Enterasys | X-Pedition XSR CLI | Specifications | Enterasys X-Pedition XSR CLI Specifications

X-Pedition™ Security Router
XSR CLI Reference Guide
Version 7.6
P/N 9033842-07
Notice
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The hardware, firmware, or software described in this document is subject to change without notice.
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Enterasys Networks, Inc.
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© 2004 Enterasys Networks, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Part Number: 9033842-07 September 2005
ENTERASYS NETWORKS, ENTERASYS XSR and any logos associated therewith, are trademarks or registered trademarks of
Enterasys Networks, Inc. in the United States and other countries. All other product names mentioned in this manual may be
trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
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Contents
Preface
Chapter 1: Network Management
Observing Syntax and Conventions ............................................................................................................... 1-1
Network Management Commands ................................................................................................................. 1-1
General Network Management Commands ...................................................................................................1-2
General Show Commands ........................................................................................................................... 1-14
snmp-server Commands .............................................................................................................................. 1-16
SNMP Show Commands .............................................................................................................................. 1-34
SLA Agent Commands ................................................................................................................................. 1-37
RTR-mode Commands ................................................................................................................................. 1-43
RTR Show Commands ................................................................................................................................. 1-45
Chapter 2: Configuring T1/E1 and T3/E3 Subsystems
Observing Syntax and Conventions ............................................................................................................. 2-55
T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands ........................................................................................................................... 2-55
T1/E1 and T3/E3 Clear and Show Commands ............................................................................................ 2-74
Drop and Insert Commands ......................................................................................................................... 2-80
Chapter 3: Configuring the XSR Platform
Observing Syntax and Conventions ............................................................................................................. 3-83
Platform Commands ..................................................................................................................................... 3-83
Clock Commands ......................................................................................................................................... 3-84
Crypto Key Commands ................................................................................................................................ 3-85
Other Platform Commands ........................................................................................................................... 3-86
SNTP Commands ......................................................................................................................................... 3-91
Platform Clear and Show Commands .......................................................................................................... 3-94
File System Commands ............................................................................................................................. 3-107
Bootrom Monitor Mode Commands ............................................................................................................3-121
Chapter 4: Configuring Hardware Controllers
Observing Syntax and Conventions ............................................................................................................. 4-83
Hardware Controller Commands .................................................................................................................. 4-83
Hardware Controller Clear and Show Commands ....................................................................................... 4-92
Chapter 5: Configuring the Internet Protocol
Observing Syntax and Conventions ............................................................................................................. 5-83
IP Commands ............................................................................................................................................... 5-83
OSPF Commands ........................................................................................................................................ 5-84
OSPF Debug and Show Commands .......................................................................................................... 5-104
RIP Commands .......................................................................................................................................... 5-123
RIP Show Commands ................................................................................................................................ 5-136
RTP Header Compression Commands ...................................................................................................... 5-137
Triggered on Demand RIP Commands ...................................................................................................... 5-142
Policy-Based Routing Commands .............................................................................................................. 5-145
PBR Clear and Show Commands .............................................................................................................. 5-148
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ARP Commands ......................................................................................................................................... 5-149
Other IP Commands ................................................................................................................................... 5-151
IP Clear and Show Commands .................................................................................................................. 5-168
Network Address Translation Commands .................................................................................................. 5-182
Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol Commands ....................................................................................... 5-191
VRRP Clear and Show Commands ............................................................................................................5-197
Chapter 6: Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol
Observing Syntax and Conventions ............................................................................................................. 6-83
BGP Configuration Commands .................................................................................................................... 6-83
Route Map Commands ............................................................................................................................... 6-110
BGP Set Commands .................................................................................................................................. 6-114
BGP Clear and Show Commands .............................................................................................................. 6-122
BGP Debug Commands ............................................................................................................................. 6-132
Chapter 7: Configuring IP Multicast
Observing Syntax and Conventions ............................................................................................................. 7-83
PIM Commands ............................................................................................................................................ 7-89
IGMP Clear and Show Commands ..............................................................................................................7-95
Chapter 8: Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
Observing Syntax and Conventions ............................................................................................................. 8-83
PPP Commands ........................................................................................................................................... 8-83
PPP Debug, Clear and Show Commands .................................................................................................... 8-97
Multilink PPP Commands ........................................................................................................................... 8-108
Multilink Show Commands ......................................................................................................................... 8-122
Chapter 9: Configuring Frame Relay
Observing Syntax and Conventions ............................................................................................................. 9-83
Frame Relay Commands .............................................................................................................................. 9-83
Frame Relay Map Class Commands ............................................................................................................ 9-95
Frame Relay Clear and Show Commands ................................................................................................. 9-102
Chapter 10: Configuring the Dialer Interface
Observing Syntax and Conventions ........................................................................................................... 10-83
Dialer Interface Commands ........................................................................................................................ 10-83
Dialer Interface Clear and Show Commands ............................................................................................. 10-90
Dial Backup Commands ............................................................................................................................. 10-93
DOD/BOD Commands ............................................................................................................................... 10-96
Dialer Watch Commands .......................................................................................................................... 10-103
Chapter 11: ISDN BRI and PRI Commands
Observing Syntax and Conventions ........................................................................................................... 11-83
ISDN Commands ........................................................................................................................................ 11-83
ISDN Debug and Show Commands ........................................................................................................... 11-92
Chapter 12: Configuring Quality of Service
Observing Syntax and Conventions ........................................................................................................... 12-83
QoS Commands ......................................................................................................................................... 12-83
Policy-Map Commands .............................................................................................................................. 12-84
Class-map Commands ............................................................................................................................. 12-101
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QoS Show Commands ............................................................................................................................. 12-105
Chapter 13: Configuring ADSL
Observing Syntax and Conventions ........................................................................................................... 13-83
ADSL Configuration Commands ................................................................................................................ 13-83
CMV Commands ........................................................................................................................................ 13-83
Other ADSL Commands ............................................................................................................................. 13-87
PPP Configuration Commands ................................................................................................................... 13-99
ATM Clear and Show Commands ............................................................................................................ 13-103
Chapter 14: Configuring the VPN
Observing Syntax and Conventions ........................................................................................................... 14-83
VPN Commands ......................................................................................................................................... 14-83
PKI commands ........................................................................................................................................... 14-84
CA Identity Mode Commands ..................................................................................................................... 14-84
Other Certificate Commands ...................................................................................................................... 14-90
IKE Security Protocol Commands .............................................................................................................. 14-94
ISAKMP Protocol Policy Mode Commands ................................................................................................ 14-95
Remote Peer ISAKMP Protocol Policy Mode Commands .......................................................................... 14-99
Remote Peer Show Commands ............................................................................................................... 14-104
IPSec Commands ..................................................................................................................................... 14-106
IPSec Clear and Show Commands ..........................................................................................................14-108
Crypto Map Mode Commands .................................................................................................................. 14-110
Crypto Transform Mode Commands ........................................................................................................ 14-115
Crypto Show Commands .......................................................................................................................... 14-118
Interface CLI Commands .......................................................................................................................... 14-121
Interface VPN Commands ........................................................................................................................ 14-122
Tunnel Commands ................................................................................................................................... 14-127
Tunnel Clear and Show Commands ......................................................................................................... 14-132
Additional Tunnel Termination Commands .............................................................................................. 14-134
DF Bit Commands .................................................................................................................................... 14-137
Chapter 15: Configuring DHCP
Observing Syntax and Conventions ........................................................................................................... 15-83
DHCP Commands ...................................................................................................................................... 15-83
ip address dhcp .................................................................................................................................... 15-92
DHCP Clear and Show Commands ......................................................................................................... 15-111
Chapter 16: Configuring Security
Observing Syntax and Conventions ........................................................................................................... 16-83
General Security Commands ..................................................................................................................... 16-84
Security Clear and Show Commands ......................................................................................................... 16-91
AAA Commands ......................................................................................................................................... 16-93
AAA Usergroup Commands ....................................................................................................................... 16-94
AAA User Commands ................................................................................................................................ 16-97
AAA Method Commands .......................................................................................................................... 16-101
AAA Per-Interface Commands ................................................................................................................. 16-111
AAA Debug and Show Commands ..........................................................................................................16-112
Firewall Feature Set Commands .............................................................................................................. 16-115
Firewall Interface Commands ................................................................................................................... 16-129
Firewall Show Commands ........................................................................................................................ 16-133
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Preface
This guide describes the Command Line Interface (CLI) commands needed to mount, connect, power‐up, and maintain an XSR from Enterasys Networks.
This guide is written for administrators who want to configure the XSR or experienced users who are knowledgeable in basic networking principles.
Contents of the Guide
Information in this guide is arranged as follows:
•
Chapter 1, Network Management, describes fundamental network control commands.
•
Chapter 2, Configuring the T1/E1 & T3/E3 Subsystems, details commands for T1/E1 and T3/E3 NIM cards.
•
Chapter 3, Configuring the XSR Platform, describes platform subsystem commands.
•
Chapter 4, Configuring Hardware Controllers, describes commands to configure the hardware controllers over serial lines.
•
Chapter 5, Configuring the Internet Protocol, describes IP commands.
•
Chapter 6, Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol, details BGP commands.
•
Chapter 7 Configuring IP Multicast, defines XSR commands for Protocol Independent Multicast ‐ Sparse Mode (PIM‐SM) and the Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP).
•
Chapter 8, Configuring the Point‐to‐Point Protocol, describes PPP setup.
•
Chapter 9, Configuring Frame Relay, details commands to configure Frame Relay.
•
Chapter 10, Configuring the Dialer Interface, describes commands to set up network connections over the Public Switch Telephone Network, provide a backup link over a dial line, and configure BoD/DoD.
•
Chapter 11, ISDN BRI and PRI Commands, details commands to set up ISDN.
•
Chapter 12, Configuring Quality of Service, outlines QoS setup commands.
•
Chapter 13, Configuring ADSL, describes configuration commands for ADSL including CMV, ATM and associated PPP commands.
•
Chapter 14, Configuring the VPN, details Virtual Private Network setup.
•
Chapter 15, Configuring DHCP, describes how to set up Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol.
•
Chapter 16, Configuring Security, describes configuring access lists, and other commands to protect against various network attacks.
XSR User’s Guide ix
Conventions Used in This Guide
The following conventions are used in this guide:
Caution: Contains information essential to avoid damage to the equipment.
Cautela: Contiene información esencial para prevenir dañar el equipo.
Achtung: Verweißt auf wichtige Informationen zum Schutz gegen Beschädigungen.
Note: Calls the reader’s attention to any item of information that may be of special importance.
Bold/En negrilla
Text in boldface indicates values you type using the keyboard or select using the
mouse (for example, a:\setup). Default settings may also appear in bold.
El texto en negrilla indica valores que usted introduce con el teclado o que
selecciona con el mouse (por ejemplo, a:\setup). Las configuraciones default
pueden también aparecer en en negrilla.
Italics/It áli ca
Text in italics indicates a variable, important new term, or the title of a manual.
El texto en itálica indica un valor variable, un importante nuevo término, o el título
de un manual.
SMALL CAPS/
Small caps specify the keys to press on the keyboard; a plus sign (+) between
keys indicates that you must press the keys simultaneously (for example,
CTRL+ALT+DEL).
Las mayusculas indican las teclas a oprimir en el teclado; un signo de más (+)
entre las teclas indica que usted debe presionar las teclas simultáneamente (por
ejemplo, CTRL+ALT+DEL).
Courier font/Tipo de
letra Courier
Text in this font denotes a file name or directory.
El texto en este tipo de letra denota un nombre de archivo o de directorio.
+
Points to text describing CLI command.
Apunta al texto que describe un comando de CLI.
FastEthernet
FastEthernet and GigabitEthernet references are generally interchangeable
throughout this guide.
Las referencias a los terminos FastEthernet y GigabitEthernet son generalmente
intercambiables en el contenido de esta guia.
Getting Help
For additional support related to the XSR, contact Enterasys Networks using one of the following methods:
x
World Wide Web
http://www.enterasys.com
Phone
(603) 332-9400
1-800-872-8440 (toll-free in U.S. and Canada)
For the Enterasys Networks Support toll-free number in your country:
http://www.enterasys.com/support/gtac-all.html
Internet mail
support@enterasys.com
To expedite your message, please type [xsr] in the subject line.
FTP
Login
Password
ftp://ftp.enterasys.com
anonymous
your Email address
Acquire the latest image and
Release Notes
http://www.enterasys.com/download
Additional documentation
http://www.enterasys.com/support/manuals
Forward comments or
suggestions
techwriting@enterasys.com
To expedite your message, type [techwriting] in the subject line, and
include the document Part Number in the Email.
Before contacting Enterasys Networks for technical support, have the following information ready:
•
Your Enterasys Networks service contract number
•
A description of the failure
•
A description of any action(s) already taken to resolve the problem (e.g., rebooting the unit, reconfiguring modules, etc.)
•
The serial and revision numbers of any relevant Enterasys Networks products in the network
•
A description of your network environment (layout, cable type, etc.)
•
Network load and frame size at the time of the problem
•
The XSR’s history (i.e., have you returned the device before, is this a recurring problem, etc.)
•
Any previous Return Material Authorization (RMA) numbers.
XSR User’s Guide
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1
Network Management
Observing Syntax and Conventions
The CLI Syntax and conventions use the notation described in the following table.
Convention
Description
xyz
Key word or mandatory parameters (bold)
[x]
[ ] Square brackets indicate an optional parameter (italic)
[x | y | z]
[ | ] Square brackets with vertical bar indicate a choice of values
{x | y | z}
{ | } Braces with vertical bar indicate a choice of a required value
[x {y | z} ]
[{ | } ] Combination of square brackets with braces and vertical bars indicates a required choice of an optional parameter
(config‐if<xx>)
xx signifies interface type and number, e.g.: F1, S2/1.0, D1, M57,
G3. F indicates a FastEthernet, and G a GigabitEthernet interface.
Next Mode entries display the CLI prompt after a command is entered.
Sub‐command headings are displayed in red text.
soho.enterasys.com
Italicized, non-syntactic text indicates either a user-specified entry or text with
special emphasis
Network Management Commands
This chapter includes the following subsets of network management commands:
•
“General Network Management Commands” on page 1‐2
•
“General Show Commands” on page 1‐14
•
“snmp‐server Commands” on page 1‐16
•
“SNMP Show Commands” on page 1‐34
•
“SLA Agent Commands” on page 1‐37
•
“RTR‐mode Commands” on page 1‐43
•
“RTR Show Commands” on page 1‐45
XSR CLI Reference Guide
1-1
General Network Management Commands
General Network Management Commands
banner
This command creates a login banner at the XSR’s CLI prompt. Text is entered one line at time and should not exceed 80 characters per line. Each successive entry adds a line to the banner, as shown in the example.
Syntax
banner login bannerLine
bannerLine
Text to be displayed at login. A maximum of 50 lines can be written per banner. Text must be enclosed in quotes.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove all banners:
XSR(config)#no banner login
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
The following example configures a login banner:
XSR(config)#banner login “Welcome Larry”
XSR(config)#banner login “You’re in the office now”
XSR(config)#banner login “Start working!”
configure terminal
This command enters configuration mode from Privileged EXEC mode.
Syntax
configure terminal
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
XSR#configure terminal
1-2
Network Management
General Network Management Commands
crypto key dsa
This command generates the Digital Signature Algorithm (DSA) type host key pair (private and public) as well as displays the public key. A unique set of host keys are created each time the XSR reboots but we recommend you generate a new pair of host keys when you believe security may be compromised.
The master encryption key is used to encrypt the keys before being saved in the hostkey.dat file in Flash. Access to this file is restricted and it cannot be read or copied. All SSH connection requests use the host keys stored in the hostkey.dat file unless none have been generated or the content of the file is corrupted. In those circumstances, default keys are used to secure the connection.
Additional host key behavior is described as follows:
•
If you have not generated a master encryption key before using SSH, the XSR will prompt you with the crypto key master generate command.
•
One to three minutes will elapse while host keys are generated by crypto key dsa, depending on the device load at the time.
•
SSH accepts no new connections during host key generation.
•
The command is ignored if stored in the startup‐config file.
•
If the master key is changed, you are not required to generate a new DSA key pair.
•
If you remove the master key, the DSA key pair is removed as well (hostkey.dat is deleted).
Syntax
crypto key dsa {generate | remove | show}
generate
Produce new key pairs.
remove
Delete old key pair.
show
Display public portion of host key pairs.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
The following example generates a new pair of keys:
XSR(config)#crypto key dsa generate
disable
This command exits from Privileged EXEC to EXEC mode.
Syntax
disable
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
XSR CLI Reference Guide
1-3
General Network Management Commands
Example
XSR#disable
enable
This command jumps to Privileged EXEC mode.
Syntax
enable
Mode
EXEC: XSR>
Example
XSR>enable
end
This command terminates configuration mode.
Syntax
end
Mode
Any configuration
Example
XSR(config)#end
exit
This command quits the current mode to a higher level. If you are in EXEC mode, it terminates the Telnet, SSH, or Console session.
Syntax
exit
Mode
All
Example
XSR(config)#exit
1-4
Network Management
General Network Management Commands
help
This command retrieves help at any Mode.
Syntax
help
Mode
All
Example
XSR#help
ip http port
This command changes the HTTP (Hyper Text Transfer Protocol) port where incoming HTTP (Web) sessions are connecting to.
Syntax
ip http port {port_number | default}
port_number
Incoming HTTP server port number from 1024 to 65535.
default
Sets the HTTP port to default.
Note: If you try to set the port-number but it is already in use (Telnet, e.g.) , it will be reset to the
default value automatically.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
Port number: 80
Example
XSR(config)#ip http port 1234
ip http server
This command enables/disables HTTP (Web) service to the router. If the optional parameter is not supplied, the HTTP server will be enabled. Since the HTTP server is disabled at boot‐up, you must either manually enable it using the CLI or enable it in the startup-config file.
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General Network Management Commands
Syntax
ip http server [enable | disable]
enable
Enables HTTP server.
disable
Disables HTTP server.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables the HTTP server:
no ip http server
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
Disable
Examples
XSR(config)#ip http server enable
XSR(config)#no ip http server
ip ssh server
This command enables/disables Secure Shell (SSH) service to the client. Because the SSH server is enabled at boot‐up, you can either manually disable the SSH server using CLI, or disable the SSH server in the startup‐config file. If the optional parameter is not supplied, the SSH server will be enabled.
Syntax
ip ssh server [enable | disable]
enable
Enables SSH server.
disable
Disables SSH server.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables the SSH server:
no ip ssh server
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Defaults
•
1-6
Enabled
Network Management
General Network Management Commands
•
Port number 22
Example
XSR(config)#ip ssh server enable
ip telnet port
This command changes the Telnet port where incoming Telnet sessions connect to.
Syntax
ip telnet port {port_number | default}
port_number
Incoming Telnet server port number from 1024 to 65535.
default
Sets the Telnet port to the default.
Note: If you try to set the port-number but it is already in use (the Web, e.g.) , it will be reset to the
default value automatically.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
Port number: 23
Examples
XSR(config)#ip telnet port 5678
ip telnet server
This command enables or disables Telnet service to the XSR. If the optional parameter is not supplied, the Telnet server is enabled.
Since the Telnet server is enabled at boot‐up, you must either manually disable it using the CLI or disable it in startup-config.
Syntax
ip telnet server [enable | disable]
enable
Enables Telnet service.
disable
Disables Telnet service.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables the Telnet server:
no ip telnet server
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General Network Management Commands
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
Enabled
Examples
XSR(config)#ip telnet server enable
XSR(config)#no ip telnet server
ping
This network connectivity command, which applies to IP ping only, sends five echo requests with a configurable packet size and source IP address. Ping stops when responses are received or after five requests are sent.
Syntax
ping dest_addr [source_addr][size pkt_size]
dest_addr
Destination address to be pinged.
source_addr
Source address for the ping packet. If not configured, the Router ID is used.
pkt_size
Payload size, ranging from 1 to 65000.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Default
Packet size: 72 bytes
Sample Output
This example shows a timed out ping with an unreachable destination:
XSR#ping 134.141.235.1
Type escape sequence to abort
Timeout
Timeout
Timeout
Timeout
Timeout
Packets: Sent = 5, Received = 0, Lost = 5
The following example shows a successful ping:
XSR#ping 134.141.235.165
Type escape sequence to abort
Reply from 192.168.27.165: 20ms
1-8
Network Management
General Network Management Commands
Reply from 192.168.27.165: 10ms
Reply from 192.168.27.165: 10ms
Reply from 192.168.27.165: 10ms
Reply from 192.168.27.165: 10ms
Packets: Sent = 5, Received = 5, Lost = 0
The following example shows the destination lost after three pings:
XSR>ping 134.141.235.165
Reply from 134.141.235.165:
Reply from 134.141.235.165:
Reply from 134.141.235.165:
Timeout
Timeout
Packets: Sent = 5, Received
20ms
10ms
10ms
= 3, Lost = 2
privilege
This command modifies the username privilege level associated with a particular CLI configuration mode. You can also associate a privilege level with another command or group of commands. The modes which can be set include the following:
•
class-map
•
configure (global)
•
controller
•
exec
•
interface-dialer
•
interface-dlci
•
interface-fastEthernet
•
interface-loopback
•
interface-serial
•
map-class-dialer
•
map-class-frame-relay
•
policy-map
•
policy-map-class
•
router-ospf
•
router-rip
•
subinterface
This command is used in conjunction with the username command to set the privilege level for a user. The show running-config command displays user information.
Syntax
privilege operationMode {level value | reset} {command | commandgroup}
privilege
Associates privilege level with a command.
operationMode
Configuration mode associated with privilege level.
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General Network Management Commands
value
Privilege level associated with the mode of operation ranging from 0 to 15 (highest).
reset
Resets the privilege level to the default.
command
Command within that mode to set a privilege for.
commandgroup
Set of commands to associate with a privilege. For example, T1 Controller group commands.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Defaults
•
Privilege level 0: all statistics (show) commands with low‐level security such as show version,
show clock, etc.
•
Privilege levels 1 through 9 ‐ the following EXEC Mode commands are available: disable,
exit, help, isdn, ping, telnet, terminal, and traceroute. Unless explicitly defined, users having privilege levels 1 ‐ 9 have no access to Privileged EXEC commands. •
Privilege levels 10 through 14 ‐ the following Privileged EXEC mode commands are available: cd, clear, clock, dir, disable, enable, exit, help, isdn, no, ping, pwd,
reload, telnet, terminal, traceroute, and verify. Unless explicitly defined, only level 15 users can access Global Mode commands.
•
Privilege level 10: all statistics (show) commands with higher level security such as show
running-config, show interface, etc.
•
Privilege level 15: other configuration commands such as configure, copy, delete,
rename, write. Only an admin can issue these commands.
•
Any user privilege level automatically inherits all privileges granted to lower privilege levels.
•
Admin privilege level (15) cannot be changed.
•
Privilege for special user admin: 15
•
Only administrators can add, delete, or change user rights.
•
Only administrators can change privilege levels for commands.
•
Users can change their own passwords but not their privilege levels.
Examples
This example sets the privilege level for the username command in Global mode to level 6:
XSR(config)#privilege configure level 6 username
This example resets the privilege level for the username command in Global mode to the default:
XSR(config)#privilege configure reset username
This example sets the privilege level for the neighbor command in Router RIP mode to level 13:
XSR(config)#privilege router-rip level 13 neighbor
1-10
Network Management
General Network Management Commands
session-timeout
This command sets the interval for closing a connection when there is no input. If the keyword console, ssh, or Telnet is used, the timeout becomes the default value for the next session of the specified type, otherwise, the timeout applies to the current session. When the console session times out, it will sit idle and prompt you for your user ID and password again.
Syntax
session-timeout {timeout | console timeout | ssh timeout | telnet timeout}
timeout
Timeout current session. Range: 15 ‐ 35,000 seconds.
console
Timeout for console session. Range: 15 ‐ 35,000 seconds.
ssh
Timeout for all SSH sessions. Range: 15 ‐ 35,000 seconds
telnet
Timeout for all Telnet sessions. Range: 15 ‐ 35,000 seconds.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Defaults
•
Timeout: 1,800 seconds
•
If neither Console, SSH, nor Telnet is specified, the timeout value will be set for the current session.
Example
This example sets the current Console timeout session to 15 seconds:
XSR(config)#session-timeout console 15
terminal
This command changes the terminal screen width and length.
Syntax
terminal {width | length} size
width
Width of the terminal screen in lines.
length
Length of the terminal screen in lines.
size
Line range from 0 to 512.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Defaults
•
Length: 23 lines
XSR CLI Reference Guide
1-11
General Network Management Commands
•
Width: 132 characters
•
0 means no limit
Example
XSR#terminal width 40
XSR#terminal length 40
traceroute
This command gathers information regarding the route that IP datagrams follow to a specified destination. This implementation of the traceroute utility uses UDP as the transport layer. It transmits three probes for each hop between source and destination.
Syntax
traceroute dest-addr [source-addr]
dest-addr
Network address of the destination.
source-addr
Source address for the ping packet. If this is not set, the Router ID is used.
Mode
EXEC: XSR>
Defaults
•
Maximum interval to wait for a response: 3 seconds
•
Maximum interval to live: 30 seconds
•
Packet size: 40 bytes.
Sample Output
XSR>traceroute 140.252.13.65 172.15.57.99
traceroute to 140.252.13.65,30 hops max,40 bytes packets
1. 140.252.13. 3520 ms
10 ms
10 ms
2. 140.252.13. 65120ms
120ms
120ms
Parameters in the Response
A probe timeout is signaled by an asterisk ” *”.
Abnormal Termination Signs
!P ‐ Protocol Unreachable
!N ‐ Network Unreachable
!H ‐ Host Unreachable
1-12
Network Management
General Network Management Commands
username
This command adds a user, privilege level, password, and encryption type for those accessing the XSR. Assigning privilege levels lets you control which users can manage selective resources. The username command can also be used in conjunction with the privilege command to associate usernames with particular configuration modes. For example, if configuring T1/E1 requires that a user have a privilege level of 6 or higher, any user with a privilege of 5 or lower would be prohibited from configuring the T1/E1 controller.
Caution: We recommend that you add no more than 3000 users due to a size limit for the the
user.dat file. Also, we suggest keeping usernames and passwords as short as possible to avoid
breaching the 200 Kbyte limit.
Admin/Administrative Users
There is a special level 15 user called admin for which you can set a password by specifying admin name as a user. The default password for admin is null (that is, the zero length string ““).
Any user with a privilege of 15 is considered an administrator. In at least one of the five permitted Telnet/SSH sessions, an administrative user must be logged. If the first four sessions are in use by regular users, then the fifth session will only allow an administrator to login, otherwise any user can login to the fifth session. If one of the first four sessions has an administrator logged in already, then the fifth session can be any user. This rule is meant to ensure that the administrator can always login.
The show running-config command displays user information. By contrast, consult the aaa
client command which configures a user with AAA security by the XSR authentication database.
Syntax
username name [privilege level] password {cleartext | secret type} password
name
User ID.
privilege
Associates a priority level with this user.
level
Priority associated with this user, ranging from 0 to 15 (highest). If the privilege is changed while the XSR is being set, the change occurs immediately.
password
Associates a password with this username.
cleartext
Password will not be encrypted.
secret
Password will be encrypted.
type
0 indicates the password is expected to be unencrypted, 5 indicates the input password is expected to be encrypted already, so it will not be encrypted again.
password
The password associated with the specified user ID. Users are stored in the startup-config file.
If you choose a secret password with an optional parameter of 5, then you must provide the password in encrypted form.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes a user. If no user exists, the command will be ignored. Also, this command will remove the admin user provided it is issued by another administrator.
no username name
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General Show Commands
Note: No user can be deleted if you presently logged in as that user and admin or other level 15
users can not be deleted unless at least one such administrator remains configured.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Defaults
•
Username: admin
•
Password: ““ (null or zero length string)
•
New user level: 0 unless explicitly set
•
Privilege for special user admin: 15
•
Users with a privilege level of 15 have the same rights as admin.
•
Only admins can add, delete, or change user rights.
•
Only admins can change privilege levels for commands.
•
Users can change their own passwords but not their privilege levels.
Examples
The following example sets 1stUser privilege to 6 and 2ndUser to 0:
XSR(config)#username 1stUser privilege 6 password cleartext Sox
XSR(config)#username 2ndUser password cleartext Celtic
The example below sets the privilege for larryc to 15, with an already coded password:
XSR(config)#username larryc privilege 15 password secret 5 J&*I8
The following example creates user larryc with a privilege of 15 and a password that will be encrypted by the XSR:
XSR(config)#username larryc privilege 15 password secret 0 nomar
General Show Commands
crypto key dsa show
This command displays the encrypted public key, one of the private/public keys generated by the crypto key dsa generate command. The private key is not displayed.
Syntax
crypto key dsa show
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
1-14
Network Management
General Show Commands
Sample Output
The following output displays public key:
XSR(config)#crypto key dsa show
---- BEGIN SSH2 PUBLIC KEY ---Subject: root
Comment: "1024-bit dsa, administrator@Robo1, Mon Mar 03 2003 05:06:16"
AAAAB3NzaC1kc3MAAACBAIgwEkVM26GpC9L+cu9HnXps8S6Qlrhp7mwGudUYDMETdWj53j
u6umHQPwekw0AsTH256mbFedfilcr+W207db+YKunWh59nan/kHGg1iZpwfeaE2kNO4om2
PqXGqdJd7tEI6Ut0cCV7R9roVUDkhmkWWcxaLL5r+YkIV7II6b33AAAAFQCO4IaKlgIhPg
W3oRkNWe3mq9iDrwAAAIBKHSIUIf/KkYd9r5bi7Ec8OHTbkCAcZqwH4gJIh8EryaMWAm7c
zjWtSlLNYhz+q5J2uoPKjct4gqxRv4RLo5yKxsSIcgD6WauvANO7yzQ1CRFBAXL9iZZMEa
AhJQbAE1WVXjD61kBmKvrcR2ZDEnpRaueAaojF4Rslo66Y6pn77gAAAIAKjfSPLGIXe0gF
JqsEIPkrY+0sMwltOV+zd8NPp/NqkIOxg9kZVASQCn/huAv6Sc3WN/WSQU/BpYu2jI8C1S
1S9BEezin8bNE8YWVLwaG1Fx+GOTEugbgflhgMfNHtzaaHEMfmLq80EJ3jRv+zjwaWYPzT
wuo+3CNydBZSwe7fmA==
---- END SSH2 PUBLIC KEY ----
show ip http
This command information about the HTTP (Web) session.
Syntax
show ip http
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
The following is output from the ip http command:
XSR#show ip http
HTTP Information:
Home page: index.html
HTTP Server: Disabled
HTTP Port: 80
show ip telnet
This command information about the Telnet session.
Syntax
show ip telnet
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
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snmp-server Commands
Sample Output
The following is output from the ip telnet command:
XSR#show ip telnet
TELNET Information:
Telnet Server: Enabled
Telnet Port: 23
Active Telnet Sessions: 1
snmp-server Commands
This command set configures the SNMP agent on the XSR. Currently, SNMP v1/v2 and v3 are supported. All commands are invoked in Global configuration mode. If the SNMP server is disabled, executing any SNMP configuration command except for snmp-server disable will automatically turn the SNMP server on after it successfully executes. By default, the SNMP server is disabled at boot‐up.
All SNMP Global configuration‐level commands have a privilege level of 15 and all show commands have a level of 10.
The MIBs listed in Table 1‐1 can be accessed on the XSR.
Table 1-1
1-16
Supported Proprietary and Standard MIB Objects
MIB
Description
ctron‐chassis‐mib
XSR components and modules MIB.
Enterasys’ Download
ctron‐download‐mib.txt (supported via online download only). This is the only MIB with v1/v2c write access.
PPP LCP
RFC‐1471. (pppLqrExtnsTable and pppTests not supported)
PPP IP
RFC‐1473.
OSPF
RFC‐1850. The following traps are supported: ospfTrapIfStateChange, ospfTrapVirtIfStateChange, ospfTrapNbrStateChange, ospfTrapVirtNbrStateChange, ospfTrapIfConfigError, ospfTrapVirtIfConfigError
RIPv2
RFC‐1724.
BGP
RFC‐1657.
Frame Relay DTE
RFC‐2115.
ctron‐timed‐reset‐
mib
This MIB provides a count down timer and forces a reset after time expires. Using this MIB to reset the XSR performs correctly only if SNMP system shutdown is enabled with the snmp-server systemshutdown command (refer to page 26).
Enterasys Configuration Change
This MIB allows management entities to determine if and when configuration changes have occurred. The MIB reports the number of changes and the time and method of the last change in each of three categories: volatile and non‐volatile changes, and firmware upgrades.
Network Management
snmp-server Commands
Table 1-1
Supported Proprietary and Standard MIB Objects (continued)
MIB
Description
Enterasys Configuration Management
This MIB allows an SNMP management entity to upload and download executable images and configuration files to the XSR and identify the active executable image and configuration files.
Using this MIB to reset the XSR will succeed only if SNMP system shutdown is enabled with the snmp-server system-shutdown command (see page 1‐27).
Enterasys Syslog Client
The XSR allows read‐only access to the Syslog server configuration.
Enterasys SNMP Persistence
This MIB lets SNMP save configuration changes to the startup‐config file. When reconfiguration occurs via SNMP or the CLI, changes remain volatile until running‐config is saved to startup‐config. By setting etsysSnmp PersistenceSave to save (2), running‐config is saved to startup‐config. The only etsysSnmpPersistenceMode supported is pushButtonSave (2).
Enterasys Firewall
This MIB implements SNMP‐based Firewall monitoring of the XSR.
Host Resource
RFC‐2790. This MIB provides monitoring of CPU load and memory.
Entity MIB V2
RFC‐2737. This MIB contains tables for physical and logical entities managed by the SNMP agent.
SNMPv3 MIBs
The SNMPv3 MIBs implemented on the XSR’s are: RFC‐3411 Framework, RFC‐3412 MPD, RFC‐3414 USM, RFC‐3415 VACM
MIB‐II
RFC‐1213. All objects except the EGP and AT groups. Address Translation (AT) data can be retrieved from ipNetToMediaTable.
Evolution of MIB‐II Interfaces Group
RFC‐1573. IfStackTable translated to SMIv1.
IP Tunnel MIB
RFC‐2667. tunnellfTable is supported when VPN is enabled.
IP Forward
RFC‐2096. ipCidrRoute objects.
Enterasys Service Level Reporting
Response Time Reporter for network monitoring.
Notification & Target
RFC‐3413.
You can download Enterasys MIBs from the following Web site:
http://www.enterasys.com/support/mibs/
XSR CLI Reference Guide
1-17
snmp-server Commands
snmp-server community
This command allows a community string to access MIBs in the XSR.
Syntax
snmp-server community community-string [view view-name][ro | rw] [access-listnum]
community-string
Community string with SNMP v1/v2c access.
view-name
Name of the view defining which MIBs are accessible.
ro
Read‐only permission.
rw
Read‐write permission.
access-list-num
Standard access‐list number ranging from 1 to 99.
Notes: You can configure up to 20 read-only and read-write community strings.
Community-based write access is available for the ct-download MIB only. For write access to other
MIBs, use SNMPv3.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes a community string from both read‐only and read‐write community tables:
no snmp-server community community-string
Defaults
•
ro
•
v1default
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
The following example creates MyCommunity for read‐write access and applies ACL #57:
XSR#snmp-server community MyCommunity rw 57
snmp-server contact
This command specifies contact information regarding the SNMP server.
Syntax
snmp-server contact contact-name
contact-name
1-18
Network Management
String of up to 255 characters. Values with spaces require quotations.
snmp-server Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command offers no contact information:
no snmp-server contact
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
Null string
Example
XSR(config)#snmp-server contact LarryCurtis@enterasys.com
XSR(config)#snmp-server contact “Larry Curtis 508 767-2536”
snmp-server enable/disable
This command enables or disables the SNMP server. If the server is disabled, using any snmp CLI command will turn it back on.
Syntax
snmp-server {enable | disable}
enable
Enables the SNMP server.
disable
Disables the SNMP server.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
Disable
snmp-server enable traps
This command enables traps and informs to be sent. SNMPv1 traps and v3 informs are supported, They are sent to the hosts configured with the snmp-server host command.
Syntax
snmp-server enable traps [[snmp [authentication]] entity | frame-relay | bgp |
ospf]
snmp
Enables all SNMP traps.
authentication
Enables authentication traps only.
entity
Enables all entity traps.
frame-relay
Enables all Frame Relay traps.
bgp
Enables all BGP traps.
ospf
Enables all OSPF traps.
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snmp-server Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables the sending of specified traps:
no snmp-server enable traps [[snmp [authentication]] entity | frame-relay]
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
Disabled
Examples
To enable all SNMP traps, enter the following command:
XSR(config)#snmp-server enable traps snmp
To enable authentication SNMP traps only, enter the following command:
XSR(config)#snmp-server enable traps snmp authentication
snmp-server engineID
This command specifies a value for the SNMP engine on the XSR. Within SNMP v3, users are localized to the device by this Engine ID.
A textual convention for SnmpEngineID is specified by RFC‐3411. Using this textual convention, the Engine ID is created with the MAC address and enterprise number for Enterasys. In order to transmit v3 informs, the XSR requires the engineIDs of remote SNMP entities which this command allows you to configure. The command also lets you configure the XSR local engineID.
All engineID settings must be set before adding users to the User Security Model (USM) table since user keys are localized with the engineID.
Caution: If you want to change the engine ID, do so before adding SNMP v3 users because you
cannot delete a user which is associated with a discarded Engine ID. But you can delete an SNMP
user when the Engine ID it is associated with still exists.
Syntax
snmp-server engineID [local | remote ip-addr {udp-port port}] engineid-string
local
The engine‐ID is for the local SNMP agent.
remote
The engine‐ID is for the remote SNMP agent.
ip-addr
The IP address of the remote host.
port
The UDP port of the remote IP address.
engineidstring
A unique hexadecimal string used to set the local engine ID according to the algorithm defined in RFC‐3411. The string must be an even number of up to 54 hex characters.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove the engineID:
no snmp-server engineID [local | remote ip-addr {udp-port port}] engineid-string
1-20
Network Management
snmp-server Commands
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
The following example specifies the Engine ID:
XSR(config)#snmp-server engineID local 00020AF100
results in an engine ID of 0x800015F80500020AF100
snmp-server group
This command configures a new SNMP group to associate SNMP users with views.
Syntax
snmp-server group group-name {v1 | v2c | v3 {auth | noauth | priv}} [read readview]
[write writeview][access access-list]
group
Defines a User Security Model (USM) group.
group-name
Name of the group.
v1
v1 security model (least secure) used.
v2c
v2 security model (next to least secure) used.
v3
v3 security model (most secure) used.
auth
authNoPriv security level used.
noauth
noAuthNoPriv security level used.
priv
authPriv security level used.
read
Specifies a read view for the group.
readview
The read view name.
write
Specifies a write view for the group.
writeview
The write view name.
access
Access‐list associated with this group.
access-list
Standard IP access‐list allowing access with this group.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove a specified SNMP group:
no snmp-server group group-name {v1 | v2c | v3}{auth | noauth | priv}}
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
This example specifies the v3auth SNMP group with auth security, the v3 view for read and write access, and is matched with an ACL written earlier:
XSR(config)#snmp-server group v3auth v3 auth read v3view write v3view access 88
XSR CLI Reference Guide
1-21
snmp-server Commands
snmp-server host
This command specifies host parameters of the SNMP server; it adds a new management station to send traps to. If the address already exists, the command will update the server’s configuration which is stored in the snmpTarget MIB defined by RFC‐2573.
Syntax
snmp-server host ip-addr {traps | informs version {2c | 3 [{auth | noauth | priv}]]
community-stringOrUser [udp-port port][notification-type]
ip-addr
IP address of the target recipient.
traps
Sends SNMP traps to this host.
informs
Sends Inform notifications.
version
The security model used.
2c
Version 2c security model used. This allows the transmission of informs and counter64 values.
3
Version 3 security model (USM) used.
auth
Authentication without encryption.
noauth
No authentication or encryption.
priv
Authentication with encryption.
communitystringOrUser
Password‐like community string to be used with for versions 1 and 2c. User name when using version 3 security model.
udp-port
Specifies the UDP port of the host to use.
port
The UDP port number of the host.
notificationtype
The type of trap to be sent including BGP, entity, frame‐relay, ospf, and snmp traps.
Note: You can configure up to 20 hosts.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form removes the specified host from the list of hosts that the XSR sent traps to:
no snmp-server host host ip-addr
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Defaults
1-22
•
Trap‐type: SNMP, entity, frame‐relay
•
UDP port: 162
Network Management
snmp-server Commands
Example
The following examples illustrate an SNMP host with trap on and off:
XSR(config)#snmp-server host 192.168.1.10 traps trapsOn
XSR(config)#no snmp-server host 192.168.2.11
Sample Output
The following are three sample outputs from the command:
Notification host: 192.168.2.10 udp-port: 162
user: v3user
security model: v3 priv
type: inform
Notification host: 192.168.10.2 udp-port: 162
user: public
security model: v1
type: trap
Notification host: 192.168.1.5 udp-port: 162
user: testuser security model: v3 noauth
type: trap
snmp-server informs
This command specifies inform request options.
Syntax
snmp-server informs [retries retries] [timeout seconds] [pending pending]
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns settings to their defaults:
no snmp-server informs [retries retries][timeout timeout] [pending pending]
retries
Maximum attempts to resend an inform request. Range: 0 ‐10.
timeout
Interval to wait for an acknowledgement before resending. Range: 1 ‐ 10 seconds.
pending
Peak number of informs waiting for acknowledgments at any one time, ranging from 1 to 100. When the peak is reached, older pending informs are discarded. Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Defaults
•
Retries: 3
•
Timeout: 15 seconds
•
Pending: 25 informs
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snmp-server Commands
Example
This example shows an inform with 1 retry, a 5‐second timeout and a 10 pending value:
XSR(config)#snmp-server informs retries 1 timeout 5 pending 10
snmp-server location
This command specifies the location of the SNMP server.
Syntax
snmp-server location location-string
location-string
Site where the SNMP server is located.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes a location for the SNMP server:
no snmp-server location
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
Null string
Example
The following example describes the SNMP server location. Note the quotation marks:
XSR(config)#snmp-server location “Beacon Street Branch”
snmp-server max-traps-per-window
This command specifies the number of traps allowed in the time window.
Syntax
snmp-server max-traps-per-window max-traps
max-traps
Sum of traps permitted, ranging from 0 to 999,999,999.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the minimum period between successive traps to the default:
no snmp-server max-traps-per-window
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
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Network Management
snmp-server Commands
Default
0 traps (unlimited)
Example
The following example sets the traps permitted to 1000:
XSR(config)#snmp-server max-traps-per-window 1000
snmp-server min-trap-spacing
This command sets the interval between successive SNMP traps. Trap spacing is only guaranteed to occur at least every spacing ‐ it might occur more often. The command implementation can exhibit a jitter of +0 to +200 milliseconds and is linked to the XSR’s fast timer tick interval.
Syntax
snmp-server min-trap-spacing spacing
spacing
Minimum interval between successive traps, ranging from 0 to 3,600,000 milliseconds. Zero (0) indicates traps are sent successively, without delay.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no formsets the minimum interval between successive traps to the default value:
no snmp-server min-trap-spacing
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
200 milliseconds
Example
The following example limits the minimum trap interval to 1 minute:
XSR#snmp-server min-trap-spacing 60000
snmp-server packetsize
This command sets the maximum allowable incoming and outgoing packet size in bytes. Packets larger than this value are dropped.
Syntax
snmp-server packetsize size
size
Peak packet size allowed, ranging from 484 to 8,192 bytes.
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snmp-server Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form sets the maximum allowed incoming and outgoing packetsize to the default:
no snmp-server packetsize
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
1,500 bytes
Example
The following example specifies the peak packet size as 1000 bytes:
XSR#snmp-server packetsize 1000
snmp-server queue-length
This command sets the retransmission queue length. Traps which have no route to the host are put into the retransmission queue for resending later.
Syntax
snmp-server queue-length length
length
Trap queue length ranging from 1 to 1000.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command resets the retransmission queue length to the default:
no snmp-server queue-length
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
10
Example
The following example sets the retransmission queue length to 50:
XSR#snmp-server queue-length 50
snmp-server set entityMIB
This command specifies physical alias and asset IDs for the entity MIB.
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Network Management
snmp-server Commands
Syntax
snmp-server set entityMIB {entPhysicalAlias | entPhysicalAssetID} host <string>
entPhysicalAlias
An alias name for the physical entity.
entPhysicalAssetID
A user‐assigned asset tracking identifier for the physical entity.
string
Text for the alias or ID not to exceed 32 characters.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command sets the PhysicalAlias or PhysicalAssetID in the Entity MIB as an empty string:
no snmp-server set entityMIB {entPhysicalAlias | entPhysicalAssetID} host
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
The following example provides an alias for the host:
XSR(config)#snmp-server set entityMIB entPhysicalAlias host aliasSalesServer
snmp-server system-shutdown
This command allows the SNMP server to reboot the XSR (usually after a software download).
Syntax
snmp-server system-shutdown
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command disallows the SNMP server from rebooting the XSR:
no snmp-server system-shutdown
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
Enabled
Example
The following example permits the SNMP server to reboot the XSR:
XSR(config)#snmp-server system-shutdown
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snmp-server Commands
snmp-server tftp-server-list
This command specifies an Access Control List (ACL) to limit TFTP servers’ access during SNMP downloads.
Syntax
snmp-server tftp-server-list access-list-num
access-list-num
Standard ACL ranging from 1 to 99.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form removes any ACL limiting other TFTP servers’ access during SNMP downloads:
no snmp-server tftp-server-list
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
The following example limits TFTP servers to ACL #57:
XSR#snmp-server tftp-server-list 57
snmp-server trap-source
This command sets the interface serving as the source for all traps and informs. Use the address of the interface from which the trap/inform goes out as the source address for the trap/inform.
Syntax
snmp-server trap-source {interface}
interface
A supported interface such as FastEthernet 1.
Note: If the interface does not have an IP address or if the interface is deleted afterwards, it will use
the address of the interface from which the trap/inform goes out as the source address for the trap/
inform.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the configured trap interface:
no snmp-server trap-source
Example
This example specifies GigabitEthernet interface 2 as the trap source:
XSR#snmp-server trap-source g2
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Network Management
snmp-server Commands
snmp-server trap-timeout
This command specifies the interval traps in the retransmission queue are retried if no route exists to the host that SNMP traps will to be sent to.
Syntax
snmp-server trap-timeout timeout
timeout
Retry interval ranging from 1 to 9,999 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the trap‐timeout to the default value:
no snmp-server trap-timeout
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
30 seconds
snmp-server user
This command configures local or remote users in an SNMP group with security models, authentication, passwords, privacy settings, and ACLs, and adding users to the USM user table. Note: Be aware that the engineID of the remote SNMP entity must be configured before you add a
user since passwords are hashed with the engineID to create a localized key.
Syntax
snmp-server user username [groupname remote ip-address [udp-port port]{v1 | v2c |
v3 [encrypted][auth {md5 | sha} auth-password [priv des56 priv-password]]}[access
access-list]
username
Name of the user.
groupname
Name of the group to which the user belongs.
remote
A remote SNMP entity.
ip-address
IP address of the remote SNMP entity.
udp-port
UDP port of the remote SNMP entity.
port
UDP port number of the remote SNMP entity. Default: 162.
v1
v1 security model (least secure) used.
v2c
v2c security model (next to least secure) used.
v3
v3 security model (most secure) used.
encrypted
Specifies passwords as MD5 or SHA digests.
auth
Authentication parameters for the user.
md5
HMAC MD5 algorithm used for authentication.
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snmp-server Commands
sha
HMAC SHA algorithm used for authentication.
auth-password
The user’s authentication password. At least 8 characters is required.
priv
Specifies the privacy setting.
des56
CBC‐DES privacy encryption algorithm.
priv-password
Privacy password for the user. A minimum of 8 characters is required.
access
Specifies an access‐list associated to this user.
access-list
Standard IP access‐list allowing access to this user.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove a user:
no snmp-server user username groupname {v1 | v2c | v3}
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
The example below configures ljc of the v3authgrp SNMP group with strong v3 level security, MD5 authentication, and the password acorntree:
XSR(config)#snmp-server user ljc v3 auth v3authgrp md5 acorntree
snmp-server view
This command creates or updates a view entry. The XSR provides one default view which is used for all community commands which do not specify a view parameter. The v1default view includes the internet tree and excludes snmpUsmMIB and snmpVacmMIB. You can remove this view with the no snmp-server v1default command.
Syntax
snmp-server view view-name {oid-tree | treeEntryName} {included | excluded}
view-name
Label for the view record that you update/create.
oid-tree
Object identifier of the subtree to be included/excluded from the view. This parameter can be either a numeric OID or a well‐known MIB name listed in Table 1‐2 on page 1‐31, or a MIB name followed by a numeric OID (i.e., system.6 for sysLocation). Names are case‐sensitive.
treeEntryName
Name of the sub‐tree equivalent to the object OID tree.
included
This view includes the specified OID tree.
excluded
This view excludes the specified OID tree.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove a view entry:
no snmp-server view view-name
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Network Management
snmp-server Commands
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Examples
The following example creates a view of all objects on the XSR:
XSR(config)#snmp-server view v3view internet included
The following example creates a view of all objects in the MIB‐II subtree:
XSR(config)#snmp-server view mib2 mib-2 included
The following example creates a view for TCP:
XSR(config)#snmp-server view TCPview tcp included
The following example creates a view of all objects in the MIB‐II subtree excluding 1.3.6.1:
XSR(config)#snmp-server view MIBIIview 1.3.6.1 excluded
The following example removes a view of MIN‐II subtree 1.3.6.1:
XSR(config)#no snmp-server view 1.3.6.1
The following example creates a view of all objects in private Enterasys and Cabletron MIBs except for the etsysConfigurationChange MIB:
XSR(config)#snmp-server view Enterasys private included
XSR(config)#snmp-server view Enterasys etsysConfigurationChangeMIB excluded
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR#show snmp view
viewname:
Enterasys
included:
private
excluded:
etsysConfigurationChangeMIB
Table 1-2
MIB Names for SNMP View Commands
SNMP Term
SNMP Numerical ID
org
1.3
dod
1.3.6
internet
1.3.6.1
mgmt
1.3.6.1.2
private
1.3.6.1.4
snmpV2
1.3.6.1.6
mib‐2
1.3.6.1.2.1
system
1.3.6.1.2.1.1
interfaces
1.3.6.1.2.1.2
ifEntry
1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1
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snmp-server Commands
Table 1-2
1-32
MIB Names for SNMP View Commands (continued)
SNMP Term
SNMP Numerical ID
at
1.3.6.1.2.1.3
atEntry
1.3.6.1.2.1.3.1.1
ip
1.3.6.1.2.1.4
ipAddrEntry
1.3.6.1.2.1.4.20.1
ipRouteEntry
1.3.6.1.2.1.4.21.1
ipNetToMediaEntry
1.3.6.1.2.1.4.22.1
icmp
1.3.6.1.2.1.5
tcp
1.3.6.1.2.1.6
tcpConnEntry
1.3.6.1.2.1.6.13.1
udp
1.3.6.1.2.1.7
udpEntry
1.3.6.1.2.1.7.5.1
egp
1.3.6.1.2.1.8
transmission
1.3.6.1.2.1.10
pppLcp
1.3.6.1.2.1.10.23.1
pppIp
1.3.6.1.2.1.10.23.3
frameRelayDTE
1.3.6.1.2.1.10.33
tunnelMIB
1.3.6.1.2.1.10.131
snmp
1.3.6.1.2.1.11
ospf
1.3.6.1.2.1.14
bgp
1.3.6.1.2.1.15
rip2
1.3.6.1.2.1.23
ifMIB
1.3.6.1.2.1.31
entityMIB
1.3.6.1.2.1.47
cabletron
1.3.6.1.4.1.52
chassis
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.2
ctTimedResetMIB
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.1.5.2
ctDownload
1.3.6.1.4.1.52.4.1.5.8
enterasys
1.3.6.1.4.1.5624
etsysConfigurationChangeMIB
1.3.6.1.4.1.5624.1.2.12
etsysSyslogClientMIB
1.3.6.1.4.1.5624.1.2.14
etsysSnmpPersistenceMIB
1.3.6.1.4.1.5624.1.2.24
etsysFirewallMIB
1.3.6.1.4.1.5624.1.2.37
etsysServiceLevelReportingMIB
1.3.6.1.4.1.5624.1.2.39
snmpFrameworkMIB
1.3.6.1.6.3.10
Network Management
snmp-server Commands
Table 1-2
MIB Names for SNMP View Commands (continued)
SNMP Term
SNMP Numerical ID
snmpMPDMIB
1.3.6.1.6.3.11
snmpUsmMIB
1.3.6.1.6.3.15
snmpVacmMIB
1.3.6.1.6.3.16
snmpEngine
1.3.6.1.6.3.10.2.1
snmpMPDStats
1.3.6.1.6.3.11.2.1
usmStats
1.3.6.1.6.3.15.1.1
usmUser
1.3.6.1.6.3.15.1.2
usmUserTable
1.3.6.1.6.3.15.1.2.2
vacmContextTable
1.3.6.1.6.3.16.1.1
vacmSecurityToGroupTable
1.3.6.1.6.3.16.1.2
vacmAccessTable
1.3.6.1.6.3.16.1.4
vacmMIBViews
1.3.6.1.6.3.16.1.5
vacmViewTreeFamilyTable
1.3.6.1.6.3.16.1.5.2
snmp-server window-time
This command specifies the length, in seconds, of the moving window used to count the number of traps sent.
Syntax
snmp-server window-time time
time
Time window interval, ranging from 1 to 3,600 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the length of the moving window used to count the number of traps sent in recently to default:
no snmp-server window-time
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
10 seconds
Example
The following example sets the moving window interval to ten minutes:
XSR(config)#snmp-server window-time 600
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SNMP Show Commands
SNMP Show Commands
show snmp
This command information about the SNMP server.
Syntax
show snmp [location]
location
The site of the SNMP server.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the command:
XSRtop(config)#show snmp
Chassis serial#: 0000019876543210
In counters:
0 SNMP packets in
0 Bad SNMP version errors
0 Unknown community names
0 Illegal operations for name supplied
0 Encoding errors
0 Packets too big
0 No such names
0 Bad values
0 Read-onlys
0 General Errors
0 Requested variables
0 Altered variables
0 Get requests
0 Get-Next requests
0 Set requests
0 Get responses
0 Traps
Out counters:
0 SNMP packets out
0 Packets too big
0 No such names
0 Bad values
0 General errors
0 Get requests
0 Get-Next requests
0 Set requests
0 Get responses
0 Traps
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Network Management
SNMP Show Commands
0 Silent drops
0 Proxy drops
The example below shows output with the location option entered:
XSR#show snmp location
Haverhill Mass.
show snmp engineID
This command displays the identification of the local SNMP engine.
Syntax
show snmp engineID
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR#show snmp engineID
Local SNMP engineID: 800015F8030001F423E691
IP-addr
Port
Rewrite Engine ID
10.10.1.48
162
800009041234
show snmp group
This command displays the names of groups on the XSR with their security model and views.
Syntax
show snmp group
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
The following sample output displays one group, nm, which was configured with a few views attached to it:
XSR#show snmp group
grouname: nm
security model: v1
readview: tcpView
wirteview: tcpView
notifyview: <no notifyview specified>
grouname: nm
security model: v2c
readview: v1default
wirteview: <no writeview specified>
notifyview: <no notifyview specified>
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SNMP Show Commands
grouname: nm
readview: v1default
notifyview: nmMIBIIview
security model: v3 auth
wirteview: nmMIBIIview
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR#show snmp group
groupname: v3RWGroup
security model: v3
readview: v3view
writeView: v3view
notifyview: <no notifyview specified>
groupname: v3ROGroup
security model: v3
readview: v3view
writeView: nmMIBIIview
notifyview: <no notifyview specified>
show snmp host
This command displays information from the SNMP Host table.
Syntax
show snmp host
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the command:
Notification host: 192.168.2.10 udp-port: 162
user: v3user
security model: v3 priv
type: inform
Notification host: 192.168.10.2 udp-port: 162
user: public
security model: v1
type: trap
Notification host: 192.168.1.5 udp-port: 162
user: testuser security model: v3 noauth
type: trap
show snmp user
This command displays information on each SNMP username in the Username table.
Syntax
show snmp user
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR#show snmp user
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Network Management
SLA Agent Commands
User name: authprivUser
Engine ID: 800015f8030001f423e691
storage-type: nonvolatile
group: v3RWGroup
active
Parameter Description
storage-type
Indicates whether the settings have been saved to persistent memory (non‐volatile) or will be lost if the device is reset (volatile).
show snmp view
This command displays information on each SNMP view in the group username table.
Syntax
show snmp view
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR#show snmp view
viewname:
v3view
included:
internet
excluded:
viewname:
v1default
included:
internet
excluded:
snmpUsmMIB
snmpVacmMIB
viewname:
MIBIIview
included:
1.3.6.1
excluded:
SLA Agent Commands
aggregate period
This command specifies the period between two aggregate measurement action intervals by the Response Time Reporter (RTR).
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SLA Agent Commands
Syntax
aggregate-period period
period
Interval between aggregate measurement, ranging from 10 to 60800 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns to the default value:
aggregate-period period
Mode
RTR Echo configuration: XSR(config-rtr-echo-xx)#
Default
600 seconds
Example
The following example sets a one‐minute aggregate period:
XSR(config-rtr-echo-1)#aggregate-period 60
buckets-of-history-kept
This command specifies how many history entries will be maintained by the Response Time Reporter (RTR).
Syntax
buckets-of-history-kept size
size
Number of history records retained. Range: 1 to 60.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns to the default value:
no buckets-of-history-kept
Mode
RTR Echo configuration: XSR(config-rtr-echo-xx)#
Default
1-38
•
Size: 10 records
•
The result is wrapped when the history is full.
Network Management
SLA Agent Commands
Example
This example sets the buckets‐of‐history value to 5 records:
XSR(config-rtr-echo-1)#buckets-of-history-kept 5
frequency
This command specifies how frequently to send a Response Time Reporter (RTR) probe. The value you configure for frequency must be larger than your configured timeout value so that a user cannot have a frequency of 1 second and a timeout of 1001 milliseconds.
Syntax
frequency {frequency-interval}
frequency-interval
How often to send a probe, ranging from 1 to 604,800 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns to the default value:
no frequency
Mode
RTR Echo configuration: XSR(config-rtr-echo-xx)#
Default
Frequency: 60 seconds
Example
The following example sets the RTR frequency to 2 seconds:
XSR(config-rtr-echo-57)#frequency 2
map
This command associates a Response Time Reporter (RTR) with a map ‐ an administratively assigned name.
Syntax
map {map-name}
map-name
Network management map to which the RTR belongs.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns to the default value:
no map
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SLA Agent Commands
Mode
RTR Echo configuration: XSR(config-rtr-echo-xx)#
Example
The following example creates an RTR map:
XSR(config-rtr-echo-57)#map "network in Peoria"
owner
This command binds a Response Time Reporter (RTR) owner (administrator) to a measurement entry.
Note: Because the Enterasys service level reporting MIB requires an owner to be created before an
entry, an owner must be added first.
Syntax
owner {owner-name}
owner-name
Ownerʹs name.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes any configured owner:
no owner
Mode
RTR Echo configuration: XSR(config-rtr-echo-xx)#
Example
The following example specifies the RTR owner:
XSR(config-rtr-echo-57)#owner operator1
request-data-size
This command specifies the Response Time Reporter (RTR) payload size.
Syntax
request-data-size {payload-size}
payload-size
Requested payload size, ranging from 12 to 16384 bytes.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns to the default value:
no request-data-size
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Network Management
SLA Agent Commands
Mode
RTR Echo configuration: XSR(config-rtr-echo-xx)#
Default
Payload size: 12 bytes
Example
The following example limits the RTR payload size to 32 bytes:
XSR(config-rtr-echo-57)#request-data-size 32
tag
This command specifies an identifier (name) for this Response Time Reporter (RTR) measurement.
Syntax
tag {name-tag}
name-tag
Name assigned to this measurement.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes any configured tag:
no tag
Mode
RTR Echo configuration: XSR(config-rtr-echo-xx)#
Example
The following example specifies the RTR name:
XSR(config-rtr-echo-57)#tag "one-way packet loss"
timeout
This command specifies a timeout for the Response Time Reporter (RTR). Be aware that the timeout value must be smaller than the frequency value. So, a user cannot have a frequency of 1 second and a timeout of 1001 milliseconds.
Syntax
timeout {timeout-value}
timeout-value
Timeout, ranging from 1 to 604800000 milliseconds.
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SLA Agent Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns to the default value:
no timeout
Mode
RTR Echo configuration: XSR(config-rtr-echo-xx)#
Default
5000 milliseconds
Example
The following example resets the RTR timeout to 500 milliseconds:
XSR(config-rtr-echo-57)#timeout 500
type
This command specifies the type of Response Time Reporter (RTR) measurement to be performed ‐ ICMP Echo ‐ as well as the destination and source host IP addresses.
Syntax
type {echo} protocol {ipIcmpEcho} dst [source-ipaddr src]
dst
IP address of the destination host.
src
IP address used as the source.
Mode
RTR configuration: XSR(config-rtr-xx)
Next Mode
RTR Echo configuration: XSR(config-rtr-echo-xx)
Example
The following example sets the RTR type and acquires RTR Echo mode:
XSR(config-rtr-57)#type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 192.168.57.3
XSR(config-rtr-echo-57)
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Network Management
RTR-mode Commands
RTR-mode Commands
rtr
This command creates a Response Time Reporter (RTR) entry. The following are sub‐commands:
•
•
rtr owner registers the RTR administrator. Go to page 1‐43 for the command description.
rtr schedule configures when an RTR entry will be run. Go to page 1‐44 for the command description.
Syntax
rtr operation-id
operation-id
Measurement ID number, ranging from 1 to 2,147,483,647.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
RTR configuration: XSR(config-rtr-xx)#
Example
The following command configures RTR entry 1 and acquires RTR mode:
XSR(config)#rtr 1
XSR(config-rtr-1)#
rtr owner
This command registers the Response Time Reporter (RTR) administrator (owner).
Syntax
rtr owner {owner-name}[ipAddress][quota quota][email email][sms sms]
owner-name:
Ownerʹs name which is case sensitive and must contain no spaces.
ipAddress
IP address of the management entity.
quota
Maximum number of records for this owner in the Enterasys service level reporting MIB history table, ranging from 1 to 10,500.
email
Ownerʹs Email address.
sms
Ownerʹs SMS phone number. It must not contain a space.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
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1-43
RTR-mode Commands
Default
Quota: 700
Example
The following example registers the RTR owner:
XSR(config)#rtr owner operator1 192.168.57.5 email larrycurtis@enterays.com quota 1000
rtr schedule
This command schedules an Response Time Reporter (RTR) entry.
Syntax
rtr schedule operation-id [[life {forever | lifetime}] start-time
{hh:mm:[ss][month day | day month] | pending | now | after hh:mm:ss}]
operation-id
Measurement ID number, ranging from 1 to 2,147,483,647.
lifetime
Entry lifespan, ranging from 1 to 2,147,483,647 seconds.
hh:mm:ss
Time in hours, minutes and seconds.
day
Day of the month.
month
Month of the year.
pending
Operation will not begin. This state is meaningful when used by SNMP. After an entry is scheduled, all supported metrics meaningful to the protocol type will be measured.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
pending
Example
The following example schedules the RTR measurement immediately:
XSR(config)#rtr schedule 1 now
1-44
Network Management
RTR Show Commands
RTR Show Commands
show rtr operation-state
This command displays the current operational state of the Response Time Reporter (RTR).
Syntax
show rtr operation-state [operation-id]
operation-id
Measurement ID, ranging from 1 to 2,147,483,647.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR>show rtr operation-state 57
RTR Entry Number: 1
Number of Operations Attempted: 84
Timeout Occurred: FALSE
Operational State of Entry: INACTIVE
show rtr configuration
This command displays your configuration of the Response Time Reporter (RTR).
Syntax
show rtr configuration [operation-id]
operation-id
Measurement ID number, ranging from 1 to 2,147,483,647.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR>show rtr configuration
RTR Entry Number: 1
Owner: monitor
Tag: all metrics
Map: network in Peoria
Type of Operation to Perform: echo
Operation Frequency (seconds): 60
Operation Timeout (milliseconds): 5000
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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RTR Show Commands
Status of Entry (SNMP RowStatus): active
Protocol Type: ipIcmpEcho
Target Address: 192.168.57.3
Source Address: 192.168.57.43
Request Size (data portion): 12
Life (seconds): 5000
Next Scheduled Start Time: Start Time already passed
Number of History Buckets kept: 15
show rtr history
This command displays the measurement history of the Response Time Reporter (RTR).
Syntax
show rtr [operation-id]
operation-id
Measurement ID number, ranging from 1 to 2,147,483,647.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR>show rtr history 57
Owner: operator-toronto
Target Address: 1.1.1.1
NET HISTORY TABLE
Bucket
Sequence
Entry
Number
1
96
2
97
3
98
4
99
AGGR HISTORY TABLE
Bucket
Sequence
Entry
Number
1
11
2
12
3
13
1-46
Network Management
TimeStamp
11:2:1
11:2:1
11:2:1
11:2:1
Sept
Sept
Sept
Sept
1
2
3
4
TimeStamp
10:42:1 Sept 1
10:52:1 Sept 2
11:22:1 Sept 3
Delay
(ms)
3
3
3
3
Average
Delay (ms)
3
3
3
Packet
Loss
FALSE
FALSE
FALSE
FALSE
Average Pkt
Loss %
0
0
0
Jitter
(ms)
0
0
0
2
Configuring T1/E1 and T3/E3 Subsystems
Observing Syntax and Conventions
The CLI Syntax and conventions use the notation described in the following table.
Convention
Description
xyz
Key word or mandatory parameters (bold)
[x]
[ ] Square brackets indicate an optional parameter (italic)
[x | y | z]
[ | ] Square brackets with vertical bar indicate a choice of values
{x | y | z}
{ | } Braces with vertical bar indicate a choice of a required value
[x {y | z} ]
[{ | } ] Combination of square brackets with braces and vertical bars indicates
a required choice of an optional parameter
(config-if<xx>)
xx signifies interface type and number, e.g.: F1, S2/1.0, D1, M57, G3. F
indicates a FastEthernet, and G a GigabitEthernet interface
Next Mode entries display the CLI prompt after a command is entered
soho.enterasys.com
Italicized, non-syntactic text indicates either a user-specified entry or text
with special emphasis
T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
The following commands define T1/E1 /T3/E3 subsystem functionality:
•
“T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands” on page 2‐55.
•
“T1/E1 and T3/E3 Clear and Show Commands” on page 2‐74.
•
“Drop and Insert Commands” on page 2‐80.
Note: The configuration commands for T1/E1 ports that occupy T3/E3 lines are the same
commands that exist for T1/E1 NIM cards.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
2-55
T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
cablelength
For T3 controllers only
This command specifies the distance of cabling from the XSR to the network equipment for a T3 NIM card only.
Note: Although you can specify cable length from 0 to 450 feet, the XSR recognizes only two
ranges: 0 to 224 and 225 to 450. For example, entering 35 feet selects the 0 to 224 range. If you
later change the cable length to 40 feet, there is no change because 40 falls within the 0 to 224
range. But, if you change the cable length to 350, the 225 to 450 range is selected. The actual length
you enter is stored in the configuration file.
Syntax
cablelength feet
feet
Distance to set the cable length, ranging from 0 to 450 feet.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the cablelength to the default value:
no cablelength
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller xx)#
Default
224 feet
Example
The following example configures the T3 controller in slot 1, card 2 with line source clocking, M13 framing, in channelized mode, and a cablelength of 225 feet:
XSR(config)#controller t3 1/2/0
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#channelized
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#clock source line
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#framing m13
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#cablelength 225
cablelength long
For T1 controllers only
This command decreases the pulse from the transmitter for long haul applications on T1 controllers only. In long haul applications (length of the haul longer than 655ft, CSU interface) the transmit pulse masks are optionally generated according to ANSI T1.403 to reduce crosstalk on 2-56
Configuring T1/E1 and T3/E3 Subsystems
T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
the received signals. This feature is provided by placing a transmit attenuator in the data path. This attenuation is selectable from 0, ‐7.5, ‐15, or ‐22.5 dB.
Note: Long haul line build-out (LBO) compensates for the loss in decibels based on the distance
from the device to the first repeater in the circuit. A longer distance from the device to the repeater
requires that the signal strength on the circuit be boosted to compensate for loss over that distance.
The ideal signal strength should be between -15 dB and -22 dB, which is calculated by adding the
Telecom/PTT company loss + cable length loss + line build out. The lengthening or building out of a
line is used to control far-end crosstalk. Line build-out attenuates the stronger signal from the
customer installation transmitter so that the transmitting and receiving signals have similar
amplitudes.
Syntax
cablelength long {0db | -7.5db | -15db | -22.5db}
0db
Number of decibels by which the transmit signal is lowered.
-7.5db
Number of decibels by which the transmit signal is lowered.
-15db
Number of decibels by which the transmit signal is lowered.
-22.5db
Number of decibels by which the transmit signal is lowered.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to return the LBO value to the default:
no cablelength long
Defaults
0 dB
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller<xx>)#
Example
The following example sets the long haul LBO to –7.5 dB:
XSR(config)#controller t1 1/0
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#cablelength long –7.5db
cablelength short
For T1 controllers only
This command specifies the pulse shape of the transmit signals as defined in the ANSI T1.102 recommendation for short‐haul applications.
These applications apply to haul lengths shorter or equal to 655‘(DSX‐1 interface). This parameter is used to obtain an optimal pulse shape for external transformers. Five haul length ranges are defined, each with different pulse shaping settings: 0...133 ft (0..40m), 133..266 ft (40..81m), 266...399 ft (81..122m), 399..533 ft (122..162m), and 533..655 ft (162..200m).
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
Syntax
cablelength short {133 | 266 | 399 | 533 | 655}
133
0 to 133 feet (cable length for short haul pulse shaping).
266
134 to 266 feet (cable length for short haul pulse shaping).
399
267 to 399 feet (cable length for short haul pulse shaping).
533
400 to 533 feet (cable length for short haul pulse shaping).
655
534 to 655 feet (cable length for short haul pulse shaping).
Syntax of the “no” form
The no form of this command returns the value to the default setting:
no cablelength short
Defaults
133 feet
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller<xx>)#
Example
The following example sets the short haul LBO to 266 feet:
XSR(config)#controller t1 1/0
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#cablelength short 266
channel-group
For T1/E1 controllers only
This command specifies timeslots that map to channel‐groups for T1/E1/ISDN‐PRI data lines (for channelized/fractional T1/E1/ISDN‐PRI services).
Timeslots and fractional/channelized T1/E1 groups allow multiple logical WAN interfaces to be created out of a single channelized T1 or E1 controller port. The logical interfaces created can have different encapsulation types – PPP, Frame Relay, etc. For each channel group (a fraction of a T1/
E1/ISDN‐PRI line), the following values must be set:
1.
The channel group must be identified by a channel group number.
2.
One or more timeslots of the T1/E1/ISDN‐PRI line must be assigned to a particular channel group.
3.
The base speed increment for the single channel can be specified in kilobits per second.
Syntax
channel-group number timeslots range [speed {56 | 64}]
number
2-58
Channel‐group number, ranging from 0 to 23 for T1 and 0 to 30 for E1 data lines.
Configuring T1/E1 and T3/E3 Subsystems
T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
range
Assigns one or more timeslots or a range of timeslots to a channel group, ranging from 1 to 24 for T1 and 1 to 31 for E1.
speed
Line speed of the T1/E1 link in kilobits per second.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of the command to remove a channel group:
no channel-group number
Defaults
Speed: 64 kbps for both T1 and E1 controllers.
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller<xx>)#
Example
The following example issues the channel-group command for T1 controller configuration. Two channels are created – the first creates group number 0 with timeslots 1 to 10; the second creates group number 1 with timeslots 11 to 20, both with default speeds of 64 kbps.
XSR(config)#controller t1 1/0
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#description T1 for Acme
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#framing esf
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#linecode b8zs
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#channel-group 0 timeslot 1-10
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#channel-group 1 timeslot 11-20
clock source
This command defines the clock source for a T1/E1 or T3/E3 line. It is needed because of synchronous transmission of data on digital interfaces as in the case of T1/E1 or T3/E3 lines. The clock source sets the required timing synchronization between the transmitter and receiver using line and internal settings.
Syntax
clock source {line | internal}
line
Clock derived from the T1/E1 or T3/E3 line provider.
internal
Clock from a chip on the T1/E1 or T3/E3 controller card.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns the value to the default setting:
no clock source
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T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
Default
Line
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller<xx>)#
Examples
The following example configures the T1 controller on NIM 1, port 0 (first port), with ESF framing, B8ZS line encoding and line source clocking:
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#framing esf
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#linecode b8zs
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#clock source line
This example set the E3 controller in with line source clocking and a national reserved bit of 0:
XSR(config-controller<E3-1/2/0>)#clock source line
XSR(config-controller<E3-1/2/0>)#national bit 0
controller
This command configures a T1/E1 or T3/E3 controller. You can invoke controller when a T1/E1 or T3/E3 NIM card is present on the XSR. This command automatically provides a full‐rate channel group on port 0, by default, and acquires Controller mode in which additional commands defining clock source, framing, line encoding, and others must be executed to configure the controller. For T1/E1 controllers only, if you prefer to configure a channel other than 0, you can manually create a channel group using all timeslots and proceed with port configuration.
If no additional commands are specified in this mode, a default non‐channelized port is created with default values.
Syntax
controller {t1 | e1 | t3 | e3}{slot/card/port}
controller {t1 | e1 | t3 | e3}{card/port}
2-60
t1
A T1 controller.
e1
An E1 controller.
t3
A T3 (44.736 Mbps) controller.
e3
An E3 (34.368 Mbps) controller.
slot
Sets the number of the slot in a system with multiple card slots. The motherboard is slot zero (0). Slot number 0 can be omitted.
card
Sets the NIM card number in the card slot (1 or 2)
port
Sets the number of the port on the slot or the port number on a NIM card, starting with zero. Valid choices are:
‐ First port in first NIM card: 0/1/0 or simply 1/0. ‐ Second port in second NIM card: 0/2/0 or simply 2/0.
Configuring T1/E1 and T3/E3 Subsystems
T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes the defined controller:
no controller {t1 | e1| t3 | e3}{slot/card/port}
no controller {t1 | e1| t3 | e3}{card/port}
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller<xx>)#
Default
Full rate
Examples
The following example sets the T1 NIM on board 1, port 0 (first port) and maps timeslots to the channel group. Also, it assigns an IP interface, sets PPP encoding and enables Serial port 1/0:
XSR(config-controller)#controller t1 1/0
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#clock source line
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#framing esf
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#channel-group 0 timeslots 1,3-5,8
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#no shutdown
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0:0
XSR(config-if<S1/0:0>#ip address 10.1.11.2 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<S1/0:0>#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<S1/0:0>#no shutdown
This example sets the E1 NIM on board 1, port 0 (first port) to use all channels at full rate:
XSR(config-controller)#controller e1 1/0
XSR(config-controller<E1-1/0:0>)#no shutdown
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0:0
XSR(config-if<S1/0:0>#ip address 10.11.44.3 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<S1/0:0>#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<S1/0:0>#no shutdown
The following example configures the T3 controller in slot 1, card 1:
XSR(config)#controller<T3-1/1/0>)
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/1/0>)#clock source line
crc
For T1/E1 controllers only
This command sets the length of the Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) per channel group. CRC length can be set to 16 or 32 bits of the Frame Check Sequence (FCS). A 32‐bit CRC provides more powerful error detection but adds overhead. Both receiver and sender must use the same setting.
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T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
Syntax
crc {16 | 32}
16 or 32
CRC size in bits per channel group or fractional link (port).
Syntax of the “‘no” Form
The no form of this command returns to the default setting:
no crc
Default
16
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
This example enables the 32‐bit CRC on the T1 interface:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0:2
XSR(config-if<S1/0:2)#crc 32
description
This command identifies the T1/E1 or T3/E3 controller. The description string provides a more descriptive name/comment for a particular T1/E1 or T3/E3 line. This parameter can be a string value of arbitrary length (max 80 characters). In all statistics reporting, this value identifies the T1/
E1 or T3/E3 line in a more descriptive way. This command is functional for all serial interfaces.
Syntax
description “string”
“string”
Comment (up to 80 characters) describing the T1/E1 or T3/E3 controller. Quotations are mandatory.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of the command deletes the description:
no description
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller<xx>)#
Examples
The following example configures the T1 controller in board (NIM care) 1, port 0 (first port), with ESF framing, B8ZS line encoding and line source clocking with a description added:
2-62
Configuring T1/E1 and T3/E3 Subsystems
T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
XSR(config)#controller t1 1/0
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#framing esf
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#linecode b8zs
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#clock source line
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#description “Acme’s T1”
The following example describes the T3 controller in slot 1, card 2:
XSR(config)#controller t3 1/2
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#description “T3 Up at ACME”
dsu mode
For T3/E3 un-channelized controllers only
This command configures an unchannelized sub‐rate T3/E3 port to emulate a proprietary Data Service Unit (DSU) scheme. The XSR supports interoperability with a wide range of third‐party DSU vendors.
Local DSU mode configuration must match the remote configuration, so you must know what type of DSU is connected to the remote port to determine if it interoperates with a T3 or E3 NIM. This command enables interoperability with providers using various T3 or E3 DSUs to provision the T3/E3 line.
Syntax
dsu mode {digitallink | kentrox | larscom | adtran | verilink}
digitallink
Digitallink mode connects the T3/E3 controller to a Digital Link, CISCO, or Quick Eagle DSU.
kentrox
Kentrox mode connects the T3/E3 controller to a Kentrox DSU.
larscom
Larscom mode links the T3 controller to a Larscom DSU.
adtran
Adtran mode connects the T3 controller to an Adtran T3SU 300.
verilink
Verilink mode connects the T3 controller to a Verilink HDM 2182.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the DSU mode to the default value:
no dsu mode
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller xx)#
Example
The following example configures the T3 controller in slot 1, card 2 with line source clocking, M13 framing, in unchannelized mode, with a cable length of 250 feet, and DSU interoperability mode set to an Adtran DSU:
XSR(config)#controller<T3-1/2/0
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#no channelized
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#clock source line
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T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#framing m13
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#cablelength 250
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#dsu mode adtran
dsu bandwidth
For T3 controllers only
This command specifies the peak allowable bandwidth used by the T3/E3 port. DSU bandwidth configuration must match the remote configuration and it is important that you know the bandwidth value set on the remote port. For example, if you reduce the bandwidth to 7,000 kbps on the local port, you must do the same on the remote port. This command reduces bandwidth by padding the T3/E3 frame.
For E3 ports in bypass framing mode, DSU bandwidth defaults to 34,368 kbps.
Even though the XSR lets you configure a continuous range of bandwidths in sub‐rate modes, vendors support bandwidths only in certain values. So, the XSR sets the user‐configured bandwidth to the closest vendor‐supported bandwidth (refer to Table 2‐1) and a message displayed showing the new bandwidth. Use the show controller command to view the vendor‐supported bandwidth the XSR sets.
Note: DSU bandwidth is configurable only for an unchannelized T3/E3 port.
Table 2-1
Vendor DSU Bandwidth
DSU Mode
DSU
Bandwidth Range (kbps)
Step Size (kbps)
digitallink
Digital Link, Quick Eagle, Cisco
300-44210 (T3), 358-34010
(E3)
300.746 (T3), 358 (E3)
kentrox
Kentrox
1500-35000/44210 (T3),
1000-24500/34010 (E3)
500 (T3/E3)
larscom
Larscom
3100-44210 (T3)
3158 (T3)
adtran
Adtran
75-44210 (T3)
75.186 (T3)
verilink
Verilink
1500-44210 (T3)
1579 (T3)
none
No DSU
44210 (T3) 34099 5
Fixed full rate
Syntax
dsu bandwidth bandwidth
bandwidth
Peak bandwidth allowed for the selected DSU, ranging from 1 to 44,210 kbps (T3) and 1 to 34,100 kbps (E3).
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the DSU bandwidth to the default:
no dsu bandwidth
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Configuring T1/E1 and T3/E3 Subsystems
T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller xx)#
Default
•
T3: 44,210 kbps (full‐rate)
•
E3: 34,099.5 kbps (full‐rate)
Example
The following example configures the T3 controller in slot 1, card 2 with line source clocking, M13 framing, in unchannelized mode, with a cable length of 250, DSU interoperability mode set to a Kentrox DSU, and a DSU bandwidth of 44,210 kbps:
XSR(config)#controller t3 1/2/0
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#no channelized
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#clock source line
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#framing m13
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#cablelength 250
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#dsu mode 1
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#dsu bandwidth 44210
e-bit-reset
This command sets the E‐bit in the E1 frame to zero while the port is in an asynchronous state.
Syntax
e-bit-reset
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command negates the E‐‐bit reset:
no e-bit-reset
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller)#
Example
The following example resets the E‐bit on the E1 controller:
XSR(config-controller<E1-1/2/0>)#
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T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
equipment
For T3/E3 controllers only
This command configures the T3/E3 controller as network or customer equipment and operates according to the T1.403 ANSI standard, allowing equipment configured as network equipment to disregard network loopback commands from the far‐end device.
Note: Since remote loopback requests are available only when C-bit framing is invoked for a T3
port, the equipment command is useful only when framing is set to C-bit.
Syntax
equipment {customer | network} loopback
customer
Controller set as customer equipment. It allows a remotely activated (feac) payload loop from the T3 line.
network
Controller set as network equipment. It disallows remotely activated (feac) payload loop from the T3 line.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the equipment value to its default:
no equipment
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller)#
Default
Customer equipment
Example
The following example sets the T3 controller in slot 1, card 2 as network equipment:
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#equipment network loopback
framing
This command sets the T1/E1 or T3/E3 framing type. Framing must match between the circuit provider and the T1/E1 or T3/E3 interface with the circuit provider determining which framing type is required.
Framing type defines the type and format of the transmission frame for T1 or E1 lines. T1 lines have two frame formats: SF (Super Frame, D4, F12) and ESF (Extended SF). E1 lines have these frame formats: CRC4 (multiframe) and NO‐CRC4 (double frame).
For unchannelized T3 ports, the C‐bit framing format is available with M13 as an option. For both channelized and unchannelized E3 ports, the G751 frame format is available. Also, the bypass framing format specifies that the G.751 framing format will be bypassed.
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Configuring T1/E1 and T3/E3 Subsystems
T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
Note: The C-bit T3 parity framing format is an enhancement of the original M13 format. The main
difference is the C-bit framing format always stuffs the first bit of the 8th block in each sub-frame. So,
in C-bit format, C-bits permit greater management and performance functions on the M frame.
Syntax
framing
framing
framing
framing
{sf | esf} (T1)
{crc4 | no-crc4} (E1)
{c-bit | m13} (T3)
{g751 | bypass} (E3)
sf
T1 frame type set to Super Frame (D4, F12).
esf
T1 frame type set to Extended Super Frame.
c-bit
T3 frame type set to C‐bit.
m13
T3 unchannelized frame type set to M13.
crc4
E1 frame type set to CRC4 frame.
no-crc4
E1 frame type set to no CRC4 frame.
g751
E3 frame type set to G.751.
bypass
E3 frame type set to be bypassed. Unchannelized implied.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Return to the default framing setting by using the no form:
no framing
Defaults
•
T1: ESF
•
E1: CRC4
•
T3: c‐bit
•
E3: g751
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller<xx>)#
Example
The following example configures the T1 controller on NIM card 0, port 0, with ESF framing:
XSR(config)#controller t1 1/0
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#framing esf
This example sets the T3 controller with line source clocking, M23 framing, and channelized mode:
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#channelized
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#clock source line
XSR(config-controller>T3-1/2/0>)#framing m13
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T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
interface serial
This command configures the Serial interface automatically created by the controller command in conjunction with T1/E1 and T3/E3 NIM operations. The T3 module offers channels to PPP and Frame Relay protocol stacks. T3/E3 Serial channels are configured and monitored similar to serial channels provisioned via T1/E1 and serial NIMs. For full and sub‐rate T3 or E3 mode, the port and channel setting is 0 only. Syntax
interface serial {slot | card | port0 | channel0}
slot
Slot number of a system from 0 to 6 card slots. The motherboard is slot zero. If the slot number is 0, it can be omitted.
card
Defines NIM card number in the card slot: 1 or 2.
port
Defines the port number on the slot or the port number on a NIM card, from 0 to 3.
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Sxx>)#
Example
The following example configures Serial interface 2/0:
XSR(config)#interface serial 2/0
XSR(config-if<S2/0>)#
international bit
For E3 controllers only
This command sets bits 6 and 8, respectively, of set II in the E3 frame.
Syntax
international bit {0 | 1}{0 | 1}
0 | 1
Value of the first international bit in the G.751 frame.
1 | 1
Value of the second international bit in the G.751 frame.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the international bits to the default:
no international bit
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller xx)#
Default
2-68
•
First international bit: 0
•
Second international bit: 0
Configuring T1/E1 and T3/E3 Subsystems
T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
Example
The following example configures the E3 controller in slot 1, card 2 with line source clocking and international bits of 0 and 0:
XSR(config)#controller e3 1/2/0
XSR(config-controller<E3-1/2/0>)#clock source line
XSR(config-controller<E3-1/2/0>)#international bit 0 0
invert data
For T1/E1 controllers only
This command inverts the data stream. Data inversion is a method of avoiding excessive zeroes that is superseded by the use of B8ZS line encoding. However, in cases where the network or remote node does not support this type of line coding, data belonging to an HDLC stream can be inverted to satisfy requirements of the line.
Syntax
invert data
Syntax of the “no” Form
Disable inverting the data stream by using the command’s no form:
no invert data
Default
Data is not inverted.
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following example enables data inversion on the full‐rate T1 interface in NIM card 1, port 0:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#invert data
linecode
For T1/E1 controllers only
This command defines the encoding type for T1/E1/ISDN‐PRI lines. Configuration must match the required setting of the service provider. The service provider determines which line encoding type is required. The following three encoding types can be configured:
•
AMI (Alternate Mark Inversion)
•
B8ZS (Bipolar 8 Zero Substitution – T1 only)
•
HDB3 (High‐density Bipolar 3 – E1 only)
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
Syntax
linecode {ami | b8zs | hdb3}
ami
Alternate Mark Inversion (AMI) line encoding.
b8zs
Bipolar 8 Zero Substitution (B8ZS) line encoding. Used for T1 controllers only.
hdb3
High‐Density Bipolar 3 (HDB3) line encoding. Used for E1 controllers only.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Return to the default linecode setting by using the no form:
no linecode
Defaults
•
T1 line: B8ZS
•
E1 line: HDB3
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller<xx>)#
Example
This example sets the T1 controller with ESF framing, and B8ZS line encoding:
XSR(config)#controller t1 1/0
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#framing esf
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#linecode b8zs
loopback
For T1/E1 controllers only
This command implements loopback tests on a T1/E1/ISDN‐PRI subsystem. Typically, it is used for diagnostic purposes although you can configure an IP address as a loopback interface as shown in the example. If you configure a loopback address for the XSR, it will be used as the Router ID. If there is no loopback address defined, the Router ID is the highest non‐zero IP address of existing configured and active interfaces.
When a T1/E1/ISDN‐PRI line malfunctions, one troubleshooting option is to perform various loopback tests, for instance, isolating pieces of the link to test separately. Loopback testing should begin on the local router and proceed to testing the service/network provider. Be aware that all loopback testing is intrusive, and while loopback tests run, data transfers over the link are barred.
Syntax
loopback {diagnostic | local {line | payload}}
diagnostic
2-70
Loops the outgoing transmit signal back to the receive signal. Use the show
t1/e1 controller command to check if loopback is set. Use show
interface serial to verify that the channel groups are looped back.
Configuring T1/E1 and T3/E3 Subsystems
T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
local line
Local loopback mode loops the entire bandwidth of the T1/E1/ISDN‐PRI line toward the network. Use external equipment to verify that the T1/E1/
ISDN‐PRI port is connected to the line.
local payload
Same as Local line, it merely loops back the T1 payload, that is, the XSR generates framing at 1.536 MBytes/sec.
Syntax of the “no” Form
no loopback
Default
Disabled
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller<xx>)#
Examples
The following example initiates a local loopback test:
XSR(config)#controller t1 1/0
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#framing esf
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#linecode b8zs
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#channel-group 0 timeslot 1-24 speed 64
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#loopback local
The following example configures an IP address as a loopback interface:
XSR(config)#interface loopback 0
XSR(config-if<L0>)#ip address 193.23.24.1 255.255.255.255
XSR(config-if<L0>)#no shutdown
national bit
For E3 controllers only
This command sets the national bit in the E3 frame ‐ bit 12.
Syntax
national bit {0 | 1}
0
Sets the national reserved bit to 0.
1
Sets the national reserved bit to 1.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the national bit to the default value:
no national bit
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller xx)#
Default
1
Example
The following example configures the E3 controller in slot 1, card 2 with line source clocking and a national reserved bit of 0:
XSR(config)#controller e3 1/2/0
XSR(config-controller<E3-1/2/0>)#clock source line
XSR(config-controller<E3-1/2/0>)#national bit 0
scramble
For T3/E3 controllers only
This command assists clock recovery on the receiving end of a T3/E3 port by randomizing the pattern of 1s and 0s carried in the physical layer frame. Randomizing the bits can prevent continuous, non‐variable bit patterns, in other words, long strings of all 1s or 0s. Several physical layer protocols rely on transitions between 1s and 0s to maintain clocking. Scrambling can prevent some bit patterns from being mistakenly interpreted as alarms. The following conditions must be met:
•
Scrambling is used only for full‐rate/sub‐rate T3/E3 ports and they must be configured as unchannelized for scrambling to take affect.
•
Remote and local T3/E3 scrambling configuration must match.
•
For T3 controllers, all DSU modes support scrambling except Clear mode.
•
For E3 controllers, only Kentrox mode supports scrambling.
•
This value is configurable only on an unchannelized T3/E3 port.
Syntax
scramble
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables scrambling:
no scramble
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller xx)#
Default
Disabled
2-72
Configuring T1/E1 and T3/E3 Subsystems
T1/E1 & T3/E3 Commands
Example
The following example configures the T3 controller in slot 1, card 2 with line source clocking, M13 framing, in unchannelized mode, cablelength of 250, DSU interoperability mode set to a Kentrox DSU, DSU bandwidth of 44210, and scrambling enabled:
XSR(config)#controller t3 1/2/0
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#no channelized
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#clock source line
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#framing m13
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#cablelength 250
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#dsu mode kentrox
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#dsu bandwidth 44210
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#scramble
shutdown
This command disables disables a T1/E1/ISDN‐PRI controller or the T3/E3 controller and all interfaces related to it. The command does not require any specific booting procedure and can be performed dynamically during system run‐time. When the interface is created, it is disabled by default.
Disabling a T3/E/3 controller causes a T3 port to transmit:
•
An Alarm Indication Signal (AIS) for M13 framing.
•
An idle signal (for C‐bit framing).
Ten seconds must elapse for alarms to clear after enabling a T3 port. Shutting down a controller causes an E3 port to transmit AIS.
Note: The AIS, also known as a blue alarm, is transmitted to notify the downstream device that an
upstream line failure has occurred.
There is a short delay for alarms to clear after enabling an E3 port. It takes 10 seconds for alarms to clear after enabling a T3 port.
Syntax
shutdown
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command restores the previously configured T1/E1 controller and interface. Also, it re‐enables a T1/E1/ISDN‐PRI channel and associated serial interface:
no shutdown
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller xx)#
Default
Disabled
XSR CLI Reference Guide
2-73
T1/E1 and T3/E3 Clear and Show Commands
Examples
The following example disables a T1 controller:
XSR(config)#controller t1 1/0
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#shutdown
The following example re‐enables a T3 controller:
XSR(config)#controller t3 1/2/0
XSR(config-controller<T3-1/2/0>)#no shutdown
T1/E1 and T3/E3 Clear and Show Commands
clear controller
This command clears controller counters for individual T1/E1 or T3/E3 controllers. It clears only counters shown with show commands – all SNMP‐related counters are not cleared. It does not reset or bring down the controller.
Syntax
clear controller {t1 | e1 | t3 | e3}{slot/card/port}
clear controller {t1 | e1 | t3 | e3}{card/port}
t1
T1 type controller.
e1
E1 type controller.
t3
T3 type controller.
e3
E3 type controller.
slot
Slot number of a system, ranging from 0 to 6. The motherboard is slot zero. If the slot number is 0, it can be omitted.
card
NIM card number in the card slot, ranging from 1 to 2.
port
Port number on a NIM card, ranging from 0 to 3.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Examples
The following example clears the T1 controller counters for board (NIM card) 1, port 0 (first port):
XSR#clear controller 1/0
Clear counters on controller 1/0 [confirm]
The following example clears the T3 controller in slot 1 and card 1:
XSR#clear controller t3 1/1/0
Clear counters on controller 1/1 [confirm]
2-74
Configuring T1/E1 and T3/E3 Subsystems
T1/E1 and T3/E3 Clear and Show Commands
show controllers
This command displays the status and statistics for any controller. The T1/E1, T3/E3, and ATM subsystems track various status and statistical parameters, including the current controller configuration. The command also displays Maintenance Data Link (MDL) information (received strings) if MDL is configured and framing is set to C‐bit on T3 NIMs.
Notes: The network can remotely test XSR’s T1 ports by placing them in loopback. If this occurs, the
controller will change state to DOWN for the duration of the test even if it remains synchronized.
Statistics displayed with the show controllers command are reset every 24 hours. That is, once
the port or line is created with the controller command, the 24-hour timer starts.
Syntax
show controllers {interface-type} slot | card | port
show controllers {interface-type} slot | port
interface
-type
XSR interface type: ATM, BRI, ISDN, T1, E1, T3, E3, Fast/GigabitEthernet, or Serial.
slot
Slot number of a system from 0 to 6 card slots. The motherboard is slot zero. If the slot number is 0, it can be omitted.
card
NIM card number in the card slot: 1 or 2.
port
Port number on the slot or the port number on a NIM card, from 0 to 3.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Default
T3/E3: Short display
Sample Output
This command displays T1 controller statistics with two channel‐groups:
T1 0/2/1 is Admin Up and Oper Up.
T1 with CSU Interface.
Applique type is Channelized T1.
Central Office (Network) loopback is set as line.
No alarms detected.
Loopback is set as none.
Cablelength long is 0db and Cablelength short is 133ft.
Framing is esf, Line Encoding is b8zs, Clock Source is line.
Description: None
Alarms Detected: None
Rx signal level -0.0DB (Accuracy:+/-3DB) [NULL string]
Bypass time slots table ( * data time slots on s/c/0 and s/c/1):
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2
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T1/E1 and T3/E3 Clear and Show Commands
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4
Rx ABCD * * * * * * F F 0 * F F F F F F F F F F F F F F
Channel 1:
Timeslots 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10
64kbps Base rate
Channel 2:
Timeslots 12,13
56kbps Base rate
Data
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
in current interval (502 seconds elapsed):
Line Code Violations
Path Code Violations
Slip Seconds
Frame Loss Seconds
Line Error Seconds [string]
Degraded Minutes
Errored Seconds
Bursty Error Seconds
Severely Error Seconds
Unavailable Seconds
Total Data (last 24 hours):
0 Line Code Violations
0 Path Code Violations
0 Slip Seconds
0 Frame Loss Seconds
0 Line Error Seconds
0 Degraded Minutes
0 Errored Seconds
0 Bursty Error Seconds
0 Severely Error Seconds
0 Unavailable Seconds
The following line is added to the output if loopback is set as line:
Central Office (Network) loopback is set as line.
The following is a partial example of the output from a T3 NIM:
XSR#show controllers t3 0/1/0
T3 0/1/0 is Admin Down and Oper Down.
Appliqué type is Un channelized T3.
Loopback is set as none.
Equipment is set as customer.
MDL transmission is disabled.
Cablelength range is 0-224 feet.
Framing is C-BIT, Clock Source is Line.
Scramble is disabled.
DSU is set to None with bandwidth 44210 kbps.
Description: None
FEAC codes Received:
2-76
Configuring T1/E1 and T3/E3 Subsystems
T1/E1 and T3/E3 Clear and Show Commands
Latest
No Code
II
No Code
Alarms Detected:
LOS
LOF
TxAIS
X
X
X
III
No Code
RxAIS
TxRAI
IV
No Code
RxRAI
LOOP
PayLd
24 Hour Statistics cleared: MAY 04 22:33:47
Current time: MAY 04 22:34:13
Interval LVC PCV
Total
4352 0
Current 4352 0
( 28s)
CCV
0
0
PES
2
2
PSES SEFS UAS
2
2
2
2
2
2
LES
2
2
CES
2
2
CSES
2
2
Note:
The 24 hour statistics is applied differently based on the selected farming type,
the following table marks the valid fields by a *
LCV PCV CCV PES PSES SEFS UAS LES CES CSES
T3 C_bit
T3 M13
*
*
*
*
*
-
E3 G751
*
E3 Bypass *
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
SES
*
*
*
*
*
-
*
-
Parameter Descriptions
Rx signal level ‐0.0DB (Accuracy:+/‐3DB) [string]
String values can be:
•
NULL string: port locked on the signal; range 0 to 43.4
•
ʺnot validʺ: port could not lock on the signal 0 to 43.4
•
ʺhigh noise floorʺ: port locked on the signal, but signal is noisy 0 to 43.4.
This line determines if the port is connected to a valid T1/E1 signal. The port will not function if the signal is ʺnot validʺ and will act unpredictable if it is ʺhigh noise floorʺ. The line displays only if the Drop&Inset NIM is configured for data and voice mode. If it is used in data mode, it will not display.
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2
Time slot number TENs.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Time slot number units.
0 1 2 3 4
XSR CLI Reference Guide
2-77
T1/E1 and T3/E3 Clear and Show Commands
Rx ABCD * * * * * * F F 0 * F F F F Time slot that bypasses between port 0 and 1 carry Channel Associated F F F F F F F F F F
Signaling (CAS). CAS signaling comprises four bits: Bit A, C, C and D. This line shows CAS signaling for each voice channel by which you can determine channel status based on the current CAS value. It is a debug aid. Channels marked with an asterisk (*) are read as follows:
•
1 ‐ On the displayed port, timeslot 10 is used for data and is marked with an asterisk (*)
•
2 ‐ On the complementary port, (the other port of the card) timeslots 1 through 6 are used for data.
•
3 ‐ All time slots not used for data on neither port are bypassed between the two ports and their CAS ‐displayed.
T3 0/1/0 is up
T3 controller in slot 0 is operating. The controllerʹs state can be up, down, or administratively down. Loopback conditions are shown as (Locally looped) or (Remotely Looped).
Applique type
Channelized or Non Channelized.
Alarms detected
Any alarms detected by the controller are displayed here. Any active alarm will bring the controller to Oper Down state. The YELLOW LED beside the port connector is ON for all physical alarms, but stays OFF for loopback modes. The following alarms are listed:
Network Line Loopback
MDL transmission is disabled
2-78
•
Transmitter is sending remote alarm (TxRAI).
•
Transmitter is sending TxAIS.
•
Receiver has loss of signal (LOS).
•
Receiver is getting RxAIS.
•
Receiver has loss of frame(LOF).
•
Receiver has remote alarm (RxRAI).
•
Receiver has no alarms (NONE).
•
Controller is set into a Payload Loop back (PayLd) from the network.
•
Controller is set locally or from the network into any type of Loopback (LOOP) from the network.
•
None ‐ normal operation
•
DS3 Line Loopback (applicable for C‐bit parity only)
Status of the maintenance data link (either enabled or disabled).
Configuring T1/E1 and T3/E3 Subsystems
T1/E1 and T3/E3 Clear and Show Commands
FEAC code received Displays the last 4 FEAC codes or commands that were received. Applicable for C‐bit parity framing only, per ANSI T1.105‐1995. This field are intended for T3 line debugging by carrier personal.
Values (the last four codes are just displayed, subsequent codes will overwrite current ones) listed are as follows:
•
DS3 Eqpt. Failure (SA)
•
DS3 LOS
•
DS3 Out‐of‐Frame
•
DS3 AIS Received
•
DS3 IDLE Received
•
DS3 Eqpt. Failure (NSA)
•
Common Eqpt. Failure (NSA)
•
Multiple DS1 LOS
•
DS1 Eqpt. Failure (SA)
•
Single DS1 LOS
•
DS1 Eqpt. Failure (NSA)
•
No code is being received
Command values are as follows:
Framing is
•
Loopback Activate •
Loopback Deactivate
•
DS3 Line
•
DS1 Line 1 to 28 (displayed but not acted upon)
•
DS1 Line All (displayed but not acted upon)
Framing type on the controller:
•
C‐BIT Parity
•
M13
•
G.751
•
Bypass
Line Code is
Line coding format on the controller: B3ZS
Clock Source is
Clock source on the controller: Internal or Line.
Line Code Violations (Valid for C‐
bit, M13, g751 & bypass)
A count of both Bipolar Violations (BPVs) and Excessive Zeros (EXZs) occurring over the accumulation period. An EXZ increments the LCV by one regardless of the zero string’s length.
P‐bit Coding Violation (Valid for C‐bit & M13)
For all DS3 applications, a PCV error event is a P‐bit parity error event. A P‐bit parity error event is the occurrence of a received P‐bit code on the DS3 M‐
frame that is not identical to the corresponding locally calculated code.
C‐bit Coding Violation (Valid for C‐bit)
For C‐bit parity applications, the CCV is the sum of coding violations reported via the C‐bits. For C‐bit parity, it is the sum of CP‐bit parity errors occurring during the accumulation interval.
P‐bit Err Secs (Valid for C‐bit & M13) PES is a second with one or more PCVs, one or more Out‐of‐Frame defects, or a detected incoming AIS. This gauge is not incremented when unavailable seconds are counted.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
2-79
Drop and Insert Commands
P‐bit Severely Err Secs (Valid for C‐bit & M13)
PSES is a second with 44 or more PCVs, one or more Out‐of‐Frame defects, or a detected incoming AIS. This gauge is not incremented when unavailable seconds are counted.
Severely Err Secs (Valid for g751)
SES is a second in which more then 43 LCV were counted or one or more Out‐
of‐Frame defects, or a detected incoming AIS. This gauge is not incremented when unavailable seconds are counted.
Severely Err Framing Secs (Valid for C‐bit, M13 & g751)
SEFS is a second with one or more Out‐of‐Frame defects or a detected incoming AIS.
Unavailable Secs (Valid for C‐bit, UAS are calculated by counting the period the interface is unavailable.
M13 & g751)
Line Err Secs
LES is a second with one or more code violations or one or more LOS defects.
C‐bit Errored Secs (Valid for C‐
bit)
CES is a second with one or more C‐bit code violations (CCV), one or more Out‐of‐Frame defects, or a detected incoming AIS. This gauge is not incremented when UASs are counted.
C‐bit Severely Errored Secs (Valid CSES is a second with 44 or more CCVs, one or more Out‐of‐Frame defects, or for C‐bit)
a detected incoming AIS. This gauge is not incremented when UASs are counted.
Drop and Insert Commands
These commands effect the operation of the T1/E1 Drop and Insert NIM.
drop-and-insert-group
This command, which takes no parameters, instructs the T1 controller to offer all its idle time slots not configured as part of a channel‐group to the Drop and Insert (D&I) agent. The T1 controller thus operates in mixed Data/Voice mode.
For T1 lines, robbed bit signaling is used for Channel‐Associated Signaling (CAS). Robbed Bit Signaling uses one bit of each timeslot for signaling every sixth frame. The XSR is configured in such a way that RBS is disabled for data timeslots (timeslots belonging to a channel group) and data can be passed at 64 or 56 Kbs.
When the command is issued for both T1 controllers on the NIM, time slots which are idle on both ports will be connected.
It is mandatory that the T1 port connected to the Central Office derive its timing from the up stream line and the port connected to the PBX supply timing to the downstream line.
Syntax
drop-and-insert-group [cas | clear]
cas
For use if the device downstream is a PBX using rob bit signalling. Entering no parameter is equivalent to entering the no command.
clear
For use if the device downstream handles data such as a Voice over IP.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes Drop and Insert functionality:
no drop-and-insert-group
2-80
Configuring T1/E1 and T3/E3 Subsystems
Drop and Insert Commands
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller<xx>)#
Default
cas
Example
This configuration instructs the XSR to terminate timeslots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 of controller T1 0/1/
0 into a PPP channel and bypass the rest of the timeslots from T1 controller 0/1/0 to controller T1 0/
1/1. controller port T0/1/0 is connected to the Central Office and controller port T0/1/1 is connected the the PBX down stream. Note that setting the clock source to internal is mandatory.
XSR(config)controller T1 0/1/0
XSR(config-controller<T1-0/1/0>)#drop-and-insert-group
XSR(config-controller<T1-0/1/0>)#channel group 0 timeslots 1,2,3-7 speed 56
XSR(config-controller<T1-0/1/0>)#clock source line
XSR(config-controller<T1-0/1/0>)#no shutdown
XSR(config-if<S0/1/0>)#interface serial 0/1/0
XSR(config-if<S0/1/0>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<S0/1/0>)#no shutdown
XSR(config)#controller 0/1/1
XSR(config-controller<T1-0/1/0>)#drop-and-insert-group
XSR(config-controller<T1-0/1/0>)#no channel group 0
XSR(config-controller<T1-0/1/0>)#clock source internal
XSR(config-controller<T1-0/1/0>)#no shutdown
show controller
For Drop & Insert NIM only
This command, useful for debugging, lists the bypassed time slots between the two T1 controllers on the NIM and associated CASABCD signaling bits received. The Rx ABCD row displays the hex value of the CAS signaling bits received by the controller. Timeslots terminated in the XSR are marked with an asterisk (*). Those timeslots are used for data on ports 1 and/or 0. The bypass timeslot table will display only if the configuration is correct, that is, D&I is enabled on both ports and one of the ports employs internal clocking.This command may help debugging CAS voice calls.
Syntax
show controller t1 {slot | card | 0/1}
Example
This example shows port 0 using timeslot 10 for data and port 1 using timeslots 1 ‐ 6 for data:
T1 0/1/0 is Admin Up and Oper Up.
T1 with CSU Interface.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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Drop and Insert Commands
Applique type is Fractional T1.
Loopback is set as none.
Cablelength long and short 0.
Framing is esf, Line Encoding is b8zs, Clock Source is line.
Description: None
Alarms Detected: None
Rx 0signal level -0.0DB (Accuracy:+/-3DB)
Bypass time slots table ( * data time slots
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Rx ABCD * * * * * * F F 0 * F F F F F F F F
on s/c/0 and s/c/1):
1 2 2 2 2 2
9 0 1 2 3 4
F F F F F F
Channel 0:
Timeslots 10
64kbps Base rate
Data in current interval (300 seconds elapsed):
0 Line Code Violations
0 Path Code Violations
8 Slip Seconds
0 Frame Loss Seconds
0 Line Error Seconds
0 Degraded Minutes
0 Errored Seconds
0 Bursty Error Seconds
0 Severely Error Seconds
9 Unavailable Seconds
Total Data (Last 0 hours and 0 minutes):
0 Line Code Violations
0 Path Code Violations
0 Slip Seconds
0 Frame Loss Seconds
0 Line Error Seconds
0 Degraded Minutes
0 Errored Seconds
0 Bursty Error Seconds
0 Severely Error Seconds
0 Unavailable Seconds
2-82
Configuring T1/E1 and T3/E3 Subsystems
3
Configuring the XSR Platform
Observing Syntax and Conventions
The CLI command syntax and conventions use the notation described in the following table.
Convention
Description
xyz
Key word or mandatory parameters (bold)
[x]
[ ] Square brackets indicate an optional parameter (italic)
[x | y | z]
[ | ] Square brackets with vertical bar indicate a choice of values
{x | y | z}
{ | } Braces with vertical bar indicate a choice of a required value
[x {y | z} ]
[{ | } ] Combination of square brackets with braces and vertical bars indicates
a required choice of an optional parameter
(config-if<xx>)
xx signifies the interface, class map, policy map or other value you specify;
e.g., F1, G3, S2/1.0, <Your Name>. F indicates a FastEthernet, and G a
GigabitEthernet interface.
Next Mode entries display the CLI prompt after a command is entered.
Sub-commands are displayed in red text.
soho.enterasys.com
Italicized, non-syntactic text indicates either a user-specified entry or text with
special emphasis
Platform Commands
The following sets of commands define the platform subsystem software of the XSR:
•
“Clock Commands” on page 3‐84.
•
“Crypto Key Commands” on page 3‐85.
•
“Other Platform Commands” on page 3‐86
•
“Platform Clear and Show Commands” on page 3‐94.
•
“File System Commands” on page 3‐107.
•
“Bootrom Monitor Mode Commands” on page 3‐121.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
3-83
Clock Commands
Clock Commands
clock set
This command sets the current time of the Real Time Clock chip (software module clock). After resetting the XSR, you must manually set the clock.
Syntax
clock set hh:mm:ss wday mday month year
hh:mm:ss
Current time.
wday
Day of the week, ranging from 1 to 7. Sunday is 1.
mday
Day of the month, ranging from 1 to 31.
month
Month of the year. January is 1.
year
Year, ranging from 2000 to 2100.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
Set the clock to 2:59:59 p.m., Friday, October 7, 2002. Type the following:
XSR#clock set 14:59:59 06 07 10 2002
clock timezone
This command sets the time zone to reflect the local time and can be offset by up to 12 hours behind or 13 hours ahead of the Universal Time Clock (UTC) time as set for Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).
Syntax
clock timezone hh mm
hh
Number of hours offset (‐12 behind to +13 ahead of GMT).
mm
Number of minutes offset (0 to 59).
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
This example sets the time‐zone 5 hours and 30 minutes behind UTC time (Eastern standard time):
XSR#clock timezone -5 30
3-84
Configuring the XSR Platform
Crypto Key Commands
Crypto Key Commands
crypto key master generate
This command generates a random master encryption key. When the command is entered, you are prompted to identify the previous master key. If you successfully identify it, the current secure data files are converted to use the new key. If not, you have the following options:
•
Retry entering the previous key,
•
Abort the key change,
•
Remove the previous file set and enter a new key.
Note: This CLI command is not reflected in the running-config.
Syntax
crypto key master generate
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
XSR(config)#crypto key master generate
crypto key master remove
This command removes the master encryption key. When entered, the command prompts you to identify the previous master key. If you successfully identify it, the current secure data files are removed. If not, you have the following options:
•
Retry entering the previous old key,
•
Abort the key removal process.
Syntax
crypto key master remove
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
XSR(config)#crypto key master remove
XSR CLI Reference Guide
3-85
Other Platform Commands
crypto key master specify
This command allows you to specify a master encryption key. When entered, the command first prompts you to identify the previous master key. If you cannot identify it, you have the following options:
•
Retry entering the previous key,
•
Abort the key change,
•
Remove the previous file set and enter a new key.
If you successfully identify a new key or proceed regardless of a correct response, you are prompted to specify a new key numbering 24 bytes. This new key will be rejected if it is identified as a weak, semi‐weak, or possibly weak key. If you specify a valid new key, the current secure data files are converted to the new key.
Note: This CLI command is not reflected in the running-config.
Syntax
crypto key master specify
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
XSR(config)#crypto key master specify
Other Platform Commands
cpu-utilization
This command enables the XSR to calculate the interval it spends on particular tasks and provides the utilization percentage per that task. CPU statistics are displayed using the show cpuutilization command.
Syntax
cpu-utilization
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables CPU utilization reporting:
no cpu-utilization
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
3-86
Configuring the XSR Platform
Other Platform Commands
Example
XSR(config)#cpu-utilization
debug processor
This command defines a method to force forwarding engine jobs to a specific CPU or allows the jobs to float between available CPUs.
Syntax
debug processor {number | job type | interface | mobility}
number
CPU: 0 or 1.
job type
Input, Output, or Protocol.
interface
The specified interface.
mobility
Fixed (assign to a CPU and port) or floating (XSR assigns CPU and port).
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Examples
The following example forces CPU 0 to accept forwarding jobs input to F1:
XSR#debug processor 0 Input FE1 FIXED
Input Job for Interface FastEthernet 1 is now fixed to Processor #0
This example forces CPU 1 to accept protocol forwarding jobs on interface F2:
XSR#debug processor 1 Protocol FE2 FIXED
Protocol Job for Interface FastEthernet 2 is now fixed to Processor #1
hostname
This command sets the system network name on the CLI prompt.
Syntax
hostname name
name
Name of the XSR that appears at the CLI prompt.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes the configured hostname:
no hostname
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Default
The name that is stored in Bootrom.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
3-87
Other Platform Commands
Example
XSR#hostname XSR-1800
XSR-1800#
logging
This command enables/disables message logging at varying severity levels for specified destinations. Refer to Appendix A in the XSR User’s Guide for a list of most router alarms and events. Normally, only HIGH severity alarms are logged to red flag critical events and those requiring operator intervention. The DEBUG alarm level is meant for maintenance personnel only.
The XSR may discard LOW and DEBUG level alarms if the system is too occupied to deliver them. The number of discarded messages is displayed by the following line in show logging command output:
Discards: high=0 medium=0 low=4 debug=22
The XSR supports as many as three Syslog servers, with logging severity levels separately configurable for each server. You can disable logging to individual Syslogs with the no logging
xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx command.
LogGen Functionality
The file option permits logging to a persistent alarm file on a CompactFlash card for HIGH or MEDIUM alarms only. If no CompactFlash card is installed, persistent logging is not performed. The router copies messages from the logging buffer in RAM to the cflash: file loggen once per second. If power to the XSR is lost, the alarm history is preserved in loggen. When the XSR comes up again it copies the history from loggen back into the RAM buffer. The entire logging history is available including alarms before and after power‐down.
The XSR’s LogGen functionality declares a message flood if too many outstanding messages are reported by other software modules in the router. LogGen then temporarily quits reporting on the Console so users can keep access to the CLI. Messages are logged to the RAM buffer only, and are gradually reported to all other enabled destinations. The message flood ends when LogGen reduces the number of outstanding messages below the defined threshold.
Syntax
logging [console | buffered | monitor | snmp | A.B.C.D | A.B.C.D | A.B.C.D | file
| timestamp][level | local | utc][high | medium | low | debug]
3-88
console
Displays system logs to the console terminal.
buffered
Saves system logs to the router’s RAM.
monitor
Displays system logs to current CLI Telnet session.
snmp
Saves system logs to a remote SNMP trap.
A.B.C.D
Up to three Syslog server IP addresses: see table in User Guidelines.
level
Sets logging level to High, Medium, Low or Debug. Enter the level immediately after the logging keyword to set that level for all destinations. Enter the level after a destination to specify that level only.
file
Logs data to a file on a CompactFlash card.
high
Sets system log to High level.
Configuring the XSR Platform
Other Platform Commands
medium
Sets system log to Medium level.
low
Sets system log to Low level.
debug
Sets system log to Debug level.
timestamp
Sets time and date.
local
Sets timestamp to local time.
utc
Sets timestamp to the Universal Time Clock.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to disable the earlier configured service:
no logging [console | buffered | monitor | snmp | A.B.C.D | file | timestamp]
Mode
Global Configuration: XSR(config)#
Defaults
•
File: off
•
A.B.C.D.: 0.0.0.0 (no messages sent until an IP address is set)
•
Logging level: High for all destinations
User Guidelines
The table below displays standard syslog error message types and definitions. Message Type
Definition
0: Emergency
System is unusable
1: Alert
Action must be taken immediately
2: Critical
Critical conditions
3: Error
Error conditions
4: Warning
Warning conditions
5: Notice
Normal but signification condition
6: Info
Informational
7: Debug
Debug-level messages
8: Security
Security related messages
The XSR recognizes messages at four levels, described in the table below:
Priority Code = Facility Code *8 + Severity
Severity
User Level Message
(Facility = 1)
Security/Auth Message
(Facility = 10)
High, severity = 2 (Critical)
10
82
Med, severity = 3 (Error)
11
83
Low, severity = 4 (Warning)
12
84
XSR CLI Reference Guide
3-89
Other Platform Commands
Debug, severity = 7 (Debug)
15
87
Examples
This example sets logging at High for the console with a local timestamp:
XSR#logging console high timestamp local
The following example sets a Low logging level for all destinations with a UTC timestamp:
XSR#logging low timestamp utc
This example sets persistent logging of High severity messages to CFlash: with a local timestamp:
XSR#logging file high timestamp local
The following example sets the logging timestamp to local time. For information about a related command, refer to clock timezone on (page 3‐84):
XSR#logging timestamp local
The following example sets the logging timestamp to universal time:
XSR#logging timestamp utc
Sample Output
The following is a sample LogGen message:
<186>Jan 27 09:13:05 10.8.40.2 LOGGEN: Message Flood: Display disabled,messages
logged to History Buffer.
The following is sample output for a message flood by the show log history command:
XSR#show log history
Log history buffer: logging severity=HIGH; messages logged= 2 <186>Jan
27 09:13:07 10.8.40.2 LOGGEN: Message Flood: Display disabled, messages logged to
History Buffer.
netload
This command selects the Remote Auto Install (RAI) option upon reboot. When no startupconfig file exists in the XSR, the system begins remote auto install processing by default.
Syntax
netload [persistent]
persistent
RAI does not cease looking for a config file over the network. Omitting this option permits RAI processing for 5 minutes, after which the XSR ceases RAI, exits and reads an existing startup-config.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables netload:
no netload [persistent]
3-90
Configuring the XSR Platform
SNTP Commands
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Examples
The following example selects a 5‐minute auto install:
XSR(config)#netload
The following example selects a persistent auto install:
XSR(config)#netload persistent
SNTP Commands
sntp-client
This command enables the SNTP client and sets the Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) primary and alternate server IP addresses. Once the XSR is configured, it sends a time request to the SNTP server every poll interval to update local time.
Note: Setting the SNTP Server IP address to 0.0.0.0 disables the SNTP client.
Syntax
sntp-client server A.B.C.D [A.B.C.D]
A.B.C.D
IP address of the primary SNTP server.
[A.B.C.D
IP of the alternate SNTP server. Set only if the primary SNTP server IP is set.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables the SNTP client:
no sntp-client
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Defaults
•
Primary and alternate server IP address: 0.0.0.0
•
SNTP client is disabled
Example
The following example sets the primary SNTP server IP address:
XSR(config)#sntp-client server 192.168.27.88
XSR CLI Reference Guide
3-91
SNTP Commands
sntp-client poll-interval
This command configures the interval the SNTP client waits, when synchronized, before sending another time request to an SNTP server. The poll‐interval is applied continuously after the client is first synchronized. If both primary and alternate servers are configured, polls are sent only to the first server, once this was detected to be active and only if this server becomes inactive will the client start polling the alternate server. A client declares a server inactive if no response is received to ten consecutive requests.
When the time is not synchronized after boot up, a resynchronization interval is used to send time requests to the server at fixed intervals of 60 seconds. A maximum of 10 such requests are sent in case no answer was received before the SNTP client decides this server is down. If an alternate server address is configured, requests are sent out to it. The resync interval is used instead of the polling interval to ensure the time is learned fairly quickly if the poll interval was set to a higher value. After initial synchronization, client requests are sent using the configured poll interval.
Syntax
sntp-client poll-interval [value]
Parameters
value
Poll‐interval, ranging from 16 to 16284 seconds.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
512 seconds
sntp-server enable
This command enables the SNTP server.
Syntax
sntp-server enable
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
Disabled
3-92
Configuring the XSR Platform
SNTP Commands
no sntp-server
This command disables the SNTP server.
Syntax
no sntp-server
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
show sntp
This command displays the current status of the SNTP server.
Syntax
show sntp
Output
XSR>show sntp
SNTP server
30.10.1.22
1.1.1.1
Stratum
10
0
#Polls
1
0
Last Receive
00:36:39
Active
Never…
Unicast
Unicast
Client Status: Enabled
Server Status: Enabled
Poll Interval: 512
Server requests: 125
Current Time: 00:36:42-UTC-Tuesday, 30-MAR-2004
Parameter Descriptions
SNTP server
30.10.1.22
The IP address of the designated SNTP server.
Stratum
Level of the network where the clock is located. The primary stratum is generally considered at stratum 1. The XSR default stratum is 10.
#Polls
Sum of client requests to the SNTP server.
Last Receive
Hour, minute and second of the last client reply from the SNTP server.
Active
Whether the SNTP is in active state.
Unicast
SNTP server point‐to‐point mode.
Client Status
State of the SNTP client ‐ enabled or disabled.
Server Status
State of the SNTP server ‐ enabled or disabled.
Poll Interval
Interval in seconds between client requests to the SNTP server.
Server requests
Sum of client requests to the server.
Clock is synchronized, stratum 10, reference is <RTC or last synchronized reference>
XSR CLI Reference Guide
3-93
Platform Clear and Show Commands
Nominal freq is xxxxx Hz, actual freq is xxxx Hz, precision is 2**16
Reference time is 12345678.12345678 (01:01:01.123 EDT Mon Jan 1 2004)
Clock offset is 1.1234 msec, root delay is 123.12 msec
Root dispersion is 12.12 msec, peer dispersion is 1.12 msec
Platform Clear and Show Commands
clear counter processor
This command clears processor performance information. CPU utilization is averaged over an 8‐
second interval.
Syntax
clear counter processor
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
XSR#clear counter processor
clear fault-report
This command deletes the fault report from RAM.
Syntax
clear fault-report
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
XSR#clear fault-report
Sample Output
No fault report to clear.
or
Fault report cleared
3-94
Configuring the XSR Platform
Platform Clear and Show Commands
clear logging
This command deletes all messages from the logging buffer in RAM.
Syntax
clear logging
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
XSR#clear logging
show buffers
This command displays platform memory statistics and is helpful in discovering where memory leaks exist in various XSR modules. Memory is allocated in increments no smaller than 64 bytes.
Syntax
show buffers
Mode
Privileged EXEC configuration: XSR#
Sample Output
XSR#show buffers
Common Buffer Pool Usage:
Pre-Allocated: 1000 for FE
1000 for FE Frag
512 for Eth1
512 for Eth2
1536 for 4 port T1E1 card 2 in slot 0
Total: 4560 1696 byte buffers = 7733760 bytes
Used:
Eth2:
T1E1-0/2:
FE Frag:
Fwd Eng:
Eth1:
128
512
0
0
128
of
of
of
of
of
512
1536
877
877
512
in
in
in
in
in
use.
use.
use.
use.
use.
0
0
0
0
0
allocations
allocations
allocations
allocations
allocations
denied.
denied.
denied.
denied.
denied.
Free: Buffers: 3792. Extra Mblks: 500. FrameElements: 5000
Jumbo buffers:
Available:
8192
8/ 8
16384
4/ 4
32768
2/ 2
65536
1/ 1
XSR CLI Reference Guide
3-95
Platform Clear and Show Commands
Memory Block Allocation:
Memory Options enabled: None.
--------------------------------------------------------------------Size
Number
Number Avg.Size Max.Size Number of
Size
Carved
Carved
In Use
In Use
Request
Requests Upgrade
--------------------------------------------------------------------64
7012
6516
26
64
20254275
0
128
6673
6637
104
128
629751
0
288
2425
2389
249
288
20319
0
512
33
26
417
512
5866
0
1024
38
29
703
1024
15652
0
2080
43
41
1362
2056
148677
0
4096
29
17
2919
4096
597
0
9216
20
18
6950
9188
22
0
17408
13
12
14069
16856
15
0
40960
10
10
25767
38916
10
0
69632
5
5
62716
65604
5
0
135168
4
4
117320
131072
138
0
291104
1
1
270336
270336
1
0
480000
0
0
0
0
0
0
700000
1
1
628488
628488
1
0
1560000
0
0
0
0
0
0
---------------------------------------------------------------------TotalBytes: 4965504 4817920
3831992
(64MB)
Overhead:
521824
Uncarved:
37914272
Max Heap:
1399088
Parameter Descriptions
Size Carved
Allocated pool sizes supported by the memory manager.
Number Carved
Sum of blocks carved in each pool shown in Column 1.
Number in Use
Sum of blocks currently in use in this pool. Every time you enter the show buffers command, this column’s data will be marked with a plus (+) or negative sign (‐). The + indicates the number in use has increased since you last entered the command. The ‐ indicates the number in use has decreased since you last entered the command.
3-96
Average Size in Use
Average size of the actual requested allocation bytes.
Max Size Request
Largest allocation requested in this pool.
Number of Requests
Sum of times a memory was allocated within this block size.
Size Upgraded
Sum of instances a memory that could have fitted in this block size was actually allocated from a larger block size. This mechanism functions if the XSR is out of uncarved memory and block memory of this size. For example, you request 30 bytes of memory. The memory manager learns that there is no more uncarved memory, examines the 64‐byte pool, and finds no more blocks in that pool either. Then the memory manager considers the 128‐byte pool and may find some free blocks there. You will receive a pointer to one of blocks in the 128‐byte pool.
Configuring the XSR Platform
Platform Clear and Show Commands
Overhead
Sum of overhead bytes used for memory tracking, etc.
Uncarved
Sum of bytes available to be carved into desired blocks.
Max Heap
Sum of bytes that can be allocated from the heap.
show buffers i/o
This command displays summary I/O (data buffers, frame elements) memory usage statistics. Allocations are based on the hardware present in the XSR.
Syntax
show buffers i/o
Mode
Privileged EXEC configuration: XSR#
Sample Output
Common Buffer Pool Usage:
-----------------------------------------------------------Pre-Allocated: 2000 for FE
1000 for FE Frag
2048 for Eth1
2048 for Eth2
2048 for Eth3
1536 for serial card
Total:10680*1696 byte buffers
*1796 (including overhead) = 19181280 bytes
Used: FE Frag:
Fwd Eng:
0
0
Eth2:
T1E1-0/2: 256
FE Frag:
0
Fwd Eng:
0
Eth1: 128
of 1500
of 3200
128 of
of
768
of
880
of
440
of
512
in use.
in use.
512 in
in use.
in use.
in use.
in use.
0 allocations denied.
0 allocations denied.
use. 0 allocations denied.
0 allocations denied.
0 allocations denied.
0 allocations denied.
0 allocations denied.
Free: Buffers: 10680. Extra Mblks: 500. FrameElements: 5000
Jumbo buffers:
Available:
8192
8/ 8
16384
4/ 4
32768
2/ 2
65536
1/ 1
XSR CLI Reference Guide
3-97
Platform Clear and Show Commands
Parameter Descriptions
Common Buffer Pool One buffer pool exists for data buffers. These buffer blocks are pre‐
Usage
allocated as shown below:
Used: FE Frag
Fwd Eng
Free
Jumbo buffers: 8192 16384 32768 65536:
•
2000 for FE: 2000 x 1696‐byte buffers were pre‐allocated for use by the Forwarding Engine.
•
1000 for FE Frag: 1000 x 1696‐byte buffers were pre‐allocated for use by FE Fragmentation.
•
2048 for Eth1: 2048 x 1696‐byte buffers were pre‐allocated for use by the Ethernet Driver for Ethernet Port 1.
•
2048 for Eth2: 2048 x 1696‐byte buffers were pre‐allocated for use by the Ethernet Driver for Ethernet Port 2.
•
2048 for Eth3: 2048 x 1696‐byte buffers were pre‐allocated for use by the Ethernet Driver for Ethernet Port 3.
•
1536 for serial card: 1536 x 1696‐byte buffers were pre‐allocated for use by the Serial NIM card.
•
Total:10680*1696 byte buffers: Total number of 1696‐byte buffers that were pre‐allocated. There are 100 bytes of overhead per buffer, so the actual amount of memory used is 10680 x 1796‐bytes.
•
0 of 1500 in use. 0 of the 1500 peak allowed blocks are currently in use.
•
0 allocations denied. 0 requests for allocation were denied.
•
0 of 3200 in use. 0 of the 3200 peak allowed blocks are currently used.
•
0 allocations denied. 0 requests for allocation were denied.
•
Buffers: 10680. Number of data buffers free now (all are free).
•
Extra Mblks: 500. Number of MBLKs (used to link multiple buffers) now free.
•
FrameElements: 5000: Number of Frame Elements (used to link multiple frames together) free now.
Size of each Jumbo buffer which is used for temporary storage of large packets before fragmentation.
Available: 8/ 8 4/ 4 (Available/Maximum) jumbo buffers. 8/8 indicates 8 available out of a 2/ 2 1/ 1:
maximum of 8 buffers. This example has every size with all buffers available.
show buffers malloc
This command displays summary Malloc (tables, configuration structure) area memory statistics. Syntax
show buffers malloc
Mode
Privileged EXEC configuration: XSR#
3-98
Configuring the XSR Platform
Platform Clear and Show Commands
Sample Output
Memory Block Allocation:
Memory Options enabled: None.
-----------------------------------------------------------------Size Number Number Avg.Size Max.Size Number of Size
Carved Carved In Use In Use
Request
Requests Upgrade
-----------------------------------------------------------------64 8132
8081
22
64
5960439
0
128 10210 10209 98
128
18507
0
288 2273
2241
252
288
8152
0
512 19
15
441
512
302
0
1024 22
20
718
1024
142
0
2080 31
30
1391
2052
48
0
4096 17
9
3185
4096
357
0
9216 13
11
7673
9188
15
0
17408 11
10
13358
16984
11
0
40960 14
13
24725
40048
14
0
69632 7
7
60418
65604
7
0
135168 3
2
118344
131072
556
0
291104 3
3
220710
270336
3
0
480000 1
1
354400
354400
1
0
700000 1
1
628488
628488
1
0
1560000 1
1
1033920
1033920
1
0
-----------------------------------------------------------------TotalBytes: 8039296 7775776
5725016 (128MB)
Overhead:
664256
Uncarved:
82346656
Max Heap:
1312224
Parameter Descriptions
Refer to the show buffers command.
show clock
This command shows current Universal Time Clock (UTC) set by Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).
Syntax
show clock
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
XSR#show clock
10:41:20-UTC-Wednesday,20-AUG-2003
If the time‐zone is set up, show clock displays both UTC and local time:
XSR#show clock
15:22:52-UTC-Thursday,28-FEB-2002
10:22:52-LOCAL-Thursday,28-FEB-2002
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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Platform Clear and Show Commands
show cpu-utilization
This command tracks current use of various CPU processes as a percentage of total CPU usage for the last five second, one minute, and five‐minute intervals, and the number of times each process was called in total since the XSR was powered on. Also, CPU utilization is shown: the first percentage indicates total CPU usage, the second indicates the percentage of CPU time spent at the interrupt level, and remaining percentages are total CPU usage for 1‐ and 5‐minute periods.
The command is a good diagnostic tool to measure which process is consuming the most CPU time and how strenuously the CPU is working as a whole. The XSR is operating normally if the CPU can satisfy advertised throughput levels at maximum capacity.
Be aware that this command draws on processor capacity at the expense of operational needs.
Syntax
show cpu-utilization
Mode
EXEC or Privileged EXEC: XSR> or XSR#
Default
CPU usage tracking is on by default.
Sample Output
XSR#show processes cpu
Process
Runtime(m)
PP
0.00
RIP
0.00
OSPF
0.00
Idle
5.40
Other
0.04
5Sec
0.01%
0.01%
0.02%
99.17%
0.80%
1Min
0.00%
0.01%
0.01%
99.24%
0.74%
5Min
0.00%
0.01%
0.01%
99.26%
0.72%
Invoked
16302
334
465
0
26700
CPU utilization for five seconds: 14.53%/0.80%; one minute: 9.88%; five minutes: 8.20%
Parameter Description
3-100
Process
XSR task measured including Packet Processor (XSR forwarding engine), RIP and OSPF Processors, Idle (calculated processor idle time), and Other (all other tasks).
Invoked
Number of times a process has been called since the XSR was active.
CPU utilization
Total percentage of CPU being used at each interval.
14.53%/0.80%; one minute: 9.88%; five minutes: 8.20%
The first percentage indicates the total and the second indicates the percentage of CPU time spent at the interrupt level, followed by one and five minute percentages.
Configuring the XSR Platform
Platform Clear and Show Commands
show fault-report
This command displays the fault report captured when the XSR experiences a system problem. It contains information that pinpoints the cause of the software failure. This data is highly technical and is intended only for the use of service support engineers to diagnose the problem.
The fault report can be viewed in Bootrom monitor mode or on the CLI.
If the XSR experiences a processor exception, the software captures a fault report and restarts automatically. Only the first fault report is saved in case of multiple failures in a special RAM area and is preserved if the XSR is re‐booted but is lost if the XSR is powered down.
Note: The XSR can store one fault report only.
The fault report contains the following data relevant to the failure:
•
Cause of processor exception
•
Time stamp
•
Contents of processor registers
•
Operating system status
•
Status of tasks, current task (e.g., crashed task)
•
Contents of stacks (task stacks, interrupt stack)
•
Status of one special task (packet processor by default)
•
Code around the crash program counter
•
Task message queues
•
Memory management statistics
•
Task stack traces for all tasks
Watchdog Fault Report
A fault report is also captured in case a catastrophic watchdog interrupt occurs. If the software does not refresh the watchdog for several seconds a watchdog fault report is captured and the XSR is warm‐booted. You can then examine the fault report to analyze the problem.
Syntax
show fault-report [0 | 1]
0 | 1
CPU 0 or 1 on XSR 3000 Series only. If neither are specified, both fault reports display.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
XSR#show fault-report
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Sample Output
The following is sample output from an XSR‐3020 router:
Fault Report captured in node RouterName on Sept 22, 2001 at
Fault: Data TLB Miss
Processor up-time = 1234 hours 59 minutes 59 seconds
3:30:59pm
Processor = PowerPC 405 GP
Exception Vector Number = 0x1100
PC=00012345 SP(r1)=00044444 LR=12345678 CTR=12345678
r0 =12345678 r1 =00044444 r2 =12345678
r3 =12345678
r4 =12345678 r5 =00044444 r6 =12345678
r7 =12345678
r8 =12345678 r9 =00044444 r10=12345678 r11=12345678
r12=12345678 r13=00044444 r14=12345678 r15=12345678
r16=12345678 r17=00044444 r18=12345678 r19=12345678
r20=12345678 r21=00044444 r22=12345678 r23=12345678
r24=12345678 r25=00044444 r26=12345678 r27=12345678
r28=12345678 r29=00044444 r30=12345678 r31=12345678
sprg0=12345678 sprg1=12345678 sprg2=12345678 sprg3=12345678
sprg4=12345678 sprg5=12345678 sprg6=12345678 sprg7=12345678
xer=12345678 msr=12345678 dccr=12345678 dcwr=12345678
iccr=12345678 sgr=12345678 sler=12345678 suor=12345678
bear=12345678 besr=12345678
ccr0=12345678 evpr=12345678 esr=12345678 dear=12345678
srr0=12345678 srr1=12345678 srr2=12345678 srr3=12345678
Crashed Task TCB:
004b19170 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678
004b19180 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678
etc.
Crashed Task Stack:
004276ae 12345678 12345678
004276be 12345678 12345678
004276ce 12345678 12345678
004276de 12345678 12345678
VxWorks Tasks:
NAME
ENTRY
tExcTask
_excTask
tLogTask
_logTask
tWdbTask
0x417cc4
12345678
12345678
12345678
12345678
TID
4b19170
4b14758
4b10c08
12345678
12345678
12345678
12345678
PRI STATUS
0
PEND
0
PEND
3
READY
12345678
12345678
12345678
12345678
12345678
12345678
12345678
12345678
12345678
12345678
12345678
12345678
PC
SP
ERRNO DELAY
4276be 4b1908c
d0003
0
4276be 4b14670
d0003
0
4276be 4b10ae4
d0003
0
tExcTask Control Block
004b19170 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678
004b19180 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678
etc.
tExcTask stack:
004276ae 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678
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Platform Clear and Show Commands
004276be 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678
004276ce 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678
004276de 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678
etc. for all tasks
End of fault report.
When the XSR is automatically rebooted after a crash it performs a warm start. The following message is logged:
11 May 29 22:20:59 TORONTO: System warm boot from crash
show logging
This command displays the current message logging settings including all possible logging destinations and their enabled message‐levels.
Syntax
show logging
Mode
EXEC or Privileged EXEC: XSR> or XSR#
Example
XSR#show logging
Sample Output
The following example displays logging information on the XSR including three Syslog servers:
XSR#show logging
Destination
Syslog: 10.10.10.20
Syslog: 10.10.10.30
Syslog: 10.10.10.40
Console
Monitor
Buffered
SNMP
File
Discards:
Logging
Severity
Message Count
medium
43
low
78
high
3
high
1630
high
1630
high
1630
high
0
disabled
0
high=0 medium=0 low=0 debug=0
timestamp UTC
show logging file
This command displays messages logged in the persistent logging file loggen on an optional CompactFlash card. This file stores data in the CFlash: directory if power to the XSR is lost. When the XSR comes up again it copies the history from loggen back into the RAM buffer. If no CompactFlash card is installed, persistent logging is not performed.
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Syntax
show logging
Mode
EXEC or Privileged EXEC: XSR> or XSR#
Example
XSR>show logging file
Sample Output
The following example displays the logging file information:
XSR#show logging file
History of logging to file cflash:loggen
File logging disabled
File cflash:loggen does not exist.
show logging history
This command displays the contents of the logging history buffer.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
XSR#show logging history
Sample Output
The following command displays logging history and severity levels:
Log history buffer: logging severity=MEDIUM+HIGH; messages logged= 8
<186>Feb 4 09:12:28 192.168.27.38 CLI: User: admin logged in from console
<186>Feb 4 09:10:56 192.168.27.38 CLI: CLI config mode released by startup-config
<186>Feb 4 09:10:56 192.168.27.38 ETH: Interface FastEthernet1, changed state to up
<186>Feb 4 09:10:56 192.168.27.38 CLI: CLI config mode locked by startup-config
<186>Feb 4 09:10:53 192.168.27.38 PLATF: System warm boot from cli
<11>May 29 22:20:59 TORONTO : System restarted
<12>May 29 22:25:59 TORONTO : Serial 0 changed state from up to down
show sntp
This command displays SNTP (Simple Network Time Protocol) setup and traffic statistics.
Syntax
show sntp
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Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
XSR#show sntp
Server IP:192.168.27.88
Poll Interval: 512
Sntp Requested: 1
Last Synced: 17:00:34-UTC-Sunday,26-JAN-2003
Current Time: 10:53:01-UTC-Monday,27-JAN-2003
show version
This command displays current XSR hardware and firmware data.
Syntax
show version
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
The following is example is output from an XSR‐1805:
XSR#show version
Enterasys Networks Operating Software
Copyright 2002 by Enterasys Networks Inc.
Hardware:
Motherboard Information:
XSR-1800 ID: 9002854-02 REV0A
Serial Number: 0000019876543210
Processor: IBM PowerPC 405GP Rev. D at 200MHz
RAM installed: 32MB
Flash installed: 8MB on processor board, 16Mb compact flash
CompactFlash: SunDisk SDP 5/3 0.6 has 32047104 bytes
Real Time Clock
I/O on Motherboard:
FastEthernet 1
FastEthernet 2 Rev 0
H/W Encryption Accelerator Rev 1
T1E1 has 4 channelized ports in NIM slot 1. Rev 0
ISDN BRI has 2 ST ports in NIM slot 2. Rev 1
Empty internal NIM slot 3
Bootrom:
Version 2.03 Built Jul 28 2003, 11:35:07
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Software:
Version 5.5.1.3, Built May 16 2003, 14:31:56
CLI revision 1.5
Software file is “xsr1800.fls” with VPN; with Firewall
XSR-1800 uptime is 33 days, 10 hours, 44 minutes.
The following example displays output from an XSR‐3150:
XSR#show version
Enterasys Networks Operating Software
Copyright 2003 by Enterasys Networks Inc.
Hardware:
Motherboard Information:
XSR-3150 ID: 9002914-04 REV0A CPLD Rev 3
Serial Number: 3646031700233215
Processor: Broadcom BCM1250 Rev 2 at 600MHz
PowerSupply1, PowerSupply2
Fans 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
CPU Temperature Max: 80C Current: 38C
Router Temperature Max: 60C Current: 24C
RAM: 512MB without interleave
Memory Bus at 120MHz, CASL at 2.0
Bootrom Flash: 4MB
Filesystem Flash: 8MB
CompactFlash not present
Real Time Clock
I/O on Motherboard:
GigabitEthernet 1 2 3
Encryption Hardware: not present
Slot 0 card 1: Empty
Slot 0 card 2: Empty
Bootrom:
Version 1.5, Built Aug 26 2003, 13:23:16
Software:
Version 6.0.0.0, Built Sep 7 2003, 16:06:27
CLI revision 1.5
Software file is “xsr3000.fls” with VPN; with Firewall.
XSR-3150 uptime is 0 years, 4 days, 2 hours, 4 minutes, 6 seconds.
show whoami
This command displays identification data for a current terminal session.
Syntax
show whoami
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
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File System Commands
Example
XSR#show whoami
Sample Output
XSR#show whoami
Comm Server “Enterasys”, current line at 9600bps.
File System Commands
The XSR employs an MS‐DOS‐compatible file system in Flash memory. The following commands are available.
boot system
This command creates a boot-config file to store the firmware file name of the active software image. This file name points to the firmware file loaded during system initialization in the following sequence:
1.
The boot‐config file is looked up in either flash: or cflash:
• If boot‐config is not found there, the router proceeds to Step 2.
• If the file named in boot‐config is not found, the router goes to Step 3.
2.
If the default file (xsr1800.fls or xsr3000.fls) is not found, the router goes to Step 3.
3.
An FTP/TFTP server as defined in network parameters of Bootrom mode is queried. If the image is not found in this remote location, initialization is suspended in Bootrom mode.
The command initiates a script requiring confirmation of your intention.
Syntax
boot system <newName.FLS>
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
•
XSR1800.FLS ‐ for Series 1800 routers
•
XSR3000.FLS ‐ for Series 3000 routers Note: A new software image file name must use the .fls extension. Optionally, you can modify a file
with the rename command.
Examples
The following XSR 1800 Series example creates a boot-config file pointing to the firmware file name VPN_XSR1800.fls:
XSR(config)#boot system VPN_XSR1900.fls
The following example renames the VPN_XSR1900.fls file to match the Bootrom default file name. After entering the command, you are prompted by the following script:
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XSR(config)#rename VPN_XSR1800.fls xsr1800.fls
Rename flash:VPN_xsr1800.fls to flash:xsr1800.fls(y/n) ? y
renaming file flash:VPN_xsr1800.fls -> flash:xsr1800.fls
XSR#
The following example renames the firmware file as part of an FTP/TFTP transfer. After entering the command, you are prompted by this script:
XSR-1800#copy tftp://192.168.37.162/c:\firmware\VPN_xsr1800.fls flash:xsr1800.fls
Copy 'c:\firmware\VPN_xsr1800.fls' from server as 'xsr1800.fls' into Flash(y/n) ? y
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Download from server done
File size: 3242460 bytes
XSR-1800#
cd
This command changes the current directory to flash: or cflash: on the XSR file system.
Syntax
cd [flash: | cflash:]
flash:
Default directory in Flash memory.
cflash:
Default directory in CompactFlash memory.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
XSR#cd cflash:
copy <file>
This command copies a file to a new file which may reside in a local directory, flash: or cflash:, or on a remote TFTP server. You can omit the destination filename if new and source file names are identical. The XSR’s MS‐DOS‐compatible file system of On‐Board Flash (flash:) or CompactFlash (cflash:) memory. Copy initiates a script prompting your confirmation.
Syntax
copy source destination
The possible options are:
XSR#copy {flash:| cflash:}[filename]{flash:| cflash:}[filename]
XSR#copy {flash:| cflash:}[filename] tftp: [[[// location]/directory]/filename]
XSR#copy tftp: [[[//location]/directory]/filename]{flash: cflash:}[filename]
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XSR#copy running-config startup-config
running-config
Keyword alias for current running configuration. This alias is only valid as follows:
copy running-config startup-config
This generates the current running configuration and saves it to flash:startup-config.
startup-config
Keyword alias for flash:startup-config.
flash:/cflash:
Alias for Flash or CompactFlash memory as a source or destination.
tftp:
Alias for a Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) network server which can be used as a source or destination. The syntax for this alias is tftp:[[//
location]/directory/]filename The location must be an IP address. Default: 0.0.0.0
.
Note: A TFTP file network transfer may be lengthy especially when loading a software image which
may be 3 - 6 Mbytes. The CLI prints a character every few seconds to indicate a transfer in progress.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Examples
XSR#copy tftp://192.168.27.1/root/enterasys-sw flash:
Save Configuration to TFTP Server
Save the startup-config file on a TFTP server over the network. Enter:
XSR#copy startup-config tftp: [[//location]/directory]/filename]
Software Image Loading from a TFTP Server
This XSR 1800 Series example loads the XSR software image into a file in Flash memory. If flash: is full, you must first delete the existing image file or rename the new image xsr1800.fls so as to copy over the old image. Be sure that your TFTP server is running and you know its IP address before you issue the command. Entering the ipconfig command at a DOS prompt will reveal the TFTP server IP address.
XSR#copy tftp://192.168.1.100/XSR1800.FLS flash:
Respond to the following script as prompted:
Destination file name [XSR1800.FLS]:
Copy ‘XSR1800.FLS’from server
as ‘XSR1800.FLS’ into Flash (y/n) ?y
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Download from server done
File size: 1856714 bytes
The image is copied to flash: and its checksum verified. Should the transfer fail, then the router is temporarily without valid software in Flash and the XSR should not be reloaded or powered‐
down. A new TFTP copy should be initiated. The CLI session which initiated the copy is blocked during TFTP loading.
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Configuration Load
This example loads startup‐config via the network from a TFTP server. The XSR does not load the configuration from the network automatically.
XSR#copy tftp:TFTP1/tftpfiles/tftpimage flash:startup-config
Save Running Configuration
To save configuration changes into non‐volatile memory, the running configuration must be copied into startup configuration:
XSR#copy running-config startup-config
copy running-config startup-config
This command copies the running configuration to the startup configuration file which is stored in non‐volatile memory. It initiates a script requiring confirmation of your intention.
Syntax
copy running-config startup-config
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
XSR#copy running-config startup-config
Sample Output
XSR#copy running-config startup-config
Copy 'running-config'
as 'startup-config' into flash: device (y/n) ? y
Running-config saved to startup-config.
<186>Sep 23 16:02:08 10.10.10.20 CLI: Running-config saved to startup-config by
user admin
copy startup-config tftp
This command saves the startup configuration on a TFTP server via the network connection. It initiates a script requiring confirmation of your intention.
Syntax
copy startup-config tftp:[[[//location]/directory]/filename]
3-110
location
IP address of the TFTP server on the network.
directory
Name of the TFTP directory.
filename
Name of the TFTP file.
Configuring the XSR Platform
File System Commands
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
XSR#copy startup-config tftp://192.168.1.100/cfg.txt
Sample Output
XSR#copy startup-config tftp://192.168.1.100/abc.cfg
Copy 'startup-config' from Flash to server
as 'abc.cfg'(y/n) ? y
Upload to server done
File size: 2997 bytes
delete <file>
This command removes a file from the XSR file system. It initiates a script requiring confirmation of your intention.
Syntax
delete [flash: | cflash:] filename
flash:
Flash memory directory.
cflash:
CompactFlash memory directory.
filename
Name of the file to be deleted.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
XSR#delete startup-config
Delete filename [startup-config] y
Delete flash:y? [confirm] n
Delete of flash aborted
dir
This commands lists files in the Flash or CompactFlash directory.
Syntax
XSR#dir [flash: | cflash:]
flash:
Flash memory directory.
cflash:
CompactFlash memory directory.
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Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Default
flash: unless you change the default using the cd command.
Example
XSR#dir flash:
Sample Output
The following is sample output from an XSR 1800 Series router:
XSR#dir flash:
Listing Directory flash:
size
817496
3220453
976
308
572
0
64
0
date
SEP-17-2002
SEP-17-2002
SEP-23-2002
SEP-17-2002
SEP-23-2002
SEP-23-2002
SEP-23-2002
SEP-23-2002
time
15:21:32
15:24:08
16:02:08
15:26:14
14:50:32
14:24:56
14:50:30
14:24:56
name
bootrom1_18.fls
xsr1800.fls
startup-config
user.dat
cert.dat
leases.cfg
dhcpd.cfg
leases.cfg.bak
2,328,576 bytes free
6,381,568 bytes total
more
This command shows a file’s contents in ASCII format by default or hexadecimal (binary) format.
Syntax
XSR#more [/ascii | /binary | flash: | cflash:]filename
/ascii
File read in flat ASCII text.
/binary
File read in Hexadecimal format.
flash:
File residing in the On‐Board Flash directory.
cflash:
File residing in the CompactFlash directory.
filename
Name of the file to be displayed.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
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File System Commands
Default
•
Format: ASCII
•
Directory: current directory
Examples
XSR#more /ascii flash:startup-config
XSR#more flash:startup-config
Sample Output
In ASCII format (/ascii):
Controller t1 1/0
Clock source line primary
Framing esf
In Binary format (/binary:):
00000000 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678
00000010 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678
00000020 12345678 12345678 12345678 12345678
pwd
This command displays the current directory.
Syntax
XSR#pwd
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
XSR#pwd
XSR#flash:
reload
This command allows the XSR to be rebooted (warm) or restarted (cold) with the option of successfully uploading a new image (the primary Enterasys Operating System [EOS] file) or falling back to the secondary (existing) file stored in Flash: or Cflash: if an error is detected. EOS Fallback tests the primary EOS and if it is not found, or verification fails, or errors appear in the startup‐
config file, or if no message is received from the configured SNMP server, the secondary EOS file is retained. Also, you can reboot or restart the XSR immediately or on a delayed basis. The EOS test duration begins when the primary EOS starts booting up and is variable to account for your network conditions.
One requirement of EOS fallback is to name the primary‐file, described in the following Syntax table. Because the EOS test verifies this file to be a bootable image, it will reject the reload
fallback command if verification fails. At this point the XSR will return to the secondary EOS file XSR CLI Reference Guide
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which is specified in the flash:boot‐config file. Although you cannot configure the secondary EOS file, if you wish to rename it, use the boot system command. Be aware that if the boot‐config file does not exist in the flash: directory, EOS fallback will seach for the default xsr1200.fls, xsr1800.fls or xsr3000.fls file first in flash:, then in cflash:, finally over the network (as specified in the bootrom using the Bootrom monitor mode commands sn or np).
When you reboot the router using reload, the newly loaded startup-config file is converted to the running config file. The command initiates a script requiring confirmation of your intention. Be aware that the reload command does not appear in startup-config.
For more information on how to use this command, refer to the Chapter 2: Managing the XSR in the XSR User’s Guide.
Syntax
reload [in | at [mmm | hh:mm] | cancel | cold | warm | fallback] primary-file
{cflash: | flash:} duration [config | snmp [ip-address]]
in
Reloads after a specified interval, expressed in minutes or hours:minutes.
at
Reloads at a particular time, expressed in hours and minutes.
cancel
Cancels a pending reload.
primaryfile
The filename, including the device name (flash:xsr1800.fls, for example), and can include any other designation of up to 31 ASCII characters. For example: flash:my_new_xsr1800.fls or cflash:8_12_04_xsr1800.fls.
cflash:
flash:
Reloads primary OS file from cflash: or flash: directory and tested for an interval you specify between 5 and 30 minues.
duration
Primary OS test period after reload, ranging from 5 to 30 minutes.
config
Fallback to secondary OS file if any syntax error is found in startup‐config.
snmp
Fallback to secondary OS file if no SNMP message was received during test.
ip-address
SNMP manager IP address to be monitored for received messages. If no SNMP IP address is specified, any received SNMP message indicates SNMP communications are successful.
cold
XSR hardware is re‐initialized with the SDRAM cleared and software rebooted. The start is slower since hardware diagnostics are performed.
warm
XSR hardware is re‐initialized and software rebooted. The start is faster since hardware diagnostics are not performed during the reboot.
none
Lack of argument performs a warm start.
Defaults
•
Warm start
•
Primary‐OS test: 10 minutes
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
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Examples
The following example immediately cold restarts the XSR:
XSR#reload cold
The following example warm upgrades the new image from the primary OS file in the flash: directory and tests it for 15 minute with the fallback option set to the secondary OS file if a syntax error is found in the startup‐config file:
XSR#reload warm fallback flash:xsr1800.fls 15 config
The following example warm reboots the XSR in 240 hours and 12 minutes:
XSR#reload in 240:12 cold
The following command upgrades the new image via SNMP using the proprietary MIBs enterasys‐
image‐validation‐mib and enterasys‐configuration‐management‐mib. For a description of the three‐step procedure to configure the MIBs, refer to the XSR User Guide.
XSR#reload fallback cflash:xsr3004.fls 6 snmp 1.1.1.2
The following example upgrades the new image in 12 hours, 12 minutes with a fallback to the secondary OS if syntax errors are detected or if no SNMP messages are received from SNMP server at 192.168.57.4 during the test:
XSR#reload at 12:12 fallback config 10 config snmp 192.168.57.4
Sample Output
The following output is displayed, prompting you for a response, when you issue a cold reload:
XSR#reload cold
Proceed with reload (y/n)? y
X-Pedition Security Router Bootrom
Copyright 2004 Enterasys Networks Inc
....etc. proceeds with warm start
The following output is displayed when you cancel a reload:
XSR#reload cancel
No EOS Fallback is enabled
No reload is scheduled
rename
This command renames a file in the Flash: or CFlash: directory.
Syntax
rename {cflash: | flash:} source-filename destination-filename
cflash:
Renames a file within the CFlash: directory.
flash:
Renames a file within the Flash: directory
source-name
Source file name.
destination-name
Destination file name.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
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File System Commands
Example
XSR#rename cflash:xsr3000.fls.5512 flash:xsr3000.fls
show hostname
This command displays the name you specified for the XSR.
Syntax
show hostname
Mode
EXEC: XSR>
Example
XSR#show hostname
Sample Output
XSR#show hostname
Local hostname is XSR
show reload
This command displays data about scheduled reloads of the Enterasys Operating System (EOS).
Syntax
show reload
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the command when a reload is scheduled:
XSR#show reload
Reload scheduled in 9:56 minutes
eos fallback
running
eos fallback
not polling
eos fallback crash monitoring
enabled
eos fallback config
disabled
eos fallback snmp monitoring
enabled
192.168.72.72
eos fallback test duration
5 minutes
eos fallback primary file
flash:vpn_xsr1800.fls
eos fallback is supported by installed bootrom 3.4 (need 3.4 or newer)
The following is sample output from the command when a reload is not scheduled:
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Configuring the XSR Platform
File System Commands
XSR#show reload
No reload is scheduled
No EOS fallback
Parameter Description
running/not polling
Scheduled reload timer is running or the test period is in progress.
crash monitoring
A reload check for system failure.
fallback config
Fallback enabled or disabled.
snmp monitoring
A reload check for SNMP messages and SNMP server IP address.
test duration
The interval reload monitors for primary EOS crashes, a syntax error in startup‐config, and SNMP messages for a configurable period between 5 and 30 minutes.
primary file
Directory and filename (including device name) of primary EOS file.
show running-config
This command displays the router’s running configuration as a sequence of CLI commands segmented by module. The XSR gathers data from all system modules but collects and displays only those values different from default settings.
Syntax
show running-config
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
XSR#show running-config
Sample Output
The XSR 1800 Series sample output below displays as a number of CLI commands under the appropriate modules:
XSRtop(config)#show running-config
!PLATFORM
! CLI version 1.5
! XSR-1800
! Software:
!
Version 5.5.1.2, Built Jul 17 2003, 13:50:37
hostname XSRtop
!NETWORK MANAGEMENT
username admin privilege 15 "password is not displayed"
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File System Commands
session-timeout console 35000
session-timeout telnet 35000
session-timeout ssh 35000
!T1E1
controller t1 0/2/0
clock source internal
no shutdown
!IKE
crypto isakmp proposal try1
authentication pre-share
encryption aes
hash md5
group 5
lifetime 40000
crypto isakmp peer 2.2.2.2 255.255.255.255
crypto isakmp peer 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.255
!IPSEC
crypto ipsec transform-set jj
no set security-association lifetime kilobytes
no set security-association lifetime seconds
!INTERFACE AND SUB-INTERFACE
interface FastEthernet 1
ip address 20.1.1.1 255.255.255.0
no shutdown
interface FastEthernet 2
ip address 1.1.1.16 255.255.255.0
interface Loopback5
int Dialer3
interface Serial 2/0:0
encapsulation ppp
ip address 30.1.1.1 255.255.255.0
no shutdown
interface Multilink 8
interface Vpn1 multi-point
interface Vpn4 point-to-point
!IP
ip local pool classA 10.10.0.0 255.255.0.0
ip route 1.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 2.2.2.2
ip route 7.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 Null0
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Configuring the XSR Platform
File System Commands
!OSPF
router ospf 1
network 30.1.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0.0.0.0
network 20.1.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0.0.0.0
!RIP
router rip
!SNMP
snmp-server community public rw
snmp-server enable
!AAA
aaa group ii
dns server primary 0.0.0.0
dns server secondary 0.0.0.0
wins server primary 0.0.0.0
wins server secondary 0.0.0.0
pptp encrypt mppe 128
policy vpn
!
aaa method radius RADIUS
backup Radbackup
enable
group DEFAULT
address ip-address 0.0.0.0
hash enable
key 48aifij4
client firewall
auth-port 851
acct-port 850
attempts 5
retransmit 5
timeout 25
qtimeout 800
!FIREWALL
ip firewall
ip firewall
ip firewall
ip firewall
ip firewall
ip firewall
!
ip firewall
!
ip firewall
ip firewall
ip firewall
network
network
network
network
network
network
private 1.0.0.0 150.255.255.255 internal
any_ext 150.0.0.0 223.255.255.255 internal
allowRADIUS 10.10.10.1 mask 255.255.255.255 internal
allowRADIUS1 10.10.10.2 mask 255.255.255.255 internal
OSPFm 224.0.0.5 224.0.0.6 internal
Ten 10.1.0.0 mask 255.255.0.0 internal
policy RADIUS allowRADIUS allowRADIUS1 Radius allow bidirectional
filter OSPFm private Ten protocol-id 89
filter OSPFm1 Ten private protocol-id 89 bidirectional
load
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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File System Commands
verify
This command verifies a packed software image file. The file name must end in *.fls. If the directory name is not specified, the current directory is used.
Syntax
XSR#verify [flash: | cflash:]filename.fls
flash:
File located in the Flash directory.
cflash:
File located in the CompactFlash directory.
filename.fls
Name of a packed software image file.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
The following sample XSR 1800 Series output displays a correct message:
XSR#verify xsr1800.fls
Verifying SW image file, j.fls
File chksum=0xeb14
SW Image size=070452 sum=0x6a9e compressed_size=1578677 entry=0x10000
Diagnostics size=815012 sum=0x2a32 compressed_size=266244 entry=0x10000
xsr1800.fls is a valid S/W image file
or an error message:
Invalid chksum(0xf2d9)!=Expected chksum0x4800
write
This command writes the running configuration to Flash memory, a network TFTP server, or a terminal. Only values different than default settings are collected and displayed.
Syntax
write
write
write
write
erase
terminal
network flash: filename
network tftp:[[/location]/directory/]filename
Sample Output
Controller t1 1/0
Clock source line primary
Framing esf\
etc.
3-120
Configuring the XSR Platform
Bootrom Monitor Mode Commands
Bootrom Monitor Mode Commands
Bootrom monitor mode offers special user access for Flash:/CompactFlash: file operations and on occasions when the XSR lacks valid software or runs abnormally. Enter the mode by pressing the key combination (CTRL-C) during the first five seconds of initialization. After you access the mode, list command groups by typing h to show the text below:
b
Boot
f
Files
n
Network
s
Status
t
Time and Date
D
For Development Only
All sub‐commands in each group can be listed by entering the command group letter. The main menu provides the following functions:
•
Reboot warm or cold
•
Update Bootrom
•
File system‐related commands for the Flash ROM file system
•
Modify network parameters
•
Various status/show commands
–
Version number
–
Hardware information
–
Display crash information
•
Display or change date and time on real‐time clock
•
Commands for development use only
bc
This command initiates a cold reboot.
bw
This command initiates a warm reboot.
bp
This command changes the Bootrom password. The default password is blank. You are prompted to enter a password by the following script:
XSR-1800: bp
Enter current password:
Enter new password: ******
Re-enter new password: ******
Password has changed.
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Bootrom Monitor Mode Commands
If the Bootrom password is lost on the XSR 1800 Series, you can restore it by pressing the Default button. Be aware that when pressed, the Default button erases all configuration files and the master encryption key.
bu
This command updates the Bootrom file from a local file. You are prompted to enter data by the following script. When the “Proceed with erasing current Bootrom in flash ...” statement appears, enter y. Be sure not to interrupt the process or power down the XSR or it may be affected adversely. After you have updated this file, you can delete it from Flash to conserve space for other files. The following example displays output from an XSR 1800 Series router:
XSR-1800: bu cflash:bootrom1_20.fls
Checking cflash:bootrom1_18.fls...
Updating bootrom with file, “cflash:bootrom1_18.fls”.
Proceed with erasing current Bootrom in flash and replace with
cflash:bootrom2_02.fls?y
*****************************************************
*
Do not interrupt or power down until complete! *
*****************************************************
Erasing 8 sectors at address=0xfff00000
Programming 130816(0x1ff00) bytes at address 0xfff00100
Programming 131072(0x20000) bytes at address 0xfff20000
Programming 131072(0x20000) bytes at address 0xfff40000
Programming 131072(0x20000) bytes at address 0xfff60000
Programming 131072(0x20000) bytes at address 0xfff80000
Programming 131072(0x20000) bytes at address 0xfffa0000
Programming 31320(0x7a58) bytes at address 0xfffc0000
Programming high branch instruction at address 0xfffffffc
Verifying Bootrom flash sectors
Locking 8 Bootrom flash sectors
*****
Bootrom update completed.
*****
Using default Bootrom password. The system is not secure!!!
Use “bp” to change password
bU
This command updates the bootrom file through a network transfer to a local file. Be sure to enter an uppercase U. After you have updated this file, you can delete it from Flash to conserve space for other files.
cd
This command changes the current directory in the file system to flash: or cflash:.
copy
This command copies a file using the syntax copy <source name> <destination name>. You can copy from flash: to cflash: and vice versa.
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Configuring the XSR Platform
Bootrom Monitor Mode Commands
da
This command displays system date and time with this sample output:
XSR-1800: da
Date: Thursday, 29-MAY-2003.
Time: 10:14:07
del
This command removes a file from flash: or cflash: memory.
df
This command displays free disk space with this sample output:
XSR-1800: df
Free space on flash: is 3383296 bytes (0x33a000).
dir
This command lists the contents of the current directory in long format. The XSR 1800 Series sample output is shown as follows:
XSR-1800: dir
size
-------1728458
1569
214
794828
0
1352
808220
date
-----MAY-08-2002
MAY-14-2002
JAN-01-2000
JAN-01-2000
DEC-27-2019
JAN-18-2020
MAY-08-2002
time
-----03:05:14
02:25:00
22:05:22
00:01:52
11:07:14
16:21:36
03:03:22
name
-------xsr1800.fls
startup-config
user.dat
bootrom1_11.fls
cert.dat
diagmsg.dat
bootrom1_15.fls
3383296(0x33a000) bytes free on flash:
The XSR 3000 Series sample output is shown as follows:
XSR-3250: dir
Listing Directory flash::
-rwxrwxrwx 1 0
0
-rwxrwxrwx 1 0
0
-rwxrwxrwx 1 0
0
-rwxrwxrwx 1 0
0
4678118
2228
1153
0
May 5 23:06 xsr3000.fls
May 29 09:57 persistent-data
May 29 09:51 startup-config
May 29 09:51 private-config
2895872(0x2c3000) bytes free on flash:
ds
This command sets the system date using the syntax yyyy mm dd w (1=Sunday). For example:
XSR-3020: ds 2003 6 1 3
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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Bootrom Monitor Mode Commands
dt
This command sets system time using the syntax hh mm ss. For example:
XSR:dt 11 59 59
ff
This command formats the Flash file system. We recommend you first save any.dat,.cert,.cfg, and your startup-config files to cflash: or a PC since any files in flash: will be deleted. You are prompted to enter data by the following script:
XSR-1800: ff
You will lose all files in the “flash:” file system.
Are you sure you want to format the “flash:” file system? (y/n) y
Unlocking flash file sectors
Initializing DOS file system.
Formatting flashrom file system
...................................................... Done.
Set working directory to flash:
Using default Bootrom password. The system is not secure!!!
Use “bp” to change password
XSR-1800:
ffc
This command formats the CompactFlash file system.
ng
This command retrieves a file over the network using a remote IP address and remote file path.
np
This command modifies network parameters. You are prompted to enter data by the following script. While most of the options are self‐explanatory, three require further description.
•
When set to no, the Autoboot option places the prompt in Bootrom mode when you boot or power up the XSR.
•
When set to yes, the default Quickboot action of delaying five seconds at startup for you to optionally enter CTRL-C and acquire Bootrom mode is negated. You can still acquire Bootrom mode, but you must immediately press CTRL-C upon seeing the X‐Pedition Security Router Bootrom header.
•
The default hostname (local target name), XSR‐1800, cannot be changed. In the absence of a user‐supplied hostname via the hostname CLI command, this name will be used as the CLI prompt and SNMP hostname in MIB‐II.
XSR-1800: np
Enter ‘.’ = clear a field; ‘-’ = go to previous field;
Local IP address (192.168.1.1) :
Gateway IP address () :
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Configuring the XSR Platform
^C = quit
Bootrom Monitor Mode Commands
Remote Host IP address (192.168.1.10) :
Remote file path (c:\) :
Use TFTP (no) :
Ftp userid (anonymous) :
Ftp password () :
Local target name (robo1) :
Autoboot (yes) :
Quick boot (no) :
Permanently save the network parameters? (y/n)
ns
This command saves a file over the network using a remote IP address/file path.
rename
This command renames a file using the syntax rename <source name> <destination name>
sb
This command displays boot parameters with this sample output:
XSR-1800: sb
Current boot file is xsr1800.fls
Boot selector default is flashrom, compactFlash, network
Available Network boot devices:
Eth1
sf
This command displays a fault report with the following sample output for the XSR 1800 Series. On XSR 3000 Series routers, you can enter sf 0 or sf 1 to display output from either CPU.
XSR-1800: sf
No fault report at 0x1feef00
This command displays the following sample output on the XSR‐3250:
XSR-3250: sf
Software Revision: 6.0.0.0 without VPN; without Firewall
Creation Date:
Sep 7 2003, 16:07:42
Broadcom BCM1250 Rev 2 CPU0 up-time 0 hours 2 minutes 20 seconds
Crashed Task = PP, Task Status = 0, errno=0 initStage=0
Exception Vector Number=0x5, Address error exception, store
pc=
821014b0 sp=
85febb90 STATUS= 3400ff81
zero=
00000000 at=
08110000 v0=
11223344
v1=
a0=
3400ff81 a1=
00000000 a2=
3400ff81
a3=
t0=
00000000 t1=
3400ff80 t2=
3400ff81
t3=
t4=
00000001 t5=
0000009b t6=
0a0122d4
t7=
s0=
85febbe0 s1=
8219d3dc s2=
00000000
s3=
s4=
00000000 s5=
00000000 s6=
00000000
s7=
t8=
00000000 t9=
00080000 k0=
eeeeeeee
k1=
00000000
85feb8f8
00000000
00000004
00000000
00000000
00000000
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Bootrom Monitor Mode Commands
gp=
8219b1e0
par1=
ffffffff
cause=
80000014
divLo=
00000000
BadVAddr=08112233
sp=
par2=
cntxt=
divHi=
PP - Crashed Task Stack
0x85feb790
ffffffff
0x85feb7a0
00000000
0x85feb7b0
00000000
0x85feb7c0
ffffffff
0x85feb7d0
00000000
0x85feb7e0
ffffffff
85febb90
85febaf8
ffffffff
00000000
s8=
par3=
fpcsr=
causeR=
(sp=85febb90):
00000000 00000008
00000001 00000000
8214ab00 0000000a
85feb7c0 ffffffff
00000002 ffffffff
82154b50 00000000
00000000
ffffffff
d3800000
ffffffff
ra=
par4=
badva=
fpcsr=
ffffffff
00000001
82142ee0
bf3285a4
85feb7e0
00000017
......
si
This command displays XSR 1800 Series inventory with this sample output:
XSR-1800: si
IBM PowerPC 405GP Rev. D
Processor speed
= 200 MHz
PLB speed
= 100 MHz
OPB speed
= 33 MHz
Ext Bus speed
= 25 MHz
PCI Bus speed
= 33 MHz (Sync)
Internal PCI arbiter enabled
RAM installed: 64MB
Flash installed: 8MB on processor board
CompactFlash: SunDisk SDP 5/3 0.6 has 32047104 bytes
Real Time Clock
FastEthernet 1
FastEthernet 2 Rev 0
H/W Encryption Accelerator Rev 1
T1E1 has 4 channelized ports on NIM slot 1. Rev 0
ISDN BRI has 2 ST ports in NIM slot 2. Rev 1
Empty internal NIM slot 3
System up for 1500 seconds.
This command displays XSR 3000 Series inventory with this sample output:
XSR-3150: si
Hardware:
Motherboard Information:
XSR-3250 ID: 9002914-04 REV0A CPLD Rev 3
Serial Number: 2914024201123206
Processor: Broadcom BCM1250 Rev 2 at 600MHz
PowerSupply1, PowerSupply2
Fans 1 2 3 4 5 7 8 10
CPU Temperature Max: 80C Current: 35C
Router Temperature Max: 60C Current: 23C
3-126
Configuring the XSR Platform
820e9178
820e9b10
08112233
820e9170
Bootrom Monitor Mode Commands
RAM: 512MB without interleave
Memory Bus at 120MHz, CASL at 2.0
Bootrom Flash: 4MB
Filesystem Flash: 8MB
CompactFlash not present
Real Time Clock
I/O on Motherboard:
GigabitEthernet 1 2 3
Encryption Hardware: not present
Slot 0 card 1: Empty
Slot 0 card 2: Empty
System up for 9 days, 3 hours, 4 minutes 10 seconds.
sn
This command displays sample XSR 1800 Series network values:
XSR-1800: sn
Local IP address
Gateway IP address
Remote IP address
Remote file path
Transfer Protocol
Local target name
Autoboot
Quick boot
IP address
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
10.120.112.33
10.120.112.1
10.120.112.88
c:/tftpDir
TFTP
XSR1
enabled
no
: 192.168.1.1
Current FastEthernet 0 MAC address is: 00:01:f4:01:01:01
Current FastEthernet 1 MAC address is: 00:01:f4:01:01:02
sv
This command displays sample XSR 1800 Series bootrom version values:
XSR-1800: sv
X-Pedition Security Router Bootrom
Copyright 2003 Enterasys Networks Inc.
HW Version: 9002854-02 REV0A Serial Number: 0001F4000102
CPU: IBM PowerPC 405GP Rev. D
VxWorks version: 5.4
Bootrom version: 1.18
Creation date: Apr 14 2003, 10:12:36
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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Bootrom Monitor Mode Commands
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Configuring the XSR Platform
4
Configuring Hardware Controllers
Observing Syntax and Conventions
The CLI command syntax and conventions use the notation described in the following table.
Convention
Description
xyz
Key word or mandatory parameters (bold)
[x]
[ ] Square brackets indicate an optional parameter (italic)
[x | y | z]
[ | ] Square brackets with vertical bar indicate a choice of values
{x | y | z}
{ | } Braces with vertical bar indicate a choice of a required value
[x {y | z} ]
[{ | } ] Combination of square brackets with braces and vertical bars indicates
a required choice of an optional parameter
(config-if<xx>)
xx signifies interface type and number, e.g.: F1, S2/1.0, D1, M57, G3. F
indicates a FastEthernet, and G a GigabitEthernet interface.
Next Mode entries display the CLI prompt after a command is entered.
soho.enterasys.com
Italicized, non-syntactic text indicates either a user-specified entry or text with
special emphasis
Hardware Controller Commands
The following command sets allow you to define synchronization features for the XSR:
•
“Hardware Controller Commands” on page 4‐83
•
“Hardware Controller Clear and Show Commands” on page 4‐92
clock rate
This command configures the clock rate for the hardware connections on a serial interface. The command is valid and takes effect only when the interface is running in Asynchronous mode. For Synchronous mode, the clock rate is received externally.
Note: The clock rate cannot be changed in loopback mode.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
4-83
Hardware Controller Commands
Syntax
clock rate bps
bps
Configures the clock rate in bits per second (baud) on the line (async only). Valid rates are: 2400, 4800, 7200, 9600, 14400, 19200, 28800, 38400, 57600, and 115200.
Syntax of the “no” Form
no clock rate
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Sx>)#
Default
9600
Example
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#clock rate 19200
databits
This command sets the number of data bits accepted on a serial port. The command is valid and takes effect only when the interface is running in Async mode. In Sync mode, the clock rate is received externally.
Syntax
databits bits
bits
Number of databits per character on a serial port, ranging from 5 to 8.
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Sx>)#
Syntax of the “no” Form
no databits
Default
8
Example
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#databits 7
4-84
Configuring Hardware Controllers
Hardware Controller Commands
description
This command sets the description text for an interface. The description will appear in the ifDescription (interface description) variable of the MIB.
Syntax
description <text>
text
Alphanumeric characters which describe the interface.
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command clears the description:
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no description
Example
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#description “My FastEthernet Interface”
duplex
This command, used in conjunction with the speed command, forces the FastEthernet/
GigabitEthernet interface to operate at a specific duplex mode and speed. Setting the speed or duplex to auto‐negotiate implies that both the speed and the duplex mode will be negotiated. It is not possible to manually set one and auto‐negotiate the other. For example, you cannot set the speed to 10 Mb/s and set the duplex to auto‐negotiate.
When issuing this command, be aware of the following additional conditions:
•
Duplex mode cannot be changed while in loopback.
•
Changing the duplex mode preserves the speed.
•
When the speed is changed from auto, duplex will be set to half.
•
Setting speed or duplex to auto, no speed, or no duplex sets both duplex and speed to auto.
•
When connecting an auto setting on an XSR to a forced setting on another router, the forced setting must be set to half-duplex regardless of the speed (10 or 100 Mbits).
•
When the Gigabit Fiber port is uses, both duplex and speed must be set to auto on both ends of the line to avoid an unpredictable link.
Syntax
duplex {full | half | auto}
full
Forces the interface to operate at full‐duplex.
half
Forces the interface to operate at half‐duplex.
auto
Allows the port to set the speed and duplex mode automatically.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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Hardware Controller Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
no duplex
Default
auto
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Fx>)#
Example
XSR(config-if<F1/0>)#duplex full
XSR(config-if<F1/0>)#speed 100
loopback
This command forces the port into internal loopback mode. That is, the sender is internally connected to the receiver. This command is normallyused for diagnostic purposes only.
Note: Issuing this command will isolate the port from any connected network.
Syntax
loopback
Syntax of the “no” Form
no loopback
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
Off
Example
The following example resets interface FastEthernet 1 to loopback:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#loopback
4-86
Configuring Hardware Controllers
Hardware Controller Commands
media-type
This command sets the media‐type appropriate to the cable type that the interface is connected to.
Syntax
media-type {RS232 | RS422 | RS449 | RS530A | V35 | X21}
Note: The XSR Serial NIM does not detect the media-type of an attached cable. You must configure
the correct interface media-type matching the attached cable for the serial interface to function
properly.
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
RS232
Example
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#media-type V35
nrzi-encoding
This command sets the encoding type to NRZI. It is valid and takes effect only when the interface is running in Synchronous mode. Some computers require the encoding type to be set to NRZI.
Syntax
nrzi-encoding
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disable NRZI encoding:
no nrzi-encoding
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Sx>)#
Default
Disabled
Example
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#nrzi-encoding
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Hardware Controller Commands
parity
This command configures the parity on a serial interface. It is valid and takes effect only when the interface is in Asynchronous mode.
Syntax
parity {even | mark | none | odd | space}
even
Even parity.
mark
A constant 1 in the parity bit.
none
No parity.
odd
Odd parity.
space
A constant 0 in the parity bit.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command invokes the none value:
no parity
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Sx>)#
Default
None
Example
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#parity odd
physical-layer
This command specifies the mode of a serial interface as either synchronous or asynchronous. If set to synchronous, the port is configured as a DTE requiring an external transmit and receive clock to be supplied. If set to asynchronous, the interface will supply its own clock.
Note: A serial interface configured as a synchronous serial port must have an external transmit and
receive clock.
Syntax
physical-layer {sync | async}
4-88
sync
Synchronous mode of XSR’s serial interface.
async
Asynchronous mode of XSR’s serial interface.
Configuring Hardware Controllers
Hardware Controller Commands
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Sx>)#
Default
Sync
Example
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#physical-layer async
shutdown
This command disables an interface. When the interface is created, it is disabled by default.
Note: Issuing this command causes the interface to drop its link while disabled.
Syntax
shutdown
Syntax of the “no” Form
no shutdown
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
When the interface is created, it is disabled by default.
Example
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
speed
This command, used in conjunction with the duplex command, forces the FastEthernet interface to operate at a specific speed and/or duplex mode. Setting the speed or duplex to auto‐negotiate implies that both the speed and the duplex mode will be negotiated. It is not possible to manually set one and auto‐negotiate the other. For example, you cannot set the speed to 10 Mb/s and set the duplex to auto‐negotiate.
For GigabitEthernet only, to set 1000 Mbits speed for copper or fiber, select auto which will autosense the correct line and duplex speeds.
Keep in mind the following caveats:
•
Changing the speed preserves the current duplex mode.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
4-89
Hardware Controller Commands
•
Speed cannot be changed in loopback mode.
•
When connecting an auto setting on an XSR to a forced setting on another router, the forced setting must be set to half-duplex regardless of the speed (10 or 100 Mbits).
•
For GigabitEthernet only, you must use a cross‐over cable when one or both ends of a line are forced. If both ends of the line are auto then you may use a cross‐over or straight‐through cable.
•
When the Gigabit Fiber port is in use, both duplex and speed must be set to auto on both ends of the line otherwise the connection is unpredictable.
Syntax
speed {10 | 100 | auto}
10
Forces the interface to operate at 10 Mbits per second.
100
Forces the interface to operate at 100 Mbits per second.
auto
Allows the port to set the speed and duplex mode automatically.
Syntax of the “no” Form
no speed
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Fx>)#
Default
Auto
Example
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#speed auto
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#duplex auto
stopbits
This command sets the number of stop‐bits on a serial port. It is valid and takes effect only when the interface is running in asynchronous mode.
Syntax
stopbits {1 | 2}
1
One stop bit.
2
Two stop bits.
Syntax of the “no” Form
no stopbits
4-90
Configuring Hardware Controllers
Hardware Controller Commands
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Sx>)#
Default
1
Example
The following example sets 2 stopbits on Serial port 1/0:
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#stopbits 2
vlan
This command configures a Virtual LAN (VLAN) ID on a sub‐interface.
Note: Similar to the PPPoE sub-interface, you must issue the no shutdown command to keep the
interface up.
Syntax
vlan vlan-id
vlan-id
Identifier of the sub‐interface, ranging from 0 to 4094.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the VLAN ID configuration:
no vlan
Mode
Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Examples
The following example configures a FastEthernet sub‐interface with VLAN ID 10:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 2.1
XSR(config-if<F2.1>)#vlan 10
XSR(config-if<F2.1>)#ip address 1.2.3.4 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<F2.1>)#no shutdown
The following example configures a VLAN configuration with PPPoE:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 2.4
XSR(config-if<F2.4>)#encapsulate ppp
XSR(config-if<F2.4>)#vlan 1400
XSR(config-if<F2.4>)#ip address negotiated
XSR(config-if<F2.4>)#ip mtu 1492
XSR(config-if<F2.4>)#no shutdown
XSR CLI Reference Guide
4-91
Hardware Controller Clear and Show Commands
Hardware Controller Clear and Show Commands
clear counters fastethernet
This command clears MIB‐II counters for the FastEthernet interface. The counters cleared include:
•
ifInOctets
•
ifInUcastPkts
•
ifInNUcastPkts
•
ifInDiscards
•
ifInErrors
•
ifOutOctets
•
ifOutUcastPkts
•
ifOutNUcastPkts
•
ifOutDiscards
•
ifOutErrors
•
ifInUnknownProtos
Syntax
clear counters fastethernet interface sub-interface
interface
FastEthernet interface number, ranging from 1 to 2.
sub-interface
FastEthernet sub‐interface number, ranging from 1 to 64.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
The following example clears the MIB‐II counters on FastEthernet port 1, sub‐interface 20:
XSR#clear counters fastethernet 1.20
clear counters gigabitethernet
This command clears the same MIB‐II counters for the interface as the clear counters
fastethernet command.
Syntax
clear counters gigabitethernet interface sub-interface
4-92
interface
Interface number, ranging from 1 to 3.
sub-interface
Sub‐interface number, ranging from 1 to 64.
Configuring Hardware Controllers
Hardware Controller Clear and Show Commands
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
The following example clears the MIB‐II counters on GigabitEthernet port 3, sub‐interface 2:
XSR#clear counters gigabitethernet 3.2
clear interface fastethernet
This command resets the hardware logic on the FastEthernet interface. Using it preserves the current loopback mode, duplex mode and speed. This command is available on the XSR 1800 Series routers only.
Note: Issuing this command causes the interface to drop its link, any packets that it may have
received, and any packets that may be in the process of being transmitted, while it resets. It
preserves the current loopback mode, duplex mode and speed.
Syntax
clear interface fastethernet number
number
FastEthernet interface number ranging from 1 to 2.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
XSR#clear interface fastethernet 2
clear interface gigabitethernet
This command resets the hardware on the GigabitEthernet interface. This command is available on the XSR 3000 Series routers only.
Note: Issuing this command causes the interface to drop its link, any packets that it may have
received, and any packets that may be in the process of being transmitted, while it resets. It
preserves the current loopback mode, duplex mode and speed.
Syntax
clear interface gigabitethernet number
number
GigabitEthernet port, ranging from 1 to 3, and sub‐interface, ranging from 1 ‐ 64.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
XSR CLI Reference Guide
4-93
Hardware Controller Clear and Show Commands
Example
The following example resets GigabitEthernet port 1, sub‐interface 5:
XSR#clear counters gigabitethernet 1.5
clear counters serial
This command clears serial interface counters. The counters cleared are:
•
ifInOctets
•
ifInUcastPkts
•
ifInNUcastPkts
•
ifInDiscards
•
ifInErrors
•
ifOutOctets
•
ifOutUcastPkts
•
ifOutNUcastPkts
•
ifOutDiscards
•
ifOutErrors
•
ifInUnknownProtos
Syntax
clear counters serial [card / port]
card
XSR card number.
port
XSR port number.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
XSR#clear counters serial 1/0
clear interface serial
This command resets the hardware logic on a serial interface.
Note: Issuing this command will cause the interface to drop its link, any packets that it may have
received, and any packets that may be in the process of being transmitted, while it resets.
4-94
Configuring Hardware Controllers
Hardware Controller Clear and Show Commands
Syntax
clear interface serial [card/port]
card
XSR card number.
port
XSR port number.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
XSR#clear interface serial 1/0
show controllers fastethernet
This command displays detailed FastEthernet controller data for a port. This interface is available on the XSR 1800 Series routers only.
Syntax
show controllers fastethernet number
number
FastEthernet interface number, ranging from 1 to 2.
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following example displays output from FastEthernet port 1:
XSR(config)#show controllers fastethernet 1
Packet Processor Tx Scheduler Stats:
157 Packet driver Tx OK
0 Packet driver not Tx: MUX END_ERR_BLOCK
0 Packet driver not Tx: MUX ERROR
0 Packet driver not Tx: Unknown Msg from MUX
The unit number is 1.
The interrupt number is 15.
Memory: base = 0xef600800
Vars: PollCount = 2806, g_eth1Interrupt = 0, bRxRunning = 0
Vars: bTxClean = 0, outQHung = 0
[...]
TX RING ENTRIES:
The ring starts at 0x01fcd000.
TxDRNum = 256, pTxMblkDR = 0x005f4824, TxDRIdx = 0
TxDRCleanIdx = 0
dataLen 0x00000000, status 0x00001300, buffer 0x00000000
XSR CLI Reference Guide
4-95
Hardware Controller Clear and Show Commands
dataLen
dataLen
dataLen
dataLen
[...]
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
status
status
status
status
0x00001300,
0x00001300,
0x00001300,
0x00001300,
buffer
buffer
buffer
buffer
0x00000000
0x00000000
0x00000000
0x00000000
RX RING ENTRIES:
The ring starts at 0x01fcc000.
RxDRNum = 128, pRxMblkDR = 0x01f33c88, RxDRIdx = 19
RxBuffSize = 1728, RxBuffOffset = 160
dataLen
dataLen
dataLen
dataLen
dataLen
[...]
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
status
status
status
status
status
0x00008000,
0x00008000,
0x00008000,
0x00008000,
0x00008000,
buffer
buffer
buffer
buffer
buffer
0x01cc6c20
0x01cc72e0
0x01cc79a0
0x01cc8060
0x01cc8720
show controllers gigabitethernet
This command displays detailed FastEthernet controller data for an interface. This command is available on the XSR 3000 Series routers only.
Syntax
show controllers gigabitethernet [number]
number
GigabitEthernet interface, ranging from 1 to 3.
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following example displays output from GigabitEthernet port 1:
XSR#show controllers gigabitethernet 1
Packet Processor Tx Scheduler Stats:
0 Packet driver Tx OK
0 Packet driver not Tx: MUX END_ERR_BLOCK
0 Packet driver not Tx: MUX ERROR
0 Packet driver not Tx: Unknown Msg from MUX
The unit number is 1.
The interrupt number is 63. The source is 19.
The PHY is 1
Memory: base=0xb0064000
Vars: g_eth1Interrupt=0, mClBlkSize=0, bufsize=0
TX RING:
Ring starts at 0x815b1620.
TMaxDR=512, pTCurrDR=0x00000c30, TAddidx=0
TRemidx=0
4-96
Configuring Hardware Controllers
Hardware Controller Clear and Show Commands
datalen
datalen
datalen
datalen
datalen
[...]
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
status
status
status
status
status
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
buffer
buffer
buffer
buffer
buffer
0x80000000
0x80000000
0x80000000
0x80000000
0x80000000
RX RING:
Ring starts at 0x81568c60.
RMaxDR=512, pRCurrDR=0x00000830, RIdx=0
datalen
datalen
datalen
datalen
datalen
[...]
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
The secondary MAC addresses
[0] : < not
[1] : < not
[2] : < not
[3] : < not
status
status
status
status
status
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
buffer
buffer
buffer
buffer
buffer
0x8ff5df60
0x8ff5e620
0x8fe86ce0
0x8fe873a0
0x8fe87a60
are (in hex):
used >
used >
used >
used >
show controllers serial
This command displays detailed serial controller data for an interface.
Syntax
show controller serial card/port
card
XSR card number of the serial controller.
port
XSR port number of the serial controller.
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following example displays output from Serial port 1/0:
XSR#show controllers serial 1/0
Forward Engine Serial Layer Tx/Rx Stats:
RX FROM UPPER LAYER & TX TO DRIVER
Pcks Rx
= 0
Pcks Tx
= 0
Pcks Discarded = 0
RX FROM DRIVER & TX TO UPPER LAYER
Pcks Rx
= 0
Pcks Tx
= 0
Pcks Discarded = 0
XSR CLI Reference Guide
4-97
Hardware Controller Clear and Show Commands
Packet Processor
0 Packet
0 Packet
0 Packet
0 Packet
The
The
The
The
Tx Scheduler Stats:
driver Tx OK
driver not Tx: MUX END_ERR_BLOCK
driver not Tx: MUX ERROR
driver not Tx: Unknown Msg from MUX
unit number is 50331656.
interrupt number is 26.
DSR poll count is 800 ms.
ACCM is at 0x01040acc.
Vars: CCR2=0x98ff0500, CCR1=0x98ff0500, CCR0=0x00000000, CD=0, g_Ser=0
Vars: bHandleRx=0, bTxClean=0
Vital Stats: TX Q Items = 0, TX Q Bytes = 0, TX CLK = 0
Memory: base = 0xa0020000
TX RING ENTRIES:
The interrupt ring starts at 0x018d6b60 (IDX = 0).
The data ring starts at 0x018f4d60.
TpTxMblkDR = 0x0104055c, TxDRIdx = 1, TxDRCleanIdx = 1
(-2)
(-1)
( 0)
( 1)
( 2)
next 0xa04d8f21,
next 0xc04d8f21,
next 0xe04d8f21,
next 0x004e8f21,
next 0x204e8f21,
[...]
flag1
flag1
flag1
flag1
flag1
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
flag2
flag2
flag2
flag2
flag2
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
buffer
buffer
buffer
buffer
buffer
0x00000000
0x00000000
0x00000000
0x00000000
0x00000000
buffer
buffer
buffer
buffer
buffer
0xe07d5021
0xa0845021
0x608b5021
0x20925021
0xe0985021
RX RING ENTRIES:
The interrupt ring starts at 0x018d6ac0 (IDX = 0).
The data ring starts at 0x018f3540.
RxDRNum = 64, pRxMblkDR = 0x018f6b8c, RxDRIdx = 0
RxBuffSize = 1728, RxBuffOffset = 160
(-2)
(-1)
( 0)
( 1)
( 2)
next 0x60358f21,
next 0x80358f21,
next 0xa0358f21,
next 0xc0358f21,
next 0xe0358f21,
[...]
flag1
flag1
flag1
flag1
flag1
0x0000fc05,
0x0000fc05,
0x0000fc05,
0x0000fc05,
0x0000fc05,
flag2
flag2
flag2
flag2
flag2
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
show interface bri
This command displays ISDN Basic Rate Interface (BRI) information for an interface.
Syntax
show interface bri [card/port:channel.sub-interface]
4-98
card
ISDN BRI card number, either 1 or 2.
port
ISDN BRI port number, either 0 or 1.
Configuring Hardware Controllers
Hardware Controller Clear and Show Commands
channel
ISDN BRI D‐ or B‐channel, either 0 for the D‐channel, and 1 or 2 for the B‐
channels.
sub-interface
ISDN BRI sub‐interface, ranging from 1 to 30.
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following example displays output by the command:
XSR(config)#show interface bri 1/0
********** Serial Interface Stats **********
D-Serial 1/0:0 is Admin Up / Oper Down
********************** ISDN Stats ISDN-BRI 1/0 *********************
Layer 1: DOWN Layer 2: DOWN State: OFFLINE
Admin Up
Oper Down
Term. 1 Spid:2200555 State:
Term. 2 Spid:2201555 State:
Total Length = 257
OFFLINE Cause: 000
OFFLINE Cause: 000
The name of this device is bri0/1/0:0 .
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
slot is 0.
card is 1.
port is 0.
channel is 0.
current MTU is 1500.
device is in polling mode, and is active.
channel is logically INACTIVE.
operational state is OPER_DOWN.
protocol used is LAPD.
baud rate is 16000 bits/sec.
device uses CRC-16 for Tx.
device uses CRC-16 for Rx.
Other Interface Statistics:
ifindex
ifType
ifAdminStatus
ifOperStatus
ifLastChange
ifInOctets
ifInUcastPkts
ifInNUcastPkts
ifInDiscards
ifInErrors
ifInUnknownProtos
ifOutOctets
ifOutUcastPkts
ifOutNUcastPkts
ifOutDiscards
ifOutErrors
ifOutQLen
0
75
1
2
00:00:00
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
16
XSR CLI Reference Guide
4-99
Hardware Controller Clear and Show Commands
show interface dialer
This command displays information about the Dialer interface.
Syntax
show interface dialer [number]
number
Dialer interface number, ranging from 0 to 255.
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following example displays information about Dialer interface 3:
XSR#show interface dialer 3
********** Dialer Interface Stats **********
Dialer3 is Admin Down
Internet address is not assigned
Dialer3
Dialer state is: DOWN
Wait for carrier default: 60, default retry: 3
Dial String
Success Failures
Map Class
Free pool ISDN channels: <0>
Free pool serial ports: <0>
show interface fastethernet
This command displays information about a FastEthernet interface. This interface is available on the XSR 1800 Series routers only.
Syntax
show interface fastethernet [number]
number
FastEthernet interface number of 1 or 2.
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following is sample output from FastEthernet interface 1:
XSR#show interface FastEthernet
FastEthernet1 is Admin Up
Internet address is 51.51.51.1,
Internet address is 52.52.52.1,
Internet address is 53.53.53.1,
4-100
Configuring Hardware Controllers
1
subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
subnet mask is 255.255.255.0 Secondary
subnet mask is 255.255.255.0 Secondary
Hardware Controller Clear and Show Commands
Internet address is 54.54.54.1, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0 Secondary
Internet address is 57.57.57.1, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0 Secondary
Internet address is 58.58.58.1, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0 Secondary
The name of this device is Eth1.
The physical link is currently up.
The device is in polling mode, and is active.
The last driver error is '(null)'.
The duplex mode is set to auto-negotiated.
The current operational duplex mode is negotiated to half.
The speed is set to auto-negotiated.
The current operational speed is negotiated to 100 Mb/s.
The MAC address is (in hex) 00:01:f4:0d:26:72.
The MTU is 1500.
The bandwidth is 100 Mb/s.
Other Interface Statistics:
ifindex
ifType
ifAdminStatus
ifOperStatus
ifLastChange
ifInOctets
ifInUcastPkts
ifInNUcastPkts
ifInDiscards
ifInErrors
ifInUnknownProtos
ifOutOctets
ifOutUcastPkts
ifOutNUcastPkts
ifOutDiscards
ifOutErrors
ifOutQLen
0
6
1
1
00:32:39
529727
0
7328
0
0
0
157800
0
157
0
0
256
The following is sample output from a VLAN interface on FastEthernet sub‐interface 2.1:
XSR#show interface FastEthernet 2.1
FastEthernet2.1 is Admin Up
Internet address is 1.2.3.4, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
Other Interface Statistics:
ifOperStatus
1
ifInOctets
956932
ifOutOctets
495034
Configured VLANs:
VLAN Id
1200
The following is sample output from a VLAN interface on FastEthernet sub‐interface 2.4 configured with PPPoE:
XSR#show interface FastEthernet 2.4
FastEthernet2.4 is Admin Up
Internet address is 5.5.5.4, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
LCP
State: OPENED
IPCP
State: OPENED
The logical link is currently Up
XSR CLI Reference Guide
4-101
Hardware Controller Clear and Show Commands
The Name of the Access Concentrator is c3600-1
The Session Id is 0x0005
The MAC Address of the Access Concentrator is 0x00:30:85:20:47:62
The MTU is 1492
Other Interface Statistics:
ifOperStatus
1
ifInOctets
119439
ifOutOctets
119256
Configured VLANs:
VLAN Id
1400
PPP Encapsulation
show interface gigabitethernet
This command displays information about a GigabitEthernet interface which is available on XSR 3000 Series routers only.
Syntax
show interface gigabitethernet [number]
number
The GigabitEthernet interface, ranging from 1 to 3, and sub‐interface. Range: 1 to 64.
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following example is sample output from GigabitEthernet interface 1:
XSR#show interface gigabitethernet 1
GigabitEthernet 1 is Admin Up
Internet address is 150.50.1.14, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
The name of this device is Eth1.
The
The
The
The
physical link is currently DOWN.
active port is copper.
device is in polling mode, and is active.
last driver error is '(null)'.
The duplex mode is set to auto-negotiated.
The current operational duplex mode is not yet determined.
The speed is set to auto-negotiated.
The current operational speed is not yet determined.
The Primary MAC address is (in hex) 00:01:f4:2b:3e:1b.
The MTU is 1518.
The bandwidth is 10 Mb/s.
Other Interface Statistics:
ifindex
ifType
ifAdminStatus
ifOperStatus
4-102
Configuring Hardware Controllers
0
6
1
2
Hardware Controller Clear and Show Commands
ifLastChange
ifInOctets
ifInUcastPkts
ifInNUcastPkts
ifInDiscards
ifInErrors
ifInUnknownProtos
ifOutOctets
ifOutUcastPkts
ifOutNUcastPkts
ifOutDiscards
ifOutErrors
ifOutQLen
00:00:00
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
256
show interface loopback
This command displays information about the loopback interface.
Syntax
show interface loopback [number]
number
Loopback address number ranging from 0 to 15.
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following is sample output from Loopback interface 5:
XSR#show interface loopback5
Loopback5 is Admin Up
Description: My loopback interface
Internet address is 57.57.57.57, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
show interface multilink
This command displays information about the Multilink interface.
Syntax
show interface multilink [number]
number
Multilink address number, ranging from 1 to 32767.
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following is sample output from Multilink interface 8:
XSR CLI Reference Guide
4-103
Hardware Controller Clear and Show Commands
XSR#show interface multilink 8
********** Multilink Interface Stats **********
Multilink 8 is Admin Down
Internet address is not assigned
LCP
State: CLOSED
Multilink State: CLOSED
Max Fragment delay is 10 ms
MLPPP Bundle Info:
Control Object state is Admin Down / Oper Down
Multilink PPP has no memberlinks
Data Object state is Admin Down
The adjacent is DOWN and data passing is
Bundle size is 0
Max Load Threshold: 0
Total Load Bandwidth is 64000 bits/sec
Bundle Stats
Rx: Total
0, TX: Total
Data
0,
Data
Ctrl
0,
Ctrl
Null
0,
Null
Drop
0,
Drop
Rx Load BW Avg
0, Max
0, Min
0
Tx Load BW Avg
0, Max
0, Min
0
FALSE
0
0
0
0
0
show interface null
This command displays attributes of the null interface (Null 0), an IP interface which uniquely does not require an IP address to appear. It is installed automatically by the XSR so that discard routes can be employed by OSPF. You cannot configure this interface, it is always administratively up and cannot be deleted.
The Null interface displays only when you enter show ip interface null 0 or show
interface null 0. If it is not specified in the show interface or show ip interface commands, it will not display. Also, it does not display in the running‐config file.
Syntax
show interface null 0
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following example is sample output from the show ip interface null 0 command:
XSR#show
Null0 is
Internet
Rcvd: 0
0
4-104
ip interface null 0
Admin Up
address is not assigned
octets, 0 unicast packets,
discards, 0 errors, 0 unknown protocol.
Configuring Hardware Controllers
Hardware Controller Clear and Show Commands
Sent:
0 octets, 0 unicast packets,
0 discards, 0 errors.
MTU is 1500 bytes.
Proxy ARP is enabled.
Helper address is not set.
Directed broadcast is enabled.
Outgoing access list is not set.
Inbound access list is not set.
IP Policy Based Routing is not enabled.
The following example is sample output from the show interface null 0 command:
XSR#show interface null 0
Null0 is Admin Up
Internet address is not assigned
show interface serial
This command displays general information for a serial interface.
Syntax
show interface serial [card/port]
card
XSR card number of serial interface.
port
XSR port number of serial interface.
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following example displays output from Serial interface 1/0:
XSR#show interface serial 1/0
********** Serial Interface Stats **********
Serial 1/0 is Admin Down / Oper Down
Internet address is 200.163.21.1
The name of this device is Ser1/0.
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
card is 1.
channel is 0.
current MTU is 1500.
device is in polling mode, and is ACTIVE.
last driver error is (null).
physical-layer is HDLC-SYNC.
baud rate is estimated to be 1024000 bits/sec.
device uses CRC-16 for Tx.
device uses CRC-16 for Rx.
type of encoding is NRZ.
media-type is RS-232/V.28 (DTE).
loopback mode is off.
Other Interface Statistics:
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Hardware Controller Clear and Show Commands
ifindex
ifType
ifAdminStatus
ifOperStatus
ifLastChange
ifInOctets
ifInUcastPkts
ifInNUcastPkts
ifInDiscards
ifInErrors
ifInUnknownProtos
ifOutOctets
ifOutUcastPkts
ifOutNUcastPkts
ifOutDiscards
ifOutErrors
ifOutQLen
0
22
1
1
00:00:25
1500
100
0
0
0
0
2134
14
0
0
0
280
show interface vpn
This command displays attributes of the configured VPN interface.
Syntax
show interface vpn [0-255]
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following is sample output displaying VPN interface 57 statistics:
XSRtop#show interface vpn 57
Vpn 57 is Admin Up
Internet address is 4.4.4.4, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
Multicast redirect to 6.6.6.6 is enabled.
This interface includes the VPN tunnel 'Boston'.
The tunnel peer's Internet IP address is 0.0.0.0.
The tunnel encapsulation protocol is UNKNOWN.
The identity used to initiate the tunnel is ''
The tunnel's current state is Disabled.
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Configuring Hardware Controllers
5
Configuring the Internet Protocol
Observing Syntax and Conventions
The CLI Syntax and conventions use the notation described below.
Convention
Description
xyz
Key word or mandatory parameters (bold)
[x]
[ ] Square brackets indicate an optional parameter (italic)
[x | y | z]
[ | ] Square brackets with vertical bar indicate a choice of values
{x | y | z}
{ | } Braces with vertical bar indicate a choice of a required value
[x {y | z} ]
[{ | } ] Combination of square brackets with braces and vertical bars indicates a required choice of an optional parameter
(config-if<xx>)
xx signifies interface type and number, e.g.: F1, S2/1.0, D1, M57, G3.
F indicates a FastEthernet, and G a GigabitEthernet interface.
Next Mode entries display the CLI prompt after a command is entered.
Sub‐command headings are displayed in red text.
soho.enterasys.com
Italicized, non-syntactic text indicates either a user-specified entry or text with
special emphasis
IP Commands
The following command sets define IP functionality on the XSR including:
•
“OSPF Commands” on page 5‐84.
•
“OSPF Debug and Show Commands” on page 5‐104.
•
“RIP Commands” on page 5‐123.
•
“RIP Show Commands” on page 5‐136.
•
“RTP Header Compression Commands” on page 5‐137.
•
“Policy‐Based Routing Commands” on page 5‐145.
•
“PBR Clear and Show Commands” on page 5‐148.
•
“ARP Commands” on page 5‐149.
•
“Other IP Commands” on page 5‐151.
•
“IP Clear and Show Commands” on page 5‐168.
•
“Network Address Translation Commands” on page 5‐182.
•
“Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol Commands” on page 5‐191.
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OSPF Commands
•
“VRRP Clear and Show Commands” on page 5‐197.
OSPF Commands
area authentication
This command enables/disables authentication for an OSPF area.
Syntax
area area-id authentication [message-digest]
area-id
OSPF area to be authenticated, expressed in decimals or IP addresses.
message-digest
Enables MD5 authentication on the OSPF area indicated by area‐id keyword
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes authentication from the OSPF area specified by area‐id:
no area area-id authentication
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
The default value is Type 0 authentication; that is, no authentication.
Example
This example enables authentication on OSPF area 10.0.0.0. interface Serial 1/1, whose address is 172.16.77.1, is part of area 10.0.0.0, so an authentication mechanism could be defined for it:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/1
XSR(config-if<S1/1)#ip address 172.16.77.1 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<S1/1)#ip ospf message-digest-key 20 md5 pass1
XSR(config)#router ospf 1
XSR(config-router)#network 172.16.77.1 0.0.0.0 area 10.0.0.0
XSR(config-router)#area 10.0.0.0 authentication message-digest
area default-cost
This command sets the cost value for the default route that is sent into a stub area by an Area Border Router (ABR). This command is restricted to ABRs attached to stub areas.
Syntax
area area-id default-cost cost
5-84
area-id
The stub area expressed in decimals or IP addresses.
cost
Cost value for a summary route that is sent to a stub area by default. Valid values are 24‐bit numbers, from 0 to 16,777,215.
Configuring the Internet Protocol
OSPF Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the cost value from the summary route that is sent by default into the stub area identified by the area‐id:
no area area-id default-cost
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
1
Example
The following command sets the cost value for the stub area 10 as 99:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip address 172.16.101.5 255.255.255.252
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#router ospf
XSR(config-router)#network 172.16.101.5 0.0.0.0 area 10
XSR(config-router)#area 10 stub no-summary
XSR(config-router)#area 10 default-cost 99
area nssa
This command configures an area as a Not So Stubby Area (NSSA) which allows some external routes represented by external Link‐State Advertisements (LSAs) to be imported into it. This is in contrast to a stub area that does not allow any external routes. External routes that are not imported into an NSSA can be represented by means of a default route. It is used when an OSPF inter‐network is connected to multiple non‐OSPF routing domains.
Syntax
area area-id nssa [default-information-originate]
area-id
NSSA area expressed in decimals or IP addresses.
default-informationoriginate
Generates a default of Type 7 into the NSSA. It is used when the router is a NSSA ABR
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command changes the NSSA back to a plain area:
no area area-id nssa [default-information-originate]
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
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OSPF Commands
Default
No NSSA defined
Example
The following example configures area 10 as a NSSA area:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip address 172.16.10.5 255.255.255.252
XSR(config)#router ospf 1
XSR(config-router)#network 172.16.10.5 0.0.0.0 area 10
XSR(config-router)#area 10 nssa default-information-originate
area range
This command defines the range of addresses to be used by Area Boundary Routers (ABRs) when they communicate routes to other areas. ABRs summarize an area’s intra‐area routes into inter‐
area routes which are then injected into other areas. The metric used is the highest metric of the included intra‐area routes. The forwarding address is 0.
Other actions implemented by this command include:
•
A summary range becomes active if it includes at least one intra‐area route being leaked into the area.
•
A discard route is installed for an active summary range. Conversely, when it becomes inactive, the discard route is removed.
•
The cost of the summary range is the highest cost among all leaked intra‐area routes.
•
SNMP supports area range via MIB object ospfAreaRangeTable as defined in RFC‐1850.
Note: You should avoid needless reorigination of Type-3 Link-State Advertisements (LSAs). For
example, leaking intra-area routes which do not change the cost of a summary will re-origination the
summary LSA.
Syntax
area area-id range ip-address mask [advertise][not-advertise]
area-id
Area at the boundary of which routes will be summarized. Valid values are decimals or IP addresses.
ip-address
Common prefix of summarized networks.
mask
Length of the common prefix.
advertise
Broadcasts a single Type‐3 LSA for all intra‐area routes leaked into this area and included in the summary range.
not-advertise
Suppresses Type‐3 LSA generation for all routes in the summary range.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command bars routes from being summarized:
no area area-id range address mask
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
OSPF Commands
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Examples
This example sets the address range used by this router for summarized routes learned at the boundary of area 0.0.0.0, as 172.16.0.0/16:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip address 172.16.16.1 255.255.240.0
XSR(config)#router ospf 1
XSR(config-router)#network 172.16.16.1 0.0.0.0 area 0.0.0.0
XSR(config-router)#area range 0.0.0.0 172.16.0.0 255.255.0.0
The following example aggregates 64.64.64.0/24 in area 1 into summary route 64.0.0.0/8 and makes the summary available for creation of inter‐area routes:
XSR(config)#router ospf 1
XSR(config-router)#area 1 range 64.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
area stub
This command defines an area as a stub area.
Syntax
area area-id stub [no-summary]
area-id
Stub area expressed in decimals or IP addresses.
no-summary
Bars an ABR from sending LSAs into the stub area. When used, this value means all destinations outside the stub area are represented via a default route.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command changes the stub back to a plain area:
no area area-id stub [no-summary]
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Defaults
Disabled
Example
The following example defines area 10 as a stub area:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip address 172.16.152.1 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<F1>)#exit
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OSPF Commands
XSR(config)#router ospf
XSR(config)#network 172.16.152.0 0.0.0.0 area 10
XSR(config)#area 10 stub
area virtual-link
This command defines an OSPF virtual link, which represents a logical connection between the backbone and a non‐backbone OSPF area. Backbones are areas including all ABRs, networks not wholly contained in any area, and their attached routers.
Syntax
area area-id virtual-link router-id [authentication [message-digest | null]]
[hello-interval seconds] [retransmit-interval seconds] [transmit-delay seconds]
[dead-interval seconds] [authentication-key key | message-digest-key keyid md5
key]
area-id
Transit area for the virtual link ‐ expressed as decimal or IP addresses ‐ and through which a virtual link is established.
router-id
The ABR’s Router ID. A virtual link is built from the ABR, where virtual link configuration occurs. You can configure a loopback address for the XSR to be used as the Router ID with theinterface loopback command. If no loopback address is defined, the Router ID is the highest non‐zero IP address of existing configured and active interfaces.
authentication
Authentication type.
message-digest
MD5 authentication is used.
null
No authentication is used.
hello-interval
seconds
Interval between hello packets on a port. It must be the same for all nodes attached to a network. Range: 1 to 3600 seconds.
retransmitinterval
seconds
Interval between successive retransmissions of the same LSAs. Valid values are greater than the expected period for the update packet to reach and return from the port, ranging from 1 to 3600 seconds.
transmit-delay
seconds
Estimated interval for a link state update packet on the port to be transmitted, ranging from 1 to 3600 seconds.
dead-interval
seconds
Interval that hello packets of a router are not communicated to neighbor routers before the neighbor learn that the router sending the hello packet is out of service. This value must be the same for all nodes attached to a certain subnet, and ranges from 1 to 3600 seconds.
authentication
key
Password used by neighbor routers. Valid values are alphanumeric strings up to 8 bytes. Neighbor routers on a network must have the same password.
message-digest
keyid md5 key
Specifies a key id and a password (key) for MD5 authentication. Neighbor routers and this router use the keyid and key. Valid values for keyid are 1 to 255. Valid values for the key are alphanumeric strings of up to 16 characters. Neighbor routers on a network must have the same keyid and key.
Syntax of the “no” Form
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
OSPF Commands
The no form of this command removes the virtual link:
no area area-id virtual-link router-id [authentication [message-digest | null]]
[hello-interval seconds] [retransmit-interval seconds] [transmit-delay seconds]
[dead-interval seconds] [authentication-key key | message-digest-key keyid md5
key]
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Defaults
•
hello‐interval seconds: 10 seconds
•
retransmit‐interval seconds: 5 seconds
•
transmit‐delay seconds: 1 second
•
dead‐interval seconds: 40 seconds
•
authentication‐key key: No default
•
message‐digest‐key keyid md5 key: No default
Example
The following example, as illustrated in Figure 5‐1, shows the virtual link configuration for two ABRs. ABR1 physically interfaces area 2 to the backbone (area 0.0.0.0). ABR2 physically interfaces area 3 to area 2. A virtual link is created between the two ABRs by means of area 2, which becomes the transit area. The RouterID for ABR1 is 192.168.33.1. The RouterID for ABR2 is 192.168.33.2.
On ABR1 enter the following commands:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip address 172.16.150.1 255.255.255.0
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip address 192.16.33.1 255.255.255.0
XSR(config)#router ospf 1
XSR(config-router)#network 172.16.150.0 0.0.0.255 area 0.0.0.0
XSR(config-router)#network 192.16.33.0 0.0.0.255 area 2
XSR(config-router)#area 2 virtual-link 192.16.33.2
On ABR2 enter the following commands:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip address 172.15.0.1 255.255.0.0
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/1
XSR(config-if<S1/1)#ip address 192.16.33.2 255.255.255.0
XSR(config)#router ospf 1
XSR(config-router)#network 172.15.0.1 0.0.0.0 area 3
XSR(config-router)#network 192.16.33.0 0.0.0.255 area 2
XSR(config-router)#area 2 virtual-link 192.16.33.1
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OSPF Commands
Figure 5-1
Area 0.0.0.0
Eth 1
172.16.150.1
Area Virtual Link Example
Area 2
ABR1
ABR2
virtual link
Serial 1/1
Serial 1/0
192.16.33.1
192.16.33.2
Area 3
Eth 1
172.15.0.1
auto-virtual-link
This command automatically creates virtual links. Refer to the area-virtual-link command for more related information.
Syntax
auto-virtual-link
Syntax
This command’s no form negates the automatic creation of a virtual link:
no auto-virtual-link
Mode
OSPF Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Example
XSR(config-router)#auto-virtual-link
database-overflow
This command dynamically limits the size of OSPF Link‐State database overflow, a condition where the XSR is unable to maintain the database in its entirety. Typically, database overflow occurs when a router imports a large number of external, Type 5 LSA routes into OSPF. This command lets you control other LSA types as well: 1‐4, 7, and 10.
Usually, this problem can be averted by proper configuration of OSPF routers into stub areas or NSSAs, since AS‐external LSAs are omitted from this type of Link‐State databases. But, in the event of an unexpected database overflow, there is insufficient time to perform this type of isolation.
Syntax
database-overflow [LSA type][option]
LSA Type:
5-90
asbr-summary
AS Border Router Summary LSA (Type 4).
external
AS External Area LSA (Type 5).
Configuring the Internet Protocol
OSPF Commands
network
Network LSA (Type 2).
nssa-external
NSSA External LSA (Type 7).
opaque-area
Opaque Area LSA (Type 10).
router
Router LSA (Type 1).
summary
Summary LSA (Type 3).
Option:limit
Peak number of LSAs accepted before overflow occurs, ranging from ‐1 to 2,147,483,647.
exit-overflow
interval
Interval before XSR tries to exit overflow. Range: 0 to 86,400 seconds.
warning-level
LSA threshold past which a warning of pending overflow is generated, ranging from 0 to 2,147,483,647.
Defaults
•
Limit: ‐1
•
Exit External Interval: 0
•
Warning Level: 0
Mode
OSPF Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Examples
The following example configures parameters for Type 5 external LSA database overflow:
XSR(config)#router ospf 1
XSR(config-router)#database-overflow external limit 1000
XSR (config-router)#database-overflow external exit-overflow-interval 3600
XSR(config-router)#database-overflow external warning-level 900
The following example configures parameters for Type 2 network LSA database overflow:
XSR(config)#router ospf 1
XSR(config-router)#database-overflow network limit 1000
XSR (config-router)#database-overflow external exit-overflow-interval 3600
XSR(config-router)#database-overflow external warning-level 900
distance (OSPF)
This command defines an administrative distance (route preference) for the OSPF domain. OSPF distances are ranked higher than connected or static networks but lower than RIP networks.
If several routes to the same destination are offered to the Routing Table Manager (RTM) by different protocols, installation is based on the distance of the protocol with the lowest value. You can set the same distance for different protocols (except for multiple static routes) with a tiebreak based on default distances.
Refer to the distance command on page 176 and ip route command on page 209 for a comparison with OSPF and static routes.
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OSPF Commands
Syntax
distance ospf {intra | inter | ext} weight
intra
OSPF intra‐area routes.
inter
OSPF inter‐area routes.
ext
OSPF external routes.
weight
Administrative distance used by the routing protocol. Range: 1 to 240.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command resets the administrative distance to the default value for the particular type of routes. If no type of routes is referenced, the distance for all three types of OSPF routes are reset to the default.
no distance OSPF {intra | inter | ext}
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
•
Distances between 241 and 255 are reserved for internal use.
•
The condition of intra‐area distance is less than inter‐area distance is less than external distance is always preserved. If you attempt to configure otherwise, the configuration will fail and you will receive a warning message.
•
Default distances must not be the same for any two routing protocols.
•
For default distances, refer to Table 5‐2 below. Table 5-1
5-92
Default Administrative Distances
Route Source
Default Distance
Connected
0
Static
1
BGP external
20
OSPF intra
108
OSPF inter
110
OSPF ext
112
RIP
120
BGP internal
200
Reserved
241‐255
Configuring the Internet Protocol
OSPF Commands
Example
This example sets the administrative distance for OSPF external routes to 65. Note that you can do so only if both intra and inter OSPF distances are less than 65, otherwise you will not be permitted to change the value.
XSR(config)#router ospf 1
XSR(config-router)#distance ospf ext 65
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OSPF Commands
ip ospf cost
This command sets the cost of sending a packet on a interface. Each router interface that participates in OSPF routing is assigned a default cost. This command overwrites the default.
Syntax
ip ospf cost cost
cost
Cost of sending a packet ranging from 1 to 65,535.
Syntax of the “no” Form
no ip ospf cost
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
10
Example
The following example sets cost 20 for interface FastEthernet 1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip ospf cost 20
ip ospf dead-interval
This command sets the interval a router must wait to receive a hello packet from its neighbor before determining that the neighbor is out of service.
Syntax
ip ospf dead-interval seconds
seconds
Interval that a router must wait to receive the hello packet. It must be the same on neighboring routers (on a specific subnet), but it can vary between subnets. This value is an unsigned integer ranging from 1 to 65,535 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the value to the default:
no ip ospf dead-interval
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
OSPF Commands
Default
Four times the value of the seconds parameter defined in the ospf hello-interval command.
Example
The following example sets the dead interval to 20 for FastEthernet port 2:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 2
XSR(config-if<F2>)#ip address 172.16.16.1 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<F2>)#ip ospf dead-interval 20
ip ospf hello-interval
This command sets the number of seconds a router must wait before sending a hello packet to neighbor routers on the interface.
Syntax
ip ospf hello-interval seconds
seconds
The hello interval. It must be the same on neighboring routers (on a specific subnet), but it can vary between subnets, ranging from 1 to 65,535 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the value to the default:
no ip ospf hello-interval
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
•
10 seconds for broadcast and point‐to‐point networks.
Example
The following example sets the hello interval to 5 for interface FastEthernet 1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip address 172.16.16.1 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip ospf hello-interval 5
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OSPF Commands
ip ospf message-digest-key
This command enables/disables OSPF MD5 authentication on an interface to validate OSPF routing updates between neighboring routers.
Syntax
ip ospf message-digest-key keyid md5 key
keyid
Key identifier on the interface where MD5 authentication is enabled. Valid values are integers from 1 to 255.
key
Password for MD5 authentication to be used with the keyid. Valid values are alphanumeric strings of up to 16 characters.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the password from this router:
no ip ospf message-digest-key keyid
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
OSPF MD5 authentication disabled
Example
The following example enables OSPF MD5 authentication on interface Serial 1/0, and sets the key identifier at 20, and the password as pass1.
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip address 172.16.77.1 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip ospf message-digest-key 20 md5 pass1
XSR(config)#router ospf 1
XSR(config-router)#network 172.16.77.1 0.0.0.0 area 10.0.0.0
XSR(config-router)#area 10.0.0.0 authentication message-digest
ip ospf passive
This command suppresses OSPF packets from being sent or received over a specified interface.
Syntax
ip ospf passive
Syntax of the “no” Form
This command’s no form removes the passive action on the interface:
no ip ospf passive
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
OSPF Commands
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>#
Example
The following example imposes OSPF passive on Fast Ethernet interface 1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip ospf passive
ip ospf poll-interval
This command sets the OSPF polling interval on Multipoint and Point‐to‐Point interfaces. The default value allows the adjacency to be established per the default Hello interval.
Syntax
ip ospf poll-interval <interval>
interval
Poll period, ranging from 1 to 65,535.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the poll interval:
no ip ospf poll-interval
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
This example configures the poll interval to 12 times the default hello interval (10 seconds):
XSR(config-if<S1/0:0>)#ip ospf poll-interval 120
ip ospf priority
This command sets the OSPF priority value for router interfaces. The priority value is communicated between routers by means of hello messages and this value influences the election of a designated router.
Syntax
ip ospf priority number
number
Specifies the router priority, ranging from 0 to 255.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the value to the default:
no ip ospf priority
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OSPF Commands
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
1
Example
The following example sets OSPF priority to 20 for FastEthernet port 1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip address 172.16.16.1 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip ospf priority 20
ip ospf retransmit-interval
This command sets the interval between retransmissions of link state advertisements for adjacencies that belong to this interface.
Syntax
ip ospf retransmit-interval seconds
seconds
Sets the retransmit period, ranging from 1 to 3600 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the value to the default:
no ip ospf retransmit-interval
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
5 seconds
Example
The following example sets the retransmit interval for interface FastEthernet 1 to 20:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip address 172.16.16.1 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip ospf retransmit-interval 20
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OSPF Commands
ip ospf transmit-delay
This command sets the interval required to transmit a link state update packet on this interface.
Syntax
ip ospf transmit-delay seconds
seconds
Specifies the transmit delay, ranging from 1 to 3600 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the value to the default.
no ip ospf transmit-delay
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
1 second
Example
The following example sets the interval required to transmit a link state update packet on interface FastEthernet 1 at 20 seconds:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip address 172.16.16.1 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip ospf transmit-delay 20
network
This command identifies and defines area IDs for interfaces OSPF runs on.
Syntax
network address wildcard-mask area area-id
address
IP address of a specific interface or a group of interfaces as a function of the wild‐card mask.
wildcard-mask
Inverted mask that begins with 0s and end with 1s. The most specific format is 0.0.0.0, which matches one address. The least specific is 255.255.255.255 matching any address.
area-id
Specifies the area‐id that the OSPF address range is linked to. Valid values are decimal values or IP addresses.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes OSPF routing for interfaces identified by the address and wildcard‐mask parameters:
no network address wildcard-mask area area-id
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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OSPF Commands
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Defaults
•
Disabled
•
Costs: LAN ‐ 10, Serial ‐ 64
Example
In this example, three routers are configured to run OSPF. Router R1 and R3 are internal routers. R1 is internal to area 1, and R3 internal to area 0. R2 is an Area Border Router (ABR). Enter the following commands on R1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip address 131.108.1.1 255.255.255.0
XSR(config)#router ospf 1
XSR(config-router)#network 131.108.1.0 0.0.255.255 area 1
On R2 (ABR), enter the following commands:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 2
XSR(config-if<F2>)#ip address 131.108.1.2 255.255.255.0
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip address 131.108.2.3 255.255.255.0
XSR(config)#router ospf 1
XSR(config-router)#network 131.108.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 1
XSR(config-router)#network 131.108.2.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
On R3, enter the following commands:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip address 131.108.2.4 255.255.255.0
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip address 110.0.0.4 255.0.0.0
XSR(config)#router ospf 1
XSR(config-router)#network 131.108.2.0. 0.0.0.255 area 0
XSR(config-router)#network 110.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 0
redistribute
This command redistributes static or RIP routes into OSPF.
Syntax
redistribute {rip | bgp | static | connected}[metric metric-value][metric-type 1
| 2][route-map-number][tag tag-value]
5-100
rip
Imports RIP routes.
bgp
Imports BGP routes.
static
Imports static routes.
connected
Imports connected routes.
Configuring the Internet Protocol
OSPF Commands
metric-value
Cost of a route being redistributed into OSPF, ranging from 0 to 16,777,214.
metric-type
OSPF exterior metric type.
1/2
OSPF external Type 1 or 2 metrics.
route-mapnumber
Number of the associated route map.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command cancels the redistribution of routes:
no redistribute from_protocol [metric metricvalue]
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
Disabled
Examples
This example redistributes static routes from 5 hops away into RIP:
XSR(config-router)#router rip
XSR(config-router)#redistribute static 5
The following example redistributes intra, inter and external OSPF routes into RIP:
XSR(config-router)#redistribute ospf match internal match external
The following example imports all OSPF routes into RIP with the default RIP metric of 1. It is equivalent to the command entered earlier.
XSR(config-router)#redistribute ospf
router ospf
This command enables the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) protocol.
Syntax
router ospf process-id
process-id
Process ID number.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables OSPF:
no router ospf process-id
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
XSR CLI Reference Guide
5-101
OSPF Commands
Next Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
OSPF disabled
Example
The following example enables OSPF routing:
XSR(config)#router ospf 2
XSR(config-router)#
summary address
This command summarizes locally‐sourced (Type‐5) routes on the XSR which are redistributed from other protocols into OSPF. Type‐7 translations are not summarized. Other actions implemented include:
•
A summary range becomes active if it includes at least one locally sourced route being redistributed into OSPF. If an active summary range is advertised, then a discard route will be installed for the summary range. Conversely, when it becomes inactive, the discard route is removed.
•
Activated summary ranges to be advertised will result in a Type‐5 Linke‐State Announcement (LSA). If they include a NSSA area, then they will also produce a Type‐7 LSA for each NSSA area.
•
The type/cost of the summary range is the highest type/cost among all included locally‐
sourced routes. The forwarding address is 0.
•
Summary ranges may overlap. So, for a locally‐sourced route, the most specific range becomes active.
•
Appendix E processing provides a unique link‐state ID for all Type‐5 LSAs advertised, be they the result of Type‐7 to Type‐5 translations, summarization or locally‐sourced routes which are not summarized.
•
A Type‐5 LSA generated by translation may supplant a Type‐5 LSA originating from a local source. This will not affect what is being generated into a NSSA because translations are not advertised into NSSA areas.
•
If for a given prefix, both a summary and a locally‐sourced route exist, the summary will be considered superior even if the summary includes only this locally‐sourced route.
•
Needless reorigination of Type‐5 LSAs will be avoided. For example. importing locally‐
sourced routes which do not change the type/cost of a summary will not result in reorigination of the summary LSA.
•
Type‐7 translations are not affected by this command. If an overflow condition occurs then both summary ranges and non‐summarized routes will be flushed from the AS.
Syntax
summary-address <ip-address><ip-mask>[not-advertise][tag <tag>]
5-102
Configuring the Internet Protocol
OSPF Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes summary addressing on the XSR:
no summary-address <ip-address><ip-mask>
ip-address ip-mask
Subnet/mask used for the summary range.
not-advertise
Suppress routes in the summary range.
tag
Value used in the generated Type‐5 LSA .
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Example
The following example produce a single Type‐5 LSA for all routes redistributed into OSPF covered by the prefix 64.0.0.0/8:
XSR(config-router)#summary-address 64.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
timers spf
This command changes timer values to fine‐tune the OSPF network.
Syntax
timers spf spf-delay spf-holdtime
spf-delay
Delay between the receipt of an update and the SPF execution, ranging from 0 to 4,294,967,295 seconds.
spf-holdtime
Minimum interval, in seconds, between two consecutive OSPF calculations. Range: 0 to 65,535. A value of 0 indicates that two consecutive OSPF calculations are performed immediately after the other.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command restores the default timer values:
no timers spf
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Defaults
•
spf‐delay: 5
•
spf‐holdtime: 10
Example
XSR(config)#router ospf 1
XSR(config-router)#network 172.15.0.0 0.0.255.255 area 0.0.0.0
XSR(config-router)#timers spf 7 3
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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OSPF Debug and Show Commands
OSPF Debug and Show Commands
debug ip ospf dr
This command debugs OSPF designated router events. As with all XSR debug commands, it is set to privilege level 15 by default.
Note: This command does not display in running config because it is a debug function. It must be
set manually every time the XSR is rebooted.
Syntax
debug ip ospf dr
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns the debug function to the default:
no debug ip ospf dr
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Example
The following example indicates the election of a designated router:
OSPF: Elect DR. dr:53.53.53.21 bdr:53.53.53.6 GigabitEthernet 2
Parameter Descriptions
Elect DR
OSPF DR Election.
dr:53.53.53.21
Designated router.
bdr:53.53.53.6
Backup Designated router.
GigabitEthernet 2
Interface on which the designated router resides.
debug ip ospf packet
This command debugs received and transmitted OSPF packets. As with all XSR debug commands, it is set to privilege level 15 by default.
Note: This command does not display in running config because it is a debug function. It must be
set manually every time the XSR is rebooted.
Syntax
debug ip ospf packet
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
OSPF Debug and Show Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns the debug function to the default:
no debug ip ospf packet
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Examples
The following example displays a transmitted Hello packet:
OSPF: Tx PKT. Hello v:2 t:1 l:44 rid:1.1.1.4 aid:0.0.0.5 chk:fa94 aut:0000 from
GigabitEthernet 2 to 224.0.0.5
The following example displays a received Hello packet that failed verification because the area ID does not match:
OSPF: Rx PKT. Hello v:2 t:1 l:44 rid:10.0.0.1 aid:0.0.0.3 chk:e9a2 aut:0000 from
GigabitEthernet 2 is NOk
The following example displays a received Hello packet that passed verification:
OSPF: Rx PKT. Hello v:2 t:1 l:48 rid:10.0.0.1 aid:0.0.0.5 chk:8846 aut:0000 from
GigabitEthernet 2 is Ok
The following example displays a received database description packet:
OSPF: Tx PKT. Database v:2 t:2 l:172 rid:1.1.1.4 aid:0.0.0.5 chk:7204 aut:0000
from GigabitEthernet 2 to 53.53.53.21
The following example displays a transmitted link state request packet:
OSPF: Tx PKT. LS request v:2 t:3 l:228 rid:1.1.1.4 aid:0.0.0.5 chk:99d5 aut:0000
from GigabitEthernet 2 to 53.53.53.21
The following example displays a received link state update packet:
OSPF: Rx PKT. LS update v:2 t:4 l:96 rid:10.0.0.1 aid:0.0.0.4 chk:7214 aut:0000
from GigabitEthernet 2.2 is Ok
The following example displays a transmitted link state acknowledge packet:
OSPF: Tx PKT. LS Ack v:2 t:5 l:44 rid:1.1.1.4 aid:0.0.0.5 chk:b63d aut:0000 from
GigabitEthernet 2 to 53.53.53.21
Parameter Descriptions
Tx PKT
OSPF Packet transmitted.
Hello
OSPF Hello Packet.
v:2
OSPF Version.
t:1
OSPF Packet Type.
l:44
OSPF Packet length.
rid:1.1.1.4 OSPF Router ID.
aid:0.0.0.5
OSPF Area ID.
chk:fa94
OSPF Packet Checksum.
aut:0000
Authentication.
from GigabitEthernet 2
Outgoing interface.
to 224.0.0.5
Destination IP address.
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OSPF Debug and Show Commands
Rx PKT
OSPF Packet received.
is Ok
OSPF received packet passed verification.
is NOk
OSPF received packet failed verification (i.e., Area ID does not match).
Database
OSPF Database Description Packet.
LS request
OSPF Link State Request Packet.
LS update
OSPF Link State Update Packet.
LS Ack
OSPF Link State Acknowledge Packet.
debug ip ospf lsas
This command debugs OSPF Link State Advertisements (LSAs). As with all XSR debug commands, it is set to privilege level 15 by default.
Note: This command does not display in running config because it is a debug function. It must be
set manually every time the XSR is rebooted.
Syntax
debug ip ospf lsas
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns the debug function to the default:
no debug ip ospf lsas
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Examples
The following example displays an LSA added to the database:
OSPF: Add LSA. summary, aid:0.0.0.4 age:0000 opt:02 id:53.53.53.0 rid:1.1.1.4
seq:80000001 chk:4867 l:28
The following example displays a received Type 1 (router) LSA:
OSPF: Rx LSA. router, nbr:10.0.0.1 age:002f opt:22 id:10.0.0.1 rid:10.0.0.1
seq:800001aa chk:f671 l:36
The following example displays a queue delayed acknowledgement:
<191>May 21 07:52:39 1.1.1.4 OSPF: Queue Delayed Ack. router, nbr:10.0.0.1
age:002f opt:22 id:10.0.0.1 rid:10.0.0.1 seq:800001aa chk:f671 l:36
The following example displays an AS border router Type 4 summary LSA:
OSPF: Rx LSA. asbr-summary, nbr:10.0.0.1 age:03e6 opt:02 id:10.0.0.1 rid:1.1.1.4
seq:80000065 chk:3c9f l:28
The following example displays a transmitted external Type 5 LSA from outgoing interface GigabitEthernet 2:
5-106
Configuring the Internet Protocol
OSPF Debug and Show Commands
OSPF: Tx LSA. external, age:017a opt:20 id:13.0.0.0 rid:10.0.0.1 seq:80000088
chk:807a l:36 from GigabitEthernet 2
The following example displays a received LSA acknowledgement:
OSPF: Rx Ack. external, nbr:10.0.0.1 age:017b opt:20 id:13.0.0.0 rid:10.0.0.1
seq:80000088 chk:807a l:36
The following example displays an LSA Updated/Modified in the database:
OSPF: Upd LSA. summary, aid:00000005 age:0000 opt:02 id:1.1.1.3 rid:1.1.1.4
seq:80000099 chk:4a2d l:28
The following example displays a retransmitted LSA:
OSPF: RTx LSA. summary, nbr:10.0.0.1 age:0000 opt:02 id:2.2.3.0 rid:1.1.1.4
seq:80000097 chk:1f8f l:28
Parameter Descriptions
Add LSA
OSPF Lsa Added to database
summary
OSPF Summary LSA
aid:0.0.0.4
OSPF LSA Area id
age:0000
OSPF LSA Age
opt:02 OSPF LSA Options
id:53.53.53.0
OSPF LSA Identifier
rid:1.1.1.4
OSPF LSA Router Id
seq:80000001
OSPF LSA Sequence Number
chk:4867
OSPF LSA Checksum
l:28
OSPF LSA Length
Rx LSA
OSPF LSA Received
router
OSPF Router LSA
Queue Delayed Ack
OSPF Queued Delayed Acknowledgement
asbr-summary
OSPF AS Border Router Summary LSA
Tx LSA
OSPF LSA Transmitted
Rtx LSA
OSPF LSA retransmitted (from retransmission queue)
external
OSPF External LSA
from GigabitEthernet 2
Outgoing interface
Rx Ack
OSPF Received Link State Acknowledgement
Upd LSA
OSPF LSA Updated/Modified in database
debug ip ospf nbr
This command debugs OSPF neighbor events. As with all XSR debug commands, it is set to privilege level 15 by default.
Note: This command does not display in running config because it is a debug function. It must be
set manually every time the XSR is rebooted.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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OSPF Debug and Show Commands
Syntax
debug ip ospf nbr
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns the debug function to the default:
no debug ip ospf nbr
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Examples
The following example displays a Transmit Database Description packet:
OSPF: Tx DDP. nbr:10.0.0.1 mtu:05dc opt:42 flg:00 seq:00002400 from
GigabitEthernet 2.1
The following example displays a received database description packet from incoming interface GigabitEthernet 2.1 ‐ I:
OSPF: Rx DDP. nbr:10.0.0.1 mtu:05dc opt:42 flg:03 seq:00002401 from
GigabitEthernet 2.1
The following example displays a Neighbor Changing state where the neighbor router ID is 10.0.0.1, the neighbor IP address is 2.2.3.21, and the previous state is EXCHANGE.
OSPF: NBR change state. nbr:10.0.0.1 ipa:1.2.3.21 state:EXCHANGE
The following example indicates the neighbor is a slave for the database exchange:
OSPF: NBR is slave. nbr:10.0.0.1 ipa:2.2.3.21 state:EX_START
Parameter Descriptions
5-108
Tx DDP
OSPF Transmit Database Description packet
nbr:10.0.0.1
Neighbor IP address
mtu:05dc
Interface MTU
opt:42
Options
flg:00
Flags
seq:00002400
Sequence number
from GigabitEthernet 2.1
Outgoing interface
Rx DDP
OSPF Received Database Description packet
from GigabitEthernet 2.1
Incoming interface
NBR change state
Neighbor Changing state
nbr:10.0.0.1
Neighbor Router ID ipa:2.2.3.21
Neighbor IP address
state:EXCHANGE
Previous State
NBR is slave
Neighbor is a slave for a database exchange.
Configuring the Internet Protocol
OSPF Debug and Show Commands
show ip ospf
This command, when any debugging type is enabled, displays output about the following types of OSPF information: designated router events, neighbor events, Link State Advertisements (LSAs), and packets.
Syntax
show ip ospf
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following is sample output when all debugging types are enabled:
XSR#show ip ospf
Routing Process "ospf 1 " with ID 1.1.1.4
Supports only single TOS(TOS0) route
It is an area border and autonomous system boundary router
Summary Link update interval is 0 seconds.
External Link update interval is 0 seconds.
Debugging enabled for:
dr
lsa
nbr
packet
Redistributing External Routes from:
static
Number of areas in this router is 4
Area BACKBONE (0)
Number of interfaces in this area is 1
Area has no authentication
SPF algorithm executed 2 times
Area ranges are
Area 0.0.0.5
Number of interfaces in this area is 2
Area has no authentication
SPF algorithm executed 2 times
Area ranges are
18.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
Parameter Descriptions
Routing Process
OSPF process number and router ID.
Supports
TOS support.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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OSPF Debug and Show Commands
It is
OSPF router designation. Valid values: area border, autonomous system boundary, and internal.
Summary Link update
interval
Update interval for summary LSAs generated by this router.
External Link update
interval
Update interval for external LSAs generated by this router.
Redistributing
External Routes from
Valid redistributed routes: static, RIP, OSPF.
Number of areas in
this router
Sum of areas this router belongs to followed by types of areas.
Number of interfaces
in this area
Sum of interfaces assigned to this area.
Area authentication
Type of authentication used for this area.
SPF algorithm
executed
Number of times the SPF algorithm is run on this router for this area.
Area ranges
Summarized area ranges.
show ip ospf border-routers
This command displays information about OSPF internal route table entries to ABRs and ASBRs.
Syntax
show ip ospf border-routers
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following is sample output:
XSR>show ip ospf border-routers
OSPF internal Routing Table
Codes: i - Intra-area route, I - Inter-area route
i
i
i
i
i
i
192.168.22.1
192.168.22.1
192.168.44.1
192.168.44.1
192.168.44.2
192.168.44.2
[64]
[64]
[64]
[64]
[64]
[64]
via
via
via
via
via
via
192.168.11.1,
192.168.11.1,
192.168.33.1,
192.168.33.1,
192.168.33.1,
192.168.11.1,
Serial1,
Serial1,
Serial2,
Serial2,
Serial2,
Serial1,
ABR,
ABR,
ABR,
ABR,
ABR,
ABR,
Area
Area
Area
Area
Area
Area
0,
4,
0,
2,
0,
0,
SPF
SPF
SPF
SPF
SPF
SPF
10
10
10
7
10
10
Parameter Descriptions
5-110
Router ID
OSPF router ID of the destination border router.
Cost
OSPF cost or metric of reaching a border router identified by the router ID.
Configuring the Internet Protocol
OSPF Debug and Show Commands
Next hop
IP address of an interface on a neighboring router identified by the router ID that can be reached.
Router type
Type of destination border router ‐ ABR or ASBR.
Area
ID of the area through which the route to the destination border router identified by the router ID has been learned.
SPF number
Internal number identifying the SPF calculation that resulted in this coute’s installation. This number usually corresponds to the number of SPF calculations on this router for an area through which the route was learned.
show ip ospf database
This command displays the link state (LS) database.
Syntax
show
show
show
show
show
show
show
show
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ospf
ospf
ospf
ospf
ospf
ospf
ospf
ospf
database
database
database
database
database
database
database
database
router [link-state-id]
network [link-state-id]
summary [link-state-id]
asbr-summary [link-state-id]
nssa-external [link-state-id]
database-external [link-state-id]
database-summary
link-state-id
LS identifier. Valid values are IP addresses.
asbr-summary
Selects asbr‐summary (Type 4) link status records. Type 4 LS records are shown in their detail format. ASBR summary records are originated by ABRs.
external
Selects external (Type 5) LS records. Type 5 LS records are shown in detailed format. External records are originated by ASBRs.
network
Selects network (Type 2) LS records, to be shown in detailed format. Network records are originated by designated routers.
router
Selects router (Type 1) LS records to be shown in their detailed format. Router records are originated by all routers.
summary
Selects summary (Type 3) LS records to be shown in original format. Summary records are originated by ABRs.
database-summary
Selects a numerical summary of the contents of the LS database displayed.
nssa-external
Selects nssa‐external (Type 7) LS records to be shown in detailed format. Type 7 records are originated by ASBRs.
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following are sample responses:
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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OSPF Debug and Show Commands
No Parameter
XSR>show ip ospf database
OSPF Router with ID(10.1.2.1)
LinkID
10.1.1.1
10.1.2.1
Displaying
ADV Router
10.0.0.1
0x0
Net Link
Age
0x1
0x80000001
States (Area 0.0.0.0)
Seq#
Checksum
0x80000001
0x61c610.5.6.1
0x927c
Displaying
Router Link
States (Area 0.0.0.0)
LinkID
10.0.0.1
10.7.7.1
10.1.2.1
ADV Router
Age
10.0.0.1
0x5
10.7.7.1 0x1
10.1.2.1 0x0
LinkID
10.5.5.1
Displaying
ADV Router
10.1.2.1
Seq#
Checksum
0x80000006
0xcb25
0x80000003
0x3689
2
0x80000009
0xcdaa
4
Summary Net Link States (Area 0.0.0.0)
Age
Seq#
Checksum
0x0
0x80000001
0x927c
Router Parameter
XSR>show ip ospf database router
OSPF Router with ID (192.168.44.1)
Router Link States (Area 0.0.0.0)
Routing Bit Set on the LSA
LS age:1292
Options: (No TOS-capability, No DC)
LS Type: Router L inks
Link State ID: 192.168.22.1
LS Seq. Number: 80000007
Checksum: 0x185a
Length:72
Area Border Router
Number of Links: 4
Link connected to: a Stub Network
(Link ID) Network/subnet number: 172.14.0.0.
(Link Data) Network Mask: 255.255.0.0
Number of TOS metrics: 0
TOS 0 Metrics: 10
Link connected to: another router (point-to-point)
(Link ID) Neighboring Router ID: 192.168.44.2
(Link Data) Router Interface address: 192.168.22.1
Number of TOS metrics: 0
TOS 0 Metrics: 64
Link connected to: a Stub Network
(Link ID) Network/subnet number: 192.168.22.0.
(Link Data) Network Mask: 255.255.255.0
Number of TOS metrics: 0
TOS 0 Metrics: 64
Link connected to: a Virtual Link
(Link ID) Neighboring Router ID: 192.168.33.2
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
LinkCount
2
OSPF Debug and Show Commands
(Link Data) Router Interface address: 0.0.0.0
Number of TOS metrics: 0
TOS 0 Metrics: 64
Network Parameter
XSR>show ip ospf database network
OSPF Router with ID (192.168.44.2)
Net Link States (Area 0.0.0.0)
Routing Bit Set on this LSA
LS age: 332
Options: (No TOS-capability, DC)
LS Type: Network Links
Link State ID: 172.16.150.1 (address of Designated Router)
Advertising Router: 192.168.44.1
LS Seq. Number: 80000004
Checksum: 0xF627
Length: 32
Network mask: /24
Attached Router: 192.168.44.1
Attached Router: 192.168.44.2
Summary Parameter: Response
XSR>show ip ospf database summary
OSPF Router with ID (192.168.44.2)
Summary Net Link States (Area 0.0.0.0)
Routing Bit Set on this LSA
LS age: 412
Options: (No TOS-capability, DC)
LS Type: Summary Links (Network)
Link State ID: 172.15.0.0 (summary Network Number)
Advertising Router: 192.168.33.2
LS Seq. number: 80000006
Checksum: 0x6A7B
Length: 28
Network Mask: /16
TOS: 0 Metric: 10
ASBR-summary Parameter: Response
XSR>show ip ospf database asb-summary
OSPF Router with ID (192.168.44.2)
Summary ASB Link States (Area 1)
LS age: 513
Options: (No TOS-capability, No DC)
LS Type: Summary Links (AS Boundary Router address)
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OSPF Debug and Show Commands
Link State ID: 172.15.0.0 (summary Network Number)
Advertising Router: 192.168.44.2
LS Seq. number: 80000006
Checksum: 0x5ACD
Length: 28
Network Mask: /0
TOS: 0 Metric: 16777215
External Parameter Response
XSR>show ip ospf database external
OSPF Router with ID (192.168.44.2)
Type-5 AS External Link States
Routing Bit Set on this LSA
LS age: 98
Options: (No TOS-capability, DC)
LS Type: AS External Link
Link State ID: 172.14.0.0 (External Network Number)
Advertising Router: 192.168.33.2
LS Seq. number: 80000003
Checksum: 0x76E0
Length: 36
Network Mask: /16
Metric Type: 2 (Larger than any link state path)
TOS: 0
Metric: 20
Forward Address: 0.0.0.0
External Route Tag: 0
NSSA-External Parameter Response
XSR>show ip ospf database nssa-external
OSPF Router with ID (192.168.44.1)
Type-7 AS External Link States (Area 2)
Routing Bit Set on this LSA
LS age: 623
Options: (No TOS-capability, No Type 7/5 translation, DC)
LS Type: AS External Link
Link State ID: 172.14.0.0 (External Network Number)
Advertising Router: 192.168.33.2
LS Seq. number: 80000001
Checksum: 0x5971
Length: 36
Network Mask: /16
Metric Type: 2 (Larger than any link state path)
TOS: 0
Metric: 20
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OSPF Debug and Show Commands
Forward Address: 192.168.33.2
External Route Tag: 0
Database-summary Parameter Response
XSR>show ip ospf data database-summary
OSPF Router with ID (192.168.44.1)
AreaID
Router
Network
S-Net
0.0.0.0
2
0
2
2
2
0
3
AS External
Total
4
0
5
S-ASBR
0
0
0
Type-7 Subtotal
N/A
4
4
9
0
4
13
Delete
0
1
0
Manage
0
1
0
Parameter Descriptions
For No Parameter
Link ID
This field varies as a function of LS record type as follows:
•
Router link states ‐ router ID of the router originating the record.
•
Network links states ‐ interface IP address of designated router to the broadcast network.
•
Summary link states ‐ summary network prefix.
•
Asbr‐summary link states ‐ router ID of the ASBR.
•
External link states ‐ external network prefix.
ADV Router
Router ID of the router originating the LS record.
Age
Age of the LS record in seconds.
Seq# Sequence number assigned by OSPF to each LS record at its time of origination.
Checksum
Field in a LS record used to verify the integrity of the contents upon the receipt by another router.
Link count
Applies only to router LS records. Count is equal to or greater than the sum of active OSPF interfaces on the originating router.
For Router Parameter
Routing bit
Set for LSAs originated by other routers.
LSA age
Age of the LS record in seconds.
LS Type
Meaning of Bit settings in the options field.
LS Type
Router links for a router L record.
Link State ID
Originating router ID for a router LSA.
Advertising Router
Originating router ID.
LS Seq Number
Sequence number assigned by OSPF to this LS record at the time of its origination.
Checksum
Field in a LS record used to verify the integrity of its contents upon the receipt by another router.
Length
Length of the LS record in bytes.
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OSPF Debug and Show Commands
Type of router
Type of OSPF router ‐ internal, ABR, and ASBR.
Number of links
Total individual links inside this LS record.
Link connected to
Assumes different values as a function of the connection offered by a router interface (link). These links can be: point‐to‐point, to a transit network, to a stub network, and to a virtual link with assigned values from 1 to 4, respectively. Different connection types are referred to as different link types.
(Link ID)
Value corresponds to the link type.
Point‐to‐point
Router ID of the neighboring router.
Transit network
IP address of designated router interface to the network.
Stub network
IP address of network or subnet.
Virtual link
Router ID of the virtual link neighbor.
(Link Data)
Value corresponds to the link type.
Point‐to‐point link
Originating router interface address to the network.
Transit network
Originating router interface address to the network.
Stub network
Network mask.
Virtual link
Originating router MIB‐II ifIndex value for the unnumbered interface. Virtual links are treated as unnumbered point‐to‐point links..
Number of TOS metrics
Value is 0 due to lack of TOS support.
Metric
Link (interface) cost.
For Network Parameter
Routing bit
Set for LSAs originated by other routers.
LSA age
Age of the LS record in seconds.
Options
Meaning of Bit settings in the options field.
LS Type
Network links for a network LS record.
Link State ID
IP address of designated router port to the network.
Advertising Router
Originating router ID.
LS Seq. Number
Sequence number assigned by OSPF to this LS record at the time of its origination.
Checksum
Field in a LS record used to verify the integrity of the contents upon the receipt by another router.
Length
Length of the LS record in bytes.
Network mask
Mask for network to which designated router is attached.
Attached router
Router ID for all routers attached to the network that are adjacent to the designated router.
For Summary Parameter Display
5-116
Routing bit
Set for LSAs originated by other routers.
LSA age
Age of the LS record in seconds.
Options
Meaning of Bit settings in the options field.
Configuring the Internet Protocol
OSPF Debug and Show Commands
LS Type
Summary links (network) for summary LS record.
Link State ID
IP address of the summarized network.
Advertising Router
Originating router ID.
LS Seq. Number
Sequence number assigned by OSPF to this LS record at the time of its origination.
Checksum
Field in a LS record used to verify the integrity of the contents upon the receipt by another router.
Length
Length of the LS record in bytes.
Network mask
Summary mask for the summarized network.
TOS
0 due to non support of TOS.
Metric
Cost to reach summary network from advertising router (ABR).
For ASB-summary Parameter Display
LSA age
Age of the LS record in seconds.
Options
Meaning of Bit settings in the options field.
LS Type
Summary links (AS Boundary Router) for an asb‐summary LS record.
Link State ID
Router ID of the ASBR.
Advertising Router
Originating router ID.
LS Seq. Number
Sequence number assigned by OSPF to this LS record at the time of its origination.
Checksum
Field in a LS record used to verify the integrity of the contents upon the receipt by another router.
Length
Length of the LS record in bytes.
Network mask
Router ID for all routers attached to the network that are adjacent with the designated router. Only for the network parameter.
Attached router Router ID for all routers attached to the network that are adjacent with the designated router. Only for the network parameter.
TOS
0 due to non support of TOS.
Metric
Cost of reaching the ASBR as advertised by the ASBR.
For External Parameter
Routing bit
Set for LSAs originated by other routers.
LSA age
Age of the LS record in seconds.
Options
Meaning of Bit settings in the options field.
LS Type
AS external link for an external LS record.
Link State ID
IP address of the external network.
Advertising Router
Originating router ID (ASBR between the OSPF and non‐OSPF domain).
LS Seq. Number Sequence number assigned by OSPF to this LS record at the time of its origination.
Checksum
Field in a LS record used to verify the integrity of the contents upon receipt by another router.
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Length
Length of the LS record in bytes.
Network mask
Mask of the network.
Metric type
OSPF type 1 or 2 metric.
TOS
0 due to non support of TOS.
Metric
Cost to reach external network from advertising router (ASBR).
Forward address
Address to which packets for the advertised external network must be sent. When it is set to 0.0.0.0, it indicates packets must be sent to the advertising router (ASBR).
External route tag
Tag that can be applied to a route by the protocol from which it originates. This tag can be used for route management, but is often left blank.
For NSSA-external Parameter
Routing bit
Set for LSAs originated by other routers.
LSA age
Age of the LS record in seconds.
Options
Meaning of Bit settings in the options field.
LS Type
AS external link for an nssa‐external LS record.
Link State ID
IP address of the external network.
Advertising Router
Originating router ID (ASBR between the OSPF and non‐OSPF domain).
LS Seq. Number
Sequence number assigned by OSPF to this LS record at the time of its origination.
Checksum
Field in a LS record used to verify the integrity of the contents upon the receipt by another router.
Length
Length of the LS record in bytes.
Network mask
Mask of the network.
Metric type
OSPF type 1 or 2 metric.
TOS
0 due to non support of TOS.
Metric
Cost to reach external network from advertising router (ASBR).
Forward address
Address to which packets for the advertised external network must be sent. When set to 0.0.0.0, it indicates that packets must be sent to the advertising router (ASBR).
External route tag
Tag that can be applied to a route by the originating protocol. It can be used for route management, but often left blank.
For Database-summary Parameter
5-118
Area ID
Area identification.
Area ID
Sum of router LS records in each area.
Network
Sum of network LS records in each area.
S‐net
Sum of summary LS records in each area.
S‐ASBR
Sum of asb‐summary LS records in each area.
Type‐7
Sum of nssa‐external LS records in each area.
Configuring the Internet Protocol
OSPF Debug and Show Commands
AS external
Sum of external LS records.
Subtotal
Subtotal Sum of LS records per area.
Delete
Sum of LS records waiting for deletion from LS DB.
Maxage
Sum of LS records that have reached maximum age.
Total
Sum of LS records in the LS database on XSR.
show ip ospf interface
This command displays interface OSPF‐related information, including network type, priority, cost, hello, interval, dead interval.
Syntax
show ip ospf interface [type][number]
type
Interface type. Valid interface types are interfaces that exist on this router.
number
Interface number. Valid values correspond to the number of a particular interface type present on this router.
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following are sample responses:
XSR>show ip ospf interface
FastEthernet1 is UP
Internet Address 51.51.51.1 Mask 255.255.255.0
Internet Address 52.52.52.1 Mask 255.255.255.0 secondary
Internet Address 53.53.53.1 Mask 255.255.255.0 secondary
Area 0.0.0.2
Router ID 51.51.51.1,Network Type BROADCAST,Cost: 10
Transmit Delay is 1 sec,State DR,Priority 1
Designated Router id 51.51.51.1, Interface addr 51.51.51.1
No backup designated router on this network
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10,Dead 40,Wait 40,Retransmit 5
No Hellos (Passive Interface)
Neighbor Count is 0, Adjacent neighbor count is 0
Parameter Descriptions
Internet address
IP address and mask assigned to this interface.
Area
OSPF area to which this interface is assigned.
Router ID
OSPF router ID. OSPF selects the Router ID from one of the IP addresses configured on this router.
No Hellos (Passive Interface)
OSPF Hellos are not sent or received on this interface.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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OSPF Debug and Show Commands
Network type
OSPF network type. Values can be broadcast, non‐broadcast, point‐to‐
point, and point‐to‐multipoint. Refer to the ip ospf network
command for more information about network type.
Cost
OSPF interface cost. This value is either the default or assigned by means of the ip ospf cost command.
Transmit delay
Number in seconds added to the LSA age field at the time of LSA transmission.
State
Interface state ‐ not state between neighbors. Valid values: DR, BDR, Drother, point‐to‐point, point‐to‐multipoint, down, backup, loopback.
Priority
Interface priority value. Refer to the ip ospf priority command for more information on priority.
Designated Router id
Router ID of the designated router on this subnet if a DR exists.
Interface addr
Address of the designated routerʹs interface to this subnet if a DR exists.
Timer intervals configured
Refers to the ip ospf hello-interval and ip ospf dead-interval
commands for hello and dead interval values. The wait timer represents the period that a router waits before initiating a designated router/
backup router election. The wait timer changes when the dead interval changes. Retransmit timer represents the period between successive transmissions of LSAs until acknowledgement is received.
Neighbor count
Sum of neighbors over the interface.
Adjacent neighbor count Sum of adjacent (FULL state) neighbors on this port.
secondary
Specified secondary IP address.
show ip ospf neighbor
This command displays the state of communication between this router and its neighbor routers.
Syntax
show ip ospf neighbor [type number] [neighbor-id] [detail]
type
Interface type of the selected interface. Valid interface types are interfaces that exist on this router.
number
Interface number of the selected interface. Valid values correspond to the number of a particular interface type present on this router.
neighbor-id
Router ID of the neighbor router that the selected port is on.
detail
Displays more data about neighbors including the area in which they are neighbors, who the designated router/backup router is on the subnet if applicable, and the decimal equivalent of the E‐bit value from the hello packet options field.
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
OSPF Debug and Show Commands
Sample Output
The following are sample responses:
XSR#show ip ospf neighbor
ID
Pri
State
10.7.7.1
1
FULL
10.0.0.1
1
FULL
Dead Intvl
40
40
Address
10.5.6.1
10.1.1.1
Address
FastEthernet6
FastEthernet3
XSR#show ip ospf neighbor detail
Neighbor 10.7.7.1 interface address 10.5.6.1
In the area 0.0.0.0 via FastEthernet6
Neighbor priority is 1, state is FULL.
Options 1
Dead interval is 40 sec(s)
Link state retransmission interval is 5 sec(s)
Neighbor 10.0.0.1, interface address 10.1.1.1
In the area 0.0.0.0 via FastEthernet3
Neighbor priority is 1, State is FULL
Options 1
Dead interval is 40 sec(s)
Link state retransmission interval is 5 sec(s)
Parameter Description
ID
Router ID of the neighbor.
Pri
Priority of the neighbor over this interface.
State
OSPF communication state with followed by the interface status of the neighbor.
Dead Intvl
Interval this router will wait without receiving a Hello packet from a neighbor before declaring a neighbor as being down.
Address
IP address of the neighbor over the interface (see next field).
Interface
Interface of this router over which it has neighbors identified by the neighbor ID.
In the area
Area over which this router is a neighbor.
Options
Decimal equivalent of the E‐bit from the options field. 0 indicates the area is a stub area, 2 indicates the area is capable of accepting external LSAs (not a stub).
show ip ospf virtual-links
This command displays data about virtual links configured on a router.
Syntax
show ip ospf virtual-links
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
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OSPF Debug and Show Commands
Sample Output
The following is sample output:
XSR>show ip ospf virtual-links
Virtual Link OSPF_VLI to router 192.168.22.1 is up
Run as demand circuit.
DoNotAge LSA not allowed (Number of Dcbitless LSA is 2).
Transit area 4, via interface Serial1, Cost of using 64
Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State POINT-TO-POINT,
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
Hello due in 00:00:08
Adjacency State FULL
Virtual Link OSPF_VLO to router 192.168.44.1 is down
Run as demand circuit
DoNotAge LSA not allowed (Number of Dcbitless LSA is 2).
Transit area 2, Cost of using 65535.
Transmit delay is 1 sec, State DOWN.,
Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
Parameter Descriptions
5-122
Virtual link
Name assigned by OSPF, the ID of the virtual link neighbor and the virtual link status ‐ up or down.
Run as
Type of circuit that OSPF considers the virtual link to be.
DoNotAge LSAs not allowed
LSAs with the DoNotAge bit set in the age field are not permitted in the link state database.
Number of Dcbitless LSA
Sum of LSAs without the Demand Circuit (DC) bit set in the options fields in the link state database of the backbone area.
Transit area
ID of the transit area through which a virtual link is set.
Via interface
Interface of this router to the transit area.
Cost of using
Cost to OSPF of routing through the virtual link.
Transmit delay
Period (in seconds) added to the LSA age field when an LSA is sent from this router through the virtual link. The default (1) can be changed during virtual link configuration.
State
One of the OSPF interface states. The interface state assigned to a virtual link is Point‐to‐Point. Refer to the description of the show ip
interface command for more information.
Timer intervals configured
Timer intervals for a virtual link can be changed from their default values via optional parameters during virtual link configuration.
Hello due
Interval the router expects to get a Hello packet from its virtual link neighbor. Hello messages may be suppressed along virtual links.
Adjacency
State of adjacency between this router and its virtual link neighbor.
Configuring the Internet Protocol
RIP Commands
RIP Commands
distance (RIP)
This command defines administrative distances (route preference) in the RIP domain. The RIP default ranks higher than all other routed distances.
If several routes to the same destination are offered to the Routing Table Manager (RTM) by different protocols, installation is based on the distance of the protocol with the lowest value. You can set the same distance for different protocols (except for multiple static routes) with a tiebreak based on default distances.
Refer to distance ospf command on page 147 and ip route on page 209 for comparison with OSPF and static routes.
Syntax
distance weight
weight
The RIP administrative distance, ranging from 1 to 240.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command resets the administrative distance to the default value:
no distance weight
Defaults
•
Distances between 241 and 255 are reserved for internal use.
•
Default distances must not be the same for any two routing protocols.
•
Refer to Table 5‐2 below for default distances. Table 5-2
Default Administrative Distances
Route Source
Default Distance
Connected
0
Static
1
BGP external
20
OSPF intra
108
OSPF internal
110
OSPF external
112
RIP
120
BGP internal
200
Reserved
241‐255
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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RIP Commands
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Example
The following example sets the RIP administrative distance to 85:
XSR(config)#router rip
XSR(config-router)#distance 85
distribute-list
This RIP command filters networks received in updates/suppresses networks from being advertised in updates.
Syntax
distribute-list access-list-number {in | out} [type number]
access-list number
IP access list number, ranging from 1 to 199. The list defines which networks will be sent and suppressed in routing updates.
in
Applies the access list to incoming routing updates.
out
Applies the access list to outgoing routing updates.
type
Interface type: ATM, BRI, Dialer, Fast/GigabitEthernet, Loopback, Multilink, Serial, or VPN.
number
Interface number on which the access list should be applied. If no interface is set, the ACL will be applied to all updates.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the filter:
no distribute-list access-list-number {in | out} [type number]
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
No filter applied
Example
The following example suppresses network 192.5.34.0 from being advertised in updates on FastEthernet interface 1:
XSR(config)#access-list 1 deny 192.5.34.0 0.0.0.255
XSR(config)#router rip
XSR(config-router)#distribute-list 1 out fastethernet 1
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
RIP Commands
Note: This type of filtering might prove problematic in situations where you want to filter an exact
route (for RIP v2). For example, if you want to filter route 10.0.0.0/8, a filter set as access-list 1
deny 10.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 will not suffice, because subnets such as 10.0.0.0/9, 10.0.0.0/
10 and so on will also be denied. So, to restrict the filter to 10.0.0.0/8 only, configure an extended
access list with the following format: access-list 101 deny 10.0.0.0 0.0.0.255
255.0.0.0 0.0.0.0
ip rip authentication
This command sets or deletes the single authentication key used for RIP authentication on the interface. Authentication can be used only if a key exists. Deleting an existing key disables the use of authentication for RIP.
Syntax
ip rip authentication key text
text
Identifies the key. Valid values are strings of 16 characters or less. Spaces can be used if the complete key is bounded by quotations.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes the specified key and prevents RIP from using authentication:
no ip rip authentication key text
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
No authentication key
Example
The following example sets the authentication mode as text and the key text as phone on FastEthernet port 1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip rip authentication key phone
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip rip authentication mode text
Note: The command refers to one key only, not a key chain.
RIP Example
The following example, as shown in Figure 5‐2, enables RIP on both FastEthernet interfaces of Router 1, also enabling routing exchanges on the serial link Router 1‐Router 2 (Serial port 2). XSR CLI Reference Guide
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RIP Commands
FastEthernet port 2 is instructed to be totally passive (no advertising on it, no sending of triggered updates, and no receiving of updates).
Serial 1 is allowed to receive both version 1 and 2 RIP, and transmits version 2. The method used is split horizon with poison reverse. Authentication mode text is used on Serial port 1, and the text is Tex:
XSR(config)#router rip
XSR(config-router)#network 192.168.1.0
XSR(config-router)#network 192.169.1.0
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.5.10.1
XSR(config-router)#passive-interface fastethernet 2
XSR(config-router)#no receive-interface fastethernet 2
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 2
XSR(config-if<F2>)#ip rip disable-triggered-updates
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip rip receive version 1 2
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip rip send version 2
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip split-horizon poison
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip rip authentication key Tex
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip rip authentication mode text
Figure 5-2
RIP Example
192.169.1.0
No advertising
No triggered RIP updates
No receiving RIP updates
Serial 1/0
Router 1
Eth 1
Eth 2
Serial 1/1
Advertises
192.168.1.0
192.169.1.0
192.5.10.1
INTERNET
192.5.10.1
192.168.1.0
Router 2
ip rip authentication mode
This command sets the authentication mode used when an authentication key is present.
Syntax
ip rip authentication mode {text}
text
Text‐only authentication performed.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command suppresses the use of authentication:
no ip rip authentication mode
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
RIP Commands
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
No authentication mode specified.
Examples
This example sets text authentication mode and the key XenObhobe for use on FastEthernet 1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip rip authentication key XenObhobe
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip rip authentication mode text
The following example enables RIP on both FastEthernet interfaces of router R1, also enabling routing exchanges on the serial link R1‐R2 (Serial 2). FastEthernet 2 is instructed to be totally passive (no advertising on it, no sending of triggered updates, and no receiving of updates).
Serial 1/0 is allowed to receive both version 1 and 2 RIP, and transmits version 2. The method used is split horizon with poison reverse. Authentication mode text is used, and the text is Tex:
XSR(config)#router rip
XSR(config-router)#network 192.168.1.0
XSR(config-router)#network 192.169.1.0
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.5.10.1
XSR(config-router)#passive-interface fastethernet 2
XSR(config-router)#no receive-interface fastethernet 2
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 2
XSR(config-if<F2>)#ip rip disable-triggered-updates
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip rip receive version 1 2
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip rip send version 2
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip split-horizon poison
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip rip authentication key Tex
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip rip authentication mode text
ip rip disable-triggered-updates
This command prevents RIP from sending triggered updates on the specified interface.
Syntax
ip rip disable-triggered-updates
Syntax of the “no” Form
no ip rip disable-triggered-updates
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
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RIP Commands
Default
Allows RIP to respond to a triggered update.
Example
This example prevents RIP from responding to a request for triggered updates on F1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip rip disable-triggered-updates
ip rip offset
This command adds an offset onto incoming/outgoing metrics to routes learned via RIP.
Syntax
ip rip offset value
value
Positive offset to be applied to metrics for networks, ranging from 0 to 16. If the offset is 0, no action is taken.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes an offset:
no ip rip offset
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
No offset applied
Example
The following example sets an offset of 1 for Serial port 1/0:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip rip offset 1
Adding an offset on an interface makes it a backup port. Suppose R1 is only 2 hops away from Rx through both interfaces. By adding 1 to 2 on Serial 1/0, the distance between R1 And Rx through Serial 1/0 becomes 3, making Serial 1/0 a backup.
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
RIP Commands
Figure 5-3
Offset Example
Distance Router 1-Router x2+1 hops
Router 1
Router x
Backup
INTERNET
Serial 1/0
Serial 1/1
INTERNET
Distance Router1-Rx2 hops
ip rip receive version
This command sets RIP v1 or v2 for update packets received on the port.
Syntax
ip rip receive version [1] [2]
1
RIP version 1.
2
RIP version 2.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command restores the default version of the RIP module update packets that are accepted on the interface:
no ip rip receive version
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
Accept both RIP version 1 and 2
Example
This example sets both RIP versions 1 and 2 for update packets received on FastEthernet port 1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip rip receive version 1 2
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RIP Commands
ip rip send version
This command sets RIP v1 or v2 for update packets sent on the interface.
Syntax
ip rip send version {1 | 2 | r1compatible}
1
RIP version 1.
2
RIP version 2.
r1compatible
Sends version 2 packets, but transmits these as broadcast packets rather than multicast packets, so that systems which only understand RIP version 1 can receive them.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form restores the version of update packets that was transmitted by the RIP module:
no ip rip send version
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
Version 1
Example
The following example sets RIP version 2 for packets sent on FastEthernet interface 1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip rip send version 2
ip split-horizon
This command sets split horizon mode for the packets to be sent by RIP.
Syntax
ip split-horizon
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables the split‐horizon mechanism entirely:
no ip split-horizon
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
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Default
IP split‐horizon
Example
The following command sets split horizon for packets to be transmitted by RIP on interface 1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip split-horizon
neighbor
This command directs the XSR to exchange point‐to‐point (non‐broadcast) routing information with a neighbor. When used in combination with the passive-interface command, RIP updates can be exchanged between a subset of routers and access servers on a LAN. One routing update is generated per neighbor.
In the rare case where the XSR or hosts on the LAN segment cannot accept RIP broadcast packets, only configured neighbors will get RIP updates.
Multiple neighbor commands can be used to specify additional neighbors or peers.
Syntax
neighbor neighborAddress
neighborAddress
IP address of a peer router with which routing datawill be exchanged.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables RIP on the specified interface:
no neighbor neighborAddress
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Example
This example instructs the XSR to send RIP updates to all ports on network 192.5.0.0 except interface F2. Also, the neighbor command allows sending RIP updates specifically to 192.5.10.1.
XSR(config)#router rip
XSR(config-router)#network 192.5.0.0
XSR(config-router)#passive-interface fastethernet 2
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.5.10.1
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RIP Commands
network
This command attaches a network of directly connected networks to a RIP routing process.
Syntax
network netAddress
netAddress
A directly connected network that RIP will advertise to its neighboring routers. This is an IP address format.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables RIP on the specified interface:
no network netAddress
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Example
This example attaches network 192.168.1.0 to the RIP routing process:
XSR(config)#router rip
XSR(config-router)#network 192.168.1.0
passive-interface
This command prevents RIP from transmitting update packets on an interface (although it can still monitor updates on the interface).
Syntax
passive-interface type num
type
Interface types include: ATM, BRI, Dialer, Fast/ GigabitEthernet, Loopback, Multilink, Serial, and VPN.
num
Physical interface number.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the passive‐interface action:
no passive-interface type num
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
No passive interface
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Example
This example sets F2 as a passive interface. No RIP updates will be transmitted on F2:
XSR(config-router)#passive-interface fastethernet 2
receive-interface
This command allows RIP to receive update packets on an interface. This does not affect the transmission of RIP updates on the specified interface.
Syntax
receive-interface type num
type
Interface type.
num
Physical interface number.
Syntax of the “no” Form
no receive-interface type num
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
Allows the reception of RIP updates on an interface.
Example
The following example denies the reception of RIP updates on F2:
XSR(config-router)#no receive-interface fastethernet 2
redistribute (OSPF/Static)
This command redistributes static or OSPF routes into RIP.
Syntax
redistribute {ospf | static}{match external [1 | 2]| internal} metric metricvalue
ospf
Imports OSPF routes.
static
Imports static routes.
match
Redistributes OSPF routes based on the OSPF type and route metric, ranging from 1 to 16 hops.
external
Redistributes external OSPF routes.
1/2
Redistributes external Type 1 or 2 OSPF routes.
internal
Redistributes inter‐ and intra‐area OSPF routes.
metric metricvalue
Cost of a route being redistributed, ranging from 1 to 16 hops.
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Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command cancels the redistribution of routes:
no redistribute from_protocol [metric metricvalue]
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
Disabled
Examples
This example redistributes static routes from 5 hops away into RIP:
XSR(config-router)#router rip
XSR(config-router)#redistribute static 5
This example redistributes intra, inter and external OSPF routes into RIP:
XSR(config-router)#redistribute ospf match internal match external
The following example imports all OSPF routes into RIP with the default RIP metric of 1. It is equivalent to the command entered earlier.
XSR(config-router)#redistribute ospf
router rip
This command enables/disables the Routing Information Protocol (RIP).
Notes: The XSR supports a total of 750 RIP routing entries with 64 MBytes of memory installed.
RIP commands configured under Interface mode are independent of enabling/disabling the RIP
protocol.
Syntax
router rip
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables RIP on the XSR:
no router rip
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
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Example
XSR(config)#router rip
XSR(config-router)#
timers
This command configures RIP timers.
Syntax
timers basic [update | invalid | flush]
update
Interval the RIP timer is revised, ranging from 1 to 2,147,483,647 seconds.
invalid
Interval the RIP timer is deemed invalid, ranging from 1 to 2,147,483,647 seconds. The invalid interval must be at least three times the update interval.
flush
Interval the RIP timer is flushed, ranging from 1 to 2,147,483,647 seconds. The flush interval must be larger than the invalid interval.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command resets the timers to the default value:
no timers basic
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Defaults
•
Update: 30 seconds
•
Invalid: 180 seconds
•
Flush: 300 seconds
Example
The following example sets values for the RIP timers:
XSR(config-router)#timers basic 10 30 60
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RIP Show Commands
RIP Show Commands
show ip rip
This command displays configuration data and statistics global to all ports.
Syntax
show ip rip [interface | database]
interface
The interface on which RIP is running.
database
The database on which RIP is set up.
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following is a sample response with no option chosen:
XSR#show ip rip
Global RIP Stats:
RIP is enabled
RIP timers (in seconds):
Update interval: 30
Invalid interval 180
Flush interval: 300
Routing for Networks:
172.16.101.1
172.16.101.5
172.16.150.0
Route Exchanging Neighbors:
172.23.11.21
172.23.11.25
Passive Interfaces:
FastEthernet 1
Receive Interfaces:
FastEthernet 1
Distribute List:
Distribute-list 1 out FastEthernet 1
The following is sample output with the database option selected:
XSR#show ip rip database
T - triggered on demand
Directly Connected networks:
192.168.27.0/24
192.168.29.0/24
201.1.1.0/24
202.1.1.0/24
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Routing Source Information:
192.168.28.0/24
via: 192.168.29.22
1.1.1.1/32
via: 192.168.29.22
10.0.0.0/32
via: 201.1.1.0
cost:2
cost:2
cost:2
age:16
age:16
age: -
FastEthernet2
FastEthernet2
Serial2/0:1.1
The following is sample output with the interface option chosen:
XSR#show ip rip interface
FastEthernet1 is UP
Internet Address 10.0.0.0, Mask 255.255.0.0
Triggered updates are enabled
Split horizon
Send rip version is 1
Receive rip version is 2
Rip authentication mode is text, key is
Rip offset metric is 1
Serial1/1 is UP
Internet Address 11.0.0.0, Mask 255.255.0.0
Triggered updates are enabled
Split horizon with poison
Triggered on demand is enabled
TRIP number of retransmissions
50
TRIP polling interval120
Send rip version is 1
Receive rip version is 2
Rip authentication mode is text, key is
Rip offset metric is 1
Parameter Descriptions
Routing for networks
Networks assigned to routing using the network command in RIP.
Route Exchanging Neighbors
Neighbors configured to trade routing data used in Pointto‐Point exchange of routing data.
Passive Interfaces
Ports RIP will not send update packets on.
Receive Interfaces
Ports RIP will not receive update packets on.
Distribute List Access list for controlling receive/send updates.
Internet address
IP address and mask assigned to this interface.
Triggered updates
Respond to a request for a trigger update from another router.
Rip versions
Send and receive RIP versions.
Split Horizon
Split horizon mode.
Offset Metric
A value that will be added to routes learned via RIP.
RTP Header Compression Commands
The following commands configures the Real Time Protocol (RTP) header compression on PPP serial interfaces. The following criteria must be met in order to select packets fro RTP compression
Must be a UDP packet
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UDP payload must be less than 500 bytes
Packet must not be fragmented
The destination port of the packet must be within user configured port range (there is no restriction on the source port)
Note: The XSR doesn’t impose any restrictions on RTP de‐compression.
clear ip rtp header compression interface serial
This command clears the RTP header compression statistics for the specific PPP serial interface.
Syntax
show ip rtp header-compression interface serial slot/port{.sub-interface}
slot/port{.sub-interface
The slot, port and sub‐interface this command is to be applied to.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR
Example
The following example clears the RTP Statistics for serial interface 2/0:1
XSR# clear ip rtp header‐compression interface serial 2/0:1
ip rtp compression connections
By default, the software supports a total of 16 RTP header compression connections on the PPP interface. This command will allow the user to change the number of RTP header compression connections in order to specify the total number of RTP header compression connections supported on an interface. If either end of the PPP link have different max‐num‐connection values, than the link will negotiate to the lower value.
Syntax
ip rtp compression connections max-num-connections
max-num-connections
The max number of RTP connections to be supported on the PPP interface. Range: 3 ‐ 1000
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command resets the RTP header compression connections to the default value of 16:
no rtp compression connections
Default
16 RTP header compression connections on the PPP interface
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Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
This command is applicable only on serial interface with PPP encapsulation. Note: The XSR currently does not block this command on ʺinterface dialerʺ and on ʺinterface multilinkʺ, but the command has no effect on these interfaces.
This command requires a reboot of the interface to take effect.
Example
The following example set the RTP header compression connections to 100, on PPP serial interface S1/0:
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)rtp compression connections 100
ip rtp header-compression
This command enables or disables the RTP header compression feature on PPP serial interfaces. The optional passive keyword tells the XSR to compress outgoing RTP packets only if incoming RTP packets on the same interface are compressed. If you use the command without the passive keyword, the software compresses all RTP traffic.
Note: With this release, XSR now supports both the VJ Header Compression (for TCP and UDP header) and the new IP Header Compression (for TCP, UDP and RTP header compression). XSR cannot be configured to initiates VJ header compression, but it does response to VJ Header compression configuration option from the remote peer with a NAK or REJ. In this release, the behavior is changed slightly. If RTP is not enabled, then upon receiving a VJ header compression negotiation option, the XSR sends back a NAK or REJ, same as in current release.
Syntax
ip rtp header-compression {passive}
Parameters
passive
The software compresses outgoing RTP packets only if incoming RTP packets on the same interface are compressed. If the command is used without the passive keyword, the software compresses all RTP traffic.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command disables the RTP header compression feature:
no ip rtp header-compression
Default
Disabled
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Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
This command is applicable only on serial interface with PPP encapsulation. Note: The XSR currently does not block this command on ʺinterface dialerʺ and on ʺinterface multilinkʺ, but the command has no effect on these interfaces.
This command requires a reboot of the interface to take effect.
Example
The following example enables RTP header compression on PPP serial interface S1/0:
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip rtp header-compression
ip rtp range
This command specifies the destination port range of UDP packets used to screen for RTP compression.
Syntax
ip rtp range starting-port-Num end-Port-Num
starting-port-Num
Starting destination UDP port number. Range: 1024 to 65535
end-port-Num
Ending Destination UDP port number. Range: 1024 to 65535 Note: The end‐port‐number must be larger or equal to the starting‐
port‐num.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command removes the RTP packet ranges
no ip rtp range
Default
Disabled
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
This command is applicable only on serial interface with PPP encapsulation. Note: The XSR currently does not block this command on ʺinterface dialerʺ and on ʺinterface multilinkʺ, but the command has no effect on these interfaces.
Example
The following example set the RTP header range from UDP port 1325 to UDP port 1400, for serial interface S1/0:
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)# ip rtp range 325 400
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show ip rtp header compression interface serial
This command displays the RTP header compression statistics for the specific PPP serial interface.
Note: The existing command “show ppp interface serial” has been updated to add the following line in the PPP stats section “TX/RX IP Header Compression (IPHC is enabled” if IP header compression has been negotiated with the remote peer. See page 8‐102 for information on the command “show ppp interface serial”.
Syntax
show ip rtp header-compression interface serial slot/port{.sub-interface}
slot/port{.sub-interface
The slot, port and sub‐interface this command is to be applied to.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR
Example
The following example displays the RTP Statistics for serial interface 2/0:1
Router# show ip rtp header‐compression interface serial 2/0:1
RTP/UDP/IP Header compression statistics:
Interface Serial 2/0:1
Active/Negotiated connections: RX = 0/0 TX = 0/0
Rcvd:
Compr. RTP = 0 Compr. UDP = 0 Full Header = 0
Error = 0 Dropped = 0 Bytes rcvd = 0 Bytes Saved = 0 Total Pkts = 0
Efficiency Improve = 0.00
Send:
Compr. RTP = 0 Compr. UDP = 0 Full Header = 0
Rej. IP = 0 Rej. Non RTP = 0 Total Pkts = 0
Bytes sent = 0 Bytes Saved = 0 Efficiency Improve = 0.00
Misses = 0 hit Ratio = 0%
Parameter Descriptions
Interface Serial
Type and number of interface.
Active/Negotiated
connections:
Number of active and Negotiated RTP connections.
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Rcvd:
Compr. RTP
Number of compressed RTP packets.
Compr. UDP
Number of compressed UDP packets.
Full Header
Number of full header packets received.
Errors
Number of packets that cannot be un‐compressed because it is out of sequence, indicating that one or more packets have been lost on the link.
Dropped
Packets whose IP, Port or SSRC does not match that in the received context. These packets are dropped
Total Pkts
Total number of packets received for RTP de‐compression
Bytes Rcvd
Total number of bytes received for RTP de‐compression
Bytes Saved
Number of bytes saved due to RTP compression.
Efficiency Improve
Efficiency Improvement ratio. Equals (Bytes of actual packet + bytes received) / Bytes Received
Sent
Compr. RTP
Number of compressed RTP packets.
Compr. UDP
Number of compressed UDP packets. Potential RTP packets with changing x,p and pt fields are sent compressed UDP.
Full Header
Number of full header packets sent.
Rejected IP
Total number of packets that cannot be compressed by RTP compression. These include fragmented packets and packets with IP option fields. These packets are sent uncompressed.
Rejected non RTP
Total number of non RTP packets (RTP version not equal to 2, RTP header length exceeding payload length, SSRC does not match that stored in the TX context. These packets are sent uncompressed.
Total Pkts
Total number of packets sent.
Bytes Rcvd
Total number of bytes sent.
Bytes Saved
Number of bytes saved because of compression.
Efficiency Improve
Efficiency Improvement ratio. Equals (Bytes saved + bytes sent)/ Bytes Sent.
Misses
Number of RTP packets that fails to compress because of no free compression context
Hit ratio
Packets compressed successfully/total packets.
Triggered on Demand RIP Commands
The following commands are subsets of triggered RIP functionality:
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•
ip rip max-retransmissions - Specifies the maximum number of retransmissions. Refer to page 190 for the command definition.
•
ip rip polling-interval ‐ Specifies the polling interval for triggered RIP requests. Refer to page 191 for the command definition.
Configuring the Internet Protocol
Triggered on Demand RIP Commands
•
ip rip triggered-on-demand ‐ Enables the functionality on the specified interface. Refer to page 192 for the command definition.
ip rip max-retransmissions
This command sets the maximum number of retransmissions to be sent.
Syntax
ip rip max-retransmissions number
number
Number of retransmissions, ranging from 2 to 120.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command resets the maximum retransmissions value to the default:
no ip rip max-retransmissions
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
36
Example
This example sets the number of retransmissions to 50:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip address 1.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip rip triggered-on-demand
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip rip max-retransmissions 50
XSR(config)#router rip
XSR(config-router)#network 1.0.0.0
ip rip polling-interval
This command sets the polling interval for triggered RIP requests. If a request gets no response after retransmissions peak, requests will continually transmit at intervals set by this command.
Note: The polling interval should be less than the dialer spoofing timeout.
Syntax
ip rip polling-interval interval
interval
Polling period ranging from 10 to 600 seconds.
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Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command resets maximum retransmissions to the default:
no ip rip polling interval
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
30 seconds
Example
The following example sets the polling interval to 120 seconds:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip address 1.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip rip triggered-on-demand
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip rip polling-interval 120
XSR(config)#router rip
XSR(config-router)#network 1.0.0.0
ip rip triggered-on-demand
This command enables triggered‐on‐demand RIP on the specified interface. It is available on a point‐to‐point Serial (WAN) interface only.
On‐demand RIP permits the update of an XSR’s RIP routing table only when the database changes or when a next hop’s reachability is detected on the WAN side of the connection. This functionality reduces the on‐demand WAN circuit’s routing traffic and allows the link to be brought down when application traffic ceases. Regular RIP updates would prevent the connection from being torn down when application use ends.
On‐demand RIP is available under conditions where the route is learned through a dialer or dialer backup connection and a dial on demand link.
The following conditions govern the command’s use:
•
RIP must be enabled.
•
IP split horizon must be enabled (default). Whether poison is enabled or not, triggered on demand will still send its updates with poison.
Another command, ip rip disable-triggered-updates, with the default enforced (triggered updates enabled), invokes triggered updates in a timely fashion as described by RFCs‐1058 and 2453 (RIP and RIPv2 protocol) and does not tear down the connection. The two features work independent of each other.
Syntax
ip rip triggered-on-demand
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Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables triggered RIP on the interface:
no ip rip triggered-on-demand
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
Disabled
Example
The following example configures triggered RIP on Serial port 1/0:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip address 1.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip rip triggered-on-demand
XSR(config-router)#network 1.0.0.0
Policy-Based Routing Commands
Policy‐Based Routing (PBR) on the XSR.
ip policy
This command applies PBR to XSR Fast/GigabitEthernet, Dialer, Loopback, Multilink, VPN and Serial interfaces.
Syntax
ip policy
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command negates PBR on XSR interfaces:
no ip policy
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
Disabled
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Examples
The following example enables PBR on interface FastEthernet 2:
XSR(config-if<F2>)#ip policy
The following example enables PBR on interface Dialer 57:
XSR(config-if<D57>)#ip policy
route-map pbr
This command adds or deletes PBR route‐map entries and acquires PBR Map configuration mode. The following commands are subsets of Route Map PBR functionality:
•
match ip address - Adds/deletes PBR match clauses. See page 5‐147 for command definition.
•
set ip next-hop ‐ Adds or deletes PBR set clauses for the next‐hop router. See page 5‐147 for command defintion.
•
set interface ‐ Adds or deletes PBR set clauses on an interface. See page 5‐148 for command defintion
Syntax
route-map pbr sequence-number
sequence-number
Sequential number of the policy entry in the PBR route map table.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command deletes the specified policy entry or the whole policy table if no sequence number is specified:
no route-map pbr [sequence-number]
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
PBR Map configuration: XSR(config-pbr-map)#
Example
In the following example, policy entry number 10 is created:
XSR(config)#route-map pbr 10
XSR(config-pbr-map)#
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match ip address
This command associates the PBR policy with a configured Access Control List (ACL).
Syntax
match ip address access-number
access-number
The ACL number used to match traffic.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command deletes the specified ACL match clause:
no match ip address access-number
Mode
PBR Map configuration: XSR(config-pbr-map)#
Example
In the following example, ACL 101 is used to match the traffic:
XSR(config-pbr-map)#match ip address 101
set ip next-hop
This command specifies a next‐hop IP address as the forwarding router for Policy Based Routing.
Syntax
set ip next-hop ip-address
ipaddress
IP address of the next hop.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command deletes the specified set clause:
no set ip next-hope ip-address
Mode
PBR Map configuration: XSR(config-pbr-map)#
Example
In the following example, 192.168.27.1 is set as the next‐hop router:
XSR(config-pbr-map)#set ip next-hop 192.168.27.1
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PBR Clear and Show Commands
set interface
This command specifies an XSR interface as the forwarding port for Policy Based Routing.
Syntax
set interface interface-num
interface-num
Interface number.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command deletes the specified set clause:
no set interface interface-num
Mode
PBR Map configuration: XSR(config-pbr-map)#
Example
The following example sets F1 as the forwarding interface:
XSR(config-pbr-map)#set interface FastEthernet 1
PBR Clear and Show Commands
clear ip pbr-cache
This command deletes entries from the PBR cache table.
Syntax
clear ip pbr-cache
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
show ip pbr-cache
This command displays the PBR cache that has been built up for fast traffic flow.
Syntax
show ip pbr-cache
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Sample Output
The following is sample output when the command is issued:
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ARP Commands
XSR>show ip pbr-cache
Source
Destination
192.168.1.1 192.168.27.1
192.168.1.1 192.168.27.33
192.168.1.1 192.168.27.33
Age(sec)
109
70
50
IP Prot
1
255
6
TCP/UDP Port
8
ICMP Code
(23, 23)
Parameter Descriptions
Source
Source IP address of the packet.
Destination
Destination IP address of the packet.
Age
Seconds left for the lifetime of the cache.
IP Protocol
IP Protocol number.
TCP/UDP Port
TCP/UDP Port number.
ICMP Code
ICMP code number.
show route-map pbr
This command displays the Policy Map Table you have configured. This is the Global Route Map that is used for Policy Based Routing.
Syntax
show route-map pbr
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Sample Output
The following is sample output when the command is issued:
XSR>show route-map pbr
route-map pbr, sequence 10
Match clauses:
ip address 102
ip address 101
Set clauses:
next-hop 192.168.27.33
interface FastEthernet1
ARP Commands
arp
This command adds permanent (static) entries to the ARP (Address Resolution Protocol) table. ARP converts an IP address into a physical address. The XSR permits adding/deleting one or all ARP entries.
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ARP Commands
Syntax
arp ip-address hardware-address
ip-address
IP address of a device on the network. Valid values are IP addresses in dotted decimal notation.
hardware-address
The 48‐bit hardware address expressed in hexidecimal notation and corresponding to the IP address identified in the ip‐address parameter.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes the specified permanent ARP entry:
no arp ip-address hardware-address
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
No permanent ARP entries in the ARP table.
Example
The example below adds a permanent ARP entry for the IP address 130.2.3.1:
XSR(config)#arp 130.2.3.1 0003.4712.7a99
arp-timeout
This command sets the duration of a dynamic ARP entry in the ARP table before expiring.
Syntax
arp-timeout seconds
seconds
Interval that an entry stays in the ARP cache, ranging from 0 to 2,147,483. Zero indicates entries are never cleared from the cache.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of his command restores the default value:
no arp-timeout
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
14,400 seconds (4 hours)
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Other IP Commands
Example
This example adds a permanent ARP entry for the IP address 130.2.3.1 and sets the timeout at 5 hours (18,000 seconds) as shown in Figure 5‐4:
XSR(config)#arp 130.2.3.1 0003.4712.7a99
XSR(config)#arp-timeout 18000
Figure 5-4
130.2.3.1
ARP Timeout Example
130.2.3.0/24
130.2.3.2
Host 2
130.2.3.3
Host 1
Router 1
Other IP Commands
ip address
This command sets a primary or secondary IP address on an interface. Secondary IP addresses are allowed on FastEthernet interfaces only. Setting the IP address enables and removing it disables the interface. Before a secondary IP address can be configured, the primary IP address should be configured, and before the primary IP address can be removed, the secondary IP addresses should be removed. This command supports Classless Inter‐Domain Routing (CIDR).
Note: When you are routing using the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) algorithm, be sure that all
secondary addresses on an interface fall into the same OSPF area as the primary addresses.
Syntax
ip address {address mask | address&mask | negotiated}{secondary]
address
IP address of the interface.
net-mask
Network mask for the configured IP address.
address&
mask
Address/mask in format A.B.C.D./m, where A.B.C.D. is the address, and m is the number of bits set to 1 in the mask.
negotiated
IP address negotiated over PPP. BRI, loopback, Fast/ GigabitEthernet and secondary IP interfaces are not supported.
secondary
A secondary IP address. If keyword is omitted, the configured address is the primary IP address. Secondary is required to add or remove such an address.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes specified IP addresses:
no ip address {address mask | address&mask | negotiated}{secondary]
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Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Examples
The following CIDR example sets IP address 192.168.1.1 with a mask of /24 on interface F1.
XSR(config)# interface FastEthernet 1
XSR(config-if)# ip address 192.168.1.1/24
The following example sets the IP address 192.168.1.1 on G2:
XSR(config)#interface gigabitethernet 2
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
In the example below, 131.108.1.27 is the primary address and 192.31.7.17 and 192.31.8.17 are secondary addresses for F1:
XSR(config)#interface
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip
FastEthernet 1
address 131.108.1.27 255.255.255.0
add 192.31.7.17 255.255.255.0 secondary
add 192.31.8.17 255.255.255.0 secondary
The following example configures 1.1.1.1 as the primary and other IP addresses as secondary addresses for F1, removes secondary IP 4.4.4.1 from the interface by entering no ip address
4.4.4.1 255.255.255.0 secondary, and updates the primary IP address to 9.9.9.1 by entering
ip address 9.9.9.1 255.255.255.0.
XSR(config)#interface
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip
XSR(config-if<F1>)#no
FastEthernet 1
address 1.1.1.1
address 2.2.2.1
address 3.3.3.1
address 4.4.4.1
shutdown
255.255.255.0
255.255.255.0 secondary
255.255.255.0 secondary
255.255.255.0 secondary
XSR(config)#interface FastEthernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#no ip address 4.4.4.1 255.255.255.0 secondary
XSR(config)#interface FastEthernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip address 9.9.9.1 255.255.255.0
ip default-network
This command specifies candidates for the default route and works in conjunction with the ip
route command which creates static routes to the default network. Default routes must be at least one hop away and have a natural mask attributed to it.
Syntax
ip default-network network-number
network-number
Number of the network.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the route:
no ip default-network network-number
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Other IP Commands
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
In the following example, as shown in Figure 5‐5, Router 1 sets two candidates for the default route: network 199.15.2.0 and 198.15.2.0.
XSR(config)#ip default-network 199.15.2.0
XSR(config)#ip default-network 198.15.2.0
Both default routes appear in the routing table, as advertised by Router 2, and Router 3, which run RIP, so both are candidates for the default route. The route to 199.15.2.0 is three hops away, and the route to 198.15.2.0 is four hops away. So the route to 199.15.2.0 is selected as the default route, and Serial 1/0 is the gateway of last resort for Router 1. A default route 0/0 next hop Serial 1/0 is configured on Router 1.
Figure 5-5
IP Default Route Example
Router 1
Metric
Route
3
199.15.2.0
4
198.15.2.0
Serial 1
INTERNET
Serial 1/1
INTERNET
199.15.1.0
198.15.1.0
Router 2
199.15.2.0
198.15.2.0
Router 3
ip directed-broadcast
This command enables/disables IP directed broadcast. Optionally, you can specify an access list to control which broadcasts are forwarded.
Syntax
ip directed-broadcast [access-list-number]
Parameters
access-listnumber
ACL number. If this is set, a broadcast must pass the ACL to be forwarded. If not set, all broadcasts are forwarded.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables directed broadcast globally:
no ip directed-broadcast [access-list-number]
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Other IP Commands
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
Enabled
Example
The following example denies ICMP broadcasts on port FastEthernet 1:
XSR(config)#access-list 100 deny ICMP any any
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip directed-broadcast 100
The following example removes the previous restriction on interface FastEthernet 1 (broadcast will be performed for all protocols):
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#no ip directed-broadcast
ip dhcp relay-source gateway
This command allows users to select the source address to use when relaying packets to the DHCP servers. The DHCP servers are configured using ip helper‐address command. Syntax
ip dhcp relay-source gateway
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form negates the command so that the outgoing interface address will be used as the source address:
no ip dhcp relay-source gateway
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
The outgoing interface address will be used as the source address.
Example
In the following example, the source address is set for interface fastethernet 1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip dhcp relay-source gateway
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
Other IP Commands
ip domain
This command identifies the domain to which the XSR belongs. If the command is reissued, it is considered an update of the domain name and will overwrite the old value with a new value.
The XSR uses the domain name to help create a certificate subject name, which is automatically formated to: <host name>.<domain name>. You can configure the host name with the hostname command. If the host name is not set when you issue the ip domain command, the XSR will use the hardcoded DefaultName.
Note: For Verisign CA interoperability, you must enter the domain name that you specified when
registering with Verisign.
Syntax
ip domain name {domain-name}
domain-name
Name of the IP domain to which the XSR belongs. Up to 128 printable characters are permitted with no spaces.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command resets the IP domain name to no value:
no ip domain name {domain-name}
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config>#
Example
In the following example, the domain name enterasys.com is used:
XSR(config>#ip domain enterasys.com
ip equal-cost multi-path
This command enables equal‐cost multi‐path routing and sets the method for path selection.
Syntax
: for enabling and setting: the selection method:
ip equal-cost multi-path {round-robin | per-flow}
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Other IP Commands
Parameters
round-robin
Round robin method of selecting the routing path, if multiple paths are available.
per-flow
Per‐flow method of selecting the routing path, if multiple paths are available.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of the command disables equal‐cost multi‐path:
no ip equal-cost multi-path
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
Disabled
Example
The following example enables equal‐cost multi‐path and sets the selection method as per‐flow:
XSR(config)# ip equal-cost multi-path per-flow
ip forward-protocol
This command enables broadcast forwarding and specifies which protocols and ports will be forwarded. The IP forward protocol is one of two commands used for UDP broadcast forwarding. Also refer to the ip helper-address command, which specifies the new destination.
If a certain service exists inside the node, and there is no need to forward the request to remote networks, the no form of this command should be used to disable the forwarding for the specific port. Such requests will not be automatically blocked from being forwarded, just because a service for them exists in the node.
Note: The XSR supports a maximum of 50 IP helper addresses per port and 50 IP forward ports
with (64 MBytes of memory installed.
Syntax
ip forward-protocol {udp [port]}
udp
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
Forward UDP datagrams.
Other IP Commands
port
Destination port that controls which UDP services are forwarded. If not set, forwarding is done on the following default ports:
•
Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) (port 69)
•
Domain Naming System (port 53)
•
Time service (port 37)
•
NetBIOS Name Server (port 137)
•
NetBIOS Datagram Server (port 138)
•
Boot Protocol (BTP) client and server datagrams (ports 67, 68)
•
TACACS service (port 49)
•
IEN‐116 Name Service (port 42)
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes a UDP port or UDP protocol. If the UDP protocol is removed, UDP forwarding is disabled.
no ip forward-protocol {udp [port]}
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Defaults
Enabled, but no port specified. This acts as a BOOTP forwarding agent. The above list of ports is used by default for forwarding.
Examples
The following example, as shown in Figure 5‐6, forwards UDP traffic to a router across the Internet:
XSR(config)#ip forward-protocol udp
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip helper-address 196.1.1.255
This example removes DNS from the list of ports for which UDP broadcast forwarding is done:
XSR(config)#no ip forward-protocol udp 53
Figure 5-6
195.1.1.0
Host
IP Forward-Protocol Example
Router 1
2
Router 2
196.1.1.0
eth 1
1
INTERNET
Global Configuration
ip forward-protocol UDP
interface ethernet 1
Destination: 195.1.1.255 ip helper-address 196.1.1.255
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Other IP Commands
DHCP Relay Functionality
The DHCP Relay functionality is applied with the help of IP broadcast forwarding. A typical situation, as shown in Figure 5‐7, occurs when a Host requests an IP address with no DHCP server located on that segment.
Router 1 can forward the DHCP request (1) to the server located on N2, if IP forward‐protocol is enabled for UDP, and the address of the DHCP server is configured as a helper address on the receiving interface of Router 1. The DHCP Relay function will detect the DHCP request and make the necessary changes to the header, replacing the destination address with the address of the server, and the source with its own address, and send it further (2) to the server. When the response (3) comes from the server, the DHCP Relay function sends it to the host (4).
Figure 5-7
N1
1
Host
4
Destination
255.255.255.255
Source: 0.0.0.x
DHCP Functionality Example
DHCP
Relay
eth 1 Function
Global Configuration
ip forward-protocol UDP
interface ethernet 1
ip helper-address address1
N2
Router 2
Router 1
INTERNET
2
addr1
3
Server
ip helper-address
This command enables forwarding of local broadcasts specifying the new destination address. It is one of two commands used for UDP broadcast forwarding. Also refer to the ip forwardprotocol command which defines the forward protocol and port number. You can add more than one helper address per interface. The command is also used to enable BOOTP Relay.
Syntax
ip helper-address address
address
Destination broadcast or host address used when forwarding.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form disables the forwarding of broadcast packets to the specified address:
no ip helper-address address
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
In this example, with one server on network 191.168.1.255 and the other on network 192.24.1.255, you permit UDP broadcasts from hosts on either network segment to reach both servers:
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
Other IP Commands
XSR(config)#ip forward-protocol udp
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip helper-address 192.168.1.255
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 2
XSR(config-if<F2)#ip helper-address 192.24.1.255
ip host
This command defines a static host name‐to‐address mapping in the static host cache.
Syntax
ip host name [tcp-port-number] address
name
Case‐sensitive name of the host.
address
Associated IP address.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove the name‐to‐address mapping:
no ip host name address
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config>)#
Default
Disabled
Example
The following example defines a static mapping for host ACME:
XSR(config>)#ip host ACME 192.168.57.28
ip irdp
This command enables/disables the ICMP Router Discovery Protocol (IRDP), which dynamically discovers routes to other networks, as defined by RFC‐1256. IRDP allows hosts to locate routers and can also infer router locations by checking RIP updates. When the XSR operates as a client, router discovery packets are generated. When the device operates as a host, router discovery packets are received. The IRDP client/server implementation does not actually examine or store full routing tables sent by routing devices, it merely keeps track of which systems are sending such data.
Using IRDP, the XSR can specify both a priority and a period after which a device should be assumed down if no other packets are received.
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Other IP Commands
Syntax
ip irdp [multicast|holdtime seconds | advertinterval seconds | preference number]
multicast
:Multicast address (224.0.0.1) instead of IP broadcasts.
holdtime
seconds
The interval router advertisements are held valid, ranging from 1 to 9000 seconds. Value must exceed advertinterval but cannot exceed 9000 seconds.
advertinterval
seconds
Peak interval between router advertisements, ranging from 3 to 1800 seconds.
preference
seconds
Value from ‐2147483647 to 2147483647 that sets a router to be the preferred router to which others home. Higher values raise XSR’s preference level.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables the IRDP command:
no ip irdp
Defaults
•
Multicast: broadcast address
•
Holdtime: 1800 seconds
•
Advertinterval: 600 seconds
•
Preference: 0
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
This example enables IRDP on F1 with the advertisements and holdtime intervals set to 10 seconds, the preference level set to 10, and advertisements sent with multicasts:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip
irdp
irdp
irdp
irdp
advertinterval 10
holdtime 10
preference 10
multicast
ip mtu
This command sets the Maximum Transmit Unit (MTU) size on a port.
Syntax
ip mtu size
size
The MTU size, ranging from 68 to 1500 bytes.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command restores the default value:
no ip mtu
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
Other IP Commands
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
1500
Example
The following example sets the MTU size to 1200 for interface Serial 1/0:
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip mtu 1200
ip proxy-arp
This command enables/disables Proxy ARP on a per interface basis, allowing the XSR to answer ARP requests on one network for a host on another network. It is available for Fast/
GigabitEthernet interfaces only.
Syntax
ip proxy-arp
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables Proxy ARP:
no ip proxy-arp
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
Enabled
Example
The following example disables proxy arp on interface F1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if)#no ip proxy-arp
ip proxy-dns
This command enables Proxy DNS. The XSR’s implementation of this feature supports the configuration of a forwarding proxy server which do not perform DNS resolution but pass on and cache DNS queries and replies to other proxy or DNS servers. Use the show running-config
command to verify current proxy DNS settings on the XSR.
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Other IP Commands
Syntax
ip proxy-dns enable
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables Proxy DNS:
no ip proxy-dns enable
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
Disabled
ip proxy-dns name server
This command specifies up to six name servers the proxy DNS server will use.
Syntax
ip proxy-dns name-server server-address1 [server-address2...server-address6]
server-address1
IP address of the name server.
server-address2...server-address6
IP address of additional name servers.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the configured name server:
no ip proxy-dns name-server server-address1 [server-address2...server-address6]
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
In the following example, 10.10.10.1 is configured as a name server:
XSR(config)#ip proxy-dns name-server 10.10.10.1
ip redirects
This command enables sending redirect messages if the software is forced to resend a packet through the same interface on which it was received.
Syntax
ip redirects
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Other IP Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command negates IP redirection:
no ip redirects
Default
Enabled
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
In the following example, IP redirection is disabled:
XSR(config)#no ip redirects
ip route
This command configures a static IP route.
Note: The XSR supports a maximum of 50 static routes with 64 MBytes of memory installed.
Syntax
ip route {A.B.C.D. mask} | {address&mask}{address |interface-type #}}[distance]}
A.B.C.D.
The IP route prefix for the static route destination.
mask
The prefix mask for the static route destination.
address&
mask
The forwarding router’s IP address and mask, expressed as A.B.C.D./N where A.B.C.D. is the address and N is the number of set bits in the mask.. address
The forwarding router’s IP address.
interfacetype #
The IP network interface: ATM, Dialer, Fast/GigabitEthernet, Loopback, Multilink, null, or VPN.
number
Identifies the card and port number: <1‐2>/<0‐0>, or the card, port and sub‐
interface number: <1‐2>/<0‐0>.<1‐64> distance
Administrative metric (preference). Range: ATM (1 to255), BRI (1 to 240), Dialer (0 to 253), Fast/GigabitEthernet (1 to 240), Loopback (1 to 240), Multilink (1‐240), and Serial (1 to 120). Only static routes identified by the pair {prefix, mask}, and matching this distance are deleted.
Syntax of the “no” Form
This command’s no form removes a static route from the routing table:
no ip route {A.B.C.D. mask}|{address&mask}{address |interface-type #}}[distance]}
If neither next hop, nor distance is cited, all static routes identified by the pair {prefix, mask} are deleted.
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Other IP Commands
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Examples
This example, shown in Figure 5‐8, sets 2 static routes to networks 192.1.2.0 and 193.62.5.0 through gateway 192.31.7.65. Note that the distance is 1 (default), making these routes preferred in case a dynamic routing protocol is running on the same router with its own routes for these destinations.
XSR(config)#ip route 192.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.31.7.65
XSR(config)#ip route 193.62.5.0 255.255.255.0 192.31.7.65
Figure 5-8
INTERNET
Router 1
Static Route Example
192.31.7.65
193.62.5.0
Router 2
192.1.2.0
ip route maximum_multiple
This command specifies the maximum number of multiple static routes which are static routes having the same destination but different next hops.
Syntax
ip route maximum_multiple value
value
Maximum number of multiple static routes allowed, ranging from 2 to 8.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command resets the maximum number of multiple static routes to the default:
no ip route maximum_multiple
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
4
Example
The following example sets the maximum value to 6:
XSR(config)#ip route maximum-multiple 6
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
Other IP Commands
ip tcp adjust-mss
This command sets the Maximum Segment Size (MSS) for TCP SYN (synchronize) packets. When the XSR terminates PPPoE traffic, a PC connected to the FastEthernet interface may have problems accessing Web sites if the PCʹs Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) setting is too high. The MTU contains maximum segment size (MSS) values for TCP packets transmitted by the PC.
Some Web sites do not perform Path MTU discovery correctly. To address this issue, the XSR automatically sets the TCP MSS to 1452 when using PPPoE ports. This forces both TCP peers to send 1492 byte packets so Path MTU discovery never has to deal with PPPoEʹs 1492‐byte MTU.
This is a sub‐command of Interface mode and is configured with the following commands:
•
interface fast/gigaethernetx.x
•
ip address negotiated
•
encapsulation ppp/mux pppoe
•
ip mtu 1492
•
ip tcp adjust-mtu 1400
Setting the MSS will cause all TCP SYN packets with the MSS option being modified if the option value exceeds the configured MSS.
Syntax
ip tcp adjust-mss mss
mss
Range of MSS: 512 to 1452.
Mode
PPPoE Interface configuration: XSR(config-if)#
Default
1452 bytes
Example
The following example configures a PPPoE client with an MSS of 1452 bytes on F1.1:
XSR(config-if<F1.1>)#ip address 192.168.100.1.255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<F1.1>)#ip tcp adjust-mss 1452
XSR(config-if<F1.1>)#no ip address
XSR(config)#interface dialer 1
XSR(config-if<D1>)#ip address negotiated
XSR(config-if<D1>)#ip mtu 1492
XSR(config-if<D1>)#ip nat outside
XSR(config-if<D1>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<D1>)#dialer pool 1
XSR(config-if<D1>)#dialer-group 1
XSR(config-if<D1>)#ppp authentication pap
XSR(config-if<D1>)#ppp pap sent-username frizz password 7 141B1309000528
XSR(config)#ip nat inside source list 101 dialer 1 overload
XSR(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0 Dialer1
XSR(config)#access-list 111 permit ip 192.168.100.0.0.0.0.255 any
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Other IP Commands
ip telnet server
This command enables or disables Telnet service to the XSR. If the optional parameter is not supplied, the Telnet server is enabled. Since the Telnet server is enabled at boot‐up, you must either manually disable it using the CLI or disable it in the startup‐config file.
Syntax
ip telnet server [enable | disable]
enable
Enables Telnet service.
disable
Disables Telnet service.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables the Telnet server:
no ip telnet server
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
Enabled
Example
The following example disables the Telnet server:
XSR(config)#ip telnet server enable
XSR(config)#no ip telnet server
ip unnumbered
This command enables IP processing on a serial interface without assigning an explicit IP address to the interface ‐ it associates a numbered interface whose address will be used with packets originating on this interface. The following conventions are observed:
5-166
•
If the numbered interface is deleted, the unnumbered association must be deleted as well.
•
If the numbered interface changes or deletes its address, the unnumbered association is preserved.
•
Routing protocols must be aware of possible changes of the address of the numbered interface they point to, as follows:
–
If the address of the numbered interface is deleted, packets sourced from the unnumbered interface that points to this numbered interface will not be transmitted.
–
If the address of the numbered interface is changed, routing protocols must reevaluate their participation in routing with the unnumbered interfaces. A match between the new address and a configured network must be found for the unnumbered interface to participate in routing.
Configuring the Internet Protocol
Other IP Commands
Syntax
ip unnumbered [type number]
type
Type of another interface on which the router has an assigned IP address. It cannot be another unnumbered interface.
number
Number of another interface on which the router has an assigned IP address. It cannot be another unnumbered interface.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables the unnumbered interface:
no ip unnumbered
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
Disabled
Example
In this example, Serial 1 is given F2ʹs address. The serial port is unnumbered:
XSR(config-if<F2>)#ip address 145.22.4.67 255.255.255.0
XSR(config)#interface serial 1
XSR(config-if<S1>)#ip unnumbered fastethernet 2
ip router-id
This command configures a router identifier, an IPv4 address specified in dotted decimal notation. It is used in routing protocols such as OSPF to uniquely identify a routing instance.
Syntax
ip router-id [ip-address]
ip-address
IP Address of router.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes a router identifier:
no ip router-id
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
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IP Clear and Show Commands
Example
The following example configures a router identifier:
XSR(config)#ip router-id 1.2.3.4
IP Clear and Show Commands
clear arp-cache
This command deletes all nonstatic entries from the ARP cache.
Syntax
clear arp-cache
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
clear ip interface-counters
This command clears all IP interface counters. If you do not enter the optional type or number value, all interface counters will be erased.
Syntax
clear ip interface-counters [type][number]
type
Interface type.
number
Interface number.
Mode
Privileged (EXEC): XSR#
clear ip proxy-dns cache
This command clears the proxy DNS cache.
Syntax
clear ip proxy-dns cache
Mode
EXEC: XSR>
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
IP Clear and Show Commands
clear ip traffic-counters
This command clears all IP related counters (IP, ICMP, ARP, UDP, TCP, RIP, OSPF) displayed by the show ip traffic command.
Syntax
clear ip traffic-counters
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
clear tcp counters
This command clears all TCP counters.
Syntax
clear tcp counters
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
show ip arp
This command displays all entries in the ARP cache.
Syntax
show ip arp [ip-address] [H.H.H] [type number]
ip-address
ARP entries matching this IP address are displayed. H.H.H
The 48‐bit MAC address.
type number
ARP entries learned via this interface type (Fast/GigabitEthernet) and number are displayed.
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following are sample responses:
XSR>show ip arp
Protocol Address
Internet 134.141.235.251
Internet 134.141.235.165
Internet 134.141.235.167
Age (min) Hardware Addr
0 0003.4712.7a99
0002.1664.a5b3
4 00d0.cf00.4b74
Type
ARPA
ARPA
ARPA
Interface
FastEthernet1
FastEthernet1
FastEthernet1
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IP Clear and Show Commands
Internet
Internet
Internet
Internet
Internet
Internet
Internet
Internet
Internet
Internet
134.141.235.137
134.141.235.150
134.141.235.155
134.141.235.124
58.58.58.1
57.57.57.1
54.54.54.1
53.53.53.1
52.52.52.1
51.51.51.1
1
0
2
17
-
00b0.d07f.0cab
00b0.d02c.06d2
00b0.d02c.077e
00b0.d06d.b6ca
0001.f4cc.dd02
0001.f4cc.dd02
0001.f4cc.dd02
0001.f4cc.dd02
0001.f4cc.dd02
0001.f4cc.dd02
ARPA
ARPA
ARPA
ARPA
ARPA
ARPA
ARPA
ARPA
ARPA
ARPA
FastEthernet1
FastEthernet1
FastEthernet1
FastEthernet1
FastEthernet2
FastEthernet2
FastEthernet2
FastEthernet2
FastEthernet2
FastEthernet2
XSR>show ip arp 134.141.235.165
Protocol Address
Age (min)
Internet 134.141.235.165
-
Hardware Addr
Type
0002.1664.a5b3 ARPA
Interface
FastEthernet1
XSR>show ip arp FastEthernet1
Protocol Address
Age (min)
Internet 134.141.235.251
0
Internet 134.141.235.165
Internet 134.141.235.150
2
Internet 134.141.235.155
5
Internet 134.141.235.124
5
Hardware Addr
0003.4712.7a99
0002.1664.a5b3
00b0.d02c.06d2
00b0.d02c.077e
00b0.d06d.b6ca
Interface
FastEthernet1
FastEthernet1
FastEthernet1
FastEthernet1
FastEthernet1
Type
ARPA
ARPA
ARPA
ARPA
ARPA
Parameter Description
Protocol
Type of network address this entry includes.
Address
Network address mapped to the MAC address in this entry.
Age (min)
Interval (in minutes) since this entry was entered in the table, rather than since the entry was last used. The timeout value is 4 hours.
Hardware Addr
MAC address mapped to network address in this entry.
Type
Encapsulation type used for the network address in this entry. Valid values are ARPA (Ethernet encapsulation), SNAP (IEEE 802.3).
show ip interface
Displays the usability status of interfaces configured for IP.
Syntax
show ip interface [type number]
type
Interface type: ATM, BRI, Dialer, Fast/GigabitEthernet, Loopback, Multilink, Serial, VPN, and Null. Not specifying a type will display all configured interfaces.
number
Interface number.
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
5-170
Configuring the Internet Protocol
IP Clear and Show Commands
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR>show ip interface
Dialer 0 is Admin Up
Internet address is 1.1.1.1/24
Last change: 11:14 AM
Rcvd:
10245 octets, 1231 unicast packets,
0 discards, 3 errors, 4 unknown protocol
Sent:
11232 octets, 1132 unicast packets,
0 discards, 2 errors
MTU is 1500 bytes
Proxy ARP is enabled.
Helper address is not set
Directed broadcast forwarding is disabled
Outgoing access list is not set
Inbound access list is not set
Router Discovery is disabled
FastEthernet 0 is Admin Up
Internet address is 134.141.235.165/24
Last change: 11:14 AM
Rcvd:
1245 octets, 131 unicast packets,
0 discards, 0 errors, 0 unknown protocol
Sent: 11232 octets, 1132 unicast packets,
0 discards, 2 errors
MTU is 1500 bytes
Proxy ARP is enabled.
Helper address is not set
Directed broadcast forwarding is enabled
Outgoing access list is not set
Inbound access list is not set
Router Discovery is enabled
FastEthernet 1 is down
Internet address is 134.141.234.2/24
Last change: 11:13 AM
MTU is 1500 bytes
Proxy ARP is disabled.
Helper address is not set
Directed broadcast forwarding is enabled
Outgoing access list is not set
Inbound access list is not set
Router Discovery is enabled
The following is sample output showing primary and secondary IP addresses:
XSR#show ip interface fastEthernet 2
FastEthernet2 is Admin Up
Internet address is 51.51.51.1, subnet
Internet address is 52.52.52.1, subnet
Internet address is 53.53.53.1, subnet
Internet address is 54.54.54.1, subnet
Internet address is 57.57.57.1, subnet
mask
mask
mask
mask
mask
is
is
is
is
is
255.255.255.0
255.255.255.0
255.255.255.0
255.255.255.0
255.255.255.0
Secondary
Secondary
Secondary
Secondary
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IP Clear and Show Commands
Internet address is 58.58.58.1, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0 Secondary
Rcvd: 515027 octets, 3306 unicast packets,
0 discards, 0 errors, 0 unknown protocol.
Sent: 363256 octets, 2472 unicast packets,
0 discards, 0 errors.
MTU is 1500 bytes.
Helper address is not set.
Directed broadcast is enabled.
Outgoing access list is not set.
Inbound access list is not set.
Router discovery is disabled.
The following is sample output from a VLAN interface on FastEthernet sub‐interface 2.1:
XSR#show ip interface FastEthernet 2.1
FastEthernet2.1 is Admin Up
Internet address is 1.2.3.4, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
Rcvd: 956984 octets, 11 unicast packets,
0 discards, 0 errors, 0 unknown protocol.
Sent: 494708 octets, 6789 unicast packets,
0 discards, 0 errors.
MTU is 1500 bytes.
Proxy ARP is enabled.
Helper address is not set.
Directed broadcast is enabled.
Outgoing access list is not set.
Inbound access list is not set.
Router discovery is disabled.
IP Policy Based Routing is not enabled.
Parameter Description
5-172
FastEthernet 1 is Admin Up
This refers to Layer 3 state for this interface. Valid states are Up and Down.
Last change
The value of system time when the interface entered the current operational state. If the current state was entered prior to the last re‐
initialization of the local network management subsystem, then this is 0.
Octets
Sum of octets received/sent through the specified interface.
Unicast packets
Sum of unicast packets received/sent through the port.
Discards
Sum of packets discarded even if no error had been detected, but for internal reasons (for instance to free up some buffer space).
Errors
Sum of packets discarded because of errors.
Unknown protocol
Sum of packets discarded because of unknown or unsupported protocol.
MTU
Shows the MTU value set on the interface.
Proxy ARP
Shows whether proxy ARP is enabled or disabled.
Helper address
Helper address if one has been set.
Directed broadcast forwarding
Indicates whether directed broadcast forwarding is enabled.
Outgoing access list
Indicates whether the interface has an outgoing access list set.
Configuring the Internet Protocol
IP Clear and Show Commands
Inbound access list Indicates whether the interface has an incoming access list set.
show ip irdp
This command displays ICMP router discovery settings.
Syntax
show ip irdp
Configuration Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following is sample output:
XSR>show ip irdp
FastEthernet1 has router server discovery enabled.
Broadcast address is used.
Advertisements will occur between every 450 and 600 seconds.
Advertisements are valid for 1800 seconds.
Preference will be 100.
Serial 1 has router server discovery disabled
FastEthernet2 has router server discovery disabled
Parameter Description
Broadcast address is used
Type of addressing used (broadcast or multicast).
Advertisements will occur between every 450 and 600 seconds
Specified minimum and maximum advertising interval for the port.
Advertisements are valid for 1800 seconds
The configured holdtime values for the interface.
Preference is 100
The configured (or in this case default) preference value for the interface.
show ip proxy-dns cache
This command displays the proxy DNS cache.
Syntax
show ip proxy-dns cache
Mode
EXEC: XSR>
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IP Clear and Show Commands
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR>show ip proxy-dns cache
Name
www.enterasys.com
www.test.com
Age(sec)
100
10
Parameter Description
Name
Designation of the DNS query.
Age
Seconds remaining for the lifetime of the cache.
show ip route
This command displays information about the Routing Table including route types, IP addresses, and costs. Administrative distances are referenced in each Routing Table entry within the brackets as follows: [distance/metric]. The command also displays all alternative routes where more than one route exists to a destination.
Syntax
show ip route [connected | address [mask [longer-prefixes]]| bgp | ospf | rip |
static]
connected
Shows only connected routes.
address
Address about which routing data will be shown.
mask
Argument for a subnet mask.
longer-prefixes
The address and mask pair becomes a prefix and any routes that match the prefix are displayed.
bgp
Shows BGP routes.
ospf
Shows OSPF routes.
rip
Shows RIP routes.
static
Shows static routes.
Note: Bracketed values indicate route distance and cost, where the first value is distance and the
second is cost. For example, [120/0003] indicates a distance of 120 (the default distance for RIP)
and a cost of 3.
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Defaults
5-174
•
LAN (FastEthernet 1, 2) interface cost: 10
•
Serial interface cost: 64
Configuring the Internet Protocol
IP Clear and Show Commands
Sample Output
The following is sample output. Note the route costs as indicated within brackets.
XSR>show ip route
Codes: C-connected, S-static, R-RIP, O-OSPF, IA-OSPF interarea
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
* - candidate default, D - default route originated from default net
O
O
O
C
R
R
R
C
C
R
C
C
C
C
S
S
E2 222.51.51.0/24
IA 192.169.1.0/24
192.168.25.0/24
192.168.5.0/24
68.0.0.0/8
67.0.0.0/8
66.0.0.0/8
58.58.58.0/24
57.57.57.0/24
55.0.0.0/8
54.54.54.0/24
53.53.53.0/24
52.52.52.0/24
51.51.51.0/24
2.0.0.0/8
3.0.0.0/8
[112/0020]
[110/0074]
[108/0084]
[ 0/0001]
[120/0002]
[120/0002]
[120/0002]
[ 0/0001]
[ 0/0001]
[120/0002]
[ 0/0001]
[ 0/0001]
[ 0/0001]
[ 0/0001]
[ 65/0001]
[ 0/0001]
via 192.168.1.6, Dialer1
via 192.168.2.9, FastEthernet1
via 192.168.3.9, FastEthernet1
directly connected, FastEthernet2
via 51.51.51.9, FastEthernet2
via 51.51.51.9, FastEthernet2
via 51.51.51.9, FastEthernet2
directly connected, FastEthernet2
directly connected, FastEthernet2
via 51.51.51.9, FastEthernet2
directly connected, FastEthernet2
directly connected, FastEthernet2
directly connected, FastEthernet2
directly connected, FastEthernet2
via 192.168.72.1, FastEthernet1
directly connected FastEthernet1
The following sample output is displayed when IP route 2.0.0.0 is specified:
XSR#show ip route 2.0.0.0
Routing entry for 2.0.0.0 (mask 255.0.0.0)
Known via "static", distance 65, metric 1
Redistributing via
Last update from 192.168.72.1 on FastEthernet1
Routing Descriptor Blocks:
*Next hop 192.168.72.1, via FastEthernet1
Route metric is 1
Total delay is 0 microseconds, minimum bandwidth is 0kbit
Reliability , minimum MTU 0 bytes
Loading , Hops 1
Parameter Description
C
Connected route
S
Static route
R
RIP route
O
OSPF route
IA
OSPF interarea route
N1
OSPF NSSA external type 1 route
N2
OSPF NSSA external type 2 route
E1
OSPF external type 1 route
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IP Clear and Show Commands
E2
OSPF external type 2 route
*
Candidate default route
D
Default route originated from default network
U
User‐configured static route
[x/y]
Distance/metric information
[0060]
Route cost
show ip static database
This command displays static route information including the destination IP address, gateway IP address, and administrative distance.
Syntax
show ip static database [A.B.C.D. A.B.C.D./mask | interface-type | distance]
distance
Distance, ranging from 1 to 120 hops.
A.B.C.D.
Next hop
A.B.C.D./<0-32>
IP address and mask
interface-type
XSR interface type: BRI, Dialer, Loopback, Multilink, Serial , VPN, or Fast/
GigabitEthernet.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Sample Output
The following is sample output:
XSR#show ip static database
Maximum number of multiple static routes: 4
Routing Information Sources:
Address
Gateway
Distance
7.0.0.0/8
Null0
1
1.1.1.0/24
2.2.2.2
1
Parameter Description
5-176
Maximum number of multiple static routes
The maximum number of routes with the same destination but different next hop.
Address
The route.
Gateway
The next hop to reach the address.
Distance
The value of the administrative distance, which is a measure of trustworthiness of the routing update. The lower the value, the more trustworthy the source of the update.
Configuring the Internet Protocol
IP Clear and Show Commands
show ip traffic
This command displays general IP protocols statistics.
Syntax
show ip traffic
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following is sample output:
XSR>show ip traffic
IP statistics:
Rcvd:
9040 total, 919 local destination, 7020 to be forwarded
5 header errors, 45 IP destination not valid
63 unknown protocol, 0 discards
Frags:
Bcast:
Sent:
30 fragments, 10 reassembled, 0 couldn't reassemble
5 fragmented, 15 fragments, 0 couldn't fragment
87 received, 97 sent
192 generated,0 drop no route, 0 discards
0 drop no route, 0 discards
ICMP statistics:
Rcvd:
44 total
0 format errors, 0 checksum errors, 0 redirects, 0 unreachable
2 echo, 2 echo reply, 0 mask requests, 0 mask replies, 0 quench
0 parameter, 0 timestamp, 0 info replies, 0 time exceeded
Sent:
23 total
0 redirects, 23 unreachable, 0 echo, 0 echo reply
0 mask requests, 0 mask replies, 0 quench, 0 timestamp
0 info reply, 0 time exceeded, 0 parameter problem
UDP statistics:
Rcvd:
82858 total, 0 checksum errors, 82852 no port
Sent:
42 total, 0 forwarded broadcasts
TCP statistics:
Rcvd:
9138 total, 0 checksum errors, 0 no port
Sent:
12425 total
RIP statistics:
Rcvd:
0 total, 0 checksum errors
0 resp to a query, 0 regular updates, 0 resp triggered by a change
Sent:
0 total
OSPF statistics:
Rcvd:
0 total, 0 checksum errors
0 hello, 0 database desc, 0 link state req
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IP Clear and Show Commands
0 link state updates, 0 link state acks
0 total
Sent:
ARP statistics:
Rcvd:
87441 requests, 5 replies
Sent:
3 requests, 36 replies (0 proxy)
Parameter Description
Total
Sum of datagrams received.
Local destination
Sum of local datagrams successfully delivered to upper layers.
To be forwarded
Sum of input datagrams, for which the XSR is not the destination.
Header errors
Sum of input datagrams discarded due to errors in the IP header, including bad checksum, version number mismatch, ttl exceeded, other format errors.
IP destination not valid
Sum of input datagrams discarded due to IP destination address not valid.
Unknown protocol
Sum of locally addressed datagrams discarded because of unknown or unsupported protocol.
Discards
Sum of input/output datagrams with no problems, but discarded due to internal reasons (such as lack of buffers).
Generated
Sum of packets internally generated.
Drop no route
Sum of packets to be transmitted and dropped because of non existent route to destination.
show resources
This command displays the allowable number of resource entries created and memory utilized. Values displayed reflect the amount of memory installed in your XSR. Monitoring memory usage can help you avoid over‐allocating memory to a particular resource and triggering a shortage.
Syntax
show resources
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following is sample output:
XSRtop#show resources
|Resources|Bytes Per|Total Bytes|Requests
Resource|InUse
|Resource |InUse
|Denied
========|=========|=========|===========|========
Number of Dynamic ARPs|
1|
96|
96|
0
Number of Static ARPs|
0|
192|
0|
0
( 64MgB)
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
IP Clear and Show Commands
Max Unresolved ARP Requests|
Routing Table Size|
Number of Static Routes|
Number of Secondary IP|
Number of Virtual IP|
IP Helper Addresses|
UDP Broadcast Fwd Entries|
OSPF LSA type 1|
OSPF LSA type 2|
OSPF LSA type 3|
OSPF LSA type 4|
OSPF LSA type 5|
OSPF LSA type 7|
Number of ACList Entries|
Number of Users|
SNMP Read-Only Communities|
SNMP Read-Write Communities|
SNMP Trap Servers|
SNMP users|
SNMP groups|
SNMP views|
Number of IP Interfaces|
Number of RIP Net|
AAA Sessions|
Authenticated Tunnels|
IKE/IPsec Tunnels|
ISAKMP SA's|
IPSEC SA's|
L2TP Tunnels|
PPTP Tunnels|
Dialer Map Classes|
Dialer Pool size|
Frame Relay Map Classes|
Number of ADSL channels|
ISAKMP Proposals|
Firewall Networks|
Firewall Services|
Firewall Network Groups|
Firewall Service Groups|
Firewall Policies|
Firewall Gating Rules|
Firewall Filters|
Firewall Sessions|
Firewall AuthEntry|
Crypto Maps|
PBR Cache Entries|
Route-map Entries|
Total: |
0|
3|
2|
0|
0|
0|
7|
2|
0|
0|
0|
0|
0|
0|
1|
0|
1|
0|
0|
2|
3|
17|
0|
0|
0|
0|
0|
0|
0|
0|
1|
0|
0|
0|
1|
6|
0|
0|
0|
1|
2|
2|
0|
0|
0|
0|
0|
384|
352|
96|
576|
1344|
96|
96|
9408|
9408|
320|
480|
480|
576|
192|
4000|
14624|
14816|
192|
9952|
4672|
3744|
7936|
96|
320|
640|
1152|
1920|
4448|
5376|
6112|
544|
1632|
256|
8096|
96|
192|
192|
96|
96|
320|
96|
192|
256|
256|
736|
96|
96|
0|
1056|
192|
0|
0|
0|
672|
18816|
0|
0|
0|
0|
0|
0|
4000|
0|
14816|
0|
0|
9344|
11232|
134912|
0|
0|
0|
0|
0|
0|
0|
0|
544|
0|
0|
0|
96|
1152|
0|
0|
0|
320|
192|
384|
0|
0|
0|
0|
0|
197824
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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IP Clear and Show Commands
Parameter Description
64MgB
Amount of memory installed in the XSR.
Resource
Table, table entry, user, or SNMP category.
ResourcesInUse
Sum of entries currently in use.
Bytes Per Resource
Sum (in bytes) of memory in use by each entry.
Total Bytes InUse
Sum (in bytes) of memory currently used by this resource.
show tcp
This command displays TCP statistics.
Syntax
show tcp {connections | general}
connections
A summary connections display.
general
A detailed general information display.
Configuration Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following are sample responses:
Connection Table
XSR>show tcp connections
-----------TCP Statistics----------Current Connections
Local Address
134.141.235.165.23
134.141.235.165.23
Foreign Address
134.141.235.124.1573
134.141.235.150.1588
Connection State
ESTAB
ESTAB
General Information Display
XSR>show tcp general
-----------TCP Statistics----------TCP General Infomation
Maximum number of TCP connections is dynamic
2 connections in state ESTABLISHED or CLOSE-WAIT
Retransmission timeouts: min 220ms; max 684 ms
Rcvd: 870 total
0 errors
Sent: 701 total
2 retransmitted
1 containing the RST flag
0 transitions from CLOSED to SYN-SENT
5-180
Configuring the Internet Protocol
IP Clear and Show Commands
4 transitions from LISTEN to SYN-RCVD
2 transitions from SYN-SENT or SYN-RCVD to CLOSED
2 transitions from ESTABLISHED or CLOSE-WAIT to CLOSE
Parameter Description
Connection state - Possible states for a TCP connection:
LISTEN
Waiting for a connection request.
SYNSENT
Waiting for a matching connection request after having sent a connection request.
SYNRCVD
Waiting for a confirming connection request ack after having both received and sent a connection request.
ESTAB
Indicates an open connection.
FINWAIT1
Waiting for a connection termination request from the remote TCP host or an ack of the connection termination request previously sent.
FINWAIT2
Waiting for a connection termination request from the remote TCP host.
CLOSEWAIT
Waiting for a connection termination request from local user.
CLOSING
Waiting for a connection termination request ACK from the remote TCP host.
LASTACK
Waiting for an ack of the connection termination request previously sent to the remote TCP host.
TIMEWAIT
Waiting for enough time to pass to be sure the remote TCP host has received the ack of its connection termination request.
CLOSED
Indicates no connection state at all.
Local address
IP address and port of the network server.
Foreign address
IP address and port of the connected remote host .
Retransmission timeout
Retransmission interval of TCP packets that were not acknowledged are waiting for retransmission.
telnet ip_address
This command supports Telnetting to another server.
Syntax
telnet ip_address [port value]
ip_address
IP address of the server you are Telnetting to.
value
Port number of the Telnet server. Range: from 0 to 65,535.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
XSR CLI Reference Guide
5-181
Network Address Translation Commands
Default
Standard Telnet port 23. If the port is not provided, the client will try to connect to port 23 on the remote server.
Example
The following example connects you to the XSR at 192.57.189.4 via Telnet:
XSR#telnet 192.57.189.4 23
Network Address Translation Commands
The XSR commands below configure Network Address Translation (NAT).
clear ip nat translation
This command clears dynamic NAT translations from the table before they time out. Although the XSR times out NAT translations by default, it is useful to clear translations before the timeout.
Syntax
clear ip nat translation interface {[all | global-ip local-ip] | [protocol globalip global-port local-ip local-port]}
interface
Port number: Dialer (0‐255), FastEthernet (1‐2), Loopback (0‐65535), Serial (card/port/channel #), VPN (0‐255).
all
Wildcard keyword to clear all dynamic translation entries on an interface.
global-ip
When used without arguments protocol, global‐port, and local‐port, it clears a simple translation that also contains the specified local‐ip address. When used with the those arguments it clears an extended translation.
local-ip
Clears an entry that contains this local IP address and the specified global‐ip address
protocol
Clears an entry containing this protocol and the specified global‐ip address, local‐ip address, global‐port and local‐port.
global-port
Clears an entry containing this global‐port and the specified protocol, global‐ip address, local‐ip address, and local‐port.
local-port
Clears an entry that contains this local‐port and the specified protocol, global‐ip address, local‐ip address, and global‐port.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Examples
The following example clears are NAT translations on GigabitEthernet interface 2:
XSR#clear ip nat translations g 2 * 2 NAPT entries or NAT mapping removed
5-182
Configuring the Internet Protocol
Network Address Translation Commands
The following example clears a specific UDP entry from the NAPT table:
XSR#clear ip nat translation fastEthernet 1 17 200.2.233.1 1220 192.168.27.95 1220
1 NAPT entries or NAT mapping removed
The following example clears all NAPT translations for host 192.168.50.2 on the private network:
XSR#clear ip nat translation fastEthernet 1 192.168.50.2 0.0.0.0
4 NAPT entries or NAT mapping removed
The following example clears all NAPT translations for, to, and from the NATted address of 10.10.10.15:
XSR#clear ip nat translation fastEthernet 1 0.0.0.0 10.10.10.15
5 NAPT entries or NAT mapping removed
ip local pool
This command configures a local pool of IP addresses for distribution to remote peers seeking connection to an interface. The command acquires IP Local Pool mode and makes available this sub‐command:
•
exclude ‐ Bars a range of IP addresses from the local pool. Refer to page 5‐184 for the sub‐
command definition.
Syntax
ip local pool pool-name IP-address subnet-mask
pool-name
Name of a particular local address pool.
IP-address
Base address of an IP subnet used to allocate IP addresses.
subnet-mask
Mask of that IP subnet. All subnet address bits matching zero bits in the mask must also be zero; that is, subnet and mask must be zero. May be expressed as A.B.C.D or /<0-32>.
Note: The pool size (mask) must be /16 or higher (Class B or C) thus limiting any one pool to 64,000
IP addresses.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to delete an IP address from the pool:
no ip local pool pool-name
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
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Next Mode
IP Local Pool configuration: XSR(ip-local-pool)#
Example
The following example creates local IP address pool marketing, which contains all IP addresses in the range 203.57.99.0 to 203.57.99.255:
XSR(config)#ip local pool marketing 203.57.99.0 255.255.255.0
exclude
This sub‐command bars the use of a range of IP addresses from an earlier created IP pool.
Syntax
exclude {ip address}{number}
ip address
Starting address to be excluded from pool.
number
Number of addresses to exclude ranging from 1 to 65535.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the specified IP address from the exclude list:
exclude {ip address}{number}
Mode
Local IP Pool configuration: XSR(ip-local-pool)#
Examples
The following example excludes the ten IP addresses between 192.168.57.100 and 192.168.57.110 from local pool HQ:
XSR(config)#ip local pool HQ 192.168.57.0 255.255.255.0
XSR(ip-local-pool)#exclude 192.168.57.100 10
The following example negates the exclusion of IP addresses 192.168.57.105 and 192.168.57.106 from the earlier excluded range of IP addresses in local pool HQ:
XSR(config)#ip local pool HQ
XSR(ip-local-pool)#no exclude 192.168.57.105 2
ip nat pool
This command defines a pool of IP addresses for Network Address Translation (NAT). NAT pools are configured using the ip local pool command and then registered as being used by NAT. A pool must be registered by the XSR or it will not be attached to an interface.
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Network Address Translation Commands
Syntax
ip nat pool name
name
Name of the IP local pool.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command removes one or more addresses from the NAT pool:
no ip nat pool name
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
The following example configures the IP NAT pool NATpool:
XSR(config)#ip nat pool NATpool
ip nat service list ???SPTD???
This command specifies a port other than the default port for the File Transfer Protocol (FTP). It is used when you want NAT to pass only FTP control sessions that are using that port. In this case, all client requests using the default port (21) will be dropped by NAT.
Syntax
ip nat service list access-list-number ftp tcp port port-number
list acl-number
Standard ACL number, ranging from 1 to 199.
ftp
FTP protocol.
tcp
TCP protocol.
port port-number
Port other than the default port. Range: 1 to 65533.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of the command disables the port:
no ip nat service list access-list-number ftp tcp port port-number
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
Disabled
Examples
The following example configures non‐standard port 2021 for FTP:
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XSR(config)#ip nat service list 1 ftp tcp port 2021
XSR(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.1.1.1
This example sets non‐standard port 2021 and standard port 21 for FTP. Be aware that if the FTP server is using both the default and another port, both ports must be configured in NAT.
XSR(config)#ip nat service list 1 ftp tcp port 21
XSR(config)#ip nat service list 1 ftp tcp port 2021
XSR(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.1.1.1
ip nat source (interface mode - NAPT)
This command applies Pool Network Address Translation (NAT) and Network Address Port Translation (NAPT) rules to an XSR interface. Both standard and extended access lists are supported as well as Network Address Port Translation.
Syntax
ip nat source [list access-list-number]{assigned overload | address ip-address
overload | pool pool_name overload}
list accesslist-number
Standard IP ACL number. Packets with source addresses that pass the ACL (permitted by the list) are dynamically translated using the local global address. If the ACL is not specified, the wildcard is assumed.
assigned
IP address of the port used as the source IP address for outgoing packets.
ip-address
Specified arbitrary IP address used as the global NAT IP address.
pool pool_name
Group of addresses from which the global address will be chosen.
overload
When overload is specified, the selected global address (either specified or from the pool) will be used to perform NAPT, which ranges from port 20000 to 40960.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command removes NAT rules from the interface:
no ip nat source [list access-list-number]{assigned overload | address ip-address
overload | pool pool_name overload}
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default:
No NAT (rule) specified for the interface.
Example
This example configures Serial interface 1/0 as the source IP address for outgoing packets:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ip nat source assigned over
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Network Address Translation Commands
ip nat source intf-static (interface mode)
This command configures a single static translation entry in the Network Address Translation (NAT) table. Interface static NAT is similar to global NAT; it takes precedence over global static NAT with the implication that if an outgoing/incoming packet matches the interface static NAT no other form of NAT will be performed. Syntax
ip nat source [list ACL_number] intf-static {local-ip global-ip |{tcp | udp}
local-ip local-port global-ip global-port}
list ACL_number
Standard IP ACL number. Packets with source addresses that pass the ACL (permitted by the list) are dynamically translated using the local global address. If the ACL is not specified, the wildcard is assumed.
static
A global static NAT table entry is added.
local-ip
A local IP address assigned to a host on the inside network.
global-ip
Translated IP address.
tcp | udp
This value implies that his is a port‐specific static NAT.
local-port
Source port of outgoing packets and destination port of incoming packets.
global-port
Destination port of outgoing packets and source port of incoming packets.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of the command removes a single static translation entry:
no ip nat intf-source static local-ip global-ip
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if-<S1>)#
Example
The following example configures a static NAT system:
XSR(config-if<S1>)#ip nat source intf-static 192.178.15.97 10.10.10.5
ip nat source static (global mode)
This command configures a single static translation entry in the Network Address Translation (NAT) table. Interface static NAT is similar to global NAT; it takes precedence over global static NAT with the implication that if an outgoing/incoming packet matches the interface static NAT no other form of NAT will be performed.
Syntax
ip nat source static {local-ip global-ip |{tcp | udp} local-ip local-port globalip global-port}
static
A global static NAT table entry is added.
local-ip
A local IP address assigned to a host on the inside network.
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global-ip
Translated IP address.
tcp | udp
This value implies that his is a port‐specific static NAT.
local-port
Source port of outgoing packets and destination port of incoming packets.
global-port
Destination port of outgoing packets and source port of incoming packets.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of the command removes a single static translation entry:
no ip nat source static local-ip global-ip
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
The following example configures a static NAT system:
XSR(config)#ip nat source static 192.178.15.97 10.10.10.5
ip nat translation
This command changes the interval after which translations time out.
Syntax
ip nat translation {timeout | udp-timeout | tcp-timeout | icmp-timeout}[seconds]
| [never]
timeout
Dynamic NAT interval (not overload translations).
udp-timeout
UDP port interval.
tcp-timeout
TCP port interval.
icmp-timeout
ICMP traffic interval.
seconds
Period after which port translation expires.
never
No expiration.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command configures default timeout values:
no ip nat translation {timeout | udp-timeout | tcp-timeout | icmp-timeout}
[seconds] | [never]
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
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Defaults
•
Timeout: 180 seconds (3 minutes)
•
UDP‐timeout: 300 seconds (5 minutes)
•
TCP‐timeout: 86,400 seconds (24 hours)
•
ICMP‐timeout: 60 seconds
Example
The example below times out UDP port translation entries in 15 minutes:
XSR(config)#ip nat translation udp-timeout 900
show ip nat translations
This command displays active NAPT translations.
Syntax
show ip nat translations [interface]
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following example displays four static NAT entries. Note that external hosts are not tracked for static NAT nor are idle times.
XSR#show ip nat translations
Interface GigabitEthernet 2
=============================================================
Num Interface-Static NAT : 4
--------------------------------------Pro
Private Host
NAT Addr
External Host
(Local IP Addr)
(Global IP Addr)
ANY
146.115.206.31
10.120.112.2
Not Tracked
TCP
146.115.206.242:80
10.120.112.146:80
Not Tracked
TCP
146.115.206.242:80
10.120.112.156:80
Not Tracked
UDP 146.115.206.32:223
10.120.112.156:143
Not Tracked
Idle
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
The following example displays four dynamic NAT entries with assigned address overloading. Note that four different inside hosts appear on the outside with a single NAT IP address (10.10.10.2).
XSR#show ip nat translations
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NAPT using address: 10.10.10.2
Num translations: 8
--------------------------------------Pro
Private Host
NAT Addr
(Local IP Addr)
(Global IP Addr)
UDP
192.168.50.90:1024
10.10.10.2:20002
UDP
192.168.50.90:1024
10.10.10.2:20001
UDP
192.168.50.91:1024
10.10.10.2:20004
UDP
192.168.50.91:1024
10.10.10.2:20003
TCP
192.168.50.70:1024
10.10.10.2:20006
TCP
192.168.50.70:1024
10.10.10.2:20005
TCP
192.168.50.71:1024
10.10.10.2:20008
TCP
192.168.50.71:1024
10.10.10.2:20007
External Host
Idle
10.10.10.15:3664
10.10.10.15:3663
10.10.10.16:3666
10.10.10.16:3665
10.10.15.75:36864
10.10.15.75:36863
10.10.15.76:36866
10.10.15.76:36865
24
24
24
24
3
3
3
3
The following example displays NAT pool entries with overload statistics. Note that a unique NAT IP address is assigned to each internal host and that if there are more internal hosts than the number of addresses in the pool, then multiple internal hosts will share a single NAT address..
XSR#show ip nat translations
Pool name: NATPool with overload
ACL Number: 100
--------------------------------------NAPT using address: 10.10.10.131
Num translations: 2
--------------------------------------Pro
Private Host
NAT Addr
(Local IP Addr)
(Global IP Addr)
UDP
192.168.50.91:1024
10.10.10.131:20002
UDP
192.168.50.91:1024
10.10.10.131:20001
External Host
10.10.10.16:3666
10.10.10.16:3665
Parameter Description
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Pro
Protocol of the port identifying the address.
Private Host
The IP address assigned to a host on the inside network.
NAT Addrl
The legitimate IP address.
External Host
Remote host that the packets are destined to.
Idle Period (seconds) of inactivity of a traffic flow.
Configuring the Internet Protocol
Idle
4
4
Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol Commands
Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol Commands
vrrp <group> adver-int
This command configures the interval between successive advertisements sent by the master VR in a virtual group. Advertisements sent by the master VR communicate the state and priority of the current master VR.
Note: All virtual routers in a virtual group must have the same advertisement interval.
Syntax
vrrp group adver-int [sec] interval
group
VR group number.
interval
Interval between successive advertisements by master VR. Range: 1‐ 255 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to restore the default value:
no vrrp group adver-int
Defaults
•
Interval: 1 second
•
Group: 1 , ranging from 1 to 255
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Examples
The following example sets advertising interval 2 for VR group 2 on FastEthernet interface 1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#vrrp 2 adver-int 2
The following example sets the default advertising interval for virtual router group 2 on F1:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#no vrrp 2 adver-int
vrrp <group> authentication
This command authenticates Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP) packets received from other routers in the group.
When a VRRP packet arrives from another router in the VRRP group, its authentication string inside the packet is compared to the string configured on the local system. If the strings match, the XSR CLI Reference Guide
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message is accepted and if not, it is discarded. All routers within the group must share the same authentication string. Note: Plain text authentication is not meant to be used for security. It simply provides a way to
prevent a misconfigured router from participating in the VRRP.
Syntax
vrrp group authentication string
group
Virtual router group number.
string
String (up to 8 alphanumeric characters) to validate incoming VRRP packets.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Disable VRRP authentication by using the no form of this command:
no vrrp group authentication
Defaults
•
No authentication of VRRP messages occurs.
•
Group : 1, ranging from 1 to 255
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Examples
The following example enables authentication for VR group 1 on F1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#vrrp 1 authentication mypass or vrrp authentication mypass
The following example disables authentication:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#no vrrp 1 authentication or no vrrp authentication
vrrp <group> ip
This command adds up to 11 virtual IP addresses per group and enables a corresponding Virtual Router (VR) on an interface. Be aware of these caveats:
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•
If the first virtual address for one VR is one of the real addresses in the XSR (it must be on the same port), the next one must also be one of the real addresses (it must be on the same port).
•
If the first virtual address is not one of the real addresses on a certain port, the next one must not be one of the real addresses on that port.
•
The set of virtual IP addresses configured on each VRRP router belonging to the same group must be the same.
Configuring the Internet Protocol
Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol Commands
Syntax
vrrp group ip ipaddress
group
VR group number. If you do not specify an input group number, the default group number will be used. Limit: 11 addresses per VR, 44 per router.
ipaddress
IP address of the VR.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the virtual IP address on a port:
no vrrp group ip ipaddress
Defaults
•
No VR configured
•
Group: 1
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Examples
The following example adds and enables virtual group1 on F1. The VRRP group is 1 and IP address 10.0.1.20 is the address of the virtual router.
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#vrrp 1 ip 10.0.1.20 or vrrp 1 ip 10.0.1.20
The following example removes virtual IP address 10.0.1.20 from virtual group 1 on F1. The VRRP group is 1 and IP address 10.0.1.20 is the address of the virtual router.
XSR(config-if<F1>)#no vrrp 1 ip 10.0.1.20 or vrrp ip 10.0.1.20
vrrp <group> master-respond-ping
This command allows the Virtual Router (VR) master to respond to an ICMP ping regardless of actual IP address ownership. RFC‐2338 specifies that a VR master that is not the actual address owner should not respond to ICMP ping associated with the virtual IP address. This configuration should be consistent on all interfaces participating in a VR.
Syntax
vrrp <group> master-respond-ping
group
VR group number, ranging from 1 to 255.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables the functionality:
no vrrp group master-respond-ping
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Defaults
•
Disabled ‐ the VR master will not respond to an ICMP echo request sent to the virtual IP address if it is not the physical owner.
•
If no group is provided, the default group is 1.
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Examples
The following example enables this feature for VR 2 on interface F1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#vrrp 2 master-respond-ping
The following example disables this feature for VR 2 on interface F1:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#no vrrp 2 master-respond-ping
vrrp <group> preempt
This command configures the router to take over as master Virtual Router (VR) for a virtual group if it has higher priority than the current master VR.
This feature is enabled by default. You can also configure a delay, which will cause the virtual router to wait the specified interval before issuing an advertisement claiming master ownership.
Notes: The XSR established as the IP address owner will pre-empt another VR, regardless of the
setting of this command.
All VRs in a virtual group must share the same preempt attribute. That is, if one VR is set as no
preempt, the others must be set likewise.
Syntax
vrrp group preempt [delay <seconds>]
group
VR group number.
seconds
Interval the router will delay before issuing an advertisement claiming master ownership.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Disable this feature with the no form of the command:
no vrrp group preempt
Defaults
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•
Enabled
•
Group : 1 , ranging from 1 to 255
•
Seconds: 0
Configuring the Internet Protocol
Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol Commands
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Examples
The following example enables preempt for virtual router group 1 with a 2‐second delay set on F1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#vrrp 1 preempt delay 2 or vrrp preempt delay 2
The following example disables the preempt for VR group 1 on F1:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#no vrrp 1 preempt or no vrrp preempt
vrrp <group> priority
This command sets the priority level of the router within a virtual group. Use it to control which router becomes the master VR.
Syntax
vrrp group priority level
group
VR group number.
level
Priority of the router within the VRRP group. Range: 1 to 254.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command restores the default value:
no vrrp group priority
Defaults
•
Level: The priority of the IP address owner is 255, otherwise the default is 100.
•
Group: 1 , ranging from 1 to 255
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Examples
This example sets priority 150 for VR group 1 on F1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#vrrp 1 priority 150 or vrrp priority 150
The following example sets priority to default for VR group 1 on F1:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#no vrrp 1 priority
or no vrrp priority
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vrrp <group> track
This command allows a Virtual Router (VR) to track another interface (FastEthernet, Serial, Dialer or Multilink PPP) or one or moe routes on the same router.
When interface A is configured to track interface B, interface A will monitor the status of interface B to decide if it wants to become the master of a VR. When interface B goes down, it will lower its priority to 0 (zero) and refrain from participating in the VR master selection. but will continue to monitor interface B. When interface B comes up, interface A will increase its VR priority back to the original value. If interface A is originally configured as a backup VR, no preemption will occur, but interface A will resume being the backup VR.
This command should be used on the interface that is most likely to be selected as master of the corresponding VR. If the interface is configured as a backup VR, the command has no effect.
When you configure watchlist tracking, if all routes fail, the VR will lower its priority to 0 and when at least one of the routes come up, the VR will return to its original priority. When specifying a watch‐group, be aware that you can use the associated dialer watch-list command. Notes: This command should be used on the interface most likely to be chosen master of the
corresponding VR. The command has no effect if the interface is configured as a backup VR.
The XSR supports one track interface per VR only, so every time it is configured, the router will
overwrite the previous one.
Caution: When you configure the track interface, the VR IP address you specify must be different
than the physical IP address of the interface otherwise client ARP tables will not be correctly
updated.
Syntax of the “no” Form
vrrp <group> track <interface-type> watch-group watch-list-number
group
VR group number, ranging from 1 to 255.
interface-type
Name and number of the interface to monitor.
watch-list-number
Number of the Dialer watch‐list to monitor, ranging from 1 to 255.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables the functionality:
no vrrp group track
Defaults
•
No interface tracking.
•
If no group is provided, the default group is 1.
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
This example enables the tracking of interface Serial 1/0 by interface F1 on VR 2:
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VRRP Clear and Show Commands
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if)#vrrp 2 track serial 1/0
This example disables the tracking of interface Serial 1/0 by interface F1 on VR 2:
XSR(config-if)#no vrrp 2 track
VRRP Clear and Show Commands
clear vrrp-counters
This command clears statistics for a specified VRRP group; it is governed by the following considerations:
•
If you do not specify both group and interface, the statistics for all Virtual Routers (VR) in the VRRP group on this router will be cleared.
•
If you specify only the group and not the interface, statistics for all the VRs in the VRRP group whose group ID matches the specified ID on this router will be cleared.
•
If you do specify the interface only, statistics for all VRs in the VRRP group configured on this interface on this router will be cleared.
•
If you specify both group and interface, only statistics for this specified VRRP group on this router will be cleared.
Syntax
clear vrrp-counters [group][interface]
group
Virtual router group number, ranging from 1 to 255.
interface
FastEthernet 1 or Fast/GigabitEthernet 2 only.
Mode
EXEC: XSR>clear vrrp-counters
Examples
To clear statistics for VR 2 on interface F1, enter:
XSR#clear vrrp-counters fastethernet 1 2
To clear statistics for all the VRs on this router, enter:
XSR#clear vrrp-counters
show vrrp
This command displays all virtual router information configured on this router.
Syntax
show vrrp
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Mode
EXEC: XSR>
Sample Output
The following sample output displays configuration data for all virtual routers on this router:
XSR#show vrrp
Ethernet Interface:
1
Group ID:
1
State:
backup
Preempt:
Preempt Enabled
Priority:
100
Adver-int:
1
Master Down Timer:
3
Authentication Code:
mypass
Virtual IP:
3.3.3.3
Primary IP:
1.1.1.1
Master Router IP:
3.3.3.3
Virtual MAC:
0x00005e005101
BecomeMaster:
2
AdvertiseRcvd:
96
ChecksumErrors:
0
VersionErrrors:
0
PriorityZeroPktsRcvd:
0
PriorityZeroPktsSend:
0
InvalidTypePktsRcvd:
0
UnknownAuthType:
0
AuthTypeErrors:
0
AuthFailures:
0
------------------------------Ethernet Interface:
2
Group ID:
2
State:
master
Preempt:
Preempt Enable
Priority:
100
Adver-int:
1
Advertise Interval Timer: 1
Authentication Code:
mypass
Virtual IP:
3.3.3.3
Primary IP:
2.2.2.2
Master Router IP:
2.2.2.2
Virtual MAC:
0x00005e005101
BecomeMaster:
2
AdvertiseRcvd:
96
ChecksumErrors:
0
VersionErrrors:
0
PriorityZeroPktsRcvd:
0
PriorityZeroPktsSend:
0
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VRRP Clear and Show Commands
InvalidTypePktsRcvd:
UnknownAuthType:
AuthTypeErrors:
AuthFailures:
0
0
10
0
show vrrp interface
This command displays all the virtual routers and their status on a specified interface.
Syntax
show vrrp interface <interface>
interface
Interface name, either FastEthernet 1 or 2 only.
Mode
EXEC: XSR>
Sample Output
This sample output displays configuration data of a virtual router on interface FastEthernet 2:
XSR#show vrrp interface fastethernet 2
Eathernet Interface:
Group ID:
State:
Preempt:
Priority:
Adver-int:
Advertise Interval Timer:
Authentication Code:
Virtual IP:
Primary IP:
Master Router IP:
Virtual MAC:
BecomeMaster:
AdvertiseRcvd:
ChecksumErrors:
VersionErrrors:
PriorityZeroPktsRcvd:
PriorityZeroPktsSend:
InvalidTypePktsRcvd:
UnknownAuthType:
AuthTypeErrors:
AuthFailures:
2
2
master
Preempt Enable
15
1
1
mypass
3.3.3.3
2.2.2.2
2.2.2.2
0x00005e005101
2
96
0
0
0
0
0
0
10
0
Parameter Description
Fast Ethernet Interface
Interface type and number
Group ID
VRRP group number
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State
Master or backup
Preempt
Preempt enabled or not
Preempt‐Delay
Preempt delay seconds
Priority
Priority of this group
Adver‐int
Advertisement interval
Master Down Timer/
Advertise Interval Timer/
Master Delay Timer
If in backup state, displays the seconds remaining to trigger Master Down Timer or Master Delay Timer; if in master state, displays the seconds remaining to trigger the next advertisement.
Authentication Code
Password
Virtual IP
Virtual IP address
Primary IP
Interface IP address Master Router IP
Master router IP address
Master‐respond‐ping
Master‐respond‐ping enabled or not
Track Interface
Interface being monitored
Virtual MAC
Virtual Mac address
BecomeMaster
Become Master counter
AdvertiseRcvd
Advertisement received packets counter
ChecksumErrors
ChecksumErrors packets counter
VersionErrors
VersionErrrors packets counter
PriorityZeroPktsRcvd
PriorityZeroPktsRcvd counter
PriorityZeroPktsSend
PriorityZeroPktsSend counter
InvalidTypePktsRcvd
InvalidTypePktsRcvd counter
UnknownAuthType
UnknownAuthType packets counter
AuthTypeErrors
AuthTypeErrors packets counter
AuthFailures
AuthFailures packets counter
show vrrp summary
This command displays VRRP summary information on this router.
Syntax
show vrrp summary
Mode
EXEC: XSR>
Sample Output
The following sample output displays VRRP summary data on the XSR:
-------------------VRRP SUMMARY----------------------------Maximum number of VRs per router:
4
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
VRRP Clear and Show Commands
Maximum number of virtual addresses per VR:
11
Number of virtual IP address in use:
Fast Ethernet 1
Fast Ethernet 2 Fast Ethernet 3
VR1
1
1
1
VR3
1
VR2
1
------------------------------------------------------------
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Configuring the Internet Protocol
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Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol
Observing Syntax and Conventions
The CLI command syntax and conventions use the notation described below.
Convention
Description
xyz
Key word or mandatory parameters (bold)
[x]
[ ] Square brackets indicate an optional parameter (italic)
[x | y | z]
[ | ] Square brackets with vertical bar indicate a choice of values
{x | y | z}
{ | } Braces with vertical bar indicate a choice of a required value
[x {y | z} ]
[{ | } ] Combination of square brackets with braces and vertical bars indicates a
required choice of an optional parameter
(config-if<xx>)
xx signifies the interface type and number; e.g., F1, G3, S2/1.0,M57. F indicates
a FastEthernet, and G a GigabitEthernet interface.
Next Mode entries display the CLI prompt after a command is entered.
Sub-command headings are displayed in red, italicized text.
soho.enterasys.com
Italicized, non-syntactic text indicates either a user-specified entry or text with
special emphasis
BGP Configuration Commands
The following command subsets define BGP functionality on the XSR, including:
•
“BGP Configuration Commands” on page 6‐83.
•
“Route Map Commands” on page 6‐110.
•
“BGP Set Commands” on page 6‐114.
•
“BGP Clear and Show Commands” on page 6‐122.
•
“BGP Debug Commands” on page 6‐132.
router bgp
This command activates a BGP routing process, after which you can configure these additional parameters:
•
BGP neighbors
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BGP Configuration Commands
•
Networks
•
Neighbor parameters
•
Routing policies
Syntax
router bgp autonomous-system
autonomous-system
The XSR’s Autonomous System (AS) number, ranging from 1 to 65,535. The AS number is included in routing updates traded by BGP routers.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the default parameter ‐ disabled:
no router bgp autonomous-system
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Examples
The following example activates the BGP routing process on a router belonging to AS 100. Note that the XSR acquires Router configuration mode after executing the command:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#
The following example displays an error message when you try to activate another BGP process when one is already running. In this example the BGP process was already activated with AS 100 when an attempt was made to activate it again with the AS 11.
XSR(config)#router bgp 11
% BGP Already running in AS 100
aggregate-address
This command creates an aggregate entry in a BGP routing table which is useful for reducing the number of advertised routes between BGP routers. An aggregate entry in the table is a single summarized route that represents multiple, more specific routes.
At least one of the more specific routes being aggregated must exist in the table for this command to take effect.
Syntax
aggregate-address address mask [as-set][summary-only] [advertise-map mapname][attribute-map map-name]
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address
The aggregate IP address.
mask
The aggregate IP mask.
Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol
BGP Configuration Commands
as-set
Prevents data loss, including contents of BGP attributes, from more specific routes in the aggregate route. Note that when the contents of those attributes vary within more specific routes, reducing them to the same value within corresponding attributes of the aggregate route can cause routing problems such as loops.
summary-only
Prevents more specific routes that comprise the aggregate route from being advertised.
advertise-map map-name The route map used to select the routes that comprise AS‐SET origin communities, ranging from 1 to 199.
attribute-map map-name The route map used to set the attribute of the aggregate route, ranging from 1 to 199.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the aggregate entry from the table:
no aggregate-address address mask
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
Disabled
Example
The following example aggregates routes ranging from 192.168.0.0 to 192.168.255.0, each with a mask of 255.255.255.0, into a single aggregate route of 192.168.0.0 with a mask of 255.255.0.0. The optional summary‐only keyword can be used to direct only the aggregate route be advertised to this router’s neighbors. Ommiting the as‐set option can indicate that all of the routes originate in the same AS and follow the same routing policy, this resulting in no loss of any BGP attribute data within the aggregate.
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#aggregate-address 192.168.0.0 255.255.0.0 summary-only
auto-summary
This command restores the default behavior of BGP by summarizing redistributed IGP subnets on classful network boundaries. Automatic summarization of IGP subnets reduces the number of routes in the BGP routing table, improving router performance and reducing the amount of bandwidth used by routing traffic between BGP peers.
Syntax
auto-summary
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes BGP summarization:
no auto-summary
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BGP Configuration Commands
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
Enabled
Example
The following example configures summarization in BGP process 100:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#auto-summary
bgp always-compare-med
This command instructs the XSR to compare the Multi Exit Discriminator (MED) value for paths from neighbors in different ASs. MED is one of the parameters considered by the XSR when selecting the best path. The path with the lowest MED value is chosen when all higher‐ranking BGP route selection criteria are the same for all competing paths to the same destination.
Syntax
bgp always-compare-med
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the MED value:
no bgp always-compare-med
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
The default value for this command is to only compare the MED values for paths from neighbors in the same AS.
Example
The following example sets MED within BGP process 100:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#bgp always-compare-med
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BGP Configuration Commands
bgp bestpath med missing-as-worst
This command specifies that a route with a MED is always considered better than a route without a MED by causing the missing MED attribute to have a value of infinity.
Syntax
bgp bestpath med missing-as-worst
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command restores the default state, where the missing MED attribute is considered to have a value of zero:
no bgp bestpath med missing-as-worst
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
A missing MED attribute is considered to have a value of zero.
Example
This example configures the bgp bestpath med missing‐as‐worst value within BGP process 100:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#bgp bestpath med missing-as-worst
bgp client-to-client reflection
This command instructs the XSR to reflect routes from a BGP route reflector to clients. When a full IBGP mesh already exists, route reflection is redundant and can be disabled by using the no bgp
client-to-client reflection command.
Syntax
bgp client-to-client reflection
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables the default reflection behavior:
no bgp client-to-client reflection
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
Route reflection is enabled.
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BGP Configuration Commands
Example
This example first disables the default reflection setting on this router then restores the default:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#no bgp client-to-client reflection
XSR(config-router)#bgp client-to-client reflection
bgp cluster-id
This command sets the cluster identifier for a BGP cluster that contains more than one route reflector. A cluster is comprised of one or more route reflectors and clients of those reflectors. Clusters containing one route reflector are identified by the router identifier of the route reflector.
Syntax
bgp cluster-id cluster-id
cluster-id
The cluster of the XSR acting as a route reflector. Valid values are cluster identifiers of up to 4 bytes. Range: 1 to 4294967295 or A.B.C.D (IP address format).
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command resets the cluster identifier to the default:
no bgp cluster-id
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
The default value is the router identifier of the route reflector in the cluster.
Example
The following example configures the bgp cluster‐id value within the BGP process 600. The BGP process corresponds to the AS in which the router resides. The cluster ID is configured as 88. This example configures the cluster ID with two route reflector clients (192.168.1.1, 192.168.1.2).
XSR(config)#router bgp 600
XSR(config-router)#bgp cluster-id 88
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.2
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.2
remote-as 600
route-reflector-client
remote-as 600
route-reflector-client
bgp confederation identifier
This command sets a BGP confederation identifier for a confederation of ASs. A confederation identifier is a valid AS number that represents a confederation comprised of two or more ASs. A confederation appears as a single AS to ASs outside of the confederation.
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BGP Configuration Commands
Syntax
bgp confederation identifier autonomous-system
autonomous-system
AS number, ranging from 1 to 65535.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the confederation identifier:
no bgp confederation identifier
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Example
The following example configures BGP confederation identifier 44 within BGP process 100:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#bgp confederation identifier 44
bgp confederation peers
This command defines ASs belonging to a confederation which is comprised of two or more ASs. A confederation appears as a single AS to ASs outside the confederation.
Syntax
bgp confederation peers autonomous-system [autonomous-system]
autonomous-system
AS number, ranging from 1 to 65535.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes the confederation Ss:
no bgp confederation peers autonomous-system
[autonomous-system][autonomous-system]...]
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Example
The following example configures the BGP confederation peers value within BGP process 100. The ASs assigned to the confederation using this command are 600, 700, and 800. Confederation 44 is configured using the bgp confederation identifier command. The AS 100 to which this router belongs is also a member of confederation 44.
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#bgp confederation identifier 44
XSR(config-router)#bgp confederation peers 600 700 800
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BGP Configuration Commands
bgp dampening
This command enables BGP route dampening to minimize propagation of flapping routes (repeatedly available/unavailable) across the network. Each time a route flaps, a penalty value of 1024 is assigned to that route.
Syntax
bgp dampening [half-life | reuse | suppress | suppress-max][route-map route-mapnumber]
half-life
Interval after which the route’s penalty becomes half its value, ranging from 1 to 45 minutes.
reuse
How low a route’s penalty must become before the route becomes eligible for use again after being suppressed, ranging from 1 to 20000.
suppress
How high a route’s penalty must become before the route is suppressed, ranging from 1 to 20000.
suppress-max
Peak interval a route can be suppressed regardless of how unstable it is. Range: 1 to 255 minutes.
route-map-number
Route map number applied to dampened routes, ranging from 1 to 199.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables BGP dampening:
no bgp dampening
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Defaults
•
Half‐life ‐ 15 minutes
•
Reuse ‐ 750
•
Suppress ‐ 2000
•
Suppress‐max ‐ 60 minutes
•
Disabled.
Example
The following example enables route flap dampening:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config)#bgp dampening
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BGP Configuration Commands
bgp default local-preference
This command changes the default local preference value. The path with the highest local preference value is preferred over competing paths to the same destination provided that all higher‐ranking route selection criteria of those paths are the same. The local preference value for the path is sent to all routers and access servers in the local AS.
Syntax
bgp default local-preference value
value
Local preference value, ranging from 0 to 4294967295.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command reverts to the local preference default:
no bgp default local-preference
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
100
Example
This example configures the BGP default local‐preference of 300 for BGP process 100. This setting indicates that all routes this router advertises to its internal BGP neighbors will have a local preference of 300.
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#bgp default local-preference 300
distance bgp
This command sets the BGP route preference ‐ administrative distance ‐ for its external and internal routes submitted to the routing table.
Syntax
distance bgp external internal
external
The administrative distance for external BGP routes ‐ those learned from neighbors external to the AS ‐ ranging from 1 to 240.
internal
The administrative distance for internal BGP routes ‐ those learned from neighbors within the same AS ‐ ranging from 1 to 240.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of the command removes the configured value:
no distance bgp
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BGP Configuration Commands
Defaults
•
External: 20
•
Internal: 200
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Example
This example sets BGP external and internal administrative distances to 50 and 150, respectively:
XSR#config terminal
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#distance bgp 50 150
neighbor advertisement-interval
This command sets the minimum interval that a router waits between sending BGP routing updates to its neighbor. Before entering this command, a neighbor or peer group must be identified by means of the neighbor remote‐as or neighbor peer‐group command. Configuring a minimum interval of zero means that there is no delay in sending BGP routing updates to its neighbor.
Syntax
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} advertisement-interval seconds
ip-address
Neighbor’s IP address.
peer-group-name
BGP peer group by name. Range: 1 to 64 characters.
seconds
Minimum interval, ranging from 0 to 600 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form returns to the advertisement interval default:
no neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name}
advertisement-interval seconds
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
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•
External peers: 30 seconds
•
Internal peers: 5 seconds
Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol
BGP Configuration Commands
Example
The following example sets the neighbor advertisement‐interval value within BGP process 100. Note that the neighbor remote-as command must be executed before this command can be entered. In the example, the router on which the configuration occurs resides in AS 100. Neighbor 192.168.1.1 resides in AS 101. The default update interval between these peers has been changed from 30 to 90 seconds.
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 advertisement-interval 90
neighbor default-originate
This command sends the route 0.0.0.0 to the BGP neighbor of the router that this command is entered on so that it can be used as the default route. Before entering this command, a neighbor or peer group must be identified by means of the neighbor remote-as or neighbor peer-group commands.
Syntax
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} default-originate
ip-address
Neighbor’s IP address.
peer-group-name
BGP peer group by name. Range: 1 to 64 characters.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns to the default value:
no neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} default-originate
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
Disabled
Example
This example sets the local router to unconditionally inject route 0.0.0.0 to neighbor 192.168.1.1:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 default-originate
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BGP Configuration Commands
neighbor distribute-list
This command distributes the information specified in an access‐list to a BGP neighbor. Before entering this command, a neighbor or peer group must be identified by means of the neighbor
remote-as or neighbor peer-group command. Also, the prefix‐based ACL must be configured.
Note: Perform a clear ip bgp neighbor <IP address> whenever this command is changed.
Syntax
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} distribute-list access-list {in | out}
ip-address
Neighbor’s IP address.
peer-group-name
BGP peer group by name. Range: 1 to 64 characters.
access-list
ACL, ranging from 1 to 199.
in
ACL applied to inbound routes.
out
ACL applied to outbound routes.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the ACL‐linked neighbor:
no neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} distribute-list access-list {in | out}
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
No access list applied
Example
This example applies access‐list 1 to incoming advertisements from neighbor 192.168.1.1. Only routes which match 10.0.0.0/8, 11.0.0.0/8 or 12.0.0.0/8 prefixes will be accepted from the neighbor.
XSR(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
XSR(config)#access-list 1 permit 11.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
XSR(config)#access-list 1 permit 12.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 distribute-list 1 in
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neighbor ebgp-multihop
This command connects the BGP neighbors on networks that are not directly‐connected to the network of the router that this command is entered on. Before entering this command, a neighbor or peer group must be identified by means of the neighbor remote-as or neighbor peer-group command.
Syntax
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} ebgp-multihop
ip-address
Neighbor’s IP address.
peer-group-name
BGP peer group by name. Range: 1 to 64 characters.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the specified neighbor:
no neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} ebgp-multihop
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
Not enabled
Example
The following example allows connections to or from neighbor 192.168.1.1, which resides on a network that is not directly connected:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 ebgp-multihop
neighbor filter-list
This command sets up a BGP filter based on AS path. Before entering this command, a neighbor or peer group must be identified by means of the neighbor remote-as or neighbor peer-group command. Also, the AS path‐based access list must be configured.
Note: Perform a clear ip bgp neighbor <IP address> whenever this command is changed.
Syntax
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} filter-list filter-list {in | out | weight
value}
ip-address
Neighbor’s IP address.
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peer-group-name
BGP peer group by name. Range: 1 to 64 characters.
filter-list
Identifies the AS path access list. Range is 1‐199.
in
Filter list is applied to inbound routes.
out
Filter list is applied to outbound routes.
weight
Assigns a weight to all routes matching the filter list.
value
Weight range from 0 to 65535.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the specified neighbor:
no neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} filter-list filter-list
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Example
This example applies filter list 1 to incoming advertisements from neighbor 192.168.1.1. Only routes which start with AS path 200 and end with AS path 500 will be accepted from the neighbor.
XSR(config)#ip as-path access-list 1 permit “^200 .* 500$”
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 filter-list 1 in
neighbor maximum-prefix
This command controls the number of prefixes received from a particular neighbor. When the maximum number of prefixes is exceeded, a CEASE message is sent and the connection is cleared. To reactivate the session, enter clear ip bgp <IP address>. If the number of prefixes is set to zero, no prefixes will be accepted from the neighbor.
Syntax
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} maximum-prefix value [threshold][warningonly]
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ip-address
Neighbor’s IP address.
peer-group-name
BGP peer group by name. Range: 1 to 64 characters.
value
Maximum number of prefixes that can be received from a neighbor, ranging from 1 to 4,294,967,295.
threshold
The threshold value ‐ percentage of maximum ‐ at which a warning is generated, ranging from 1 to 100 prefixes.
warning-only
When the maximum number of prefixes is reached the XSR generates a warning message instead of terminating the peering session.
Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol
BGP Configuration Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the specified neighbor:
no neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} maximum-prefix value [threshold]
[warning-only]
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Defaults
•
No restriction on the number of prefixes.
•
Threshold: 75 prefixes
Example
The following example sets the maximum number of prefixes allowed from the neighbor at 192.168.1.1 to 10000:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 maximum-prefix 10000
neighbor next-hop-self
This command disables automatic next‐hop selection. Updates meant for the specified system or peer group are forced to advertise this router as the next hop.
Syntax
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} next-hop-self
ip-address
Neighbor’s IP address.
peer-group-name
BGP peer group by name. Range: 1 to 64 characters.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns to the default value:
no neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} next-hop-self
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
Next hop selection is performed automatically by BGP.
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Example
The following example sets the router at 192.168.1.1 as the next hop:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 next-hop-self
neighbor password
This command sets a password for Message Digest 5 (MD5) authentication on the TCP connection between the XSR that this command is entered on and a BGP neighbor. The same password must be configured on both routers. When a password is configured for a neighbor, the existing session is replaced by a new session.
Syntax
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} password password-value
ip-address
Neighbor’s IP address.
peer-group-name
BGP peer group by name. Range: 1 to 64 characters.
password-value
Alphanumeric password. Range is 1‐30 characters.
Syntax of the “no” Form
This command’s no form removes the password for the specified router:
no neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} password password-value
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
No authentication
Example
The following example adds a password for the specified router:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 password 123456
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neighbor peer-group
This command creates a BGP peer group and assigns a BGP neighbor to a peer group.
Syntax
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} peer-group [peer-group-name]
ip-address
Neighbor’s IP address.
peer-group-name
BGP peer group by name. Range: 1 to 64 characters.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the specifed neighbor peer group:
no neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} peer-group [peer-group-name]
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Example
The following example creates peer group ExternalGroup and assigns neighbor 192.168.1.1 to peer group ExternalGroup:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor ExternalGroup peer-group
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 peer-group ExternalGroup
neighbor remote-as
This command adds an entry to the BGP neighbor table. BGP requires manual neighbor configuration. The configuration of neighbors on both of the neighboring BGP routers allows a BGP session to be set up between the routers and allows the exchange of BGP update messages.
For external BGP neighbors, the IP address specified is that of the neighbor interface to the shared subnet between routers (unless ebgp‐multihop is enabled). For internal BGP neighbors, the neighbor IP address is any reachable IP address from the router.
Syntax
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} remote-as autonomous-system
ip-address
Neighbor’s IP address.
peer-group-name
BGP peer group by name. Range: 1 to 64 characters.
autonomous-system
AS by number, ranging from 1 to 65535.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the specified entry from the table:
no neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} remote-as autonomous-system
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Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Example
The following example configures two neighbors. Neighbor 192.168.1.1 is an external neighbor since the AS number of 101 differs from the AS number for the router 100. Neighbor 192.168.2.1 is an internal neighbor since it resides in the same AS 100.
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.2.1 remote-as 100
neighbor route-map
This command applies a route map to routes that enter from or exit out of a BGP neighbor or peer group. The route map must be configured first.
Note: Perform a clear ip bgp neighbor <IP address> whenever this command is changed.
Syntax
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} route-map route-map# {in | out}
ip-address
Neighbor’s IP address.
peer-group-name
BGP peer group by name. Range: 1 to 64 characters.
route-map#
Identifies the route map number. Range: 1‐199.
in
Route map is applied to inbound routes.
out
Route map is applied to outbound routes.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes the specified neighbor’s route map:
no neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} route-map route-map# {in | out}
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Example
The following example adds a neighbor route map:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 route-map 1 in
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neighbor route-reflector-client
This command establishes the router that this command was entered on as a BGP route reflector. This command also identifies the specified neighbor router as the client of the BGP route reflector. Neighbors configured with this command are members of the client group and the remaining internal BGP peers are members of the non‐client group for the router reflector. Syntax
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} route-reflector-client
ip-address
Neighbor’s IP address.
peer-group-name
BGP peer group by name. Range: 1 to 64 characters.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes a neighbor’s route reflector:
no neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} route-reflector-client
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Example
The following example sets a neighbor’s reoute reflector:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 route-reflector-client
neighbor send-community
This command instructs the system to send a community attributed to a BGP neighbor.
Syntax
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} send-community
ip-address
Neighbor’s IP address.
peer-group-name
BGP peer group by name. Range: 1 to 64 characters.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes a neighbor’s community:
no neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} send-community
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
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Example
The following example sets a neighbor’s community:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 send-community
neighbor shutdown
This command disables a neighbor or peer‐group.
Syntax
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} shutdown
ip-address
Neighbor’s IP address.
peer-group-name
BGP peer group by name. Range: 1 to 64 characters.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns to the command default:
no neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} shutdown
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
No change is made to status of BGP neighbor or peer group.
Example
This example disables any active session for neighbor 192.168.1.1:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 shutdown
neighbor soft-reconfiguration inbound
This command instructs the system to store updates as they are received. Updates are required to be stored in order to perform inbound soft reconfiguration.
Syntax
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} soft-reconfiguration inbound
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ip-address
Neighbor’s IP address.
peer-group-name
BGP peer group by name. Range: 1 to 64 characters.
Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol
BGP Configuration Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns to the command default:
no neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} soft-reconfiguration inbound
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
No soft reconfiguration is done.
Example
The following example configures soft reconfiguration on the router:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 soft-reconfiguration inbound
neighbor timers
This command changes the values of BGP timers for a peer or peer group. When a session is started, BGP negotiates the hold‐time with the neighbor, selecting the smaller value. The keep‐
alive timer is then set based on the negotiated hold‐time and the configured keep‐alive interval. By default, the keep‐alive timer is set to 30 seconds and the hold‐time timer set to 90 seconds. This 1 to 3 ratio is strictly maintained between the timers.
Note: Perform a clear ip bgp neighbor <IP address> whenever this command is changed.
The timers configured for a specific neighbor or peer group override the timers configured for all
BGP neighbors using the timers bgp command.
Syntax
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} timers keep-alive
ip-address
Neighbor’s IP address.
peer-group-name
BGP peer group’s name, ranging from 1 to 64 characters.
keep-alive
Keep‐alive interval, ranging from 0 to 4,294,967,296 seconds. A keep‐
alive of zero indicates no keep‐alives are sent between neighbors so the peer session will not time out.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns to the command default:
no neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} timers keep-alive
Default
Keep‐alive: 30 seconds
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Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Example
This example sets the peer keep‐alive to 10 seconds and, subsequently, the hold‐time to 30 seconds:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 1.1.1.1 timers 10
neighbor update-source
This command specifies the source IP address used when communicating with a BGP neighbor. A loopback interface is typically used with this command.
Syntax
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} update-source interface
ip-address
Neighbor’s IP address.
peer-group-name
BGP peer group by name. Range: 1 to 64 characters.
interface
Identifies the interface to be used as the source.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes a neighbor’s update source:
no neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} update-source interface
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
Best outbound interface.
Example
The following example sources BGP TCP connections for the specified neighbor with the IP address of the loopback interface rather than the best local address:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 update-source loopback 0
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BGP Configuration Commands
neighbor weight
This command specifies a weight value for a connection to a neighbor or a BGP peer group. Note: Perform a clear ip bgp neighbor <IP address> whenever this command is changed.
Syntax
neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} weight value
ip-address
Neighbor’s IP address.
peer-group-name
BGP peer group by name. Range: 1 to 64 characters.
value
Assigns a weight for all routes learned from this neighbor, ranging from 0 to 65535.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes a neighbor’s weight:
no neighbor {ip-address | peer-group-name} weight value
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Example
The following example sets the specified neighbor’s weight to 100:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 weight 100
ip as-path access-list
This command creates an as‐path filter list which can be applied to filter inbound and outbound BGP updates. The as‐path variable in the BGP routing update message is examined against a required parameter of this command, which represents AS numbers identified by means of a regular expression. Multiple regular expressions can be configured under a particular as‐path filter list.
Note: Perform a clear ip bgp whenever this command is changed.
Syntax
ip as-path access-list access-list-number {permit | deny} as-regular-expression
access-list-number
Identifies the access list by number. Range is 1 to 199.
permit
Instructs XSR to permit access to paths matching specified conditions.
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BGP Configuration Commands
deny
Instructs XSR to deny access to paths matching specified conditions.
as-regularexpression
Identifies an AS in the access list by means of the regular expression.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the configured filter list:
no ip as-path access-list access-list-number
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
The following example configures the IP as‐path access‐list value in the context of configuring a route map and performing a match using the match as-path command.
The as‐path access list is 33, ends with a regular expression “.* 640 .*” and is referenced in the match as‐path command, which in turn is configured inside of the route map 33. This means that a match occurs if the as‐path variable in a BGP update message contains AS 640.
XSR(config)#ip as-path access-list 33 permit “.* 640 .*”
XSR(config)#route-map 33 permit 1
XSR(config-route-map)#match as-path 33
XSR(config-route-map)#set local-preference 300
ip community-list
This command defines a community list that filters on the BGP COMMUNITY attribute. The community list you define typically is referenced by the match community command, which includes a route map that implements routing policies based on community attributes. Multiple community attributes can be configured for a particular community list.
Note: Perform a clear ip bgp neighbor whenever this command is changed.
Syntax
ip community-list community-list-number {permit | deny} community-number
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community-listnumber
Community list number (standard), ranging from 1 to 199.
permit
XSR permits access to community lists matching conditions you specifiy.
deny
XSR denies access to community lists matching conditions. you specify.
Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol
BGP Configuration Commands
community-number
Community number as it was defined for this router via the set
community command. Valid values are:
•
Range: 1 to 4,294,967,200.
•
aa:nn: AS number, Community number.
•
internet: the Internet community.
•
no‐export: the community route will not be advertised to an EBGP peer.
•
no‐advertise: the route will not be advertised to any peer.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the commmunity list number:
no community-list community-list-number
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
This example configures IP community list 88. The community numbers specified in the list are 2000, 3000, and 4000 in the first, second, and third instance of the command, respectively. This list can be referenced within the match community command that is part of a route map controlling BGP routing based on the community attribute. The match will seek updates that include community numbers 2000, 3000, or 4000.
XSR(config)#ip community-list 88 permit 2000
XSR(config)#ip community-list 88 permit 3000
XSR(config)#ip community-list 88 permit 4000
network
This command specifies the list of networks for the BGP routing process. Networks can be learned from connected routes or via dynamic routing. The BGP process must be notified about the networks it will route which con occurs via manual injection of routes into the BGP process with the network command. Routes originated by BGP via the network command have their origin code set to IGP.
Network numbers that are injected into BGP by means of the network command must already exist in the IP routing table on the router as static, directly‐connected, or dynamically‐derived routes. If network numbers do not already exist, they will not be placed into the BGP table, even though they will appear in the router’s configuration.
Syntax
network network-number [mask network-mask]
network-number
Network that BGP advertises.
mask
Used when a network‐mask is explicitly specified for the network‐
number. Without the network‐mask being specified, a default classful mask is assumed.
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network-mask
The mask associated with the network‐number for which the BGP process routes. It is specified when the network‐number represents a subnet as opposed to a classful network.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form removes the network from the routing table:
no network network-number [mask network-mask]
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Example
The following example configures a network with and without the optional mask keyword. In the optional mask statement, the network‐number represents a subnet of class B network 172.17.0.0. A default Class C network mask is assumed for the network 192.168.1.0 in the configuration statement without the optional parameters.
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#network 172.17.151.0 mask 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-router)#network 192.168.1.0
redistribute
This command redistributes routes from a protocol into the BGP. Redistributed routes can be learned from dynamic routing (OSPF, RIP), static routes, and connected routes.
Redistributed routes can have their path attributes set in BGP by the route-map command. By default, redistributed static routes have their origin code set to incomplete unless otherwise configured by route-map.
Syntax
redistribute {ospf | rip | static | connected} [metric metric-value | route-map
route-map-name]
ospf
OSFP routes.
rip
RIP routes.
static
Static routes.
connected
Connected routes.
metric-value
Metric for redistributed routes. Range: 0‐4294967295.
route-map-name
Route map applied to redistributed routes, ranging from 1 to 199.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns to the command default:
no redistribute {ospf | rip | static | connected}
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Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
Redistribution is not enabled.
Example
The following example redistributes static routes into BGP:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#redistribute static
synchronization
This command synchronizes BGP with the IGP in the AS. You should synchronize BGP with IGP if there are routers in the AS that are not BGP routers.
Syntax
synchronization
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables synchronization:
no synchronization
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Default
Enabled
Example
The following example disables synchronization:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#no synchronization
timers bgp
This command resets BGP timers. When a session is started on a router, BGP negotiates hold‐time with the neighbor and selects the smaller value. The keepalive timer is then set based on the negotiated hold‐time and the configured keepalive period. By default, the keepalive timer is set at 60 seconds and the holdtime timer is set at 180 seconds. It is recommended you maintain this 1 to 3 ratio between the timers.
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Route Map Commands
Syntax
timers bgp keep-alive
keep-alive
Keepalive interval. A keep alive of zero indicates no keepalives are sent between neighbors so the peer session will not time out. Range: 0 ‐ 4294967296 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes the timers value:
no timers bgp
Mode
Router configuration: XSR(config-router)#
Defaults
•
Keepalive timer: 30 seconds
•
Holdtime timer: 90 seconds
Example
The following example sets the hold‐timer interval to 30 seconds:
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#timers bgp 30
Route Map Commands
Route maps are comprised of sets of match and set commands. Match commands define the match criteria for route maps. Routes that match all defined match criteria are processed via set commands and those that do not match all of the defined match criteria in the route map are ignored.
match as-path
This command matches the values of the as_path variable in BGP routing update messages to the values of AS numbers identified through the AS‐path access list.
A route must match at least one match statement of a route-map command. If a route does not match any match statements, the route is not advertised on outbound route maps and is not accepted on inbound route maps.
Syntax
match as-path path-list-number
path-list-number
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Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol
AS‐path access list to match, ranging from 1 to 199.
Route Map Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the patch list number:
no match as-path path-list-number
Mode
Route‐map configuration: XSR(config-route-map)#
Example
This example sets the match as‐path in the context of configuring a route map and as‐path ACL 33.
XSR(config)#route-map 1 permit 1
XSR(config-route-map)#match as-path 33
XSR(config-route-map)#set local-preference 300
XSR(config-route-map)#exit
XSR(config)#ip as-path access-list 33 permit “.* 550 .*”
Route map 1 is configured with the optional permit keyword and sequence number 1. If these values are omitted, a route map will default to the permit keyword and sequence number 10.
After route map 1 is defined via the route-map command, you enter the match as-path command which references as‐path access list 33 ‐ the last configuration statement in the example. AS‐path access list 33 ends with a regular expression “.* 550 .*”, indicating a match will occur if the as_path variable in a BGP update message contains AS number 550.
If a match occurs, then the set local-preference command sets the local preference attribute for the matching BGP updates to 300, overriding the default value of 100. A route flagged with a higher local preference value is more preferable to a route with a lower local preference. Consequently, the routes passing through AS 550 become more preferable to other routes for the same destinations.
match community-list
This command matches the community attribute in a BGP routing update message with the values of the community attribute identified through the community access list.
A route must match at least one match statement of a route-map command. If a route does not match any match statements, the route is not advertised on outbound route maps and is not accepted on inbound route maps.
Syntax
match community-list community-list-number
community-list-number
Community ACL to match by number, ranging from 1 to 199.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the community list number:
no match community-list community-list-number
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Route Map Commands
Mode
Route‐map configuration: XSRA(config-route-map)#
Default
No match based on community list
Example
The following example configures the match community value in the context of configuring a route map named 1 and community list 77 on XSRA and XSRB:
Router A configuration:
XSRA(config)#route-map 1 permit 1
XSRA(config-route-map)#match community 77
XSRA(config-route-map)#set local-preference 500
XSRA(config-route-map)#exit
XSRA(config)#ip community-list 77 permit 300:22
Router B configuration:
XSRB(config)#route-map 1 permit 1
XSRB(config-route-map)#match community 77
XSRB(config-route-map)#set local-preference 200
XSRB(config-route-map)#exit
XSRB(config)#ip community-list 77 permit 300:22
XSRA and XSRB are border routers within the same AS. The community is identified by name 300:22. The numeric format aa:nn, where aa and nn represent two‐byte numbers, is one of the allowable formats for community names. BGP updates matching community name 300:22 are assigned a higher local preference on XSRA (500) than on XSRB (200). This makes XSRA the preferable exit point from this AS for the networks that have been grouped under the community name 300:22. Use the set community command to assign community names.
match metric
This command matches the MED attribute in a BGP routing update message. A route must match at least one match statement of a route-map command. If a route does not match any match statements, the route is not advertised on outbound route maps and is not accepted on inbound route maps.
Syntax
match metric metric-value
metric-value
MED value to match, ranging from 0 to 2147483647.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the match metric value:
no match metric metric-value
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Route Map Commands
Mode
Route‐map configuration: XSR(config-route-map)#
Example
The following example sets the match metric to 300:
XSR(config)#route-map 1 permit 1
XSR(config-route-map)#match metric 300
match ip address
This command matches IP addresses in a BGP routing update message. A route must match at least one match statement of a route-map command. If this is not done, the route is not advertised on outbound route maps and is not accepted on inbound route maps.
Syntax
match ip address access-list-number
access-list-number
The ACL to match, ranging from 1 to 199.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the match IP address value:
no match ip address access-list-number
Mode
Route‐map configuration: XSR(config-route-map)#
Default
No matching based on IP prefix.
Example
The following example sets the matching IP address to 10:
XSR(config)#access-list 10 permit 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
XSR(config)#route-map 1 permit 1
XSR(config-route-map)#match ip address 10
match ip next-hop
This command matches the value of the next hop attribute in a BGP routing update message against an ACL specified by the command. A route must match at least one match statement of a route-map command. If a route does not match any match statements, it is not advertised on outbound route maps and is not accepted on inbound route maps.
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BGP Set Commands
Syntax
match ip next-hop access-list-number
access-list-number
The ACL to match, ranging from 1 to 199.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the match next hop value:
no match ip next-hop access-list-number
Mode
Route‐map configuration: XSR(config-route-map)#
Default
No matching based on IP next hop.
Example
The following example sets the matching IP next hop to 10:
XSR(config)#access-list 10 permit 1.2.3.4
XSR(config)#route-map 1 permit 1
XSR(config-route-map)#match ip next-hop 10
BGP Set Commands
Route maps are comprised of sets of match and set commands. Match commands define the match criteria for route maps. Routes that match all defined match criteria are processed via set commands and those that do not match all of the defined match criteria in the route map are ignored.
set as-path
This command increases the length of the AS‐path attribute for the BGP routing update messages that meet the match conditions specified within a route map.
The length of the AS path attribute influences the BGP route selection process for destinations that can be reached by means of multiple paths. AS path length is the only global BGP metric that you can use to influence best‐path selection. A BGP speaker can influence the best path selection by a peer by varying the length of the AS path.
If you do not set local preference or weight, AS path length determines which of multiple routes are selected. Routes with longer autonomous system paths are preferred. To prefer a path, you can pad the autonomous system path by prepending extra autonomous system numbers.
Syntax
set as-path prepend as-path-string
prepend
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Instructs the system to attach the as‐path‐string value to the AS path of the route that matches the route map.
Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol
BGP Set Commands
as-path-string
The AS path list which will be prepended to the AS path attribute of the route that matches the route map. The as‐path list represents one or more valid AS numbers that are specified as an integer between 1 and 65535.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the AS path value:
no set as-path
Mode
Route‐map configuration: XSR(config-route-map)#
Example
The following example configures the as‐path value in the context of configuring a route map and the match command. The match as-path command references AS‐path access list 37 which identifies the BGP routing updates to which the set as-path command will apply.
In this case, match clause ʺ.*ʺ will match all routes. Relevant updates will have one instance of the AS number 100 prepended into their AS path variable. Assuming that all of the BGP route selection criteria remain the same, the routes with the fewest AS numbers in the AS path variable will be chosen as the best routes to the identified destinations. If more than one AS path is to be prepended, then the string should be surrounded by quotes.
XSR(config)#ip as-path access-list 37 permit ".*"
XSR(config)#route-map 1 permit 1
XSR(config-route-map)#match as-path 37
XSR(config-route-map)#set as-path prepend 100
XSR(config-route-map)#set as-path prepend "100 100"
set community
This command specifies the community attribute in a BGP routing update message. Be sure that a match clause has been specified.
A community is a group of destinations which share the community attribute. A BGP speaker can use the community attribute to control which routing data it accepts or distributes to neighbors. A BGP speaker can append the community attribute to routes it receives that do not already have the attribute.
Syntax
set community {community-number | aa:nn | additive | internet | local-AS | noadvertise | no-export | none}
community-number
The community number. Range: 1 to 4,294,967,295.
aa:nn
Community number in the format aa:nn where aa identifies the AS and nn the community within the AS. Range: 1 to 65,535.
additive
Adds the community to existing communities.
internet
Established Internet community.
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BGP Set Commands
local-AS
Established community which specifies that routes containing this value should not be advertised to external BGP peers.
no-advertise
Established community which specifies that routes containing this value should not be advertised to any other BGP peers (internal or external).
no-export
Established community which specifies that routes containing this value should not be advertised outside a BGP confederation boundary.
none
Removes any existing communities.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the set community value:
no set community
Mode
Route‐map configuration: XSR(config-route-map)#
Example
The following example configures the set community value in the context of configuring route map 1 and the neighbor send community value:
XSR(config)#ip access-list 37 permit 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
XSR(config)#route-map 1 permit 1
XSR(config-route-map)#match ip address 37
XSR(config-route-map)#set community 500:10
XSR(config-route-map)#exit
XSR(config)#route-map 1 permit 2
XSR(config-route-map)#set community none
XSR(config-route-map)#exit
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 send-community
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 route-map 1 out
Route map 1 is applied to the outgoing BGP updates between this router and its peering neighbor identified by IP address 192.168.1.1 in AS 101. The first instance of route map 1 matches the destinations in the BGP updates against the criteria specified in ACL 37 (10.0.0.0/8). If there is not a match, the second instance of route map 1 is invoked, which matches on all remaining routes and removes any community attributes. This means that routes matching ACL 37 criteria will have a community attribute set to 500:10, but all of the other routes advertised to 192.168.1.1 will not.
The BGP peer 192.168.1.1 will then have the option to apply a desired routing policy to all routes arriving from this router with the community attribute set to 500:10.
set dampening
This command configures route flap dampening, a mechanism to combat network overhead which arises from the proliferation of uncontrolled disconnecting/reconnecting networks.
With route dampening, you can address these problem routes as follows:
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BGP Set Commands
•
The XSR penalizes a route marked as unstable with a value of 1024 each time it fails. If penalties accrue beyond the suppress threshold you set, the route is no longer advertised.
•
The XSR permits suppressed routes to rejoin the BGP routing table when their penalties drop below the threshold.
•
After a route assumes a penalty, the XSR cuts the penalty in half each time a half‐life interval you configure elapses.
•
When penalties drop below the configurable reuse value, the XSR frees the route, re‐inserting it into the BGP routing table.
•
The XSR does not suppress routes indefinitely. You can set the max‐suppress value and fix the maximum period a route can be suppressed before it is advertised again.
Syntax
set dampening half-life | reuse | suppress | suppress-max
half-life
Interval after which the route’s penalty becomes half its value, ranging from 1 to 45 minutes.
reuse
Specifies how low a route’s penalty must become before the route becomes eligible for use again after being suppressed, ranging from 1 to 20,000 seconds.
suppress
Specifies how high a route’s penalty must become before the route is suppressed, ranging from 1 to 20,000.
suppress-max
Specifies that maximum interval in minutes that a route can be suppressed regardless of how unstable it is, ranging from 1 to 20,000 minutes.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes route dampening:
no set dampening
Mode
Route‐map configuration: XSR(config-route-map)#
Defaults
•
Half‐life: 15 minutes
•
Reuse: 750 seconds
•
Suppress: 2000
•
Suppress‐max: 60 minutes ‐ four times the half‐life value.
Example
This example displays the use of the set dampening for IP prefix 10.0.0.0 for BGP process 100:
XSR(config)#ip access-list 10 permit 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
XSR(config)#route-map 1 permit 1
XSR(config-route-map)#match ip address 10
XSR(config-route-map)#set 30 1500 10000 120
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BGP Set Commands
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config)#bgp dampening route-map 1
set ip next-hop
This command specifies where to output packets that pass a match clause of a route map for policy routing. It modifies the value of the next hop attribute in a BGP routing update message.
The next‐hop attribute identifies the next hop to reach a route. Next‐hop for an EBGP session is the IP address of the BGP neighbor that announced the route. Next‐hop for IBGP sessions is either the BGP neighbor that announced the route (for routes that originate inside the AS) or the BGP neighbor from which the route was learned (for routes injected into the AS via EBGP).
Syntax
set ip next-hop value
value
The next hop IP address.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the next hop value:
no set ip next-hop value
Mode
Route‐map configuration: XSR(config-route-map)#
Example
The following example sets the IP next hop attribute in the BGP update which matches 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 to 1.2.3.4:
XSR(config)#access-list 10 permit 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
XSR(config)#route-map 1 permit 1
XSR(config-route-map)#match ip address 10
XSR(config-route-map)#set ip next-hop 1.2.3.4
set local-preference
This command modifies the value of the local preference attribute in a BGP routing update message. This parameter impacts the BGP route selection process for traffic leaving an AS. Be sure that a match clause has been specified.
Local preference indicates priority given to a particular route when more than one route exists to the same destination. A higher local preference indicates a more preferred route. Local preference is local to this autonomous system and is exchanged only with IBGP peers.
Syntax
set local-preference value
value
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Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol
Preference value, ranging from 0 to 2147483647.
BGP Set Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the local preference value:
no set local-preference value
Mode
Route‐map configuration: XSR(config-route-map)#
Default
Preference value: 100.
Example
The following example configures the set local‐preference value in the context of configuring a route map and match:
XSR(config)#route-map 1 permit 1
XSR(config-route-map)#match as-path 37
XSR(config-route-map)#set local-preference 400
Route map 1 uses the match as‐path command that is referencing an as‐path access list 37. This list identifies the BGP routing updates to which the set local‐preference command will apply. The relevant updates will have the value of their local preference set to 400, which is higher than the default of 100. Assuming that all of the BGP route selection criteria remain the same, the routes with the highest local preference will be chosen as the best routes to the identified destinations. This, however, applies only in multi‐homed ASs as the local preference attribute impacts only which way the traffic leaves an AS if there are multiple exit points from it.
set metric
This command modifies the metric associated with routes that match a particular route map. This command can also be used to manipulate the value of the MED for matching BGP routes. Be sure that a match clause has been specified.
Metrics are values that the router uses to indicate preferred paths to networks. Updates with non‐
zero metrics are used for route selection inside the AS. BGP automatically compares metrics for routes to internal neighbors. You can use metric to select the best path when there are multiple alternatives. Routes with lower metric values are more preferred.
Syntax
set metric metric-value
metric-value
The value of the metric, ranging from 0 to 2,147,483,647.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the metric value:
no set metric metric-value
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BGP Set Commands
Mode
Route‐map configuration: XSR(config-route-map)#
Default
The dynamically‐learned metric value.
Example
The following example displays how the set metric command is used to update the value of the MED value for BGP routes that are advertised to an external neighbor:
XSR(config)#access-list 66 permit 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
XSR(config)#route-map 1 permit 1
XSR(config-route-map)#match ip address 66
XSR(config-route-map)#set metric 20
XSR(config-route-map)#exit
XSR(config)#route-map 1 permit 2
XSR(config-route-map)#set metric 30
XSR(config-route-map)#exit
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 route-map 1 out
The set metric command is used to change the value of the MED, which impacts the flow of inbound traffic into a multi‐homed AS. All of the outbound updates leaving this router and matching ACL 66 will have MED value of 20 assigned to them. All of the remaining updates will have the MED value of 30. A lower value of MED is preferred in the BGP route selection process.
set origin
This command assigns a value to the origin attribute in the BGP routing update message which impacts BGP route selection. Ensure that a match clause has been specified.
This attribute indicates where a routing update is derived. BGP prefers routes with the lowest origin type: IGP is preferred over EGP and EGP is preferred over incomplete.
Syntax
set origin {igp | egp | incomplete}
igp
Sets BGP origin code to Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP).
egp
Sets BGP origin code to Exterior Gateway Protocol (EGP).
incomplete
Sets BGP origin code to unknown.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes BGP origin coding:
no set origin {igp | egp | incomplete}
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Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol
BGP Set Commands
Mode
Route‐map configuration: Router(config-route-map)#
Default
The default value for this command is the default value for the origin code. The default value for the origin code is incomplete for routes that are advertised into BGP by means of the redistribute command.
Example
The following example configures the set origin value for redistributed static routes:
XSR(config)#route-map 1 permit 1
XSR(config-route-map)#set origin igp
XSR(config-route-map)#exit
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#redistribute static route-map 1
set weight
This command specifies the weight value for matching BGP routing table entries. Be sure that a match clause has been specified.
Weight is used for best path selection and is assigned locally to the router. It is not propagated or carried through any route updates. Routes with a higher weight are preferred when multiple routes exist to the same destination.
Syntax
set weight weight
weight
Weight is local to the XSR on which it is configured, and it is not propagated in BGP routing update messages. But, it is the first value considered in the BGP route selection process. Routes with the higher weight are prefered over alternate routes to the same destinations but with a lower weight. Range: 0 to 65535.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the weight value:
no set weight weight
Mode
Route‐map configuration: Router(config-route-map)#
Defaults
•
Routes advertised into BGP via redistribution or the network command: 32768
•
Routes advertised by a BGP neighbor: 0
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BGP Clear and Show Commands
Example
The following example configures the weight parameter in the context of configuring route map 1 and applying it to updates arriving from two remote neighbors:
XSR(config)#ip as-path access-list 67 permit “^101 .*”
XSR(config)#ip as-path access-list 57 permit “^102 .*”
XSR(config)#route-map 1 permit 1
XSR(config-route-map)#match as-path 67
XSR(config-route-map)#set weight 6000
XSR(config-route-map)#exit
XSR(config)#route-map 1 permit 2
XSR(config-route-map)#match as-path 57
XSR(config-route-map)#set weight 5000
XSR(config-route-map)#exit
XSR(config)#router bgp 100
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 101
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.2.1 remote-as 102
XSR(config-router)#
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.1.1 route-map 1 in
XSR(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.2.1 route-map 1 in
The two instances of route map 1 perform a match on IP as‐path access lists 67 and 57, in that order with a weight of 6000 for updates matching ACL 67, and 5000 for updates matching ACL 57. If the same destinations are advertised by all two remote neighbors, the outbound traffic from this router will be directed to the neighbor who had a match on ACL 67, as those routes will have the highest value of the weight parameter.
BGP Clear and Show Commands
clear ip bgp
This command resets one or more BGP connections, by either a hard or soft reset. Soft resets are preferred because they are less disruptive overall to internetworking. BGP connections must be reset whenever the BGP routing policy is changed by means of one of the following:
•
BGP‐related access lists
•
BGP‐related weights
•
BGP‐related distribution lists
•
Specification of the BGP timer
•
BGP administrative distance
•
BGP‐related route maps
•
BGP neighbor configuration
Two options for soft reset are:
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•
Route refresh is supported depending on whether the route refresh capability has been negotiated during the OPEN session
•
Stored updates (explicit neighbor soft-reconfiguration)
Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol
BGP Clear and Show Commands
Syntax
clear ip bgp {* | address | peer-group peer-group-name} [soft [in | out]]}
*
A wild card which resets all current BGP sessions.
address
Resets the indicated BGP neighbor.
peer-group-name
Resets the indicated BGP peer group.
soft
Performs a soft reconfiguration.
in
Triggers an inbound soft reconfiguration.
out
Triggers an outbound soft reconfiguration.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Examples
This example displays all BGP connections and neighbors cleared by means of a hard reset, the most drastic way of clearing BGP links.
XSR#clear ip bgp *
The following example displays a soft inbound reset with neighbor 192.168.11.1:
XSR#clear ip bgp 192.168.11.1 soft in
clear ip bgp dampening
This command resets BGP dampening parameters to the system default and unsuppresses suppressed routes.
Syntax
clear ip bgp {dampening [ip-address mask]}
ip-address
The network to clear damping information on.
mask
The network mask to clear damping information on.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Examples
The following example clears route dampening information about the route to all routers and unsuppresses suppressed routes:
XSR#clear ip bgp dampening
The following example clears route dampening information about the route to network 12.0.0.0 and unsuppresses its suppressed routes:
XSR# clear ip bgp 12.0.0.0 255.0.0.0
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BGP Clear and Show Commands
show ip bgp
This command displays entries in the BGP routing table.
Syntax
show ip bgp [network][network-mask][longer-prefixes]
network
Number of a network in the BGP routing table.
network-mask
All BGP routes matching the address and mask pair.
longer-prefixes
Routes and specific routers are displayed.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Examples
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR#show ip bgp
Local router ID is 1.1.1.4
Status codes: s suppressed, * valid, > best, i - internal
Origin codes: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? = incomplete
Network
*> 192.4.4.0/24
*> 192.1.1.0/24
* 55.5.5.0/24
*> 55.5.5.0/24
*> 6.6.6.2/32
Next Hop
Metric LocPrf Weight Path
192.168.72.100
0
300
100 300
192.168.72.100
0
300
100 300
52.52.52.3
200
100 200
192.168.72.100
0
300
100 300
192.168.72.100
0
300
100 300
?
?
?
?
?
Local Router ID: IP Address of the router
Status codes:
•
s – the bgp table entry is suppressed
•
* - the bgp table entry is valid
•
> - the bgp table entry is the best entry for the network
•
i – the bgp table entry is learned via IBGP
Origin Codes:
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•
i – Entry originated from an IGP
•
e – Entry originated from an EGP
•
? – Entry originated from an unknown source (i.e redistribution)
Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol
BGP Clear and Show Commands
Display Parameters
Network
IP address of destination network.
Next Hop
IP address of the next hop to the destination network.
Metric
Value of Multi‐Exit Descriminator.
LocPrf
Value of Local Preference.
Weight
Weight of the route.
Path
AS path to the destination network.
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR#show ip bgp 55.5.5.0/24
BGP routing table entry for 55.5.5.0 255.255.255.0
Paths: (2 available, learned over EBGP)
AS Path 200, Aggregator 500 1.2.3.4
Next Hop 52.52.52.3 from 52.52.52.3 (52.52.52.3)
Origin ?, localpref 200, weight 100, atomic, valid
BGP routing table entry for 55.5.5.0 255.255.255.0
Paths: (2 available, best #1, learned over EBGP)
AS Path 300
Next Hop 192.168.72.100 from 192.168.72.100 (192.168.72.100)
Origin ?, localpref 300, med 0, weight 100, valid, best
show ip bgp community
This command displays routes associated with BGP communities.
Syntax
show ip bgp community community-number | internet | local-AS | no-export | noadvertise
community-number
Community number, ranging from 1 to 4,294,967,295.
internet
Well‐known Internet community.
local-AS
Well‐known community specifying that routes with this value should not be sent outside a local AS.
no-export
Well‐known community specifying that routes with this value should not be advertised outside a BGP confederation boundary.
no-advertise
Well‐known community specifying that routes with this value should not be advertised to any other.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Example
The following is sample output from the command:
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BGP Clear and Show Commands
XSR#show ip bgp community 400
Local router ID is 1.1.1.4
Status codes: s suppressed, * valid, > best, i - internal
Origin codes: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? = incomplete
Network
*> 192.4.4.0/24
*> 192.1.1.0/24
*> 66.6.6.2/32
*> 55.5.5.0/24
*> 6.6.6.2/32
Next Hop
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
Metric LocPrf Weight Path
0
100
100 300 ?
0
100
100 300 ?
0
100
100 300 ?
0
100
100 300 ?
0
100
100 300 ?
show ip bgp community-list
This command displays routes that are permitted by the indicated BGP community list.
Syntax
show ip bgp community-list {community-list-number | [exact-match]}
community-list-number
Community list number. Range: 1 to 199.
exact-match]
Routes displayed by exact match.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Example
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR#show ip bgp community community-list 1
Local router ID is 1.1.1.4
Status codes: s suppressed, * valid, > best, i - internal
Origin codes: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? = incomplete
Network
*> 192.4.4.0/24
*> 192.1.1.0/24
*> 66.6.6.2/32
*> 55.5.5.0/24
*> 6.6.6.2/32
Next Hop
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
Metric LocPrf Weight
0
100
100 300
0
100
100 300
0
100
100 300
0
100
100 300
0
100
100 300
show ip bgp dampened-paths
This command displays BGP routes suppressed due to dampening.
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Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol
Path
?
?
?
?
?
BGP Clear and Show Commands
Syntax
show ip bgp dampened-paths
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Example
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR#show ip bgp
Local router ID
Status codes: s
Origin codes: i
dampened-paths
is 1.1.1.4
suppressed, * valid, > best, i - internal
- IGP, e - EGP, ? = incomplete
*> 192.4.4.0/24
*> 192.1.1.0/24
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
0
0
100
100
100 300 ?
100 300 ?
show ip bgp filter-list
This command displays routes conforming to a specified filter list.
Syntax
show ip bgp filter-list access-list-number
access-list-number
Number of an AS path ACL. Range: 1 to 199.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Example
The following example is sample output from the command:
XSR#show ip bgp
Local router ID
Status codes: s
Origin codes: i
Network
*> 192.4.4.0/24
*> 192.1.1.0/24
*> 66.6.6.2/32
*> 55.5.5.0/24
*> 6.6.6.2/32
filter-list 2
is 1.1.1.4
suppressed, * valid, > best, i - internal
- IGP, e - EGP, ? = incomplete
Next Hop
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
Metric LocPrf Weight
0
100
100 300
0
100
100 300
0
100
100 300
0
100
100 300
0
100
100 300
Path
?
?
?
?
?
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BGP Clear and Show Commands
show ip bgp inconsistent-as
This command displays routes that have incomplete originating ASs.
Syntax
show ip bgp inconsistent-as
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Example
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR#show ip bgp
Local router ID
Status codes: s
Origin codes: i
inconsistent-as
is 1.1.1.4
suppressed, * valid, > best, i - internal
- IGP, e - EGP, ? = incomplete
Network
*> 192.4.4.0/24
*> 192.1.1.0/24
*> 66.6.6.2/32
*> 55.5.5.0/24
*> 6.6.6.2/32
Next Hop
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
Metric LocPrf Weight
0
100
100 300
0
100
100 300
0
100
100 300
0
100
100 300
0
100
100 300
Path
?
?
?
?
?
show ip bgp neighbors
This command displays information about TCP and BGP connections to neighbors.
Syntax
show ip bgp neighbors [neighbor-address]
neighbor-address
The IP address of the neighbor whose routes the XSR has learned from. If omitted, all neighbors are displayed.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Example
The following is sample output from the command. The output is filtered to show only that the 192.168.72.100 neighbor and the route refresh capability has been exchanged with this neighbor.
XSR#show ip bgp neighbors 192.168.72.100
BGP neighbor is 192.168.72.100 remote AS 300 external link
BGP version 4, remote router ID 192.168.72.100
BGP state = ESTABLISHED
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Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol
BGP Clear and Show Commands
Hold time is 90, keepalive interval is 30 seconds
Neighbor capabilities:
Route Refresh: advertised & received
Address family IPv4 Unicast: advertised & received
Received 11 messages, 1 notifications
Sent 10 messages, 1 notifications, 0 in queue
Route Refresh request: received 0 sent 0
Last reset: Peer connection reset
3 accepted prefixes
Outgoing update AS path filter list is 33
Route map for outgoing advertisements is 60
Display Parameters
BGP neighbor
IP address of the BGP neighbor and its AS number. If the neighbor is in the same AS as the router, then the link between them is internal (IBGP), otherwise it is considered external (EBGP).
BGP neighbor
AS of the neighbor.
external link
This is an EBGP peer.
BGP version
BGP version used to communicate with the peer.
remote router ID
IP address of the neighbor.
BGP state
Internal state of the BGP connection.
Hold Time
Maximum interval, in seconds, that can elapse between messages from the peer.
keepalive interval
Interval, in seconds, between sending keepalive packets.
Neighbor capabilities
BGP capabilities advertised and received from this neighbor.
Route Refresh
Status of the route refresh capability.
Address family IPv4 Unicast
IP Version 4 unicast‐specific properties.
Received
Sum of BGP messages received from this peer, including keepalives.
notifications
Sum of error messages received from the peer.
Sent
Sum of BGP messages sent to this peer, including keepalives.
notifications
Sum of error messages sent from this XSR to the peer.
Route refresh request
Sum of route refresh requests sent and received from this neighbor.
Last Reset
Previous reset reason.
accepted prefixes
Number of prefixes accepted.
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BGP Clear and Show Commands
show ip bgp peer-group
This command displays information about the BGP peer group belonging to the router that this command is entered on.
Syntax
show ip bgp peer-group [peer-group-name][summary]
peer-group-name
Information about a specific peer group.
summary
Summary status of all peer group members.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Example
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR#show ip bgp peer-group external
BGP peer group is external
BGP version 4
Minimum time between advertisement runs is 0 seconds
peer-group is external, members
18.1.1.3 192.168.72.19
XSR#show ip bgp peer-group external summary
Neighbor
192.168.72.19
18.1.1.3
V
4
4
AS
400
400
MsgRcvd MsgSent
157
169
157
164
InQ
0
0
OutQ
0
0
State
ESTAB
ESTAB
show ip bgp regexp
This command displays BGP AS paths that match the indicated regular expression.
Syntax
show ip bgp regexp regexp
regexp
The regular expression to match BGP AS paths.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Example
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR#show ip bgp regexp 300$
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Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol
BGP Clear and Show Commands
Local router ID is 1.1.1.4
Status codes: s suppressed, * valid, > best, i - internal
Origin codes: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? = incomplete
Network
*> 192.4.4.0/24
*> 192.1.1.0/24
*> 66.6.6.2/32
*> 55.5.5.0/24
*> 6.6.6.2/32
Next Hop
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
192.168.72.100
Metric LocPrf Weight
0
100
100 300
0
100
100 300
0
100
100 300
0
100
100 300
0
100
100 300
Path
?
?
?
?
?
show ip bgp summary
This command displays status for all BGP connections.
Syntax
show ip bgp summary
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Example
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR#show ip bgp summary
Neighbor
192.168.72.19
18.1.1.3
52.52.52.3
192.168.72.100
V
4
4
4
4
AS
400
400
200
300
MsgRcvd MsgSent
177
189
177
184
186
188
177
186
InQ
0
0
0
0
OutQ
0
0
0
0
State
ESTAB
ESTAB
ESTAB
ESTAB
Display Parameters
Neighbor
IP address of the neighbor.
V
BGP version spoken to the neighbor.
AS
AS number.
MsgRcvd
BGP messages received from a neighbor.
MsgSent
BGP messages sent to a neighbor.
InQ
Number of messages from a neighbor is waiting to be processed.
OutQ
Number of messages waiting to be sent to a neighbor.
State
Current state of the BGP session.
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BGP Debug Commands
show route-map
This command displays configured route maps and information about policy maps that are referenced.
Syntax
show route-map [map-number]
map-number
The number of a route map, ranging from 1 to 199.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Example
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR#show route-map
route-map 1, permit, sequence 1
Match clauses:
community-list 1
Set clauses:
local-preference 300
route-map 1, permit, sequence 2
Match clauses:
community-list 2
Set clauses:
local-preference 200
route-map 2, permit
Match clauses:
ip address 1
Set clauses:
community 100:100
BGP Debug Commands
debug ip bgp
This command displays information related to processing of the BGP. Like all XSR debug commands, it is set to privilege level 15 by default.
Syntax
debug ip bgp [events | updates]
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events
Displays BGP events.
updates
Displays BGP updates.
Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol
BGP Debug Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables debugging output:
no debug ip bgp [events | updates]
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Default
BGP debugging is disabled.
Examples
The following is sample output with the events option chosen:
XSR#debug ip bgp events
BGP: Event:STOP, Nbr:192.168.2.1, AS:300, Skt:0, State:IDLE
BGP: Event:START, Nbr: 192.168.2.1, AS:300, Skt:0,
State:PEND_START
BGP: Event:START, Nbr: 192.168.2.1, AS:300, Skt:2, State:CONNECT
BGP: Event:TCP_OPEN, Nbr: 192.168.2.1, AS:300, Skt:2, State:OPENSENT
BGP: Event:RX_OPEN, Nbr: 192.168.2.1, AS:300, Skt:2, State:OPENCONFIRM
BGP: Event:RX_KEEP, Nbr: 192.168.2.1, AS:300, Skt:2, State:ESTABLISHED
BGP: Event:RX_UPDATE, Nbr: 192.168.2.1, AS:300, Skt:2, State:ESTABLISHED
BGP: Event:KEEP_EXP, Nbr: 192.168.2.1, AS:300, Skt:2, State:ESTABLISHED
BGP: Debug event generated from the BGP process
Event: BGP event that has been processed
Nbr: Neighbor IP address
AS: AS number
Skt: Socket identifier
State: State of the BGP connection
The following is sample output with the updates option chosen:
XSR#debug ip bgp updates
BGP: Rx Update. Nbr: 192.168.2.1, w/ attr: Origin:? AS_SEQ Path:300 Next
Hop:192.168.2.2 Med:0
BGP: Rx NLRI. Nbr: 192.168.2.1, Prefix:6.6.6.0, Len:24
BGP: Rx NLRI. Nbr: 192.168.2.1, Prefix:7.7.7.0, Len:24
BGP: Rx NLRI. Nbr: 192.168.2.1, Prefix:8.8.8.0, Len:24
BGP: Tx Update. Nbr: 192.168.2.1, w/ attr: Origin:? AS_SEQ Path:100 Next
Hop:192.168.2.2
BGP: Tx NLRI. Nbr: 192.168.2.1, Prefix:5.0.0.0, Len:8
BGP: Tx NLRI. Nbr: 192.168.2.1, Prefix:10.0.0.0, Len:8
BGP: Tx NLRI. Nbr: 192.168.2.1, Prefix:2.0.0.0, Len:8
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BGP Debug Commands
Display Parameters
BGP
Debug event generated by the BGP process.
Rx Update
Update message has been received.
Tx Update
Update message being transmitted.
Nbr
Neighbor IP address.
w/ attr
Path Attributes in the update message.
Origin
Origin of the path.
AS_SEQ Path
AS Sequence Path list.
Next Hop
Next Hop IP address.
Med
Multi‐exit discriminator.
Rx NLRI
Received Network Layer reachability information.
Prefix
Network IP address.
Len
Length of prefix mask.
Tx NLRI Transmitted Network Layer reachability information.
show ip traffic
This command display BGP statistics among other IP data.
Syntax
show ip traffic
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Example
The following sample outputdisplays only BGP‐specific data:
XSR#show ip traffic
BGP Statistics:
Rcvd:
184 total
3 opens, 0 notifications, 4 updates
177 keepalives, 0 route-refresh
Sent:
186 total
4 opens, 0 notifications, 6 updates
176 keepalives, 0 route-refresh
6-134
Configuring the Border Gateway Protocol
7
Configuring IP Multicast
Observing Syntax and Conventions
The CLI command syntax and conventions use the notation described below.
Convention
Description
xyz
Key word or mandatory parameters (bold)
[x]
[ ] Square brackets indicate an optional parameter (italic)
[x | y | z]
[ | ] Square brackets with vertical bar indicate a choice of values
{x | y | z}
{ | } Braces with vertical bar indicate a choice of a required value
[x {y | z} ]
[{ | } ] Combination of square brackets with braces and vertical bars indicates
a required choice of an optional parameter
(config-if<xx>)
xx signifies the interface, class map, policy map or other value you specify;
e.g., F1, G3, S2/1.0, <Your Name>. F indicates a FastEthernet, and G a
GigabitEthernet interface.
Next Mode entries display the CLI prompt after a command is entered.
Sub-commands are displayed in red text.
soho.enterasys.com
Italicized, non-syntactic text indicates either a user-specified entry or text with
special emphasis
IGMP and Generic Multicast Commands
The following command sets define IP Multicast functionality on the XSR, including:
•
“PIM Commands” on page 7‐89.
•
“IGMP Clear and Show Commands” on page 7‐95.
ip multicast-routing
This command enables/disables multicast routing and multicast switching.
Syntax
ip multicast-routing
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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Observing Syntax and Conventions
Syntax
The no form of the command disables the multicast service:
no ip multicast-routing
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
Disabled
Example
In the following example, multicast service is enabled on the XSR:
XSR(config)#ip multicast-routing
ip igmp version
This command manually sets the IGMP version on a local interface.
Syntax
ip igmp version version_number
version_number
IGMP version number, ranging from 1 to 3.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the default value.
no ip igmp version
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
IGMP Version 2
Example
The following example sets the IGMP version number to 3:
XSR(config)#interface FastEthernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip igmp version 3
7-84
Configuring IP Multicast
Observing Syntax and Conventions
ip igmp join
This command manually joins a multicast group to a local interface.
Syntax
ip igmp join-group group-address
group-address
Address of the multicast group.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command cancels membership in a group:
no ip igmp join-group group-address
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following example joins the XSR to multicast group 225.2.2.1:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip igmp join-group 225.2.2.1
ip igmp last-member-query-count
This command configures the retransmit count at which the XSR sends IGMP group‐specific host query messages.
Syntax
ip igmp last-member-query-count count
count
Retransmit count, ranging from 1 to 7.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets this count to the default:
no ip igmp last-member-query-count
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
2
Example
The following example changes the IGMP group‐specific host query retransmit count to 3:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip igmp last-member-query-count 3
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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Observing Syntax and Conventions
ip igmp last-member-query-interval
This command sets the frequency at which IGMP group‐specific host query messages are sent.
Syntax
ip igmp last-member-query-interval interval
interval
Frequency to send IGMP group‐specific host query messages, ranging from 100 to 65535 milliseconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets this frequency to the default:
no ip igmp last-member-query-interval
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
1000 milliseconds
Example
This example changes the IGMP group‐specific host query message interval to 2 seconds:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip igmp last-member-query-interval 2000
ip igmp query-interval
This command configures the frequency at which the XSR sends IGMP host query messages.
Syntax
ip igmp query-interval seconds
seconds
Frequency to send IGMP host query messages, ranging from 1 to 32767 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets this frequency to the default value:
no ip igmp query-interval
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
125 seconds
7-86
Configuring IP Multicast
Observing Syntax and Conventions
Example
This example changes the frequency which IGMP host‐query messages are sent to 3 minutes:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip igmp query-interval 180
ip igmp query-max-response-time
This command configures the maximum response time advertised in IGMP queries.
Syntax
ip igmp query-max-response-time seconds
seconds
Maximum response time advertised in IGMP queries.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets this response time to the default:
no ip igmp query-max-response-time
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
10 seconds
Example
The following example sets a maximum response time of 8 seconds:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip igmp query-max-response-time 8
ip igmp querier-timeout
This command sets the timeout period before the XSR takes over as the querier for the interface after the previous querier has stopped querying.
Syntax
ip igmp querier-timeout seconds
seconds
Interval the XSR waits after the previous querier has stopped querying and before it takes over as the querier, ranging from 2 to 65535 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets this response time to the default value:
no ip igmp querier-timeout
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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Observing Syntax and Conventions
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
Two times the query interval
Example
The following example sets the XSR to wait 30 seconds from the time it received the last query before it takes over as the querier for the interface:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip igmp querier-timeout 30
ip multicast ttl-threshold
This command sets the Time‐To‐Live (TTL) threshold of packets being forwarded out an interface.
Syntax
ip multicast ttl-threshold ttl-value
ttl-value
Time‐to‐live value, ranging from 0 to 255 hops.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets this threshold to the default value:
no ip multicast ttl-threshold
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
Zero ‐ all multicast packets are forwarded out the interface.
Example
The following example sets the TTL threshold on a border router to 20. Multicast packets must have a TTL greater than 20 in order to be forwarded out this interface:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip multicast ttl-threshold 20
7-88
Configuring IP Multicast
PIM Commands
PIM Commands
ip pim sparse-mode
This command enables Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) Sparse Mode (SM) on a local interface.
Syntax
ip pim sparse-mode
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables PIM on an interface:
no ip pim sparse-mod
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
PIM‐SM is disabled on an interface
Example
The following example enables PIM sparse mode on F1:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip pim sparse-mode
ip pim bsr-border
This command specifies an interface so BootStrap Router (BSR) messages are not sent or received through an interface.
Syntax
ip pim bsr-border
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the BSR border setting:
no ip pim bsr-border
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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PIM Commands
Example
The following example sets interface F1 as the PIM domain border:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip pim bsr-border
ip pim bsr-candidate
This command enables the XSR to announce its candidacy as a BootStrap Router (BSR).
Syntax
ip pim bsr-candidate type number [hash-mask-length [priority]]
type number
Interface from which the BSR address is derived, to make it a candidate. This interface must be enabled with PIM.
hash-masklength
Length of a mask that is used to be ANDed with the group address before the hash function is called. All groups with the same seed hash (correspond) to the same Rendezvous Point (RP). This option provides one RP for multiple groups.
priority
Preference value, ranging from 0 to 255. The BSR with the larger priority is preferred. If priority values are the the same, the IP address breaks the tie. The BSR candidate with the higher IP address is preferred.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes this XSR as a BSR candidate:
no ip pim bsr-candidate
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Defaults
•
BSR candidate is not enabled with this router.
•
Priority: 0
Example
The following example configures the IP address of the router on F1 to be a candidate:
XSR(config)#ip pim bsr-candidate FastEthernet 1
7-90
Configuring IP Multicast
PIM Commands
ip pim dr-priority
This command sets the priority for which a router is elected as the Designated Router (DR).
Syntax
ip pim dr-priority priority-value
priority-value
Preference value, ranging from 0 to 4294967294, to set the priority of the router for selection as the DR.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables the DR functionality:
no ip pim dr-priority
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Defaults
•
DR functionality is disabled on the interface
•
DR‐priority: 1
Example
The following example sets the DR priority value of F1 to 20:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip pim dr-priority 20
ip pim message-interval
This command configures the frequency at which a Protocol Independent Multicast Sparse Mode (PIM‐SM) router sends periodic join and prune messages.
Syntax
ip pim message-interval seconds
seconds
Interval to send periodic PIM‐SM join and prune messages. Range: 1 to 65535.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the interval to the default value:
no ip pim message-interval
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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PIM Commands
Default
60 seconds
Example
The following example changes the PIM‐SM message interval to 120 seconds:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip pim message-interval 120
ip pim query-interval
This command sets the frequency of Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) router query messages.
Syntax
ip pim query-interval seconds
seconds
Interval to send periodic PIM router query messages. Range: 1 to 65535.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the interval to the default value:
no ip pim query-interval
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
30 seconds
Example
This example resets the PIM router query message interval to 60 seconds:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip pim query-interval 60
ip pim rp-address
This command sets the static Rendezvous Point (RP) for the specific multicast group. (Dynamically learned RP always has a higher priority than statically configured RP.)
Syntax
ip pim rp-address rp-address [access-list]
7-92
rp-address
IP address of a router to be a PIM RP. This is a unicast IP address in four‐part, dotted notation.
access-list ACL number defines for which multicast groups the RP should be used.
Configuring IP Multicast
PIM Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the static RP configuration:
no ip pim rp-address rp-address
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
This example configures the RP used by the multicast groups within the range 225.1.1.0/24:
XSR(config)#access-list 2 permit 225.1.1.0 0.0.0.255
XSR(config)#ip pim rp-address 192.168.2.5
ip pim rp-candidate
This command sets the XSR to advertise itself as a PIM candidate Rendezvous Point (RP) to the BSR. Only one candidate RP can be configured per box.
Syntax
ip pim rp-candidate type number [group-list access-list][priority priority-value]
type number
Interface whose IP address is advertised as a candidate RP address.
access-list
Standard IP access list number that defines the group prefixes that are advertised in association with the RP address.
priority
The priority of this candidate RP. priority-value
Priority value, ranging from 0 to 255.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes this XSR as an RP candidate:
no ip pim rp-candidate
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Defaults
•
The XSR is not configured as an RP candidate.
•
DR priority is 192 by default if it becomes one.
Example
This example sets the XSR to advertise itself as a candidate RP to the BSR in its PIM domain:
XSR(config)#interface FastEthernet 1
XSR(config)#ip pim rp-candidate FastEthernet 1
XSR CLI Reference Guide
7-93
PIM Commands
ip pim regcksum wholepacket
This command changes the register checksum calculation to the industry standard.
Syntax
ip pim RegCksum wholepacket
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command removes the static RP configuration:
no ip pim RegCksum wholepacket
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
Checksum based on header only.
Example
The following example changes the calculation of the register packet to the industry standard:
XSR(config)#ip pim RegCksum wholepacket
ip pim spt-threshold
This command configures the threshold over which a PIM leaf router should join the shortest path source tree for the specified group.
Syntax
ip pim spt-threshold {kbps|infinity} [group-list access-list]
kbps
Traffic rate in kbps.
infinity
Never join the shortest path tree.
group-list
access-list
Groups the threshold applies to. The value 0 applies the threshold to all groups.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command restores the threshold to the default:
no ip pim spt-threshold
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
7-94
Configuring IP Multicast
IGMP Clear and Show Commands
Default
The threshold is 0
Example
The following example sets the source tree switching threshold to 4 kbps:
XSR(config)#ip pim spt-threshold 4
IGMP Clear and Show Commands
clear ip mroute
This command deletes entries from the multicast table.
Syntax
clear ip mroute [group-address][source-address]
group-address
IP address of the multicast group.
source-address
IP address of the multicast source.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
show ip igmp groups
This command displays the multicast groups with receivers that are directly connected to the XSR and were learned through the Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP).
Syntax
show ip igmp groups [group-address | type number | summary]
group-address
Address of the multicast group.
type
Interface type.
number
Interface number.
summary
A one‐line, abbreviated summary of each entry in the IGMP groups table.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Example
The following example displays sample responses:
XSR>show ip igmp groups
Interface name:
FastEthernet1
XSR CLI Reference Guide
7-95
IGMP Clear and Show Commands
State:
Mode:
Current version:
Group IP:
Reporter IP:
V1MEM exist timer:
V2MEM exist timer:
Member expire timer:
Source IP:
Dynamic
Include
V3
232.1.1.1
3.3.3.199
0
0
256
6.6.6.10 (Forward state: YES, Timer:260)
Parameters in the Response
Group IP
Multicast group address.
Interface name
The interface through which the group membership is learned.
State
Dynamic learning or static configure.
Mode
Exclude or Include.
Reporter IP
Last host to report being a member of the multicast group.
V1MEM exist timer
V1 member existing timer.
V2MEM exist timer
V2 member existing timer.
Member expire timer
Group member expire timer.
Source IP
Sender IP address.
Forward state
Forward state for this source IP.
Timer
Source timer for this source IP.
show ip igmp interface
This command displays multicast‐related information about an interface.
Syntax
show ip igmp interface [type number]
type
Interface type.
number
Interface number.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Example
The following example displays sample responses:
XSRinterface
Interface name:
Interface state:
IGMP version:
Protocol owner:
7-96
Configuring IP Multicast
FastEthernet2
Up
2
PIM-SM
IGMP Clear and Show Commands
IGMP state:
Enabled
Multicast ttl threshold: 0
Current query Interval:
125
Last Member Interval:
1
Querier timeout:
255
Max Response Timeout:
10
Current robust value:
2
Querier IP:
1.1.1.2 (Self)
Query sending timer:
124
Group configured:
None
-------------------------------------------------------Interface name:
FastEthernet1
Interface state:
Up
IGMP version:
3
Protocol owner:
PIM-SM
IGMP state:
Enabled
Multicast ttl threshold: 0
Current query Interval:
125
Last Member Interval:
1
Querier timeout:
255
Max Response Timeout:
10
Current robust value:
2
Querier IP:
3.3.3.1 (Self)
Query sending timer:
124
Group configured:
225.1.1.1
---------------------------------------------------------
Parameters in the Response
Interface name
Interface type, number.
Interface state
Interface status.
IGMP version IGMP version on this interface.
Protocol owner
Multicast routing protocol configured on this interface.
IGMP state IGMP enable state.
Multicast ttl threshold
Multicast TTL threshold on this interface.
Configured query interval
Configured query interval on this interface.
Current query interval Current query interval on this interface.
Last member interval
Last member interval on this interface.
Querier timeout Querier timeout configured on this interface.
Max response timeout Max response timeout configured on this interface.
Current robust value
Robust value on this interface.
Querier IP
Querier IP address.
Query sending timer
Query sending timer on this interface.
Group configured Static groups configured on this interface.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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IGMP Clear and Show Commands
show ip mroute
This command displays entries in the IP multicast routing table.
Syntax
show ip mroute [][source-address][summary]
group-address
IP address of the multicast group.
source-address
IP address of the multicast source.
summary
A one‐line, abbreviated summary of each entry in the IP multicast routing table.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Example
The following example displays sample responses:
XSR>show ip mroute
IP Multicast Routing Table
Flags: D - Dense, S - Sparse, C - Connected, P - Pruned
F - Register flag, T - SPT-bit set
Timers: Uptime/Expires
Interface state: Interface, Next-Hop, State/Mode
(*, 224.0.255.3), 5:29:15/00:01:14, RP is 192.168.26.2, flags:
Incoming interface: FastEthernet1, RPF neighbor 10.3.35.1
Outgoing interface list:
FastEthernet0, Forward/Sparse, 5:29:15/0:01:57
(192.168.27.0/24, 224.0.255.3), 6:29:15/00:02:47, flags: TS
Incoming interface: FastEthernet1, RPF neighbor 10.3.35.1
Outgoing interface list:
FastEthernet0, Forward/Sparse, 8:29:15/0:02:47
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Configuring IP Multicast
IGMP Clear and Show Commands
Parameters in the Response
Flags
Provides information about following entries:
•
D ‐ Dense:‐ Entry is operating in dense mode.
•
S ‐ Sparse: Entry is operating in sparse mode.
•
C ‐ Connected: A member of the multicast group is present on the directly connected interface.
•
P ‐ Pruned: Route has been pruned.
•
F ‐ Register flag: Indicates that the software is Registering for a multicast source.
•
T ‐ SPT‐bit set: Indicates that packets have been received on the shortest path source tree.
(198.92.37.100/32, 224.0.255.1)
Entry in the IP multicast routing table. The entry consists of the IP address of the source router followed by the IP address of the multicast group. An asterisk (*) in place of the source router indicates all sources.
uptime
The interval in hours, minutes, and seconds the entry has been in the IP multicast routing table.
RP
Address of the rendezvous point (RP) router. For routers and access servers operating in sparse mode, this address is always 0.0.0.0.
flags
Information about the entry.
Incoming interface
Expected interface for a multicast packet from the source. If the packet is not received on this interface, it is discarded.
RPF neighbor IP address of the upstream router to the source. Tunneling indicates that this router is sending data to the RP encapsulated in Register packets. The hexadecimal number in parentheses indicates to which RP it is registering. Each bit indicates a different RP if multiple RPs per group are used.
Outgoing interface list
Interfaces through which packets will be forwarded.
FastEthernet1
Name and number of the outgoing interface.
Forward/Sparse
Sparse‐mode interface is in forward mode.
time/time (uptime/
expiration time)
Per interface, the interval in hours, minutes, and seconds the entry has been in the IP multicast routing table. Following the slash (/), the interval in hours, minutes, and seconds until the entry will be removed from the table.
show ip pim bsr
This command displays Bootstrap Router (BSR) version 2 information.
Syntax
show ip pim bsr
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
XSR CLI Reference Guide
7-99
IGMP Clear and Show Commands
Example
The following example displays sample responses:
XSR>#show ip pim bsr
PIMv2 Bootstrap information
This system is the Elected Bootstrap Router (BSR)
BSR address: 192.168.27.1
Uptime: 04:37:46, BSR Priority: 4, Hash mask length: 30
Next bootstrap message in 00:00:03 seconds
This system is the Candidate Bootstrap Router (CBSR)
Candidate BSR Address: 50.0.0.30 Priority: 0, Hash Mask Length: 30
Parameters in the Response
BSR address IP address of the bootstrap router.
Uptime
Interval that this XSR has been up, in hours:minutes:seconds.
BSR Priority
Priority as set by the ip pim bsr-candidate command.
Hash mask length Length of a mask (32 bits maximum) that is to be ANDed with the group address before the hash function is called. This value is configured by the ip pim bsr-candidate command.
Next bootstrap message in
Period (in hours:minutes:seconds) in which the next bootstrap message is due from this BSR.
show ip pim interface
This command displays data about interfaces set for Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM).
Syntax
show ip pim interface [type number]
type
Interface type.
number
Interface number.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Example
The following example display sample responses:
XSR>show ip pim interface
PIM Interface Table
Address
Interface
30.0.0.20
FastEthernet1
40.0.0.20
FastEthernet2
7-100
Configuring IP Multicast
Nbr Count
0
2
Hello Intvl
30
30
DR
30.0.0.20
40.0.0.40
IGMP Clear and Show Commands
Parameter Descriptions
Address
IP address of the next‐hop router.
Interface
Interface type and number that is configured to run PIM.
Nbr Count Number of PIM neighbors discovered through this interface.
Hello Intvl The interval between Hello messages. The default is 30 seconds.
DR
IP address of the designated router on the LAN.
show ip pim neighbor
This command displays discovered Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) neighbors.
Syntax
show ip pim neighbor [type number]
type
Interface type.
number
Interface number.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Example
The following example shows sample responses:
XSR>#show ip pim neighbor
PIM Neighbor Table
Neighbor Address Interface DR Priority
192.168.26.2
Ethernet0
192.168.26.33
Ethernet0
192.168.27.1
Ethernet1
192.192.27.13
Ethernet1
Uptime
15:38:16
13:33:20
15:33:20
16:56:06
Expires
0:01:25
0:01:05
0:01:08
0:01:04
Mode
Sparse
Sparse (DR)
Sparse (DR)
Sparse
Parameters Descriptions
Neighbor Address
IP address of the PIM neighbor.
Interface
Interface type and number on which the neighbor is reachable.
DR Priority
The DR priority of the neighbor.
Uptime
Interval in hours, minutes, and seconds the entry has been in the PIM neighbor table.
Expires
Interval in hours, minutes, and seconds until the entry will be removed from the IP multicast routing table.
Mode
Mode in which the interface is operating.
(DR)
Indicates that this neighbor is a designated router on the LAN.
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IGMP Clear and Show Commands
show ip pim rp
This command displays the active rendezvous points (RPs) that are cached with associated multicast routing entries.
Syntax
show ip pim rp [group-address | mapping]
group-address
Address of the group about which to display RPs.
mapping
Displays all group‐to‐RP mappings of which the XSR is aware.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Example
The following example display sample responses:
XSR>show ip pim rp
Group: 224.2.240.20, RP: 192.168.10.13
Group: 224.1.127.155, RP: 192.168.10.13
Group: 224.2.127.154, RP: 192.168.10.13
Group: 224.2.128.153, RP: 192.168.10.13
XSR>show ip pim rp mapping
Group Address: 224.0.0.0 Mask: 240.0.0.0
RP Address: 30.0.0.20 Holdtime: 150 Priority: 192
RP Address: 50.0.0.40 Holdtime: 150 Priority: 192
Parameter Descriptions
Group
Address of the multicast group about which to display RP data.
RP
Address of the RP for that group.
Holdtime
The interval before the candidate RP expires.
Priority
The priority value for the candidate RP.
show ip pim rp-hash
This command displays the rendezvous point (RP) that is being selected for a specified group.
Syntax
show ip pim rp-hash {group-address}
group-address
Address of the group about which to display RPs.
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
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Configuring IP Multicast
IGMP Clear and Show Commands
Example
The following example displays sample responses:
XSR>show ip pim rp-hash 239.1.1.1
RP 192.168.27.12
Parameter Descriptions
RP
Address of the RP for the group specified (239.1.1.1).
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IGMP Clear and Show Commands
7-104
Configuring IP Multicast
8
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
Observing Syntax and Conventions
The CLI Syntax and conventions use the notation described in the following table.
Convention
Description
xyz
Key word or mandatory parameters (bold)
[x]
[ ] Square brackets indicate an optional parameter (italic)
[x | y | z]
[ | ] Square brackets with vertical bar indicate a choice of values
{x | y | z}
{ | } Braces with vertical bar indicate a choice of a required value
[x {y | z} ]
[{ | } ] Combination of square brackets with braces and vertical bars indicates a
required choice of an optional parameter
(config-if<xx>)
xx signifies interface type and number, e.g.: F1, S2/1.0, D1, M57, G3. F
indicates a FastEthernet, and G a GigabitEthernet interface.
Next Mode entries display the CLI prompt after a command is entered.
Sub-command headings are displayed in red text.
soho.enterasys.com
Italicized, non-syntactic text indicates either a user-specified entry or text with
special emphasis
PPP Commands
This chapter defines Point‐to‐Point Protocol (PPP) service profiles, specify and monitor serial ports, and define Multilink PPP and Bandwidth Allocation Protocol (BAP) functionality in the following command sets:
•
“PPP Debug, Clear and Show Commands” on page 8‐97.
•
“Multilink PPP Commands” on page 8‐108.
•
“Multilink Show Commands” on page 8‐122.
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PPP Commands
encapsulation ppp
This command sets the Point‐to‐Point Protocol (PPP) as the encapsulation method used by a serial port. To use PPP encapsulation, the XSR must be configured with an IP routing protocol.
Note: If encapsulation is changed from one type to another, all related values of the current
encapsulation and any sub-interface settings are deleted. Also, once encapsulation is set on an
interface, any sub-interface of that port created later is automatically encapsulated. Finally, you must
first enter the no encapsulation command to change the encapsulation type.
Syntax
encapsulation ppp
Syntax of the “no” Form
no encapsulation ppp
Default
No encapsulation
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)
Example
The following example enables PPP encapsulation on Serial interface 1/0:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation ppp
interface
This command selects a physical or virtual port for configuration as a router interface. The XSR supports ATM, BRI, Dialer, Fast/GigabitEthernet, Loopback, Multilink, Serial, or VPN interfaces. For configuration purposes, all serial ports and T1/E1/ISDN‐PRI channel groups are treated as a serial interface.
Optionally, you can set up the Console port on the XSR 1800 series as a WAN interface for dial backup purposes (refer to the Caution below). Do so by entering 0 only.
Caution: Be aware that when you enable the Console port as a WAN port, you can no longer
directly connect to it because it is in data communication mode. Your only access to the CLI will be
to Telnet to an IP address of a configured port. Also, if your startup-config file does not configure
any ports properly and sets up the console port as a serial interface, you will no longer be able to
login and will have to press the Default button to erase your configuration. For details about
configuring the Console with a modem, see “Chapter 2: Managing the XSR” in the XSR User’s
Guide.
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Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
PPP Commands
Syntax
interface type slot_num card_num port_num sub-interface_num
type
ATM, BRI, Dialer, Fast/GigabitEthernet, Loopback, Multilink, Serial or VPN port.
slot_num
The NIM number ranging from 0 to 6 depending on the XSR model.
card_num
The NIM card number ranging from 1 to 2 depending on the NIM installed in the slot.
port_num
The physical port number ranging from: 0 (ATM), 0 to 1 (BRI), 0 to 255 (Dialer & VPN), 0 to 15 (Loopback), 1 to 32767 (Multilink), 0 to 3 (Serial), 1 to 2 (FastEthernet), 1 to 3 (GigabitEthernet), and 0 (Console).
If a Serial port resides on a T1/E1 port, then channel group data must be added at the end of the string to mark which channel group of the T1/E1 port will be set:
card_num/NIM_num/ port_within_NIM: [channel‐group_num].
For example, 0/2/1:15 sets channel‐group 15 of the T1 or E1 port 1 in NIM slot 2 on the motherboard.
subinterface_num Number ranging from 1 to 30 (ATM, BRI & Serial), and 1 to 64 (Fast/
GigabitEthernet).
Slots, cards, ports, and sub‐interfaces are expressed as follows on the CLI:
0
The console port. (Only on the XSR 1800 series)
<0-0>/<1-2>/<0-3>
Slot, card, and port number.
<1-2>/<0-3>
Card and port number.
<1-2>/<0-3>.<1-30>
Card, port and sub‐interface number.
<1-2>/<0-3>:<0-31>
Card, port and channel number.
<1-2>/<0-3>:<0-31> .<1-30>
Card, port, channel and sub‐interface number.
Note: Leading zeros defined in interface_num can be omitted. For example, 0/1/2 is equivalent to 1/2.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command deletes the interface:
no interface serial port_num interface_num
Note: You cannot directly delete a Serial interface assigned to a T1/E1 channel group. You must
instead delete a channel group to delete the Serial port.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Examples
This example selects interface serial 1/0 and sets PPP encapsulation:
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PPP Commands
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
The following example selects channel group 12 of the T1/E1 port1 on the second NIM card so that later configurations will apply to this serial port:
XSR(config)#interface serial 2/1:12
XSR(config-if<s2/1:12)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
ppp authentication
This command specifies the type and order in which CHAP, MS‐CHAP or PAP protocols are requested on the interface. Once CHAP, PAP authentication or both have been enabled, the XSR requires the remote device to prove its identity before allowing data traffic to flow.
PAP authentication requires the remote device to send a name and password to be checked against a matching entry in the local username database.
CHAP authentication sends a challenge to the remote device. The remote device must encrypt the challenge value with a shared secret and return the encrypted value and its name to the XSR in a response message. The XSR uses the remote deviceʹs name to look up the appropriate secret in the local username database. It uses the looked‐up secret to encrypt the original challenge and verify that encrypted values match.
MS‐CHAP is closely derived from the PPP CHAP with the exception that it uses MD4 as the hashing algorithm.
You may enable PAP or CHAP, MS‐CHAP or all of them, in either order. If both methods are enabled, then the first method specified will be requested during link negotiation. If the peer suggests using the second method or simply refuses the first, then the second method is tried. Some remote devices support CHAP only and some PAP only. The order in which you specify the methods will be based on your concerns about the remote deviceʹs ability to correctly negotiate the appropriate method as well as your concern about data line security. PAP usernames and passwords are sent as clear‐text strings and can be intercepted and reused. CHAP has eliminated most of the known security holes.
Enabling or disabling PPP authentication does not affect the XSRʹs willingness to authenticate itself to the remote device.
Note: If you specify CHAP authentication on one side of a connection, you should set CHAP on the
other side as well.
Syntax
ppp authentication {any mix of pap chap ms-chap}
Possible parameter combinations include:
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chap
Enables CHAP on a serial interface.
pap
Enables PAP on a serial interface.
ms-chap
Enables MS‐CHAP on a serial interface.
chap pap
Preference of CHAP authentication before PAP.
pap chap
Preference of PAP authentication before CHAP.
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
PPP Commands
ms-chap pap chap
Preference of MS‐CHAP authentication, then PAP authentication, then CHAP.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disable PPP authentication:
no ppp authentication
Default
Not enabled
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example 1
Figure 8‐1 shows two routers, Site A and Site B, attempting to authenticate each other using CHAP. The configuration example follows.
Figure 8-1
Authentication Configured on Both Peers
ppp chap
Site A
(Serial Interface 1/0)
ppp chap
Site B
(Serial Interface 1/1)
Challenge - ID 4
Challenge - ID 8
Response - ID 8
Response - ID 4
Success/Failure - ID 4
Success/Failure - ID 8
Figure 8‐1 shows both routers send challenges and responses and either a failure or success. The following sample configuration illustrates the preceding example. On Site A, enter the following commands:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ppp authentication chap
On Site B, enter the following commands:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/1
XSR(config-if<S1/1>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<S1/1>)#no shutdown
XSR(config-if<S1/1>)#ppp authentication chap
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PPP Commands
Example 2
Figure 8‐2 shows two routers, Site A and Site B, and only one peer configured to do authentication (using chap) with only Site B issuing the challenge. The configuration example follows.
Figure 8-2
Authentication Configured on One Peer
no ppp authentication
Site A
(Serial Interface 1/0)
Response - ID 9
ppp chap
Site B
(Serial Interface 1/1)
Challenge - ID 9
Success/Failure - ID 9
Refer to the following sample configuration for the preceding example. On Site A enter the following commands:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ppp authentication chap
On Site B enter the following commands:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/1
XSR(config-if<S1/1>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<S1/1)#no ppp authentication
ppp chap
This command specifies a unique hostname on an interface, refuses CHAP authentication requests from peers, or uses a default password during CHAP authentication when no other password is available. It can enable multiple routers to appear to have the same hostname when using CHAP authentication.
This command can be used to set a default password during authentication challenges when the challengerʹs username cannot be found in the username list. It is also required when the challenger does not specify its name in the challenge packet and a default password must be sent. Be aware that this password is only used in response to challenges and is not used to authenticate the peer.
Syntax
ppp chap {hostname hostname | refuse | password word}
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hostname
Alternate name sent in the CHAP challenge.
refuse
Refuse to authenticate using CHAP.
word
Default password sent to CHAP challenges when no passwords are available.
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
PPP Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables either function:
no ppp chap {hostname | refuse | password}
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Examples
The following example creates the alternate CHAP hostname freud and the default chap password sigmund:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 1
XSR(config-if<D1>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<D1>)#ppp chap hostname freud
XSR(config-if<D1>)#ppp chap password sigmund
The following example enables CHAP authentication refusal:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 1
XSR(config-if<D1>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<D1>)#ppp chap refuse
ppp keepalive
This command sets the keepalive timer on a Point‐to‐Point port. PPP keepalives are sent out as echo requests over the PPP port at specified intervals. They apply to any serial port on which PPP encapsulation is enabled. If you do not specify the interval the default interval is used.
When Link Quality Management (LQM) is enabled on the interface along with ppp keepalive, echo requests are disabled. Upon disabling the LQM feature echo requests will start again if ppp keepalive is still configured.
Syntax
ppp keepalive [period]
period
Keepalive period in seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of the command to disable the keepalives:
no ppp keepalive
Default
Enabled at 30 seconds
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
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PPP Commands
Example
The following example sets Serial interface 1/0 to have keepalive configured at 8‐second intervals:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ppp keepalive 8
ppp lcp max-configure
This command configures the restart timer counter for the peak number of Configure‐Requests sent out on a Point‐to‐Point interface. Using the Link Control Protocol (LCP), the command applies to any Serial, or Dialer port, or Fast/GigabitEthernet sub‐interface on which PPP encapsulation is set. This counter totals the peak number of configure requests sent without receiving a Configure‐Ack, Configure‐Nak or Configure‐Reject.
Syntax
ppp lcp max-configure number
number
Setting for the configure‐request counter, ranging from 1 to 255.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command resets the counter to the default value:
no ppp lcp max-configure
Default
10
Mode
Serial, Dialer or Fast/GigabitEthernet sub‐interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following example sets the LCP max‐configure value at 2 requests:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 2
XSR(config-if<D2>)#ppp lcp max-configure 2
ppp lcp max-failure
This command configures the counter for the maximum number of Configure‐Nak packets sent out on a Point‐to‐Point interface. Using the Link Control Protocol (LCP), the command applies to any Serial or Dialer port, or Fast/GigabitEthernet sub‐interface on which PPP encapsulation is set. This counter totals the peak number of Configure‐Nak packets to send; subsequent Nak packets are converted to Configure‐Reject packets.
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Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
PPP Commands
Syntax
ppp lcp max-failure number
number
Setting for the max‐failure counter. Range: 1 to 255.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command resets the counter to the default value:
no ppp lcp max-failure
Default
5
Mode
Serial, Dialer or Fast/GigabitEthernet Sub‐interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Examples
The following example sets the lcp max‐failure value at 100 packets on Serial interface 2/1:
XSR(config)#interface serial 2/1
XSR(config-if<S2/1>)#ppp lcp max-failure 100
The following example sets the lcp max‐failure value at 200 packets on FastEthernet sub‐interface 2/1.1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 2.1
XSR(config-if<F2/1:1>)#ppp lcp max-failure 200
ppp lcp max-terminate
This command configures the restart timer counter for the number of Terminate‐Requests sent out on a Point‐to‐Point interface. Using the Link Control Protocol (LCP), the command applies to any Serial or Dialer port, or Fast/GigabitEthernet sub‐interface on which PPP encapsulation is set.
This counter totals the peak number of terminate requests sent without receiving a Terminate‐Ack before assuming that the peer cannot respond.
Syntax
ppp lcp max-terminate number
number
Setting for the terminate‐request counter. Range: 1 to 255.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command resets the counter to the default value:
no ppp lcp max-terminate
Default
2
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PPP Commands
Mode
Serial, Dialer and Fast/GigabitEthernet Sub‐interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following example sets the terminate‐request counter at 10 requests on Dialer interface 57:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 57
XSR(config-if<D57>)#ppp lcp max-terminate 10
ppp max-bad-auth
This command permits multiple authentication failures. It configures a Point‐to‐Point interface not to reset itself immediately after an authentication failure but to allow a specified number of authentication retries. This command applies to any serial interface on which PPP encapsulation is enabled.
Syntax
ppp max-bad-auth number
number
Number of retries after which the interface resets itself.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to reset to the default (immediate reset):
no ppp max-bad-auth
Default
0
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following example sets serial interface 1/0 to allow five additional retries after an initial authentication failure (for a total of six failed authentication attempts):
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ppp authentication chap
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ppp max-bad-auth 6
ppp pap sent-username
This command configures a PAP username and clear text password for the specified interface. The value is used in the PAP authentication request packet to the peer.
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Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
PPP Commands
Syntax
ppp pap sent-username [username] password [password]
username
Username sent in the PAP authentication request packet.
password
The clear text password sent in the PAP authentication request packet. Limit: up to 255 ASCII characters. Enclose password in double quotes if entering a string with spaces
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to delete the username and password:
no pap sent-username
Default
No username or password
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
This example configuration of a the PAP authentication username of jim and a clear text PAP password of evans on serial interface 2/1:
XSR(config)#interface serial 2/1
XSR(config-if<S2/1>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<S1/1>)#no shutdown
XSR(config-if<S2/1>)#ppp pap sent-username jim pass evans
ppp peer default ip address
This command specifies the default IP address of a remote peer for use during PPP/IPCP negotiation if the peer requests it. The address is used when the remote peer sends a 0.0.0.0 IP address in the CONFIG REQUEST and asks the local system to assign an IP address. The address will not be used if the peer already has been assigned an IP address with its own local configuration.
This command can be used for Interface Serial, T1/E1 channel groups, BRI leased line with PPP encapsulated; Ethernet sub‐interface and ATM sub‐interface with PPPoE or PPPoA encapsulated. When used at the dialer interface, it applies to the Point‐to‐Point (P2P) dialer interface only. For Dialer Multipoint‐to‐Point interfaces, the dialer map ip command supplies the remote address associated with particular dialing numbers.
Note: The peer default IP address takes effect only when the peer is configured as IP address
negotiated.
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PPP Commands
Syntax
ppp peer default ip address {ip address}
ip address
IP address of the remote peer.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove the IP address:
no ppp peer default ip address
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Examples
This example sets the peer’s IP address on Serial interface 1/0:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ppp peer default ip address 192.168.1.3
This example sets the peer’s IP address on P2P Dialer interface 1:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 1
XSR(config-if<D1>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<D1>)#ppp peer default ip address 10.10.10.1
This example sets the peer’s IP address on M2P Dialer interface 2:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 2 multi-point
XSR(config-if<D1>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<D1>)#dialer map ip 20.20.20.1 9051234567
ppp quality
This command sets the minimum Link Quality Monitoring (LQM) value on a serial interface before the link will go down.
Percentages are calculated for both incoming and outgoing directions. The outgoing quality is calculated by comparing the total number of packets and bytes sent to the total number of packets and bytes received by the destination node. The incoming quality is calculated by comparing the total number of packets and bytes received to the total number of packets and bytes sent by the destination node.
If the link quality percentage is not maintained, the link is considered of poor quality and taken down (by sending a DOWN event to all active NCPs). LQM forces a time lag so the link does not bounce up and down.
Syntax
ppp quality [percentage]
percentage
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Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
Sets the link quality threshold, ranging from 1 to 100.
PPP Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to disable LQM:
no ppp quality
Default
Disabled
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following example enables LQM on Serial interface 2/0:
XSR(config)#interface serial 2/0
XSR(config-if<S2/0>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<S2/0>)#no shutdown
XSR(config-if<S2/0>)#ppp quality 75
ppp timeout retry
This command sets the restart timer for Configure‐Requests and Terminate‐Requests on a Point‐
to‐Point interface. The timer is the peak interval to wait for a response during PPP negotiation. This command applies to any serial port on which PPP encapsulation is enabled.
Syntax
ppp timeout retry seconds
seconds
Restart timer interval, ranging from 1 to 255 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command resets the timer to the default value:
no ppp timeout retry
Default
3
Mode
Serial, Dialer, and Fast/GigabitEthernet Sub‐interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following example resets the restart timer of Serial interface 1:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1>)#encapsulation ppp
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PPP Commands
XSR(config-if<S1>)#ppp timeout retry 20
username
This command adds or modifies a user who can manage the XSR.
Note: Refer to “Network Management” on page 1 for more details.
This command specifies the password to be used in the PPP Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP) caller identification and by the Password Authentication Protocol (PAP).
A username entry is required for each remote system that the XSR communicates with and from which it seeks authentication for protocols such as CHAP and PAP or MSCHAP. When the XSR receives CHAP and MSCHAP challenges, the received username is searched through the list of usernames to find a password so it can send a response.
When the XSR receives responses to its challenges, the response name is searched through the list of usernames and passwords and compared. When the XSR receives PAP responses it also searches through its list of usernames to match passwords.
Syntax
username name password {cleartext | secret type} password
name
User ID.
cleartext
The password will not be encrypted.
secret
The password will be encrypted.
type
0 or 5. 0 means the input password is expected to be unencrypted; 5 means the input password is already encrypted so it will not be encrypted again.
password
For CHAP authentication: specifies the secret password for the local router or the remote system. The secret is encrypted when stored on the local router.
The password can be up to 255 ASCII characters. Enclose the password in double quotes if entering a string with spaces. There is no limit to the number of username‐password combinations that can be specified, allowing any number of remote systems to be authenticated.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes the user:
no username name
Default
No password is predefined
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config}#
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Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
PPP Debug, Clear and Show Commands
Example
The following example enables CHAP on serial interface 1/0 and defines a password for local server Bob and remote server John:
XSR(config)#hostname Bob
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ppp authentication chap
XSR(config)#username John password remote_dev
PPP Debug, Clear and Show Commands
debug ppp packet
This command enables PPP debugging for an interface from outside the actual interface. It performs the same PPP debugging as the ppp debug packet command but is issued from EXEC mode.
Note: All XSR debug commands are set to privilege level 15 by default.
Syntax
debug ppp packet [interface type/number] limit [x][type1][type2]…
interface type
Dialer, ATM, Serial, BRI, Multilink, or Fast/GigabitEthernet interfaces.
number
Interface number.
x
Total number of packets to debug, ranging from 1 to 1,000,000.
type1
Packet types to debug including: PAP, CHAP, AUTH, BACP,
type2
BAP, BCP, CCP, ECP, IPCP, IPXCP, LCP and LQM.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The following no form of the command returns the default value:
no debug ppp packet [interface type/number]
Mode
EXEC configuration: XSR>
Note: This command does not display in the running config file since it is strictly a debug function. It
must be set manually every time you reboot the XSR.
Example
The following example debugs sets PPP debugging on Serial interface 2/0:0 with a limit of 10 packets for LCP, BACP and BAP protocols:
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PPP Debug, Clear and Show Commands
XSR#debug ppp packet serial 2/0:0 limit 10 lcp bacp bap
Sample Output
The following debugging output displays all PPP control packets:
May 21, 2003: 13:00:00 Rx 20 bytes LCP CONFIG_REQ:
MRU: 1500
Magic Number: 12345678 (0xBC614E)
May 21, 2003: 13:00:00 Tx 12 bytes IPCP CONFIG_ACK:
IP Address: 10.10.10.10
If the length field in the packet in the content does not match the total packet
length, it will be displayed as a warning:
May 21, 2003: 13:00:00 Rx 20 bytes LCP CONFIG_REQ:
MRU: 1500
Magic Number: 12345678 (0xBC614E)
(WARNING!!! NOT MATCHING PCK LENGTH 60bytes)
ppp debug packet
This command invokes debugging of Type 1 and 2 PPP control packets (transmit and receive) on Serial, Multilink, or Dialer interfaces. For Multilink, debugging is applied only to the bundle which handles IPCP and BAP/BACP negotiations. For Dialer interfaces, it is applied to the Serial interface that the dialer allocates to dial out. Within the control packet, the following fields are decoded and displayed: protocol (see list below), code (type of packet), packet identifier, packet length, and the type, length and content of the option.
You can select these packet types to be debugged: PAP, CHAP, MS‐CHAP, AUTH, BACP, BAP, BCP, CCP, ECP, IPCP, IPXCP, LCP, MLPPP, and LQM. You can specify up to nine packets types to be debugged, and if you choose all packet types, entering ppp debug packet is sufficient. You can also choose to specify the same packet type repeatedly that is, ppp debug packet auth auth
auth auth) which will have the same effect as issuing the packet type once.
Notes: You do not necessarily need to set a limit to be able to specify the types of packets. But, you
cannot specify packet type first and then request a limit.
All XSR debug commands are set to privilege level 15 by default.
This command does not display in the running config file since it is strictly a debug function. It must
be set manually every time you reboot the XSR.
You must issue this command after you enter encapsulation ppp.
Syntax
ppp debug packet limit [x][type1][type2]...
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x
Total number of packets to debug, ranging from 1 to 1,000,000.
type1
Packet types to debug including: PAP, CHAP, AUTH, BACP,
type2
BAP, BCP, CCP, ECP, IPCP, IPXCP, LCP and LQM.
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
PPP Debug, Clear and Show Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes PPP debugging on the interface:
no ppp debug packet
Default
Limit: 100 packets
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
This example sets PPP debugging of IPCP and LQM packets with a 50‐packet limit on Serial 1/0:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#ppp debug packet limit 50 ipcp lqm
Sample Output
The following debugging output is displayed on Multilink interface 57:
XSR#show interface multilink 57
********** Multilink Interface Stats **********
Multilink 57 is Admin Up
Internet address is 192.168.34.1, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
LCP
State: OPENED
IPCP
State: OPENED
Multilink
State: OPENED
Detailed Debug PPP Control Packet is ON for [type1] [type2] [type3], limit is [x],
number decoded is [y]
clear ppp
This command clears PPP counters for interfaces running PPP.
Syntax
clear ppp
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
The following output displays when you enter the show ppp interface command after clearing the serial 1/0:0 port:
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PPP Debug, Clear and Show Commands
XSR#show ppp interface
********** PPP Stats **********
Serial 1/0:0: PPP is Admin Up / Oper Up / Link Speed: 64000
LCP Current State:
OPENED
IPCP Current State:
OPENED
Multilink Current State:
OPENED
LCP STATS
Total Rcv
Total Rcv
Total Rcv
Total Rcv
Total
Total
Total
Total
Rx
Rx
Rx
Rx
Tx
Tx
Tx
Tx
Pck:
Control Pck:
Data Pck:
Pck Discarded:
Pck:
Control Pck:
Data Pck:
Pck Discarded:
Control
Control
Control
Control
Pck
Pck
Pck
Pck
Discarded:
Error:
Unknown protocol:
Too Long:
LocalToRemoteProtocolCompression:
RemoteToLocalProtocolCompression:
LocalMRU:
RemoteMRU:
ReceiveFcsSize:
TransmitFcsSize:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Disabled
Disabled
1500
1500
16
16
LQR STATS
No LQM Monitoring
LCP CONFIGURATION
InitialMRU:
MagicNumber:
FcsSize:
LQR CONFIGURATION
Period:
Status:
1500
true
16
10 sec
Disabled
show ppp
This command displays all configured PPP ports and status including Link Control Protocol (LCP) and Link Quality Monitoring (LQM) states.
Syntax
show ppp
8-100
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
PPP Debug, Clear and Show Commands
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following output is displayed for Serial and Multilink interfaces:
XSR#show ppp
Serial 1/0 PPP State:
LCP State: OPENED
IPCP State: OPENED
Multilink 8 MLPPP State:
LCP State: OPENED
IPCP State: OPENED
Multilink State: OPENED
Multilink State: OPENED
The following output is displayed for configured Dialer interfaces:
XSR#show ppp
Dialer0
LCP Current State:
INITIAL IPCP Current State: INITIAL
Dialer1 MLPPP State:
LCP State: opened Multilink State:
Dialer2 MLPPP State:
LCP State: opened Multilink State:
Dialer3 MLPPP State:
LCP State: opened Multilink State:
Dialer4 MLPPP State:
LCP State: opened Multilink State:
Dialer5 MLPPP State:
LCP State: opened Multilink State:
Dialer33 MLPPP State:
LCP State: opened Multilink State:
Dialer44 MLPPP State:
LCP State: opened Multilink State:
Dialer1 MLPPP State:
LCP State: opened Multilink State:
Multilink 4 MLPPP State:
LCP State: opened Multilink State:
opened
opened
opened
opened
opened
opened
opened
opened
opened
show interface serial
This command displays interface statistics and PPP status if the interface is encapsulated with PPP.
Syntax
show interface [card/port:channel number] [type | type number]
card/port
The PPP WAN port for which to view link status, stats and configuration data.
type
Serial or Dialer ‐ Interface types which PPP can run on.
number
Card/port ‐ for serial interface.
Card/port:channel number ‐ for serial channel groups.
Number ‐ for other logical interfaces such as Dialer.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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PPP Debug, Clear and Show Commands
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following output is produced by this command:
Serial 1/0 is Admin Up / Oper Up
Internet address is 25.25.25.3, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
LCP
State: OPENED
IPCP
State: OPENED
Multilink State: OPENED
show ppp interface
This command displays all configured PPP instances, the interface they belong to and their status.
To issue this command correctly, follow the guidelines below:
•
Issuing the show ppp interface command without any other parameter displays link status, statistics and configuration for all interfaces running PPP.
•
The show ppp interface type command displays link status, statistics and settings for any interface type running PPP.
•
The show ppp interface type number command displays link status, statistics and configuration for the interface type number.
•
The show ppp interface dialer number [multi-class serial] command displays Dialer statistics with Serial and Multiclass options.
•
The show ppp interface multilink number [bap | memberlink | multi-class]
command displays multilink statistics with various options.
Syntax
show ppp interface card/port [type number options]
card/port
The NIM number and PPP WAN port:channel number to view associated link status, statistics and settings.
type
The interface type PPP is running on including: Dialer (0 to 255), Multilink (1 to 32767), or Serial (see below).
number
Card/port numbers or Card/port:channel number.
option
memberlink, mlpppgroup (MLPPP only), multi‐class, or bap (MLPPP only) statistics.
The Serial port card, port, sub‐interface, and channel numbers are expressed as follows:
8-102
0
Console port.
<1-2>/<0-3>
Card and port number.
<1-2>/<0-3>.<1-30>
Card, port, sub‐interface number.
<1-2>/<0-3>:<0-31>
Card, port and channel number.
<1-2>/<0-3>:<0-31>.<1-30>
Card, port, channel and sub‐interface number
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
PPP Debug, Clear and Show Commands
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following output displays with a PPP connection established (PPP quality has not been enabled on the interface so the LINK QUALITY statistic is not monitoring):
XSR>show ppp interface serial 1/0
********** MLPPP Stats **********
Multilink 8: MLPPP is Admin Up / Oper Up
Group Num: 8
LCP
State: OPENED
IPCP
State: OPENED
Multilink State: OPENED
Bundle Size:
Max Load Threshold:
Bundle Tx Load Avg:
Bundle Rx Load Avg:
Last Tx Seq Num:
Last Fwd Seq Num:
Last Rcv M:
No Of Frag Rcvd:
No Of Frag Discard:
No Of Frag in Rcv List:
No Of Pck in Tx Buf Q:
Reassem Start Tick:
Last M Change Tick:
High Pri Member link is
31
120
240
240
14787652
12933548
12933518
12920875
0
11
0
3882798
3882815
Serial 1/0:29
Multilink PPP includes following memberlink interface:
Serial 1/0:2
Serial 1/0:6
Serial 1/0:9
Serial 1/0:15
Serial 1/0:17
Serial 1/0:18
Serial 1/0:19
Serial 1/0:23
Serial 1/0:26
Serial 1/0:28
Serial 1/0:30
Serial 1/0:20
Serial 1/0:27
Serial 1/0:22
Serial 1/0:21
Serial 1/0:8
Serial 1/0:4
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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PPP Debug, Clear and Show Commands
Serial
Serial
Serial
Serial
Serial
Serial
Serial
Serial
Serial
Serial
Serial
Serial
Serial
Serial
1/0:0
1/0:3
1/0:7
1/0:13
1/0:10
1/0:1
1/0:25
1/0:11
1/0:24
1/0:12
1/0:5
1/0:16
1/0:14
1/0:29
The following displays output with PPP quality enabled and a PPP connection:
XSR>show ppp serial 0/4/1
********** PPP Stats **********
Interface Serial 0/4/1
LCP Current State:
IPCP Current State:
Multilink Current State:
OPENED
OPENED
OPENED
LCP STATS
Total Rcv
Total Rcv
Total Rcv
Total Rcv
1618575
420
1618155
1
Total
Total
Total
Total
Rx
Rx
Rx
Rx
Tx
Tx
Tx
Tx
Pck:
Control Pck:
Data Pck:
Pck Discarded:
Pck:
Control Pck:
Data Pck:
Pck Discarded:
Control
Control
Control
Control
Pck
Pck
Pck
Pck
Discarded:
Error:
Unknown protocol:
Too Long:
LocalToRemoteProtocolCompression:
RemoteToLocalProtocolCompression:
LocalMRU:
RemoteMRU:
ReceiveFcsSize:
TransmitFcsSize:
LQR STATS
8-104
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
1618653
420
1618233
2
0
0
0
0
Disabled
Disabled
1500
1500
16
16
PPP Debug, Clear and Show Commands
Quality:
good
InGoodOctets: 26600
LocalPeriod:
100000
RemotePeriod:
100000
OutLQRs:1000InLQRs: 1000
LCP Configuration:
LCP CONFIGURATION
InitialMRU:
MagicNumber:
FcsSize:
LQR CONFIGURATION
Period:
Status:
1500
true
16
10 sec
Disabled
Output Parameters Summary
For PPP link status and statistics, refer to the following section. For LQR status and statistics, go to page 106. For LQR parameters, go to page 107.
LCP Statistics
This section displays PPP‐link specific management information.
Rx Control Pck Discarded
Range
32‐bit counter
Description
Sum of received packets discarded because length is too short (less than 4).
Rx Control Pck Error
Range
32‐bit counter
Description
Sum of received packets n detected with an error in the control field.
Rx Control Pck Unknown protocol
Range
32‐bit counter
Description
Sum of received packets detected with an unknown protocol field.
Rx Control Pck Too Long
Range
32‐bit counter
Description
Sum of received packets discarded because their length exceeded the MRU. Packets that are longer than the MRU but which are successfully received and processed are NOT included in this count.
LocalToRemoteProtocolCompression
Range
INTEGER {enabled (1), disabled (2)}
Description
Indicates whether the local PPP entity will use Protocol Compression when sending packets to the remote PPP entity. The value is meaningful only when the link has reached the open state.
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PPP Debug, Clear and Show Commands
RemoteToLocalProtocolCompression
Range
INTEGER {enabled (1), disabled (2)}
Description
Indicates whether the remote PPP entity will use Protocol Compression when sending packets to the local PPP entity. The value is meaningful only when the link has reached the open state.
LocalMRU
Range
INTEGER (1…2147483648)
Description
Current value of the MRU for the local PPP Entity. This value is the MRU that the remote entity uses when sending packets to the local PPP entity. The value is meaningful only when the link has reached the open state. RemoteMRU
Range
INTEGER (1...2147483648)
Description
Current value of the MRU for the remote PPP Entity. This value is the MRU that the local entity uses when sending packets to the remote PPP entity. The value is meaningful only when the link has reached the open state.
ReceiveFcsSize
Range
INTEGER (0...128)
Description
Size of the Frame Check Sequence (FCS) in bits that the remote node will generate when is sending packets to the local node. The value is meaningful only when the link has reached the open state.
TransmitFcsSize
Range
INTEGER (0...128)
Description
Size of the Frame Check Sequence (FCS) in bits that the local node will generate when is sending packets to the remote node. The value is meaningful only when the link has reached the open state.
LQR Status and Statistics
This section displays LQR parameters displayed for the local PPP entity. Values are displayed only if LQR Quality Monitoring has been successfully negotiated on the link.
Quality
Range
Integer ‐ Good, Bad, or Not‐determined
Description
Current quality of the link as declared by the local PPP entityʹs Link Quality Management modules. No effort is made to define good or bad, nor is the policy used to learn it. The not‐determined value indicates that the entity does not actually evaluate the linkʹs quality. This value clarifies the determined to be good case from the node termination made and presumed to be good case.
LocalPeriod
Range
8-106
Integer ‐ 1 to 2147483648
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
PPP Debug, Clear and Show Commands
Description
The LQR reporting period, in hundredths of a second, that is in effect for the local PPP entity.
OutLQRs
Range
32‐bit counter
Description
Value of the OutLQRs counter on the local node for the link. OutLQRs increases by one for each transmitted Link ‐Quality ‐Report packet.
LCP Configuration
This section describes LCP configuration data displayed for a PPP Link.
InitialMRU
Range
Integer ‐ 0 to 2147483647
Description
Initial Maximum Receive Unit (MRU) that the local PPP entity will advertise to the remote entity. If the value of this variable is 0 then the local PPP entity will not advertise any MRU to the remote entity and the default MRU will be assumed. Changing this object will take effect when the link is next restarted.
Default
1500
MagicNumber
Range
Integer ‐ False or True
Description
If true (2), the local node will try to perform Magic Number negotiation with the remote node. If false (1), negotiation is not tried. The local node will comply with any magic number negotiations tried by the remote node, per the PPP RFC. Changing this object will take effect when the link is next restarted.
Defaults
False
FcsSize
Range
Integer ‐ 0 to 128
Description
Size of the FCS, in bits, the local node will try to negotiate for use with the remote node. Regardless of this value’s object, the local node will comply with any FCS size negotiations started by the remote node, according to the PPP RFC. Changing this object will take effect when the link is next restarted.
Default
16
LQR Configuration
This section describes LQR configuration data displayed for a PPP link.
Period
Range
Integer ‐ 0 to 2147483647
Description
The LQR Reporting Period that the local PPP entity will attempt to negotiate with the remote entity, in hundredths of a second. Changing this object will take effect when the link is next restarted.
Default
0
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Multilink PPP Commands
Status
Range
Integer ‐ Disabled or Enabled
Description
If enabled(2), the local node will try to perform LQR negotiation with the remote node. If disabled(1), negotiation is not tried. The local node will comply with any magic number negotiations tried by the remote node, according to the PPP RFC. Changing this object takes effect when the link is next restarted.
Default
Enabled
Multilink PPP Commands
interface multilink
This command names the multilink group and creates a logic interface for this multilink group. Only the PPP multilink group is supported currently.
Syntax
interface multilink number [1-32767]
1-32767
Designation of the virtual multilink group.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes the multilink group:
no interface multilink number [1-32767]
Default
No multilink group
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
Multilink Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Mxx>)#
Example
The following example enables multilink on group 2 with serial interface 1/1 configured as the physical interface:
XSR(config)#interface multilink 2
XSR(config-if<M2>)ppp multilink endpoint ip 192.168.10.214
XSR(config-if<M2>)ip address 192.168.10.213 255.255.255.252
XSR(config-if<M2>)no shutdown
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/1
XSR(config-if<S1/1>)#media-type X21
8-108
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
Multilink PPP Commands
XSR(config-if<S1/1>)#multilink-group 2
XSR(config-if<S1/1>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<S1/1>)#ppp multilink
XSR(config-if<S1/1>)#no shutdown
multilink max-links
This command sets the maximum number of links allowed in this bundle. If multilink BAP is configured and the number of active links exceed the maximum number of links, BAP will try to negotiate the links down.
Syntax
multilink max-links number (1-255)
1-255
Maximum number of links allowed in this bundle.
Default
16
Mode
Dialer Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
This example sets the minimum multilink limit to 6 on Dialer port 4:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 4
XSR(config-<D4>)#multilink min-links 6
multilink min-links
This command triggers the dialer to maintain the minimum number of links in a bundled multilink over a switched line and should be configured on the called side of a connection. It is the first means by which the XSR effects Bandwidth‐on‐Demand (BoD).
The multilink load-threshold command is the second means by which the XSR controls traffic via BoD. A third means to effect BoD is by use of the Bandwidth Allocation Protocol (BAP) which is activated by several ppp bap commands. BAP negotiates with the peer to add or drop a link, and can request a phone number from a central repository with the ppp bap number
command. If multilink BAP is configured and the number of active links is less than the minimum number of links, BAP will try to negotiate the links up.
Syntax
multilink min-links number (1-255)
1-255
Minimum number of links allowed in this bundle.
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Multilink PPP Commands
Default
1
Mode
Dialer Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Examples
The following example sets the minimum multilink limit to 6 on the terminating dialer interface:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 4
XSR(config-if<D4>)#multilink min-links 6
ppp bap call
This command sets Bandwidth Allocation Protocol (BAP) call values on a dialer interface to set up Bandwidth‐on‐Demand (BoD). It permits the port to accept links from and initiate links to a peer.
The multilink load-threshold command is a second means by which the XSR controls traffic via BoD. It is also provided by setting the multilink min-links command.
Note: The multilink load-threshold command must be set to operate BAP.
Syntax
ppp bap call {accept | request}
accept
Accepts links from a peer. This default lets peers can add links to the ML bundle.
request
Lets the local side of the connection start links. Set up on the called side of a link only.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables previously set BAP values:
no ppp bap call {accept | request}
Default
Accept
Mode
Dialer Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Dx>)#
Example
The following example sets BAP call values on Dialer interface 57:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 57
XSR(config-if<D57>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<D57>)#no shutdown
8-110
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
Multilink PPP Commands
XSR(config-if<D57>)#ppp bap call accept
ppp bap callback
This command sets enables Bandwidth Allocation Protocol (BAP) callback parameters on a dialer interface to set up Bandwidth‐on‐Demand (BoD). It permits the port to initiate adding a link to or requesting a link from a peer. It applies to Dialer interfaces only.
The multilink load-threshold command is a second means by which the XSR controls traffic via BoD. It is also provided by setting the multilink min-links command.
Note: You must configure multilink load-threshold to run BAP.
Syntax
ppp bap callback {accept | request}
accept
Local router initiates a link addition upon peer notification.
request
Local router requests a peer to initiate a link.
Mode
Dialer Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Dx>)#
Mode of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes callback configuration:
no ppp bap callback {accept | request}
Example
The following example configures BAP to accept and request callbacks:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 1
XSR(config-if<D1>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<D1>)#no shutdown
XSR(config-if<D1>)#ppp bap callback accept
XSR(config-if<D1>)#ppp bap callback request
ppp bap number
This command specifies the Bandwidth Allocation Protocol (BAP) phone number which a peer can dial to connect and set up Bandwidth‐on‐Demand (BoD). It applies to dialer interfaces only.
The multilink load-threshold command is a second means by which the XSR controls traffic via BoD. It is also provided by setting the multilink min-links command.
Note: The multilink load-threshold command must be set to operate BAP.
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Multilink PPP Commands
Syntax
ppp bap number {default phone-number}
default phone-number Primary number for incoming calls. Up to 5 numbers can be entered.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command removes a BAP phone number:
no ppp bap number {default phone-number}
Mode
Dialer Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Dx>)#
Example
The following example specifies the BAP default phone number:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 1
XSR(config-if<D1>)#ppp bap number
ppp bap timeout
This command configures Bandwidth Allocation Protocol (BAP) action timeouts to set up Bandwidth‐on‐Demand (BoD).
The multilink load-threshold command is a second means by which the XSR controls traffic via BoD. It is also provided by setting the multilink min-links command.
Syntax
ppp bap timeout {pending seconds | response seconds}
pending seconds
Wait interval for pending actions. Range: 2 to 180 seconds.
response seconds
Wait interval for response packets. Range: 2 to 180 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command deletes BAP action timeouts:
no ppp bap timeout {pending | response}
Defaults
•
Pending seconds: 20
•
Response seconds: 20
Mode
Dialer Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Dx>)#
8-112
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
Multilink PPP Commands
Example
The following example resets the BAP pending timeout on Dialer port 1:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 1
XSR(config-if<D1>)#ppp bap timeout pending 60
ppp multilink
This command enables Multilink PPP on an XSR interface. Multilink PPP operates over single or multiple interfaces that are configured to support both Dial‐on‐Demand rotary groups and PPP encapsulation. It applies to asynchronous serial interfaces, and ISDN leased‐line Basic Rate Interfaces (BRIs), and ISDN Primary Rate Interfaces (PRIs).
This command is associated with the following multilink sub‐commands:
–
endpoint sets the multilink group Endpoint Descriptor over the multilink bundle. Refer to page 8‐114 for command details.
–
fragment-delay sets the maximum fragment delay interval. Refer to page 8‐115 for command details.
–
fragment disable disables fragmentation over a multilink PPP connection. Refer to page page 8‐117 for command details.
–
group ‐ configures a PPP link and assigns it to a specified PPP multilink group. Refer to page 8‐118 for command details.
–
load-threshold set the value which triggers the dialer to add or delete a link from the multilink bundle. See page 8‐119 for details.
–
multi-class sets the Multi‐Class MLPPP option for the MLPPP header format. Refer to page 8‐120 for command details.
Multilink PPP BAP is designed to manage bandwidth of a multilink bundle. BAP works in conjunction with the multilink load-threshold command to enable Bandwidth‐on‐Demand (BoD) when bandwidth must be added or removed on the XSR.
BAP negotiates with the peer to add or drop a link, and can request a phone number from a central site repository using the bap number default command.
Note: BAP is employed on Dialer and ISDN lines only.
Use the multilink load-threshold command to enable a dialer interface (dialer profile) to bring up additional links and add them to a multilink bundle. If you want a multilink bundle to be connected indefinitely, you must set a very high idle timer.
Syntax
ppp multilink {bap}
bap
Enables BAP/BACP to be negotiated over the multilink bundle.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command not only removes multilink on the interface but also multilink BAP if it also was configured:
no ppp multilink {bap}
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Multilink PPP Commands
Default
Disabled
Mode
Dialer or Serial Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<D/Sxx>)#
Examples
The following example configures a dialer for Multilink PPP. It does not show the configuration of the physical interfaces.
XSR(config)#interface dialer 0
XSR(config-if<D0>)#ip address 101.0.0.2 255.0.0.0
XSR(config-if<D0>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<D0>)#dialer idle-timeout 500
XSR(config-if<D0>)#dialer map ip 101.0.0.1 name ny broadcast 41612345678922
XSR(config-if<D0>)#dialer load-threshold 30 either
XSR(config-if<D0>)#ppp authentication chap
XSR(config-if<D0>)#ppp multilink
The following example configures Multilink PPP leased‐line service on BRI interface 2/1. Specifying the leased‐line speed of 56 kbps adds two B‐channels to the BRI port, one of which is enabled for Frame Relay service.
XSR(config)#interface bri 2/1
XSR(config-if<BRI-2/1>)#leased-line 56
XSR(config)#interface bri 2/1:1
XSR(config-if<BRI-2/1:1>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<BRI-2/1:1>)#ppp multilink
XSR(config-if<BRI-2/1:1>)#ppp multilink group 1
XSR(config)#interface bri 2/1:2
XSR(config-if<BRI-2/1:2>)#ip address 3.3.3.4 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<BRI-2/1:2>)#encapsulation frame-relay
XSR(config)#interface multilink 1
XSR(config-if<M1>)#ip address 3.3.3.3 255.255.255.0
ppp multilink endpoint
This command sets the multilink group Endpoint Descriptor (EPD) value (class) over the multilink bundle. It applies only to interfaces that can configure a bundle interface including Multilink, Dialer, and ISDN BRI or PRI interfaces.
Syntax
ppp multilink endpoint [null | hostname | ip_address | mac interface | fastethernet
(1-2) string | phone]
8-114
null
NULL class is specified with a value of 0.
hostname
Local Assigned address class is set with a local host name entered using the hostname command.
ip_address
IP address class is set with a specified IP address value.
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
Multilink PPP Commands
mac
interface
IEEE 802.1 Global MAC address class is set with a MAC address of either Fastethernet 1 or 2. fastethernet
string
PPP Magic Number class is specified. Instead of using the negotiated PPP magic number, you can specify any string less than 20 characters.
phone
PSTN Directory Number class set with a phone number of no more than 15 digits.
Mode
Dialer, Multilink, BRI Interface, and Controller configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>) and
XSR(config-controller<T/Exx>)
Default
Hostname
Example
The following example sets the PPP multilink endpoint value over virtual multilink interface 57:
XSR(config)#interface multilink 57
XSR(config-if<M57>)#ppp multilink endpoint
XSR(config-if<M57>)#ppp multilink endpoint
XSR(config-if<M57>)#ppp multilink endpoint
XSR(config-if<M57>)#ppp multilink endpoint
XSR(config-if<M57>)#ppp multilink endpoint
null
hostname
ip address 1.1.1.1
string aaaaaaa
phone 1234567890
ppp multilink fragment-delay
This command sets the maximum fragment delay interval in milliseconds. The value is used to compute the maximum fragment size that can be sent over each member link in the bundle. The maximum fragment size is calculated as:
Fragment size (in bytes) = fragment‐delay (ms) x link speed (kbps) / 8
Note: The maximum fragment size is limited to 1500 bytes.
Table 8‐1 below shows the relationship between maximum fragment delay and maximum fragment size. Italicized figures indicate bytes.
Each MLPPP packet includes one fragment with an additional HDLC header (2 bytes), PID (2 bytes), MLPPP header (2/4 bytes for short/long sequence number format) and FCS (2 bytes).
The actual fragment size will be decided after the load balance over member link is taken into account and should not exceed the maximum fragment size allowed. When the command is XSR CLI Reference Guide
8-115
Multilink PPP Commands
entered, no maximum fragment size will be set and the fragment size will only be decided with the load balance. Table 8-1
Maximum Fragment Size (bytes)/Fragment Delay (ms)
Link Speed
Fragment Delay (ms)
5 ms
10 ms
20 ms
50 ms
100 ms
500 ms
1000 ms
56 kbps
35
70
140
280
560
1120
1500
64 kbps
40
80
160
320
640
1280
1500
128 kbps
80
160
320
640
1280
1500
1500
256 kbps
160
320
640
1280
1500
1500
1500
512 kbps
320
640
1280
1500
1500
1500
1500
768 kbps
640
1280
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1536 kbps
1280
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
2024 kbps
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
1500
Syntax
ppp multilink fragment-delay value
value
Delay interval ranging from 10 to 1000 in milliseconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes the fragment‐delay setting:
no ppp multilink fragment-delay
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
10 milliseconds
Example
The following example sets the fragment‐delay to 30 milliseconds on the Dialer 2 interface:
XSR(config-if<D2>)#ppp multilink fragment-delay 30
8-116
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
Multilink PPP Commands
ppp multilink fragment disable
This command disables fragmentation over a bundle PPP connection, supporting Multilink and Dialer interfaces.
Syntax
ppp multilink fragment disable
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command enables fragmentation (default mode):
no ppp multilink fragment disable
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
Enabled
Examples
The following example disables fragmentation over Multilink interface 1: XSR(config-if<M1>)#ppp multilink fragment disable
Display Examples
The following examples display fragmentation settings by the show interface multilink
command:
XSR#show interface multilink 1
********** Multilink Interface Stats **********
Multilink 1 is Admin Up
Internet address is 30.30.30.2, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
LCP
State: OPENED
IPCP
State: OPENED
Multilink
State: OPENED
Multi-Class State: OPENED
Multilink header format is LONG SEQ NUM
Class suspendable level is 5 tx classes and 5 rcv classes
Fragmentation is disabled
……
The following example displays fragmentation settings by the show ppp interface multilink command:
XSR#show ppp interface multilink 1
********** MLPPP Bundle Stats **********
Multilink 1: MLPPP is Admin Up / Oper Up
XSR CLI Reference Guide
8-117
Multilink PPP Commands
Group Num: 1
LCP
State:
IPCP
State:
Multilink
State:
Multi-Class State:
OPENED
OPENED
OPENED
OPENED
Multilink header format is LONG SEQ NUM
Class suspendable level is 5 tx classes and 5 rcv classes
Fragmentation is disabled
Bundle Size:
2
Class Level Tx:
5
Rx:
5
Max Load Threshold:
0
Bundle Tx Load Avg:
0
Bundle Rx Load Avg:
0
No Of Pck in Rx Buf Q: 0
Lowest link Speed:
1536000
Max Fragment Size:
Not Set
High Pri Member link is Serial 2/0:0
……
The following example displays fragmentation settings:
XSR# show ppp interface multilink 1 multiclass
********** MLPPP Bundle MultiClass Stats **********
Multilink 1: MLPPP is Admin Up / Oper Up
Group Num: 1
LCP
State: OPENED
IPCP
State: OPENED
Multilink
State: OPENED
Multi-Class State: OPENED
Multilink header format is LONG SEQ NUM
Class suspendable level is 5 tx classes and 5 rcv classes
Fragmentation is disabled
Max Fragment Size is not set
ppp multilink group
This command configures a PPP link and assigns it to or removes it from a specified PPP Multilink bundle. It applies only to interfaces that can configure a bundle interface including multilink, dialer, and ISDN BRI or PRI interfaces.
Syntax
multilink group 1 - 32767
1 - 32767
8-118
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
Designation of the PPP multilink group.
Multilink PPP Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the PPP multilink group:
no multilink-group
Default
Disabled with no specific multilink group assigned
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Examples
The following example assigns PPP link Serial interface 1/1 to the PPP multilink group 20:
XSR(config-if<S1/1>)#multilink group 20
The next example also assigns PPP link Serial interface 1/1 to the PPP multilink group 20:
XSR(config-if<S1/1>)#ppp multilink group 20
multilink load-threshold
This command sets the multilink load threshold which triggers the dialer to add or delete a link from the multilink bundle. It should be configured on the called side of a connection only. This command effects Bandwidth‐on‐Demand (BoD) on the XSR.
In determining whether to trigger the dialer, the XSR monitors only the bundle load. The load threshold provides the dialer with a trigger to add or delete the multilink member link from the member link bundle. The load is sampled every second and averaged over an 8‐second period. Triggering is delayed for 10 seconds when the load surpasses or falls below the threshold.
Triggering is generated when:
•
Either the inbound or outbound traffic surpasses the threshold; or
•
Both inbound and outbound traffic fall below the threshold.
No triggering is generated when:
•
The number of member links is already equal to the max‐links value set on the bundle when the load surpasses the threshold; and •
The number of the links is already equal to the min‐links value set on the bundle when the load falls below the threshold.
The multilink load-threshold command is the second means by which the XSR controls traffic via BoD. It is also provided by setting the multilink min-links command, which is the first means by which the XSR controls traffic. A third means used to effect BoD is by use of the Bandwidth Allocation Protocol (BAP) which is activated by several ppp bap commands. BAP negotiates with the peer to add or drop a link, and can request a phone number from a central repository with the ppp bap number command.
Note: To avoid unexpected behavior, configure this command on one peer only. If it is set on both
peers, their threshold values should match.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
8-119
Multilink PPP Commands
Syntax
multilink load-threshold number (1-255)
1-255
Load on the port: 255 indicates it has reached 100% of bandwidth.
Default
255
Mode
Dialer Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following example sets the multilink PPP load threshold to 250 on the terminating Dialer interface:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 4
XSR(config-<D4>)#multilink load-threshold 250
ppp multilink multi-class
This command enables Multi‐Class MLPPP (Multilink PPP) for the Multilink PPP header format providing Quality of Service (QoS) for selected packets between peers. It supports five streams of sequence numbers, the long sequence format by default, and the short sequence number by negotiation. Any class lower than the default requested by the peer will be accepted, and higher than the default will eventually trigger a reject message if the value is accepted by the peer.
Syntax
ppp multilink multi-class
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables multi‐class MLPPP:
no ppp multilink multi-class
Defaults
•
Long sequence number
•
Accept negotiation for short sequence number
•
Accept any suspendable (class) level less than or equal to 5
•
Disabled
Mode
Dialer or Multilink Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
8-120
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
Multilink PPP Commands
Example
The following example enables the multi‐class MLPPP option:
XSR(config-if<D57>)#ppp multilink multi-class
XSR CLI Reference Guide
8-121
Multilink Show Commands
Multilink Show Commands
show interface multilink
This command displays multilink interface statistics including MLPPP status for both the bundle and the member link.
Syntax
show interface multilink [number]
card/port
The ML interface port for viewing link status, statistics and configuration data.
number
Logical interfaces.
Mode
EXEC: XSR>
Sample Output
Thefollowing is sample output for Multilink interface 8:
XSR>show interface multilink 8
********** Multilink Interface Stats **********
Multilink 8: MLPPP is Admin Up / Oper Up
Group Num: 8
LCP
State: OPENED
IPCP
State: OPENED
Multilink
State: OPENED
Multi-Class State: OPENED
Multilink header format is LONG SEQ NUM
Class suspendable level is 5 tx classes and 5 rcv classes
Max Fragment delay is 10 ms
MLPPP Bundle Info:
Control Object state is Admin Down / Oper Down
Multilink PPP has no memberlinks
Data Object state is Admin Down
The adjacent is DOWN and data passing is
Bundle size is 0
Max Load Threshold: 0
Total Load Bandwidth is 64000 bits/sec
Bundle Stats
Rx: Total
0, TX: Total
Data
0,
Data
Ctrl
0,
Ctrl
Null
0,
Null
Drop
0,
Drop
Rx Load BW Avg
0, Max
0, Min
0
Tx Load BW Avg
0, Max
0, Min
0
8-122
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
FALSE
0
0
0
0
0
Multilink Show Commands
PPP Multilink Status
LCP State
Range
INITIAL/ STARTING/ CLOSED/ STOPPED/ CLOSING/ STOPPING/ REQSENT/ ACKRCVD/ ACKSENT/ OPENED
Description
LCP state. Refer to RFC‐1661 for details.
IPCP State
Range
INITIAL/ STARTING/ CLOSED/ STOPPED/ CLOSING/ STOPPING/
REQSENT/ ACKRCVD/ ACKSENT/ OPENED
Description
IPCP state. Refer to RFC‐1332 for details.
Multilink State
Range
OPENED/CLOSED
Description
MLPPP state, OPENED if negotiation with peer successful; CLOSED otherwise.
Multi-Class State
Range
OPENED/CLOSED
Description
Multi‐Class state, OPENED if negotiation is successful with the peer; CLOSED otherwise.
Bundle Size
Range
1‐256
Description
Number of member links under the bundle.
Class Level Tx/Rx
Range
1‐5
Description
Multi‐Class level after negotiation. 1 for multi‐class disabled.
Max Load Threshold
Range
0‐255
Description
Zero (0) indicates load threshold monitoring is disabled.
Bundle Tx/Rx Load Avg
Range
0‐255
Description
Average loading of Tx/Rx loading. 255 = 100% loading against the bandwith.
No Of Pck in Rx Buf Q
Range
Not defined.
Description
Number of packets in the rx forwarding buffer.
Lowest link Speed
Range
Not defined.
Description
Lowest speed link under the bundle for calculating the maximum fragment size.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
8-123
Multilink Show Commands
Max Fragment Size
Range
Not defined.
Description
Maximum fragment size over the member links.
High Pri Member link is Serial 1/00
Range
Not defined.
Description
Highest speed link under the bundle. Used to transmit the control packet.
PPP Multilink Bundle Statistics
Rx Stats
Total
Sum of packets received under the bundle including data, control, Null content packet and the discarded packet.
Data
Sum of data packets received under the bundle.
Control
Sum of control packets received under the bundle.
Null
Sum of Null content packets received under the bundle, used for synchronizing tx/rx sequence number.
Discard Pck Too Sum of packets discarded because size is too long, up to 1504 bytes.
Long
Invalid Proto
Sum of packets discarded because protocol field is invalid for PPP.
Wrong Proto
Sum of packets discarded because protocol field is wrong for MLPPP.
Padding Error
Sum of packets discarded because padding size is wrong.
Invalid Cls#
Sum of packets discarded because class number greater than class level negotiated.
Error to CP
Sum of internal messages lost.
No Lower Lyr
Sum of packets discarded because lower layer is not ready.
No Upper Lyr
Sum of packets discarded because upper layer is not ready.
Others
Sum of packets discarded due to errors recorded in classes or member links.
Tx Stats
8-124
Total
Sum of packets transmitted under the bundle including data, control, Null content, and discarded packets.
Data
Sum of data packets transmitteded under the bundle.
Control
Sum of control packets transmitted under the bundle.
Null Sum of Null content packets transmitted under the bundle. Used for synchronizing the tx/rx sequence number.
Discard Pck Too Long
Sum of packets discarded because the size is too long, up to 1504 bytes..
No Lower Lyr
Sum of packets discarded because the lower layer is not ready.
EnQueue Full
Sum of packets discarded because the transmission queue is full.
Others
Sum of packets discarded due to error recorded in classes or member links.
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
Multilink Show Commands
show ppp interface multilink/dialer
This command displays PPP status, statistics and configuration data for interfaces running PPP.
Syntax
show ppp interface [interface type/number][option type]
interface type
Dialer or multilink interface upon which MLPPP can be configured
number
Designation for multilink or dialer interface.
option type
Available options including the following:
none
Display general MLPPP status and statistics.
multi-class
Display Multi‐Class related information.
bap
Display BAP‐related information.
memberlink
Display multilink member link‐related information
Mode
EXEC: XSR>
Sample Output
The following example displays output without Multi‐Class configured:
********** MLPPP Bundle Stats **********
Multilink 8: MLPPP is Admin Up Open Up
Group Num: 8
LCP
State: OPENED
IPCP
State: OPENED
Multilink
State: OPENED
Multi-Class State: CLOSED
Bundle Size:
1
Class Level Tx:
1
Rx:
1
Max Load Threshold:
0
Bundle Tx Load Avg:
0
Bundle Rx Load Avg:
0
No Of Pck in Rx Buf Q: 0
Lowest link Speed:
1984000
Max Fragment Size:
256
High Pri Member link is Serial 1/0:0
Rx Stats
Total:
Data:
Control:
Null:
Discard:
Pck Too Long:
0
0
0
0
0
XSR CLI Reference Guide
8-125
Multilink Show Commands
Invalid Proto:
Wrong Proto:
Padding Error:
Invalid Cls#:
Error to CP:
No Lower Lyr:
No Upper Lyr:
Others:
Tx Stats
Total:
Data:
Control:
Null:
Discard:
Pck Too Long:
No Lower Lyr:
EnQueue Full:
Others:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
The following is is sample output with Multi‐Class configured:
********** MLPPP Bundle Stats **********
Multilink 8: MLPPP is Admin Up / Oper Up
Group Num: 8
LCP
State: OPENED
IPCP
State: OPENED
Multilink
State: OPENED
Multi-Class State: OPENED
Multilink header format is LONG SEQ NUM
Class suspendable level is 5 tx classes and 5 rcv classes
Max Fragment delay is 10 ms
Bundle Size:
1
Class Level Tx:
5
Rx:
5
Max Load Threshold:
0
Bundle Tx Load Avg:
0
Bundle Rx Load Avg:
0
No Of Pck in Rx Buf Q: 0
Lowest link Speed:
1984000
Max Fragment Size:
256
High Pri Member link is Serial 1/0:0
Rx Stats
Total:
Data:
Control:
Null:
Discard:
8-126
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
0
0
0
0
Multilink Show Commands
Pck Too Long:
Invalid Proto:
Wrong Proto:
Padding Error:
Invalid Cls#:
Error to CP:
No Lower Lyr:
No Upper Lyr:
Others:
Tx Stats
Total:
Data:
Control:
Null:
Discard:
Pck Too Long:
No Lower Lyr:
EnQueue Full:
Others:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Refer to the show interface multilink command page 122 for parameter descriptions.
show ppp interface multilink/dialer multi-class
This command displays Multi‐Class MLPPP status and statistics.
Syntax
show ppp interface [type | type number] multi-class
type
Multilink or Dialer interfaces upon which PPP is running.
number
Designation for either Multilink or Dialer interfaces.
Mode
EXEC: XSR>
Sample Output
The following example displays output of this command:
********** MLPPP Bundle MultiClass Stats **********
Multilink 1: MLPPP is Admin Up / Oper Up
Group Num: 1
LCP
State: OPENED
IPCP
State: OPENED
Multilink
State: OPENED
Multi-Class State: OPENED
Multilink header format is LONG SEQ NUM
Class suspendable level is 5 tx classes and 5 rcv classes
XSR CLI Reference Guide
8-127
Multilink Show Commands
Max Fragment delay is 10 ms
Max Fragment Size is 256 bytes
Class
QoSCls#
ExpctSeq#
LastFwdSeq#
LastM#
maxFListSize
FragListSize
TxSeq#
TxBufferSize
Rx Load
Average
Max
Min
Tx Load
Average
Max
Min
Rx Stats:
Total
Discard
SeqError
FListFull
Seq<Exp
NoBgnFlg
AddFgFail
CleanQ
Tx Stats:
Total
Discard
CleanQ
QFull
0
-1
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
4
3
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
PPP Multilink Multi-Class Bundle Parameter Descriptions
Class
Range
0 ‐ 4
Description
Suspendable class level ‐ 0: default class lowest level: 4: highest level.
QoSCls#
Range
8-128
‐1 ‐ 3
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
Multilink Show Commands
Description
Equivalent QoS class, •
•
•
•
•
-1: fair class.
0: low priority class.
1: normal priority class.
2: medium priority class.
3: high priority class.
ExpctSeq#
Range
‐1 ‐ 16777215
Description
Next expected sequence number of receiving fragment for this class.
LastFwdSeq#
Range
‐1 ‐ 16777215
Description
Last forwarded sequence number of the fragment of this class to the upper layer.
LastM#
Range
‐1 ‐ 16777215
Description
Last M (the smallest received sequence number) of all the member links in this class to the upper layer.
MaxFListSize
Range
Not defined.
Description
Maximum receive fragment reassemble list size for this class. Reset when a show command is issued.
FragListSize
Range
Not defined.
Description
Current receive fragment reassemble list size for this class.
TxSeq#
Range
‐1 ‐ 16777215
Description
Last sequence number transmitted in this class.
TxBufferSize
Range
0‐1
Description
Current transmit buffer size for this class.
Tx/Rx Load
Average/Max/Min
Range
0‐255
Description
Transmit/receive load for this class against the total bandwidth, 255=100%
XSR CLI Reference Guide
8-129
Multilink Show Commands
Rx Stats
Total
Sum of fragments received for this class.
Discard Seq Error
Sum of received fragments discarded for this class because sequence number is out of order.
FlistFull
Sum of received fragments discarded for this class because fragment list is full.
Seq<Exp
Sum of received fragment discarded for this class because sequence number is less than expected.
NoBgnFlg
Sum of received fragments discarded for this class because no BEGIN flag detected.
AddFgFail
Sum of received fragments discarded for this class because fragment cannot be added into fragment list.
CleanQ
Sum of received fragments discarded for this class while cleaning the interface.
Tx Stats
Total
Sum of fragments transmitted for this class.
Discard CleanQ
Sum of transmission fragments discarded for this class while cleaning port.
Qfull
Sum of transmission fragments discarded for this class because transmission queue is full.
show ppp interface multilink/dialer memberlink
This command displays general member link statistics under MLPPP or specific member link statistics if specified.
Syntax
show ppp interface multilink <1-32767> memberlink [type number]
show ppp interface dialer <1-256> memberlink [type number]
Parameters
type
Interface type serial. If serial is specified, only this serial member link statistics display, otherwise all member link data display.
number
Card/port numbers for a serial interface. Card/port:channel numbers for serial channel groups.
Mode
EXEC: XSR>
Sample Output
The following example displays output of this command:
********** MLPPP Member Link Stats **********
Multilink 1: MLPPP is Admin Up / Oper Up
Group Num: 1
LCP
State: OPENED
8-130
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
Multilink Show Commands
IPCP
Multilink
Multi-Class
State: OPENED
State: OPENED
State: OPENED
Multilink header format is LONG SEQ NUM
Class suspendable level is 5 tx classes and 5 rcv classes
Serial 1/0:0
Tx: Total
Rx: Total
0
0
Discard
Discard
0(0/0)
0
PPP Multilink Member Link Paremeter Descriptions
The detail of transmit/receive statistics for the member link
Serial 1/00
Name of the member link.
Tx
Total
Sum of fragments transmitted over this member link.
Discard
Sum of transmitting fragments discarded over this member due to invalid length or no lower layer.
Rx
Total
Sum of fragments received over this member link.
Discard
Sum of received fragments discarded over this member link.
show ppp interface multilink/dialer memberlink multi-class
This command displays multi‐class statistics on the member link under MLPP.
Syntax
show ppp interface multilink <1-32767> memberlink multi-class <type number>
show ppp interface dialer <1-256> memberlink multi-class <type number>
Parameters
type
Interface type Serial. If serial is specified, only this serial member link statistics display, otherwise all member link data display.
number
Card/port numbers for a Serial port. Card/port:channel numbers for Serial channel groups.
Mode
EXEC: XSR>
Sample Output
The following example displays output of this command:
XSR CLI Reference Guide
8-131
Multilink Show Commands
********** MLPPP Member Link MultiClassStats **********
Multilink 1: MLPPP is Admin Up / Oper Up
Group Num: 1
LCP
State: OPENED
IPCP
State: OPENED
Multilink
State: OPENED
Multi-Class State: OPENED
Multilink header format is LONG SEQ NUM
Class suspendable level is 5 tx classes and 5 rcv classes
Class
Serial 1/0:0
LastRxSeq#
LastTxSeq#
Rx Stats:
Total
Discard
FListFull
Seq#Err
Seq<Expt
NoBegin
AddFrgFail
CleanQ
Tx Stats:
Total
Discard
CleanQ
QFull
0
1
2
3
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
PPP Multilink Member Link Multi-Class Parameter Descriptions
Class
Range
0 ‐ 4
Description
Level of suspendable class, 0 default class lowest suspendable level 4 the highest suspendable level
Serial 1/00
Name of the member link.
LastRXSeq#
Range
‐1 ‐ 16777215
Description
Last sequence number of fragment sent over the member link for this class.
LastRXSeq#
8-132
Range
‐1 ‐ 16777215
Description
Last sequence number of fragment received over the member link for this class.
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
Multilink Show Commands
Rx Stats
Total
Sum of fragments received for this class.
Discard SeqError
Sum of received fragments discarded for this class because sequence number is out of order over this member link.
FlistFull
Sum of received fragments discarded for this class over this member link because fragment list is full.
Seq<Exp
Sum of received fragments discarded for this class over this member link because sequence number is less than expected.
NoBgnFlg
Sum of received fragments discarded for this class over this member link because no BEGIN flag is deteced.
AddFgFail
Sum of received fragments discarded for this class over this member link because fragment can not be added to the fragment list.
CleanQ
Sum of received fragments discarded for this class over this member link while cleaning the interface.
Tx Stats
Total
Sum of fragments transmitted for this class under this member link.
Discard CleanQ
Sum of transmission fragments discarded for this class under this member link during interface cleaning.
Qfull
Sum of transmission fragments discarded for this class under this member link because transmission queue is full.
show ppp interface dialer x mlpppgroup x bap
This command displays BAP multilink bundle statistics of a specific bundle under the dialer interface. You can view individual multilink bundles when more than one exists on the dialer interface.
Syntax
show ppp interface dialer <number> mlpppgroup <number> bap
number
Dialer interface number, ranging from 0 to 255.
number
Multilink bundle number, ranging from 0 to 255.
Mode
EXEC: XSR>
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the command:
********** MLPPP Bundle Stats **********
Dialer1: MLPPP is Admin Up / Oper Up
Group Num: 1
LCP
State: OPENED
IPCP
State: OPENED
XSR CLI Reference Guide
8-133
Multilink Show Commands
BACP
State: OPENED
Multilink
State: OPENED
Multi-Class State: OPENED
Multilink header format is LONG SEQ NUM
Class suspendable level is 5 tx classes and 5
Max Fragment delay is 10 ms
Bundle Size:
20
Class Level Tx:
5
Rx:
5
Max Load Threshold:
100
Bundle Tx Load Avg:
0
Bundle Rx Load Avg:
0
No Of Pck in Rx Buf Q: 0
Lowest link Speed:
64000
Max Fragment Size:
64
High Pri Member link is Serial 3/2/0:10
Rx Stats
Total:
Data:
Control:
Null:
Discard:
Pck Too Long:
Invalid Proto:
Wrong Proto:
Padding Error:
Invalid Cls#:
Error to CP:
No Lower Lyr:
No Upper Lyr:
Others:
Tx Stats
Total:
Data:
Control:
Null:
Discard:
Pck Too Long:
No Lower Lyr:
EnQueue Full:
Others:
20137
19103
2
1032
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
18
10891
9799
42
1050
0
0
0
0
BAP information:
Local has precedence
Rcv Call-Req:
8-134
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
0
Multilink Show Commands
Rcv Call-ReqAck:
Rcv CallBack-Req:
Rcv CallBack-ReqAck:
Rcv LinkDrop-Req:
Rcv LinkDrop-ReqAck:
Tx Call-Req:
Tx Call-ReqAck:
Tx CallBack-Req:
Tx CallBack-ReqAck:
Tx LinkDrop-Req:
Tx LinkDrop-ReqAck:
Discriminators
Serial 3/2/0:26
Serial 3/2/0:30
Serial 3/2/0:29
Serial 3/2/0:28
Serial 3/2/0:27
Serial 3/2/0:25
Serial 3/2/0:24
Serial 3/2/0:23
Serial 3/2/0:22
Serial 3/2/0:21
Serial 3/2/0:20
Serial 3/2/0:14
Serial 3/2/0:19
Serial 3/2/0:18
19
0
0
0
0
20
0
0
0
0
0
Local
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Remote
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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Multilink Show Commands
8-136
Configuring the Point-to-Point Protocol
9
Configuring Frame Relay
Observing Syntax and Conventions
CLI command syntax and conventions use the notation described below.
Convention
Description
xyz
Key word or mandatory parameters (bold)
[x]
[ ] Square brackets indicate an optional parameter (italic)
[x | y | z]
[ | ] Square brackets with vertical bar indicate a choice of values
{x | y | z}
{ | } Braces with vertical bar indicate a choice of a required value
[x {y | z} ]
[{ | } ] Combination of square brackets with braces and vertical bars indicates a
required choice of an optional parameter
(config-if<xx>)
xx signifies the interface type, class map, policy map or other value you specify;
e.g., F1, G3, M57, S2/1.0, Node Name., DLCI class name
Next Mode entries display the CLI prompt after a command is entered.
soho.enterasys.com
Italicized, non-syntactic text indicates either a user-specified entry or text with
special emphasis
Frame Relay Commands
This chapter describes the configurable features of the Frame Relay interface for the XSR in the following command subsets:
•
“Frame Relay Map Class Commands” on page 9‐95
•
“Frame Relay Clear and Show Commands” on page 9‐102
encapsulation frame-relay
This command enables Frame Relay encapsulation on an interface using IETF (RFC‐2427) encapsulation format. When connecting to non‐XSR servers, be sure the remote end is configured for IETF encapsulation unless the remote end can handle IETF‐formatted Frame Relay headers. Other routers may be configured using the following command: encapsulation frame-relay IETF
Note: If encapsulation is changed from one type to another, all related values of the current
encapsulation and any sub-interface settings are deleted. Also, once encapsulation is set on an
interface, any sub-interface of that port created later is automatically encapsulated. Finally, you must
first enter the no encapsulation command to change the encapsulation type.
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Frame Relay Commands
Syntax
encapsulation frame-relay
Syntax of the “no” Form
Disable Frame Relay encapsulation on the interface with the no form:
no encapsulation frame-relay
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
This example sets Frame Relay encapsulation on interface serial 1/0:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation frame-relay
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
frame-relay class
This command associates a map class to an interface or sub‐interface. It can be applied to both Frame Relay interfaces and sub‐interfaces. Note: Frame Relay traffic shaping must be enabled on the interface for this command to be
effective.
Each virtual circuit (DLCI) created on the interface or sub‐interface inherits all relevant parameters defined in the named map class. For each virtual circuit, the precedence rules are as follows:
•
Use the map class associated with the virtual circuit if it is configured:
frame-relay interface-dlci dlci-num
class map-class-name
•
If not, use the map class associated with the sub‐interface if the map class exists:
interface serial 1/0.1 point
frame-relay class sub-interface-map-class-name
•
If not, use the map class associated with the interface if the map class exists:
interface serial 1/0
frame-relay class interface-map-class-name
•
If not, use the interface default parameters (CIR: 56 kbps, Bc and Be: 7000 bits, adaptive shaping: disabled and service‐policy: not set).
Syntax
frame-relay class name
name
9-84
Configuring Frame Relay
Name of the map class.
Frame Relay Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form removes the association of the map class to the interface or sub‐interface:
no frame-relay class name
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following commands set Frame Relay map classes fastlink and normlink with an outbound CIR value of 56 kbps and 25.6 kbps, respectively:
XSR(config)#map-class frame-relay fastlink
XSR(config-map-class<fastlink>)#frame-relay cir out 56000
XSR(config)#map-class frame-relay normlink
XSR(config-map-class<normlink>)#frame-relay cir out 25600
The following commands direct serial link 1/0 to use QoS values from the normlink map class unless explicitly overridden.
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation frame-relay
XSR(config-map-class<fastlink>)#frame-relay traffic-shaping
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay class normlink
The following commands configure sub‐interface serial 1/0.2 to use a different map class (fastlink) than that specified for serial 1/0.
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0.2 point-to-point
XSR(config-subif<S1/0.2>)#no shutdown
XSR(config-subif<S1/0.2>)#frame-relay class fastlink
frame-relay interface-dlci
This command assigns a data‐link connection identifier (DLCI) to a specified Frame Relay sub‐
interface. It is used for sub‐interfaces only. When you invoke this command, you enter Frame Relay DLCI Interface mode. This provides the following command options, which must be used with the relevant class names you previously assigned:
•
class name ‐ assigns a map class to a DLCI.
•
no class name ‐ cancels the relevant class.
•
exit ‐ quits Frame Relay DLCI interface mode.
If you attempt to create a DLCI which has already been configured, the following sample warning will be issued:
DLCI 43 is already configured on sub-interface 3
Note: You must delete an existing DLCI before the same DLCI can be created on a different subinterface of the Frame Relay interface.
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Frame Relay Commands
Once chosen as static, no inverse ARP will be sent out by default. A free inverse ARP request (similar to above) can be requested by this command.
Once chosen as static, this DLCI can be made to respond to a broadcast bootp message entering on this DLCI from the frame‐relay network. Non‐broadcast bootp will still be sent to the local DHCP server or relayed to the IP helper address server..
Notes: The remote site must support sending inverse-arp responses or the interface will come
down.
An inverse arp is sent from the XSR at a rate of 1 every 4 seconds. It is not configurable.
Syntax
frame-relay interface-dlci nn [[keep-alive nn [gratuitous-inverse-arp]] |
[gratuitous-inverse-arp [keep-alive nn]] | [ip A.B.C.D [[bootp [[gratuitousinverse-arp [keep-alive nn]] | [keep-alive nn [gratuitous-inverse-arp]]]] |
[gratuitous-inverse-arp [[bootp [keep-alive nn]] | [keep-alive nn [bootp]]]] |
[keep-alive nn [[gratuitous-inverse-arp [bootp]] | [bootp [gratuitous-inversearp]]]]]]]
interface-dlci
nn
DLCI number for the sub‐interface, ranging from 16 to 1007. For the Point‐
to‐Point (P2P) sub‐interface type, only one DLCI is allowed. For Point‐to‐
Multi‐Point (P2MP) you can configure multiple DLCIs.
gratuitousinverse-arp
Sends inverse ARP request and ignores a response. This parameter occurs for non‐static IP mapping. P2P sub‐interfaces will generate a free inverse arp to allow the remote side to learn the IP address of this sub‐interface. This parameter is useful only for P2P sub‐interfaces, since Point‐to‐MultiPoint interfaces withdynamic IP resolution will always inverse ARP to learnthe remote nodeʹs IP address. Omitting this value in a P2P sub‐interface prevents sending an inverse‐arp request. An inverse‐arp responseis always sent when an inverse‐arp request is received. Broadcast bootp is not supported in dynamic mode. Allbootp request in this mode are forwarded.
ip
Protocol type to set static IP address to DLCI mapping.
A.B.C.D
Static IP address of peer node. No address checking done.
bootp
Respond to a broadcast bootp request with static IP address (used for Remote Auto Install Central Site).
gratuitousinverse-arp
Sends inverse ARP request. Response is ignored. Valid for both MP2P & P2P sub‐interfaces.
keep-alive nn
nn refers to the duration that a DLCI under a P2P interface will wait with no traffic being received before sending an inverse‐arp packet to confirm that the remote side is still present. The nn range is 10 to 600 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no command to delete the DLCI from the specified sub‐interface:
no frame-relay interface-dlci dlci-num
Mode
Sub‐interface configuration: XSR(config-subif<xx>)#
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Configuring Frame Relay
Frame Relay Commands
Next Mode
Frame Relay DLCI configuration: XSR(config-fr-dlci<xx>)#
Examples
The following example maps DLCIs 16 and 18 on serial sub‐interface 1/0.1 to the specified IP addresses, supporting bootp and sending a free inverse ARP. Also, DLCI 17 is configured on sub‐
interface 1/0.2, a free inverse ARP is sent, and emote keep‐alive is supported in P2P mode.
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0.1 multi-point
XSR(config-subif)#ip helper 10.10.1.2
XSR(config-subif)#ip address 133.133.1.1 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 16 ip 133.133.1.2 gratuitousinverse-arp bootp
XSR(config-fr-dlci)#frame-relay interface-dlci 18 ip 133.133.1.3 bootp
XSR(config-fr-dlci)#no shutdown
XSR(config-fr-dlci)#interface serial 1/0.2 point-to-point
XSR(config-subif)#ip helper 10.10.1.2
XSR(config-subif)#ip address 133.134.1.1 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 17 gratuitous-inverse-arp keep-alive
30
XSR(config-fr-dlci)#no shutdown
frame-relay intf-type
This command defines the Frame Relay interface type for the interface. The XSR works as a UNI device only, with DTE or DCE as valid entries.
Syntax
frame-relay intf-type {dte | dce}
dte
Specifies the XSR to act as a Frame Relay DTE UNI device.
dce
Specifies the XSR to act as a Frame Relay DCE UNI device.
Syntax of the “no” Form
no frame-relay intf-type {dte | dce}
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Default
dte
Examples
The following example configures Serial interface 1/0 to act as a Frame Relay DTE, and to use the ANSI Annex‐D LMI:
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Frame Relay Commands
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation frame-relay
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay intf-type dte
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi
The following example configures Serial interface 1/0 to act as a Frame Relay DCE, and to use the ANSI Annex‐D LMI:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation frame-relay
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay intf-type dce
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi
frame-relay lmi-t391dte
This command sets the interval between LMI Link Integrity Verification (LIV) message transmissions on the Data Terminal Equipment (DTE) interface.
Note: On third-party devices, the LMI LIV period may be configured using the KeepAlive
configuration on the interface.
Syntax
frame-relay lmi-t391dte period_in_sec
period_ in_sec
Sets the interval between LMI LIV polls, ranging from 5 to 330 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no command to restore the default interval value:
no frame-relay lmi-t391dte
Default
10
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
Refer to the example in the lmi-n391dte command on page 89.
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Configuring Frame Relay
Frame Relay Commands
frame-relay lmi-n391dte
This command sets the full status‐polling interval when the Digital Terminal Equipment (DTE) interface is configured to set the full status message‐polling interval.
Syntax
frame-relay lmi-n391dte num_ka-exchanges
num_ka-exchanges
Number of keep‐alive exchanges to occur before requesting a full status message, ranging from 1 to 255.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command restores the default interval value:
no frame-relay lmi-n391dte
Default
6
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
This example establishes that a status inquiry will be sent every five seconds and that one of every ten status inquiries generated will request a full status response from the Frame Relay switch. The other nine status inquiries will request keep‐alive exchanges only:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation frame-relay
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay intf-type dte
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay lmi-n391dte 10
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay lmi-t391dte 5
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
frame-relay lmi-n392dce
This command sets the error threshold on a Data Communications Equipment (DCE) interface.
Syntax
frame-relay lmi-n392dce threshold
threshold
Error threshold, ranging from 1 to 10.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the current setting:
no frame-relay lmi-n392dce
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Frame Relay Commands
Default
3
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
This example sets the LMI failure threshold to 5 for the DCE device:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation frame-relay
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay intf-type dce
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay lmi-n392dce 5
frame-relay lmi-n392dte
This command sets the error threshold on a Data Terminal Equipment (DTE) interface.
Syntax
frame-relay lmi-n392dte threshold
threshold
Error threshold, ranging from 1 to 10.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no command to remove the current setting:
no frame-relay lmi-n392dte
Default
3
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following example sets the LMI failure threshold to 5 for the DTE device:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation frame-relay
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay intf-type dte
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay lmi-n392dte 5
9-90
Configuring Frame Relay
Frame Relay Commands
frame-relay lmi-t392dce
This command sets polling verification timer on a Data Communications Equipment (DCE) interface. The timer marks the duration that the DCE expects to receive a Status Enquiry from a DTE device.
Syntax
frame-relay lmi-t392dce period_in_sec
events
Interval to wait for a Status Enquiry, ranging from 5 to 30 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command restores the default interval:
no frame-relay lmi-t392dce
Default
15 seconds
Example
The following example sets the DCE to wait 20 seconds for a status enquiry from the DTE before declaring an error event:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation frame-relay
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay intf-type dce
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay lmi-t392dce 20
frame-relay lmi-n392dce
This command sets the error threshold on a Data Communications Equipment (DCE) interface.
Syntax
frame-relay lmi-n392dce threshold
threshold
Error threshold, ranging from 1 to 10.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the current setting:
no frame-relay lmi-n392dce
Default
3
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Frame Relay Commands
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
This example sets the LMI failure threshold to 5 for the DCE device:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation frame-relay
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay intf-type dce
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay lmi-n392dce 5
frame-relay lmi-n393dce
This command sets the monitored event count on a Data Communications Equipment (DCE) interface.
Syntax
frame-relay lmi-n393dce events
events
Value of monitored events count ranging from 1 to 10.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the current setting:
no frame-relay lmi-n393dce
Default
4
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
This example sets the LMI monitored events count to 10 on serial port 1/0:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation frame-relay
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay lmi-n393dce 10
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Configuring Frame Relay
Frame Relay Commands
frame-relay lmi-type
This command configures the Local Management Interface (LMI) type on a per‐interface basis.
Syntax
frame-relay lmi-type {ilmi | ansi | q933a | auto | none}
ilmi
Interim LMI (FRF 1.1).
ansi
Annex D defined by American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard T1.617.
q933a
ITU‐T Q.933 Annex A.
auto
The port will attempt to detect and match the LMI type used by the attached Frame Relay switch.
none
No LMI used. This is meant to test or connect XSRs directly.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no command to return to the default LMI type:
no frame-relay lmi-type {ilmi | ansi | q933a | auto | none}
Default
auto
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
This example sets serial interface 1/0 to use the ANSI Annex‐D LMI:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation frame-relay
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
frame-relay traffic-shaping
This command enables map‐class parameters for all Permanent Virtual Circuits (PVCs) on a Frame Relay port. For virtual circuits which have no specific traffic shaping or queuing parameters specified, a set of default values is used.
Syntax
frame-relay traffic-shaping
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Frame Relay Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command disables the use of map‐class parameters:
no frame-relay traffic-shaping
Default
Disable
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
This example enables both traffic shaping and per‐virtual circuit queuing:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation frame-relay
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#frame-relay traffic-shaping
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
interface
This command selects a physical port for configuration as a router interface. The XSR supports FastEthernet or GigabitEthernet, serial, and T1/E1/ISDN‐PRI physical ports. For configuration purposes, all serial ports and T1/E1/ISDN‐PRI channel groups are treated as a serial port.
Optionally, you can set up the Console port as a WAN interface for dial backup purposes (refer to the Caution below).
Caution: Be aware that when you enable the Console port as a WAN port, you can no longer
directly connect to it because it is in data communication mode. Your only access to the CLI will
be to Telnet to an IP address of a configured port. Also, if your startup-config file does not
configure any ports properly and sets up the console port as a serial interface, you will no longer
be able to login and will have to press the Default button to erase your configuration.
Syntax
interface serial port_num interface_num
port_num
interface
_num
The physical port and interface number. An interface number for a serial interface can be comprised of: card_num/NIM_num/port_within_NIM. For example, 0/1/2 sets physical port 2 on the NIM card in slot 1 of the motherboard. Leading zeros in interface_num can be omitted. So 0/1/2 is the same as 1/2.
If the serial port resides on a T1/E1 port, then channel group data must be added at the end of the string to mark which channel group of the T1/E1 port will be set:
card_num/NIM_num/ port_within_NIM: [channel‐group_num]. For example, 0/2/
1:15 sets channel‐group 15 of the T1 or E1 port 1 in NIM slot 2 on the motherboard.
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Configuring Frame Relay
Frame Relay Map Class Commands
Note: Leading zeros defined in interface_num can be omitted. For example, 0/1/2 is equivalent to 1/
2.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command deletes the interface:
no interface serial port_num interface_num
Note: You cannot directly delete a Serial interface assigned to a T1/E1 channel group. You must
instead delete a channel group to erase the Serial port.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Examples
This example selects interface serial 1/0 and sets Frame Relay encapsulation:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation frame-relay
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
The following example selects channel group 12 of the T1/E1 port1 on the second NIM card so that later configurations will apply to this serial port:
XSR(config)#interface serial 2/1:12
XSR(config-if<s2/1:12)#encapsulation frame-relay
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
Frame Relay Map Class Commands
class
This command assigns a map class to a specific Data‐Link Connection Identifier (DLCI). This can be used to override the default values for the DLCIs or to override a class assigned to the interface or sub‐interface that the DLCI belongs to.
The actual map class is defined using the map-class frame-relay command in Global configuration mode. This command only applies to assigning a map class to DLCIs.
Syntax
class name
name
Name of the map class to associate with this DLCI, up to 29 characters.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command removes the assigned map class from the DLCI.
no class name
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Frame Relay Map Class Commands
Mode
Virtual Circuit configuration: XSR(config-fr-dlci)#
Example
The first three commands in the following example set up Serial sub‐interface 1/0.1 with associated DLCI 16. The last two commands define map class Hello.
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0.1 point-to-point
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#interface serial 1/0.1 point-to-point
XSR(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 16
XSR(config-fr-dlci)#class Hello
XSR(config)#map-class frame-relay Hello
XSR(config-map-class<Hello>)#frame-relay cir out 128000
frame-relay adaptive-shaping
This command enables and selects the mechanism to trigger adaptive shaping, the dynamic imposition of traffic shaping parameters (CIR, Bc, Be) based on external feedback indicating upstream congestion conditions.
Frame Relay switches use BECN (Back End Congestion Notification) to indicate congestion and throttle the DTE traffic rate.
Syntax
frame-relay adaptive-shaping
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command disables adaptive shaping:
no frame-relay adaptive-shaping
Mode
Map Class configuration: XSR(config-map-class)#
Default
Disabled
Example
This example sets Frame Relay map‐class normlink with traffic shaping:
XSR(config)#map-class frame-relay normlink
XSR(config-map-class)#frame-relay adaptive-shaping
frame-relay bc
This command specifies the outgoing Committed burst size (Bc) for a Frame Relay map‐class. Committed burst is specified in bits, but an implicit time factor is derived from the sampling interval (Tc) on the switch, which is defined as the burst size divided by the Committed Information Rate (CIR). This is expressed in the formula: Tc = Bc/CIR. For more information, refer to “frame‐relay cir” on page 98.
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Configuring Frame Relay
Frame Relay Map Class Commands
Syntax
frame-relay bc out bits
out
Sets the traffic direction ‐ output rate limiting only.
bits
Committed burst size, in bits.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command resets the committed burst size to its default value:
no frame-relay bc out
Mode
Map Class configuration: XSR(config-map-class)#
Default
7000 bits
Example
This example creates the map class slowlink with bc set to 6000 bits:
XSR(config)#map-class frame-relay slowlink
XSR(config-map-class<slowlink>)#frame-relay bc out 6000
frame-relay be
This command specifies the outgoing excess Burst size (Be) for a Frame Relay map‐class.
Syntax
frame-relay be out bits
out
Sets the traffic direction ‐ output rate limiting only.
bits
Committed burst size in bits.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command resets the committed burst size to its default value:
no frame-relay be out
Mode
Map Class configuration: XSR(config-map-class)#
Default
7000 bits
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Frame Relay Map Class Commands
Example
This example adds map class slowlink with Be of 10000 and Bc of 6000 bits:
XSR(config)#map-class frame-relay slowlink
XSR(config-map-class<slowlink>)#frame-relay be out 10000
XSR(config-map-class<slowlink>)#frame-relay bc out 6000
frame-relay cir
This command specifies the outgoing Committed Information Rate (CIR) for a Frame Relay map‐
class. CIR, Bc and Be values specify how the XSR forwards packets under normal and congested conditions using the following equation:
Tc = Bc/CIR = 7,000 bits / 56,000 bps = 125 mS (Bc and CIR values are default)
Frame Relay networks are committed to deliver Bc bits of data every Tc, so maximum committed throughput equals 7,000/125mS = 56kbps = CIR. In this sense, Committed Burst (Bc) is not really a burst but a “smoothing” function for the number of bits that the XSR is allowed to transmit during the Tc period in order to achieve the specified CIR.
Since the maximum number of bits that can be sent during Tc is Bc plus Be bits, using the default values, maximum throughput equals (Bc + Be)/Tc = (7,000 + 7,000)/125mS = 112kbps = 2 * 56kbps = 2 * CIR.
Syntax
frame-relay cir out rate
out
Sets the traffic direction ‐ output rate limiting only.
rate
CIR, ranging from 1000 to 1,000,000 bits per second.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command resets the CIR to its default value:
no frame-relay cir out
Mode
Map Class configuration: XSR(config-map-class)#
Defaults
•
CIR enforced for outgoing traffic only
•
CIR: 56000 bps
•
Be: 7000 bits
•
Bc: 7000 bits
Example
This example creates the map class slowlink with cir set at 9600 bps:
XSR(config)#map-class frame-relay slowlink
XSR(config-map-class<slowlink>)#frame-relay cir out 9600
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Configuring Frame Relay
Frame Relay Map Class Commands
frame-relay fragment
This command specifies the FRF.12 end‐to‐end fragment size for a Frame Relay map‐class. Fragment size is defined in bytes. It specifies the number of payload bytes from the original frame that will go into each fragment. The transmitted fragment will include eight additional bytes from headers (6) and CRC(2).
Note: For proper operation of fragmentation, QOS is required to classify a service-policy which will
define a high priority queue. The queue must send frames no larger than the fragment size or
fragmentation will also be applied to high priority queue data and latency will grow, defeating the
primary purpose of FRF.12 fragmentation.
Syntax
frame-relay fragment bytes
bytes
Size of frame to pass unfragmented.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no command disables FRF.12 end‐to‐end fragmentation:
no frame-relay fragment
Mode
Map Class configuration: XSR(config-map-class)#
Default
Fragmentation is disabled
Example
The following example creates the map class slowlink with fragmentation set at 53 bytes:
XSR(config)#map-class frame-relay slowlink
XSR(config-map-class<slowlink>)#frame-relay fragment 53
XSR(config-map-class<slowlink>)#service-policy frf12
map-class frame-relay
The command selects a supported Frame Relay map class and gives it a mnemonic name that can be referenced in Frame Relay configuration.
Map-class frame-relay starts configuration of a map‐class profile with a user‐specific name. When a map‐class command is entered, the CLI enters Map‐Class configuration mode, changing the CLI prompt to config-map-class where you can enter map‐class specific values.
Syntax
map-class [frame-relay | dialer] map-class-name
frame-relay
Sets a Frame Relay map class.
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Frame Relay Map Class Commands
dialer
Sets a dialer map class. For more information, refer to “Configuring the Dialer Interface” on page 83.
map-class-name
Name of the map class to associate with this DLCI, up to 29 characters.
Syntax of the “no” Form
no map-class [frame-relay | dialer] map-class-name
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
FR Map‐Class configuration: XSR(config-map-class)#
Example
This example defines frame relay map‐class normlink:
XSR(config)#map-class frame-relay normlink
XSR(config-map-class<normlink>)#frame-relay adaptive-shaping
XSR(config-map-class<normlink>)#frame-relay cir out 64000
XSR(config-map-class<normlink>)#frame-relay bc out 8000
XSR(config-map-class<normlink>)#frame-relay be out 8000
XSR(config-map-class<normlink>)#service-policy output HighPriority
service-policy
This command sets the service‐policy profile for the class map. The service‐policy is a flexible method to configure QoS for an interface, sub‐interface and DLCI, You can use it to create priority queues, custom queues, WFQ or FIFO queues. Refer to “Configuring Quality of Service” on page 83 for more details.
Syntax
service-policy {out} service-policy-name
out
Service policy applies to outgoing traffic only.
service-policyname
Name of the separated configured service‐policy profile to apply for this map‐class.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables a service‐policy:
no service-policy output service-policy-name
Mode
Map Class configuration: XSR(config-map-class)#
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Configuring Frame Relay
Frame Relay Map Class Commands
Example
The following example specifies HighPriority as the policy for the class map:
XSR(config-map-class)#service-policy out HighPriority
shutdown
This command disables an interface or sub‐interface. A sub‐interface is shut down (no longer passing data) when one of the following occurs:
•
An explicit shutdown command is entered on the sub‐interface.
•
A shutdown command is issued on the parent Frame Relay interface of this sub‐interface.
•
A shutdown command is issued on a T1 controller.
Syntax
shutdown
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no command to enable the interface after it is shut down:
no shutdown
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
sub-interface
This command starts configuration for a sub‐interface on a serial interface. You can configure up to 50 sub‐interfaces on the XSR.
Syntax
interface serial interface_id.sub-interface_num [multi-point | point-to-point
interface_id.subinterface-num
The sub‐interface, comprised of interface_num and numerical values. The entities are separated by a period “.” The number range is 1 to 50.
multi-point
The sub‐interface acts as a multi‐point connection, so that multiple DLCIs can be defined within this sub‐interface to connect to multiple remote sites.
point-to-point
The sub‐interface acts as a point‐to‐point connection.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
Sub‐interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
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Frame Relay Clear and Show Commands
Examples
This example selects sub‐interface Serial 1/0.5 on a serial interface:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#encapsulation frame-relay
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#interface serial 1/0.5 multi-point
XSR(config-subif<S1/0.5>)#no shutdown
This example selects a sub‐interface on a T1/E1 card:
XSR(config)#interface serial 2/1
XSR(config-if<S2/1>)#encapsulation frame-relay
XSR(config-if<S2/1>)#no shutdown
XSR(config-if<S2/1>)#interface serial 2/1:12.1 multi-point
XSR(config-subif<S2/1:12.1>)#no shutdown
Frame Relay Clear and Show Commands
clear frame-relay counter
This command clears the statistics of a particular Frame Relay DLCI, or all DLCIs under a specified Frame Relay sub‐interface, or a Frame Relay port, or all Frame Relay ports on the XSR.
Syntax
clear frame-relay counter [[interface] [interface-num] [dlci dlci-num]]
interface
-num
The interface or sub‐interface number of the Frame Relay port or sub‐interface affected by this command. If interface serial interface‐num is not specified, then this command applies to all Frame Relay ports. If interface‐num specifies a sub‐
interface, then only DLCIs in that particular sub‐interface will be cleared. If interface‐num calls for an interface, then all DLCIs on the Frame Relay interface will be cleared.
dlci-num
The specific DLCI whose statistics will be cleared.
Mode
EXEC: XSR>
clear frame-relay inarp
This command clears the inverse ARP table of one or all Frame Relay ports, causing the Frame Relay multipoint sub‐interfaces to issue Inverse ARP requests to re‐discover next hop addresses.
Syntax
clear frame-relay inarp [interface][interface-num][dlci] [dlci-num]
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Configuring Frame Relay
Frame Relay Clear and Show Commands
interface
-num
If the interface‐num or sub‐interface number is set and the dlci‐num is not, all learned inverse ARP entries for the interface and its logical sub‐interfaces will be cleared.
dlci-num
The DLCI of a particular virtual port whose inverse ARP entry is to be cleared.
Mode
EXEC: XSR>
Examples
The following example clears all Frame Relay Inverse ARP entries:
XSR(config)#clear frame-relay inarp
This example clears all Frame Relay Inverse ARP entries for Interface 1/0 and its sub‐interfaces:
XSR(config)#clear frame-relay inarp interface 1/0
The following example clears the Inverse ARP entry for DLCI 16 on sub‐interface 1/0.1:
XSR(config)#clear frame-relay inarp interface 1/0.1 dlci 16
show frame-relay fragment
This command displays information about Frame Relay fragmentation. When no parameters are specified, the output displays a summary of each data‐link connection identifier (DLCI) configured for fragmentation including fragmentation type, configured fragment size, and number of fragments transmitted, received, and dropped. When a specific interface and DLCI are specified, additional details are displayed.
Syntax
show frame-relay fragment [interface interface [dlci]]
interface
A specific interface for which Frame Relay fragmentation data will be shown.
interface
Interface number containing the DLCI(s) for which to show fragmentation data.
dlci
Specific DLCI for which to display fragmentation data.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: Router#
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR(config)#show frame-relay fragment
Frame Relay End-to-End Fragmentation Summary
interface
dlci
frag-size in-frag
Serial 2/0.1
960
53
0
Serial 1/0:0.1
16
64
0
out-frag
0
0
dropped-frag
0
0
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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Frame Relay Clear and Show Commands
XSR(config)#show frame-relay fragment interface serial 2/0.1 960
Frame Relay End-to-End Fragmentation Detailed Statistics
Serial 2/0.1 DLCI = 960
Fragment Size = 53
Incoming Traffic
Outgoing Traffic
Fragmented pkts
= 0
Fragmented pkts
Fragmented bytes
= 0
Fragmented bytes
Assembled pkts
= 0
Pre-fragmented pkts
Assembled bytes
= 0
Pre-fragmented bytes
Non-fragmented pkts
= 0
Non-fragmented pkts
Non-fragmented bytes
= 0
Non-fragmented bytes
Dropped Assembled pkts
= 0
Interleaved pkts
Pkt Sequence # Errors
= 0
Unexpected Begin Frag
= 0
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Parameter Descriptions
fragment‐size
The configured fragment size in bytes.
In/out fragmented pkts
Sum of frames received/sent by this DLCI that had a fragmentation header.
In/out fragmented bytes
Sum of bytes, including those in the Frame Relay bytes headers, that have been received/sent by this DLCI.
In/out un‐fragmented pkts
Sum of frames received/sent by this DLCI that do notrequire reassembly, and therefore do not contain the FRF.12 header. These counters can be incremented only when the end‐to‐end fragmentation type is set.
In/out un‐fragmented bytes
Sum of bytes received/sent by this DLCI that do not require reassembly, and sp do not contain the FRF.12 header.
In assembled pkts
Sum of fully reassembled frames received by this DLCI, including frames without a Frame Relay fragmentationheader (in un‐fragmented packets). This counter corresponds to frames viewed by upper‐layer protocols.
In assembled bytes
Sum of bytes in the fully reassembled frames received by this DLCI, including frames without a Frame Relay fragmentation header (in un‐fragmented bytes). This counter corresponds to the sum of bytes viewed byupper‐layer protocols.
In dropped reassembled pkts
Sum of fragments received by this DLCI that are dropped for reasons such as running out of memory, receiving segments out of sequence, receiving an unexpected frame with a B bit set, or timing out on a reassembling frame.
Pkt Sequence # Error
Sum of fragments received by this DLCI that have an fragments unexpected sequence number.
Unexpected BeginFrag
Sum of fragments received by this DLCI that have an unexpected B bit set unexpected B (Begin) bit set. When this occurs, all fragments being reassembled are dropped and a new frame is begun with this fragment.
out pre‐fragmented pkts
Sum of fully reassembled frames sent by this DLCI, including frames transmitted without a Frame Relay fragmentation header (out un‐fragmented pkts).
out dropped fragmenting pkts
Sum of fragments dropped by this DLCI during transmission because of running out of memory.
in out‐of‐sequence fragments
Sum of fragments received by this DLCI with an unexpected sequence number.
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Configuring Frame Relay
Frame Relay Clear and Show Commands
in fragments with unexpected Sum of fragments received by this DLCI that have an unexpected B (Begin) bit set. B bit set
When this occurs, all fragments being reassembled are dropped and a new frame is begun with this fragment.
out interleaved packets
Sum of packets leaving this DLCI that have been interleaved between segments.
show frame-relay lmi
This command displays Local Management Interface (LMI) statistics. Enter the command without arguments to obtain statistics about all Frame Relay interfaces.
Syntax
show frame-relay lmi [interface] [interface-num]
interface
-num
The interface or sub‐interface number of the Frame Relayport or sub‐interface affec ted by this command. If interface serial interface‐num is not specified, then this command applies to all Frame Relay ports. If interface‐num specifies a sub‐
interface, then only DLCIs in that particular sub‐interface may be cleared. If interface‐num calls for a port, then all DLCIs on the Frame Relay interface will be cleared.
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following example displays output on Serial interface 2/0 from an XSR with a Serial NIM installed:
XSR#show frame-relay lmi
LMI Statistics for Serial 2/0 (Frame Relay DTE) LMI = AUTO (AUTO)
Interface = INACTIVE
Status Enq. Sent = 0
Status Msg. Rcvd = 0
Status Timeout = 0
Updated Status Rcvd = 0
# configured PVCs = 2
Invalid L2 LMI info = 0
local sequence number
= 127
net sequence number = 127
# PVCs reported by LMI = 0
Invalid L3 LMI Info = 0
Down DLCIs:
16, 18
The following example displays output on Serial interface 2/0:1 from an XSR with a T1/E1 Serial controller NIM installed:
LMI Statistics for Serial 0/2/0:1 (Frame Relay DTE) LMI = NONE
Interface = down
Status Enq. Sent = 0
Status Msg. Rcvd = 0
Status Timeout = 0
Updated Status Rcvd = 0
# configured PVCs = 1
Invalid L2 LMI info = 0
local sequence number
= 127
net sequence number = 127
# PVCs reported by LMI = 0
Invalid L3 LMI Info = 0
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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Frame Relay Clear and Show Commands
Parameter Descriptions
LMI
The configured or auto‐detected LMI type. If the port is set for AUTO LMI, then the XSR shows AUTO (nn), where nn is ILMI, ANSI, or ITU if the port has successfully negotiated/
detected the LMI supported by the switch, otherwise it displays AUTO.
Status Enq. Sent
Sum of LMI status enquiry messages sent.
Status Msgs Rcvd
Sum of LMI status messages received.
Status Timeouts
Sum of times the status message was not received within the keepalive time value.
Update Status Rcvd
Sum of LMI asynchronous update status messages received.
Invalid L2 LMI info
Sum of received LMI messages with invalid unnumbered information field.
Invalid L3 LMI
Sum of LMI messages with invalid fields.fields
Un‐configured DLCIs List of un‐configured DLCIs are reported to be in an Active state by the Frame Relay switch. This field is not displayed if the configured LMI type is None.
Down DLCIs
List of configured DLCIs are reported to be in a Down or Inactive state by the Frame Relay switch. This field is not displayed if the configured LMI type is None.
Interface
Down marks the port as active but not communicating with the switch; Inactive marks the port as shut down; Up marks the port as operational.
Local/net sequence number
Value of current or next to transmit/received LMI control packet.
show frame-relay map
This command displays data from current frame‐relay map entries.
Syntax
show frame-relay map
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following example displays a multi‐point Frame Relay map:
XSR#show frame-relay map
Frame Relay Map Statistics (Serial 2/0)
Serial 2/0.1 dlci 973 (0x3CD, 0xF0D0) Remote Addr. 10.10.10.5,
gratuitous-inverse-arp, bootp, static ip
Serial 2/0.1 dlci 972 (0x3CC, 0xF0C0) Remote Addr. 10.10.10.4,
gratuitous-inverse-arp, static ip
Serial 2/0.1 dlci 971 (0x3CB, 0xF0B0) Remote Addr. 10.10.10.3,
static ip
Serial 2/0.1 dlci 970 (0x3CA, 0xF0A0) Remote Addr. un-resolved,
gratuitous-inverse-arp
Serial 2/0.1 dlci 960 (0x3C0, 0xF000) Remote Addr. un-resolved
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Configuring Frame Relay
Frame Relay Clear and Show Commands
The following example displays a point‐to‐point Frame Relay map:
XSR#show frame-relay map
Frame Relay Map Statistics (Serial 2/0)
Serial 2/0.3 dlci 981 (0x3D5, 0xF450) Remote Addr.
gratuitous-inverse-arp, bootp, static ip 2.2.2.3
P2P,
Parameter Descriptions
Serial 2/0
Identifies a Frame Relay interface being displayed.
Serial 2/0.1
Identifies the specific sub‐interface that is associated with a DLCI.
dlci 981(0x3D5,0xF450) DLCI number displayed three ways: its decimal value, its hexadecimal value (0x3D5), and its value as it appears on the wire (0xF450).
Remote Addr.10.10.10.5
The remote peer IP address learned using Inverse ARP.
Remote Addr.
The node is waiting for Inverse ARP response to resolve un‐resolved the remote peerʹs IP address.
Remote Addr.P2P
This DLCI does not require Inverse ARP to resolve the remote peer’s IP address.
gratuitous Inverse‐arp
This DLCI will offer a free Inverse ARP to help the remote learn changes to the local interface. The response from the remote is not used for address resolution.
bootp
This DLCI will respond to a broadcast bootp request originated from the adjacent peer. The bootp response includes the static IP address configured on this DLCI.
static ip 2.2.2.3
This DLCI has been configured with a static IP address for the remote peer. Inverse arp request will not be used to learn the remoteʹs address.
show frame-relay pvc
This command displays statistics about permanent virtual circuits (PVCs) on Frame Relay interfaces. Statistics can be retrieved on specific Frame Relay interfaces by specifying the interface or the DLCI. Statistics on all PVCs can be shown by omitting arguments in the command.
If the LMI status report shows a PVC is not active, it is marked inactive. A PVC is marked deleted if it is not listed in a periodic LMI status message.
Syntax
show frame-relay pvc [interface interface [dlci-num]]
interface
Interface or sub‐interface number containing the DLCI(s) for which you wish to display PVC information.
dlci
DLCI number used on the interface. Statistics for the specified PVC are displayed when a DLCI is also set.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
XSR#show frame-relay pvc serial 2/0:1.1
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Frame Relay Clear and Show Commands
PVC Statistics for Serial 2/0:1.1 (Frame Relay DTE)
DLCI
= 16
PVC Status
= UP
INPUT:
Pkt/Sec
= 0
Packets
= 17941
Bytes
= 20018904
BECN pkts
= 0
FECN pkts
= 0
OUTPUT:
Pkt/Sec
= 2
Packets
= 17942
Bytes
= 20018904
BECN pkts
= 0
FECN pkts
= 0
bcast pkts
= 0
bcast bytes = 0
LMI = NONE
Drop Pkts
DE pkts
= 0
= 0
Drop Pkts
DE pkts
CIR assists
= 0
= 0
= 0
PVC created: 12/01/2000 02:23:37
Last status change: 12/01/2000 02:23:47
FRF.12 = ENABLED
Fragment size = 53
Adaptive Shape = DISABLED
Shaping Drops = 0
minCIR=28000
BC=7000
BE=7000
limit=56
interval=125
Parameter Descriptions
DLCI
One of the Data‐link Connection Identifier numbers for the PVC.
PVC STATUS
Status of the PVC: ACTIVE ‐ DLCI is in data passing mode.
INACTIVE ‐ LMI message not received for longer than n392dte events and not in data passing mode.
DELETED ‐ LMI message declares DLCI is not activated.
Input: Pkt/Sec
The incoming data rate for this PVC in packets per second (measured for 8 seconds)
Input: pkts
Sum of packets received on this PVC.
Input: bytes
The packet rate in pps on this PVC in the last sampling period (last 8 seconds).
Input: Drop pkts
Sum of incoming packets on this PVC dropped.
In FECN pkts
Sum of packets received with FECN bit set.
In BECN pkts
Sum of packets received with BECN bit set.
In DE pkts
Sum of DE packets received.
Output: Pkt/Sec
Sum of packets sent on this PVC.
Output: pkts
Sum of packets sent on this PVC.
Output: bytes
Sum of bytes sent on this PVC.
Output: Drop pkts
Sum of outgoing packets on this PVC dropped.
Out BECN pkts
Sum of packets sent with BECN bit set. Value always 0.
Out FECN pkts
Sum of packets sent with FECN bit set. Value always 0.
Out DE pkts
Sum of DE packets sent. Value always 0.
Out bcast pkts
Sum of output broadcast packets. Value always 0.
Out bcast bytes
Sum of output broadcast bytes. Value always 0.
CIR assists
Sum of times the DLCI needed help to achieve CIR.
Pvc create time
Time the PVC was created.
Last status change
Time the PVC changed status (active to inactive).
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Configuring Frame Relay
Frame Relay Clear and Show Commands
FRF.12
FRF.12 has been disabled on this PVC. This line is not printed if disabled.
Fragment size
Size of the payload for fragmented packets.
Adaptive Shape
Status of Adaptive Shaping for this PVC.
Shaping Drops
Sum of packets dropped due to traffic shaping.
minCIR
The minimum Committed Information Rate, bits/sec.
BC
Current Committed burst size, in bits.
BE
Current Excess burst size, in bits.
Interval
Bc/CIR in milliseconds.
show frame-relay traffic
This command displays global Frame Relay statistics since the last reload.
Syntax
show frame-relay traffic
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
XSR#show frame-relay traffic
Frame Relay statistics:
TX: ARP requests = 19
ARP replies = 2
RX: ARP requests = 2
ARP replies = 19
show frame-relay map-class
This command displays Frame Relay map‐class usage data. It provides a view of all configured Frame Relay map classes and whether they are being referenced by any Frame Relay interfaces.
Syntax
show frame-relay map-class
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
XSR#show frame-relay map-class
Total 7 frame relay map-classes configured in the node
“Central”, “Branch_1”, “three”, “Class_4”, “Class_5”,
“Class_6”, “test”,
Map-Class “generic” has 1 registered users
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Frame Relay Clear and Show Commands
Serial 1/0, CIR= 64000, Bc=8000, BE= 9000, fragment=53
Adaptive Shaping: Disabled, Service Policy: Voice
# FR Ports = 1, # FR sub-Interfaces = 3, # DLCIs = 7
show interface serial
The following statistics are added to the command if the port is configured for Frame Relay.
Sample Output
The following example displays T1 statistics:
XSR#show interface serial 2/0:1
********** Serial Interface Stats **********
Serial 2/0:1 is Admin Up
Internet address is not assigned
Frame Relay Port Statistics:
Line Protocol = UP
Encapsulation FRAME-RELAY IETF, FRAME-RELAY DTE, LMI = NONE
Num PVCs = 1, Total LMI Tx = 0, LMI Rx = 0
TX: Packets = 18155, Bytes = 20214344 PPS = 0
RX: Packets = 18154, Bytes = 20214072 PPS = 0
Approximate Speed = 128 Kbps
Discarded Packets TX/RX = 0/0
Sub Interface 1
State = UP, Num Stations = 1
Configured DLCIs: 16, 18, 22
The following example displays Serial interface 2/0 statistics:
********** Serial Interface Stats **********
Serial 2/0 is Admin Up
Internet address is 10.10.11.30, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
Frame Relay Port Statistics:
Line Protocol = UP
Encapsulation FRAME-RELAY IETF, FRAME-RELAY DTE, LMI = NONE
Num PVCs = 2, Total LMI Tx = 10, LMI Rx = 0
TX: Packets = 10, Bytes = 133 PPS = 0
RX: Packets = 0,
Bytes = 0
PPS = 0
Approximate Speed = 65 Kbps
Discarded Packets TX/RX = 0/0
Sub Interface 1
State = UP, Num Stations = 1
Configured DLCIs:
16
Sub Interface 2
State = UP, Num Stations = 1
Configured DLCIs:
150
The name of this device is Ser2/0.
9-110
Configuring Frame Relay
Frame Relay Clear and Show Commands
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
The
card is 2.
channel is 0.
current MTU is 1506.
device is in polling mode, and is active.
last driver error is (null).
physical-layer is HDLC-SYNC, the TX, RX clock source is external.
device uses CRC-16 for Tx.
device uses CRC-16 for Rx.
type of encoding is NRZ.
media-type is RS-232/V.28 (DTE).
loopback mode is off.
Other Interface Statistics:
ifindex
ifType
ifAdminStatus
ifOperStatus
ifLastChange
ifInOctets
ifInUcastPkts
ifInNUcastPkts
ifInDiscards
ifInErrors
ifInUnknownProtos
ifOutOctets
ifOutUcastPkts
ifOutNUcastPkts
ifOutDiscards
ifOutErrors
ifOutQLen
RX overrun
0
23
1
1
00:00:24
0
0
0
0
0
0
173
10
0
0
0
352
0
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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Configuring Frame Relay
10
Configuring the Dialer Interface
This chapter describes commands for the dialer, dialer backup, and Dial‐on‐Demand/Bandwidth‐
on‐Demand services.
Observing Syntax and Conventions
The CLI command syntax and conventions use the notation described in the following table.
Convention
Description
xyz
Key word or mandatory parameters (bold)
[x]
[ ] Square brackets indicate an optional parameter (italic)
[x | y | z]
[ | ] Square brackets with vertical bar indicate a choice of values
{x | y | z}
{ | } Braces with vertical bar indicate a choice of a required value
[x {y | z} ]
[{ | } ] Combination of square brackets with braces and vertical bars indicates a
required choice of an optional parameter
(config-if<xx>)
xx signifies interface type and number, e.g.: F1, S2/1.0, D1, M57, L1,
ATM0/1/1
Next Mode entries display the CLI prompt after a command is entered
soho.enterasys.com
Italicized, non-syntactic text indicates either a user-specified entry or text with
special emphasis
Dialer Interface Commands
The following set of commands defines dial services on the XSR:
•
Dialer Interface Clear and Show commands on page 10‐90.
•
Dialer Backup commands on page 10‐93.
•
DOD/BOD commands on page 10‐96.
•
Dialer Watch commands on page 10‐103.
dialer dtr
This command specifies that a non‐V.25bis modem using Electronic Industries Association (EIA) signaling will be used on the serial line interface. This signal is known as the DTR signal. The dialer string command has no effect on DTR dialers. Be aware of the following mandatory conditions:
XSR CLI Reference Guide
10-83
Dialer Interface Commands
•
The dialer string command must be set to the dialer interface that owns the dialer pool where the dialer DTR serial interface is added.
•
The serial interface must be configured for synchronous data mode.
•
The modem must be configured with DTR‐controlled dialing interface, CTS follows DCD, DTR disconnects, sync data mode and a preset dialing out telephone number.
Syntax
dialer dtr
Syntax of the “no” Form
no dialer dtr
Default
DTR dialing is disabled
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
XSR(config-if<S1/1>)#dialer dtr
dialer pool
This command specifies which dialer pool the dialer interface should use. The dialer interface will use one of the physical interfaces in the dialer pool to attach to the interfaceʹs configured destination.
Syntax
dialer pool number
number
Dial pool number, ranging from 1 to 255.
Syntax of the “no” Form
no dialer pool
Default
Disabled ‐ no pool is specified.
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Configuring the Dialer Interface
Dialer Interface Commands
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Note: This command is intended for dialer interfaces only.
Example
The following example shows dialer interface 0 assigned to dialer pool 6.
XSR(config)#interface dialer 0
XSR(config-if<D1>)#dialer pool 6
XSR(config-if<D1>)#no shutdown
dialer pool-member
This command configures physical interfaces for dial devices only.
Syntax
dialer pool-member number [priority priority]
number
Dialpool number ranging from 1 to 255.
priority
Priority of the interface within the dialing pool - ranging from 0 (lowest) to 255
(highest). Ports with the highest priority are selected first for dialing out.
Syntax of the “no” Form
no dialer pool-member number
Defaults
•
Disabled. When enabled, no default dialing pool number is assigned
•
Priority: 0
•
Minimum: 0
•
Maximum: 255
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following example shows a serial interface belonging to two dialer pools with priorities configured for each pool:
XSR(config-if)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#dialer pool-member 1 priority 10
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#dialer pool-member 2 priority 20
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#no shutdown
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Dialer Interface Commands
dialer string
This command creates a string used to place a call a destination or subnet. Typically, it is the telephone number needed for dialing.
Syntax
dialer string dial-string [class class-name]
dial-string
Phone number to be sent to a dial device.
class-name
Map class associated with this dialer string.
Syntax of the “no” Form
no dialer string dial-string
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
This example shows that dialer interface 0 configured to use map‐class XXX when using dialer string 9055559988:
XSR(config-if)#interface dialer 0
XSR(config-if<D0>)#dialer string 9055559988 class XXX
dialer wait-for-carrier-time (interface configuration)
This command configures the time a dialer interface waits for a carrier signal. It is used when configuring a particular dialer interface.
Syntax
dialer wait-for-carrier-time seconds
seconds
Interval the interface waits for a carrier signal when a call is placed via the dial device.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command resets to default value:
no dialer wait-for-carrier-time
Default
60 seconds
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
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Configuring the Dialer Interface
Dialer Interface Commands
Example
The following example specifies a wait time of 90 seconds for the carrier signal on serial port 1/0:
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#dialer wait-for-carrier-time 90
dialer wait-for-carrier-time (map-class dialer configuration)
This command configures the time to wait for a carrier signal associated with a specific dialer map class. Dialer map classes are used to configure certain characteristics with dialer strings when configuring dialer ports.
Syntax
dialer wait-for-carrier-time seconds
seconds
Interval the port waits for a carrier signal when a call is placed through the dial device.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command resets to the default value:
no dialer wait-for-carrier-time
Default
60 seconds
Mode
Map‐class dialer configuration: XSR(config-map-class)#
Example
The example below specifies a 120‐second wait time for the carrier signal of the dialer map class TEST on Dialer port 57:
XSR(config-if<D57>)#interface dialer 57
XSR(config-if<D57>)#ip address 196.16.25.1 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<D57>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<D57>)#dialer remote-name SiteA
XSR(config-if<D57>)#dialer string 4165555584 class TEST
XSR(config-if<D57>)#dialer pool 1
XSR(config)#map-class dialer TEST
XSR(config-map-class)#dialer wait-for-carrier-time 120
interface dialer
This command adds a dialer interface to connect with one or more specified sub‐networks. A dialer interface connects to a dial device via a pool of physical ports.
The dialer interface is created in two ways: point‐to‐point or point‐to‐multipoint by using the multipoint parameter. When configured, the dialer line is not physically connected but the entry is maintained in the routing table thus preserving on‐demand access when interesting packets are received and accepted by an Access Control List (ACL).
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Dialer Interface Commands
This mode of operation of the dialer interface is called spoofing and it is the default mode for this interface. Spoofing mode changes to non‐spoofing mode when the following conditions are met:
•
Another interface or sub‐interface is set with the backup interface dialer command.
•
The interface configured with the backup command (the primary interface) is up.
Dial‐on‐demand applications require that a dialer‐group, dialer‐list and ACL also be configured.
Syntax
interface dialer [number | multi-point][sub-interface]
number
Non-spoofed mode for a backup line or spoofed mode for on-demand connectivity to
a remote peer. Dialer interface number ranges from 0 to 255.
multi-point
Spoofed, point-to-multi-point mode configuring on-demand connectivity to remote
peers.
sub-interface
Sub-interface of the dialer interface.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the dialer interface:
interface dialer number
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
Dialer Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<D>)#
Default
Interface is spoofed
Examples
The following example configures Dialer port 200 in backup mode with minimal settings:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 200
XSR(config-if<D200>)#ip address 200.17.10.5 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<D200>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<D200>)#authentication chap
XSR(config-if<D200>)#no shutdown
The following example configures the dialer in point‐to‐point spoofed mode with interesting packets defined by ACL 101, a dialer‐group and associated dialer‐list mapped to ACL 101:
XSR(config#access-list 101 permit ip 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 255.255.255.255 0.0.0.0
XSR(config)#interface dialer 3
XSR(config-if<D3>)#dialer-group 7
XSR(config)#dialer-list 7 protocol ip list 101
The following example configures the dialer in multi‐point spoofed mode with interesting packets defined by ACL 101, a dialer‐group and associated dialer‐list mapped to ACL 101:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 3 multi-point
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Configuring the Dialer Interface
Dialer Interface Commands
XSR(config-if<D3>)#dialer-group 7
XSR(config-if<D3>)#access-list 101 permit ip 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 255.255.255.255
0.0.0.0
XSR(config)#dialer-list 7 protocol ip list 101
map-class dialer
This command defines the dial stringʹs characteristics and associates them with a unique class name. Once the map-class dialer classname command is executed the parameters assigned to that classname must be configured. The classname assigned must match the classname assigned to the dialer string class classname so they can be linked.
Syntax
map-class dialer classname
classname
Unique class identifier.
Default
None ‐ no class name
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
Map‐Class Dialer configuration: XSR(config-map-class<xx>)#
Example
The example below specifies a 90‐second wait time for the carrier signal of the dialer map class TEST on Dialer port 0:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 0
XSR(config-if<D0>)#ip address 196.16.25.1 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<D0>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<D0>)#dialer remote-name sitea
XSR(config-if<D0>)#dialer string 4165555584 class TEST
XSR(config-if<D0>)#dialer pool 1
XSR(config-if<D0>)#no shutdown
XSR(config)#map-class dialer 57
XSR(config-map-class<57>)#dialer wait-for-carrier-time 90
modem-init-string
This command sets an AT command string used to initialize a modem.
Syntax
modem-init-string word
word
Text to initialize the modem.
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Dialer Interface Clear and Show Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the modem‐init‐string:
no modem-init-string
Mode
Map‐Class Dialer configuration: XSR(config-map-class<xx>)#
Example
The following example specifies a modem initialization string to disable dialtone detection for the Map Class Remote:
XSR(config-map-class<Remote>)#modem-init-string ATX3
Dialer Interface Clear and Show Commands
clear dialer
This command clears dialer statistics for physical interfaces connected to the dialer interfaces. If the interface is not specified, all interface (for the dialer) statistics will be cleared.
Syntax
clear dialer
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
XSR#clear dialer
show dialer
This command displays general information and some configurations of interfaces configured under the dialer; for instance, the dialer interfaces and the serial and async interfaces under the dialer interfaces.
Syntax
show dialer [number]
number
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
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Configuring the Dialer Interface
Interface number.
Dialer Interface Clear and Show Commands
Example
XSR#show dialer 1
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the show dialer command for a dialer interface:
#show dialer 5
Dialer5
Dialer state is: UP
Wait for carrier default: 60, default retry: 3
Dial String
Success Failures
Map Class
3200
2
0
Dialer pool 23
(Serial 2/0:0, )
Parameter Descriptions
Dialer1
Name of the dialer interface.
Wait for carrier(30 secs)
Seconds to wait for carrier signal.
Default retry
Number of default call retries.
Dial String
Dial strings to used to make calls.
Successes
Number of successful connections.
Failures
Failed Connections.
Map Class
Name of associated map class.
Dialer pool 2, priority 0
Indicates that this interface is a member of dialer pool 2 with a priority of 0 in that pool.
Serial0
Type of interface.
show dialer maps
This command displays dialer policies.
Syntax
show dialer maps
Mode
EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the show dialer maps command:
Dialer maps configured on Interface <Dialer1>:
Next hop IP address: <10.10.10.2>
Remote host: <robo2>
Map class: <isdn>
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Dialer Interface Clear and Show Commands
Phone numbers: <2400:12>
Connection speed/type: <64k>/<On Demand>
Dialer maps configured on Interface <Dialer2>:
Next hop IP address: <20.20.20.2>
Phone numbers: <2400>
Connection speed/type: <not set>/<On Demand>
show dialer sessions
This command displays information regarding dialer sessions.
Syntax
show dialer sessions
Mode
EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the show dialer sessions command:
XSR#show dialer sessions
ID
Interface
Type
0001
Dialer1
On Demand
0002
Dialer1
Multilink
0003
Dialer1
Incoming
0004
Dialer0
On Demand
State
IDLE
CONNECTED
CONNECTED
WAITING
MLPPP
001
001
001
000
Phone#
Phys Intf
3100
Serial 2/0:30
Serial 2/0:12
D-Serial 1/0:0
2600
Parameter Descriptions
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ID
Dial session ID number ‐ node‐wide and unique. Range: 1 to 512.
Interface
Dialer interface number which has requested the dial session.
Type
Dial session type:
•
On demand: session that handles on demand connection requests
•
Backup: session which is requested by a backed up interface or watched route
•
Multilink: dial session requested by a multilink group used for backup or on demand
•
Callback: dial callback session.
•
Bandwidth: a Bandwidth on Demand requested connection.
State
IDLE, WAITING, CALLING or CONNECTED.
MLPPP
MLPPP group number to which the dial session belongs.
Phone No
Number used to dial out.
Phys Intf
Dialer pool port used to build a switched link with remote peer.
Configuring the Dialer Interface
Dial Backup Commands
Dial Backup Commands
The following set of commands defines a backup dial line.
backup
This command set backup functionality on Serial, Ethernet or sub‐interfaces. You can also specify a delay before a secondary interface is brought up or down after a primary interface is brought up or down. We suggest this command be used when lines suffer intermittent disruptions causing the primary line to come up and fall temporarily. A backup delay ensures the secondary line does not come up and down prematurely.
Note: The XSR sets UTC for time-range calculation.
Syntax
backup interface dialer dialer-interface-number [delay enable-delay disable-delay
[never]][time-range hh:mm hh:mm]
interface
Dialer interface number used for backup.
delay
enable-delay
disable-delay
Backup enable delay, ranging from 0 to 99999999, followed by the backup disable
delay, ranging frm 0 to 99999999, or the keyword never indicating the backup,
once enabled, is not being disabled when the primary link comes up.
The enable-delay is the interval in seconds that elapses after the primary port goes
down. The disable-delay is the interval in seconds that elapses after the primary port
comes up.
never
Stops the secondary port from being deactivated.
time-range
hh:mm hh:mm
Backup timer range - start from hh:mm to end hh:mm. When backup is not set, it is
is always active. Otherwise it is active during the configured time range only.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes backup from the interface:
no backup interface
Default
1 second
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following example provides a 10‐second delay in activating the secondary line and a 20‐
second delay in deactivating the secondary line when the primary serial line goes up and down.
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/1
XSR(config-if<S1/1>)#backup delay 10 20
XSR(config-if<S1/1>)#no shutdown
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Dial Backup Commands
backup interface dialer
This command designates a Serial or Fast/GigabitEthernet/GigabitEthernet interface or sub‐
interface as a backup dialer interface.
Caution: To configure a backup FastEthernet/GigabitEthernet interface or sub-interface, the port
must be in the shutdown state.
Syntax
backup interface dialer number
number
Dialer interface number to use as the backup interface. Range: 0 to 255.
Syntax of the “no” Form
no backup interface dialer number
Note: Only one dialer interface can be associated with one dialer pool but one dialer pool may be
associated with many dialer interfaces.
Default
Disabled
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Examples
The example below configures Dialer interface 57 as the backup for Fast/GigabitEthernet port 2:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 2
XSR(config-if<F2>)#backup interface dialer 57
XSR(config-if<F2>)#ip address 192.168.27.114 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<F2>)#no shutdown
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/2
XSR(config-if<S1/2>)#physical-layer async
XSR(config-if<S1/2>)#dialer pool-member 1
XSR(config-if<S1/2>)#no shutdown
XSR(config)#interface dialer 57
XSR(config-if<D57>)#dialer pool 1
XSR(config-if<D57>)#dialer redial attempts 3 forever
XSR(config-if<D57>)#dialer string 67921
XSR(config-if<D57>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if<D57>)#ip address 10.10.10.1 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<D57>)#no shutdown
Ethernet backup is applied further in the example below where Dialer interface 57 is configured as the DSL backup (PPPoE) for Fast/GigabitEthernet sub‐interface 2.1 ‐ invoking the sub‐interface enables PPPoE. Note that the IP address of the PPPoE caller is negotiated over PPP and the MTU size is reset to 1492 bytes to avoid Web access problems by PCs attached to the XSR.
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Configuring the Dialer Interface
Dial Backup Commands
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 2
XSR(config-if<F2>)#no shutdown
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 2.1
XSR(config-if>)#backup interface dialer 57
XSR(config-if>)#encapsulation ppp
XSR(config-if>)#ip address negotiated
XSR(config-if>)#ip mtu 1492
XSR(config-if>)#no shutdown
backup time-range
This command configures a period when the backup dialer should be up and down, regardless of traffic on the line. A backup dialer port is configured to protect a primary interface and once its time‐range is specified, the backup dialer port can be enabled and disabled.
Syntax
backup time-range start-time end-time
start-time
Time in hh:mm when the dialer port should be enabled.
end-time
Time in hh:mm when the dialer port should be disabled.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables the time‐range feature:
no backup time-range
Default
None
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Examples
The example below configures Dialer port 1 to be enabled at 6:30 a.m. and to disable itself at 11:55 p.m.
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/1
XSR(config-if<S1/1>)#backup interface dialer 1
XSR(config-if<S1/1>)#no shutdown
XSR(config-if<S1/1>)#backup time-range 06:30 23:55
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DOD/BOD Commands
show interface dialer
This command displays general information for a dialer interface.
Syntax
show interface dialer number
number
Dialer interface number ranging from 0 to 255
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
The example below displays output from the show interface dialer command:
XSR#show interface dialer
********** Dialer Interface Stats **********
Dialer1 is Admin Up
Internet address is 10.10.10.1, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
Dialer1
Dialer state is: UP
Wait for carrier default: 60, default retry: 3
Dial String
Success Failures
Map Class
Dialer pool 3
(Serial 2/0:0, )
Free pool ISDN channels: <25>
Free pool serial ports: <0>
Neighbor Dial String
3100
Success
1
Failures
0
Map Class
Active links MLPPP group <1> to <10.10.10.2>: <5>
DOD/BOD Commands
The XSR supports the following Dial on Demand (DoD)/Bandwidth on Demand (BoD) commands.
dialer-group
This command controls dialer access by configuring an interface to belong to a specific dialing group. This access group is associated with an access list by the dialer-list command.
Packets which match the dialer group trigger a connection request. That is, the destination address of packets is evaluated against one or more ACLs; if the packets pass, either a call is initiated (if no connection were already established) or the idle timer is reset (if a call is active).
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Configuring the Dialer Interface
DOD/BOD Commands
Syntax
dialer-group group-number
group-number
Number of the dialer access group to which the specified interface belongs.
Acceptable values are nonzero, positive integers between 1 and 10.
Syntax of the ‘no’ Form
Use the no form of this command to remove an interface from the specified dialer access group:
no dialer-group
Mode
Dialer Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Dx>)#
Example
The following example configures dialer group 7 on dialer interface 1, mapping ACL 101 to dialer‐
list 7:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 1
XSR(config-if<D1>)#dialer-group 7
XSR(config)#access-list 101 permit ip 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 255.255.255.255 0.0.0.0
XSR(config)#dialer-list 7 protocol ip list 101
dialer-list
This command defines a dialer list to control dialing by protocol or by a combination of protocol and Access Control List (ACL). Because IP is the sole protocol supported at this time, an ACL must be specified using the dial-list command.
Syntax
dialer-list dialer-group protocol protocol-name list access-list-number]
dialer-group
Number of a dialer access group identified in any dialer-group command,
ranging from 1 to 10.
protocol-name
Only the protocol ip is supported at this time.
list
Specifies that an access list will be used for defining a granularity finer than an
entire protocol.
access-list-number
Numbers specified in IP standard (1 - 99) or extended (100 - 99) access lists.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to delete a dialer list:
no dialer-list dialer-group [protocol protocol-nam [list access-list-number]
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
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DOD/BOD Commands
Example
The following example maps ACL 1350 to dialer list 57:
XSR(config)#access-list 57 permit ip 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 255.255.255.255 0.0.0.0
XSR(config)#dialer-list 57 protocol ip list 1350
dialer called
This command maps incoming calls to one of the dialer interfaces. A maximum number of 32 called numbers per dialer interface can be configured.
Syntax
dialer called DNIS:subaddress
Dialed Number Identification Service, or the called party number, a colon, and
the ISDN subaddress.
DNIS:subaddress
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the configured number:
no dialer called DNIS:subaddress
Mode
Dialer Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Dx>)#
Example
The following example configures a dialer profile for a receiver with DNIS 12345 and ISDN subaddress 6789:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 1
XSR(config-if<D1>)#dialer called 12345:6789
dialer caller
This command configures caller ID screening with an option providing ISDN callback. The XSR will accept calls from a specified phone number. A maximum of 32 caller numbers can be set per dialer port.
The command matches numbers starting with the least significant digits of the calling number, starting from the last digit. Typically the ISDN switch does not provide the complete calling number, only the local number (four to seven of the least significant digits).
The dialed number must be configured in the Dialer interface.
Syntax
dialer caller number [callback]
10-98
number
Phone number to screen. Limit: 32 characters.
callback
Returns the call to the dialer. This option applies to DoD applications and supports
PPP and MLPPP. If used in a backup capacity, set the number of retries to 1.
Configuring the Dialer Interface
DOD/BOD Commands
Note: If the ISDN switch does not provide the calling number, callback will fail.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables the feature:
no dialer caller number
Mode
Dialer Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Dx>)#
Example
The following example configures the dialer caller numbers to screen:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 1
XSR(config-if<D1>)#dialer caller 5084712345
dialer idle-timeout
This command specifies the idle timeout interval before the XSR disconnects the line. The timeout trigger is based on outbound traffic only.
Caution: This command must be invoked on the called side of a link with a 0 value to ensure the
link is not dropped after 120 seconds by the called side.
Syntax
dialer idle-timeout seconds
seconds
Interval before disconnecting the line, ranging from 0 to 2,147,483 seconds.
Specifying 0 disables the timeout.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to reset the idle timeout to the default:
no dialer idle-timeout
Mode
Dialer Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Dx>)#
Default
120 seconds
Examples
The following example resets the idle‐timeout:
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DOD/BOD Commands
XSR(config)#interface dialer 1
XSR(config-if<D1>)#dialer idle-timeout 300
The following example disables the idle‐timeout:
XSR(config-if<D1>)#dialer idle-timeout 0
dialer map
This command configures a Dialer or Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) interface to call one or multiple sites. Each dialer interface can be configured with a maximum of 16 different dialer maps. The command also enables spoofing on the specified dialer interface but is available in multi‐point mode only.
Syntax
All options are shown in the first form of the command as follows:
dialer map protocol next-hop-address [name hostname][class map-class][spc]
[speed 56 | 64][dial-string][:isdn-subaddress]]
protocol
Protocol keyword; ip is supported at this time.
next-hop-address
Protocol address used to match against addresses to which packets are
destined.
name
The remote system with which the local router or access server communicates.
hostname
Case-sensitive name or ID of the remote device (usually the host name).) It is
used for incoming call mapping based on the authenticated user name
negotiated under PPP.
map-class
Name of map class used to dial out.
spc
A Semi-Permanent Connection between your equipment and the exchange.
speed 56 | 64
Keyword and value indicating the line speed in kilobits per second to use. For
ISDN only.
dial-string
Telephone number sent to the dialing device when it recognizes packets with
the specified next hop address that matches the access lists defined.
:isdn-subaddress
Sub-address number used for ISDN multipoint connections.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes a particular dialer map entry:
no dialer map protocol next-hop-address [name hostname] [class map-class] [spc]
[speed 56 | 64] [broadcast] [dial-string[:isdn-subaddress]]
Mode
Dialer Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Dx>)#
Default
Speed: 64 kbps
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Configuring the Dialer Interface
DOD/BOD Commands
Example
The following example configures a next hop IP address, SPC, hostname and line speed for map class AcmeMap:
XSR(config)#dialer map 1
XSR(config-if<D1>)#dialer map ip 192.168.57.9 class AcmeMap name AcmeHost spc
speed 56 12345:6789
dialer persistent
This command brings up a permanent switched connection in the absence of an interesting packet or primary‐line‐down backup dial trigger.
Syntax
dialer persistent [delay n]
n
Interval that the dial-out process is delayed after the Dialer interface boots up,
ranging from 1 to 2147483 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes the persistent setting:
no dialer persistent
Mode
Dialer Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Dx>)#
Default
‐1 second
Example
The following example configures Dialer interface 57 to be persistent for two minutes:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 57
XSR(config-if<D57>)#dialer persistent 120
dialer redialer attempts
This command sets the redial trigger after failed dial attempts. With an infinite number of specified redial attempts, it is possible to physically connect a modem at any time after setting the dial trigger and still make a connection. Also, if more resources (interfaces) are available in the dialer pool, the dialer is free to redial all members of the pool.
Syntax
dialer redial attempts n interval m re-enable t [forever]
attempts
Redial attempts.
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DOD/BOD Commands
n
Number of redial attempts made if dial-up or ISDN connection establishment
fails, ranging from 1 to 65535.
interval
Period between redial attempts.
m
Interval period, ranging from 5 to 2678400 seconds (31 days).
re-enable
Period for which the port is disabled if all redial tries fail.
t
Re-enable period, ranging from 5 to 2678400 seconds.
forever
Number of redial attempts applied to all members of the dialer pool in a neverending loop if dial-up or ISDN connection establishment is unsuccessful. Redial
attempts end if the dial trigger is reset or the connection is established.
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Defaults
•
Attempt: 1 (no redial)
•
Interval: 10 seconds
•
Re‐enable: 5 seconds
Example
Assuming you have configured Serial interfaces 1/0, 1/1, and 1/2 as part of dialer pool 1, the following example sets the dialer to attempt dialing each interface five times (if all attempts are unsuccessful), indefinitely until the dial trigger is reset or a connection is successfully established.
XSR(config)#interface dialer 1
XSR(config-if<D1>)#dialer pool 1
XSR(config-if<D1>)#dialer redial attempts 5 forever
dialer remote-name
This command specifies, for a dialer interface, the PPP authenticated user name of the remote router that is calling in.
Syntax
dialer remote-name username
username
Case-sensitive character string identifying the remote device with a maximum
length of 255 characters.
Mode
Dialer Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Dx>)#
Example
The following example sets the authentication name for the remote router on Dialer interface 7:
XSR(config)#interface dialer 7
XSR(config-if<D1>)#dialer remote-name “Auth West”
10-102
Configuring the Dialer Interface
Dialer Watch Commands
Dialer Watch Commands
dialer watch-group
This command enables Dialer Watch backup on a dialer interface with up to 16 watch‐groups.
Note: The XSR sets UTC for time-range calculation.
Syntax
dialer watch-group group-number
group-number
Assigned number that will point to a globally defined list of IP addresses to
watch, ranging from 1 to 255.f
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to disable this feature:
no dialer watch-group group-number
Mode
Dialer Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Dx>)#
Example
The following example configures a dialer watch group:
XSR(config-if<D3>)#dialer watch-group 57
dialer watch-list
This command adds a list of IP addresses you want monitored. Use this command with the dialer watch‐group interface configuration command. The number of the group list must match the group number.
Note: The XSR sets UTC for time-range calculation.
Syntax
dialer watch-list group-number [delay route-check initial initial-delay][delay
connect connect-delay][delay disconnect disconnect-delay][ip ip-address addressmask]][time-range start-time end-time]
group-number
Number assigned to the list, ranging from 1 to 255.
ip
IP is the only routed protocol supported for Dialer Watch at this time.
ip-address
IP address or address range to be applied to the list.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
10-103
Dialer Watch Commands
address-mask
IP address mask to be applied to the list.
initial-delay
The delay interval between the time when a new route is added to any dialer
watch list and the start of the backup process for that route if the route fails to
come up. This delay prevents the XSR from starting backup process for the
configured watched routes immediately after bootup. Range: 1 to 2,147,483
seconds.
connect-delay
The delay interval between when a route set up under the watch list goes down
and when the dialer subsystem starts the backup process. Range: 1 to
2,147,483 seconds.
disconnect-delay
The delay interval between when a route set up under the watch list and
currently backed up comes up and when the dialer subsystem ends the backup
process. Range: 1 to 2,147,483 seconds.
start-time
end-time
Time range when the watch-list is set as active using the 24-hour format hh:mm
for both start and the end times. The watch-list does not trigger the backup
outside this time range regardless of the state of route collection.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to disable this feature:
no dialer watch-list group-number [delay route-check initial initial-delay][delay
connect connect-delay][delay disconnect disconnect-delay][ip ip-address addressmask]
Mode
Dialer Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<Dx>)#
Default
•
Initial delay: 30 seconds
•
Connect delay: 2 seconds
•
Disconnect delay: 2 seconds
Example
The following example configures the dialer watch option:
XSR(config-if<D9>)dialer watch-list 57 delay route-check initial 15 delay connect
1 delay disconnect 1 ip 192.168.69.9 255.255.255.0
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the show interface dialer command displaying dialer watch statistics:
********** Dialer1 Interface Stats **********
Internet address is 1.1.1.2, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
Dialer1 is Admin Up, Description: <Vancouver>
Oper Status is SPOOFING
Dial stats:
wait for carrier 60s, redial attempts 3, redial interval 10s
10-104
Configuring the Dialer Interface
Dialer Watch Commands
dial string: 3200, success: 0, fail: 0
Dialer pool 1 stats:
member: Serial 1/3:0,
available B-channels: 30, serial ports: 0
Watch-group stats:
watch-group 1, rt cnt 1, trigg cnt 1, state is UP,
delays: init 10, connect 3, disconnect 3,
time range 10:15 11:15
timer expires in 18h:32m:28s
watch-group 2, rt cnt 1, trigg cnt 1, state is UP,
delays: init 30, connect 60, disconnect 2,
time range 10:0 11:17
timer expires in 18h:17m:29s
XSR CLI Reference Guide
10-105
Dialer Watch Commands
10-106
Configuring the Dialer Interface
11
ISDN BRI and PRI Commands
Observing Syntax and Conventions
The CLI Syntax and conventions use the notation described in the following table.
Convention
Description
xyz
Key word or mandatory parameters (bold)
[x]
[ ] Square brackets indicate an optional parameter (italic)
[x | y | z]
[ | ] Square brackets with vertical bar indicate a choice of values
{x | y | z}
{ | } Braces with vertical bar indicate a choice of a required value
[x {y | z} ]
[{ | } ] Combination of square brackets with braces and vertical bars indicates
a required choice of an optional parameter
(config-if<xx>)
xx signifies the interface type and number; e.g., F1, G3, S2/1.0, M57, BRI1/1, PRI-2/1. F indicates a FastEthernet, and G a GigabitEthernet
interface.
Next Mode entries display the CLI prompt after a command is entered
soho.enterasys.com
Italicized, non-syntactic text indicates either a user-specified entry or text with
special emphasis
ISDN Commands
The following set of commands allows you to configure BRI/PRI functionality on the XSR.
interface bri
This command configures a BRI interface for each physical BRI port on the BRI NIM card. When entered, the interface bri command must be followed by the isdn switch-type command for BRI ISDN applications, or the leased-line bri command for BRI leased line applications. If none of the above commands are issued BRI ports are non‐operational.
Syntax
interface bri board/slot/port
board/slot/port
BRI board, slot, and port numbers. For leased‐line applications: 1 for B1 and 2 for B2. Sub‐ports are added by the leased-line [56 | 64] command.
Book Title goes here
11-83
ISDN Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
no interface bri board/slot
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
BRI Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<BRI-xx>)#
Example
The following example acquires BRI B‐channel 1 interface mode:
XSR(config)#interface bri 1/1
XSR(config-if<BRI-1/1>)#
isdn answer1, isdn answer2 (BRI)
This command, isdn answer1, directs the XSR to screen a called‐party or sub‐address number in the incoming setup message for ISDN BRI calls. Issue the isdn answer1 or 2 command to filter incoming calls based on the called‐party or sub‐address number.
If you do not specify this command, all calls are processed or accepted. If you specify the command, the XSR must verify the incoming called‐party number and the sub‐address before processing and/or accepting the call. The verification proceeds from right to left for the called‐
party number; it also proceeds from right to left for the sub‐address number.
You can configure the called‐party number only or the sub‐address. In such a case, only the configured value is verified. To configure a sub‐address only, include the colon (:) before the sub‐
address number.
Note: This command is applicable to the BRI ETSI switch only.
Syntax
isdn answer1 [called-party-number][:subaddress]
called-
Telephone number of the called party. At least one value,
party-number
called‐party‐number or subaddress, must be specified. This value can total no more than 50 digits.
Number that follows as a sub‐address. The colon (:) sets both called‐
party and subaddress, or subaddress only.
called‐party and subaddress, or subaddress only.
subaddress
11-84
ISDN BRI and PRI Commands
Sub‐address number used for ISDN multipoint connections. At least one value, called‐party or subaddress, must be set. The sub‐address can total no more than 50 digits.
ISDN Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove the verification request:
no isdn answer1 [called-party-number][:subaddress]
Default
No verification of either number
Mode
BRI Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<BRI-xx>)#
Examples
The following example configures BRI interface 1/1 with called‐party and sub‐address numbers:
XSR(config)#interface bri 1/1
XSR(config-if<BRsaI-1/1>)#isdn answer1 6171234:5678
The following example configures BRI interface 2/0 with a sub‐address number only:
XSR(config)#interface bri 2/0
XSR(config-if<BRI-2/0>)#isdn answer1:5678
isdn bchan-number-order (PRI)
This command configures an ISDN PRI interface to choose an outgoing call in either ascending or descending order. The XSR selects the lowest or highest available B‐channel starting at either channel B1 (ascending) or channel B23 for a T1 anD‐channel B30 for an E1 (descending). Use this command only if your service provider requests it to decrease the probability of call collisions.
Syntax
isdn bchan-number-order {ascending | descending}
ascending
Selects the outgoing B‐channel in ascending order as follows: 1 to 24 for a T1 and 1 to 31 for an E1 card.
descending
Selects the outgoing B‐channel in descending order as follows: 24 to 1 for a T1 and 31 to 1 for an E1 card.
Syntax of the “no” Form
To restore the default, use the no form or simply reconfigure the interface with the new value:
no isdn bchan-number-order
Default
Descending
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
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11-85
ISDN Commands
Example
The following example sets the T1 controller to make call selections in ascending order:
XSR(config)#controller t1 1/0/0
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0:0>)#description “T1 at Acme”
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0:0>)#framing esf
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0:0>)#linecode b8zs
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0:0>)#pri-group
XSR(config-controller<T1-2/1>isdn bchan-number-order ascending
isdn call
This command is used for debugging purposes only to test call setup procedures with a Central Office ISDN switch or test equipment. It is automatically disconnected after 30 seconds.
Note: Enter this command in Privileged EXEC, not Global configuration mode.
Syntax
isdn call c/p [board/slot/port] dialing-string [56 | 64]
c/p
BRI or PRI port ID.
dialing-string
Called phone number and sub‐address.
56
Call placed at 56 kbps rate.
64
Call placed at 64 kbps rate.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
The following example initiates an ISDN call on BRI port 2/1 at 56 kbps:
XSR#isdn call 2/1:61712345678 56
<186>Jul 28 22:49:51 10.10.10.20 ISDN:
No Channel Available For Test Call
isdn calling-number
This command configures an ISDN PRI or BRI interface to include caller‐number in the out‐going setup message. This billing number is used for non Fully Initializing Terminals (FIT) outside North America only because the isdn spid1/2 command already configures the LDN.
11-86
ISDN BRI and PRI Commands
ISDN Commands
A PRI or BRI port can have only one ISDN calling‐number entry. For ISDN PRI, this command is intended for use when the network offers better pricing on calls in which devices present the caller number. When configured, the calling number is included in the outgoing setup message.
Note: There is no mechanism to mark outgoing calls with the Calling Number and Calling
Subaddress for call routing on the receiving end.
Syntax
isdn calling-number calling-number:subaddress
calling-number
Number of the device making the outgoing call. Only one entry is allowed.
:subaddress
Extension of the phone number.
Syntax of the “no” Form
no isdn calling-number
Mode
BRI Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<BRI-x>)#
Example
The following example specifies a calling number for the XSR:
XSR(config)#interface bri 1/0
XSR(config-if<BRI-1/0>)#isdn calling-number 5088781234
isdn disconnect
This command is used for debugging purposes to test ISDN connectivity. It sets up an ISDN data call to test call setup procedures with a Central Office ISDN switch or test equipment. It is used to disconnect a call before automatic disconnect occurs in 30 seconds or if a call is not dropped.
Note: Enter this command in Privileged EXEC, not Global configuration mode.
Syntax
isdn disconnect c/p channel_number
c/p
BRI or PRI port ID.
channel_number
BRI: 1 or 2, E1 PRI: 0 to 31, T1 PRI: 0 to 22.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Book Title goes here
11-87
ISDN Commands
Example
The following example sets up a test call on channel 24 on BRI port 1/1:
XSR#isdn disconnect 1/1 24
<186>Jul 28 22:49:51 10.10.10.20 ISDN:
No Channel Available For Test Call
isdn spid1, isdn spid2 (BRI)
This command specifies the Service Profile Identification Number (SPID) which is supplied by your ISDN service provider.
North America (NOAM) ISDN switches use Fully Initializing Terminals (FIT) service which require the CPE to register its SPID with the Central Office (CO) before service can begin.
Syntax
isdn spid1 spid-number {max digits| ldn} {max digits}
isdn spid2 spid-number {max digits} ldn} {max digits}
spid-number
Number of the service to which you have subscribed, up to 26 digits. Assigned by the ISDN service provide, it is a 7 to 10‐digit phone number with additional prefix and suffix digits such as 905361707001.
If a SPID is set to 0 and the no isdn autodetect command was issued (autodetect not active), then the line is assumed to be No FIT type and will not attempt registration with the CO.
ldn
This Local Directory Number is a 7 or 10‐digit number assigned by the service provider. It is also used for setting the calling number for outgoing calls.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the SPID number:
no isdn spid1 {max digits| ldn} {max digits}
no isdn spid2
Mode
BRI Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<BRI-x>)
Example
The following example specifies a SPID and LDN for the B1 channel:
XSR(config-if<BRI-2/1>)#isdn spid1 508876123401 5088761234
isdn switch-type (BRI/PRI)
This command sets the central office switch type for the ISDN port, and triggers the creation of the following three dedicated serial interfaces: slot/card/port:0, slot/card/port:1 and slot/card/port:2 for the D, B1 and B2 channels, respectively. Because this command does not have a no form, you can only replace the switch with another, not remove it. The show interface command displays the ISDN interface status.
11-88
ISDN BRI and PRI Commands
ISDN Commands
Note: This command is valid only after the pri-group command was issued.
Syntax
isdn switch-type switch-type {basic-dms100 | basic-ni1 | basic-ntt | basic-net3 |
primary-net5 | primary-ni2 | primary-5ess | primary-dms100 | primary-ntt}
BRI Switch Types:
basic-dms100
North America legacy ISDN switch.
basic-ni1
National ISDN 1 switch for North America.
basic-5ess
North America legacy ISDN switch: not supported.
basic-ntt
Switch for ISDN in Japan.
basic-net3
ETSI‐compliant switch for Euro‐ISDN.
PRI Switch Types:
primary-net5
ETSI‐compliant switch for Euro‐ISDN.
primary-ni2
T1 National ISDN switch type (T1 default).
primary-5ess
T1 NOAM legacy switch.
primary-dms100
T1 NOAM legacy switch.
primary-ntt
T1/J1 ISDN switch for Japan.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes the three serial interfaces:
no isdn switch-type
Defaults
•
BRI: basic‐net3
•
PRI: primary‐net5
•
E1: primary‐net5
•
T1: primary‐ni2
•
J1: primary‐ntt
Mode
BRI/PRI Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<BRI/PRI-xx>)#
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11-89
ISDN Commands
Example
The following example selects a switch type on the BRI 1/1 interface:
XSR(config)#interface bri 1/1
XSR(config-if<BRI-1/1>)#isdn switch-type basic-net3
leased-line bri
This command sets up an ISDN BRI port for leased‐line operation. Leased‐line service at 64 or 128 kbps via BRI is provided in Japan and Germany. The 56 and 112 kbps speeds are provided for eventual North American deployment of this service.
Once a BRI interface is configured for access over leased lines, it is no longer a dialer interface, and signaling over the D‐channel no longer applies. Although the interface is called interface BRI, it is configured as a synchronous serial port and all serial port commands are available.
This command creates a serial interface that is configured as a standard serial port. It can be issued once for speeds equal to and higher then 112 as both B‐channels are bound to the created serial interface. For 56 and 64 bps speeds, the command can be issued twice to create individual serial interfaces :1 and :2 for B1 and B2, respectively.
After you enter the command, you must exit BRI configuration mode and configure the channels by entering interface bri [board/port:1] or interface bri [board/port:2]. These Bearer ports are configured as regular synchronous serial interfaces.
Note: The shutdown/no shutdown channel commands are overridden by the interface bri
shutdown/no shutdown commands.
Syntax
leased-line bri speed {56 | 64 | 112 | 128 | 144}
56 | 64
Two streams are supported, one on each B‐channel.
112 | 128 |144
One stream is supported over the bonded B1 + B2 or B1+ B2 + D‐
channels.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command cancels leased‐line BRI by deleting the earlier created serial interface and returning to the basic‐net3 ISDN switch‐type:
no leased-line bri
Default
CMD/switch type basic‐net3
Mode
BRI Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
11-90
ISDN BRI and PRI Commands
ISDN Commands
Examples
The following example configures two data streams on leased‐line BRI interface 1/1 at 56 kbps with PPP encapsulation:
XSR(config)#interface bri 1/1
XSR(config-if<BRI-1/1>)#leased-line 56
XSR(config)#interface bri 1/1:1
XSR(config-if<BRI-1/1:1>)#ip address 1.1.1.2 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<BRI-1/1:1>)#encapsulation ppp
The following example configures BRI B‐channel 2:
XSR(config)#interface bri 1/1:2
XSR(config-if<BRI-1/1:2>)#ip address 1.1.1.3 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<BRI-1/1:2>)#encapsulation frame-relay
The following example configures one data stream on leased‐line BRI interface 1/1 at 112 kbps with Frame Relay encapsulation:
XSR(config)#interface bri 1/1
XSR(config-if<BRI-1/1>)#leased-line 112
XSR(config)#interface bri 0/1/2:1
XSR(config-if<BRI-1/2:1>)#ip address 1.1.1.3 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-if<BRI-1/2:1>)#encapsulation frame-relay
pri-group
This command configures a T1/E1 port to ISDN PRI on a channelized E1/T1 card. All 23 T1 or 30 E1 time slots are assigned to ISDN control.
Syntax
pri-group
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deregisters the T1/E1 controller from the ISDN controller. Use the no form to remove the ISDN PRI and restore the T1/E1 controller to its default mode:
no pri-group
Mode
Controller configuration: XSR(config-controller<T/Exx>)#
Example
The following NFAS example configures PRI with D‐channel backup:
XSR(config)#controller t1 1/0
XSR(config-controller<T1-1/0>)#pri-group
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11-91
ISDN Debug and Show Commands
shutdown (BRI)
This command forces all data calls to be disconnected and signals all internal XSR resources that the port is not available.
Syntax
shutdown [board/slot/port]
board/slot/port
XSR board, slot and port numbers.
Syntax of the “no” Form
no shutdown [board/slot/port]
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config)#shutdown
ISDN Debug and Show Commands
debug isdn
This command initiates a Layer 2 or 3 ISDN debug session to trace failed calls at the D channel level. Issuing the command has the effect of locking out debugging by any other Telnet or Console connection. If both Layer 2 (Q921) and 3 (Q931) choices are selected, tracing will display both layers.
Note: To prevent unauthorized personnel from observing the debug session on the network, users
with privilege level 15 only can issue this command.
You can exit the debug session either by isuing the no debug isdn command or terminating the Telnet or Console session.
Optionally, you can set a limit of up to 9999 messages which will display at the CLI after which the debug session will end. If the limit is not specified, after 100 displayed messages, the no debug
isdn command will automatically be run. The limit parameter is a global value that is refreshed each time debug isdn is entered.
Syntax
debug isdn slot/card/port Q931 | Q921 [limit {10-9999}]
11-92
slot/card/port
ISDN board, slot, and port numbers.
Q931
Layer 3 protocol tracing enabled for a port issue.
Q921
Layer 2 protocol tracing enabled for a port issue.
limit
ISDN debug session exits after all messages display.
10-9999
Number of messages displayed during a debug session.
ISDN BRI and PRI Commands
ISDN Debug and Show Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes ISDN message tracing. You may choose to issue the command with all or no parameters selected.
no debug isdn slot/card/port Q931 | Q921 [limit {10‐9999}]
Default
Messages: 100
Mode
EXEC Configuration: XSR
Examples
The following example configures Layer 3 ISDN debugging on the specified interface:
XSR#debug isdn 0/1/0 q931
ISDN-DBG 0/1/0 Enable Q931 Tracing
show controllers bri
This command displays physical line data concerning Basic Rate Interface (BRI) sub‐interfaces.
Syntax
show controllers bri [board/slot/port] [:channel number]
board
XSR board, slot and port numbers: <1-2>/<0-1>
/slot
Card, port and D‐channel or, <1-2>/<0-1>:<0-2> /port
Card, port and channel (0 = D, 1 = B1, 2 = B2).
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Example
The following output is produced for BRI sub‐interface 2/1:0
XSR#show controllers bri 2/1:0
Forward Engine Serial Layer Tx/Rx Stats:
RX FROM UPPER LAYER & TX TO DRIVER
Pcks Rx
= 0
Pcks Tx
= 0
Pcks Discarded = 0
RX FROM DRIVER & TX TO UPPER LAYER
Pcks Rx
= 0
Pcks Tx
= 0
Pcks Discarded = 0
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11-93
ISDN Debug and Show Commands
Packet Processor
0 Packet
0 Packet
0 Packet
0 Packet
Tx Scheduler Stats:
driver Tx OK
driver not Tx: MUX END_ERR_BLOCK
driver not Tx: MUX ERROR
driver not Tx: Unknown Msg from MUX
The unit number is 167772177.
The interrupt number is 27.
General: SCC 4 parm ram = 0xa0290f00, reg = 0xa0291660
TX RING ENTRIES:
The data ring starts at 0xa0290200.
TxDRNum = 16, pTxMblkDR = 0x010fc120, TxDRIdx = 0
TxDRCleanIdx = 0
(-2)
(-1)
( 0)
( 1)
( 2)
CmdStsLen
CmdStsLen
CmdStsLen
CmdStsLen
CmdStsLen
[...]
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
0x00000000,
pBuf
pBuf
pBuf
pBuf
pBuf
0x00000000
0x00000000
0x00000000
0x00000000
0x00000000
RX RING ENTRIES:
The data ring starts at 0xa02901c0.
RxDRNum = 8, pRxMblkDR = 0x00ffd200, RxDRIdx = 0
RxBuffSize = 1728, RxBuffOffset = 160
(-2)
(-1)
( 0)
( 1)
( 2)
CmdStsLen
CmdStsLen
CmdStsLen
CmdStsLen
CmdStsLen
[...]
0x80000000,
0xa0000000,
0x80000000,
0x80000000,
0x80000000,
pBuf
pBuf
pBuf
pBuf
pBuf
0x21e146e0
0x21e14da0
0x21e11e60
0x21e12520
0x21e12be0
show interface bri
This command displays the status of the B and D‐channelsʹ serial driver. Generally speaking, BRI channels are displayed exactly as standard serial ports and PRI channels are displayed as standard T1/E1/ISDN‐PRI serial channels.
If the B‐channel is not connected by an active call, the OPER state will be down. The D‐channel will display L1 and L2 status in addition to standard output.
To display the D‐ or B‐channels use the following commands:
11-94
•
BRI ‐ show interface bri 1/0 or show interface bri 1/0:0 ‐ for D channel
•
PRI ‐ show interface serial 2/1:23 for T1 D channel
•
PRI ‐ show interface serial 2/1:15 for E1 D channel
•
PRI ‐ show interface serial 2/1:0 - 22 for T1 B channels
ISDN BRI and PRI Commands
ISDN Debug and Show Commands
•
PRI ‐ show interface serial 2/1:0 - 14, 16-30 for E1 B channels
Use the following table for reference.
Table 11-1
Channel Number Mappings
Service Provider Channel
Numbering
Enterasys Channel
Numbering
B‐channels
D‐channels
B‐channels
D‐channel
T1
1‐23
24
0‐22
23
E1
1‐31
16
0‐30 (not 15)
15
BRI
1, 2
‐
1, 2
0
Syntax (PRI)
show interface bri [card/port]:[channel number]
:channel
Valid channel numbers are: E1 ‐ 0 to 30 (D‐channel: 15),
number
T1 ‐ 0 to 22 (D‐channel: 23)
Syntax (BRI)
show interface bri [card/port]:[channel number]
channel number
1 and 2 (0 is the D‐channel)
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following output is displayed for the BRI interface 1/1:0:
********** Serial Interface Stats **********
D-Serial 1/1:0 is Admin Up / Oper Down
********************** ISDN Stats ISDN-BRI 1/1 *********************
Layer 1: DOWN Layer 2: DOWN State: OFFLINE
Admin Up
Oper Down
Term. 1 Spid:2200555 State: OFFLINE Cause: 000
Term. 2 Spid:2201555 State: OFFLINE Cause: 000
Total Length = 257
The name of this device is bri1/1/0.
The card is 1.
The port is 1.
The following output is displayed for the PRI interface 2/1:
********************** ISDN Stats ISDN-PRI 21 *********************
Layer 1: UP Layer 2: UP State: ONLINE
Admin Up
Oper Up
Book Title goes here
11-95
ISDN Debug and Show Commands
Standard output of the command follows but is not displayed here.
The following output is displayed for the BRI interface 2/1:
XSR#sh interface bri 2/1
********** Serial Interface Stats **********
D-Serial 2/1:0 is Admin Down / Oper Down
********************** ISDN Stats ISDN-BRI 2/1 *******************
Layer 1: DOWN Layer 2: DOWN State: OFFLINE
Admin Down
Oper Down
The name of this device is bri2/1/0.
The card is 2.
The port is 1.
The channel is 0.
The current MTU is 1506.
The device is in polling mode, and is INACTIVE.
The channel is logically INACTIVE.
The operational state is OPER_DOWN.
The protocol used is LAPD.
The baud rate is 16000 bits/sec.
The device uses CRC-16 for Tx.
The device uses CRC-16 for Rx.
Other Interface Statistics:
ifindex
0
ifType
75
ifAdminStatus
1
ifOperStatus
2
ifLastChange
00:00:00
ifInOctets
0
ifInUcastPkts
0
ifInNUcastPkts
0
ifInDiscards
0
ifInErrors
0
ifInUnknownProtos
0
ifOutOctets
0
ifOutUcastPkts
0
ifOutNUcastPkts
0
ifOutDiscards
0
ifOutErrors
0
ifOutQLen
16
11-96
ISDN BRI and PRI Commands
ISDN Debug and Show Commands
show isdn history
This command displays past ISDN actions on the XSR.
Syntax
show isdn history [board/slot/port]
board/slot/port
XSR board, slot and port numbers.
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following output displays incoming and outgoing call data for BRI interface 1/0 and its sub‐
interfaces:
XSR#show isdn history 1/0
********************** ISDN
Channel
Dir
BRI 1/0:2
INCOMING
BRI 1/0:1
OUTGOING
BRI 1/0:1
OUTGOING
BRI 1/0:1
OUTGOING
BRI 1/0:1
INCOMING
BRI 1/0:1
INCOMING
BRI 1/0:2
INCOMING
BRI 1/0:1
OUTGOING
Call History ISDN-BRI 1/0
Start Time
End Time
07:23:10:135 07:23:40:158
07:23:09:817 07:23:39:983
06:32:21:351 06:32:24:947
06:31:09:214 06:31:11:804
06:31:00:856 06:31:02:296
06:24:59:093 06:25:03:116
06:21:03:982 06:21:07:906
06:21:03:719 06:21:07:906
**********************
Cause
Phone Num
016
2100
016
2100
016
2100
016
2100
016
No CALLING Num.
016
No CALLING Num.
016
2100
016
2100
The following output displays incoming call data for PRI interface 2/0 and sub‐interfaces 23 ‐ 30:
XSR#show isdn history 2/0
********************** ISDN
Channel
Dir
Serial 2/0:30
INCOMING
Serial 2/0:29
INCOMING
Serial 2/0:28
INCOMING
Serial 2/0:27
INCOMING
Serial 2/0:26
INCOMING
Serial 2/0:25
INCOMING
Serial 2/0:24
INCOMING
Serial 2/0:23
INCOMING
Call History ISDN-PRI 2/0
Start Time
End Time
20:15:33:888 20:15:51:276
20:15:33:874 20:15:51:142
20:15:33:880 20:15:51:047
20:15:33:870 20:15:50:924
20:15:33:866 20:15:50:835
20:15:33:860 20:15:50:709
20:15:33:856 20:15:50:621
20:15:33:853 20:15:50:486
**********************
Cause
Phone Num
016
No CALLING Num.
016
No CALLING Num.
016
No CALLING Num.
016
No CALLING Num.
016
No CALLING Num.
016
No CALLING Num.
016
No CALLING Num.
016
No CALLING Num.
Prameter Descriptions
Cause
Cause code describing why the call was disconnected.
Phone Num
Calling number for incoming calls and called number for outgoing calls.
Book Title goes here
11-97
ISDN Debug and Show Commands
show isdn active
This command displays current call information of all BRI or PRI ports, or only the selected port specified by board/slot/port identifier.
Syntax
show isdn active [board/slot/port]
board/slot/port
XSR board, slot and port numbers.
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following output displays current call data on BRI interface 1/0:
XSR#show isdn active 1/0
************************** ISDN Stats ISDN-BRI
Layer 1:
UP Layer 2:
UP State: ONLINE
1/0 **********************
Admin Up
Oper Up
Ch No
State
Dir
Speed
Called / Start
1
CONNECTED OUTGOING 64 2100
07:27:52:314
2
CONNECTED INCOMING 64 2100
07:27:52:686
Calling / Destination
Outgoing Test Call
2100
Unknown Call
Cause
0
0
Parameter Descriptions
Call Type
Type of call: INCOMING for incoming, OUTGOING for outgoing or ‐‐ when call direction cannot be determined.
Calling or Called Phone
Number for outgoing call displays.
10 least significant digits 8 least significant digits of called sub‐address.
of called number
The following parameters are for incoming call displays:
10 least significant digits 8 least significant digits of the calling sub‐address. If the incoming of calling number
SETUP message does carries the relevant information element, nothing will be printed.
11-98
Destination
Specifies the Dialer interface/Dialer session that handles the call. The name display is limited to 10 characters.
Speed
56 or 64.
B/S/P
Port ID Board/Slot/Port.
Cause
3‐digit number from 0 to 127 sent by the CO in a Cause Information Element. Refer to the table in the Configuring ISDN chapter of the XSR User’s Guide for Cause Code explanations.
Start
Call start date and time.
End
Call end time.
ISDN BRI and PRI Commands
ISDN Debug and Show Commands
show isdn service
This command displays the service status of all or selected ISDN ports.
Syntax
show isdn service [board/slot/port]
board/slot/port
XSR board, slot and port numbers.
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Parameter Descriptions
Layer 1 Status
ACTIVE| DEACTIVE | PENDING ‐ (Active ‐ cable up and line synchronized)
Layer 2 Status
LAPD: UP | DOWN; State: OFFLINE (Offline ‐ ISDN is not registered with SPIDs or SPIDs not required)
Examples
The following example displays statistics fom the BRI NOAM port:
XSR#show isdn service 1/1
********************** ISDN Service ISDN-BRI
Layer 1:
UP Layer 2:
UP State: ONLINE
Term. 1 Spid:2200555 State:
Term. 2 Spid:2201555 State:
Ch No State
Ch No State
1
IDLE
2
IDLE
1/1 ********************
Admin Up
Oper Up
ONLINE Cause: 000
ONLINE Cause: 000
Ch No State
Ch No
State
Ch No
State
The following example shows output from BRI port 1/0:
#show isdn service 1/0 (BRI)
********************** ISDN Service ISDN-BRI
Layer 1:
UP Layer 2:
UP State: ONLINE
Ch No State
1
IDLE
Ch No State
2
IDLE
Ch No
1/0 ********************
Admin Up
Oper Up
State
Ch No
State
Ch No
State
The following example shows output from PRI port 2/0:
XSR#show isdn service 2/0
********************** ISDN Service ISDN-PRI
Layer 1:
UP Layer 2:
UP State: ONLINE
Ch
0
5
10
15
No State
CONNECTED
CONNECTED
CONNECTED
D-channel
Ch
1
6
11
16
No State
CONNECTED
CONNECTED
CONNECTED
CONNECTED
Ch
2
7
12
17
No State
CONNECTED
CONNECTED
CONNECTED
CONNECTED
2/0 ********************
Admin Up
Oper Up
Ch
3
8
13
18
No State
CONNECTED
CONNECTED
CONNECTED
CONNECTED
Ch
4
9
14
19
No State
CONNECTED
CONNECTED
CONNECTED
CONNECTED
Book Title goes here
11-99
ISDN Debug and Show Commands
20 CONNECTED
25 CONNECTED
30 CONNECTED
11-100
ISDN BRI and PRI Commands
21 CONNECTED
26 CONNECTED
22 CONNECTED
27 CONNECTED
23 CONNECTED
28 CONNECTED
24 CONNECTED
29 CONNECTED
12
Configuring Quality of Service
Observing Syntax and Conventions
The CLI Syntax and conventions use the notation described in the following table.
Convention
Description
xyz
Key word or mandatory parameters (bold)
[x]
[ ] Square brackets indicate an optional parameter (italic)
[x | y | z]
[ | ] Square brackets with vertical bar indicate a choice of values
{x | y | z}
{ | } Braces with vertical bar indicate a choice of a required value
[x {y | z}]
[{ | } ] Combination of square brackets with braces and vertical bars indicates a required choice of an optional parameter
(config-if<xx>)
xx signifies the interface, class map, policy map or other value you specify; e.g., F1, G3, S2/1.0, <Your Name>. F indicates a FastEthernet, and G a GigabitEthernet interface.
Next Mode entries display the CLI prompt after a command is entered.
Sub‐command headings are displayed in red text.
soho.enterasys.com
Italicized, non-syntactic text indicates either a user-specified entry or text with
special emphasis
QoS Commands
The following set of commands configure Quality of Service (QoS) values for the XSR:
•
“Policy‐Map Commands” on page 12‐84.
•
“Class‐map Commands” on page 12‐101.
•
“QoS Show Commands” on page 12‐105.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
12-83
Policy-Map Commands
service-policy
This command attaches a policy map to an output or input interface. You can attach a single policy map to one or more interfaces.
Syntax
service-policy [input | output] policy-map-name
policy-map-name
Attaches the specified policy map onto the output port.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of the command removes a policy map from the interface:
no service-policy [input | output]
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following example associates policy map ACMEpolicy with Serial 1/0:
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#service-policy output ACMEpolicy
Policy-Map Commands
policy-map
This command creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy. Sub‐commands associated with this command are:
•
bandwidth ‐ Specifies the bandwidth allocated for a class belonging to a policy map. Go to page 12‐86 for the command definition.
•
class ‐ Specifies the criteria for classifying traffic. Go to page 12‐87 for the command definition.
•
police ‐ Configures traffic policing. Go to page 12‐89 for the command definition.
•
priority ‐ Prioritizes a class of traffic belonging to a policy map. Go to page 12‐90 for the command definition.
•
queue-limit ‐ Specifies the peak number of packets the queue can hold for a class policy configured in a policy map. Refer to page 12‐91 for the command definition.
•
random-detect (RED) ‐ Enables Random Early Detect on an interface. Refer to page 12‐92 for the command definition.
•
random-detect (WRED) ‐ Enables Weighted Random Early Detect on an interface. Refer to page 12‐93 for the command definition.
•
random-detect dscp ‐ Specifies the DSCP value. Refer to page 12‐93 for the command definition.
12-84
Configuring Quality of Service
Policy-Map Commands
•
random-detect exponential-weighting-constant ‐ Configures the WRED exponential weight factor for the average queue size calculation.Refer to page 12‐95 for the command definition.
•
random-detect precedence ‐ Configures WRED minimum and maximum threshold and maximum drop probability values for a IP precedence value. Go to page 12‐96 for the command definition.
•
set cos ‐ Marks the IEEE 802.1 priority in the header of output VLAN packets with a Class of Service (CoS) matching clause. Go to page 12‐97 for the command definition.
•
set ip dscp ‐ Marks a packet by setting the IP Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) parameter. Go to page 12‐98 for the command definition.
•
set ip precedence ‐ Sets the precedence value in the IP header. Go to page 12‐99 for the command definition.
•
shape ‐ Enables and configures traffic shaping on a class. Go to page 12‐100 for the command definition.
Use the policy-map command to specify the name of the policy map to be created, added to, or modified before you can configure policies for classes whose match criteria are defined in a class map. Invoking the policy-map command enables QoS Policy‐Map configuration mode in which you can configure or modify the class policies for that policy map.
You can configure class policies in a policy map only if the classes have match criteria defined for them. You use the class-map and match commands to configure the match criteria for a class. You can configure up to 64 class policies in a policy map.
A single policy map can be attached to multiple interfaces concurrently. If you attempt to attach a policy map to an interface and available bandwidth on the interface cannot accommodate the total bandwidth requested by class policies comprising the policy map, the interface becomes oversubscribed. In such a case, when classes try to send with all of their bandwidth, some classes may be unable to transmit.
Whenever you modify class policy in an attached policy map, CBWFQ is notified and the new classes are installed as part of the policy map in the CBWFQ system.
Syntax
policy-map policy-map-name
policy-map-name
Name of the policy map.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to delete a policy map:
no policy-map policy-map-name
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
Policy‐Map configuration: XSR(config-pmap-<xx>)#
XSR CLI Reference Guide
12-85
Policy-Map Commands
Example
These commands create class‐map class1 and define its match criteria:
XSR(config)#class-map class1
XSR(config-cmap<class1>)#match access-group 136
These commands create the policy map which is defined to contain policy specifications for class1 and the default class:
XSR(config)#policy-map policy1
XSR(config-pmap<policy1>)#class class1
XSR(config-pmap-c<class1>)#bandwidth 2000
XSR(config-pmap-c<class1>)#queue-limit 40
XSR(config-pmap<policy1>)#class class-default
XSR(config-pmap-c<class-default>)#queue-limit 20
bandwidth
This command specifies or modify the bandwidth allocated for a class belonging to a policy map. It is used in conjunction with a class defined by the class-map command. The bandwidth command specifies the bandwidth for traffic in that class. Class‐Based Weighted Fair Queueing (CBWFQ) derives the weight for packets belonging to the class from the bandwidth allocated to the class. CBWFQ then uses the weight to ensure that the queue for the class is serviced fairly.
The amount of bandwidth can be specified in percentages or kilobits per second (kbps). When configured in kbps, the class weight is calculated as a ratio of the bandwidth specified for that class over the available link bandwidth. The available link bandwidth is equal to the interface bandwidth minus the sum of all bandwidth reserved for low latency queues. When configured in percentages, the class weight is equal to the bandwidth percentages.
Configuring bandwidth in percentages is most useful when the underlying link bandwidth is unknown, changes over time, or the relative class bandwidth distributions are known. For interfaces that have adaptive shaping rates, CBWFQ can be set by configuring class bandwidths in percentages.
The following restrictions apply to the bandwidth command:
•
If the percent keyword is used, the sum of class bandwidth percentages cannot exceed 100% .
•
The amount of bandwidth set should be large enough to also accommodate Layer 2 overhead.
•
A policy map can have all the class bandwidths specified in kbps or all the class bandwidths specified in percentages, but not a mix of both. But, the unit for the priority command in the priority class can be different from the bandwidth unit of the CBWFQ.
Note: When the bandwidth of an interface is insufficient to satisfy the bandwidth of a policy map, the
interface becomes oversubscribed and some CBFWQ classes may become unable to transmit.
Syntax
bandwidth {bandwidth-kbps | percent percent}
12-86
bandwidth-kbps
Amount of bandwidth, in kbps, assigned to the class.
percent
Available bandwidth percentage assigned to the class.
Configuring Quality of Service
Policy-Map Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
Remove the bandwidth specified for a class by using the no form of this command:
no bandwidth
Mode
Policy‐Map Class configuration: XSR(config-pmap-c<xx>)#
Example
The following example specifies a bandwidth of 2000 Kbps for polmap6:
XSR(config)#policy-map polmap6
XSR(config-pmap<polmap6>)#class acl22
XSR(config-pmap-c<acl22>)#bandwidth 2000
XSR(config-pmap-c<acl22>)#queue-limit 30
class
This QoS policy‐map sub‐command specifies the name of the traffic class whose policy you want to create or to change and sets the criteria for classifying traffic. The XSR provides a robust set of matching rules for you to define the criteria.
Before using the class command, you must first enter the policy-map command to identify the policy map you want to change. This also allows you to enter QoS policy‐map configuration mode. After you specify a policy map, you can configure policy for new classes or modify policy for any existing classes in that policy map.
The class name you specify in the policy map ties the characteristics for that class ‐ that is, its policy ‐ to the class map and its match criteria, as configured using the class-map command.
When a class is removed, available bandwidth for the interface is incremented by the amount previously allocated to the class.
Note: The XSR supports a maximum of 64 traffic classes.
The predefined default class called class‐default is the class to which traffic is directed if that traffic does not satisfy the match criteria of other classes whose policy is defined in the policy map.
Syntax
class {class-name | class-default}
class-name
Specifies the name of the class to set or modify policy.
class-default
Specifies the default class to configure or modify policy.
Note: Class-default cannot be removed with the no class command.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
12-87
Policy-Map Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes a class from the policy map:
no class {class-name}
Mode
Policy‐Map configuration: XSR(config-pmap<xx>)#
Next Mode
Policy‐Map Class configuration: XSR(config-pmap-c<xx>)#
Example
This example creates class1 with a minimum of 20 percent in the event of congestion, and the queue reserved for this class can enqueue 40 packets before tail drop is enacted to handle additional packets.
XSR(config)#policy-map policy1
XSR(config-pmap-policy1>)#class class1
XSR(config-pmap-c<class1>)#bandwidth percent 20
XSR(config-pmap-c<class1>)#queue-limit 40
These commands create class2 with a minimum of 3000 kbps of bandwidth for this class in the event of congestion. RED drops up to one out of three packets when the average queue size becomes bigger than 34 and drops each packet if it becomes bigger than 57. RED packet drop is used for congestion avoidance.
XSR(config-pmap<policy1>)#class class2
XSR(config-pmap-c<class2>)#bandwidth 3000
XSR(config-pmap-c<class2>)#random-detect 34 57 3
These commands configure the default map class where a maximum of 20 packets per queue are enqueued before tail drop is enforced to handle additional packets.
XSR(config-pmap<policy1>)#class class-default
XSR(config-pmap-c<class-default>)#queue-limit 20
clear policy-map
This command removes Policy Map statistics for specified interfaces.
Syntax
clear policy-map interface type number
type
XSR interface type: BRI, Dialer, Fast/GigabitEthernet, Loopback, Multilink, and Serial.
number
Card, port, channel, and sub‐interface number.
Mode
EXEC: XSR> or XSR(config)#
12-88
Configuring Quality of Service
Policy-Map Commands
police
This command configures traffic policing.
Syntax
police bps [burst-normal][burst-max][conform-action action][exceed-action
action][violate-action action]
bps
Average rate ranging from 1,000 to 100,000,000 bps.
burst-normal
Normal burst size ranging from 1,000 to 51,200,000 bps. If less than 1000 bytes burst‐normal will be set to 1000 bytes.
burst-max
Excess burst size ranging from 1,000 to 51,2000,000 bytes. Value must be greater than or equal to normal‐burst size. It will automatically be changed to the normal‐burst size if less than normal‐burst.
conform-action
Action to take on packets that conform to the rate limit. exceed-action
Action to take on packets that exceed the rate limit. violate-action
Action to take on packets that violate normal and maximum burst sizes. If violate‐action is set, the token bucket algorithm will use two token buckets.
action
Action to take on packets. You may specify one keyword:
•
drop ‐ Drops the packet.
•
set-prec-transmit new-prec ‐ Sets IP precedence and sends the packet.
•
set-dscp-transmit new-prec ‐ Sets the differentiated services code point (DSCP) value and sends the packet.
•
transmit ‐ Sends the packet.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Traffic policing is removed by using the no form of this command:
no police
Defaults
•
burst‐normal: average rate multiplied by one second)
•
conform‐action: transmit
•
exceed‐action: drop
•
violate‐action: drop
•
Command is disabled by default
Mode
Policy‐Map Class configuration: XSR(config-pmap-c-<xx>)#
XSR CLI Reference Guide
12-89
Policy-Map Commands
Example
The following example defines a traffic class using the class-map command and match criteria from the traffic class with the Traffic Policing configuration, which is configured in the service policy using the policy-map command. The service-policy command is then used to attach this service policy to the interface.
In this example, traffic policing is configured with the average rate of 8000 bits per second and the normal burst size at 1200 bytes and an excess burst of 2000 bytes for all packets leaving F1/0:
XSR(config)#class-map access-match
XSR(config-cmap<access-match>)#match access-group 1
XSR(config)#policy-map police-setting
XSR(config-pmap<police-setting>)#class access-match
XSR(config-pmap-c<access-match>)#police 8000 1200 2000 conform-action transmit
exceed-action drop
XSR(config>)interface fastethernet 1/0
XSR(config-if<F1>)#service-policy output police-setting
priority
This command gives priority to a class of traffic belonging to a policy map. It configures low latency queueing, providing strict Priority Queues (PQ) over Class‐based Weighted Fair Queueing (CBWFQ). Strict PQ allows delay‐sensitive data such as voice to be de‐queued and sent before packets in other queues are dequeued.
The burst argument specifies the burst size and, as such, configures the network to accommodate temporary bursts of traffic. The default burst value, which is computed as 1 second of traffic at the configured bandwidth rate, is used when the burst argument is not specified.
Priority queues can be reserved by absolute bandwidth with these settings: high, medium, low and normal.
Note: The bandwidth and priority commands cannot be used in the same class, within the
same policy map, but they can be used together in the same policy map. They cannot be configured
for class-default. Class-default is always defined as fair queue.
Syntax
priority priority-level bandwidth-kbps [burst]
priority level
Specifies the priority queue: high, medium, low or normal. Normal priority has the least precedence.
bandwidth-kbps
Guaranteed allowed bandwidth for priority traffic. Beyond the guaranteed bandwidth, priority traffic will be dropped to ensure that non‐priority traffic is not starved. Range: 1 to 100,000 kbps.
burst
Sets the burst size, ranging from 32 to 2,000,000 bytes.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Remove a previously specified priority specified for a class with the no form of this command:
no priority
12-90
Configuring Quality of Service
Policy-Map Commands
Mode
Policy‐Map Class configuration: XSR(config-pmap-c-<xx>)#
Example
The following example configures two PQs for the policy map policy57, with a high priority level, guaranteed bandwidth of 300 kbps and a one‐time allowable burst size of 500 kbps for the map‐
class voice; and a low priority bandwidth, 80 bytes of guaranteed bandwidth, and a burst size 2000 bytes for map‐class beta.
XSR(config)#policy-map policy57
XSR(config-pmap<policy57>)#class voice
XSR(config-pmap-c<voice>)#priority high 300 500
XSR(config-pmap<policy57>)#class beta
XSR(config-pmap-c<beta>)#priority low 80 2000
queue-limit
This command specifies or modifies the maximum number of packets the queue can hold for a class policy configured in a policy map.
Class‐Based Weighted Fair Queueing (CBWFQ) creates a queue for every class for which a class map is defined. Packets satisfying the match criteria for a class accumulate in the queue reserved for the class until they are sent, which occurs when the queue is serviced by the Fair Queueing process. When the peak packet threshold you set for the class is reached, any further packet enqueueing to the class queue causes tail drop.
Syntax
queue-limit number-of-packets
number-ofpackets
A number ranging from 1 to 64 specifying the peak number of packets that the queue can accomodate for this class.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of the command removes the queue packet limit from a class. If RED is not configured, the queue limit is restored to the default value.
no queue-limit
Mode
Policy‐Map Class configuration: XSR(config-pmap-c-<xx>)#
Default
64
Example
The following example configures policy map policy75 to contain policy for class acl203. Policy for this class is set so that the queue reserved for it has a maximum packet limit of 50.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
12-91
Policy-Map Commands
XSR(config)#policy-map policy75
XSR(config-pmap<policy75>)#class acl203
XSR(config-pmap-c<acl203>)#bandwidth percent 35
XSR(config-pmap-c<acl203>)#queue-limit 50
random-detect (RED)
This command configures RED for a policy map.
This command configures and enables Random Early Detect (RED) for the class. RED is a congestion avoidance mechanism that slows traffic by randomly dropping packets during congestion and is useful with protocols like TCP that respond to dropped packets by reducing the transmission rate. While RED may be implemented using WRED, this command is retained for compatibility with earlier releases and simplicity of configuration when only RED is required.
Syntax
random-detect min-thres max-thres [mark-prob]
min-thres
Peak limit of average packet queue length, ranging from 1 to 4096, beyond which the XSR randomly drops packets.
max-thres
Peak limit of average packet queue length, ranging from 1 to 4096, beyond which all packets are dropped.
mark-prob
Mark probability denominator, ranging from 1 to 65,536. This is the liklihood of queued packets being dropped when their number exceeding the minimum threshold is between 0 and (1/mark‐prob). When the peak threshold is reached, drop probability is 1 divided by the peak probability.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disable RED on an interface:
no random-detect
Mode
Policy‐Map Class configuration: XSR(config-pmap-c-<xx>)#
Defaults
•
Disabled
•
Mark‐prob: 10
Example
The following example enables RED. The minimum and maximum thresholds are 24 and 40, respectively. The dropping probability is 1/4.
XSR(config)#policy-map foobar
XSR(config-pmap<foobar>)#class alpha
XSR(config-pmap-c<alpha>)#random-detect 24 40 4
12-92
Configuring Quality of Service
Policy-Map Commands
random-detect (WRED)
This command configures and enables Weighted Random Early Detect (WRED) for the class. WRED is a congestion avoidance mechanism that slows traffic by randomly dropping packets when congestion exists. WRED is useful with protocols like TCP that respond to dropped packets by decreasing the transmission rate.
To set or change WRED parameters, use the random-detect {dscp | precedence} command.
If no parameter passed to the command, the default is prec‐based WRED.
Syntax
random-detect {dscp-based | prec-based}
dscp-based
WRED uses DSCP values when calculating drop probability.
prec-based
WRED uses IP precedence values when calculating drop probability.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables WRED on an interface:
no random-detect
Mode
Policy‐Map Class configuration: XSR(config-pmap-c-<xx>)#
Default
Prec‐based
Example
The following example enables WRED as DSCP‐based with the default values for parameters:
XSR(config)#policy-map DSCP
XSR(config-pmap<DSCP>)#class A
XSR(config-pmap-c<a>)#random-detect dscp-based
random-detect dscp
This command changes the Weighted Random Early Detect (WRED) minimum and maximum threshold and maximum drop probability for a DiffServ Code Point (DSCP) value.
This command specifies the DiffServ Code Point (DSCP) value. The DSCP can be a number from 0 to 63, or any of the following keywords: af1, af12 , af13, af21, af22, af23, af31, af32, af33, af41, af42, af43, cs1, cs2, cs3, cs4, cs5, cs6, cs7, ef or default. Each DSCP value has initial WRED parameters.
Table 12‐1 provides initial parameter settings for each DSCP value. The last row details parameters for DSCP values not shown in the table.
Note: This command must be used in conjunction with the random-detect (interface) command.
Also, random-detect dscp is available only if you specified the dscp-based argument when
using the random-detect (interface) command.
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Syntax
random-detect dscp dscp-value min-thres max-thres [mark-prob]
dscp-value
The DSCP value.
min-thres
Minimum limit of average packet queue length, ranging from 1 to 4096, beyond which the XSR randomly drops packets.
max-thres
Maximum limit of average packet queue length, ranging from 1 to 4096, beyond which all packets are dropped.
mark-prob
Mark probability denominator ranging from 1 to 65,536. This is the liklihood of queued packets being dropped when their number exceeding the minimum threshold is between 0 and (1/mark‐prob). When the maximum threshold is reached, drop probability is 1 divided by the maximum probability.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form reverts WRED parameters to the default for a DSCP value:
no random-detect
Mode
Policy‐Map Class configuration: XSR(config-pmap-c-<xx>)#
Defaults
•
Disabled
•
Default min‐threshold settings used by the random-detect dscp command are shown in the following table. The default max‐threshold and mark‐probability are 40 and 1/10 respectively for all DSCP values.
Table 12-1
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DSCP Threshold/Max Drop Probability Parameters
DSCP
Min Threshold
Max Threshold
Max Drop Probability
af11
32
40
1/10
af12
28
40
1/10
af13
24
40
1/10
Af21
32
40
1/10
Af22
28
40
1/10
Af23
24
40
1/10
Af41
32
40
1/10
Af31
28
40
1/10
Af32
24
40
1/10
Af33
32
40
1/10
Af42
28
40
1/10
Af43
24
40
1/10
Configuring Quality of Service
Policy-Map Commands
Table 12-1
DSCP Threshold/Max Drop Probability Parameters (continued)
DSCP
Min Threshold
Max Threshold
Max Drop Probability
Cs1
32
40
1/10
Cs2
28
40
1/10
Cs3
24
40
1/10
Cs4
32
40
1/10
Cs5
28
40
1/10
Cs6
24
40
1/10
Cs7
32
40
1/10
Ef
28
40
1/10
Initial parameters for all 24
other DSCP values
40
1/10
Examples
The following example enables WRED with a minimum threshold for DSCP af21 of 24 and maximum threshold of 40. The dropping probability is 1/4th. All other DSCPs have default values.
XSR(config)#policy-map wred
XSR(config-pmap<wred>)#class a
XSR(config-pmap-c<a>)#random-detect dscp-based
XSR(config-pmap-c<a>)#random-detect dscp af21 24 40 4
The following example sets WRED It sets DSCP 33 WRED parameters to 10, 20, 10 and changes the setting for all other DSCP values from initial to default 5, 10, 20.
XSR(config)#policy-map wred
XSR(config-pmap<wred>)#class a
XSR(config-pmap-c<a>)#random-detect dscp-based
XSR(config-pmap-c<a>)#random-detect dscp 33 10 20 10
XSR(config-pmap-c<a>)#random-detect default 5 10 20
random-detect exponential-weighting-constant
This command configures the Weighted Random Early Detect (WRED) exponential weight factor for the average queue size calculation. The weight constant is expressed as a power of 2.
WRED uses the exponential weighting factor to calculate average queue size. To simplify computing average queue size, the weight constant is allowed to be a power of 2. Choosing the right value of this constant is important for proper WRED operation. The default value is based on available data and should be changed only if your applications benefit from a different value.
Syntax
random-detect exponential-weighting-constant value
value
Exponent ranging from 1 to 16.
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Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the constant to the default value of 9:
no random-detect exponential-weighting-constant
Mode
Policy‐Map Class configuration: XSR(config-pmap-c-<xx>)#
Example
The following example enables WRED and sets the weight constant to (1/2)^5:
XSR(config)#policy-map wred
XSR(config-pmap<wred>)#class a
XSR(config-pmap-c<a>)#random-detect dscp-based
XSR(config-pmap-c<a>)#random-detect exponential-weighting-constant 5
random-detect precedence
This command sets Weighted Random Early Detect (WRED) the minimum and maximum threshold and maximum drop probability values for a IP precedence value.
The default WRED maximum drop probability (MaxP) is 1/10 and the default maximum threshold (MaxTh) is 40 for all IP precedence values. The default minimum threshold is calculated from MaxTh based on following formula:
MinTh = (1/2 ‐ precvalue/16) x MaxTh
To change the default setting, use the random-detect precedence default command. By doing so, all IP precedence will share the same values except those which were explicitly configured with random-detect precedence. This setting is useful if WRED should operate as RED. To revert to the original default setting, enter no random-detect precedence default.
Syntax
random-detect precedence prec-value min-thres max-thres [mark-prob]default
prec-value
Precedence value, ranging from 0 to 7 with the keyword default.
min-thres
Minimum number of packets in the queue, ranging from 1 to 4096, beyond which the XSR randomly drops packets.
max-thres
Maximum number of packets in the queue, ranging from 1 to 4096, beyond which the XSR drops all packets.
mark-prob
Mark probability denominator. Liklihood of queued packets to be dropped when their number exceeding the minimum limit is between 0 and (1/mark‐prob). Range: 1 to 65,536.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command reverts WRED parameters to the default for a precedence value:
no random-detect precedence prec-value
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Configuring Quality of Service
Policy-Map Commands
Defaults
•
Disabled
•
Mark‐prob: 10
Mode
Policy‐Map Class configuration: XSR(config-pmap-c-<xx>)#
Examples
The following example enables WRED with a minimum IP precedence threshold of 24 and maximum of 40. The dropping probability is 1/4. All other precedence types have default values.
XSR(config)#policy-map wred
XSR(config-pmap<wred>)#class a
XSR(config-pmap-c<a>)#random-detect prec-based
XSR(config-pmap-c<a>)#random-detect precedence 3 24 40 4
The following example sets WRED as RED with a minimum threshold of 10 and maximum threshold of 20:
XSR(config)#policy-map foo
XSR(config-pmap<foo>)#class a
XSR(config-pmap-c<a>)#random-detect prec-based
XSR(config-pmap-c<a>)#random-detect precedence default 10 20
set cos
This command marks the IEEE 802.1 priority in the header of output VLAN packets with a Class of Service (CoS) matching clause. As part of CoS configuration, the XSR associates a policy map with a class of traffic. By comparison, the match cos command marks the headers of incoming VLAN packets.
Note: Setting a VLAN priority value is applicable only to VLAN sub-interfaces; the set clause is
ignored for other interface types.
For information on the vlan command, go to page 4‐91 in the Configuring Hardware Controllers chapter.
Syntax
set cos ieee802.1p-value
ieee802.1p-value
Priority value to mark output VLAN packets, ranging from 0 to 7.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the match clause.
no set cos ieee802.1p-value
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Mode
Policy‐Map Class configuration: XSR(config-pmap-c-<xx>)#
Example
The following example configures policy‐map setCosTo4 that matches input priority value range from 5 to 7 and sets the output VLAN priority to 4:
XSR(config)#policy-map setCosTo4
XSR(config-pmap<setCosTo4>)#class matchCos5To7
XSR(config-pmap-c<matchCos5to7>)#set cos 4
set ip dscp
This command marks a packet by setting the IP Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) in the Type of Service (ToS) byte. Once the IP DSCP bit is set, other QoS services can then operate on the bit settings.
Note: You cannot mark a packet by the IP precedence with the set ip precedence command
and mark the same packet with an IP DSCP value by entering the set ip dscp command.
The network gives priority (or some type of expedited handling) to marked traffic. Typically, you set IP precedence at the edge of the network (or administrative domain); data then is queued based on the precedence. Class‐Based Weighted Fair Queueing (CBWFQ) can speed up handling for high‐precedence traffic at congestion points. Note: Reserved keywords EF (Expedited Forwarding), AF11 (Assured Forwarding Class 11), and
AF12 (Assured Forwarding Class 12) can be specified instead of numeric values.
Syntax
set ip dscp ip-dscp-value
ip-dscp-value
A number from 0 to 63 that sets the IP DSCP value. Reserved keywords can be set instead of numeric values as follows:
af11 ‐ Match packets with AF11 DSCP (001010)
af12 ‐ Match packets with AF12 DSCP (001100)
af13 ‐ Match packets with AF13 DSCP (001110)
af21 ‐ Match packets with AF21 DSCP (010010)
af22 ‐ Match packets with AF22 DSCP (010100)
af23 ‐ Match packets with AF23 DSCP (010110)
af31 ‐ Match packets with AF31 DSCP (011010)
af32 ‐ Match packets with AF32 DSCP (011100)
af33 ‐ Match packets with AF33 DSCP (011110)
af41 ‐ Match packets with AF41 DSCP (100010)
af42 ‐ Match packets with AF42 DSCP (100100)
af43 ‐ Match packets with AF43 DSCP (001010)
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Policy-Map Commands
cs1 ‐ Match packets with CS1 DSCP (001000)
cs2 ‐ Match packets with CS2 DSCP (010000)
cs3 ‐ Match packets with CS3 DSCP (011000)
cs4 ‐ Match packets with CS4 DSCP (100000)
cs5 ‐ Match packets with CS5 DSCP (101000)
cs6 ‐ Match packets with CS6 DSCP (110000)
cs7 ‐ Match packets with CS7 DSCP (111000)
default ‐ Match packets with default DSCP (000000)
ef ‐ Match packets with Expedited Forwarding (EF) DSCP (101110)
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes a previously set IP DSCP:
no set ip dscp
Mode
Policy‐Map Class configuration: XSR(config-pmap-c-xx)#
Example
In the following example, the IP DSCP TOS byte is set to 8 for class1 and cs2 for class2 in policy57:
XSR(config)#policy-map policy57
XSR(config-pmap<policy57>)#class class1
XSR(config-pmap-c<class1>)#set ip dscp 8
XSR(config-pmap<policy57>)#class class2
XSR(config-pmap-c<class1>)#set ip dscp cs2
set ip precedence
This command sets the precedence value in the IP header. The network gives priority (or some type of expedited handling) to marked traffic through the application of CBWFQ or RED at points downstream in the network. Typically, you set IP Precedence at the edge of the network (or administrative domain); data then is queued based on the precedence. CBWFQ can speed up handling for certain precedence traffic at congestion points.
Syntax
set ip precedence ip-precedence-value
ip-precedence-value
Number from 0 to 7 that sets the precedence bit in the IP header.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form leaves the precedence value at its current setting:
no set ip precedence
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Policy-Map Commands
Mode
Policy‐Map Class configuration: XSR(config-pmap-c-xx)#
Example
The following example sets the IP Precedence bit to 7 for packets that satisfy the match criteria of the class map called class39. All packets that satisfy the match criteria of class39 are marked with the IP Precedence value of 7. How packets marked with the IP Precedence value of 7 are treated is determined by your network configuration.
XSR(config)#policy-map policy57
XSR(config-pmap<policy57>)#class class39
XSR(config-pmap-c<class39>)#set ip precedence 7
shape
This command enables and configures traffic shaping on a class. It can be applied to any fair‐class or priority class. The default burst is sufficient to achieve the average rate and is calculated from the rate and the default measurement interval of 10 milliseconds:
Burst equals rate multiplied by (10 milliseconds divided by 1000)
In order to sustain the average rate, the normal burst cannot be less than the default burst. The default value for exceed burst is equal to the normal burst.
Syntax
shape rate [[burst]exceed-burst]
rate
Average or peak rate for output traffic in bbps.
burst
Maximum threshold burst size. Range: 1 to 20,000 bytes.
exceed-burst
Maximum exceed burst size. Range 1 to 40,000 bytes.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables traffic shaping on a class:
no shape
Default
Disabled
Mode
Policy‐Map Class configuration: XSR(config-pmap-c-xx)#
Example
The following example configures Class A with 20% of the link bandwidth to a maximum of 64 Kbytes and maximum burst of 2000 bytes:
XSR(config)#policy-map foo
XSR(config-pmap<foo>)#class A
XSR(config-pmap-c<a>)#bandwidth percent 20
XSR(config-pmap-c<a>)#shape 64000 2000
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Class-map Commands
Class-map Commands
class-map
This command creates a class map for matching packets to a specified class. Use it to specify the name of the class for which you want to create or modify class map match criteria.
Packets arriving at the output interface are checked against the match criteria set for a class map to determine if the packet belongs to that class. Sub‐commands associated with the command are:
•
match access-group ‐ configures the match criteria for a class map on the basis of a configured ACL. Go to page 12‐102 for the command definition.
•
match cos ‐ identifies a specific IEEE 802.1 priority value as a match criterion. Go to
page 12‐103 for the command definition.
•
match ip dscp ‐ identifies a specific IP Differentiated Service Code Point (DSCP) value as a match criterion. Go to page 12‐103 for the command definition.
•
match ip precedence ‐ identifies IP precedence values as match criteria. Go to page 12‐104 for the command definition.
Syntax
class-map {match-all match-any} class-map-name
match-all
Packets must match all criteria in the class‐map to belong to the class‐name.
match-any
Packets must match any (one or more) criteria in the class map to belong to the class‐name.
class-mapname
Designation for the class‐map which is used for the class map and to set policy for the class in the policy map.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove an existing class map:
no class-map [match-all] | [match-any] word
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
Class‐Map configuration: XSR(config-cmap<xx>)#
Default
match‐all
Example
The following example creates class‐map class57 and defines its match criterion with policy map policy99 which is configured to contain policy rules for class57 and the default class.
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Class-map Commands
XSR(config)#class-map class57
XSR(config-cmap<class57>)#match access-group 136
XSR(config)#policy-map policy99
XSR(config-pmap<policy99>)#class class57
XSR(config-pmap-c<class57>)#bandwidth percent 10
XSR(config-pmap-c<class57>)#queue-limit 40
XSR(config-pmap<policy99>)#class class-default
XSR(config)#interface serial 1/0
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#service-policy output policy99
match access-group
This command configures the match criteria for a class map on the basis of the specified Access Control List (ACL).
You define traffic classes based on match criteria including ACLs, DSCP and/or IP Precedence. Packets satisfying the match criteria for a class constitute the traffic for that class.
The match access-group command specifies a numbered ACL whose contents are used as the match criteria against which packets are checked to determine if they belong to the class set by the class map.
To use the match access-group command, you must first enter the class-map command to specify the name of the class whose match criteria you want to establish. After you identify the class, you can use one of the following commands to configure its match criteria:
•
match access-group
•
match ip dscp
•
match ip precedence
Syntax
match access-group {access-group}
access-group
A numbered ACL whose contents are used as the match criteria against which packets are checked to determine if they belong to the class. Range: 1 to 199.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes ACL match criteria from a class map:
no match access-group access-group
Mode
Class‐map configuration: XSR(config-cmap-xx)#
Example
The following example specifies a class map called acl57 and configures the ACL numbered 57 to be used as the match criteria for this class:
XSR(config)#class-map acl57
XSR(config-cmap<ac157>)#match access-group 57
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Configuring Quality of Service
Class-map Commands
match cos
This command identifies a specific IEEE 802.1 priority value as a match criterion. Up to 8 priority values can be matched in one match statement. For example, if you wanted the priority values of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7 (note that only one of the priority values must be a successful match criterion, not all of the specified priority values), enter the match cos 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 command.
This command is used by the class map to identify a specific priority value marking on the header of incoming VLAN packets. By comparison, the set cos command marks the headers of outgoing VLAN packets. For information on the vlan command, go to page 4‐91 in the Configuring Hardware Controllers chapter.
Syntax
match cos ieee802.1p-value [ieee802.1p-value] [ieee802.1p-value] ...
ieee802.1p-value
Priority value in the input VLAN header, ranging from 0 to 7.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the match clause:
no match cos
Default
No match clause for VLAN priority
Mode
Class‐map configuration: XSR(config-cmap-xx)#
Example
The following example example configures classmap matchCos5To7 that matches input priority values from 5 to 7:
XSR(config)#class-map matchCos5To7
XSR(config-cmap<matchCos5To7>)#match cos 5 6 7
match ip dscp
This command identifies a specific IP Differentiated Service Code Point (DSCP) value as a match criterion. Up to 8 IP DSCP values can be matched in one match statement. For example, if you wanted the IP DCSP values of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7 (note that only one of the IP DSCP values must be a successful match criterion, not all of the specified IP DSCP values), enter the match ip dscp 0
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 command.
This command is used by the class map to identify a specific IP DSCP value marking on a packet. The ip‐dscp‐value arguments are used as markings only. The IP DSCP values have no mathematical significance. For instance, the ip‐dscp‐value of 2 is not greater than 1. The value simply indicates that a packet marked with the ip‐dscp‐value of 2 is different than a packet marked with the ip‐dscp‐
value of 1. The treatment of these marked packets is defined by the user through the setting of QoS policies in policy‐map class configuration mode.
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Class-map Commands
Syntax
match ip dscp ip-dscp-value [ip-dscp-value][ip-dscp-value] [ip-dscp-value] [ipdscp-value][ip-dscp-value][ip-dscp-value][ip-dscp-value]
ip-dscp-value
Specifies a value from 0 to 63 to identify an IP DSCP value.
Syntax of the “no” Form
To remove a specific IP DSCP value from a class map, use the no form of this command:
no match ip dscp ip-dscp-value [ip-dscp-value][ip-dscp-value][ip-dscp-value][ipdscp-value][ip-dscp-value][ip-dscp-value][ip-dscp-value]
Mode
Class‐map configuration: XSR(config-cmap-xx)#
Example
The following example shows how to configure the service policy called priority55 and attach service policy priority55 to an interface. In this example, the class map ipdscp15 will evaluate all packets entering interface F1 for an IP DSCP value of 15. If the incoming packet has been marked with the IP DSCP value of 15, the packet will be treated with a high priority level.
XSR(config)#class-map ipdscp15
XSR(config-cmap<ipdscp15>)#match ip dscp 15
XSR(config)#policy-map priority55
XSR(config-pmap<priority55>)#class ipdscp15
XSR(config-pmap-c<ipdscp15>)#priority high 55
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#service-policy output priority55
match ip precedence
This command identifies IP precedence values as match criteria. Up to 4 precedence values can be matched in one match statement. For example, if you wanted the IP precedence values of 0, 1, 2, or 3 (note that only one of the IP precedence values must be a successful match criterion, not all of the specified IP precedence values), enter the match ip precedence 0 1 2 3 command.
The ip‐precedence‐value arguments are used as markings only, they have no mathematical significance. For instance, the ip‐precedence‐value of 2 is not greater than 1. The value simply indicates that a packet marked with the ip‐precedence‐value of 2 is different than a packet marked with the ip‐precedence‐value of 1. You define the treatment of these different packets by setting QoS policies in Policy‐map Class configuration mode.
Syntax
match ip precedence ip-precedence-value [ip-precedence-value] [ip-precedencevalue][ip-precedence-value][ip-precedence-value][ip-precedence-value][ipprecedence-value] [ip-precedence-value][ip-precedence-value]
ip-precedence-value
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Configuring Quality of Service
Specifies an IP precedence value from 0 to 7.
QoS Show Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove IP precedence values from a class map:
no match ip precedence ip-precedence-value [ip-precedence-value] [ip-precedencevalue][ip-precedence-value][ip-precedence-value][ip-precedence-value][ipprecedence-value] [ip-precedence-value][ip-precedence-value]
Mode
Class‐map configuration: XSR(config-cmap-xx)#
Example
The following example shows how to configure the service policy called priority50 and attach service policy priority50 to an interface. In this example, the class map called ipprec5 will evaluate all packets entering F1/0/0 for an IP precedence value of 5. If the incoming packet has been marked with the IP precedence value of 5, the packet will be treated with a priority level of 50.
XSR(config)#class-map ipprec5
XSR(config-cmap<ipprec5>)#match ip precedence 5
XSR(config)#policy-map priority50
XSR(config-pmap<priority50>)#class ipprec5
XSR(config-pmap-c<ipprec5>)#priority high 50
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#service-policy output priority50
QoS Show Commands
show class-map
This command displays all class maps and their matching criteria.
You can use the show class-map command to display all class maps and their matching criteria. If you enter the optional class‐map‐name argument, the specified class map and its matching criteria will be displayed.
Syntax
show class-map [class-map-name]
class-map-name
Name of the class map.
Mode
EXEC, Privileged EXEC, or Global configuration: XSR>, XSR#, or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
In this example, three class maps are defined. Packets that match access list 103 belong to class c3, IP packets with IP precedence belong to class c2, and packets with DSCP 32 belong to class c1. The output from the show class-map command shows the three defined class maps.
XSR#show class-map
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QoS Show Commands
Class
Match
Class
Match
Class
Match
map c3
access-group 103
map c2
ip precedence 2
map c1
ip dscp 32
show policy-map
This command displays the configuration of all classes for a specified service policy map or all classes for all existing policy maps. It displays the configuration of a service policy map created using the policy-map command. You can use the show policy-map command to display all class configurations comprising any existing service policy map, whether or not that service policy map has been attached to an interface.
Syntax
show policy-map [policy-map] interface-type
policy-map
Service policy map name whose complete configuration will be shown.
interface
type
Configuration for classes on the specified interface including: ATM, BRI, Fast/
GigabitEthernet, Loopback, Serial, Multilink, or Dialer (0 to 255).
Default
All existing policy map configurations are displayed.
Mode
EXEC, Privileged EXEC, or Global configuration: XSR>, XSR#, or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
This example displays the contents of the service policy map called po1:
XSR#show policy-map po1
Policy Map po1
CLass c1: Weighted Fair Queue bandwidth 600 (kbps)
Class c2: Weighted Fair Queue bandwidth 300 (kbps)
This example displays the contents of all policy maps on the XSR:
XSR#show policy-map
Policy Map p6
Class c1: Weighted Fair Queue bandwidth 10 %
Class c2: Weighted Fair Queue bandwidth 80 %
Policy Map p9
Class c1: Priority high bandwidth 300 (kbps)
Class c2: Weighted Fair Queue bandwidth 800 (kbps)
Policy Map p10
Class c1: Weighted Fair Queue bandwidth 600 (kbps)
Class c2: Weighted Fair Queue bandwidth 300 (kbps)
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QoS Show Commands
show policy-map interface
This command shows the configuration of all service policies applied on an interface or Frame Relay Data‐link Connection Identifier (DLCI). It displays the configuration for classes on the specified interface or specified DLCI only if a service policy has been attached to the interface or PVC. This command shows input and the output policies applied to the interfaces.Counters displayed after you enter the show policy-map interface command are updated only if congestion is present on the interface.
Note: This command displays policy information about Frame Relay PVCs only if Frame Relay
Traffic Shaping (FRTS) is enabled on the interface.
Counters displayed after you enter the show policy‐map interface command are updated only if congestion is present on the interface.
When QoS is applied to a Dialer interface, this command displays no data. To display the policy‐
map after the dialer has built the connection, enter the show policy map command on the interface from the dialer pool that the dialer called on and not the dialer interface itself.
Syntax
show policy-map interface interface-type [dlci dlci] mlpppgroup
interface
type
Interface or sub‐interface type including: ATM, BRI, Fast/GigabitEthernet, Loopback, Multilink, or Dialer (0‐255).
dlci
A specific PVC for which policy configuration is shown.
dlci
A Data‐Link Connection Identifier (DLCI) number used on the interface. Policy configuration for the corresponding PVC is shown when a DLCI is specified.
mlpppgroup
Multilink PPP group number.
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following example shows policy map mypolicy attached to DLCI 100 on Serial interface 1/0. Policy is applied simultaneously to input and output traffic. Input policy displays counters for input QoS (actual bandwidth and policing). Shaping, bandwidth and buffer management are not perfomred on input traffic and are shown for output traffic only.
XSR(config)#policy-map mypolicy
XSR(config-pmap<mypolicy>)#exit
XSR(config)#class-map smallPackets
XSR(config-pmap-c<smallPackets>)#priority high 800
XSR(config-pmap-c<smallPackets>)#random-detect 20 25 2
XSR(config-pmap-c<smallPackets>)#class immediate-data
XSR(config-pmap-c<immediate-data>)#bandwidth 300
XSR(config-pmap-c<immediate-data>)#class class-default
XSR(config-pmap-c<class-default>)#shape 100000 12500
XSR CLI Reference Guide
12-107
QoS Show Commands
XSR(config)#map-class frame-relay foo
XSR(config-map-class<foo>)#frame-relay cir out 100000
XSR(config-map-class<foo>)#frame-relay bc out 10000
XSR(config-map-class<foo>)#service-policy output mypolicy
XSR(config-map-class<foo>)#service policy input mypolicy
XSR#show policy-map interface s1/0.1 dlci 100
Serial1/0.1: DLCI 100 output: mypolicy
Class smallPackets
Priority High
Bandwidth 800 (kbps)Actual bandwidth 0 (kbps),
Random-detect :
Avg Qsize: 5.32, Random Drops : 54
min-th : 20 max-th : 25 mark-prob : 1/2
Tx/NoBuff/Error (19892/35/0)
Class immediate-data
Weighted Fair Queuing
Bandwidth 300 (kbps) Actual bandwidth 0 (kbps),
Max Qsize: 64, Qsize: 32, Tail drops 223
Tx/NoBuff/Error (3321/22/0)
Class class-default
Weighted Fair Queuing
Bandwidth 436 (kbps) Actual bandwidth 0 (kbps),
Max Qsize: 64, Qsize: 0, Tail drops 0
Tx/NoBuff/Error (0/0/0)
Traffic shaping
Average Normal Exceed Refresh Refresh
Rate
Burst
Burst
Time
Bytes
100000 12500
0
10(ms) 125
Serial1/0.1: DLCI 100 input : mypolicy
Class smallPackets
Actual bandwidth 12 (kbps) Tx/NoBuff/Error (19892/0/0)
Class immediate-data
Actual bandwidth 0 (kbps) Tx/NoBuff/Error (3321/0/0)
Class class-default
Actual bandwidth 0 (kbps)Tx/NoBuff/Error (0/0/0)
Parmeter Descriptions
12-108
Bandwidth
Configured bandwidth for a class in percentage or kbps.
Actual bandwidth
Bandwidth that this class actually receives on the output link.
Max Qsize
Configured queue size.
Qsize
Current queue size.
Configuring Quality of Service
QoS Show Commands
Tail drops
Sum of packets dropped by Tail Drop buffer management.
Tx
Sum of packets transmitted successfully.
NoBuff
Sum of packets rejected by the driver because of no buffer. This value is always zero when the policy map is applied to DLCI and MLPPP.
Error
Sum of transmit (driver) errors when trying to send out a packet. Value is always zero when the policy map is applied to DLCI and MLPPP.
Avg Qsize
RED average queue size.
Random Drops
Sum of packets dropped by RED.
min-th
Configured minimum threshold for RED.
max-th
Configured maximum threshold for RED.
mark-prob
Configured mark probability for RED.
show random-detect interface
This command displays data about Random Early Detection (RED).
Syntax
show random-detect interface [interface-type interface-number]
interface-type
The type of interface.
interface-number
The number of the interface.
Mode
EXEC: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following commands configure policy‐map Shape: XSR(config)#policy-map Shape
XSR(config-pmap<Shape>)#class d32
XSR(config-pmap-c<d32>)#bandwidth per
XSR(config-pmap-c<d32>)#random-detect
XSR(config-pmap-c<d32>)#random-detect
XSR(config-pmap-c<d32>)#random-detect
30
dscp-based
dscp 32 10 20 10
dscp default 2 5 20
The following is sample output from the command. There are drops only from class d32.
XSR#show random-detect interface serial 1/0:0
Serial 1/0:0
output: Shape
output: Shape
Class d32
Weighted Random-detect:
Avg Qsize: 5, Total Random Drops: 2223
XSR CLI Reference Guide
12-109
QoS Show Commands
DSCP
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
12-110
min-th
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
10
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
Configuring Quality of Service
max-th
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
20
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
mark-prob
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
10
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
tail drop
early drop
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1900
323
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
QoS Show Commands
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
2
5
20
2
5
20
2
5
20
2
5
20
2
5
20
2
5
20
2
5
20
2
5
20
2
5
20
2
5
20
2
5
20
2
5
20
2
5
20
2
5
20
2
5
20
Exponential weighting constant:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
9
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Parameter Descriptions
Average Queue size
Average output queue size for this interface.
Total Random Drops
Sum of packets dropped for all DSCP codepoint..
Min-th
Minimum threshold.
Max-th
Maximum length of the queue. When the average queue size is larger than this number, any additional packets will be dropped.
Mark-prob
Probability (1/mark‐prob) for random drops.
DSCP
DSCP code point.
Tail drop
Number of drops because of average queue size greater than max‐
threshold.
Early drop
Number of drops when the average queue size is between min‐
threshold and max‐threshold.
show shape interface
This command displays information about QoS traffic shaping.
Syntax
show shape interface [interface-type interface-number]
interface-type
Type of interface.
interface-number
Number of the interface.
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
XSR CLI Reference Guide
12-111
QoS Show Commands
Sample Output
This following commands configure shape information for each class. In the following example policy‐map shape is configured as follows:
XSR(config)#policy-map Shape
XSR(config-pmap<Shape>)#class d32
XSR(config-pmap-c<d32>)#bandwidth per 30
XSR(config-pmap-c<d32>)#shape 400000 50000
XSR(config-pmap-c<d32>)#class d33
XSR(config-pmap-c<d33>)#bandwidth per 30
XSR(config-pmap-c<d32>)#shape 100000 12500
The following is sample output displays shape information for classes d32 and d33:
XSR# show shape interface serial 1/0:0
Serial 0/1/0:0
output: Shape
Serial 0/1/1:1
output: Shape
Class d32
Traffic
Average
Rate
400000
Class d33
Traffic
Average
Rate
100000
shaping
Normal Exceed
Burst
Burst
50000
0
Refresh Refresh
Time
Bytes
10(ms) 500
shaping
Normal Exceed
Burst
Burst
12500
0
Refresh Refresh
Time
Bytes
10(ms) 125
Parameter Descriptions
12-112
Average Rate
Average shaped rate configured.
Normal burst
Configured normal burst.
Exceed burst
Configured exceed burst.
Refresh time
Time interval of bucket refill with tokens.
Refresh bytes
Number of bytes added to the bucket per time interval.
Configuring Quality of Service
13
Configuring ADSL
Observing Syntax and Conventions
The CLI command syntax and conventions use the notation described below.
Convention
Description
xyz
Key word or mandatory parameters (bold)
[x]
[ ] Square brackets indicate an optional parameter (italic)
[x | y | z]
[ | ] Square brackets with vertical bar indicate a choice of values
{x | y | z}
{ | } Braces with vertical bar indicate a choice of a required value
[x {y | z} ]
[{ | } ] Combination of square brackets with braces and vertical bars indicates a
required choice of an optional parameter
(config-if<xx>)
xx signifies interface type and number, e.g.: F1, S2/1.0, D1, M57, L1,
ATM0/1/1
Next Mode entries display the CLI prompt after a command is entered.
Sub-command headings are displayed in red, italicized text.
soho.enterasys.com
Italicized, non-syntactic text indicates either a user-specified entry or text with
special emphasis
ADSL Configuration Commands
The following command sets define ADSL functionality on the XSR including:
•
“CMV Commands” on page 13‐83.
•
“Other ADSL Commands” on page 13‐87.
•
“PPP Configuration Commands” on page 13‐99.
•
“ATM Clear and Show Commands” on page 13‐103.
CMV Commands
cmv append
This command adds a Command Management Variable (CMV) to the DSP training list which is used by the DSP firmware when the line is in training mode. This command is intended for use by Enterasys field service personnel only. This command requires that the ADSL NIM be installed and the DSP firmware file be present in the Flash: directory.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
13-83
CMV Commands
Syntax
cmv append command-ID offset value
command-ID
Represents a 4‐character CMV command.
offset
Decimal or hexadecimal number representing where to write the value.
value
Decimal or hexadecimal number.
Mode
ATM Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMxx>)#
Example
The following example adds the CMV DOPT 1 with a hex value:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/1>)#cmv append DOPT 1 0x306090c0
cmv clear
This command removes all Command Management Variable (CMV) commands from the CMV training list which is used by the DSP firmware when the line is in training mode. This command is intended for use by Enterasys field service personnel only.
This command requires that the ADSL NIM be installed and the DSP firmware file be present in the Flash: directory.
Syntax
cmv clear
Mode
ATM Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMxx>)#
Example
The following example deletes all CMVs from the training list:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/1>)#cmv clear
cmv cr
This command reads a Command Management Variable (CMV) from the DSP. This command is intended for use by Enterasys field service personnel only.
This command requires that the ADSL NIM be installed and the DSP firmware file be present in the Flash: directory.
13-84
Configuring ADSL
CMV Commands
Syntax
cmv cr command-ID offset
command-ID
Represents a 4‐character CMV command.
offset
Decimal or hexadecimal number representing where to read the value.
Mode
ATM Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMxx>)#
Example
The following example reads CMV STAT 0 from the DSP:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/1>)#cmv cr STAT 0
cmv cw
This command writes a Command Management Variable (CMV) to the DSP. This command is intended for use by Enterasys field service personnel only.
This command requires that the ADSL NIM be installed and the DSP firmware file be present in the Flash: directory.
Syntax
cmv cw command-ID offset value
command-ID
Represents a 4‐character CMV command.
offset
Decimal or hexadecimal number representing where to write the value.
value
Decimal or hexadecimal number.
Mode
ATM Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMxx>)#
Example
The following example writes UOPT 2 with a hex value to the DSP:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/1>)#cmv cw UOPT 2 0x0c0e1014
cmv delete
This command deletes the specified Command Management Variable (CMV) from the DSP retaining list which is used by the DSP firmware when the line is in training mode. This command is intended for use by Enterasys field service personnel only.
This command requires that the ADSL NIM be installed and the DSP firmware file be present in the Flash: directory.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
13-85
CMV Commands
Syntax
cmv delete command-ID offset [value]
command-ID
Represents a 4‐character CMV command.
offset
Decimal or hexadecimal number representing where to write the value.
value
Decimal or hexadecimal number
Mode
ATM Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMxx>)#
Example
The following example deletes CMV OPTN2, from the retaining list:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/1>)#cmv delete OPTN 2
cmv print
This command prints the Command Management Variable (CMV) training list on the console. The training list is used by the DSP firmware when the line is in training mode. This command is intended for use by Enterasys field service personnel only.
This command requires that the ADSL NIM be installed and the DSP firmware file be present in the Flash: directory.
Syntax
cmv print
Mode
ATM Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMxx>)#
Example
The following example prints the CMV training list to the console:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/1>)#cmv print
cmv save
This command saves the Command Management Variable (CMV) training list to a file. The training list is used by the DSP firmware when the line is in training mode. This command is intended for use by Enterasys field service personnel only.
This command requires that the ADSL NIM be installed and the DSP firmware file be present in the Flash: directory.
13-86
Configuring ADSL
Other ADSL Commands
Syntax
cmv save file-name
file-name
The name of the file used to save the CMV training list.
Mode
ATM Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMxx>)#
Example
The following example saves the CMV training list to file retrain‐list:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/1>)#cmv save retrain-list
Save complete
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/1>)#
Other ADSL Commands
description
This command adds a description string to an existing ATM interface object.
This command requires that the ADSL NIM be installed and the DSP firmware file be present in the Flash: directory.
Syntax
description description_text
description_text
A text string that describes the interface object. Text with embedded spaces must be enclosed in double quotes. Omitting the description text results in an empty description string.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the description text to an empty string:
no description
Mode
ATM Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMxx>)#
Example
The following example adds ADSL Line to the interface object:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/1>)#description “ADSL Line”
XSR CLI Reference Guide
13-87
Other ADSL Commands
interface atm
This command creates an ATM interface object and its associated device driver which downloads the specified firmware file to the on‐board DSP. Depending on the size of the DSP firmware and the characteristics of the download procedure, this procedure may take a noticeable amount of time. After a successful load, the interface and device driver is in the administrative down state (shutdown).
Caution: This command requires that the ADSL NIM be installed and the DSP firmware file be
present in the Flash: directory.
Syntax
interface atm {slot/card/port}
slot
The XSR slot number, ranging from 0 to 2.
card
The XSR NIM number, ranging from 1 to 2.
port
The XSR slot number: 0. The sub‐interface number ranges from 1 to 30.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the interface object and all associated sub‐interface objects. The interface must be shut down first.
no interface atm {slot/card/port}
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
ATM Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMxx>)#
Example
The following example creates an ATM interface on slot 0, card 1, port 1:
XSR(config)#interface atm 0/1/1
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/1>)#
interface atm sub-interface
This command creates an ATM sub‐interface object and associates it with its ATM interface peer. Setup of internal data paths, which will route an IP interface to the ATM sub‐interface, will continue as configuration proceeds and a no shutdown command has been issued against this sub‐interface instance. On successful construction, the sub‐interface is in the administrative down state (shutdown).
This command requires that the ADSL NIM be installed, the DSP firmware file be present in the Flash: directory, and the ATM port be properly configured.
The following commands are sub‐commands of atm sub-interface:
13-88
Configuring ADSL
Other ADSL Commands
•
backup ‐ configures and enables a backup interface for the ATM sub‐interface. Refer to page 13‐90 for the command description.
•
crypto ‐ enables and configures VPN parameters on the sub‐interface. Refer to page 13‐92 for the command description.
•
description ‐ adds a description string to an existing ATM sub‐interface. Refer to page 13‐92 for the command description.
•
encapsulation ‐ selects the data encapsulation method for this ATM sub‐interface. Refer to page 13‐92 for the command description.
•
exit ‐ quits ATM Sub‐Interface mode and returns to Global mode. Refer to page 13‐93 for the command description.
•
ip address ‐ specifies the IP address and subnet mask of the ATM sub‐interface or requests the IP address and subnet mask be negotiated. Refer to page 13‐93 for the command description.
•
no shutdown ‐ sets the ATM sub‐interface to the administrative up state and enables the virtual circuit. Refer to page 13‐94 for the command description.
•
oam-pvc ‐ enables end‐to‐end F5 (circuit) OAM cell procedures for ATM Permanent Virtual Circuit (PVC) management. Refer to page 13‐95 for the command description.
•
oam-retry ‐ configures parameters related to OAM cell handling for ATM VC management. Refer to page 13‐96 for the command description.
•
pvc ‐ sets the sub‐interface circuit type to PVC and specifies ATM VPI/VCI values. Refer to page 13‐96 for the command description.
•
shutdown ‐ sets the ATM sub‐interface to the administrative Down state halting all data traffic on this VC. Refer to page 13‐97 for the command description.
Syntax
interface atm {slot/card/port.sub-interface}[point-to-point]
slot
The XSR slot number, ranging from 0 to 2.
card
The XSR NIM number, ranging from 1 to 2.
port
The XSR slot number: 0.
sub-interface
Identifies a sub‐interface on that interface, ranging from 1 to 30.
point-to-point
Interoperability option.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes the sub‐interface object:
no interface atm [slot/]card/port.sub-interface [point-to-point]
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMxx.x>)#
XSR CLI Reference Guide
13-89
Other ADSL Commands
Defaults
•
Backup: Disabled
•
VPN: Disabled
•
Description: Set to the empty string
•
Encapsulation: None
•
IP: Not configured
•
PPP: Not configured
•
OAM procedures: Disabled
•
ATM PVC VPI/VCI: Set to 1/32
•
The sub‐interface will be in the shutdown state
Example
The following example creates an ATM sub‐interface object on ATM interface slot 0, card 1, port 1:
XSR(config)#interface atm 0/1/1.1 point-to-point
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/1.1>)#
backup
This command configures and enables a backup interface for this ATM sub‐interface. This command requires a properly configured ATM sub‐interface and Dialer group.
Syntax
backup {delay down-wait {up-wait | never} | interface dialer id | time-range
begin-hh:mm end-hh:mm}
down-wait
Seconds to wait before switching to the backup interface.
up-wait |
never
Seconds to wait before switching back to ATM interface. If set to never, it will remain on the backup interface.
id
Dialer to use for backup when ATM interface is down.
begin-hh:mm
Time of day to switch to the backup line regardless of ATM interface state.
end-hh:mm
Time of day to revert to normal interface backup procedures.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables a backup for this ATM sub‐interface:
no backup {delay | interface | time-range}
Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMx/x/x.x>)#
13-90
Configuring ADSL
Other ADSL Commands
Default
Disabled by default. When enabled, all operational parameters must be specified. Example
The following example configures a sub‐interface backup with a Dialer ID of 1, delay of 20 seconds before switching to the backup, and a delay of 10 seconds before switching back to the ATM sub‐interface. The example also configures the sub‐interface to switch to the backup line at 8:30 P.M. then switch back to the normal interface at 9:50 P.M. :
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#backup interface Dialer1
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#backup delay 20 10
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#backup time-range 20:30 21:50
crypto
This command enables and configures the DF‐bit VPN parameter on this ATM sub‐interface. This command requires a properly configured ATM sub‐interface.
Syntax
crypto {ezipsec | ipsec df-bit {clear | copy | set}| map [map-name]}
ezipsec
EZ‐IPSec automatic configuration enabled.
ipsec df-bit
IPSec enabled with the following DF‐bit options:
clear
The outer IP header clears the DF bit and the XSR may fragment the packet to add IPSec encapsulation.
copy
XSR searches the original packet for the outer DF‐bit setting.
set
The outer IP header has the DF‐bit set; but, the XSR may fragment the packet if the original packet cleared the DF‐bit.
map-name
Attaches a crypto map to the interface and name (optional).
Syntax of the “no” Form
This command’s no disables the specified DF‐bit setting:
no crypto {ezipsec | ipsec df-bit}| map [map-name]}
Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMx/x/x.x>)#
Default
Disabled
Example
The following example enables EZ‐IPSec with the option of having the XSR look in the original packet for the outer DF bit setting. This example also attaches the crypto map ets‐vpn:
XSR CLI Reference Guide
13-91
Other ADSL Commands
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#crypto ezipsec
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#crypto ipsec df-bit copy
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#crypto map ets-vpn
description
This command adds a description string to an existing ATM sub‐interface. This command requires a properly configured ATM sub‐interface.
Syntax
description description_text
description
_text
A string describing the sub‐interface object. Text with embedded spaces must be enclosed in double quotes. Omitting text causes an empty string.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command sets the description text to an empty string:
no description
Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMxx.x>)#
Example
The following example adds the ADSL VC 1/32 text string to the sub‐interface object:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#description “ADSL VC 1/32”
encapsulation
This command selects the data encapsulation method for this ATM sub‐interface. Be aware that an encapsulation method must be selected before the sub‐interface can pass data.
Note: This command requires a properly configured ATM sub-interface. In order to change
encapsulation, you must issue the no encapsulation command first before restting the value.
Syntax
encapsulation {mux | snap}{ipoa | pppoa | pppoe} [service-name]
13-92
mux
VC multiplexing (per RFC‐2684/1483).
snap
LLC/SNAP multiplexing (per RFC‐2684/1483).
ipoa
IP encapsulated traffic flows on this VC (per RFC‐2684).
pppoa
PPP encapsulated traffic flows on this VC (per RFC‐2364).
pppoe
PPP over Ethernet encapsulated traffic flows on this VC (per RFC‐2516).
Configuring ADSL
Other ADSL Commands
service
-name
The name of the PPPoE service. If not specified, PPPoE connects to the first advertised service name. At this time, the XSR will connect with the first advertised service name only.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes any form of encapsulation, effectively disabling the sub‐
interface:
no encapsulation
Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMxx.x>)#
Default
The default encapsulation is none. An encapsulation method must be specified before the sub‐
interface can pass data. When the sub‐interface is configured for PPPoE encapsulation, the source Ethernet MAC address will be set to the MAC address of FastEthernet interface 2.
Example
The following example configures the sub‐interface for LLC/SNAP multiplexing and PPPoA encapsulated traffic:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#encapsulation snap pppoa
exit
This command quits the ATM Sub‐Interface mode and returns to Global mode.
Syntax
exit
Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMxx.x>)#
Example
The following example exits the sub‐interface ATM command mode from ATM interface slot 0, card 1, port 0, sub‐interface 1:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#exit
XSR(config)#
ip address
This command specifies the IP address and subnet mask of the ATM sub‐interface or requests the IP address and subnet mask be negotiated. This command requires a properly configured ATM sub‐interface.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
13-93
Other ADSL Commands
Syntax
ip address {ip-address/subnet-mask | negotiated}
ip-address
The IP address associated with this sub‐interface in the form: A.B.C.D.
subnet-mask
The subnet mask bits represents the number of bits set to 1 in the subnet mask, ranging from 0 to 32.
negotiated
IP address/subnet mask are negotiated by PPP. This value cannot be set when using IPoA encapsulation.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns this parameter to its default setting:
no ip address
Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMxx.x>)#
Default
•
IP address: 0.0.0.0
•
Subnet mask: 0.0.0.0.
Example
This example sets the sub‐interface IP address to 10.1.1.1 and the subnet mask to 255.0.0.0:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#ip address 10.1.1.1 255.0.0.0
or
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#ip address 10.1.1.1/8
no shutdown
This command sets the ATM sub‐interface to the administrative Up state (no shutdown) and enables the virtual circuit.
The associated ATM interface must be in the administrative Up state (no shutdown) before a no
shutdown on a sub‐interface is executed.
Syntax
no shutdown
Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMxx.x>)#
Example
The following example sets the ATM sub‐interface to the administrative up state:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0>)#no shutdown
13-94
Configuring ADSL
Other ADSL Commands
oam-pvc
This command enables end‐to‐end F5 (circuit) OAM cell procedures for ATM Permanent Virtual Circuit (PVC) management. OAM cells and how they are used are as follows:
•
Alarm Indication Signal (AIS) – Received from the network to indicate a problem in the forward‐to‐XSR data flow.
•
Continuity Check (CC) – Echoed to the sender when received. The XSR does not generate CC cells for connectivity management but will respond to CC procedure negotiation cells.
•
Loopback – Echoed back to the sender when received. The XSR sends loopback cells to monitor the end‐to‐end connectivity on the VC.
•
Remote Defect Indication (RDI) – Received from the network to indicate a problem in the reverse‐from‐XSR data flow. Sent to the network to indicate a problem in the local node XSR as well as in response to any AIS cells received.
The loopback cells monitor and declare the circuit up or down as follows:
•
The circuit is UP immediately after line training completes successfully.
•
The circuit is declared DOWN when down‐count consecutive loopback response cells are missed.
•
The circuit is declared UP when up‐count consecutive loopback response cells are received.
This command requires a properly configured ATM sub‐interface.
Syntax
oam-pvc [manage][frequency]
manage
Optional keyword.
frequency
Interval between sending end‐to‐end F5 OAM loopback cells when the VC is in the UP state. Range: 1 to 3600 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables all OAM procedures for this sub‐interface:
no oam-pvc
Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMx/x/x.x>)#
Defaults
•
OAM procedures: Disabled
•
Interval between loopback cells (frequency): 10 seconds
•
Initial down‐count value: 5
•
Initial up‐count value: 3
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Other ADSL Commands
Example
The following example sets the OAM frequency to 20 seconds:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#oam-pvc manage 20
oam retry
This command configures parameters related to OAM cell handling for ATM VC management. This command requires a properly configured ATM sub‐interface.
Syntax
oam retry up-count down-count retry-frequency
up-count
Sum of consecutive end‐to‐end F5 OAM loopback cells responses that must be received to change the VC connection state to up. Range: 0 to 255.
down-count
Sum of consecutive end‐to‐end F5 OAM loopback cells responses that are not received to change the VC connection state to down. Range: 0 to 255.
retryfrequency
Interval between sending end‐to‐end F5 OAM loopback cells when a change in the up/down state of a VC is being verified. Range: 1 to 3600 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns this parameter to its default setting:
no oam retry
Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMx/x/x.x>)#
Default
•
Initial down‐count value: 5
•
Initial up‐count value: 3
•
Initial retry‐frequency value: 10
•
Default settings apply only when OAM management has been enabled with the oam-pvc command.
Example
This example sets the up‐count to 5, the down‐count to 8, and the retry‐frequency to 2 seconds:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#oam retry 5 8 2
pvc
This command sets the sub‐interface circuit type to PVC and specifies ATM VPI/VCI values. This command requires a properly configured ATM sub‐interface.
13-96
Configuring ADSL
Other ADSL Commands
Syntax
pvc vpi/vci
vpi/vci
ATM VC identifier values. VPI range: 0 to 255, VCI range: 0 to 65535.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns this parameter to its default setting:
no pvc
Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMx/x/x.x>)#
Default
VPI/VCI defaults to 1/32. This is not the ILMI virtual circuit.
Example
This example sets the sub‐interface circuit type to PVC and sets the ATM VPI/VCI values to 2/48:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#pvc 2/48
shutdown
This command sets the ATM sub‐interface to the administrative Down state halting all data traffic on this VC.
Syntax
shutdown
Syntax of the “no” Form
Refer to the atm sub-interface command on page 13‐88.
Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMx/x/x.x>)#
Example
The following example sets the ATM sub‐interface to the administrative down state:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#shutdown
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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Other ADSL Commands
no shutdown
This command sets the ATM interface to the administrative Up state and enables the line for operation. Data traffic cannot flow until at least one associated sub‐interface is set to the administrative Up state. Issuing this command does not change the administrative state of sub‐
interfaces associated with this ATM interface.
This command surveys the status of the DSP firmware (which was loaded and started at boot time) and if it finds it in an illegal state (i.e., crashed), it reloads and restarts the DSP firmware before proceeding with the no shutdown operation. Depending on the size of the DSP firmware and characteristics of the download process, this operation may take a noticeable length of time.
Syntax
no shutdown
Mode
ATM Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMxx>)#
Example
The following example sets the ATM interface to the administrative up state:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0>)#no shutdown
shutdown
This command sets the ATM interface to the administrative Down state. As a result, all ATM sub‐
interfaces associated with this ATM interface are shut down, all data traffic is stopped and the line disabled.
Syntax
shutdown
Syntax of the “no” Form
Refer to no shutdown on page 13‐98.
Mode
ATM Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMxx>)#
Example
The following example sets the ATM interface to the administrative down state:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0>)#shutdown
13-98
Configuring ADSL
PPP Configuration Commands
PPP Configuration Commands
This section lists the subset of PPP configuration commands that apply when an ATM sub‐
interface is configured for PPPoA or PPPoE encapsulation.
ppp chap
This command configures PPP to use the Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP) for user authentication on a PPP session. This command requires a properly configured ATM sub‐
interface specifying encapsulation type PPPoA or PPPoE.
Syntax
ppp chap {hostname <name> | password pwd | refuse}
name
Specifies the CHAP hostname.
pwd
Specifies the CHAP password as pwd.
refuse
Rejects authentication by CHAP.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns this parameter to its default setting:
no ppp chap
Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMx/x/x.x>)#
Default
Disabled
Example
The following example designates the CHAP hostname ENT1:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#ppp chap hostname ENT1
ppp keepalive
This command enables PPP to use LCP echo requests as a keepalive mechanism. It requires a properly configured ATM sub‐interface specifying encapsulation type PPPoA or PPPoE.
Syntax
ppp keepalive <seconds>
seconds
Interval between keepalive messages, ranging from 0 to 32767 seconds.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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PPP Configuration Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns this parameter to its default setting:
no ppp keepalive
Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMx/x/x.x>)#
Defaults
•
Disabled
•
Keepalive period: 30 seconds
Example
This example enables the keepalive mechanism and sets the time between messages to 20 seconds:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#ppp keepalive 20
ppp lcp
This command configures Link Control Protocol (LCP) parameters for PPP. It requires a properly configured ATM sub‐interface specifying encapsulation type PPPoA or PPPoE.
Syntax
ppp lcp {max-configure <count1> | max-failure <count2> | max-terminate <count3>}
max-configure count1
Peak number of Configure‐Requests to send. Range: 1 to 255.
max-failure count2
Peak number of Configure‐Nak packets to send. Range: 1 to 255.
max-terminate count3
Peak number of Terminate‐Requests to send. Range: 1 to 255.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns this parameter to its default setting:
no ppp lcp
Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMx/x/x.x>)#
Defaults
13-100
•
Configure‐Requests: 10
•
Configure‐Nak: 5
•
Terminate‐Requests: 2
Configuring ADSL
PPP Configuration Commands
Example
The following example sets LCP parameters:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#ppp lcp max-configure 5 max-failure 5 max-terminate 2
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#
ppp max-bad-auth
This command configures the maximum number of authentication failures for PPP. It requires a properly configured ATM sub‐interface specifying encapsulation type PPPoA or PPPoE.
Syntax
ppp max-bad-auth <count>
count
Peak number of authentication attempts. Range: 0 to 4,294,967,295
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns this parameter to its default setting:
no ppp max-bad-auth
Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMx/x/x.x>)#
Default
Default number of attempts: 0
Example
The following example resets the command parameter to 16:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#ppp max-bad-auth 16
ppp pap
This command configures PPP to use the Password Authentication Protocol (PAP) for user authentication on a PPP session. This command requires a properly configured ATM sub‐interface specifying encapsulation type PPPoA or PPPoE.
Syntax
ppp pap sent-username <username> password <userpassword>
username
The name to use for authentication.
userpassword
The user’s password.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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PPP Configuration Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns this parameter to its default setting:
no ppp pap
Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMx/x/x.x>)#
Default
PAP is disabled
Example
The following example sets the PAP user name to bob and the password to confidential:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#ppp sent-name bob password confidential
ppp quality
This command configures the minimum link quality for PPP, which is a measure of the amount of data successfully passed over the link. The minimum quality value is specified as a percentage of the total data sent. This command requires a properly configured ATM sub‐interface specifying encapsulation type PPPoA or PPPoE.
Syntax
ppp quality <percent>
percent
The minimum link quality value, ranging from 0 to 100.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns this parameter to its default setting:
no ppp quality
Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMx/x/x.x>)#
Default
Disabled
Example
The following example sets the minimum link quality value to 88%:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#ppp quality 88
13-102
Configuring ADSL
ATM Clear and Show Commands
ppp timeout retry
This command sets the maximum time to wait for a response during PPP negotiation. It requires a properly configured ATM sub‐interface specifying encapsulation type PPPoA or PPPoE.
Syntax
ppp timeout retry <seconds>
seconds
The peak wait interval, ranging from 1 to 255 seconds.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command returns this parameter to its default setting:
no ppp timeout retry
Mode
ATM Sub‐Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<ATMx/x/x.x>)#
Default
3 seconds
Example
This example resets the maximum wait time for a response during PPP negotiation to 12 seconds:
XSR(config-if<ATM0/1/0.1>)#ppp timeout retry 12
ATM Clear and Show Commands
clear counters atm
This command clears ATM counters for the ATM interface.
Syntax
clear counters atm {slot/card/port}
slot
The XSR slot number, ranging from 0 to 2.
card
The XSR NIM number, ranging from 1 to 2.
port
The XSR slot number: 0. The sub‐interface number ranges from 1 to 30.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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ATM Clear and Show Commands
Example
The following example clears the ATM counters:
XSR#clear counters atm
show controllers atm
This command displays internal hardware configuration and operational interface details regarding: receive (Rx) and transmit (Tx) DMA descriptors, memory usage, and PCI device ID information. When you issue the command to display sub‐interface statistics, the output returned includes: packet processor (QOS) scheduling statistics, ATM sub‐interface counters, ATM sub‐
interface data plane status, and driver circuit statistics.
Syntax
show controllers atm {slot/card/port.sub-interface}
slot
The XSR slot number, ranging from 0 to 2.
card
The XSR NIM number, ranging from 1 to 2.
port
The XSR slot number: 0.
sub-interface
Identifies a sub‐interface on that interface, ranging from 1 to 30.
Mode
EXEC or Privileged EXEC: XSR> or XSR#
Examples
The following is sample output when an interface is specified:
XSR#show controllers atm 1/0
********** ATM Controller Stats **********
ATM 1/0
DSP Image File: CFlash:adsl.fls
DSP File Rev. : 1.0.0.1
DSP Image Rev.: 43e2ea93
13-104
Attenuation: 43.0 db
DMT state: 42
SNR Margin: 6 db
CRC Errors: 0
OAM counters:
ifInOctets
ifInUcastPkts
ifInDiscards
ifInErrors
ifOutOctets
ifOutUcastPkts
ifOutDiscards
ifOutErrors
total_count
tx_notready
tx_toomany
UNK counters:
ifInOctets
ifInUcastPkts
ifInDiscards
ifInErrors
ifOutOctets
ifOutUcastPkts
ifOutDiscards
ifOutErrors
Cells:
AIS in
RDI in
RDI out
CC in
CC out
LBBK in
LPBK out
Configuring ADSL
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
0
0
0
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
ATM Clear and Show Commands
The following is sample output when a sub‐interface is specified:
XSR#show controllers atm 1/0.1
********** ATM Sub-Interface Stats **********
ATM 1/0.1
Packet Processor Tx Scheduler Stats:
952 Packet driver Tx OK
0 Packet driver not Tx: MUX END_ERR_BLOCK
0 Packet driver not Tx: MUX ERROR
0 Packet driver not Tx: Unknown Msg from MUX
Statistic Counters:
Rx PacketTotalCount
Rx PacketDiscardCount
Rx MuxHeaderError
Rx SnapHeaderError
Rx PPPoEethTypeError
Rx PPPoEethTypeARP
Rx PPPoEethTypeIP
Rx PPPoEethTypeRARP
Tx PacketTotalCount
Tx PacketDiscardCount
987
18
0
0
0
6
12
0
952
0
********** ATM Data Object Stats **********
Upper Adjacent is CONNECTED and UP, ATM PassData is TRUE
FE: Admin Up / Oper Up PPPoE: Oper Up
********** Driver Virtual Circuit Stats **********
VPI/VCI 1/32:
ccRx1
987
ccRx2
987
received-adslr1
987
noeop
0
crc
0
wor
0
ovr
0
toomany
0
stop
0
be1
0
be2
0
receivertnerr
0
nonewmblk
0
receivertnnull
0
tx_null_mblk
0
tx_no_enable
0
tx_length_err
0
sent-adslt
952
tx_no_free_slots
0
tx_no_showtime_loop 0
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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ATM Clear and Show Commands
Parameters in the Sub-Interface Response
DSP Image File: CFlash:adsl.fls
Name of the file containing the DSP image.
DSP Image Rev.: 43e2ea93
Vendorʹs revision of the DSP image.
DMT state: 42
Current operational state of the DSP.
OAM counters/ UNK counters
Sub‐set of the interface table input and output counters for the OAM and unconfigured channels on the ATM interface. Refer to RFC‐1213 for parameter descriptions.
Cells:
Detailed OAM cell totals for receive and transmit counters.
total_count/ tx_notready/tx_toomany
Internal chipset debug counters.
Packet Processor Tx Scheduler Stats
952 Packet driver Tx OK
Sum of packets transmitted.
0 Packet driver not Tx: MUX END_ERR_BLOCK
Sum of failed transmit attempts due to the driver returning an END_ERR_BLOCK status.
0 Packet driver not Tx: MUX ERROR
Sum of failed transmit attempts due to the driver returning an ERROR status.
0 Packet driver not Tx: Unknown Msg from MUX
Sum of failed transmit attempts due to the driver returning an unknown error status.
ATM Sub-interface Statistic Counters:
Rx PacketTotalCount
Sum of packets received.
Rx PacketDiscardCount
Sum of packets received that were discarded because of an error.
Rx MuxHeaderError
Sum of packets received that were discarded due to an error in the VC Multiplexing encapsulation header.
Rx SnapHeaderError
Sum of packets received that were discarded due to an error in the LLC/SNAP encapsulation header.
Rx PPPoEethTypeError
Sum of PPPoE packets received that were discarded because the Ethernet type is unsupported.
Rx PPPoEethTypeARP
Sum of PPPoE packets received that were discarded because the Ethernet type ARP is unsupported.
Rx PPPoEethTypeIP
Sum of PPPoE packets received that were discarded because the Ethernet type IP is unsupported.
Rx PPPoEethTypeRARP
Sum of PPPoE packets received that were discarded because the Ethernet type RARP is unsupported.
Tx PacketTotalCount
Sum of packets transmitted.
Tx PacketDiscardCount
Sum of transmit packets discarded for any reason.
ATM Data Object Stats
Internal data plane status information.
VPI/VCI 1/32
Virtual Path Index and Virtual Circuit Index for the ATM PVC.
ccRx2 987 through
tx_no_showtime_loop 0
Driver internal debug counters.
13-106
Configuring ADSL
ATM Clear and Show Commands
show interface atm
This command displays the running configuration and statistical details for an ATM interface. Statistics supported by the ADSL interface are hardware dependent. General categories include the following:
•
Analog details including upstream and downstream bit rates
•
ATM cell counters (especially OAM cells)
•
OAM (circuit UP/DOWN) state
•
Frame (AAL5) counters
•
Layer state information
•
VC table
•
Administrative state (Enabled/Disabled)
•
Operational state (Up/Down)
•
Loopback on
•
DSP firmware
•
Backup interface
•
Description string
When you issue the command to display sub‐interface statistics, the output returned includes: •
VPI/VCI
•
IP address (value + configured or negotiated)
•
Encapsulation method
•
Administrative state (enabled/disabled)
•
Operational state (Up/Down)
•
PPP state information (PPPoE ‐ host name/service name)
•
Description string
•
VPN information
Syntax
show interface atm {slot/card/port.sub-interface}
slot
The XSR slot number, ranging from 0 to 2.
card
The XSR NIM number, ranging from 1 to 2.
port
The XSR slot number: 0.
sub-interface
Identifies a sub‐interface on that interface, ranging from1 to 30.
Mode
EXEC or Privileged EXEC: XSR> or XSR#
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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ATM Clear and Show Commands
Examples
The following is sample output when an interface is specified:
XSR#show interface atm 1/0
********** ATM Interface Stats **********
ATM 1/0 is Admin Up / Oper Up
The name of this device is adsl
Administrative State is ENABLED
Operational State is UP
OAM circuit is UP
The upstream data rate is 480 kbit/sec
The downstream data rate is 10208 kbit/sec
General info:
ifindex
ifType
ifAdminStatus
ifOperStatus
ifLastChange
ifInOctets
ifInUcastPkts
ifInNUcastPkts
ifInDiscards
ifInErrors
ifInUnknownProtos
ifOutOctets
ifOutUcastPkts
ifOutNUcastPkts
ifOutDiscards
ifOutErrors
ifOutQLen
AAL5 in
AAL5 out
HEC errors
AIS F4
RDI F4
CC
F4
LPBK F4
VPI/VCI
1/32
AAL5
00000047
0
0
1
1
00:02:34
2950
47
0
0
0
0
5088
48
0
0
0
100
47
48
0
0
0
0
0
AIS
00000000
RDI
00000000
CC
00000000
LPBK
00000000
The following is sample output when a sub‐interface is specified:
XSR#show interface atm 1/0.1
********** ATM Sub-Interface Stats **********
ATM 1/0.1 is Admin Up / Oper Up
Internet address is 30.0.0.11, subnet mask is 255.255.255.255
LCP
State: OPENED
IPCP
State: OPENED
PPPoE is Oper Up
13-108
Configuring ADSL
AIS/RDI
ATM Clear and Show Commands
The
The
The
The
The
logical link is currently Up
Name of the Access Concentrator is ENTERASY-CDDU1S
Session Id is 0x000b
MAC Address of the Access Concentrator is 0x00:60:f9:11:01:08
MTU is 1492
The name of this device is adsl-0
Administrative state is ENABLED
Operational State is UP
Circuit monitoring enabled
VPI is 1.
VCI is 32.
ifindex
ifType
ifAdminStatus
ifOperStatus
ifLastChange
ifInOctets
ifInUcastPkts
ifInNUcastPkts
ifInDiscards
ifInErrors
ifInUnknownProtos
ifOutOctets
ifOutUcastPkts
ifOutNUcastPkts
ifOutDiscards
ifOutErrors
ifOutQLen
0
0
1
1
00:02:34
20510
408
0
0
0
0
37728
388
0
0
0
100
Parameters in the Interface Response
ATM 1/0 is Admin Up / Oper Up
Administrative state: Admin Up or Admin Down and Operational state: Oper Up or Oper Down.
The name of this device is adsl-0
Hardware device name.
Administrative State is ENABLED
Driver administrative state: ENABLED or DISABLED.
Operational State is UP
Driver operational state is UP or DOWN.
OAM circuit is UP
Driver OAM channel state is UP or DOWN.
The upstream data rate is 480 kbit/
sec.
Negotiated upstream data rate.
The downstream data rate is 10208
kbit/sec.
Negotiated downstream data rate.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
13-109
ATM Clear and Show Commands
General info:
MIB2 interface table entries as described in RFC‐1213 including AIS F4, RDI F4, CC F4, LPBK F4.
The last four fields in the General info section count the number OAM cells (by type) received by the interface on the Virtual Path (F4) flow.
The circuit table at the end of the display lists all the configured ATM sub‐interfaces related to this ATM interface.
•
VPI/VCI ‐ PVC circuit identifier.
•
AAL5 ‐ Sum of AAL5 frames received.
•
AIS ‐ Sum of received Alarm Indication Signal cells received.
•
RDI ‐ Sum of Remote Defect Indication cells received.
•
CC ‐ Sum of Continuity Check cells received.
•
LPBK ‐ Sum of Loopback cells received.
•
AIS/RDI ‐ the current alarm state of the circuit: AIS or RDI
Parameters in the Sub-Interface Response
ATM 1/0.1 is Admin Up / Oper Up
Administrative state: Admin Up or Admin Down; Operational state: Oper Up or Oper Down.
Internet address is 30.0.0.11,
subnet mask is 255.255.255.255
IP layer information.
LCP
State: OPENED/IPCP
State: OPENED
PPP layer information.
PPP Layer Information
PPPoE is Oper Up
The logical link is currently Up
The Name of the Access Concentrator
is ENTERASY-CDDU1S
The Session Id is 0x000b
The MAC Address of the Access
Concentrator is
0x00:60:f9:11:01:08
The MTU is 1492
The name of this device is adsl-0
Hardware device name.
Administrative state is ENABLED
Driver administrative state: ENABLED or DISABLED.
Operational State is UP
Driver operational state: UP or DOWN
Circuit monitoring enabled/Circuit
monitoring disabled
Circuit monitoring operational state. This line will only be displayed when OAM procedures are enabled by the OAM-PVC command and the ADSL line is UP .
VPI is 1/VCI is 32
Virtual Path Index and Virtual Circuit Index for the ATM PVC.
The last section contains the MIB2 interface table as described in RFC‐1213.
13-110
Configuring ADSL
14
Configuring the VPN
Observing Syntax and Conventions
The CLI Syntax and conventions use the notation described in the following table.
Convention
Description
xyz
Key word or mandatory parameters (bold)
[x]
[ ] Square brackets indicate an optional parameter (italic)
[x | y | z]
[ | ] Square brackets with vertical bar indicate a choice of values
{x | y | z}
{ | } Braces with vertical bar indicate a choice of a required value
[x {y | z} ]
[{ | } ] Combination of square brackets with braces and vertical bars
indicates a required choice of an optional parameter
(config-if<xx>)
xx signifies the interface type and number; e.g., F1, G3, S2/1.0, D1. F
indicates a FastEthernet, and G a GigabitEthernet port.
XSR(aaa-method-xx)#
xx signifies the AAA Method type; e.g., local, pki, radius
Next Mode entries display the CLI prompt after a command is entered.
Sub-command headings are displayed in red, italicized text.
soho.enterasys.com
Italicized, non-syntactic text indicates either a user-specified entry or text
with special emphasis
VPN Commands
The following command subsets configure the Virtual Private Network suite of functionality for the XSR:
•
“PKI commands” on page 14‐84.
•
“CA Identity Mode Commands” on page 14‐84.
•
“Other Certificate Commands” on page 14‐90.
•
“IKE Security Protocol Commands” on page 14‐94.
•
“ISAKMP Protocol Policy Mode Commands” on page 14‐95.
•
“Remote Peer ISAKMP Protocol Policy Mode Commands” on page 14‐99
•
“Remote Peer Show Commands” on page 14‐104.
•
“IPSec Commands” on page 14‐106.
•
“IPSec Clear and Show Commands” on page 14‐108.
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PKI commands
•
“Crypto Map Mode Commands” on page 14‐110.
•
“Crypto Transform Mode Commands” on page 14‐115.
•
“Crypto Show Commands” on page 14‐118.
•
“Interface CLI Commands” on page 14‐121.
•
“Interface VPN Commands” on page 14‐122.
•
“Tunnel Commands” on page 14‐127.
•
“Tunnel Clear and Show Commands” on page 14‐132.
•
“Additional Tunnel Termination Commands” on page 14‐134.
•
“DF Bit Commands” on page 14‐137.
Note: AAA commands are described in Chapter 13: Configuring Security.
PKI commands
The following commands configure Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) on the XSR.
CA Identity Mode Commands
crypto ca identity
This command declares the Certificate Authority (CA) the XSR should use and identifies CAs which may be required as part of the CA chain for the router or a peer IPSec client. If you previously declared the CA and just want to update its characteristics, specify the name you previously created. In some cases, the CA might require a particular CA name, such as its domain name.
Performing this command acquires CA Identity mode, where you can specify CA characteristics with the following sub‐commands:
•
crl frequency ‐ Specifies the interval between Certificate Revocation List (CRL) retrievals and other maintenance that may be performed periodically. Refer to page 14‐85 for the command definition.
•
enrollment http-proxy ‐ Specifies the local HTTP proxy server. It is optional. Refer to page 14‐86 for the command definition.
•
enrollment retry count ‐ Specifies how many certificate enrollment polls the XSR will send before giving up. It is defaulted. Refer to page 14‐86 for the command definition.
•
enrollment retry period ‐ Specifies an interval that the XSR should wait between sending certificate request retries. It is defaulted. Refer to page 14‐87 for the command definition.
•
enrollment url ‐ Specifies the URL of the CA and is always required. Refer to page 14‐88 for the command definition.
Syntax
crypto ca identity name
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Configuring the VPN
CA Identity Mode Commands
name
Name for the CA.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form to delete all identity information and certificates associated with the CA:
no crypto ca identity name
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
Certificate Authority Identity configuration: XSR(ca-identity)#
Examples
The following example declares and identifies characteristics of the CA. In this example, the name ACMEca is created for the CA, which is located at http://ca_server.. This is the minimum configuration required to declare a CA.
XSR(config)#crypto ca identity ACMEca
XSR(ca-identity)#enrollment url http://ca_server
The following example sets a nonstandard retry period and count, and permits the router to accept certificates when CRLs are not obtainable.
XSR(config)#crypto ca identity ACMEca
XSR(ca-identity)#enrollment url http://AAA_ca/coldstorage/scripts.exe
XSR(ca-identity)#query url ldap://serverx
XSR(ca-identity)#enrollment retry period 20
XSR(ca-identity)#enrollment retry count 100
In the example above, if the XSR does not get a certificate back from the CA within 20 minutes of sending a certificate request, it will resend the request. The XSR will repeat certificate requests every retry period until until 100 requests have been sent. If the CA is not available at the specified location, obtain the URL from your CA administrator.
crl frequency
The command specifies the interval between Certificate Revocation List (CRL) retrievals.
Syntax
crl frequency number
numbers
Interval between retries, ranging from 1 to 1440 minutes.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command resets the value to the default:
no crl frequency
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CA Identity Mode Commands
Mode
Certificate Authority Identity configuration: XSR(ca-identity)#
Example
The following example sets the CRL to be retrieved for five hours:
XSR(config)#crypto ca identity ACMEca
XSR(ca-identify)crl frequency 300
enrollment http-proxy
This command specifies the local HTTP proxy server name and port.
Syntax
enrollment http-proxy hostname port_#
hostname
The URL of the local HTTP proxy server, which is the proxy serverʹs IP address.
port_#
HTTP Proxy server port number, ranging from 1 to 10,000.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command clears the proxy server setting:
no enrollment http-proxy
Mode
Certificate Authority Identity configuration: XSR(ca-identity)#
Example
The following example sets the HTTP proxy server IP address and port #:
XSR(config)#crypto ca identity ACMEca
XSR(ca-identity)#enrollment http-proxy 192.168.57.9 999
enrollment retry count
This command specifies how many times the XSR resends a certificate request when it does not receive a certificate from the Certificate Authority (CA) from the previous request.
Syntax
enrollment retry count number
number
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Configuring the VPN
Attempts the XSR will make to resend a certificate request to the CA while waiting on an original request. Range: 1 to 100.
CA Identity Mode Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command resets the value to the default:
no enrollment retry count
Default
3
Mode
Certificate Authority Identity configuration: XSR(ca-identity)#
Example
The following example declares a CA, and changes the retry period to 10 minutes and the retry count to 60. The XSR will resend the certificate request every 10 minutes until it receives the certificate or until approximately 10 hours pass since the original request was sent, whichever occurs first. (10 minutes x 60 tries = 600 minutes [10 hours]).
XSR(config)#crypto ca identity ACMEca
XSR(ca-identity)#enrollment url http://ca_server
XSR(ca-identity)#enrollment retry period 10
XSR(ca-identity)#enrollment retry count 60
enrollment retry period
This command specifies the wait period between certificate requests.
Syntax
enrollment retry period minutes
minutes
The interval, ranging from 1 to 60 minutes, the XSR waits before resending a certificate request to the CA.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of the command to reset the retry period to the default:
no enrollment retry period
Default
5 minutes
Mode
Certificate Authority Identity configuration: XSR(ca-identity)#
Example
The following example declares a CA and changes the retry period:
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CA Identity Mode Commands
XSR(config)#crypto ca identity ACMEca
XSR(ca-identity)#enrollment url http://ca_server
XSR(ca-identity)#enrollment retry period 5
enrollment url
This command sets the Uniform Resource Locator (URL) of the Certificate Authority (CA). If the CA cgi‐bin script site is not the default /cgi‐bin/ pkiclient.exe at the CA, you must also include the non‐standard script site in the URL as http://CA_name/ script_location where script_location is the full path to the CA scripts. Be aware that the URL format may vary.
Syntax
enrollment url url
url
The URL of the CA where the XSR sends certificate requests. The URL may be in the form of http://CA_name where CA_name is the CAʹs host IP address or defined static IP hostname.
Syntax of the “no” Form
This command’s no form deletes the CAʹs URL value from the configuration:
no enrollment url url
Mode
Certificate Authority Identity configuration: XSR(ca-identity)#
Examples
The following example shows the minimum configuration required to declare a CA:
XSR(config)#crypto ca identity ACMEca
XSR(ca-identity)#enrollment url http://ca_server
The example below shows a static IP hostname for the enrollment URL:
XSR(config)#crypto ca identity CAserver
XSR(ca-identity)#enrollment url http://ParentCA.domain.com/ certsrv/mscep/
mscep.dll
crypto ca enroll
This command enrolls a certificate for the XSR with the specified Certificate Authority (CA). It is not saved in the XSR configuration file but in a local encrypted database named cert.dat.
Notes: You can remove existing certificates with the no certificate command.
If an enroll request to the Entrust CA fails, be sure the CA does not contain an outstanding
PENDING enroll request from that same XSR by a previously incomplete enroll request. Because
the Entrust CA allows only one outstanding request from any single client seeking certificate
enrollment, the CA administrator must delete the pending certificate for the outstanding request at
the CA then the XSR can reissue its certificate enrollment request.
For Verisign CA compliance, you must provide the domain name that you specified when signing up
with Verisign by using the ip domain command. See page 5‐155 for command details.
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Configuring the VPN
CA Identity Mode Commands
Caution: We recommend that you do not enroll more certificates than permitted by the 1.5 MByte
system limit imposed on the cert.dat Flash file. Doing so may destabilize the XSR and require
you to delete the file.
Syntax
crypto ca enroll name
name
Name of the CA. Use the same name as when you declared the CA with the crypto ca identity command.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command cancels a current enrollment request:
no crypto ca enroll name
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following script displays when you invoke the crypto ca enroll command. Note that you are prompted to enter your password and whether to proceed.
XSR(config)#crypto ca enroll ACMEca
%
% Start certificate enrollment
% Create a challenge password. You will need to verbally provide this password to
the CA Administrator in order to revoke your certificate.
For security reasons your password will not be saved in the configuration.
Please make a note of it.
Password:****
Re-enter password:****
Include the router serial number in the subject name (y/n) ? y
The serial number in the certificate will be: 3526015000250142
Request certificate from CA (y/n) ? y
You may experience a short delay while RSA keys are generated.
Once key generation is complete, the certificate request
will be sent to the Certificate Authority.
Use 'show crypto ca certificate' to show the fingerprint.
<186>Aug 29 7:11:1 192.168.1.33 PKI: A certificate was successfully
received from the CA.
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Other Certificate Commands
show crypto ca identity
This command displays data about enrolled Certificate Authorities (CA).
Syntax
show crypto ca identity
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following output displays when you invoke the command:
XSR#show crypto ca identity
CA Identity - childca2
Enrollment Information:
Retry Period:
5 minutes
Retry Count:
3
Crl Frequency:
60 minutes
CA Identity - childca1
Enrollment Information:
Retry Period:
5 minutes
Retry Count:
3
Crl Frequency:
60 minutes
CA Identity - ldapca
Enrollment Information:
URL:
http://1.1.1.10/certsrv/mscep/mscep.dll/
Retry Period:
5 minutes
Retry Count:
3
Crl Frequency:
60 minutes
Other Certificate Commands
crypto ca authenticate
This command authenticates the Certificate Authority (CA) by obtaining the CAʹs certificate. It acquires the CA certificate, computes the CAʹs fingerprint, and stores the certificate and fingerprint locally.
Syntax
crypto ca authenticate name
name
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Configuring the VPN
The name of the CA. This is the same name used when the CA was declared with the crypto ca identity command.
Other Certificate Commands
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following script prompts you to accept the certificate.
XSR#crypto ca authenticate ACMEca
Certificate has the following attributes:
Fingerprint: 0123 4567 89AB CDEF 0123
Do you accept this certificate? [yes/no] y
crypto ca certificate chain
This command invokes Certificate Chain mode. In this mode, you can delete a certificate by entering the no certificate commands. If you issue this command, you should also:
•
Ask the CA administrator to revoke XSRʹs certificates at the CA; you must supply the challenge password you created when you first got the certificates with crypto ca enroll.
•
Remove the XSRʹs certificates from the configuration using the certificate command.
Syntax
crypto ca certificate chain name
name
CA name. Use the same name you declared using crypto ca identity.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
Certificate chain configuration: XSR(config-cert-chain)#
Example
This command acquires Certificate Chain mode in which a certificate can be added or removed. Note that the script prompts you to remove the certificate:
XSR(config)#crypto ca certificate chain ACMEca
XSR(config-cert-chain)#no certificate 0123456789ABCDEF0123456789ABCDEF
% Are you sure you want to remove the certificate [yes/no]? yes
% Be sure to ask the CA administrator to revoke this certificate.
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Other Certificate Commands
crypto ca crl request
This command downloads a new Certificate Revocation List (CRL) from the specified Certificate Authority (CA), updating the CRL.
Syntax
crypto ca crl request name
name
CA name. Use the same name you declared using crypto ca identity.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
The following below immediately downloads the latest CRL to the router:
XSR(config)#crypto ca crl request
show crypto ca crls
This command displays data about Certificate Revocation Lists (CRL) issued by a Certificate Authority (CA).
Syntax
show crypto ca crls
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following output displays when you invoke the command:
XSR#show crypto ca crls
CRL State:
Version:
Issuer:
Valid From:
Valid To:
Issuing CDP:
Crl Size:
VALID
V2
C=US, O=Enterasys, OU=VPN2, CN=Child CA2
2002 Aug 20th, 18:45:21 GMT
2002 Aug 20th, 20:20:21 GMT
http://childca2/CertEnroll/Child%20CA2.crl
512 bytes
CRL - issued by ldapca
State:
VALID
Version:
V2
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Configuring the VPN
Other Certificate Commands
Issuer:
C=US, O=sml, CN=ldapca
Valid From:
2002 Aug 20th, 18:26:01 GMT
Valid To:
2002 Aug 20th, 20:01:01 GMT
Issuing CDP:
ldap://ldapca.sml.com/CN=ldapca(6),CN=ldapca,CN=CDP,CN=Publ
ic%20Key%20Services,CN=Services,CN=Configuration,DC=sml,DC=com?certificateRevoc
ationList?base?objectclass=cRLDistributionPoint
Crl Size:
365 bytes
show crypto ca certificates
This command lists information about the following:
•
XSR certificate, if you have requested them from CAs (see the crypto ca enroll command).
•
CA certificates, if you received them (refer to the crypto ca authenticate command).
Syntax
show crypto ca certificates
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Example
The following sample output shows two XSRs’ certificates and the CAʹs certificate. In this example, special usage RSA key pairs were previously generated, and a certificate was requested and received for each key pair.
XSR>show crypto ca certificates
Certificate
Subject Name
Name: XSR.example.com
IP Address: 10.0.0.1
Status: Available
Certificate Serial Number: 428125BDA34196003F6C78316CD8FA95
Key Usage: Signature
Certificate
Subject Name
Name: XSR.example.com
IP Address: 10.0.0.1
Status: Available
Certificate Serial Number: AB352356AFCD0395E333CCFD7CD33897
Key Usage: Encryption
CA Certificate
Status: Available
Certificate Serial Number: 3051DF7123BEE31B8341DFE4B3A338E5F
Key Usage: Not Set
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IKE Security Protocol Commands
The following is sample output from the command when the CA supports an RA. In this example, CA and RA certificates were requested earlier by the crypto ca authenticate command.
XSR>show crypto ca certificates
CA Certificate
Status: Available
Certificate Serial Number: 3051DF7123BEE31B8341DFE4B3A338E5F
Key Usage: Not Set
RA Signature Certificate
Status: Available
Certificate Serial Number: 34BCF8A0
Key Usage: Signature
RA KeyEncipher Certificate
Status: Available
Certificate Serial Number: 34BCF89F
Key Usage: Encryption
IKE Security Protocol Commands
The following commands configure the Internet Key Exchange (IKE) Security Protocol on the XSR.
clear crypto isakmp
This command clears one or all active Internet Key Exchange connections.
Syntax
clear crypto isakmp [connection-id]
connection-id
Sets which connection to clear. If this argument is not used, all existing links will be cleared.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
The following output shows an IKE connection between two peers connected by interfaces 172.21.114.123 and 172.21.114.67:
XSR#show crypto isakmp sa
State
Connection-ID
1
QM_IDLE
8
QM_IDLE
Source
172.21.114.67
155.0.0.1
The following example clears IKE connection 8:
XSR#clear crypto isakmp 8
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Configuring the VPN
Destination
172.21.114.123
155.0.0.2
Lifetime
2000
4000
ISAKMP Protocol Policy Mode Commands
ISAKMP Protocol Policy Mode Commands
crypto isakmp proposal
This command defines an IKE proposal (policy) ‐ a set of parameters used during IKE negotiation. It invokes ISAKMP protocol policy configuration mode where the following sub‐commands are available to specify parameters in the proposal:
•
authentication ‐ Authentication method used by an IKE proposal. Refer to page 14‐96 for the command definition.
•
encryption ‐ Encoding method used by an IKE proposal. Refer to page 14‐97 for the command definition.
•
group ‐ Diffie‐Hellman group type used by an IKE proposal. Refer to page 14‐97 for the command definition.
•
•
hash ‐ Hash algorithm used by an IKE proposal. Refer to page 14‐98 for the command definition.
lifetime ‐ SA interval used by an IKE proposal. Refer to page 14‐99 for the command definition.
Many IKE proposals (policies) can be configured on each peer participating in IPSec. When IKE negotiation begins, it tries to find a common proposal (policy) on both peers; the common proposal contains exactly the same encryption, hash, authentication, and Diffie‐Hellman values. The lifetime value does not necessarily have to be the same.
Syntax
crypto isakmp proposal name
name
Proposal name to be defined.
Syntax of the “no” Form
To delete an IKE proposal (policy), use the no form of this command:
no crypto isakmp proposal name
Defaults
The DEFAULT proposal contains these default values:
•
Authentication: RSA signatures
•
Encryption: Triple DES
•
Group: 2
•
Hash: SHA‐1
•
Lifetime: 28,840 seconds (8 hours)
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
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ISAKMP Protocol Policy Mode Commands
Next Mode
ISAKMP protocol proposal configuration: XSR(config-isakmp)#
Example
The following example configures two policies for the peer:
XSR(config)#crypto isakmp proposal 57
XSR(config-isakmp)#hash md5
XSR(config-isakmp)#authentication rsa-sig
XSR(config-isakmp)#group2
XSR(config-isakmp)#lifetime 5000
XSR(config)#crypto isakmp policy 99
XSR(config-isakmp)#authentication pre-share
XSR(config-isakmp)#lifetime 10000
The above configuration results in the following policies:
XSR# show
Name
57
99
DEFAULT
crypto isakmp proposal
Authentication
Encrypt
RSASignature
DES
PreSharedKeys
DES
RSASignature
DES
Integrity
HMAC-MD5
HMAC-SHA
HMAC-SHA
Group
Modp1024
Modp768
Modp768
Lifetime
5000
10000
86400
authentication
This command specifies the authentication method used within an IKE proposal (policy).
Syntax
authentication {rsa-sig | pre-share}
rsa-sig
RSA signatures public key authentication method.
pre-share
Pre‐shared keys authentication method.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command resets authentication to the default:
no authentication
Default
rsa‐sig
Mode
ISAKMP protocol policy configuration: XSR(config-isakmp)#
Example
This example specifies RSA signatures authentication for IKE proposal ACMEproposal:
XSR(config)#crypto isakmp proposal ACMEproposal
XSR(config-isakmp)#authentication rsa-sig
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Configuring the VPN
ISAKMP Protocol Policy Mode Commands
encryption
This command sets the encryption algorithm used in an IKE proposal (policy).
Syntax
encryption {des | 3des | aes}
des
Data Encryption Standard (DES) encryption.
3des
Triple Data Encryption Standard (3DES) encryption.
aes
Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) encryption.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this commands resets the algorithm to the default:
no encryption
Default
3DES
Mode
ISAKMP protocol proposal configuration: XSR(config-isakmp)#
Example
This example specifies 3DES as the encryption method for the IKE proposal ACMEproposal:
XSR(config)#crypto isakmp proposal ACMEproposal
XSR(config-isakmp)#encryption 3des
group
This command sets the Diffie‐Hellman group in an IKE proposal (policy).
Note: Due to the lack of an IETF standard, IKE Diffie-Helman bit groups 2048, 3072, and 4096 are
not enabled.
Syntax
group {1 | 2 | 5}
1
768‐bit Diffie‐Hellman group.
2
1024‐bit Diffie‐Hellman group.
5
1536‐bit Diffie‐Hellman group.
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ISAKMP Protocol Policy Mode Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command resets the value to the default:
no group
Default
Group 2
Mode
ISAKMP protocol policy configuration: XSR(config-isakmp)#
Example
The following example configures Group 5 on ACMEproposal:
XSR(config)#crypto isakmp proposal ACMEproposal
XSR(config-isakmp)#Group5
hash
This command sets the hash algorithm used in an IKE proposal (policy).
Syntax
hash {sha | md5}
sha
Secure Hash Algorithm1 (SHA‐1) hash.
md5
Message‐Digest Algorithm (MD5) algorithm.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form this command resets to the default ‐ sha:
no hash
Default
sha
Mode
ISAKMP Protocol Policy configuration: XSR(config-isakmp)#
Example
This example specifies MD‐5 as the hash algorithm to be used for IKE proposal ACMEproposal:
XSR(config)#crypto isakmp proposal ACMEproposal
XSR(config-isakmp)#hash md5
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Configuring the VPN
Remote Peer ISAKMP Protocol Policy Mode Commands
lifetime
This command specifies the lifetime of an IKE Security Association (SA) for a given IKE proposal (policy).
Syntax
lifetime seconds
seconds
The interval, in seconds, each SA exists before expiring.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command resets to the default value:
no lifetime
Default
28,800 seconds (8 hours)
Mode
ISAKMP protocol policy configuration: XSR(config-isakmp)#
Example
The following example sets the IKE SA lifetime at 8 hours for ACMEproposal:
XSR(config)#crypto isakmp proposal ACMEproposal
XSR(config-isakmp)#lifetime 28800
Remote Peer ISAKMP Protocol Policy Mode Commands
crypto isakmp peer
This command configures the remote peer’s IP address and/or subnet and acquires ISAKMP configuration mode. The following sub‐commands can be entered at ISAKMP Peer mode:
•
config-mode sets the local IKE Mode configuration, the de facto standard to assign IP addresses within IKE. Refer to page 14‐100 for the command definition.
•
exchange-mode sets IKE to main or aggressive exchange mode. Refer to page 14‐101 for the command definition.
•
nat-traversal sets the IKE and IPSec NAT (Network Address Translation) traversal mode. Refer to page 14‐102 for the command definition.
•
proposal attaches IKE policies to a remote peer. Refer to page 14‐102 for the command definition.
•
user-id defines the identity information to be used during aggressive IKE Phase 1 negotiation. Refer to page 14‐103 for the command definition.
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Remote Peer ISAKMP Protocol Policy Mode Commands
Syntax
crypto isakmp peer_address subnet-mask
peer_address
Peerʹs IP address or IP subnet to which the policy will be attached.
subnet-mask
Value used with the peer‐address.
Syntax
The no form of this command removes policies from a remote peer:
no crypto isakmp peer peer_address subnet-mask
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
Remote Peer ISAKMP protocol policy configuration: XSR(config-isakmp-peer)#
Example
The following example sets the remote peer’s IKE policies:
XSR(config)#crypto isakmp peer 192.168.57.9 255.255.255.255
XSR(config-isakmp)#
config-mode
This command sets the local IKE Mode Configuration role. While not officially an IETF standard, config‐mode is the de facto standard for assigning IP addresses within IKE.
Internet Key Exchange (IKE) Mode Configuration, as implemented by many vendors, allows a gateway to download an IP address (and other network level configuration) to the client as part of IKE negotiation. Using this exchange, the gateway gives IP addresses to the IKE client to be used as an inner IP address encapsulated under IPSec. This method provides a known IP address for the client that can be matched against IPSec policy.
When configured as a Mode Config gateway, the XSR allocates an IP address to a peerm requesting it and when configured as a client, the XSR requests an IP address from the gateway.
Syntax
config-mode {client | gateway}
client
Act as a Configuration Mode client with this peer.
gateway
Act as a Configuration Mode server with this peer.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command resets IKE configuration mode to the default:
no config-mode
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Configuring the VPN
Remote Peer ISAKMP Protocol Policy Mode Commands
Default
Disabled
Mode
Remote Peer ISAKMP protocol policy configuration: XSR(config-isakmp-peer)#
Example
The following example configures the IKE IP address assignment mode to client:
XSR(config)#crypto isakmp peer 2.2.2.2 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-isakmp-peer)#config-mode client
exchange-mode
This command sets IKE to main or aggressive exchange mode.
Notes: It is useful to specify a user ID instead of an IP address when configuring an SA in
aggressive mode (with pre-shared keys) for a peer whose IP address is dynamic. If you specify no
ID, its IP address will be used by default. But, in that case, you will have to re-configure (with a new
entry in the aaa user database) both ends of the tunnel every time the address changes. Use the
user-id <string> command instead.
Due to the vulnerability of pre-shared keys on VPN devices using aggressive mode tunnels,
Enterasys Networks recommends instead using a certificate or employing a very long password
which is not listed in a dictionary.
Syntax
exchange-mode {main | aggressive}
main
IKE exchange mode set to main mode.
aggressive
IKE exchange mode set to aggressive mode.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command resets the exchange mode to the default:
no exchange-mode
Default
Aggressive mode
Mode
Remote Peer ISAKMP protocol policy configuration: XSR(config-isakmp-peer)#
Example
The following example configures the IKE mode to main:
XSR(config)#crypto isakmp peer 192.168.57.9 255.255.255.255
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Remote Peer ISAKMP Protocol Policy Mode Commands
XSR(config-isakmp-peer)#exchange-mode main
nat-traversal
The command sets the IKE and IPSec NAT (Network Address Translation) traversal mode used when communicating with remote peers matching the peer subnet and wildcard masks.
The automatic parameter configures IKE to automatically detect unroutable IP addresses between the local and remote gateway and to then switch to UDP encapsulation of IPSec traffic. The alternate values for this parameter (enabled and disabled) unconditionally turn UDP encapsulation of IPSec packets on or off, respectively.
Syntax
nat-traversal {automatic | enabled | disabled}
automatic
IKE NAT mode dynamically responds to discovered unroutable IP addresses by UDP‐encapsulating this traffic.
enabled
IKE NAT mode unconditionally on.
disabled
IKE NAT mode unconditionally off.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command resets the default value:
no nat-traversal
Default
Disabled
Mode
Remote Peer ISAKMP protocol policy configuration: XSR(config-isakmp-peer)#
Example
The following example sets IKE NAT mode to enabled:
XSR(config-isakmp-peer)#nat-traversal enabled
proposal
This command attaches up to three IKE policies to a remote peer. Proposals are configured with the crypto isakmp proposal command.
Syntax
proposal pol1 [poll2 poll3]
pol2 poll3
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Configuring the VPN
Names of policies attached to the remote peer.
Remote Peer ISAKMP Protocol Policy Mode Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes policies from the peer:
no proposal
Mode
Remote Peer ISAKMP protocol policy configuration: XSR(config-isakmp-peer)#
Example
The following example attaches a proposal to the remote peer:
XSR(config)#crypto isakmp peer 192.168.57.9 255.255.255.255
XSR(config-isakmp-peer)#proposal 3des_md5_gh2
user-id
This command defines the identity information to be used during aggressive IKE Phase 1 negotiation for peer‐to‐peer connections. Enter it when configuring the peer’s ISAKMP for a peer with pre‐shared keys whose IP address is dynamic. If you specify no ID, the IP address will be used by default. But, in that case, you will have to re‐configure (with a new entry in the aaa user
database) both ends of the tunnel every time the address changes.
Note: The exchange mode for this ISAKMP must be set to aggressive.
Syntax
user-id “string”
“string”
User‐defined identification enclosed by quotations.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes the user identity:
no user-id “string”
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
The following example configures the identification ROBO1. This ID will be used for aggressive IKE Phase 1 messages sent to the peer matching the ISAKMP’s peer address (0.0.0.0, for example):
XSR(config)#crypto isakmp peer 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0
XSR(config-isakmp-peer)#exchange-mode aggressive
XSR(config-isakmp-peer)#user-id “ROBO1 in Shrewsbury”
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Remote Peer Show Commands
Remote Peer Show Commands
show crypto isakmp peer
This command displays attributes for each ISAKMP peer. IKEʹs first configuration derives from the IP address of the remote peer. ISAKMP peers created by EZ‐IPSec configuration are marked with an asterisk (*) in the leftmost column of the show output. These proposals may not be used in other user‐defined ISAKMP policies ‐ they are reserved for EZ‐IPSec.
Syntax
show crypto isakmp peer
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following is sample output from the command:
XSR#show crypto isakmp peer
Applicable Subnet
Exch-Mode Config-Mode
192.168.57.4/2
Main
Client
192.168.57.9/32
Main
Disabled
NAT
Off
Off
User ID
p1
Proposals
*** NONE ***
*** NONE ***
The following output was produced by an ISAKMP peer created by EZ‐IPSec:
XSR#show crypto isakmp peer
Exch-Mode Config-Mode
Applicable Subnet
* 141.154.196.87/32 Main
Client
NAT
Auto
User ID
Proposals
ez-ike-3des-sha-rsa
ez-ike-3des-md5-rsa
Parameter Description
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Applicable subnet
Subnet describing a range of IP addresses representing peers.
Applicable subnet
Main or Aggressive.
Config‐Mode
Client, Gateway or Disabled.
NAT
Indicates whether NAT Traversal is On or Off. Be aware that Off may be indicated even when NAT‐T is being used.
User ID
User‐specified peer name.
Proposals
IKE policies.
Configuring the VPN
Remote Peer Show Commands
show crypto isakmp proposal
This command lists attributes for each Internet Key Exchange (IKE) proposal. ISAKMP proposals created with EZ‐IPSec are marked with an asterisk (*) in the show output. These proposals may not be used in other user‐defined ISAKMP policies ‐ they are reserved for EZ‐IPSec.
Syntax
show crypto isakmp proposal
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
XSR#show crypto isakmp proposal
Name
Authentication
test
PreSharedKeys
Encrypt
AES
Integrity Group
HMAC-MD5 Modp1024
Lifetime
The following output was produced by ISAKMP proposals created via EZ‐IPSec:
XSR#show crypto isakmp proposal
Name
Authentication
*ez-ike-3des-sha-psk PreSharedKeys
*ez-ike-3des-md5-psk PreSharedKeys
*ez-ike-3des-sha-rsa RSASignature
*ez-ike-3des-md5-rsa RSASignature
Encrypt Integrity Group
3DES
HMAC-SHA
Modp1024
3DES
HMAC-MD5
Modp1024
3DES
HMAC-SHA
Modp1024
3DES
HMAC-MD5
Modp1024
Lifetime
28800
28800
28800
28800
show crypto isakmp sa
This command lists all current Internet Key Exchange Security Associations (SAs) for your XSR. An SA occupies a certain state depending upon where in the authentication process the peers are and what exchange mode they share ‐ Aggressive, Main or Quick. During long exchanges, some of the MM states may be seen. Refer to the Parameter Descriptions for further explanation.
Syntax
show crypto isakmp sa
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following output displays two SAs, one in Main Mode exchange preparing to authenticate and the other in Quick Mode exchange ready for traffic:
XSR#show crypto isakmp sa
Connection-ID
State
526
MM_KEY_AUTH
9
QM_IDLE
Source
192.168.2.2
192.168.55.10
Destination
192.168.2.1
141.154.196.87
Lifetime
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IPSec Commands
Parameters Descriptions
Main Mode Exchange
MM_NO_STATE
ISAKMP SA has only just been created and no state is yet established.
MM_SA_SETUP
Peers have agreed on settings for the ISAKMP SA.
MM_KEY_EXCH
Peers have exchanged Diffie‐Hellman public keys and built a shared secret. The ISAKMP SA is not authenticated.
MM_KEY_AUTH
ISAKMP SA is authenticated. If the XSR began this exchange, this state transitions immediately to QM_IDLE and a Quick Mode exchange begins.
Aggressive Mode Exchange
AG_NO_STATE
ISAKMP SA has only just been created and no state is yet established.
AG_INIT_EXCH
Peers have made the first exchange in Aggressive Mode but the SA is not authenticated.
AG_AUTH
ISAKMP SA has been authenticated. If the XSR began this exchange, this state transitions immediately to QM_IDLE and a Quick Mode exchange begins.
Quick Mode Exchange
QM_IDLE
ISAKMP SA is quiescent. It remains authenticated with its peer and may be used for later Quick Mode exchanges.
IPSec Commands
This section describes commands that configure the IPSec protocol which provides anti‐replay protection as well as data authentication and encryption.
access-list
This command creates an access list which is used to define which IP traffic will and will not be protected by the crypto process. ACLs associated with IPSec crypto map entries have these primary functions:
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•
Select outbound traffic to be protected by IPSec: the keyword permit equates with protected traffic.
•
Indicate the data flow to be protected by the new Security Associations (SAs) ‐ specified by a single permit entry‐ when initiating negotiations for IPSec SAs.
•
Process inbound traffic to filter out and discard traffic that should have been protected by IPSec.
•
Determine whether or not to accept requests for IPSec SAs on behalf of the requested data flows when processing IKE negotiation from the IPSec peer (negotiation is done only for ipsec‐
isakmp crypto map entries.) In order to be accepted, if the peer initiates IPSec negotiation, it must specify a data flow that is “permitted” by a crypto access list associated with an ipsec‐
isakmp crypto map entry.
Configuring the VPN
IPSec Commands
Syntax
access-list acl-number {deny | permit} protocol [source_addr source_mask [eq port]
destination_addr destination_mask [eq port]
acl-number
A uniquely defined access list number.
deny
Prevents traffic from being protected by IPSec in the contextof a particular crypto map entry: it does not allow the policy as set in crypto map statements to be applied to this traffic.
permit
Causes all IP traffic that matches the specified conditions to be protected by IPSec using the policy described by the corresponding crypto map command statements.
protocol
Name or number of an IP protocol. It can be one of the keywords ip, tcp, or udp, or an integer ranging from 1 to 254 representing an IP protocol number. To match any Internet protocol, including TCP, and UDP, use the keyword ip.
eq port
A clause to define a matching source and/or destination port number. Source and/or destination is defined by the location of the eq keyword in the command. A port number of zero matches any port. May only be used with TCP and UDP protocols.
source-addr
Address of the network or host from which the packet is sent.
source-mask
Netmask bits (mask) to be applied to source_addr.
destination-addr
IP address of the network or host to where the packet is sent.
destination-mask
Netmask bits (mask) to be applied to destination_addr.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the access list:
no access-list acl-number {deny | permit} protocol [source_addr source_mask [eq
port] destination_addr destination_mask [eq port]
Default
An extended ACL defaults to a list that denies everything.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Examples
The following example configures two IP ACLs:
XSR(config)#access-list 100 permit ip 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 192.168.1.0
XSR(config)#access-list 101 permit ip 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 host 10.123.234.45
The following ACLs secure L2TP:
XSR(config)#access-list 120 permit udp any eq 1701 any
XSR(config)#access-list 130 permit udp any any eq 1701
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IPSec Clear and Show Commands
IPSec Clear and Show Commands
clear crypto sa
This command deletes IPSec Security Associations (SAs) as follows:
•
If the SAs were established via IKE, they are deleted and future IPSec traffic will require new SAs to be negotiated. (When IKE is used, the IPSec SAs are established only when needed.)
•
The peer keyword deletes any IPSec SAs for the specified peer.
•
The map keyword deletes any IPSec SAs for the named crypto map set.
•
The counters keyword simply clears the traffic counters maintained for each SA; it does not clear the SAs themselves.
Note: If there are many thousands of tunnels in use, this command will use as many system
resources as are available for as long as necessary to complete the task, making the XSR appear
“frozen.”
Syntax
clear
clear
clear
clear
crypto
crypto
crypto
crypto
sa
sa peer {ip-address | peer-name}
sa map map-name
sa counters
ip-address
Specify a remote peerʹs IP address.
peer-name
Specify a remote peerʹs name as the fully qualified domain name.
map-name
Specify the name of a crypto map set.
Default
If peer, map, or counters keywords are not used, all IPSec SAs are deleted.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
The following example clears the SA counters for all peers:
XSR#clear crypto sa counters
show access-lists
This command shows one or all access lists defined in the XSR. Alternatively, you can view the packet threshold after which the ACL violations log is triggered.
Syntax
show access-lists number log-update-threshold
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Configuring the VPN
IPSec Clear and Show Commands
number
Access list number defined using the access-list command.
log-update-threshold
Packet ceiling, when met, will trigger violations log.
Default
If an access list number is not specified, all access lists are shown.
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Examples
The following example displays configured access lists on the XSR:
XSR#show access-lists
Extended IP access list 100
permit ip any host 192.168.1.0
The following example displays the log threshold:
XSR(config)#show access-lists log-update-threshold
access-list log-update-threshold 10000
crypto key master
This command creates, deletes, or specifies a master encryption key, which encodes all other keys on the XSR including AAA user database and private keys used by PKI (user.dat, cert.dat and hostkey.dat). Before configuring your VPN, you must generate this key.
Caution: The master encryption key is stored in hardware, not Flash, and you cannot read the
key - only overwrite the old key by writing a new one. To ensure router security, it is critical not to
compromise the key. There are situations where you may want to keep the key, for example, to
save the user database off-line in order to later download it to the XSR. In order to encrypt the
user database, you need the same master key, indicating the key designation with the master
key specify command. Be aware that if the XSR is inoperable and you press the Default
button, the master key is erased and you must generate a new one.
Syntax
crypto key master {generate | remove | specify}
generate
Create a master encryption key.
remove
Delete the master encryption and host key pair (hostkey.dat).
specify
Specify a master encryption key.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
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Crypto Map Mode Commands
Sample Output
The following output displays when a master key is generated:
XSR(config)#crypto key master generate
New key is 8573 4583 3994 2ff5
183b 4bdf fe92 dbc1
1132 ffe0 f8d9 3759
A script displays when a master key is specified, prompting you for the following information:
XSR(config)#crypto key master specify
Specify first encryption key in hex digits:
Specify second encryption key in hex digits:
Specify third encryption key in hex digits:
Are you sure? [y]:
[]: 8573 4583 3994 2ff5
[]: 183b 4bdf fe92 dbc1
[]: 1132 ffe0 f9d9 3759
Crypto Map Mode Commands
crypto map (Global IPSec)
This command creates or modifies a crypto map entry. It also acquires Crypto Map mode. Along with the setting of a transform‐set, this constitutes IPSec Phase 2 configuration.
In Crypto Map mode, the following sub‐commands are available:
•
match address ‐ Correlates ACLs to map. Refer to page 14‐111 for the command definition.
•
mode ‐ Selects encapsulation type ‐ tunnel or transport‐ for a transform‐set. Refer to page 14‐112 for the command definition.
•
set peer ‐ Specifies peer’s IP address. Refer to page 14‐113 for the command definition.
•
set security-association level per-host ‐ Specifies separate SAs be requested for each source/destination host pair. Refer to page 14‐114 for the command definition.
•
set transform-set ‐ Correlates transform‐sets with map. Refer to page 14‐114 for the command definition.
Crypto Map
Crypto maps provide two functions: filter and classify traffic to be protected as well as define the policy to be applied to that traffic. The first use affects the flow of traffic on an interface; the second affects the negotiation performed (via IKE) on behalf of that traffic.
IPSec crypto maps link definitions of the following:
•
Which traffic should be protected.
•
Which IPSec peers the protected traffic can be forwarded to ‐ these are the peers with which a Security Association (SA) can be built.
•
Which transform‐sets are acceptable for use with the protected traffic.
•
How keys and SAs should be used or managed.
Note: A crypto map has no effect until it is attached to an interface.
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Configuring the VPN
Crypto Map Mode Commands
Crypto Map Rules
A crypto map is a collection of rules, each with a different seq‐num but the same map‐name. So, for a given interface, you can have certain traffic forwarded to one IPSec peer with specified security applied to that traffic, and other traffic forwarded to the same or a different IPSec peer with different IPSec security applied. To accomplish this you create two crypto maps, each with the same map‐name, but each with a different seq‐num. Crypto map rules are searched in order of seq‐
num. Sequence numbers, in addition to determining the order in which traffic is tested against the rules, are used as an anti‐replay device to reject duplicate and old packets and so prevent an intruder from copying a conversation and using it to work out encryption algorithms.
Syntax
crypto map map-name seq-num [ipsec-isakmp]
map-name
Crypto map identification. This is the name assigned when the crypto map was created.
seq-num
32‐bit digit you assign to the crypto map. Range: 1 to 4096.
ipsec-isakmp
This value provides backward compatibility with the industry‐standard CLI. It is not mandatory.
Syntax of the “no” Form
To delete a crypto map entry, use the no form of this command:
no crypto map map-name [seq-num]
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
Crypto Map configuration: XSR(config-crypto-m)#
Sample Output
The following example creates the crypto map ACMEmap:
XSR(config)#crypto map ACMEmap 7
XSR(config-crypto-m)#set transform-set esp-3des-sha
XSR(config-crypto-m)#match address 120
match address
This command specifies an access control list (ACL) for a crypto map entry. An ACL is applied bidirectionally by IPSec and the XSR considers its “source” as the local address and its “destination” as the remote address so typically only one match address and ACL is needed to define traffic with a peer.
Syntax
match address [access-list-id]
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Crypto Map Mode Commands
access-list-id
Identifies the extended ACL by its number. This value should match the access‐list‐number argument of the ACL being matched.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form to remove the ACL from a crypto map entry:
no match address [access-list-id]
Default
No access lists are matched to the crypto map entry.
Mode
Crypto Map configuration: XSR(config-crypto-m)#
Example
The following static crypto map example shows the minimum required crypto map configuration when IKE will be used to establish the SAs:
XSR(config)#crypto map ACMEmap 7 ipsec-isakmp
XSR(config-crypto-m)#match address 101
XSR(config-crypto-m)#set transform-set my_t_set1
XSR(config-crypto-m)#set peer 10.0.0.1
mode
This command selects one of two IPSec‐defined encapsulation modes, tunnel or transport, for a transform‐set. Tunnel mode, the default, typically is used with VPNs because the entire private network packet is carried as the payload of the IPSec packet. Transport mode carries only the payload (TCP or UDP typically) of the private network packet as the payload of the IPSec packet.
Note: Transport mode must be selected for a Windows L2TP/IPSec client to operate properly.
Syntax
mode [tunnel | transport]
tunnel
Tunnel mode.
transport
Transport mode.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command resets the mode to the default:
no mode
Default
Tunnel mode
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Configuring the VPN
Crypto Map Mode Commands
Mode
Crypto Map configuration: XSR(config-crypto-m)#
Example
This example defines a transform‐set and changes the mode to transport mode. The mode value only applies to IP traffic with source and destination addresses at the local and remote IPSec peers.
XSR(config)#crypto ipsec transform-set newer esp-des esp-sha-hmc
XSR(config)crypto map ACMEmap 14
XSR(config-crypto-m)#mode transport
set peer
This command specifies an IPSec peer in a crypto map entry. When traffic passing through the interface matches a crypto map entry, a tunnel is opened to the peer specified by this command.
Syntax
set peer ip-address
ip-address
Specifies the IPSec peer by its IP address.
Syntax of the “no” Form
To remove an IPSec peer from a crypto map entry, use the no form of this command:
no set peer {hostname | ip-address}
Default
No peer is defined
Mode
Crypto Map configuration: XSR(config-crypto-m)#
Example
This example shows a crypto map configuration when IKE is used to build Security Associations. In this example, an SA could be set up with either the IPSec peer at 10.0.0.1 or the peer at 10.0.0.2.
XSR(config)#crypto map ACMEmap 7 ipsec-isakmp
XSR(config-crypto-m)#match address 101
XSR(config-crypto-m)#set transform-set my_t_set1
XSR(config-crypto-m)#set peer 10.0.0.1
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Crypto Map Mode Commands
set security-association level per-host
This command specifies that separate IPSec Security Associations (SAs) should be requested for each source/destination host pair.
Syntax
set security-association level per-host
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form specifies that one SA should be requested for each crypto map ACL permit entry.
no set security-association level per-host
Default
For a given crypto map, all traffic between two IPSec peers matching a single crypto map ACL permit entry will share the same SA.
Mode
Crypto Map configuration: XSR(config-crypto-m)#
Example
The following example sets the SA request on a per‐host basis:
XSR(config)crypto map ACMEmap
XSR(config-crypto-m)#set security-association level per-host
set transform-set
This command specifies which transform‐sets can be used with the crypto map entry.
Syntax
set transform-set transform-set-name1 [transform-set-name2...transform-set-name6]
transform-set-name
Name of the transform‐set. Up to 6 can be specified.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes all transform‐sets from a crypto map entry:
no set transform-set
Mode
Crypto Map configuration: XSR(config-crypto-m)#
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Configuring the VPN
Crypto Transform Mode Commands
Example
This example defines two transform‐sets, specifying both can be used within a crypto map entry. When traffic matches ACL 101, the SA can use either transform‐set my_t_set1 (first priority) or my_t_set2 (second priority) depending on which transform‐set matches the remote peerʹs transform‐sets.
XSR(config)#crypto ipsec transform-set my_t_set1 esp-des esp-sha-hmac
XSR(config)#crypto ipsec transform-set my_t_set2 ah-sha-hmac esp-des esp-sha-hmac
XSR(config)#crypto map ACMEmap 7 ipsec-isakmp
XSR(config-crypto-m)#match address 101
XSR(config-crypto-m)#set transform-set my_t_set1 my_t_set2
XSR(config-crypto-m)#set peer 10.0.0.1
Crypto Transform Mode Commands
crypto ipsec transform-set
This command defines a transform‐set which is an acceptable combination of security protocols and algorithms to apply to IP Security protected traffic. During IPSec Security Association (SA) negotiation, peers agree to use a particular transform‐set when protecting a particular data flow.
This command acquires Crypto Transform configuration Mode. The following sub‐commands are available in this mode:
•
set pfs ‐ Specifies that IPSec should ask for PFS when seeking new SAs for this crypto map entry, or that IPSec requires PFS when getting requests for new SAs. Refer to page 14‐116 for the command definition.
•
set security-association lifetime ‐ Specifies the interval used when negotiating IPSec SAs. Refer to page 14‐117 for the command definition.
A transform‐set is an acceptable combination of security protocols, algorithms and other settings to apply to IP Security‐protected traffic. During IPSec SA negotiation, the peers agree to use a particular transform‐set when protecting a particular data flow.
Syntax
crypto ipsec transform-set transform-set-name transform1 [transform2 [transform3]]
transformset-name
Name of the transform‐set to create or modify.
transform1
Specify up to 3 transforms defining the IPSec security protocols and algorithms. The choices are:
•
ah‐md5‐hmac: AH transform with HMAC‐MD5 algorithm.
•
ah‐sha‐hmac: AH transform with HMAC‐SHA algorithm.
•
esp‐3des: ESP transform with 56‐bit DES encryption (168‐bits).
•
esp‐aes: ESP transform with 128‐bit AES encryption.
•
esp‐des: ESP transform with 168‐bit Triple DES encryption.
•
esp‐md5‐hmac: ESP transform with HMAC‐MD5 data integrity algorithm.
•
esp‐null: ESP transform with no encryption.
•
esp‐sha‐hmac: ESP transform with HMAC‐SHA data integrity algorithm.
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Crypto Transform Mode Commands
Mode of the “no” Form
The no form of the command deletes a transform‐set:
no crypto ipsec transform-set transform-set-name
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
Crypto Transform configuration: XSR(cfg-crypto-tran)#
Example
The following example defines the transforms to apply for t‐set1 SA negoatiation:
XSR(config)#crypto ipsec transform-set t-set1 esp-3des esp-sha-hmac
set pfs
This command specifies that IPSec ask for Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) when requesting new Security Associations (SAs) for this crypto map entry, or that IPSec requires PFS when receiving requests for new SAs.
PFS is a security condition under which there is confidence that the compromise of a session’s key will not lead to easier compromise of the key used in the next session (after the key is refreshed). When PFS is used a session’s keys are generated independently, so a key compromised in one session will not affect the keys used in subsequent sessions.
Note: Due to the lack of an IETF standard, IKE Diffie-Helman bit groups 2048, 3072, and 4096 are
not enabled.
Syntax
set pfs [group1 | group2]
group1
Specifies that IPSec should use the 768‐bit Diffie‐Hellman prime modulus group when performing the new Diffie‐Hellman exchange.
group2
Specifies that IPSec should use the 1024‐bit Diffie‐Hellman prime modulus group when performing the new Diffie‐Hellman exchange.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of the command for IPSec not to request PFS:
no set pfs
Default
Disabled
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Configuring the VPN
Crypto Transform Mode Commands
Mode
Crypto Transform configuration: XSR(cfg-crypto-tran)#
Example
This example selects PFS group 2 whenever a new SA is negotiated for crypto map ACMEmap:
XSR(config)#crypto map ACMEmap 7 ipsec-isakmp
XSR(config)#crypto ipsec transform-set t-set1 esp-3des esp-sha-hmac
XSR(cfg-crypto-tran)#set pfs group2
set security-association lifetime
This command sets the lifetime interval used when negotiating IPSec Security Associations (SAs). Data passing through the XSR is encrypted using keys generated during IKE exchange. The lifetime of those keys may be defined in seconds or in data volume which was encrypted using those keys. When that lifetime expires new keys are generated and traffic continues to be passed using new keys.
Syntax
set security-association lifetime {seconds seconds | kilobytes kilobytes}
seconds
The interval an SA lives before expiring, ranging from 300 to 86,400,000 seconds.
kilobytes
The volume of traffic, in KBytes, that can pass between IPSec peers using a given SA before that SA expires, ranging from 1 MByte to 1000 GBytes.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables the specified lifetime metric. It does not reset the default:
no set security-association lifetime {seconds | kilobytes}
Default
3600 seconds with no limit on traffic volume.
Mode
Crypto Transform configuration: XSR(cfg-crypto-tran)#
Example
The following example sets the SA lifetime to 7,200 KBytes and disables the seconds parameter:
XSR(cfg-crypto-tran)#)#set security-association lifetime kilobytes 7200
XSR(cfg-crypto-tran)#)#no set security-association lifetime seconds
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Crypto Show Commands
Crypto Show Commands
show crypto ipsec sa
This command displays current Security Associations (SAs) settings.
Syntax
show crypto ipsec sa
[map map-name | address]
map-name
Shows any existing SAs created for the crypto map set named map‐name.
address
Shows all existing SAs, sorted by the destination address (either the local address or the address of the IPSec remote peer) and then by protocol (AH or ESP).
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following is sample output when NAT is not present between the crypto endpoints. The first section is the inbound SA, and the second section, the outbound SA. The UDP port follow the the IP address for crypto endpoints when a NAT is present.
XSR#show crypto ipsec sa
10.1.1.2/32, UDP, 1701 ==> 10.2.1.34/32, UDP, 1701 : 71 packets
ESP: SPI=f5ae2b52, Transform=3DES/HMAC-SHA, Life=3575S/249929KB
Local crypto endpt.=10.2.1.34, Remote crypto endpt.=10.1.1.2
Encapsulation=Transport
10.2.1.34/32, UDP, 1701 ==> 10.1.1.2/32, UDP, 1701 : 36 packets
ESP: SPI=5419ec15, Transform=3DES/HMAC-SHA, Life=3575S/249933KB
Local crypto endpt.=10.2.1.34, Remote crypto endpt.=10.1.1.2
Encapsulation=Transport
The following is sample output when NAT is present between the crypto endpoints. Note that UDP‐Encaps displays, indicating that encapsulation is enabled with a NAT present.
10.2.1.10/32, UDP, 1701 ==> 10.2.1.34/32, UDP, 1701 : 52 packets
ESP: SPI=40d5e065, Transform=3DES/HMAC-SHA, Life=3589S/249932KB
Local crypto endpt.=10.2.1.34:4500, Remote crypto endpt.=10.2.1.10:41108
Encapsulation=Transport UDP-Encaps
10.2.1.34/32, UDP, 1701 ==> 10.2.1.10/32, UDP, 1701 : 32 packets
ESP: SPI=5c0f6fb5, Transform=3DES/HMAC-SHA, Life=3589S/249934KB
Local crypto endpt.=10.2.1.34:4500, Remote crypto endpt.=10.2.1.10:41108
Encapsulation=Transport UDP-Encaps
Parameter Description
14-118
10.2.1.10/32, UDP, 1701
IP address, protocol, and protocol port number of the source ACL entry associated with this SA.
10.2.1.34/32, UDP, 1701
IP address, protocol, and protocol port number of the destination ACL entry associated with this SA.
52 packets
Number of packets processed by this SA.
Configuring the VPN
Crypto Show Commands
ESP
Type of SA: either ESP or AH.
SPI=40d5e065
Unique Security Parameter Index (SPI) number for the SA.
Transform
Encryption algorithm set.
Life=3589s/249932KB Lifetime of the SA in seconds and KBytes.
Local crypto endpt.‐10.2.1.34:4500
IP address and port number of the local crypto peer.
Remote crypto endpt.‐10.2.1.34:4500
IP address and port number of the remote crypto peer.
Encapsulation
ESP or AH Encoding Mode.
UDP‐Encaps
Indicates NAT is present between the crypto endpoints.
show crypto ipsec transform-set
This command displays configured transform‐sets. IPSec transform‐sets created with EZ‐IPSec configuration are marked with an asterisk (*) in the show output. These proposals may not be used in other user‐defined IPSec policies. They are reserved for EZ‐IPSec
Syntax
show crypto ipsec transform-set [transform-set-name]
transform-set-name
Shows transform‐sets with the specific transform‐set‐name only.
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following example was produced from manually configured transform‐sets:
XSR#show crypto ipsec transform-set
PFS
Name
esp-3des-md5
Disabled
ah-sha
Disabled
ESP
AES
None
ESP-AH
HMAC-MD5
None
AH
None
HMAC-SHA
IPCOMP
None
None
The following output was produced by EZ‐IPSec transform‐sets:
XSR#show crypto ipsec transform-set
Name
PFS
ESP
*ez-esp-3des-sha-pfs
Modp768
3DES
*ez-esp-3des-sha-no-pfs
Disabled 3DES
*ez-esp-3des-md5-pfs
Modp768
3DES
*ez-esp-3des-md5-no-pfs
Disabled 3DES
*ez-esp-aes-sha-pfs
Modp768
AES
*ez-esp-aes-sha-no-pfs
Disabled AES
*ez-esp-aes-md5-pfs
Modp768
AES
*ez-esp-aes-md5-no-pfs
Disabled
AES
ESP-AH
AH
HMAC-SHA
None
HMAC-SHA
None
HMAC-MD5
None
HMAC-MD5
None
HMAC-SHA
None
HMAC-SHA
None
HMAC-MD5
None
HMAC-MD5
None
IPCOMP
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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Crypto Show Commands
show crypto map
This command displays the crypto map configuration. IPSec crypto maps created with EZ‐IPSec configuration are marked with an asterisk (*) in the leftmost column of the show output. These proposals may not be used in other user‐defined IPSec policies. They are reserved for EZ‐IPSec.
Syntax
show crypto map [interface type | tag map-name]
type
Shows only the crypto map set applied to the specified interface including: ATM, BRI, Dialer, Fast/GigabitEthernet, Multilink, or Serial.
map-name
Shows only the crypto map set with the specified map‐name.
Mode
EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
XSR#show crypto map
Crypto Map Table
Policy rule list
Name
ezipsec
n03;c03
test
test.10;test.20
IPSec Policy Rule Table
ACL
Disp
Mode
Bundle Gateway
Name
*c03
c03 Process
Tunnel SPD
141.154.196.87
*n03
n03
Process
test.10 110 llProcess
test.20 120 llProcess
Tunnel SPD
Trans SPD
Tunnel SPD
141.154.196.87
0.0.0.0
1.1.2.1
Proposals
ez-esp-3des-sha-pfs
ez-esp-3des-md5-pfs
ez-esp-aes-sha-pfs
ez-esp-aes-md5-pfs
ez-esp-3des-sha-no-pfs
ez-esp-3des-md5-no-pfs
ez-esp-aes-sha-no-pfs
ez-esp-aes-md5-no-pfs
ez-esp-3des-sha-pfs
ez-esp-3des-md5-pfs
ez-esp-aes-sha-pfs
ez-esp-aes-md5-pfs
ez-esp-3des-sha-no-pfs
ez-esp-3des-md5-no-pfs
ez-esp-aes-sha-no-pfs
ez-esp-aes-md5-no-pfs
T/Med ah-sha
T/Med esp-3des-md5
EZ-IPSec Access Control List
Name Local Address
*c03 10.120.122.17
*n03 172.16.19.0/24
14-120
Configuring the VPN
Remote Address
0.0.0.0/0
0.0.0.0/0
Prot
ANY
ANY
Lport
0
0
Rport
0
Interface CLI Commands
Interface CLI Commands
crypto map
This command applies a previously defined crypto map to an interface. It is governed by the following rules:
•
A crypto map must be assigned to an interface before that port can provide IPSec services.
•
Only 1 crypto map can be assigned an interface although it can be attached to multiple ports.
•
A crypto map may not be assigned to an interface that already has crypto ezipsec enabled.
•
Crypto maps may not be assigned to a VPN interface ( it is invalid at Interface VPN mode).
Syntax
crypto map map-name
map-name
Crypto map ID assigned when the crypto map was created.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Delete a crypto map from the interface with the no form of this command:
no crypto map [map-name]
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Next Mode
Crypto Map configuration: XSR(config-crypto-m)#
Sample Output
This example assigns crypto map ACMEmap to the F1 interface. When traffic passes through F1, it will be evaluated against all the crypto map entries in the ACMEmap set. When outbound traffic matches an access list in one of the ACMEmap crypto map entries, a Security Association will be established for that crypto map entryʹs configuration (if no SA or connection already exists).
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#crypto map ACMEmap
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Interface VPN Commands
crypto ezipsec
This command creates a suite of IPSec policies, sorted by cryptographic strength, that are offered to the remote security gateway. The gateway selects one of these policies based on its local configuration. EZ‐IPSec relies upon the IKE Mode Configuration protocol to obtain an IP address from the remote security gateway.
An EZ‐IPSec crypto map is also created and attached to the interface under configuration. Refer to the XSR User’s Guide for specific examples and how crypto ezipsec is used with RIP and NAT. Be aware of the following rules governing this command:
•
Crypto ezipsec may not be enabled on an interface that already has a crypto map.
•
Crypto maps may be attached to other network interfaces.
•
EZ‐IPSec parameters cannot be changed but can be supplemented with custom values.
Syntax
crypto ezipsec
Syntax of the “no” Form
no crypto ezipsec
Default
Disabled
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following example configures EZ‐IPSec on Serial interface 1:
XSR(config-if<S1/0>)#crypto ezipsec
Interface VPN Commands
interface vpn
This command acquires virtual Interface VPN configuration mode from which you can configure the following sub‐commands:
•
copy-tos ‐ Copies TOS bits during the encapsulation/decapsulation process. Refer to
page 14‐124 for the command definition.
•
description - Describes the VPN interface. Refer to page 14‐125 for the command definition.
•
14-122
ip address negotiated - Requires a site‐to‐site tunnel to obtain an IP address from the remote tunnel gateway via PPP or IKE Mode Config. Refer to page 14‐126 for the command definition.
Configuring the VPN
Interface VPN Commands
•
ip multicast-redirect - Native IPSec tunnels attached to VPN interfaces will not easily forward multicast traffic multicast packet redirection to the unicast address of the remote tunnel endpoint. Refer to page 14‐126 for the command definition.
•
ip address ‐ Defines an explicit IP address on this virtual interface. Refer to page 5‐151 for the command description.
•
ip nat source ‐ Controls NAT on packets entering this VPN port. Refer to page 5‐186 for the command description.
•
ip rip commands ‐ Configures RIP options on the VPN interface. Refer to the “Configuring the Internet Protocol” on page 5‐83 chapter for descriptions of RIP commands.
•
ip split-horizon ‐ Sets RIP split‐horizon options on the VPN port. Refer to page 5‐130 for the command description.
•
ip unnumbered ‐ Creates an unnumbered VPN interface. Refer to page 5‐166 for the command description.
•
service-policy ‐ Attaches a policy map to an VPN output or input interface. Refer to page 14‐127 for the command description.
•
tunnel ‐ Creates a tunnel to a VPN gateway. Refer to page 14‐127 for the command description.
Some VPN configuration properties are associated with a specific network interface or require creation of virtual network interfaces that represent tunnels.
This section defines the VPN‐related subcommands provided by the interface vpn command.
A VPN interface is a special form of a virtual network interface that represents an IPSec tunnel with EZ‐IPSec automatic configuration, L2TP, or PPTP tunnel(s). It is required to support VPN tunnels which have IP addresses. These tunnels should not be confused with tunnel mode in IPSec. A tunnel on a VPN interface has IP addresses at both ends and is used by the routing subsystem like any other network interface.
A VPN interface can be configured as follows:
•
interface vpn 4 point-to-point
•
interface vpn 3 multi-point
Point‐to‐Point interfaces are used when defining an outbound tunnel to another gateway. This interface type, in conjunction with the tunnel command, is suited to initiating outbound tunnels to other security gateways that support dynamic IP address assignment.
Note: The tunnel command is a sub-command of interface vpn.
Each outbound tunnel is associated with a VPN interface. That interface, which can be configured into the routing protocols, is considered down until the tunnel has connected and an IP address has been obtained from the remote VPN gateway.
Note: Only one tunnel may be defined per point-to-point VPN interface.
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Interface VPN Commands
A multi‐point interface accepts many inbound tunnels and is used when the XSR is configured as a remote access VPN gateway.
Note: The no shutdown command is not required to bring up the virtual interface because it is
always enabled.
Syntax
interface vpn {number}{point-to-point | multi-point}
number
VPN interface number ranging from 1 to 255.
point-to-point
VPN port type initiating outbound tunnels to another gateway.
multi-point
VPN port type terminating inbound tunnels from a remote access VPN gateway.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The following command deletes the specified VPN interface:
no interface vpn
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-int-vpn)#
Example
The following example creates VPN interface 57:
XSR(config)#interface vpn 57
XSR(config-int-vpn)#
copy-tos
This command copies TOS bits during the encapsulation/decapsulation process. It can be applied to a VPN interface or inserted in the crypto isamp peer command. When applied, the command copies the TOS byte from the inner to the outer header for output packets. For input packets, it copies the TOS byte from the outer to the inner header.
Syntax
copy-tos
Syntax of the “no” Form
The following no form of the command removes the TOS copy action:
no copy-tos
14-124
Configuring the VPN
Interface VPN Commands
Mode
VPN Interface configuration: XSR(config‐if<xx>)#
Example
The following example configures VPN interface 1 with an IP address, and TOS copy enabled. It also sets a peer IP address, GRE, and turns on the associated VPN tunnel.
XSR(config)#interface vpn 1
XSR(config-int-vpn)#ip address 20.20.20.1/24
XSR(config-int-vpn)#copy-tos
XSR(config-int-vpn)#service-policy output vpn
XSR(config-int-vpn)#tunnel t1
XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#set protocol gre
XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#set peer 10.10.10.2
XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#set active
XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#no shutdown
description
This commands describes a VPN interface and any tunnel it contains.
Syntax
description comment
comment
Everything to the end of the line is recorded as a comment. Use quotation marks for multiple words.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes the description described earlier:
no description
Mode
Interface Internet Protocol configuration: XSR(config-int<vpn>)#
Example
The following example describes ACME_VPN:
XSR(config)#interface vpn 57 multi-point
XSR(config-int<vpn>)#description ACME_VPN
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Interface VPN Commands
ip address negotiated
This command marks the VPN interface to dynamically get its IP address via the tunnel protocol. PPTP and L2TP protocols use PPP IPCP and IPSec/IKE uses the Mode Configuration protocol.
Syntax
ip address negotiated
Syntax of the “no” Form
no ip address negotiated
Mode
Interface Internet Protocol configuration: XSR(config-int<vpn>)#
Example
The following example sets the VPN interface to get its IP address from the tunnel protocol:
XSR(config)#interface vpn 57 point-to-point
XSR(config-int<vpn>)#ip address negotiated
ip multicast-redirect
This command controls redirection of multicast packets to the unicast address of the remote tunnel endpoint or to an explicitly defined address such as another IP address at the end of an unnumbered tunnel. The command is useful because native IPSec tunnels attached to VPN interfaces will not easily forward multicast traffic without substantial crypto map configuration.
Multicast redirection must be enabled to support RIP over IPSec tunnels when explicit multicast policy rules are not included in the Security Policy Database. Redirection is not required for PPTP and L2TP tunnels.
Note: Multicast redirection, if enabled, applies to all tunnels terminating at a point-to-multipoint VPN
interface.
Syntax
ip multicast-redirect [tunnel-endpoint | ip-address]
tunnel-endpoint
Redirects multicast to the remote tunnel endpointʹs IP address as dynamically set during tunnel creation.
ip-address
Redirects multicast traffic to an explicit, predefined address.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of the command disables multicast packet redirection and allows multicast traffic to flow through the tunnel without modification:
no ip multicast-redirect [tunnel-endpoint | ip-address]
14-126
Configuring the VPN
Tunnel Commands
Mode
Internet Protocol Interface configuration: XSR(config-int<vpn>)#
Example
This example redirects multicast traffic to the remote tunnel server:
XSR(config)#interface vpn 57 multi-point
XSR(config-int<vpn>)#ip multicast-redirect tunnel-endpoint
service-policy
This command attaches a policy map to an VPN output or input interface. You can attach a single policy map to one or more interfaces.
Syntax
service-policy [input | output] policy-map-name
policy-map-name
Attaches the specified policy map onto the output port.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of the command removes a policy map from the interface:
no service-policy [input | output]
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following example attaches service policy VPNpolicy to VPN output interface 1:
XSR(config)#interface vpn 1
XSR(config-int<vpn>)#service-policy output VPNpolicy
Tunnel Commands
tunnel
This sub‐command of interface vpn names a tunnel created at boot time that links this VPN interface with another VPN gateway. The VPN interface, with its tunnel, is equivalent to a point‐
to‐point interface. Issuing the command acquires Tunnel configuration mode, making available the following sub‐commands:
•
•
set active - Enables the VPN tunnel. Refer to page 14‐128 for the command definition.
set heartbeat - Monitors tunnel connectivity. Refer to page 14‐129 for the command definition.
•
set peer - Specifies the physical IP address of the remote VPN gateway. Refer to
page 14‐130 for the command definition.
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Tunnel Commands
•
set protocol - Defines the VPN tunneling protocol used when the tunnel is created: client mode or network extension mode. Refer to page 14‐130 for the command definition.
•
set user - Username employed when connecting to the remote peer. Refer to page 14‐131 for the command definition.
Syntax
tunnel tunnel-name
tunnel-name
The name assigned to the tunnel.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes the tunnel:
no tunnel tunnel-name
Mode
Interface Internet Protocol configuration: XSR(config-int-vpn)#
Next Mode
Tunnel configuration: XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#
Example
The following example adds the tunnel ACME_VPN:
XSR(config)#interface vpn 57 multi-point
XSR(config-int<vpn>)#tunnel ACME_VPN
XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#
set active
This command enables the tunnel.
Syntax
set active
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables the tunnel:
no set active
Default
Enabled
14-128
Configuring the VPN
Tunnel Commands
Mode
Tunnel configuration: XSR(config-tms-tunnel)#
Example
The following example enables the tunnel ACME_VPN:
XSR(config)#interface vpn 57 multi-point
XSR(config-int<vpn>)#tunnel ACME_VPN
XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#set active
set heartbeat
This command configures the mechanism to probe a tunnel peer to monitor tunnel connectivity. Ping is used over IKE/IPSec tunnels configured with dynamically assigned addresses.
Syntax
set heartbeat {interval | retries>} [A.B.C.D]
interval
Interval between heartbeat tries before timing out, ranging from 1 to 3600 seconds. Zero (0) disables the heartbeat.
retries
Number of retries before the tunnel is declared down, ranging from 3 to 100.
A.B.C.D.
IP address of a specified remote peer to ping to monitor tunnel connectivity.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables the heartbeat:
no set heartbeat
Defaults
•
Interval: 6 seconds
•
Retries: 3
Mode
Tunnel configuration: XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#
Example
The following example sets tunnel heartbeat values:
XSR(config)#interface vpn 57 multi-point
XSR(config-int<vpn>)#tunnel “ACME VPN”
XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#set heartbeat 50 10 192.168.57.9
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Tunnel Commands
set peer
This command specifies the physical IP address of the remote VPN gateway.
Syntax
set peer ip-address
ip-address
IP address of the peer.
Syntax of the “no” Form
no set peer ip-address
Mode
Tunnel configuration: XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#
Example
The following example sets the IP address of the remote VPN gateway:
XSR(config)#interface vpn 57 multi-point
XSR(config-int<vpn>)#tunnel ACME_VPN
XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#set peer ip-address 192.168.57.9
set protocol
This command defines the VPN tunneling protocol ‐ Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE) or IP Security (IPSec) ‐ used to create the tunnel.
IPSec accepts one of two sub‐commands that create a Client or Network Extension mode site‐to‐
site tunnel. Client mode creates NAT on the VPN interface to hide the addresses of the trusted network (attached to F1). IPSec security policy encrypts data passing to and from the IP address assigned to the tunnel. Network extension mode creates IPSec security policies that encrypt traffic flowing to the trusted network via the tunnel in addition to securing traffic flowing to the tunnelʹs assigned address.
Syntax
set protocol {gre | ipsec}[client-mode | network-extension-mode]
gre
GRE tunneling protocol.
ipsec
IPSec tunneling protocol.
client-mode
Initiates a Client‐mode EZ‐IPSec tunnel.
network-extension-mode
Initiates a NEM EZ‐IPSec tunnel.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command negates the protocol selected earlier:
no set protocol
14-130
Configuring the VPN
Tunnel Commands
Mode
Tunnel configuration: XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#
Default
IPSec
Examples
The following example sets the IPSec tunnel protocol in client mode:
XSR(config)#interface vpn 29 point-to-point
XSR(config-int<vpn>)#tunnel ACME_VPN
XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#set protocol ipsec client-mode
The example below connects a GRE tunnel attached to a VPN interface:
XSR(config)#interface vpn 2 point-to-point
XSR(config-int<vpn>)#ip address 192.168.1.123 255.255.255.0
XSR#(config-int<vpn>)#tunnel my-gre-tunnel
XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#set protocol gre
XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#set peer 10.1.2.3
XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#set active
set user
This command specifies a user’s identity when connecting to a peer. It invokes EZ‐IPSec by applying the credentials (password and/or certificate) used during tunnel creation obtained from the AAA subsystem. An EZ‐IPSec tunnel uses aggressive mode with the username as the IKE identity. Refer to the aaa user, user-id, and show crypto ca certificate commands for more information.
Syntax
set user username
username
Username employed when connecting to the peer.
Mode
Tunnel configuration: XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#
Examples
The following example specifies the pre‐shared key of a peer by username:
XSR(config)#interface vpn 29 point-to-point
XSR(config-int<vpn>)#tunnel ACME_VPN
XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#set user jonathan
The following example specifies the pre‐shared key of a peer by certificate:
XSR(config)#interface vpn 29 point-to-point
XSR(config-int<vpn>)#tunnel ACME_VPN
XSR#(config-tms-tunnel)#set user certificate
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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Tunnel Clear and Show Commands
Tunnel Clear and Show Commands
clear tunnel
This command terminates a non‐GRE tunnel associated with a user or tunnel ID. Tunnels will re‐
establish themselves if set to do so unless the user is disabled in its database. For example, a cleared IPSec tunnel will re‐establish if traffic is initiated.
Note: This command terminates all but GRE and GRE/IPSec tunnels with an error message
displayed if you attempt to do so. To bring down a GRE tunnel, remove its interface or use the no
set active command.
L2TP and PPTP tunnels will be disconnected on the server side. The client side of the tunnel will time out after its designated timeout period.
Syntax
clear tunnel
<user-ID | <tunnel-ID>
user-ID
Name of the VPN user.
tunnel-ID
Identification number associated with this tunnel.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
The following example terminates tunnel 40000001:
XSR#clear tunnel 40000001
show tunnels
This command lists all tunnels currently connected to the XSR.
Syntax
show tunnels <user-ID | tunnel-ID>
user-ID
Name of the VPN user.
tunnel-ID
Identification number associated with this tunnel.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
The following is sample output queried by the xsrclient User‐ID:
XSR#show tunnels xsrclient
14-132
Configuring the VPN
Tunnel Clear and Show Commands
User: xsrclient
Tunnel ID:
VPN Interface:
Group:
Connect Time:
Protocol:
Authentication Method:
Packets In/Out:
Errors In/Out:
Discards In/Out:
40000001
VPN1
xsrgroup
11/05/2003, 23:39
L2TP
MS-CHAPv2
0000000088/0000000027
0000000000/0000000000
0000000000/0000000000
The following is sample output queried by the Tunnel ID 40000001:
XSR#show tunnel 40000001
Tunnel ID: 40000001
User:
VPN Interface:
Group:
Connect Time:
Protocol:
Authentication Method:
Packets In/Out:
Errors In/Out:
Discards In/Out:
xsrclient
VPN1
xsrgroup
11/05/2003, 23:39
L2TP
MS-CHAPv2
0000000088/0000000027
0000000000/0000000000
0000000000/0000000000
Parameter Description
VPN Interface
VPN port number to which the client is connected.
User ID
Name of the VPN user.
Tunnel ID
Tunnel identification number associated with this tunnel.
Group ID
VPN group name (if authenticated through AAA)
Connect Time
Start time and date for the connection.
Protocol Type
Type of protocol used in relation to this tunnel (e.g. PPTP, GRE, IPSec).
Authentication Method
Method of authentication (shared key/certificate, MS‐CHAP, etc.)
Packets In/Out
Sum of incoming and outgoing packets.
Errors In/Out
Sum of incoming and outgoing packets with errors.
Discards In/Out
Sum of discarded incoming and outgoing packets.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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Additional Tunnel Termination Commands
Additional Tunnel Termination Commands
ip local pool
This command configures a local pool of IP addresses for when a remote peer connects to a point‐
to‐multipoint interface or for use by DHCP.
Note: If an aaa user is configured to use a static IP address which belongs to a local IP pool, you
must exclude that address from the local pool to prevent it from being assigned to another user.
The command acquires IP Local Pool configuration mode and provides these sub‐commands:
•
exclude ‐ Bars a range of IP addresses from the local pool. Refer to page 14‐135 for the sub‐
command definition.
•
exit ‐ Quits IP Local Pool configuration mode. Refer to page 14‐135 for the sub‐command definition.
Syntax
ip local pool pool-name IP-address subnet-mask
pool-name
Name of a particular local address pool.
IP-address
Base address of an IP subnet used to allocate IP addresses.
subnet-mask
Mask of that IP subnet. All subnet address bits matching zero bits in the mask must also be zero; that is, subnet and mask must be zero. May be expressed as A.B.C.D or /<0-32>.
Note: The pool size (mask) must be /16 or higher (Class B or C) thus limiting any one pool to 64,000
IP addresses.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to delete an IP address from the pool:
no ip local pool pool-name
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
IP Local Pool configuration: XSR(ip-local-pool)#
Example
The following example creates a local IP address pool named marketing, which contains all IP addresses in the range 203.57.99.0 to 203.57.99.255:
XSR(config)#ip local pool marketing 203.57.99.0 255.255.255.0
14-134
Configuring the VPN
Additional Tunnel Termination Commands
exclude
This sub‐command bars the use of a range of IP addresses from an earlier created IP pool.
Syntax
exclude {ip address} {number}
ip address
Starting address to be excluded from pool.
number
Number of addresses to exclude, ranging from 1 to 65535.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the specified IP address from the exclude list:
exclude {ip address}{number}
Mode
Local IP Pool configuration: XSR(ip-local-pool)#
Examples
The following example excludes the 10 IP addresses between 192.168.57.100 and 192.168.57.110 from local pool HQ:
XSR(config)#ip local pool HQ 192.168.57.0 255.255.255.0
XSR(ip-local-pool)#exclude 192.168.57.100 10
The following example negates the exclusion of IP addresses 192.168.57.105 and 192.168.57.106 from the earlier excluded range of IP addresses in local pool HQ:
XSR(config)#ip local pool HQ
XSR(ip-local-pool)#no exclude 192.168.57.105 2
exit
This sub‐command quits IP Local Pool configuration mode.
Syntax
exit
Mode
IP Local Pool configuration: XSR(ip-local-pool)#
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Additional Tunnel Termination Commands
show ip local pool
This command displays statistics for any defined IP address pools.
Syntax
show ip local pool [name]
name
Name you specified for an IP address pool.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Sample Output
This output displays when the command is specified without a name:
XSR#show ip local pool
-----------IP Pools Statistics----------Pool
Subnet
Mask
test
10.120.122.0
255.255.255.192 26
local 1.1.1.0
255.255.255.0
ddd
1.2.3.4
255.255.255.255
test
192.168.57.1
255.255.255.255
test1 192.168.57.252 255.255.255.255
test3 192.168.58.0
255.255.255.0
7
255
1
1
1
246
Free
0
0
0
0
0
0
In use
Excluded
2
0
0
0
0
10
The following output displays when the command is specified with the name test:
XSR#show ip local pool test
-----------IP Pools Statistics----------Statistics of IP pool test
Available addresses:
10.120.122.1
10.120.122.2
10.120.122.3
10.120.122.5
10.120.122.6
10.120.122.7
10.120.122.8
10.120.122.9
10.120.122.11
10.120.122.12
10.120.122.13
10.120.122.14
10.120.122.15
10.120.122.16
10.120.122.17
10.120.122.18
10.120.122.19
10.120.122.20
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Configuring the VPN
Reserved
1
0
0
0
0
DF Bit Commands
10.120.122.22
10.120.122.24
10.120.122.25
10.120.122.26
10.120.122.28
10.120.122.31
10.120.122.32
Inuse addresses:
10.120.122.10
10.120.122.21
10.120.122.23
10.120.122.27
10.120.122.29
10.120.122.30
10.120.122.34
Excluded addresses:
Reserved addresses:
10.120.122.0
10.120.122.4
Parameter Description
Pool
Name of the IP pool.
Subnet
Mask of the IP pool.
Mask
IP address subnetwork of the IP pool.
Free
Sum of unused IP addresses within the pool.
In use
Sum of occupied IP addresses within the pool.
Excluded
Sum of IP addresses barred from use within the pool.
Reserved
Sum of IP addresses set aside within the pool, such as the initial address 192.168.57.0 within the 192.168.57.256 range.
DF Bit Commands
crypto ipsec df-bit (Global configuration)
This command sets the DF bit for the encapsulating header in VPN Tunnel Mode to all interfaces.
The clear setting for the DF bit should be used for encapsulating Tunnel Mode IPSec traffic when you can transmit packets larger than the available MTU size or you do not know the available MTU size.
Syntax
crypto ipsec df-bit {clear | set | copy}
clear
XSR will clear the DF bit from the outer IP header; the router may fragment the packet to add IPSec encapsulation.
set
XSR will set the DF bit in the outer IP header but the router may fragment the packet if the original packet had the DF bit cleared.
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DF Bit Commands
copy
XSR will search the original packet for the outer DF bit setting.
Defaults
•
Disabled
•
Copy setting
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
The following example clears the DF bit on all interfaces:
XSR(config)#crypto ipsec df-bit clear
crypto ipsec df-bit (Interface configuration)
This command sets the DF bit for the encapsulating header in VPN Tunnel Mode to a specific interface.
The clear setting for the DF bit should be used for encapsulating Tunnel Mode IPSec traffic when you can transmit packets larger than the available MTU size or you do not know the available MTU size.
Note: This command overrides any existing DF bit global settings.
Syntax
crypto ipsec df-bit {clear | set | copy}
clear
XSR will clear the DF bit from the outer IP header; the router may fragment the packet to add IPSec encapsulation.
set
XSR will set the DF bit in the outer IP header but the router may fragment the packet if the original packet had the DF bit cleared.
copy
XSR will search the original packet for the outer DF bit setting.
Defaults
•
Disabled
•
Copy setting
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following example sets the DF bit on F1:
XSR(config-if<F1>)#crypto ipsec df-bit set
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Configuring the VPN
15
Configuring DHCP
Observing Syntax and Conventions
The CLI command syntax and conventions use the notation described in the following table.
Convention
Description
xyz
Key word or mandatory parameters (bold)
[x]
[ ] Square brackets indicate an optional parameter (italic)
[x | y | z]
[ | ] Square brackets with vertical bar indicate a choice of values
{x | y | z}
{ | } Braces with vertical bar indicate a choice of a required value
[x {y | z} ]
[{ | } ] Combination of square brackets with braces and vertical bars indicates a
required choice of an optional parameter
(config-if<xx>)
xx signifies the interface type and number, class map, policy map or other
value you specify; e.g., F1, G3, S2/1.0, <Your Name>. F indicates a
FastEthernet, and G a GigabitEthernet interface.
Sub-command headings are displayed in red text.
Next Mode entries display the CLI prompt after a command is entered
soho.enterasys.com
Italicized, non-syntactic text indicates either a user-specified entry or text with
special emphasis
DHCP Commands
The following commands configure the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) on the XSR.
bootfile
This command sets the name of the default boot image for a DHCP client. Depending on the client configuration inheritance, the command should be used from the proper mode. If it is specified from multiple modes, an override mechanism chooses the innermost config value, with host being innermost, then client‐class and pool being the most general.
Syntax
bootfile filename
filename
Specifies the name of the file that is used as a boot image.
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DHCP Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to delete the boot image name:
no bootfile
Mode
Any of the following command modes are available:
DHCP pool configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#
DHCP host configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-host)#
DHCP client class configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-class)#
Example
The following example specifies roboboot as the name of the boot file:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#bootfile roboboot
client-class
This command specifies the name of a DHCP client class. The XSR aggregates DHCP clients which will share the same configured attributes. Adding a client class to different DHCP pools in not permitted. For example, you cannot add client class marketing to both pool1 and pool2.
Note: Adding a client class to different DHCP pools in not permitted. For example, you cannot add
client class marketing to both pool1 and pool2.
Syntax
client-class name
name
Designation of the client class using standard ASCII characters.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove the client class:
no client-class name
Mode
Either of the following command modes are available:
DHCP pool configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#
DHCP host configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-host)#
When specified from DHCP pool configuration mode, the CLI acquires DHCP class configuration sub‐mode: XSR(config-dhcp-class)#
When specified from DHCP host configuration mode, the CLI does not acquire a new sub‐mode.
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Configuring DHCP
DHCP Commands
Example
The following example specifies string clientclass1 that will be the name of the client class:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#client-class cc1
client-identifier
This command specifies the unique identifier (in dotted hexadecimal notation) for a Microsoft DHCP client. It is valid for manual bindings only. Microsoft DHCP clients require client identifiers instead of hardware addresses. The client identifier is formed by concatenating the media type and the Ethernet hardware (MAC) address.
For example, the Microsoft client identifier for Ethernet address 0001.f401.2710 is 0100.01f4.0127.10, where the leading 01 (italicized above) indicates the Ethernet media type. Be aware that you cannot add a client identifier to different DHCP pools. For example, client ID 0100.01f4.0127.10 cannot be added to both pool1 and pool2.
Note: You cannot add a client identifier to different DHCP pools. For example, client ID
0100.01f4.0127.10 cannot be added to both pool1 and pool2.
Syntax
client-identifier identifier [client-class name]
identifier
Unique identification of the client in dotted hexadecimal notation; for example:
0100.01f4.0127.10.
name
Specifies a client belonging to a client class.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to delete the client identifier:
no client-identifier identifier [client-class name]
Mode
Any of the following command modes are available:
DHCP pool configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#
DHCP host configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-host)#
DHCP client class configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-class)#
Next Mode
When this command is specified from DHCP pool configuration sub‐mode or DHCP client‐class mode, the CLI acquires DHCP host mode. When the command is entered from DHCP host mode, the CLI does not acquire a sub‐mode.
XSR(config-dhcp-host)#
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DHCP Commands
Example
The following example specifies the client identifier for MAC address 00.01f4.0127.10 in dotted hexadecimal notation:
XSR(config-dhcp)#client-identifier 0100.01f4.0127.10
The following example specifies the client identifier for MAC address 0001.f401.2710 in dotted hexadecimal notation, for the host with IP address 10.10.10.20:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#host 10.10.10.20 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-dhcp-host)#client-identifier 0100.01f4.0127.10
The following example specifies the client identifier for MAC address 00.01f4.0127.10 in dotted hexadecimal notation, and adds it to class eng:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#client-class eng
XSR(config-dhcp-class)#client-identifier 0100.01f4.0127.10
client-name
This command specifies the name of a DHCP client. The client name should not include the domain name. The command is available from DHCP host mode only.
Syntax
client-name name
name
Designation of the client, defined using any set of standard ASCII characters. The client
name should not include the domain name. For example, the name soho should not be
specified as soho.enterasys.com.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove the client name:
no client-name name
Mode
DHCP host configuration only: XSR(config-dhcp-host)#
Example
The following example specifies a string soho1 that will be the name of the client with MAC address 1111.2222.3333:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#hardware-address 1111.2222.3333
XSR(config-dhcp-host)#client-name soho1
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Configuring DHCP
DHCP Commands
debug ip dhcp server
This command enables DHCP server debugging. This command should be used for troubleshooting purposes only.
Syntax
debug ip dhcp server {events | packets | linkages}
events
Reports server events, such as address assignments and database updates.
packets
Decodes DHCP receptions and transmissions.
linkages
Displays database linkage data such as parent-child relationships in a radix tree.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use no form of this command to disable DHCP server debugging:
no debug ip DHCP server {events | packets}
Default
Disabled
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
The following example enables DHCP server events debugging:
XSR#debug ip DHCP server events
default-router
This command specifies the default router list for a DHCP client. Depending on the client configuration inheritance, the command should be used from the proper mode. If it is specified from multiple modes, an override mechanism chooses the innermost config value, with host as innermost, then client‐class and pool as the most general.
Syntax
default-router address [address2...address8]
address
IP address of a default router. One IP address is required.
address2
...address8
Specifies up to eight addresses in the command line listed in order of preference
(default router address has the highest priority, then router address 2, etc.).
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove the default router list:
no default-router
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DHCP Commands
Mode
Any of the following command modes are available:
DHCP pool configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#
DHCP host configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-host)#
DHCP client class configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-class)#
Example
The following example sets 14.12.1.99 as the IP address of the default router for any client in the subnet with three other routers in descending order of preference:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#default-router 14.12.1.99 14.13.1.66 14.12.1.56 14.12.1.57
The following example specifies 14.12.1.1 as the IP address of the default router for the host with MAC address 0010.a4f5.28a1:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#hardware-address 0010.a4f5.28a1
XSR(config-dhcp-host)#default-router 14.12.1.1
The following example specifies 14.12.1.99 as the IP address of the default router for any client in the client class eng:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#client-class eng
XSR(config-dhcp-class)#default-router 14.12.1.99
dns-server
This command specifies the DNS IP servers available to a DHCP client. It is available from DHCP pool, host, or client class mode. Depending on the client configuration inheritance, the command should be used from the proper mode. If it is specified from multiple modes, an override mechanism chooses the innermost config value, with host as innermost, then client‐class and pool as the most general.
Syntax
dns-server address [address2...address8]
address
IP address of a DNS server. One IP address is required.
address2 ...
address8
You can list up to 8 addresses at the prompt line by order of preference (DNS
server address is highest priority, then server address2, etc.).
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove the DNS server list:
no dns-server
Mode
Any of the following command modes are available:
DHCP pool configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#
DHCP host configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-host)#
DHCP client class configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-class)#
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Configuring DHCP
DHCP Commands
Example
The following example specifies 11.12.1.99 as the IP address of the DNS server of a client in the subnet:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#dns-server 11.12.1.99
The following example specifies 11.12.1.99 as the IP address of the DNS server of the host with the MAC address 1111.2222.3333:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#hardware-address 1111.2222.3333
XSR(config-dhcp-host)#dns-server 11.12.1.99
The following example specifies 11.12.1.99 as the IP address of the DNS server of a client in the client‐class engineering:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#client-class engineering
XSR(config-dhcp-class)#dns-server 11.12.1.99
domain-name
This command specifies the domain name for DHCP client services by the DHCP server. Depending on the client configuration inheritance, the command should be used from the proper mode. If it is specified from multiple modes, an override mechanism chooses the innermost config value, with host as innermost, then client‐class and pool as the most general.
Syntax
domain-name domain
domain
Domain name string of the client.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove the domain name:
no domain-name
Mode
Any of the following command modes are available:
DHCP pool configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#
DHCP host configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-host)#
DHCP client class configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-class)#
Examples
The following example specifies enterasys.com as the domain name of a client in the subnet:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#domain-name enterasys.com
The following example specifies enterasys.com as the domain name of the host with the MAC address 0011.a121.1fa2:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#hardware-address 0011.a121.1fa2
XSR(config-dhcp-host)#domain-name enterasys.com
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DHCP Commands
The following example specifies enterasys.com as the domain name of any client in the client‐class engineering:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#client-class engineering
XSR(config-dhcp-class)#domain-name enterasys.com
hardware-address
This command sets the hardware address of a DHCP client and is valid for manual bindings only.
Note: You cannot add a hardware address to different DHCP pools. Hardware address
0100.01f4.0127.10 cannot be added to both pool1 and pool2, e.g.
Syntax
hardware-address address type [client-class name]
address
MAC address of the client hardware platform.
type
Protocol of the hardware platform. Strings and values are acceptable. String options are:
• ethernet
• ieee802
Value options:
• 1 - 10 Mbyte Ethernet
• 6 - IEEE 802 networks
name
A client belonging to a client class can be specified here.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove the hardware address:
no hardware-address address type [client-class name]
Default
Ethernet
Mode
Any of the following command modes are available:
DHCP pool configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#
DHCP host configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-host)#
DHCP client class configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-class)#
Next Mode
When this command is entered from DHCP pool configuration sub‐mode or DHCP client‐class mode, the CLI acquires DHCP host configuration mode:
XSR(config-dhcp-host)#
When specified from either DHCP host or client mode, the command does not cause the CLI to acquire any sub‐mode.
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Configuring DHCP
DHCP Commands
Examples
The following example specifies the hardware address for the DHCP client host to be of Ethernet type with MAC address 0001.f401.2710:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#hardware-address 0001.f401.2710 ethernet
The following example specifies the hardware address for the DHCP client host with IP address 10.10.10.20 to be of Ethernet type with 0001.f401.2710 as the MAC address:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#host 10.10.10.20 255.255.255.0
XSR(config-dhcp-host)#hardware-address 0001.f401.2710 ethernet
The following example sets the hardware address for the DHCP host in class eng to be of Ethernet type with MAC address 0001.f401.2710:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#client-class writer
XSR(config-dhcp-class)#hardware-address 0001.f401.2710 ethernet
host
This command specifies the IP address and network mask for a manual binding to a DHCP client. By default, the DHCP server will examine its defined IP address pools if the mask and prefix length are unspecified. If no mask is specified in the IP address pool database, the Class A, B, or C natural mask is used. This command is valid for manual bindings only.
Note: You cannot add a host to different DHCP pools. For example, host firewall cannot be added to
both pool1 and pool2.
Syntax
host address [mask | prefix-length]
address
IP address of the client.
mask
Network mask of the client.
prefix-length
Number of bits that comprise the address prefix. The prefix is an alternative way
of specifying a client’s network mask. It must be preceded by a forward slash (/).
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove the IP address of the client:
no host
Mode
Any of the following command modes are available:
DHCP pool configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#
DHCP host configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-host)#
DHCP client class configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-class)#
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DHCP Commands
Next Mode
When this command is specified from either DHCP pool configuration mode or DHCP class configuration sub‐mode, the CLI acquires DHCP host configuration mode. When specified from DHCP host or client mode, the command does not acquire a sub‐mode.
XSR(config-dhcp-host)#
Examples
This example sets 15.12.1.99 as the IP address of the client and 255.255.248.0 as its subnet mask:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#host 15.12.1.99 255.255.248.0
The following example specifies 15.12.1.99 as the IP address and 255.255.248.0 as the subnet mask, for the host with hardware address 1111.2222.3333:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#hardware-address 1111.2222.3333
XSR(config-dhcp-host)#host 15.12.1.99 255.255.248.0
The following example specifies 15.12.1.99 as the IP address and 255.255.248.0 as the subnet mask for the client in the client‐class eng:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#client-class eng
XSR(config-dhcp-class)#host 15.12.1.99 255.255.248.0
ip address dhcp
This command configures an interface as a DHCP Client. An Ethernet interface can be configured to use DHCP Client to acquire an IP address as well as other configuration parameters. Bootfile download is not supported.
Note: When an interface address is configured to be DHCP negotiated the only legal version of the
no command is entered as no ip address dhcp.
Syntax
ip address dhcp [client-id client-identifier][hostname string]
Parameters
client-identifier
This value corresponds to Option 61 passed within DHCP packets. A DHCP server uses this value to index its database of address bindings. The value is expected to be unique for all clients in an administrative domain. It is intended that this value be either a MAC address or the symbolic ID of a port with a MAC address (e.g. FastEthernet 1.)
hostname string
The string corresponds to Option 12. The name may or may not be qualified with the local domain name. RFC‐1035 character set restrictions are enforced.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables DHCP client:
no ip address dhcp
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Configuring DHCP
DHCP Commands
Default
DCHP Client is not active on an interface
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following example enables DHCP Client:
XSR(config)#interface FastEthernet1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip address dhcp
ip dhcp ping packets
This command specifies the number of packets a DHCP server sends to an IP address as part of a ping operation. The DHCP server pings an IP address before assigning the address to a requesting client. If the ping is unanswered, the DHCP server assumes that the address is not in use and assigns the address to the requesting client. Setting the number argument to a value of 0 turns off the DHCP server ping operation completely.
Syntax
ip dhcp ping packets number
number
Sum of ping packets sent before assigning the address to a requesting client.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to prevent the server from pinging IP addresses:
no ip dhcp ping packets
Default
Two packets
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
The following example specifies six ping attempts by the DHCP server toward an IP address before stopping any further ping attempts:
XSR(config)#ip dhcp ping packets 6
ip dhcp ping timeout
This command specifies how long a DHCP server waits for a ping reply from an IP address.
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DHCP Commands
Syntax
ip dhcp ping timeout milliseconds
The interval the DHCP server waits for a ping reply before it stops trying to
reach an IP address for client assignment. The peak timeout is 10 seconds.
milliseconds
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to restore the ping timeout default:
no ip dhcp ping timeout
Default
500 milliseconds
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example
The following example specifies that the DHCP server will wait 900 milliseconds for a ping reply before considering the ping a failure:
XSR(config)#ip dhcp ping timeout 900
ip dhcp pool
This command configures a DHCP server IP address pool. The XSR supports adding 1000 network addresses per pool and one DHCP pool per network. Class B or higher subnet masks are supported.
Note: The DHCP pool name must match the name given the IP local pool.
Syntax
ip dhcp pool name
name
A character string or integer which match the name you designate for the IP local pool.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove the address pool:
no ip dhcp pool name
Default
DHCP address pools are not configured
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Configuring DHCP
DHCP Commands
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
DHCP pool configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#
Example
The following example adds IP local pool sales with specified subnetworks and defines sales as the name of the DHCP server IP address pool:
XSR(config)#ip local pool sales 192.168.57.0/24
XSR(config)#ip dhcp pool sales
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#
ip dhcp server
This command enables the DHCP Server features on the XSR. By default, DHCP server services are disabled on all XSR interfaces, which means that the DHCP server will not respond to client requests received on any XSR ports. DHCP Server can be enabled on a FastEthernet/GigabitEthernet primary interface and VLAN sub‐interface. Secondary interface assignment is not supported.
Note: If either DHCP/BOOTP Relay (using ip helper-address) or DHCP Server is enabled on
one FastEthernet/GigabitEthernet port, you cannot also configure the other service on the second
Fast/GigabitEthernet port. The XSR permits either one or the other service to operate, not both.
Syntax
ip dhcp server
server
Enables/disables a DHCP server on a FastEthernet/GigabitEthernet port.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to disable DHCP server features:
no ip dhcp
Default
Disabled
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following example enables DHCP server on FastEthernet port 1:
XSR(config)#interface fastethernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip dhcp server
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DHCP Commands
ip local pool
This command, when issued multiply, configures a local pool of IP addresses to be used for a DHCP Server pool range. Use it in conjunction with the no form of to create one or more local address pools from which IP addresses are assigned when a remote peer connects.
Note: For clients that use a statically defined IP address (do not use DHCP to obtain an IP address),
you must exclude that address from the local pool.
The command acquires IP Local Pool mode and makes available the following sub‐commands:
•
exclude ‐ Bars a range of IP addresses from the local pool. Refer to page 15‐97 for the sub‐
command definition.
•
exit ‐ Quits IP Local Pool configuration mode. Refer to page 15‐97 for the sub‐command definition.
Syntax
ip local pool pool-name subnet-address subnet-mask
pool-name
Name of a particular local address pool.
subnet-address
Base address of an IP subnet used to allocate IP addresses.
subnet-mask
Subnet mask of that IP subnet. All subnet address bits matching zero bits in the
mask must also be zero; that is, subnet and mask must be zero.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to delete an IP address from the pool:
no ip local pool pool-name
Default
No address pools are configured
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
IP Local Pool configuration: XSR(ip-local-pool)#
Examples
The following example creates a local IP address pool named marketing, which contains all IP addresses in the range 203.57.99.0 to 203.57.99.255:
XSR(config)#ip local pool marketing 203.57.99.0 255.255.255.0
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Configuring DHCP
DHCP Commands
exclude
This sub‐command of ip local pool bars the use of a range of IP addresses from an earlier created IP pool.
Syntax
exclude {ip address}{number}
ip address
Starting address to be excluded from pool.
number
Number of addresses to exclude, ranging from 1 to 65535.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form exempts the specified IP address from being excluded from the pool:
exclude {ip address}{number}
Mode
Local IP Pool configuration: XSR(ip-local-pool)#
Examples
The following example excludes the ten IP addresses between 192.168.57.100 and 192.168.57.110 from local pool HQ:
XSR(config)#ip local pool HQ 192.168.57.0 255.255.255.0
XSR(ip-local-pool)#exclude 192.168.57.100 10
The following example negates the exclusion of IP addresses 192.168.57.105 and 192.168.57.106 from the earlier excluded range of IP addresses in local pool HQ:
XSR(config)#ip local pool HQ
XSR(ip-local-pool)#no exclude 192.168.57.105 2
exit
This sub‐command of ip local pool quits IP Local Pool configuration mode.
Syntax
exit
Mode
IP Local Pool configuration: XSR(ip-local-pool)#
XSR CLI Reference Guide
15-97
DHCP Commands
lease
This command configures the duration of the lease for an IP address that a DHCP server assigns to a DHCP client. The lease time set is the system default value which overrides the non‐specified default value (one day).
If the client requests a lease period exceeding the period configured on the server, the lease interval offered by the server will equal that of the value configured by this command. If the client does not request a particular lease period ‐ typical client behavior ‐ it is granted the configured default value. Manual bindings are not held accountable to this lease period.
Depending on the client configuration inheritance, the command should be used from the proper mode. If it is specified from multiple modes, an override mechanism chooses the innermost config value, with client‐class as innermost, then pool as most general.
Syntax
lease {days [hours] [minutes] | infinite}
days
Duration of the lease in days.
hours
Number of hours in the lease. A days value must be supplied before you can
configure an hours value.
minutes
Number of minutes in the lease. Days and hours values must be set before you
can configure a minutes value.
infinite
Duration of the lease is unlimited.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to restore the default value:
no lease
Default
One day
Mode
Either of the following command modes are available:
DHCP pool configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#
DHCP client class configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-class)#
Example
The following example configures a one‐day lease:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#lease 1
The following example configures a one‐hour lease:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#lease 0 1
The following example configures a one‐minute lease:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#lease 0 0 1
15-98
Configuring DHCP
DHCP Commands
netbios-name-server
This command configures NetBIOS Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS) name servers that are available to Microsoft DHCP clients. Depending on the client configuration inheritance, the command should be used from the proper mode. If it is specified from multiple modes, an override mechanism chooses the innermost config value, with host as innermost, then client‐class and pool as the most general.
Syntax
netbios-name-server address [address2...address8]
address
IP address of a NetBIOS WINS server. One address is needed.
address2 ..
address8
Specifies up to eight addresses in the command line listed in order of preference
(NetBIOS name server address has the highest priority, then server address2, etc.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove the NetBIOS name server list:
no netbios-name-server
Mode
DHCP Pool, Host, or Client Class config mode: XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#, XSR(config-dhcphost)# or XSR(config-dhcp-class)#
Example
The following example specifies the IP address of a NetBIOS name server available to a Microsoft DHCP client in the subnet:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#netbios-name-server 13.12.1.90
The following example specifies the IP address of a NetBIOS name server available to the Microsoft DHCP client with client identifier 1111.2222.3333.4444:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#client-identifier 1111.2222.3333.4444
XSR(config-dhcp-host)#netbios-name-server 13.12.1.90
The following example specifies the IP address of a NetBIOS name server available to a Microsoft DHCP client in the client class engineering:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#client-class engineering
XSR(config-dhcp-class)# netbios-name-server 13.12.1.90
XSR CLI Reference Guide
15-99
DHCP Commands
netbios-node-type
This command configures the NetBIOS node type for Microsoft DHCP clients. Depending on the client configuration inheritance, the command should be used in proper mode. If it is specified from multiple modes, an override mechanism chooses the innermost config value, with host as innermost, then client‐class and pool as the most general.
Syntax
netbios-node-type type
type
Specifies the NetBIOS node type. Valid types are:
• b-node - Broadcast
• p-node - Peer-to-peer
• m-node - Mixed
• h-node - Hybrid (recommended)
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove the NetBIOS node type:
no netbios-node-type
Mode
Any of the following command modes are available:
DHCP pool configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#
DHCP host configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-host)#
DHCP client class configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-class)#
Example
This example sets NetBIOS name server type as hybrid for a Microsoft DHCP client in the subnet:
XSR(config-dhcp)#netbios node-type h-node
The following example specifies the NetBIOS name server type as hybrid for the Microsoft DHCP client with MAC address 0010.a4f5.28a1:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#hardware-address 0010.a4f5.28a1
XSR(config-dhcp-host)#netbios node-type h-node
The following example specifies the NetBIOS name server type as hybrid for a Microsoft DHCP client in the client class engineering:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#client-class engineering
XSR(config-dhcp-class)#netbios node-type h-node
15-100
Configuring DHCP
DHCP Commands
next-server
This command specifies the server from which the initial boot file will be loaded. The server can be designated either by IP address or hostname.
Syntax
next-server server [hostname | ip_address]
hostname
Designation of the server by name.
ip_address
Designation of the server by IP address.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove the next‐server:
no next-server server [hostname | ip_address]
Mode
Any of the following command modes are available:
DHCP pool configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#
DHCP host configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-host)#
DHCP client class configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-class)#
Example
The following example specifies the IP address of a next‐server:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)next-server 192.168.57.4
option
This command configures DHCP server options/extensions. DHCP Server provides a framework for passing configuration data to hosts on a TCP/IP network. Configuration values and other control data are carried in tagged data items stored in the options field of the DHCP message.
The data items are also called options or client extensions. The current set of XSR‐supported DHCP options and BOOTP vendor extensions are described in Table 15‐1 on page 102 and generally in RFC‐2132. Default values are defined in RFC‐1122.
Depending on the client configuration inheritance, the command should be used from the proper mode. If it is specified from multiple modes, an override mechanism chooses the innermost config value, with host as innermost, then client‐class and pool as the most general.
Syntax
option code {ascii string | hex string | ip address}
code
DHCP option code.
ascii string
An ASCII character string. Strings containing space must be enclosed with quotes.
The following options are set with an ASCII string: 12, 14, 15, 17, 18, 40, 47, and 64.
XSR CLI Reference Guide
15-101
DHCP Commands
hex string
Dotted hexadecimal data. Each byte in hexadecimal character strings is two hex
digits - each byte can be separated by a period, colon, or white space. The following
options are set with a hex value: 2, 13, 19, 20, 22-27, 29-31, 34-39, 43, 46,58, 59.
ip address
Specifies an IP address. The following options are set with an IP address: 1, 3-11, 16,
21, 28, 32, 33, 41, 42, 44, 45, 48, 49, 65, 68-76, and 118.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Use the no form of this command to remove the options:
no option code [instance number]
Default
Default instance number: 0
Mode
Any of the following command modes are available:
DHCP pool configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#
DHCP host configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-host)#
DHCP client class configuration: XSR(config-dhcp-class)#
Note: Option examples are shown following the table.
Table 15-1
XSR-Supported DHCP Options
#
Protocol
Name
Category/
Type
Default
Description
0
Pad
-
-
Causes subsequent fields to align on word boundaries.
Length: 1 octet
1
Subnet
Mask
Basic/
Address
Mask
See
description
Client's subnet mask (RFC-950). If both Subnet Mask and Router options are
specified in a DHCP reply, the Subnet Mask option must be expressed first.
Length: 4 octets
Default: Subnet of the interface on which the request was received
2
Time Offset BOOTP/
32-bit hex
integer (in
twos)
-
Offset of a client's subnet in seconds from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).
Positives indicate a site east of, and negatives a site west of the zero
meridian.
Length: 4 octets
3*
Router
Basic, MS
DHCP Client/
IP address
list
-
List of IP addresses for default routers on the client's subnet. List in order of
preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
CLI command: default-router
4
Time
Server
BOOTP/IP
address list
-
RFC-868 compliant timeservers available to a client. List in order of
preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
15-102
Configuring DHCP
DHCP Commands
Table 15-1
XSR-Supported DHCP Options (continued)
Protocol
Name
Category/
Type
5
Name
Server
6*
#
Default
Description
BOOTP/IP
address list
-
IEN 116 name servers available to a client. List in order of preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
Domain
Name
Server
Basic, MS
DHCP Client/
IP address
list
-
List of Domain Name System (STD 13, RFC-1035) name servers available to
a client. List in order of preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
CLI command: dns-server
7
Log Server
Servers/IP
address list
-
MIT-LCS UDP log servers available to a client. List in order of preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
8
Cookie
Server
BOOTP/IP
address list
-
RFC-865 compliant cookie servers available to the client. List in order of
preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
9
LPR Server Servers/IP
address list
-
RFC-1179 compliant line printer servers available to the client. List in order of
preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
10
Impress
Server
BOOTP/IP
address list
-
Imagen Impress servers available to the client. List in order of preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
11
Resource
Location
Server
BOOTP/IP
address list
-
RFC-887 compliant resource location servers available to the client. List in
order of preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
12* Host Name
Basic/ASCII
string
-
Name of the client which will or will not be qualified with the local domain
name. See RFC-1035 for character set limits.
Length: 1-octet minimum; multiples of 4
CLI command: client-name
13
Boot File
Size
BOOTP/16-bit hex integer
Length in 512-octet blocks of the default boot image for the client.
Length: 2 octets
14
Merit Dump
File
BOOTP/
ASCII string
-
Path name of a file to which the client's core image will be placed if the client
crashes. Use forward-slashes.
Length: 4-octet minimum
15* Domain
Name
Basic, MS
DHCP Client/
ASCII string
-
Domain name that the client will use when resolving host names through the
Domain Name System.
Length: 4-octet minimum
CLI command: domain-name
16
Swap
Server
BOOTP/IP
address list
-
IP address of the client's swap server.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
17
Root Path
BOOTP/
ASCII string
-
Path name of a client's root disk. Use forward-slashes.
Length: 4-octet minimum
18
Extensions
Path
BOOTP/
ASCII string
-
String specifying a file, retrievable through TFTP. Use forward-slashes.
Length: 4-octet minimum
19
IP Forward- Host IP/
ing Enable Boolean
/Disable
(hex)
false
Specifies if a client will set its IP layer for packet forwarding.
Length: 1 octet
Values: 0=disable; 1=enable
XSR CLI Reference Guide
15-103
DHCP Commands
Table 15-1
XSR-Supported DHCP Options (continued)
Protocol
Name
Category/
Type
20
Non-Local
Source
Routing
Host IP/
Boolean
(hex)
21
#
Default
Description
false
Specifies whether a client will configure its IP layer to allow forwarding of
datagrams with non-local source routes.
Length: 1 octet
Values: 0=disable; 1=enable
Policy Filter Host IP/
Alternating
IP address/
mask
-
Policy filters for non-local source routing, consisting of a list of IP addresses
and masks that specify destination/mask pairs with which to filter incoming
source routes. Any source-routed datagram whose next-hop address does not
match one of the filters should be discarded by the client.
Length: 8-octet minimum; multiples of 8
22
Maximum
Datagram
Reassembly Size
Host IP/16-bit
hex integer
576
Peak size datagram a client will be ready to reassemble.
Length: 2 octets
Value: 576 minimum
23
Default IP
Time-toLive
Host IP/1 to
255 (hex),
rejects 0
64
Default TTL that a client will use on outgoing datagrams.
Length: 1 octet
Values: 1 to 255
24
Path MTU
Aging
Timeout
Host IP/32-bit
hex integer
-
Timeout (in seconds) to use when aging Path MTU values discovered by the
mechanism (RFC-1191).
Length: 4-octets
25
Path MTU
Plateau
Table
Host IP/16-bit
hex integer
-
Table of MTU sizes to use when performing Path MTU Discovery (RFC-1191).
It is ordered from smallest to largest.
Length: 2-octet minimum, multiples of 2
Value: 68 minimum
26
Interface
MTU
Interface/
16-bit hex
integer(s)
576
Maximum time to live on this interface.
Length: 2-octet minimum; multiples of 2
Value: 68 minimum
27
All Subnets
Are Local
Interface/
Boolean
(hex)
false
Specifies if a client will assume all subnets of the IP network to which the client
is connected use the same MTU as the subnet of that network to which the
client is directly linked.
Length: 1 octet
Values: 1=all subnets share same MTU; 0=some directly-connected subnets
may have smaller MTUs
28
Broadcast
Address
Interface/
0.0.0.0,
255.255.255.
255, or
nonstandard
255.255.
255.255
Broadcast address in use on the client's subnet.
Length: 4 octets
29
Perform
Mask
Discovery
Interface/
Boolean
(hex)
false
Specifies if a client will perform subnet mask discovery via ICMP.
Length: 1 octet
Values: 0=disable; 1=enable
30
Mask
Supplier
Interface/
Boolean
(hex)
false
Specifies ifa client will respond to subnet mask requests via ICMP.
Length: 1 octet
Values: 0=do not respond; 1=respond
31
Perform
Router
Discovery
Interface/
Boolean
-
Specifies if a client will solicit routers using Router Discovery mechanism
(RFC-1256).
Length: 1 octet
Values: 0=disable; 1=enable
15-104
Configuring DHCP
DHCP Commands
Table 15-1
XSR-Supported DHCP Options (continued)
Protocol
Name
Category/
Type
32
Router
Solicitation
Address
33
#
Default
Description
Interface/
IP address
-
Address to which a client should send router solicitation requests.
Length: 4 octets
Static
Route
Interface/
IP address
pairs
-
Static routes that a client will install in its routing cache. If multiple routes to the
same destination are specified, they are listed in descending order of priority.
Routes consist of a list of IP address pairs: the first is the destination address,
the second is the router for the destination. The default route 0.0.0.0 is an
illegal destination for a static route.
Length: 8-octet minimum; multiples of 8
34
Trailer
Encapsulation
Interface/
Boolean
(hex)
false
Specifies if a client will negotiate the use of trailers (RFC-893) when using the
ARP protocol.
Length: 1 octet
Values: 0 = do not use; 1 = use
35
ARP Cache
Timeout
Interface/
32-bit hex
integer
60
Timeout in seconds for ARP cache entries.
Length: 4-octets
36
Ethernet
Encapsulation
Interface/
Boolean
(hex)
false
(1.e.,
894
style)
Specifies if a client will use Ethernet Version 2 (RFC-894) or IEEE 802.3
(RFC-1042) encapsulation if port is Ethernet.
Length: 1 octet
Value: 0 uses RFC-894 coding; 1 uses RFC-1042 coding
37
TCP
Interface/
Default TTL 8-bit integer
(> 0)
60
Default TTL a client will use when sending TCP segments.
Length: 1 octet, expressed in hex
Value: minimum 1
38
TCP
Keepalive
Interval
Interface/
32-bit hex
integer
0 (keep-alives
not
generated)
Interval in seconds that the TCP client will wait before sending a keep-alive
message on a TCP connection. The time is specified as a 32-bit unsigned
integer. A value of zero indicates that the client will not generate keep-alive
messages on connections unless specifically requested by an application.
Length: 4-octets
39
TCP
Keepalive
Garbage
Interface/
Boolean
(hex)
false
(off)
Specifies if a client will send TCP keep-alive messages with an octet of
garbage for compatibility with older implementations.
Length: 1 octet
Values: 0=do not send; 1=send
40
NIS
Domain
Servers/
ASCII string
-
Name of a client's NIS domain.
Length: 4-octet minimum
41
Network
Information
Servers
Servers
/IP address
list
-
IP addresses indicating NIS servers available to a client. List in order of
preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
42
NTP
Servers
Servers
/IP address
list
-
IP addresses indicating NTP servers available to a client. List in order of
preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
43
VendorSpecific
Data
- /Hex
-
Option used by clients/servers to swap vendor-specific data.
Length: 4-octet minimum
XSR CLI Reference Guide
15-105
DHCP Commands
Table 15-1
#
XSR-Supported DHCP Options (continued)
Protocol
Name
Category/
Type
Default
Description
44* NetBIOS
over TCP/
IP Name
Server
WINS/
NetBIOS, MS
DHCP Client/
IP address list
-
RFC-1001/1002 NBNS name servers listed by preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
CLI command: netbios-name-server
45
WINS/
NetBIOS
/IP address
list
-
NBDD name servers(RFC-1001/1002) listed by preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
46* NetBIOS
over TCP/
IP Node
Type
WINS/
NetBIOS, MS
DHCP Client/
1, 2, 4, or 8
(hex)
-
The value is a single octet that identifies client type:
1: B-node; 2: P-node; 4: M-node; 8: H-node
Length: 1 octet
CLI command: netbios-node-type
47
NetBIOS
over TCP/
IP Scope
WINS/
NetBIOS, MS
DHCP Client/
ASCII string
-
NetBIOS over TCP/IP scope value for a client (RFC-1001/1002).
Length: 4-octet minimum
48
X Windows Servers/
Font Server IP address
list
-
X Window System Font servers available to a client. List in order of
preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
49
X Windows
Display
Manager
Servers/
IP address
list
-
IP addresses of systems running X Window System Display Manager and are
available to a client. List addresses in order of preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
50
Requested
IP Address
IP address
-
Used in a client request (DHCPDISCOVER or DHCPREQUEST) to allow a
client to request a particular IP address be assigned.
Length: 4 octets
51
IP Address Lease
Lease Time Information,
MS DHCP
Client/32-bit
hex integer
-
Used in a client request (DHCPDISCOVER or DHCPREQUEST) to allow a
client to request a lease time for the IP address. In a server reply
(DHCPOFFER), a DHCP server uses this option to specify the lease time it is
willing to offer.
Length: 4 octets
Value: seconds
52
Option
Overload
-
Indicates that the DHCP sname or file fields are being overloaded by using
them to carry DHCP options. A DHCP server inserts this option if the returned
values will exceed the usual space allotted for options. If this option is present,
the client interprets the specified additional fields after it concludes
interpretation of the standard option fields.
1 = The file field is used to hold options.
2 = The sname field is used to hold options.
3 = Both fields are used to hold options.
Length: 1 octet
15-106
NetBIOS
over TCP/
IP
Datagram
Distribution
Server
-
Configuring DHCP
DHCP Commands
Table 15-1
XSR-Supported DHCP Options (continued)
Protocol
Name
Category/
Type
Default
Description
53
DHCP
Message
Type
-
-
Conveys the type of DHCP message. The default is 1 (DHCPDISCOVER).
1=DHCPDISCOVER
2=DHCPOFFER
3=DHCPREQUEST
4=DHCPDECLINE
5=DHCPACK
6=DHCPNAK
7=DHCPRELEASE
8=DHCPINFORM
Length: 1 octet
54
Server
Identifier
IP address
-
Used in DHCPOFFER and DHCPREQUEST messages, and may optionally
be included in the DHCPACK and DHCPNAK messages. DHCP servers
include this option in the DHCPOFFER to allow the client to distinguish
between lease offers. DHCP clients use the contents of the server identifier
field as the destination address for any DHCP messages unicast to the DHCP
server. DHCP clients also indicate which of several lease offers is being
accepted by including this option in a DHCPREQUEST message. The
identifier is the IP address of the selected server.
Length: 4 octets
55
Parameter
Request
List
Hex integer
-
Used by a DHCP server to request values for specified configuration
parameters. The list of requested values is specified as n octets, where each
octet is a valid DHCP option code. The client can list the options in order of
preference. The DHCP server is not required to return the options in the
requested order, but must try to insert the requested options in the order
requested by the client.
Length: 1-octet minimum
56
Message
String
-
Used by a DHCP server to print an error message to a DHCP client in a
DHCPNAK message in the event of a failure. A client may use this option in a
DHCPDECLINE message to indicate why the client declined the offered
values. The message consists of n octets of NVT ASCII text, which the client
may display on an available output device.
Length: 1-octet minimum
57
Maximum
DHCP
Message
Size
16-bit hex
integer
-
Maximum length DHCP message that a client is willing to accept. Length is
specified as an unsigned 16-bit integer. A client may use the maximum DHCP
message size option in DHCPDISCOVER or DHCPREQUEST messages, but
should not use the option in DHCPDECLINE messages.
Length: 2 octets
Value: 576 minimum
58
Renewing
(T1) Time
Value
Lease Data,
MS DHCP
Client/32-bit
hex integer
-
Time interval from address assignment until a client transitions to the
RENEWING state.
Length: 4 octets
Value: seconds, as a 32-bit unsigned integer
59
Rebinding
(T2) Time
Value
Lease Data,
MS DHCP
Client/32-bit
hex integer
-
Interval from address assignment until a client transitions to the REBINDING
state.
Length: 4 octets
Value: seconds, as a 32-bit unsigned integer
#
XSR CLI Reference Guide
15-107
DHCP Commands
Table 15-1
XSR-Supported DHCP Options (continued)
Protocol
Name
Category/
Type
Default
Description
ClientIdentifier
Basic/String
-
A DHCP client’s unique identifier. DHCP servers use this value to index their
database of address bindings. This value is expected to be unique for all
clients in an administrative domain.
Length: 2-octet minimum
CLI command: ip address dhcp
64
NIS+
Domain
Servers/
ASCII string
-
Name of the client's NIS+ domain.
Length: 4-octet minimum
65
NIS+
Servers
Servers/IP
address list
-
IP addresses indicating NIS+ servers available to a client. List in order of
preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
67
Bootfile
name
BOOTP/
String
-
Identifies a bootfile name when when the file field in the DHCP header has
been used for DHCP options.
Length: 1-octet minimum
68
Mobile IP
Home
Agent
Servers/IP
address list
-
IP addresses indicating mobile IP home agents available to a client. List
agents in order of preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
69
SMTP
Server
Servers/IP
address list
-
SMTP servers available to a client. List in order of preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
70
POP3
Server
Servers/IP
address list
-
POP3 servers available to a client. List in order of preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
71
NNTP
Server
Servers/IP
address list
-
NNTP servers available to a client. List in order of preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
72
Default
WWW
Server
Servers/IP
address list
-
WWW servers available to a client. List in order of preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
73
Default
Finger
Server
Servers/IP
address list
-
Finger servers available to a client. List in order of preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
74
Default IRC
Server
Servers/IP
address list
-
IRC servers available to a client. List in order of preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
75
StreetTalk
Server
Servers/IP
address list
-
StreetTalk servers available to a client. List in order of preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
76
STDA
Server
Servers/IP
address list
-
STDA servers available to a client. List in order of preference.
Length: 4-octet minimum; multiples of 4
82
DHCP
Relay
Agent
Information
DHCP Relay/
String
-
This helper option is used in an environment where DHCP Relay is co-located
with circuit access equipment (DSL and cable-based LANs) to reduce
broadcasts, prevent IP spoofing, client ID spoofing, and MAC address
spoofing. Defined by RFC-3046.
Length: Variable
90
DHCP
Authentication
DHCP
Protocol/
Structured
Data
-
Mechanism for authenticating DHCP messages, clients and servers. Based on
HMAC-MD5.
Defined by RFC-3118.
Length: Variable; minimum 11 octets
#
61
*
15-108
Configuring DHCP
DHCP Commands
Table 15-1
#
XSR-Supported DHCP Options (continued)
Protocol
Name
Category/
Type
Default
Description
117 Name
Service
Search
Server/
Multiple
16-bit hex
integers
-
Sets site of Name Service servers to clients to be used for lookup. Each 16-bit
field specifies a Name Server to be used for lookup:
0 – client should refer to local naming information
6 – use DNS
41 – use NIS
44 – use NetBIOS over TCP/IP
65 – use NIS+
Defined by RFC-2937.
Length: Minimum 2 octets; multiple of 2 octets
118 Subnet
Selection
Interface/
IP address
-
Sets the subnet IP address (RFC-3011). Used by a client to inform/force
server to assign an IP address-specific subnet.
Length: 4 octets
150 TFTP
Server
Cisco Vendor
Extension/IP
address
-
Address of the TFTP server. This option supports the XSR’s Remote Auto
Install functionality.
Length: 4 octets
Note: DHCP options marked with an asterisk (*) can also be configured at the CLI.
Examples
The following example configures DHCP option 33, which specifies static routes that the client should install in its routing cache. If multiple routes to the same destination are set, they are listed in descending order of priority. The routes consist of IP address pairs. The first address is the destination address, the second address is the router for the destination.
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 33 ip 90.1.1.90 123.124.23.26 90.1.1.90 123.24.56.78
The following example configures DHCP option 19, which specifies whether the client should enable its IP layer for packet forwarding. Values of 0 and 1 disable and enable IP forwarding, respectively. IP forwarding is enabled in the following example:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 19 hex 01
The following example configures DHCP option 1, which sets the client’s subnet mask as higher priority when it and the router ID are specified in the DHCP REPLY:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 1 ip 255.255.255.0
The following example configures DHCP option 2, which locates a client as an offset 4650 seconds from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) or five hours west of the zero meridian (London):
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 2 hex 4650
The following example configures DHCP option 72, which specifies World Wide Web (WWW) servers for DHCP clients. Two WWW server addresses are configured in the following example:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 72 ip 168.24.3.252 168.24.3.253
The example below configures DHCP option 13, which specifies a client’s default boot image size:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 13 hex 8001
The following example configures DHCP option 41, which specifies Network Information Servers (NIS) for DHCP clients. Two NIS server addresses are configured in the following example:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 41 ip 90.3.4.5 90.1.1.7 90.43.9.254
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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DHCP Commands
The following example configures DHCP option 36, which specifies Ethernet encapsulation Version 2 (RFC‐894) or IEEE 802.3 for DHCP clients. Version 2 encapsulation is set in this example:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 36 hex 00
The following example configures DHCP option 21, which sets a policy filter for non‐local source routing. The filters consist of a list of IP addresses and masks that specify destination/mask pairs with which to filter inbound source routes. Any source‐routed datagram whose next‐hop address does not match one of the filters is discarded by the client.
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 21 ip 90.1.1.78 255.255.0.0 134.141.90.1
255.255.255.0
The following example configures DHCP option 22, which specifies the maximum size datagram a client will reassemble. The value is 1052 bytes:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 22 hex 41
The following example sets DHCP option 28, specifying the broadcast address in use on the clientʹs subnet. The value is: 255.255.255.255.
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 28 ip 255.255.255.255
The following example configures DHCP option 35, which specifies the timeout in seconds for ARP cache entries. The value is 604,800 (1 week):
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 35 hex 93A8
The following example sets DHCP option 14, specifying the pathname where a DHCP client’s core image will be placed if the client crashes:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 14 ascii c:/dump/path
The following example configures DHCP option 31, which specifies that the DHCP client should not perform subnet mask discovery:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 29 hex 00
The following example configures DHCP option 19, which specifies that the DHCP client should configure its IP layer for packet forwarding:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 19 hex 01
The following example configures DHCP option 31, which specifies that the DHCP client should perform Router Discovery:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 31 hex 01
The following example configures DHCP option 47, which specifies a NetBIOS over TCP/IP scope parameter for a DHCP client:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 47 ascii scope
The following example configures DHCP option 40, which specifies the DHCP client’s NIS domain:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 40 ascii NISserver
The following example configures DHCP option 18, which specifies the pathname of a file retrievable through TFTP:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 18 ascii /extension/path
The following example configures DHCP option 18, which specifies a list of prioritized static routes (in descending order) the DHCP client should install in its routing cache:
XSR(config-dhcp-pool)#option 33 ip 90.1.1.90 123.124.23.26 90.1.1.90 123.24.56.78
15-110
Configuring DHCP
DHCP Clear and Show Commands
service dhcp
This command enables DHCP server functionality to respond to client requests. Although DHCP server is enabled by default on all XSR interfaces, you can optionally enable or disable it on a specific interface.
Syntax
service dhcp [interface]
interface
The port on which the DHCP server is enabled or disabled.
Syntax of the “no” Form
Disable the DHCP server by using the no form of this command:
no service dhcp [interface]
Default
Enabled on all interfaces
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Example:
The example below enables DHCP services on interface FastEthernet 1:
XSR(config)#service dhcp fastethernet 1
DHCP Clear and Show Commands
clear ip dhcp binding
This command deletes an automatic address binding from the DHCP server binding database. Use the no host command to delete a manual binding. Typically, the address denotes the IP address of the client. If an asterisk (*) is used as the address parameter, DHCP clears all automatic bindings.
Syntax
clear ip dhcp binding {address | * }
address
Address of the binding you want to clear.
*
Clears all automatic bindings.
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
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DHCP Clear and Show Commands
Example
The example below deletes address binding 18.12.22.99 from a DHCP server bindings database:
XSR#clear ip dhcp binding 18.12.22.99
clear ip dhcp server statistics
This command resets all DHCP server counters. All counters are cumulative and are initialized, or set to zero, with this command.
Syntax
clear ip DHCP server statistics
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
The following example resets all DHCP counters to zero:
XSR#clear ip DHCP server statistics
show dhcp lease
This command displays DHCP Client information.
Syntax
show dhcp lease
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
Example
XSR#show dhcp lease
Temp IP addr: 192.168.70.102 for peer on Interface: FastEthernet0
Temp sub net mask: 255.255.255.0
Temp default-gateway addr: 192.168.70.1
State: 5 BOUND
DHCP Lease Server: 192.168.70.1, config.enterasys.com
DNS Server: 24.25.26.27
24.25.26.28
DHCP transaction id: 29247
Lease: 36000 secs, Renewal: 17205 secs, Rebind: 31500 secs
Next timer fires after 4:44:25
15-112
Configuring DHCP
DHCP Clear and Show Commands
Parameter Descriptions
Temp IP addr
IP address assigned via DHCP to the client from the server.
Temp sub net mask
Subnet mask assigned via DHCP to the client from the server.
Temp default-gateway addr Default gateway assigned by the DHCP server.
State
DHCP Client FSM state:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
0 ‐ None
1 ‐ REBOOTING
2 ‐ INIT
3 ‐ SELECTING
4 ‐ REQUESTING
5 ‐ BOUND
6 ‐ RENEWING
7 ‐ REBINDING
8 ‐ STOPPED
9 and others ‐ NOTVALID
DHCP Lease Server
DHCP server IP address and name.
DNS Server
DNC server IP address.
DHCP Transaction ID
Transaction ID for current DHCP offer from the server.
Lease/ Renewal/ Rebind
Current lease, renewal, and rebind periods.
Next timer fires after
Timer for the next time DHCP renew request.
show interface
This command displays DHCP interface’s IP address and subnet mask. When negotiating, the interface will indicate ʺInternet address is not assignedʺ.
Syntax
show interface
Examples
The following example does not display the DHCP assigned address while the protocol is negotiating:
XSR#show interface
FastEthernet 1 is Admin Up
Internet address is not assigned
The following example displays the DHCP assigned address when the protocol has finished negotiation:
xsr#show interface
FastEthernet 1 is Admin Up
Internet address is 172.16.1.1, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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DHCP Clear and Show Commands
show ip dhcp binding
This command displays active address bindings on the DHCP server. If the address is not specified, all address bindings are shown. Otherwise, only the binding for the specified client is displayed. The lease expiration time can be displayed based on the Universal Time Clock (UTC) or local clock. If the local clock is not specified, UTC is the default.
Note: BOOTP bindings do not have leases: their Active designation is always N.
Syntax
show ip dhcp binding [ip-address][utc | local]
ip-address
IP address of the DHCP client.
utc
Bindings displayed according to the Universal Time Clock.
local
Bindings displayed according to local time.
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Examples
The following examples display the lease expiration in default UTC time:
XSR#show ip dhcp binding 168.16.22.11
IP address
168.16.1.11
Hardware address
00a0.9802.32df
Lease expiration
Feb 01 1998 12:00AM
Type
Automatic
Act.
Y
Type
Manual
ACT.
N
XSR#show ip dhcp binding 168.16.22.254
IP address
Hardware address
168.16.3.254 02c7.f800.0423
Lease expiration
Infinite
The following example displays the lease expiration in local time:
XSR#show ip dhcp binding local
IP address
11.1.0.253
Hardware address
0002.2ab4.4b01
Lease expiration
JUL 19 2003 09:07PM
Type
Act.
Automatic Y
The following example displays the lease expiration in UTC time:
XSR#show ip dhcp binding UTC
IP address
11.1.0.253
Hardware address
0002.2ab4.4b01
Lease expiration
JUL 19 2003 05:07PM
Type
Automatic
Act.
Y
The following example displaysthe lease expiration of DHCP client 11.1.0.253 in UTC time:
XSR#show ip dhcp binding UTC 11.1.0.253
IP address
15-114
Configuring DHCP
Hardware address
Lease expiration
Type
Act.
DHCP Clear and Show Commands
11.1.0.253
0002.2ab4.4b01
JUL 19 2003 05:07PM
Automatic
Y
The following example the displays lease expiration of DHCP client 11.1.0.253 in local time:
XSR#show ip dhcp binding local 11.1.0.253
IP address
11.1.0.253
Hardware address
0002.2ab4.4b01
Lease expiration
JUL 19 2003 09:07PM
Type
Automatic
Act.
Y
Parameter Descriptions
IP address
IP address of the DHCP client.
Hardware address
Ethernet MAC address of the DHCP client.
Lease expiration
Date and time when the DHCP client’s lease expires.
Type
Automatic or Manual lease renewal.
Act(tive)
Whether lease is active or not ‐ Y or N.
show ip dhcp server statistics
This command displays DHCP server statistics.
Syntax
show ip dhcp server statistics
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Example
The following example displays DHCP server statistics:
XSR# show ip DHCP server statistics
Database agents
1
Memory usage
Address pools
Database agents
Automatic bindings
Manual bindings
Expired bindings
Malformed messages
20392
2
1
26
1
3
0
Message
BOOTREQUEST
DHCPDISCOVER
DHCPREQUEST
DHCPDECLINE
DHCPRELEASE
DHCPINFORM
Received
12
20
17
0
0
0
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DHCP Clear and Show Commands
Message
BOOTREPLY
DHCPOFFER
DHCPACK
DHCPNAK
Sent
12
19
17
6
Parameter Descriptions
15-116
Memory usage
Sum of bytes of RAM allocated by the DHCP server.
Address pools
Sum of configured address pools in the DHCP database.
Database agents
Sum of database agents entered in the DHCP database.
Automatic bindings
Sum of IP addresses automatically mapped to the Ethernet MAC addresses of hosts found in the DHCP database.
Manual bindings
Sum of IP addresses manually mapped to the Ethernet MAC addresses of hosts found in the DHCP database.
Expired bindings
Sum of expired leases.
Malformed messages
Sum of truncated or corrupted messages received by the DHCP server.
Message
DHCP message type received by the DHCP server.
Configuring DHCP
16
Configuring Security
Observing Syntax and Conventions
The CLI Syntax and conventions use the notation described in the following table.
Convention
Description
xyz
Key word or mandatory parameters (bold)
[x]
[ ] Square brackets indicate an optional parameter (italic)
[x | y | z]
[ | ] Square brackets with vertical bar indicate a choice of values
{x | y | z}
{ | } Braces with vertical bar indicate a choice of a required value
[x {y | z} ]
[{ | } ] Combination of square brackets with braces and vertical bars indicates a
required choice of an optional parameter
(config-if<xx>)
xx signifies the interface type and number; e.g., F1, G3, S2/1.0,M57. F indicates
a FastEthernet, and G a GigabitEthernet interface.
Next Mode entries display the CLI prompt after a command is entered.
Sub-command headings are displayed in red, italicized text.
soho.enterasys.com
Italicized, non-syntactic text indicates either a user-specified entry or text with
special emphasis
The following set of commands allows you to define security features for the XSR, including:
•
“General Security Commands” on page 16‐84
•
“Security Clear and Show Commands” on page 16‐91
•
“AAA Commands” on page 16‐93
•
“AAA Usergroup Commands” on page 16‐94
•
“AAA User Commands” on page 16‐97
•
“AAA Method Commands” on page 16‐101
•
“AAA Per‐Interface Commands” on page 16‐111
•
“AAA Debug and Show Commands” on page 16‐112
•
“Firewall Feature Set Commands” on page 16‐115
•
“Firewall Interface Commands” on page 16‐129
•
“Firewall Show Commands” on page 16‐133
XSR CLI Reference Guide
16-83
General Security Commands
General Security Commands
access-list (extended)
This command defines an extended IP Access List (ACL) by number ranging from 100 to 199. You can restrict or allow the following traffic:
•
IP (Any Internet Protocol)
•
TCP (Transmission Protocol)
•
UDP (User Datagram Protocol)
•
ICMP (Internet Control Message Protocol)
•
ESP (Encapsulation Security Payload)
•
GRE (Generic Router Encapsulation) protocol
•
AH (Authentication Header) protocol
New and existing ACL entries can be added/replaced in a particular ACL without you having to rewrite the entire ACL by using the insert/replace number parameters. If neither the insert nor the replace option is specified, then the new entry is appended to the list. This is noteworthy since ACL criteria are evaluated in the order displayed by the show access-list command.
Apply restrictions defined by an ACL with ip access-group command.
Syntax
access-list list# {insert | replace} entry# {deny | permit}{protocol}|{log}
{srcIpAddr [srcWildCardBits]| [qualifier] | source-port |
host srcIpAddr | any}
range min-sport | max-sport
{dstIpAddr [dstWildCardBits]| [qualifier]|destn-port |
host dstIpAddr | any}
range min-dprt | max-dprt
type [code]
16-84
[established]
list#
Extended ACL number, ranging from 100 ‐ 199.
insert
New access entry is inserted before existing entry # in the existing ACL. The show access-list command from within Global mode sequentially numbers entries for this purpose.
replace
New access entry replaces an entry # in the existing ACL (the entry # must already exist.)
entry#
Entry’s list number within the ACL. No number is required for first entry.
deny
Access is denied if specified conditions are met.
permit
Access is permitted if conditions met.
protocol
Specifies the IP protocol: IP, TCP, UDP, ICMP, ESP, GRE, or AH. IP represents any protocol.
log
Enables alarm logging and reporting of source IP addresses for configured ACL entries.
srcIPAddr
The source expressed by IP address.
Configuring Security
General Security Commands
srcWild
CardBits
Specifies bits to ignore in the source address.
host
Only the exact source address matches the condition. Same as srcWildCardBits = 0.0.0.0.
any
Any source address matches the condition. Same as srcWildCardBits = 255.255.255.255.
qualifier
Value applied to the source port: eq ‐ equal than, neq ‐ not equal to, lt ‐ less than, gt ‐ greater than.
source-port
Optional source port number (0 ‐ 65535). range
Value must be within the minimum and maximum source and destination port range.
min-sport
Lowest port number from 0 to 65535. Combine with max‐sport.
max-sport
Highest port number from 0 to 65535. Normally greater than min‐sport but if less than min, values are swapped.
dstIPAddr
The destination expressed by IP address.
dstWild CardBits
Specifies bits to ignore in the destination address.
destn-port
Destination port number. Range: 0 to 65535.
type,code
ICMP message type only (0‐255) and code (0‐255).
established
Matches if a TCP connection is already established, that is, if either ACK or RST bits are set in the TCP header.
Note: The srcWildCardBits/dstWildCardBits mask specifies bits to ignore (which allow
any value where the bits are set), as opposed to the traditional method of specifying
bits to keep.
Note: Source and destination ports are defined only for TCP or UDP. A message type and code can
be defined for ICMP.
Additional Syntax
The access-list command also provides the move option, expressed in the following syntax:
access-list list-number move destination src1 [src2]
list#
ACL number, ranging from 100 ‐ 199.
move
Moves a sequence of ACL entries in front of another entry. Range: 1‐999.
destination
Number of the existing ACL entry before which subsequent entry or range of entries is to be moved. Range: 1 to 999. If being moved to the end, use a non‐
existent number (e.g., 999).
src1
Single entry number, or the first entry number in the range to be moved before the destination. Range: 1 to 999.
src2
Optional last entry number in the range to be moved. Range: 1 to 999. If not specified, only one entry is moved.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the defined access list:
no access-list list-number [ent1][ent2]]
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General Security Commands
list#
The standard access list number, ranging from 1 to 99.
ent1
Optional single entry number, or the first entry number in the range to be removed. If unspecified, the entire ACL is removed.
ent2
Optional last entry number in the range to be removed.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
No access list defined (that is, all access permitted)
Examples
The following example denies access only for ICMP packets coming from hosts on the three specified networks. The wildcard bits apply to the host portions of the network addresses. Any host with a source address that does not match the access list statements will be permitted.
XSR(config)#access-list 100 deny ICMP 192.5.34.0 0.0.0.255
XSR(config)#access-list 100 deny ICMP 128.88.0.0 0.0.255.255
XSR(config)#access-list 100 deny ICMP 36.0.0.0 0.255.255.255
The following example replaces entry 87 with the following entry:
XSR(config)#access-list 123 replace 87 deny ip host 1.2.1.2
The following example removes entries 16, 17 and 18 from ACL 177:
XSR(config)#no access-list 177 16 18
The following example removes the entire ACL 102:
XSR(config)#no access-list 102
The following example moves entries 16 ‐ 18 within an ACL to the beginning of the list:
XSR(config)#access-list 101 move 1 16 18
The example below moves entries 16 ‐ 18 from ACL 144 to its beginning:
XSR(config)#access-list 144 move 1 16 18
The following example moves entry 2 to the end of ACL 133:
XSR(config)#access-list 133 move 999 2
access-list (standard)
This command defines a standard IP Access List (ACL) by numbers, ranging from 1 to 99. ACL restrictions are applied using the ip access-group command.
New and existing ACL entries can be added/replaced in a particular ACL without you having to rewrite the entire ACL by using the insert/replace number parameters. If neither the insert nor the replace option is specified, then the new entry is appended to the list. This is noteworthy since ACL criteria are evaluated in the order displayed by the show access-list command.
16-86
Configuring Security
General Security Commands
Syntax
access-list list# [[{insert | replace | move}] [{entry# destination source1
[source2]]}{deny | permit}{log} {srcIpAddr [srcWildCardBits]| host srcIpAddr |
any}
list#
Standard access list number ranging from 1 to 99.
insert
New access entry is inserted before an existing entry # in an ACL. The show
access-list command sequentially numbers entries for this purpose.
replace
Same as above, except the new access entry replaces an entry # in the existing ACL (the entry # must already exist.)
move
Moves a sequence of ACL entries in front of another entry.
entry#
Sequential entry number in ACL to add/delete ranging from 1 to 999.
destination
Position before which entries are to be moved. Range: 1‐999. source1
Sequential number of first ACL entry to move. Range: 1‐999.
source2
Sequential number of last ACL entry to move. Range: 1‐999.
deny
Denies access if specified conditions are met.
permit
Permits access if conditions met.
log
Enables alarm logging and reporting of source IP addresses for configured ACL entries.
srcIpAddr
Identifies the source by IP address.
srcWildCard
Bits
Bits to ignore in the source address. A mask of 0.0.0.225 implies only the most important bits of the source address are considered.
host
Marks only the exact source address matching the condition. Same as srcWildCardBits = 0.0.0.0.
any
Marks any source address matching the condition. Same as srcWildCardBits = 255.255.255.255.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the defined access list or entries (one or more) in a list:
no access-list list-number [ent1 [ent2]]
list-number
The standard access list number ranging from 1 to 99.
ent1
Optional single entry number, or the first entry number in the range to be removed. If unspecified, the entire ACL is removed.
ent2
Optional last entry number in the range to be removed.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
No access list defined (all access permitted)
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General Security Commands
Examples
The following example allows access only to those hosts on the three specified networks. The wildcard bits apply to the host portions of the network addresses. Any host with a source address that does not match the access list statements will be rejected.
XSR(config)#access-list 1 permit 192.5.34.0 0.0.0.255
XSR(config)#access-list 1 permit 128.88.0.0 0.0.255.255
XSR(config)#access-list 1 permit 36.0.0.0 0.255.255.255
The following example replaces entry 88 with the following entry:
XSR(config)#access-list 57 replace 88 deny host 1.2.1.2
The example below removes entries 16, 17 and 18 from ACL 87:
XSR(config)#no access-list 87 16 18
The following example removes the entire ACL 57:
XSR(config)#no access-list 57
The next example moves entries 16 ‐ 18 from ACL 57 to its start:
XSR(config)#access-list 57 move 1 16 18
The example below moves entry 2 to the end of ACL 57:
XSR(config)#access-list 57 move 999 2
access-list log-update-threshold
This command publishes an ACL violations log when a specified number of packets the XSR processes is met. ACL violations logging is updated every five minutes so regardless of how you specify this command, the five‐minute timer remains in effect. The command functions as follows:
•
ACL alarms display the: ACL group number, permit or deny clause, source IP address and number of packets logged in the last five minutes.
•
Alarms are set to medium severity level by default.
•
Setting the alarm severity level to high with the logging command disables all ACL alarms.
•
After an update is reported, the log is cleared for the entry with that source IP and ACL group.
•
Standard and extended ACLs are supported.
•
If reporting is enabled for every packet, too many packets may log messages resulting in some message loss due to packet flooding.
Caution: If the threshold is 1 packet, you may flood the XSR and generate alarms.
For associated information on this funtionality, refer to the access-list commands on page 16‐84 and page 16‐86, show access-list log-update-threshold command on page 16‐92, and logging command on page 3‐88.
Syntax
access-list log-update-threshold <number-of-packets>
<number-of-packets>
16-88
Configuring Security
Packets, ranging from 1 to 2,147,483,647.
General Security Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
Threshold logging is disabled with the no form of this command:
no access-list log-update-threshold
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Default
Disabled
Example
The following example enables alarm logging for ACL 101 and sets the log threshold at 10000:
XSR(config)#access-list 101 deny ip 15.15.15.1 0.0.0.255 16.16.16.1 0.0.0.255 log
XSR(config)#access-list log-update-threshold 10000
hostdos
This command enables host security protection against various DoS attacks via source IP address validation.
Note: Performing source address validation can improve security in some situations but can
erroneously discard valid packets in situations where inbound and outbound paths differ and will
negatively impact some routing protocols.
Syntax
hostdos {land | fragmicmp | largeicmp [size] | checkspoof}
land
Enables land attack protection.
fragmicmp
Enables fragmented ICMP packets protection.
largeicmp
Enables large ICMP packets protection.
size
Packet size above which protection starts, ranging from 1 to 65535.
checkspoof
Enables spoofed address checking.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form disables the specified security feature:
no hostdos {land | fragmicmp | largeicmp [size] | checkspoof}
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Defaults
•
Disabled
•
Size: 1024
XSR CLI Reference Guide
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General Security Commands
Example
The example below enables protection from land attack and large ICMP packets. Synflood protection will trigger for more than 7 sessions. Protection against large ICMP packets will trigger for packets larger than 2,000 bytes.
XSR(config)#hostdos land
XSR(config)#hostdos largeicmp 2000
ip access-group
This command applies access list restrictions to an interface.
Syntax
ip access-group access list-number {in | out}
list-number
Number of an access list, ranging from 1 to 199.
in
Filters on inbound packets
out
Filters on outbound packets
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the specified access group:
no ip access-group access list-number {in | out}
Mode
Interface configuration: XSR(config-if<xx>)#
Example
The following example, as illustrated in Figure 16‐1, applies ACL 101 to all inbound packets on interface FastEthernet 1. ACL 101 will route only packets with a destination of network 192.5.34.0. All packets with other destinations received on FastEthernet 1 will be dropped.
XSR(config)#access-list 101 permit any 192.5.34.0 0.0.0.255
XSR(config)#interface FastEthernet 1
XSR(config-if<F1>)#ip access-group 1
Figure 16-1
IP Access-Group Example
192.5.34.0
192.6.34.0
192.7.34.0
Eth1
Router 1
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Configuring Security
Security Clear and Show Commands
Security Clear and Show Commands
clear hostdos-counters
This command clears all host security statistics.
Syntax
clear hostdos-counters
Mode
Privileged EXEC: XSR#
show access-lists
This command displays configured IP access lists. When it is issued from Global mode, it also prints a sequential entry number beside each ACL entry. This number can be used by the accesslist and no access-list commands to specify which entries to replace, insert before, move, or delete. Since entry numbers are only useable in Global mode, (and may change when Global mode is exited) they are only displayed when in that mode.
Syntax
show access-lists [number]
number
ACL ID, Range: 1 to 199. If no number is specified, the entire ACL table displays.
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR> or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following output displays when the command is issued at the Privileged EXEC mode:
XSR>show access-lists 101
Extended IP access list 101
permit tcp host 18.2.32.130 any established
permit icmp host 18.2.32.130 any
permit tcp host 18.2.32.130 host 171.69.2.141 gt 1023
permit tcp host 18.2.32.130 host 171.69.2.135 eq 23
permit udp host 198.92.32.130 host 171.68.225.126 eq 45
deny ip 11.6.0.0 0.1.255.255 224.0.0.0 15.255.255.255(
deny ip 172.24.24.0 0.0.1.255 224.0.0.0 15.255.255.255
The following output displays when the command is issued at the Privileged EXEC mode:
XSR(config)#show access-lists
Standard IP access list 2
1: deny
host 3.4.3.4
Extended IP access list 101
1: permit tcp
host 2.1.2.1 any
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Security Clear and Show Commands
show access-list log-update-threshold
This command displays ACL log information. It is processed as follows:
•
A packet with a fresh source IP address on the ACL group is reported immediately. Data is cached to keep track of the occurrence happening again in the near future.
•
All other arrivals of the packet with existing source IP address data on that ACL group will increment the number of packets and, after five minutes, log an alarm with the sum of packets gathered in the last five minutes. The count will reset after the alarm is logged.
•
For enabled threshold data, if the count matches the threshold then the alarm is logged and the count reset. Other packets received after the threshold is met will increment the count until the next threshold is met or five minutes have elapsed.
Syntax
show access-list log-update-threshold
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following example displays a sample ACL log:
XSR#show access-list log-update-threshold
access-list log-update-threshold 10000
show hostdos
This command displays enabled host security features and their statistics.
Syntax
show hostdos
Mode
Privileged EXEC or Global configuration: XSR# or XSR(config)#
Sample Output
The following example displays a sample host security configuration with statistics:
XSR#show hostdos
LANd Attack (Destination IP = Source IP}
Enabled
10 attacks
Spoofed Address Check
Enabled
0 attacks
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Configuring Security
AAA Commands
IP packet with Multicast/broadcast source address
Always enabled
No attacks
Syn flood attack mitigation
Always enabled
100 attacks
Fragmented ICMP traffic
Enabled
38 attacks
Large ICMP packets
Enabled;Size 1024
42 attacks
Ping-of-Death attack
Always enabled
No attack
Filter TCP traffic with Syn and Fin bits set
Always enabled
No attack
AAA Commands
The following Authentication, Authorization and Accounting (AAA) commands and command subsets validate and display information about AAA usergroups, users, and methods on the XSR:
•
aaa client
•
AAA Usergroup, User, Method amd AAA show commands
aaa client
This command configures sub‐systems Telnet, Console, SSH (Secure Shell) and PPP to use AAA for authentication.
Syntax
aaa client {telnet | console | ssh | ppp}
telnet
Telnet sub‐system.
console
Console sub‐system.
ssh
SSH sub‐system.
ppp
PPP sub‐system.
Syntax of the No Form
The no form of this command resets the sub‐system to use its own local AAA mechanism:
no aaa client {telnet | console | ssh | ppp}
Default
Each sub‐system uses its local user database.
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AAA Usergroup Commands
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Examples
The following example configures the Telnet sub‐system to use the AAA sub‐system:
XSR(config)#aaa client telnet
The following example configures the SSH sub‐system to accept AAA:
XSR(config)#aaa client ssh
AAA Usergroup Commands
aaa group
This command adds a local user group and acquires Usergroup configuration mode. Each user defined in the node must belong to one group only. The following sub‐commands are available in Usergroup mode:
•
dns server ‐ Sets the address of DNS servers. Refer to page 16‐95 for the command definition.
•
ip pool ‐ Links a globally defined pool of IP addresses to the user group. Refer to
page 16‐95 for the command definition.
•
pptp encrypt mppe ‐ Enables MPPE encoding on a PPTP connection. Refer to page 16‐96 for the command definition.
•
privilege ‐ Sets the privilege level of a user. Refer to page 16‐101 for the command definition.
•
wins server ‐ Sets the address of WINS servers. Refer to page 16‐97 for the command definition.
Syntax
aaa group group-name
group-name
Name of the group.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes the group:
no aaa group group-name
Default
There is a default group named DEFAULT.
Mode
Global configuration: XSR(config)#
Next Mode
Usergroup configuration: XSR(aaa-group)#
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Configuring Security
AAA Usergroup Commands
Example
The following example adds the usergroup headquarters:
XSR(config)#aaa group headquarters
XSR(aaa-group)#
dns server
This command sets the address of DNS servers. These addresses are given to connecting clients during connection time.
Syntax
dns server [primary | secondary] ip-address
primary
Specifies primary DNS server.
secondary
Specifies secondary DNS server.
ip-address
Specifies IP address of the DNS server.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the configured server:
no dns server [primary | secondary] ip-address
Mode
Usergroup configuration: XSR(aaa-group)#
Example
The following example sets the primary DNS server IP address:
XSR(config)#aaa group headquarters
XSR(aaa-group)#dns server primary 192.168.57.9
ip pool
This command links a globally defined pool of IP addresses to the group of users. IP pool is defined globally by using the ip local pool command. If an IP pool is not linked to the group of users, each user must have an IP address configured or the connection will fail.
Note: If an aaa user is configured to use a static IP address which belongs to a local IP pool, you
must exclude that address from the local pool.
Syntax
ip pool pool-name
pool-name
Name of the pool to be linked to the group of users. The pool‐name is defined by the ip local pool command.
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AAA Usergroup Commands
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form unlinks a pool of addresses from a group of users:
no ip pool pool-name
Mode
Usergroup configuration: XSR(aaa-group)#
Example
The following example adds the IP pool denver:
XSR(config)#aaa group headquarters
XSR(aaa-group)#ip pool denver
pptp encrypt mppe
This command enables Microsoft Point‐to‐Point Encryption (MPPE) on a PPTP connection. The command must be added to the interface that will carry PPTP‐MPPE traffic. All Windows clients using MPPE require MS‐CHAP.
Note: All configurable MPPE options must be identical on both tunnel endpoints.
Syntax
pptp encrypt mppe {auto | 40 | 128}
auto
Offers 40‐ and 128‐bit encryption strength if available.
40
Only 40‐bit encryption allowed.
128
Only 128‐bit encryption allowed.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command disables MPPE encryption:
no pptp encrypt mppe
Default
128‐bit encryption
Mode
Usergroup configuration: XSR(aaa-group)#
Example
The following example enables MPPE with auto encryption:
XSR(config)#aaa group
XSR(aaa-group)#pptp encrypt mppe auto
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Configuring Security
AAA User Commands
wins server
This command sets the WINS server address which is given to connecting clients during connection time.
Syntax
wins server [primary | secondary] ip-address
replace
Specifies the primary WINS server.
secondary
Specifies the secondary WINS server.
ip-address
Specifies the IP address of the WINS server.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command removes the configured server:
no wins server [primary | secondary] ip-address
Mode
Usergroup configuration: XSR(aaa-group)#
Example
The following example sets the secondary WINS server IP address:
XSR(config)#aaa group headquarters
XSR(aaa-group)#wins server secondary 192.168.57.9
AAA User Commands
aaa user
This command creates a new user profile in the local user database. During authentication, user‐
provided credentials are matched against the userʹs profile in the group. If you do not later associate this new user with a group, it will be added to the DEFAULT AAA group.
Note: If an aaa user is configured to use a static IP address which belongs to a local IP pool, you
must exclude that address from the local pool.
The following sub‐commands can be configured in AAA User mode:
•
group - Specifies the group the user belongs to. Refer to page 16‐98 for the command definition.
•
ip address - Specifies the IP Address assigned to the remote user. Refer to page 16‐99 for the command definition.
•
password - Sets a user’s password. Refer to page 16‐99 for the command definition.
•
policy ‐ Configures the user’s authorized list of services. Refer to page 16‐100 for the command definition.
•
privilege ‐ Sets the privilege level of a user. Refer to page 16‐101 for the command definition.
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AAA User Commands
Syntax
aaa user user-name
user-name
Name of new user in the group; it is employed during login.
Syntax of the “no” Form
The no form of this command deletes the user profile:
no aaa user user-name
Mode
Global co