Adaptec | 5405Z | User`s guide | Adaptec 5405Z User`s guide

Serial Attached SCSI RAID Controllers
Installation and User’s Guide
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Copyright
©2010 Adaptec, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted
in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written consent of
Adaptec, Inc., 691 South Milpitas Blvd., Milpitas, CA 95035.
Trademarks
Adaptec, Adaptec Storage Manager, MaxIQ, SerialSelect, and the Adaptec logo are trademarks of Adaptec, Inc., which may be
registered in some jurisdictions.
Microsoft, Windows, and Vista are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the US and other countries, used under license.
Red Hat is a trademark of Red Hat, Inc. in the US and other countries, used under license.
All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
Changes
The material in this document is for information only and is subject to change without notice. While reasonable efforts have been
made in the preparation of this document to assure its accuracy, Adaptec, Inc. assumes no liability resulting from errors or
omissions in this document, or from the use of the information contained herein.
Adaptec reserves the right to make changes in the product design without reservation and without notification to its users.
Disclaimer
IF THIS PRODUCT DIRECTS YOU TO COPY MATERIALS, YOU MUST HAVE PERMISSION FROM THE COPYRIGHT
OWNER OF THE MATERIALS TO AVOID VIOLATING THE LAW WHICH COULD RESULT IN DAMAGES OR OTHER
REMEDIES.
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Adaptec Customer Support
If you have questions about installing or using your Adaptec product, check this document first—you will find answers to most of
your questions. If you need further assistance, use the support options listed below. To expedite your service, have your computer
in front of you.
Technical Support Identification (TSID) Number
● Before contacting Technical Support, you need your product unique TSID number. The TSID number identifies your product
and support status.
●
The TSID number is included on a white, bar-coded label, like this example:
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Affix a copy of the TSID label to the CD jacket so that you don’t lose it. In addition, it's recommended that you register your
product so that you have easy access to your TSID when contacting Customer Support.
Note: The phone numbers below are subject to change. Please visit the Support section of www.adaptec.com for the
most up to date contact information.
North America
● Visit our Web site at www.adaptec.com.
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Search the Adaptec Support Knowledgebase (ASK) at ask.adaptec.com for articles, troubleshooting tips, and frequently asked
questions for your product.
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For information about Adaptec’s support options, call +1 408-957-2550, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week.
To speak with a Technical Support Specialist, call +1 408-934-7274.
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For support via e-mail, submit your question at ask.adaptec.com.
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You can order Adaptec products, including accessories and cables, by calling +1 408-957-7274. Or, you can order cables online at
www.adaptec.com/buy-cables.
Europe
Visit our Web site at www.adaptec-europe.com.
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German: Call +49 89 43 66 55 22. For support via e-mail, submit your question at ask-de.adaptec.com.
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French: Call +49 89 43 66 55 33. For support via e-mail, submit your question at ask-fr.adaptec.com.
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English: Call +49 89 43 66 55 44. For support via e-mail, submit your question at ask.adaptec.com.
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You can order Adaptec cables online at www.adaptec.com/buy-cables.
Japan
● Visit our Web site at www.adaptec.co.jp.
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Call +0066-3313-2601.
Australia
Call +61-2-9503-1555.
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Limited 3-Year Hardware Warranty
1. Adaptec, Inc. (“Adaptec”) warrants to the purchaser of this product that it will be free from defects in material and workmanship for
a period of three (3) years from the date of purchase. If the product should become defective within the warranty period, Adaptec, at
its option, will repair or replace the product, or refund the purchaser’s purchase price for the product, provided it is delivered at the
purchaser’s expense to an authorized Adaptec service facility or to Adaptec.
2. Repair or replacement parts or products will be furnished on an exchange basis and will either be new or reconditioned. All
replaced parts or products shall become the property of Adaptec. This warranty shall not apply if the product has been damaged
by accident, misuse, abuse or as a result of unauthorized service or parts.
3. Warranty service is available to the purchaser by delivering the product during the warranty period to an authorized Adaptec
service facility or to Adaptec and providing proof of purchase price and date. The purchaser shall bear all shipping, packing and
insurance costs and all other costs, excluding labor and parts, necessary to effectuate repair, replacement or refund under this
warranty.
4. For more information on how to obtain warranty service, write or telephone Adaptec at 691 South Milpitas Boulevard,
Milpitas, CA 95035, (800) 959-7274.
5. THIS LIMITED WARRANTY DOES NOT EXTEND TO ANY PRODUCT WHICH HAS BEEN DAMAGED AS A RESULT OF
ACCIDENT, MISUSE, ABUSE, OR AS A RESULT OF UNAUTHORIZED SERVICE OR PARTS.
6. THIS WARRANTY IS IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER EXPRESS WARRANTIES WHICH NOW OR HEREAFTER MIGHT
OTHERWISE ARISE RESPECT TO THIS PRODUCT. IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING THOSE OF MERCHANTABILITY,
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT SHALL (A) HAVE NO GREATER DURATION THAN 3
YEARS FROM THE DATE OF PURCHASE, (B) TERMINATE AUTOMATICALLY AT THE EXPIRATION OF SUCH PERIOD
AND (C) TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY LAW BE EXCLUDED. IN THE EVENT THIS PRODUCT BECOMES DEFECTIVE
DURING THE WARRANTY PERIOD, THE PURCHASER’S EXCLUSIVE REMEDY SHALL BE REPAIR, REPLACEMENT OR
REFUND AS PROVIDED ABOVE. INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION
LOSS OF DATA, ARISING FROM BREACH OF ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTY ARE NOT THE RESPONSIBILITY OF
ADAPTEC AND, TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY LAW, ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED BOTH FOR PROPERTY DAMAGE, AND
TO THE EXTENT NOT UNCONSCIONABLE, FOR PERSONAL INJURY DAMAGE.
7. SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES
FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS, AND SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW LIMITATIONS ON HOW LONG AN IMPLIED
WARRANTY LASTS, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION OR EXCLUSIONS MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
8. This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which vary from state to state.
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Regulatory Compliance Statements
Federal Communications Commission Radio Frequency Interference Statement
WARNING: Changes or modifications to this unit not expressly approved by the party responsible for compliance could void the user’s authority to
operate the equipment.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are
designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate
radio frequency energy, and if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. However, if this equipment does cause
interference to radio or television equipment reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to
correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
■
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
■
Increase the separation between equipment and receiver.
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Connect the equipment to an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.
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Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/television technician for help.
■
Use a shielded and properly grounded I/O cable and power cable to ensure compliance of this unit to the specified limits of the rules.
This device complies with part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) this device may not
cause harmful interference and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause
undesired operation.
Use only with the listed ITE:
Adaptec, Inc.
Adaptec RAID 5085/Adaptec RAID 5405/Adaptec RAID 5445/
Adaptec RAID 5805/
Adaptec RAID 5405Z/Adaptec RAID 5805Z/Adaptec RAID 5445Z/
Adaptec RAID 5805Q/Adaptec RAID 5805ZQ/
Adaptec RAID 51245/Adaptec RAID 51645/Adaptec RAID 52445/
Adaptec RAID 2045/Adaptec RAID 2405/Adaptec RAID 2405Q
Tested to Comply
With FCC Standards
FOR HOME OR OFFICE USE
European Union Compliance Statement
This Information Technology Equipment has been tested and found to comply with EMC Directive 89/336/EEC, as amended by 92/31/EEC
and 93/68/EEC, in accordance with:
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EN55022 (1998+A1:2000+A2:2003) Emissions
EN55024 (1998+A1:2001+A2:2003) Immunity:
– EN61000-4-2 (1995) Electrostatic discharge: ±4 kV contact, ±8 kV air
– EN61000-4-3 (1996) Radiated immunity
– EN61000-4-4 (1995) Electrical fast transients/burst: ±1 kV AC, ±0.5 kV I/O
– EN61000-4-5 (1995) Surges ±1 kV differential mode, ±2 kV common mode
– EN61000-4-6 (1996) Conducted immunity: 3 V
– EN61000-4-11 (1994) Supply dips and variation: 30% and 100%
In addition, all equipment requiring U.L. listing has been found to comply with EMC Directive 73/23/EEC as amended by 93/68/EEC in
accordance with EN60950 with amendments A1, A2, A3, A4, A11.
Australian/New Zealand Compliance Statement
This device has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to the Australian/New Zealand standard
AS/NZS 3548 set out by the Spectrum Management Agency.
Canadian Compliance Statement
This Class B digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe B respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur le matériel brouilleur du Canada.
Japanese Compliance (Voluntary Control Council Initiative)
This equipment complies to class B Information Technology equipment based on VCCI (Voluntary Control Council for Interface). This
equipment is designed for home use but it may causes radio frequency interference problem if used too near to a television or radio. Please
handle it correctly per this documentation.
!
Caution: Risk of explosion if the battery is replaced by an incorrect type. Dispose of used batteries according to the
instructions.
Contents
About This Guide
What You Need to Know Before You Begin ................................................... 12
Terminology Used in this Guide ...................................................................... 12
How to Find More Information....................................................................... 12
Kit Contents and System Requirements
Kit Contents ...................................................................................................... 14
System Requirements........................................................................................ 14
About Your RAID Controller
Standard RAID Controller Features ................................................................ 16
Array-level Features .................................................................................... 16
Advanced Data Protection Suite ................................................................ 17
Adding a Battery Backup Module .................................................................... 17
Upgrading the Controller Firmware ................................................................ 17
About the Adaptec RAID 5085......................................................................... 18
About the Adaptec RAID 5405......................................................................... 19
About the Adaptec RAID 5445......................................................................... 20
About the Adaptec RAID 5805/5805Q ............................................................ 21
About the Adaptec RAID 51245....................................................................... 22
About the Adaptec RAID 51645....................................................................... 23
About the Adaptec RAID 52445....................................................................... 24
About the Adaptec RAID 5405Z ...................................................................... 25
About the Adaptec RAID 5445Z ...................................................................... 26
About the Adaptec RAID 5805Z/5805ZQ ....................................................... 27
About the Adaptec RAID 2045......................................................................... 28
About the Adaptec RAID 2405/2405Q ............................................................ 29
Contents
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Getting Started
Choosing a RAID Level..................................................................................... 31
Selecting Disk Drives and Cables ..................................................................... 32
Disk Drives .................................................................................................. 32
Cables .......................................................................................................... 32
Installation Options .......................................................................................... 33
Basic Installation Steps...................................................................................... 34
Installing with an Operating System.......................................................... 34
Installing on an Existing Operating System .............................................. 34
Installing the Controller and Disk Drives
Before You Begin............................................................................................... 36
Installing the Controller ................................................................................... 36
Installing a RAID Controller...................................................................... 36
Installing a RAID Controller with Zero Maintenance Cache Protection 37
Connecting Disk Drives to Your Controllers .................................................. 38
Connecting Directly to the Controller....................................................... 38
Connecting to a System Backplane ............................................................ 39
Connecting MaxIQ Solid State Drives and other SSDs ............................ 40
Connecting External Devices............................................................................ 42
Next Steps .......................................................................................................... 42
Creating a Bootable Array
Setting the Boot Controller .............................................................................. 44
Creating an Array.............................................................................................. 44
Creating an Array with the ACU ............................................................... 44
Creating an Array with Adaptec Storage Manager ................................... 46
Making Your Array Bootable ........................................................................... 47
Installing the Driver and an Operating System
Before You Begin............................................................................................... 49
Creating a Driver Disk ...................................................................................... 49
Installing with Windows................................................................................... 50
Installing with Windows Server 2003 or Windows XP............................. 50
Installing with Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, or Windows Vista ... 50
Installing with Red Hat Linux .......................................................................... 51
Installing with SUSE Linux............................................................................... 51
Installing with OpenServer ............................................................................... 51
Installing with UnixWare ................................................................................. 52
Installing with Solaris........................................................................................ 52
Installing with VMware .................................................................................... 53
Installing with FreeBSD .................................................................................... 53
Contents
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Installing the Driver on an Existing Operating System
Before You Begin............................................................................................... 55
Creating a Driver Disk ...................................................................................... 55
Installing on Windows...................................................................................... 56
Installing on Windows Server 2003 or Windows XP................................ 56
Installing with Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, or Windows Vista ... 56
Installing on Red Hat or SUSE Linux .............................................................. 56
Installing on OpenServer .................................................................................. 57
Installing on UnixWare .................................................................................... 57
Installing on Solaris........................................................................................... 57
Installing on VMware ....................................................................................... 58
Installing on FreeBSD ....................................................................................... 58
Managing Your Storage Space
About Adaptec Storage Manager ..................................................................... 60
Installing Adaptec Storage Manager .......................................................... 60
About the Adaptec RAID Controller Configuration Utility........................... 60
About the Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility ............................................. 61
About the Adaptec Flash Utility ....................................................................... 61
Which Utility Should I Use? ............................................................................. 61
Solving Problems
Troubleshooting Checklist ............................................................................... 63
Monitoring Disk Drives Status......................................................................... 63
Silencing the Alarm........................................................................................... 63
Recovering from a Disk Drive Failure ............................................................. 64
Failed Disk Drive Protected by a Hot Spare.............................................. 64
Failed Disk Drive Not Protected by a Hot Spare....................................... 64
Failure in Multiple Arrays Simultaneously................................................ 64
Disk Drive Failure in a RAID 0 Array........................................................ 65
Multiple Failures in the Same Array .......................................................... 65
Failed Drive in MaxIQ Pool ....................................................................... 65
Resetting the Controller.................................................................................... 65
Introduction to SAS
Terminology Used in This Chapter ................................................................. 68
What is SAS?...................................................................................................... 68
How Do SAS Devices Communicate?.............................................................. 69
What’s a Phy? .................................................................................................... 69
What’s a SAS Port?............................................................................................ 70
What’s a SAS Address?...................................................................................... 70
What’s a SAS Connector? ................................................................................. 70
What do SAS Cables Look Like?....................................................................... 70
How are Disk Drives Identified in SAS? .......................................................... 71
What are the SAS Connection Options?.......................................................... 71
Direct-attach Connections ......................................................................... 71
Contents
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Backplane Connections .............................................................................. 71
SAS Expander Connections........................................................................ 72
How is SAS Different from Parallel SCSI? ....................................................... 73
Understanding RAID
Understanding Drive Segments ....................................................................... 75
Non-redundant Arrays (RAID 0)..................................................................... 75
RAID 1 Arrays ................................................................................................... 76
RAID 1 Enhanced Arrays.................................................................................. 76
RAID 10 Arrays ................................................................................................. 77
RAID 5 Arrays ................................................................................................... 78
RAID 5EE Arrays............................................................................................... 79
RAID 50 Arrays ................................................................................................. 80
RAID 6 Arrays ................................................................................................... 81
RAID 60 Arrays ................................................................................................. 81
Selecting the Best RAID Level .......................................................................... 82
Using the Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility
Introduction to the ARC Utility....................................................................... 84
Running the ARC Utility .................................................................................. 84
Navigating the ARC Utility ........................................................................ 84
Using the ACU to Create and Manage Arrays................................................. 84
Creating a New Array ................................................................................. 84
Managing Existing Arrays .......................................................................... 85
Initializing Disk Drives............................................................................... 86
Rescanning Disk Drives.............................................................................. 86
Secure Erasing Disk Drives......................................................................... 87
Managing Global Hot Spares ..................................................................... 87
Using the ACU to Create and Manage JBODs ................................................ 87
Creating a New JBOD................................................................................. 87
Managing Existing JBODs.......................................................................... 88
Using the ACU to Manage the MaxIQ Pool.................................................... 88
Using SerialSelect to Modify Controller Settings............................................. 88
Opening SerialSelect.................................................................................... 89
Applying Changes and Exiting................................................................... 89
Modifying Your Controller’s Configuration............................................. 89
Formatting and Verifying Disk Drives............................................................. 91
Locating Disk Drives......................................................................................... 91
Identifying Disk Drives ..................................................................................... 92
Viewing the Event Log ...................................................................................... 93
Contents
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Using the Array Configuration Utility for DOS
Getting Started .................................................................................................. 95
Working in the ACU Using Menus.................................................................. 95
Running the ACU Using Scripts ...................................................................... 96
About Playback Mode ................................................................................ 96
About Record Mode ................................................................................... 97
Creating the Script File Manually .............................................................. 97
Array Definition Block Keywords.............................................................. 98
ACU Error Codes...................................................................................... 101
Sample Scripts ........................................................................................... 102
Using the Adaptec Flash Utility
System Requirements...................................................................................... 105
Before You Begin............................................................................................. 105
Obtaining the Firmware ........................................................................... 105
Creating the Firmware Update Disks ...................................................... 106
Running the Menu-based AFU ...................................................................... 106
Running the AFU from the Command Line ................................................. 107
AFU Commands ....................................................................................... 107
Updating the Flash Using the AFU Command Line..................................... 110
Controller LED and I2C Connector Quick Reference
Adaptec RAID 5085 LED Connector Specification....................................... 112
Adaptec RAID 5405/5405Z LED and I2C Connector Specification ............ 114
Adaptec RAID 5445/5445Z LED and I2C Connector Specification ............ 115
Adaptec RAID 5805/5805Q/5805Z/5805ZQ LED and I2C Connector
Specification .................................................................................................... 117
Adaptec RAID 51245 LED and I2C Connector Specification ...................... 119
Adaptec RAID 51645 LED and I2C Connector Specification ...................... 121
Adaptec RAID 52445 LED and I2C Connector Specification ...................... 123
Adaptec RAID 2045 LED Connector Specification....................................... 126
Adaptec RAID 2405/2405Q LED and I2C Connector Specification............ 126
Safety Information
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) ........................................................................ 128
Technical Specifications
Environmental Specifications......................................................................... 130
DC Power Requirements ................................................................................ 130
Current Requirements .................................................................................. 130
Index
About This Guide
1
In this chapter...
What You Need to Know Before You Begin .......................................................................... 12
Terminology Used in this Guide............................................................................................ 12
How to Find More Information ............................................................................................ 12
This Installation and User’s Guide explains how to install your Adaptec® RAID controller. It
also describes the utilities included in your controller kit, and provides a basic overview of
Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) and Redundant Array of Independent Disk (RAID) technology.
These RAID controller models are described in this guide:
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Adaptec RAID 5085
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Adaptec RAID 5405/5405Z
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Adaptec RAID 5445/5445Z
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Adaptec RAID 5805/5805Q/5805Z/5805ZQ
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Adaptec RAID 51245
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Adaptec RAID 51645
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Adaptec RAID 52445
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Adaptec RAID 2045
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Adaptec RAID 2405/2405Q
Chapter 1: About This Guide
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12
What You Need to Know Before You Begin
You should be familiar with computer hardware, data storage, RAID technology, and SAS and
Serial ATA (SATA) technology. (For an introduction to SAS, see page 67.)
You should also be familiar with Direct-Attached Storage (DAS) concepts and technology.
Note: Because this guide covers multiple Adaptec RAID products, some of the features and
functions described may not be available for your controller. For more information, see About
Your RAID Controller on page 15.
Terminology Used in this Guide
Because you can use your Adaptec RAID controller to manage data storage in a variety of
configurations, the generic term “storage space” is used to refer to controller(s) and disk drives
being managed with Adaptec Storage ManagerTM or the other utilities described in this guide.
Many of the terms and concepts referred to in this guide are known to computer users by
multiple names. This guide uses these terms:
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Controller (also known as adapter, board, or card)
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Disk drive (also known as hard disk, hard drive, or hard disk drive)
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Enclosure (also known as a RAID enclosure, storage enclosure, or JBOD enclosure)
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Array (also known as a container or logical drive)
Note: In DAS environments, Adaptec Storage Manager refers to arrays as logical drives.
Your RAID controller creates arrays, which your operating system (and Adaptec Storage
Manager) recognizes as logical drives. For more information, refer to the Adaptec Storage
Manager User’s Guide on the Adaptec RAID Controller Installation DVD.
How to Find More Information
You can find more information about your Adaptec RAID controller and the software and
utilities included with it by referring to these documents:
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Readme.txt—Includes updated product information and known issues; located on the
RAID Controller Installation DVD.
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Adaptec Storage Manager User’s Guide—Describes how to install and use the Adaptec
Storage Manager software (see page 60) to manage your direct attached storage; located on
the RAID Controller Installation DVD.
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Adaptec Storage Manager Online Help—Describes how to use the Adaptec Storage
Manager software; accessible from the main window of Adaptec Storage Manager.
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Adaptec RAID Controller Command Line Utility User’s Guide—Describes how to use the
included Adaptec RAID Controller Configuration (ARCCONF) command line utility (see
page 60) to perform basic array and configuration management functions; located on the
RAID Controller Installation DVD.
Kit Contents and System
Requirements
2
In this chapter...
Kit Contents............................................................................................................................ 14
System Requirements ............................................................................................................. 14
This chapter lists the contents of your Adaptec RAID controller kit and the system
requirements that must be met for you to successfully install and use your controller.
Chapter 2: Kit Contents and System Requirements
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14
Kit Contents
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Adaptec RAID controller
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Adaptec RAID Controller Installation DVD (bootable), including controller drivers,
Adaptec Storage Manager, ARCCONF command line utility, and documentation
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Cables (Not all kits contain cables. If your kit does, the type and quantity vary—for cable
information about your controller, visit the Adaptec Web site at www.adaptec.com.)
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(Selected models only) Low-profile bracket
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Adaptec Serial Attached SCSI RAID Controllers Quick Start Guide
System Requirements
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PC-compatible computer with Intel Pentium, or equivalent, processor
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Motherboard with these features:
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Support for multifunction devices where one of the devices is a PCI bridge
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Large memory-mapped address ranges
Refer to the Readme file on the RAID Controller Installation DVD for additional
motherboard compatibility information.
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One of these operating systems:
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Microsoft® Windows® Server 2008 (with SP2), Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows
Server 2003 (Enterprise and Standard with SP1 or SP2, 32-bit and 64-bit), Windows
Server 2003 R2 (32-bit and 64-bit), Windows 7, Windows VistaTM (with SP1 or SP2),
Windows XP (with SP1, SP2, or SP3, 32-bit and 64-bit)
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Red Hat® Enterprise Linux 5.4, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.8 (32-bit and 64-bit)
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SUSE Linux ES 11, SUSE Linux ES 10 SP3 (32-bit and 64-bit)
Note: For the latest on Adaptec’s support of Linux or to download driver sources, visit
the Support area of the Adaptec Web site at www.adaptec.com.
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SCO® OpenServer® 6.0 MP4
UnixWare® 7.1.4
Sun® SolarisTM 10, Solaris 10 x86 U7, Solaris 10 x64 U4
VMware ESX Server 3.5 with U1, U2, or U3, VMware ESX Server 4.0 (storage
management must be done by command-line, BIOS utility, or remote GUI
connection—see page 83)
FreeBSD 8.0, 7.2, 6.4
Note: For up-to-date operating system version support check the readme on your RAID
Controller Installation DVD or visit the Adaptec Web Site at www.adaptec.com. From the
main menu select Support>Knowledgebase>Find Answers. Select your controller type and
OS support to generate a list of supported operating systems.
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128 MB (or more) of RAM
Available compatible PCIe slot (depending on your controller model—see the descriptions
starting on page 15)
20 MB of free disk drive space
16-bit SVGA color monitor with a resolution of at least 800 x 600
DVD-ROM drive
About Your RAID Controller
3
In this chapter...
Standard RAID Controller Features ...................................................................................... 16
Adding a Battery Backup Module ......................................................................................... 17
Upgrading the Controller Firmware ..................................................................................... 17
About the Adaptec RAID 5085 .............................................................................................. 18
About the Adaptec RAID 5405 .............................................................................................. 19
About the Adaptec RAID 5445 .............................................................................................. 20
About the Adaptec RAID 5805/5805Q.................................................................................. 21
About the Adaptec RAID 51245 ............................................................................................ 22
About the Adaptec RAID 51645 ............................................................................................ 23
About the Adaptec RAID 52445 ............................................................................................ 24
About the Adaptec RAID 5405Z............................................................................................ 25
About the Adaptec RAID 5445Z............................................................................................ 26
About the Adaptec RAID 5805Z/5805ZQ............................................................................. 27
About the Adaptec RAID 2045 .............................................................................................. 28
About the Adaptec RAID 2405/2405Q.................................................................................. 29
This chapter provides an overview of standard Adaptec RAID controller features, and
describes the unique features of your controller.
Chapter 3: About Your RAID Controller
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16
Standard RAID Controller Features
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Support for SAS disk drives, SATA/SATA II disk drives, SATA Solid State Drives (SSD),
and Adaptec MaxIQ™ Solid State Drives
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Flash ROM for updates to controller firmware, BIOS, and the Adaptec RAID
Configuration utility
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Disk drive hot-swapping
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Event logging and broadcasting including email and SNMP messages
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Multiple options for creating and managing RAID arrays—A full software application
(Adaptec Storage Manager), a BIOS-based utility (ACU), a command line utility
(ARCCONF), and a DOS utility (see Managing Your Storage Space on page 59)
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Native command queuing (NCQ), which lets disk drives arrange commands into the most
efficient order for optimum performance
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Support for disk drive enclosures with SES2 enclosure management hardware
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Support for a battery backup module (see page 17)
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Support for a zero maintenance cache protection module (see page 36)
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Support for MaxIQ SSD cache performance kit (see page 88)
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Power-management of disk drives in your storage space to reduce cooling and electricity
costs (see page 85)
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Audible alarm
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I/O statistics logging and automatic forwarding for remote analysis (“call home”)
Array-level Features
Note: Not all features are supported by all controllers. For more information, refer to the Adaptec
Storage Manager User’s Guide or online Help.
●
Support for RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 10, RAID 50, simple volumes, and spanned
volumes
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Support for JBOD disks (appear as a physical disk drives to the operating system; not
redundant)
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Support for hot spares (global and dedicated)
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Support for automatic failover, so arrays are automatically rebuilt when a failed disk drive is
replaced (applies to redundant arrays in SES2- or SAF-TE-enabled disk drive enclosures only)
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Optimized disk utilization, which ensures that the full capacity of all disk drives can be
used, even if the disk drives vary in size
●
Online capacity expansion, so you can increase the capacity of an array without recreating it
●
Support for array migration from one RAID level to another
Chapter 3: About Your RAID Controller
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17
Advanced Data Protection Suite
Note: The following features are supported on Adaptec 5-Series controllers only.
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Copyback Hot Spare—You can use this feature to move data from a hot spare back to its
original location after a failed disk drive is replaced.
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Striped Mirror (RAID 1E)—A RAID 1 Enhanced array is similar to a RAID 1 array except
that data is both mirrored and striped, and more disk drives can be included.
●
Hot Space (RAID 5EE)—A RAID 5EE array is similar to a RAID 5 array except that it
includes a distributed spare and must be built from a minimum of four disk drives.
●
Dual Drive Failure Protection (RAID 6)—A RAID 6 array is similar to a RAID 5 array
except that it includes two independent sets of parity data instead of one.
●
Dual Drive Failure Protection (RAID 60)—A RAID 60 array is similar to a RAID 50 array
except that it includes four independent sets of parity data instead of two.
Adding a Battery Backup Module
This table shows the battery model supported by your Adaptec RAID controller.
RAID Controller
Adaptec RAID 5085/Adaptec RAID 5405/Adaptec RAID
5445/Adaptec RAID 5805/5805Q/
Adaptec 51245/Adaptec 51645/Adaptec 52445
Battery Model
Adaptec Battery Module 800
Adaptec Battery Module 800T
To purchase a battery backup module, refer to the Adaptec Web site at www.adaptec.com.
Upgrading the Controller Firmware
To upgrade the firmware on your Adaptec RAID controller, follow the instructions in Using the
Adaptec Flash Utility on page 104. You can also use the Adaptec Storage Manager to upgrade
your controller firmware, refer to the Adaptec Storage Manager User’s Guide.
Chapter 3: About Your RAID Controller
●
18
About the Adaptec RAID 5085
The Adaptec RAID 5085 is a SAS RAID controller with these features:
Ext. Alarm
Aggregate Activity
Mode 0 Flash
connector
Activity
LEDs
Diagnostic
LEDs
Audible Alarm
Drive Activity LED
connectors for CN1/CN0
CN0
CN1
2 external SAS
connectors
Battery connector
PCIe x8 connector
Mounting bracket
Form Factor
Low-profile MD2
Bus compatibility
PCIe
PCIe bus width
x8
PCIe bus speed
2.5 Gb/s
Phys (Unified Serial Ports)
8
Standard cache
512 MB DDR2
Connectors, external
2 mini-SAS x4 (SFF-8088)
Maximum number of disk drives
8 direct-attached (or up to 256 with expanders)
Enclosure Support
I2C and SGPIO (Serial General Purpose Output)
Onboard speaker
Yes
Battery Backup Module
Adaptec Battery Module 800/800T (sold separately—see
page 17)
Chapter 3: About Your RAID Controller
●
About the Adaptec RAID 5405
The Adaptec RAID 5405 is a SAS RAID controller with these features:
Drive Activity LED connectors for CN0/CN1
Drive Activity LEDs for CN0/CN1
Mode 0 Flash
connector
Aggregate
Activity
Diagnostic LEDs
Internal mini-SAS
connector CN0
Status CN0
I2C connector for CN0
PCIe x8 connector
Battery connector
Mounting bracket
Ext. Alarm connector
Form Factor
Low-profile MD2
Bus compatibility
PCIe
PCIe bus width
x8
PCIe bus speed
2.5 Gb/s
Phys (Unified Serial Ports)
4
Standard cache
256 MB DDR2
Connectors, internal
1 mini-SAS x4 (SFF-8087)
Maximum number of disk drives
4 direct-attached (or up to 256 with expanders)
Enclosure Support
I2C and SGPIO
Onboard speaker
Yes
Battery Backup Module
Adaptec Battery Module 800/800T (sold separately—see
page 17)
19
Chapter 3: About Your RAID Controller
●
20
About the Adaptec RAID 5445
The Adaptec RAID 5445 is a SAS RAID controller with these features:
Drive Activity CN1/CN0
Status CN1/CN0
Mode 0 Flash connector
Ext. Alarm
Diagnostic LEDs
(back of card)
Internal mini-SAS
connector CN0
ABM-800
connector
External miniSAS connector
CN1
Audible Alarm
I2C connector for CN0
PCIe x8 connector
Aggregate
Activity
Mounting bracket
Form Factor
Low-profile MD2
Bus compatibility
PCIe
PCIe bus width
x8
PCIe bus speed
2.5 Gb/s
Phys (Unified Serial Ports)
8
Standard cache
512 MB DDR2
Connectors
1 mini-SAS x4 (SFF-8087) internal
1 mini-SAS x4 (SFF-8088) external
Maximum number of disk drives
8 direct-attached (or up to 256 with expanders)
Enclosure Support
I2C and SGPIO
Onboard speaker
Yes
Battery Backup Module
Adaptec Battery Module 800/800T (sold separately—see
page 17)
Chapter 3: About Your RAID Controller
●
21
About the Adaptec RAID 5805/5805Q
The Adaptec RAID 5805/5805Q is a SAS RAID controller with these features:
Drive Activity LED connectors for CN0/CN1
Drive Activity LEDs for CN0/CN1
Mode 0 Flash
connector
Aggregate
Activity
Diagnostic LEDs
CN1
2 internal mini-SAS
connectors
CN0
Status CN1, CN0
I2C connector for CN1
I2C connector for CN0
PCIe x8 connector
Battery connector
Mounting bracket
Ext. Alarm connector
Form Factor
Low-profile MD2
Bus compatibility
PCIe
PCIe bus width
x8
PCIe bus speed
2.5 Gb/s
Phys (Unified Serial Ports)
8
Standard cache
512 MB DDR2
Connectors, internal
2 mini-SAS x4 (SFF-8087)
Maximum number of disk drives
8 direct-attached (or up to 256 with expanders)
MaxIQ SSD support
5805: 8 Adaptec MaxIQ-branded/Intel X25-E SSDs (2TB max)
5805Q: 8 MaxIQ-compatible SSDs using any Solid State Drive
on compatibility list (2TB max); see www.adaptec.com/
compatibility
Enclosure Support
I2C and SGPIO
Onboard speaker
Yes
Battery Backup Module
Adaptec Battery Module 800/800T (sold separately—see
page 17)
Chapter 3: About Your RAID Controller
●
22
About the Adaptec RAID 51245
The Adaptec RAID 51245 is a SAS RAID controller with these features:
Mode 0 Flash
I2C, CN2
Activity CN2
I2C, CN1
I2C, CN0
CN0
Activity
CN0, CN1
CN1
CN6
CN2
3 internal
mini-SAS
connectors
1 external
mini-SAS
connector
ABM-800 connector
Reserved
Ext. Alarm
Aggregate Activity
Form Factor
Full Height, Half Length
Bus compatibility
PCIe
PCIe bus width
x8
PCIe bus speed
2.5 Gb/s
Phys (Unified Serial Ports)
16
Standard cache
512 MB DDR2
Connectors, Internal
3 mini-SAS x4 (SFF-8087)
Connectors, Exteneral
1 mini-SAS x4 (SFF-8088)
Maximum number of disk drives
16 direct-attached (or up to 256 with expanders)
Enclosure Support
I2C and SGPIO
Onboard speaker
Yes
Battery Backup Module
Adaptec Battery Module 800/800T (sold separately—see
page 17)
Chapter 3: About Your RAID Controller
●
23
About the Adaptec RAID 51645
The Adaptec RAID 51645 is a SAS RAID controller with these features:
Mode 0 Flash
Activity CN2, CN3
I2C, CN2
I2C, CN3
I2C, CN1
I2C, CN0
CN0
Activity
CN0, CN1
CN1
CN6
CN2
4 internal
mini-SAS
connectors
CN3
1 external
mini-SAS
connector
ABM-800 connector
Reserved
Ext. Alarm
Aggregate Activity
Form Factor
Full Height, Half Length
Bus compatibility
PCIe
PCIe bus width
x8
PCIe bus speed
2.5 Gb/s
Phys (Unified Serial Ports)
20
Standard cache
512 MB DDR2
Connectors, Internal
4 mini-SAS x4 (SFF-8087)
Connectors, Exteneral
1 mini-SAS x4 (SFF-8088)
Maximum number of disk drives
20 direct-attached (or up to 256 with expanders)
Enclosure Support
I2C and SGPIO
Onboard speaker
Yes
Battery Backup Module
Adaptec Battery Module 800/800T (sold separately—see
page 17)
Chapter 3: About Your RAID Controller
●
24
About the Adaptec RAID 52445
The Adaptec RAID 52445 is a SAS RAID controller with these features:
I2C, CN2
I2C, CN3
I2C, CN4
I2C, CN5
Mode 0 Flash connector
I2C, CN1
I2C, CN0
Activity CN2, CN3
CN4 CN5
CN0
Activity
CN0, CN1
CN1
CN2
CN6
1 external
mini-SAS
connector
CN3
6 internal
mini-SAS
connectors
ABM-800 connector
Reserved
Ext. Alarm
Aggregate Activity
Activity CN4, CN5
Form Factor
Full Height, Half Length
Bus compatibility
PCIe
PCIe bus width
x8
PCIe bus speed
2.5 Gb/s
Phys (Unified Serial Ports)
28
Standard cache
512 MB DDR2
Connectors, Internal
6 mini-SAS x4 (SFF-8087)
Connectors, Exteneral
1 mini-SAS x4 (SFF-8088)
Maximum number of disk drives
28 direct-attached (or up to 256 with expanders)
Enclosure Support
I2C and SGPIO
Onboard speaker
Yes
Battery Backup Module
Adaptec Battery Module 800/800T (sold separately—see
page 17)
Chapter 3: About Your RAID Controller
●
About the Adaptec RAID 5405Z
The Adaptec RAID 5405Z is a SAS RAID controller with these features:
Drive Activity LED connectors for CN0
Drive Activity LEDs for CN0
I2C connector for CN0
Ext. Alarm connector
Aggregate Activity
Mode 0 Flash connector
Diagnostic LEDs
Internal mini-SAS
connector CN0
PCIe x8 connector
ZMM-100CC Cap
Card connector
ZMM-100DB
Daughterboard
Mounting bracket
Form Factor
Low-profile MD2
Bus compatibility
PCIe
PCIe bus width
x8
PCIe bus speed
2.5 Gb/s
Phys (Unified Serial Ports)
4
Standard cache
512 MB DDR2
Connectors, internal
1 mini-SAS x4 (SFF-8087)
Maximum number of disk drives
4 direct-attached (or up to 256 with expanders)
Enclosure Support
I2C and SGPIO
Onboard speaker
Yes
Zero Maintenance Cache
Protection Module
Adaptec ZMM-100DB daughterboard (pre-installed),
Adaptec ZMM-100CC super cap card (user installed—see
page 37)
25
Chapter 3: About Your RAID Controller
●
26
About the Adaptec RAID 5445Z
The Adaptec RAID 5445Z is a SAS RAID controller with these features:
Drive Activity LED connectors for CN0/CN1
Drive Activity LEDs for CN0/CN1
I2C connectors for CN0/CN1
Ext. Alarm connector
Aggregate Activity
Mode 0 Flash connector
Diagnostic LEDs
Internal mini-SAS
connector CN0
CN1
1 external
mini-SAS
connector
PCIe x8 connector
Mounting bracket
ZMM-100CC Cap
Card connector
ZMM-100DB
Daughterboard
Form Factor
Low-profile MD2
Bus compatibility
PCIe
PCIe bus width
x8
PCIe bus speed
2.5 Gb/s
Phys (Unified Serial Ports)
8
Standard cache
512 MB DDR2
Connectors
1 mini-SAS x4 (SFF-8087) internal
1 mini-SAS x4 (SFF-8088) external
Maximum number of disk drives
8 direct-attached (or up to 256 with expanders)
Enclosure Support
I2C and SGPIO
Onboard speaker
Yes
Zero Maintenance Cache
Protection Module
Adaptec ZMM-100DB daughterboard (pre-installed),
Adaptec ZMM-100CC super cap card (user installed—see
page 37)
Chapter 3: About Your RAID Controller
●
27
About the Adaptec RAID 5805Z/5805ZQ
The Adaptec RAID 5805Z/5805ZQ is a SAS RAID controller with these features:
Drive Activity LED connectors for CN0/CN1
Drive Activity LEDs for CN0/CN1
I2C connectors for CN0/CN1
Ext. Alarm connector
Aggregate Activity
Mode 0 Flash connector
Diagnostic LEDs
CN1
2 internal mini-SAS
connectors
CN0
ZMM-100CC Cap
Card connector
PCIe x8 connector
Mounting bracket
ZMM-100DB
Daughterboard
Form Factor
Low-profile MD2
Bus compatibility
PCIe
PCIe bus width
x8
PCIe bus speed
2.5 Gb/s
Phys (Unified Serial Ports)
8
Standard cache
512 MB DDR2
Connectors, internal
2 mini-SAS x4 (SFF-8087)
Maximum number of disk drives
8 direct-attached (or up to 256 with expanders)
MaxIQ SSD support
5805Z: 8 Adaptec MaxIQ-branded/Intel X25-E SSDs (2TB max)
5805ZQ: 8 MaxIQ-compatible SSDs using any Solid State Drive
on compatibility list (2TB max); see www.adaptec.com/
compatibility
Enclosure Support
I2C and SGPIO
Onboard speaker
Yes
Zero Maintenance Cache
Protection Module
Adaptec ZMM-100DB daughterboard (pre-installed),
Adaptec ZMM-100CC super cap card (user installed—see page
37)
Chapter 3: About Your RAID Controller
About the Adaptec RAID 2045
The Adaptec RAID 2045 is a SAS RAID controller with these features:
Aggregate Activity
Mode 0 Flash connector
CN1
1 external miniSAS connector
PCIe x8 connector
Mounting bracket
Form Factor
Low-profile MD2
Bus compatibility
PCIe
PCIe bus width
x8
PCIe bus speed
2.5 Gb/s
Phys (Unified Serial Ports)
4
Standard cache
128 MB DDR2
Connectors, external
1 mini-SAS x4 (SFF-8088)
Maximum number of disk drives
4 direct-attached (or up to 128 with expanders)
Enclosure Support
I2C and SGPIO
Onboard speaker
No
Battery Backup Module
No
●
28
Chapter 3: About Your RAID Controller
●
29
About the Adaptec RAID 2405/2405Q
The Adaptec RAID 2405/2405Q is a SAS RAID controller with these features:
Activity connector for CN0
Aggregate Activity
Mode 0 Flash connector
Internal mini-SAS
connector CN0
I2C, CN0
PCIe x8 connector
Mounting bracket
Form Factor
Low-profile MD2
Bus compatibility
PCIe
PCIe bus width
x8
PCIe bus speed
2.5 Gb/s
Phys (Unified Serial Ports)
4
Standard cache
128 MB DDR2
Connectors, internal
1 mini-SAS x4 (SFF-8087)
Maximum number of disk drives
4 direct-attached (or up to 128 with expanders)
MaxIQ SSD support
2405: 1 Adaptec MaxIQ-branded/Intel X25-E SSDs (80GB max)
2405Q: 1 MaxIQ-compatible SSD using any Solid State Drive on
compatibility list (80GB max); see www.adaptec.com/
compatibility
Enclosure Support
I2C and SGPIO
Onboard speaker
No
Battery Backup Module
No
Getting Started
4
In this chapter...
Choosing a RAID Level.......................................................................................................... 31
Selecting Disk Drives and Cables .......................................................................................... 32
Installation Options ............................................................................................................... 33
Basic Installation Steps........................................................................................................... 34
This chapter provides the basic information you need to set up your disk drives and arrays the
way you want them. It also describes the options you have for installing your Adaptec
controller and disk drives, and creating arrays for data storage.
Chapter 4: Getting Started
●
31
Choosing a RAID Level
This section provides a brief overview of the RAID levels supported by your Adaptec RAID
controller, including the minimum and maximum number of disk drives required by each.
Note: Before you begin, familiarize yourself with your Adaptec controller’s physical features
and the RAID levels that it supports (see Standard RAID Controller Features on page 16).
●
RAID 0 (Non-redundant Array)—Stripes data across multiple disk drives. Improved
performance but no redundancy (see page 75).
●
RAID 1 Array—Created from two disk drives where one disk drive is a mirror of the other
(the same data is stored on each disk drive). Redundancy, but reduced capacity (see page 76).
●
RAID 1E Array—Similar to a RAID 1 array except that data is mirrored and striped, and more
disk drives can be included (see page 76).
●
RAID 5 Array—Stripes data for improved performance and uses parity data to provide
redundancy (see page 78).
●
RAID 5EE Array—Similar to a RAID 5 array, but includes a distributed spare and must
include a minimum of four disk drives (see page 79).
●
RAID 10 Array—Built from two or more equal-sized RAID 1 arrays, stripes and mirrors
data across multiple disk drives. Redundancy and improved performance (see page 77).
●
RAID 50 Array—Built from multiple disk drives configured as two or more RAID 5
arrays, stripes stored data and parity data across all disk drives (see page 80).
●
RAID 6 Array—Similar to a RAID 5 array except that it includes two independent sets of
parity data instead of one (see page 81).
●
RAID 60 Array—Similar to a RAID 50 array except that it includes four independent sets
of parity data instead of two (see page 81).
Use the table on page 82 to see how many disk drives you must connect to your RAID
controller to support the RAID level you want.
Chapter 4: Getting Started
●
32
Selecting Disk Drives and Cables
Disk Drives
Your SAS controller supports SAS disk drives, SATA disk drives, SATA Solid State Drives (SSD),
and Adaptec MaxIQ Solid State Drives. When selecting disk drives for your RAID array, ensure
that all the disk drives have the same performance level. You can use different-sized disk drives in
the array, but the array will be limited to the capacity of the smallest and slowest disk drive. For
more information about arrays, refer to the Adaptec Storage Manager User’s Guide or online Help.
For more information about compatible disk drives, refer to the Adaptec Web site at
www.adaptec.com/compatibility.
Cables
Depending on your requirements, you can use any of these cables:
External mini-SAS (SFF-8088 to SFF-8470)—Connects
to an external SAS enclosure.
Internal mini-SAS with power (SFF-8087 to SFF-8482)—Connects
to four SAS or SATA disk drives.
Chapter 4: Getting Started
●
33
Internal mini-SAS to SATA fan-out (SFF-8087 to 4x SATA)—Connects
to four SATA disk drives.
External mini-SAS to mini-SAS (SFF-8088 to SFF-8088)—
Connects to a backplane or enclosure.
Internal mini-SAS to mini-SAS (SFF-8087 to SFF-8087)—
Connects to a backplane or enclosure.
Cable connectors are keyed so that you can’t insert them incorrectly.
Adaptec recommends using only Adaptec SAS cables. For more information or to purchase
cables, visit the Adaptec Web site at www.adaptec.com.
Installation Options
When you install your Adaptec controller, you can choose to create a bootable array and then
install your operating system and the controller driver on that array.
Alternatively, you can complete a standard installation, where the controller driver is installed
on an existing operating system.
Chapter 4: Getting Started
●
34
Basic Installation Steps
This section describes the installation process. Follow the steps for the installation option
you’ve chosen.
Installing with an Operating System
1
Install and connect your controller and internal disk drives (see page 35).
If your controller has an external connector, you can connect external disk drives as well
(or instead).
2
Set the boot controller (see page 44).
3
Create a bootable array (see page 44).
4
Install your operating system and the controller driver (see page 48.)
5
Install Adaptec Storage Manager and begin to manage your data storage (see page 59).
Installing on an Existing Operating System
1
Install and connect your controller and internal disk drives (see page 35).
If your controller has an external connector, you can connect external disk drives as well
(or instead).
2
Install the controller driver (see page 54).
3
Install Adaptec Storage Manager and begin to manage your data storage (see page 59).
Installing the Controller and Disk
Drives
5
In this chapter...
Before You Begin .................................................................................................................... 36
Installing the Controller......................................................................................................... 36
Connecting Disk Drives to Your Controllers ........................................................................ 38
Connecting External Devices................................................................................................. 42
Next Steps ............................................................................................................................... 42
This chapter explains how to install your Adaptec RAID controller, and how to install and
connect internal and external disk drives.
Chapter 5: Installing the Controller and Disk Drives
●
36
Before You Begin
●
Read Safety Information on page 128.
●
Familiarize yourself with your Adaptec RAID controller’s physical features and the RAID
levels that it supports (see page 16).
●
Ensure you have the right quantity of disk drives for the RAID level you want to use for
your arrays (see page 32).
●
Ensure that you have the proper cables for your controller and disk drives (see page 32).
●
If you are installing a low-profile RAID controller into a low-profile computer cabinet,
replace the original full-height bracket with the low-profile bracket included in the kit.
! Caution: Handle the controller by its bracket or edges only.
Installing the Controller
This section describes how to install your Adaptec RAID controller into your computer cabinet.
Adaptec RAID controllers come in two basic configurations: standard and zero maintenance
cache protection with batteryless backup. Follow one of these sets of instructions:
●
To install a standard series Adaptec RAID controller (without zero maintenance cache
protection), see the following section.
●
To install an Adaptec RAID controller with zero maintenance cache protection, see page
37.
Installing a RAID Controller
1
Turn off your computer and disconnect the power cord. Open
the cabinet, following the manufacturer’s instructions.
2
Select an available PCIe expansion slot that’s compatible with
your RAID controller and remove the slot cover, as shown at
right. (PCIe bus compatibility is marked to the controller figures
in About Your RAID Controller on page 15.)
! Caution: Touch a grounded metal object before handling
the RAID controller.
3
As shown at right, insert the RAID controller into the expansion
slot and press down gently but firmly until it clicks into place.
When installed properly, the RAID controller should appear
level with the expansion slot.
4
Secure the bracket in the expansion slot, using the retention device
(for instance, a screw or lever) supplied with your computer.
5
Connect your computer’s disk activity LED cable to the LED
connector on the controller (marked on the figures in About
Your RAID Controller on page 15).
Ensure that the positive lead of the LED cable (usually a red
wire or a wire marked with a red stripe) is attached to pin 1.
Chapter 5: Installing the Controller and Disk Drives
●
37
6
Optional—Connect your RAID controller’s I2C connector (not available on all models) to
an I2C connector on an internal backplane or enclosure, using an I2C cable. For more
connection details, see About Your RAID Controller on page 15.
7
Prepare and install your internal disk drives, following the instructions in Connecting Disk
Drives to Your Controllers on page 38.
If you are not installing internal disk drives, close your computer cabinet, reattach the
power cord, then continue with Connecting External Devices on page 42.
Installing a RAID Controller with Zero Maintenance Cache Protection
Warning: Do not attempt to connect a Battery Backup Module (see page 17) to an
Adaptec RAID controller with Zero Maintenance Cache Protection. The battery module can
overheat and may even explode!
1
Turn off your computer and disconnect the power cord. Open
the cabinet, following the manufacturer’s instructions.
2
Select an available PCIe expansion slot that’s compatible with
your RAID controller and remove the slot cover, as shown at
right. (PCIe bus compatibility is marked to the controller figures
in About Your RAID Controller on page 15.)
! Caution: Touch a grounded metal object before handling
the RAID controller.
3
As shown at right, insert the RAID controller into the
expansion slot and press down gently but firmly until it clicks
into place. When installed properly, the RAID controller
should appear level with the expansion slot.
4
Secure the bracket in the expansion slot, using the retention
device (for instance, a screw or lever) supplied with your
computer.
5
Attach the zero maintenance cap card (ZMM-100CC)
to the RAID controller by inserting the connector into
the socket on the ZMM-100DB daughterboard, as
shown at right. The connector attaches to the socket in
only one direction.
6
Choose a location on the chassis or in the system to fix
the tethered cap card using the included tie-backs such
that (i) the cable (18.5") reaches the mating location on
the RAID controller when the controller is installed in
the expansion slot; (ii) wiring is routed and secured so
that it does not contact any moving parts (fans, for
instance); and (iii) the cap card is protected from excessive heat.
Chapter 5: Installing the Controller and Disk Drives
●
38
7
Thread the tie-backs through the slots on the
cap card and fix to the selected location on the
computer chassis. The tie-backs should
completely encircle the cap card to ensure that
it is held in place securely, as shown at right. Be
careful not to restrict air-flow through your
system.
8
Connect your computer’s disk activity LED
cable to the LED connector on the controller (marked on the figures in About Your RAID
Controller on page 15).
Ensure that the positive lead of the LED cable (usually a red wire or a wire marked with a
red stripe) is attached to pin 1.
9
Connect your RAID controller’s I2C connector to an I2C connector on an internal
backplane or enclosure, using an I2C cable. For more connection details, see About Your
RAID Controller on page 15.
10 Prepare and install your internal disk drives, following the instructions in Connecting Disk
Drives to Your Controllers on page 38.
If you are not installing internal disk drives, close your computer cabinet, reattach the
power cord, then continue with Connecting External Devices on page 42.
Connecting Disk Drives to Your Controllers
You can connect SAS disk drives, SATA disk drives, SATA Solid State Drives (SSD), and
Adaptec MaxIQ Solid State Drives to your SAS RAID controller. (See www.adaptec.com/
compatibility for a list of compatible disk drives.) There are no jumpers or switches to set
before installation.
If you plan to build a bootable array using internal disk drives, ensure you install at least the
minimum number disk drives required to support the RAID level you want. See page 31 for
more information.
Note: Although you can connect both SAS and SATA disk drives to your SAS controller, Adaptec
recommends that you not combine SAS and SATA disk drives within the same array or logical
drive. See page 68 for more information.
You have two connection options:
●
To connect directly to the controller, see the following section.
●
To connect to a backplane, see page 39.
To connect Adaptec MaxIQ SSDs or other SSDs to your controller, see page 40.
Connecting Directly to the Controller
In a direct-attach connection, SAS or SATA disk drives are connected directly to a SAS card
with SAS cables. The number of direct-attached disk drives is limited to four per internal SAS
connector. (For more information about direct-attach connections, see page 71.)
1
Install your internal SAS or SATA disk drives, following the instructions in your system’s
documentation.
Chapter 5: Installing the Controller and Disk Drives
2
●
39
Use internal SAS or mini-SAS cables to attach the disk drives to the controller, as shown in
the following example.
SAS/SATA
disk drives or
SATA SSDs
internal x4 mini-SAS connectors
mini-SAS to SATA fan-out cable
Single-port connector
Note: SAS fan-out cables are also available with an additional sideband (SFF-8448) cable
that caries SGPIO signals for enclosure management. This additional sideband cable is not
used with direct-attached disk drives.
3
When all internal disk drives have been installed and attached to the controller, close your
computer cabinet, reattach the power cord, then continue with Connecting External
Devices on page 42.
Connecting to a System Backplane
In a backplane connection, disk drives and SAS cards are attached to and communicate with
each other through a system backplane.
The number of disk drives is limited to the number of slots available on the backplane. Some
backplanes have embedded SAS expanders and can support up to 128 end devices. (For more
information about backplane and expander connections, see page 71.)
1
Connect one or more internal SAS or SATA disk drives to the backplane. (Refer to your
system’s documentation for more information.)
2
Use an internal SAS cable to connect the controller to the backplane, as shown in the
examples on page 40.
Chapter 5: Installing the Controller and Disk Drives
●
40
Disk drives or
SSDs on
backplane
Controller connected to backplane
with Internal mini-SAS to mini-SAS
(SFF-8087 to SFF-8087)
Disk drives or
SSDs on
backplane
External SAS cable
connecting to a
drive bay
Controller connected to backplane
with multi-lane cable (SFF-8484)
3
When all internal disk drives have been installed and connected, close your computer
cabinet, reattach the power cord, then continue with Connecting External Devices on page 42.
Connecting MaxIQ Solid State Drives and other SSDs
To connect an Adaptec MaxIQ Solid State Drive or other SSD to your controller, use a directattached connection or a backplane connection. If your server does not have a standard 2.5inch drive tray, you must use a bracket/SLED which enables the SSD to fit properly (not
included with MaxIQ SSD kit).
Note: For MaxIQ caching applications, you can use any Solid State Drive on the compatibility
list, including Adaptec MaxIQ-branded SSDs and, with Adaptec Q-series controllers, select
SSDs from other manufacturers. For RAID arrays, you can use any Solid State Drive on the
compatibility list. See www.adaptec.com/compatibility for a list of MaxIQ-compatible Solid
State Drives.
Chapter 5: Installing the Controller and Disk Drives
●
41
In a direct-attach connection, you connect SSDs directly to the controller with SAS cables
(mini-SAS to SATA). In a backplane connection, use the appropriate cable for your backplane
type (see page 39 for more about backplane connections). You can connect a maximum of
eight MaxIQ-compatible SSDs to a controller. For RAID arrays, Adaptec RAID controllers
support a maximum of 256 drives, including SSDs (for details, see page 15).
Note: The following steps use an Adaptec MaxIQ SSD as an example but the procedure is
suitable for any compatible SSD.
1
Install your Adaptec MaxIQ SSDs in your server. For servers with a standard 2.5-inch drive
tray, install the SSD directly into the tray. If your server does not have a standard 2.5-inch
drive tray, use a bracket or adapter which enables it to fit properly.
Use a 2.5” to 3.5” adapter to
install MaxIQ SSD if server does
not have 2.5” tray.
Typical MaxIQ SSD installation.
Chapter 5: Installing the Controller and Disk Drives
2
●
42
Use an internal mini-SAS to SATA cable to attach the SSD(s) to the controller, as shown in
the following example.
To other SSDs
Internal x4 mini-SAS connector
Single-port connector
MaxIQ SSD connected to controller
with internal mini-SAS to SATA Fanout
cable (SFF-8087 to 4x-SATA)
3
When all SSDs have been installed and connected, close your computer cabinet, reattach
the power cord, then continue with Connecting External Devices on page 42.
Connecting External Devices
Note: If you are not connecting any external devices, see the following section, Next Steps.
Use high-quality cables to connect your controller to your external device(s), such as disk
drives or disk drive enclosures.
Adaptec recommends using only Adaptec cables. For more information or to purchase cables,
visit the Adaptec Web site at www.adaptec.com.
Next Steps
If you are installing the controller driver and an operating system onto a bootable array,
continue with Creating a Bootable Array on page 43.
If you are completing a standard installation onto an existing operating system, continue with
Installing the Driver on an Existing Operating System on page 54.
Creating a Bootable Array
6
In this chapter...
Setting the Boot Controller.................................................................................................... 44
Creating an Array ................................................................................................................... 44
Making Your Array Bootable ................................................................................................. 47
This chapter explains how to set your Adaptec controller to be the boot controller, and how to
create a bootable array.
Note: If you are completing a standard installation onto an existing operating system, you
don’t have to complete this task. Skip to Installing the Driver on an Existing Operating System
on page 54.
Chapter 6: Creating a Bootable Array
●
44
Setting the Boot Controller
Note: If your system won’t contain more than one bootable controller, skip to the next section,
Creating an Array.
Your Adaptec RAID controller supports bootable disk drives and bootable arrays. To enable
your system to boot from either a disk drive or an array connected to your controller:
1
Enter the system setup.
2
Navigate to the drive boot sequence.
3
Move the boot controller to the top of the list.
For more information, refer to your computer documentation.
Creating an Array
This section explains how to create an array.
A RAID 5 array is created in the examples shown in this section because RAID 5 provides the
most security and best performance with a minimum of three disk drives. However, you can
choose to create an array with a different RAID level; you can also change array level later, after
the operating system is installed.
You can create an array using any of these tools:
●
Array Configuration Utility (ACU)—BIOS-based menus and keyboard navigation (see
the following section).
●
Adaptec Storage Manager—Graphical software application (running from a bootable
installation DVD) that you can navigate with your mouse (see page 60).
●
ARCCONF—Command line utility. For instructions, refer to the Adaptec RAID Controller
Command Line Utility User’s Guide.
You can use either tool, but the ACU utility is the quicker and easier tool for this task.
Note: Adaptec recommends that you not combine SAS and SATA disk drives within the same
array. Adaptec Storage Manager generates a warning if you try to create a logical drive using a
combination of SAS and SATA disk drives. See page 68 for more information.
Creating an Array with the ACU
The ACU is menu-based and instructions for completing tasks appear on-screen. Menus can
be navigated using the arrows, Enter, Esc, and other keys on your keyboard.
To create a RAID 5 array:
1
Power on your computer. When prompted, press Ctrl+A to enter the ARC utility.
Note: During boot up, if your system has insufficient memory the following message will
display. “Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility will load after, system initialization. Please wait...
Or press <Enter> Key to attempt loading the utility forcibly [Generally, not recommended]”
2
If you have more than one controller of the same model or family in your computer, select
your controller, then press Enter.
3
Select Array Configuration Utility, then press Enter.
Chapter 6: Creating a Bootable Array
●
45
4
Select Initialize Drives, then press Enter.
5
Select at least three disk drives for the array, press Insert for each selected disk drive, then
press Enter.
! Caution: During initialization, all data is deleted from the disk. Before continuing,
back up any data you want to keep.
6
Press Y, then press Enter.
The selected disk drives are initialized, then the ACU screen appears.
7
Select Create Array, then press Enter.
8
Select the disk drives that were just initialized, press Insert for each selected disk drive,
then press Enter.
9
When the Array Properties screen opens, follow the instructions in the following table.
Property Line
Entry or Selection
Array Type
Select RAID 5, then press Enter.
Array Label
Type a name, then press Enter.
Array Size
Press Enter, then press Enter again to use the default granularity of GB.
Stripe Size
Press Enter to use the default (256 KB).
Read Caching
Press Enter to use the default (Yes).
Write Caching
Press Enter to use the default (Enable always).
Create RAID via
Press Enter to use the default (Build/Verify).
[Done]
Press Enter.
10 When a cache warning message displays, type Y.
11 Once the array is created, a message displays telling you that the array can now be used.
Press any key to return to the ACU Menu.
You can start using the array immediately. However, performance is reduced until the
build process is complete.
12 Press Esc until the Exit utility window appears.
13 Select Yes, then press Enter.
The computer restarts.
14 Continue with Making Your Array Bootable on page 47.
Chapter 6: Creating a Bootable Array
●
46
Creating an Array with Adaptec Storage Manager
This section describes how to use the Adaptec Storage Manager configuration wizard to build a
RAID 5 array.
Note: You will need the Adaptec RAID Controller Installation DVD to complete this task.
To create a RAID 5 array:
1
Insert the Adaptec RAID Controller Installation DVD into your DVD drive, then restart
your computer.
2
When prompted, select the language you want, then press Enter.
3
Review the license information, then press Enter.
The main menu opens.
4
Click Launch Configuration Utility.
Adaptec Storage Manager opens.
5
Click Create.
The Configuration wizard opens.
6
Select Express configuration..., then click Next.
Chapter 6: Creating a Bootable Array
7
●
47
Review the information that is displayed.
Note: In DAS environments, Adaptec Storage Manager uses the term logical drives when
referring to arrays (see page 12).
In this example, Adaptec Storage Manager has used thirteen equal-sized disk drives to
automatically create one logical drive with RAID 5 and a hot spare.
To exclude specific disk drives from the logical drive, specify a size for the logical drive, or
to make other changes to the configuration, click Modify logical devices.
8
Click Apply, then click Yes when prompted to confirm applying your new configuration.
Adaptec Storage Manager builds the logical drive.
The configuration is saved on the Adaptec controller (as an “array”, see page 12) and on
the physical disk drives.
9
Partition and format your logical drive.
The logical drive you created appears as a physical disk drive on your operating system.
You must partition and format these logical drives before you can use them to store data.
10 Close all windows, then click Reboot to restart your system.
11 Remove the Adaptec RAID Controller Installation DVD.
For information on installing and using Adaptec Storage Manager as a full software
application, refer to the Adaptec Storage Manager User’s Guide or online Help.
12 Continue with the following section.
Making Your Array Bootable
Use the ACU to make the array bootable (see Creating Bootable Arrays on page 85).
Then continue with Installing the Driver and an Operating System on page 48.
Installing the Driver and an
Operating System
7
In this chapter...
Before You Begin .................................................................................................................... 49
Creating a Driver Disk ........................................................................................................... 49
Installing with Windows ........................................................................................................ 50
Installing with Red Hat Linux ............................................................................................... 51
Installing with SUSE Linux.................................................................................................... 51
Installing with OpenServer .................................................................................................... 51
Installing with UnixWare ....................................................................................................... 52
Installing with Solaris............................................................................................................. 52
Installing with VMware ......................................................................................................... 53
Installing with FreeBSD ......................................................................................................... 53
This chapter explains how to install your Adaptec RAID controller driver and an operating
system onto a bootable array (see page 43).
To install the driver on an existing operating system, see page 54.
Chapter 7: Installing the Driver and an Operating System
●
49
Before You Begin
●
Install and connect your Adaptec RAID controller and internal disk drives (see page 35).
●
Create a bootable array (see page 43).
●
Create a driver disk (see the following section).
Note: For up-to-date operating system version support, visit the Adaptec Web Site at
www.adaptec.com. From the main menu select Support>Knowledgebase>Find Answers. Select
your controller type and OS support to generate a list of supported operating systems and to
download the latest drivers.
Creating a Driver Disk
Note: You will need a floppy disk to complete this task for all operating systems except
Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, and Windows 7.
To create a driver disk:
1
Set your system BIOS so that your computer boots from the DVD drive. (For instructions,
refer to your computer documentation.)
2
Turn on your computer, then insert the RAID Controller Installation DVD included in
your RAID controller kit.
3
Click Create Diskette, then select your operating system.
Note: Linux only—If prompted, select your operating system and then the version.
4
When prompted, insert a floppy disk, then click OK.
The system creates the driver disk.
5
Remove and label the driver disk.
6
Continue with the instructions for your operating system:
●
For Windows, see page 50.
●
For Red Hat Linux, see page 51.
●
For SUSE Linux, see page 51.
●
For OpenServer, see page 51.
●
For UnixWare, see page 52.
●
For Solaris, see page 52
●
For VMware, see page 53.
●
For FreeBSD, see page 53.
Chapter 7: Installing the Driver and an Operating System
●
50
Installing with Windows
Note: You will need your Windows Installation CD to complete this task.
Installing with Windows Server 2003 or Windows XP
To install the Adaptec RAID controller driver while installing Windows:
1
Insert your Windows CD, then restart the computer.
2
Follow the on-screen instructions to begin the Windows installation.
3
When prompted to install a third-party driver, press F6.
Note: When F6 is active, a prompt appears at the bottom of the screen for only 5 seconds.
If you miss your chance to press F6, restart your computer.
4
Insert the driver disk, then wait until you are prompted to install a driver.
5
Press S to specify that the driver is on a floppy disk, then press Enter.
The computer reads the disk.
6
When the Adaptec driver is found, press Enter.
7
Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the installation.
8
Continue with Managing Your Storage Space on page 59.
Installing with Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, or Windows Vista
To install the Adaptec RAID controller driver while installing Windows:
1
Insert your Windows CD, then restart the computer.
2
Follow the on-screen instructions to begin the Windows installation.
3
When prompted to specify a location for Windows, select Load Driver.
4
Insert the Adaptec RAID Controller Installation DVD, then click OK.
5
When the Adaptec driver is found, press Next.
6
Click Next again to accept the default partition configuration, or refer to your Windows
documentation to configure partitions manually.
7
Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the installation.
8
Continue with Managing Your Storage Space on page 59.
Chapter 7: Installing the Driver and an Operating System
●
51
Installing with Red Hat Linux
Note: You will need your Red Hat Installation CD to complete this task.
To install the Adaptec RAID controller driver while installing Red Hat Linux:
1
Insert the first Red Hat Installation CD.
2
Restart your computer.
3
When the Red Hat Welcome screen appears, type linux dd at the Boot: prompt.
4
When prompted, insert the driver disk, then select OK.
5
Follow the prompts to set up the environment you want.
6
If you are installing other third-party devices, install them now. Otherwise, select Done.
7
Complete the Linux installation, following the instructions included with your operating
system.
8
Continue with Managing Your Storage Space on page 59.
Installing with SUSE Linux
To install the Adaptec RAID controller driver while installing SUSE Linux:
1
Insert the first SUSE Installation CD.
2
Restart your computer.
3
When the SUSE installation selection screen appears, choose the type of installation you
want, then press the F6 key to indicate the use of a driver disk. (If F6 is not shown on the
screen, you may have an older version of SUSE; press the Alt key instead.)
4
When prompted, insert the driver disk, then press any key to continue.
5
Follow the prompts to set up the environment you want.
6
If you are installing other third-party devices, install them now. Otherwise, select Back.
7
Complete the Linux installation, following the instructions included with your operating
system.
8
Continue with Managing Your Storage Space on page 59.
Installing with OpenServer
Note: You will need your OpenServer Installation CD to complete this task.
To install the driver when installing OpenServer:
1
Insert the OpenServer Installation CD.
2
Restart your computer.
3
Follow the on-screen instructions to begin the OpenServer installation.
4
When prompted to load more HBA drivers, insert the driver disk, then select Yes. (To load
more HBA drivers, repeat this step.)
Chapter 7: Installing the Driver and an Operating System
5
When all drivers have loaded, select No.
6
Complete the OpenServer installation, following the instructions included with your
operating system.
7
Continue with Managing Your Storage Space on page 59.
●
52
Installing with UnixWare
Note: You will need your UnixWare Installation CD to complete this task.
To install the driver when installing UnixWare:
1
Insert the UnixWare Installation CD.
2
Restart your computer.
3
Follow the on-screen instructions to begin the UnixWare installation.
4
When prompted to load more HBA drivers, insert the driver disk, then select Yes. (To load
more HBA drivers, repeat this step.)
5
When all drivers have loaded, select No.
6
Complete the UnixWare installation, following the instructions included with your
operating system.
7
Continue with Managing Your Storage Space on page 59.
Installing with Solaris
Note: This task is not necessary if you are installing Solaris 10 Update 2 or later. Instead, you
can choose to install Solaris using the in-box driver and update it either during or after the
installation is complete, if required. You will need a floppy disk to complete this task.
To create a driver disk:
1
Start your computer.
2
Interrupt the autoboot, press the ESC key. The Device Configuration Assistant (DCA)
Utility will open.
3
Select F4_Add Driver.
4
Insert a floppy disk.
5
Complete the Solaris installation, following the instructions included with your operating
system.
Chapter 7: Installing the Driver and an Operating System
●
53
Installing with VMware
Note: You will need your VMware Installation CD to complete this task.
To install the driver when installing VMware:
1
Insert the VMware Installation CD.
2
Restart your computer.
3
Follow the on-screen instructions to begin the VMware installation.
Note: The VMware embedded driver will see the device and install.
4
Complete the VMware installation, following the instructions included with your
operating system.
Note: Currently, the Adaptec Storage Manager GUI is not supported on VMware. To create and
manage arrays, you must connect to the VMware machine from a remote GUI or use the
ARCCONF utility. See page 61 for more information.
Installing with FreeBSD
Note: You will need your FreeBSD Installation CD to complete this task.
To install the driver when installing FreeBSD:
1
Insert the FreeBSD Installation CD.
2
Restart your computer.
3
When the FreeBSD start screen opens, select 6 to escape to loader prompt.
4
Type load kernel.
5
Insert the driver floppy disk.
6
Type load disk0:aacu.ko.
If the driver fails to load, run lsdev and check for the floppy disk drive. Then, try again with
the appropriate device.
7
Type boot.
8
Complete the FreeBSD installation, following the instructions included with your
operating system.
9
Reboot your computer, then remove the driver disk.
10 Repeat Steps 3 through 7 the first time you boot the operating system to load the drivers
again for the initial bootup.
Installing the Driver on an Existing
Operating System
8
In this chapter...
Before You Begin .................................................................................................................... 55
Creating a Driver Disk ........................................................................................................... 55
Installing on Windows ........................................................................................................... 56
Installing on Red Hat or SUSE Linux.................................................................................... 56
Installing on OpenServer ....................................................................................................... 57
Installing on UnixWare .......................................................................................................... 57
Installing on Solaris................................................................................................................ 57
Installing on VMware............................................................................................................. 58
Installing on FreeBSD ............................................................................................................ 58
This chapter explains how to install your Adaptec RAID controller driver.
Note: To install the driver while you’re installing an operating system, see page 48.
Chapter 8: Installing the Driver on an Existing Operating System
●
55
Before You Begin
Before you begin, install and connect your Adaptec RAID controller and internal disk drives
(see page 35).
You must also create a driver disk before you begin installing the controller driver.
Note: For up-to-date operating system version support, visit the Adaptec Web Site at
www.adaptec.com. From the main menu select Support>Knowledgebase>Find Answers. Select
your controller type and OS support to generate a list of supported operating systems and to
download the latest drivers.
Creating a Driver Disk
Note: You will need a floppy disk to complete this task.
To create a driver disk:
1
Set your system BIOS so that your computer boots from the DVD drive. (For instructions,
refer to your computer documentation.)
2
Turn on your computer, then insert the RAID Controller Installation DVD included in
your RAID controller kit.
3
Click Create Diskette, then select your operating system.
Note: Linux only—If prompted, select your operating system and then the version.
4
When prompted, insert a floppy disk, then click OK.
The system creates the driver disk.
5
Remove and label the driver disk.
6
Continue with the instructions for your operating system:
●
For Windows, see page 56.
●
For Red Hat or SUSE Linux, see page 56.
●
For OpenServer, see page 57.
●
For UnixWare, see page 57.
●
For Solaris, see page 57.
●
For VMware, see page 58.
●
For FreeBSD, see page 58.
Chapter 8: Installing the Driver on an Existing Operating System
●
56
Installing on Windows
Follow the instructions in this section for your version of Windows.
Installing on Windows Server 2003 or Windows XP
To install the driver on Windows:
1
Start or restart Windows.
The Found New Hardware Wizard opens and searches for the driver.
2
Insert the driver disk, select Floppy drive, then click Next.
3
Click Next, then click Next again.
4
Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the driver installation.
5
Remove the driver disk and restart your computer.
6
Continue with Managing Your Storage Space on page 59.
Installing with Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, or Windows Vista
1
Start or restart Windows.
The Found New Hardware Wizard opens and searches for the driver.
2
Insert the driver disk, then select Locate and Install Driver Software.... and Don’t Search
Online.
3
Click Next, then click Close.
4
When the installation is complete, remove the driver disk and restart your computer.
5
Continue with Managing Your Storage Space on page 59.
Installing on Red Hat or SUSE Linux
To install the module on Red Hat or SUSE Linux:
1
Insert and mount the RAID Controller Installation DVD:
Red Hat: mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/cdrom
SUSE: mount /dev/cdrom /media/cdrom
2
Install the module RPM:
rpm -Uvh mount-point/xxx/yyy.rpm
where mount-point is the specific mount point on the Linux system, xxx is the driver path,
and yyy.rpm is the rpm file.
3
Reboot your computer to ensure the driver loaded correctly.
4
Run fdisk, mkfs, and create mount points for any new disk drives.
5
Continue with Managing Your Storage Space on page 59.
Chapter 8: Installing the Driver on an Existing Operating System
●
57
Installing on OpenServer
To install the driver on OpenServer:
1
Start your computer, then insert the driver disk.
2
Begin the driver package installer:
pkgadd -d diskette1
3
At the installer prompt, type go.
4
Select 1 for the aacraid package.
5
When the installation is complete, select q to quit the installer.
6
Reboot your computer and remove the driver disk.
7
Continue with Managing Your Storage Space on page 59.
Installing on UnixWare
To install the driver on UnixWare:
1
Start your computer, then insert the driver disk.
2
Begin the driver package installer:
pkgadd -d diskette1
3
At the installer prompt, type go.
4
Select 1 for the aacraid package.
5
When the installation is complete, select q to quit the installer.
6
Reboot your computer and remove the driver disk.
7
Continue with Managing Your Storage Space on page 59.
Installing on Solaris
To install the driver on Solaris:
1
Start your computer.
2
Check for any pre-existing Adaptec driver by performing a pkginfo SUNWaac in a terminal
window. If there is no pre-existing Adaptec driver on your computer, continue with Step 3.
If an Adaptec driver is already installed on your computer, perform a pkgrm SUNWaac to
remove it.
! Caution: If your operating system currently boots from the Adaptec controller, do not
reset your computer after you remove the pre-existing Adaptec driver. Instead, follow
the steps in this section to install a new driver before rebooting your computer.
3
Insert and mount the driver disk:
volcheck
4
Change to the driver installer directory:
cd /floppy/floppy0/DU/sol_210/i86pc/Tools
Chapter 8: Installing the Driver on an Existing Operating System
5
●
58
Start the driver installer:
./install.sh -i
6
Reboot your computer, then remove the driver disk.
7
Continue with Managing Your Storage Space on page 59.
Installing on VMware
Note: The embedded driver provided by VMware should be suitable for most applications. If an
updated driver is needed, use the following procedure.
To install the driver on VMware:
1
Start your computer, then insert the driver disk.
2
At the console screen of the VMware server, mount the Adaptec RAID Controller
Installation DVD:
mount –r /dev/cdrom /mnt/cdrom
3
Install the module RPM:
rpm -i --force VMware-3.5-64607-esx-drivers-scsi-aacraid-1.1.5-2457.i586.rpm
Note: The rpm version string may differ for your VMware distribution.
4
Follow the on-screen instructions to save the boot image and run the vmware-mkinitrd
command manually.
5
Reboot your computer and remove the driver disk.
Note: Currently, the Adaptec Storage Manager GUI is not supported on VMware. To create and
manage arrays, you must connect to the VMware machine from a remote GUI or use the
ARCCONF utility. See page 61 for more information.
Installing on FreeBSD
To install the driver on FreeBSD:
1
Start your computer.
2
Insert and mount the driver disk:
mount -t msdos /dev/fd0 /mnt
3
Copy the driver package to the /tmp directory:
cp /mnt/aac-02.00.00-x.tgz /tmp
4
Install the driver package:
pkg_add /tmp/aac-02.00.00-x.tgz
5
Reboot your computer, then remove the driver disk.
Managing Your Storage Space
9
In this chapter...
About Adaptec Storage Manager........................................................................................... 60
About the Adaptec RAID Controller Configuration Utility ................................................ 60
About the Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility................................................................... 61
About the Adaptec Flash Utility ............................................................................................ 61
Which Utility Should I Use? .................................................................................................. 61
Once you have installed your Adaptec RAID controller, disk drives (or other devices), and
device driver, you can begin to build and manage your storage space.
This chapter introduces Adaptec Storage Manager, and describes the other utilities included
with your Adaptec RAID controller.
Chapter 9: Managing Your Storage Space
●
60
About Adaptec Storage Manager
Adaptec Storage Manager is a full-featured software application that helps you build a storage
space for your online data, using Adaptec RAID controllers and disk drives.
With Adaptec Storage Manager, you can group disk drives into logical drives and build in
redundancy to protect your data and improve system performance.
From a single workstation, you can use Adaptec Storage Manager to monitor and manage all
the controllers and disk drives in your storage space.
When Adaptec Storage Manager is installed on a computer, the Adaptec Storage Manager agent
is also installed automatically. The agent is like a service that keeps your storage space running.
It’s designed to run in the background, without user intervention, and its job is to monitor and
manage system health, event notifications, task schedules, and other on-going processes on
that system. It sends notices when tasks are completed successfully, and sounds an alarm when
errors or failures occur on that system.
The agent uses less memory than the full application. If your storage space includes systems
that won’t be connected to monitors (and therefore won’t require the user interface), you can
choose to run the agent only on those systems instead of the full application. For more
information, refer to the Adaptec Storage Manager online Help, or to the Adaptec Storage
Manager User’s Guide on the Adaptec RAID Controller Installation DVD.
Installing Adaptec Storage Manager
Adaptec Storage Manager is included on the Adaptec RAID Controller Installation DVD. For
installation instructions, refer to the Adaptec Storage Manager User’s Guide, also included on
the installation DVD.
About the Adaptec RAID Controller Configuration Utility
The Adaptec RAID Controller Configuration (ARCCONF) is a command line utility that you
can use to perform some basic array and configuration management functions.
With ARCCONF, you can:
●
Create and delete logical drives
●
Modify and copy configuration settings
●
Recover from disk drive failures and troubleshoot
ARCCONF and the Adaptec RAID Controller Command Line Utility User’s Guide, which
describes how to use ARCCONF, are included on the Adaptec RAID Controller Installation
DVD.
Note: Adaptec recommends that only advanced users familiar with command line interfaces
use ARCCONF.
Chapter 9: Managing Your Storage Space
●
61
About the Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility
The Adaptec RAID Configuration (ARC) utility is a BIOS-based utility that you can use to
create and manage controllers, disk drives and other devices, and arrays. The ARC utility
comprises these tools:
●
Array Configuration Utility (ACU)—For creating and managing arrays, and initializing
and rescanning disk drives. (ACU for DOS is also available. See page 94.)
●
SerialSelect—For modifying your controller and disk drive settings.
●
Disk Utilities—For formatting or verifying disk drives.
The ARC utility is included in your controller’s BIOS. For more information, see Using the
Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility on page 83.
Note: The ARC utility is primarily intended for preoperating system installation configuration.
About the Adaptec Flash Utility
The Adaptec Flash Utility (AFU) is a text-based DOS utility that you can use to update, save, or
verify your RAID controller’s firmware BIOS and Non-Volatile Random Access Memory
(NVRAM).
! Caution: Although the AFU contains safeguards to prevent you from accidentally damaging
your RAID controller’s flash contents, it is still important to use the AFU carefully and
correctly to avoid rendering your RAID controller inoperable.Adaptec recommends that only
advanced users familiar with working in DOS use the AFU. You can also use Adaptec
Storage Manager to update the controller firmware/BIOS. See the Adaptec Storage
Manager User’s Guide for more information.
Which Utility Should I Use?
To create a bootable array, Adaptec recommends that you use the BIOS-based ACU (See Using
the Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility on page 83).
For all subsequent storage management tasks, Adaptec recommends that you install and use
Adaptec Storage Manager (see page 60). As a full-featured software application with a
graphical user interface, it is the easiest to use and offers the widest range of management
functions.
Solving Problems
10
In this chapter...
Troubleshooting Checklist ..................................................................................................... 63
Silencing the Alarm ................................................................................................................ 63
Recovering from a Disk Drive Failure ................................................................................... 64
Resetting the Controller......................................................................................................... 65
This chapter provides basic troubleshooting information and solutions for solving controller
problems.
Chapter 10: Solving Problems
●
63
Troubleshooting Checklist
If you encounter difficulties installing or using your Adaptec RAID controller, check these
items first:
●
With your computer powered off, check the connections to each disk drive, power supply,
LED connector, and so on.
Try disconnecting and reconnecting disk drives from the Adaptec RAID controller.
●
Check that your Adaptec RAID controller is installed in a compatible PCIe expansion slot.
To double-check the bus compatibility of your controller, see About Your RAID Controller
on page 15.
●
Ensure that your Adaptec RAID controller is firmly seated and secured in the PCIe
expansion slot.
●
If your Adaptec RAID controller is not detected during system boot, try installing it in a
different compatible expansion slot. (See page 36 for instructions.)
●
Did the driver install correctly?
●
If you have external disk drives (or other devices), are they powered on?
●
Check the Readme on the installation DVD for compatibility issues and known problems.
If you are still unable to resolve a problem, you can find additional troubleshooting
information and direction on the Adaptec Web site at www.adaptec.com or the Support
Knowledgebase at ask.adaptec.com.
Monitoring Disk Drives Status
You can use the ‘blink’ feature of Adaptec Storage Manager to monitor the status of your SAS
and SATA disk drives. When you blink a specific disk drive or set of disk drives, the LED(s) on
the selected disk drives flash.
This table describes the LED flash states.
Controller Device State
Slot State
LED Flash State
Failed
Device is faulty
On
Rebuilding
Device is rebuilding
Slow flash
Blink
Identify the device
Fast flash
Other
No error
Off
For more information about backplanes, see Backplane Connections on page 71. For more
information about using Adaptec Storage Manager to monitor your disk drives, refer to the
Adaptec Storage Manager User’s Guide or the online Help.
Silencing the Alarm
If your Adaptec RAID controller includes an alarm, the alarm will sound when an error occurs.
To silence the alarm, use Adaptec Storage Manager (see Managing Your Storage Space on page 59.)
OR SerialSelect (see Modifying Your Controller’s Configuration on page 89.)
Chapter 10: Solving Problems
●
64
Recovering from a Disk Drive Failure
This section explains how to recover when a disk drive fails:
●
If the array was protected by a hot spare (see page 64).
●
If the array was not protected by a hot spare (see page 64).
●
If there is a disk drive failure in more than one array simultaneously (see page 64).
●
If it is a RAID 0 array (see page 65).
●
If multiple disk drives fail within the same array (see page 65).
●
If the drive is part of the MaxIQ pool (see page 65).
Note: Adaptec Storage Manager uses the term logical drives or logical devices when referring
to arrays (see page 12).
Failed Disk Drive Protected by a Hot Spare
When an array is protected by a hot spare, if a disk drive in that array fails the hot spare is
automatically incorporated into the array and takes over for the failed drive.
To recover from the failure:
1
Remove and replace the failed disk drive.
2
If copyback is not enabled—In Adaptec Storage Manager, remove the ‘hot spare’
designation from the original hot spare (the disk drive that was built into the array). Then,
designate a new hot spare to protect the arrays on that controller.
If copyback is enabled—Data is automatically moved back to its original location once the
controller detects that the failed drive has been replaced. No action is required.
Failed Disk Drive Not Protected by a Hot Spare
When a array is not protected by a hot spare, if a disk drive in that array fails, remove and
replace the failed disk drive. The controller detects the new disk drive and begins to rebuild the
array.
If the controller fails to rebuild the array, check that the cables, disk drives, and controllers are
properly installed and connected. Make sure that the new disk drive is equal or greater in size
than the failed disk drive. Then, if necessary, use Adaptec Storage Manager to rebuild the array.
For instructions, refer to the Adaptec Storage Manager User’s Guide or online Help.
Failure in Multiple Arrays Simultaneously
If there’s a disk drive failure in more than one array at the same time (one failure per array),
and the arrays have hot spares protecting them, the controller rebuilds the arrays with these
limitations:
●
A hot spare must be of equal or greater size than the failed disk drive it’s replacing.
●
Failed disk drives are replaced with hot spares in the order in which they failed. (The array
that includes the disk drive that failed first is rebuilt first, assuming an appropriate hot
spare is available—see bullet above.)
Chapter 10: Solving Problems
●
65
If there are more disk drive failures than hot spares, see Failed Disk Drive Not Protected by a Hot
Spare.
If copyback is enabled, data is moved back to its original location once the controller detects
that the failed drive has been replaced.
Disk Drive Failure in a RAID 0 Array
Because RAID 0 volumes do not include redundancy, if a disk drive fails in a RAID 0 array, the
data can’t be recovered.
Correct the cause of the failure or replace the failed disk drives. Then, restore your data (if
available).
Multiple Failures in the Same Array
Except in RAID 6 and RAID 60 arrays (see page 74), if more than one disk drive fails at the
same time in the same array, the data normally can’t be recovered.
You may be able to recover the data by forcing the logical drive online or by recreating the
logical drive without the initialization step. You can use the BIOS utility, ACU (see page 61),
the command-line utility, ARCCONF, or Adaptec Storage Manager. For more information,
refer to the Adaptec RAID Controller Command Line Interface User’s Guide and the Adaptec.
Storage Manager User’s Guide.
Note: In some instances, RAID 10 and RAID 50 arrays may survive multiple disk drive failures,
depending on which disk drives fail.
Failed Drive in MaxIQ Pool
Because Solid State Drives (SSD) in the MaxIQ pool are used just for caching, not permanent
storage, no data recovery or rebuilding is necessary. Once you identify the failed SSD, for
example, by using Adaptec Storage Manager’s rapid fault isolation feature, replace the failed
SSD with a new one (see page 40), then add the SSD to the MaxIQ pool following the
instructions on page 88 or by using Adaptec Storage Manager.
Resetting the Controller
This section explains how to reset (or Mode 0 flash) your Adaptec RAID controller. You may
want to do this if the controller becomes inoperable, or if a firmware upgrade is unsuccessful.
To reset your Adaptec RAID controller:
1
Download the firmware version currently installed on your controller from
www.adaptec.com
2
Extract the downloaded files to a folder on your local hard drive (for example,
C:\Download\Drivers).
3
Create a bootable DOS floppy disk and copy the AFU.exe file to it. Copy the first firmware
image to the same floppy disk.
4
Create additional bootable DOS floppy disks and copy each additional firmware image to
its own floppy disk.
5
Power off your computer, disconnect the power cord, then open the cabinet following the
manufacturer’s instructions.
Chapter 10: Solving Problems
●
66
6
Disconnect all cables from the controller, then attach a shorting jumper to the Mode 0
flash connector. (To locate the Mode 0 flash connector on your Adaptec RAID controller,
see the figures in About Your RAID Controller on page 15.)
7
Reconnect the power cord, power on your computer, then boot to the floppy disk
containing the AFU.exe file (see Step 3).
8
At the prompt, type a:\afu update /c x
where x is the controller number.
9
Insert the other floppy disks when prompted.
10 When the flash is complete, power off your computer, disconnect the power cord, then
remove the jumper.
11 Close the computer cabinet, reconnect the power cord, then power on your computer.
The controller should boot correctly.
Introduction to SAS
A
In this appendix...
Terminology Used in This Chapter ....................................................................................... 68
What is SAS? ........................................................................................................................... 68
How Do SAS Devices Communicate? ................................................................................... 69
What’s a Phy? .......................................................................................................................... 69
What’s a SAS Port?.................................................................................................................. 70
What’s a SAS Address?............................................................................................................ 70
What’s a SAS Connector? ....................................................................................................... 70
What do SAS Cables Look Like? ............................................................................................ 70
How are Disk Drives Identified in SAS? ................................................................................ 71
What are the SAS Connection Options? ............................................................................... 71
How is SAS Different from Parallel SCSI?............................................................................. 73
This section provides a basic overview of the main features of SAS, introduces some common
SAS terms, and explains how SAS differs from parallel SCSI.
Note: For technical articles and tutorials about SAS, refer to the SCSI Trade Association
(STATM) Web site at www.scsita.org.
Appendix A: Introduction to SAS
●
68
Terminology Used in This Chapter
For convenience, SAS HBAs and SAS RAID controllers are referred to generically in this
chapter as SAS cards. HBAs, RAID controllers, disk drives, and external disk drive enclosures
are referred to as end devices and expanders are referred to as expander devices.
For convenience, this chapter refers to end devices and expander devices collectively as SAS
devices.
What is SAS?
Legacy parallel SCSI is an interface that lets devices such as computers and disk drives
communicate with each other. Parallel SCSI moves multiple bits of data in parallel (at the same
time), using the SCSI command set.
SAS is an evolution of parallel SCSI to a point-to-point serial interface. SAS also uses the SCSI
command set, but moves multiple bits of data one at a time. SAS links end devices through
direct-attach connections, or through expander devices.
SAS cards can typically support up to 128 end devices and can communicate with both SAS
and SATA devices. (You can add 128 end devices—or even more—with the use of SAS
expanders. See page 72.)
Note: Although you can use both SAS and SATA disk drives in the same SAS domain (see page
72), Adaptec recommends that you not combine SAS and SATA disk drives within the same
array or logical drive. The difference in performance between the two types of disk drives may
adversely affect the performance of the array.
Data can move in both directions simultaneously across a SAS connection (called a link—see
page 69). Link speed is 300 MB/sec in half-duplex mode. Therefore, a SAS card with eight links
has a bandwidth of 2400 MB/sec.
Although they share the SCSI command set, SAS is conceptually different from parallel SCSI
physically, and has its own types of connectors, cables, connection options, and terminology,
as described in the rest of this chapter.
To compare SAS to parallel SCSI, see How is SAS Different from Parallel SCSI? on page 73.
Appendix A: Introduction to SAS
●
69
How Do SAS Devices Communicate?
SAS devices communicate with each other through links. A link is a physical connection
between two phys.
As shown in the following figure, SAS devices contain ports (see page 70), ports contain phys,
and each phy contains one transmitter and one receiver—one transceiver. A phy can belong to
one port only.
SAS Device
SAS Device
link
Narrow
Receiver
Phy Transmitter
Port
SAS Device
Wide
Port
Phy
Receiver
Transmitter
Phy
Receiver
Transmitter
Transmitter
Receiver
Phy
Transmitter
Receiver
Phy
Transmitter
Receiver
Phy
Narrow
Port
Wide
Port
SAS Device
Wide
Port
Receiver
Phy Transmitter
Transmitter
Receiver
Phy
Receiver
Phy Transmitter
Transmitter
Receiver
Phy
Receiver
Transmitter
Transmitter
Receiver
Phy
Receiver
Phy Transmitter
Transmitter
Receiver
Phy
Phy
Wide
Port
What’s a Phy?
Phys are part of the physical communication connection between SAS devices. Each phy
contains a transceiver that sends data back and forth between SAS devices.
When a connection is formed between two end devices, a link is established from a phy in one
port to a phy in the other port. As shown in the figure above, a wide port can support multiple
independent links simultaneously.
Phys are internal, within SAS connectors (see page 70).
SAS cables physically connect one or more phys on one SAS device to one or more phys on
another SAS device.
Appendix A: Introduction to SAS
●
70
What’s a SAS Port?
Note: Because the physical link between SAS devices is from phy to phy, rather than port to
port, a “port” is more of a virtual concept, different from what is normally considered a port on
other types of RAID controllers and storage devices.
A port is one or more phys. A narrow port contains one phy. A wide port typically contains four
phys.
Each port has its own unique SAS address (see page 71), and all the phys in a port share that
same SAS address.
SAS card port options vary. A SAS card with four phys could be configured with one wide port,
with two wide ports that comprise two phys, or with four narrow ports each containing one
phy. (A wide port with four phys is referred to as a 4-wide or 4x port.)
What’s a SAS Address?
Each SAS port is identified with a unique SAS address, which is shared by all phys on that port.
For example, a SAS disk drive might have two narrow ports. Each port has one unique SAS
address. The single phy in each port uses its port’s SAS address.
In another example, a SAS device might have one 4-wide port. That port has one SAS address,
which is shared by all four phys in the port.
Unlike SCSI devices and SCSI IDs, SAS devices self-configure their SAS addresses. User
intervention is not required to set SAS addresses, and SAS addresses cannot be modified.
What’s a SAS Connector?
A SAS or mini-SAS connector is the physical plug or receptacle that you see on a SAS device.
It’s what you plug a SAS cable into, or the end of the SAS cable that’s being plugged in. (See
Cables on page 32.)
A connector is what forms physical links between phys. Some SAS connectors can support
multiple links. The number of links a SAS connector can support is referred to as its width.
Narrow connectors support a single link; wide connectors supports more than 1 link.
A single SAS device may have one or more connectors. A single SAS connector may help form
links between more than two SAS devices. (For instance, as shown in the figure on page 39, the
4-wide internal SAS connector forms links with four independent disk drives.)
What do SAS Cables Look Like?
Internal standard SAS cables are narrower than internal parallel SCSI cables. The connectors
vary in size depending on the number of links they support, from single link connectors to
4-wide (or larger) connectors. Internal fan-out cables let you attach four disk drives to a single
4-wide connector.
Mini-SAS connectors support both internal and external SAS connections. The mini-SAS
connectors are smaller than the standard SAS internal and external connectors. Mini-SAS
connectors support single and multilinks with the ability to scale to future speed needs.
For examples of some internal SAS/mini-SAS cables and an external SAS/mini-SAS cables, see
Cables on page 32.
Appendix A: Introduction to SAS
●
71
How are Disk Drives Identified in SAS?
In the BIOS and in the management utilities (see Identifying Disk Drives on page 92), disk
drives are identified in the following formats:
●
CNX:DevY = Device Y is attached to Connector X (see Direct-attach Connections below for
more information)
●
BoxX:SlotX = Enclosure X is attached to a disk drive in Slot X (see Backplane Connections
below for more information)
●
ExpX:PhyX = Expander X is attached to Phy X (see SAS Expander Connections below for
more information)
where X is the count number.
Note: Devices other than disk drives (CDROM, tape drives, etc...) are listed in order after your
system disk drives.
In parallel SCSI, XX is the disk drive’s channel number, YY is the target number, and ZZ is the
logical unit number (LUN).
What are the SAS Connection Options?
You can connect end devices to each other through direct cable connections and through
backplane connections. When you use one or more expander devices (see page 72), you can
create large configurations.
Direct-attach Connections
In a direct-attach connection, SAS or SATA disk drives are connected directly to a SAS card
with SAS or mini-SAS cables. One disk drive is attached to one SAS/mini-SAS connector with
one SAS/mini-SAS cable (or multiple disk drives are attached to one SAS/mini-SAS connector
with one fan-out cable). The figure on page 39 shows an example of direct-attach connections.
The number of direct-attached disk drives is limited to the number of phys supported by the
SAS card. (Note that there may be multiple phys within a single connector. See page 72.)
Backplane Connections
In a backplane connection, disk drives and SAS cards are attached to and communicate with
each other through a system backplane.
There are two types of backplane connections, passive and active. When connecting to either
backplane, it’s important to properly connect your disk drive LEDs in order to identify disk
drive conditions. See About Your RAID Controller on page 15 for your RAID controller Activity
LED connections and locations.
Once you have connected to a backplane, use Adaptec Storage Manager to manage your disk
drives. For more information, refer to the Adaptec Storage Manager User’s Guide on the RAID
Controller Installation DVD.
.The number of end devices is limited to the number of slots available on the backplane. For
example, the Adaptec S50 enclosure, which contains an expander, is a backplane connection
that supports up to 12 SAS or SATA disk drives.
Appendix A: Introduction to SAS
●
72
Some backplanes support daisy-chain expansion to other backplanes. For example, you can
daisy-chain (connect one to the next) up to nine Adaptec S50 enclosures to a single SAS card in
a host system.
SAS Expander Connections
A SAS expander device literally expands the number of end devices that you can connect
together. Expander devices, typically embedded into a system backplane (see page 71), support
large configurations of SAS end devices, including SAS cards and SAS and SATA disk drives.
With expander devices, you can build large and complex storage topologies.
There are two types of SAS expanders: fanout expanders and edge expanders. Each performs a
different role in a storage system. (For more information about how SAS expanders work, refer
to the STA Web site at www.scsita.org.)
You can connect up to 128 SAS ports to an edge expander. (A single edge expander can
therefore support up to 128 SAS addresses.)
You can connect up to 128 edge expanders to a fanout expander.
You can use only one fanout expander in any single SAS domain (a topology of SAS—and
possibly SATA—end devices and expander devices). A single SAS domain can therefore
comprise up to 16,384 SAS ports (and therefore up to 16,384 SAS addresses including the
fanout expander).
The next figure illustrates (in very basic terms) a SAS domain and shows how SAS cards, SAS
and SATA disk drives, and expander devices can fit together in a large data storage topology.
SAS Domain
SATA
SATA
SATA
Edge
Expander
Edge
Expander
SAS
Disk Drives
Disk Drives
SATA
SAS
Edge
Expander
Fanout Expander
SAS Card
SAS
SAS Card
SATA
Disk Drives
SAS
SATA
Disk Drives
Edge
Expander
SAS
Disk Drives
SATA
SAS Card
Edge
Expander
Disk Drives
SATA
Disk Drives
SAS
Appendix A: Introduction to SAS
●
73
How is SAS Different from Parallel SCSI?
In summary, although SAS and parallel SCSI both use the SCSI command set, how they move
data from one place to another is very different. To support point-to-point serial data
transport, SAS introduces new types of connectors, cables, connection options, and
terminology.
Generally speaking, SAS is faster and more flexible than parallel SCSI, and provides more
options for building your storage space. SAS lets you mix SAS and SATA disk drives together,
and lets you connect many, many more devices.
This table describes many of the main differences between the two interfaces.
Parallel SCSI
Serial Attached SCSI
Parallel interface
Serial interface
Maximum speed 320 MB/sec shared by all
devices on the bus
Maximum speed 300 MB/sec per phy when in halfduplex mode
Supports SCSI devices only
Supports SATA and SAS disk drives simultaneously
Up to 16 devices per SCSI channel
More than 100 disk drives per SAS card, using an
expander (see page 72) or 50 SATAII disk drives.
Supports single-port devices only
Supports single- and dual-port devices
Uses SCSI IDs to differentiate between
devices connected to the same adapter
Uses unique SAS addresses to differentiate
between devices
User intervention required to set SCSI IDs
SAS addresses self-configured by SAS devices
Requires bus termination
Requires no bus termination
Standard SCSI connectors
SAS connectors (see page 32)
Understanding RAID
B
In this appendix...
Understanding Drive Segments............................................................................................. 75
Non-redundant Arrays (RAID 0) .......................................................................................... 75
RAID 1 Arrays ........................................................................................................................ 76
RAID 1 Enhanced Arrays....................................................................................................... 76
RAID 10 Arrays ...................................................................................................................... 77
RAID 5 Arrays ........................................................................................................................ 78
RAID 5EE Arrays.................................................................................................................... 79
RAID 50 Arrays ...................................................................................................................... 80
RAID 6 Arrays ........................................................................................................................ 81
RAID 60 Arrays ...................................................................................................................... 81
Selecting the Best RAID Level................................................................................................ 82
When you create arrays (or logical drives), you can assign a RAID level to protect your data.
Each RAID level offers a unique combination of performance and redundancy. RAID levels
also vary by the number of disk drives they support.
This appendix describes the RAID levels supported by your Adaptec RAID controller, and
provides a basic overview of each to help you select the best level of protection for your data
storage.
Appendix B: Understanding RAID
●
75
Understanding Drive Segments
A drive segment is a disk drive or portion of a disk drive that is used to create an array. A disk
drive can include both RAID segments (segments that are part of an array) and available
segments. Each segment can be part of only one logical device at a time. If a disk drive is not
part of any logical device, the entire disk is an available segment.
Non-redundant Arrays (RAID 0)
An array with RAID 0 includes two or more disk drives and provides data striping, where data
is distributed evenly across the disk drives in equal-sized sections. However, RAID 0 arrays do
not maintain redundant data, so they offer no data protection.
Compared to an equal-sized group of independent disks, a RAID 0 array provides improved I/O
performance.
Drive segment size is limited to the size of the smallest disk drive in the array. For instance, an
array with two 250 GB disk drives and two 400 GB disk drives can create a RAID 0 drive
segment of 250 GB, for a total of 1000 GB for the volume, as shown in this figure.
Disk Drive 1
250 GB
Disk Drive 2
250 GB
Disk Drive 3
400 GB
Drive Segment Size
(Smallest Disk Drive)
Disk Drive 1
1 5 ... 997
Disk Drive 2
2 6 ... 998
Disk Drive 3
3 7 ... 999
Unused Space = 150 GB
Disk Drive 4
Disk Drive 4
400 GB
Disk Drives in Logical Drive
4 8 ... 1000
Unused Space = 150 GB
RAID 0 Logical Drive = 1000 GB
Appendix B: Understanding RAID
●
76
RAID 1 Arrays
A RAID 1 array is built from two disk drives, where one disk drive is a mirror of the other (the
same data is stored on each disk drive). Compared to independent disk drives, RAID 1 arrays
provide improved performance, with twice the read rate and an equal write rate of single disks.
However, capacity is only 50 percent of independent disk drives.
If the RAID 1 array is built from different- sized disk drives, the free space, drive segment size is
the size of the smaller disk drive, as shown in this figure.
Drive Segment Size
(Smallest Disk Drive)
Disk Drive 1
Disk Drive 2
250 GB
400 GB
Disk Drive 1
1 – 250
Disk Drive 2
1 – 250
Unused Space = 150 GB
RAID 1 Logical Drive = 250 GB
Disk Drives in Logical Drive
RAID 1 Enhanced Arrays
A RAID 1 Enhanced (RAID 1E) array—also known as a striped mirror—is similar to a RAID 1
array except that data is both mirrored and striped, and more disk drives can be included. A
RAID 1E array can be built from three or more disk drives.
In this example, the large bold numbers represent the striped data, and the smaller, non-bold
numbers represent the mirrored data stripes.
Disk Drive 1
400 GB
Disk Drive 2
400 GB
Disk Drive 3
400 GB
Disk Drives in Logical Drive
Disk Drive 1
1
3
4
6
Disk Drive 2
2
1
5
4
Disk Drive 3
3
2
6
5
RAID 1E Logical Drive = 600 GB
Appendix B: Understanding RAID
●
77
RAID 10 Arrays
A RAID 10 array is built from two or more equal-sized RAID 1 arrays. Data in a RAID 10 array
is both striped and mirrored. Mirroring provides data protection, and striping improves
performance.
Drive segment size is limited to the size of the smallest disk drive in the array. For instance, an
array with two 250 GB disk drives and two 400 GB disk drives can create two mirrored drive
segments of 250 GB, for a total of 500 GB for the array, as shown in this figure.
Disk Drive 1
250 GB
Disk Drive 2
250 GB
Disk Drive 3
400 GB
Drive Segment Size
(Smallest Disk Drive)
Disk Drive 1
1 3 ... 499
Disk Drive 2
2 4 ... 500
Disk Drive 3
1 3 ... 499
Unused Space = 150 GB
Disk Drive 4
400 GB
Disk Drive 4
2 4 ... 500
Unused Space = 150 GB
Disk Drives in Logical Drive
RAID 10 Logical Drive = 500 GB
Appendix B: Understanding RAID
●
78
RAID 5 Arrays
A RAID 5 array is built from a minimum of three disk drives, and uses data striping and parity
data to provide redundancy. Parity data provides data protection, and striping improves
performance.
Parity data is an error-correcting redundancy that’s used to re-create data if a disk drive fails.
In RAID 5 arrays, parity data (represented by Ps in the next figure) is striped evenly across the
disk drives with the stored data.
Drive segment size is limited to the size of the smallest disk drive in the array. For instance, an
array with two 250 GB disk drives and two 400 GB disk drives can contain 750 GB of stored
data and 250 GB of parity data, as shown in this figure.
Disk Drive 1
250 GB
Disk Drive 2
250 GB
Disk Drive 3
400 GB
Drive Segment Size
(Smallest Disk Drive)
Disk Drive 1
1 4 ...
P
Disk Drive 2
2 5 ... 748
Disk Drive 3
3 P ... 749
Unused Space = 150 GB
Disk Drive 4
400 GB
Disk Drive 4
P 6 ... 750
Unused Space = 150 GB
Disk Drives in Logical Drive
RAID 5 Logical Drive = 750 GB plus Parity
Appendix B: Understanding RAID
●
79
RAID 5EE Arrays
A RAID 5EE array—also known as a hot space—is similar to a RAID 5 array except that it
includes a distributed spare drive and must be built from a minimum of four disk drives.
Unlike a hot spare, a distributed spare is striped evenly across the disk drives with the stored
data and parity data, and can’t be shared with other logical disk drives. A distributed spare
improves the speed at which the array is rebuilt following a disk drive failure.
A RAID 5EE array protects your data and increases read and write speeds. However, capacity is
reduced by two disk drives’ worth of space, which is for parity data and spare data.
In this figure, S represents the distributed spare, P represents the distributed parity data.
Disk Drive 1
250 GB
Disk Drive 2
250 GB
Disk Drive 3
400 GB
Drive Segment Size
(Smallest Disk Drive)
Disk Drive 1
1 S ...
P
Disk Drive 2
2 P ... 449
Disk Drive 3
S 3 ...
S
Unused Space = 150 GB
Disk Drive 4
400 GB
Disk Drive 4
P 4 ... 500
Unused Space = 150 GB
Disk Drives in Logical Drive
Based on the drive segment sizes used:
RAID 5EE Logical Drive = 500 GB plus parity
and hot spare.
Appendix B: Understanding RAID
●
80
RAID 50 Arrays
A RAID 50 array is built from six to forty-eight disk drives configured as two or more RAID 5
arrays, and stripes stored data and parity data across all disk drives in both RAID 5 arrays. (For
more information, see RAID 5 Arrays on page 78.)
The parity data provides data protection, and striping improves performance. RAID 50 arrays
also provide high data transfer speeds.
Drive segment size is limited to the size of the smallest disk drive in the array. For example,
three 250 GB disk drives and three 400 GB disk drives comprise two equal-sized RAID 5 arrays
with 500 GB of stored data and 250 GB of parity data. The RAID 50 array can therefore contain
1000 GB (2 x 500 GB) of stored data and 500 GB of parity data.
In this figure, P represents the distributed parity data.
RAID 50
Logical Drive
=
1000 GB
plus Parity
RAID 5
A
Each RAID 5 Logical Drive has
500 GB Data Storage
250 GB Parity Data
RAID 5
B
1, 5, P
3, P, 9
P, 7, 11
4, P, 10
Drive 1
250 GB
Drive 2
250 GB
Drive 3
250 GB
2, 6, P
Drive 4
400 GB
Drive 5
400 GB
P, 8, 12
Drive 6
400 GB
Total Unused
Space = 150 GB
Appendix B: Understanding RAID
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81
RAID 6 Arrays
A RAID 6 array—also known as dual drive failure protection—is similar to a RAID 5 array
because it uses data striping and parity data to provide redundancy. However, RAID 6 arrays
include two independent sets of parity data instead of one. Both sets of parity data are striped
separately across all disk drives in the array.
RAID 6 arrays provide extra protection for your data because they can recover from two
simultaneous disk drive failures. However, the extra parity calculation slows performance
(compared to RAID 5 arrays).
RAID 6 arrays must be built from at least four disk drives. Maximum stripe size depends on
the number of disk drives in the array.
Disk Drive 1
250 GB
Disk Drive 2
250 GB
Disk Drive 3
400 GB
Drive Segment Size
(Smallest Disk Drive)
Disk Drive 1
1 P1 ...
P2
Disk Drive 2
2 P2 ... 449
Disk Drive 3
P1 3 ...
P1
Unused Space = 150 GB
Disk Drive 4
400 GB
Disk Drive 4
P2 4 ... 500
Unused Space = 150 GB
Disk Drives in Logical Drive
Based on the drive segment sizes used:
RAID 6 Logical Drive = 500 GB plus
parity (P1 & P2)
RAID 60 Arrays
Similar to a RAID 50 array (see page 80), a RAID 60 array—also known as dual drive failure
protection—is built from eight disk drives configured as two or more RAID 6 arrays, and
stripes stored data and two sets of parity data across all disk drives in both RAID 6 arrays.
Two sets of parity data provide enhanced data protection, and striping improves performance.
RAID 60 arrays also provide high data transfer speeds.
Appendix B: Understanding RAID
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82
Selecting the Best RAID Level
Use this table to select the RAID levels that are most appropriate for the logical drives on your
storage space, based on the number of available disk drives and your requirements for
performance and reliability.
Redundancy
Disk Drive
Usage
Read
Performance
Write
Performance
Built-in
Hot Spare
Minimum
Disk
Drives
RAID 0
No
100%
ŠŠŠ
ŠŠŠ
No
2
RAID 1
Yes
50%
ŠŠ
ŠŠ
No
2
RAID 1E
Yes
50%
ŠŠ
ŠŠ
No
3
RAID 10
Yes
50%
ŠŠ
ŠŠ
No
4
RAID 5
Yes
67 – 94%
ŠŠŠ
Š
No
3
RAID 5EE
Yes
50 – 88%
ŠŠŠ
Š
Yes
4
RAID 50
Yes
67 – 94%
ŠŠŠ
Š
No
6
RAID 6
Yes
50 – 88%
ŠŠ
Š
No
4
RAID 60
Yes
50 – 88%
ŠŠ
Š
No
8
RAID Level
Disk drive usage, read performance, and write performance depend on the number of drives in
the logical drive. In general, the more drives, the better the performance.
Using the Adaptec RAID
Configuration Utility
C
In this appendix...
Introduction to the ARC Utility ............................................................................................ 84
Running the ARC Utility........................................................................................................ 84
Using the ACU to Create and Manage Arrays ...................................................................... 84
Using the ACU to Create and Manage JBODs...................................................................... 87
Using the ACU to Manage the MaxIQ Pool.......................................................................... 88
Using SerialSelect to Modify Controller Settings ................................................................. 88
Formatting and Verifying Disk Drives .................................................................................. 91
Locating Disk Drives .............................................................................................................. 91
Identifying Disk Drives .......................................................................................................... 92
Viewing the Event Log ........................................................................................................... 93
The Adaptec RAID Configuration (ARC) utility is a BIOS-based utility that you can use to
create and manage controllers, disk drives and other devices, and arrays.
Note: Adaptec recommends that only advanced users familiar with working in a computer BIOS
use the ARC utility tools. For more information, see Managing Your Storage Space on page 59.
Appendix C: Using the Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility
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84
Introduction to the ARC Utility
The ARC utility comprises these tools:
●
The Array Configuration Utility (ACU)—For creating and managing arrays, and
initializing and rescanning disk drives (see page 84).
Note: Also available—ACU for DOS. See page 94.
●
SerialSelect—For modifying your controller and disk drive settings (see page 88).
●
Disk Utilities—For formatting or verifying disk drives (see page 91).
Running the ARC Utility
If your Adaptec controller is connected to a RAID enclosure, power on your enclosure (or
enclosures) before you power on your computer.
Start or restart your computer. When prompted, press Ctrl+A.
During boot up, if your system has insufficient memory this message displays:
“Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility will load after, system initialization. Please wait... Or
press <Enter> Key to attempt loading the utility forcibly [Generally, not recommended]”
Note: The first time you power on your computer after you install a new controller, the BIOS
may display a configuration that doesn’t match your system’s configuration. This is normal.
Navigating the ARC Utility
All the tools within the ARC utility are menu-based and instructions for completing tasks
appear on-screen. Menus can be navigated using the arrows, Enter, Esc, and other keys on your
keyboard.
Using the ACU to Create and Manage Arrays
To open the ACU, start the ARC utility (see page 84). If you have more than one controller,
select your controller, then press Enter. Select Array Configuration Utility, then press Enter.
Follow the on-screen instructions to create and manage arrays, and initialize, rescan, and erase
disk drives.
Creating a New Array
To begin creating an array, select Create Arrays from the main ACU menu.
Only disk drives that can be used in a new array are available for selection. (Disk drives must be
initialized before they can be used in an array. See Initializing Disk Drives on page 86 for more
information.)
Use the Array Properties menu to modify the array’s RAID level, size, name, stripe size, cache
settings, and MaxIQ settings.
Note: For more information about RAID levels and using disk drives to create arrays, see
Choosing a RAID Level on page 31. For more information about MaxIQ, see Modifying Cache
Settings on page 86; see also Using the ACU to Manage the MaxIQ Pool on page 88.
Appendix C: Using the Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility
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85
Managing Existing Arrays
To view or modify existing arrays, select Manage Arrays from the main ACU menu.
From the Manage Arrays menu, you can:
●
View the properties of an array.
Note: Failed drives are displayed in a different text color.
●
Make an array bootable (see Creating Bootable Arrays on page 85).
●
Assign or remove hot spares.
●
Modify power management settings.
●
Change the cache settings for an array.
●
Delete an array.
! Caution: Before deleting an array, back up the data to avoid permanently losing it.
Creating Bootable Arrays
Note: You may need to change the system BIOS to modify the boot order. For more
information, refer to your computer documentation.
The controller always uses the lowest numbered array as its bootable array.
To make an array bootable:
1
Select Manage Arrays from the main ACU menu.
2
Select the array that you want to make bootable, then press Ctrl+B.
Note: You cannot make an array bootable while it’s building, verifying, or rebuilding.
The array’s number changes to Array 00, which makes this array the controller’s boot array.
3
Restart your computer.
Modifying Power Management Settings
Power management settings switch the array to low power state when it is inactive for a specific
time.
To modify power management settings:
1
Select Manage Arrays from the main ACU menu.
2
Select the array, then press Ctrl+W.
In the power management console, enter these details:
Option
Description
Power Management
When enabled, switches the array to low power state, when the array/
drive is inactive.
Slow Down Drive After
The duration of inactive state of the array/drive after which it is slowed
down to low power mode. This is an optional setting.
Note: The disk drive should support low power mode.
Appendix C: Using the Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility
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86
Option
Description
Power Off Drive After
The duration of inactive state of the array/drive after which it is powered
off. This is an optional setting.
Note: Power Off Drive After duration should be greater than Slow
Down Drive After Duration.
Verify Drive After
The regular time interval at which the system performs a health check of
the array/drive.
Modifying Cache Settings
You can modify the read and write cache settings for an array. You can also modify the MaxIQ
cache settings. The MaxIQ cache uses the MaxIQ-compatible Solid State Drives in your system
as a read cache pool to improve performance in read-intensive applications.
Note: For more information about MaxIQ, see Using the ACU to Manage the MaxIQ Pool on page
88.
To modify cache settings:
1
Select Manage Arrays from the main ACU menu.
2
Select the array, then press Ctrl+C.
The Modify Cache Settings window opens.
3
Enable or disable read caching.
4
Press Tab.
5
Select the preferred MaxIQ setting (Enable/Disable), press Tab, then enable or disable
MaxIQ.
Note: To enable MaxIQ caching, read caching must also be enabled.
6
Press Tab.
7
Enable or disable write caching: select Enable always for “write-back” caching; select
Disable for “write-through” caching.
8
Press Enter to accept the values.
Initializing Disk Drives
If a disk drive appears grayed-out (unavailable for use in a new array), it may need to be
initialized.
To begin initializing a disk drive, select Initialize Drives from the main ACU menu. You can
initialize one drive or multiple drives. If an error occurs during initialization, the message
“Initializing drives...FAILED x of n” is displayed. Press Enter to see a list of drives that failed to
initialize. Press Esc to continue.
! Caution: Do not initialize a disk drive that is part of an array. Initializing a disk drive that’s
part of an array may make the array unusable.
Back up all data from your disk drive before you initialize it.
Rescanning Disk Drives
To begin rescanning a disk drive, select Rescan Drives from the main ACU menu.
Appendix C: Using the Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility
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87
Secure Erasing Disk Drives
When you perform a secure erase on a disk drive, all data on that disk drive is completely and
irretrievably eradicated. Secure erase performs three distinct writing passes to the disk drive
being erased—it does not just write zeros.
Performing a secure erase takes up to six times longer than clearing (or zeroing) a disk drive.
You may want to perform a secure erase only on disk drives that contain confidential or
classified information.
Note: To erase (or zero) a disk drive with non-classified information, you may choose to format
it (see page 91) instead, or clear it using Adaptec Storage Manager—both options take much
less time than the secure erase option.
To begin a secure erase, select Secure Erase from the main ACU menu, then select Y (yes). To
return to the main ACU menu once the secure erase has begun, press Esc.
The selected disk drive(s) cannot be used until the erase is complete.
Stopping a Secure Erase
To stop a secure erase in progress:
1
In the main ACU window, select Secure Erase.
2
Select the disk drive being secure erased, then press Ctrl+Q.
The secure erase stops and the ACU returns to its main window.
Managing Global Hot Spares
A hot spare is a disk drive that automatically replaces any failed drive in a logical drive. A global
hot spare is not assigned to a specific logical drive. It protects any logical drive on the controller
(except RAID 0 logical drives). You can create and delete global hot spares even if no arrays
exist.
To create and delete global hot spares:
1
Select Global Hotspares from the main ACU menu.
The Global Hotspare Management window opens.
2
Using the arrow keys, select a drive from the list. Existing hot spares are marked with a “*”.
3
Press Ins to create a new global hot spare. Press Del to delete a hot spare.
4
Press Enter to save your changes and return to the main menu.
Using the ACU to Create and Manage JBODs
Start the ARC utility (see page 84). If you have more than one controller, select your controller,
then press Enter. Select Array Configuration Utility, then press Enter.
Follow the on-screen instructions to create and manage JBODs.
Creating a New JBOD
A JBOD disk appears as a physical disk drive to the operating system. A JBOD disk is not
redundant and not bootable.
Appendix C: Using the Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility
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88
To begin creating a JBOD, select Create JBOD from the main ACU menu. All the supported
disk drives are displayed. Select a disk drive and Enter.
Managing Existing JBODs
To delete a JBOD or morph a JBOD into a simple volume, select Manage JBODs from the main
ACU menu.
From the Manage JBODs menu, you can:
●
Morph a JBOD into a simple volume.
●
Delete a JBOD
Note: When you delete a JBOD, you lose all data on that disk.
Converting a JBOD Into a Simple Volume
You can convert any JBOD into a simple volume.
1
Select Manage JBODs from the main ACU menu.
2
Select the JBOD that you want to morph into a simple volume and press Ctrl+V.
Using the ACU to Manage the MaxIQ Pool
The MaxIQ cache is a global read cache pool. It uses the MaxIQ-compatible Solid State Drives
(SSDs) in your system as fast cache memory for read-intensive operations. Before you can
enable MaxIQ caching on a logical device (see page 86), you must assign at least one SSD to the
MaxIQ pool.
Note: You can configure the MaxIQ pool only if you have one or more MaxIQ-compatible Solid
State Drives installed on the RAID controllers in your system. For a list of MaxIQ-compatible
SSDs, refer to the Adaptec Web site at www.adaptec.com/compatibility.
To add an SSD to the MaxIQ pool or to remove an SSD from the MaxIQ pool:
1
Start the ARC utility (see page 84). If you have more than one controller, select your
controller, then press Enter. Select Array Configuration Utility, then press Enter.
2
Select Manage MaxIQ Pool from the ACU main menu.
All supported SSDs are displayed.
3
Using the arrow keys, select an SSD from the list.
4
Press Ins to add the SSD to the MaxIQ pool.
5
To remove an SSD from the pool, press the right arrow to switch windows, use the arrow
keys to select an SSD, then press Del.
6
Press Enter to save your changes and return to the main menu.
Using SerialSelect to Modify Controller Settings
The SerialSelect utility is a tool for modifying the settings of your controller and the disk drives
connected to it.
Appendix C: Using the Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility
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89
Opening SerialSelect
To open SerialSelect, start the ARC utility (see page 84), select SerialSelect, then press Enter.
Follow the on-screen instructions to modify the settings of your controller and connected disk
drives as required.
Applying Changes and Exiting
1
To exit SerialSelect, press Esc until you are prompted to exit.
If you modified any settings, you are prompted to save the changes before you exit.
2
Select Yes to exit, then press any key to restart your computer.
Any changes you made take effect after the computer restarts.
Modifying Your Controller’s Configuration
Note: Default controller settings are suitable for most computers. Adaptec recommends that
you do not change the default setting.
To modify your controller’s basic settings, select Controller Configuration from the main
SerialSelect menu.
To modify your controller’s power management settings, select Advanced Configuration.
To modify your controller’s PHY settings, select PHY Configuration.
Some options may not be available for your controller.
General Controller Settings
Note: Default settings are shown in bold type.
Option
Description
Drive’s Write Cache
When set to Enable All, write cache is enabled on all disk drives on the
controller. (Enabling the write cache overrides any individual drive
settings in Adaptec Storage Manager.) When set to Disable All, write
cache is not used on the disk drives. When set to Drive Specific, write
cache is enabled/disabled on a per-drive basis in Adaptec Storage
Manager.
Caution—When write cache is enabled, there is a slight possibility of
data loss or corruption during a power failure.
Runtime BIOS
When enabled, the controller BIOS allows the controller to act as a
bootable device. Disabling the BIOS allows another controller to act as a
bootable device.
Automatic Failover
When enabled, the controller automatically rebuilds an array when a
failed disk drive is replaced. When disabled, the array must be rebuilt
manually.
Array Background
Consistency Check
When enabled, the controller constantly verifies a redundant array. Note
that there may be a significant performance reduction. Default is
disabled.
Array-based BBS
Support
When enabled in systems that support BBS, the controller presents
attached bootable devices up to the BIOS for boot device selection. This
is relevant for logical arrays. Default is disabled.
SATA Native Command
Queuing (NCQ)
When enabled, NCQ is enabled. Disable this feature if you want to
attach more than 48 SATA II disk drives. Only available with SATA II disk
drives.
Appendix C: Using the Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility
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90
Option
Description
Physical Drives Display
During POST
When enabled, connected disk drives are displayed during system Power
On Self Test (POST). Displaying the disk drives adds a few seconds to
the overall POST time. Default is disabled.
DVD/CD-ROM Boot
Support
When enabled, the system can be booted from a bootable CD. (This
setting is not available on all RAID controller models.)
Removable Media
Devices Boot Support
When enabled, removable media devices, such as CD drives, are
supported. (This setting is not available on all RAID controller models.)
Alarm Control
When enabled, the alarm sounds. Default is enabled.
Note—When the alarm is turned off (disabled), it will automatically turn
back on after a reboot.
Default Background
Task Priority
Sets the default priority for background tasks on the controller (such as
logical drive creation) to High, Medium, or Low. Default is Medium.
Note—This setting applies to new tasks. It does not affect currently
running tasks.
LED Indication Mode
When set to Activity/Fault, the drive LEDs blink to indicate I/O activity
(randomly depending on I/O load) and fault (steady 1Hz). When set to
Fault Only, the drive LEDs blink to indicate fault state only. Default is
Activity/Fault.
Backplane Mode
When set to Auto, controller automatically detects backplane signal
type: I2C or SGPIO. To set the backplane mode explicitly select SGPIO,
I2C, or Disabled. Default is Auto.
Selectable Performance
Mode
When set to Dynamic, performance criteria adjusts automatically based
on controller usage, RAID level, and disk drive type. When set to OLTP/
Db, performance criteria is optimized for transaction-oriented
applications, such as data entry and retrieval. Default is Dynamic.
Power Management Settings
Note: When power management is disabled, no related options will be displayed.
Note: Make sure the operating system driver supports power management.
Note: Default settings are shown in bold type.
Option
Description
Power Management
Settings
When enabled, switches the system to low power state, based on the
specified settings.
Time Zone
The time zone of the place in which the system is located. Time specific
power management settings are implemented based on the set time
zone. By default, it is set to 00:00.
The valid range for the time zone settings is -12:00 to +12:00.
Stay Awake Start
The time from which the system should operate in the full power mode,
irrespective of other power management settings, daily. By default it is
set to 00:00.
The valid range is 00:00 to 23:59.
Stay Awake End
The time until which the system should operate in the full power mode,
irrespective of other power management settings, daily. By default it is
set to 00:00.
The valid range is 00:00 to 23:59.
Appendix C: Using the Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility
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91
Option
Description
Spin Up Limit (Internal)
The number of internal drives to be spun up at any given moment. By
default it is set to 0. In the default setting, all the internal drives will
spin up.
Spin Up Limit (External)
The number of external drives to be spun up at any given moment. By
default it is set to 0. In the default setting, all the external drives will
spin up.
PHY Settings
Option
Description
PHY Rate
The data transfer rate between the controller and devices. The default setting is
Auto, which allows the SAS card to adjust the data transfer rate, as needed. For
low-port 5-series RAID controllers (5085, 5405), you can set the PHY rate to
1.5Gb/second or 3.0Gb/second (the maximum rate).
CRC Checking When enabled, determines whether the controller verifies the accuracy of data
transfer on the serial bus. Default setting is Yes (enabled). Set to No (disabled)
only if the controller is connected to a device that does not support CRC Checking.
SAS Address
In a situation where you want each phy on a controller to be in a different SAS
domain, this setting specifies a unique world-wide name for each phy. Default
is 0.
Note: This setting is for SAS address conflict resolution only and should otherwise
remain at its default value.
Formatting and Verifying Disk Drives
You can use the disk utilities to low-level format or verify your disk drives. (New disk drives are
low-level formatted at the factory and do not need to be low-level formatted again.)
! Caution: Before you format a disk drive, back up all data. Formatting destroys all data on
a disk drive.
To format or verify a disk drive:
1
Start the ARC utility (see page 84).
2
Select the controller you want, then press Enter.
3
Select Disk Utilities.
4
Select the disk drive you want, then press Enter.
5
Select Format Disk or Verify Disk Media.
Locating Disk Drives
Note: This feature is only available with disk drives that have an activity LED.
You can use the Identify Drive feature to physically locate a disk drive by blinking the LED.
To locate a disk drive:
1
Start the ARC utility (see page 84).
2
Select the controller you want, then press Enter.
3
Select Disk Utilities.
Appendix C: Using the Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility
4
Select the disk drive you want, then press Enter.
5
Select Identify Drive, then press Enter.
6
When you have finished locating your disk drive, press any key to stop the blinking.
●
92
Identifying Disk Drives
You can identify disk drives by viewing the list of disk drives on your system. Only physical
drives that display during POST are shown.
To identify a disk drive:
1
Start the ARC utility (see page 84).
2
Select the controller you want, then press Enter.
3
Select Disk Utilities.
The Disk Utilities view will provide you with the following information:
Location
Model
Rev#
Speed
Size
CN1=DEV1
Box0=Slot0
Exp0=phy0
The manufacturer
information.
The revision
number of the
disk drive.
The speed of the
disk drive.
The size of the
disk drive.
The location information of a disk drive is determined by three types of connections:
●
Direct attached drives—The connection is determined by the cable connected to a device,
for example CN1 (connector 1) is connected to DEV1 (device 1). For more information, see
Direct-attach Connections on page 71.
●
Storage Enclosure Processor (SEP) managed devices—The connection is determined by an
active backplane. Box0 (enclosure 0) is connected to slot0 (disk drive slot 0 in the
enclosure). For more information, see Backplane Connections on page 71.
●
Expanders—The connections is determined by an expander. Exp0 (expander 0) is
connected to phy0 (phy 0 within a connector). For more information, see SAS Expander
Connections on page 72.
Note: Devices other than disk drives (CDROM, tape drives, etc...) are listed in order after your
system disk drives.
Appendix C: Using the Adaptec RAID Configuration Utility
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93
Viewing the Event Log
The BIOS-based event log records all firmware events, such as configuration changes, array
creation, and boot activity.
Some events are not stored indefinitely—the event log is cleared of any non-persistent events
each time you restart your computer; additionally, once the log is full, new events overwrite
old events.
To view the event log:
1
Start the ARC utility (see page 84).
2
Select the controller you want, then press Enter.
3
When the ARC utility menu appears, then press Ctrl+P.
4
Select Controller Log Information, then press Enter.
The current event log opens.
Using the Array Configuration Utility
for DOS
D
In this appendix...
Getting Started ....................................................................................................................... 95
Working in the ACU Using Menus........................................................................................ 95
Running the ACU Using Scripts............................................................................................ 96
This chapter describes the Array Configuration Utility (ACU) for DOS, a text-based utility that
you can use to create, configure, and manage arrays. (A BIOS-based ACU is also available. See
page 84.)
Note: Adaptec recommends that only advanced users familiar with working in DOS use the
ACU for DOS utility. For more information, see Managing Your Storage Space on page 59.
Appendix D: Using the Array Configuration Utility for DOS
●
95
Getting Started
Note: You need a bootable floppy disk to complete this task.
The ACU for DOS runs from a floppy disk which you can create using the RAID Controller
Installation DVD that came in your Adaptec RAID controller kit.
To create the ACU floppy disk:
1
Insert your RAID Controller Installation DVD into the DVD drive, then browse to this
file:
packages/firmware/controllermodel/acu.exe
Where controllermodel is the model number of your Adaptec RAID controller.
2
Insert a bootable floppy disk and copy the acu.exe file to it.
3
Continue in one of two ways:
●
Work in the ACU using menus (see the following section)
●
Run the ACU using scripts (see page 96)
Working in the ACU Using Menus
To work in the ACU using menus:
1
Insert the ACU floppy disk (see Getting Started above), then start or restart your computer.
The computer boots to the DOS command line.
2
Type ACU on the command line, then press Enter.
The ACU is menu-based and instructions for completing tasks appear on-screen. Menus
can be navigated using the arrow, Enter, Esc, and other keys on your keyboard.
For more information about completing tasks, see Using the ACU to Create and Manage
Arrays on page 84.
Appendix D: Using the Array Configuration Utility for DOS
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96
Running the ACU Using Scripts
To work in the ACU using scripts:
1
Insert the ACU floppy disk (see page 95), then start or restart your computer.
The computer boots to the DOS command line.
2
Type ACU on the command line, specify a script file, and specify either the /P or /R switches
listed in the following table. (Don’t specify both.)
You may also add one or both of the optional switches.
Note: Command line syntax is not case sensitive.
Switch
Description
/P <file>
Playback Mode—The ACU reads the contents of the specified script file and
creates arrays and configures channel settings based on the keywords
defined in the script. See page 96.
/R <file>
Record Mode—The ACU writes a RAID controller’s existing array configuration
to a specified script file, which lets you create the same configuration by
running the ACU in playback mode (/P switch) with the resulting script. See
page 97.
/L <file>
(Optional) Log Filename Switch—If you include this switch, the ACU records
its activity and any errors it encounters in the log file. If you do not include this
switch, the ACU displays activity and errors on the screen.
The file is a standard DOS file, which can include a drive, directory, filename,
and extension. Only the filename and extension (.log) are required. If no drive
or directory is specified, the file is placed in the same location as the ACU
executable.
/C <number> (Optional) Controller Number Switch—In systems with more than one
controller, this switch specifies which controller to change, where number is
the controller number. The default controller number is 0.
Note—The number assigned to a particular controller depends on the
controller’s physical PCI slot and the order in which your system scans its PCI
slots.
About Playback Mode
In this mode, the ACU reads the contents of the specified script file and creates arrays based on
the keywords specified in the script.
The syntax is ACU /P <file> where file is the name of the script file. The file parameter can
include a drive, directory, filename, and extension. If no drive or directory is specified, the
script file used should be placed in the same location as the ACU executable.
Note: The script file syntax allows only one hot spare to be assigned to an array. Therefore,
when recording a RAID 10, the ACU can’t map hot spares assigned to the individual mirror sets
in the resulting script file. Instead, the ACU creates a single list for all hot spares assigned to
the RAID 10. For more information, see Method Keyword on page 100.
Appendix D: Using the Array Configuration Utility for DOS
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97
About Record Mode
Note: You can also create a script file manually (see the following section).
In Record Mode, the ACU writes a RAID controller’s existing array configuration to a specified
script file, which lets you create the same configuration by running the ACU in Playback Mode
(/P switch) with the resulting script.
You can only record one RAID controller at a time with Record Mode. Record multiple RAID
controllers separately using separate script files.
The syntax is ACU /R <file> where file is the name of the script file. The file parameter can
include a drive, directory, filename, and extension, but only the filename and extension are
required. If no drive or directory is specified, the file is placed in the same location as the ACU
executable.
The ACU supports only a subset of available array types. If it encounters an array it can’t
create, a warning displays (or is recorded in the log file, if the /L switch is used); no keywords
for that array are recorded in its script file.
When recording an array, the ACU always uses the default Wait setting (equivalent to
Wait=Yes) unless you edit the script file and include Wait=No in the array’s definition block.
For more information, see Wait Keyword on page 101.
Creating the Script File Manually
Script files contain blocks:
●
Array definition block keywords (see page 98)
●
Optional—ACU error codes (see page 101)
The syntax rules are:
●
Each keyword must start its own line.
●
Syntax is not case sensitive.
Entering Comments in the Script File
To enter a comment in the script file, start with a pound character (#). You can start anywhere
on a line. For a sample script that includes comments, see Sample Scripts on page 102.
Appendix D: Using the Array Configuration Utility for DOS
●
98
Array Definition Block Keywords
The array definition block always begins with the keyword Array and ends with the keyword
End. The other required array definition keywords are Drives and Type.
Array definition keywords and descriptions are listed in this table.
Keyword
Required? Description
Array
Yes
Indicates the start of an array definition block. No default. See page 98.
Drives
Yes
Specifies the disk drives used in creating the array. No default. See
page 98.
End
Yes
Indicates the end of an array definition block. No default. See page 99.
HotspareDrives
No
Specifies hot spares to assign to the array. No default. See page 99.
InitializeAll
No
Indicates whether to initialize all the drives connected to the
controller. Default is No. See page 99.
Method
Yes
Indicates the method (Build/Verify, Clear, or Quick Init) to use when
creating a redundant array. Default is Build. See page 100.
ReadCache
No
Indicates whether read caching is enabled for this array. Default is
Yes. See page 100.
Size
No
Specifies the size of the array. Default is Maximum. See page 100.
StripeSize
No
Specifies size of contiguous I/O, in bytes. Default is 256. See page
100.
Type
Yes
Indicates the type of array to create. No default. See page 101.
Wait
No
Indicates whether the ACU should wait for the new array’s Build/
Verify or Clear to complete before continuing. Default is Yes. See
page 101.
WriteCache
No
Indicates whether write caching is enabled for this array. Default is
Yes. See page 101.
Array Keyword
Array is a required keyword, indicating the start of an array definition block. The syntax is
Array=<label>, where label is an optional alphanumeric string.
For example:
Array=MyData
Drives Keyword
Drives is a required keyword, specifying the devices to use in creating the array. There is no
default value.
A disk drive is identified by its channel number, ID (target), and LUN, separated by colons; for
example, 0:0:0 or 0:1:0. Separate multiple disk drive identifiers with commas.
Prior to creating any new arrays, the ACU initializes any drives specified by the Drives
keyword. If a disk drive is specified in more than one array definition block in a script, it is
initialized only once.
! Caution: Any disk drive specified within the script file is initialized, which destroys any
data on that disk drive.
Appendix D: Using the Array Configuration Utility for DOS
●
99
For example:
Drives=0:0:0
Drives=0:0:0,0:1:0,0:2:0
End Keyword
End is a required keyword, indicating the end of the block.
HotspareDrives Keyword
Hotspare Drives is an optional keyword, specifying the hot spares to assign to the array. The
syntax for listing hot spares is the same as the Drives Keyword on page 98. If Hotspare Drives is
not specified, no hot spares are assigned to the array.
For example:
HotspareDrives=0:0:0,0:1:0
The same disk drive can be assigned to protect multiple arrays (as a pool spare). Once a pool
spare is used by a failed disk drive, however, it is no longer available to protect the other arrays
its assigned to.
This keyword does not verify that the available space on the specified hot spares is sufficient to
serve as failover for the array.
When assigning hot spares to a multilevel array, Hotspare Drives assigns all the hot spares in
the list to all arrays within the multilevel array.
InitializeAll Keyword
If you want the ACU to initialize all drives connected to the controller and delete any existing
arrays before any new arrays are created, even those that are not specified in any Drives
keyword definition, specify InitializeAll=Yes. Otherwise, the ACU initializes only those drives
specified by the Drives keyword.
! Caution: Initializing a disk drive automatically deletes any existing arrays with that disk
drive as their member.
Possible values:
●
Yes—Initialize all drives.
●
No (default)—Do not initialize all drives; only those drives specified with the Drives
keyword are initialized.
For example:
#Initialize the drives prior array creation.
InitializeAll=Yes
InitializeAll is a global keyword that you need to specify only once.
InitializeAll is always performed prior to array creation regardless of its position in the script.
If both InitializeAll=Yes and InitializeAll=No are specified in the same script file,
InitializeAll=Yes is always the overriding value.
If an array is deleted during a Build/Verify process, the process is automatically terminated.
Appendix D: Using the Array Configuration Utility for DOS
●
100
Method Keyword
Method is an optional keyword, indicating which method to use when creating a redundant
(RAID 1, 1E, 10, 5, 5EE, 50, 6 and 60) array. Possible values:
●
Build (the default)—Perform a Build/Verify process on the array. Takes longer than Clear,
but allows you to begin using the array immediately.
●
Clear—Clear the array. Faster than a Build/Verify process, but you have to wait for the
operation to be completed before you can begin using the array.
●
Quick Init—Makes the array available immediately, but does not accomplish a Build/
Verify. Parity and mirror information is created as data is written to the disk drive (called
full-stripe write mode), which reduces overall array performance. Maximum performance
is achieved by starting and completing a Build/Verify.
●
Skip Init—If multiple disk drives fail in the same logical drive, you may be able to recover
the data by recreating the logical drive without the initialization step. Omitting the
initialization step reconstructs the logical drive metadata without modifying or destroying
any other data on the disks.
For example:
Method=Build
ReadCache Keyword
ReadCache indicates whether the array uses read caching.
Possible values:
●
Yes (default)—Enable read caching.
●
No—Disable read caching.
For example:
ReadCache=Yes
Size Keyword
The Size keyword specifies the size of the array. Specify Maximum (the default) to create an
array using the maximum available space, based on the array type and drives selected.
Otherwise, specify the size as an integer or a decimal number, followed by the unit
keyword MB (megabytes), GB (gigabytes), or TB (terabytes).
Note: A unit keyword is required with a numeric size value. If no unit keyword is specified, the
ACU exits with an error.
For example:
Size=2.5GB
Size=300MB
Size=Maximum
StripeSize Keyword
The StripeSize keyword specifies the stripe size (in KB) written to each member of a striped
array (RAID 0, 10, 5, 5, 5EE, 50, 6 or 60).
The possible values for StripeSize are 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512 and 1024 KB. Default is 256.
Appendix D: Using the Array Configuration Utility for DOS
●
101
For example:
StripeSize=256
Type Keyword
Type is a required keyword, indicating the array type. There is no default value. The possible
values: Volume, RAID0, RAID1, RAID5, RAID10, or RAID50.
Depending on the RAID levels supported by your RAID controller, additional possible values
are: RAID1E, RAID5EE, RAID6, RAID60.
Wait Keyword
Wait is an optional keyword that you can use to tell the ACU to allow the ACU to continue
while the Build/Verify or Clear completes in the background; specify Wait=No. Otherwise, the
ACU waits by default.
If the host is powered off before the Build/Verify or Clear process completes and is then
restarted, the process resumes without any user intervention.
For example:
Wait=Yes
Wait=No
WriteCache Keyword
The WriteCache keyword indicates whether write caching is used for this array if write caching
is supported for the system. Possible values are as follows:
●
Yes (default)—Enable the write cache.
●
No—Disable the write cache.
Setting an array’s WriteCache keyword to Yes might result in data loss or corruption during a
power failure.
For example:
WriteCache=Yes
ACU Error Codes
When the ACU detects an error, it reports the error and exits immediately. If a log file is
specified, the ACU writes the error code to the log file. Otherwise, it displays the error code on
the screen.
The possible error messages returned by the ACU are listed in this table.
Code Description
0
ACU ran without changes—ACU exited with no errors (success) and no report is required.
1
No controller found.
2
Syntax or logical error in the script file—The ACU encountered an invalid command or
keyword in the specified script file.
3
Unable to open file.
4
Error in the command line parameters—You passed an invalid command-line switch to the
ACU. (See Running the ACU Using Scripts on page 96 for a list of valid command-line switches.)
Appendix D: Using the Array Configuration Utility for DOS
●
102
Code Description
5
Unable to read system configuration—The ACU was unable to get the configuration
information from the specified controller.
6
No drives detected.
7
Specified drive not found in system.
8
Specified array size too small—You specified an array size that is smaller than the
minimum size allowed for this array.
9
Specified array size too big—You specified an array size that is larger than the maximum
size allowed for this array.
10
Number of drives do not match the array type—The number of drives you selected is
invalid for the type of array specified.
11
Unable to initialize drive.
12
Error occurred while creating array.
13
Too many spare drives assigned—You attempted to assign more than the maximum
number of hot spares allowed for the specified array.
14
Insufficient memory to run the application.
15
Incorrect controller number.
16
Controller not responding.
17
Build/Verify/Clear failed.
18
Cannot use drives on shared channel.
21
Failed in getting kernel version. Unknown product ID.
22
Kernel timeout in writing command.
23
No RAID channels available
24
Error: wrong stripe size in creating array - script mode.
100
You ran ACU and made changes—The ACU exited with no errors (success) and you must
restart the computer.
Sample Scripts
This command invokes the ACU and creates arrays on controller 1 based on the array
keywords defined in the script file A:\RAID.ACU. It also configures Channel 0 and saves a log
of the operation in the log file C:\RAID.LOG:
A:\> ACU /P A:\RAID.ACU /L C:\RAID.LOG /C1
This sample script file is the RAID.ACU script as referred to in the ACU command above. This
script creates these arrays—a 500 MB single-disk volume, and a 2-GB two-disk drive RAID 1
with a hot spare:
# Create a 500MB volume labeled ‘MySystem’
Array=MySystem
Type=Volume
Size=500MB
Drives=0:0:0
End
# Create a 2GB mirror labeled ‘MyMirror’
Array=MyMirror
Type=RAID1
Size=2GB
Appendix D: Using the Array Configuration Utility for DOS
# Use drives 1 and 2
Drives=0:1:0,0:2:0
# Disable write cache
WriteCache=No
# Assign 1 spare drive
HotspareDrives=0:3:0
End
This sample script file creates a maximum-size three-disk-drive RAID 5:
# Create a maximum size RAID 5 labeled ‘MyData’
Array=MyData
Type=RAID5
Size=Maximum
# Use the maximum stripe size
StripeSize=1024
# Clear the array (don’t build/verify it)
Method=Clear
# Don’t wait for clear to complete
Wait=No
# Use drives 0, 1, 2
Drives=0:0:0, 0:1:0, 0:2:0
End
●
103
Using the Adaptec Flash Utility
E
In this appendix...
System Requirements ........................................................................................................... 105
Before You Begin .................................................................................................................. 105
Running the Menu-based AFU............................................................................................ 106
Running the AFU from the Command Line....................................................................... 107
Updating the Flash Using the AFU Command Line .......................................................... 110
This chapter describes how to use the Adaptec Flash Utility (AFU), a text-based DOS utility
that you can use to update, save, or verify the RAID controller’s firmware BIOS and NVRAM.
! Caution: Although the AFU contains safeguards to prevent you from accidentally damaging
your RAID controller’s flash contents, it is still important to use the AFU carefully and
correctly to avoid rendering your RAID controller inoperable.
Adaptec recommends that only advanced users familiar with working in DOS use the AFU.
For more information, see Managing Your Storage Space on page 59.
Appendix E: Using the Adaptec Flash Utility
●
105
System Requirements
●
MS–DOS version 5.0 or later.
Note: You can’t run the AFU from a DOS command prompt window under any version of
Windows.
●
At least 8 MB of extended memory.
Compatibility Notes
●
Supports HIMEM.SYS; compatible with other DOS drivers running under HIMEM.SYS
(for example, SMARTDRV.SYS and SETVER.SYS).
●
Does not support DOS extenders installed in memory, such as EMM386.SYS and
DOS4GW.
Before You Begin
1
Obtain the firmware (see the following section).
2
Create firmware disks (see page 106).
There are two ways to run the AFU:
1
Using the AFU menus (see page 106)
2
From the command line (see page 107)
Obtaining the Firmware
To obtain RAID controller firmware, go to:
●
The RAID Controller Installation DVD—Includes the AFU executable (AFU.exe) and a
separate flash image. The flash image may comprise multiple User Flash Image (UFI) files.
●
The Adaptec Web site—Download a new firmware file to get the most recent version of
firmware/BIOS and AFU.
See www.adaptec.com for more information.
Appendix E: Using the Adaptec Flash Utility
●
106
Creating the Firmware Update Disks
To create the firmware update disks:
1
Copy these files to empty, formatted floppy disks, a USB flash drive, or a writable CD:
●
AFU.exe
●
Axxxx01.ufi
where xxx is the model number of your controller.
Note: Most controller model numbers have a suffix (for example Adaptec RAID 3405).
Check that the .ufi file is the correct file for your controller before copying.
2
If using floppy disks, copy each additional Axxxx0x.ufi file to a separate floppy disk. (Some
RAID controllers have two UFI files; some have four. Each goes onto its own floppy disk.)
3
To use a menu-based AFU, see the following section.
To run the AFU from the command line, see page 107.
Running the Menu-based AFU
To run the menu-based AFU:
1
Shut down your operating system and reboot to DOS from a bootable MS-DOS floppy
disk or from a DOS partition on a bootable drive. (You can use a disk drive connected to
the controller you are updating.) If your computer isn’t set up to boot from the bootable
floppy disk, enter the system setup utility and change the setting.
2
Insert the firmware update disk (created using the steps above) containing AFU.exe
3
At the DOS command prompt, type AFU with no arguments.
The AFU’s main menu is displayed.
4
Select Select Controllers, then select the Adaptec RAID controller(s) to be flashed.
To update multiple RAID controllers in the same system, update the boot controller’s flash
first, restart the computer, then update the flash for the remaining controllers.
5
Select Select an Operation.
6
Choose the operation you want, then follow the on-screen instructions to complete the
task:
●
Update flash image—Updates all the flash components on a RAID controller with the
flash image data from the UFI file.
●
Save flash image—Reads the contents of a RAID controller’s flash components and
saves the data to a UFI file, which you can use to restore a RAID controller’s flash if
required.
●
Verify flash image—Reads the contents of a RAID controller’s flash components and
compares it to the contents of the specified UFI file.
●
Display flash information—Displays version information about a RAID controller’s
flash components.
●
List flash image—Lists all supported RAID controllers detected on your system.
Appendix E: Using the Adaptec Flash Utility
7
●
107
Complete the flash operation and restart your computer before trying to use the RAID
controller again. (You can not use your RAID controller while you are updating its flash.)
The AFU processes the selected command, prompts you to insert additional floppy disks
as needed, and reports either success or an error message code.
Running the AFU from the Command Line
Note: You can also run a menu-based AFU (see page 106).
To run the AFU from the command line:
1
Shut down your operating system and reboot to DOS from a bootable DOS floppy disk or
from a DOS partition on a bootable drive. (You can use a disk connected to the controller
you’re updating.) If your computer isn’t set up to boot from the bootable floppy disk, enter
the system setup utility to change the setting.
2
Insert the firmware update disk containing AFU.exe
3
At the DOS command, type AFU followed by a command (see page 107) and any switches
you want.
Note: To find a controller number, type AFU LIST, then press Enter.
The AFU processes the command, prompts you to insert additional floppy disks as needed,
exits, and reports either success or an error message code.
To update a RAID controller’s flash using the command line utility ARCCONF, see page 110.
AFU Commands
This section lists the available AFU commands.
List
Displays the AFU-supported RAID controllers installed on your computer. Also displays the
ID numbers assigned to each controller.
You don’t have to restart the computer after completing this command.
This example shows a typical system response to a LIST command:
A:\> AFU LIST
Adaptec Flash Utility V4.0-0 B5749
(c)Adaptec Inc. 1999–2005. All Rights Reserved.
Controllers Detected and Recognized:
Controller #0 (03:05:00) Adaptec RAID 51645
Save
Saves the contents of a RAID controller’s flash in a UFI file. The name of the UFI file is based
on the controller type and can’t be changed.
You must restart the computer following a SAVE command.
The command syntax for the SAVE command is
AFU SAVE [/C<Controller ID>] [/D <UFI File Path>]
Appendix E: Using the Adaptec Flash Utility
●
108
These switches are available:
●
/C <Controller ID>—One or more RAID controller IDs representing the set of RAID
controllers on which to perform the specified command. The default is 0; if the computer
has multiple RAID controllers, the AFU defaults to controller 0 unless you specify
otherwise.
For example:
To specify a single RAID controller ID: /C 0
To specify multiple IDs separated by commas: /C 0,2
To indicate all RAID controllers: ALL
If you are using multiple RAID controllers, you must specify the controller you want by
using the /C switch; otherwise, the AFU displays an error message and exits.
●
/D <UFI File Path>—Specifies the path where the UFI files are located. If you do not
specify the /D switch, the AFU looks for (or creates) its UFI files in the default location.
You cannot specify the name of a UFI file, only its path. UFI filenames are predefined,
based on the RAID controller type.
In this example, the AFU saves flash contents from RAID controller 0 to a UFI file in the
current default drive and directory:
A:\> AFU SAVE /C 0
In this example, the AFU saves flash contents from Controller 1 to a UFI file in
C:\UFI_FILES:
A:\> AFU SAVE /C 1 /D C:\UFI_FILES
Update
Updates the flash components of one or more RAID controllers on your computer from the
flash image data in a UFI file. You must restart the computer following an UPDATE command.
The command syntax for the UPDATE command is:
AFU UPDATE [/C<Controller ID>] [/D <UFI File Path>]
This example shows a typical system response after an update.
A:\> AFU UPDATE /C 0
Adaptec Flash Utility V4.0-0 B5749
(c)Adaptec Inc. 1999–2005. All Rights Reserved.
Updating Controller 0 (Adaptec RAID 31205)
Reading flash image file (Build 5749)
AFU is about to update firmware on controllers Adaptec RAID 51645
***PLEASE DO NOT REBOOT THE SYSTEM DURING THE UPDATE***
This might take a few minutes.
Writing Adaptec RAID 51645 (4MB) Flash Image to controller 0...OK.
Verifying...OK
Please restart the computer to allow firmware changes to take effect.
Appendix E: Using the Adaptec Flash Utility
●
109
Verify
Compares the contents of each of the flash components on a RAID controller to the
corresponding image in a UFI file, and indicates whether they match. After using the VERIFY
command, you must restart the computer.
The command syntax for the VERIFY command is as follows:
AFU VERIFY [/C<Controller ID>] [/D <UFI File Path>]
This example shows a typical system response after a VERIFY command.
A:\> AFU VERIFY /C 0
Adaptec Flash Utility V4.0-0 B5749
(c)Adaptec Inc. 1999–2005. All Rights Reserved.
Reading flash image file (Build 5748)
Controller #0: Adaptec RAID 51645
ROM: Checksum: 797B [VALID] (Build 5748)
File: Checksum: 797B [VALID] (Build 5748)
Image Compares Correctly
Version
Displays version information about the flash components on a RAID controller. After using
the VERSION command, restart your computer.
The command syntax for the VERSION command is:
AFU VERSION [/C<Controller ID>]
This example displays version information about all supported RAID controllers.
A:\> AFU VERSION /C 0
Adaptec Flash Utility V4.0-0 B5749
(c)Adaptec Inc. 1999–2005. All Rights Reserved.
Version Information for Controller #0 (Adaptec RAID 51645)
ROM: Build 5748 [VALID] Fri Sep 27 13:28:40 EDT 2005
A:\> AFU VERSION /C ALL
Help
Displays a summary of AFU functions and command switches. For example:
A:\> AFU HELP
A:\> AFU /?
Appendix E: Using the Adaptec Flash Utility
●
110
Updating the Flash Using the AFU Command Line
1
Create the firmware update disks (see page 106).
2
Shut down your operating system and reboot to DOS from a bootable DOS floppy disk or
from a DOS partition on a bootable drive. (You can use a disk connected to the controller
you’re updating.) If your computer isn’t set up to boot from the bootable floppy disk or a
bootable device other than a disk drive, enter the system setup utility to change the setting.
3
Insert the firmware update disk containing AFU.exe
4
At the DOS command, if you have multiple controllers and you don’t know the number of
the controller you want to update, type AFU LIST, then press Enter. Otherwise, skip to the
next step.
5
At the DOS command, type AFU followed by a command (see page 107) and any switches
you want.
6
Update the flash using the instructions suitable for your requirements:
●
To update a single RAID controller:
AFU UPDATE /C <cont_number>
Where <cont_number> is the number of the RAID controller whose firmware you
are updating. For example, to upgrade Controller 0, type AFU UPDATE /C 0
●
To update multiple RAID controllers:
AFU UPDATE /C <cont_number_a>,<cont_number_b>
Where <controller_number_a> and <controller_number_b> are the
numbers of the Adaptec RAID controllers whose firmware you are updating. For
example, to upgrade controllers 0, 2, and 3, type AFU UPDATE /C 0, 2, 3
●
To update all RAID controllers simultaneously:
AFU UPDATE /C all
Note: The UFI file identifies the RAID controllers, so you don’t have to worry about
flashing the wrong controller.
7
When prompted, insert the first firmware disk into your floppy disk drive.
The AFU reads the first disk.
8
When prompted, remove the first firmware disk and insert the second firmware disk into
your floppy disk drive.
9
Repeat Step 8 as required until the flash update is complete.
Controller LED and I2C Connector
Quick Reference
F
In this appendix...
Adaptec RAID 5085 LED Connector Specification............................................................ 112
Adaptec RAID 5405/5405Z LED and I2C Connector Specification.................................. 114
Adaptec RAID 5445/5445Z LED and I2C Connector Specification.................................. 115
Adaptec RAID 5805/5805Q/5805Z/5805ZQ LED and I2C Connector Specification ...... 117
Adaptec RAID 51245 LED and I2C Connector Specification............................................ 119
Adaptec RAID 51645 LED and I2C Connector Specification............................................ 121
Adaptec RAID 52445 LED and I2C Connector Specification............................................ 123
Adaptec RAID 2045 LED Connector Specification............................................................ 126
Adaptec RAID 2405/2405Q LED and I2C Connector Specification ................................. 126
This chapter provides a reference guide for Adaptec® RAID controllers of Activity LED and
I2C connectors.
Appendix F: Controller LED and I2C Connector Quick Reference
●
112
Adaptec RAID 5085 LED Connector Specification
2249100-R
ASR-5085/512MB RoHS SGL
●
Adaptec RAID 5085 Activity LED Header Connector: Molex 10-89-7162 or equivalent
●
Activity LED Header Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-55-2161 or equivalent
J2:
J2 Pin Number
Signal
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
2
2
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 0
LED Cathode
1
3
+3.3V
LED Anode
4
4
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 1
LED Cathode
3
5
+3.3V
LED Anode
6
6
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 2
LED Cathode
5
7
+3.3V
LED Anode
8
8
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 3
LED Cathode
7
9
+3.3V
LED Anode
10
10
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 0
LED Cathode
9
11
+3.3V
LED Anode
12
12
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 1
LED Cathode
11
13
+3.3V
LED Anode
14
14
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 2
LED Cathode
13
15
+3.3V
LED Anode
16
16
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 3
LED Cathode
15
●
Adaptec RAID 5085 Aggregate Activity LED Board Connector: Molex 22-28-4023 or
equivalent
●
Aggregate LED Mating Cable Connector: Molex 50-57-9002 or equivalent
J1:
J1 Pin Number Signal
Description
2
ACTIVITY
LED Cathode
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
●
Adaptec RAID 5085 External Alarm Connector: Molex 22-28-4023 or equivalent
●
Alarm Mating Cable Connector: Molex 50-57-9002 or equivalent
Appendix F: Controller LED and I2C Connector Quick Reference
●
J12:
J12 Pin Number
Signal
Description
2
~2kHz Square Wave
Open collector transistor
1
+3.3V
●
Adaptec RAID 5085 Status LED Board Connector: Molex 10-89-7162 or equivalent
●
Status LED Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-55-2161 or equivalent
J14:
J14 Pin Number
Signal
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
2
2
STATUS CN0, LANE 0
LED Cathode
1
3
+3.3V
LED Anode
4
4
STATUS CN0, LANE 1
LED Cathode
3
5
+3.3V
LED Anode
6
6
STATUS CN0, LANE 2
LED Cathode
5
7
+3.3V
LED Anode
8
8
STATUS CN0, LANE 3
LED Cathode
7
9
+3.3V
LED Anode
10
10
STATUS CN1, LANE 0
LED Cathode
9
11
+3.3V
LED Anode
12
12
STATUS CN1, LANE 1
LED Cathode
11
13
+3.3V
LED Anode
14
14
STATUS CN1, LANE 2
LED Cathode
13
15
+3.3V
LED Anode
16
16
STATUS CN1, LANE 3
LED Cathode
15
113
Appendix F: Controller LED and I2C Connector Quick Reference
●
114
Adaptec RAID 5405/5405Z LED and I2C Connector
Specification
2258100-R
ASR-5405 RoHS KIT
2258100JA-R
ASR-5405/JA RoHS KIT
2258200-R
ASR-5405 RoHS Single
2266800-R
ASR-5405Z RoHS Single
●
Adaptec RAID 5405/5405Z Activity LED Header Connector: Molex 10-89-7162 or
equivalent
●
Activity LED Header Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-55-2161 or equivalent
J2:
22-55-2161
Pin Number
J2 Pin Number
Signal
Description
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
2
2
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 0
LED Cathode
1
3
+3.3V
LED Anode
4
4
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 1
LED Cathode
3
5
+3.3V
LED Anode
6
6
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 2
LED Cathode
5
7
+3.3V
LED Anode
8
8
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 3
LED Cathode
7
●
Adaptec RAID 5405/5405Z Aggregate Activity LED Board Connector: Molex 22-28-4023
or equivalent
●
Aggregate LED Mating Cable Connector: Molex 50-57-9002 or equivalent
J1:
J1 Pin Number Signal
Description
2
ACTIVITY
LED Cathode
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
●
Adaptec RAID 5405/5405Z External Alarm Connector: Molex 22-28-4023 or equivalent
●
Alarm Mating Cable Connector: Molex 50-57-9002 or equivalent
J12:
J12 Pin Number
Signal
2
~2kHz Square Wave
Open collector transistor
1
+3.3V
—
●
Description
Adaptec RAID 5405/5405Z I2C Board Connector : Molex 22-43-6030 or equivalent
Appendix F: Controller LED and I2C Connector Quick Reference
●
●
115
I2C Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-43-3030 or equivalent
J4:
J4 Pin Number
Signal
3
I2C Clock
2
Ground
1
I2C Data
●
Adaptec RAID 5405 Status LED Board Connector: Molex 10-89-7162 or equivalent
●
Status LED Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-55-2161 or equivalent
J14 (Adaptec RAID 5405 only):
J14 Pin Number
Signal
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
2
2
STATUS CN0, LANE 0
LED Cathode
1
3
+3.3V
LED Anode
4
4
STATUS CN0, LANE 1
LED Cathode
3
5
+3.3V
LED Anode
6
6
STATUS CN0, LANE 2
LED Cathode
5
7
+3.3V
LED Anode
8
8
STATUS CN0, LANE 3
LED Cathode
7
Adaptec RAID 5445/5445Z LED and I2C Connector
Specification
2228800-R
ASR-5445 RoHS Kit
2244900-R
ASR-5445/512MB RoHS SGL
2267000-R
ASR-5445Z RoHS Single
●
Adaptec RAID 5445/5445Z Activity LED Header Connector: Molex 10-89-7162 or
equivalent
●
Activity LED Header Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-55-2161 or equivalent
J2:
Note: For Adaptec RAID 5445, header J2 is a 16-pin connector (pins 1-16). For Adaptec RAID
5445Z, header J2 is an 8-pin connector (pins 1-8 only).
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
J2 Pin Number
Signal
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
2
2
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 0
LED Cathode
1
3
+3.3V
LED Anode
4
4
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 1
LED Cathode
3
Appendix F: Controller LED and I2C Connector Quick Reference
●
J2 Pin Number
Signal
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
5
+3.3V
LED Anode
6
6
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 2
LED Cathode
5
7
+3.3V
LED Anode
8
8
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 3
LED Cathode
7
9
+3.3V
LED Anode
10
10
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 0
LED Cathode
9
11
+3.3V
LED Anode
12
12
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 1
LED Cathode
11
13
+3.3V
LED Anode
14
14
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 2
LED Cathode
13
15
+3.3V
LED Anode
16
16
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 3
LED Cathode
15
116
●
Adaptec RAID 5445/5445Z Aggregate Activity LED Board Connector: Molex 22-28-4023
or equivalent
●
Aggregate LED Mating Cable Connector: Molex 50-57-9002 or equivalent
J1:
J1 Pin Number Signal
Description
2
ACTIVITY
LED Cathode
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
●
Adaptec RAID 5445/5445Z External Alarm Connector: Molex 22-28-4023 or equivalent
●
Alarm Mating Cable Connector: Molex 50-57-9002 or equivalent
J12:
J12 Pin Number
Signal
Description
2
~2kHz Square Wave
Open collector transistor
1
+3.3V
—
●
Adaptec RAID 5445/5445Z I2C Board Connector : Molex 22-43-6030 or equivalent
●
I2C Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-43-3030 or equivalent
J4:
J4 Pin Number
Signal
3
I2C Clock
2
Ground
1
I2C Data
●
Adaptec RAID 5445 Status LED Board Connector: Molex 10-89-7162 or equivalent
●
Status LED Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-55-2161 or equivalent
Appendix F: Controller LED and I2C Connector Quick Reference
●
117
J14 (Adaptec RAID 5445 only):
J14 Pin Number
Signal
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
2
2
STATUS CN0, LANE 0
LED Cathode
1
3
+3.3V
LED Anode
4
4
STATUS CN0, LANE 1
LED Cathode
3
5
+3.3V
LED Anode
6
6
STATUS CN0, LANE 2
LED Cathode
5
7
+3.3V
LED Anode
8
8
STATUS CN0, LANE 3
LED Cathode
7
9
+3.3V
LED Anode
10
10
STATUS CN1, LANE 0
LED Cathode
9
11
+3.3V
LED Anode
12
12
STATUS CN1, LANE 1
LED Cathode
11
13
+3.3V
LED Anode
14
14
STATUS CN1, LANE 2
LED Cathode
13
15
+3.3V
LED Anode
16
16
STATUS CN1, LANE 3
LED Cathode
15
Adaptec RAID 5805/5805Q/5805Z/5805ZQ LED and I2C
Connector Specification
2244100-R
ASR-5805 RoHS KIT
2244100JA-R
ASR-5805/JA RoHS KIT
2244300-R
ASR-5805/512MB RoHS Single
2266900-R
ASR-5805Z RoHS Single
2268500-R
ASR-5805Q RoHS Single
2268600-R
ASR-5805ZQ RoHS Single
●
Adaptec RAID 5805/5805Q/5805Z/5805ZQ Activity LED Header Connector: Molex 1089-7162 or equivalent
●
Activity LED Header Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-55-2161 or equivalent
J2:
J2 Pin Number
Signal
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
2
2
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 0
LED Cathode
1
3
+3.3V
LED Anode
4
4
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 1
LED Cathode
3
5
+3.3V
LED Anode
6
Appendix F: Controller LED and I2C Connector Quick Reference
●
J2 Pin Number
Signal
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
6
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 2
LED Cathode
5
7
+3.3V
LED Anode
8
8
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 3
LED Cathode
7
9
+3.3V
LED Anode
10
10
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 0
LED Cathode
9
11
+3.3V
LED Anode
12
12
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 1
LED Cathode
11
13
+3.3V
LED Anode
14
14
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 2
LED Cathode
13
15
+3.3V
LED Anode
16
16
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 3
LED Cathode
15
118
●
Adaptec RAID 5805/5805Q/5805Z/5805ZQ Aggregate Activity LED Board Connector:
Molex 22-28-4023 or equivalent
●
Aggregate LED Mating Cable Connector: Molex 50-57-9002 or equivalent
J1:
J1 Pin Number Signal
Description
2
ACTIVITY
LED Cathode
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
●
Adaptec RAID 5805/5805Q/5805Z/5805ZQ External Alarm Connector: Molex 22-284023 or equivalent
●
Alarm Mating Cable Connector: Molex 50-57-9002 or equivalent
J12:
J12 Pin Number
Signal
Description
2
~2kHz Square Wave
Open collector transistor
1
+3.3V
—
●
Adaptec RAID 5805/5805Q/5805Z/5805ZQ I2C CN0 Board Connector : Molex 22-436030 or equivalent
●
I2C Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-43-3030 or equivalent
J4:
J4 Pin Number
Signal
3
I2C Clock
2
Ground
1
I2C Data
●
Adaptec RAID 5805/5805Q/5805Z/5805ZQ I2C CN1 Board Connector : Molex 22-436030 or equivalent
Appendix F: Controller LED and I2C Connector Quick Reference
●
●
119
I2C Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-43-3030 or equivalent
J5:
J5 Pin Number
Signal
3
I2C Clock
2
Ground
1
I2C Data
●
Adaptec RAID 5805/5805Q Status LED Board Connector: Molex 10-89-7162 or
equivalent
●
Status LED Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-55-2161 or equivalent
J14 (Adaptec RAID 5805/5805Q only):
J14 Pin Number
Signal
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
2
2
STATUS CN0, LANE 0
LED Cathode
1
3
+3.3V
LED Anode
4
4
STATUS CN0, LANE 1
LED Cathode
3
5
+3.3V
LED Anode
6
6
STATUS CN0, LANE 2
LED Cathode
5
7
+3.3V
LED Anode
8
8
STATUS CN0, LANE 3
LED Cathode
7
9
+3.3V
LED Anode
10
10
STATUS CN1, LANE 0
LED Cathode
9
11
+3.3V
LED Anode
12
12
STATUS CN1, LANE 1
LED Cathode
11
13
+3.3V
LED Anode
14
14
STATUS CN1, LANE 2
LED Cathode
13
15
+3.3V
LED Anode
16
16
STATUS CN1, LANE 3
LED Cathode
15
Adaptec RAID 51245 LED and I2C Connector Specification
2258400-R
ASR-51245 RoHS Kit
2258300-R
ASR-51245 RoHS Single
●
Adaptec RAID 51245 Activity LED Header Connector for CN0/CN1: Molex 10-89-7162
or equivalent
●
Activity LED Header Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-55-2161 or equivalent
Appendix F: Controller LED and I2C Connector Quick Reference
●
J3:
J3 Pin Number
Signal
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
2
2
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 0
LED Cathode
1
3
+3.3V
LED Anode
4
4
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 1
LED Cathode
3
5
+3.3V
LED Anode
6
6
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 2
LED Cathode
5
7
+3.3V
LED Anode
8
8
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 3
LED Cathode
7
9
+3.3V
LED Anode
10
10
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 0
LED Cathode
9
11
+3.3V
LED Anode
12
12
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 1
LED Cathode
11
13
+3.3V
LED Anode
14
14
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 2
LED Cathode
13
15
+3.3V
LED Anode
16
16
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 3
LED Cathode
15
●
Adaptec RAID 51245 Activity LED Board Connector for CN2: Molex 10-89-7162 or
equivalent
●
Activity LED Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-55-2161 or equivalent
J1:
J1 Pin Number
Signal
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
1
Unused
Unused
2
2
Unused
Unused
1
3
Unused
Unused
4
4
Unused
Unused
3
5
Unused
Unused
6
6
Unused
Unused
5
7
Unused
Unused
8
8
Unused
Unused
7
9
+3.3V
LED Anode
10
10
ACTIVITY CN2, LANE 0
LED Cathode
9
11
+3.3V
LED Anode
12
12
ACTIVITY CN2, LANE 1
LED Cathode
11
13
+3.3V
LED Anode
14
14
ACTIVITY CN2, LANE 2
LED Cathode
13
15
+3.3V
LED Anode
16
16
ACTIVITY CN2, LANE 3
LED Cathode
15
120
Appendix F: Controller LED and I2C Connector Quick Reference
●
121
●
Adaptec RAID 51245 Aggregate Activity LED Board Connector: Molex 22-28-4023 or
equivalent
●
Aggregate LED Mating Cable Connector: Molex 50-57-9002 or equivalent
J10:
J10 Pin Number
Signal
Description
2
ACTIVITY
LED Cathode
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
●
Adaptec RAID 51245 External Alarm Connector: Molex 22-28-4023 or equivalent
●
Alarm Mating Cable Connector: Molex 50-57-9002 or equivalent
J12:
J12 Pin Number
Signal
Description
2
~2kHz Square Wave
Open collector transistor
1
+3.3V
—
●
Adaptec RAID 51245 I2C Board Connector : Molex 22-43-6030 or equivalent
●
I2C Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-43-3030 or equivalent
J28, J29, J30:
J2x Pin Number
Signal
3
I2C Clock
2
Ground
1
I2C Data
Adaptec RAID 51645 LED and I2C Connector Specification
2258500-R
ASR-51645 RoHS Kit
2258600-R
ASR-51645 RoHS Single
●
Adaptec RAID 51645 Activity LED Header Connector for CN0/CN1: Molex 10-89-7162
or equivalent
●
Activity LED Header Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-55-2161 or equivalent
J3:
J3 Pin Number
Signal
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
2
2
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 0
LED Cathode
1
3
+3.3V
LED Anode
4
4
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 1
LED Cathode
3
5
+3.3V
LED Anode
6
Appendix F: Controller LED and I2C Connector Quick Reference
●
J3 Pin Number
Signal
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
6
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 2
LED Cathode
5
7
+3.3V
LED Anode
8
8
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 3
LED Cathode
7
9
+3.3V
LED Anode
10
10
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 0
LED Cathode
9
11
+3.3V
LED Anode
12
12
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 1
LED Cathode
11
13
+3.3V
LED Anode
14
14
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 2
LED Cathode
13
15
+3.3V
LED Anode
16
16
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 3
LED Cathode
15
122
●
Adaptec RAID 51645 Activity LED Board Connector for CN2/CN3: Molex 10-89-7162 or
equivalent
●
Activity LED Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-55-2161 or equivalent
J1:
J1 Pin Number
Signal
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
2
2
ACTIVITY CN3, LANE 0
LED Cathode
1
3
+3.3V
LED Anode
4
4
ACTIVITY CN3, LANE 1
LED Cathode
3
5
+3.3V
LED Anode
6
6
ACTIVITY CN3, LANE 2
LED Cathode
5
7
+3.3V
LED Anode
8
8
ACTIVITY CN3, LANE 3
LED Cathode
7
9
+3.3V
LED Anode
10
10
ACTIVITY CN2, LANE 0
LED Cathode
9
11
+3.3V
LED Anode
12
12
ACTIVITY CN2, LANE 1
LED Cathode
11
13
+3.3V
LED Anode
14
14
ACTIVITY CN2, LANE 2
LED Cathode
13
15
+3.3V
LED Anode
16
16
ACTIVITY CN2, LANE 3
LED Cathode
15
●
Adaptec RAID 51645 Aggregate Activity LED Board Connector: Molex 22-28-4023 or
equivalent
●
Aggregate LED Mating Cable Connector: Molex 50-57-9002 or equivalent
Appendix F: Controller LED and I2C Connector Quick Reference
●
123
J10:
J10 Pin Number
Signal
Description
2
ACTIVITY
LED Cathode
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
●
Adaptec RAID 51645 External Alarm Connector: Molex 22-28-4023 or equivalent
●
Alarm Mating Cable Connector: Molex 50-57-9002 or equivalent
J12:
J12 Pin Number
Signal
Description
2
~2kHz Square Wave
Open collector transistor
1
+3.3V
—
●
Adaptec RAID 51645 I2C Board Connector : Molex 22-43-6030 or equivalent
●
I2C Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-43-3030 or equivalent
J27, J28, J29, J30:
J2x Pin Number
Signal
3
I2C Clock
2
Ground
1
I2C Data
Adaptec RAID 52445 LED and I2C Connector Specification
2258800-R
ASR-52445 RoHS Kit
2258700-R
ASR-52445 RoHS Single
●
Adaptec RAID 52445 Activity LED Header Connector for CN0/CN1: Molex 10-89-7162
or equivalent
●
Activity LED Header Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-55-2161 or equivalent
J3:
J3 Pin Number
Signal
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
2
2
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 0
LED Cathode
1
3
+3.3V
LED Anode
4
4
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 1
LED Cathode
3
5
+3.3V
LED Anode
6
6
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 2
LED Cathode
5
7
+3.3V
LED Anode
8
8
ACTIVITY CN1, LANE 3
LED Cathode
7
Appendix F: Controller LED and I2C Connector Quick Reference
●
J3 Pin Number
Signal
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
9
+3.3V
LED Anode
10
10
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 0
LED Cathode
9
11
+3.3V
LED Anode
12
12
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 1
LED Cathode
11
13
+3.3V
LED Anode
14
14
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 2
LED Cathode
13
15
+3.3V
LED Anode
16
16
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 3
LED Cathode
15
124
●
Adaptec RAID 52445 Activity LED Board Connector for CN2/CN3: Molex 10-89-7162 or
equivalent
●
Activity LED Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-55-2161 or equivalent
J1:
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
J1 Pin Number
Signal
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
2
2
ACTIVITY CN3, LANE 0
LED Cathode
1
3
+3.3V
LED Anode
4
4
ACTIVITY CN3, LANE 1
LED Cathode
3
5
+3.3V
LED Anode
6
6
ACTIVITY CN3, LANE 2
LED Cathode
5
7
+3.3V
LED Anode
8
8
ACTIVITY CN3, LANE 3
LED Cathode
7
9
+3.3V
LED Anode
10
10
ACTIVITY CN2, LANE 0
LED Cathode
9
11
+3.3V
LED Anode
12
12
ACTIVITY CN2, LANE 1
LED Cathode
11
13
+3.3V
LED Anode
14
14
ACTIVITY CN2, LANE 2
LED Cathode
13
15
+3.3V
LED Anode
16
16
ACTIVITY CN2, LANE 3
LED Cathode
15
●
Adaptec RAID 52445 Activity LED Header Connector for CN4/CN5: Molex 10-89-7162
or equivalent
●
Activity LED Header Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-55-2161 or equivalent
J2:
22-55-2161
Pin Number
J2 Pin Number
Signal
Description
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
2
2
ACTIVITY CN4, LANE 0
LED Cathode
1
Appendix F: Controller LED and I2C Connector Quick Reference
●
J2 Pin Number
Signal
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
3
+3.3V
LED Anode
4
4
ACTIVITY CN4, LANE 1
LED Cathode
3
5
+3.3V
LED Anode
6
6
ACTIVITY CN4, LANE 2
LED Cathode
5
7
+3.3V
LED Anode
8
8
ACTIVITY CN4, LANE 3
LED Cathode
7
9
+3.3V
LED Anode
10
10
ACTIVITY CN5, LANE 0
LED Cathode
9
11
+3.3V
LED Anode
12
12
ACTIVITY CN5, LANE 1
LED Cathode
11
13
+3.3V
LED Anode
14
14
ACTIVITY CN5, LANE 2
LED Cathode
13
15
+3.3V
LED Anode
16
16
ACTIVITY CN5, LANE 3
LED Cathode
15
125
●
Adaptec RAID 52445 Aggregate Activity LED Board Connector: Molex 22-28-4023 or
equivalent
●
Aggregate LED Mating Cable Connector: Molex 50-57-9002 or equivalent
J10:
J10 Pin Number
Signal
Description
2
ACTIVITY
LED Cathode
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
●
Adaptec RAID 52445 External Alarm Connector: Molex 22-28-4023 or equivalent
●
Alarm Mating Cable Connector: Molex 50-57-9002 or equivalent
J12:
J12 Pin Number
Signal
Description
2
~2kHz Square Wave
Open collector transistor
1
+3.3V
—
●
Adaptec RAID 52445 I2C Board Connector : Molex 22-43-6030 or equivalent
●
I2C Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-43-3030 or equivalent
J25, J26, J27, J28, J29, J30:
J2x Pin Number
Signal
3
I2C Clock
2
Ground
1
I2C Data
Appendix F: Controller LED and I2C Connector Quick Reference
●
126
Adaptec RAID 2045 LED Connector Specification
2260300-R
ASR-2045 RoHS SGL
●
Adaptec RAID 2045 Aggregate Activity LED Board Connector: Molex 22-28-4023 or
equivalent
●
Aggregate LED Mating Cable Connector: Molex 50-57-9002 or equivalent
J1:
J1 Pin Number Signal
Description
2
ACTIVITY
LED Cathode
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
Adaptec RAID 2405/2405Q LED and I2C Connector
Specification
2260100-R
ASR-2405 RoHS KIT
2260200-R
ASR-2405 RoHS SGL
2268300-R
ASR-2405Q RoHS Single
●
Adaptec RAID 2405/2405Q Activity LED Header Connector: Molex 10-89-7082 or
equivalent
●
Activity LED Header Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-55-2081 or equivalent
J2:
J2 Pin Number
Signal
Description
22-55-2161
Pin Number
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
2
2
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 0
LED Cathode
1
3
+3.3V
LED Anode
4
4
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 1
LED Cathode
3
5
+3.3V
LED Anode
6
6
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 2
LED Cathode
5
7
+3.3V
LED Anode
8
8
ACTIVITY CN0, LANE 3
LED Cathode
7
●
Adaptec RAID 2405/2405Q Aggregate Activity LED Board Connector: Molex 22-28-4023
or equivalent
●
Aggregate LED Mating Cable Connector: Molex 50-57-9002 or equivalent
Appendix F: Controller LED and I2C Connector Quick Reference
●
J1:
J1 Pin Number Signal
Description
2
ACTIVITY
LED Cathode
1
+3.3V
LED Anode
●
Adaptec RAID 2405/2405Q I2C Board Connector : Molex 22-43-6030 or equivalent
●
I2C Mating Cable Connector: Molex 22-43-3030 or equivalent
J4:
J4 Pin Number
Signal
3
I2C Clock
2
Ground
1
I2C Data
127
Safety Information
G
To ensure your personal safety and the safety of your equipment:
●
Keep your work area and the computer clean and clear of debris.
●
Before opening the system cabinet, unplug the power cord.
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD)
! Caution: ESD can damage electronic components when they are improperly handled, and
can result in total or intermittent failures. Always follow ESD-prevention procedures when
removing and replacing components.
To prevent ESD damage:
●
Use an ESD wrist or ankle strap and ensure that it makes skin contact. Connect the
equipment end of the strap to an unpainted metal surface on the chassis.
If a wrist strap is not available, ground yourself by touching the metal chassis before
handling the controller or any other part of the computer.
●
Avoid touching the controller against your clothing. The wrist strap protects components
from ESD on the body only.
●
Handle the controller by its bracket or edges only. Avoid touching the printed circuit
board or the connectors.
●
Put the controller down only on an antistatic surface such as the bag supplied in your kit.
●
If you are returning the controller to Adaptec, put it back in its antistatic bag immediately.
Technical Specifications
H
In this appendix...
Environmental Specifications.............................................................................................. 130
DC Power Requirements...................................................................................................... 130
Current Requirements.......................................................................................................... 130
Appendix H: Technical Specifications
●
130
Environmental Specifications
Note: Adaptec RAID controllers require adequate airflow to operate reliably. The recommended
airflow is 200 LFM. Forced airflow is recommended.
Ambient temperature with forced airflow
0 °C to 55 ° C
Ambient temperature without forced airflow
0 °C to 40 ° C
Ambient temperature with Battery Backup Unit
(BBU)
0 °C to 40 ° C
Relative humidity
10% to 90%, noncondensing
Altitude
Up to 3,000 meters
Note: Ambient temperature measured 1” from RAID processor.
DC Power Requirements
Bus Type
Description
Requirements
PCIe
Ripple and noise
50 mV peak-to-peak (max)
PCIe
DC Voltage
3.3 V ± 9%, 12 V ± 8%
Current Requirements
Adaptec Model
Typical Current
Adaptec RAID 5085
0.45 A @ 3.3 VDC; 1.0 A @ 12.0 VDC
Adaptec RAID 5805/5805Q
0.45 A @ 3.3 VDC; 1.0 A @ 12.0 VDC
Adaptec RAID 5405
0.45A @ 3.3VDC; 0.94A @ 12.0VDC
Adaptec RAID 5445
0.45A @ 3.3VDC; 1.0A @ 12.0VDC
Adaptec RAID 5805Z/5805ZQ
0.39 A @ 3.3 VDC; 1.21 A @ 12.0 VDC
Adaptec RAID 5405Z
0.38 A @ 3.3 VDC; 1.18 A @ 12.0 VDC
Adaptec RAID 5445Z
0.40 A @ 3.3 VDC; 1.24 A @ 12.0 VDC
Adaptec RAID 51245
0.47A @ 3.3VDC; 1.68A @ 12.0VDC
Adaptec RAID 51645
0.47A @ 3.3VDC; 1.72A @ 12.0VDC
Adaptec RAID 52445
0.47A @ 3.3VDC; 1.78A @ 12.0VDC
Adaptec RAID 2045
0.43A @ 3.3VDC; 0.83A @ 12.0VDC
Adaptec RAID 2405/2405Q
0.43A @ 3.3VDC; 0.83A @ 12.0VDC
Index
A
activity LED connector specifications 111
ACU
arrays 44
creating arrays 44, 84
creating bootable arrays 85
initializing disk drives 86
managing arrays 85
rescanning disk drives 86
secure erasing disk drives 87
stopping a secure erase 87
ACU for DOS 94 to 103
array definition block keywords 98
creating a floppy disk 95
menus 95
playback mode 96
record mode 97
sample scripts 102
script file syntax 97
scripts 96
switches 96
Adaptec customer support 3
Adaptec Flash Utility. See AFU
Adaptec RAID Configuration utility 61, 83 to 93
Adaptec RAID Controller Configuration utility. See
ARCCONF
Adaptec Storage Manager 60
creating arrays 46
installing 60
adapters. See controllers
advanced data protection 17
AFU 61, 104 to 110
Alarm Control setting 90
ARCCONF 60
Array Background Consistency Check setting 89, 90
Array Configuration Utility. See ACU
array definition block
End keyword 99
HotspareDrives keyword 99
array migration 16
Array-based BBS Support setting 89
arrays
creating (ACU) 44, 84
creating (Adaptec Storage Manager) 46
creating bootable arrays 85
making an array bootable 47
managing with ACU 85
non-redundant 75
RAID 1 76
RAID 10 77
RAID 1E 76
RAID 5 78
RAID 50 80
RAID 5EE 79
RAID 6 81
RAID 60 81
arrays (bootable) 43
audible alarm 63
automatic failover 16
Automatic Failover setting 89
B
backplane connections 39, 71
battery backup module 17
batteryless backup 36, 37
BBU 17
boards. See controllers
boot controller 44
Index
bootable arrays 47
creating 43, 85
CRC Checking setting 91
customer support 3
C
D
cards. See controllers
CD-ROM Boot Support setting 90
command line interface (flash utility) 107
command line utility 60
connectors 71, 92
contents of controller kit 14
controllers
activity LED connector specifications 111
Alarm Control setting 90
Array Background Consistency Check setting 89,
direct-attach connections 38, 71
disk drives 32, 71
connecting to controllers 38
connections 92
external 42
failure recovery
multiple arrays 64
multiple disk drives 65
RAID 0 arrays 65
with hot spare 64
without hot spare 64
formatting 91
identifying 92
initializing 86
recovering from failure 64
rescanning 86
SAS identifiers 71
secure erasing 87
stopping a secure erase 87
solid state 16, 32, 38
types of connections 92
verifying 91
drive requirements 32
Drive’s Write Cache setting 89
driver and operating system installation 48
driver disk 49
driver installation 54 to 58
drivers
installing on FreeBSD 58
installing on Linux 56
installing on OpenServer 57
installing on Solaris 57
installing on UnixWare 57
installing on VMWare 58
installing on Windows 56
installing with FreeBSD 53
installing with Linux 51
installing with OpenServer 51
installing with UnixWare 52
installing with VMWare 53
installing with Windows 50
90
Array-based BBS Support setting 89
array-level features 16
Automatic Failover setting 89
CD-ROM Boot Support setting 90
connecting disk drives 38
connecting external devices 42
CRC Checking setting 91
data protection 17
descriptions 15 to 29
disk drives 32
Drive’s Write Cache setting 89
event log 93
figures 15 to 29
firmware 105
flashing 65
I2C connector specifications 111
installation options 33
installing 36
modifying general settings 89
modifying settings with SerialSelect 88
modifying with SerialSelect 91
Phy Rate setting 91
Physical Drives Display During POST setting 90
RAID levels 31
Removable Media Devices Boot Support setting 90
resetting 65
Runtime BIOS setting 89
SAS Address setting 91
SAS cables 32
setting boot controller 44
specifications 129
standard features
troubleshooting 63
updating firmware 105
upgrading firmware 17
copyback 17
E
electrostatic discharge 128
end devices 68
End property 99
event log 93
●
132
Index
expander connections 72
expander devices 68
external devices 42
K
F
L
failed disk drives 64
multiple arrays 64
multiple disk drives 65
RAID 0 arrays 65
without hot spare 64
firmware 105
creating floppy disks 106
firmware upgrades 17
flashing controllers 65
floppy disks for firmware update 106
formatting disk drives 91
FreeBSD
driver installation 58
OS installation 53
LED connector specifications 111
LED Indication Mode 90
Linux
driver installation 56
OS installation 51
Linux installation 51
H
hard disk, hard disk drive, hard drive. See disk drive
hot spares 16
HotspareDrives keyword
array definition block 99
I
I2C connector specifications 111
initializing disk drives 86
installation
backplane 39
controllers 36
creating a driver disk 49
direct-attach 38
disk drives 38
driver 54 to 58
driver and FreeBSD 53
driver and Linux 51
driver and OpenServer 51
driver and operating system 48
driver and UnixWare 52
driver and VMWare 53
driver and Windows 50
existing operating system 34
external devices 42
installation options 33
solid state drives 40 to 42
with operating system 34
●
133
kit contents 14
M
MaxIQ cache settings 84, 86
MaxIQ pool 88
MaxIQ Solid State Drive 16, 32
failed 65
installing 40 to 42
mini-SAS
direct connection 39
enclosure cable 32
internal cable 32
overview 70
SAS to SATA cable 33
mirroring 31
mode 0 flash 65
N
NCQ 16
non-redundant arrays 75
O
online expansion 16
OpenServer
driver installation 57
OS installation 51
operating system installation 48
operating systems 14
P
parity 31
Phy Rate setting 91
phys 69
Physical Drives Display During POST setting 90
playback mode 96
R
RAID 17
non-redundant arrays 75
Index
RAID 0 75
RAID 1 76
RAID 10 77
RAID 1E 17, 76
RAID 5 78
RAID 50 80
RAID 5EE 17, 79
RAID 6 17, 81
RAID 60 17, 81
RAID controllers. See controllers
RAID levels 31
record mode 97
recovering from disk drive failure 64
Red Hat
driver installation 56
OS installation 51
Redundant Array of Independent Disks. See RAID
Removable Media Devices Boot Support setting 90
replacing failed disk drives 64
requirements 14
drive 32
rescanning disk drives 86
resetting controllers 65
Runtime BIOS setting 89
S
safety information 128
SAS
4-wide ports 70
backplane connections 71
cables 32
comparison to parallel SCSI 73
connectors 70
description 68
direct-attach connections 71
disk drives 71
edge expanders 72
end devices 68
expander connections 72
expander devices 68
fanout expanders 72
link speed 68
links 69
narrow connectors 70
narrow ports 70
phys 69
ports 69, 70
SAS address 70
SAS cards 68
SAS devices 68
SAS domain 72
●
134
terminology 68
transceivers 69
wide connectors 70
wide ports 70
SAS Address setting 91
SAS devices 68
SAS disk drive identifiers 71
scripts in ACU for DOS 102
secure erasing disk drives 87
stopping a secure erase 87
Selectable Performance Mode 90
Serial Attached SCSI. See SAS
SerialSelect 88
applying changes 89
exiting 89
modifying controller settings 89
opening 89
software 60
Solaris
driver installation 57
Solid State Drive (SSD) 16, 32, 38, 86, 88
installing 40 to 42
specifications 129
storage management
Adaptec RAID Configuration utility 61
Adaptec Storage Manager 60
AFU 61
ARCCONF 60
storage space 12
support, customer 3
SUSE
driver installation 56
SUSE installation 51
switches in ACU for DOS 96
system requirements 14
T
technical specifications 129
technical support 3
Technical Support Identification (TSID) number 3
terminology 12
SAS 68
tools
Adaptec RAID Configuration utility 61
Adaptec Storage Manager 60
AFU 61
ARCCONF 60
troubleshooting tips 62
TSID Number
See Technical Support Identification Number
Index
U
UnixWare
driver installation 57
OS installation 52
updating firmware 105
upgrading firmware 17
utilities
Adaptec RAID Controller utility 61
AFU 61
ARCCONF 60
V
verifying disk drives 91
VMWare
driver installation 58
OS installation 53
W
Windows
driver installation 56
OS installation 50
Z
zero maintenance cache protection 16, 36, 37
zero maintenance module (ZMM) 37
●
135
Adaptec, Inc.
691 South Milpitas Boulevard
Milpitas, CA 95035 USA
©2010 Adaptec, Inc.
All rights reserved. Adaptec and the Adaptec logo are
trademarks of Adaptec, Inc. which may be
registered in some jurisdictions.
Part Number: CDP-00243-06-A Rev. A
JB 04/10
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