Orlando Utilities Commission

Orlando Utilities Commission

BLACK & VEATCH CORPORATION

11401 LAMAR AVENUE, OVERLAND PARK, KS 66211

+1 913-458-7134 | [email protected]

01 March 2013

Mr. Steve Garl

Florida Public Service Commission

2540 Shumard Oak Blvd

Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0688

Subject: 2013 Orlando Utilities Commission Annual Conservation Report

Dear Mr. Garl:

Attached please find an electronic version (in PDF format) of the 2013 Orlando

Utilities Commission (OUC) Annual Conservation Report. The 2013 OUC Annual

Conservation Report was prepared by Black & Veatch and is being submitted by Black

& Veatch on behalf of OUC. In addition to this electronic version, five hardcopies of this report are being sent to your attention via FedEx.

If you have any questions about this report, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Very truly yours,

BLACK & VEATCH CORPORATION

Bradley Kushner

Principal Consultant, Management Consulting Division

Orlando Utilities Commission

2013 Annual Conservation Report

March 2013

Orlando Utilities Commission

2013 Annual Conservation Report Table of Contents

Table of Contents

1.0 Introduction………………………………………………………………………………..1-1

1.1

Background of OUC’s Current Numeric Conservation Goals………………..1-1

1.2

OUC’s Conservation and DSM Programs…………………….......................1-1

1.3

OUC’s Renewable Energy and Sustainability Initiavites and Community

Involvement………………………………………..........................................1-3

1.3.1 OUC Renewable Energy - Solar ………………………………………...1-3

1.3.2 OUC Renewable Energy – Landfill Gas…………………………………1-5

1.3.3 OUC Carbon Reduction …………………………………………………1-5

1.3.4 OUC Energy Efficiency and Sustainability ……………………………..1-7

1.3.5 OUC’s Green Team ……………………………………………………..1-7

1.3.6 OUC Community Activities …………………………………………….1-8

1.3.6.1 Lowe’s Utility Partnership Event………………………………1-9

1.3.6.2 Water Color Project …………………………………………...1-9

1.3.6.3 City of Orlando Weatherization Programs………………….....1-9

1.3.6.4 Project A.W.E.S.OM.E………………………………………...1-9

1.3.6.5 ―Light Up Nemours‖ (Believe in Conservation Contest) …….1-10

1.3.6.6 Habitat for Humanity…………………………………………..1-10

1.3.6.7 OUC Orlando Half Marathon and 5K…………………………1-10

1.3.7 Customer Education Initiatives ………………………………………...1-10

1.3.7.1 Preferred Contractor Network. ……………………………….1-10

1.3.7.2 Mobile Site …………………………………………………...1-11

1.3.7.3 New Conservation Website …………………………………..1-11

1.3.7.4 Home Energy Reports Program………………………………1-11

1.3.7.5 Energy & Water Conservation DVD…………………………1-11

1.3.7.6 Media Overview………………………………………………1-12

1.3.7.7 Orlando Magic Partnership …………………………………..1-11

1.3.7.8 Connections…………………………………………………...1-12

1.3.7.9 Social Media………………………………………………….1-12

2.0 Conservation Goals and Demand-Side Management Plan ......................................... …2-1

2.1 Approved Numeric Conservation Goals……………………….......................2-1

2.2 OUC Demand-Side Management Programs…………………………………...2-1

2.2.1 Quantifiable Conservation Programs ………………………………….....2-1

2.2.1.1 Residential Energy Survey Program …………………………..2-1

2.2.1.2 Residential Duct Repair Rebate Program ……………………....2-3

2.2.1.3 Residential Ceiling Insulation Rebate Program………………..2-3

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2013 Annual Conservation Report Table of Contents

2.2.1.4 Residential Window Film/Solar Screen Rebate Program .......... 2-3

2.2.1.5 Residential High Performance Window Rebate Program .......... 2-4

2.2.1.6 Residential Caulking and Weather Stripping Rebate Program .. 2-4

2.2.1.7 Residential Wall Insulation Rebate Program ............................. 2-4

2.2.1.8 Residential Cool/Reflective Roof Rebate Program .................... 2-5

2.2.1.9 Residential Heat Pump Rebate Program .................................... 2-5

2.2.1.10 Residential Efficiency Delivered Program ................................. 2-6

2.2.1.11 Residential Billed Solution Insulation Program ......................... 2-7

2.2.1.12 Residential New Home Program ................................................ 2-7

2.2.1.13 Residential Compact Fluorescent Lighting Program ................. 2-7

2.2.1.14 Residential HVAC Proper Sizing with R-30 Attic Insulation

Program ...................................................................................... 2-7

2.2.1.15 Commercial Energy Audit Program ........................................... 2-8

2.2.1.16 Commercial Indoor Lighting Retrofit Program .......................... 2-8

2.2.1.17 Commercial Heat Pump Rebate Program .................................. 2-9

2.2.1.18 Commercial Duct Repair Rebate Program ................................. 2-9

2.2.1.19 Commercial Window Film/Solar Screen Rebate Program ....... 2-10

2.2.1.20 Commercial Ceiling Insulation Rebate Program ...................... 2-10

2.2.1.21 Commercial Cool/Reflective Roof Rebate Program ................ 2-10

2.2.2 Additional Conservation Measures ......................................................... 2-11

2.2.2.1 Residential Energy Conservation Rate Structure ..................... 2-11

2.2.2.2 Commercial OUConsumption Online ...................................... 2-11

2.2.2.3 Commercial OUConvenient Lighting ...................................... 2-11

2.2.2.4 OUCooling ............................................................................... 2-11

2.2.2.5 Small Business Efficiency Pilot ............................................... 2-12

3.0 Status of OUC Approved Numeric Goals ....................................................................... 3-1

3.1 Summary of OUC Residential Numeric Goals .................................................... 3-1

3.2 Summary of OUC Commercial/Industrial Numeric Goals .................................. 3-2

3.3 Summary of OUC Combined Numeric Goals ..................................................... 3-2

Appendix A Examples of Some of OUC’s Electric DSM Educational and Marketing Campaign

Material

Appendix B Multi-family ARRA Grant project ―Transforming the Multi-Family Market Place

Through Efficiency Improvements‖

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2013 Annual Conservation Report 1.0 Introduction

1.0 Introduction

In accordance with Rule 25-17.0021, Florida Administrative Code, the Florida Public

Service Commission (FPSC) must establish numeric conservation goals for the Orlando Utilities

Commission (OUC) at least once every five years. In addition, OUC must file an annual report showing the status of its numeric conservation goals.

1.1 Background of OUC’s Current Numeric Conservation Goals

OUC’s residential and commercial/industrial numeric conservation goals for the 2010 through 2019 period were established by the FPSC in the Final Order Approving Numeric

Conservation Goals (Order No. PSC-09-0855-FOF-EG, issued December 30, 2009). On March

30, 2010, OUC filed a petition requesting FPSC approval of OUC’s DSM Plan, which was subsequently approved pursuant to the FPSC Order issued September 3, 2010 (Order No. PSC-

10-0554-PAA-EG), with Consummating Order issued September 28, 2010 (Order No. PSC-10-

0595-CO-EG). OUC’s DSM Plan sets forth the programs that OUC anticipated offering to achieve the numeric conservation goals established by the FPSC. The approved numeric conservation goals are summarized in Section 2.0 of this report.

1.2 OUC’s Conservation and DSM Programs

OUC has been increasingly emphasizing its DSM and conservation programs to increase customer awareness of such programs. Not only do these programs help customers save money by saving energy, the programs help OUC reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and better position OUC to meet possible future greenhouse gas regulations. It should be noted that government mandates have forced manufacturers to increase their efficiency standards, thereby decreasing the incremental amount of energy savings achievable. In addition, the efficiency of new generation has increased. These appliance and generating unit efficiency improvements have mitigated to some degree the effectiveness of DSM and conservation programs, as the incremental benefit of such programs is partially offset by overall efficiency increases in the marketplace as a whole.

The following two sections of this report provide more specific details concerning the

DSM and conservation programs offered by OUC in calendar year 2012, (Section 2.0), and present the participation levels and associated numeric savings for each of OUC’s quantifiable conservation programs which were offered in 2012 (Section 3.0) and were consistent with

OUC’s submitted DSM Plan. The quantifiable DSM Plan’s conservation programs offered to

OUC’s customers in 2012 included the following:

Residential Energy Survey Program (Walk-Through, DVD, and Online)

Residential Duct Repair Rebate Program

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Residential Ceiling Insulation Rebate Program

Residential Window Film/Solar Screen Rebate Program

Residential High Performance Window Rebate Program

Residential Caulking and Weather Stripping Rebate Program

Residential Wall Insulation Rebate Program

Residential Cool/Reflective Roof Rebate Program

Residential Heat Pump Rebate Program

Residential Efficiency Delivered Program

1.0 Introduction

Residential Billed Solution Insulation Program

Residential New Home Rebate Program

Residential Compact Fluorescent Lighting Program

Residential AC Proper Sizing with R-30 Attic Insulation Rebate Program

Commercial Energy Audit Program

Commercial Indoor Lighting Retrofit Billed Solution Program

Commercial Indoor Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program

Commercial Heat Pump Rebate Program

Commercial Duct Repair Rebate Program

Commercial Window Film/Solar Screen Program

Commercial Ceiling Insulation Program

Commercial Cool/Reflective Roof Program

1

During calendar year 2012, OUC continued to offer the following measures that have not been quantified, but aid OUC’s customers in reliability, energy conservation, and education:

Residential Energy Conservation Rate Structure

Commercial OUConsumption Online

Commercial OUConvenient Lighting

OUCooling

Small Business Efficiency Pilot

1

As stated in OUC’s DSM Plan, the annual energy and demand reductions associated with the Commercial

Cool/Reflective Roof Program were not included in OUC’s projected energy and demand reductions. In order to be consistent with the DSM Plan, this Conservation Report includes information on the Commercial Cool/Reflective

Roof Program, but does not include the energy and peak demand reductions realized when summarizing total energy and demand reductions.

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2013 Annual Conservation Report 1.0 Introduction

1.3 OUC’s Renewable Energy and Sustainability Initiatives and Community Involvement

The remainder of this section discusses OUC’s recent renewable energy and sustainability initiatives, as well as OUC’s recent activities in the community.

1.3.1 OUC Renewable Energy – Solar

In addition to continuing to promote DSM and conservation, OUC is actively working to promote customer awareness of opportunities to increase the role of renewable energy. One such initiative is OUC’s Green Pricing Program. Participation in this program helps add renewable energy to OUC’s generation portfolio, improves regional air and water quality, and assists OUC in developing additional renewable energy resources. Program participants may pay an additional $5.00 on their monthly utility bills for each 200 kWh block blend of local bio-energy

(75 percent), local solar energy (20 percent) and purchased wind power (5 percent); or $10.00 for each 200 kWh block of 100 percent solar energy. There is no limit to the number of 200 kWh blocks that a participant may acquire to support funding of additional renewable energy to

OUC’s portfolio. Participation helps OUC develop cleaner alternative energy resources, such as solar, wind, and biomass. The annual per customer participation of 2,400 kWh is equivalent to the environmental benefit of planting 3 acres of forest, taking three cars off the road, preventing the use of 27 barrels of oil, or bicycling more than 30,575 miles instead of driving.

Further examples of OUC’s commitment to renewable energy are OUC’s environmentally friendly solar programs, which are available to both residential and commercial customers. These programs include the Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Net Metering Program and the

Solar PV Credit Program, and the Solar Thermal program, which generates heat for domestic water heating systems. Participating customers in the PV Credit program can install a solar PV system on their homes or business and sign an agreement allowing OUC to retain the rights to the environmental benefits or attributes. For the Net Metering Program, participating customers receive a monthly production credit on their utility bills for energy produced in excess of what the home or business can use. Any excess electricity generated and delivered by the solar PV systems back to OUC’s electric grid is credited at the customer’s retail electric rate. Customers participating in the Solar PV Credit program receive a monthly credit of $0.05 for each kWh produced from their system. Commercial Solar Thermal Program participants receive a monthly credit of $0.03 for each kWh equivalent produced by their solar hot water system. Customers participating in the Residential Solar Thermal Program receive a rebate of up to $1,000 for installing a solar hot water system. Residential customers may also benefit from OUC’s partnership with the Orlando Federal Credit Union to provide low interest loan options for solar thermal and PV installations, helping to keep the net monthly cost low, all of which can be included on the OUC bill. Additional federal tax credits may also be available to help minimize

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2013 Annual Conservation Report 1.0 Introduction

costs. To date, a total of 512 customers participate in OUC’s solar incentive programs adding

4.1 MW of distributed capacity to OUC’s energy portfolio.

To further facilitate development of solar energy, OUC supported Orange County in its efforts to obtain a $2.5 million grant from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to install a 1 MW solar array on the Orange County Convention Center. The project ―went live‖ in

May 2009 and is currently producing clean, green power. In 2008, Orlando was designated a

―Solar American City‖ by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The ongoing partnership between OUC, City of Orlando and Orange County received $450,000 in funding and technical expertise to help develop solar projects in OUC’s service area that can be replicated across the country.

In September 2009, OUC and clean energy company Petra Solar teamed up to launch the first utility pole-mounted solar photovoltaic system in Florida. Ten of Petra Solar’s SunWave™ intelligent photovoltaic solar systems have been installed on OUC utility poles along Curry Ford

Road. Together the panels can generate up to 2 KW, about enough to power a small home. The innovative solar panel demonstration project is expected to help enhance the Smart Grid capabilities and reliability of the electric distribution grid. Petra Solar worked in collaboration with the University of Central Florida in developing the pole-mounted approach to clean energy generation. The SunWave systems not only turn street light and utility poles into solar generators, they also communicate with the electric grid and can offer smart grid capabilities.

The systems can improve grid reliability through real-time communications between solar generators in the field and the utility control center. In addition, the systems enhance electric distribution grid reliability through a host of capabilities such as voltage and frequency monitoring and reactive power compensation.

During 2010, OUC invested $100,000 in an educational partnership with the Orlando

Science Center to build a 31.5 kW PV array atop the Science Center’s observatory. The system provides about 42,660 kWh of electricity per year, or enough power to serve about four homes.

The PV installation not only provides green power to the Science Center but also an educational experience on the science of solar energy for the thousands of children who visit the center each year.

OUC has added solar to its fleet of natural gas, coal, and landfill gas generation already on site at Stanton Energy Center. Duke Energy owns and maintains the Stanton Solar Farm, which produces about 6 MW, or enough power for about 600 homes. Brought on-line in late

2011, the Stanton Solar Farm consists of more than 25,000 modules featuring solar panels with a patented single-axis tracking system design that can withstand Category 4 hurricane winds while increasing electricity output by 30 percent. OUC plans to purchase the output of this installation, which is the first solar farm in Orange County, for the next 20 years.

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2013 Annual Conservation Report

1.3.2

OUC Renewable Energy – Landfill Gas(LFG)

1.0 Introduction

The gas produced by the biological breakdown of organic matter in landfill is known as methane or landfill gas. It is created by the decomposition of wet organic waste under anaerobic, or oxygen-less, conditions in a landfill. This gas is considered a renewable energy source because the anaerobic digestion process continues as waste materials are constantly added to the landfill. In partnership with Orange County, OUC captures methane gas emissions from county landfill cells, and pipes it to the Stanton Energy center where it is co-fired with coal. In addition to helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, this project has the potential to displace more than 3 percent of the coal burned at the Stanton Energy Center. It is also capable of producing in excess of 100,000 MWh of reduced-emissions power.

OUC and Orange County recently brought a new LFG facility on line that will recover up to 22 MW of landfill gas capacity from the Orange County Landfill’s southern expansion site.

OUC has signed a 20-year renewable energy purchase power agreement for nearly 4 MW of energy generated from landfill gas in Port Charlotte. Its current capacity is now at 2.8 MW but is expected to increase over time.

1.3.3 OUC Carbon Reduction

With more than 775 vehicles – ranging from plug-in hybrids to bucket trucks – OUC’s fleet logs more than 4.7 million miles annually. OUC reduces their carbon footprint by using alternative fuels, purchasing more hybrids and recycling automotive products to help our environment. As part of an overall plan to reduce emissions in fleet, OUC uses―B20‖ – a blend of 80 percent petroleum diesel and 20 percent biodiesel – a clean-burning alternative fuel made from new or used vegetables oils and animal fats, including recycled cooking grease. Compared to petroleum diesel, biodiesel produces lower emissions, so it is better for the environment. B20 has been integrated seamlessly into the fueling system without any changes to vehicles or fuel storage and distribution equipment. Since 2006, nearly 696,000 gallons of B20 have been purchased, and the reduction in diesel fuel has reduced OUC’s carbon footprint by 1,772 tonnes of CO

2 e (carbon dioxide equivalent). OUC uses biodiesel at the Pershing Fleet Center and plans to expand its use to the Gardenia site in the near future. Biodiesel is now available in downtown

Orlando. Thanks to a $2.5 million grant from the Florida Department of Environment

Protection, Central Florida’s LYNX transit system opened a biodiesel blending facility and fueling station at its Orlando Operations Center.

Embracing fuel-efficient technology as a commitment to green initiatives, OUC was the first municipal utility in Florida to acquire a plug-in hybrid that gets up to 99 miles per gallon. In addition to the plug-in, OUC has 19 other traditional hybrids in the fleet.

OUC also moved forward with an agreement to develop the charging infrastructure, test, and lease 6 all-electric

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2013 Annual Conservation Report 1.0 Introduction

vehicles with a 100 mile range (the Nissan ―Leaf‖), and has also leased two Chevy Volts, which can run on gasoline or electricity.

OUC now has five hybrid bucket trucks and one auxiliary battery system to operate the aerial tower hydraulics. Bucket trucks are a promising application for hybrid technology since much of the vehicle’s work is done when stationary. The hybrid diesel-electric system allows the main engine to be turned off while crews operate entirely off the battery.

OUC’s Fleet Division has incorporated a number of eco-conscious policies, including the use of earth-friendly products and special care taken to dispose contaminated fuels according to environmental standards. Tires, batteries and oil filters are recycled through vendors, while freon, antifreeze and motor oil are handled on site. OUC also has a vehicle idling policy that requires the engine to be turned off after five minutes. Diesel engines use about one gallon of fuel per hour when idling, so this policy saves about $4 per hour per vehicle.

As part of OUC’s commitment to alternative fuels and efficient transportation, three of the nine electric-vehicle charging stations at Reliable Plaza are powered by the sun. Located in the parking garage, the 16-panel solar array provides a total of 2.8 kW of power to charge the vehicles. At night or on a cloudy day when the sun is not shining, the power is drawn from

Reliable Plaza. When the sun is shining but no car is charging, the power is fed back into the building. OUC can access a special website to track real time info and total system usage for its charging stations. A full charge takes about four hours for a Nissan Leaf. Users have a key fob for the charging station and supply their own power cord. Plug-in drivers can go to mychargepoint.net to locate available charging stations nationwide. Users register with

Chargepoint to set up an account that links to their credit card. The power is billed by Nova

Charge.

To help prepare Central Florida to support plug-ins, OUC partnered with the City of

Orlando, Orange County, and others as part of a national non-profit initiative called Project Get

Ready. OUC and the City of Orlando also hosted the national kickoff of the U.S. Department of

Energy ChargePoint America Grant, which has provided nearly 300 public charging stations to

Central Florida; 135 of these stations are located in OUC’s service territory. OUC is developing an electric vehicle infrastructure solution for Greater Orlando, and as part of this effort is offering businesses the opportunity to participate by allocating space for charging stations.

Participating businesses were given the option of owning the equipment or hosting the equipment. Customers that choose to own the equipment were reimbursed for installation costs.

Customers that opted to host the equipment had no out of pocket expense. OUC installs, owns, and operates the equipment at hosted sites. In the coming year, OUC plans to offer a rebate of

$1,000 to commercial customers who install additional charging stations within its service territory.

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2013 Annual Conservation Report 1.0 Introduction

1.3.4 OUC Energy Efficiency and Sustainability

OUC’s commitment to efficiency and sustainability is further demonstrated by Reliable

Plaza, OUC’s energy and water efficient center in south downtown that opened in 2008 and replaced OUC’s 40-year-old Administration Building on South Orange Avenue. Reliable Plaza earned Gold Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification in 2009, officially cementing the 10-story administration and customer service center as the "Greenest

Building in downtown Orlando." The non-profit U.S. Green Building Council awarded the Gold level certification after completing a review of the building's design and construction. Reliable

Plaza also holds a Florida Water Star certification, a voluntary program for new and existing construction that encourages water efficiency in appliances plumbing fixtures, irrigation systems and landscapes.

Reliable Plaza showcases a number of environmentally friendly features designed to use 28 percent less energy and 40 percent less water than a similarly sized facility.

One of the more innovative offerings at Reliable Plaza is the interactive conservation education center. With a live link to the building’s conservation systems, the center’s touch screen gives customers real time data on how Reliable Plaza uses – and saves – energy and water. The center provides information on green building ideas and conservation tips customers can use at home.

1.3.5 OUC’s Green Team

With the philosophy that changing an organization’s culture requires both corporate and individual accountability, OUC has established the Green Team – a dedicated group of employee volunteers who are working to implement practical, sustainable operations in their respective work areas.

In addition to setting benchmarks and establishing metrics, the Green Team identifies ways to improve energy and water efficiency in OUC buildings, reduce waste, use product inventories more efficiently, lower emissions from operations, and create a healthier, happier environment for employees and customers.

With the Gold LEED-certified Reliable Plaza setting the standard, other OUC facilities have followed suit, implementing a number of environmental efforts, including:

Retrofitting and upgrading light bulbs and ballasts

Installing light sensors

Turning up thermostats

Cutting back on landscape and exterior building lighting

Purchasing Energy Star-rated appliances when replacements are needed

Using environmentally friendly cleaning products

Upgrading HVAC systems

Installing rain sensors on irrigation systems

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2013 Annual Conservation Report 1.0 Introduction

Cutting grass less frequently at water plants, substations and areas not highly visible to the public

Going forward, OUC is planning a number of new green initiatives. OUC currently has single stream recycling at all of its facilities and also recycles industrial materials such as wood pallets, utility meters, wire reels and copper. It has also developed internal policies such as electronic document storage, online document review, double-sided printing and specifies the use of recycled paper and office products whenever practicable. In the coming months, OUC will be focused on reducing its energy and water usage with efficiency upgrades at its Pershing and Gardenia facilities.

1.3.6 OUC Community Activities

OUC also continues to play an active role in the local community. OUC employees have donated more than 55,000 hours and $200,000 to 180 community organizations since 1993.

OUC conservation support personnel have made hundreds of public appearances related to conservation at schools, business expos, professional associations, and homeowner association meetings. Conservation specialists conducted presentations, provided face-to face consultations, scheduled audits, and disseminated information on conservation programs. Below is a list of events OUC participated in during 2012:

Nissan LEAF Drive Electric Tour

Project Get Ready Stakeholder Meeting

Eco-nomic Living Expo

Orlando Business Journal Power Breakfast

Neighborhood & Community Summit

Colony Cove HOA Presentation

Orlando Magic Fan Fest (NBA Green Week)

Valencia Earth Day Event

Watercolor Project Awards

CNL Earth Day Fair

GE Earth Day

Earth Day at Lake Eola

Hispanic Business Expo

State of Orange County Address

Valencia EV Event

Mascot Games

Florida Energy Summit

Solar Power International Conference

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Lake Eola's Electric Auto Showcase

State of Downtown Address

Home & Garden Show

1.0 Introduction

Richmond Estates HOA Presentation

Florida Water Festival

Specific examples of community activities in which OUC was involved during 2012 are outlined below.

1.3.6.1 Lowe’s Utility Partnership Event. OUC partnered with Lowe’s to celebrate Energy

Awareness Month. OUC utilized its partnership with Lowe’s to educate customers on the benefits of saving energy and water as well as rebates available through OUC. Conservation

Auditors were on site at the Lowe’s Home Improvement store in Southeast Orlando in October.

Conservation Auditors and OUC representatives engaged customers by conducting a scavenger hunt throughout the store for customers to identify ENERGY STAR® and OUC rebated products for a chance to win a $50 Lowe’s gift card.

1.3.6.2 Water Color Project. For the sixth year in a row, OUC hosted the Water Color Project, a conservation-themed art program that encourages students to showcase the importance of saving water through their artwork. Elementary students compete to have their artwork featured in an annual calendar, while middle and high school students decorate rain barrels that become a traveling exhibit that is displayed throughout the community.

1.3.6.3 City of Orlando Weatherization Programs. OUC also partnered with the City of

Orlando on several weatherization programs that target homes in some of the City’s least energyefficient neighborhoods. Based on historical consumption data from OUC, the City developed an energy intensity map to identify the neighborhoods with the highest energy consumption per square foot.

A relatively new program—P.O.W.E.R. (Provide Opportunity, Weatherization,

Efficiency and Rehabilitation)—weatherizes and renovates the homes of Orlando residents who apply and meet specific income requirements.

1.3.6.4 Project AWESOME. OUC and the Orlando Science Center delivered energy and water conservation workshops to fifth grade classrooms throughout OUC’s service territory via Project

AWESOME (Alternative Water & Energy Supply; Observation, Methods & Education). It was the third year of the educational program that promotes both water and energy conservation through a hands-on curriculum using content approved by OUC and meeting Sunshine State

Standards. Projects included allowing students to make an aquifer, build a solar-powered car, and test low flow showerheads and compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) against traditional fixtures as part of an electric and water conservation and alternative sources educational program. Project A.W.E.S.O.M.E., which launched in 2009, delivers two 90-minute classroom

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2013 Annual Conservation Report 1.0 Introduction

workshops—energy in the fall and water in the spring—to students in support of their Science

FCAT preparation. In the 2011–2012 school year, 7,500 fifth grade students in 50 schools in

Orange and Osceola County participated, and the program received high marks from both teachers and students. According to post-test assessments, more than 60 percent of the students improved their science skills.

1.3.6.5 “Light Up Nemours” (Believe in Conservation Contest). OUC teamed up with

Nemours Children’s Hospital to celebrate the hospital’s grand opening by giving elementary school children the chance to participate in a special lighting ceremony. The winners of a conservation-themed art contest received the opportunity to turn on the hospital’s colorful lights for the very first time. The colorful lights are unique to Nemours Children’s Hospital, where patients are able to pick the lighting color in their own rooms.

The winning schools received $1,000 to be used to teach children the importance of conservation and efficiency; knowledge which will help families reduce their utility bills by making good decisions. Nemours also is going green. In fact, 90 percent of the hospital’s construction waste has been recycled, and reclaimed water is being used for more than 60,000 square feet of garden space. Nemours is working toward a Leadership in Energy and

Environmental Design (LEED) certification.

1.3.6.6 Habitat for Humanity. OUC has been a long time partner of Habitat for Humanity

Orlando, and in 2012 donated $60,000 worth of energy efficient features towards Staghorn Villas

– Habitat Orlando’s energy efficient townhome project. The $8 million community houses 58 local families. OUC provided 870 compact fluorescent light bulbs, and upgraded all of the community’s lighting systems. Siemens partnered with OUC on the project, matching OUC’s

$60,000 donation.

1.3.6.7 OUC Orlando Half Marathon and 5K. Each December the annual OUC Orlando Half

Marathon and 5k races through the streets of downtown Orlando. Considered one of the

Southeast’s premier and most popular road races, the event starts and finishes in picturesque

Lake Eola Park. It offers participants a scenic tour of The City Beautiful throughout their entire running experience. Known for its relatively flat/fast course and favorable Florida weather, the race attracts world class runners, local athletes and amateurs alike.

1.3.7 Customer Education Initiatives

From providing better online access to their consumption history to designing convenient and effective conservation programs, OUC is arming customers with the information and tools they need to optimize the efficiency of their homes and businesses. While the tools and technologies we use might have changed, OUC’s commitment to conservation has not.

1.3.7.1 Preferred Contractor Network. OUC’s revamped its Preferred Contractor Network

(PCN) in order to take the hassle out of home improvement by eliminating the guesswork and the paperwork. With the PCN, customers seeking to improve the efficiency of their home don’t have

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to worry about finding a qualified contractor or submitting rebate forms and receipts. Instead they simply select an OUC-approved contractor who completes the work and provides the qualifying rebate at the point of sale. Customers can start saving energy, water and money right away. For the contractors who earn OUC’s stamp of approval, they benefit by growing their business and promoting OUC’s rebates.

1.3.7.2 Mobile Site. OUC continued to offer a mobile version of its website —m.ouc.com— for handheld devices. The mobile site lets customers interact with OUC on the go. They can pay their bill, check their account, find a rebate or get conservation tips right from their cell phone.

Customers have the same online access to OUC.com but in an easy-to-use mobile format.

1.3.7.3 Conservation Website. OUC’s conservation website (http://www.ReliablyGreen.com), which launched in January 2010, was developed to inform OUC’s customers about energy conservation and ways to ―Make Your Mark‖ while showcasing OUC’s own green efforts in

―How We Make Our Mark.‖ In 2012, OUC developed an additional six water conservation videos to show customers how they can start saving water and money starting at the tap. It’s a one-stop, 24-hour shop for energy and water conservation and rebate information for OUC customers.

1.3.7.4 Home Energy Reports Program. The Home Energy Reports Program, OUC’s largest conservation effort to date serving 78,000 customers, encourages customers to conserve by comparing their consumption to their efficient neighbors. Participants receive regular emails or printed reports showing how they rank along with tips and suggestions on how they can improve.

To administer the Home Energy Reports, OUC is working with Opower, a software company that helps utilities meet their efficiency goals through effective customer engagement.

1.3.7.5 Energy & Water Conservation DVD. OUC continued to offer a conservation video in an interactive DVD format in English or Spanish that walks customers through a ―do-it-yourself‖ energy and water audit for their home that can help lower their utility bill. In 2012, OUC developed an additional six water conservation videos to show customers how they can save water and money starting at the tap. It is also available online at http://www.ouc.com/waystosave.

1.3.7.6 Media Overview. To reach the desired audience, OUC implemented a comprehensive media campaign that utilized print, online, television, radio, outdoor media and community partnerships. By diversifying their media, OUC is able to reach a broader range of customers and reinforce their commitment to showing customers how to reduce their energy and water use and ultimately their utility bills.

1.3.7.7 Orlando Magic Partnership. After assisting with the energy and water efficiency features in the design phase of the Orlando Magic’s new LEED certified home, OUC has continued its green partnership with the Orlando Magic since the Amway Center opened in

October 2010:

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2013 Annual Conservation Report 1.0 Introduction

The promotion of the facility’s LEED certification and its energy and water efficiency features

Sponsorship of the NBA Green Week (April 2012)

An interactive educational booth at home game Fan Fest events

A public information campaign on www.orlandomagic.com.

With this partnership, OUC reaches many of its customers who attend Magic games or follow them on TV. In addition to the approximately 7,000 season ticket holders who reside in the OUC service territory, 87 corporations hold suites, loge boxes or legends suites at the arena.

These include many large and mid-size commercial businesses that can benefit from OUC’s commercial products and services.

1.3.7.8 Connections. Connections is a monthly newsletter sent to all OUC customers whether they receive a paper statement or e-bill. The Connections newsletters also are posted on http://www.OUC.com and feature information on OUC’s programs, events and energy and water saving tips. A sample Connections newsletter is included in Appendix A of this report.

1.3.7.9 Social Media. Facebook and Twitter allow OUC to spotlight special events and programs in the community and provide a conservation tip of the day, consisting of 365 daily tips on how to save energy, water and money. OUC also utilizes OUC TV via YouTube to promote conservation and renewable initiatives.

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2.0 Conservation Goals and

Demand-Side Management Plan

2.0 Conservation Goals and

Demand-Side Management Plan

2.1 Approved Numeric Conservation Goals

The FPSC-established annual goals for both annual peak demand and energy reductions are presented in Table 2-1.

Table 2-1

OUC Approved Numeric Conservation Goals

Residential Reduction Commercial/Industrial Reduction

Year

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Total

Summer

MW

0.50

0.50

0.50

0.50

0.50

0.50

0.50

0.50

0.50

0.50

5.00

Winter

MW

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

2.0

GWh

1.8

1.8

1.8

1.8

1.8

1.8

1.8

1.8

1.8

1.8

18.0

2.2 OUC Demand-Side Management Programs

Summer

MW

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

7.0

Winter

MW

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

7.0

GWh

1.8

1.8

1.8

1.8

1.8

1.8

1.8

1.8

1.8

1.8

18.0

As shown in Table 2-1, the FPSC has established residential and commercial/industrial conservation goals for OUC for the 2010 through 2019 period. In response to this requirement,

OUC offered various programs during calendar year 2012 including programs that result in demand and/or energy reductions that were quantifiable, as well as programs that were not quantifiable but aided OUC’s customers in reliability, energy conservation, and education. Each of these programs is described further in the remainder of this section.

2.2.1 Quantifiable Conservation Programs

2.2.1.1 Residential Energy Survey Program.

OUC has been offering home energy surveys dating back to the late 1970’s. The home energy walk-through surveys were designed to provide residential customers with recommended energy efficiency measures and practices customers can implement. The Residential Energy Survey Program consists of three measures:

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Demand-Side Management Plan

the Residential Energy Walk-Through Survey, the Residential Energy Survey DVD, and an interactive Online Energy Survey. These measures are available to both single family and multifamily residential customers.

The Residential Energy Walk-Through Survey includes a complete examination of the attic; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system; air duct and air returns; window caulking; weather stripping around doors; faucets and toilets; and lawn sprinkler systems. OUC provides participating customers specific tips on conserving electricity and water as well as details on customer rebate programs. OUC Conservation Specialists are using this walk-through type audit as a means of motivating OUC customers to participate in other conservation programs and qualify for appropriate rebates.

A Residential Energy Survey Video was first offered in 2000 by OUC and is now available to OUC customers in an interactive DVD format. The DVD is free and is distributed in

English and Spanish to OUC customers by request. The DVD was developed to further assist

OUC customers in surveying their homes for potential energy saving opportunities. The DVD walks the customer through a complete visual assessment of energy and water efficiency in his or her home. A checklist brochure to guide the customer through the audit accompanies the

DVD. The DVD has several benefits over the walk-through survey, including the convenience of viewing the DVD at any time without a scheduled appointment and the ability to watch the DVD numerous times. In addition to the Energy Walk-Through and the DVD Surveys, OUC offers customers an interactive Online Home Energy Audit. The interactive Online Home Energy Audit is available on OUC’s web sites, http://www.OUC.com

and http://www.ReliablyGreen.com.

One of the primary benefits of the Residential Energy Survey Program is the education it provides to customers on energy conservation measures and ways their lifestyle can directly affect their energy use. Customers participating in the Energy Survey Program are informed about conservation measures that they can implement. Customers will benefit from the increased efficiency in their homes, and decreased electric and water bills.

Participation in the Walk-Through Energy Survey has been consistently strong over the past several years and interest in the Energy Survey DVD, as well as the interactive Online

Home Energy Audit, has been high since the measures were first introduced. Feedback from customers who have taken advantage of the surveys has been very positive.

OUC customers can participate in this program by requesting an appointment for a Walk-

Through Energy Survey by calling the OUC Customer Service Call Center or requesting an

Energy Survey DVD. OUC customers can also use the Online Home Energy Audit at their convenience by visiting OUC’s websites. Participation is tracked through service orders that are produced when appointments are scheduled and completed or the DVD is mailed. Online

Surveys are tracked through the service provider (Apogee), who produces monthly activity reports.

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2.2.1.2 Residential Duct Repair Rebate Program. The Duct Repair Rebate Program originated in 2000 and is designed to encourage customers to repair leaking ducts on existing systems. Qualifying customers must have an existing central air conditioning system of 5.5 tons or less and ducts must be sealed with mastic and fabric tape or Underwriters Laboratory (UL) approved duct tape. Participating customers receive a rebate for 100 percent of the cost of duct repairs on their homes, up to $160.

Customers can participate by submitting a rebate application form available through

OUC’s Customer Service Centers or on line at http://www.OUC.com or http://www.ReliablyGreen.com. Proofs of purchase or receipts are required to be attached to the application and repairs can be performed by a contractor or the customer. Participation is tracked based on the number of rebates processed. Typically these rebates are credited on the customer’s bill, or a check can be processed and sent to the property owner who may have paid for the improvement.

2.2.1.3 Residential Ceiling Insulation Rebate Program. The attic is the easiest place to add insulation and lower total energy costs throughout the seasons. The ceiling insulation rebate program has been offered for several years and is designed to encourage customers to upgrade their attic insulation. Participating customers receive $0.05 per square foot for upgrading their attic insulation up to R-30. If the customer arranges an OUC pre-inspection and it is verified the existing insulation is R-11 or less, OUC will pay a rebate of $0.14 per square foot.

Customers can participate by submitting a rebate application form available through

OUC’s Customer Service Centers or on line at http://www.OUC.com and http://www.ReliablyGreen.com. Proofs of purchase or receipts are required to be attached to the application and repairs can be performed by a contractor or the customer. Participation is tracked based on the number of rebates processed. Typically these rebates are credited on the customer’s bill, or a check can be processed and sent to the property owner who may have paid for the improvement.

2.2.1.4 Residential Window Film/Solar Screen Rebate Program. Installing solar window film on pre-existing homes can help reflect the heat during hot summer days and help the efficiency of home cooling units. The window film/solar screen rebate program has been offered for several years and is designed to encourage customers to install solar shading on their windows. Participating customers will receive a rebate in the amount of $1 per square foot for installation of solar shading film with a shading coefficient of 0.5 or less on east-, west, and south-facing windows.

Customers can participate by submitting a rebate application form available through

OUC’s Customer Service Centers or on line at http://www.OUC.com or http://www.ReliablyGreen.com. Proofs of purchase or receipts are required to be attached to the application and repairs can be performed by a contractor or the customer. Participation is

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tracked based on the number of rebates processed. Typically these rebates are credited on the customer’s bill, or a check can be processed and sent to the property owner who may have paid for the improvement.

2.0 Conservation Goals and

Demand-Side Management Plan

2.2.1.5 Residential High Performance Window Rebate Program. Energy-efficient windows can help minimize heating, cooling, and lighting costs. The high performance windows rebate program has been offered for several years and is designed to encourage customers to install windows that improve energy efficiency in their homes. Customers will receive a $2 rebate per square foot for the purchase of ENERGY STAR® rated energy efficient windows.

Customers can participate by submitting a rebate application form available through

OUC’s Customer Service Centers or on line at http://www.OUC.com or http://www.ReliablyGreen.com. Proofs of purchase or receipts are required to be attached to the application and repairs can be performed by a contractor or the customer. Participation is tracked based on the number of rebates processed. Typically these rebates are credited on the customer’s bill, or a check can be processed and sent to the property owner who may have paid for the improvement.

2.2.1.6 Residential Caulking and Weather Stripping Rebate Program. Properly sealing cracks and openings in houses can significantly reduce heating and cooling costs, improve building durability, and create a healthier indoor environment. In an effort to continue providing this program in a more cost productive and efficient manner this program was incorporated into the Efficiency Delivered program described in Section 2.2.1.10.

As a standalone program, customers received a rebate for 50 percent of the cost (up to

$100) for the caulking and weather stripping of their homes. Customers can now participate in the program via the Efficiency Delivered program.

2.2.1.7 Residential Wall Insulation Rebate Program. Air leakage and improperly installed insulation can waste 20 percent or more of the energy used to heat and cool a house.

The wall insulation rebate program is designed to encourage customers to insulate the walls of their homes. Customers will receive a rebate of $0.66 per square foot of insulation added, with the requirement that the initial insulation R-value must be increased by a minimum of R-10.

Customers can participate by submitting a rebate application form available through

OUC’s Customer Service Centers or on line at http://www.OUC.com or http://www.ReliablyGreen.com. Proofs of purchase or receipts are required to be attached to the application and repairs can be performed by a contractor or the customer. Participation is tracked based on the number of rebates processed. Typically these rebates are credited on the customer’s bill, or a check can be processed and sent to the property owner who may have paid for the improvement.

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Demand-Side Management Plan

2.2.1.8 Residential Cool/Reflective Roof Rebate Program. A cool/reflective roof reflects the sun’s rays to help lower roof surface temperature and increase roof life. It helps lower energy bills during the summer by preventing heat absorption. The cool/reflective roof rebate program, which has been offered in the past couple of years, is designed to encourage customers to install new roofing to help insulate their homes. Customers will receive a rebate of

$0.14 per square foot for ENERGY STAR® cool/reflective roofing that has an initial solar reflectance greater than or equal to 0.70.

Customers can participate by submitting a rebate application form available through

OUC’s Customer Service Centers or on line at http://www.OUC.com or http://www.ReliablyGreen.com. Proofs of purchase or receipts are required to be attached to the application and repairs can be performed by a contractor or the customer. Participation is tracked based on the number of rebates processed. Typically these rebates are credited on the customer’s bill, or a check can be processed and sent to property owner who may have paid for the improvement.

2.2.1.9 Residential Heat Pump Rebate Program. The residential heat pump rebate program provides rebates to qualifying customers in existing homes who install heat pumps having a seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) of 14.0 or higher. Customers will obtain a rebate in the form of a credit on their bill ranging from $20 to $1,275, depending upon the SEER rating and capacity (tons) of the new heat pump. The following table illustrates the incentives available depending on the size and efficiency of the Heat Pump installed.

1

1 1/2

2

2 1/2

3

3 1/2

4

4 1/2

5

14

20

55

90

120

155

190

225

260

295

15

80

145

205

270

335

395

460

525

590

Heat Pump SEER

16

130

220

17 18

$

175

$

215

290 350

310 400 480

400

490

580

670

755

515

625

735

850

960

615

745

880

1,010

1,145

845 1,075 1,275

Customers can participate by submitting a rebate application form available through

OUC’s Customer Service Centers or on line at http://www.OUC.com or http://www.ReliablyGreen.com. Proofs of purchase or receipts are required to be attached to the application, and work must be performed by a contractor. Participation is tracked based on the number of rebates processed. Typically these rebates are credited on the customer’s bill or a check can be processed and sent to the property owner who may have paid for the improvement.

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2.2.1.10 Residential Efficiency Delivered Program. What was once referred to as the home energy fix-up program has now been revamped and expanded to allow for any OUC customer both Energy and Water to participate and renamed as the Efficiency Delivered program. The program is available to residential customers (single family homes) and provides up to $2,000 of energy and water efficiency upgrades based on the needs of the customer’s home. A Conservation Specialist from OUC performs a survey at the home and determines which home improvements have the potential of saving the customer the most money. The program is an income based program which is the basis for how much OUC will help contribute toward the cost of improvements and consists of three household income tiers: 1) $40,000 or less

OUC will contribute 85% of the total cost, 2) $40,001 to $60,000 OUC will contribute 50% of the total cost, and 3) greater than $60,000 OUC will contribute the rebate incentives that apply toward the total cost. Each customer must request and complete a free Residential Energy

Survey. Ordinarily, Energy Survey recommendations require a customer to spend money replacing or adding energy conservation measures: however, customers may not have the discretionary income to implement these measures especially those in the lower income tier.

Under this program, OUC will arrange for a licensed, approved contractor to perform the necessary repairs based on a negotiated and contracted rate. The remaining portion of the cost the customer is responsible for, can be paid directly to OUC or over an interest-free 12-month period on the participant’s monthly electric bill. To be eligible for this program, the customer’s account must be in good credit standing with the exception of our low-income customers who are only required to have a current balance. Some of the improvements covered under this program include ceiling insulation, duct system repair, pipe insulation, window film, window caulk, door caulk, door weather stripping, door sweep, threshold plate, air filter replacement, toilet replacement, irrigation repairs, water flow restrictors and minor plumbing repairs.

The purpose of the program is to reduce the energy and water costs especially for lowincome households, particularly those households with elderly persons, disabled persons and children. Through this program, OUC helps to lower the bills of customers who may have difficulty paying their bills, thereby decreasing the potential for costly service disconnect fees and late charges. OUC believes that this program will help customers afford other essential living expenses. For others, this program offers a one-stop-shop to facilitate the implementation of a whole suite of conservation measures at reasonable costs and pre-screened qualified contractors.

Efficiency Delivered contractor(s) are selected through a Request For Proposal (RFP) process on a routine basis. Eligible customers are referred to the participating contractor after the

OUC Conservation Specialist inspection is complete. The Efficiency Delivered contractor then inspects the home and creates a proposal to install eligible measures. Once the customer accepts the proposal and signs the agreement the contractor calls the customer and schedules the work.

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2.0 Conservation Goals and

Demand-Side Management Plan

Typically the work is completed within 45 days. Upon receipt of notice of completion and customer acceptance, payment to the contractor is processed and the customer’s share of the conservation improvements is billed. Participation is tracked based on completed installations.

2.2.1.11 Residential Billed Solution Insulation Program. The billed solution insulation program was merged into the newly expanded Efficiency Delivered program in 2011 as described above. OUC is still providing interest free financing over 12 months through the

OUC bill for any remaining costs that exist not covered by OUC’s incentives, up to $2,000.

2.2.1.12 Residential New Home Rebate Program. Previously named The Residential

Gold Ring Home Program has been transformed into a more flexible ―a la carte‖ program offering a variety of choices for the Builder or Home buyer. This transformation was based on feedback OUC received from the residential building community in order to increase the level of participation in OUC’s program. The chart below reflects an example of the incentives available.

Rebate Rate of Rebate

Square Footage

Total

Cool/Reflective Roof

Block Wall lnsulation

$0.04 per sq. ft

$0.16 per sq. ft

2,000

1,100

$80

$176

Ceiling Insulation Upgrade to R-38 $0.04 per sq. ft

up to $1,275

2,000 $80

*$460 Heat Pump 2,000

Energy Star® Washing Machine

$100

N/A

$100

Energy Star® Heat Pump Water

Heater

Solar Water Heater

$650

$1000

N/A

N/A

$650

$1,000

*Based on a typical HVAC Heat Pump size for a 2000 square foot home of 4 tons with a 15 SEER efficiency. Refer to Heat Pump rebate chart for other details.

Due to the downturn in homebuilding in the past few years the demand for this program has significantly diminished.

2.2.1.13 Residential Compact Fluorescent Lighting Program. OUC will give away at least one compact fluorescent lamp to customers who participate in OUC’s in-home energy audit program, contribute to OUC’s customer assistance program Project Care, attend a CFL giveaway event, or sign up for Budget Billing or OUConvenient Billing. OUC will encourage their installation in fixtures that they use the most or at least operate four hours per day. This practice may be eliminated as incandescent lamps are curtailed from the market place due to legislation over the next few years. The loss of the energy savings will be made up through increases from other OUC programs.

2.2.1.14 Residential AC Proper Sizing with R-30 Attic Insulation Program. OUC offers this program to assist its customers in properly sizing their air conditioning (AC) units.

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Demand-Side Management Plan

The program combines proper sizing of AC systems along with installation of R-30 insulation.

OUC will provide the customer with a $40 rebate when provided with certified sizing documentation; the rebate increases to $85 when combined with participation in another OUC program such as the Heat Pump, Block Wall Insulation, Ceiling Insulation Upgrade, Floor

Insulation Upgrade, or Duct Repair/Replacement programs.

2.2.1.15 Commercial Energy Audit Program. The commercial/industrial energy audit program has been offered for several years and is focused on increasing the energy efficiency and energy conservation of commercial buildings and includes a free survey comprised of a physical walk-through inspection of the commercial facility performed by highly trained and experienced energy experts. The survey will examine heating and air conditioning systems including duct work, refrigeration equipment, lighting, water heating, motors, process equipment, and the thermal characteristics of the building including insulation. Following the inspection the customer receives a written report detailing cost-effective recommendations to make the facility more energy and water efficient. Participating customers are encouraged to participate in other OUC commercial programs and directly benefit from energy conservation, which decreases their electric and water bills.

OUC customers can participate by calling the OUC Customer Service Call Center and requesting an appointment for a Walk-Through Energy. Participation is tracked through service orders that are produced when appointments are scheduled and completed.

2.2.1.16 Commercial Indoor Lighting Retrofit Program. The indoor lighting retrofit program has been offered for several years and reduces energy consumption for the commercial customer through the replacement of older fluorescent and incandescent lighting with newer, more efficient lighting technologies. A special alliance between OUC and the lighting contractor enables OUC to offer the customer a discounted project cost. An additional feature of the program is a ―cash-flow neutral billing solution‖ that allows the customer to pay for the retrofit through the monthly savings that the project generates. This removes the major participation barrier of lacking the upfront capital funding normally required to implement an impactful conservation measure. The project payment appears on the participating customer’s utility bill as a line-item and is typically offset by the energy savings. The Term is set to be equal to the payback period of the project. After the project has been completely paid for, the participating customer’s utility bill will decrease by the energy cost savings.

Lighting contractor(s) are selected through an RFP process. Eligible customers are referred to the lighting contractor typically after an energy survey or through other contacts generated by OUC’s Account Representatives. The Lighting contractor inspects the facility and creates a proposal to install eligible measures. Once the customer accepts the proposal and signs the payment agreement, the work is scheduled and completed. Upon receipt of notice of completion, customer acceptance and an OUC inspection, payment to the contractor is

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2.0 Conservation Goals and

Demand-Side Management Plan

processed, and the customer is billed through their OUC bill based on the terms of the payment agreement. Participation is tracked based on completed installations.

As contemplated in OUC’s FPSC-approved DSM Plan, OUC has expanded its Indoor

Lighting retrofit program by offering the option of receiving a $150/kW rebate instead of the billed solution mentioned above. This expansion provides more options to encourage participation.

2.2.1.17 Commercial Heat Pump Rebate Program. The commercial heat pump rebate program provides rebates to qualifying customers in existing buildings who install heat pumps having a seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) of 14.0 or higher. Customers will obtain a rebate in the form of a credit on their bill ranging from $20 to $1,275, depending upon the SEER rating and capacity (tons) of the new heat pump. The following table illustrates the incentives available depending on the size and efficiency of the Heat Pump installed.

1

1 1/2

2

2 1/2

3

3 1/2

4

4 1/2

5

14

20

55

90

120

155

190

225

260

295

15

80

145

205

270

335

395

460

525

590

Heat Pump SEER

16

130

220

17 18

$

175

$

215

290 350

310 400 480

400

490

580

515

625

735

615

745

880

670

755

845

850

960

1,075

1,010

1,145

1,275

Customers can participate by submitting a rebate application form available through

OUC’s Customer Service Centers or on line at http://www.OUC.com or http://www.ReliablyGreen.com. Proofs of purchase or receipts are required to be attached to the application and repairs can be performed by a contractor. Participation is tracked based on the number of rebates processed. Typically these rebates are credited on the customer’s bill, or a check can be processed and sent to the property owner who may have paid for the improvement.

2.2.1.18 Commercial Duct Repair Rebate Program. The duct repair rebate program started in 2009. OUC will rebate 100 percent of cost, up to $160. Qualifying customers must have an existing central air conditioning system of 5.5 tons or less and ducts must be sealed with mastic and fabric tape or Underwriters Laboratory (UL) approved duct tape.

Customers can participate by submitting a rebate application form available through

OUC’s Customer Service Centers or on line at http://www.OUC.com or http://www.ReliablyGreen.com. Proofs of purchase or receipts are required to be attached to the application and repairs can be performed by a contractor. Participation is tracked based on the

March 2013 2-9 Black & Veatch

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2013 Annual Conservation Report

2.0 Conservation Goals and

Demand-Side Management Plan

number of rebates processed. Typically these rebates are credited on the customer’s bill, or a check can be processed and sent to the property owner who may have paid for the improvement.

2.2.1.19 Commercial Window Film/Solar Screen Rebate Program. The window film/solar screen rebate program started in 2009 and is designed to help reflect the heat during hot summer days and retain heat on cool winter days. OUC will rebate customers $1 per square footfor window tinting and solar screening with a shading coefficient of 0.5 or less.

Customers can participate by submitting a rebate application form available through

OUC’s Customer Service Centers or on line at http://www.OUC.com or http://www.ReliablyGreen.com. Proofs of purchase or receipts are required to be attached to the application and repairs can be performed by a contractor. Participation is tracked based on the number of rebates processed. Typically these rebates are credited on the customer’s bill, or a check can be processed and sent to the property owner who may have paid for the improvement.

2.2.1.20 Commercial Ceiling Insulation Rebate Program. The ceiling insulation rebate program started in 2009 and was designed to increase a building’s resistance to heat loss and gain. Participating customers receive $0.05 per square foot, for upgrading their attic insulation up to R-30. If the customer arranges an OUC pre-inspection and it is verified the existing insulation is R-11 or less, OUC will pay a rebate of $0.14 per square foot.

Customers can participate by submitting a rebate application form available through

OUC’s Customer Service Centers or on line at http://www.OUC.com or http://www.ReliablyGreen.com. Proofs of purchase or receipts are required to be attached to the application and repairs can be performed by a contractor. Participation is tracked based on the number of rebates processed. Typically these rebates are credited on the customer’s bill, or a check can be processed and sent to the property owner who may have paid for the improvement.

2.2.1.21 Commercial Cool/Reflective Roof Rebate Program. The cool/reflective roofs rebate program started in 2009 and was designed to reflect the sun’s rays and lower roof surface temperature while increasing the lifespan of the roof. OUC will rebate customers at $0.14 per square foot for ENERGY STAR® cool/reflective roofing that has an initial solar reflectance greater than or equal to 0.70.

Customers can participate by submitting a rebate application form available through

OUC’s Customer Service Centers or on line at http://www.OUC.com or http://www.ReliablyGreen.com. Proofs of purchase or receipts are required to be attached to the application and repairs can be performed by a contractor. Participation is tracked based on the number of rebates processed. Typically these rebates are credited on the customer’s bill, or a check can be processed and sent to the property owner who may have paid for the improvement.

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2.2.2 Additional Conservation Measures

2.0 Conservation Goals and

Demand-Side Management Plan

The following measures are offered by OUC to its customers, resulting in energy savings and increased reliability. Although the measures were not included in OUC’s DSM Plan, they are initiatives OUC’s local board of Commissioners have elected to offer that provide additional benefits to OUC’s customers.

2.2.2.1 Residential Energy Conservation Rate Structure. Beginning in October 2002,

OUC modified its residential rate structure to a two-tiered block structure to encourage energy conservation. Residential customers using more than 1,000 kWh per month pay a higher rate for the additional energy usage. The purpose of this rate structure is to make OUC customers more energy-conscientious and to encourage conservation of energy resources.

2.2.2.2 Commercial OUConsumption Online. OUConsumption enables businesses to check their energy usage and demand from a desktop computer and manage their energy load.

Customers are able to analyze the metered interval load data for multiple locations, compare energy usage among facilities, and measure the effectiveness of various energy efficiency efforts.

The data can also be downloaded for further analysis. Participants must cover a one-time set-up fee of $45, a $45 monthly fee per meter, up to $500 for a load profiling meter and the cost of additional infrastructure to provide connectivity to the meter.

2.2.2.3 Commercial OUConvenient Lighting. OUConvenient Lighting provides complete outdoor lighting services for commercial applications, including industrial parks, sports complexes, and residential developments. Each lighting package is customized for each participant, allowing the participant to choose among light fixtures and poles. OUC handles all of the upfront financial costs and maintenance. The participant then pays a low monthly fee for each fixture. OUC also retrofits existing fixtures to new light sources or higher output units, increasing efficiency as well as providing preventive and corrective maintenance. New interlocal agreements have allowed this OUConvenient Lighting to expand into neighboring communities like Clermont, Oviedo, and Brevard County.

2.2.2.4 OUCooling. Originally formed in 1997 as a partnership between OUC and Trigen-

Cinergy Solutions, OUCooling helps to lower air conditioning-related electric charges and reduce capital and operating costs. During 2004, OUC bought Trigen-Cinergy’s rights and is now the sole owner of OUCooling. OUCooling will fund, install, and maintain a central chiller plant for each business district participating in the program. The main benefits to the businesses are lower electric energy consumption, increased reliability, and the elimination of the environmental risks associated with the handling of chemicals. Other benefits for the businesses include avoided initial capital cost, lower maintenance costs, a smaller mechanical room

(therefore more rental space), no insurance requirements, improved property resale value, and availability of maintenance personnel for other duties.

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Demand-Side Management Plan

OUC currently has five chilled water districts: downtown Orlando, the Mall at Millenia, the Starwood Resort, Lake Nona, and the Orange County Convention Center including Lockheed

Martin and neighboring hotels. OUC envisions building other chiller plants to serve commercial campuses, hotels, retail shopping centers, and tourist attractions. OUC recently added its fifth district at Lake Nona, with the potential to provide up to 50,000 tons of chilled water to the medical complexes and research facilities located in the area. At full build out, this central chilled water system may be one of the largest in the US. In addition, a 17.6 million gallon chilled water thermal storage tank serving the Orange County Convention Center among other facilities and hotels, is one of the largest in the world. The tank works in tandem with 18 water cooled chillers and feeds a chilled water loop that can handle more than 33,000 gallons of 37º F water per minute.

2.2.2.5 Small Business Efficiency Pilot.

OUC’s Small Business Efficiency Pilot shows small business owners how to reduce energy and water consumption and improve overall business operations. The pilot focuses on providing essential services to entrepreneurial and small businesses, which include how to write a business plan, how to write contracts, proper accounting methods and other information necessary for a new business to succeed. After completion, small businesses receive a $250 credit on their utility bill.

For participation, customers are required to complete a Commercial Energy Survey or have had one completed in the past 12 months, fill an application form (downloadable from http://www.OUC.com), and attend a one-hour counseling session at the University of Central

Florida’s Small Business Development Center (SBDC). Validation of the application form by the

SBDC is necessary before turning it in to OUC for credit processing.

2.2.2.6 Residential Floor Insulation. OUC added a Floor Insulation rebate to incent customers to insulate wood floors over unconditioned spaces. This incentive is mostly geared towards older homes that were not built to today’s more energy efficient standards. The $0.07 per square foot incentive is for a minimum of R-11 floor insulation.

2.2.2.7 Energy Star Washing Machine. OUC added a $50 incentive for the purchase of

Energy Star washing machines to bring customers’ attention to the benefits of these new machines. Not only do they use less electricity and water, but they also reduce the energy required to dry the clothes which accounts for the majority of the electric savings.

2.2.2.8 Solar Water Heating. OUC changed its previous incentive of $0.03 per kWh equivalent production incentive to a one time upfront rebate of $1,000 to incent customers to purchase a Solar Water Heater. OUC continues to partner with Orlando Federal Credit Union

(OFCU) to provide OUC’s residential customers with low interest loan options for installing

Solar Thermal Systems. Below are the low interest loan rates and terms for the solar thermal program.

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Solar Thermal Systems

($7,500 maximum loan amount)

Terms (months)

36

Rate (APR)

0.00%

60

84

2.75%

4.00%

2.0 Conservation Goals and

Demand-Side Management Plan

2.2.2.9 Heat Pump Water Heaters. OUC added a new incentive of $650 for the purchase of a Heat Pump Water Heater. It appears this technology has passed the development stage, become more affordable and has become more of a standard option for customers to consider.

As with other incentives, this has the potential to change as equipment minimum efficiency standards change in the future.

2.2.2.10 Commercial Custom Incentive Program.

OUC developed a program to accommodate the various other efficiency improvements possible in a commercial application that were not covered by an existing standard conservation program. It is impractical to have specific individual programs for all potential conservation measures especially when there are technological changes and improvements occurring all the time. With the Custom Incentive program, OUC can accommodate practically any measure that can reduce electric demand above code requirements that a commercial customer wants to implement. The incentive is $250/KW provided it is a measure other than just an indoor lighting retrofit. Qualifying measures can include chillers, thermal storage systems, packaged cooling unit replacements, fan and pump motor efficiency upgrades, refrigeration equipment, etc. The program brochure is available at: http://www.ouc.com/Libraries/RG_Documents/CommIndustrial_Incentives_Info_Sheets_lo.sflb.ashx

2.2.2.11 Multi-Family ARRA Grant Project.

The multi-family market segment is a notoriously difficult market segment to penetrate when it comes to conservation program participation. The owners of the complex do not have a great interest in reducing the tenants’ electric bills they do not pay. And the tenants do not have an interest in improving property they do not own. These disincentives lead to a lack of participation from the multi-family market segment, unless the market can be transformed. One way to begin to transform this market is to illustrate the benefits of efficiency that could lead to lower overall costs for tenants that translate to higher satisfaction rates that lead to higher occupancy rates, lower maintenance costs and higher property values for the owners. Last year the opportunity arose when American Recovery and

Reinvestment Act (ARRA) grant money became available. OUC partnered with the University of Florida (UF) and were awarded a Clean Energy ARRA grant to install conservation measures

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in several multi-family apartment complexes to start illustrating these benefits in a real application, not just theoretical. The project consisted of installing conservation measures such as: R-30 Attic Insulation, SEER 15 High Efficiency Heat Pumps, Duct Repair, Solar window film, Energy Star Refrigerators, Heat Pump Water Heaters, Compact Flourescents, Water Saving

Showerheads and Aerators. In keeping with the objectives of the ARRA funds, OUC targeted low-income complexes where the savings would have the greatest economic benefit. The highlights of the project that was completed on 4/30/2012 include:

Five (5) low-income apartment complexes

Total of 272 Apartments retrofitted (other half reserved for control group)

Total Project Cost: $1,295,960

Clean Energy Grant used towards Project Cost: $390,000

OUC contribution towards Project Cost: $215,786

Complex owners’ contribution $651,426

Total expected savings from retrofits: $142,247/yr

Average savings per apartment: $523/yr

Total estimated kWh savings per year: 1,016,052

Once a full year has passed, the plan is to perform some measurement and verification analytics to demonstrate all of the associated benefits derived from these retrofit projects and share the results with the multi-family ownership and tenant community alike. The full details of the report ―Transforming the Multi-Family Market Place Through Efficiency Improvements‖ are included in Appendix B.

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2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Orlando Utilities Commission

2013 Annual Conservation Report 3.0 Status of OUC Approved Numeric Goals

3.0 Status of OUC Approved Numeric Goals

This section presents the status of OUC’s actual demand and energy reduction versus the numeric peak demand and energy reduction approved by the FPSC.

3.1 Summary of OUC Residential Numeric Goals

Table 3-1 indicates that OUC exceeded its residential peak demand and energy reduction goals during calendar year 2012.

Calendar

Year

Table 3-1

Comparison of Actual Conservation Savings to

Numeric Conservation Goals – Residential Programs

Winter Peak kW

Reduction

Total

Achieved

Reduction

Commission

Approved

Goals

789

749

472

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

200

200

200

200

200

200

200

200

200

200

Summer Peak kW

Reduction

Total

Achieved

Reduction

Commission

Approved

Goals

1,000

953

617

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

500

500

500

500

500

500

500

500

500

500

MWh Energy Reduction

Total

Achieved

Reduction

3,011

2,692

1,921

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Commission

Approved

Goals

1,800

1,800

1,800

1,800

1,800

1,800

1,800

1,800

1,800

1,800

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2013 Annual Conservation Report 3.0 Status of OUC Approved Numeric Goals

3.2 Summary of OUC Commercial/Industrial Numeric Goals

As shown in Table 3-2, OUC substantially exceeded its commercial and industrial peak demand and energy reduction goals during calendar year 2012. Strong performance in OUC’s

Commercial Indoor Lighting Retrofit program was a significant contributor to the overall

Commerical/Industrial demand and energy reductions shown in Table 3-2.

Calendar

Year

Table 3-2

Comparison of Actual Conservation Savings to

Numeric Conservation Goals – Commercial / Industrial Programs

1

Winter Peak kW

Reduction

Total

Achieved

Reduction

Commission

Approved

Goals

Summer Peak kW

Reduction

Total

Achieved

Reduction

Commission

Approved

Goals

MWh Energy Reduction

Total

Achieved

Reduction

Commission

Approved

Goals

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

935

619

1,750

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

700

700

700

700

700

700

700

700

700

1,667

611

1,748

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

700

700

700

700

700

700

700

700

700

5,800

3,003

7,256

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

1,800

1,800

1,800

1,800

1,800

1,800

1,800

1,800

1,800

2019

N/A 700 N/A 700 N/A 1,800

(1). As stated in OUC’s DSM Plan, the annual energy and demand reductions associated with the Commercial

Cool/Reflective Roof Program were not included in OUC’s projected energy and demand reductions. In order to be consistent with the DSM Plan, this Conservation Report includes information on the Commercial

Cool/Reflective Roof Program, but does not include the energy and peak demand reductions realized when summarizing total energy and demand reductions.

3.3 Summary of OUC Combined Numeric Goals

OUC surpassed both its total (combined residential, commercial, and industrial) energy goals, by approximately 155 percent, and its peak demand goals, by approximately 97 percent for the summer and approximately 147 percent for the winter.

Table 3-3 displays the total annual peak demand and energy savings achieved through

OUC’s DSM and conservation programs since calendar year 2010. In calendar year 2012, OUC realized a total reduction in energy use of 9,177 MWh and a reduction in peak demand of 2,365 kW for summer and 2,222 kW for winter. OUC’s energy and peak demand reduction successes

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were driven by relatively consistent participation in the majority of OUC’s conservation programs, as well as strong performance in its Commercial Indoor Lighting Retrofit program.

Table 3-3

Comparison of Actual Conservation Savings to

Numeric Conservation Goals – Residential and Commercial / Industrial Programs

1

Calendar

Year

Winter Peak kW

Reduction

Total

Achieved

Reduction

Commission

Approved

Goals

Summer Peak kW

Reduction

Total

Achieved

Reduction

Commission

Approved

Goals

MWh Energy Reduction

Total

Achieved

Reduction

Commission

Approved

Goals

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

1,724

1,368

2,222

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

900

900

900

900

900

900

900

900

900

2,667

1,564

2,365

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

1,200

1,200

1,200

1,200

1,200

1,200

1,200

1,200

1,200

8,811

5,695

9,177

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

3,600

3,600

3,600

3,600

3,600

3,600

3,600

3,600

3,600

2019

N/A 900 N/A 1,200 N/A 3,600

(1). As stated in OUC’s DSM Plan, the annual energy and demand reductions associated with the Commercial

Cool/Reflective Roof Program were not included in OUC’s projected energy and demand reductions. In order to be consistent with the DSM Plan, this Conservation Report includes information on the Commercial

Cool/Reflective Roof Program, but does not include the energy and peak demand reductions realized when summarizing total energy and demand reductions.

Tables 3-4 through 3-30 present the annual demand and energy savings for each of the directly quantifiable programs offered by OUC during calendar year 2012. Each table also includes the actual program costs and participation for 2012 and participation projections for years 2013 through 2019, unless otherwise noted. The utility costs associated with the programs have been updated based on actual costs incurred during calendar year 2012. Unless otherwise noted, actual cumulative penetration rates for each program reflect 2010 as the base year and do not consider customer participation prior to 2010.

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Table 3-4

Residential Home Energy Walk-Through Survey – Single Family

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Table 3-5

Residential Home Energy Walk-Through Survey – Multi Family

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Table 3-6

Residential Home Energy DVD Survey – Single Family

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Table 3-7

Residential Home Energy DVD Survey – Multi Family

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Table 3-8

Residential Home Energy Online Survey – Single Family

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Table 3-9

Residential Home Energy Online Survey – Multi Family

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Table 3-10

Residential Duct Repair Rebates

3.0 Status of OUC Approved Numeric Goals

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Table 3-11

Residential Ceiling Insulation Rebates

3.0 Status of OUC Approved Numeric Goals

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Table 3-12

Residential Window Film/Solar Screen Rebates

3.0 Status of OUC Approved Numeric Goals

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Table 3-13

Residential High Performance Window Rebates

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Table 3-14

Residential Caulking and Weather Stripping Rebates

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Table 3-15

Residential Wall Insulation Rebates

3.0 Status of OUC Approved Numeric Goals

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Table 3-16

Residential Cool/Reflective Roof Rebates

3.0 Status of OUC Approved Numeric Goals

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Table 3-17

Residential Heat Pump Rebates

3.0 Status of OUC Approved Numeric Goals

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Table 3-18

Residential Efficiency Delivered (formerly known as Home Energy Fix-Up)

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Table 3-19

Residential Billed Solution Insulation

3.0 Status of OUC Approved Numeric Goals

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Table 3-20

Residential New Home Rebate Program (formerly known as Gold Ring Home)

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Table 3-21

Residential Compact Fluorescent Lighting

3.0 Status of OUC Approved Numeric Goals

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Table 3-22

Residential HVAC Proper Sizing with R-30 Attic Insulation Rebate

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Table 3-23

Commercial Energy Audit

3.0 Status of OUC Approved Numeric Goals

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Table 3-24

Commercial Indoor Lighting Retrofit – Billed Solution

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Table 3-25

Commercial Indoor Lighting Retrofit – Rebates

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Table 3-26

Commercial Heat Pump Rebate

3.0 Status of OUC Approved Numeric Goals

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Table 3-27

Commercial Duct Repair Rebate

3.0 Status of OUC Approved Numeric Goals

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Table 3-28

Commercial Window Film/Solar Screen Rebate

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Table 3-29

Commercial Ceiling Insulation Rebate

3.0 Status of OUC Approved Numeric Goals

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Table 3-30

Commercial Cool/Reflective Roof Rebate

3.0 Status of OUC Approved Numeric Goals

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Appendix A- Examples of Some of OUC’s Electric DSM

Educational and Marketing Campaigns

Appendix A

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Appendix B- Multi-family ARRA Grant project ―Transforming the Multi-Family Market

Place Through Efficiency Improvements‖

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