tabs on
the bottom side of the
speaker bezel and
remove the bezel from
the computer.
Take Apart
Speaker - 42
Speaker
Note: This topic includes
instructions for removing
the speaker housing,
speaker, and fan cable.
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Remove the side access
panel
• Open the chassis
Take Apart
Speaker - 43
1
2
3
Carefully lay the
computer on its side.
Disconnect the speaker
cable from the logic
board.
Press in the two latches
on the sides of the
speaker housing and
slide the housing
straight up out of the
computer.
Take Apart
PCI Cards - 44
PCI Cards
Note: the FireWire and
Ultra Wide SCSI PCI cards
have unique installation
procedures, which are
explained in separate takeapart topics following this
procedure.
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Remove the side access
panel
• Open the chassis
Take Apart
PCI Cards - 45
1
Using a Phillips
screwdriver, remove
the screw securing the
PCI card to the rear
panel.
Take Apart
PCI Cards - 46
2
Using both hands, gently
pull straight out on the
card to remove it.
Replacement Note: Align the
PCI card with the expansion
slot and press in firmly
until the connector is seated.
Do not force the card or you
may damage the connector
pins. If you feel resistance,
remove the card and try
installing it again. Once the
card is securely inserted
into the PCI slot, replace the
screw that holds the PCI
card frame to the rear panel.
Take Apart
Ultra Wide SCSI PCI Card - 47
Ultra Wide SCSI PCI Card
The ultra wide SCSI card installs like any other PCI card
(see the PCI Cards take-apart topic for more information);
however, the ultra wide SCSI card must be installed in the
first PCI slot (that is, the PCI slot nearest the video card).
In addition, the ultra wide SCSI cable must be routed in a
very specific manner. The procedure for installing and
routing the ultra wide SCSI cable is explained on the
following pages.
Take Apart
Ultra Wide SCSI PCI Card - 48
1
Attach the end of the
ultra wide SCSI cable
that has just one
connector to the ultra
wide SCSI PCI card.
Note: The ultra wide
cable folds as shown
about 4 inches from the
connector that attaches
to the ultra wide SCSI
card.
Take Apart
Ultra Wide SCSI PCI Card - 49
2
Route the cable along the
back edge of the chassis
and away from the logic
board being sure to leave
plenty of room between
the ultra wide SCSI cable
and the heatsink.
Note: The ultra wide
cable should be at least a
1/2 inch away from the
heatsink when the
chassis is closed.
Take Apart
Ultra Wide SCSI PCI Card - 50
3
4
Stuff the unused SCSI
cable (if present)
behind the power cable
and through the first cut
out in the drive chassis.
Note: If the unused SCSI
cable is attached to the
logic board, it must be
terminated.
The IDE cable (if
present) should also be
behind the power cable
and fed through the first
cut out in the drive
chassis.
Take Apart
Ultra Wide SCSI PCI Card - 51
5
Tape down the ultra
wide SCSI cable two
times to the internal
chassis and fold the cable
as shown before feeding
it through the internal
chassis.
Note: The edge of the
cable fold should be over
the handle baffle.
Take Apart
Ultra Wide SCSI PCI Card - 52
6
Once you feed the ultra
wide SCSI cable through
the internal chassis,
tape the cable to the
plastic fan baffle
(which is behind the
power supply), being
careful not to cover the
vents on the power
supply with the tape.
Note: Be sure to use the
Kapton tape that is on the
service parts list to
tape the cable in place.
Take Apart
Ultra Wide SCSI PCI Card - 53
7
8
9
Attach the very end of the ultra wide SCSI cable (i.e., the
very last connector) to the ultra wide hard drive, which
in most cases will be installed above the power supply.
Note: Two extra connectors are provided in the middle of
the ultra wide SCSI cable in case additional ultra wide
hard drives are installed in the third and fourth drive
bays.
The unused IDE cable (if present) can be placed either
behind the floppy drive or between the power supply and
hard drive.
The unused SCSI cable (if present) should be folded and
placed behind the floppy drive and above the CD-ROM or
DVD-ROM drive.
Take Apart
FireWire PCI Card - 54
FireWire PCI Card
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Remove the side access
panel
• Open the chassis
Note: The FireWire card
comes from the factory
installed in the middle PCI
slot.
Take Apart
FireWire PCI Card - 55
1
2
Disconnect the internal
FireWire cable from the
card.
Using a Phillips
screwdriver, remove
the screw securing the
FireWire card to the
rear panel and gently lift
up on the card to remove
it.
Take Apart
FireWire PCI Card - 56
Replacement Note: The
following steps explain how
to route and reconnect the
FireWire cable.
3
4
After connecting the
internal FireWire cable
to the card, route the
cable along the edge of
the logic board. Tuck the
cable underneath the
corner of the logic board
to keep it out of the way.
Run the internal
FireWire cable through
the opening in the drive
chassis as shown.
Take Apart
FireWire PCI Card - 57
5
Run the FireWire cable
up to meet the drives.
Then, connect the very
end of the FireWire
cable to the power
supply cable.
Take Apart
FireWire PCI Card - 58
6
Connect the second to last
connector on the
FireWire cable to the
back of the CD-ROM or
DVD-ROM drive.
Take Apart
FireWire PCI Card - 59
Note: The graphic at left
shows the internal FireWire
cable and each of its
connectors.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 60
Processor Module
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Remove the side access
panel
• Open the chassis
Take Apart
Processor Module - 61
1
Remove the screw that
holds the processor
module wire to the logic
board.
Replacement Note: The
processor module wire
attaches to the top of the
logic board (not
underneath). When
screwing down the wire, be
careful not to damage the
capacitor that is next to the
screw hole. Use a manual
screw driver to avoid
damaging the capacitor.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 62
Warning: The heat sink may
be hot to the touch.
2
While pressing down on
the top of the clip that
secures the heatsink, use
a small flatblade
screwdriver to lift up on
the front tab of the clip
to release it.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 63
3
Lift up the clip and
remove it from heatsink.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 64
4
Lift up the heatsink to
remove it from the
processor module.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 65
5
Lift the metal lever at
the left of the processor
module.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 66
6
Pick up the processor
module by the edges and
gently lift straight up to
remove it. Be careful not
to bend the pins underneath the module.
IMPORTANT: If you are only
replacing the processor
module, stop here. If,
however, you are removing
the processor module in
order to replace the logic
board, continue on to the
next page.
Replacement Note: Don’t
force the processor module.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 67
7
Remove the warranty
sticker and red jumper
block located next to the
battery if replacing the
logic board only.
IMPORTANT: When
replacing the processor
module, you must change
the processor jumper block
and warranty sticker to be
compatible with the processor module you are installing. Failure to install the
jumper block properly will
result in a unit that does not
power on. See the instructions on the following page.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 68
8
Processor
Jumper Block
Pin1
Pin1
Pin1
233 MHz 266 MHz 300 MHz
Black
Red
White
Battery
The graphic at left shows
how the processor
module jumper should be
installed. You will either
install a red jumper
(for the 233 MHz
processor), a white
jumper (for the 266
MHz processor), or a
black jumper (for the
300 MHz processor).
Be sure to cover the pins
as shown and to install
the jumper block with
the gold connector pins
facing down towards the
board.
Take Apart
Processor Module - 69
Replacement Note: Position the processor module evenly
over the processor module slot and make sure the card is
seated evenly. Press down gently on the processor module to
install it. Never force the module into place or you may
damage the gold connector pins on the underside. Flip down
the metal lever that secures the processor module to the
board.
Replace the heat sink on top of the processor module. Secure
the heat sink by inserting the clip into the slot at the rear of
the processor and then swinging the clip down over the heat
sink. Press the clip into the front latch to fasten in place.
Take Apart
Logic Board - 70
Logic Board
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Remove side access panel
• Remove PCI cards (if
present)
• Remove I/O card
• Open chassis
Note: Before you replace the
logic board, you should
verify that the problem is
not with the voltage
regulator. Refer to the
Troubleshooting chapter for
more information.
Take Apart
Logic Board - 71
1
2
Disconnect all cables
from the logic board.
Using a Phillips
screwdriver, remove
the logic board mounting
screws, one of which
attaches the processor
module wire to the logic
board.
Replacement Note: The
processor module wire
attaches to the top of the
logic board (not
underneath). Be careful not
to damage the nearby
capacitor when screwing
down the processor wire.
Take Apart
Logic Board - 72
3
4
5
Release the two plastic
latches on the front of
the logic board.
Replacement Note: Make
sure the latches reengage the logic board.
Slide the logic board
forward far enough for
the ports to clear the
openings in the I/O
panel.
Lift the board out of the
computer.
IMPORTANT: There is a
power supply jumper on
the logic board at J28 (near
Take Apart
Logic Board - 73
PCI slots). If the logic board is installed in the PM G3
Minitower, this jumper must cover the pins marked “PS”.
Failure to install this jumper correctly will result in a
computer that will not boot up.
Note: Replacement logic boards come with the J28 jumper
pre-installed in the PM G3 Desktop configuration; that is, the
jumper comes installed on the “Mac” pins. If you are
installing the logic board in a Power Mac G3 Minitower or
Server G3 unit, you must move the J28 jumper to cover the
“PS” pins. When replacing the logic board, be sure to check
the power supply jumper setting.
IMPORTANT: If you are replacing the logic board, you must
transfer the processor module and processor jumper (at
J16) from the original logic board to the replacement board.
See the take-apart instructions for the “Processor Module”
for more information. You must also cover the processor
Take Apart
Logic Board - 74
jumper with a new warranty sticker, which comes with the
replacement logic board. This sticker must be in place to
protect the customer’s product warranty.
IMPORTANT: If you are replacing the logic board and the new
logic board does not come with a voltage regulator, you
must transfer the voltage regulator from the old logic board
to the new board.
Note: Before returning the logic board to Apple, remove the
processor module, processor jumper block and warranty
sticker, DRAM, SGRAM, the I/O card, and any PCI cards (if
present). Do NOT remove the voltage regulator or ROM
DIMM.
Take Apart
Logic Board - 75
Replacement Note: As a final
step, you must reconnect all
cables to the logic board.
Depending on which version
of the G3 Minitower logic
board you have, you will
either see a regular IDE
cable or a split master/
slave IDE cable. Both
versions of the IDE cable
attach to the same connector
on the logic board. The
graphic at left shows the
split master/slave IDE cable
connected.
Take Apart
I/O Card - 76
I/O Card
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Remove the side access
panel
• Open the chassis
Take Apart
I/O Card - 77
1
2
3
From the back side of
the computer, remove
the single screw that
attaches the I/O card to
the rear panel.
Remove the two I/O card
mounting screws that
attach the I/O card to the
metal chassis.
Gently lift up on the I/O
card to remove it from
the computer.
Take Apart
Voltage Regulator - 78
Voltage Regulator
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Remove the side access
panel
• Open the chassis
Take Apart
Voltage Regulator - 79
1
Press down on the two
white levers on either
side of the voltage
regulator to release it.
Lift up on the voltage
regulator to remove it
from the logic board.
Take Apart
Modem Card - 80
Modem Card
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Remove the side access
panel
• Open the chassis
• Remove the I/O Card
Take Apart
Modem Card - 81
1
Lay the I/O card on a flat
surface and gently lift up
on the modem card to
remove it.
Replacement Note: Align the
modem card evenly over the
modem slot on the I/O card
and press down gently to
install the card. Do not force
the modem card into the slot.
Take Apart
Chassis Locking Latches - 82
Chassis Locking
Latches
Before you begin, remove
the side access panel.
Take Apart
Chassis Locking Latches - 83
1
Remove the screw and
washer and remove the
locking latch.
Take Apart
Chassis Handle - 84
Chassis Handle
Before you begin, remove
the side access panel.
Take Apart
Chassis Handle - 85
1
Lift the retainer latch
while sliding the handle
toward the back of the
computer.
Take Apart
Top Cover - 86
Top Cover
Before you begin, remove
the following:
• Side access panel
• Floppy drive
• Hard drive
Take Apart
Top Cover - 87
1
2
Release the three tabs
holding the top cover by
pushing the front tab
toward the back of the
unit and the back two
tabs toward the front of
the unit (see arrows).
Slide the top cover
toward the stationary
panel side to remove it
from the chassis.
Take Apart
I/O Panel - 88
I/O Panel
Before you begin, remove
the following:
• Side access panel
• PCI cards (if present)
• I/O card
• Logic board
Take Apart
I/O Panel - 89
1
2
3
Using a small flatblade
screwdriver, lift up on
the two EMI shield stop
tabs at either end of the
I/O panel shield to
release the tabs.
Using the same flatblade
screwdriver, gently lift
up on the three plastic
tabs at the bottom of the
I/O panel to release
them.
Swing the panel up,
release the top two tabs,
and remove the I/O panel
and shield from the
computer.
Take Apart
Rear Panel - 90
Rear Panel
Before you begin, remove
the following:
• Side access panel
• PCI cards (if present)
• I/O card
Take Apart
Rear Panel - 91
1
2
Using a small flatblade
screwdriver, gently
release the top five tabs
and two bottom tabs on
the rear panel.
Lift the rear panel from
the computer to remove
it.
Take Apart
Stationary Panel - 92
Stationary Panel
Before you begin, remove
the following:
• Side access panel
• PCI cards (if present)
• I/O card
• Logic board
• I/O panel
• Rear panel
• Speaker bezel
Take Apart
Stationary Panel - 93
1
Using a flatblade
screwdriver, release the
six latches holding the
stationary panel to the
chassis.
Take Apart
Stationary Panel - 94
2
3
4
Lift the chassis slightly and slide the stationary panel
forward.
Push the light/power actuator in toward the case so that
it is released from the stationary panel.
Remove the panel from the computer.
Take Apart
Logic Board Latch - 95
Logic Board Latch
Before you begin, remove
the following:
• Side access panel
• PCI cards (if present)
• Logic board
• I/O panel
• AV module video in/out
• Rear panel
• Speaker bezel
• Stationary panel
Take Apart
Logic Board Latch - 96
1
2
Carefully lay the
computer on its side so
the bottom of the chassis
is exposed.
Using a flatblade
screwdriver, release the
tab holding the logic
board latch to the
underside of the chassis.
Take Apart
Logic Board Latch - 97
3
Slide the logic board
latch forward and
remove it from the
computer.
Take Apart
Light Pipe/Power Actuator - 98
Light Pipe/Power
Actuator
Before you begin, remove
the following:
• Side access panel
• PCI cards (if present)
• I/O card
• Logic board
• I/O panel
• Rear panel
• Speaker bezel
• Stationary panel
Take Apart
Light Pipe/Power Actuator - 99
1
Lift the end of the LED
cable slightly and
remove the light pipe
lamp from the light
pipe/power actuator.
Take Apart
Light Pipe/Power Actuator - 100
2
Press in the two latches
on the sides of the
actuator and slide it
forward out of the
chassis.
Take Apart
Chassis - 101
Chassis
Remove the following:
• Side access panel
• PCI cards (if present)
• I/O card
• Logic board
• I/O panel
• Rear panel
• Speaker bezel
• Stationary panel
• Light/Power actuator
• Speaker
• Floppy drive
• CD-ROM or DVD-ROM
drive
• Zip drive
• Hard drive
Take Apart
Chassis - 102
•
•
•
•
Bottom drives
Power supply
Locking chassis latches
Chassis handle
K Service Source
Upgrades
Power Macintosh/Server G3
Minitower
Upgrades
PCI or I/O Cards - 1
Shield
Port Access Cover Screw
Port Access Cover
PCI or I/O Cards
Before you begin, open the
chassis.
1
2
Remove the screw that
holds the port access
cover in place.
Pull out the access
cover.
Note: If you remove all
three port access covers,
be sure the sheet metal
shield remains under the
edge of the logic board.
Upgrades
PCI or I/O Cards - 2
3
I/O Card Screw
Align the card connector
with the expansion slot
and press straight down
until the connector
inserts all the way into
the slot.
Note: It may be helpful
to hold the card slightly
away from the port
access opening until the
card fits into the slot.
Note: If the PCI card is a
full 12 inches, be sure
it fits into one of the
three card guides at the
front of the computer.
Port
Access
PCI Slot
12-Inch PCI Card Guides
Upgrades
PCI or I/O Cards - 3
4
I/O Card Screw
5
6
Port
Access
PCI Slot
12-Inch PCI Card Guides
If you meet resistance,
pull the card out and try
again.
To test the connection,
pull the card up gently.
The card should remain
firmly in place.
Reinstall the screw to
secure the card in place.
Upgrades
DRAM - 4
DRAM
DRAM DIMM
Connectors
Notches
DRAM Slot (1 of 3)
Ejector
Before you begin, open the
chassis.
Note: DIMM shape and
components may vary.
1
Ribs (inside slot)
To remove existing
DRAM DIMMs to make
room for new ones, push
down on the ejectors.
Upgrades
DRAM - 5
2
DRAM DIMM
Connectors
Notches
DRAM Slot (1 of 3)
Ejector
Ribs (inside slot)
3
Align DIMM notches with
DRAM slot ribs.
Note: The DIMM is
designed to fit in the slot
only one way.
With ejectors open,
press the DIMM into the
slot.
Note: Slot may have one
or two ejectors.
Upgrades
VRAM - 6
VRAM
SGRAM SO-DIMM
Rib
SGRAM SO-DIMM
Video Memory
Slot
Notch
Connectors
Before you begin, open the
chassis.
Note: SGRAM DIMM shape
and components may vary.
1
To remove existing
SGRAM DIMM, spread
arms of video memory
slot apart slightly. The
SGRAM DIMM will pop
up.
Upgrades
VRAM - 7
2
SGRAM SO-DIMM
Rib
SGRAM SO-DIMM
Video Memory
Slot
Notch
Connectors
3
Align SGRAM DIMM
notches with VRAM slot
ribs.
Note: SGRAM DIMM fits
into slot only one way.
Press the SGRAM DIMM
into the slot.
Note: SGRAM DIMM
should be flat and
parallel to the logic
board.
Upgrades
Modem Card - 8
Modem Card
Before you begin, do the
following:
• Remove the side access
panel
• Open the chassis
• Remove the I/O Card
Upgrades
Modem Card - 9
1
2
Insert a small flatblade
screwdriver in the
modem slot cover on the
I/O card.
Gently twist the
screwdriver to pop out
the metal modem slot
cover.
Upgrades
Modem Card - 10
1
Holding the modem card
at a slight angle to the
I/O card, insert the
metal lip on the modem
card’s connector panel
through the opening in
the I/O card.
Upgrades
Modem Card - 11
2
3
Gently swing down the
modem card so that it is
aligned on top of the
modem card slot on the
I/O card.
Gently press down
evenly on the modem
card to install it. Be sure
the card is properly
seated.
Upgrades
Modem Card - 12
4
Reinstall the I/O card in
the computer. Be sure to
insert the three screws
that secure the I/O card
to the metal chassis.
K Service Source
Troubleshooting
Power Macintosh/Server G3
Minitower
Troubleshooting
General/ - 1
General
The Symptom Charts included in this chapter will help you
diagnose specific symptoms related to your product. Because cures
are listed on the charts in the order of most likely solution, try
the cures in the order presented. Verify whether or not the
product continues to exhibit the symptom. If the symptom
persists, try the next cure. (Note: If you have replaced a module,
reinstall the original module before you proceed to the next cure.)
For additional assistance, contact Apple Technical Support.
Troubleshooting
New Components Theory of Operation/Voltage Regulator - 2
New Components Theory of Operation
New components on the Power Macintosh G3 and Macintosh Server
G3 logic board and new strategies for parts replacement make
troubleshooting these systems significantly different from
previous models. Take a moment to read and understand how each
of these new components interacts with the system.
Voltage Regulator
The voltage regulator module regulates the voltage for the particular processor used in different Power Mac/Server G3 systems.
The voltage regulator provides an easy way to regulate voltage
without changing specific resistor values on the logic board. When
you replace the logic board, you must transfer the voltage regulator from the old logic board to the new one. (Note: Always try
replacing the voltage regulator to resolve power-on problems
before replacing the logic board.)
Troubleshooting
New Components Theory of Operation/Processor Module - 3
Processor Module
The logic board comes with a removable processor module. You can
replace this module when the logic board or processor module
fails. The processor module sits in a ZIF socket for easy removal.
Processor modules can be ordered from Service, and each is
shipped with the appropriate jumper configuration block to place
in location J16. The processor should rarely fail. Replace it only
as a last resort.
When replacing the processor module, you must change the processor jumper block and warranty sticker to be compatible with
the processor module you are installing. Failure to install the
jumper block properly will result in a unit that does not boot up.
Refer to “Processor Module” in Take-Apart for installation
instructions.
Troubleshooting
New Components Theory of Operation/Jumper Location J16 - 4
Jumper Location J16
The jumper block you place at location J16 configures the board
to work with different processor modules. Use the appropriate
jumper block, identified by color, for each processor module.
Refer to “Processor Module” in Take-Apart for instructions.
Processor Speed
Jumper Color
266
White
233
300
Red
Black
The jumper block is protected by a void-warranty sticker. End
users are not allowed to remove this jumper block. If the sticker
has been tampered with on a unit you receive for repair, do not
honor the service warranty on the system.
Troubleshooting
New Components Theory of Operation/Jumper Location J28 - 5
Jumper Location J28
Jumper location J28 controls which power supply the logic board
can accommodate. When you receive a Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 logic board from Service, you need to place the
jumper in the proper location. The power supply used in the
Power Macintosh G3 Desktop computer is different from the
power supply used in the Power Macintosh G3 Minitower and
Macintosh Server G3 computers.
If the logic board is installed in the Minitower/Server chassis,
the power supply jumper must cover the pins marked “PS”. If
the logic board is installed in the Desktop chassis, this jumper
must cover the pins marked “Mac”. (Replacement logic boards
should come preset for the Desktop model.) When replacing the
logic board, be sure to check the power supply jumper setting. If
this jumper is missing or set incorrectly for the computer model,
the computer will not boot up
Troubleshooting
New Components Theory of Operation/I/O Cards - 6
I/O Cards
Power Macintosh G3/Macintosh Server G3 computers require an
I/O card that moves video and/or audio from the main logic board.
These cards are placed in the PERCH connector on the main logic
board. If the card is not seated correctly, different symptoms
appear. Look in the Symptom Charts for details on troubleshooting
these cards.
Note: the computer will boot up without the I/O card installed, but
they will not operate properly.
Troubleshooting
New Components Theory of Operation/HFS+ Formatted Drives -
HFS+ Formatted Drives
Some Power Macintosh G3 Minitower computers ship with hard
drives that are formatted with HFS and some later models ship
with hard drives that are formatted with HFS+ (also referred to
as Mac OS Extended format). (Note: the hard drives in all
Macintosh Server G3 computers are formatted with HFS+.)
Before you try to repair a customer’s hard drive, it is imperative
that you determine how the drive has been formatted.
Norton Utilities version 3.5 is not compatible with HFS+ (or Mac
OS Extended format), and in fact, can destroy data on the hard
drive. Norton Utilities version 3.5.3 or 3.5.2 will not attempt to
repair a drive formatted with Mac OS Extended format and
versions 3.5.1 and earlier cannot recognize that a hard drive is in
Mac OS Extended format and can result in hard drive corruption
and loss of all data on the drive.
Troubleshooting
New Components Theory of Operation/HFS+ Formatted Drives Note: When diagnosing hard drive problems, it is important to
verify whether or not the customer may have used the wrong disk
repair software for their drive before assuming that the problem
is hardware related.
If you experience problems with a hard drive that has been
formatted with HFS+, Apple Computer recommends using the
version of Disk First Aid included on the system software CD that
shipped with the unit. (See the Symantec Web site at http://
www.symantec.com/nu/num-hfs.html for more information on
Norton Utilities and Mac OS Extended format.)
Some other disk utility and disk locking programs are
incompatible with Mac OS Extended format. Before you attempt to
use a disk utility or disk locking program, make sure the version
you have is compatible with Mac OS Extended format. Check the
documentation that came with the program or contact the
manufacturer or the vendor that supplied the program.
Troubleshooting
New Components Theory of Operation/HFS+ Formatted Drives Use the Get Info command in system 8.1 to determine how a hard
drive has been formatted. Drives formatted with HFS will appear
as “Mac OS Standard”, while drives formatted with HFS+ will
appear as “Mac OS Extended.”
For more information on HFS+ formatting of hard drives, refer to
the Technical Info Library, article # 30344.
Troubleshooting
Cleaning Procedure for Card Connectors/HFS+ Formatted Drives
Cleaning Procedure for Card Connectors
It is possible for residue to build up on the gold edge connector
pins on some PCI cards, which could cause a variety of symptoms.
If you are having problems with a PCI card, inspect the connector
pins with a magnifying glass. If you find residue, use a pencil
eraser to gently clean the pins.
Troubleshooting
Power Supply Verification/Verification Procedure - 11
Power Supply Verification
The Power Macintosh G3 logic board requires a “trickle” power
of +5V in order to power-up. If this trickle power is not present,
the system will not power-up. If the system fails to power-up,
follow the procedure outlined below to determine whether or not
the problem is related to the power supply.
Note: In order to verify the power supply you will need a
voltmeter.
Verification Procedure
Follow the procedures in the Take-Apart chapter to access the
power supply.
IMPORTANT: For all the following steps you will want to leave the
power supply connector plugged into the logic board during testing.
Troubleshooting
Power Supply Verification/Verification Procedure - 12
1.
Plug in a known-good power cord into the back of the computer. Note: Do NOT power on the computer.
Note: For the next steps, refer to Figure 1 on the next page to
identify the pins indicated.
2.
Connect the black lead of the voltmeter to pin 16 of the power
supply connector. Connect the red lead of the voltmeter to pin
9 (purple wire) of the 20-pin power supply cable. The
voltmeter should measure approximately +5V.
If you do not measure +5V then re-check the voltmeter connections and check for voltage again. If voltage is still not
present then replace the power supply; otherwise, continue on
to the next step.
If you DO measure +5V on pin 9 (purple wire) then the power
supply is likely OK. Continue on to the next step for further
verification.
Troubleshooting
Power Supply Verification/Verification Procedure - 13
Figure 1. Power Supply 20-Pin Connector
Troubleshooting
Power Supply Verification/Verification Procedure - 14
3.
Power up the computer by pressing the On/Off button on the
front of the Power Mac G3. Note: Verify that the power on/
off cable is plugged into connector J30.
If the computer powers up normally then the power supply is
OK. If the power supply does not power up, continue on to the
next step.
4.
Check to see if the power supply fan is spinning.
If the power supply fan is not spinning then verify that the
jumper at connector J28 is installed in the correct location
(on the Minitower, the correct location is “PS/2 Supply”; on
the Desktop, the correct location is “MAC Supply”); otherwise, continue to the next step.
5.
Connect the black lead of the voltmeter to pin 16 of the power
supply connector. Connect the red lead of the voltmeter to pin
1 (orange cable) of the 20-pin power supply cable. The
Troubleshooting
Power Supply Verification/Verification Procedure - 15
voltmeter should measure approximately +3.3V.
If you do not measure +3.3V, re-check the voltmeter connections and check for voltage again. If voltage is still not
present, replace the power supply; otherwise, continue on to
the next step.
6.
Connect the black lead of the voltmeter to pin 16 of the power
supply connector. Connect the red lead of the voltmeter to pin
4 (red cable) of the 20-pin power supply cable. The voltmeter should measure approximately +5V.
If you do not measure +5V, re-check the voltmeter connections and check for voltage again. If voltage is still not
present, replace the power supply; otherwise, continue on to
the next step.
7.
Measure the voltage of pin 10 (yellow cable) of the 20-pin
power supply connector. The voltage should measure
Troubleshooting
Power Supply Verification/Verification Procedure - 16
approximately +12V.
If you do not measure +12V, re-check the voltmeter connections and check for voltage again. If voltage is still not
present, replace the power supply; otherwise, continue on to
the next step.
8.
The testing is complete. You have just verified that the power
supply is not faulty and is not the cause of the “No powerup” problem.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/System - 17
Symptom Charts
System
Fan on power supply
is running, but no
startup chime,
screen is black, drive
not accessed at
startup, and no LED on
front of system
1
2
3
4
5
Verify power supply voltage switch is set correctly for your
region (see “Voltage Switch” in Basics chapter for more
information).
Check jumper block J28. Be sure setting is correct for type
of power supply installed (see “Logic Board” in Take-Apart
chapter for more information).
Check jumper block configuration at J16. Make sure jumper
block is correct color for processor type installed (see
“Processor Module” in Take-Apart chapter for more
information) and that it is installed in the correct direction.
Reseat voltage regulator.
Reseat processor module. Make sure locking arm is in down
position.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/System - 18
6
7
8
9
Reseat ROM DIMM.
Replace voltage regulator.
Replace logic board.
Replace processor module.
Fan is running, LED is
on, drive is accessed
at startup, but no
startup chime and
screen is black
Reseat ROM DIMM.
No apparent power,
fan isn’t running, no
LED
1
2
3
4
5
Verify power cord is attached securely at both ends.
Verify that the power outlet is good.
Verify ADB cable is good and connected properly.
Check internal power cables and verify they are attached
securely at both ends.
Check jumper block J28. Make sure setting is correct for
type of power supply installed (see “Logic Board” in Take-
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/System - 19
Apart chapter for more information).
6 Reset Cuda chip. (Refer to “The Cuda Chip” in Basics chapter
for instructions.)
7 Reset logic board. (Refer to “Resetting the Logic Board” in
Basics chapter for instructions.)
8 Replace power cord.
9 Reseat voltage regulator.
10 Check the power supply by following the procedures in
“Power Supply Verification” outlined earlier in this
troubleshooting chapter.
11 Replace logic board.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/System - 20
Computer begins to
power up, the fan and
hard drive are
spinning, the power
LED is lit, but there
is no video and the
boot chime is
followed by sound of
breaking glass
1
2
Clicking, chirping,
thumping, or rubbing
1
3
4
5
2
3
4
Reseat ROM DIMM.
Reseat DRAM DIMMs. (Note: the computer does not ship with
any on-board memory. You must have a DRAM DIMM
installed for the computer to boot properly.)
Test for a bad DRAM DIMM by removing the DIMMs one at a
time (replacing each one afterwards). Replace any faulty
DRAM DIMMs.
Verify external SCSI cabling is secure.
Verify external SCSI devices are good.
Remove all PCI cards and test unit. If problem does not occur
with cards removed, begin replacing cards one at a time to
determine which card is causing problem. Replace problem
card with known-good card.
Remove hard drive. If problem no longer occurs, replace
hard drive with a known-good drive.
Replace power supply.
Replace processor module.
Troubleshooting
System shuts down
intermittently
Symptom Charts/System - 21
5
6
7
8
Replace logic board.
Replace floppy drive cable.
Replace floppy drive.
Replace I/O card.
1
Make sure air vents are clear. Thermal protection
circuitry may shut down system. After 30 to 40 minutes,
system should be OK.
Make sure power cord is plugged in firmly.
Replace power cord.
Check battery.
Reset Cuda chip. (Refer to “The Cuda Chip” in Basics chapter
for instructions.)
Reset logic board. (Refer to “Resetting the Logic Board” in
Basics chapter for instructions.)
Replace power supply.
Replace logic board.
Replace processor module.
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Troubleshooting
System
intermittently
crashes or hangs
Symptom Charts/System - 22
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Verify system software is version 8.0 or later with enabler
770 for G3 Minitower, or version 8.1 or later with
appropriate software extensions for G3 Server.
Verify software is known-good. Do a clean install of system
software.
Verify software is Power Macintosh compatible (contact
developer). Also, try booting with extensions off to
determine if there are system init problems.
Clear parameter RAM. Hold down <Command> <Option> <P>
<R> during startup but before "Welcome to Macintosh"
appears.
Remove all SDRAM DIMMs and try replacing them one at a
time to test. Replace any bad DIMMs.
Replace logic board.
Replace processor module.
Troubleshooting
During startup,
following message is
displayed, "This
startup disk will not
work on this
Macintosh model...."
Symptom Charts/System - 23
1
2
3
Verify startup disk is good.
Verify system software is version 8.0 or later with enabler
770 for G3 Minitower, or version 8.1 or later with
appropriate software extensions for G3 Server.
Do a clean install of system software.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Error Chords - 24
Error Chords
One-part error
chord (sound of
breaking glass)
sounds during
startup sequence
1
2
3
4
5
Disconnect IDE data cable from hard drive and reboot system.
If startup sequence is normal, initialize hard drive. Test unit
again with IDE data cable connected. If error chord still
sounds, replace hard drive.
Disconnect floppy drive cable from floppy drive and reboot
system. If startup sequence is normal, replace floppy drive.
Reseat processor module.
Replace logic board.
Replace processor module.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Video - 25
Video
Screen is black, but
boot tone is present,
drive operates, fan is
running, and LED is
lit
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Adjust brightness on monitor.
Clear parameter RAM. Hold down <Command> <Option> <P>
<R> during startup but before "Welcome to Macintosh"
appears.
Reset Cuda chip. (Refer to “The Cuda Chip” in Basics chapter
for instructions.)
Reset logic board. (Refer to “Resetting the Logic Board” in
Basics chapter for instructions.)
Replace monitor cable.
Remove all SDRAM DIMMs and try replacing them one at a
time to test. Replace any bad DIMMs.
Test with known-good monitor. Replace monitor if
necessary. Refer to appropriate monitor manual to
troubleshoot defective monitor.
Replace logic board.
Replace processor module.
Troubleshooting
Screen is black, no
boot tone and drive
does not operate, but
fan is running and
LED is lit
Symptom Charts/Video - 26
1
2
3
4
5
6
Boot tone is present
and screen lights up,
but nothing is
displayed on screen
1
2
3
4
Reset Cuda chip. (Refer to “The Cuda Chip” in Basics chapter
for instructions.)
Reset logic board. (Refer to “Resetting the Logic Board” in
Basics chapter for instructions.)
Remove all SDRAM DIMMs and try replacing them one at a
time to test. Replace any bad DIMMs.
Replace logic board.
Replace power supply.
Replace processor module.
Reset Cuda chip. (Refer to “The Cuda Chip” in Basics chapter
for instructions.)
Reset logic board. (Refer to “Resetting the Logic Board” in
Basics chapter for instructions.)
Replace monitor cable.
Test with known-good monitor. Replace monitor if
necessary. Refer to appropriate monitor manual to
troubleshoot defective monitor.
Troubleshooting
Horizontal flickering
lines when viewing
Apple Video Play
application with
video mirroring on
Symptom Charts/Video - 27
5
6
Replace logic board.
Replace processor module.
1
Replace the Audio/Video card with a Version II Audio/Video
card (p/n 661-2044).
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Floppy Drive - 28
Floppy Drive
Internal floppy drive
does not operate
1
2
3
4
5
Replace floppy disk with known-good disk.
Replace floppy drive cable.
Replace floppy drive.
Replace logic board.
Replace processor module.
During system
startup, disk ejects;
display shows icon
with blinking "X"
1
2
3
4
5
Replace disk with known-good system disk.
Replace floppy drive cable.
Replace floppy drive.
Replace logic board.
Replace processor module.
Disk does not eject
1
Switch off computer. Hold down mouse button while you
switch computer on.
Replace floppy drive cable.
Replace floppy drive.
2
3
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Floppy Drive - 29
4
5
Replace logic board.
Replace processor module.
Drive attempts to
eject disk, but doesn’t
1
2
Reseat floppy drive bezel and drive so bezel slot aligns
correctly with drive.
Replace floppy drive.
Internal floppy drive
runs continuously
1
2
3
4
5
Replace disk with known-good floppy disk.
Replace floppy drive cable.
Replace floppy drive.
Replace logic board.
Replace processor module.
MS-DOS drive does
not recognize a disk
formatted on a 1.4 MB
drive
To read and write files with either MS-DOS or 1.4 MB drive,
format all disks with MS-DOS drive first.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Hard Drive - 30
Hard Drive
Single internal hard
drive does not
operate; drive
doesn’t spin
1
2
No internal SCSI
drives operate
1
3
2
3
4
5
6
7
Replace hard drive power cable.
Replace hard drive. If problem resolved, reinstall IDE device
driver and system software.
Replace power supply.
Verify there are no duplicate SCSI device addresses on a
single SCSI bus.
Disconnect external SCSI devices and check for proper
termination. Only last device in SCSI chain should be
terminated.
Check internal SCSI devices for proper termination.
Replace internal SCSI data cable to which non-operational
devices are attached.
Replace power supply.
Replace logic board.
Replace processor module.
Troubleshooting
Works with internal
or external SCSI
devices but not with
both
Symptom Charts/Hard Drive - 31
1
2
3
4
Verify there are no duplicate SCSI device addresses
Replace terminator on external SCSI device.
Verify that SCSI device at end of internal SCSI data cable is
only device terminated.
Refer to appropriate manual to troubleshoot defective
external device.
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Peripherals - 32
Peripherals
Cursor does not move
1
2
6
7
Check mouse connection.
Inspect inside of mouse for buildup of dirt or other
contaminants. Clean mouse if necessary.
If mouse was connected to keyboard, connect mouse to
computer ADB port instead. If mouse works, replace
keyboard.
Replace ADB cable.
If mouse does not work in any ADB port on computer, replace
mouse.
Replace logic board.
Replace processor module.
1
2
3
Boot from floppy or bootable CD.
Replace mouse.
Replace logic board.
3
4
5
Cursor moves, but
clicking mouse
button has no effect
Troubleshooting
Double-click doesn’t
open application,
disk, or server
Symptom Charts/Peripherals - 33
1
2
5
Remove duplicate system folders.
Clear parameter RAM. Hold down <Command> <Option> <P>
<R> during startup but before "Welcome to Macintosh"
appears.
If mouse was connected to keyboard, connect mouse to
computer ADB port instead. If mouse works, replace
keyboard.
If mouse does not work in any ADB port on computer, replace
mouse.
Replace logic board. Retain customer's DIMMs.
1
2
3
4
Check keyboard connection to ADB port.
Replace keyboard cable.
Replace keyboard.
Replace logic board.
3
4
No response to any
key on keyboard
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Peripherals - 34
Known-good serial
printer does not work
1
2
3
4
5
6
Verify you have correct version of system software.
Verify that Chooser is set correctly.
Reinstall correct printer drivers.
Do clean install of system software.
Replace printer interface cable.
Replace logic board. Retain customer's DIMMs.
Known-good network
printer does not print
1
2
3
4
Check network connections.
Verify you have correct version of system software.
Verify that Chooser is set correctly.
Does printer show up in Chooser? If so, do clean install of
system software and/or network and printer software.
Replace logic board. Retain customer's DIMMs.
5
Color StyleWriter
4500 printer does
not respond
Upgrade to the Color StyleWriter 4500 driver, version 1.1 or
later. Refer to this URL online: http://www.apple.com/support/
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/CD-ROM Drive - 35
CD-ROM Drive
CD-ROM drive does
not work
1
2
Try using known-good compact disc.
Replace CD-ROM drive mechanism.
Macintosh does not
display CD-ROM icon
once CD is inserted in
drive
1
2
3
Try using known-good compact disc.
Verify CD-ROM software is installed.
Reinstall CD-ROM software. You may have to use an external
CD-ROM drive.
Reseat CD-ROM data cable at logic board connector as well as
at CD-ROM connector.
Replace CD-ROM drive mechanism.
Replace CD-ROM data cable.
4
5
6
Troubleshooting
Symptom Charts/Miscellaneous - 36
Miscellaneous
No sound from
speaker
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Ethernet connection
drops off line by itself
Disconnect any microphones or external speakers.
Verify that volume setting in Control Panel is adequate and
mute is not checked.
Clear parameter RAM. Hold down <Command> <Option> <P>
<R> during startup but before "Welcome to Macintosh"
appears. Verify speaker is plugged into logic board.
Plug headphones or external speakers into the external jack.
If the the external jack works, replace the internal speaker
or logic board. If the external jack doesn’t work, proceed to
the next step.
Replace I/O Audio card.
Replace speaker.
Replace logic board.
Install Ethernet driver 2.0.4 or later.
K Service Source
Exploded View
Power Macintosh/Server G3
Minitower
Exploded View
2
Rear
Panel
922-3297
Rear
Drive
Carrier
922-2600
Hard Drive
4GB IDE 661-1342
4GB UW SCSI661-2050
9GB UW SCSI 661-2047
Power
Supply
Bracket
922-3288
Modem
Apple/GV
56.6K
661-1510
Fan
922-3295
Chassis
Latch
922-2685
Power Supply
200 W
661-1496
Internal
Chassis
922-3296
Heatsink
Kit
076-0715
Voltage
I/O Card Regulator
661-1456
Card
661-1457 922-3292
Chassis
Handle/
Baffle
922-3298
Jumper Block Kit
076-0716 (233 MHz)
076-0717 (266 MHz)
076-0737 (300 MHZ)
Light/
Power
Actuator
922-2588
Side
Access
Panel
922-3270
Speaker
Bezel
922-3269
Processor Module
661-1460 (233 Mhz)
661-1461 (266 Mhz) Speaker Speaker
Logic 661-2059 (300 Mhz) Housing 922-1639
Board
922-3300
661-1302
Floppy Drive Cable
922-3265
Floppy/Zip Drive Shield
922-2623
Floppy
Drive
661-1390
SCSI Cable
922-3264
Stationary
Panel
922-3290
Top Cover
922-2602
I/O Panel
922-3289
LED
Power
Cable
922-3273
Fan Baffle
922-3299
Hard Drive Cable
IDE 922-3266 / or
UW SCSI
922-3329
ATAPI
CD-ROM
Drive
661-1401
Zip Drive
661-1331
Floppy Drive Bezel
922-2594
CD-ROM Cable
Audio
922-2663
CD-ROM Drive Shield
922-2598
CD-ROM Drive Bezel
922-3219
Zip Drive Shield
922-2623
Zip Drive Bezel
922-2624
Front Drive
Carrier
922-2599
Power Macintosh G3 Minitower/Macintosh Server G3
Blank Shield
922-2978
Blank Bezel
922-2596
Power Macintosh G3 Minitower Screw Matrix
922-2739
w/lock washer
922-3636
Power Supply Mounting (2)
(underside of swinging
chassis)
Power Supply to Fan
Housing (4)
Power Supply Interior (2)
Floppy Drive to Carrier (4)
CD-ROM Drive to Carrier (4)
Zip-Drive to Carrier (4)
Hard Drive Bracket to
Chassis (2)
0
1
8
1 3 1 5 3
4 8 2 8 4
0
1
1
8
1 3 1 5 3
4 8 2 8 4
922-3268
922-3644
w/lock washer
Hard Drive Bracket to
Hard Drive (4)
Latch (1)ea
0
1
8
1
Scale
Scale
1 3 1 5 3
4 8 2 8 4
0
1
1
8
1 3 1 5 3
4 8 2 8 4
1
Scale
Scale
922-1203
w/lock washer
Power Supply Mounting (4)
CD-ROM Drive Shield (2)
at Rear of Box
PCI Covers (1) ea =3
Power Supply Mounting
Floppy Drive Shield (2)
Bracket (4)
Zip-Drive Shield (2)
PCI Cards (2)
0
1
8
1 3 1 5 3
4 8 2 8 4
1
Scale
922-3240
Logic Board w/washer (1)
Logic Board to Ground wire
no/washer (1)
0
1
8
1 3 1 5 3
4 8 2 8 4
Scale
1
033-1009 AV Card Update
4/7/98 7:18 PM
Page 1

About Your Optional Power Macintosh
Audio/ Video Card
The information in this update describes the additional capabilities of Power Macintosh
computers that are equipped with an optional Audio/Video (AV ) card. For more information
on setting up or using your Power Macintosh computer, see the setup manual that came with
you computer.
Left and Right RCA-Type Audio Ports
In addition to the standard sound input and output ports, the Power Macintosh AV card
provides additional sound input and output capabilities through RCA-type connectors. These
connectors are found on devices such as videocassette recorders ( VCRs) and tape decks. The
RCA-type ports are color-coded: red for right, and white for left. (The yellow ports are for
connecting video equipment.)
- Audio output ports
- Audio input ports
(left & right)
(left & right)
Connect your Macintosh to
the RCA-style Audio In ports
of video or audio equipment
such as VCRs and tape decks
Connect your Macintosh to
the RCA-style Audio Out ports
of video or audio equipment
such as VCRs and tape decks
- Sound output port
Connect your Macintosh
to headphones, externally
powered (amplified) speakers,
or other audio equipment using
a 3.5-mm miniplug connector
≈ Sound input port
Connect your Macintosh to an
Apple PlainTalk microphone
or other audio input
equipment using a 3.5-mm
miniplug connector
The left and right RCA-type ports accept this type of connector:
033-1009 AV Card Update
4/7/98 7:18 PM
Page 2
RCA-type plug
If your equipment has a different connector, you can purchase an adapter at an electronics
supply store.
Connecting Audio Equipment Using the RCA Ports
To connect audio equipment using the RCA ports on the AV card, follow the steps below. For
instructions on connecting an audio device using the standard sound input and output ports,
see the setup manual that came with your computer.
1
Make sure that the audio equipment has a cable like this one that has two RCA plugs at each
end:
RCA plugs
RCA plugs
2
Shut down the computer, turn off the audio equipment, and place the equipment near
the computer.
3
Attach cables to the audio equipment following the instructions that came with the equipment.
4
If your audio equipment is a sound input device, such as a tape deck, audio CD player, or
VCR, attach it to the RCA-type left and right audio input ports (-).
5
If your audio equipment is a sound output device, such as amplified speakers, attach it to the
optional RCA-type left and right audio output ports (-).
The following illustration shows a typical cable arrangements for a tape deck connected with
RCA-type connectors.
- Audio output ports (left and right)
Audio In ports (left and right)
Tape deck
6
2
Turn on the computer and the audio equipment.
033-1009 AV Card Update
4/7/98 7:18 PM
Page 3
Connecting Video Equipment
The Power Macintosh AV card provides additional ports for connecting video equipment so
that you can view TV and other video images on your computer monitor and store the
images on your hard disk. You can also view the Macintosh desktop on a television screen
attached to the computer and record images from the desktop to a videocassette recorder
( VCR).
Your Macintosh can work with two major video formats:
m Composite video, which is used by most televisions, most VCRs, and laserdisc players.
Composite video devices plug into the computer’s RCA-type video ports (˜ and Â).
m S-video, which is a high-quality video format used by many video cameras, VCRs, and
televisions. S-video devices plug into the computer’s S-video ports (æ and Æ).
The illustration below shows the computer’s video input and output ports. (The RCA-type
ports are color-coded: yellow for composite video, red for right audio, and white for left audio.)
 Composite video
˜ Composite video
output port
input port
Connects your Macintosh
to the RCA-style Video In
port of most VCRs or other
video recording or video
display equipment
Connects your Macintosh
to the RCA-style Video Out port
of most VCRs, laserdisc players,
video cameras, and other
video input equipment
Æ S-video output port
æ S-video input port
Connects your Macintosh
to the S-video In port of VCRs
or other video recording or
video display equipment that
uses an S-video connector
Connects your Macintosh to
the S-video Out port of VCRs,
laserdisc players, video cameras,
or other video input equipment
that uses an S-video connector
The S-video input and output ports accept S-video connectors, and the composite video
input and output ports accept RCA-type connectors.
S-video connector
RCA-type connector
3
033-1009 AV Card Update
4/7/98 7:18 PM
Page 4
Note: The S-video input port is compatible with both seven-pin and four-pin S-video connectors.
Important The S-video connector is a round plug with several small metal pins. It
resembles other Macintosh connectors, such as those for a printer, modem, mouse, or
keyboard. Don’t confuse the connectors; they’re not interchangeable.
Depending on what kind of ports are available on your video equipment, you’ll need
different cables (available at an electronics supply store).
m If your equipment has an S-video Out port, you’ll need a video cable with S-video
connectors at each end, and two audio cables with RCA-type connectors at each end.
(The audio cables can be separate, or joined like the one in the illustration.)
S-video plug
RCA plugs
S-video plug
RCA plugs
m If your equipment has an RCA Video Out port, you’ll need one video cable with RCA-type
connectors (plugs) at each end, and two audio cables with RCA-type connectors at each
end. (The cables can be separate, or joined like the one in the illustration.)
RCA plugs
RCA plugs
Connecting Video Equipment for Input to the Computer
When you connect video equipment to the video input port on your computer, you can view
video on your monitor, capture video images, and hear the sound from the video equipment
through the computer’s speaker. The instructions that follow are for connecting a stereo VCR
and video camera, but you can use them as a model for connecting your computer to any
video equipment.
To connect a VCR or video camera for input, do the following:
1
Shut down the Macintosh and turn off the VCR or video camera.
2
Attach one end of the video cable to the Video Out port on the video equipment.
Follow the directions that came with the VCR or camera.
3
4
Plug the other end of the video cable into either the S-video input port (æ) or the yellow
composite video input port (˜) on the Macintosh.
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If the S-video connector doesn’t slide easily into the port, check the pin alignment and try
again. Don’t use force, which could damage the computer or cable.
4
Plug the RCA-type connectors on the audio cables into the left and right RCA Audio Out ports
on the VCR or camera.
5
Plug the RCA-type connectors on the audio cables into the left and right RCA input ports (-)
on the computer.
If the cable is color-coded, the red connector is for the right port, and the black or white
connector is for the left port.
The next four illustrations show S-video connections and composite video connections for
both a VCR and a camera. Your finished connections should look like one of the following:
S-video connection for input from a VCR
- Audio input ports (left and right)
S-video Out
port
Audio Out ports
(left and right)
æ S-video
input port
S-video
cable
VCR
Dual RCA-plug cable (available at most electronics supply stores)
Composite video connection for input from a VCR
- Audio input ports (left and right)
Video Out
port
Audio Out ports
(left and right)
˜ Composite
video
input port
VCR
Triple RCA-plug cable (available at most electronics supply stores)
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S-video connection for input from a camera
- Audio input ports (left and right)
S-video Out port
Audio Out ports
(left and right)
æ S-video
input port
S-video cable
Dual RCA-plug cable (available at most electronics supply stores)
Composite video connection for input from a camera
- Audio input ports (left and right)
Video Out port
Audio Out ports
(left and right)
˜ Composite
video
input port
Triple RCA-plug cable (available at most electronics supply stores)
6
Turn on the computer and the VCR or camera.
7
To hear or capture on your computer the audio coming into the RCA input ports, open the
Monitors & Sound control panel, click the Sound button, and make sure that the RCA input
ports are the selected sound input source.
Click the button labeled h for help.
You can now begin working with the video equipment connected to your computer. To learn
more about using the AV features of your computer to play or capture video on your
computer, open Mac OS Help (available in the Help menu) and look up “video” in the index.
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Connecting Video Equipment for Output From the Computer
You can connect a VCR to record computer images and audio on videotape. The VCR records
what is happening on the computer’s monitor, sounds generated by the computer, and
speech spoken into a microphone if one is connected. This capability is useful for creating
video presentations or software demonstrations.
Note: The video out ports are primarily intended for recording what is happening on the
computer’s monitor. You can use video-editing software to save captured and edited video
on a VCR if the video-editing software supports the use of a single monitor. However, to get
full video-editing support with independent monitor and video (or TV) output, you need to
purchase and install a third-party video capture PCI card.
To connect a VCR for output from the computer, do the following:
1
Shut down the Macintosh and turn off the VCR.
2
Attach one end of the video cable to the Video In port on the VCR.
Follow the directions that came with the VCR.
3
Plug the other end of the video cable into either the S-video output port (Æ) or the yellow
composite video output port (Â) on the Macintosh.
If the S-video connector doesn’t slide easily into the port, check the pin alignment and try
again. Don’t use force, which could damage the computer or cable.
4
Plug the RCA-type connectors on the audio cables into the left and right Audio In ports on
the VCR.
5
Plug the RCA-type connectors on the audio cables into the left and right audio output ports
(-) on the Macintosh.
If the cable is color-coded, the red connector is for the right port, and the black or white
connector is for the left port.
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Depending on whether your equipment has S-video or composite video (RCA-type) ports,
your finished connections should look like one of the following:
S-video connection for output from the computer
- Audio output ports (left and right)
Æ S-video output port
S-video In port
S-video
cable
Audio In ports
(left and right)
VCR
Dual RCA-plug cable (available at most electronics supply stores)
Composite video connection for output from the computer
- Audio output ports (left and right)
 Composite video output port
Video In
port
Audio In ports
(left and right)
VCR
Triple RCA-plug cable (available at most electronics supply stores)
6
Turn on the computer and the VCR.
7
Select “line input” on your VCR.
See the manual that came with your VCR for instructions on how to select the line input source.
For further instructions on how to record the computer’s output on videotape and add voice
annotation, open Mac OS Help (available in the Help menu) and look for the information on
saving computer images to videotape in the “Monitors” topic area.
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Connecting a Television
You can connect to your computer any television that has either an S-video or composite
video input port and Audio In ports. The television displays a mirror image of the computer
monitor display, and (if the television has speakers) plays the sounds generated by the
computer. This capability is especially useful for giving presentations if you have a largescreen television.
To connect a television for TV mirroring, first you turn off the computer and connect the
television to it. Then you use the Control Strip to turn on TV mirroring. (If you need to learn
more about the Control Strip, see Mac OS Help, available in the Help menu.)
Because TV mirroring uses a limited number of resolutions supported by televisions, it works
best with multisynchronous monitors that support many resolutions. If you are using a fixedfrequency monitor, the monitor display will be disabled when you turn on TV mirroring.
(Most newer monitors are multisynchronous; refer to the manual that came with your
monitor if you are not sure.)
To connect a television and turn on TV mirroring, do the following:
1
Turn off your computer and connect the television according to the instructions in the
previous section, “Connecting Video Equipment for Output From the Computer.”
Depending on the type of connectors your equipment has (S-video or composite video),
your connection should look like one of the following illustrations.
Television used as a monitor with an S-video connection
- Audio
output ports
(left and right)
S-video In
port
Audio In ports
(left and right)
Æ S-video
output port
TV
S-video cable
Dual RCA-plug cable (available at most electronics supply stores)
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Television used as a monitor with a composite video connection
- Audio output
ports
(left and right)
Video In
port
Audio In ports
(left and right)
 Composite
video
output port
TV
Triple RCA-plug cable (available at most electronics supply stores)
2
Turn on the television and the computer.
3
Click the TV Mirroring icon in the Control Strip, and choose Turn TV Mirroring On from the
menu that appears.
TV Mirroring icon
Resolution icon
A message warns you to make sure a television is connected before continuing.
4
Click OK to close the message.
The screen resolution changes to one that is compatible with the television.
5
10
To improve the screen display of the monitor and the television, do one or more of the following:
m Choose a different resolution from the Resolution icon in the Control Strip.
m Choose a different Overscan setting from the TV Mirroring icon in the Control Strip.
When Overscan is turned on, the computer image fills the whole television screen, but
the edges may not be visible. Turning off Overscan adds a black border around the
computer image so that the entire computer image is visible on the television.
m Choose the television standard supported by your television (either NTSC or PAL) from
the TV Mirroring icon in the Control Strip.
m Adjust the image controls such as brightness and contrast on the television.
m To rearrange desktop icons that are no longer on the screen, click anywhere on the
Finder desktop and choose Clean Up from the View menu.
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To turn off TV Mirroring, click the TV Mirroring icon in the Control Strip, and choose Turn TV
Mirroring Off from the menu that appears.
Power Macintosh AV Card Specifications
Video Input
m
m
m
m
m
m
Type: composite or S-video
Standards supported: NTSC, PAL, and SECAM
Resolution supported: 320 x 240, which scales to any size up to the size of the monitor
Polarity: sync negative
Voltage level: 0.7 Vpp minimum, 1.0 Vpp typical, 1.4 Vpp maximum
Impedance: 75 ohms (Ω) internally terminated
Video Output
m
m
m
m
m
m
Type: composite and S-video
Standards supported: NTSC and PAL
Resolutions supported: 512 x 384, 640 x 480, 800 x 600, and 832 x 624
Polarity: sync negative (no sync on S-video chroma signal)
Voltage level: 1.0 Vpp ±5% into a 75 Ω resistive load (S-video chroma 0.7 Vpp)
Impedance: 75 Ω source
Sound input using the RCA-type audio input ports
m
m
m
m
Input impedance (preamplifier off ): more than 80 kΩ
Maximum input voltage (preamplifier off ): 1 Vrms = 2.8 Volts peak-to-peak (Vpp), nominal
Input impedance (preamplifier on): more than 5 kΩ
Maximum input voltage (preamplifier on): 62 millivolts (mVrms) = 175 mVpp, nominal
Sound output using the optional RCA-type audio output ports
m Output impedance: 400 Ω
m Maximum output voltage: 1 Vrms = 2.8 Vpp, nominal
Noise, distortion, and bandwidth
m Audio input signal-to-noise ratio (SNR): 85 decibels (dB) unweighted (add +8 dB to
estimate A weighting)
m Total harmonic distortion: 0.05%
m Bandwidth: 20 Hz–20 kHz at 44.1-kHz sample rate (Other sample rates scale the upper
cutoff frequency.)
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
Update: About Your
Build-To-Order Macintosh
Congratulations on purchasing your Macintosh computer. Since you chose the components of
your computer, parts of it may differ from what’s described in the manual that came with it.
This update addresses the differences and also includes information on additional components
not covered in the manual.
10/100Base-T Network Connection
If your computer came with the 10/100Base-T Ethernet option, a 10/100Base-T Ethernet card
is installed in one of your computer’s PCI slots. You can connect a cable for a 10Base-T or a
100Base-T Ethernet network to this card.
10/100Base-T Ethernet port (RJ-45)
Note: The type of twisted-pair cable you use depends on whether you connect to 10Base-T or
100Base-T Ethernet. Category 5 twisted-pair cable must be used to connect to 100Base-T
if you want to get the maximum speed from this connection.
Checking the Status of a 10/100Base-T Network Connection
If you connect your computer to a network using the 10/100Base-T Ethernet card, you can
check the card’s LED indicators to monitor network activity. There are four indicators:
m ACT (Activity): Blinks when the 10/100Base-T Ethernet card is active
m COL (Collision): Glows when a network collision has occurred (a temporary condition that
occurs when two computers on a network try to send data simultaneously)
m LNK (Link): Glows when a reliable 10 megabit (Mbit) or 100 Mbit network connection has
been established
m 100 Mb: Glows when a reliable 100 Mbit link is established
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10/100Base-T Ethernet Card Specifications
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
Open Transport: Mac OS 7.5.2 or later, AppleShare, AppleTalk, NetWare for Macintosh, TCP/IP
Connector: RJ-45 (for 10Base-T and 100Base-T)
Media, 10Base-T: Cat 3, 4, or 5 UTP on 2 pairs up to 100 meters (m)
Media, 100Base-T: Cat 5 UTP on 2 pairs up to 100 m
Bus interface: PCI revision 2.0 and 2.1, share interrupt A
Channel speeds: IEEE Auto Negotiation of 10Base-T and 100Base-T
Communications: IEEE 802.3u 100Base-T; IEEE 802.3i 10Base-T
Controllers: DECchip 21140, 32-bit internal processor per channel
Power: 1.2 amperes (A) @ 5 volts (V ) typical
Ultra Wide SCSI Hard Disk Drive and PCI Card
If your computer came with an Ultra Wide SCSI hard disk drive, it includes some or all of the
following components:
m an internal Ultra Wide SCSI hard disk drive
m in certain configurations, additional internal Ultra Wide SCSI hard disk drives
m an Ultra Wide SCSI card in one of your computer’s PCI slots
m an internal Ultra Wide SCSI cable that supports up to three internal devices (including your
pre-installed Ultra Wide hard disks)
Do not connect any SCSI devices to the external 68-pin SCSI-3 connector or
to the internal 50-pin SCSI-2 connector on the PCI card that supports the internal hard
disk. Connecting even one external SCSI device to the external 68-pin connector
extends the overall cable length of the SCSI bus beyond the limit for which error-free
operation can be guaranteed; the combined length of the internal cable and the
external cable reduces the reliability of all the devices connected to the Ultra Wide
SCSI bus. Connecting a device to the internal 50-pin SCSI-2 connector will cause your
Ultra Wide SCSI devices to transfer data at the slower, SCSI-2 rate.
Warning
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About the Ultra Wide SCSI Bus
Up to three internal devices can be connected to the Ultra Wide SCSI bus on this card.
All devices on the same SCSI bus must have unique ID numbers, but devices on different SCSI
buses may use the same SCSI ID number. (For example, you could have a removable media
drive with ID number 3 connected to the computer’s built-in regular SCSI-1 bus and a hard
disk with ID number 3 connected to the Ultra Wide SCSI-3 bus.)
The hard disks installed in your computer at the factory and the SCSI card have reserved
certain SCSI ID numbers on the Ultra Wide SCSI bus. Other ID numbers are available for
assignment to SCSI devices that are added later, as described in the following table.
Ultra Wide SCSI ID Number
Device
0
1 through 6
Factory-installed hard disk drive (terminated)
Available1
7
8 through 15
SCSI PCI card (terminated)
Available
1
If your computer came with two or more Ultra Wide SCSI hard disk drives, use the System Profiler program (available in the
Apple menu) to find out the SCSI ID numbers of your drives.
Important The factory-installed internal hard disk and the SCSI card are both terminated.
Other SCSI devices that you install and connect to the Ultra Wide SCSI bus must not be
terminated. If you attach a terminated device to the internal SCSI interface, the computer will
malfunction.
You use the internal ribbon cable with the 68-pin connector to connect an internal SCSI device
to the Ultra Wide SCSI bus.
68-pin connector
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Ultra Wide SCSI Card Specifications
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
Automatic termination
Advanced Data Streaming Technology (ADS)
RAID-ready
Embedded RISC I/P processor
Ultra SCSI connector: Fine pitch 68-pin “P”
Flash ROM BIOS
PCI 2.1 compliant
Large command FIFO
Supports disconnect/reconnect
Asynchronous I/O support
Multiple initiator support
SCSI-3 tagged command queuing
SCSI Manager 4.3 compatible
RAID Disk Volume Management Software
Certain Power Macintosh G3 configurations are supplied with RAID disk volume management
software. This software enables your hard disk drives to be striped or mirrored.
The RAID CD can be used as a startup disk. You can restart from it and use the RAID
application to initialize and stripe or mirror your hard disks. You can also use the RAID Installer
to place a copy of the RAID application on one of your hard disks.
To restart your computer from the RAID CD, insert the CD and hold down the C key while
you restart.
Refer to the documentation supplied on the RAID CD for full instructions on how to set up
and maintain RAID volumes.
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Using Disk Utilities and Formats With RAID
Drive Setup, the disk utility from Apple Computer, should not be used with RAID
volumes. You must manage your RAID volumes using the RAID application.
Important
To set up your RAID volumes to take advantage of Mac OS Extended (HFS Plus) format:
1
Create and set up your RAID volumes using the RAID application.
2
Quit the RAID application and return to the Finder.
3
Select the new RAID volume and choose Erase Disk from the Special menu to reformat the
volume in Extended format.
This process will erase all the data on your RAID volume. Be sure you back
up your files before reformatting RAID volumes.
Warning
128-Bit 2D/3D Graphics Accelerator Card
If your computer came with an additional graphics card, you have the following options for
connecting an external monitor to your computer:
m connect an external monitor to the built-in monitor port (shown in the manual that came
with your computer)
m connect an external monitor to the graphics card installed in one of the PCI slots
There are two ports on the optional graphics card. One is the type found on the back of most
Macintosh computers; the other is a VGA port so you don’t need an adapter for a VGA monitor.
Note: You cannot use both ports on the optional graphics card at the same time.
m connect two external monitors to your computer
You can connect one monitor to the built-in monitor port and the other monitor to one of
the ports on the graphics card, which is installed in one of the PCI slots.
Apple monitor port
VGA monitor port
Important To capture video using the video input ports on the optional Power Macintosh
Audio/ Video card, a monitor needs to be connected to the built-in monitor port. If you have
only one monitor connected to the optional 128-bit 2D/3D graphics accelerator card, you will
not be able to capture video. If you want to capture video, switch your monitor to the built-in
monitor port or connect a second monitor. When performing video capture with two monitors
connected to your Power Macintosh, make sure that the video capture window is displayed on
the monitor that is connected to the built-in monitor port.
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Display Modes and Color Depths
1
Resolution
Color Depths
Vertical Refresh Rate (Hertz)
512 x 384
640 x 480
640 x 870
800 x 600
832 x 624
1024 x 768
1152 x 870
1280 x 960
1280 x 1024
1600 x 1024
1600 x 1200
1920 x 1080
1920 x 1200
256, thousands, millions
256, thousands, millions
256, thousands, millions
256, thousands, millions
256, thousands, millions
256, thousands, millions
256, thousands, millions
256, thousands, millions
256, thousands, millions
256, thousands, millions
256, thousands, millions
256, thousands, millions
256, thousands
60
60, 67, 75, 85, 120
75
60, 72, 75, 85
75
60, 70, 75, 85
75
60, 75, 85
60, 75, 85
76
60, 65, 70, 75, 85
60, 72
76
1
The resolutions that appear in the Monitors & Sound control panel are dependent upon the type of monitor you are using.
Graphics Card Specifications
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
260 megabytes (MB) per second sustained image scroll rate
4.2 gigabytes (GB) per second sustained color fill rate
Up to 1.2 million Gouraud shaded polygons per second
240 megahertz (MHz) RAM digital-to-analog converter (RAMDAC)
8 MB VRAM (Note: Additional VRAM cannot be added.)
Supports QuickDraw 3D
QuickTime video playback (video scaling and color space conversion handled in software)
Video Memory (SGRAM)
The manual Setting Up Your Power Macintosh and the Technical Information booklet state
that your computer only has 2 MB of video memory built into the computer’s main logic board
and that you can add video memory by installing a Small Outline (SO) Dual Inline Memory
Module (DIMM) in a slot on the logic board. However, if your computer came with
6 MB of video memory, a 4 MB SO-DIMM has already been installed in the expansion slot on
the logic board. You will not be able to add any more video memory.
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Apple FireWire Card
The optional Apple FireWire Card is designed to work with digital video camcorders and decks
that use the DV format and have a FireWire port (sometimes marked IEEE 1394 or DV IN/OUT).
The included hardware and software, together with a non-linear editing application, allow you
to capture DV movie clips to your hard disk. You can view the clips in MoviePlayer or other
QuickTime 3.0 applications, and edit and render the DV movies. If you are using a video
editing application with an export function, you can send (print or record) movies back to the
tape in your camcorder or deck. The software also allows the FireWire device to be controlled
from the computer.
The FireWire Bus
FireWire is a serial bus that can support high-performance devices, such as DV cameras and
printers. Devices can be connected in any combination of branching and chaining, as long as
no loops are formed. A FireWire bus can support up to 16 consecutive cable hops of 4.5 meters
each. There are no SCSI-style ID numbers to set and no termination requirements.
The Apple FireWire Card is designed to keep the network alive even if the Macintosh is shut
down. Loss of power to the Macintosh will not affect the operation of a FireWire card as long as
it can draw power from other cards on the bus.
Each card provides power which is available to other devices on the network. This means that
a system shutdown will not result in interrupted transmission over a FireWire network.
For more information about cable management and power issues, please refer to
the FireWire ReadMe file on the FireWire CD.
Important
Apple FireWire Hardware
If you ordered the Apple FireWire Card with your computer, you have received the following
items:
m the Apple FireWire Card, installed in one of your computer’s PCI slots
m a FireWire cable, 4-pin to 6-pin, 2 meters long
m a FireWire software installation CD
Your Apple FireWire Card has three FireWire ports, as shown in the following illustration.
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To connect your Macintosh to a DV camera, plug the 6-pin connector into the Apple FireWire
Card and the 4-pin connector into the camera’s DV port. Both of these connectors snap into
place when properly engaged. If you want to connect two computers together (or if your
device has a 6-pin FireWire port), you can obtain cables through an AV equipment retailer or
electronics store.
4-pin 1394 (FireWire) connector
6-pin 1394 (FireWire) connector
Apple FireWire Card Software
To install the Apple FireWire Card software:
1
Insert the FireWire CD.
2
Double-click the Installer icon.
3
Follow the onscreen instructions.
4
Restart your computer.
An extension called FireWire Support may be located in a folder titled FireWire in
the Apple Extras folder on your Macintosh. Do not move this older extension to your
Extensions folder, as it may interfere with the operation of the new Apple FireWire software.
Important
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DVD-ROM Drive
If you chose the DVD-ROM option for your computer, you have a DVD-ROM drive in place of
the CD-ROM drive. This type of drive is used in the same way as a CD-ROM drive, but allows
you to use a wider range of disc formats:
m DVD-ROM
m CD-ROM (Modes 1 and 2)
m CD-ROM XA (Mode 2, Forms 1 and 2)
m CD-I (Mode 2, Forms 1 and 2)
m CD-Audio
m Photo CD
m video CD
Disc speeds and capacities vary depending upon the type of disc used.
Note: This DVD-ROM drive supports the use of DVD movie titles. However, third-party
MPEG-2 hardware is required for actual playback.
9
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