302-375
SCI SelfSensing Close
Coupled Pump
302-375
Installation, Operation, and Maintenance Manual
SUPERSEDES: NEW
EFFECTIVE: September 01, 2015
Plant ID:
Table of Contents
1 SAFETY REQUIREMENTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
2 GENERAL INSTALLATION REQUIREMENTS. . . . . 2
2.1 Receiving Pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
2.2 Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
2.3 Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
3 MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
3.1 Routine Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
3.2 Close Coupled Pumps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3.3 Close Coupled Motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3.4 Mechanical Seal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
4 DIS-ASSEMBLY AND RE-ASSEMBLY. . . . . . . . . . . 3
4.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
4.2 Dis-Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
4.3 Re-Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
5 PUMP PIPING - GENERAL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
6 APPLICATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
7 MECHANICAL INSTALLATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
7.1 Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
7.2 Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
7.3 VFD Mounting to Wall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
7.4 Pump Piping – Detailed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
8 ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
8.1 Exploded Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
8.2 Electrical Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
8.3 Grounding Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
8.4 Typical Terminal Wiring Configurations . . . . . . 17
9 USER INTERFACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
9.1 Local Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
9.2 Backup and Copying Parameter Settings . . . . 28
9.3 Password Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
10 PUMP CONTROL SET-UPS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
10.1 SelfSensing Description. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
10.2 Set-up Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
10.3 Variable Flow Control (Flow Compensation) . 32
10.4 Constant Flow Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
10.5 Constant Pressure Control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
10.6 Sequencing (Standby Pump Alternation). . . . 33
© 2015 Taco, Inc.
11 ONSITE DRIVE MOUNTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
11.1 Matching Pump and Drive Tag.. . . . . . . . . . . . 34
11.2 Mechanical Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
11.3 Electrical Code Compliance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
11.4 Before Start Saftey Check. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
11.5 Applying Power to FC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
11.6 Run Automatic Motor Adaption . . . . . . . . . . . 36
11.7 Increase Warning Current Limit. . . . . . . . . . . 36
11.8 Check Motor Rotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
12 START-UP PROCEDURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
12.1 Check Points Before First Start . . . . . . . . . . . 37
12.2 Check Motor Rotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
12.3 Start Pump. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
12.4 Verify Flow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
13 SYSTEM BALANCING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
13.1 About SelfSensing ProBalance . . . . . . . . . . . 39
13.2 My Personal Menu for ProBalance . . . . . . . . 40
13.3 Balancing Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
13.4 Additional Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
14 MENUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
15 WARNINGS AND ALARMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
15.1 Supplemental Warning and Alarm Settings. . 70
16 SFI PUMP PROBLEM ANALYSIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
17 SPECIFICATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
17.1 Power-dependent Specifications . . . . . . . . . . 74
17.2 Connection Tightening Torques. . . . . . . . . . . 76
A SET-UP FOR STANDBY PUMP ALTERNATION. . 77
1
1 SAFETY REQUIREMENTS
CAUTION: These instructions should be
read completely prior to installation of the
equipment. A copy of these instructions
should be retained on file for future reference.
WARNING: Electrical shock hazard. Disconnect ALL power sources when installing or
servicing this equipment to prevent electrical
shock or equipment damage.
This pump is intended for the circulation of water or
other suitable HVAC media. It is not intended for
hazardous, corrosive, or flammable liquids.
2.2 Location
Pump should be accessible for inspection and repair
work, head room must be provided for the use of hoist or
tackle as necessary.
Lift pump by slinging through motor eye bolts and securing through pump adapter.
NOTE: In no case should any part of motor
be covered with insulation.
2.3 Foundation
The pump must always be supported.
Pump must not be operated until all piping and/or electrical connections are in place.
Pumps with smaller motors may be suspended in the
pip-ing, provided the piping is supported adjacent to the
pump.
Proper care and suitable equipment should be used to
move and install this heavy equipment.
For pumps with larger motors, the pump should be
attached to foundation using lead anchors.
Care should be taken when installing pipe systems to
avoid placing an excessive load on the pump unions.
Refer to motor installation instructions to determine
proper terminal connections in order to obtain correct
pump rotation.
When the system piping is used as an earth bonding
path for the building electrical services (check local
codes), the pump should not be relied upon as part of
the circuit. A properly installed bridging connection
should be provided.
If electrical connection is to be made using any means
other than rigid conduit, proper strain relief must be provided (min 100N tension).
Pump should be installed according to local electrical
and safety codes using appropriate size wire and
suitable over current protection. It should use a lockable
isolator or circuit breaker conforming to applicable
electrical codes.
It is recommended that the pump be fitted with a suitable
“emergency stop” per the requirements of applicable
electrical codes.
2 GENERAL INSTALLATION
REQUIREMENTS
2.1 Receiving Pump
NOTE: Piping loads shall not be applied to
the pump.
Pump must be allowed to move with piping movement.
Expansion of piping must be taken into account when
piping and suitable devices should be employed. Do not
rigidly connect the pump to the floor.
NOTE: Provide vibration isolation pads
under floor mounted supports. Do not support unit by the motor eye-bolts.
3 MAINTENANCE
3.1 Routine Inspections
Routine inspections should be made on a regular basis.
Inspections made while pump is running should reveal
potential failures.
• Inspect motor bearings for any sign of temperature
rise. Temperature should not exceed 160°F. Temperature rise may indicate the early stages of bearing
problems.
• Listen for any unusual noise:
1.Air trapped in pump.
2.Hydraulic noise.
3.Mechanical noise in motor and/or pump.
• Check suction gauge reading and confirm that it is
normal.
Inspect for shipping damage. If a shortage or damage
occurs, contact carrier immediately.
© 2015 Taco, Inc.
2
• Check discharge gauge reading and confirm that it is
normal. If gauge readings are abnormal find out why.
NOTE: Suction and discharge gauges
should read the same with pump stopped.
3.2 Close Coupled Pumps
The pump section is attached directly to the motor shaft
and does not contain bearings.
3.3 Close Coupled Motors
CAUTION: Overgreasing bearings can cause
prema-ture bearing failures. Do not mix dissimilar
greases. Do not lubricate while pump is running.
Do not remove or install drain plug while pump is
running.
On Close Coupled Pumps, motor bearings carry both
pump and motor load. Therefore, it is of the utmost
importance to have the bearings properly lubricated at all
times.
The recommended lubricants for CI/CE motors are
Chevron “SRI No. 2” and Shell “Dolium R”.
Ball Bearings:
Ball bearings are greased at the factory. Grease
will not flow out during shipment, so no checking will
be required at start-up.
Regrease bearings as indicated by motor manufacturer’s instructions. Normally greasing is required every two
(2) years or 3,000 hours of operation. On motors, grease
is usually introduced with a grease gun through a
grease fit-tings.
3.4 Mechanical Seal
Mechanical seals are the most delicate component
of the pump. Special care has to be given to them to
assure trouble-free operation.
The sealing element of a mechanical seal consists of a
carbon washer rotating against a stationary ring.
Chemicals most commonly used for this procedure are
sodium triphosphate, sodium carbonate, or caustic soda
but any non-foaming detergents as used in dishwashers
can be applied.
Fill system with clean water, add cleaning chemicals (1 lb.
for every 40 to 50 gallons of water or manufacturer’s
instruction). Start pump and heat up system. Let system
run for a few hours and then drain and refill with fresh
water. Your pumps are now ready for continuous duty.
4 DIS-ASSEMBLY AND REASSEMBLY
4.1 General
If the pump has been maintained and serviced properly,
breakdowns requiring pump disassembly should occur
only rarely.
• If a problem occurs, the cause should be determined,
if possible, before dis-assembling. (See “Problem
Analysis”)
• If the pump is being dis-assembled, all parts must be
carefully handled, avoid heavy blows and shocks.
• All parts must be carefully cleaned and inspected for
wear. Recondition or replace parts where necessary.
4.2 Dis-Assembly
Drain liquid from casing by removing drain plug.
CAUTION: Allow pump to cool and secure
suction and discharge valves before working
on pump!
Remove re-circulation line.
Remove bolts holding cover/adapter to casing, pry cover/
adapter and motor assembly from casing.
Surfaces of both are highly lapped to assure sealing.
Remove impeller bolt in a counterclockwise direction.
Remove impeller and key.
Any dirt that penetrates between the two mating parts
will cause a rapid wear of the seal faces and will
ultimately result in seal leakage.
In all cases of mechanical seal arrangement, after
removing the sleeve and its seal assembly, the seal
rotating element may be drawn off the shaft sleeve.
New heating systems are usually contaminated by
various materials such as construction debris,
welding slugs, pipe joint compound, mill scale, etc. It
is of utmost importance that such systems be
cleaned out thoroughly before putting pump into
continuous operation.
Cleaning of a heating system is simple and easy. First
flush out system with cold water at city pressure to
remove all loose for-eign matter that penetrated into the
system. Afterwards, boil out system with chemicals to
remove dirt adhering to pipes.
© 2015 Taco, Inc.
NOTE: Apply silicone grease on the OD of
the sleeve in the area between the seal and
the end of the sleeve. This will help removal
of the old seal. The stationary element is to
be removed from the cover.
All parts must be cleaned and inspected for wear.
Replace parts where necessary.
3
5 PUMP PIPING - GENERAL
Remove bolts holding cover/adapter to casing, pry cover/
adapter and motor assembly from casing.
Remove impeller bolt in a counterclockwise direction.
Remove impeller and key.
In all cases of mechanical seal arrangement, after
removing the sleeve and its seal assembly, the seal
rotat-ing element may be drawn off the shaft sleeve.
NOTE: Apply silicone grease on the OD of
the sleeve in the area between the seal and
the end of the sleeve. This will help removal
of the old seal. The stationary element is to
be removed from the cover.
All parts must be cleaned and inspected for wear.
Replace parts where necessary.
4.3 Re-Assembly
CAUTION: NEVER connect any pump to
piping, unless extra care is taken to measure
and align the piping flanges well. Always
start piping from pump. Use as few bends as
possible and preferably long radius elbows.
Do not use flexible connectors on the suction or discharge of a vertical in-line pump, unless the pump is rigidly mounted to a foundation. Ensure piping exerts no
strain on pump as this could distort the casing causing
breakage or early failure due to pump misalignment. All
connecting pipe flanges must be square to the pipe work
and parallel to the pump flanges.
Suction and discharge pipes may be increased or
decreased at pump nozzle to suit pump capacity and
par-ticular conditions of installation. Use eccentric
reducers on suction connection with flat side uppermost.
Be certain that all parts to be replaced are free from
burrs, with screw threads and connecting faces clear and
free from damage.
Lay out the suction line with a continual rise towards the
pump without high points, thus eliminating possibility of
air pockets that may prevent the pump from operating
effectively.
Insert stationary element of seal into cover adapter, slip
cover-adapter over shaft and engage rabbit of motor.
6 APPLICATION
Note: Do not touch the seal surfaces
because this may result in leakage. Do not
contaminate seal faces with fingerprints.
Lubricate smaller OD of shaft sleeve with silicone grease.
Do not use petroleum oil or grease.
Place spring on shaft sleeve to abut against sleeve
shoulder. Slide rotary seal on sleeve until it contacts
spring.
Slide the shaft sleeve on the shaft, larger bore first. Be
certain the O-ring is correctly seated in the groove.
Assemble impeller key and impeller on shaft. Refit with
new impeller washer on impeller bolt and tighten carefully. Be certain that the impeller rotates freely by hand.
Apply a few spots of gasket adhesive to gasket surface of
cover. Place a new casing gasket against gasket surface
and press against adhesive.
Assemble cover-adapter complete with motor into casing. Insure that gasket is seated correctly. Install hexheaded cap screws into casing tapings and tighten uniformly.
Reconnect re-circulation line and drain plug.
© 2015 Taco, Inc.
Working Pressure:
175 psig
Optional Working Pressure:
300 psig
Temperature:
250°F Standard
300°F Hi Temperature
7 MECHANICAL INSTALLATION
7.1 Location
Locate pump in an easily accessible place with sufficient
space around it for maintenance and servicing. On larger
pumps allow head room for the use of hoists or overhead
cranes. Locate pump on a dry and clean place so that
motor will be protected from moisture and dust.
On closed heating systems, place compression tank at
the suction side of the pump. When pump head is less than
20 feet, it is permissible to connect compression tank to
dis-charge side of the pump.
On open systems, install pump close to liquid
supply and make suction piping as short and as straight
as possible.
4
7.2 Foundation
The foundation serves to carry the pump weight and
to absorb vibration. Normally, the foundation is made of
a concrete block, preferably tied in with the floor or
ground. Make the foundation block about 4" longer and
4" wider than the base of the frame. Height of the block
may vary from 2/3 to 1 times the width of the foundation
(Fig. 1). When foundation is poured, provide a hole near
each of the four (4) corners. To simplify installation and
maintenance use lead Anchors. Place the front Anchor
about 2" from the edge of the foundation to clear
overhanging casings (Fig. 2).
7.3 Pump Piping – Detailed
Correct piping is of prime importance for the proper
operation and long life of the pump. Stresses induced
by piping will cause excessive wear of seals and
bearings that could ultimately destroy these elements.
Both suction and discharge piping should be
suspended close to the pump connections so that no
pipe weight rests on the pump. Pipe flanges and pump
flanges must align perfectly before connections are
made. Piping should never be drawn by force into
place.
Thermal expansion of piping requires special
attention on heating installations. If no room is
provided for pipe expansion, stresses are induced in
the piping that will exert a load on the pump. Forces
created by pipe stresses can exceed by far the load
exerted through pipe and water weight. Stress forces
can distort pump, bend shafts, wear out seals and
impeller wear rings and ultimately burn out bearings.
To protect pump from thermal pipe stresses, provide
spring hangers and flexible connectors that are
suitable to compensate for pipe expansion. (Fig. 3A)
Install gate valves on both suction and discharge
side of the pump to allow servicing without draining the
system. Also provide a flanged nipple (Spool) between
gate valve and suction end of the pump to enable you
to take the pump apart without disturb-ing piping (Fig. 3
B). In order to have them easily accessible, the pump
and flange nipples should not be covered with
insulation.
On open pumping systems drawing water from a
level below the pump (suction lift), install a foot valve
with strainer. On open systems where the pump is
located below the suction water level (suction head),
install a check valve in the discharge line close to the
pump.
7.3.1 Pump Setting
To set pump attach Anchor Blocks finger tight to pump
frame and place in position with Anchor Blocks suspended
freely in the four holes in the concrete foundation.
Next, level pump by inserting four wedges, one under
each cor-ner of the frame. At the same time, also check
level and square-ness of suction and discharge flanges. If
everything checks out, pour concrete (right up to the bottom
of the frame) into the four holes at the corners and let set for
thirty six (36) to forty eight (48) hours before tightening bolts.
WARNING: UNEXPECTED STARTUP HAZARD
Disconnect and lockout power before servicing.
Failure to follow these instructions could result in
serious personal injury or death, or property damage.
SPRING HANGER
(IF REQUIRED)
NOTE: WHERE THERMAL EXPANSION OF
PIPING IS ANTICIPATED, INSTALL SPRING
PIPE HANGERS & FLEXIBLE CONNECTORS
WHICH ARE SUITABLE TO COMPENSATE
FOR THIS EXPANSION.
INSTALL PER INSTRUCTIONS OF
MANUFACTURER.
GATE
VALVE
MULTI PURPOSE VALVE
FLEXIBLE
CONNECTOR
(IF REQUIRED)
PRESSURE GAUGE
SUCTION
DIFFUSER
PIPE
STANCHION
Fig. 7-1 Typical Installation – Vertical Piping
7.3.2 Connecting Pipes
Piping may now be connected to pump. Make certain that
pump and pipe flanges are strictly parallel and properly
spaced for the gaskets that will be used. Also check that
pipes are supported properly and do not rest on pump
flanges. Never draw pipes by force to pump flanges.
© 2015 Taco, Inc.
5
PRESSURE
GAUGE
PRESSURE
GAUGE
GATE VALVE
PIPE
STANCHION
MULTI PURPOSE
VALVE
PIPE
STANCHION
THIS PIECE TO BE
FREELY REMOVABLE
Fig. 7-2 Typical Installation - Horizontal Piping
7.4 VFD Mounting to Wall
7.5.1 Lifting
• Check the weight of the unit to determine a safe lifting method.
• Ensure that the lifting device is suitable for the task.
• If necessary, plan for a hoist, crane, or forklift with the
appropriate rating to move the unit.
• For lifting, use hoist rings on the unit, when provided.
Item A is a back plate properly installed for required airflow to cool the unit.
Figure 7-4 Proper Mounting with Railings
7.5.2 Mounting
• Mount the unit vertically.
• The frequency converter allows side by side installation.
• Ensure that the strength of the mounting location will
support the unit weight.
• Mount the unit to a solid flat surface or to the
optional back plate to provide cooling airflow (see
Figure 7-2 and Figure 7-3).
• Improper mounting can result in overheating and
reduced performance.
• Use the slotted mounting holes on the unit for wall
mounting, when provided.
Figure 7-3: Proper Mounting with Back Plate
© 2015 Taco, Inc.
NOTE: Back plate is required when mounted
on railings.
7.4.3 Tightening Torques
See “17.2 Connection Tightening Torques” on page
76 for proper tightening specifications.
6
8 ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS
8.1 Exploded Views
Figure 8-1: Exploded View A Size
Item #
Description
1
Detachable Keypad LCP
2
VFD Face Cover
3
Communication Terminals, 3 pins, #s; 61,68,69
4
Communication Terminals, 10 pins, #s; 12,13,18,19,27,29,32,33,20,37
5
Communication Terminals, 6 pins, #s; 39,42,50,53,54,55
6
Relay Terminal, #1, #s; 01,02,03
7
Relay Terminal, #2, #s; 04,05,06
8
Motor Output Plug (only for Type 1 / IP21 enclosures)
9
Power Input Plug (only for Type 1 / IP21 enclosures)
~Danfoss accessory bags only contain item #s 3 to 7 (or #s 3 to 9 if type A).
~ All hardware (screws, clamps, grommets, etc.) included in the accessory bags.
© 2015 Taco, Inc.
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Figure 8-2: Exploded View B and C Sizes
Item #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Description
Detachable Keypad LCP
VFD Face Cover
Communication Terminals, 3 pins, #s; 61,68,69
Communication Terminals, 10 pins, #s; 12,13,18,19,27,29,32,33,20,37
Communication Terminals, 6 pins, #s; 39,42,50,53,54,55
Relay Terminal, #1, #s; 01,02,03
Relay Terminal, #2, #s; 04,05,06
Motor Output Plug (only for Type 1 / IP21 enclosures)
Power Input Plug (only for Type 1 / IP21 enclosures)
~Danfoss accessory bags only contain item #s 3 to 7 (or #s 3 to 9 if type A).
~ All hardware (screws, clamps, grommets, etc.) included in the accessory bags.
8.2 Electrical Installation
This section contains detailed instructions for wiring the adjustable frequency drive. The following tasks are described.
•
•
•
•
Wiring the motor to the adjustable frequency drive output terminals
Wiring the AC line power to the adjustable frequency drive input terminals
Connecting control and serial communication wiring
After power has been applied, checking input and motor power; programming control terminals for their intended
functions
© 2015 Taco, Inc.
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Figure 8-3 shows the main drive electrical connection.
Figure 8-3: Basic Wiring Schematic Drawing
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
9
Figure 8-5 shows a typical bypass electrical connection
Figure 8-5: Bypass Wiring Schematic Drawing for A2-A3
Frames
Figure 8-4 shows a typical bypass electrical connection
Figure 8-4: Bypass Wiring Schematic Drawing for B2-C1 Frames
DANGER: EQUIPMENT HAZARD! Rotating shafts and electrical equipment can be hazardous. All electrical work must conform to national and local electrical codes. It is strongly recommended that installation,
start-up, and maintenance be performed only by trained and qualified personnel. Failure to follow these
guidelines could result in death or serious injury.
CAUTION: WIRING ISOLATION! Run input power, motor wiring and control wiring in three separate
metallic conduits or use separated shielded cable for high frequency noise isolation. Failure to isolate
power, motor and control wiring could result in less than optimum adjustable frequency drive and associated equipment performance.
For your safety, comply with the following requirements:
• Electronic controls equipment is connected to hazardous AC line voltage. Extreme care should be
taken to protect against electrical hazards when
applying power to the unit.
• Run motor cables from multiple adjustable frequency
drives separately. Induced voltage from output motor
cables run together can charge equipment
capacitors even with the equipment turned off and
locked out.
All adjustable frequency drives must be provided with
short-circuit and overcurrent protection. Input fusing is
required to provide this protection, see Figure 9.2.3. If
not factory supplied, fuses must be provided by the
installer as part of installation.
Figure 8-6: Adjustable Frequency Drive Fuses
8.2.1 Overload and Equipment Protection
• An electronically activated function within the adjustable frequency drive provides overload protection for
the motor. The overload calculates the level of
increase to activate timing for the trip (controller output stop) function. The higher the current draw, the
quicker the trip response. The overload provides
Class 20 motor protection. See “15 Warnings and
Alarms” on page 61 for details on the trip function.
• Because the motor wiring carries high frequency current, it is important that wiring for line power, motor
power, and control is run separately. Use metallic
conduit or separated shielded wire. Failure to isolate
power, motor, and control wiring could result in less
than optimum equipment performance. See Figure 84.
Figure 8-5: Proper Electrical Installation Using
Flexible Conduit
Wire Type and Ratings
• All wiring must comply with local and national regulations regarding cross-section and ambient temperature requirements.
• Danfoss recommends that all power connections be
made with a minimum 167°F [75 °C] rated copper
wire.
8.3 Grounding Requirements
DANGER: GROUNDING HAZARD! For
operator safety, it is important to ground
adjustable frequency drive properly in accordance with national and local electrical
codes as well as instructions contained
within these instructions. Ground currents
are higher than 3.5 mA. Failure to ground the
adjustable frequency drive properly could
result in death or serious injury.
NOTE: It is the responsibility of the user or certified electrical installer to ensure correct grounding of the equipment in accordance with national and local electrical
codes and standards.
• Follow all local and national electrical codes to
ground electrical equipment properly.
• Proper protective grounding for equipment with
ground currents higher than 3.5 mA must be established, see Leakage Current (>3.5 mA).
• A dedicated ground wire is required for input power,
motor power and control wiring.
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
11
• Use the clamps provided with on the equipment for
proper ground connections.
• Do not ground one adjustable frequency drive to
another in a “daisy chain” fashion.
• Keep the ground wire connections as short as possible.
• Use of high-strand wire to reduce electrical noise is
recommended.
• Follow the motor manufacturer wiring requirements.
Follow national and local codes regarding protective
grounding of equipment with a leakage current > 3.5 mA.
Adjustable frequency drive technology implies high frequency switching at high power. This will generate a
leak-age current in the ground connection. A fault
current in the adjustable frequency drive at the output
power termi-nals might contain a DC component which
can charge the filter capacitors and cause a transient
ground current. The ground leakage current depends on
various system configurations including RFI filtering,
shielded motor cables, and adjustable frequency drive
power
EN/ICE61800-5-1(Power Drive System Prodcut Standard)
requires special care if the leakage current
exceeds 3.5mA.
Grounding must be reinforced in one of the following
ways:
8.3.3 Grounding Using Shielded Cable
Grounding clamps are provided for motor wiring (see
Figure 8-6).
Figure 8-7: Grounding with Shielded Cable
8.3.4 Grounding Using Conduit
DANGER: GROUNDING HAZARD! Do not
use conduit connected to the adjustable frequency drive as a replacement for proper
grounding. Ground currents are higher than
3.5 mA. Improper grounding can result in
personal injury or electrical shorts.
Dedicated grounding clamps are provided (See Figure 87).
Figure 8-8: Grounding with Conduit
• Ground wire of at least 0.0155 in2 [10mm2]
• Two separate ground wires both complying with the
dimensioning rules
See EN/IEC61800-5-1 and EN50178 for further information.
8.3.2 Using RCDs
Where residual current devices (RCDs), also known as
ground leakage circuit breakers (ELCBs), are used, comply with the following:
• Use RCDs of type B only which are capable of
detecting AC and DC currents
• Use RCDs with an inrush delay to prevent faults due
to transient ground currents
• Dimension RCDs according to the system configuration and environmental considerations
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
1.Use a wire stripper to remove the insulation for
proper grounding.
2.Secure the grounding clamp to the stripped portion
of the wire with the screws provided.
3.Secure the grounding wire to the grounding clamp
provided.
12
8.3.5 Motor Connection
DANGER: INDUCED VOLTAGE! Run output motor cables from multiple adjustable
frequency drives separately. Induced voltage
from output motor cables run together can
charge equipment capacitors even with the
equipment turned off and locked out. Failure
to run output motor cables separately could
result in death or serious injury.
Figure 8-10: Motor, Line Power and Ground Wiring
for B-Frame Sizes and Above Using Shielded
Cable
• For maximum wire sizes, see “17.1 Power-dependent Specifications” on page 74.
• Comply with local and national electrical codes for
cable sizes.
• Motor wiring knockouts or access panels are pro-
vided at the base of IP21 and higher (NEMA1/12)
units
• Do not install power factor correction capacitors
between the adjustable frequency drive and the
motor
• Do not wire a starting or pole-changing device
between the adjustable frequency drive and the
motor.
• Connect the 3-phase motor wiring to terminals 96
(U), 97 (V), and 98 (W).
• Ground the cable in accordance with grounding
instructions provided.
• Follow the motor manufacturer wiring requirements
The three following figures represent line power input,
motor, and grounding for basic adjustable frequency
drives. Actual configurations vary with unit types and
optional equipment.
Figure 8-11: Motor, Line Power and Ground
Wiring B-Frame Sizes and Above Using
Shielded Cable or Conduit
Figure 8-9: Motor, Line Power and Ground Wiring
for A-Frame Sizes
8.3.6 AC Line Power Connection
Size wiring based upon the input current of the adjustable
frequency drive.
• Comply with local and national electrical codes for
cable sizes.
• Connect 3-phase AC input power wiring to terminals
L1, L2, and L3 (see Figure 8-11).
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13
• Depending on the configuration of the equipment,
input power will be connected to the line power input
terminals or the input disconnect.
Figure 8-12: Connecting to AC Line Power
Figure 8-13: Control Wiring Access for A2, A3,
B3, B4, C3 and C4 Enclosures
Figure 8-14: Control Wiring Access for A4, A5,
B1, B2, C1 and C2 Enclosures
• Ground the cable in accordance with grounding
instructions provided in “8.3 Grounding Requirements” on page 11.
• All adjustable frequency drives may be used with an
isolated input source as well as with ground reference power lines. When supplied from an isolated
line power source (IT line power or floating delta) or
TT/TN-S line power with a grounded leg (grounded
delta), set 14-50 RFI 1 to OFF. When off, the internal
RFI filter capacitors between the chassis and the
intermediate circuit are isolated to avoid damage to
the intermediate circuit and to reduce ground capacity currents in accordance with IEC 61800-3.
8.3.7 Control Wiring
Isolate control wiring from high power components in the
adjustable frequency drive.
If the adjustable frequency drive is connected to a thermistor, for PELV isolation, optional thermistor control
wiring must be reinforced/ double insulated. A 24 VDC
supply voltage is recommended.
Access
Remove access coverplate with a screwdriver. See “Figure 8-12: Control Wiring Access for A2, A3, B3, B4, C3
and C4 Enclosures” on page 14.
Or remove front cover by loosening attaching screws.
See “Figure 8-13: Control Wiring Access for A4, A5, B1,
B2, C1 and C2 Enclosures” on page 14.
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
Please see the table below before tightening the covers.
Table 1: Tightening Torques for Covers (Nm)
Frame
IP20
A4/A5
B1
B2
C1
C2
* No screws to tighten
- Does not exist
IP21
*
*
*
*
IP55
2
2.2
2.2
2.2
2.2
IP66
2
2.2
2.2
2.2
2.2
14
Control Terminal Types
Figure 8-14 shows the removable adjustable frequency
drive connectors.
Figure 8-16: Unplugging Control Terminals
Figure 8-15: Control Terminal Locations
1.Open the contact by inserting a small screwdriver
into the slot above or below the contact, as shown
in Figure 8-16.
2.Insert the bared control wire into the contact.
3.Remove the screwdriver to fasten the control wire
into the contact.
4.Ensure the contact is firmly established and not
loose. Loose control wiring can be the source of
equipment faults or less than optimal operation.
Figure 8-17: Connecting Control Wiring
• Connector 1 provides four programmable digital
inputs terminals, two additional digital terminals programmable as either input or output, a 24V DC terminal supply voltage, and a common for optional
customer supplied 24V DC voltage.
• Connector 2 terminals (+)68 and (-)69 are for an RS485 serial communications connection.
• Connector 3 provides two analog inputs, one analog
output, 10V DC supply voltage, and commons for the
inputs and output.
• Connector 4 is a USB port available for use with the
MCT-10 Set-up Software.
• Also provided are two Form C relay outputs that are
in various locations depending upon the adjustable
frequency drive configuration and size.
Wiring to Control Terminals
Control terminal connectors can be unplugged from the
adjustable frequency drive for ease of installation, as
shown in Figure 8-15.
© 2015 Taco, Inc.
Using Shielded Control Cables
Correct Shielding
The preferred method in most cases is to secure control
and serial communication cables with shielding clamps
provided at both ends to ensure best possible high frequency cable contact.
15
50/60 Hz ground loops
With very long control cables, ground loops may occur.
To eliminate ground loops, connect one end of the
shield-toground with a 100 nF capacitor (keeping leads
short).
Avoid EMC noise on serial communication
To eliminate low-frequency noise between adjustable frequency drives, connect one end of the shield to terminal
61.
1. This terminal is connected to ground via an inter
RC link. Use twisted-pair cables to reduce interference
between conductors.
Control Terminal Functions
Adjustable frequency drive functions are commanded by
receiving control input signals.
• When factory installed optional equipment is wired to
terminal 27, do not remove that wiring.
Terminal 53 and 54 Switches
• Analog input terminals 53 and 54 can select either
voltage (0 to 10V) or current (0/4–20mA) input signals
• Remove power to the adjustable frequency drive
before changing switch positions.
• Set switches A53 and A54 to select the signal type. U
selects voltage, and I selects current.
• The switches are accessible when the LCP has been
removed (see Figure 8-17). Note that some option
cards available for the unit may cover these switches
and must be removed to change switch settings.
Always remove power to the unit before removing
option cards.
• Terminal 53 default is for a speed reference signal in
open-loop set in 16-61 Terminal 53 Switch Setting
• Terminal 54 default is for a feedback signal in closedloop set in 16-63 Terminal 54 Switch Setting
Figure 8-17: Location of Terminals 53 and 54
Switches
• Each terminal must be programmed for the function
it will be supporting in the parameters associated
with that terminal.
• It is important to confirm that the control terminal is
programmed for the correct function. See “9 User
Interface” on page 26 for details on accessing
parameters.
• The default terminal programming is intended to initiate adjustable frequency drive functioning in a
typical operational mode.
Jumper Terminals 12 and 27
A jumper wire may be required between terminal 12 (or
13)
3) and terminal 27 for the adjustable frequency drive
operate when using factory default programming values.
• Digital input terminal 27 is designed to receive an
24VDC external interlock command. In many applications, the user wires an external interlock device to
terminal 27.
• When no interlock device is used, wire a jumper
between control terminal 12 (recommended) or 13 to
terminal 27. This provides an internal 24 V signal on
terminal 27.
• No signal present prevents the unit from operating.
• When the status line at the bottom of the LCP reads
“AUTO REMOTE COASTING” or “Alarm 60 External
Interlock” is displayed, this indicates that the unit is
ready to operate but is missing an input signal on terminal 27.
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16
8.4 Typical Terminal Wiring Configurations
The unit connection blocks are shown in “Figure 8-15 Control Terminal Locations” on page 14.
Table 2: Control Terminal Information
Terminal
number
Parameter
setting
Relay Outputs
01, 02, 03 5-40 Relay 1
[160] No Alarm
Connector 1
04, 05, 06 5-40 Relay 2
12, 13
-
[5] Running
+24 V DC
18
5-10
[8] Start
19
27
29
32
33
20
61
5-11
5-12
5-13
5-14
5-15
-
[0] No Operation
[0] No Operation
Jog
[0] No Operation
68
69
39
42
8-3
8-3
6-5
50
53
54
55
6-1
6-2
-
Connector 2
Connector 3
Description
Form C Relay Output. Used for AC or DC voltages and either
resistive or inductive loads. see the following section on relay
wiring for contact current and voltage ratings.
24 V DC supply voltage. Maximum output current is 200 mA
total for all 24 V loads. Intended for digital inputs, external
transducers.
Start/Stop digital input signal for the drive. Connect input to 24
V to start. Open the input to stop the drive.
Digital input (not used)
Digital input (not used)
Jog
Digital input (not used)
[23] Set-up Select Bit 0 Digital input (not used)
Common
Common for digital inputs and reference for 24 V supply
Shield Connection
Integrated RC filter for cable shield. ONLY for connecting the
shield when experiencing EMC problems.
+
RS485 Interface (+)
RS485 Interface (-)
AO Common
Common for analog output
4-20mA Motor
Analog output. Default setting is 4-20mA signal (500 ohms
Freq
maximum) based on motor speed.
+10 V DC
10 V DC analog supply voltage. 15mA max.
[0] No Operation
Analog input 53.
[0] No Operation
Analog input 54.
AI Common
Common for analog input.
Figure 8-19: Control Terminal Connectors 1-4 and Relay Output Locations
Drive 1 Relay. Relay
1 is on the right in
this view.
Relay 2.
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8.4.1 Factory default set-up
This configuration makes use of the controller factory default settings for input/output. The factory default settings are
configured for Set-up 1, SelfSensing system curve control without an external transducer. No parameters need to be
changed to use this configuration. Set-up 3, SelfSensing constant flow control, uses the same default settings.
Set-ups can be changed by modifying the parameter 0-10 Active Set-up.
NOTE: The factory default settings require a start signal wired to DI18 (see below).
Comm Port
61
68
SHLD +
69
-
I/O Analog
39
42
50
53
COM AOUT +10V A IN
I/O Digital
54
A IN
55
12
13
18
19
27
29
32
33
20
COM +24V +24V D IN D IN D IN D IN D IN D IN COM
Starting/Stopping
Controller
[5-10]
[8] Start*
Start: Closed
* factory defaul
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8.4.2 Relay Outputs
As shown above, each unit has two form C programmable relay outputs. The relay terminals can be found on the controller in various locations according to the frame size.
Figure 8-20: Wiring the Relay Terminals
Relay 1
01 02
Relay 2
03
04 05
COM NO NC
COM NO NC
Unit Receiving
Output from
Relay 1
[5-40.0]
[160] No Alarm*
No Alarm: Comm=NO
Alarm: Comm = NC
06
COM NO NC
COM NO NC
Unit Receiving
Output from
Relay 2
[5-40.1]
[5] Running*
Running: Comm=NO
Off: Comm = NC
* Factory Default Setting
Table 3: Relay Terminal Specifications
Programmable relay outputs
Relay 01 Terminal number
Maximum terminal load (AC-1) on 1–3 (NC), 1–2 (NO) (Resistive load)
Maximum terminal load (AC-15) (Inductive load @ cosI 0.4)
Maximum terminal load (DC-1) on 1–2 (NO), 1–3 (NC) (Resistive load)
Maximum terminal load (DC-13) (Inductive load)
Relay 02 Terminal number
Maximum terminal load (AC-2) on 4–5 (NO) (resistive load)
Maximum terminal load (AC-15) (Inductive load @ cosI 0.4)
Maximum terminal load (DC-1) on 4–5 (NO) (Resistive load)
Maximum terminal load (DC-13) on 4–5 (NO) (Inductive load)
Maximum terminal load (AC-1) on 4–6 (NC) (Resistive load)
Maximum terminal load (AC-15) on 4–6 (NC) (Inductive load @ cosI 0.4)
Maximum terminal load (DC-1) on 4–6 (NC) (Resistive load)
Maximum terminal load (DC-13) on 4–6 (NC) (Inductive load)
Minimum terminal load on 1–3 (NC), 1–2 (NO), 4–6 (NC), 4–5 (NO)
Environment according to EN 60664–1
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
2
1–3 (break), 1–2 (make)
240 V AC, 2A
240 V AC, 0.2A
60 V DC, 1A
24 V DC, 0.1A
4–6 (break), 4–5 (make)
400 V AC, 2A
240 V AC, 0.2A
80 V DC, 2A
24 V DC, 0.1A
240 V AC, 2A
240 V AC, 0.2A
50 V DC, 2A
24 V DC, 0.1A
24 V DC 10mA, 24 V AC 20mA
overvoltage category III/pollution degree 2
19
8.4.3 Adding Transducer Input
This configuration adds a transducer for closed loop control or external monitoring. Use Set-up 4 for pressure control
(Delta P) using a wired pressure transducer.
NOTE: Analog input configuration switches must be set before using the analog input, as shown in
Figure 8-21.
Figure 8-21: Terminal Wiring for 4–20mA Sensor Sensor
I/O Analog
39
42
50
53
COM AOUT +10V A IN
COM
AI
Unit Receiving
Analog Output
(Optional)
[6-50]
[137] Speed*
4-20 mA
* factory defaul
I/O Digital
54
A IN
55
12
13
18
19
27
29
32
33
20
COM +24V +24V D IN D IN D IN D IN D IN D IN COM
AO
+24V
4-20 mA
Transducer
[Group 6-]
[Group20-]
(See Table)
Set A54=I
Starting/Stopping
Controller
[5-10]
[8] Start*
Start: Closed
* factory defaul
Figure 8-21: Location of Terminals 53 and 54 Switches
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
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The following wiring scheme is used with Set-up 4 as shown in “10.1 SelfSensing Description” on page 31
Figure 8-22: Terminal Wiring for 0–10V Sensor
I/O Analog
39
42
50
53
COM AOUT +10V A IN
COM
AI
Unit Receiving
Analog Output
(Optional)
[6-50]
[137] Speed*
4-20 mA
* factory defaul
I/O Digital
54
A IN
55
12
13
18
19
27
29
32
33
20
COM +24V +24V D IN D IN D IN D IN D IN D IN COM
AO
+24V
0-10V
Transducer
[Group 6-]
[Group20-]
(See Table)
Set A54=U
Starting/Stopping
Controller
[5-10]
[8] Start*
Start: Closed
* factory defaul
To configure the controller for closed loop control based on the input from an external transducer, use the following
parameters:
Table 4: Settings for a Wired Sensor for Input
Parameter
number
0–10
6-24*
6-25*
6-27*
20-00
20-12
20–13
0–13
20–14
0–14
Description
esc
to
Active Set-up
For wired pressure transducer, choose Set-up 4.
Terminal 54 Low Ref./Feedb. Minimum transducer input value. For example, for a 0–100 PSI transducer, set to
Value
0.. For live 0 function set feedback to 1V or 10 PSI Note: Live 0 does not work if
minimum is set to 0.
Terminal 54 High Ref./Feedb. Maximum transducer input value. For example, for a 0–100 PSI transducer, set to
Value
100.
Terminal 54 Live Zero
Enabled
Feedback 1 Source
Analog Input 54*
Reference/Feedback
Set as appropriate for application. For example, set to PSI when using a pressure
transducer. The default value for this setting is PSI.
Min
Reference/FeedMinimum transducer input value. For example, for a 0–100 PSI transducer, set to
back
0 PSI.
Max
Reference/Feed- Maximum transducer input value. For example, for a 100 PSI transducer, set to
back
100 PSI.
* To use AI 53, set parameters 6–14, 6–15, 6–17 and set 20–00 to “Analog Input 53.
To set up the controller with a transducer that is intended for external monitoring, as opposed to feedback to the controller, set the following parameters:
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
21
Table 5: Settings for a Wired Sensor for External Monitoring
Parameter
number
Description
esc
0-24
21-14
21–10
Display Line 3 Large
Ext. 1 Feedback Source
Ext. 1 Ref./Feedback Unit
21–11
Ext. 1 Minimum Reference
21–12
Ext. 1 Maximum Reference
6–24*
Terminal 54 Low Ref./Feedb. Value
6–25*
Terminal 54 High Ref./Feedb. Value
6–27*
Terminal 54 Live Zero
to
Ext. 1 Feedback [Unit]
Analog Input 54*
Select as appropriate for application. For example, set to PSI when using a
pressure transducer.
Minimum transducer input value. For example, for a 0–60 PSI transducer,
set to 0 PSI.
Maximum transducer input value. For example, for a 60 PSI transducer,
set to 60 PSI.
Minimum transducer input value. For example, for a 0–60 PSI transducer,
set to 0 PSI.
Maximum transducer input value. For example, for a 60 PSI transducer,
set to 60 PSI.
Disabled
* To use AI 53, set parameters 6–14, 6–15, 6–17 and set 20-00 to “Analog Input 53.
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
22
8.4.4 Speed control with external potentiometer
This configuration allows an external potentiometer to control the speed of the motor.To use this set-up, the analog
input must be configured as a voltage input.
The following wiring scheme is used with Set-up 2 as shown in “10.1 SelfSensing Description” on page 31.
Figure 8-23: Terminal Wiring for Potentiometer used as External Speed Reference
I/O Analog
39
42
50
53
COM AOUT +10V A IN
COM
AI
Unit Receiving
Analog Output
(Optional)
[6-50]
[137] Speed*
4-20 mA
* factory defaul
I/O Digital
54
A IN
55
12
13
18
19
27
29
32
33
20
COM +24V +24V D IN D IN D IN D IN D IN D IN COM
+10V AI53 COM
Speed Control
Potentiometer
Starting/Stopping
Controller
[5-10]
[1-00] [0] Open Loop [8] Start*
[3-15] [1] AI54
Start: Closed
Group 6* factory defaul
Group 20(See Table)
Set A54=U
To set up the controller for speed control with an external potentiometer, set the following parameters:
Parameter
number
1-00
3-15
6-20
6-21
6-24
6-25
6-27
20-00
Description
esc
Configuration Mode
Reference 1 Source
Terminal 54 Low Voltage*
Terminal 54 High Voltage*
Terminal 54 Low Ref./Feedb. Value
Terminal 54 High Ref./Feedb. Value
Terminal 54 Live Zero
Feedback 1 Source
to
Open Loop
Analog Input 54
0V
10 V
0
Maximum motor speed. For example, 2950 Hz.
Disabled.
No Function
* Set switch A54 = U
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
23
8.4.5 Control from external PLC/BMS through Analog Input
This set-up allows an external control source such as a PLC or BMS controller to provide: a) the process variable, b)
the setpoint or c) a speed reference. The output from the external control device can be either a voltage or current signal. The analog input configuration switches must be set to the correct type of output signal. The drawing below shows
the connections for this configuration.
This wiring scheme is used with Set-up 2, as shown in “10.1 SelfSensing Description” on page 31.
Figure 8-24: Terminal Wiring for External Control Source
I/O Analog
39
42
50
53
COM AOUT +10V A IN
COM
AI
Unit Receiving
Analog Output
[6-50]
[137] Speed*
4-20 mA
* factory defaul
I/O Digital
54
A IN
55
12
13
18
19
27
29
32
33
20
COM +24V +24V D IN D IN D IN D IN D IN D IN COM
AO
COM
PLC or BMS
Control Signal
[Group 6-]
[Group20-]
(See Table)
Set A54=U for 0-10V
Set A54=I for 4-20mA
Starting/Stopping
Controller
[5-10]
[8] Start*
Start: Closed
* factory defaul
Table 6: Parameter Configuration for Use of an External Control Signal
Parameter
Number
1-00
3-15
6-24
6-25
6-27
20-00
20-12
0-12
20-14
Parameter
Description
For process variable from
BMS/PLC*
For setpoint from BMS/ PLC**
Configuration Mode
Reference 1 Source
Terminal 54 Low Ref./
Feedb. Value
Closed Loop
No Function
Minimum value of process variable. For example, for a 0-60PSI
transducer, set to 0.
Terminal 54 High
Maximum value of process variRef./Feedb. Value
able. For example, for a 60PSI
transducer, set to 60.
Terminal 54 Live Zero Enabled
Feedback 1 Source Analog Input 54
Closed Loop
Analog Input 54*
Minimum reference/setpoint
value. For example, for a 060PSI DP transducer, set to 0.
Maximum reference/setpoint
value. For example, for a 60PSI
DP transducer, set to 60.
Enabled
Select as appropriate for application. This can be any selection
except the setting of parameter
3-15.
Reference/Feed
Select as appropriate for appli- Select as appropriate for applicaUnit
cation. For example, set to PSI tion. For example, set to PSI
when using pressure feedback. when using pressure reference.
Maximum Reference/ Maximum transducer feedback Maximum reference/setpoint
Feedback
value. For example, for a 60PSI value. For example, for a 60PSI
transducer, set to 60 PSI.
transducer, set to 60 PSI.
For speed reference
from BMS/PLC***
Open Loop
Analog Input 54*
Minimum motor speed.
For example, 0 RPM.
Maximum motor speed.
For example, 2950
RPM.
Disabled
No Function
NA
NA
* To use AI 53, configure parameters 6-14, 6-15, 6-17 and set 20-00 to Analog Input 5
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
24
8.4.6 Control From External PLC/BMS Using Communications Port
The controller can be controlled from a BMS or PLC through the communications port. In this configuration, the BMS or
PLC overrides the setpoint to control the drive. Control cables must be braided screened/shielded and the screen must
be connected to the metal cabinet of the controller using two cable clamps (one at each end). The bus connections
must be terminated by turning the BUS TER switch to the on position. This switch can be found under the LCP, when
the LCP is detached.
This wiring scheme is used with Set-up 2, as shown in “10.1 SelfSensing Description” on page 31.
Figure 8-25: Terminal Connections for External Control via Communications Port
Comm Port
61
68
SHLD +
SHLD
69
-
+
-
RS485
Controller
[8-**] Config params
Table 7: Parameter settings for Modbus RTU and BACnet protocols
Parameter Number
8-02
8-30
-30
8-31
-31
8-32
-32
8-33
8-34
8-35
8-36
8-37
Parameter Description
Control Source
Prot
Add
Rate
Parity/Stop bit
Estimated cycle time
Minimum Response Delay
Maximum Response Delay
Maximum Inter-Char Delay
Protocol
Modbus RTU
FC Port
Modbus RTU
1
19200
Even Parity, 1 Stop bit
0 ms
10 ms
5000 ms
0.86 ms
BACnet
FC Port
BACnet
1
9600
No Parity, 1 Stop bit
0 ms
10 ms
5000 ms
25 ms
The parameters above show a typical scenario used for Modbus RTU or BACnet protocols. The parameters must be
set as appropriate for the devices on the network. 8-32 Baud Rate and 8-33 Parity/Stop Bit should be set to match the
other devices on the network. For specific communication set-up information for Modbus RTU, refer to the document
number MG92B102. For specific communication set-up information for BACnet, see documents MG14C102 and
MG11D202. These documents can be downloaded from www.danfoss.com.
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
25
b.Display menu keys for changing the display to
show status options, programming, or error message history.
c. Navigation keys for programming functions, moving the display cursor, and speed control in local
operation. Also included are the status indicators.
d.Operational mode keys and reset.
9 USER INTERFACE
9.1 Local Control Panel
The local control panel (LCP) is the combined display
and keypad on the front of the unit. The LCP is the user
interface to the adjustable frequency drive.
The LCP has several user functions.
• Start, stop, and control speed when in local control
• Display operational data, status, warnings and cautions
• Programming adjustable frequency drive functions
• Manually reset the adjustable frequency drive after a
fault when auto-reset is inactive
LCP Layout
The LCP is divided into four functional groups (see
Figure 9-1).
Figure 9-1: LCP
Setting LCP Display Values
The display area is activated when the adjustable frequency drive receives power from AC line voltage, a DC
bus terminal, or an external 24V supply.
The information displayed on the LCP can be customized
for user application.
• Each display readout has a parameter associated
with it.
• Options are selected in the quick menu Q3-13 Display Settings.
• Display 2 has an alternate larger display option.
• The adjustable frequency drive status at the bottom
line of the display is generated automatically and is
not selectable.
Display
A
B
1.1
.1
1.2
.2
1.3
.3
2
Parameter
number
00
00-23
Default setting
Head
Motor Horsepower
Motor Hz
GPM
Figure 9-2: Status Display
1.1
1.2
C
2
1.3
D
Display Menu Keys
Menu keys are used for menu access for parameter setup, toggling through status display modes during normal
operation, and viewing fault log data.
a.Display area
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
26
Key
Figure 9-3: Navigation Keys
Function
Status
Press to show operational information.
• In Auto mode, press and hold to toggle betwee
status readout displays.
• Press repeatedly to scroll through each status
display.
• Press and hold [Status] plus [ ] or [ ] to adjust
the display brightness.
• The symbol in the upper right corner of the dis
play shows the direction of motor rotation and
which set-up is active. This is not programmable.
Quick
Allows access to programming parameters for iniMenu
tial set-up instructions and many detailed application instructions.
• Press to access Q2 Quick Set-up for sequenced
instructions to program the basic adjustable frequency drive set-up.
• Press to access Q3 Function Set-ups for
sequenced instructions to program applications
• Follow the sequence of parameters as pre
sented for the function set-up.
Main Menu Allows access to all programming parameters.
• Press twice to access top level index
• Press once to return to the last location
accessed.
• Press and hold to enter a parameter number for
direct access to that parameter.
Alarm Log Displays a list of current warnings, the last 10
alarms, and the maintenance log.
• For details about the adjustable frequency drive
before it entered the alarm mode, select the alarm
number using the navigation keys and press [OK].
Navigation Keys
Navigation keys are used for programming functions and
moving the display cursor. The navigation keys also provide speed control in local (hand) operation. Three
adjustable frequency drive status indicators are also
located in this area.
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
Key
ey
Back
Cancel
Info
Navigation
Keys
OK
Light
Light
Funct
Reverts to the previous step or list in the menu
structure.
Cancels the last change or command as long as
the display mode has not changed.
Press for a de!nition of the function being displayed.
Use the four navigation arrows to move
between items in the menu.
Use to access parameter groups or to enable a
choice.
Indic
Green
ON
Yellow
WARN
Red
ALARM
Function
The ON light activates when the
adjustable frequency drive receives
power from AC line voltage, a DC bus
terminal, or an external 24 V supply.
When warning conditions are met, the
yellow WARN light comes on and text
appears in the display area identifying
the problem.
A fault condition causes the red alarm
light to flash and an alarm text is displayed.
27
Operation Keys
Operation keys are found at the bottom of the control
panel.
Figure 9-4: Operation Keys
Key
ey
Hand On
Off
Auto On
Reset
Funct
Press to start the adjustable frequency drive in
local control.
• Use the navigation keys to control adjustable
frequency drive speed.
• An external stop signal by control input on
serial communication overrides the local hand
on.
Stops the motor but does not remove power to
the adjustable frequency drive.
Puts the system in remote operational mode.
• Responds to an external start command
bycontrol terminals or serial communication
• Speed reference is from an external source
Resets the adjustable frequency drive manually
after a fault has been cleared.
9.2 Backup and Copying Parameter
Settings
Programming data is stored internally in the adjustable
frequency drive.
• The data can be uploaded into the LCP memory as a
storage backup.
• Once stored in the LCP, the data can be downloaded
back into the adjustable frequency drive.
• Initialization of the adjustable frequency drive to
restore factory default settings does not change data
stored in the LCP memory.
DANGER: UNINTENDED START! When
adjustable frequency drive is connected to
AC line power, the motor may start at any
time. The adjustable frequency drive, motor,
and any driven equipment must be in operational readiness. Failure to be in operational
readiness when the adjustable frequency
drive is connected to AC line power could
result in death, serious injury, equipment, or
property damage.
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
Uploading Data to the LCP
1.Press [OFF] to stop the motor before uploading or
downloading data.
2.Go to 0-50 LCP Copy.
3.Press [OK].
4.Select All to LCP.
5.Press [OK]. A progress bar shows the uploading
process.
6.Press [Hand On] or [Auto On] to return to normal
operation.
Downloading Data from the LCP
1.Press [OFF] to stop the motor before uploading or
downloading data.
2.Go to 0-50 LCP Copy.
3.Press [OK].
4.Select All from LCP.
5.Press [OK]. A progress bar shows the downloading
process.
6.Press [Hand On] or [Auto On] to return to normal
operation.
Restoring Default Settings
CAUTION: Initialization restores the unit to
factory default settings. Any programming,
motor data, localization, and monitoring
records will be lost. Uploading data to the
LCP provides a backup prior to initialization.
Restoring the adjustable frequency drive parameter settings back to default values is done by initialization of the
adjustable frequency drive. Initialization can be through
14-22 Operation Mode or manually.
• Initialization using 14-22 Operation Mode does not
change adjustable frequency drive data such as
operating hours, serial communication selections,
personal menu settings, fault log, alarm log, and
other monitoring functions.
• Using 14-22 Operation Mode is generally recommended.
• Manual initialization erases all motor, programming,
localization, and monitoring data and restores
factory default settings.
Recommended Initialization
1.Press [Main Menu] twice to access parameters.
2.Scroll to 14-22 Operation Mode.
3.Press [OK].
4.Scroll to Initialization.
5.Press [OK].
6.Remove power to the unit and wait for the display
to turn off.
7.Apply power to the unit. Default parameter settings
are restored during start-up. This may take slightly
longer than normal.
Press
[Reset] to return to operation mode.
8.
28
Manual Initialization
1.Remove power to the unit and wait for the display
to turn off.
2.Press and hold [Status], [Main Menu], and [OK] at
the same time and apply power to the unit.
Factory default parameter settings are restored during
start-up. This may take slightly longer than normal.
5.Scroll down
to parameter 0-61 Access to
Main Menu w/o Password.
Manual initialization does not reset the following adjustable frequency drive information:
•
•
•
•
15-00 Operating Hours
15-03 Power-ups
15-04 Over Temps
15-05 Over Volts
6.Press [OK].
7.Change parameter 0-61 to “[2] LCP: No Access.”
9.3 Password Protection
9.3.1 Enable Password Protection for
Main Menu
1.Press [Main Menu].
8.Press [OK].
2.Select 0-** Operation / Display by pressing [OK].
The Main Menu is now password protected. The default
password is 100.
9.3.2 Disable Main Menu Password
1.Follow steps 1-6 in section 9.3.1 above.
2.Change parameter 0-61 to “[0] Full Access.”
3.Scroll Down
to parameter 0-6* Password.
3.Press [OK].
4.Press [OK].
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
The Main Menu Password is now disabled.
29
9.3.6 Change Password for Personal
Menu
1.Follow steps 1-4 in in section 9.3.4 above.
2. Scroll down
to parameter 0-65 Personal
Menu Password.
3.Press [OK].
4.Adjust/Edit the password using the arrow keys.
5.Press [OK].
The Personal Menu Pasword is now changed.
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
30
10 PUMP CONTROL SET-UPS
2.View the display to confirm the current set-up.
10.1 SelfSensing Description
The Taco SelfSensing pump is a Taco pump equipped
with a variable frequency drive (VFD) with SelfSensing
control technology. SelfSensing control is an innovative
concept in circulating pumps. Pump performance and
characteristic curves are embedded in the memory of
the speed controller during manufacture. This data
includes power, speed, head and flow across the flow
range of the pump. During operation, the power and
speed of the pump are monitored, enabling the controller
to establish the hydraulic performance and position in
the pumps head-flow characteristic.
These measurements enable the pump to continuously
identify the head and flow at any point in time, giving
accurate pressure control without the need for external
feedback signals. Patented software technology within
the controller ensures trouble-free operation in all conditions.
3.Press the [Quick Menus] button.
4.Press the [OK] button to enter “My Personal
Menu.”
5. Scroll down
and press OK.
to Parameter 0-10 Active Set-up
Incorporating the pump’s hydraulic data into the controller and removing sensors results in true integration of all
components and removes the risk of sensor failure.
6.Change Active Set-up from “Set-up 1” to “Set-up 3”
and press OK.
10.2 Set-up Menu
The controller has 4 different system set-ups:
Set-up
Description
Set-up 1 SelfSensing Variable Flow
Control
Instructions
Section 10.3 (Wiring:
Section 8.4.2)
Set-up 2 Standby / BAS System Input Section 8.4.5
Set-up 3 SelfSensing Constant Flow
Control
a.Parameter 0-10 Active Set-up.
Before
Section 10.4 (Wiring:
Section 8.4.2)
Set-up 4 Delta P Control, 0-10V Input Section 8.4.3
(Wire Pressure Transducer)
After
10.2.1 Set-up Change Procedure
To change the set-up, follow the steps below.
1.If the pump is enabled, press the [Off] button and
ensure the motor has stopped.
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
b.You will know the change has happened when
you see
change to
.
31
10.3 Variable Flow Control (Flow
Compensation)
Under Variable Flow Control (otherwise known as Flow
Compensation mode), the controller is set to control the
pump speed according to a ‘control curve’ between max
and min flow (see Figure 10-1 below). This mode should
be used for system distribution pumps. It is widely recognised that fitting a differential pressure sensor at the
most remote load, across the supply piping and return
piping encompassing the valve & coil set, is the
benchmark scheme for energy efficiency.
Figure 10-1: Variable Flow Graph
The pump will be supplied with point ‘A’ set as the
design duty point provided at the time of order and the
minimum head at zero flow (Control Head) will be set as
40% of the design head ‘HDESIGN’ as the default.
To change the control curve from the factory settings,
fol-low the startup procedures in “Section 11: On-site
Drive Mounting” on page 34.
10.4 Constant Flow Control
SelfSensing pumps can be configured to maintain a constant pump flow in a system. This control setting is ideal
for primary systems such as boiler or chiller loops that
require a constant flow.
10.4.1 For Central Plant, Constant Flow
Boiler/Chiller
Control
Head
SelfSensing pumps can replicate this control without
the need for the remote sensor. As the flow required by
the system is reduced, the pump automatically reduces
the head developed according to the pre-set control
curve. In other words, the pump follows the control
curve.
It is often found that using a remote differential
pressure sensor to sense the pressure across a remote
load could theoretically result in loads close to the pump
being under-pumped. The situation would be where the
load at a loop extremity is satisfied and the control valve
closes while a load close to the pump needs full flow.
The probability of this occuring is remote but it is
possible. One answer to this is to move the sensor
closer to the pump (two-thirds out in the system is a
popular recommendation) although physically repositioning the sensor at a commissioning stage can be
a costly exercise. With Self-Sensing pump control it is
possible to replicate the moving of a sensor by
increasing the Control Head setting.
The design duty head and flow of the pump (provided
at time of order) is shown as point ‘A’ in Figure 10-1
below.
It is not always the case that the design duty point
required will fall on the maximum speed of the pump and
in the majority of cases (as shown in Figure 10-1 above)
it will be at a reduced speed.
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
If this pump was ordered for a central plant constant flow
boiler/chiller, you do not need to go through the
balancing procedures below. Ensure the drive is already
in Set-up 3 (SelfSensing Constant Flow Mode) and is
therefore already self-balancing.
Figure 10-2: Constant Flow Graph
10.4.2 Settings for Constant Flow Control
To set the pump to constant flow mode and adjust the
flow rate, follow steps 1-12 in section 13.3.1.
32
10.5 Constant Pressure Control
SelfSensing pumps can be configured to maintain a constant pump head in a system as the demand varies. This
effectively simulates the mounting of a differential pressure sensor at, or near, the pump.
For external sequencer wiring instructions, see “8.4.5
Control from external PLC/BMS through Analog Input”
on page 24.
Figure 10-3: Constant Pressure Graph
10.5.1 Settings for Constant Pressure
Control
To revert to this mode of control simply follow these
steps:
1.. Set the design head, HDESIGN, value in par. 20-21 (Setpoint 1) in the units set in par. 20-12 (Reference/Feedback Unit).
2.. Turn off flow compensation by setting par. 22-80
‘Disabled’ [0].
10.6 Sequencing (Standby Pump
Alternation)
10.6.1 Onboard Pump Sequencer
The SelfSensing pump is equipped with a built-in pump
sequencer. The sequencer alternates 2 pumps back and
forth according to a time interval. The factory default is 24
hours. The maximum value is 99 hours. If the duty pump
has a fault or failure, the duty pump stops and the waiting
pump automatically starts.
For detailed connections and settings for the pump’s
onboard pump sequencer see “Appendix A: Set-Up for
Standby Pump Alternation” on page 77.
10.6.2 External Pump Sequencers
The SelfSensing pump can be sequenced with external
pump sequencers.
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
33
11 ON-SITE DRIVE MOUNTING
Follow the steps below for on-site drive mounting to wall
11.1 Match Pump and Drive Tags
IMPORTANT: Ensure the pump tag matches
the VFD tag. The pump and drive will have
identical tags as shown below.
Figure 11-1: Example Tag
11.2 Mechanical Connections
For mechanical connections to wall, see section 7.4.
11.3 Electric Code Compliance
Installation must be in compliance with national and local
electric codes.
For electrical connections see Section “8 Electrical Connections” on page 7.
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
11.4 Before Start Safety Inspection
DANGER: HIGH VOLTAGE! If input and output connections have been connected
improperly, there is potential for high voltage
on these terminals. If power leads for multiple motors are improperly run in same conduit, there is potential for leakage current to
charge capacitors within the frequency converter, even when disconnected from mains
input. For initial start up, make no assumptions about power components. Follow prestart procedures. Failure to follow pre-start
procedures could result in personal injury or
damage to equipment.
1.Input power to the unit must be OFF and locked
out. Do not rely on the frequency converter disconnect switches for input power isolation.
2.Verify that there is no voltage on input terminals L1
(91), L2 (92), and L3 (93), phase-to-phase and
phase-to-ground.
3.Verify that there is no voltage on output terminals
96 (U), 97 (V), and 98 (W), phase-to-phase and
phase-to-ground.
4.Confirm continuity of the motor by measuring ohm
values on U-V (96-97), V-W (97-98), and W-U (9896).
5.Check for proper grounding of the frequency converter as well as the motor.
6.Inspect the frequency converter for loose connections on terminals.
7.Record the following motor-nameplate data: power,
voltage, frequency, full load current, and nominal
speed. These values are needed to program motor
nameplate data later.
8.Confirm that the supply voltage matches voltage of
frequency converter and motor.
CAUTION: Before applying power to the
unit, inspect the entire installation as
detailed in Table 8 on page 35. Check
mark those items when completed.
34
Table 8: Inspection Checklist
Inspect for
Auxiliary equipment
Cable routing
Control wiring
Cooling clearance
EMC considerations
Environmental considerations
Fusing and circuit breakers
(grounding)
Input and output power wiring
Panel interior
Switches
Vibration
Description
Check?
– Look for auxiliary equipment, switches, disconnects, or input fuses/circuit breakers that may reside on the input power side of the frequency
converter or output side to the motor. Ensure that they are ready for full
speed operation.
– Check function and installation of any sensors used for feedback to the
frequency converter.
– Remove power factor correction caps on motor(s), if present.
– Ensure that input power, motor wiring, and control wiring are separated
or in three separate metallic conduits for high frequency noise isolation.
– Check for broken or damaged wires and loose connections.
– Check that control wiring is isolated from power and motor wiring for
noise immunity.
– Check the voltage source of the signals, if necessary.
– The use of shielded cable or twisted pair is recommended. Ensure that
the shield is terminated correctly.
– Measure that top and bottom clearance is adequate to ensure proper air
flow for cooling.
– Check for proper installation regarding electromagnetic compatibility.
– See equipment label for the maximum ambient operating temperature
limits.
– Humidity levels must be 5-95% non-condensing.
– Check for proper fusing or circuit breakers.
– Check that all fuses are inserted firmly and in operational condition and
that all circuit breakers are in the open position.
– The unit requires an earth wire(ground wire) from its chassis to the building earth (ground).
– Check for good earth connections(ground connections) that are tight
and free of oxidation.
– Earthing (Grounding) to conduit or mounting the back panel to a metal
surface is not a suitable earth (ground).
– Check for loose connections.
– Check that motor and mains are in separate conduit or separated
screened cables.
– Inspect that the unit interior is free of dirt, metal chips, moisture, and corrosion.
– Ensure that all switch and disconnect settings are in the proper positions.
– Check that the unit is mounted solidly or that shock mounts are used, as
necessary.
– Check for an unusual amount of vibration.
11.5 Applying Power to the Frequency Converter
DANGER: HIGH VOLTAGE! Frequency converters contain high voltage when connected to AC mains.
Installation, start-up and maintenance should be performed by qualified personnel only. Failure to comply
could result in death or serious injury.
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
35
WARNING: UNINTENDED START! When
the frequency converter is connected to AC
mains, the motor may start at any time. The
frequency converter, motor, and any driven
equipment must be in operational readiness.
Failure to comply could result in death, serious injury, equipment, or property damage.
1.Confirm the input voltage is balanced within 3%. If
not, correct input voltage imbalance before proceeding. Repeat this procedure after the voltage
correction.
2.Ensure that optional equipment wiring, if present,
matches the installation application.
3.Ensure that all operator devices are in the OFF
position. Panel doors should be closed or cover
mounted.
4.Apply power to the unit. DO NOT start the frequency converter at this time. For units with a disconnect switch, turn to the ON position to apply
power to the frequency converter.
NOTE: If the status line at the bottom of the LCP reads
“AUTO REMOTE COASTING” or “Alarm 60 External
Interlock” is displayed, this indicates that the unit is
ready to operate but is missing an input signal on
terminal 27.
11.6 Run Automatic Motor Adaptation
Automatic motor adaptation (AMA) is a test procedure
that measures the electrical characteristics of the motor
to optimize compatibility between the frequency converter and the motor.
• The frequency converter builds a mathematical
model of the motor for regulating output motor current. The procedure also tests the input phase balance of electrical power. It compares the motor
characteristics with the data entered in parameters 120 to 1-25.
• It does not cause the motor to run or harm to the
motor. Some motors may be unable to run the complete version of the test. In that case, select Enable
reduced AMA.
• If an output filter is connected to the motor, select
Enable reduced AMA.
• Run this procedure on a cold motor for best results.
To run AMA:
1.Press [Main Menu] to access parameters.
2.Scroll to parameter group 1-** Load and Motor.
3.Press [OK].
4.Scroll to parameter group 1-2* Motor Data.
5.Press [OK].
6.Scroll to 1-29 Automatic Motor Adaptation (AMA).
7.Press [OK].
8.Select Enable complete AMA.
9.Press [OK].
10.Follow on-screen instructions.
11.The test runs automatically and indicates when it
is complete.
11.7 Increase Warning Current Limit
Increase warning current limit in parameter 4-51
Warning Current High to the current specified on motor
name-plate.
11.8 Check Motor Rotation
Before running the frequency converter, check the motor
rotation. The motor will run briefly at 5Hz or the minimum
frequency set in 4-12 Motor Speed Low Limit [Hz].
1.Press [Quick Menu].
2.Scroll to Q2 Quick Set-up.
3.Press [OK].
4.Scroll to 1-28 Motor Rotation Check.
5.Press [OK].
6.Scroll to Enable.
7.The following text appears: “Note! Motor may run in
wrong direction.”
8.Press [OK].
9.Follow the on-screen instructions.
To change the direction of rotation, remove power to the
frequency converter and wait for power to discharge.
Reverse the connection of any two of the three motor
cables on the motor or frequency converter side of the
connection.
NOTE: The AMA algorithm does not work
when using PM motors.
NOTE: AMA has already been completed by
Taco on all pump-mounted VFDs. You will
only need to run AMA if the wire/motor lead
is different from the one supplied by Taco.
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
36
12 START-UP PROCEDURE
12.1 Check Points Before First Start
Verify that motor is correctly wired for voltage available.
Verify that the pump has been primed. The pump should
never be run dry.
NOTE: Extra effort may be required to get
the air out of the seal chamber.
WARNING: Make sure power supply to
pump motor is locked out before touching
motor shaft.
Verify that all rotating parts turn freely.
The pump should be stopped if any of the following
occur:
•
•
•
•
•
•
No discharge.
Insufficient discharge.
Insufficient pressure.
Loss of suction.
Excessive power consumption.
Vibration.
See “17 Pump Problem Analysis” on page 74 for help
in troubleshooting.
2.To navigate on the keypad, use the [OK] and
[ARROW] buttons shown below.
12.2 Check Motor Rotation
Before running the frequency converter, check the motor
rotation. The motor will run briefly at 20Hz or the minimum frequency set in 4-12 Motor Speed Low Limit [Hz].
1.Check Motor rotation.
a.Press [Quick Menu].
b.Scroll to Q2 Quick Set-up.
c. Press [OK].
d.Scroll to 1-28 Motor Rotation Check.
e.Press [OK].
f. Scroll to Enable.
g.The following text appears: “Note! Motor may run
in wrong direction.”
h.Press [OK].
i. Follow the on-screen instructions.
NOTE: To change the direction of rotation,
remove power to the frequency converter
and wait for power to discharge. Reverse the
connection of any two of the three motor
cables on the motor or frequency converter
side of the connection.
12.3 Start Pump
CAUTION: MOTOR START! Ensure that
the motor, system, and any attached
equipment is ready for start. It is the
responsibility of the user to ensure safe
operation under any con-dition. Failure to
ensure that the motor, sys-tem, and any
attached equipment is ready for start could
result in personal injury or equipment
damage.
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
3.Ensure the drive is in Set-up 1.
4.To change to Set-up 1, press the [Quick Menus]
button.
5.Press the [OK] button to enter “My Personal menu'
37
12.4 Verify Flow
6. Scroll down
and press OK.
to Parameter 0-10 Active Set-up
The VFD is factory programmed with the Design Pressure Head and Design VFD Speed that were indicated at
the time of order.
If this pump was ordered for a system distribution pump
(quadratic system curve), it ships in Set-up 1 (it will track
a system control curve like the one shown in Figure 10-1
Follow the steps below to determine whether the pump is
producing the required amount of flow.
7.Change Active Set-up to “Set-up 1”.
a.Parameter 0-10 Active Set-up.
Before
13.Close zone valves to ensure pump speed slows
as demand is reduced. Then open the valves to
ensure the pump increases speed until it reaches
the desired flow.
14.If the pump is not meeting the desired flow conditions, as shown in the figure below, see “13
System Balancing” on page 39.
Figure 11-1: Over-sized Pump Example
After
b.You will know the change has happened when
you see
change to
.
8.Press the [Status] button to get back to the main
screen.
9.Close the discharge valve before starting pump.
DANGER: MAKE SURE SUCTION VALVE
IS OPEN!!
10.Press the [Auto on] button.
11.Once the pump has started, open the discharge
valve slowly.
CAUTION: Do not operate pump for prolonged periods with discharge valve closed,
to avoid overheating and potentially damaging loads.
12.After the discharge valve is fully open, let the
drive ramp up to the design flow point that was
specified.
IMPORTANT: Allow the pump enough time
to settle out at the specified design flow.
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
38
13 SYSTEM BALANCING
13.1 About SelfSensing ProBalance
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LV WR PRYHWKHDGMXVWHGRSHUDWLQJSRLQWDWGHVLJQIORZ
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Figure 13-2: Measure System Resistance
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Figure 13-3: Reset Control Curve
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39
13.2 My Personal Menu for ProBalance
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EDODQFLQJSURFHVV
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ZLWKWKHMy Personal Menu
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13.2.1 My Personal Menu Structure
Table 9: My Personal Menu
Parameter Number
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
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13.3 Balancing Procedure
3.Press the [Off] Button.
13.3.1 Measure System Resistance
Figure 13-4 shows a typical system response at
startup. Point A is programmed at the factory per the
specification/equipment schedule and the pump is set
to stay on the control curve shown in Figure 13-1.
However, pumps are typically oversized due to safety
factor. Since the actual system resistance is too low
for the pump to operate at Point A, after it reaches its
max speed (typically 60hz), the pump will 'run out' to
the right on the 60hz curve to Point B.
4.Ensure the drive is in the set-up you ordered.
Figure 13-4: Measure System Resistance
5.Press the [Quick Menus] button.
6.Press the [OK] button to enter “My Personal
Menu.”
The following procedure shows how to measure the
actual system resistance at the intended design flow.
(Point C) This point is used later to reprogram the pump
to operate along the adjusted control curve shown
in Figure13-3.
1.Ensure the system is filled and all valves are set to
100% open.
2.To navigate on the keypad use the [OK] and
[ARROW] buttons shown below.
7. Scroll down
and press OK.
to Parameter 0-10 Active Set-up
8.Change Active Set-up from “Set-up 1” to “Set-up 3”
and press OK.
a.Parameter 0-10 Active Set-up.
Before
After
b.You will know the change has happened when
you see
change to
.
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
41
9.Scroll up
press OK.
to parameter 20-21 Setpoint 1 and
13.3.2 Set Adjusted Operating Point at
Design Flow
Figure 13-5: Set Control Curve Max (Point C)
10.Set the system’s flow at design point (flow value
that was specified at the time of order is already
displayed) and press [OK].
a.Parameter 20-21 Setpoint 1.
Point C
1.Press the [Quick Menus] button.
2.Press the [OK] button to enter “My Personal
Menu.”
11.Press the [Auto on] button.
12.
12.Press
the [Status] button to get back to the main
screen.
a.Let the drive ramp up to the design flow point
that was specified.
b.IMPORTANT: Allow the pump enough time to
settle out at the specified design flow.
c. IMPORTANT: Record the Hz and ft WG displayed on the top of the LCD.
3. Scroll down
and press OK.
to parameter 0-10 Active Set-up
4.Change Active Set-up from “Set-up 3” to “Set-up 1”
then press OK.
a.Parameter 0-10 Active Set-up.
Before
13.Press the [Off] Button.
a.Wait for the pump to come to a complete stop
before moving to the next step.
After
b.You will know the change has happened when
you see
change to
.
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
42
5.Scroll down
to parameter 20-00 Feedback
Source and press OK.
9.Scroll down
to to parameter 22-86 Speed at
Design Point and press OK.
6.Change feedback from “Sensorless Pressure” to
“No function” then press OK.
10.Enter the Hz you recorded in Set-up 3 (from Step
12 above) and press OK.
a.Parameter 20-00 = Feedback 1 Source.
a.Parameter 22-86 = Speed at Design Point [Hz].
Before
After
7.Scroll down
to parameter 1-00 Configuration
Mode and press OK.
11.Scroll down
to parameter 20-00 Feedback
1 Source and press OK.
12.Change feedback from “No function” to “Sensorless Pressure” and press OK.
a.Parameter 20-00 = Feedback 1 Source.
8.Change the Configuration Mode from “Closed
Loop” to “Open Loop” then press OK.
Before
a.Parameter 1-00 = Configuration Mode.
Before
After
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
After
13.Scroll down
to parameter 1-00 Configuration Mode and press OK.
43
14.Change the Configuration Mode from “Open
Loop” to “Closed Loop” and press OK.
a.Parameter 1-00 = Configuration Mode.
set the units back to GPM for proper function. Then
press OK.
a.Parameter 20-60 = Sensorless Unit to GPM.
Before
After
15.Scroll down
to parameter 20-12 Reference/
Feedback Unit and press OK.
16.Change the Reference/Feedback Unit to ft WG
(press the [Down Arrow] button to reach the setting
faster). IMPORTANT: Due to the change in parameters, the drive will default back to metric units. It is
important to set the units back to ft WG for proper
function. Then press OK.
a.Parameter 20-12 = Reference/Feedback Unit to
ft Wg.
19.Scroll down
1and press OK.
to parameter 20-21 Setpoint
20.
20.Enter the Pressure Head set point (ft WG) that
you previously recorded (from Step 12). Then
press OK.
a.Parameter 20-21 = Setpoint 1.
21.Press the [Auto on] button to start the pump.
22.
22.Press
the [Status] button to get back to the main
screen.
17.Scroll down
to parameter 20-60 Sensorless Unit and press OK.
23.Press the [Quick Menus] button.
18.Change Sensorless Unit to GPM (press the [Up
Arrow] button to reach the setting faster). IMPORTANT: Due to the change in parameters, the drive
will default back to metric units. It is important to
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
44
the [OK] button to enter “My Personal
24.
24.Press
Menu.”
3.Press the [OK] button to enter “My Personal
Menu.”
to parameter 22-89 Flow at
25.Scroll down
Design Point and press OK.
4. Scroll down
and press OK.
a.Parameter 22-89 Flow at Design Point.
to Parameter 0-10 Active Set-up
5.Change Active Set-up from “Set-up 1” to “Set-up 3”
and press OK.
a.Parameter 0-10 Active Set-up.
the [Status] button to get back to the main
26.Press
26.
screen.
Before
27.The programming process is now complete.
After
13.3.3 Set Control Head
This Step is Optional.
Follow this procedure to reset the control head (Point
D). The factory default setting for Point D is 40% of
the design head value (point A).
Figure 13-6: Control Head (Control Curve
Minimum - Point D)
b.You will know the change has happened when
you see
change to
.
6.Scroll up
press OK.
to parameter 20-21 Setpoint 1 and
Point D
7.Set the system’s flow at design point (flow value
that was specified at the time of order is already
displayed) and press [OK].
1.Press the [Off] Button.
2.Press the [Quick Menus] button.
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
45
a.Parameter 20-21 Setpoint 1.
a.Parameter 0-10 Active Set-up.
Before
8.Press the [Auto on] button.
After
9.Press the [Status] button to get back to the main
screen.
a.Let the drive ramp up to the design flow point
that was specified.
b.IMPORTANT: Allow the pump enough time to
settle out at the specified design flow.
10.Press the [Off] Button.
b.You will know the change has happened when
you see
change to
.
15.Scroll down
to parameter 20-00 Feedback
Source and press OK.
16.Change feedback from “Sensorless Pressure” to
“No function” then press OK.
a.Wait for the pump to come to a complete stop
before moving to the next step.
11.Press the [Quick Menus] button.
12.Press the [OK] button to enter “My Personal
Menu.”
13.Scroll down
up and press OK.
to parameter 0-10 Active Set-
14.Change Active Set-up from “Set-up 3” to “Set-up
1” then press OK.
a.Parameter 20-00 = Feedback 1 Source.
Before
After
17.Scroll down
to parameter 1-00 Configuration Mode and press OK.
18.Change the Configuration Mode from “Closed
Loop” to “Open Loop” then press OK.
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
46
a.Parameter 1-00 = Configuration Mode.
a.Parameter 22-84 = Speed at No-Flow.
Before
After
19.Scroll down
to parameter 22-87 Pressure
at No-Flow Speed and press OK.
20.Set the desired Pressure at No-Flow in ft WG
20.
(Control Head) then press OK.
a.Parameter 22-87 = Pressure at No-Flow Speed.
23.Scroll down
to parameter 20-00 Feedback
1 Source and press OK.
24.Change feedback from “No function” to “Sensorless Pressure” and press OK.
a.Parameter 20-00 = Feedback 1 Source.
Before
After
21.Scroll down
to parameter 22-84 Speed at
No-Flow and press OK.
22.Set the VFD Speed required to produce the
desired static pressure head when your system is
at No-Flow conditions. The factory default is 40%
of Design Pressure Head. Consult the online reference look up table for your specific pump model to
determine the relationship between static head
pressure and VFD Speed requirements. Then
press OK.
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
25.Scroll down
to parameter 1-00 Configuration Mode and press OK.
26.Change the Configuration Mode from “Open
Loop” to “Closed Loop” and press OK.
47
a.Parameter 1-00 = Configuration Mode.
a.Parameter 20-60 = Sensorless Unit to GPM.
Before
31.Press the [Auto on] button to start the pump.
After
27.Scroll down
to parameter 20-12 Reference/
Feedback Unit and press OK.
28.Change the Reference/Feedback Unit to ft WG
(press the [Down Arrow] button to reach the setting
faster). IMPORTANT: Due to the change in parameters, the drive will default back to metric units. It is
important to set the units back to ft WG for proper
function. Then press OK.
32.
32.Press
the [Status] button to get back to the main
screen.
33. The programming process is now complete and
you can run the drive
a.Parameter 20-12 = Reference/Feedback Unit to
ft Wg.
29.Scroll down
to parameter 20-60 Sensorless Unit and press OK.
30.Change Sensorless Unit to GPM (press the [Up
Arrow] button to reach the setting faster). IMPORTANT: Due to the change in parameters, the drive
will default back to metric units. It is important to
set the units back to GPM for proper function. Then
press OK.
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
48
13.3.4 Flow Fine Tuning
After balancing is complete, if the flow at Point C requires
fine tuning, simply increase or decrease Parameter 20-21
Setpoint 1 until desired flow is achieved. Follow this procedure to adjust the setpoint.
Par 22-81 (Square-linear Curve Approximation), which
should be set to ‘100%’.
Figure 13-7: Curve Approximation Settings
1.Press the [Quick Menus] button.
2.Press the [OK] button to enter “My Personal
Menu.”
3. Scroll down
and press OK.
to parameter 20-21 Setpoint 1
The effect of adjusting par. 22-81 is shown in Figure
13-7 above. A setting of 100% gives the ideal
theoretical control curve between the design head and
minimum head while 0% provides a straight line linear
approximation.
4.Enter the Pressure Head set point (ft WG) that will
achieve the desired flow. Then press OK.
a.Parameter 20-21 = Setpoint 1.
5.Press the [Auto on] button to start the pump.
6.Press the [Status] button to get back to the main
screen.
13.4 Additional Settings
Other settings that are set to enable the pump to operate
on a control curve are:
• Par. 22-80 (Flow Compensation), which should be
set to ‘Enabled’ [1]
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49
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
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0-38 Display Text 2
0-39 Display Text 3
1-90 Motor Thermal Protection
1-93 Thermistor Source
3-10 Preset Reference
5-13 Terminal 29 Digital
Input
5-14 Terminal 32 Digital
Input
5-15 Terminal 33 Digital
Input
Q3-21 Analog Reference
6-50 Terminal 42 Output
6-51 Terminal 42 Output Min
Scale
6-52 Terminal 42 Output Max
Scale
Q3-12 Clock Settings
0-20 Display Line 1.1 Small
Q3-13 Display Settings
0-77 DST/Summertime End
0-76 DST/Summertime Start
0-74 DST/Summertime
0-72 Time Format
0-71 Date Format
Q3-32 Multi Zone / Adv
6-11 Terminal 53 High Voltage
6-12 Terminal 53 Low Current
20-79 PID Autotuning
20-12 Reference/Feedback Unit
20-08 Feedback 3 Source Unit
20-07 Feedback 3 Conversion
20-06 Feedback 3 Source
20-05 Feedback 2 Source Unit
20-04 Feedback 2 Conversion
20-03 Feedback 2 Source
20-02 Feedback 1 Source Unit
20-01 Feedback 1 Conversion
20-00 Feedback 1 Source
3-15 Reference 1 Source
3-16 Reference 2 Source
1-00 Configuration Mode
20-74 Maximum Feedback Level
20-73 Minimum Feedback Level
20-72 PID Output Change
20-13 Minimum Reference/
Feedb.
20-14 Maximum Reference/
Feedb.
6-10 Terminal 53 Low Voltage
20-12 Reference/Feedback Unit
Q3-31 Single Zone Ext. Setpoint 20-70 Closed-loop Type
1-00 Configuration Mode
20-71 PID Performance
6-13 Terminal 53 High Current
6-14 Terminal 53 Low Ref./Feedb.
Value
6-01 Live Zero Timeout Func- 6-15 Terminal 53 High Ref./
tion
Feedb. Value
20-21 Setpoint 1
6-22 Terminal 54 Low Current
6-24 Terminal 54 Low Ref./
Feedb. Value
6-25 Terminal 54 High Ref./
Feedb. Value
6-26 Terminal 54 Filter Time
Constant
6-27 Terminal 54 Live Zero
6-00 Live Zero Timeout Time
1-00 Configuration Mode
20-12 Reference/Feedback
Unit
20-13 Minimum Reference/
Feedb.
20-14 Maximum Reference/
Feedb.
6-22 Terminal 54 Low Current
20-81 PID Normal/ Inverse
6-24 Terminal 54 Low Ref./Feedb.
Control
Value
3-02 Minimum Reference
20-82 PID Start Speed [RPM] 6-25 Terminal 54 High Ref./
Feedb. Value
3-03 Maximum Reference 20-83 PID Start Speed [Hz]
6-26 Terminal 54 Filter Time Constant
6-10 Terminal 53 Low Volt- 20-93 PID Proportional Gain 6-27 Terminal 54 Live Zero
age
6-11 Terminal 53 High Volt- 20-94 PID Integral Time
6-00 Live Zero Timeout Time
age
6-12 Terminal 53 Low Cur- 20-70 Closed-loop Type
6-01 Live Zero Timeout Function
rent
6-13 Terminal 53 High Cur- 20-71 PID Performance
20-81 PID Normal/ Inverse Conrent
trol
20-82 PID Start Speed [RPM]
6-14 Terminal 53 Low Ref./ 20-72 PID Output Change
Feedb. Value
3-03 Maximum Reference
Q3-11 Analog Output
0-70 Date and Time
3-02 Minimum Reference
4-53 Warning Speed High
1-29 Automatic Motor Adaptation Q3-2 Open-loop Settings
(AMA)
14-01 Switching Frequency
Q3-20 Digital Reference
0-24 Display Line 3 Large
0-37 Display Text 1
Q3-1 General Settings
Q3-10 Adv. Motor Settings
14.0.1 Quick Menu Structure - page 1
14 MENUS
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
51
20-72 PID Output Change
20-73 Minimum Feedback
Level
20-74 Maximum Feedback
Level
20-79 PID Autotuning
6-22 Terminal 54 Low Current
6-23 Terminal 54 High Current
20-20 Feedback Function
4-56 Warning Feedback Low
4-57 Warning Feedback High
22-27 Dry Pump Delay
22-80 Flow Compensation
22-81 Square-linear Curve
Approximation
22-82 Work Point Calculation
22-83 Speed at No-Flow [RPM]
2-17 Over-voltage Control
1-73 Flying Start
1-71 Start Delay
5-13 Terminal 29 Digital Input
5-40 Function Relay
5-12 Terminal 27 Digital Input
5-02 Terminal 29 Mode
5-01 Terminal 27 Mode
22-77 Minimum Run Time
22-75 Short Cycle Protection
22-76 Interval between Starts
1-71 Start Delay
1-73 Flying Start
22-84 Speed at No-Flow [Hz]
1-86 Trip Speed Low [RPM]
22-85 Speed at Design Point
[RPM]
22-86 Speed at Design Point [Hz] 1-87 Trip Speed Low [Hz]
22-26 Dry Pump Function
22-44 Wake-up Ref./FB Difference
22-45 Setpoint Boost
22-46 Maximum Boost Time
2-16 AC Brake Max. Current
22-46 Maximum Boost Time
2-10 Brake Function
1-80 Function at Stop
2-00 DC Hold/Preheat Current
22-62 Broken Belt Delay
4-10 Motor Speed Direction
4-64 Semi-Auto Bypass Set- Q3-41 Pump Functions
up
1-03 Torque Characteristics 22-20 Low Power Auto Setup
6-00 Live Zero Timeout Time
22-60 Broken Belt Function
6-01 Live Zero Timeout Function 22-61 Broken Belt Torque
6-24 Terminal 54 Low Ref./
Feedb. Value
6-25 Terminal 54 High Ref./
Feedb. Value
6-26 Terminal 54 Filter Time Con- Q3-4 Application Settings
stant
Q3-40 Fan Functions
6-27 Terminal 54 Live Zero
20-71 PID Performance
6-21 Terminal 54 High Voltage
22-42 Wake-up Speed [RPM]
22-43 Wake-up Speed [Hz]
Q3-42 Compressor Functions
1-03 Torque Characteristics
22-43 Wake-up Speed [Hz]
22-44 Wake-up Ref./FB Difference
22-45 Setpoint Boost
1-03 Torque Characteristics
20-94 PID Integral Time
20-70 Closed-loop Type
22-41 Minimum Sleep Time
1-73 Flying Start
22-40 Minimum Run Time
20-83 PID Start Speed [Hz]
22-90 Flow at Rated Speed
22-87 Pressure at No-Flow
Speed
22-88 Pressure at Rated Speed
22-89 Flow at Design Point
20-13 Minimum Reference/
Feedb.
20-14 Maximum Reference/
Feedb.
6-10 Terminal 53 Low Voltage
20-93 PID Proportional Gain 22-42 Wake-up Speed [RPM] 22-41 Minimum Sleep Time
22-24 No-Flow Delay
22-22 Low Speed Detection
22-23 No-Flow Function
22-21 Low Power Detection
20-94 PID Integral Time
20-93 PID Proportional Gain
20-83 PID Start Speed [Hz]
20-22 Setpoint 2
22-23 No-Flow Function
20-81 PID Normal/ Inverse
22-24 No-Flow Delay
Control
20-82 PID Start Speed [RPM] 22-40 Minimum Run Time
6-15 Terminal 53 High Ref./ 20-73 Minimum Feedback
Feedb. Value
Level
Q3-3 Closed-loop Settings 20-74 Maximum Feedback
Level
Q3-30 Single Zone Int. Set- 20-79 PID Autotuning
point
20-21 Setpoint 1
22-22 Low Speed Detection
6-14 Terminal 53 Low Ref./
Feedb. Value
6-15 Terminal 53 High Ref./
Feedb. Value
6-16 Terminal 53 Filter Time Constant
6-17 Terminal 53 Live Zero
6-20 Terminal 54 Low Voltage
6-12 Terminal 53 Low Current
6-13 Terminal 53 High Current
6-11 Terminal 53 High Voltage
0-23 Display Line 2 Large
0-22 Display Line 1.3 Small
0-21 Display Line 1.2 Small
14.0.2 Quick Menu Structure - page 2
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
52
0-77 DST/Summertime End
1-36 Iron Loss Resistance (Rfe)
1-82 Min Speed for Function at
Stop [Hz]
0-38 Display Text 2
0-79 Clock Fault
1-39 Motor Poles
1-86 Trip Speed Low [RPM]
0-0* Basic Settings
0-39 Display Text 3
0-81 Working Days
0-01 Language
1-5* Load-Indep. Setting
1-87 Trip Speed Low [Hz]
0-4* LCP Keypad
0-82 Additional Working Days 1-50 Motor Magnetization at Zero 1-9* Motor Temperature
0-02 Motor Speed Unit
Speed
0-03 Regional Settings
0-40 [Hand on] Key on LCP
0-83 Additional Non-Working 1-51 Min Speed Normal Magne- 1-90 Motor Thermal Protection
Days
tizing [RPM]
0-04 Operating State at Power-up 0-41 [Off] Key on LCP
0-89 Date and Time Readout 1-52 Min Speed Normal Magne- 1-91 Motor External Fan
tizing [Hz]
0-05 Local Mode Unit
0-42 [Auto on] Key on LCP
1-** Load and Motor
1-58 Flystart Test Pulses Current 1-93 Thermistor Source
0-1* Set-up Operations
0-43 [Reset] Key on LCP
1-0* General Settings
1-59 Flystart Test Pulses Fre2-** Brakes
quency
2-0* DC Brake
0-10 Active Set-up
1-6* Load-Depend. Settg.
0-44 [Off/Reset] Key on LCP 1-00 Configuration Mode
0-11 Programming Set-up
0-45 [Drive Bypass] Key on
1-03 Torque Characteristics 1-60 Low Speed Load Compen- 2-00 DC Hold/Preheat Current
LCP
sation
0-12 This Set-up Linked to
0-5* Copy/Save
1-06 Clockwise Direction
1-61 High Speed Load Compen- 2-01 DC Brake Current
sation
1-62 Slip Compensation
2-02 DC Braking Time
0-13 Readout: Linked Set-ups
0-50 LCP Copy
1-2* Motor Data
1-63 Slip Compensation Time
2-03 DC Brake Cut-in Speed
0-14 Readout: Prog. Set-ups /
0-51 Set-up Copy
1-20 Motor Power [kW]
Constant
[RPM]
Channel
1-64 Resonance Dampening
2-04 DC Brake Cut In Speed [Hz]
0-6* Password
1-21 Motor Power [HP]
0-2* LCP Display
1-65 Resonance Dampening
2-1* Brake Energy Funct.
0-20 Display Line 1.1 Small
0-60 Main Menu Password
1-22 Motor Voltage
Time Constant
0-21 Display Line 1.2 Small
0-61 Access to Main Menu w/ 1-23 Motor Frequency
1-7* Start Adjustments
2-10 Brake Function
o Passwor
0-22 Display Line 1.3 Small
0-65 Personal Menu Pass1-24 Motor Current
1-71 Start Delay
2-11 Brake Resistor (ohm)
word
2-12 Brake Power Limit (kW)
0-23 Display Line 2 Large
0-66 Access to Personal
1-25 Motor Nominal Speed
1-73 Flying Start
Menu w/o Password
0-7* Clock Settings
1-28 Motor Rotation Check
1-77 Compressor Start Max
2-13 Brake Power Monitoring
0-24 Display Line 3 Large
Speed [RPM]
0-25 My Personal Menu
0-70 Date and Time
1-29 Automatic Motor Adap- 1-78 Compressor Start Max
2-15 Brake Check
Speed [Hz]
tation (AMA)
1-79 Compressor Start Max Time 2-16 AC Brake Max. Current
1-3* Addl. Motor Data
0-3* LCP Cust. Readout
0-71 Date Format
to Trip
0-30 Custom Readout Unit
0-72 Time Format
1-30 Stator Resistance (Rs) 1-8* Stop Adjustments
2-17 Over-voltage Control
1-31 Rotor Resistance (Rr)
1-80 Function at Stop
3-** Reference / Ramps
0-31 Custom Readout Min Value 0-74 DST/Summertime
0-** Operation / Display
0-37 Display Text 1
14.0.3 Main Menu Structure - page1
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
53
3-94 Minimum Limit
3-95 Ramp Delay
4-** Limits / Warnings
4-1* Motor Limits
3-04 Reference Function
3-1* References
3-10 Preset Reference
3-11 Jog Speed [Hz]
4-13 Motor Speed High Limit
[RPM]
4-14 Motor Speed High Limit
[Hz]
4-16 Torque Limit Motor Mode
4-17 Torque Limit Generator
Mode
4-18 Current Limit
4-50 Warning Current Low
3-51 Ramp 2 Ramp-up Time
3-80 Jog Ramp Time
3-8* Other Ramps
4-53 Warning Speed High
4-52 Warning Speed Low
3-52 Ramp 2 Ramp-down Time 4-51 Warning Current High
4-5* Adj. Warnings
3-5* Ramp 2
3-42 Ramp 1 Ramp-down Time 4-19 Max Output Frequency
3-41 Ramp 1 Ramp-up Time
3-19 Jog Speed [RPM]
3-4* Ramp 1
3-17 Reference 3 Source
3-16 Reference 2 Source
6-13 Terminal 53 High Current
6-12 Terminal 53 Low Current
6-11 Terminal 53 High Voltage
6-02 Fire Mode Live Zero Timeout Function
6-1* Analog Input 53
6-10 Terminal 53 Low Voltage
6-01 Live Zero Timeout Function
6-00 Live Zero Timeout Time
5-96 Pulse Out #29 Timeout Preset
5-97 Pulse Out #X30/6 Bus Control
5-98 Pulse Out #X30/6 Timeout
Preset
6-** Analog In/Out
6-0* Analog I/O Mode
6-14 Terminal 53 Low Ref./
Feedb. Value
5-15 Terminal 33 Digital Input 5-60 Terminal 27 Pulse Output 6-15 Terminal 53 High Ref./
Variable
Feedb. Value
5-16 Terminal X30/2 Digital 5-62 Pulse Output Max Freq #27 6-16 Terminal 53 Filter Time
Input
Constant
5-17 Terminal X30/3 Digital 5-63 Terminal 29 Pulse Output 6-17 Terminal 53 Live Zero
Input
Variable
5-11 Terminal 19 Digital Input 5-57 Term. 33 Low Ref./Feedb.
Value
5-12 Terminal 27 Digital Input 5-58 Term. 33 High Ref./Feedb.
Value
5-13 Terminal 29 Digital Input 5-59 Pulse Filter Time Constant
#33
5-14 Terminal 32 Digital Input 5-6* Pulse Output
5-52 Term. 29 Low Ref./Feedb.
Value
5-53 Term. 29 High Ref./Feedb.
5-01 Terminal 27 Mode
Value
5-02 Terminal 29 Mode
5-54 Pulse Filter Time Constant
#29
5-1* Digital Inputs
5-55 Term. 33 Low Frequency
5-10 Terminal 18 Digital Input 5-56 Term. 33 High Frequency
3-13 Reference Site
4-10 Motor Speed Direction
3-14 Preset Relative Reference 4-11 Motor Speed Low Limit
[RPM]
3-15 Reference 1 Source
4-12 Motor Speed Low Limit [Hz] 5-00 Digital I/O Mode
4-64 Semi-Auto Bypass Set- 5-5* Pulse Input
up
5-50 Term. 29 Low Frequency
5-** Digital In/Out
5-0* Digital I/O mode
5-51 Term. 29 High Frequency
5-42 Off Delay, Relay
4-60 Bypass Speed From
[RPM]
4-61 Bypass Speed From
[Hz]
4-62 Bypass Speed to [RPM] 5-41 On Delay, Relay
3-93 Maximum Limit
3-03 Maximum Reference
4-63 Bypass Speed To [Hz]
4-6* Speed Bypass
3-92 Power Restore
1-81 Min Speed for Function at 3-0* Reference Limits
Stop [RPM]
5-33 Term X30/7 Digi Out (MCB 5-93 Pulse Out #27 Bus Control
101)
5-4* Relays
5-94 Pulse Out #27 Timeout Preset
5-95 Pulse Out #29 Bus Control
5-40 Function Relay
1-35 Main Reactance (Xh)
0-76 DST/Summertime Start
0-32 Custom Readout Max
Value
3-02 Minimum Reference
14.0.4 Main Menu Structure - page 2
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54
10-05 Readout Transmit Error
Counter
10-06 Readout Receive Error
Counter
10-07 Readout Bus Off Counter
9-22 Telegram Selection
9-23 Parameters for Signals
9-27 Parameter Edit
9-28 Process Control
8-54 Reversing Select
8-55 Set-up Select
8-56 Preset Reference
Select
8-7* BACnet
4-58 Missing Motor Phase
Function
6-64 Terminal X30/8 Output
Timeout Preset
8-** Comm. and Options
8-0* General Settings
8-01 Control Site
8-02 Control Source
3-91 Ramp Time
6-30 Terminal X30/11 Low Voltage
6-31 Terminal X30/11 High Voltage
6-34 Term. X30/11 Low Ref./
Feedb. Value
6-35 Term. X30/11 High Ref./
Feedb. Value
6-36 Term. X30/11 Filter Time
Constant
6-37 Term. X30/11 Live Zero
6-4* Analog Input X30/12
6-40 Terminal X30/12 Low Voltage
6-41 Terminal X30/12 High Voltage
6-44 Term. X30/12 Low Ref./
Feedb. Value
6-45 Term. X30/12 High Ref./
Feedb. Value
6-46 Term. X30/12 Filter Time
Constant
8-73 MS/TP Max Info
Frames
8-74 "I-Am" Service
8-75 Initialization Password
8-8* FC Port Diagnostics
8-80 Bus Message Count
8-06 Reset Control Timeout
8-08 Readout Filtering
8-1* Control Settings
8-10 Control Profile
8-31 Address
8-84 Slave Messages Sent
9-70 Programming Set-up
9-68 Status Word 1
8-30 Protocol
10-20 COS Filter 1
10-2* COS Filters
10-15 Net Control
9-67 Control Word 1
8-83 Slave Error Count
10-14 Net Reference
10-10 Process Data Type Selection
10-11 Process Data Con!g Write
10-12 Process Data Con!g Read
10-13 Warning Parameter
10-1* DeviceNet
9-65 Profile Number
9-53 Profibus Warning Word
9-63 Actual Baud Rate
9-64 Device Identification
9-52 Fault Situation Counter
9-47 Fault Number
9-45 Fault Code
9-44 Fault Message Counter
10-00 CAN Protocol
10-0* Common Settings
8-13 Configurable Status Word 8-81 Bus Error Count
STW
8-3* FC Port Settings
8-82 Slave Messages Rcvd
8-07 Diagnosis Trigger
8-05 End-of-Timeout Function
8-70 BACnet Device
Instance
8-72 MS/TP Max Masters
8-04 Control Timeout Function
8-03 Control Timeout Time
10-01 Baud Rate Select
10-02 MAC ID
9-18 Node Address
8-53 Start Select
4-57 Warning Feedback High
3-90 Step Size
6-24 Terminal 54 Low Ref./
Feedb. Value
6-25 Terminal 54 High Ref./
Feedb. Value
6-26 Terminal 54 Filter Time
Constant
6-27 Terminal 54 Live Zero
6-3* Analog Input X30/11
4-56 Warning Feedback Low
3-9* Digital Pot. meter
5-66 Terminal X30/6 Pulse Out- 6-20 Terminal 54 Low Voltage
put Variable
5-30 Terminal 27 Digital Out- 5-68 Pulse Output Max Freq
6-21 Terminal 54 High Voltage
put
#X30/6
5-31 Terminal 29 Digital Out- 5-9* Bus Controlled
6-22 Terminal 54 Low Current
put
5-32 Term X30/6 Digi Out
5-90 Digital & Relay Bus Control 6-23 Terminal 54 High Current
(MCB 101)
10-** CAN Fieldbus
9-16 PCD Read Configuration
8-52 DC Brake Select
4-55 Warning Reference High
5-65 Pulse Output Max Freq #29 6-2* Analog Input 54
3-82 Starting Ramp Up Time
5-18 Terminal X30/4 Digital
Input
5-3* Digital Outputs
4-54 Warning Reference Low
3-81 Quick Stop Ramp Time
14.0.5 Main Menu Structure - page 3
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55
14-00 Switching Pattern
14-01 Switching Frequency
14-03 Overmodulation
14-04 PWM Random
14-1* Mains On/Off
14-10 Mains Failure
14-11 Mains Voltage at Mains
Fault
14-12 Function at Mains Imbalance
14-2* Reset Functions
14-20 Reset Mode
14-21 Automatic Restart Time
14-22 Operation Mode
11-10 Drive Profile
11-15 LON Warning Word
11-17 XIF Revision
11-18 LonWorks Revision
11-2* LON Param. Access
11-21 Store Data Values
13-** Smart Logic
13-00 SL Controller Mode
13-01 Start Event
13-02 Stop Event
13-03 Reset SLC
13-0* SLC Settings
14-0* Inverter Switching
15-42 Voltage
15-43 Software Version
15-44 Ordered Typecode String
15-45 Actual Typecode String
15-46 Adjustable Frequency
Drive Ordering No
15-0* Operating Data
15-00 Operating Hours
15-01 Running Hours
15-02 kWh Counter
15-03 Power-ups
15-30 Alarm Log: Error Code
15-31 Alarm Log: Value
15-72 Option in Slot B
15-23 Historic Log: Date and
Time
15-3* Alarm Log
15-73 Slot B Option SW Version
10-33 Store Always
10-34 DeviceNet Product Code
10-39 Devicenet F Parameters
11-** LonWorks
11-0* LonWorks ID
9-90 Changed Parameters (1)
9-91 Changed Parameters (2)
9-92 Changed Parameters (3)
9-93 Changed Parameters (4)
9-94 Changed parameters (5)
10-32 Devicenet Revision
10-31 Store Data Values
10-30 Array Index
10-21 COS Filter 2
10-22 COS Filter 3
10-23 COS Filter 4
10-3* Parameter Access
15-99 Parameter Metadata
16-** Data Readouts
16-0* General Status
16-00 Control Word
15-98 Drive Identification
15-74 Option in Slot C0
15-75 Slot C0 Option SW Version
14-6* Auto Derate
15-32 Alarm Log: Time
15-76 Option in Slot C1
14-60 Function at Overtem- 15-33 Alarm Log: Date and Time 15-77 Slot C1 Option SW Verperature
sion
14-61 Function at Inverter
15-4* Drive Identification
15-9* Parameter Info
Overload
14-62 Inv. Overload Derate 15-40 FC Type
15-92 Defined Parameters
Current
15-** Drive Information
15-93 Modi!ed Parameters
15-41 Power Section
14-51 DC Link Compensation
14-52 Fan Control
14-53 Fan Monitor
8-96 Bus Feedback 3
9-** Profibus
9-00 Setpoint
9-07 Actual Value
9-15 PCD Write Configuration
14-50 RFI Filter
8-40 Telegram selection
8-42 PCD write configuration
8-43 PCD read configuration
8-5* Digital/Bus
8-50 Coasting Select
11-1* LON Functions
9-84 Defined Parameters (5)
8-95 Bus Feedback 2
8-4* FC MC protocol set
14-** Special Functions
9-83 Defined Parameters (4)
8-94 Bus Feedback 1
8-37 Maximum Inter-Char Delay
9-82 Defined Parameters (3)
8-91 Bus Jog 2 Speed
8-36 Maximum Response Delay
9-71 Profibus Save Data Values
9-72 ProfibusDriveReset
9-80 Defined Parameters (1)
9-81 Defined Parameters (2)
8-85 Slave Timeout Errors
8-89 Diagnostics Count
8-9* Bus Jog / Feedback
8-90 Bus Jog 1 Speed
8-32 Baud Rate
42 8-33 Parity / Stop Bits
8-34 Estimated cycle time
8-35 Minimum Response Delay
6-47 Term. X30/12 Live Zero
6-5* Analog Output
6-50 Terminal 42 Output
6-51 Terminal 42 Output Min
Scale
6-52 Terminal 42 Output Max
Scale
6-53 Terminal 42 Output Bus
Control
6-54 Terminal 42 Output Timeout Preset
6-6* Analog Output X30/8
6-60 Terminal X30/8 Output
6-61 Terminal X30/8 Min. Scale
6-62 Terminal X30/8 Max. Scale
6-63 Terminal X30/8 Output Bus
Control
11-00 Neuron ID
14.0.6 Main Menu Structure - page 4
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
56
16-37 Inv. Max. Current
16-30 DC Link Voltage
16-32 Brake Energy /s
16-33 Brake Energy /2 min
16-34 Heatsink Temp.
16-36 Inv. Nom. Current
16-26 Power Filtered [kW]
16-27 Power Filtered [hp]
16-3* Drive Status
13-51 SL Controller Event
13-52 SL Controller Action
16-22 Torque [%]
13-5* States
13-44 Logic Rule Boolean 3
13-42 Logic Rule Boolean 2
13-43 Logic Rule Operator 2
13-41 Logic Rule Operator 1
13-40 Logic Rule Boolean 1
13-4* Logic Rules
13-20 SL Controller Timer
13-2* Timers
13-12 Comparator Value
13-1* Comparators
13-10 Comparator Operand
13-11 Comparator Operator
15-04 Overtemps
15-05 Overvolts
15-06 Reset kWh Counter
15-47 Power Card Ordering No
15-48 LCP Id No
15-49 SW ID Control Card
15-07 Reset Running Hours 15-50 SW ID Power Card
Counter
14-29 Service Code
15-08 Number of Starts
15-51 Adj. Frequency Drive
Serial Number
14-3* Current Limit Ctrl.
15-1* Data Log Settings
15-53 Power Card Serial Number
15-55 Vendor URL
14-30 Current Lim Ctrl, Propor- 15-10 Logging Source
tional Gain
14-31 Current Lim Ctrl, Integra- 15-11 Logging Interval
15-56 Vendor Name
tion Time
15-6* Option Ident
14-32 Current Lim Ctrl, Filter
15-12 Trigger Event
Time
14-4* Energy Optimizing
15-60 Option Mounted
15-13 Logging Mode
14-40 VT Level
15-14 Samples Before Trig- 15-61 Option SW Version
ger
14-41 AEO Minimum Magneti- 15-2* Historic Log
15-62 Option Ordering No
zation
14-42 Minimum AEO Fre15-20 Historic Log: Event
15-63 Option Serial No
quency
14-43 Motor Cosphi
15-21 Historic Log: Value
15-70 Option in Slot A
14-5* Environment
15-22 Historic Log: Time
15-71 Slot A Option SW Version
16-66 Digital Output [bin]
18-1* Fire Mode Log
20-14 Maximum Reference/
Feedb.
16-67 Pulse Input #29 [Hz]
18-10 Fire Mode Log: Event 20-2* Feedback/Setpoint
16-68 Pulse Input #33 [Hz]
18-11 Fire Mode Log: Time 20-20 Feedback Function
16-69 Pulse Output #27 [Hz]
18-12 Fire Mode Log: Date 20-21 Setpoint 1
and Time
16-70 Pulse Output #29 [Hz]
18-3* Inputs & Outputs
20-22 Setpoint 2
16-71 Relay Output [bin]
18-30 Analog Input X42/1
20-23 Setpoint 3
18-31 Analog Input X42/3
20-3* Feedb. Adv. Conv.
16-72 Counter A
18-32 Analog Input X42/5
20-30 Refrigerant
16-73 Counter B
18-33 Analog Out X42/7 [V] 20-31 User Defined Refrigerant
16-75 Analog In X30/11
A1
16-76 Analog In X30/12
18-34 Analog Out X42/9 [V] 20-32 User-defined Refrigerant
A2
14-23 Typecode Setting
14-25 Trip Delay at Torque Limit
14-26 Trip Delay at Inverter
Fault
14-28 Production Settings
14.0.7 Main Menu Structure - page 5
21-00 Closed-loop Type
20-94 PID Integral Time
20-95 PID Differentiation Time
20-96 PID Diff. Gain Limit
21-** Ext. Closed-loop
21-0* Ext. CL Autotuning
20-9* PID Controller
20-91 PID Anti Windup
20-93 PID Proportional Gain
16-17 Speed [RPM]
16-18 Motor Thermal
20-84 On Reference Bandwidth
16-16 Torque [Nm]
16-15 Frequency [%]
16-13 Frequency
16-14 Motor Current
16-12 Motor Voltage
16-11 Power [hp]
16-10 Power [kW]
16-1* Motor Status
16-09 Custom Readout
16-05 Main Actual Value [%]
16-01 Reference [Unit]
16-02 Reference [%]
16-03 Status Word
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16-8* Fieldbus & FC Port
16-80 Fieldbus CTW 1
16-82 Fieldbus REF 1
16-84 Comm. Option STW
16-85 FC Port CTW 1
16-86 FC Port REF 1
16-9* Diagnosis Readouts
16-90 Alarm Word
16-91 Alarm Word
16-92 Warning Word
16-93 Warning Word 2
16-94 Ext. Status Word
16-96 Maintenance Word
18-** Info & Readouts
16-39 Control Card Temp.
16-40 Logging Buffer Full
16-43 Timed Actions Status
16-49 Current Fault Source
16-5* Ref. & Feedb.
16-50 External Reference
16-52 Feedback [Unit]
16-53 Digi Pot Reference
16-54 Feedback 1 [Unit] 2
16-55 Feedback 2 [Unit]
16-56 Feedback 3 [Unit]
16-58 PID Output [%]
16-6* Inputs & Outputs
16-60 Digital Input
18-03 Maintenance Log: Date
and Time
21-60 Ext. 3 Normal/Inverse
Control
21-61 Ext. 3 Proportional Gain
16-65 Analog Output 42 [mA]
22-40 Minimum Run Time
20-00 Feedback 1 Source
20-01 Feedback 1 Conversion
20-02 Feedback 1 Source
Unit
20-03 Feedback 2 Source
20-04 Feedback 2 Conversion
20-05 Feedback 2 Source
Unit
20-06 Feedback 3 Source
20-07 Feedback 3 Conversion
20-08 Feedback 3 Source
Unit
20-12 Reference/Feedback
Unit
20-13 Minimum Reference/
Feedb.
22-4* Sleep Mode
21-15 Ext. 1 Setpoint
21-11 Ext. 1 Minimum Reference
21-12 Ext. 1 Maximum Reference
21-13 Ext. 1 Reference Source
21-14 Ext. 1 Feedback Source
21-03 Minimum Feedback Level
21-04 Maximum Feedback Level
21-09 PID Autotuning
21-1* Ext. CL 1 Ref./Fb.
21-10 Ext. 1 Ref./Feedback Unit
21-02 PID Output Change
21-01 PID Performance
22-86 Speed at Design Point
[Hz]
22-87 Pressure at No-Flow
Speed
22-88 Pressure at Rated Speed
22-89 Flow at Design Point
20-83 PID Start Speed [Hz]
23-62 Timed Bin Data
23-63 Timed Period Start
23-61 Continuous Bin Data
23-60 Trend Variable
21-23 Ext. 1 Differentation Time
21-2* Ext. CL 1 PID
21-20 Ext. 1 Normal/Inverse
Control
20-81 PID Normal/ Inverse Con- 21-21 Ext. 1 Proportional Gain
trol
20-82 PID Start Speed [RPM]
21-22 Ext. 1 Integral Time
20-79 PID Autotuning
20-8* PID Basic Settings
20-74 Maximum Feedback Level 21-19 Ext. 1 Output [%]
20-72 PID Output Change
21-17 Ext. 1 Reference [Unit]
20-73 Minimum Feedback Level 21-18 Ext. 1 Feedback [Unit]
20-71 PID Performance
20-7* PID Autotuning
20-70 Closed-loop Type
18-35 Analog Out X42/11 [V] 20-33 User-defined Refrigerant
A3
18-36 Analog Input X48/2
20-34 Duct 1 Area [m2]
[mA]
18-37 Temp. Input X48/4
20-35 Duct 1 Area [in2]
18-38 Temp. Input X48/7
20-36 Duct 2 Area [m2]
18-39 Temp. Input X48/10
20-37 Duct 2 Area [in2]
18-5* Ref. & Feedb.
20-38 Air Density Factor [%]
18-50 Sensorless Readout 20-6* Sensorless
[unit]
20-** Drive Closed-loop
20-60 Sensorless Unit
20-0* Feedback
20-69 Sensorless Information
21-30 Ext. 2 Ref./Feedback Unit 21-62 Ext. 3 Integral Time
22-41 Minimum Sleep Time
21-31 Ext. 2 Minimum Reference 21-63 Ext. 3 Differentation Time 22-42 Wake-up Speed
[RPM]
21-3* Ext. CL 2 Ref./Fb.
21-24 Ext. 1 Dif. Gain Limit
18-02 Maintenance Log: Time
16-64 Analog Input 54
16-63 Terminal 54 Switch Setting 18-01 Maintenance Log: Action
16-61 Terminal 53 Switch Setting 18-0* Maintenance Log
16-62 Analog Input 53
18-00 Maintenance Log: Item
16-77 Analog Out X30/8 [mA]
16-38 SL Controller State
14.0.8 Main Menu Structure - page 6
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58
22-34 Low Speed Power [kW] 22-80 Flow Compensation
22-35 Low Speed Power [HP] 22-81 Square-linear Curve
Approximation
22-36 High Speed [RPM]
22-82 Work Point Calculation
22-37 High Speed [Hz]
22-83 Speed at No-Flow
[RPM]
22-38 High Speed Power
22-84 Speed at No-Flow [Hz]
[kW]
22-85 Speed at Design Point
22-39 High Speed Power
[RPM]
[HP]
25-59 Run-on Line Delay
25-25 OBW Time
21-54 Ext. 3 Feedback Source
21-55 Ext. 3 Setpoint
24-9* Multi-Motor Funct.
21-6* Ext. CL 3 PID
21-59 Ext. 3 Output [%]
21-57 Ext. 3 Reference [Unit]
21-58 Ext. 3 Feedback [Unit]
22-33 Low Speed [Hz]
22-77 Minimum Run Time
22-78 Minimum Run Time
Override
22-79 Minimum Run Time
Override Value
22-8* Flow Compensation
22-61 Broken Belt Torque
22-62 Broken Belt Delay
22-7* Short Cycle Protection
22-75 Short Cycle Protection
22-76 Interval between Starts
24-00 Fire Mode Function
24-01 Fire Mode Configuration
26-2* Analog Input X42/3
23-6* Trending
23-54 Reset Energy Log
23-51 Period Start
23-53 Energy Log
23-50 Energy Log Resolution
23-5* Energy Log
23-16 Maintenance Text
26-53 Terminal X42/9 Bus Control
24-11 Drive Bypass Delay Time
24-10 Drive Bypass Function
24-05 Fire Mode Preset Reference
24-06 Fire Mode Reference
Source
24-07 Fire Mode Feedback
Source
24-09 Fire Mode Alarm Handling
24-1* Drive Bypass
23-13 Maintenance Time Interval 24-02 Fire Mode Unit
23-14 Maintenance Date and
24-03 Fire Mode Min Reference
Time
23-15 Reset Maintenance Word 24-04 Fire Mode Max Reference
23-11 Maintenance Action
23-12 Maintenance Time Base
23-09 Timed Actions Reactivation 23-84 Cost Savings
23-1* Maintenance
24-** Appl. Functions 2
23-10 Maintenance Item
24-0* Fire Mode
23-82 Investment
23-83 Energy Savings
22-6* Broken Belt Detection 23-04 Occurrence
22-60 Broken Belt Function 23-08 Timed Actions Mode
23-66 Reset Continuous Bin Data
23-67 Reset Timed Bin Data
23-64 Timed Period Stop
23-65 Minimum Bin Value
23-8* Payback Counter
23-80 Power Reference Factor
23-81 Energy Cost
23-0* Timed Actions
23-00 ON Time
22-90 Flow at Rated Speed
23-** Time-based Functions
22-5* End of Curve
23-01 ON Action
22-50 End of Curve Function 23-02 OFF Time
22-51 End of Curve Delay
23-03 OFF Action
22-43 Wake-up Speed [Hz]
22-44 Wake-up Ref./FB Difference
22-45 Setpoint Boost
22-46 Maximum Boost Time
21-53 Ext. 3 Reference Source
22-27 Dry Pump Delay
22-3* No-Flow Power Tuning
21-50 Ext. 3 Ref./Feedback Unit 22-30 No-Flow Power
21-51 Ext. 3 Minimum Reference 22-31 Power Correction Factor
21-52 Ext. 3 Maximum Reference 22-32 Low Speed [RPM]
21-44 Ext. 2 Dif. Gain Limit
21-5* Ext. CL 3 Ref./Fb.
22-0* Miscellaneous
22-00 External Interlock
Delay
21-37 Ext. 2 Reference [Unit]
22-01 Power Filter Time
21-38 Ext. 2 Feedback [Unit]
22-2* No-Flow Detection
22-20 Low Power Auto Set21-39 Ext. 2 Output [%]
up
21-4* Ext. CL 2 PID
22-21 Low Power Detection
21-40 Ext. 2 Normal/Inverse Con- 22-22 Low Speed Detection
trol
21-41 Ext. 2 Proportional Gain
22-23 No-Flow Function
21-42 Ext. 2 Integral Time
22-24 No-Flow Delay
21-43 Ext. 2 Differentation Time 22-26 Dry Pump Function
21-34 Ext. 2 Feedback Source
21-35 Ext. 2 Setpoint
21-32 Ext. 2 Maximum Reference 21-64 Ext. 3 Dif. Gain Limit
21-33 Ext. 2 Reference Source
22-** Appl. Functions
14.0.9 Main Menu Structure - page 7
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© 2013 Taco, Inc.
59
25-82 Lead Pump
24-93 Missing Motor Coeffcient 3 25-29 Destage Function
25-86 Reset Relay Counters 26-30 Terminal X42/5 Low Voltage
25-9* Service
26-31 Terminal X42/5 High Voltage
25-90 Pump Interlock
26-34 Term. X42/5 Low Ref./
Feedb. Value
25-91 Manual Alternation
26-35 Term. X42/5 High Ref./
Feedb. Value
26-** Analog I/O Option
26-36 Term. X42/5 Filter Time
Constant
26-0* Analog I/O Mode
26-37 Term. X42/5 Live Zero
24-97 Locked Rotor Coeffcient 2 25-41 Ramp-up Delay
25-46 De-staging Speed
[RPM]
25-47 Destaging Speed [Hz]
25-5* Alternation Settings
25-50 Lead Pump Alternation
25-51 Alternation Event
25-52 Alternation Time Interval
25-53 Alternation Timer Value
25-00 Cascade Controller
25-24 SBW De-staging Delay
25-23 SBW Staging Delay
25-22 Fixed Speed Bandwidth
25-21 Override Bandwidth
25-20 Staging Bandwidth
26-00 Terminal X42/1 Mode
26-01 Terminal X42/3 Mode
26-02 Terminal X42/5 Mode
26-1* Analog Input X42/1
26-10 Terminal X42/1 Low
Voltage
26-11 Terminal X42/1 High
Voltage
25-54 Alternation Prede!ned 26-14 Term. X42/1 Low Ref./
Time
Feedb. Value
25-55 Alternate if Load <
26-15 Term. X42/1 High Ref./
50%
Feedb. Value
25-56 Staging Mode at Alter- 26-16 Term. X42/1 Filter Time
nation
Constant
25-58 Run Next Pump Delay 26-17 Term. X42/1 Live Zero
25-45 Staging Speed [Hz]
25-0* System Settings
25-02 Motor Start
25-04 Pump Cycling
25-05 Fixed Lead Pump
25-06 Number of Pumps
25-2* Bandwidth Settings
25-44 Staging Speed [RPM]
25-** Cascade Controller
24-99 Locked Rotor Coeffcient 4 25-43 Destaging Threshold
24-98 Locked Rotor Coeffcient 3 25-42 Staging Threshold
25-85 Relay ON Time
24-96 Locked Rotor Coeffcient 1 25-40 Ramp-down Delay
35-03 Term. X48/7 Input Type
35-02 Term. X48/7 Temp. Unit
35-01 Term. X48/4 Input Type
31-11 Bypass Running Hours
13-19 Remote Bypass Activation
35-** Sensor Input Option
35-0* Temp. Input Mode
35-00 Term. X48/4 Temp. Unit
31-10 Bypass Status Word
31-03 Test Mode Activation
31-02 Bypass Trip Time Delay
31-01 Bypass Start Time Delay
31-00 Bypass Mode
26-62 Terminal X42/11 Max.
Scale
26-63 Terminal X42/11 Bus Control
26-64 Terminal X42/11 Timeout
Preset
31-** Bypass Option
26-61 Terminal X42/11 Min. Scale
26-60 Terminal X42/11 Output
26-54 Terminal X42/9 Timeout
Preset
26-6* Analog Out X42/11
26-52 Terminal X42/9 Max. Scale 35-05 Term. X48/10 Input Type
26-51 Terminal X42/9 Min. Scale 35-04 Term. X48/10 Temp. Unit
26-50 Terminal X42/9 Output
24-4* Analog Out X42/7
26-40 Terminal X42/7 Output
26-41 Terminal X42/7 Min. Scale
26-42 Terminal X42/7 Max. Scale
26-43 Terminal X42/7 Bus Control
26-44 Terminal X42/7 Timeout
Preset
26-5* Analog Out X42/9
26-3* Analog Input X42/5
25-84 Pump ON Time
26-20 Terminal X42/3 Low Voltage
26-21 Terminal X42/3 High Voltage
26-24 Term. X42/3 Low Ref./
Feedb. Value
26-25 Term. X42/3 High Ref./
Feedb. Value
26-26 Term. X42/3 Filter Time
Constant
26-27 Term. X42/3 Live Zero
25-4* Staging Settings
24-95 Locked Rotor Function
24-94 Missing Motor Coeffcient 4 25-30 Destage Function Time 25-83 Relay Status
25-81 Pump Status
24-92 Missing Motor Coeffcient 2 25-28 Stage Function Time
25-8* Status
25-80 Cascade Status
25-26 Destage At No-Flow
24-91 Missing Motor Coeffcient 1 25-27 Stage Function
24-90 Missing Motor Function
14.0.10 Main Menu Structure - page 8
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60
35-27 Term. X48/7 High
Temp. Limit
35-3* Temp. Input X48/10
35-34 Term. X48/10 Filter
Time Constant
35-35 Term. X48/10 Temp.
Monitor
35-36 Term. X48/10 Low
Temp. Limit
35-06 Temperature Sensor Alarm 35-17 Term. X48/4 High
Function
Temp. Limit
35-1* Temp. Input X48/4
35-2* Temp. Input X48/7
35-14 Term. X48/4 Filter Time
35-24 Term. X48/7 Filter
Constant
Time Constant
35-15 Term. X48/4 Temp. Monitor 35-25 Term. X48/7 Temp.
Monitor
35-16 Term. X48/4 Low Temp.
35-26 Term. X48/7 Low
Limit
Temp. Limit
35-44 Term. X48/2 Low Ref./
Feedb. Value
35-43 Term. X48/2 High Current
35-37 Term. X48/10 High Temp. 35-45 Term. X48/2 High Ref./
Limit
Feedb. Value
35-4* Analog Input X48/2
35-46 Term. X48/2 Filter Time
Constant
35-42 Term. X48/2 Low Current 35-47 Term. X48/2 Live Zero
15 WARNINGS AND ALARMS
15.0.3 Warning and Alarm Displays
15.0.1 System Monitoring
The adjustable frequency drive monitors the condition of
its input power, output, and motor factors as well as
other system performance indicators. A warning or alarm
may not necessarily indicate a problem internal to the
adjust-able frequency drive itself. In many cases it
indicates fail-ure conditions from input voltage, motor
load or temperature, external signals, or other areas
monitored by the adjustable frequency drive’s internal
logic. Be sure to investigate those areas exterior to the
adjustable fre-quency drive as indicated in the alarm or
warning.
An alarm or trip lock alarm will flash on display along with
the alarm number.
15.0.2 Warning and Alarm Types
Warnings
A warning is issued when an alarm condition is impending or when an abnormal operating condition is present
and may result in the adjustable frequency drive issuing
an alarm. A warning clears by itself when the abnormal
condition is removed.
Alarms
In addition to the text and alarm code on the adjustable
frequency drive display, the status indicator lights operate.
Trip
An alarm is issued when the adjustable frequency drive
is tripped, that is, the adjustable frequency drive
suspends operation to prevent adjustable frequency
drive or sys-tem damage. The motor will coast to a stop.
The adjust-able frequency drive logic will continue to
operate and monitor the adjustable frequency drive
status. After the fault condition is remedied, the
adjustable frequency drive can be reset. It will then be
ready to start operation again.
A trip can be reset in any of 4 ways:
•
•
•
•
Press [RESET] on the LCP
Digital reset input command
Serial communication reset input command
Auto reset
Trip Lock
An alarm that causes the adjustable frequency drive to
trip lock requires that input power is cycled. The motor
will coast to a stop. The adjustable frequency drive logic
will continue to operate and monitor the adjustable frequency drive status. Remove input power to the adjustable frequency drive and correct the cause of the fault,
then restore power. This action puts the adjustable frequency drive into a trip condition as described above
and may be reset in any of those four ways.
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
Warn. LED
Warning
ar
Alarm
lar
Trip Lock
ON
Alarm LED
OFF
ON (Flashing)
ON (Flashing)
15.0.4 Warning and Alarm Definitions The
table below defines whether a warning is issued prior to
an alarm, and whether the alarm trips the unit or trip
locks the unit.
61
Table 10: Alarm/Warning Code List
No.
o.
1
2
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
42
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
Descript
10 Volts low
Live zero error
Mains phase loss
DC link voltage high
DC link voltage low
DC overvoltage
DC undervoltage
Inverter overloaded
Motor ETR overtemperature
Thrmstr overld
Torque limit
Overcurren
Groun fault
Hardwar mismatch
Shor Circuit
Control word timeout
Internal Fan Fault
External Fan Fault
Brake resistor short-circuited
Brake resistor power limit
Brake chopper short-circuited
Brak check
Driv overtemperature
Motor phase U missing
Motor phase V missing
Motor phase W missing
Inrus fault
Fieldbus communication fault
Out of frequency range
Main failure
Phas Imbalance
Interna fault
Heatsin sensor
Overloa of Digital Output Terminal
27
Overloa of Digital Output Terminal
29
Overload of Digital Output On X30/6
Overload of Digital Output On X30/7
Pwr. card supply
24 V supply low
1.8 V supply low
Spee limit
AMA calibration failed
AMA check Unom and Inom
AMA low Inom
AMA motor too big
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
Warning
X
(X)
(X)
X
X
X
X
X
(X)
(X)
X
X
X
(X)
X
X
X
(X)
X
(X)
X
(X)
(X)
(X)
X
X
X
X
Alarm/Trip
(X)
(X)
X
X
X
(X)
(X)
X
X
X
X
X
(X)
Parameter
Reference
Alarm/Trip Lock
(X)
6-01
14-12
1-90
1-90
X
X
X
X
8-04
14-53
(X)
X
(X)
X
(X)
(X)
(X)
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
2-13
2-15
X
(X)
(X)
(X)
X
4-58
4-58
4-58
X
X
(X)
X)
5-
5-01
(X)
X)
5-
5-02
(X)
(X)
X
X
5-32
5-33
X
X
X
(X)
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
1-86
62
No.
o.
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
62
Descript
64
65
66
67
69
70
71
AMA motor too small
AMA Parameter out of range
AMA interrupted by user
AM timeout
AMA internal fault
Curren limit
Externa Interlock
Output Frequency at Maximum
Limit
Voltag Limit
Control Board Overtemperature
Heatsin Temperature Low
Option Configuration has Changed
Pwr Card Temp
Illegal FC configuration
PTC 1 Safe Stop
72
Dangerou Failure
73
76
79
80
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
201
202
203
204
243
244
245
246
247
248
250
251
Safe Stop Auto Restart
Power Unit Set-up
Illegal PS config
Drive Initialized to Default Value
Analog input 54 wrong settings
No-Flo
Dr Pump
End of Curve
Broke Belt
Star Delayed
Sto Delayed
Cloc Fault
Fire M was Active
Fire M Limits Exceeded
Missi Motor
Lock Rotor
Bra IGBT
Heatsi temp
Heatsi sensor
Pwr.ca supply
Pwr.ca temp
Illegal PS config
New spare parts
N
Type Code
Warning Alarm/
Alarm/Trip Lock
Trip
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Parameter
Reference
X
X
X
X1)
X1)
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
22-2*
22-2*
22-5*
22-6*
22-7*
22-7*
0-7*
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
(X) Dependent on parameter
1)
Cannot be Auto reset via 14-20 Reset Mode
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
63
15.0.5 Fault Messages
WARNING 6, DC link voltage low
The warning/alarm information below defines the warning/alarm condition, provides the probable cause for the
condition, and details a remedy or troubleshooting procedure.
The intermediate circuit voltage (DC) is lower than the
low voltage warning limit. The limit is dependent on the
adjustable frequency drive voltage rating. The adjustable
frequency drive is still active.
WARNING 1, 10 volts low
WARNING/ALARM 7, DC overvoltage
The control card voltage is below 10 V from terminal 50.
Remove some of the load from terminal 50, as the 10 V
supply is overloaded. Max. 15 mA or minimum 590
Ohms. This condition can be caused by a short in a connected potentiometer or improper wiring of the potentiometer.
If the intermediate circuit voltage exceeds the limit, the
adjustable frequency drive trips after a time.
Troubleshooting
Change the ramp type
Troubleshooting
Connect a brake resistor
Extend the ramp time
Remove the wiring from terminal 50. If the warning
clears, the problem is with the customer wiring. If the
warning does not clear, replace the control card.
Activate functions in 2-10 Brake Function
WARNING/ALARM 2, Live zero error
WARNING/ALARM 8, DC undervoltage
This warning or alarm will only appear if programmed by
the user in 6-01 Live Zero Timeout Function. The signal
on one of the analog inputs is less than 50% of the minimum value programmed for that input. This condition
can be caused by broken wiring or faulty device sending
the signal.
If the intermediate circuit voltage (DC) drops below the
undervoltage limit, the adjustable frequency drive checks
if a 24 VDC backup supply is connected. If no 24 VDC
backup supply is connected, the adjustable frequency
drive trips after a fxed time delay. The time delay varies
with unit size.
Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Check connections on all the analog input terminals.
Control card terminals 53 and 54 for signals, terminal 55
common. MCB 101 terminals 11 and 12 for signals, terminal 10 common. MCB 109 terminals 1, 3, 5 for signals,
terminals 2, 4, 6 common).
Check that the supply voltage matches the
Check that the adjustable frequency drive programming
and switch settings match the analog signal type.
WARNING/ALARM 9, Inverter overload
Perform Input Terminal Signal Test.
WARNING/ALARM 4, Mains phase loss
A phase is missing on the supply side, or the line voltage
imbalance is too high. This message also appears for a
fault in the input rectifer on the adjustable frequency
drive. Options are programmed at 14-12 Function at
Mains Imbalance.
Troubleshooting
Check the supply voltage and supply currents to the
adjustable frequency drive.
WARNING 5, DC link voltage high
The intermediate circuit voltage (DC) is higher than the
high voltage warning limit. The limit is dependent on the
adjustable frequency drive voltage rating. The adjustable
frequency drive is still active.
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
Increase 14-26 Trip Delay at Inverter Fault
adjustable frequency drive voltage.
Perform Input voltage test
Perform soft charge and recti!er circuit test
The adjustable frequency drive is about to cut out
because of an overload (current too high for too long).
The counter for electronic, thermal inverter protection
gives a warning at 98% and trips at 100%, while giving
an alarm. The adjustable frequency drive cannot be
reset until the counter is below 90%.
The fault is that the adjustable frequency drive has been
overloaded by more than 100% for too long.
Troubleshooting
Compare the output current shown on the LCP with the
adjustable frequency drive rated current.
Compare the output current shown on the LCP with measured motor current.
64
Display the Thermal Drive Load on the LCP and monitor
the value. When running above the adjustable frequency
drive continuous current rating, the counter should
increase. When running below the adjustable frequency
drive continuous current rating, the counter should
decrease.
See the derating section in the Design Guide for more
details if a high switching frequency is required.
WARNING/ALARM 10, Motor Overload Temperature
According to the electronic thermal protection (ETR), the
motor is too hot. Select whether the adjustable
frequency drive gives a warning or an alarm when the
counter reaches 100% in 1-90 Motor Thermal Protection.
The fault occurs when the motor is overloaded by more
than 100% for too long.
Troubleshooting
• Check for motor overheating.
• Check if the motor is mechanically overloaded.
• Check that the motor current set in 1-24 Motor Current is correct.
• Ensure that Motor data in parameters 1-20 through
1-25 are set correctly.
• If an external fan is in use, check in 1-91 Motor External Fan that it is selected.
• Running AMA in 1-29 Automatic Motor Adaptation
(AMA) may tune the adjustable frequency drive to the
motor more accurately and reduce thermal loading.
WARNING/ALARM 11, Thermistor overload
The thermistor might be disconnected. Select whether
the adjustable frequency drive gives a warning or an
alarm in 1-90 Motor Thermal Protection.
Troubleshooting
• Check for motor overheating.
• Check if the motor is mechanically overloaded.
• When using terminal 53 or 54, check that the thermistor is connected correctly between either terminal
53 or 54 (analog voltage input) and terminal 50 (+10
V supply) and that the terminal switch for 53 or 54 is
set for voltage. Check 1-93 Thermistor Source
selects terminal 53 or 54.
• When using digital inputs 18 or 19, check that the
thermistor is connected correctly between either terminal 18 or 19 (digital input PNP only) and terminal
50. Check 1-93 Thermistor Source selects terminal
18 or 19.
WARNING/ALARM 12, Torque limit
The torque has exceeded the value in 4-16 Torque Limit
Motor Mode or the value in 4-17 Torque Limit Generator
Mode. 14-25 Trip Delay at Torque Limit can change this
from a warning only condition to a warning followed by
an alarm.
Troubleshooting
• If the motor torque limit is exceeded during ramp-up,
extend the ramp-up time.
• If the generator torque limit is exceeded during rampdown, extend the ramp-down time.
• If torque limit occurs while running, possibly increase
the torque limit. Be sure the system can operate
safely at a higher torque.
• Check the application for excessive current draw on
the motor.
WARNING/ALARM 13, Overcurrent
The inverter peak current limit (approx. 200% of the
rated current) is exceeded. The warning lasts about 1.5
sec. Then the adjustable frequency drive trips and
issues an alarm. This fault may be caused by shock
loading or fast acceleration with high inertia loads. If
extended mechan ical brake control is selected, trip can
be reset externally.
Troubleshooting
• Remove power and check if the motor shaft can be
turned.
• Make sure that the motor size matches the adjustable frequency drive.
• Check parameters 1-20 through 1-25 for correct
motor data.
WARNING/ALARM 14, Ground Fault
There is current from the output phases to ground, either
in the cable between the adjustable frequency drive and
the motor or in the motor itself.
Troubleshooting
• Remove power to the adjustable frequency drive and
repair the ground fault.
• Check for ground faults in the motor by measuring
the resistance to ground of the motor leads and the
motor with a megohmmeter.
WARNING/ALARM 15, Hardware Mismatch
A fitted option is not operational with the present control
board hardware or software.
Record the value of the following parameters and contact
your Danfoss supplier:
15-40 FC Type
15-41 Power Section
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
65
15-42 Voltage
WARNING/ALARM 25, Brake Resistor Short Circuit
15-43 Software Version
The brake resistor is monitored during operation. If a
short circuit occurs, the brake function is disabled and
the warning appears. The adjustable frequency drive is
still operational but without the brake function. Remove
power to the adjustable frequency drive and replace the
brake resistor (see 2-15 Brake Check).
15-45 Actual Typecode String
15-49 SW ID Control Card
15-50 SW ID Power Card
15-60 Option Mounted
15-61 Option SW Version
WARNING/ALARM 16, Short Circuit
There is a short circuit in the motor or motor wiring.
Remove power to the adjustable frequency drive and
repair the short circuit.
WARNING/ALARM 17, Control Word Timeout
There is no communication to the adjustable frequency
drive.
The warning will only be active when 8-04 Control Timeout Function is NOT set to [0] OFF.
If 8-04 Control Timeout Function is set to Stop and Trip,
a warning appears and the adjustable frequency drive
ramps down until it stops then displays an alarm.
Troubleshooting
• Check connections on the serial communication
cable.
• Increase 8-03 Control Timeout Time.
• Check the operation of the communication equipment.
• Verify proper installation based on EMC requirements.
WARNING/ALARM 23, Internal Fan Fault
The fan warning function checks if the fan is running. The
fan warning can be disabled in 14-53 Fan Monitor.
Troubleshooting
• Check for proper fan operation.
• Cycle power to the adjustable frequency drive and
check that the fan operates briefly at startup.
• Check the sensors on the heatsink and control card.
WARNING/ALARM 24, External Fan Fault
The fan warning function checks if the fan is running. The
fan warning can be disabled in 14-53 Fan Monitor.
Troubleshooting
• Check for proper fan operation.
• Cycle power to the adjustable frequency drive and
check that the fan operates briefly at startup.
• Check the sensors on the heatsink and control card.
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
WARNING/ALARM 26, Brake Resistor Power Limit
The power transmitted to the brake resistor is calculated
as a mean value over the last 120 seconds of run time.
The calculation is based on the intermediate circuit voltage and the brake resistance value set in 2-16 AC Brake
Max. Current. The warning is active when the dissipated
braking is higher than 90% of the brake resistance
power. If Trip [2] is selected in 2-13 Brake Power
Monitoring, the adjustable frequency drive will trip when
the dissipated braking energy reaches 100%.
WARNING/ALARM 27, Brake Chopper Fault
The brake transistor is monitored during operation and if
a short circuit occurs, the brake function is disabled and
a warning is issued. The adjustable frequency drive is
still operational but, since the brake transistor has
shortcir-cuited, substantial power is transmitted to the
brake resistor, even if it is inactive.
Remove power to the adjustable frequency drive and
remove the brake resistor.
WARNING/ALARM 28, Brake Check Failed
The brake resistor is not connected or not working.
Check 2-15 Brake Check.
WARNING/ALARM 29, Heatsink Temp
The maximum temperature of the heatsink has been
exceeded. The temperature fault will not reset until the
temperature falls below the reset heatsink temperature.
The trip and reset points are based on the adjustable frequency drive power size.
Troubleshooting
Check for the following conditions.
• Ambient temperature too high.
• Motor cable too long.
• Incorrect airflow clearance above and below the
adjustable frequency drive.
• Blocked airflow around the adjustable frequency
drive.
• Damaged heatsink fan.
• Dirty heatsink.
66
WARNING/ALARM 30, Motor phase U missing
Motor phase U between the adjustable frequency drive
and the motor is missing.
Remove power from the adjustable frequency drive and
check motor phase U.
WARNING/ALARM 31, Motor phase V missing
Motor phase V between the adjustable frequency drive
and the motor is missing.
Remove power from the adjustable frequency drive and
check motor phase V.
WARNING/ALARM 30, Motor phase W missing
Motor phase W between the adjustable frequency drive
and the motor is missing.
Remove power from the adjustable frequency drive and
check motor phase W.
WARNING/ALARM 33, Inrush Fault
Too many power-ups have occurred within a short
time period. Let the unit cool to operating temperature.
WARNING/ALARM 34, Fieldbus Communication Fault
Communication between the serial communication bus
and the communication option card is not operating.
WARNING/ALARM 36, Mains Failure
This warning/alarm is only active if the supply voltage to
the adjustable frequency drive is lost and 14-10 Mains
Failure is NOT set to [0] No Function. Check the fuses to
the adjustable frequency drive and line power supply to
the unit.
WARNING/ALARM 36, Internal Fault
When an internal fault occurs, a code number defined
in the table below is displayed.
Troubleshooting
• Cycle power to the adjustable frequency drive.
• Check that the option is properly installed.
• Check for loose or missing wiring.
It may be necessary to contact your Danfoss supplier or
service department. Note the code number for further
troubleshooting directions.
No.
o.
0
256-258
512-519
783
T
Serial port cannot be initialized. Contact your
Danfoss supplier or DanfossService Department.
Power EEPROM data is defect or too old.
Internal fault. Contact yourDanfoss supplier or
DanfossService Department.
Parameter value outside of min/max limits
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
No.
o.
T
1024-1284 Internal fault. Contact your Danfoss supplier or
the Danfoss Service Department.
1299
Option SW in slot A is too old.
1300
Option SW in slot B is too old.
1302
Option SW in slot C1 is too old.
1315
Option SW in slot A is not supported (not
allowed).
1316
Option SW in slot B is not supported (not
allowed).
1318
Option SW in slot C1 is not supported (not
allowed).
1379-2819 Internal fault. Contact yourDanfoss supplier or
DanfossService Department.
2820
LCP stack overflow.
2821
Serial port overflow.
2822
USB port overflow.
3072-5122 Parameter value is outside its limit.
5123
Opt
in slot A: Hardware incompatible with control board hardware.
5124
Option in slot B: Hardware incompatible with control board hardware.
5125
Option in slot C0: Hardware incompatible with
control board hardware.
5126
Option in slot C1: Hardware incompatible with
control board hardware.
5376-6231 Internal fault. Contact your Danfoss supplier or
DanfossService Department.
WARNING/ALARM 39, Heatsink Sensor
No feedback from the heatsink temperature sensor.
The signal from the IGBT thermal sensor is not available
on the power card. The problem could be on the power
card, on the gate drive card, or the ribbon cable between
the power card and gate drive card.
WARNING/ALARM 40, Overload of digital output terminal 27
Check the load connected to terminal 27 or remove
shortcircuit connection. Check 5-00 Digital I/O Mode and
5-01 Terminal 27 Mode.
WARNING/ALARM 40, Overload of digital output terminal 29
Check the load connected to terminal 27 or remove
shortcircuit connection. Check 5-00 Digital I/O Mode and
5-01 Terminal 29 Mode.
WARNING/ALARM 40, Overload of digital output on
X30/6 or overload of digital ouput on x30/7
For X30/6, check the load connected to X30/6 or remove
short-circuit connection. Check 5-32 Term X30/6 Digi Out
(MCB 101).
67
For X30/7, check the load connected to X30/7 or remove
short-circuit connection. Check 5-33 Term X30/7 Digi
Out (MCB 101).
ALARM 51, AMA check Unom and Inom
WARNING/ALARM 45, Ground Fault 2
The settings for motor voltage, motor current, and motor
power are wrong. Check the settings in parameters 1-20
to 1-25.
Ground fault on start-up.
ALARM 52, AMA low Inom
Troubleshooting
The motor current is too low. Check the setting in 4-18
Current Limit.
• Check for proper grounding and loose connections.
• Check for proper wire size.
• Check motor cables for short-circuits or leakage currents.
WARNING/ALARM 46, Power Card Supply
The supply on the power card is out of range.
There are three power supplies generated by the switch
mode power supply (SMPS) on the power card: 24 V, 5
V, +/- 18 V. When powered with 24 VDC with the MCB
107 option, only the 24 V and 5 V supplies are
monitored. When powered with three phase AC line
voltage, all three supplied are monitored.
Troubleshooting
•
•
•
•
Check for a defective power card.
Check for a defective control card.
Check for a defective option card.
If a 24 VDC power supply is used, verify proper supply power.
WARNING/ALARM 47, 24 V Supply Low
ALARM 53, AMA motor too big
The motor is too big for the AMA to operate.
ALARM 54, AMA motor too small
The motor is too small for the AMA to operate.
ALARM 55, AMA parameter out of range
The parameter values of the motor are outside of the
acceptable range. AMA will not run.
ALARM 56, AMA interrupted by user
The AMA has been interrupted by the user.
ALARM 57, AMA timeout
Try to restart AMA again. Repeated restarts may overheat the motor.
ALARM 58, AMA internal fault
Contact your Danfoss supplier.
WARNING 59, Current limit
The 24 V DC is measured on the control card. The external 24 VDC backup power supply may be overloaded;
otherwise, contact your Danfoss supplier.
The current is higher than the value in 4-18 Current
Limit. Ensure that Motor data in parameters 1-20 through
1-25 are set correctly. Possibly increase the current limit.
Be sure the system can operate safely at a higher limit.
WARNING/ALARM 48, 1.8 Supply Low
ALARM 60, External interlock
The 1.8V DC supply used on the control card is outside
of allowable limits. The power supply is measured on the
control card. Check for a defective control card. If an
option card is present, check for an overvoltage condition.
A digital input signal is indicating a fault condition external to the adjustable frequency drive. An external interlock has commanded the adjustable frequency drive to
trip. Clear the external fault condition. To resume normal
operation, apply 24 VDC to the terminal programmed for
external interlock. Reset the adjustable frequency drive.
WARNING/ALARM 49, Speed Limit
When the speed is not within the specified range in 4-11
Motor Speed Low Limit [RPM] and 4-13 Motor Speed
High Limit [RPM], the adjustable frequency drive will
show a warning. When the speed is below the specified
limit in 1-86 Trip Speed Low [RPM] (except when
starting or stopping), the adjustable frequency drive will
trip.
WARNING 62, Output frequency at maximum limit
ALARM 50, AMA calibration failed
Contact your Danfoss supplier or Danfoss Service
Department.
WARNING/ALARM 65, Control card over temperature
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
The output frequency has reached the value set in 4-19
Max Output Frequency. Check the application to determine the cause. Possibly increase the output frequency
limit. Be sure the system can operate safely at a higher
output frequency. The warning will clear when the output
drops below the maximum limit.
The cutout temperature of the control card is 176°F
[80 °C].
68
Troubleshooting
ALARM 93, Dry pump
• Check that the ambient operating temperature is
within limits.
• Check for clogged filters.
• Check fan operation.
• Check the control card.
WARNING 66, Heatsink temperature low
A no-flow condition in the system with the frequency
con-verter operating at high speed may indicate a dry
pump. 22-26 Dry Pump Function is set for alarm.
Troubleshoot the system and reset the frequency
converter after the fault has been cleared.
The adjustable frequency drive is too cold to operate.
This warning is based on the temperature sensor in the
IGBT module. Increase the ambient temperature of the
unit. Also, a trickle amount of current can be supplied to
the adjustable frequency drive whenever the motor is
stopped by setting 2-00 DC Hold/Preheat Current at 5%
and 1-80 Function at Stop.
Feedback is lower than the setpoint. This may indicate
leakage in the system. 22-50 End of Curve Function is
set for alarm. Troubleshoot the system and reset the
adjustable frequency drive after the fault has been
cleared.
ALARM 67,
changed
Option
module
configuration
ALARM 94, End of curve
has
One or more options have either been added or
removed since the last power-down. Check that the
configuration change is intentional and reset the
adjustable frequency drive.
ALARM 68, Safe stop activated
Loss of the 24 VDC signal on terminal 37 has caused
the adjustable frequency drive to trip. To resume normal
operation, apply 24 VDC to terminal 37 and reset the
adjustable frequency drive.
ALARM 69, Power card temperature
The temperature sensor on the power card is either too
hot or too cold.
ALARM 70, Illegal FC configuration
The control card and power card are incompatible. Contact your supplier with the typecode of the unit from the
nameplate and the part numbers of the cards to check
compatibility.
ALARM 80, Drive initialized to default value
Parameter settings are initialized to default settings after
a manual reset. Reset the unit to clear the alarm.
ALARM 92, No-flow
A no-flow condition has been detected in the system. 2223 No-Flow Function is set for alarm. Troubleshoot the
system and reset the adjustable frequency drive after the
fault has been cleared.
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
ALARM 95, Broken belt
Torque is below the torque level set for no load,
indicating a broken belt. 22-60 Broken Belt Function is
set for alarm. Troubleshoot the system and reset the
adjustable frequency drive after the fault has been
cleared.
ALARM 96, Start delayed
Motor start has been delayed due to short-cycle protection. 22-76 Interval between Starts is enabled. Troubleshoot the system and reset the adjustable frequency
drive after the fault has been cleared.
WARNING 97, Stop delayed
Stopping the motor has been delayed due to short cycle
protection. 22-76 Interval between Starts is enabled.
Troubleshoot the system and reset the adjustable frequency drive after the fault has been cleared.
WARNING 98, Clock fault
Time is not set or the RTC clock has failed. Reset the
clock in 0-70 Date and Time.
WARNING 200, Fire mode
This indicates the adjustable frequency drive is operating
in fire mode. The warning clears when fire mode is
removed. See the fire mode data in the alarm log.
WARNING 201, Fire mode was active
This indicates the adjustable frequency drive had
entered fire mode. Cycle power to the unit to remove the
warning. See the fire mode data in the alarm log.
WARNING 202, Fire mode limits exceeded
While operating in fire mode one or more alarm conditions has been ignored which would normally trip the
unit. Operating in this condition voids unit warranty.
Cycle power to the unit to remove the warning. See the
fire mode data in the alarm log.
69
WARNING 203, Missing motor
With an adjustable frequency drive operating multimotors, an underload condition was detected. This could
indicate a missing motor. Inspect the system for proper
operation.
WARNING 204, Locked rotor
3.Press [OK].
4.Scroll Down
Detection.
to parameter 22-2* No-Flow
With an adjustable frequency drive operating multimotors, an overload condition was detected. This could
indicate a locked rotor. Inspect the motor for proper
oper-ation.
WARNING 250, New spare part
A component in the adjustable frequency drive has been
replaced. Reset the adjustable frequency drive for
normal operation.
5.Press [OK].
WARNING 251, New type code
A component in the adjustable frequency drive has been
replaced and the type code changed. Reset the adjustable frequency drive for normal operation.
6.Scroll down
Function.
to parameter 22-23 No-Flow
15.1 Supplemental Warning and
Alarm Settings
15.1.1 No-Flow
Definition: No-flow = low power consumption & low
speed condition.
Pump response options:
• off [0]
• sleep mode [1]
• warning + run [2] (Factory default mode for SelfSensing pump)
• alarm + trip [3]
No-Flow Settings
1.Press [Main Menu].
2.Scroll down
tions.
to parameter 22-** Appl. Func-
7.Press [OK].
8.Change parameter 22-23 to desired feature.
9.Press [Back].
10.Scroll down
to parameter 22-24 No-Flow
Delay.
11.Select the amount of time the pump will run after
no-flow is detected, before going into the mode
selected in Parameter 22-23.
15.1.2 Dry-Run
Definition: Dry-run = low power consumption and 60Hz
high speed condition.
Pump response options:
• off [0],
• warning + run [1] (Factory default mode for SelfSensing pump)
• alarm + trip [2]
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
70
• manual reset alarm [3]
8.Press [Back].
Dry-Run Settings
1.Press [Main Menu].
9.Scroll down
Delay.
2.Scroll down
tions.
to parameter 22-27 Dry Pump
to parameter 22-** Appl. Func-
10.Select the amount of time the pump will run after
dry-run is detected, before going into the mode
selected in Parameter 22-26.
3.Press [OK].
15.1.3 End-Of-Curve
4.Scroll Down
Detection.
to parameter 22-2* No-Flow
Definition: End-of-curve = pump yielding too large a volume to ensure the set pressure @ 60Hz max speed condition).
Pump response options:
• off [0],
• warning + run [1] (Factory default mode for SelfSensing pump)
• alarm + trip [2]
• manual reset alarm [3]
End-Of-Curve Settings
1.Press [Main Menu].
5.Press [OK].
6.Scroll down
Function.
to parameter 22-26 Dry Pump
Press [OK].
2.Scroll down
tions.
to parameter 22-** Appl. Func-
3.Press [OK].
7.Change parameter 22-26 to desired feature.
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
71
4.Scroll Down
Curve.
to parameter 22-5* End of
Function at Inverter Overload Settings
1.Press [Main Menu].
2.Scroll Down
Functions.
to parameter 14-** Special
5.Press [OK].
6.Press [OK]
to change parameter 25-50 End
of Curve Function.
3.Press [OK].
4.Scroll Down
to parameter 14-6* Auto Derate.
7.Change parameter 22-50 to desired feature.
8.Press [Back].
9.Scroll down
Delay.
to parameter 25-51 End of Curve
10.Select the amount of time the pump will run after
end-of-curve is detected, before going into the
mode selected in Parameter 25-50.
15.1.4 Function at Inverter Overload
5. Scroll down
to parameter 14-61 Function at
Inverter Overload.
6.Press [OK].
7.Change parameter 14-61 to desired feature.
Definition: Function at Inverter overload = running along
HP limit curve.
Pump response options:
• default VFD trips at 110% rated current [0];
• de-rate VFD when load exceeds rating via speed
reduction [1]. (Factory default mode for SelfSensing
pump)
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
72
16 SCI PUMP PROBLEM ANALYSIS
A. NO DISCHARGE
1. Pump not primed
2. Speed too low (when direct connected to electric motor, determine whether or not motor is
across the line and receives full
voltage)
3. System head too high
4. Suction lift higher than that for
which pump is designed
5. Impeller completely plugged
6. Wrong direction of rotation
7. Air leak in the suction line
8. Air leak through stuffing box
B. INSUFFICIENT DISCHARGE
1. Air leaks in suction line or stuffing
box
2. Speed too low (when direct connected to electric motor, determine whether or not motor is
across the line and receives full
voltage)
3. System head higher than anticipated
4. Insufficient NPSH (net positive
suction head). Suction lift too
high. Check with gauges. Check
also for clogged suction line or
screen.
5. Not enough suction head for hot
or volatile liquids
6. Foot valve too small
7. Impeller partially plugged
8. Mechanical defects:
Wearing rings worn
Impeller damaged
Foot valve or suction opening
not submerged enough
Wrong direction of rotation
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
C. INSUFFICIENT PRESSURE
1. Speed too low (when direct connected to electric motor, determine whether or not motor is
across the line and receives full
voltage)
2. System head less than anticipated
3. Air or gas in liquid
4. Mechanical defects:
Wearing rings worn
Impeller damaged Impeller
diameter too small Wrong
direction of rotation
D. LOSS OF SUCTION FOLLOWING
PERIOD OF SATISFACTORY
OPERATION
1. Leaky suction line
2. Waterseal plugged
3. Suction lift too high or insufficient
NPSH
4. Air or gas in liquid
5. Casing gasket defective
6. Clogging of strainer
E. EXCESSIVE POWER
CONSUMPTION
1. Speed too high
2. System head lower than rating,
pumps too much liquid
3. Specific gravity or viscosity of
liquid is too high
4. Mechanical defects:
Shaft bent
Rotating element binds
Stuffing boxes too tight
Wearing rings worn
F. VIBRATION
1. Air leak in suction line
2. Air or gas in liquid
3. Impeller partially plugged
4. Mechanical defects:
Damaged impeller
Misalignment of pump and
driver
Bearing worn Rotor
out of balance Shaft
bent
5. Foundation not rigid
G. MOTOR RUNS HOT
1. Speed too high
2. Specific gravity or viscosity of
liquid pumped is too high
3. Mechanical defects:
Shaft bent
Rotating element binds
Defects in motor Voltage
and/or frequency
lower than rating
Misalignment of pump and
driver
H. PUMP BEARINGS OVERHEAT
1. Contaminated lubricant
2. Mechanical defects:
Shaft bent
Rotor out of balance
Misalignment of pump and
driver
73
17 SPECIFICATIONS
17.1 Power-dependent Specifications
Table 11: Line Power Supply 200-240 V AC
Line Power Supply 200-240 V AC - Normal overload 110% for 1 minute
Adjustable frequency drive
Typical Shaft Output [kW]
IP20, IP21 max. cable cross-section (line power, motor,
brake and load sharing) [mm2 (AWG)]
IP55, IP66 max. cable cross-section (line power, motor,
brake and load sharing) [mm2 (AWG)]
Max. cable cross-section with disconnect
P1K1
1.1
P1K5
1.5
P2K2
2.2
P3K0
3
P3K7
3.7
4, 4, 4 (12, 12, 12) (min. 0.2 (24))
4, 4, 4 (12, 12, 12)
6, 4, 4, (10, 12, 12)
Table 12: Line Power Supply 3 x 200-240 V AC
Line Power Supply 3 x 200-240 V AC - Normal overload 110% for 1 minute
Adjustable frequency drive
Typical Shaft Output [kW]
IP20, IP21 max. cable cross-section (line power, motor,
brake and load sharing) [mm2 (AWG)]
IP21, IP55, IP66 max. cable cross-section (line power,
motor) [mm2 (AWG)]
IP21, IP55, IP66 max. cable cross-section (brake, load
sharing) [mm2 (AWG)]
P5K5
5.5
P7K5
7.5
P11K
11
P15K
15
10, 10 (8,8-)
35,-,- (2,-,-)
35 (2)
10, 10 (8,8-)
35, 25, 25
(2, 4, 4)
50 (1)
35,-,- (2,-,-)
50 (1)
16, 10, 16 (6, 8 ,6)
P18K
18.5
50 (1)
Table 13: Line Power Supply 3 x 200-240 V AC
Line Power Supply 3 x 200-240 V AC - Normal overload 110% for 1 minute
Adjustable frequency drive
Typical Shaft Output [kW]
IP20, IP21 max. cable cross-section (line power, motor,
brake and load sharing) [mm2 (AWG)]
IP21, IP55, IP66 max. cable cross-section (line power,
motor) [mm2 (AWG)]
IP21, IP55, IP66 max. cable cross-section (brake, load
sharing) [mm2 (AWG)]
P22K
22
P30K
30
P37K
37
P45K
45
150 (300 MCM)
150 (300 MCM)
95 (3/0)
Table 14: Line Power Supply 3 x 380-480 V AC
Line Power Supply 3 x 380-480 V AC - Normal overload 110% for 1 minute
Adjustable frequency drive
Typical Shaft Output [kW]
Typical Shaft Output [HP] at 460 V
IP20, IP21 max. cable cross-section (line power, motor,
brake and load sharing) [mm2 (AWG)] 1)
IP55, IP66 max. cable cross-section (line power, motor,
brake and load sharing) [mm2 (AWG)] 1)
Max. cable cross-section with disconnect
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
P1K1
1.1
1.5
P1K5
1.5
2.0
P2K2
2.2
2.9
P3K0
3
4.0
P4K0
4
5.0
P5K5
5.5
7.5
P7K5
7.5
10
4, 4, 4 (12, 12, 12)
(min. 0.2 (24))
4, 4, 4 (12, 12, 12)
6, 4, 4 (10, 12, 12)
74
Table 15: Line Power Supply 3 x 380-480 V AC
Line Power Supply 3 x 380-480 V AC - Normal overload 110% for 1 minute
Adjustable frequency drive
Typical Shaft Output [kW]
Typical Shaft Output [HP] at 460 V 15 20 25 30 40
IP20 max. cable cross-section (line power, brake, motor
and load sharing)
IP21, IP55, IP66 max. cable cross-section (line power,
motor) [mm2 (AWG)]
IP21, IP55, IP66 max. cable cross-section (brake, load
sharing) [mm2 (AWG)]
P11K
11
15
P15K
15
20
P18K
18.5
25
P22K
22
30
P30K
30
40
16, 10, - (8, 8, -)
35,-,- (2,-,-)
35 (2)
10, 10, 16 (6, 8, 6)
35, 25, 25 (2, 4, 4)
50 (1)
10, 10, - (8, 8, -)
35, -, - (2, -, -)
50 (1)
Table 16: Line Power Supply 3 x 380-480 V AC
Line Power Supply 3 x 380-480 V AC - Normal overload 110% for 1 minute
Adjustable frequency drive
Typical Shaft Output [kW]
Typical Shaft Output [HP] at 460 V 15 20 25 30 40
IP20 max. cable cross-section (line power, brake, motor
and load sharing)
IP21, IP55, IP66 max. cable cross-section (line power,
motor) [mm2 (AWG)]
IP21, IP55, IP66 max. cable cross-section (brake, load
sharing) [mm2 (AWG)]
P37K
37
50
P45K
45
60
P55K
55
75
50 (1)
P75K
75
100
P90K
90
125
150 (300 MCM)
150 (300 MCM)
95 (3/0)
Table 17: With brake and load sharing 95 / 4/0
Line Power Supply 3 x 525-600 V AC - Normal overload 110% for 1 minute
Size:
Typical Shaft Output [kW]
IP20 max. cable cross-section (line power, motor,
brake and load sharing) [mm2]/[AWG]
IP55, IP66 max. cable cross-section (line power,
motor, brake and load sharing) [mm2]/[AWG]
Max. cable cross-section with disconnect
P1K1
1.1
P1K5
1.5
P2K2
2.2
P3K0
3
P3K7
3.7
PK40
4
P5K5
5.5
P7K5
7.5
P11K
11
P55K
55
P75K
75
P90K
90
4, 4, 4 (12, 12, 12)
(min. 0.2 (24))
4, 4, 4 (12, 12, 12)
(min. 0.2 (24))
6, 4, 4 (12, 12, 12)
Table 18: With brake and load sharing 95 / 4/0
Line Power Supply 3 x 525-600 V AC - Normal overload 110% for 1 minute
Size:
Typical Shaft Output [kW]
IP20 max. cable cross-section (line power, motor,
brake and load sharing) [mm2]/[AWG]
IP55, IP66 max. cable cross-section (line power,
motor, brake and load sharing) [mm2]/[AWG]
Max. cable cross-section with disconnect
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
P15K
15
P18K
18.5
P22K
22
P30K
30
P37K
37
P45K
45
75
17.1.1 Line Power Supply 3 x 525-690 V AC
Table 19: Line Power Supply 3 x 525-690 V AC
Normal overload 110% for 1 minute
Adjustable frequency drive
Typical Shaft Output [kW]
IP20 max. cable cross-section (line power, motor, brake
and load sharing) [mm2]/(AWG)
P1K1
1.1
P1K5
1.5
P2K2
2.2
P3K0
3
P4K0
4
P5K5
5.5
P7K5
7.5
[0.2-4]/(24-10)
Table 20: Line Power Supply 3 x 525-690 V AC IP20-Chassis/IP21-IP55/NEMA 1-NEMA12
Normal overload 110% for 1 minute
Adjustable frequency drive
Typical Shaft Output [kW]
Typical Shaft Output [HP] at 575V
P11K
11
16.4
P15K
15
20.1
P18K
18
24
P22K
22
33
P45K
45
60
[35]/(1/0)
Max. cable size (line power, motor, brake) [mm2]/(AWG) 1)
P55K
55
75
[50]/(1)
Table 21: Line Power Supply 3 x 525-690 V AC IP21-IP55/NEMA 1-NEMA 12
Normal overload 110% for 1 minute
Adjustable frequency drive
Typical Shaft Output [kW]
Typical Shaft Output [HP] at 575V
P30K
30
40
P37K
37
60
P55K
55
75
P75K
75
100
[95]/(4/0)
Max. cable size (line power, motor, brake) [mm2]/(AWG) 1)
1)
P45K
45
60
American Wire Gauge
17.2 Connection Tightening Torques
Table 22: Tightening of Terminals
Power (kW)
Enclosure
200-240
V
380-480/
500 V
Torque (Nm)
525-600 V 525-690 V
A2
2
A3
3
A4
4
A5
5
B1
1
B2
2
B3
3
B4
4
C1
1
C2
2
1.1-2.
3.0-3.
1.1-2.
1.1-3.
5.5-1
1
5.5-1
15-1
18-3
37-4
1.1-4.0
5.5-7.5
1.1-4.0
1.1-7.5
11-18
22-30
11-18
22-37
37-55
75-90
1.1-7.5
11-18
22-30
11-18
22-37
37-55
75-90
C3
3
C4
4
2237-4
45-55
75-90
45-55
75-90
1)
1.1-7.5
1.1-7.5
11-30
11-37
37-90
45-55
Line
Power
Motor
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
1.8
4.5
1.8
4.5
10
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
1.8
4.5
1.8
4.5
10
14/24 1)
10
14/24 1)
10
14/24 1)
14/24 1)
DC
Brake
Brake
Connection
Gr
Relay
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
1.5
3.7
1.8
4.5
10
14
4
1.8
1.8
1.8
1.8
1.5
3.7
1.8
4.5
10
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
10
14
4
10
1
3
3
0.6
0.6
For different cable dimensions x/y, where x <= 0.147 in2 [95 mm2] and y >= 0.147 in2 [95 mm2].
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
76
APPENDIX A: SET-UP FOR STANDBY PUMP ALTERNATION
This section describes how to alternate Taco SCI pump units based on elapsed time and how to configure the standby
pump to energize in the event that the duty pump fails.
A.1 Overview
Two identical drives are used; one installed on each pump. One drive is configured as the “lead” drive and the other
as the “standby” drive, but both drives participate equally in the alternation. The “lead” drive is the drive that controls
the alternation process. If one drive enters an alarm condition, the other automatically assumes operation. Alternation
attempts do not occur when one drive is in alarm.
This system requires one set of dry contacts for start/stop. Twenty-four VDC control voltage from both drives is wired
to the lead drive’s relay 1. If the lead drive’s control circuitry is working, it supplies power. If the lead drive cannot
provide control voltage, the standby drive automatically assumes control.
Figure A-1: Wiring for 2x0 Pump Alternation
Relay 1
Drive 1
Drive 2
01 02
03
COM NO NC
I/O Digital
12
13
18
19
27
29
32
33
20
+24V +24V D IN D IN D IN D IN D IN D IN COM
12
13
18
19
27
29
32
33
20
+24V +24V D IN D IN D IN D IN D IN D IN COM
I/O Digital
No external monitoring is needed. Pump alternation is controlled by the active set-up of each drive. The active set-up is
controlled by the lead drive.
• Under normal conditions, the lead drivechanges its active set-up based on the time delay specified in timer 0 by
parameter setting 13–20.0.
• When the lead drive is operating normally in set-up 1, its digital output 29 is high. This state puts the standby drive
into set-up 2.
• When the lead drive is operating normally in set-up 2, its digital output 29 is low. This state puts the standby drive
into set-up 1.
• If the lead drive encounters an alarm condition or loses power, its digital output 29 is low. This state puts the
standby drive into set-up 1, allowing it to take over operation.
• If the standby drive encounters an alarm condition or loses power, its digital output 27 is low. This condition causes
the lead drive to move into set-up 1, allowing it to take over operation.
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
77
During system commissioning and other situations, the
user may want to force pump alternation rather than rely
on the setting in parameter 13-20.0.
• Logic rule 1 allows the user to override the timer by
pressing the [ok] and [>] keys on the keypad (local
control panel) simultaneously.
• Timer 1 offers “anti–bounce” protection for this key
combination. After this combination of keys is
pressed, the drive ignores any instance of the same
combination again for two seconds.
6. Scroll down
to Parameter 0-10 Active Setup and press [OK].
7.Change “Active Set-up 1” to “Multi Set-up”.
a.Parameter 0-10 = Active Set-up.
A.2 Settings
Settings to operate the standby pump alternation have
been programmed into the My Personal Menu. Follow
this procedure to enable the drive's standby pump alternation capabilities.
8.Press [OK].
1.Press the [Quick Menus] button.
9.Repeat this procedure on the Standby Drive.
2.Press the [OK] button to enter “My Personal
Menu.”
3.Scroll down
to Parameter 13-20 SL Controller Time and press [OK].
A.2.1 Check Alternation
1.Ensure the lead and standby pumps are connected
per wiring diagram in Figure A-1 above.
2.On the Lead drive (Drive A), Press the [Status] button to get back to the main screen.
3.The Lead drive (Drive A) should display
in the
upper right hand corner of the screen (Set-up 1).
4.(Set the amount of time between pump alternations. Factory default is 24 hours. Maximum value
is 99 hours.
a.Parameter 13-20 = SL Controller Time.
4.On the Standby drive (Drive B), Press the [Status]
button to get back to the main screen.
5.Press [OK].
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
78
5. The Standby drive (Drive B) should display
in
the upper right hand corner of the screen (Set-up
2).
6. If Drive B remains in Set-up 1
, check the following:
a.Check that wire connections comply with
Figure A-1.
b.Check that both Drives’ active set-ups are set to
“Multi Set-up” per Section A.2 ”Settings”.
7.To test alternation, Press [OK] and [Right Arrow] at
the same time.
8.Observe the two drives swap setups.
a. Drive A switches to Set-up 2
, becoming the
Standby Drive.
b. Drive B switches to Set-up 1
, becoming the
Lead Drive.
9.Repeate step 7 as desired.
10.The pumps are now ready for alternation.
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
79
A.3 Parameters
Table 23: Lead and Lag Drive Parameters
Parameter Number
0–01
0–03
0–10
0–11
0–12
5–01
5–02
5–10
5–11
5–12
5–13
5–14
5–15
5–19
5–30
5–31
5–40
5–40.0
5–40.1
Parameter Name
Language
Regional settings
Active set-up
Programming set-up
This set–up linked to
Terminal 27 mode
Terminal 29 mode
Terminal 18 digital input
Terminal 19 digital input
Terminal 27 digital input
Terminal 29 digital input
Terminal 32 digital input
Terminal 33 digital input
Terminal 37 Safe Stop
Terminal 27 digital output
Terminal 29 digital output
Relay 1
Function Relay
Function Relay
Parameter Value
Set-up 1
Set-up 2
[22] English US
[1] North America
[9] Multi set-up
[1] Set-up 1
[0] Not linked
[1] Output
[1] Output
[8] Start
[0] No operation
[0] No operation
Jog
[0] No operation
[23] Set-up select bit 0
Safe Stop Alarm
[160] No alarm
[160] No alarm
[1] Control ready
[1] Control ready
Running
[22]
[1] North America
[9] Multi set-up
[2] Set-up 2
[1] Set-up 1
[1] Output
[1] Output
[0] No operation
[0] No operation
[0] No operation
Jog
[0] No operation
[23] Set-up select bit 0
Safe Stop Alarm
[160] No alarm
[0] No operation
[1] Control ready
[1] Control ready
Running
[1] on
[37] Digital input di32
[26] Logic rule 0
024:00:00.000
000:00:02.000
[1] on
[37] Digital input di32
[26] Logic rule 0
024:00:00.000
000:00:02.000
[37] Digital input di32
[43] ok key
[5] not and
[1] and
[1] true
[46] Right key
[2] or
[30] SL time–out 0
[37] Digital input di32
[43] ok key
[5] not and
[1] and
[1] true
[46] Right key
[2] or
[30] SL time–out 0
[1] true
[31] SL time–out 1
[27] Logic rule 1
[1] true
[31] sl time–out 1
[27] Logic rule 1
[30] Start timer 1
[29] Start timer 0
[1] true
[31] SL time–out 1
[27] Logic rule 1
[1] true
[31] sl time–out 1
[27] Logic rule 1
[30] Start timer 1
[29] Start timer 0
State controller start and stop events
13–00
13–01
13–02
13–20.0
13–20.1
SL controller mode
Start event
Stop event
SL controller timer 0
SL controller timer 1
Logic rules
13–40.0
13–40.1
13–41.0
13–41.1
13–42.0
13–42.1
13–43.1
13–44.1
Logic rule boolean 1
Logic rule boolean 1
Logic rule operator 1
Logic rule operator 1
Logic rule boolean 2
Logic rule boolean 2
Logic rule operator 2
Logic rule boolean 3
States
13–51.0
13–51.1
13–51.2
13–51.3
13–51.4
13–51.5
13–52.0
13–52.1
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
SL controller event
SL controller event
SL controller event
SL controller event
SL controller event
SL controller event
SL controller action
SL controller action
80
Parameter Number
13–52.2
13–52.3
13–52.4
13–52.5
???-???, Effective: ???????
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
Parameter Name
SL controller action
SL controller action
SL controller action
SL controller action
Parameter Value
Set-up 1
[3] Select set-up 2
[30] Start timer 1
[29] Start timer 0
[2] Select set-up 1
Set-up 2
[3] Select set-up 2
[30] Start timer 1
[29] Start timer 0
[2] Select set-up 1
81
LIMITED WARRANTY STATEMENT
Taco, Inc. (Taco) will repair or replace without
charge (at the company's option) any product
or part which is proven defective under normal
use within one (1) year from the date of start-up
or one (1) year and six (6) months from date of
shipment (whichever occurs first).
In order to obtain service under this warranty, it
is the responsibility of the purchaser to
promptly notify the local Taco stocking distributor or Taco in writing and promptly deliver the
subject product or part, delivery prepaid, to the
stocking distributor. For assistance on warranty returns, the purchaser may either contact
the local Taco stocking distributor or Taco. If
the subject product or part contains no defect
as covered in this warranty, the purchaser will
be billed for parts and labor charges in effect at
time of factory examination and repair.
Any Taco product or part not installed or operated in conformity with Taco instructions or
which has been subject to accident, disaster,
neglect, misuse, misapplication, inadequate
operating environment, repair, attempted
repair, modification or alteration, or other
abuse, will not be covered by this warranty.
Taco products are not intended for use to support fire suppression systems, life support systems, critical care applications, commercial
aviation, nuclear facilities or any other applications where product failure could lead to injury
to person, loss of life, or catastrophic property
damage and should not be sold for such purposes.
If in doubt as to whether a particular product is
suitable for use with a Taco product or part, or
for any application restrictions, consult the
applicable Taco instruction sheets or in the U.S.
contact Taco at 401-942-8000 and in Canada
contact Taco (Canada) Limited at 905-5649422.
Taco reserves the right to provide replacement
products and parts which are substantially similar in design and functionally equivalent to the
defective product or part. Taco reserves the
right to make changes in details of design, construction, or arrangement of materials of its
products without notification.
INCLUDING WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS IS IN EFFECT ONLY
FOR THE DURATION OF THE EXPRESS
WARRANTY SET FORTH IN THE FIRST
PARAGRAPH ABOVE.
THE ABOVE WARRANTIES ARE IN LIEU OF
ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR
STATUTORY, OR ANY OTHER WARRANTY
OBLIGATION ON THE PART OF TES.
TACO WILL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES RESULTING FROM
THE USE OF ITS PRODUCTS OR ANY INCIDENTAL COSTS OF REMOVING OR
REPLACING DEFECTIVE PRODUCTS.
This warranty gives the purchaser specific
rights, and the purchaser may have other rights
which vary from state to state. Some states do
not allow limitations on how long an implied
warranty lasts or on the exclusion of incidental
or consequential damages, so these limitations
or exclusions may not apply to you.
TACO OFFERS THIS WARRANTY IN LIEU
OF ALL OTHER EXPRESS WARRANTIES.
ANY WARRANTY IMPLIED BY LAW
Taco, Inc., 1160 Cranston Street, Cranston, RI 02920. Telephone: (401) 942-8000 FAX: (401) 942-2360.
Taco (Canada), Ltd., 8450 Lawson Road, Unit #3, Milton, Ontario L9T 0J8. Telephone: 905/564-9422. FAX: 905/564-9436.
Visit our web site at: http://www.taco-hvac.com
Printed in the USA
© 2013 Taco, Inc.
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