DETE Driver Safety Guide

DETE Driver Safety Guide
DETE Driver Safety Guide
Driver Safety Guide
Department of Education, Training & Employment
DETE Driver Safety Guide
Acknowledgements
The Department of Education, Training and Employment Queensland acknowledges the input
made by the following organisations to the development of this guide:
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Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety Queensland (CARRS-Q);
QFleet;
Worksafe Victoria; and
Victorian Transport Accident Commission (TAC).
Introduction
Many Departmental staff are required to drive as part of their role. For some staff, this is
infrequent, and for others it is a regular part of work over long periods of time and in remote
areas.
This guideline has been developed to assist employees to better manage their work-related
driving tasks to eliminate or reduce risks as far as is reasonably practicable.
Workplace Health & Safety Legislation and Driver Safety
In Queensland, driver safety in the workplace is covered by the Work Health and Safety Act
2011 (WHS Act 2011) and Transport Operations Act 1995 legislation and regulations (that
include licensing and road rules).
Under the WHS Act 2011, the Department of Education, Training and Employment (DETE) has
a duty to ensure so far as reasonably practicable the health and safety of workers and others in
the workplace. To do this, DETE must understand the risks involved: identify hazards, assess
the likelihood and consequences of hazards and manage them.
In the context of work related driver safety this would include:
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information about safety features of the vehicle and how to use them;
knowledge about factors that influence driver behaviour (e.g. the causes and
effects of fatigue);
knowledge about and implementing strategies to manage a varied range of road/travel
conditions;
information about safely driving the vehicle; and
information about the safe maintenance of the vehicle.
DETE Driver Safety Guide
Both DETE and DETE employees have duties to each other and to others who might be
affected by the work they undertake. In the case of work related driving, passengers and other
road users, can be affected by the driver’s behaviour and practices.
DETE employees also have a duty to cooperate with the measures that an employer has
developed to eliminate or reduce risks. Applied to work related driving, the employee duties
would include:
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holding a current and valid driver’s licence
abiding by all road rules including speed limits, drug and alcohol laws and use of
seatbelts.
refraining from driving if impaired by tiredness or medication
reporting any incidents, near misses and hazards in the MyHR Workplace Health and
Safety system.
undertaking the relevant pre and post drive vehicle checks.
Traffic Offences
DETE employees who commit a traffic offence such as speeding, failing to obey traffic signs
and signals, using a mobile telephone or failing a drug or blood alcohol test whilst driving in a
Queensland Government owned vehicle are responsible for any penalties incurred as a result
of the offence.
If a penalty results in the loss of drivers licence then Fleet management must
be notified so that vehicles are no longer able to be allocated to the suspended driver.
What is Risk Management?
Driving causes a large number of fatalities and serious injuries every year.
Although work
related injury rates are low in DETE, it is still one of the highest risk activities regularly
undertaken in the workplace. We all have a responsibility to take care of ourselves and
respect others on the road. Before using a vehicle for any work purpose you need to ensure
you undertake a risk assessment, so that hazards can be identified and managed.
In the context of health and safety, Hazard means anything that can cause harm.
Risk is the
chance (low, medium high or extreme), that someone will be harmed by the hazard in
combination with the consequences of that hazard (eg how serious will the outcome be?).
DETE Driver Safety Guide
The risk management process is:
• Identify Risks
• Assess Risks
• Manage Risks
• Review and monitor controls and risk.
Risk Management Matrix
The risk matrix is a commonly used tool to assist assessing risk levels. To use the matrix,
simply consider the activity in terms of the likelihood of an incident happening, in conjunction
with the consequence (or injury) if the incident did occur. The result of these two
considerations is a risk level: low, medium, high, or extreme.
Consequence
Likelihood
Insignificant
Minor
Moderate
Major
Critical
Almost
Certain
Medium
Medium
High
Extreme
Extreme
Likely
Low
Medium
High
High
Extreme
Possible
Low
Medium
High
High
High
Unlikely
Low
Low
Medium
Medium
High
Rare
Low
Low
Low
Low
Medium
RISK LEVEL
Low: Little chance of incurring any injury
Medium: Some chance of incurring a minor injury
High: Likely that an injury requiring medical attention could occur
Extreme: Likely that a serious injury could occur
CONSEQUENCE
Insignificant: No injury requiring treatment
Minor: Minor injury; first aid
Moderate: Injury requiring medical treatment
Major: Serious injury requiring specialist medical treatment or hospitalisation
Critical: Loss of life; permanent disability or injury
LIKELIHOOD
Rare: Probably would never happen
Unlikely: Would not expect to happen
Possible: May happen, but you would expect not
Likely: Expect to happen at some time
Almost Certain: Probably would happen given the number of times the activity is done
How to do a risk assessment for driving
Work related driving should be assessed considering the identified risks. This guide identifies
and outlines the high risks associated with driving. Any travel that is deemed as high risk
should have an appropriate travel plan which is approved by the driver’s manager. The travel
plan template provided in this guide can be used to document a risk management process.
DETE Driver Safety Guide
DETE Management of Safe Driving
There are three major elements of driver safety for DETE.
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The role and duties of the Department in providing policy direction and accountability
regarding driver safety through procedures and processes;
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The role and duties of fleet management in procuring and managing vehicles; and
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The role and duties employees in managing driver safety behaviours and practices.
Fleet Management
The majority of the Department’s vehicles are leased through QFleet, who are responsible for
procuring, leasing and providing maintenance and support to Queensland Government
agencies. Each vehicle has a QFleet Driver Companion booklet which outlines instructions
and requirements in the following areas:
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Looking after your vehicle
Environmental Care
Servicing and Repairs
Common Repair Items
Breakdown Assistance
Emergency/Accident Procedure
Insurance Claims Procedure
Driver Safety
DET Fleet Management - What Driver Safety looks like
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Vehicles are chosen against criteria covering active and passive safety features;
Employees and their representatives are consulted regarding the needs of the business
in terms of vehicle selection;
There is a safe driving and vehicle selection policy;
All new staff are required to drive undertake an induction which includes driver and
vehicle safety;
Regular vehicle services and checks are undertaken and documented;
Drivers are provided with information about hazards, such as adverse conditions.
Senior management/owner responsibilities are defined along with everyone involved in
the driving task.
All vehicles are maintained to manufacturer’s service requirements.
DETE Driver Safety Guide
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All vehicles have emergency contact numbers.
Records of fleet and driver license details are kept and used to improve performance.
The inclusion of safety equipment such as first aid kits and fire extinguishers can be
determined through a risk assessment process.
Safe Driving Practices
There are three key areas that must be considered when managing driver safety.
These
are the driver, the vehicle and the journey.
The driver section includes information about driver training and competency, identification
of risks associated with distraction, fatigue and also other driver behaviours such as
controlling speed, alcohol and drug use and managing issues such as road rage.
The vehicle section includes information about ensuring that the vehicle is in a safe
condition, well maintained and also suitable for the purpose.
The journey section includes information about considering the length of the journey, the
time period allocated for the journey, the location and road conditions (eg remote) and
communications.
All of these elements can be documented in a Travel Plan.
DETE Driver Safety Guide
The Driver
Driving tasks including driver behaviour makes up a significant part of the risk of driving for work.
This section looks at some of the elements of driving identified as a risk, and outlines things that
can be considered to control that risk that should be considered by the driver of work vehicles.
You may identify more hazards than are listed here.
Before you get in the car:
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Driver competency and fitness to drive – has your driver’s licence been checked by fleet
management recently?
Ensure that you have provided the most up to date information
to fleet management.
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If driving is a requirement for a role, it is good practice to consider this in recruitment and
selection processes.
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Informing and supervising drivers – part of normal induction training for new employees
that may undertake work related driving is to cover DETE driver and vehicle safety
procedures. This would include covering legal requirements, pre-start checks,
emergency/crash procedure, understanding road conditions and the effects of fatigue.
Risks associated with driving:
There are a number of risk factors and behaviours that should be considered while you are
driving.
Speed
Speeding is one of the greatest risk factors in driving.
Speeding doesn’t just mean driving
faster than the posted speed limit, it also means driving too fast for the conditions such as
weather, traffic and road conditions. Speeding is dangerous because it affects reaction time,
stopping distance and the consequences of speeding accidents can result in fatalities.
Drivers can manage speed through:
DETE Driver Safety Guide
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Observing the speed limit.
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Driving at the speed appropriate for conditions.
If the conditions are poor, travel at a
speed lower than the posted speed limit.
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If you are slowing down from a high speed, check your speedometer, speed can be
difficult to judge after travelling at high speed for a period of time.
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Increasing distance between the vehicle ahead of you if travelling at higher speeds.
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Reducing speed where pedestrian activity is high
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Reducing speed when the vehicle is heavily loaded or towing a trailer
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Responding to speed warning alerts
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Adjusting arrival or departure times to compensate for delays
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Planning trips taking into account timeframes and speed limits and possible delays (eg
heavy traffic or road works)
Drugs and Alcohol
It is illegal to drive under the influence of drugs and alcohol.
driver’s ability to drive safely.
attention span and vision.
Drugs and alcohol impair a
They affect things like reaction time, thought processes,
Some prescription medications may affect your ability to drive.
Many of these are labeled accordingly.
Check with your physician if you are unsure if
prescription medications will affect your ability to drive.
Drivers can manage this through:
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Avoiding alcohol consumption prior to driving
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Using transport alternatives at functions with alcohol
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Taking into account the influence of prescribed and other medications before driving
Fatigue
Fatigue is one of the most important factors contributing to work-related road crashes.
Effects of fatigue on driving are:
DETE Driver Safety Guide
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Impaired performance, judgement and attentiveness
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Slower reaction time
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Drowsiness and tiredness and an increased probability of falling asleep at the wheel
Fatigue occurs because driving involves long periods of concentration, long periods awake,
monotony and other environmental causes such as temperature, airflow etc.
Basic signs of fatigue are:
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Wandering in the lane or over lane lines
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Changes in speed – especially slowing down without reason
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Nodding
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Yawning
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Lapses in concentration (for example, not remembering parts of the journey)
Drivers can manage this by:
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Having sufficient sleep before driving and not driving when feeling tired
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Taking 15 minute breaks with exercise after every two hours of driving
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Sharing the driving.
If there is more than one driver, swapping every hour helps to
manage fatigue
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Not driving in the hours when normally asleep e.g. midnight to dawn
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Not starting a long trip after a full day’s work
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Avoiding driving long distances after consuming a large meal
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Not using the vehicles heater because it can induce drowsiness
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Not using the recycled air setting in vehicles, as this can affect air quality over long
periods of time
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Keeping the cabin well ventilated and a comfortable temperature
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Keeping the mind active e.g. listening to car radio
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Not getting too comfortable; use wind, noise and an upright seating position to remain
alert
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Stopping to have a sleep if required
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Avoiding medications which cause drowsiness
DETE Driver Safety Guide
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Breaking the journey with an overnight stop, if appropriate.
Use of Mobile Telephones
Drivers should be aware of the Queensland road rules in relation to mobile phone usage whilst
driving. Advice from Queensland Police Service in relation to the Transport Operations Act
1995 is that:
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Holding a mobile phone whilst driving or stationary in traffic (ie traffic lights) is prohibited.
Mobile phones mounted in cradles are acceptable but only to receive or end a call. This
means that you are able to only press one button. The only way to make outgoing calls
is to pull over and dial the number or use voice activation if your phone is capable.
Using mobile phones distract drivers in a number of ways such as through sound, sight, the
need to physically respond to the phone (ie the need to take your hand of wheel to answer it)
and also by distracting attention from the primary task of driving.
Drivers can manage this by:
• Allowing calls to go to message bank;
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Leaving a message on voicemail advising incoming callers that you are driving and
cannot take calls; and
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Answering calls only after the vehicle is pulled over to the side of the road.
Further Driver Behaviour Information and Resources
DETE has information and resources organised into toolbox talks developed by CARRS-Q
(Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety Queensland). These are available on a
number of driver safety topics including:
• Reversing;
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Road Rage;
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Close Following; and
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Low Speed Manoeuvres and Parking.
Contact Organisational Health or your Regional Health and Safety Consultant to find out more
about this information.
In the event of a crash/incident
Immediate actions
DETE Driver Safety Guide
Attend to injured person(s)
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Apply first aid and do not move seriously injured person(s) (prevent contact with blood
and other bodily fluids by using protective gloves.
Ensure the injured person(s) is/are as comfortable as possible.
Ensure the safety of others
• Isolate the site where the incident occurred (try not to disturb the area in case police
investigation is required)
• Remove from the site all people who are not directly involved
Call triple zero (000) for emergency services, or if using a mobile phone and 000 does not work,
dial 112. These are free calls.
Immediately report the crash to the police if:
• The vehicle requires towing;
• all drivers do not provide personal details;
• any persons are injured or killed; or
• damage to the vehicle or property is over $2500.
All drivers involved are required to exchange the following details:
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full name and address – QFleet should also be noted as the owner of the vehicle;
workplace details including contact number registration number; and
make and model of vehicles involved.
Report the crash to your Officer in Charge. If towing is required of a Qfleet vehicle, contact
RACQ 24 hour Road Service on 1800 648 058 and quote vehicle registration and QFleet
membership number: 14472621.
Follow up actions
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Notify relevant stakeholders.
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Report the incident as per DETE procedure HLS-PR-005: Health and Safety incident
recording and notification.
DETE Driver Safety Guide
The Vehicle
The management of health and safety is everybody’s business.
The health and safety points
to consider in a risk assessment process regarding vehicles are outlined below.
Some of
these risk considerations will be the responsibility of fleet management to control. These have
been noted in the Fleet Management section of this guide.
best position to identify issues with those vehicles.
However, drivers are often in the
It is expected that they inform fleet/admin
of any issues as they become aware of them. Other points will be the responsibility of the
driver to manage.
Suitability
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Is vehicle suitability considered at the time of procurement of new vehicles?
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Are safety standards such as the Australasian New Car Assessment Program (ANCAP)
Safety Rating considered at the time of procurement of new vehicles?
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Is the vehicle suitable for the immediate driving task it is required for?
Condition – including Safety Equipment
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Are drivers undertaking basic safety checks?
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Is the vehicle maintained and in a safe and fit condition?
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Has the vehicle been filled with a sufficient amount of fuel to commence the journey?
(Vehicles are to be returned with minimum of half a tank of fuel.)
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Are maintenance arrangements in place, and how are maintenance standards ensured?
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Is safety equipment appropriate and in good working order?
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Are the seatbelts fitted correctly and function properly?
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Are you familiar with variables such as handbrake operation (some vehicles have a foot
operated ‘handbrake’) and mirror adjustment controls?
Ergonomic considerations.
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Is the vehicle parked in a place where it is easy to load/unload equipment or luggage?
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Is the seat adjusted so that the driver has good posture?
Conditionally Registered Vehicles
DETE Driver Safety Guide
Conditional registration is a registration scheme for non-standard vehicles that previously were
exempt or unable to be registered. Conditional registration gives you the benefit of compulsory
third party insurance in the event of a crash occurring on a road causing personal injury.
Any vehicle that does not comply with the standard regulations for registration but requires
access to roads to fulfil operational tasks should have conditional registration. This will affect
agricultural, construction and recreational vehicles including;
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Forklifts
Tractors
Graders
Harvesters
Ride on lawnmowers
Two- three- or four-wheeled recreational vehicles.
For further information on conditionally registered vehicles please refer to the
Conditional Registration of Vehicles Fact Sheet
Use of Personal Vehicles
Workers who use their private vehicle to undertake official duties are to be paid a motor vehicle
allowance (Public Service Directive – Motor Vehicle Allowances). Staff are entitled to claim a
kilometric allowance in accordance with this directive and departmental policy. Staff should
obtain written approval from their manager to claim a Kilometric Allowance when they are using
their vehicle for work related duties
https://oneportal.deta.qld.gov.au/Services/Finance/Forms/Documents/Appforauthoritytoclaimkilo
metricallowance.doc
Before getting this authorisation staff should:
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Ensure that the vehicle is covered by either a comprehensive motor vehicle insurance
policy or a third party property damage insurance policy; and
Produce evidence that the insurance policy has been endorsed to indemnify the
Queensland Government against certain liabilities at law. This is a standard
endorsement available on request from all insurance companies. You are also required
to provide a Certificate of Currency for your motor vehicle insurance policy.
Your insurance company may charge a fee to supply this endorsement. The Public Service
directive 14/10 - Motor Vehicle Allowances also states that the department should refund
any endorsement fees that might be charged by an insurance company.
DETE Driver Safety Guide
Staff should seek advice from their own insurer regarding the type and amount of cover in
their current insurance policies. E.g. whether:
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Their policies cover use of their personal vehicle for work purposes
The effect an accident would have on any no claim bonus
The extent of cover if the vehicle is involved in an incident while being used for work;
and/or
The extent of cover if items (eg fuel) being transported explode or burst into flames.
Breakdown Assistance
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If you require assistance in case of a breakdown, contact RACQ 24 hour Road Service –
Call 1800 648 058 or 13 11 11
Quote vehicle registration and QFleet membership number: 14472621
All QFleet vehicles are covered by RACQ’s 24 hour Road Service
For further information, please contact Fleet Management.
If a breakdown, flat tyre or other unexpected incident occurs, the driver is required to
immediately advise the contact officer of the event, their location and proposed actions.
Following an incident in a Departmental vehicle, an incident report form should be completed as
outlined in the Health and Safety Incident Recording and Notification Procedure HLS-PR-005:
Health and safety incident recording and notification.
For all QFleet vehicles Page 12 of the QFleet Driver Companion outlines the insurance claims
procedure, please record all the details outlined in the accident details form on page 13 of the
Qfleet Driver Companion.
When you return to your workplace you will also be required to complete the QFleet Motor
Vehicle Accident Claim Form.
DETE Driver Safety Guide
The Journey
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Have you planned the route you will take on the journey?
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Is the route appropriate for the vehicle undertaking the journey? Is the quality of the
road a factor in the journey? Does the vehicle require 4WD to undertake the journey?
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Are schedules realistic?
allow for rest breaks.
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Is sufficient account of periods when drivers are most likely to feel fatigue when planning
work schedules?
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Has the length of work day been considered when employees are asked to drive?
Remember that sometimes employees will start a journey from home.
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Can drivers make an overnight stay rather than complete a long road journey at the end
of the day?
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Are staff advised about the dangers of fatigue during driving?
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Can long journeys be eliminated or reduced with other methods of transport?
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Is consideration given to adverse weather conditions such as rain, high winds and flash
flooding when planning journeys?
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Can journey times and routes be rescheduled to take account of adverse weather
conditions
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are drivers not pressured to complete journeys where weather conditions are difficult
Do journey times take account of road types and condition,
Driving in Rural and Remote Areas
No employee is to travel into a remote or isolated area without having reasonable means of
communication with their contact point and/or other emergency contact points. Consideration
should be given to how the employee might be supported prior to travel such as advising police
or local authorities of the proposed visit, agreeing on check in times and procedures to be taken
in an emergency. All rural travel should be considered high risk and have a risk assessment
and travel plan.
Risk factors include:
DETE Driver Safety Guide
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unfamiliar driving conditions
driver inexperience
excessive speed for the road conditions
narrow and unsealed roads and differing/inconsistent road surfaces
farm machinery and other slow moving vehicles on the road
animals on the road
riskier overtaking
restricted communication networks
limited ambulance and medical services
longer response times by emergency services in the event of a crash.
Drivers can manage this by:
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planning the journey in detail
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selecting an appropriate vehicle, and checking safety and serviceablility before departure
including inflation pressure of tyres and having a spare
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allowing adequate travel time
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obtaining a map and taking it with you
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checking weather forecasts
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pre-planning refuelling stops
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ensuring the vehicle has a jack and wheel brace.
Practice wheel changing if possible.
Transporting Hazardous Chemicals and Dangerous Goods
DETE employees should obtain written approval of, or direction, from their manager to transport
dangerous goods, this will provide documentation confirming both the work activity and the
transport method. Similar to any other work task, should an injury occur during this activity the
DETE employees will be afforded protection under the department’s worker’s compensation
policy. Any transport involving dangerous goods should be considered high risk and have an
appropriate, approved travel plan.
Please refer to the Guideline for Managing Risks with Chemicals in DET Workplaces (HLS-PR006) Chapter 4 Purchasing, Storage and Handling for further information.
The Australian Dangerous Goods Code published by the National Transport Commission is also
available for further information. The code is available at:
http://www.ntc.gov.au/viewpage.aspx?documentid=01147
DETE Driver Safety Guide
Travel Planning - Travel Assessed as High Risk
A contact officer/s is to be nominated for each travel plan, the contact officer is to receive
check-ins and monitor the travel. The manager must be advised once a check-in is missed
and take control when activation of emergency procedures is necessary.
A map of the intended route for the trip may be requested and should be provided to the
manager with the travel plan. Alterations to, or deviations from the plan are to be
communicated as soon as possible to the manager or contact officer.
Please refer to the Pre-Drive Checklist and Travel Plan for assistance in developing a Travel
Plan.
Any work related travel assessed as high risk is to have a travel plan detailing the intended
route and expected timings for departure, arrival at destination, rest breaks, refuelling and
refreshment stops and agreed communications check in schedule.
Some examples of high risk travel include:
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Travel to remote areas
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Travel at dusk/dawn and at night
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Travel involving transport of dangerous goods
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Travel involving adverse weather conditions
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